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  1. Depression in Older Adults

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    ... here Home » Depression In Older Adults: More Facts Depression In Older Adults: More Facts Depression affects more ... combination of both. [8] Older Adult Attitudes Toward Depression: According to a Mental Health America survey [9] ...

  2. Depression - older adults

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    ... life for weeks or longer. Depression in older adults is a widespread problem, but it is not ... In older adults, life changes can increase the risk for depression or make existing depression worse. Some of these changes are: ...

  3. Older Adults and Depression

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    ... Older Adults and Depression Share Older Adults and Depression Download PDF Download ePub Download Mobi Order a ... If so, you may have depression. What is depression? Everyone feels down or sad sometimes, but these ...

  4. Schizophrenia in older adults.

    PubMed

    Collier, Elizabeth; Sorrell, Jeanne M

    2011-11-01

    Although the number of people older than 55 with schizophrenia is expected to double during the next 20 years, the research data on older adults with schizophrenia are limited. This appears to be because until the middle of the 20th century, it was assumed that mental illness in older adults was a part of the aging process and because older adults are often excluded from research investigations. Nursing research is needed to explore how people with schizophrenia learn to manage their problems as they age, as well as how those who are first diagnosed with schizophrenia in later life adapt to their illness. Mental health nurses need to be cautious in assigning premature labels to older adults with mental illness that may lead to unsubstantiated assumptions about levels of disability. Instead, nurses should realize individual potential regarding undiscovered strengths and should attempt to create interventions that recognize and foster personal development for older adults with schizophrenia. PMID:22007854

  5. Older Adults and Alcohol

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    ... Alcohol Exposure Support & Treatment Alcohol Policy Special Populations & Co-occurring Disorders Publications & Multimedia Brochures & Fact Sheets NIAAA ... are here Home » Alcohol & Your Health » Special Populations & Co-occurring Disorders » Older Adults In this Section Underage ...

  6. Yoga and Older Adults

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    ... My Go4Life Get Free Stuff Be a Partner Yoga and Older Adults Yoga is a mind and body practice that typically ... breathing exercises, and relaxation. Researchers are studying how yoga may help improve health and to learn more ...

  7. Depression in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fiske, Amy; Wetherell, Julie Loebach; Gatz, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Depression is less prevalent among older adults than among younger adults but can have serious consequences. Over half of cases represent a first onset in later life. Although suicide rates in the elderly are declining, they are still higher than in younger adults and more closely associated with depression. Depressed older adults are less likely to endorse affective symptoms and more likely to display cognitive changes, somatic symptoms, and loss of interest than are younger adults. Risk factors leading to the development of late life depression likely comprise complex interactions among genetic vulnerabilities, cognitive diathesis, age-associated neurobiological changes, and stressful events. Insomnia is an often overlooked risk factor for late life depression. We suggest that a common pathway to depression in older adults, regardless of which predisposing risks are most prominent, may be curtailment of daily activities. Accompanying self-critical thinking may exacerbate and maintain a depressed state. Offsetting the increasing prevalence of certain risk factors in late life are age-related increases in psychological resilience. Other protective factors include higher education and socioeconomic status, engagement in valued activities, and religious or spiritual involvement. Treatments including behavioral therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, cognitive bibliotherapy, problem-solving therapy, brief psychodynamic therapy, and life review/reminiscence therapy are effective but too infrequently used with older adults. Preventive interventions including education for individuals with chronic illness, behavioral activation, cognitive restructuring, problem-solving skills training, group support, and life review have also received support. PMID:19327033

  8. Obesity in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Kalish, Virginia B

    2016-03-01

    The percentage of older obese adults is on the rise. Many clinicians underestimate the health consequences of obesity in the elderly, citing scarce evidence and concerns that weight loss might be detrimental to the health of older adults. Although overweight and obese elders are not at the same risk for morbidity and mortality as younger individuals, quality of life and function are adversely impacted. Weight loss plans in the elderly should include aerobic activities as well as balance and resistance activities to maintain optimal physical function. PMID:26896206

  9. Substance abuse among older adults.

    PubMed

    Kuerbis, Alexis; Sacco, Paul; Blazer, Dan G; Moore, Alison A

    2014-08-01

    Although the myth that older adults do not use mood-altering substances persists, evidence suggests that substance use among older adults has been underidentified for decades. The baby boom generation is unique in its exposure to, attitudes toward, and prevalence of substance use-causing projected rates of substance use to increase over the next twenty years. Given their unique biological vulnerabilities and life stage, older adults who misuse substances require special attention. Prevalence rates of substance use and misuse among older adults, methods of screening and assessment unique to older adults, and treatment options for older adults are reviewed. PMID:25037298

  10. Older Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Jeffrey

    In an effort to improve the quality of life for area senior citizens, De Anza College has established an older adult education program which combines adaptive physical education with holistic health care principles to instruct students in relaxation, nutrition, and physical activity. Classes are held in convalescent hospitals, retirement homes,…

  11. Older Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Jeffrey

    In an effort to improve the quality of life for area senior citizens, De Anza College has established an older adult education program which combines adaptive physical education with holistic health care principles to instruct students in relaxation, nutrition, and physical activity. Classes are held in convalescent hospitals, retirement homes,

  12. Protein and older adults.

    PubMed

    Chernoff, Ronni

    2004-12-01

    Body composition changes as people get older. One of the noteworthy alterations is the reduction in total body protein. A decrease in skeletal muscle is the most noticeable manifestation of this change but there is also a reduction in other physiologic proteins such as organ tissue, blood components, and immune bodies as well as declines in total body potassium and water. This contributes to impaired wound healing, loss of skin elasticity, and an inability to fight infection. The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for adults for protein is 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight. Protein tissue accounts for 30% of whole-body protein turnover but that rate declines to 20% or less by age 70. The result of this phenomenon is that older adults require more protein/kilogram body weight than do younger adults. Recently, it has become clear that the requirement for exogenous protein is at least 1.0 gram/kilogram body weight. Adequate dietary intake of protein may be more difficult for older adults to obtain. Dietary animal protein is the primary source of high biological value protein, iron, vitamin B(12), folic acid, biotin and other essential nutrients. In fact, egg protein is the standard against which all other proteins are compared. Compared to other high-quality protein sources like meat, poultry and seafood, eggs are the least expensive. The importance of dietary protein cannot be underestimated in the diets of older adults; inadequate protein intake contributes to a decrease in reserve capacity, increased skin fragility, decreased immune function, poorer healing, and longer recuperation from illness. PMID:15640517

  13. Rhinitis in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Nyenhuis, Sharmilee; Mathur, Sameer K.

    2013-01-01

    Rhinitis symptoms of rhinorrhea, congestion, sneezing, nasal/ocular pruritis, and postnasal drainage can significantly affect the quality of life for older adults. As the US population ages, it will be increasingly important for healthcare providers to effectively diagnose and manage rhinitis. Rhinitis is categorized broadly into allergic rhinitis and non-allergic rhinitis. Environmental changes and avoidance measures are a primary means of intervention. In addition, there are several topical therapies (nasal sprays) that can be effective for symptom control. PMID:23389558

  14. Quitting Smoking for Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Quitting Smoking for Older Adults Quitting When You’re Older ... may wonder if it’s too late to quit smoking. Or you may ask yourself if it’s even ...

  15. Hip Fractures among Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... training for health care providers. Learn More Hip Fractures Among Older Adults Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... older. What You Can Do to Prevent Hip Fractures You can prevent hip fractures by taking steps ...

  16. AIDS and the Older Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allers, Christopher T.

    1990-01-01

    Older adults are finding themselves the neighbors of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients as well as the primary caregivers of infected adult children. Focuses on roles, issues, and conflicts older adults face in dealing with relatives or neighbors with AIDS. Case management and educational intervention strategies are also offered.

  17. Older Adults and Mental Health

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Information Publications Educational Resources Clinical Trials — Participants Statistics Help for ... Older Adults and Mental Health Depression Depression is not a normal part of aging. ...

  18. Clinical Interviewing with Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohlman, Jan; Sirota, Karen Gainer; Papp, Laszlo A.; Staples, Alison M.; King, Arlene; Gorenstein, Ethan E.

    2012-01-01

    Over the next few decades the older adult population will increase dramatically, and prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders are also expected to increase in the elderly cohort. These demographic projections highlight the need for diagnostic instruments and methods that are specifically tailored to older adults. The current paper discusses the

  19. Root Caries in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Dick; Hyde, Susan

    2015-08-01

    Older adults are retaining an increasing number of natural teeth, and nearly half of all individuals aged 75 and older have experienced root caries. Root caries is a major cause of tooth loss in older adults, and tooth loss is the most significant negative impact on oral health-related quality of life for the elderly. The need for improved preventive efforts and treatment strategies for this population is acute. PMID:26357814

  20. Sarcopenia in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Walston, Jeremy D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Sarcopenia, or the decline of skeletal muscle tissue with age, is one of the most important causes of functional decline and loss of independence in older adults. The purpose of this article is to review the current definitions of sarcopenia, its potential causes and clinical consequences, and the potential for intervention. Recent findings Although no consensus diagnosis has been reached, sarcopenia is increasingly defined by both loss of muscle mass and loss of muscle function or strength. Its cause is widely regarded as multifactorial, with neurological decline, hormonal changes, inflammatory pathway activation, declines in activity, chronic illness, fatty infiltration, and poor nutrition, all shown to be contributing factors. Recent molecular findings related to apoptosis, mitochondrial decline, and the angiotensin system in skeletal muscle have highlighted biological mechanisms that may be contributory. Interventions in general continue to target nutrition and exercise. Summary Efforts to develop a consensus definition are ongoing and will greatly facilitate the development and testing of novel interventions for sarcopenia. Although pharmaceutical agents targeting multiple biological pathways are being developed, adequate nutrition and targeted exercise remain the gold standard for therapy. PMID:22955023

  1. Computer acceptance of older adults.

    PubMed

    Nägle, Sibylle; Schmidt, Ludger

    2012-01-01

    Even though computers play a massive role in everyday life of modern societies, older adults, and especially older women, are less likely to use a computer, and they perform fewer activities on it than younger adults. To get a better understanding of the factors affecting older adults' intention towards and usage of computers, the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Usage of Technology (UTAUT) was applied as part of a more extensive study with 52 users and non-users of computers, ranging in age from 50 to 90 years. The model covers various aspects of computer usage in old age via four key constructs, namely performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influences, and facilitating conditions, as well as the variables gender, age, experience, and voluntariness it. Interestingly, next to performance expectancy, facilitating conditions showed the strongest correlation with use as well as with intention. Effort expectancy showed no significant correlation with the intention of older adults to use a computer. PMID:22317258

  2. Dementia: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 3orMore Aging & Health A to Z Find a Geriatrics Healthcare Professional Medications & Older Adults Making Your Wishes ... neurologists who specialize in memory disorders, and other geriatrics healthcare professionals, such as geriatrics nurse practitioners, also ...

  3. Humanistic Education for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Christopher R.

    1981-01-01

    Explores three elements of instruction that contribute to the development of humanistic educational programs for older adults, including intended educational outcomes, needs of older learners, and instructional methods. Presented at the Association for Gerontology in Higher Education meeting, Washington, D.C., March 1979. (RC)

  4. Sexuality in Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in size or shape, which may affect her self-esteem. Changes for men: As a man gets older, ... as arthritis, heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, and depression can make sex more challenging. Health ...

  5. Weight Management in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Gill, Lydia E; Bartels, Stephen J; Batsis, John A

    2015-09-01

    As the number of older adults increases rapidly, the national epidemic of obesity is also affecting our aging population. This is particularly concerning given the numerous health risks and increased costs associated with this condition. Weight management is extremely important for older adults given the risks associated with abdominal adiposity, which is a typical fat redistribution during aging, and the prevalence of comorbid conditions in this age group. However, approaches to weight loss must be considered critically given the dangers of sarcopenia (a condition that occurs when muscle mass and quality are lost), the increased risk of hip fracture with weight loss, and the association between reduced mortality and increased BMI in older adults. This overview highlights the challenges and implications of measuring adiposity in older adults and the dangers and benefits of weight loss in this population and provides an overview of the new Medicare Obesity Benefit. In addition, we provide a summary of outcomes from successful weight loss interventions for older adults and discuss implications for advancing clinical practice. PMID:26627496

  6. Wound Healing in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Gould, Lisa J; Fulton, Ana Tuya

    2016-01-01

    Impaired wound healing in the elderly represents a major clinical problem that is growing as our population ages. Wound healing is affected by age and by co-morbid conditions, particularly diabetes and obesity. This is particularly important in Rhode Island as the state has a very high percentage of vulnerable older adults. A multi- disciplinary approach that incorporates the skills of a comprehensive wound center with specialized nursing, geriatric medicine and palliative care will facilitate rapid wound healing, reduce costs and improve outcomes for our older adults that suffer from 'problem wounds'. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-02.asp, free with no login]. PMID:26827084

  7. Catastrophic events and older adults.

    PubMed

    Cloyd, Elizabeth; Dyer, Carmel B

    2010-12-01

    The plight of older adults during catastrophic events is a societal concern. Older persons have an increased prevalence of cognitive disorders, chronic illnesses, and mobility problems that limit their ability to cope. These disorders may result in a lack of mental capacity and the ability to discern when they should evacuate or resolve problems encountered during a catastrophe. Some older persons may have limited transportation options, and many of the elderly survivors are at increased risk for abuse, neglect, and exploitation. Recommendations for future catastrophic events include the development of a federal tracking system for elders and other vulnerable adults, the designation of separate shelter areas for elders and other vulnerable adults, and involvement of gerontological professionals in all aspects of emergency preparedness and care delivery, including training of frontline workers. Preparation through preevent planning that includes region-specific social services, medical and public health resources, volunteers, and facilities for elders and vulnerable adults is critical. Elders need to be protected from abuse and fraud during catastrophic events. A public health triage system for elders and other vulnerable populations in pre- and postdisaster situations is useful, and disaster preparedness is paramount. Communities and members of safety and rescue teams must address ethical issues before an event. When older adults are involved, consideration needs to be given to triage decision making, transporting those who are immobile, the care of older adults who receive palliative care, and the equitable distribution of resources. Nurses are perfectly equipped with the skills, knowledge, and training needed to plan and implement disaster preparedness programs. In keeping with the tradition of Florence Nightingale, nurses can assume several crucial roles in disaster preparedness for older adults. Nurses possess the ability to participate and lead community policy development, serve on rescue teams, perform patient assessments, and deliver care. Nurses are crucial to well-planned and executed programs for catastrophic events that affect older adults. Also, all health care providers involved must be aware of the physical and psychological ramifications of disaster relief. The health and resilience of disaster-relief teams depend on paying attention to signs and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder and seeking appropriate treatment should it occur. PMID:21095558

  8. [Polypharmacy issues in older adults].

    PubMed

    Chiang-Hanisko, Lenny; Tan, Jung-Ying; Chiang, Ling-Chun

    2014-06-01

    Polypharmacy is a major concern in the care of older adults. People over 65 years of age frequently have multiple medical conditions and may have cancer, which requires multiple medications for treatment. The use of multiple medications increases the risk of drug-drug interactions, non-adherence, and adverse drug reactions. Polypharmacy is a term that refers to a high number of prescribed medications, usually five and above, or the use of more medications than is clinically justified. Although medications are an important factor in improving and maintaining the quality of life of older adults, polypharmacy increases the risks of morbidity and mortality, loss of functional independence, and a multiplicity of cognitive and physical problems in this population. This article examines issues related to polypharmacy in older adults and identifies nursing strategies and interventions to detect and prevent polypharmacy. Nursing strategies discussed include: (1) increasing patient knowledge of pharmacological issues, (2) increasing patient medication management competency, (3) promoting safe patient medication practices, and (4) enhancing patient education. Nurses must be familiar with medicine regimens, understand the primary factors that affect adherence, and participate in continuing education to enhance their ability to safeguard older adult patients. PMID:24899563

  9. Visuomotor Binding in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloesch, Emily K.; Abrams, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Action integration is the process through which actions performed on a stimulus and perceptual aspects of the stimulus become bound as a unitary object. This process appears to be controlled by the dopaminergic system in the prefrontal cortex, an area that is known to decrease in volume and dopamine functioning in older adults. Although the

  10. Walking Tips for Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the most ppular form of exercise among older adults and it's a great choice. What can walking do for you? strengthen muscles help prevent weight gain lower risks of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and osteoporosis improve balance lower the likelihood of falling If it’s been ...

  11. Cancer Screening in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Wingfield, Sarah A; Heflin, Mitchell T

    2016-02-01

    Cancer screening is an important tool for reducing morbidity and mortality in the elderly. In this article, performance characteristics of commonly used screening tests for colorectal, lung, prostate, breast, and cervical cancers are discussed. Guidelines are emphasized and key issues to consider in screening older adults are highlighted. PMID:26614858

  12. Visuomotor Binding in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloesch, Emily K.; Abrams, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Action integration is the process through which actions performed on a stimulus and perceptual aspects of the stimulus become bound as a unitary object. This process appears to be controlled by the dopaminergic system in the prefrontal cortex, an area that is known to decrease in volume and dopamine functioning in older adults. Although the…

  13. Evaluation of older bay mud sediment from Richmond Harbor, California

    SciTech Connect

    Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.

    1996-09-01

    The older, bay mud (OBM) unit predates modem man and could act as a barrier to the downward transport of contaminants from the younger bay mud (YBM) because of its hard-packed consistency. However, its chemical and biological nature have not been well characterized. Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conducted three independent studies of OBM sediment in January 1993, January 1994, and October 1994. These studies evaluated potential chemical contamination and biological effects of OBM that could occur as a result of dredging and disposal activities. These evaluations were performed by conducting chemical analysis, solid-phase toxicity tests, suspended- particulate-phase (SPP) toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation tests on the OBM sediment. If the sediment chemistry and toxicity results showed no or minimal contamination and toxicological responses, then either the OBM could be left exposed in Richmond Harbor after dredging the YBM without leaving a source of contamination, or if the project depths necessitate, the OBM would be acceptable for disposal at an appropriate disposal site.

  14. Older Adults and Gambling: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariyabuddhiphongs, Vanchai

    2012-01-01

    This paper uses the social cognitive theory model to review the literature on older adult gambling, and related personal and environment characteristics. Results show that lottery is the kind of gambling most frequently played by older adults, followed by casino games. Older adults take trips to casinos to socialize, find excitement, and win

  15. Older Adults and Gambling: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariyabuddhiphongs, Vanchai

    2012-01-01

    This paper uses the social cognitive theory model to review the literature on older adult gambling, and related personal and environment characteristics. Results show that lottery is the kind of gambling most frequently played by older adults, followed by casino games. Older adults take trips to casinos to socialize, find excitement, and win…

  16. Changing Medical Students' Attitudes toward Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Ernest; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Gilbert, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Given the growth in the number of older adults and the ageist attitudes many in the health care profession hold, interventions aimed at improving health professionals' attitudes toward older adults are imperative. Vital Visionaries is an intergenerational art program designed to improve medical students' attitudes toward older adults. Participants…

  17. Nutrition Goals for Older Adults: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwath, Caroline C.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses specific goals of nutrition education for older adults and high-risk groups within the elderly population through review of three crucial areas: current knowledge of eating patterns, nutrient intake, and supplement use of older adults; existing information on multiple influences on eating habits of older adults; and potential benefits

  18. Information and Referral Services for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luck, Carolyn

    1979-01-01

    Relates information and referral (I&R) services to the specific needs of the older adult. Subjects considered include special problems of older adults, stereotyping, ways of dealing with older adults in the context of I&R, problem callers, relationships with other agencies, and situations when I&R cannot help. (Author/JD)

  19. Cochlear Implantation in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Frank R.; Chien, Wade W.; Li, Lingsheng; Niparko, John K.; Francis, Howard W.

    2012-01-01

    Cochlear implants allow individuals with severe-to-profound hearing loss access to sound and spoken language. The number of older adults in the United States who are potential candidates for cochlear implantation is approximately 150,000 and will continue to increase with the aging of the population. Should cochlear implantation (CI) be routinely recommended for these older adults, and do these individuals benefit from CI? We reviewed our 12 year experience with cochlear implantation in adults ≥60 years (n = 445) at Johns Hopkins to investigate the impact of CI on speech understanding and to identify factors associated with speech performance. Complete data on speech outcomes at baseline and 1 year post-CI were available for 83 individuals. Our results demonstrate that cochlear implantation in adults ≥60 years consistently improved speech understanding scores with a mean increase of 60. 0% (S. D. 24. 1) on HINT sentences in quiet . The magnitude of the gain in speech scores was negatively associated with age at implantation such that for every increasing year of age at CI the gain in speech scores was 1. 3 percentage points less (95% CI: 0. 6 – 1. 9) after adjusting for age at hearing loss onset. Conversely, individuals with higher pre-CI speech scores (HINT scores between 40–60%) had significantly greater post-CI speech scores by a mean of 10. 0 percentage points (95% CI: 0. 4 – 19. 6) than those with lower pre-CI speech scores (HINT <40%) after adjusting for age at CI and age at hearing loss onset. These results suggest that older adult CI candidates who are younger at implantation and with higher preoperative speech scores obtain the highest speech understanding scores after cochlear implantation with possible implications for current Medicare policy. Finally, we provide an extended discussion of the epidemiology and impact of hearing loss in older adults. Future research of CI in older adults should expand beyond simple speech outcomes to take into account the broad cognitive, social, and physical functioning outcomes that are likely detrimentally impacted by hearing loss and may be mitigated by cochlear implantation. PMID:22932787

  20. Lead toxicity in older adults.

    PubMed

    Vig, E K; Hu, H

    2000-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that lead, even at relatively low levels of exposure, has the potential to harm not only the young and the occupationally-exposed, but also older people. Because they have been alive for a longer period of time, older adults have had more potential exposures to lead. They may have been exposed to lead while working in unregulated occupations, or they may have encountered more lead in the environment on a daily basis. Several large epidemiological studies have found that older people have higher blood and bone lead levels than younger adults. Additionally, sporadic clusters of acute lead exposure among older adults as a result of activities such as ceramic glaze hobby work and consumption of moonshine whiskey continue to be reported. After lead enters the body, it circulates in the blood reaching the soft tissues and bone. Researchers have learned that lead can hibernate within bone for decades. Although lead within bone is of uncertain toxicity to bone tissue, conditions of bone resorption, such as osteoporosis, can cause bone lead to reenter the bloodstream where it can then re-expose the soft tissue, and, potentially, exert delayed deleterious effects. Evidence is emerging that blood and bone lead levels, reflecting relatively modest exposures, are associated with hypertension, renal insufficiency, and cognitive impairment. Medical treatments that now exist to slow the rate of bone resorption may maintain lead within bones. On-going studies evaluating the relationship between body lead stores and both cognitive and renal impairment, as well as the potential modifying effect of bone resorption, will help determine whether bone resorption should be retarded specifically to preserve organ function. Physicians should be aware of potential past and present lead exposures among their older patients. Ongoing lead exposure should be prevented. In the future, treatment of osteoporosis may be undertaken not only to improve bone health but also to prevent mobilization of bone lead stores and subsequent toxicity. PMID:11083332

  1. Older Adults and Food Safety

    MedlinePLUS

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  2. Sexuality in Nigerian older adults

    PubMed Central

    Olatayo, Adeoti Adekunle; Kubwa, Ojo Osaze; Adekunle, Ajayi Ebenezer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oftentimes the older adults are assumed to be asexual as few studies explore into the sexuality of this age group worldwide and even in Nigeria. It is an important aspect of quality of life which is often neglected by people in this age group, attending physicians and the society as a whole. The study was aimed at determining the perception of older adults about sexuality, identify the factors that could militate against sexuality and fill any void in information in this regard. Methods Descriptive study conducted in one hundred older adults. A semi-structured questionnaire was administered to consenting participants between 1st of September 2013 and 31st of March 2014. Results Mean age of respondents was 66.42± 5.77 years. Seventy-eight percent of the male respondents considered engaging in sexual activity as safe compared to 45.8% of the female respondents. More of the women (33.3%) regarded sexuality in the older adults as a taboo when compared to the men (5.4%). However, the men were more favourably disposed to discussing sexual problems than the women with their spouses (42% vs 20%) and Physicians (23.2% vs 0.0%). Major factors responsible for sexual inactivity were participants’ medical ailments (65%), partners’ failing health (15%) as well as anxiety about sexual performance (25%) in the men and dyspareunia (25%) in women. Conclusion There is an urgent need to correct the misconception about sexuality in this age group especially among the women and for the physicians to explore the sexual history of every patient. PMID:26977224

  3. Differing Perspectives on Older Adult Caregiving.

    PubMed

    Brank, Eve M; Wylie, Lindsey E

    2014-01-17

    Informal older adult caregiving allows older adults to stay in their homes or live with loved ones, but decisions surrounding older adult care are fraught with complexities. Related research and case law suggest that an older adult's need for and refusal of help are important considerations; the current study is the first to examine these factors experimentally. Two samples (potential caregivers and care recipients) provided responses regarding anticipated emotions, caregiver abilities, and allocation of daily caregiving decision making based on a vignette portraying an older adult who had a high or low level of autonomy and who accepted or refused help. Study findings suggest differing views about caregiving; potential caregivers may not be as well prepared to take on caregiving as the potential care recipients anticipate and potential caregivers may allocate more decisional responsibility to older adults than the care recipients expect. Implications for older adult abuse are discussed. PMID:24652926

  4. Preserving mobility in older adults.

    PubMed Central

    Buchner, D M

    1997-01-01

    Age-related loss of strength contributes to impaired mobility and increases the risk of falls. Recent research has focused on 2 approaches to preventing age-related loss of strength--promoting physical activity and exercise (especially strength training) and using trophic factors to enhance muscle performance. Epidemiologic evidence strongly supports a role of regular physical activity in successful aging by preserving muscle performance, promoting mobility, and reducing fall risk. Randomized controlled trials provide convincing evidence that strength and endurance training improve muscle performance in older adults. Evidence is rapidly accumulating from randomized trials that endurance, strength, and balance training promote mobility and reduce fall risk, though exercise effects differ according to the type of exercise, details of the exercise program, and the target group of older adults. Because lifetime regular physical activity is recommended for all older adults, a reasonable strategy (especially for weak adults) is an activity program that includes strength training. In contrast, insufficient evidence exists to recommend the long-term use of trophic factors to preserve muscular performance. An intervention that merits additional study is avoiding the use of psychoactive drugs because drugs like benzodiazepines appear to be risk factors for inactivity and may have unrecognized direct effects on muscular performance. Because chronic illness is a risk factor for inactivity and disuse muscle atrophy, randomized trials comparing strength training with other interventions would be useful in understanding whether strength training has advantages in preserving muscle performance and improving health-related quality of life in a variety of chronic illnesses such as depressive illness. PMID:9348757

  5. Falls Prevention: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... linked to high risk of falling. Frail older adults must focus on maintaining their weight and eating a robust diet in order to ... you care for is an older, frail diabetic adult, discuss the need for strict glycemic ... Nutrition to Prevent Weight Loss As we get older, it becomes more ...

  6. The International Network for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Dianne

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Older Adults Network of the International Council for Adult Education and its efforts to identify educational needs common to older adults worldwide. Offers brief descriptions of 12 exemplary programs funded by the network, which focus on such concerns as literacy, retirement, social action, vocational training, and cultural

  7. Helping Older Adults Adjust to Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sink, Clay V.; D'Abrosca, Louis A.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses some of the fears and anxieties of automation held by older adults. Teaching techniques that aid the older adult learning process are suggested. The article also contains an interview with Anna M. Tucker, director of the Rhode Island Department of Elderly Affairs, concerning the elder adult's fear of automation. (CT)

  8. Modified MyPyramid for Older Adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 1999 we proposed a Modified Food Guide Pyramid for 70+ Adults. It has been extensively used in a variety of settings and formats to highlight the unique dietary challenges of older adults. We now propose a Modified MyPyramid for Older Adults in a format consistent with the MyPyramid graphic. I...

  9. Functional decline in older adults.

    PubMed

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S; Whitson, Heather E; Pavon, Juliessa; Hoenig, Helen

    2013-09-15

    Functional disability is common in older adults. It is often episodic and is associated with a high risk of subsequent health decline. The severity of disability is determined by physical impairments caused by underlying medical conditions, and by external factors such as social support, financial support, and the environment. When multiple health conditions are present, they often result in greater disability than expected because the patient's ability to compensate for one problem may be affected by comorbid conditions. Evaluation of functional disability is most effective when the physician determines the course of the disability, associated symptoms, effects on specific activities, and coping mechanisms the patient uses to compensate for the functional problem. Underlying health conditions, impairments, and contextual factors (e.g., finances, social support) should be identified using validated screening tools. Interventions should focus on increasing the patient's capacity to cope with task demands and reducing the demands of the task itself. Interventions for functional decline in older adults are almost always multifactorial because they must address multiple conditions, impairments, and contextual factors. PMID:24134046

  10. Death, Suicide, and the Older Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastenbaum, Robert

    1992-01-01

    Notes characteristics of older adults at high risk for suicide (male, living alone, living in low-income transient urban area, depression). Provides converging perspectives on death and suicide from standpoints of external observer and older adult. Interprets statistical pattern and critiques current policy proposals for limiting society's…

  11. Healthy Weights for Healthy Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Parents For Men For Women For Seniors Healthy Weights for Healthy Older Adults Published June 04, 2014 Print Email Men and ... also can be a problem for some older adults. Here are a few tasty tips to pump up ... or energy balance. Enjoy More Beans. Add canned beans to salads, ...

  12. Health Contract with Sedentary Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, David; Rhodes, Darson

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Health educators used health contracts with sedentary older adults for the purpose of increasing exercise or physical activity. Design and Methods: Two health educators helped 25 sedentary older adults complete health contracts, and then they conducted follow-up evaluations. The percentage of scheduled exercise sessions successfully

  13. Textile Recycling, Convenience, and the Older Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domina, Tanya; Koch, Kathryn

    2001-01-01

    Results of a study to examine the recycling practices and needs of older adults (n=217) indicated that older adults do recycle traditional materials, but need accommodations for physical limitations. They report textile recycling as time consuming and difficult and used donations to religious organizations as their principal means of textile

  14. Exploring Older Adults' Health Information Seeking Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manafo, Elizabeth; Wong, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore older adults' (55-70 years) health information-seeking behaviors. Methods: Using a qualitative methodology, based on grounded theory, data were collected using in-depth interviews. Participants were community-living, older adults in Toronto, Canada who independently seek nutrition and health information. Interview transcripts

  15. Older Adults' Acceptance of Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lin; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick; Salvendy, Gavriel

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated variables contributing to older adults' information technology acceptance through a survey, which was used to find factors explaining and predicting older adults' information technology acceptance behaviors. Four factors, including needs satisfaction, perceived usability, support availability, and public acceptance, were…

  16. Saskatchewan Older Adult Literacy Survey. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regina Univ. (Saskatchewan). Univ. Extension. Seniors Education Centre.

    The Saskatchewan Older Adult Literacy Survey involved 16 literacy programs offered by the regional colleges, public libraries, and technical institutes throughout the province of Saskatchewan, Canada. The 2-month survey acquired information for an overview of the current state of older adults and literacy in Saskatchewan through mailed…

  17. Older Adults' Acceptance of Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lin; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick; Salvendy, Gavriel

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated variables contributing to older adults' information technology acceptance through a survey, which was used to find factors explaining and predicting older adults' information technology acceptance behaviors. Four factors, including needs satisfaction, perceived usability, support availability, and public acceptance, were

  18. Older Adult Women Learners in Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Mary Alice

    2009-01-01

    This chapter examines the potential for personal growth, development, and learning of older adult women who will have many productive years in the workforce. What implications are there for adult education communities who will interact with these older women? How do they adapt to the educational environment, and what social support will enable

  19. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Older Adults' Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godkin, M. Dianne; Toth, Ellen L.

    1994-01-01

    Examined knowledge, attitudes, and opinions of 60 older adults about cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Most had little or no accurate knowledge of CPR. Knowledge deficits and misconceptions of older adults should be addressed so that they may become informed and active participants in CPR decision-making process. (BF)

  20. Older Adults Have Difficulty in Decoding Sarcasm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Louise H.; Allen, Roy; Bull, Rebecca; Hering, Alexandra; Kliegel, Matthias; Channon, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    Younger and older adults differ in performance on a range of social-cognitive skills, with older adults having difficulties in decoding nonverbal cues to emotion and intentions. Such skills are likely to be important when deciding whether someone is being sarcastic. In the current study we investigated in a life span sample whether there are

  1. Older Adults Have Difficulty in Decoding Sarcasm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Louise H.; Allen, Roy; Bull, Rebecca; Hering, Alexandra; Kliegel, Matthias; Channon, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    Younger and older adults differ in performance on a range of social-cognitive skills, with older adults having difficulties in decoding nonverbal cues to emotion and intentions. Such skills are likely to be important when deciding whether someone is being sarcastic. In the current study we investigated in a life span sample whether there are…

  2. Textile Recycling, Convenience, and the Older Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domina, Tanya; Koch, Kathryn

    2001-01-01

    Results of a study to examine the recycling practices and needs of older adults (n=217) indicated that older adults do recycle traditional materials, but need accommodations for physical limitations. They report textile recycling as time consuming and difficult and used donations to religious organizations as their principal means of textile…

  3. Dealing with Persistent Pain in Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Pain Management Related Documents PDF Dealing with Persistent Pain in Later Life Download Join our e-newsletter! Resources Dealing with Persistent Pain in Older Adults Tools and Tips Printer-friendly ...

  4. Heart Failure: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Heart Failure Unique to Older Adults This section provides ... or maintain quality of life. Urinary Incontinence and Heart Failure If you have heart failure, you may ...

  5. Brain health and exercise in older adults.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Michael A; Gill, Dawn P; Petrella, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    Identifying feasible and effective interventions aimed at mitigating the effects of cognitive decline in older adults is currently a high priority for researchers, clinicians, and policy makers. Evidence suggests that exercise and cognitive training benefit cognitive health in older adults; however, a preferred modality has to be endorsed yet by the scientific community. The purpose of this review is to discuss and critically examine the current state of knowledge concerning the effects of aerobic, resistance, cognitive, and novel dual-task exercise training interventions for the preservation or improvement of cognitive health in older adults. A review of the literature suggests that the potential exists for multiple exercise modalities to improve cognitive functioning in older adults. Nonetheless current limitations within the field need to be addressed prior to providing definitive recommendations concerning which exercise modality is most effective at improving or maintaining cognitive health in aging. PMID:23851414

  6. Safe Travel Tips for Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 3orMore Aging & Health A to Z Find a Geriatrics Healthcare Professional Medications & Older Adults Making Your Wishes ... these expert tips and recommendations from the American Geriatrics Society’s Health in Aging Foundation. Whether you are ...

  7. Screening for Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Recommendation | 2 Screening for Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults 1 The Task Force concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for cognitive ...

  8. Older Adults' Knowledge of Internet Hazards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Galen A.; Hough, Michelle G.; Mazur, Elizabeth; Signorella, Margaret L.

    2010-01-01

    Older adults are less likely to be using computers and less knowledgeable about Internet security than are younger users. The two groups do not differ on trust of Internet information. The younger group shows no age or gender differences. Within the older group, computer users are more trusting of Internet information, and along with those with…

  9. Older Adults' Knowledge of Internet Hazards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Galen A.; Hough, Michelle G.; Mazur, Elizabeth; Signorella, Margaret L.

    2010-01-01

    Older adults are less likely to be using computers and less knowledgeable about Internet security than are younger users. The two groups do not differ on trust of Internet information. The younger group shows no age or gender differences. Within the older group, computer users are more trusting of Internet information, and along with those with

  10. Older Students in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clennell, Stephanie, Ed.; And Others

    British students 60 years and older in 1985-86 were studied in order to learn about their age, sex, marital status, employment background, the subjects they study, their reasons for studying, how they study, and what they think about their studies. Considered by the researchers to be the largest survey of older students, the study involved 2,254

  11. Media preferences of older and younger adults.

    PubMed

    Mundorf, N; Brownell, W

    1990-10-01

    This study updates and extends research on television viewing and magazine reading of older adults and compares it with media preferences of college students. Older adults (n = 74; mean age = 72.08) reported higher levels of television viewing than college students (n = 149; mean age = 19.87). Viewing preferences of both groups were more similar than expected. Although more men than women reported watching television for information, most respondents cited entertainment as the primary motive for television viewing. All but older females showed a stronger preference for male characters. Magazine readership was strongly differentiated by gender and age. PMID:2276644

  12. Electrophysiological entropy in younger adults, older controls and older cognitively declined adults.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Michael J; Kilmartin, Liam; Keane, Michael; Collins, Peter; Staff, Roger T; Kaiser, Jochen; Lai, Robert; Upton, Neil

    2012-03-22

    The current study examined electrophysiological entropy in younger adults, older adults, and older cognitively declined adults across four experimental conditions - eyes closed, eyes open, and during both encoding and recognition of words in a memory task. We hypothesised reduced entropy in older declined adults relative to both older controls and younger adults, with the largest group differences in entropy expected during the encoding and recognition phases of the experiment. We also hypothesised greater hemispheric asymmetry in younger adults compared with older controls and older declined adults. Results revealed significant increases in entropy from eyes closed to eyes open to task. Young adults showed higher entropy in the right relative to the left hemisphere in the temporal lobe and higher entropy in the left relative to the right hemisphere in the parietal lobe. Old cognitively declined adults showed no significant differences between right and left hemisphere entropy. There was a trend whereby older declined adults showed lower entropy than older controls in the frontal lobe, this difference being largest in the left hemisphere during the encoding phase of the experiment. Results indicate that measures of entropy are sensitive to information processing demands and that higher cognitive performance may not be a simple function of entropy level, but rather a combination of level and range, or differentiated range of entropy states across the brain. PMID:22342163

  13. Delirium: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hyperventilation or diabetes are also capable of causing water loss, as are problems in the digestive tract. Unfortunately, dehydration often goes unrecognized in frail older people. Being dehydrated puts you at increased risk for ... Electrolyte Abnormalities: Hyponatremia, Hypernatremia As you ...

  14. Evaluation of Verbal Behavior in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Amy C.; Fuqua, Wayne; Merritt, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 5% of older adults have a dementia diagnosis, and language deterioration is commonly associated with this disorder (Kempler, 2005). Several instruments have been developed to diagnose dementia and assess language capabilities of elderly adults. However, none of these instruments take a functional approach to language assessment as

  15. Young and Older Adults' Reading of Distracters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemper, Susan; Mcdowd, Joan; Metcalf, Kim; Liu, Chiung-Ju

    2008-01-01

    Eye-tracking technology was employed to examine young and older adults' performance in the reading with distraction paradigm. Distracters of 1, 2, and 4 words that formed meaningful phrases were used. There were marked age differences in fixation patterns. Young adults' fixations to the distracters and targets increased with distracter length.

  16. Management of Colorectal Cancer in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Joleen M

    2016-02-01

    Treatment for colorectal cancer should not be based on age alone. Pooled analyses from clinical trials show that fit older adults are able to tolerate treatment well with similar efficacy as younger adults. When an older adult is considered for treatment, the clinical encounter must evaluate for deficits in physical and cognitive function, and assess comorbidities, medications, and the degree of social support, all which have may affect tolerance of treatment. Based on the degree of fitness of the patient, multiple alternatives to aggressive treatment regimens and strategies exist to minimize toxicity and preserve quality of life during treatment. PMID:26614863

  17. Alcohol and substance misuse in older adults.

    PubMed

    Blow, Frederic C; Barry, Kristen L

    2012-08-01

    With the "Baby Boom" cohort reaching the age of 65 years, the older adult population is growing and will continue to grow at a rapid rate. There is a substantial and growing number of older adults who misuse alcohol, psychoactive prescription drugs, and/or other substances. The emerging literature on the cohort of aging adults indicates that they are continuing to use alcohol and psychoactive prescription medications at a higher rate than previous generations. The development and refinement of techniques to address these problems and provide early intervention services is going to be crucial to meeting the needs of this growing population. This chapter provides background on the extent of the problem, guidelines for alcohol and psychoactive medication use, and methods for screening and providing early interventions to improve the lives of older adults who misuse alcohol and/or psychoactive medications and drugs. PMID:22660897

  18. Candidacy for Kidney Transplantation of Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Grams, Morgan E.; Kucirka, Lauren M.; Hanrahan, Colleen F.; Montgomery, Robert A.; Massie, Allan B.; Segev, Dorry L.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To develop a prediction model for kidney transplantation (KT) outcomes specific to older adults with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and to use this model to estimate the number of excellent older KT candidates who lack access to KT. DESIGN Secondary analysis of data collected by the United Network for Organ Sharing and U.S. Renal Disease System. SETTING Retrospective analysis of national registry data. PARTICIPANTS Model development: Medicare-primary older recipients (aged ? 65) of a first KT between 1999 and 2006 (N = 6,988). Model application: incident Medicare-primary older adults with ESRD between 1999 and 2006 without an absolute or relative contraindication to transplantation (N = 128,850). MEASUREMENTS Comorbid conditions were extracted from U.S. Renal Disease System Form 2728 data and Medicare claims. RESULTS The prediction model used 19 variables to estimate post-KT outcome and showed good calibration (HosmerLemeshow P = .44) and better prediction than previous population-average models (P < .001). Application of the model to the population with incident ESRD identified 11,756 excellent older transplant candidates (defined as >87% predicted 3-year post-KT survival, corresponding to the top 20% of transplanted older adults used in model development), of whom 76.3% (n = 8,966) lacked access. It was estimated that 11% of these candidates would have identified a suitable live donor had they been referred for KT. CONCLUSION A risk-prediction model specific to older adults can identify excellent KT candidates. Appropriate referral could result in significantly greater rates of KT in older adults. PMID:22239290

  19. CPR - adult and child 9 years and older

    MedlinePLUS

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation - adult; Rescue breathing and chest compressions - adult; Resuscitation - cardiopulmonary - adult; Cardiopulmonary resuscitation - child 9 years and older; Rescue breathing ...

  20. Positive messaging promotes walking in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Notthoff, Nanna; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    Walking is among the most cost-effective and accessible means of exercise. Mounting evidence suggests that walking may help to maintain physical and cognitive independence in old age by preventing a variety of health problems. However, older Americans fall far short of meeting the daily recommendations for walking. In two studies, we examined whether considering older adults preferential attention to positive information may effectively enhance interventions aimed at promoting walking. In Study 1, we compared the effectiveness of positive, negative, and neutral messages to encourage walking (as measured with pedometers). Older adults who were informed about the benefits of walking walked more than those who were informed about the negative consequences of failing to walk, whereas younger adults were unaffected by framing valence. In Study 2, we examined within-person change in walking in older adults in response to positively- or negatively-framed messages over a 28-day period. Once again, positively-framed messages more effectively promoted walking than negatively-framed messages, and the effect was sustained across the intervention period. Together, these studies suggest that consideration of age-related changes in preferences for positive and negative information may inform the design of effective interventions to promote healthy lifestyles. Future research is needed to examine the mechanisms underlying the greater effectiveness of positively as opposed to negatively framed messages and the generalizability of findings to other intervention targets and other subpopulations of older adults. PMID:24956001

  1. Positive messaging promotes walking in older adults.

    PubMed

    Notthoff, Nanna; Carstensen, Laura L

    2014-06-01

    Walking is among the most cost-effective and accessible means of exercise. Mounting evidence suggests that walking may help to maintain physical and cognitive independence in old age by preventing a variety of health problems. However, older Americans fall far short of meeting the daily recommendations for walking. In 2 studies, we examined whether considering older adults' preferential attention to positive information may effectively enhance interventions aimed at promoting walking. In Study 1, we compared the effectiveness of positive, negative, and neutral messages to encourage walking (as measured with pedometers). Older adults who were informed about the benefits of walking walked more than those who were informed about the negative consequences of failing to walk, whereas younger adults were unaffected by framing valence. In Study 2, we examined within-person change in walking in older adults in response to positively- or negatively-framed messages over a 28-day period. Once again, positively-framed messages more effectively promoted walking than negatively-framed messages, and the effect was sustained across the intervention period. Together, these studies suggest that consideration of age-related changes in preferences for positive and negative information may inform the design of effective interventions to promote healthy lifestyles. Future research is needed to examine the mechanisms underlying the greater effectiveness of positively- as opposed to negatively-framed messages and the generalizability of findings to other intervention targets and other subpopulations of older adults. PMID:24956001

  2. Modified MyPyramid for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, Alice H; Rasmussen, Helen; Yu, Winifred W; Epstein, Susanna R; Russell, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    In 1999 we proposed a Modified Food Guide Pyramid for adults aged 70+ y. It has been extensively used in a variety of settings and formats to highlight the unique dietary challenges of older adults. We now propose a Modified MyPyramid for Older Adults in a format consistent with the MyPyramid graphic. It is not intended to substitute for MyPyramid, which is a multifunctional Internet-based program allowing for the calculation of individualized food-based dietary guidance and providing supplemental information on food choices and preparation. Pedagogic issues related to computer availability, Web access, and Internet literacy of older adults suggests a graphic version of MyPyramid is needed. Emphasized are whole grains and variety within the grains group; variety and nutrient density, with specific emphasis on different forms particularly suited to older adults' needs (e.g. frozen) in the vegetables and fruits groups; low-fat and non-fat forms of dairy products including reduced lactose alternatives in the milk group; low saturated fat and trans fat choices in the oils group; and low saturated fat and vegetable choices in the meat and beans group. Underlying themes stress nutrient- and fiber-rich foods within each group and food sources of nutrients rather than supplements. Fluid and physical activity icons serve as the foundation of MyPyramid for Older Adults. A flag to maintain an awareness of the potential need to consider supplemental forms of calcium, and vitamins D and B-12 is placed at the top of the pyramid. Discussed are newer concerns about potential overnutrition in the current food landscape available to older adults. PMID:18156396

  3. Interventions to Improve Walking in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Brach, Jennifer S.; VanSwearingen, Jessie M.

    2013-01-01

    Interventions to improve walking in older adults have historically been multifactorial (i.e. strengthening, endurance and flexibility programs) focusing on improving the underlying impairments. These impairment-based programs have resulted in only modest improvements in walking. In older adults, walking is slow, less stable, inefficient, and the timing and coordination of stepping with postures and phases of gait is poor. We argue the timing and coordination problems are evidence of the loss of motor skill in walking. Taking a lesson from the sports world and from neurorehabilitation, task-oriented motor learning exercise is an essential component of training to improve motor skill and may be a beneficial approach to improving walking in older adults. In this article we: 1) briefly review the current literature regarding impairment-based interventions for improving mobility, 2) discuss why the results have been only modest, and 3) suggest an alternative approach to intervention (i.e. task oriented motor learning). PMID:24319641

  4. Improved Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Forman, Daniel E; Alexander, Karen; Brindis, Ralph G; Curtis, Anne B; Maurer, Mathew; Rich, Michael W; Sperling, Laurence; Wenger, Nanette K

    2016-01-01

    Longevity is increasing and the population of older adults is growing. The biology of aging is conducive to cardiovascular disease (CVD), such that prevalence of coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease, arrhythmia and other disorders are increasing as more adults survive into old age. Furthermore, CVD in older adults is distinctive, with management issues predictably complicated by multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty and other complexities of care that increase management risks (e.g., bleeding, falls, and rehospitalization) and uncertainty of outcomes. In this review, state-of-the-art advances in heart failure, acute coronary syndromes, transcatheter aortic valve replacement, atrial fibrillation, amyloidosis, and CVD prevention are discussed. Conceptual benefits of treatments are considered in relation to the challenges and ambiguities inherent in their application to older patients. PMID:26918183

  5. Attitudes toward advertisements of the older adults.

    PubMed

    Estrada, M; Moliner, M A; Snchez, J

    2010-01-01

    In this study we will analyze the attitude of older adults to advertisements, differentiating between advertisements that contain rhetorical figures (trope ads) and those that do not (explicit ads). We will also study their attitude toward the brand advertised according to their degree of involvement with the product. In the course of the empirical research, a total of 183 personal surveys were carried out with people aged over 65 taking as reference 2 products with different prices and durabilities. Analysis of the results indicated that in products involving little economic effort, older adults showed the same attitude toward both trope and explicit advertisements. However, with products requiring greater economic effort, older adults showed differences in their attitudes to trope ads and to explicit ads depending on their degree of involvement with the product. These differences had a strong effect on their attitudes to the brands of the products analyzed. PMID:20503807

  6. Improved Cardiovascular Disease Outcomes in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Daniel E.; Alexander, Karen; Brindis, Ralph G.; Curtis, Anne B.; Maurer, Mathew; Rich, Michael W.; Sperling, Laurence; Wenger, Nanette K.

    2016-01-01

    Longevity is increasing and the population of older adults is growing. The biology of aging is conducive to cardiovascular disease (CVD), such that prevalence of coronary artery disease, heart failure, valvular heart disease, arrhythmia and other disorders are increasing as more adults survive into old age.  Furthermore, CVD in older adults is distinctive, with management issues predictably complicated by multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty and other complexities of care that increase management risks (e.g., bleeding, falls, and rehospitalization) and uncertainty of outcomes.  In this review, state-of-the-art advances in heart failure, acute coronary syndromes, transcatheter aortic valve replacement, atrial fibrillation, amyloidosis, and CVD prevention are discussed.  Conceptual benefits of treatments are considered in relation to the challenges and ambiguities inherent in their application to older patients. PMID:26918183

  7. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy with Older Adults: Rationale and Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petkus, Andrew J.; Wetherell, Julie Loebach

    2013-01-01

    Older adults are the fastest growing segment of the population. With these changing demographics, mental health professionals will be seeing more older clients. Additionally, older adults are an underserved population in that most older adults in need of mental health services do not receive treatment. Thus, it is essential that treatments for

  8. Neuropsychological mechanisms of falls in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Chan, John S. Y.; Yan, Jin H.

    2014-01-01

    Falls, a common cause of injury among older adults, have become increasingly prevalent. As the worlds population ages, the increase inand the prevalence offalls among older people makes this a serious and compelling societal and healthcare issue. Physical weakness is a critical predictor in falling. While considerable research has examined this relationship, comprehensive reviews of neuropsychological predictors of falls have been lacking. In this paper, we examine and discuss current studies of the neuropsychological predictors of falls in older adults, as related to sporting and non-sporting contexts. By integrating the existing evidence, we propose that brain aging is an important precursor of the increased risk of falls in older adults. Brain aging disrupts the neural integrity of motor outputs and reduces neuropsychological abilities. Older adults may shift from unconscious movement control to more conscious or attentive motor control. Increased understanding of the causes of falls will afford opportunities to reduce their incidence, reduce consequent injuries, improve overall well-being and quality of life, and possibly to prolong life. PMID:24782761

  9. Exercise in the healthy older adult.

    PubMed

    Karani, R; McLaughlin, M A; Cassel, C K

    2001-01-01

    Habitual exercise provides numerous health benefits to the older adult. While dynamic aerobic activities increase stamina and lung capacity, isometric or resistance training improves muscle strength and endurance. Long-term benefits of continued exercise include a decreased risk of death from heart disease, enhanced balance and mobility, a decreased risk of diabetes, and an improvement in depressive symptoms. While the hazards of exercise relate predominantly to extremes of intensity and duration, all older adults should consult with a physician before beginning a new activity program. A prescription for exercise should include both aerobic and resistance training components, and frequent follow-up to improve adherence is highly recommended. PMID:11528286

  10. Excessive Body Weight in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Porter Starr, Kathryn N; Bales, Connie W

    2015-08-01

    The health challenges prompted by obesity in the older adult population are poorly recognized and understudied. A defined treatment of geriatric obesity is difficult to establish, as it must take into account biological heterogeneity, age-related comorbidities, and functional limitations (sarcopenia/dynapenia). This retrospective article highlights the current understanding of the optimal body mass index (BMI) in later life, addressing appropriate recommendations based on BMI category, age, and health history. The findings of randomized control trials of weight loss/maintenance interventions help one to move closer to evidence-based and appropriately individualized recommendations for body weight management in older adults. PMID:26195092

  11. Depression among older adults with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Park, Mijung; Reynolds, Charles F

    2015-02-01

    Older adults with Diabetes Mellitus (DM) experience greater risk for comorbid depression compared to those who do not have DM. Undetected, untreated or under-treated depression impinges an individual's ability to manage their DM successfully, hinders their adherence to treatment regime, and undermines provider-patient relationships. Thus, in the context of caring for older adults with DM, comorbid depression presents special challenges and opportunities for clinicians. In this article, we summarize the clinical presentation of late-life depression, potential mechanisms of comorbidity of depression and DM, importance of depression in the successful management of DM, and available best practice models for depression treatment. PMID:25453305

  12. Optimal management of ADHD in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Torgersen, Terje; Gjervan, Bjorn; Lensing, Michael B; Rasmussen, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Background The manifestation of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) among older adults has become an interesting topic of interest due to an increasing number of adults aged 50 years and older (≥50 years) seeking assessment for ADHD. Unfortunately, there is a lack of research on ADHD in older adults, and until recently only a few case reports existed. Method A systematic search was conducted in the databases Medline/PubMed and PsycINFO in order to identify studies regarding ADHD in adults ≥50 years. Results ADHD persists into older ages in many patients, but the prevalence of patients fulfilling the criteria for the diagnosis at age ≥50 years is still unknown. It is reason to believe that the prevalence is falling gradually with age, and that the ADHD symptom level is significantly lower in the age group 70–80 years than the group 50–60 years. There is a lack of controlled studies of ADHD medication in adults ≥50 years, but this review suggests that many patients aged ≥50 years experience beneficial effects of pharmacological treatment. The problem with side effects and somatic complications may rise to a level that makes pharmacotherapy for ADHD difficult after the age of 65 years. Physical assessment prior to initiation of ADHD medication in adults ≥50 years should include a thorough clinical examination, and medication should be titrated with low doses initially and with a slow increase. In motivated patients, different psychological therapies alone or in addition to pharmacotherapy should be considered. Conclusion It is essential when treating older adult patients with ADHD to provide good support based on knowledge and understanding of how ADHD symptoms have affected health, quality of life, and function through the life span. Individualized therapy for each elderly patient should be recommended to balance risk–benefit ratio when pharmacotherapy is considered to be a possible treatment. PMID:26811680

  13. Atomoxetine Treatment for ADHD: Younger Adults Compared with Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durell, Todd; Adler, Lenard; Wilens, Timothy; Paczkowski, Martin; Schuh, Kory

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Atomoxetine is a nonstimulant medication for treating child, adolescent, and adult ADHD. This meta-analysis compared the effects in younger and older adults. Method: A post hoc analysis was conducted using data from two double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials. Data from patients aged 18-25 years were compared with data from

  14. Older adults' perceptions of home telehealth services.

    PubMed

    Cimperman, Miha; Brenčič, Maja Makovec; Trkman, Peter; Stanonik, Mateja de Leonni

    2013-10-01

    The success of home telemedicine depends on end-user adoption, which has been slow despite rapid advances in technological development. This study focuses on an examination of significant factors that may predict the successful adoption of home telemedicine services (HTS) among older adults. Based on previous studies in the fields of remote patient monitoring, assisted living technologies, and consumer health information technology acceptance, eight factors were identified as a framework for qualitative testing. Twelve focus groups were conducted with an older population living in both urban and rural environments. The results reveal seven predictors that play an important role in perceptions of HTS: perceived usefulness, effort expectancy, social influence, perceived security, computer anxiety, facilitating conditions, and physicians' opinion. The results provide important insights in the field of older adults' acceptance of HTS, with guidelines for the strategic planning, developing, and marketing of HTS for the graying market. PMID:23931702

  15. Older Adults' Perceptions of Home Telehealth Services

    PubMed Central

    Brenčič, Maja Makovec; Trkman, Peter; de Leonni Stanonik, Mateja

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The success of home telemedicine depends on end-user adoption, which has been slow despite rapid advances in technological development. This study focuses on an examination of significant factors that may predict the successful adoption of home telemedicine services (HTS) among older adults. Based on previous studies in the fields of remote patient monitoring, assisted living technologies, and consumer health information technology acceptance, eight factors were identified as a framework for qualitative testing. Twelve focus groups were conducted with an older population living in both urban and rural environments. The results reveal seven predictors that play an important role in perceptions of HTS: perceived usefulness, effort expectancy, social influence, perceived security, computer anxiety, facilitating conditions, and physicians' opinion. The results provide important insights in the field of older adults' acceptance of HTS, with guidelines for the strategic planning, developing, and marketing of HTS for the graying market. PMID:23931702

  16. Transnational Older Adults and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treas, Judith

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the international migration patterns and the family lives of older adults. Informants (N = 54) reported that they came to the United States to help out their grown children with housekeeping, child care, and domestic economizing. They described how they strategically navigated U.S. immigration laws choosing to

  17. Attitudes toward Advertisements of the Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estrada, M.; Moliner, M. A.; Sanchez, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this study we will analyze the attitude of older adults to advertisements, differentiating between advertisements that contain rhetorical figures (trope ads) and those that do not (explicit ads). We will also study their attitude toward the brand advertised according to their degree of involvement with the product. In the course of the

  18. Social participation and older adults' sleep.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jen-Hao; Lauderdale, Diane S; Waite, Linda J

    2016-01-01

    Sleep complaints are common among older adults, and poor sleep has been found to predict chronic diseases and mortality. Many studies suggest that social participation benefits healthy aging. We examined the relationships between older adults' social participation and their sleep using two waves (2005-2006, 2010-2011) of data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP). The NSHAP recorded older adults' social participation (including religious attendance, volunteer work, and attendance at meetings of organized groups) over five years, and included self-reported sleep duration in both waves and, in the second wave, measures of insomnia symptoms and measures of sleep patterns and rhythms using actigraphy for a subsample. Cross-sectional analysis of the second wave indicates that those reporting higher levels of social participation had better actigraphic sleep but not better self-reported sleep. However, longitudinal analysis suggests that change in social participation was not associated with actigraphic or self-reported sleep characteristics in the second wave data. Further analysis using fixed-effects model showed no association between change in social participation and change in self-reported sleep duration. Thus, although older adults with greater social participation slept better, we did not find that increasing social participation improved sleep. These findings imply that a self-selection process may at work; or if social participation does affect sleep, the causal effect may be over a much shorter time frame than five years. PMID:26724432

  19. Effective Teaching and Programming for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Von Hahn, Margaret; Riddell, Gail

    This booklet is intended as a guide for community educators on planning and teaching educational programs for older adults. Chapter 1, Getting Started, discusses the program plan which identifies the sponsoring agency, advisory committee, and ways of determining needs and interests. Chapter 2, Designing the Program, focuses on the participants,

  20. Text-Learning Capabilities of Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glynn, Shawn M.; Muth, K. Denise

    1979-01-01

    Text-learning strategies may help students to: (1) focus attention on key concepts; (2) organize information for storage and retrieval; and (3) integrate new information with existing, related knowledge. Since these strategies can provide learning contexts that stimulate attentional and organizational processes, their use with older adult students

  1. Caribbean Students' Attitudes toward Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prudent, Ella S.; Tan, P. Philip

    2002-01-01

    A survey indicated that Caribbean college students (n=201) had largely neutral attitudes toward older adults. Those who had close relationships with elders had more positive attitudes. Social work students were more positive than sociology, psychology, or English majors. Ethnicity was not a factor. (SK)

  2. Drug therapies in older adults (part 1).

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, Omar; Jackson, Stephen H D

    2015-02-01

    Prescribing for older adults represents a significant challenge as the UK population ages. Physiological decline and the rising prevalence of frailty increase the likelihood of altered pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics, suboptimal prescribing and adverse effects among this growing cohort of the population. In the first of two articles, we begin by considering these issues and posit four key questions which should be considered when prescribing for older adults. Does this agent reflect the priorities of the patient? Are there alternatives - with greater efficacy, effectiveness or tolerability - that might be considered? Are the dose, frequency and formulation appropriate? How does this prescription relate to concurrent medication? We also describe current drug therapies in two disease states with a predilection for older adults: Alzheimer's disease (AD) and osteoporosis. Using these examples we highlight the limitations of evidence-based medicine and guidelines in this cohort of the population, illustrating the reliance on sub-group analysis to demonstrate the efficacy of drug therapies for older adults in osteoporosis and the underutilisation of appropriate treatments for patients with AD as a result of flawed guidelines. PMID:25650198

  3. Drug therapies in older adults (part 2).

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, Omar; Jackson, Stephen Hd

    2015-04-01

    In this, the second of two articles, we continue our evaluation of drug therapies in older adults. Having previously described the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic consequences of physiological ageing, along with the challenge of appropriate prescribing, we proposed four key questions which should be considered when prescribing for this cohort of the population. Does this agent reflect the priorities of the patient? Are there alternatives - with greater efficacy, effectiveness or tolerability - that might be considered? Are the dose, frequency and formulation appropriate? How does this prescription relate to concurrent medication? We also highlighted the reliance on subgroup analysis to demonstrate the efficacy of drug therapies for older adults in osteoporosis and the underutilisation of appropriate treatments for patients with Alzheimer's disease as a result of flawed guidelines. Here we describe current drug therapies in systolic heart failure, noting the limited inclusion of older adults in key trials, while also reviewing the pharmacological treatment of orthostatic hypotension. In doing so, we advocate the intermittent use of midodrine as a first-line treatment for orthostasis in older adults, counter to the generic guidelines produced by various learned societies, but in keeping with the scant trial data available. PMID:25824068

  4. Mobility in Older Adults: A Comprehensive Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Sandra C.; Porter, Michelle M.; Menec, Verena H.

    2010-01-01

    Mobility is fundamental to active aging and is intimately linked to health status and quality of life. Although there is widespread acceptance regarding the importance of mobility in older adults, there have been few attempts to comprehensively portray mobility, and research has to a large extent been discipline specific. In this article, a new

  5. Blueberry supplementation improves memory in older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The prevalence of dementia, in particular Alzheimer’s disease, is increasing with the expansion of the older adult population. In the absence of effective therapy, preventive approaches are essential to mitigate this public health problem. Blueberries contain polyphenolic compounds, most prominent...

  6. LIPID PROFILES OF RURAL OLDER ADULTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age is an independent, non-modifiable risk factor for CVD, the leading cause of death in the United States. The purpose of this study was to examine total cholesterol and lipoprotein sub-fractions in relation to statin use and ATPIII guidelines in a sample of older adults, n=278. 161f and 117m. Fa...

  7. Nutritional strategies for frail older adults.

    PubMed

    Posthauer, Mary Ellen; Collins, Nancy; Dorner, Becky; Sloan, Colleen

    2013-03-01

    The objectives of this continuing education article are to analyze the aging process and its effect on the nutritional status of frail older adults; determine how sarcopenia, anorexia, malnutrition, and Alzheimer disease increase the risk for pressure ulcer development and impact the healing process; and to apply evidence-based nutrition guidelines and implement practical solutions for wound healing. PMID:23426414

  8. Community College Older Adult Program Development Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getskow, Veronica

    This guide provides information and suggestions for developing programs that meet the needs of older adults at community colleges. Recommended procedures are presented for the following stages of program development: (1) leadership influences, highlighting the process of hiring effective leaders, key leadership skills, and leaders'

  9. Services for Older Adults: Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumme, Debbie

    This curriculum guide contains materials for a course that provides occupationally specific training designed to develop knowledge and skills for employment in the area of services for older adults. Contents include an introduction, the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) covered; sample course outlines; instructional strategies organized…

  10. Services for Older Adults: Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mumme, Debbie

    This curriculum guide contains materials for a course that provides occupationally specific training designed to develop knowledge and skills for employment in the area of services for older adults. Contents include an introduction, the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) covered; sample course outlines; instructional strategies organized

  11. Current Psychopathology in Previously Assaulted Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acierno, Ron; Lawyer, Steven R.; Rheingold, Alyssa; Kilpatrick, Dean G.; Resnick, Heidi S.; Saunders, Benjamin E.

    2007-01-01

    Older adult women age 55+ years (N = 549) were interviewed as part of a population-based epidemiological research study of lifetime experiences with physical and sexual assault and current mental health problems. Although overall rates of psychopathology were low, producing very small cells for comparison, women who reported experiencing physical

  12. Older adults have difficulty in decoding sarcasm.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Louise H; Allen, Roy; Bull, Rebecca; Hering, Alexandra; Kliegel, Matthias; Channon, Shelley

    2015-12-01

    Younger and older adults differ in performance on a range of social-cognitive skills, with older adults having difficulties in decoding nonverbal cues to emotion and intentions. Such skills are likely to be important when deciding whether someone is being sarcastic. In the current study we investigated in a life span sample whether there are age-related differences in the interpretation of sarcastic statements. Using both video and verbal materials, 116 participants aged between 18 and 86 completed judgments about whether statements should be interpreted literally or sarcastically. For the verbal stories task, older adults were poorer at understanding sarcastic intent compared with younger and middle-aged participants, but there was no age difference in interpreting control stories. For the video task, older adults showed poorer understanding of sarcastic exchanges compared with younger and middle-aged counterparts, but there was no age difference in understanding the meaning of sincere interactions. For the videos task, the age differences were mediated by the ability to perceive facial expressions of emotion. Age effects could not be explained in terms of variance in working memory. These results indicate that increased age is associated with specific difficulties in using nonverbal and contextual cues to understand sarcastic intent. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26501728

  13. Senior Health: Older Adults and Newer Technology

    MedlinePLUS

    ... older adults who struggle to stand and walk. New technology includes knee units, shock-absorbing pylons, and other ... knees help protect them from stumbling and falling. New technology also helps increase a person’s “mental energy.” This ...

  14. Older adults challenged financially when adult children move home.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Steven P; Padilla-Frausto, D Imelda

    2014-02-01

    This policy brief looks at the financial burdens imposed on older Californians when adult children return home, often due to a crisis not of their own making, to live with their parents. The findings show that on average in California, the amount of money that older adults need in order to maintain a minimally decent standard of living while supporting one adult child in their home increases their expenses by a minimum of 50 percent. Low-income older adults are usually on fixed incomes, so helping an adult child can provide the child with a critical safety net but at the cost of the parents' own financial well-being. Policy approaches to assisting this vulnerable population of older adults include implementing reforms to increase Supplemental Security Income (SSI), improving the availability of affordable housing, assuring that all eligible nonelderly adults obtain health insurance through health care reform's expansion of Medi-Cal and subsidies, and increasing food assistance through SNAP and senior meal programs. PMID:24804354

  15. Evaluation of Verbal Behavior in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Amy C.; Fuqua, R. Wayne; Merritt, Todd A.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 5% of older adults have a dementia diagnosis, and language deterioration is commonly associated with this disorder (Kempler, 2005). Several instruments have been developed to diagnose dementia and assess language capabilities of elderly adults. However, none of these instruments take a functional approach to language assessment as described by Skinner (1957). The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a function-based assessment for language deficits of older adults. Thirty-one participants were categorized into a control group (n ?=? 15) and a dementia group (n ?=? 16) based on their score on the Dementia Rating Scale-2. Individuals with dementia performed significantly worse on the tact assessment than those without dementia. Participants from both groups performed better on measures of tacts than intraverbals or mands, even though topographically identical responses were required in these assessments. The data provide support for Skinner's conceptualization of functionally independent verbal operants. PMID:23814369

  16. Pneumococcal Vaccination and Revaccination of Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Artz, Andrew S.; Ershler, William B.; Longo, Dan L.

    2003-01-01

    As individuals advance in age, the risk of infection, bacteremia, and mortality caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae rises. Retrospective data demonstrate that the licensed penumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV) is effective in older persons in reducing serotype-specific invasive disease. PPV demonstrates good immunogenicity in older adults, generally comparable to that in younger subjects, although certain cohorts respond less well. The response to PPV is T cell independent, however, and does not elicit immunologic memory. The duration of the anti-capsular polysaccharide antibody response appears to wane as early as 3 years after vaccination. In older persons, revaccination induces an antibody response, although it may not be as strong as that from the initial vaccine. While revaccination of older adults has been recommended, clinical efficacy has not yet been proven. Measures of antibody function may be at least as important in determining protection as are quantitative antibody levels. Additional studies of immunogenicity, particularly regarding revaccination, will facilitate the design of an optimal pneumococcal vaccination policy. Research into conjugate- and protein-based pneumococcal vaccines, which elicit T-cell-dependent responses and induce immunologic memory, is needed in older persons. In the meantime, administering to PPV to recommended groups should be a public health priority. PMID:12692100

  17. Life Satisfaction and Frailty Among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmson, Katarina; Fritzell, Emelie; Eklund, Kajsa; Dahlin-Ivanoff, Synneve

    2013-01-01

    Functional and physical impairment are factors believed to lead to declined life satisfaction among older adults. This study aimed to examine life satisfaction among older adults and the influence of frailty. Baseline data from two studies addressing frail older adults aged 80+ in Gothenburg, Sweden, (n=577) were used. Frailty was measured through eight indicators. Life satisfaction was measured with Fugl-Meyer’s instrument LiSat-11. Perceived life satisfaction was rather high within the studied population, with 66% being satisfied with life as a whole. Most life satisfaction items were significantly associated with frailty status, with non-frail participants being satisfied to a higher extent for all items with the exception of financial situation, sexual life and partnership relation. The factors significantly explaining life satisfaction were psychological health, partner relationship, leisure and ADL. This study shows that older adults’ satisfaction with life as a whole is almost as high as in younger age groups. Respondents with higher degree of frailty reported significantly lower degrees of life satisfaction, indicating a possibility to maintain life satisfaction by preventing or delaying the development of frailty. PMID:26973917

  18. Older Adults and Drinking | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Rethinking Drinking Older Adults and Drinking Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of ... than when they were younger. Drinking puts older adults at greater risk for falls, car crashes, and ...

  19. Living with Multiple Health Problems: What Older Adults Should Know

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PDF Living With Multiple Health Problems: What Older Adults Should Know Download Join our e-newsletter! Resources Living With Multiple Health Problems: What Older Adults Should Know Tools and Tips Printer-friendly PDF ...

  20. Older and Wiser: Adult Learning and Ethnic Minority Elders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadzie, Stella

    1993-01-01

    The British "Older and Wiser" project demonstrated the need for educational opportunities for older adults from minority groups. The double barriers of ageism and racism faced by these adults must be addressed. (SK)

  1. Preventing Elder Abuse and Neglect in Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Share Glossary previous page Related Documents PDF Preventing Elder Abuse and Neglect in Older Adults Download Join our e-newsletter! Resources Preventing Elder Abuse and Neglect in Older Adults Tools and ...

  2. Child's play: the creativity of older adults.

    PubMed

    Capps, Donald

    2012-09-01

    In this article, I discuss Paul W. Pruyser's view presented in his article "An Essay on Creativity" (Pruyser in Bull Menninger Clin 43:294-353, 1979) that creative persons manifest early childhood qualities of playfulness, curiosity, and pleasure seeking and that adaptation is itself a form of creativity. I then discuss his article "Creativity in Aging Persons" (Pruyser in Bull Menninger Clin 51:425-435, 1987) in which he presents his view that aging itself is a potentially creative process, that creativity among older adults is not limited to the talented few, and that older adulthood has several specific features that are conducive to creativity. Significant among these features are object loss (especially involving human relationships) and functional loss (due to the vicissitudes of aging). Noting his particular emphasis on object loss and its role in late-life creativity, I focus on functional loss, and I emphasize the importance of adaptation in sustaining the creativity of older adults who experience such loss. I illustrate this adaptation by considering well-known painters who in late life suffered visual problems common to older adults. I suggest that in adapting to their visual problems these artists drew on the early childhood qualities (playfulness, curiosity and pleasure seeking) that all creative persons possess and that they are therefore illustrative for other older adults who are experiencing functional losses. I conclude with Erik H. Erikson's (Toys and reasons: stages in the ritualization of experience, W. W. Norton, New York, 1977) and Paul W. Pruyser's (Pastor Psychol 35:120-131, 1986) reflections on the relationship between seeing and hoping. PMID:22706923

  3. Diagnosis and management of urinary tract infection in older adults.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Theresa Anne; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2014-03-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a commonly diagnosed infection in older adults. Despite consensus guidelines developed to assist providers in diagnosing UTI, distinguishing symptomatic UTI from asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) in older adults is problematic, as many older adults do not present with localized genitourinary symptoms. This article summarizes the recent literature and guidelines on the diagnosis and management of UTI and ASB in older adults. PMID:24484576

  4. Adapting "Distance Learning" Instruction to Older Adult Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Penelope Louise

    As distance learning plays an increasing role in adult education, instruction to older adults must be adapted for individual learner differences. Two stereotypic adult education client groups have been described: the SAVY adult (Schooled, Active, Verbal, Younger) and the ONUS adult (Older, Non-Verbal, Unschooled, Sedentary). Instructional methods

  5. Nutraceutical intervention improves older adults' cognitive functioning.

    PubMed

    Small, Brent J; Rawson, Kerri S; Martin, Christina; Eisel, Sarah L; Sanberg, Cyndy D; McEvoy, Cathy L; Sanberg, Paul R; Shytle, R Douglas; Tan, Jun; Bickford, Paula C

    2014-02-01

    Interventions to improve the cognitive health of older adults are of critical importance. In the current study, we conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial using a pill-based nutraceutical (NT-020) that contained a proprietary formulation of blueberry, carnosine, green tea, vitamin D3, and Biovin to evaluate the impact on changes in multiple domains of cognitive functioning. One hundred and five cognitively intact adults aged 65-85 years of age (M=73.6 years) were randomized to receive NT-020 (n=52) or a placebo (n=53). Participants were tested with a battery of cognitive performance tests that were classified into six broad domains--episodic memory, processing speed, verbal ability, working memory, executive functioning, and complex speed at baseline and 2 months later. The results indicated that persons taking NT-020 improved significantly on two measures of processing speed across the 2-month test period in contrast to persons on the placebo whose performance did not change. None of the other cognitive ability measures were related to intervention group. The results also indicated that the NT-020 was well tolerated by older adults, and the presence of adverse events or symptoms did not differ between the NT-020 and placebo groups. Overall, the results of the current study were promising and suggest the potential for interventions like these to improve the cognitive health of older adults. PMID:24134194

  6. Nutraceutical intervention improves older adults' cognitive functioning.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Small BJ; Rawson KS; Martin C; Eisel SL; Sanberg CD; McEvoy CL; Sanberg PR; Shytle RD; Tan J; Bickford PC

    2014-02-01

    Interventions to improve the cognitive health of older adults are of critical importance. In the current study, we conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial using a pill-based nutraceutical (NT-020) that contained a proprietary formulation of blueberry, carnosine, green tea, vitamin D3, and Biovin to evaluate the impact on changes in multiple domains of cognitive functioning. One hundred and five cognitively intact adults aged 65-85 years of age (M=73.6 years) were randomized to receive NT-020 (n=52) or a placebo (n=53). Participants were tested with a battery of cognitive performance tests that were classified into six broad domains--episodic memory, processing speed, verbal ability, working memory, executive functioning, and complex speed at baseline and 2 months later. The results indicated that persons taking NT-020 improved significantly on two measures of processing speed across the 2-month test period in contrast to persons on the placebo whose performance did not change. None of the other cognitive ability measures were related to intervention group. The results also indicated that the NT-020 was well tolerated by older adults, and the presence of adverse events or symptoms did not differ between the NT-020 and placebo groups. Overall, the results of the current study were promising and suggest the potential for interventions like these to improve the cognitive health of older adults.

  7. Nutraceutical Intervention Improves Older Adults' Cognitive Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Kerri S.; Martin, Christina; Eisel, Sarah L.; Sanberg, Cyndy D.; McEvoy, Cathy L.; Sanberg, Paul R.; Shytle, R. Douglas; Tan, Jun; Bickford, Paula C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Interventions to improve the cognitive health of older adults are of critical importance. In the current study, we conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial using a pill-based nutraceutical (NT-020) that contained a proprietary formulation of blueberry, carnosine, green tea, vitamin D3, and Biovin to evaluate the impact on changes in multiple domains of cognitive functioning. One hundred and five cognitively intact adults aged 65–85 years of age (M=73.6 years) were randomized to receive NT-020 (n=52) or a placebo (n=53). Participants were tested with a battery of cognitive performance tests that were classified into six broad domains—episodic memory, processing speed, verbal ability, working memory, executive functioning, and complex speed at baseline and 2 months later. The results indicated that persons taking NT-020 improved significantly on two measures of processing speed across the 2-month test period in contrast to persons on the placebo whose performance did not change. None of the other cognitive ability measures were related to intervention group. The results also indicated that the NT-020 was well tolerated by older adults, and the presence of adverse events or symptoms did not differ between the NT-020 and placebo groups. Overall, the results of the current study were promising and suggest the potential for interventions like these to improve the cognitive health of older adults. PMID:24134194

  8. Carpal tunnel syndrome in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Scott; Herskovitz, Steven; Verghese, Joe

    2006-01-01

    The clinical and electrophysiologic characteristics of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) in elderly adults are not well-established. We examined age differences in clinical, functional, and electrophysiologic features in elderly adults referred for evaluation to a neuromuscular service for evaluation of symptoms suggestive of CTS. Of 415 consecutive subjects referred over an 18-month period, 343 met clinical criteria for CTS. There were 158 young (?50 y), 115 middle-aged (5164 y), and 70 elderly adults (?65 y). There were no age differences in the duration of CTS symptoms, hand function, or presence of autonomic symptoms. The elderly adults had a higher prevalence of thenar weakness and thenar atrophy than younger subjects. Electrophysiologic abnormalities were more common and more severe in the older subjects. Our study shows that although there are no age differences in subjective complaints of CTS, older adults had objective clinical and electrophysiologic evidence of a more severe median nerve entrapment. Our findings suggest that greater attention needs to be paid to objective evidence of CTS severity rather than subjective complaints when evaluating elderly adults presenting for clinical evaluation of CTS. PMID:16634057

  9. Effects of a Forgiveness Intervention for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allemand, Mathias; Steiner, Marianne; Hill, Patrick L.

    2013-01-01

    The authors' aim in the present study was to examine the effects of a brief forgiveness intervention for older adults. The psychoeducational group intervention consists of (a) established core components of previous forgiveness interventions and (b) additional components considering specific needs of older adults. Seventy-eight older adults (mean

  10. Older Adults and E-Learning: Opportunities and Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Githens, Rod P.

    2007-01-01

    E-learning and distance education can play a role in helping older adults become integrated with the rest of society. As demographic and cultural changes affect the place of older adults in society, online learning programs become increasingly appealing to older adults. In this article, I discuss (1) the changing notion of work and learning in

  11. Reviewing and Critiquing Computer Learning and Usage among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Young Sek

    2008-01-01

    By searching the keywords of "older adult" and "computer" in ERIC, Academic Search Premier, and PsycINFO, this study reviewed 70 studies published after 1990 that address older adults' computer learning and usage. This study revealed 5 prominent themes among reviewed literature: (a) motivations and barriers of older adults' usage of computers, (b)

  12. Focused assessment in the care of the older adult.

    PubMed

    Gentleman, Bethany

    2014-03-01

    This article presents an overview of the focused subjective and objective assessment of the older adult for the critical care nurse. Discussion includes the distinguishing features inherent to older adults, and relevant evidence-based screening tools that the nurse can use in assessing the critically ill older adult. PMID:24484920

  13. Resilience in Rural Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Context: Identifying ways to meet the health care needs of older adults is important because their numbers are increasing and they often have more health care issues. High resilience level may be one factor that helps older adults adjust to the hardships associated with aging. Rural community-dwelling older adults often face unique challenges such…

  14. Reviewing and Critiquing Computer Learning and Usage among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Young Sek

    2008-01-01

    By searching the keywords of "older adult" and "computer" in ERIC, Academic Search Premier, and PsycINFO, this study reviewed 70 studies published after 1990 that address older adults' computer learning and usage. This study revealed 5 prominent themes among reviewed literature: (a) motivations and barriers of older adults' usage of computers, (b)…

  15. Resilience in Rural Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Context: Identifying ways to meet the health care needs of older adults is important because their numbers are increasing and they often have more health care issues. High resilience level may be one factor that helps older adults adjust to the hardships associated with aging. Rural community-dwelling older adults often face unique challenges such

  16. Management of pain in older adults.

    PubMed

    Cavalieri, Thomas A

    2005-03-01

    The elderly are often untreated or undertreated for pain. Barriers to effective management include challenges to proper assessment of pain; underreporting on the part of patients; atypical manifestations of pain in the elderly; a need for increased appreciation of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes of aging; and misconceptions about tolerance and addiction to opioids. Physicians can effectively manage pain in the elderly by understanding different types of pain (nociceptive and neuropathic), and appropriate use of nonopioid, opioid, and adjuvant medications. Opioids have become more widely accepted for treating older adults who have persistent pain, but their use requires physicians have an understanding of prevention and management of side effects, opioid titration and withdrawal, and careful monitoring. Placebo use is unwarranted and unethical. Nonpharmacologic approaches to pain management are essential and include osteopathic manipulative treatment, cognitive behavioral therapy, exercise, and spiritual interventions. The holistic and interdisciplinary approach of osteopathic medicine offers an approach that can optimize effective pain management in older adults. PMID:18154193

  17. Multimorbidity in older adults with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Heidi; Evenhuis, Heleen M

    2014-04-01

    Multimorbidity may be related to the supposed early aging of people with intellectual disabilities (ID). This group may suffer more often from multimorbidity, because of ID-related physical health conditions, unhealthy lifestyle and metabolic effects of antipsychotic drug use. Multimorbidity has been defined as two or more chronic conditions. Data on chronic conditions have been collected through physical assessment, questionnaires, and medical files. Prevalence, associated factors and clusters of multimorbidity have been studied in 1047 older adults (? 50 years) with ID. Multimorbidity was prevalent in 79.8% and associated with age and severe/profound ID. Four or more conditions were prevalent in 46.8% and associated with age, severe/profound ID and Down syndrome. Factor analyses did not reveal a model for disease-clusters with good fit. Multimorbidity is highly prevalent in older adults with ID. Multimorbidity should receive more attention in research and clinical practice for targeted pro-active prevention and treatment. PMID:24529858

  18. Treatment of specific phobia in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Pachana, Nancy A; Woodward, Rana M; Byrne, Gerard JA

    2007-01-01

    Phobias are common in later life, yet treatment research in this population remains scant. The efficacy of exposure therapy, in combination with other Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT) components, in the treatment of specific phobia with a middle and older aged sample was examined. Sixteen adults aged 4568 with DSM-IV diagnosis of a specific phobia received a manualized intervention over ten weeks, and were compared with a control group. Results indicated significant time effects in the treatment group for the primary outcome variables of phobic severity and avoidance as well as secondary outcome variables including depression and anxiety. Symptom presence and severity also significantly declined in the treatment group. No significant changes in state anxiety were noted across the treatment period. Such results provide support for the efficacy of exposure combined with CBT treatment for specific phobia in middle to older aged adults. PMID:18044196

  19. Substance abuse in older adults. An overview.

    PubMed

    Widlitz, Michelle; Marin, Deborah B

    2002-12-01

    Substance abuse among older adults, including abuse of alcohol and prescription and over-the-counter drugs, has been called an invisible epidemic. Signs and symptoms of abuse in older adults vary from those presented in younger persons and this variation can complicate the diagnosis. Validated screening tools, such as CAGE and MAST-G, can aid diagnosis, but primary care physicians also need to be alert to suspicious medical conditions often associated with substance use disorders. Treatment goal is almost always abstinence; although efficacy remains uncertain, brief interventions by primary care physicians are recommended when patients are identified as at-risk. Pharmacotherapies may be used, but caution is advised due to associated side effects. Physicians may even be able to prevent the development of benzodiazepine dependence by prescribing alternative treatments for anxiety and depression in this population. PMID:12494731

  20. Perceived age discrimination in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Rippon, Isla; Kneale, Dylan; de Oliveira, Cesar; Demakakos, Panayotes; Steptoe, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: to examine perceived age discrimination in a large representative sample of older adults in England. Methods: this cross-sectional study of over 7,500 individuals used data from the fifth wave of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA), a longitudinal cohort study of men and women aged 52 years and older in England. Wave 5 asked respondents about the frequency of five everyday discriminatory situations. Participants who attributed any experiences of discrimination to their age were treated as cases of perceived age discrimination. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the odds ratios of experiencing perceived age discrimination in relation to selected sociodemographic factors. Results: approximately a third (33.3%) of all respondents experienced age discrimination, rising to 36.8% in those aged 65 and over. Perceived age discrimination was associated with older age, higher education, lower levels of household wealth and being retired or not in employment. The correlates of age discrimination across the five discriminatory situations were similar. Conclusion: understanding age discrimination is vital if we are to develop appropriate policies and to target future interventions effectively. These findings highlight the scale of the challenge of age discrimination for older adults in England and illustrate that those groups are particularly vulnerable to this form of discrimination. PMID:24077751

  1. THE OLDER ADULT DRIVER WITH COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT

    PubMed Central

    Carr, David B.; Ott, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    Although automobiles remain the transportation of choice for older adults, late life cognitive impairment and dementia often impair the ability to drive safely. There is, however, no commonly utilized method of assessing dementia severity in relation to driving, no consensus on the assessment of older drivers with cognitive impairment, and no gold standard for determining driving fitness. Yet, clinicians are called upon by patients, their families, other health professionals, and often the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) to assess their patients' fitness-to-drive and to make recommendations about driving privileges. Using the case of Mr W, we describe the challenges of driving with cognitive impairment for both the patient and caregiver, summarize the literature on dementia and driving, discuss evidenced-based assessment of fitness-to-drive, and address important ethical and legal issues. We describe the role of physician assessment, referral to neuropsychology, functional screens, dementia severity tools, driving evaluation clinics, and DMV referrals that may assist with evaluation. Finally, we discuss mobility counseling (eg, exploration of transportation alternatives) since health professionals need to address this important issue for older adults who lose the ability to drive. The application of a comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach to the older driver with cognitive impairment will have the best opportunity to enhance our patients' social connectedness and quality of life, while meeting their psychological and medical needs and maintaining personal and public safety. PMID:20424254

  2. Small intestinal permeability in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Luzia; Ramminger, Sara; Haas, Verena; Postrach, Elisa; Werich, Martina; Fischer, Andr; Koller, Michael; Swidsinski, Alexander; Bereswill, Stefan; Lochs, Herbert; Schulzke, Jrg?Dieter

    2014-01-01

    Abstract It is not yet clear whether intestinal mucosal permeability changes with advancing age in humans. This question is of high importance for drug and nutrition approaches for older adults. Our main objective was to answer the question if small intestinal barrier integrity deteriorates with healthy aging. We conducted a cross?sectional study including the pooled data of 215 nonsmoking healthy adults (93 female/122 male), 84 of whom were aged between 60 and 82 years. After a 12?h fast, all participants ingested 10 g of lactulose and 5 g of mannitol. Urine was collected for 5 h afterwards and analyzed for test sugars. The permeability index (PI = lactulose/mannitol) was used to assess small intestinal permeability. Low?grade inflammation defined by high?sensitivity C?reactive protein ?1 mL/L and kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate) were determined in the older age group. The PI was similar in older compared to younger adults (P =0.887). However, the urinary recovery of lactulose and mannitol was lower in the older adults and this change was neither associated with urinary volume nor glomerular filtration rate. The PI was not significantly correlated with low?grade inflammation or presence of noninsulin?dependent type 2 diabetes. However, it significantly deteriorated in the copresence of both conditions compared to low?grade inflammation alone (P =0.043) or type 2 diabetes alone (P =0.015). Small intestinal mucosal barrier does not deteriorate with age per se. But low?grade inflammation coupled with minor disease challenges, such as type 2 diabetes, can compromise the small intestinal barrier. PMID:24771689

  3. Chronic use of benzodiazepines among older adults

    PubMed Central

    Alvarenga, Jussara Mendonça; Giacomin, Karla Cristina; de Loyola, Antônio Ignácio; Uchoa, Elizabeth; Firmo, Josélia Oliveira Araújo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the perception of and motivation for the chronic use of benzodiazepine among older adults. METHODS A qualitative study was conducted on 22 older adults living in Bambuí, MG, Southeastern Brazil, who were taking benzodiazepines and had the clinical and cognitive ability to respond to interview questions. The collected data were analyzed on the basis of the “signs, meanings, and actions” model. RESULTS The main reasons pointed out for the use of benzodiazepines were “nervousness”, “sleep problems”, and “worry” due to family and financial problems, everyday problems, and existential difficulties. None of the interviewees said that they used benzodiazepines in a dose higher than that recommended or had been warned by health professionals about any risks of their continuous use. Different strategies were used to obtain the prescription for the medication, and any physician would prescribe it, indicating that a bond was established with the drug and not with the health professional or healthcare service. Obtaining and consuming the medication turned into a crucial issue because benzodiazepine assumes the status of an essential food, which leads users to not think but sleep. It causes a feeling of relief from their problems such as awareness of human finitude and fragility, existential difficulties, and family problems. CONCLUSIONS Benzodiazepine assumes the characteristics of polyvalence among older adults, which extrapolate specific clinical indications, and of essentiality to deal with life’s problems in old age. Although it relieves the “nerves”, the chronic use of benzodiazepines buffers suffering and prevents older adults from going through the suffering. This shows important difficulties in the organization and planning of strategies that are necessary for minimizing the chronic use in this population. PMID:26039388

  4. Dental Hygiene Students’ Perceptions of Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, R. Constance; Shockey, Alcinda Trickett; Long, D. Leann

    2015-01-01

    Geriatric education is an important component of the dental hygiene curriculum because, in it, students acquire skills and attitudes to help provide quality care to older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine if off-site exposure to nursing home residents with supervised oversight had the potential to improve dental hygiene students’ attitudes toward older adults. Senior dental hygiene students at one school completed a pre-nursing home experience questionnaire. A series of geriatric lectures and discussions, which included discussions about students’ anxieties of working with institutionalized older adults, were held prior to the nursing home experience. The students then participated in two supervised four-hour nursing home experiences, were debriefed after the experiences, and completed a second questionnaire. Of thirty-nine potential participants in the study, thirty-two took part in the pre-nursing home experience questionnaire (82.1 percent). They had a mean split Fabroni score of 34.2 (95 percent confidence interval: 32.2, 36.3). The thirty participants in the post-experience questionnaire (76.9 percent of total) had a mean split score of 32.7 (95 percent confidence interval: 30.1, 35.3). This study failed to reject the null hypothesis of no mean difference between the pre- and post-nursing home experience; however, the post-experience mean score was lower than the pre-nursing home experience mean score, indicating a more positive attitude toward older adults after the experience. PMID:25480277

  5. Tolerability of Antihypertensive Medications in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Dharmarajan, Thiruvinvamalai S; Dharmarajan, Lekshmi

    2015-10-01

    Several guidelines for hypertension have recently undergone revisions to incorporate an approach providing choices of medications based on age, race, and specific situations where hypertension may co-exist with disorders such as diabetes, coronary artery disease, heart failure and chronic kidney disease. Initial recommendations include diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and calcium channel blockers; beta blockers are favored in some guidelines and are a choice in specific settings. Within the classes of drugs, several antihypertensive agents provide options. This review discusses antihypertensive drugs by class, including adverse effects and tolerability, with preferences in older adults and specific settings. Adverse drug events from antihypertensive medications are discussed by class and where applicable for specific agents. Data from select studies pertinent to tolerability and adverse effects are presented in tables for several classes of drugs. The rationale for nonadherence to medication is reviewed, including the roles played by tolerability and adverse drug effects. Antihypertensive therapy in typical settings in older adults is discussed; they include hypertension in association with impaired cognition, depression, diabetes, sexual dysfunction, and falls. The key to successful therapy and tolerability is to promote a healthy lifestyle in conjunction with medications as the approach, thereby also lowering the adverse drug effects. The eventual choice of the specific drug(s) is based on risks, benefits, and patient preferences, and is best tailored for each older adult. PMID:26442857

  6. Alcohol, medications, and the older adult.

    PubMed

    Dharia, Sheetal P; Slattum, Patricia W

    2011-11-01

    Late-onset alcoholism is a common occurrence in older adults and may be a consequence of life-changing events such as retirement, declining health, loss of independence, or loss of a loved one. Alcohol use and misuse often go unrecognized. Alcohol use can cause significant drug interactions and exacerbate underlying disease. Because of physiologic changes in older adults, alcohol pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics may be altered and contribute to adverse alcohol-induced clinical consequences. We report on an elderly man who may have had unrecognized alcohol-induced drug interactions, falling, and exacerbation of heart failure. Following a fall, he was admitted to the hospital. After discharge, the man and his wife relocated to an assisted living facility and he abstained from alcohol. Four months later the man received a prescription for a glass of wine or two with dinner; one week later after two glasses of wine, a dose of lorazepam was given. Later that evening the patient fell and suffered a subdural hematoma. The effects of alcohol in older adults are discussed. PMID:22079793

  7. Physical activity is medicine for older adults

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Denise

    2014-01-01

    There is evidence from high quality studies to strongly support the positive association between increased levels of physical activity, exercise participation and improved health in older adults. Worldwide, around 3.2 million deaths per year are being attributed to inactivity. In industrialised countries where people are living longer lives, the levels of chronic health conditions are increasing and the levels of physical activity are declining. Key factors in improving health are exercising at a moderate-to-vigorous level for at least 5?days per week and including both aerobic and strengthening exercises. Few older adults achieve the level of physical activity or exercise that accompanies health improvements. A challenge for health professionals is to increase physical activity and exercise participation in older adults. Some success in this has been reported when physicians have given specific, detailed and localised information to their patients, but more high quality research is needed to continue to address this issue of non-participation in physical activity and exercise of a high enough level to ensure health benefits. PMID:24255119

  8. Knowledge and injury prevention practices in homes of older adults.

    PubMed

    Shields, Wendy C; Perry, Elise C; Szanton, Sarah L; Andrews, Margaret R; Stepnitz, Rebecca L; McDonald, Eileen M; Gielen, Andrea C

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the prevalence of preventive safety measures in homes with older, urban-dwelling adults; determine the relationship between sociodemographic variables and injury prevention measures; and describe older adults' knowledge of safety topics. Teams conducted interviews and home observations in 603 homes to confirm preventive safety measures. Households with older adults were rarely observed to have recommended smoke alarm (34%) or carbon monoxide coverage (22%). Water temperature was safe in 64% of homes. Among households headed by someone other than the older adult, odds of having a working smoke alarm on every floor were much lower than in older adult-headed households (95% confidence interval: 0.04-0.35). Few older adults interviewed about safety knowledge correctly answered several items related to fire and carbon monoxide. Effort is needed to improve knowledge and promote the lifesaving benefits of injury countermeasures so that older adults can be adequately protected. PMID:22832066

  9. Recognition of rapid speech by blind and sighted older adults

    PubMed Central

    Gordon-Salant, Sandra; Friedman, Sarah A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The goal of this study was to determine if older blind participants recognize time-compressed speech better than older sighted participants. Method Three groups of adults with normal hearing participated (n = 10/group): older sighted, older blind, and younger sighted listeners. Low-predictability sentences that were uncompressed (0% time compression ratio, TCR) and compressed at three rates (40%, 50%, and 60% TCR) were presented to listeners in quiet and noise. Results Older blind listeners recognized all time-compressed speech stimuli significantly better than older sighted listeners in quiet. In noise, the older blind adults recognized the uncompressed and 40% TCR speech stimuli better than the older sighted adults. Performance differences between the younger sighted adults and older blind adults were not observed. Conclusions The findings support the notion that older blind adults recognize time-compressed speech considerably better than older sighted adults in quiet and noise. Their performance levels are similar to those of younger adults, suggesting that age-related difficulty in understanding time-compressed speech is not an inevitable consequence of aging. Rather, frequent listening to speech at rapid rates, which was highly correlated with performance of the older blind adults, may be a useful technique to minimize age-related slowing in speech understanding. PMID:20689022

  10. Asthma Is More Severe in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dweik, Raed A.; Comhair, Suzy A.; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Moore, Wendy C.; Peters, Stephen P.; Busse, William W.; Jarjour, Nizar N.; Calhoun, William J.; Castro, Mario; Chung, K. Fan; Fitzpatrick, Anne; Israel, Elliot; Teague, W. Gerald; Wenzel, Sally E.; Love, Thomas E.; Gaston, Benjamin M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe asthma occurs more often in older adult patients. We hypothesized that the greater risk for severe asthma in older individuals is due to aging, and is independent of asthma duration. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of prospectively collected data from adult participants (N=1130; 454 with severe asthma) enrolled from 2002 2011 in the Severe Asthma Research Program. Results The association between age and the probability of severe asthma, which was performed by applying a Locally Weighted Scatterplot Smoother, revealed an inflection point at age 45 for risk of severe asthma. The probability of severe asthma increased with each year of life until 45 years and thereafter increased at a much slower rate. Asthma duration also increased the probability of severe asthma but had less effect than aging. After adjustment for most comorbidities of aging and for asthma duration using logistic regression, asthmatics older than 45 maintained the greater probability of severe asthma [OR: 2.73 (95 CI: 1.96; 3.81)]. After 45, the age-related risk of severe asthma continued to increase in men, but not in women. Conclusions Overall, the impact of age and asthma duration on risk for asthma severity in men and women is greatest over times of 18-45 years of age; age has a greater effect than asthma duration on risk of severe asthma. PMID:26200463

  11. The Seattle Care Pathway: Defining Dental Care for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Pretty, Iain

    2015-08-01

    It is well-recognized that the demographic shift in the population will result in a larger proportion of older adults and those adults will live longer than ever before. There is, therefore, a need to ensure dental services recognize this transition and plan for the management of older adults in primary care dental practices. This article describes the evidence for, and the details of, the Seattle Care Pathway to ensure older adults receive optimum dental care. PMID:26357813

  12. Organizational Support and Volunteering Benefits for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Fengyan; Choi, Eunhee; Morrow-Howell, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study tested a theoretical model of volunteering benefits and examined the mechanism through which volunteering benefits older adults. Design and Methods: This is a 2-wave study of 253 older adult volunteers serving in 10 volunteer programs. Older volunteers completed the mailed surveys in 2005 and 2006. Structural equation modeling

  13. Older Adults' Motivation to Learn in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yi-Yin

    2011-01-01

    A limited amount of literature has discussed older adults in formal education, especially their motivations to learn in higher education. This study aims to understand older adults' learning in the context of higher education. Specifically, this study argues that higher education can function as a stimulating learning environment that helps older

  14. Examining What Older Adults Read and Watch on TV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scales, Alice M.

    1996-01-01

    Reading and television preferences of 58 adults over 65 and 39 younger adults were compared. More younger people watched entertainment programs. More older blacks than whites read religious materials and watched TV for news; more older whites read leisure materials and viewed entertainment. More older people disliked TV violence. Overall, most

  15. Recognition of Rapid Speech by Blind and Sighted Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon-Salant, Sandra; Friedman, Sarah A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether older blind participants recognize time-compressed speech better than older sighted participants. Method: Three groups of adults with normal hearing participated (n = 10/group): (a) older sighted, (b) older blind, and (c) younger sighted listeners. Low-predictability sentences that were uncompressed (0% time

  16. Memory impairment in older adults diversionary thoughts

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Ftima; Resende, Flvia; Salom Pinho, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The diversion paradigm was created in the context of explaining the effect of the instruction to forget some recently encoded material in the list-method of the directed forgetting paradigm. The current study of healthy older adults employed the diversion paradigm with two main goals: to determine whether thinking about an autobiographical memory interferes with the recall of recently encoded information and to explore whether the degree of forgetting depends on the temporal distance created by the diversionary thought. Ninety non-institutionalized Portuguese older adults (47 females and 43 males), aged 6569 years, with education levels of between 3 and 6 years participated in this study. The exclusion criteria were as follows: presence of depressive symptomatology (assessed with the Geriatric Depression Scale-30) and global cognitive deterioration (assessed with the MiniMental State Examination). Concerning the diversion paradigm, one group was instructed to think about an autobiographical event (remembering ones childhood home or the last party that one had attended) after studying one word list (List 1) and before viewing the second word list (List 2). After a brief distraction task, the participant had to recall the words from both of the studied lists. In the control group, the procedure was the same, but the diversionary thought was substituted by a speed reading task. The obtained results showed the amnesic effect of diversionary thought but did not show a greater degree of forgetting when the autobiographical events in the diversionary thoughts were temporally more distant. Considering the practical implications of these results, this study alerts us to the importance of promoting strategies that enable older adults to better remember important information and effectively forget irrelevant information. PMID:26539106

  17. Preventing Falls in Older Adults Who Live in Community Settings

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for Patients Preventing Falls in Older Adults Who Live in Community Settings: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force ... in people aged 65 years or older who live in community settings and are at high risk ...

  18. Throwing patterns of older adults: a follow-up investigation.

    PubMed

    Williams, K; Haywood, K; VanSant, A

    1991-01-01

    Previous investigations of the movement patterns of older adults have focused on functional movements. Performance declines have been reported with increasing age. Many investigations, however, do not require older adults to perform maximal, force producing actions. Smaller declines might be observed if older adults made a maximal effort. This investigation examined changes in a maximal skill--the overarm throw for force. Active, older adults were videotaped as they threw tennis balls. Thirteen people were filmed for two consecutive years. Gender and age differences were examined for movement patterns, ball velocity, and selected kinematic measures. Participants threw using patterns and velocities generally observed in children in middle elementary-school years. This result suggested there was a decline in this force production skill. Some older adults regressed in the movement patterns they used over the two years of testing. Older males threw faster, using more advanced movement patterns than older females. PMID:1761317

  19. Motivation to Learn among Older Adults in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Dian-Fu; Lin, Sung-Po

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed the survey on adults administered by the Ministry of Education in Taiwan in 2008, and logistic regression analysis showed a close relationship between learning motivations of older adults. The finding revealed that the higher age or the lower education attainment of older adults, the lower their learning motivation. The

  20. Treatment of osteoporosis in older adults.

    PubMed

    Gosch, M; Kammerlander, C; Nicholas, J A

    2014-06-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mineral density and associated with low impact skeletal fractures most often involving the spine, hip, pelvis, proximal humerus and forearm. It is predominantly a disease of ageing, affecting primarily postmenopausal women, but also older men. Both hip and non-hip fractures are associated with excess mortality post-fracture. Fragility fractures can be acutely and subacutely life threatening for many older patients. Postmenopausal osteoporosis has a big impact on health care expenses, with associated spending expected to double for osteoporosis by the year 2050. Despite the severe medical and socioeconomic consequences of fragility fractures, treatment and prevention efforts remain inadequate, particularly in the oldest and highest-risk patients. Osteoporosis is still viewed as an inevitable consequence of aging, rather than an opportunity for treatment and prevention. Multiple factors contribute to the failure of initiating appropriate treatment for osteoporosis, even in patients with fragility fractures. Our review offers an overview of the current literature and offers answers common issues in the management of osteoporosis in older adults. PMID:24820095

  1. Fruit and vegetable intake among older adults: a scoping review

    PubMed Central

    Kadell, Andria R.

    2013-01-01

    Older adults are the fastest growing segment of the world population. Older adults are also at heightened risk of chronic conditions (such as diabetes, heart disease, and cancer) and specific geriatric conditions (such as cognitive impairment, frailty, and falls). Research studies have examined the relationship between fruit and vegetable intake and subsequent health outcomes and the correlates of fruit and vegetable intake in the U.S. population. However, relatively few studies have specifically examined health impacts and correlates of fruit and vegetable intake among older adults, who have unique biophysical and socioeconomic circumstances. Evidence is reviewed to (1) describe findings related to consumption and chronic, geriatric, and other health outcomes among older adults and (2) describe patterns in fruit and vegetable consumption among older adults and how these patterns vary within and among populations. This review addresses specific barriers faced by older adults in obtaining and consuming fruits and vegetables in community settings. Recommendations for practice and policy are discussed. PMID:23769545

  2. Blood Pressure in Older Adults: the Importance of Frailty.

    PubMed

    Odden, Michelle C; Beilby, Pamela R; Peralta, Carmen A

    2015-07-01

    The importance of high blood pressure (BP) and the effect of BP lowering in older adults remain controversial due to the mixed evidence in this population. Frailty status may resolve the apparently conflicting findings and identify subpopulations who share common risk. Emerging evidence demonstrates that low BP is associated with poor outcomes in older frail adults or those with poor functional status. In contrast, in non-frail older adults, low BP appears beneficial. Frail older adults may be at increased risk of hypotension, serious fall injuries, and polypharmacy. Additionally, peripheral BP may not be the best prognostic measure in this population. The majority of clinical practice guidelines give little recommendation for frail older adults, which is likely due to their systematic underrepresentation in randomized controlled trials. Future studies need to consider modifications to safely include frail older adults, and guidelines should consider inclusion of evidence beyond randomized controlled trials. PMID:26068656

  3. Training attentional control in older adults

    PubMed Central

    MacKay-Brandt, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated benefits for older adults from training attentional control using a variable priority strategy, but the construct validity of the training task and the degree to which benefits of training transfer to other contexts are unclear. The goal of this study was to characterize baseline performance on the training task in a sample of 105 healthy older adults and to test for transfer of training in a subset (n = 21). Training gains after 5 days and extent of transfer was compared to another subset (n = 20) that served as a control group. Baseline performance on the training task was characterized by a two-factor model of working memory and processing speed. Processing speed correlated with the training task. Training gains in speed and accuracy were reliable and robust (ps <.001, η2 = .57 to .90). Transfer to an analogous task was observed (ps <.05, η2 = .10 to .17). The beneficial effect of training did not translate to improved performance on related measures of processing speed. This study highlights the robust effect of training and transfer to a similar context using a variable priority training task. Although processing speed is an important aspect of the training task, training benefit is either related to an untested aspect of the training task or transfer of training is limited to the training context. PMID:21728889

  4. Depression among older adults with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mijung; Reynolds, Charles F.

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Depression is among the leading causes of decreased disability-adjusted life years in the world1 and a serious public health problem.2 Older adults with DM experience greater risk for comorbid depression compared to those who do not have DM.3 Having DM increases the risk of subsequent development or recurrence of depression. Conversely, history of depression increases the risk for new onset DM.4 As an unwanted co-traveler of DM, undetected, untreated or undertreated depression impinges an individual’s ability to manage their DM successfully, hindering their adherence to treatment regime.5 It also undermines the effectiveness of provider-patient communication and decays therapeutic relationships. Thus, in the context of caring for older adults with DM, comorbid depression presents special challenges and opportunities for clinicians. Moreover, recent studies have suggested that co-occurring depression and DM may accelerate cognitive decline, highlighting the importance of treating depression and DM. Several treatment modalities are available, which can be used to treat and manage depression in primary care settings: pharmaceutical, brief psychotherapeutic, behavioral and life style interventions, and combination therapies. An evidence-based health care delivery model is also available for treating depression in primary care settings. In this article, we summarize the clinical presentation of late-life depression, potential mechanisms of comorbidity of depression and DM, importance of depression in the successful management of DM, and available best practice models for depression treatment. PMID:25453305

  5. Cognitive consequences of expressive regulation in older adults.

    PubMed

    Emery, Lisa; Hess, Thomas M

    2011-06-01

    Previous research has suggested that older and young adults are equally able to regulate their outward expressions of emotion and that the regulation of emotional expression in younger adults results in decreased memory for the emotional stimulus. In the current study, we examined whether older adults show this same memory effect. Older and young adults viewed positive and negative emotional pictures under instructions to view the pictures naturally, enhance their facial expressions, or suppress their facial expressions. Older and young adults showed equivalent outward regulation of expression, but suppressing their emotional expressions led to reduced memory for emotional stimuli only in the young adults. The results suggest that older and young adults are achieving control of their expressions through different mechanisms or strategies. PMID:21171781

  6. NICHE Recommended Care of the Critically Ill Older Adult.

    PubMed

    Giambattista, Laura; Howard, Richard; Ruhe Porto, Raquel; Barker, Nancy; Carroll, Dawn; Pfeiffer, Judith; Davidson, Judy E

    2015-01-01

    Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders provides evidence-based best practices for the care of the hospitalized older adult. Older adults are a vulnerable population at greater risk of functional decline during and after hospitalization, safety concerns related to polypharmacy, ineffective pain management, and population-specific physiological responses to medications. Family members of hospitalized older adults are also vulnerable and may experience postintensive care syndrome. This manuscript explores the application of Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders standards through a case study approach to optimize patient/family-centered care of the critically ill older adult. PMID:26039643

  7. Trust and trustworthiness in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Phoebe E; Slessor, Gillian; Rieger, Matthias; Rendell, Peter G; Moustafa, Ahmed A; Ruffman, Ted

    2015-12-01

    In a series of 1-shot economic trust games in which participants could make real monetary profits, but also risked losing money, 2 studies compared young and older adults' trust (amount invested with trustees) and trustworthiness (amount returned to investors by trustees). In Study 1, young (n = 35) and older (n = 32) participants acted as investors, and the age of simulated trustees (young, older) was manipulated. In Study 2, young (n = 61) and older (n = 67) participants acted in real life as both investors and trustees. They completed 2 face-to-face trust games with same- and other-age partners, and 3 anonymous trust games with same-, other-, and unknown-age partners. Study 1 found that young and older participants rate older trustees as appearing more trustworthy than young trustees, but neither group invest more with older than young trustees. Rather, older participants were more likely than young participants to invest money averaged across trustee age. In Study 2, there were no age-related differences in trust, but older adults were more trustworthy than young adults in anonymous games with same- and unknown-age partners. It was also found that young adults demonstrate greater reputational concerns than older adults by reciprocating more trust when face-to-face than anonymous. We discuss the complex influences of age on trust game investing and reciprocation, as well as the implications for older adults' wellbeing and financial security. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26389525

  8. The role of chiropractic care in older adults

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    There are a rising number of older adults; in the US alone nearly 20% of the population will be 65 or older by 2030. Chiropractic is one of the most frequently utilized types of complementary and alternative care by older adults, used by an estimated 5% of older adults in the U.S. annually. Chiropractic care involves many different types of interventions, including preventive strategies. This commentary by experts in the field of geriatrics, discusses the evidence for the use of spinal manipulative therapy, acupuncture, nutritional counseling and fall prevention strategies as delivered by doctors of chiropractic. Given the utilization of chiropractic services by the older adult, it is imperative that providers be familiar with the evidence for and the prudent use of different management strategies for older adults. PMID:22348431

  9. In The Best Interest Of The (Adult) Child: Ideas About Kinship Care Of Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Tezra; Perry, Tam E.; Valeriani, Julia

    2014-01-01

    This article uses a qualitative, ethnographic approach to examine the experiences older adults and their kin, as the older adult engages in relocation. Studies looking at caregiving by kin for older adults highlight burdens for the adult child. This study offers a life course perspective on kinship care, analyzing older adults' decisions' to move. It was found that many older adults are strongly influenced by the desire to not be cared for by their kin as well as to select housing near their existing social network, which might exclude kin. In conclusion, policy implications are discussed. PMID:25278741

  10. Methodological Challenges in Physical Activity Research with Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chase, Jo-Ana D.

    2015-01-01

    The aging adult population is growing, as well as the incidence of chronic illness among older adults. Physical activity has been demonstrated in the literature to be a beneficial component of self-management for chronic illnesses commonly found in the older adult population. Health sciences research seeks to develop new knowledge, practices, and policies that may benefit older adults’ management of chronic illness and quality of life. However, research with the older adult population, though beneficial, includes potential methodological challenges specific to this age group. This article discusses common methodological issues in research among older adults, with a focus on physical activity intervention studies. Awareness and understanding of these issues may facilitate future development of research studies devoted to the aging adult population, through appropriate modification and tailoring of sampling techniques, intervention development, and data measures and collection. PMID:21821726

  11. SAME-SEX PARTNERSHIPS AND THE HEALTH OF OLDER ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Mark Edward; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen I.

    2015-01-01

    While extensive research has examined associations between marriage, cohabitation, and the health of heterosexual adults, it remains unclear whether similar patterns of health are associated with same-sex partnerships for lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) older adults. This article examines whether having a same-sex partner is associated with general self-reported health and depressive symptoms for LGB older adults. Based on survey data collected from LGB adults 50 years of age and older, having a same-sex partner was associated with better self-reported health and fewer depressive symptoms when compared with single LGB older adults, controlling for gender, age, education, income, sexuality, and relationship duration. Relationship duration did not significantly impact the association between partnership status and health. In light of recent public debates and changes in policies regarding same-sex partnerships, more socially integrated relationship statuses appear to play a role in better health for LGB older adults. PMID:25948876

  12. How retellings shape younger and older adults memories

    PubMed Central

    Mather, Mara

    2014-01-01

    The way a story is retold influences the way it is later remembered; after retelling an event in a biased manner people subsequently remember the event in line with their distorted retelling. This study tested the hypothesis that this should be especially true for older adults. To test this, older and younger adults retold a story to be entertaining, to be accurate, or did not complete an initial retelling. Later, all participants recalled the story as accurately as possible. On this final test younger adults were unaffected by how they had previously retold the story. In contrast, older adults had better memory for the storys content and structure if they had previously retold the story accurately. Furthermore, for older adults, greater usage of storytelling language during the retelling was associated with lower subsequent recall. In summary, retellings exerted a greater effect on memory in older, compared with younger, adults. PMID:25436107

  13. Predicting premorbid memory functioning in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Duff, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Assessing cognitive change during a single visit requires the comparison of estimated premorbid abilities and current neuropsychological functioning. Although premorbid intellect has been widely examined, estimating premorbid memory abilities has received less attention. The current study used demographic variables and an estimate of premorbid intellect to predict premorbid memory abilities in a sample of 95 community-dwelling, cognitively intact older adults. These prediction formulae were then applied to a sample of 74 individuals with amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment to look for discrepancies between premorbid and current memory abilities. Despite minimal differences between premorbid and current memory abilities in the intact sample, large and statistically significant differences were observed in the impaired sample. Although validation in larger samples is needed, the current estimates of premorbid memory abilities may aid clinicians in determining change across time. PMID:21154041

  14. Memory training plus yoga for older adults.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Graham J; Vance, David E; Wayde, Ernest; Ford, Katy; Ross, Jeremiah

    2015-06-01

    Previous tests of the SeniorWISE intervention with community-residing older adults that were designed to improve affect and cognitive performance were successful and positively affected these outcomes. In this study, we tested whether adding yoga to the intervention would affect the outcomes. Using a quasiexperimental pre-post design, we delivered 12 hours of SeniorWISE memory training that included a 30-minute yoga component before each training session. The intervention was based on the four components of self-efficacy theory: enactive mastery experience, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion, and physiologic arousal. We recruited 133 older adults between the ages of 53 and 96 years from four retirement communities in Central Texas. Individuals were screened and tested and then attended training sessions two times a week over 4 weeks. A septuagenarian licensed psychologist taught the memory training, and a certified yoga instructor taught yoga. Eighty-three participants completed at least 9 hours (75%) of the training and completed the posttest. Those individuals who completed made significant gains in memory performance, instrumental activities of daily living, and memory self-efficacy and had fewer depressive symptoms. Thirteen individuals advanced from poor to normal memory performance, and seven improved from impaired to poor memory performance; thus, 20 individuals improved enough to advance to a higher functioning memory group. The findings from this study of a memory training intervention plus yoga training show that the benefits of multifactorial interventions had additive benefits. The combined treatments offer a unique model for brain health programs and the promotion of nonpharmacological treatment with the goals of maintaining healthy brain function and boosting brain plasticity. PMID:25943999

  15. Data Sources Available for Modeling Environmental Exposures in Older Adults

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report, “Data Sources Available for Modeling Environmental Exposures in Older Adults,” focuses on information sources and data available for modeling environmental exposures in the older U.S. population, defined here to be people 60 years and older, with an emphasis on those...

  16. Assertiveness by Older Adults with Visual Impairment: Context Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Ellen Bouchard; Anas, Ann P.; Mays, Heather

    2008-01-01

    Within a communication predicament of aging and disability framework, this study examined the impact of two types of contextual variation on perceptions of older adult assertiveness within problematic service encounters. Young (N = 66) and older (N = 66) participants evaluated conversational scenarios in which a visually-impaired older woman

  17. Data Sources Available for Modeling Environmental Exposures in Older Adults

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report, Data Sources Available for Modeling Environmental Exposures in Older Adults, focuses on information sources and data available for modeling environmental exposures in the older U.S. population, defined here to be people 60 years and older, with an emphasis on those...

  18. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy with Older Adults: Rationale and Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Petkus, Andrew J; M.A; Wetherell, Julie Loebach

    2015-01-01

    Older adults are the fastest growing segment of the population. With these changing demographics, mental health professionals will be seeing more older clients. Additionally, older adults are an underserved population in that most older adults in need of mental health services do not receive treatment. Thus, it is essential that treatments for mental and behavioral health problems are empirically supported with older adults and that mental health professionals are aware of the special needs of older adult populations. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is an emerging approach to the treatment of distress. The purpose of this article is to provide a rationale for using ACT with older adults based on gerontological theory and research. We also review research on ACT-related processes in later life. We present a case example of an older man with depression and anxiety whom we treated with ACT. Finally, we describe treatment recommendations and important adaptations that need to be considered when using ACT with older adults and discuss important areas for future research.

  19. Older Adults Seeking Healthcare Information on the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardt, Jeffrey H.; Hollis-Sawyer, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Due to an aging population and increases in healthcare costs, particular attention needs to be focused on developing Internet sites that provide older adults with credible and accurate healthcare information. Present research findings suggest that motivation is only one factor that influences whether or not older adults utilize the World Wide Web

  20. Older Adults as Home Visitors Modeling Parenting for Troubled Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arch, Shirley D.

    1978-01-01

    A program based on regular home visits by older adults to families of neglected or developmentally delayed children provides a model for parenting in the home, helps the children and gives the older adult visitors a satisfying role to play in society. (SE)

  1. Emotional Wellness Needs: Older Adults in Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russ, Randall

    2009-01-01

    The importance of emotional wellness for rural older adults is a topic of growing significance. Older adults, now the fastest growing United States population sector, have special wellness needs. By the year 2030, about 70 million people will be over the age of 65. A low or declining sense of control over one's life increases depression. Emotional

  2. Older Adults' Comprehension of Transformational and Deactivation Negation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolin, Sara J.

    2015-01-01

    The present research aimed to examine young and older adults' comprehension of negated text to determine the locus of older adults' difficulty in understanding this text construction. Participants were asked to read short passages at their own pace, complete a lexical decision task, and answer a comprehension question about what they had read.

  3. Therapeutic Uses of Music with Older Adults. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clair, Alicia Ann; Memmott, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    In this comprehensively updated second edition, written by Alicia Ann Clair and Jenny Memmott the extraordinary benefits of music therapy for older adults are detailed. "Therapeutic Uses of Music with Older Adults" not only examines these benefits but also clarifies the reasons that music is beneficial. This important book shows both informal and…

  4. Older Adults: What Every Paediatric Nurse Should Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barba, Beth Ellen; Tesh, Anita Starr; Cowen, Kay; Hancock, Debbie; Moore, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Older adults have always been important parts of children's lives, playing a variety of roles including grandparent, caregiver, friend, and neighbour. Grandparents also play a variety of roles in families. Often a child's first encounter with serious illness or death involves a grandparent or other older adult. Grandparents are also increasingly…

  5. Older Adults' Memory for Verbally Presented Medical Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bankoff, Sarah M.; Sandberg, Elisabeth Hollister

    2012-01-01

    Previous research demonstrates that patients typically have difficulty remembering information presented during healthcare consultations. This study examined how older adults learn and remember verbally presented medical information. Healthy older adults were tested for recall in experimental and field settings. Participants viewed a five-minute…

  6. Older Adults' Memory for Verbally Presented Medical Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bankoff, Sarah M.; Sandberg, Elisabeth Hollister

    2012-01-01

    Previous research demonstrates that patients typically have difficulty remembering information presented during healthcare consultations. This study examined how older adults learn and remember verbally presented medical information. Healthy older adults were tested for recall in experimental and field settings. Participants viewed a five-minute

  7. Volunteerism, Health, and Civic Engagement among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, Benjamin H.; Gillespie, Alayna A.

    2008-01-01

    In North America, 40-50 per cent of older adults are actively involved as formal volunteers in providing diverse health and human services. We review empirical studies concerning older adults' motivations for volunteering, as well as the health and morale benefits they derive from this expression of altruism. Knowledge of the exact nature and

  8. Institutional Facilitation in Sustained Volunteering among Older Adult Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Fengyan; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Hong, Songiee

    2009-01-01

    As more nonprofit organizations rely on older adult volunteers to provide services, it is important to retain volunteers for an extended period of time to ensure service quality and the beneficial outcomes of volunteering. Nonprofit organizations are positioned to facilitate older adult volunteers' role performance. Based on an institutional

  9. Observational Learning among Older Adults Living in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Story, Colleen D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate learning by older adults living in nursing homes through observational learning based on Bandura's (1977) social learning theory. This quantitative study investigated if older adults could learn through observation. The nursing homes in the study were located in the midwestern United States. The

  10. The Nature of Subjective Cognitive Complaints of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newson, Rachel S.; Kemps, Eva B.

    2006-01-01

    The current study investigated the nature of subjective cognitive complaints of older adults in relation to a broad array of individual cognitive functions known to decline with age. A 60-item questionnaire was developed to examine: (1) whether older adults experience problems with these cognitive functions (problems with cognition); (2) the

  11. The Family Life Education Needs of Midlife and Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Sharon M.; Morris Michael Lane

    2003-01-01

    Using a life course perspective, reports the findings from a needs assessment for midlife and older adults regarding family life education. A sample of 264 adults aged 50 and older indicated interest in 29 family life education topics. The highest rated topics were nutrition and health, fitness and exercise, and positive aspects of aging.

  12. Older Adults' Comprehension of Transformational and Deactivation Negation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolin, Sara J.

    2015-01-01

    The present research aimed to examine young and older adults' comprehension of negated text to determine the locus of older adults' difficulty in understanding this text construction. Participants were asked to read short passages at their own pace, complete a lexical decision task, and answer a comprehension question about what they had read.…

  13. Medication Adherence in Older Adults: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Elizabeth W.; Rung, Ariane L.; Leon, Kyla A.; Firestein, Catherine; Krousel-Wood, Marie

    2014-01-01

    To effectively address medication adherence and improve cardiovascular health among older adults, a deeper understanding is needed of the barriers that this age group faces and of approaches that would be most effective and feasible for improving adherence. We conducted a focus group study (n = 25) in a diverse population of older adults with…

  14. Self-Report Measure of Psychological Abuse of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Kendon J.; Iris, Madelyn; Ridings, John W.; Langley, Kate; Anetzberger, Georgia J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study tested key psychometric properties of the Older Adult Psychological Abuse Measure (OAPAM), one self-report scale of the Older Adult Mistreatment Assessment (OAMA). Design and Methods: Items and theory were developed in a prior concept mapping study. Subsequently, the measures were administered to 226 substantiated clients by 22…

  15. Health Literacy Programs for Older Adults: A Systematic Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manafo, Elizabeth; Wong, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Older adults make up the fastest growing age group in North America. This has demanded increased attention in supporting the health and well-being of this population and, in particular, the role of health information in promoting the health and well-being of older adults. Increased availability and accessibility of information as well as a greater

  16. Health-Related Variables and Functional Fitness among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkin, Linda D.; Haddock, Bryan L.

    2010-01-01

    This study assesses the functional fitness of a convenient sample of older adults (greater than 70 years), to examine correlations between functional fitness and several other health-related variables and to compare with criterion performance data as established by Rikli and Jones (2001). One hundred and seven community-dwelling older adults with…

  17. Ethical Issues Involving Research Conducted with Homebound Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locher, Julie L.; Bronstein, Janet; Robinson, Caroline O.; Williams, Charlotte; Ritchie, Christine S.

    2006-01-01

    Conducting research in the home setting with homebound older adults presents distinct ethical and practical challenges that require special consideration. This article describes the methodological issues that make studying homebound older adults especially vulnerable to therapeutic misconception and researcher role conflict and offers practical

  18. Changing Students' Stereotypes of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurtele, Sandy K.; Maruyama, LaRae

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that university students tend to hold negative attitudes about older adults. However, there is some evidence to suggest that these ageist attitudes can be challenged and changed through curricular intervention. The current study was designed to determine whether the "Activities of Older Adults" exercise as part of a…

  19. Older Adults: Community College Students of the 1990s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Ford M.

    With a declining pool of youth to draw from, community colleges need to be concerned about what can be done to serve the needs of a burgeoning older adult population. Recent research on the educational needs of older adults reveals that they are interested in: (1) information on such personal business and financial topics as social security

  20. Self-Report Measure of Psychological Abuse of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Kendon J.; Iris, Madelyn; Ridings, John W.; Langley, Kate; Anetzberger, Georgia J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study tested key psychometric properties of the Older Adult Psychological Abuse Measure (OAPAM), one self-report scale of the Older Adult Mistreatment Assessment (OAMA). Design and Methods: Items and theory were developed in a prior concept mapping study. Subsequently, the measures were administered to 226 substantiated clients by 22

  1. Videogames to Promote Physical Activity in Older Adults with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Leutwyler, Heather; Hubbard, Erin M; Vinogradov, Sophia; Dowling, Glenna A

    2012-10-01

    Older adults with schizophrenia need physical activity interventions to improve their physical health. The purpose of this report is to describe the preliminary acceptability of a videogame-based physical activity program using the Kinect for Xbox 360 game system (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) in older adults with schizophrenia. PMID:24761318

  2. An Exploration of Personality Traits in Older Adult Amateur Musicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffman, Don D.

    2007-01-01

    The primary research question for the study was, "Will older adult amateur musicians' personality profiles reflect the traits found in professional musicians?" Participants (N = 58, ages 52 to 79) recruited from a New Horizons Institute "band camp" for older adult amateur musicians completed a musical background questionnaire and the Cattell

  3. Medication Adherence in Older Adults: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Elizabeth W.; Rung, Ariane L.; Leon, Kyla A.; Firestein, Catherine; Krousel-Wood, Marie

    2014-01-01

    To effectively address medication adherence and improve cardiovascular health among older adults, a deeper understanding is needed of the barriers that this age group faces and of approaches that would be most effective and feasible for improving adherence. We conducted a focus group study (n=25) in a diverse population of older adults with

  4. Older Adults and Reading, the Effect of Residential Lifestyles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Martha S.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a study conducted regarding the reading preferences of older adults. Noninstitutionalized older adults tend to read to gain knowledge; those who are institutionalized tend to read primarily to pass time. Suggestions, such as including large-print books, are listed to improve the reading habits of both groups. (CT)

  5. Volunteerism, Health, and Civic Engagement among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, Benjamin H.; Gillespie, Alayna A.

    2008-01-01

    In North America, 40-50 per cent of older adults are actively involved as formal volunteers in providing diverse health and human services. We review empirical studies concerning older adults' motivations for volunteering, as well as the health and morale benefits they derive from this expression of altruism. Knowledge of the exact nature and…

  6. Therapeutic Uses of Music with Older Adults. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clair, Alicia Ann; Memmott, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    In this comprehensively updated second edition, written by Alicia Ann Clair and Jenny Memmott the extraordinary benefits of music therapy for older adults are detailed. "Therapeutic Uses of Music with Older Adults" not only examines these benefits but also clarifies the reasons that music is beneficial. This important book shows both informal and

  7. Health-Related Variables and Functional Fitness among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkin, Linda D.; Haddock, Bryan L.

    2010-01-01

    This study assesses the functional fitness of a convenient sample of older adults (greater than 70 years), to examine correlations between functional fitness and several other health-related variables and to compare with criterion performance data as established by Rikli and Jones (2001). One hundred and seven community-dwelling older adults with

  8. Observational Learning among Older Adults Living in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Story, Colleen D.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate learning by older adults living in nursing homes through observational learning based on Bandura's (1977) social learning theory. This quantitative study investigated if older adults could learn through observation. The nursing homes in the study were located in the midwestern United States. The…

  9. Dare to Dream: New Venture Incubator for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantman, Shira; Gimmon, Eli

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a project that aims to foster active aging through entrepreneurial activities among older adults. The project establishes the feasibility of implementing an intervention program that assimilates the concept and capabilities of entrepreneurship among older adults and supports them while launching new

  10. Changing Students' Stereotypes of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wurtele, Sandy K.; Maruyama, LaRae

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that university students tend to hold negative attitudes about older adults. However, there is some evidence to suggest that these ageist attitudes can be challenged and changed through curricular intervention. The current study was designed to determine whether the "Activities of Older Adults" exercise as part of a

  11. Health Literacy Programs for Older Adults: A Systematic Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manafo, Elizabeth; Wong, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Older adults make up the fastest growing age group in North America. This has demanded increased attention in supporting the health and well-being of this population and, in particular, the role of health information in promoting the health and well-being of older adults. Increased availability and accessibility of information as well as a greater…

  12. Older Adults' Uptake and Adherence to Exercise Classes: Instructors' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hawley-Hague, Helen; Horne, Maria; Skelton, Dawn A; Todd, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Exercise classes provide a range of benefits for older adults, but adherence levels are poor. We know little of instructors' experiences of delivering exercise classes to older adults. Semistructured interviews, informed by the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), were conducted with instructors (n = 19) delivering multicomponent exercise classes to establish their perspectives on older adults' uptake and adherence to exercise classes. Analysis revealed 'barriers' to uptake related to identity, choice/control, cost, and venue, and 'solutions' included providing choice/control, relating exercise to identity, a personal touch, and social support. Barriers to adherence included unrealistic expectations and social influences, and solutions identified were encouraging commitment, creating social cohesion, and an emphasis on achieving outcomes. Older adults' attitudes were an underlying theme, which related to all barriers and solutions. The instructor plays an important, but not isolated, role in older adults' uptake and adherence to classes. Instructors' perspectives help us to further understand how we can design successful exercise classes. PMID:26214265

  13. When does prior knowledge disproportionately benefit older adults' memory?

    PubMed

    Badham, Stephen P; Hay, Mhairi; Foxon, Natasha; Kaur, Kiran; Maylor, Elizabeth A

    2016-05-01

    Material consistent with knowledge/experience is generally more memorable than material inconsistent with knowledge/experience - an effect that can be more extreme in older adults. Four experiments investigated knowledge effects on memory with young and older adults. Memory for familiar and unfamiliar proverbs (Experiment 1) and for common and uncommon scenes (Experiment 2) showed similar knowledge effects across age groups. Memory for person-consistent and person-neutral actions (Experiment 3) showed a greater benefit of prior knowledge in older adults. For cued recall of related and unrelated word pairs (Experiment 4), older adults benefited more from prior knowledge only when it provided uniquely useful additional information beyond the episodic association itself. The current data and literature suggest that prior knowledge has the age-dissociable mnemonic properties of (1) improving memory for the episodes themselves (age invariant), and (2) providing conceptual information about the tasks/stimuli extrinsically to the actual episodic memory (particularly aiding older adults). PMID:26473767

  14. Trends in Kidney Transplant Outcomes in Older Adults Running Header: Kidney Transplant Outcomes in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    McAdams-DeMarco, Mara A.; James, Nathan; Salter, Megan L.; Walston, Jeremy; Segev, Dorry L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Age limits for kidney transplantation (KT) have expanded significantly in recent years, yet outcomes in older recipients remain poorly understood. The goal of this study was to estimate relative mortality and death-censored graft loss by year of KT between 19902011. Design Cohort study. Setting All KT recipients in the United States as reported to the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR). Participants 30,207 KT recipients aged ?65 at the time of transplantation. Measurements Mortality and death-censored graft loss ascertained through center report, linkage to Social Security Death Master File, and linkage to Medicare. Results Older adults currently represent 18.4% of KT recipients, a 5-fold rise from 3.4% in 1990; similar increases were noted for both deceased (5.4-fold) and live donor (9.1-fold) transplants. Current recipients are not only older, but also more likely to be female, African American, have lengthier pre-transplant dialysis, have diabetes or hypertension, and receive marginal kidneys. Mortality for older deceased donor recipients between 20092011 was 57% lower (HR=0.43, 95%CI:0.330.56, P<0.001) than in 19901993; mortality for older live donor recipients was 50% lower (HR=0.50, 95%CI:0.360.68, P<0.001). Death-censored graft loss for older deceased donor recipients between 20092011 was 65% lower (HR=0.35, 95% CI:0.290.42, P<0.001) than in 19901993; death-censored graft loss for older live donor KT recipients was 59% lower (HR=0.41, 95%CI:0.240.70, P<0.001). Conclusion Despite a major increase in number of older adults transplanted, and an expanding window of transplant eligibility, mortality and graft loss have decreased substantially for this recipient population. These trends are important to understand, both for patient counseling as well as transplant referral. PMID:25439325

  15. Screening and evaluation tools for sleep disorders in older adults.

    PubMed

    Luyster, Faith S; Choi, JiYeon; Yeh, Chao-Hsing; Imes, Christopher C; Johansson, Ann E E; Chasens, Eileen R

    2015-11-01

    The negative effects of impaired sleep on physical and mental well-being in older adults have recently been recognized by health care professionals. However, researchers and clinicians may be unaware of reliable and valid screening and evaluation tools for evaluating sleep disorders in older adults. The purpose of this article is to present subjective and objective instruments that measure sleep quality, excessive daytime sleepiness, obstructive sleep apnea, insomnia and restless leg syndrome that are appropriate for use in adult and older adult patients. PMID:26608435

  16. Project Roadmap: Reeducating Older Adults in Maintaining AIDS Prevention--A Secondary Intervention for Older HIV-Positive Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illa, Lourdes; Echenique, Marisa; Saint Jean, Gilbert; Bustamante-Avellaneda, Victoria; Metsch, Lisa; Mendez-Mulet, Luis; Eisdorfer, Carl; Sanchez-Martinez, Mario

    2010-01-01

    The number of older adults living with HIV/AIDS is larger than ever. Little is known about their sexual behaviors, although contrary to stereotypes, older adults desire and engage in sexual activity. Despite increased recognition of the need for prevention interventions targeting HIV-positive individuals, no secondary HIV prevention interventions

  17. Freirean Philosophy and Pedagogy in the Adult Education Context: The Case of Older Adults' Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findsen, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Central tenets of Freirean philosophy and pedagogy are explored and applied to the emerging field of older adults' learning (educational gerontology), a sub-field of adult education. I argue that many of Freire's concepts and principles have direct applicability to the tasks of adult educators working alongside marginalized older adults. In…

  18. Freirean Philosophy and Pedagogy in the Adult Education Context: The Case of Older Adults' Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findsen, Brian

    2007-01-01

    Central tenets of Freirean philosophy and pedagogy are explored and applied to the emerging field of older adults' learning (educational gerontology), a sub-field of adult education. I argue that many of Freire's concepts and principles have direct applicability to the tasks of adult educators working alongside marginalized older adults. In

  19. Conceptual processing of distractors by older but not younger adults.

    PubMed

    Amer, Tarek; Hasher, Lynn

    2014-12-01

    Evidence from perceptually based implicit memory tasks demonstrates greater priming from distracting information among older compared with younger adults. We examined whether older adults also show greater conceptually based implicit priming from distracting information. We measured priming using a general-knowledge test that was preceded by an incidental-encoding task (a color-naming Stroop task in one experiment and a 1-back task involving pictures with irrelevant words superimposed in a second experiment). Younger adults showed no priming from the distracting information in either experiment, whereas older adults showed reliable priming in both experiments. Thus, unlike young adults, older adults process irrelevant information conceptually and then can use that information to boost their performance on a subsequent task. PMID:25376192

  20. Driving patterns in older adults with glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability to drive is important for ensuring quality of life for many older adults. Glaucoma is prevalent in this age group and may affect driving. The purpose of this study is to determine if glaucoma and glaucomatous visual field (VF) loss are associated with driving cessation, limitations, and deference to another driver in older adults. Methods Cross-sectional study. Eighty-one glaucoma subjects and 58 glaucoma suspect controls between age 60 and 80 reported if they had ceased driving, limited their driving in various ways, or preferred another to drive. Results Twenty-three percent of glaucoma subjects and 6.9% of suspects had ceased driving (p = 0.01). Glaucoma subjects also had more driving limitations than suspects (2.0 vs. 1.1, p = 0.007). In multivariable models, driving cessation was more likely for glaucoma subjects as compared to suspects (OR = 4.0; 95% CI = 1.1-14.7; p = 0.03). The odds of driving cessation doubled with each 5 decibel (dB) decrement in the better-eye VF mean deviation (MD) (OR = 2.0; 95% CI = 1.4-2.9; p < 0.001). Glaucoma subjects were also more likely than suspects to report a greater number of driving limitations (OR = 4.7; 95% CI = 1.3-16.8; p = 0.02). The likelihood of reporting more limitations increased with the VF loss severity (OR = 1.6 per 5 dB decrement in the better-eye VF MD; 95% CI = 1.1-2.4; p = 0.02). Neither glaucoma nor VF MD was associated with other driver preference (p > 0.1 for both). Conclusions Glaucoma and glaucomatous VF loss are associated with greater likelihood of driving cessation and greater limitation of driving in the elderly. Further prospective study is merited to assess when and why people with glaucoma change their driving habits, and to determine if their observed self-regulation of driving is adequate to ensure safety. PMID:23432845

  1. Older Adults Make Less Advantageous Decisions than Younger Adults: Cognitive and Psychological Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Fein, George; McGillivray, Shannon; Finn, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This study tested the hypotheses that older adults make less advantageous decisions than younger adults on the Iowa gambling task (IGT). Less advantageous decisions, as measured by the IGT, are characterized by choices that favor larger versus smaller immediate rewards, even though such choices may result in long-term negative consequences. The IGT, and measures of neuropsychological function, personality, and psychopathology were administered to 164 healthy adults 18–85 years of age. Older adults performed less advantageously on the IGT compared with younger adults. Additionally, a greater number of older adult’s IGT performances were classified as ‘impaired’ when compared to younger adults. Less advantageous decisions were associated with obsessive symptoms in older adults and with antisocial symptoms in younger adults. Performance on the IGT was positively associated with auditory working memory and psychomotor function in young adults, and in immediate memory in older adults. PMID:17445297

  2. The thermic effect of food is reduced in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Du, Shichun; Rajjo, Tamim; Santosa, Sylvia; Jensen, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The thermic effect of food accounts for ~ 10% of daily energy expenditure. A reduction in the thermic effect of food, which has been variably observed in the older adults, could predispose to fat gain. We tested whether the thermic effect of food is reduced in older adults compared with young adults by analyzing our database of standardized studies conducted at the Mayo Clinic between 1999 and 2009. Methods Data was available from 136 older adults volunteers age 60 to 88 (56 females) and 141 young adults ages 18 to 35 years (67 female). Basal energy expenditure was measured by indirect calorimetry to assess basal metabolic rate. Body fat, fat free mass and visceral fat were measured using a combination of dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and an abdominal CT scan. We measured the thermic effect of food and postprandial insulinemia in 123 older adults (52 female) and 86 young (38 female) of these volunteers. Results Basal metabolic rate adjusted for fat free mass was less in older adults (P = 0.01) and the thermic effect of food was ~ 1% (P = 0.02) less in the older adults. After controlling for meal size and fat free mass, body fat and fat distribution did not predict the thermic effect of food. Conclusions Both basal metabolic rate and the thermic effect of food are less in older adults than young adults, even when they have similar amounts of lean tissue and consume a similar size meal. These factors contribute to lower daily energy expenditure in the older adults. PMID:24155251

  3. Weighty concerns: the growing prevalence of obesity among older adults.

    PubMed

    Houston, Denise K; Nicklas, Barbara J; Zizza, Claire A

    2009-11-01

    The prevalence of obesity among older adults has increased during the past 20 years and will affect both medical and social services. Along with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and several cancers, obesity is associated with increased risk of physical and cognitive disability. However, relatively little attention has been given to the issue of weight management among community-dwelling older adults. Intentional weight loss in obese older adults has not been widely advocated by health care providers due to the uncertainty of whether the benefits outweigh the risks. Limited data in older adults show that intentional weight loss is effective in improving diabetes, cardiovascular risk factors, and physical function. This review describes the changes in body composition associated with aging, the consequences of obesity in older adults, and the effect of intentional weight loss on chronic disease risk factors and physical function. Recommendations for weight loss in obese older adults that minimize the likelihood of adverse effects on muscle mass, bone density, or other aspects of nutritional status are reviewed. Specific recommendations for macronutrient intake, in particular protein, and selected micronutrients, vitamin D and B-12, as well as dietary fiber, and fluid intake as part of a hypocaloric diet and recommendations for physical activity are described. As part of the health professionals team, dietetics practitioners need to be able to guide and manage weight loss treatment options on an individual basis by evaluating the potential benefits against the potential risks in obese older adults. PMID:19857630

  4. Palliative care for the older adult.

    PubMed

    Kapo, Jennifer; Morrison, Laura J; Liao, Solomon

    2007-02-01

    The majority of deaths in the United States occur in the geriatric population. These older adults often develop multiple chronic medical problems and endure complicated medical courses with a variety of disease trajectories. Palliative care physicians need to be skilled in addressing the needs of these frail elders with life-limiting illness as they approach the end of life. Although geriatrics and palliative medicine share much in common, including an emphasis on optimizing quality of life and function, geriatric palliative care is distinct in its focus on the geriatric syndromes and on the provision of care in a variety of long-term care settings. Expertise in the diagnosis and management of the geriatric syndromes and in the complexities of long-term care settings is essential to providing high-quality palliative care to the elderly patient. This paper is a practical review of common geriatric syndromes, including dementia, delirium, urinary incontinence, and falls, with an emphasis on how they may be encountered in the palliative care setting. It also highlights important issues regarding the provision of palliative care in different long-term care settings. PMID:17298269

  5. Management of Constipation in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Mounsey, Anne; Raleigh, Meghan; Wilson, Anthony

    2015-09-15

    Chronic constipation is common in adults older than 60 years, and symptoms occur in up to 50% of nursing home residents. Primary constipation is also referred to as functional constipation. Secondary constipation is associated with chronic disease processes, medication use, and psychosocial issues. Fecal impaction should be treated with mineral oil or warm water enemas. Most patients are initially treated with lifestyle modifications, such as scheduled toileting after meals, increased fluid intake, and increased dietary fiber intake. Additional fiber intake in the form of polycarbophil, methylcellulose, or psyllium may improve symptoms. Fiber intake should be slowly increased over several weeks to decrease adverse effects. The next step in the treatment of constipation is the use of an osmotic laxative, such as polyethylene glycol, followed by a stool softener, such as docusate sodium, and then stimulant laxatives. Long-term use of magnesium-based laxatives should be avoided because of potential toxicity. If symptoms do not improve, a trial of linaclotide or lubiprostone may be appropriate, or the patient may be referred for further diagnostic evaluation. Peripherally acting mu-opioid antagonists are effective for opioid-induced constipation but are expensive. PMID:26371734

  6. Hypoglycemia: A Serious Complication for the Older Adult with Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ballin, Mary C

    2016-02-01

    Hypoglycemic events range from mild to severe and occur at an increased rate among older adults with diabetes. Some diabetes medications increase the risk of hypoglycemia, as can inadequate nutrition, cognitive impairment, and other factors. While hypoglycemia can often be easily treated, the physi-ologic, sensory, and cognitive changes of aging can inhibit bodily mechanisms that produce warning symptoms of low blood glucose and impair the ability to recognize such symptoms when they occur. Severe hypoglycemic events in older adults can have devastating consequences. Nurses are well positioned to assess for hypoglycemia and to educate the growing population of older adults with type 2 diabetes on its prevention. PMID:26771666

  7. Suicide in Older Adults: The Role of Emotions and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Szanto, Katalin; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2014-01-01

    Suicide in older adults is a significant clinical concern. In this review of recent findings, we concentrate on the role of emotions and cognition in suicide risk and behavior in older adults. We discuss the epidemiology of suicide in older adults, integrate recent findings on non-psychotic major depression, schizophrenia and suicidal ideation, explore the relationship of emotion regulation with suicide, present recent advances on suicide in demented patients, and describe the latest developments on cognition and decision processes in suicide. PMID:25226883

  8. Priorities for Action in a Rural Older Adults Study

    PubMed Central

    Averill, Jennifer B.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the findings from a recent study of older adults in the rural southwestern United States and discusses practice and research implications. The aim of the study was to analyze health disparities and strengths in the contexts of rurality, aging, a depressed economy, and limited health resources. Identified themes needing action included sustained access to prescriptions, transportation solutions for older adults in isolated communities, inadequate access to care, poor infrastructure and coordination of services, scarce assisted living and in-home care for frail older adults, and barriers related to culture, language, and economics. PMID:22929381

  9. Pain in older adults living in sheltered accommodation--agreement between assessments by older adults and staff.

    PubMed

    Blomqvist, K; Hallberg, I R

    1999-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the presence of pain, pain duration, localization(s), intensity, type and pharmacological treatment among older adults living in sheltered accommodation or receiving rehabilitation, as well as the agreement between pain assessments performed by staff and the older adults. Twenty-nine randomly selected older adults (65+ years) and the staff who looked after them participated in a structured interview based on standardized measures for pain assessment and physical, intellectual and communicative functions. Pain was found to be common, with a majority of participants experiencing it every day or all of the time. Nine out of 22 of the older adults in pain had no pain relief drugs at all. Agreement between assessments by the older adults and the staff was no higher than moderate and in general pain levels were underestimated. The findings indicate that older adults were at risk of undetected and untreated pain and the risk was even higher for those with speech difficulties. The provision of good nursing care for older adults in sheltered accommodation requires systematic routines for frequent pain assessments. PMID:10401349

  10. Connecting Socially Isolated Older Rural Adults with Older Volunteers through Expressive Arts.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Ann; Skinner, Mark W; Wilkinson, Fay; Reid, Heather

    2016-03-01

    Employing a participatory arts-based research approach, we examined an innovative program from rural Ontario, Canada, designed to address social isolation among older people. Older socially isolated adults were matched to trained volunteers, where in dyads, the eight pairs created expressive art in their home setting over the course of 10 home visits. With thematic and narrative inquiry, we analysed the experiences and perceptions of the program leader, older participants, and older volunteers via their artistic creations, weekly logs, evaluations, and field notes. The findings reveal a successful intervention that positively influenced the well-being of older adult participants and older volunteers, especially in regards to relationships, personal development, and creating meaning as well as extending the intervention's impact beyond the program's duration. We also discuss opportunities for similar programs to inform policy and enable positive community-based health and social service responses to rural social isolation. PMID:26934547

  11. Older adults can improve compensatory stepping with repeated postural perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Dijkstra, Bauke W.; Horak, Fay B.; Kamsma, Yvo P. T.; Peterson, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to respond quickly and accurately to an external perturbation with a stepping response is critical to avoid falls and this ability is impaired in older, compared to young adults. However, little is known about whether young and older adults improve compensatory stepping responses similarly with practice. This study compares the extent to which young and older adults can improve, retain, and generalize postural compensatory steps in response to external perturbations. Centre of mass displacement, step characteristics and lower leg muscle activation latencies were measured during one training session of compensatory stepping in response to large surface translations in 13 young and 12 older adults. Retention was tested 24 h later. Older adults decreased their center of mass displacements over repeated exposure to large surface translations in both the anterior and posterior directions and retained these improvements. In contrast, young adults only showed adaptation and retention of forward stepping responses. Neither group was able to generalize improvements in stepping responses across directions. These results suggest step training may be beneficial for older adults, however additional, multidirectional training may be necessary to facilitate generalization of postural stepping responses for any direction of a slip or trip. PMID:26539111

  12. Gun Access and Safety Practices among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Hillary D.; Flaten, Hanna K.; Betz, Marian E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Given high rates of gun ownership among older adults, geriatric providers can assess firearm safety practices using a “5 Ls” approach: Locked; Loaded; Little children; feeling Low; and Learned owner. This study describes gun access and the “5 Ls” among US older adults. Methods. Data on the “5 Ls” from the Second Injury Control and Risk Survey (ICARIS-2), a national telephone survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, were analyzed. Weighted variables were used to generate national estimates regarding prevalence of gun ownership and associated gun safety among older adults (≥55 years). Results. Of 2939 older adults, 39% (95% CI 37%–42%) reported ≥1 gun stored at home. Among those with guns at home, 21% (95% CI 18–24%) stored guns loaded and unlocked; 9.2% (95% CI 6.6–12%) had ≥1 child in household; 5.1% (95% CI 3.5–6.8%) reported past-year suicidal ideation and 3.6% (95% CI 2.1–5.2%) reported history of a suicide attempt; and 55% (95% CI 51–59%) stated that ≥1 adult had attended firearm safety workshop. Conclusion. Some older adults may be at elevated risk of firearm injury because of storage practices, suicidal thoughts, or limited safety training. Future work should assess effective approaches to reduce the risk of gun-related injuries among older adults.

  13. Gun Access and Safety Practices among Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Lum, Hillary D; Flaten, Hanna K; Betz, Marian E

    2016-01-01

    Background. Given high rates of gun ownership among older adults, geriatric providers can assess firearm safety practices using a "5 Ls" approach: Locked; Loaded; Little children; feeling Low; and Learned owner. This study describes gun access and the "5 Ls" among US older adults. Methods. Data on the "5 Ls" from the Second Injury Control and Risk Survey (ICARIS-2), a national telephone survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, were analyzed. Weighted variables were used to generate national estimates regarding prevalence of gun ownership and associated gun safety among older adults (≥55 years). Results. Of 2939 older adults, 39% (95% CI 37%-42%) reported ≥1 gun stored at home. Among those with guns at home, 21% (95% CI 18-24%) stored guns loaded and unlocked; 9.2% (95% CI 6.6-12%) had ≥1 child in household; 5.1% (95% CI 3.5-6.8%) reported past-year suicidal ideation and 3.6% (95% CI 2.1-5.2%) reported history of a suicide attempt; and 55% (95% CI 51-59%) stated that ≥1 adult had attended firearm safety workshop. Conclusion. Some older adults may be at elevated risk of firearm injury because of storage practices, suicidal thoughts, or limited safety training. Future work should assess effective approaches to reduce the risk of gun-related injuries among older adults. PMID:26949391

  14. The assessment of frailty in older adults.

    PubMed

    Abellan van Kan, Gabor; Rolland, Yves; Houles, Mathieu; Gillette-Guyonnet, Sophie; Soto, Maria; Vellas, Bruno

    2010-05-01

    No clear consensual definition regarding frailty seems to emerge from the literature after 30 years of research in the topic, and a large array of models and criteria has been proposed to define the syndrome. Controversy continues to exist on the choice of the components to be included in the frailty definition. Two main definitions based on clusters of components are found in literature: a physical phenotype of frailty, operationalized in 2001 by providing a list of 5 measurable items of functional impairments, which coexists with a multidomain phenotype, based on a frailty index constructed on the accumulation of identified deficits based on comprehensive geriatric assessment. The physical phenotype considers disability and comorbidities such as dementia as distinct entities and therefore outcomes of the frailty syndrome, whereas comorbidity and disability can be components of the multidomain phenotype. Expanded models of physical frailty (models that included clusters other than the original 5 items such as dementia) increased considerably the predicting capacity of poor clinical outcomes when compared with the predictive capacity of the physical phenotype. The unresolved controversy of the components shapes the clusters of original frailty syndrome, and the components depend very much on how frailty is defined. This update also highlights the growing evidence on gait speed to be considered as a single-item frailty screening tool. The evaluation of gait speed over a short distance emerges from the literature as a tool with the capacity to identify frail older adults, and slow gait speed has been proven to be a strong predictor for frailty-adverse outcomes. PMID:20497846

  15. Older Adults Expend More Listening Effort than Young Adults Recognizing Speech in Noise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosselin, Penny Anderson; Gagne, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Listening in noisy situations is a challenging experience for many older adults. The authors hypothesized that older adults exert more listening effort compared with young adults. Listening effort involves the attention and cognitive resources required to understand speech. The purpose was (a) to quantify the amount of listening effort

  16. The Relationship Between Expectations for Aging and Physical Activity Among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sarkisian, Catherine A; Prohaska, Thomas R; Wong, Mitchell D; Hirsch, Susan; Mangione, Carol M

    2005-01-01

    Background New strategies to increase physical activity among sedentary older adults are urgently needed. Objective To examine whether low expectations regarding aging (age-expectations) are associated with low physical activity levels among older adults. Design Cross-sectional survey. Participants Six hundred and thirty-six English- and Spanish-speaking adults aged 65 years and above attending 14 community-based senior centers in the Los Angeles region. Over 44% were non-Latino whites, 15% were African American, and 36% were Latino. The mean age was 77 years (range 65 to 100). Measurements Self-administered written surveys including previously tested measures of age-expectations and physical activity level in the previous week. Results Over 38% of participants reported <30 minutes of moderate-vigorous physical activity in the previous week. Older adults with lower age-expectations were more likely to report this very low level of physical activity than those with high age-expectations, even after controlling for the independent effect of age, sex, ethnicity, level of education, physical and mental healthrelated quality of life, comorbidity, activities of daily living impairment, depressive symptoms, self-efficacy, survey language, and clustering at the senior center. Compared with the quintile of participants having the highest age-expectations, participants with the lowest quintile of age-expectations had an adjusted odds ratio of 2.6 (95% confidence intervals: 1.5, 4.5) of reporting <30 minutes of moderate-vigorous physical activity in the previous week. Conclusions In this diverse sample of older adults recruited from senior centers, low age-expectations are independently associated with very low levels of physical activity. Harboring low age-expectations may act as a barrier to physical activity among sedentary older adults. PMID:16191137

  17. Falls among Older Adults: Public Health Impact and Prevention Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Judy A.

    2003-01-01

    Provides an overview of the epidemiology of falls among older adults, describes current prevention strategies, and highlights key areas that need to be addressed, including risk assessments, exercise, and environmental changes. (Contains 50 references.) (JOW)

  18. Exercises for Older Adults, Using Free and Inexpensive Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbin, David E.; Metal-Corbin, Josie

    1986-01-01

    This article illustrates how old bicycle inner tubes, wire coat hangers, stockings, panty hose, and milk dispenser bladders can be used as part of an exercise program for older adults. Specific exercises and activities are suggested. (MT)

  19. Hydrate for health: listening to older adults' need for information.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Mary H; Marquez, Celine S; Kline, Katherine V; Morris, Erin; Linares, Brenda; Carlson, Barbara W

    2014-10-01

    An interdisciplinary team of faculty and students developed the Hydrate for Health project to provide relevant and evidence-based information to community-dwelling older adults. Evidence-based factsheets on bladder health, nighttime urination, medication safety, and physical activity/exercise, as well as a fluid intake self-monitoring tool, were developed. Four focus groups were conducted and included older adults (N = 21) who participated in activities at two local senior centers to obtain their feedback about the relevance of the factsheets. Extensive revisions were required based on the feedback received. Older adults expressed a desire for pragmatic information (i.e., how to determine fluid sources from food, how to measure water, how to determine their own fluid needs). They also wanted information that could be easily incorporated into daily life. Nurses play a central role in listening to and incorporating older adults' voices into consumer education materials. PMID:25275782

  20. Medication Adherence in Older Adults: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Elizabeth W .; Rung, Ariane L.; Leon, Kyla A.; Firestein, Catherine; Krousel-Wood, Marie A.

    2014-01-01

    To effectively address medication adherence and improve cardiovascular health among older adults, a deeper understanding is needed of the barriers that this age group faces and approaches that would be most effective and feasible for improving adherence. We conducted a focus group study (n=25) in a diverse population of older adults with hypertension recruited from the Cohort Study of Medication Adherence in Older Adults (CoSMO). A structured guide was used to collect feedback on barriers to adherence and acceptability and feasibility of intervention strategies. The final coding framework outlines factors at the individual, relationship, health care system, and environmental or policy level which affect adherence in older adults, including memory, knowledge, attitudes and beliefs, side effects, social support, interaction with health care providers, and cost and convenience of medication filling. Patient responses highlighted the varied nature of barriers and the need for interventions which are both multi-faceted and tailored. PMID:25214707

  1. Antimnemonic effects of schemas in young and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Badham, Stephen P.; Maylor, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Schema-consistent material that is aligned with an individual’s knowledge and experience is typically more memorable than abstract material. This effect is often more extreme in older adults and schema use can alleviate age deficits in memory. In three experiments, young and older adults completed memory tasks where the availability of schematic information was manipulated. Specifying nonobvious relations between to-be-remembered word pairs paradoxically hindered memory (Experiment 1). Highlighting relations within mixed lists of related and unrelated word pairs had no effect on memory for those pairs (Experiment 2). This occurred even though related word pairs were recalled better than unrelated word pairs, particularly for older adults. Revealing a schematic context in a memory task with abstract image segments also hindered memory performance, particularly for older adults (Experiment 3). The data show that processing schematic information can come with costs that offset mnemonic benefits associated with schema-consistent stimuli. PMID:25980799

  2. Medicines and You: A Guide for Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Tobacco Products Drugs Home Drugs Resources for You Medicines and You: A Guide for Older Adults Share ... What You Need to Know About Your Prescription Medicines The following questions will help you get the ...

  3. 'Mindfulness' Might Help Older Adults with Back Pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 157420.html 'Mindfulness' Might Help Older Adults With Back Pain Mind-body program was also linked with short- ... pain relief to seniors suffering from chronic lower back pain, new research suggests. The study involved nearly 300 ...

  4. Quick Guide to Health Literacy and Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Quick Guide to Health Literacy and Older Adults skip to content ODPHP Health Communication Healthy People 2010 Health Communication Focus Area Health Literacy Improvement Consumer and Patient e-Health Resources Health ...

  5. Medication Management Assessment for Older Adults in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orwig, Denise; Brandt, Nicole; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe the Medication Management Instrument for Deficiencies in the Elderly (MedMaIDE) and to provide results of reliability and validity testing. Design and Methods: Participants were 50 older adults, aged 65 and older, who lived in the community, took at least one prescription medication, and were then

  6. EVALUATING RISK IN OLDER ADULTS USING PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rapid growth in the number of older Americans has many implications for public health, including the need to better understand the risks posed by environmental exposures to older adults. An important element for evaluating risk is the understanding of the doses of environment...

  7. Older Adults and Alcohol: You Can Get Help

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Use In Older People Falls and Fractures Understanding Alzheimer's Disease: What You Need to Know Also of Interest Alcohol Use and Older Adults - NIHSeniorHealth Prescription and Illicit Drug Abuse - NIHSeniorHealth PDF (278.9 ... Connect with NIH Disclaimer Accessibility ...

  8. Reasons for Living and Coping Abilities among Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Range, Lillian M.; Stringer, Traci A.

    1996-01-01

    In this study, 79 older adults completed the Reasons for Living and the Cope inventories. Overall coping was significantly correlated with total reasons for living, although the low correlation suggests the constructs were moderately unique. Found older women may underrate their ability to cope. Implies suicide prevention strategies should target

  9. Lifetime Trauma, Emotional Support, and Life Satisfaction among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, Neal

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships among lifetime exposure to traumatic events, emotional support, and life satisfaction in three cohorts of older adults. Design and Methods: Face-to-face interviews were conducted with a nationwide sample of 1,518 older people in 2003. Approximately 500 elders were interviewed in…

  10. A Comparison of Cohabiting Relationships among Older and Younger Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Valarie; Scott, Mindy E.

    2005-01-01

    This study explores how cohabitation differs for older and younger adults, drawing on data from 966 cohabitors in each of the first 2 waves of the National Survey of Families and Households. Older cohabitors report significantly higher levels of relationship quality and stability than younger cohabitors, although they are less likely to have plans

  11. The Susceptibility of Older Adults to Environmental Hazards

    EPA Science Inventory

    This rapid growth in the number of older Americans has many implications for public health, including the need to better understand the health risks posed by environmental exposures to older adults. This paper describes the need to link environmental exposures, the processing of...

  12. Operant Conditioning in Older Adults with Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spira, Adam P.; Edelstein, Barry A.

    2007-01-01

    Behavioral interventions based on operant principles are commonly attempted to manage agitation in older adults with dementia. The extent to which operant conditioning can occur in persons with particular dementias, however, is unclear. The present study involved use of a button-pressing task to evaluate the sensitivity of the responding of older

  13. Listeriosis Prevention for Older Adults: Effective Messages and Delivery Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cates, Sheryl C.; Kosa, Katherine M.; Moore, Christina M.; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; Ten Eyck, Toby A.; Cowen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Individuals aged 60 years and older are at an increased risk for listeriosis and other foodborne illnesses. They can reduce their risk by following recommended food safety practices. A total of 8 focus groups were conducted to characterize older adults' food safety knowledge and practices, their impressions of educational materials on listeriosis

  14. Listeriosis Prevention for Older Adults: Effective Messages and Delivery Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cates, Sheryl C.; Kosa, Katherine M.; Moore, Christina M.; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; Ten Eyck, Toby A.; Cowen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Individuals aged 60 years and older are at an increased risk for listeriosis and other foodborne illnesses. They can reduce their risk by following recommended food safety practices. A total of 8 focus groups were conducted to characterize older adults' food safety knowledge and practices, their impressions of educational materials on listeriosis…

  15. Lexical Attrition in Younger and Older Bilingual Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goral, Mira; Libben, Gary; Obler, Loraine K.; Jarema, Gonia; Ohayon, Keren

    2008-01-01

    Healthy monolingual older adults experience changes in their lexical abilities. Bilingual individuals immersed in an environment in which their second language is dominant experience lexical changes, or attrition, in their first language. Changes in lexical skills in the first language of older individuals who are bilinguals, therefore, can be

  16. Older Adults: Work-Related Issues and Implications for Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewington, Janice O.; Nassar-McMillan, Sylvia

    2000-01-01

    In a period of business downsizing, older workers are at risk for unemployment. Finding a suitable replacement job is difficult and can lead to emotional and financial distress. Counselors need to be aware of the work-related issues facing older adults and understand the suitable interventions that will help them make smoother career and life…

  17. Employment and Older Adults. Overview: ERIC Fact Sheet No. 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaudin, Bart

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the employment situation facing older adults. Statistics (Harris 1974 and 1979) are presented on the number of older Americans who are working, volunteering, or have an interest in working or volunteering; the attitudes of employers and employees about retirement and about working after age 65; and the

  18. Extended Workforce Participation of Older Adults: Issues and Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Laura M.

    Demographic, social, and economic trends are pointing in the direction of increased work force participation for older adults. The four major forces responsible for change in work patterns are the changing work force, changing older people, economic forces, and social forces. These forces are mediated by social convention, especially the

  19. Diet quality and older adults special considerations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The demographic shift occurring in both developed and developing countries is towards an older population. For example, the U.S. population over the age of 65 years grew from 3.1 million in 1900 to 35.0 million in 2000. During that same time period individuals aged 85 years and older increased by ...

  20. Perspectives on Wellness Self-Monitoring Tools for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jina; Le, Thai; Reeder, Blaine; Thompson, Hilaire J.; Demiris, George

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Our purpose was to understand different stakeholder perceptions about the use of self-monitoring tools, specifically in the area of older adults’ personal wellness. In conjunction with the advent of personal health records, tracking personal health using self-monitoring technologies shows promising patient support opportunities. While clinicians’ tools for monitoring of older adults have been explored, we know little about how older adults may self-monitor their wellness and health and how their health care providers would perceive such use. Methods We conducted three focus groups with health care providers (n=10) and four focus groups with community-dwelling older adults (n=31). Results Older adult participants’ found the concept of self-monitoring unfamiliar and this influenced a narrowed interest in the use of wellness self-monitoring tools. On the other hand, health care provider participants showed open attitudes towards wellness monitoring tools for older adults and brainstormed about various stakeholders’ use cases. The two participant groups showed diverging perceptions in terms of: perceived uses, stakeholder interests, information ownership and control, and sharing of wellness monitoring tools. Conclusions Our paper provides implications and solutions for how older adults’ wellness self-monitoring tools can enhance patient-health care provider interaction, patient education, and improvement in overall wellness. PMID:24041452

  1. Assessment and measurement of pain in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Keela A.; Garand, Linda

    2011-01-01

    Although the empirical base is still limited when providing clear directions for pain assessment and management in older adults, it is possible to identify recommendations for guiding practice based on consensus and a developing scientific base to support best practice activities. This article offers a brief overview of the epidemiology and consequences of pain, followed by a summary of issues and approaches relevant to pain assessment in older adults. Cohort specific recommendations for comprehensive pain assessment and measurement are then addressed. PMID:11459715

  2. Older adults' pain communication: the effect of interruption.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Deborah Dillon; Fedo, John

    2009-09-01

    The effect of interrupting older adults as they talk about their osteoarthritis pain was examined in a secondary analysis using a nonrandomized two-group design. Participants were part of a study in which older adults orally responded to a series of three pain questions asked by a videotaped practitioner presented on a computer screen. The initial 96 participants were given visual and auditory cues to touch the computer screen to continue to the next question. The remaining 216 participants received only the visual cue after the auditory cue was noted to interrupt participant responses. Older adults' pain communication was audiotaped, transcribed, and content analyzed using 16 a priori criteria from the American Pain Society's (2002)Guidelines for the Management of Pain in Osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Juvenile Chronic Arthritis. Older adults in the uninterrupted group responded with significantly more pain information, M=6.3 (SD=3.69), than the interrupted group, M=5.3 (SD=3.22); F(1,300)=4.49, p=.04, chi(2)=0.004. Adjusting for sample size differences, older adults in the interrupted group described 56% less information about the source of their pain, 41% less about the quality of their pain, 29% less about their pain treatments, 24% less about the timing of their pain, and 15% less about their pain intensity. The brief, innocuous interruption diminished the amount of important pain information communicated by the older adults. Deliberate interruptions by practitioners might further reduce communication of important pain information. PMID:19706352

  3. Health maintenance in older adults: combining evidence and individual preferences.

    PubMed

    Gestuvo, Maria Kristina

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing interest in maintaining health and delaying disability for older adults as this population segment expands. And instead of focusing on a traditional disease-specific approach to health maintenance, there is an ongoing shift to a patient-centered approach, and defining outcomes based on the older adults' goals. In this approach, their goals and preferences are central, and other factors such as their health status and prognosis help determine which goals may be realistic. These subjective goals and objective characteristics are then balanced with the risks, benefits, and harms of established evidence-driven health-maintenance recommendations. Hence, older adults share their goals and preferences with clinicians; while clinicians share information on risks, benefits, harms, and uncertainties of existing health-maintenance recommendations, and help guide the older adult through how existing evidence can respond to their health goals and preferences. In this article, the concept of patient-centered care in the context of health maintenance for older adults is discussed; and health maintenance recommendations for older adults are reviewed. PMID:22976362

  4. Emotional Stroop Performance in Older Adults: Effects of Habitual Worry

    PubMed Central

    Price, Rebecca B.; Siegle, Greg; Mohlman, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Objective In clinically anxious individuals, selective attention to negative cues in the environment may perpetuate a vicious cycle of emotional dysfunction. However, very little is known regarding the role of negative attentional bias in anxious older adults. There is evidence that in older adults without clinical anxiety, the opposite bias (toward positive, and away from negative, emotional material) is present. We explored how these age-related changes in emotional processing interact with anxiety. Method Sixty older adults (age 60+) completed the emotional Stroop (eStroop) task, a widely used measure of attentional bias which requires rapid identification of the color in which neutral and emotional words are printed. Participants were stratified into high-, mid-, and low-worry groups on the basis of a self-report measure, the Penn State Worry Questionnaire. Results The high-worry group exhibited a bias towards threat-related words, while the low- and mid-worry groups showed a bias away from threat-related words. By contrast, the low- and mid-worry groups showed a bias towards positive words, potentially consistent with an established positivity effect in older adults; while the high-worry group showed a bias away from positive items. Conclusion Older adults who worry frequently exhibit a pattern of eStroop performance that is broadly consistent with the younger adult literature, suggesting that selective attention towards threat-related information may be seen as a relevant factor in older, as in younger, anxiety. PMID:21941169

  5. Shared conceptualizations and divergent experiences of counseling among African American and white older adults.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jin Hui; Wittink, Marsha; Dahlberg, Britt

    2011-08-01

    Research findings suggest that older adults prefer counseling for depression treatment; however, few older adults use counseling services. In this article we present the results of our analysis of semistructured interviews with 102 older adults to explore conceptualizations of counseling and impediments to use among African American and White older adults. We found that older adults believe counseling is beneficial; however, use was hindered in multiple ways. Older adults were skeptical about establishing a caring relationship with a professional. African American older adults did not mention social relationships to facilitate depression care, whereas White older adults described using personal relationships to navigate counseling services. African American older men were least familiar with counseling. Our findings suggest that African American and White older adults share a strong cultural model of counseling as beneficial; however, significant impediments exist and affect older adults differentially based on ethnicity. PMID:21464469

  6. Reverse correlating trustworthy faces in young and older adults

    PubMed Central

    thier-Majcher, Catherine; Joubert, Sven; Gosselin, Frdric

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about how older persons determine if someone deserves their trust or not based on their facial appearance, a process referred to as facial trustworthiness.In the past few years, Todorov and colleagues have argued that, in young adults, trustworthiness judgments are an extension of emotional judgments, and therefore, that trust judgments are made based on a continuum between anger and happiness (Todorov, 2008; Engell et al., 2010). Evidence from the literature on emotion processing suggest that older adults tend to be less efficient than younger adults in the recognition of negative facial expressions (Calder et al., 2003; Firestone et al., 2007; Ruffman et al., 2008; Chaby and Narme, 2009). Based on Todorov';s theory and the fact that older adults seem to be less efficient than younger adults in identifying emotional expressions, one could expect that older individuals would have different representations of trustworthy faces and that they would use different cues than younger adults in order to make such judgments. We verified this hypothesis using a variation of Mangini and Biederman's (2004) reverse correlation method in order to test and compare classification images resulting from trustworthiness (in the context of money investment), from happiness, and from anger judgments in two groups of participants: young adults and older healthy adults. Our results show that for elderly participants, both happy and angry representations are correlated with trustworthiness judgments. However, in young adults, trustworthiness judgments are mainly correlated with happiness representations. These results suggest that young and older adults differ in their way of judging trustworthiness. PMID:24046755

  7. Reverse correlating trustworthy faces in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Ethier-Majcher, Catherine; Joubert, Sven; Gosselin, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about how older persons determine if someone deserves their trust or not based on their facial appearance, a process referred to as "facial trustworthiness."In the past few years, Todorov and colleagues have argued that, in young adults, trustworthiness judgments are an extension of emotional judgments, and therefore, that trust judgments are made based on a continuum between anger and happiness (Todorov, 2008; Engell et al., 2010). Evidence from the literature on emotion processing suggest that older adults tend to be less efficient than younger adults in the recognition of negative facial expressions (Calder et al., 2003; Firestone et al., 2007; Ruffman et al., 2008; Chaby and Narme, 2009). Based on Todorov';s theory and the fact that older adults seem to be less efficient than younger adults in identifying emotional expressions, one could expect that older individuals would have different representations of trustworthy faces and that they would use different cues than younger adults in order to make such judgments. We verified this hypothesis using a variation of Mangini and Biederman's (2004) reverse correlation method in order to test and compare classification images resulting from trustworthiness (in the context of money investment), from happiness, and from anger judgments in two groups of participants: young adults and older healthy adults. Our results show that for elderly participants, both happy and angry representations are correlated with trustworthiness judgments. However, in young adults, trustworthiness judgments are mainly correlated with happiness representations. These results suggest that young and older adults differ in their way of judging trustworthiness. PMID:24046755

  8. Diabetes self-care and the older adult.

    PubMed

    Weinger, Katie; Beverly, Elizabeth A; Smaldone, Arlene

    2014-10-01

    The prevalence of diabetes is highest in older adults, a population that is increasing. Diabetes self-care is complex with important recommendations for nutrition, physical activity, checking glucose levels, and taking medication. Older adults with diabetes have unique issues that impact self-care. As people age, their health status, support systems, physical and mental abilities, and nutritional requirements change. Furthermore, comorbidities, complications, and polypharmacy complicate diabetes self-care. Depression is also more common among the elderly and may lead to deterioration in self-care behaviors. Because of concerns about cognitive deficits and multiple comorbidities, adults older than 65 years are often excluded from research trials. Thus, little clinical evidence is available and the most appropriate treatment approaches and how to best support older patients' self-care efforts are unclear. This review summarizes the current literature, research findings, and expert and consensus recommendations with their rationales. PMID:24510969

  9. Exploring Life Satisfaction Among Older Adults in Dakar.

    PubMed

    Macia, Enguerran; Duboz, Priscilla; Montepare, Joann M; Gueye, Lamine

    2015-12-01

    Studies on correlates of subjective well-being of older adults are virtually non-existent in sub-Saharan Africa. Yet, understanding and improving the well-being of older adults should be a focal point of research and policy directed at this fast growing population. The aim of this study was to assess the links between socio-demographic factors, economic conditions, health, social relations, and the life satisfaction of older adults in Dakar. To this end, a survey was conducted on a sample of 500 dwellers of the Senegalese capital, aged 50 to 100, using the quota method for greater representativeness. Results revealed that with advancing age older adults expressed greater life satisfaction, and that older women were more satisfied than older men. As well, economic conditions were a main predictor of life satisfaction, along with good social relations. In contrast to findings with Western populations, neither self-rated health nor physical disabilities were associated with aging adults' life satisfaction. Findings suggest a number of avenues for future research. PMID:26481797

  10. Forearm vascular responses to mental stress in healthy older adults

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Matthew J.; Patel, Hardikkumar M.; Muller, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Forearm vascular conductance (FVC) increases in response to mental stress (verbal mental arithmetic) in young people. However, the effect of healthy aging and mental stress on FVC is unknown. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that FVC and cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) would be attenuated in older adults compared to young adults. In 13 young (27 1 year) and 11 older (62 1 year) subjects, we quantified heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP), FVC (Doppler ultrasound), and CVC (laser Doppler flowmetry) in response to a 3?min bout of mental stress in the supine posture. Changes from baseline were compared between groups and physiological variables were also correlated. Older adults had a blunted HR response to mental stress (? = 7 2 vs. 14 2 beats/min) but ?MAP was comparable between groups (? = 11 2 mmHg vs. 9 1). During the third minute of mental stress, the %?FVC (?2 5 vs. 31 12%) and %?CVC (2 6 vs. 31 15%) were both impaired in older adults compared to young subjects. There was no relationship between ?HR and %?CVC in either group, but there was a positive relationship between ?HR and %?FVC in both young subjects (R = 0.610, P < 0.027) and older subjects (R = 0.615, P < 0.044), such that larger tachycardia was associated with higher forearm vasodilation. These data indicate that older adults have impaired forearm vasodilation in response to mental stress. PMID:24744859

  11. Emergency Department Utilization by Older Adults: a Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    Latham, Lesley P.; Ackroyd-Stolarz, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    Background Emergency Departments (EDs) are playing an increasingly important role in the care of older adults. Characterizing ED usage will facilitate the planning for care delivery more suited to the complex health needs of this population. Methods In this retrospective cross-sectional study, administrative and clinical data were extracted from four study sites. Visits for patients aged 65 years or older were characterized using standard descriptive statistics. Results We analyzed 34,454 ED visits by older adults, accounting for 21.8% of the total ED visits for our study time period. Overall, 74.2% of patient visits were triaged as urgent or emergent. Almost half (49.8%) of visits involved diagnostic imaging, 62.1% involved lab work, and 30.8% involved consultation with hospital services. The most common ED diagnoses were symptom- or injury-related (25.0%, 17.1%. respectively). Length of stay increased with age group (Mann-Whitney U; p < .0001), as did the proportion of visits involving diagnostic testing and consultation (?2; p < .0001). Approximately 20% of older adults in our study population were admitted to hospital following their ED visit. Conclusions Older adults have distinct patterns of ED use. ED resource use intensity increases with age. These patterns may be used to target future interventions involving alternative care for older adults. PMID:25452824

  12. Domestic Robots for Older Adults: Attitudes, Preferences, and Potential

    PubMed Central

    Mitzner, Tracy L.; Beer, Jenay M.; Prakash, Akanksha; Chen, Tiffany L.; Kemp, Charles C.; Rogers, Wendy A.

    2014-01-01

    The population of older adults in America is expected to reach an unprecedented level in the near future. Some of them have difficulties with performing daily tasks and caregivers may not be able to match pace with the increasing need for assistance. Robots, especially mobile manipulators, have the potential for assisting older adults with daily tasks enabling them to live independently in their homes. However, little is known about their views of robot assistance in the home. Twenty-one independently living older Americans (65–93 years old) were asked about their preferences for and attitudes toward robot assistance via a structured group interview and questionnaires. In the group interview, they generated a diverse set of 121 tasks they would want a robot to assist them with in their homes. These data, along with their questionnaire responses, suggest that the older adults were generally open to robot assistance but were discriminating in their acceptance of assistance for different tasks. They preferred robot assistance over human assistance for tasks related to chores, manipulating objects, and information management. In contrast, they preferred human assistance to robot assistance for tasks related to personal care and leisure activities. Our study provides insights into older adults' attitudes and preferences for robot assistance with everyday living tasks in the home which may inform the design of robots that will be more likely accepted by older adults. PMID:25152779

  13. Domestic Robots for Older Adults: Attitudes, Preferences, and Potential.

    PubMed

    Smarr, Cory-Ann; Mitzner, Tracy L; Beer, Jenay M; Prakash, Akanksha; Chen, Tiffany L; Kemp, Charles C; Rogers, Wendy A

    2014-04-01

    The population of older adults in America is expected to reach an unprecedented level in the near future. Some of them have difficulties with performing daily tasks and caregivers may not be able to match pace with the increasing need for assistance. Robots, especially mobile manipulators, have the potential for assisting older adults with daily tasks enabling them to live independently in their homes. However, little is known about their views of robot assistance in the home. Twenty-one independently living older Americans (65-93 years old) were asked about their preferences for and attitudes toward robot assistance via a structured group interview and questionnaires. In the group interview, they generated a diverse set of 121 tasks they would want a robot to assist them with in their homes. These data, along with their questionnaire responses, suggest that the older adults were generally open to robot assistance but were discriminating in their acceptance of assistance for different tasks. They preferred robot assistance over human assistance for tasks related to chores, manipulating objects, and information management. In contrast, they preferred human assistance to robot assistance for tasks related to personal care and leisure activities. Our study provides insights into older adults' attitudes and preferences for robot assistance with everyday living tasks in the home which may inform the design of robots that will be more likely accepted by older adults. PMID:25152779

  14. Older and younger adults' accuracy in discerning health and competence in older and younger faces.

    PubMed

    Zebrowitz, Leslie A; Franklin, Robert G; Boshyan, Jasmine; Luevano, Victor; Agrigoroaei, Stefan; Milosavljevic, Bosiljka; Lachman, Margie E

    2014-09-01

    We examined older and younger adults' accuracy judging the health and competence of faces. Accuracy differed significantly from chance and varied with face age but not rater age. Health ratings were more accurate for older than younger faces, with the reverse for competence ratings. Accuracy was greater for low attractive younger faces, but not for low attractive older faces. Greater accuracy judging older faces' health was paralleled by greater validity of attractiveness and looking older as predictors of their health. Greater accuracy judging younger faces' competence was paralleled by greater validity of attractiveness and a positive expression as predictors of their competence. Although the ability to recognize variations in health and cognitive ability is preserved in older adulthood, the effects of face age on accuracy and the different effects of attractiveness across face age may alter social interactions across the life span. PMID:25244467

  15. Older and Younger Adults Accuracy in Discerning Health and Competence in Older and Younger Faces

    PubMed Central

    Zebrowitz, Leslie A.; Franklin, Robert G.; Boshyan, Jasmine; Luevano, Victor; Agrigoroaei, Stefan; Milosavljevic, Bosiljka; Lachman, Margie E.

    2015-01-01

    We examined older and younger adults accuracy judging the health and competence of faces. Accuracy differed significantly from chance and varied with face age but not rater age. Health ratings were more accurate for older than younger faces, with the reverse for competence ratings. Accuracy was greater for low attractive younger faces, but not for low attractive older faces. Greater accuracy judging older faces health was paralleled by greater validity of attractiveness and looking older as predictors of their health. Greater accuracy judging younger faces competence was paralleled by greater validity of attractiveness and a positive expression as predictors of their competence. Although the ability to recognize variations in health and cognitive ability is preserved in older adulthood, the effects of face age on accuracy and the different effects of attractiveness across face age may alter social interactions across the life span. PMID:25244467

  16. Story Processing Ability in Cognitively Healthy Younger and Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Heather Harris; Capilouto, Gilson J.; Srinivasan, Cidambi; Fergadiotis, Gerasimos

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to examine the relationships among measures of comprehension and production for stories depicted in wordless pictures books and measures of memory and attention for 2 age groups. Method: Sixty cognitively healthy adults participated. They consisted of two groups--young adults (20-29 years of age) and older

  17. Approximate Quantification in Young, Healthy Older Adults', and Alzheimer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandini, Delphine; Lemaire, Patrick; Michel, Bernard Francois

    2009-01-01

    Forty young adults, 40 healthy older adults, and 39 probable AD patients were asked to estimate small (e.g., 25) and large (e.g., 60) collections of dots in a choice condition and in two no-choice conditions. Participants could choose between benchmark and anchoring strategies on each collection of dots in the choice condition and were required to

  18. Health Literacy, Social Support, and Health Status among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shoou-Yih D.; Arozullah, Ahsan M.; Cho, Young Ik; Crittenden, Kathleen; Vicencio, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The study examines whether social support interacts with health literacy in affecting the health status of older adults. Health literacy is assessed using the short version of the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Social support is measured with the Medical Outcome Study social support scale. Results show, unexpectedly, that rather

  19. Perceptions of Physical Activity by Older Adults: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jancey, Jonine M.; Clarke, Ann; Howat, Peter; Maycock, Bruce; Lee, Andy H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To identify issues and perceptions concerning physical activity in older adults. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Perth, Western Australia. Methods: Sixteen adults aged 65 to 74 years were interviewed in their own homes using a semi-structured interview schedule. Data were analysed using a descriptive qualitative methodology.

  20. Creative Ageing? Selfhood, Temporality and the Older Adult Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabeti, Shari

    2015-01-01

    This paper is based on a long-term ethnography of an adult creative writing class situated in a major urban art gallery in the United Kingdom. It takes the claims of one group of older adults--that creative writing made them "feel younger"--as the starting point for exploring this connection further. It places these claims broadly within

  1. New Approaches to the Education of Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Mary Alice

    New approaches to the education of older adults can be identified through a review of the literature on the following topics: developmental perspectives (including generativity and integrity) and adult development, life span habits (as determined by longitudinal research), gender roles, reminiscence, cognitive, and need-based learning. One of the…

  2. Incidence of Dementia in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strydom, Andre; Chan, Trevor; King, Michael; Hassiotis, Angela; Livingston, Gill

    2013-01-01

    Dementia may be more common in older adults with intellectual disability (ID) than in the general population. The increased risk for Alzheimer's disease in people with Down syndrome (DS) is well established, but much less is known about dementia in adults with ID who do not have DS. We estimated incidence rates from a longitudinal study of

  3. Educating Older Adults: Discourses, Ideologies & Policies 1999-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobias, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This article tells the story of policies relevant to education, ageism and older adults between 1999 and 2005. It follows an article published in a previous "New Zealand Journal of Adult Learning" that described and critiqued policy developments between the 1980s and 2001. The story is located in the context of ongoing historical struggles between…

  4. Approximate Quantification in Young, Healthy Older Adults', and Alzheimer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandini, Delphine; Lemaire, Patrick; Michel, Bernard Francois

    2009-01-01

    Forty young adults, 40 healthy older adults, and 39 probable AD patients were asked to estimate small (e.g., 25) and large (e.g., 60) collections of dots in a choice condition and in two no-choice conditions. Participants could choose between benchmark and anchoring strategies on each collection of dots in the choice condition and were required to…

  5. Reading Practices and Profiles of Older Adults in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Su-Yen

    2008-01-01

    Using data from a national survey of adults in Taiwan, this study presents findings regarding older adults' reading practices with respect to newspapers, magazines, books, and Internet information. The study also identifies four reading profiles defined by the frequency and diversification of the material read: the nonreaders, the less diversified

  6. Behavioral Factors Contributing to Older Adults Falling in Public Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson, Lindy; Manor, Debra; Fitzgerald, Maureen H.

    2003-01-01

    A study of behavior patterns, actions, and habits that contribute to older adults falling in public places identified such factors as lack of familiarity, health, overexertion, environmental influences/hazards, eyesight and mobility behaviors, and pace. Prevention interventions should employ strategies that actively engage adults in critical

  7. Health Literacy, Social Support, and Health Status among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Shoou-Yih D.; Arozullah, Ahsan M.; Cho, Young Ik; Crittenden, Kathleen; Vicencio, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The study examines whether social support interacts with health literacy in affecting the health status of older adults. Health literacy is assessed using the short version of the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Social support is measured with the Medical Outcome Study social support scale. Results show, unexpectedly, that rather…

  8. Entity versus incremental theories predict older adults' memory performance.

    PubMed

    Plaks, Jason E; Chasteen, Alison L

    2013-12-01

    The authors examined whether older adults' implicit theories regarding the modifiability of memory in particular (Studies 1 and 3) and abilities in general (Study 2) would predict memory performance. In Study 1, individual differences in older adults' endorsement of the "entity theory" (a belief that one's ability is fixed) or "incremental theory" (a belief that one's ability is malleable) of memory were measured using a version of the Implicit Theories Measure (Dweck, 1999). Memory performance was assessed with a free-recall task. Results indicated that the higher the endorsement of the incremental theory, the better the free recall. In Study 2, older and younger adults' theories were measured using a more general version of the Implicit Theories Measure that focused on the modifiability of abilities in general. Again, for older adults, the higher the incremental endorsement, the better the free recall. Moreover, as predicted, implicit theories did not predict younger adults' memory performance. In Study 3, participants read mock news articles reporting evidence in favor of either the entity or incremental theory. Those in the incremental condition outperformed those in the entity condition on reading span and free-recall tasks. These effects were mediated by pretask worry such that, for those in the entity condition, higher worry was associated with lower performance. Taken together, these studies suggest that variation in entity versus incremental endorsement represents a key predictor of older adults' memory performance. PMID:24128076

  9. Auditory evoked response to gaps in noise: Older adults

    PubMed Central

    Lister, Jennifer J.; Maxfield, Nathan D.; Pitt, Gabriel J.; Gonzalez, Victoria B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to describe the auditory evoked response to silent gaps for a group of older adults using stimulus conditions identical to those used in psychophysical studies of gap detection. Design The P1-N1-P2 response to the onsets of stimuli (markers) defining a silent gap for within-channel (spectrally identical markers) and across-channel (spectrally different markers) conditions was examined using four perceptually-equated gap durations. Study Sample A group of 24 older adults (mean age = 63 years) with normal hearing or minimal hearing loss participated. Results Older adults exhibited neural activation patterns that were qualitatively different and more frontally oriented than those observed in a previous study (Lister et al., 2007) of younger listeners. Older adults showed longer P2 latencies and larger P1 amplitudes than younger adults, suggesting relatively slower neural travel time and altered auditory inhibition/arousal by irrelevant stimuli. Conclusion Older adults appeared to recruit later-occurring T-complex-like generators for gap processing, compared to earlier-occurring T-complex-like generators by the younger group. Early and continued processing of channel cues with later processing of gap cues may represent the inefficiency of the aging auditory system and may contribute to poor speech understanding in noisy, real-world listening environments. PMID:21385014

  10. Trust in Physicians Among U.S. Chinese Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Manrui; Dong, XinQi

    2014-01-01

    Background. Trust in physicians influences the health and well-being of older adults and is an important indicator to assess the quality of medical care. However, Asian aging populations are often underrepresented in studies of patient trust in physicians. This study aims to examine the level of trust in physicians among Chinese older adults in a community-dwelling Chinese aging population. Methods. Data were drawn from the Population Study of Chinese Elderly, a population-based survey of U.S. Chinese older adults in the Greater Chicago area. Guided by a community-based participatory research approach, a total of 3,159 Chinese older adults aged 60 and above were surveyed. An 11-item scale was used to measure participants’ trust in physicians. Results. On a scale of 11–55, the level of trust in physician among U.S. Chinese older adults was 42.0 (SD = 6.3). Items related to confidence in physicians’ knowledge and skills were most commonly endorsed, including trusting physicians’ judgment on medical care (84.8%), trusting physicians’ advice (84.2%), and trusting physicians’ words that something is so and must be true (81.2%). Younger age, male gender, higher educational level, fewer years of residing in the United States and in the community, poorer self-reported health status, and poorer quality of life were associated with lower level of trust in physicians. Conclusions. Trust in physician is commonly endorsed among U.S. Chinese older adults. However, future longitudinal studies are needed to improve our understanding of risk factors and outcomes associated with trust in physicians among U.S. Chinese older adults. PMID:25378448

  11. External distraction impairs categorization performance in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Wais, Peter E.; Gazzaley, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The detrimental influence of distraction on memory and attention is well established, yet it is not as clear if irrelevant information impacts categorization abilities and if this impact changes in aging. We examined categorization with morphed prototype stimuli in both younger and older adults, using an adaptive staircase approach to assess participants' performance in conditions with and without visual distractors. Results showed that distraction did not affect younger adults, but produced a negative impact on older adults' categorization such that there was an interaction of age and distraction. These results suggest a relationship between the increased susceptibility to visual distraction in normal aging and impairment in categorization. PMID:25244485

  12. Accessibility accommodations for older adults seeking e-health information.

    PubMed

    Chaffin, Amy J; Maddux, Cleborne D

    2007-03-01

    The study tested the effect of Web page design accommodations for older adults. Two websites, designed by the researchers, were viewed and evaluated by three groups of adults: Younger (ages 30 to 64), Older (ages 65 to 84), and Oldest (ages 85 and older). The two sites, one with accommodations and one without, had identical health content. Thirty adults in each of three age groups rated both web pages. A 2 X 3, mixed ANOVA, age by page style was calculated. Both main effects and the interaction were significant. In all groups, ratings for the website without accommodations were lower than for the site with accommodations. The ratings of the site without accommodations were lowest among adults in the Oldest group. PMID:17378186

  13. Depression Literacy Among American Indian Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Roh, Soonhee; Brown-Rice, Kathleen; Pope, Natalie D; Lee, Kyoung Hag; Lee, Yeon-Shim; Newland, Lisa A

    2015-01-01

    Older American Indians experience high rates of depression and other psychological disorders, yet little research exist on the depression literacy of this group. Depression literacy is fundamental for individuals seeking help for depression in a timely and appropriate manner. In the present study the authors examine levels and predictors of knowledge of depression symptoms in a sample of rural older American Indians (N=227) living in the Midwestern United States. Data from self-administered questionnaires indicate limited knowledge of depression and negative attitudes toward seeking help for mental health problems. Additional findings and implications for social work practice and policy are discussed. PMID:25924076

  14. Eye-hand coordination strategies in older adults.

    PubMed

    Coats, Rachel; Fath, Aaron; Astill, Sarah; Wann, John

    2015-09-01

    Hand movement kinematics and eye-hand coordination are affected by aging. These age differences are exacerbated when task difficulty is increased, but the exact nature of these differences has yet to be established. We examined the performance of 12 older adults (mean age = 74) and 11 younger adults (mean age = 20) on a multi-phase prehension task. Participants had to reach for and pick up a target object with their preferred hand, place it in a tray, then reach for a second target object and place that in the same tray (baseline condition). On half the trials (stabilising condition) participants were required to hold the tray as still as possible just above the surface of the table with their non-preferred hand. Hand and eye movements were recorded. Older adults took longer to complete their overall movement but only in the stabilising condition [t(21) = 3.38 ; p < 0.01], largely due to an extended duration for the first submovement. They reached lower peak velocities and spent proportionally less time decelerating than the younger adults. Group differences were most apparent at the start of the movement and in the stabilising condition, suggesting both that older adults look more like their younger counterparts if given enough time, and that the added complexity of the stabilising task had a greater effect on the performance of the older adults than the young. Older adults adopted two different eye-hand coordination strategies, preferring to make an eye movement to the next target as soon as possible in some circumstances, or spending longer fixating the current target when accuracy requirements were high. Older adults appeared to employ an eye movement strategy that enabled them to benefit from visual feedback, presumably to aid hand movement control and improve task performance. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326840

  15. Civic Engagement for Older Adults With Functional Limitations: Piloting an Intervention for Adult Day Health Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabelko-Schoeny, Holly; Anderson, Keith A.; Spinks, Katie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Past research has demonstrated the importance of civic engagement for older adults, yet previous studies have not focused specifically on the potential benefits of civic engagement for older adults with functional limitations. This pilot study explored the feasibility and effectiveness of an intervention designed to promote civic

  16. Systematic Review of Falls in Older Adults with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wildes, Tanya M; Dua, Priya; Fowler, Susan A.; Miller, J. Philip; Carpenter, Christopher R.; Avidan, Michael S.; Stark, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Objectives lder adults frequently experience falls, at great cost to themselves and society. Older adults with cancer may be at greater risk for falls and have unique risk factors. Materials and Methods We undertook a systematic review of the available medical literature to examine the current evidence regarding factors associated with falls in older adults with cancer. PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, CENTRAL, DARE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and clinical trials.gov were searched using standardized terms for concepts of oncology/cancer, people 60 and older, screening, falls and diagnosis. Eligible studies included cohort or case-control studies or clinical trials in which all patients, or a subgroup of patients, had a diagnosis of cancer and in which falls were either the primary or secondary outcome. Results We identified 31 studies that met our inclusion criteria. Several studies suggest that falls are more common in older adults with a diagnosis of cancer than those without. Among the 11 studies that explored factors associated with outpatient falls, some risk factors for falls established in the general population were also associated with falls in older adults with cancer, including dependence in activities of daily living and prior falls. Other factors associated with falls in a general population, such as age, polypharmacy and opioid use, were not predictive of falls among oncology populations. Falls among older adults with cancer in the inpatient setting were associated with established risk factors for falls in people without cancer, but also with factors unique to an oncology population, such as brain metastases. Conclusions Falls in older adults with cancer are more common than in the general population, and are associated with risk factors unique to people with cancer. Further study is needed to establish methods of screening older adults with cancer for fall risk and ultimately implement interventions to reduce their risk of falls. Identifying which older adults with cancer are at greater risk for falls is a requisite step to ultimately intervene and prevent falls in this vulnerable population. PMID:25454770

  17. Worry in Older Community-Residing Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Kaye; Clemson, Lindy; Cant, Rosemary; Ke, Liang; Cumming, Robert G.; Kendig, Hal; Mathews, Mark

    2011-01-01

    With rising longevity, increasing numbers of older people are experiencing changes in their everyday family and social life, changes in their financial status, and a greater number of chronic conditions affecting their health. We took the opportunity to explore these relationships with worry in a group of volunteer community-living elderly (n =…

  18. Worry in Older Community-Residing Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Kaye; Clemson, Lindy; Cant, Rosemary; Ke, Liang; Cumming, Robert G.; Kendig, Hal; Mathews, Mark

    2011-01-01

    With rising longevity, increasing numbers of older people are experiencing changes in their everyday family and social life, changes in their financial status, and a greater number of chronic conditions affecting their health. We took the opportunity to explore these relationships with worry in a group of volunteer community-living elderly (n =

  19. Vitamin D recommendations for older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many randomized, controlled trials indicate that vitamin D will lower falls and fractures, so it was reasonable for Sanders et al. to hypothesize that a single annual 500,000 IU oral dose of vitamin D3 would be effective in reducing falls and fractures in older women with one or more risk factors fo...

  20. OLDER ADULTS: AN ENVIRONMENTALLY SUSCEPTIBLE POPULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The baby boom generation is quickly becoming the geriatric generation. The over-65 age bracket hit 13% of Americans in 1997, and is expected to reach 20% by 2030 accounting for 73 million Americans. World-wide the total number of older people (>60years) is expected to double from...

  1. Bridging the digital divide in older adults: a study from an initiative to inform older adults about new technologies

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ya-Huei; Damnée, Souad; Kerhervé, Hélène; Ware, Caitlin; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In a society where technology progresses at an exponential rate, older adults are often unaware of the existence of different kinds of information and communication technologies (ICTs). To bridge the gap, we launched a 2-year project, during which we conducted focus groups (FGs) with demonstrations of ICTs, allowing older adults to try them out and to share their opinions. This study aimed at investigating how participants perceived this kind of initiative and how they reacted to different kinds of ICTs. Patients and methods In total, 14 FGs were conducted with community-dwelling older adults, with a frequency of two FGs on the same topic once per trimester. Twenty-three older adults (four men and 19 women) attended at least one FG but only nearly half of them were regular attendants (ten participating in at least five sessions). Age of participants ranged from 63 years to 88 years, with a mean of 77.1 years. All of them had completed secondary education. The analyses of the data were performed according to inductive thematic analysis. Results Four overarching themes emerged from the analysis. The first concerned participants’ motivation for and assessment of the project. The second theme identified the underlying factors of the “digital divide” between the younger and the older generations. The third theme concerned the factors of technology adoption among older adults. The fourth one identified participants’ attitudes toward assistive ICTs, designed specifically for older adults (“gerontechnologies”). Discussions and conclusion This project encouraging older adults to be informed about different kinds of ICTs was positively rated. With regard to ICTs, participants perceived a digital divide. The underlying factors are generation/cohort effects, cognitive and physical decline related to aging, and negative attitudes toward technologies. However, more and more older adults adopt different kinds of ICTs in order to fit in with the society. Concerning assistive ICTs, they manifested a lack of perceived need and usefulness. Also, there was a negative image of end users of this kind of technologies. The so-called gerontechnologies specifically targeting older adults contain stigmatizing symbolism that might prevent them from adopting them. PMID:25624752

  2. Recruitment and Retention of Older Adults in Aging Research

    PubMed Central

    Mody, Lona; Miller, Douglas K.; McGloin, Joanne M.; Div, M; Freeman, Marcie; Marcantonio, Edward R.; Magaziner, Jay; Studenski, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Older adults continue to be underrepresented in clinical research despite their burgeoning population in the United States and worldwide. Physicians often propose treatment plans for older adults based on data from studies involving primarily younger, more-functional, healthier participants. Major barriers to recruitment of older adults in aging research relate to their substantial health problems, social and cultural barriers, and potentially impaired capacity to provide informed consent. Institutionalized older adults offer another layer of complexity that requires cooperation from the institutions to participate in research activities. This paper provides study recruitment and retention techniques and strategies to address concerns and overcome barriers to older adult participation in clinical research. Key approaches include early in-depth planning; minimizing exclusion criteria; securing cooperation from all interested parties; using advisory boards, timely screening, identification, and approach of eligible patients; carefully reviewing the benefit:risk ratio to be sure it is appropriate; and employing strategies to ensure successful retention across the continuum of care. Targeting specific strategies to the condition, site, and population of interest and anticipating potential problems and promptly employing predeveloped contingency plans are keys to effective recruitment and retention. PMID:19093934

  3. Obesity, Intentional Weight Loss, and Physical Disability in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Rejeski, W. Jack; Marsh, Anthony P.; Chmelo, Elizabeth; Rejeski, Jared J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary We examine obesity, intentional weight loss, and physical disability in older adults. Based on prospective epidemiological studies, BMI exhibits a curvilinear relationship with physical disability; there appears to be some protective effect associated with older adults being overweight. Whereas the greatest risk for physical disability occurs in older adults who are ≥class II obesity, the effects of obesity on physical disability appears to be moderated by both sex and race. Obesity at age 30 constitutes a greater risk for disability later in life than when obesity develops at age 50 or later; however, physical activity may buffer the adverse effects obesity has on late life physical disability. Data from a limited number of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) reinforce the important role that physical activity plays in weight loss programs for older adults. Furthermore, short-term studies have found that resistance training may be particularly beneficial in these programs since this mode of exercise attenuates the loss of fat-free mass during caloric restriction. Multi-year RCTs are needed to examine whether weight loss can alter the course of physical disablement in aging and to determine the long-term feasibility and effects of combining resistance exercise with weight loss in older adults. PMID:19922431

  4. Physical activity programs and behavior counseling in older adult populations.

    PubMed

    2004-11-01

    Physical activity offers one of the greatest opportunities for people to extend years of active independent life and reduce functional limitations. The purpose of this paper is to identify key practices for promoting physical activity in older adults, with a focus on older adults with chronic disease or low fitness and those with low levels of physical activity. Key practices identified in promotion activity in older adults include: 1) A multidimensional activity program that includes endurance, strength, balance, and flexibility training is optimal for health and functional benefits; 2) Principles of behavior change, including: social support, self-efficacy, active choices, health contracts, assurances of safety, and positive reinforcement enhance adherence; 3) Management of risk by beginning at low intensity but gradually increasing to moderate physical activity, which has a better risk-to-benefit ratio and should be the goal for older adults; 4) An emergency procedure plan is prudent for community based programs; and 5) Monitoring aerobic intensity is important for progression and for motivation. Selected content review of physical activity programming from major organizations and institutions are provided. Regular participation in physical activity is one of the most effective ways for older adults, including those with disabilities, to help prevent chronic disease, promote independence, and increase quality of life in old age. PMID:15514518

  5. Workshop on immunizations in older adults: identifying future research agendas.

    PubMed

    High, Kevin P; D'Aquila, Richard T; Fuldner, Rebecca A; Gerding, Dale N; Halter, Jeffrey B; Haynes, Laura; Hazzard, William R; Jackson, Lisa A; Janoff, Edward; Levin, Myron J; Nayfield, Susan G; Nichol, Kristin L; Prabhudas, Mercy; Talbot, Helen K; Clayton, Charles P; Henderson, Randi; Scott, Catherine M; Tarver, Erika D; Woolard, Nancy F; Schmader, Kenneth E

    2010-04-01

    Goals for immunization in older adults may differ from those in young adults and children, in whom complete prevention of disease is the objective. Often, reduced hospitalization and death but also averting exacerbation of underlying chronic illness, functional decline, and frailty are important goals in the older age group. Because of the effect of age on dendritic cell function, T cell-mediated immune suppression, reduced proliferative capacity of T cells, and other immune responses, the efficacy of vaccines often wanes with advanced age. This article summarizes the discussion and proceedings of a workshop organized by the Association of Specialty Professors, the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the American Geriatrics Society, the National Institute on Aging, and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Leading researchers and clinicians in the fields of immunology, epidemiology, infectious diseases, geriatrics, and gerontology reviewed the current status of vaccines in older adults, identified knowledge gaps, and suggest priority areas for future research. The goal of the workshop was to identify what is known about immunizations (efficacy, effect, and current schedule) in older adults and to recommend priorities for future research. Investigation in the areas identified has the potential to enhance understanding of the immune process in aging individuals, inform vaccine development, and lead to more-effective strategies to reduce the risk of vaccine-preventable illness in older adults. PMID:20398161

  6. Older Adults Do Not Notice Their Names: A New Twist to a Classic Attention Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naveh-Benjamin, Moshe; Kilb, Angela; Maddox, Geoffrey B.; Thomas, Jenna; Fine, Hope C.; Chen, Tina; Cowan, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Although working memory spans are, on average, lower for older adults than young adults, we demonstrate in 5 experiments a way in which older adults paradoxically resemble higher capacity young adults. Specifically, in a selective-listening task, older adults almost always failed to notice their names presented in an unattended channel. This is an…

  7. Older Adults Do Not Notice Their Names: A New Twist to a Classic Attention Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naveh-Benjamin, Moshe; Kilb, Angela; Maddox, Geoffrey B.; Thomas, Jenna; Fine, Hope C.; Chen, Tina; Cowan, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    Although working memory spans are, on average, lower for older adults than young adults, we demonstrate in 5 experiments a way in which older adults paradoxically resemble higher capacity young adults. Specifically, in a selective-listening task, older adults almost always failed to notice their names presented in an unattended channel. This is an

  8. How Feelings of Stereotype Threat Influence Older Adults Memory Performance

    PubMed Central

    Chasteen, Alison L.; Bhattacharyya, Sudipa; Horhota, Michelle; Tam, Raymond; Hasher, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present research was to explore the role of stereotype threat as a mediator of older peoples memory performance under different instructional sets. In three studies, younger and older participants completed a memory test that was either framed as a memorization or as an impression formation task. Across these studies, memory performance was greater for younger than for older adults and was higher in the impression formation than memorization condition, but was not different for older adults in the two instruction conditions. These results also showed that age differences in memory performance were mediated by participants feelings of stereotype threat, such that age was positively related to stereotype threat and stereotype threat was negatively related to memory performance. These data demonstrate that concerns about being negatively stereotyped influence age differences in memory performance, and that the effects of these feelings on performance are not easily reduced by reframing the task instructions. PMID:16036721

  9. Description of older adults as depicted in magazine advertisements.

    PubMed

    McConatha, J T; Schnell, F; McKenna, A

    1999-12-01

    Negative attitudes about aging have been widespread and films, television, radio, and print media may serve as an important source of socialization or reflect the current views of older adults. This study focused on examination of the frequency of depictions of older men and women in 765 advertisements appearing in Time and Newsweek national weekly news magazines, and on an analysis of their roles suggested in photographs depicting a total of 2,505 persons. These were collected over a one-year period and coded by three persons. Analysis indicated that older adults, especially older women, were not only presented infrequently but, when presented roles, were often passive or dependent as is consistent with social stereotypes. PMID:10672769

  10. HIV behavioural interventions targeted towards older adults: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The increasing number of people living with HIV aged 50 years and older has been recognised around the world yet non-pharmacologic HIV behavioural and cognitive interventions specifically targeted to older adults are limited. Evidence is needed to guide the response to this affected group. Methods We conducted a systematic review of the available published literature in MEDLINE, Embase and the Education Resources Information Center. A search strategy was defined with high sensitivity but low specificity to identify behavioural interventions with outcomes in the areas of treatment adherence, HIV testing uptake, increased HIV knowledge and uptake of prevention measures. Data from relevant articles were extracted into excel. Results Twelve articles were identified all of which originated from the Americas. Eight of the interventions were conducted among older adults living with HIV and four for HIV-negative older adults. Five studies included control groups. Of the included studies, four focused on general knowledge of HIV, three emphasised mental health and coping, two focused on reduced sexual risk behaviour, two on physical status and one on referral for care. Only four of the studies were randomised controlled trials and seven – including all of the studies among HIV-negative older adults – did not include controls at all. A few of the studies conducted statistical testing on small samples of 16 or 11 older adults making inference based on the results difficult. The most relevant study demonstrated that using telephone-based interventions can reduce risky sexual behaviour among older adults with control reporting 3.24 times (95% CI 1.79-5.85) as many occasions of unprotected sex at follow-up as participants. Overall however, few of the articles are sufficiently rigorous to suggest broad replication or to be considered representative and applicable in other settings. Conclusions More evidence is needed on what interventions work among older adults to support prevention, adherence and testing. More methodological rigourised needed in the studies targeting older adults. Specifically, including control groups in all studies is needed as well as sufficient sample size to allow for statistical testing. Addition of specific bio-marker or validated behavioural or cognitive outcomes would also strengthen the studies. PMID:24884947

  11. Working memory binding of visual object features in older adults.

    PubMed

    Read, Christina A; Rogers, Jeffrey M; Wilson, Peter H

    2016-05-01

    Accurate mental representation of visual stimuli requires retaining not only the individual features but also the correct relationship between them. This associative process of binding is mediated by working memory (WM) mechanisms. The present study re-examined reports of WM-related binding deficits with aging. In Experiment 1, 31 older and 31 younger adults completed a visual change detection task with feature-location relations presented either simultaneously or sequentially; the paradigm was also designed specifically to minimize the impact of lengthy retention intervals, elaborative rehearsal, and processing demands of multi-stimulus probes. In Experiment 2, 38 older and 42 younger adults completed a modified task containing both feature-location relations and feature-feature conjunctions. In Experiment 1 although feature-location binding was more difficult with sequential compared with simultaneous presentation, the effect was independent of age. In Experiment 2 while older adults were overall slower and less accurate than young adults, there were no age-specific deficits in WM binding. Overall, after controlling for methodological factors, there was no evidence of an age-related visual WM binding deficit for surface or location features. However, unlike younger adults, older adults appeared less able to restrict processing of irrelevant features, consistent with reported declines with age in strategic capacities of WM. PMID:26344033

  12. Differences in active commuting among younger and older adults.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Melissa; Der Ananian, Cheryl; Campbell, Matthew E

    2014-04-01

    The demonstrated health benefits of active commuting (AC) and low participation rates among older adults indicate a need to examine the socioecological correlates of AC by age category. An online survey of employed U.S. adults examined AC participation and individual, employment-related, community, and environmental variables. Participants were dichotomized by age (younger: 18-49 yr; n = 638, 64% and older: ≥ 50 yr; n = 359, 36%). Logistic-regression analyses examined differences in AC correlates by age. Older adults were less likely to be active commuters (13.4%) than younger adults (27.9%; p < .001) For older adults, analyses yielded a Nagelkerke R2 = .76, with perceived behavioral control, behavioral beliefs, household cars, and walking distance as predictors. Analyses for younger adults resulted in a Nagelkerke R2 = .79, with perceived behavioral control, coworker normative beliefs, parking problems at work, greater employer and community support for AC, and bad weather as predictors. Findings suggest age should be considered when examining and targeting AC behaviors. PMID:23689245

  13. Neuroanatomical Characteristics and Speech Perception in Noise in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Patrick C. M.; Ettlinger, Marc; Sheppard, John P.; Gunasekera, Geshri M.; Dhar, Sumitrajit

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Previous research has attributed older adults difficulty with perceiving speech in noise to peripheral hearing loss. Recent studies have suggested a more complex picture, however, and implicate the central nervous system in sensation and sensory deficits. This study examines the relationship between the neuroanatomical structure of cognitive regions and the ability to perceive speech in noise in older adults. In particular, the neuroanatomical characteristics of the left ventral and dorsal prefrontal cortex are considered relative to standard measures of hearing in noise. Design The participants were fifteen older and fourteen younger right-handed native speakers of American English who had no neurological deficits and scored better than normal on standardized cognitive tests. We measured the participants peripheral hearing ability as well as their ability to perceive speech in noise using standardized tests. Anatomical magnetic resonance images were taken and analyzed to extract regional volumes and thicknesses of several key neuroanatomical structures. Results The results showed that younger adults had better hearing sensitivity and better speech perception in noise ability than older adults. For the older adults only, the volume of the left pars triangularis and the cortical thickness of the left superior frontal gyrus were significant predictors of performance on the speech-in-noise test. Discussion These findings suggest that, in addition to peripheral structures, the central nervous system also contributes to the ability to perceive speech in noise. In older adults, a decline in the volume and cortical thickness of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) during aging can therefore be a factor in a declining ability to perceive speech in a naturalistic environment. Our study shows a link between anatomy of PFC and speech perception in older adults. These findings are consistent with the decline-compensation hypothesis, which states that a decline in sensory processing due to cognitive aging can be accompanied by an increase in the recruitment of more general cognitive areas as a means of compensation. We found that a larger PFC volume may compensate for declining peripheral hearing. Clinically, recognizing the contribution of the cerebral cortex expands treatment possibilities for hearing loss in older adults beyond peripheral hearing aids to include strategies for improving cognitive function. We conclude by considering several mechanisms by which the PFC may facilitate speech perception in noise including inhibitory control, attention, cross-modal compensation, and phonological working memory, though no definitive conclusion can be drawn. PMID:20588117

  14. Multidimensional Attitudes of Emergency Medicine Residents Toward Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Teresita M.; Chan, Shu B.; Hansoti, Bhakti

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The demands of our rapidly expanding older population strain many emergency departments (EDs), and older patients experience disproportionately high adverse health outcomes. Trainee attitude is key in improving care for older adults. There is negligible knowledge of baseline emergency medicine (EM) resident attitudes regarding elder patients. Awareness of baseline attitudes can serve to better structure training for improved care of older adults. The objective of the study is to identify baseline EM resident attitudes toward older adults using a validated attitude scale and multidimensional analysis. Methods Six EM residencies participated in a voluntary anonymous survey delivered in summer and fall 2009. We used factor analysis using the principal components method and Varimax rotation, to analyze attitude interdependence, translating the 21 survey questions into 6 independent dimensions. We adapted this survey from a validated instrument by the addition of 7 EM-specific questions to measures attitudes relevant to emergency care of elders and the training of EM residents in the geriatric competencies. Scoring was performed on a 5-point Likert scale. We compared factor scores using student t and ANOVA. Results 173 EM residents participated showing an overall positive attitude toward older adults, with a factor score of 3.79 (3.0 being a neutral score). Attitudes trended to more negative in successive post-graduate year (PGY) levels. Conclusion EM residents demonstrate an overall positive attitude towards the care of older adults. We noted a longitudinal hardening of attitude in social values, which are more negative in successive PGY-year levels. PMID:25035760

  15. Physical Activity Interventions Among Older Adults: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Chase, Jo-Ana D.

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) is important in the management of chronic illness among older adults worldwide. Researchers have conducted several intervention studies to increase PA behavior in this population. This review of the past 12 years of relevant PA intervention research among adults age 60 and older systematically summarized research findings, identified characteristics of successful interventions, and proposed areas of future research. Twenty studies were reviewed for this paper, most employing a combination cognitive-behavioral intervention design. Cognitive-based only and combination interventions were more successful in changing PA behavior; however, behavioral-based interventions demonstrated more long-term changes in PA behavior. Among theory-based interventions, self-efficacy was the most commonly operationalized construct. Findings from this review may inform future primary research to promote PA behavior among older adults, as well as gerontological clinical practice. PMID:23923347

  16. Interactive resistance chair to promote strengthening exercise in older adults.

    PubMed

    Jeong, In Cheol; Finkelstein, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    We developed a strengthening exercise support system which can be remotely managed and clinically supervised via internet. Older adults may potentially benefit from such an exercise system however functionality of this system requires validation before commencement of field studies in older adults. The aim of this study was to introduce and assess validity of a prototype telerehabilitation system supporting computer-assisted home-based strengthening exercise. The system included a resistance chair with a set of movement and physiologic sensors. Real-time feedback on exercise performance was displayed on a touch screen dashboard. Personalized exercise parameters were managed by a rehabilitation team via a designated telerehabilitation site. Assessment of the system demonstrated sufficient validity in real-time identification of exercise performance and cardiovascular parameters. We concluded that the interactive resistance chair has a potential in promoting strengthening exercise and it is warranted for further evaluation in community dwelling older adults. PMID:25991131

  17. Treatment of depression in older adults beyond fluoxetine

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Gabriela Arantes

    2015-01-01

    This review aimed to discuss the importance of the comprehensive treatment of depression among older adults in Brazil. The abuse of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, including fluoxetine hydrochloride, as antidepressants has been considered a serious public health problem, particularly among older adults. Despite the consensus on the need for a comprehensive treatment of depression in this population, Brazil is still unprepared. The interface between pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy is limited due to the lack of healthcare services, specialized professionals, and effective healthcare planning. Fluoxetine has been used among older adults as an all-purpose drug for the treatment of depressive disorders because of psychosocial adversities, lack of social support, and limited access to adequate healthcare services for the treatment of this disorder. Preparing health professionals is a sine qua non for the reversal of the age pyramid, but this is not happening yet. PMID:25830872

  18. Nutritional Vulnerability in Older Adults: A Continuum of Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Porter Starr, Kathryn N.; McDonald, Shelley R.; Bales, Connie W.

    2015-01-01

    A nutritionally vulnerable older adult has a reduced physical reserve that limits the ability to mount a vigorous recovery in the face of an acute health threat or stressor. Often this vulnerability contributes to more medical complications, longer hospital stays, and increased likelihood of nursing home admission. We have characterized in this review the etiology of nutritional vulnerability across the continuum of the community, hospital, and long term care settings. Frail older adults may become less vulnerable with strong, consistent, and individualized nutritional care. Interventions for the vulnerable older adult must take their nutritional needs into account to optimize resiliency in the face of the acute and/or chronic health challenges they will surely face in their life course. PMID:26042189

  19. An innovative approach to recruiting homebound older adults.

    PubMed

    Crawford Shearer, Nelma B; Fleury, Julie D; Belyea, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Recruiting older adults to participate in intervention research is essential for advancing the science in this field. Developing a relevant recruitment plan responsive to the unique needs of the population before beginning a project is critical to the success of a research study. This article describes our experiences in the process of recruiting homebound older adults to test a community-based health empowerment intervention. In our study, the trust and partnership that existed between the research team and Community Action Agency facilitated the role of the home-delivered meal drivers as a trusted and untapped resource for study recruitment. Researchers can benefit from thinking creatively and developing meaningful partnerships when conducting research with older adults. PMID:20128539

  20. Asymptomatic bacteriuria and urinary tract infection in older adults.

    PubMed

    Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2007-08-01

    Asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and urinary tract infection (UTI) are common in older community dwellers (ages 65 and older) and nursing home residents. The challenge involved in distinguishing ASB from UTI in this population results from other comorbid illnesses that may present with symptoms similar to UTI and from elderly adults who have cognitive impairment not being able to report their symptoms. This article reviews the most updated information on diagnosis, microbiology, management, and prevention of ASB and UTI as they pertain to older community dwellers and nursing home residents. PMID:17631235

  1. Emerging HIV Epidemic Among Older Adults in Nanning, China

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xinqin; Xu, Yongfang; Chen, Shiyi; Shi, Jian; Morisky, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The HIV/AIDS surveillance data indicates that the proportion of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHAs) who were 50 years old or older increased to 42.7% in 2011 from 16.5% in 2007 in Nanning, the capital city of Guangxi Province. A greater number of newly diagnosed HIV cases compared to clinical AIDS cases were identified from older adults. The dominant HIV transmission mode among older PLWHAs was heterosexual although approximately 30% of all PLWHAs acquired HIV through heterosexual contacts. PMID:22984779

  2. Emergency Department Visits by Older Adults for Motor Vehicle Collisions

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Jody A.; Ginde, Adit A.; Lowenstein, Steven R.; Betz, Marian E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: To describe the epidemiology and characteristics of emergency department (ED) visits by older adults for motor vehicle collisions (MVC) in the United States (U.S.). Methods: We analyzed ED visits for MVCs using data from the 20032007 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS). Using U.S. Census data, we calculated annual incidence rates of driver or passenger MVC-related ED visits and examined visit characteristics, including triage acuity, tests performed and hospital admission or discharge. We compared older (65+ years) and younger (1864 years) MVC patients and calculated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to measure the strength of associations between age group and various visit characteristics. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of admissions for MVC-related injuries among older adults. Results: From 20032007, there were an average of 237,000 annual ED visits by older adults for MVCs. The annual ED visit rate for MVCs was 6.4 (95% CI 4.68.3) visits per 1,000 for older adults and 16.4 (95% CI 14.018.8) visits per 1,000 for younger adults. Compared to younger MVC patients, after adjustment for gender, race and ethnicity, older MVC patients were more likely to have at least one imaging study performed (OR 3.69, 95% CI 1.469.36). Older MVC patients were not significantly more likely to arrive by ambulance (OR 1.47; 95% CI 0.762.86), have a high triage acuity (OR 1.56; 95% CI 0.773.14), or to have a diagnosis of a head, spinal cord or torso injury (OR 0.97; 95% CI 0.422.23) as compared to younger MVC patients after adjustment for gender, race and ethnicity. Overall, 14.5% (95% CI 9.819.2) of older MVC patients and 6.1% (95% CI 4.87.5) of younger MVC patients were admitted to the hospital. There was also a non-statistically significant trend toward hospital admission for older versus younger MVC patients (OR 1.78; 95% CI 0.714.43), and admission to the ICU if hospitalized (OR 6.9, 95% CI 0.951.9), after adjustment for gender, race, ethnicity, and injury acuity. Markers of injury acuity studied included EMS arrival, high triage acuity category, ED imaging, and diagnosis of a head, spinal cord or internal injury. Conclusion: Although ED visits after MVC for older adults are less common per capita, older adults are more commonly admitted to the hospital and ICU. Older MVC victims require significant ED resources in terms of diagnostic imaging as compared to younger MVC patients. As the U.S. population ages, and as older adults continue to drive, EDs will have to allocate appropriate resources and develop diagnostic and treatment protocols to care for the increased volume of older adult MVC victims. PMID:24381674

  3. Hydration in older adults: the contribution of bioelectrical impedance analysis.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Lynette R; Heiss, Cynthia J; Parsons, Susan D; Foley, Amanda S; Mefferd, Antje S; Hollinger, Deborah; Parham, Douglas F; Patterson, Jeremy

    2014-06-01

    The sensory and gastrointestinal changes that occur with ageing affect older adults' food and liquid intake. Any decreased liquid intake increases the risk for dehydration. This increased dehydration risk is compounded in older adults with dysphagia. The availability of a non-invasive and easily administered way to document hydration levels in older adults is critical, particularly for adults in residential care. This pilot study investigated the contribution of bioelectrical impedance analysis to measure hydration in 19 older women in residential care: 13 who viewed themselves as healthy and six with dysphagia. Mann-Whitney U analyses documented no significant between-group differences for Total Body Water (TBW), Fat Free Mass (FFM), Fat Mass (FM), and percentage Body Fat (%BF). However, when compared to previously published data for age-matched women, the TBW and FFM values of the two participant groups were notably less, and FM and %BF values were notably greater than expected. If results are confirmed through continued investigation, such findings may suggest that long-term care facilities are unique environments in which all older residents can be considered at-risk for dehydration and support the use of BIA as a non-invasive tool to assess and monitor their hydration status. PMID:24521507

  4. Treating Older Adults With Schizophrenia: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Jeste, Dilip V.

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia affects people of all age groups. Treatment plans for older adults with schizophrenia must consider the effects of age on the course of the illness as well as on the response to antipsychotics and to psychosocial interventions. Positive symptoms of schizophrenia tend to become less severe, substance abuse becomes less common, and mental health functioning often improves. Hospitalizations are more likely to be due to physical problems rather than psychotic relapses. Physical comorbidity is a rule, however, and older age is a risk factor for most side effects of antipsychotics, including metabolic syndrome and movement disorders. We recently reported high rates of adverse events and medication discontinuation along with limited effectiveness of commonly used atypical antipsychotics in older adults. Psychosocial interventions such as cognitive behavioral social skills training are efficacious in improving functioning in older adults with schizophrenia. In formulating treatment plans for this population, a balanced approach combining cautious antipsychotic medication use with psychosocial interventions is recommended. Antipsychotic medications should generally be used in lower doses in older adults. Close monitoring for side effects and effectiveness of the medications and a watchful eye on their risk:benefit ratio are critical. In a minority of patients it may be possible to discontinue medications. Sustained remission of schizophrenia after decades of illness is not rare, especially in persons who receive appropriate treatment and psychosocial support—there can be light at the end of a long tunnel. PMID:23552180

  5. The pleasurable recreational activities among community-dwelling older adults.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Joji; Masuda, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Yusuke; Gotoh, Tadao; Kawamura, Takashi; Iguchi, Akihisa

    2006-01-01

    This study aimed to clarify what pleasurable recreational activities older adults like to participate in, and to investigate the relationship between those activities and quality of life (QOL). Questionnaires were delivered to older residents (65 years and above) in a Japanese rural area. The residents' background information, the amount of pleasure for various activities, and the QOL were surveyed. The QOL was evaluated by the revised Philadelphia Geriatric Center (PGC) morale scale. The amount of pleasure taken in a majority of the activities, such as conversation with family or neighbors showed a significant association with the happiness score, but only a few activities showed significant association between the revised PGC morale scale and the amount of pleasure. The multiple regression analyses indicated that the amount of pleasure in exercise, the difficulty in managing finances, and amount of pleasure taken in watching TV were significant variables for predicting the happiness score. The results indicated that the amount of pleasure older adults experienced when engaging in activities such as conversation with family or neighbors showed significant association with the older adults' happiness. These results may be helpful in understanding contributions of various activities to the perception of pleasure in older adults. PMID:16368155

  6. Home modification by older adults and their informal caregivers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heejung; Ahn, Yong Han; Steinhoff, Andreanna; Lee, Kang Hee

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine dyadic factors of home modification in frail older adults and their informal caregivers for improving health care at home in the United States. A secondary data analysis used the National Alliance for Caregiving and the American Association of Retired Persons caregiver survey dataset. Among randomly selected samples from 7 states in the U.S., 737dyads of informal caregivers and frail older adults were selected based on age and medical conditions. Descriptive analyses and a hierarchical binary logistic regression analysis were performed. The study findings showed that the prevalence of home modification in the survey population was 42.20% in the United States. The home modifying group was likely to live together in a rural area, to consist of older care-recipients and younger caregivers, and to be Caucasian (p<.05). Physically functional impairments were the strongest factors of home modification (p<.01), while older adults living with heart disease were more likely to modify their homes (p=.03). In conclusion, older adults' and their caregivers' factors clearly affect home modification for health care at home. Our findings revealed that home modification represents an important contribution to multidisciplinary care and is based on comprehensive assessments, multidisciplinary decision-making processes, and careful planning of individualized interventions. Relevant policy suggestions may enhance the effectiveness of home modification to support aging in place in the United States. PMID:25109810

  7. Sexual Behavior of Older Adults Living with HIV in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Negin, Joel; Geddes, Louise; Brennan-Ing, Mark; Kuteesa, Monica; Karpiak, Stephen; Seeley, Janet

    2016-02-01

    Sexual behavior among older adults with HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa has been understudied despite the burgeoning of this population. We examined sexual behavior among older adults living with HIV in Uganda. Participants were eligible for the study if they were 50 years of age or older and living with HIV. Quantitative data were collected through face-to-face interviews, including demographic characteristics, health, sexual behavior and function, and mental health. Of respondents, 42 were men and 59 women. More than one-quarter of these HIV-positive older adults were sexually active. A greater proportion of older HIV-positive men reported being sexually active compared to women (54 vs. 15 %). Among those who are sexually active, a majority never use condoms. Sixty-one percent of men regarded sex as at least somewhat important (42 %), while few women shared this opinion (20 %). Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that odds of sexual activity in the past year were significantly increased by the availability of a partner (married/cohabitating), better physical functioning, and male gender. As more adults live longer with HIV, it is critical to understand their sexual behavior and related psychosocial variables in order to improve prevention efforts. PMID:26324184

  8. Fall Prevention for Older Adults Receiving Home Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Bamgbade, Sarah; Dearmon, Valorie

    2016-02-01

    Falls pose a significant risk for community-dwelling older adults. Fall-related injuries increase healthcare costs related to hospitalization, diagnostic procedures, and/or surgeries. This article describes a quality improvement project to reduce falls in older adults receiving home healthcare services. The fall prevention program incorporated best practices for fall reduction, including fall risk assessment, medication review/management, home hazard and safety assessment, staff and patient fall prevention education, and an individualized home-based exercise program. The program was implemented and evaluated during a 6-month time frame. Fewer falls occurred post implementation of the falls prevention program with no major injuries. PMID:26835805

  9. Brains of optimistic older adults respond less to fearful faces.

    PubMed

    Bangen, Katherine J; Bergheim, Marianne; Kaup, Allison R; Mirzakhanian, Heline; Wierenga, Christina E; Jeste, Dilip V; Eyler, Lisa T

    2014-04-01

    The authors examined the neural correlates of emotion processing and how they relate to individual differences in optimism among older adults. Brain response during processing of fearful faces was measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging in 16 older adults and was correlated with level of optimism. Greater optimism was associated with reduced activation in the fusiform gyrus and frontal regions, which may reflect decreased salience of negative emotional information or better emotion regulation among optimistic individuals. Relationships persisted after taking into account cortical thickness, amygdala volume, and resting perfusion. Findings have potential implications for the promotion of successful aging. PMID:24275797

  10. Why should older adults receive the shingles vaccine?

    PubMed

    Harkness, Turna Laneigh

    2010-10-01

    This article seeks to educate health care providers in understanding the need for immunization of older adults with the new herpes zoster vaccine, Zostavax(). Herpes zoster (shingles) is a painful and disabling condition that can result in significant morbidity, loss of productivity, and decrease in quality of life. Herpes zoster is a reactivation of the varicella zoster virus, the same virus that causes chicken pox. Anyone who has had chickenpox can get shingles. Evidence found in the literature demonstrates that the vaccine prevents shingles in approximately half of adults 60 and older. PMID:20506935

  11. Spatiotemporal stability of lip movements in older adult speakers.

    PubMed

    Wohlert, A B; Smith, A

    1998-02-01

    Although the intelligibility of healthy older adults normally seems unimpaired, age-related changes occur in sensorimotor components of the speech system and in such global parameters as speech rate. In order to clarify the effect of these changes on the variability of speech movements, we examined oral peripheral abilities, speech rate, and speech kinematics in a group of 10 adults age 76-83, compared to a group of 10 young adults. Participants repeated a short phrase 15 times at habitual, fast, and slow rates. The resulting lip displacement signals were time- and amplitude-normalized, and successive standard deviations along the movement waveforms were summed to produce a spatiotemporal index (STI) representing individual variability in movement pattern. Participants tended to show greatest variability at slow rate, less variability at fast rate, and least variability at habitual rate. For the older adults, STI at habitual rate was significantly higher (more variable) and speech durations were longer than those of young adults. Perioral strength and tactile acuity were poorer in these older adults than in young adults. We conclude that as sensorimotor abilities change in old age, speakers are less consistent in the spatiotemporal organization of speech movements, reflecting decreased stability of speech motor control. PMID:9493732

  12. Lexical attrition in younger and older bilingual adults

    PubMed Central

    GORAL, MIRA; LIBBEN, GARY; OBLER, LORAINE K.; JAREMA, GONIA; OHAYON, KEREN

    2011-01-01

    Healthy monolingual older adults experience changes in their lexical abilities. Bilingual individuals immersed in an environment in which their second language is dominant experience lexical changes, or attrition, in their first language. Changes in lexical skills in the first language of older individuals who are bilinguals, therefore, can be attributed to the typical processes accompanying older age, the typical processes accompanying first-language attrition in bilingual contexts, or both. The challenge, then, in understanding how lexical skills change in bilingual older individuals, lies in dissociating these processes. This paper addresses the difficulty of teasing apart the effects of ageing and attrition in older bilinguals and proposes some solutions. It presents preliminary results from a study of lexical processing in bilingual younger and older individuals. Processing differences were found for the older bilingual participants in their first language (L1), but not in their second language (L2). It is concluded that the lexical behaviour found for older bilinguals in this study can be attributed to L1 attrition and not to processes of ageing. These findings are discussed in the context of previous reports concerning changes in lexical skills associated with typical ageing and those associated with bilingual L1 attrition. PMID:18568793

  13. Operative risk stratification in the older adult.

    PubMed

    Scandrett, Karen G; Zuckerbraun, Brian S; Peitzman, Andrew B

    2015-02-01

    As the population ages, the health care system must to adapt to the needs of the older population. Hospitalization risks are particularly significant in the frail geriatric patients, with costly and morbid consequences. Appropriate preoperative assessment can identify sources of increased risk and enable the surgical team to manage this risk, through "prehabilitation," intraoperative modification, and postoperative care. Geriatric preoperative assessment expands usual risk stratification and careful medication review to include screening for functional disability, cognitive impairment, nutritional deficiency, and frailty. The information gathered can also equip the surgeon to develop a patient-centered and realistic treatment plan. PMID:25459549

  14. Experience of Discrimination Among U.S. Chinese Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ruijia; Simon, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Experiences of discrimination are detrimental to health and well-being. This study aimed to examine experiences of discrimination and responses to unfair treatment among community-dwelling U.S. Chinese older adults. Method. Guided by a community-based participatory research approach, 3,159 community-dwelling Chinese older adults aged 60 years and older in the Greater Chicago area were interviewed in person between 2011 and 2013. Results. Of the 3,159 participants interviewed, 58.9% were women and the mean age was 72.8 years. A total of 671 (21.3%) participants reported having experienced discrimination and 1,454 (48.2%) reported passive response to unfair treatment. Older adults living in Chicagos Chinatown had the lowest prevalence of perceived discrimination compared with those living in other areas. Younger age, higher education, higher income, fewer children, more years in the United States, more years in the community, poorer health status, lower quality of life, and worsening health over the last year were associated with higher frequency of discrimination reported. Younger age, higher education, higher income, being married, living with more people, having fewer children, more years in the United States, and better health over the past year were associated with engaged responses to unfair treatment. Conclusion. U.S. Chinese older adults suffered considerable discrimination, but tended to have passive responses to unfair treatment. Future longitudinal studies are needed to improve our understanding of the risk factors and outcomes associated with discrimination among U.S. Chinese older adults. PMID:25326642

  15. Management of fibromyalgia in older adults.

    PubMed

    Fitzcharles, Mary-Ann; Ste-Marie, Peter A; Shir, Yoram; Lussier, David

    2014-10-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a pain syndrome characterized by dysregulation of pain-processing mechanisms. FM may arise de novo or evolve following nervous system sensitization after an identifiable triggering event or related to a peripheral pain generator such as osteoarthritis. Although the focus symptom of FM is generalized body pain, patients may also experience sleep and mood disturbance, fatigue, and other somatic symptoms leading to the concept of a polysymptomatic condition. In view of prevalent other comorbidities in older patients, FM may be overlooked and management may be neglected, thereby contributing to poor well-being. Pertinent to the older patient is to ensure that the diagnosis of FM is correct and that other conditions are not misdiagnosed as FM. Whereever possible, treatment strategies should emphasize non-pharmacologic interventions that encompass healthy lifestyle habits, with attention to adequate physical activity in particular. Drug treatments should be tailored to the individual needs of the patient, with knowledge that they may offer only a modest effect, but with caution to ensure that adverse effects do not overshadow therapeutic effects. PMID:25227451

  16. Depressive symptoms in institutionalized older adults

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Lvia Maria; Mattos, Ins Echenique

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of depressive symptoms among institutionalized elderly individuals and to analyze factors associated with this condition. METHODS This was a cross-sectional study involving 462 individuals aged 60 or older, residents in long stay institutions in four Brazilian municipalities. The dependent variable was assessed using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale. Poissons regression was used to evaluate associations with co-variables. We investigated which variables were most relevant in terms of presence of depressive symptoms within the studied context through factor analysis. RESULTS Prevalence of depressive symptoms was 48.7%. The variables associated with depressive symptoms were: regular/bad/very bad self-rated health; comorbidities; hospitalizations; and lack of friends in the institution. Five components accounted for 49.2% of total variance of the sample: functioning, social support, sensory deficiency, institutionalization and health conditions. In the factor analysis, functionality and social support were the components which explained a large part of observed variance. CONCLUSIONS A high prevalence of depressive symptoms, with significant variation in distribution, was observed. Such results emphasize the importance of health conditions and functioning for institutionalized older individuals developing depression. They also point to the importance of providing opportunities for interaction among institutionalized individuals. PMID:24897042

  17. Management of older adults with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Antonio; Mina, Roberto

    2013-05-01

    Two-thirds of patients with multiple myeloma are aged 65 years or more and the prevalence of multiple myeloma in elderly patients is expected to rise in the next future. Patients older than 65 years are usually considered ineligible for transplantation. The introduction of novel agents, such as the immunomodulatory drugs thalidomide and lenalidomide and the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, combined with conventional chemotherapy, has radically changed the treatment paradigm of elderly patients and improved outcome. A sequential approach, consisting of an induction regimen associated with a high rate of complete response, followed by consolidation/maintenance therapy, induces a profound cytoreduction and delays relapse, thus improving survival. Novel agents associated with reduced-intensity autologous transplant showed to be safe and effective in fit elderly patients. Patients older than 75 years or vulnerable ones are more susceptible to adverse events that negatively affect treatment adherence and outcome. In this setting, less toxic regimens and appropriate dose reductions should be adopted. Here we provide an overview of novel agent-based treatment strategies for elderly patients with multiple myeloma. PMID:23623929

  18. Recruiting the Older, Adult, Female Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Dennis T.; Achtziger, Mary Ann

    1982-01-01

    A program for adult women reentry students at a Long Island campus of the C. W. Post Center is chronicled from the development of a rationale through formation of an advisory committee, institution of a series of workshops, addition of motivation through financial aid, and offering of child care and other needed services. (MSE)

  19. Attitudes toward Younger and Older Adults: The German Aging Semantic Differential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluth, Sebastian; Ebner, Natalie C.; Schmiedek, Florian

    2010-01-01

    The present study used the German Aging Semantic Differential (ASD) to assess attitudes toward younger and older adults in a heterogeneous sample of n = 151 younger and n = 143 older adults. The questionnaire was administered in two versions, one referring to the evaluation of younger adults, the other to the evaluation of older adults.

  20. Toward a New Motivation to Learn Framework for Older Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yi-Yin; Sandmann, Lorilee R.

    2012-01-01

    Although existing literature addresses adults' motivation to learn, and some specifically focuses on older adults, it is now recognized that older adults are more heterogeneous and complex than other age groups. Therefore, this study seeks to provide an alternative theoretical framework to investigate motivation to learn for older adult learners…

  1. A Preliminary Analysis of Reading Materials and Strategies Used by Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champley, Jill; Scherz, Julie W.; Apel, Kenn; Burda, Angela N.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study was to gather information related to reading abilities of typically aging older adults, the strategies that older adults use to improve reading comprehension, and the types and frequency of reading materials older adults use. Ninety-six adults, mostly college-educated volunteers between the ages of 65 and 79

  2. Longitudinal Increase in Anisometropia in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Haegerstrom-Portnoy, Gunilla; Schneck, Marilyn E.; Lott, Lori A.; Hewlett, Susan E.; Brabyn, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Anisometropia shows an exponential increase in prevalence with increasing age based on cross-sectional studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate longitudinal changes in anisometropia in all refractive components in older observers and to assess the influence of early cataract development. Methods Refractive error was assessed at two time points separated by ~12 years in 118 older observers (ages 67.1 and 79.3 years at the two test times). Anisometropia defined as ?1.00 D was calculated for all refractive components. The subjects had intact ocular lenses in both eyes throughout the study. Lens evaluations were performed at the second test using LOCS III. Results All refractive components approximately doubled in prevalence of anisometropia. Spherical equivalent anisometropia changed from 16.1% to 32.2%. Similar changes were found for spherical error (17% to 38.1%), primary astigmatism (7.6% to 17.8%) and oblique astigmatism (14.4% to 29.7%). Many who did not have anisometropia at the first visit subsequently developed anisometropia (for ex. 26.3% for spherical error and 22.9% for oblique cylinder). The onset of anisometropia occurred at all ages within the studied age range with no particular preference for any one age. A small number lost anisometropia over time. Individual comparisons of refractive error changes in the two eyes in combination with nuclear lens changes showed that early changes in nuclear sclerosis in the two eyes could account for a large proportion of anisometropia (~40%) but unequal hyperopic shift in the spherical component in the two eyes was the primary cause of the anisometropia. Conclusions Anisometropia is at least 10 times more common in the elderly than in children and anisometropia develops in all refractive components in the oldest observers. Clinicians need to be aware of this common condition that could lead to binocular vision problems and potentially cause falls in the elderly. PMID:24276578

  3. Ethical Issues Involving Research Conducted With Homebound Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Locher, Julie L.; Bronstein, Janet; Robinson, Caroline O.; Williams, Charlotte; Ritchie, Christine S.

    2009-01-01

    Conducting research in the home setting with home-bound older adults presents distinct ethical and practical challenges that require special consideration. This article describes the methodological issues that make studying homebound older adults especially vulnerable to therapeutic misconception and researcher role conflict and offers practical strategies for researchers to deal with these problems when studying this population. In writing this article, we draw on more than a decade of descriptive and intervention research focusing exclusively on the homebound older population in which the authors have collaborated. Therapeutic misconception and researcher role conflict may occur because of methodological issues related to the recruitment of participants, the homebound status of participants, and the home setting as the interview site. Particular care is required on the part of the researcher to address these ethical issues. This may be accomplished especially through clear communication during the informed consent process with participants and in scientific communication with colleagues. PMID:16581879

  4. Chinese older adults' Internet use for health information.

    PubMed

    Wong, Carmen K M; Yeung, Dannii Y; Ho, Henry C Y; Tse, Kin-Po; Lam, Chun-Yiu

    2014-04-01

    Technological advancement benefits Internet users with the convenience of social connection and information search. This study aimed at investigating the predictors of Internet use to search for online health information among Chinese older adults. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) was applied to examine the predictiveness of perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, and attitudes toward Internet use on behavioral intention to search for health information online. Ninety-eight Chinese older adults were recruited from an academic institute for older people and community centers. Frequency of Internet use and physical and psychological health were also assessed. Results showed that perceived ease of use and attitudes significantly predicted behavioral intention of Internet use. The potential influences of traditional Chinese values and beliefs in health were also discussed. PMID:24717738

  5. "Everyday ethics" in the care of hospitalized older adults.

    PubMed

    Seaman, Jennifer B; Erlen, Judith A

    2013-01-01

    As the U.S. population ages, the proportion of hospitalized patients older than 65 years will continue to increase with a significant number likely to have some degree of cognitive impairment. Because of the high rate of falls-related traumatic injury among older adults, many will require orthopaedic services. These patients may have multiple comorbidities and are at increased risk for complications. Varying degrees of cognitive impairment in combination with possible postoperative complications including delirium places these patients at risk for decreased decisional capacity and can create ethical dilemmas during the provision of bedside care. This article explores some everyday ethical dilemmas that nurses face in their care of hospitalized older adults, and offers nurses strategies to preserve patient dignity and self-determination while providing high-quality, evidence-based nursing care. PMID:24022424

  6. The Design of Online Learning Communities for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Marti M.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the creation of SeniorSage, an eight week facilitated online learning community for older adult volunteers in a Florida learning center. Discusses how members were prepared to participate in the community, explains the instructional design theory that guided the development of SeniorSage, and recommends future research. (Author/LRW)

  7. Trait Routinization, Functional and Cognitive Status in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zisberg, Anna; Zysberg, Leehu; Young, Heather M.; Schepp, Karen G.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the associations between trait routinization and functional and cognitive as well as demographic indicators. A sample of American older adults living independently in a retirement community (n = 80) were assessed regarding their functional status, cognitive status, and preference for routine. Robust associations between…

  8. Older Adults' Reports of Formal Care Hours and Administrative Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Steven M.; Brassard, Andrea B.; Simone, Bridget; Stern, Yaakov

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Personal assistance care is a Medicaid benefit in New York, but few data are available on its prevalence and contribution to home care. We examined these issues in a New York City sample by assessing older adults' reports of weekly home care hours and Medicaid billing records. Design and Methods: With help from New York City's Human

  9. The Application of a Generativity Model for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehlman, Katie; Ligon, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Generativity is a concept first introduced by Erik Erikson as a part of his psychosocial theory which outlines eight stages of development in the human life. Generativity versus stagnation is the main developmental concern of middle adulthood; however, generativity is also recognized as an important theme in the lives of older adults. Building on

  10. Measuring Successful Aging in Southern Black Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troutman, Meredith; Nies, Mary A.; Bentley, Monica

    2011-01-01

    With the growing size of the population of aging Black individuals, it is important to understand successful aging in this group. This study, therefore, piloted the Successful Aging Inventory (SAI) with a convenience sample of Black older adults. Participants completed a demographic form, the SAI, Purpose in Life Test, Life Satisfaction

  11. Older Japanese Adults and Mobile Phones: An Applied Ethnographic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hachiya, Kumiko

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative research investigates the meaning of "keitai" (mobile phones) for older Japanese adults between the ages of 59 and 79. Participants' emails from keitai, handwritten daily logs, and audio and video recordings from meetings and interviews were collected during my stay of nearly seven months in one of the largest cities in Japan.

  12. Instructional Videos for Supporting Older Adults Who Use Interactive Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gramss, Denise; Struve, Doreen

    2009-01-01

    The study reported in this paper investigated the usefulness of different instructions for guiding inexperienced older adults through interactive systems. It was designed to compare different media in relation to their social as well as their motivational impact on the elderly during the learning process. Precisely, the video was compared with…

  13. Trait Routinization, Functional and Cognitive Status in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zisberg, Anna; Zysberg, Leehu; Young, Heather M.; Schepp, Karen G.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the associations between trait routinization and functional and cognitive as well as demographic indicators. A sample of American older adults living independently in a retirement community (n = 80) were assessed regarding their functional status, cognitive status, and preference for routine. Robust associations between

  14. Instructional Videos for Supporting Older Adults Who Use Interactive Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gramss, Denise; Struve, Doreen

    2009-01-01

    The study reported in this paper investigated the usefulness of different instructions for guiding inexperienced older adults through interactive systems. It was designed to compare different media in relation to their social as well as their motivational impact on the elderly during the learning process. Precisely, the video was compared with

  15. Motivational Interviewing to Affect Behavioral Change in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Sherry M.; Cooper, R. Lyle; Cassie, Kim McClure

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews and assesses the existing research literature on the efficacy of motivational interviewing (MI) to promote lifestyle changes and improve functioning among older adults confronting serious health challenges. A comprehensive literature review was conducted of intervention studies that tested the use of MI to achieve behavioral…

  16. Keep Your Mouth Healthy: Oral Care for Older Adults

    MedlinePLUS

    ... risk for oral and throat cancers. If medicines lead to a dry mouth, ask your doctor if other drugs might be used instead. If dry mouth continues, drink plenty of water, chew sugarless gum, and avoid tobacco and alcohol. Older Adults and Oral Health NIHSeniorHealth: Gum (Periodontal) ...

  17. Factors associated with frailty in chronically ill older adults.

    PubMed

    Hackstaff, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    An ex post facto analysis of a secondary dataset examined relationships between physical frailty, depression, and the self-perceived domains of health status and quality-of-life in older adults. The randomized sample included 992 community-dwelling, chronically ill, and functionally impaired adults age 65 and older who received care from a Southern California Kaiser Permanente medical center between 1998 and 2002. Physical frailty represents a level of physiologic vulnerability and functional loss that results in dependence on others for basic, daily living needs (Fried et al., 2001). The purpose of the study was to identify possible intervention junctures related to self-efficacy of older adults in order to help optimize their functionality. Multivariate correlation analyses showed statistically significant positive correlations between frailty level and depression (r = .18; p = < .05), number of medical conditions (r = .09; p = < .05), and self-rated quality-of-life (r = .24; p = < .05). Frailty level showed a statistically significant negative correlation with self-perceived health status (r = -.25; p = < .05). Notably, no statistically significant correlation was found between age and frailty level (r = -.03; p = < .05). In linear regression, self-perceived health status had a partial variance with frailty level (part r = -.18). The significant correlations found support further research to identify interventions to help vulnerable, older adults challenge self-perceived capabilities so that they may achieve optimum functionality through increased physical activity earlier on, and increased self-efficacy to support successful adaptation to aging-related losses. PMID:20182990

  18. Social Vulnerability Scale for Older Adults: Validation Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinsker, Donna M.; Stone, Valerie; Pachana, Nancy; Greenspan, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    The Social Vulnerability Scale (SVS), an informant-report of social vulnerability for older adults, was piloted in a sample of 167 undergraduate students (63 male, 104 female) from the University of Queensland. Participants aged 18 - 53 (M = 25.53 years, SD = 7.83 years) completed the SVS by rating a relative or friend aged [greater than or equal

  19. Older Adults in Lifelong Learning: Participation and Successful Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloane-Seale, Atlanta; Kops, Bill

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between the participation of older adult learners in educational activities and successful aging. In partnership with seniors' organizations, focus-group interviews were conducted on seniors' involvement in learning and their perceptions of its influence on successful aging. Successful aging is defined in…

  20. Treatment of Depression and Suicide in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhar, Sunil S.; Brown, Gregory K.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) intervention for suicide prevention in older adults. Although many studies have found that CBT interventions are efficacious for reducing depressive symptoms in the elderly, researchers have yet to evaluate the efficacy of such interventions for preventing suicide or reducing suicide risk

  1. Self-Report Measure of Financial Exploitation of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Kendon J.; Iris, Madelyn; Ridings, John W.; Langley, Kate; Wilber, Kathleen H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to improve the measurement of financial exploitation (FE) by testing psychometric properties of the older adult financial exploitation measure (OAFEM), a client self-report instrument. Design and Methods: Rasch item response theory and traditional validation approaches were used. Questionnaires were administered by

  2. Attitudes toward Older Adults: A Reexamination of Two Major Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwasaki, Michiko; Jones, James A.

    2008-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to reexamine the psychometric properties of two major scales measuring attitudes toward older adults. The Kogan Attitudes Toward Old People Scale (Kogan OP Scale; Kogan, 1961b) was administered to a sample of 512 college students in Study One. The refined version (Polizzi & Millikin, 2002) of the Aging Semantic

  3. SeniorCise: A Print Exercise Intervention for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Nicole D.; DellaCorte, Michelle R.; Nigg, Claudio R.; Clark, Phillip G.; Burbank, Patricia M.

    2001-01-01

    The SeniorCise booklet and program (based on the Transtheoretical Model of behavior change) were evaluated by 61 older adults; 91% said it helped them think about exercise and 72% engaged in exercise. Positive aspects were presentation, instructions, motivation, and ease of understanding. Few illustrations and lack of a Spanish edition were

  4. Formal caregivers of older adults: reflection about their practice

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Marina Picazzio Perez; Barros, Juliana de Oliveira; de Almeida, Maria Helena Morgani; Mngia, Elisabete Ferreira; Lancman, Selma

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To understand the job function of caregivers of older adults and contribute to the debate on the consolidation of this professional practice. METHODOLOGICAL PROCEDURES This is a descriptive, qualitative, and exploratory study. Four focal group sessions were performed in 2011 with 11 elderly companions, formal caregivers of older adults in the Programa Acompanhante de Idosos (Program for Caregivers of Older Adults), Sao Paulo, SP, Southeastern Brazil. These sessions, guided by a semi-structured script, were audio-recorded and fully transcribed. Data were analyzed using the Content Analysis technique, Thematic Modality. RESULTS In view of considering the caregivers of older adults as a new category of workers, it was difficult to define their duties. The elderly companions themselves as well as the care receivers, their families, and the professionals that comprised the team were unclear about their duties. The professional practice of these formal caregivers has been built on the basis of constant discussions and negotiations among them and other team members in Programa Acompanhante de Idosos during daily work. This was achieved via a recognition process of their job functions and by setting apart other workers exclusive responsibilities. CONCLUSIONS The delimitation of specific job functions for elderly companions is currently one of the greatest challenges faced by these workers to develop and consolidate their professional role as well as improve Programa Acompanhante de Idosos. PMID:25372163

  5. Reasons for Older Adult Participation in University Programs in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villar, Feliciano; Triado, Carme; Pinazo, Sacramento; Celdran, Montserrat; Sole, Carme

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the reasons expressed by older adults for attending a university program in Barcelona (Spain). Results were based on the responses of 36 elders to questions from a semistructured interview. These were (a) reasons for joining a university course and (b) factors that prevent enrolling in that course. Participants mentioned more

  6. What Motivates Older Adults to Improve Diet and Exercise Patterns?

    PubMed

    Bardach, Shoshana H; Schoenberg, Nancy E; Howell, Britteny M

    2016-02-01

    Dietary intake and physical activity are lifestyle behaviors that are learned, developed, and practiced throughout an individual's lifetime. These lifestyle behaviors have a profound role on health and quality of life-with late-life changes still resulting in notable improvements. Despite well documented benefits of behavior change, such changes are extremely challenging. The purpose of this study is to better understand from the perspective of older adults themselves, the factors that may influence their likelihood of making lifestyle changes. Participants were recruited two primary care clinics. 104 older adults ranging in age from 65 to 95 were included. Participants were interviewed about their motivations and plans to change diet and physical activity behaviors following a routine primary care visit. All interviews were transcribed and transcripts were analyzed using a line-by-line coding approach. Older adults reported that their likelihood of making a lifestyle change related to perceptions of old age, personal motivation, and perceived confidence in the ability to make effective changes. These findings suggest the importance of creating more positive images of old age and tailoring health promotion efforts to older adults' motivations and confidence in their ability to make behavior changes. PMID:26159781

  7. Adapting Homework for an Older Adult Client with Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coon, David W.; Thompson, Larry W.; Gallagher-Thompson, Dolores

    2007-01-01

    There is growing evidence that psychosocial treatments incorporating behavioral intervention strategies can be effective in the treatment of depression in older adults with cognitive impairment. However, less work with such cases has focused on the use of cognitive interventions in tandem with these behavioral intervention strategies. This case…

  8. Volunteer Drivers: Their Contributions to Older Adults and to Themselves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerschner, Helen; Rousseau, Marie-Helene

    2008-01-01

    In 2004 and 2005 the Beverly Foundation surveyed volunteer drivers in an effort to better understand how and why they support older adults. The sample comprised 714 volunteer drivers from 367 communities, representing 40 states, who responded to the survey. Their responses provided qualitative and quantitative information about who they are, why

  9. Civic Engagement and Older Adults: A Critical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinson, Marty; Minkler, Meredith

    2006-01-01

    The aging of the baby boom generation, together with research that links volunteerism and positive health outcomes in later life, has contributed to a burgeoning of interest in initiatives and programs promoting civic engagement among older adults. Although useful in potentially expanding role options in later life, this growing attention also

  10. Measuring Successful Aging in Southern Black Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troutman, Meredith; Nies, Mary A.; Bentley, Monica

    2011-01-01

    With the growing size of the population of aging Black individuals, it is important to understand successful aging in this group. This study, therefore, piloted the Successful Aging Inventory (SAI) with a convenience sample of Black older adults. Participants completed a demographic form, the SAI, Purpose in Life Test, Life Satisfaction…

  11. A Dietary Screening Questionnaire Identifies Dietary Patterns in Older Adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary patterns reflect habitual exposure of foods and nutrients, and are a preferred means to assess diet and disease relationships. Our objective was to design a screening tool to assess diet quality and dietary patterns among older adults, and to relate the patterns to markers of general health ...

  12. Visual Object Pattern Separation Deficits in Nondemented Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toner, Chelsea K.; Pirogovsky, Eva; Kirwan, C. Brock; Gilbert, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    Young and nondemented older adults were tested on a continuous recognition memory task requiring visual pattern separation. During the task, some objects were repeated across trials and some objects, referred to as lures, were presented that were similar to previously presented objects. The lures resulted in increased interference and an increased…

  13. Digital Skills Acquisition: Future Trends among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliam, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify future trends and barriers that will either facilitate or impede the narrowing of the digital skills divide among older adults during the next 10 years. Methodology: To address the research questions, this study used a modified version of the Delphi process using a panel of experts who…

  14. The Level of Willingness to Evacuate among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray-Graves, Amy; Turner, Keith W.; Swan, James H.

    2011-01-01

    The issues of rising numbers of disasters, overwhelming increases in number of older adults, and historically flawed evacuations present real challenges. During the next two decades, the number of American baby boomers, who turn 65, will increase by 40%. As evidenced by recent disasters, the imperfections and vulnerabilities of flawed evacuations…

  15. Prejudice Reduction in University Programs for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Jose-Luis Alvarez; Camara, Carmen Palmero; Eguizabal, Alfredo Jimenez

    2011-01-01

    The present paper, drawing from the perspective of social cognition, examines and evaluates an intervention based on social-cognitive perspective-taking on the reduction of stereotyping and prejudice in older adults. Data were collected in a sample of Spanish participants with a mean age of 63.2 years. The intervention, aimed at reducing prejudice

  16. Characteristics of Older Adults and the Aging: Some Comments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Cash J.; Cangemi, Joseph P.

    1978-01-01

    Asserting that both humanistic and manpower considerations dictate that we address the aging process, this article describes the characteristics of older adults and illustrates the way in which they may be allowed to remain productive. Maslow's "Need Hierarchy" and Thorndike's "Theory of Developmental Tasks" are applied to the aging process. (JC)

  17. Bilateral Brain Regions Associated with Naming in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obler, Loraine K.; Rykhlevskaia, Elena; Schnyer, David; Clark-Cotton, Manuella R.; Spiro, Avron, III; Hyun, JungMoon; Kim, Dae-Shik; Goral, Mira; Albert, Martin L.

    2010-01-01

    To determine structural brain correlates of naming abilities in older adults, we tested 24 individuals aged 56-79 on two confrontation-naming tests (the Boston Naming Test (BNT) and the Action Naming Test (ANT)), then collected from these individuals structural Magnetic-Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) data. Overall,…

  18. Understanding Arthritis Promoting Healthy Lifestyles for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tremethick, Mary Jane; Hogan, Patricia I.; Coleman, Barb; Adams, Kady

    2010-01-01

    One of the goals of "Healthy People 2010" is to decrease the incidence of limitation in physical activity due to arthritis. Physical education, recreation, and dance professionals can play an important role in meeting this objective by addressing barriers to physical activity and exercise in older adults with arthritis, and by successfully

  19. The Impact of Arthritis on Life Satisfaction of Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burckhardt, Carol S.

    Poor health has been implicated as a suppressor of the life satisfaction of older adults. To clarify the contribution of arthritis to this process, functional disability, negative affect, pain, current severity of the disease, self-esteem, perception of general health, and internal health locus of control, were placed within a causal model as

  20. Older Japanese Adults and Mobile Phones: An Applied Ethnographic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hachiya, Kumiko

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative research investigates the meaning of "keitai" (mobile phones) for older Japanese adults between the ages of 59 and 79. Participants' emails from keitai, handwritten daily logs, and audio and video recordings from meetings and interviews were collected during my stay of nearly seven months in one of the largest cities in Japan.…

  1. Digital Skills Acquisition: Future Trends among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliam, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify future trends and barriers that will either facilitate or impede the narrowing of the digital skills divide among older adults during the next 10 years. Methodology: To address the research questions, this study used a modified version of the Delphi process using a panel of experts who

  2. Visual Object Pattern Separation Varies in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Heather M.; Toner, Chelsea; Pirogovsky, Eva; Kirwan, C. Brock; Gilbert, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    Young and nondemented older adults completed a visual object continuous recognition memory task in which some stimuli (lures) were similar but not identical to previously presented objects. The lures were hypothesized to result in increased interference and increased pattern separation demand. To examine variability in object pattern separation…

  3. Digital Gaming Perspectives of Older Adults: Content vs. Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marston, Hannah R.

    2013-01-01

    There were two objectives to this study: (a) to establish flow and (2) to establish whether computer game interaction or content was important to the older adult, using the Nintendo Wii and the Sony PlayStation 2 consoles. An earlier study had identified the sports genre as a preference, and three games (golf, tennis, and boxing) were selected

  4. The chemical senses and nutrition in older adults.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Claire

    2008-01-01

    Taste and smell are critical to dietary selection, especially for older adults, whose appetite is reduced. Neuroimaging studies can elucidate the process that causes the decrease of chemosensory functions with aging. The profound lost of olfactory functions in persons with Alzheimer disease accentuate the problem of inadequate food intake and disease progression. PMID:19042574

  5. Differential Diagnosis in Older Adults: Dementia, Depression, and Delirium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gintner, Gary G.

    1995-01-01

    Examines three common disorders, dementia, depression, and delirium, which can be particularly difficult to diagnose in older adults. Presents three aspects that are helpful in making a decision: age-related differences, medical issues that need to be ruled out, and assessment methods particularly useful in the diagnostic process. (JPS)

  6. Physical Activity among Rural Older Adults with Diabetes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Bell, Ronny A.; Smith, Shannon L.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Wetmore-Arkader, Lindsay K.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This analysis describes physical activity levels and factors associated with physical activity in an ethnically diverse (African American, Native American, white) sample of rural older adults with diabetes. Method: Data were collected using a population-based, cross-sectional stratified random sample survey of 701 community-dwelling

  7. Behavior-Analytic Research on Dementia in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trahan, Maranda A.; Kahng, SungWoo; Fisher, Alyssa B.; Hausman, Nicole L.

    2011-01-01

    It is estimated that 1 in 10 adults aged 65 years and older have been diagnosed with dementia, which is associated with numerous behavioral excesses and deficits. Despite the publication of a special section of the "Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis" ("JABA") on behavioral gerontology (Iwata, 1986), there continues to be a paucity of…

  8. Participatory Action Research with Older Adults: Key Principles in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Thomas; Minkler, Meredith

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Although participatory action research (PAR) is increasingly viewed as an important complement to traditional investigator-driven research, relatively little PAR has taken place in which older adults have been prominent partners. This article provides a review of the literature on PAR in gerontology, highlighting key studies and their…

  9. Binaural Advantage for Younger and Older Adults with Normal Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubno, Judy R.; Ahlstrom, Jayne B.; Horwitz, Amy R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Three experiments measured benefit of spatial separation, benefit of binaural listening, and masking-level differences (MLDs) to assess age-related differences in binaural advantage. Method: Participants were younger and older adults with normal hearing through 4.0 kHz. Experiment 1 compared spatial benefit with and without head shadow.

  10. Participatory Action Research with Older Adults: Key Principles in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Thomas; Minkler, Meredith

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Although participatory action research (PAR) is increasingly viewed as an important complement to traditional investigator-driven research, relatively little PAR has taken place in which older adults have been prominent partners. This article provides a review of the literature on PAR in gerontology, highlighting key studies and their

  11. Treatment of Depression and Suicide in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhar, Sunil S.; Brown, Gregory K.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) intervention for suicide prevention in older adults. Although many studies have found that CBT interventions are efficacious for reducing depressive symptoms in the elderly, researchers have yet to evaluate the efficacy of such interventions for preventing suicide or reducing suicide risk…

  12. [Gait analysis and tailored exercise prescription in older adults].

    PubMed

    Kressig, R W; Beauchet, O

    2004-02-01

    Examining gait characteristics in older adults enhances our understanding of movement control in this population and helps to better target preventive interventions. Walking is a highly automated, regular motor behavior that is mostly controlled by subcortical locomotor brain regions. With increasing age, walking requires higher levels of attention and thus more cortical involvement in motor control. This can affect gait regularity by increasing stride-to-stride variability that is characteristically high among fallers. A growing number of clinical gait analysis systems is now available to determine gait variability and thus the falling risk in older adults. Interventions targeting high gait variability in older adults need to consider basic principles of motor learning. Previously common and automatic gait patterns have to be relearned and again brought up to a highly automated level of motor control. Regular walking exercise, and particularly T'ai Chi with its emphasis on sequenced, slow, and highly controlled movements, might be helpful in this relearning process. Further research is needed to explore other interventions that could favorably affect stride-to-stride variability of older adults. PMID:14991291

  13. ASSOCIATION OF WEIGHT STATUS WITH DIETARY PATTERNS IN OLDER ADULTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary patterns and weight status are reported for 2 groups of community-living older adults, a rural Pennsylvania group and an urban Boston group. Diet patterns were defined by cluster analysis. Two major dietary patterns were identified for rural study participants and 4 major dietary patterns we...

  14. Motivational Interviewing to Affect Behavioral Change in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Sherry M.; Cooper, R. Lyle; Cassie, Kim McClure

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews and assesses the existing research literature on the efficacy of motivational interviewing (MI) to promote lifestyle changes and improve functioning among older adults confronting serious health challenges. A comprehensive literature review was conducted of intervention studies that tested the use of MI to achieve behavioral

  15. Visual Arts and Older Adult Learners in Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Irma

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of visual arts and its impact on successful aging and older adult learners in retirement. Retirement is one of the most important economic, psychological, and social transitions in most people's lives. Longevity has increased in the last sixty years such that in 2010, the average person can

  16. Self-Report Measure of Financial Exploitation of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Kendon J.; Iris, Madelyn; Ridings, John W.; Langley, Kate; Wilber, Kathleen H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to improve the measurement of financial exploitation (FE) by testing psychometric properties of the older adult financial exploitation measure (OAFEM), a client self-report instrument. Design and Methods: Rasch item response theory and traditional validation approaches were used. Questionnaires were administered by…

  17. Reasons for Older Adult Participation in University Programs in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villar, Feliciano; Triado, Carme; Pinazo, Sacramento; Celdran, Montserrat; Sole, Carme

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the reasons expressed by older adults for attending a university program in Barcelona (Spain). Results were based on the responses of 36 elders to questions from a semistructured interview. These were (a) reasons for joining a university course and (b) factors that prevent enrolling in that course. Participants mentioned more…

  18. Quantitative gait disturbances in older adults with cognitive impairments.

    PubMed

    Bridenbaugh, Stephanie A; Kressig, Reto W

    2014-01-01

    Gait is a complex motor task, initiated and governed by different areas of the brain. Studies have shown a clear association between gait and cognition. Impairments in both gait and cognition are prevalent in older adults. Older adults with gait impairment have an increased risk of developing cognitive impairments. Those with cognitive impairment often have gait impairments and more falls than cognitively healthy older adults. Recent studies have shown that quantitative gait analysis, particularly performed during dual task conditions, can detect gait deficits that cannot yet be seen by the naked eye, even to a trained specialist. Some studies have shown that such gait disturbances were measurable years before mild cognitive impairment or dementia or walking difficulties were clinically manifest. Quantitative gait analysis can provide early detection of gait and cognitive impairments as well as fall risk. Future quantitative gait studies may help distinguish dementia subtypes in early stages of the diseases. Early detection of gait and cognitive impairments would provide a better understanding of disease pathophysiology and progression. Early detection also allows the timely implementation of interventions with the ultimate goal of improving or maintaining mobility and functional independence for as long as possible. Quantitative gait analysis should be viewed as a clinical tool to aid diagnoses and treatment planning. This review examines the current literature on quantitatively measured gait impairment in older adults with mild cognitive impairment or a dementia subtype. PMID:24050167

  19. Operant Conditioning in Older Adults with Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spira, Adam P.; Edelstein, Barry A.

    2007-01-01

    Behavioral interventions based on operant principles are commonly attempted to manage agitation in older adults with dementia. The extent to which operant conditioning can occur in persons with particular dementias, however, is unclear. The present study involved use of a button-pressing task to evaluate the sensitivity of the responding of older…

  20. Alternating and Sequential Motion Rates in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, John E.; Cotton, Susan; Perry, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Background: Alternating motion rate (AMR) and sequential motion rate (SMR) are tests of articulatory diadochokinesis that are widely used in the evaluation of motor speech. However, there are no quality normative data available for adults aged 65 years and older. Aims: There were two aims: (1) to obtain a representative, normative dataset of

  1. The Level of Willingness to Evacuate among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray-Graves, Amy; Turner, Keith W.; Swan, James H.

    2011-01-01

    The issues of rising numbers of disasters, overwhelming increases in number of older adults, and historically flawed evacuations present real challenges. During the next two decades, the number of American baby boomers, who turn 65, will increase by 40%. As evidenced by recent disasters, the imperfections and vulnerabilities of flawed evacuations

  2. Elevator and Escalator Safety Education for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanks, Roma Stovall

    1996-01-01

    In eight focus groups in five cities, older adults identified their concerns about safety on elevators and escalators, often related to misunderstanding of the equipment. Their preferences for delivery of safety information included video/television, pamphlets, discussions, and posters. Educational interventions and modifications for disabilities

  3. Technology: Education and Training Needs of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Lesa; Watson, Carol

    2014-01-01

    The impact of the global aging of the population on social, economic, political, and health care institutions is unequaled. Parallel to this, evolving developments in technology promise opportunities for sales and product development to support positive aging. Older adults are excited to utilize technologies that they perceive as practical.

  4. Cognitive Style Predictors of Affect Change in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacowitz, Derek M.; Seligman, Martin E. P.

    2002-01-01

    Cognitive styles are the lenses through which individuals habitually process information from their environment. In this study, we evaluated whether different cognitive style individual difference variables, such as explanatory style and dispositional optimism, could predict changes in affective state over time in community-dwelling older adults.

  5. Participation in Learning and Wellbeing among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research was to identify the effects of participation in learning on the subjective wellbeing of older adults. Data were from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA), a large-scale, nationally representative survey of those aged 50 and above. The survey contains several wellbeing measures and information on three

  6. Bilateral Brain Regions Associated with Naming in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obler, Loraine K.; Rykhlevskaia, Elena; Schnyer, David; Clark-Cotton, Manuella R.; Spiro, Avron, III; Hyun, JungMoon; Kim, Dae-Shik; Goral, Mira; Albert, Martin L.

    2010-01-01

    To determine structural brain correlates of naming abilities in older adults, we tested 24 individuals aged 56-79 on two confrontation-naming tests (the Boston Naming Test (BNT) and the Action Naming Test (ANT)), then collected from these individuals structural Magnetic-Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) data. Overall,

  7. Ethnically Diverse Older Adults' Beliefs about Staying Mentally Sharp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Daniela B.; Laditka, Sarah B.; Laditka, James N.; Wu, Bei; Liu, Rui; Price, Anna E.; Tseng, Winston; Corwin, Sara J.; Ivey, Susan L.; Hunter, Rebecca; Sharkey, Joseph R.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined diverse older adults' (n = 396, ages 50+) views about how to stay mentally sharp. We conducted 42 focus groups in four languages at nine United States locations using a standardized discussion guide and methods. The groups represented African Americans, American Indians, Chinese Americans, Latinos, Whites other than Latinos,

  8. Sleep Reduces False Memory in Healthy Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lo, June C.; Sim, Sam K. Y.; Chee, Michael W. L.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the effects of post-learning sleep and sleep architecture on false memory in healthy older adults. Design: Balanced, crossover design. False memory was induced using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm and assessed following nocturnal sleep and following a period of daytime wakefulness. Post-learning sleep structure was evaluated using polysomnography (PSG). Setting: Sleep research laboratory. Participants: Fourteen healthy older adults from the Singapore-Longitudinal Aging Brain Study (mean age standard deviation = 66.6 4.1 y; 7 males). Measurements and Results: At encoding, participants studied lists of words that were semantically related to non-presented critical lures. At retrieval, they made remember/know and new judgments. Compared to wakefulness, post-learning sleep was associated with reduced remember responses, but not know responses to critical lures. In contrast, there were no significant differences in the veridical recognition of studied words, false recognition of unrelated distractors, discriminability, or response bias between the sleep and the wake conditions. More post-learning slow wave sleep was associated with greater reduction in false memory. Conclusions: In healthy older adults, sleep facilitates the reduction in false memory without affecting veridical memory. This benefit correlates with the amount of slow wave sleep in the post-learning sleep episode. Citation: Lo JC; Sim SK; Chee MW. Sleep reduces false memory in healthy older adults. SLEEP 2014;37(4):665-671. PMID:24744453

  9. Digital Gaming Perspectives of Older Adults: Content vs. Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marston, Hannah R.

    2013-01-01

    There were two objectives to this study: (a) to establish flow and (2) to establish whether computer game interaction or content was important to the older adult, using the Nintendo Wii and the Sony PlayStation 2 consoles. An earlier study had identified the sports genre as a preference, and three games (golf, tennis, and boxing) were selected…

  10. Civic Engagement and Older Adults: A Critical Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinson, Marty; Minkler, Meredith

    2006-01-01

    The aging of the baby boom generation, together with research that links volunteerism and positive health outcomes in later life, has contributed to a burgeoning of interest in initiatives and programs promoting civic engagement among older adults. Although useful in potentially expanding role options in later life, this growing attention also…

  11. Motivations and Benefits of the Travel Experiences of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahn, Young-Joo; Janke, Megan C.

    2011-01-01

    The motivations and benefits of educational travel among individuals aged 55 years old and over were examined in this study. A total of 136 older adults enrolled in Elderhostel programs participated in this study and reported their perceived benefits and motivations for engaging in educational travel experiences. Correlation analyses were used to

  12. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belanger, Lynda; LeBlanc, Melanie; Morin, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Insomnia is associated with significant morbidity and is often a persistent problem, particularly in older adults. It is important to attend to this complaint and not assume that it will remit spontaneously. In many cases, unfortunately, insomnia remains unrecognized and untreated, often because it is presumed that insomnia is an inevitable

  13. Older Adults Talk Technology: Technology Usage and Attitudes

    PubMed Central

    Mitzner, Tracy L.; Boron, Julie B.; Fausset, Cara Bailey; Adams, Anne E.; Charness, Neil; Czaja, Sara J.; Dijkstra, Katinka; Fisk, Arthur D.; Rogers, Wendy A.; Sharit, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Older adults (n = 113) participated in focus groups discussing their use of and attitudes about technology in the context of their home, work, and healthcare. Participants reported using a wide variety of technology items, particularly in their homes. Positive attitudes (i.e., likes) outnumbered negative attitudes (i.e., dislikes), suggesting that older adults perceive the benefits of technology use to outweigh the costs of such use. Positive attitudes were most frequently related to how the technology supported activities, enhanced convenience, and contained useful features. Negative attitudes were most frequently associated with technology creating inconveniences, unhelpful features, as well as security and reliability concerns. Given that older adults reported more positive than negative attitudes about the technologies they use, these results contradict stereotypes that older adults are afraid or unwilling to use technology. These findings also highlight the importance of perceived benefits of use and ease of use for models of technology acceptance. Emphasizing the benefits of technology in education and training programs may increase future technology adoption. PMID:20967133

  14. Creative Retirement: Survey of Older Adults' Educational Interests and Motivations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloane-Seale, Atlanta; Kops, Bill

    2004-01-01

    The University of Manitoba's Continuing Education Division (CED) and Creative Retirement Manitoba (CRM) formed a partnership to promote applied research on lifelong learning and older adults, to develop new and to complement existing educational activities, and to explore new program models and instructional methods to meet the educational needs

  15. Adapting Homework for an Older Adult Client with Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coon, David W.; Thompson, Larry W.; Gallagher-Thompson, Dolores

    2007-01-01

    There is growing evidence that psychosocial treatments incorporating behavioral intervention strategies can be effective in the treatment of depression in older adults with cognitive impairment. However, less work with such cases has focused on the use of cognitive interventions in tandem with these behavioral intervention strategies. This case

  16. A National Directory of Physical Fitness Programs for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, Lesley

    This directory is designed to help its users locate colleges and universities in the United States that offer physical fitness programs for older adults. The directory's annotations include: program area, scope of activities comprising the program, target population, duration of program, and special comments. The focus of the listed programs is on

  17. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belanger, Lynda; LeBlanc, Melanie; Morin, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Insomnia is associated with significant morbidity and is often a persistent problem, particularly in older adults. It is important to attend to this complaint and not assume that it will remit spontaneously. In many cases, unfortunately, insomnia remains unrecognized and untreated, often because it is presumed that insomnia is an inevitable…

  18. Alkaline diets favor lean tissue mass in older adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining muscle mass in aging is important to prevent falls and fractures. The net acid load from diets that are rich in acidogenic protein and cereal grains relative to their content of alkalinogenic fruits and vegetables may contribute to reduced lean tissue mass in older adults. This analysis ...

  19. Technology: Education and Training Needs of Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Lesa; Watson, Carol

    2014-01-01

    The impact of the global aging of the population on social, economic, political, and health care institutions is unequaled. Parallel to this, evolving developments in technology promise opportunities for sales and product development to support positive aging. Older adults are excited to utilize technologies that they perceive as practical.…

  20. Visual Object Pattern Separation Varies in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Heather M.; Toner, Chelsea; Pirogovsky, Eva; Kirwan, C. Brock; Gilbert, Paul E.

    2013-01-01

    Young and nondemented older adults completed a visual object continuous recognition memory task in which some stimuli (lures) were similar but not identical to previously presented objects. The lures were hypothesized to result in increased interference and increased pattern separation demand. To examine variability in object pattern separation

  1. Reasons to accumulate excess: older adults who hoard possessions.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Elizabeth; Raffin-Bouchal, Shelley; Marcy-Edwards, Donna

    2008-01-01

    This article is directed towards a deeper understanding of emotional issues that underpin hoarding behaviors by older people. A focused ethnographic research design was used as the method of exploration. The sample consisted of eight older adults who received home care and who were identified as exhibiting compulsive hoarding behaviors. The act of acquiring excess was found to be reassuring for older hoarders because stockpiled possessions relieved their anxieties and helped them to feel proud and productive, needed by others, connected, socially engaged, and in control. The hoarded possessions had value that was embedded but undeclared. Older hoarders were likely to have a positive view of themselves and their hoarding habits. For those who were not in imminent danger, hoarding constituted a certain quality of life. PMID:19042237

  2. Emotional memory for musical excerpts in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Irene; Dellacherie, Delphine; Samson, Sverine

    2015-01-01

    The emotions evoked by music can enhance recognition of excerpts. It has been suggested that memory is better for high than for low arousing music (Eschrich et al., 2005; Samson et al., 2009), but it remains unclear whether positively (Eschrich et al., 2008) or negatively valenced music (Aub et al., 2013; Vieillard and Gilet, 2013) may be better recognized. Moreover, we still know very little about the influence of age on emotional memory for music. To address these issues, we tested emotional memory for music in young and older adults using musical excerpts varying in terms of arousal and valence. Participants completed immediate and 24 h delayed recognition tests. We predicted highly arousing excerpts to be better recognized by both groups in immediate recognition. We hypothesized that arousal may compensate consolidation deficits in aging, thus showing more prominent benefit of high over low arousing stimuli in older than younger adults on delayed recognition. We also hypothesized worst retention of negative excerpts for the older group, resulting in a recognition benefit for positive over negative excerpts specific to older adults. Our results suggest that although older adults had worse recognition than young adults overall, effects of emotion on memory do not seem to be modified by aging. Results on immediate recognition suggest that recognition of low arousing excerpts can be affected by valence, with better memory for positive relative to negative low arousing music. However, 24 h delayed recognition results demonstrate effects of emotion on memory consolidation regardless of age, with a recognition benefit for high arousal and for negatively valenced music. The present study highlights the role of emotion on memory consolidation. Findings are examined in light of the literature on emotional memory for music and for other stimuli. We finally discuss the implication of the present results for potential music interventions in aging and dementia. PMID:25814950

  3. Adapting Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Older Adults at Risk for Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Heisel, Marnin J.; Talbot, Nancy L.; King, Deborah A.; Tu, Xin M.; Duberstein, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To pilot a psychological intervention adapted for older adults at-risk for suicide. Design A focused, uncontrolled, pre-to-post-treatment psychotherapy trial. All eligible participants were offered the study intervention. Setting Outpatient mental healthcare provided in the psychiatry department of an academic medical center in a mid-sized Canadian city. Participants Seventeen English-speaking adults 60 years or older, at- risk for suicide by virtue of current suicide ideation, death ideation, and/or recent self-injury. Intervention A 16-session course of Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) adapted for older adults at-risk for suicide who were receiving medication and/or other standard psychiatric treatment for underlying mood disorders. Measurements Participants completed a demographics form, screens for cognitive impairment and alcohol misuse, a semi-structured diagnostic interview, and measures of primary (suicide ideation and death ideation), and secondary study outcomes (depressive symptom severity; social adjustment and support; psychological well-being), and psychotherapy process measures. Results Participants experienced significant reductions in suicide ideation, death ideation, and depressive symptom severity, and significant improvement in perceived meaning in life, social adjustment, perceived social support, and other psychological well-being variables. Conclusions Study participants experienced enhanced psychological well-being and reduced symptoms of depression and suicide ideation over the course of IPT adapted for older adults at-risk for suicide. Larger, controlled trials are needed to further evaluate the impact of this novel intervention and to test methods for translating and integrating focused interventions into standard clinical care with at-risk older adults. PMID:24840611

  4. Emotional memory for musical excerpts in young and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Irene; Dellacherie, Delphine; Samson, Sverine

    2015-01-01

    The emotions evoked by music can enhance recognition of excerpts. It has been suggested that memory is better for high than for low arousing music (Eschrich et al., 2005; Samson et al., 2009), but it remains unclear whether positively (Eschrich et al., 2008) or negatively valenced music (Aub et al., 2013; Vieillard and Gilet, 2013) may be better recognized. Moreover, we still know very little about the influence of age on emotional memory for music. To address these issues, we tested emotional memory for music in young and older adults using musical excerpts varying in terms of arousal and valence. Participants completed immediate and 24 h delayed recognition tests. We predicted highly arousing excerpts to be better recognized by both groups in immediate recognition. We hypothesized that arousal may compensate consolidation deficits in aging, thus showing more prominent benefit of high over low arousing stimuli in older than younger adults on delayed recognition. We also hypothesized worst retention of negative excerpts for the older group, resulting in a recognition benefit for positive over negative excerpts specific to older adults. Our results suggest that although older adults had worse recognition than young adults overall, effects of emotion on memory do not seem to be modified by aging. Results on immediate recognition suggest that recognition of low arousing excerpts can be affected by valence, with better memory for positive relative to negative low arousing music. However, 24 h delayed recognition results demonstrate effects of emotion on memory consolidation regardless of age, with a recognition benefit for high arousal and for negatively valenced music. The present study highlights the role of emotion on memory consolidation. Findings are examined in light of the literature on emotional memory for music and for other stimuli. We finally discuss the implication of the present results for potential music interventions in aging and dementia. PMID:25814950

  5. The hypercorrection effect in younger and older adults

    PubMed Central

    Eich, Teal S.; Stern, Yaakov; Metcalfe, Janet

    2012-01-01

    The hypercorrection effect, which refers to the finding that errors committed with high confidence are more likely to be corrected than are low confidence errors, has been replicated many times, and with both young adults and children. In the present study, we contrasted older with younger adults. Participants answered general-information questions, made confidence ratings about their answers, were given corrective feedback, and then were retested on questions that they had gotten wrong. While younger adults showed the hypercorrection effect, older adults, despite higher overall accuracy on the general-information questions and excellent basic metacognitive ability, showed a diminished hypercorrection effect. Indeed, the correspondence between their confidence in their errors and the probability of correction was not significantly greater than zero, showing, for the first time, that a particular participant population is selectively impaired on this error-correction task. These results potentially offer leverage both on the mechanisms underlying the hypercorrection effect and on reasons for older adults' memory impairments, as well as on memory functions that are spared. PMID:23241028

  6. Listening to Older Adult Parents of Adult Children with Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Judith R.

    2012-01-01

    This article uses qualitative research and narrative analysis to examine the experience of women age 55 and older who are parents caring for adult children with mental illness. Knowledge about the conflicts of older parents with dependent children is underdeveloped. In this study, analysis of women's stories about parenting in later life reveal…

  7. Listening to Older Adult Parents of Adult Children with Mental Illness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Judith R.

    2012-01-01

    This article uses qualitative research and narrative analysis to examine the experience of women age 55 and older who are parents caring for adult children with mental illness. Knowledge about the conflicts of older parents with dependent children is underdeveloped. In this study, analysis of women's stories about parenting in later life reveal

  8. Activity Levels in Healthy Older Adults: Implications for Joint Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Thorp, Laura E.; Orozco, Diego; Block, Joel A.; Sumner, Dale R.; Wimmer, Markus A.

    2012-01-01

    This work evaluated activity levels in a group of healthy older adults to establish a target activity level for adults of similar age after total joint arthroplasty (TJA). With the decreasing age of TJA patients, it is essential to have a reference for activity level in younger patients as activity level affects quality of life and implant design. 54 asymptomatic, healthy older adults with no clinical evidence of lower extremity OA participated. The main outcome measure, average daily step count, was measured using an accelerometer-based activity monitor. On average the group took 8813 3611 steps per day, approximately 4000 more steps per day than has been previously reported in patients following total joint arthroplasty. The present work provides a reference for activity after joint arthroplasty which is relevant given the projected number of people under the age of 65 who will undergo joint arthroplasty in the coming years. PMID:23577274

  9. Gender and Friendship Norms Among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Felmlee, Diane; Muraco, Anna

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined same- and cross-gender friendship norms in a sample of 135 adults (average age 73 years). Participants evaluated a friends behavior, quantitatively and qualitatively, in vignettes in which the friends gender was experimentally manipulated. Gender often significantly, though modestly, influenced normative evaluations. Women frequently had higher expectations of friends than men and placed a greater emphasis on intimacy. Women were more disapproving of violations of friendship rules, such as betraying a confidence, paying a surprise visit, and failing to stand up for a friend in public. However, both men and women were less approving of a man than a woman who greets another friend with a kiss or who requests to stay overnight. Respondents open-ended comments reflected positive attitudes regarding cross-gender friendships. Most findings demonstrated that men and women across a wide age range held similar cultural norms for close ties, norms of trust, commitment, and respect. PMID:20473364

  10. Posttraumatic stress symptoms in older adults hospitalized for fall injury?

    PubMed Central

    Jayasinghe, Nimali; Sparks, Martha A.; Kato, Kaori; Wyka, Katarzyna; Wilbur, Kaitlyn; Chiaramonte, Gabrielle; Barie, Philip S.; Lachs, Mark S.; O'Dell, Michael; Evans, Arthur; Bruce, Martha L.; Difede, JoAnn

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although unintentional falls may pose a threat of death or injury, few studies have investigated their psychological impact on older adults. This study sought to gather data on early posttraumatic stress symptoms in older adults in the hospital setting after a fall. Method Participants in this study were 100 adults age 65 years or older admitted to a large urban hospital in New York City because of a fall. Men and women were represented approximately equally in the sample; most were interviewed within days of the fall event. The study's bedside interview included the Posttraumatic Stress Symptom Scale, which inquires about the presence and severity of 17 trauma-related symptoms. Results Twenty-seven participants reported substantial posttraumatic stress symptoms (moderate or higher severity). Exploratory bivariate analyses suggested an association between posttraumatic stress symptom severity and female gender, lower level of education, unemployment, number of medical conditions, and back/chest injury. Conclusions A significant percentage of older patients hospitalized after a fall suffer substantial posttraumatic stress. Future investigations are needed to assess the association between the psychiatric impact of a fall and short-term inpatient outcomes as well as longer-term functional outcomes. PMID:25213226

  11. Social networks of older adults living with HIV in Finland.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Nuno Ribeiro; Kylmä, Jari; Kirsi, Tapio; Pereira, Marco

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the social networks of older adults living with HIV. Interviews were conducted with nine individuals aged 50 or older living with HIV in Helsinki, Finland. Analysis of transcripts was analysed by inductive qualitative content analysis. Results indicated that these participants' networks tended to be large, including those both aware and unaware of the participants' health status. Analysis identified three main themes: large multifaceted social networks, importance of a support group, and downsizing of social networks. Support received appeared to be of great importance in coping with their health condition, especially since the time of diagnosis. Friends and family were the primary source of informal support. The majority of participants relied mostly on friends, some of whom were HIV-positive. Formal support came primarily from the HIV organisation's support group. In this study group, non-disclosure did not impact participants' well-being. In years to come, social networks of older adults living with HIV may shrink due to personal reasons other than HIV-disclosure. What is of primary importance is that healthcare professionals become knowledgeable about psychosocial issues of older adults living with HIV, identifying latent problems and developing adequate interventions in the early stages of the disease; this would help prevent social isolation and foster successful ageing with HIV. PMID:26278329

  12. Older adult drivers living in residential care facilities

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Hillary D.; Ginde, Adit A.; Betz, Marian E.

    2015-01-01

    Residential care facilities (RCF) provide assistance to older adults who cannot live independently, but it is unclear whether these residents have retired from driving. Here, we characterize older adults living in RCFs who still drive from a national cross-sectional survey of residents (2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities), representing ~733,000 adults living in RCFs such as assisted living facilities and personal care homes. Key resident characteristics were health, function, mobility and community activity indicators, which could be associated with increased driving risk. Of 8,087 residents, 4.5% (95%CI=3.9-5.1) were current drivers. Many drivers were older than 80 years (74%, 95%CI=67-79), in very good health (31%, 95%CI=25-38) or good health (35%, 95%CI=29-42), and had a median of two medical conditions. Most were independent with activities of daily living, though some needed assistance with walking and used gait devices. Given these results, RCF staff and healthcare providers need a heightened awareness of factors associated with driving risk to promote safety of older drivers and provide resources for likely transition to other transportation. PMID:26366125

  13. Ageing with HIV: newly diagnosed older adults in Italy.

    PubMed

    Orchi, N; Balzano, R; Scognamiglio, P; Navarra, A; De Carli, G; Elia, P; Grisetti, S; Sampaolesi, A; Giuliani, M; De Filippis, A; Puro, V; Ippolito, G; Girardi, E

    2008-04-01

    The prevalence of HIV/AIDS among people in midlife and late adulthood has been increasing in Western countries over the last decade. We analyzed data from a prospective, observational multi-centre study on individuals newly diagnosed with HIV between January 2004 and March 2007 in 10 public counselling and testing sites in Latium, Italy. At diagnosis, routine demographic, epidemiological, clinical and laboratory data are recorded, and patients are asked to complete a questionnaire investigating socio-demographic and psycho-behavioural aspects. To analyze the association of individual characteristics with age, we compared older adults (> or = 50 years) with their younger counterpart (18-49 years). To adjust for potential confounding effect of the epidemiological, clinical and behavioural characteristics, to identify factors associated with older age at HIV diagnosis, multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. Overall, 1073 individuals were identified, 125 of whom (11.6%) were aged 50 years or above. The questionnaire was completed by 41% (440/1073). Compared with their younger counterparts, a higher proportion of older patients were males, born in Italy, reported heterosexual or unknown HIV risk exposure, were never tested for HIV before and were in a more advanced stage of HIV infection at diagnosis. In addition, older adults had a lower educational level and were more frequently living with their partners or children. With respect to psycho-behavioural characteristics, older patients were more likely to have paid money for sex and have never used recreational drugs. Interestingly, no differences were found regarding condom use, which was poor in both age groups. These findings may have important implications for the management of older adults with HIV, who should be targeted by appropriate public health actions, such as opportunistic screening and easier access to healthcare. Moreover, strategies including information on HIV and prevention of risk behaviours are needed. PMID:18449818

  14. Preparing Human Service Practitioners to Teach Older Adults. Information Series No. 209.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiemstra, Roger

    This paper overviews existing research on how one teaches the older person. It is aimed at the many persons who work with older adults, regardless of whether they are trained to teach older adults. Suggestions are outlined for the design and implementation of effective education for older persons. Several areas that are examined are (1) the

  15. Short Physical Performance Battery in Hospitalized Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Steve; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.; Goodwin, James S.; Graham, James; Ostir, Glenn V.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims The Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) has played an important role in establishing a linkage between lower body function and health in community dwelling older adults. It has had limited use in hospitalized elders, however. The objectives of this study were to determine if SPPB information could be reliably collected in a hospitalized older patient population, and compare SPPB scoring criteria previously established in a community population to a hospitalized population. Methods A cross sectional design that included 90 adults aged 65 years or older admitted to an Acute Care for Elders (ACE) unit. Patient information was collected within 24 hours of hospitalization. SPPB was scored using established criteria for older persons in the community and revised criteria for older persons hospitalized with acute illness. Results The mean age of the sample was 75.3 (SD 7.1) years, 61% were women, and 67.8% were non-Hispanic white, 21.2% non-Hispanic black and 11% Hispanic. Mean hospital and community SPPB scores were 4.9 (SD 3.5) and 3.6 (SD 2.9), respectively. In multivariate regression analyses, increasing age (b= ?0.15, SE 0.06, p=0.007), length of stay (b= ?0.36, SE 0.15, p=0.02), comorbidities (b= ?0.36, SE 0.16, p=0.04), and cognition (b= ?2.94, SE 1.25, p=0.02) were significantly and inversely associated with hospital SPPB. Only age (b= ?0.11, SE 0.05, p=0.02) was significantly associated with community SPPB. Conclusions This study showed that the SPPB can be reliably collected in hospitalized older patients. The study further suggests that revised hospital SPPB scoring criteria may be appropriate when used in this older population. PMID:20154514

  16. Incidence of dementia in older adults with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Strydom, Andre; Chan, Trevor; King, Michael; Hassiotis, Angela; Livingston, Gill

    2013-06-01

    Dementia may be more common in older adults with intellectual disability (ID) than in the general population. The increased risk for Alzheimer's disease in people with Down syndrome (DS) is well established, but much less is known about dementia in adults with ID who do not have DS. We estimated incidence rates from a longitudinal study of dementia in older adults with ID without DS and compared them to general population rates. 222 participants with ID without DS aged 60 years and older were followed up an average of 2.9 years later to identify those who had declined in functional or cognitive abilities. Those who screened positive had a comprehensive assessment for dementia, diagnosed using ICD 10 and DSM IV criteria. 134 participants who did not have dementia at initial assessment were alive and interviewed at follow up; 21 (15.7%) were diagnosed with dementia. Overall incidence rate for those aged ? 60 was 54.6/1000 person years (95% CI 34.1-82.3). The highest incidence rate (97.8/1000 person years) was in the age group 70-74. Standardised incidence ratio for those aged ? 65 was 4.98 (95% CI 1.62-11.67). Incidence of dementia in older people with intellectual disabilities are up to five times higher than older adults in the general population. Screening may be useful in this population given the high incident rates, particularly as more effective treatments become available. Studies to explore the underlying aetiological factors for dementia associated with intellectual disability could help to identify novel protective and risk factors. PMID:23578903

  17. Correlates of Susceptibility to Scams in Older Adults Without Dementia

    PubMed Central

    James, Bryan D.; Boyle, Patricia A.; Bennett, David A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined correlates of susceptibility to scams in 639 community-dwelling older adults without dementia from a cohort study of aging. Regression models adjusted for age, sex, education, and income were used to examine associations between susceptibility to scams, measured by 5-item self-report measure, and a number of potential correlates. Susceptibility was positively associated with age and negatively associated with income, cognition, psychological well being, social support, and literacy. Fully adjusted models indicated that older age and lower levels of cognitive function, decreased psychological well-being, and lower literacy in particular may be markers of susceptibility to financial victimization in old age. PMID:24499279

  18. Correlates of susceptibility to scams in older adults without dementia.

    PubMed

    James, Bryan D; Boyle, Patricia A; Bennett, David A

    2014-01-01

    This study examined correlates of susceptibility to scams in 639 community-dwelling older adults without dementia from a cohort study of aging. Regression models adjusted for age, sex, education, and income were used to examine associations between susceptibility to scams, measured by a five-item self-report measure, and a number of potential correlates. Susceptibility was positively associated with age and negatively associated with income, cognition, psychological well-being, social support, and literacy. Fully adjusted models indicated that older age and lower levels of cognitive function, decreased psychological well-being, and lower literacy in particular may be markers of susceptibility to financial victimization in old age. PMID:24499279

  19. Cerebellar direct current stimulation enhances motor learning in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Hardwick, Robert M.; Celnik, Pablo A.

    2014-01-01

    Developing novel approaches to combat age related declines in motor function is key to maintaining health and function in older adults, a subgroup of the population that is rapidly growing. Motor adaptation, a form of motor learning, has been shown to be impaired in healthy older subjects compared to their younger counterparts. Here we tested whether excitatory anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the cerebellum could enhance adaptation in older subjects. Participants performed a center-out reaching task, adapting to the sudden introduction of a visual cursor rotation. Older participants receiving sham tDCS (mean age 56.3 6.8 years) were slower to adapt than younger participants (mean age 20.7 2.1 years. In contrast, older participants who received anodal tDCS (mean age 59.6 8.1 years) adapted faster, with a rate that was similar to younger subjects. We conclude that cerebellar anodal tDCS enhances motor adaptation in older individuals. Our results highlight the efficacy of the novel approach of using cerebellar tDCS to combat age related deficits in motor learning. PMID:24792908

  20. Disrupted cortico-cerebellar connectivity in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Jessica A.; Peltier, Scott J.; Wiggins, Jillian Lee; Jaeggi, Susanne M.; Buschkuehl, Martin; Fling, Brett W.; Kwak, Youngbin; Jonides, John; Monk, Christopher S.; Seidler, Rachael D.

    2013-01-01

    Healthy aging is marked by declines in a variety of cognitive and motor abilities. A better understanding of the aging brain may aid in elucidating the neural substrates of these behavioral effects. Investigations of resting state functional brain connectivity have provided insights into pathology, and to some degree, healthy aging. Given the role of the cerebellum in both motor and cognitive behaviors, as well as its known volumetric declines with age, investigating cerebellar networks may shed light on the neural bases of age-related functional declines. We mapped the resting state networks of the lobules of the right hemisphere and the vermis of the cerebellum in a group of healthy older adults and compared them to those of young adults. We report disrupted cortico-cerebellar resting state network connectivity in older adults. These results remain even when controlling for cerebellar volume, signal-to-noise ratio, and signal-to-fluctuation noise ratio. Specifically, there was consistent disruption of cerebellar connectivity with both the striatum and the medial temporal lobe. Associations between connectivity strength and both sensorimotor and cognitive task performance indicate that cerebellar engagement with the default mode network and striatal pathways is associated with better performance for older adults. These results extend our understanding of the resting state networks of the aging brain to include cortico-cerebellar networks, and indicate that age differences in network connectivity strength are important for behavior. PMID:23792980

  1. Gender Differences in Cognition among Older Adults in China

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xiaoyan; Hu, Yuqing; McArdle, John J.; Smith, James P.; Zhao, Yaohui

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we model gender differences in cognitive ability in China using a new sample of middle-aged and older Chinese respondents. Modeled after the American Health and Retirement Study (HRS), the CHARLS Pilot survey respondents are 45 years and older in two quite distinct provinces—Zhejiang, a high-growth industrialized province on the East Coast, and Gansu, a largely agricultural and poor province in the West—in a sense new and old China. Our cognition measures proxy for two different dimensions of adult cognition—episodic memory and intact mental status. On both measures, Chinese women score much lower than do Chinese men, a gender difference that grows among older Chinese cohorts. We relate both these cognition scores to schooling, urban residence, family and community levels of economic resources, and height. We find that cognition is more closely related to mean community resources than to family resources, especially for women, suggesting that in traditional poor Chinese communities there are strong economic incentives to favor boys at the expense of girls. We also find that these gender differences in cognitive ability have been steadily decreasing across birth cohorts as the economy of China grew rapidly. Among cohorts of young adults in China, there is no longer any gender disparity in cognitive ability. This parallels the situation in the United States where cognition scores of adult women actually exceed those of adult men. PMID:24347682

  2. Young and Older Adults' Gender Stereotype in Multitasking

    PubMed Central

    Strobach, Tilo; Woszidlo, Alesia

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated discrepancies between two components of stereotyping by means of the popular notion that women are better at multitasking behaviors: the cognitive structure in individuals (personal belief) and the perceived consensus regarding certain beliefs (perceived belief of groups). With focus on this notion, we examined whether there was empirical evidence for the stereotype's existence and whether and how it was shared among different age groups. Data were collected from 241 young (n = 129) and older (n = 112) German individuals. The reported perceptions of gender effects at multitasking were substantial and thus demonstrated the existence of its stereotype. Importantly, in young and older adults, this stereotype existed in the perception of attributed characteristics by members of a collective (perceived belief of groups). When contrasting this perceived belief of groups and the personal belief, older adults showed a similar level of conformation of the gender stereotype while young adults were able to differentiate between these perspectives. Thus, young adults showed a discrepancy between the stereotype's components cognitive structure in individuals and perceived consensus regarding certain beliefs. PMID:26733913

  3. Improving Medication Management among At-risk Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Delinda; Kripalani, Sunil; DuPapau, V.J.

    2013-01-01

    Low health literacy is common among Medicare recipients and affects their understanding of complex medication regimens. Interventions are needed to improve medication use among older adults, while addressing low health literacy. Community-dwelling older adults in this study were enrolled in an inner-city adult day center. They completed a baseline measure of health literacy, medication self-efficacy, and medication adherence. They were provided with a personalized, illustrated daily medication schedule (PictureRx). Six weeks later, their medication self-efficacy and adherence were assessed. Among the 20 participants in this pilot project, 70% had high likelihood of limited health literacy and took an average of 13.2 prescription medications. Both self-efficacy and medication adherence increased significantly after provision of the PictureRx cards (p<0.001 and p<0.05, respectively). Al participants rated the PictureRx cards as very helpful in terms of helping them remember the medications purpose and dosing. Illustrated daily medication schedules improve medication self-efficacy and adherence among at-risk, community-dwelling older adults. PMID:22587641

  4. Older adults, unlike younger adults, do not modulate alpha power to suppress irrelevant information.

    PubMed

    Vaden, Ryan J; Hutcheson, Nathan L; McCollum, Lesley A; Kentros, Jonathan; Visscher, Kristina M

    2012-11-15

    This study examines the neural mechanisms through which younger and older adults ignore irrelevant information, a process that is necessary to effectively encode new memories. Some age-related memory deficits have been linked to a diminished ability to dynamically gate sensory input, resulting in problems inhibiting the processing of distracting stimuli. Whereas oscillatory power in the alpha band (8-12 Hz) over visual cortical areas is thought to dynamically gate sensory input in younger adults, it is not known whether older adults use the same mechanism to gate out sensory input. Here we identified a task in which both older and younger adults could suppress the processing of irrelevant sensory stimuli, allowing us to use electroencephalography (EEG) to explore the neural activity associated with suppression of visual processing. As expected, we found that the younger adults' suppression of visual processing was correlated with robust modulation of alpha oscillatory power. However, older adults did not modulate alpha power to suppress processing of visual information. These results demonstrate that suppression of alpha power is not necessary to inhibit the processing of distracting stimuli in older adults, suggesting the existence of alternative strategies for suppressing irrelevant, potentially distracting information. PMID:22885248

  5. Older Adults Need Guidance to Meet Nutritional Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Foote, Janet A.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Harris, Robin B.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to compare the diet of healthy, free-living senior volunteers to the dietary reference intakes (DRIs) and Food Guide Pyramid recommendations. Methods This study was a cross-sectional assessment of dietary habits, as measured using a standardized food frequency questionnaire, among 1740 healthy Southwestern U.S. adults, aged 51 to 85 years. Assessment of independently-living volunteers to chemoprevention trials provides an efficient mechanism to profile typical dietary habits among the older adult population. Results Daily estimated macronutrient intakes exceeded recommended proportions of protein and fat. In contrast, more than 60% of this senior population reported dietary vitamin D, vitamin E, folate and calcium intakes below estimated average requirements (EAR). Based on the Food Guide Pyramid recommendations, fewer than 10% of the older adults consumed the recommended daily dairy and grain servings. More females than males consumed recommended vegetable (49% versus 40%) and fruit (53% versus 48%) servings (p <, 0.05). More males consumed recommended grain (11% versus 7%) and protein (78% versus 73%) servings (p <, 0.05) than females. Conclusions Mean micronutrient intakes compared well with DRIs, although fewer than one-half of these older adults consumed recommended levels for vitamin D, vitamin E, folate, and calcium or daily food servings of dairy, grains, vegetables or fruits. Since the beneficial aspects of foods are not limited to essential nutrients, nutrition recommendations to older adults may be improved by emphasizing daily servings of nutrient-dense choices within the Food Pyramid. PMID:11022877

  6. Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression in Older Adults Delivered via Videoconferencing: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzari, Claudia; Egan, Sarah J.; Rees, Clare S.

    2011-01-01

    Depression affects up to 25% of older adults. Underdetection and subsequent undertreatment of depression in older adults has been attributed in part to difficulties in older adults being able to access treatment. This uncontrolled pilot study, N = 3, explored the acceptability and efficacy of a brief behavioral activation treatment delivered via…

  7. Understanding Older Adults' Perceptions of Internet Use: An Exploratory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Robert; Spears, Jeffrey; Luptak, Marilyn; Wilby, Frances

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined factors related to older adults' perceptions of Internet use. Three hundred ninety five older adults participated in the study. The factor analysis revealed four factors perceived by older adults as critical to their Internet use: social connection, self-efficacy, the need to seek financial information, and the need to…

  8. More than Just a Communication Medium: What Older Adults Say about Television and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, Giang T.; Wittink, Marsha N.; Murray, Genevra F.; Barg, Frances K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Older adults watch more television than younger people do. Television's role in mental health has been described in the general population, but less is known about how older adults think of television in the context of depression. Design and Methods: Using a semistructured interview created to help clinicians understand how older adults

  9. An Intergenerational E-Mail Pal Project on Attitudes of College Students toward Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Carla A.

    2011-01-01

    Intergenerational interactions have demonstrated some success at improving attitudes of college students toward older adults. This quasiexperimental study involved undergraduate college students paired with older adults for a six-week e-mail exchange. Student attitudes toward older adults were measured pre- and posttest with Polizzi's revised

  10. Bounded Rationality, Emotions and Older Adult Decision Making: Not so Fast and yet so Frugal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanoch, Yaniv; Wood, Stacey; Rice, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Herbert Simon's work on bounded rationality has had little impact on researchers studying older adults' decision making. This omission is surprising, as human constraints on computation and memory are exacerbated in older adults. The study of older adults' decision-making processes could benefit from employing a bounded rationality perspective,

  11. Appreciating the Predicament of Housebound Older Adults with Arthritis: Portrait of a Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nour, Kareen; Laforest, Sophie; Gignac, Monique; Gauvin, Lise

    2005-01-01

    This paper draws a socio-demographic, physical, psychosocial, and behavioural profile of housebound older adults with arthritis and compares older adults with rheumatoid arthritis to those with osteoarthritis. Data from 125 housebound older adults with osteoarthritis (65%) or rheumatoid arthritis (35%) were compared to published samples and to

  12. Journal Writing with Web 2.0 Tools: A Vision for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, Craig E.; Aagard, Steven

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how Web 2.0 technologies may facilitate journaling and related inquiry methods among older adults. Benefits and limitations of journaling are summarized as well as computer skills of older adults. We then describe how Web 2.0 technologies can enhance journaling among older adults by diminishing feelings of isolation,…

  13. An Information Needs Profile of Israeli Older Adults, regarding the Law and Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getz, Irith; Weissman, Gabriella

    2010-01-01

    Based on Nicholas' framework for assessing information needs, this research aims to construct a profile of both Israeli older adults and their information needs regarding laws and social services. Data were collected by questionnaires answered by 200 older adults, born in Europe, Asia and Africa, who attended social clubs for older adults. The

  14. Journal Writing with Web 2.0 Tools: A Vision for Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, Craig E.; Aagard, Steven

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how Web 2.0 technologies may facilitate journaling and related inquiry methods among older adults. Benefits and limitations of journaling are summarized as well as computer skills of older adults. We then describe how Web 2.0 technologies can enhance journaling among older adults by diminishing feelings of isolation,

  15. Social Workers' Attitudes toward Older Adults: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Donna; Chonody, Jill

    2013-01-01

    Ageist attitudes toward older adults have been recognized as barriers to recruiting and training competent social workers. This article provides a systematic review of the literature that focused on social workers' and social work students' attitudes toward older adults and working with older adults. The authors sought empirical studies

  16. Understanding Older Adults' Perceptions of Internet Use: An Exploratory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zheng, Robert; Spears, Jeffrey; Luptak, Marilyn; Wilby, Frances

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined factors related to older adults' perceptions of Internet use. Three hundred ninety five older adults participated in the study. The factor analysis revealed four factors perceived by older adults as critical to their Internet use: social connection, self-efficacy, the need to seek financial information, and the need to

  17. Social Workers' Attitudes toward Older Adults: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Donna; Chonody, Jill

    2013-01-01

    Ageist attitudes toward older adults have been recognized as barriers to recruiting and training competent social workers. This article provides a systematic review of the literature that focused on social workers' and social work students' attitudes toward older adults and working with older adults. The authors sought empirical studies…

  18. An Information Needs Profile of Israeli Older Adults, regarding the Law and Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getz, Irith; Weissman, Gabriella

    2010-01-01

    Based on Nicholas' framework for assessing information needs, this research aims to construct a profile of both Israeli older adults and their information needs regarding laws and social services. Data were collected by questionnaires answered by 200 older adults, born in Europe, Asia and Africa, who attended social clubs for older adults. The…

  19. Appreciating the Predicament of Housebound Older Adults with Arthritis: Portrait of a Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nour, Kareen; Laforest, Sophie; Gignac, Monique; Gauvin, Lise

    2005-01-01

    This paper draws a socio-demographic, physical, psychosocial, and behavioural profile of housebound older adults with arthritis and compares older adults with rheumatoid arthritis to those with osteoarthritis. Data from 125 housebound older adults with osteoarthritis (65%) or rheumatoid arthritis (35%) were compared to published samples and to…

  20. Participation of Older Adults in Health Programs and Research: A Critical Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, William B.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Briefly reviews illustrative literature on willingness or unwillingness of older adults to participate in clinical trials, health promotion/disease prevention initiatives, and health programs to maintain or improve functioning of chronically ill older adults. Review provides overview of participation of older adults in health programs and

  1. Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression in Older Adults Delivered via Videoconferencing: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzari, Claudia; Egan, Sarah J.; Rees, Clare S.

    2011-01-01

    Depression affects up to 25% of older adults. Underdetection and subsequent undertreatment of depression in older adults has been attributed in part to difficulties in older adults being able to access treatment. This uncontrolled pilot study, N = 3, explored the acceptability and efficacy of a brief behavioral activation treatment delivered via

  2. "You don't want to burden them": older adults' views on family involvement in care.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Eileen; Lewis, Lisa M; Barg, Frances K; Bogner, Hillary R

    2009-08-01

    Burden emerged as an important concept among older adults in a study of how older adults interact with their families around care. The authors conducted 50 semistructured interviews with adults older than the age of 65 years and a spouse or adult child. The sample was stratified by ethnicity thus giving the opportunity to explore both ethnic similarities and differences. Older adults who expressed the concept of burden were more likely to be White compared with older adults who did not express burden. Older respondents discussed burden in relation to not wanting to complicate the busy lives of adult children, guilt about health problems, and concern that children were overly worried about the care of their older family member. The expression and meaning of burden differed according to ethnicity. This study has implications for practice and policies to meet the needs of families and promote the independence of older persons. PMID:19474397

  3. Characterizing Motion Parallax Depth Thresholds in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Holmin, Jessica; Nawrot, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Successful navigation in the world requires effective visuospatial processing. Unfortunately, older adults have many visuospatial deficits, which can have severe real-world consequences. One visuospatial process, depth from motion parallax (MP), has been largely unexplored in older adults. Unambiguous depth from MP requires intact retinal image motion processing and an extra-retinal pursuit eye movement signal. Both the motion and eye movement systems are affected by age. Given these deficits, it follows logically that sensitivity to MP may be affected in older adults, but no one has investigated this possibility. The current study characterizes depth from MP in older adults and explores whether age-related changes in the motion and pursuit systems affect depth perception from motion parallax. Stationary younger (18-35 years) and older (60-75 years) observers performed depth-phase judgments on random-dot motion parallax stimuli. The stimuli translated laterally at one of three velocities (2.3, 10.1, and 25 deg/sec), generating the necessary pursuit signal. Dots within the stimuli translated laterally (0.013-0.92 deg/sec), generating constituent retinal image motion. The MP depth threshold at each pursuit velocity was quantified using the motion/pursuit ratio, which takes into account image motion, pursuit signal, and viewing distance. In addition, observers performed an analogous motion perception threshold task to assess age-related changes in motion perception. Age-related changes in the pursuit system were assessed with a step-ramp pursuit task at the three velocities used in the motion parallax task. Older adults have higher motion parallax thresholds at all pursuit velocities, as well as higher motion thresholds and lower pursuit gain, especially at higher velocities. We conclude that the threshold limit for unambiguous depth from MP is affected by age. Decreased sensitivity to depth from MP is tied to age-related deficits in motion perception and pursuit eye movements, both of which are necessary for unambiguous depth from MP. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326493

  4. Neurobehavioural consequences of closed head injury in older adults.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, F C; Levin, H S; Presley, R M; Searcy, J; Colohan, A R; Eisenberg, H M; Jann, B; Bertolino-Kusnerik, L

    1994-01-01

    This study examined the neurobehavioural effects of closed head injury (CHI) in adults aged 50 years and older. Twenty two mild to moderate CHI patients who were within seven months of the injury were administered measures of language, memory, attention, and executive functioning. Compared with demographically similar normal controls, the patients exhibited significantly poorer functioning on the cognitive domains. Naming and word fluency under timed conditions, verbal and visual memory, and the ability to infer similarities were especially vulnerable. These initial findings indicate that CHI in older adults produces considerable cognitive deficits in the early stages of recovery. Future research should characterise long term outcome and the potential links between head injury and the development of progressive dementia. PMID:8057121

  5. Management of delirium in critically ill older adults.

    PubMed

    Balas, Michele C; Rice, Michael; Chaperon, Claudia; Smith, Heather; Disbot, Maureen; Fuchs, Barry

    2012-08-01

    Delirium in older adults in critical care is associated with poor outcomes, including longer stays, higher costs, increased mortality, greater use of continuous sedation and physical restraints, increased unintended removal of catheters and self-extubation, functional decline, new institutionalization, and new onset of cognitive impairment. Diagnosing delirium is complicated because many critically ill older adults cannot communicate their needs effectively. Manifestations include reduced ability to focus attention, disorientation, memory impairment, and perceptual disturbances. Nurses often have primary responsibility for detecting and treating delirium, which can be extraordinarily complicated because patients are often voiceless, extremely ill, and require high levels of sedatives to facilitate mechanical ventilation. An aggressive, appropriate, and compassionate management strategy may reduce the suffering and adverse outcomes associated with delirium and improve relationships between nurses, patients, and patients' family members. PMID:22855075

  6. Social Networks of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Erosheva, Elena A.; Kim, Hyun-Jun; Emlet, Charles; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen I.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study examines global social networks—including friendship, support, and acquaintance networks—of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) older adults. Design and Methods Utilizing data from a large community-based study, we employ multiple regression analyses to examine correlates of social network size and diversity. Results Controlling for background characteristics, network size was positively associated with being female, transgender identity, employment, higher income, having a partner or a child, identity disclosure to a neighbor, engagement in religious activities, and service use. Controlling in addition for network size, network diversity was positively associated with younger age, being female, transgender identity, identity disclosure to a friend, religious activity, and service use. Implications According to social capital theory, social networks provide a vehicle for social resources that can be beneficial for successful aging and well-being. This study is a first step at understanding the correlates of social network size and diversity among LGBT older adults. PMID:25882129

  7. Development of an exercise expert system for older adults.

    PubMed

    Boyette, L W; Lloyd, A; Manuel, S; Boyette, J E; Echt, K V

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a computerized exercise expert system (CEES) that creates tailored exercise plans for older adults. A panel of experts was selected in the areas of medicine, exercise physiology, health promotion, exercise psychology, and gerontology. The experts communicated with the principal investigator and the project members by mail, email, telephone, and expert meetings. A two-day workshop was held during the second year for the project members as well as local and national experts to review the CEES. The CEES demonstrated adequate inter-rater reliability (0.80) and criterion validity (0.70). Content validity was achieved by literature review and expert opinion. The CEES gathers information on the elder's health status, clinical factors, and exercise determinants that characterize specific barriers or incentives to exercise. The software program then develops individualized exercise prescriptions that are customized to older adults. PMID:11322474

  8. Neighbourhood deprivation and physical activity in UK older adults.

    PubMed

    Fox, K R; Hillsdon, M; Sharp, D; Cooper, A R; Coulson, J C; Davis, M; Harris, R; McKenna, J; Narici, M; Stathi, A; Thompson, J L

    2011-03-01

    The benefits of regular physical activity for older adults are now well-established but this group remain the least active sector of the population. In this paper, the association between levels of neighbourhood deprivation and physical activity was assessed. A sample of 125 males with a mean age of 77.5 (5.6) years, and 115 females with a mean age of age 78.6 (8.6) underwent 7-day accelerometry, a physical performance battery, and completed a daily journeys log. Univariate associations between physical activity parameters and level of deprivation of neighbourhood were extinguished in regression models controlling for age, gender, and level of educational attainment. Age, gender, educational attainment, body mass index, physical function, and frequency of journeys from the home explained between 50% and 54% of variance in activity parameters. These results suggest the importance of strategies to help older adults maintain physical function, healthy weight, and remain active in their communities. PMID:21292536

  9. Sodium-Reduction Strategies for Meals Prepared for Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Losby, Jan L.; Patel, Deesha; Schuldt, June; Hunt, Glynnis S.; Stracuzzi, Jeanne C.; Johnston, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    This article describes lessons learned from implementing sodium-reduction strategies in programs that provide meals to older adults in 2 New York counties, with one county replicating the approaches of the other. The implemented sodium-reduction strategies were product substitutions, recipe modifications, and cooking from scratch. Both counties were able to achieve modest sodium reductions in prepared meals. Lessons learned to implement sodium reduction strategies include the following: (1) identifying partners with shared experience and common goals; (2) engaging experts; (3) understanding the complexity of the meals system for older adults; (4) conducting sodium nutrient analysis; (5) making gradual and voluntary reductions to sodium content; and (6) working toward sustainable sodium reduction. PMID:24322812

  10. Dimensionality of Everyday Problem Solving in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Marsiske, Michael; Willis, Sherry L.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated individual differences in older adults' everyday problem-solving performance using 3 instruments. Past research, typically using only single measures, has yielded a multitude of findings regarding age effects in everyday problem solving. The present sample consisted of 111 older adults (44 men, 67 women) who ranged in age from 68 to 94 years. Confirmatory factor analyses revealed that, within each of the 3 instruments, subscales representing particular content domains could be reliably identified. There was, however, little relation between the different instruments, and the measures also differed in their relation with chronological age. These results support the view that everyday problem-solving competence is a multidimensional construct, of which previous investigations may only have studied particular dimensions. PMID:7662186

  11. Adapting Telemonitoring Technology Use for Older Adults: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kristine; Pennathur, Priya; Bossen, Ann; Gloeckner, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Telehealth technologies are increasing health care access for patients in the home and in community, rural, and underserved areas. Older adults may be challenged to use new technologies due to aging-related changes, lack of experience, and different attitudes toward their use. The current pilot study evaluated potential issues in one-on-one training/instructions and use of a telemonitoring application. Older adults may benefit from specific adaptations and training to use new health care technologies, and behavioral coding is an effective way to evaluate the user interface for new technologies. Feedback from the current study will be used to adapt the application and training to support dementia caregivers. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2016; 9(1):17-23.]. PMID:26020575

  12. Medication Misadventures in Older Adults Literature From 2013

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Joseph T.; Semla, Todd P.; Schmader, Kenneth E.

    2014-01-01

    This is the second year that editors of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society have been gracious enough to allow us to compile the latest literature regarding medication misadventures (i.e., medication errors and adverse drug events) for its readers. As noted in some recent well written comprehensive reviews, medication errors due to suboptimal drug use continues to be very common in older adults.13 We believe that it is important to summarize this literature in a single place because it is very difficult to compile using standard literature search techniques as they often miss key studies. We hope you find these articles informative and useful in the conduct of high quality clinical research and care of older adults. PMID:25333528

  13. Promoting Walking Among Older Adults Living in Retirement Communities

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Dori E.; Kerr, Jacqueline; Sallis, James F.; Norman, Gregory J.; Calfas, Karen; Patrick, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The authors tested the feasibility and acceptability, and explored the outcomes, of 2 walking interventions based on ecological models among older adults living in retirement communities. An enhanced intervention (EI) was compared with a standard walking intervention (SI) among residents in 4 retirement facilities (N = 87 at baseline; mean age = 84.1 yr). All participants received a walking intervention including pedometers, printed materials, and biweekly group sessions. EI participants also received phone counseling and environmental-awareness components. Measures included pedometer step counts, activities of daily living, environment-related variables, physical function, depression, cognitive function, satisfaction, and adherence. Results indicated improvements among the total sample for step counts, neighborhood barriers, cognitive function, and satisfaction with walking opportunities. Satisfaction and adherence were high. Both walking interventions were feasible to implement among facility-dwelling older adults. Future studies can build on this multilevel approach. PMID:22186798

  14. Excessive Body Weight in Older Adults: Concerns and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Porter Starr, Kathryn N.; Bales, Connie W.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Despite its growing pervasiveness, the health challenges prompted by obesity in the older adult population are poorly recognized and under-studied. A defined treatment for geriatric obesity is difficult to establish, as it must take into account biological heterogeneity, age-related co-morbidities, and functional limitations (sarcopenia/dynapenia). This restrospective article highlights our current understanding of the optimal body mass index (BMI) in later life, addressing appropriate recommendations based on BMI category, age, and health history. As the findings of randomized control trials of weight loss/maintenance interventions continue to accumulate, we are moving closer to evidence-based and appropriately individualized recommendations for body weight management in older adults. PMID:26195092

  15. The Impact of Disordered Gambling Among Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Kerber, Cindy; Adelman-Mullally, Theresa; Kim, MyoungJin; Astroth, Kim Schafer

    2015-10-01

    The current study is a secondary analysis that describes the mental, social, and economic health impacts of disordered gambling in older adults recovering from pathological gambling. The study sought to answer the following research questions: (a) What are the problem behaviors in the mental, social, and economic health dimensions?; and (b) What is the association between mental, social, and economic health impact dimensions and the South Oaks Gambling Screen score? The study population comprised a convenience sample of 40 older adults recovering from pathological gambling in the Midwestern United States. Participants were originally recruited from Gamblers Anonymous(®) meetings and gambling treatment centers. Significant findings for the current study population were: gambling causing depression, being fired from a job due to gambling, and still paying off gambling debt. Nurses should evaluate effects of disordered gambling, assess for disordered gambling, and include a financial assessment in routine care of this patient population. PMID:26489103

  16. Promoting walking among older adults living in retirement communities.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Dori E; Kerr, Jacqueline; Sallis, James F; Norman, Gregory J; Calfas, Karen; Patrick, Kevin

    2012-07-01

    The authors tested the feasibility and acceptability, and explored the outcomes, of 2 walking interventions based on ecological models among older adults living in retirement communities. An enhanced intervention (EI) was compared with a standard walking intervention (SI) among residents in 4 retirement facilities (N = 87 at baseline; mean age = 84.1 yr). All participants received a walking intervention including pedometers, printed materials, and biweekly group sessions. EI participants also received phone counseling and environmental-awareness components. Measures included pedometer step counts, activities of daily living, environment-related variables, physical function, depression, cognitive function, satisfaction, and adherence. Results indicated improvements among the total sample for step counts, neighborhood barriers, cognitive function, and satisfaction with walking opportunities. Satisfaction and adherence were high. Both walking interventions were feasible to implement among facility-dwelling older adults. Future studies can build on this multilevel approach. PMID:22186798

  17. [Clinical features of sleep disorders in older adults].

    PubMed

    Chiba, Shigeru; Tamura, Yoshiyuki

    2015-06-01

    There are three major neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the sleep-waking cycle: the sleep system, the waking system, and the system that determines sleep-waking timing. Sleep dlisorders of older adults seem to be caused by functional or organic changes in one or more of the three systems, and are roughly classified into two categories: (i) normal age-related, and (ii) pathological. The former includes decreased amplitude and advanced phase of circadian rhythms (body temperature, melatonin secretion, and sleep-waking), as well as reduced sleep duration, sleep fragmentation, and a decrease of slow-wave sleep in sleep architecture. Pathological sleep disorders include medical and psychiatric diseases (e.g., lifestyle-related diseases, dementia, delirium, and depression) and primary age-related sleep disorders (e.g., REM sleep behavior disorder and periodic limb move- ment disorders). This mini-review delineates the clinical features of sleep disorders in older adults. PMID:26065118

  18. Optimism and Planning for Future Care Needs among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sörensen, Silvia; Hirsch, Jameson K.; Lyness, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with an increase in need for assistance. Preparation for future care (PFC) is related to improved coping ability as well as better mental and physical health outcomes among older adults. We examined the association of optimism with components of PFC among older adults. We also explored race differences in the relationship between optimism and PFC. In Study 1, multiple regression showed that optimism was positively related to concrete planning. In Study 2, optimism was related to gathering information. An exploratory analysis combining the samples yielded a race interaction: For Whites higher optimism, but for Blacks lower optimism was associated with more planning. High optimism may be a barrier to future planning in certain social and cultural contexts. PMID:26045699

  19. Temporal Discounting of Hypothetical Monetary Rewards by Adolescents, Adults, and Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Robert; McHugh, Louise A.

    2009-01-01

    The present experiment examined temporal discounting across 3 different age bands: adolescents, adults, and older adults (mean ages 14, 46, and 73 years, respectively). A computerized task was employed in which participants were asked to choose between larger rewards available at a specified time in the future--either 100 British Pounds or 1,000

  20. Predictors of Adult Education Program Satisfaction in Urban Community-Dwelling Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamashita, Takashi; Lpez, Erick B.; Keene, Jennifer R.; Kinney, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Lifelong learning is receiving greater attention due to population aging in modern societies. Lifelong learning benefits individuals by supporting their physical, psychological, social, and economic well-being. However, older adults generally have lower motivation for learning than younger adults, and facilitating long-term participation in

  1. Temporal Discounting of Hypothetical Monetary Rewards by Adolescents, Adults, and Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Robert; McHugh, Louise A.

    2009-01-01

    The present experiment examined temporal discounting across 3 different age bands: adolescents, adults, and older adults (mean ages 14, 46, and 73 years, respectively). A computerized task was employed in which participants were asked to choose between larger rewards available at a specified time in the future--either 100 British Pounds or 1,000…

  2. Improving the Evidence Base for Treating Older Adults With Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Statement.

    PubMed

    Hurria, Arti; Levit, Laura A; Dale, William; Mohile, Supriya G; Muss, Hyman B; Fehrenbacher, Louis; Magnuson, Allison; Lichtman, Stuart M; Bruinooge, Suanna S; Soto-Perez-de-Celis, Enrique; Tew, William P; Postow, Michael A; Cohen, Harvey J

    2015-11-10

    The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) convened a subcommittee to develop recommendations on improving the evidence base for treating older adults with cancer in response to a critical need identified by the Institute of Medicine. Older adults experience the majority of cancer diagnoses and deaths and make up the majority of cancer survivors. Older adults are also the fastest growing segment of the US population. However, the evidence base for treating this population is sparse, because older adults are underrepresented in clinical trials, and trials designed specifically for older adults are rare. The result is that clinicians have less evidence on how to treat older adults, who represent the majority of patients with cancer. Clinicians and patients are forced to extrapolate from trials conducted in younger, healthier populations when developing treatment plans. This has created a dearth of knowledge regarding the risk of toxicity in the average older patient and about key end points of importance to older adults. ASCO makes five recommendations to improve evidence generation in this population: (1) Use clinical trials to improve the evidence base for treating older adults with cancer, (2) leverage research designs and infrastructure for generating evidence on older adults with cancer, (3) increase US Food and Drug Administration authority to incentivize and require research involving older adults with cancer, (4) increase clinicians' recruitment of older adults with cancer to clinical trials, and (5) use journal policies to improve researchers' reporting on the age distribution and health risk profiles of research participants. PMID:26195697

  3. Management of Type 1 Diabetes in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Ruban; Weinstock, Ruth S.

    2014-01-01

    In Brief Older adults with type 1 diabetes are at high risk for severe hypoglycemia and may have serious comorbid conditions. Problems with cognition, mobility, dexterity, vision, hearing, depression, and chronic pain interfere with the ability to follow complex insulin regimens. With the development of geriatric syndromes, unpredictable eating, and frailty, treatment regimens must be modified with the goal of minimizing hypoglycemia and severe hyperglycemia and maximizing quality of life. PMID:26246751

  4. Epidemiology and Public Health Concerns of CKD in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Fung, Enrica; Kurella Tamura, Manjula

    2016-01-01

    CKD is increasingly common in older adults. Estimating the glomerular filtration rate can be challenging in this population, with sarcopenia affecting the accuracy of various formulae. Competing risks of death influence the risk of progression to end-stage kidney disease. In managing CKD in this population, one must take into consideration other comorbidities including assessment of geriatric syndromes. More research is still needed to guide medical management in this heterogeneous population. PMID:26709057

  5. Hippocampal neurochemistry, neuromorphometry, and verbal memory in nondemented older adults

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, M.E.; Pan, J.W.; Hetherington, H.P.; Katz, M.J.; Verghese, J.; Buschke, H.; Derby, C.A.; Lipton, R.B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Characterization of the behavioral correlates of neuromorphometry and neurochemistry in older adults has important implications for an improved understanding of the aging process. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that a measure of hippocampal neuronal metabolism was associated with verbal memory in nondemented older adults after controlling for hippocampal volume. Methods 4-T MRI, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS), and neuropsychological assessment were conducted in 48 older adults (23 women; mean age 81 years). Average hippocampal N-acetyl aspartate/creatine ratios (NAA/Cr) and hippocampal volumes were obtained. Neuropsychological evaluation included tests of verbal memory (Buschke and Grober Free and Cued Selective Reminding TestImmediate Recall [FCSRT-IR], Wechsler Memory ScaleRevised Logical Memory subtest) and attention and executive function (Trail Making Test Parts A and B). Results Linear regression analysis indicated that after adjusting for age, hippocampal NAA/Cr was a significant predictor of FCSRT-IR performance (? = 0.38, p = 0.01, R 2 = 0.21). Hippocampal volume was also a significant predictor of FCSRT-IR performance after adjusting for age and midsagittal area (? = 0.47, p = 0.01, R 2 = 0.24). In a combined model, hippocampal NAA/Cr (? = 0.33, p = 0.03) and volume (? = 0.35, p = 0.03) were independent predictors of FCSRT-IR performance, accounting for 30% of the variance in memory. Conclusions These findings indicate that nondemented older adults with smaller hippocampal volumes and lower levels of hippocampal N-acetyl aspartate/creatine ratio metabolites perform more poorly on a test of verbal memory. The integrity of both the structure and metabolism of the hippocampus may underlie verbal memory function in nondemented elderly. PMID:18367703

  6. Anemia and risk of dementia in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chang Hyung; Falvey, Cherie; Harris, Tamara B.; Simonsick, Eleanor M.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Ferrucci, Luigi; Metti, Andrea L.; Patel, Kushang V.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether anemia is associated with incident dementia in older adults. Methods: We studied 2,552 older adults (mean age 76.1 years; 38.9% black; 51.8% female) participating in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition study and free of dementia at baseline. We defined anemia using WHO criteria (hemoglobin concentration <13 g/dL for men and <12 g/dL for women). Dementia diagnosis was determined by dementia medication use, hospital records, or a change in Modified Mini-Mental State (3MS) score of more than 1.5 SD from mean. Discrete time Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to examine the hazard for developing dementia associated with anemia. Results: Of 2,552 participants, 392 (15.4%) older adults had anemia at baseline. Over 11 years of follow-up, 455 (17.8%) participants developed dementia. In the unadjusted model, those with baseline anemia had an increased risk of dementia (23% vs 17%, hazard ratio = 1.64; 95% confidence interval 1.30, 2.07) compared to those without anemia. The association remained significant after adjusting for demographics, APOE ?4, baseline 3MS score, comorbidities, and renal function. Additional adjustment for other anemia measures (mean corpuscular volume, red cell distribution width), erythropoietin, and C-reactive protein did not appreciably change the results. There was no interaction by sex and race on risk of developing dementia. Conclusion: Among older adults, anemia is associated with an increased risk of developing dementia. Findings suggest that further study of anemia as a risk factor for dementia and a target for intervention for cognitive health is warranted. PMID:23902706

  7. Quantification of postural stability in older adults using mobile technology.

    PubMed

    Ozinga, Sarah J; Alberts, Jay L

    2014-12-01

    Traditional biomechanical systems used to capture kinematic data have shown that declines in postural stability are frequently present in older adults and neurological populations. Recent advances in processor speed and measuring capabilities of on-board electronics within mobile devices present an opportunity to gather kinematic data and apply biomechanical analyses to potentially quantify postural stability. The aim of this project was to determine if the kinematic data gathered using a mobile device were of sufficient quantity and quality to characterize postural stability in older adults. Twelve healthy older adults completed six different balance conditions under altered surface, stance and vision. Simultaneous kinematic measurements were gathered from a three-dimensional motion analysis system and iPad during balance conditions. Correlation between the two systems was significant across balance conditions and outcome measures: peak-to-peak (r = 0.70-0.99), normalized path length (r = 0.64-0.98), root mean square (r = 0.73-0.99) of linear acceleration, 95 % volume (r = 0.96-0.99) of linear and angular acceleration and total power across different frequencies (r = 0.79-0.92). The mean absolute percentage error metric, used to evaluate time-series measurements point-by-point, indicated that when measuring linear and angular acceleration, the iPad tracked the motion analysis system with average error between 6 and 10 % of motion analysis measurements across all balance conditions. Collectively, similar accuracy with the iPad compared to motion capture suggests the sensors provide sufficient accuracy and quality for the quantification of postural stability in older adults. The objectivity, portability, and ease of use of this device make it ideal for use in clinical environments, which often lack biomechanical systems. PMID:25150554

  8. Vagus nerve stimulation therapy for epilepsy in older adults.

    PubMed

    Sirven, J I; Sperling, M; Naritoku, D; Schachter, S; Labar, D; Holmes, M; Wilensky, A; Cibula, J; Labiner, D M; Bergen, D; Ristanovic, R; Harvey, J; Dasheiff, R; Morris, G L; O'Donovan, C A; Ojemann, L; Scales, D; Nadkarni, M; Richards, B; Sanchez, J D

    2000-03-14

    The authors assessed the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) for refractory epilepsy in 45 adults 50 years of age and older. They determined seizure frequency, adverse effects, and quality of life. At 3 months, 12 patients had a >50% decrease in seizure frequency; at 1 year, 21 of 31 studied individuals had a >50% seizure decrease. Side effects were mild and transient. Quality of life scores improved significantly with time. PMID:10720294

  9. Negative Social Interactions and Incident Hypertension Among Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sneed, Rodlescia S.; Cohen, Sheldon

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if negative social interactions are prospectively associated with hypertension among older adults. Methods This is a secondary analysis of data from the 2006 and 2010 waves of the Health and Retirement Study, a survey of community-dwelling older adults (age >50). Total average negative social interactions were assessed at baseline by averaging the frequency of negative interactions across four domains (partner, children, other family, friends). Blood pressure was measured at both waves. Individuals were considered to have hypertension if they reported use of antihypertensive medications, had measured average resting systolic blood pressure ? 140 mmHg, or measured average resting diastolic blood pressure ?90 mmHg. Analyses excluded those hypertensive at baseline and controlled for demographics, personality, positive social interactions, and baseline health. Results Twenty-nine percent of participants developed hypertension over the four-year follow-up. Each one-unit increase in the total average negative social interaction score was associated with a 38% increased odds of developing hypertension. Sex moderated the association between total average negative social interactions and hypertension, with effects observed among women but not men. The association of total average negative interactions and hypertension in women was attributable primarily to interactions with friends, but also to negative interactions with family and partners. Age also moderated the association between total average negative social interactions and hypertension, with effects observed among those ages 5164, but not those ages ?65. Conclusion In this sample of older adults, negative social interactions were associated with increased hypertension risk in women and the youngest older adults. PMID:24884909

  10. Healthy aging for older adults with intellectual and development disabilities.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Kathleen M; Robinson, Laura M; VanLare, Shelley

    2013-01-01

    The number of older adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) has increased rapidly in the United States as part of the general "graying"of the country. This has presented challenges in maintaining the quality of life and health for these individuals in later years. Issues including diagnostic overshadowing (the tendency to overlook symptoms of mental or physical illness as causes for decline), lack of knowledge about aging in adults with IDD, and health care disparities are discussed in this article along with recommendations for clinicians to help them meet this growing challenge. PMID:23413456

  11. GAIT INITIATION IN OLDER ADULTS WITH POSTURAL INSTABILITY

    PubMed Central

    Hass, Chris J.; Waddell, Dwight E.; Wolf, Steven L.; Juncos, Jorge L.; Gregor, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Background This study examined changes in the translation of the center of pressure during forward and lateral (90 degrees to the side) gait initiation in two populations of older adults with postural instability. Methods Twenty-eight older adults transitioning to frailty and 16 persons with Parkinson's disease in the "on medication state" were evaluated during initiation trials. Displacements, velocities, and smoothness of the center of pressure trace were calculated and compared. Findings Both groups produced movements of the center of pressure that on average were reduced compared to healthy populations. Adults transitioning to frailty were able to scale the output of the motor program so forces that propel the body in the intended direction of movement were maximized as evidenced by movements of the center of pressure. The adults transitioning to frailty produced patterns of center of pressure trajectories that were more similar to healthy adults where as individuals with Parkinsons disease produced trajectories that were counterproductive to producing efficient gait initiation in both the forward and lateral direction. Interpretation These findings suggest that persons with Parkinsons disease even when in the medicated state exhibit inefficient postural adjustments during both forward and lateral gait initiation and that these postural adjustments are more susceptible to deterioration from the complex interaction of central and peripheral changes associated with Parkinsons disease than to aging alone. PMID:18407387

  12. Correlates of Depressive Symptoms in Older Adults with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Jones, LaRita C.; Clay, Olivio J.; Ovalle, Fernando; Cherrington, Andrea; Crowe, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Investigators examined correlates of depressive symptoms within a sample of older adults with diabetes. Participants completed a structured telephone interview with measures including depressive symptoms, health conditions, cognitive function, and diabetes distress. Correlations and hierarchical linear regression models were utilized to examine bivariate and covariate-adjusted correlates of depressive symptoms. The sample included 246 community-dwelling adults with diabetes (?65 years old). In bivariate analyses, African Americans, individuals with specific health issues (neuropathy, stroke, respiratory issues, arthritis, and cardiac issues), and those with higher levels of diabetes distress reported more depressive symptoms. Older age, higher education, more income, and better cognitive function were inversely associated with depressive symptoms. In the final covariate-adjusted regression model, stroke (B = .22, p < .001), cognitive function (B = ?.14, p < .01), and higher levels of diabetes-related distress (B = .49, p < .001) each were uniquely associated with more depressive symptoms. Diabetes distress partially mediated the associations between cardiac issues and depressive symptoms and between cognitive function and depressive symptoms. Findings suggest that interventions targeted at helping older adults manage their diabetes-related distress and reducing the likelihood of experiencing additional health complications may reduce depressive symptoms within this population. PMID:26682235

  13. New perspectives for motivating better decisions in older adults.

    PubMed

    Strough, JoNell; de Bruin, Wndi Bruine; Peters, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Decision-making competence in later adulthood is affected by declines in cognitive skills, and age-related changes in affect and experience can sometimes compensate. However, recent findings suggest that age-related changes in motivation also affect the extent to which adults draw from experience, affect, and deliberative skills when making decisions. To date, relatively little attention has been given to strategies for addressing age-related changes in motivation to promote better decisions in older adults. To address this limitation, we draw from diverse literatures to suggest promising intervention strategies for motivating older recipients' motivation to make better decisions. We start by reviewing the life-span developmental literature, which suggests that older adults' motivation to put effort into decisions depends on the perceived personal relevance of decisions as well as their self-efficacy (i.e., confidence in applying their ability and knowledge). Next, we discuss two approaches from the health intervention design literature, the mental models approach and the patient activation approach, which aim to improve motivation for decision making by improving personal relevance or by building self-efficacy or confidence to use new information and skills. Using examples from these literatures, we discuss how to construct interventions to motivate good decisions in later adulthood. PMID:26157398

  14. Autonomous unobtrusive detection of mild cognitive impairment in older adults.

    PubMed

    Akl, Ahmad; Taati, Babak; Mihailidis, Alex

    2015-05-01

    The current diagnosis process of dementia is resulting in a high percentage of cases with delayed detection. To address this problem, in this paper, we explore the feasibility of autonomously detecting mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in the older adult population. We implement a signal processing approach equipped with a machine learning paradigm to process and analyze real-world data acquired using home-based unobtrusive sensing technologies. Using the sensor and clinical data pertaining to 97 subjects, acquired over an average period of three years, a number of measures associated with the subjects' walking speed and general activity in the home were calculated. Different time spans of these measures were used to generate feature vectors to train and test two machine learning algorithms namely support vector machines and random forests. We were able to autonomously detect MCI in older adults with an area under the ROC curve of 0.97 and an area under the precision-recall curve of 0.93 using a time window of 24 weeks. This study is of great significance since it can potentially assist in the early detection of cognitive impairment in older adults. PMID:25585407

  15. Cognitive benefits of computer games for older adults.

    PubMed

    Zelinski, Elizabeth M; Reyes, Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a basis for the hypothesis that digital action games may produce cognitive benefits for older adults. First, a discussion of the relationship between cognitive and physical health shows the increasing weight given to the role of declines in cognition in the development of dependency in older adult population studies. Second, evidence that cognitive training produces 'far transfer' in elders is presented. The key issue is that one approach, known as extended practice training, has been successful in producing far transfer to memory and other processes. Its principles, which are consistent with those associated with positive brain plasticity effects, are identified. Those principles are then related to the mechanics of digital action games, which also have the important added feature of producing the experiences of presence, engagement, and flow, the subjective elements of game play that are likely to sustain interest and emotional investment in the skills practiced so that the play produces cognitive benefits. The specific cognitive abilities proposed to be improved by different types of game genres are outlined, and recent developments in game and interface design that may affect the willingness of older adults to play are described. PMID:25126043

  16. Stereotype threat reduces false recognition when older adults are forewarned.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jessica T; Gallo, David A

    2016-05-01

    Exposing older adults to ageing stereotypes can reduce their memory for studied information-a phenomenon attributed to stereotype threat-but little is known about stereotype effects on false memory. Here, we assessed ageing stereotype effects on the Deese-Roediger-McDermott false memory illusion. Older adults studied lists of semantically associated words, and then read a passage about age-related memory decline (threat condition) or an age-neutral passage (control condition). They then took a surprise memory test with a warning to avoid false recognition of non-studied associates. Relative to the control condition, activating stereotype threat reduced the recognition of both studied and non-studied words, implicating a conservative criterion shift for associated test words. These results indicate that stereotype threat can reduce false memory, and they help to clarify mixed results from prior ageing research. Consistent with the regulatory focus hypothesis, threat motivates older adults to respond more conservatively when error-prevention is emphasised at retrieval. PMID:26218527

  17. Cognitive benefits of computer games for older adults

    PubMed Central

    Zelinski, Elizabeth M.; Reyes, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a basis for the hypothesis that digital action games may produce cognitive benefits for older adults. First, a discussion of the relationship between cognitive and physical health shows the increasing weight given to the role of declines in cognition in the development of dependency in older adult population studies. Second, evidence that cognitive training produces ‘far transfer’ in elders is presented. The key issue is that one approach, known as extended practice training, has been successful in producing far transfer to memory and other processes. Its principles, which are consistent with those associated with positive brain plasticity effects, are identified. Those principles are then related to the mechanics of digital action games, which also have the important added feature of producing the experiences of presence, engagement, and flow, the subjective elements of game play that are likely to sustain interest and emotional investment in the skills practiced so that the play produces cognitive benefits. The specific cognitive abilities proposed to be improved by different types of game genres are outlined, and recent developments in game and interface design that may affect the willingness of older adults to play are described. PMID:25126043

  18. Neuropsychological Correlates of Complicated Grief in Older Spousally Bereaved Adults

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Across many research domains, evidence for complicated grief as a distinct psychopathology continues to grow. Previous research from neuropsychology has shown an increased attentional bias to emotionally relevant stimuli in those suffering from complicated grief. This study furthers our understanding of the characteristics that distinguish complicated grief. We expand on previous research by (a) testing older adults, (b) excluding those with comorbid major depressive disorder, (c) using participant-chosen grief-related stimuli, and (d) using a married, nonbereaved control group. Methods. We recruited 76 older adults in 3 groups: spousally bereaved with complicated grief, spousally bereaved with noncomplicated grief, and nonbereaved controls. Performance on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task, Digit Span Backwards, and the emotional counting Stroop was examined. Results. Results indicate longer reaction time across 3 blocks of grief-related words in the complicated grief group but no difference across 3 blocks of the neutral words. The 3 groups performed comparably on the other neurocognitive tasks, indicating no cognitive differences in working memory or set shifting between groups. Furthermore, these effects of complicated grief generalize to older adults and appear independent of major depression. Discussion. Complicated grief has cognitive interference as a neuropsychological component highlighting it as distinct from noncomplicated grief. PMID:23551907

  19. Dimensions of self-rated health in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Borim, Flávia Silva Arbex; Neri, Anita Liberalesso; Francisco, Priscila Maria Stolses Bergamo; Barros, Marilisa Berti de Azevedo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the association between negative self-rated health and indicators of health, wellbeing and sociodemographic variables in older adults. METHODS Cross-sectional study that used data from a population-based health survey with a probability cluster sample that was carried out in Campinas, SP, Southeastern Brazil,, in 2008 and 2009. The participants were older adults (≥ 60 years) and the dependent variable was self-rated health, categorized as: excellent, very good, good, bad and very bad. The adjusted prevalence ratios were estimated by means of Poisson multiple regression. RESULTS The highest prevalences of bad/very bad self-rated health were observed in the individuals who never attended school, in those with lower level of schooling, with monthly per capita family income lower than one minimum salary. Individuals who scored five or more in the physical health indicator also had bad self-rated health, as well as those who scored five or more in the Self-Reporting Questionnaire 20 and those who did not refer feeling happiness all the time. CONCLUSIONS The independent effects of material life conditions, physical and mental health and subjective wellbeing, observed in self-rated health, suggest that older adults can benefit by health policies supported by a global and integrative view of old age. PMID:25372161

  20. Autonomous Unobtrusive Detection of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Taati, Babak; Mihailidis, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The current diagnosis process of dementia is resulting in a high-percentage of cases with delayed detection. To address this problem, in this paper we explore the feasibility of autonomously detecting mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in the older adult population. We implement a signal processing approach equipped with a machine learning paradigm to process and analyze real world data acquired using home-based unobtrusive sensing technologies. Using the sensor and clinical data pertaining to 97 subjects, acquired over an average period of 3 years, a number of measures associated with the subjects' walking speeds and general activity in the home were calculated. Different time spans of these measures were used to generate feature vectors to train and test two machine learning algorithms namely support vector machines and random forests. We were able to autonomously detect MCI in older adults with an area under the ROC curve of 0.97 and an area under the precision-recall curve of 0.93 using a time window of 24 weeks. This work is of great significance since it can potentially assist in the early detection of cognitive impairment in older adults. PMID:25585407