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1

Depression in Older Adults  

MedlinePLUS

... You are here Home » Depression In Older Adults Depression In Older Adults Depression affects more than 19 ... combination of both. [8] Older Adult Attitudes Toward Depression: According to a Mental Health America survey [9] ...

2

Older Adults and Alcohol  

MedlinePLUS

... Older Adults In this Section Overview of Alcohol Consumption Alcohol Facts & Statistics What Is A Standard Drink? Drinking Levels Defined Alcohol's Effects on the Body Alcohol Use Disorder Genetics of ...

3

Yoga and Older Adults  

MedlinePLUS

... nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Yoga and Older Adults Yoga is a mind and body practice that typically ... breathing exercises, and relaxation. Researchers are studying how yoga may help improve health and to learn more ...

4

Dementia: Unique to Older Adults  

MedlinePLUS

... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Dementia Unique to Older Adults This section provides information ... Managing Additional Health Problems in Older Adults with Dementia Dementia is rare in adults younger than 60. ...

5

Diabetes: Unique to Older Adults  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... Incontinence Related Video Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Diabetes Unique to Older Adults ... their disease or condition in conjunction with other health issues. As older adults live longer, they may ...

6

Healthy Aging (for Older Adults)  

MedlinePLUS

... Access general health information for older adults . Healthy Aging Topics Healthy Brain Initiative Cognitive health and impairment, ... topics for older adults Interactive Data Tool Healthy Aging Data Portfolio Provides easy access to CDC data ...

7

Literacy Proficiency of Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As a supplement to the International Adult Literacy Survey, the Netherlands devoted special attention to the literacy proficiency of older adults. A close look at the literacy skills of older adults and their use in daily life is relevant because demographic developments, individualisation, the position of older employees in the labour market and…

van der Kamp, Max; Boudard, Emmanuel

2003-01-01

8

Pain Assessment for Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

WHY: Studies on pain in older adults (persons 65 years of age and older) have demonstrated that 25%-50% of community dwelling older people have persistent pain. Additionally, 45-80% of nursing home residents report pain that is often left untreated. Pain is strongly associated with depression and can result in decreased socialization, impaired ambulation and increased healthcare utilization and costs. Older

Ellen Flaherty

9

Visuomotor Binding in Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Action integration is the process through which actions performed on a stimulus and perceptual aspects of the stimulus become bound as a unitary object. This process appears to be controlled by the dopaminergic system in the prefrontal cortex, an area that is known to decrease in volume and dopamine functioning in older adults. Although the decline should lead to reduced action integration in older adults, we found equivalent integration in both young and older adults. This indicates that older adults may be able to compensate for their dopaminergic deficiencies by activating additional neural networks that are not used by young adults. PMID:20810199

Bloesch, Emily K.; Abrams, Richard A.

2010-01-01

10

[Rehabilitation for older adults.  

PubMed

The positive effect of rehabilitation is well documented among older adults where functional disability affects daily activities and participation. Existing knowledge, however, needs to be implemented in daily routines. Everyday rehabilitation in the municipalities is improving. Fast-track methods are tested in hospitals. More studies are needed for follow-up evaluation and regarding how, for whom and for how long rehabilitation should take place. All doctors should be aware of and able to handle the patient's need of rehabilitation in an integrated health-care perspective. PMID:25096739

Hendriksen, Carsten; Lyngbye, Pernille Würtz

2014-05-12

11

Clinical Interviewing with Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the next few decades the older adult population will increase dramatically, and prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders are also expected to increase in the elderly cohort. These demographic projections highlight the need for diagnostic instruments and methods that are specifically tailored to older adults. The current paper discusses the…

Mohlman, Jan; Sirota, Karen Gainer; Papp, Laszlo A.; Staples, Alison M.; King, Arlene; Gorenstein, Ethan E.

2012-01-01

12

[Sleep disorders in older adults].  

PubMed

Sleep is an essential physiological process with restorative functions. It is reported that the prevalence of chronic sleep-related complaints in older adults is over 50%, which is higher than that in younger adults. The etiology of sleep disorders in older adults is considered to be multifactorial, consisting of normal age-related changes(e.g., sleep fragmentation, earlier awakening, and decreased slow wave sleep), medical or psychiatric diseases (e.g., lifestyle-related diseases, dementia, delirium, and depression), primary age-related sleep disorders(e.g., sleep-related breathing disorders and periodic limb movement disorders), or a combination of these factors. Because sleep disorders in older adults may have implications for quality of life, it is crucial to distinguish normal age-related sleep changes from those originating from pathological processes. This mini-review discusses crucial points in the diagnosis and management of sleep disorders in older adults. PMID:24261205

Chiba, Shigeru

2013-10-01

13

Diabetes Resources for Older Adults  

MedlinePLUS

... Professionals, Businesses & Schools Partners & Community Organizations About NDEP | Contact Us | Site Map Tengo diabetes ¿Corro riesgo? You are here: NDEP Home > Resources > Diabetes Resources for Older Adults Text Size: S M L | About Diabetes Resources for ...

14

Older Adults and Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... Health & Education > Mental Health Information Older Adults and Mental Health Depression Depression is not a normal part of ... Finder Newsletters RSS Feeds The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) is part of the National Institutes of ...

15

Computer acceptance of older adults.  

PubMed

Even though computers play a massive role in everyday life of modern societies, older adults, and especially older women, are less likely to use a computer, and they perform fewer activities on it than younger adults. To get a better understanding of the factors affecting older adults' intention towards and usage of computers, the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Usage of Technology (UTAUT) was applied as part of a more extensive study with 52 users and non-users of computers, ranging in age from 50 to 90 years. The model covers various aspects of computer usage in old age via four key constructs, namely performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influences, and facilitating conditions, as well as the variables gender, age, experience, and voluntariness it. Interestingly, next to performance expectancy, facilitating conditions showed the strongest correlation with use as well as with intention. Effort expectancy showed no significant correlation with the intention of older adults to use a computer. PMID:22317258

Nägle, Sibylle; Schmidt, Ludger

2012-01-01

16

Hip Fractures among Older Adults  

MedlinePLUS

... MMWR 1996;45(41):877–83. Deprey SM, Descriptive analysis of fatal falls of older adults in ... for persons with and without hip fracture: a population-based study. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society ...

17

Sexuality in Older Adults  

MedlinePLUS

... feel good about yourself. As you age, your sexual health will change. But growing older doesn’t have ... life at any age. How does aging affect sexual health? Changes for women: As a woman approaches menopause, ...

18

Alcohol use among older adults.  

PubMed

Alcohol use problems among older adults have been called the "invisible epidemic." As the population of older adults continues to grow, there is an increased need to reexamine alcohol use in this population. The authors provide an overview on alcohol use in the over-60 age group. The main areas of focus included research on the prevalence of drinking in that population, as well as comments on the best practices in assessment and psychological treatment. Several screening assessments have been recommended for use with older adults, such as the CAGE questionnaire, Michigan Alcohol Screening Test-Geriatric version, Alcohol-Related Problems Survey, and the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. The authors note age-appropriate psychological treatment interventions that include brief interventions, family interventions, motivational counseling, and cognitive behavioral therapies. Barriers to assessment and treatment are also discussed. PMID:17128962

Sorocco, Kristen H; Ferrell, Sean W

2006-10-01

19

Visuomotor Binding in Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Action integration is the process through which actions performed on a stimulus and perceptual aspects of the stimulus become bound as a unitary object. This process appears to be controlled by the dopaminergic system in the prefrontal cortex, an area that is known to decrease in volume and dopamine functioning in older adults. Although the…

Bloesch, Emily K.; Abrams, Richard A.

2010-01-01

20

Enhancing Creativity in Older Adults.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study evaluated effects on creativity of a Quality of Life Program for 55 older adults. Subjects participated in a variety of creative activities. An increase in scores (particularly in fluency and flexibility) by the experimental group supported a growth theory of lifelong creativity. (DB)

Goff, Kathy

1992-01-01

21

The Older Adult and Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

According to recent census figures, 10% of today's population are over 65 years old. It has often been stated that individual learning needs and capabilities decline with age. To challenge this idea, a study was conducted to gather information about older adults, their learning interests, activities, and obstacles. Four hypotheses were tested…

Hiemstra, Roger

22

Adventure Programming for the Older Adult.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Outdoor adventure education programs generally have not met the demands of older adults. Ways to attract older adults to these programs and to tailor activities to allay their fears and maximize their enjoyment are discussed. (PP)

Ewert, Alan

1983-01-01

23

Heart Failure: Unique to Older Adults  

MedlinePLUS

Heart Failure Unique to Older Adults This section provides information to help older adults and their caregivers ... or maintain quality of life. Urinary Incontinence and Heart Failure If you have heart failure, you may ...

24

Older Adults' Acceptance of Information Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated variables contributing to older adults’ information technology acceptance through a survey, which was used to find factors explaining and predicting older adults’ information technology acceptance behaviors. Four factors, including needs satisfaction, perceived usability, support availability, and public acceptance, were found using factor analysis. According to older adults’ self-reported scores, the factors of needs satisfaction and support availability

Lin Wang; Pei-Luen Patrick Rau; Gavriel Salvendy

2011-01-01

25

Older Adults and Gambling: A Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper uses the social cognitive theory model to review the literature on older adult gambling, and related personal and environment characteristics. Results show that lottery is the kind of gambling most frequently played by older adults, followed by casino games. Older adults take trips to casinos to socialize, find excitement, and win…

Ariyabuddhiphongs, Vanchai

2012-01-01

26

Director's Guide to Recruiting Older Adults.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide is intended for Adult Basic Education (ABE) practitioners, specifically Texas ABE cooperative directors, who wish to increase recruitment and attendance among undereducated older adults. General information may be used for all older adults, but two age categories (age 45-64 and age 65 and older) are distinguished in instances seemingly…

Kasworm, Carol; Stedman, Ken C.

27

Hearing loss in older adults.  

PubMed

Hearing loss affects approximately one-third of adults 61 to 70 years of age and more than 80 percent of those older than 85 years. Men usually experience greater hearing loss and have earlier onset compared with women. The most common type is age-related hearing loss; however, many conditions can interfere with the conduction of sound vibrations to the inner ear and their conversion to electrical impulses for conduction to the brain. Screening for hearing loss is recommended in adults older than 50 to 60 years. Office screening tests include the whispered voice test and audioscopy. Older patients who admit to having difficulty hearing may be referred directly for audiometry. The history can identify risk factors for hearing loss, especially noise exposure and use of ototoxic medications. Examination of the auditory canal and tympanic membrane can identify causes of conductive hearing loss. Audiometric testing is required to confirm hearing loss. Adults presenting with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss should be referred for urgent assessment. Management of hearing loss is based on addressing underlying causes, especially obstructions (including cerumen) and ototoxic medications. Residual hearing should be optimized by use of hearing aids, assistive listening devices, and rehabilitation programs. Surgical implants are indicated for selected patients. Major barriers to improved hearing in older adults include lack of recognition of hearing loss; perception that hearing loss is a normal part of aging or is not amenable to treatment; and patient nonadherence with hearing aids because of stigma, cost, inconvenience, disappointing initial results, or other factors. PMID:22962895

Walling, Anne D; Dickson, Gretchen M

2012-06-15

28

disaster series for older adults Profile of Displaced Older  

E-print Network

of Hurricane Katrina Profile of Displaced Older Adults Following Hurricane Katrina, around 73% of deaths in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. In Part One of this series, we describe a group of older adults who Katrina made landfall, we share how they prepared for Hurricane Katrina. The pro- file also includes

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

29

Exercise training and depression in older adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article provides a review of the evidence supporting exercise as an effective treatment of depression in older adults. Depression is prevalent among older adults and is associated with significant morbidity, increased risk of mortality, and economic burden. Although effective treatments for depression exist (e.g., antidepressant medication, cognitive-behavioral therapy), the disorder remains inadequately treated for many older individuals. Recently, the

Krista A. Barbour; James A. Blumenthal

2005-01-01

30

The older adult experiencing sepsis.  

PubMed

Sepsis is a potentially fatal response to infection affecting patients across the life span. Sepsis can progress from systemic inflammatory response to severe sepsis and septic shock if not recognized promptly and managed effectively. Risk factors for sepsis include age, gender, the presence of invasive devices (eg, urinary catheters), and chronic medical conditions (eg, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Sepsis awareness is essential and includes identification of population-focused risk factors, recognition of clinical signs and symptoms, and timely implementation of interventions. The purpose of this article was to examine sepsis in older adults, including prevalence, atypical presentation of the condition, and considerations for sepsis management in the elderly population. PMID:25741958

Englert, Nadine C; Ross, Carl

2015-01-01

31

Modified MyPyramid for Older Adults  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In 1999 we proposed a Modified Food Guide Pyramid for 70+ Adults. It has been extensively used in a variety of settings and formats to highlight the unique dietary challenges of older adults. We now propose a Modified MyPyramid for Older Adults in a format consistent with the MyPyramid graphic. I...

32

Evaluation of older bay mud sediment from Richmond Harbor, California  

SciTech Connect

The older, bay mud (OBM) unit predates modem man and could act as a barrier to the downward transport of contaminants from the younger bay mud (YBM) because of its hard-packed consistency. However, its chemical and biological nature have not been well characterized. Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conducted three independent studies of OBM sediment in January 1993, January 1994, and October 1994. These studies evaluated potential chemical contamination and biological effects of OBM that could occur as a result of dredging and disposal activities. These evaluations were performed by conducting chemical analysis, solid-phase toxicity tests, suspended- particulate-phase (SPP) toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation tests on the OBM sediment. If the sediment chemistry and toxicity results showed no or minimal contamination and toxicological responses, then either the OBM could be left exposed in Richmond Harbor after dredging the YBM without leaving a source of contamination, or if the project depths necessitate, the OBM would be acceptable for disposal at an appropriate disposal site.

Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.

1996-09-01

33

disaster series for older adults Coping by Displaced Older  

E-print Network

of Hurricane Katrina Six to Ten Months After Hurricane Katrina In disasters, older persons face accumulated.Readers shouldreviewtheProfile of Displaced Older Adult in the Aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in Part Oneofthe Disaster setuphouseintheircurrentresidence.Showinga 2005calendar,weremindedstudyparticipantsthat Hurricane Katrina hit on August 29, 2005

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

34

Verbosity and emotion recognition in older adults.  

PubMed

Previous research suggests that older adults are more verbose than young adults and that general inhibitory difficulties might play a role in such tendencies. In the present study of 60 young adults and 61 older adults, the authors examined whether verbosity might also be related to difficulty deciphering emotional expressions. Measures of verbosity included total talking time, percentage of time spent on-topic, and extremity of off-topic verbosity. Over all 3 measures, older men and women were significantly more verbose than young men and women. Older men's (but not older women's) verbosity was related to poorer emotion recognition, which fully mediated the age effect. The results are consistent with the idea that older men who talk more do so, in part, because they fail to decipher the emotional cues of a listener. PMID:20545434

Ruffman, Ted; Murray, Janice; Halberstadt, Jamin; Taumoepeau, Mele

2010-06-01

35

Older Adults' Acceptance of Information Technology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated variables contributing to older adults' information technology acceptance through a survey, which was used to find factors explaining and predicting older adults' information technology acceptance behaviors. Four factors, including needs satisfaction, perceived usability, support availability, and public acceptance, were…

Wang, Lin; Rau, Pei-Luen Patrick; Salvendy, Gavriel

2011-01-01

36

Exploring Older Adults' Health Information Seeking Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To explore older adults' (55-70 years) health information-seeking behaviors. Methods: Using a qualitative methodology, based on grounded theory, data were collected using in-depth interviews. Participants were community-living, older adults in Toronto, Canada who independently seek nutrition and health information. Interview transcripts…

Manafo, Elizabeth; Wong, Sharon

2012-01-01

37

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Older Adults' Expectations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined knowledge, attitudes, and opinions of 60 older adults about cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Most had little or no accurate knowledge of CPR. Knowledge deficits and misconceptions of older adults should be addressed so that they may become informed and active participants in CPR decision-making process. (BF)

Godkin, M. Dianne; Toth, Ellen L.

1994-01-01

38

Textile Recycling, Convenience, and the Older Adult.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Results of a study to examine the recycling practices and needs of older adults (n=217) indicated that older adults do recycle traditional materials, but need accommodations for physical limitations. They report textile recycling as time consuming and difficult and used donations to religious organizations as their principal means of textile…

Domina, Tanya; Koch, Kathryn

2001-01-01

39

Treatment of insomnia in older adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Insomnia outcome studies from the last 15 years show consistent success for behavioral treatment with older adults. The present review of evaluation and treatment covers the effects of aging on ability to sleep, the insomnia classification system, the treatment efficacy database, and critical outcome research methodology. Clinical trial methodology with older adults includes familiar challenges; for example, the need for

Sidney D. Nau; Christina S. McCrae; Kristen G. Cook; Kenneth L. Lichstein

2005-01-01

40

Scoping review report: obesity in older adults.  

PubMed

Obesity is associated with an increased risk for early death, heart disease and stroke, disability and several other comorbidities. Although there is concern about the potential burden on health-care services with the aging demographic and the increasing trend of obesity prevalence in older adults, evidence on which to base management strategies is conflicting for various reasons. The analytic framework for this review is based on a scoping review methodology, and was conducted to examine what is known about the diagnosis, treatment and management of obesity in older adults. A total of 492 relevant research articles were identified using PubMed, Scirus, EBSCO, Clinicaltrials.gov, Cochrane Reviews and Google Scholar. The findings of this review indicate that the current WHO (World Health Organization)-recommended body mass index, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio obesity thresholds for the general adult population may not be appropriate for older adults. Alternatively, weight change or physical fitness may be more useful measures of mortality and health risk in obese older adults. Furthermore, although obesity in older adults is associated with several disorders that increase functional disability, epidemiological evidence suggests that obesity is protective against mortality in seniors. Consequently, the trend toward increasing prevalence of obesity in older adults will lead to an increase in unhealthy life years and health-care costs. The findings from this review also suggest that treatment strategies for obese older adults should focus on maintaining body weight and improving physical fitness and function rather than weight loss, and that a combination of aerobic and resistance exercise appears to be the most effective strategy. In conclusion, this review demonstrates the need for more research to clarify the definition of obesity in older adults, to establish criteria for evaluating when to treat older adults for obesity, and to develop effective treatment strategies focused on functional outcomes in obese older adults. PMID:22410960

Decaria, J E; Sharp, C; Petrella, R J

2012-09-01

41

Perceptions of technology among older adults.  

PubMed

Changes and advancements in technology have the potential to benefit older adults by promoting independence and increasing the ability to age in place. However, older adults are less likely to adopt new technology unless they see benefits to themselves. This study assessed the perceptions of 30 older adults in the Midwest concerning technology via three separate focus groups (i.e., independent apartment complex, a rural community, exercise program participants), which addressed a need in the literature (i.e., inclusion of oldest-old and rural individuals). The focus group questions included items such as what technology older adults currently used, desired improvements in technology, and the greatest challenges participants were facing or would face in the future. Overall, older adults were enthusiastic about learning new forms of technology that could help them maintain their independence and quality of life. Five themes emerged from all three focus groups: (a) Frustrations, Limitations, and Usability Concerns; (b) Transportation; (c) Help and Assistance; (d) Self-Monitoring; and (e) Gaming. The themes have important implications for future technology developed for older adults; in particular, older adults were willing and eager to adopt new technology when usefulness and usability outweighed feelings of inadequacy. PMID:23244061

Heinz, Melinda; Martin, Peter; Margrett, Jennifer A; Yearns, Mary; Franke, Warren; Yang, Hen-I; Wong, Johnny; Chang, Carl K

2013-01-01

42

Medication Adherence among Older Adults with Schizophrenia  

PubMed Central

Older adults with schizophrenia are a growing segment of the population yet their physical and mental health status is extremely poor. The paper presents findings from a qualitative study that explored the understanding older adults with schizophrenia have of their physical health status. The study was conducted among 28 older adults with schizophrenia from a variety of settings using semi-structured interviews and participant observation. Self-management of psychiatric and non-psychiatric medications and its affect on their health status was one of the central themes that emerged from the study. Different styles of medication adherence were identified and factors associated with each style are presented. The findings provide insights into the design of clinical interventions aimed at promoting medication adherence among older adults with schizophrenia. PMID:23327119

Leutwyler, Heather C.; Fox, Patrick J.; Wallhagen, Margaret

2014-01-01

43

After the Disaster: Considerations for Older Adults  

E-print Network

When older adults must evacuate their homes, they may worry about receiving their Social Security payments, receiving Medicare benefits from new health care providers, and replacing medications left behind. This publication explains who to call...

Crocker, Andrew

2005-10-07

44

Healthy Weights for Healthy Older Adults  

MedlinePLUS

... strong muscles and bones. Enjoy the Power of Protein People of all ages need protein for strong, healthy bodies. Some older adults do not get the protein they need to maintain muscle mass, fight infection ...

45

Falls Among Older Adults: An Overview  

MedlinePLUS

... Safety Traumatic Brain Injury Injury Response Violence Prevention Data & Statistics (WISQARS) Funded Programs Communications Press Room Social Media Publications Injury Center Falls Among Older Adults: An Overview On this Page How big is the problem? What outcomes are linked to ...

46

Healthcare Disparities Between Older and Younger Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) states that within the next few decades, adults aged 65 and older will represent 20% of the US population. As a result, health professionals will see an increase in the number of older patients they treat and as such, must be knowledgeable about the aging process and age-associated issues in order to provide appropriate

Megan Coral

2009-01-01

47

Older Adults' Knowledge of Internet Hazards  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Older adults are less likely to be using computers and less knowledgeable about Internet security than are younger users. The two groups do not differ on trust of Internet information. The younger group shows no age or gender differences. Within the older group, computer users are more trusting of Internet information, and along with those with…

Grimes, Galen A.; Hough, Michelle G.; Mazur, Elizabeth; Signorella, Margaret L.

2010-01-01

48

Advocating on Behalf of Older Adults.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Approximately 34 million people, or 13 percent of the population of the United States, are 65 or older. It is not just the increasing numbers that make it important for counselors to serve as advocates for older adults. Ageism, societal marginalization, vulnerability, and elder abuse are growing problems for this population. There is evidence that…

Goodman, Jane; Waters, Elinor

49

Physical Activity in Older Adults with Arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Physical activity offers an effective, nonpharmacological means to improve the health of older adults, including those with\\u000a arthritis. Clinical practice guidelines identify a substantial therapeutic role for physical activity in osteoarthritis and\\u000a rheumatoid arthritis. For older adults, including those with arthritis, regular physical activity ­counteracts the reduction\\u000a in fitness, stamina, and loss of muscle strength associated with aging, prevents the

Dorothy D. Dunlop; Pamela A. Semanik; Rowland W. Chang

50

Update on vaccination guidelines for older adults.  

PubMed

Vaccination is a vital component of routine preventative health. Older adults can potentially benefit most from vaccines because they have greater susceptibility to disease and associated complications. The number of infections covered and the types of vaccines available has grown significantly in recent years. Although this represents tremendous progress, it can also result in confusion and missed opportunities to provided recommended vaccinations. This review summarizes the current guidelines for vaccination of older adults and highlights the latest innovations. PMID:25753174

Pilkinton, Mark Alexander; Talbot, H Keipp

2015-03-01

51

Older Students in Adult Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

British students 60 years and older in 1985-86 were studied in order to learn about their age, sex, marital status, employment background, the subjects they study, their reasons for studying, how they study, and what they think about their studies. Considered by the researchers to be the largest survey of older students, the study involved 2,254…

Clennell, Stephanie, Ed.; And Others

52

Comprehension of Health-Related Written Materials by Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined how Flesch Reading Ease and text cohesion affect older adults' comprehension of common health texts. All older adults benefited when high Flesh Reading Ease was combined with high cohesion. Older adults with small working memories had more difficulty understanding texts high in Flesch Reading Ease. Additionally, older adults

Liu, Chiung-Ju; Kemper, Susan; Bovaird, James A.

2009-01-01

53

Preventing Malnutrition in Older Adults  

MedlinePLUS

... Accessed October 29, 2010 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Senior health: How to detect and prevent malnutrition.. Accessed October 29, 2010 National Resource Center on Nutrition, Physical Activity and Aging. Malnutrition and Older Americans. Accessed ...

54

Evaluation of Verbal Behavior in Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Approximately 5% of older adults have a dementia diagnosis, and language deterioration is commonly associated with this disorder (Kempler, 2005). Several instruments have been developed to diagnose dementia and assess language capabilities of elderly adults. However, none of these instruments take a functional approach to language assessment as…

Gross, Amy C.; Fuqua, Wayne; Merritt, Todd A.

2013-01-01

55

Patterns of Rumination by Young and Older Adults  

E-print Network

often than young adults and that the structure of rumination by young and older adults would differ, including the relationship between rumination, working memory, inhibition, and mood. These hypotheses were supported. Older adults reported less...

Schmalzried, RaLynn Cheri

2012-05-31

56

Sexually transmitted infections and older adults.  

PubMed

Older adults continue to be sexually active in their later years. A range of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) such as chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, and HIV have been reported among older adults. Risk factors for STIs in older populations include (a) normal sexual changes associated with aging (e.g., increased time to attain an erection, decreased vaginal lubrication, decreases in sexual hormones); (b) psychosocial changes (e.g., loss of partner or spouse and re-entering the dating scene); and (c) risky sexual behaviors, including no or infrequent use of condoms. Screening of adults for STIs should occur regardless of age based on guidelines such as those from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. As discussed in this article, nurses can use assessment guides and engage in interventions such as counseling and education with older adults to reduce STI risk or refer for treatment. Numerous online resources exist for both nurses and older adults to increase knowledge of STIs. PMID:24066789

Johnson, Beverly K

2013-11-01

57

Older Adults’ Detection of Misspellings During Reading  

PubMed Central

Objectives. Previous research has suggested that older adults’ ability to detect a word as correctly or incorrectly spelled is intact, relative to younger adults. The purpose of the present experiment was to investigate the stability of misspelling detection processes across older adulthood when misspellings are presented in the context of reading. Methods. Participants included 180 older adults represented equally from three decades: young–old adults in their 60s, middle-old adults in their 70s, and old–old adults in their 80s. They read sentences about health-related topics one word at a time and pressed a key to detect misspellings. A repeated measures analysis of variance was conducted on misspelling detection accuracy as well as response times for correctly detected misspellings. Results. There was a consistent age-related decline in misspelling detection, where middle-old and old–old adults were less accurate and slower than young–old adults in detecting misspellings. Discussion. Requiring misspelling detection during reading increases the working memory demands that are necessary for successful comprehension. In resource-demanding contexts, the top–down verification process of confirming a word’s orthographic features becomes more difficult with increasing age. PMID:20616153

Farrell, Meagan T.; Margolin, Sara J.

2010-01-01

58

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy with Older Adults: Rationale and Considerations  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Older adults are the fastest growing segment of the population. With these changing demographics, mental health professionals will be seeing more older clients. Additionally, older adults are an underserved population in that most older adults in need of mental health services do not receive treatment. Thus, it is essential that treatments for…

Petkus, Andrew J.; Wetherell, Julie Loebach

2013-01-01

59

Neuropsychological mechanisms of falls in older adults  

PubMed Central

Falls, a common cause of injury among older adults, have become increasingly prevalent. As the world’s population ages, the increase in—and the prevalence of—falls among older people makes this a serious and compelling societal and healthcare issue. Physical weakness is a critical predictor in falling. While considerable research has examined this relationship, comprehensive reviews of neuropsychological predictors of falls have been lacking. In this paper, we examine and discuss current studies of the neuropsychological predictors of falls in older adults, as related to sporting and non-sporting contexts. By integrating the existing evidence, we propose that brain aging is an important precursor of the increased risk of falls in older adults. Brain aging disrupts the neural integrity of motor outputs and reduces neuropsychological abilities. Older adults may shift from unconscious movement control to more conscious or attentive motor control. Increased understanding of the causes of falls will afford opportunities to reduce their incidence, reduce consequent injuries, improve overall well-being and quality of life, and possibly to prolong life. PMID:24782761

Liu, Yu; Chan, John S. Y.; Yan, Jin H.

2014-01-01

60

Older Adults’ Common Sense Models of Diabetes  

PubMed Central

Objective Investigate the importance of viewing belief systems about health maintenance holistically. Methods Qualitative (N=74) and quantitative data (N=95) were obtained from multi-ethnic rural-dwelling older adults with diabetes to characterize their Common Sense Models (CSMs) of diabetes. Results There is a discrete number of CSMs held by older adults, each characterized by unique clusters of diabetes-related knowledge and beliefs. Individuals whose CSM was shaped by biomedical knowledge were better able to achieve glycemic control. Conclusions Viewing individuals’ health beliefs incrementally or in a piece-meal strategy may be less effective for health behavior change than focusing on beliefs holistically. PMID:21683021

Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Ip, Edward H.; Chapman, Christine; Kirk, Julienne K.; Bell, Ronny A.; Quandt, Sara A.

2010-01-01

61

Housing Checklist for Older Adults.  

E-print Network

with furniture. Night lights are provided in the bedroom, bathroom and D D hallway. Light for general illumination in all rooms is controlled D D by a switch located directly inside the door. Fluorescent lighting is not used as older people have D D trouble... and adjusted. 0 0 The heating system requires minimum attention and 0 0 maintenance. " A screen is provided for use with an open fire. 0 0 13 Yes No FURNISHINGS 0 0 Tables and other furniture have rounded edges. 0 0 Chairs, sofa and tables stand firmly...

Anonymous,

1980-01-01

62

Atomoxetine Treatment for ADHD: Younger Adults Compared with Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Atomoxetine is a nonstimulant medication for treating child, adolescent, and adult ADHD. This meta-analysis compared the effects in younger and older adults. Method: A post hoc analysis was conducted using data from two double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials. Data from patients aged 18-25 years were compared with data from…

Durell, Todd; Adler, Lenard; Wilens, Timothy; Paczkowski, Martin; Schuh, Kory

2010-01-01

63

The International Network for Older Adults  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although funds were not available to bring members of the Older Adults Network to the World Assembly of Adult Education in January 1990, there was, among the delegates, considerable interest in the subject and several meetings were arranged. The thing that struck me most was not how different were our situations, coming as we did from every corner of the earth, but how many problems and concerns we had in common. With the second Network Newsletter, sent out in the spring of 1991, questionnaires asked for brief details of schemes which involved older people in projects that were, in some way, conservational. They could be involved in conserving language, mythology or history. They might be working to improve and save their environment. The aim is to establish a small but useful register of such projects in sufficient detail to encourage contact and replication by others. For this purpose, small grants are being made available from the money given by CIDA. Slowly but surely, the Older Adults Network is gathering information about positive actions being taken to ensure that older people, in all countries, have the skills and opportunities they need to continue as fully participating citizens. With the rapidly increasing number of older people in all our countries, this small beginning will, hopefully, be a foundation on which much important work will be done in the years to come.

Norton, Dianne

1992-07-01

64

Optimizing Sleep in Older Adults: Treating Insomnia  

PubMed Central

As the world’s population ages, the elevated prevalence of insomnia in older adults is a growing concern. Insomnia is characterized by difficulty falling or remaining asleep, or by non-restorative sleep, and resultant daytime dysfunction. In addition to being at elevated risk for primary insomnia, older adults are at greater risk for comorbid insomnia, which results from, or occurs in conjunction with another medical or psychiatric condition. In this review, we discuss normal changes in sleep that accompany aging, circadian rhythm changes and other factors that can contribute to late-life insomnia, useful tools for the assessment of insomnia and related problems in older people, and both non-pharmacological and pharmacological strategies for the management of insomnia and optimization of sleep in later life. PMID:23746664

Wennberg, Alexandra M.; Canham, Sarah L.; Smith, Michael T.; Spira, Adam P.

2013-01-01

65

Older Adults' Perceptions of Home Telehealth Services  

PubMed Central

Abstract The success of home telemedicine depends on end-user adoption, which has been slow despite rapid advances in technological development. This study focuses on an examination of significant factors that may predict the successful adoption of home telemedicine services (HTS) among older adults. Based on previous studies in the fields of remote patient monitoring, assisted living technologies, and consumer health information technology acceptance, eight factors were identified as a framework for qualitative testing. Twelve focus groups were conducted with an older population living in both urban and rural environments. The results reveal seven predictors that play an important role in perceptions of HTS: perceived usefulness, effort expectancy, social influence, perceived security, computer anxiety, facilitating conditions, and physicians' opinion. The results provide important insights in the field of older adults' acceptance of HTS, with guidelines for the strategic planning, developing, and marketing of HTS for the graying market. PMID:23931702

Bren?i?, Maja Makovec; Trkman, Peter; de Leonni Stanonik, Mateja

2013-01-01

66

LIPID PROFILES OF RURAL OLDER ADULTS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Age is an independent, non-modifiable risk factor for CVD, the leading cause of death in the United States. The purpose of this study was to examine total cholesterol and lipoprotein sub-fractions in relation to statin use and ATPIII guidelines in a sample of older adults, n=278. 161f and 117m. Fa...

67

Creativity and Life Satisfaction of Older Adults.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An experimental group of 55 older adults participated in creative activities (control group n=53). Completion of Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking and a morale scale demonstrated a positive link between creativity and life satisfaction. It was unclear whether increased satisfaction caused greater creativity or vice versa. (SK)

Goff, Kathy

1993-01-01

68

Studies of directed forgetting in older adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we present four experiments comparing the performance of younger and older adults on directed forget- ting tasks. In this type of task (e.g., see Bjork, 1989), partici- pants are presented items to study, some of which they are told to remember and others of which they are told to forget. Because the cueing as to which items

Rose T. Zacks; Gabriel Radvansky; Lynn Hasher

1996-01-01

69

Providing Quality Primary Care to Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

trend for older adults to seek care from non-pri- mary care specialists at a higher rate than in the recent past. In 2005, 43% of ambulatory care visits by patients aged 65 and over were to primary care physicians and 57% were to non-primary care spe- cialists. In 1980, 62% of ambulatory care visits by patients aged 65 and over

Gregg Warshaw

2009-01-01

70

Training Older Adults to Use Computers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discussion of older adults in the workforce focuses on methods for training them how to use computers. Topics discussed include changes in processing information into memory, learning skills, learning processes, the learning environment, content planning, self-pacing materials, group and cooperative learning, and the instructor's role. (five…

Carter, Janet Houser; Honeywell, Robert

1991-01-01

71

Community College Older Adult Program Development Guidelines.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide provides information and suggestions for developing programs that meet the needs of older adults at community colleges. Recommended procedures are presented for the following stages of program development: (1) leadership influences, highlighting the process of hiring effective leaders, key leadership skills, and leaders'…

Getskow, Veronica

72

Endurance of Undergraduate Attitudes toward Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This cross-sectional study assessed undergraduate attitudes toward older adults and attitude endurance 3 to 18 months after aging coursework. Survey respondents included 349 students who took an aging elective and 430 comparison students. Aging-elective students indicated more positive attitudes than comparison students. Attitudes did not vary…

Funderburk, Brooke; Damron-Rodriguez, JoAnn; Storms, Lene Levy; Solomon, David H.

2006-01-01

73

Nutritional strategies for frail older adults.  

PubMed

The objectives of this continuing education article are to analyze the aging process and its effect on the nutritional status of frail older adults; determine how sarcopenia, anorexia, malnutrition, and Alzheimer disease increase the risk for pressure ulcer development and impact the healing process; and to apply evidence-based nutrition guidelines and implement practical solutions for wound healing. PMID:23426414

Posthauer, Mary Ellen; Collins, Nancy; Dorner, Becky; Sloan, Colleen

2013-03-01

74

Services for Older Adults: Curriculum Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This curriculum guide contains materials for a course that provides occupationally specific training designed to develop knowledge and skills for employment in the area of services for older adults. Contents include an introduction, the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) covered; sample course outlines; instructional strategies organized…

Mumme, Debbie

75

Blueberry supplementation improves memory in older adults  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The prevalence of dementia, in particular Alzheimer’s disease, is increasing with the expansion of the older adult population. In the absence of effective therapy, preventive approaches are essential to mitigate this public health problem. Blueberries contain polyphenolic compounds, most prominent...

76

Preventing Traumatic Brain Injury in Older Adults  

MedlinePLUS

Preventing Traumatic Brain Injury in Older Adults U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Most of ... ways to prevent it. What is a traumatic brain injury or TBI? Traumatic brain injury or TBI is ...

77

Clinical Assessment Research with Older Adults.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Methodological issues in geropsychological assessment research are discussed and illustrated through recent investigations. Cross-sectional studies are needed to extend and diversify age norms, and short-term longitudinal studies should be planned to assess the predictive validity of test outcomes and diagnostic profiles of older adults. (SLD)

La Rue, Asenath; Markee, Taryn

1995-01-01

78

Attitudes toward Advertisements of the Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study we will analyze the attitude of older adults to advertisements, differentiating between advertisements that contain rhetorical figures (trope ads) and those that do not (explicit ads). We will also study their attitude toward the brand advertised according to their degree of involvement with the product. In the course of the…

Estrada, M.; Moliner, M. A.; Sanchez, J.

2010-01-01

79

Mobility in Older Adults: A Comprehensive Framework  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mobility is fundamental to active aging and is intimately linked to health status and quality of life. Although there is widespread acceptance regarding the importance of mobility in older adults, there have been few attempts to comprehensively portray mobility, and research has to a large extent been discipline specific. In this article, a new…

Webber, Sandra C.; Porter, Michelle M.; Menec, Verena H.

2010-01-01

80

Evaluation of Verbal Behavior in Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Approximately 5% of older adults have a dementia diagnosis, and language deterioration is commonly associated with this disorder (Kempler, 2005). Several instruments have been developed to diagnose dementia and assess language capabilities of elderly adults. However, none of these instruments take a functional approach to language assessment as described by Skinner (1957). The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a function-based assessment for language deficits of older adults. Thirty-one participants were categorized into a control group (n ?=? 15) and a dementia group (n ?=? 16) based on their score on the Dementia Rating Scale-2. Individuals with dementia performed significantly worse on the tact assessment than those without dementia. Participants from both groups performed better on measures of tacts than intraverbals or mands, even though topographically identical responses were required in these assessments. The data provide support for Skinner's conceptualization of functionally independent verbal operants. PMID:23814369

Gross, Amy C.; Fuqua, R. Wayne; Merritt, Todd A.

2013-01-01

81

Living with Multiple Health Problems: What Older Adults Should Know  

MedlinePLUS

... Stroke Related Documents PDF Living With Multiple Health Problems: What Older Adults Should Know Download Join our e-newsletter! Resources Living With Multiple Health Problems: What Older Adults Should Know Tools and Tips ...

82

Preventing Falls in Older Adults Who Live in Community Settings  

MedlinePLUS

Preventing Falls in Older Adults Who Live in Community Settings: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Summaries ... full report is titled “Prevention of Falls in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force ...

83

Five Ways Older Adults Can Be More Active  

MedlinePLUS

... Professionals, Businesses & Schools Partners & Community Organizations About NDEP | Contact Us | Site Map Tengo diabetes ¿Corro riesgo? You are here: NDEP Home > Resources > Five Ways Older Adults Can Be More Active Five Ways Older Adults ...

84

Overview of persistent pain in older adults.  

PubMed

With the shifting age demographics of the U.S. population, more psychologists will be asked to provide clinical services to older adults. Given the high prevalence of persistent pain in aging, in many cases this will mean providing empirically supported interventions for pain and the interference it creates. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad overview of the scope and impact of persistent pain in older people and to discuss mechanisms by which persistent geriatric pain can lead to suffering and disability. We consider the unique context of pain in older adulthood and review differences between older and younger people in terms of pain perception, the social network, beliefs about pain, pain-related coping, and adherence to pain medication. Finally, we discuss special issues affecting pain management in older adults, including dementia, polypharmacy, and barriers to accessing adequate pain care. This review also highlights a need for greater provider training in pain management to meet the needs of a changing U.S. population. PMID:24547805

Molton, Ivan R; Terrill, Alexandra L

2014-01-01

85

Adapting "Distance Learning" Instruction to Older Adult Differences.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As distance learning plays an increasing role in adult education, instruction to older adults must be adapted for individual learner differences. Two stereotypic adult education client groups have been described: the SAVY adult (Schooled, Active, Verbal, Younger) and the ONUS adult (Older, Non-Verbal, Unschooled, Sedentary). Instructional methods…

Richardson, Penelope Louise

86

Resilience in Rural Community-Dwelling Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: Identifying ways to meet the health care needs of older adults is important because their numbers are increasing and they often have more health care issues. High resilience level may be one factor that helps older adults adjust to the hardships associated with aging. Rural community-dwelling older adults often face unique challenges such…

Wells, Margaret

2009-01-01

87

Effects of a Forgiveness Intervention for Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors' aim in the present study was to examine the effects of a brief forgiveness intervention for older adults. The psychoeducational group intervention consists of (a) established core components of previous forgiveness interventions and (b) additional components considering specific needs of older adults. Seventy-eight older adults (mean…

Allemand, Mathias; Steiner, Marianne; Hill, Patrick L.

2013-01-01

88

Nutraceutical Intervention Improves Older Adults' Cognitive Functioning  

PubMed Central

Abstract Interventions to improve the cognitive health of older adults are of critical importance. In the current study, we conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial using a pill-based nutraceutical (NT-020) that contained a proprietary formulation of blueberry, carnosine, green tea, vitamin D3, and Biovin to evaluate the impact on changes in multiple domains of cognitive functioning. One hundred and five cognitively intact adults aged 65–85 years of age (M=73.6 years) were randomized to receive NT-020 (n=52) or a placebo (n=53). Participants were tested with a battery of cognitive performance tests that were classified into six broad domains—episodic memory, processing speed, verbal ability, working memory, executive functioning, and complex speed at baseline and 2 months later. The results indicated that persons taking NT-020 improved significantly on two measures of processing speed across the 2-month test period in contrast to persons on the placebo whose performance did not change. None of the other cognitive ability measures were related to intervention group. The results also indicated that the NT-020 was well tolerated by older adults, and the presence of adverse events or symptoms did not differ between the NT-020 and placebo groups. Overall, the results of the current study were promising and suggest the potential for interventions like these to improve the cognitive health of older adults. PMID:24134194

Rawson, Kerri S.; Martin, Christina; Eisel, Sarah L.; Sanberg, Cyndy D.; McEvoy, Cathy L.; Sanberg, Paul R.; Shytle, R. Douglas; Tan, Jun; Bickford, Paula C.

2014-01-01

89

Clostridium difficile infection in older adults  

PubMed Central

Clostridium difficile infection, the most frequent cause of nosocomial diarrhea, disproportionately affects older adults. The two most important risk factors for developing C. difficile infection are antimicrobial exposure and age >65 years old. Risk factors specific to older adults are frequent interactions with healthcare systems and age-related changes in physiology, including immune senescence and changes to the gut microbiome. Metronidazole and oral vancomcyin are the mainstays of conventional treatment for C. difficile infection. Alternative therapies include fidaxomicin, a narrow-spectrum macrocyclic antibiotic, and fectal bacteriotherapy, which offers an excellent therapeutic outcome. Strategies to prevent C. difficile infections include enhanced infection control measures and reducing inappropriate antimicrobial use through stewardship. PMID:24955106

Jump, Robin LP

2014-01-01

90

Polypharmacy in Older Adults with Cancer  

PubMed Central

The definition of “polypharmacy” ranges from the use of a large number of medications; the use of potentially inappropriate medications, which can increase the risk for adverse drug events; medication underuse despite instructions to the contrary; and medication duplication. Older adults are particularly at risk because they often present with several medical conditions requiring pharmacotherapy. Cancer-related therapy adds to this risk in older adults, but few studies have been conducted in this patient population. In this review, we outline the adverse outcomes associated with polypharmacy and present polypharmacy definitions offered by the geriatrics literature. We also examine the strengths and weaknesses of these definitions and explore the relationships among these definitions and what is known about the prevalence and impact of polypharmacy. PMID:20418534

Maggiore, Ronald J.; Gross, Cary P.

2010-01-01

91

Small intestinal permeability in older adults  

PubMed Central

Abstract It is not yet clear whether intestinal mucosal permeability changes with advancing age in humans. This question is of high importance for drug and nutrition approaches for older adults. Our main objective was to answer the question if small intestinal barrier integrity deteriorates with healthy aging. We conducted a cross?sectional study including the pooled data of 215 nonsmoking healthy adults (93 female/122 male), 84 of whom were aged between 60 and 82 years. After a 12?h fast, all participants ingested 10 g of lactulose and 5 g of mannitol. Urine was collected for 5 h afterwards and analyzed for test sugars. The permeability index (PI = lactulose/mannitol) was used to assess small intestinal permeability. Low?grade inflammation defined by high?sensitivity C?reactive protein ?1 mL/L and kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate) were determined in the older age group. The PI was similar in older compared to younger adults (P =0.887). However, the urinary recovery of lactulose and mannitol was lower in the older adults and this change was neither associated with urinary volume nor glomerular filtration rate. The PI was not significantly correlated with low?grade inflammation or presence of noninsulin?dependent type 2 diabetes. However, it significantly deteriorated in the copresence of both conditions compared to low?grade inflammation alone (P =0.043) or type 2 diabetes alone (P =0.015). Small intestinal mucosal barrier does not deteriorate with age per se. But low?grade inflammation coupled with minor disease challenges, such as type 2 diabetes, can compromise the small intestinal barrier. PMID:24771689

Valentini, Luzia; Ramminger, Sara; Haas, Verena; Postrach, Elisa; Werich, Martina; Fischer, André; Koller, Michael; Swidsinski, Alexander; Bereswill, Stefan; Lochs, Herbert; Schulzke, Jörg?Dieter

2014-01-01

92

Electronic Medication Reminder for Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a As the numbers of the elderly people is increasing rapidly, it is important and urgent to design appropriate products for\\u000a older adults. Because of physical and mental function decline, the elderly need to take multiple drugs, they often occurring\\u000a medication non-compliance behavior, seriously affecting the health of the elderly. Forget to take medicine is one the most\\u000a frequency problem, so

Yi-Lin Lo; Chang-Franw Lee; Wang-Chin Tsai

93

Dental hygiene students' perceptions of older adults.  

PubMed

Geriatric education is an important component of the dental hygiene curriculum because, in it, students acquire skills and attitudes to help provide quality care to older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine if off-site exposure to nursing home residents with supervised oversight had the potential to improve dental hygiene students' attitudes toward older adults. Senior dental hygiene students at one school completed a pre-nursing home experience questionnaire. A series of geriatric lectures and discussions, which included discussions about students' anxieties of working with institutionalized older adults, were held prior to the nursing home experience. The students then participated in two supervised four-hour nursing home experiences, were debriefed after the experiences, and completed a second questionnaire. Of thirty-nine potential participants in the study, thirty-two took part in the pre-nursing home experience questionnaire (82.1 percent). They had a mean split Fabroni score of 34.2 (95 percent confidence interval: 32.2, 36.3). The thirty participants in the post-experience questionnaire (76.9 percent of total) had a mean split score of 32.7 (95 percent confidence interval: 30.1, 35.3). This study failed to reject the null hypothesis of no mean difference between the pre- and post-nursing home experience; however, the post-experience mean score was lower than the pre-nursing home experience mean score, indicating a more positive attitude toward older adults after the experience. PMID:25480277

Wiener, R Constance; Shockey, Alcinda Trickett; Long, D Leann

2014-12-01

94

Small intestinal permeability in older adults.  

PubMed

Abstract It is not yet clear whether intestinal mucosal permeability changes with advancing age in humans. This question is of high importance for drug and nutrition approaches for older adults. Our main objective was to answer the question if small intestinal barrier integrity deteriorates with healthy aging. We conducted a cross-sectional study including the pooled data of 215 nonsmoking healthy adults (93 female/122 male), 84 of whom were aged between 60 and 82 years. After a 12-h fast, all participants ingested 10 g of lactulose and 5 g of mannitol. Urine was collected for 5 h afterwards and analyzed for test sugars. The permeability index (PI = lactulose/mannitol) was used to assess small intestinal permeability. Low-grade inflammation defined by high-sensitivity C-reactive protein ?1 mL/L and kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate) were determined in the older age group. The PI was similar in older compared to younger adults (P = 0.887). However, the urinary recovery of lactulose and mannitol was lower in the older adults and this change was neither associated with urinary volume nor glomerular filtration rate. The PI was not significantly correlated with low-grade inflammation or presence of noninsulin-dependent type 2 diabetes. However, it significantly deteriorated in the copresence of both conditions compared to low-grade inflammation alone (P = 0.043) or type 2 diabetes alone (P = 0.015). Small intestinal mucosal barrier does not deteriorate with age per se. But low-grade inflammation coupled with minor disease challenges, such as type 2 diabetes, can compromise the small intestinal barrier. PMID:24771689

Valentini, Luzia; Ramminger, Sara; Haas, Verena; Postrach, Elisa; Werich, Martina; Fischer, André; Koller, Michael; Swidsinski, Alexander; Bereswill, Stefan; Lochs, Herbert; Schulzke, Jörg-Dieter

2014-01-01

95

Chronic use of benzodiazepines among older adults  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To analyze the perception of and motivation for the chronic use of benzodiazepine among older adults. METHODS A qualitative study was conducted on 22 older adults living in Bambuí, MG, Southeastern Brazil, who were taking benzodiazepines and had the clinical and cognitive ability to respond to interview questions. The collected data were analyzed on the basis of the “signs, meanings, and actions” model. RESULTS The main reasons pointed out for the use of benzodiazepines were “nervousness”, “sleep problems”, and “worry” due to family and financial problems, everyday problems, and existential difficulties. None of the interviewees said that they used benzodiazepines in a dose higher than that recommended or had been warned by health professionals about any risks of their continuous use. Different strategies were used to obtain the prescription for the medication, and any physician would prescribe it, indicating that a bond was established with the drug and not with the health professional or healthcare service. Obtaining and consuming the medication turned into a crucial issue because benzodiazepine assumes the status of an essential food, which leads users to not think but sleep. It causes a feeling of relief from their problems such as awareness of human finitude and fragility, existential difficulties, and family problems. CONCLUSIONS Benzodiazepine assumes the characteristics of polyvalence among older adults, which extrapolate specific clinical indications, and of essentiality to deal with life’s problems in old age. Although it relieves the “nerves”, the chronic use of benzodiazepines buffers suffering and prevents older adults from going through the suffering. This shows important difficulties in the organization and planning of strategies that are necessary for minimizing the chronic use in this population.

Alvarenga, Jussara Mendonça; Giacomin, Karla Cristina; de Loyola, Antônio Ignácio; Uchoa, Elizabeth; Firmo, Josélia Oliveira Araújo

2014-01-01

96

Physical activity is medicine for older adults  

PubMed Central

There is evidence from high quality studies to strongly support the positive association between increased levels of physical activity, exercise participation and improved health in older adults. Worldwide, around 3.2 million deaths per year are being attributed to inactivity. In industrialised countries where people are living longer lives, the levels of chronic health conditions are increasing and the levels of physical activity are declining. Key factors in improving health are exercising at a moderate-to-vigorous level for at least 5?days per week and including both aerobic and strengthening exercises. Few older adults achieve the level of physical activity or exercise that accompanies health improvements. A challenge for health professionals is to increase physical activity and exercise participation in older adults. Some success in this has been reported when physicians have given specific, detailed and localised information to their patients, but more high quality research is needed to continue to address this issue of non-participation in physical activity and exercise of a high enough level to ensure health benefits. PMID:24255119

Taylor, Denise

2014-01-01

97

Knowledge and injury prevention practices in homes of older adults.  

PubMed

This study aimed to describe the prevalence of preventive safety measures in homes with older, urban-dwelling adults; determine the relationship between sociodemographic variables and injury prevention measures; and describe older adults' knowledge of safety topics. Teams conducted interviews and home observations in 603 homes to confirm preventive safety measures. Households with older adults were rarely observed to have recommended smoke alarm (34%) or carbon monoxide coverage (22%). Water temperature was safe in 64% of homes. Among households headed by someone other than the older adult, odds of having a working smoke alarm on every floor were much lower than in older adult-headed households (95% confidence interval: 0.04-0.35). Few older adults interviewed about safety knowledge correctly answered several items related to fire and carbon monoxide. Effort is needed to improve knowledge and promote the lifesaving benefits of injury countermeasures so that older adults can be adequately protected. PMID:22832066

Shields, Wendy C; Perry, Elise C; Szanton, Sarah L; Andrews, Margaret R; Stepnitz, Rebecca L; McDonald, Eileen M; Gielen, Andrea C

2013-01-01

98

Functional Literacy of Older Adults: The Case of the Netherlands.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of the International Adult Literacy Survey, the literacy levels of older adults in the Netherlands were investigated. A sample of 918 adults aged 50-75 was tested on prose, document, and quantitative scales; 40 older adults were interviewed to determine in what contexts they experience literacy problems and what kinds of coping strategies…

van der Kamp, Max; Scheeren, Jo

99

Comprehension of Health-related Written Materials by Older Adults  

PubMed Central

This study examined how Flesch Reading Ease and text cohesion affect older adults' comprehension of common health texts. All older adults benefited when high Flesh Reading Ease was combined with high cohesion. Older adults with small working memories had more difficulty understanding texts high in Flesch Reading Ease. Additionally, older adults with low verbal ability or older than 77 years of age had difficulty understanding texts high in text cohesion but low in Flesch Reading Ease. These results imply that writers must increase Flesch Reading Ease without disrupting text cohesion to ensure comprehension of health-related texts. PMID:19543546

Liu, Chiung-ju; Kemper, Susan; Bovaird, James A.

2008-01-01

100

The Capacity to Consent to Research among Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of this study was to develop and validate an assessment tool for research consent competence in older participants. A four-item instrument was developed to assess the capacity of the older adults to consent to research. Data were obtained from 203 nursing home residents from two facilities and 201 community-dwelling older adults in a…

Lee, Minhong

2010-01-01

101

Community Reentry and Older Adult Offenders: Redefining Social Work Roles  

Microsoft Academic Search

The number of older adults in US prisons continues to rise. In 2002, adults ages 50 and older made up 8% of the US prison population, up from 4% a decade prior. Many older offenders are released to communities that are poorly equipped to meet their special needs. and largely unprepared for the social and fiscal costs of their reentry.

Doreen Higgins; Margaret E. Severson

2009-01-01

102

Attitudes of Older Adults toward a Computer Training Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many older adult have an interest in learning to use computers. The study reported in this article examined whether older adults' attitudes toward computers can be influenced by direct, customized computer training. Thirty older participants who registered for introductory computer courses offered at a SeniorNet computer lab completed the…

Segrist, Kathleen A.

2004-01-01

103

Attitudes of Older Adults Toward a Computer Training Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many older adult have an interest in learning to use computers. The study reported in this article examined whether older adults' attitudes toward computers can be influenced by direct, customized computer training. Thirty older participants who registered for introductory computer courses offered at a SeniorNet computer lab completed the…

Segrist, Kathleen

2004-01-01

104

Recognition of Rapid Speech by Blind and Sighted Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: To determine whether older blind participants recognize time-compressed speech better than older sighted participants. Method: Three groups of adults with normal hearing participated (n = 10/group): (a) older sighted, (b) older blind, and (c) younger sighted listeners. Low-predictability sentences that were uncompressed (0% time…

Gordon-Salant, Sandra; Friedman, Sarah A.

2011-01-01

105

Role of Allergen Sensitization in Older Adults  

PubMed Central

There is a common perception among physicians and patients that allergic diseases are not relevant in older adults. There is recognition that both innate and adaptive immune functions decline with aging. It is the function of a variety of immune cells in the form of allergic inflammation that is a hallmark of allergic diseases. In fact, there is a fairly consistent observation that measures of allergic sensitization, such as skin prick testing, specific IgE or total IgE decline with age. Nonetheless, the association between allergic sensitization and allergic diseases, particularly asthma and allergic rhinitis, remains robust in the elderly population. Consequently, an appropriate evaluation of allergic sensitivities is warranted and indicated in older asthma and rhinitis patients in order to provide optimal care for the individual and minimize any resultant morbidity and mortality. PMID:21667198

Viswanathan, Ravi K.; Mathur, Sameer K.

2012-01-01

106

Neighborhood amenities and mobility in older adults.  

PubMed

Diversity of neighborhood amenities may promote the mobility of older adults. A 2010 community-based sample of 510 adults aged ?65 years in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and geospatial data from the Esri Business Analyst database (Esri, Inc., Redlands, California) were used to assess associations of neighborhood amenity diversity with mobility. Neighborhoods were defined by census tract, and diversity of amenities was derived by using the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design's neighborhood development index (US Green Building Council, Washington, DC). Generalized estimating equations adjusted for demographic, socioeconomic, and neighborhood characteristics were used to estimate differences in mobility score by tertile of amenity diversity. Analyses were stratified by participants' routine travel habits (stayed at home, stayed in home zip code, or traveled beyond home zip code). We found that for those who spent most of their time in their home neighborhoods, mobility scores (from the Life-Space Assessment, which ranges from 0 to 104 points) were 8.3 points higher (95% confidence interval: 0.1, 16.6) among those who lived in neighborhoods with the most amenity diversity compared with those who lived in neighborhoods with the least amenity diversity. No significant associations between amenity diversity and mobility were observed for those who did not leave home or who regularly traveled outside their neighborhoods. Neighborhoods with a high diversity of amenities may be important promoters of mobility in older adults who do not routinely travel outside their neighborhoods. PMID:23666814

Rosso, Andrea L; Grubesic, Tony H; Auchincloss, Amy H; Tabb, Loni P; Michael, Yvonne L

2013-09-01

107

Neighborhood Amenities and Mobility in Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Diversity of neighborhood amenities may promote the mobility of older adults. A 2010 community-based sample of 510 adults aged ?65 years in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and geospatial data from the Esri Business Analyst database (Esri, Inc., Redlands, California) were used to assess associations of neighborhood amenity diversity with mobility. Neighborhoods were defined by census tract, and diversity of amenities was derived by using the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design's neighborhood development index (US Green Building Council, Washington, DC). Generalized estimating equations adjusted for demographic, socioeconomic, and neighborhood characteristics were used to estimate differences in mobility score by tertile of amenity diversity. Analyses were stratified by participants' routine travel habits (stayed at home, stayed in home zip code, or traveled beyond home zip code). We found that for those who spent most of their time in their home neighborhoods, mobility scores (from the Life-Space Assessment, which ranges from 0 to 104 points) were 8.3 points higher (95% confidence interval: 0.1, 16.6) among those who lived in neighborhoods with the most amenity diversity compared with those who lived in neighborhoods with the least amenity diversity. No significant associations between amenity diversity and mobility were observed for those who did not leave home or who regularly traveled outside their neighborhoods. Neighborhoods with a high diversity of amenities may be important promoters of mobility in older adults who do not routinely travel outside their neighborhoods. PMID:23666814

Rosso, Andrea L.; Grubesic, Tony H.; Auchincloss, Amy H.; Tabb, Loni P.; Michael, Yvonne L.

2013-01-01

108

Spatial navigation in young versus older adults  

PubMed Central

Older age is associated with changes in the brain, including the medial temporal lobe, which may result in mild spatial navigation deficits, especially in allocentric navigation. The aim of the study was to characterize the profile of real-space allocentric (world-centered, hippocampus-dependent) and egocentric (body-centered, parietal lobe dependent) navigation and learning in young vs. older adults, and to assess a possible influence of gender. We recruited healthy participants without cognitive deficits on standard neuropsychological testing, white matter lesions or pronounced hippocampal atrophy: 24 young participants (18–26 years old) and 44 older participants stratified as participants 60–70 years old (n = 24) and participants 71–84 years old (n = 20). All underwent spatial navigation testing in the real-space human analog of the Morris Water Maze, which has the advantage of assessing separately allocentric and egocentric navigation and learning. Of the eight consecutive trials, trials 2–8 were used to reduce bias by a rebound effect (more dramatic changes in performance between trials 1 and 2 relative to subsequent trials). The participants who were 71–84 years old (p < 0.001), but not those 60–70 years old, showed deficits in allocentric navigation compared to the young participants. There were no differences in egocentric navigation. All three groups showed spatial learning effect (p’ s ? 0.01). There were no gender differences in spatial navigation and learning. Linear regression limited to older participants showed linear (? = 0.30, p = 0.045) and quadratic (? = 0.30, p = 0.046) effect of age on allocentric navigation. There was no effect of age on egocentric navigation. These results demonstrate that navigation deficits in older age may be limited to allocentric navigation, whereas egocentric navigation and learning may remain preserved. This specific pattern of spatial navigation impairment may help differentiate normal aging from prodromal Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:24391585

Gazova, Ivana; Laczó, Jan; Rubinova, Eva; Mokrisova, Ivana; Hyncicova, Eva; Andel, Ross; Vyhnalek, Martin; Sheardova, Katerina; Coulson, Elizabeth J.; Hort, Jakub

2013-01-01

109

MUSIC AND QUALITY OF LIFE IN OLDER ADULTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article briefly reviews some basic issues of adult development and measures used in assessing quality of life as a background for reviewing music studies with healthy older adults. Research shows that music activities (both music listening and music making) can influence older adults’ perceptions about the quality of their lives. Some research has examined the effects of music listening

Don D. Coffman

2002-01-01

110

How emotion affects older adults’ memories for event details  

Microsoft Academic Search

As adults age, they tend to have problems remembering the details of events and the contexts in which events occurred. This review presents evidence that emotion can enhance older adults’ abilities to remember episodic detail. Older adults are more likely to remember affective details of an event (e.g., whether something was good or bad, or how an event made them

Elizabeth A. Kensinger

2009-01-01

111

Are Older Adults More Attuned to Morally Charged Information?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whereas older adults typically show declines in various cognitive processes, they also typically demonstrate greater interest in social relationships. Part of this increased focus on interpersonal relations may extend to morality, which by its very nature is concerned with social contracts, obligations, and the give-and-take among people. The authors tested whether in comparison to younger adults, older adults show increased

Darcia Narvaez; Gabriel A. Radvansky; Nicholas A. Lynchard; David E. Copeland

2011-01-01

112

Fruit and vegetable intake among older adults: a scoping review  

PubMed Central

Older adults are the fastest growing segment of the world population. Older adults are also at heightened risk of chronic conditions (such as diabetes, heart disease, and cancer) and specific geriatric conditions (such as cognitive impairment, frailty, and falls). Research studies have examined the relationship between fruit and vegetable intake and subsequent health outcomes and the correlates of fruit and vegetable intake in the U.S. population. However, relatively few studies have specifically examined health impacts and correlates of fruit and vegetable intake among older adults, who have unique biophysical and socioeconomic circumstances. Evidence is reviewed to (1) describe findings related to consumption and chronic, geriatric, and other health outcomes among older adults and (2) describe patterns in fruit and vegetable consumption among older adults and how these patterns vary within and among populations. This review addresses specific barriers faced by older adults in obtaining and consuming fruits and vegetables in community settings. Recommendations for practice and policy are discussed. PMID:23769545

Kadell, Andria R.

2013-01-01

113

Recognition of facial, auditory, and bodily emotions in older adults.  

PubMed

Understanding older adults' social functioning difficulties requires insight into their recognition of emotion processing in voices and bodies, not just faces, the focus of most prior research. We examined 60 young and 61 older adults' recognition of basic emotions in facial, vocal, and bodily expressions, and when matching faces and bodies to voices, using 120 emotion items. Older adults were worse than young adults in 17 of 30 comparisons, with consistent difficulties in recognizing both positive (happy) and negative (angry and sad) vocal and bodily expressions. Nearly three quarters of older adults functioned at a level similar to the lowest one fourth of young adults, suggesting that age-related changes are common. In addition, we found that older adults' difficulty in matching emotions was not explained by difficulty on the component sources (i.e., faces or voices on their own), suggesting an additional problem of integration. PMID:19805486

Ruffman, Ted; Halberstadt, Jamin; Murray, Janice

2009-11-01

114

Update on managing generalized anxiety disorder in older adults.  

PubMed

With the recent updates to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th edition; DSM-5), there are many questions on how to care for older adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and other psychiatric conditions. The current article reviews the new changes to the DSM-5 for diagnosis of GAD, discusses new anxiety assessment scales that are validated in older adults, evaluates pharmacological agents that have been studied in older adults for GAD treatment, and provides monitoring recommendations to help those who provide care to older adults experiencing GAD. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 41(4), 10-20.]. PMID:25848826

Clifford, Kalin M; Duncan, Nakia A; Heinrich, Krista; Shaw, Jennifer

2015-04-01

115

The role of chiropractic care in older adults  

PubMed Central

There are a rising number of older adults; in the US alone nearly 20% of the population will be 65 or older by 2030. Chiropractic is one of the most frequently utilized types of complementary and alternative care by older adults, used by an estimated 5% of older adults in the U.S. annually. Chiropractic care involves many different types of interventions, including preventive strategies. This commentary by experts in the field of geriatrics, discusses the evidence for the use of spinal manipulative therapy, acupuncture, nutritional counseling and fall prevention strategies as delivered by doctors of chiropractic. Given the utilization of chiropractic services by the older adult, it is imperative that providers be familiar with the evidence for and the prudent use of different management strategies for older adults. PMID:22348431

2012-01-01

116

How retellings shape younger and older adults' memories.  

PubMed

The way a story is retold influences the way it is later remembered; after retelling an event in a biased manner people subsequently remember the event in line with their distorted retelling. This study tested the hypothesis that this should be especially true for older adults. To test this, older and younger adults retold a story to be entertaining, to be accurate, or did not complete an initial retelling. Later, all participants recalled the story as accurately as possible. On this final test younger adults were unaffected by how they had previously retold the story. In contrast, older adults had better memory for the story's content and structure if they had previously retold the story accurately. Furthermore, for older adults, greater usage of storytelling language during the retelling was associated with lower subsequent recall. In summary, retellings exerted a greater effect on memory in older, compared with younger, adults. PMID:25436107

Barber, Sarah J; Mather, Mara

2014-04-01

117

How retellings shape younger and older adults’ memories  

PubMed Central

The way a story is retold influences the way it is later remembered; after retelling an event in a biased manner people subsequently remember the event in line with their distorted retelling. This study tested the hypothesis that this should be especially true for older adults. To test this, older and younger adults retold a story to be entertaining, to be accurate, or did not complete an initial retelling. Later, all participants recalled the story as accurately as possible. On this final test younger adults were unaffected by how they had previously retold the story. In contrast, older adults had better memory for the story’s content and structure if they had previously retold the story accurately. Furthermore, for older adults, greater usage of storytelling language during the retelling was associated with lower subsequent recall. In summary, retellings exerted a greater effect on memory in older, compared with younger, adults. PMID:25436107

Mather, Mara

2014-01-01

118

A Literature Review of the Psychosocial Development of Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this literature review is to examine existing models of psychosocial development of older adults especially framed around human mortality as a point of discussion that informs all aspects of human development in older adulthood. Well known, in addition to burgeoning, human psychosocial development models that considered older

Moon, Paul J.

2005-01-01

119

Data Sources Available for Modeling Environmental Exposures in Older Adults  

EPA Science Inventory

This report, ?Data Sources Available for Modeling Environmental Exposures in Older Adults,? focuses on information sources and data available for modeling environmental exposures in the older U.S. population, defined here to be people 60 years and older, with an emphasis on those...

120

OLDER ADULTS' USE OF COMPUTERS: A SURVEY Joy Goodman  

E-print Network

OLDER ADULTS' USE OF COMPUTERS: A SURVEY Joy Goodman Department of Computing Science University older people, survey, computer use, interaction design 1. INTRODUCTION The number of older people of Glasgow GLASGOW G12 8QQ UK joy@dcs.gla.ac.uk Audrey Syme Division of Applied Computing University

Goodman, Joy

121

Predicting premorbid memory functioning in older adults  

PubMed Central

Assessing cognitive change during a single visit requires the comparison of estimated premorbid abilities and current neuropsychological functioning. Although premorbid intellect has been widely examined, estimating premorbid memory abilities has received less attention. The current study used demographic variables and an estimate of premorbid intellect to predict premorbid memory abilities in a sample of 95 community-dwelling, cognitively intact older adults. These prediction formulae were then applied to a sample of 74 individuals with amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment to look for discrepancies between premorbid and current memory abilities. Despite minimal differences between premorbid and current memory abilities in the intact sample, large and statistically significant differences were observed in the impaired sample. Although validation in larger samples is needed, the current estimates of premorbid memory abilities may aid clinicians in determining change across time. PMID:21154041

Duff, Kevin

2010-01-01

122

Integrating guidelines, CKD, multimorbidity, and older adults.  

PubMed

Clinical practice guidelines provide guidance in decision making relating to diagnosis, management, and treatment in specific areas of health care. They play an essential role in the evaluation and synthesis of an ever-expanding evidence base and are of increasing importance in aging societies with a high prevalence of overlapping disease comorbid conditions. Integration of chronic disease guidance is essential, particularly in older people, in order to understand critical disease interactions and the potential adverse effects that individual guideline statements may engender in different disease areas. This requires a need for flexibility that not only recognizes the differences in patients' characteristics, but also their preferences for medical interventions and health outcomes. The question is how this can be achieved. In this article, we look at the standardization of clinical practice guidelines from the chronic kidney disease standpoint and consider how tools for integrating guidelines, such as the ADAPTE process and the knowledge-to-action cycle, can be used to guide appropriate decision making and take account of patient choice in older adults with multimorbidity. PMID:25483849

Stevens, Paul E; Lamb, Edmund J; Levin, Adeera

2015-03-01

123

Ethical Issues Involving Research Conducted with Homebound Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Conducting research in the home setting with homebound older adults presents distinct ethical and practical challenges that require special consideration. This article describes the methodological issues that make studying homebound older adults especially vulnerable to therapeutic misconception and researcher role conflict and offers practical…

Locher, Julie L.; Bronstein, Janet; Robinson, Caroline O.; Williams, Charlotte; Ritchie, Christine S.

2006-01-01

124

Videogames to Promote Physical Activity in Older Adults with Schizophrenia.  

PubMed

Older adults with schizophrenia need physical activity interventions to improve their physical health. The purpose of this report is to describe the preliminary acceptability of a videogame-based physical activity program using the Kinect™ for Xbox 360 game system (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) in older adults with schizophrenia. PMID:24761318

Leutwyler, Heather; Hubbard, Erin M; Vinogradov, Sophia; Dowling, Glenna A

2012-10-01

125

Health Literacy Programs for Older Adults: A Systematic Literature Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Older adults make up the fastest growing age group in North America. This has demanded increased attention in supporting the health and well-being of this population and, in particular, the role of health information in promoting the health and well-being of older adults. Increased availability and accessibility of information as well as a greater…

Manafo, Elizabeth; Wong, Sharon

2012-01-01

126

Balance screening of an inner city older adult population  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Until recently, studies of balance abilities were conducted on nursing home residents or volunteers in a clinical laboratory setting. Little is known about balance abilities of older adults living independently in large urban cities or who represent different ethnic backgrounds. The purpose of this study was to describe balance abilities in these individuals.Subjects: Older adults (n = 251) ranging

Roberta A. Newton

1997-01-01

127

Effectiveness of Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine in Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

background Streptococcus pneumoniae is the chief cause of pneumonia in older adults, but it remains unclear whether use of the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine alters the overall risk of community-acquired pneumonia. In a large population of older adults, we assessed the effectiveness of the pneumococcal vaccine. methods In this retrospective cohort study, 47,365 Group Health Cooperative members 65 years of age

Lisa A. Jackson; Kathleen M. Neuzil; Onchee Yu; Patti Benson; William E. Barlow; Annette L. Adams; Christi A. Hanson; Lisa D. Mahoney; David K. Shay; William W. Thompson

2003-01-01

128

Impact of Health Conditions on Food Intakes Among Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Even well older adults may experience a range of age-related physiological changes and chronic health conditions and may become increasingly sedentary—key factors that could affect appetite and hunger and lead to changes in diet composition. The present article reviews recent literature on the impact of prevalent health conditions on dietary choice. Research shows some evidence that older adults make positive

Bryna Shatenstein

2008-01-01

129

Impact of Arts Participation on Health Outcomes for Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to present findings from a literature review on the documented health benefits of arts programs for older adults. A systematic literature review was conducted to examine research publications on participatory arts programs for older adults and their reported impact on health outcomes. A total of 2,205 articles were found. Of these, 11 were eligible

Melissa Castora-Binkley; Linda Noelker; Thomas Prohaska; William Satariano

2010-01-01

130

Health-Related Variables and Functional Fitness among Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study assesses the functional fitness of a convenient sample of older adults (greater than 70 years), to examine correlations between functional fitness and several other health-related variables and to compare with criterion performance data as established by Rikli and Jones (2001). One hundred and seven community-dwelling older adults with…

Wilkin, Linda D.; Haddock, Bryan L.

2010-01-01

131

Health Status and Health Literacy in Older Adults  

E-print Network

it as the standard when testing their validity. The third section of this study used primary data to examine health literacy, patient activation and health status in older adults. The study participants were older adults (n=533) recruited from senior centers, aging...

Fulton, Daphne Saxon

2014-08-04

132

Thiazolidinedione Use and Bone Loss in Older Diabetic Adults  

E-print Network

glucose tolerance test ( 200 mg/dl) participated in the study. Main Outcome Measures: Whole-body, lumbarThiazolidinedione Use and Bone Loss in Older Diabetic Adults Ann V. Schwartz, Deborah E. Sellmeyer (BMD) in older adults with type 2 diabetes. Design: We analyzed 4-yr follow-up data from the Health

Abraham, Nader G.

133

Therapeutic Uses of Music with Older Adults. Second Edition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this comprehensively updated second edition, written by Alicia Ann Clair and Jenny Memmott the extraordinary benefits of music therapy for older adults are detailed. "Therapeutic Uses of Music with Older Adults" not only examines these benefits but also clarifies the reasons that music is beneficial. This important book shows both informal and…

Clair, Alicia Ann; Memmott, Jenny

2008-01-01

134

Older Adults: Community College Students of the 1990s.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With a declining pool of youth to draw from, community colleges need to be concerned about what can be done to serve the needs of a burgeoning older adult population. Recent research on the educational needs of older adults reveals that they are interested in: (1) information on such personal business and financial topics as social security…

Craig, Ford M.

135

Basic Psychological Needs Satisfaction, Motivation, and Exercise in Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

A predominate motivation theory used to predict exercise behavior is self-determination theory, which posits that motivation is driven by satisfaction of three basic psychological needs: autonomy, competence, and relatedness. This study investigates the relationship between motivation, basic psychological needs satisfaction, and exercise in a sample of older adults. Significant differences were found between older adult exercisers and nonexercisers in intrinsic

Rena A. Kirkland; Nancy J. Karlin; Megan Babkes Stellino; Steven Pulos

2011-01-01

136

FACILITATION AND INTERFERENCE IN THE OLDER ADULT LEARNER. FINAL REPORT.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THIS STUDY IS CONCERNED WITH THE DEGREE TO WHICH OLDER AND YOUNGER ADULTS ARE SUBJECT TO THE INTERFERING EFFECTS OF PAST HABITS. TO DETERMINE THE EXTENT TO WHICH HYPOTHESES BASED ON ASSUMPTIONS OF CONTEMPORARY INTERFERENCE THEORY HOLD FOR THE OLDER ADULT POPULATION, THESE HYPOTHESES WERE TESTED IN A NEGATIVE TRANSFER TASK, WHERE INCOMPATIBLE…

MCCRYSTAL, THOMAS J.

137

Older Adults' Perceptions of Mobility: A Metasynthesis of Qualitative Studies.  

PubMed

Purpose of the Study: Optimal mobility is an important element of healthy aging. Yet, older adults' perceptions of mobility and mobility preservation are not well understood. The purposes of our study were to (a) identify studies that report older adults' perceptions of mobility, (b) conduct a standardized methodological quality assessment, and (c) conduct a metasynthesis of the identified studies. PMID:24637252

Goins, R Turner; Jones, Jacqueline; Schure, Marc; Rosenberg, Dori E; Phelan, Elizabeth A; Dodson, Sherry; Jones, Dina L

2014-03-17

138

Implementation of Expressive Physical Touch in Depressed Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Depression is a serious problem among older adults and there is limited research on the most effective way to implement and evaluate the effects of expressive touch, either alone or in combination with verbalization, on levels of depression. A convenience sample of 24 institutionalized depressed older adult subjects (15 females and 9 males), ages 67 to 91 years was used

MaryBeth Tank Buschmann; Linda M. Hollinger-Smith; Sharon E. Peterson-Kokkas

1999-01-01

139

Treatment of Depression and Suicide in Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes a cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) intervention for suicide prevention in older adults. Although many studies have found that CBT interventions are efficacious for reducing depressive symptoms in the elderly, researchers have yet to evaluate the efficacy of such interventions for preventing suicide or reducing suicide risk in older adults. In this article we describe a 12-session CBT

Sunil S. Bhar; Gregory K. Brown

140

Dietary Screening Tool Identifies Nutritional Risk in Older Adults  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Background: No rapid methods exist for screening overall dietary intakes of older adults. Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a scoring system for a diet screening tool to identify nutritional risk among community-dwelling older adults. Design: This cross-sectional st...

141

Older Adults' Memory for Verbally Presented Medical Information  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous research demonstrates that patients typically have difficulty remembering information presented during healthcare consultations. This study examined how older adults learn and remember verbally presented medical information. Healthy older adults were tested for recall in experimental and field settings. Participants viewed a five-minute…

Bankoff, Sarah M.; Sandberg, Elisabeth Hollister

2012-01-01

142

Emotional Wellness Needs: Older Adults in Rural Communities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The importance of emotional wellness for rural older adults is a topic of growing significance. Older adults, now the fastest growing United States population sector, have special wellness needs. By the year 2030, about 70 million people will be over the age of 65. A low or declining sense of control over one's life increases depression. Emotional…

Russ, Randall

2009-01-01

143

Volunteerism, Health, and Civic Engagement among Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In North America, 40-50 per cent of older adults are actively involved as formal volunteers in providing diverse health and human services. We review empirical studies concerning older adults' motivations for volunteering, as well as the health and morale benefits they derive from this expression of altruism. Knowledge of the exact nature and…

Gottlieb, Benjamin H.; Gillespie, Alayna A.

2008-01-01

144

Older Adults Seeking Healthcare Information on the Internet  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Due to an aging population and increases in healthcare costs, particular attention needs to be focused on developing Internet sites that provide older adults with credible and accurate healthcare information. Present research findings suggest that motivation is only one factor that influences whether or not older adults utilize the World Wide Web…

Hardt, Jeffrey H.; Hollis-Sawyer, Lisa

2007-01-01

145

Designing Risk Communication for Older Adults Vaibhav Garg  

E-print Network

and financial fraud. According to Federal Trade Commission over 20% of the victims of financial fraud are older connelly@indiana.edu ABSTRACT Older adults are more susceptible to fraud than younger adults offline- ties, including managing their financial assets. Therefore, there is a need to develop risk

Connelly, Kay

146

Dare to Dream: New Venture Incubator for Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to describe a project that aims to foster active aging through entrepreneurial activities among older adults. The project establishes the feasibility of implementing an intervention program that assimilates the concept and capabilities of entrepreneurship among older adults and supports them while launching new…

Hantman, Shira; Gimmon, Eli

2014-01-01

147

Cognitive Decline and Older Adults’ Perception of Stigma Controllability  

PubMed Central

Emerging research suggests that older adults who experience age-related declines in regulatory abilities may have more difficulty inhibiting their expression of negative bias to stigmatized individuals as compared with young adults. However, it remains largely unexplored why this might be. For instance, older adults may hold stigmatized individuals more accountable for their conditions as compared with young adults, which could subsequently increase their expression of negative bias. The current study investigated this question by testing 90 older adults and 44 young adults. Researchers found that older adults with relatively impaired executive function placed a greater emphasis on controllability when evaluating stigmatized individuals and rated the stigmatized conditions overall as being more changeable. PMID:23042645

2013-01-01

148

Stereotype traits of older adults generated by young, middle-aged, and older Chinese participants  

E-print Network

This study examined stereotype traits of older adults elicited from 40 young (M age = 19.6), 40 middle-aged (M = 36.8), and 40 older Chinese adults (M = 64.7). Trait lists were compared across age groups and to traits reported by U.S. and Chinese...

Zhang, Yan Bing; Hummert, Mary Lee; Garstka, Teri A.

2002-01-01

149

Alcohol and prescription drug safety in older adults  

PubMed Central

Background The objectives of this study were to investigate older adults’ knowledge of prescription drug safety and interactions with alcohol, and to identify pharmacists’ willingness to disseminate prescription drug safety information to older adults. Methods The convenience sample consisted of 48 older adults aged 54–89 years who were recruited from a local pharmacy and who completed surveys addressing their alcohol consumption, understanding of alcohol and prescription drug interactions, and willingness to change habits regarding alcohol consumption and prescription drugs. To address pharmacist willingness, 90 pharmacists from local pharmacies volunteered and answered questions regarding their willingness to convey prescription drug safety information to older adults. Results Older adults reported low knowledge of alcohol and prescription drug safety, with women tending to be slightly more knowledgeable. More importantly, those who drank in the previous few months were less willing to talk to family and friends about how alcohol can have harmful interactions with prescription drugs, or to be an advocate for safe alcohol and prescription drug use than those who had not had a drink recently. Pharmacists reported that they were willing to convey prescription drug safety information to older adults via a variety of formats, including displaying or distributing a flyer, and directly administering a brief intervention. Conclusion In this study, older adults were found to have inadequate knowledge of prescription drug safety and interactions with alcohol, but pharmacists who regularly come in contact with older adults indicated that they were ready and willing to talk to older adults about prescription drug safety. Future research should focus on interventions whereby pharmacists disseminate prescription drug safety information to older adults in order to improve healthy prescription drug and alcohol behavior and reduce medical and health costs associated with interactions between alcohol and prescription drugs. PMID:23467625

Zanjani, Faika; Hoogland, Aasha I; Downer, Brian G

2013-01-01

150

Project Roadmap: Reeducating Older Adults in Maintaining AIDS Prevention--A Secondary Intervention for Older HIV-Positive Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The number of older adults living with HIV/AIDS is larger than ever. Little is known about their sexual behaviors, although contrary to stereotypes, older adults desire and engage in sexual activity. Despite increased recognition of the need for prevention interventions targeting HIV-positive individuals, no secondary HIV prevention interventions…

Illa, Lourdes; Echenique, Marisa; Saint Jean, Gilbert; Bustamante-Avellaneda, Victoria; Metsch, Lisa; Mendez-Mulet, Luis; Eisdorfer, Carl; Sanchez-Martinez, Mario

2010-01-01

151

Current drug treatment of hyperlipidemia in older adults.  

PubMed

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) remains the leading cause of death, especially in older adults. Managing modifiable risk factors (e.g., hyperlipidemia, hypertension) remains the primary approach to prevent ASCVD events and ASCVD-related mortality. Statins are generally considered one of the most effective approaches to reduce ASCVD risk, especially for secondary prevention, yet remain underutilized in older adults. The evidence to support statin therapy in older adults is less robust than in their younger counterparts, especially in individuals aged 75 years and older. Recent lipid guidelines have raised this concern, yet statin therapy is recommended in 'at risk' older adults. Determining which older adults should receive statin therapy for primary prevention of ASCVD is challenging, as the currently available risk estimation tools are of limited use in those aged over 75 years. Furthermore, non-statin therapies have been de-emphasized in recent clinical practice guidelines and remain understudied in the older adult population. This is unfortunate given that older adults are less likely to tolerate moderate- to high-intensity statins. Non-statin therapies could be viable options in this population if more was understood about their ability to lower ASCVD risk and safety profiles. Nevertheless, lipid-lowering agents remain an integral component of the overall strategy to reduce atherogenic burden in older adults. Future research in this area should aim to enroll more older adults in clinical trials, determine the utility of ASCVD risk estimation for primary prevention, and investigate the role of non-statin therapies in this population. PMID:25637391

Dixon, Dave L; Donohoe, Krista L; Ogbonna, Kelechi C; Barden, Sarah M

2015-02-01

152

The thermic effect of food is reduced in older adults.  

PubMed

The thermic effect of food accounts for ~10% of daily energy expenditure. A reduction in the thermic effect of food, which has been variably observed in the older adults, could predispose to fat gain. We tested whether the thermic effect of food is reduced in older adults compared with young adults by analyzing our database of standardized studies conducted at the Mayo Clinic between 1999 and 2009. Data were available from 136 older adult volunteers aged 60-88 (56 females) and 141 young adults aged 18-35 years (67 females). Basal energy expenditure was measured by indirect calorimetry to assess basal metabolic rate. Body fat, fat free mass, and visceral fat were measured using a combination of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and an abdominal CT scan. The thermic effect of food and postprandial insulinemia were measured in 123 older adults (52 females) and 86 young adults (38 females) of these volunteers. Basal metabolic rate adjusted for fat-free mass was less in older adults (p=0.01) and the thermic effect of food was ~1% (p=0.02) less in the older adults. After controlling for meal size and fat-free mass, body fat and fat distribution did not predict the thermic effect of food. Both basal metabolic rate and the thermic effect of food are less in older adults than young adults, even when they have similar amounts of lean tissue and consume a similar size meal. These factors contribute to lower daily energy expenditure in the older adults. PMID:24155251

Du, S; Rajjo, T; Santosa, S; Jensen, M D

2014-05-01

153

Driving patterns in older adults with glaucoma  

PubMed Central

Background The ability to drive is important for ensuring quality of life for many older adults. Glaucoma is prevalent in this age group and may affect driving. The purpose of this study is to determine if glaucoma and glaucomatous visual field (VF) loss are associated with driving cessation, limitations, and deference to another driver in older adults. Methods Cross-sectional study. Eighty-one glaucoma subjects and 58 glaucoma suspect controls between age 60 and 80 reported if they had ceased driving, limited their driving in various ways, or preferred another to drive. Results Twenty-three percent of glaucoma subjects and 6.9% of suspects had ceased driving (p?=?0.01). Glaucoma subjects also had more driving limitations than suspects (2.0 vs. 1.1, p?=?0.007). In multivariable models, driving cessation was more likely for glaucoma subjects as compared to suspects (OR?=?4.0; 95% CI?=?1.1-14.7; p?=?0.03). The odds of driving cessation doubled with each 5 decibel (dB) decrement in the better-eye VF mean deviation (MD) (OR?=?2.0; 95% CI?=?1.4-2.9; p??0.1 for both). Conclusions Glaucoma and glaucomatous VF loss are associated with greater likelihood of driving cessation and greater limitation of driving in the elderly. Further prospective study is merited to assess when and why people with glaucoma change their driving habits, and to determine if their observed self-regulation of driving is adequate to ensure safety. PMID:23432845

2013-01-01

154

Personality disorders in older adults: emerging research issues.  

PubMed

Empirical research focusing on personality disorders (PDs) among older adults is mainly limited to studies on psychometric properties of age-specific personality tests, the age neutrality of specific items/scales, and validation of personality inventories for older adults. We identified only two treatment studies-one on dialectical behavior therapy and one on schema therapy-both with promising results among older patients despite small and heterogeneous populations. More rigorous studies incorporating age-specific adaptations are needed. Furthermore, in contrast to increasing numbers of psychometric studies, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-5 pays little attention to the characteristics of older adults with PDs. Moreover, the constructs "personality change due to another medical condition" and "late-onset personality disorder" warrant further research among older adults. These needs will become even more pressing given the aging society worldwide. PMID:25421011

van Alphen, S P J; van Dijk, S D M; Videler, A C; Rossi, G; Dierckx, E; Bouckaert, F; Voshaar, R C Oude

2015-01-01

155

Normative spatiotemporal gait parameters in older adults.  

PubMed

While factor analyses have characterized pace, rhythm and variability as factors that explain variance in gait performance in older adults, comprehensive analyses incorporating many gait parameters have not been undertaken and normative data for many of those parameters are lacking. The purposes of this study were to conduct a factor analysis on nearly two dozen spatiotemporal gait parameters and to contribute to the normative database of gait parameters from healthy, able-bodied men and women over the age of 70. Data were extracted from 294 participants enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. Spatiotemporal gait data were obtained as participants completed two walks across a 5.6-m electronic walkway (GAITRite(®)). Five primary domains of spatiotemporal gait performance were identified: a "rhythm" domain was characterized by cadence and temporal parameters such as stride time; a "phase" domain was characterized by temporophasic parameters that constitute distinct divisions of the gait cycle; a "variability" domain encompassed gait cycle and step variability parameters; a "pace" domain was characterized by parameters that included gait speed, step length and stride length; and a "base of support" domain was characterized by step width and step width variability. Several domains differed between men and women and differed across age groups. Reference values of 23 gait parameters are presented which researchers or clinicians can use for assessing and interpreting gait dysfunction in aging persons. PMID:21531139

Hollman, John H; McDade, Eric M; Petersen, Ronald C

2011-05-01

156

Transforming emergency care for older adults  

PubMed Central

Already crowded and stressful, US emergency departments are facing the challenge of serving an aging population that requires complex and lengthy evaluations. Creative solutions are necessary to improve the value and ensure the quality of emergency care delivered to older adults while more fully addressing their complex underlying physical, social, cognitive, and situational needs. Developing models of geriatric emergency care, including some that are already in use at dedicated geriatric emergency departments, incorporate a variety of physical, procedural, and staffing changes. Among the options for “geriatricizing” emergency care are approaches that may eliminate the need for an emergency department visit, such as telemedicine; for initial hospitalization, such as patient observation units; and for rehospitalization, such as comprehensive discharge planning. By transforming its current safety-net role to becoming a partner in care coordination, emergency departments have the opportunity to better integrate into the broader health care system, improve patient health outcomes, contribute to optimizing the health care system, and reduce overall costs of care—keys to improving emergency care for patients of all ages. PMID:24301394

Hwang, Ula; Shah, Manish N.; Han, Jin H.; Carpenter, Christopher R.; Siu, Albert L.; Adams, James G.

2014-01-01

157

Improving associative memory in older adults with unitization.  

PubMed

We examined if unitization inherent preexperimentally could reduce the associative deficit in older adults. In Experiment 1, younger and older adults studied compound word (CW; e.g., store keeper) and noncompound word (NCW; e.g., needle birth) pairs. We found a reduction in the age-related associative deficit such that older but not younger adults showed a discrimination advantage for CW relative to NCW pairs on a yes-no associative recognition test. These results suggest that CW compared to NCW word pairs provide schematic support that older adults can use to improve their memory. In Experiment 2, reducing study time in younger adults decreased associative recognition performance, but did not produce a discrimination advantage for CW pairs. In Experiment 3, both older and younger adults showed a discrimination advantage for CW pairs on a two-alternative forced-choice recognition test, which encourages greater use of familiarity. These results suggest that test format influenced young adults' use of familiarity during associative recognition of unitized pairs, and that older adults rely more on familiarity than recollection for associative recognition. Unitization of preexperimental associations, as in CW pairs, can alleviate age-related associative deficits. PMID:25396267

Ahmad, Fahad N; Fernandes, Myra; Hockley, William E

2015-07-01

158

Priorities for Action in a Rural Older Adults Study  

PubMed Central

This article reports the findings from a recent study of older adults in the rural southwestern United States and discusses practice and research implications. The aim of the study was to analyze health disparities and strengths in the contexts of rurality, aging, a depressed economy, and limited health resources. Identified themes needing action included sustained access to prescriptions, transportation solutions for older adults in isolated communities, inadequate access to care, poor infrastructure and coordination of services, scarce assisted living and in-home care for frail older adults, and barriers related to culture, language, and economics. PMID:22929381

Averill, Jennifer B.

2013-01-01

159

Older Adults Expend More Listening Effort than Young Adults Recognizing Speech in Noise  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Listening in noisy situations is a challenging experience for many older adults. The authors hypothesized that older adults exert more listening effort compared with young adults. Listening effort involves the attention and cognitive resources required to understand speech. The purpose was (a) to quantify the amount of listening effort…

Gosselin, Penny Anderson; Gagne, Jean-Pierre

2011-01-01

160

Factors that influence exercise participation amoung older adults  

E-print Network

The purpose of this study was to survey adults age 60 and older to measure their levels of exercise self-efficacy, attitudes toward exercise and health, and perceived exercise control beliefs. Participants also defined other intrapersonal factors...

Murphey, Kristina Kile

2001-01-01

161

Older adult consumers of Texas public mental health services:  

E-print Network

Knowledge concerning the current utilization of mental health care by the nation's geriatric population is greatly lacking. Research conducted prior to and during the 1980s consistently found that older adults utilize mental health care...

Karlin, Bradley Eric

2002-01-01

162

Quick Guide to Health Literacy and Older Adults  

MedlinePLUS

... Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Quick Guide to Health Literacy and Older Adults skip to content ODPHP Health Communication Healthy People 2010 Health Communication Focus Area Health Literacy Improvement Consumer and Patient e-Health Resources Health ...

163

Hydrate for health: listening to older adults' need for information.  

PubMed

An interdisciplinary team of faculty and students developed the Hydrate for Health project to provide relevant and evidence-based information to community-dwelling older adults. Evidence-based factsheets on bladder health, nighttime urination, medication safety, and physical activity/exercise, as well as a fluid intake self-monitoring tool, were developed. Four focus groups were conducted and included older adults (N = 21) who participated in activities at two local senior centers to obtain their feedback about the relevance of the factsheets. Extensive revisions were required based on the feedback received. Older adults expressed a desire for pragmatic information (i.e., how to determine fluid sources from food, how to measure water, how to determine their own fluid needs). They also wanted information that could be easily incorporated into daily life. Nurses play a central role in listening to and incorporating older adults' voices into consumer education materials. PMID:25275782

Palmer, Mary H; Marquez, Celine S; Kline, Katherine V; Morris, Erin; Linares, Brenda; Carlson, Barbara W

2014-10-01

164

Medicines and You: A Guide for Older Adults  

MedlinePLUS

Medicines and You: A Guide for Older Adults (PDF version - 334KB) • Aging and Health: You and Your ... What You Need to Know About Your Prescription Medicines The following questions will help you get the ...

165

Preventing Elder Abuse and Neglect in Older Adults  

MedlinePLUS

... to tell others that someone you trust and love is abusing or neglecting you. Making matters worse, ... no good reason, is a form of abusive control. Sexual abuse: If an older adult suffers from ...

166

Medication Adherence in Older Adults: A Qualitative Study  

PubMed Central

To effectively address medication adherence and improve cardiovascular health among older adults, a deeper understanding is needed of the barriers that this age group faces and approaches that would be most effective and feasible for improving adherence. We conducted a focus group study (n=25) in a diverse population of older adults with hypertension recruited from the Cohort Study of Medication Adherence in Older Adults (CoSMO). A structured guide was used to collect feedback on barriers to adherence and acceptability and feasibility of intervention strategies. The final coding framework outlines factors at the individual, relationship, health care system, and environmental or policy level which affect adherence in older adults, including memory, knowledge, attitudes and beliefs, side effects, social support, interaction with health care providers, and cost and convenience of medication filling. Patient responses highlighted the varied nature of barriers and the need for interventions which are both multi-faceted and tailored. PMID:25214707

Holt, Elizabeth W .; Rung, Ariane L.; Leon, Kyla A.; Firestein, Catherine; Krousel-Wood, Marie A.

2014-01-01

167

Falls among Older Adults: Public Health Impact and Prevention Strategies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides an overview of the epidemiology of falls among older adults, describes current prevention strategies, and highlights key areas that need to be addressed, including risk assessments, exercise, and environmental changes. (Contains 50 references.) (JOW)

Stevens, Judy A.

2003-01-01

168

Older Adults: Work-Related Issues and Implications for Counseling.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a period of business downsizing, older workers are at risk for unemployment. Finding a suitable replacement job is difficult and can lead to emotional and financial distress. Counselors need to be aware of the work-related issues facing older adults and understand the suitable interventions that will help them make smoother career and life…

Brewington, Janice O.; Nassar-McMillan, Sylvia

2000-01-01

169

EVALUATING RISK IN OLDER ADULTS USING PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC MODELS  

EPA Science Inventory

The rapid growth in the number of older Americans has many implications for public health, including the need to better understand the risks posed by environmental exposures to older adults. An important element for evaluating risk is the understanding of the doses of environment...

170

Food Choice Processes of Older Adults: A Qualitative Investigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

One way to promote optimal nutrition for older adults is to expand nutrition professionals’ understanding of the cognitive food choice processes of the elderly. This investigation used a constructivist approach and qualitative methods to elicit the factors important to the food choices of individuals aged 65 years and older who lived independently. Using a multiple-perspective model of the food choice

Laura Winter Falk; Carole A. Bisogni; Jeffery Sobal

1996-01-01

171

Older Adult Inmates: The Challenge for Social Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Older adult inmates have grown both in proportion and in number due to the confluence of a number of factors. This aging of the prison population has created a host of policy and practice issues that encompass justice considerations, cost containment issues, and biopsychosocial care needs. The older prisoner's physical, social, and psychological…

Snyder, Cindy; van Wormer, Katherine; Chadha, Janice; Jaggers, Jeremiah W.

2009-01-01

172

Perceptions of Living Alone Among Older Adult Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

This exploratory study examines older women's perceptions of living alone. Older adult women (N = 53) living alone were interviewed. Findings show tremendous variability in the perceptions of this sample. Whereas some women showed significant levels of loneliness and depression, many did not. Thirteen percent of the participants (n = 7) negatively perceived living alone, 49.1% (n = 26) neutrally

Elaine M. Eshbaugh

2008-01-01

173

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in older adults with diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed

Diabetes mellitus exerts a strong effect on atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk into older age (beyond ages 70-74 years). This effect is particularly noticeable with regard to coronary artery disease and cerebral microvascular disease. Thus, diabetes mellitus in older adults deserves the same careful medical attention as it does in middle age. PMID:25453299

Barzilay, Joshua I; Mukamal, Kenneth J; Kizer, Jorge R

2015-02-01

174

Drug Burden Index in older adults: theoretical and practical issues  

PubMed Central

Anticholinergic and sedative medications are commonly used in older adults and are associated with adverse clinical outcomes. The Drug Burden Index was developed to measure the cumulative exposure to these medications in older adults and its impact on physical and cognitive function. This narrative review discusses the research and clinical applications of the Drug Burden Index, and its advantages and limitations, compared with other pharmacologically developed measures of high-risk prescribing. PMID:25246778

Kouladjian, Lisa; Gnjidic, Danijela; Chen, Timothy F; Mangoni, Arduino A; Hilmer, Sarah N

2014-01-01

175

Assessment and measurement of pain in older adults  

PubMed Central

Although the empirical base is still limited when providing clear directions for pain assessment and management in older adults, it is possible to identify recommendations for guiding practice based on consensus and a developing scientific base to support best practice activities. This article offers a brief overview of the epidemiology and consequences of pain, followed by a summary of issues and approaches relevant to pain assessment in older adults. Cohort specific recommendations for comprehensive pain assessment and measurement are then addressed. PMID:11459715

Herr, Keela A.; Garand, Linda

2011-01-01

176

Views of Older Native American Adults in Colonial New England  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the perceptions and treatment of older Native American adults in colonial New England (1620–1783). Social\\u000a scientists have found that varying degrees of persistence and change have historically characterized Indian attitudes toward\\u000a older adults in communities located in the central and western United States. In regards to northeastern North America, historians\\u000a have learned that, during the colonial period,

Jason Eden; Naomi Eden

2010-01-01

177

Ambient Displays for Integrating Older Adults into Social Networking Sites  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Social networking sites (SNS) help users sustain and strengthen ties with friends and relatives. However older adults who\\u000a are less technically inclined individuals are often left aside these SNS felling as outsiders within their own family that\\u000a uses this media to socialize. To assist these non-technical older adults we developed two ambient displays aimed at seamlessly\\u000a integrate them into SNS.

Raymundo Cornejo; Jesús Favela; Monica Tentori

2010-01-01

178

Gender Differences in Nutritional Risk Among Older Rural Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Older adults are vulnerable to nutrition-related health problems due to health and psychosocial changes that accompany aging. Those in rural communities face additional problems. This study characterizes the nutritional risk of rural older adults using the Nutritional Risk Index (NRI), paying particular attention to gender differences in risk. Data come from face-to-face interviews with a random sample of 638 White

Sara A. Quandt; Dinnie Chao

2000-01-01

179

Prevalence of HIV and chronic comorbidities among older adults  

PubMed Central

Objectives Limited evidence is available on HIV, aging and comorbidities in sub-Saharan Africa. This article describes the prevalence of HIV and chronic comorbidities among those aged 50 years and older in South Africa using nationally representative data. Design The WHO’s Study of global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) was conducted in South Africa in 2007–2008. SAGE includes nationally representative cohorts of persons aged 50 years and older, with comparison samples of those aged 18–49 years, which aims to study health and its determinants. Methods Logistic and linear regression models were applied to data from respondents aged 50 years and older to determine associations between age, sex and HIV status and various outcome variables including prevalence of seven chronic conditions. Results HIV prevalence among adults aged 50 and older in South Africa was 6.4% and was particularly elevated among Africans, women aged 50–59 and those living in rural areas. Rates of chronic disease were higher among all older adults compared with those aged 18–49. Of those aged 50 years and older, 29.6% had two or more of the seven chronic conditions compared with 8.8% of those aged 18–49 years (P < 0.0001). When controlling for age and sex among those aged 50 and older, BMI was lower among HIV-infected older adults aged 50 and older (27.5 kg/m2) than in HIV-uninfected individuals of the same age (30.6) (P < 0.0001). Grip strength among HIV-infected older adults was significantly (P=0.004) weaker than among similarly-aged HIV-uninfected individuals. Conclusion HIV-infected older adults in South Africa have high rates of chronic disease and weakness. Studies are required to examine HIV diagnostics and treatment instigation rates among older adults to ensure equity of access to quality care, as the number and percentage of older adults living with HIV is likely to increase. PMID:22781177

Negin, Joel; Martiniuk, Alexandra; Cumming, Robert G.; Naidoo, Nirmala; Phaswana-Mafuya, Nancy; Madurai, Lorna; Williams, Sharon; Kowal, Paul

2015-01-01

180

Testosterone replacement therapy in older adult men  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Serum testosterone levels decline slowly with normal ageing in men and, although all men are not destined to become hypogonadal as they age, the prevalence of androgen deficiency in the older male is not insignificant. Over the past several decades, there has been an increasing interest in evaluating whether testosterone therapy (male HRT) might be beneficial for certain older

J. Lisa Tenover

1999-01-01

181

Diet quality and older adults – special considerations  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The demographic shift occurring in both developed and developing countries is towards an older population. For example, the U.S. population over the age of 65 years grew from 3.1 million in 1900 to 35.0 million in 2000. During that same time period individuals aged 85 years and older increased by ...

182

Kidney transplantation in the older adult.  

PubMed

The end-stage renal disease population is aging. Nearly half of all new patients are older than 65 years and one third are older than 70 years. Assessing the possibility of transplantation for older patients with end-stage renal disease often involves contemplating more complex issues, including cognitive impairment, decreased functional status, and frailty, which makes selecting appropriate candidates more difficult. Older transplant recipients have decreased patient and transplant survival compared with younger recipients. For example, 75% of deceased donor transplant recipients aged 30-49 years are alive after 5 years compared to only 61% for those older than 65 years. Despite poorer outcomes compared with younger recipients, older transplant recipients have a significant improvement in survival compared with similar patients who remain on the wait list, with decreases in mortality of 41%-61% depending on the study. Use of living donors, even older living donors, provides significantly better outcomes for elderly recipients compared with the use of deceased donors. However, in the absence of a living donor, survival is improved significantly by accepting an expanded criteria donor organ rather than waiting for a standard criteria deceased donor. Older transplant recipients experience more infectious complications and less acute rejection, but the risk of transplant loss from rejection is increased compared with younger patients. These immunologic issues, along with the fact that older patients often are excluded from transplant trials, have made selecting an ideal immunosuppressive regimen challenging. Prospective comparative trials of different agents in the elderly population are warranted to better define the risk-benefit profile. This review discusses transplantation outcomes, including patient and transplant survival, different donor types, quality of life, and immunosuppression for older dialysis patients. PMID:23261121

Knoll, Greg A

2013-05-01

183

Reverse correlating trustworthy faces in young and older adults.  

PubMed

Little is known about how older persons determine if someone deserves their trust or not based on their facial appearance, a process referred to as "facial trustworthiness."In the past few years, Todorov and colleagues have argued that, in young adults, trustworthiness judgments are an extension of emotional judgments, and therefore, that trust judgments are made based on a continuum between anger and happiness (Todorov, 2008; Engell et al., 2010). Evidence from the literature on emotion processing suggest that older adults tend to be less efficient than younger adults in the recognition of negative facial expressions (Calder et al., 2003; Firestone et al., 2007; Ruffman et al., 2008; Chaby and Narme, 2009). Based on Todorov';s theory and the fact that older adults seem to be less efficient than younger adults in identifying emotional expressions, one could expect that older individuals would have different representations of trustworthy faces and that they would use different cues than younger adults in order to make such judgments. We verified this hypothesis using a variation of Mangini and Biederman's (2004) reverse correlation method in order to test and compare classification images resulting from trustworthiness (in the context of money investment), from happiness, and from anger judgments in two groups of participants: young adults and older healthy adults. Our results show that for elderly participants, both happy and angry representations are correlated with trustworthiness judgments. However, in young adults, trustworthiness judgments are mainly correlated with happiness representations. These results suggest that young and older adults differ in their way of judging trustworthiness. PMID:24046755

Ethier-Majcher, Catherine; Joubert, Sven; Gosselin, Frédéric

2013-01-01

184

Organizing a Literacy Program for Older Adults. Literacy Education for the Elderly Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide describes a model for a community-based literacy program for older adults that uses older adults as tutors. Guidelines are provided to program sponsors for implementing literacy education for older adults. Chapter I provides an overview of the problem of illiterate older adults and literacy education for them. Chapter II addresses the…

Jacobs, Bella; Ventura-Merkel, Catherine

185

Somatic symptoms and depressive symptoms among older adult Korean immigrants.  

PubMed

Given the lack of understanding of how Korean immigrants express depressive symptoms, the purpose of this descriptive correlational study was to describe somatic symptoms and depressive symptoms and examine the relationship between them, as reported by older adult Korean immigrants. Purposive sampling was used in this study of 160 older adult (ages 65 to 91) Korean immigrants. Most of these participants immigrated to the United States at an older age. They reported a high level of depressive symptoms, and these symptoms were closely associated with somatic symptoms, a finding that coincides with previous studies differentiating Korean individuals from individuals of other cultures. The findings from this study highlight the need for health care providers to be aware of and recognize cultural differences in how patients express depressive symptoms somatically when assessing and treating depression within the older adult Korean immigrant population. PMID:24971586

Lee, Young Me

2015-01-01

186

NIHSeniorHealth Health Information for Older Adults  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The National Institute on Aging (NIA) and the National Library of Medicine recently launched NIHSeniorHealth.gov, a website developed from NIA research on older adults, cognitive aging, and computer usage. This easy-to-use website "makes aging-related health information easily accessible for adults 60 and older" and serves as "a useful tool for family members and friends who are seeking online health information for their older relatives." Topics covered include Alzheimer's disease, arthritis, exercising for older adults, and more. The website offers several options for enhancing usability, including a virtual voice that reads all text aloud. Visitors may also watch video clips (captions available), take short quizzes, or follow links to MEDLINEplus websites for more detailed information.

187

How Older Adults Combine Medical and Experiential Notions of Depression  

PubMed Central

Past research has suggested that patients might not accept depression treatment in part because of differences between patient and doctor understandings of depression. In this article, we use a cultural models approach to explore how older adults incorporate clinical and experiential knowledge into their model of depression. We conducted semistructured interviews about depression with 19 patients aged 65 years and older who were identified by their physicians as depressed. We found that whereas older adults viewed as helpful the doctor’s ability to identify symptoms and “put it all together” into a diagnosis, they felt that this viewpoint omitted important information about the etiology and feeling of depression grounded in embodied experience and social context. Our findings suggest that more emphasis on issues related to the etiology of depression, the effect of depression on social relationships, and emotions emanating from depression might lead to more acceptable depression treatments for older adults. PMID:18689531

Wittink, Marsha N.; Dahlberg, Britt; Biruk, Crystal; Barg, Frances K.

2009-01-01

188

Helping older adults find meaning and purpose through storytelling.  

PubMed

The purpose of this article is to describe a storytelling project that was designed to help community-dwelling older adults find meaning and purpose in their lives through reminiscing about the past. The storytelling project was successful not only for the older adults who participated but also for the nursing students, who were given an opportunity to learn about interviewing and communicating with older adults. The value of life review and storytelling as a nursing intervention became evident from this project. When time is taken to listen to the valuable stories and life lessons of the older population, nurses create a better understanding of their patients while their patients recall special memories and feel proud of their lives. PMID:19928712

Scott, Katie; DeBrew, Jacqueline Kayler

2009-12-01

189

Domestic Robots for Older Adults: Attitudes, Preferences, and Potential.  

PubMed

The population of older adults in America is expected to reach an unprecedented level in the near future. Some of them have difficulties with performing daily tasks and caregivers may not be able to match pace with the increasing need for assistance. Robots, especially mobile manipulators, have the potential for assisting older adults with daily tasks enabling them to live independently in their homes. However, little is known about their views of robot assistance in the home. Twenty-one independently living older Americans (65-93 years old) were asked about their preferences for and attitudes toward robot assistance via a structured group interview and questionnaires. In the group interview, they generated a diverse set of 121 tasks they would want a robot to assist them with in their homes. These data, along with their questionnaire responses, suggest that the older adults were generally open to robot assistance but were discriminating in their acceptance of assistance for different tasks. They preferred robot assistance over human assistance for tasks related to chores, manipulating objects, and information management. In contrast, they preferred human assistance to robot assistance for tasks related to personal care and leisure activities. Our study provides insights into older adults' attitudes and preferences for robot assistance with everyday living tasks in the home which may inform the design of robots that will be more likely accepted by older adults. PMID:25152779

Smarr, Cory-Ann; Mitzner, Tracy L; Beer, Jenay M; Prakash, Akanksha; Chen, Tiffany L; Kemp, Charles C; Rogers, Wendy A

2014-04-01

190

Domestic Robots for Older Adults: Attitudes, Preferences, and Potential  

PubMed Central

The population of older adults in America is expected to reach an unprecedented level in the near future. Some of them have difficulties with performing daily tasks and caregivers may not be able to match pace with the increasing need for assistance. Robots, especially mobile manipulators, have the potential for assisting older adults with daily tasks enabling them to live independently in their homes. However, little is known about their views of robot assistance in the home. Twenty-one independently living older Americans (65–93 years old) were asked about their preferences for and attitudes toward robot assistance via a structured group interview and questionnaires. In the group interview, they generated a diverse set of 121 tasks they would want a robot to assist them with in their homes. These data, along with their questionnaire responses, suggest that the older adults were generally open to robot assistance but were discriminating in their acceptance of assistance for different tasks. They preferred robot assistance over human assistance for tasks related to chores, manipulating objects, and information management. In contrast, they preferred human assistance to robot assistance for tasks related to personal care and leisure activities. Our study provides insights into older adults' attitudes and preferences for robot assistance with everyday living tasks in the home which may inform the design of robots that will be more likely accepted by older adults. PMID:25152779

Mitzner, Tracy L.; Beer, Jenay M.; Prakash, Akanksha; Chen, Tiffany L.; Kemp, Charles C.; Rogers, Wendy A.

2014-01-01

191

Emergency Department Utilization by Older Adults: a Descriptive Study  

PubMed Central

Background Emergency Departments (EDs) are playing an increasingly important role in the care of older adults. Characterizing ED usage will facilitate the planning for care delivery more suited to the complex health needs of this population. Methods In this retrospective cross-sectional study, administrative and clinical data were extracted from four study sites. Visits for patients aged 65 years or older were characterized using standard descriptive statistics. Results We analyzed 34,454 ED visits by older adults, accounting for 21.8% of the total ED visits for our study time period. Overall, 74.2% of patient visits were triaged as urgent or emergent. Almost half (49.8%) of visits involved diagnostic imaging, 62.1% involved lab work, and 30.8% involved consultation with hospital services. The most common ED diagnoses were symptom- or injury-related (25.0%, 17.1%. respectively). Length of stay increased with age group (Mann-Whitney U; p < .0001), as did the proportion of visits involving diagnostic testing and consultation (?2; p < .0001). Approximately 20% of older adults in our study population were admitted to hospital following their ED visit. Conclusions Older adults have distinct patterns of ED use. ED resource use intensity increases with age. These patterns may be used to target future interventions involving alternative care for older adults. PMID:25452824

Latham, Lesley P.; Ackroyd-Stolarz, Stacy

2014-01-01

192

Older adults' perceptions of physical activity: a qualitative study.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to explore older adults' perceptions of participation in physical activity (PA) as it impacts productive ageing and informs occupational therapy (OT) practice. In this phenomenological study, 15 community-dwelling older adults were recruited using purposive and snowball sampling at community locations. Data collection methods included two interviews and an observation. The primary finding was that older adults continue individual patterns of meaningful PA across their lifespan when they have support to adapt to age-associated limitations, with a gradual decline in intensity during older years. Although this study's qualitative methodology limits broad generalizability, the findings provide applicability when situated in the context of community-living older adults interested in health maintenance through PA participation. OT practitioners have an important role with community-dwelling older adults to impact productive ageing by designing and promoting meaningful PA with adaptations that address unique, age-associated concerns. There is a need for further experimental research taking an occupational performance and health perspective to enhance the contribution of OT for this population's health-related quality of life through meaningful PA. PMID:24302685

Janssen, Sclinda L; Stube, Jan E

2014-06-01

193

Inflammatory markers and cardiovascular health in older adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the past decade inflammatory markers have emerged as strong independent risk indicators for cardiovascular disease. Even though adults over the age of 65 experience a high proportion of such events, most epidemiologic data are from middle-aged populations. In this review we examine the role that inflammatory markers play in the prediction of incident cardiovascular disease specifically in older adults.

Stephen B. Kritchevsky; Matteo Cesari; Marco Pahor

2005-01-01

194

Health Literacy, Social Support, and Health Status among Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examines whether social support interacts with health literacy in affecting the health status of older adults. Health literacy is assessed using the short version of the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Social support is measured with the Medical Outcome Study social support scale. Results show, unexpectedly, that rather…

Lee, Shoou-Yih D.; Arozullah, Ahsan M.; Cho, Young Ik; Crittenden, Kathleen; Vicencio, Daniel

2009-01-01

195

Cautiousness and Visual Selective Attention Performance of Older Adults.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Older adults are significantly slower than young adults in the naming response in the Stroop Color Word Interference Test. Hypotheses attempting to explain this age-related difference in a perceptual-cognitive task have included orthogenic principle, response-competition, and cautiousness. This study examines whether there are any significant…

Panek, Paul E.; Rush, Michael C.

196

Complex Learning Preferences and Strategies of Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The research reported in this study concerns older adults from Australia who voluntarily chose to learn the craft of woodturning. The paper examines the literature of adult learning under the themes of presage factors, the learning environment, instructional methods, and techniques for facilitators. The paper then reports on the analysis of two…

Delahaye, Brian L.; Ehrich, Lisa C.

2008-01-01

197

Incidence of Dementia in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dementia may be more common in older adults with intellectual disability (ID) than in the general population. The increased risk for Alzheimer's disease in people with Down syndrome (DS) is well established, but much less is known about dementia in adults with ID who do not have DS. We estimated incidence rates from a longitudinal study of…

Strydom, Andre; Chan, Trevor; King, Michael; Hassiotis, Angela; Livingston, Gill

2013-01-01

198

Story Processing Ability in Cognitively Healthy Younger and Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of the study was to examine the relationships among measures of comprehension and production for stories depicted in wordless pictures books and measures of memory and attention for 2 age groups. Method: Sixty cognitively healthy adults participated. They consisted of two groups--young adults (20-29 years of age) and older

Wright, Heather Harris; Capilouto, Gilson J.; Srinivasan, Cidambi; Fergadiotis, Gerasimos

2011-01-01

199

Metacomprehension and Comprehension Performance in Younger and Older Adults.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Metacomprehension Scale was completed by 30 younger and 30 older adults. Younger adults reported greater use of strategies to resolve comprehension failures and valued good comprehension more. The regulation dimension of metacomprehension was a reliable predictor of comprehension performance. (SK)

Moore, DeWayne; And Others

1997-01-01

200

Older and Younger Adults’ Accuracy in Discerning Health and Competence in Older and Younger Faces  

PubMed Central

We examined older and younger adults’ accuracy judging the health and competence of faces. Accuracy differed significantly from chance and varied with face age but not rater age. Health ratings were more accurate for older than younger faces, with the reverse for competence ratings. Accuracy was greater for low attractive younger faces, but not for low attractive older faces. Greater accuracy judging older faces’ health was paralleled by greater validity of attractiveness and looking older as predictors of their health. Greater accuracy judging younger faces’ competence was paralleled by greater validity of attractiveness and a positive expression as predictors of their competence. Although the ability to recognize variations in health and cognitive ability is preserved in older adulthood, the effects of face age on accuracy and the different effects of attractiveness across face age may alter social interactions across the life span. PMID:25244467

Zebrowitz, Leslie A.; Franklin, Robert G.; Boshyan, Jasmine; Luevano, Victor; Agrigoroaei, Stefan; Milosavljevic, Bosiljka; Lachman, Margie E.

2015-01-01

201

Older adults' recognition of bodily and auditory expressions of emotion.  

PubMed

This study compared young and older adults' ability to recognize bodily and auditory expressions of emotion and to match bodily and facial expressions to vocal expressions. Using emotion discrimination and matching techniques, participants assessed emotion in voices (Experiment 1), point-light displays (Experiment 2), and still photos of bodies with faces digitally erased (Experiment 3). Older adults' were worse at least some of the time in recognition of anger, sadness, fear, and happiness in bodily expressions and of anger in vocal expressions. Compared with young adults, older adults also found it more difficult to match auditory expressions to facial expressions (5 of 6 emotions) and bodily expressions (3 of 6 emotions). PMID:19739917

Ruffman, Ted; Sullivan, Susan; Dittrich, Winand

2009-09-01

202

Older Adults Do Not Notice Their Names: A New Twist to a Classic Attention Task  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although working memory spans are, on average, lower for older adults than young adults, we demonstrate in 5 experiments a way in which older adults paradoxically resemble higher capacity young adults. Specifically, in a selective-listening task, older adults almost always failed to notice their names presented in an unattended channel. This is an…

Naveh-Benjamin, Moshe; Kilb, Angela; Maddox, Geoffrey B.; Thomas, Jenna; Fine, Hope C.; Chen, Tina; Cowan, Nelson

2014-01-01

203

Bridging the digital divide in older adults: a study from an initiative to inform older adults about new technologies  

PubMed Central

Purpose In a society where technology progresses at an exponential rate, older adults are often unaware of the existence of different kinds of information and communication technologies (ICTs). To bridge the gap, we launched a 2-year project, during which we conducted focus groups (FGs) with demonstrations of ICTs, allowing older adults to try them out and to share their opinions. This study aimed at investigating how participants perceived this kind of initiative and how they reacted to different kinds of ICTs. Patients and methods In total, 14 FGs were conducted with community-dwelling older adults, with a frequency of two FGs on the same topic once per trimester. Twenty-three older adults (four men and 19 women) attended at least one FG but only nearly half of them were regular attendants (ten participating in at least five sessions). Age of participants ranged from 63 years to 88 years, with a mean of 77.1 years. All of them had completed secondary education. The analyses of the data were performed according to inductive thematic analysis. Results Four overarching themes emerged from the analysis. The first concerned participants’ motivation for and assessment of the project. The second theme identified the underlying factors of the “digital divide” between the younger and the older generations. The third theme concerned the factors of technology adoption among older adults. The fourth one identified participants’ attitudes toward assistive ICTs, designed specifically for older adults (“gerontechnologies”). Discussions and conclusion This project encouraging older adults to be informed about different kinds of ICTs was positively rated. With regard to ICTs, participants perceived a digital divide. The underlying factors are generation/cohort effects, cognitive and physical decline related to aging, and negative attitudes toward technologies. However, more and more older adults adopt different kinds of ICTs in order to fit in with the society. Concerning assistive ICTs, they manifested a lack of perceived need and usefulness. Also, there was a negative image of end users of this kind of technologies. The so-called gerontechnologies specifically targeting older adults contain stigmatizing symbolism that might prevent them from adopting them. PMID:25624752

Wu, Ya-Huei; Damnée, Souad; Kerhervé, Hélène; Ware, Caitlin; Rigaud, Anne-Sophie

2015-01-01

204

Obesity, Intentional Weight Loss, and Physical Disability in Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Summary We examine obesity, intentional weight loss, and physical disability in older adults. Based on prospective epidemiological studies, BMI exhibits a curvilinear relationship with physical disability; there appears to be some protective effect associated with older adults being overweight. Whereas the greatest risk for physical disability occurs in older adults who are ?class II obesity, the effects of obesity on physical disability appears to be moderated by both sex and race. Obesity at age 30 constitutes a greater risk for disability later in life than when obesity develops at age 50 or later; however, physical activity may buffer the adverse effects obesity has on late life physical disability. Data from a limited number of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) reinforce the important role that physical activity plays in weight loss programs for older adults. Furthermore, short-term studies have found that resistance training may be particularly beneficial in these programs since this mode of exercise attenuates the loss of fat-free mass during caloric restriction. Multi-year RCTs are needed to examine whether weight loss can alter the course of physical disablement in aging and to determine the long-term feasibility and effects of combining resistance exercise with weight loss in older adults. PMID:19922431

Rejeski, W. Jack; Marsh, Anthony P.; Chmelo, Elizabeth; Rejeski, Jared J.

2009-01-01

205

A photovoice study of older adults' conceptualizations of risk.  

PubMed

Risk is a multifaceted and complex concept that mediates quality of life through the balance between risk taking and risk avoidance. Society expects older adults to identify and manage their personal risks yet little is known about the meaning of risk in their daily lives and how they balance the tensions between taking and avoiding risks. Therefore the purpose of this study was to explore how older adults construe risk. A qualitative exploratory study that incorporated photovoice methodology was used. Seventeen older adults, over a weeklong period, took pictures and kept a log of the places, spaces, events, activities, or situations that best represented risk. Subsequently, they participated in a follow-up individual interview. Older adults viewed risk both positively and negatively, judging the saliency of a risk according to criteria that related both to the risk itself and to personal characteristics. Although risk was avoided in specific situations, risk taking was participants' primary approach to risk, which assumed three forms: adaptive, opportunistic, and/or unjustifiable. Contrary to societal views, older adults view risk as constructive and personally relevant, and as something to be taken and need to be supported in risk taking rather than risk avoidance. PMID:22939541

Rush, Kathy L; Murphy, Mary Ann; Kozak, Jean Francois

2012-12-01

206

Neural representation of dynamic frequency is degraded in older adults.  

PubMed

Older adults, even with clinically normal hearing sensitivity, often report difficulty understanding speech in the presence of background noise. Part of this difficulty may be related to age-related degradations in the neural representation of speech sounds, such as formant transitions. Frequency-following responses (FFRs), which are dependent on phase-locked neural activity, were elicited using sounds consisting of linear frequency sweeps, which may be viewed as simple models of formant transitions. Eighteen adults (ten younger, 22-24 years old, and nine older, 51-67 years old) were tested. FFRs were elicited by tonal sweeps in six conditions. Two directions of frequency change, rising or falling, were used for each of three rates of frequency change. Stimulus-to-response cross correlations revealed that older adults had significantly poorer representation of the tonal sweeps, and that FFRs became poorer for faster rates of change. An additional FFR signal-to-noise ratio analysis based on time windows revealed that across the FFR waveforms and rates of frequency change, older adults had smaller (poorer) signal-to-noise ratios. These results indicate that older adults, even with clinically-normal hearing sensitivity, have degraded phase-locked neural representations of dynamic frequency. PMID:25724819

Clinard, Christopher G; Cotter, Caitlin M

2015-05-01

207

OLDER ADULTS: AN ENVIRONMENTALLY SUSCEPTIBLE POPULATION  

EPA Science Inventory

The baby boom generation is quickly becoming the geriatric generation. The over-65 age bracket hit 13% of Americans in 1997, and is expected to reach 20% by 2030 accounting for 73 million Americans. World-wide the total number of older people (>60years) is expected to double from...

208

Worry in Older Community-Residing Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With rising longevity, increasing numbers of older people are experiencing changes in their everyday family and social life, changes in their financial status, and a greater number of chronic conditions affecting their health. We took the opportunity to explore these relationships with worry in a group of volunteer community-living elderly (n =…

Brock, Kaye; Clemson, Lindy; Cant, Rosemary; Ke, Liang; Cumming, Robert G.; Kendig, Hal; Mathews, Mark

2011-01-01

209

OLDER ADULTS' USE OF COMPUTERS: A SURVEY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Older people are an important and growing sector of the population, of whom the numbers who use computers are increasing rapidly. Yet their requirements are not often considered in the design of computer systems and software, and as a result they often find them difficult to use. In order to include them effectively, it is first necessary to find out

Joy Goodman; Audrey Syme; Roos Eisma

210

Vitamin D recommendations for older adults  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Many randomized, controlled trials indicate that vitamin D will lower falls and fractures, so it was reasonable for Sanders et al. to hypothesize that a single annual 500,000 IU oral dose of vitamin D3 would be effective in reducing falls and fractures in older women with one or more risk factors fo...

211

Differences in active commuting among younger and older adults.  

PubMed

The demonstrated health benefits of active commuting (AC) and low participation rates among older adults indicate a need to examine the socioecological correlates of AC by age category. An online survey of employed U.S. adults examined AC participation and individual, employment-related, community, and environmental variables. Participants were dichotomized by age (younger: 18-49 yr; n = 638, 64% and older: ? 50 yr; n = 359, 36%). Logistic-regression analyses examined differences in AC correlates by age. Older adults were less likely to be active commuters (13.4%) than younger adults (27.9%; p < .001) For older adults, analyses yielded a Nagelkerke R2 = .76, with perceived behavioral control, behavioral beliefs, household cars, and walking distance as predictors. Analyses for younger adults resulted in a Nagelkerke R2 = .79, with perceived behavioral control, coworker normative beliefs, parking problems at work, greater employer and community support for AC, and bad weather as predictors. Findings suggest age should be considered when examining and targeting AC behaviors. PMID:23689245

Bopp, Melissa; Der Ananian, Cheryl; Campbell, Matthew E

2014-04-01

212

Neuroanatomical Characteristics and Speech Perception in Noise in Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Objectives Previous research has attributed older adult’s difficulty with perceiving speech in noise to peripheral hearing loss. Recent studies have suggested a more complex picture, however, and implicate the central nervous system in sensation and sensory deficits. This study examines the relationship between the neuroanatomical structure of cognitive regions and the ability to perceive speech in noise in older adults. In particular, the neuroanatomical characteristics of the left ventral and dorsal prefrontal cortex are considered relative to standard measures of hearing in noise. Design The participants were fifteen older and fourteen younger right-handed native speakers of American English who had no neurological deficits and scored better than normal on standardized cognitive tests. We measured the participants’ peripheral hearing ability as well as their ability to perceive speech in noise using standardized tests. Anatomical magnetic resonance images were taken and analyzed to extract regional volumes and thicknesses of several key neuroanatomical structures. Results The results showed that younger adults had better hearing sensitivity and better speech perception in noise ability than older adults. For the older adults only, the volume of the left pars triangularis and the cortical thickness of the left superior frontal gyrus were significant predictors of performance on the speech-in-noise test. Discussion These findings suggest that, in addition to peripheral structures, the central nervous system also contributes to the ability to perceive speech in noise. In older adults, a decline in the volume and cortical thickness of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) during aging can therefore be a factor in a declining ability to perceive speech in a naturalistic environment. Our study shows a link between anatomy of PFC and speech perception in older adults. These findings are consistent with the decline-compensation hypothesis, which states that a decline in sensory processing due to cognitive aging can be accompanied by an increase in the recruitment of more general cognitive areas as a means of compensation. We found that a larger PFC volume may compensate for declining peripheral hearing. Clinically, recognizing the contribution of the cerebral cortex expands treatment possibilities for hearing loss in older adults beyond peripheral hearing aids to include strategies for improving cognitive function. We conclude by considering several mechanisms by which the PFC may facilitate speech perception in noise including inhibitory control, attention, cross-modal compensation, and phonological working memory, though no definitive conclusion can be drawn. PMID:20588117

Wong, Patrick C. M.; Ettlinger, Marc; Sheppard, John P.; Gunasekera, Geshri M.; Dhar, Sumitrajit

2010-01-01

213

Multidimensional Attitudes of Emergency Medicine Residents Toward Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Introduction The demands of our rapidly expanding older population strain many emergency departments (EDs), and older patients experience disproportionately high adverse health outcomes. Trainee attitude is key in improving care for older adults. There is negligible knowledge of baseline emergency medicine (EM) resident attitudes regarding elder patients. Awareness of baseline attitudes can serve to better structure training for improved care of older adults. The objective of the study is to identify baseline EM resident attitudes toward older adults using a validated attitude scale and multidimensional analysis. Methods Six EM residencies participated in a voluntary anonymous survey delivered in summer and fall 2009. We used factor analysis using the principal components method and Varimax rotation, to analyze attitude interdependence, translating the 21 survey questions into 6 independent dimensions. We adapted this survey from a validated instrument by the addition of 7 EM-specific questions to measures attitudes relevant to emergency care of elders and the training of EM residents in the geriatric competencies. Scoring was performed on a 5-point Likert scale. We compared factor scores using student t and ANOVA. Results 173 EM residents participated showing an overall positive attitude toward older adults, with a factor score of 3.79 (3.0 being a neutral score). Attitudes trended to more negative in successive post-graduate year (PGY) levels. Conclusion EM residents demonstrate an overall positive attitude towards the care of older adults. We noted a longitudinal hardening of attitude in social values, which are more negative in successive PGY-year levels. PMID:25035760

Hogan, Teresita M.; Chan, Shu B.; Hansoti, Bhakti

2014-01-01

214

Designing Personalized Treatment Engagement Interventions for Depressed Older Adults  

PubMed Central

SYNOPSIS Despite the benefits of treatment for late-life depression, we are faced with the challenges of underutilization of mental health services by older adults and non-adherence to offered interventions. This paper describes psychosocial and interactional barriers and facilitators of treatment engagement among depressed older adults served by community health care settings. We describe the need to engage older adults in treatment using interventions that: 1. target psychological barriers such as stigma and other negative beliefs about depression and its treatment; and 2. increase individuals’ involvement in the treatment decision-making process. We then present personalized treatment engagement interventions that our group has designed for a variety of community settings. PMID:21536170

Raue, Patrick J.; Sirey, Jo Anne

2011-01-01

215

Treatment of depression in older adults beyond fluoxetine  

PubMed Central

This review aimed to discuss the importance of the comprehensive treatment of depression among older adults in Brazil. The abuse of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, including fluoxetine hydrochloride, as antidepressants has been considered a serious public health problem, particularly among older adults. Despite the consensus on the need for a comprehensive treatment of depression in this population, Brazil is still unprepared. The interface between pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy is limited due to the lack of healthcare services, specialized professionals, and effective healthcare planning. Fluoxetine has been used among older adults as an all-purpose drug for the treatment of depressive disorders because of psychosocial adversities, lack of social support, and limited access to adequate healthcare services for the treatment of this disorder. Preparing health professionals is a sine qua non for the reversal of the age pyramid, but this is not happening yet.

Wagner, Gabriela Arantes

2015-01-01

216

Treatment of depression in older adults beyond fluoxetine.  

PubMed

This review aimed to discuss the importance of the comprehensive treatment of depression among older adults in Brazil. The abuse of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, including fluoxetine hydrochloride, as antidepressants has been considered a serious public health problem, particularly among older adults. Despite the consensus on the need for a comprehensive treatment of depression in this population, Brazil is still unprepared. The interface between pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy is limited due to the lack of healthcare services, specialized professionals, and effective healthcare planning. Fluoxetine has been used among older adults as an all-purpose drug for the treatment of depressive disorders because of psychosocial adversities, lack of social support, and limited access to adequate healthcare services for the treatment of this disorder. Preparing health professionals is a sine qua non for the reversal of the age pyramid, but this is not happening yet. PMID:25830872

Wagner, Gabriela Arantes

2015-01-01

217

Care Coordination for Cognitively Impaired Older Adults and Their Caregivers  

PubMed Central

Dementia and delirium, the most common causes of cognitive impairment (CI) among hospitalized older adults, are associated with higher mortality rates, increased morbidity and higher health care costs. A growing body of science suggests that these older adults and their caregivers are particularly vulnerable to systems of care that either do not recognize or meet their needs. The consequences can be devastating for these older adults and add to the burden of hospital staff and caregivers, especially during the transition from hospital to home. Unfortunately, little evidence exists to guide optimal care of this patient group. Available research findings suggest that hospitalized cognitively impaired elders may benefit from interventions aimed at improving care management of both CI and co-morbid conditions but the exact nature and intensity of interventions needed are not known. This article will explore the need for improved transitional care for this vulnerable population and their caregivers. PMID:18032200

Naylor, Mary D.; Hirschman, Karen B.; Bowles, Kathryn H.; Bixby, M. Brian; Konick-McMahan, JoAnne; Stephens, Caroline

2008-01-01

218

Prescribers' experiences with powered mobility prescription among older adults.  

PubMed

Despite the potential benefits of powered mobility, many older adults do not have access to this technology. To date, few studies have explored how prescribers make decisions regarding provision of powered mobility. Therefore, we undertook a qualitative study to develop a better understanding of prescribers' attitudes toward and practices with older adult candidates for powered mobility devices. Our analysis of 10 in-depth interviews identified three main themes: (1) "Deciding who should be entitled" explored how therapists decided who should have access to powered mobility, (2) "power wheelchair negotiation" described the discord between clients and therapists that became apparent during this process, and (3) "practical considerations" revealed how contextual factors shaped the provision of powered mobility. The findings suggest that the ways in which powered mobility is funded, provided, and accommodated should be improved so that more older adults have access to these devices and can use them to their full potential. PMID:23245788

Mortenson, W Ben; Clarke, Laura Hurd; Best, Krista

2013-01-01

219

Potentially inappropriate medications in community-dwelling older adults.  

PubMed

Potentially inappropriate medication (PIM) use is a significant worldwide public health problem. Community-dwelling older adults are susceptible to the negative outcomes associated with the use of PIMs. A database search (January 1991-June 2013) produced 19 prospective correlational and 10 intervention studies. The current state of the science reveals that conceptual clarity is lacking regarding the use of PIMs. The prevalence of PIM use is well documented in an abundance of descriptive studies. However, researchers have not examined an intervention's effects on health outcomes in community-dwelling older adults. Although independent older adults can acquire PIMs outside of a provider, current interventions aim to change the behavior of the prescribing physician and pharmacist. Nurses need to collaborate with other disciplines in PIM use research. Priority needs are to design interventions that reduce the use of PIMs and negative health outcomes. PMID:24530281

Shade, Marcia Y; Berger, Ann M; Chaperon, Claudia

2014-01-01

220

Faith and health self-management of rural older adults.  

PubMed

This analysis uses in-depth interview data collected from 145 African American, European American and Native American men and women aged 70 and older who reside in two rural North Carolina counties to understand the role of religious faith and prayer in the health self-management of these older adults. The analysis addresses three specific questions: how do these older adults use religion to help them manage their health; are there ethnic and gender differences in the use of religion; and are differences in health status related to differences in the use of religion? The integral role of religion in the lives of these older rural adults is an overarching theme present in the interview texts. Six major themes link religion and health self-management: (1) prayer and faith in health self-management, (2) reading the Bible, (3) church services, (4) mental and spiritual health, (5) stories of physical healing, and (6) ambivalence. Faith and religious activities provide an anchor in the lives of these older adults. There is little variation in the use of religion for health self-management by gender, ethnicity or health status. These results suggest that the strength of religion in rural culture may limit the effectiveness of general religiosity scales to discern the relationship of religion to health and health behavior in rural populations. PMID:14618010

Arcury, T A; Quandt, S A; McDonald, J; Bell, R A

2000-01-01

221

The pleasurable recreational activities among community-dwelling older adults.  

PubMed

This study aimed to clarify what pleasurable recreational activities older adults like to participate in, and to investigate the relationship between those activities and quality of life (QOL). Questionnaires were delivered to older residents (65 years and above) in a Japanese rural area. The residents' background information, the amount of pleasure for various activities, and the QOL were surveyed. The QOL was evaluated by the revised Philadelphia Geriatric Center (PGC) morale scale. The amount of pleasure taken in a majority of the activities, such as conversation with family or neighbors showed a significant association with the happiness score, but only a few activities showed significant association between the revised PGC morale scale and the amount of pleasure. The multiple regression analyses indicated that the amount of pleasure in exercise, the difficulty in managing finances, and amount of pleasure taken in watching TV were significant variables for predicting the happiness score. The results indicated that the amount of pleasure older adults experienced when engaging in activities such as conversation with family or neighbors showed significant association with the older adults' happiness. These results may be helpful in understanding contributions of various activities to the perception of pleasure in older adults. PMID:16368155

Onishi, Joji; Masuda, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Yusuke; Gotoh, Tadao; Kawamura, Takashi; Iguchi, Akihisa

2006-01-01

222

Chemotherapy for the Older Adult with Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cancer is a disease of aging; approximately 60% of all cancers and 70% of cancer mortality occur in persons aged 65 years\\u000a and over. Aging is a highly individualized process, characterized by physiologic and psychosocial changes that can affect\\u000a tolerance to treatment. Older patients are a highly heterogeneous group, with varying levels of risk for functional or physical\\u000a decline and

Supriya Mohile; Nail Nagovskiy; Lodovico Balducci

223

Medication adherence in older adults: the pillbox half full.  

PubMed

Medication nonadherence is a common concern for nurses and family members who care for older adults. Medication nonadherence can be intentional and/or nonintentional. Understanding the reason for nonadherence is essential in achieving the desired clinical and behavioral outcomes. Traditional interventions, such as educational and behavioral interventions, must often be combined to be successful. New technologies offer nurses opportunities to explore interventions for the baby boomers, who are now tapping into Medicare. Nurses can contribute to finding a solution to medication adherence through policy, systems, practice, and research, with the first step being effective communication with older adults and their caregivers. PMID:24846467

Haugh, Kathy Henley

2014-06-01

224

Innovations in dental care delivery for the older adult.  

PubMed

Access to and reducing disparities in oral health for older adults is a complex problem that requires innovative strategies. In addition to offering dental services in alternative settings, such as senior centers, places that are familiar to older adults, and where physical limitations can be better accommodated, alternatives to the traditional provider should be considered. Many states are changing laws and practice acts to allow dental hygienists to provide preventive services without the supervision of a dentist. Also, collaborations between dental and non-dental professionals can be a successful strategy for increasing access to oral health care for this high-risk population. PMID:25201546

Bethel, Lynn Ann; Kim, Esther E; Seitz, Charles M; Swann, Brian J

2014-10-01

225

Sarcopenic indices in community-dwelling older adults  

PubMed Central

Background Sarcopenic indices are used to estimate loss of skeletal lean mass and function, and to determine the prevalence of sarcopenia in older adults. It is believed that older women and men with lower skeletal lean mass will be weaker and have more functional limitations. Purpose 1) To classify community-dwelling older adults using two common sarcopenic indices: appendicular lean mass/height2 (ALM/ht2) and skeletal muscle index (SMI), and 2) to determine each indices value as indicators of lower extremity strength and physical function. Methods The sample consisted of 154 community-dwelling older adults (111 women, 43 men; mean age=82.4 SD=3.6 years; mean BMI=25.8 SD=4.4 kg/m2). Each underwent whole-body dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) to assess lean mass. The 9-item modified physical performance test (PPT) and s elf-selected walking speed were used to evaluate function. Lower extremity strength was measured bilaterally using isokinetic dynamometry. Results The ALM/ht2 index classified 75 participants (49%) as sarcopenic (SP) and 79 (51%) as non-sarcopenic (NSP). The SMI classified 129 participants (84%) as SP and 25 (16%) as NSP. There were no differences in functional measures between groups by gender using either index after classification. The ALM/ht2 index was more strongly correlated with peak torque of all lower extremity muscle groups (r=.276–.487) compared with the SMI (r=.103–.344). There was no relationship between either sarcopenic index and physical function. Discussion There were marked differences in how two sarcopenic indices classified community-dwelling older adults. Lower extremity strength was lower in older women classified as sarcopenic compared to non-sarcopenic using the ALM/ht2 index, but LE strength was not different in older men. However, no lower extremity strength differences were observed between sarcopenic and non-sarcopenic men or women using the SMI classification. Neither sarcopenic index uniformly identified community-dwelling older adults with functional or strength deficits. Conclusions Detection of strength deficits using sarcopenic indices alone may be gender-specific, and may not reflect strength or functional decline in community-dwelling men 80 years of age or older. Given associations between lower extremity strength and physical function, strength measures remain a better predictor of physical performance than sarcopenic indices for community-dwelling older men and women. PMID:22166895

Merriwether, Ericka N.; Host, Helen H.; Sinacore, David R.

2011-01-01

226

Operative risk stratification in the older adult.  

PubMed

As the population ages, the health care system must to adapt to the needs of the older population. Hospitalization risks are particularly significant in the frail geriatric patients, with costly and morbid consequences. Appropriate preoperative assessment can identify sources of increased risk and enable the surgical team to manage this risk, through "prehabilitation," intraoperative modification, and postoperative care. Geriatric preoperative assessment expands usual risk stratification and careful medication review to include screening for functional disability, cognitive impairment, nutritional deficiency, and frailty. The information gathered can also equip the surgeon to develop a patient-centered and realistic treatment plan. PMID:25459549

Scandrett, Karen G; Zuckerbraun, Brian S; Peitzman, Andrew B

2015-02-01

227

Treatment planning considerations in older adults.  

PubMed

The older patient often presents with clinically challenging dental problems combined with complex medical, social, psychological, and financial barriers to oral health. Through careful consideration, the clinician can design a thoughtfully sequenced treatment plan that addresses dental conditions and facilitates improved oral health. Several models serve to guide the clinician with this endeavor. Treatment planning for a medically complex patient with xerostomia and dementia involves a great deal of uncertainty, which may be attenuated by flexibility and good communication with the patient and all involved parties. PMID:25201539

Oong, Ella M; An, Gregory K

2014-10-01

228

Attitudes toward Younger and Older Adults: The German Aging Semantic Differential  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present study used the German Aging Semantic Differential (ASD) to assess attitudes toward younger and older adults in a heterogeneous sample of n = 151 younger and n = 143 older adults. The questionnaire was administered in two versions, one referring to the evaluation of younger adults, the other to the evaluation of older adults.…

Gluth, Sebastian; Ebner, Natalie C.; Schmiedek, Florian

2010-01-01

229

Faith and health self-management of rural older adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

This analysis uses in-depth interview data collected from 145 AfricanAmerican, European American and Native American men and women aged 70and older who reside in two rural North Carolina counties to understand therole of religious faith and prayer in the health self-management of theseolder adults. The analysis addresses three specific questions: how do theseolder adults use religion to help them manage

Thomas A. Arcury; Sara A. Quandt; Juliana McDonald; Ronny A. Bell

2000-01-01

230

Hypermnesia: Age-related differences between young and older adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hypermnesia is a net improvement in memory performance that occurs across tests in a multitest paradigm with only one study\\u000a session. Our goal was to identify possible age-related differences in hypermnesic recall. We observed hypermnesia for young\\u000a adults using verbal (Experiment 1) as well as pictorial (Experiment 2) material, but no hypermnesia for older adults in either\\u000a experiment. We found

Robert L. Widner; Hajime Otani; Anderson D. Smith

2000-01-01

231

Depressive symptoms in institutionalized older adults  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To estimate the prevalence of depressive symptoms among institutionalized elderly individuals and to analyze factors associated with this condition. METHODS This was a cross-sectional study involving 462 individuals aged 60 or older, residents in long stay institutions in four Brazilian municipalities. The dependent variable was assessed using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale. Poisson’s regression was used to evaluate associations with co-variables. We investigated which variables were most relevant in terms of presence of depressive symptoms within the studied context through factor analysis. RESULTS Prevalence of depressive symptoms was 48.7%. The variables associated with depressive symptoms were: regular/bad/very bad self-rated health; comorbidities; hospitalizations; and lack of friends in the institution. Five components accounted for 49.2% of total variance of the sample: functioning, social support, sensory deficiency, institutionalization and health conditions. In the factor analysis, functionality and social support were the components which explained a large part of observed variance. CONCLUSIONS A high prevalence of depressive symptoms, with significant variation in distribution, was observed. Such results emphasize the importance of health conditions and functioning for institutionalized older individuals developing depression. They also point to the importance of providing opportunities for interaction among institutionalized individuals. PMID:24897042

Santiago, Lívia Maria; Mattos, Inês Echenique

2014-01-01

232

Alternating and Sequential Motion Rates in Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Alternating motion rate (AMR) and sequential motion rate (SMR) are tests of articulatory diadochokinesis that are widely used in the evaluation of motor speech. However, there are no quality normative data available for adults aged 65 years and older. Aims: There were two aims: (1) to obtain a representative, normative dataset of…

Pierce, John E.; Cotton, Susan; Perry, Alison

2013-01-01

233

Older Adults' Reports of Formal Care Hours and Administrative Records  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Personal assistance care is a Medicaid benefit in New York, but few data are available on its prevalence and contribution to home care. We examined these issues in a New York City sample by assessing older adults' reports of weekly home care hours and Medicaid billing records. Design and Methods: With help from New York City's Human…

Albert, Steven M.; Brassard, Andrea B.; Simone, Bridget; Stern, Yaakov

2004-01-01

234

Using Video Animation to Assess Mobility in Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Background. Although the importance of the context of task performance in the assessment of mobility in older adults is generally understood, there is little empirical evidence that demonstrates how sensitive older adults are to subtle changes in task demands. Thus, we developed a novel approach to examine this issue. Methods. We collected item response data to 81 animated video clips, where various mobility-related tasks were modified in a systematic fashion to manipulate task difficulty. Results. The participants (N = 234), 166 women and 68 men, had an average age of 81.9 years and a variety of comorbidities. Histograms of item responses revealed dramatic and systematic effects on older adults’ self-reported ability when varying walking speed, use of a handrail during ascent and descent of stairs, walking at different speeds outdoors over uneven terrain, and carrying an object. For example, there was almost a threefold increase in reporting the inability to walk at the fast speed compared with the slow speed for a minute or less, and twice as many participants reported the inability to walk at the fast speed outdoors over uneven terrain compared with indoors. Conclusions. The data provide clear evidence that varying the contextual features and demands of a simple task such as stair climbing has a significant impact on older adults’ self-reporting of ability related to mobility. More work is needed on the psychometric properties of such assessments and to determine if this methodology has conceptual and clinical relevance in studying mobility disability. PMID:21127192

Ip, Edward H.; Barnard, Ryan T.; Wong, Yue-Ling; Rejeski, W. Jack

2011-01-01

235

Family Caregivers of Older Adults: A Life Span Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When faced with changes in physical health, cognition, and daily functioning, older adults most frequently rely on family members for instrumental support and more intense care activities. Using a life span perspective as our guiding framework, we identified several developmental themes across the late-life caregiving research including individual…

Roberto, Karen A.; Jarrott, Shannon E.

2008-01-01

236

Volunteer Drivers: Their Contributions to Older Adults and to Themselves  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2004 and 2005 the Beverly Foundation surveyed volunteer drivers in an effort to better understand how and why they support older adults. The sample comprised 714 volunteer drivers from 367 communities, representing 40 states, who responded to the survey. Their responses provided qualitative and quantitative information about who they are, why…

Kerschner, Helen; Rousseau, Marie-Helene

2008-01-01

237

Reliability and Stability of Executive Functioning in Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

A number of methodological questions have been raised about the reliability and validity of measuring executive functioning (EF) across multiple time points. In this study, correlational and latent-variable analyses were used to examine test–retest reliability of 5 common measures of EF and the stability of a latent EF construct. One hundred eighteen nondemented older adults were tested twice over a

Mark L. Ettenhofer; David Z. Hambrick; Norman Abeles

2006-01-01

238

The Level of Willingness to Evacuate among Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The issues of rising numbers of disasters, overwhelming increases in number of older adults, and historically flawed evacuations present real challenges. During the next two decades, the number of American baby boomers, who turn 65, will increase by 40%. As evidenced by recent disasters, the imperfections and vulnerabilities of flawed evacuations…

Gray-Graves, Amy; Turner, Keith W.; Swan, James H.

2011-01-01

239

Fluad®-MF59®-Adjuvanted Influenza Vaccine in Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Influenza directly or indirectly contributes to the four leading causes of global mortality, at rates that are highest in older adults. As the proportion of older adults in the Korean population is greater than in most other countries, influenza prevention is a greater public health priority in Korea than elsewhere. Conventional inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) is less immunogenic and efficacious (-50%) in older than in young adults, but adjuvanting the vaccine with oil-in-water emulsion MF59® increases immunogenicity, resulting in comparatively higher levels of hemagglutination inhibition antibodies and greater protection against all influenza, as well as cases requiring hospitalization. A recent observational study demonstrated that the adjuvanted vaccine protected older adults against influenza in a year when nonadjuvanted IIV was ineffective. In another multiyear study, the adjuvanted vaccine was estimated to be 25% more effective in preventing pneumonia and influenza hospitalizations compared to nonadjuvanted vaccine. Although MF59-adjuvanted vaccine is transiently more reactogenic than nonadjuvanted vaccine, there is no evidence that it increases risks for serious adverse events, including those with an autoimmune etiology. Experience thus far indicates a favorable balance of benefit to risk for MF59. This may reflect the adjuvant's mechanism of action in which the squalene oil emulsion increases antibody responses to co-administered antigen without acting more generally as an immunopotentiator. PMID:24265964

2013-01-01

240

Reasons for Older Adult Participation in University Programs in Spain  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the reasons expressed by older adults for attending a university program in Barcelona (Spain). Results were based on the responses of 36 elders to questions from a semistructured interview. These were (a) reasons for joining a university course and (b) factors that prevent enrolling in that course. Participants mentioned more…

Villar, Feliciano; Triado, Carme; Pinazo, Sacramento; Celdran, Montserrat; Sole, Carme

2010-01-01

241

Technology and older adults: : designing for accessibility and usability  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two major demographic trends underscore the importance of considering technology adoption by older adults: the aging of the population and rapid dissemination of technology within most societal contexts. In the past decade, developments in computer and information technologies have occurred at an unprecedented rate and technology has become an integral component of work, education, healthcare, communication and entertainment. At the

Sara J. Czaja

2006-01-01

242

Measuring Successful Aging in Southern Black Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the growing size of the population of aging Black individuals, it is important to understand successful aging in this group. This study, therefore, piloted the Successful Aging Inventory (SAI) with a convenience sample of Black older adults. Participants completed a demographic form, the SAI, Purpose in Life Test, Life Satisfaction…

Troutman, Meredith; Nies, Mary A.; Bentley, Monica

2011-01-01

243

Lay Meanings of Health among Rural Older Adults in Appalachia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: Self-perceptions of health vary depending on one's social and cultural context. Rural residents have been characterized as having a distinct culture, and health differences by residence have been well documented. While there is evidence of poor health among rural older adults, little research has examined how they perceive and define…

Goins, R. Turner; Spencer, S. Melinda; Williams, Kimberly

2011-01-01

244

Older Adults Talk Technology: Technology Usage and Attitudes  

PubMed Central

Older adults (n = 113) participated in focus groups discussing their use of and attitudes about technology in the context of their home, work, and healthcare. Participants reported using a wide variety of technology items, particularly in their homes. Positive attitudes (i.e., likes) outnumbered negative attitudes (i.e., dislikes), suggesting that older adults perceive the benefits of technology use to outweigh the costs of such use. Positive attitudes were most frequently related to how the technology supported activities, enhanced convenience, and contained useful features. Negative attitudes were most frequently associated with technology creating inconveniences, unhelpful features, as well as security and reliability concerns. Given that older adults reported more positive than negative attitudes about the technologies they use, these results contradict stereotypes that older adults are afraid or unwilling to use technology. These findings also highlight the importance of perceived benefits of use and ease of use for models of technology acceptance. Emphasizing the benefits of technology in education and training programs may increase future technology adoption. PMID:20967133

Mitzner, Tracy L.; Boron, Julie B.; Fausset, Cara Bailey; Adams, Anne E.; Charness, Neil; Czaja, Sara J.; Dijkstra, Katinka; Fisk, Arthur D.; Rogers, Wendy A.; Sharit, Joseph

2010-01-01

245

Increasing Student/Older Adult Interaction by Life Review Assignments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A method for increasing interaction between students and older adults in a geriatric pharmacy course uses an instructional module on stereotypes, age and personality, role changes, and nursing home living. The course requires students to conduct a life review of someone over age 65. The exercise improves student communication skills and…

Sumner, Edward D.; Haight, Barbara K.

1993-01-01

246

Interventions to Promote Physical Activity by Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Physical inactivity has been established to be an independent risk factor for a range of chronic diseases and con- ditions that threaten the health of the nation. However, only a minority of the population is currently meeting the recommended levels of regular physical activity, which have been linked with important health and quality- of-life benefits. Older adults are at particular

Abby C. King

2001-01-01

247

Ethnically Diverse Older Adults' Beliefs about Staying Mentally Sharp  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined diverse older adults' (n = 396, ages 50+) views about how to stay mentally sharp. We conducted 42 focus groups in four languages at nine United States locations using a standardized discussion guide and methods. The groups represented African Americans, American Indians, Chinese Americans, Latinos, Whites other than Latinos,…

Friedman, Daniela B.; Laditka, Sarah B.; Laditka, James N.; Wu, Bei; Liu, Rui; Price, Anna E.; Tseng, Winston; Corwin, Sara J.; Ivey, Susan L.; Hunter, Rebecca; Sharkey, Joseph R.

2011-01-01

248

Motivational Interviewing to Affect Behavioral Change in Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reviews and assesses the existing research literature on the efficacy of motivational interviewing (MI) to promote lifestyle changes and improve functioning among older adults confronting serious health challenges. A comprehensive literature review was conducted of intervention studies that tested the use of MI to achieve behavioral…

Cummings, Sherry M.; Cooper, R. Lyle; Cassie, Kim McClure

2009-01-01

249

Usability of Touch-Panel Interfaces for Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The usability of a touch-panel interface was compared among young, middle-aged, and older adults. In addition, a performance model of a touch panel was developed so that pointing time could be predicted with higher accuracy. Moreover, the target location to which a participant could point most quickly was determined. The pointing time with a PC mouse was longer for the

Atsuo Murata; Hirokazu Iwase

2005-01-01

250

Technology: Education and Training Needs of Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The impact of the global aging of the population on social, economic, political, and health care institutions is unequaled. Parallel to this, evolving developments in technology promise opportunities for sales and product development to support positive aging. Older adults are excited to utilize technologies that they perceive as practical.…

Huber, Lesa; Watson, Carol

2014-01-01

251

Understanding Arthritis Promoting Healthy Lifestyles for Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the goals of "Healthy People 2010" is to decrease the incidence of limitation in physical activity due to arthritis. Physical education, recreation, and dance professionals can play an important role in meeting this objective by addressing barriers to physical activity and exercise in older adults with arthritis, and by successfully…

Tremethick, Mary Jane; Hogan, Patricia I.; Coleman, Barb; Adams, Kady

2010-01-01

252

Biobehavioral Rehabilitation for Older Adults with Essential Tremor.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Essential tremor (ET), the most prevalent movement disorder, has a peak prevalence in the sixth decade of life, primarily affecting the hands and head. Persons with ET are often significantly disabled and medical intervention often had limited effectiveness. Describes a biobehavioral rehabilitation model for older adults with ET. (Author/JBJ)

Lundervold, Duane A.; Poppen, Roger

1995-01-01

253

Digital Skills Acquisition: Future Trends among Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify future trends and barriers that will either facilitate or impede the narrowing of the digital skills divide among older adults during the next 10 years. Methodology: To address the research questions, this study used a modified version of the Delphi process using a panel of experts who…

Gilliam, Brian K.

2011-01-01

254

Enhancing tactile sensation in older adults with electrical noise stimulation  

E-print Network

Enhancing tactile sensation in older adults with electrical noise stimulation Neel T. Dhruv, James low-level electrical noise stimulation was shown to enhance tactile sensitiv- ity in healthy young elderly subjects. Electrical noise stimulation resulted in a statistically signi¢cant increase

Collins, James J.

255

Self-Reported Cognitive Inconsistency in Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Insight into one's own cognitive abilities, or metacognition, has been widely studied in developmental psychology. Relevance to the clinician is high, as memory complaints in older adults show an association with impending dementia, even after controlling for likely confounds. Another candidate marker of impending dementia under study is inconsistency in cognitive performance over short time intervals. Although there has been

Susan Vanderhill; David F. Hultsch; Michael A. Hunter; Esther Strauss

2010-01-01

256

Older Japanese Adults and Mobile Phones: An Applied Ethnographic Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This qualitative research investigates the meaning of "keitai" (mobile phones) for older Japanese adults between the ages of 59 and 79. Participants' emails from keitai, handwritten daily logs, and audio and video recordings from meetings and interviews were collected during my stay of nearly seven months in one of the largest cities in Japan.…

Hachiya, Kumiko

2010-01-01

257

Alkaline diets favor lean tissue mass in older adults  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Maintaining muscle mass in aging is important to prevent falls and fractures. The net acid load from diets that are rich in acidogenic protein and cereal grains relative to their content of alkalinogenic fruits and vegetables may contribute to reduced lean tissue mass in older adults. This analysis ...

258

Participation in Learning and Wellbeing among Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this research was to identify the effects of participation in learning on the subjective wellbeing of older adults. Data were from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA), a large-scale, nationally representative survey of those aged 50 and above. The survey contains several wellbeing measures and information on three…

Jenkins, Andrew

2011-01-01

259

Cognitive spare capacity in older adults with hearing loss.  

PubMed

Individual differences in working memory capacity (WMC) are associated with speech recognition in adverse conditions, reflecting the need to maintain and process speech fragments until lexical access can be achieved. When working memory resources are engaged in unlocking the lexicon, there is less Cognitive Spare Capacity (CSC) available for higher level processing of speech. CSC is essential for interpreting the linguistic content of speech input and preparing an appropriate response, that is, engaging in conversation. Previously, we showed, using a Cognitive Spare Capacity Test (CSCT) that in young adults with normal hearing, CSC was not generally related to WMC and that when CSC decreased in noise it could be restored by visual cues. In the present study, we investigated CSC in 24 older adults with age-related hearing loss, by administering the CSCT and a battery of cognitive tests. We found generally reduced CSC in older adults with hearing loss compared to the younger group in our previous study, probably because they had poorer cognitive skills and deployed them differently. Importantly, CSC was not reduced in the older group when listening conditions were optimal. Visual cues improved CSC more for this group than for the younger group in our previous study. CSC of older adults with hearing loss was not generally related to WMC but it was consistently related to episodic long term memory, suggesting that the efficiency of this processing bottleneck is important for executive processing of speech in this group. PMID:24904409

Mishra, Sushmit; Stenfelt, Stefan; Lunner, Thomas; Rönnberg, Jerker; Rudner, Mary

2014-01-01

260

Outreach Services for Older Adults at the Wadsworth Public Library.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports on a study conducted to assist the Wadsworth Public Library in future planning and refining of services to older adults especially in library outreach. A questionnaire was distributed to residents (n=350) of one nursing home, four apartment complexes for seniors, one assisted living complex, one senior center, and any patrons…

Black, Barbara A.

261

Hyphens for Disambiguating Phrases: Effectiveness for Young and Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hyphens that disambiguate phrasing in ambiguous sentences influence reading rate and reading comprehension for younger and older adults. Moreover, as working memory (WM) has been implicated in age-related changes in sentence comprehension for both auditory and written materials, we asked if it…

Anema, Inge; Obler, Loraine K.

2012-01-01

262

Prevalence and Correlates of Exercise Among Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

A secondary analysis of data from the 1990 Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Supplement to the National Health Interview Survey was conducted to estimate the prevalence of exercise among adults aged 55 and older and identify correlates of exercise in this population. Walking and participation in other exercises were the exercise variables, and the explanatory variables included sociodemographic measures, self-reported

Hirsch S. Ruchlin; Mark S. Lachs

1999-01-01

263

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Insomnia is associated with significant morbidity and is often a persistent problem, particularly in older adults. It is important to attend to this complaint and not assume that it will remit spontaneously. In many cases, unfortunately, insomnia remains unrecognized and untreated, often because it is presumed that insomnia is an inevitable…

Belanger, Lynda; LeBlanc, Melanie; Morin, Charles M.

2012-01-01

264

The Impact of Arthritis on Life Satisfaction of Older Adults.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Poor health has been implicated as a suppressor of the life satisfaction of older adults. To clarify the contribution of arthritis to this process, functional disability, negative affect, pain, current severity of the disease, self-esteem, perception of general health, and internal health locus of control, were placed within a causal model as…

Burckhardt, Carol S.

265

Differential Diagnosis in Older Adults: Dementia, Depression, and Delirium.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines three common disorders, dementia, depression, and delirium, which can be particularly difficult to diagnose in older adults. Presents three aspects that are helpful in making a decision: age-related differences, medical issues that need to be ruled out, and assessment methods particularly useful in the diagnostic process. (JPS)

Gintner, Gary G.

1995-01-01

266

Services for Older Adults. Reference Book [and] Student Activity Book.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This student activity book and reference book, which are part of a family and consumer sciences education series focusing on a broad range of employment opportunities, are intended for use in 1- and 2- programs preparing Texas high school students for employment in occupations related to providing services for older adults. The reference book…

Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences.

267

Attitudes toward Older Adults: A Reexamination of Two Major Scales  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Two studies were conducted to reexamine the psychometric properties of two major scales measuring attitudes toward older adults. The Kogan Attitudes Toward Old People Scale (Kogan OP Scale; Kogan, 1961b) was administered to a sample of 512 college students in Study One. The refined version (Polizzi & Millikin, 2002) of the Aging Semantic…

Iwasaki, Michiko; Jones, James A.

2008-01-01

268

Quantitative gait disturbances in older adults with cognitive impairments.  

PubMed

Gait is a complex motor task, initiated and governed by different areas of the brain. Studies have shown a clear association between gait and cognition. Impairments in both gait and cognition are prevalent in older adults. Older adults with gait impairment have an increased risk of developing cognitive impairments. Those with cognitive impairment often have gait impairments and more falls than cognitively healthy older adults. Recent studies have shown that quantitative gait analysis, particularly performed during dual task conditions, can detect gait deficits that cannot yet be seen by the naked eye, even to a trained specialist. Some studies have shown that such gait disturbances were measurable years before mild cognitive impairment or dementia or walking difficulties were clinically manifest. Quantitative gait analysis can provide early detection of gait and cognitive impairments as well as fall risk. Future quantitative gait studies may help distinguish dementia subtypes in early stages of the diseases. Early detection of gait and cognitive impairments would provide a better understanding of disease pathophysiology and progression. Early detection also allows the timely implementation of interventions with the ultimate goal of improving or maintaining mobility and functional independence for as long as possible. Quantitative gait analysis should be viewed as a clinical tool to aid diagnoses and treatment planning. This review examines the current literature on quantitatively measured gait impairment in older adults with mild cognitive impairment or a dementia subtype. PMID:24050167

Bridenbaugh, Stephanie A; Kressig, Reto W

2014-01-01

269

Auditory Training: Evidence for Neural Plasticity in Older Adults  

E-print Network

animal and human models of plasticity in the brain's ability to process speech and other meaningful37 Auditory Training: Evidence for Neural Plasticity in Older Adults Samira Anderson Auditory, such as when trying to understand speech in noise or when listening to music. Here, we review evidence from

Kraus, Nina

270

ASSOCIATION OF WEIGHT STATUS WITH DIETARY PATTERNS IN OLDER ADULTS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Dietary patterns and weight status are reported for 2 groups of community-living older adults, a rural Pennsylvania group and an urban Boston group. Diet patterns were defined by cluster analysis. Two major dietary patterns were identified for rural study participants and 4 major dietary patterns we...

271

Self-Report Measure of Financial Exploitation of Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This study was designed to improve the measurement of financial exploitation (FE) by testing psychometric properties of the older adult financial exploitation measure (OAFEM), a client self-report instrument. Design and Methods: Rasch item response theory and traditional validation approaches were used. Questionnaires were administered by…

Conrad, Kendon J.; Iris, Madelyn; Ridings, John W.; Langley, Kate; Wilber, Kathleen H.

2010-01-01

272

Visual Arts and Older Adult Learners in Retirement  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore the role of visual arts and its impact on successful aging and older adult learners in retirement. Retirement is one of the most important economic, psychological, and social transitions in most people's lives. Longevity has increased in the last sixty years such that in 2010, the average person can…

Hunt, Irma

2012-01-01

273

Supportive Group Interventions with Caregivers of Frail Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of supportive group interventions with caregivers of frail older adults is discussed in this article. Four categories of group interventions are described: (1) mutual support groups, (2) psychoeducational groups, (3) social, recreational and educational groups, and (4) service and advocacy groups. Research evidence on the efficacy of group interventions with this population is also considered. Recommendations are made

Philip McCallion; Ronald W. Toseland

1996-01-01

274

Bilateral Brain Regions Associated with Naming in Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To determine structural brain correlates of naming abilities in older adults, we tested 24 individuals aged 56-79 on two confrontation-naming tests (the Boston Naming Test (BNT) and the Action Naming Test (ANT)), then collected from these individuals structural Magnetic-Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) data. Overall,…

Obler, Loraine K.; Rykhlevskaia, Elena; Schnyer, David; Clark-Cotton, Manuella R.; Spiro, Avron, III; Hyun, JungMoon; Kim, Dae-Shik; Goral, Mira; Albert, Martin L.

2010-01-01

275

The Design of Online Learning Communities for Older Adults.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the creation of SeniorSage, an eight week facilitated online learning community for older adult volunteers in a Florida learning center. Discusses how members were prepared to participate in the community, explains the instructional design theory that guided the development of SeniorSage, and recommends future research. (Author/LRW)

Snyder, Marti M.

2002-01-01

276

Living alone and depression in Chinese older adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Western literature has repeatedly indicated a strong relationship between living alone and depression among the aged population, however, studies among the Chinese population are scarce. In this paper, we examine whether the association between living alone and depression is independent of health status, social support and financial strain among Chinese older adults, and subsequently assess whether such association persists after

K.-L. Chou; A. H. Y. Ho; I. Chi

2006-01-01

277

Formal caregivers of older adults: reflection about their practice  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To understand the job function of caregivers of older adults and contribute to the debate on the consolidation of this professional practice. METHODOLOGICAL PROCEDURES This is a descriptive, qualitative, and exploratory study. Four focal group sessions were performed in 2011 with 11 elderly companions, formal caregivers of older adults in the Programa Acompanhante de Idosos (Program for Caregivers of Older Adults), Sao Paulo, SP, Southeastern Brazil. These sessions, guided by a semi-structured script, were audio-recorded and fully transcribed. Data were analyzed using the Content Analysis technique, Thematic Modality. RESULTS In view of considering the caregivers of older adults as a new category of workers, it was difficult to define their duties. The elderly companions themselves as well as the care receivers, their families, and the professionals that comprised the team were unclear about their duties. The professional practice of these formal caregivers has been built on the basis of constant discussions and negotiations among them and other team members in Programa Acompanhante de Idosos during daily work. This was achieved via a recognition process of their job functions and by setting apart other workers’ exclusive responsibilities. CONCLUSIONS The delimitation of specific job functions for elderly companions is currently one of the greatest challenges faced by these workers to develop and consolidate their professional role as well as improve Programa Acompanhante de Idosos. PMID:25372163

Batista, Marina Picazzio Perez; Barros, Juliana de Oliveira; de Almeida, Maria Helena Morgani; Mângia, Elisabete Ferreira; Lancman, Selma

2014-01-01

278

Assessing Quality of Life in Older Adults With Cognitive Impairment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This article discusses theoretical, psychometric, and practical considerations of quality of life assessment in older adults with cognitive impairment. It describes a new measure of quality of life in dementia, the QOL-AD, and examines the reliability and validity of patient and caregiver reports of patient quality of life. Methods: Subjects were 177 patient\\/caregiver dyads. Patient Mini Mental State Exam

REBECCA G. LOGSDON; LAURA E. GIBBONS; SUSAN M. MCCURRY; LINDA TERI

2002-01-01

279

Trait Routinization, Functional and Cognitive Status in Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the associations between trait routinization and functional and cognitive as well as demographic indicators. A sample of American older adults living independently in a retirement community (n = 80) were assessed regarding their functional status, cognitive status, and preference for routine. Robust associations between…

Zisberg, Anna; Zysberg, Leehu; Young, Heather M.; Schepp, Karen G.

2009-01-01

280

Time of Day Affects Episodic Memory in Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The neuropsychological test scores of 2,030 cognitively normal older adults were examined to evaluate performance patterns as they related to time of day (TOD) at which testing was initiated. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine the association of TOD with scores on seven neuropsychological tests used in the clinical evaluation of dementia. Episodic memory performance was significantly related to

Barbara Martin; Angela L. H. Buffington; Kathleen A. Welsh-Bohmer; Jason Brandt

2008-01-01

281

Treatment of Depression and Suicide in Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes a cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) intervention for suicide prevention in older adults. Although many studies have found that CBT interventions are efficacious for reducing depressive symptoms in the elderly, researchers have yet to evaluate the efficacy of such interventions for preventing suicide or reducing suicide risk…

Bhar, Sunil S.; Brown, Gregory K.

2012-01-01

282

Physical Activity among Rural Older Adults with Diabetes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This analysis describes physical activity levels and factors associated with physical activity in an ethnically diverse (African American, Native American, white) sample of rural older adults with diabetes. Method: Data were collected using a population-based, cross-sectional stratified random sample survey of 701 community-dwelling…

Arcury, Thomas A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Bell, Ronny A.; Smith, Shannon L.; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Wetmore-Arkader, Lindsay K.; Quandt, Sara A.

2006-01-01

283

METACOMPREHENSION AND COMPREHENSION PERFORMANCE IN YOUNGER AND OLDER ADULTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

On the basis of metamemory assessment research and theories of discourse comprehension, the Metacomprehension Scale (MCS) was designed to assess multiple dimensions of metacomprehension. In a sample of younger (n = 30) and older (n = 30) adults, we examined age differences in self?assessed components of metacomprehension and the relation of the MCS to comprehension performance and general verbal ability.

DeWayne Moore; Karen Zabrucky; Nannette Evans Commander

1997-01-01

284

Characteristics of Older Adults and the Aging: Some Comments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Asserting that both humanistic and manpower considerations dictate that we address the aging process, this article describes the characteristics of older adults and illustrates the way in which they may be allowed to remain productive. Maslow's "Need Hierarchy" and Thorndike's "Theory of Developmental Tasks" are applied to the aging process. (JC)

Kowalski, Cash J.; Cangemi, Joseph P.

1978-01-01

285

Community Response Grids for Older Adults: Motivations, Usability, and Sociability  

E-print Network

with the vulnerability of older adults before, during, and after a disaster. Since the 9/11 terrorist attack, there has. The paper ends with a call to action and suggestions for future research directions. Keywords: Community to action and future research directions. Motivations for a CRG Limitations of current emergency response

Golbeck, Jennifer

286

Older Korean-American Adults' Attitudes toward the Computer  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study seeks to gain a holistic understanding of how older Korean-American adults' socio-demographic factors affect their attitudes toward the computer. The research was guided by four main questions: (1) What do participants describe as the consequences of their using the computer? (2) What attitudes toward the computer do participants…

Kwon, Hyuckhoon

2009-01-01

287

Digital Gaming Perspectives of Older Adults: Content vs. Interaction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There were two objectives to this study: (a) to establish flow and (2) to establish whether computer game interaction or content was important to the older adult, using the Nintendo Wii and the Sony PlayStation 2 consoles. An earlier study had identified the sports genre as a preference, and three games (golf, tennis, and boxing) were selected…

Marston, Hannah R.

2013-01-01

288

Emotional memory for musical excerpts in young and older adults  

PubMed Central

The emotions evoked by music can enhance recognition of excerpts. It has been suggested that memory is better for high than for low arousing music (Eschrich et al., 2005; Samson et al., 2009), but it remains unclear whether positively (Eschrich et al., 2008) or negatively valenced music (Aubé et al., 2013; Vieillard and Gilet, 2013) may be better recognized. Moreover, we still know very little about the influence of age on emotional memory for music. To address these issues, we tested emotional memory for music in young and older adults using musical excerpts varying in terms of arousal and valence. Participants completed immediate and 24 h delayed recognition tests. We predicted highly arousing excerpts to be better recognized by both groups in immediate recognition. We hypothesized that arousal may compensate consolidation deficits in aging, thus showing more prominent benefit of high over low arousing stimuli in older than younger adults on delayed recognition. We also hypothesized worst retention of negative excerpts for the older group, resulting in a recognition benefit for positive over negative excerpts specific to older adults. Our results suggest that although older adults had worse recognition than young adults overall, effects of emotion on memory do not seem to be modified by aging. Results on immediate recognition suggest that recognition of low arousing excerpts can be affected by valence, with better memory for positive relative to negative low arousing music. However, 24 h delayed recognition results demonstrate effects of emotion on memory consolidation regardless of age, with a recognition benefit for high arousal and for negatively valenced music. The present study highlights the role of emotion on memory consolidation. Findings are examined in light of the literature on emotional memory for music and for other stimuli. We finally discuss the implication of the present results for potential music interventions in aging and dementia.

Alonso, Irene; Dellacherie, Delphine; Samson, Séverine

2015-01-01

289

Listening to Older Adult Parents of Adult Children with Mental Illness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article uses qualitative research and narrative analysis to examine the experience of women age 55 and older who are parents caring for adult children with mental illness. Knowledge about the conflicts of older parents with dependent children is underdeveloped. In this study, analysis of women's stories about parenting in later life reveal…

Smith, Judith R.

2012-01-01

290

Individual Difference Factors in Risky Driving among Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Introduction Motor-vehicle crashes kill roughly 4,500 American adults over the age of 75 annually. Among younger adults, one behavioral factor consistently linked to risky driving is personality, but this predictor has been overshadowed by research on cognitive, perceptual, and motor processes among older drivers. Method In this study, a sample of 101 licensed drivers, all age 75 and over, were recruited to complete self-report measures on personality, temperament, and driving history. Participants also completed a virtual environment (VE) course designed to assess risk-taking driving behavior. State records of motor-vehicle crashes were collected. Results Results suggest both a sensation-seeking personality and an undercontrolled temperament are related to risky driving among older adults. Sensation-seeking was particularly related to history of violations and tickets, while temperamental control was more broadly related to a number of risky driving measures. Methodological and crash prevention issues are discussed. PMID:18023635

Schwebel, David C.; Ball, Karlene K.; Severson, Joan; Barton, Benjamin K.; Rizzo, Matthew; Viamonte, Sarah M.

2007-01-01

291

Activity Levels in Healthy Older Adults: Implications for Joint Arthroplasty  

PubMed Central

This work evaluated activity levels in a group of healthy older adults to establish a target activity level for adults of similar age after total joint arthroplasty (TJA). With the decreasing age of TJA patients, it is essential to have a reference for activity level in younger patients as activity level affects quality of life and implant design. 54 asymptomatic, healthy older adults with no clinical evidence of lower extremity OA participated. The main outcome measure, average daily step count, was measured using an accelerometer-based activity monitor. On average the group took 8813 ± 3611 steps per day, approximately 4000 more steps per day than has been previously reported in patients following total joint arthroplasty. The present work provides a reference for activity after joint arthroplasty which is relevant given the projected number of people under the age of 65 who will undergo joint arthroplasty in the coming years. PMID:23577274

Thorp, Laura E.; Orozco, Diego; Block, Joel A.; Sumner, Dale R.; Wimmer, Markus A.

2012-01-01

292

Occupational therapy use by older adults with cancer.  

PubMed

Occupational therapy may significantly improve cancer survivors' ability to participate in activities, thereby improving quality of life. Little is known, however, about the use of occupational therapy services by adults with cancer. The objective of this study was to understand what shapes patterns of occupational therapy use to help improve service delivery. We examined older (age >65 yr) adults diagnosed with breast, prostate, lung, or melanoma (skin) cancer between 2004 and 2007 (N = 27,131) using North Carolina Central Cancer Registry data linked to Medicare billing claims. Survivors who used occupational therapy within 1 yr before their cancer diagnosis were more likely to use occupational therapy after diagnosis but also experienced the highest levels of comorbidities. Survivors with Stage 4 cancers or lung cancer were less likely to use occupational therapy. These findings suggest possible disparities in utilization of occupational therapy by older adults with cancer. PMID:25184473

Pergolotti, Mackenzi; Cutchin, Malcolm P; Weinberger, Morris; Meyer, Anne-Marie

2014-01-01

293

What Turns Older Adults on to Education. Research Describing Participation in Educational Activities by Active Older Adults.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study identified distinguishing characteristics of active older adults who participate in educational activities and measured factors that motivated participation. The dependent variables were participation and nonparticipation; independent variables were educational attainment, anomie, life satisfaction, and certain learning-related factors. A…

Fisher, James C.

294

Somatic complaints in older adults: aging process or symptoms of depression  

E-print Network

This study examined the efficacy of somatic symptoms on a new measure of depression designed specifically for older adults. Resent research has shown somatic symptoms to be accurate predictors of depression in older adults, yet they have been...

Gentry, Ruth Anne

2013-02-22

295

Are Older Adults Wiser Than College Students? A Comparison of Two Age Cohorts  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined whether (a) older adults are wiser than college students, (b) college-educated older adults are wiser\\u000a than current college students, and (c) wise older adults show evidence of personal growth. Using a sample of 477 undergraduate\\u000a college students and 178 older adults (age 52+), results showed that college students tended to score as high on the self-administered\\u000a three-dimensional

Monika Ardelt

2010-01-01

296

Gender and Friendship Norms Among Older Adults  

PubMed Central

The authors examined same- and cross-gender friendship norms in a sample of 135 adults (average age 73 years). Participants evaluated a friend’s behavior, quantitatively and qualitatively, in vignettes in which the friend’s gender was experimentally manipulated. Gender often significantly, though modestly, influenced normative evaluations. Women frequently had higher expectations of friends than men and placed a greater emphasis on intimacy. Women were more disapproving of violations of friendship rules, such as betraying a confidence, paying a surprise visit, and failing to stand up for a friend in public. However, both men and women were less approving of a man than a woman who greets another friend with a kiss or who requests to stay overnight. Respondents’ open-ended comments reflected positive attitudes regarding cross-gender friendships. Most findings demonstrated that men and women across a wide age range held similar cultural norms for close ties, norms of trust, commitment, and respect. PMID:20473364

Felmlee, Diane; Muraco, Anna

2010-01-01

297

Correlates of Susceptibility to Scams in Older Adults Without Dementia  

PubMed Central

This study examined correlates of susceptibility to scams in 639 community-dwelling older adults without dementia from a cohort study of aging. Regression models adjusted for age, sex, education, and income were used to examine associations between susceptibility to scams, measured by 5-item self-report measure, and a number of potential correlates. Susceptibility was positively associated with age and negatively associated with income, cognition, psychological well being, social support, and literacy. Fully adjusted models indicated that older age and lower levels of cognitive function, decreased psychological well-being, and lower literacy in particular may be markers of susceptibility to financial victimization in old age. PMID:24499279

James, Bryan D.; Boyle, Patricia A.; Bennett, David A.

2013-01-01

298

Computer use by older adults: A multi-disciplinary review Nicole Wagner, Khaled Hassanein *, Milena Head  

E-print Network

Review Computer use by older adults: A multi-disciplinary review Nicole Wagner, Khaled Hassanein f o Article history: Available online 22 April 2010 Keywords: Older adults Aging Computer use of computer and Internet users. In many cases, older adults are the fastest growing computer and Internet user

Hitchcock, Adam P.

299

Measuring impact of ICTs on Quality of Life of Older Adults  

E-print Network

Measuring impact of ICTs on Quality of Life of Older Adults Kay Connelly School of Informatics and Computing Indiana University RQ1: Does the technology impact the quality of life of older adults? RQ1.1: Does the technology change older adults' perceptions of quality of life? RQ1.2: Does the technology

Connelly, Kay

300

Appreciating the Predicament of Housebound Older Adults with Arthritis: Portrait of a Population  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper draws a socio-demographic, physical, psychosocial, and behavioural profile of housebound older adults with arthritis and compares older adults with rheumatoid arthritis to those with osteoarthritis. Data from 125 housebound older adults with osteoarthritis (65%) or rheumatoid arthritis (35%) were compared to published samples and to…

Nour, Kareen; Laforest, Sophie; Gignac, Monique; Gauvin, Lise

2005-01-01

301

Cognitive Function and Oral Health Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Both oral health problems and cognitive impairment are relatively common among older adults. Poorer oral health appears to contribute to a decline in quality of life and to be related to various medical conditions. Little is known about the relationship of cognitive function to oral health among community-dwelling older adults. Methods. The sample included 1984 dentate community-dwelling older adults

Bei Wu; Brenda L. Plassman; Richard J. Crout; Jersey Liang

302

Bounded Rationality, Emotions and Older Adult Decision Making: Not so Fast and yet so Frugal  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Herbert Simon's work on bounded rationality has had little impact on researchers studying older adults' decision making. This omission is surprising, as human constraints on computation and memory are exacerbated in older adults. The study of older adults' decision-making processes could benefit from employing a bounded rationality perspective,…

Hanoch, Yaniv; Wood, Stacey; Rice, Thomas

2007-01-01

303

Exercise Accelerates Wound Healing Among Healthy Older Adults: A Preliminary Investigation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Older adults are likely to experience delayed rates of wound healing, impaired neuroendocrine responsiveness, and increased daily stress. Exercise activity has been shown to have a positive effect on physiological functioning and psychological functioning among older adults. This study evaluated the effect of a 3-month exercise program on wound healing, neuroendocrine function, and perceived stress among healthy older adults.

Charles F. Emery; Janice K. Kiecolt-Glaser; Ronald Glaser; William B. Malarkey; David J. Frid

2005-01-01

304

First Year Graduate Social Work Students' Knowledge of and attitude Toward Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study examined attitudes and knowledge of 96 first year MSW social work students toward older adults using the Aging Semantic Differential (ASD) and the Facts on Aging Quiz II. Results suggest that the sample had limited previous contact with older adults and little knowledge about aging prior to admission. Students reported negative attitudes toward older adults on productivity,

Zvi D. Gellis; Susan Sherman; Frances Lawrance

2003-01-01

305

A Profile of Psychologists' Views of Critical Risk Factors for Completed Suicide in Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability to accurately and reliably predict whether an older adult will commit suicide has eluded clinicians and researchers. A random national sample of psychologists who work with older adults was surveyed regarding their perception of 36 risk factors for completed suicide and indirect self-destructive behavior in older adults. This study produced a profile of psychologists' assessment and treatment practices

Lisa M. Brown; Bruce Bongar; Karin M. Cleary

2004-01-01

306

Journal Writing with Web 2.0 Tools: A Vision for Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes how Web 2.0 technologies may facilitate journaling and related inquiry methods among older adults. Benefits and limitations of journaling are summarized as well as computer skills of older adults. We then describe how Web 2.0 technologies can enhance journaling among older adults by diminishing feelings of isolation,…

Shepherd, Craig E.; Aagard, Steven

2011-01-01

307

An Information Needs Profile of Israeli Older Adults, regarding the Law and Services  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Based on Nicholas' framework for assessing information needs, this research aims to construct a profile of both Israeli older adults and their information needs regarding laws and social services. Data were collected by questionnaires answered by 200 older adults, born in Europe, Asia and Africa, who attended social clubs for older adults. The…

Getz, Irith; Weissman, Gabriella

2010-01-01

308

Improving Medication Management among At-risk Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Low health literacy is common among Medicare recipients and affects their understanding of complex medication regimens. Interventions are needed to improve medication use among older adults, while addressing low health literacy. Community-dwelling older adults in this study were enrolled in an inner-city adult day center. They completed a baseline measure of health literacy, medication self-efficacy, and medication adherence. They were provided with a personalized, illustrated daily medication schedule (PictureRx™). Six weeks later, their medication self-efficacy and adherence were assessed. Among the 20 participants in this pilot project, 70% had high likelihood of limited health literacy and took an average of 13.2 prescription medications. Both self-efficacy and medication adherence increased significantly after provision of the PictureRx cards (p<0.001 and p<0.05, respectively). Al participants rated the PictureRx cards as very helpful in terms of helping them remember the medication’s purpose and dosing. Illustrated daily medication schedules improve medication self-efficacy and adherence among at-risk, community-dwelling older adults. PMID:22587641

Martin, Delinda; Kripalani, Sunil; DuPapau, V.J.

2013-01-01

309

Community-dwelling older adults with memory loss  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To identify the health-related needs of community-dwelling older adults with mild memory loss. Design Qualitative study using semistructured, audiotaped, face-to-face interviews and focus groups. Setting A large community in Newfoundland. Participants Twenty-two adults between the ages of 58 and 80 years. Methods This needs assessment used a qualitative methodology of collecting and analyzing narrative data to develop an understanding of the issues, resources, and constraints of community-dwelling older adults with mild memory loss. Data were collected through semistructured, audiotaped, face-to-face interviews and focus groups. Transcripts of the interviews were analyzed using interpretive phenomenologic analysis. Main findings Three constitutive patterns with relational themes and subthemes were identified: forgetting and remembering, normalizing yet questioning, and having limited knowledge of resources. Participants described many examples of how their daily lives were affected by forgetfulness. They had very little knowledge of resources that provided information or support. Most of the participants believed they could not discuss their memory problems with their family doctors. Conclusion It is important for older adults with mild memory loss to have access to resources that will assist them in understanding their condition and make them feel supported. PMID:23486801

Parsons, Karen; Surprenant, Aimee; Tracey, Anne-Marie; Godwin, Marshall

2013-01-01

310

Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Cognition in Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Both sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and cognitive impairment are common among older adults, yet few studies have examined their relationship within this population to determine whether the effect of SDB on cognition is of similar or greater magnitude as that observed in younger- and middle-aged adults. Here, we review the extant literature and report that studies are largely supportive of an association between SDB and cognitive impairment in older adults, particularly in the domains of attention/vigilance, executive function, and verbal delayed recall memory. Presence of the APOE4 allele may confer increased vulnerability to SDB-associated cognitive dysfunction among elderly individuals. Although findings are mixed, there is strong evidence to suggest that SDB-related intermittent hypoxemia is the primary mechanism through which SDB exerts its adverse effects on cognition. We propose a microvascular model in which chronic intermittent hypoxemia causes vasculopathy that ultimately is expressed as cognitive impairment in the older adult. However, it remains unclear if the effects of SDB on cognition are the same regardless of age, or if there is a synergistic interaction between age and SDB. PMID:22752614

Zimmerman, Molly E.; Aloia, Mark S.

2013-01-01

311

Use of Complementary Medications among Older Adults with Cancer  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Little is known about complementary medication use among older adults with cancer, particularly those undergoing chemotherapy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of complementary medication use and to identify factors associated with its use among older adults with cancer. METHODS The prevalence of complementary medication use (defined as herbal agents, minerals, or other dietary supplements excluding vitamins) was evaluated in a cohort of adults aged ?65 years who were about to start chemotherapy for their cancer. The association between complementary medication use and patient characteristics (sociodemographics; comorbidity; functional, nutritional, psychological, and cognitive status); medication use (number of medications and concurrent vitamin use); and cancer characteristics (type and stage) was analyzed. RESULTS The cohort included 545 patients [mean age 73 years (range 65–91); 52% female] with cancer (61% Stage IV). Seventeen percent (N=93) of these patients reported using ?1 complementary medications [mean number of complementary medications among users was 2 (range 1–10)]. Complementary medication use was associated with: 1) earlier cancer stage, with 29% of those with stages I–II vs. 17% with III–IV (OR=2.05, 95% CI:1.21–3.49); and 2) less impairment with instrumental activities of daily living (OR=1.39, 95% CI:1.12–1.73). CONCLUSIONS Complementary medication use was reported by 17% of older adults with cancer and was more common among those with less advanced disease (receiving adjuvant potentially curative treatment) and higher functional status. Further studies are needed to determine the association between complementary medication use and cancer outcomes among older adults. PMID:22359348

Maggiore, Ronald J; Gross, Cary P; Togawa, Kayo; Tew, William P; Mohile, Supriya G; Owusu, Cynthia; Klepin, Heidi D; Lichtman, Stuart M; Gajra, Ajeet; Ramani, Rupal; Katheria, Vani; Klapper, Shira M; Hansen, Kurt; Hurria, Arti

2012-01-01

312

A randomized study of reinforcing ambulatory exercise in older adults  

PubMed Central

Many older adults do not meet physical activity recommendations and suffer from health-related complications. Reinforcement interventions can have pronounced effects on promoting behavior change; this study evaluated the efficacy of a reinforcement intervention to enhance walking in older adults. Forty-five sedentary adults with mild to moderate hypertension were randomized to 12-week interventions consisting of pedometers and guidelines to walk 10,000 steps/day or that same intervention with chances to win $1-$100 prizes for meeting recommendations. Patients walked an average of about 4,000 steps/day at baseline. Throughout the intervention, participants in the reinforcement intervention met walking goals on 82.5% ± 25.8% of days versus 55.3% ± 37.1% of days in the control condition, p < .01. Even though steps walked increased significantly in both groups relative to baseline, participants in the reinforcement condition walked an average of about 2,000 more steps/day than participants in the control condition, p < .02. Beneficial effects of the reinforcement condition relative to the control condition persisted at a 24-week follow-up evaluation, p < .02, although steps/day were lower than during the intervention period in both groups. Participants in the reinforcement intervention also evidenced greater reductions in blood pressure and weight over time and improvements in fitness indices, ps < .05. This reinforcement-based intervention substantially increased walking and improved clinical parameters, suggesting that larger-scale evaluations of reinforcement-based interventions for enhancing active lifestyles in older adults are warranted. Ultimately, economic analyses may reveal reinforcement interventions to be cost-effective, especially in high-risk populations of older adults. PMID:24128075

Petry, Nancy M.; Andrade, Leonardo F.; Barry, Danielle; Byrne, Shannon

2014-01-01

313

Life scripts across age groups: A comparison of adolescents, young adults, and older adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main purpose of the present study was to investigate cultural life scripts across three age groups. Adolescents, young adults, and older adults were asked to list the seven most important events that a typical newborn would experience in a lifetime. They also provided estimates of emotional valence and age for the life script events they listed. Results showed that

Ali ?. Tekcan; Burcu Kaya-K?z?löz; Handan Odaman

2012-01-01

314

Phase-shifting response to light in older adults  

PubMed Central

Abstract?Age-related changes in circadian rhythms may contribute to the sleep disruption observed in older adults. A reduction in responsiveness to photic stimuli in the circadian timing system has been hypothesized as a possible reason for the advanced circadian phase in older adults. This project compared phase-shifting responses to 2 h of broad-spectrum white light at moderate and high intensities in younger and older adults. Subjects included 29 healthy young (25.1 ± 4.1 years; male to female ratio: 8: 21) and 16 healthy older (66.5 ± 6.0 years; male to female ratio: 5: 11) subjects, who participated in two 4-night and 3-day laboratory stays, separated by at least 3 weeks. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of three different time-points, 8 h before (?8), 3 h before (?3) or 3 h after (+3) the core body temperature minimum (CBTmin) measured on the baseline night. For each condition, subjects were exposed in a randomized order to 2 h light pulses of two intensities (2000 lux and 8000 lux) during the two different laboratory stays. Phase shifts were analysed according to the time of melatonin midpoint on the nights before and after light exposure. Older subjects in this study showed an earlier baseline phase and lower amplitude of melatonin rhythm compared to younger subjects, but there was no evidence of age-related changes in the magnitude or direction of phase shifts of melatonin midpoint in response to 2 h of light at either 2000 lux or 8000 lux. These results indicate that the acute phase-shifting response to moderate- or high-intensity broad spectrum light is not significantly affected by age. PMID:24144880

Kim, Seong Jae; Benloucif, Susan; Reid, Kathryn Jean; Weintraub, Sandra; Kennedy, Nancy; Wolfe, Lisa F; Zee, Phyllis C

2014-01-01

315

Older adults have unstable gait kinematics during weight transfer.  

PubMed

The present article investigates gait stability of healthy older persons during weight transfer. Ten healthy older persons and ten younger persons walked 10 min each on a treadmill at 3 different gait speeds. The intra-stride change in gait stability was defined by the local divergence exponent ?(t) estimated by a newly developed method. The intra-stride changes in ?(t) during weight transfer were identified by separating each stride into a single and double support phase. The intra-stride changes in ?(t) were also compared to changes in the variation of the gait kinematics, i.e., SD(t). The healthy older persons walked at the same preferred walking speed as the younger persons. However, they exhibited significantly larger ?(t) (p<0.001) during weight transfer in the double support phase. Local divergence was closely related to intra-stride changes in SD(t) of the feet in the anterior-posterior direction. Furthermore, a high correlation was found between local divergence and the variation in step length and step width for both older (R>0.67, p<0.05) and younger persons (R>0.67, p<0.05). The present results indicate that the gait kinematics of older adults are more dynamical unstable during the weight transfer compared to younger persons. Furthermore, a close relationship exists between intra-stride changes in dynamical stability and variation in step length and step width. Further work will validate the results of the present study using real-life perturbations of the gait kinematics of both younger and older adults. PMID:22541943

Ihlen, Espen A F; Sletvold, Olav; Goihl, Tobias; Wik, Per B; Vereijken, Beatrix; Helbostad, Jorunn

2012-06-01

316

Integrated data visualisation: an approach to capture older adults’ wellness  

PubMed Central

Informatics tools can help support the health and independence of older adults. In this paper, we present an approach towards integrating health-monitoring data and describe several techniques for the assessment and visualisation of integrated health and well-being of older adults. We present three different visualisation techniques to provide distinct alternatives towards display of the same information, focusing on reducing the cognitive load of data interpretation. We demonstrate the feasibility of integrating health-monitoring information into a comprehensive measure of wellness, while also highlighting the challenges of designing visual displays targeted at multiple user groups. These visual displays of wellness can be incorporated into personal health records and can be an effective support for informed decision-making. PMID:23079025

Wilamowska, Katarzyna; Demiris, George; Thompson, Hilaire

2013-01-01

317

Therapeutic environments for older adults: constituents and meanings.  

PubMed

This article presents the findings of a study that aimed to describe what constitutes therapeutic environments and interpret what it means to be in such environments for older adults. Interview and observational data collected in Swedish health care contexts were subjected to qualitative content analysis. The findings describe therapeutic environments as being constituted by three interacting and interwoven categories: the physical environment, people's doing and being in the environment, and an organizational philosophy of care. The findings are interpreted in light of the existential philosophy of home as a concept, a place, and an existential experience, highlighting that therapeutic environments can support existential at-homeness among patients. The findings of this study can contribute to nursing practice by providing a conceptual basis for reflecting on and evaluating how the physical environment, staff's doing and being, and the organizational philosophy of care cooperate to support well-being among older adults living in long-term care facilities. PMID:18561561

Edvardsson, David

2008-06-01

318

Promoting walking among older adults living in retirement communities.  

PubMed

The authors tested the feasibility and acceptability, and explored the outcomes, of 2 walking interventions based on ecological models among older adults living in retirement communities. An enhanced intervention (EI) was compared with a standard walking intervention (SI) among residents in 4 retirement facilities (N = 87 at baseline; mean age = 84.1 yr). All participants received a walking intervention including pedometers, printed materials, and biweekly group sessions. EI participants also received phone counseling and environmental-awareness components. Measures included pedometer step counts, activities of daily living, environment-related variables, physical function, depression, cognitive function, satisfaction, and adherence. Results indicated improvements among the total sample for step counts, neighborhood barriers, cognitive function, and satisfaction with walking opportunities. Satisfaction and adherence were high. Both walking interventions were feasible to implement among facility-dwelling older adults. Future studies can build on this multilevel approach. PMID:22186798

Rosenberg, Dori E; Kerr, Jacqueline; Sallis, James F; Norman, Gregory J; Calfas, Karen; Patrick, Kevin

2012-07-01

319

Medication Misadventures in Older Adults Literature From 2013  

PubMed Central

This is the second year that editors of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society have been gracious enough to allow us to compile the latest literature regarding medication misadventures (i.e., medication errors and adverse drug events) for its readers. As noted in some recent well written comprehensive reviews, medication errors due to suboptimal drug use continues to be very common in older adults.1–3 We believe that it is important to summarize this literature in a single place because it is very difficult to compile using standard literature search techniques as they often miss key studies. We hope you find these articles informative and useful in the conduct of high quality clinical research and care of older adults. PMID:25333528

Hanlon, Joseph T.; Semla, Todd P.; Schmader, Kenneth E.

2014-01-01

320

Factors that influence dental students' attitudes about older adults.  

PubMed

Our study considered dental students' general attitudes towards older persons using the Aging Semantic Differential. The influence of age, gender, cohort, education, and academic exposure on general attitudes towards older adults was evaluated using a total of 328 dental students across all four years of academic standing. Students were assessed in the fall and spring semesters. The results showed differential responding on the four subscales, with slight positive ratings on the autonomy, acceptability, and integrity subscales and a slight negative rating for instrumentality. Females expressed more negative attitudes than their male counterparts, with no age differences. There was also no significant impact from a specific, didactic educational component offered to the fourth-year students. However, the fourth-year students were the only group to show positive changes across the full academic year. The results suggest that general attitudes can be changed, but didactic (classroom) forms of education alone are insufficient to meaningfully modify students' perceptions of the elderly. Exposure to older adults in a clinical setting appears to be a critical element, as the fourth-year students received much greater exposure to older patients and more intensified interface with their mentors. PMID:19126770

Nochajski, Thomas H; Waldrop, Deborah P; Davis, Elaine L; Fabiano, Jude A; Goldberg, Louis J

2009-01-01

321

Prevalence and factors associated with frailty among Peruvian older adults.  

PubMed

The objective of this study is to examine the prevalence and factors associated with frailty in Peruvian Navy Veteran's older adults and family members. A total of 311 non-institutionalized men and women aged 60 years and older, from the Geriatrics Service of the Peruvian Navy Medical Center (Centro Médico Naval "Cirujano Mayor Santiago Távara") were assessed between May and October 2010. Frailty was defined as having two or more of the following components: (1) unintentional weight-loss, (2) weakness (lowest 20% in grip-strength), (3) self-reported exhaustion, and (4) slow walking speed (lowest 20% 8-m walk-time in seconds). Additionally, information on socio-demographic factors, medical conditions, depressive symptoms, disability, and cognitive function were obtained. Of the 311 participants, 78 (25.1%) were not frail, 147 (47.3%) were pre-frail, and 86 (27.8%) were frail. Using logistic regression analysis, we found that older age, being married, falls in the last year and disability were factors significantly associated with being frail. We conclude that prevalence of pre-frail and frail status in Peruvian Navy Veterans and family members is high. Our data reports risk factors for frailty that have been reported in the past in other population groups. A larger sample and longitudinal follow-up are needed to design and implement comprehensive geriatric interventions that can benefit Peruvian Navy Veteran's older adults at risk of becoming frail. PMID:23978328

Runzer-Colmenares, Fernando M; Samper-Ternent, Rafael; Al Snih, Soham; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J; Parodi, José F; Wong, Rebeca

2014-01-01

322

Prevalence and Factors Associated with Frailty Among Peruvian Older Adults  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study is to examine the prevalence and factors associated with frailty in Peruvian Navy Veteran's older adults and family members. A total of 311 non-institutionalized men and women aged 60 years and older, from the Geriatrics Service of the Peruvian Navy Medical Center (Centro Médico Naval “Cirujano Mayor Santiago Távara”) were assessed between May and October 2010. Frailty was defined as having two or more of the following components: 1) unintentional weight-loss, 2) weakness (lowest 20% in grip-strength), 3) self-reported exhaustion, and 4) slow walking speed (lowest 20% 8-meter walk-time in seconds). Additionally, information on socio-demographic factors, medical conditions, depressive symptoms, disability, and cognitive function were obtained. Of the 311 participants, 78 (25.1%) were not frail, 147 (47.3%) were pre-frail, and 86 (27.8%) were frail. Using logistic regression analysis, we found that older age, being married, falls in the last year and disability were factors significantly associated with being frail. We conclude that prevalence of pre-frail and frail status in Peruvian Navy Veterans and family members is high. Our data reports risk factors for frailty that have been reported in the past in other population groups. A larger sample and longitudinal follow-up are needed to design and implement comprehensive geriatric interventions that can benefit Peruvian Navy Veteran's older adults at risk of becoming frail. PMID:23978328

Runzer-Colmenares, Fernando M.; Samper-Ternent, Rafael; Snih, Soham Al; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.; Parodi, José F.; Wong, Rebeca

2013-01-01

323

Surrogate decision-making: judgment standard preferences of older adults.  

PubMed

This qualitative study examines the judgment standard preferences of older adults related to surrogate decision-making for medical treatment. Thirty community dwelling adults over the age of 60 were presented with scenarios that depicted three decision-making standards, two of which are the predominant legal standards (substituted judgment and best interests), and a proposed third standard that allows the surrogate to consider the interests of the family in the decision-making process (best judgment). Half of the sample preferred substituted judgment, five preferred best interests, and ten chose best judgment. Selected cases are presented that demonstrate the themes associated with each judgment standard preference. PMID:12959484

Moore, Crystal Dea; Sparr, Jennifer; Sherman, Susan; Avery, Lisa

2003-01-01

324

Physical Therapy Management of Select Rheumatic Conditions in Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Rheumatic diseases and their resultant musculoskeletal and cardiopulmonary impairments are primary conditions limiting activity\\u000a and function in older adults. Certain rheumatologic conditions such as polymyalgia rheumatica, degenerative spinal stenosis,\\u000a and osteoporosis occur later in life. Other conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis (OA), and ankylosing spondylitis\\u000a manifest at younger ages but their clinical manifestations may exacerbate with advancing age and

Maura Daly Iversen; Madhuri K. Kale

325

Evidence-Based Psychological Treatments for Insomnia in Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The review describes evidence-based psychological treatments (EBTs) for insomnia in older adults. Following coding procedures developed by the American Psychological Association's Committee on Science and Practice of the Society for Clinical Psychology, two treatments were found to meet EBT criteria: sleep restriction–sleep compression therapy and multicomponent cognitive–behavioral therapy. One additional treatment (stimulus control therapy) partially met criteria, but further corroborating

Susan M. McCurry; Rebecca G. Logsdon; Linda Teri; Michael V. Vitiello

2007-01-01

326

Predicting Treatment Response in Older Adults with Insomnia  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined potential predictors of treatment outcome in late-life insomnia. Fifty-four older adults with chronic insomnia were treated with cognitive–behavior therapy (CBT), pharmacotherapy (PCT), or combined CBT plus PCT. Pretreatment characteristics such as demographic, clinical, psychometric, and sleep variables were examined as correlates or potential predictors of treatment response. Treatment response was defined by posttreatment sleep efficiency as measured

Anouk Gagné; Charles M. Morin

2001-01-01

327

Evolving concepts of cardiovascular disease prevention in older adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in older adults. Clinical and subclinical disease increase\\u000a in prevalence with age and impose a significant burden on this population. Given the increase in absolute cardiovascular risk\\u000a with age, there is tremendous potential for benefit from primary and secondary cardiovascular disease preventive interventions\\u000a in the elderly. Recent clinical trials focusing

Ali Yazdanyar; Anne B. Newman

2009-01-01

328

Chapter 2 Lessons Learned on Forced Relocation of Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article is an exploratory-descriptive study of older adult public housing residents who were forcibly relocated from their homes when Hurricane Andrew struck Miami-Dade County in 1992. The subjects were all African Americans (N = 58) with a mean age of 67 years (S.D. = 9.8) who lived in economically depressed, low-income communities. Almost 70% were females. The subjects suffered

Sara Sanders; Stan L. Bowie; Yvonne Dias Bowie

2004-01-01

329

Part-Set Cuing Effects in Younger and Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 3 experiments, the authors examined part-set cuing effects in younger and older adults. Participants heard lists of category exemplars and later recalled them. Recall was uncued or cued with a subset of studied items. In Experiment 1, participants were cued with some of the category names, and they remembered fewer never-cued categories than a free-recall condition. In Experiment 2,

Elizabeth J. Marsh; Patrick O. Dolan; David A. Balota; Henry L. Roediger

2004-01-01

330

Directed forgetting of actions by younger and older adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Memory for actions that are performed is substantially better than memory for descriptions of actions (e.g., Earles, 1996).\\u000a In fact, people may form memories for actions even if they do not intend to or want to remember them. The directed forgetting\\u000a paradigm was used to test the ability of younger and older adults to intentionally forget simple actions (also known

Julie L. Earles; Alan W. Kersten

2002-01-01

331

Health Correlates of Recreational Gambling in Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Prior studies have found high rates of alcohol use and abuse\\/depen- dence, depression, bankruptcy, and incar- ceration associated with recreational gam- bling. Despite growing rates of recreational gambling in older adults, little is known re- garding its health correlates in this age group. The objective of this study was to identify health and well-being correlates of past-year recreational gambling

Rani A. Desai; Paul K. Maciejewski; David J. Dausey; Barbara J. Caldarone; Marc N. Potenza

2004-01-01

332

Quantification of postural stability in older adults using mobile technology.  

PubMed

Traditional biomechanical systems used to capture kinematic data have shown that declines in postural stability are frequently present in older adults and neurological populations. Recent advances in processor speed and measuring capabilities of on-board electronics within mobile devices present an opportunity to gather kinematic data and apply biomechanical analyses to potentially quantify postural stability. The aim of this project was to determine if the kinematic data gathered using a mobile device were of sufficient quantity and quality to characterize postural stability in older adults. Twelve healthy older adults completed six different balance conditions under altered surface, stance and vision. Simultaneous kinematic measurements were gathered from a three-dimensional motion analysis system and iPad during balance conditions. Correlation between the two systems was significant across balance conditions and outcome measures: peak-to-peak (r = 0.70-0.99), normalized path length (r = 0.64-0.98), root mean square (r = 0.73-0.99) of linear acceleration, 95 % volume (r = 0.96-0.99) of linear and angular acceleration and total power across different frequencies (r = 0.79-0.92). The mean absolute percentage error metric, used to evaluate time-series measurements point-by-point, indicated that when measuring linear and angular acceleration, the iPad tracked the motion analysis system with average error between 6 and 10 % of motion analysis measurements across all balance conditions. Collectively, similar accuracy with the iPad compared to motion capture suggests the sensors provide sufficient accuracy and quality for the quantification of postural stability in older adults. The objectivity, portability, and ease of use of this device make it ideal for use in clinical environments, which often lack biomechanical systems. PMID:25150554

Ozinga, Sarah J; Alberts, Jay L

2014-12-01

333

Antipsychotic drug use and mortality in older adults with dementia  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between treatment with antipsychotics (both conventional and atypical) and all-cause mortality.\\u000aDESIGN: Population-based, retrospective cohort study.\\u000aSETTING: Ontario, Canada.\\u000aPATIENTS: Older adults with dementia who were followed between 1 April 1997 and 31 March 2003.\\u000aMEASUREMENTS: The risk for death was determined at 30, 60, 120, and 180 days after the initial dispensing of antipsychotic

Sudeep S. Gill; Susan E. Bronskill; Sharon-Lise T. Normand; Geoffrey M. Anderson; Kathy Sykora; Kelvin Lam; Chaim M. Bell; Philip E. Lee; Hadas D. Fischer; Nathan Herrmann; Jerry H. Gurwitz; Paula A. Rochon

2007-01-01

334

Psychological Services for Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this chapter, we review the psychological needs and service provisions for older adults with an intellectual disability\\u000a (ID). The reader will be directed toward research that identifies an increasing longevity, concomitant increases in aging-related\\u000a morbidities, and psychosocial factors. Specific aging-related conditions will be discussed, along with their impact on functional\\u000a status and mental health, including a discussion of the

James P. Acquilano; Philip W. Davidson; Matthew P. Janicki

335

Intentional non-adherence to medications by older adults.  

PubMed

'The extent to which an individual's medication-taking behaviour and/or execution of lifestyle changes, corresponds with agreed recommendations from a healthcare provider', is a highly complex behaviour, defined as adherence. However, intentional non-adherence is regularly observed and results in negative outcomes for patients along with increased healthcare provision costs. Whilst this is a consistent issue amongst adults of all ages, the burden of chronic disease is greatest amongst older adults. As a result, the absolute prevalence of intentional non-adherence is increased in this population. This non-systematic review of intentional non-adherence to medication highlights the extent of the problem amongst older adults. It notes that age, per se, is not a contributory factor in intentionally non-adherent behaviours. Moreover, it describes the difference in methodology required to identify such behaviours in contrast to reports of non-adherence in general: the use of focus groups, semi-structured, one-to-one interviews and questionnaires as opposed to pill counts, electronic medication monitors and analysis of prescription refill rates. Using Leventhal's Common-Sense Model of Self-Regulation, it emphasizes six key factors that may contribute to intentional non-adherence amongst older adults: illness beliefs, the perceived risks (e.g. dependence, adverse effects), benefits and necessity of potential treatments, the patient-practitioner relationship, inter-current physical and mental illnesses, financial constraints and pharmaceutical/pharmacological issues (poly-pharmacy/regimen complexity). It describes the current evidence for each of these aspects and notes the paucity of data validating Leventhal's model in this regard. It also reports on interventions that may address these issues and explicitly acknowledges the lack of evidence-based interventions available to healthcare practitioners. As a result, it highlights five key areas that require urgent research amongst older adults: (1) the overlap between intentional and unintentional non-adherence, particularly amongst those who may be frail or isolated; (2) the potential correlation between symptomatic benefit and intentional vs. unintentional non-adherence to medication; (3) an evaluation of the source of prescribing (i.e. a long-standing provider vs. an acute episode of care) and the patient-prescriber relationship as determinants of intentional and unintentional non-adherence; (4) the decision-making processes leading to selective intentional non-adherence amongst older adults with multiple medical problems; and (5) the development and evaluation of interventions designed to reduce intentional non-adherence, specifically addressing each of the aspects listed above. PMID:24566876

Mukhtar, Omar; Weinman, John; Jackson, Stephen H D

2014-03-01

336

Enteral Nutrition for Older Adults in Healthcare Communities.  

PubMed

Older adults living in healthcare communities (HCCs) have multiple comorbidities and are at increased risk of malnutrition and unintended weight loss. Aging affects nearly every system as well as body composition and structure, causing physiological changes that can affect nutrition status. A significant percentage (56%) of residents who live in nursing facilities require extensive help to eat and have dental problems such as ill-fitting dentures, missing teeth, and swallowing problems, which can lead to inadequate caloric intake and unintended weight loss. Alzheimer disease or dementia is prevalent in both nursing facilities and in assisted living/residential care communities, where it affects 45% of older adults. In cognitively impaired residents, most tube feeding placements occur in the acute care setting and result in significant use of additional healthcare resources, along with high postinsertion mortality rates within 60 days of insertion. Nursing facilities receiving Medicare or Medicaid funding must abide by state and federal regulations and undergo rigorous surveys while balancing complex decisions related to initial placement of feeding tubes. Healthcare professionals must recognize the importance of establishing nutrition treatment goals that are resident centered and that respect the unique values and personal decisions of the older adult. Informed choice, resident-centered care decisions, and the review of living wills and/or advance directives are essential in the decision-making process. After enteral nutrition is started, healthcare practitioners must carefully review the physician's orders and administer and monitor the resident's tolerance, checking for potential complications. PMID:24964789

Posthauer, Mary Ellen; Dorner, Becky; Friedrich, Elizabeth K

2014-06-25

337

Reproducibility of peroneal motor nerve conduction measurement in older adults  

PubMed Central

Objective While neuropathy is common in the elderly, nerve conduction (NC) reproducibility in older adults is not well-established. We sought to evaluate intraobserver reproducibility of peroneal motor NC measures in a diverse sample of older adults. Methods We measured peroneal motor NC amplitude and velocity in a subset of participants (mean age=82.9 ± 2.7, n=62, 50% female, 51.6% black, 35.5% DM) in the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study. Using coefficients of variation (CVs), intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), and Bland Altman Plots, we compared two sets of measurements taken by the same examiner hours apart on the same day. Results Low CVs (2.15–4.24%) and moderate to high ICCs (0.75–0.99) were observed. No systematic variation was found across measures. Despite small numbers in some subgroups, we found no differences in reproducibility by diabetes, race, or study site. Conclusion NC measures have moderate to high intraobsever reproducibility in older adults and are not affected by diabetes, race, or gender. Significance These data provide evidence to support use of these measures in aging research. PMID:23022036

Ward, Rachel E.; Boudreau, Robert M.; Vinik, Aaron I.; Zivkovic, Sasa A.; Njajou, Omer T.; Satterfield, Suzanne; Harris, Tamara B.; Newman, Anne B.; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.

2012-01-01

338

Usability of touch-panel interfaces for older adults.  

PubMed

The usability of a touch-panel interface was compared among young, middle-aged, and older adults. In addition, a performance model of a touch panel was developed so that pointing time could be predicted with higher accuracy. Moreover, the target location to which a participant could point most quickly was determined. The pointing time with a PC mouse was longer for the older adults than for the other age groups, whereas there were no significant differences in pointing time among the three age groups when a touch-panel interface was used. Pointing to the center of a square target led to the fastest pointing time among nine target locations. Based on these results, we offer some guidelines for the design of touch-panel interfaces and show implications for users of different age groups. Actual or potential applications of this research include designing touch-panel interfaces to make them accessible for older adults and predicting movement times when users operate such devices. PMID:16553065

Murata, Atsuo; Iwase, Hirokazu

2005-01-01

339

Differences in perceived autonomy among American and Japanese older adults.  

PubMed

Perceived autonomy refers to perceived personal self-governance, or rather that a person feels free from external constraint to determine his or her own actions and behaviors. This study examined perceived autonomy among community-dwelling older adults residing in New York City and West Japan. A cross-sectional design was adopted using self-reports from 340 older adults (n = 220 Japanese, n = 120 Americans) recruited from senior centers. Perceived autonomy was quantified with the Hertz Perceived Enactment of Autonomy Scale (HPEAS), which includes three subscales: voluntariness, individuality, and self-direction. Compared to American respondents, more Japanese respondents were male (67.7% vs. 40.8%), more likely to live with others (78% vs. 25.7%), reported lower perceived autonomy (86.9 vs. 109.5), and scored lower on all three subscales of the HPEAS. Despite significant differences in perceived autonomy, a sociocultural factor such as social support was identified as an important factor for older adults in both groups. PMID:24529389

Matsui, Miho; Capezuti, Elizabeth

2014-05-01

340

Dimensions of self-rated health in older adults  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To analyze the association between negative self-rated health and indicators of health, wellbeing and sociodemographic variables in older adults. METHODS Cross-sectional study that used data from a population-based health survey with a probability cluster sample that was carried out in Campinas, SP, Southeastern Brazil,, in 2008 and 2009. The participants were older adults (? 60 years) and the dependent variable was self-rated health, categorized as: excellent, very good, good, bad and very bad. The adjusted prevalence ratios were estimated by means of Poisson multiple regression. RESULTS The highest prevalences of bad/very bad self-rated health were observed in the individuals who never attended school, in those with lower level of schooling, with monthly per capita family income lower than one minimum salary. Individuals who scored five or more in the physical health indicator also had bad self-rated health, as well as those who scored five or more in the Self-Reporting Questionnaire 20 and those who did not refer feeling happiness all the time. CONCLUSIONS The independent effects of material life conditions, physical and mental health and subjective wellbeing, observed in self-rated health, suggest that older adults can benefit by health policies supported by a global and integrative view of old age. PMID:25372161

Borim, Flávia Silva Arbex; Neri, Anita Liberalesso; Francisco, Priscila Maria Stolses Bergamo; Barros, Marilisa Berti de Azevedo

2014-01-01

341

Sleep Discrepancy, Sleep Complaint, and Poor Sleep Among Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Objectives. Discrepancy between self-report- and actigraphy-measured sleep, often considered an artifact of measurement error, has been well documented among insomnia patients. Sleep problems are common among older adults, and this discrepancy may represent meaningful sleep-related phenomenon, which could have clinical and research significance. Method. Sleep discrepancy was examined in 4 groups of older adults (N = 152, mean age = 71.93 years) based on sleep complaint versus no complaint and presence versus absence of insomnia symptoms. Participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory-second edition (BDI-II) and 14 nights of sleep diaries and actigraphy. Results. Controlling for covariates, group differences were found in the duration and frequency of discrepancy in sleep onset latency (SOLd) and wake after sleep onset (WASOd). Those with insomnia symptoms and complaints reported greater duration and frequency of WASOd than the other 3 groups. Quantities of SOLd and WASOd were related to BDI-II score and group status, indicating that sleep discrepancy has meaningful clinical correlates. Discussion. Discrepancy occurred across all groups but was pronounced among the group with both insomnia symptoms and complaints. This discrepancy may provide a means of quantifying and conceptualizing the transition from wake to sleep among older adults, particularly those with sleeping problems. PMID:23804432

2013-01-01

342

Cognitive benefits of computer games for older adults.  

PubMed

The purpose of this paper is to develop a basis for the hypothesis that digital action games may produce cognitive benefits for older adults. First, a discussion of the relationship between cognitive and physical health shows the increasing weight given to the role of declines in cognition in the development of dependency in older adult population studies. Second, evidence that cognitive training produces 'far transfer' in elders is presented. The key issue is that one approach, known as extended practice training, has been successful in producing far transfer to memory and other processes. Its principles, which are consistent with those associated with positive brain plasticity effects, are identified. Those principles are then related to the mechanics of digital action games, which also have the important added feature of producing the experiences of presence, engagement, and flow, the subjective elements of game play that are likely to sustain interest and emotional investment in the skills practiced so that the play produces cognitive benefits. The specific cognitive abilities proposed to be improved by different types of game genres are outlined, and recent developments in game and interface design that may affect the willingness of older adults to play are described. PMID:25126043

Zelinski, Elizabeth M; Reyes, Ricardo

2009-01-01

343

Cognitive benefits of computer games for older adults  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this paper is to develop a basis for the hypothesis that digital action games may produce cognitive benefits for older adults. First, a discussion of the relationship between cognitive and physical health shows the increasing weight given to the role of declines in cognition in the development of dependency in older adult population studies. Second, evidence that cognitive training produces ‘far transfer’ in elders is presented. The key issue is that one approach, known as extended practice training, has been successful in producing far transfer to memory and other processes. Its principles, which are consistent with those associated with positive brain plasticity effects, are identified. Those principles are then related to the mechanics of digital action games, which also have the important added feature of producing the experiences of presence, engagement, and flow, the subjective elements of game play that are likely to sustain interest and emotional investment in the skills practiced so that the play produces cognitive benefits. The specific cognitive abilities proposed to be improved by different types of game genres are outlined, and recent developments in game and interface design that may affect the willingness of older adults to play are described. PMID:25126043

Zelinski, Elizabeth M.; Reyes, Ricardo

2010-01-01

344

Productive engagement in older adults: a concept analysis.  

PubMed

This study aimed to clarify the concept of productive engagement as it applies to older adults. The concept analysis was based on Walker and Avant's eight-step method. A literature review of articles published in English between 1990 and 2011 (n?=?37) was conducted, using an electronic search of multiple sources. Results revealed that four defining attributes for productive engagement include continuing to work either paid or unpaid, caring for others, engaging in social activities, and growing spirituality. The antecedents of productive engagement are sociocultural factors as well as individual and institutional capacities. Meanwhile, the consequences are increased feelings of usefulness, improved health and well-being, aged successfully, and enhanced quality of life. Model, borderline, and contrary cases are presented to illustrate the concept's defining attributes. Defining the concept of productive engagement provides a basis for nurses and other health professionals to better understand productive engagement in older adults, thus effective strategic plans or programs for promoting productive roles among older adults can be further developed. PMID:23320736

Thanakwang, Kattika; Isaramalai, Sang-Arun

2013-03-01

345

Literacy of Older Adults in America. Results from the National Adult Literacy Survey.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 1992 National Adult Literacy Survey (NALS) examined three types of literacy--prose, document, and quantitative--among the entire older adult population and various subgroups thereof. Of the nationally representative sample of 26,091 adults interviewed during the NALS, 2,267 were aged 60-69, 1,005 were aged 70-79, and 442 were at least 80 years…

Brown, Helen; And Others

346

What do older adults seek in their potential romantic partners? Evidence from online personal ads.  

PubMed

Because of the dearth of available partners, older women looking to date may have to relax their dating standards to find a dating partner, perhaps accepting a life situation that is not what they had hoped for. However older women may be reluctant to sacrifice an often recently-gained lifestyle free of caregiving obligations. Older men, on the other hand, have a large pool of potential dating partners and do not face the same dilemma. We compared Internet dating profiles for 100 older adults and 100 younger adults, and found that older adults (and especially older women) were more selective than younger adults when it came to the age, race, religion, income, and height of a prospective dating partner. However, older adults were willing to travel substantially farther than younger adults to meet the right partner. These findings paint a clear picture of older Internet daters as eager to meet the right person, but not desperate to meet just anyone. PMID:21391407

William, D McIntosh; Locker, Lawrence; Briley, Katherine; Ryan, Rebecca; Scott, Alison J

2011-01-01

347

Community-dwelling Adults Versus Older Adults: Psychopathology and the Continuum Hypothesis  

PubMed Central

Little empirical evidence is available on older adults regarding the existence of a continuum between “normal” personality traits and DSM-IV-TR Axes I and II disorders (American Psychiatric Association, 2000). Given the typical complexity of clinical presentations in advanced age, it is feasible to expect a dimensional conceptualization of psychopathology to apply to older adults. In this pilot investigation, we first tested age differences in psychopathology, upholding the view that older adults should be considered separately from younger individuals in research on psychopathology. Then, in support of the dimensional approach, we tested the hypothesized continuity between normality and psychopathology by verifying the fulfillment of two operational criteria of continuity. A non-clinical sample of 100 Italian respondents was divided into two groups (50 people per group, 25 women and 25 men), aged 25–64 and 65–84, respectively. The instruments used were a measure of normal personality, SFERAS (Boncori & Barruffi, 2004) and one of Axes I and II psychopathology, TALEIA-400A (Boncori, 2007). MANOVA analyses demonstrated a significant effect on both measures, with older adults achieving higher Axis I scores and higher scores on normal personality traits connected to anxiety. The continuum hypothesis was confirmed on older and younger adults through correlational analyses that verified the fulfillment of both continuity criteria. Our results show that Italian older adults differ significantly in psychopathology from younger individuals; however, contrary to findings from other countries, in a negative direction. The continuity results (although in need of replication with larger samples, utilizing statistical methods better suited for these analyses, such as taxometric procedures) offer preliminary support for the notion that the dimensional approach to psychopathology could work well in older age. PMID:25419037

Lagana, Luciana; Tramutolo, C.; Boncori, L.; Cruciani, A.C.

2014-01-01

348

Oh, Honey, I Already Forgot That: Strategic Control of Directed Forgetting in Older and Younger Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two experiments investigated list-method directed forgetting with older and younger adults. Using standard directed forgetting instructions, significant forgetting was obtained with younger but not older adults. However, in Experiment 1 older adults showed forgetting with an experimenter-provided strategy that induced a mental context change—specifically, engaging in diversionary thought. Experiment 2 showed that age-related differences in directed forgetting occurred because older

Lili Sahakyan; Peter F. Delaney; Leilani B. Goodmon

2008-01-01

349

Risk Aversion Among Depressed Older Adults with Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite considerable research on depression in older adults, few studies have included individuals with personality disorders\\u000a or have used laboratory tasks to examine behavioral correlates of depression among older adults. This study used the Bechara\\u000a Gambling Task to examine the hypothesis that depressed older adults with co-morbid personality disorders (n = 59) would demonstrate greater aversion to risk, when compared with older

Alexander L. Chapman; Thomas R. Lynch; M. Zachary Rosenthal; Jennifer S. Cheavens; Moria J. Smoski; K. Ranga Rama Krishnan

2007-01-01

350

Understanding older adults' usage of community green spaces in Taipei, Taiwan.  

PubMed

As the world's population ages, there is an increasing need for community environments to support physical activity and social connections for older adults. This exploratory study sought to better understand older adults' usage and perceptions of community green spaces in Taipei, Taiwan, through direct observations of seven green spaces and nineteen structured interviews. Descriptive statistics from observations using the System for Observing Play and Recreation in Communities (SOPARC) confirm that older adults use Taipei's parks extensively. Our analyses of interviews support the following recommendations for age-friendly active living initiatives for older adults: make green spaces accessible to older adults; organize a variety of structured activities that appeal to older adults particularly in the morning; equip green spaces for age-appropriate physical activity; and, promote the health advantages of green spaces to older adults. PMID:24473116

Pleson, Eryn; Nieuwendyk, Laura M; Lee, Karen K; Chaddah, Anuradha; Nykiforuk, Candace I J; Schopflocher, Donald

2014-02-01

351

Understanding Older Adults’ Usage of Community Green Spaces in Taipei, Taiwan  

PubMed Central

As the world’s population ages, there is an increasing need for community environments to support physical activity and social connections for older adults. This exploratory study sought to better understand older adults’ usage and perceptions of community green spaces in Taipei, Taiwan, through direct observations of seven green spaces and nineteen structured interviews. Descriptive statistics from observations using the System for Observing Play and Recreation in Communities (SOPARC) confirm that older adults use Taipei’s parks extensively. Our analyses of interviews support the following recommendations for age-friendly active living initiatives for older adults: make green spaces accessible to older adults; organize a variety of structured activities that appeal to older adults particularly in the morning; equip green spaces for age-appropriate physical activity; and, promote the health advantages of green spaces to older adults. PMID:24473116

Pleson, Eryn; Nieuwendyk, Laura M.; Lee, Karen K.; Chaddah, Anuradha; Nykiforuk, Candace I. J.; Schopflocher, Donald

2014-01-01

352

What do IPAQ questions mean to older adults? Lessons from cognitive interviews  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Most questionnaires used for physical activity (PA) surveillance have been developed for adults aged ?65 years. Given the health benefits of PA for older adults and the aging of the population, it is important to include adults aged 65+ years in PA surveillance. However, few studies have examined how well older adults understand PA surveillance questionnaires. This study aimed

Kristiann C Heesch; Jannique GZ van Uffelen; Robert L Hill; Wendy J Brown

2010-01-01

353

Economic determinants of diet in older adults: systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background and aims Many economic factors are associated with diet, yet the evidence is generally cross-sectional. Older people are considered especially vulnerable to poor diets from negative changes to varied economic factors. This review extends current knowledge on known correlates to decipher actual economic determinants of diet in older adults. Methods Eight bibliometric databases were searched between May and December 2012, supplemented by hand-searches, with no restrictions on publication date or country. Longitudinal studies, or reviews, were eligible when examining diet as a function of change in an economic factor in non-institutionalised adults ?60?years. Data were extracted using a standardised evidence table and quality assessed before narrative synthesis. Results We found nine original studies for inclusion, of which eight examined change from work to retirement and one evaluated a food price intervention. Designs were generally pre-post without controls and varying in follow-up. Studies reported mixed impact on food spending and/or food intake. Retirement was shown to both reduce and have no impact on food spending and to have either positive and negative, or positive and no impact on food intake. Subgroup differences were observed, especially between men and women. Conclusions Despite ample research on economic correlates of older adults' diets, little is still known about actual economic determinants of diet in this population. Studies of retirement suggest divergent effects in some but not all older people. Robust high-quality longitudinal studies to decipher economic drivers of diet must be prioritised in research and policy as firm conclusions remain elusive. PMID:23761410

Conklin, Annalijn I; Maguire, Eva R; Monsivais, Pablo

2013-01-01

354

Hospitalization of older adults due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To analyze the temporal evolution of the hospitalization of older adults due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions according to their structure, magnitude and causes. METHODS Cross-sectional study based on data from the Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Unified Health System and from the Primary Care Information System, referring to people aged 60 to 74 years living in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Souhteastern Brazil. The proportion and rate of hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions were calculated, both the global rate and, according to diagnoses, the most prevalent ones. The coverage of the Family Health Strategy and the number of medical consultations attended by older adults in primary care were estimated. To analyze the indicators’ impact on hospitalizations, a linear correlation test was used. RESULTS We found an intense reduction in hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions for all causes and age groups. Heart failure, cerebrovascular diseases and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases concentrated 50.0% of the hospitalizations. Adults older than 69 years had a higher risk of hospitalization due to one of these causes. We observed a higher risk of hospitalization among men. A negative correlation was found between the hospitalizations and the indicators of access to primary care. CONCLUSIONS Primary healthcare in the state of Rio de Janeiro has been significantly impacting the hospital morbidity of the older population. Studies of hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions can aid the identification of the main causes that are sensitive to the intervention of the health services, in order to indicate which actions are more effective to reduce hospitalizations and to increase the population’s quality of life. PMID:25372173

Marques, Aline Pinto; Montilla, Dalia Elena Romero; de Almeida, Wanessa da Silva; de Andrade, Carla Lourenço Tavares

2014-01-01

355

Home-Delivered Meals and Nutrition Status Among Older Adults.  

PubMed

The trend among older adults in the United States is to "age in place" instead of opting for institutionalization. To maintain older adults with chronic conditions in their homes and to improve health after hospitalization, comprehensive social, health, and nutrition services are essential. Quality of dietary intake is crucial and yet often underestimated. Calorie needs decrease with age while nutrient needs remain the same, even increasing for some nutrients. This poses difficulties for individuals with functional disabilities who are unable to shop and cook due to physical or mental limitations or on a limited budget. The Older American Act home-delivered meal (HDM) program offers at least 1 healthy meal per day, 5 or more days per week, and targets individuals homebound due to illness, disability, or social isolation and those with greatest economic or social need. This review summarizes the available literature on the relationship between HDM and health outcomes. The HDM program is difficult to evaluate because of the multifactorial effect on health status. However, national surveys and smaller studies show that it is well targeted, efficient, and well liked; provides quality food to needy individuals; and helps individuals remain living independently. Studies show that HDMs improve dietary intake, with greater health benefits when more meals reach the neediest individuals. HDMs also decrease institutionalization of older adults and resulting healthcare expenditures. However, funding has not kept up with increased demand for this program. More studies with improved designs may provide more information supporting the program's impact on nutrition status and decreased health expenditures. PMID:25030738

Sahyoun, Nadine R; Vaudin, Anna

2014-06-01

356

Functional Language Networks in Sedentary and Physically Active Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have identified consistent age-related changes during various cognitive tasks, such that older individuals display more positive and less negative task-related activity than young adults. Recently, evidence shows that chronic physical exercise may alter aging-related changes in brain activity; however, the effect of exercise has not been studied for the neural substrates of language function. Additionally, the potential mechanisms by which aging alters neural recruitment remain understudied. To address these points, the present study enrolled elderly adults who were either sedentary or physically active to characterize the neural correlates of language function during semantic fluency between these groups in comparison to a young adult sample. Participants underwent fMRI during semantic fluency and transcranial magnetic stimulation to collect the ipsilateral silent period, a measure of interhemispheric inhibition. Results indicated that sedentary older adults displayed reductions in negative task-related activity compared to the active old group in areas of the attention network. Longer interhemispheric inhibition was associated with more negative task-related activity in the right and left posterior perisylvian cortex, suggesting that sedentary aging may result in losses in task facilitatory cortical inhibition. However, these losses may be mitigated by regular engagement in physical exercise. PMID:23458438

Zlatar, Zvinka Z.; Towler, Stephen; McGregor, Keith M.; Dzierzewski, Joseph M.; Bauer, Andrew; Phan, Stephanie; Cohen, Matthew; Marsiske, Michael; Manini, Todd M.; Crosson, Bruce

2013-01-01

357

Older Adults’ Training Preferences for Learning to Use Technology  

PubMed Central

Older adults may benefit from using technology in their everyday lives. However, adults over 65 may need more training than their younger counterparts given they have had less experience with technology. In this study, 113 adults between the ages of 65 and 85 participated in focus group interviews discussing their training needs and preferences for technology items used in the home. Participants expressed an interest in receiving additional training, particularly for specific tasks. Participants also discussed preferences for various characteristics of training, such as who should conduct the training and for their preferred method of training. One of the most frequently discussed preferences was for self-training using text materials, such as a manual. PMID:25309139

Mitzner, Tracy L.; Fausset, Cara Bailey; Boron, Julie B.; Adams, Anne E.; Dijkstra, Katinka; Lee, Chin Chin; Rogers, Wendy A.; Fisk, Arthur D.

2014-01-01

358

Older LGBT adult training panels: an opportunity to educate about issues faced by the older LGBT community.  

PubMed

Older lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) adults face unique issues that can impede their well-being. Although many advances have helped address these issues, there is a need for education efforts that raise awareness of service providers about these issues. This study explores evaluation data of training panels provided by older LGBT adults and the views of training participants on issues faced by the older LGBT community after attending the panels. Participants were 605 students and professionals from over 34 education and communication settings. Implications for trainings on participants and older LGBT trainers are discussed. PMID:23905835

Rogers, Anissa; Rebbe, Rebecca; Gardella, Chanel; Worlein, Mary; Chamberlin, Mya

2013-01-01

359

Older Adults’ Perspectives on Successful Aging: Qualitative Interviews  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES Lay perceptions of “successful aging” are important for understanding this multifaceted construct and developing ways to assist older adults to age well. The purpose of this qualitative study was to obtain older adults’ individual perspectives on what constitutes successful aging, along with their views regarding activities and interventions to enhance its likelihood. METHODS Qualitative interviews were conducted with 22 community-dwelling adults over age 60. Participants were recruited from retirement communities, a low-income senior housing complex, and a continued learning center in San Diego County. Interview transcripts were analyzed using a “Coding Consensus, Co-occurrence, and Comparison” grounded theory framework. RESULTS The mean age of participants was 80 years (range: 64 to 96), with 59% being women. Two primary themes were identified as key to successful aging - i.e., self-acceptance/self-contentment (with sub-themes of realistic self-appraisal, a review of one’s life, and focusing on the present) and engagement with life/self-growth (with sub-themes of novel pursuits, giving to others, social interactions, and positive attitude). A balance between these two constructs appeared critical. A need for interventions that address support systems and personally tailored information to make informed decisions and enhance coping strategies were also emphasized. CONCLUSIONS Older adults viewed successful aging as a balance between self-acceptance and self-contentedness on one hand and engagement with life and self-growth in later life on the other. This perspective supports the concept of wisdom as a major contributor to successful aging. Interventions to enhance successful aging may include those that promote productive and social engagement along with effective coping strategies. PMID:20593536

Reichstadt, Jennifer; Sengupta, Geetika; Depp, Colin A.; Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Jeste, Dilip V.

2010-01-01

360

Olfactory Dysfunction Predicts 5-Year Mortality in Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Prediction of mortality has focused on disease and frailty, although antecedent biomarkers may herald broad physiological decline. Olfaction, an ancestral chemical system, is a strong candidate biomarker because it is linked to diverse physiological processes. We sought to determine if olfactory dysfunction is a harbinger of 5-year mortality in the National Social Life, Health and Aging Project [NSHAP], a nationally representative sample of older U.S. adults. 3,005 community-dwelling adults aged 57–85 were studied in 2005–6 (Wave 1) and their mortality determined in 2010–11 (Wave 2). Olfactory dysfunction, determined objectively at Wave 1, was used to estimate the odds of 5-year, all cause mortality via logistic regression, controlling for demographics and health factors. Mortality for anosmic older adults was four times that of normosmic individuals while hyposmic individuals had intermediate mortality (p<0.001), a “dose-dependent” effect present across the age range. In a comprehensive model that included potential confounding factors, anosmic older adults had over three times the odds of death compared to normosmic individuals (OR, 3.37 [95%CI 2.04, 5.57]), higher than and independent of known leading causes of death, and did not result from the following mechanisms: nutrition, cognitive function, mental health, smoking and alcohol abuse or frailty. Olfactory function is thus one of the strongest predictors of 5-year mortality and may serve as a bellwether for slowed cellular regeneration or as a marker of cumulative toxic environmental exposures. This finding provides clues for pinpointing an underlying mechanism related to a fundamental component of the aging process. PMID:25271633

Pinto, Jayant M.; Wroblewski, Kristen E.; Kern, David W.; Schumm, L. Philip; McClintock, Martha K.

2014-01-01

361

Virtual Visits in Home Health Care for Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Background. This review identifies the content of virtual visits in community nursing services to older adults and explores the manner in which service users and the nurses use virtual visits. Design. An integrative literature review. Method. Data collection comprised a literature search in three databases: Cinahl, Medline, and PubMed. In addition, a manual search of reference lists and expert consultation were performed. A total of 12 articles met the inclusion criteria. The articles were reviewed in terms of study characteristics, service content and utilization, and patient and health care provider experience. Results. Our review shows that in most studies the service is delivered on a daily basis and in combination with in-person visits. The findings suggest that older home-dwelling patients can benefit from virtual visits in terms of enhanced social inclusion and medication compliance. Service users and their nurses found virtual visits satisfactory and suitable for care delivery in home care to the elderly. Evidence for cost-saving benefits of virtual visits was not found. Conclusions. The findings can inform the planning of virtual visits in home health care as a complementary service to in-person visits, in order to meet the increasingly complex needs of older adults living at home. PMID:25506616

Husebø, Anne Marie Lunde

2014-01-01

362

Does mood state change risk taking tendency in older adults?  

PubMed

No study has been conducted to evaluate the influences of age differences on specific moods for risk taking tendencies. This study examined the patterns of risk taking tendencies among younger and older persons in 3 transient affective states: positive, neutral, and negative moods. By means of viewing happy, neutral, or sad movie clips, participants were induced to the respective mood. Risk taking tendencies were measured with decision tasks modified from the Choice Dilemmas Questionnaire (N. Kogan & M. A. Wallach, 1964). Consistent with the affect infusion model (J. P. Forgas, 1995), risk taking tendency was greater for those individuals who were in a happy mood than for those who were in a sad mood, for both young and older participants. However, an asymmetrical effect of positive and negative mood on risk taking tendency was identified among both the young and older participants, but in opposite directions. These results are consistent with the predictions of the negativity bias and the positivity effect found in young and older adults, respectively, and are interpreted via information processing and motivation effects of mood on the decision maker. PMID:17563186

Chou, Kee-Lee; Lee, Tatia M C; Ho, Andy H Y

2007-06-01

363

Positive Side Effects of a Job-Related Training Program for Older Adults in South Korea  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of the current study was to evaluate empirically positive side effects of a job-related training program on older adults' self-esteem, depression, and social networks. A total of 70 older adults participated in the study after completing the Older Paraprofessional Training Program developed and provided by the Continuing Education…

Lee, Minhong; Choi, Jae-Sung

2012-01-01

364

Crisis Model for Older Adults: Special Considerations for an Aging Population  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As the U.S. population ages, counselors must begin structuring their interactions to meet the unique needs of older adults, especially in the area of crisis intervention. The purposes of this article are to draw attention to the rapidly growing, often disregarded older population and to introduce the Crisis Model for Older Adults (CM-OA), an…

Jungers, Christin M.; Slagel, Leslie

2009-01-01

365

Concepts and Causation of Depression: A Cross-Cultural Study of the Beliefs of Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: This U.K. study explored how older adults with depression (treated and untreated) and the general older population conceptualize depression. A multicultural approach was used that incorporated the perspectives of Black Caribbean, South Asian, and White British older adults. The study sought to explore and compare beliefs about the nature…

Lawrence, Vanessa; Murray, Joanna; Banerjee, Sube; Turner, Sara; Sangha, Kuljeet; Byng, Richard; Bhurgra, Dinesh; Huxley, Peter; Tylee, Andre; Macdonald, Alastair

2006-01-01

366

Improving aerobic capacity in healthy older adults does not necessarily lead to improved cognitive performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of aerobic exercise training in a sample of 85 older adults were investigated. Ss were assigned randomly to either an aerobic exercise group, a nonaerobic exercise (yoga) group, or a waiting-list control group. Following 16 weeks of the group-specific protocol, all of the older Ss received 16 weeks of aerobic exercise training. The older adults demonstrated a significant

David J. Madden; James A. Blumenthal; Philip A. Allen; Charles F. Emery

1989-01-01

367

The Meaning of the Learning Experiences of Older Adults in Hong Kong  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article discusses the themes that emerged from qualitative research exploring the meaning that Chinese older adults find in their learning experiences in Hong Kong. In-depth interviewing was used to solicit information from older learners taking courses in elderly centers or units. Four themes were identified: (a) older adults as learners,…

Fok, Shiu-yeu

2010-01-01

368

Older Adults in Nursing Homes: Assessing Relationships Between Multiple Constructs of Social Integration, Facility Characteristics, and Health  

E-print Network

An extensive body of research has examined connections between older adults' social worlds and health and well-being, particularly for community-dwelling older adults. Yet, little is known about the social worlds of older ...

Leedahl, Skye N.

2013-05-31

369

Occupational therapy and driving and community mobility for older adults.  

PubMed

This special issue of the American Journal of Occupational Therapy includes summaries from a systematic evidence-based literature review of occupational therapy and driving and community mobility for older adults. Since the previous review on this topic in 2008, the cohort of 78 million baby boomers began turning 65 in January 2011. As a group, this cohort is more likely to have longer life expectancy, stay in the workforce longer, and age in place in the community. Is the occupational therapy profession ready for the potential demand for driving rehabilitation services from this generation of older drivers who grew up with the automobile and are dependent on it for access to and participation in their communities? PMID:25397759

Golisz, Kathleen

2014-01-01

370

White matter microstructural organization and gait stability in older adults  

PubMed Central

Understanding age-related decline in gait stability and the role of alterations in brain structure is crucial. Here, we studied the relationship between white matter microstructural organization using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and advanced gait stability measures in 15 healthy young adults (range 18–30 years) and 25 healthy older adults (range 62–82 years). Among the different gait stability measures, only stride time and the maximum Lyapunov exponent (which quantifies how well participants are able to attenuate small perturbations) were found to decline with age. White matter microstructural organization (FA) was lower throughout the brain in older adults. We found a strong correlation between FA in the left anterior thalamic radiation and left corticospinal tract on the one hand, and step width and safety margin (indicative of how close participants are to falling over) on the other. These findings suggest that white matter FA in tracts connecting subcortical and prefrontal areas is associated with the implementation of an effective stabilization strategy during gait. PMID:24959139

Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Van Impe, Annouchka; Duysens, Jacques; Swinnen, Stephan P.

2014-01-01

371

Social capital and health among older adults in South Africa  

PubMed Central

Background Little is known about social capital and health among older adults in South Africa. This study investigates the association between social capital and several health variables, namely: self-rated health, depressive symptoms, cognitive functioning and physical inactivity, among older South Africans. Methods We conducted a national population-based cross-sectional study with a national probability sample of 3840 individuals aged 50 years or older who participated in the Study of Global Ageing and Adults Health (SAGE wave 1) in 2008 in South Africa. Measures included socio-demographic characteristics, health variables, cognitive functioning and physical activity. Social capital was assessed with six components, namely: marital status, social action, sociability, trust and solidarity, safety, and civic engagement. Results The social capital assessment revealed that 56% of the respondents were married or cohabiting, 45% reported low (0) social action, 42% reported medium (2–3) sociability, 43% reported high (2) trust and solidarity, 50% reported high (2–4) civic engagement and 42% reported medium (6) psychological resources. In multivariate analysis, self-reported good health was associated with younger age, having secondary education and higher social capital (being married or cohabiting, high trust and solidarity and greater psychological resources). Depressive symptoms were associated with lower social capital (not being married or cohabiting, lack of high trust and solidarity and low psychological resources). Better cognitive functioning was associated with younger age, higher educational level, greater wealth and higher social capital (being married or cohabiting, high trust and solidarity, lack of safety, higher civic engagement and greater psychological resources). Physical inactivity was associated with older age and lower social capital (lower social action, lack of safety, lower civic engagement and poorer psychological resources). Conclusions Given the basis of these findings on cross sectional data and subsequent limitation, it was found that these study findings mimic the findings of many European and American studies. Social capital among the elderly generation in South Africa is imperative for better health. PMID:24073666

2013-01-01

372

Nondrug therapies for pain management among rural older adults.  

PubMed

This quasiexperimental two-group pilot study tested an intervention aimed at educating older adults in rural communities about the appropriate use of nondrug treatments for pain. Earlier data reveal that older adults use significantly less nonpharmacologic modalities than their younger counterparts, and that pain self-treatment is prevalent in rural areas. Individuals aged ?60 years who experienced pain in the preceding 2 weeks were recruited from rural Midwestern communities through the use of flyers and information sessions at hospitals, churches, and community organizations. Upon enrollment, participants selected a date for an educational session, which was randomized to the experimental or control condition. All participants (n = 53) completed a series of questionnaires (Brief Pain Inventory, Symptom Distress Scale, Perceived Control Scale) at the initial educational session (T1) and at a two-week follow-up session (T2). Participants in the control and experimental groups attended a 30-minute educational session on safe use of over-the-counter medications; the experimental group also received an additional 30-minute session on safe and effective use of heat, cold, and relaxation breathing. Hot and cold packs and relaxation breathing instruction were provided for use over the 2-week period. There was a significant increase in the use of all nondrug treatments and a decrease in pain-related distress and current pain scores in the experimental group compared with the control group. This study informs nurses and other health care providers on the value of education for use of nondrug therapies in conjunction with pharmacologic pain management among rural older adults. PMID:21620309

Fouladbakhsh, Judith M; Szczesny, Susan; Jenuwine, Elisabeth S; Vallerand, April H

2011-06-01

373

Oral Health Self-Care Behaviors of Rural Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Objectives This analysis describes the dental self-care behaviors used by a multi-ethnic sample of older adults, and it delineates the associations of self-care behaviors with personal characteristics and oral health problems. Methods A cross-sectional comprehensive oral health survey conducted with a random, multi-ethnic (African American, American Indian, white) sample of 635 community-dwelling rural adults aged 60 years and older was completed in two rural southern counties. Results Rural older adults engage in a variety of self-care behaviors, including the use of Over-the-Counter (OTC) Medicine (12.1%), OTC Dental Products (84.3%), Salt (51.0%), Prayer (6.1%), and Complementary Therapies (18.2%). Some gender and ethnic class differences are apparent, with greater use by women of OTC Medicine and Salt, and greater use by African Americans and American Indians of OTC Medicine and OTC Dental Products. Use of dental self-care behaviors appears to be driven by need. Those reporting oral pain, bleeding gums, and dry mouth have a greater odds of engaging in most of the dental self-care behaviors, including use of complementary therapies. Conclusions The major factor leading to the use of self-care behaviors is need. Although oral pain does increase the use of self-care behaviors, so do bleeding gums and dry mouth. Research and practice should address self-care behaviors used for oral health problems in addition to pain. Investigators should expand analysis of dental self-care behavior and the relationship of self-care behavior to the use of professional services. Further research also should explore the use of complementary therapies in dental self-care. PMID:19486460

Arcury, Thomas A.; Bell, Ronny A.; Anderson, Andrea M.; Chen, Haiying; Savoca, Margaret R.; Kohrman, Teresa; Quandt, Sara A.

2008-01-01

374

Testing the acceptability of liquid fish oil in older adults.  

PubMed

Inflammatory conditions likely to benefit from fish oil therapy are prevalent in older adults however acceptability in this group is uncertain. This study aimed to assess the palatability of a range of liquid fish oil concentrations, the frequency and extent of side effects, and to summarise any effects on adherence to fish oil therapy in older adults. One hundred patients (>=60 years) completed a randomised, single-blind palatability study, conducted in two parts. In part one, 50 subjects, blinded to random sample order, consumed multiple liquid fish oil samples (2x10%, 40% and 100%). In part two, 50 subjects tasted one concentration, or 100% extra light olive oil (control). Pleasantness of taste was scored on a 5-point Likert scale. Side effects were recorded 24-hr post-tasting. Results of part one showed that 9/50 participants reported increasingly unpleasant taste with increasing fish oil concentration. 14/50 reported unpleasant taste for 100% fish oil vs 7/50 for 10%. 14/50 reported side effects which would not affect compliance with therapy. For part two, 1/12 reported unpleasant taste for 100% vs 0/13 for 10% fish oil or control. 4/50 reported side effects and 2/4 indicated these would prevent ongoing fish oil therapy. The authors conclude that taste itself is not a deterrent to fish oil therapy. Furthermore, reported adverse effects may not be a true reaction to fish oil, or dissuade patients from compliance. Liquid fish oil supplements are acceptable to older adults, therefore should be investigated as a therapy for geriatric conditions. PMID:21669585

Yaxley, Alison; Miller, Michelle D; Fraser, Robert J; Cobiac, Lynne; Crotty, Maria

2011-01-01

375

Anticholinergic activity of 107 medications commonly used by older adults.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to measure the anticholinergic activity (AA) of medications commonly used by older adults. A radioreceptor assay was used to investigate the AA of 107 medications. Six clinically relevant concentrations were assessed for each medication. Rodent forebrain and striatum homogenate was used with tritiated quinuclidinyl benzilate. Drug-free serum was added to medication and atropine standard-curve samples. For medications that showed detectable AA, average steady-state peak plasma and serum concentrations (C(max)) in older adults were used to estimate relationships between in vitro dose and AA. All results are reported in pmol/mL of atropine equivalents. At typical doses administered to older adults, amitriptyline, atropine, clozapine, dicyclomine, doxepin, L-hyoscyamine, thioridazine, and tolterodine demonstrated AA exceeding 15 pmol/mL. Chlorpromazine, diphenhydramine, nortriptyline, olanzapine, oxybutynin, and paroxetine had AA values of 5 to 15 pmol/mL. Citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine, lithium, mirtazapine, quetiapine, ranitidine, and temazepam had values less than 5 pmol/mL. Amoxicillin, celecoxib, cephalexin, diazepam, digoxin, diphenoxylate, donepezil, duloxetine, fentanyl, furosemide, hydrocodone, lansoprazole, levofloxacin, metformin, phenytoin, propoxyphene, and topiramate demonstrated AA only at the highest concentrations tested (patients with above-average C(max) values, who receive higher doses, or are frail may show AA). The remainder of the medications investigated did not demonstrate any AA at the concentrations examined. Psychotropic medications were particularly likely to demonstrate AA. Each of the drug classifications investigated (e.g., antipsychotic, cardiovascular) had at least one medication that demonstrated AA at therapeutic doses. Clinicians can use this information when choosing between equally efficacious medications, as well as in assessing overall anticholinergic burden. PMID:18510583

Chew, Marci L; Mulsant, Benoit H; Pollock, Bruce G; Lehman, Mark E; Greenspan, Andrew; Mahmoud, Ramy A; Kirshner, Margaret A; Sorisio, Denise A; Bies, Robert R; Gharabawi, Georges

2008-07-01

376

Pain assessment in hospitalized older adults with dementia and delirium.  

PubMed

Pain can have negative effects leading to prolonged hospital stays. Determining the presence of uncontrolled and untreated pain in patients with cognitive impairments such as delirium, dementia, and delirium superimposed on dementia (DSD) is challenging. One tool commonly suggested for use in assessment of pain in older adults with cognitive impairment is the Pain Assessment In Advanced Dementia (PAINAD) scale. Proper use of the PAINAD scale as part of a comprehensive pain management plan can help reduce the likelihood of a patient experiencing unrecognized and untreated pain. Using an individual example, this article illustrates best practices in pain assessment and management for a woman experiencing DSD during an acute hospitalization. PMID:24800815

Paulson, Christina May; Monroe, Todd; Mion, Lorraine C

2014-06-01

377

Physiologic Field Triage Criteria for Identifying Seriously Injured Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate the ability of out-of-hospital physiologic measures to predict serious injury for field triage purposes among older adults and potentially reduce the under-triage of seriously injured elders to non-trauma hospitals. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study involving injured adults 55 years and older transported by 94 emergency medical services (EMS) agencies to 122 hospitals (trauma and non-trauma) in 7 regions of the western United States from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2008. We evaluated initial out-of-hospital Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, systolic blood pressure (SBP), respiratory rate, heart rate, shock index (SBP ÷ heart rate), out-of-hospital procedures, mechanism of injury, and patient demographics. The primary outcome was “serious injury,” defined as Injury Severity Score (ISS) ? 16, as a measure of trauma center need. We used multivariable regression models, fractional polynomials and binary recursive partitioning to evaluate appropriate physiologic cut-points and the value of different physiologic triage criteria. Results A total of 44,890 injured older adults were evaluated and transported by EMS, of whom 2,328 (5.2%) had ISS ? 16. Nonlinear associations existed between all physiologic measures and ISS ? 16 (unadjusted and adjusted p ? 0.001 for all,), except for heart rate (adjusted p = 0.48). Revised physiologic triage criteria included GCS score ? 14; respiratory rate < 10 or > 24 breaths per minute or assisted ventilation; and SBP < 110 or > 200 mmHg. Compared to current triage practices, the revised criteria would increase triage sensitivity from 78.6 to 86.3% (difference 7.7%, 95% CI 6.1–9.6%), reduce specificity from 75.5 to 60.7% (difference 14.8%, 95% CI 14.3–15.3%), and increase the proportion of patients without serious injuries transported to major trauma centers by 60%. Conclusions Existing out-of-hospital physiologic triage criteria could be revised to better identify seriously injured older adults at the expense of increasing over-triage to major trauma centers. PMID:24933614

Newgard, Craig D.; Richardson, Derek; Holmes, James F.; Rea, Thomas D.; Hsia, Renee Y.; Mann, N. Clay; Staudenmayer, Kristan; Barton, Erik D.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Haukoos, Jason S.

2015-01-01

378

Knowledge of Results after Good Trials Enhances Learning in Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In recent years, some researchers have examined motor learning in older adults. Some of these studies have specifically looked at the effectiveness of different manipulations of extrinsic feedback, or knowledge of results (KR). Given that many motor tasks may already be more challenging for older adults compared to younger adults, making KR more…

Chiviacowsky, Suzete; Wulf, Gabriele; Wally, Raquel; Borges, Thiago

2009-01-01

379

Aging, Subjective Experience, and Cognitive Control: Dramatic False Remembering by Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent research suggests that older adults are more susceptible to interference effects than are young adults; however, that research has failed to equate differences in original learning. In 4 experiments, the authors show that older adults are more susceptible to interference effects produced by a misleading prime. Even when original learning…

Jacoby, Larry L.; Bishara, Anthony J.; Hessels, Sandra; Toth, Jeffrey P.

2005-01-01

380

The Role of Healthcare Providers and Caregivers in Educating Older Adults about Foodborne Illness Prevention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adults aged 60 or older are more likely than younger adults to experience severe complications or even death as a result of foodborne infections. This study investigated which specific groups of healthcare providers or other caregivers are most receptive to providing food safety information to older adults. Telephone-based focus groups were conducted with health care providers and caregivers to determine

Kelly C. Wohlgenant; Sheryl C. Cates; Sandria L. Godwin; Leslie Speller-Henderson

2012-01-01

381

The Effects of Pure Pair Repetition on Younger and Older Adults' Associative Memory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although aging causes relatively minor impairment in recognition memory for components, older adults' ability to remember associations between components is typically significantly compromised, relative to that of younger adults. This pattern could be associated with older adults' relatively intact familiarity, which helps preserve component…

Kilb, Angela; Naveh-Benjamin, Moshe

2011-01-01

382

Older Adults With Intellectual Disabilities: Targets for Increasing Victimization, A Call for a Preemptive Screening Policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aging population is a rapidly growing demographic in the United States. Isolation, limited autonomy, and declining physical and mental health render many older adults vulnerable to abuse, neglect, and exploitation. As the population grows, so does the need for Adult Protective Services (APS). This article highlights an ultrasensitive subgroup of older adults who may be more susceptible to victimization—those

Sheryl Strasser; Karen OQuin; Thomas Price; Elizabeth Leyda

2012-01-01

383

Older-Adult Playfulness: An Innovative Construct and Measurement for Healthy Aging Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Few studies of adult playfulness exist, but limited research on older adults and playfulness suggests that playfulness in later life improves cognitive, emotional, social, and psychological functioning and healthy aging overall. Older adults represent a rapidly growing segment of the U.S. population, underscoring the need to understand the aging…

Yarnal, Careen; Qian, Xinyi

2011-01-01

384

Sleep modulates word-pair learning but not motor sequence learning in healthy older adults  

E-print Network

Sleep modulates word-pair learning but not motor sequence learning in healthy older adults Jessica Sleep benefits memory across a range of tasks for young adults. However, remarkably little is known of the role of sleep on memory for healthy older adults. We used 2 tasks, 1 assaying motor skill learning

Ivry, Rich

385

Where Would You Turn for Help? Older Adults' Awareness of Community Support Services  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Previous findings on older adults' awareness of community support services (CSSs) have been inconsistent and marred by acquiescence or over-claiming bias. To address this issue, this study used a series of 12 vignettes to describe common situations faced by older adults for which CSSs might be appropriate. In telephone interviews, 1,152 adults

Denton, M.; Ploeg, J.; Tindale, J.; Hutchison, B.; Brazil, K.; Akhtar-Danesh, N.; Quinlan, M.; Lillie, J.; Plenderleith, J. Millen; Boos, L.

2008-01-01

386

Practice of Adult Education--Older Adults, Tourism, and Learning in Yellowstone  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to present a program of learning for older adults in a national park. Because of the growing trend of tourism among retirees this learning during leisure is gaining prominence. The paper brings together the concepts of aging, self-directed learning, and tourism and leisure. In addition this paper presents a…

Roberson, Donald N., Jr.

2005-01-01

387

Older adults learn less, but still reduce metabolic cost, during motor adaptation  

PubMed Central

The ability to learn new movements and dynamics is important for maintaining independence with advancing age. Age-related sensorimotor changes and increased muscle coactivation likely alter the trial-and-error-based process of adapting to new movement demands (motor adaptation). Here, we asked, to what extent is motor adaptation to novel dynamics maintained in older adults (?65 yr)? We hypothesized that older adults would adapt to the novel dynamics less well than young adults. Because older adults often use muscle coactivation, we expected older adults to use greater muscle coactivation during motor adaptation than young adults. Nevertheless, we predicted that older adults would reduce muscle activity and metabolic cost with motor adaptation, similar to young adults. Seated older (n = 11, 73.8 ± 5.6 yr) and young (n = 15, 23.8 ± 4.7 yr) adults made targeted reaching movements while grasping a robotic arm. We measured their metabolic rate continuously via expired gas analysis. A force field was used to add novel dynamics. Older adults had greater movement deviations and compensated for just 65% of the novel dynamics compared with 84% in young adults. As expected, older adults used greater muscle coactivation than young adults. Last, older adults reduced muscle activity with motor adaptation and had consistent reductions in metabolic cost later during motor adaptation, similar to young adults. These results suggest that despite increased muscle coactivation, older adults can adapt to the novel dynamics, albeit less accurately. These results also suggest that reductions in metabolic cost may be a fundamental feature of motor adaptation. PMID:24133222

Huang, Helen J.

2013-01-01

388

Role of dried blood spots in health and disease diagnosis in older adults.  

PubMed

Older adults represent a substantial number of the world population, which is set to grow considerably in the coming years. The health challenges faced by the older adults are unique. Several age-related changes in them make phlebotomy difficult. Application of dried blood has been demonstrated to be useful in the other similarly vulnerable population, the neonates. Similar approach of standardization and demonstration of use of dried blood spots (DBS) for analytes of interest in older adult population would be highly appreciated. There are very few reports of use of DBS in older adults. There are several potential areas of interest for older adults in which DBS assays are available but have not been applied for screening in them. This review describes a brief general overview of DBS, its advantages and disadvantages and potential use in disease diagnosis in older adults. PMID:25529881

Lakshmy, Ramakrishnan; Tarik, Mohamad; Abraham, Ransi Ann

2014-12-01

389

Older adult mental health: Teaching senior-level baccalaureate nursing students what they need to know.  

PubMed

Within the older adult population, certain idiosyncratic aspects of mental illness add to the challenges of helping clients manage these disorders. Older adults are more likely than younger populations to experience physiologically based comorbidities, a dynamic that further strains coping capacities. Barriers to the provision of comprehensive mental health nursing care for older adults include myths and stigmas about aging and mental health. Nurse educators are challenged to move students toward a more positive, empirically based approach to the care of older adults' mental health. In this article, background information supporting the importance of working to improve students' knowledge of and attitudes toward mental illness in older adults is provided. Specific teaching strategies in the areas of older adult mental health, dementia, and delirium are discussed. Resources to support the incorporation of these strategies into nursing curricula are described. PMID:20608592

Puentes, William J; Bradway, Christine K; Aselage, Melissa

2010-07-01

390

Work Hours, Retirement and Supportive Relations among Older Adults  

PubMed Central

While the literature widely acknowledges the importance of social support to the health, well-being and performance of older adults, little is known about the way in which occupational conditions affect older employees’ access to social support over time and whether these effects are maintained after retirement. Accordingly, in the current study we examine the degree to which work hours have longer term effects on the amount and type of support older individuals receive from intimate coworkers, family and non-work friends, and whether these effects are attenuated or intensified for those who retire. Longitudinal data were collected from a random sample of members of nine unions, 6 months prior to their retirement eligibility (T1) and approximately one year after Time 1 (T2). Our findings indicate that while retirement attenuates the positive association between Time 1 work hours and subsequent coworkers' support as well as the negative relationship between Time 1 work hours and subsequent non-work friends support, retirement fails to attenuate the negative effect of Time 1 work hours on subsequent family support. Policy implications are discussed. PMID:20485475

Nahum-Shani, Inbal

2010-01-01

391

Mood alterations in older adults following acute exercise.  

PubMed

Limited research indicates positive affective change following acute bouts of exercise, but whether this improved affect among younger subjects may be generalized to older individuals is not known. The present study, then, examined the effects of a single bout of physical activity among older participants. 16 trained women (Mage = 64.5 +/- 7.6 yr.) completed an abbreviated Profile of Mood States prior to and immediately following a 75-min. session of aerobic line dancing. A series of one-way analyses of variance with repeated measures were used to examine differences between pre- and posttest subscores on mood states. Significant decreases following exercise in scores on Tension, Depression, Fatigue, and Anger and a significant increase in scores on Vigor relative to preexercise (control) scores were found. Global mood was significantly improved after the exercise session. No significant difference was found between pre- and postexercise measures of Confusion. Previous findings of significant improvements in affect immediately after an acute bout of exercise may be generalized to older adults. Repetition with a nonexercised control group is desirable. PMID:7991308

Pierce, E F; Pate, D W

1994-08-01

392

Changes in physician utilization over time among older adults.  

PubMed

Although much is known from cross-sectional studies about the use of physician services among older adults, little is known about the consistency of or changes in that utilization over time. Hierarchical multivariable regression analysis of data on the 2,430 older adults who were enrolled in the LSOA and successfully reinterviewed in 1986, 1988, and 1990 is used to model changes in the number of physician visits between 1984 and 1990 based on the predisposing, enabling, and need (including functional status) characteristics measured in 1984, and subsequent changes in functional status. Overall, 19 percent of the variance in physician utilization is explained, with 8 percent coming from the introduction of the need characteristics, 4.7 percent from the subsequent introduction of the number of physician visits at baseline, and 4.9 percent from the subsequent introduction of changes in functional status. Declines in each of the functional status measures are significantly associated with increases in physician utilization, although improvements are fundamentally unrelated. PMID:7757830

Stump, T E; Johnson, R J; Wolinsky, F D

1995-01-01

393

Cumulative exposure to traumatic events in older adults  

PubMed Central

Objectives The present study examined the impact of cumulative trauma exposure on current posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity in a nonclinical sample of adults in their 60s. The predictive utility of cumulative trauma exposure was compared to other known predictors of PTSD, including trauma severity, personality traits, social support, and event centrality. Method Community-dwelling adults (n = 2,515) from the crest of the Baby Boom generation completed the Traumatic Life Events Questionnaire, the PTSD Checklist, the NEO Personality Inventory, the Centrality of Event Scale, and rated their current social support. Results Cumulative trauma exposure predicted greater PTSD symptom severity in hierarchical regression analyses consistent with a dose-response model. Neuroticism and event centrality also emerged as robust predictors of PTSD symptom severity. In contrast, the severity of individuals’ single most distressing life event, as measured by self-report ratings of the A1 PTSD diagnostic criterion, did not add explanatory variance to the model. Analyses concerning event categories revealed that cumulative exposure to childhood violence and adulthood physical assaults were most strongly associated with PTSD symptom severity in older adulthood. Moreover, cumulative self-oriented events accounted for a larger percentage of variance in symptom severity compared to events directed at others. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the cumulative impact of exposure to traumatic events throughout the life course contributes significantly to post-traumatic stress in older adulthood above and beyond other known predictors of PTSD. PMID:24011223

Ogle, Christin M.; Rubin, David C.; Siegler, Ilene C.

2014-01-01

394

Access to continued-use medication among older adults, Brazil  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To determine the prevalence and associated access factors for all continued-use prescription drugs and the ways in which they can be obtained. METHODS Data was obtained from the 2008 Household National Survey. The sample comprised 27,333 individuals above 60 years who reported that they used continued-use prescription drugs. A descriptive analysis and binary and multiple multinomial logistic regressions were performed. RESULTS 86.0% of the older adults had access to all the medication they needed, and among them, 50.7% purchased said medication. Those who obtained medication from the public health system were younger (60-64 years), did not have health insurance plans, and belonged to the lower income groups. It is remarkable that 14.0% of the subjects still had no access to any continued-use medication, and for those with more than four chronic diseases, this amount reached 22.0%. Those with a greater number of chronic diseases ran a higher risk of not having access to all the medication they needed. CONCLUSIONS There are some groups of older adults with an increased risk of not obtaining all the medication they need and of purchasing it. The results of this study are expected to contribute to guide programs and plans for access to medication in Brazil. PMID:25741646

Viana, Karynna Pimentel; Brito, Alexandre dos Santos; Rodrigues, Claudia Soares; Luiz, Ronir Raggio

2015-01-01

395

Computerized Cognitive Training with Older Adults: A Systematic Review  

PubMed Central

A systematic review to examine the efficacy of computer-based cognitive interventions for cognitively healthy older adults was conducted. Studies were included if they met the following criteria: average sample age of at least 55 years at time of training; participants did not have Alzheimer’s disease or mild cognitive impairment; and the study measured cognitive outcomes as a result of training. Theoretical articles, review articles, and book chapters that did not include original data were excluded. We identified 151 studies published between 1984 and 2011, of which 38 met inclusion criteria and were further classified into three groups by the type of computerized program used: classic cognitive training tasks, neuropsychological software, and video games. Reported pre-post training effect sizes for intervention groups ranged from 0.06 to 6.32 for classic cognitive training interventions, 0.19 to 7.14 for neuropsychological software interventions, and 0.09 to 1.70 for video game interventions. Most studies reported older adults did not need to be technologically savvy in order to successfully complete or benefit from training. Overall, findings are comparable or better than those from reviews of more traditional, paper-and-pencil cognitive training approaches suggesting that computerized training is an effective, less labor intensive alternative. PMID:22792378

Kueider, Alexandra M.; Parisi, Jeanine M.; Gross, Alden L.; Rebok, George W.

2012-01-01

396

Prevalence of Cognitive Impairment in Community-Dwelling Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Introduction Mild cognitive impairment can be considered as an intermediate clinical state between normal cognitive aging and mild dementia. Elderly people with this impairment represent an at-risk group for the development of dementia. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of cognitive impairment in community-dwelling older adults by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and its relationship with socio-demographic variables. Methods In this analytical-descriptive study, 212 subjects admitted to Hamadan’s day care centers were selected through simple random sampling method. To gather the data, MMSE was used as well as a questionnaire containing demographic variables. Data analysis was completed through SPSS-16. Results The sample consisted of 17.9% male, 59.4% of whom were married. According to the results, 96 cases (45.3%) suffered from mild (MMSE?22), 110 cases (51.9%) from moderate (11?MMSE?21) and 6 cases (2.8%) from severe cognitive disorder (MMSE?10). As findings revealed, factors such as age (Pv = 0.005, r = -0.491) and schooling (Pv < 0.001) are of significant relationship with MMSE score. Discussion Prevalence of cognitive decline in community-dwelling older adults was of normal range. Hence, familial relations and social support can decrease mental status disorder. PMID:25436081

Rashedi, Vahid; Rezaei, Mohammad; Gharib, Masoud

2014-01-01

397

Executive function and bilingualism in young and older adults  

PubMed Central

Research suggests that being bilingual results in advantages on executive control processes and disadvantages on language tasks relative to monolinguals. Furthermore, the executive function advantage is thought to be larger in older than younger adults, suggesting that bilingualism may buffer against age-related changes in executive function. However, there are potential confounds in some of the previous research, as well as inconsistencies in the literature. The goal of the current investigation was to examine the presence of a bilingual advantage in executive control and a bilingual disadvantage on language tasks in the same sample of young and older monolingual anglophones, monolingual francophones, and French/English bilinguals. Participants completed a series of executive function tasks, including a Stroop task, a Simon task, a sustained attention to response task (SART), the Wisconsin Card Sort Test (WCST), and the digit span subtest of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, and language tasks, including the Boston Naming Test (BNT), and category and letter fluency. The results do not demonstrate an unequivocal advantage for bilinguals on executive function tasks and raise questions about the reliability, robustness and/or specificity of previous findings. The results also did not demonstrate a disadvantage for bilinguals on language tasks. Rather, they suggest that there may be an influence of the language environment. It is concluded that additional research is required to fully characterize any language group differences in both executive function and language tasks. PMID:25120442

Kousaie, Shanna; Sheppard, Christine; Lemieux, Maude; Monetta, Laura; Taler, Vanessa

2014-01-01

398

Investigating tooth loss and associated factors among older Taiwanese adults.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate factors associated with tooth loss in older Taiwanese adults with different numbers of remaining teeth. This study evaluated oral health status and tooth loss among 2286 adults aged over 65. Subjects were classified according to number of teeth (Group 1 <20 teeth vs. Group 2 ?20 teeth). Tooth loss and oral health data were collected from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), compared between groups and analyzed by multivariate modeling. Group 1 subjects were older and had more partial dentures. Tooth loss was associated with self-limited food choices due to oral health status, and malnutrition. Tooth loss in Group 2 subjects was significantly associated with lower mental status. Tooth loss may predict cognitive status (odds ratio (OR) 1.30) and physical-disability (OR 1.79). Our results suggested that tooth loss was associated with age, more partial dentures, self-limited food choices, malnutrition, and lower mental and cognitive status and physical disability. PMID:24568967

Wang, Tze-Fang; Chen, Ying-Yu; Liou, Yiing-Mei; Chou, Chyuan

2014-01-01

399

Older Adults’ Perception of Chronic Illness Management in South Korea  

PubMed Central

Objectives: Despite the recent emphasis on a patient-centered chronic care model, few studies have investigated its use in older adults in South Korea. We explored how older Korean adults perceive and cope with their chronic illness. Methods: We conducted focus group interviews in Seoul, Korea in January 2010. Focus groups were formed by disease type (hypertension and type 2 diabetes) and gender using purposive sampling. Inclusion criteria were patients aged 60 and over who had been diagnosed with diabetes or hypertension and received care at a community health center for at least six months prior to participation. Interview data were analyzed through descriptive content analysis. Results: Among personal factors, most participants felt overwhelmed when they received their diagnosis. However, with time and control of their acute symptoms using medication, their worry diminished and participants tended to denying being identified as a patient or sick person. Among socio-familial factors, participants reported experiencing stigma with their chronic illness and feeling it was a symbol of weakness. Instead of modifying their lifestyles, which might interfere with their social relationships, they resorted to only following their medicine regime prescribed by their doctor. Participants also reported feeling that their doctor only prescribed medications and acted in an authoritative and threatening manner to induce and reinforce participants’ compliance with treatment. Conclusions: For successful patient-centered management of chronic illnesses, supportive environments that include family, friends, and healthcare providers should be established. PMID:25139170

Kang, Minah; Kim, Jaiyong; Bae, Sang-Soo; Choi, Yong-Jun; Shin, Dong-Soo

2014-01-01

400

Community-Based Home Healthcare Project for Korean Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Objectives The aim of this study was to identify the effects of community-based home healthcare projects that influence service performances with regard to Korean national long-term care insurance services in older adults. Methods The project's applicants were 18 operational agencies in national long-term care institutions in Korea, and participants were care recipients (n = 2263) registered in long-term care institutions. We applied our healthcare system to the recruited participants for a 3-month period from October 2012 to December 2012. We measured the community-based home healthcare services such as long-term care, health and medical service, and welfare and leisure service prior to and after applying the community-based home healthcare system. Results After the implementation of community-based home healthcare project, all community-based home healthcare services showed an increase than prior to the project implementation. The nutrition management service was the most increased and its increase rate was 628.6%. A comparison between the long-term care insurance beneficiaries and nonbeneficiaries showed that health and medical services’ increase rate of nonbeneficiaries was significantly higher than beneficiaries (p < 0.001). Conclusion Our community-based home healthcare project might improve the service implementation for older adults and there was a difference in the increase rate of health and medical services between Korean national long-term care insurance beneficiaries and nonbeneficiaries. PMID:24298438

Lee, TaeBum

2013-01-01

401

Life Events, Coping, and Antihypertensive Medication Adherence Among Older Adults  

PubMed Central

The authors examined the association between life events and antihypertensive medication adherence in older adults and the moderating role of coping. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted by using data (n = 1,817) from the Cohort Study of Medication Adherence among Older Adults (recruitment conducted from August 2006 through September 2007). Life events occurring in the 12 months preceding the study interview were assessed via the Holmes Rahe Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS), and coping levels were assessed via an adapted version of the John Henry Active Coping Scale. Low adherence to antihypertensive medication was defined as scores less than 6 on the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (known as “MMAS-8”). Of study participants, 13.2% had low adherence, and 27.2% and 5.0% had medium (150–299) and high (?300) SRRS scores, respectively. After multivariable adjustment, the odds ratios for low adherence associated with medium and high, versus low, SRRS were 1.50 (95% confidence interval: 1.11, 2.02) and 2.11 (95% confidence interval: 1.24, 3.58), respectively. When multivariable models were stratified by coping level, the association between life events and adherence was evident only among participants with low coping levels. PMID:23035146

Holt, Elizabeth W.; Muntner, Paul; Joyce, C.; Morisky, Donald E.; Webber, Larry S.; Krousel-Wood, Marie

2012-01-01

402

Whom do older adults trust most to provide information about prescription drugs?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Cost-related nonadherence to medieations is common among older adults, yet physician-patient communication about medication cost concerns is infrequent. One factor affecting communication and adherence may be older adults' confidence in the information about prescription drugs provided by physicians and other sources.Objectives: This study was conducted to identify which source older adults most trust to provide information on drugs and

Julie M. Donohue; Haiden A. Huskamp; Ira B. Wilson; Joel Weissman

2009-01-01

403

Hearing Loss and Older Adults’ Perceptions of Access to Care  

PubMed Central

We investigated whether hard-of-hearing older adults were more likely to report difficulties and delays in accessing care and decreased satisfaction with healthcare access than those without hearing loss. The Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (2003–2006 wave, N = 6,524) surveyed respondents regarding hearing, difficulties/delays in accessing care, satisfaction with healthcare access, socio-demographics, chronic conditions, self-rated health, depression, and length of relationship with provider/site. We used multivariate regression to compare access difficulties/delays and satisfaction by respondents’ hearing status (hard-of-hearing or not). Hard-of-hearing individuals comprised 18% of the sample. Compared to those not hard-of-hearing, hard-of-hearing individuals were significantly more likely to be older, male and separated/divorced. They had a higher mean number of chronic conditions, including atherosclerotic vascular disease, diabetes and depression. After adjustment for potential confounders, hard-of-hearing individuals were more likely to report difficulties in accessing healthcare (Odds Ratio 1.85; 95% Confidence Interval 1.19–2.88). Satisfaction with healthcare access was similar in both groups. Our findings suggest healthcare access difficulties will be heightened for more of the population because of the increasing prevalence of hearing loss. The prevalence of hearing loss in this data is low and our findings from a telephone survey likely underestimate the magnitude of access difficulties experienced by hard-of-hearing older adults. Further research which incorporates accessible surveys is needed. In the meantime, clinicians should pay particular attention to assessing barriers in healthcare access for hard-of-hearing individuals. Resources should be made available to proactively address these issues for those who are hard-of-hearing and to educate providers about the specific needs of this population. PMID:21301940

Schumacher, Jessica R.; Barnett, Steven; Smith, Maureen A.

2011-01-01

404

Repeat hospitalization and mortality in older adult burn patients.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to examine 2-year postdischarge outcomes-including hospital readmissions, complications, and mortality-for a cohort of older adults with burn injury. In a statewide hospital discharge database, we identified all patients ? 45 years of age admitted for acute burn injury from 1996 to 2005 and followed each patient for any hospital admissions 2 years following discharge. We then linked the state database to the National Death Index to identify patients who died within the 2-year period. Kaplan-Meier survival functions estimated proportion of patients who died or were readmitted. Logistic regression was used to estimate mortality risk at 2 years for each age group. A total of 2573 patients were admitted with burn injuries, and 2388 (93%) survived to discharge. Of all index patients, 1077 (45%) had at least one rehospitalization, with those in the older age groups having more rehospitalizations. Of patients rehospitalized within 30 days, 25% were admitted for wound coverage or burn infection, 14% for rehabilitation, 10% for sepsis, and 9% for psychiatric reasons. Compared to those discharged home, more patients discharged to nursing facilities had ? 1 rehospitalization (71.5 vs 31.5%, P < .001). Survival progressively decreased by age category throughout the follow-up period. Compared with patients aged 45 to 54 years, the older age groups had increased mortality risk at 2 years: odds ratio (OR) 1.53 (95% confidence interval, 1.22-1.88) for the 55 to 64 years group, OR 2.51 (95% confidence interval, 2.03-3.09) for the 65 to 74 years group, and OR 2.90 (95% confidence interval, 2.36-3.55) for the ? 75 years group. This population-based study indicates that older patients have a high likelihood of rehospitalization and increased long-term mortality. PMID:23292594

Mandell, Samuel P; Pham, Tam; Klein, Matthew B

2013-01-01

405

Strategies used by older adults to maintain or restore attributed dignity.  

PubMed

Dignity has been linked to the well-being of older adults. However, little is known about how older adults respond to perceived threats to their dignity. Nineteen community-dwelling older adults were interviewed regarding how they maintained their dignity. Grounded theory methods were used to identify (a) the characteristics of situations in which the dignity of older adults was threatened; (b) strategies used by older adults to defend their dignity; (c) variation in those strategies in relation to individual characteristics; and (d) similarities or differences among strategies used by community-dwelling and hospitalized older adults. Three types of strategies (i.e., introspective, interactive, and active) were identified. Although all individuals used all three types of strategies, each participant had a dominant style. Community-dwelling older adults exhibited greater breadth in their responses than their hospitalized counterparts. Understanding the strategies used by community-dwelling older adults with chronic health problems to maintain dignity may help health care providers develop interventions to protect the dignity of older adults. PMID:25423625

Jacelon, Cynthia S

2014-01-01

406

The Effect of Response Modality on Task Performance When Using an Interactive Voice Response System for Older and Younger Adults  

E-print Network

Response System for Older and Younger Adults by Nicole T. Howie The purpose of this experiment was to gain a greater understanding of how set- level compatibility affects task performance of older adults while using differentially affect performance between younger (18 - 39 years old) and older (65 years and older) adults

Byrne, Mike

407

Comparative Validity of Physical Activity Measures in Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Purpose To compare the validity of various physical activity measures with doubly labeled water (DLW)–measured physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) in free-living older adults. Methods Fifty-six adults aged ?65 yr wore three activity monitors (New Lifestyles pedometer, ActiGraph accelerometer, and a SenseWear (SW) armband) during a 10-d free-living period and completed three different surveys (Yale Physical Activity Survey (YPAS), Community Health Activities Model Program for Seniors (CHAMPS), and a modified Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (modPASE)). Total energy expenditure was measured using DLW, resting metabolic rate was measured with indirect calorimetry, the thermic effect of food was estimated, and from these, estimates of PAEE were calculated. The degree of linear association between the various measures and PAEE was assessed, as were differences in group PAEE, when estimable by a given measure. Results All three monitors were significantly correlated with PAEE (r = 0.48–0.60, P < 0.001). Of the questionnaires, only CHAMPS was significantly correlated with PAEE (r = 0.28, P = 0.04). Statistical comparison of the correlations suggested that the monitors were superior to YPAS and modPASE. Mean squared errors for all correlations were high, and the median PAEE from the different tools was significantly different from DLW for all but the YPAS and regression-estimated PAEE from the ActiGraph. Conclusions Objective devices more appropriately rank PAEE than self-reported instruments in older adults, but absolute estimates of PAEE are not accurate. Given the cost differential and ease of use, pedometers seem most useful in this population when ranking by physical activity level is adequate. PMID:20881882

COLBERT, LISA H.; MATTHEWS, CHARLES E.; HAVIGHURST, THOMAS C.; KIM, KYUNGMANN; SCHOELLER, DALE A.

2012-01-01

408

Correlates of Quality of Life in Older Adults With Diabetes  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To evaluate associations between health-related quality of life (HRQL) and geriatric syndromes, diabetes complications, and hypoglycemia in older adults with diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A race-stratified random sample of 6,317 adults with type 2 or type 1 diabetes, aged 60 to 75 years, enrolled in Kaiser Permanente Northern California, who completed a survey that included a HRQL instrument based on the Short Form 8-item health survey. Administrative records were used to ascertain diagnoses of geriatric syndromes, diabetes complications, and hypoglycemia. Associations were estimated between HRQL and exposures in exposure-specific and combined exposure models (any syndrome, any complication, or hypoglycemia). Conservatively, differences of ?3 points were considered the minimally important difference in HRQL scores. RESULTS HRQL was lower with nearly all exposures of interest. The lowest physical HRQL was associated with amputation. In combined exposure models, geriatric syndromes (?5.3 [95% CI ?5.8 to ?4.8], P < 0.001) and diabetes complications (?3.5 [?4.0 to ?2.9], P < 0.001) were associated with lower physical HRQL. The lowest mental HRQL was associated with depression, underweight (BMI <18 kg/m2), amputation, and hypoglycemia. In combined exposure models, only hypoglycemia was associated with lower mental HRQL (?4.0 [?7.0 to ?1.1], P = 0.008). CONCLUSIONS Geriatric syndromes and hypoglycemia are associated with lower HRQL to a comparable degree as diabetes complications. Addressing geriatric syndromes and avoiding hypoglycemia should be given as high a priority as preventing diabetes complications in older adults with diabetes. PMID:21636795

Laiteerapong, Neda; Karter, Andrew J.; Liu, Jennifer Y.; Moffet, Howard H.; Sudore, Rebecca; Schillinger, Dean; John, Priya M.; Huang, Elbert S.

2011-01-01

409

Older Adults are Highly Responsive to Recent Events During Decision-Making  

PubMed Central

Recent work suggests that older adults’ decision-making behavior is highly affected by recent events. In the present work younger and older adults performed a two-choice task where one option provided a larger average reward, but there was a large amount of noise around the mean reward for each option which led to sharp improvements or declines in rewards over trials. Older adults showed greater responsiveness to recent events than younger adults as evidenced by fits of Reinforcement Learning (RL) models. Older adults were particularly sensitive to recent negative events, which was evidenced by a strong tendency for older adults to switch to the other option following steep declines in reward. This tendency led to superior performance for older adults in one condition where heightened sensitivity to recent negative events was advantageous. These results extend prior work that has found an older adult bias toward negative feedback, and suggest that older adults engage in more abrupt switching in response to negative outcomes than younger adults. PMID:25580469

Worthy, Darrell A.; Otto, A. Ross; Doll, Bradley B.; Byrne, Kaileigh A.; Maddox, W. Todd

2014-01-01

410

Changes and events over life course: a comparative study between groups of older adults  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: to identify the changes which had occurred over the last year in the life of older adults, as well as the values attributed to these changes. METHOD: this is a multicentric, cross-sectional study, of the inquiry type, undertaken in three cities of the Brazilian Northeast, investigating two distinct groups of older adults. RESULTS: among the 236 older adults interviewed, it was observed that 30.0% reported health as the main change in their life course in the last year, this category being the most significant response among the older adults aged between 80 and 84 years old (37.7%). Changes in the family were mentioned by 11.5% of the older adults; death (9.6%) and alterations in routine activities (9.6%). In relation to the value attributed to these changes, it was ascertained that for 64.7% of the older adults aged between 65 and 69 years old, these changes were positive. In the older group, 49.4% of the older adults believe that their changes were related to losses. CONCLUSION: the knowledge of the changes mentioned, the value attributed to these changes, and the self-evaluation of health provide information which assists in formulating actions which are more specific to the real needs of these age groups. They also provide the health professionals with a better understanding of how some experiences are experienced in the life trajectories of these older adults. PMID:25806625

Silva, Luípa Michele; Silva, Antônia Oliveira; Tura, Luiz Fernando Rangel; Moreira, Maria Adelaide Silva Paredes; Nogueira, Jordana Almeida; Cavalli, Stefano

2015-01-01

411

THE PERSISTENCE OF INFERENCES IN MEMORY FOR YOUNGER AND OLDER ADULTS  

E-print Network

Younger and older adults’ susceptibility to the continued influence of inferences in memory was examined using a paradigm implemented by Wilkes and Leatherbarrow. Research has shown that younger adults have difficulty forgetting inferences they make...

Guillory, Jimmeka J.

2010-07-14

412

The role of prior knowledge in error correction for younger and older adults.  

PubMed

Previous work has demonstrated that, when given feedback, younger adults are more likely to correct high-confidence errors compared with low-confidence errors, a finding termed the hypercorrection effect. Research examining the hypercorrection effect in both older and younger adults has demonstrated that the relationship between confidence and error correction was stronger for younger adults compared with older adults. Their results demonstrated that the relationship between confidence and error correction was stronger for younger adults compared with older adults. However, recent work suggests that error correction is largely related to prior knowledge, while confidence may primarily serve as a proxy for prior knowledge. Prior knowledge generally remains stable or increases with age; thus, the current experiment explored how both confidence and prior knowledge contributed to error correction in younger and older adults. Participants answered general knowledge questions, rated how confident they were that their response was correct, received correct answer feedback, and rated their prior knowledge of the correct response. Overall, confidence was related to error correction for younger adults, but this relationship was much smaller for older adults. However, prior knowledge was strongly related to error correction for both younger and older adults. Confidence alone played little unique role in error correction after controlling for the role of prior knowledge. These data demonstrate that prior knowledge largely predicts error correction and suggests that both older and younger adults can use their prior knowledge to effectively correct errors in memory. PMID:25558782

Sitzman, Danielle M; Rhodes, Matthew G; Tauber, Sarah K; Liceralde, Van Rynald T

2015-07-01

413

Distress and recurrence of intrusive thoughts in younger and older adults.  

PubMed

The current study incorporated a life span perspective into existing theories of intrusive thoughts to examine age-related differences in the difficulty controlling intrusive thoughts, the distress following intrusive thought recurrences, and the meanings assigned to these recurrences. Younger (N = 51) and older (N = 49) community adults were randomly assigned to suppress (i.e., keep out of mind) or monitor an intrusive thought. Participants rated their positive and negative affect throughout engagement with the intrusive thought, and they also rated the meanings they gave to recurrences of their everyday intrusive thoughts. The results demonstrated that older adults tended to perceive greater difficulty with controlling the intrusive thought than younger adults despite the fact that they did not differ in the actual recurrence of the intrusive thought. With regard to distress, older adults experienced steadier levels of positive affect than younger adults throughout engagement with the intrusive thought. However, older adults also reported greater residual negative affect after engaging with the intrusive thought than younger adults. Finally, older and younger adults appeared to assign meanings to recurrences of intrusive thoughts in line with age-relevant concerns. Specifically, older adults were prone to interpret the recurrence of intrusive thoughts as a sign of cognitive decline, but they were less likely than younger adults to see intrusive thoughts as a sign of moral failure. Together, these results highlight a range of potential risk and protective factors in older adults for experiencing emotion dysregulation after intrusive thoughts. PMID:21707184

Magee, Joshua C; Teachman, Bethany A

2012-03-01

414

Interindividual differences in attentional control profiles among younger and older adults.  

PubMed

This study aimed at characterizing the individual variability in three attentional control functions (shifting, inhibition, and updating), among 75 older and 75 younger adults. It also examined the intellectual and health variables associated with different cognitive profiles. Cluster analyses identified three separate attentional control profiles for both age groups, but the patterns of variability were strikingly different. Younger adults' profiles were characterized by homogeneous performance across domains and differed only in their overall level of performance. In contrast, older adults' profiles were characterized by uneven levels of performance across domains and inhibition stood out as critical in distinguishing between profiles. One subgroup of older adults had poor inhibition and more adverse lifestyle characteristics and appeared more cognitively vulnerable. In conclusion, subgroups of younger and older adults with different attentional control profiles can be identified, but the expression of variability changes with age as older adults' profiles become more heterogeneous. PMID:24922080

Sylvain-Roy, Stéphanie; Belleville, Sylvie

2015-05-01

415

Medication misadventures in older adults: literature from 2013.  

PubMed

The objective of this paper is to review articles published in 2013 examining drug-related problems in the elderly and comment on their potential impact on clinical practice. To identify articles, we did a systematic search of the English-language literature restricted to those aged 65 + from January 2013 to December 2013 using Medline and Google Scholar and a combination of the following search terms: drug-related problems, medication-related problems, medication errors, suboptimal prescribing, inappropriate prescribing, underutilization, polypharmacy, medication monitoring, medication dispensing, medication administration, medication adherence, adverse drug events, and adverse drug withdrawal events. A manual search of major general medicine and clinical pharmacology journals was also conducted to identify additional articles. A total of 51 articles were identified of which 20 were chosen to highlight. Three were annotated and critiqued and the additional 17 articles were summarized in an appendix. One article reported the results of a randomized controlled trial that showed that a pharmacist intervention successfully reduced suboptimal prescribing in older hospital patients. Another paper from this group previously reported data from the same study showing that the intervention also reduced medication related readmissions to the hospital. An observational study compared the use of two thiazide diuretics in older outpatients. They found that chlorthalidone was more likely to cause hypokalemia than hydrochlorothiazide. Finally, in a randomized controlled trial a pharmacist intervention resulted in the reduction of anticholinergic burden but did result in an improvement in cognition. These studies highlight that medication errors and adverse drug events continue to be important issues for health care professionals caring for older adults. PMID:25333528

Hanlon, Joseph T; Semla, Todd P; Schmader, Kenneth E

2014-10-01

416

Older Adults' Perceptions of Physical Activity and Cognitive Health: Implications for Health Communication  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Messages promoting physical activity (PA) to maintain cognitive health (CH) may increase PA and enhance CH among older persons. This study examined older adults' perceptions of PA and CH. We conducted 10 focus groups with irregularly active older Black and White women and men (N = 55), ages 65 to 74 in South Carolina. Constant comparison methods…

Price, Anna E.; Corwin, Sara J.; Friedman, Daniela B.; Laditka, Sarah B.; Colabianchi, Natalie; Montgomery, Kara M.

2011-01-01

417

Use of Complementary Therapies for Health Promotion Among Older Adults  

PubMed Central

This article describes the types of complementary therapies used by older adults for health promotion, and delineates the predisposing, enabling, and need factors associated with their use. One-hundred ninety-five African American and White participants (age 65+) completed a baseline interview and up to six sets of three daily follow-up interviews at monthly intervals. Complementary therapies for health promotion included home remedies, specific foods or beverages, herbs, supplements, vitamins, over-the-counter (OTC) medicine, prayer, exercise, and being active. Although gender, ethnicity, education, and trust in doctors were associated with the use of complementary therapies for health promotion, health information seeking was the predisposing factor most often associated. The enabling factors were also associated with their use. Health information seeking, which reflects a wellness lifestyle, had the most consistent associations with complementary therapy use for health promotion. This health self-management for health promotion may have positive effects on future medical expenditures. PMID:24652893

Arcury, Thomas A.; Nguyen, Ha T.; Sandberg, Joanne C.; Neiberg, Rebecca H.; Altizer, Kathryn P.; Bell, Ronny A.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Lang, Wei; Quandt, Sara A.

2014-01-01

418

Assessment of subjective cognitive impairment among older adults.  

PubMed

HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Assessment of Subjective Cognitive Impairment Among Older Adults" found on pages 28-35, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until March 31, 2018. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. Describe factors associated with subjective cognitive impairment in older adults. 2. Identify the characteristics of four questions used to improve the assessment of subjective cognitive impairment. DISCLOSURE STATEMENT Neither the planners nor the authors have any conflicts of interest to disclose. Subjective cognitive impairment (SCI) refers to an individual's everyday concerns related to cognitive functioning, which can exist even in the absence of objectively assessed impairment. SCI is common among older adults, and although symptoms may be mild, SCI is associated with subsequent cognitive decline as well as significant negative effects on everyday functional ability, mood, and social engagement. Despite the potential consequences, SCI is often underreported and undetected. Thus, it is critical to consider assessing for SCI among older adults to determine cognitive impairment risk and support early intervention to promote functional well-being and health management. The current article reviews factors related to SCI, evaluates existing methods for the assessment of SCI, and proposes a person-centered framework for enhancing assessment. Application of the framework is further illustrated through the use of clinical examples. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 41(4), 28-35.]. PMID:25800031

Hill, Nikki L; Mogle, Jacqueline M; Munoz, Elizabeth; Wion, Rachel; Colancecco, Elise M

2015-04-01

419

Interpersonal Effects of Suffering in Older Adult Caregiving Relationships  

PubMed Central

Examining the interpersonal effects of suffering in the context of family caregiving is an important step to a broader understanding of how exposure to suffering affects humans. In this review article, we first describe existing evidence that being exposed to the suffering of a care recipient (conceptualized as psychological distress, physical symptoms, and existential/spiritual distress) directly influences caregivers’ emotional experiences. Drawing from past theory and research, we propose that caregivers experience similar, complementary, and/or defensive emotions in response to care recipient suffering through mechanisms such as cognitive empathy, mimicry, and conditioned learning, placing caregivers at risk for psychological and physical morbidity. We then describe how gender, relationship closeness, caregiving efficacy, and individual differences in emotion regulation moderate these processes. Finally, we provide directions for future research to deepen our understanding of interpersonal phenomena among older adults, and we discuss implications for clinical interventions to alleviate the suffering of both caregivers and care recipients. PMID:19739924

Monin, Joan K.; Schulz, Richard

2009-01-01

420

In The Zone: Flow State and Cognition in Older Adults  

PubMed Central

The current study investigated the nature of the flow state among older adults. Flow is a pleasurable experiential state that occurs during full-capacity engagement in which an individual is performing at a level that is matched with the demands of the task. Each participant completed a scale assessing dimensions of flow in a particular activity selected by the participant. More cognitively demanding activities elicited higher levels of flow for those with higher fluid ability, but lower levels of flow for those with lower fluid ability. This pattern was reversed for activities that were low in demand. Our data highlight the potential importance of considering motivational states such as flow in understanding cognitive optimization in adulthood. PMID:21443348

Payne, Brennan R.; Jackson, Joshua J.; Noh, Soo Rim; Stine-Morrow, Elizabeth A. L.

2011-01-01

421

Recruitment and retention of older adults in influenza immunization study.  

PubMed

Minority older adults have been under-represented in previous research studies in which Caucasian populations have been recruited. This article describes a consumer-centered model that addresses strategies to enhance recruitment and retention of a racially diverse healthy elderly population in an influenza immunization study. A consumer-centered model was employed in a 3-year research study that examined age-related changes in the immune responses to influenza vaccination. Four factors seem to be critical for successful recruitment and retention of African American, Latino and Caucasian elders: (1) building trust between the research team, and the community at large; (2) convenience (or inconvenience) to the volunteer; (3) timing of recruitment and data collection; and (4) incentives. PMID:19175248

Gonzalez, Elizabeth W; Gardner, Elizabeth M; Murasko, Donna

2007-01-01

422

Auditory Training: Evidence for Neural Plasticity in Older Adults.  

PubMed

Improvements in digital amplification, cochlear implants, and other innovations have extended the potential for improving hearing function; yet, there remains a need for further hearing improvement in challenging listening situations, such as when trying to understand speech in noise or when listening to music. Here, we review evidence from animal and human models of plasticity in the brain's ability to process speech and other meaningful stimuli. We considered studies targeting populations of younger through older adults, emphasizing studies that have employed randomized controlled designs and have made connections between neural and behavioral changes. Overall results indicate that the brain remains malleable through older adulthood, provided that treatment algorithms have been modified to allow for changes in learning with age. Improvements in speech-in-noise perception and cognition function accompany neural changes in auditory processing. The training-related improvements noted across studies support the need to consider auditory training strategies in the management of individuals who express concerns about hearing in difficult listening situations. Given evidence from studies engaging the brain's reward centers, future research should consider how these centers can be naturally activated during training. PMID:25485037

Anderson, Samira; Kraus, Nina

2013-05-01

423

Changes in Hearing Thresholds over 10 Years in Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Changes in hearing thresholds over a 10-year period in a large population of older adults (2130) ranging in age from 48 to 92 years were documented. Pure-tone thresholds at frequencies from 0.5 to 8 kHz were evaluated at a baseline examination and 2.5, 5, and 10 years later. For younger age groups (50–69 years of age), threshold changes were generally greatest for higher frequencies; in older age groups (70–89 years of age), threshold changes were generally greatest for lower frequencies due to a ceiling effect at higher frequencies. At frequencies of 0.5, 1, 2, and 8 kHz, the pattern of 10-year changes in thresholds across audiometric frequencies was generally similar for men and women. Threshold changes at 4 and 6 kHz were relatively constant for all ages in men across the 10-year examination period; threshold changes at the same frequencies in women increased for the 48–59 and 60–69 years age groups and then tended to level off. Other than age and gender, the best baseline examination predictors of 10-year thresholds at a specific audiometric frequency were the baseline threshold at that frequency followed by the baseline threshold for the next higher test frequency. PMID:18795468

Wiley, Terry L.; Chappell, Rick; Carmichael, Lakeesha; Nondahl, David M.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.

2009-01-01

424

Older adults do not notice their names: a new twist to a classic attention task.  

PubMed

Although working memory spans are, on average, lower for older adults than young adults, we demonstrate in 5 experiments a way in which older adults paradoxically resemble higher capacity young adults. Specifically, in a selective-listening task, older adults almost always failed to notice their names presented in an unattended channel. This is an exaggeration of what high-span young adults show and the opposite of what low-span young adults show. This striking finding in older adults remained significant after controlling for working memory span and for noticing their names in an attended channel. The findings were replicated when presentation rate was slowed and when the ear in which the unattended name was presented was controlled. These results point to an account of older adults' performance involving not only an inhibition factor, which allows high-span young adults to suppress the channel to be ignored, but also an attentional capacity factor, with more unallocated capacity. This capacity allows low-span young adults to notice their names much more often than older adults with comparably low working memory spans do. PMID:24820668

Naveh-Benjamin, Moshe; Kilb, Angela; Maddox, Geoffrey B; Thomas, Jenna; Fine, Hope C; Chen, Tina; Cowan, Nelson

2014-11-01

425

Depression and Its Correlates Among Older Adults Accessing Aging Services  

PubMed Central

Objectives To define the prevalence and correlates of depression among older adults receiving assessments by nonmedical community-based care managers at the point of entry to care and thus prior to provision of aging services. Our long-term goal is to inform development of collaborative care models for late life depression that incorporate Aging Services Providers. Methods Aging Services Provider Network (ASPN) clients receiving in-home assessments were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition module for affective disorders and measures of depression symptom severity, alcohol use, physical health, functional status, social support, stressful life events, and religiosity. Engagement in mental healthcare was documented. Results Subjects (N = 378) were primarily white (84%) and women (69%) with household incomes under $1,750/month (62%). Half lived alone (48%). Their mean age was 77 years. Thirty-one percent had clinically significant depressive symptoms and 27% met criteria for a current major depressive episode, of which 61% were being treated with medication and 25% by a mental health provider. Nearly half (47%) had experienced one or more episodes of major depression during their lives. Disability, number of medical conditions, number and severity of recent stressful life events, low social support, and low religiosity were independently associated with current major depression. Conclusion Depressive illness was common among this sample of ASPN clients. Because ASPN care managers have expertise in managing many of the problems correlated with depression, they may play a significant role in identifying, preventing, and collaborating in the treatment of depressive illnesses among community-dwelling older adults. PMID:22434017

Richardson, Thomas M.; Friedman, Bruce; Podgorski, Carol; Knox, Kerry; Fisher, Susan; He, Hua; Conwell, Yeates

2011-01-01

426

Identifying training modalities to improve multitasking in older adults.  

PubMed

Studies that have measured the effects of attentional training have relied on a range of training formats, which may vary in their efficacy. In particular, it is unclear whether programs that practice dual-tasking are more effective in improving divided attention than programs focusing on flexible allocation priority training. The aims of this study were as follows: (1) to compare the efficacy of different types of attentional training formats and (2) to assess transfer to distal measures. Forty-two healthy older adults were randomly assigned to one of three training groups. In the SINGLE training condition, participants practiced a visual detection and an alphanumeric equation task in isolation. In the FIXED training condition, participants practiced both tasks simultaneously with equal attention allocated to each. In the VARIABLE training condition, participants varied the attentional priority allocated to each task. After training, all participants improved their performance on the alphanumeric equation task when performed individually, including those in the SINGLE training condition. Participants in the FIXED training condition improved their divided attention, but only the participants in the VARIABLE training condition showed a greater capacity to vary their attentional priorities according to the instructions. Regarding transfer, all groups improved their performance on the 2-back condition, but only the VARIABLE and FIXED conditions resulted in better performance on the 1-back condition. Overall, the study supports the notion that attentional control capacities in older adults are plastic and can be improved with appropriate training and that the type of training determines its impact on divided attention. PMID:25073453

Bier, Bianca; de Boysson, Chloé; Belleville, Sylvie

2014-01-01

427

Quality of life of older adults in Turkey.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to examine the factors affecting the quality of life of the elderly people in Turkey. Three-hundred community-dwelling older adults (Mage=68.35, SD=5.80 years) participated in this study. The quality of life was examined through World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire-Older Adults Module Turkish Version (WHOQOL-OLD Turkish). Analysis of Variances (ANOVA) showed significant age differences in sensory abilities, social participation, and intimacy sub-scale scores. Post hoc Scheffe Test results indicated that elderly people aged 75 years and over differed from other age groups; although their scores in social participation and intimacy were lower; they had higher scores in sensory abilities than those aged 60-65 and 66-74 years. There were significant differences between the educational levels of these elderly people in sensory abilities, autonomy, past-present-and-future activities, social participation, and death-and-dying sub-scales. The autonomy, past-present-and-future activities, social participation, and death-and-dying scores of those with high school education were higher than that of those with secondary school or less education except in sensory abilities scores. There were differences found between the variable of with whom the elderly people lived and of QOL sub-scales of the elderly people's sensory abilities, past-today-and-future activities, death-and-dying, social participation, and intimacy. In addition, the total average score of the QOL sub-scales with the sufficiency of income of the elderly people were interconnected. In conclusion, the findings revealed that gender, age, education, marital status, childbearing, social insurance, health status, living arrangement and income variables are the determinant to improving the quality of life of elderly people. PMID:25064031

Bilgili, Naile; Arpac?, Fatma

2014-01-01

428

Hippocampal subfields differentially correlate with chronic pain in older adults.  

PubMed

Although previous studies have demonstrated that the hippocampus plays a role in pain processing, the role of hippocampal subfields is uncertain. The goal of this study was to examine the relationship between hippocampal subfield volumes and chronic pain in nondemented older adults. The study sample included 86 community-residing adults age 70 or older who were free of dementia and recruited from the Einstein Aging Study. Chronic pain was defined as pain over the last 3 months, that was moderate or severe (minimum rating of 4 out of 10) most, or all of the time. Hippocampal subfield volumes were estimated using FreeSurfer software. We modeled the association between chronic pain and hippocampal and subfield volume using linear regression. The sample had a mean age of 80 and was 58% female. Chronic pain, present in 55% of the sample, was associated with smaller right and total hippocampal volumes, particularly in women, after adjusting for age, education, and intracranial volume (eTICV). In addition, in women, volume was significantly reduced in participants with chronic pain in right CA2-3 (?=-0.35, p=0.010), right CA4-DG (?=-0.35, p=0.011), left presubiculum (?=-0.29, p=0.030), and left fimbria (?=-0.30, p=0.023). In men, chronic pain was not associated with the volume of any of the hippocampal subfield volumes. Chronic pain in women is associated with a reduction in the volume of right hippocampus and also selected hippocampal subfields. Future studies should clarify the mechanisms underlying the association between regional hippocampal volumes and chronic pain, particularly in women. PMID:24878607

Ezzati, Ali; Zimmerman, Molly E; Katz, Mindy J; Sundermann, Erin E; Smith, Jeremy L; Lipton, Michael L; Lipton, Richard B

2014-07-21

429

Exercise and Alzheimer's Disease Biomarkers in Cognitively Normal Older Adults  

PubMed Central

Objective In addition to the increasingly recognized role of physical exercise in maintaining cognition, exercise may influence Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology as transgenic mouse studies show lowered levels of AD pathology in exercise groups. The objective of this study was to elucidate the association between exercise and AD pathology in humans using Pittsburgh Compound B (PIB), amyloid-? (A?)42, tau, and phosphorylated tau (ptau)181 biomarkers. Methods Sixty-nine older adults (17 males, 52 females) aged 55–88 were recruited and confirmed to be cognitively normal. A questionnaire on physical exercise levels over the last decade was administered to all. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were collected from 56 participants, and amyloid imaging with PIB was performed on 54 participants. Results Participants were classified based on biomarker levels. Those with elevated PIB (p=.030), tau (p=.040) and ptau181 ((p=.044) had significantly lower exercise with a non-significant trend for lower A?42 (p=.135) to be associated with less exercise. Results were similar for PIB after controlling for covariates; tau (p=.115) and ptau181 (p=.123) differences were reduced to non-significant trends. Additional analyses also demonstrated that active individuals who met the exercise guidelines set by the American Heart Association (AHA) had significantly lower PIB binding and higher A?42 levels with and without controlling for covariates (PIB: p=.006 and p=.001; A?42: p=.042 and p=.046). Lastly, the associations between exercise engagement and PIB levels were more prominent in APOE epsilon 4 non-carriers. Interpretation Collectively, these results are supportive of an association between exercise engagement and AD biomarkers in cognitively normal older adults. PMID:20818789

Liang, Kelvin Y.; Mintun, Mark A.; Fagan, Anne M.; Goate, Alison M.; Bugg, Julie M.; Holtzman, David M.; Morris, John C.; Head, Denise

2010-01-01

430

Executive Function Processes Predict Mobility Outcomes in Older Adults  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: There is growing evidence suggesting an association between cognitive function and physical performance in late life. This study examined the relationship between performance on executive function measures and subsequent mobility outcomes among community dwelling older adults across a 12-month randomized controlled exercise trial. DESIGN: Randomized controlled clinical trial SETTING: Champaign-Urbana, Illinois PARTICIPANTS: Community dwelling older adults (N = 179; Mage = 66.4) INTERVENTION: A 12-month exercise trial with two arms: an aerobic exercise group and a stretching and strengthening group MEASUREMENTS: Established cognitive tests of executive function including the flanker task, task switching and a dual task paradigm, and the Wisconsin card sort test. Mobility was assessed using the timed 8-foot up and go test and times to climb up and down a flight of stairs. METHODS: Participants completed the cognitive measures at baseline and the mobility measures at baseline and after 12 months of the intervention. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine whether baseline executive function predicted post-intervention functional performance after controlling for age, sex, education, cardiorespiratory fitness and baseline mobility levels. RESULTS: Our analyses revealed that selective baseline executive function measures, particularly performance on the flanker task (?’s =.15 to .17) and the Wisconsin card sort test (?’s =.11 to .16) consistently predicted mobility outcomes at month 12. The estimates were in the expected direction, such that better baseline performance on the executive function measures predicted better performance on the timed mobility tests independent of the intervention group. CONCLUSION: Executive functions of inhibitory control, mental set shifting and attentional flexibility were predictive of functional mobility. Given the literature associating mobility limitations with disability, morbidity, and mortality, these results are important for understanding the antecedents to poor mobility function that can be attenuated by well-designed interventions to improve cognitive performance. PMID:24521364

Gothe, Neha P.; Fanning, Jason; Awick, Elizabeth; Chung, David; Wójcicki, Thomas R.; Olson, Erin A.; Mullen, Sean P.; Voss, Michelle; Erickson, Kirk I.; Kramer, Arthur F.; McAuley, Edward

2013-01-01

431

Broadly tuned face representation in older adults assessed by categorical perception.  

PubMed

Studies of face recognition in older adults (60 years of age and older) report increases in false alarms over younger adults (usually 18-30 years of age), but no age differences in hits. To examine this phenomenon, we compared older and younger adults in categorical perception of faces. We hypothesized that face representations in older adults would be broadly tuned, resulting in overlapping representations, manifested by a shallower slope in identity categorization than in younger adults, and age-related reductions in the advantage for between-categories, as compared with within-category, face discrimination. We morphed faces to change linearly from one identity to another. We used familiar or unfamiliar faces in separate conditions to examine the role of familiarity. Categorical perception was assessed in an identity-classification task and a discrimination task. Older adults showed a shallower slope and poorer discrimination compared with younger adults, and both groups exhibited better performance with familiar than unfamiliar faces. Enhanced discriminability for between-categories as compared with within-category faces was seen for both familiar and unfamiliar faces in younger adults, but only for familiar faces in older adults. The more broadly tuned representations of unfamiliar faces in older adults may lead to misidentification and greater false alarms for unfamiliar faces, but not for familiar faces. PMID:24490946

Lee, Yunjo; Smith, Courtney R; Grady, Cheryl L; Hoang, Nick; Moscovitch, Morris

2014-06-01

432

The Relationship between Everyday Problem Solving and Inconsistency in Reaction Time in Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether inconsistency in reaction time (RT) is predictive of older adults' ability to solve everyday problems. A sample of 304 community dwelling non-demented older adults, ranging in age from 62 to 92, completed a measure of everyday problem solving, the Everyday Problems Test (EPT). Inconsistency in latencies across trials was assessed

Catherine L. Burton; Esther Strauss; David F. Hultsch; Michael A. Hunter

2009-01-01

433

Maladaptive and Compulsive Behavior in Prader-Willi Syndrome: New Insights from Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although maladaptive and compulsive behaviors are increasingly well-described in young persons with Prader-Willi syndrome, it is unclear how these problems manifest in older adults with this syndrome. In Part I, I compared maladaptive and compulsive behaviors in 45 older adults with Prader-Willi syndrome (ages 30 to 50 years) to 195 children,…

Dykens, Elisabeth M.

2004-01-01

434

Alcohol consumption and inflammatory markers in older adults: the Cardiovascular Health Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: We sought to determine the relation of alcohol intake and systemic inflammation in a population-based sample of older adults. Methods and results: As part of the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS), 5865 adults aged 65 years and older reported their intake of beer, wine, and liquor. We determined white blood cell count (WBC), factor VIII coagulant activity (factor VIIIc), and

Kenneth J Mukamal; Mary Cushman; Murray A Mittleman; Russell P Tracy; David S Siscovick

2004-01-01

435

Postural Balance and Self-Reported Balance Confidence in Older Adults with a Hip Fracture History  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Balance dysfunction and loss of balance confidence have been associated with functional limitations and loss of independency in daily tasks. This study examined various aspects of postural balance and balance confidence between older adults with a hip fracture history and their non-fractured counterparts. A comprehensive assessment of balance capacity in older adults with a hip fracture history may help

Sanna Sihvonen; Jenni Kulmala; Mauri Kallinen; Markku Alén; Ilkka Kiviranta; Sarianna Sipilä

2009-01-01

436

Anaerobic Power and Physical Function in Strength-Trained and Non-Strength-Trained Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Challenging daily tasks, such as transferring heavy items or rising from the floor, may be dependent on the ability to generate short bursts of energy anaerobically. The purposes of this study were to determine if strength- trained (ST) older adults have higher anaerobic power output compared with non-strength-trained (NST) older adults and to determine the relationship between anaerobic power

Jill M. Slade; Tanya A. Miszko; Jennifer H. Laity; Subodoh K. Agrawal; M. Elaine Cress

2002-01-01

437

A MULTIDISCIPLINARY PRACTICE MODEL FOR INDEPENDENT PRACTITIONERS WHO WORK WITH OLDER ADULTS IN THE COMMUNITY  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article presents a framework for the integration of community services for older adults. A model for multidisciplinary practice is introduced to teach students and professionals how independent practitioners can integrate their community practices. Practitioners from disciplines such as medicine, nursing, social work, psychiatry, psychology, finance, law, and religion can develop collaborative community practices to more effectively serve older adults.

Terry Tirrito; Ilene Nathanson; Nieli Langer

1996-01-01

438

A Music Therapy Strategy for Depressed Older Adults in the Community  

Microsoft Academic Search

A music therapy strategy for depressed older adults involves eight music-listening programs facilitated by a music therapist for use in the home environment. Body relaxation, imagery, stimulation, and sleep enhancement are included in these programs that use music to cue relaxation and positive thinking. Four case studies describing successful application of this approach to older adults with depression and\\/or anxiety

Suzanne B. Hanser

1990-01-01

439

Insightful Learning of Life's Lessons with Older Adult Guests in the Classroom  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An intergenerational initiative was developed and implemented to enhance gerontology in the first course of the practice sequence. Seventeen students met with older adults (ages 82-98) in the classroom and at an assisted living facility. The evaluation of this older adult infusion project was conducted through two questionnaires and by the review…

Velez Ortiz, Daniel; Cross, Suzanne L.; Day, Angelique

2012-01-01

440

Working Memory Training and Transfer in Older Adults: Effects of Age, Baseline Performance, and Training Gains  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent studies suggest that working memory training may benefit older adults; however, findings regarding training and transfer effects are mixed. The current study aimed to investigate the effects of a process-based training intervention in a diverse sample of older adults and explored possible moderators of training and transfer effects. For…

Zinke, Katharina; Zeintl, Melanie; Rose, Nathan S.; Putzmann, Julia; Pydde, Andrea; Kliegel, Matthias

2014-01-01

441

Does Expressive Writing Reduce Stress and Improve Health for Family Caregivers of Older Adults?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: We examined whether written emotional disclosure reduces stress and improves health outcomes for family caregivers of physically frail and cognitively impaired older adults, as it has been shown to do for certain student and clinical populations. Design and Methods: Primary caregivers of older adults attending a day program were randomly…

Mackenzie, Corey S.; Wiprzycka, Ursula J.; Hasher, Lynn; Goldstein, David

2007-01-01

442

One Story at a TimeNarrative Therapy, Older Adults, and Addictions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Various factors including social isolation and financial worries put older adults at risk for addictions. Indeed, older adults are the largest consumers of medication, and alcohol consumption is rising. Yet interventions are limited and problems often go unreported. Unearthing “problem” stories in people’s lives (i.e., “the addiction story”) and retelling them in more empowering ways, narrative therapy offers a viable

Paula J. Gardner; Jennifer M. Poole

2009-01-01

443

Bioelectrical Impedance Detects Apparent Changes in Nutritional Status of Orally-Supplemented Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

LEARNING OUTCOME: To list three advantages of using bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) for assessing the effect of nutrition therapy in older adultsThis study evaluated changes in nutritional status over six months after an acute care hospitalization in a sample of nutritionally-compromised older adults. Subjects from a larger study were randomly assigned to receive “standard care” or two cans of oral

J. M. Friedmann; H. Smiciklas-Wright; G. L. Jensen; M. A. McCamish

1997-01-01

444

Extra-Individual Correlates of Physical Activity Attainment in Rural Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: Challenged with a higher incidence of disease, reduced social support, and less access to physical activity facilities and services, rural older adults may find healthy active living a challenge. Despite these challenges, some rural older adults manage to achieve active lifestyles. Purpose: This study investigates the relative importance…

Shores, Kindal A.; West, Stephanie T.; Theriault, Daniel S.; Davison, Elizabeth A.

2009-01-01

445

Older adults and cellular phones: A mixed-methods usability study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This mixed-methods usability study examined the reasons why older adults used cellular phones. Qualitative and quantitative data included both actual use and perceptions of the technology. Older adults were interviewed and asked to describe why they owned cell phones. The analysis of these data resulted in an emergence of four themes: perceived usefulness, safety\\/security, perceived ease of use, and social

Sara J Kubik

2008-01-01

446

Ethnic and Class Variations in Promoting Social Activities Among Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Engagement in social activities impacts the health outcomes of older adults, especially as regards mortality and physical and cognitive disability. Participation and its benefits vary by socioeconomic gradient and ethnicity. This research aims to identify activities of interest to diverse older adults and factors that influence participation (barriers, motives, perceived benefits, and role expectations). We conducted five focus groups throughout

Iveris L. Martinez; Kristen Kim; Elizabeth Tanner; Linda P. Fried; Teresa Seeman

2009-01-01

447

An Investigation of the Relationship between Health Literacy and Social Communication Skills in Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine connections between health literacy and social communication skills in older adults, a population that experiences chronic health conditions but is reported to have low health literacy and declines in communication skills. Sixty-three older adults were administered the "Social Communication" subtest of the…

Hester, Eva Jackson

2009-01-01

448

How Older Adults Make Decisions regarding Smart Technology: An Ethnographic Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Comparatively little research has been conducted regarding the smart technology needs of the older adult population despite the proliferation of smart technology prototypes. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceived smart technology needs of older adults with mobility impairments while using an ethnographic research approach to…

Davenport, Rick D.; Mann, William; Lutz, Barbara

2012-01-01

449

Factors Affecting Burnout when Caring for Older Adults Needing Long Term Care Services in Korea  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to address factors related to caregiver burnout as a result of caring for an older adult with a chronic disease. Characteristics of care recipients and caregivers as well as social support were included to identify the relationships with caregiver burnout. The analysis was based on a sample of 334 older adults and…

Won, Seojin; Song, Inuk

2012-01-01

450

Involving Older Adults as Co-Researchers in Social Work Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article examines the contribution of older adults as co-researchers to the evaluation of a gerontological social work course. The evaluation was conducted at an Israeli college as part of a collaborative project with a United Kingdom university. Here, we follow the older adults who are service users through their transition to the role of…

Gutman, Carolyn; Hantman, Shira; Ben-Oz, Miriam; Criden, Wendy; Anghel, Roxana; Ramon, Shula

2014-01-01

451

Adapting Choral Singing Experiences for Older Adults: The Implications of Sensory, Perceptual, and Cognitive Changes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As people age, they naturally experience sensory, perceptual, and cognitive changes. Many of these changes necessitate adaptations in designing programs for older adults. Choral singing is an activity that has many potential benefits for older adults, yet the rehearsal environment, presentation style, and content of material presented may need to…

Yinger, Olivia Swedberg

2014-01-01

452

Evaluation of a Peer-Led, Low-Intensity Physical Activity Program for Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Physical inactivity is a primary contributor to decreasing functional physical fitness and increasing chronic disease in older adults. Purpose: This study assessed the health-related benefits of ExerStart for Lay Leaders, a 20-week, community based, peer-led, low-impact exercise program for older adults. ExerStart focuses on aerobic…

Werner, Danilea; Teufel, James; Brown, Stephen L.

2014-01-01

453

Benefits, Motivations, and Barriers Related to Environmental Volunteerism for Older Adults: Developing a Research Agenda  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Interest in civic engagement focused on the natural environment has grown dramatically, as has the population of older adults. Our article explores the potential for increased environmental volunteerism among older adults to enrich the lives of volunteers while benefitting the community and environmental quality. Curiously, this convergence has…

Bushway, Lori J.; Dickinson, Janis L.; Stedman, Richard C.; Wagenet, Linda P.; Weinstein, David A.

2011-01-01

454

Hand assessment in older adults with musculoskeletal hand problems: a reliability study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal hand pain is common in the general population. This study aims to investigate the inter- and intra-observer reliability of two trained observers conducting a simple clinical interview and physical examination for hand problems in older adults. The reliability of applying the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria for hand osteoarthritis to community-dwelling older adults will also be investigated.

Helen L Myers; Elaine Thomas; Elaine M Hay; Krysia S Dziedzic

2011-01-01

455

Personal Strength and Finding Meaning in Conjugally Bereaved Older Adults: A Four-Year Prospective Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study was performed to identify the patterns and mechanisms of the development of personal strength of bereaved older adults over a 4-year period after spousal death. The findings showed that while bereaved older adults, on average, experienced a moderate level of personal strength at 6 months post-spousal death with a slight increase over a…

Kim, Su Hyun; Kjervik, Diane; Belyea, Michael; Choi, Eun Sook

2011-01-01

456

Inhibitory Deficits in Older Adults: List-Method Directed Forgetting Revisited  

Microsoft Academic Search

In list-method directed forgetting, participants are cued to intentionally forget a previously studied list while remembering a subsequently presented 2nd list. Results from prior research are inconclusive on whether older adults show deficits in this type of task. In 3 experiments, the authors reexamined the issue and compared younger and older adults' responsiveness to the forget cue. Across the experiments,

Martina Zellner; Karl-Heinz Bäuml

2006-01-01

457

Using Personal Narratives for Curriculum Development about Substance Abuse and Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports on a project to sensitize graduate social work students taking courses in substance abuse to the needs of older adults. Graduate social work students at a major urban school of social work in the Northeast were recruited and trained to interview older adults with a history of substance abuse problems regarding their life…

Bial, Martha C.; Gutheil, Irene A.; Hanson, Meredith; White-Ryan, Linda

2012-01-01

458

Predicting Trainee Ageism Using Knowledge, Anxiety, Compassion, and Contact with Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the growing proportion of older adults in the population, ageism is prevalent and can facilitate discriminatory behavior, even in healthcare settings. This study used multiple regression to investigate the relationship between knowledge of aging, aging anxiety, and degree of older adult contact with ageism in undergraduates training for…

Boswell, Stefanie S.

2012-01-01

459

Alcohol and Other Drug Dependence Severity Among Older Adults in Treatment: Measuring Characteristics and Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The number of older adults is increasing, yet little is known about their responses to treatment for substance dependence. While age-appropriate measures have been developed for depression and alcohol screening among older adults, severity and outcome measurement for this population has not been addressed. The purpose of the present study was (1) to add to the limited but growing literature

Valerie J. Slaymaker; Patricia Owen

2008-01-01

460

Do Alternative Names Block Young and Older Adults' Retrieval of Proper Names?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study evaluates whether tip of the tongue experiences (TOTs) are caused by a more accessible word which blocks retrieval of the target word, especially for older adults. In a ''competitor priming'' paradigm, young and older adults produced the name of a famous character (e.g., Eliza Doolittle) in response to a question and subsequently named…

Cross, Emily S.; Burke, Deborah M.

2004-01-01

461

Balance and Mobility Training for Older Adults: An Undergraduate Service-Learning Experience.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a service learning program aimed at improving balance and mobility in a group of older adults from an independent living center while giving college students (mainly exercise and sport science majors) an opportunity to interact with this population. The program has resulted in improved balance and mobility for the older adults and…

Williams, Kathleen; Kovacs, Christopher

2001-01-01

462

Effects of an Enhanced Discharge Planning Intervention for Hospitalized Older Adults: A Randomized Trial  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose of the Study: To identify needs encountered by older adult patients after hospital discharge and assess the impact of a telephone transitional care intervention on stress, health care utilization, readmissions, and mortality. Design and Methods: Older adult inpatients who met criteria for risk of post-discharge complications were…

Altfeld, Susan J.; Shier, Gayle E.; Rooney, Madeleine; Johnson, Tricia J.; Golden, Robyn L.; Karavolos, Kelly; Avery, Elizabeth; Nandi, Vijay; Perry, Anthony J.

2013-01-01

463

Impact of Training Modality on Strength and Physical Function in Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The importance of maintaining strength in older adults is well documented and various training modalities have been recommended; however, the effectiveness of various interventions with high translation to public health practice has not been completely characterized. Additionally, the interrelations among mode, strength, and lower extremity physical function (LEPF) changes in older adults warrant further investigation. Purpose: The primary aims

Mark M. Misic; Rudy J. Valentine; Karl S. Rosengren; Jeffrey A. Woods; Ellen M. Evans

2009-01-01

464

Talker Differences in Clear and Conversational Speech: Vowel Intelligibility for Older Adults with Hearing Loss  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: To establish the range of talker variability for vowel intelligibility in clear versus conversational speech for older adults with hearing loss and to determine whether talkers who produced a clear speech benefit for young listeners with normal hearing also did so for older adults with hearing loss. Method: Clear and conversational vowels…

Ferguson, Sarah Hargus

2012-01-01

465

Use of seal-like robot PARO in sensory group therapy for older adults with dementia  

E-print Network

Use of seal-like robot PARO in sensory group therapy for older adults with dementia Wan-Ling Chang to interact with it. Keywords-PARO, socially assistive robot, robot therapy, dementia, older adults I (MSBT) is widely used for people with dementia. The method uses controlled sensory stimulation in a non

Sabanovic, Selma

466

Diet and Exercise Interventions Reduce Intrahepatic Fat Content and Improve Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Older Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Both obesity and aging increase intrahepatic fat (IHF) content, which leads to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and metabolic abnormalities such as insulin resistance. We evaluated the effects of diet and diet in conjunction with exercise on IHF content and associated metabolic abnormalities in obese older adults. Eighteen obese (BMI ?30 kg\\/m2) older (?65 years old) adults completed a 6-month

Krupa Shah; Abby Stufflebaum; Tiffany N. Hilton; David R. Sinacore; Samuel Klein; Dennis T. Villareal

2009-01-01

467

Anemia Is Associated With Depression in Older Adults: Results From the InCHIANTI Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Depression is a common disorder among older adults, and it has been associated with adverse outcomes, including increased risk of morbidity and mortality as well as incomplete or delayed recovery from illness and disability. The objective of this study was to examine whether depressive symptoms and anemia are associated among older adults living in the community. Methods. We used

Graziano Onder; Brenda W. J. H. Penninx; Matteo Cesari; Stefania Bandinelli; Fulvio Lauretani; Benedetta Bartali; Anna Maria Gori; Marco Pahor; Luigi Ferrucci

2005-01-01

468

Volunteering among Older Spanish Adults: Does the Type of Organization Matter?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study in Spain explored three aspects of older adult volunteering (motivations, satisfaction, and perceptions of benefits and drawbacks) and examines to what extent these aspects are influenced by the type of organization and other factors (sociodemographic variables and level of volunteering). The sample consisted of 88 older adults

Celdran, Montserrat; Villar, Feliciano

2007-01-01

469

The Influence of Self-Perceptions of Aging on Older Adults' Cognition and Behavior  

E-print Network

THE INFLUENCE OF SELF-PERCEPTIONS OF AGING ON OLDER ADULTS’ COGNITION AND BEHAVIOR A Dissertation by MATTHEW LANE HUGHES Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... Stereotypes Affect Older Adults’ Performance ........................................................... 17 Reducing Stereotype Threat ......................................................................................... 28 Stereotype Threat and Dementia...

Hughes, Matthew Lane

2014-07-29

470

Childlessness, Parenthood, and Depressive Symptoms among Middle-Aged and Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Prior research has examined whether parenthood is associated with higher levels of well-being among older adults, but definitions of parental status have varied. The authors examine links between parental status and depressive symptoms among older adults, comparing biological and social definitions of parenthood. The study finds few differences…

Bures, Regina M.; Koropeckyj-Cox, Tanya; Loree, Michael

2009-01-01

471

Millar's Story: The Dynamic Experience of an Older Adult Computer Learner  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The participation of older adults in computer learning environments is a recent phenomenon. Older adults of the twenty-first century have not grown up with information and communication technologies and are not likely to have used computers in their working lives. They may even feel alien in the world of technology. The purpose of this paper is to…

Russell, Helen

2005-01-01

472

KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDES OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS REGARDING THE HEALTH AND NUTRITION OF OLDER ADULTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study evaluated knowledge and attitudes of undergraduates regarding nutrition and health of the aged and students' intentions of pursuing career involvement with older adults. The participants evaluated were undergraduates from three mid-western universities (n=1,755). The majority of those surveyed were uninformed and unlikely to pursue career involvement with older adults. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed.

Roschelle A. Heuberger; Melanie Stanczak

2004-01-01

473

The Effect of Implicit Stereotypes on the Physical Performance of Older Adults  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to explore how stereotypes affect physical performance in older adults. During Experiment 1, older adults were primed with objects representing aging stereotypes to determine whether these objects can activate stereotypes of aging. Results from the first part of this study provide evidence that certain material…

Moriello, Gabriele; Cotter, J. James; Shook, Nathalie; Dodd-McCue, Diane; Welleford, E. Ayn

2013-01-01

474

Personal Characteristics and Factors Motivating Older Adult Participation in Hospital-Sponsored Educational Offerings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Hospitals venturing into educational programming for older adults may do so with some trepidation, since older adults have a documentable poor record of participation. Therefore, this study examined the relative importance of previously identified motivational factors when an institution has no proven record in gerontological programming.…

Venesy, Barbara A.

475

Circadian Sleep-Wake Rhythm of Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The circadian sleep-wake rhythm changes with aging, resulting in a more fragmented sleep-wake pattern. In individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID), brain structures regulating the sleep-wake rhythm might be affected. The aims of this study were to compare the sleep-wake rhythm of older adults with ID to that of older adults in the general…

Maaskant, Marijke; van de Wouw, Ellen; van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen M.; Echteld, Michael A.

2013-01-01

476

Interface Design for Older Adults with Varying Cultural Attitudes toward Uncertainty  

E-print Network

; experiment; computerized cognitive assessment; olderadults ACM Classification Keywords H.5.2 [Information technology for older adults. Our design context was Cognitive Testing on a Computer (C-TOC): a self- administered computerized test underdevelopment, intended to screen older adults for cognitive impairments

McGrenere, Joanna

477

Implementation of Health Promotion in the Older Adults in Bangkok, Thailand  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Effective strategies that bring health promotion messages to older adults in a developing country are needed. To evaluate the impact of various education media upon changes in knowledge and health behavior, a double-blind, randomized controlled trial was conducted involving 1,268 older adults in a southwest Bangkok suburb. Group teaching…

Assantachai, Prasert; Bunnag, Chaweewan; Piya-Anant, Manee; Thamlikitkul, Visanu

2006-01-01

478

The National Blueprint for Promoting Physical Activity in the Mid-Life and Older Adult Population  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Blueprint: Increasing Physical Activity Among Adults Age 50 and Older was designed to develop a national strategy for the promotion of physically active lifestyles among the mid-life and older adult population. The Blueprint identifies barriers to physical activity in the areas of research, home and community programs, medical…

Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek; Sheppard, Lisa; Senior, Jane; Park, Chae-Hee; Mockenhaupt, Robin; Bazzarre, Terry

2005-01-01

479

Evaluating Websites for Older Adults: Adherence to "Senior-Friendly" Guidelines and End-User Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Older adults in the US are the fastest-growing demographic, and also the largest-growing group of internet users. The aim of this research was to evaluate websites designed for older adults in terms of (1) how well they adhere to "senior-friendly" guidelines and (2) overall ease of use and satisfaction. In Experiment I, 40 websites designed for…

Hart, T. A.; Chaparro, B. S.; Halcomb, C. G.

2008-01-01

480

Use and Design of Handheld Computers for Older Adults - A review and appraisal  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a comprehensive literature review to investigate whether and why older adults accept handheld computers, and how to design elderly-friendly handheld computers. Findings about acceptance, input devices, menu and functions, and output devices are summarized. First, older adults were under social pressure to use mobile phones, but they had low acceptance of advanced functions. Also, they had a

Jia Zhou; Pei-Luen Patrick Rau

2012-01-01