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Sample records for older mouse liver

  1. Mouse models for liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Bakiri, Latifa; Wagner, Erwin F

    2013-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of primary liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related cell death in human and the fifth in women worldwide. The incidence of HCC is increasing despite progress in identifying risk factors, understanding disease etiology and developing anti-viral strategies. Therapeutic options are limited and survival after diagnosis is poor. Therefore, better preventive, diagnostic and therapeutic tools are urgently needed, in particular given the increased contribution from systemic metabolic disease to HCC incidence worldwide. In the last three decades, technological advances have facilitated the generation of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) to mimic the alterations frequently observed in human cancers or to conduct intervention studies and assess the relevance of candidate gene networks in tumor establishment, progression and maintenance. Because these studies allow molecular and cellular manipulations impossible to perform in patients, GEMMs have improved our understanding of this complex disease and represent a source of great potential for mechanism-based therapy development. In this review, we provide an overview of the current state of HCC modeling in the mouse, highlighting successes, current challenges and future opportunities. PMID:23428636

  2. Heme synthesis in normal mouse liver and mouse liver tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, D.L.; Becker, F.F. )

    1990-04-15

    Hepatic cancers from mice and rats demonstrate decreased levels of delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the heme synthetic pathway, and increased heme oxygenase, the heme-catabolizing enzyme. These findings suggest that diminution of P-450, b5, and catalase in these lesions may result from a heme supply that is limited by decreased heme synthesis and increased heme catabolism. Heme synthesis was measured in mouse liver tumors (MLT) and adjacent tumor-free lobes (BKG) by administering the radiolabeled heme precursors {sup 55}FeCl3 and (2-{sup 14}C)glycine and subsequently extracting the heme for determination of specific activity. Despite reduced delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase activity in MLT, both tissues incorporated (2-14C)glycine into heme at similar rates. At early time points, heme extracted from MLT contained less 55Fe than that from BKG. This was attributed to the findings that MLT took up 55Fe at a slower rate than BKG and had larger iron stores than BKG. The amount of heme per milligram of protein was also similar in both tissues. These findings militate against the hypothesis that diminished hemoprotein levels in MLT result from limited availability of heme. It is probable, therefore, that decreased hemoprotein levels in hepatic tumors are linked to a general program of dedifferentiation associated with the cancer phenotype. Diminution of hemoprotein in MLT may result in a relatively increased intracellular heme pool. delta-Aminolevulinic acid synthase and heme oxygenase are, respectively, negatively and positively regulated by heme. Thus, their alteration in MLT may be due to the regulatory influences of the heme pool.

  3. Gene Expression Profile Analysis of Type 2 Diabetic Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Ben; He, Zhishui; Zhai, Qiwei

    2013-01-01

    Liver plays a key role in glucose metabolism and homeostasis, and impaired hepatic glucose metabolism contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the precise gene expression profile of diabetic liver and its association with diabetes and related diseases are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we detected the gene expression profile by high-throughput sequencing in 9-week-old normal and type 2 diabetic db/db mouse liver. Totally 12132 genes were detected, and 2627 genes were significantly changed in diabetic mouse liver. Biological process analysis showed that the upregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Surprisingly, the downregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in immune-related processes, although all the altered genes were still mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Similarly, KEGG pathway analysis showed that metabolic pathways were the major pathways altered in diabetic mouse liver, and downregulated genes were enriched in immune and cancer pathways. Analysis of the key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism showed that some key enzyme genes were significantly increased and none of the detected key enzyme genes were decreased. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and hepatitis were most likely to be associated with diabetes. Taken together, this study provides the digital gene expression profile of diabetic mouse liver, and demonstrates the main diabetes-associated hepatic biological processes, pathways, key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism and potential hepatic diseases. PMID:23469233

  4. Replacement of Diseased Mouse Liver by Hepatic Cell Transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhim, Jonathan A.; Sandgren, Eric P.; Degen, Jay L.; Palmiter, Richard D.; Brinster, Ralph L.

    1994-02-01

    Adult liver has the unusual ability to fully regenerate after injury. Although regeneration is accomplished by the division of mature hepatocytes, the replicative potential of these cells is unknown. Here, the replicative capacity of adult liver cells and their medical usefulness as donor cells for transplantation were investigated by transfer of adult mouse liver cells into transgenic mice that display an endogenous defect in hepatic growth potential and function. The transplanted liver cell populations replaced up to 80 percent of the diseased recipient liver. These findings demonstrate the enormous growth potential of adult hepatocytes, indicating the feasibility of liver cell transplantation as a method to replace lost or diseased hepatic parenchyma.

  5. Orthotopic mouse liver transplantation to study liver biology and allograft tolerance.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Shinichiro; Ueki, Shinya; Ono, Yoshihiro; Kasahara, Naoya; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Angélica; Kimura, Shoko; Yoshida, Osamu; Murase, Noriko; Yasuda, Yoshikazu; Geller, David A; Thomson, Angus W

    2016-07-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation in the mouse is a powerful research tool that has led to important mechanistic insights into the regulation of hepatic injury, liver immunopathology, and transplant tolerance. However, it is a technically demanding surgical procedure. Setup of the orthotopic liver transplantation model comprises three main stages: surgery on the donor mouse; back-table preparation of the liver graft; and transplant of the liver into the recipient mouse. In this protocol, we describe our procedure in stepwise detail to allow efficient completion of both the donor and recipient operations. The protocol can result in consistently high technical success rates when performed by personnel experienced in the protocol. The technique can be completed in ∼2-3 h when performed by an individual who is well practiced in performing mouse transplantation in accordance with this protocol. We have achieved a perioperative survival rate close to 100%. PMID:27254462

  6. A comparative analysis of liver transcriptome suggests divergent liver function among human, mouse and rat.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yao; Ping, Jie; Chen, Hui; Jiao, Longxian; Zheng, Siyuan; Han, Ze-Guang; Hao, Pei; Huang, Jian

    2010-11-01

    The human liver plays a vital role in meeting the body's metabolic needs and maintaining homeostasis. To address the molecular mechanisms of liver function, we integrated multiple gene expression datasets from microarray, MPSS, SAGE and EST platforms to generate a transcriptome atlas of the normal human liver. Our results show that 17396 genes are expressed in the human liver. 238 genes were identified as liver enrichment genes, involved in the functions of immune response and metabolic processes, from the MPSS and EST datasets. A comparative analysis of liver transcriptomes was performed in humans, mice and rats with microarray datasets shows that the expression profile of homologous genes remains significantly different between mouse/rat and human, suggesting a functional variance and regulation bias of genes expressed in the livers. The integrated liver transcriptome data should provide a valuable resource for the in-depth understanding of human liver biology and liver disease. PMID:20800674

  7. Proteomic and Bioinformatics Analyses of Mouse Liver Microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Fang; Zhan, Xianquan; Li, Mao-Yu; Fang, Fan; Li, Guoqing; Li, Cui; Zhang, Peng-Fei; Chen, Zhuchu

    2012-01-01

    Microsomes are derived mostly from endoplasmic reticulum and are an ideal target to investigate compound metabolism, membrane-bound enzyme functions, lipid-protein interactions, and drug-drug interactions. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of the liver and its diseases, mouse liver microsomes were isolated and enriched with differential centrifugation and sucrose gradient centrifugation, and microsome membrane proteins were further extracted from isolated microsomal fractions by the carbonate method. The enriched microsome proteins were arrayed with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) and carbonate-extracted microsome membrane proteins with one-dimensional gel electrophoresis (1DE). A total of 183 2DE-arrayed proteins and 99 1DE-separated proteins were identified with tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 259 nonredundant microsomal proteins were obtained and represent the proteomic profile of mouse liver microsomes, including 62 definite microsome membrane proteins. The comprehensive bioinformatics analyses revealed the functional categories of those microsome proteins and provided clues into biological functions of the liver. The systematic analyses of the proteomic profile of mouse liver microsomes not only reveal essential, valuable information about the biological function of the liver, but they also provide important reference data to analyze liver disease-related microsome proteins for biomarker discovery and mechanism clarification of liver disease. PMID:22500222

  8. Human liver endothelial cells, but not macrovascular or microvascular endothelial cells, engraft in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Filali, Ebtisam El; Hiralall, Johan K; van Veen, Henk A; Stolz, Donna B; Seppen, Jurgen

    2013-01-01

    Liver cell transplantation has had limited clinical success so far, partly due to poor engraftment of hepatocytes. Instead of hepatocytes. other cell types, such as endothelial cells, could be used in ex vivo liver gene therapy. The goal of the present study was to compare the grafting and repopulation capacity of human endothelial cells derived from various tissues. Human endothelial cells were isolated from adult and fetal livers using anti-human CD31 antibody-conjugated magnetic beads. Human macrovascular endothelial cells were obtained from umbilical vein. Human microvascular endothelial cells were isolated from adipose tissue. Cells were characterized using flow cytometry. Liver engraftment and repopulation of endothelial cells was studied after intrasplenic transplantation in monocrotaline-treated immunodeficient mice. Following transplantation, human liver endothelial cells engrafted throughout the mouse liver. With immunoscanning electron microscopy, fenestrae in engrafted human liver endothelial cells were identified, a characteristic feature of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells. In contrast, CD31-negative liver cells, human macrovascular and microvascular endothelial cells were not capable of repopulating mouse liver. Characterization of human liver, macrovascular, and microvascular endothelial cells demonstrated expression of CD31, CD34, and CD146 but not CD45. Our study shows that only human liver endothelial cells, but not macro- and microvascular endothelial cells, have the unique capacity to engraft and repopulate the mouse liver. These results indicate that mature endothelial cells cannot transdifferentiate in vivo and thus do not exhibit phenotypic plasticity. Our results have set a basis for further research to the potential of human liver endothelial cells in liver-directed cell and gene therapy. PMID:23044355

  9. Mouse models of liver fibrosis mimic human liver fibrosis of different etiologies.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Allyson K; Maroni, Luca; Marzioni, Marco; Ahmed, Syed T; Milad, Mena; Ray, Debolina; Alpini, Gianfranco; Glaser, Shannon S

    2014-12-01

    The liver has the amazing capacity to repair itself after injury; however, the same processes that are involved in liver regeneration after acute injury can cause serious consequences during chronic liver injury. In an effort to repair damage, activated hepatic stellate cells trigger a cascade of events that lead to deposition and accumulation of extracellular matrix components causing the progressive replacement of the liver parenchyma by scar tissue, thus resulting in fibrosis. Although fibrosis occurs as a result of many chronic liver diseases, the molecular mechanisms involved depend on the underlying etiology. Since studying liver fibrosis in human subjects is complicated by many factors, mouse models of liver fibrosis that mimic the human conditions fill this void. This review summarizes the general mouse models of liver fibrosis and mouse models that mimic specific human disease conditions that result in liver fibrosis. Additionally, recent progress that has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the fibrogenic processes of each of the human disease conditions is highlighted. PMID:25396098

  10. Mouse models of liver fibrosis mimic human liver fibrosis of different etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Allyson K.; Maroni, Luca; Marzioni, Marco; Ahmed, Syed T.; Milad, Mena; Ray, Debolina; Alpini, Gianfranco; Glaser, Shannon S.

    2014-01-01

    The liver has the amazing capacity to repair itself after injury; however, the same processes that are involved in liver regeneration after acute injury can cause serious consequences during chronic liver injury. In an effort to repair damage, activated hepatic stellate cells trigger a cascade of events that lead to deposition and accumulation of extracellular matrix components causing the progressive replacement of the liver parenchyma by scar tissue, thus resulting in fibrosis. Although fibrosis occurs as a result of many chronic liver diseases, the molecular mechanisms involved depend on the underlying etiology. Since studying liver fibrosis in human subjects is complicated by many factors, mouse models of liver fibrosis that mimic the human conditions fill this void. This review summarizes the general mouse models of liver fibrosis and mouse models that mimic specific human disease conditions that result in liver fibrosis. Additionally, recent progress that has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the fibrogenic processes of each of the human disease conditions is highlighted. PMID:25396098

  11. Spaceflight Activates Lipotoxic Pathways in Mouse Liver.

    PubMed

    Jonscher, Karen R; Alfonso-Garcia, Alba; Suhalim, Jeffrey L; Orlicky, David J; Potma, Eric O; Ferguson, Virginia L; Bouxsein, Mary L; Bateman, Ted A; Stodieck, Louis S; Levi, Moshe; Friedman, Jacob E; Gridley, Daila S; Pecaut, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Spaceflight affects numerous organ systems in the body, leading to metabolic dysfunction that may have long-term consequences. Microgravity-induced alterations in liver metabolism, particularly with respect to lipids, remain largely unexplored. Here we utilize a novel systems biology approach, combining metabolomics and transcriptomics with advanced Raman microscopy, to investigate altered hepatic lipid metabolism in mice following short duration spaceflight. Mice flown aboard Space Transportation System -135, the last Shuttle mission, lose weight but redistribute lipids, particularly to the liver. Intriguingly, spaceflight mice lose retinol from lipid droplets. Both mRNA and metabolite changes suggest the retinol loss is linked to activation of PPARα-mediated pathways and potentially to hepatic stellate cell activation, both of which may be coincident with increased bile acids and early signs of liver injury. Although the 13-day flight duration is too short for frank fibrosis to develop, the retinol loss plus changes in markers of extracellular matrix remodeling raise the concern that longer duration exposure to the space environment may result in progressive liver damage, increasing the risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:27097220

  12. Spaceflight Activates Lipotoxic Pathways in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Jonscher, Karen R.; Alfonso-Garcia, Alba; Suhalim, Jeffrey L.; Orlicky, David J.; Potma, Eric O.; Ferguson, Virginia L.; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Bateman, Ted A.; Stodieck, Louis S.; Levi, Moshe; Friedman, Jacob E.; Gridley, Daila S.; Pecaut, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Spaceflight affects numerous organ systems in the body, leading to metabolic dysfunction that may have long-term consequences. Microgravity-induced alterations in liver metabolism, particularly with respect to lipids, remain largely unexplored. Here we utilize a novel systems biology approach, combining metabolomics and transcriptomics with advanced Raman microscopy, to investigate altered hepatic lipid metabolism in mice following short duration spaceflight. Mice flown aboard Space Transportation System -135, the last Shuttle mission, lose weight but redistribute lipids, particularly to the liver. Intriguingly, spaceflight mice lose retinol from lipid droplets. Both mRNA and metabolite changes suggest the retinol loss is linked to activation of PPARα-mediated pathways and potentially to hepatic stellate cell activation, both of which may be coincident with increased bile acids and early signs of liver injury. Although the 13-day flight duration is too short for frank fibrosis to develop, the retinol loss plus changes in markers of extracellular matrix remodeling raise the concern that longer duration exposure to the space environment may result in progressive liver damage, increasing the risk for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:27097220

  13. Psychosine-induced alterations in peroxisomes of Twitcher Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Contreras, Miguel Agustin; Haq, Ehtishamul; Uto, Takuhiro; Singh, Inderjit; Singh, Avtar Kaur

    2008-01-01

    Krabbe’s disease is a neuroinflammatory disorder in which galactosylsphingosine (psychosine) accumulates in nervous tissue. To gain insight into whether the psychosine-induced effects in nervous tissue extend to peripheral organs, we investigated the expression of cytokines and their effects on peroxisomal structure/function in twitcher mouse liver (animal model of Krabbe disease). Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated TNF-α and IL-6 expression, which was confirmed by mRNAs quantitation. Despite the presence of TNF-α, lipidomic analysis did not indicate a significant decrease in sphingomyelin or an increase in ceramide fractions. Ultrastructural analysis of catalase-dependent staining of liver sections showed reduced reactivity without significant changes in peroxisomal contents. This observation was confirmed by assaying catalase activity and quantitation of its mRNA, both of which were found significantly decreased in twitcher mouse liver. Western blot analysis demonstrated a generalized reduction of peroxisomal matrix and membrane proteins. These observations indicate that twitcher mouse pathobiology extends to the liver, where the induction of TNF-α and IL-6 compromise peroxisomal structure and function. PMID:18602885

  14. Zonated quantification of steatosis in an entire mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Schwen, Lars Ole; Homeyer, André; Schwier, Michael; Dahmen, Uta; Dirsch, Olaf; Schenk, Arne; Kuepfer, Lars; Preusser, Tobias; Schenk, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Many physiological processes and pathological conditions in livers are spatially heterogeneous, forming patterns at the lobular length scale or varying across the organ. Steatosis, a common liver disease characterized by lipids accumulating in hepatocytes, exhibits heterogeneity at both these spatial scales. The main goal of the present study was to provide a method for zonated quantification of the steatosis patterns found in an entire mouse liver. As an example application, the results were employed in a pharmacokinetics simulation. For the analysis, an automatic detection of the lipid vacuoles was used in multiple slides of histological serial sections covering an entire mouse liver. Lobuli were determined semi-automatically and zones were defined within the lobuli. Subsequently, the lipid content of each zone was computed. The steatosis patterns were found to be predominantly periportal, with a notable organ-scale heterogeneity. The analysis provides a quantitative description of the extent of steatosis in unprecedented detail. The resulting steatosis patterns were successfully used as a perturbation to the liver as part of an exemplary whole-body pharmacokinetics simulation for the antitussive drug dextromethorphan. The zonated quantification is also applicable to other pathological conditions that can be detected in histological images. Besides being a descriptive research tool, this quantification could perspectively complement diagnosis based on visual assessment of histological images. PMID:27104496

  15. Function of GATA Factors in the Adult Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Rena; Rebolledo-Jaramillo, Boris; Zong, Yiwei; Wang, Liqing; Russo, Pierre; Hancock, Wayne; Stanger, Ben Z.; Hardison, Ross C.; Blobel, Gerd A.

    2013-01-01

    GATA transcription factors and their Friend of Gata (FOG) cofactors control the development of diverse tissues. GATA4 and GATA6 are essential for the expansion of the embryonic liver bud, but their expression patterns and functions in the adult liver are unclear. We characterized the expression of GATA and FOG factors in whole mouse liver and purified hepatocytes. GATA4, GATA6, and FOG1 are the most prominently expressed family members in whole liver and hepatocytes. GATA4 chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) identified 4409 occupied sites, associated with genes enriched in ontologies related to liver function, including lipid and glucose metabolism. However, hepatocyte-specific excision of Gata4 had little impact on gross liver architecture and function, even under conditions of regenerative stress, and, despite the large number of GATA4 occupied genes, resulted in relatively few changes in gene expression. To address possible redundancy between GATA4 and GATA6, both factors were conditionally excised. Surprisingly, combined Gata4,6 loss did not exacerbate the phenotype resulting from Gata4 loss alone. This points to the presence of an unusually robust transcriptional network in adult hepatocytes that ensures the maintenance of liver function. PMID:24367609

  16. MACS Isolation and Culture of Mouse Liver Mesothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuchang; Lua, Ingrid; Asahina, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Mesothelial cells (MCs) form a single squamous epithelial cell layer and cover the surfaces of the internal organs, as well as the walls of cavities. The isolation of MCs is of great importance to study their function and characteristics for the understanding of physiology and pathophysiology of the liver. Glycoprotein M6a (GPM6A) was originally identified as a cell surface protein expressed in neurons and recently its expression was reported in epicardium and liver MCs (Wu et al., 2001; Bochmann et al., 2010; Li et al., 2012). Here we describe a method to isolate MCs from the adult mouse liver with anti-GPM6A antibodies. Under the low glucose and serum concentration, primary MCs grow and form epithelial colonies (Figure 1).

  17. Control of mouse liver ornithine aminotransferase synthesis (OAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Burcham, J.M.; Peraino, C.

    1987-05-01

    Control of hepatic OAT synthesis by dietary protein and diurnal cycling was studied by using Western blots, in vitro translation of free polysomes, and slot blots of total liver RNA. Western blots showed that animals maintained on an 85% casein diet had higher levels of OAT protein than mice fed a 20% casein diet. Slot blots of total liver RNA from animals on either diet did not indicate a commensurate increase in OAT mRNA levels in animals on the high casein diet. Western blots of livers from mice maintained on a 12-hour light and 12-hour dark cycle did not show differences in the level of OAT protein. However, OAT synthesis by in vitro translation of free polysomes was several fold higher when polysomes isolated at the beginning of the light period were used. Corresponding measurements of OAT mRNA in slot blots of total liver RNA did not show any differences in OAT mRNA levels between the light and dark periods. These results suggest that the control of OAT synthesis in mouse liver by dietary protein and diurnal cycles is primarily at the level of translation.

  18. Quantitative proteomic survey of endoplasmic reticulum in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Song, Yanping; Jiang, Ying; Ying, Wantao; Gong, Yan; Yan, Yujuan; Yang, Dong; Ma, Jie; Xue, Xiaofang; Zhong, Fan; Wu, Songfeng; Hao, Yunwei; Sun, Aihua; Li, Tao; Sun, Wei; Wei, Handong; Zhu, Yunping; Qian, Xiaohong; He, Fuchu

    2010-03-01

    To gain a better understanding of the critical function of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in liver, we carried out a proteomic survey of mouse liver ER. The ER proteome was profiled with a new three-dimensional, gel-based strategy. From 6152 and 6935 MS spectra, 903 and 1042 proteins were identified with at least two peptides matches at 95% confidence in the rough (r) and smooth (s) ER, respectively. Comparison of the rER and sER proteomes showed that calcium-binding proteins are significantly enriched in the sER suggesting that the ion-binding function of the ER is compartmentalized. Comparison of the rat and mouse ER proteomes showed that 662 proteins were common to both, comprising 53.5% and 49.3% of those proteomes, respectively. We proposed that these proteins were stably expressed proteins that were essential for the maintenance of ER function. GO annotation with a hypergeometric model proved this hypothesis. Unexpectedly, 210 unknown proteins and some proteins previously reported to occur in the cytosol were highly enriched in the ER. This study provides a reference map for the ER proteome of liver. Identification of new ER proteins will enhance our current understanding of the ER and also suggest new functions for this organelle. PMID:20073521

  19. Discrimination of tumorigenic triazole conazoles from phenobarbital by transcriptional analyses of mouse liver gene expression

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are fungicides used to control fungal growth in environmental settings and to treat humans with fungal infections. Mouse hepatotumorigenic conazoles display many of the same hepatic toxicologic responses as the mouse liver carcinogen phenobarbital (PB): constitutive and...

  20. Increased metallothionein in mouse liver, kidneys, and duodenum during lactation.

    PubMed

    Solaiman, D; Jonah, M M; Miyazaki, W; Ho, G; Bhattacharyya, M H

    2001-03-01

    Lactation-induced increases in cadmium absorption and retention have been demonstrated in mid-lactating mice, but no systematic measurements of endogenous metal-binding protein concentrations during lactation have been reported. Using Cd/hemoglobin radioassay, this study detected significant increases in metallothionein (MT) concentrations in liver (4-fold), kidneys (2-fold), and duodenum (2-fold), but not jejunum, of mouse dams on days 13 and 20 of lactation. These increases occurred in the absence of cadmium exposure and were specific to the lactation period; dams 5 days after weaning showed MT levels that were similar to those of nonpregnant (NP) mice. Similarly, Northern blot analyses of livers from lactating mice demonstrated that MT mRNA concentrations in maternal liver during mid-lactation were 6-fold higher than those observed 5 days after pups were weaned. Gel filtration of final supernatants from the Cd/hemoglobin assay confirmed that the Cd-binding molecule induced during lactation was indeed metallothionein. In addition, chromatographic analyses of cytosols from tissues taken from dams administered small amounts of Cd (66 ng/mouse) showed that the trace amounts of Cd absorbed through the maternal gastrointestinal tract during mid-lactation were also bound to the MT. These results indicate MT induction in mouse dams occurs as a physiological consequence of lactation, requiring no external stimulus. This induced MT participates in binding low levels of dietary cadmium consumed by the dam. During lactation, elevated maternal MT may affect pathways for essential trace metals as well as sequester toxic metals harmful to the neonate. Multiparous humans may have increased risk of accumulating environmental Cd. PMID:11222885

  1. Mouse genotypes drive the liver and adrenal gland clocks

    PubMed Central

    Košir, Rok; Prosenc Zmrzljak, Uršula; Korenčič, Anja; Juvan, Peter; Ačimovič, Jure; Rozman, Damjana

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms regulate a plethora of physiological processes. Perturbations of the rhythm can result in pathologies which are frequently studied in inbred mouse strains. We show that the genotype of mouse lines defines the circadian gene expression patterns. Expression of majority of core clock and output metabolic genes are phase delayed in the C56BL/6J line compared to 129S2 in the adrenal glands and the liver. Circadian amplitudes are generally higher in the 129S2 line. Experiments in dark – dark (DD) and light – dark conditions (LD), exome sequencing and data mining proposed that mouse lines differ in single nucleotide variants in the binding regions of clock related transcription factors in open chromatin regions. A possible mechanisms of differential circadian expression could be the entrainment and transmission of the light signal to peripheral organs. This is supported by the genotype effect in adrenal glands that is largest under LD, and by the high number of single nucleotide variants in the Receptor, Kinase and G-protein coupled receptor Panther molecular function categories. Different phenotypes of the two mouse lines and changed amino acid sequence of the Period 2 protein possibly contribute further to the observed differences in circadian gene expression. PMID:27535584

  2. Mouse genotypes drive the liver and adrenal gland clocks.

    PubMed

    Košir, Rok; Prosenc Zmrzljak, Uršula; Korenčič, Anja; Juvan, Peter; Ačimovič, Jure; Rozman, Damjana

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms regulate a plethora of physiological processes. Perturbations of the rhythm can result in pathologies which are frequently studied in inbred mouse strains. We show that the genotype of mouse lines defines the circadian gene expression patterns. Expression of majority of core clock and output metabolic genes are phase delayed in the C56BL/6J line compared to 129S2 in the adrenal glands and the liver. Circadian amplitudes are generally higher in the 129S2 line. Experiments in dark - dark (DD) and light - dark conditions (LD), exome sequencing and data mining proposed that mouse lines differ in single nucleotide variants in the binding regions of clock related transcription factors in open chromatin regions. A possible mechanisms of differential circadian expression could be the entrainment and transmission of the light signal to peripheral organs. This is supported by the genotype effect in adrenal glands that is largest under LD, and by the high number of single nucleotide variants in the Receptor, Kinase and G-protein coupled receptor Panther molecular function categories. Different phenotypes of the two mouse lines and changed amino acid sequence of the Period 2 protein possibly contribute further to the observed differences in circadian gene expression. PMID:27535584

  3. Case Study: Polycystic Livers in a Transgenic Mouse Line

    SciTech Connect

    Lovaglio, Jamie A.; Artwohl, James E.; Ward, Christopher J.; Diekwisch, Thomas G. H.; Ito, Yoshihiro; Fortman, Jeffrey D.

    2014-04-01

    Three mice (2 male, 1 female; age, 5 to 16 mo) from a mouse line transgenic for keratin 14 (K14)-driven LacZ expression and on an outbred Crl:CD1(ICR) background, were identified as having distended abdomens and livers that were diffusely enlarged by numerous cysts (diameter, 0.1 to 2.0 cm). Histopathology revealed hepatic cysts lined by biliary type epithelium and mild chronic inflammation, and confirmed the absence of parasites. Among 21 related mice, 5 additional affected mice were identified via laparotomy. Breeding of these 5 mice (after 5 mo of age) did not result in any offspring; the K14 mice with olycystic livers failed to reproduce. Affected male mice had degenerative testicular lesions, and their sperm was immotile. Nonpolycystic K14 control male mice bred well, had no testicular lesions, and had appropriate sperm motility. Genetic analysis did not identify an association of this phenotype with the transgene or insertion site.

  4. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection.

    PubMed

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27003162

  5. Proteomic Profiling of Mouse Liver following Acute Toxoplasma gondii Infection

    PubMed Central

    He, Jun-Jun; Ma, Jun; Elsheikha, Hany M.; Song, Hui-Qun; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii remains a global public health problem. However, its pathophysiology is still not-completely understood particularly the impact of infection on host liver metabolism. We performed iTRAQ-based proteomic analysis to evaluate early liver protein responses in BALB/c mice following infection with T. gondii PYS strain (genotype ToxoDB#9) infection. Our data revealed modification of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, as indicated by the upregulation of immune response and downregulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain, and the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and xenobiotics. T. gondii seems to hijack host PPAR signaling pathway to downregulate the metabolism of fatty acids, lipids and energy in the liver. The metabolism of over 400 substances was affected by the downregulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The top 10 transcription factors used by upregulated genes were Stat2, Stat1, Irf2, Irf1, Sp2, Egr1, Stat3, Klf4, Elf1 and Gabpa, while the top 10 transcription factors of downregulated genes were Hnf4A, Ewsr1, Fli1, Hnf4g, Nr2f1, Pparg, Rxra, Hnf1A, Foxa1 and Foxo1. These findings indicate global reprogramming of the metabolism of the mouse liver after acute T. gondii infection. Functional characterization of the altered proteins may enhance understanding of the host responses to T. gondii infection and lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27003162

  6. Mammary-carcinoma cells in mouse liver: infiltration of liver tissue and interaction with Kupffer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Roos, E.; Dingemans, K. P.; Van de Pavert, I. V.; Van den Bergh-Weerman, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    Interactions between TA3 mammary-carcinoma cells and liver cells were studied with the electron microscope in mouse livers that had been perfused with a defined medium containing the tumour cells. Infiltration of liver tissue by the TA3 cells proceeded in the following steps. First, numerous small protrusions were extended through endothelial cells and into hepatocytes. Next, some cells had larger processes deeply indenting hepatocytes. Finally a few tumour cells became located outside the blood vessels. Two variant cell lines, TA3/Ha and TA3/St, differing in cell coat and surface charge, did not differ in the extent of infiltration. TA3/Ha cells were often encircled by thin processes of liver macrophages (Kupffer cells). Encircled cells were initially intact, but later some of them degenerated. These observations suggest that TA3/Ha cells were phagocytized by the Kupffer cells. Encirclement appeared to be inhibited after only 30 min, when many cells were still partly surrounded. Encirclement of TA3/St was much less frequent. After injection of tumour cells intra-portally in vivo, similar results were obtained, which demonstrated the validity of the perfused liver model. TA3/Ha cells formed much fewer tumour nodules in the liver than TA3/St cells. Images Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 PMID:687522

  7. Mouse models of liver cancer: Progress and recommendations.

    PubMed

    He, Li; Tian, De-An; Li, Pei-Yuan; He, Xing-Xing

    2015-09-15

    To clarify the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and investigate the effects of potential therapies, a number of mouse models have been developed. Subcutaneous xenograft models are widely used in the past decades. Yet, with the advent of in vivo imaging technology, investigators are more and more concerned with the orthotopic models nowadays. Genetically engineered mouse models (GEM) have greatly facilitated studies of gene function in HCC development. Recently, GEM of miR-122 and miR-221 provided new approaches for better understanding of the in vivo functions of microRNA in hepatocarcinogenesis. Chemically induced liver tumors in animals share many of the morphological, histogenic, and biochemical features of human HCC. Yet, the complicated and obscure genomic alternation restricts their applications. In this review, we highlight both the frequently used mouse models and some emerging ones with emphasis on their merits or defects, and give advises for investigators to chose a "best-fit" animal model in HCC research. PMID:26259234

  8. Quantitative changes in endogenous DNA adducts correlate with conazole mutagenicity and tumorigenicity in mouse liver.**

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that the conazole fungicides triadimefon and propiconazole, which are tumorigenic in mouse liver, are in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses. The nontumorigenic conazole myclo...

  9. Quantitative changes in endogenous DNA adducts correlate with conazole mutagenicity and tumorigenicity in mouse liver.

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that the conazole fungicides triadimefon and propiconazole, which are tumorigenic in mouse liver, are in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses. The nontumorigenic conazole myclo...

  10. Metabolism of 20-hydroxyvitamin D3 by mouse liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chloe Y S; Slominski, Andrzej T; Tuckey, Robert C

    2014-10-01

    20-Hydroxyvitamin D3 [20(OH)D3], the major product of CYP11A1 action on vitamin D3, is biologically active and like 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] can inhibit proliferation and promote differentiation of a range of cells, and has anti-inflammatory properties. However, unlike 1,25(OH)2D3, it does not cause toxic hypercalcemia at high doses and is therefore a good candidate for therapeutic use to treat hyperproliferative and autoimmune disorders. In this study we analyzed the ability of mouse liver microsomes to metabolize 20(OH)D3. The two major products were identified from authentic standards as 20,24-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [20,24(OH)2D3] and 20,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [20,25(OH)2D3]. The reactions for synthesis of these two products from 20(OH)D3 displayed similar Km values suggesting that they were catalyzed by the same cytochrome P450. Some minor metabolites were produced by reactions with higher Km values for 20(OH)D3. Some metabolites gave mass spectra suggesting that they were the result of hydroxylation followed by dehydrogenation. One product had an increase in the wavelength for maximum absorbance from 263nm seen for 20(OH)D3, to 290nm, suggesting a new double bond was interacting with the vitamin D-triene chromophore. The two major products, 20,24(OH)2D3 and 20,25(OH)2D3 have both previously been shown to have higher potency for inhibition of colony formation by melanoma cells than 20(OH)D3, thus it appears that metabolism of 20(OH)D3 by mouse liver microsomes can generate products with enhanced activity. PMID:25138634

  11. Metabolism of 20-hydroxyvitamin D3 by mouse liver microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chloe Y.S.; Slominski, Andrzej T.; Tuckey, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    20-Hydroxyvitamin D3 [20(OH)D3], the major product of CYP11A1 action on vitamin D3, is biologically active and like 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] can inhibit proliferation and promote differentiation of a range of cells, and has anti-inflammatory properties. However, unlike 1,25(OH)2D3, it does not cause toxic hypercalcemia at high doses and is therefore a good candidate for therapeutic use to treat hyperproliferative and autoimmune disorders. In this study we analyzed the ability of mouse liver microsomes to metabolize 20(OH)D3. The two major products were identified from authentic standards as 20,24-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [20,24(OH)2D3] and 20,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [20,25(OH)2D3]. The reactions for synthesis of these two products from 20(OH)D3 displayed similar Km values suggesting that they were catalyzed by the same cytochrome P450. Some minor metabolites were produced by reactions with higher Km values for 20(OH)D3. Some metabolites gave mass spectra suggesting that they were the result of hydroxylation followed by dehydrogenation. One product had an increase in the wavelength for maximum absorbance from 263 nm seen for 20(OH)D3, to 290 nm, suggesting a new double bond was interacting with the vitamin D-triene chromophore. The two major products, 20,24(OH)2D3 and 20,25(OH)2D3 have both previously been shown to have higher potency for inhibition of colony formation by melanoma cells than 20(OH)D3, thus it appears that metabolism of 20(OH)D3 by mouse liver microsomes can generate products with enhanced activity. PMID:25138634

  12. Case Study: Polycystic Livers in a Transgenic Mouse Line

    PubMed Central

    Lovaglio, Jamie; Artwohl, James E; Ward, Christopher J; Diekwisch, Thomas GH; Ito, Yoshihiro; Fortman, Jeffrey D

    2014-01-01

    Three mice (2 male, 1 female; age, 5 to 16 mo) from a mouse line transgenic for keratin 14 (K14)-driven LacZ expression and on an outbred Crl:CD1(ICR) background, were identified as having distended abdomens and livers that were diffusely enlarged by numerous cysts (diameter, 0.1 to 2.0 cm). Histopathology revealed hepatic cysts lined by biliary type epithelium and mild chronic inflammation, and confirmed the absence of parasites. Among 21 related mice, 5 additional affected mice were identified via laparotomy. Breeding of these 5 mice (after 5 mo of age) did not result in any offspring; the K14 mice with polycystic livers failed to reproduce. Affected male mice had degenerative testicular lesions, and their sperm was immotile. Nonpolycystic K14 control male mice bred well, had no testicular lesions, and had appropriate sperm motility. Genetic analysis did not identify an association of this phenotype with the transgene or insertion site. PMID:24674586

  13. [Isolation and purification of primary Kupffer cells from mouse liver].

    PubMed

    Sun, Chao; Luo, Qingbo; Lu, Xiuxian; Zheng, Daofeng; He, Diao; Wu, Zhongjun

    2016-08-01

    Objective To isolate and purify Kupffer cells (KCs) from BALB/c mice by an efficient method of low-speed centrifugation and rapid adherence. Methods The mouse liver tissue was perfused in situ and digested with 0.5 g/L collagenase type IV in vitro by water bath. Then, through the low-speed centrifugation, KCs were separated from the mixed hepatocytes, and purified by rapid adherent characteristics. Finally, the production and activity of KCs obtained by this modified method were compared with those isolated by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. We used F4/80 antibody immunofluorescence technique to observe morphological features of KCs, flow cytometry (FCM) to detect the expression of F4/80 antibody and the ink uptake test to observe the phagocytic activity. Moreover, using FCM, we evaluated the expressions of molecules associated with antigen presentation, including major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II), CD40, CD86 and CD68 on the surface of KCs subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) modeling. And, ELISA was conducted to measure tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production of the cultured KCs following H/R. Results The yield of KCs was (5.83±0.54)×10(6) per mouse liver and the survival rate of KCs was up to 92% by low-speed centrifugation and rapid adherent method. Compared with Percoll density gradient centrifugation [the yield of KCs was (2.19±0.43)×10(6) per liver], this new method significantly improved the yield of KCs. F4/80 immunofluorescence showed typical morphologic features of KCs such as spindle or polygon shapes and FCM identified nearly 90% F4/80 positive cells. The phagocytic assay showed that lots of ink particles were phagocytosed into the isolated cells. KC H/R models expressed more MHC II, CD40 and CD86 and produced more TNF-α participating in inflammation. Conclusion The efficient method to isolate and purify KCs from BALB /c mice has been successfully established. PMID:27412929

  14. Altered microRNA expression induced by tumorigenic conazoles in mouse liver.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole, and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. As part of a coordinated study to understand the molecular determinants ...

  15. A potential microRNA signature for tumorigenic conazoles in mouse liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. As part of a coordinated study to understand the molecular determinants of conazole tumor...

  16. A microRNA signature for tumorigenic conazoles in mouse liver.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. As part of a coordinated study to understand the molecular determinants o...

  17. Analyzing the temporal regulation of translation efficiency in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Janich, Peggy; Arpat, Alaaddin Bulak; Castelo-Szekely, Violeta; Gatfield, David

    2016-06-01

    Mammalian physiology and behavior follow daily rhythms that are orchestrated by endogenous timekeepers known as circadian clocks. Rhythms in transcription are considered the main mechanism to engender rhythmic gene expression, but important roles for posttranscriptional mechanisms have recently emerged as well (reviewed in Lim and Allada (2013) [1]). We have recently reported on the use of ribosome profiling (RPF-seq), a method based on the high-throughput sequencing of ribosome protected mRNA fragments, to explore the temporal regulation of translation efficiency (Janich et al., 2015 [2]). Through the comparison of around-the-clock RPF-seq and matching RNA-seq data we were able to identify 150 genes, involved in ribosome biogenesis, iron metabolism and other pathways, whose rhythmicity is generated entirely at the level of protein synthesis. The temporal transcriptome and translatome data sets from this study have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus under the accession number GSE67305. Here we provide additional information on the experimental setup and on important optimization steps pertaining to the ribosome profiling technique in mouse liver and to data analysis. PMID:27114907

  18. Proteomic Analysis of Propiconazole Responses in Mouse Liver-Comparison of Genomic and Proteomic Profiles

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have performed for the first time a comprehensive profiling of changes in protein expression of soluble proteins in livers from mice treated with the mouse liver tumorigen, propiconazole, to uncover the pathways and networks altered by this commonly used fungicide. Utilizing t...

  19. PPARÁ-DEPENDENT GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN THE MOUSE LIVER AFTER EXPOSURE TO PEROXISOME PROLIFERATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferators (PP) are a large class of structurally diverse chemicals that mediate their effects in the liver mainly through the PP-activated receptor ¿ (PPARα). Development of PP induced hepatocarcinogenesis in mouse liver is known to be dependent on PPAR&#...

  20. Proteomic analysis of propiconazole responses in mouse liver: comparison of genomic and proteomic profiles

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have performed for the first time a comprehensive profiling of changes in protein expression of soluble proteins in livers from mice treated with the mouse liver tumorigen, propiconazole, to uncover the pathways and networks altered by this fungicide. Utilizing twodimensional...

  1. Comprehensive Analysis of in Vivo Phosphoproteome of Mouse Liver Microsomes.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Oh Kwang; Sim, JuHee; Kim, Sun Ju; Sung, Eunji; Kim, Jin Young; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Lee, Sangkyu

    2015-12-01

    Protein phosphorylation at serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues are some of the most widespread reversible post-translational modifications. Microsomes are vesicle-like bodies, not ordinarily present within living cells, which form from pieces of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), plasma membrane, mitochondria, or Golgi apparatus of broken eukaryotic cells. Here we investigated the total phosphoproteome of mouse liver microsomes (MLMs) using TiO2 enrichment of phosphopeptides coupled to on-line 2D-LC-MS/MS. In total, 699 phosphorylation sites in 527 proteins were identified in MLMs. When compared with the current phosphoSitePlus database, 155 novel phosphoproteins were identified in MLM. The distributions of phosphosites were 89.4, 8.0, and 2.6% for phosphoserine, phosphotheronine, and phosphotyrosine, respectively. By Motif-X analysis, eight Ser motifs and one Thr motif were found, and five acidic, two basophilic-, and two proline-directed motifs were assigned. The potential functions of phosphoproteins in MLM were assigned by Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis. In GO annotation, phosphorylated microsomal proteins were involved in mRNA processing, mRNA metabolic processes, and RNA splicing. In the KEGG pathway analysis, phosphorylated microsomal proteins were highly enriched in ribosome protein processing in ER and ribosomes and in RNA transport. Furthermore, we determined that 52 and 23 phosphoproteins were potential substrates of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A and casein kinase II, respectively, many of which are 40S/60S ribosomal proteins. Overall, our results provide an overview of features of protein phosphorylation in MLMs that should be a valuable resource for the future understanding of protein synthesis or translation involving phosphorylation. PMID:26487105

  2. Activation of farnesoid X receptor induces RECK expression in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Xiaomin; Wu, Weibin; Zhu, Bo; Sun, Zhichao; Ji, Lingling; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Meiling; Zhou, Lei; Gu, Jianxin

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •RECK is a novel transcriptional target gene of FXR in mouse liver. •The FXR response element is located within the intron 1 of RECK gene. •FXR agonist reverses the down-regulation of RECK in the liver in mouse NASH model. -- Abstract: Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) belongs to the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily, and functions as a transcription factor regulating the transcription of numerous genes involved in bile acid homeostasis, lipoprotein and glucose metabolism. In the present study, we identified RECK, a membrane-anchored inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases, as a novel target gene of FXR in mouse liver. We found that FXR agonist substantially augmented hepatic RECK mRNA and protein expression in vivo and in vitro. FXR regulated the transcription of RECK through directly binding to FXR response element located within intron 1 of the mouse RECK gene. Moreover, FXR agonist reversed the down-regulation of RECK in the livers from mice fed a methionine and choline deficient diet. In summary, our data suggest that RECK is a novel transcriptional target of FXR in mouse liver, and provide clues to better understanding the function of FXR in liver.

  3. Activation of farnesoid X receptor induces RECK expression in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiaomin; Wu, Weibin; Zhu, Bo; Sun, Zhichao; Ji, Lingling; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Meiling; Zhou, Lei; Gu, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) belongs to the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily, and functions as a transcription factor regulating the transcription of numerous genes involved in bile acid homeostasis, lipoprotein and glucose metabolism. In the present study, we identified RECK, a membrane-anchored inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases, as a novel target gene of FXR in mouse liver. We found that FXR agonist substantially augmented hepatic RECK mRNA and protein expression in vivo and in vitro. FXR regulated the transcription of RECK through directly binding to FXR response element located within intron 1 of the mouse RECK gene. Moreover, FXR agonist reversed the down-regulation of RECK in the livers from mice fed a methionine and choline deficient diet. In summary, our data suggest that RECK is a novel transcriptional target of FXR in mouse liver, and provide clues to better understanding the function of FXR in liver. PMID:24291500

  4. Co-expression network analysis identifies transcriptional modules in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Ye, Hua

    2014-10-01

    The mouse liver transcriptome has been extensively studied but little is known about the global hepatic gene network of the mouse under normal physiological conditions. Understanding this will help reveal the transcriptional organization of the liver and elucidate its functional complexity. Here, weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was carried out to explore gene co-expression networks using large-scale microarray data from normal mouse livers. A total of 7,203 genes were parsed into 16 gene modules associated with protein catabolism, RNA processing, muscle contraction, transcriptional regulation, oxidation reduction, sterol biosynthesis, translation, fatty acid metabolism, immune response and others. The modules were organized into higher order co-expression groups. Hub genes in each module were found to be critical for module function. In sum, the analyses revealed the gene modular map of the mouse liver under normal physiological condition. These results provide a systems-level framework to help understand the complexity of the mouse liver at the molecular level, and should be beneficial in annotating uncharacterized genes. PMID:24816893

  5. Liver Transplantation Outcomes Using Grafts From Donors Older Than the Age of 80 Years.

    PubMed

    Rabelo, A V; Alvarez, M J; Méndez, C S M; Villegas, M T; MGraneroa, K; Becerra, A; Dominguez, M; Raya, A M; Exposito, M; Suárez, Y F

    2015-11-01

    We performed a retrospective cohort study between 2002 and 2014 to compare liver transplantation outcomes between recipients of grafts from donors older than and younger than the age of 80 years. Numerical variables were compared with the Student t test when their distribution was normal and the Mann-Whitney test when it was not, whereas categorical variables were compared with Pearson chi-squared test or Fisher test, as appropriate; P < .05 was considered significant. The study included 312 patients with organs from donors younger than 80 years of age and 17 with organs from older donors. The 2 recipient groups did not significantly differ in weight, height, gender, body mass index (BMI), CHILD or MELD score, intensive care unit (ICU) or hospital stay, need for intraoperative hemoderivatives, postreperfusion syndrome, biliary or vascular complications, ischemic cholangiopathy, number of repeat surgeries, graft rejection, retransplantation, or survival at 6 months. Although earlier studies considered livers from elderly donors to be suboptimal, our results support the proposition that octogenarian donors can be an excellent source of liver grafts. PMID:26680060

  6. Repair of liver mediated by adult mouse liver neuro-glia antigen 2-positive progenitor cell transplantation in a mouse model of cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyu; Siegel, Christopher T.; Shuai, Ling; Lai, Jiejuan; Zeng, Linli; Zhang, Yujun; Lai, Xiangdong; Bie, Ping; Bai, Lianhua

    2016-01-01

    NG2-expressing cells are a population of periportal vascular stem/progenitors (MLpvNG2+ cells) that were isolated from healthy adult mouse liver by using a “Percoll-Plate-Wait” procedure. We demonstrated that isolated cells are able to restore liver function after transplantation into a cirrhotic liver, and co-localized with the pericyte marker (immunohistochemistry: PDGFR-β) and CK19. Cells were positive for: stem cell (Sca-1, CD133, Dlk) and liver stem cell markers (EpCAM, CD14, CD24, CD49f); and negative for: hematopoietic (CD34, CD45) and endothelial markers (CD31, vWf, von Willebrand factor). Cells were transplanted (1 × 106 cells) in mice with diethylnitrosamine-induced cirrhosis at week 6. Cells showed increased hepatic associated gene expression of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), Albumin (Alb), Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (Sox9), hepatic nuclear factors (HNF1a, HNF1β, HNF3β, HNF4α, HNF6, Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), Leucine-rich repeated-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5) and Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT). Cells showed decreased fibrogenesis, hepatic stellate cell infiltration, Kupffer cells and inflammatory cytokines. Liver function markers improved. In a cirrhotic liver environment, cells could differentiate into hepatic lineages. In addition, grafted MLpvNG2+ cells could mobilize endogenous stem/progenitors to participate in liver repair. These results suggest that MLpvNG2+ cells may be novel adult liver progenitors that participate in liver regeneration. PMID:26905303

  7. Repair of liver mediated by adult mouse liver neuro-glia antigen 2-positive progenitor cell transplantation in a mouse model of cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongyu; Siegel, Christopher T; Shuai, Ling; Lai, Jiejuan; Zeng, Linli; Zhang, Yujun; Lai, Xiangdong; Bie, Ping; Bai, Lianhua

    2016-01-01

    NG2-expressing cells are a population of periportal vascular stem/progenitors (MLpvNG2(+) cells) that were isolated from healthy adult mouse liver by using a "Percoll-Plate-Wait" procedure. We demonstrated that isolated cells are able to restore liver function after transplantation into a cirrhotic liver, and co-localized with the pericyte marker (immunohistochemistry: PDGFR-β) and CK19. Cells were positive for: stem cell (Sca-1, CD133, Dlk) and liver stem cell markers (EpCAM, CD14, CD24, CD49f); and negative for: hematopoietic (CD34, CD45) and endothelial markers (CD31, vWf, von Willebrand factor). Cells were transplanted (1 × 10(6) cells) in mice with diethylnitrosamine-induced cirrhosis at week 6. Cells showed increased hepatic associated gene expression of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), Albumin (Alb), Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (Sox9), hepatic nuclear factors (HNF1a, HNF1β, HNF3β, HNF4α, HNF6, Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), Leucine-rich repeated-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5) and Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT). Cells showed decreased fibrogenesis, hepatic stellate cell infiltration, Kupffer cells and inflammatory cytokines. Liver function markers improved. In a cirrhotic liver environment, cells could differentiate into hepatic lineages. In addition, grafted MLpvNG2(+) cells could mobilize endogenous stem/progenitors to participate in liver repair. These results suggest that MLpvNG2(+) cells may be novel adult liver progenitors that participate in liver regeneration. PMID:26905303

  8. Human Glucocorticoid Receptor β Regulates Gluconeogenesis and Inflammation in Mouse Liver.

    PubMed

    He, Bo; Cruz-Topete, Diana; Oakley, Robert H; Xiao, Xiao; Cidlowski, John A

    2015-01-01

    While in vitro studies have demonstrated that a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) splice isoform, β-isoform of human GR (hGRβ), acts as a dominant-negative inhibitor of the classic hGRα and confers glucocorticoid resistance, the in vivo function of hGRβ is poorly understood. To this end, we created an adeno-associated virus (AAV) to express hGRβ in the mouse liver under the control of the hepatocyte-specific promoter. Genome-wide expression analysis of mouse livers showed that hGRβ significantly increased the expression of numerous genes, many of which are involved in endocrine system disorders and the inflammatory response. Physiologically, hGRβ antagonized GRα's function and attenuated hepatic gluconeogenesis through downregulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) in wild-type (WT) mouse liver. Interestingly, however, hGRβ did not repress PEPCK in GR liver knockout (GRLKO) mice. In contrast, hGRβ regulates the expression of STAT1 in the livers of both WT and GRLKO mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that hGRβ binds to the intergenic glucocorticoid response element (GRE) of the STAT1 gene. Furthermore, treatment with RU486 inhibited the upregulation of STAT1 mediated by hGRβ. Finally, our array data demonstrate that hGRβ regulates unique components of liver gene expression in vivo by both GRα-dependent and GRα-independent mechanisms. PMID:26711253

  9. Mouse liver protein sulfhydryl depletion after acetaminophen exposure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Greenhaw, James; Shi, Qiang; Roberts, Dean W; Hinson, Jack A; Muskhelishvili, Levan; Davis, Kelly; Salminen, William F

    2013-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury is the leading cause of acute liver failure in many countries. This study determined the extent of liver protein sulfhydryl depletion not only in whole liver homogenate but also in the zonal pattern of sulfhydryl depletion within the liver lobule. A single oral gavage dose of 150 or 300 mg/kg APAP in B6C3F1 mice produced increased serum alanine aminotransferase levels, liver necrosis, and glutathione depletion in a dose-dependent manner. Free protein sulfhydryls were measured in liver protein homogenates by labeling with maleimide linked to a near infrared fluorescent dye followed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Global protein sulfhydryl levels were decreased significantly (48.4%) starting at 1 hour after the APAP dose and maintained at this reduced level through 24 hours. To visualize the specific hepatocytes that had reduced protein sulfhydryl levels, frozen liver sections were labeled with maleimide linked to horseradish peroxidase. The centrilobular areas exhibited dramatic decreases in free protein sulfhydryls while the periportal regions were essentially spared. These protein sulfhydryl-depleted regions correlated with areas exhibiting histopathologic injury and APAP binding to protein. The majority of protein sulfhydryl depletion was due to reversible oxidation since the global- and lobule-specific effects were essentially reversed when the samples were reduced with tris(2-carboxyethy)phosphine before maleimide labeling. These temporal and zonal pattern changes in protein sulfhydryl oxidation shed new light on the importance that changes in protein redox status might play in the pathogenesis of APAP hepatotoxicity. PMID:23093024

  10. A novel method of mouse ex utero transplantation of hepatic progenitor cells into the fetal liver

    SciTech Connect

    Shikanai, Mima; Asahina, Kinji; Iseki, Sachiko Teramoto, Kenichi; Nishida, Tomohiro; Shimizu-Saito, Keiko; Ota, Masato; Eto, Kazuhiro; Teraoka, Hirobumi

    2009-04-03

    Avoiding the limitations of the adult liver niche, transplantation of hepatic stem/progenitor cells into fetal liver is desirable to analyze immature cells in a hepatic developmental environment. Here, we established a new monitor tool for cell fate of hepatic progenitor cells transplanted into the mouse fetal liver by using ex utero surgery. When embryonic day (ED) 14.5 hepatoblasts were injected into the ED14.5 fetal liver, the transplanted cells expressed albumin abundantly or {alpha}-fetoprotein weakly, and contained glycogen in the neonatal liver, indicating that transplanted hepatoblasts can proliferate and differentiate in concord with surrounding recipient parenchymal cells. The transplanted cells became mature in the liver of 6-week-old mice. Furthermore, this method was applicable to transplantation of hepatoblast-like cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells. These data indicate that this unique technique will provide a new in vivo experimental system for studying cell fate of hepatic stem/progenitor cells and liver organogenesis.

  11. Folate supplementation differently affects uracil content in DNA in the mouse colon and liver

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High folate intake may increase the risk of cancer, especially in the elderly. The present study examined the effects of ageing and dietary folate on uracil misincorporation into DNA, which has a mutagenic effect, in the mouse colon and liver. Old (18 months; n 42) and young (4 months; n 42) male C5...

  12. ASSESSING MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF THREE TOXICOLOGICALLY DIFFERENT CONAZOLES BASED ON PATHWAY ANALYSIS OF MOUSE LIVER TRANSCRIPTOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study was designed to identify the underlying molecular mechanism for the induction of mouse liver tumors by structurally-related conazoles. CD-1 mice were treated with the tumor producing conazoles, triadimefon (1800, 500, or 100 ppm), or propiconazole (2500, 500, or...

  13. Myostatin inhibits proliferation and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in mouse liver cells.

    PubMed

    Watts, Rani; Ghozlan, Mostafa; Hughey, Curtis C; Johnsen, Virginia L; Shearer, Jane; Hittel, Dustin S

    2014-06-01

    Although myostatin functions primarily as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth and development, accumulating biological and epidemiological evidence indicates an important contributing role in liver disease. In this study, we demonstrate that myostatin suppresses the proliferation of mouse Hepa-1c1c7 murine-derived liver cells (50%; p < 0.001) in part by reducing the expression of the cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases that elicit G1-S phase transition of the cell cycle (p < 0.001). Furthermore, real-time PCR-based quantification of the long noncoding RNA metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (Malat1), recently identified as a myostatin-responsive transcript in skeletal muscle, revealed a significant downregulation (25% and 50%, respectively; p < 0.05) in the livers of myostatin-treated mice and liver cells. The importance of Malat1 in liver cell proliferation was confirmed via arrested liver cell proliferation (p < 0.05) in response to partial Malat1 siRNA-mediated knockdown. Myostatin also significantly blunted insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and Akt phosphorylation in liver cells while increasing the phosphorylation of myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS), a protein that is essential for cancer cell proliferation and insulin-stimulated glucose transport. Together, these findings reveal a plausible mechanism by which circulating myostatin contributes to the diminished regenerative capacity of the liver and diseases characterized by liver insulin resistance. PMID:24882465

  14. Hydrodynamic Transfection for Generation of Novel Mouse Models for Liver Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Calvisi, Diego F.

    2015-01-01

    Primary liver cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, are leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Recent large-scale genomic approaches have identified a wide number of genes whose deregulation is associated with hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma development. Murine models are critical tools to determine the oncogenic potential of these genes. Conventionally, transgenic or knockout mouse models are used for this purpose. However, several limitations apply to the latter models. Herein, we review a novel approach for stable gene expression in mouse hepatocytes by hydrodynamic injection in combination with Sleeping Beauty–mediated somatic integration. This method represents a flexible, reliable, and cost-effective tool to generate preclinical murine models for liver cancer research. Furthermore, it can be used as an in vivo transfection method to study biochemical cross talks among multiple pathways along hepatocarcinogenesis and to test the therapeutic potential of drugs against liver cancer. PMID:24480331

  15. Deciphering the Developmental Dynamics of the Mouse Liver Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Gunewardena, Sumedha S.; Yoo, Byunggil; Peng, Lai; Lu, Hong; Zhong, Xiaobo; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Cui, Julia Yue

    2015-01-01

    During development, liver undergoes a rapid transition from a hematopoietic organ to a major organ for drug metabolism and nutrient homeostasis. However, little is known on a transcriptome level of the genes and RNA-splicing variants that are differentially regulated with age, and which up-stream regulators orchestrate age-specific biological functions in liver. We used RNA-Seq to interrogate the developmental dynamics of the liver transcriptome in mice at 12 ages from late embryonic stage (2-days before birth) to maturity (60-days after birth). Among 21,889 unique NCBI RefSeq-annotated genes, 9,641 were significantly expressed in at least one age, 7,289 were differently regulated with age, and 859 had multiple (> = 2) RNA splicing-variants. Factor analysis showed that the dynamics of hepatic genes fall into six distinct groups based on their temporal expression. The average expression of cytokines, ion channels, kinases, phosphatases, transcription regulators and translation regulators decreased with age, whereas the average expression of peptidases, enzymes and transmembrane receptors increased with age. The average expression of growth factors peak between Day-3 and Day-10, and decrease thereafter. We identified critical biological functions, upstream regulators, and putative transcription modules that seem to govern age-specific gene expression. We also observed differential ontogenic expression of known splicing variants of certain genes, and 1,455 novel splicing isoform candidates. In conclusion, the hepatic ontogeny of the transcriptome ontogeny has unveiled critical networks and up-stream regulators that orchestrate age-specific biological functions in liver, and suggest that age contributes to the complexity of the alternative splicing landscape of the hepatic transcriptome. PMID:26496202

  16. Adult mouse model of early hepatocellular carcinoma promoted by alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ambade, Aditya; Satishchandran, Abhishek; Gyongyosi, Benedek; Lowe, Patrick; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To establish a mouse model of alcohol-driven hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) that develops in livers with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). METHODS: Adult C57BL/6 male mice received multiple doses of chemical carcinogen diethyl nitrosamine (DEN) followed by 7 wk of 4% Lieber-DeCarli diet. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and liver Cyp2e1 were assessed. Expression of F4/80, CD68 for macrophages and Ly6G, MPO, E-selectin for neutrophils was measured. Macrophage polarization was determined by IL-1β/iNOS (M1) and Arg-1/IL-10/CD163/CD206 (M2) expression. Liver steatosis and fibrosis were measured by oil-red-O and Sirius red staining respectively. HCC development was monitored by magnetic resonance imaging, confirmed by histology. Cellular proliferation was assessed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). RESULTS: Alcohol-DEN mice showed higher ALTs than pair fed-DEN mice throughout the alcohol feeding without weight gain. Alcohol feeding resulted in increased ALT, liver steatosis and inflammation compared to pair-fed controls. Alcohol-DEN mice had reduced steatosis and increased fibrosis indicating advanced liver disease. Molecular characterization showed highest levels of both neutrophil and macrophage markers in alcohol-DEN livers. Importantly, M2 macrophages were predominantly higher in alcohol-DEN livers. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed increased numbers of intrahepatic cysts and liver histology confirmed the presence of early HCC in alcohol-DEN mice compared to all other groups. This correlated with increased serum alpha-fetoprotein, a marker of HCC, in alcohol-DEN mice. PCNA immunostaining revealed significantly increased hepatocyte proliferation in livers from alcohol-DEN compared to pair fed-DEN or alcohol-fed mice. CONCLUSION: We describe a new 12-wk HCC model in adult mice that develops in livers with alcoholic hepatitis and defines ALD as co-factor in HCC. PMID:27122661

  17. An orthotopic mouse model of hepatocellular carcinoma with underlying liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Reiberger, Thomas; Chen, Yunching; Ramjiawan, Rakesh R; Hato, Tai; Fan, Christopher; Samuel, Rekha; Roberge, Sylvie; Huang, Peigen; Lauwers, Gregory Y; Zhu, Andrew X; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Jain, Rakesh K; Duda, Dan G

    2015-08-01

    Subcutaneous xenografts have been used for decades to study hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). These models do not reproduce the specific pathophysiological features of HCCs, which occur in cirrhotic livers that show pronounced necroinflammation, abnormal angiogenesis and extensive fibrosis. As these features are crucial for studying the role of the pathologic host microenvironment in tumor initiation, progression and treatment response, alternative HCC models are desirable. Here we describe a syngeneic orthotopic HCC model in immunocompetent mice with liver cirrhosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) that recapitulates key features of human HCC. Induction of substantial hepatic fibrosis requires 12 weeks of CCl4 administration. Intrahepatic implantation of mouse HCC cell lines requires 30 min per mouse. Tumor growth varies by tumor cell line and mouse strain used. Alternatively, tumors can be induced in a genetically engineered mouse model. In this setting, CCl4 is administered for 12 weeks after tail-vein injection of Cre-expressing adenovirus (adeno-Cre) in Stk4(-/-)Stk3(F/-) (also known as Mst1(-/-)Mst2(F/-); F indicates a floxed allele) mice, and it results in the development of HCC tumors (hepatocarcinogenesis) concomitantly with liver cirrhosis. PMID:26203823

  18. An orthotopic mouse model of hepatocellular carcinoma with underlying liver cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Reiberger, Thomas; Chen, Yunching; Ramjiawan, Rakesh R; Hato, Tai; Fan, Christopher; Samuel, Rekha; Roberge, Sylvie; Huang, Peigen; Lauwers, Gregory Y; Zhu, Andrew X; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Jain, Rakesh K; Duda, Dan G

    2016-01-01

    Subcutaneous xenografts have been used for decades to study hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). These models do not reproduce the specific pathophysiological features of HCCs, which occur in cirrhotic livers that show pronounced necroinflammation, abnormal angiogenesis and extensive fibrosis. As these features are crucial for studying the role of the pathologic host microenvironment in tumor initiation, progression and treatment response, alternative HCC models are desirable. Here we describe a syngeneic orthotopic HCC model in immunocompetent mice with liver cirrhosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) that recapitulates key features of human HCC. Induction of substantial hepatic fibrosis requires 12 weeks of CCl4 administration. Intrahepatic implantation of mouse HCC cell lines requires 30 min per mouse. Tumor growth varies by tumor cell line and mouse strain used. Alternatively, tumors can be induced in a genetically engineered mouse model. In this setting, CCl4 is administered for 12 weeks after tail-vein injection of Cre-expressing adenovirus (adeno-Cre) in Stk4−/−Stk3F/− (also known as Mst1−/−Mst2F/−; F indicates a floxed allele) mice, and it results in the development of HCC tumors (hepatocarcinogenesis) concomitantly with liver cirrhosis. PMID:26203823

  19. Synthesis of fatty acids in the perused mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Salmon, D M; Bowen, N L; Hems, D A

    1974-09-01

    1. Fatty acid synthesis de novo was measured in the perfused liver of fed mice. 2. The total rate, measured by the incorporation into fatty acid of (3)H from (3)H(2)O (1-7mumol of fatty acid/h per g of fresh liver), resembled the rate found in the liver of intact mice. 3. Perfusions with l-[U-(14)C]lactic acid and [U-(14)C]glucose showed that circulating glucose at concentrations less than about 17mm was not a major carbon source for newly synthesized fatty acid, whereas lactate (10mm) markedly stimulated fatty acid synthesis, and contributed extensive carbon to lipogenesis. 4. The identification of 50% of the carbon converted into newly synthesized fatty acid lends further credibility to the use of (3)H(2)O to measure hepatic fatty acid synthesis. 5. The total rate of fatty acid synthesis, and the contribution of glucose carbon to lipogenesis, were directly proportional to the initial hepatic glycogen concentration. 6. The proportion of total newly synthesized lipid that was released into the perfusion medium was 12-16%. 7. The major products of lipogenesis were saturated fatty acids in triglyceride and phospholipid. 8. The rate of cholesterol synthesis, also measured with (3)H(2)O, expressed as acetyl residues consumed, was about one-fourth of the basal rate of fatty acid synthesis. 9. These results are discussed in terms of the carbon sources of hepatic newly synthesized fatty acids, and the effect of glucose, glycogen and lactate in stimulating lipogenesis, independently of their role as precursors. PMID:4464843

  20. Structural changes in the cytoskeleton in regenerating mouse liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gleiberman, A.S.; Bannikov, G.A.; Troyanovskii, S.M.

    1985-05-01

    After CCl/sub 4/ poisoning induced in rats poisoning centrilobular necroses formed in the liver during the next 24 h. Single a-feto protein-containing cells appeared onnthe second day of regeneration. By the end of the 2nd day a perinecrotic layer of cells containing AFP was formed. There is a definite correlation between loss of biliary capillary antigen, the appearance of bundles of prekeratin and actin, and expression of AFP synthesis. It is possible to include all these features in a single marker ocmplex of ''embronalization'' of the hepatocyte.

  1. Ozone-related fluorescent compounds in mouse liver and lung

    SciTech Connect

    Csallany, A.S.; Manwaring, J.D.; Menken, B.Z.

    1985-08-01

    Groups of ten female, weanling mice were fed a basal, vitamin E-deficient diet or a basal diet supplemented with RRR-alpha-tocopheryl acetate for 14 months. During the last month one group from each dietary regimen was exposed for 30-60 min/day to 1.5 ppm ozone (25 hr total ozone exposure) and the remaining groups to control ambient air. The liver and lung tissues were homogenized and extracted with 2:1 chloroform:methanol and water. Excitation and emission wavelengths for the eluting fractions were determined by continuous emission scans from 250 to 600 nm for each excitation wavelength between 250 and 500 nm. Ozone exposure did not effect the concentration of any of the fluorescent materials examined in the lung, but it resulted in a significant increase in two of four water-soluble compounds in the liver with excitation wavelength maxima/emission wavelength maxima of 270 nm/310 nm and 275 nm/350 nm (smaller molecular weight material) suggesting in vivo lipid oxidation.

  2. Decellularized liver scaffolds effectively support the proliferation and differentiation of mouse fetal hepatic progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaojun; Cui, Jing; Zhang, Bing-Qiang; Zhang, Hongyu; Bi, Yang; Kang, Quan; Wang, Ning; Bie, Ping; Yang, Zhanyu; Wang, Huaizhi; Liu, Xiangde; Haydon, Rex C; Luu, Hue H; Tang, Ni; Dong, Jiahong; He, Tong-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Decellularized whole organs represent ideal scaffolds for engineering new organs and/or cell transplantation. Here, we investigate whether decellularized liver scaffolds provide cell-friendly biocompatible three-dimensional environment to support the proliferation and differentiation of hepatic progenitor cells. Mouse liver tissues are efficiently decellularized through portal vein perfusion. Using the reversibly immortalized mouse fetal hepatic progenitor cells (iHPCs), we are able to effectively recellularize the decellularized liver scaffolds. The perfused iHPCs survive and proliferate in the three-dimensional scaffolds in vitro for 2 weeks. When the recellularized scaffolds are implanted into the kidney capsule of athymic nude mice, cell survival and proliferation of the implanted scaffolds are readily detected by whole body imaging for 10 days. Furthermore, EGF is shown to significantly promote the proliferation and differentiation of the implanted iHPCs. Histologic and immunochemical analyses indicate that iHPCs are able to proliferate and differentiate to mature hepatocytes upon EGF stimulation in the scaffolds. The recellularization of the biomaterial scaffolds is accompanied with vascularization. Taken together, these results indicate that decullarized liver scaffolds effectively support the proliferation and differentiation of iHPCs, suggesting that decellularized liver matrix may be used as ideal biocompatible scaffolds for hepatocyte transplantation. PMID:23625886

  3. Decellularized liver scaffolds effectively support the proliferation and differentiation of mouse fetal hepatic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojun; Cui, Jing; Zhang, Bing-Qiang; Zhang, Hongyu; Bi, Yang; Kang, Quan; Wang, Ning; Bie, Ping; Yang, Zhanyu; Wang, Huaizhi; Liu, Xiangde; Haydon, Rex C; Luu, Hue H; Tang, Ni; Dong, Jiahong; He, Tong-Chuan

    2014-04-01

    Decellularized whole organs represent ideal scaffolds for engineering new organs and/or cell transplantation. Here, we investigate whether decellularized liver scaffolds provide cell-friendly biocompatible three-dimensional (3-D) environment to support the proliferation and differentiation of hepatic progenitor cells. Mouse liver tissues are efficiently decellularized through portal vein perfusion. Using the reversibly immortalized mouse fetal hepatic progenitor cells (iHPCs), we are able to effectively recellularize the decellularized liver scaffolds. The perfused iHPCs survive and proliferate in the 3-D scaffolds in vitro for 2 weeks. When the recellularized scaffolds are implanted into the kidney capsule of athymic nude mice, cell survival and proliferation of the implanted scaffolds are readily detected by whole body imaging for 10 days. Furthermore, epidermal growth factor (EGF) is shown to significantly promote the proliferation and differentiation of the implanted iHPCs. Histologic and immunochemical analyzes indicate that iHPCs are able to proliferate and differentiate to mature hepatocytes upon EGF stimulation in the scaffolds. The recellularization of the biomaterial scaffolds is accompanied with vascularization. Taken together, these results indicate that decullarized liver scaffolds effectively support the proliferation and differentiation of iHPCs, suggesting that decellularized liver matrix may be used as ideal biocompatible scaffolds for hepatocyte transplantation. PMID:23625886

  4. Rapamycin Attenuates Mouse Liver Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury by Inhibiting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    PubMed

    Zhu, J; Hua, X; Li, D; Zhang, J; Xia, Q

    2015-01-01

    The roles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in liver ischemia and reperfusion injury (IRI) have been well recognized. However, the impact of rapamycin (Rapa), a broadly used immunosuppressive agent in human liver transplantation, on ER stress during IRI remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate the roles of Rapa in the regulation of ER stress in vivo and in vitro. In a mouse liver partial warm ischemia and reperfusion mode, we demonstrated that Rapa markedly protected livers from IRI, as evidenced by serum alanine aminotransferase (sALT) levels and liver histology. Then we also confirmed the protection of Rapa from thapsigargin (Tg)-induced cell death in primary hepatocytes. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments showed that the ER stress markers were markedly up-regulated by IRI and Tg treatment, whereas they were down-regulated by Rapa pretreatment, as monitored by Western blot at the protein levels and by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) at the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels. In addition, it was also revealed that Rapa was able to remarkably inhibit the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and enhance autophagy both in IR-stressed livers and Tg-treated primary hepatocytes. Thus, these results suggest that Rapa protects livers from IRI through inhibiting the ER stress pathway. PMID:26293028

  5. Differential effects of targeting Notch receptors in a mouse model of liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huntzicker, Erik G.; Hötzel, Kathy; Choy, Lisa; Che, Li; Ross, Jed; Pau, Gregoire; Sharma, Neeraj; Siebel, Christian W.; Chen, Xin; French, Dorothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Primary liver cancer encompasses both hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cholangiocarcinoma (CC). The Notch signaling pathway, known to be important for the proper development of liver architecture, is also a potential driver of primary liver cancer. However, with four known Notch receptors and several Notch ligands, it is not clear which Notch pathway members play the predominant role in liver cancer. To address this question we utilized antibodies to specifically target Notch1, Notch2, Notch3 or Jag1 in a mouse model of primary liver cancer driven by AKT and NRas. We show that inhibition of Notch2 reduces tumor burden by eliminating highly malignant hepatocellular carcinoma- and cholangiocarcinoma-like tumors. Inhibition of the Notch ligand Jag 1 had a similar effect, consistent with Jag1 acting in cooperation with Notch2. This effect was specific to Notch2, as Notch3 inhibition did not decrease tumor burden. Unexpectedly, Notch1 inhibition altered the relative proportion of tumor types, reducing HCC-like tumors but dramatically increasing CC-like tumors. Finally, we show that Notch2 and Jag1 are expressed in, and Notch2 signaling is activated in, a subset of human HCC samples. Conclusions: These findings underscore the distinct roles of different Notch receptors in the liver and suggest that inhibition of Notch2 signaling represents a novel therapeutic option in the treatment of liver cancer. PMID:25311838

  6. Functional Integrity of the Chimeric (Humanized) Mouse Liver: Enzyme Zonation, Physiologic Spaces, and Hepatic Enzymes and Transporters.

    PubMed

    Chow, Edwin C Y; Wang, Jason Z Ya; Quach, Holly P; Tang, Hui; Evans, David C; Li, Albert P; Silva, Jose; Pang, K Sandy

    2016-09-01

    Chimeric mouse liver models are useful in vivo tools for human drug metabolism studies; however, liver integrity and the microcirculation remain largely uninvestigated. Hence, we conducted liver perfusion studies to examine these attributes in FRGN [Fah(-/-), Rag2(-/-), and Il2rg(-/-), NOD strain] livers (control) and chimeric livers repopulated with mouse (mFRGN) or human (hFRGN) hepatocytes. In single-pass perfusion studies (2.5 ml/min), outflow dilution profiles of noneliminated reference indicators ((51)Cr-RBC, (125)I-albumin, (14)C-sucrose, and (3)H-water) revealed preservation of flow-limited distribution and reduced water and albumin spaces in hFRGN livers compared with FRGN livers, a view supported microscopically by tightly packed sinusoids. With prograde and retrograde perfusion of harmol (50 µM) in FRGN livers, an anterior sulfation (Sult1a1) over the posterior distribution of glucuronidation (Ugt1a1) activity was preserved, evidenced by the 42% lower sulfation-to-glucuronidation ratio (HS/HG) and 14% higher harmol extraction ratio (E) upon switching from prograde to retrograde flow. By contrast, zonation was lost in mFRGN and hFRGN livers, with HS/HG and E for both flows remaining unchanged. Remnant mouse genes persisted in hFRGN livers (10%-300% those of FRGN). When hFRGN livers were compared with human liver tissue, higher UGT1A1 and MRP2, lower MRP3, and unchanged SULT1A1 and MRP4 mRNA expression were observed. Total Sult1a1/SULT1A1 protein expression in hFRGN livers was higher than that of FRGN livers, consistent with higher harmol sulfate formation. The composite data on humanized livers suggest a loss of zonation, lack of complete liver humanization, and persistence of murine hepatocyte activities leading to higher sulfation. PMID:27342868

  7. Study of in vivo exposure of single-walled carbon nanotubes in mouse liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Lyndon L.

    Currently, few studies are available that have explored the role of carbon nanoparticles in liver toxicity. The susceptibility of the liver to nanoparticles rises from the inhalation exposure route often encountered during manufacturing and occupational exposure. Persons occupying these types of environmental setting are exposed to airborne nanoparticles less than 100nm, which have unobstructed access to most area of the lungs due to their size. Several reports have shown that single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) induce oxidative stress and pose the greatest cytotoxicity potential do to their size. Also, studies in mice indicate nanoparticles tend to accumulate in organs such as the spleen, kidney and liver, which is a major concern due to a lack of knowledge as to their fate. Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT's) are able to more easily penetrate through the cell membrane and display higher cell toxicity than Multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCTs), opening the possibility for crossing various biological barriers within the body. Therefore effective occupational and environmental health risk assessments are significant in controlling the manufacture process of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The present study was undertaken to determine the toxicity exhibited by SWCNT in mouse liver tissue as a model system. Mouse exposure during inhalation with and without SWCNT and reactive oxygen species (ROS) products were measured by change in fluorescence using dichloro fluorescein (DCF). The result showed no increase ROS on exposure of SWCNT in a dose and time dependent manner. Also, there is no reduction levels of glutathione (GSH) and super oxide dismutase (SOD), the antioxidant protective mechanism present in mouse liver cells upon SWCNT exposure. Lipid Peroxidation (LPO) and Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) assays indicated no tissue or protein damage. Additionally, Caspases --8 and --3 assays were conducted in order to understand the apoptotic signaling pathways initiated by

  8. [Histopathology of strobilocercosis found in the livers of white mouse.].

    PubMed

    Aydin, Nasuhi Engin; Miman, Ozlem; Gül, Mehmet; Daldal, Nilgün

    2010-01-01

    The adult form of Taenia taeniaeformis is found in the intestine of the cat and cheetah. The larva form is called Strobilocercus fasciolaris and is found in rodents such as mice and rats. Our objective was to draw attention to that rare zoonosis, since it has already been reported in the literature as strobilocercosis in humans. During an experimental animal study conducted at Inonu University, some unexpected cystic formations were found in the livers of nine 6-8-month-old healthy white mice, which affected the conducted study negatively. These cystic formations were examined histopathologically. Prepared sections were stained with haemotoxylin eosin, periodic acid-Schiff and Masson trichrome stains, and examined by light microscopy. Strobilocercus fasciolaris larvae that curled towards cyst cavity and their hooks were seen. Plasma cells, macrophage, focus of eosinophilic infiltration and fibroblastic connective tissue were simultaneous found. In this paper, histopathological changes in intermediate hosts caused by Strobilocercus fasciolaris and other cestod larvae have been discussed. PMID:20340085

  9. A New Mouse Model That Spontaneously Develops Chronic Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fransén-Pettersson, Nina; Duarte, Nadia; Nilsson, Julia; Lundholm, Marie; Mayans, Sofia; Larefalk, Åsa; Hannibal, Tine D.; Hansen, Lisbeth; Schmidt-Christensen, Anja; Ivars, Fredrik; Cardell, Susanna; Palmqvist, Richard; Rozell, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Here we characterize a new animal model that spontaneously develops chronic inflammation and fibrosis in multiple organs, the non-obese diabetic inflammation and fibrosis (N-IF) mouse. In the liver, the N-IF mouse displays inflammation and fibrosis particularly evident around portal tracts and central veins and accompanied with evidence of abnormal intrahepatic bile ducts. The extensive cellular infiltration consists mainly of macrophages, granulocytes, particularly eosinophils, and mast cells. This inflammatory syndrome is mediated by a transgenic population of natural killer T cells (NKT) induced in an immunodeficient NOD genetic background. The disease is transferrable to immunodeficient recipients, while polyclonal T cells from unaffected syngeneic donors can inhibit the disease phenotype. Because of the fibrotic component, early on-set, spontaneous nature and reproducibility, this novel mouse model provides a unique tool to gain further insight into the underlying mechanisms mediating transformation of chronic inflammation into fibrosis and to evaluate intervention protocols for treating conditions of fibrotic disorders. PMID:27441847

  10. Dose-response involvement of constitutive androstane receptor in mouse liver hypertrophy induced by triazole fungicides.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Kei; Inoue, Kaoru; Takahashi, Miwa; Matsuo, Saori; Irie, Kaoru; Kodama, Yukio; Ozawa, Shogo; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Yoshida, Midori

    2013-07-31

    To clarify the dose-response relationship between constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) activity and induction of cytochrome P450 2B (CYP2B) expression and hypertrophy by triazole fungicides in mouse liver, three dose levels of cyproconazole (Cypro), tebuconazole (Teb), fluconazole (Flu), and phenobarbital (PB), a typical CYP2B inducer, were administrated in diet to male wild-type (WT) and CAR-knockout (CARKO) mice for one week. In WT mice, all compounds dose-dependently induced liver weight increases and hepatocellular hypertrophy accompanied by CYP2B expression. In CARKO mice, these effects were not induced by PB, while Cypro or Flu induced these effects only at the highest dose. Dose-dependent liver hypertrophy was detected in CARKO mice treated with Teb, but at the lowest dose the intensity was weakened compared to WT mice. The present results indicate that Cypro and Flu mainly induced CAR-mediated liver hypertrophy, while Teb slightly involved CAR. The involvement of CAR in triazole-induced liver hypertrophy was dose-responsive. In addition, all three triazoles have non-CAR-mediated liver hypertrophy pathways, indicating that the hypertrophy induced by these triazoles differs from that of PB. PMID:23721867

  11. NMR estimation of protective effect of insulin on mouse liver with epinephrine-induced metabolic lesions.

    PubMed

    Yushmanov, V E; Khristianovich, D S; Rozantseva, T V; Sibeldina, L A

    1991-08-01

    In order to study the effects of epinephrine and insulin on liver metabolism, measurements of cellular phosphates and intracellular pH by 31PNMR, of glycogen by 13C NMR and of lactate by 1H NMR were performed in freshly dissected mouse liver at 0-4 degrees C and in ethanolic liver extracts. The injection of epinephrine hydrochloride (0.1 mL of 0.1% solution i.p. per mouse) caused remarkable changes in liver metabolic profiles which were expressed most distinctly in 15-30 min and could not be attributed solely to epinephrine-induced hyperglycemia. Among these metabolic changes are falls in the levels of ATP and uridine diphosphate sugars by 60-70%, possibly related to glycogen depletion, and intracellular acidification by 0.5 units attributed to the release of protons during hydrolysis of ATP rather than to accumulation of lactate in anaerobic glycolysis. Insulin injected prior to epinephrine (4 units i.p.) markedly suppressed epinephrine-induced metabolic alterations, although the effect of the combination of insulin and epinephrine was not the sum of the separate effects of these hormones. The maximum protective effect of insulin was reached when insulin was injected 15 min prior to epinephrine. The results obtained demonstrate the applicability of NMR for evaluating the protective activity of modifiers at various extreme exposures. PMID:1931556

  12. Regulation of retinoid X receptor gamma expression by fed state in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sangkyu; Lee, Yoo Jeong; Ko, Eun Hee; Kim, Jae-woo

    2015-02-27

    Glucose metabolism is balanced by glycolysis and gluconeogenesis with precise control in the liver. The expression of genes related to glucose metabolism is regulated primarily by glucose and insulin at transcriptional level. Nuclear receptors play important roles in regulating the gene expression of glucose metabolism at transcriptional level. Some of these nuclear receptors form heterodimers with RXRs to bind to their specific regulatory elements on the target promoters. To date, three isotypes of RXRs have been identified; RXRα, RXRβ and RXRγ. However, their involvement in the interactions with other nuclear receptors in the liver remains unclear. In this study, we found RXRγ is rapidly induced after feeding in the mouse liver, indicating a potential role of RXRγ in controlling glucose or lipid metabolism in the fasting–feeding cycle. In addition, RXRγ expression was upregulated by glucose in primary hepatocytes. This implies that glucose metabolism governed by RXRγ in conjunction with other nuclear receptors. The luciferase reporter assay showed that RXRγ as well as RXRα increased SREBP-1c promoter activity in hepatocytes. These results suggest that RXRγ may play an important role in tight control of glucose metabolism in the fasting–feeding cycle. - Highlights: • Refeeding increases the RXRγ expression level in mouse liver. • RXRγ expression is induced by high glucose condition in primary hepatocytes. • RXRγ and LXRα have synergistic effect on SREBP-1c promoter activity. • RXRγ binds to LXRE(-299/-280) located within SREBP-1c promoter region and interacts with LXRα.

  13. Determination of butyltin metabolites in the mouse liver by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Uneo, S; Susa, N; Furukawa, Y

    1995-08-01

    A new analytical method for observation of the metabolic status of butyltin compounds in the mouse liver was devised by a combination of extraction, purification and separation followed by quantitative analysis of each butyltin compound. After the extraction of all tin compounds from liver homogenate with ethyl acetate, these compounds were purified by combination of the fractional extract with organic solvents and column chromatography. The purified fraction was also analyzed by thin-layer chromatography, identifying each tin compound from differences in mobility on a silica gel plate. The tin content in the each separated spot on the plates was measured by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry after extraction by acid treatment. About 90% of tin was recovered by this method from the liver of mice which had been administered tri- or dibutyltin compound orally. This method will be useful for quantification of each metabolic product formed from butyltin compounds in vivo. PMID:8519922

  14. Inhibition of neoplastic development in the liver by hepatocyte growth factor in a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed Central

    Santoni-Rugiu, E; Preisegger, K H; Kiss, A; Audolfsson, T; Shiota, G; Schmidt, E V; Thorgeirsson, S S

    1996-01-01

    Overexpression of the c-myc oncogene is associated with a variety of both human and experimental tumors, and cooperation of other oncogenes and growth factors with the myc family are critical in the evolution of the malignant phenotype. The interaction of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) with c-myc during hepatocarcinogenesis in a transgenic mouse model has been analyzed. While sustained overexpression of c-myc in the liver leads to cancer, coexpression of HGF and c-myc in the liver delayed the appearance of preneoplastic lesions and prevented malignant conversion. Furthermore, tumor promotion by phenobarbital was completely inhibited in the c-myc/HGF double transgenic mice, whereas phenobarbital was an effective tumor promoter in the c-myc single transgenic mice. The results indicate that HGF may function as a tumor suppressor during early stages of liver carcinogenesis, and suggest the possibility of therapeutic application for this cytokine. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8790372

  15. Altered hepatic clearance and killing of Candida albicans in the isolated perfused mouse liver model.

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, R T; Horst, M N; Garner, R E; Hudson, J; Jenkins, P R; Richardson, A L

    1990-01-01

    The adherence of Candida albicans was studied in situ by using the perfused mouse liver model. After exhaustive washing, 10(6) C. albicans were infused into mouse livers. At the time of recovery, 62 +/- 5% (mean +/- standard error of the mean) of the infused C. albicans were recovered from the liver and 14 +/- 3% were recovered from the effluent for a total recovery of 76 +/- 4%. This indicates that 86 +/- 3% of the original inoculum was trapped by the liver and that 24 +/- 4% was killed within the liver. Chemical pretreatment of C. albicans with 8 M urea, 12 mM dithiothreitol, 2% beta-mercaptoethanol, 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate, 10% Triton X-100, or 3 M potassium chloride or enzyme pretreatment with alpha-mannosidase, alpha-chymotrypsin, subtilisin, beta-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, pronase, trypsin, papain, or lipase did not alter adherence of C. albicans to hepatic tissue. By contrast, pepsin pretreatment significantly decreased hepatic trapping. Simultaneous perfusion with either 100 mg of C. albicans glycoprotein per liter or 100 mg of C. albicans mannan per liter also decreased trapping. Furthermore, both substances eluted previously trapped C. albicans from hepatic tissue. Chemical pretreatment with 8 M urea, 12 mM dithiothreitol, or 3 M KCI or enzymatic pretreatment with alpha-mannosidase, subtilisin, alpha-chymotrypsin, or papain increased killing of C. albicans three- to fivefold within hepatic tissue. The data suggest that mannose-containing structures on the surface of C. albicans, for example. mannans or glucomannoproteins, mediate adherence of C. albicans within the liver. Indirectly, chemical and enzymatic pretreatment renders C. albicans more susceptible to hepatic killing. PMID:2117571

  16. Liver fatty acid-binding protein binds monoacylglycerol in vitro and in mouse liver cytosol.

    PubMed

    Lagakos, William S; Guan, Xudong; Ho, Shiu-Ying; Sawicki, Luciana Rodriguez; Corsico, Betina; Kodukula, Sarala; Murota, Kaeko; Stark, Ruth E; Storch, Judith

    2013-07-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP; FABP1) is expressed both in liver and intestinal mucosa. Mice null for LFABP were recently shown to have altered metabolism of not only fatty acids but also monoacylglycerol, the two major products of dietary triacylglycerol hydrolysis (Lagakos, W. S., Gajda, A. M., Agellon, L., Binas, B., Choi, V., Mandap, B., Russnak, T., Zhou, Y. X., and Storch, J. (2011) Am. J. Physiol. Gastrointest. Liver Physiol. 300, G803-G814). Nevertheless, the binding and transport of monoacylglycerol (MG) by LFABP are uncertain, with conflicting reports in the literature as to whether this single chain amphiphile is in fact bound by LFABP. In the present studies, gel filtration chromatography of liver cytosol from LFABP(-/-) mice shows the absence of the low molecular weight peak of radiolabeled monoolein present in the fractions that contain LFABP in cytosol from wild type mice, indicating that LFABP binds sn-2 MG in vivo. Furthermore, solution-state NMR spectroscopy demonstrates two molecules of sn-2 monoolein bound in the LFABP binding pocket in positions similar to those found for oleate binding. Equilibrium binding affinities are ∼2-fold lower for MG compared with fatty acid. Finally, kinetic studies examining the transfer of a fluorescent MG analog show that the rate of transfer of MG is 7-fold faster from LFABP to phospholipid membranes than from membranes to membranes and occurs by an aqueous diffusion mechanism. These results provide strong support for monoacylglycerol as a physiological ligand for LFABP and further suggest that LFABP functions in the efficient intracellular transport of MG. PMID:23658011

  17. Liver Fatty Acid-binding Protein Binds Monoacylglycerol in Vitro and in Mouse Liver Cytosol*

    PubMed Central

    Lagakos, William S.; Guan, Xudong; Ho, Shiu-Ying; Sawicki, Luciana Rodriguez; Corsico, Betina; Kodukula, Sarala; Murota, Kaeko; Stark, Ruth E.; Storch, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP; FABP1) is expressed both in liver and intestinal mucosa. Mice null for LFABP were recently shown to have altered metabolism of not only fatty acids but also monoacylglycerol, the two major products of dietary triacylglycerol hydrolysis (Lagakos, W. S., Gajda, A. M., Agellon, L., Binas, B., Choi, V., Mandap, B., Russnak, T., Zhou, Y. X., and Storch, J. (2011) Am. J. Physiol. Gastrointest. Liver Physiol. 300, G803–G814). Nevertheless, the binding and transport of monoacylglycerol (MG) by LFABP are uncertain, with conflicting reports in the literature as to whether this single chain amphiphile is in fact bound by LFABP. In the present studies, gel filtration chromatography of liver cytosol from LFABP−/− mice shows the absence of the low molecular weight peak of radiolabeled monoolein present in the fractions that contain LFABP in cytosol from wild type mice, indicating that LFABP binds sn-2 MG in vivo. Furthermore, solution-state NMR spectroscopy demonstrates two molecules of sn-2 monoolein bound in the LFABP binding pocket in positions similar to those found for oleate binding. Equilibrium binding affinities are ∼2-fold lower for MG compared with fatty acid. Finally, kinetic studies examining the transfer of a fluorescent MG analog show that the rate of transfer of MG is 7-fold faster from LFABP to phospholipid membranes than from membranes to membranes and occurs by an aqueous diffusion mechanism. These results provide strong support for monoacylglycerol as a physiological ligand for LFABP and further suggest that LFABP functions in the efficient intracellular transport of MG. PMID:23658011

  18. Cytokeratin 8/18 as a new marker of mouse liver preneoplastic lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Kakehashi, Anna; Kato, Ayumi; Inoue, Masayo; Ishii, Naomi; Okazaki, Etsuko; Wei, Min; Tachibana, Taro; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2010-01-01

    To search for a reliable biomarker of preneoplastic lesions arising early in mouse hepatocarcinogenesis the proteomes of microdissected basophilic foci, hepatocellular adenomas (HCAs), carcinomas (HCCs) and normal-appearing liver of B6C3F1 mice initiated with diethylnitrosamine (DEN) were analysed on anionic (Q10) surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS) ProteinChip arrays. Significant overexpression of cytokeratin 8 (CK8; m/z 54, 565), cytokeratin 18 (CK18; m/z 47,538) proteins was found in basophilic foci as well as in HCAs and HCCs. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry demonstrated profound overexpression of CK8 and CK18 proteins (CK8/18) in all basophilic foci, mixed cell type foci, HCAs and HCCs in B6C3F1 and C57BL/6J mice initiated with DEN. A strong correlation between CK8/18-positive foci development and multiplicity of liver tumors in B6C3F1 and C57Bl/6J mice was further observed. Moreover, formation of CK8 and CK18 complexes due to CK8 phosphorylation at Ser73 and Ser431 was found to be strongly associated with neoplastic transformation of mice liver basophilic foci. Elevation of CK8/18 was strongly correlated with induction of cell proliferation in basophilic foci and tumors. In conclusion, our data imply that CK8/18 is a novel reliable marker of preneoplastic lesions arising during mouse hepatocarcinogenesis which might be used for prediction of tumor development and evaluation of environmental agents as well as drugs and food additives using mouse liver tests.

  19. Alcoholic Liver Disease: A Mouse Model Reveals Protection by Lactobacillus fermentum

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Rosario; Rappa, Francesca; Macaluso, Filippo; Caruso Bavisotto, Celeste; Sangiorgi, Claudia; Di Paola, Gaia; Tomasello, Giovanni; Di Felice, Valentina; Marcianò, Vito; Farina, Felicia; Zummo, Giovanni; Conway de Macario, Everly; J.L. Macario, Alberto; Cocchi, Massimo; Cappello, MD, Francesco; Marino Gammazza, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Alcoholism is one of the most devastating diseases with high incidence, but knowledge of its pathology and treatment is still plagued with gaps mostly because of the inherent limitations of research with patients. We developed an animal model for studying liver histopathology, Hsp (heat-shock protein)-chaperones involvement, and response to treatment. Methods: The system was standardized using mice to which ethanol was orally administered alone or in combination with Lactobacillus fermentum following a precise schedule over time and applying, at predetermined intervals, a battery of techniques (histology, immunohistochemistry, western blotting, real-time PCR, immunoprecipitation, 3-nitrotyrosine labeling) to assess liver pathology (e.g., steatosis, fibrosis), and Hsp60 and iNOS (inducible form of nitric oxide synthase) gene expression and protein levels, and post-translational modifications. Results: Typical ethanol-induced liver pathology occurred and the effect of the probiotic could be reliably monitored. Steatosis score, iNOS levels, and nitrated proteins (e.g., Hsp60) decreased after probiotic intake. Conclusions: We describe a mouse model useful for studying liver disease induced by chronic ethanol intake and for testing pertinent therapeutic agents, e.g., probiotics. We tested L. fermentum, which reduced considerably ethanol-induced tissue damage and deleterious post-translational modifications of the chaperone Hsp60. The model is available to test other agents and probiotics with therapeutic potential in alcoholic liver disease. PMID:26795070

  20. Kinetics and Longevity of ϕC31 Integrase in Mouse Liver and Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Christopher L.; Keravala, Annahita; Woodard, Lauren E.; Hillman, Robert T.; Stowe, Timothy R.; Chu, Jacqueline N.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The ϕC31 integrase system provides genomic integration of plasmid DNA that may be useful in gene therapy. For example, the ϕC31 system has been used in combination with hydrodynamic injection to achieve long-term expression of factor IX in mouse liver. However, a concern is that prolonged expression of ϕC31 integrase within cells could potentially stimulate chromosome rearrangements or an immune response. Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses were performed to investigate the duration of ϕC31 integrase expression in mouse liver. Integrase was expressed within 2 to 3 hr after hydrodynamic injection of a plasmid expressing ϕC31 integrase. Expression peaked between 8 and 16 hr and fell to background levels by 24–48 hr postinjection. Analysis of the amount of integrase plasmid DNA present in the liver over time suggested that the brief period of integrase expression could largely be accounted for by rapid loss of the bulk of the plasmid DNA, as well as by silencing of plasmid expression. PCR analysis of integration indicated that ϕC31 integrase carried out genomic integration of a codelivered attB-containing plasmid by 3 hr after plasmid injection. Integrase was expressed for longer times and at higher levels in transfected cultured cells compared with liver. Inhibitor studies suggested that the enzyme had a short half-life and was degraded by the 26S proteasome. The short duration of integrase expression in liver and rapid integration reaction appear to be features favorable for use in gene therapy. PMID:20497035

  1. Amarogentin regulates self renewal pathways to restrict liver carcinogenesis in experimental mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sur, Subhayan; Pal, Debolina; Banerjee, Kaustav; Mandal, Suvra; Das, Ashes; Roy, Anup; Panda, Chinmay Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Amarogentin, a secoiridoid glycoside isolated from medicinal plant Swertia chirata, was found to restrict CCl4 /N-nitrosodiethyl amine (NDEA) induced mouse liver carcinogenesis by modulating G1/S cell cycle check point and inducing apoptosis. To understand its therapeutic efficacy on stem cell self renewal pathways, prevalence of CD44 positive cancer stem cell (CSC) population, expressions (mRNA/protein) of some key regulatory genes of self renewal Wnt and Hedgehog pathways along with expressions of E-cadherin and EGFR were analyzed during the liver carcinogenesis and in liver cancer cell line HepG2. It was observed that amarogentin could significantly reduce CD44 positive CSCs in both pre and post initiation stages of carcinogenesis than carcinogen control mice. In Wnt pathway, amarogentin could inhibit expressions of β-catenin, phospho β-catenin (Y-654) and activate expressions of antagonists sFRP1/2 and APC in the liver lesions. In Hedgehog pathway, decreased expressions of Gli1, sonic hedgehog ligand, and SMO along with up-regulation of PTCH1 were seen in the liver lesions due to amarogentin treatment. Moreover, amarogentin could up-regulate E-cadherin expression and down-regulate expression of EGFR in the liver lesions. Similarly, amarogentin could inhibit HepG2 cell growth along with expression and prevalence of CD44 positive CSCs. Similar to in vivo analysis, amarogentin could modulate the expressions of the key regulatory genes of the Wnt and hedgehog pathways and EGFR in HepG2 cells. Thus, our data suggests that the restriction of liver carcinogenesis by amarogentin might be due to reduction of CD44 positive CSCs and modulation of the self renewal pathways. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26154024

  2. Time-course comparison of xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Pamela K.; Woods, Courtney G.; Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Gatti, Daniel M.; Cunningham, Michael L.; Rusyn, Ivan

    2009-03-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR){alpha} are transcription factors known to be primary mediators of liver effects, including carcinogenesis, by phenobarbital-like compounds and peroxisome proliferators, respectively, in rodents. Many similarities exist in the phenotypes elicited by these two classes of agents in rodent liver, and we hypothesized that the initial transcriptional responses to the xenobiotic activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} will exhibit distinct patterns, but at later time-points these biological pathways will converge. In order to capture the global transcriptional changes that result from activation of these nuclear receptors over a time-course in the mouse liver, microarray technology was used. First, differences in basal expression of liver genes between C57Bl/6J wild-type and Car-null mice were examined and 14 significantly differentially expressed genes were identified. Next, mice were treated with phenobarbital (100 mg/kg by gavage for 24 h, or 0.085% w/w diet for 7 or 28 days), and liver gene expression changes with regards to both time and treatment were identified. While several pathways related to cellular proliferation and metabolism were affected by phenobarbital in wild-type mice, no significant changes in gene expression were found over time in the Car-nulls. Next, we determined commonalities and differences in the temporal response to phenobarbital and WY-14,643, a prototypical activator of PPAR {alpha}. Gene expression signatures from livers of wild-type mice C57Bl6/J mice treated with PB or WY-14,643 were compared. Similar pathways were affected by both compounds; however, considerable time-related differences were present. This study establishes common gene expression fingerprints of exposure to activators of CAR and PPAR{alpha} in rodent liver and demonstrates that despite similar phenotypic changes, molecular pathways differ between classes of chemical carcinogens.

  3. Inducible differentiation and morphogenesis of bipotential liver cell lines from wild-type mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Strick-Marchand, Hélène; Weiss, Mary C

    2002-10-01

    This work shows that hepatic cell lines reproducibly can be derived from E14 embryos of many mouse inbred strains. These bipotential mouse embryonic liver (BMEL) cell lines present a mixed morphology, containing both epithelial and palmate-like cells, and an uncoupled phenotype, expressing hepatocyte transcription factors (HNF1alpha, HNF4alpha, GATA4) but not functions (apolipoproteins, albumin). BMEL cells are bipotential: under inducing conditions they express hepatocyte and bile duct functions. In addition, they can undergo morphogenesis in Matrigel culture to form bile duct units. When returned to basal culture conditions, the differentiated cells revert, within a few days, to an undifferentiated state. The ensemble of markers expressed by BMEL cells implies that they originate from hepatoblasts, the endodermal precursors of the liver. In conclusion, the establishment of a simple and reproducible method to isolate from any mouse embryo bipotential hepatic cell lines that exhibit the properties of transit stem cells provides a novel paradigm for investigation of hepatic cell lineage relationships. PMID:12297826

  4. Spatio-temporal Model of Xenobiotic Distribution and Metabolism in an in Silico Mouse Liver Lobule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiao; Sluka, James; Clendenon, Sherry; Glazier, James; Ryan, Jennifer; Dunn, Kenneth; Wang, Zemin; Klaunig, James

    Our study aims to construct a structurally plausible in silico model of a mouse liver lobule to simulate the transport of xenobiotics and the production of their metabolites. We use a physiologically-based model to calculate blood-flow rates in a network of mouse liver sinusoids and simulate transport, uptake and biotransformation of xenobiotics within the in silico lobule. Using our base model, we then explore the effects of variations of compound-specific (diffusion, transport and metabolism) and compound-independent (temporal alteration of blood flow pattern) parameters, and examine their influence on the distribution of xenobiotics and metabolites. Our simulations show that the transport mechanism (diffusive and transporter-mediated) of xenobiotics and blood flow both impact the regional distribution of xenobiotics in a mouse hepatic lobule. Furthermore, differential expression of metabolic enzymes along each sinusoid's portal to central axis, together with differential cellular availability of xenobiotics, induce non-uniform production of metabolites. Thus, the heterogeneity of the biochemical and biophysical properties of xenobiotics, along with the complexity of blood flow, result in different exposures to xenobiotics for hepatocytes at different lobular locations. We acknowledge support from National Institute of Health GM 077138 and GM 111243.

  5. Evaluation of the Role of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α (PPARα) in Mouse Liver Tumor Induction by Trichloroethylene and Metabolites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an industrial solvent and a widespread environmental contaminant. Induction of liver cancer in mice by TCE is thought to be mediated by two metabolites, dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA), both of which are themselves mouse liver carcinoge...

  6. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Dependent Induction of Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase mRNAs in Mouse LiverS

    PubMed Central

    Celius, Trine; Roblin, Steven; Harper, Patricia A.; Matthews, Jason; Boutros, Paul C.; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Okey, Allan B.

    2016-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) are important in detoxication but generally are considered not to be inducible by xenobiotics. Our recent microarray studies revealed induction of FMO2 and FMO3 mRNAs by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in liver of mice with wild-type aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) but not in Ahr-null mice. The aim of the present study was to delineate mechanisms of FMO regulation. In adult male mice, basal FMO3 mRNA is low but was induced 6-fold at 4 h and 6000-fold at 24 h. The ED50 was approximately 1 μg/kg for FMO2 and FMO3, similar to that for the classic AHR-regulated gene, Cyp1a1. In adult female mice basal FMO3 mRNA is high and was not induced at 4 h but was elevated 8-fold at 24 h. FMO5 mRNA was significantly down-regulated by TCDD in both male and female adult mice. Juvenile mice show no sex difference in response to TCDD; FMO3 was induced 4 to 6-fold by TCDD in both sexes. Chromatin immuno-precipitation demonstrated recruitment of AHR and aryl hydrocarbon nuclear translocator proteins to Fmo3 regulatory regions, suggesting that induction by TCDD is a primary AHR-mediated event. Although FMO2 and FMO3 mRNAs were highly induced by TCDD in adult males, overall FMO catalytic activity increased only modestly. In contrast to the striking up-regulation of FMO2 and FMO3 in mouse liver, TCDD has little effect on FMO mRNA in rat liver. However, FMO2 and FMO3 mRNAs were highly induced in transgenic mice that express wild-type rat AHR, indicating that lack of induction in rat is not due to an incompetent AHR in this species. PMID:18765683

  7. Detection of Phenolic Metabolites of Styrene in Mouse Liver and Lung Microsomal IncubationsS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shuijie; Zhang, Fan; Gao, Lingbo; Zeng, Su

    2010-01-01

    Metabolic activation is considered to be a critical step for styrene-induced pulmonary toxicity. Styrene-7,8-oxide is a primary oxidative metabolite generated by vinyl epoxidation of styrene. In addition, urinary 4-vinylphenol (4-VP), a phenolic metabolite formed by aromatic hydroxylation, has been detected in workers and experimental animals after exposure to styrene. In the present study, new oxidative metabolites of styrene, including 2-vinylphenol (2-VP), 3-vinylphenol (3-VP), vinyl-1,4-hydroquinone, and 2-hydroxystyrene glycol were detected in mouse liver microsomal incubations. The production rates of 2-VP, 3-VP, 4-VP, and styrene glycol were 0.0527 ± 0.0045, 0.0019 ± 0.0006, 0.0053 ± 0.0002, and 4.42 ± 0.33 nmol/(min · mg protein) in mouse liver microsomes, respectively. Both disulfiram (100 μM) and 5-phenyl-1-pentyne (5 μM) significantly inhibited the formation of the VPs and styrene glycol. 2-VP, 3-VP, and 4-VP were metabolized in mouse liver microsomes at rates of 2.50 ± 0.30, 2.63 ± 0.13, and 3.45 ± 0.11 nmol/(min · mg protein), respectively. The three VPs were further metabolized to vinylcatechols and/or vinyl-1,4-hydroquinone and the corresponding glycols. Pulmonary toxicity of 2-VP, 3-VP, and 4-VP was evaluated in CD-1 mice, and 4-VP was found to be more toxic than 2-VP and 3-VP. PMID:20724499

  8. Humanized Mouse Models to Study Cell-Mediated Immune Responses to Liver-Stage Malaria Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Good, Michael F; Hawkes, Michael T; Yanow, Stephanie K

    2015-11-01

    Malaria vaccine development is hampered by the lack of small animal models that recapitulate human immune responses to Plasmodium falciparum. We review the burgeoning literature on humanized mice for P. falciparum infection, including challenges in engraftment of human immune cells, hepatocytes, and erythrocytes. Recent advances in immune-compromised mouse models and stem cell technology have already enabled proof of concept that the entire parasite life cycle can be sustained in a murine model and that adaptive human immune responses to several parasite stages can be measured. Nonetheless, optimization is needed to achieve a reproducible and relevant murine model for malaria vaccine development. This review is focused on the complexities of T cell development in a mouse humanized with both a lymphoid system and hepatocytes. An understanding of this will facilitate the use of humanized mice in the development of liver-stage vaccines. PMID:26458783

  9. Hemopexin Prevents Endothelial Damage and Liver Congestion in a Mouse Model of Heme Overload

    PubMed Central

    Vinchi, Francesca; Gastaldi, Stefania; Silengo, Lorenzo; Altruda, Fiorella; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2008-01-01

    Intravascular hemolysis results in the release of massive amounts of hemoglobin and heme into plasma, where they are rapidly bound by haptoglobin and hemopexin, respectively. Data from haptoglobin and hemopexin knockout mice have shown that both proteins protect from renal damage after phenylhydrazine-induced hemolysis, whereas double-mutant mice were especially prone to liver damage. However, the specific role of hemopexin remains elusive because of the difficulty in discriminating between hemoglobin and heme recovery. To study the specific role of hemopexin in intravascular hemolysis, we established a mouse model of heme overload. Under these conditions, both endothelial activation and vascular permeability were significantly higher in hemopexin-null mice compared with wild-type controls. Vascular permeability was particularly altered in the liver, where congestion in the centrolobular area was believed to be associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. Liver damage in hemopexin- null mice may be prevented by induction of heme oxygenase-1 before heme overload. Furthermore, heme-treated hemopexin-null mice exhibited hyperbilirubinemia, prolonged heme oxygenase-1 expression, excessive heme metabolism, and lack of H-ferritin induction in the liver compared with heme-treated wild-type controls. Moreover, these mutant mice metabolize an excess of heme in the kidney. These studies highlight the importance of hemopexin in heme detoxification, thus suggesting that drugs mimicking hemopexin activity might be useful to prevent endothelial damage in patients suffering from hemolytic disorders. PMID:18556779

  10. Lactobacillus casei Shirota protects from fructose-induced liver steatosis: a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wagnerberger, Sabine; Spruss, Astrid; Kanuri, Giridhar; Stahl, Carolin; Schröder, Markus; Vetter, Walter; Bischoff, Stephan C; Bergheim, Ina

    2013-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that Lactobacillus casei Shirota (Lcs) protects against the onset of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in a mouse model of fructose-induced steatosis, C57BL/6J mice were either fed tap water or 30% fructose solution +/- Lcs for 8 weeks. Chronic consumption of 30% fructose solution led to a significant increase in hepatic steatosis as well as plasma alanine-aminotransferase (ALT) levels, which was attenuated by treatment with Lcs. Protein levels of the tight junction protein occludin were found to be markedly lower in both fructose treated groups in the duodenum, whereas microbiota composition in this part of the intestine was not affected. Lcs treatment markedly attenuated the activation of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 signalling cascade found in the livers of mice only treated with fructose. Moreover, in livers of fructose fed mice treated with Lcs peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ activity was markedly higher than in mice only fed fructose. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that the dietary intake of Lcs protects against the onset of fructose-induced NAFLD through mechanisms involving an attenuation of the TLR-4-signalling cascade in the liver. PMID:22749137

  11. Mass Spectrometry-Based Metabolite Profiling in the Mouse Liver following Exposure to Ultraviolet B Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Min; Shon, Jong Cheol; Lee, Mee Youn; Liu, Kwang-Hyeon; Kim, Jeong Kee; Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Although many studies have been performed on the effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the skin, only a limited number of reports have investigated these effects on non-skin tissue. This study aimed to describe the metabolite changes in the liver of hairless mice following chronic exposure to UVB radiation. We did not observe significant macroscopic changes or alterations in hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the liver of UVB-irradiated mice, compared with those for normal mice. In this study, we detected hepatic metabolite changes by UVB exposure and identified several amino acids, fatty acids, nucleosides, carbohydrates, phospholipids, lysophospholipids, and taurine-conjugated cholic acids as candidate biomarkers in response to UVB radiation in the mouse liver by using various mass spectrometry (MS)-based metabolite profiling including ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight (TOF)-MS, gas chromatography-TOF-MS and nanomate LTQ-MS. Glutamine exhibited the most dramatic change with a 5-fold increase in quantity. The results from altering several types of metabolites suggest that chronic UVB irradiation may impact significantly on major hepatic metabolism processes, despite the fact that the liver is not directly exposed to UVB radiation. MS-based metabolomic approach for determining regulatory hepatic metabolites following UV irradiation will provide a better understanding of the relationship between internal organs and UV light. PMID:25275468

  12. Macrophage Migration Inhibitor Factor Upregulates MCP-1 Expression in an Autocrine Manner in Hepatocytes during Acute Mouse Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jieshi; Yang, Le; Tian, Lei; Li, Weiyang; Yang, Lin; Li, Liying

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitor factor (MIF), a multipotent innate immune mediator, is an upstream component of the inflammatory cascade in diseases such as liver disease. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a highly representative chemokine, is critical in liver disease pathogenesis. We investigated the role of MIF in regulating hepatocytic MCP-1 expression. MIF and MCP-1 expression were characterized by immunochemistry, RT-PCR, ELISA, and immunoblotting in CCl4-treated mouse liver and isolated hepatocytes. MIF was primarily distributed in hepatocytes, and its expression increased upon acute liver injury. Its expression was also increased in injured hepatocytes, induced by LPS or CCl4, which mimic liver injury in vitro. MIF was expressed earlier than MCP-1, strongly inducing hepatocytic MCP-1 expression. Moreover, the increase in MCP-1 expression induced by MIF was inhibited by CD74- or CD44-specific siRNAs and SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor. Further, CD74 or CD44 deficiency effectively inhibited MIF-induced p38 activation. MIF inhibitor ISO-1 reduced MCP-1 expression and p38 phosphorylation in CCl4-treated mouse liver. Our results showed that MIF regulates MCP-1 expression in hepatocytes of injured liver via CD74, CD44, and p38 MAPK in an autocrine manner, providing compelling information on the role of MIF in liver injury, and implying a new regulatory mechanism for liver inflammation. PMID:27273604

  13. Macrophage Migration Inhibitor Factor Upregulates MCP-1 Expression in an Autocrine Manner in Hepatocytes during Acute Mouse Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jieshi; Yang, Le; Tian, Lei; Li, Weiyang; Yang, Lin; Li, Liying

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitor factor (MIF), a multipotent innate immune mediator, is an upstream component of the inflammatory cascade in diseases such as liver disease. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a highly representative chemokine, is critical in liver disease pathogenesis. We investigated the role of MIF in regulating hepatocytic MCP-1 expression. MIF and MCP-1 expression were characterized by immunochemistry, RT-PCR, ELISA, and immunoblotting in CCl4-treated mouse liver and isolated hepatocytes. MIF was primarily distributed in hepatocytes, and its expression increased upon acute liver injury. Its expression was also increased in injured hepatocytes, induced by LPS or CCl4, which mimic liver injury in vitro. MIF was expressed earlier than MCP-1, strongly inducing hepatocytic MCP-1 expression. Moreover, the increase in MCP-1 expression induced by MIF was inhibited by CD74- or CD44-specific siRNAs and SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor. Further, CD74 or CD44 deficiency effectively inhibited MIF-induced p38 activation. MIF inhibitor ISO-1 reduced MCP-1 expression and p38 phosphorylation in CCl4-treated mouse liver. Our results showed that MIF regulates MCP-1 expression in hepatocytes of injured liver via CD74, CD44, and p38 MAPK in an autocrine manner, providing compelling information on the role of MIF in liver injury, and implying a new regulatory mechanism for liver inflammation. PMID:27273604

  14. Gene Expression Profile Change and Associated Physiological and Pathological Effects in Mouse Liver Induced by Fasting and Refeeding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Zhou, Ben; He, Zhishui; Zhai, Qiwei

    2011-01-01

    Food availability regulates basal metabolism and progression of many diseases, and liver plays an important role in these processes. The effects of food availability on digital gene expression profile, physiological and pathological functions in liver are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we applied high-throughput sequencing technology to detect digital gene expression profile of mouse liver in fed, fasted and refed states. Totally 12162 genes were detected, and 2305 genes were significantly regulated by food availability. Biological process and pathway analysis showed that fasting mainly affected lipid and carboxylic acid metabolic processes in liver. Moreover, the genes regulated by fasting and refeeding in liver were mainly enriched in lipid metabolic process or fatty acid metabolism. Network analysis demonstrated that fasting mainly regulated Drug Metabolism, Small Molecule Biochemistry and Endocrine System Development and Function, and the networks including Lipid Metabolism, Small Molecule Biochemistry and Gene Expression were affected by refeeding. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and diabetes mellitus were most likely to be affected by food availability. This study provides the digital gene expression profile of mouse liver regulated by food availability, and demonstrates the main biological processes, pathways, gene networks and potential hepatic diseases regulated by fasting and refeeding. These results show that food availability mainly regulates hepatic lipid metabolism and is highly correlated with liver-related diseases including liver cancer and diabetes. PMID:22096593

  15. Mouse precision-cut liver slices as an ex vivo model to study idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Mackenzie; Chen, Yixi; Starokozhko, Viktoriia; Merema, Marjolijn T; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2012-09-17

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (IDILI) has been the top reason for withdrawing drugs from the market or for black box warnings. IDILI may arise from the interaction of a drug's reactive metabolite with a mild inflammation that renders the liver more sensitive to injury resulting in increased toxicity (inflammatory stress hypothesis). Aiming to develop a robust ex vivo screening method to study inflammatory stress-related IDILI mechanisms and to find biomarkers that can detect or predict IDILI, mouse precision-cut liver slices (mPCLS) were coincubated for 24 h with IDILI-related drugs and lipopolysaccharide. Lipopolysaccharide exacerbated ketoconazole (15 μM) and clozapine (45 μM) toxicity but not their non-IDILI-related comparators, voriconazole (1500 μM) and olanzapine (45 μM). However, the other IDILI-related drugs tested [diclofenac (200 μM), carbamazepine (400 μM), and troglitazone (30 μM)] did not cause synergistic toxicity with lipopolysaccharide after 24 h of incubation. Lipopolysaccharide further decreased the reduced glutathione levels caused by ketoconazole or clozapine in mPCLS after 24 h of incubation, which was not the case for the other drugs. Lipopolysaccharide significantly increased nitric oxide (NO), cytokine, and chemokine release into the mPCLS media, while the treatment with the drugs alone did not cause any substantial change. All seven drugs drastically reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production. Interestingly, only ketoconazole and clozapine increased the lipopolysaccharide-induced granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) release. Pilot experiments showed that diclofenac and troglitazone, but not carbamazepine, demonstrated synergistic toxicity with lipopolysaccharide after a longer incubation of 48 h in mPCLS. In conclusion, we have developed an ex vivo model to detect inflammatory stress-related liver toxicity and identified ketoconazole, clozapine

  16. Ha-ras and β-catenin oncoproteins orchestrate metabolic programs in mouse liver tumors.

    PubMed

    Unterberger, Elif B; Eichner, Johannes; Wrzodek, Clemens; Lempiäinen, Harri; Luisier, Raphaëlle; Terranova, Rémi; Metzger, Ute; Plummer, Simon; Knorpp, Thomas; Braeuning, Albert; Moggs, Jonathan; Templin, Markus F; Honndorf, Valerie; Piotto, Martial; Zell, Andreas; Schwarz, Michael

    2014-10-01

    The process of hepatocarcinogenesis in the diethylnitrosamine (DEN) initiation/phenobarbital (PB) promotion mouse model involves the selective clonal outgrowth of cells harboring oncogene mutations in Ctnnb1, while spontaneous or DEN-only-induced tumors are often Ha-ras- or B-raf-mutated. The molecular mechanisms and pathways underlying these different tumor sub-types are not well characterized. Their identification may help identify markers for xenobiotic promoted versus spontaneously occurring liver tumors. Here, we have characterized mouse liver tumors harboring either Ctnnb1 or Ha-ras mutations via integrated molecular profiling at the transcriptional, translational and post-translational levels. In addition, metabolites of the intermediary metabolism were quantified by high resolution (1)H magic angle nuclear magnetic resonance. We have identified tumor genotype-specific differences in mRNA and miRNA expression, protein levels, post-translational modifications, and metabolite levels that facilitate the molecular and biochemical stratification of tumor phenotypes. Bioinformatic integration of these data at the pathway level led to novel insights into tumor genotype-specific aberrant cell signaling and in particular to a better understanding of alterations in pathways of the cell intermediary metabolism, which are driven by the constitutive activation of the β-Catenin and Ha-ras oncoproteins in tumors of the two genotypes. PMID:24535843

  17. The organoid-initiating cells in mouse pancreas and liver are phenotypically and functionally similar

    PubMed Central

    Dorrell, Craig; Tarlow, Branden; Wang, Yuhan; Canaday, Pamela S; Haft, Annelise; Schug, Jonathan; Streeter, Philip R; Finegold, Milton J; Shenje, Lincoln T; Kaestner, Klaus H; Grompe, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic Lgr5 expression has been associated with organoid-forming epithelial progenitor populations but the identity of the organoid-initiating epithelial cell subpopulation has remained elusive. Injury causes the emergence of an Lgr5+ organoid-forming epithelial progenitor population in the adult mouse liver and pancreas. Here, we define the origin of organoid-initiating cells from mouse pancreas and liver prior to Lgr5 activation. This clonogenic population was defined as MIC1-1C3+/CD133+/CD26− in both tissues and the frequency of organoid initiation within this population was approximately 5% in each case. The transcriptomes of these populations overlapped extensively and showed enrichment of epithelial progenitor-associated regulatory genes such as Sox9 and FoxJ1. Surprisingly, pancreatic organoid cells also had the capacity to generate hepatocyte-like cells upon transplantation to Fah-/- mice, indicating a differentiation capacity similar to hepatic organoids. Although spontaneous endocrine differentiation of pancreatic progenitors was not observed in culture, adenoviral delivery of fate-specifying factors Pdx1, Neurog3 and MafA induced insulin expression without glucagon or somatostatin. Pancreatic organoid cultures therefore preserve many key attributes of progenitor cells while allowing unlimited expansion, facilitating the study of fate determination. PMID:25151611

  18. The organoid-initiating cells in mouse pancreas and liver are phenotypically and functionally similar.

    PubMed

    Dorrell, Craig; Tarlow, Branden; Wang, Yuhan; Canaday, Pamela S; Haft, Annelise; Schug, Jonathan; Streeter, Philip R; Finegold, Milton J; Shenje, Lincoln T; Kaestner, Klaus H; Grompe, Markus

    2014-09-01

    Pancreatic Lgr5 expression has been associated with organoid-forming epithelial progenitor populations but the identity of the organoid-initiating epithelial cell subpopulation has remained elusive. Injury causes the emergence of an Lgr5(+) organoid-forming epithelial progenitor population in the adult mouse liver and pancreas. Here, we define the origin of organoid-initiating cells from mouse pancreas and liver prior to Lgr5 activation. This clonogenic population was defined as MIC1-1C3(+)/CD133(+)/CD26(-) in both tissues and the frequency of organoid initiation within this population was approximately 5% in each case. The transcriptomes of these populations overlapped extensively and showed enrichment of epithelial progenitor-associated regulatory genes such as Sox9 and FoxJ1. Surprisingly, pancreatic organoid cells also had the capacity to generate hepatocyte-like cells upon transplantation to Fah(-/-) mice, indicating a differentiation capacity similar to hepatic organoids. Although spontaneous endocrine differentiation of pancreatic progenitors was not observed in culture, adenoviral delivery of fate-specifying factors Pdx1, Neurog3 and MafA induced insulin expression without glucagon or somatostatin. Pancreatic organoid cultures therefore preserve many key attributes of progenitor cells while allowing unlimited expansion, facilitating the study of fate determination. PMID:25151611

  19. Contribution and Mobilization of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a mouse model of carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Yang, Xue; Jing, Yingying; Zhang, Shanshan; Zong, Chen; Jiang, Jinghua; Sun, Kai; Li, Rong; Gao, Lu; Zhao, Xue; Wu, Dong; Shi, Yufang; Han, Zhipeng; Wei, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is associated with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs). In this study, we aimed to determine what role MSCs play in the process and how they mobilize from bone marrow (BM). We employed a mouse model of carbon tetrachloride(CCl4)-induced liver fibrosis. Frozen section was used to detect MSCs recruited to mice and human fibrotic liver. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) was detected to assess liver function. It was found that MSCs of both exogenous and endogenous origin could aggravate liver fibrosis and attenuate liver damage as indicated by lower serum ALT and AST levels. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1α)/ CXCR4 was the most important chemotactic axis regulating MSCs migration from BM to fibrotic liver. Frozen section results showed that the migration did not start from the beginning of liver injury but occurred when the expression balance of SDF-1α between liver and BM was disrupted, where SDF-1α expression in liver was higher than that in BM. Our findings provide further evidence to show the role of BM-MSCs in liver fibrosis and to elucidate the mechanism underlying MSCs mobilization in our early liver fibrosis mice model induced by CCl4. PMID:26643997

  20. Nuclear receptor CAR-regulated expression of the FAM84A gene during the development of mouse liver tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kamino, Hiroki; Yamazaki, Yuichi; Saito, Kosuke; Takizawa, Daichi; Kakizaki, Satoru; Moore, Rick; Negishi, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear xenobiotic receptor CAR is a phenobarbital (PB)-activated transcription factor. Using a mouse model of two-step liver tumorigenesis, in which tumor growth was initiated by diethyl nitrosamine (DEN) and promoted by chronic treatment with PB, we previously demonstrated that tumors developed only in the presence of CAR. Here, we have identified the FAM84A (family with sequence similarity 84, member A) gene as a CAR-regulated gene that is over-expressed during development of phenobarbital-promoted mouse liver tumors. FAM84A mRNA was induced in the liver of DEN/PB-treated mice prior to the development of liver tumors and this induction continued in the non-tumor as well as tumor tissues of a tumor-bearing liver. Western blotting demonstated that FAM84A protein expression increased in mouse liver after PB treatment; however, the FAM84A protein in liver and liver tumors was not phosphorylated at the serine 38 residue, which has been reported to correlate with morphological changes in cells. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed the cytoplasmic localization of FAM84A protein and its expression during tumor development in normal tissues (especially in hepatocytes around the central vein), eosinophilic foci, adenomas and carcinomas. HepG2 cell-based reporter assays indicated that CAR activated the FAM84A promoter. Exogenous over-expression of FAM84A in HepG2 cells resulted in increased cell migration. The physiological function of FAM84A remains unknown, but our results suggest that FAM84A is up-regulated by CAR during the development of liver tumors, and may play an important role in the progression of liver cancer by increasing cell migration. PMID:21424122

  1. Comparative Analysis of the Relationship between Trichloroethylene Metabolism and Tissue-Specific Toxicity among Inbred Mouse Strains: Liver Effects

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hong Sik; Bradford, Blair U.; Kosyk, Oksana; Shymonyak, Svitlana; Uehara, Takeki; Collins, Leonard B.; Bodnar, Wanda M.; Ball, Louise M.; Gold, Avram; Rusyn, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widely used organic solvent. Although TCE is classified as carcinogenic to humans, substantial gaps remain in our understanding of inter-individual variability in TCE metabolism and toxicity, especially in the liver. We tested a hypothesis that amounts of oxidative metabolites of TCE in mouse liver are associated with liver-specific toxicity. Oral dosing with TCE was conducted in sub-acute (600 mg/kg/d; 5 days; 7 inbred mouse strains) and sub-chronic (100 or 400 mg/kg/d; 1, 2, or 4 weeks; 2 inbred mouse strains) designs. We evaluated the quantitative relationship between strain-, dose-, and time-dependent formation of TCE metabolites from cytochrome P450-mediated oxidation [trichloroacetic acid (TCA), dichloroacetic acid (DCA), and trichloroethanol] and glutathione conjugation [S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)glutathione] in serum and liver, and various liver toxicity phenotypes. In sub-acute study, inter-strain variability in TCE metabolite amounts was observed in serum and liver. No induction of Cyp2e1 protein levels in liver was detected. Serum and liver levels of TCA and DCA were correlated with increased transcription of peroxisome proliferator-marker genes Cyp4a10 and Acox1, but not with degree of induction in hepatocellular proliferation. In sub-chronic study, serum and liver levels of oxidative metabolites gradually decreased over time despite continuous dosing. Liver protein levels of Cyp2e1, Adh and Aldh2 were unaffected by treatment with TCE. While the magnitude of induction of peroxisome proliferator-marker genes also declined, hepatocellular proliferation increased. This study offers a unique opportunity to provide a scientific data-driven rationale for some of the major assumptions in human health assessment of TCE. PMID:25424544

  2. Prediction of Liver Injury Induced by Chemicals in Human With a Multiparametric Assay on Isolated Mouse Liver Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Porceddu, Mathieu; Buron, Nelly; Borgne-Sanchez, Annie

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) in humans is difficult to predict using classical in vitro cytotoxicity screening and regulatory animal studies. This explains why numerous compounds are stopped during clinical trials or withdrawn from the market due to hepatotoxicity. Thus, it is important to improve early prediction of DILI in human. In this study, we hypothesized that this goal could be achieved by investigating drug-induced mitochondrial dysfunction as this toxic effect is a major mechanism of DILI. To this end, we developed a high-throughput screening platform using isolated mouse liver mitochondria. Our broad spectrum multiparametric assay was designed to detect the global mitochondrial membrane permeabilization (swelling), inner membrane permeabilization (transmembrane potential), outer membrane permeabilization (cytochrome c release), and alteration of mitochondrial respiration driven by succinate or malate/glutamate. A pool of 124 chemicals (mainly drugs) was selected, including 87 with documented DILI and 37 without reported clinical hepatotoxicity. Our screening assay revealed an excellent sensitivity for clinical outcome of DILI (94 or 92% depending on cutoff) and a high positive predictive value (89 or 82%). A highly significant relationship between drug-induced mitochondrial toxicity and DILI occurrence in patients was calculated (p < 0.001). Moreover, this multiparametric assay allowed identifying several compounds for which mitochondrial toxicity had never been described before and even helped to clarify mechanisms with some drugs already known to be mitochondriotoxic. Investigation of drug-induced loss of mitochondrial integrity and function with this multiparametric assay should be considered for integration into basic screening processes at early stage to select drug candidates with lower risk of DILI in human. This assay is also a valuable tool for assessing the mitochondrial toxicity profile and investigating the mechanism of action of new

  3. Mouse liver selenium-binding protein decreased in aboundance by peroxisome proliferators.

    SciTech Connect

    Giometti, C. S.; Liang, X.; Tollaksen, S. L.; Wall, D. B.; Lubman, D. M.; Subbarao, V.; Sambasiva Rao, M.

    2000-06-01

    Several studies with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) have shown that the abundance of numerous mouse liver proteins is altered in response to treatment with chemicals known to cause peroxisome proliferation. The peptide masses from tryptic digests of two liver proteins showing dramatic decreases in abundance in response to numerous peroxisome proliferators were used to search sequence databases. The selenium-binding protein 2 (SBP2 formerly 56 kDa acetaminophen-binding protein, AP 56) and selenium-binding protein 1 (SBP1 formerly 56 kDa selenium-binding protein, SP 56) in mouse liver, proteins with a high degree of sequence similarity, were the highest ranked identities obtained. Identity with SBP2 was subsequently confirmed by immunodetection with specific antiserum. Treatment of mice with 0.025% ciprofibrate resulted in the more basic of this pair of proteins being decreased to 30% of control abundance while the acidic protein was decreased to 7% of the control amount. Dexamethasone treatment, in contrast, caused increases of 80% and 20% in the abundance of the acidic and basic forms, respectively. Administration of dexamethasone to mice in combination with ciprofibrate produced expression of the acidic SBP2 at 23% of the control level and the basic SBP2 at 36%, a slightly moderated reduction compared with the decrease that occurred with ciprofibrate alone. These data suggest that peroxisome proliferators such as ciprofibrate cause a decrease in the abundance of the SBP2, which leads to increased cell proliferation, even in the presence of an inhibitor such as dexamethasone. Such a decrease in SBP, thought to serve as cell growth regulation factors, could be central to the nongenotoxic carcinogenicity of the peroxisome proliferators observed in rodents.

  4. Cholesterol diet enhances daily rhythm of Pai-1 mRNA in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Takashi; Nakayama, Emiko; Suzuki, Sawako; Akiyama, Masashi; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2004-10-01

    Myocardial infarction frequently occurs in the morning, a phenomenon in part resulting from the downregulation of fibrinolytic activity. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a key factor behind fibrinolytic activity, and its gene expression is controlled under the circadian clock gene in the mouse heart and liver. Hypercholesterolemia has been associated with impaired fibrinolysis due to enhanced PAI-1 activity, which has also been implicated in atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to decipher whether the Pai-1 gene is still expressed daily with hypercholesterolemia. Hypercholesterolemia (1% cholesterol diet) did not significantly affect the daily expression of clock genes (Per2 and Bmal1) and clock-controlled genes (Dbp and E4bp4) in the liver (P > 0.05); however, daily expression of the Pai-1 gene and Pai-1 promoter regulating factor genes such as Nr4a1 was significantly upregulated (P < 0.01). Daily restricted feeding for 4 h during the day reset the gene expression of Per2, Pai-1, Nr4a1, and Tnf-alpha. Lesion of the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the location of the main clock system, led to loss of Per2 and Pai-1 daily expression profiles. In the present experiments, we demonstrated that hypercholesterolemia enhanced daily expression of the Pai-1, Tnf-alpha, and Nr4a1 genes in the mouse liver without affecting clock and clock-controlled genes. Therefore, the risk or high frequency of acute atherothrombotic events in the morning still seems to be a factor that may be augmented under conditions of hypercholesterolemia. PMID:15361354

  5. Cloning and characterization of the mouse glucokinase gene locus and identification of distal liver-specific DNase I hypersensitive sites

    SciTech Connect

    Postic, C.; Niswender, K.D.; Shelton, K.D.; Pettepher, C.C.; Granner, D.K.; Magnuson, M.A.

    1995-10-10

    We cloned and characterized an 83-kb fragment of mouse genomic DNA containing the entire glucokinase (GK) gene. The 11 exons of the gene span a total distance of 49 kb, with exons 1{beta} and 1L being separated by 35 kb. A total of 25,266 bp of DNA sequence information was determined: from {approximately}-9.2 to {approximately}+15 kb (24,195 bp), relative to the hepatocyte transcription start site, and from -335 to -736 bp (1071 bp), relative to the transcription start site in {beta} cells. These sequences revealed that mouse GK is >94% identical to rat and human GK. Mouse hepatic GK mRNA is regulated by fasting and refeeding, as also occurs in the rat. Alignment of the upstream and downstream promoter regions of the mouse, rat, and human genes revealed several evolutionarily conserved regions that may contribute to transcriptional regulation. However, fusion gene studies in transgenic mice indicate that the conserved regions near the transcription start site in hepatocytes are themselves not sufficient for position-independent expression in liver. Analysis of the chromatin structure of a 48-kb region of the mouse gene using DNase I revealed eight liver-specific hypersensitive sites whose locations ranged from 0.1 to 36 kb upstream of the liver transcription start site. The availability of a single, contiguous DNA fragment containing the entire mouse GK gene should allow further studies of cell-specific expression of GK to be performed. 46 refs., 8 figs.

  6. Genetically modified mouse models for the study of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Perumal; Mahesh Kumar, M Jerald; Venkatesan, Ramasamy; Majundar, Subeer S; Juyal, Ramesh C

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. NAFLD represents a large spectrum of diseases ranging from (1) fatty liver (hepatic steatosis); (2) steatosis with inflammation and necrosis; to (3) cirrhosis. The animal models to study NAFLD/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are extremely useful, as there are still many events to be elucidated in the pathology of NASH. The study of the established animal models has provided many clues in the pathogenesis of steatosis and steatohepatitis, but these remain incompletely understood. The different mouse models can be classified in two large groups. The first one includes genetically modified (transgenic or knockout) mice that spontaneously develop liver disease, and the second one includes mice that acquire the disease after dietary or pharmacological manipulation. Although the molecular mechanism leading to the development of hepatic steatosis in the pathogenesis of NAFLD is complex, genetically modified animal models may be a key for the treatment of NAFLD. Ideal animal models for NASH should closely resemble the pathological characteristics observed in humans. To date, no single animal model has encompassed the full spectrum of human disease progression, but they can imitate particular characteristics of human disease. Therefore, it is important that the researchers choose the appropriate animal model. This review discusses various genetically modified animal models developed and used in research on NAFLD. PMID:22468076

  7. Regulation of retinoid X receptor gamma expression by fed state in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangkyu; Lee, Yoo Jeong; Ko, Eun Hee; Kim, Jae-Woo

    2015-02-27

    Glucose metabolism is balanced by glycolysis and gluconeogenesis with precise control in the liver. The expression of genes related to glucose metabolism is regulated primarily by glucose and insulin at transcriptional level. Nuclear receptors play important roles in regulating the gene expression of glucose metabolism at transcriptional level. Some of these nuclear receptors form heterodimers with RXRs to bind to their specific regulatory elements on the target promoters. To date, three isotypes of RXRs have been identified; RXRα, RXRβ and RXRγ. However, their involvement in the interactions with other nuclear receptors in the liver remains unclear. In this study, we found RXRγ is rapidly induced after feeding in the mouse liver, indicating a potential role of RXRγ in controlling glucose or lipid metabolism in the fasting-feeding cycle. In addition, RXRγ expression was upregulated by glucose in primary hepatocytes. This implies that glucose metabolism governed by RXRγ in conjunction with other nuclear receptors. The luciferase reporter assay showed that RXRγ as well as RXRα increased SREBP-1c promoter activity in hepatocytes. These results suggest that RXRγ may play an important role in tight control of glucose metabolism in the fasting-feeding cycle. PMID:25637539

  8. Liver transplant outcomes using ideal donation after circulatory death livers are superior to using older donation after brain death donor livers.

    PubMed

    Scalea, Joseph R; Redfield, Robert R; Foley, David P

    2016-09-01

    Multiple reports have demonstrated that liver transplantation following donation after circulatory death (DCD) is associated with poorer outcomes when compared with liver transplantation from donation after brain death (DBD) donors. We hypothesized that carefully selected, underutilized DCD livers recovered from younger donors have excellent outcomes. We performed a retrospective study of the United Network for Organ Sharing database to determine graft survivals for patients who received liver transplants from DBD donors of age ≥ 60 years, DBD donors < 60 years, and DCD donors < 50 years of age. Between January 2002 and December 2014, 52,271 liver transplants were performed in the United States. Of these, 41,181 (78.8%) underwent transplantation with livers from DBD donors of age < 60 years, 8905 (17.0%) from DBD donors ≥ 60 years old, and 2195 (4.2%) livers from DCD donors < 50 years of age. DCD livers of age < 50 years with < 6 hours of cold ischemia time (CIT) had superior graft survival when compared with DBD livers ≥ age 60 years (P < 0.001). In 2014, there were 133 discarded DCD livers; of these, 111 (83.4%) were from donors < age 50 years old. Young DCD donor livers (age < 50 years old) with short CITs yield results better than that seen with DBD livers > 60 years old. Careful donor organ and recipient selection can lead to excellent results, despite previous reports suggesting otherwise. Increased acceptance of these DCD livers would lead to shorter wait list times and increased national liver transplant rates. Liver Transplantation 22 1197-1204 2016 AASLD. PMID:27314220

  9. Subchronic effects of valproic acid on gene expression profiles for lipid metabolism in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Min-Ho |; Kim, Mingoo |; Lee, Byung-Hoon |; Kim, Ju-Han |; Kang, Kyung-Sun |; Kim, Hyung-Lae |; Yoon, Byung-Il |; Chung, Heekyoung; Kong, Gu |; Lee, Mi-Ock ||

    2008-02-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is used clinically to treat epilepsy, however it induces hepatotoxicity such as microvesicular steatosis. Acute hepatotoxicity of VPA has been well documented by biochemical studies and microarray analysis, but little is known about the chronic effects of VPA in the liver. In the present investigation, we profiled gene expression patterns in the mouse liver after subchronic treatment with VPA. VPA was administered orally at a dose of 100 mg/kg/day or 500 mg/kg/day to ICR mice, and the livers were obtained after 1, 2, or 4 weeks. The activities of serum liver enzymes did not change, whereas triglyceride concentration increased significantly. Microarray analysis revealed that 1325 genes of a set of 32,996 individual genes were VPA responsive when examined by two-way ANOVA (P < 0.05) and fold change (> 1.5). Consistent with our previous results obtained using an acute VPA exposure model (Lee et al., Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 220:45-59, 2007), the most significantly over-represented biological terms for these genes included lipid, fatty acid, and steroid metabolism. Biological pathway analysis suggests that the genes responsible for increased biosynthesis of cholesterol and triglyceride, and for decreased fatty acid {beta}-oxidation contribute to the abnormalities in lipid metabolism induced by subchronic VPA treatment. A comparison of the VPA-responsive genes in the acute and subchronic models extracted 15 commonly altered genes, such as Cyp4a14 and Adpn, which may have predictive power to distinguish the mode of action of hepatotoxicants. Our data provide a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of VPA-induced hepatotoxicity and useful information to predict steatogenic hepatotoxicity.

  10. Microarray Data Reveal Relationship between Jag1 and Ddr1 in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Underkoffler, Lara A.; Carr, Erikka; Nelson, Anthony; Ryan, Matthew J.; Schultz, Reiner; Loomes, Kathleen M.

    2013-01-01

    Alagille syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder involving bile duct paucity and cholestasis in addition to cardiac, skeletal, ophthalmologic, renal and vascular manifestations. Mutations in JAG1, encoding a ligand in the Notch signaling pathway, are found in 95% of patients meeting clinical criteria for Alagille syndrome. In order to define the role of Jag1 in the bile duct developmental abnormalities seen in ALGS, we previously created a Jag1 conditional knockout mouse model. Mice heterozygous for the Jag1 conditional and null alleles demonstrate abnormalities in postnatal bile duct growth and remodeling, with portal expansion and increased numbers of malformed bile ducts. In this study we report the results of microarray analysis and identify genes and pathways differentially expressed in the Jag1 conditional/null livers as compared with littermate controls. In the initial microarray analysis, we found that many of the genes up-regulated in the Jag1 conditional/null mutant livers were related to extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions, cell adhesion and cell migration. One of the most highly up-regulated genes was Ddr1, encoding a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) belonging to a large RTK family. We have found extensive co-localization of Jag1 and Ddr1 in bile ducts and blood vessels in postnatal liver. In addition, co-immunoprecipitation data provide evidence for a novel protein interaction between Jag1 and Ddr1. Further studies will be required to define the nature of this interaction and its functional consequences, which may have significant implications for bile duct remodeling and repair of liver injury. PMID:24391948

  11. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase expression in mouse liver is increased in obesity- and fasting-induced steatosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jialin; Kulkarni, Supriya R; Li, Liya; Slitt, Angela L

    2012-02-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (Ugt) catalyze phase II conjugation reactions with glucuronic acid, which enhances chemical polarity and the elimination from the body. Few studies have addressed whether Ugt expression and activity are affected by liver disease, such as steatosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether steatosis induced by obesity or fasting could affect liver Ugt mRNA expression and activity. Male C57BL/6J and Lep(ob/ob) (ob/ob) mice were fed ad libitum or food was withheld for 24 h. In steatotic livers of ob/ob mice, Ugt1a1, -1a6, -1a9, -2a3, -3a1, and -3a2 mRNA expression increased. Fasting, which also induced steatosis, increased hepatic Ugt1a1, -1a6, -1a7, -1a9, -2b1, -2b5, -2a3, -3a1, and -3a2 mRNA expression in mouse liver. Likewise, acetaminophen glucuronidation increased by 47% in hepatic microsomes from ob/ob mice compared with that in C57BL/6J mice, but not after fasting. In both steatosis models, Ugt induction was accompanied by increased aryl hydrocarbon receptor, constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α, pregnane X receptor, nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α mRNA expression. In addition, fasting increased CAR, PPAR, and Nrf2 binding activity. The work points to hepatic triglyceride concentrations corresponding with nuclear receptor and Ugt expression. The findings indicate that steatosis significantly alters hepatic Ugt expression and activity, which could have a significant impact on determining circulating hormone levels, drug efficacy, and environmental chemical clearance. PMID:22031624

  12. Development of Short-term Molecular Thresholds to Predict Long-term Mouse Liver Tumor Outcomes: Phthalate Case Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Short-term molecular profiles are a central component of strategies to model health effects of environmental chemicals. In this study, a 7 day mouse assay was used to evaluate transcriptomic and proliferative responses in the liver for a hepatocarcinogenic phthalate, di (2-ethylh...

  13. Susceptibility of Different Mouse Wild Type Strains to Develop Diet-Induced NAFLD/AFLD-Associated Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fengler, Vera H. I.; Macheiner, Tanja; Kessler, Sonja M.; Czepukojc, Beate; Gemperlein, Katja; Müller, Rolf; Kiemer, Alexandra K.; Magnes, Christoph; Haybaeck, Johannes; Lackner, Carolin; Sargsyan, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Although non-alcoholic and alcoholic fatty liver disease have been intensively studied, concerning pathophysiological mechanisms are still incompletely understood. This may be due to the use of different animal models and resulting model-associated variation. Therefore, this study aimed to compare three frequently used wild type mouse strains in their susceptibility to develop diet-induced features of non-alcoholic/alcoholic fatty liver disease. Fatty liver disease associated clinical, biochemical, and histological features in C57BL/6, CD-1, and 129Sv WT mice were induced by (i) high-fat diet feeding, (ii) ethanol feeding only, and (iii) the combination of high-fat diet and ethanol feeding. Hepatic and subcutaneous adipose lipid profiles were compared in CD-1 and 129Sv mice. Additionally hepatic fatty acid composition was determined in 129Sv mice. In C57BL/6 mice dietary regimens resulted in heterogeneous hepatic responses, ranging from pronounced steatosis and inflammation to a lack of any features of fatty liver disease. Liver-related serum biochemistry showed high deviations within the regimen groups. CD-1 mice did not exhibit significant changes in metabolic and liver markers and developed no significant steatosis or inflammation as a response to dietary regimens. Although 129Sv mice showed no weight gain, this strain achieved most consistent features of fatty liver disease, apparent from concentration alterations of liver-related serum biochemistry as well as moderate steatosis and inflammation as a result of all dietary regimens. Furthermore, the hepatic lipid profile as well as the fatty acid composition of 129Sv mice were considerably altered, upon feeding the different dietary regimens. Accordingly, diet-induced non-alcoholic/alcoholic fatty liver disease is most consistently promoted in 129Sv mice compared to C57BL/6 and CD-1 mice. As a conclusion, this study demonstrates the importance of genetic background of used mouse strains for modeling diet

  14. A meta-analysis study of gene expression datasets in mouse liver under PPARα knockout.

    PubMed

    He, Kan; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Qishan; Pan, Yuchun

    2013-06-01

    Gene expression profiling of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) has been used in several studies, but there were no consistent results on gene expression patterns involved in PPARα activation in genome-wide due to different sample sizes or platforms. Here, we employed two published microarray datasets both PPARα dependent in mouse liver and applied meta-analysis on them to increase the power of the identification of differentially expressed genes and significantly enriched pathways. As a result, we have improved the concordance in identifying many biological mechanisms involved in PPARα activation. We suggest that our analysis not only leads to more identified genes by combining datasets from different resources together, but also provides some novel hepatic tissue-specific marker genes related to PPARα according to our re-analysis. PMID:23938112

  15. Benzoquinone toxicity is not prevented by sulforaphane in CD-1 mouse fetal liver cells.

    PubMed

    Philbrook, Nicola A; Winn, Louise M

    2016-08-01

    Benzene is an environmental pollutant known to cause leukemia in adults, and may be associated with childhood leukemia. While the mechanisms of benzene-mediated carcinogenicity have not been fully elucidated, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage are implicated. Sulforaphane (SFN) induces nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which contributes to SFN-mediated protection against carcinogenesis. We exposed cultured CD-1 mouse fetal liver cells to the benzene metabolite, benzoquinone, to determine its potential to cause DNA damage and alter DNA repair. Cells were also exposed to SFN to determine potential protective effects. Initially, cells were exposed to benzoquinone to confirm increased ROS and SFN to confirm Nrf2 induction. Subsequently, cells were treated with benzoquinone (with or without SFN) and levels of ROS, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG; marker of oxidative DNA damage), gamma histone 2A variant X (γH2AX; marker of DNA double-stranded breaks; DSBs) and transcript levels of genes involved in DNA repair were measured. Benzoquinone exposure led to a significant increase in ROS, which was not prevented by pretreatment with SFN or the antioxidative enzyme, catalase. DNA damage was increased after benzoquinone exposure, which was not prevented by SFN. Benzoquinone exposure significantly decreased the transcript levels of the critical base excision repair gene, 8-oxoguanine glycosylase (Ogg1), which was not prevented by SFN. The findings of this study demonstrate for the first time that DNA damage and altered DNA repair are a consequence of benzoquinone exposure in CD-1 mouse fetal liver cells and that SFN conferred little protection in this model. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26456483

  16. Nrf2 protects against As(III)-induced damage in mouse liver and bladder

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tao; Huang, Zheping; Chan, Jefferson Y.; Zhang, Donna D.

    2009-01-01

    Arsenic compounds are classified as toxicants and human carcinogens. Environmental exposure to arsenic imposes a big health issue worldwide. Arsenic elicits its toxic efforts through many mechanisms, including generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Nrf2 is the primary transcription factor that controls expression of a main cellular antioxidant response, which is required for neutralizing ROS and thus defending cells from exogenous insults. Previously, we demonstrated a protective role of Nrf2 against arsenic-induced toxicity using a cell culture model. In this report, we present evidence that Nrf2 protects against liver and bladder injury in response to six-weeks of arsenic exposure in a mouse model. Nrf2−/− mice displayed more severe pathological changes in the liver and bladder, compared to Nrf2+/+ mice. Furthermore, Nrf2−/− mice were more sensitive to arsenic-induced DNA hypomethylation, oxidative DNA damage, and apoptotic cell death. These results indicate a protective role of Nrf2 against arsenic toxicity in vivo. Hence, this work demonstrates the feasibility of using dietary compounds that target activation of the Nrf2 signaling pathway to alleviate arsenic-induced damage. PMID:19538980

  17. Comprehensive and quantitative analysis of lysophospholipid molecular species present in obese mouse liver by shotgun lipidomics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunyan; Wang, Miao; Han, Xianlin

    2015-01-01

    Shotgun lipidomics exploits the unique chemical and physical properties of lipid classes and individual molecular species to facilitate the high-throughput analysis of a cellular lipidome on a large scale directly from the extracts of biological samples. A platform for comprehensive analysis of lysophospholipid (LPL) species based on shotgun lipidomics has not been established. Herein, after extensive characterization of the fragmentation pattern of individual LPL class and optimization of all experimental conditions including developing new methods for optimization of collision energy, and recovery and enrichment of LPL classes from the aqueous phase after solvent extraction, a new method for comprehensive and quantitative analysis of LPL species was developed. This newly developed method was applied for comprehensive analysis of LPL species present in mouse liver samples. Remarkably, the study revealed significant accumulation of LPL species in the liver of ob/ob mice. Taken together, by exploiting the principles of shotgun lipidomics in combination with a novel strategy of sample preparation, LPL species present in biological samples can be determined by the established method. We believe that this development is significant and useful for understanding the pathways of phospholipid metabolism and for elucidating the role of LPL species in signal transduction and other biological functions. PMID:25860968

  18. Differences in Liver Injury and Trophoblastic Mitochondrial Damage in Different Preeclampsia-like Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yi-Wei; Yang, Zi; Ding, Xiao-Yan; Yu, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Preeclampsia is a multifactorial disease during pregnancy. Dysregulated lipid metabolism may be related to some preeclampsia. We investigated the relationship between triglycerides (TGs) and liver injury in different preeclampsia-like mouse models and their potential common pathways. Methods: Preeclampsia-like models (Nw-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester [L-NAME], lipopolysaccharide [LPS], apolipoprotein C-III [Apo] transgnic mice + L-NAME, β2 glycoprotein I [βGPI]) were used in four experimental groups: L-NAME (LN), LPS, Apo-LN and βGPI, respectively, and controls received saline (LN-C, LPS-C, Apo-C, βGPI-C). The first three models were established in preimplantation (PI), early-, mid- and late-gestation (EG, MG and LG). βGPI and controls were injected before implantation. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), 24-hour urine protein, placental and fetal weight, serum TGs, total cholesterol (TC) and pathologic liver and trophocyte changes were assessed. Results: MAP and proteinuria were significantly increased in the experimental groups. Placenta and fetal weight in PI, EP and MP subgroups were significantly lower than LP. Serum TGs significantly increased in most groups but controls. TC was not different between experimental and control groups. Spotty hepatic cell necrosis was observed in PI, EG, MG in LN, Apo-LN and βGPI, but no morphologic changes were observed in the LPS group. Similar trophoblastic mitochondrial damage was observed in every experimental group. Conclusions: Earlier preeclampsia onset causes a higher MAP and urine protein level, and more severe placental and fetal damage. Preeclampsia-like models generated by varied means lead to different changes in lipid metabolism and associated with liver injury. Trophoblastic mitochondrial damage may be the common terminal pathway in different preeclampsia-like models. PMID:26063365

  19. Protein Targets of Isoniazid-Reactive Metabolites in Mouse Liver in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Koen, Yakov M; Galeva, Nadezhda A; Metushi, Imir G; Uetrecht, Jack; Hanzlik, Robert P

    2016-06-20

    Isoniazid (INH) has been a first-line drug for the treatment of tuberculosis for more than 40 years. INH is well-tolerated by most patients, but some patients develop hepatitis that can be severe in rare cases or after overdose. The mechanisms underlying the hepatotoxicity of INH are not known, but covalent binding of reactive metabolites is known to occur in animals and is suspected in human cases. A major unresolved question is the identity of the liver proteins that are modified by INH metabolites. Treating mice with INH leads to accumulation of isonicotinoyl-lysine residues on numerous proteins in the hepatic S9 fraction. Analysis of this fraction by SDS-PAGE followed by tryptic digestion of bands and LC-MS/MS revealed a single adducted peptide derived from d-dopachrome decarboxylase. When a tryptic digest of whole S9 was applied to anti-INH antibody immobilized on beads, only 12 peptides were retained, 5 of which clearly contained isonicotinoyl-lysine adducts and could be confidently assigned to 5 liver proteins. In another experiment, undigested S9 fractions from INA-treated and untreated (UT) mice were adsorbed in parallel on anti-INA beads and the retained proteins were digested and analyzed by LC-MS/MS. The INA-S9 digest showed 1 adducted peptide that was associated with a unique protein whose identity was corroborated by numerous nonadducted peptides in the digest and 13 other proteins identified only by multiple nonadducted peptides. None of these 14 proteins was associated with any peptides present in the UT-S9 fraction. Overall, we identified 7 mouse liver proteins that became adducted by INH metabolites in vivo. Of these 7 INH target proteins, only 2 have been previously reported as targets of any reactive metabolite in vivo. PMID:27097313

  20. Usage of adenovirus expressing thymidine kinase mediated hepatocellular damage for enabling mouse liver repopulation with allogenic or xenogenic hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Daniel; Balasiddaiah, Anangi; Lamas, Oscar; Duret, Cedric; Neri, Leire; Guembe, Laura; Galarraga, Miguel; Larrea, Esther; Daujat-Chavanieu, Martine; Muntane, Jordi; Maurel, Patrick; Riezu, Jose Ignacio; Prieto, Jesus; Aldabe, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown that the liver of immunodeficient mice can be efficiently repopulated with human hepatocytes when subjected to chronic hepatocellular damage. Mice with such chimeric livers represent useful reagents for medical and clinical studies. However all previously reported models of humanized livers are difficult to implement as they involve cross-breeding of immunodeficient mice with mice exhibiting genetic alterations causing sustained hepatic injury. In this paper we attempted to create chimeric livers by inducing persistent hepatocellular damage in immunodeficient Rag2(-/-) γc(-/-) mice using an adenovirus encoding herpes virus thymidine kinase (AdTk) and two consecutive doses of ganciclovir (GCV). We found that this treatment resulted in hepatocellular damage persisting for at least 10 weeks and enabled efficient engraftment and proliferation within the liver of either human or allogenic hepatocytes. Interestingly, while the nodules generated from the transplanted mouse hepatocytes were well vascularized, the human hepatocytes experienced progressive depolarization and exhibited reduced numbers of murine endothelial cells inside the nodules. In conclusion, AdTk/GCV-induced liver damage licenses the liver of immunodeficient mice for allogenic and xenogenic hepatocyte repopulation. This approach represents a simple alternative strategy for chimeric liver generation using immunodeficient mice without additional genetic manipulation of the germ line. PMID:24086405

  1. Liver-Specific Reactivation of the Inactivated Hnf-1α Gene: Elimination of Liver Dysfunction To Establish a Mouse MODY3 Model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ying-Hue; Magnuson, Mark A.; Muppala, Vijayakumar; Chen, Shih-Shun

    2003-01-01

    Mice deficient in hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 α (HNF-1α) develop dwarfism, liver dysfunction, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Liver dysfunction in HNF-1α-null mice includes severe hepatic glycogen accumulation and dyslipidemia. The liver dysfunction may appear as soon as 2 weeks after birth. Since the HNF-1α-null mice become diabetic 2 weeks after birth, the early onset of the liver dysfunction is unlikely to be due to the diabetic status of the mice. More likely, it is due directly to the deficiency of HNF-1α in liver. Although the HNF-1α-null mice have an average life span of 1 year, the severe liver phenotype has thwarted attempts to study the pathogenesis of maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 3 (MODY3) and to examine therapeutic strategies for diabetes prevention and treatment in these mice. To circumvent this problem, we have generated a new Hnf-1α mutant mouse line, Hnf-1αkin/kin, using gene targeting to inactivate the Hnf-1α gene and at the same time, to incorporate the Cre-loxP DNA recombination system into the locus for later revival of the Hnf-1α gene in tissues by tissue-specifically expressed Cre recombinase. The Hnf-1αkin/kin mice in which the expression of HNF-1α was inactivated in germ line cells were indistinguishable from the HNF-1α-null mice with regard to both the diabetes and liver phenotypes. Intriguingly, when the inactivated Hnf-1α gene was revived in liver (hepatic Hnf-1α revived) by the Cre recombinase driven by an albumin promoter, the Hnf-1αkin/kin mice, although severely diabetic, grew normally and did not develop any of the liver dysfunctions. In addition, we showed that the expression of numerous genes in pancreas, including a marker gene for pancreas injury, was affected by liver dysfunction but not by the deficiency of HNF-1α in pancreas. Thus, our hepatic-Hnf-1α-revived mice may serve as a useful mouse model to study the human MODY3 disorder. PMID:12529398

  2. Metabolism of aildenafil in vivo in rats and in vitro in mouse, rat, dog, and human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wu, Linan; Gu, Yuan; Si, Duanyun; Liu, Changxiao

    2014-06-01

    Aildenafil, 1-{[3-(6, 7-dihydro-1-methyl-7-oxo-3-propyl-1H-pyrazolo [4, 3-d] primidin-5-yl)-4-ethoxyphenyl] sulfonyl}-cis-3, 5-dimethylpiperazine, a phosphodiesterase type V enzyme inhibitor (PDE5I), is under development for treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED). The purpose of this study was to elucidate metabolism of aildenafil in vivo in rats and in vitro in mouse, rat, dog, and human liver microsomes. Thirty-one phase I metabolites have been found by LTQ/Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometry in rat urine, faeces, and bile after oral administration. Major biotransformation pathways of aildenafil included N-dealkylation of the piperazine ring, hydroxylation and dehydrogenation, aliphatic hydroxylation and loss of alkyl group of piperazine ring. Minor pathways involved hydroxylation on the phenyl ring, pyrazole N-demethylation, O-deethylation, loss of piperazine ring (cleavage of N-S bond) and dehydrogenation on the piperazine ring. Similar metabolic pathways of aildenafil were observed in the incubations of liver microsomes from mouse, rat, and dog as well as from human. The depletion rate of parent drug in mouse and rat liver microsomes was significantly different from that in human liver microsomes. The cytochrome P450 reaction phenotyping analysis was conducted using isozyme-specific inhibitors. The results indicated that CYP3A was the main isoenzyme involved in oxidative metabolism of aildenafil. Overall, these in vitro and in vivo findings should provide valuable information on possible metabolic behaviours of aildenafil in humans. PMID:24311535

  3. Quantitative proteomics analysis of the liver reveals immune regulation and lipid metabolism dysregulation in a mouse model of depression.

    PubMed

    Wu, You; Tang, Jianyong; Zhou, Chanjuan; Zhao, Libo; Chen, Jin; Zeng, Li; Rao, Chenglong; Shi, Haiyang; Liao, Li; Liang, Zihong; Yang, Yongtao; Zhou, Jian; Xie, Peng

    2016-09-15

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a highly prevalent and debilitating mental illness with substantial impairments in quality of life and functioning. However, the pathophysiology of major depression remains poorly understood. Combining the brain and body should provide a comprehensive understanding of the etiology of MDD. As the largest internal organ of the human body, the liver has an important function, yet no proteomic study has assessed liver protein expression in a preclinical model of depression. Using the chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) mouse model of depression, differential protein expression between CUMS and control (CON) mice was examined in the liver proteome using isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. More than 4000 proteins were identified and 66 most significantly differentiated proteins were used for further bioinformatic analysis. According to the ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA), we found that proteins related to the inflammation response, immune regulation, lipid metabolism and NFκB signaling network were altered by CUMS. Moreover, four proteins closely associated with these processes, hemopexin, haptoglobin, cytochrome P450 2A4 (CYP2A4) and bile salt sulfotransferase 1 (SULT2A1), were validated by western blotting. In conclusion, we report, for the first time, the liver protein expression profile in the CUMS mouse model of depression. Our findings provide novel insight (liver-brain axis) into the multifaceted mechanisms of major depressive disorder. PMID:27247144

  4. Post-traumatic stress responses following liver transplantation in older children.

    PubMed

    Walker, A M; Harris, G; Baker, A; Kelly, D; Houghton, J

    1999-03-01

    Eighteen children aged between 7 and 16 years who had undergone a liver transplantation were interviewed using the Child Post-Traumatic Stress Reaction Index (CPTS-RI) to discover if they had post-traumatic stress symptoms. A case control design was used to define which factors were important for the development of post-traumatic stress. Results of a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), with post-traumatic stress symptom intensity as measured on the CPTS-RI as the dependent variable, revealed a significant difference between the liver transplantation group compared with children who had a chronic life-threatening illness or had undergone a routine surgical operation. A post hoc (Tukey's HSD test) statistical analysis was performed and significance at the .05 level was found between the liver transplantation group and both the chronic illness group and the routine surgical operation group. Our results indicate that the acute life-threat involved in the liver transplantation contributed to the development of post-traumatic stress. It was thought that dissociation may be important in preventing the resolution of the trauma. Additional investigations are needed with larger numbers in a longitudinal study beginning before the transplant to determine the course of the PTSD symptoms and the appropriate timing of interventions to reduce the harmful effects of these symptoms. PMID:10190338

  5. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) potentiates autoimmune hepatitis in the CYP2D6 mouse model.

    PubMed

    Müller, Peter; Messmer, Marie; Bayer, Monika; Pfeilschifter, Josef M; Hintermann, Edith; Christen, Urs

    2016-05-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and its more severe development non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are increasing worldwide. In particular NASH, which is characterized by an active hepatic inflammation, has often severe consequences including progressive fibrosis, cirrhosis, and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here we investigated how metabolic liver injury is influencing the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). We used the CYP2D6 mouse model in which wild type C57BL/6 mice are infected with an Adenovirus expressing the major liver autoantigen cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6). Such mice display several features of human AIH, including interface hepatitis, formation of LKM-1 antibodies and CYP2D6-specific T cells, as well as hepatic fibrosis. NAFLD was induced with a high-fat diet (HFD). We found that pre-existing NAFLD potentiates the severity of AIH. Mice fed for 12 weeks with a HFD displayed increased cellular infiltration of the liver, enhanced hepatic fibrosis and elevated numbers of liver autoantigen-specific T cells. Our data suggest that a pre-existing metabolic liver injury constitutes an additional risk for the severity of an autoimmune condition of the liver, such as AIH. PMID:26924542

  6. Obese diet-induced mouse models of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-tracking disease by liver biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansen, Maria Nicoline Baandrup; Veidal, Sanne Skovgård; Rigbolt, Kristoffer Tobias Gustav; Tølbøl, Kirstine Sloth; Roth, Jonathan David; Jelsing, Jacob; Vrang, Niels; Feigh, Michael

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To characterize development of diet-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) by performing liver biopsy in wild-type and genetically obese mice. METHODS: Male wild-type C57BL/6J (C57) mice (DIO-NASH) and male Lepob/Lepob (ob/ob) mice (ob/ob-NASH) were maintained on a diet high in trans-fat (40%), fructose (22%) and cholesterol (2%) for 26 and 12 wk, respectively. A normal chow diet served as control in C57 mice (lean chow) and ob/ob mice (ob/ob chow). After the diet-induction period, mice were liver biopsied and a blinded histological assessment of steatosis and fibrosis was conducted. Mice were then stratified into groups counterbalanced for steatosis score and fibrosis stage and continued on diet and to receive daily PO dosing of vehicle for 8 wk. Global gene expression in liver tissue was assessed by RNA sequencing and bioinformatics. Metabolic parameters, plasma liver enzymes and lipids (total cholesterol, triglycerides) as well as hepatic lipids and collagen content were measured by biochemical analysis. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease activity score (NAS) (steatosis/inflammation/ballooning degeneration) and fibrosis were scored. Steatosis and fibrosis were also quantified using percent fractional area. RESULTS: Diet-induction for 26 and 12 wk in DIO-NASH and ob/ob-NASH mice, respectively, elicited progressive metabolic perturbations characterized by increased adiposity, total cholesterol and elevated plasma liver enzymes. The diet also induced clear histological features of NASH including hepatosteatosis and fibrosis. Overall, the metabolic NASH phenotype was more pronounced in ob/ob-NASH vs DIO-NASH mice. During the eight week repeated vehicle dosing period, the metabolic phenotype was sustained in DIO-NASH and ob/ob-NASH mice in conjunction with hepatomegaly and increased hepatic lipids and collagen accumulation. Histopathological scoring demonstrated significantly increased NAS of DIO-NASH mice (0 vs 4.7 ± 0.4, P < 0.001 compared to lean chow

  7. A Balanced Diet Is Necessary for Proper Entrainment Signals of the Mouse Liver Clock

    PubMed Central

    Hirao, Akiko; Tahara, Yu; Kimura, Ichiro; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2009-01-01

    Background The peripheral circadian clock in mice is entrained not only by light-dark cycles but also by daily restricted feeding schedules. Behavioral and cell culture experiments suggest an increase in glucose level as a factor in such feeding-induced entrainment. For application of feeding-induced entrainment in humans, nutrient content and dietary variations should be considered. Principal Finding To elucidate the food composition necessary for dietary entrainment, we examined whether complete or partial substitution of dietary nutrients affected phase shifts in liver clocks of mice. Compared with fasting mice or ad libitum fed mice, the liver bioluminescence rhythm advanced by 3–4 h on the middle day in Per2::luciferase knock-in mice that were administered a standard mouse diet, i.e. AIN-93M formula [0.6–0.85 g/10 g mouse BW] (composition: 14% casein, 47% cornstarch, 15% gelatinized cornstarch, 10% sugar, 4% soybean oil, and 10% other [fiber, vitamins, minerals, etc.]), for 2 days. When each nutrient was tested alone (100% nutrient), an insignificant weak phase advance was found to be induced by cornstarch and soybean oil, but almost no phase advance was induced by gelatinized cornstarch, high-amylose cornstarch, glucose, sucrose, or casein. A combination of glucose and casein without oil, vitamin, or fiber caused a significant phase advance. When cornstarch in AIN-93M was substituted with glucose, sucrose, fructose, polydextrose, high-amylose cornstarch, or gelatinized cornstarch, the amplitude of phase advance paralleled the increase in blood glucose concentration. Conclusions Our results strongly suggest the following: (1) balanced diets containing carbohydrates/sugars and proteins are good for restricted feeding-induced entrainment of the peripheral circadian clock and (2) a balanced diet that increases blood glucose, but not by sugar alone, is suitable for entrainment. These findings may assist in the development of dietary recommendations for on

  8. Renal Impairment with Sublethal Tubular Cell Injury in a Chronic Liver Disease Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Tokiko; Kotani, Hirokazu; Miyao, Masashi; Kawai, Chihiro; Jemail, Leila; Abiru, Hitoshi; Tamaki, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of renal impairment in chronic liver diseases (CLDs) has been primarily studied in the advanced stages of hepatic injury. Meanwhile, the pathology of renal impairment in the early phase of CLDs is poorly understood, and animal models to elucidate its mechanisms are needed. Thus, we investigated whether an existing mouse model of CLD induced by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) shows renal impairment in the early phase. Renal injury markers, renal histology (including immunohistochemistry for tubular injury markers and transmission electron microscopy), autophagy, and oxidative stress were studied longitudinally in DDC- and standard diet–fed BALB/c mice. Slight but significant renal dysfunction was evident in DDC-fed mice from the early phase. Meanwhile, histological examinations of the kidneys with routine light microscopy did not show definitive morphological findings, and electron microscopic analyses were required to detect limited injuries such as loss of brush border microvilli and mitochondrial deformities. Limited injuries have been recently designated as sublethal tubular cell injury. As humans with renal impairment, either with or without CLD, often show almost normal tubules, sublethal injury has been of particular interest. In this study, the injuries were associated with mitochondrial aberrations and oxidative stress, a possible mechanism for sublethal injury. Intriguingly, two defense mechanisms were associated with this injury that prevent it from progressing to apparent cell death: autophagy and single-cell extrusion with regeneration. Furthermore, the renal impairment of this model progressed to chronic kidney disease with interstitial fibrosis after long-term DDC feeding. These findings indicated that DDC induces renal impairment with sublethal tubular cell injury from the early phase, leading to chronic kidney disease. Importantly, this CLD mouse model could be useful for studying the pathophysiological mechanisms

  9. UPTAKE OF [3H]-COLCHICINE INTO BRAIN AND LIVER OF MOUSE, RAT, AND CHICK

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Edward L.; Alberti, Marie Hebert; Flood, James F.

    1980-07-01

    The uptake of [ring A-4-{sup 3}H] colchicine and [ring C-methoxy-{sup 3}H]colchicine has been compared in mice from 1 to 24 hr after administration. Less radioactivity was found in brain after administration of ring-labeled colchicine than after administration of the methoxy-labeled colchicine. Three hr after administration of ring-labeled colchicine, 5% of the label was in liver and about 0.01% of the label was present in brain. Forty percent of the brain radioactivity was bound to tubulin as determined by vinblastine precipitation. After 3 hr, an average of 8% of the radioactivity from methoxy-labeled colchicine was found in the liver and 0.16% in brain. However, less than 5% of the activity in brain was precipitated by vinblastine, and the colchicine equivalent was comparable to that found after administration of the ring-labeled colchicine. The amount of colchicine entering mouse brain after subcutaneous injection is comparable to the minimum behaviorally effective dose when administered to the caudate. The metabolism of [ring C-methoxy-{sup 3}H] and [ring A-{sup 3}H]colchicine was also studied in rats. the general pattern was similar to mice; less radioactivity was found in brain after administration of the ring-labeled alkoloid than after administration of methoxy-labeled colchicine. Again, 40-50% of ring-labeled colchicine was precipitated by vinblastine. A much smaller percentage of the methoxy-labeled drug was precipitated by vinblastine than of the ring A-labeled colchicine. These experiments, together with behavioral experiments [7], support the hypotheses that structural alteration in synapses by recently synthesized proteins which are transported down the axons and dendrites may be an essential process for long-term memory formation.

  10. Age-related subproteomic analysis of mouse liver and kidney peroxisomes

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Jia; Garcia-Arcos, Itsaso; Alvarez, Ruben; Cristobal, Susana

    2007-01-01

    Background Despite major recent advances in the understanding of peroxisomal functions and how peroxisomes arise, only scant information is available regarding this organelle in cellular aging. The aim of this study was to characterize the changes in the protein expression profile of aged versus young liver and kidney peroxisome-enriched fractions from mouse and to suggest possible mechanisms underlying peroxisomal aging. Peroxisome-enriched fractions from 10 weeks, 18 months and 24 months C57bl/6J mice were analyzed by quantitative proteomics. Results Peroxisomal proteins were enriched by differential and density gradient centrifugation and proteins were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), quantified and identified by mass spectrometry (MS). In total, sixty-five proteins were identified in both tissues. Among them, 14 proteins were differentially expressed in liver and 21 proteins in kidney. The eight proteins differentially expressed in both tissues were involved in β-oxidation, α-oxidation, isoprenoid biosynthesis, amino acid metabolism, and stress response. Quantitative proteomics, clustering methods, and prediction of transcription factors, all indicated that there is a decline in protein expression at 18 months and a recovery at 24 months. Conclusion These results indicate that some peroxisomal proteins show a tissue-specific functional response to aging. This response is probably dependent on their differential regeneration capacity. The differentially expressed proteins could lead several cellular effects: such as alteration of fatty acid metabolism that could alert membrane protein functions, increase of the oxidative stress and contribute to decline in bile salt synthesis. The ability to detect age-related variations in the peroxisomal proteome can help in the search for reliable and valid aging biomarkers. PMID:18042274

  11. Impact of high-fat diet on the proteome of mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Benard, Outhiriaradjou; Lim, Jihyeon; Apontes, Pasha; Jing, Xiaohong; Angeletti, Ruth H; Chi, Yuling

    2016-05-01

    Chronic overnutrition, for instance, high-fat diet (HFD) feeding, is a major cause of rapidly growing incidence of metabolic syndromes. However, the mechanisms underlying HFD-induced adverse effects on human health are not clearly understood. HFD-fed C57BL6/J mouse has been a popular model employed to investigate the mechanisms. Yet, there is no systematic and comprehensive study of the impact of HFD on the protein profiles of the animal. Here, we present a proteome-wide study of the consequences of long-term HFD feeding. Utilizing a powerful technology, stable isotope labeling of mammals, we detected and quantitatively compared 965 proteins extracted from livers of chow-diet-fed and HFD-fed mice. Among which, 122 proteins were significantly modulated by HFD. Fifty-four percent of those 122 proteins are involved in metabolic processes and the majority participate in lipid metabolism. HFD up-regulates proteins that play important roles in fatty acid uptake and subsequent oxidation and are linked to the transcription factors PPARα and PGC-1α. HFD suppresses lipid biosynthesis-related proteins that play major roles in de novo lipogenesis and are linked to SREBP-1 and PPARγ. These data suggest that HFD-fed mice tend to develop enhanced fat utilization and suppressed lipid biosynthesis, understandably a self-protective mechanism to counteract to excessive fat loading, which causes liver steatosis. Enhanced fatty acid oxidation increases reactive oxygen species and inhibits glucose oxidation, which are associated with hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. This proteomics study provides molecular understanding of HFD-induced pathology and identifies potential targets for development of therapeutics for metabolic syndromes. PMID:27133419

  12. Uptake of (/sup 3/H)colchicine into brain and liver of mouse, rat, and chick

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, E.L.; Alberti, M.H.; Flood, J.F.

    1981-01-01

    The uptake of (ring A-4-/sup 3/H) colchicine and (ring C-methoxy-/sup 3/H)colchicine has been compared in mice from 1 to 24 hr after administration. Less radioactivity was found in brain after administration of ring-labeled colchicine than after administration of the methoxy-labeled colchicine. Three hr after administration of ring-labeled colchicine, 5% of the label was in liver and about 0.01% of the label was present in brain. Forty percent of the brain radioactivity was bound to tubulin as determined by vinblastine precipitation. After 3 hr, an average of 8% of the radioactivity from methoxy-labeled colchicine was found in the liver and 0.16% in brain. However, less than 5% of the activity in brain was precipitated by vinblastine, and the colchicine equivalent was comparable to that found after administration of the ring-labeled colchicine. The amount of colchicine entering mouse brain after subcutaneous injection is comparable to the minimum behaviorally effective dose when administered to the caudate. The metabolism of (ring C-methoxy-/sup 3/H) and (ring A-/sup 3/H)colchicine was also studied in rats. The general pattern was similar to mice; less radioactivity was found in brain after administration of the ring-labeled alkaloid than after administration of methoxy-labeled colchicine. Again, 40-50% of ring-labeled colchicine was precipitated by vinblastine. A much smaller percentage of the methoxy-labeled drug was precipitated by vinblastine than of the ring A-labeled colchicine. These experiments, together with behavioral experiments, support the hypotheses that structural alterations in synapses by recently synthesized proteins which are transported down the axons and dendrites may be an essential process for long-term memory formation.

  13. Erythropoietic protoporphyria in the house mouse. A recessive inherited ferrochelatase deficiency with anemia, photosensitivity, and liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tutois, S; Montagutelli, X; Da Silva, V; Jouault, H; Rouyer-Fessard, P; Leroy-Viard, K; Guénet, J L; Nordmann, Y; Beuzard, Y; Deybach, J C

    1991-01-01

    A viable autosomal recessive mutation (named fch, or ferrochelatase deficiency) causing jaundice and anemia in mice arose in a mutagenesis experiment using ethylnitrosourea. Homozygotes (fch/fch) display a hemolytic anemia, photosensitivity, cholestasis, and severe hepatic dysfunction. Protoporphyrin is found at high concentration in erythrocytes, serum, and liver. Ferrochelatase activity in various tissues is 2.7-6.3% of normal. Heterozygotes (+/fch) are not anemic and have normal liver function; they are not sensitive to light exposure; ferrochelatase activity is 45-65% of normal. Southern blot analysis using a ferrochelatase cDNA probe reveals no gross deletion of the ferrochelatase gene. This is the first spontaneous form of erythropoietic protoporphyria in the house mouse. Despite the presence in the mouse of clinical and biochemical features infrequent in the human, this mutation may represent a model for the human disease, especially in its severe form. Images PMID:1939658

  14. Detection of rodent liver carcinogen genotoxicity by the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay in multiple mouse organs (liver, lung, spleen, kidney, and bone marrow).

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Y F; Izumiyama, F; Nishidate, E; Matsusaka, N; Tsuda, S

    1997-07-14

    We have recently designed a simple method for applying the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCG) assay to mouse organs. With this method, each organ is minced, suspended in chilled homogenizing buffer containing NaCl and Na2EDTA, gently homogenized using a Potter-type homogenizer set in ice, and then centrifuged nuclei are used for the alkaline SCG assay. In the present study, we used the method to assess the genotoxicity of 8 rodent hepatic carcinogens in 5 mouse organs (liver, lung, kidney, spleen, and bone marrow). The carcinogens we studied were p-aminoazobenzene, auramine, 2,4-diaminotoluene, p-dichlorobenzene, ethylene thiourea (ETU), styrene-7,8-oxide, phenobarbital sodium, and benzene-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexachloride (BHC); except for p-aminoazobenzene, they do not induce micronuclei in mouse bone marrow cells. Mice were sacrificed 3 and 24 h after the administration of each carcinogen. p-Aminoazobenzene, ETU, and styrene-7,8-oxide induced alkaline labile DNA lesions in all of the organs studied. Auramine, 2,4-diaminotoluene, p-dichlorobenzene, and phenobarbital sodium also produced lesions, but their effect was greatest in the liver. BHC, which is not genotoxic in in vitro tests, did not show any effects. We suggest that it may be possible to use the alkaline SCG assay to detect in vivo activity of chemicals whose genotoxicity is not expressed in bone marrow cells. PMID:9268046

  15. Therapeutic efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on human colorectal cancer liver metastasis in orthotopic nude-mouse models.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Takashi; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Yong; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-10-13

    Liver metastasis is the most frequent cause of death from colon and other cancers. Generally, liver metastasis is recalcitrant to treatment. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on liver metastasis in orthotopic mouse models. HT-29 human colon cancer cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) were used in the present study. S. typhimurium A1-R infected HT-29 cells in a time-dependent manner, inhibiting cancer-cell proliferation in vitro. S. typhimurium A1-R promoted tumor necrosis and inhibited tumor growth in a subcutaneous tumor mouse model of HT-29-RFP. In orthotopic mouse models, S. typhimurium A1-R targeted liver metastases and significantly reduced their growth. The results of this study demonstrate the future clinical potential of S. typhimurium A1-R targeting of liver metastasis. PMID:26375054

  16. Therapeutic efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on human colorectal cancer liver metastasis in orthotopic nude-mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Takashi; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Yong; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Liver metastasis is the most frequent cause of death from colon and other cancers. Generally, liver metastasis is recalcitrant to treatment. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on liver metastasis in orthotopic mouse models. HT-29 human colon cancer cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) were used in the present study. S. typhimurium A1-R infected HT-29 cells in a time-dependent manner, inhibiting cancer-cell proliferation in vitro. S. typhimurium A1-R promoted tumor necrosis and inhibited tumor growth in a subcutaneous tumor mouse model of HT-29-RFP. In orthotopic mouse models, S. typhimurium A1-R targeted liver metastases and significantly reduced their growth. The results of this study demonstrate the future clinical potential of S. typhimurium A1-R targeting of liver metastasis. PMID:26375054

  17. Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane technical mixture regulates cell cycle and apoptosis genes through the activation of CAR and ERα in mouse livers

    SciTech Connect

    Kazantseva, Yuliya A.; Yarushkin, Andrei A.; Pustylnyak, Vladimir O.

    2013-09-01

    Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) is a widely used organochlorine pesticide and a xenoestrogen that promotes rodent hepatomegaly and tumours. A recent study has shown significant correlation between DDT serum concentration and liver cancer incidence in humans, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We hypothesised that a mixture of DDT isomers could exert effects on the liver through pathways instead of classical ERs. The acute effects of a DDT mixture containing the two major isomers p,p′-DDT (85%) and o,p′-DDT (15%) on CAR and ERα receptors and their cell cycle and apoptosis target genes were studied in mouse livers. ChIP results demonstrated increased CAR and ERα recruitment to their specific target gene binding sites in response to the DDT mixture. The results of real-time RT-PCR were consistent with the ChIP data and demonstrated that the DDT was able to activate both CAR and ERα in mouse livers, leading to target gene transcriptional increases including Cyp2b10, Gadd45β, cMyc, Mdm2, Ccnd1, cFos and E2f1. Western blot analysis demonstrated increases in cell cycle progression proteins cMyc, Cyclin D1, CDK4 and E2f1 and anti-apoptosis proteins Mdm2 and Gadd45β. In addition, DDT exposure led to Rb phosphorylation. Increases in cell cycle progression and anti-apoptosis proteins were accompanied by a decrease in p53 content and its transcriptional activity. However, the DDT was unable to stimulate the β-catenin signalling pathway, which can play an important role in hepatocyte proliferation. Thus, our results indicate that DDT treatment may result in cell cycle progression and apoptosis inhibition through CAR- and ERα-mediated gene activation in mouse livers. These findings suggest that the proliferative and anti-apoptotic conditions induced by CAR and ERα activation may be important contributors to the early stages of hepatocarcinogenesis as produced by DDT in rodent livers. - Highlights: • DDT activated both CAR and ERα and their cell

  18. CELL CYCLE SYNCHRONIZATION OF MOUSE LIVER EPITHELIAL CELLS BY ELUTRIATION CENTRIFUGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlman, Andrew L.; Bartholomew, James C.

    1980-06-01

    Detailed methods are described for the sorting and cell cycle synchronization by means of centrifugal elutriation of an established mouse liver epithelial cell line(NMuLi). In a comparison between three different elutriation media and between two different temperatures(4° and 20° C), the NMuLi cells were found to be most reproducibly sorted in the cell cycle when run in growth medium in the absence of serum and at the lower temperature. Under these conditions. and using decrements of rotor speed calculated from an empirically derived algorithm as described in the text an initially asynchronous population (38% G{sub 1}, 36% S, and 28% G{sub 2}M) was sorted into fractions enriched to 60% G{sub 1}, 75% S, and 50% G{sub 2}M. Of the cells loaded into the rotor, 30% were lost in the elutriation process, and about 20% recovered as aggregates. The remainder appeared in the various synchronized fractions. Epithelial cells sorted in this manner demonstrated no loss of viability, and upon replating showed significant movement in the cell cycle by 6 hrs post elutriation. The degree of synchronous movement through the cell cycle achieved by elutriation depended on the part of the cell cycle from which the original elutriated fraction came. Cells collected as late S and G{sub 2}M moved through the cell cycle with the tightest sychrony.

  19. Circadian and feeding rhythms differentially affect rhythmic mRNA transcription and translation in mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Atger, Florian; Gobet, Cédric; Marquis, Julien; Martin, Eva; Wang, Jingkui; Weger, Benjamin; Lefebvre, Grégory; Descombes, Patrick; Naef, Felix; Gachon, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Diurnal oscillations of gene expression are a hallmark of rhythmic physiology across most living organisms. Such oscillations are controlled by the interplay between the circadian clock and feeding rhythms. Although rhythmic mRNA accumulation has been extensively studied, comparatively less is known about their transcription and translation. Here, we quantified simultaneously temporal transcription, accumulation, and translation of mouse liver mRNAs under physiological light–dark conditions and ad libitum or night-restricted feeding in WT and brain and muscle Arnt-like 1 (Bmal1)-deficient animals. We found that rhythmic transcription predominantly drives rhythmic mRNA accumulation and translation for a majority of genes. Comparison of wild-type and Bmal1 KO mice shows that circadian clock and feeding rhythms have broad impact on rhythmic gene expression, Bmal1 deletion affecting surprisingly both transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Translation efficiency is differentially regulated during the diurnal cycle for genes with 5′-Terminal Oligo Pyrimidine tract (5′-TOP) sequences and for genes involved in mitochondrial activity, many harboring a Translation Initiator of Short 5′-UTR (TISU) motif. The increased translation efficiency of 5′-TOP and TISU genes is mainly driven by feeding rhythms but Bmal1 deletion also affects amplitude and phase of translation, including TISU genes. Together this study emphasizes the complex interconnections between circadian and feeding rhythms at several steps ultimately determining rhythmic gene expression and translation. PMID:26554015

  20. Proteome-wide identification and quantification of S-glutathionylation targets in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    McGarry, David J; Chen, Wenzhang; Chakravarty, Probir; Lamont, Douglas L; Wolf, C Roland; Henderson, Colin J

    2015-07-01

    Protein S-glutathionylation is a reversible post-translational modification regulating sulfhydryl homeostasis. However, little is known about the proteins and pathways regulated by S-glutathionylation in whole organisms and current approaches lack the sensitivity to examine this modification under basal conditions. We now report the quantification and identification of S-glutathionylated proteins from animal tissue, using a highly sensitive methodology combining high-accuracy proteomics with tandem mass tagging to provide precise, extensive coverage of S-glutathionylated targets in mouse liver. Critically, we show significant enrichment of S-glutathionylated mitochondrial and Krebs cycle proteins, identifying that S-glutathionylation is heavily involved in energy metabolism processes in vivo. Furthermore, using mice nulled for GST Pi (GSTP) we address the potential for S-glutathionylation to be mediated enzymatically. The data demonstrate the impact of S-glutathionylation in cellular homeostasis, particularly in relation to energy regulation and is of significant interest for those wishing to examine S-glutathionylation in an animal model. PMID:25891661

  1. Regulation of retinoid mediated cholesterol efflux involves liver X receptor activation in mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Manna, Pulak R; Sennoune, Souad R; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul; Slominski, Andrzej T; Pruitt, Kevin

    2015-08-14

    Removal of cholesterol from macrophage-derived foam cells is a critical step to the prevention of atherosclerotic lesions. We have recently demonstrated the functional importance of retinoids in the regulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein that predominantly mediates the intramitochondrial transport of cholesterol in target tissues. In the present study, treatment of mouse macrophages with retinoids, particularly all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) and 9-cis RA, resulted in increases in cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein AI (Apo-A1). Activation of the PKA pathway by a cAMP analog, (Bu)2cAMP, markedly augmented retinoid mediated cholesterol efflux. Macrophages overexpressing hormone-sensitive lipase increased the hydrolysis of cholesteryl esters and concomitantly enhanced the efficacy of retinoic acid receptor and liver X receptor (LXR) ligands on StAR and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) protein levels. RAs elevated StAR promoter activity in macrophages, and an increase in StAR levels augmented cholesterol efflux to Apo-A1, suggesting retinoid-mediated efflux of cholesterol involves enhanced oxysterol production. Further studies revealed that retinoids activate the LXR regulated genes, sterol receptor-element binding protein-1c and ABCA1. These findings provide insights into the regulatory events in which retinoid signaling effectively enhances macrophage cholesterol efflux and indicate that retinoid therapy may have important implications in limiting and/or regressing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:26119689

  2. Differential gene expression in mouse liver associated with the hepatoprotective effect of clofibrate

    SciTech Connect

    Moffit, Jeffrey S.; Koza-Taylor, Petra H.; Holland, Ricky D.; Thibodeau, Michael S.; Beger, Richard D.; Lawton, Michael P.; Manautou, Jose E. . E-mail: jose.manautou@uconn.edu

    2007-07-15

    Pretreatment of mice with the peroxisome proliferator clofibrate (CFB) protects against acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. Previous studies have shown that activation of the nuclear peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-alpha (PPAR{alpha}) is required for this effect. The present study utilizes gene expression profile analysis to identify potential pathways contributing to PPAR{alpha}-mediated hepatoprotection. Gene expression profiles were compared between wild type and PPAR{alpha}-null mice pretreated with vehicle or CFB (500 mg/kg, i.p., daily for 10 days) and then challenged with APAP (400 mg/kg, p.o.). Total hepatic RNA was isolated 4 h after APAP treatment and hybridized to Affymetrix Mouse Genome MGU74 v2.0 GeneChips. Gene expression analysis was performed utilizing GeneSpring (registered) software. Our analysis identified 53 genes of interest including vanin-1, cell cycle regulators, lipid-metabolizing enzymes, and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2, an acetaminophen binding protein. Vanin-1 could be important for CFB-mediated hepatoprotection because this protein is involved in the synthesis of cysteamine and cystamine. These are potent antioxidants capable of ameliorating APAP toxicity in rodents and humans. HPLC-ESI/MS/MS analysis of liver extracts indicates that enhanced vanin-1 gene expression results in elevated cystamine levels, which could be mechanistically associated with CFB-mediated hepatoprotection.

  3. Sexually dimorphic effect of in vitro fertilization (IVF) on adult mouse fat and liver metabolomes.

    PubMed

    Feuer, Sky K; Donjacour, Annemarie; Simbulan, Rhodel K; Lin, Wingka; Liu, Xiaowei; Maltepe, Emin; Rinaudo, Paolo F

    2014-11-01

    The preimplantation embryo is particularly vulnerable to environmental perturbation, such that nutritional and in vitro stresses restricted exclusively to this stage may alter growth and affect long-term metabolic health. This is particularly relevant to the over 5 million children conceived by in vitro fertilization (IVF). We previously reported that even optimized IVF conditions reprogram mouse postnatal growth, fat deposition, and glucose homeostasis in a sexually dimorphic fashion. To more clearly interrogate the metabolic changes associated with IVF in adulthood, we used nontargeted mass spectrometry to globally profile adult IVF- and in vivo-conceived liver and gonadal adipose tissues. There was a sex- and tissue-specific effect of IVF on adult metabolite signatures indicative of metabolic reprogramming and oxidative stress and reflective of the observed phenotypes. Additionally, we observed a striking effect of IVF on adult sexual dimorphism. Male-female differences in metabolite concentration were exaggerated in hepatic IVF tissue and significantly reduced in IVF adipose tissue, with the majority of changes affecting amino acid and lipid metabolites. We also observed female-specific changes in markers of oxidative stress and adipogenesis, including reduced glutathione, cysteine glutathione disulfide, ophthalmate, urate, and corticosterone. In summary, embryo manipulation and early developmental experiences can affect adult patterns of sexual dimorphism and metabolic physiology. PMID:25211591

  4. Divergent Inflammatory, Fibrogenic, and Liver Progenitor Cell Dynamics in Two Common Mouse Models of Chronic Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Köhn-Gaone, Julia; Dwyer, Benjamin J; Grzelak, Candice A; Miller, Gregory; Shackel, Nicholas A; Ramm, Grant A; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Elsegood, Caryn L; Olynyk, John K; Tirnitz-Parker, Janina E E

    2016-07-01

    Complications of end-stage chronic liver disease signify a major cause of mortality worldwide. Irrespective of the underlying cause, most chronic liver diseases are characterized by hepatocellular necrosis, inflammation, fibrosis, and proliferation of liver progenitor cells or ductular reactions. Vast differences exist between experimental models that mimic these processes, and their identification is fundamental for translational research. We compared two common murine models of chronic liver disease: the choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet versus thioacetamide (TAA) supplementation. Markers of liver injury, including serum alanine transaminase levels, apoptosis, hepatic fat loading, and oxidative stress, as well as inflammatory, fibrogenic and liver progenitor cell responses, were assessed at days 3, 7, 14, 21, and 42. This study revealed remarkable differences between the models. It identified periportal injury and fibrosis with an early peak and slow normalization of all parameters in the CDE regimen, whereas TAA-treated mice had pericentral patterns of progressive injury and fibrosis, resulting in a more severe hepatic injury phenotype. This study is the first to resolve two different patterns of injury and fibrosis in the CDE and TAA model and to indisputably identify the fibrosis pattern in the TAA model as driven from the pericentral vein region. Our data provide a valuable foundation for future work using the CDE and TAA regimens to model a variety of human chronic liver diseases. PMID:27181403

  5. Progressive developmental restriction, acquisition of left-right identity and cell growth behavior during lobe formation in mouse liver development.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Mary C; Le Garrec, Jean-Francois; Coqueran, Sabrina; Strick-Marchand, Helene; Buckingham, Margaret

    2016-04-01

    To identify cell-based decisions implicated in morphogenesis of the mammalian liver, we performed clonal analysis of hepatocytes/hepatoblasts in mouse liver development, using a knock-in allele of Hnf4a/laacZ This transgene randomly undergoes a low frequency of recombination that generates a functional lacZ gene that produces β-galactosidase in tissues in which Hnf4a is expressed. Two types of β-galactosidase-positive clones were found. Most have undergone three to eight cell divisions and result from independent events (Luria-Delbrück fluctuation test); we calculate that they arose between E8.5 and E13.5. A second class was mega-clones derived from early endoderm progenitors, generating many descendants. Some originated from multi-potential founder cells, with labeled cells in the liver, pancreas and/or intestine. A few mega-clones populate only one side of the liver, indicating hepatic cell chirality. The patterns of labeled cells indicate cohesive and often oriented growth, notably in broad radial stripes, potentially implicated in the formation of liver lobes. This retrospective clonal analysis gives novel insights into clonal origins, cell behavior of progenitors and distinct properties of endoderm cells that underlie the formation and morphogenesis of the liver. PMID:26893346

  6. Mobilization of endogenous bone marrow-derived stem cells in a thioacetamide-induced mouse model of liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    El-Akabawy, Gehan; El-Mehi, Abeer

    2015-06-01

    The clinical significance of enhancing endogenous circulating haematopoietic stem cells is becoming increasingly recognized, and the augmentation of circulating stem cells using granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) has led to promising preclinical and clinical results for several liver fibrotic conditions. However, this approach is largely limited by cost and the infeasibility of maintaining long-term administration. Preclinical studies have reported that StemEnhance, a mild haematopoietic stem cell mobilizer, promotes cardiac muscle regeneration and remedies the manifestation of diabetes. However, the effectiveness of StemEnhance in ameliorating liver cirrhosis has not been studied. This study is the first to evaluate the beneficial effect of StemEnhance administration in a thioacetamide-induced mouse model of liver fibrosis. StemEnhance augmented the number of peripheral CD34-positive cells, reduced hepatic fibrosis, improved histopathological changes, and induced endogenous liver proliferation. In addition, VEGF expression was up-regulated, while TNF-α expression was down-regulated in thioacetamide-induced fibrotic livers after StemEnhance intake. These data suggest that StemEnhance may be useful as a potential therapeutic candidate for liver fibrosis by inducing reparative effects via mobilization of haematopoietic stem cells. PMID:25857836

  7. Effect of lectins on hepatic clearance and killing of Candida albicans by the isolated perfused mouse liver.

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, R T; Garner, R E; Hudson, J A

    1992-01-01

    The isolated perfused mouse liver model was used to study the effects of various lectins on hepatic trapping and killing of Candida albicans. After mouse livers were washed with 20 to 30 ml of perfusion buffer, 10(6) C. albicans CFU were infused into the livers. At the time of recovery, 63% +/- 2% (mean +/- standard error of the mean) of the infused C. albicans CFU were recovered from the liver and 14% +/- 1% were recovered from the effluent for a total recovery of 77% +/- 2%. This indicated that 86% +/- 9% of the original inoculum was trapped by the liver and that 23% +/- 2% was killed within the liver. When included in both preperfusion and postperfusion buffers (0.2 mg of lectin per ml), Ulex europeaus lectin (binding specificity for fucose) decreased hepatic trapping of C. albicans by 37% and eluted trapped C. albicans from the liver only when included in postperfusion buffer. By comparison, treatment of C. albicans with U. europeaus lectin before infusion had no effect on the trapping or killing of yeast cells. When Lens culinaris lectin (binding specificity for mannose) was included in the perfusion buffers, hepatic killing of C. albicans increased by 16% with no significant effect on hepatic killing when yeast cells were treated with L. culinaris lectin before infusion. Forty to 55% of the infused C. albicans were killed when concanavalin A (binding specificities for mannose and glucose), Glycine max (binding specificity for N-acetylgalactosamine), or Arachis hypogea (binding specificity for galactose) lectin was included in the perfusion buffer or when yeast cells were treated with these lectins before their infusion. When C. albicans was treated with concanavalin A at a concentration of less than 0.02 mg/ml, hepatic killing of yeast cells was not significantly increased. The data suggest that a fucose-containing receptor on the surface of either sinusoidal endothelial cells or Kupffer cells is involved in the trapping of C. albicans by the perfused mouse

  8. Controlled induction of DNA double-strand breaks in the mouse liver induces features of tissue ageing

    PubMed Central

    White, Ryan R.; Milholland, Brandon; de Bruin, Alain; Curran, Samuel; Laberge, Remi-Martin; van Steeg, Harry; Campisi, Judith; Maslov, Alexander Y.; Vijg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage has been implicated in ageing, but direct evidence for a causal relationship is lacking, owing to the difficulty of inducing defined DNA lesions in cells and tissues without simultaneously damaging other biomolecules and cellular structures. Here we directly test whether highly toxic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) alone can drive an ageing phenotype using an adenovirus-based system based on tetracycline-controlled expression of the SacI restriction enzyme. We deliver the adenovirus to mice and compare molecular and cellular end points in the liver with normally aged animals. Treated, 3-month-old mice display many, but not all signs of normal liver ageing as early as 1 month after treatment, including ageing pathologies, markers of senescence, fused mitochondria and alterations in gene expression profiles. These results, showing that DSBs alone can cause distinct ageing phenotypes in mouse liver, provide new insights in the role of DNA damage as a driver of tissue ageing. PMID:25858675

  9. Toxicogenomic Dissection of the Perfluorooctanoic Acid Transcript Profile in Mouse Liver: Evidence for the Involvement of Nuclear Receptors PPARα and CAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of perfluorinated alkyl acids including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) elicit effects similar to peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) in mouse and rat liver. There is strong evidence that PPC cause many of their effects linked to liver cancer through the nuclear recep...

  10. Toxicogenomic Dissection of the Perfluorooctanoic Acid Transcript Profile in Mouse Liver: Evidence for Involvement of the Nuclear Receptors PPARα and CAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of perfluorinated alkyl acids including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) elicit effects similar to peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) in mouse and rat liver. There is strong evidence that PPC cause many of their effects related to liver carcinogenesis through the nucle...

  11. Establishment of a mouse model for amiodarone-induced liver injury and analyses of its hepatotoxic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Takai, Shohei; Oda, Shingo; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Fukami, Tatsuki; Nakajima, Miki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is the most frequent cause of post-marketing warnings and withdrawals. Amiodarone (AMD), an antiarrhythmic, presents a risk of liver injury in humans, and its metabolites, formed by cytochrome P450 3A4, are likely more toxic to hepatocytes than AMD is. However, it remains to be clarified whether the metabolic activation of AMD is involved in liver injury in vivo. In this study, to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of AMD-induced liver injury, mice were administered AMD [1000 mg kg(-1), per os (p.o.)] after pretreatment with dexamethasone [DEX, 60 mg kg(-1), intraperitoneal (i.p.)], which induces P450 expression, once daily for 3 days. The plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels were significantly increased by AMD administration in the DEX-pretreated mice, and the liver concentrations of desethylamiodarone (DEA), a major metabolite of AMD, were correlated with the changes in the plasma ALT levels. Cytochrome c release into the hepatic cytosol and triglyceride levels in the plasma were increased in DEX plus AMD-administered mice. Furthermore, the ratio of reduced glutathione to oxidized glutathione disulfide in the liver significantly decreased in the DEX plus AMD-administered mice. The increase of ALT levels was suppressed by treatment with gadolinium chloride (GdCl3 ), which is an inhibitor of Kupffer cell function. From these results, it is suggested that AMD and/or DEA contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD-induced liver injury by producing mitochondrial and oxidative stress and Kupffer cell activation. This study proposes the mechanisms of AMD-induced liver injury using an in vivo mouse model. PMID:25900201

  12. Liver spots

    MedlinePlus

    Sun-induced skin changes - liver spots; Senile or solar lentigines; Skin spots - aging; Age spots ... Liver spots are changes in skin color that occur in older skin. The coloring may be due to aging, exposure to the sun ...

  13. Trihalomethanes in liver pathology: Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Faustino-Rocha, Ana I; Rodrigues, D; da Costa, R Gil; Diniz, C; Aragão, S; Talhada, D; Botelho, M; Colaço, A; Pires, M J; Peixoto, F; Oliveira, P A

    2016-08-01

    Trihalomethanes (THMs) are disinfection byproducts found in chlorinated water, and are associated with several different kinds of cancer in human populations and experimental animal models. Metabolism of THMs proceeds through enzymes such as GSTT1 and CYP2E1 and gives rise to reactive intermediates, which form the basis for their toxic activities. The aim of this study was to assess the mitochondrial dysfunction caused by THMs at low levels, and the resulting hepatic histological and biochemical changes in the mouse. Male ICR mice were administered with two THMs: dibromochloromethane (DBCM) and bromodichloromethane (BDCM); once daily, by gavage, to a total of four administrations. Animals were sacrificed four weeks after DBCM and BDCM administrations. Blood biochemistry was performed for alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total bilirubin (TB), albumin (Alb), total protein (TP), creatinine, and urea. Animals exposed to DBCM and BDCM showed elevated ALT and TB levels (p < 0.05) as compared with controls. Histological analysis confirmed the presence of vacuolar degenerescence and a multifocal necrotizing hepatitis in 33% of animals (n = 2). Mitochondrial analysis showed that THMs reduced mitochondrial bioenergetic activity (succinate dehydrogenase (SQR), cytochrome c oxidase (COX), and ATP synthase) and increased oxidative stress (glutathione S-transferase (GST)) in hepatic tissues (p < 0.05). These results add detail to the current understanding of the mechanisms underlying THM-induced toxicity, supporting the role of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in liver toxicity caused by DBCM and BDCM. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1009-1016, 2016. PMID:25640707

  14. Properties of a 5′-nucleotidase purified from mouse liver plasma membranes

    PubMed Central

    Evans, W. H.; Gurd, James W.

    1973-01-01

    1. Extraction of a mouse liver plasma-membrane fraction with a detergent buffer, N-dodecylsarcosinate–Tris buffer (sarcosyl–Tris buffer), solubilized 90% of the protein and 70% of the 5′-nucleotidase activity. 2. The proteins of the sarcosyl–Tris buffer extract were fractionated by a rate-zonal centrifugation in a sucrose–detergent gradient. The major protein peak sedimented ahead of phospholipids, which mainly remained in the overlay. Glycoproteins were separated ahead of the protein peak. 3. The 5′-nucleotidase activity peak was associated with 5% of the protein applied to the gradient, and contained relatively few protein bands. 4. The 5′-nucleotidase was purified further by gel filtration on Sepharose and Sephadex columns equilibrated with sarcosyl–Tris buffer, to give a single glycoprotein band on sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. The purified enzyme was lipid-free. 5. Electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels in sarcosyl–Tris buffers showed that the enzymic activity was coincident with the protein band. 6. The molecular weight suggested for the enzyme activity by gel filtration or centrifugation in sucrose gradients was 140000–150000. Sometimes, a minor enzyme peak of lower molecular weight was obtained. 7. Polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate indicated that as the polyacrylamide concentration was increased from 5 to 15%, the apparent molecular weight of the enzyme decreased from 130000 to 90000. 8. The evidence that 5′-nucleotidase is composed of two active and similar, if not identical, glycoprotein subunits and the role of detergent in effecting the separation of membrane proteins and glycoproteins are discussed. 9. Substrate requirements, pH optima and the nature of inhibition by an analogue of adenosine diphosphate are reported. ImagesPLATE 1PLATE 2Fig. 6. PMID:4721620

  15. Liver cancer - hepatocellular carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Primary liver cell carcinoma; Tumor - liver; Cancer - liver; Hepatoma ... Hepatocellular carcinoma accounts for most liver cancers. This type of cancer occurs more often in men than women. It is usually diagnosed in people age 50 or older. Hepatocellular ...

  16. Liver cancer - hepatocellular carcinoma

    MedlinePlus

    Primary liver cell carcinoma; Tumor - liver; Cancer - liver; Hepatoma ... Hepatocellular carcinoma accounts for most liver cancers. This type of cancer occurs more often in men than women. It is usually diagnosed in people age 50 or older. ...

  17. Development of the vitamin A-storing cell in mouse liver during late fetal and neonatal periods.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, E; Hirosawa, K; Abe, K; Naka, S

    1984-01-01

    Vitamin A-storing cells in perinatal mouse liver were studied by chemical and autoradiographic analyses of exogenous vitamin A. The amount of retinyl palmitate in the fetal liver increased significantly following oral administration of retinyl acetate to the mother, suggesting the existence of storage sites of the vitamin in fetal liver. Light microscope semi-serial autoradiography of the fetal liver on the 15th day of gestation showed that 3H-vitamin A administered to the mother was incorporated into cells distributed exclusively along the hepatic blood vessels and the blood islands. Mitotic figures of the labeled cells were frequently observed. Electron microscope autoradiography revealed that the vitamin was incorporated into lipid droplets, rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus of the fibroblast-like cells in close apposition to the endothelial cells. The labeled cells differed in their ultrastructure from the vitamin A-storing cells (Ito cells) of the adult liver. In the later gestational period, silver grains tended to be more concentrated in lipid droplets, and the cytological features of the labeled cells became similar to those of the vitamin A-storing cells. Both retinyl palmitate content and the labeling of lipid droplets increased rapidly in the liver of neonates after commencement of suckling. The labeled cells had the same appearance as the vitamin A-storing cells (Ito cells). It is concluded that vitamin A transported across the placenta is taken up in the fetal liver by the cells distributed along the blood vessels, and that these cells proliferate in accordance with vascular development and gradually take on the characteristics of vitamin A-storing cells during the perinatal period. A defensive role of the vitamin A-storing cell against the toxic effects of vitamin A is also suggested. PMID:6476398

  18. Control of Hepatitis C Virus Replication in Mouse Liver-Derived Cells by MAVS-Dependent Production of Type I and Type III Interferons

    PubMed Central

    Anggakusuma; Frentzen, Anne; Gürlevik, Engin; Yuan, Qinggong; Steinmann, Eike; Ott, Michael; Staeheli, Peter; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan; Schmidt, Tobias; Hornung, Veit; Kuehnel, Florian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) efficiently infects only humans and chimpanzees. Although the detailed mechanisms responsible for this narrow species tropism remain elusive, recent evidence has shown that murine innate immune responses efficiently suppress HCV replication. Therefore, poor adaptation of HCV to evade and/or counteract innate immune responses may prevent HCV replication in mice. The HCV NS3-4A protease cleaves human MAVS, a key cellular adaptor protein required for RIG-I-like receptor (RLR)-dependent innate immune signaling. However, it is unclear if HCV interferes with mouse MAVS function equally well. Moreover, MAVS-dependent signaling events that restrict HCV replication in mouse cells were incompletely defined. Thus, we quantified the ability of HCV NS3-4A to counteract mouse and human MAVS. HCV NS3-4A similarly diminished both human and mouse MAVS-dependent signaling in human and mouse cells. Moreover, replicon-encoded protease cleaved a similar fraction of both MAVS variants. Finally, FLAG-tagged MAVS proteins repressed HCV replication to similar degrees. Depending on MAVS expression, HCV replication in mouse liver cells triggered not only type I but also type III IFNs, which cooperatively repressed HCV replication. Mouse liver cells lacking both type I and III IFN receptors were refractory to MAVS-dependent antiviral effects, indicating that the HCV-induced MAVS-dependent antiviral state depends on both type I and III IFN receptor signaling. IMPORTANCE In this study, we found that HCV NS3-4A similarly diminished both human and mouse MAVS-dependent signaling in human and mouse cells. Therefore, it is unlikely that ineffective cleavage of mouse MAVS per se precludes HCV propagation in immunocompetent mouse liver cells. Hence, approaches to reinforce HCV replication in mouse liver cells (e.g., by expression of essential human replication cofactors) should not be thwarted by the poor ability of HCV to counteract MAVS-dependent antiviral signaling

  19. Toll Like Receptor 4 Dependent Kupffer Cell Activation and Liver Injury in a Novel Mouse Model of Parenteral Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    El Kasmi, Karim C.; Anderson, Aimee L.; Devereaux, Michael W.; Fillon, Sophie A.; Harris, J. Kirk; Lovell, Mark A.; Finegold, Milton J.; Sokol, Ronald J.

    2011-01-01

    Infants with intestinal failure who are parenteral nutrition (PN)-dependent may develop cholestatic liver injury and cirrhosis (PN-associated liver injury: PNALI). The pathogenesis of PNALI remains incompletely understood. We hypothesized that intestinal injury with increased intestinal permeability combined with administration of PN promotes LPS-TLR4 signaling dependent Kupffer cell activation as an early event in the pathogenesis of PNALI. We developed a mouse model in which intestinal injury and increased permeability were induced by oral treatment for 4 days with dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) followed by continuous infusion of soy lipid-based PN solution through a central venous catheter for 7 (PN/DSS7d) and 28 (PN/DSS28d) days. Liver injury and cholestasis were evaluated by serum AST, ALT, bile acids, total bilirubin, and by histology. Purified Kupffer cells were probed for transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PN/DSS7d mice showed elevated portal vein LPS levels, evidence of hepatocyte injury and cholestasis, and increased Kupffer cell expression of IL6, TNFα, and TGFβ. Serological markers of liver injury remained elevated in PN/DSS28d mice associated with focal inflammation, hepatocyte apoptosis, peliosis, and Kupffer cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia. PN infusion without DSS pre-treatment or DSS pre-treatment alone did not result in liver injury or Kupffer cell activation. Suppression of the intestinal microbiota with broad spectrum antibiotics or ablation of TLR4 signaling in TLR4 mutant mice resulted in significantly reduced Kupffer cell activation and markedly attenuated liver injury in PN/DSS7d mice. Conclusion These data suggest that intestinal-derived LPS activates Kupffer cells through TLR4 signaling in early stages of PNALI. PMID:22120983

  20. Deregulation of energy metabolism promotes antifibrotic effects in human hepatic stellate cells and prevents liver fibrosis in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Swathi; Potter, James J; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Sur, Surojit; Hamilton, James P; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Mezey, Esteban; Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram

    2016-01-15

    Liver fibrosis and cirrhosis result from uncontrolled secretion and accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins by hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) that are activated by liver injury and inflammation. Despite the progress in understanding the biology liver fibrogenesis and the identification of potential targets for treating fibrosis, development of an effective therapy remains elusive. Since an uninterrupted supply of intracellular energy is critical for the activated-HSCs to maintain constant synthesis and secretion of ECM, we hypothesized that interfering with energy metabolism could affect ECM secretion. Here we report that a sublethal dose of the energy blocker, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) facilitates phenotypic alteration of activated LX-2 (a human hepatic stellate cell line), into a less-active form. This treatment-dependent reversal of activated-LX2 cells was evidenced by a reduction in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen secretion, and an increase in activity of matrix metalloproteases. Mechanistically, 3-BrPA-dependent antifibrotic effects involved down-regulation of the mitochondrial metabolic enzyme, ATP5E, and up-regulation of glycolysis, as evident by elevated levels of lactate dehydrogenase, lactate production and its transporter, MCT4. Finally, the antifibrotic effects of 3-BrPA were validated in vivo in a mouse model of carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis. Results from histopathology & histochemical staining for collagen and α-SMA substantiated that 3-BrPA promotes antifibrotic effects in vivo. Taken together, our data indicate that sublethal, metronomic treatment with 3-BrPA blocks the progression of liver fibrosis suggesting its potential as a novel therapeutic for treating liver fibrosis. PMID:26525850

  1. Model steatogenic compounds (amiodarone, valproic acid, and tetracycline) alter lipid metabolism by different mechanisms in mouse liver slices.

    PubMed

    Szalowska, Ewa; van der Burg, Bart; Man, Hai-Yen; Hendriksen, Peter J M; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M

    2014-01-01

    Although drug induced steatosis represents a mild type of hepatotoxicity it can progress into more severe non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Current models used for safety assessment in drug development and chemical risk assessment do not accurately predict steatosis in humans. Therefore, new models need to be developed to screen compounds for steatogenic properties. We have studied the usefulness of mouse precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) as an alternative to animal testing to gain more insight into the mechanisms involved in the steatogenesis. To this end, PCLS were incubated 24 h with the model steatogenic compounds: amiodarone (AMI), valproic acid (VA), and tetracycline (TET). Transcriptome analysis using DNA microarrays was used to identify genes and processes affected by these compounds. AMI and VA upregulated lipid metabolism, whereas processes associated with extracellular matrix remodelling and inflammation were downregulated. TET downregulated mitochondrial functions, lipid metabolism, and fibrosis. Furthermore, on the basis of the transcriptomics data it was hypothesized that all three compounds affect peroxisome proliferator activated-receptor (PPAR) signaling. Application of PPAR reporter assays classified AMI and VA as PPARγ and triple PPARα/(β/δ)/γ agonist, respectively, whereas TET had no effect on any of the PPARs. Some of the differentially expressed genes were considered as potential candidate biomarkers to identify PPAR agonists (i.e. AMI and VA) or compounds impairing mitochondrial functions (i.e. TET). Finally, comparison of our findings with publicly available transcriptomics data showed that a number of processes altered in the mouse PCLS was also affected in mouse livers and human primary hepatocytes exposed to known PPAR agonists. Thus mouse PCLS are a valuable model to identify early mechanisms of action of compounds altering lipid metabolism. PMID:24489787

  2. The fetal mouse is a sensitive genotoxicity model that exposes lentiviral-associated mutagenesis resulting in liver oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nowrouzi, Ali; Cheung, Wing T; Li, Tingting; Zhang, Xuegong; Arens, Anne; Paruzynski, Anna; Waddington, Simon N; Osejindu, Emma; Reja, Safia; von Kalle, Christof; Wang, Yoahe; Al-Allaf, Faisal; Gregory, Lisa; Themis, Matthew; Holder, Maxine; Dighe, Niraja; Ruthe, Alaine; Buckley, Suzanne Mk; Bigger, Brian; Montini, Eugenio; Thrasher, Adrian J; Andrews, Robert; Roberts, Terry P; Newbold, Robert F; Coutelle, Charles; Schmidt, Manfred; Themis, Mike

    2013-02-01

    Genotoxicity models are extremely important to assess retroviral vector biosafety before gene therapy. We have developed an in utero model that demonstrates that hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development is restricted to mice receiving nonprimate (np) lentiviral vectors (LV) and does not occur when a primate (p) LV is used regardless of woodchuck post-translation regulatory element (WPRE) mutations to prevent truncated X gene expression. Analysis of 839 npLV and 244 pLV integrations in the liver genomes of vector-treated mice revealed clear differences between vector insertions in gene dense regions and highly expressed genes, suggestive of vector preference for insertion or clonal outgrowth. In npLV-associated clonal tumors, 56% of insertions occurred in oncogenes or genes associated with oncogenesis or tumor suppression and surprisingly, most genes examined (11/12) had reduced expression as compared with control livers and tumors. Two examples of vector-inserted genes were the Park 7 oncogene and Uvrag tumor suppressor gene. Both these genes and their known interactive partners had differential expression profiles. Interactive partners were assigned to networks specific to liver disease and HCC via ingenuity pathway analysis. The fetal mouse model not only exposes the genotoxic potential of vectors intended for gene therapy but can also reveal genes associated with liver oncogenesis. PMID:23299800

  3. Lactobacillus rhamnosus CCFM1107 treatment ameliorates alcohol-induced liver injury in a mouse model of chronic alcohol feeding.

    PubMed

    Tian, Fengwei; Chi, Feifei; Wang, Gang; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Chen, Yongquan; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus CCFM1107 was screened for high antioxidative activity from 55 lactobacilli. The present study attempted to explore the protective properties of L. rhamnosus CCFM1107 in alcoholic liver injury. A mouse model was induced by orally feeding alcohol when simultaneously treated with L. rhamnosus CCFM1107, the drug Hu-Gan- Pian (HGP), L. rhamnosus GG (LGG), and L. plantarum CCFM1112 for 3 months. Biochemical analysis was performed for both serum and liver homogenate. Detailed intestinal flora and histological analyses were also carried out. Our results indicated that the administration of L. rhamnosus CCFM1107 significantly inhibited the increase in the levels of serum aminotransferase and endotoxin, as well as the levels of triglyceride (TG) and cholesterol (CHO) in the serum and in the liver. Glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were elevated while the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) were decreased. The enteric dysbiosis caused by alcohol was restored by increasing the numbers of both lactobacilli and bifidobacteria and decreasing the numbers of both enterococci and enterobacter. Histological analysis confirmed the protective effect of L. rhamnosus CCFM1107. Compared with the other lactobacilli and to the drug Hu-Gan-Pian, there is a high chance that L. rhamnosus CCFM1107 provides protective effects on alcoholic liver injury by reducing oxidative stress and restoring the intestinal flora. PMID:26626356

  4. The Fetal Mouse Is a Sensitive Genotoxicity Model That Exposes Lentiviral-associated Mutagenesis Resulting in Liver Oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nowrouzi, Ali; Cheung, Wing T; Li, Tingting; Zhang, Xuegong; Arens, Anne; Paruzynski, Anna; Waddington, Simon N; Osejindu, Emma; Reja, Safia; von Kalle, Christof; Wang, Yoahe; Al-Allaf, Faisal; Gregory, Lisa; Themis, Matthew; Holder, Maxine; Dighe, Niraja; Ruthe, Alaine; Buckley, Suzanne MK; Bigger, Brian; Montini, Eugenio; Thrasher, Adrian J; Andrews, Robert; Roberts, Terry P; Newbold, Robert F; Coutelle, Charles; Schmidt, Manfred; Themis, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Genotoxicity models are extremely important to assess retroviral vector biosafety before gene therapy. We have developed an in utero model that demonstrates that hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development is restricted to mice receiving nonprimate (np) lentiviral vectors (LV) and does not occur when a primate (p) LV is used regardless of woodchuck post-translation regulatory element (WPRE) mutations to prevent truncated X gene expression. Analysis of 839 npLV and 244 pLV integrations in the liver genomes of vector-treated mice revealed clear differences between vector insertions in gene dense regions and highly expressed genes, suggestive of vector preference for insertion or clonal outgrowth. In npLV-associated clonal tumors, 56% of insertions occurred in oncogenes or genes associated with oncogenesis or tumor suppression and surprisingly, most genes examined (11/12) had reduced expression as compared with control livers and tumors. Two examples of vector-inserted genes were the Park 7 oncogene and Uvrag tumor suppressor gene. Both these genes and their known interactive partners had differential expression profiles. Interactive partners were assigned to networks specific to liver disease and HCC via ingenuity pathway analysis. The fetal mouse model not only exposes the genotoxic potential of vectors intended for gene therapy but can also reveal genes associated with liver oncogenesis. PMID:23299800

  5. A novel mouse model of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma induced by liver-specific Kras activation and Pten deletion

    PubMed Central

    Ikenoue, Tsuneo; Terakado, Yumi; Nakagawa, Hayato; Hikiba, Yohko; Fujii, Tomoaki; Matsubara, Daisuke; Noguchi, Rei; Zhu, Chi; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Kudo, Yotaro; Asaoka, Yoshinari; Yamaguchi, Kiyoshi; Ijichi, Hideaki; Tateishi, Keisuke; Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Maeda, Shin; Koike, Kazuhiko; Furukawa, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is an aggressive malignancy with poor prognosis and its incidence is increasing worldwide. Recently, several types of cells have been considered as the origin of ICC, namely cholangiocytes, liver progenitor cells, and hepatocytes. Here, we have established a novel mouse model of ICC by liver-specific Kras activation and Pten deletion. An activating mutation of Kras in combination with deletion of Pten was introduced in embryonic hepatic bipotential progenitor cells (so-called hepatoblasts) and mature hepatocytes using the Cre-loxP system. As a result, liver-specific Kras activation and homozygous Pten deletion cooperated to induce ICCs exclusively. In contrast, Kras activation in combination with heterozygous Pten deletion induced both ICCs and HCCs, whereas Kras activation alone resulted in HCCs but not ICCs. Furthermore, a cell-lineage visualization system using tamoxifen-inducible Cre-loxP demonstrated that the ICCs did not originate from hepatocytes but from cholangiocytes. Our data suggest that mice carrying liver-specific Kras activation in combination with homozygous Pten deletion should be useful for the investigation of therapeutic strategies for human ICC. PMID:27032374

  6. A novel mouse model of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma induced by liver-specific Kras activation and Pten deletion.

    PubMed

    Ikenoue, Tsuneo; Terakado, Yumi; Nakagawa, Hayato; Hikiba, Yohko; Fujii, Tomoaki; Matsubara, Daisuke; Noguchi, Rei; Zhu, Chi; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Kudo, Yotaro; Asaoka, Yoshinari; Yamaguchi, Kiyoshi; Ijichi, Hideaki; Tateishi, Keisuke; Fukushima, Noriyoshi; Maeda, Shin; Koike, Kazuhiko; Furukawa, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is an aggressive malignancy with poor prognosis and its incidence is increasing worldwide. Recently, several types of cells have been considered as the origin of ICC, namely cholangiocytes, liver progenitor cells, and hepatocytes. Here, we have established a novel mouse model of ICC by liver-specific Kras activation and Pten deletion. An activating mutation of Kras in combination with deletion of Pten was introduced in embryonic hepatic bipotential progenitor cells (so-called hepatoblasts) and mature hepatocytes using the Cre-loxP system. As a result, liver-specific Kras activation and homozygous Pten deletion cooperated to induce ICCs exclusively. In contrast, Kras activation in combination with heterozygous Pten deletion induced both ICCs and HCCs, whereas Kras activation alone resulted in HCCs but not ICCs. Furthermore, a cell-lineage visualization system using tamoxifen-inducible Cre-loxP demonstrated that the ICCs did not originate from hepatocytes but from cholangiocytes. Our data suggest that mice carrying liver-specific Kras activation in combination with homozygous Pten deletion should be useful for the investigation of therapeutic strategies for human ICC. PMID:27032374

  7. Animal models for the study of liver fibrosis: new insights from knockout mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hiromitsu

    2011-01-01

    Fibrosis arises as part of a would-healing response that maintains organ structure and integrity following tissue damage but also contributes to a variety of human pathologies such as liver fibrosis. Liver fibrosis is an abnormal response of the liver to persistent injury with the excessive accumulation of collagenous extracellular matrices. Currently there is no effective treatment, and many patients end up with a progressive form of the disease, eventually requiring a liver transplant. The clarification of mechanisms underlying pathogenesis of liver fibrosis and the development of effective therapy are of clinical importance. Experimental animal models, in particular targeted gene knockouts (loss of function) in mice, have become a powerful resource to address the molecular mechanisms or significance of the targeted gene in hepatic functions and diseases. This review will focus on the recent advances in knowledge obtained from genetically engineered mice that provide novel insights into the pathophysiology of liver fibrosis. PMID:21350186

  8. Teratogenic study of phenobarbital and levamisole on mouse fetus liver tissue using biospectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ashtarinezhad, Azadeh; Panahyab, Ataollah; Shaterzadeh-Oskouei, Shahrzad; Khoshniat, Hessam; Mohamadzadehasl, Baharak; Shirazi, Farshad H

    2016-09-01

    Biospectroscopic investigations have attracted attention of both the clinicians and basic sciences researchers in recent years. Scientists are discovering new areas for FTIR biospectroscopy applications in medicine. The aim of this study was to measure the possibility of FTIR-MSP application for the recognition and detection of fetus abnormalities after exposure of pregnant mouse to phenobarbital (PB) and levamisole (LEV) alone or in combination. PB is one of the most widely used antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), with sedative and hypnotic effects. When used by pregnant women, it is known to be a teratogenic agent. LEV is an antihelminthic drug with some applications in immune-deficiency as well as colon cancer therapy. Four groups of ten pregnant mice were selected for the experiments as follows: one control group received only standard diet, one group was injected with 120mg/kg of BP, one group was injected with 10mg/kg of LEV, and the last group was treated simultaneously with both BP and LEV at the above mentioned doses. Drugs administration was performed on gestation day 9 and fetuses were dissected on pregnancy day 15. Each dissected fetus was fixed, dehydrated and embedded in paraffin. Sections of liver (10μm) were prepared from control and treated groups by microtome and deparaffinized with xylene. The spectra were taken by FTIR-MSP in the region of 4000-400cm(-1). All the spectra were normalized based on amide II band (1545cm(-1)) after baseline correction of the entire spectrum, followed by classification using PCA, ANN and SVM. Both morphological and spectral changes were shown in the treated fetuses as compared to the fetuses in the control group. While cleft palate and C-R elongation were seen in PB injected fetuses, developmental retardation was mostly seen in the LEV injected group. Biospectroscopy revealed that both drugs mainly affected the cellular lipids and proteins, with LEV causing more changes in amide I and lipid regions than PB. Application of

  9. Lysophosphatidic Acid Alters the Expression Profiles of Angiogenic Factors, Cytokines, and Chemokines in Mouse Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chia-Hung; Lai, Shou-Lun; Ho, Cheng-Maw; Lin, Wen-Hsi; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lee, Po-Huang; Peng, Fu-Chuo; Kuo, Sung-Hsin; Wu, Szu-Yuan; Lai, Hong-Shiee

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a multi-function glycerophospholipid. LPA affects the proliferation of hepatocytes and stellate cells in vitro, and in a partial hepatectomy induced liver regeneration model, the circulating LPA levels and LPA receptor (LPAR) expression levels in liver tissue are significantly changed. Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (Lsecs) play an important role during liver regeneration. However, the effects of LPA on Lsecs are not well known. Thus, we investigated the effects of LPA on the expression profiles of angiogenic factors, cytokines, and chemokines in Lsecs. Methods Mouse Lsecs were isolated using CD31-coated magnetic beads. The mRNA expression levels of LPAR’s and other target genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The protein levels of angiogenesis factors, cytokines, and chemokines were determined using protein arrays and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Critical LPAR related signal transduction was verified by using an appropriate chemical inhibitor. Results LPAR1 and LPAR3 mRNA’s were expressed in mouse LPA-treated Lsecs. Treating Lsecs with a physiological level of LPA significantly enhanced the protein levels of angiogenesis related proteins (cyr61 and TIMP-1), cytokines (C5/C5a, M-CSF, and SDF-1), and chemokines (MCP-5, gp130, CCL28, and CXCL16). The LPAR1 and LPAR3 antagonist ki16425 significantly inhibited the LPA-enhanced expression of cyr61, TIMP-1, SDF-1, MCP-5, gp130, CCL28, and CXCL16, but not that of C5/C5a or M-CSF. LPA-induced C5/C5a and M-CSF expression may have been through an indirect regulation mechanism. Conclusion LPA regulated the expression profiles of angiogenic factors, cytokines, and chemokines in Lsecs that was mediated via LPAR1 and LPAR3 signaling. Most of the factors that were enhanced by LPA have been found to play critical roles during liver regeneration. Thus, these results may prove useful for manipulating LPA effects on liver regeneration. PMID:25822713

  10. Knockout of mouse Cyp3a gene enhances synthesis of cholesterol and bile acid in the liver[S

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Mari; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Watanabe, Mio; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Takehara, Shoko; Inaba, Asumi; Nitta, Shin-ichiro; Senda, Naoto; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Chiba, Kan

    2013-01-01

    Here, we studied the effects of cytochrome P450 (CYP)3A deficiency on the mRNA expression of genes encoding regulators of hepatic cholesterol levels using Cyp3a-knockout (Cyp3a−/−) mice. The mRNA expression levels of genes encoding enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis in the livers of Cyp3a−/− mice were higher than those of wild-type (WT) mice. Nuclear levels of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-2 (SREBP-2), which enhances cholesterol biosynthesis, were also higher in the livers of Cyp3a−/− mice. Binding of SREBP-2 to the Hmgcs1 gene promoter was more abundant in the livers of Cyp3a−/− mice. These results suggest that deficiency of CYP3A enzymes enhances transcription of genes encoding enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis via activation of SREBP-2. On the other hand, hepatic cholesterol levels in Cyp3a−/− mice were 20% lower than those in WT mice. The mRNA expression levels of genes encoding enzymes involved in bile acid synthesis, plasma levels of 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one and hepatic levels of total bile acid were significantly higher in Cyp3a−/− mice than in WT mice. These findings suggest that reduction of hepatic total cholesterol in Cyp3a−/− mice would be the consequence of enhanced bile acid synthesis. Therefore, CYP3A enzymes appear to play roles in the synthesis of cholesterol and bile acid in vivo. PMID:23709690

  11. Arsenic induces apoptosis in mouse liver is mitochondria dependent and is abrogated by N-acetylcysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Santra, Amal . E-mail: asantra2000@yahoo.co.in; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Ghatak, Subhadip; Biswas, Ayan; Dhali, Gopal Krishna

    2007-04-15

    Arsenicosis, caused by arsenic contamination of drinking water supplies, is a major public health problem in India and Bangladesh. Chronic liver disease, often with portal hypertension occurs in chronic arsenicosis, contributes to the morbidity and mortality. The early cellular events that initiate liver cell injury due to arsenicosis have not been studied. Our aim was to identify the possible mechanisms related to arsenic-induced liver injury in mice. Liver injury was induced in mice by arsenic treatment. The liver was used for mitochondrial oxidative stress, mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). Evidence of apoptosis was sought by TUNEL test, caspase assay and histology. Pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) was done to modulate hepatic GSH level. Arsenic treatment in mice caused liver injury associated with increased oxidative stress in liver mitochondria and alteration of MPT. Altered MPT facilitated cytochrome c release in the cytosol, activation of caspase 9 and caspase 3 activities and apoptotic cell death. Pretreatment of NAC to arsenic-treated mice abrogated all these alteration suggesting a glutathione (GSH)-dependent mechanism. Oxidative stress in mitochondria and inappropriate MPT are important in the pathogenesis of arsenic induced apoptotic liver cell injury. The phenomenon is GSH dependent and supplementation of NAC might have beneficial effects.

  12. The metabolism of nitrophenolic and 5-arylazorhodanine anthelmintics by Ascaris suum, Moniezia expansa and by mouse- and sheep-liver enzymes.

    PubMed

    Douch, P G; Buchanan, L L

    1979-08-01

    1. The anthelmintics disophenol (2,6-diiodo-4-nitrophenol), nitroxynil (3-iodo-4-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzonitrile) and nitrodan (3-methyl-5-(4-nitrophenylazo)rhodanine) were reduced in vitro to the corresponding amines by intact Ascaris suum, Moniezia expansa, by enzymes prepared from these helminths, and by mouse- and sheep-liver homogenates. Helminth reductases required NADH2 and glutathione as cofactors and were inhibited about 50% by 2.0 x 10(-7) M allopurinol. Azo bonds of nitrodan and its analogues were not reduced by the helminths but were reduced by mouse- and sheep-liver enzymes. 2. Mouse- and sheep-liver enzymes, in addition to effecting nitro reduction, metabolized nitroxynil by hydrolysis to 3-iodo-4-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzamide and 3-iodo-4-hydroxy-5-nitrobenzoic acid. No hydroxylation products were found. Nitrodan was oxidized by the mammalian microsomal oxidation enzyme system to the thiazolidinedione derivative, but not by helminth enzymes. PMID:516789

  13. Detection of mouse liver cancer via a parallel iterative shrinkage method in hybrid optical/microcomputed tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ping; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Qian; Xue, Zhenwen; Li, Yongbao; Ning, Nannan; Yang, Xin; Li, Xingde; Tian, Jie

    2012-12-01

    Liver cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide. In order to enable the noninvasive detection of small liver tumors in mice, we present a parallel iterative shrinkage (PIS) algorithm for dual-modality tomography. It takes advantage of microcomputed tomography and multiview bioluminescence imaging, providing anatomical structure and bioluminescence intensity information to reconstruct the size and location of tumors. By incorporating prior knowledge of signal sparsity, we associate some mathematical strategies including specific smooth convex approximation, an iterative shrinkage operator, and affine subspace with the PIS method, which guarantees the accuracy, efficiency, and reliability for three-dimensional reconstruction. Then an in vivo experiment on the bead-implanted mouse has been performed to validate the feasibility of this method. The findings indicate that a tiny lesion less than 3 mm in diameter can be localized with a position bias no more than 1 mm the computational efficiency is one to three orders of magnitude faster than the existing algorithms; this approach is robust to the different regularization parameters and the lp norms. Finally, we have applied this algorithm to another in vivo experiment on an HCCLM3 orthotopic xenograft mouse model, which suggests the PIS method holds the promise for practical applications of whole-body cancer detection.

  14. PPARα activation drives demethylation of the CpG islands of the Gadd45b promoter in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Hwan; Wahyudi, Lilik Duwi; Kim, Kee K; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2016-08-01

    Growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible beta (GADD45b) plays a pivotal role in many intracellular events in both cell survival- and cell death-related signaling. To date, the study of GADD35b has mainly focused on investigation of its function, as well as interacting molecules. However, studies of Gadd45b gene regulation are limited. In this study, we investigated the transcriptional regulation mechanism of Gadd45b. Since Gadd45b mRNA is highly induced by the PPARα agonist Wy-14,643 in the mouse liver, we analyzed the Gadd45b promoter using an in vivo reporter assay. Interestingly, the naked Gadd45b-luciferase construct strongly induced luciferase activity without any stimulant in our in vivo system. Therefore, we investigated the epigenetic changes in the Gadd45b promoter region using mouse liver genomic DNA, the methylation-specific restriction enzyme (HpaII), and disulfide conversion. Our results showed that two possible CpG methylation sites were methylated and demethylated by Wy-14,643 treatment. This study indicates that epigenetic change at the Gadd45b promoter is critical for Gadd45b induction. PMID:27233605

  15. Detection of mouse liver cancer via a parallel iterative shrinkage method in hybrid optical/microcomputed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ping; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Qian; Xue, Zhenwen; Li, Yongbao; Ning, Nannan; Yang, Xin; Li, Xingde; Tian, Jie

    2012-12-01

    Liver cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide. In order to enable the noninvasive detection of small liver tumors in mice, we present a parallel iterative shrinkage (PIS) algorithm for dual-modality tomography. It takes advantage of microcomputed tomography and multiview bioluminescence imaging, providing anatomical structure and bioluminescence intensity information to reconstruct the size and location of tumors. By incorporating prior knowledge of signal sparsity, we associate some mathematical strategies including specific smooth convex approximation, an iterative shrinkage operator, and affine subspace with the PIS method, which guarantees the accuracy, efficiency, and reliability for three-dimensional reconstruction. Then an in vivo experiment on the bead-implanted mouse has been performed to validate the feasibility of this method. The findings indicate that a tiny lesion less than 3 mm in diameter can be localized with a position bias no more than 1 mm; the computational efficiency is one to three orders of magnitude faster than the existing algorithms; this approach is robust to the different regularization parameters and the lp norms. Finally, we have applied this algorithm to another in vivo experiment on an HCCLM3 orthotopic xenograft mouse model, which suggests the PIS method holds the promise for practical applications of whole-body cancer detection. PMID:23224049

  16. Trichloroethylene-Induced Gene Expression and DNA Methylation Changes in B6C3F1 Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jian; Chen, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), widely used as an organic solvent in the industry, is a common contaminant in air, soil, and water. Chronic TCE exposure induced hepatocellular carcinoma in mice, and occupational exposure in humans was suggested to be associated with liver cancer. To understand the role of non-genotoxic mechanism(s) for TCE action, we examined the gene expression and DNA methylation changes in the liver of B6C3F1 mice orally administered with TCE (0, 100, 500 and 1000 mg/kg b.w. per day) for 5 days. After 5 days TCE treatment at a dose level of 1000 mg/kg b.w., a total of 431 differentially expressed genes were identified in mouse liver by microarray, of which 291 were up-regulated and 140 down-regulated. The expression changed genes were involved in key signal pathways including PPAR, proliferation, apoptosis and homologous recombination. Notably, the expression level of a number of vital genes involved in the regulation of DNA methylation, such as Utrf1, Tet2, DNMT1, DNMT3a and DNMT3b, were dysregulated. Although global DNA methylation change was not detected in the liver of mice exposed to TCE, the promoter regions of Cdkn1a and Ihh were found to be hypo- and hypermethylated respectively, which correlated negatively with their mRNA expression changes. Furthermore, the gene expression and DNA methylation changes induced by TCE were dose dependent. The overall data indicate that TCE exposure leads to aberrant DNA methylation changes, which might alter the expression of genes involved in the TCE-induced liver tumorgenesis. PMID:25549359

  17. Food Additive P-80 Impacts Mouse Gut Microbiota Promoting Intestinal Inflammation, Obesity and Liver Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ratnesh Kumar; Wheildon, Nolan; Ishikawa, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity has emerged as one of the most important global public health issue. The change to the human microbiome as a result of changes in the quality and quantity of food intake over the past several decades has been implicated in the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome. We administered polysorbate-80 to mice via gavage. The researchers monitor liver noninvasively using a bioluminescence imaging. For the liver dysfunction we measure the liver enzymes and PAS stain on liver, electron microscopy liver mitochondria. For the assessment of intestinal inflammation we measured fecal LCN2, LPS, MPO and flagellin by ELISA and qPCR. We use confocal microscopy to detect closet bacteria near the epithelium. 16S sequence was used for the composition of microbiota. Compared with control mice, those receiving emulsifier, showed impaired glycemic tolerance, hyperinsulinemia, altered liver enzymes, larger mitochondria and increased gall bladder size. Additionally, mice in the experimental group showed higher levels of DCA, reduced Muc2 RNA expression, reduced mucus thickness in the intestinal epithelium and increased gut permeability. Intestinal bacteria of mice receiving P-80 were found deeper in the mucus and closer to the intestinal epithelium and had increased level of bioactive LPS, flagellin and LCN2 expression. The result of the study are supportive of evidence that emulsifier agents such as polysorbate-80, may be contributing to obesity related intestinal inflammation and progression of liver dysfunction and alternation of gut microbiota. PMID:27430014

  18. Chronic liver disease is triggered by taurine transporter knockout in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Warskulat, Ulrich; Borsch, Elena; Reinehr, Roland; Heller-Stilb, Birgit; Mönnighoff, Irmhild; Buchczyk, Darius; Donner, Markus; Flögel, Ulrich; Kappert, Günther; Soboll, Sibylle; Beer, Sandra; Pfeffer, Klaus; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Gabrielsen, Marcus; Amiry-Moghaddam, Mahmood; Ottersen, Ole Petter; Dienes, Hans Peter; Häussinger, Dieter

    2006-03-01

    Taurine is an abundant organic osmolyte with antioxidant and immunomodulatory properties. Its role in the pathogenesis of chronic liver disease is unknown. The liver phenotype was studied in taurine transporter knockout (taut-/-) mice. Hepatic taurine levels were ~21, 15 and 6 mumol/g liver wet weight in adult wild-type, heterozygous (taut+/-) and homozygous (taut-/-) mice, respectively. Immunoelectronmicroscopy revealed an almost complete depletion of taurine in Kupffer and sinusoidal endothelial cells, but not in parenchymal cells of (taut-/-) mice. Compared with wild-type mice, (taut-/-) and (taut+/-) mice developed moderate unspecific hepatitis and liver fibrosis with increased frequency of neoplastic lesions beyond 1 year of age. Liver disease in (taut-/-) mice was characterized by hepatocyte apoptosis, activation of the CD95 system, elevated plasma TNF-alpha levels, hepatic stellate cell and oval cell proliferation, and severe mitochondrial abnormalities in liver parenchymal cells. Mitochondrial dysfunction was suggested by a significantly lower respiratory control ratio in isolated mitochondria from (taut-/-) mice. Taut knockout had no effect on taurine-conjugated bile acids in bile; however, the relative amount of cholate-conjugates acid was decreased at the expense of 7-keto-cholate-conjugates. In conclusion, taurine deficiency due to defective taurine transport triggers chronic liver disease, which may involve mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:16421246

  19. Gene expression profiling in mouse liver infected with Clonorchis sinensis metacercariae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Min; Ko, Byung-Sam; Ju, Jung-Won; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Yang, Suk-Jin; Yeom, Young Il; Kim, Tong-Soo; Won, Yonggwan; Kim, Il-Chul

    2009-12-01

    Clonorchis sinensis, the parasite that causes clonorchiasis, is endemic in many Asian countries, and infection with the organism drives changes in the liver tissues of the host. However, information regarding the molecular events in clonorchiasis remains limited, and little is currently known about host-pathogen interactions in clonorchiasis. In this study, we assessed the gene expression profiles in mice livers via DNA microarray analysis 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks after induced metacercariae infection. Functional clustering of the gene expression profile showed that the immunity-involved genes were induced in the livers of the mice at the early stage of metacercariae infection, whereas immune responses were reduced in the 6-week liver tissues after infection in which the metacercariae became adult flukes. Many genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, including Peci, Cyp4a10, Acat1, Ehhadh, Gcdh, and Cyp2 family were downregulated in the infected livers. On the other hand, the liver tissues infected with the parasite expressed Wnt signaling molecules such as Wnt7b, Fzd6, and Pdgfrb and cell cycle-regulating genes including cyclin-D1, Cdca3, and Bcl3. These investigations constitute an excellent starting point for increased understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying host-pathogen interaction during the development of C. sinensis in the host liver. PMID:19902254

  20. The inward rectifier potassium channel Kir2.1 is expressed in mouse neutrophils from bone marrow and liver

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Daniela S.; Yellen, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are phagocytic cells that play a critical role in innate immunity by destroying bacterial pathogens. Channels belonging to the inward rectifier potassium channel subfamily 2 (Kir2 channels) have been described in other phagocytes (monocytes/macrophages and eosinophils) and in hematopoietic precursors of phagocytes. Their physiological function in these cells remains unclear, but some evidence suggests a role in growth factor-dependent proliferation and development. Expression of functional Kir2 channels has not been definitively demonstrated in mammalian neutrophils. Here, we show by RT-PCR that neutrophils from mouse bone marrow and liver express mRNA for the Kir2 subunit Kir2.1 but not for other subunits (Kir2.2, Kir2.3, and Kir2.4). In electrophysiological experiments, resting (unstimulated) neutrophils from mouse bone marrow and liver exhibit a constitutively active, external K+-dependent, strong inwardly rectifying current that constitutes the dominant current. The reversal potential is dependent on the external K+ concentration in a Nernstian fashion, as expected for a K+-selective current. The current is not altered by changes in external or internal pH, and it is blocked by Ba2+, Cs+, and the Kir2-selective inhibitor ML133. The single-channel conductance is in agreement with previously reported values for Kir2.1 channels. These properties are characteristic of homomeric Kir2.1 channels. Current density in short-term cultures of bone marrow neutrophils is decreased in the absence of growth factors that are important for neutrophil proliferation [granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and stem cell factor (SCF)]. These results demonstrate that mouse neutrophils express functional Kir2.1 channels and suggest that these channels may be important for neutrophil function, possibly in a growth factor-dependent manner. PMID:25472961

  1. Inflammatory responses in a new mouse model of prolonged hepatic cold ischemia followed by arterialized orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiu-Da; Gao, Feng; Ke, Bibo; Zhai, Yuan; Lassman, Charles R; Tsuchihashi, Sei-Ichiro; Farmer, Douglas G; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W

    2005-10-01

    The current models of liver ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) in mice are largely limited to a warm ischemic component. To investigate the mechanism of hepatic "cold" IRI, we developed and validated a new mouse model of prolonged cold preservation followed by syngeneic orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Two hundred and forty-three OLTs with or without rearterialization and preservation in University of Wisconsin solution at 4 degrees C were performed in Balb/c mice. The 14-day survivals in the nonarterialized OLT groups were 92% (11/12), 82% (9/11), and 8% (1/12) after 1-hour, 6-hour and 24-hour preservation, respectively. In contrast, hepatic artery reconstruction after 1-hour, 6-hour, and 24-hour preservation improved the outcome as evidenced by 2-week survival of 100% (12/12), 100% (10/10), and 33% (4/12), respectively, and diminished hepatocellular damage (serum alanine aminotransferase /histology). Moreover, 24-hour (but not 1-h) cold preservation of rearterialized OLTs increased hepatic CD4+ T-cell infiltration and proinflammatory cytokine (tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 2, interferon-gamma) production, as well as enhanced local apoptosis, and Toll-like receptor 4/caspase 3 expression. These cardinal features of hepatic IRI validate the model. In conclusion, we have developed and validated a new mouse model of IRI in which hepatic artery reconstruction was mandatory for long-term animal survival after prolonged (24-h) OLT preservation. With the availability of genetically manipulated mouse strains, this model should provide important insights into the mechanism of antigen-independent hepatic IRI and help design much needed refined therapeutic means to combat hepatic IRI in the clinics. PMID:16184555

  2. Bioinformatic analysis of microRNA networks following the activation of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ruixin; Su, Shengzhong; Wan, Yinan; Shen, Frank; Niu, Ben; Coslo, Denise M; Albert, Istvan; Han, Xing; Omiecinski, Curtis J

    2016-09-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR; NR1I3) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that functions as a xenosensor, serving to regulate xenobiotic detoxification, lipid homeostasis and energy metabolism. CAR activation is also a key contributor to the development of chemical hepatocarcinogenesis in mice. The underlying pathways affected by CAR in these processes are complex and not fully elucidated. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as critical modulators of gene expression and appear to impact many cellular pathways, including those involved in chemical detoxification and liver tumor development. In this study, we used deep sequencing approaches with an Illumina HiSeq platform to differentially profile microRNA expression patterns in livers from wild type C57BL/6J mice following CAR activation with the mouse CAR-specific ligand activator, 1,4-bis-[2-(3,5,-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP). Bioinformatic analyses and pathway evaluations were performed leading to the identification of 51 miRNAs whose expression levels were significantly altered by TCPOBOP treatment, including mmu-miR-802-5p and miR-485-3p. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of the differentially expressed microRNAs revealed altered effector pathways, including those involved in liver cell growth and proliferation. A functional network among CAR targeted genes and the affected microRNAs was constructed to illustrate how CAR modulation of microRNA expression may potentially mediate its biological role in mouse hepatocyte proliferation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie. PMID:27080131

  3. Sexually Dimorphic Patterns of Episomal rAAV Genome Persistence in the Adult Mouse Liver and Correlation With Hepatocellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Dane, Allison P; Cunningham, Sharon C; Graf, Nicole S; Alexander, Ian E

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors (rAAVs) show exceptional promise for liver-targeted gene therapy, with phenotype correction in small and large animal disease models being reported with increasing frequency. Success in humans, however, remains a considerable challenge that demands greater understanding of host–vector interactions, notably those governing the efficiency of initial gene transfer and subsequent long-term persistence of gene expression. In this study, we examined long-term enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) expression and vector genome persistence in the mouse liver after rAAV2/8-mediated gene transfer in early adulthood. Two intriguing findings emerged of considerable scientific and clinical interest. First, adult female and male mice showed distinctly different patterns of persistence of eGFP expression across the hepatic lobule after exhibiting similar patterns initially. Female mice retained a predominantly perivenous pattern of expression, whereas male mice underwent inversion of this pattern with preferential loss of perivenous expression and relative retention of periportal expression. Second, these changing patterns of expression correlated with sexually dimorphic patterns of genome persistence that appear linked both spatially and temporally to underlying hepatocellular proliferation. Observation of the equivalent phenomenon in man could have significant implications for the long-term therapeutic efficacy of rAAV-mediated gene transfer, particularly in the context of correction of liver functions showing metabolic zonation. PMID:19568224

  4. Regulation by vascular endothelial growth factor of human colon cancer tumorigenesis in a mouse model of experimental liver metastasis.

    PubMed Central

    Warren, R S; Yuan, H; Matli, M R; Gillett, N A; Ferrara, N

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between angiogenesis and hepatic tumorigenesis, we examined the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in 8 human colon carcinoma cell lines and in 30 human colorectal cancer liver metastases. Abundant message for VEGF was found in all tumors, localized to the malignant cells within each neoplasm. Two receptors for VEGF, KDR and flt1, were also demonstrated in most of the tumors examined. KDR and flt1 mRNA were limited to tumor endothelial cells and were more strongly expressed in the hepatic metastases than in the sinusoidal endothelium of the surrounding liver parenchyma. VEGF monoclonal antibody administration in tumor-bearing athymic mice led to a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of growth of subcutaneous xenografts and to a marked reduction in the number and size of experimental liver metastases. In hepatic metastases of VEGF antibody-treated mice, neither blood vessels nor expression of the mouse KDR homologue flk-1 could be demonstrated. These data indicate that VEGF is a commonly expressed angiogenic factor in human colorectal cancer metastases, that VEGF receptors are up-regulated as a concomitant of hepatic tumorigenesis, and that modulation of VEGF gene expression or activity may represent a potentially effective antineoplastic therapy in colorectal cancer. Images PMID:7535799

  5. Involvement of N-acetyl-lactosamine-containing sugar structures in the liver metastasis of mouse colon carcinoma (colon 26) cells.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, H; Ito, M; Miura, Y; Hirano, H

    1994-01-01

    Histochemical aspects of the process of experimentally induced metastasis were examined by light and electron microscopy with labelled lectins employed as a probe. Mouse colon carcinoma cells (colon 26) were injected into the spleen of Balb/c mice and liver metastasis was induced. Among the lectins tested, Erythrina cristagalli agglutinin (ECA) stained the metastasized colon 26 cells strongly compared with the heterogeneous and faint staining in non-metastasized tumour foci in the spleen or in the subcutaneous space. Other lectins, such as Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (PHA-L), Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin (PHA-E) and Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA), having specificity for branched complex type sugar chains, did not show any differences between metastasized cells and non-metastasized tumour foci. In addition, N-acetyl-lactosamine, a specific inhibitor of ECA binding, significantly inhibited the attachment of suspended colon 26 cells to sectioned unfixed normal liver tissue. These results indicate that the expression of galactose (Gal) beta 1-4 N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc) residues of branched complex type sugar chains having specificity for ECA are important for the interaction process of carcinoma cells with hepatic cells in the process of liver metastasis. PMID:7532448

  6. Liver.

    PubMed

    Kim, W R; Lake, J R; Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Schladt, D P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Wainright, J L; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    The median waiting time for patients with MELD ≥ 35 decreased from 18 days in 2012 to 9 days in 2014, after implementation of the Share 35 policy in June 2013. Similarly, mortality among candidates listed with MELD ≥ 35 decreased from 366 per 100 waitlist years in 2012 to 315 in 2014. The number of new active candidates added to the pediatric liver transplant waiting list in 2014 was 655, down from a peak of 826 in 2005. The number of prevalent candidates (on the list on December 31 of the given year) continued to decline, 401 active and 173 inactive. The number of deceased donor pediatric liver transplants peaked at 542 in 2008 and was 478 in 2014. The number of living donor liver pediatric transplants was 52 in 2014; most were from donors closely related to the recipients. Graft survival continued to improve among pediatric recipients of deceased donor and living donor livers. PMID:26755264

  7. Mouse Monoclonal Antibodies for Liver Cancer Research | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute Laboratory of Molecular Biology seeks parties for collaborative research to co-develop and commercialize antibody drug/toxin conjugates as liver cancer therapy and diagnostics.

  8. Transcriptional profiling of mouse and human livers at different life stages

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the presence offoreign compounds,metabolichomeostasis oftheorganismismaintained by the liver's ability to detoxify and eliminate these xenobiotics. This is accomplished, in part, by the expression ofxenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), which metabolize xenobiotics and det...

  9. Modeling toxicodynamic effects of trichloroethylene on liver in mouse model of autoimmune hepatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Kathleen M.; Reisfeld, Brad; Zurlinden, Todd J.; Kreps, Meagan N.; Erickson, Stephen W.; Blossom, Sarah J.

    2014-09-15

    Chronic exposure to industrial solvent and water pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) in female MRL +/+ mice generates disease similar to human autoimmune hepatitis. The current study was initiated to investigate why TCE-induced autoimmunity targeted the liver. Compared to other tissues the liver has an unusually robust capacity for repair and regeneration. This investigation examined both time-dependent and dose-dependent effects of TCE on hepatoprotective and pro-inflammatory events in liver and macrophages from female MRL +/+ mice. After a 12-week exposure to TCE in drinking water a dose-dependent decrease in macrophage production of IL-6 at both the transcriptional and protein level was observed. A longitudinal study similarly showed that TCE inhibited macrophage IL-6 production. In terms of the liver, TCE had little effect on expression of pro-inflammatory genes (Tnfa, Saa2 or Cscl1) until the end of the 40-week exposure. Instead, TCE suppressed hepatic expression of genes involved in IL-6 signaling (Il6r, gp130, and Egr1). Linear regression analysis confirmed liver histopathology in the TCE-treated mice correlated with decreased expression of Il6r. A toxicodynamic model was developed to estimate the effects of TCE on IL-6 signaling and liver pathology under different levels of exposure and rates of repair. This study underlined the importance of longitudinal studies in mechanistic evaluations of immuntoxicants. It showed that later-occurring liver pathology caused by TCE was associated with early suppression of hepatoprotection rather than an increase in conventional pro-inflammatory events. This information was used to create a novel toxicodynamic model of IL-6-mediated TCE-induced liver inflammation. - Highlights: • We developed a toxicodynamic model to study effects of trichloroethylene on liver. • We examined protective as well as pro-inflammatory events in the liver. • Trichloroethylene inhibits IL-6 production by macrophages. • Trichloroethylene

  10. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition aggravates fasting-induced triglyceride accumulation in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Shin-Ichi; Nakamura, Kaai; Ando, Midori; Kamei, Hiroyasu; Hakuno, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2014-01-01

    Although fasting induces hepatic triglyceride (TG) accumulation in both rodents and humans, little is known about the underlying mechanism. Because parasympathetic nervous system activity tends to attenuate the secretion of very-low-density-lipoprotein-triglyceride (VLDL-TG) and increase TG stores in the liver, and serum cholinesterase activity is elevated in fatty liver disease, the inhibition of the parasympathetic neurotransmitter acetylcholinesterase (AChE) may have some influence on hepatic lipid metabolism. To assess the influence of AChE inhibition on lipid metabolism, the effect of physostigmine, an AChE inhibitor, on fasting-induced increase in liver TG was investigated in mice. In comparison with ad libitum-fed mice, 30 h fasting increased liver TG accumulation accompanied by a downregulation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP-1) and liver-fatty acid binding-protein (L-FABP). Physostigmine promoted the 30 h fasting-induced increase in liver TG levels in a dose-dependent manner, accompanied by a significant fall in plasma insulin levels, without a fall in plasma TG. Furthermore, physostigmine significantly attenuated the fasting-induced decrease of both mRNA and protein levels of SREBP-1 and L-FABP, and increased IRS-2 protein levels in the liver. The muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine blocked these effects of physostigmine on liver TG, serum insulin, and hepatic protein levels of SREBP-1 and L-FABP. These results demonstrate that AChE inhibition facilitated fasting-induced TG accumulation with up regulation of the hepatic L-FABP and SREBP-1 in mice, at least in part via the activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Our studies highlight the crucial role of parasympathetic regulation in fasting-induced TG accumulation, and may be an important source of information on the mechanism of hepatic disorders of lipid metabolism. PMID:25383314

  11. Modeling toxicodynamic effects of trichloroethylene on liver in mouse model of autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Kathleen M.; Reisfeld, Brad; Zurlinden, Todd; Kreps, Meagan N.; Erickson, Stephen W.; Blossom, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic exposure to industrial solvent and water pollutant trichloroethylene (TCE) in female MRL+/+ mice generates disease similar to human autoimmune hepatitis. The current study was initiated to investigate why TCE-induced autoimmunity targeted the liver. Compared to other tissues the liver has an unusually robust capacity for repair and regeneration. This investigation examined both time-dependent and dose-dependent effects of TCE on hepatoprotective and pro-inflammatory events in liver and macrophages from female MRL+/+ mice. After a 12-week exposure to TCE in drinking water a dose-dependent decrease in macrophage production of IL-6 at both the transcriptional and protein level was observed. A longitudinal study similarly showed that TCE inhibited macrophage IL-6 production. In terms of the liver, TCE had little effect on expression of pro-inflammatory genes (Tnfa, Saa2 or Cscl1) until the end of the 40-week exposure. Instead, TCE suppressed hepatic expression of genes involved in IL-6 signaling (Il6r, gp130, and Egr1). Linear regression analysis confirmed liver histopathology in the TCE-treated mice correlated with decreased expression of Il6r. A toxicodynamic model was developed to estimate the effects of TCE on IL-6 signaling and liver pathology under different levels of exposure and rates of repair. This study underlined the importance of longitudinal studies in mechanistic evaluations of immuntoxicants. It showed that later-occurring liver pathology caused by TCE was associated with early suppression of hepatoprotection rather than an increase in conventional pro-inflammatory events. This information was used to create a novel toxicodynamic model of IL-6-mediated TCE-induced liver inflammation. PMID:25026505

  12. Chronic overexpression of PNPLA3I148M in mouse liver causes hepatic steatosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, John Zhong; Huang, Yongcheng; Karaman, Ruchan; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Brown, H. Alex; Roddy, Thomas; Castro-Perez, Jose; Cohen, Jonathan C.; Hobbs, Helen H.

    2012-01-01

    A genetic variant in PNPLA3 (PNPLA3I148M), a triacylglycerol (TAG) hydrolase, is a major risk factor for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD); however, the mechanism underlying this association is not known. To develop an animal model of PNPLA3-induced fatty liver disease, we generated transgenic mice that overexpress similar amounts of wild-type PNPLA3 (PNPLA3WT) or mutant PNPLA3 (PNPLA3I148M) either in liver or adipose tissue. Overexpression of the transgenes in adipose tissue did not affect liver fat content. Expression of PNPLA3I148M, but not PNPLA3WT, in liver recapitulated the fatty liver phenotype as well as other metabolic features associated with this allele in humans. Metabolic studies provided evidence for 3 distinct alterations in hepatic TAG metabolism in PNPLA3I148M transgenic mice: increased formation of fatty acids and TAG, impaired hydrolysis of TAG, and relative depletion of TAG long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. These findings suggest that PNPLA3 plays a role in remodeling TAG in lipid droplets, as they accumulate in response to food intake, and that the increase in hepatic TAG levels associated with the I148M substitution results from multiple changes in hepatic TAG metabolism. The development of an animal model that recapitulates the metabolic phenotype of the allele in humans provides a new platform in which to elucidate the role of PNLPA3I148M in NAFLD. PMID:23023705

  13. Postponing the Hypoglycemic Response to Partial Hepatectomy Delays Mouse Liver Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiansheng; Schriefer, Andrew E; Cliften, Paul F; Dietzen, Dennis; Kulkarni, Sakil; Sing, Sucha; Monga, Satdarshan P S; Rudnick, David A

    2016-03-01

    All serious liver injuries alter metabolism and initiate hepatic regeneration. Recent studies using partial hepatectomy (PH) and other experimental models of liver regeneration implicate the metabolic response to hepatic insufficiency as an important source of signals that promote regeneration. Based on these considerations, the analyses reported here were undertaken to assess the impact of interrupting the hypoglycemic response to PH on liver regeneration in mice. A regimen of parenteral dextrose infusion that delays PH-induced hypoglycemia for 14 hours after surgery was identified, and the hepatic regenerative response to PH was compared between dextrose-treated and control mice. The results showed that regenerative recovery of the liver was postponed in dextrose-infused mice (versus vehicle control) by an interval of time comparable to the delay in onset of PH-induced hypoglycemia. The regulation of specific liver regeneration-promoting signals, including hepatic induction of cyclin D1 and S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 expression and suppression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and p27 expression, was also disrupted by dextrose infusion. These data support the hypothesis that alterations in metabolism that occur in response to hepatic insufficiency promote liver regeneration, and they define specific pro- and antiregenerative molecular targets whose regenerative regulation is postponed when PH-induced hypoglycemia is delayed. PMID:26772417

  14. Involvement of Mouse Constitutive Androstane Receptor in Acifluorfen-Induced Liver Injury and Subsequent Tumor Development.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Kazunori; Inoue, Kaoru; Ichimura, Ryohei; Takahashi, Miwa; Kodama, Yukio; Shibutani, Makoto; Yoshida, Midori

    2016-06-01

    Acifluorfen (ACI), a protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PROTOX) inhibitor herbicide, promotes the accumulation of protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), and induces tumors in the rodent liver. Porphyria is a risk factor for liver tumors in humans; however, the specific mechanisms through which ACI induces hepatocarcinogenesis in rodents are unclear. Here, we investigated the mode of action of ACI-induced hepatocarcinogenesis, focusing on constitutive androstane receptor (CAR, NR1I3), which is essential for the development of rodent liver tumors in response to certain cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2B inducers. Dietary treatment with 2500 ppm ACI for up to 13 weeks increased Cyp2b10 expression in the livers of wild-type (WT) mice, but not in CAR-knockout (CARKO) mice. Microscopically, ACI treatment-induced cytotoxic changes, including hepatocellular necrosis and inflammation, and caused regenerative changes accompanied by prolonged increases in the numbers of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive hepatocytes in WT mice. In contrast, these cytotoxic and regenerative changes in hepatocytes were significantly attenuated, but still observed, in CARKO mice. ACI treatment also increased liver PPIX levels similarly in both genotypes; however, no morphological evidence of porphyrin deposition was found in hepatocytes from either genotype. Treatment with 2500 ppm ACI for 26 weeks after initiation with diethylnitrosamine increased the incidence and multiplicities of altered foci and adenomas in hepatocytes from WT mice; these effects were significantly reduced in CARKO mice. These results indicated that prolonged cytotoxicity in the liver was a key factor for ACI-induced hepatocarcinogenesis, and that CAR played an important role in ACI-induced liver injury and tumor development in mice. PMID:26928356

  15. Distinct anti-oncogenic effect of various microRNAs in different mouse models of liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Heng; Liu, Yan; Wang, XinWei; Calvisi, Diego F.; Song, Guisheng; Chen, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Deregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is a typical feature of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the in vivo relevance of miRNAs along hepatocarcinogenesis remains largely unknown. Here, we show that liver tumors induced in mice by c-Myc overexpression or AKT/Ras co-expression exhibit distinct miRNA expression profiles. Among the downregulated miRNAs, eight (miR-101, miR-107, miR-122, miR-29, miR-365, miR-375, miR-378, and miR-802) were selected and their tumor suppressor activity was determined by overexpressing each of them together with c-Myc or AKT/Ras oncogenes in mouse livers via hydrodynamic transfection. The tumor suppressor activity of these microRNAs was extremely heterogeneous in c-Myc and AKT/Ras mice: while miR-378 had no tumor suppressor activity, miR-107, mir-122, miR-29, miR-365 and miR-802 exhibited weak to moderate tumor suppressor potential. Noticeably, miR-375 showed limited antineoplastic activity against c-Myc driven tumorigenesis, whereas it strongly inhibited AKT/Ras induced hepatocarcinogenesis. Furthermore, miR-101 significantly suppressed both c-Myc and AKT/Ras liver tumor development. Altogether, the present data demonstrate that different oncogenes induce distinct miRNA patterns, whose modulation differently affects hepatocarcinogenesis depending on the driving oncogenes. Finally, our findings support a strong tumor suppressor activity of miR-101 in liver cancer models regardless of the driver oncogenes involved, thus representing a promising therapeutic target in human HCC. PMID:25762642

  16. Cross-Activating Invariant NKT Cells and Kupffer Cells Suppress Cholestatic Liver Injury in a Mouse Model of Biliary Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Duwaerts, Caroline C.; Sun, Eric P.; Cheng, Chao-Wen; van Rooijen, Nico; Gregory, Stephen H.

    2013-01-01

    Both Kupffer cells and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells suppress neutrophil-dependent liver injury in a mouse model of biliary obstruction. We hypothesize that these roles are interdependent and require iNKT cell-Kupffer cell cross-activation. Female, wild-type and iNKT cell-deficient C57Bl/6 mice were injected with magnetic beads 3 days prior to bile duct ligation (BDL) in order to facilitate subsequent Kupffer cell isolation. On day three post-BDL, the animals were euthanized and the livers dissected. Necrosis was scored; Kupffer cells were isolated and cell surface marker expression (flow cytometry), mRNA expression (qtPCR), nitric oxide (NO.) production (Griess reaction), and protein secretion (cytometric bead-array or ELISAs) were determined. To address the potential role of NO. in suppressing neutrophil accumulation, a group of WT mice received 1400W, a specific inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, prior to BDL. To clarify the mechanisms underlying Kupffer cell-iNKT cell cross-activation, WT animals were administered anti-IFN-γ or anti-lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 antibody prior to BDL. Compared to their WT counterparts, Kupffer cells obtained from BDL iNKT cell-deficient mice expressed lower iNOS mRNA levels, produced less NO., and secreted more neutrophil chemoattractants. Both iNOS inhibition and IFN-γ neutralization increased neutrophil accumulation in the livers of BDL WT mice. Anti-LFA-1 pre-treatment reduced iNKT cell accumulation in these same animals. These data indicate that the LFA-1-dependent cross-activation of iNKT cells and Kupffer cells inhibits neutrophil accumulation and cholestatic liver injury. PMID:24260285

  17. Cross-activating invariant NKT cells and kupffer cells suppress cholestatic liver injury in a mouse model of biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Duwaerts, Caroline C; Sun, Eric P; Cheng, Chao-Wen; van Rooijen, Nico; Gregory, Stephen H

    2013-01-01

    Both Kupffer cells and invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells suppress neutrophil-dependent liver injury in a mouse model of biliary obstruction. We hypothesize that these roles are interdependent and require iNKT cell-Kupffer cell cross-activation. Female, wild-type and iNKT cell-deficient C57Bl/6 mice were injected with magnetic beads 3 days prior to bile duct ligation (BDL) in order to facilitate subsequent Kupffer cell isolation. On day three post-BDL, the animals were euthanized and the livers dissected. Necrosis was scored; Kupffer cells were isolated and cell surface marker expression (flow cytometry), mRNA expression (qtPCR), nitric oxide (NO (.) ) production (Griess reaction), and protein secretion (cytometric bead-array or ELISAs) were determined. To address the potential role of NO (.) in suppressing neutrophil accumulation, a group of WT mice received 1400W, a specific inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor, prior to BDL. To clarify the mechanisms underlying Kupffer cell-iNKT cell cross-activation, WT animals were administered anti-IFN-γ or anti-lymphocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 antibody prior to BDL. Compared to their WT counterparts, Kupffer cells obtained from BDL iNKT cell-deficient mice expressed lower iNOS mRNA levels, produced less NO (.) , and secreted more neutrophil chemoattractants. Both iNOS inhibition and IFN-γ neutralization increased neutrophil accumulation in the livers of BDL WT mice. Anti-LFA-1 pre-treatment reduced iNKT cell accumulation in these same animals. These data indicate that the LFA-1-dependent cross-activation of iNKT cells and Kupffer cells inhibits neutrophil accumulation and cholestatic liver injury. PMID:24260285

  18. Screening a mouse liver gene expression compendium identifies modulators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR).

    PubMed

    Oshida, Keiyu; Vasani, Naresh; Thomas, Russell S; Applegate, Dawn; Gonzalez, Frank J; Aleksunes, Lauren M; Klaassen, Curtis D; Corton, J Christopher

    2015-10-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates the biological and toxic effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), dioxin-like compounds (DLC) as well as some drugs and endogenous tryptophan metabolites. Short-term activation of AhR can lead to hepatocellular steatosis, and chronic activation can lead to liver cancer in mice and rats. Analytical approaches were developed to identify biosets in a genomic database in which AhR activity was altered. A set of 63 genes was identified (the AhR gene expression biomarker) that was dependent on AhR for regulation after exposure to TCDD or benzo[a]pyrene and includes the known AhR targets Cyp1a1 and Cyp1b1. A fold-change rank-based test (Running Fisher's test; p-value ≤ 10(-4)) was used to evaluate the similarity between the AhR biomarker and a test set of 37 and 41 biosets positive or negative, respectively for AhR activation. The test resulted in a balanced accuracy of 95%. The rank-based test was used to identify factors that activate or suppress AhR in an annotated mouse liver/mouse primary hepatocyte gene expression database of ∼ 1850 comparisons. In addition to the expected activation of AhR by TCDD and DLC, AhR was activated by AP20189 and phenformin. AhR was suppressed by phenobarbital and 1,4-Bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP) in a constitutive activated receptor (CAR)-dependent manner and pregnenolone-16α-carbonitrile in a pregnane X receptor (PXR)-dependent manner. Inactivation of individual genes in nullizygous models led to AhR activation (Pxr, Ghrhr, Taf10) or suppression (Ahr, Ilst6st, Hnf1a). This study describes a novel screening strategy for identifying factors in mouse liver that perturb AhR in a gene expression compendium. PMID:26215100

  19. FULL-GENOME ANALYSIS OF ALTERNATIVE SPLICING IN MOUSE LIVER AFTER HEPATOTOXICANT EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alternative splicing plays a role in determining gene function and protein diversity. We have employed whole genome exon profiling using Affymetrix Mouse Exon 1.0 ST arrays to understand the significance of alternative splicing on a genome-wide scale in response to multiple toxic...

  20. Dietary methionine can sustain cytosolic redox homeostasis in the mouse liver

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Sofi; Prigge, Justin R.; Talago, Emily A.; Arnér, Elias S. J.; Schmidt, Edward E.

    2015-01-01

    Across phyla, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) transfers intracellular reducing power to thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1) and glutathione reductase (GR), thereby supporting fundamental housekeeping and antioxidant pathways. Here we show that a third, NADPH-independent, pathway can bypass the need for TrxR1 and GR in mammalian liver. Most mice genetically engineered to lack both TrxR1 and GR in all hepatocytes (“TR/GR-null livers”) remain long-term viable. TR/GR-null livers cannot reduce oxidized glutathione disulfide but still require continuous glutathione synthesis. Inhibition of cystathionine gamma-lyase causes rapid necrosis of TR/GR-null livers, indicating that methionine-fueled trans-sulfuration supplies the necessary cysteine precursor for glutathione synthesis via an NADPH-independent pathway. We further show that dietary methionine provides the cytosolic disulfide reducing power and all sulfur amino acids in TR/GR-null livers. Although NADPH is generally considered an essential reducing currency, these results indicate that hepatocytes can adequately sustain cytosolic redox homeostasis pathways using either NADPH or methionine. PMID:25790857

  1. Genome-Wide Tissue-Specific Farnesoid X Receptor Binding in Mouse Liver and Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ann M.; Hart, Steven N.; Kong, Bo; Fang, Jianwen; Zhong, Xiao-bo; Guo, Grace L.

    2016-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a bile acid-activated transcription factor belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily. FXR is highly expressed in liver and intestine and crosstalk mediated by FXR in these two organs is critical in maintaining bile acid homeostasis. FXR deficiency has been implicated in many liver and intestine diseases. However, regulation of transcription by FXR at the genomic level is not known. This study analyzed genome-wide FXR binding in liver and intestine of mice treated with a synthetic FXR ligand (GW4064) by chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq). The results showed a large degree of tissue-specific FXR binding, with only 11% of total sites shared between liver and intestine. The sites were widely distributed between intergenic, upstream, intragenic, and downstream of genes, with novel sites identified within even known FXR target genes. Motif analysis revealed a half nuclear receptor binding site, normally bound by a few orphan nuclear receptors, adjacent to the FXR response elements, indicating possible involvement of some orphan nuclear receptors in modulating FXR function. Furthermore, pathway analysis indicated that FXR may be extensively involved in multiple cellular metabolic pathways. Conclusion This study reports genome-wide FXR binding in vivo and the results clearly demonstrate tissue-specific FXR/gene interaction. In addition, FXR may be involved in regulating broader biological pathways in maintaining hepatic and intestinal homeostasis. PMID:20091679

  2. Global Transcriptional Response to Hfe Deficiency and Dietary Iron Overload in Mouse Liver and Duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Alejandra; Luukkaala, Tiina; Fleming, Robert E.; Britton, Robert S.; Bacon, Bruce R.; Parkkila, Seppo

    2009-01-01

    Iron is an essential trace element whose absorption is usually tightly regulated in the duodenum. HFE-related hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) is characterized by abnormally low expression of the iron-regulatory hormone, hepcidin, which results in increased iron absorption. The liver is crucial for iron homeostasis as it is the main production site of hepcidin. The aim of this study was to explore and compare the genome-wide transcriptome response to Hfe deficiency and dietary iron overload in murine liver and duodenum. Illumina™ arrays containing over 47,000 probes were used to study global transcriptional changes. Quantitative RT-PCR (Q-RT-PCR) was used to validate the microarray results. In the liver, the expression of 151 genes was altered in Hfe−/− mice while dietary iron overload changed the expression of 218 genes. There were 173 and 108 differentially expressed genes in the duodenum of Hfe−/− mice and mice with dietary iron overload, respectively. There was 93.5% concordance between the results obtained by microarray analysis and Q-RT-PCR. Overexpression of genes for acute phase reactants in the liver and a strong induction of digestive enzyme genes in the duodenum were characteristic of the Hfe-deficient genotype. In contrast, dietary iron overload caused a more pronounced change of gene expression responsive to oxidative stress. In conclusion, Hfe deficiency caused a previously unrecognized increase in gene expression of hepatic acute phase proteins and duodenal digestive enzymes. PMID:19787063

  3. CAR and PXR-dependent transcriptional changes in the mouse liver after exposure to propiconazole

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to the conazoles propiconazole and triadimefon but not myclobutanilled to tumors in mice after 2 years. Transcript profiling studies in the livers ofwild-type mice after short-term exposure to the conazoles revealed signatures indicating the involvement ofthe nuclear rec...

  4. Role of amidation in bile acid effect on DNA synthesis by regenerating mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Barbero, E R; Herrera, M C; Monte, M J; Serrano, M A; Marin, J J

    1995-06-01

    Effect of bile acids on DNA synthesis by the regenerating liver was investigated in mice in vivo after partial hepatectomy (PH). Radioactivity incorporation into DNA after [14C]thymidine intraperitoneal administration peaked at 48 h after PH. At this time a significant taurocholate-induced dose-dependent reduction in DNA synthesis without changes in total liver radioactivity content was found (half-maximal effect at approximately 0.1 mumol/g body wt). Effect of taurocholate (0.5 mumol/g body wt) was mimicked by chocolate, ursodeoxycholate, deoxycholate, dehydrocholate, tauroursodeoxycholate, taurochenodeoxycholate, and taurodeoxycholate. In contrast, chenodeoxycholate, glycocholate, glycochenodeoxycholate, glycoursodeoxycholate, glycodeoxycholate, 5 beta-cholestane, bromosulfophthalein, and free taurine lacked this effect. No relationship between hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance and inhibitory effect was observed. Analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography indicated that inhibition of thymidine incorporation into DNA was not accompanied by an accumulation of phosphorylated DNA precursors in the liver but rather by a parallel increase in nucleotide catabolism. Bile acid-induced modifications in DNA synthesis were observed in vivo even in the absence of changes in toxicity tests, which suggests that the inhibitory effect shared by most unconjugated and tauroconjugated bile acids but not by glycoconjugated bile acids should be accounted for by mechanisms other than nonselective liver cell injury. PMID:7611405

  5. Interactions of silver nanoparticles with primary mouse fibroblasts and liver cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, S.; Jain, J.; Rajwade, J.M.; Paknikar, K.M.

    2009-05-01

    Primary cells are ideal for in vitro toxicity studies since they closely resemble tissue environment. Here, we report a detailed study on the in vitro interactions of 7-20 nm spherical silver nanoparticles (SNP) with primary fibroblasts and primary liver cells isolated from Swiss albino mice. The intended use of silver nanoparticles is in the form of a topical antimicrobial gel formulation for the treatment of burns and wounds. Upon exposure to SNP for 24 h, morphology of primary fibroblasts and primary liver cells remained unaltered up to 25 {mu}g/mL and 100 {mu}g/mL SNP, respectively, although with minor decrease in confluence. IC{sub 50} values for primary fibroblasts and primary liver cells as revealed by XTT assay were 61 {mu}g/mL and 449 {mu}g/mL, respectively. Ultra-thin sections of primary cells exposed to 1/2 IC{sub 50} SNP for 24 h, visualized under Transmission electron microscope showed the presence of dark, electron dense, spherical aggregates inside the mitochondria, and cytoplasm, probably representing the intracellular SNP. When the cells were challenged with {approx} 1/2 IC{sub 50} concentration of SNP (i.e. 30 {mu}g/mL and 225 {mu}g/mL for primary fibroblasts and primary liver cells, respectively), enhancement of GSH ({approx} 1.2 fold) and depletion of lipid peroxidation ({approx} 1.4 fold) were seen in primary fibroblasts which probably protect the cells from functional damage. In case of primary liver cells; increased levels of SOD ({approx} 1.4 fold) and GSH ({approx} 1.1 fold) as compared to unexposed cells were observed. Caspase-3 activity assay indicated that the SNP concentrations required for the onset of apoptosis were found to be much lower (3.12 {mu}g/mL in primary fibroblasts, 12.5 {mu}g/mL in primary liver cells) than the necrotic concentration (100 {mu}g/mL in primary fibroblasts, 500 {mu}g/mL in primary liver cells). These observations were confirmed by CLSM studies by exposure of cells to 1/2 IC{sub 50} SNP (resulting in apoptosis

  6. Transient Expression of Transgenic IL-12 in Mouse Liver Triggers Unremitting Inflammation Mimicking Human Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Gil-Farina, Irene; Di Scala, Marianna; Salido, Eduardo; López-Franco, Esperanza; Rodríguez-García, Estefania; Blasi, Mercedes; Merino, Juana; Aldabe, Rafael; Prieto, Jesús; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2016-09-15

    The etiopathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) remains poorly understood. In this study, we sought to develop an animal model of human AIH to gain insight into the immunological mechanisms driving this condition. C57BL/6 mice were i.v. injected with adeno-associated viral vectors encoding murine IL-12 or luciferase under the control of a liver-specific promoter. Organ histology, response to immunosuppressive therapy, and biochemical and immunological parameters, including Ag-specific humoral and cellular response, were analyzed. Mechanistic studies were carried out using genetically modified mice and depletion of lymphocyte subpopulations. Adeno-associated virus IL-12-treated mice developed histological, biochemical, and immunological changes resembling type 1 AIH, including marked and persistent liver mononuclear cell infiltration, hepatic fibrosis, hypergammaglobulinemia, anti-nuclear and anti-smooth muscle actin Abs, and disease remission with immunosuppressive drugs. Interestingly, transgenic IL-12 was short-lived, but endogenous IL-12 expression was induced, and both IL-12 and IFN-γ remained elevated during the entire study period. IFN-γ was identified as an essential mediator of liver damage, and CD4 and CD8 T cells but not NK, NKT, or B cells were essential executors of hepatic injury. Furthermore, both MHC class I and MHC class II expression was upregulated at the hepatocellular membrane, and induction of autoreactive liver-specific T cells was detected. Remarkably, although immunoregulatory mechanisms were activated, they only partially mitigated liver damage. Thus, low and transient expression of transgenic IL-12 in hepatocytes causes loss of tolerance to hepatocellular Ags, leading to chronic hepatitis resembling human AIH type 1. This model provides a practical tool to explore AIH pathogenesis and novel therapies. PMID:27511737

  7. CD8 T-cell-mediated protection against liver-stage malaria: lessons from a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Van Braeckel-Budimir, Natalija; Harty, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a major global health problem, with severe mortality in children living in sub-Saharan Africa, and there is currently no licensed, effective vaccine. However, vaccine-induced protection from Plasmodium infection, the causative agent of malaria, was established for humans in small clinical trials and for rodents in the 1960s. Soon after, a critical role for memory CD8 T cells in vaccine-induced protection against Plasmodium liver-stage infection was established in rodent models and is assumed to apply to humans. However, these seminal early studies have led to only modest advances over the ensuing years in our understanding the basic features of memory CD8 T cells required for protection against liver-stage Plasmodium infection, an issue which has likely impeded the development of effective vaccines for humans. Given the ethical and practical limitations in gaining mechanistic insight from human vaccine and challenge studies, animal models still have an important role in dissecting the basic parameters underlying memory CD8 T-cell immunity to Plasmodium. Here, we will highlight recent data from our own work in the mouse model of Plasmodium infection that identify quantitative and qualitative features of protective memory CD8 T-cell responses. Finally, these lessons will be discussed in the context of recent findings from clinical trials of vaccine-induced protection in controlled human challenge models. PMID:24936199

  8. C-Jun N-Terminal Kinase 2 Promotes Graft Injury via the Mitochondrial Permeability Transition After Mouse Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Theruvath, T. P.; Czerny, C.; Ramshesh, V. K.; Zhong, Z.; Chavin, K. D.; Lemasters, J. J.

    2009-01-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway enhances graft injury after liver transplantation (LT). We hypothesized that the JNK2 isoform promotes graft injury via the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). Livers of C57BL/6J (wild-type, WT) and JNK2 knockout (KO) mice were transplanted into WT recipients after 30 h of cold storage in UW solution. Injury after implantation was assessed by serum ALT, histological necrosis, TUNEL, Caspase 3 activity, 30-day survival, and cytochrome c and 4-hydroxynonenal immunostaining. Multiphoton microscopy after LT monitored mitochondrial membrane potential in vivo. After LT, ALT increased three times more in WT compared to KO (p < 0.05). Necrosis and TUNEL were more than two times greater in WT than KO (p < 0.05). Immunostaining showed a >80% decrease of mitochondrial cytochrome c release in KO compared to WT (p < 0.01). Lipid peroxidation was similarly decreased. Every KO graft but one survived longer than all WT grafts (p < 0.05, Kaplan-Meier). After LT, depolarization of mitochondria occurred in 73% of WT hepatocytes, which decreased to 28% in KO (p < 0.05). In conclusion, donor JNK2 promotes injury after mouse LT via the MPT. MPT inhibition using specific JNK2 inhibitors may be useful in protecting grafts against adverse outcomes from ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:18671679

  9. MiRNA expression profile of ionizing radiation-induced liver injury in mouse using deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jike; Chen, Chen; Hao, Limin; Zheng, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Naixun; Wang, Zhenyu

    2016-08-01

    In order to investigate the potential regulatory roles of microRNAs (miRNAs) in mouse response to ionizing radiation (IR), the small RNA libraries from liver tissues of mice with or without ionizing radiation (IR) were sequenced by high-throughput deep sequencing technology. A total of 270 miRNAs including 212 known and 58 potentially novel miRNAs were identified. Within these miRNAs, there were 48 miRNAs that were differentially expressed, including 27 known and 21 novel miRNAs. The results of quantitative RT-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) were in consistent with the sequencing analysis. Target gene prediction, function annotation, and pathway of the identified miRNAs were analyzed using RNAhybrid, miRanda software and Swiss-Prot, Gene Ontology (GO), Clusters of Orthologous Groups (COG), Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes, and Genomes (KEGG) and non-redundant (NR) databases. These results should be useful to investigate the biological function of miRNAs under IR-induced liver injury. PMID:27214643

  10. Studies of Secondary Melanoma on C57BL/6J Mouse Liver Using 1H NMR Metabolomics

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Ju; Isern, Nancy G.; Burton, Sarah D.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2013-10-31

    NMR metabolomics, consisting of solid state high resolution (hr) magic angle spinning (MAS) 1H NMR (1H hr-MAS), liquid state high resolution 1H-NMR, and principal components analysis (PCA) has been used to study secondary metastatic B16-F10 melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse liver . The melanoma group can be differentiated from its control group by PCA analysis of the absolute concentrations or by the absolute peak intensities of metabolites from either 1H hr-MAS NMR data on intact liver tissues or liquid state 1H-NMR spectra on liver tissue extracts. In particular, we found that the absolute concentrations of alanine, glutamate, creatine, creatinine, fumarate and cholesterol are elevated in the melanoma group as compared to controls, while the absolute concentrations of succinate, glycine, glucose, and the family of linear lipids including long chain fatty acids, total choline and acylglycerol are decreased. The ratio of glycerophosphocholine to phosphocholine is increased by about 1.5 fold in the melanoma group, while the absolute concentration of total choline is actually lower in melanoma mice. These results suggest the following picture in secondary melanoma metastasis: Linear lipid levels are decreased by beta oxidation in the melanoma group, which contributes to an increase in the synthesis of cholesterol, and also provides an energy source input for TCA cycle. These findings suggest a link between lipid oxidation, the TCA cycle and the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) signal pathway in tumor metastases. Thus this study indicates that the metabolic profile derived from NMR analysis can provide a valuable bio-signature of malignancy and cell hypoxia in metastatic melanoma.

  11. IL-12-based vaccination therapy reverses liver-induced systemic tolerance in a mouse model of hepatitis B virus carrier.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhutian; Kong, Xiaohui; Li, Fenglei; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2013-10-15

    Liver-induced systemic immune tolerance that occurs during chronic hepadnavirus infection is the biggest obstacle for effective viral clearance. Immunotherapeutic reversal of this tolerance is a promising strategy in the clinic but remains to be explored. In this study, using a hepatitis B virus (HBV)-carrier mouse model, we report that IL-12-based vaccination therapy can efficiently reverse systemic tolerance toward HBV. HBV-carrier mice lost responsiveness to hepatitis B surface Ag (HBsAg) vaccination, and IL-12 alone could not reverse this liver-induced immune tolerance. However, after IL-12-based vaccination therapy, the majority of treated mice became HBsAg(-) in serum; hepatitis B core Ag was also undetectable in hepatocytes. HBV clearance was dependent on HBsAg vaccine-induced anti-HBV immunity. Further results showed that IL-12-based vaccination therapy strongly enhanced hepatic HBV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses, including proliferation and IFN-γ secretion. Systemic HBV-specific CD4(+) T cell responses were also restored in HBV-carrier mice, leading to the arousal of HBsAg-specific follicular Th-germinal center B cell responses and anti-hepatitis B surface Ag Ab production. Recovery of HBsAg-specific responses also correlated with both reduced CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cell frequency and an enhanced capacity of effector T cells to overcome inhibition by regulatory T cells. In conclusion, IL-12-based vaccination therapy may reverse liver-induced immune tolerance toward HBV by restoring systemic HBV-specific CD4(+) T cell responses, eliciting robust hepatic HBV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses, and facilitating the generation of HBsAg-specific humoral immunity; thus, this therapy may become a viable approach to treating patients with chronic hepatitis B. PMID:24048897

  12. Hepatitis C Virus Infection Suppresses the Interferon Response in the Liver of the Human Hepatocyte Chimeric Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Tsuge, Masataka; Fujimoto, Yoshifumi; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Zhang, Yizhou; Ohnishi, Mayu; Kohno, Tomohiko; Abe, Hiromi; Miki, Daiki; Imamura, Michio; Takahashi, Shoichi; Ochi, Hidenori; Hayes, C. Nelson; Miya, Fuyuki; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Recent studies indicate that hepatitis C virus (HCV) can modulate the expression of various genes including those involved in interferon signaling, and up-regulation of interferon-stimulated genes by HCV was reported to be strongly associated with treatment outcome. To expand our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying treatment resistance, we analyzed the direct effects of interferon and/or HCV infection under immunodeficient conditions using cDNA microarray analysis of human hepatocyte chimeric mice. Methods Human serum containing HCV genotype 1b was injected into human hepatocyte chimeric mice. IFN-α was administered 8 weeks after inoculation, and 6 hours later human hepatocytes in the mouse livers were collected for microarray analysis. Results HCV infection induced a more than 3-fold change in the expression of 181 genes, especially genes related to Organismal Injury and Abnormalities, such as fibrosis or injury of the liver (P = 5.90E-16 ∼ 3.66E-03). IFN administration induced more than 3-fold up-regulation in the expression of 152 genes. Marked induction was observed in the anti-fibrotic chemokines such as CXCL9, suggesting that IFN treatment might lead not only to HCV eradication but also prevention and repair of liver fibrosis. HCV infection appeared to suppress interferon signaling via significant reduction in interferon-induced gene expression in several genes of the IFN signaling pathway, including Mx1, STAT1, and several members of the CXCL and IFI families (P = 6.0E-12). Genes associated with Antimicrobial Response and Inflammatory Response were also significantly repressed (P = 5.22×10−10 ∼ 1.95×10−2). Conclusions These results provide molecular insights into possible mechanisms used by HCV to evade innate immune responses, as well as novel therapeutic targets and a potential new indication for interferon therapy. PMID:21886832

  13. Adenovirus-Mediated Somatic Genome Editing of Pten by CRISPR/Cas9 in Mouse Liver in Spite of Cas9-Specific Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Mou, Haiwei; Li, Shaoyong; Li, Yingxiang; Hough, Soren; Tran, Karen; Li, Jia; Yin, Hao; Anderson, Daniel G; Sontheimer, Erik J; Weng, Zhiping; Gao, Guangping; Xue, Wen

    2015-07-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 derived from the bacterial adaptive immunity pathway is a powerful tool for genome editing, but the safety profiles of in vivo delivered Cas9 (including host immune responses to the bacterial Cas9 protein) have not been comprehensively investigated in model organisms. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a prevalent human liver disease characterized by excessive fat accumulation in the liver. In this study, we used adenovirus (Ad) vector to deliver a Streptococcus pyogenes-derived Cas9 system (SpCas9) targeting Pten, a gene involved in NASH and a negative regulator of the PI3K-AKT pathway, in mouse liver. We found that the Ad vector mediated efficient Pten gene editing even in the presence of typical Ad vector-associated immunotoxicity in the liver. Four months after vector infusion, mice receiving the Pten gene-editing Ad vector showed massive hepatomegaly and features of NASH, consistent with the phenotypes following Cre-loxP-induced Pten deficiency in mouse liver. We also detected induction of humoral immunity against SpCas9 and the potential presence of an SpCas9-specific cellular immune response. Our findings provide a strategy to model human liver diseases in mice and highlight the importance considering Cas9-specific immune responses in future translational studies involving in vivo delivery of CRISPR/Cas9. PMID:26086867

  14. Comparison of the Treatment Efficiency of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation via Tail and Portal Veins in CCl4-Induced Mouse Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Nhung Hai; Nguyen, Nam Hai; Le, Trinh Van; Vu, Ngoc Bich; Huynh, Nghia; Nguyen, Thanh Van; Le, Huy Minh; Phan, Ngoc Kim

    2016-01-01

    Because of self-renewal, strong proliferation in vitro, abundant sources for isolation, and a high differentiation capacity, mesenchymal stem cells are suggested to be potentially therapeutic for liver fibrosis/cirrhosis. In this study, we evaluated the treatment effects of mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) on mouse liver cirrhosis induced by carbon tetrachloride. Portal and tail vein transplantations were examined to evaluate the effects of different injection routes on the liver cirrhosis model at 21 days after transplantation. BM-MSCs transplantation reduced aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase levels at 21 days after injection. Furthermore, BM-MSCs induced positive changes in serum bilirubin and albumin and downregulated expression of integrins (600- to 7000-fold), transforming growth factor, and procollagen-α1 compared with the control group. Interestingly, both injection routes ameliorated inflammation and liver cirrhosis scores. All mice in treatment groups had reduced inflammation scores and no cirrhosis. In conclusion, transplantation of BM-MSCs via tail or portal veins ameliorates liver cirrhosis in mice. Notably, there were no differences in treatment effects between tail and portal vein administrations. In consideration of safety, we suggest transfusion of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells via a peripheral vein as a potential method for liver fibrosis treatment. PMID:26839564

  15. Beneficial effect of a weight-stable, low-fat/low-saturated fat/low-glycaemic index diet to reduce liver fat in older subjects.

    PubMed

    Utzschneider, Kristina M; Bayer-Carter, Jennifer L; Arbuckle, Matthew D; Tidwell, Jaime M; Richards, Todd L; Craft, Suzanne

    2013-03-28

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia and can progress to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. We sought to determine whether dietary fat and saturated fat content alter liver fat in the absence of weight change in an older population. Liver fat was quantified by magnetic resonance spectroscopy before and after 4 weeks on an isoenergetic low-fat/low-saturated fat/low-glycaemic index (LGI) (LSAT: 23 % fat/7 % saturated fat/GI < 55) or a high-fat/high-saturated fat/high-GI (HSAT: 43 % fat/24 % saturated fat/GI>70) diet in older subjects. In the present study, twenty subjects (seven males/thirteen females; age 69.3 (SEM 1.6) years, BMI 26.9 (SEM 0.8) kg/m2) were randomised to the LSAT diet and fifteen subjects (six males/nine females; age 68.6 (SEM 1.8) years, BMI 28.1 (SEM 0.9) kg/m2) to the HSAT diet. Weight remained stable. Liver fat decreased significantly on the LSAT diet (median 2.2 (interquartile range (IQR) 3.1) to 1.7 (IQR 1.8) %, P= 0.002) but did not change on the HSAT diet (median 1.2 (IQR 4.1) to 1.6 (IQR 3.9) %). The LSAT diet lowered fasting glucose and total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol and raised TAG (P< 0.05), while the HSAT diet had no effect on glucose or HDL-cholesterol but increased total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol (P< 0.05). Fasting insulin and homeostasis model of insulin resistance did not change significantly on either diet, but the Matsuda index of insulin sensitivity improved on the LSAT diet (P< 0.05). Assignment to the LSAT v. HSAT diet was a predictor of changes in lipid parameters but not liver fat. We conclude that diet composition may be an important factor in the accumulation of liver fat, with a low-fat/low-saturated fat/LGI diet being beneficial. PMID:22849970

  16. Beneficial effect of a weight-stable, low-fat/low-saturated fat/low-glycaemic index diet to reduce liver fat in older subjects

    PubMed Central

    Utzschneider, Kristina M.; Bayer-Carter, Jennifer L.; Arbuckle, Matthew D.; Tidwell, Jaime M.; Richards, Todd L.; Craft, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is associated with insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia and can progress to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. We sought to determine whether dietary fat and saturated fat content alter liver fat in the absence of weight change in an older population. Liver fat was quantified by magnetic resonance spectroscopy before and after 4 weeks on an isoenergetic low-fat/low-saturated fat/low-glycaemic index (LGI) (LSAT: 23% fat/7% saturated fat/GI < 55) or a high-fat/high-saturated fat/high-GI (HSAT: 43% fat/24% saturated fat/GI > 70) diet in older subjects. In the present study, twenty subjects (seven males/thirteen females; age 69·3 (sem 1·6) years, BMI 26·9 (sem 0·8) kg/m2) were randomised to the LSAT diet and fifteen subjects (six males/nine females; age 68·6 (sem 1·8) years, BMI 28·1 (sem 0·9) kg/m2) to the HSAT diet. Weight remained stable. Liver fat decreased significantly on the LSAT diet (median 2·2 (interquartile range (IQR) 3·1) to 1·7 (IQR 1·8) %, P=0·002) but did not change on the HSAT diet (median 1·2 (IQR 4·1) to 1·6 (IQR 3·9) %). The LSAT diet lowered fasting glucose and total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol and raised TAG (P<0·05), while the HSAT diet had no effect on glucose or HDL-cholesterol but increased total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol (P<0·05). Fasting insulin and homeostasis model of insulin resistance did not change significantly on either diet, but the Matsuda index of insulin sensitivity improved on the LSAT diet (P<0·05). Assignment to the LSAT ν. HSAT diet was a predictor of changes in lipid parameters but not liver fat. We conclude that diet composition may be an important factor in the accumulation of liver fat, with a low-fat/low-saturated fat/LGI diet being beneficial. PMID:22849970

  17. Carbamazepine suppresses calpain-mediated autophagy impairment after ischemia/reperfusion in mouse livers

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae-Sung Wang, Jin-Hee Biel, Thomas G. Kim, Do-Sung Flores-Toro, Joseph A. Vijayvargiya, Richa Zendejas, Ivan Behrns, Kevin E.

    2013-12-15

    Onset of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) plays a causative role in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Current therapeutic strategies for reducing reperfusion injury remain disappointing. Autophagy is a lysosome-mediated, catabolic process that timely eliminates abnormal or damaged cellular constituents and organelles such as dysfunctional mitochondria. I/R induces calcium overloading and calpain activation, leading to degradation of key autophagy-related proteins (Atg). Carbamazepine (CBZ), an FDA-approved anticonvulsant drug, has recently been reported to increase autophagy. We investigated the effects of CBZ on hepatic I/R injury. Hepatocytes and livers from male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to simulated in vitro, as well as in vivo I/R, respectively. Cell death, intracellular calcium, calpain activity, changes in autophagy-related proteins (Atg), autophagic flux, MPT and mitochondrial membrane potential after I/R were analyzed in the presence and absence of 20 μM CBZ. CBZ significantly increased hepatocyte viability after reperfusion. Confocal microscopy revealed that CBZ prevented calcium overloading, the onset of the MPT and mitochondrial depolarization. Immunoblotting and fluorometric analysis showed that CBZ blocked calpain activation, depletion of Atg7 and Beclin-1 and loss of autophagic flux after reperfusion. Intravital multiphoton imaging of anesthetized mice demonstrated that CBZ substantially reversed autophagic defects and mitochondrial dysfunction after I/R in vivo. In conclusion, CBZ prevents calcium overloading and calpain activation, which, in turn, suppresses Atg7 and Beclin-1 depletion, defective autophagy, onset of the MPT and cell death after I/R. - Highlights: • A mechanism of carbamazepine (CBZ)-induced cytoprotection in livers is proposed. • Impaired autophagy is a key event contributing to lethal reperfusion injury. • The importance of autophagy is extended and confirmed in an in vivo model. • CBZ is a potential

  18. Chronic Intake of Japanese Sake Mediates Radiation-Induced Metabolic Alterations in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Tetsuo; Vares, Guillaume; Wang, Bing; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Sake is a traditional Japanese alcoholic beverage that is gaining popularity worldwide. Although sake is reported to have beneficial health effects, it is not known whether chronic sake consumption modulates health risks due to radiation exposure or other factors. Here, the effects of chronic administration of sake on radiation-induced metabolic alterations in the livers of mice were evaluated. Sake (junmai-shu) was administered daily to female mice (C3H/He) for one month, and the mice were exposed to fractionated doses of X-rays (0.75 Gy/day) for the last four days of the sake administration period. For comparative analysis, a group of mice were administered 15% (v/v) ethanol in water instead of sake. Metabolites in the liver were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry one day following the last exposure to radiation. The metabolite profiles of mice chronically administered sake in combination with radiation showed marked changes in purine, pyrimidine, and glutathione (GSH) metabolism, which were only partially altered by radiation or sake administration alone. Notably, the changes in GSH metabolism were not observed in mice treated with radiation following chronic administration of 15% ethanol in water. Changes in several metabolites, including methionine and valine, were induced by radiation alone, but were not detected in the livers of mice who received chronic administration of sake. In addition, the chronic administration of sake increased the level of serum triglycerides, although radiation exposure suppressed this increase. Taken together, the present findings suggest that chronic sake consumption promotes GSH metabolism and anti-oxidative activities in the liver, and thereby may contribute to minimizing the adverse effects associated with radiation. PMID:26752639

  19. Activity of mouse liver glutathione S-transferases toward trans,trans-muconaldehyde and trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal.

    PubMed

    Goon, D; Saxena, M; Awasthi, Y C; Ross, D

    1993-04-01

    This study investigated the catalytic activities of hepatic glutathione S-transferase (GST) isoenzymes isolated from CD-1 mice toward two activated alkenals of toxicological relevance: trans,trans-muconaldehyde (MA), a putative myelotoxic metabolite of benzene, and trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), a highly reactive lipid peroxidation product. The activity toward 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) was also determined. Four isoenzymes with pI values of 9.8, 8.7, 6.4, and 5.7 were each isolated from male and female mice. The isoenzymes with pI values of 8.7 and 6.4 are pi and mu class GSTs, respectively, whereas the pI 9.8 and 5.7 GSTs are both alpha class isoenzymes. CDNB activity was greatest in the pi (pI 8.7) isoenzyme of both sexes. In addition, the CDNB activity of the pi (pI 8.7) isoenzyme from males was markedly greater than the corresponding GST from female mouse liver. In contrast to CDNB, both MA and HNE were better substrates for the acidic alpha (pI 5.7) and mu (pI 6.4) GSTs, whereas minimal activity toward either alkenal was detected in the pi (pI 8.7) and alpha (pI 9.8) isoenzymes. Maximum activity toward MA and HNE was exhibited by the alpha (pI 5.7) isoenzyme of both sexes. The level of HNE activity observed with the alpha (pI 5.7) isoenzyme was five- to sixfold greater than that reported previously for any mouse GST isoenzyme. Moreover, the specific activities of the female alpha (pI 5.7) isoenzyme toward both HNE and MA were markedly greater than those of the corresponding isoenzyme from males. A similar gender-specific difference was noted in the activity of the mu (pI 6.4) isoenzyme toward HNE, but not toward MA. These results show that both MA and HNE are substrates for the alpha (pI 5.7) and mu (pI 6.4) GSTs of murine liver, with maximum activity toward both activated alkenals exhibited by the alpha (pI 5.7) isozyme. In addition, evidence is presented that demonstrates a female-dominant sex difference in the activity of the alpha (pI 5

  20. Stimulation of DNA synthesis in rat and mouse liver by various tumor promoters.

    PubMed

    Büsser, M T; Lutz, W K

    1987-10-01

    In order to investigate whether the stimulation of liver DNA synthesis might be used to detect one class of hepatic tumor promoters, the incorporation of orally administered radiolabelled thymidine into liver DNA was determined in rats and mice 24 h after a single oral gavage of test compounds at various dose levels. Three DNA-binding hepatocarcinogens, aflatoxin B1, benzidine and carbon tetrachloride, did not stimulate but rather inhibited DNA synthesis (not for CCl4). Four hepatic tumor promoters, clofibrate, DDT, phenobarbital and thioacetamide, gave rise to a stimulation in a dose-dependent manner. Single oral doses between 0.02 and 0.3 mmol/kg were required to double the level of thymidine incorporation into liver DNA (= doubling dose, DD). Differences between species or sex as observed in long-term carcinogenicity studies were reflected by a different stimulation of liver DNA synthesis. In agreement with the bioassay data, aldrin was positive only in male mice (DD = 0.007 mmol/kg) but not in male rats of female mice. 2,3,7,8-TCDD was positive in male mice (DD = 10(-6) mmol/kg) and in female rats (DD = 2 X 10(-6) mmol/kg) but not in male rats. The assay was also able to distinguish between structural isomers with different carcinogenicities. [alpha]Hexachlorocyclohexane stimulated liver DNA synthesis with a doubling dose of about 0.2 mmol/kg in male rats whereas the [gamma]-isomer was ineffective even at 1 mmol/kg. So far, only one result was inconsistent with carcinogenicity bioassay data. The different carcinogenicity of di(2-ethylhexyl)adipate (negative in rats) and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (positive) was not detectable. Both plasticizers were positive in this short-term system with DD's of 0.7 mmol/kg for DEHA and 0.5 mmol/kg for DEHP. The proposed assay is discussed as an attempt to devise short-term assays for carcinogens not detected by the routine genotoxicity test systems. PMID:2443263

  1. RNA-Seq reveals common and unique PXR- and CAR-target gene signatures in the mouse liver transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Cui, Julia Yue; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2016-09-01

    entire hepatic transcriptome correlated with a marked change in the expression of many DNA and histone epigenetic modifiers. In conclusion, the present study has revealed known and novel, as well as common and unique targets of PXR and CAR in mouse liver following pharmacological activation using their prototypical ligands. Results from this study will further support the role of these receptors in regulating the homeostasis of xenobiotic and intermediary metabolism in the liver, and aid in distinguishing between PXR and CAR signaling at various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie. PMID:27113289

  2. MiR-152 May Silence Translation of CaMK II and Induce Spontaneous Immune Tolerance in Mouse Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingcheng; Yan, Sheng; Zhou, Lin; Xie, Haiyang; Chen, Hui; Li, Hui; Zhang, Jinhua; Zhao, Jiacong; Zheng, Shusen

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous immune tolerance in mouse liver transplantation has always been a hotspot in transplantation-immune research. Recent studies revealed that regulatory T cells (Tregs), hepatic satellite cells and Kupffer cells play a potential role in spontaneous immune tolerance, however the precise mechanism of spontaneous immune tolerance is still undefined. By using Microarray Chips, we investigated different immune regulatory factors to decipher critical mechanisms of spontaneous tolerance after mouse liver transplantation. Allogeneic (C57BL/6-C3H) and syngeneic (C3H-C3H) liver transplantation were performed by 6-8 weeks old male C57BL/6 and C3H mice. Graft samples (N = 4 each group) were collected from 8 weeks post-operation mice. 11 differentially expressed miRNAs in allogeneic grafts (Allografts) vs. syngeneic grafts (Syngrafts) were identified using Agilent Mouse miRNA Chips. It was revealed that 185 genes were modified by the 11 miRNAs, furthermore, within the 185 target genes, 11 of them were tightly correlated with immune regulation after Gene Ontology (GO), Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis and Genbank data cross-comparison. Verified by real-time PCR and western blot, our results indicated that mRNA expression levels of IL-6 and TAB2 were respectively down regulated following miR-142-3p and miR-155 augment. In addition, increased miR-152 just silenced mRNA of CaMK II and down-regulated translation of CaMK II in tolerated liver grafts, which may play a critical role in immune regulation and spontaneous tolerance induction of mouse liver transplantation. PMID:25133393

  3. Heat-killed bacteria induce genome instability in mouse small intestine, liver and spleen tissues.

    PubMed

    Koturbash, Igor; Thomas, James E; Kovalchuk, Olga; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2009-06-15

    Bacterial infection has been associated with several malignancies, yet the exact mechanism of infection-associated carcinogenesis remains obscure. Furthermore, it is still not clear whether oncontransformation requires an active infection process, or merely the presence of inactivated bacteria remnants is enough to cause deleterious effects. Here, we analyzed whether or not consumption of non-pathogenic and pathogenic heat-killed Escherichia coli leads to changes in genome stability in somatic tissues of exposed animals. For one week, mice were given to drink filtered or not-filtered water contaminated with heat-killed non-pathogenic E. coli DH5alpha or heat-killed pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 Sakai. Control animals received tap water. One week after exposure, molecular changes were analyzed in the small intestine, an organ that is in immediate contact with contaminated water. Additionally, we studied the effect in the distant spleen and liver, the organs that are involved in an immune response and detoxification, respectively. Finally, muscles were chosen as neutral tissues that were not supposed to be affected. Intestinal, liver and spleen but not muscle cells responded to all bacterial treatments with an increased level of DNA damage monitored by the induction of gammaH2AX foci. In the intestine, elevated levels of DNA damage were in parallel with an increase in Ku70 and p53 expression. We have also found an elevated level of cellular proliferation in the intestine, liver and spleen but not in muscle tissues of all exposed animals as measured by increase in PCNA levels. Our data suggest that exposure to heat-killed filtered bacteria can trigger substantial molecular responses and cause genomic instability in target and distant organs. Even though bacteria were non-pathogenic and unable to cause infection, their remnants still caused a profound effect on exposed animals. PMID:19440049

  4. Carbon tetrachloride-mediated lipid peroxidation induces early mitochondrial alterations in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Knockaert, Laetitia; Berson, Alain; Ribault, Catherine; Prost, Pierre-Emmanuel; Fautrel, Alain; Pajaud, Julie; Lepage, Sylvie; Lucas-Clerc, Catherine; Bégué, Jean-Marc; Fromenty, Bernard; Robin, Marie-Anne

    2012-03-01

    Although carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4))-induced acute and chronic hepatotoxicity have been extensively studied, little is known about the very early in vivo effects of this organic solvent on oxidative stress and mitochondrial function. In this study, mice were treated with CCl(4) (1.5 ml/kg ie 2.38 g/kg) and parameters related to liver damage, lipid peroxidation, stress/defense and mitochondria were studied 3 h later. Some CCl(4)-intoxicated mice were also pretreated with the cytochrome P450 2E1 inhibitor diethyldithiocarbamate or the antioxidants Trolox C and dehydroepiandrosterone. CCl(4) induced a moderate elevation of aminotransferases, swelling of centrilobular hepatocytes, lipid peroxidation, reduction of cytochrome P4502E1 mRNA levels and a massive increase in mRNA expression of heme oxygenase-1 and heat shock protein 70. Moreover, CCl(4) intoxication induced a severe decrease of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV activity, mitochondrial DNA depletion and damage as well as ultrastructural alterations. Whereas DDTC totally or partially prevented all these hepatic toxic events, both antioxidants protected only against liver lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial damage. Taken together, our results suggest that lipid peroxidation is primarily implicated in CCl(4)-induced early mitochondrial injury. However, lipid peroxidation-independent mechanisms seem to be involved in CCl(4)-induced early hepatocyte swelling and changes in expression of stress/defense-related genes. Antioxidant therapy may not be an efficient strategy to block early liver damage after CCl(4) intoxication. PMID:22157718

  5. Dual Mode Action of Mangiferin in Mouse Liver under High Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jihyeon; Liu, Zhongbo; Apontes, Pasha; Feng, Daorong; Pessin, Jeffrey E.; Sauve, Anthony A.; Angeletti, Ruth H.; Chi, Yuling

    2014-01-01

    Chronic over-nutrition is a major contributor to the spread of obesity and its related metabolic disorders. Development of therapeutics has been slow compared to the speedy increase in occurrence of these metabolic disorders. We have identified a natural compound, mangiferin (MGF) (a predominant component of the plants of Anemarrhena asphodeloides and Mangifera indica), that can protect against high fat diet (HFD) induced obesity, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance and hyperlipidemia in mice. However, the molecular mechanisms whereby MGF exerts these beneficial effects are unknown. To understand MGF mechanisms of action, we performed unbiased quantitative proteomic analysis of protein profiles in liver of mice fed with HFD utilizing 15N metabolically labeled liver proteins as internal standards. We found that out of 865 quantified proteins 87 of them were significantly differentially regulated by MGF. Among those 87 proteins, 50% of them are involved in two major processes, energy metabolism and biosynthesis of metabolites. Further classification indicated that MGF increased proteins important for mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative activity including oxoglutarate dehydrogenase E1 (Dhtkd1) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit 6B1 (Cox6b1). Conversely, MGF reduced proteins critical for lipogenesis such as fatty acid stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (Scd1) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (Acac1). These mass spectrometry data were confirmed and validated by western blot assays. Together, data indicate that MGF upregulates proteins pivotal for mitochondrial bioenergetics and downregulates proteins controlling de novo lipogenesis. This novel mode of dual pharmacodynamic actions enables MGF to enhance energy expenditure and inhibit lipogenesis, and thereby correct HFD induced liver steatosis and prevent adiposity. This provides a molecular basis supporting development of MGF or its metabolites into therapeutics to treat metabolic disorders. PMID:24598864

  6. Sexual Dimorphism in the Control of Amebic Liver Abscess in a Mouse Model of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lotter, Hannelore; Jacobs, Thomas; Gaworski, Iris; Tannich, Egbert

    2006-01-01

    Amebic liver abscess (ALA) is the most common extraintestinal manifestation of human infection by the enteric protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. In contrast to intestinal infection, ALA greatly predominates in males but is rare in females. Since humans are the only relevant host for E. histolytica, experimental studies concerning this sexual dimorphism have been hampered by the lack of a suitable animal model. By serial liver passage of cultured E. histolytica trophozoites in gerbils and mice, we generated amebae which reproducibly induce ALA in C57BL/6 mice. Interestingly, all animals developed ALA, but the time courses of abscess formation differed significantly between the genders. Female mice were able to clear the infection within 3 days, whereas in male mice the parasite could be recovered for at least 14 days. Accordingly, male mice showed a prolonged time of recovery from ALA. Immunohistology of abscesses revealed that polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages were the dominant infiltrates, but in addition, γ,δ-T cells, NK cells, and natural killer T (NKT) cells were also present at early times during abscess development, whereas conventional α,β-T cells appeared later, when female mice had already cleared the parasite. Interestingly, male and female mice differed in early cytokine production in response to ameba infection. Enzyme-linked immunospot assays performed with spleen cells of infected animals revealed significantly higher numbers of interleukin-4-producing cells in male mice but significantly higher numbers of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells in female mice. Early IFN-γ production and the presence of functional NKT cells were found to be important for the control of hepatic amebiasis as application of an IFN-γ-neutralizing monoclonal antibody or the use of NKT knockout mice (Vα14iNKT, Jα 18−/−) dramatically increased the size of ALA in female mice. In addition, E. histolytica trophozoites could be reisolated from

  7. Sexual dimorphism in the control of amebic liver abscess in a mouse model of disease.

    PubMed

    Lotter, Hannelore; Jacobs, Thomas; Gaworski, Iris; Tannich, Egbert

    2006-01-01

    Amebic liver abscess (ALA) is the most common extraintestinal manifestation of human infection by the enteric protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. In contrast to intestinal infection, ALA greatly predominates in males but is rare in females. Since humans are the only relevant host for E. histolytica, experimental studies concerning this sexual dimorphism have been hampered by the lack of a suitable animal model. By serial liver passage of cultured E. histolytica trophozoites in gerbils and mice, we generated amebae which reproducibly induce ALA in C57BL/6 mice. Interestingly, all animals developed ALA, but the time courses of abscess formation differed significantly between the genders. Female mice were able to clear the infection within 3 days, whereas in male mice the parasite could be recovered for at least 14 days. Accordingly, male mice showed a prolonged time of recovery from ALA. Immunohistology of abscesses revealed that polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages were the dominant infiltrates, but in addition, gamma,delta-T cells, NK cells, and natural killer T (NKT) cells were also present at early times during abscess development, whereas conventional alpha,beta-T cells appeared later, when female mice had already cleared the parasite. Interestingly, male and female mice differed in early cytokine production in response to ameba infection. Enzyme-linked immunospot assays performed with spleen cells of infected animals revealed significantly higher numbers of interleukin-4-producing cells in male mice but significantly higher numbers of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-producing cells in female mice. Early IFN-gamma production and the presence of functional NKT cells were found to be important for the control of hepatic amebiasis as application of an IFN-gamma-neutralizing monoclonal antibody or the use of NKT knockout mice (Valpha14iNKT, Jalpha 18(-/-)) dramatically increased the size of ALA in female mice. In addition, E. histolytica trophozoites

  8. Effect of several analogs of 2,4,6-triphenyldioxane-1,3 on CYP2B induction in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Pustylnyak, Vladimir; Kazakova, Yuliya; Yarushkin, Andrei; Slynko, Nikolai; Gulyaeva, Lyudmila

    2011-11-15

    2,4,6-Triphenyldioxane-1,3 (TPD) is a highly effective inducer of CYP2В in rats, but not in mice. Several analogs of TPD were synthesized. All substituents were entered into the same position of TPD (R=H, cisTPD and transTPD; R=N(CH(3))(2), transpDMA; R=NO(2), transpNO(2); R=F, transpF; R=OCH(3), transpMeO). The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of TPD analogs on CYP2B induction in mouse livers. Among the six test compounds, four (R=-N(CH(3))(2), -NO(2), -F, -OCH(3)) demonstrated a dose-dependent induction of mouse CYP2B. To further characterize the compounds, we determined ED50s using sigmoidal dose-response curves. The dose-response study has shown that all active compounds have similar potencies to induce CYP2B in mouse livers. Western-blot analysis and multiplex RT-PCR have shown that the increase of CYP2B activity in mouse liver is related to the high content of CYP2B proteins and paralleled the increase of cyp2b10 mRNA level. ChIP results have demonstrated that the transcriptional enhancement of cyp2b10 gene in response to compounds is accompanied by the increased recruitment of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) to its specific binding site (PBREM) on the target gene. Thus, minor structural changes in TPD cause dramatic changes in its ability to induce mouse CYP2B, and it is likely several TPD analogs act by activation of mouse CAR. PMID:21982821

  9. Combined effects of social stress and liver fluke infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Avgustinovich, Damira F; Marenina, Mariya K; Zhanaeva, Svetlana Ya; Tenditnik, Mikhail V; Katokhin, Alexey V; Pavlov, Konstantin S; Sivkov, Anton Yu; Vishnivetskaya, Galina B; Lvova, Maria N; Tolstikova, Tatiana G; Mordvinov, Viatcheslav A

    2016-03-01

    The effects of two influences, social stress and acute opisthorchiasis, were investigated in inbred C57BL/6J male mice. In the model of social stress, mice were repeatedly attacked and defeated by aggressive outbred ICR male mice and were in continuous sensory contact with an aggressive conspecific mouse in their home cage for 20 days. Acute opisthorchiasis was provoked by invasion of Opisthorchis felineus (50 larvae per animal) on the fourth day after the social stress was induced. Simultaneous action of both factors caused the hypertrophy of adrenal glands, as well as elevated the activity of cathepsins B and L in the spleen. This effect on the activity of the cysteine proteases in the hippocampus and hypothalamus following O. felineus invasion was the predominant result of simultaneous action with social stress. Acute opisthorchiasis, social stress, and their combination caused an increase in the level of blood IL-6 in approximately 30% of the animals. Social stress induced a more pronounced effect on mouse plus-maze behavior than O. felineus invasion. Our results suggest a more severe negative effect of the simultaneous influence of both factors on most of the parameters that were investigated. PMID:26778779

  10. Glucocorticoid receptor-PPARα axis in fetal mouse liver prepares neonates for milk lipid catabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rando, Gianpaolo; Tan, Chek Kun; Khaled, Nourhène; Montagner, Alexandra; Leuenberger, Nicolas; Bertrand-Michel, Justine; Paramalingam, Eeswari; Guillou, Hervé; Wahli, Walter

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, hepatic lipid catabolism is essential for the newborns to efficiently use milk fat as an energy source. However, it is unclear how this critical trait is acquired and regulated. We demonstrate that under the control of PPARα, the genes required for lipid catabolism are transcribed before birth so that the neonatal liver has a prompt capacity to extract energy from milk upon suckling. The mechanism involves a fetal glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-PPARα axis in which GR directly regulates the transcriptional activation of PPARα by binding to its promoter. Certain PPARα target genes such as Fgf21 remain repressed in the fetal liver and become PPARα responsive after birth following an epigenetic switch triggered by β-hydroxybutyrate-mediated inhibition of HDAC3. This study identifies an endocrine developmental axis in which fetal GR primes the activity of PPARα in anticipation of the sudden shifts in postnatal nutrient source and metabolic demands. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11853.001 PMID:27367842

  11. Glutamine inhibits CCl4 induced liver fibrosis in mice and TGF-β1 mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition in mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Nirajan; Chand, Lokendra; Han, Myung Kwan; Lee, Seung Ok; Kim, Chan Young; Jeong, Yeon Jun

    2016-07-01

    Glutamine, traditionally a non-essential amino acid, now has been considered as essential in serious illness and injury. It is a major precursor for glutathione synthesis. However, the anti-fibrotic effect of glutamine and its molecular mechanism in experimental liver fibrosis have not been explored. In the present study we aimed to examine the potential role of glutamine in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced liver fibrosis and TGF-β1 mediated epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) and apoptosis in mouse hepatocytes. Liver fibrosis was induced by intraperitoneal injection of CCl4 three times a week for 10 weeks. Glutamine treatment effectively attenuated liver injury and oxidative stress. Collagen content was significantly decreased in liver sections of glutamine treated mice compared to CCl4 model mice. Furthermore, glutamine decreased expression level of α-SMA and TGF-β in liver tissue. Our in vitro study showed that TGF-β1 treatment in hepatocytes resulted in loss of E-cadherin and increased expression of mesenchymal markers and EMT related transcription factor. In addition, TGF-β1 increased the expression of apoptotic markers. However, glutamine interestingly suppressed TGF-β1 mediated EMT and apoptosis. In conclusion, our results suggest that glutamine ameliorates CCl4 induced liver fibrosis and suppresses TGF-β1 induced EMT progression and apoptosis. PMID:27137983

  12. Protoporphyrinogen oxidase: high affinity tetrahydrophthalimide radioligand for the inhibitor/herbicide-binding site in mouse liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Birchfield, N B; Casida, J E

    1996-01-01

    Protoporphyrinogen oxidase (protox), the last common enzyme in heme and chlorophyll biosynthesis, is the target of several classes of herbicides acting as inhibitors in both plants and mammals. N-(4-Chloro-2-fluoro-5-(propargyloxy)phenyl)-3,4,5,6-tetrahydro phthalimide (a potent protox inhibitor referred to as THP) was synthesized as a candidate radioligand ([3H]-THP) by selective catalytic reduction of 3,6-dihydrophthalic anhydride (DHPA) with tritium gas followed by condensation in 45% yield with 4-chloro-2-fluoro-5-(propargyloxy)aniline. Insertion of tritium at the 3 and 6 carbons of DHPA as well as the expected 4 and 5 carbons resulted in high specific activity [3H]THP (92 Ci/mmol). This radioligand undergoes rapid, specific, saturable, and reversible binding to the inhibitor/herbicide binding site of the protox component of cholate-solubilized mouse liver mitochondria with an apparent Kd of 0.41 nM and Bmax of 0.40 pmol/mg of protein. In the standard assay, mouse preparation (150 micrograms of protein) and [3H]THP (0.5 nM) are incubated in 500 microL of phosphate buffer at pH 7.2 for 15 min at 25 degrees C followed by addition of ammonium sulfate and filtration with glass fiber filters. The potencies of five nitrodiphenyl ethers and two other herbicides as inhibitors of [3H]THP binding correlate well with those for inhibition of protox activity (r2 = 0.97, n = 7), thus validating the binding assay as relevant to enzyme inhibition. It is also suitable to determine in vivo block as illustrated by an approximately 50% decrease in [3H]THP binding in liver mitochondria from mice treated ip with oxyfluorfen at 4 mg/kg. This is the first report of a binding assay for protox in mammals. The high affinity and specific activity of [3H]THP facilitate quantitation of protox and therefore research on a sensitive inhibition site for porphyrin biosynthesis. PMID:8902268

  13. Regulation of Multidrug Resistance-Associated Protein 2 by Calcium Signaling in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Laura N.; Guerra, Mateus T.; Kruglov, Emma; Mennone, Albert; Garcia, Celia R. S.; Chen, Ju; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein 2 (Mrp2) is a canalicular transporter responsible for organic anion secretion into bile. Mrp2 activity is regulated by insertion into the plasma membrane; however, the factors that control this are not understood. Calcium (Ca2+) signaling regulates exocytosis of vesicles in most cell types, and the type II inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (InsP3R2) regulates Ca2+ release in the canalicular region of hepatocytes. However, the role of InsP3R2 and of Ca2+ signals in canalicular insertion and function of Mrp2 is not known. The aim of this study was to determine the role of InsP3R2-mediated Ca2+ signals in targeting Mrp2 to the canalicular membrane. Livers, isolated hepatocytes, and hepatocytes in collagen sandwich culture from wild-type (WT) and InsP3R2 knockout (KO) mice were used for western blots, confocal immunofluorescence, and time-lapse imaging of Ca2+ signals and of secretion of a fluorescent organic anion. Plasma membrane insertion of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-Mrp2 expressed in HepG2 cells was monitored by total internal reflection microscopy. InsP3R2 was concentrated in the canalicular region of WT mice but absent in InsP3R2 KO livers, whereas expression and localization of InsP3R1 was preserved, and InsP3R3 was absent from both WT and KO livers. Ca2+ signals induced by either adenosine triphosphate (ATP) or vasopressin were impaired in hepatocytes lacking InsP3R2. Canalicular secretion of the organic anion 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA) was reduced in KO hepatocytes, as well as in WT hepatocytes treated with 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA). Moreover, the choleretic effect of tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) was impaired in InsP3R2 KO mice. Finally, ATP increased GFP-Mrp2 fluorescence in the plasma membrane of HepG2 cells, and this also was reduced by BAPTA. Conclusion InsP3R2-mediated Ca2+ signals enhance organic anion secretion into bile by targeting Mrp2 to

  14. Glutamate Cysteine Ligase—Modulatory Subunit Knockout Mouse Shows Normal Insulin Sensitivity but Reduced Liver Glycogen Storage

    PubMed Central

    Lavoie, Suzie; Steullet, Pascal; Kulak, Anita; Preitner, Frederic; Do, Kim Q.; Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) deficits have been observed in several mental or degenerative illness, and so has the metabolic syndrome. The impact of a decreased glucose metabolism on the GSH system is well-known, but the effect of decreased GSH levels on the energy metabolism is unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the sensitivity to insulin in the mouse knockout (KO) for the modulatory subunit of the glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLM), the rate-limiting enzyme of GSH synthesis. Compared to wildtype (WT) mice, GCLM-KO mice presented with reduced basal plasma glucose and insulin levels. During an insulin tolerance test, GCLM-KO mice showed a normal fall in glycemia, indicating normal insulin secretion. However, during the recovery phase, plasma glucose levels remained lower for longer in KO mice despite normal plasma glucagon levels. This is consistent with a normal counterregulatory hormonal response but impaired mobilization of glucose from endogenous stores. Following a resident-intruder stress, during which stress hormones mobilize glucose from hepatic glycogen stores, KO mice showed a lower hyperglycemic level despite higher plasma cortisol levels when compared to WT mice. The lower hepatic glycogen levels observed in GCLM-KO mice could explain the impaired glycogen mobilization following induced hypoglycemia. Altogether, our results indicate that reduced liver glycogen availability, as observed in GCLM-KO mice, could be at the origin of their lower basal and challenged glycemia. Further studies will be necessary to understand how a GSH deficit, typically observed in GCLM-KO mice, leads to a deficit in liver glycogen storage. PMID:27148080

  15. Evaluation of viral and mammalian promoters for driving transgene expression in mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Dosari, Mohammed; Zhang Guisheng; Knapp, Joseph E.; Liu Dexi . E-mail: dliu@pitt.edu

    2006-01-13

    Fifteen luciferase plasmid constructs driven by various promoters including cytomegalovirus (CMV), Rous sarcoma virus (RSV), human serum albumin (SA), {alpha}-1 antitrypsin (AAT), cytochrome P450 CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C18, CYP2D6, CYP3A4, mouse CYP2b10, human amyloid precursor protein (APP), chicken {beta} actin (ACT), nuclear factor {kappa} B (NF{kappa}B), and heat shock protein 70 (HS) promoters were hydrodynamically introduced into mouse hepatocytes, and the level and persistence of luciferase gene expression were examined. Eight hours post-gene transfer, the CMV and AAT promoters showed the highest activity, followed by the CYP2D6, HS, and RSV promoters which were slightly less active. The human serum albumin promoter exhibited the lowest activity among the promoters examined. The time course of gene expression showed a two-phase decline in luciferase activity with a rapid phase within First 5-7 days and a slower decline thereafter. Results from Southern and Northern blot analyses revealed a good correlation between the decline of luciferase activity and the decrease in mRNA level, suggesting promoter silencing as the possible mechanism for the observed transient luciferase gene expression. Inclusion of EBN1 and oriP sequences of Epstein-Barr virus into the plasmid extended the period of active transcription for about one week. These results provide important information concerning the role of promoters in regulating transgene expression and for the proper design of plasmids for gene expression and gene therapy.

  16. In vitro metabolism of norbormide in rat, mouse and guinea pig liver preparations.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Shanthinie; Hopkins, Brian; Bova, Sergio; Rennison, David; Brimble, Margaret; Tingle, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    Differences between species in response to norbormide (NRB) may arise through differential pharmacodynamic and/or pharmacokinetic properties. We hypothesise that species-selectivity is at least partly determined by differences in metabolism based on in vitro data generated in liver preparations from rats, mice and guinea pigs. HPLC separation and LC/MS identification revealed that NRB undergoes metabolism primarily to hydroxylated form that was tentatively identified in both rat and non-rat species with NADPH as the preferred cofactor. However, the metabolic profile and the rate are different between species. Gender differences are also reported in the metabolic rate in rats and we postulate that this may be responsible for different toxic sensitivities seen between sexes. Using this knowledge, we aim to develop pharmacological tool(s) for use in designing a new class of drugs that can be targeted in a tissue-selective manner. Further in vivo pharmacokinetic with receptor affinity studies are warranted. PMID:21783932

  17. Dysregulation of hepatic zinc transporters in a mouse model of alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qian; Li, Qiong; Zhong, Wei; Zhang, Jiayang; Sun, Xiuhua; Tan, Xiaobing; Yin, Xinmin; Sun, Xinguo; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Zinc deficiency is a consistent phenomenon observed in patients with alcoholic liver disease, but the mechanisms have not been well defined. The objective of this study was to determine if alcohol alters hepatic zinc transporters in association with reduction of hepatic zinc levels and if oxidative stress mediates the alterations of zinc transporters. C57BL/6 mice were pair-fed with the Lieber-DeCarli control or ethanol diets for 2, 4, or 8 wk. Chronic alcohol exposure reduced hepatic zinc levels, but increased plasma and urine zinc levels, at all time points. Hepatic zinc finger proteins, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF-4α), were downregulated in ethanol-fed mice. Four hepatic zinc transporter proteins showed significant alterations in ethanol-fed mice compared with the controls. ZIP5 and ZIP14 proteins were downregulated, while ZIP7 and ZnT7 proteins were upregulated, by ethanol exposure at all time points. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that chronic ethanol exposure upregulated cytochrome P-450 2E1 and caused 4-hydroxynonenal accumulation in the liver. For the in vitro study, murine FL-83B hepatocytes were treated with 5 μM 4-hydroxynonenal or 100 μM hydrogen peroxide for 72 h. The results from in vitro studies demonstrated that 4-hydroxynonenal treatment altered ZIP5 and ZIP7 protein abundance, and hydrogen peroxide treatment changed ZIP7, ZIP14, and ZnT7 protein abundance. These results suggest that chronic ethanol exposure alters hepatic zinc transporters via oxidative stress, which might account for ethanol-induced hepatic zinc deficiency. PMID:24924749

  18. Soft-hydrothermal processing of red cedar bedding reduces its induction of cytochrome P450 in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Okano, S; Yoshinari, K; Miyamoto, T; Yamazoe, Y; Shinya, K; Ioku, K; Kasai, N

    2009-04-01

    Red cedar-derived bedding materials cause changes in cytochrome P450-dependent microsomal enzyme systems in laboratory animals. We examined the effect of essential oil of red cedar (EORC), as well as the effect of bedding from which it had been removed, on the hepatic expression cytochrome P450s in mice. EORC was obtained from liquid extracts of red cedar bedding by a soft-hydrothermal process and was administered orally to mice. Between days 1 and 2 after administration, hepatic P450s were significantly induced as follows: CYP3As, 7.1x; CYP1As, 1.6x; CYP2E1, 1.5x; CYP2Cs, 1.6x. A housing study of mice indicated that red cedar bedding increased the levels of these P450s in mouse liver, whereas mice housed in cedar bedding from which EORC had been removed (ST-cedar bedding) showed significantly lower levels of P450s, especially CYP3As, CYP1As and CYP2E1. Soft-hydrothermal processing partially removed many components of EORC. In particular, several volatile sesquiterpenes, naphthalene-derived aromatics and 4,4-dimethyl-13alpha-androst-5-ene were decreased in the ST-cedar bedding, suggesting that these may be responsible for P450 induction. This study demonstrated that the removal of these volatile compounds by soft-hydrothermal processing can decrease the hepatic P450-inducing effect of red cedar bedding. PMID:19116287

  19. Mouse Fetal Liver Culture System to Dissect Target Gene Functions at the Early and Late Stages of Terminal Erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Baobing; Mei, Yang; Yang, Jing; Ji, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Erythropoiesis involves a dynamic process that begins with committed erythroid burst forming units (BFU-Es) followed by rapidly dividing erythroid colony forming units (CFU-Es). After CFU-Es, cells are morphologically recognizable and generally termed terminal erythroblasts. One of the challenges for the study of terminal erythropoiesis is the lack of experimental approaches to dissect gene functions in a chronological manner. In this protocol, we describe a unique strategy to determine gene functions in the early and late stages of terminal erythropoiesis. In this system, mouse fetal liver TER119 (mature erythroid cell marker) negative erythroblasts were purified and transduced with exogenous expression of cDNAs or small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) for the genes of interest. The cells were subsequently cultured in medium containing growth factors other than erythropoietin (Epo) to maintain their progenitor stage for 12 hr while allowing the exogenous cDNAs or shRNAs to express. The cells were changed to Epo medium after 12 hr to induce cell differentiation and proliferation while the exogenous genetic materials were already expressed. This protocol facilitates analysis of gene functions in the early stage of terminal erythropoiesis. To study late stage terminal erythropoiesis, cells were immediately cultured in Epo medium after transduction. In this way, the cells were already differentiated to the late stage of terminal erythropoiesis when the transduced genetic materials were expressed. We recommend a general application of this strategy that would help understand detailed gene functions in different stages of terminal erythropoiesis. PMID:25225899

  20. Liver spots

    MedlinePlus

    Sun-induced skin changes - liver spots; Senile or solar lentigines; Skin spots - aging; Age spots ... Liver spots are changes in skin color that occur in older skin. The coloring may be due to aging, exposure to the sun or other sources of ...

  1. Transplacental arsenic plus postnatal 12-O-teradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate exposures associated with hepatocarcinogenesis induce similar aberrant gene expression patterns in male and female mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jie . E-mail: Liu6@niehs.nih.gov; Xie Yaxiong; Merrick, B. Alex; Shen Jun; Ducharme, Danica M.K.; Collins, Jennifer; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Logsdon, Daniel; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2006-06-15

    Our prior work shows that in utero arsenic exposure alone is a complete transplacental carcinogen, producing hepatocellular carcinoma in adult male offspring but not in females. In a follow-up study to potentially promote arsenic-initiated tumors, mice were exposed to arsenic (85 ppm) from gestation day 8 to 18 and then exposed to 12-O-teradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a well-known tumor promoter after weaning. The dermal application of TPA (2 {mu}g/0.1 ml acetone, twice/week for 21 weeks) after transplacental arsenic did not further increase arsenic-induced liver tumor formation in adult males but significantly increased liver tumor formation in adult females. Thus, for comparison, liver tumors and normal liver samples taken from adult male and female mice at necropsy were analyzed for aberrant gene/protein expression by microarray, real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Arsenic/TPA treatment resulted in increased expression of {alpha}-fetoprotein, k-ras, c-myc, estrogen receptor-{alpha}, cyclin D1, cdk2na, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, cytokeratin-8, cytokeratin-18, glutathione S-transferases and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in liver and liver tumors from both male and female mice. Arsenic/TPA also decreased the expression of BRCA1, betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase, CYP7B1, CYP2F2 and insulin-like growth factor-1 in normal and cancerous livers. Alterations in these gene products were associated with arsenic/TPA-induced liver tumors, regardless of sex. Thus, transplacental arsenic plus postnatal TPA exposure induced similar aberrant gene expression patterns in male and female mouse liver, which are persistent and potentially important to the mechanism of arsenic initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis.

  2. Metabolism of trans, trans-muconaldehyde, a cytotoxic metabolite of benzene, in mouse liver by alcohol dehydrogenase Adh1 and aldehyde reductase AKR1A4

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Duncan M.; Lyon, Robert; Watson, David G.; Barski, Oleg A.; McGarvie, Gail; Ellis, Elizabeth M. . E-mail: Elizabeth.ellis@strath.ac.uk

    2006-01-15

    The reductive metabolism of trans, trans-muconaldehyde, a cytotoxic metabolite of benzene, was studied in mouse liver. Using an HPLC-based stopped assay, the primary reduced metabolite was identified as 6-hydroxy-trans, trans-2,4-hexadienal (OH/CHO) and the secondary metabolite as 1,6-dihydroxy-trans, trans-2,4-hexadiene (OH/OH). The main enzymes responsible for the highest levels of reductase activity towards trans, trans-muconaldehyde were purified from mouse liver soluble fraction first by Q-sepharose chromatography followed by either blue or red dye affinity chromatography. In mouse liver, trans, trans-muconaldehyde is predominantly reduced by an NADH-dependent enzyme, which was identified as alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh1). Kinetic constants obtained for trans, trans-muconaldehyde with the native Adh1 enzyme showed a V {sub max} of 2141 {+-} 500 nmol/min/mg and a K {sub m} of 11 {+-} 4 {mu}M. This enzyme was inhibited by pyrazole with a K {sub I} of 3.1 {+-} 0.57 {mu}M. Other fractions were found to contain muconaldehyde reductase activity independent of Adh1, and one enzyme was identified as the NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase AKR1A4. This showed a V {sub max} of 115 nmol/min/mg and a K {sub m} of 15 {+-} 2 {mu}M and was not inhibited by pyrazole.

  3. Comparative Metabolomic and Genomic Analyses of TCDD-Elicited Metabolic Disruption in Mouse and Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Forgacs, Agnes L.; Kent, Michael N.; Makley, Meghan K.; Mets, Bryan; DelRaso, Nicholas; Jahns, Gary L.; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Zacharewski, Timothy R.; Reo, Nicholas V.

    2012-01-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) elicits a broad spectrum of species-specific effects that have not yet been fully characterized. This study compares the temporal effects of TCDD on hepatic aqueous and lipid metabolite extracts from immature ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice and Sprague-Dawley rats using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance–based metabolomic approaches and integrates published gene expression data to identify species-specific pathways affected by treatment. TCDD elicited metabolite and gene expression changes associated with lipid metabolism and transport, choline metabolism, bile acid metabolism, glycolysis, and glycerophospholipid metabolism. Lipid metabolism is altered in mice resulting in increased hepatic triacylglycerol as well as mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acid (FA) levels. Mouse-specific changes included the induction of CD36 and other cell surface receptors as well as lipases- and FA-binding proteins consistent with hepatic triglyceride and FA accumulation. In contrast, there was minimal hepatic fat accumulation in rats and decreased CD36 expression. However, choline metabolism was altered in rats, as indicated by decreases in betaine and increases in phosphocholine with the concomitant induction of betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase and choline kinase gene expression. Results from these studies show that aryl hydrocarbon receptor–mediated differential gene expression could be linked to metabolite changes and species-specific alterations of biochemical pathways. PMID:21964420

  4. Bisphenol S Interacts with Catalase and Induces Oxidative Stress in Mouse Liver and Renal Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Liu, Rutao; Zong, Wansong

    2016-08-31

    Bisphenol S (BPS) is present in multitudinous consumer products and detected in both food and water. It also has been a main substitute for bisphenol A (BPA) in the food-packaging industry. Yet, the toxicity of BPS is not fully understood. The present study of the toxicity of BPS was divided into two parts. First, oxidative stress, cell viability, apoptosis level, and catalase (CAT) activity in mouse hepatocytes and renal cells were investigated after BPS exposure. After 12 h of incubation with BPS, all of these parameters of hepatocytes and renal cells changed by >15% as the concentration of BPS ranged from 0.1 to 1 mM. Second, the direct interaction between BPS and CAT on the molecule level was investigated by multiple spectral methods and molecular docking investigations. BPS changed the structure and the activity of CAT through binding to the Gly 117 residue on the substrate channel of the enzyme. The main binding forces were hydrogen bond and hydrophobic force. PMID:27508457

  5. Cordyceps sinensis prevents apoptosis in mouse liver with D-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide-induced fulminant hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Jung; Cheng, Shiu-Min; Teng, Yi-Hsien; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Lee, Shin-Da

    2014-01-01

    Cordyceps sinensis (C. sinensis) has long been considered to be an herbal medicine and has been used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases. The present study examined the cytoprotective properties of C. sinensis on D(+)-galactosamine (GalN)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fulminant hepatic failure. Mice were randomly assigned into control, GalN/LPS, CS 20 mg and CS 40 mg groups (C. sinensis, oral gavage, five days/week, four weeks). After receiving saline or C. sinensis, mice were intraperitoneally given GalN (800 mg/kg)/LPS (10 μg/kg). The effects of C. sinensis on TNF-α, IL-10, AST, NO, SOD, and apoptoticrelated proteins after the onset of endotoxin intoxication were determined. Data demonstrated that GalN/LPS increased hepatocyte degeneration, circulating AST, TNF-α, IL-10, and hepatic apoptosis and caspase activity. C. sinensis pre-treatment reduced AST, TNF-α, and NO and increased IL-10 and SOD in GalN/LPS induced fulminant hepatic failure. C. sinensis attenuated the apoptosis of hepatocytes, as evidenced by the TUNEL and capase-3, 6 activity analyses. In summary, C. sinensis alleviates GalN/LPS-induced liver injury by modulating the cytokine response and inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:24707872

  6. Lichen acids as uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation of mouse-liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Abo-Khatwa, A N; al-Robai, A A; al-Jawhari, D A

    1996-01-01

    Three lichen acids-namely, (+)usnic acid, vulpinic acid, and atranorin-were isolated from three lichen species (Usnea articulata, Letharia vulpina, and Parmelia tinctorum, respectively). The effects of these lichen products on mice-liver mitochondrial oxidative functions in various respiratory states and on oxidative phosphorylation were studied polarographically in vitro. The lichen acids exhibited characteristics of the 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), a classical uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation. Thus, they released respiratory control and oligomycin inhibited respiration, hindered ATP synthesis, and enhanced Mg(+2)-ATPase activity. (+)Usnic acid at a concentration of 0.75 microM inhibited ADP/O ratio by 50%, caused maximal stimulation of both state-4 respiration (100%) and ATPase activity (300%). Atranorin was the only lichen acid with no significant effect on ATPase. The uncoupling effect was dose-dependent in all cases. The minimal concentrations required to cause complete uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation were as follows: (+)usnic acid (1 microM), vulpinic acid, atranorin (5 microM) and DNP (50 microM). It was postulated that the three lichen acids induce uncoupling by acting on the inner mitochondrial membrane through their lipophilic properties and protonophoric activities. PMID:8726330

  7. Unique functions of Gata4 in mouse liver induction and heart development.

    PubMed

    Borok, Matthew J; Papaioannou, Virginia E; Sussel, Lori

    2016-02-15

    Gata4 and Gata6 are closely related transcription factors that are essential for the development of a number of embryonic tissues. While they have nearly identical DNA-binding domains and similar patterns of expression, Gata4 and Gata6 null embryos have strikingly different embryonic lethal phenotypes. To determine whether the lack of redundancy is due to differences in protein function or Gata4 and Gata6 expression domains, we generated mice that contained the Gata6 cDNA in place of the Gata4 genomic locus. Gata4(Gata6/Gata6) embryos survived through embryonic day (E)12.5 and successfully underwent ventral folding morphogenesis, demonstrating that Gata6 is able to replace Gata4 function in extraembryonic tissues. Surprisingly, Gata6 is unable to replace Gata4 function in the septum transversum mesenchyme or the epicardium, leading to liver agenesis and lethal heart defects in Gata4(Gata6/Gata6) embryos. These studies suggest that Gata4 has evolved distinct functions in the development of these tissues that cannot be performed by Gata6, even when it is provided in the identical expression domain. Our work has important implications for the respective mechanisms of Gata function during development, as well as the functional evolution of these essential transcription factors. PMID:26687508

  8. Liver X Receptors (LXRs) Alpha and Beta Play Distinct Roles in the Mouse Epididymis.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, Marjorie; Ouvrier, Aurélia; Cadet, Rémi; Damon-Soubeyrand, Christelle; Guiton, Rachel; Janny, Laurent; Kocer, Ayhan; Marceau, Geoffroy; Pons-Rejraji, Hanae; Trousson, Amalia; Drevet, Joël R; Saez, Fabrice

    2016-03-01

    After its production in the testis, a spermatozoon has to undergo posttesticular maturation steps to become fully motile and fertile. The first step is epididymal maturation, during which immature spermatozoa are transformed into biochemically mature cells ready to proceed to the next step, capacitation, a physiological process occurring in the female genital tract. The biochemical transformations include modification of sperm lipid composition during epididymal transit, with significant changes in fatty acids, phospholipids, and sterols between the caput and the cauda epididymal spermatozoa. Although quantitative aspects of these changes are well documented for several mammalian species, molecular mechanisms governing these steps are poorly understood. Transgenic male mice invalidated for the two liver X receptors (LXRalpha and LXRbeta, nuclear oxysterol receptors regulating cholesterol and lipid metabolism) become sterile when aging, showing an epididymal phenotype. We used single-knockout-model mice to characterize the role of each LXR isoform during sperm maturation in the epididymis. We show here that although a certain redundancy exists in the functions of the two LXR isoforms, some physiological processes are more under the influence of only one of them. In both cases, aging males showed slight subfertility, associated with dyslipidemia, emphasizing the importance of lipid metabolism in relation with male fertility. PMID:26792941

  9. Rapamycin and dietary restriction induce metabolically distinctive changes in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhen; Wang, Rong; Fok, Wilson C; Coles, Alexander; Salmon, Adam B; Pérez, Viviana I

    2015-04-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) is the gold standard intervention used to delay aging, and much recent research has focused on the identification of possible DR mimetics. Energy sensing pathways, including insulin/IGF1 signaling, sirtuins, and mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR), have been proposed as pathways involved in the antiaging actions of DR, and compounds that affect these pathways have been suggested to act as DR mimetics, including metformin (insulin/IGF1 signaling), resveratrol (sirtuins), and rapamycin (mTOR). Rapamycin is a promising DR mimetic because it significantly increases both health span and life span in mice. Unfortunately, rapamycin also leads to some negative effects, foremost among which is the induction of insulin resistance, potentially limiting its translation into humans. To begin clarifying the mechanism(s) involved in insulin resistance induced by rapamycin, we compared several aspects of liver metabolism in mice treated with DR or rapamycin for 6 months. Our data suggest that although both DR and rapamycin inhibit lipogenesis, activate lipolysis, and increased serum levels of nonesterified fatty acids, only DR further activates β-oxidation of the fatty acids leading to the production of ketone bodies. PMID:24755936

  10. Ketogenic diet delays the phase of circadian rhythms and does not affect AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Genzer, Yoni; Dadon, Maayan; Burg, Chen; Chapnik, Nava; Froy, Oren

    2015-12-01

    Ketogenic diet (KD) is used for weight loss or to treat epilepsy. KD leads to liver AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, which would be expected to inhibit gluconeogenesis. However, KD leads to increased hepatic glucose output. As AMPK and its active phosphorylated form (pAMPK) show circadian oscillation, this discrepancy could stem from wrong-time-of-day sampling. The effect of KD was tested on mouse clock gene expression, AMPK, mTOR, SIRT1 and locomotor activity for 2 months and compared to low-fat diet (LFD). KD led to 1.5-fold increased levels of blood glucose and insulin. Brain pAMPK/AMPK ratio was 40% higher under KD, whereas that in liver was not affected. KD led to 40% and 20% down-regulation of the ratio of pP70S6K/P70S6K, the downstream target of mTOR, in the brain and liver, respectively. SIRT1 levels were 40% higher in the brain, but 40% lower in the liver of KD-fed mice. Clock genes showed delayed rhythms under KD. In the brain of KD-fed mice, amplitudes of clock genes were down-regulated, whereas 6-fold up-regulation was found in the liver. The metabolic state under KD indicates reduced satiety in the brain and reduced anabolism alongside increased gluconeogenesis in the liver. PMID:26408964