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Sample records for oleamide suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced

  1. p-Cresyl sulfate suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced anti-bacterial immune responses in murine macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Takahiro; Makino, Ikuyo; Kawakami, Koji; Kato, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Kaneko, Kimiyuki

    2016-03-14

    p-Cresyl sulfate (pCS) is a known uremic toxin that is metabolized from p-cresol produced by intestinal bacteria. Abnormal accumulation of pCS in the blood is a characteristic of chronic kidney disease (CKD). pCS is suggested to cause immune dysfunction and increase the risk of infectious diseases in CKD patients. In this study, we focused on the effects of pCS on macrophage functions related to host defense. We evaluated the effects of pCS on cytokine production, nitric oxide (NO) production, arginase activity, expression of cell-surface molecules, and phagocytosis in the macrophage-like cell line, RAW264.7. pCS significantly decreased interleukin (IL)-12 p40 production and increased IL-10 production. pCS also decreased NO production, but did not influence arginase activity. pCS suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced CD40 expression on the cell surface, but did not influence phagocytosis. We further assessed whether the effects of pCS observed in the macrophage-like cell line were consistent in primary macrophages. Similar to RAW264.7 cells, pCS decreased IL-12 p40 and p70 production and increased IL-10 production in primary peritoneal macrophages. These data indicate that pCS suppresses certain macrophage functions that contribute to host defense, and may play a role in CKD-related immune dysfunction. PMID:26784855

  2. IFN-τ Alleviates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation by Suppressing NF-κB and MAPKs Pathway Activation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haichong; Zhao, Gan; Jiang, Kangfeng; Chen, Xiuying; Rui, Guangze; Qiu, Changwei; Guo, Mengyao; Deng, Ganzhen

    2016-06-01

    IFN-τ, which is a type I interferon with low cytotoxicity, is defined as a pregnancy recognition signal in ruminants. Type I interferons have been used as anti-inflammatory agents, but their side effects limit their clinical application. The present study aimed to determine the anti-inflammatory effects of IFN-τ in a lipopolysaccharide-stimulated acute lung injury (ALI) model and in RAW264.7 cells and to confirm the mechanism of action involved. The methods used included histopathology, measuring the lung wet/dry ratio, determining the myeloperoxidase activity, ELISA, qPCR, and western blot. The results revealed that IFN-τ greatly ameliorated the infiltration of inflammatory cells and the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6. Further analysis revealed that IFN-τ down-regulated the expression of TLR-2 and TLR-4 mRNA and the activity of the NF-κB and MAPK pathways both in a lipopolysaccharide-induced ALI model and in RAW264.7 cells. The results demonstrated that IFN-τ suppressed the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines by inhibiting the phosphorylation of the NF-κB and MAPK pathways. Thus, IFN-τ may be an optimal target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:27052630

  3. Peripheral and central mediators of lipopolysaccharide induced suppression of defensive rage behavior in the cat.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, S; Bhatt, R S; Zalcman, S S; Siegel, A

    2009-11-10

    Based upon recent findings in our laboratory that cytokines microinjected into the medial hypothalamus or periaqueductal gray (PAG) powerfully modulate defensive rage behavior in cat, the present study determined the effects of peripherally released cytokines following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge upon defensive rage. The study involved initial identification of the effects of peripheral administration of LPS upon defensive rage by electrical stimulation from PAG and subsequent determination of the peripheral and central mechanisms governing this process. The results revealed significant elevation in response latencies for defensive rage from 60 to 300 min, post LPS injection, with no detectable signs of sickness behavior present at 60 min. In contrast, head turning behavior elicited by stimulation of adjoining midbrain sites was not affected by LPS administration, suggesting a specificity of the effects of LPS upon defensive rage. Direct administration of LPS into the medial hypothalamus had no effect on defensive rage, suggesting that the effects of LPS were mediated by peripheral cytokines rather than by any direct actions upon hypothalamic neurons. Complete blockade of the suppressive effects of LPS by peripheral pretreatment with an Anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) antibody but not with an anti- interleukin-1 (IL-1) antibody demonstrated that the effects of LPS were mediated through TNF-alpha rather than through an IL-1 mechanism. A determination of the central mechanisms governing LPS suppression revealed that pretreatment of the medial hypothalamus with PGE(2) or 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonists each completely blocked the suppressive effects of LPS, while microinjections of a TNF-alpha antibody into the medial hypothalamus were ineffective. Microinjections of -Iodo-N-[2-[4-(methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-(2-pyridinyl) benzamide monohydrochloride (p-MPPI) into lateral hypothalamus (to test for anatomical specificity) had no effect upon

  4. Prenylated Flavonoids from Cudrania tricuspidata Suppress Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Neuroinflammatory Activities in BV2 Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Cheol; Yoon, Chi-Su; Quang, Tran Hong; Ko, Wonmin; Kim, Jong-Su; Oh, Hyuncheol; Kim, Youn-Chul

    2016-01-01

    In Korea and China, Cudrania tricuspidata Bureau (Moraceae) is an important traditional medicinal plant used to treat lumbago, hemoptysis, and contusions. The C. tricuspidata methanol extract suppressed both production of NO and PGE2 in BV2 microglial cells. Cudraflavanone D (1), isolated from this extract, remarkably suppressed the protein expression of inducible NO synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, and decreased the levels of NO and PGE2 in BV2 microglial cells exposed to lipopolysaccharide. Cudraflavanone D (1) also decreased IL-6, TNF-α, IL-12, and IL-1β production, blocked nuclear translocation of NF-κB heterodimers (p50 and p65) by interrupting the degradation and phosphorylation of inhibitor of IκB-α, and inhibited NF-κB binding. In addition, cudraflavanone D (1) suppressed the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK pathways. This study indicated that cudraflavanone D (1) can be a potential drug candidate for the cure of neuroinflammation. PMID:26907256

  5. Prenylated Flavonoids from Cudrania tricuspidata Suppress Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Neuroinflammatory Activities in BV2 Microglial Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Cheol; Yoon, Chi-Su; Quang, Tran Hong; Ko, Wonmin; Kim, Jong-Su; Oh, Hyuncheol; Kim, Youn-Chul

    2016-01-01

    In Korea and China, Cudrania tricuspidata Bureau (Moraceae) is an important traditional medicinal plant used to treat lumbago, hemoptysis, and contusions. The C. tricuspidata methanol extract suppressed both production of NO and PGE₂ in BV2 microglial cells. Cudraflavanone D (1), isolated from this extract, remarkably suppressed the protein expression of inducible NO synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, and decreased the levels of NO and PGE₂ in BV2 microglial cells exposed to lipopolysaccharide. Cudraflavanone D (1) also decreased IL-6, TNF-α, IL-12, and IL-1β production, blocked nuclear translocation of NF-κB heterodimers (p50 and p65) by interrupting the degradation and phosphorylation of inhibitor of IκB-α, and inhibited NF-κB binding. In addition, cudraflavanone D (1) suppressed the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK pathways. This study indicated that cudraflavanone D (1) can be a potential drug candidate for the cure of neuroinflammation. PMID:26907256

  6. Deer Bone Oil Extract Suppresses Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Responses in RAW264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyeon-Son; Im, Suji; Park, Yooheon; Hong, Ki-Bae; Suh, Hyung Joo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of deer bone oil extract (DBOE) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in RAW264.7 cells. DBOE was fractionated by liquid-liquid extraction to obtain two fractions: methanol fraction (DBO-M) and hexane fraction (DBO-H). TLC showed that DBO-M had relatively more hydrophilic lipid complexes, including unsaturated fatty acids, than DBOE and DBO-H. The relative compositions of tetradecenoyl carnitine, α-linoleic acid, and palmitoleic acid increased in the DBO-M fraction by 61, 38, and 32%, respectively, compared with DBOE. The concentration of sugar moieties was 3-fold higher in the DBO-M fraction than DBOE and DBO-H. DBO-M significantly decreased LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. This DBO-M-mediated decrease in NO production was due to downregulation of mRNA and protein levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In addition, mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as cyclooxygenase (COX-2), interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-12β, was suppressed by DBO-M. Our data showed that DBO-M, which has relatively higher sugar content than DBOE and DBO-H, could play an important role in suppressing inflammatory responses by controlling pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators. PMID:27040632

  7. GADD34 suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis and tissue injury through the regulation of macrophage activation.

    PubMed

    Ito, S; Tanaka, Y; Oshino, R; Okado, S; Hori, M; Isobe, K-I

    2016-01-01

    Growth arrest and DNA damage inducible protein 34 (GADD34) is induced by various cellular stresses, such as DNA damage, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and amino-acid deprivation. Although the major roles of GADD34 are regulating ER stress responses and apoptosis, a recent study suggested that GADD34 is linked to innate immune responses. In this report, we investigated the roles of GADD34 in inflammatory responses against bacterial infection. To explore the effects of GADD34 on systemic inflammation in vivo, we employed a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced murine sepsis model and assessed the lethality, serum cytokine levels, and tissue injury in the presence or absence of GADD34. We found that GADD34 deficiency increased the lethality and serum cytokine levels in LPS-induced sepsis. Moreover, GADD34 deficiency enhanced tissue destruction, cell death, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in LPS-induced acute liver injury. Pro-inflammatory cytokine production after LPS stimulation is regulated by the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway. In vitro experiments revealed that GADD34 suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine production by macrophages through dephosphorylation of IKKβ. In conclusion, GADD34 attenuates LPS-induced sepsis and acute tissue injury through suppressing macrophage activation. Targeting this anti-inflammatory role of GADD34 may be a promising area for the development of therapeutic agents to regulate inflammatory disorders. PMID:27171261

  8. A tetramethoxychalcone from Chloranthus henryi suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in BV2 microglia.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Si-Yu; Wang, Li-Jun; Zhang, Qiu-Yan; Xu, Peng; Pan, Li-Long; Hu, Jin-Feng

    2016-03-01

    Neuroinflammation underlies the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative diseases. 2׳-hydroxy-4,3׳,4׳,6׳-tetramethoxychalcone (HTMC) is a known chalcone derivative isolated from Chloranthus henryi with anti-inflammatory activities in BV2 macrophages. However, its pharmacological effects on microglial cells have not been demonstrated. To this end, we examined the effects of HTMC on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in BV2 microglial cells. HTMC concentration-dependently inhibited LPS-induced expression of inflammatory enzymes including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide (NO) production, and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6. In addition, HTMC inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by reducing NADPH oxidase (Nox) 2 and Nox4 expression. In addition, HTMC interfered LPS-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK) phosphorylation in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. By inhibiting phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Jun, HTMC suppressed LPS-induced activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation. Taken together, our data indicate that HTMC suppresses inflammatory responses in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells by modulating JNK-AP-1 and NADPH oxidases-ROS pathways. HTMC represents a promising therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative and related aging-associated diseases. PMID:26852953

  9. Paeonol suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory cytokines in macrophage cells and protects mice from lethal endotoxin shock.

    PubMed

    Chen, Na; Liu, Dianfeng; Soromou, Lanan Wassy; Sun, Jingjing; Zhong, Weiting; Guo, Weixiao; Huo, Meixia; Li, Hongyu; Guan, Shuang; Chen, Zhenwen; Feng, Haihua

    2014-06-01

    Paeonol (2'-hydroxy-4'-methoxyacetophenone) is the main phenolic compound of the radix of Paeonia suffruticosa which has been used as traditional Chinese medicine. In this study, we primarily investigated the anti-inflammatory effects and the underlying mechanisms of paeonol in RAW macrophage cells; and based on these effects, we assessed the protective effects of paeonol on lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia in mice. The in vitro study showed that paeonol regulated the production of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 via inactivation of IκBα, ERK1/2, JNK, and p38 MAPK. In mouse model of lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia, pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines are significantly regulated, and thus the survival rates of lipolysaccharide-challenged mice are improved by paeonol (150, 200, or 250 mg/kg). Therefore, paeonol has a beneficial activity against lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in RAW 264.7 cell and mouse models. PMID:23413967

  10. Papaverine inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced microglial activation by suppressing NF-κB signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Yalong; Mu, Yalin; Wang, Kun; Xu, Ke; Yang, Jing; Zhu, Yu; Luo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of papaverine (PAP) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglial activation and its possible mechanisms. Materials and methods BV2 microglial cells were first pretreated with PAP (0, 0.4, 2, 10, and 50 μg/mL) and then received LPS stimulation. Transcription and production of proinflammatory factors (IL1β, TNFα, iNOS, and COX-2) were used to evaluate microglial activation. The transcriptional changes undergone by M1/M2a/M2b markers were used to evaluate phenotype transformation of BV2 cells. Immunofluorescent staining and Western blot were used to detect the location and expression of P65 and p-IKK in the presence or absence of PAP pretreatment. Results Pretreatment with PAP significantly inhibited the expression of IL1β and TNFα, and suppressed the transcription of M1/M2b markers Il1rn, Socs3, Nos2 and Ptgs2, but upregulated the transcription of M2a markers (Arg1 and Mrc1) in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, PAP pretreatment significantly decreased the expression of p-IKK and inhibited the nuclear translocation of P65 after LPS stimulation. Conclusion PAP not only suppressed the LPS-induced microglial activity by inhibiting transcription/production of proinflammatory factors, but also promoted the transformation of activated BV2 cells from cytotoxic phenotypes (M1/M2b) to a neuroprotective phenotype (M2a). These effects were probably mediated by NF-κB signaling pathway. Thus, it would be a promising candidate for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27013863

  11. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Intervention Suppresses Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation and Weight Loss in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying-Hua; Li, Xiang-Yong; Chen, Chih-Yu; Zhang, Hong-Man; Kang, Jing X.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sepsis is a critical medical condition, characterized by a severe systemic inflammation and rapid loss of muscle mass. Preventive and therapeutic strategies for this complex disease are still lacking. Here, we evaluated the effect of omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intervention on LPS-challenged mice with respect to inflammation, body weight and the expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathway components. LPS administration induced a dramatic loss of body weight within two days. Treatment with n-3 PUFA not only stopped loss of body weight but also gradually reversed it back to baseline levels within one week. Accordingly, the animals treated with n-3 PUFA exhibited markedly lower levels of inflammatory cytokines or markers in plasma and tissues, as well as down-regulation of TLR4 pathway components compared to animals without n-3 PUFA treatment or those treated with omega-6 PUFA. Our data demonstrate that n-3 PUFA intervention can suppress LPS-induced inflammation and weight loss via, at least in part, down-regulation of pro-inflammatory targets of the TLR4 signaling pathway, and highlight the therapeutic potential of n-3 PUFA in the management of sepsis. PMID:25689565

  12. Armeniacae semen extract suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced expressions of cyclooxygenase [correction of cycloosygenase]-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase in mouse BV2 microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hyun-Kyung; Yang, Hye-Young; Lee, Taeck-Hyun; Shin, Min-Chul; Lee, Myoung-Hwa; Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Chang-Ju; Kim, Ok-Jin; Hong, Seon-Pyo; Cho, Sonhae

    2005-03-01

    Armeniacae semen is the seed of Prunus armeniaca L. var. ansu MAXIM which is classified into Rosaceae. In traditional oriental medicine, Armeniacae semen has been used for the treatment of pain and inflammatory diseases. In this study, the effect of Armeniacae semen extract on lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation was investigated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Western blot, prostaglandin E2 immunoassay, and nitric oxide detection on mouse BV2 microglial cells. In the present results, Armeniacae semen extract suppressed prostaglandin E2 synthesis and nitric oxide production by inhibiting the lipopolysaccharide-stimulated enhancement of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA expression in BV2 cells. These results show that Armeniacae semen exerts anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects probably by suppression of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase expressions. PMID:15744067

  13. Enhanced radiosensitization of p53 mutant cells by oleamide

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yoon-Jin; Chung, Da Yeon; Lee, Su-Jae; Ja Jhon, Gil; Lee, Yun-Sil . E-mail: yslee@kcch.re.kr

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Effect of oleamide, an endogenous fatty-acid primary amide, on tumor cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR) has never before been explored. Methods and Materials: NCI H460, human lung cancer cells, and human astrocytoma cell lines, U87 and U251, were used. The cytotoxicity of oleamide alone or in combination with IR was determined by clonogenic survival assay, and induction of apoptosis was estimated by FACS analysis. Protein expressions were confirmed by Western blotting, and immunofluorescence analysis of Bax by use of confocal microscopy was also performed. The combined effect of IR and oleamide to suppress tumor growth was studied by use of xenografts in the thighs of nude mice. Results: Oleamide in combination with IR had a synergistic effect that decreased clonogenic survival of lung-carcinoma cell lines and also sensitized xenografts in nude mice. Enhanced induction of apoptosis of the cells by the combined treatment was mediated by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which resulted in the activation of caspase-8, caspase-9, and caspase-3 accompanied by cytochrome c release and Bid cleavage. The synergistic effects of the combined treatment were more enhanced in p53 mutant cells than in p53 wild-type cells. In p53 wild-type cells, both oleamide and radiation induced Bax translocation to mitochondria. On the other hand, in p53 mutant cells, radiation alone slightly induced Bax translocation to mitochondria, whereas oleamide induced a larger translocation. Conclusions: Oleamide may exhibit synergistic radiosensitization in p53 mutant cells through p53-independent Bax translocation to mitochondria.

  14. Inhibition of sphingosine kinase prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced preterm birth and suppresses proinflammatory responses in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Vibhuti; Ashby, Charles R; Olgun, Nicole S; Sundaram, Sruthi; Salami, Oluwabukola; Munnangi, Swapna; Pekson, Ryan; Mahajan, Prathamesh; Reznik, Sandra E

    2015-03-01

    Premature delivery occurs in 12% of all births, and accounts for nearly half of long-term neurological morbidity, and 60% to 80% of perinatal mortality. Despite advances in obstetrics and neonatology, the rate of premature delivery has increased approximately 12% since 1990. The single most common cause of spontaneous preterm birth is infection. Several lines of evidence have demonstrated the role of endothelin-1 as both a constrictor of uterine myometrial smooth muscle and a proinflammatory mediator. Endothelin-1 activates the phospholipase C pathway, leading to activation of protein kinase C and, in turn, sphingosine kinase (SphK). The inhibition of SphK has been recently shown to control the proinflammatory response associated with sepsis. We show herein, for the first time, that SphK inhibition prevents inflammation-associated preterm birth in a murine model. Rescue of pups from premature abortion with an SphK inhibitor occurs by suppression of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor α, Il-1β, and Il-6 and attenuation of polymorphonuclear inflammatory cells into the placental labyrinth. Moreover, we postulate that inhibition of SphK leads to suppression of endothelin-converting enzyme-1 expression, indicating the presence of an endothelin-converting enzyme 1/endothelin 1-SphK positive feedback loop. This work introduces a novel approach for the control of infection-triggered preterm labor, a condition for which there is no effective treatment. PMID:25579843

  15. Plantamajoside ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury via suppressing NF-κB and MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haichong; Zhao, Gan; Jiang, Kangfeng; Chen, Xiuying; Zhu, Zhe; Qiu, Changwei; Li, Chengye; Deng, Ganzhen

    2016-06-01

    Despite developments in the knowledge and therapy of acute lung injury in recent decades, mortality remains high, and there is usually a lack of effective therapy. Plantamajoside, a major ingredient isolated from Plantago asiatica L. (Plantaginaceae), has been reported to have potent anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effect of plantamajoside on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice has not been investigated. The present study aimed to reveal the potential mechanism responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of plantamajoside on LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice and in RAW264.7 cells. The results of histopathological changes as well as the lung wet-to-dry ratio and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity showed that plantamajoside ameliorated the lung injury that was induced by LPS. qPCR and ELISA assays demonstrated that plantamajoside suppressed the production of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α in a dose-dependent manner. TLR4 is an important sensor in LPS infection. Molecular studies showed that the expression of TLR4 was inhibited by plantamajoside administration. Further study was conducted on nuclear factor (NF)-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) using pathways using western blots. The results showed that plantamajoside inhibited the phosphorylation of IκBα, p65, p38, JNK and ERK. All results indicated that plantamajoside has protective effect on LPS-induced ALI in mice and in RAW264.7 cells. Thus, plantamajoside may be a potential therapy for the treatment of pulmonary inflammation. PMID:27089391

  16. Enterococcus faecalis lipoteichoic acid suppresses Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-8 expression in human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Im, Jintaek; Baik, Jung Eun; Kim, Kyoung Whun; Kang, Seok-Seong; Jeon, Jun Ho; Park, Ok-Jin; Kim, Hyun Young; Kum, Kee-Yeon; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2015-08-01

    Periodontitis is caused by multi-bacterial infection and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Enterococcus faecalis are closely associated with inflammatory periodontal diseases. Although lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of A. actinomycetemcomitans (Aa.LPS) and lipoteichoic acid of E. faecalis (Ef.LTA) are considered to be major virulence factors evoking inflammatory responses, their combinatorial effect on the induction of chemokines has not been investigated. In this study, we investigated the interaction between Aa.LPS and Ef.LTA on IL-8 expression in human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells. Aa.LPS, but not Ef.LTA, substantially induced IL-8 expression at the protein and mRNA levels. Interestingly, Ef.LTA suppressed Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression without affecting the binding of Aa.LPS to Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Ef.LTA reduced Aa.LPS-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, including ERK, JNK and p38 kinase. Furthermore, Ef.LTA inhibited the Aa.LPS-induced transcriptional activities of the activating protein 1, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein and nuclear factor-kappa B transcription factors, all of which are known to regulate IL-8 gene expression. Ef.LTA augmented the expression of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-M (IRAK-M), a negative regulator of TLR intracellular signaling pathways, in the presence of Aa.LPS at both the mRNA and protein levels. Small interfering RNA silencing IRAK-M reversed the attenuation of Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression by Ef.LTA. Collectively, these results suggest that Ef.LTA down-regulates Aa.LPS-induced IL-8 expression in human PDL cells through up-regulation of the negative regulator IRAK-M. PMID:25840438

  17. Crocin Upregulates CX3CR1 Expression by Suppressing NF-κB/YY1 Signaling and Inhibiting Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Microglial Activation.

    PubMed

    Lv, Bochang; Huo, Fuquan; Zhu, Zhongqiao; Xu, Zhiguo; Dang, Xiaojie; Chen, Tao; Zhang, Ting; Yang, Xinguang

    2016-08-01

    Glaucoma is a group of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and optic nerve fibers. Microglial activation has been shown to be deleterious to RGCs and may participate in the progression of glaucoma. Crocin, one of the major active ingredients in saffron, has been found to inhibit microglial activation. However, the mechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether crocin can inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglial activation and to clarify the mechanisms involved. The influence of crocin on primary RGCs and LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells survival was determined by the MTT and lactate dehydrogenase assays, or by flow cytometry. BV2 cells were pretreated with various concentrations of crocin for 2 h followed by 1 μg/mL LPS stimulation. Microglial markers and pro-inflammatory mediators were assessed by real-time PCR, western blot and ELISA. Furthermore, CX3CR1 expression was detected and the underlying mechanism was examined. The concentrations of crocin ranged from 0.1 to 1 μM, and did not show any cytotoxicity in RGC and BV2 cells. After crocin pretreatment, the expression of microglial markers (CD11b and Iba-1) and pro-inflammatory mediators (iNOS, COX-2, IL-1β, and TNF-α) induced by LPS were significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, CX3CR1 expression was remarkably increased by crocin via the suppression of NF-κB/Yin Yang 1 (YY1) signaling in BV2 cells. In conclusion, crocin effectively suppresses microglial activation and upregulates CX3CR1 expression by suppressing NF-κB/YY1 signaling. PMID:27084772

  18. Zinc Carnosine Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Mediators by Suppressing NF-κb Activation in Raw 264.7 Macrophages, Independent of the MAPKs Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Theng Choon; Chan, Kok Meng; Sharif, Razinah

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling pathway in the anti-inflammatory effects of zinc carnosine (ZnC) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced RAW 264.7 cells. Cells were pretreated with ZnC (0-100 μM) for 2 h prior to the addition of LPS (1 μg/ml). Following 24 h of treatment, ZnC was found not to be cytotoxic to RAW 264.7 cells up to the concentration of 100 μM. Our current findings showed that ZnC did not protect RAW 264.7 cells from LPS-induced "respiratory burst". Significant increment in intracellular glutathione (GSH) level and reduction in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) concentration can only be observed in cell pretreated with high doses of ZnC only (50 and 100 μM for GSH and 100 μM only for TBARS). On the other hand, pretreatment of cells with ZnC was able to inhibit LPS-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 expression significantly. Furthermore, results from immunoblotting showed that ZnC was able to suppress nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation, and highest suppression can be observed at 100 μM of ZnC pretreatment. However, pretreatment of ZnC did not inhibit the early activation of MAPKs. In conclusion, pretreatment with ZnC was able to inhibit the expression of inflammatory mediators in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 cells, mainly via suppression of NF-κB activation, and is independent of the MAPKs signaling pathway. PMID:26749414

  19. (7R,8S)-Dehydrodiconiferyl Alcohol Suppresses Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Responses in BV2 Microglia by Inhibiting MAPK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Si-Yu; Xu, Peng; Luo, Xiao-Ling; Hu, Jin-Feng; Liu, Xin-Hua

    2016-07-01

    (7R,8S)-Dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (DDA), a lignan isolated from the dried stems of Clematis armandii, has been found to exert potential anti-inflammatory activity in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the effects and possible mechanisms of DDA on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated inflammatory response in murine BV2 microglia. Our results revealed that non-toxic concentrations (6.25-25 μM) of DDA markedly suppressed LPS-induced production of nitric oxide, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, and release of inflammatory factors, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 in a concentration dependent manner. In addition, DDA time- and concentration-dependently attenuated LPS-induced phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK), but not protein kinase B, p38, or extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Moreover, DDA significantly suppress LPS-mediated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation by inhibiting phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65. Collectively, our results demonstrated that DDA inhibited LPS-stimulated inflammatory response in BV2 cell, at least in part, through inhibition of NF-κB activation and modulation of JNK signaling. PMID:26961887

  20. Suppressive Effect on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Proinflammatory Mediators by Citrus aurantium L. in Macrophage RAW 264.7 Cells via NF-κB Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sang-Rim; Han, Dae-Yong; Park, Kwang-Il; Park, Hyeon-Soo; Cho, Yong-Bae; Lee, Hu-Jang; Lee, Won-Sup; Ryu, Chung Ho; Ha, Yeong Lae; Lee, Do Hoon; Kim, Jin A.; Kim, Gon-Sup

    2011-01-01

    Citrus fruits have been used as an edible fruit and a traditional medicine since ancient times. In particular, the peels of immature citrus fruits are used widely in traditional herbal medicine in Korea, as they are believed to contain bioactive components exerting anti-inflammatory activity. This study examined whether the crude methanol extract of Citrus aurantium L. (CME) has a suppressive effect on inducible enzymes and proinflammatory cytokines by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway in LPS-stimulated macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. The cells were pretreated with the indicated concentrations of CME (5, 10, 20, and 50 μg/mL) and then treated with LPS (1 μg/mL). The results showed that CME (10, 20, and 50 μg/mL) inhibited the LPS- (1 μg/mL) induced mRNA and protein expression of iNOS in macrophage Raw 264.7 cells. In addition, the expression of COX-2 was inhibited at the mRNA and protein levels by CME in a dose-dependent manner. The mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6, were markedly reduced by CME (10, 20, and 50 μg/mL). Moreover, CME clearly suppressed the nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunits, which was correlated with its inhibitory effect on I-κB phosphorylation. These results suggest that CME has anti-inflammatory properties by modulating the expression of COX-2, iNOS, and proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6, in macrophage RAW 264.7 cells via the NF-κB pathway. PMID:20953420

  1. A systemic defect in Toll-like receptor 4 signaling increases lipopolysaccharide-induced suppression of IL-2-dependent T-cell proliferation in COPD.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Jürgen; Chikosi, Sarah-Jane; Yanik, Sarah; Rupp, Jan; Jungck, David; Koch, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The susceptibility to bacterial infections is increased in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This promotes exacerbations. IL-2 triggers CD4(+)/Th1-cell proliferation, which is important for infection defense. Bacterial endotoxin (LPS) activates MyD88/IRAK and TRIF/IKKε/TBK1 pathways via Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) in Th1 cells. Systemic defects in TLR pathways in CD4(+)/Th1 cells cause an impairment of IL-2-dependent immune responses to bacterial infections in COPD. Peripheral blood CD4(+) T cells of never smokers, smokers without COPD, and smokers with COPD (each n = 10) were ex vivo activated towards Th1 and stimulated with LPS. IL-2, MyD88, and TRIF expression, and cell proliferation was analyzed by ELISA, quantitative RT-PCR, and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and trypan blue staining comparative among the cohorts. IL-2 release from activated T cells was increased in COPD vs. smokers and never smokers. LPS reduced IL-2 expression and T-cell proliferation. These effects were increased in COPD vs. never smokers and inversely correlated with FEV1 (%predicted). The MyD88/TRIF ratio was decreased in Th1 cells of COPD. The suppression of IL-2 by LPS was abolished by MyD88/IRAK blockade in never smokers but by TRIF/IKKε/TBK1 blockade in COPD. Moxifloxacin restored IL-2 expression and T-cell proliferation in the presence of LPS by blocking p38 MAPK. The increased IL-2 release from Th1 cells in COPD might contribute to airway inflammation in disease exacerbations. A switch from MyD88/IRAK to TRIF/IKKε/TBK1 signaling amplifies the suppression of IL-2-dependent proliferation of CD4(+) T cells by LPS in COPD. This molecular pathology is of systemic origin, might impair adaptive immune responses, and could explain the increased susceptibility to bacterial infections in COPD. Targeting TLR4-downstream signaling, for example, with moxifloxacin, might reduce exacerbation rates. PMID:26498252

  2. Pinocembrin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in Labeo rohita macrophages via the suppression of the NF-κB signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Giri, Sib Sankar; Sen, Shib Sankar; Sukumaran, Venkatachalam; Park, Se Chang

    2016-09-01

    Pinocembrin is a flavonoid that has been reported to exhibit various pharmacological and biological activities including antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory. To explore the anti-inflammatory activity of pinocembrin in a fish cell line, we investigated its ability to regulate the inflammatory mediators elevated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in Labeo rohita head-kidney (HK) macrophages. HK macrophages of L. rohita were treated with LPS (1 μg mL(-1)) in the presence or absence of pinocembrin. We examined the inhibitory effect of pinocembrin on LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production. The inhibitory effect of pinocembrin on nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was investigated by RT-PCR and western blot. The effect of pinocembrin on pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β)) and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was investigated by ELISA and RT-PCR. The phosphorylation of three mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) ERK, JNK, and p38 was analysed by western blot. Pinocembrin inhibited LPS-induced productions of NO and PGE2, and also markedly inhibited TNF-α, IL-1β, iNOS, and COX-2 production in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA expression levels decreased significantly, while IL-10 mRNA expression increased (P < 0.05) with pinocembrin pre-treatment. RT-PCR and western blot analysis showed that pinocembrin decreased both the mRNA and protein expression levels of LPS-induced iNOS and COX-2 in HK macrophages. Pinocembrin suppressed the phosphorylation of MAPK in LPS-stimulated HK macrophages. Further, pinocembrin significantly inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity via the attenuation of IκBα degradation. Taken together, pinocembrin reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, and IL-1β, by inhibiting NF-κB activation via the suppression of ERK and p38

  3. Yi Qi Qing Re Gao-containing serum inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced rat mesangial cell proliferation by suppressing the Wnt pathway and TGF-β1 expression

    PubMed Central

    YANG, LIPING; SUN, XUEYAN; ZHAN, YONGLI; LIU, HUIJIE; WEN, YUMIN; MAO, HUIMIN; DONG, XI; LI, PING

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Yi Qi Qing Re Gao-containing serum (YQ-S) on rat mesangial cell (MC) proliferation and to investigate the underlying mechanism. MCs were divided into the control, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated, YQ-S and fosinopril-containing serum (For-S) groups, and cultured for 48 h. An MTT assay was used to evaluate the proliferation of MCs. In addition, reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were conducted to detect the expression levels of Wnt4, β-catenin and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 in MCs. The results indicated that YQ-S inhibited LPS-induced MC proliferation. The Wnt4 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression levels were reduced in the YQ-S group (P<0.01 or P<0.05). Furthermore, the Wnt4, β-catenin and TGF-β1 protein expression levels were suppressed in the YQ-S group (P<0.01 or P<0.05). Therefore, YQ-S appears to inhibit MC proliferation, and its mechanism may involve the inhibition of the Wnt signaling pathway and downregulation of TGF-β1 expression. PMID:27073458

  4. Nrf2 regulates ferroportin 1-mediated iron efflux and counteracts lipopolysaccharide-induced ferroportin 1 mRNA suppression in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Harada, Nobuhiko; Kanayama, Masaya; Maruyama, Atsushi; Yoshida, Aruto; Tazumi, Kyoko; Hosoya, Tomonori; Mimura, Junsei; Toki, Tsutomu; Maher, Jonathan M; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Itoh, Ken

    2011-04-01

    Iron is an essential element of hemoglobin, and efficient iron recycling from senescent erythrocytes by splenic macrophages is required for erythrocyte hemoglobin synthesis during erythropoiesis. Ferroportin 1 (Fpn1) is the sole iron exporter in mammals, and it also regulates iron reutilization. In this study, we demonstrated genetically that a redox-sensitive transcription factor, Nrf2, regulates Fpn1 mRNA expression in macrophages. Nrf2 activation by several electrophilic compounds commonly resulted in the upregulation of Fpn1 mRNA in bone marrow-derived and peritoneal macrophages obtained from wild-type mice but not from Nrf2 knockout mice. Further, Nrf2 activation enhanced iron release from the J774.1 murine macrophage cell line. Previous studies showed that inflammatory stimuli, such as LPS, downregulates macrophage Fpn1 by transcriptional and hepcidin-mediated post-translational mechanisms leading to iron sequestration by macrophages. We showed that two Nrf2 activators, diethyl maleate and sulforaphane (SFN; a natural Nrf2 activator found in broccoli), restored the LPS-induced suppression of Fpn1 mRNA in human and mouse macrophages, respectively. Furthermore, SFN counteracted the LPS-induced increase of Hepcidin mRNA by an Nrf2-independent mechanism in mouse peritoneal macrophages. These results demonstrate that Nrf2 regulates iron efflux from macrophages through Fpn1 gene transcription and suggest that Nrf2 may control iron metabolism during inflammation. PMID:21303654

  5. N-adamantyl-4-methylthiazol-2-amine suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced brain inflammation by regulating NF-κB signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chang Hun; Kim, Jiae; Ahn, Jee-Yin; Hahn, Hoh-Gyu; Cho, Sung-Woo

    2015-12-15

    We report that N-adamantyl-4-methylthiazol-2-amine (KHG26693), a novel thiazole derivative, can prevent lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced brain inflammation in mice. In this LPS-induced model of brain inflammation, administration of KHG26693 effectively prevented increases in the levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, prostaglandin E2, malondialdehyde, and nitric oxide, and mitigated reductions in the levels of superoxide dismutase in the hippocampus. KHG26693 also prevented reductions in the levels of hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factors. Furthermore, pretreatment with KHG26693 prior to LPS treatment dramatically attenuated the elevation of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 protein levels. Moreover, pretreatment with KHG26693 significantly suppressed LPS-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB and IκBα through the inactivation of IKKβ. Additionally, KHG26693 caused the downregulation of LPS-induced cystathionine-b-synthase gene expression in the brain. Although the clinical relevance of our findings remains to be determined, our data suggest that KHG26693 might prevent neuronal cell injury via the reduction of inflammation and oxidative stress in the brain. PMID:26616878

  6. Malabaricone C suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses via inhibiting ROS-mediated Akt/IKK/NF-κB signaling in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jungwon; Tae, Nara; Min, Byung Sun; Choe, Jongseon; Lee, Jeong-Hyung

    2012-11-01

    Malabaricone C (MLB-C), isolated from nutmeg, is a phenolic diarylnonanoid that is known to exert a variety of pharmacological activities. In the present study, we investigated the molecular actions of MLB-C against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in RAW264.7 cells and murine peritoneal macrophages. MLB-C inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interferon-γ (INF-γ) in a dose-dependent manner. Consistent with NO and PGE(2) inhibition, MLB-C suppressed LPS-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression as well as the promoter activities of COX-2 and iNOS. MLB-C pretreatment prevented LPS-induced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation through the inhibition of phosphorylation of IκB kinase (IKK), phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα, and nuclear translocation of NF-κB. In addition, MLB-C blocked LPS-induced serine 536 phosphorylation and transcriptional activity of RelA/p65 subunit of NF-κB. Further study demonstrated that MLB-C inhibited LPS-induced Akt phosphorylation, which is an upstream activator of NF-κB, by reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, without affecting phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). These findings indicate that MLB-C exerts an anti-inflammatory effect through the inhibition of NF-κB activation by inhibiting interconnected ROS/Akt/IKK/NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:22917708

  7. A conjugated linoleic acid-enriched beef diet attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in mice in part through PPARgamma-mediated suppression of toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Clare M; Draper, Eve; Keogh, Brian; Rahman, Arman; Moloney, Aidan P; Mills, Kingston H G; Loscher, Christine E; Roche, Helen M

    2009-12-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a PUFA found in beef and dairy products that has immunoregulatory properties. The level of CLA in beef can be enhanced by feeding cattle fresh grass rather than concentrates. This study determined the effect of feeding a high-CLA beef diet on inflammation in an in vivo model of septic shock. Mice were fed a high-CLA beef (4.3% total fatty acid composition) or low-CLA beef diet (0.84% total fatty acid composition) for 6 wk. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 3 microg) or sterile PBS was injected i.v. and serum was harvested 6 h after injection. Serum interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-12p70, IL-12p40, and interferon-gamma concentrations were significantly reduced in response to the LPS challenge in the high-CLA beef diet group. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC) from the high-CLA beef diet group had significantly less IL-12 and more IL-10 in response to ex vivo LPS stimulation. Furthermore, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and CD14 protein and mRNA expression on BMDC was significantly attenuated in the high-CLA compared with the low-CLA beef diet group. Complimentary in vitro experiments to determine the specificity of the effect showed that synthetic cis9, trans11-CLA suppressed surface expression of CD14 and TLR4 on BMDC. Treatment with the PPARgamma inhibitor GW9662 partially reversed TLR4 expression in immature BMDC. The results of this study demonstrate that feeding a diet enriched in high-beef CLA exerts profound antiinflammatory effects in vivo within the context of LPS-induced sepsis. In addition, downregulation of BMDC TLR4 is mediated through induction of PPARgamma. PMID:19846417

  8. β-Caryophyllene alleviates D-galactosamine and lipopolysaccharide-induced hepatic injury through suppression of the TLR4 and RAGE signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hong-Ik; Hong, Jeong-Min; Choi, Joo-Wan; Choi, Hyo-Sun; Kwak, Jong Hwan; Lee, Dong-Ung; Kook Lee, Sang; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2015-10-01

    Agastache rugosa (A. rugosa, Labiatae), a perennial herb spread throughout Korean fields, is widely consumed as a wild edible vegetable and is used in folk medicine. This study examined the hepatoprotective mechanisms of β-caryophyllene (BCP), a major bicyclic sesquiterpene of A. rugosa, against D-galactosamine (GalN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced hepatic failure. Mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of BCP (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) 1 h before GalN (800 mg/kg)/LPS (40 μg/kg) injection and were killed 1 h or 6 h after GalN/LPS injection. GalN/LPS markedly increased mortality and serum aminotransferase activity, both of which were attenuated by BCP. BCP also attenuated increases in serum tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin 6, and high-mobility group protein B1 levels by GalN/LPS. GalN/LPS significantly increased toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) protein expression, extracellular signal-related kinase, p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation, nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), early growth response protein-1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 protein expression. These increases were attenuated by BCP. Furthermore, BCP suppressed increased TLR4 and RAGE protein expression and proinflammatory cytokines production in LPS-treated isolated Kupffer cells. Our findings suggest that BCP protects against GalN/LPS-induced liver injury through down-regulation of the TLR4 and RAGE signaling. PMID:26254779

  9. Endothelin receptor-antagonists suppress lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine release from alveolar macrophages of non-smokers, smokers and COPD subjects.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Kathrin; Köhler-Bachmann, Stefanie; Jungck, David; Körber, Sandra; Yanik, Sarah; Knoop, Heiko; Wehde, Deborah; Rheinländer, Sonja; Walther, Jörg W; Kronsbein, Juliane; Knobloch, Jürgen; Koch, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Smoking-induced COPD is characterized by chronic airway inflammation, which becomes enhanced by bacterial infections resulting in accelerated disease progression called exacerbation. Alveolar macrophages (AM) release endothelin-1 (ET-1), IL-6, CCL-2 and MMP-9, all of which are linked to COPD pathogenesis and exacerbation. ET-1 signals via ETA- and ETB-receptors (ETAR, ETBR). This is blocked by endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs), like bosentan, which targets both receptors, ETAR-selective ambrisentan and ETBR-specific BQ788. Therefore, ERAs could have anti-inflammatory potential, which might be useful in COPD and other inflammatory lung diseases. We hypothesized that ERAs suppress cytokine release from AM of smokers and COPD subjects induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the most important immunogen of gram-negative bacteria. AM were isolated from the broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) of n=29 subjects (11 non-smokers, 10 current smokers without COPD, 8 smokers with COPD), cultivated and stimulated with LPS in the presence or absence of ERAs. Cytokines were measured by ELISA. Endothelin receptor expression was investigated by RT-PCR and western blot. AM expressed ETAR and ETBR mRNA, but only ETBR protein was detected. LPS and ET-1 both induced IL-6, CCL-2 and MMP-9. LPS-induced IL-6 release was increased in COPD versus non-smokers and smokers. Bosentan, ambrisentan and BQ788 all partially reduced all cytokines without differences between cohorts. Specific ETBR inhibition was most effective. LPS induced ET-1, which was exclusively blocked by BQ788. In conclusion, LPS induces ET-1 release in AM, which in turn leads to CCL-2, IL-6 and MMP-9 expression rendering AM sensitive for ERAs. ERAs could have anti-inflammatory potential in smoking-induced COPD. PMID:26526351

  10. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of ICAM-1 through modulation of toll-like receptor-4 signaling in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Seok, Sun Mi; Park, Tae Yeop; Park, Hye-Si; Baik, Eun Joo; Lee, Soo Hwan

    2015-05-01

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) is a glycolytic intermediate with salutary effects in various brain injury models, but its neuroprotective mechanism is incompletely understood. In this study, we examined the effects of FBP on the expression of adhesion molecules in cerebrovascular endothelial cells and explored the possible mechanisms therein involved. FBP significantly down-regulated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of adhesion molecules and leukocyte adhesion to brain endothelial cells and inhibited NF-κB activity, which is implicated in the expression of adhesion molecules. FBP abrogated ICAM-1 expression and NF-κB activation induced by macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2-kDa (MALP-2) or overexpression of MyD88 or TRAF6. FBP suppressed TRAF6-induced phosphorylation of TAK1, IKKβ and IκBα, but fail to affect NF-κB activity induced by ectopic expression of IKKβ. In addition, LPS-induced IRAK-1 phosphorylation was inhibited by FBP, suggesting the presence of multiple molecular targets of FBP in MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. FBP significantly attenuated ICAM-1 expression and NF-κB activity induced by poly[I:C] or overexpression of TRIF or TBK1. FBP significantly repressed the expression of interferon-β (IFN-β) and the activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) induced by LPS, poly[I:C] or overexpression of TRIF or TBK1, but fail to affect IRF3 activity induced by ectopic expression of constitutively active IRF3. Overall, our results demonstrate that FBP modulates both MyD88- and TRIF-dependent signaling pathways of TLR4 and subsequent inflammatory responses in brain endothelial cells, providing insight into its neuroprotective mechanism in brain injury associated with inflammation. PMID:25843256

  11. SIRT2 ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ae Sin; Jung, Yu Jin; Kim, Dal; Nguyen-Thanh, Tung; Kang, Kyung Pyo; Lee, Sik; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Won

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Knockout of SIRT2 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced iNOS expression. • Lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production is decreased in SIRT2 KO macrophage. • SIRT2 deficiency suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced ROS production in macrophage. • M1-macrophage related factors are decreased in SIRT2 deficient cells. • SIRT2 deficiency decreases lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of NFκB. - Abstract: Introduction: SIRT2 is a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases and associated with numerous processes such as infection, carcinogenesis, DNA damage and cell cycle regulation. However, the role of SIRT2 in inflammatory process in macrophage remains unclear. Materials and methods: In the present study, we have evaluated the regulatory effects of SIRT2 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages isolated from SIRT2 knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) mice or Raw264.7 macrophage cells. As inflammatory parameters, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the productions of nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and M1-macrophage-related factors were evaluated. We also examined the effects of SIRT2 on activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB) signaling. Results: SIRT2 deficiency inhibits LPS-induced iNOS mRNA and protein expression in bone marrow derived macrophages. SIRT2-siRNA transfection also suppressed LPS-induced iNOS expression in Raw264.7 macrophage cells. Bone marrow derived macrophages isolated from SIRT2 KO mice produced lower nitric oxide and expressed lower levels of M1-macrophage related markers including iNOS and CD86 in response to LPS than WT mice. Decrease of SIRT2 reduced the LPS-induced reactive oxygen species production. Deficiency of SIRT2 resulted in inhibition of NFκB activation through reducing the phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα. The phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of p65 was significantly decreased in SIRT2-deficient macrophages after LPS stimulation. Discussion: Our data suggested that

  12. Hydrangenol inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production in BV2 microglial cells by suppressing the NF-κB pathway and activating the Nrf2-mediated HO-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Ju; Kang, Chang-Hee; Jayasooriya, Rajapaksha Gedara Prasad Tharanga; Dilshara, Matharage Gayani; Lee, Seungheon; Choi, Yung Hyun; Seo, Yong Taek; Kim, Gi-Young

    2016-06-01

    We previously demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effect of water extract of Hydrangea macrophylla in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophage cells. Here, we investigated whether hydrangenol, a bioactive component of H. macrophylla, attenuates the expression of nitric oxide (NO) and its associated gene, inducible NO synthase (iNOS), in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells. Our data showed that low dosages of hydrangenol inhibited LPS-stimulated NO release and iNOS expression without any accompanying cytotoxicity. Hydrangenol also suppressed LPS-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) subunits, consequently inhibiting DNA-binding activity of NF-κB. Additionally, the NF-κB inhibitors, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and PS-1145, significantly attenuated LPS-induced iNOS expression, indicating that hydrangenol-induced NF-κB inhibition might be a key regulator of iNOS expression. Furthermore, our data showed that hydrangenol suppresses NO production by inducing heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). The presence of cobalt protoporphyrin, a specific HO-1 inducer, potently suppressed LPS-induced NO production. Hydrangenol also promoted nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and subsequently increased its binding activity at the specific antioxidant response element sites. Additionally, transient knockdown of Nrf2 significantly downregulated hydrangenol-induced HO-1 expression, indicating that hydrangenol-induced Nrf2 is an upstream regulator of HO-1. Taken together, these data suggest that hydrangenol attenuates NO production and iNOS expression in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells by inhibiting NF-κB activation and by stimulating the Nrf2-mediated HO-1 signaling pathway. Therefore, hydrangenol is a promising therapeutic agent for treatment of LPS-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:27032067

  13. α-Chaconine isolated from a Solanum tuberosum L. cv Jayoung suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory mediators via AP-1 inactivation in RAW 264.7 macrophages and protects mice from endotoxin shock.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung-Goo; Lee, Suel-Gie; Lee, Hwi-Ho; Lee, Hae Jun; Shin, Ji-Sun; Kim, Nan-Jung; An, Hyo-Jin; Nam, Jung-Hwan; Jang, Dae Sik; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2015-06-25

    In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of α-chaconine in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages and in LPS-induced septic mice. α-Chaconine inhibited the expressions of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) at the transcriptional level, and attenuated the transcriptional activity of activator protein-1 (AP-1) by reducing the translocation and phosphorylation of c-Jun. α-Chaconine also suppressed the phosphorylation of TGF-β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1), which lies upstream of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 7 (MKK7)/Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. JNK knockdown using siRNA prevented the α-chaconine-mediated inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediators. In a sepsis model, pretreatment with α-chaconine reduced the LPS-induced lethality and the mRNA and production levels of pro-inflammatory mediators by inhibiting c-Jun activation. These results suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of α-chaconine are associated with the suppression of AP-1, and support its possible therapeutic role for the treatment of sepsis. PMID:25913072

  14. Ebselen Is a Potential Anti-Osteoporosis Agent by Suppressing Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor Kappa-B Ligand-Induced Osteoclast Differentiation In vitro and Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Bone Destruction In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jong Min; Kim, Ju-Young; Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Oh, Jaemin; Lee, Myeung Su

    2016-01-01

    Ebselen is a non-toxic seleno-organic drug with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that is currently being examined in clinical trials to prevent and treat various diseases, including atherosclerosis, stroke, and cancer. However, no reports are available for verifying the pharmacological effects of ebselen on major metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis. In this study, we observed that ebselen suppressed the formation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells in an osteoblast/osteoclast co-culture by regulating the ratio of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin secreted by osteoblasts. In addition, ebselen treatment in the early stage of osteoclast differentiation inhibited RANKL-dependent osteoclastogenesis by decreasing the phosphorylation of IκB, PI3K, and Akt in early signaling pathways and by subsequently inducing c-Fos and nuclear factor of activated T-cells c1. Further, ebselen induced apoptosis of osteoclasts in the late stage of osteoclast differentiation. In addition, ebselen treatment suppressed filamentous actin ring formation and bone resorption activity of mature osteoclasts. Reflecting these in vitro effects, administration of ebselen recovered bone loss and its µ-CT parameters in lipopolysaccharide-mediated mouse model. Histological analysis confirmed that ebselen prevented trabecular bone matrix degradation and osteoclast formation in the bone tissues. Finally, it was proved that the anti-osteoclastogenic action of ebselen is achieved through targeting N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. These results indicate that ebselen is a potentially safe drug for treating metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:27019631

  15. Hesperetin Suppresses Inflammatory Responses in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced RAW 264.7 Cells via the Inhibition of NF-κB and Activation of Nrf2/HO-1 Pathways.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hua; Hao, Jilong; Liu, Taotao; Zhang, Dongyan; Lv, Hongming; Song, E; Zhu, Chao

    2016-06-01

    Hesperetin (Hesp), a common flavanone glycoside, was extracted from the fruit peel of Citrus aurantium L. (Rutaceae). Hesp has been shown to possess various biological properties, including antioxidant, neuroprotective, and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of Hesp on inflammatory responses in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced RAW 264.7 cells. Our results indicated that Hesp treatment dramatically suppressed secretion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-1β; reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene expression; inhibited NF-κB (p65) phosphorylation; and blocked IκBα phosphorylation and degradation. Further studies revealed Hesp markedly enhanced the heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) expression, which were involved with inducing Nrf2 nuclear translocation and decreasing Keap1 protein expression. Together, these results indicated that the anti-inflammatory effect of Hesp may be associated with NF-κB inhibition and Nrf2/HO-1 activation. PMID:26994999

  16. Modified Wu-Zi-Yan-Zong prescription, a traditional Chinese polyherbal formula, suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammatory processes in rat astrocytes via NF-κB and JNK/p38 MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ke-Wu; Zhang, Tai; Fu, Hong; Liu, Geng-Xin; Wang, Xue-Mei

    2012-01-15

    Neuroinflammation plays an important role in several neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory properties of modified Wu-Zi-Yan-Zong prescription (MWP), a traditional Chinese polyherbal formula, in primary cultured rat astrocytes treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The results showed that MWP significantly inhibited release of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E (PGE), as well as expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in LPS-induced rat astrocytes. Mechanism study indicated that MWP significantly inhibited nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inflammatory signaling pathway through attenuating inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB (IκB) degradation and down-regulating IκB kinases (IKKs) phosphorylation level. Moreover, MWP also decreased c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK)/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, which play an important role in the induction of proinflammatory gene expressions. At last, MWP protected neurons from LPS-activated astrocytes in neuron-astrocyte co-culture system. Taken together, our results suggest that MWP may act to suppress neuroinflammatory response in LPS-stimulated rat astrocytes via NF-κB and JNK/p38 MAPK signaling cascades, and MWP may be a useful agent for prevention and treatment of neuroinflammatory disease. PMID:21893401

  17. A novel ligand-independent peptide inhibitor of TREM-1 suppresses tumor growth in human lung cancer xenografts and prolongs survival of mice with lipopolysaccharide-induced septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Sigalov, Alexander B.

    2014-01-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) amplifies the inflammatory response and plays a role in cancer and sepsis. Inhibition of TREM-1 by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in macrophages suppresses cancer cell invasion in vitro. In the clinical setting, high levels of TREM-1 expression on tumor-associated macrophages are associated with cancer recurrence and poor survival of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). TREM-1 upregulation on peritoneal neutrophils has been found in human sepsis patients and in mice with experimental lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced septic shock. However, the precise function of TREM-1 and the nature of its ligand are not yet known. In this study, we used the signaling chain homooligomerization (SCHOOL) model of immune signaling to design a novel, ligand-independent peptide-based TREM-1 inhibitor and demonstrated that this peptide specifically silences TREM-1 signaling in vitro and in vivo. Utilizing two human lung tumor xenograft nude mouse models (H292 and A549) and mice with LPS-induced sepsis, we show for the first time that blockade of TREM-1 function using non-toxic and non-immunogenic SCHOOL peptide inhibitors: 1) delays tumor growth in xenograft models of human NSCLC, 2) prolongs survival of mice with LPS-induced septic shock, and 3) substantially decreases cytokine production in vitro and in vivo. In addition, targeted delivery of SCHOOL peptides to macrophages utilizing lipoprotein-mimicking nanoparticles significantly increased peptide half-life and dosage efficacy. Together, the results suggest that ligand-independent modulation of TREM-1 function using small synthetic peptides might be a suitable treatment for sepsis and NSCLC and possibly other types of inflammation-associated disorders. PMID:24836682

  18. [INFLUENCE OF OLEAMIDE OF WATER AND ION TRANSPORT IN THE OSMOREGULATORY ORGANS].

    PubMed

    Shakhmatova, E I; Bogolepova, A E; Dubina, M V; Natochin, Yu V

    2015-01-01

    Application of oleamide (final concentration of 10 μM) at the skin basal surface of the frog, Rana temporaria L., augmented the short-circuit current (SCC) from 59.8 ± 2.5 to 78.2 ± 1.4 μA/cm2. Oleamide added to the serous membrane of the frog urinary bladder at a final dose of 1 μM induced more than 30-fold increase of osmotic permeability. The addition of arginine-vasotocin on the background of oleamide action further increased SCC across the isolated frog skin and osmotic permeability of the frog urinary bladder. Intraperitoneal injection of oleamide at a dose of 0.1 mM/100 g BW to water-loaded non-anesthetized Wistar rats decreased diuresis by 22%, enhanced solute-free water reabsorption and urinary sodium excretion by 31% and 55% respectively, but did not affect the renal potassium excretion. The results obtained provide evidence of similarity of oleamide and neurohypophyseal hormones effects on water and ion transport in epithelial cells of osmoregulatory organs in vertebrates. PMID:26983280

  19. Antiallergic Activity of Ethanol Extracts of Arctium lappa L. Undried Roots and Its Active Compound, Oleamide, in Regulating FcεRI-Mediated and MAPK Signaling in RBL-2H3 Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Woong-Suk; Lee, Sung Ryul; Jeong, Yong Joon; Park, Dae Won; Cho, Young Mi; Joo, Hae Mi; Kim, Inhye; Seu, Young-Bae; Sohn, Eun-Hwa; Kang, Se Chan

    2016-05-11

    The antiallergic potential of Arctium lappa L. was investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats, ICR mice, and RBL-2H3 cells. Ethanol extract (90%) of A. lappa (ALE, 100 μg/mL) inhibited the degranulation rate by 52.9%, determined by the level of β-hexosaminidase. ALE suppressed passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (PCA) in rats and attenuated anaphylaxis and histamine release in mice. To identify the active compound of ALE, we subsequently fractionated and determined the level of β-hexosaminidase in all subfractions. Oleamide was identified as an active compound of ALE, which attenuated the secretion of histamine and the production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin-4 (IL-4) in cells treated with compound 48/80 or A23187/phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). Oleamide suppressed FcεRI-tyrosine kinase Lyn-mediated pathway, c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK/SAPK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38-MAPKs). These results showed that ALE and oleamide attenuated allergic reactions and should serve as a platform to search for compounds with antiallergic activity. PMID:27087645

  20. Preventive effects of a fermented dairy product against Alzheimer's disease and identification of a novel oleamide with enhanced microglial phagocytosis and anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Ano, Yasuhisa; Ozawa, Makiko; Kutsukake, Toshiko; Sugiyama, Shinya; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Aruto; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ever-increasing number of patients with dementia worldwide, fundamental therapeutic approaches to this condition have not been established. Epidemiological studies suggest that intake of fermented dairy products prevents cognitive decline in the elderly. However, the active compounds responsible for the effect remain to be elucidated. The present study aims to elucidate the preventive effects of dairy products on Alzheimer's disease and to identify the responsible component. Here, in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (5xFAD), intake of a dairy product fermented with Penicillium candidum had preventive effects on the disease by reducing the accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ) and hippocampal inflammation (TNF-α and MIP-1α production), and enhancing hippocampal neurotrophic factors (BDNF and GDNF). A search for preventive substances in the fermented dairy product identified oleamide as a novel dual-active component that enhanced microglial Aβ phagocytosis and anti-inflammatory activity towards LPS stimulation in vitro and in vivo. During the fermentation, oleamide was synthesized from oleic acid, which is an abundant component of general dairy products owing to lipase enzymatic amidation. The present study has demonstrated the preventive effect of dairy products on Alzheimer's disease, which was previously reported only epidemiologically. Moreover, oleamide has been identified as an active component of dairy products that is considered to reduce Aβ accumulation via enhanced microglial phagocytosis, and to suppress microglial inflammation after Aβ deposition. Because fermented dairy products such as camembert cheese are easy to ingest safely as a daily meal, their consumption might represent a preventive strategy for dementia. PMID:25760987

  1. Preventive Effects of a Fermented Dairy Product against Alzheimer’s Disease and Identification of a Novel Oleamide with Enhanced Microglial Phagocytosis and Anti-Inflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ano, Yasuhisa; Ozawa, Makiko; Kutsukake, Toshiko; Sugiyama, Shinya; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Yoshida, Aruto; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ever-increasing number of patients with dementia worldwide, fundamental therapeutic approaches to this condition have not been established. Epidemiological studies suggest that intake of fermented dairy products prevents cognitive decline in the elderly. However, the active compounds responsible for the effect remain to be elucidated. The present study aims to elucidate the preventive effects of dairy products on Alzheimer’s disease and to identify the responsible component. Here, in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (5xFAD), intake of a dairy product fermented with Penicillium candidum had preventive effects on the disease by reducing the accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ) and hippocampal inflammation (TNF-α and MIP-1α production), and enhancing hippocampal neurotrophic factors (BDNF and GDNF). A search for preventive substances in the fermented dairy product identified oleamide as a novel dual-active component that enhanced microglial Aβ phagocytosis and anti-inflammatory activity towards LPS stimulation in vitro and in vivo. During the fermentation, oleamide was synthesized from oleic acid, which is an abundant component of general dairy products owing to lipase enzymatic amidation. The present study has demonstrated the preventive effect of dairy products on Alzheimer’s disease, which was previously reported only epidemiologically. Moreover, oleamide has been identified as an active component of dairy products that is considered to reduce Aβ accumulation via enhanced microglial phagocytosis, and to suppress microglial inflammation after Aβ deposition. Because fermented dairy products such as camembert cheese are easy to ingest safely as a daily meal, their consumption might represent a preventive strategy for dementia. PMID:25760987

  2. Vasorelaxant effects of oleamide in rat small mesenteric artery indicate action at a novel cannabinoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Hoi, Pui Man; Hiley, C Robin

    2006-03-01

    Oleamide (cis-9-octadecenoamide) exhibits some cannabimimetic responses despite its low affinities at the currently known cannabinoid receptors. Here we have investigated whether or not it is a vasorelaxant in rat small mesenteric arteries. Oleamide elicited vasorelaxation (EC50=1.2+/-0.2 microM, Rmax=99.1+/-3.9%, n=8) which was reduced by endothelial removal. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition reduced the response (EC50=5.3+/-1.6 microM, Rmax=59.2+/-7.7%, n=7; P<0.01) as did blockade of Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels (KCa) with apamin plus charybdotoxin (both 50 nM) (EC50=2.1+/-0.2 microM, Rmax=58.4+/-1.9%, n=5; P<0.05). Desensitisation of vanilloid receptors with capsaicin (10 microM for 30 min) shifted the oleamide concentration-response curve approximately 30-fold to the right (n=7; P<0.01). Pertussis toxin (400 ng ml-1 for 2 h) caused a two-fold shift in the response curve (EC50=2.2+/-0.4 microM, Rmax=66.8+/-4.5%, n=6; P<0.01). Rimonabant (CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist; SR141716A; 3 microM) significantly inhibited relaxation induced by oleamide (EC50=3.5+/-0.3 microM, Rmax=75.1+/-1.9%; n=8; P<0.05). In contrast, neither the more selective CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251 (1 microM), nor the CB2 antagonist, SR144528 (1 microM), had significant effects. O-1918 (10 microM), a putative antagonist at a novel endothelial cannabinoid receptor (abnormal-cannabidiol site), markedly reduced the relaxation to oleamide (n=7; P<0.01). It is concluded that oleamide responses in the rat isolated small mesenteric artery are partly dependent on the presence of the endothelium, activation of Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels (KC)) and involve capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves. Oleamide may share a receptor (sensitive to rimonabant and O-1918, and coupled to KC) and Gi/o) with anandamide in this vessel. This might be distinct from both of the known cannabinoid receptors and the novel abnormal-cannabidiol site. PMID:16415907

  3. Blockade of the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Glutamate Receptor Ameliorates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Renal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ho-Shiang; Ma, Ming-Chieh

    2015-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation in rat kidney reduces renal perfusion and ultrafiltration. Hypoperfusion-induced ischemia is the most frequent cause of functional insufficiency in the endotoxemic kidney. Here, we used non-hypotensive rat model of lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia to examine whether NMDA receptor hyperfunction contributes to acute kidney injury. Lipopolysaccharide-induced renal damage via increased enzymuria and hemodynamic impairments were ameliorated by co-treatment with the NMDA receptor blocker, MK-801. The NMDA receptor NR1 subunit in the rat kidney mainly co-localized with serine racemase, an enzyme responsible for synthesizing the NMDA receptor co-agonist, D-serine. The NMDA receptor hyperfunction in lipopolysaccharide-treated kidneys was demonstrated by NR1 and serine racemase upregulation, particularly in renal tubules, and by increased D-serine levels. Lipopolysaccharide also induced cell damage in cultured tubular cell lines and primary rat proximal tubular cells. This damage was mitigated by MK-801 and by small interfering RNA targeting NR1. Lipopolysaccharide increased cytokine release in tubular cell lines via toll-like receptor 4. The release of interleukin-1β from these cells are the most abundant. An interleukin-1 receptor antagonist not only attenuated cell death but also abolished lipopolysaccharide-induced NR1 and serine racemase upregulation and increases in D-serine secretion, suggesting that interleukin-1β-mediated NMDA receptor hyperfunction participates in lipopolysaccharide-induced tubular damage. The results of this study indicate NMDA receptor hyperfunction via cytokine effect participates in lipopolysaccharide-induced renal insufficiency. Blockade of NMDA receptors may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of sepsis-associated renal failure. PMID:26133372

  4. Astragalus saponins Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation in Mouse Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Ren, Tianjing; Zheng, Lucong; Chen, Hubiao; Ko, Joshua Kashun; Auyeung, Kathy Kawai

    2016-01-01

    Excessive nitric oxide (NO) and pro-inflammatory cytokines are produced during the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases and cancer. It has been demonstrated that anti-inflammation contributes Astragalus membranaceus saponins (AST)'s beneficial effects in combination of conventional anticancer drugs. However, the immunomodulating property of AST has not been well characterized. In this study, we found that AST suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced generation of NO without causing cytotoxicity in the mouse macrophage RAW264.7. The gene and protein overexpression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) as well as the production of tumor necrosis factor-[Formula: see text], evoked by LPS, was consistently down-regulated by AST. AST also inhibited the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and suppressed nuclear factor (NF)-[Formula: see text]B activation and the associated I[Formula: see text]B[Formula: see text] degradation during LPS insult. Furthermore, AST induced growth inhibition in promyelocytic leukemic HL-60 cells and T-lymphocyte leukemic Jurkat cells, but exerted no cytotoxic effects in normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). It is known that the chemotherapeutic drug 5-FU can suppress the immune system, which can be identified by a reduced white blood cell count and decreased hematocrit, while the combination of AST and 5-FU can reverse the above hematologic toxicities. To summarize, non-cytotoxic concentrations of AST suppress LPS-induced inflammatory responses via the modulation of p38 MAPK signaling and the inhibition of NO and cytokine release. Importantly, AST can alleviate the hematologic side effects of current chemotherapeutic agents. These findings can facilitate the establishment of AST in the treatment of inflammatory diseases and inflammation-mediated tumor development. PMID:27109155

  5. Intermittent fasting attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation and memory impairment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Systemic bacterial infections often result in enduring cognitive impairment and are a risk factor for dementia. There are currently no effective treatments for infection-induced cognitive impairment. Previous studies have shown that intermittent fasting (IF) can increase the resistance of neurons to injury and disease by stimulating adaptive cellular stress responses. However, the impact of IF on the cognitive sequelae of systemic and brain inflammation is unknown. Methods Rats on IF for 30 days received 1 mg/kg of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline intravenously. Half of the rats were subjected to behavioral tests and the other half were euthanized two hours after LPS administration and the hippocampus was dissected and frozen for analyses. Results Here, we report that IF ameliorates cognitive deficits in a rat model of sepsis by a mechanism involving NF-κB activation, suppression of the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and enhancement of neurotrophic support. Treatment of rats with LPS resulted in deficits in cognitive performance in the Barnes maze and inhibitory avoidance tests, without changing locomotor activity, that were ameliorated in rats that had been maintained on the IF diet. IF also resulted in reduced levels of mRNAs encoding the LPS receptor TLR4 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the hippocampus. Moreover, IF prevented LPS-induced elevation of IL-1α, IL-1β and TNF-α levels, and prevented the LPS-induced reduction of BDNF levels in the hippocampus. IF also significantly attenuated LPS-induced elevations of serum IL-1β, IFN-γ, RANTES, TNF-α and IL-6 levels. Conclusions Taken together, our results suggest that IF induces adaptive responses in the brain and periphery that can suppress inflammation and preserve cognitive function in an animal model of systemic bacterial infection. PMID:24886300

  6. Carbachol ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal epithelial tight junction damage by down-regulating NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Jianguo

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol reduced the lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol ameliorated the lipopolysaccharide-induced ileal tight junction damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol prevented the LPS-induced NF-{kappa}{beta} and myosin light-chain kinase activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbachol exerted its beneficial effects in an {alpha}7 nicotinic receptor-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Carbachol is a cholinergic agonist that protects the intestines after trauma or burn injury. The present study determines the beneficial effects of carbachol and the mechanisms by which it ameliorates the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced intestinal barrier breakdown. Rats were injected intraperitoneally with 10 mg/kg LPS. Results showed that the gut barrier permeability was reduced, the ultrastructural disruption of tight junctions (TJs) was prevented, the redistribution of zonula occludens-1 and claudin-2 proteins was partially reversed, and the nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-{kappa}{beta}) and myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) activation in the intestinal epithelium were suppressed after carbachol administration in LPS-exposed rats. Pretreatment with the {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}7nAchR) antagonist {alpha}-bungarotoxin blocked the protective action of carbachol. These results suggested that carbachol treatment can protect LPS-induced intestinal barrier dysfunction. Carbachol exerts its beneficial effect on the amelioration of the TJ damage by inhibiting the NF-{kappa}{beta} and MLCK pathways in an {alpha}7nAchR-dependent manner.

  7. 6'-O-Caffeoyldihydrosyringin isolated from Aster glehni suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 expression via NF-κB and AP-1 inactivation in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Seo, Seunghwan; Lee, Kyoung-Goo; Shin, Ji-Sun; Chung, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Jae Yeol; Kim, Hyoung Ja; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2016-10-01

    Previously, we found that ethyl acetate extract fraction of Aster glehni exhibited anti-hyperuricemic effects in animal models and also five new caffeoylglucoside derivatives were isolated from this fraction. In this work, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effects of these caffeoylglucoside derivatives and found that 6'-O-caffeoyldihydrosyringin (2, CDS) most potently inhibited the LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in RAW 264.7 macrophages. In addition, CDS was found to concentration-dependently reduce the production of NO, PGE2, and the pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) induced by LPS in macrophages. Consistent with these observations, CDS concentration-dependently inhibited LPS-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxidase-2 (COX-2) expression at the protein level and also iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, and IL-6, IL-1β expression at the mRNA level. Furthermore, CDS suppressed the LPS-induced transcriptional activities of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1) as well as the phosphorylation of p65 and c-Fos. Taken together, these results suggest that the anti-inflammatory effect of CDS is associated with the downregulation of iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 expression via the negative regulation of NF-κB and AP-1 activation in LPS-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. PMID:27590705

  8. Arctigenin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xianbao; Sun, Hongzhi; Zhou, Dun; Xi, Huanjiu; Shan, Lina

    2015-04-01

    Arctigenin (ATG) has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effects of ATG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) remains not well understood. In the present study, our investigation was designed to reveal the effect of ATG on LPS-induced ALI in rats. We found that ATG pretreatment attenuated the LPS-induced ALI, as evidenced by the reduced histological scores, myeloperoxidase activity, and wet-to-dry weight ratio in the lung tissues. This was accompanied by the decreased levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-1 (IL-6) in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, ATG downregulated the expression of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, promoted the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB-α (IκBα) and activated the adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPKα) in the lung tissues. Our results suggested that ATG attenuates the LPS-induced ALI via activation of AMPK and suppression of NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25008149

  9. Wogonoside ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Ren, Yi; Yang, Chengliang; Guo, Yue; Zhang, Xiaojing; Hou, Gang; Guo, Xinjin; Sun, Nan; Liu, Yongyu

    2014-12-01

    Wogonoside has been reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we evaluated the effect of wogonoside on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Male BALB/c mice with ALI, induced by intranasal instillation of LPS, were treated with wogonoside 1 h prior to LPS exposure. Mice treated with LPS alone showed significantly increased TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). When pretreated with wogonoside, the TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β levels were significantly decreased. Meanwhile, wogonoside significantly inhibited LPS-induced increases in the macrophage and neutrophil infiltration of lung tissues and markedly attenuated myeloperoxidase activity. Furthermore, wogonoside inhibited the TLR4 expression and the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65, and IκB induced by LPS. In conclusion, our results indicate that wogonoside exhibits a protective effect on LPS-induced ALI via suppression of TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathways. PMID:24854163

  10. Role of Notch signaling during lipopolysaccharide-induced preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Varkha; Jaiswal, Mukesh K; Pamarthy, Sahithi; Katara, Gajendra K; Kulshrestha, Arpita; Gilman-Sachs, Alice; Hirsch, Emmet; Beaman, Kenneth D

    2016-08-01

    Notch signaling pathways exert effects throughout pregnancy and are activated in response to TLR ligands. To investigate the role of Notch signaling in preterm labor, Notch receptors (Notch1-4), its ligand Delta-like protein-1, transcriptional repressor hairy and enhancer of split-1, and Notch deregulator Numb were assessed. Preterm labor was initiated on gestation d 14.5 by 1 of 2 methods: 1) inflammation-induced preterm labor: intrauterine injection of LPS (a TLR4 agonist) and 2) hormonally induced preterm labor: subcutaneous injection of mifepristone. Delta-like protein-1, Notch1, and hairy and enhancer of split-1 were elevated significantly, and Numb was decreased in the uterus and placenta of inflammation-induced preterm labor mice but remained unchanged in hormonally induced preterm labor compared with their respective controls. F4/80(+) macrophage polarization was skewed in the uterus of inflammation-induced preterm labor toward M1-positive (CD11c(+)) and double-positive [CD11c(+) (M1) and CD206(+) (M2)] cells. This process is dependent on activation of Notch signaling, as shown by suppression of M1 and M2 macrophage-associated cytokines in decidual macrophages in response to γ-secretase inhibitor (an inhibitor of Notch receptor processing) treatment ex vivo. γ-Secretase inhibitor treatment also diminished the LPS-induced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in decidual and placental cells cultured ex vivo. Furthermore, treatment with recombinant Delta-like protein-1 ligand enhanced the LPS-induced proinflammatory response. Notch ligands (Jagged 1 and 2 and Delta-like protein-4) and vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor involved in angiogenesis were reduced significantly in the uterus and placenta during inflammation-induced preterm labor. These results suggest that up-regulation of Notch-related inflammation and down-regulation of angiogenesis factors may be associated with inflammation-induced preterm labor but not with

  11. Effects of naltrexone on lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shinn-Long; Lee, Yen-Mei; Chang, Hsin-Yi; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Yen, Mao-Hsiung

    2005-01-01

    Naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, has been reported to possess an anti-inflammatory effect via blockade of opioid receptor. The aim of this study is to evaluate the protective effect of naltrexone on LPS-induced septic shock in rats. Sepsis was induced by administration of LPS (10 mg/kg, i.v.) in anesthetized rats. Results demonstrated that pretreatment with naltrexone (10 mg/kg, i.v.) significantly ameliorated hypotension and bradycardia of rats 6 h after LPS administration. In isolated blood vessel, study showed that pretreatment with naltrexone significantly improved norepinephrine-induced vasoconstriction and ACh-induced vasorelaxation in aorta of endotoxemic animals. Naltrexone significantly reduced the elevation of serum glutamate-oxalacetate transaminase and glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (as index of hepatic function) induced by LPS. The infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils into liver 48 h after LPS treatment in mice was also reduced by naltrexone. On the other hand, naltrexone significantly decreased the levels of plasma TNF-alpha and inhibited overproduction of superoxide anions in aortic rings. However, naltrexone did not suppress the overproduction of NO (measured by its metabolites nitrite/nitrate in plasma) and iNOS expression in lungs induced by LPS. In in vitro study, naltrexone did not attenuate non-enzymatic iron-induced lipid peroxidation in rat brain homogenates. In conclusion, pretreatment with naltrexone significantly improved circulatory failure and hepatic dysfunction in sepsis. These effects were associated with reduction of TNF-alpha levels and superoxide anion formation, which may be attributed to antagonism of opioid receptors. PMID:15917999

  12. Montelukast attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced cardiac injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Khodir, A E; Ghoneim, H A; Rahim, M A; Suddek, G M

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the possible protective effects of montelukast (MNT) against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cardiac injury, in comparison to dexamethasone (DEX), a standard anti-inflammatory. Male Sprague Dawley rats (160-180 g) were assigned to five groups (n = 8/group): (1) control; (2) LPS (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.)); (3) LPS + MNT (10 mg/kg, per os (p.o.)); (4) LPS + MNT (20 mg/kg, p.o.); and (5) LPS + DEX (1 mg/kg, i.p.). Twenty-four hours after LPS injection, heart/body weight (BW) ratio and percent survival of rats were determined. Serum total protein, creatine kinase muscle/brain (CK-MB), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities were measured. Heart samples were taken for histological assessment and for determination of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) contents. Cardiac tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) expression was evaluated immunohistochemically. LPS significantly increased heart/BW ratio, serum CK-MB, ALP, and LDH activities and decreased percent survival and serum total protein levels. MDA content increased in heart tissues with a concomitant reduction in GSH content. Immunohistochemical staining of heart specimens from LPS-treated rats revealed high expression of TNF-α. MNT significantly reduced percent mortality and suppressed the release of inflammatory and oxidative stress markers when compared with LPS group. Additionally, MNT effectively preserved tissue morphology as evidenced by histological evaluation. MNT (20 mg/kg) was more effective in alleviating LPS-induced heart injury when compared with both MNT (10 mg/kg) and DEX (1 mg/kg), as evidenced by decrease in positive staining by TNF-α immunohistochemically, decrease MDA, and increase GSH content in heart tissue. This study demonstrates that MNT might have cardioprotective effects against the inflammatory process during endotoxemia. This effect can be attributed to its antioxidant and/or anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:26089034

  13. Paeonol attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced depressive-like behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Tao, Weiwei; Wang, Hanqing; Su, Qiang; Chen, Yanyan; Xue, Wenda; Xia, Baomei; Duan, Jinao; Chen, Gang

    2016-04-30

    The present study was designed to detect the anti-depressant effects of paeonol and the possible mechanisms in the lipopolysaccharide-induced depressive-like behavior. Open-field test(OFT), tail suspension test(TST) and forced swimming test(FST) were used to evaluate the behavioral activity. The contents of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) in mice hippocampus were determined by HPLC-ECD. Serum interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our results showed that LPS significantly decreased the levels of 5-HT and NE in the hippocampus. LPS also reduced open-field activity, as well as increased immobility duration in FST and TST. Paeonol administration could effectively reverse the alterations in the concentrations of 5-HT, NE and reduce the IL-6 and TNF-α levels. Moreover, paeonol effectively downregulated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) and Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in hippocampal. In conclusion, paeonol administration exhibited significant antidepressant-like effects in mice with LPS-induced depression. PMID:27086220

  14. A novel podocyte gene, semaphorin 3G, protects glomerular podocyte from lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Ryoichi; Takemoto, Minoru; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takahiro; He, Peng; Maezawa, Yoshiro; Sakamoto, Kenichi; Tsurutani, Yuya; Ide, Shintaro; Ide, Kana; Kawamura, Harukiyo; Kobayashi, Kazuki; Tokuyama, Hirotake; Tryggvason, Karl; Betsholtz, Christer; Yokote, Koutaro

    2016-01-01

    Kidney diseases including diabetic nephropathy have become huge medical problems, although its precise mechanisms are still far from understood. In order to increase our knowledge about the patho-physiology of kidney, we have previously identified >300 kidney glomerulus-enriched transcripts through large-scale sequencing and microarray profiling of the mouse glomerular transcriptome. One of the glomerulus-specific transcripts identified was semaphorin 3G (Sema3G) which belongs to the semaphorin family. The aim of this study was to analyze both the in vivo and in vitro functions of Sema3G in the kidney. Sema3G was expressed in glomerular podocytes. Although Sema3G knockout mice did not show obvious glomerular defects, ultrastructural analyses revealed partially aberrant podocyte foot processes structures. When these mice were injected with lipopolysaccharide to induce acute inflammation or streptozotocin to induce diabetes, the lack of Sema3G resulted in increased albuminuria. The lack of Sema3G in podocytes also enhanced the expression of inflammatory cytokines including chemokine ligand 2 and interleukin 6. On the other hand, the presence of Sema3G attenuated their expression through the inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced Toll like receptor 4 signaling. Taken together, our results surmise that the Sema3G protein is secreted by podocytes and protects podocytes from inflammatory kidney diseases and diabetic nephropathy. PMID:27180624

  15. A novel podocyte gene, semaphorin 3G, protects glomerular podocyte from lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Ryoichi; Takemoto, Minoru; Akimoto, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Takahiro; He, Peng; Maezawa, Yoshiro; Sakamoto, Kenichi; Tsurutani, Yuya; Ide, Shintaro; Ide, Kana; Kawamura, Harukiyo; Kobayashi, Kazuki; Tokuyama, Hirotake; Tryggvason, Karl; Betsholtz, Christer; Yokote, Koutaro

    2016-01-01

    Kidney diseases including diabetic nephropathy have become huge medical problems, although its precise mechanisms are still far from understood. In order to increase our knowledge about the patho-physiology of kidney, we have previously identified >300 kidney glomerulus-enriched transcripts through large-scale sequencing and microarray profiling of the mouse glomerular transcriptome. One of the glomerulus-specific transcripts identified was semaphorin 3G (Sema3G) which belongs to the semaphorin family. The aim of this study was to analyze both the in vivo and in vitro functions of Sema3G in the kidney. Sema3G was expressed in glomerular podocytes. Although Sema3G knockout mice did not show obvious glomerular defects, ultrastructural analyses revealed partially aberrant podocyte foot processes structures. When these mice were injected with lipopolysaccharide to induce acute inflammation or streptozotocin to induce diabetes, the lack of Sema3G resulted in increased albuminuria. The lack of Sema3G in podocytes also enhanced the expression of inflammatory cytokines including chemokine ligand 2 and interleukin 6. On the other hand, the presence of Sema3G attenuated their expression through the inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced Toll like receptor 4 signaling. Taken together, our results surmise that the Sema3G protein is secreted by podocytes and protects podocytes from inflammatory kidney diseases and diabetic nephropathy. PMID:27180624

  16. Effect of Capparis spinosa Linn. extract on lipopolysaccharide-induced cognitive impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ashish; Digvijaya; Garg, Arun; Kumar, Ashok

    2016-02-01

    Cognitive disorders in mankind are not uncommon. Apart from neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's (AD), various stresses also affect cognitive functions. Plants are known to be potential source of compounds that ameliorate several diseases including cognitive impairment. Here, we evaluated effect of aqueous extract of caper (Capparis spinosa) buds on lipopolysaccharide-induced cognitive impairment in rats using two different oral doses i.e. 10 (pre-treatment) and 30 mg/rat(post-treatment) through assessment of behavioural (Morris Water maze test and Y maze test), biochemical (Cholinesterase assay) and histopathological (H&E staining) parameters. Lipopolysaccharide (from E. coli) administration resulted in an increased neurodegeneration and time taken to reach the platform (in Morris water maze). The increased neurodegeneration in CA1 region of hippocampus was significantly reduced in animals which received caper bud extract; they showed marked reduction in time taken to reach the platform at both the dose levels. The experiment demonstrated that caper bud extract exhibits potential protective effect against learning and memory damage induced by chronic administration of lipopolysaccharide (175 μg/kg) for 7 days. The results suggest that the caper bud extract could be explored for its use in the treatment of cognitive disorders. PMID:26934780

  17. Cerium dioxide nanoparticles do not modulate the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Salik; Al-Nsour, Faris; Rice, Annette B; Marshburn, Jamie; Ji, Zhaoxia; Zink, Jeffery I; Yingling, Brenda; Walker, Nigel J; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2012-01-01

    Background Cerium dioxide (CeO2) nanoparticles have potential therapeutic applications and are widely used for industrial purposes. However, the effects of these nanoparticles on primary human cells are largely unknown. The ability of nanoparticles to exacerbate pre-existing inflammatory disorders is not well documented for engineered nanoparticles, and is certainly lacking for CeO2 nanoparticles. We investigated the inflammation-modulating effects of CeO2 nanoparticles at noncytotoxic concentrations in human peripheral blood monocytes. Methods CD14+ cells were isolated from peripheral blood samples of human volunteers. Cells were exposed to either 0.5 or 1 μg/mL of CeO2 nanoparticles over a period of 24 or 48 hours with or without lipopolysaccharide (10 ng/mL) prestimulation. Modulation of the inflammatory response was studied by measuring secreted tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, macrophage chemotactic protein-1, interferon-gamma, and interferon gamma-induced protein 10. Results CeO2 nanoparticle suspensions were thoroughly characterized using dynamic light scattering analysis (194 nm hydrodynamic diameter), zeta potential analysis (−14 mV), and transmission electron microscopy (irregular-shaped particles). Transmission electron microscopy of CD14+ cells exposed to CeO2 nanoparticles revealed that these nanoparticles were efficiently internalized by monocytes and were found either in vesicles or free in the cytoplasm. However, no significant differences in secreted cytokine profiles were observed between CeO2 nanoparticle-treated cells and control cells at noncytotoxic doses. No significant effects of CeO2 nanoparticle exposure subsequent to lipopolysaccharide priming was observed on cytokine secretion. Moreover, no significant difference in lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine production was observed after exposure to CeO2 nanoparticles followed by lipopolysaccharide exposure. Conclusion CeO2 nanoparticles at noncytotoxic concentrations neither

  18. The Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Model of Azithromycin for Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Depressive-Like Behavior in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Kun; Qi, Qu; Hao, Haiping; Wang, Guangji; Chen, Yuancheng; Liang, Yan; Xie, Lin

    2013-01-01

    A mechanism-based model was developed to describe the time course of lipopolysaccharide-induced depressive-like behavior and azithromycin pharmacodynamics in mice. The lipopolysaccharide-induced disease progression was monitored by lipopolysaccharide, proinflammatory cytokines, and kynrenine concentration in plasma. The depressive-like behavior was investigated by forced swimming test and tail suspension test. Azithromycin was selected to inhibit the surge of proinflammatory cytokines induced by lipopolysaccharide. Disease progression model and azithromycin pharmacodynamics were constructed from transduction and indirect response models. A delay in the onset of increased proinflammatory cytokines, kynrenine, and behavior test compared to lipopolysaccharide was successfully characterized by series transduction models. The inhibition of azithromycin on proinflammatory cytokines was described by an indirect response model. After lipopolysaccharide challenging, the proinflammatory cytokines, kynrenine and behavior tests would peak approximately at 3, 12, and 24 h respectively, and then the time courses slowly declined toward a baseline state after peak response. During azithromycin administration, the peak levels of proinflammatory cytokines, kynrenine and behavior indexes decreased. Model parameters indicated that azithromycin significantly inhibited the proinflammatory cytokines level in plasma and improved the depressive-like behavior induced by inflammation. The integrated model for disease progression and drug intervention captures turnovers of proinflammatory cytokines, kynrenine and the behavior results in the different time phases and conditions. PMID:23358536

  19. Perindopril Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Amyloidogenesis and Memory Impairment by Suppression of Oxidative Stress and RAGE Activation.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ruby; Bhat, Shahnawaz Ali; Hanif, Kashif; Nath, Chandishwar; Shukla, Rakesh

    2016-02-17

    Clinical and preclinical studies account hypertension as a risk factor for dementia. We reported earlier that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition attenuated the increased vulnerability to neurodegeneration in hypertension and prevented lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced memory impairment in normotensive wistar rats (NWRs) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Recently, a receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) has been reported to induce amyloid beta (Aβ1-42) deposition and memory impairment in hypertensive animals. However, the involvement of ACE in RAGE activation and amyloidogenesis in the hypertensive state is still unexplored. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the role of ACE on RAGE activation and amyloidogenesis in memory-impaired NWRs and SHRs. Memory impairment was induced by repeated (on days 1, 4, 7, and 10) intracerebroventricular (ICV) injections of LPS in SHRs (25 μg) and NWRs (50 μg). Our data showed that SHRs exhibited increased oxidative stress (increased gp91-phox/NOX-2 expression and ROS generation), RAGE, and β-secretase (BACE) expression without Aβ1-42 deposition. LPS (25 μg, ICV) further amplified oxidative stress, RAGE, and BACE activation, culminating in Aβ1-42 deposition and memory impairment in SHRs. Similar changes were observed at the higher dose of LPS (50 μg, ICV) in NWRs. Further, LPS-induced oxidative stress was associated with endothelial dysfunction and reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF), more prominently in SHRs than in NWRs. Finally, we showed that perindopril (0.1 mg/kg, 15 days) prevented memory impairment by reducing oxidative stress, RAGE activation, amyloidogenesis, and improved CBF in both SHRs and NWRs. These findings suggest that perindopril might be used as a therapeutic strategy for the early stage of dementia. PMID:26689453

  20. Losartan attenuated lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury by suppression of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wang; Deng, Yue; Deng, Jia; Wang, Dao-Xin; Zhang, Ting

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Recent study has shown that renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in the development of acute lung injury (ALI) with high level of angiotensin II (AngII) generated form AngI catalyzed by angiotensin-converting enzyme. AngII plays a major effect mainly through AT1 receptor. Therefore, we speculate inhibition of AT1 receptor may possibly attenuate the lung injury. Losartan, an antagonist of AT1 receptor for angiotensin II, attenuated lung injury by alleviation of the inflammation response in ALI, but the mechanism of losartan in ALI still remains unclear. Methods: Thirty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into Control group, ALI group (LPS), and Losartan group (LPS + Losartan). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissue were obtained for analysis. The expressions of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and caspase-3 were detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting. Results: In ALI group, TNF-α and protein level in BALF, MPO activity in lung tissue, pulmonary edema and lung injury were significantly increased. Losartan significantly reduced LPS-induced increase in TNF-α and protein level in BALF, MPO activity, pulmonary edema and lung injury in LPS-induced lung injury. The mRNA and protein expression levels of LOX-1 were significantly decreased with the administration of losartan in LPS-induced lung injury. Also, losartan blocked the protein levels of caspase-3 and ICAM-1 mediated by LOX-1 in LPS-induced lung injury. Conclusions: Losartan attenuated lung injury by alleviation of the inflammation and cell apoptosis by inhibition of LOX-1 in LPS-induced lung injury. PMID:26884836

  1. Suppressive effects of Indigofera suffruticosa Mill extracts on lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in murine RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tzy-Yen; Sun, Hai-Lun; Yao, Hsien-Tsung; Lii, Chong-Kuei; Chen, Haw-Wen; Chen, Pei-Yin; Li, Chien-Chun; Liu, Kai-Li

    2013-05-01

    Indigofera suffruticosa Mill is used as an herbal medicine for the treatment of inflammation. The aim of this study is to assess the anti-inflammatory potency of I. suffruticosa and its likely molecular mechanisms of action in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. Both water and ethanolic extracts of I. suffruticosa significantly decreased LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) as well as the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor-α, and pro-interleukin-1β. Moreover, LPS-induced inhibitory factor-κB-α phosphorylation, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) nuclear protein-DNA binding affinity, and NF-κB reporter gene activity were dramatically inhibited by I. suffruticosa extracts. Exogenous addition of I. suffruticosa significantly induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression, and the presence of HO-1 small interfering RNA partly reversed the inhibitory effects of I. suffruticosa on LPS-induced NO production and iNOS expression. Furthermore, I. suffruticosa induced HO-1 expression may be through activation of the ERK/nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 pathway. Eight phenolic compounds were found in the I. suffruticosa extracts, but salicylic acid was the only one detected in the plasma of mice fed with I. suffruticosa extracts. In summary, I. suffruticosa have a strong anti-inflammatory property that diminishes pro-inflammatory mediator expressions by lessening LPS-induced NF-κB activation and inducing HO-1 expression in macrophages. PMID:23352929

  2. Oxidized low density lipoprotein suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in microglia: Oxidative stress acts through control of inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ohn Soon; Lee, Chang Seok; Joe, Eun-hye; Jou, Ilo . E-mail: jouilo@ajou.ac.kr

    2006-03-31

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) is readily oxidized under certain conditions, resulting in the formation of oxidized LDL (oxLDL). Despite numerous in vitro reports that reveal the pathogenic role of oxidative stress, anti-oxidative strategies have underperformed in the clinic. In this study, we examine the role of oxLDL in brain inflammatory responses using cultured rat brain microglia. We demonstrate that oxLDL inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in these cells. It also decreases LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and production of nitric oxide, and reduces LPS-induced secretion of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Oxysterols, known components of oxLDL and endogenous agonists of liver X receptor, can simulate the inhibitory effects of oxLDL in LPS-activated microglia. In addition, their inhibitory effects were mimicked by liver X receptor (LXR) agonists and potentiated by a retinoid X receptor agonist, suggesting these molecules heterodimerize to function as oxysterol receptors. Taken together, our results demonstrate that oxLDL inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory responses in brain microglia and that these inhibitory effects are mediated by oxysterols and, at least in part, by the nuclear receptor LXR. Our results suggest an additional mechanism of action for oxidative stress that acts indirectly via modulation of inflammatory responses. Although further studies are needed, these results answer in part the question of why anti-oxidative strategies have not been successful in clinical situations. Moreover, as brain inflammation participates in the initiation and progression of several neurodegenerative disorders, the present data provide information that should prove a useful guide for designing therapeutic strategies to combat oxidative brain diseases.

  3. Bowman-Birk inhibitor and genistein among soy compounds that synergistically inhibit nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 pathways in lipopolysaccharide-induced macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inflammation has an important role in the development of chronic diseases. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory properties of eight soybean bioactive compounds using lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages. Genistein, daidzein, mix isoflavone glucosides, saponin A group glyco...

  4. Recombinant thrombomodulin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response by blocking the functions of CD14.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chih-Yuan; Chang, Wei-En; Shi, Guey-Yueh; Chang, Bi-Ying; Cheng, Sheng-En; Shih, Yun-Tai; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2015-02-15

    CD14, a multiligand pattern-recognition receptor, is involved in the activation of many TLRs. Thrombomodulin (TM), a type I transmembrane glycoprotein, originally was identified as an anticoagulant factor that activates protein C. Previously, we showed that the recombinant TM lectin-like domain binds to LPS and inhibits LPS-induced inflammation, but the function of the recombinant epidermal growth factor-like domain plus serine/threonine-rich domain of TM (rTMD23) in LPS-induced inflammation remains unknown. In the current study, we found that rTMD23 markedly suppressed the activation of intracellular signaling pathways and the production of inflammatory cytokines induced by LPS. The anti-inflammatory activity of rTMD23 was independent of activated protein C. We also found that rTMD23 interacted with the soluble and membrane forms of CD14 and inhibited the CD14-mediated inflammatory response. Knockdown of CD14 in macrophages suppressed the production of inflammatory cytokines induced by LPS, and rTMD23 inhibited LPS-induced IL-6 production in CD14-knockdown macrophages. rTMD23 suppressed the binding of LPS to macrophages by blocking the association between monocytic membrane-bound TM and CD14. The administration of rTMD23 in mice, both pretreatment and posttreatment, significantly increased the survival rate and reduced the inflammatory response to LPS. Notably, the serine/threonine-rich domain is essential for the anti-inflammatory activity of rTMD23. To summarize, we show that rTMD23 suppresses the LPS-induced inflammatory response in mice by targeting CD14 and that the serine/threonine-rich domain is crucial for the inhibitory effect of rTMD23 on LPS-induced inflammation. PMID:25609841

  5. Transcutaneous Auricular Vagus Nerve Stimulation Protects Endotoxemic Rat from Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu Xue; He, Wei; Jing, Xiang Hong; Liu, Jun Ling; Rong, Pei Jing; Ben, Hui; Liu, Kun; Zhu, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Background. Transcutaneous auricular vagus nerve stimulation (ta-VNS) could evoke parasympathetic activities via activating the brainstem autonomic nuclei, similar to the effects that are produced after vagus nerve stimulation (VNS). VNS modulates immune function through activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Methods. VNS, ta-VNS, or transcutaneous electrical acupoint stimulation (TEAS) on ST36 was performed to modulate the inflammatory response. The concentration of serum proinflammatory cytokines and tissue NF-kappa B p65 (NF-κB p65) were detected in endotoxaemia affected anesthetized rats. Results. Similar to the effect of VNS, ta-VNS suppressed the serum proinflammatory cytokines levels, such as tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) as well as NF-kappa B p65 expressions of lung tissues. ST36 stimulation also decreases LPS-induced high TNF-α level and NF-κB signal, but it did not restrain proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β and IL-6. Neither ta-VNS nor ST36 stimulation could suppress LPS-induced TNF-α and NF-κB after vagotomy or with α7nAChR antagonist injection. Conclusions. The present paper demonstrated that ta-VNS could be utilized to suppress LPS-induced inflammatory responses via α7nAChR-mediated cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. PMID:23346208

  6. Interleukin-13 Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced BPIFA1 Expression in Nasal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui-Chen; Hsu, Hui-Ying; Wu, Lii-Tzu; Chiang-Ni, Chuan; Chen, Chih-Jung; Wu, Tsu-Fang; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Peng, Ming-Te; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chen, Chuan-Mu; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1 (SPLUNC1) protein is expressed in human nasopharyngeal and respiratory epithelium and has demonstrated antimicrobial activity. SPLUNC1 is now referred to as bactericidal/permeability-increasing fold containing family A, member 1 (BPIFA1). Reduced BPIFA1 expression is associated with bacterial colonization in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP). Interleukin 13 (IL-13), predominately secreted by T helper 2 (TH2) cells, has been found to contribute to airway allergies and suppress BPIFA1 expression in nasal epithelial cells. However, the molecular mechanism of IL-13 perturbation of bacterial infection and BPIFA1 expression in host airways remains unclear. In this study, we found that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced BPIFA1 expression in nasal epithelial cells was mediated through the JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway and AP-1 activation. We further demonstrated that IL-13 downregulated the LPS-induced activation of phosphorylated JNK and c-Jun, followed by attenuation of BPIFA1 expression. Moreover, the immunohistochemical analysis showed that IL-13 prominently suppressed BPIFA1 expression in eosinophilic CRSwNP patients with bacterial infection. Taken together, these results suggest that IL-13 plays a critical role in attenuation of bacteria-induced BPIFA1 expression that may result in eosinophilic CRSwNP. PMID:26646664

  7. Interleukin-13 Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced BPIFA1 Expression in Nasal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Yung-An; Lin, Chia-Der; Chen, Hui-Chen; Hsu, Hui-Ying; Wu, Lii-Tzu; Chiang-Ni, Chuan; Chen, Chih-Jung; Wu, Tsu-Fang; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Peng, Ming-Te; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chen, Chuan-Mu; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1 (SPLUNC1) protein is expressed in human nasopharyngeal and respiratory epithelium and has demonstrated antimicrobial activity. SPLUNC1 is now referred to as bactericidal/permeability-increasing fold containing family A, member 1 (BPIFA1). Reduced BPIFA1 expression is associated with bacterial colonization in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP). Interleukin 13 (IL-13), predominately secreted by T helper 2 (TH2) cells, has been found to contribute to airway allergies and suppress BPIFA1 expression in nasal epithelial cells. However, the molecular mechanism of IL-13 perturbation of bacterial infection and BPIFA1 expression in host airways remains unclear. In this study, we found that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced BPIFA1 expression in nasal epithelial cells was mediated through the JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway and AP-1 activation. We further demonstrated that IL-13 downregulated the LPS-induced activation of phosphorylated JNK and c-Jun, followed by attenuation of BPIFA1 expression. Moreover, the immunohistochemical analysis showed that IL-13 prominently suppressed BPIFA1 expression in eosinophilic CRSwNP patients with bacterial infection. Taken together, these results suggest that IL-13 plays a critical role in attenuation of bacteria-induced BPIFA1 expression that may result in eosinophilic CRSwNP. PMID:26646664

  8. Dietary L-arginine supplementation attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jianzhuang; Liu, Shasha; Guo, Yuming; Applegate, Todd J; Eicher, Susan D

    2014-04-28

    In the present study, two experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of dietary L-arginine (Arg) supplementation on the inflammatory response and innate immunity of broiler chickens. Expt 1 was designed as a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement (n 8 cages/treatment; n 6 birds/cage) with three dietary Arg concentrations (1.05, 1.42 and 1.90%) and two immune treatments (injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline) given at an interval of 48 h between 14 and 21 d of age. In Expt 2, correlation between dietary Arg concentration (0.99, 1.39, 1.76, 2.13 or 2.53%) and percentage of circulating B cells (percentage of circulating lymphocytes) was determined. In Expt 1, LPS injection decreased body-weight gain and feed intake and increased feed conversion ratio of the challenged broilers (14-21 d; P< 0.05). LPS injection suppressed (P< 0.05) the percentages of splenic CD11+ and B cells (percentages of splenic lymphocytes) and phagocytic activity of splenic heterophils and macrophages; Arg supplementation linearly decreased the percentages of CD11+, CD14+ and B cells in the spleen (P< 0.10). LPS injection increased (P< 0.05) the expression of IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA in the spleen and caecal tonsils. Arginine supplementation decreased (P< 0.05) the expression of IL-1β, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and PPAR-γ mRNA in the spleen and IL-1β, IL-10, TLR4 and NF-κB mRNA in the caecal tonsils. In Expt 2, increasing dietary Arg concentrations linearly and quadratically reduced the percentage of circulating B cells (P< 0.01). Collectively, Arg supplementation attenuated the overexpression of pro-inflammatory cytokines probably through the suppression of the TLR4 pathway and CD14+ cell percentage. Furthermore, excessive Arg supplementation (1.76%) suppressed the percentages of circulating and splenic B cells. PMID:24330949

  9. Modulation of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Chorioamnionitis in Fetal Sheep by Maternal Betamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Katherine B.; Snyder, Candice C.; Gisslen, Tate; Kemp, Matthew W.; Newnham, John P.; Kramer, Boris W.; Jobe, Alan H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We tested the hypothesis that the order of exposure to maternal betamethasone and intra-amniotic (IA) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) will differentially modulate inflammation in the chorioamnion. Study Design: Time-mated Merino ewes with singleton fetuses received saline alone, IA LPS alone, maternal betamethasone before LPS, or betamethasone after LPS. We assessed inflammatory markers in the chorioamnion and the amniotic fluid. Results: Inflammatory cell infiltration, expression of myeloperoxidase, serum amyloid A3 (acute phase reactant) in the chorioamnion, and levels of interleukin (IL)-8 in the amniotic fluid increased 7 days after LPS exposure. Betamethasone prior to LPS decreased infiltration of the inflammatory cells, CD3+ T cells, and decreased the levels of IL-1β and IL-8 in the amniotic fluid. Conclusions: Betamethasone 7 days prior to LPS exposure suppressed LPS-induced inflammation. The markers of inflammation largely had returned to the baseline 14 days after LPS exposure. PMID:23653388

  10. Enhanced expression of transient receptor potential channel 3 in uterine smooth muscle tissues of lipopolysaccharide-induced preterm delivery mice

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Dongming; Zhang, Lijuan; Na, Quan; Liu, Sishi; Zhuang, Yanyan; Lv, Yuan; Liu, Caixia

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): We aimed to investigate the influence of transient receptor potential channel 3 (TRPC3) on lipopolysaccharide-induced (LPS) preterm delivery mice. Materials and Methods: Mice were randomly assigned to the four groups: an unpregnant group, a mid-pregnancy group (E15), a term delivery group, and an LPS-induced preterm delivery group (intraperitoneal injection LPS at 15 days). Uterine smooth muscles were obtained through caesarean section; TRPC3 expression was measured by real-time PCR, western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. A specific inhibitor of TRPC3 (SKF96365) was injected into the LPS-induced preterm delivery group to determine whether the delivery interval was prolonged. Results: TRPC3 was primarily expressed in the uterine smooth muscle layer. In addition, the LPS-induced preterm delivery group had an obviously higher expression level of TRPC3 mRNA and protein compared with the unpregnant and E15 groups, which were close to term delivery. More importantly, SKF96365 prolongs the delivery interval of LPS-induced preterm delivery mice. Conclusion: Enhanced expression of TRPC3 may be associated with LPS-induced preterm delivery in mice. The specific inhibitor of TRPC3 (SKF96365) may be helpful for clinical treatment of preterm delivery. PMID:27403264

  11. Therapeutic Effect of the Tuber of Alisma orientale on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kwun, Min Jung; Choi, Jun-Yong; Ahn, Kyung-Seop; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Lee, Yong Gyu; Christman, John W.; Sadikot, Ruxana T.

    2013-01-01

    Although Alisma orientale, an ethnic herb, has been prescribed for treating various diseases in Asian traditional medicine, experimental evidence to support its therapeutic effects is lacking. Here, we sought to determine whether A. orientale has a therapeutic effect on acute lung injury (ALI). Ethanol extract of the tuber of A. orientale (EEAO) was prepared and fingerprinted by HPLC for its constituents. Mice received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for the induction of ALI. At 2 h after LPS treatment, mice received an intratracheal (i.t.) spraying of various amounts of EEAO to the lung. Bioluminescence imaging of transgenic NF-κB/luciferase reporter mice shows that i.t. EEAO posttreatment suppressed lung inflammation. In similar experiments with C57BL/6 mice, EEAO posttreatment significantly improved lung inflammation, as assessed by H&E staining of lung sections, counting of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and semiquantitative RT-PCR analyses of proinflammatory cytokines and Nrf2-dependent genes in the inflamed lungs. Furthermore, EEAO posttreatment enhanced the survival of mice that received a lethal dose of LPS. Together, our results provide evidence that A. orientale has a therapeutic effect on ALI induced by sepsis. PMID:23983806

  12. Stanniocalcin-1 ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shih-En; Wu, Chin-Pyng; Wu, Shu-Yu; Peng, Chung-Kan; Perng, Wann-Cherng; Kang, Bor-Hwang; Chu, Shi-Jye; Huang, Kun-Lun

    2014-06-01

    Stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) is an endogenous glycoprotein whose anti-inflammatory effects occur through induction of uncoupling proteins to reduce oxidative stress. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that exogenous recombinant human STC1 (rhSTC1) protects against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury in mice. Anesthetized C57BL/6 mice underwent intratracheal spraying of LPS (20 µg/10 g body wt), and lung injury was assessed 24h later by analyzing pulmonary edema, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and lung histopathology. Lung inflammation, oxidative stress, and expression of STC1 and its downstream uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) were analyzed at specific time points. Expression of UCP2 was suppressed initially but was subsequently upregulated after STC1 elevation in response to intratracheal administration of LPS. Intratracheal rhSTC1 treatment 1h before or after LPS spraying significantly attenuated pulmonary inflammation, oxidative stress, cell apoptosis, and acute lung injury. Pretreatment with STC1 short interfering RNA 48 h before LPS spraying inhibited the expression of STC1 and UCP2 and significantly increased the extent of lung injury. These findings suggest that STC1 is an endogenous stress protein that may counteract LPS-induced lung injury by inhibiting the inflammatory cascade and inducing antioxidant and antiapoptotic mechanisms. However, the potential clinical application of STC1 and the direct linkage between UCP2 and LPS-induced lung injury remain to be further investigated. PMID:24685991

  13. Chemical Profiles and Protective Effect of Hedyotis diffusa Willd in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Renal Inflammation Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jian-Hong; Liu, Meng-Hua; Zhang, Xu-Lin; He, Jing-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Protective effect of Hedyotis diffusa (H. diffusa) Willd against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced renal inflammation was evaluated by the productions of cytokines and chemokine, and the bioactive constituents of H. diffusa were detected by the ultra-fast liquid chromatography -diode array detector-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (UFLC-DAD-Q-TOF-MS/MS) method. As the results showed, water extract of H. diffusa (equal to 5.0 g/kg body weight) obviously protected renal tissues, significantly suppressed the productions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, as well as significantly promoted the production of IL-10 in serum and renal tissues. According the chemical profiles of H. diffusa, flavonoids, iridoid glycosides and anthraquinones were greatly detected in serum from H. diffusa extract treatment mice. Two main chemotypes, including eight flavonoids and four iridoid glycosides were found in renal tissues from H. diffusa extract treatment mice. The results demonstrated that water extract of H. diffusa had protective effect on renal inflammation, which possibly resulted from the bioactive constituents consisting of flavonoids, iridoids and anthraquinones. PMID:26580602

  14. Chemical Profiles and Protective Effect of Hedyotis diffusa Willd in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Renal Inflammation Mice.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jian-Hong; Liu, Meng-Hua; Zhang, Xu-Lin; He, Jing-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Protective effect of Hedyotis diffusa (H. diffusa) Willd against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced renal inflammation was evaluated by the productions of cytokines and chemokine, and the bioactive constituents of H. diffusa were detected by the ultra-fast liquid chromatography-diode array detector-quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometry (UFLC-DAD-Q-TOF-MS/MS) method. As the results showed, water extract of H. diffusa (equal to 5.0 g/kg body weight) obviously protected renal tissues, significantly suppressed the productions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, as well as significantly promoted the production of IL-10 in serum and renal tissues. According the chemical profiles of H. diffusa, flavonoids, iridoid glycosides and anthraquinones were greatly detected in serum from H. diffusa extract treatment mice. Two main chemotypes, including eight flavonoids and four iridoid glycosides were found in renal tissues from H. diffusa extract treatment mice. The results demonstrated that water extract of H. diffusa had protective effect on renal inflammation, which possibly resulted from the bioactive constituents consisting of flavonoids, iridoids and anthraquinones. PMID:26580602

  15. Blockade of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase protects mice against lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxin shock.

    PubMed

    Jung, In Duk; Lee, Min-Goo; Chang, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Jun Sik; Jeong, Young-Il; Lee, Chang-Min; Park, Won Sun; Han, Jin; Seo, Su-Kil; Lee, Sang Yong; Park, Yeong-Min

    2009-03-01

    Suppression of an excessive systemic inflammatory response is a promising and potent strategy for treating endotoxic sepsis. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), which is the rate-limiting enzyme for tryptophan catabolism, may play a critical role in various inflammatory disorders. In this study, we report a critical role for IDO in the dysregulated immune response associated with endotoxin shock. We found that IDO knockout (IDO(-/-)) mice and 1-methyl-D-tryptophan-treated, endotoxin-shocked mice had decreased levels of the cytokines, TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-12, and enhanced levels of IL-10. Blockade of IDO is thought to promote host survival in LPS-induced endotoxin shock, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate IDO expression during endotoxin shock. In vitro and in vivo, IDO expression was increased by exogenous IL-12, but decreased by exogenous IL-10 in dendritic cells and splenic dendritic cells. Interestingly, whereas LPS-induced IL-12 levels in serum were higher than those of IL-10, the balance between serum IL-12 and IL-10 following challenge became reversed in IDO(-/-)- or 1-methyl-D-tryptophan-treated mice. Our findings demonstrate that the detrimental immune response to endotoxin shock may occur via IDO modulation. Restoring the IL-12 and IL-10 balance by blocking IDO represents a potential strategy for sepsis treatment. PMID:19234212

  16. Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells Inhibit Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Reactions in Macrophages and Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dequan; Wang, Cong; Chi, Chuang; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Jing; Fang, Jun; Pan, Jingye

    2016-01-01

    Background. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) accompanied by trauma can lead to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and even death. Early inhibition of the inflammation is necessary for damage control. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs), as a novel therapy modality, have been shown to reduce inflammatory responses in human and animal models. Methods. In this study, we used Western blot, quantitative PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to assess the activity of BMSCs to suppress the inflammation induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in human umbilical cord endothelial cells (HUVECs) and alveolar macrophages. Results. Our results demonstrated that LPS caused an inflammatory response in alveolar macrophages and HUVECs, increased permeability of HUVEC, upregulated expression of toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, TLR4, phosphorylated p65, downregulated release of IL10, and promoted release of TNF-α in both cells. Coculture with BMSCs attenuated all of these activities induced by LPS in the two tested cell types. Conclusions. Together, our results demonstrate that BMSCs dosage dependently attenuates the inflammation damage of alveolar macrophages and HUVECs induced by LPS. PMID:27057093

  17. Effect of anti-macrophage migration inhibitory factor antibody on lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary neutrophil accumulation.

    PubMed

    Makita, H; Nishimura, M; Miyamoto, K; Nakano, T; Tanino, Y; Hirokawa, J; Nishihira, J; Kawakami, Y

    1998-08-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a recently rediscovered pro-inflammatory cytokine that has the unique potential to override the anti-inflammatory action of glucocorticoids. Since recent reports suggest the pivotal role of MIF in acute lung injury, we examined the protective effect of anti-MIF antibody on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury in rats. Rats were injected with LPS (7 mg/kg) intraperitoneally with or without pretreatment with anti-MIF antibody. The anti-MIF antibody significantly attenuated LPS-induced migration of neutrophils to the lungs at 4 and 24 h as demonstrated by observation of the number of neutrophils per alveolus, the activity of myeloperoxidase of the lung tissue, and cell differentiation of neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. The increased level of macrophage inflammatory protein-2, a powerful neutrophil chemokine, in BAL fluid was also significantly attenuated by pretreatment with the anti-MIF antibody as compared with the control group. Additionally, positive immunostaining for MIF was observed in bronchial epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages, and Northern blot analysis of lung tissues demonstrated increased MIF mRNA 24 h after LPS injection. These data suggest that the anti-MIF antibody has therapeutic potential for the treatment of acute lung injury by suppressing the level of neutrophil chemokine in the lungs. PMID:9700137

  18. Effects of Citral on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Yan; Zhao, Hongfeng; Liu, Jinyang; Fang, Chao; Miao, Renying

    2016-04-01

    Citral is an active compound of lemongrass oil which has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of citral on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory response in a rat model of peritonitis and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). LPS was intraperitoneally injected into rats to establish a peritonitis model. The HUVECs were treated with citral for 12 h before exposure to LPS. The levels of TNF-α and IL-8 were measured using ELISA. Western blotting was used to detect the expression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, NF-κB, and PPAR-γ. The results showed that citral had a protective effect against LPS-induced peritonitis. Citral decreased the levels of WBCs and inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6. Citral also inhibited LPS-induced myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the peritoneal tissue. Treatment of HUVECs with citral significantly inhibited TNF-α and IL-8 expression induced by LPS. LPS-induced VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 expression were also suppressed by citral. Meanwhile, we found that citral inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB activation in HUVECs. Furthermore, we found that citral activated PPAR-γ and the anti-inflammatory effects of citral can be reversed by PPAR-γ antagonist GW9662. In conclusion, citral inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory response via activating PPAR-γ which attenuates NF-κB activation and inflammatory mediator production. PMID:26658749

  19. BAT3 negatively regulates lipopolysaccharide-induced NF-κB signaling through TRAF6.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeojin; Lee, In Young; Yun, Hee Jae; Lee, Woo Sang; Kang, Seongman; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Lee, Ji Eun; Choi, Eui-Ju

    2016-09-16

    TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) plays a critical role in NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, both of which mediate macrophage activation in response to pathogen-associated molecular patterns such as bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharides (LPS). In this study, we investigated whether HLA-B associated transcript-3 (BAT3) regulates LPS-induced macrophage activation. BAT3 physically interacted with TRAF6 in macrophages, and this interaction was enhanced in the cells after LPS treatment. Furthermore, BAT3 inhibited the homo-oligomerization of TRAF6 as well as the interaction between TRAF6 and its downstream kinase transforming growth factor beta-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), thereby suppressing TRAF6-mediated signaling events. Intriguingly, TRAF6 mediated ubiquitination of BAT3 and this ubiquitination was crucial for its inhibitory effect on TRAF6-mediated signaling. Depletion of BAT3 by RNA interference resulted in enhancement of LPS-induced activation of the NF-κB signaling with increasing expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These findings suggest that BAT3 functions as the negative regulator of LPS-induced macrophage activation. PMID:27501752

  20. Modulation of lipopolysaccharide-induced chorioamnionitis by Ureaplasma parvum in sheep

    PubMed Central

    SNYDER, Candice C.; WOLFE, Katherine B.; GISSLEN, Tate; KNOX, Christine L.; KEMP, Matthew W.; KRAMER, Boris W.; NEWNHAM, John P.; JOBE, Alan H.; KALLAPUR, Suhas G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Ureaplasma colonization in the setting of polymicrobial flora is common in women with chorioamnionitis, and is a risk factor for preterm delivery and neonatal morbidity. We hypothesized that ureaplasma colonization of amniotic fluid will modulate chorioamnionitis induced by E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Methods Sheep received intra-amniotic (IA) injections of media (control) or live ureaplasma either 7 or 70d before delivery. Another group received IA LPS 2d before delivery. To test for interactions, U. parvum exposed animals were challenged with IA LPS, and delivered 2d later. All animals were delivered preterm at 125±1 day gestation. Results Both IA ureaplasmas and LPS induced leukocyte infiltration of chorioamnion. LPS greatly increased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and myeloperoxidase in leukocytes, while ureaplasmas alone caused modest responses. Interestingly, 7d but not 70d ureaplasma exposure significantly downregulated LPS induced pro-inflammatory cytokines and myeloperoxidase expression in the chorioamnion. Conclusion Acute U. parvum exposure (7d) can suppress LPS induced chorioamnionitis. PMID:23410690

  1. HSPA12B inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Li, Xuehan; Huang, Lei; Jiang, Surong; Tu, Fei; Zhang, Xiaojin; Ma, He; Li, Rongrong; Li, Chuanfu; Li, Yuehua; Ding, Zhengnian; Liu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein A12B (HSPA12B) is a newly discovered member of the HSP70 protein family. This study investigated the effects of HSPA12B on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and the possible mechanisms involved. A HUVECs inflammatory model was induced by LPS. Overexpression of HSPA12B in HUVECs was achieved by infection with recombinant adenoviruses encoding green fluorescence protein-HSPA12B. Knockdown of HSPA12B was achieved by siRNA technique. Twenty four hours after virus infection or siRNA transfection, HUVECs were stimulated with 1 μg/ml LPS for 4 hrs. Endothelial cell permeability ability was determined by transwell permeability assay. The binding rate of human neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) with HUVECs was examined using myeloperoxidase assay. Cell migrating ability was determined by the wound-healing assay. The mRNA and protein expression levels of interested genes were analyzed by RT-qPCR and Western blot, respectively. The release of cytokines interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α was measured by ELISA. HSPA12B suppressed LPS-induced HUVEC permeability and reduced PMN adhesion to HUVECs. HSPA12B also inhibited LPS-induced up-regulation of adhesion molecules and inflammatory cytokine expression. By contrast, knockdown of HSPA12B enhanced LPS-induced increases in the expression of adhesion molecules and inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, HSPA12B activated PI3K/Akt signalling pathway and pharmacological inhibition of this pathway by Wortmannin completely abrogated the protection of HSPA12B against inflammatory response in HUVECs. Our results suggest that HSPA12B attenuates LPS-induced inflammatory responses in HUVECs via activation of PI3K/Akt signalling pathway. PMID:25545050

  2. Cholangiocyte N-Ras Protein Mediates Lipopolysaccharide-induced Interleukin 6 Secretion and Proliferation*

    PubMed Central

    O'Hara, Steven P.; Splinter, Patrick L.; Trussoni, Christy E.; Gajdos, Gabriella B.; Lineswala, Pooja N.; LaRusso, Nicholas F.

    2011-01-01

    Cholangiocytes, the epithelial cells lining the bile ducts in the liver, are periodically exposed to potentially injurious microbes and/or microbial products. As a result, cholangiocytes actively participate in microbe-associated, hepatic proinflammatory responses. We previously showed that infection of cultured human cholangiocytes with the protozoan parasite, Cryptosporidium parvum, or treatment with Gram-negative bacteria-derived LPS, activates NFκB in a myeloid differentiation 88 (MyD88)-dependent manner. Here, we describe a novel signaling pathway initiated by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) involving the small GTPase, Ras, that mediates cholangiocyte proinflammatory cytokine production and induction of cholangiocyte proliferation. Using cultured human cholangiocytes and a Ras activation assay, we found that agonists of plasma membrane TLRs (TLR 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6) rapidly (<10 min) activated N-Ras, but not other p21 Ras isoforms, resulting in the rapid (<15 min) phosphorylation of the downstream Ras effector, ERK1/2. RNA interference-induced depletion of TRAF6, a downstream effector of MyD88 and known activator of MAPK signaling, had no effect on N-Ras activation. Following N-Ras activation the proinflammatory cytokine, IL6, is rapidly secreted. Using a luciferase reporter, we demonstrated that LPS treatment induced IL6 promoter-driven luciferase which was suppressed using MEK/ERK pharmacologic inhibitors (PD98059 or U0126) and RNAi-induced depletion of N-Ras. Finally, we showed that LPS increased cholangiocyte proliferation (1.5-fold), which was inhibited by depletion of N-Ras; TLR agonist-induced proliferation was also inhibited following pretreatment with an IL6 receptor-blocking antibody. Together, our results support a novel signaling axis involving microbial activation of N-Ras likely involved in the cholangiocyte pathogen-induced proinflammatory response. PMID:21757746

  3. Attenuation by phosphodiesterase inhibitors of lipopolysaccharide-induced thromboxane release and bronchoconstriction in rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, S; Featherstone, R L; Held, H D; Nüsing, R; Schudt, C; Wendel, A

    1997-12-01

    Exposure of perfused rat lungs to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) causes induction of cyclooxygenase-2 followed by thromboxane (TX)-mediated bronchoconstriction (BC). Recently, phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors have received much interest because they not only are bronchodilators but also can suppress release of proinflammatory mediators. In the present study, we investigated the effect of three different PDE inhibitors on TX release and BC in LPS-exposed perfused rat lungs. The PDE inhibitors used were motapizone (PDE III specific), rolipram (PDE IV specific), and zardaverine (mixed PDE III and IV specific). At 5 microM, a concentration at which all three compounds selectively block their respective PDE isoenzyme, rolipram (IC50 = 0.04 microM) and zardaverine (IC50 = 1.8 microM) largely attenuated the LPS-induced BC, whereas motapizone was almost ineffective (IC50 = 40 microM). In contrast to LPS, BC induced by the TX-mimetic U46619 was prevented with comparable strength by motapizone and rolipram. In LPS-treated lungs, the TX release was reduced to 50% of controls by rolipram and zardaverine but was unaltered in the presence of 5 microM motapizone. Increasing intracellular cAMP through perfusion of db-cAMP or forskolin (activates adenylate cyclase) also reduced TX release and BC. We conclude that PDE inhibitors act via elevation of intracellular cAMP. Although both PDE III and PDE IV inhibitors can relax airway smooth muscle, in the model of LPS-induced BC, PDE IV inhibitors are more effective because (in contrast to PDE III inhibitors) they also attenuate TX release. PMID:9400021

  4. Vitamin D3 pretreatment regulates renal inflammatory responses during lipopolysaccharide-induced acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shen; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Tan, Zhu-Xia; Xie, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Hua; Zhao, Hui; Yu, De-Xin; Xu, De-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is highly expressed in human and mouse kidneys. Nevertheless, its functions remain obscure. This study investigated the effects of vitamin D3 (VitD3) pretreatment on renal inflammation during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury. Mice were intraperitoneally injected with LPS. In VitD3 + LPS group, mice were pretreated with VitD3 (25 μg/kg) at 48, 24 and 1 h before LPS injection. As expected, an obvious reduction of renal function and pathological damage was observed in LPS-treated mice. VitD3 pretreatment significantly alleviated LPS-induced reduction of renal function and pathological damage. Moreover, VitD3 pretreatment attenuated LPS-induced renal inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules. In addition, pretreatment with 1,25(OH)2D3, the active form of VitD3, alleviated LPS-induced up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in human HK-2 cells, a renal tubular epithelial cell line, in a VDR-dependent manner. Further analysis showed that VitD3, which activated renal VDR, specifically repressed LPS-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 subunit in the renal tubules. LPS, which activated renal NF-κB, reciprocally suppressed renal VDR and its target gene. Moreover, VitD3 reinforced the physical interaction between renal VDR and NF-κB p65 subunit. These results provide a mechanistic explanation for VitD3-mediated anti-inflammatory activity during LPS-induced acute kidney injury. PMID:26691774

  5. Rosiglitazone pretreatment protects against lipopolysaccharide-induced fetal demise through inhibiting placental inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bo, Qing-Li; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Yu, Zhen; Fu, Lin; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Gui-Bin; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-03-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ is highly expressed in human and rodent placentas. Nevertheless, its function remains obscure. The present study investigated the effects of rosiglitazone, a PPAR-γ agonist, on LPS-induced fetal death. All pregnant mice except controls were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (150 μg/kg) daily from gestational day (GD)15 to GD17. As expected, maternal LPS injection caused placental inflammation and resulted in 63.6% fetal death in dams that completed the pregnancy. Interestingly, LPS-induced fetal mortality was reduced to 16.0% when pregnant mice were pretreated with RSG. Additional experiment showed that rosiglitazone pretreatment inhibited LPS-induced expressions of tumor necrosis factor (Tnf)-α, interleukin (Il)-1β, Il-6, macrophage inflammatory protein (Mip)-2 and keratinocyte-derived chemokine (Kc) in mouse placenta. Although rosiglitazone had little effect on LPS-evoked elevation of IL-10 in amniotic fluid, it alleviated LPS-evoked release of TNF-α and MIP-2 in amniotic fluid. Further analysis showed that pretreatment with rosiglitazone, which activated placental PPAR-γ signaling, simultaneously suppressed LPS-evoked nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation and blocked nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and p50 subunits in trophoblast giant cells of the labyrinth layer. These results provide a mechanistic explanation for PPAR-γ-mediated anti-inflammatory activity in the placentas. Overall, the present study provides additional evidence for roles of PPAR-γ as an important regulator of placental inflammation. PMID:26773728

  6. Paricalcitol attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced myocardial inflammation by regulating the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ae Sin; Jung, Yu Jin; Thanh, Tùng Nguyễn; Lee, Sik; Kim, Won; Kang, Kyung Pyo; Park, Sung Kwang

    2016-04-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, colon and breast cancer, infectious diseases and allergies. Vascular alterations are an important pathophysiological mechanism of sepsis. Experimental data suggest that paricalcitol, a vitamin D2 analogue, exerts beneficial effects on renal inflammation and fibrosis. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of paricalcitol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced myocardial inflammation and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. We used primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells for in vitro experiments, in which stimulation with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was used to induce endothelial cell inflammation. For in vivo experiments, myocardial inflammation was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of 15 mg/kg LPS into C57BL6 mice pre-treated with or without 0.2 µg/kg paricalcitol. Treatment with paricalcitol suppressed the TNF-α-induced increase in the protein expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and fractalkine in endothelial cells. Treatment with paricalcitol also decreased the TNF-α-induced nuclear factor (NF)-κB binding activity. In a mouse model of LPS-induced myocardial inflammation, pre-treatment with paricalcitol prevented the LPS-induced increase in the expression of myocardial ICAM-1, phosphorylated p65 and myocardial TNF-α. Pre-treatment with paricalcitol also alleviated endotoxemia‑induced microvascular leakage in the myocardium. The findings of our study suggest that paricalcitol exerts a protective effect against LPS-induced myocardial inflammation by regulating the expression of cell adhesion molecules and TNF-α, and by improving myocardial permeability. PMID:26954764

  7. Vitamin D3 pretreatment regulates renal inflammatory responses during lipopolysaccharide-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shen; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Tan, Zhu-Xia; Xie, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Hua; Zhao, Hui; Yu, De-Xin; Xu, De-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is highly expressed in human and mouse kidneys. Nevertheless, its functions remain obscure. This study investigated the effects of vitamin D3 (VitD3) pretreatment on renal inflammation during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury. Mice were intraperitoneally injected with LPS. In VitD3 + LPS group, mice were pretreated with VitD3 (25 μg/kg) at 48, 24 and 1 h before LPS injection. As expected, an obvious reduction of renal function and pathological damage was observed in LPS-treated mice. VitD3 pretreatment significantly alleviated LPS-induced reduction of renal function and pathological damage. Moreover, VitD3 pretreatment attenuated LPS-induced renal inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and adhesion molecules. In addition, pretreatment with 1,25(OH)2D3, the active form of VitD3, alleviated LPS-induced up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in human HK-2 cells, a renal tubular epithelial cell line, in a VDR-dependent manner. Further analysis showed that VitD3, which activated renal VDR, specifically repressed LPS-induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 subunit in the renal tubules. LPS, which activated renal NF-κB, reciprocally suppressed renal VDR and its target gene. Moreover, VitD3 reinforced the physical interaction between renal VDR and NF-κB p65 subunit. These results provide a mechanistic explanation for VitD3-mediated anti-inflammatory activity during LPS-induced acute kidney injury. PMID:26691774

  8. Rice hull smoke extract protects mice against a Salmonella lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Phil; Nam, Seok Hyun; Friedman, Mendel

    2014-08-01

    Endotoxemia (sepsis, septic shock) is an inflammatory, virulent disease that results mainly from infection by Gram-negative bacteria. The present study investigates the inhibitory effects of a rice hull smoke extract (RHSE) against murine endotoxemia induced by Salmonella lipopolysaccharide and d-galactosamine (LPS/GalN). Pretreatment of the mice with RHSE via dietary administration for 2 weeks resulted in the suppression (in %) of LPS/GalN-induced catalase by 70.7, superoxide dismutase (SOD) by 54.6, and transaminase (GOT/GPT) liver enzymes by 40.6/62.5, the amelioration of necrotic liver lesions, and the reduction of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) by 61.1 and nitrite serum level by 83.4, as well as myeloperoxidase (MPO) enzyme associated with necrotic injury of the lung and kidney by 65.7 and 63.3, respectively. The RHSE also extended the lifespan of the toxemic mice. The results using inflammation biomarkers and from the lifespan studies suggest that the RHSE can protect mice against LPS/GalN-induced liver, lung, and kidney injuries and inflammation by blocking oxidative stress and TNF-α production, thereby increasing the survival of the toxic-shock-induced mice. These beneficial effects and previous studies on the antimicrobial effects against Salmonella Typhimurium in culture and in mice suggest that the smoke extract also has the potential to serve as a new multifunctional resource in human food and animal feeds. Possible mechanisms of the beneficial effects at the cellular and molecular levels and suggested food uses are discussed. PMID:25068861

  9. Paricalcitol attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced myocardial inflammation by regulating the NF-κB signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    LEE, AE SIN; JUNG, YU JIN; THANH, TÙNG NGUYỄN; LEE, SIK; KIM, WON; KANG, KYUNG PYO; PARK, SUNG KWANG

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, colon and breast cancer, infectious diseases and allergies. Vascular alterations are an important pathophysiological mechanism of sepsis. Experimental data suggest that paricalcitol, a vitamin D2 analogue, exerts beneficial effects on renal inflammation and fibrosis. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of paricalcitol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced myocardial inflammation and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. We used primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells for in vitro experiments, in which stimulation with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was used to induce endothelial cell inflammation. For in vivo experiments, myocardial inflammation was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of 15 mg/kg LPS into C57BL6 mice pre-treated with or without 0.2 µg/kg paricalcitol. Treatment with paricalcitol suppressed the TNF-α-induced increase in the protein expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and fractalkine in endothelial cells. Treatment with paricalcitol also decreased the TNF-α-induced nuclear factor (NF)-κB binding activity. In a mouse model of LPS-induced myocardial inflammation, pre-treatment with paricalcitol prevented the LPS-induced increase in the expression of myocardial ICAM-1, phosphorylated p65 and myocardial TNF-α. Pre-treatment with paricalcitol also alleviated endotoxemia-induced microvascular leakage in the myocardium. The findings of our study suggest that paricalcitol exerts a protective effect against LPS-induced myocardial inflammation by regulating the expression of cell adhesion molecules and TNF-α, and by improving myocardial permeability. PMID:26954764

  10. Clausena anisata-mediated protection against lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Chan-Mi; Shin, In-Sik; Shin, Na-Rae; Hong, Ju-Mi; Kwon, Ok-Kyoung; Kim, Jung-Hee; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Bach, Tran-The; Hai, Do-Van; Quang, Bui-Hong; Choi, Sang-Ho; Lee, Joongku; Myung, Pyung-Keun; Ahn, Kyung-Seop

    2016-04-01

    Clausena anisata (Willd.) Hook.f. ex Benth. (CA), which is widely used in traditional medicine, reportedly exerts antitumor, anti-inflammatory and other important therapeutic effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential therapeutic effects of CA in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) and in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Male C57BL/6 mice were administered treatments for 3 days by oral gavage. On day 3, the mice were instilled intranasally with LPS or PBS followed 3 h later by oral CA (30 mg/kg) or vehicle administration. In vitro, CA decreased nitric oxide (NO) production and pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-6 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. CA also reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators, such as cyclooxygenase-2. In vivo, CA administration significantly reduced inflammatory cell numbers in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-6, and IL-1β, as well as reactive oxygen species production in the BALF. CA also effectively reduced airway inflammation in mouse lung tissue of an LPS-induced ALI mouse model, in addition to decreasing inhibitor κB (IκB) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 phosphorylation. Taken together, the findings demonstrated that CA inhibited inflammatory responses in a mouse model of LPS-induced ALI and in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Thus, CA is a potential candidate for development as an adjunctive treatment for inflammatory disorders, such as ALI. PMID:26952971

  11. β-Glucan modulates the lipopolysaccharide-induced innate immune response in rat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Ma, Haitian; Miao, Jinfeng; Huang, Guoqing; Tong, Mingqing; Zou, Sixiang

    2013-02-01

    Mastitis, caused by mammary pathogenic bacteria which are frequent implications of Escherichia coli, is an important disease affecting women and dairy animals worldwide. The β-glucan binding of dectin-1 can induce its own intracellular signaling and can mediate a variety of cellular responses. This work was to investigate the effect of β-glucan on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory response and related innate immune signaling in primary rat mammary epithelial cells. Cells were treated with serum-free medium added with a DMSO solution containing β-glucans at concentrations of 0, 1, 5, 25 μmol/L for 12h, and then exposed to 10 μg/mL LPS for 40 min. Moreover, cells were pretreated with BAY 11-7082 to inhibit NF-κB and then successively exposed to 5 μmol/L β-glucan, 10 μg/mL LPS, 5 μmol/L β-glucan and 10 μg/mL LPS, according to the specific experimental design. Normal control cultures contained an equal volume of DMSO, which was collected at the same time. After incubating rat mammary epithelial cells for 40 min with 10 μg/mL LPS, TLR4, MyD88 and NF-κB expression all increased (P<0.05), as did the secretion of TNF-α and IL-1β (P<0.05), but IκB and β-casein expression both decreased (P<0.05). Treatment with different concentrations of β-glucan for 12h activated Dectin1/Syk, which subsequently suppressed TLR4, MyD88 and NF-κB expression and TNF-α and IL-1β secretion. However, it restored the IκB and β-casein expression that had been induced by the 40 min incubation with 10 μg/mL LPS. Pretreatment with BAY 11-7082 at 10 µmol/L for 2h partially prevented NF-κB induction by LPS, but the presence of β-glucan prevented this inactivation. BAY 11-7082 could not simultaneously inhibit LPS induction of TLR4, MyD88 and β-glucan activation of Dectin1/Syk in rat mammary epithelial cells. These findings demonstrated that β-glucan activation of Dectin1/Syk attenuated LPS induction of TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB and inhibited the LPS

  12. Identification and characterization of lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-alpha factor gene from Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Li, Xuejing; Gen, Xuyun; Chen, Yue; Wei, Junli; Sun, Jinsheng

    2014-02-15

    Lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-α factor (LITAF) is an important transcription factor participating in innate immunity through regulating TNF-α and other inflammatory cytokines expression. However, the expression and biological relevance of LITAF in fish is still very limited. In this study, a full-length LITAF cDNA, termed PoLITAF, was identified from Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus. PoLITAF contains a 67 bp 5'-untranslated sequence, a 435 bp open reading frame, and a 647 bp 3'-untranslated sequence. PoLITAF protein is comprised of 144 amino acids with a conserved C-terminal LITAF-like domain and shows 51-76% sequence similarity and 40-65% sequence identity with other LITAF homologues. Characterization of this new gene revealed that PoLITAF mRNA was detected in all examined tissues with the highest expression in gill. In head kidney primary culture, the expression of Japanese flounder PoLITAF and TNF-α was significantly up-regulated in response to Poly(I:C) and bacterial endotoxin LPS stimulation. Further in vivo experiments demonstrated that PoLITAF expression was up-regulated in head kidney, gill and spleen post bacterial challenge with Edwardsiella tarda. Moreover, the up-regulated expression of Japanese flounder TNF-α following the enhanced expression of PoLITAF was detected as early as 4h in both gill and head kidney tissues and 12h in spleen after the bacterial infection in vivo. Our findings suggest that PoLITAF is a novel inducible gene possibly involved in Japanese flounder innate immunity. PMID:24359872

  13. High concentrations of extracellular potassium enhance bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide-induced neurotoxicity in glia-neuron mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Chang, R C; Hudson, P M; Wilson, B C; Liu, B; Abel, H; Hong, J S

    2000-01-01

    A sudden increase in extracellular potassium ions (K(+)) often occurs in cerebral ischemia and after brain trauma. This increase of extracellular K(+) constitutes the basis for spreading depression across the cerebral cortex, resulting in the expansion of neuronal death after ischemic and traumatic brain injuries. Besides spreading depression, it has become clear that cerebral inflammation also is a key factor contributing to secondary brain injury in acute neurological disorders. Experiments to validate the relationship between elevated levels of extracellular K(+) and inflammation have not been studied. This study aims to elucidate the roles of high concentrations of extracellular K(+) in bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide-induced production of inflammatory factors. Increased concentration of KCl in the medium (20mM) significantly enhanced neurotoxicity by lipopolysaccharide in glia-neuron mixed cultures. To delineate the underlying mechanisms of increased neurotoxicity, the effects of high extracellular K(+) were examined by using mixed glial cultures. KCl at 20mM significantly enhanced nitrite, an index for nitric oxide, production by about twofold, and was pronounced from 24 to 48h, depending on the concentration of KCl. Besides nitric oxide production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha was also enhanced. The augmentative effects of high KCl on the production of inflammatory factors were probably due to the further activation of microglia, since high KCl also enhanced the production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in microglia-enriched cultures. The increased production of nitrite by high K(+) was eliminated through use of a K(+)-blocker. Taken together, the results show that increases of extracellular K(+) concentrations in spreading depression augment lipopolysaccharide-elicited neurotoxicity, because production of inflammatory factors such as nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-alpha are potentiated. Since spreading depression and cerebral inflammation

  14. Study on anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of clomipramine in carrageenan- and lipopolysaccharide-induced rat models of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kostadinov, Ilia; Delev, Delian; Petrova, Atanaska; Stanimirova, Irina; Draganova, Krassimira; Kostadinova, Ivanka; Murdjeva, Marianna

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of clomipramine in carrageenan- and lipopolysaccharide-induced (LPS-induced) models of inflammation by investigating the changes in serum levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α and the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-β after single and repeated administration of the drug. In order to study the effect of single and repeated doses of clomipramine on carrageenan-induced paw oedema, male Wistar rats were divided in five groups (n = 8): control, positive control group and three experimental groups treated with 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg bw clomipramine, respectively. The effect of single and repeated doses of clomipramine on serum cytokine levels was studied as animals were divided in four groups: two control groups treated with saline and two experimental groups treated with clomipramine 20 mg/kg bw. Carrageenan and LPS were injected immediately after clomipramine or saline injection. Serum cytokine concentrations were tested by enzyme immunoassay. Following acute administration only the highest dose that was used inhibited the carrageenan-induced inflammation. Oedema inhibition was observed with 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg bw clomipramine after repeated administration. Single and repeated administration of clomipramine at a dose of 20 mg/kg bw did not significantly change the serum levels of TGF-1β, IL-10 and TNF-α when compared to the controls in carrageenan-induced inflammation. Following LPS-induced inflammation clomipramine significantly increased the serum levels of TGF-1β after repeated administration and decreased TNF-α in rats after single-dose and repeated pretreatment with 20 mg/kg bw clomipramine. A significant increase in the levels of IL-10 in relation to this inflammatory model was observed only in single dose treated animals. Clomipramine possesses an anti-inflammatory effect in the carrageenan-induced model of exudative inflammation. In LPS-induced inflammation

  15. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Middle Ear Inflammation Disrupts the cochlear Intra-Strial Fluid–Blood Barrier through Down-Regulation of Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinhui; Chen, Songlin; Hou, Zhiqiang; Cai, Jing; Dong, Mingmin; Shi, Xiaorui

    2015-01-01

    Middle ear infection (or inflammation) is the most common pathological condition that causes fluid to accumulate in the middle ear, disrupting cochlear homeostasis. Lipopolysaccharide, a product of bacteriolysis, activates macrophages and causes release of inflammatory cytokines. Many studies have shown that lipopolysaccharides cause functional and structural changes in the inner ear similar to that of inflammation. However, it is specifically not known how lipopolysaccharides affect the blood-labyrinth barrier in the stria vascularis (intra-strial fluid–blood barrier), nor what the underlying mechanisms are. In this study, we used a cell culture-based in vitro model and animal-based in vivo model, combined with immunohistochemistry and a vascular leakage assay, to investigate lipopolysaccharide effects on the integrity of the mouse intra-strial fluid–blood barrier. Our results show lipopolysaccharide-induced local infection significantly affects intra-strial fluid–blood barrier component cells. Pericytes and perivascular-resident macrophage-like melanocytes are particularly affected, and the morphological and functional changes in these cells are accompanied by substantial changes in barrier integrity. Significant vascular leakage is found in the lipopolysaccharide treated-animals. Consistent with the findings from the in vivo animal model, the permeability of the endothelial cell monolayer to FITC-albumin was significantly higher in the lipopolysaccharide-treated monolayer than in an untreated endothelial cell monolayer. Further study has shown the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation to have a major effect on the expression of tight junctions in the blood barrier. Lipopolysaccharide was also shown to cause high frequency hearing loss, corroborated by previous reports from other laboratories. Our findings show lipopolysaccharide-evoked middle ear infection disrupts inner ear fluid balance, and its particular effects on the intra-strial fluid

  16. Results from in vitro and ex vivo skin aging models assessing the antiglycation and anti-elastase MMP-12 potential of glycylglycine oleamide

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanowicz, Patrick; Haure, Marie-José; Ceruti, Isabelle; Bessou-Touya, Sandrine; Castex-Rizzi, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Background Glycation is an aging reaction of naturally occurring sugars with dermal proteins. Type I collagen and elastin are most affected by glycation during intrinsic chronological aging. Aim To study the in vitro and ex vivo assays in human skin cells and explants and the antiaging effects of glycylglycine oleamide (GGO). Materials and methods The antiglycation effect of GGO was assessed in a noncellular in vitro study on collagen and, ex vivo, by immunohistochemical staining on human skin explants (elastin network glycation). The ability of GGO to contract fibroblasts was assessed in a functional assay, and its anti-elastase (MMP-12) activity was compared to that of oleic acid alone, glycylglycine (GG) alone, and oleic acid associated with GG. Results In vitro, GGO reduced the glycation of type I collagen. Ex vivo, GGO restored the expression of fibrillin-1 inhibited by glycation. Furthermore, GGO induced a tissue retraction of almost 30%. Moreover, the MMP-12 activity was inhibited by up to 60%. Conclusion Under the present in vitro and ex vivo conditions, GGO prevents glycation of the major structural proteins of the dermis, helping to reduce the risk of rigidification. By maintaining the elastic function of the skin, GGO may be a promising sparring partner for other topical antiaging agents. PMID:27382322

  17. Purple carrot anthocyanins suppress lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in the co-culture of intestinal Caco-2 and macrophage RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Olejnik, Anna; Kowalska, Katarzyna; Kidoń, Marcin; Czapski, Janusz; Rychlik, Joanna; Olkowicz, Mariola; Dembczyński, Radosław

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of purple carrot anthocyanins (PCA) with respect to gut inflammation, simulated in a co-culture system consisting of intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells and RAW264.7 macrophages. The obtained results indicated that PCA extract down-regulates the mRNA expression of proinflammatory interleukins Il-1β (↓91%) and Il-6 (↓69%) as well as inflammatory mediators, such as cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNos), in lipopolysaccharide-activated RAW264.7 cells. The decrease in the generation of prostaglandin E2 (↓48%) and nitric oxide (↓26%) was observed as a result of the inhibition of Cox-2 (↓25%) and iNos (↓12%) mRNA expressions, respectively. Moreover, the PCA reduced mRNA expression (↓40%) and production (↓17%) of IL-8 in intestinal cells. The anti-inflammatory effect of PCA was contributed to the protection of the intestinal barrier, which was disrupted upon the stimulation of macrophages. These findings may provide preliminary justification for the use of PCA in further studies focused on the prevention and therapy supporting the conventional treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:26613574

  18. 1,5-Anhydro-D-fructose attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine release via suppression of NF-{kappa}B p65 phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Meng Xiaojie; Kawahara, Ko-ichi; Nawa, Yuko; Miura, Naoki; Shrestha, Binita; Tancharoen, Salunya; Sameshima, Hisayo; Hashiguchi, Teruto; Maruyama, Ikuro

    2009-03-06

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulates macrophages by activating NF-{kappa}B, which contributes to the release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} and interleukin (IL)-6. 1,5-anhydro-D-fructose (1,5-AF), a monosaccharide formed from starch and glycogen, exhibits anti-oxidant activity and enhances insulin secretion. This study examined the effects of 1,5-AF on LPS-induced inflammatory reactions and elucidated its molecular mechanisms. Before LPS challenge, mice were pretreated with 1,5-AF (38.5 mg/kg). We found that 1,5-AF pretreatment attenuated cytokine release into the serum, including TNF-{alpha}, IL-6 and macrophage chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1. Furthermore, pretreatment with 1,5-AF (500 {mu}g/ml) attenuated cytokine release, and 1,5-AF directly inhibited the nuclear translocalization of the NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit in LPS-stimulated murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells. This inhibition was responsible for decreased LPS-induced phosphorylation on Ser536 of the NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit, which is a posttranslational modification involved in the non-canonical pathway. Collectively, these findings indicate that the anti-inflammatory activity of 1,5-AF occurs via inactivation of NF-{kappa}B.

  19. 5-Methoxyl Aesculetin Abrogates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation by Suppressing MAPK and AP-1 Pathways in RAW 264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Li, Xueqin; Wu, Haifeng; Long, Wei; Jiang, Xiaojian; Shen, Ting; Qiang, Qian; Si, Chuanling; Wang, Xinfeng; Jiang, Yunyao; Hu, Weicheng

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, a pale amorphous coumarin derivative, 5-methoxyl aesculetin (MOA), was isolated from the dried bark of Fraxinus rhynchophylla Hance (Oleaceae). MOA modulates cytokine expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages, but the precise mechanisms are still not fully understood. We determined the effects of MOA on the production of inflammatory mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the LPS-induced inflammatory responses of RAW 264.7 macrophages. MOA significantly inhibited the LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6, and interleukin-1β. It also effectively attenuated inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, and TNF-α mRNA expression and significantly decreased the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species. It inhibited phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), thus blocking nuclear translocation of activation protein (AP)-1. In a molecular docking study, MOA was shown to target the binding site of ERK via the formation of three hydrogen bonds with two residues of the kinase, which is sufficient for the inhibition of ERK. These results suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of MOA in RAW 264.7 macrophages derive from its ability to block both the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and one of their downstream transcription factors, activator protein-1 (AP-1). Our observations support the need for further research into MOA as a promising therapeutic agent in inflammatory diseases. PMID:26938526

  20. Arctigenin Protects against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Pulmonary Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in a Mouse Model via Suppression of MAPK, HO-1, and iNOS Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-zhou; Jiang, Zheng-kui; He, Bao-xia; Liu, Xian-ben

    2015-08-01

    Arctigenin, a bioactive component of Arctium lappa (Nubang), has anti-inflammatory activity. Here, we investigated the effects of arctigenin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury. Mice were divided into four groups: control, LPS, LPS + DMSO, and LPS + Arctigenin. Mice in the LPS + Arctigenin group were injected intraperitoneally with 50 mg/kg of arctigenin 1 h before an intratracheal administration of LPS (5 mg/kg). Lung tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALFs) were collected. Histological changes of the lung were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Arctigenin decreased LPS-induced acute lung inflammation, infiltration of inflammatory cells into BALF, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, arctigenin pretreatment reduced the malondialdehyde level and increased superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and glutathione peroxidase/glutathione disulfide ratio in the lung. Mechanically, arctigenin significantly reduced the production of nitric oxygen and inducible nitric oxygen synthase (iNOS) expression, enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, and decreased the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Arctigenin has anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects on LPS-induced acute lung injury, which are associated with modulation of MAPK, HO-1, and iNOS signaling. PMID:25616905

  1. Gardenia jasminoides extracts and gallic acid inhibit lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation by suppression of JNK2/1 signaling pathways in BV-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wen-Hung; Kuo, Heng-Hung; Ho, Li-Hsing; Tseng, Ming-Lang; Siao, An-Ci; Hung, Chang-Tsen; Jeng, Kee-Ching; Hou, Chien-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Gardenia jasminoides Ellis (GJ, Cape Jasmine Fruit, Zhi Zi) has been traditionally used for the treatment of infectious hepatitis, aphthous ulcer, and trauma; however, the direct evidence is lacking. Materials and Methods: We investigated the effect of the GJ extract (GJ) and gallic acid (GA) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced inflammation of BV-2 microglial cells and acute liver injury in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Results: Our results showed that the GJ extract and GA reduced LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and prostaglandin (PGE2) production in BV-2 cells. The GJ extract and GA significantly decreased serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels in LPS-treated rats. Furthermore, the water extract, but not the ethanol extract, of the GJ dose-dependently inhibited LPS-induced JNK2/1 and slightly p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in BV-2 cells. Conclusion: Taken together, these results indicate that the protective mechanism of the GJ extract involves an antioxidant effect and inhibition of JNK2/1 MAP kinase and COX-2 expressions in LPS-induced inflammation of BV-2 cells. PMID:26221479

  2. Anti-inflammatory effects of apigenin in lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory in acute lung injury by suppressing COX-2 and NF-kB pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Yu-Tao; Xiao, Lu; Zhu, Lingpeng; Wang, Qiujuan; Yan, Tianhua

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the possible mechanisms responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of apigenin lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory in acute lung injury. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effects of apigenin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice and the possible mechanisms involved in this protection were investigated. Pretreatment with apigenin prior to the administration of intratracheal LPS significantly induced a decrease in lung wet weight/dry weight ratio in total leukocyte number and neutrophil percent in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and in IL-6 and IL-1β, the tumor neurosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the BALF. These results showed that anti-inflammatory effects of apigenin against the LPS-induced ALI may be due to its ability of primary inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene expression and nuclear factor kB (NF-kB) gene expression of lung. The results presented here suggest that the protective mechanism of apigenin may be attributed partly to decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines through the inhibition of COX-2 and NF-kB activation. The results support that use of apigenin is beneficial in the treatment of ALI. PMID:24958013

  3. Gambogic acid covalently modifies IκB-kinase-β subunit to mediate suppression of lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of NF-κB in macrophages*

    PubMed Central

    Palempalli, Umamaheshwari D.; Gandhi, Ujjawal; Kalantari, Parisa; Vunta, Hema; Arner, Ryan J.; Narayan, Vivek; Ravindran, Anand; Prabhu, K. Sandeep

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Gambogic acid (GA) is a polyprenylated xanthone abundant in the resin of Garcinia morella and G. hanburyi with a long history of use as a complementary and alternative medicine. The anti-tumor activity of GA has been well demonstrated and is thought to arise partly from the associated anti-inflammatory activity. Recent studies have indicated that the anti-tumor activity of GA is mediated by its ligation of the transferrin receptor TfR1. Since the cellular expression of TfR1 is down-regulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), we hypothesized that an alternative pathway exists in immune cells, such as macrophages, where GA could mitigate the expression of pro-inflammatory genes. Here we demonstrate that GA inhibits the LPS-dependent expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) target pro-inflammatory genes in macrophages. Western immunoblot, NF-κB luciferase reporter, and gel shift analyses revealed that GA strongly blocked the activation of NF-κB induced by LPS; while 9,10-dihydroGA that lacks the reactive α,β-unsaturated carbonyl group was ineffective. Moreover, GA was able to decrease nuclear p65 levels in RAW264.7 macrophages, where the expression of TfR1 was down-regulated by RNA interference. In-vitro kinase assays coupled with interaction studies using biotinylated GA as well as proteomic analysis demonstrated that IKKβ, a key kinase of the NF-κB signaling axis, was covalently modified by GA at Cys179 causing significant inhibition of its kinase activity. Taken together, these data demonstrate the potent anti-inflammatory activity of GA. PMID:19140805

  4. Gambogic acid covalently modifies IkappaB kinase-beta subunit to mediate suppression of lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of NF-kappaB in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Palempalli, Umamaheshwari D; Gandhi, Ujjawal; Kalantari, Parisa; Vunta, Hema; Arner, Ryan J; Narayan, Vivek; Ravindran, Anand; Prabhu, K Sandeep

    2009-04-15

    GA (gambogic acid) is a polyprenylated xanthone abundant in the resin of Garcinia morella and Garcinia hanburyi with a long history of use as a complementary and alternative medicine. The antitumour activity of GA has been well demonstrated and is thought to arise partly from the associated anti-inflammatory activity. Recent studies have indicated that the antitumour activity of GA is mediated by its ligation of TfR1 (transferrin receptor-1). Since the cellular expression of TfR1 is down-regulated by LPS (lipopolysaccharide), we hypothesized that an alternative pathway exists in immune cells, such as macrophages, where GA could mitigate the expression of pro-inflammatory genes. Here we demonstrate that GA inhibits the LPS-dependent expression of NF-kappaB (nuclear factor kappaB) target pro-inflammatory genes in macrophages. Western immunoblot, NF-kappaB-luciferase reporter and gel-shift analyses revealed that GA strongly blocked the activation of NF-kappaB induced by LPS, whereas 9,10-dihydro-GA, which lacks the reactive alpha,beta-unsaturated carbonyl group, was ineffective. Moreover, GA was able to decrease nuclear p65 levels in RAW264.7 macrophages, where the expression of TfR1 was down-regulated by RNA interference. in vitro kinase assays coupled with interaction studies using biotinylated GA as well as proteomic analysis demonstrated that IKKbeta [IkappaB (inhibitory kappaB) kinase-beta], a key kinase of the NF-kappaB signalling axis, was covalently modified by GA at Cys-179, causing significant inhibition of its kinase activity. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potent anti-inflammatory activity of GA. PMID:19140805

  5. Ulinastatin suppresses lipopolysaccharide induced neuro-inflammation through the downregulation of nuclear factor-κB in SD rat hippocampal astrocyte

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuting; Zhao, Lei; Fu, Huiqun; Wu, Yan; Wang, Tianlong

    2015-03-20

    Astrocyte activation plays a pivotal role in neuroinflammation, which contributes to neuronal damage, so the inhibition of astrocyte activation may alleviate the progression of neurodegeneration. Recent studies have proved that urinary trypsin inhibitor ulinastatin could inhibit NF-kB activation. In our study, the inhibitory effects of ulinastatin on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators were investigated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-reduced primary astrocyte. Our results showed that ulinastatin significantly inhibited LPS-induced astrogliosis, which is measured by MTT and BrdU. Ulinastatin decreased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, it significantly decreased both the mRNA and the protein levels of these pro-inflammatory cytokines and also increased the protein levels of IκB-α binded to NF-κB, which blocked NF-κB translocation to the nucleus and prevented its activity. Our results suggest that ulinastatin is able to inhibit neuroinflammation by interfering with NF-κB signaling. The study provides direct evidence of potential therapy methods of ulinastatin for the treatment of neuroinflammatory diseases. - Highlights: • The anti-inflammatory effect of UTI on hippocampal astrocyte. • UTI showed protective effect on neuroinflammation by the downregulation of NF-κB. • UTI led to expression of cytokines decreased in concentration and time dependence.

  6. 5-Methoxyl Aesculetin Abrogates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation by Suppressing MAPK and AP-1 Pathways in RAW 264.7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lei; Li, Xueqin; Wu, Haifeng; Long, Wei; Jiang, Xiaojian; Shen, Ting; Qiang, Qian; Si, Chuanling; Wang, Xinfeng; Jiang, Yunyao; Hu, Weicheng

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, a pale amorphous coumarin derivative, 5-methoxyl aesculetin (MOA), was isolated from the dried bark of Fraxinus rhynchophylla Hance (Oleaceae). MOA modulates cytokine expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages, but the precise mechanisms are still not fully understood. We determined the effects of MOA on the production of inflammatory mediators and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the LPS-induced inflammatory responses of RAW 264.7 macrophages. MOA significantly inhibited the LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6, and interleukin-1β. It also effectively attenuated inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, and TNF-α mRNA expression and significantly decreased the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species. It inhibited phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), thus blocking nuclear translocation of activation protein (AP)-1. In a molecular docking study, MOA was shown to target the binding site of ERK via the formation of three hydrogen bonds with two residues of the kinase, which is sufficient for the inhibition of ERK. These results suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of MOA in RAW 264.7 macrophages derive from its ability to block both the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and one of their downstream transcription factors, activator protein-1 (AP-1). Our observations support the need for further research into MOA as a promising therapeutic agent in inflammatory diseases. PMID:26938526

  7. Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced rat acute lung injury via suppressing the ERK1/2 and NF-κB signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingchuan; Zeng, Zhen; Cao, Yongmei; Liu, Yujing; Ping, Feng; Liang, Mengfan; Xue, Ying; Xi, Caihua; Zhou, Ming; Jiang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by severe sepsis remains a major challenge in intensive care medicine. ACE2 has been shown to protect against lung injury. However, the mechanisms of its protective effects on ARDS are largely unknown. Here, we report that ACE2 prevents LPS-induced ARDS by inhibiting MAPKs and NF-κB signaling pathway. Lentiviral packaged Ace2 cDNA or Ace2 shRNA was intratracheally administrated into the lungs of male SD rats. Two weeks after gene transfer, animals received LPS (7.5 mg/Kg) injection alone or in combination with Mas receptor antagonist A779 (10 μg/Kg) or ACE2 inhibitor MLN-4760 (1 mg/Kg) pretreatment. LPS-induced lung injury and inflammatory response were significantly prevented by ACE2 overexpression and deteriorated by Ace2 shRNA. A779 or MLN-4760 pretreatment abolished the protective effects of ACE2. Moreover, overexpression of ACE2 significantly reduced the Ang II/Ang-(1-7) ratio in BALF and up-regulated Mas mRNA expression in lung, which was reversed by A779. Importantly, the blockade of ACE2 on LPS-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38 and p50/p65 was also abolished by A779. Whereas, only the ERK1/2 inhibitor significantly attenuated lung injury in ACE2 overexpressing rats pretreated with A779. Our observation suggests that AEC2 attenuates LPS-induced ARDS via the Ang-(1-7)/Mas pathway by inhibiting ERK/NF-κB activation. PMID:27302421

  8. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 expression by xanthanolides isolated from Xanthium strumarium.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jeong Hoon; Lim, Hyo Jin; Lee, Hwa Jin; Kim, Hee-Doo; Jeon, Raok; Ryu, Jae-Ha

    2008-03-15

    Three sesquiterpenoids, xanthatin (1), xanthinosin (2), and 4-oxo-bedfordia acid (3) were isolated from Xanthium strumarium as inhibitors of nitric oxide synthesis in activated microglia (IC(50) values: 0.47, 11.2, 136.5 microM, respectively). Compounds 1 and 2 suppressed the expression of iNOS and COX-2 and the activity of NF-kappaB through the inhibition of LPS-induced I-kappaB-alpha degradation in microglia. PMID:18276135

  9. 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid, a plant-derived oxylipin, attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in microglia.

    PubMed

    Taki-Nakano, Nozomi; Kotera, Jun; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-13

    Jasmonates are plant lipid-derived oxylipins that act as key signaling compounds in plant immunity, germination, and development. Although some physiological activities of natural jasmonates in mammalian cells have been investigated, their anti-inflammatory actions in mammalian cells remain unclear. Here, we investigated whether jasmonates protect mouse microglial MG5 cells against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation. Among the jasmonates tested, only 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) suppressed LPS-induced expression of the typical inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor α. In addition, only OPDA reduced LPS-induced nitric oxide production through a decrease in the level of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Further mechanistic studies showed that OPDA suppressed neuroinflammation by inhibiting nuclear factor κB and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in LPS-activated MG5 cells. In addition, OPDA induced expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 (SOCS-1), a negative regulator of inflammation, in MG5 cells. Finally, we found that the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 signaling cascade induced by OPDA is not involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of OPDA. These results demonstrate that OPDA inhibited LPS-induced cell inflammation in mouse microglial cells via multiple pathways, including suppression of nuclear factor κB, inhibition of p38, and activation of SOCS-1 signaling. PMID:27086850

  10. Engeletin Alleviates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Endometritis in Mice by Inhibiting TLR4-mediated NF-κB Activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haichong; Zhao, Gan; Jiang, Kangfeng; Li, Chengye; Qiu, Changwei; Deng, Ganzhen

    2016-08-10

    Engeletin (dihydrokaempferol 3-rhamnoside) is a flavanonol glycoside. It can be found in the skin of white grapes and white wine and is widely distributed in southeast Asia, and the leaves are used in a tea. Here, we explored the impact of engeletin against the inflammatory reaction in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endometritis mouse model. Engeletin treatment significantly attenuated uterus damage and decreased myeloperoxidase activity. ELISA and qPCR assays showed that engeletin dose-dependently suppressed the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6. Molecular studies also demonstrated that the levels of iNOS, COX-2, and TLR4, along with their downstream molecules MyD88, IRAK1, TRAF6, and TAK1, were also suppressed by engeletin. In addition, engeletin treatment inhibited NF-κB signaling-pathway activation. Moreover, immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated that engeletin suppressed NF-κB-p65 nuclear translocation. These data indicated the protective action of engeletin against LPS-stimulated endometritis in mice via negative regulation of pro-inflammatory mediators via the TLR4-regulated NF-κB pathway. PMID:27411287

  11. Protective Effect of Brown Alga Phlorotannins against Hyper-inflammatory Responses in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Sepsis Models.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yeong-In; Woo, Jeong-Hwa; Seo, Yun-Ji; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Lim, Yunsook; Choi, Jung-Hye

    2016-01-27

    Brown algae have been recognized as a food ingredient and health food supplement in Japan and Korea, and phlorotannins are unique marine phenol compounds produced exclusively by brown algae. Sepsis is a whole-body inflammatory condition with a mortality rate of 30-40%. Here, we investigated the effects of a phlorotannin-rich extract of the edible brown alga Ecklonia cava against hyper-inflammatory response in LPS-induced septic shock mouse model. E. cava extract significantly increased the survival rate and attenuated liver and kidney damage in the mice. In addition, E. cava attenuated serum levels of NO, PGE2, and HMGB-1. In macrophages, treatment with E. cava extract down-regulated iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, IL-6, and HMGB-1. In addition, E. cava suppressed the NIK/TAK1/IKK/IκB/NFκB pathway. Moreover, E. cava increased Nrf2 and HO-1 expression. HO-1 knockdown using siRNA restored the extract-suppressed NO and PGE2 production. Dieckol, a major compound in the extract, reduced mortality, tissue toxicity, and serum levels of the inflammatory factors in septic mice. These data suggest that brown algae phlorotannins suppress septic shock through negative regulation of pro-inflammatory factors via the NIK/TAK1/IKK/IκB/NFκB and Nrf2/HO-1 pathways. PMID:26730445

  12. The sleep lipid oleamide may represent an endogenous anticonvulsant: an in vitro comparative study in the 4-aminopyridine rat brain-slice model.

    PubMed

    Dougalis, Antonios; Lees, George; Ganellin, C Robin

    2004-03-01

    cis-Oleamide (cOA) is a putative endocannabinoid, which modulates GABA(A) receptors, Na+ channels and gap-junctions (important targets for clinical and experimental anticonvulsants). Here we address the hypothesis that cOA possesses seizure limiting properties and might represent an endogenous anticonvulsant. Field potentials were recorded from the rat hippocampus and visual cortex. The effects of cOA, were compared to carbamazepine (CBZ), pentobarbital (PB) and carbenoxolone (CRX) on 4-Aminopyridine(4AP)-induced epileptiform discharges. CBZ (100 microM), PB (50 microM) and CRX (100 microM), but not cOA (64 microM), significantly attenuated the duration of the evoked epileptiform discharges in CA1. Interictal activity in CA3 was significantly depressed by CRX and cOA (irreversible by AM251), increased by CBZ and remained unaffected by PB. CBZ, PB and CRX abolished spontaneous ictal events and attenuated evoked ictal discharges in the visual cortex. cOA did not abolish spontaneous ictal events, but significantly (albeit weakly) reduced the duration of evoked ictal events. cOA and CRX, in contrast to CBZ or PB, caused a significant delay in the development of the evoked (tonic phase) epileptiform discharges. The weak effects of cOA seem independent of cannabinoid (CB1) receptors. Enzymatic cleavage and lack of specific antagonists for cOA confound simple interpretations of its actions in slices. Its high lipophilicity, imposing a permeability barrier, may also explain the lack of anticonvulsant activity. The effects of cOA may well be masked by release of the endogenous ligand upon ictal depolarisation as we demonstrate here for established endocannabinoids. cOA does not possess profound antiepileptic actions in our hands compared to CBZ, PB or CRX. PMID:14975678

  13. Amelioration of Acute Kidney Injury in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome by an Aldose Reductase Inhibitor, Fidarestat

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Mizukami, Hiroki; Kamata, Kosuke; Inaba, Wataru; Kato, Noriaki; Hibi, Chihiro; Yagihashi, Soroku

    2012-01-01

    Background Systemic inflammatory response syndrome is a fatal disease because of multiple organ failure. Acute kidney injury is a serious complication of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and its genesis is still unclear posing a difficulty for an effective treatment. Aldose reductase (AR) inhibitor is recently found to suppress lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cardiac failure and its lethality. We studied the effects of AR inhibitor on LPS-induced acute kidney injury and its mechanism. Methods Mice were injected with LPS and the effects of AR inhibitor (Fidarestat 32 mg/kg) before or after LPS injection were examined for the mortality, severity of renal failure and kidney pathology. Serum concentrations of cytokines (interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α) and their mRNA expressions in the lung, liver, spleen and kidney were measured. We also evaluated polyol metabolites in the kidney. Results Mortality rate within 72 hours was significantly less in LPS-injected mice treated with AR inhibitor both before (29%) and after LPS injection (40%) than untreated mice (90%). LPS-injected mice showed marked increases in blood urea nitrogen, creatinine and cytokines, and AR inhibitor treatment suppressed the changes. LPS-induced acute kidney injury was associated with vacuolar degeneration and apoptosis of renal tubular cells as well as infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages. With improvement of such pathological findings, AR inhibitor treatment suppressed the elevation of cytokine mRNA levels in multiple organs and renal sorbitol accumulation. Conclusion AR inhibitor treatment ameliorated LPS-induced acute kidney injury, resulting in the lowered mortality. PMID:22253906

  14. LFG-500, a newly synthesized flavonoid, attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury and inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Chenglin; Yang, Dan; Cao, Xin; Wang, Fan; Jiang, Haijing; Guo, Hao; Du, Lei; Guo, Qinglong; Yin, Xiaoxing

    2016-08-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) often causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Improved treatment and effective strategies are still required for ALI patients. Our previous studies demonstrated that LFG-500, a novel synthesized flavonoid, has potent anti-cancer activities, while its anti-inflammatory effect has not been revealed. In the present study, the in vivo protective effect of LFG-500 on the amelioration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI and inflammation was detected. LFG-500 attenuated LPS-induced histological alterations, suppressed the infiltration of inflammatory cells in lung tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, as well as inhibited the secretion of several inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-6 in lung tissues after LPS challenge. In addition, the in vitro effects and mechanisms were studied in LPS stimulated RAW 264.7 cells and THP-1 cells. LFG-500 significantly decreased the secretion and expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 through inhibiting the transcriptional activation of NF-κB. Moreover, overexpression of NF-κB p65 reversed the inhibitory effect of LFG-500 on LPS-induced NF-κB activation and inflammatory cytokine secretion. Further elucidation of the mechanism revealed that p38 and JNK MAPK pathways were involved in the anti-inflammation effect of LFG-500, through which LFG-500 inhibited the classical IKK-dependent pathway and led to inactivation of NF-κB. More importantly, LFG-500 suppressed the expression and nuclear localization of NF-κB in LPS-induced ALI mice. Taken together, these results demonstrated that LFG-500 could attenuate LPS-induced ALI and inflammation by suppressing NF-κB activation, which provides new evidence for the anti-inflammation activity of LFG-500. PMID:27206337

  15. Naringin lauroyl ester inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of nuclear factor κB signaling in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Hiromi; Tsutsuki, Hiroyasu; Nakazawa, Masami; Ueda, Mitsuhiro; Ihara, Hideshi; Sakamoto, Tatsuji

    2016-07-01

    Naringin (Nar) has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. It was recently reported that enzymatic modification of Nar enhanced its functions. Here, we acylated Nar with fatty acids of different sizes (C2-C18) using immobilized lipase from Rhizomucor miehei and investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of these molecules. Treatment of murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells with Nar alkyl esters inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production, with Nar lauroyl ester (Nar-C12) showing the strongest effect. Furthermore, Nar-C12 suppressed the LPS-induced expression of inducible NO synthase by blocking the phosphorylation of inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-κB-α as well as the nuclear translocation of NF-κB subunit p65 in macrophage cells. Analysis of Nar-C12 uptake in macrophage cells revealed that Nar-C12 ester bond was partially degraded in the cell membrane and free Nar was translocated to the cytosol. These results indicate that Nar released from Nar-C12 exerts anti-inflammatory effects by suppressing NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26967587

  16. PKC412 (CGP41251) modulates the proliferation and lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses of RAW 264.7 macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Katsutoshi; Inoue, Hiroshi . E-mail: hinoue@genome.tokushima-u.ac.jp; Hashimoto, Kahoko; Takaku, Hiroshi; Takata, Yoichiro; Nakano, Shunji; Yasui, Natsuo; Itakura, Mitsuo

    2007-08-17

    PKC412 (CGP41251) is a multitarget protein kinase inhibitor with anti-tumor activities. Here, we investigated the effects of PKC412 on macrophages. PKC412 inhibited the proliferation of murine RAW 264.7 macrophages through induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. At non-toxic drug concentrations, PKC412 significantly suppressed the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced release of TNF-{alpha} and nitric oxide, while instead enhancing IL-6 secretion. PKC412 attenuated LPS-induced phosphorylations of MKK4 and JNK, as well as AP-1 DNA binding activities. Furthermore, PKC412 suppressed LPS-induced Akt and GSK-3{beta} phosphorylations. These results suggest that the anti-proliferative and immunomodulatory effects of PKC412 are, at least in part, mediated through its interference with the MKK4/JNK/AP-1 and/or Akt/GSK-3{beta} pathways. Since macrophages contribute significantly to the development of both acute and chronic inflammation, PKC412 may have therapeutic potential and applications in treating inflammatory and/or autoimmune diseases.

  17. Auraptene in the Peels of Citrus kawachiensis (Kawachi Bankan) Ameliorates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation in the Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Kana; Mori, Hirotomo; Toyoda, Nobuki; Yoshimura, Morio; Amakura, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Takashi; Sugawara, Kuniaki; Sudo, Masahiko; Nakajima, Mitsunari; Furukawa, Yoshiko

    2014-01-01

    Examination of the dried peel powder of Citrus kawachiensis, one of the citrus products of Ehime, Japan, showed that it contained naringin (NGIN; 44.02 ± 0.491 mg/g), narirutin (NRTN; 4.46 ± 0.0563 mg/g), auraptene (AUR; 4.07 ± 0.033 mg/g), and 3,5,6,7,8,3',4'-heptamethoxyflavone (HMF; 0.27 ± 0.0039 mg/g). When this dried peel powder was orally preadministered at the dose of 1.2 or 2.4 g/kg/day for 7 days into lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) injected mice, an animal model of systemic inflammation, it suppressed (1) LPS-induced loss of body weight and abnormal behavior in the open field, (2) LPS-induced activation of microglia and astrocytes in the hippocampus, and (3) LPS-induced expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, which were coexpressed in astrocytes of these mice. When NGIN or AUR was preadministered to LPS-injected mice at an amount similar to that in the peel powder, AUR, but not NGIN, had the ability to suppress the LPS-induced inflammation in the brain of these model mice. The dried powder of flavedo tissue (the outer colored layer of the mesocarp of a citrus fruit) and juice, which contained sufficient amounts of AUR, also had anti-inflammatory effect. These results suggest that AUR was the main ingredient responsible for the anti-inflammatory property of the dried peels of C. kawachiensis. PMID:24955102

  18. Sinomenine down-regulates TLR4/TRAF6 expression and attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced osteoclastogenesis and osteolysis.

    PubMed

    He, Longgang; Duan, Heng; Li, Xianglian; Wang, Song; Zhang, Yueyang; Lei, Linsheng; Xu, Jiake; Liu, Shuwen; Li, Xiaojuan

    2016-05-15

    Sinomenine (SIN) is an anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic alkaloid derived from Sinomenioum acutum. Effects of SIN on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced osteolysis have not been reported. Here, we found that SIN reduced LPS-induced erosion of skull bones in C57BL/6 mice significantly. LPS can induce bone-absorbing osteoclast formation independent of RANKL in pre-osteoclastic RAW264.7 cells in vitro. Here, SIN suppressed LPS-induced osteoclast formation and osteoclast survival in RAW264.7 cells. Expression of osteoclastic-specific marker genes was also inhibited by SIN during osteoclast differentiation and osteoclast survival stimulated with LPS. SIN showed much stronger inhibitory effects on expression of Fra-1 and MMP-9 mRNA in osteoclast differentiation rather than osteoclast survival. SIN dramatically inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α production in vitro and in vivo. Further signaling studies revealed that SIN suppressed the activation and relative gene expression of three notable nuclear factors (NF-κB, AP-1, NFAT), reduced intracellular levels of Ca(2+), and down-regulated phosphorylation of MAPK p38 (but not JNK) in LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. Focusing on upstream signals after LPS stimulation, SIN decreased expression of TLR4 and TRAF6 during osteoclast differentiation, and reduced expression of TLR4 (but not TRAF6) in osteoclast survival. These data suggest that SIN might be a potential agent for the treatment of osteolysis caused by Gram-negative bacteria infection or inflammation due to its inhibition of osteoclastogenesis through reduction of TLR4/TRAF6 expression and downstream signal transduction. PMID:26965104

  19. Ethyl acetate extracts of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) sprouts inhibit lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hong, Yong-Han; Chao, Wen-Wan; Chen, Miaw-Ling; Lin, Bi-Fong

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate if food components that exert anti-inflammatory effects may be used for inflammatory disorders by examining alfalfa sprout ethyl acetate extract (ASEA). The cytokine profile and life span of BALB/c mice with acute inflammation after intra-peritoneal (ip) injection of 15 mg/kg BW lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were determined. The results showed that the life span of LPS-induced inflammatory mice were negatively correlated with serum levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-1beta at 9 hr after LPS-injection, which indicated that suppressing these cytokines in the late phase of inflammation may be beneficial for survival. The in vitro experiment then showed that ASEA significantly reduced IL-6 and IL-1beta production and the NF-kappaB trans-activation activity of mitogen-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. To further evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of ASEA in vivo, BALB/c mice were tube-fed with 25 mg ASEA/kg BW/day in 50 microl sunflower oil, while the control and PDTC (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, an anti-inflammatory agent) groups were tube-fed with 50 microl sunflower oil/day only. After one week of tube-feeding, the PDTC group was injected with 50 mg/kg BW PDTC and one hour later, all of the mice were injected with 15 mg/kg BW LPS. The results showed that the ASEA and PDTC groups had significantly lower serum TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-1beta levels at 9 hr after LPS challenge, and significantly higher survival rates than the control group. This study suggests that ASEA supplementation can suppress the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and alleviate acute inflammatory hazards. PMID:19594948

  20. Tanreqing Injection Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Airway Inflammation through MAPK/NF-κB Signaling Pathways in Rats Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Jiang, Hong-li; Cai, Lin-li; Yan, Min; Dong, Shou-jin; Mao, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Background. Tanreqing injection (TRQ) is a commonly used herbal patent medicine for treating inflammatory airway diseases in view of its outstanding anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we explored the signaling pathways involved in contributions of TRQ to LPS-induced airway inflammation in rats. Methods/Design. Adult male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats randomly divided into different groups received intratracheal instillation of LPS and/or intraperitoneal injection of TRQ. Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid (BALF) and lung samples were collected at 24 h, 48 h, and 96 h after TRQ administration. Protein and mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, Interleukin- (IL-) 1β, IL-6, and IL-8 in BALF and lung homogenate were observed by ELISA and real-time PCR, respectively. Lung sections were stained for p38 MAPK and NF-κB detection by immunohistochemistry. Phospho-p38 MAPK, phosphor-extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1/2, phospho-SAPK/JNK, phospho-NF-κB p65, phospho-IKKα/β, and phospho-IκB-α were measured by western blot analysis. Results. The results showed that TRQ significantly counteracted LPS-stimulated release of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8, attenuated cells influx in BALF, mitigated mucus hypersecretion, suppressed phosphorylation of NF-κB p65, IκB-α, ΙKKα/β, ERK1/2, JNK, and p38 MAPK, and inhibited p38 MAPK and NF-κB p65 expression in rat lungs. Conclusions. Results of the current research indicate that TRQ possesses potent exhibitory effects in LPS-induced airway inflammation by, at least partially, suppressing the MAPKs and NF-κB signaling pathways, in a general dose-dependent manner. PMID:27366191

  1. Vitamin K3 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury through inhibition of nuclear factor-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, S; Nishiumi, S; Nishida, M; Mizushina, Y; Kobayashi, K; Masuda, A; Fujita, T; Morita, Y; Mizuno, S; Kutsumi, H; Azuma, T; Yoshida, M

    2010-01-01

    Vitamin K is a family of fat-soluble compounds including phylloquinone (vitamin K1), menaquinone (vitamin K2) and menadione (vitamin K3). Recently, it was reported that vitamin K, especially vitamins K1 and K2, exerts a variety of biological effects, and these compounds are expected to be candidates for therapeutic agents against various diseases. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of vitamin K3 in in vitro cultured cell experiments and in vivo animal experiments. In human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells, vitamin K3 inhibited the tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α-evoked translocation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB into the nucleus, although vitamins K1 and K2 did not. Vitamin K3 also suppressed the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB and production of TNF-α in mouse macrophage RAW264·7 cells. Moreover, the addition of vitamin K3 before and after LPS administration attenuated the severity of lung injury in an animal model of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which occurs in the setting of acute severe illness complicated by systemic inflammation. In the ARDS model, vitamin K3 also suppressed the LPS-induced increase in the serum TNF-α level and inhibited the LPS-evoked nuclear translocation of NF-κB in lung tissue. Despite marked efforts, little therapeutic progress has been made, and the mortality rate of ARDS remains high. Vitamin K3 may be an effective therapeutic strategy against acute lung injury including ARDS. PMID:20030669

  2. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species mediate the lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory response in human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Wang, Xiaoxuan; Zheng, Ming; Luan, Qing Xian

    2016-09-10

    Although periodontal diseases are initiated by bacteria that colonize the tooth surface and gingival sulcus, the host response is believed to play an essential role in the breakdown of connective tissue and bone. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) have been proposed to regulate the activation of the inflammatory response by the innate immune system. However, the role of mtROS in modulating the response of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) to immune stimulation by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) has yet to be fully elucidated. Here, we showed that LPS from Porphyromonas gingivalis stimulated HGFs to increase mtROS production, which could be inhibited by treatment with a mitochondrial-targeted exogenous antioxidant (mito-TEMPO) or transfection with manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). A time-course study revealed that an increase in the concentration of mtROS preceded the expression of inflammatory cytokines in HGFs. Mito-TEMPO treatment or MnSOD transfection also significantly prevented the LPS-induced increase of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α. Furthermore, suppressing LPS-induced mtROS generation inhibited the activation of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and inhibitor of nuclear factor-κB kinase, as well as the nuclear localization of nuclear factor-κB. These results demonstrate that mtROS generation is a key signaling event in the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory response of HGFs. PMID:27515000

  3. Naringin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced damage in human umbilical vein endothelial cells via attenuation of inflammation, apoptosis and MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Bi, Cheng; Jiang, Yinong; Fu, Tingting; Hao, Yu; Zhu, Xifang; Lu, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Endothelial cell activation, injury and dysfunction have been regarded as one of the initial key events in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an important mediator of inflammation, can cause endothelial cell damage and apoptosis. Naringin (Nar), one major flavanone glycoside from citrus fruits, shows various pharmacological actions, but the effect of Nar on LPS-induced damage in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) remains unknown. The present results showed that Nar significantly improved the survival rate of HUVECs, and decreased reactive oxygen species and intracellular Ca(2+) levels caused by LPS compared with model group. In addition, Nar obviously decreased cytochrome c release from mitochondria into cytosol. Moreover, Nar significantly down-regulated the protein or mRNA levels of IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α, VCAM-1, ICAM-1, NF-κB, AP-1, cleaved-3,-7,-9, p53, Bak and Bax, and up-regulated the expressions of Bcl-xl, Bcl-2 to suppress inflammation and apoptosis. Furthermore, Nar obviously inhibited phosphorylation levels of JNK, ERK and p38 MAPK. In conclusion, Nar exhibited potent effects against LPS-induced damage in HUVECs through the modulation of oxidative stress, inflammation, apoptosis and MAPK pathways, which should be developed as a potent candidate for the treatment of atherosclerosis in the future. PMID:27006302

  4. Endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition in lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury drives a progenitor cell-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshio; Tada, Yuji; Nishimura, Rintaro; Kawasaki, Takeshi; Sekine, Ayumi; Urushibara, Takashi; Kato, Fumiaki; Kinoshita, Taku; Ikari, Jun; West, James; Tatsumi, Koichiro

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary vascular endothelial function may be impaired by oxidative stress in endotoxemia-derived acute lung injury. Growing evidence suggests that endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) could play a pivotal role in various respiratory diseases; however, it remains unclear whether EndMT participates in the injury/repair process of septic acute lung injury. Here, we analyzed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated mice whose total number of pulmonary vascular endothelial cells (PVECs) transiently decreased after production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), while the population of EndMT-PVECs significantly increased. NAD(P)H oxidase inhibition suppressed EndMT of PVECs. Most EndMT-PVECs derived from tissue-resident cells, not from bone marrow, as assessed by mice with chimeric bone marrow. Bromodeoxyuridine-incorporation assays revealed higher proliferation of capillary EndMT-PVECs. In addition, EndMT-PVECs strongly expressed c-kit and CD133. LPS loading to human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-Ls) induced reversible EndMT, as evidenced by phenotypic recovery observed after removal of LPS. LPS-induced EndMT-HMVEC-Ls had increased vasculogenic ability, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and expression of drug resistance genes, which are also fundamental properties of progenitor cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate that LPS induces EndMT of tissue-resident PVECs during the early phase of acute lung injury, partly mediated by ROS, contributing to increased proliferation of PVECs. PMID:27106288

  5. Heat Shock Protein 72 Enhances Autophagy as a Protective Mechanism in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Peritonitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu; Zhou, Yi; Fan, Jinjin; Cao, Shirong; Cao, Tao; Huang, Fengxian; Zhuang, Shougang; Wang, Yihan; Yu, Xueqing; Mao, Haiping

    2011-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis–related peritonitis causes the denudation of mesothelial cells and, ultimately, membrane integrity alterations and peritoneal dysfunction. Because heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) confers protection against apoptosis and because autophagy mediates survival in response to cellular stresses, we examined whether autophagy contributes to HSP72-mediated cytoprotection in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced peritonitis. Exposure of cultured peritoneal mesothelial cells to LPS resulted first in autophagy and later, apoptosis. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine or Beclin-1 small-interfering RNA sensitized cells to apoptosis and abolished the antiapoptotic effect of HSP72, suggesting that autophagy activation acts as a prosurvival mechanism. Overexpression of HSP72 augmented autophagy through c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and Beclin-1 up-regulation. Suppression of JNK activity reversed HSP72-mediated Beclin-1 up-regulation and autophagy, indicating that HSP72-mediated autophagy is JNK dependent. In a rat model of LPS-associated peritonitis, autophagy occurred before apoptosis in peritoneum. Up-regulation of HSP72 by geranylgeranylacetone increased autophagy, inhibited apoptosis, and attenuated peritoneal injury, and these effects were blunted by down-regulation of HSP72 with quercetin. Additionally, blocking autophagy by chloroquine promoted apoptosis and aggravated LPS-associated peritoneal dysfunction. Thus, HSP72 protects peritoneum from LPS-induced mesothelial cells injury, at least in part by enhancing JNK activation–dependent autophagy and inhibiting apoptosis. These findings imply that HSP72 induction might be a potential therapy for peritonitis. PMID:22001349

  6. Resveratrol attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced dysfunction of blood-brain barrier in endothelial cells via AMPK activation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol, a phytoalexin, is reported to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in vascular cells. The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by specialized brain endothelial cells that are interconnected by tight junctions, strictly regulates paracellular permeability to maintain an optimal extracellular environment for brain homeostasis. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effects of resveratrol and the role of AMPK in BBB dysfunction induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exposure of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) to LPS (1 µg/ml) for 4 to 24 hours week dramatically increased the permeability of the BBB in parallel with lowered expression levels of occluding and claudin-5, which are essential to maintain tight junctions in HBMECs. In addition, LPS significantly increased the reactive oxygen species (ROS) productions. All effects induced by LPS in HBVMCs were reversed by adenoviral overexpression of superoxide dismutase, inhibition of NAD(P) H oxidase by apocynin or gain-function of AMPK by adenoviral overexpression of constitutively active mutant (AMPK-CA) or by resveratrol. Finally, upregulation of AMPK by either AMPK-CA or resveratrol abolished the levels of LPS-enhanced NAD(P)H oxidase subunits protein expressions. We conclude that AMPK activation by resveratrol improves the integrity of the BBB disrupted by LPS through suppressing the induction of NAD(P)H oxidase-derived ROS in HBMECs. PMID:27382348

  7. Resveratrol attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced dysfunction of blood-brain barrier in endothelial cells via AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Min; Liu, Bo

    2016-07-01

    Resveratrol, a phytoalexin, is reported to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in vascular cells. The blood-brain barrier (BBB), formed by specialized brain endothelial cells that are interconnected by tight junctions, strictly regulates paracellular permeability to maintain an optimal extracellular environment for brain homeostasis. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effects of resveratrol and the role of AMPK in BBB dysfunction induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exposure of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) to LPS (1 µg/ml) for 4 to 24 hours week dramatically increased the permeability of the BBB in parallel with lowered expression levels of occluding and claudin-5, which are essential to maintain tight junctions in HBMECs. In addition, LPS significantly increased the reactive oxygen species (ROS) productions. All effects induced by LPS in HBVMCs were reversed by adenoviral overexpression of superoxide dismutase, inhibition of NAD(P) H oxidase by apocynin or gain-function of AMPK by adenoviral overexpression of constitutively active mutant (AMPK-CA) or by resveratrol. Finally, upregulation of AMPK by either AMPK-CA or resveratrol abolished the levels of LPS-enhanced NAD(P)H oxidase subunits protein expressions. We conclude that AMPK activation by resveratrol improves the integrity of the BBB disrupted by LPS through suppressing the induction of NAD(P)H oxidase-derived ROS in HBMECs. PMID:27382348

  8. Hepatoprotective effect of germanium-containing Spirulina in rats with (D)-galactosamine- and lipopolysaccharide-induced hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Yoshinari, Orie; Shiojima, Yoshiaki; Igarashi, Kiharu

    2014-01-14

    In the present study, the protective effects of dietary Spirulina (SP) and germanium-containing Spirulina (GeSP) were compared in rats with liver injury induced by an intraperitoneal injection of d-galactosamine and lipopolysaccharide (GalN/LPS). Wistar rats were fed one of the following diets: the basal diet (GalN/LPS-CON group; n 6), the basal diet supplemented with 5 % SP or GeSP (GalN/LPS-SP and GalN/LPS-GeSP group, respectively; n 7 each). After administering these diets for 7 d, each rat was intraperitoneally injected with GalN/LPS. Increases in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities were suppressed in the GalN/LPS-GeSP group (GalN/LPS-CON v. GalN/LPS-GeSP: ALT 1052 (sem 187) v. 509 (sem 88) IU/l and AST 2183 (sem 368) v. 1170 (sem 196) IU/l) following the injection of GalN/LPS. Plasma levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and TNF-α in GeSP-fed rats were significantly lower when compared with those in the GalN/LPS-CON group (GalN/LPS-CON v. GalN/LPS-GeSP: IFN-γ 142·8 (sem 17·5) v. 66·8 (sem 9·7) pg/ml and TNF-α 72·3 (sem 15·4) v. 31·2 (sem 6·8) pg/ml). However, the decrease in these levels observed in the GalN/LPS-SP group was not as prominent as those observed in the GalN/LPS-GeSP group. Furthermore, the increase in liver catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities, as well as the level of oxidised glutathione (GSSG), was more suppressed in GeSP-fed rats (GalN/LPS-CON v. GalN/LPS-GeSP: CAT 457 (sem 47) v. 262 (sem 54) U/mg liver protein; GPx 1·30 (sem 0·11) v. 0·53 (sem 0·09) U/mg liver protein; GSSG 2·18 (sem 0·33) v. 1·31 (sem 0·24) mmol/kg liver) after the injection of GalN/LPS. These changes were more pronounced in the GalN/LPS-GeSP group than in the GalN/LPS-SP group. These results suggest that GeSP could afford a significant protective effect in the alleviation of GalN/LPS-induced hepatic damage. In addition, the results indicate that GeSP is more effective than SP. PMID

  9. Coumarins from Angelica decursiva inhibit lipopolysaccharide-induced nitrite oxide production in RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Ishita, Ishrat Jahan; Nurul Islam, Md; Kim, Yeong Shik; Choi, Ran Joo; Sohn, Hee Sook; Jung, Hyun Ah; Choi, Jae Sue

    2016-01-01

    Angelica decursiva has long been used in Korean traditional medicine as an antitussive, analgesic, antipyretic, and cough remedy. In this study, the anti-inflammatory activity of 9 coumarin derivatives isolated from a 90 % methanol fraction was evaluated via inhibition of production of nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well as the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Among the tested compounds, edulisin II (1) exhibited the most potent NO production inhibitory activity, followed by decursidin (2), Pd-C-III (3), 4-hydroxy Pd-C-III (4), Pd-C-I (5), and Pd-C-II (6). In contrast, (+)-trans-decursidinol (7) did not exhibit NO suppressive effects on LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Structure-activity relationships revealed that esterification of the hydroxyl at C-3' or C-4' of 7 with an angeloyl/senecioyl/acetyl group is essential for its inhibitory activity against NO production, while the number of angeloyl or senecioyl groups, and their positions greatly affect the potency of these coumarins. Coumarins 1-6 also inhibited TNF-α production and iNOS protein expression, while compounds 1-4 inhibited COX-2 protein expression in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. These results suggest that coumarins isolated from A. decursiva might be used as potential leads for the development of therapeutic agents for inflammation-associated disorders. PMID:26474585

  10. Role of UCP2 in the protective effects of PPARβ/δ activation on lipopolysaccharide-induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Toral, Marta; Romero, Miguel; Jiménez, Rosario; Robles-Vera, Iñaki; Tamargo, Juan; Martínez, María Carmen; Pérez-Vizcaíno, Francisco; Duarte, Juan

    2016-06-15

    Bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates inflammatory pathways, induces cytokine expression in the endothelium, augments reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the vascular wall, and induces endothelial dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)β/δ activation on LPS-induced inflammation, oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction and to determine whether uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2) plays a role in these effects. In vivo, the PPARβ/δ agonist GW0742 treatment prevented the LPS-induced reduction in aortic relaxation, the increase in vascular ROS production, the upregulation of NOX1, NOX2, p47(phox), and p22(phox) mRNA levels, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers in mice. We show that in mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAECs), GW0742 prevented the decreased A23187-stimulated nitric oxide (NO) production, and the increased intracellular ROS levels caused by exposure to LPS in vitro. The PPARβ/δ antagonist GSK0660 abolished all these in vivo and in vitro protective effects induced by GW0742. This agonist also restored the reduced expression of UCP2 and mitofusin-2 induced by LPS. The effects of GW0742 on NO and ROS production in MAEC exposed to LPS were abolished by the UCP2 inhibitor genipin or by siRNA targeting UCP-2. Genipin also suppressed the expressional changes on NADPH oxidase and ER stress markers induced by GW0742. In conclusion, PPARβ/δ activation restored the LPS-induced endothelial dysfunction by upregulation of UCP2, with the subsequent alleviation of ER stress and NADPH oxidase activity, thus reducing intracellular ROS production and increasing NO bioavailability. PMID:27179975

  11. Somatostatin ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced tight junction damage via the ERK-MAPK pathway in Caco2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lei, Shan; Cheng, Tianming; Guo, Yandong; Li, Chen; Zhang, Wendi; Zhi, Fachao

    2014-07-01

    Dysfunction of the epithelial barrier is an important pathogenic factor of inflammatory bowel disease and other inflammatory conditions of the gut. Somatostatin (SST) has been demonstrated to reduce local and systemic inflammation reactions and maintain the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). To determine the beneficial effect of SST on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced damage of the tight junction (TJ) and its mechanisms, Caco2 cells pretreated with SST (1nM) or MEK inhibitor U0126 (10μM) were exposed to LPS. LPS significantly reduced the expression of TJ proteins in a dose-dependent way. LPS (100μg/ml) greatly induced Caco2 monolayer barrier dysfunction by decreasing transepithelial resistance and increasing epithelial permeability. Pretreatment with SST effectively improved the barrier dysfunction of Caco2 cells. SST significantly increased the expression of TJ proteins occludin and ZO-1 and inhibited the redistribution of TJ proteins due to LPS stimulation. Furthermore, SST decreased the LPS-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, and a selective MEK inhibitor markedly protected the barrier function against LPS disturbance by blocking the activation of the ERK-MAPK pathway in Caco2 cells. Besides, LPS significantly increased the mRNA level of SSTR5, which was partly inhibited by pretreatment with SST. In conclusion, the present study indicates that SST protects the Caco2 monolayer barrier against LPS-induced tight junction breakdown by down-regulating the activation of the ERK-MAPK pathway and suppression the activation of SSTR5. PMID:24950815

  12. Gliptin and GLP-1 analog treatment improves survival and vascular inflammation/dysfunction in animals with lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Steven, Sebastian; Hausding, Michael; Kröller-Schön, Swenja; Mader, Michael; Mikhed, Yuliya; Stamm, Paul; Zinßius, Elena; Pfeffer, Amanda; Welschof, Philipp; Agdauletova, Saule; Sudowe, Stephan; Li, Huige; Oelze, Matthias; Schulz, Eberhard; Klein, Thomas; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors are used to treat hyperglycemia by increasing the incretin glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). Previous studies showed anti-inflammatory and antiatherosclerotic effects of DPP-4 inhibitors. Here, we compared the effects of linagliptin versus sitagliptin and liraglutide on survival and vascular function in animal models of endotoxic shock by prophylactic therapy and treatment after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. Gliptins were administered either orally or subcutaneously: linagliptin (5 mg/kg/day), sitagliptin (50 mg/kg/day) or liraglutide (200 µg/kg/day). Endotoxic shock was induced by LPS injection (mice 17.5-20 mg/kg i.p., rats 10 mg/kg/day). Linagliptin and liraglutide treatment or DPP-4 knockout improved the survival of endotoxemic mice, while sitagliptin was ineffective. Linagliptin, liraglutide and sitagliptin ameliorated LPS-induced hypotension and vascular dysfunction in endotoxemic rats, suppressed inflammatory parameters such as whole blood nitrosyl-iron hemoglobin (leukocyte-inducible nitric oxide synthase activity) or aortic mRNA expression of markers of inflammation as well as whole blood and aortic reactive oxygen species formation. Hemostasis (tail bleeding time, activated partial thromboplastin time) was impaired in endotoxemic rats and recovered under cotreatment with linagliptin and liraglutide. Finally, the beneficial effects of linagliptin on vascular function and inflammatory parameters in endotoxemic mice were impaired in AMP-activated kinase (alpha1) knockout mice. The improved survival of endotoxemic animals and other data shown here may warrant further clinical evaluation of these drugs in patients with septic shock beyond the potential improvement of inflammatory complications in diabetic individuals with special emphasis on the role of AMP-activated kinase (alpha1) in the DPP-4/GLP-1 cascade. PMID:25600227

  13. Effects of blue honeysuckle (Lonicera caerulea L.) extract on lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xue-Hai; Ohgami, Kazuhiro; Shiratori, Kenji; Suzuki, Yukari; Koyama, Yoshikazu; Yoshida, Kazuhiko; Ilieva, Iliyana; Tanaka, Tsuneo; Onoe, Kazunori; Ohno, Shigeaki

    2006-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of blue honeysuckle extract (BHE), which contains high level of phenolic compounds, on endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU). Male Lewis rats were randomly divided into 5 groups with 14 rats in each (eight rats for collection of aqueous humor, six rats for histologic examination). EIU was induced by a footpad injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). 1, 10, or 100 mg of BHE was injected intravenously immediately after LPS injection. The aqueous humor was collected at 24 h after LPS injection, the number of infiltrating cells, protein concentration, nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and prostaglandin (PG)-E2 levels in the aqueous humor were determined. Some eyes were enucleated for histologic examination and immunohistochemical analysis. Immunohistochemical staining with a monoclonal antibody against activated nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB was performed to evaluate the effect of BHE on NF-kappaB activation. To further clarify the anti-inflammatory effect, RAW264.7 cells (a mouse macrophage cell line) were stimulated with LPS in the presence or absence of BHE and its major phenolics, cyanidin 3-glucoside (C3G), cyanidin 3-rutinoside (C3R), chlorogenic acid (CA). Expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were analyzed by Western blot method. BHE treatment significantly reduced the inflammatory cell infiltration, the protein concentration, the levels of NO, TNF-alpha and PGE2 in the aqueous humor and improved histologic status of the ocular tissue. The number of activated NF-kappaB-positive cells was lower in the iris-ciliary body treated with BHE at 3 h after LPS injection. BHE significantly suppressed the production of NO, PGE2 and TNF-alpha in the culture medium as well as the expression of iNOS and COX-2 by LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent fashion. C3G, C3R and CA showed no or weak inhibitory effects on the level of inflammatory mediators and the

  14. Dioscin reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory liver injury via regulating TLR4/MyD88 signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hong; Hu, Changsheng; Yin, Lianhong; Tao, Xufeng; Xu, Lina; Qi, Yan; Han, Xu; Xu, Youwei; Zhao, Yanyan; Wang, Changyuan; Peng, Jinyong

    2016-07-01

    We previously reported the effects of dioscin against carbon tetrachloride-, acetaminophen- and alcohol-induced acute liver damage. However, its effect on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory liver injury remains unknown. In the present work, liver injury in mice and rats was induced by LPS, and dioscin was intragastrically administered for 7days. In vitro, the AML-12 cells and HepG-2 cells were treated with LPS after dioscin treatment. The results showed that dioscin not only markedly reduced serum ALT, AST levels and relative liver weights, but also restored cell injury caused by LPS. In mechanism study, dioscin significantly attenuated inflammation through down-regulating the levels of toll-like receptor (TLR) 4, myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK1), tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), phosphorylated inhibitor of nuclear factor κB kinase (p-IKK), phosphorylated inhibitor of nuclear factor κB alpha (p-IκBα), phosphorylated nuclear factor κB p65 (p-NF-κB p65), high-mobility group protein 1 (HMGB-1), interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). TLR4 overexpression was also decreased by dioscin, leading to the markedly decreased levels of MyD88, IRAK1, TRAF6, p-IKK, p-IκBα, p-NF-κB p65 and HMGB-1. Suppression of MyD88 by ST2825 eliminated the inhibitory effects of dioscin on the levels of IRAK1, TRAF6, p-IKK, p-IκBα, p-NF-κB p65, HMGB-1, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. Our results suggested that dioscin exhibited protective effect against LPS-induced liver injury via altering TLR4/MyD88 pathway, which should be developed as one potent candidate for the treatment of acute inflammatory liver injury in the future. PMID:27135544

  15. Interleukin 6 Mediates the Therapeutic Effects of Adipose-Derived Stromal/Stem Cells in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shijia; Danchuk, Svitlana D.; Bonvillain, Ryan W.; Xu, Beibei; Scruggs, Brittni A.; Strong, Amy L.; Semon, Julie A.; Gimble, Jeffrey M.; Betancourt, Aline M.; Sullivan, Deborah E.; Bunnell, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    Adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs) have anti-inflammatory as well as immunosuppressive activities and are currently the focus of clinical trials for a number of inflammatory diseases. Acute lung injury (ALI) is an inflammatory condition of the lung for which standard treatment is mainly supportive due to lack of effective therapies. Our recent studies have demonstrated the ability of both human ASCs (hASCs) and mouse ASCs (mASCs) to attenuate lung damage and inflammation in a rodent model of lipopolysaccharide-induced ALI, suggesting that ASCs may also be beneficial in treating ALI. To better understand how ASCs may act in ALI and to elucidate the mechanism(s) involved in ASC modulation of lung inflammation, gene expression analysis was performed in ASC-treated (hASCs or mASCs) and control sham-treated lungs. The results revealed a dramatic difference between the expression of anti-inflammatory molecules by hASCs and mASCs. These data show that the beneficial effects of hASCs and mASCs in ALI may result from the production of different paracrine factors. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) expression in the mASC-treated lungs was significantly elevated as compared to sham-treated controls 20 hours after delivery of the cells by oropharyngeal aspiration. Knockdown of IL-6 expression in mASCs by RNA interference abrogated most of their therapeutic effects, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory properties of mASCs in ALI are explained, at least in part, by activation of IL-6 secretion. PMID:24449042

  16. Suppressive effects of ketamine on macrophage functions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yi; Chen, T.-L.; Sheu, J.-R.; Chen, R.-M. . E-mail: rmchen@tmu.edu.tw

    2005-04-01

    Ketamine is an intravenous anesthetic agent. Clinically, induction of anesthesia with ketamine can cause immunosuppression. Macrophages play important roles in host defense. In this study, we attempted to evaluate the effects of ketamine on macrophage functions and its possible mechanism using mouse macrophage-like Raw 264.7 cells as the experimental model. Exposure of macrophages to 10 and 100 {mu}M ketamine, which correspond to 0.1 and 1 times the clinically relevant concentration, for 1, 6, and 24 h had no effect on cell viability or lactate dehydrogenase release. When the administered concentration reached 1000 {mu}M, ketamine caused a release of lactate dehydrogenase and cell death. Ketamine, at 10 and 100 {mu}M, did not affect the chemotactic activity of macrophages. Administration of 1000 {mu}M ketamine in macrophages resulted in a decrease in cell migration. Treatment of macrophages with ketamine reduced phagocytic activities. The oxidative ability of macrophages was suppressed by ketamine. Treatment with lipopolysaccharide induced TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, and IL-6 mRNA in macrophages. Administration of ketamine alone did not influence TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, or IL-6 mRNA production. Meanwhile, cotreatment with ketamine and lipopolysaccharide significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, and IL-6 mRNA levels. Exposure to ketamine led to a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential. However, the activity of mitochondrial complex I NADH dehydrogenase was not affected by ketamine. This study shows that a clinically relevant concentration of ketamine (100 {mu}M) can suppress macrophage function of phagocytosis, its oxidative ability, and inflammatory cytokine production possibly via reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential instead of direct cellular toxicity.

  17. Isolation of Lignan and Fatty Acid Derivatives from the Grains of Echinochloa utilis and Their Inhibition of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Nitric Oxide Production in RAW 264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc Hung; Zhao, Bing Tian; Le, Duc Dat; Yoon, Young Ho; Ko, Jee Youn; Woo, Koan Sik; Jun, Do Youn; Kim, Young Ho; Woo, Mi Hee

    2016-01-20

    Two new fatty acid derivatives, echinochlorins A (8) and B (9) and a racemic lignan, (±)-anti-1-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-2-{4-[(E)-3-acetoxypropen-1-yl]-2-methoxyphenoxy}propan-1,3-diol 3-acetate (1), were isolated from Echinochloa utilis grains, along with six known lignans (2-7) and two fatty acid derivatives (10, 11). Their structures were established by spectroscopic data analyses (IR, UV, HR-FABMS, GC-MS, and 1D and 2D NMR). The configuration of 1 was determined by Mosher's method. Compound 5 displayed potential inhibitory activity on lipopolysaccharide-induced NO production in macrophage RAW 264.7 cells with an IC50 value of 4.8 ± 0.5 μM. These isolated compounds in crude EtOH extract were also quantitated by HPLC. PMID:26725284

  18. Transmembrane TNF-α Reverse Signaling Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Proinflammatory Cytokine Formation in Macrophages by Inducing TGF-β: Therapeutic Implications.

    PubMed

    Pallai, Anna; Kiss, Beáta; Vereb, György; Armaka, Marietta; Kollias, George; Szekanecz, Zoltán; Szondy, Zsuzsa

    2016-02-01

    TNF-α, a potent proinflammatory cytokine, is generated in a precursor form called transmembrane (m)TNF-α that is expressed as a type II polypeptide on the surface of certain cells. mTNF-α was shown to act both as a ligand by binding to TNF-α receptors, as well as a receptor that transmits outside-to-inside (reverse) signals back into the mTNF-α-bearing cells. In this study, we show that nonactivated macrophages express basal levels of mTNF-α and respond to anti-TNF-α Abs by triggering the MAPK kinase 4 signaling pathway. The pathway induces TGF-β. Based on inhibitory experiments, the production of TGF-β1 is regulated via Jun kinases, whereas that of other TGF-βs is regulated via p38 MAPKs. Exposure to LPS further induced the expression of mTNF-α, and triggering of mTNF-α strongly suppressed the LPS-induced proinflammatory response. Neutralizing TGF-β by Abs prevented the mTNF-α-mediated suppression of LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine formation, indicating that the immune-suppressive effect of mTNF-α is mediated via TGF-β. Although apoptotic cells are also known to suppress LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine formation in macrophages by upregulating TGF-β, we show that they do not use the mTNF-α signaling pathway. Because TGF-β possesses a wide range of immune-suppressive effects, our data indicate that upregulation of TGF-β synthesis by those TNF-α-targeting molecules, which are able to trigger mTNF-α, might contribute to their therapeutic effect in the treatment of certain inflammatory diseases such as Crohn's disease, Wegener's granulomatosis, or sarcoidosis. Additionally, none of the TNF-α-targeting molecules is expected to interfere with the immune-silencing effects of apoptotic cells. PMID:26729808

  19. Berberine Decreased Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase mRNA Stability through Negative Regulation of Human Antigen R in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ji-Sun; Choi, Hye-Eun; Seo, SeungHwan; Choi, Jung-Hye; Baek, Nam-In; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2016-07-01

    Berberine, a major isoquinoline alkaloid found in medicinal herbs, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory effects; however, the underlying mechanisms responsible for its actions are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of berberine and the molecular mechanisms involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 and THP-1 macrophages and its effects in LPS-induced septic shock in mice. In both macrophage cell types, berberine inhibited the LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) protein expression, but it had no effect on iNOS mRNA transcription. Suppression of LPS-induced iNOS protein expression by berberine occurred via a human antigen R (HuR)-mediated reduction of iNOS mRNA stability. Molecular data revealed that the suppression on the LPS-induced HuR binding to iNOS mRNA by berberine was accompanied by a reduction in nucleocytoplasmic HuR shuttling. Pretreatment with berberine reduced LPS-induced iNOS protein expression and the cytoplasmic translocation of HuR in liver tissues and increased the survival rate of mice with LPS-induced endotoxemia. These results show that the suppression of iNOS protein expression by berberine under LPS-induced inflammatory conditions is associated with a reduction in iNOS mRNA stability resulting from inhibition of the cytoplasmic translocation of HuR. PMID:27189969

  20. Aromadendrin Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Nuclear Translocation of NF-κB and Phosphorylation of JNK in RAW 264.7 Macrophage Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Won; Kim, Nam Ho; Kim, Ji-Young; Park, Jun-Ho; Shin, Seung-Yeon; Kwon, Yong-Soo; Lee, Hee Jae; Kim, Sung-Soo; Chun, Wanjoo

    2013-01-01

    Aromadendrin, a flavonol, has been reported to possess a variety of pharmacological activities such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-diabetic properties. However, the underlying mechanism by which aromadendrin exerts its biological activity has not been extensively demonstrated. The objective of this study is to elucidate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of aromadedrin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Aromadendrin significantly suppressed LPS-induced excessive production of pro-inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO) and PGE2. In accordance, aromadendrin attenuated LPSinduced overexpression iNOS and COX-2. In addition, aromadendrin significantly suppressed LPS-induced degradation of IκB, which sequesters NF-κB in cytoplasm, consequently inhibiting the nuclear translocation of pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF- κB. To elucidate the underlying signaling mechanism of anti-inflammatory activity of aromadendrin, MAPK signaling pathway was examined. Aromadendrin significantly attenuated LPS-induced activation of JNK, but not ERK and p38, in a concentration-dependent manner. Taken together, the present study clearly demonstrates that aromadendrin exhibits anti-inflammatory activity through the suppression of nuclear translocation of NF-κB and phosphorylation of JNK in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. PMID:24265867

  1. Flavonoid fraction of guava leaf extract attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response via blocking of NF-κB signalling pathway in Labeo rohita macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sen, Shib Sankar; Sukumaran, V; Giri, Sib Sankar; Park, Se Chang

    2015-11-01

    Psidium guajava L. is a well-known traditional medicinal plant widely used in folk medicine. To explore the anti-inflammatory activity of the flavonoid fraction of guava leaf extract (FGLE), we investigated its ability to suppress the levels of inflammatory mediators elevated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in Labeo rohita head-kidney (HK) macrophages. HK macrophages of L. rohita were treated with LPS in the presence or absence of the FGLE. We examined the inhibitory effect of FGLE on LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production. The inhibitory effect of FGLE on nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were investigated by RT-PCR and western blot. The effect of FGLE on proinflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) or interleukin-1β (IL-1β) was also investigated by ELISA and RT-PCR. The phosphorylation of three mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK) molecules ERK, JNK and p38 was analysed by western blot analysis. FGLE inhibited LPS-induced NO and PGE2 production. It also effectively inhibited TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-10, iNOS, and COX-2 production in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, FGLE suppressed the mRNA expression levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in LPS-stimulated HK macrophages. RT-PCR and western blot analysis showed that FGLE decreased both the mRNA and protein expression levels of LPS-induced iNOS and COX-2 in HK macrophages. FGLE suppresses the phosphorylation of MAPK molecules in LPS-stimulated HK macrophages. FGLE also significantly inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity. The molecular mechanism by which FGLE suppresses the expression of inflammatory mediators appears to involve the inhibition of NF-κB activation, through the suppression of LPS-induced IκB-α degradation. Together these results suggest that FGLE contains potential therapeutic agent(s), which regulate NF-κB activation, for the treatment of inflammatory conditions in L. rohita macrophages. PMID:26327113

  2. Ginger and Zingerone Ameliorate Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Systemic Inflammation in Mice, Assessed by Nuclear Factor-κB Bioluminescent Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hsiang, Chien-Yun; Cheng, Hui-Man; Lo, Hsin-Yi; Li, Chia-Cheng; Chou, Pei-Chi; Lee, Yu-Chen; Ho, Tin-Yun

    2015-07-01

    Ginger is a commonly used spice in cooking. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the anti-inflammatory activities of ginger and its component zingerone in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute systemic inflammation in mice via nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) bioluminescent imaging. Ginger and zingerone significantly suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB activities in cells in a dose-dependent manner, and the maximal inhibition (84.5% ± 3.5% and 96.2% ± 0.6%) was observed at 100 μg/mL ginger and zingerone, respectively. Moreover, dietary ginger and zingerone significantly reduced LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production in sera by 62.9% ± 18.2% and 81.3% ± 6.2%, respectively, and NF-κB bioluminescent signals in whole body by 26.9% ± 14.3% and 38.5% ± 6.2%, respectively. In addition, ginger and zingerone suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB-driven luminescent intensities in most organs, and the maximal inhibition by ginger and zingerone was observed in small intestine. Immunohistochemical staining further showed that ginger and zingerone decreased interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-, CD11b-, and p65-positive areas in jejunum. In conclusion, our findings suggested that ginger and zingerone were likely to be broad-spectrum anti-inflammatory agents in most organs that suppressed the activation of NF-κB, the production of IL-1β, and the infiltration of inflammatory cells in mice. PMID:26073629

  3. Anti-inflammatory mechanism of α-viniferin regulates lipopolysaccharide-induced release of proinflammatory mediators in BV2 microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Dilshara, Matharage Gayani; Lee, Kyoung-Tae; Kim, Hee Ju; Lee, Hak-Ju; Choi, Yung Hyun; Lee, Chang-Min; Kim, Lark Kyun; Kim, Gi-Young

    2014-07-01

    α-Viniferin is an oligostilbene of trimeric resveratrol and has anticancer activity; however, the molecular mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of α-viniferin has not been completely elucidated thus far. Therefore, we determined the mechanism by which α-viniferin regulates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of proinflammatory mediators in BV2 microglial cells. Treatment with α-viniferin isolated from Clematis mandshurica decreased LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). α-Viniferin also downregulated the LPS-induced expression of proinflammatory genes such as iNOS and COX-2 by suppressing the activity of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) via dephosphorylation of Akt/PI3K. Treatment with a specific NF-κB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), indirectly showed that NF-κB is a crucial transcription factor for expression of these genes in the early stage of inflammation. Additionally, our results indicated that α-viniferin suppresses NO and PGE2 production in the late stage of inflammation through induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) regulated by nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2). Taken together, our data indicate that α-viniferin suppresses the expression of proinflammatory genes iNOS and COX-2 in the early stage of inflammation by inhibiting the Akt/PI3K-dependent NF-κB activation and inhibits the production of proinflammatory mediators NO and PGE2 in the late stage by stimulating Nrf2-mediated HO-1 signaling pathway in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglial cells. These results suggest that α-viniferin may be a potential candidate to regulate LPS-induced inflammation. PMID:24859013

  4. Stearoyl lysophosphatidylcholine prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced extracellular release of high mobility group box-1 through AMP-activated protein kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joung-Min; Han, Hui-Jing; Hur, Young-Hoe; Quan, Hui; Kwak, Sang-Hyun; Choi, Jeong-Il; Bae, Hong-Beom

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies have suggested that stearoyl lysophosphatidlycholine (LPC) protects against lethal experimental sepsis by inhibiting lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced extracellular release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). However, limited information exists on the mechanism by which stearoyl-LPC suppresses the extracellular release of HMGB1 in monocyte/macrophages stimulated with LPS. In this study, we found that stearoyl-LPC increased the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in macrophages. Exposure of LPS-stimulated macrophages to stearoyl-LPC decreased the extracellular release of HMGB1 in peritoneal macrophages, which were inhibited by the AMPK inhibitor, compound C. In addition, stearoyl-LPC-mediated suppression of HMGB1 release was abolished by siRNA-mediated knock-down of AMPKα1. Stearoyl-LPC increased the phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a downstream target of activated AMPK, in mice lungs and decreased HMGB1 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids in mice administered LPS. These results reveal a novel mechanism by which stearoyl-LPC regulates LPS-mediated cellular translocation of HMGB1. PMID:26218280

  5. Bilobol inhibits the lipopolysaccharide-induced expression and distribution of RhoA in HepG2 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    XU, JIN; LI, YUEYING; YANG, XIAOMING; LIU, YALI; CHEN, YONGCHANG; CHEN, MIN

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed the localization of RhoA protein in the cell nucleus, in addition to its distribution in the cytosol and cell membrane. The results of previous studies by our group indicated that nuclear RhoA expression is increased, or RhoA is transported into the nucleus, when cells become cancerous or damaged. Furthermore, application of the anticancer agent Taxol appeared to reduce nuclear RhoA localization, indicating an association between the nuclear translocation of RhoA and tumor progression. Bilobol is a traditional Chinese medicine ingredient, however, its anticancer effect has remained unclear. The present study aimed to demonstrate the anticarcinogenic action of bilobol against hepatocellular carcinoma, in order to lay the foundations for subsequent research into the mechanisms underlying its anticancer effects. In the present study, HepG2 cells were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), to induce inflammation, and/or bilobol. By performing an ELISA, it was observed that bilobol was able to suppress the inflammation induced by LPS. In addition, immunofluorescence and western blot analyses indicated that bilobol may reduce the expression of RhoA, suppress translocation of RhoA into the nucleus and inhibit the RhoA/Rho-associated protein kinase signaling pathway. In conclusion, the present study revealed the potential anticancer effects of bilobol. PMID:26622605

  6. Methyl 9-Oxo-(10E,12E)-octadecadienoate Isolated from Fomes fomentarius Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Response by Blocking Phosphorylation of STAT3 in Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Ji-Hyun; Yi, Young-Joo; Lee, Myeong-Seok; Seo, Dong-Won

    2015-01-01

    Fomes fomentarius is a fungus of the Polyporaceae family and is used in traditional oriental therapies. Although the anti-inflammatory activities of this species have been previously reported, the identity of the bioactive compounds responsible for this activity remains unknown. Here, we investigated whether methyl 9-oxo-(10E,12E)-octadecadienoate (FF-8) purified from F. fomentarius exerts anti-inflammatory activity in murine macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). FF-8 suppressed secretion of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 through downregulation of inducible NO synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 expression induced by LPS. In addition, pretreatment of cells with FF-8 led to a reduction in levels of secreted inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in macrophages stimulated with LPS. Conversely, FF-8 did not affect nuclear factor κB, p38, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathways. Instead, FF-8 specifically interfered with signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation induced by LPS. Collectively, this study demonstrated that FF-8 purified from F. fomentarius suppresses inflammatory responses in macrophages stimulated with LPS by inhibiting STAT3 activation. Further studies will be required to elucidate the anti-inflammatory effect of FF-8 in vivo. PMID:26539049

  7. 2-Cyclopropylimino-3-methyl-1,3-thiazoline hydrochloride alters lipopolysaccharide-induced proinflammatory cytokines and neuronal morphology in mouse fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-A; Cho, Chang Hun; Choi, Soo Young; Ahn, Jee-Yin; Yang, Seung-Ju; Cho, Sung-Woo

    2016-03-01

    It is well documented that a maternal immune response to infection during pregnancy can cause neurodevelopmental damage. We demonstrate in our current study that maternally administered 2-cyclopropylimino-3-methyl-1,3-thiazoline hydrochloride (KHG26377), a novel thiazole derivative, prevents fetal malformations and neurodevelopmental deficits in offspring by blocking lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation. Administration of KHG26377 effectively regulated LPS-induced inflammatory markers and mediators such as soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1, se-Selectin, macrophage chemoattractant protein-1, and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 in the maternal serum. Furthermore, maternally administered KHG26377 showed an inhibitory effect on the LPS-induced developmental toxicity by selectively suppressing the TNF-α level in maternal serum, amniotic fluid, placenta, fetal liver, and fetal brain as well as by suppression of LPS-induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), and myelin basic protein (MBP) levels in the fetal brain. In addition, pretreatment of neuronal cells with KHG26377 effectively reestablished the cell body morphology and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) staining compared to the LPS-treated group in cortex primary neuronal cultures. Although the clinical relevance of our findings remains to be determined, our results provide novel insights into KHG26377 as a possible therapeutic agent to protect fetuses against various inflammatory responses. PMID:26522435

  8. Phosphorylation of Akt Mediates Anti-Inflammatory Activity of 1-p-Coumaroyl β-D-Glucoside Against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation in RAW264.7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Van Anh; Lee, Jae-Won; Kim, Ji-Young; Park, Jun-Ho; Lee, Hee Jae; Kim, Sung-Soo; Kwon, Yong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    Hydroxycinnamic acids have been reported to possess numerous pharmacological activities such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-tumor properties. However, the biological activity of 1-p-coumaroyl β-D-glucoside (CG), a glucose ester derivative of p-coumaric acid, has not been clearly examined. The objective of this study is to elucidate the anti-inflammatory action of CG in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells. In the present study, CG significantly suppressed LPS-induced excessive production of pro-inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO) and PGE2 and the protein expression of iNOS and COX-2. CG also inhibited LPS-induced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1β and TNF-α. In addition, CG significantly suppressed LPS-induced degradation of IκB. To elucidate the underlying mechanism by which CG exerts its anti-inflammatory action, involvement of various signaling pathways were examined. CG exhibited significantly increased Akt phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent manner, although MAPKs such as Erk, JNK, and p38 appeared not to be involved. Furthermore, inhibition of Akt/PI3K signaling pathway with wortmannin significantly, albeit not completely, abolished CG-induced Akt phosphorylation and anti-inflammatory actions. Taken together, the present study demonstrates that Akt signaling pathway might play a major role in CG-mediated anti-inflammatory activity in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells. PMID:24634601

  9. Dihydroisocoumarin Derivatives from Marine-Derived Fungal Isolates and Their Anti-inflammatory Effects in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced BV2 Microglia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Cheol; Quang, Tran Hong; Ngan, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Yoon, Chi-Su; Sohn, Jae Hak; Yim, Joung Han; Feng, Yu; Che, Yongsheng; Kim, Youn-Chul; Oh, Hyuncheol

    2015-12-24

    Chemical investigation of the EtOAc extracts of marine-derived fungal isolates Aspergillus sp. SF-5974 and Aspergillus sp. SF-5976 yielded a new dihydroisocoumarin derivative (1) and 12 known metabolites. The structures of the isolated metabolites were established by extensive spectroscopic analyses, including 1D and 2D NMR spectra and MS data. Among the metabolites, the absolute configuration of 5'-hydroxyasperentin (6) was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The in vitro antineuroinflammatory effects of the metabolites were also evaluated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated microglial cells. Among the isolated metabolites, dihydroisocoumarin derivatives 1-6 (10-80 μM) were shown to inhibit LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production by suppressing the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), respectively, in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglia. Further, 1 (20-80 μM) was found to suppress the phosphorylation of the inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B-α (IκB-α), interrupt the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), and decrease the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). PMID:26651366

  10. Andrographolide sulfonate ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice by down-regulating MAPK and NF-κB pathways.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shuang; Hang, Nan; Liu, Wen; Guo, Wenjie; Jiang, Chunhong; Yang, Xiaoling; Xu, Qiang; Sun, Yang

    2016-05-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a severe, life-threatening medical condition characterized by widespread inflammation in the lungs, and is a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the patient population. New therapies for the treatment of ALI are desperately needed. In the present study, we examined the effect of andrographolide sulfonate, a water-soluble form of andrographolide (trade name: Xi-Yan-Ping Injection), on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI and inflammation. Andrographolide sulfonate was administered by intraperitoneal injection to mice with LPS-induced ALI. LPS-induced airway inflammatory cell recruitment and lung histological alterations were significantly ameliorated by andrographolide sulfonate. Protein levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum were reduced by andrographolide sulfonate administration. mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in lung tissue were also suppressed. Moreover, andrographolide sulfonate markedly suppressed the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) as well as p65 subunit of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In summary, these results suggest that andrographolide sulfonate ameliorated LPS-induced ALI in mice by inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK-mediated inflammatory responses. Our study shows that water-soluble andrographolide sulfonate may represent a new therapeutic approach for treating inflammatory lung disorders. PMID:27175331

  11. Analysis of the synergistic effect of glycyrrhizin and other constituents in licorice extract on lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide production using knock-out extract.

    PubMed

    Uto, Takuhiro; Morinaga, Osamu; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2012-01-01

    The pharmacological evidence for synergism between natural compounds is not fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the synergistic function of one target compound in medicinal plant extract by using knock-out (KO) extract, which is one target compound-eliminated extract from whole crude extract. Licorice is the most important ingredient used in the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and the Japanese Kampo medicine, and one of the major active components of licorice is glycyrrhizin (GC). To identify the potential role of GC, we prepared GC-removed extract (GC-KO extract) from licorice extract (LE) using immunoaffinity column conjugated with anti-GC monoclonal antibody (MAb), which could eliminate 99.5% of GC from LE. LE inhibited nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible NO synthase (iNOS) expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264 murine macrophage cells. However, treatment of GC alone could not show the suppression of NO production and iNOS expression. Interestingly, the inhibitory effect of GC-KO extract was significantly attenuated compared with LE. Furthermore, the combined treatment with GC-KO extract and GC could improve the attenuated inhibition. Taken together, our results indicate that GC may exert synergistic suppression of iNOS expression when coexisting with the other constituents contained in LE, and KO extract is a useful approach for determination of real pharmacological functions of natural compound in the phytochemical mixture. PMID:22178686

  12. Quercetin reversed lipopolysaccharide-induced inhibition of osteoblast differentiation through the mitogen‑activated protein kinase pathway in MC3T3-E1 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Chun; Zhao, Nzhi-Jun; Guo, Chun; Chen, Jing-Tao; Song, Jin-Ling; Gao, Li

    2014-12-01

    Quercetin, a flavonoid found in onions and other vegetables, has potential inhibitory effects on bone resorption in vivo and in vitro. In our previous study it was identified that quercetin triggered the apoptosis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)‑induced osteoclasts and inhibited bone resorption. Currently, little information is available detailing the effect of quercetin on osteoblast differentiation and bone formation in bacteria‑induced inflammatory diseases. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of quercetin on osteoblast differentiation in MC3T3‑E1 osteoblasts stimulated with LPS. LPS significantly downregulated the mRNA expression of osteoblast‑related genes in the MC3T3‑E1 cells. By contrast, quercetin significantly restored the LPS‑suppressed mRNA expression of osteoblast‑related genes in a dose‑dependent manner. Quercetin also restored the protein expression of Osterix in MC3T3‑E1 cells suppressed by LPS. Furthermore, quercetin selectively triggered the activation of the mitogen‑activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway by enhancing the expression of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and reducing the expression of c‑Jun N‑terminal kinase. These data suggest that quercetin reversed the inhibition of osteoblast differentiation induced by LPS through MAPK signaling. These findings suggest that quercetin may be of potential use as a therapeutic agent to restore osteoblast function in bacteria‑induced bone diseases. PMID:25323558

  13. Andrographolide sulfonate ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice by down-regulating MAPK and NF-κB pathways

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shuang; Hang, Nan; Liu, Wen; Guo, Wenjie; Jiang, Chunhong; Yang, Xiaoling; Xu, Qiang; Sun, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a severe, life-threatening medical condition characterized by widespread inflammation in the lungs, and is a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the patient population. New therapies for the treatment of ALI are desperately needed. In the present study, we examined the effect of andrographolide sulfonate, a water-soluble form of andrographolide (trade name: Xi-Yan-Ping Injection), on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI and inflammation. Andrographolide sulfonate was administered by intraperitoneal injection to mice with LPS-induced ALI. LPS-induced airway inflammatory cell recruitment and lung histological alterations were significantly ameliorated by andrographolide sulfonate. Protein levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and serum were reduced by andrographolide sulfonate administration. mRNA levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in lung tissue were also suppressed. Moreover, andrographolide sulfonate markedly suppressed the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) as well as p65 subunit of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In summary, these results suggest that andrographolide sulfonate ameliorated LPS-induced ALI in mice by inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK-mediated inflammatory responses. Our study shows that water-soluble andrographolide sulfonate may represent a new therapeutic approach for treating inflammatory lung disorders. PMID:27175331

  14. Tempol and perindopril protect against lipopolysaccharide-induced cognition impairment and amyloidogenesis by modulating brain-derived neurotropic factor, neuroinflammation and oxido-nitrosative stress.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammed Ragab Abdel-Aziz; Abo-Youssef, Amira Morad Hussein; Messiha, Basim Anwar Shehata; Khattab, Mahmoud Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    We aim to evaluate the protective role of the central angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor perindopril, compared with the standard reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger tempol, against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cognition impairment and amyloidogenesis in a simulation to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Mice were allocated into a control group, an LPS control group (0.8 mg/kg, i.p., once), a tempol (100 mg/kg/day, p.o., 7 days) treatment group, and two perindopril (0.5 and 1 mg/kg/day, p.o., 7 days) treatment groups. A behavioral study was conducted to evaluate spatial and nonspatial memory in mice, followed by a biochemical study involving assessment of brain levels of Aβ and BDNF as Alzheimer and neuroplasticity markers; tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), nitric oxide end-products (NOx), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) as inflammatory markers; and superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione reduced (GSH), and nitrotyrosine (NT) as oxido-nitrosative stress markers. Finally, histopathological examination of cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and cerebellum sections was performed using both routine and special staining. Tempol and perindopril improved spatial and nonspatial memory in mice without affecting locomotor activity; decreased brain Aβ deposition and BDNF depletion; decreased brain TNF-α, NOx, nNOS, iNOS, MDA, and NT levels; and increased brain SOD and GSH contents, parallel to confirmatory histopathological findings. Tempol and perindopril may be promising agents against AD progression via suppression of Aβ deposition and BDNF decline, suppression of TNF-α production, support of brain antioxidant status, and amelioration of oxido-nitrosative stress and NT production. PMID:27026404

  15. Tetrahydroberberrubine attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury by down-regulating MAPK, AKT, and NF-κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiu; Yu, Sulan; Chen, Ling; Liu, Han; Zhang, Jian; Ge, Haixia; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Boyang; Kou, Junping

    2016-08-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a life-threatening syndrome that is characterized by overwhelming lung inflammation and increased microvascular permeability, which causes a high mortality worldwide. Here, we studied the protective effect of tetrahydroberberrubine (THBru), a berberine derivative, on a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury that was established in our previous studies. The results showed that a single oral administration of THBru significantly decreased the lung wet to dry weight (W/D) ratio at doses of 2, 10 and 50mg/kg administered 1h prior to LPS challenge (30mg/kg, intravenous injection). Histopathological changes, such as pulmonary edema, infiltration of inflammatory cells and coagulation, were also attenuated by THBru. In addition, THBru markedly decreased the total cell counts, total protein and nitrate/nitrite content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), significantly decreased tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nitrate/nitrite content in the plasma, and reduced the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the lung tissues. Additionally, THBru (10μM) significantly decreased the content of TNF-α and nitric oxide (NO) in LPS-induced THP-1 cells in vitro. Moreover, THBru significantly suppressed the activation of the MAPKs JNK and p38, AKT, and the NF-κB subunit p65 in LPS-induced THP-1 cells. These findings confirm that THBru attenuates LPS-induced acute lung injury by inhibiting the release of inflammatory cytokines and suppressing the activation of MAPKs, AKT, and NF-κB signaling pathways, which implicates it as a potential therapeutic agent for ALI or sepsis. PMID:27470389

  16. Salt-inducible kinase 3 deficiency exacerbates lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxin shock accompanied by increased levels of pro-inflammatory molecules in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sanosaka, Masato; Fujimoto, Minoru; Ohkawara, Tomoharu; Nagatake, Takahiro; Itoh, Yumi; Kagawa, Mai; Kumagai, Ayako; Fuchino, Hiroyuki; Kunisawa, Jun; Naka, Tetsuji; Takemori, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages play important roles in the innate immune system during infection and systemic inflammation. When bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binds to Toll-like receptor 4 on macrophages, several signalling cascades co-operatively up-regulate gene expression of inflammatory molecules. The present study aimed to examine whether salt-inducible kinase [SIK, a member of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) family] could contribute to the regulation of immune signal not only in cultured macrophages, but also in vivo. LPS up-regulated SIK3 expression in murine RAW264.7 macrophages and exogenously over-expressed SIK3 negatively regulated the expression of inflammatory molecules [interleukin-6 (IL-6), nitric oxide (NO) and IL-12p40] in RAW264.7 macrophages. Conversely, these inflammatory molecule levels were up-regulated in SIK3-deficient thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages (TEPM), despite no impairment of the classical signalling cascades. Forced expression of SIK3 in SIK3-deficient TEPM suppressed the levels of the above-mentioned inflammatory molecules. LPS injection (10 mg/kg) led to the death of all SIK3-knockout (KO) mice within 48 hr after treatment, whereas only one mouse died in the SIK1-KO (n = 8), SIK2-KO (n = 9) and wild-type (n = 8 or 9) groups. In addition, SIK3-KO bone marrow transplantation increased LPS sensitivity of the recipient wild-type mice, which was accompanied by an increased level of circulating IL-6. These results suggest that SIK3 is a unique negative regulator that suppresses inflammatory molecule gene expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages. PMID:25619259

  17. Enhanced anti-inflammatory effects of DHA and quercetin in lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW264.7 macrophages by inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Si, Tian-Lei; Liu, Qi; Ren, Yu-Fei; Li, Hui; Xu, Xiao-Yun; Li, Er-Hu; Pan, Si-Yi; Zhang, Jiu-Liang; Wang, Ke-Xing

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) + quercetin (QE) used in combination. DHA and QE are natural compounds derived from various foods and have been demonstrated to exert anti‑inflammatory effects The protein mRNA expression involved in the nuclear factor (NF)-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway was analyzed by western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction methods respectively, other cytokines were detected by an enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay kit. The results of the present study demonstrated that combined treatment of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)‑stimulated RAW264.7 cells with DHA + QE decreased the levels of pro‑inflammatory mediators to a greater extent than QE or DHA alone. Additionally, DHA + QE synergistically suppressed nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2 and cyclooxygenase-2 levels. Molecular‑level studies indicated that the DHA + QE combination can significantly inhibit the mRNA expression of NF‑κB subunits p50 and p65, extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and c‑JUN N‑terminal kinase (JNK) 1/2, which suggests that the NF‑κB signalling pathway is involved in the synergistic effects observed. Furthermore, western blot analysis demonstrated that DHA + QE synergistically inhibit the phosphorylation of p50, p65, ERK1/2 and JNK1/2. This finding indicates that the enhanced anti‑inflammatory effects of the combined compounds are achieved by suppressing NF‑κB and MAPK signalling in LPS‑stimulated RAW264.7 cells. The results of the present study suggest that DHA and QE in combination may be utilized as potent anti‑inflammatory compounds, with potential preventative or palliative effects on obesity, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27176922

  18. Bigelovii A Protects against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Blocking NF-κB and CCAAT/Enhancer-Binding Protein δ Pathways.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chunguang; Guan, Fuqin; Shen, Yanfei; Tang, Huifang; Yuan, Dong; Gao, Hongwei; Feng, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Optimal methods are applied to acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the mortality rate is still high. Accordingly, further studies dedicated to identify novel therapeutic approaches to ALI are urgently needed. Bigelovii A is a new natural product and may exhibit anti-inflammatory activity. Therefore, we sought to investigate its effect on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced ALI and the underlying mechanisms. We found that LPS-induced ALI was significantly alleviated by Bigelovii A treatment, characterized by reduction of proinflammatory mediator production, neutrophil infiltration, and lung permeability. Furthermore, Bigelovii A also downregulated LPS-stimulated inflammatory mediator expressions in vitro. Moreover, both NF-κB and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein δ (C/EBPδ) activation were obviously attenuated by Bigelovii A treatment. Additionally, phosphorylation of both p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 (upstream signals of C/EBPδ activation) in response to LPS challenge was also inhibited by Bigelovii A. Therefore, Bigelovii A could attenuate LPS-induced inflammation by suppression of NF-κB, inflammatory mediators, and p38 MAPK/ERK1/2-C/EBPδ, inflammatory mediators signaling pathways, which provide a novel theoretical basis for the possible application of Bigelovii A in clinic. PMID:27194827

  19. Heat-Processed Scutellariae Radix Enhances Anti-Inflammatory Effect against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice via NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yu Ock; Park, Chan Hum; Lee, Gyeong-Hwan; Yokozawa, Takako; Roh, Seong-Soo; Rhee, Man Hee

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to examine whether heat-processed Scutellariae Radix has an ameliorative effect on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced acute lung injury in mice. The effects of Scutellariae Radix heat-processed at 160°C (HSR) were compared with those of nonheat-processed Scutellariae Radix (NSR). The LPS-treated group displayed a markedly decreased body weight and significantly increased lung weight; however, the administration of NSR or HSR improved both the body and lung weights. The increased oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarker levels in the serum and lung were reduced significantly with HSR. The reduced superoxide dismutase and catalase increased significantly by both NSR and HSR. Also, the dysregulated oxidative stress and inflammation were significantly ameliorated by NSR and HSR. The expression of inflammatory mediators and cytokines by nuclear factor-kappa B activation was modulated through inhibition of a nuclear factor kappa Bα degradation. Also, lung histological change was markedly suppressed by HSR rather than NSR. Overall, the ameliorative effects of HSR were superior to those when being nonheat-processed. The representative flavonoid contents of Scutellariae Radix that include baicalin, baicalein, and wogonin were greater by heat process. These data reveal heat-processed Scutellariae Radix may be a critical factor involved in the improvement of lung disorders caused by LPS. PMID:26167192

  20. Protective effect of erdosteine against hypochlorous acid-induced acute lung injury and lipopolysaccharide-induced neutrophilic lung inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Hosoe, H; Kaise, T; Ohmori, K

    2000-11-01

    The effect of erdosteine, a mucoactive drug, on hypochlorous acid (HOCl)-induced lung injury, and the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced increase in tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production and neutrophil recruitment into the airway, was investigated. Male BALB/c mice were orally administered erdosteine (3-100 mgkg(-1)), ambroxol hydrochloride (ambroxol) (3-30 mgkg(-1)), S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine (S-CMC) (100-600 mgkg(-1)) or prednisolone (10 mgkg(-1)), 1 h before intratracheal injection of HOCl or LPS. In the HOCl-injected mice, erdosteine markedly suppressed increases in the ratios of lung wet weight to bodyweight and lung dry weight to bodyweight, whereas the other mucoactive drugs ambroxol and S-CMC had little effect. Erdosteine also inhibited the LPS-induced neutrophil influx, although it did not affect the increased level of TNF-alpha in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The results suggest that attenuation of reactive oxygen species and neutrophil recruitment is involved in the clinical efficacy of erdosteine in the treatment of chronic bronchitis. PMID:11186250

  1. Differential Modulation of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Cytokine Production by and Antioxidant Activity of Fomentariol in RAW264.7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dong-Won; Yi, Young-Joo; Lee, Myeong-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal mushrooms have been used worldwide to treat cancer and modulate the immune system. Over the last several years, there has been increasing interest in isolating bioactive compounds from medicinal mushrooms and evaluating their health beneficial effects. Fomes fomentarius is used in traditional oriental medicine and is known to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, and antitumor effects. In the present study, we isolated fomentariol from Fomes fomentarius and investigated its anti-inflammatory effect in murine macrophages (RAW264.7 cells) stimulated with lipopolysaccharides. Fomentariol inhibited the production of nitric oxide and intracellular reactive oxygen species triggered by lipopolysaccharides. Interestingly, fomentariol differentially regulated cytokine production triggered by lipopolysaccharides. Fomentariol effectively suppressed the production of interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 but not tumor necrosis factor-α. The inhibitory effect of fomentariol against nitric oxide, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6 production was possibly mediated by downregulation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathway. Taken together, our results suggest that fomentariol differentially modulated inflammatory responses triggered by lipopolysaccharides in macrophages and is one of the bioactive compounds that mediate the physiological effects of Fomes fomentarius. PMID:26839505

  2. KCHO-1, a Novel Antineuroinflammatory Agent, Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Neuroinflammatory Responses through Nrf2-Mediated Heme Oxygenase-1 Expression in Mouse BV2 Microglia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Sung; Ko, Wonmin; Yoon, Chi-Su; Kim, Dong-Cheol; Yun, Jinju; Lee, Jun-Kyung; Jun, Ki-Young; Son, Ilhong; Kim, Dong-Woung; Song, Bong-Keun; Choi, Seulah; Jang, Jun-Hyeog; Oh, Hyuncheol; Kim, Sungchul; Kim, Youn-Chul

    2014-01-01

    The brain is vulnerable to oxidative stress and inflammation that can occur as a result of aging or neurodegenerative diseases. Our work has sought to identify natural products that regulate heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and to determine their mechanism of action in neurodegenerative diseases. KCHO-1 is a novel herbal therapeutic containing 30% ethanol (EtOH) extracts from nine plants. In this study, we investigated the antineuroinflammatory effects of KCHO-1 in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) treated mouse BV2 microglia. KCHO-1 inhibited the protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), iNOS-derived nitric oxide (NO), cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2, and COX-2-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in LPS-stimulated BV2 microglia. It also reduced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-6 production. This effect was correlated with the suppression of inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B-α (IκB-α) phosphorylation and degradation and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) translocation and DNA binding. Additionally, KCHO-1 upregulated HO-1 expression by promoting nuclear translocation of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in mouse BV2 microglia. Tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), an HO activity inhibitor, was used to verify the inhibitory effects of KCHO-1 on proinflammatory mediators and proteins associated with HO-1 expression. Our data suggest that KCHO-1 has therapeutic potential in neurodegenerative diseases caused by neuroinflammation. PMID:25580149

  3. Aqueous extract of Psoralea corylifolia L. inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced endothelial-mesenchymal transition via downregulation of the NF-κB-SNAIL signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bom; Jang, Eun Hyang; Hong, Darong; Cho, In Hye; Park, Min-Ju; Kim, Jong-Ho

    2015-10-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a pivotal event in the invasion and metastasis of cancer cells. Psoralea corylifolia L. (PC) inhibits the proliferation of various cancer cells. However, its possible role in EMT has not been identified. In the present study, we examined the effects of an aqueous extract of Psoralea corylifolia L. (PCAE), a typical medicinal decoction, on the EMT. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced EMT-like phenotypic changes, enhancing cell migration and invasion. However, PCAE markedly reduced the expression of the LPS-induced EMT markers, including N-cadherin and vimentin, and increased the expression of β-catenin. PCAE also inhibited cell migration and invasion in vitro. The effects of PCAE on the LPS-induced EMT were mediated by the inactivation of the NF-κB-SNAIL signaling pathway. The results provide new evidence that PCAE suppresses cancer cell invasion and migration by inhibiting EMT. Therefore, PCAE is a potentially effective dietary chemopreventive agent for malignant tumors since it inhibits metastasis. PMID:26238218

  4. Magnolol ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats through PPAR-γ-dependent inhibition of NF-kB activation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Hsien; Chen, Meng-Chuan; Chen, Tso-Hsiao; Chang, Heng-Yuan; Chou, Tz-Chong

    2015-09-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) has a high morbidity and mortality rate due to the serious inflammation and edema occurred in lung. Magnolol extracted from Magnolia officinalis, has been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant activities. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are known to exert a cytoprotective effect against cellular inflammatory stress and oxidative injury. The aim of this study was to explore the involvement of PPAR-γ in the beneficial effect of magnolol in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. We found that treatment with magnolol greatly improved the pathological features of ALI evidenced by reduction of lung edema, polymorphonuclear neutrophil infiltration, ROS production, the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), the expression of iNOS and COX-2, and NF-κB activation in lungs exposed to LPS. Importantly, magnolol is capable of increasing the PPAR-γ expression and activity in lungs of ALI. However, blocking PPAR-γ activity with GW9662 markedly abolished the protective and anti-inflammatory effects of magnolol. Taken together, the present study provides a novel mechanism accounting for the protective effect of magnolol in LPS-induced ALI is at least partly attributed to induction of PPAR-γ in lungs, and in turn suppressing NF-κB-related inflammatory responses. PMID:26072062

  5. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells protect alveolar macrophages from lipopolysaccharide-induced apoptosis partially by inhibiting the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Zhang, Hongwu; Zeng, Mian; He, Wanmei; Li, Ming; Huang, Xubin; Deng, David Y B; Wu, Jianfeng

    2015-02-01

    Apoptosis of alveolar macrophages (AMs) plays a pathogenic role in acute lung injury (ALI) and its severe type, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising therapeutic cells for preventing apoptosis and eliminating cellular injury. We investigated the effects of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced apoptosis in AMs using transwell experiments, and examined the underlying mechanisms LPS induced AMs apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent fashion, whereas BMSCs reduced AMs apoptosis when co-cultured at appropriate ratios. BMSCs decreased expression of cleaved caspase-3 and the pro-apoptotic protein, Bax, whilst increased levels of the anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2, prolonging the lifespan of AMs in vitro. Promotion of AMs survival by BMSCs required down-regulation of p-GSK-3β and β-catenin in AMs. The anti-apoptosis action of BMSCs was reversed by SB216763, a specific inhibitor of GSK-3β that also activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling. In conclusion, BMSCs can attenuate AM apoptosis partially by suppressing the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PMID:25229877

  6. Effects of prostaglandin E2, cholera toxin and 8-bromo-cyclic AMP on lipopolysaccharide-induced gene expression of cytokines in human macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, W W; Burke, P A; Drotar, M E; Chavali, S R; Forse, R A

    1995-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) appears to regulate macrophage cytokine production through the stimulatory GTP-binding protein (Gs protein)-mediated cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent transmembrane signal transduction pathway. In this study, we used PGE2, cholera toxin (CT; a direct G alpha s protein stimulator) and 8-bromo-cAMP (a membrane permeable cAMP analogue) to stimulate this pathway, and investigated their influence on cytokine gene expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated human macrophages. The mRNA expression for interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-1 beta, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-6 and IL-8 were determined employing reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using specific primers. We demonstrated that PGE2, CT and 8-bromo-cAMP inhibited the LPS-induced gene activation of TNF-alpha and IL-1 alpha, and had no effect on the gene activation of IL-1 beta and IL-8. Further, our data indicate that PGE2 suppressed the gene activation of IL-6 following LPS stimulation, but neither CT nor 8-bromo-cAMP had an effect. These data suggest that PGE2 alters LPS-stimulated gene activation of only some of the early macrophage cytokines, and does so either by a Gs transmembrane cAMP-dependent or an independent system. Images Figure 1 PMID:7751029

  7. Protective Effect of Ginsenosides Rg1 and Re on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Sepsis by Competitive Binding to Toll-Like Receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Su, Fei; Xue, Yin; Wang, Yuemin; Zhang, Lili; Chen, Wangxue

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that ginsenosides Rg1 and Re enhanced the immune response in C3H/HeB mice but not in C3H/HeJ mice carrying a mutation in the Tlr4 gene. The results of the present study showed that both Rg1 and Re inhibited mRNA expression and production of proinflammatory mediators that included tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, cyclooxygenase-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. Rg1 was found to be distributed both extracellularly and intracellularly but Re was located only extracellularly to compete with LPS for binding to Toll-like receptor 4. Preinjection of Rg1 and Re into rats suppressed LPS-induced increases in body temperature, white blood cell counts, and levels of serum proinflammatory mediators. Preinjection of Rg1 and Re into mice prevented the LPS-induced decreases in total white blood cell counts and neutrophil counts, inhibited excessive expression of multiple proinflammatory mediators, and successfully rescued 100% of the mice from sepsis-associated death. More significantly, when administered after lethal LPS inoculation, Rg1, but not Re, still showed a potent antisepsis effect and protected 90% of the mice from death. The better protection efficacy of Rg1 could result from its intracellular distribution, suggesting that Rg1 may be an ideal antisepsis agent. PMID:26149990

  8. Anti-neuroinflammatory activities of indole alkaloids from kanjang (Korean fermented soy source) in lipopolysaccharide-induced BV2 microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Cheol; Quang, Tran Hong; Yoon, Chi-Su; Ngan, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Lim, Seong-Il; Lee, So-Young; Kim, Youn-Chul; Oh, Hyuncheol

    2016-12-15

    Kanjang (Korean soy sauce) is a byproduct of the production of the Korean fermented soybean. In the present study, seven indole alkaloid derivatives were isolated from methanol extract of kanjang. Their structures were identified as 1-propyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-β-carboline-3-carboxylic acid (1), 1-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-β-carboline-3-carboxylic acid (2), 1-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-β-carboline-1-carboxylic acid (3), 3-indoleacetic acid (4), Nb-acetyltryptamine (5), 1-methyl-3,4-dihydro-β-carboline (6), and flazine (7) by NMR and MS analyses. Preliminary screening for anti-neuroinflammatory effects of isolated indole alkaloids in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 cells revealed that these compounds inhibited the production of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2. For the subsequent investigation of anti-neuroinflammatory action of these metabolites, compounds 4 and 7 were selected, and the results revealed that these inhibitory effects correlated with the suppressive effect of 4 and 7 on inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 expression in LPS-stimulated BV2 cells. In regards to the mechanism of the anti-inflammatory effect, 4 and 7 significantly inhibited the nuclear factor-kappa B pathway. PMID:27451156

  9. The Anti-Inflammatory Effects and Mechanisms of Eupafolin in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Responses in RAW264.7 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chin-Chaun; Lin, Ming-Wei; Liang, Chan-Jung; Wang, Shu-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Eupafolin is a flavone isolated from Artemisia princeps Pampanini (family Asteraceae). The aim of this study was to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of eupafolin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW264.7 macrophages and LPS-induced mouse skin and lung inflammation models and to identify the mechanism underlying these effects. Eupafolin decreased the LPS-induced release of inflammatory mediators (iNOS, COX-2 and NO) and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α) from the RAW264.7 macrophages. Eupafolin inhibited the LPS-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK1/2, JNK, AKT and p65 and the nuclear translocation of p65 and c-fos. These effects were mainly mediated by the inhibition of JNK. In the mouse paw and lung models, eupafolin effectively suppressed the LPS-induced edema formation and down-regulated iNOS and COX-2 expression. These results demonstrated that eupafolin exhibits anti-inflammatory properties and suggested that eupafolin can be developed as an anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:27414646

  10. The Anti-Inflammatory Effects and Mechanisms of Eupafolin in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Responses in RAW264.7 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Chaun; Lin, Ming-Wei; Liang, Chan-Jung; Wang, Shu-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Eupafolin is a flavone isolated from Artemisia princeps Pampanini (family Asteraceae). The aim of this study was to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of eupafolin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW264.7 macrophages and LPS-induced mouse skin and lung inflammation models and to identify the mechanism underlying these effects. Eupafolin decreased the LPS-induced release of inflammatory mediators (iNOS, COX-2 and NO) and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α) from the RAW264.7 macrophages. Eupafolin inhibited the LPS-induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK1/2, JNK, AKT and p65 and the nuclear translocation of p65 and c-fos. These effects were mainly mediated by the inhibition of JNK. In the mouse paw and lung models, eupafolin effectively suppressed the LPS-induced edema formation and down-regulated iNOS and COX-2 expression. These results demonstrated that eupafolin exhibits anti-inflammatory properties and suggested that eupafolin can be developed as an anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:27414646

  11. Bigelovii A Protects against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury by Blocking NF-κB and CCAAT/Enhancer-Binding Protein δ Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chunguang; Guan, Fuqin; Shen, Yanfei; Tang, Huifang; Yuan, Dong; Gao, Hongwei; Feng, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Optimal methods are applied to acute lung injury (ALI) and the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the mortality rate is still high. Accordingly, further studies dedicated to identify novel therapeutic approaches to ALI are urgently needed. Bigelovii A is a new natural product and may exhibit anti-inflammatory activity. Therefore, we sought to investigate its effect on lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced ALI and the underlying mechanisms. We found that LPS-induced ALI was significantly alleviated by Bigelovii A treatment, characterized by reduction of proinflammatory mediator production, neutrophil infiltration, and lung permeability. Furthermore, Bigelovii A also downregulated LPS-stimulated inflammatory mediator expressions in vitro. Moreover, both NF-κB and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein δ (C/EBPδ) activation were obviously attenuated by Bigelovii A treatment. Additionally, phosphorylation of both p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 (upstream signals of C/EBPδ activation) in response to LPS challenge was also inhibited by Bigelovii A. Therefore, Bigelovii A could attenuate LPS-induced inflammation by suppression of NF-κB, inflammatory mediators, and p38 MAPK/ERK1/2—C/EBPδ, inflammatory mediators signaling pathways, which provide a novel theoretical basis for the possible application of Bigelovii A in clinic. PMID:27194827

  12. A Solute Carrier Family 22 Member 3 Variant rs3088442 G→A Associated with Coronary Heart Disease Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-induced Inflammatory Response*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lu; He, Meian; Zhou, Li; Miao, Xiaoping; Wu, Fangqing; Huang, Suli; Dai, Xiayun; Wang, Tian; Wu, Tangchun

    2015-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have identified single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) within the SLC22A3 (solute carrier family 22 member 3) gene associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) in the Caucasian population. We performed molecular analysis to investigate the potential role of SLC22A3 variants in CHD. Our study showed that the common polymorphism rs3088442 G→A, which is localized in the 3′ UTR of the SLC22A3 gene, was associated with a decreased risk of CHD in the Chinese population by a case control study. In silico analysis indicated that G→A substitution of SNP rs3088442 created a putative binding site for miR-147 in the SLC22A3 mRNA. By overexpressing miR-147 or inhibiting endogenous miR-147, we demonstrated that SNP rs3088442 G→A recruited miR-147 to inhibit SLC22A3 expression. Moreover, SLC22A3 deficiency significantly decreased LPS-induced monocytic inflammatory response by interrupting NF-κB and MAPK signaling cascades in a histamine-dependent manner. Notably, the expression of SLC22A3A was also suppressed by LPS stimulus. Our findings might indicate a negative feedback mechanism against inflammatory response by which SLC22A3 polymorphisms decreased the risk of CHD. PMID:25561729

  13. Ginsenoside Rg1 improves lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury by inhibiting inflammatory responses and modulating infiltration of M2 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bao, Suhong; Zou, Yun; Wang, Bing; Li, Yinjiao; Zhu, Jiali; Luo, Yan; Li, Jinbao

    2015-09-01

    Ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1), the major effective component of ginseng, has been reported to have potent anti-inflammatory properties. However, the effect of ginsenoside Rg1 on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) -induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice was unknown. The present study was designed to investigate the protective role of Rg1 on LPS-induced ALI and explore the potential mechanisms. The mice were divided randomly into four groups: the sham group, the LPS group and the LPS+Rg1 (40 mg/kg or 200mg/kg) pretreatment groups. All mice received Rg1 or an equivalent volume of phosphate buffer saline (PBS) intraperitoneally 1h before LPS administration. Edema quantification, histology, and apoptosis were detected 6h after LPS administration. The number of inflammatory cells, the percentage of alternative activated (M2) macrophages and the exudate quantification in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were evaluated. The caspase 3 expression, and the levels of phosphorylated IκB-α and p65 were tested. The results showed that the Rg1 pretreatment group markedly improved lung damage, modulated the infiltration of neutrophils and M2 macrophages, prevented the production of protein and proinflammatory cytokines in BALF, and inhibited apoptosis in lung. We also found that Rg1 suppressed NF-κB and caspase 3 activation. These data suggest that Rg1 plays a protective role against LPS-induced ALI by ameliorating inflammatory responses, regulating the infiltration of M2 macrophages, and inhibiting pulmonary cell apoptosis. PMID:26122136

  14. Protective effect of ginsenosides Rg1 and Re on lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis by competitive binding to Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Su, Fei; Xue, Yin; Wang, Yuemin; Zhang, Lili; Chen, Wangxue; Hu, Songhua

    2015-09-01

    We previously demonstrated that ginsenosides Rg1 and Re enhanced the immune response in C3H/HeB mice but not in C3H/HeJ mice carrying a mutation in the Tlr4 gene. The results of the present study showed that both Rg1 and Re inhibited mRNA expression and production of proinflammatory mediators that included tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, cyclooxygenase-2, and inducible nitric oxide synthase from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. Rg1 was found to be distributed both extracellularly and intracellularly but Re was located only extracellularly to compete with LPS for binding to Toll-like receptor 4. Preinjection of Rg1 and Re into rats suppressed LPS-induced increases in body temperature, white blood cell counts, and levels of serum proinflammatory mediators. Preinjection of Rg1 and Re into mice prevented the LPS-induced decreases in total white blood cell counts and neutrophil counts, inhibited excessive expression of multiple proinflammatory mediators, and successfully rescued 100% of the mice from sepsis-associated death. More significantly, when administered after lethal LPS inoculation, Rg1, but not Re, still showed a potent antisepsis effect and protected 90% of the mice from death. The better protection efficacy of Rg1 could result from its intracellular distribution, suggesting that Rg1 may be an ideal antisepsis agent. PMID:26149990

  15. An analysis on the suppression of NO and PGE2 by diphenylheptane A and its effect on glycerophospholipids of lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW264.7 cells with UPLC/ESI-QTOF-MS.

    PubMed

    She, Yuqi; Zheng, Qifan; Xiao, Xuerong; Wu, Xia; Feng, Yifan

    2016-05-01

    Diarylheptanoid A, 5-hydroxy-7-(4'-hydroxy-3'-methoxyphenyl)-1-phenyl-3-heptanone, is a naturally occurring phytochemical ingredient isolated from the rhizome of Alpinia officinarum. In order to confirm the anti-inflammatory activity of diphenylheptane A, we investigated its effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), as well as upstream genes, including the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) p65, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Our results have proved the anti-inflammatory property of diphenylheptane A. Based on this finding, an LPS-induced RAW264.7 cell inflammatory model was introduced to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity associated with glycerophospholipid (GPL) metabolism regulated by diphenylheptane A. We applied ultra-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-quadruple time of flight-mass spectrometry (UPLC/ESI-QTOF-MS) to the metabolic profiling of GPL synthesis in LPS-stimulated macrophages with the aim of identifying differentially synthesized GPL metabolites. Sixteen GPL metabolites, whose changes were restored to normal level after diphenylheptane A treatment, were further screened to be considered as useful biomarkers of inflammation. Overall, our study revealed for the first time that diphenylheptane A reestablished the production of 16 plasma membrane GPLs to basal level in LPS-activated RAW264.7 cells, suggesting the potential therapeutic property of phytochemical compounds against inflammatory diseases. Graphical abstract The schematic diagram of the study. PMID:27025382

  16. Ghrelin protects alveolar macrophages against lipopolysaccharide-induced apoptosis through growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a-dependent c-Jun N-terminal kinase and Wnt/β-catenin signaling and suppresses lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Zeng, Mian; He, Wanmei; Huang, Xubin; Luo, Liang; Zhang, Hongwu; Deng, David Y B

    2015-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) undergo increased apoptosis during sepsis-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Ghrelin exhibits an antiapoptotic effect in several cell types and protects against sepsis-induced ARDS in rats; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying this antiapoptotic effect remain poorly understood. In this study, we first examined the antiapoptotic effect of ghrelin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated AMs in vitro. In AMs, GH secretagogue receptor-1a (GHSR-1a), the ghrelin receptor, was expressed, and treatment of AMs with ghrelin markedly reduced LPS-induced apoptosis, mitochondrial transmembrane potential decrease, and cytochrome c release. These effects of ghrelin were mediated by GHSR-1a because a GHSR-1a-targeting small interfering RNA abolished the antiapoptotic action of ghrelin. LPS treatment activated the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway but inhibited the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Interestingly, combined LPS-ghrelin treatment reduced JNK activation and increased Wnt/β-catenin activation. Furthermore, like ghrelin treatment, the addition of the JNK inhibitor SP600125 or the glycogen synthase kinase-3β inhibitor SB216763 rescued AMs from apoptosis. We also demonstrated that ghrelin altered the balance of Bcl-2-family proteins and inhibited caspase-3 activity. Next, we investigated whether ghrelin protected against septic ARDS in vivo. Sepsis was induced in male rats by performing cecal ligation and puncture; administration of ghrelin reduced sepsis-induced AMs apoptosis, pulmonary injury, protein concentrations in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, the lung neutrophil infiltration, and wet to dry weight ratio. However, administration of a specific ghrelin-receptor antagonist, [D-Lys-3]-GH-releasing peptide-6, abolished the beneficial effects of ghrelin. Collectively our results suggest that ghrelin exerts an antiapoptotic effect on AMs at least partly by inhibiting JNK and activating the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and thereby helps alleviate septic ARDS in rats. PMID:25337654

  17. Sevoflurane prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced barrier dysfunction in human lung microvascular endothelial cells: Rho-mediated alterations of VE-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yiran; Tan, Qindong; Chen, Rui; Cao, Biao; Li, Wenhong

    Acute lung injury (ALI) mainly occurs as increased permeability of lung tissue and pleural effusion. Inhaled anesthetic sevoflurane has been demonstrated to alleviate lung permeability by upregulating junction proteins after ischemia-reperfusion. However, the exact mechanisms of its protective effect on reperfusion injury remain elusive. The aim of this study was to assess possible preconditioning with sevoflurane in an in vitro model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced barrier dysfunction in human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-Ls). In this study, HMVEC-Ls were exposed to minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane for 2 h. LPS significantly increased the permeability of HMVEC-L. Moreover, the distribution of junction protein, vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, in cell-cell junction area and the total expression in HMVEC-Ls were significantly decreased by LPS treatment. However, the abnormal distribution and decreased expression of VE-cadherin and hyperpermeability of HMVEC-Ls were significantly reversed by pretreatment with sevoflurane. Furthermore, LPS-induced activation of the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway was significantly inhibited with sevoflurane. Such activation, abnormal distribution and decreased expression of VE-cadherin and hyperpermeability of HMVEC-Ls were significantly inhibited with sevoflurane pretreatment or knockdown of RhoA or ROCK-2. In conclusion, sevoflurane prevented LPS-induced rupture of HMVEC-L monolayers by suppressing the RhoA/ROCK-mediated VE-cadherin signaling pathway. Our results may explain, at least in part, some beneficial effects of sevoflurane on pulmonary dysfunction such as ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:26529544

  18. Geniposide plays an anti-inflammatory role via regulating TLR4 and downstream signaling pathways in lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaojing; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Tiancheng; Jiang, Haichao; Zhang, Zecai; Fu, Yunhe; Yang, Zhengtao; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-10-01

    Geniposide is a medicine isolated from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, which is a traditional Chinese herb that is widely used in Asia for the treatment of inflammation, brain diseases, and hepatic disorders. Mastitis is a highly prevalent and important infectious disease. In this study, we used a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mouse mastitis model and LPS-stimulated primary mouse mammary epithelial cells (mMECs) to explore the anti-inflammatory effect and the mechanism of action of geniposide. Using intraductal injection of LPS as a mouse model of mastitis, we found that geniposide significantly reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells and downregulated the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6). To further investigate the anti-inflammatory mechanism, we used LPS-stimulated mMECs as an in vitro mastitis model. The results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) showed that geniposide inhibited the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis demonstrated that geniposide could suppress the phosphorylation of inhibitory kappa B (IκBα), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Geniposide also inhibited the expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the LPS-stimulated mMECs. In conclusion, geniposide exerted its anti-inflammatory effect by regulating TLR4 expression, which affected the downstream NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. Thus, geniposide may be a potential drug for mastitis therapy. PMID:24771071

  19. Silencing Angiopoietin-Like Protein 4 (ANGPTL4) Protects Against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury Via Regulating SIRT1 /NF-kB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liang; Li, Shaoying; Zhao, Yunfeng; Qian, Pin; Ji, Fuyun; Qian, Lanlan; Wu, Xueling; Qian, Guisheng

    2015-10-01

    Lung inflammation and alveolar epithelial cell death are critical events in the development and progression of acute lung injury (ALI). Although angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) participates in inflammation, whether it plays important roles in ALI and alveolar epithelial cell inflammatory injury remains unclear. We therefore investigated the role of angptl4 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI and the associated mechanisms. Lentivirus-mediated short interfering RNA targeted to the mouse angptl4 gene (AngsiRNA) and a negative control lentivirus (NCsiRNA) were intranasally administered to mice. Lung inflammatory injury and the underlying mechanisms for regulation of angptl4 on the LPS-induced ALI were subsequently determined. We reported that angptl4 levels were increased both in human alveolar epithelial A549 cells and lung tissues obtained from a mouse model of LPS-induced ALI. Angptl4 expression was induced by LPS in alveolar epithelial cells, whereas LPS-induced lung inflammation (neutrophils infiltration in the lung tissues, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 6), lung permeability (lung wet/dry weight ratio and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein concentration), tissue damage (caspase3 activation), and mortality rates were attenuated in AngsiRNA-treated mice. The inflammatory reaction (tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 6) and apoptosis rates were reduced in AngsiRNA(h)-treated A549 cells. Moreover, angptl4 promoted NF-kBp65 expression and suppressed SIRT1 expression both in mouse lungs and A549 cells. Additionally, SIRT1 antagonist nicotinamide (NAM) attenuated the inhibitory effects of AngsiRNA both on LPS-induced NF-kBp65 expression and IL6 expression. These findings suggest that silencing angptl4 protects against LPS-induced ALI via regulating SIRT1/NF-kB signaling pathway. PMID:25727991

  20. Folic Acid Protects against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Preterm Delivery and Intrauterine Growth Restriction through Its Anti-Inflammatory Effect in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xu-Ting; Zhou, Jun; Chen, Xue; Wang, Hua; Wu, Shu-Xian; Xia, Mi-Zhen; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, De-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that maternal folic acid (FA) supplementation during pregnancy reduces the risk of neural tube defects, but whether FA prevents preterm delivery and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) remains obscure. Previous studies showed that maternal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure induces preterm delivery, fetal death and IUGR in rodent animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of FA on LPS-induced preterm delivery, fetal death and IUGR in mice. Some pregnant mice were orally administered with FA (0.6, 3 or 15 mg/kg) 1 h before LPS injection. As expected, a high dose of LPS (300 μg/kg, i.p.) on gestational day 15 (GD15) caused 100% of dams to deliver before GD18 and 89.3% of fetuses dead. A low dose of LPS (75 μg/kg, i.p.) daily from GD15 to GD17 resulted in IUGR. Interestingly, pretreatment with FA prevented LPS-induced preterm delivery and fetal death. In addition, FA significantly attenuated LPS-induced IUGR. Further experiments showed that FA inhibited LPS-induced activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in mouse placentas. Moreover, FA suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB activation in human trophoblast cell line JEG-3. Correspondingly, FA significantly attenuated LPS-induced upregulation of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in mouse placentas. In addition, FA significantly reduced the levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and keratinocyte-derived cytokine (KC) in amniotic fluid of LPS-treated mice. Collectively, maternal FA supplementation during pregnancy protects against LPS-induced preterm delivery, fetal death and IUGR through its anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:24324824

  1. Neuroprotection of (+)-2-(1-Hydroxyl-4-Oxocyclohexyl) Ethyl Caffeate Against Hydrogen Peroxide and Lipopolysaccharide Induced Injury via Modulating Arachidonic Acid Network and p38-MAPK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jiao-Ning; Xu, Liu-Xin; Shan, Lei; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Li, Hong-Lin; Wang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and neuroinflammation are highly relevant to the pathological processes of various neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). (+)-2-(1-hydroxyl-4-oxocyclohexyl) ethyl caffeate (HOEC), a novel 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor, was isolated from the whole plant of Incarvillea mairei var granditlora (Wehrhahn) Grierson. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of HOEC on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) -induced cytotoxicity and neuroinflammation in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay, LDH release assay, morphological observation and Hoechst 33342/PI dual staining followed by EIA, immunofluorescence staining and Western Blotting analysis were performed to elucidate the neuroprotective effect of HOEC. Treatment with HOEC at various concentrations prior to H2O2 exposure significantly enhanced cell viability, decreased LDH release, prevented cell morphologic changes and apoptosis. Instead of PGE2 reduction, HOEC markedly inhibited the production of LTB4 and suppressed the macrophage-mediated neurotoxicity. Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining showed that HOEC inhibited H2O2-induced p38 phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. Neuroprotective effect of HOEC was abolished by a p38 inhibitor. Further in vivo studies of LPS-induced neuroinflammation confirmed the anti-inflammatory effects of HOEC. These findings that HOEC protects SH-SY5Y cells from H2O2 and LPS-induced injury via arachidonic acid network modulation followed by p38 MAPK and NF-κB signaling, might make HOEC be considered as a therapeutic candidate for prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases involving oxidative stress or/and inflammation. PMID:26510982

  2. Cyanidin-3-O-β-glucoside ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury by reducing TLR4 recruitment into lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yunhe; Zhou, Ershun; Wei, Zhengkai; Wang, Wei; Wang, Tiancheng; Yang, Zhengtao; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-07-15

    Cyanidin-3-O-β-glucoside (C3G), a typical anthocyanin pigment that exists in the human diet, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to detect the effect of C3G on LPS-induced acute lung injury and to investigate the molecular mechanisms. Acute lung injury was induced by intratracheal administration of LPS in mice. Alveolar macrophages from mice were stimulated with LPS and were treated with C3G. Our results showed that C3G attenuated lung histopathologic changes, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 production in LPS-induced acute lung injury model. In vitro, C3G dose-dependently inhibited TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 and IFN-β production, as well as NF-κB and IRF3 activation in LPS-stimulated alveolar macrophages. Furthermore, C3G disrupted the formation of lipid rafts by depleting cholesterol and inhibited TLR4 translocation into lipid rafts. Moreover, C3G activated LXRα-ABCG1-dependent cholesterol efflux. Knockout of LXRα abrogated the anti-inflammatory effects of C3G. In conclusion, C3G has a protective effect on LPS-induced acute lung injury. The promising anti-inflammatory mechanisms of C3G is associated with up-regulation of the LXRα-ABCG1 pathway which result in disrupting lipid rafts by depleting cholesterol and reducing translocation of TLR4 to lipid rafts, thereby suppressing TLR4 mediated inflammatory response. PMID:24841888

  3. Foeniculum vulgare Mill. Protects against Lipopolysaccharide-induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice through ERK-dependent NF-κB Activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hui Su; Kang, Purum; Kim, Ka Young; Seol, Geun Hee

    2015-03-01

    Foeniculum vulgare Mill. (fennel) is used to flavor food, in cosmetics, as an antioxidant, and to treat microbial, diabetic and common inflammation. No study to date, however, has assessed the anti-inflammatory effects of fennel in experimental models of inflammation. The aims of this study were to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of fennel in model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury. Mice were randomly assigned to seven groups (n=7~10). In five groups, the mice were intraperitoneally injected with 1% Tween 80-saline (vehicle), fennel (125, 250, 500µl/kg), or dexamethasone (1 mg/kg), followed 1 h later by intratracheal instillation of LPS (1.5 mg/kg). In two groups, the mice were intraperitoneally injected with vehicle or fennel (250µl/kg), followed 1 h later by intratracheal instillation of sterile saline. Mice were sacrificed 4 h later, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung tissues were obtained. Fennel significantly and dose-dependently reduced LDH activity and immune cell numbers in LPS treated mice. In addition fennel effectively suppressed the LPS-induced increases in the production of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, with 500µl/kg fennel showing maximal reduction. Fennel also significantly and dose-dependently reduced the activity of the proinflammatory mediator matrix metalloproteinase 9 and the immune modulator nitric oxide (NO). Assessments of the involvement of the MAPK signaling pathway showed that fennel significantly decreased the LPS-induced phosphorylation of ERK. Fennel effectively blocked the inflammatory processes induced by LPS, by regulating pro-inflammatory cytokine production, transcription factors, and NO. PMID:25729281

  4. Proteomic Analysis of the Effects of Aged Garlic Extract and Its FruArg Component on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Neuroinflammatory Response in Microglial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mossine, Valeri V.; Nknolise, Dineo L.; Li, Jilong; Chen, Zhenzhou; Cheng, Jianlin; Greenlief, C. Michael; Mawhinney, Thomas P.; Brown, Paula N.; Fritsche, Kevin L.; Hannink, Mark; Lubahn, Dennis B.; Sun, Grace Y.; Gu, Zezong

    2014-01-01

    Aged garlic extract (AGE) is widely used as a dietary supplement, and is claimed to promote human health through anti-oxidant/anti-inflammatory activities with hypolipidemic, antiplatelet and neuroprotective effects. Prior studies of AGE have mainly focused on its organosulfur compounds, with little attention paid to its carbohydrate derivatives, such as N-α-(1-deoxy-D-fructos-1-yl)-L-arginine (FruArg). The goal of this study is to investigate actions of AGE and FruArg on antioxidative and neuroinflammatory responses in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated murine BV-2 microglial cells using a proteomic approach. Our data show that both AGE and FruArg can significantly inhibit LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in BV-2 cells. Quantitative proteomic analysis by combining two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) with mass spectrometry revealed that expressions of 26 proteins were significantly altered upon LPS exposure, while levels of 20 and 21 proteins exhibited significant changes in response to AGE and FruArg treatments, respectively, in LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. Notably, approximate 78% of the proteins responding to AGE and FruArg treatments are in common, suggesting that FruArg is a major active component of AGE. MULTICOM-PDCN and Ingenuity Pathway Analyses indicate that the proteins differentially affected by treatment with AGE and FruArg are involved in inflammatory responses and the Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress response. Collectively, these results suggest that AGE and FruArg attenuate neuroinflammatory responses and promote resilience in LPS-activated BV-2 cells by suppressing NO production and by regulating expression of multiple protein targets associated with oxidative stress. PMID:25420111

  5. Proteomic analysis of the effects of aged garlic extract and its FruArg component on lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammatory response in microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hui; Qu, Zhe; Mossine, Valeri V; Nknolise, Dineo L; Li, Jilong; Chen, Zhenzhou; Cheng, Jianlin; Greenlief, C Michael; Mawhinney, Thomas P; Brown, Paula N; Fritsche, Kevin L; Hannink, Mark; Lubahn, Dennis B; Sun, Grace Y; Gu, Zezong

    2014-01-01

    Aged garlic extract (AGE) is widely used as a dietary supplement, and is claimed to promote human health through anti-oxidant/anti-inflammatory activities with hypolipidemic, antiplatelet and neuroprotective effects. Prior studies of AGE have mainly focused on its organosulfur compounds, with little attention paid to its carbohydrate derivatives, such as N-α-(1-deoxy-D-fructos-1-yl)-L-arginine (FruArg). The goal of this study is to investigate actions of AGE and FruArg on antioxidative and neuroinflammatory responses in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated murine BV-2 microglial cells using a proteomic approach. Our data show that both AGE and FruArg can significantly inhibit LPS-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in BV-2 cells. Quantitative proteomic analysis by combining two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) with mass spectrometry revealed that expressions of 26 proteins were significantly altered upon LPS exposure, while levels of 20 and 21 proteins exhibited significant changes in response to AGE and FruArg treatments, respectively, in LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. Notably, approximate 78% of the proteins responding to AGE and FruArg treatments are in common, suggesting that FruArg is a major active component of AGE. MULTICOM-PDCN and Ingenuity Pathway Analyses indicate that the proteins differentially affected by treatment with AGE and FruArg are involved in inflammatory responses and the Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress response. Collectively, these results suggest that AGE and FruArg attenuate neuroinflammatory responses and promote resilience in LPS-activated BV-2 cells by suppressing NO production and by regulating expression of multiple protein targets associated with oxidative stress. PMID:25420111

  6. Spherical nucleic acid targeting microRNA-99b enhances intestinal MFG-E8 gene expression and restores enterocyte migration in lipopolysaccharide-induced septic mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Hao, Liangliang; Bu, Heng-Fu; Scott, Alexander W.; Tian, Ke; Liu, Fangyi; De Plaen, Isabelle G.; Liu, Yulan; Mirkin, Chad A.; Tan, Xiao-Di

    2016-01-01

    Milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8) maintains the intestinal homeostasis by enhancing enterocyte migration and attenuating inflammation. We previously reported that sepsis is associated with down-regulation of intestinal MFG-E8 and impairment of enterocyte migration. Here, we showed that impairment of intestinal epithelial cell migration occurred in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced septic mice. Treatment of RAW264.7 cells (a murine macrophage-like cell line) with LPS increased expression of miR-99b, a microRNA that is predicted to target mouse MFG-E8 3′UTR. Using a luciferase assay, we showed that miR-99b mimic suppressed the activity of a reporter containing MFG-E8 3′UTR. This suggests the role of miR-99b in inhibition of MFG-E8 gene expression. In addition, we developed an anti-miR99b spherical nucleic acid nanoparticle conjugate (SNA-NCanti-miR99b). Treatment of both naïve and LPS-challenged cells with SNA-NCanti-miR99b enhanced MFG-E8 expression in the cells. Administration of SNA-NCanti-miR99b rescued intestinal MFG-E8 expression in LPS-induced septic mice and attenuated LPS inhibitory effects on intestinal epithelial cell migration along the crypt-villus axis. Collectively, our study suggests that LPS represses MFG-E8 expression and disrupts enterocyte migration via a miR-99b dependent mechanism. Furthermore, this work shows that SNA-NCanti-miR99b is a novel nanoparticle-conjugate capable of rescuing MFG-E8 gene expression and maintaining intestinal epithelial homeostasis in sepsis. PMID:27538453

  7. Spherical nucleic acid targeting microRNA-99b enhances intestinal MFG-E8 gene expression and restores enterocyte migration in lipopolysaccharide-induced septic mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Hao, Liangliang; Bu, Heng-Fu; Scott, Alexander W; Tian, Ke; Liu, Fangyi; De Plaen, Isabelle G; Liu, Yulan; Mirkin, Chad A; Tan, Xiao-Di

    2016-01-01

    Milk fat globule-EGF factor 8 (MFG-E8) maintains the intestinal homeostasis by enhancing enterocyte migration and attenuating inflammation. We previously reported that sepsis is associated with down-regulation of intestinal MFG-E8 and impairment of enterocyte migration. Here, we showed that impairment of intestinal epithelial cell migration occurred in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced septic mice. Treatment of RAW264.7 cells (a murine macrophage-like cell line) with LPS increased expression of miR-99b, a microRNA that is predicted to target mouse MFG-E8 3'UTR. Using a luciferase assay, we showed that miR-99b mimic suppressed the activity of a reporter containing MFG-E8 3'UTR. This suggests the role of miR-99b in inhibition of MFG-E8 gene expression. In addition, we developed an anti-miR99b spherical nucleic acid nanoparticle conjugate (SNA-NC(anti-miR99b)). Treatment of both naïve and LPS-challenged cells with SNA-NC(anti-miR99b) enhanced MFG-E8 expression in the cells. Administration of SNA-NC(anti-miR99b) rescued intestinal MFG-E8 expression in LPS-induced septic mice and attenuated LPS inhibitory effects on intestinal epithelial cell migration along the crypt-villus axis. Collectively, our study suggests that LPS represses MFG-E8 expression and disrupts enterocyte migration via a miR-99b dependent mechanism. Furthermore, this work shows that SNA-NC(anti-miR99b) is a novel nanoparticle-conjugate capable of rescuing MFG-E8 gene expression and maintaining intestinal epithelial homeostasis in sepsis. PMID:27538453

  8. Low levels of TGF-β1 enhance human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cell fibronectin production and extend survival time in a rat model of lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Liu, Qingshen; Qi, Lei; Dai, Xiaoyu; Liu, Huan; Wang, Yunshan

    2016-08-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cellular source for cell‑based therapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. However, the use of MSCs is limited by their low incorporation rate in the graft environment. The majority of cells are lost from the graft within 1 month, due to reduced microenvironment or local inflammation at the graft site. The extracellular matrix (ECM) may assist the survival and expansion of MSCs. The present study aimed to identify an effective approach to increase ECM expression levels by MSCs in order to enhance the therapeutic effect and survival rate of MSCs at the injury site. The concentration‑dependent effect of transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β1 on human umbilical cord (hUC)‑MSC proliferation and expression of ECM genes was investigated. MSCs were successfully isolated, cultured and expanded from hUC. A low concentration of TGF‑β1 (0.1 ng/ml) exhibited the optimal effect on hUC‑MSC proliferation and markedly stimulated the expression of ECM genes, particularly fibronectin (FN). Furthermore, treatment with TGF‑β1 caused no alteration in the immunophenotype and differentiation capacity of MSCs. In vivo experiments in rats demonstrated that intravenous injection of control UC-MSCs or TGF-β1-pre-treated UC-MSCs reduced the severity of lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury, assessed using histology, measurements of the wet‑dry lung weight ratio, and neutrophil count and protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. However, the short‑term (48 h) therapeutic effects of untreated and TGF‑β1‑pre‑treated UC‑MSCs were similar. The survival of MSCs in damaged lungs, determined by Sry gene expression levels, were significantly increased in MSCs pre‑treated with TGF‑β1. In conclusion, pre‑treatment of MSCs with a low concentration of TGF‑β1 enhanced the expression of ECM components, particularly FN, thus, improving the survival and potential therapeutic benefits of MSCs

  9. Lipopolysaccharide induced conversion of recombinant prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Fozia; Bjorndahl, Trent C; Ladner, Carol L; Perez-Pineiro, Rolando; Ametaj, Burim N; Wishart, David S

    2014-01-01

    The conformational conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) to the β-rich infectious isoform PrPSc is considered a critical and central feature in prion pathology. Although PrPSc is the critical component of the infectious agent, as proposed in the “protein-only” prion hypothesis, cellular components have been identified as important cofactors in triggering and enhancing the conversion of PrPC to proteinase K resistant PrPSc. A number of in vitro systems using various chemical and/or physical agents such as guanidine hydrochloride, urea, SDS, high temperature, and low pH, have been developed that cause PrPC conversion, their amplification, and amyloid fibril formation often under non-physiological conditions. In our ongoing efforts to look for endogenous and exogenous chemical mediators that might initiate, influence, or result in the natural conversion of PrPC to PrPSc, we discovered that lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of gram-negative bacterial membranes interacts with recombinant prion proteins and induces conversion to an isoform richer in β sheet at near physiological conditions as long as the LPS concentration remains above the critical micelle concentration (CMC). More significant was the LPS mediated conversion that was observed even at sub-molar ratios of LPS to recombinant ShPrP (90–232). PMID:24819168

  10. The Attenuation of Scutellariae radix Extract on Oxidative Stress for Colon Injury in Lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW264.7 Cell and 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene Sulfonic Acid-induced Ulcerative Colitis Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yu; Yang, Jun; Lin, Lianjie; Lin, Yan; Zheng, Changqing

    2016-01-01

    ) could significantly increase the activity of glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase associated with OS in lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW264.7 cell damage and 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced ulcerative colitis ratsThe level of malondialdehyde was markedly reduced by SR both in vitro and in vivo SR could decrease the severity of acute TNBS-induced colitis in ratsSR could significantly downregulate the expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 protein in colon tissue. Abbreviations used: OS: Oxidative stress, UC: Ulcerative colitis, SR: Scutellariae radix, TNBS: 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid, DAI: Disease activity index, MPO: Myeloperoxidase, GSH-PX: Glutathione peroxidase, CAT: Catalase, SOD: Superoxide dismutase, MDA: Malondialdehyde, TGF-β1: Transforming growth factor beta 1, OD: Optical density, ROS: Reactive oxygen species. PMID:27076753

  11. Carvacrol, a component of thyme oil, activates PPARalpha and gamma and suppresses COX-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Mariko; Nakata, Rieko; Katsukawa, Michiko; Hori, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Saori; Inoue, Hiroyasu

    2010-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), the rate-limiting enzyme in prostaglandin biosynthesis, plays a key role in inflammation and circulatory homeostasis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-dependent transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily and are involved in the control of COX-2 expression, and vice versa. Here, we show that COX-2 promoter activity was suppressed by essential oils derived from thyme, clove, rose, eucalyptus, fennel, and bergamot in cell-based transfection assays using bovine arterial endothelial cells. Moreover, from thyme oil, we identified carvacrol as a major component of the suppressor of COX-2 expression and an activator of PPARalpha and gamma. PPARgamma-dependent suppression of COX-2 promoter activity was observed in response to carvacrol treatment. In human macrophage-like U937 cells, carvacrol suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, suggesting that carvacrol regulates COX-2 expression through its agonistic effect on PPARgamma. These results may be important in understanding the antiinflammatory and antilifestyle-related disease properties of carvacrol. PMID:19578162

  12. [Study on material basis of Mahuang Fuzi Xixin decoction for anti-inflammation and immune suppression based on combined method of serum pharmacochemistry and serum pharmacology].

    PubMed

    Tang, Feng; Liang, Shao-yu; Chen, Fei-long; Tang, Qing-fa; Tan, Xiao-mei

    2015-05-01

    To investigate me material basis of Mahuang Fuzi Xixin decoction (MFXD) for anti-inflammation and immune-suppression based on the combined method of serum chemical and serum pharmacological. The LC-MS/MS fingerprints of MFXD, drug-containing serum and blank serum were compared to define the components in plasma. Histamine, β-hexosaminidase released from RBL-2H3 cell infulenced by drug-containing serum at different time points were measured by ELISA. The effect of drug-containing serum on lipopolysaccharide-induced splenocyte proliferation at different time points were determined by MTT. A correlation analysis was made on components of MFXD and pharmacological indexes based the stepwise regression method. After the intragastrical administration with MFXD, 32 components were discovered in rat serum, including 27 prototype components (10 from Mahuang, 13 from Fuzi and four from Xixin) and five unknown components. Compared with blank serum, drug-containing serum could reduce the release of histamine from RBL-2H3 induced by antigen at different time points (P < 0.05); except the 4-hour drug-containing serum, all of the remaining drug-containing serums could inhibit the RBL-2H3 mastocyte degranulation induced by antigen at different time points (P < 0.05). Drug-containing serum could significantly lipopolysaccharide-induced mouse splenocyte proliferation at 15 and 30 min (P < 0.05). A regression analysis was made on the chemical data of components absorbed into blood and pharmacological indexes, i. e. release rate of histamine, release rate of β-hexosaminidase and inhibition rate of splenocyte. This suggested the close correlations among methyl pseudo-ephedrine, pseudoephedrine and histamine released from RBL-2H3 induced by antigen; pseudoephedrine, hypaconine, methyl pseudoephedrine and β-hexosaminidase released from RBL-2H3 induced by antigen; as well as benzoyl hypaconine, benzoylaconine, 14-benzoyl-10-OH-mesaconine, mesaconine and lipopolysaccharide-induced mouse

  13. Carvacrol, a component of thyme oil, activates PPARα and γ and suppresses COX-2 expression[S

    PubMed Central

    Hotta, Mariko; Nakata, Rieko; Katsukawa, Michiko; Hori, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Saori; Inoue, Hiroyasu

    2010-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), the rate-limiting enzyme in prostaglandin biosynthesis, plays a key role in inflammation and circulatory homeostasis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand-dependent transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily and are involved in the control of COX-2 expression, and vice versa. Here, we show that COX-2 promoter activity was suppressed by essential oils derived from thyme, clove, rose, eucalyptus, fennel, and bergamot in cell-based transfection assays using bovine arterial endothelial cells. Moreover, from thyme oil, we identified carvacrol as a major component of the suppressor of COX-2 expression and an activator of PPARα and γ. PPARγ-dependent suppression of COX-2 promoter activity was observed in response to carvacrol treatment. In human macrophage-like U937 cells, carvacrol suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, suggesting that carvacrol regulates COX-2 expression through its agonistic effect on PPARγ. These results may be important in understanding the antiinflammatory and antilifestyle-related disease properties of carvacrol. PMID:19578162

  14. The Protective Effects of the Supercritical-Carbon Dioxide Fluid Extract of Chrysanthemum indicum against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice via Modulating Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chu-Wen; Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Sai-Xia

    2014-01-01

    The supercritical-carbon dioxide fluid extract of Chrysanthemum indicum Linné. (CFE) has been demonstrated to be effective in suppressing inflammation. The aim of this study is to investigate the preventive action and underlying mechanisms of CFE on acute lung injury (ALI) induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mice. ALI was induced by intratracheal instillation of LPS into lung, and dexamethasone was used as a positive control. Results revealed that pretreatment with CFE abated LPS-induced lung histopathologic changes, reduced the wet/dry ratio and proinflammatory cytokines productions (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6), inhibited inflammatory cells migrations and protein leakages, suppressed the levels of MPO and MDA, and upregulated the abilities of antioxidative enzymes (SOD, CAT, and GPx). Furthermore, the pretreatment with CFE downregulated the activations of NF-κB and the expressions of TLR4/MyD88. These results suggested that CFE exerted potential protective effects against LPS-induced ALI in mice and was a potential therapeutic drug for ALI. Its mechanisms were at least partially associated with the modulations of TLR4 signaling pathways. PMID:25214712

  15. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) inhibits lipopolysaccharide induced inflammation in part via downregulated NF-κB and p38/JNK activation in microglial and attenuates microglia activation in lipopolysaccharide treatment mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chongfei; Yu, Lifeng; Kong, Lingbo; Ma, Rui; Zhang, Juliang; Zhu, Qingsheng; Zhu, Jinyu; Hao, Dingjun

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies designed to inhibit the activation of microglia may lead to significant advancement in the treatment of most neurodegenerative diseases. Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a naturally occurring redox cofactor that acts as an essential nutrient, antioxidant, and has been reported to exert potent immunosuppressive effects. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory effects of PQQ was investigated in LPS treated primary microglia cells. Our observations showed that pretreatment with PQQ significantly inhibited the production of NO and PGE2 and suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory mediators such as iNOS, COX-2, TNF-a, IL-1b, IL-6, MCP-1 and MIP-1a in LPS treated primary microglia cells. The nuclear translocation of NF-κB and the phosphorylation level of p65, p38 and JNK MAP kinase pathways were also inhibited by PQQ in LPS stimulated primary microglia cells. Further a systemic LPS treatment acute inflammation murine brain model was used to study the suppressive effects of PQQ against neuroinflammation in vivo. Mice treated with PQQ demonstrated marked attenuation of neuroinflammation based on Western blotting and immunohistochemistry analysis of Iba1-against antibody in the brain tissue. Indicated that PQQ protected primary cortical neurons against microglia-mediated neurotoxicity. These results collectively suggested that PQQ might be a promising therapeutic agent for alleviating the progress of neurodegenerative diseases associated with microglia activation. PMID:25314304

  16. The inhibition of JNK MAPK and NF-κB signaling by tenuifoliside A isolated from Polygala tenuifolia in lipopolysaccharide-induced macrophages is associated with its anti-inflammatory effect.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Su; Lee, Dong-Sung; Bae, Gi-Sang; Park, Sung-Joo; Kang, Dae-Gil; Lee, Ho-Sub; Oh, Hyuncheol; Kim, Youn-Chul

    2013-12-01

    The root of Polygala tenuifolia Willd. (Polygalaceae) is well known for its use in the treatment of neurasthenia, amnesia, and inflammation. In this study, we isolated phenyl propanoid type metabolite tenuifoliside A, one of the phenylpropanoids from P. tenuifolia, and investigated its anti-inflammatory effects in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 and murine peritoneal macrophages. The results showed that tenuifoliside A inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), prostaglandin E2 (PG E2), and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2. In addition, tenuifoliside A suppressed the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β. We also evaluated the effects of tenuifoliside A on the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB). Tenuifoliside A inhibited the translocation of the NF-κB subunit p65 into the nucleus by interrupting the phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitor kappa B (IκB)-α in LPS-stimulated murine peritoneal macrophages. Moreover, we confirmed that the suppression of the inflammatory process by tenuifoliside A was mediated through the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) pathway based on the fact that tenuifoliside A significantly decreased p-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK) protein expression in LPS-stimulated murine peritoneal macrophages. Taken together, the anti-inflammatory effects of tenuifoliside A were mediated by the inhibition of the NF-κB and MAPK pathways. This study is the first report on the anti-inflammatory effects of tenuifoliside A, and the strong anti-inflammatory effects of tenuifoliside A provide potential compound to be developed as therapeutic for inflammatory diseases. PMID:24076326

  17. Delphinidin, a specific inhibitor of histone acetyltransferase, suppresses inflammatory signaling via prevention of NF-{kappa}B acetylation in fibroblast-like synoviocyte MH7A cells

    SciTech Connect

    Seong, Ah-Reum; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, KyungChul; Lee, Mee-Hee; Lee, Yoo-Hyun; Lee, Jeongmin; Jun, Woojin; Kim, Sunoh; Yoon, Ho-Geun

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Delphinidin is a novel inhibitor of p300/CBP histone acetyltransferase. {yields} Delphinidin prevents the hyperacetylation of p65 by inhibiting the HAT activity of p300/CBP. {yields} Delphinidin efficiently suppresses the expression of inflammatory cytokines in MH7A cells via hypoacetylation of NF-{kappa}B. {yields} Delphinidin inhibits cytokine release in the Jurkat T lymphocyte cell line. -- Abstract: Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitors (HATi) isolated from dietary compounds have been shown to suppress inflammatory signaling, which contributes to rheumatoid arthritis. Here, we identified a novel HATi in Punica granatum L. known as delphinidin (DP). DP did not affect the activity of other epigenetic enzymes (histone deacetylase, histone methyltransferase, or sirtuin1). DP specifically inhibited the HAT activities of p300/CBP. It also inhibited p65 acetylation in MH7A cells, a human rheumatoid arthritis synovial cell line. DP-induced hypoacetylation was accompanied by cytosolic accumulation of p65 and nuclear localization of IKB{alpha}. Accordingly, DP treatment inhibited TNF{alpha}-stimulated increases in NF-{kappa}B function and expression of NF-{kappa}B target genes in these cells. Importantly, DP suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in Jurkat T lymphocytes, demonstrating that HATi efficiently suppresses cytokine-mediated immune responses. Together, these results show that the HATi activity of DP counters anti-inflammatory signaling by blocking p65 acetylation and that this compound may be useful in preventing inflammatory arthritis.

  18. Anti-inflammatory effects of methanol extract of Canarium lyi C.D. Dai & Yakovlev in RAW 264.7 macrophages and a murine model of lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ju-Mi; Kwon, Ok-Kyoung; Shin, In-Sik; Jeon, Chan-Mi; Shin, Na-Rae; Lee, Joongku; Park, Sang-Hong; Bach, Tran The; Hai, Do Van; Oh, Sei-Ryang; Han, Sang-Bae; Ahn, Kyung-Seop

    2015-05-01

    Canarium lyi C.D. Dai & Yakovlev (CL) is a member of the Anacardiaceae family. To the best of our knowledge, no studies on its anti-inflammatory effects have yet been reported. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of CL on inflammation in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells and LPS-induced acute lung injury (ALI) mice. CL attenuated the production of LPS-stimulated inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Furthermore, CL suppressed phosphorylation of the inhibitor κB-α (IκB-α), p38, c-Jun terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), as well as the translocation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) p65 subunit into the nucleus. For the in vivo efficacy, the effect of CL on a mouse model of LPS-induced acute lung injury was assessed. CL treatment of the mice significantly inhibited the inflammatory cell recruitment and pro-inflammatory cytokine production in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF). CL-treated mice also showed a marked inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and phosphorylation of IκB and p65. In addition, CL attenuated lung histopathological changes in LPS-induced ALI mice. In conclusion, our results suggest that CL is a potential therapeutic candidate for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, including pneumonia. PMID:25738976

  19. A Standardized Traditional Chinese Medicine Preparation Named Yejuhua Capsule Ameliorates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice via Downregulating Toll-Like Receptor 4/Nuclear Factor-κB

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chu-Wen; Chen, Zhi-Wei; Wu, Xiao-Li; Ning, Zhao-Xiao; Su, Zu-Qing; Li, Yu-Cui; Su, Zi-Ren; Lai, Xiao-Ping

    2015-01-01

    A standardized traditional Chinese medicine preparation named Yejuhua capsule (YJH) has been clinically used in treatments of various acute respiratory system diseases with high efficacy and low toxicity. In this study, we were aiming to evaluate potential effects and to elucidate underlying mechanisms of YJH against lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. Moreover, the chemical analysis and chromatographic fingerprint study were performed for quality evaluation and control of this drug. ALI was induced by intratracheal instillation of LPS (5 mg/kg) into the lung in mice and dexamethasone (5 mg/kg, p.o.) was used as a positive control drug. Results demonstrated that pretreatments with YJH (85, 170, and 340 mg/kg, p.o.) effectively abated LPS-induced histopathologic changes, attenuated the vascular permeability enhancement and edema, inhibited inflammatory cells migrations and protein leakages, suppressed the ability of myeloperoxidase, declined proinflammatory cytokines productions, and downregulated activations of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and expressions of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). This study demonstrated that YJH exerted potential protective effects against LPS-induced ALI in mice and supported that YJH was a potential therapeutic drug for ALI in clinic. And its mechanisms were at least partially associated with downregulations of TLR4/NF-κB pathways. PMID:25878714

  20. Inhibitory Effects of Chemical Compounds Isolated from the Rhizome of Smilax glabra on Nitric Oxide and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Production in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced RAW264.7 Cell

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chuan-li; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Dong-mei; Chen, Wen-long; Hu, Meng-mei; Wang, Min; Xu, Xiao-jie

    2015-01-01

    The rhizome of Smilax glabra has been used for a long time as both food and folk medicine in many countries. The present study focused on the active constituents from the rhizome of S. glabra, which possess potential anti-inflammatory activities. As a result, nine known compounds were isolated from the rhizome of S. glabra with the bioassay-guiding, and were identified as syringaresinol (1), lasiodiplodin (2), de-O-methyllasiodiplodin (3), syringic acid (4), 1,4-bis(4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,3-bis(hydroxymethyl)-1,4-butanediol (5), lyoniresinol (6), trans-resveratrol (7), trans-caffeic acid methyl ester (8), and dihydrokaempferol (9). Among these compounds, 2 and 3 were isolated for the first time from S. glabra. In addition, the potential anti-inflammatory activities of the isolated compounds were evaluated in vitro in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) induced RAW264.7 cells. Results indicated that 4 and 7 showed significant inhibitory effects on NO production of RAW264.7 cells, and 1, 2, 3, and 5 showed moderate suppression effects on induced NO production. 1, 7, and 5 exhibited high inhibitory effects on TNF-α production, with the IC50 values less than 2.3, 4.4, and 16.6 μM, respectively. These findings strongly suggest that compounds 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, and 9 were the potential anti-inflammatory active compositions of S. glabra. PMID:25821492

  1. Nrf2 suppresses macrophage inflammatory response by blocking proinflammatory cytokine transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Eri H.; Suzuki, Takafumi; Funayama, Ryo; Nagashima, Takeshi; Hayashi, Makiko; Sekine, Hiroki; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Moriguchi, Takashi; Motohashi, Hozumi; Nakayama, Keiko; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Nrf2 (NF-E2-related factor-2) transcription factor regulates oxidative/xenobiotic stress response and also represses inflammation. However, the mechanisms how Nrf2 alleviates inflammation are still unclear. Here, we demonstrate that Nrf2 interferes with lipopolysaccharide-induced transcriptional upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-6 and IL-1β. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-seq and ChIP-qPCR analyses revealed that Nrf2 binds to the proximity of these genes in macrophages and inhibits RNA Pol II recruitment. Further, we found that Nrf2-mediated inhibition is independent of the Nrf2-binding motif and reactive oxygen species level. Murine inflammatory models further demonstrated that Nrf2 interferes with IL6 induction and inflammatory phenotypes in vivo. Thus, contrary to the widely accepted view that Nrf2 suppresses inflammation through redox control, we demonstrate here that Nrf2 opposes transcriptional upregulation of proinflammatory cytokine genes. This study identifies Nrf2 as the upstream regulator of cytokine production and establishes a molecular basis for an Nrf2-mediated anti-inflammation approach. PMID:27211851

  2. Suppression of interleukin-6-induced C-reactive protein expression by FXR agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Songwen Liu Qiangyuan; Wang Juan; Harnish, Douglas C.

    2009-02-06

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a human acute-phase protein, is a risk factor for future cardiovascular events and exerts direct pro-inflammatory and pro-atherogenic properties. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, plays an essential role in the regulation of enterohepatic circulation and lipid homeostasis. In this study, we report that two synthetic FXR agonists, WAY-362450 and GW4064, suppressed interleukin-6-induced CRP expression in human Hep3B hepatoma cells. Knockdown of FXR by short interfering RNA attenuated the inhibitory effect of the FXR agonists and also increased the ability of interleukin-6 to induce CRP production. Furthermore, treatment of wild type C57BL/6 mice with the FXR agonist, WAY-362450, attenuated lipopolysaccharide-induced serum amyloid P component and serum amyloid A3 mRNA levels in the liver, whereas no effect was observed in FXR knockout mice. These data provide new evidence for direct anti-inflammatory properties of FXR.

  3. Niclosamide suppresses RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and prevents LPS-induced bone loss.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Yoon-Hee; Kim, Ju-Young; Baek, Jong Min; Ahn, Sung-Jun; So, Hong-Seob; Oh, Jaemin

    2016-02-01

    Niclosamide (5-chloro-salicyl-(2-chloro-4-nitro) anilide) is an oral anthelmintic drug used for treating intestinal infection of most tapeworms. Recently, niclosamide was shown to have considerable efficacy against some tumor cell lines, including colorectal, prostate, and breast cancers, and acute myelogenous leukemia. Specifically, the drug was identified as a potent inhibitor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which is associated with osteoclast differentiation and function. In this study, we assessed the effect of niclosamide on osteoclastogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro study showed that receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation was inhibited by niclosamide, due to inhibition of serine-threonine protein kinase (Akt) phosphorylation, inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappaB (IκB), and STAT3 serine(727). Niclosamide decreased the expression of the major transcription factors c-Fos and NFATc1, and thereafter abrogated the mRNA expression of osteoclast-specific genes, including TRAP, OSCAR, αv/β3 integrin (integrin αv, integrin β3), and cathepsin K (CtsK). In an in vivo model, niclosamide prevented lipopolysaccharide-induced bone loss by diminishing osteoclast activity. Taken together, our results show that niclosamide is effective in suppressing osteoclastogenesis and may be considered as a new and safe therapeutic candidate for the clinical treatment of osteoclast-related diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:26792726

  4. Identification and characterization of Kava-derived compounds mediating TNF-α suppression

    PubMed Central

    Pollastri, Michael P.; Whitty, Adrian; Merrill, Jamie Cassidy; Ashton, Trent D.; Amar, Salomon

    2009-01-01

    There is a substantial unmet need for new classes of drugs that block TNF-α-mediated inflammation, and particularly for small molecule agents that can be taken orally. We have screened a library of natural products against an assay measuring TNF-α secretion in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated THP-1 cells, seeking compounds capable of interfering with the TNF-α inducing transcription factor Lipopolysaccharide Induced TNF Alpha Factor (LITAF). Among the active compounds were several produced by the kava plant (Piper mysticum), extracts of which have previously been linked to a range of therapeutic effects. When tested in vivo, a representative of these compounds, kavain, was found to render mice immune to lethal doses of LPS. Kavain displays promising pharmaceutical properties, including good solubility and high cell permeability, but pharmacokinetic experiments in mice showed relatively rapid clearance. A small set of kavain analogs was synthesized, resulting in compounds of similar or greater potency in vitro compared to kavain. Interestingly, a ring-opened analog of kavain inhibited TNF-α secretion in the cell based assay and suppressed LITAF expression in the same cells, whereas the other compounds inhibited TNF-α secretion without affecting LITAF levels, indicating a potential divergence in mechanism of action. PMID:19538508

  5. Potential use of fucose-appended dendrimer/α-cyclodextrin conjugates as NF-κB decoy carriers for the treatment of lipopolysaccharide-induced fulminant hepatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Akao, Chiho; Tanaka, Takahiro; Onodera, Risako; Ohyama, Ayumu; Sato, Nana; Motoyama, Keiichi; Higashi, Taishi; Arima, Hidetoshi

    2014-11-10

    The purpose of the present study is to treat lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fulminant hepatitis by NF-κB decoy complex with fucose-appended dendrimer (generation 2; G2) conjugate with α-cyclodextrin (Fuc-S-α-CDE (G2)). Fuc-S-α-CDE (G2, average degree of substitution of fucose (DSF2))/NF-κB decoy complex significantly suppressed nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production from LPS-stimulated NR8383 cells, a rat alveolar macrophage cell line, by adequate physicochemical properties and fucose receptor-mediated cellular uptake. Intravenous injection of Fuc-S-α-CDE (G2, DSF2)/NF-κB decoy complex extended the survival of LPS-induced fulminant hepatitis model mice. In addition, Fuc-S-α-CDE (G2, DSF2)/NF-κB decoy complex administered intravenously highly accumulated in the liver, compared to naked NF-κB decoy alone. Furthermore, the liver accumulation of Fuc-S-α-CDE (G2, DSF2)/NF-κB decoy complex was inhibited by the pretreatment with GdCl3, a specific inhibitor of Kupffer cell uptake. Also, the serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and TNF-α levels in LPS-induced fulminant hepatitis model mice were significantly attenuated by the treatment with Fuc-S-α-CDE (G2, DSF2)/NF-κB decoy complex, compared with naked NF-κB decoy alone. Taken together, these results suggest that Fuc-S-α-CDE (G2, DSF2) has the potential for a novel Kupffer cell-selective NF-κB decoy carrier for the treatment of LPS-induced fulminant hepatitis in mice. PMID:25020038

  6. Cynandione A attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced production of inflammatory mediators via MAPK inhibition and NF-κB inactivation in RAW264.7 macrophages and protects mice against endotoxin shock.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hwan; Lee, Tae Hoon; Lee, Sang Min; Park, Ji Hae; Park, Keun Hyung; Jung, Mira; Jung, Hana; Mohamed, Mohamed Antar Aziz; Baek, Nam-In; Chung, In Sik; Kim, Jiyoung

    2015-07-01

    Cynanchum wilfordii has been traditionally used in eastern Asia for the treatment of various diseases such as gastrointestinal diseases and arteriosclerosis. Cynandione A (CA), an acetophenone, is one of major constituents from roots of C. wilfordii. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory activities of CA were investigated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW264.7 macrophages and LPS-administered C57BL/6 N mice. CA significantly decreased LPS-induced production of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 in a dose-dependent manner, while CA up to 200 μM did not exhibit cytotoxic activity. Our data also showed that CA significantly attenuated expression of iNOS and COX-2 in LPS-stimulated macrophages. CA inhibited phosphorylation of IκB-α and MAP kinases such as ERK and p38. Furthermore, we demonstrated that CA inhibited translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus, transcription of the NF-κB minimal promoter and NF-κB DNA binding activity. Administration of CA significantly decreased the plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β in LPS-injected mice and improved survival of septic mice with lethal endotoxemia. These results demonstrate that CA has effective inhibitory effects on production of inflammatory mediators via suppressing activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, suggesting that CA may be used as a potential anti-inflammatory agent for the prevention and treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25361770

  7. Wogonin prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury and inflammation in mice via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-mediated attenuation of the nuclear factor-kappaB pathway.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jing; Pan, Di; Zhao, Yue; Zhao, Li; Sun, Jie; Wang, Yu; You, Qi-Dong; Xi, Tao; Guo, Qing-Long; Lu, Na

    2014-10-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) from a variety of clinical disorders, characterized by diffuse inflammation, is a cause of acute respiratory failure that develops in patients of all ages. Previous studies reported that wogonin, a flavonoid-like chemical compound which was found in Scutellaria baicalensis, has anti-inflammatory effects in several inflammation models, but not in ALI. Here, the in vivo protective effect of wogonin in the amelioration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) -induced lung injury and inflammation was assessed. In addition, the in vitro effects and mechanisms of wogonin were studied in the mouse macrophage cell lines Ana-1 and RAW264.7. In vivo results indicated that wogonin attenuated LPS-induced histological alterations. Peripheral blood leucocytes decreased in the LPS-induced group, which was ameliorated by wogonin. In addition, wogonin inhibited the production of several inflammatory cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6, in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissues after LPS challenge, while the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) inhibitor GW9662 reversed these effects. In vitro results indicated that wogonin significantly decreased the secretion of IL-6, IL-1β and tumour necrosis factor-α in Ana-1 and RAW264.7 cells, which was suppressed by transfection of PPARγ small interfering RNA and GW9662 treatment. Moreover, wogonin activated PPARγ, induced PPARγ-mediated attenuation of the nuclear translocation and the DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor-κB in vivo and in vitro. In conclusion, all of these results showed that wogonin may serve as a promising agent for the attenuation of ALI-associated inflammation and pathology by regulating the PPARγ-involved nuclear factor-κB pathway. PMID:24766487

  8. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression and inducible nitric oxide synthase by 4-[(2′-O-acetyl-α-l-rhamnosyloxy)benzyl]isothiocyanate from Moringa oleifera

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun-Jung; Cheenpracha, Sarot; Chang, Leng Chee; Kondratyuk, Tamara P.; Pezzuto, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Moringa oleifera Lamarack is commonly consumed for nutritional or medicinal properties. We recently reported the isolation and structure elucidation of novel bioactive phenolic glycosides, including 4-[(2′-O-acetyl-α-l-rhamnosyloxy)benzyl]isothiocyanate (RBITC), which was found to suppress inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage cells. Inhibitors of proteins such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and iNOS are potential anti-inflammatory and cancer chemopreventive agents. The inhibitory activity of RBITC on NO production (IC50 = 0.96 ± 0.23 µM) was greater than that mediated by other well-known isothiocyanates such as sulforaphane (IC50 = 2.86 ± 0.39 µM) and benzyl isothiocyanate (IC50 = 2.08 ± 0.28 µM). RBITC inhibited expression of COX-2 and iNOS at both the protein and mRNA levels. Major upstream signaling pathways involved mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). RBITC inhibited phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase and stress-activated protein kinase, as well as ubiquitin-dependent degradation of inhibitor κBα (IκBα). In accordance with IκBα degradation, nuclear accumulation of NF-κB, and subsequent binding to NF-κB cis-acting element, was attenuated by treatment with RBITC. These data suggest RBITC should be included in the dietary armamentarium of isothiocyanates potentially capable of mediating anti-inflammatory or cancer chemopreventive activity. PMID:21774591

  9. 14-3-3γ Regulates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Responses and Lactation in Dairy Cow Mammary Epithelial Cells by Inhibiting NF-κB and MAPKs and Up-Regulating mTOR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lixin; Lin, Ye; Liu, Lili; Bian, Yanjie; Zhang, Li; Gao, Xuejun; Li, Qingzhang

    2015-01-01

    As a protective factor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced injury, 14-3-3γ has been the subject of recent research. Nevertheless, whether 14-3-3γ can regulate lactation in dairy cow mammary epithelial cells (DCMECs) induced by LPS remains unknown. Here, the anti-inflammatory effect and lactation regulating ability of 14-3-3γ in LPS-induced DCMECs are investigated for the first time, and the molecular mechanisms responsible for their effects are explored. The results of qRT-PCR showed that 14-3-3γ overexpression significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis revealed that 14-3-3γ overexpression also suppressed the production of TNF-α and IL-6 in cell culture supernatants. Meanwhile, CASY-TT Analyser System showed that 14-3-3γ overexpression clearly increased the viability and proliferation of cells. The results of kit methods and western blot analysis showed that 14-3-3γ overexpression promoted the secretion of triglycerides and lactose and the synthesis of β-casein. Furthermore, the expression of genes relevant to nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) and lactation-associated proteins were assessed by western blot, and the results suggested that 14-3-3γ overexpression inactivated the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways by down-regulating extracellular signal regulated protein kinase (ERK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) and inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB) phosphorylation levels, as well as by inhibiting NF-κB translocation. Meanwhile, 14-3-3γ overexpression enhanced the expression levels of β-casein, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1), serine/threonine protein kinase Akt 1 (AKT1), sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR

  10. Suppressive effects of three diketopiperazines from marine-derived bacteria on TGFBIp-mediated septic responses in human endothelial cells and mice.

    PubMed

    Jung, Byeongjin; Ku, Sae-Kwang; Gao, Ming; Kim, Kyung-Min; Han, Min-Su; Choi, Hyukjae; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2016-06-01

    Diketopiperazine is a naturally occurring cyclic dipeptide found from diverse living organisms. The compounds in this structure class have been known with a broad spectrum of bioactivities including anti-inflammatory activities. Transforming growth factor β-induced protein (TGFBIp) is an extracellular matrix protein whose expression in several cell types is greatly increased by TGF-β. TGFBIp is released by human umbilical vein endothelial cells and functions as a mediator of experimental sepsis. Here, three (1-3) of diketopiperazines were isolated from two strains of marine-derived bacteria and we hypothesized that 1-3 could reduce TGFBIp-mediated severe inflammatory responses in human endothelial cells and mice. Here, we investigated the anti-septic effects and underlying mechanisms of 1-3 against TGFBIp-mediated septic responses. 1-3 effectively inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced release of TGFBIp and suppressed TGFBIp-mediated septic responses. In addition, 1-3 suppressed cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis lethality and pulmonary injury. In conclusion, 1-3 suppressed TGFBIp-mediated and CLP-induced septic responses. Therefore, 1-3 could be a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of various severe vascular inflammatory diseases via inhibition of the TGFBIp signaling pathway. PMID:27106029

  11. Dibenzylbutyrolactone lignans from Forsythia koreana fruits attenuate lipopolysaccharide-induced inducible nitric oxide synthetase and cyclooxygenase-2 expressions through activation of nuclear factor-κb and mitogen-activated protein kinase in RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yun; Cho, Bong Jae; Park, Tae Wook; Park, Byoung Eun; Kim, Soo Jung; Sim, Sang Soo; Kim, Chang Jong

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we reported that dibenzylbutyrolactone lignans (DBLLs) from the fruit of Forsythia koreana NAKAI (Oleaceae) has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-asthmatic effects. In this study, to clarify the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of DBLL, we evaluated the effects of DBLLs on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expressions, nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) productions, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activations, inhibitor of κB (IκB) and inhibitor of κB kinase (IKK) phosphorylations in cytosolic proteins, and cytotoxicity in Raw264.7 cells. DBLLs potently suppressed both the enzyme expression and DNA-binding activity of NF-κB. Arctiin, arctigenin (1.0 µM) and matairesinol (10 µM) inhibited the expression of iNOS by 37.71±2.86%, 32.51±4.28%, and 27.44±2.65%, respectively, and arctiin, arctigenin (0.1 µM) and matairesinol (1.0 µM) inhibited COX-2 expression by 37.93±7.81%, 26.70±4.61% and 29.37±5.21%, respectively. The inhibitory effects of DBLLs on NO and PGE(2) productions were the same patterns as those seen for the reductions in iNOS and COX-2 expression, respectively. Arctiin, arctigenin (1.0 µM) and matairesinol (10 µM) significantly (p<0.05) inhibited NF-κB DNA binding by 44.85±6.67%, 44.16±6.61%, and 44.79±5.62%, respectively, and arctiin (0.1 µM) and arctigenin (1.0 µM) significantly (p<0.05) inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB by 20.58±3.86% and 25.99±6.18%, respectively. Furthermore, arctiin, matairesinol (1.0 µM) and arctigenin (10 µM) inhibited the phosphorylation of IKK by 38.80±6.64%, 38.33±6.65%, and 38.57±8.14%, respectively. In addition, DBLLs potently inhibited the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of MAPKs (SAPK/c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), p38, and extracellular signal receptor-activated kinase (ERK)1/2). Overall, arctiin was the most effective; its effect was nearly

  12. Baicalin exerts protective effects against lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury by regulating the crosstalk between the CX3CL1-CX3CR1 axis and NF-κB pathway in CX3CL1-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    DING, XIN-MIN; PAN, LEI; WANG, YONG; XU, QIN-ZHI

    2016-01-01

    further promote NF-κB activation. These findings demonstrate that the crosstalk between the CX3CL1-CX3CR1 axis and NF-κB signaling pathway plays a direct role in LPS-induced lung injury. The inhibition of the activation of the CX3CL1-CX3CR1 axis may thus suppress the development of ALI. In addition, baicalin inhibited the crosstalk between the CX3CL1-CX3CR1 axis and NF-κB pathway in mice with LPS-induced ALI. Thus, treatment with baicalin may be a potential therapeutic strategy for ALI. PMID:26782291

  13. Baicalin exerts protective effects against lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury by regulating the crosstalk between the CX3CL1-CX3CR1 axis and NF-κB pathway in CX3CL1-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xin-Min; Pan, Lei; Wang, Yong; Xu, Qin-Zhi

    2016-03-01

    further promote NF-κB activation. These findings demonstrate that the crosstalk between the CX3CL1-CX3CR1 axis and NF-κB signaling pathway plays a direct role in LPS-induced lung injury. The inhibition of the activation of the CX3CL1-CX3CR1 axis may thus suppress the development of ALI. In addition, baicalin inhibited the crosstalk between the CX3CL1-CX3CR1 axis and NF-κB pathway in mice with LPS-induced ALI. Thus, treatment with baicalin may be a potential therapeutic strategy for ALI. PMID:26782291

  14. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is being suppressed by high blood sugar. ... away. The lab measures the glucose and growth hormone (GH) levels in each sample.

  15. Dexamethasone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    Dexamethasone suppression test measures whether adrenocorticotrophic hormone ( ACTH ) secretion by the pituitary can be suppressed. ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong ... your blood is drawn so that the cortisol level in your blood ...

  16. Dexamethasone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    DST; ACTH suppression test; Cortisol suppression test ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong man-made (synthetic) glucocorticoid medication. Afterward, your blood is drawn ...

  17. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is ...

  18. N-Adamantyl-4-methylthiazol-2-amine suppresses amyloid β-induced neuronal oxidative damage in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chang Hun; Kim, Eun-A; Kim, Jiae; Choi, Soo Young; Yang, Seung-Ju; Cho, Sung-Woo

    2016-06-01

    Recently, we have reported that N-adamantyl-4-methylthiazol-2-amine (KHG26693) successfully reduced the production of oxidative stress in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and lipopolysaccharide-induced BV-2 microglial cells by increasing their antioxidant capacity. However, antioxidative effects of KHG26693 against Aβ (Aβ)-induced oxidative stress have not yet been reported. In the present study, we further investigated the antioxidative function of KHG26693 in Aβ-mediated primary cultured cortical neurons. We showed here that KHG26693 attenuated Aβ-induced cytotoxicity, increase of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, elevation of caspase-3 expression, and impairment of mitochondrial membrane potential in cultured primary cortical neurons. KHG26693 also decreases the Aβ-mediated formation of malondialdehyde, reactive oxygen species, and NO production by decreasing nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and NADPH oxidase level. Moreover, KHG26693 suppress the Aβ-induced oxidative stress through a possible mechanism involving attenuation of GSH and antioxidant enzyme activities such as glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Finally, pretreatment of cortical neurons with KHG26693 significantly reduced the Aβ-induced protein oxidation and nitration. To our knowledge, this is the first report, showing that KHG26693 significantly attenuates Aβ-induced oxidative stress in primary cortical neurons, and may prove attractive strategies to reduce Aβ-induced neural cell death. PMID:27002191

  19. Lipopolysaccharide induces autotaxin expression in human monocytic THP-1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Song; Zhang Junjie

    2009-01-09

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted enzyme with lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity, which converts lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) into lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive phospholipid involved in numerous biological activities, including cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration. In the present study, we found that bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a well-known initiator of the inflammatory response, induced ATX expression in monocytic THP-1 cells. The activation of PKR, JNK, and p38 MAPK was required for the ATX induction. The LPS-induced ATX in THP-1 cells was characterized as the {beta} isoform. In the presence of LPC, ATX could promote the migrations of THP-1 and Jurkat cells, which was inhibited by pertussis toxin (PTX), an inhibitor of Gi-mediated LPA receptor signaling. In summary, LPS induces ATX expression in THP-1 cells via a PKR, JNK and p38 MAPK-mediated mechanism, and the ATX induction is likely to enhance immune cell migration in proinflammatory response by regulating LPA levels in the microenvironment.

  20. Lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Hamesch, K; Borkham-Kamphorst, E; Strnad, P; Weiskirchen, R

    2015-04-01

    The intraperitoneal application of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) alone or in combination with other hepatotoxins is an experimental model for inducing systemic and hepatic inflammation in rodents applied worldwide. The endotoxin is recognized by the LPS-binding protein. This complex binds together with the lymphocyte antigen 96 (MD2) and the pattern-recognition receptor CD14 to members of the toll-like receptor family. The activated receptor complex in turn transduces signals to well characterized intracellular cascades that result in a multifaceted network of intracellular responses ending in inflammation. The most prominent among these is the activation of the NF-κB pathway and the production of a multitude of inflammatory cytokines. Although the application of LPS is in general easy to perform, unintended variations in preparation of the injection solution or in handling of the animals might affect the reproducibility or the outcome of a specific experiment. Here, we present a well-standardized protocol that allows for an induction of highly reproducible acute hepatic inflammation in mice. Furthermore, examples of appropriate readouts for the resulting inflammatory response are given. PMID:25835737

  1. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide induced acute inflammation in lung by chlorination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinshan; Xue, Jinling; Xu, Bi; Xie, Jiani; Qiao, Juan; Lu, Yun

    2016-02-13

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS, also called endotoxin) is a pro-inflammatory constituent of gram negative bacteria and cyanobacteria, which causes a potential health risk in the process of routine urban application of reclaimed water, such as car wash, irrigation, scenic water refilling, etc. Previous studies indicated that the common disinfection treatment, chlorination, has little effect on endotoxin activity removal measured by Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) assay. However, in this study, significant decrease of acute inflammatory effects was observed in mouse lung, while LAL assay still presented a moderate increase of endotoxin activity. To explore the possible mechanisms, the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results showed the chlorination happened in alkyl chain of LPS molecules, which could affect the interaction between LPS and LPS-binding protein. Also the size of LPS aggregates was found to drop significantly after treatment, which could be another results of chlorination caused polarity change. In conclusion, our observation demonstrated that chlorination is effective to reduce the LPS induced inflammation in lung, and it is recommended to use health effect-based methods to assess risk removal of water treatment technologies. PMID:26530889

  2. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Toxic Shock Syndrome in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Stach, Christopher S; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2016-01-01

    Enhancement of susceptibility to lipopolysaccharide (LPS; endotoxin) is a defining characteristic of Staphylococcus aureus superantigens. At the time of this publication, there are 24 identified staphylococcal superantigens (SAgs), some of which have yet to be fully characterized. Testing the capacity of superantigens to potentiate LPS sensitivity is essential to characterize the role of these proteins in disease development. Here we describe how to perform studies of the enhancement of LPS-induced toxic shock syndrome in rabbits. This protocol also provides information on a second important activity of superantigens: the production of fever. PMID:26676037

  3. Nilotinib ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats

    SciTech Connect

    El-Agamy, Dina S.

    2011-06-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of the new tyrosine kinase inhibitor, nilotinib on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in rats and explore its possible mechanisms. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given nilotinib (10 mg/kg) by oral gavage twice daily for 1 week prior to exposure to aerosolized LPS. At 24 h after LPS exposure, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples and lung tissue were collected. The lung wet/dry weight (W/D) ratio, protein level and the number of inflammatory cells in the BALF were determined. Optical microscopy was performed to examine the pathological changes in lungs. Malondialdehyde (MDA) content, superoxidase dismutase (SOD) and reduced glutathione (GSH) activities as well as nitrite/nitrate (NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -}) levels were measured in lung tissues. The expression of inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), transforming growth factor-{beta}{sub 1} (TGF-{beta}{sub 1}) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were determined in lung tissues. Treatment with nilotinib prior to LPS exposure significantly attenuated the LPS-induced pulmonary edema, as it significantly decreased lung W/D ratio, protein concentration and the accumulation of the inflammatory cells in the BALF. This was supported by the histopathological examination which revealed marked attenuation of LPS-induced ALI in nilotinib treated rats. In addition, nilotinib significantly increased SOD and GSH activities with significant decrease in MDA content in the lung. Nilotinib also reduced LPS mediated overproduction of pulmonary NO{sub 2}{sup -}/NO{sub 3}{sup -} levels. Importantly, nilotinib caused down-regulation of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-{alpha}, TGF-{beta}{sub 1} and iNOS levels in the lung. Taken together, these results demonstrate the protective effects of nilotinib against the LPS-induced ALI. This effect can be attributed to nilotinib ability to counteract the inflammatory cells infiltration and hence ROS generation and regulate cytokine effects. - Research highlights: > The protective effects of nilotinib against LPS-induced ALI in rats were studied. > Nilotinib showed potent anti-inflammatory activity as it attenuated PMN infiltration and hence ROS generation. > In addition, nilotinib caused down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokine production.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Apoptosis of Astrocytes: Therapeutic Intervention by Minocycline.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arpita; Patro, Nisha; Patro, Ishan K

    2016-05-01

    Astrocytes are most abundant glial cell type in the brain and play a main defensive role in central nervous system against glutamate-induced toxicity by virtue of numerous transporters residing in their membranes and an astrocyte-specific enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS). In view of that, a dysregulation in the astrocytic activity following an insult may result in glutamate-mediated toxicity accompanied with astrocyte and microglial activation. The present study suggests that the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation results in significant astrocytic apoptosis compared to other cell types in hippocampus and minocycline could not efficiently restrict the glutamate-mediated toxicity and apoptosis of astrocytes. Upon LPS exposure 76 % astrocytes undergo degeneration followed by 44 % oligodendrocytes, 26 % neurons and 10 % microglia. The pronounced astrocytic apoptosis resulted from the LPS-induced glutamate excitotoxicity leading to their hyperactivation as evident from their hypertrophied morphology, glutamate transporter 1 upregulation and downregulation of GS. Therapeutic minocycline treatment to LPS-infused rats efficiently restricted the inflammatory response and degeneration of other cell types but could not significantly combat with the apoptosis of astrocytes. Our study demonstrates a novel finding on cellular degeneration in the hippocampus revealing more of astrocytic death and suggests a more careful consideration on the protective efficacy of minocycline. PMID:26188416

  5. Acanthoic acid ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Qiushi, Wang; Guanghua, Li; Guangquan, Xu

    2015-03-01

    Acanthoic acid, a pimaradiene diterpene isolated from Acanthopanax koreanum, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory activities. However, the effects of acanthoic acid on LPS-induced acute lung injury have not been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effect of acanthoic acid on LPS-induced ALI and to clarify the possible anti-inflammatory mechanisms. In vivo, an LPS-induced ALI model in mice was used to assess the protective effects of acanthoic acid on ALI. Meanwhile, mouse alveolar macrophages MH-S were stimulated with LPS in the presence or absence of acanthoic acid. The expressions of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β were measured by ELISA. LXRα and NF-κB expression were detected by Western blot analysis. The results showed that acanthoic acid downregulated LPS-induced TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production in BALF. MPO activity and lung wet-to-dry ratio were also inhibited by acanthoic acid. In addition, acanthoic acid attenuated lung histopathologic changes. In vitro, acanthoic acid inhibited inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production and NF-κB activation in LPS-stimulated alveolar macrophages. Acanthoic acid was found to up-regulated the expression of LXRα. The inhibition of acanthoic acid on LPS-induced cytokines and NF-κB activation can be abolished by LXRα siRNA. In conclusion, our results suggested that the protective effect of acanthoic acid on LPS-induced ALI was due to its ability to activate LXRα, thereby inhibiting LPS-induced inflammatory response. PMID:25620130

  6. Ethanol versus lipopolysaccharide-induced hypothermia: involvement of urocortin.

    PubMed

    Turek, V F; Ryabinin, A E

    2005-01-01

    The urocortin1 (Ucn1) neurons of the mid-brain-localized Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EW) are robustly responsive to ethanol (EtOH) administration, and send projections to the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), which contains corticotropin-releasing factor type 2 receptors (CRF2) that are responsive to Ucn1. In addition, the DRN has been shown to be involved in regulation of body temperature, a function greatly affected by EtOH administration. The goal of the present study was to identify the role that the urocortinergic projections from the EW to the DRN have in mediating EtOH-induced and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced hypothermia. Male C57BL6/J mice were used. Groups of mice underwent cannulation of the DRN, and then received i.p. injections of EtOH (2g/kg) or LPS (600 microg/kg or 400 microg/kg), followed by intra-DRN injections of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) or anti-sauvagine (aSVG) (55 pmol), a CRF2 antagonist. Separate groups of mice received single intra-DRN injections of Ucn1 (20 pmol), CRF (20 pmol) or aCSF. For all experiments, core temperatures were monitored rectally every 30 min for several hours post-injection. Both EtOH and LPS induced hypothermia, and aSVG significantly attenuated this effect after EtOH; however, there was no significant attenuation of hypothermia after either dose of LPS. Ucn1 injection also caused hypothermia, while CRF injection did not. These data demonstrate that EtOH-induced hypothermia, but not LPS-induced hypothermia, may involve Ucn1 from EW acting at CRF2 receptors in the DRN. PMID:15964490

  7. Pleurotus eryngii Ameliorates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Lung Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Andoh, Tsugunobu; Ouchi, Kenji; Inatomi, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Pleurotus eryngii (P. eryngii) is consumed as a fresh cultivated mushroom worldwide and demonstrated to have multiple beneficial effects. We investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of P. eryngii in mice with acute lung injury (ALI). Intranasal instillation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (10 μg/site/mouse) induced marked lung inflammation (increase in the number of inflammatory cells, protein leakage, and production of nitric oxide in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid) as well as histopathological damage in the lung, 6 h after treatment. Mice administered heat-treated P. eryngii (0.3–1 g/kg, p.o. (HTPE)) 1 h before LPS challenge showed decreased pulmonary inflammation and ameliorated histopathological damage. These results suggest that HTPE has anti-inflammatory effects against ALI. Thus, P. eryngii itself may also have anti-inflammatory effects and could be a beneficial food for the prevention of ALI induced by bacterial infection. PMID:24799939

  8. Ligustrazine effect on lipopolysaccharide-induced pulmonary damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiqi; Chen, Yuanzhuo; Li, Wenjie; Li, Congye; Zhang, Xiangyu; Peng, Hu; Gao, Chengjin

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of ligustrazine (tetramethylpyrazine, TMP) in alleviating pulmonary damage induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Twenty-four healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: the blank group, LPS group, and TMP treatment group (TMP group). The LPS group was intraperitoneally injected with LPS (20mg/kg), and the TMP group was intraperitoneally injected with LPS (20mg/kg) and ligustrazine (80mg/kg). Blood gas analysis, hematoxylin-eosin staining dye extravasation and diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) score, the wet/dry lung tissue (W/D) ratios, the expression of CD31+ vascular endothelial microparticles (EMPs), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels, and the protein expression of Rho-associated coiled-coil-forming protein kinase (ROCK) II and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) were analyzed. Compared with the blank group, the arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) declined in both 1 and 4h (P<0.01), the W/D ratio and DAD score increased (P<0.01), and the TNF-α levels in serum, CD31+ EMPs, and protein expression of ROCK II and TLR4 were significantly increased (P<0.01) in the LPS group. Compared with the LPS group, PaO2 significantly increased in the TMP group at 4h (P<0.05), while the W/D ratio and DAD score were significantly decreased in the TMP group (P<0.01). TNF-α levels, CD31+ EMPs, and protein expression of ROCK II and TLR4 were significantly decreased in the TMP group compared with the LPS group (P<0.01). This study demonstrated that TMP can alleviate LPS-induced pulmonary damage by attenuating pulmonary vascular permeability and CD31+ EMP levels in the plasma, reducing the release of the inflammatory mediator TNF-α and inhibiting the protein expression of ROCK II and TLR4. PMID:26088147

  9. Lumican overexpression exacerbates lipopolysaccharide-induced renal injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiao-Mei; Ma, Ling; Jin, Yu-Nan; Yu, Yan-Qiu

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of lumican in mice with endotoxin-induced acute renal failure (ARF). Lumican transgenic mice and wild‑type mice were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 10 mg/kg) to establish a model of ARF. The mice were sacrificed at 24 h and the blood and renal tissue samples were collected. The value of serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were measured to determine renal function. An ELISA was used to determined the concentrations of renal cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, interleukin (IL)‑6, IL‑4 and IL‑10. The protein expression levels of Toll-like receptor (TLR4) and nuclear factor (NF)κB in renal tissues were assessed using western blot analysis. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end labeling was performed to monitor apoptosis of renal tissue. Light microscopy and electron microscopy were used to observe structural changes in the renal tissues. Following the administration of LPS, the SCr and BUN values of mice in the lumican transgenic group were higher compared with those in the control group. The expression levels of renal TLR4, NFκB, TNFα, IL‑6, IL‑4 and IL‑10 were upregulated in the lumican transgenic mice compared with those in the wild‑type control group. Apoptosis was detected predominantly on the renal tubule. There was a significant difference in the optical density of apoptotic bodies between the control mice and the lumican transgenic mice. Light and electron microscopy demonstrated more severe renal tissue injury in the lumican transgenic mice compared with that in the control mice. In conclusion, LPS may cause excessive apoptosis in the renal tubular cells via the TLR4 signal transduction pathway, a decrease in the number of renal tubular cells and ARF. Lumican may be important in mice with LPS-induced ARF. PMID:26081832

  10. Patchouli alcohol dampens lipopolysaccharide induced mastitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-Ping; Yuan, Shi-Fang; Cai, Guo-Hong; Wang, Hui; Wang, Ling; Yu, Lei; Ling, Rui; Yun, Jun

    2014-10-01

    Patchouli alcohol (PA), a tricyclic sesquiterpene isolated from Pogostemonis Herba, has been known to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and other important therapeutic activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of PA on LPS-induced mastitis in vivo and the possible mechanism. The mouse model of mastitis was induced by injection of LPS through the duct of mammary gland. Mice were pretreated with dexamethasone or PA 1 h before and 12 h after induction of LPS. The myeloperoxidase activity and inflammatory cytokines production in mammary tissues were determined. The effects of PA on NF-κB signal pathways were analyzed by Western blotting. The results showed that PA inhibited the LPS-induced TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production in a dose manner. It was also observed that PA attenuated mammary histopathologic changes. Furthermore, Western blot analysis showed that PA could inhibit the phosphorylation of NF-κB and IκB induced by LPS. These results indicate that PA inhibits NF-κB signaling pathways to attenuate inflammatory injury induced by LPS. PA may be a potent therapeutic reagent for the prevention of mastitis. PMID:24839088

  11. Lipopolysaccharide induces expression of collagen VI in the rat lung.

    PubMed

    Okawa, Sayuri; Unuma, Kana; Yamada, Atsushi; Aki, Toshihiko; Uemura, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of the lung during the septic systemic inflammatory response elicited by administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was investigated. Eight-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected i.p. with 15 mg/kg LPS. After 24 h, the lungs were excised to evaluate the cellular responses to LPS. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) analysis revealed that type VI collagen (ColVI) was extremely upregulated during sepsis in the rat lung within the first 24 h of LPS administration. Upregulation of ColVI protein and its mRNA was demonstrated by Western blot analysis, real time PCR, and immunohistochemistry. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the activation of ColVI in the rat lung at the early stage of systemic inflammation. Activation of ColVI might be involved in sepsis-mediated lung fibrosis at an early stage. PMID:26023260

  12. Chikusetsusaponin V attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yan Wen; Zhang, Chang Cheng; Zhao, Hai Xia; Wan, Jing Zhi; Deng, Li Li; Zhou, Zhi Yong; Dun, Yao Yan; Liu, Chao Qi; Yuan, Ding; Wang, Ting

    2016-06-01

    Chikusetsusaponin V (CsV), a saponin from Panax japonicus, has been reported to inhibit inflammatory responses in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced macrophage cells. However, whether CsV could alleviate LPS-induced liver injury in vivo and the potential mechanisms involved remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of CsV on LPS-induced acute liver injury in mice and further explored the potential mechanisms involved. Our results showed that CsV significantly attenuated elevation of alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels and improved liver histopathological changes in LPS-induced mice. In addition, CsV decreased serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) levels and inhibited mRNA expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), TNF-α and IL-1β in LPS challenged mice. Furthermore, CsV inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation by downregulating phosphorylated NF-κB, IκB-α, ERK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 levels in the liver tissue, which ultimately decreased nucleus NF-κB protein level. In conclusion, our data suggested that CsV could be a promising drug for preventing LPS challenged liver injury since it attenuated LPS-induced inflammatory responses, partly via inhibiting NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:26981791

  13. Inhibitory Effects of Antimicrobial Peptides on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yue; Shang, Dejing

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are usually small molecule peptides, which display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, high efficiency, and stability. For the multiple-antibiotic-resistant strains, AMPs play a significant role in the development of novel antibiotics because of their broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and specific antimicrobial mechanism. Besides broad-spectrum antibacterial activity, AMPs also have anti-inflammatory activity. The neutralization of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) plays a key role in anti-inflammatory action of AMPs. On the one hand, AMPs can readily penetrate the cell wall barrier by neutralizing LPS to remove Gram-negative bacteria that can lead to infection. On the contrary, AMPs can also inhibit the production of biological inflammatory cytokines to reduce the inflammatory response through neutralizing circulating LPS. In addition, AMPs also modulate the host immune system by chemotaxis of leukocytes, to promote immune cell proliferation, epithelialization, and angiogenesis and thus play a protective role. This review summarizes some recent researches about anti-inflammatory AMPs, with a focus on the interaction of AMPs and LPS on the past decade. PMID:26612970

  14. Interleukin-1 in Lipopolysaccharide Induced Chorioamnionitis in the Fetal Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Clare A.; Nitsos, Ilias; Hillman, Noah H.; Pillow, J. Jane; Polglase, Graeme R.; Kramer, Boris W.; Kemp, Matthew W.; Newnham, John P.; Jobe, Alan H.; Kallapur, Suhas G.

    2011-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that interleukin 1 (IL-1) mediates intra-amniotic lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced chorioamnionitis in preterm fetal sheep. Time-mated Merino ewes with singleton fetuses received IL-1α, LPS, or saline (control) by intra-amniotic injection 1 to 2 days before operative delivery at 124 ± 1 days gestational age (N = 5-9/group; term = 150 days). Recombinant human IL-1 receptor antagonist (rhIL-1ra) was given into the amniotic fluid 3 hours before intra-amniotic LPS or saline to block IL-1 signaling. Inflammation in the chorioamnion was determined by histology, cytokine messenger RNA (mRNA), protein expression, and by quantitation of activated inflammatory cells. Intra-amniotic IL-1 and LPS both induced chorioamnionitis. However, IL-1 blockade with IL-1ra did not decrease intra-amniotic LPS-induced increases in pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNAs, numbers of inflammatory cells, myeloperoxidase, or monocyte chemotactic protein-1-expressing cells in the chorioamnion. We conclude that IL-1 and LPS both can cause chorioamnionitis, but IL-1 is not an important mediator of LPS-induced chorioamnionitis in fetal sheep. PMID:21493953

  15. Fire Suppression and Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    This report is concerned with the following topics regarding fire suppression:What is the relative effectiveness of candidate suppressants to extinguish a representative fire in reduced gravity, including high-O2 mole fraction, low -pressure environments? What are the relative advantages and disadvantages of physically acting and chemically-acting agents in spacecraft fire suppression? What are the O2 mole fraction and absolute pressure below which a fire cannot exist? What effect does gas-phase radiation play in the overall fire and post-fire environments? Are the candidate suppressants effective to extinguish fires on practical solid fuels? What is required to suppress non-flaming fires (smoldering and deep seated fires) in reduced gravity? How can idealized space experiment results be applied to a practical fire scenario? What is the optimal agent deployment strategy for space fire suppression?

  16. Bisphosphonates and statins inhibit expression and secretion of MIP-1α via suppression of Ras/MEK/ERK/AML-1A and Ras/PI3K/Akt/AML-1A pathways.

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Takeda, Tomoya; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Shimaoka, Hirotaka; Fujita, Arisa; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Mashimo, Kenji; Fujiwara, Daiichiro; Sakaguchi, Katsuhiko; Satou, Takao; Nishida, Shozo

    2015-01-01

    Osteolytic bone disease in multiple myeloma (MM) is associated with upregulated osteoclast activity. Macrophage inflammatory protein-1α (MIP-1α) is crucially involved in the development of osteolytic bone lesions in MM. We previously reported that minodronate inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced MIP-1α secretion in mouse myeloma cells. However, it remains unknown whether bisphosphonates and statins inhibit MIP-1α secretion by human MM cells. In present study, we investigated whether bisphosphonates and statins had any inhibitory effect on MIP-1α secretion by human myeloma cells and the mechanism underlying this effect. In this study, we found that bisphosphonates and statins inhibited MIP-1α mRNA and MIP-1α secretion and suppressed extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt phosphorylation by inhibiting Ras prenylation. Moreover, bisphosphonates and statins suppressed the expression of acute myeloid leukemia-1A (AML-1A) mRNA, a MIP-1α transcription factor. These results indicate that bisphosphonates and statins suppress the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/ERK/AML-1A and Ras/phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/Akt/AML-1A pathways, thereby inhibiting MIP-1α secretion by MM cells. Therefore, use of MIP-1α expression inhibitors such as bisphosphonates and statins may provide a new therapeutic approach to inhibiting tumour progression and bone destruction in MM patients. PMID:25628928

  17. Suppression of the TRIF-dependent signaling pathway of Toll-like receptors by luteolin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Kyung; Kim, So Young; Kim, Yoon Sun; Lee, Won-Ha; Hwang, Daniel H; Lee, Joo Young

    2009-04-15

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play important roles in induction of innate immune responses for both host defense against invading pathogens and wound healing after tissue injury. Since dysregulation of TLR-mediated immune responses is closely linked to many chronic diseases, modulation of TLR activation by small molecules may have therapeutic potential against such diseases. Expression of the majority of lipopolysaccharide-induced TLR4 target genes is mediated through a MyD88-independent (TRIF-dependent) signaling pathway. In order to evaluate the therapeutic potential of the flavonoid luteolin we examined its effect on TLR-stimulated signal transduction via the TRIF-dependent pathway. Luteolin suppressed activation of Interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and NFkappaB induced by TLR3 and TLR4 agonists resulting in the decreased expression of target genes such as TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-12, IP-10, IFNbeta, CXCL9, and IL-27 in macrophages. Luteolin attenuated ligand-independent activation of IRF3 or NFkappaB induced by TLR4, TRIF, or TBK1, while it did not inhibit TLR oligomerization. Luteolin inhibited TBK1-kinase activity and IRF3 dimerization and phosphorylation, leading to the reduction of TBK1-dependent gene expression. Structural analogs of luteolin such as quercetin, chrysin, and eriodictyol also inhibited TBK1-kinase activity and TBK1-target gene expression. These results demonstrate that TBK1 is a novel target of anti-inflammatory flavonoids resulting in the down-regulation of the TRIF-dependent signaling pathway. These results suggest that the beneficial activities of these flavonoids against inflammatory diseases may be attributed to the modulation of TLR-mediated inflammatory responses. PMID:19426678

  18. Cough suppression disorders spectrum.

    PubMed

    Reich, Jerome M

    2014-02-01

    Volitional cough suppression, identified exclusively in females, is an unusual causal mechanism for instances of lobar atalectasis and bronchiectasis. It is a postulated mechanism for the genesis of Lady Windermere Syndrome. PMID:24462261

  19. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  20. Immune modulation of metalloproteinase production in human macrophages. Selective pretranslational suppression of interstitial collagenase and stromelysin biosynthesis by interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, S D; Campbell, E J; Kobayashi, D K; Welgus, H G

    1990-01-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) is a lymphokine that activates mononuclear phagocytes. To test the hypothesis that IFN-gamma might have important effects upon the ability of human mononuclear phagocytes to degrade extracellular matrix, we have studied the action of this cytokine on the production of metalloproteinases and the counterregulatory tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) by the human alveolar macrophage. We have found that IFN-gamma potently and selectively suppresses the lipopolysaccharide-induced production of two metalloproteinases--interstitial collagenase and stromelysin--by 50-90% at doses greater than or equal to 10 U/ml. The synthesis of TIMP and 92-kD type IV collagenase was also diminished by IFN-gamma, but these responses required 50- to 100-fold higher concentrations of the cytokine. All doses of IFN-gamma increased total and secreted protein synthesis slightly, indicating a highly specific effect on metalloenzyme biosynthesis. Inhibition of metalloproteinase expression occurred at a pretranslational level, as evidenced by parallel reductions in enzyme biosynthesis and collagenase-specific steady-state mRNA levels. Interestingly, the effect of IFN-gamma on metalloenzyme production was not readily reversible. Therefore, while IFN-gamma activates the macrophage and renders it tumoricidal, this enhanced function appears to be attained at the expense of the cell's capacity to degrade extracellular matrix. Images PMID:2170447

  1. Explosion suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Sapko, Michael J.; Cortese, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

  2. Photoimmune suppression and photocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Stephen E

    2002-03-01

    The primary cause of non-melanoma skin cancer, the most prevalent form of human neoplasia, is the ultraviolet (UV) radiation found in sunlight. Exposing mice to UV radiation induces skin cancers that are highly antigenic. Upon transfer of an UV-induced skin cancer to a normal syngeneic mouse, the tumor cells are recognized and rapidly destroyed by the immune system of the recipient. This raises the question of how these cancers avoided immune destruction during their development in the UV-irradiated host. This question was answered when it was discovered that in addition to being carcinogenic, UV radiation was also immunosuppressive. Studies with immune suppressed transplantation recipients, and biopsy proven skin cancer patients have confirmed that UV-induced immune suppression is a risk factor for skin cancer development in humans. It is of great importance, therefore, to understand the mechanisms underlying UV-induced immune suppression. The focus of this manuscript will be to use some examples from the more recent scientific literature to review the mechanisms by which UV radiation suppresses the immune response and allows for the progressive outgrowth of antigenic skin tumors. PMID:11861222

  3. Parasitic suppressing circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, J. T.; Raposa, F. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A circuit for suppressing parasitic oscillations across an inductor operating in a resonant mode is described. The circuit includes a switch means and resistive means connected serially across the inductor. A unidirectional resistive-capacitive network is also connected across the inductor and to the switch means to automatically render the switch means conducting when inductive current through the inductor ceases to flow.

  4. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Townsend, Harold E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

  5. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

  6. Menstrual suppression: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hillard, Paula Adams

    2014-01-01

    Menstrual suppression to provide relief of menstrual-related symptoms or to manage medical conditions associated with menstrual morbidity or menstrual exacerbation has been used clinically since the development of steroid hormonal therapies. Options range from the extended or continuous use of combined hormonal oral contraceptives, to the use of combined hormonal patches and rings, progestins given in a variety of formulations from intramuscular injection to oral therapies to intrauterine devices, and other agents such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists. The agents used for menstrual suppression have variable rates of success in inducing amenorrhea, but typically have increasing rates of amenorrhea over time. Therapy may be limited by side effects, most commonly irregular, unscheduled bleeding. These therapies can benefit women’s quality of life, and by stabilizing the hormonal milieu, potentially improve the course of underlying medical conditions such as diabetes or a seizure disorder. This review addresses situations in which menstrual suppression may be of benefit, and lists options which have been successful in inducing medical amenorrhea. PMID:25018654

  7. Vibrotactile suppression of tinnitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhardt, Martin L.

    2002-05-01

    At the Society's 142nd meeting, the efficacy of high frequency bone conducted stimulation in suppressing tinnitus was presented. The hypothesized mechanism was the reprogramming of frequency tuning of auditory neurons in the central nervous system, secondarily to peripheral hearing loss. This mechanism is unlikely in cases of tinnitus in the presence of normal audiometric sensitivity. There is the possibility that hearing loss above 10 kHz can play a role in tinnitus, an association not thoroughly explored. Somatomotor stimulation influencing the quality of tinnitus has been reported, as have interconnections of the auditory and somatosensory systems. There would appear to be an evolutionary advantage of linking the sensorimotor organization of the external ear and the auditory function of the brainstem in sound localization. Thus, stimulation of the pinna and post auricular area may be a means of suppressing tinnitus. To that end a thin aluminum ceramic bimorph was constructed to fit on the inner surface of the pinna. When driven by low (<100 Hz) and high (>10 kHz) frequencies multiplied by MHz carriers, demodulation in the skin resulted in vibrotactile stimulation. Tactile stimulation was an adjunct to the high frequencies resulting in a multimodal suppressive effect in a small pilot study.

  8. Retigeric Acid B Exhibits Antitumor Activity through Suppression of Nuclear Factor-κB Signaling in Prostate Cancer Cells in Vitro and in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong-Qing; Hu, Xiao-Yan; Lu, Tao; Cheng, Yan-Na; Young, Charles Y. F.; Yuan, Hui-Qing; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Previously, we reported that retigeric acid B (RB), a natural pentacyclic triterpenic acid isolated from lichen, inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis in androgen-independent prostate cancer (PCa) cells. However, the mechanism of action of RB remains unclear. In this study, we found that using PC3 and DU145 cells as models, RB inhibited phosphorylation levels of IκBα and p65 subunit of NF-κB in a time- and dosage-dependent manner. Detailed study revealed that RB blocked the nuclear translocation of p65 and its DNA binding activity, which correlated with suppression of NF-κB-regulated proteins including Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, cyclin D1 and survivin. NF-κB reporter assay suggested that RB was able to inhibit both constitutive activated-NF-κB and LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-induced activation of NF-κB. Overexpression of RelA/p65 rescued RB-induced cell death, while knockdown of RelA/p65 significantly promoted RB-mediated inhibitory effect on cell proliferation, suggesting the crucial involvement of NF-κB pathway in this event. We further analyzed antitumor activity of RB in in vivo study. In C57BL/6 mice carrying RM-1 homografts, RB inhibited tumor growth and triggered apoptosis mainly through suppressing NF-κB activity in tumor tissues. Additionally, DNA microarray data revealed global changes in the gene expression associated with cell proliferation, apoptosis, invasion and metastasis in response to RB treatment. Therefore, our findings suggested that RB exerted its anti-tumor effect by targeting the NF-κB pathway in PCa cells, and this could be a general mechanism for the anti-tumor effect of RB in other types of cancers as well. PMID:22666431

  9. Sesquiterpene lactone parthenolide attenuates production of inflammatory mediators by suppressing the Toll-like receptor-4-mediated activation of the Akt, mTOR, and NF-κB pathways.

    PubMed

    Nam, Yoon Jeong; Lee, Da Hee; Lee, Min Sung; Lee, Chung Soo

    2015-09-01

    Microbial product lipopolysaccharide has been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory skin diseases. Parthenolide present in extracts of the herb feverfew has demonstrated an anti-inflammatory effect. However, the effect of parthenolide on the Akt/mTOR and NF-κB pathway activation-induced productions of inflammatory mediators in keratinocytes has not been studied. Using human keratinocytes, we investigated the effect of parthenolide on the inflammatory mediator production in relation to the Toll-like receptor-4-mediated-Akt/mTOR and NF-κB pathways, which regulate the transcription genes involved in immune and inflammatory responses. Parthenolide, Akt inhibitor, Bay 11-7085, and N-acetylcysteine each attenuated the lipopolysaccharide-induced production of IL-1β and PGE2, increase in the levels of cyclooxygenase, formation of reactive oxygen species, increase in the levels of Toll-like receptor-4, and activation of the Akt/mTOR and NF-κB in keratinocytes. The results show that parthenolide appears to attenuate the lipopolysaccharide-stimulated production of inflammatory mediators in keratinocytes by suppressing the Toll-like receptor-4-mediated activation of the Akt, mTOR, and NF-κB pathways. The activation of signaling transduction pathways appear to be regulated by reactive oxygen species. Parthenolide appears to attenuate the microbial product-mediated inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:25971793

  10. Next generation fire suppressants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Jerry A.

    1995-01-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral ban microprocessors controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  11. Next generation fire suppressants

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.A.

    1995-03-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral band microprocessor controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  12. Suppression of flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An active aerodynamic control system to control flutter over a large range of oscillatory frequencies is described. The system is not affected by mass, stiffness, elastic axis, or center of gravity location of the system, mode of vibration, or Mach number. The system consists of one or more pairs of leading edge and trailing edge hinged or deformable control surfaces, each pair operated in concert by a stability augmentation system. Torsion and bending motions are sensed and converted by the stability augmentation system into leading and trailing edge control surface deflections which produce lift forces and pitching moments to suppress flutter.

  13. Planck-suppressed operators

    SciTech Connect

    Assassi, Valentin; Baumann, Daniel; Green, Daniel; McAllister, Liam E-mail: dbaumann@damtp.cam.ac.uk E-mail: mcallister@cornell.edu

    2014-01-01

    We show that the recent Planck limits on primordial non-Gaussianity impose strong constraints on light hidden sector fields coupled to the inflaton via operators suppressed by a high mass scale Λ. We study a simple effective field theory in which a hidden sector field is coupled to a shift-symmetric inflaton via arbitrary operators up to dimension five. Self-interactions in the hidden sector lead to non-Gaussianity in the curvature perturbations. To be consistent with the Planck limit on local non-Gaussianity, the coupling to any hidden sector with light fields and natural cubic couplings must be suppressed by a very high scale Λ > 10{sup 5}H. Even if the hidden sector has Gaussian correlations, nonlinearities in the mixing with the inflaton still lead to non-Gaussian curvature perturbations. In this case, the non-Gaussianity is of the equilateral or orthogonal type, and the Planck data requires Λ > 10{sup 2}H.

  14. Factors influencing dust suppressant effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, C.R.; Eisele, T.C.; Chesney, D.J.; Kawatra, S.K.

    2008-11-15

    Water sprays are a common method used to reduce particulate matter (PM) emissions. Various factors such as wettability, surface area coverage, fine particle engulfment rates, interparticle adhesion forces, suppressant penetration and suppressant longevity have all been suggested as critical factors in achieving effective PM control. However, it has not been established which of these factors are the most important. Experimental work indicated that suppressant penetration is the most critical of these factors. The length of time after application that suppressants were effective was also improved by using hygroscopic reagents that retained moisture to prevent evaporation. Maximizing suppressant penetration and improving suppressant longevity led to an average 86% reduction in PM10 concentrations in laboratory dust tower tests.

  15. ZERO SUPPRESSION FOR RECORDERS

    DOEpatents

    Fort, W.G.S.

    1958-12-30

    A zero-suppression circuit for self-balancing recorder instruments is presented. The essential elements of the circuit include a converter-amplifier having two inputs, one for a reference voltage and the other for the signal voltage under analysis, and a servomotor with two control windings, one coupled to the a-c output of the converter-amplifier and the other receiving a reference input. Each input circuit to the converter-amplifier has a variable potentiometer and the sliders of the potentiometer are ganged together for movement by the servoinotor. The particular noveity of the circuit resides in the selection of resistance values for the potentiometer and a resistor in series with the potentiometer of the signal circuit to ensure the full value of signal voltage variation is impressed on a recorder mechanism driven by servomotor.

  16. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1994-10-04

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein. 3 figs.

  17. Interference suppression of SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanov, V P

    2011-01-24

    The theory of three-wave SRS is developed, which takes into account nonlinear dispersion of a medium for arbitrary phases of the pump waves at the input to the medium. The effect of interference suppression of SRS is predicted for values of the total phase of the three-wave pump (2n+1){pi} (n=0, {+-}1, {+-}2...), the effect being caused by the destructive interference of polarisations of the nonresonant dipole-allowed transitions. The relation between the contributions of the linear and nonlinear dispersions to the SRS is found. It is shown that at a sufficiently large wave detuning, the anti-Stokes wave amplitude experiences spatial oscillations. (nonlinear-optics phenomena)

  18. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1994-01-01

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein.

  19. An Alternative to Thought Suppression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boice, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "Setting free the bears: Escape from thought suppression," by D. M. Wegner (see record 2011-25622-008). While Wegner supposed that we might have to learn to live with bad thoughts, the present author discusses the use of imagination and guided imagery as an alternative to forced thought suppression.

  20. STRV Cryocooler Tip Motion Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R.; Ross, R. G., Jr.; Johnson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV-1b) scheduled to fly at the beginning of June 1994, has a cryocooler vibration suppression experiment aboard doing motion suppression of the tip of the coldfinger. STRV-1b is a bread box sized satellite to be launched on the next flight of the Ariane-4.

  1. Nonanesthetics can suppress learning.

    PubMed

    Kandel, L; Chortkoff, B S; Sonner, J; Laster, M J; Eger, E I

    1996-02-01

    Nonanesthetic gases or vapors do not abolish movement in response to noxious stimuli despite partial pressures and affinities for lipids that would, according to the Meyer-Overton hypothesis, predict such abolition. We investigated whether nonanesthetics depress learning and memory (i.e., provide amnesia). To define learning, we used a "fear-potentiated startle paradigm": rats trained to associate light with a noxious stimulus (footshock) will startle more, as measured by an accelerometer, when a startle-eliciting stimulus (e.g., a noise) is paired with light than when the startle-eliciting stimulus is presented alone. We imposed light-shock pairings on 98 rats under three conditions: no anesthesia (control); 0.20, 0.29, and 0.38 times the minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) of desflurane; or two nonanesthetics (1,2-dichloroperfluorocyclobutane and perfluoropentane) at partial pressures predicted from their lipid solubilities to be between 0.2 and 1 MAC. Desflurane produced a dose-related depression of learning with abolition of learning at 0.28 MAC. Perfluoropentane at 0.2-predicted MAC had the same effect as 0.28 MAC desflurane. 1,2-Dichloroperfluorocyclobutane at 0.5- to 1-predicted MAC abolished learning. Because nonanesthetics suppress learning but not movement (the two critical components of anesthesia), they may prove useful in discriminating between mechanisms and sites of action of anesthetics. PMID:8561335

  2. Inducing amnesia through systemic suppression

    PubMed Central

    Hulbert, Justin C.; Henson, Richard N.; Anderson, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal damage profoundly disrupts the ability to store new memories of life events. Amnesic windows might also occur in healthy people due to disturbed hippocampal function arising during mental processes that systemically reduce hippocampal activity. Intentionally suppressing memory retrieval (retrieval stopping) reduces hippocampal activity via control mechanisms mediated by the lateral prefrontal cortex. Here we show that when people suppress retrieval given a reminder of an unwanted memory, they are considerably more likely to forget unrelated experiences from periods surrounding suppression. This amnesic shadow follows a dose-response function, becomes more pronounced after practice suppressing retrieval, exhibits characteristics indicating disturbed hippocampal function, and is predicted by reduced hippocampal activity. These findings indicate that stopping retrieval engages a suppression mechanism that broadly compromises hippocampal processes and that hippocampal stabilization processes can be interrupted strategically. Cognitively triggered amnesia constitutes an unrecognized forgetting process that may account for otherwise unexplained memory lapses following trauma. PMID:26977589

  3. Inducing amnesia through systemic suppression.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, Justin C; Henson, Richard N; Anderson, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal damage profoundly disrupts the ability to store new memories of life events. Amnesic windows might also occur in healthy people due to disturbed hippocampal function arising during mental processes that systemically reduce hippocampal activity. Intentionally suppressing memory retrieval (retrieval stopping) reduces hippocampal activity via control mechanisms mediated by the lateral prefrontal cortex. Here we show that when people suppress retrieval given a reminder of an unwanted memory, they are considerably more likely to forget unrelated experiences from periods surrounding suppression. This amnesic shadow follows a dose-response function, becomes more pronounced after practice suppressing retrieval, exhibits characteristics indicating disturbed hippocampal function, and is predicted by reduced hippocampal activity. These findings indicate that stopping retrieval engages a suppression mechanism that broadly compromises hippocampal processes and that hippocampal stabilization processes can be interrupted strategically. Cognitively triggered amnesia constitutes an unrecognized forgetting process that may account for otherwise unexplained memory lapses following trauma. PMID:26977589

  4. Sound can suppress visual perception.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Souta; Ide, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    In a single modality, the percept of an input (e.g., voices of neighbors) is often suppressed by another (e.g., the sound of a car horn nearby) due to close interactions of neural responses to these inputs. Recent studies have also suggested that close interactions of neural responses could occur even across sensory modalities, especially for audio-visual interactions. However, direct behavioral evidence regarding the audio-visual perceptual suppression effect has not been reported in a study with humans. Here, we investigated whether sound could have a suppressive effect on visual perception. We found that white noise bursts presented through headphones degraded visual orientation discrimination performance. This auditory suppression effect on visual perception frequently occurred when these inputs were presented in a spatially and temporally consistent manner. These results indicate that the perceptual suppression effect could occur across auditory and visual modalities based on close and direct neural interactions among those sensory inputs. PMID:26023877

  5. Suppressive drug interactions between antifungals.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Marjon G J; Bollenbach, Tobias

    2014-04-24

    In this issue of Chemistry & Biology, Cokol and colleagues report a systematic study of drug interactions between antifungal compounds. Suppressive drug interactions occur more frequently than previously realized and come in different flavors with interesting implications. PMID:24766845

  6. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Snoek, Hella Leonie

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  7. n-Butanol extract from Folium isatidis inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and protects mice against lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxic shock.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lili; Lu, Yili; Jin, Jiahui; Dong, Lili; Xu, Fengli; Chen, Shuangshuang; Wang, Zhanyue; Liang, Guang; Shan, Xiaoou

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis, which is caused by severe infection, is an important cause of mortality, but effective clinical treatment against sepsis is extremely limited. As the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays a major role in inflammatory responses. Studies have shown beneficial pharmacological effects for Folium isatidis. The present study further illuminated the effects of n-butanol extract from Folium isatidis in LPS-induced septic shock and identified the main active chemical components. Our study showed that pretreatment with n-butanol extract from Folium isatidis not only significantly inhibited LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 production but also markedly and dose dependently enhanced the recruitment of MyD88, the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and the degradation of IκB-α. Additionally, the extract exhibited dramatic protective effects against lung injury and death in mice with septic shock. Eight main active compounds were identified, including organic acids, glycoside, indolinones, and flavonoids. These findings provide a perspective on the respiratory protection offered by n-butanol extract from Folium isatidis in LPS-induced sepsis and outline a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of sepsis. PMID:26491261

  8. Visual Surround Suppression in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Tibber, Marc S.; Anderson, Elaine J.; Bobin, Tracy; Antonova, Elena; Seabright, Alice; Wright, Bernice; Carlin, Patricia; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.; Dakin, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    Compared to unaffected observers patients with schizophrenia (SZ) show characteristic differences in visual perception, including a reduced susceptibility to the influence of context on judgments of contrast – a manifestation of weaker surround suppression (SS). To examine the generality of this phenomenon we measured the ability of 24 individuals with SZ to judge the luminance, contrast, orientation, and size of targets embedded in contextual surrounds that would typically influence the target’s appearance. Individuals with SZ demonstrated weaker SS compared to matched controls for stimuli defined by contrast or size, but not for those defined by luminance or orientation. As perceived luminance is thought to be regulated at the earliest stages of visual processing our findings are consistent with a suppression deficit that is predominantly cortical in origin. In addition, we propose that preserved orientation SS in SZ may reflect the sparing of broadly tuned mechanisms of suppression. We attempt to reconcile these data with findings from previous studies. PMID:23450069

  9. The amphetamine appetite suppressant saga.

    PubMed

    2004-02-01

    (1) In 1999, all amphetamine derivatives still sold in France as appetite suppressants were withdrawn from the market because of serious cardiovascular adverse effects. Sibutramine, marketed in France since 2001, is closely related to this group of drugs. (2) The adverse effects shared by these drugs are mainly neuropsychiatric (due to a psychostimulant action) and cardiovascular (arterial hypertension and tachycardia). (3) More specific cardiovascular adverse effects, such as pulmonary hypertension and severe cardiac valve damage, emerged after several years of use. The first reports date back to the 1960s. (4) The pulmonary hypertension associated with appetite suppressants can be fatal or necessitate transplantation. (5) Cardiac valve damage due to appetite suppressants is generally irreversible and sometimes requires surgery. PMID:15055225

  10. Vibration suppression using smart structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim; Inman, Daniel J.; Dosch, Jeffrey

    1991-01-01

    The control of structures for vibration suppression is discussed in the context of using smart materials and structures. Here the use of smart structures refers to using embedded piezoelectric devices as both control actuators and sensors. Using embedded sensors and actuators allows great improvements in performance over traditional structures (both passive and active) for vibration suppression. The application of smart structures to three experimental flexible structures is presented. The first is a flexible beam, the second is a flexible beam undergoing slewing motion, the third is a ribbed antenna. A simple model of a piezoelectric actuator/sensor is presented. The equations of motion for each structure is presented. The control issues considered as those associated with multi-input, multi-output control, PID control and LQR control implementation. A modern control analysis illustrates the usefulness of smart structures for vibration suppression.

  11. Background suppression in MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jeffery L.; Beck, Larry W.; Ferguson, David B.; Haw, James F.

    Pulse sequences for suppressing background signals from spinning modules used in magic-angle spinning NMR are described. These pulse sequences are based on spatially selective composite 90° pulses originally reported by Bax, which provide for no net excitation of spins outside the homogeneous region of the coil. We have achieved essentially complete suppression of background signals originating from our Vespel spinning module (which uses a free-standing coil) in both 1H and 13C spectra without notable loss in signal intensity. Successful modification of both Bloch decay and cross-polarization pulse sequences to include spatially selective pulses was essential to acquire background-free spectra for weak samples. Background suppression was also found to be particularly valuable for both T1 and T1 ϱ, relaxation measurements.

  12. Aging and repeated thought suppression success.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Ann E; Smyth, Frederick L; Beadel, Jessica R; Teachman, Bethany A

    2013-01-01

    Intrusive thoughts and attempts to suppress them are common, but while suppression may be effective in the short-term, it can increase thought recurrence in the long-term. Because intentional suppression involves controlled processing, and many aspects of controlled processing decline with age, age differences in thought suppression outcomes may emerge, especially over repeated thought suppression attempts as cognitive resources are expended. Using multilevel modeling, we examined age differences in reactions to thought suppression attempts across four thought suppression sequences in 40 older and 42 younger adults. As expected, age differences were more prevalent during suppression than during free monitoring periods, with younger adults indicating longer, more frequent thought recurrences and greater suppression difficulty. Further, younger adults' thought suppression outcomes changed over time, while trajectories for older adults' were relatively stable. Results are discussed in terms of older adults' reduced thought recurrence, which was potentially afforded by age-related changes in reactive control and distractibility. PMID:23776442

  13. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Xue, Yongjun

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans.

  14. Stimulus Fractionation by Interocular Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Zadbood, Asieh; Lee, Sang-Hun; Blake, Randolph

    2011-01-01

    Can human observers distinguish physical removal of a visible stimulus from phenomenal suppression of that stimulus during binocular rivalry? As so often happens, simple questions produce complex answers, and that is the case in the study reported here. Using continuous flash suppression to produce binocular rivalry, we were able to identify stimulus conditions where most – but not all – people utterly fail to distinguish physical from phenomenal stimulus removal, although we can be certain that those two equivalent perceptual states are accompanied by distinct neural events. More interestingly, we find subtle variants of the task where distinguishing the two states is trivially easy, even for people who utterly fail under the original conditions. We found that stimulus features are differentially vulnerable to suppression. Observers are able to be aware of existence/removal of some stimulus attributes (flicker) but not others (orientation), implying that interocular suppression breaks down the unitary awareness of integrated features belonging to a visual object. These findings raise questions about the unitary nature of awareness and, also, place qualifications on the utility of binocular rivalry as a tool for studying the neural concomitants of conscious visual awareness. PMID:22102839

  15. Charmonium suppression in nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S. |

    1996-11-01

    Measurements of {psi} and {psi}{prime} production from experiment NA50 at the CERN SPS are compared to calculations based on a hadronic model of charmonium suppression developed previously. Data on centrality dependence and total cross sections are in good accord with these predictions. Uncertainties in theoretical quantities such as NA50`s L parameter are discussed.

  16. Suppressing explosive synchronization by contrarians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiyun; Guan, Shuguang; Zou, Yong; Chen, Xiaosong; Liu, Zonghua

    2016-01-01

    Explosive synchronization (ES) has recently received increasing attention and studies have mainly focused on the conditions of its onset so far. However, its inverse problem, i.e. the suppression of ES, has not been systematically studied so far. As ES is usually considered to be harmful in certain circumstances such as the cascading failure of power grids and epileptic seizure, etc., its suppression is definitely important and deserves to be studied. We here study this inverse problem by presenting an efficient approach to suppress ES from a first-order to second-order transition, without changing the intrinsic network structure. We find that ES can be suppressed by only changing a small fraction of oscillators into contrarians with negative couplings and the critical fraction for the transition from the first order to the second order increases with both the network size and the average degree. A brief theory is presented to explain the underlying mechanism. This finding underlines the importance of our method to improve the understanding of neural interactions underlying cognitive processes.

  17. Conditioned suppression, punishment, and aversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme-Johnson, D. W.; Yarczower, M.

    1974-01-01

    The aversive action of visual stimuli was studied in two groups of pigeons which received response-contingent or noncontingent electric shocks in cages with translucent response keys. Presentation of grain for 3 sec, contingent on key pecking, was the visual stimulus associated with conditioned punishment or suppression. The responses of the pigeons in three different experiments are compared.

  18. DENDRITIC POLYMERS AS FIRE SUPPRESSANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes an evaluation of the applicability of one of the latest advances in polymer technology (dendritic polymers) to suppressing fires, one of the greatest survivability threats to military personnel and vehicles. Certain types of alkali and transition metal compl...

  19. Multiple cilia suppress tumour formation.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Primary cilia are cellular structures that have important functions in development and disease. The suppression of multiciliate differentiation of choroid plexus precursors, and maintenance of a single primary cilium by Notch1, is now shown to be involved in choroid plexus tumour formation. PMID:27027488

  20. High temperature suppression of dioxins.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Ming-Xiu; Chen, Tong; Fu, Jian-Ying; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Lu, Sheng-Yong; Li, Xiao-Dong; Yan, Jian-Hua; Buekens, Alfons

    2016-03-01

    Combined Sulphur-Nitrogen inhibitors, such as sewage sludge decomposition gases (SDG), thiourea and amidosulphonic acid have been observed to suppress the de novo synthesis of dioxins effectively. In this study, the inhibition of PCDD/Fs formation from model fly ash was investigated at unusually high temperatures (650 °C and 850 °C), well above the usual range of de novo tests (250-400 °C). At 650 °C it was found that SDG evolving from dried sewage sludge could suppress the formation of 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDD/Fs with high efficiency (90%), both in weight units and in I-TEQ units. Additionally, at 850 °C, three kinds of sulphur-amine or sulphur-ammonium compounds were tested to inhibit dioxins formation during laboratory-scale tests, simulating municipal solid waste incineration. The suppression efficiencies of PCDD/Fs formed through homogeneous gas phase reactions were all above 85% when 3 wt. % of thiourea (98.7%), aminosulphonic acid (96.0%) or ammonium thiosulphate (87.3%) was added. Differences in the ratio of PCDFs/PCDDs, in weight average chlorination level and in the congener distribution of the 17 toxic PCDD/Fs indicated that the three inhibitors tested followed distinct suppression pathways, possibly in relation to their different functional groups of nitrogen. Furthermore, thiourea reduced the (weight) average chlorinated level. In addition, the thermal decomposition of TUA was studied by means of thermogravimetry-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TG-FTIR) and the presence of SO2, SO3, NH3 and nitriles (N≡C bonds) was shown in the decomposition gases; these gaseous inhibitors might be the primary dioxins suppressants. PMID:26716881

  1. Ambroxol inhibits platelet-derived growth factor production in human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Utsugi, Mitsuyoshi; Dobashi, Kunio; Koga, Yasuhiko; Masubuchi, Ken; Shimizu, Yasuo; Endou, Katsuaki; Nakazawa, Tsugio; Mori, Masatomo

    2002-02-01

    Several growth factors, including platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), have been implicated in the mechanism of lung and airway remodeling. We investigated the effect of ambroxol, trans-4-[(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzyl) amino] cyclohexanol hydrochloride, on the lipopolysaccharide-induced PDGF production in human monocytic cells, THP-1. Ambroxol inhibited the lipopolysaccharide-induced PDGF-AB production via PDGF-A mRNA expression. Lipopolysaccharide activated p44/42 extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and ambroxol attenuated the lipopolysaccharide-induced p44/42 ERK activation. Furthermore, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)-1-specific inhibitor, 2-(2-amino-3-methoxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one (PD 98059), blocked the lipopolysaccharide-induced p44/42 ERK activation and PDGF production. These findings indicate that ambroxol inhibits the lipopolysaccharide-induced PDGF production due to the suppression of p44/42 ERK activity. PMID:11834245

  2. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Xue, Y.

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans. 13 figs.

  3. Improved Hepatoprotective Effect of Liposome-Encapsulated Astaxanthin in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Chun-Hung; Chang, Chun-Chao; Lin, Shiang-Ting; Chyau, Charng-Cherng; Peng, Robert Y.

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute hepatotoxicity is significantly associated with oxidative stress. Astaxanthin (AST), a xanthophyll carotenoid, is well known for its potent antioxidant capacity. However, its drawbacks of poor aqueous solubility and low bioavailability have limited its utility. Liposome encapsulation is considered as an effective alternative use for the improvement of bioavailability of the hydrophobic compound. We hypothesized that AST encapsulated within liposomes (LA) apparently shows improved stability and transportability compared to that of free AST. To investigate whether LA administration can efficiently prevent the LPS-induced acute hepatotoxicity, male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = six per group) were orally administered liposome-encapsulated AST at 2, 5 or 10 mg/kg-day (LA-2, LA-5, and LA-10) for seven days and then were LPS-challenged (i.p., 5 mg/kg). The LA-10 administered group, but not the other groups, exhibited a significant amelioration of serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT), glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (CRE), hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), IL-6, and hepatic nuclear NF-κB and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), suggesting that LA at a 10 mg/kg-day dosage renders hepatoprotective effects. Moreover, the protective effects were even superior to that of positive control N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 200 mg/kg-day). Histopathologically, NAC, free AST, LA-2 and LA-5 partially, but LA-10 completely, alleviated the acute inflammatory status. These results indicate that hydrophobic AST after being properly encapsulated by liposomes improves bioavailability and can also function as potential drug delivery system in treating hepatotoxicity. PMID:27428953

  4. Broiler pulmonary hypertensive responses during lipopolysaccharide-induced tolerance and cyclooxygenase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wideman, R F; Bowen, O T; Erf, G F

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS, endotoxin) triggers pulmonary hypertension (PH) characterized by an increase in pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) that reaches a peak value within 20 to 25 min and then gradually subsides within 60 min. As the PAP subsides PH cannot be reinitiated, signifying the onset of a period of tolerance (refractoriness) to repeated LPS exposure. The present study was conducted to determine the duration of this tolerance, and to evaluate key mediators thought to contribute to LPS-mediated PH in broilers. Tolerance was shown to persist for 4 to 5 d after the initial exposure to LPS. In tolerant broilers supramaximal i.v. injections of LPS did not reinitiate PH, nor was a significant modulatory role for nitric oxide demonstrated. The pulmonary vasculature of tolerant broilers remains responsive to the thromboxane A(2) (TxA(2)) mimetic U44069, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin), and constitutive nitric oxide. Meclofenamate successfully blocked the conversion of arachidonic acid to vasoconstrictive eicosanoids such as TxA(2); nevertheless, meclofenamate failed to inhibit PH in response to LPS. Therefore, TxA(2) does not appear to be the primary vasoconstrictor involved in the PH response to LPS and neither does 5-HT. Broilers emerging from tolerance 5 d after the initial exposure to LPS exhibited interindividual variation in their PH responsiveness to a second LPS injection, ranging from zero response (individuals that remain fully tolerant) to large increases in PAP (post-tolerant individuals). Tolerance might be an important compensatory or protective mechanism for broilers whose pulmonary vascular capacity is marginally adequate under optimal conditions, and whose respiratory systems are chronically challenged with LPS in commercial production facilities. The key vasoconstrictors responsible for the PH elicited by LPS remain to be determined. PMID:19096060

  5. Eupatorium lindleyanum DC. flavonoids fraction attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chunjun; Yao, Shi; Chen, Jinglei; Wei, Xiaochen; Xia, Long; Chen, Daofeng; Zhang, Jian

    2016-10-01

    Eupatorium lindleyanum DC., "Ye-Ma-Zhui" called by local residents in China, showed anti-inflammatory activity and is used to treat tracheitis. We had isolated and identified the flavonoids, diterpenoids and sesquiterpenes compounds from the herb. In the present study, we evaluated the protective effects of the flavonoids fraction of E. lindleyanum (EUP-FLA) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice and the possible underlying mechanisms of action. EUP-FLA could significantly decrease lung wet-to-dry weight (W/D) ratio, nitric oxide (NO) and protein concentration in BALF, lower myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, increase superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and down-regulate the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β). Additionally, EUP-FLA attenuated lung histopathological changes and significantly reduced complement deposition with decreasing the levels of Complement 3 (C3) and Complement 3c (C3c) in serum. These results demonstrated that EUP-FLA may attenuate LPS-induced ALI via reducing productions of pro-inflammatory mediators, decreasing the level of complement and affecting the NO, SOD and MPO activity. PMID:27398612

  6. CAF1-knockout mice are more susceptive to lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jia-Xin; Li, Jia-Shu; Hu, Rong; Li, Xiao-Min; Wang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The carbon catabolite repressor protein 4 (CCR4)–negative on TATA (NOT) complex includes multiple subunits and is conserved in the eukaryotic cells. The CCR4–NOT complex can regulate gene expression at different levels. Two subunits of the CCR4–NOT complex, CCR4 and CCR4-associated factor 1 (CAF1), possess deadenylase activity. In yeast, the deadenylase activity is mainly provided by the CCR4 subunit; however, the deadenylase activity is provided by both CCR4 and CAF1 in other eukaryotes. A previous study reported that CAF1 but not CCR4 is required for the decay of a reporter mRNA with AU-rich elements. Our previous study showed that CAF1 is involved in the regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression. Both ICAM-1 and IL-8 play crucial roles in acute lung injury. In the present study, we examined the effects of CAF1 deficiency on IL-8 and ICAM-1 expression and acute lung injury in mice. Here we showed that there were no differences between the wild-type and CAF1-knockout mice on phenotypes. The lung histology and protein and mRNA levels of IL-8 and ICAM-1 in unstimulated wild-type mice were comparable to those in unstimulated CAF1-knockout mice. However, lipopolysaccharide stimulation led to more severe lung histological injury and greatly higher IL-8 and ICAM-1 expression in CAF1-knockout mice compared to the wild-type mice. These results, together with our previous study, suggest that CAF1 is involved in the regulation of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated IL-8 and ICAM-1 expression in vivo and affects the progression of acute lung injury. PMID:27358572

  7. Voluntary wheel running attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced liver inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Peppler, Willem T; Anderson, Zachary G; Sutton, Charles D; Rector, R Scott; Wright, David C

    2016-05-15

    Sepsis induces an acute inflammatory response in the liver, which can lead to organ failure and death. Given the anti-inflammatory effects of exercise, we hypothesized that habitual physical activity could protect against acute sepsis-induced liver inflammation via mechanisms, including heat shock protein (HSP) 70/72. Male C57BL/6J mice (n = 80, ∼8 wk of age) engaged in physical activity via voluntary wheel running (VWR) or cage control (SED) for 10 wk. To induce sepsis, we injected (2 mg/kg ip) LPS or sterile saline (SAL), and liver was harvested 6 or 12 h later. VWR attenuated increases in body and epididymal adipose tissue mass, improved glucose tolerance, and increased liver protein content of PEPCK (P < 0.05). VWR attenuated increases in LPS-induced IL-6 signaling and mRNA expression of other inflammatory markers (TNF-α, chemokine C-C motif ligand 2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, IL-10, IL-1β) in the liver; however, this was not reflected at the whole body level, as systemic markers of inflammation were similar between SED and VWR. Insulin tolerance was greater in VWR compared with SED at 6 but not 12 h after LPS. The protective effect of VWR occurred in parallel with increases in the liver protein content of HSP70/72, a molecular chaperone that can protect against inflammatory challenges. This study provides novel evidence that physical activity protects against the inflammatory cascade induced by LPS in the liver and that these effects may be mediated via HSP70/72. PMID:26887432

  8. Curcumin attenuates D-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury and mitochondrial dysfunction in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingfei; Xu, Li; Zhang, Lili; Ying, Zhixiong; Su, Weipeng; Wang, Tian

    2014-08-01

    Curcumin, a naturally occurring antioxidant, has various beneficial effects in the treatment of human diseases. However, little information regarding the protection it provides against acute liver injury is available. The present study investigated the protective effects of curcumin against D-galactosamine (D-GalN)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute liver injury in mice. A total of 40 male Kunming mice were randomly assigned to 5 groups: 1) mice administered saline vehicle injection (control), 2) mice administered 200 mg/kg body weight (BW) curcumin by i.p. injection (CUR), 3) mice administered D-GalN/LPS (700 mg and 5 μg/kg BW) via i.p. injection (GL), 4) mice administered 200 mg/kg BW curcumin i.p. 1 h before D-GalN/LPS injection (CUR-GL), and 5) mice administered 200 mg/kg BW curcumin i.p. 1 h after D-GalN/LPS injection (GL-CUR). Twenty h after D-GalN/LPS injection, serum alanine aminotransferase activities were 18.5% and 13.5% lower (P < 0.05) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities were 26.6% and 9.6% lower (P < 0.05) in the CUR-GL and GL-CUR groups, respectively, than in the GL group. The CUR-GL and GL-CUR groups had 64.4% and 15.0% higher (P < 0.05) mitochondrial membrane potentials, respectively, and the CUR-GL group had a 44.7% lower reactive oxygen species concentration than the GL group (P < 0.05). Mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase activities were 111% and 77.9% higher (P < 0.05) and the percentages of necrotic cells were 47.0% and 32.4% lower (P < 0.05) in the CUR-GL and GL-CUR groups, respectively, than in the GL group. Liver mRNA levels of sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) were 56.4% lower (P < 0.05) in the CUR-GL group than in the GL group. Moreover, compared with the GL-CUR group, the CUR-GL group had an 18.7% lower serum AST activity, a 31.7% lower mitochondrial malondialdehyde concentration, a 36.0% lower hepatic reactive oxygen species concentration, and a 43.0% higher mitochondrial membrane potential. These results suggested that curcumin protects against D-GalN/LPS-induced liver damage by the enhancing antioxidant defense system, attenuating mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibiting apoptosis. This was especially true for curcumin pretreatment, which highlighted its promise as a preventive treatment for acute liver injury in clinical settings. PMID:24899159

  9. A Standardized Extract of Rhus verniciflua Stokes Protects Wistar Rats Against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ji Eun; Shin, Jae-Ho; Kwon, Oran; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2015-11-01

    Rhus verniciflua stokes (RVS) (Anacardiaceae) has been traditionally used as a folk remedy for gastritis, several cancers, and various metabolic diseases. The present study evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of RVS extract standardized to fustin content using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated rats. The rats were randomly divided into six groups and intragastrically administered 0, 100, 250, or 500 mg/kg body weight (bw) of RVS or 15 mg/kg bw of fustin for 14 days. LPS was intraperitoneally injected 18 h before sacrifice. The nitric oxide levels of RVS extract in either the serum or liver were significantly decreased compared to the LPS-treated rats (P<.05). The treatment with the RVS extract also blunted the rise of malondialdehyde levels in the liver (P<.05). The administration of RVS extract and fustin significantly prevented the elevation of interleukin 6 cytokine, iNOS, and COX-2 mRNA expression in the liver. Inflammatory cell infiltration was also significantly attenuated by the RVS extract or fustin supplementation. These results suggest that our standardized RVS extract has preventive effects on inflammatory reactions. PMID:26501382

  10. CCR5 deficiency accelerates lipopolysaccharide-induced astrogliosis, amyloid-beta deposit and impaired memory function.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chul Ju; Park, Mi Hee; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Kim, Ju Hwan; Yun, Na Young; Oh, Sang Yeon; Song, Ju Kyung; Seo, Hyun Ok; Kim, Yun-Bae; Hwang, Dae Yeon; Oh, Ki-Wan; Han, Sang-Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-03-15

    Chemokine receptors are implicated in inflammation and immune responses. Neuro-inflammation is associated with activation of astrocyte and amyloid-beta (Aβ) generations that lead to pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Previous our study showed that deficiency of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) results in activation of astrocytes and Aβ deposit, and thus memory dysfunction through increase of CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression. CCR5 knockout mice were used as an animal model with memory dysfunction. For the purpose LPS was injected i.p. daily (0.25 mg/kg/day). The memory dysfunctions were much higher in LPS-injected CCR5 knockout mice compared to CCR5 wild type mice as well as non-injected CCR5 knockout mice. Associated with severe memory dysfuction in LPS injected CCR5 knockout mice, LPS injection significant increase expression of inflammatory proteins, astrocyte activation, expressions of β-secretase as well as Aβ deposition in the brain of CCR5 knockout mice as compared with that of CCR5 wild type mice. In CCR5 knockout mice, CCR2 expressions were high and co-localized with GFAP which was significantly elevated by LPS. Expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) which ligands of CCR2 also increased by LPS injection, and increment of MCP-1 expression is much higher in CCR5 knockout mice. BV-2 cells treated with CCR5 antagonist, D-ala-peptide T-amide (DAPTA) and cultured astrocytes isolated from CCR5 knockout mice treated with LPS (1 μg/ml) and CCR2 antagonist, decreased the NF-ĸB activation and Aβ level. These findings suggest that the deficiency of CCR5 enhances response of LPS, which accelerates to neuro-inflammation and memory impairment. PMID:26910914

  11. Thermoregulatory role of inducible nitric oxide synthase in lipopolysaccharide-induced hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Saia, Rafael S; Carnio, Evelin C

    2006-09-01

    We have tested the hypothesis that nitric oxide (NO) arising from inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) plays a role in hypothermia during endotoxemia by regulating vasopressin (AVP) release. Wild-type (WT) and iNOS knockout mice (KO) were intraperitoneally injected with either saline or Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) 10.0 mg/kg in a final volume of 0.02 mL. Body temperature was measured continuously by biotelemetry during 24 h after injection. Three hours after LPS administration, we observed a significant drop in body temperature (hypothermic response) in WT mice, which remained until the seventh hour, returning then close to the basal level. In iNOS KO mice, we found a significant fall in body temperature after the fourth hour of LPS administration; however, the hypothermic response persisted until the end of the 24 h of the experiment. The pre-treatment with beta-mercapto-beta,beta-cyclopentamethylenepropionyl(1), O-Et-Tyr2, Val4, Arg8-Vasopressin, an AVP V1 receptor antagonist (10 microg/kg) administered intraperitoneally, abolished the persistent hypothermia induced by LPS in iNOS KO mice, suggesting the regulation of iNOS under the vasopressin release in this experimental model. In conclusion, our data suggest that the iNOS isoform plays a role in LPS-induced hypothermia, apparently through the regulation of AVP release. PMID:16714035

  12. Ginkgolide B functions as a determinant constituent of Ginkgolides in alleviating lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fugen; Shi, Wei; Zhou, Guojun; Yao, Hongyi; Xu, Chengyun; Xiao, Weiqiang; Wu, Junsong; Wu, Ximei

    2016-07-01

    Ginkgolides are the major bioactive components of Ginkgo biloba extracts, however, the exact constituents of Ginkgolides contributing to their pharmacological effects remain unknown. Herein, we have determined the anti-inflammatory effects of Ginkgolide B (GB) and Ginkgolides mixture (GM) at equivalent dosages against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation. RAW 264.7 cell culture model and mouse model of LPS-induced lung injury were used to evaluate in vitro and in vivo effects of GB and GM, respectively. In RAW 264.7 cells, GB and GM at equivalent dosages exhibit an identical capacity to attenuate LPS-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA and protein expression and subsequent NO production. Likewise, GB and GM possess almost the same potency in attenuating LPS-induced expression and activation of nuclear factor kappa B (p65) and subsequent increases in tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA levels. In LPS-induced pulmonary injury, GB and GM at the equivalent dosages have equal efficiency in attenuating the accumulation of inflammatory cells, including neutrophils, lymphocytes, and macrophages, and in improving the histological damage of lungs. Moreover, GB and GM at equivalent dosages decrease the exudation of plasma protein to the same degree, whereas GM is superior to GB in alleviating myeloperoxidase activities. Finally, though GB and GM at equivalent dosages appear to reduce LPS-induced IL-1β mRNA and protein levels and IL-10 protein levels to the same degree, GM is more potent than GB to attenuate the IL-10 mRNA levels. Taken together, this study demonstrates that GB functions as the determinant constituent of Ginkgolides in alleviating LPS-induced lung injury. PMID:27261579

  13. Alkaline Phosphatase Protects Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Early Pregnancy Defects in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Wei; Ni, Hua; Herington, Jennifer; Reese, Jeff; Paria, Bibhash C.

    2015-01-01

    Excessive cytokine inflammatory response due to chronic or superphysiological level of microbial infection during pregnancy leads to pregnancy complications such as early pregnancy defects/loss and preterm birth. Bacterial toxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), long recognized as a potent proinflammatory mediator, has been identified as a risk factor for pregnancy complications. Alkaline phosphatase (AP) isozymes have been shown to detoxify LPS by dephosphorylation. In this study, we examined the role of alkaline phosphatase (AP) in mitigating LPS-induced early pregnancy complications in mice. We found that 1) the uterus prior to implantation and implantation sites following embryo implantation produce LPS recognition and dephosphorylation molecules TLR4 and tissue non-specific AP (TNAP) isozyme, respectively; 2) uterine TNAP isozyme dephosphorylates LPS at its sites of production; 3) while LPS administration following embryo implantation elicits proinflammatory cytokine mRNA levels at the embryo implantation sites (EISs) and causes early pregnancy loss, dephosphorylated LPS neither triggers proinflammatory cytokine mRNA levels at the EISs nor induces pregnancy complications; 4) AP isozyme supplementation to accelerate LPS detoxification attenuates LPS-induced pregnancy complications following embryo implantation. These findings suggest that a LPS dephosphorylation strategy using AP isozyme may have a unique therapeutic potential to mitigate LPS- or Gram-negative bacteria-induced pregnancy complications in at-risk women. PMID:25910276

  14. Lipopolysaccharide-induced Lung Injury Involves the Nitration-mediated Activation of RhoA*

    PubMed Central

    Rafikov, Ruslan; Dimitropoulou, Christiana; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Kangath, Archana; Gross, Christine; Pardo, Daniel; Sharma, Shruti; Jezierska-Drutel, Agnieszka; Patel, Vijay; Snead, Connie; Lucas, Rudolf; Verin, Alexander; Fulton, David; Catravas, John D.; Black, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by increased endothelial hyperpermeability. Protein nitration is involved in the endothelial barrier dysfunction in LPS-exposed mice. However, the nitrated proteins involved in this process have not been identified. The activation of the small GTPase RhoA is a critical event in the barrier disruption associated with LPS. Thus, in this study we evaluated the possible role of RhoA nitration in this process. Mass spectroscopy identified a single nitration site, located at Tyr34 in RhoA. Tyr34 is located within the switch I region adjacent to the nucleotide-binding site. Utilizing this structure, we developed a peptide designated NipR1 (nitration inhibitory peptide for RhoA 1) to shield Tyr34 against nitration. TAT-fused NipR1 attenuated RhoA nitration and barrier disruption in LPS-challenged human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Further, treatment of mice with NipR1 attenuated vessel leakage and inflammatory cell infiltration and preserved lung function in a mouse model of ALI. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the mechanism by which Tyr34 nitration stimulates RhoA activity was through a decrease in GDP binding to the protein caused by a conformational change within a region of Switch I, mimicking the conformational shift observed when RhoA is bound to a guanine nucleotide exchange factor. Stopped flow kinetic analysis was used to confirm this prediction. Thus, we have identified a new mechanism of nitration-mediated RhoA activation involved in LPS-mediated endothelial barrier dysfunction and show the potential utility of “shielding” peptides to prevent RhoA nitration in the management of ALI. PMID:24398689

  15. Protective effect of penehyclidine hydrochloride on lipopolysaccharide-induced acute kidney injury in rat.

    PubMed

    Cao, H J; Yu, D M; Zhang, T Z; Zhou, J; Chen, K Y; Ge, J; Pei, L

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to observe the effect of penehyclidine hydrochloride (PHC) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury in rats and expression of tight junction proteins ZO-1 and occludin. Adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided randomly (N = 10) into control group (C), LPS group (LPS), low-dose PHC group (L-PHC), and high-dose PHC group (H-PHC). All rats, except C group, received a vena caudalis injection of 5.0 mg/kg LPS; after 30 min, rats in L-PHC and H-PHC groups received a vena caudalis injection of 0.3 and 0.9 mg/kg PHC. After 24 h, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, serum creatinine (Scr), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were detected. Histopathological changes and expression of ZO-1 and occludin were observed in renal tissues. Versus levels of TNF-α (38.5 ± 9.0), IL-1β (46.3 ± 12.7), Scr (37.2 ± 9.3), and BUN (6.5 ± 1.1) in control group, those in LPS group, TNF-α (159.0 ± 21.3), IL-1β (130.8 ± 18.7), Scr (98.5 ± 18.2), and BUN (12.8 ± 1.8), increased obviously (P < 0.05), with significantly structural changes and decreases of ZO-1 and occludin. However, TNF-α (111.3 ± 11.6), IL-1β (78.4 ± 14.3), Scr (51.3 ± 12.5), BUN (8.1 ± 1.2) in H-PHC group, and TNF-α (120.8 ± 14.3), IL-1β (92.5 ± 19.0), Scr (56.7 ± 14.7), BUN (9.7 ± 1.6) in L-PHC group were obviously decreased (P < 0.05). PHC has protective effects on acute kidney injury in sepsis, including abatement of renal tissue inflammation and functional improvement, potentially by upregulating ZO-1 and occludin. PMID:26345867

  16. Protective Role of Proton-Sensing TDAG8 in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tsurumaki, Hiroaki; Mogi, Chihiro; Aoki-Saito, Haruka; Tobo, Masayuki; Kamide, Yosuke; Yatomi, Masakiyo; Sato, Koichi; Dobashi, Kunio; Ishizuka, Tamotsu; Hisada, Takeshi; Yamada, Masanobu; Okajima, Fumikazu

    2015-01-01

    Acute lung injury is characterized by the infiltration of neutrophils into lungs and the subsequent impairment of lung function. Here we explored the role of TDAG8 in lung injury induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administrated intratracheally. In this model, cytokines and chemokines released from resident macrophages are shown to cause neutrophilic inflammation in the lungs. We found that LPS treatment increased TDAG8 expression in the lungs and confirmed its expression in resident macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids. LPS administration remarkably increased neutrophil accumulation without appreciable change in the resident macrophages, which was associated with increased penetration of blood proteins into BAL fluids, interstitial accumulation of inflammatory cells, and damage of the alveolar architecture. The LPS-induced neutrophil accumulation and the associated lung damage were enhanced in TDAG8-deficient mice as compared with those in wild-type mice. LPS also increased several mRNA and protein expressions of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the lungs or BAL fluids. Among these inflammatory mediators, mRNA and protein expression of KC (also known as CXCL1), a chemokine of neutrophils, were significantly enhanced by TDAG8 deficiency. We conclude that TDAG8 is a negative regulator for lung neutrophilic inflammation and injury, in part, through the inhibition of chemokine production. PMID:26690120

  17. Lipopolysaccharide-induced Pulpitis Up-regulates TRPV1 in Trigeminal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Chung, M.-K.; Lee, J.; Duraes, G.; Ro, J.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Tooth pain often accompanies pulpitis. Accumulation of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), a product of Gram-negative bacteria, is associated with painful clinical symptoms. However, the mechanisms underlying LPS-induced tooth pain are not clearly understood. TRPV1 is a capsaicin- and heat-gated nociceptive ion channel implicated in thermosensation and hyperalgesia under inflammation or injury. Although TRPV1 is expressed in pulpal afferents, it is not known whether the application of LPS to teeth modulates TRPV1 in trigeminal nociceptors. By assessing the levels of protein and transcript of TRPV1 in mouse trigeminal ganglia, we demonstrate that dentinal application of LPS increases the expression of TRPV1. Our results suggest that the up-regulation of TRPV1 in trigeminal nociceptors following bacterial infection could contribute to hyperalgesia under pulpitis conditions. PMID:21712529

  18. Effect of Embelin Against Lipopolysaccharide-induced Sickness Behaviour in Mice.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Ashique; Dhadde, Shivsharan B; Durg, Sharanbasappa; Veerapur, V P; Badami, S; Thippeswamy, B S; Patil, Jagadevappa S

    2016-05-01

    Sickness behaviour is a coordinated set of adaptive behavioural changes that develop in ill individuals during the course of an infection. It is relevant to understanding depression and some aspects of the suffering that in cancer. Embelin has been reported to possess antiinflammatory, neuroprotective and anxiolytic assets and has been shown to inhibit nuclear factor κB pathway and cytokine production. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of embelin isolated from Embelia ribes Burm in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced sickness behaviour in mice. Adult male Swiss albino mice were pre-treated with embelin (10 and 20 mg/kg, p.o.) or dexamethasone (1 mg/kg, i.p.) for 3 days and then challenged with LPS (400 µg/kg, i.p.). At different time intervals of post-LPS challenge, sickness behaviour was evaluated in the animals by battery of behavioural tests (plus maze, open field, light-dark box, forced swim, social behaviour assessment, sucrose preference and food and water intake). Levels of oxidative stress makers (reduced glutathione and lipid peroxidation) in mice brain were also analysed. LPS induced behavioural alterations, anhedonia and anorexia, in mice. Pre-treatment with embelin attenuated behavioural changes induced by LPS. In addition, embelin prevented anhedonia, anorexia and ameliorated brain oxidative stress markers. The experimental outcomes of the present study demonstrated protective effect of embelin in LPS-induced sickness behaviour in mice. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26890475

  19. Moderate Exercise Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation and Associated Maternal and Fetal Morbidities in Pregnant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald-Goodfellow, Shannyn K.; Surita, Fernanda G.; Pinto e Silva, João L.; Tayade, Chandrakant; Othman, Maha; Ozolinš, Terence R. S.

    2016-01-01

    Fetal growth restriction (FGR) and coagulopathies are often associated with aberrant maternal inflammation. Moderate-intensity exercise during pregnancy has been shown to increase utero-placental blood flow and to enhance fetal nutrition as well as fetal and placental growth. Furthermore, exercise is known to reduce inflammation. To evaluate the effect of moderate-intensity exercise on inflammation associated with the development of maternal coagulopathies and FGR, Wistar rats were subjected to an exercise regime before and during pregnancy. To model inflammation-induced FGR, pregnant rats were administered daily intraperitoneal injections of E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on gestational days (GD) 13.5–16.5 and sacrificed at GD 17.5. Control rats were injected with saline. Maternal hemostasis was assessed by thromboelastography. Moderate-intensity exercise prevented LPS-mediated increases in white blood cell counts measured on GD 17.5 and improved maternal hemostasis profiles. Importantly, our data reveal that exercise prevented LPS-induced FGR. Moderate-intensity exercise initiated before and maintained during pregnancy may decrease the severity of maternal and perinatal complications associated with abnormal maternal inflammation. PMID:27124733

  20. Nogo-B protects mice against lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wujian; Zhu, Ying; Ning, Yunye; Dong, Yuchao; Huang, Haidong; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Qinying; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Nogo-B, a member of the reticulon 4 protein family, plays a critical role in tissue repair and acute inflammation. Its role in acute lung injury (ALI) remains unclear. Here, we assessed the function of Nogo-B during tissue injury in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI mouse model. We found that pulmonary Nogo-B was significantly repressed after LPS instillation in C57BL/6 mice. Over-expression of pulmonary Nogo-B using an adenovirus vector carrying the Nogo-B-RFP-3flag gene (Ad-Nogo-B) significantly prolonged the survival of mice challenged with a lethal dose of LPS. The Ad-Nogo-B-treated mice also had less severe lung injury, less alveolar protein exudation, and a higher number of macrophages but less neutrophil infiltration compared with Ad-RFP-treated mice. Interestingly, microarray analysis showed that the Ad-Nogo-B-treated mice had different gene expression profiles compared with the controls and the prominent expression of genes related to wound healing and the humoral immune response after LPS induction. Of the 49 differently expressed genes, we found that the expression of PTX3 was significantly up-regulated following Nogo-B over-expression as observed in lung tissues and RAW264.7 cells. In conclusion, Nogo-B plays a protective role against LPS-induced ALI, and this effect might be exerted through the modulation of alveolar macrophage recruitment and PTX3 production. PMID:26174362

  1. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Dynamic Lipid Membrane Reorganization: Tubules, Perforations, and Stacks

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Peter G.; Lamoureux, Loreen; Swingle, Kirstie L.; Mukundan, Harshini; Montaño, Gabriel A.

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a unique lipoglycan, with two major physiological roles: 1), as a major structural component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and 2), as a highly potent mammalian toxin when released from cells into solution (endotoxin). LPS is an amphiphile that spontaneously inserts into the outer leaflet of lipid bilayers to bury its hydrophobic lipidic domain, leaving the hydrophilic polysaccharide chain exposed to the exterior polar solvent. Divalent cations have long been known to neutralize and stabilize LPS in the outer membrane, whereas LPS in the presence of monovalent cations forms highly mobile negatively-charged aggregates. Yet, much of our understanding of LPS and its interactions with the cell membrane does not take into account its amphiphilic biochemistry and charge polarization. Herein, we report fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy analysis of the interaction between LPS and fluid-phase supported lipid bilayer assemblies (sLBAs), as model membranes. Depending on cation availability, LPS induces three remarkably different effects on simple sLBAs. Net-negative LPS-Na+ leads to the formation of 100-μm-long flexible lipid tubules from surface-associated lipid vesicles and the destabilization of the sLBA resulting in micron-size hole formation. Neutral LPS-Ca2+ gives rise to 100-μm-wide single- or multilamellar planar sheets of lipid and LPS formed from surface-associated lipid vesicles. Our findings have important implications about the physical interactions between LPS and lipids and demonstrate that sLBAs can be useful platforms to study the interactions of amphiphilic virulence factors with cell membranes. Additionally, our study supports the general phenomenon that lipids with highly charged or bulky headgroups can promote highly curved membrane architectures due to electrostatic and/or steric repulsions. PMID:24896118

  2. The anti-inflammatory effects of methylsulfonylmethane on lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Hee; Kim, Dae Hwan; Lim, Hwan; Baek, Doo-Yeon; Shin, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Jin-Kyung

    2009-04-01

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), also known as dimethyl sulfone and methyl sulfone, is an organic sulfur-containing compound that occurs naturally in a variety of fruits, vegetables, grains, and animals, including humans. In the present study, we demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects of MSM in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine macrophages, RAW264.7 cells. MSM significantly inhibited the release of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E(2) by alleviating the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, the levels of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were decreased by MSM treatment in cell culture supernatants. Further study indicated that the translocation of the p65 subunit of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB to the nucleus was inhibited by MSM treatment in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, in which it helped block degradation of inhibitor of NF-kappaB. In addition, in vivo studies demonstrated that topical administration of MSM at 500-1250 microg/ear resulted in similar inhibitory activities in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-induced mouse ear edema. Collectively, theses results indicate that MSM inhibits LPS-induced release of pro-inflammatory mediators in murine macrophages through downregulation of NF-kappaB signaling. PMID:19336900

  3. Uncoupling Protein 2 Increases Susceptibility to Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qin; Wang, Jianchun; Hu, Mingdong; Yang, Yu; Guo, Liang; Xu, Jing; Lei, Chuanjiang; Jiao, Yan; Xu, JianCheng

    2016-01-01

    Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is upregulated in patients with systemic inflammation and infection, but its functional role is unclear. We up- or downregulated UCP2 expression using UCP2 recombinant adenovirus or the UCP2 inhibitor, genipin, in lungs of mice, and investigated the mechanisms of UCP2 in ALI. UCP2 overexpression in mouse lungs increased LPS-induced pathological changes, lung permeability, lung inflammation, and lowered survival rates. Furthermore, ATP levels and mitochondrial membrane potential were decreased, while reactive oxygen species production was increased. Additionally, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activity was elevated, which increased the sensitivity to LPS-induced apoptosis and inflammation. LPS-induced apoptosis and release of inflammatory factors were alleviated by pretreatment of the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125 or the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580, but not by the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor PD98059 in UCP2-overexpressing mice. On the other hand, LPS-induced alveolar epithelial cell death and inflammation were attenuated by genipin. In conclusion, UCP2 increased susceptibility to LPS-induced cell death and pulmonary inflammation, most likely via ATP depletion and activation of MAPK signaling following ALI in mice. PMID:27057102

  4. CCR5 deficiency accelerates lipopolysaccharide-induced astrogliosis, amyloid-beta deposit and impaired memory function

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Yeon; Kim, Ju Hwan; Yun, Na Young; Oh, Sang Yeon; Song, Ju Kyung; Seo, Hyun Ok; Kim, Yun-Bae; Hwang, Dae Yeon; Oh, Ki-Wan; Han, Sang-Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors are implicated in inflammation and immune responses. Neuro-inflammation is associated with activation of astrocyte and amyloid-beta (Aβ) generations that lead to pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Previous our study showed that deficiency of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) results in activation of astrocytes and Aβ deposit, and thus memory dysfunction through increase of CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression. CCR5 knockout mice were used as an animal model with memory dysfunction. For the purpose LPS was injected i.p. daily (0.25 mg/kg/day). The memory dysfunctions were much higher in LPS-injected CCR5 knockout mice compared to CCR5 wild type mice as well as non-injected CCR5 knockout mice. Associated with severe memory dysfuction in LPS injected CCR5 knockout mice, LPS injection significant increase expression of inflammatory proteins, astrocyte activation, expressions of β-secretase as well as Aβ deposition in the brain of CCR5 knockout mice as compared with that of CCR5 wild type mice. In CCR5 knockout mice, CCR2 expressions were high and co-localized with GFAP which was significantly elevated by LPS. Expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) which ligands of CCR2 also increased by LPS injection, and increment of MCP-1 expression is much higher in CCR5 knockout mice. BV-2 cells treated with CCR5 antagonist, D-ala-peptide T-amide (DAPTA) and cultured astrocytes isolated from CCR5 knockout mice treated with LPS (1 μg/ml) and CCR2 antagonist, decreased the NF-ĸB activation and Aβ level. These findings suggest that the deficiency of CCR5 enhances response of LPS, which accelerates to neuro-inflammation and memory impairment. PMID:26910914

  5. Febuxostat protects rats against lipopolysaccharide-induced lung inflammation in a dose-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Fahmi, Alaa N A; Shehatou, George S G; Shebl, Abdelhadi M; Salem, Hatem A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate possible protective effects of febuxostat, a highly potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor, against acute lung injury (ALI) induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rats. Male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into six groups, as follows: (i) vehicle control group; (ii) and (iii) febuxostat 10 and febuxostat 15 groups, drug-treated controls; (iv) LPS group, receiving an intraperitoneal injection of LPS (7.5 mg/kg); (v) and (vi) febuxostat 10-LPS and febuxostat 15-LPS groups, receiving oral treatment of febuxostat (10 and 15 mg/kg/day, respectively) for 7 days before LPS. After 18 h administration of LPS, blood was collected for C-reactive protein (CRP) measurement. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was examined for leukocyte infiltration, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, protein content, and total nitrate/nitrite. Lung weight gain was determined, and lung tissue homogenate was prepared and evaluated for oxidative stress. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was assessed in BALF and lung homogenate. Moreover, histological changes of lung tissues were evaluated. LPS elicited lung injury characterized by increased lung water content (by 1.2 fold), leukocyte infiltration (by 13 fold), inflammation and oxidative stress (indicated by increased malondialdehyde (MDA), by 3.4 fold), and reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity (by 34 %). Febuxostat dose-dependently decreased LPS-induced lung edema and elevations in BALF protein content, infiltration of leukocytes, and LDH activity. Moreover, the elevated levels of TNF-α in BALF and lung tissue of LPS-treated rats were attenuated by febuxostat pretreatment. Febuxostat also displayed a potent antioxidant activity by decreasing lung tissue levels of MDA and enhancing SOD activity. Histological analysis of lung tissue further demonstrated that febuxostat dose-dependently reversed LPS-induced histopathological changes. These findings demonstrate a significant dose-dependent protection by febuxostat against LPS-induced lung inflammation in rats. PMID:26713331

  6. Deletion of Monoglyceride Lipase in Astrocytes Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-induced Neuroinflammation*

    PubMed Central

    Grabner, Gernot F.; Eichmann, Thomas O.; Wagner, Bernhard; Gao, Yuanqing; Farzi, Aitak; Taschler, Ulrike; Radner, Franz P. W.; Schweiger, Martina; Lass, Achim; Holzer, Peter; Zinser, Erwin; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Yi, Chun-Xia; Zimmermann, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Monoglyceride lipase (MGL) is required for efficient hydrolysis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglyerol (2-AG) in the brain generating arachidonic acid (AA) and glycerol. This metabolic function makes MGL an interesting target for the treatment of neuroinflammation, since 2-AG exhibits anti-inflammatory properties and AA is a precursor for pro-inflammatory prostaglandins. Astrocytes are an important source of AA and 2-AG, and highly express MGL. In the present study, we dissected the distinct contribution of MGL in astrocytes on brain 2-AG and AA metabolism by generating a mouse model with genetic deletion of MGL specifically in astrocytes (MKOGFAP). MKOGFAP mice exhibit moderately increased 2-AG and reduced AA levels in brain. Minor accumulation of 2-AG in the brain of MKOGFAP mice does not cause cannabinoid receptor desensitization as previously observed in mice globally lacking MGL. Importantly, MKOGFAP mice exhibit reduced brain prostaglandin E2 and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels upon peripheral lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. These observations indicate that MGL-mediated degradation of 2-AG in astrocytes provides AA for prostaglandin synthesis promoting LPS-induced neuroinflammation. The beneficial effect of astrocyte-specific MGL-deficiency is not fully abrogated by the inverse cannabinoid receptor 1 agonist SR141716 (Rimonabant) suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effects are rather caused by reduced prostaglandin synthesis than by activation of cannabinoid receptors. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that MGL in astrocytes is an important regulator of 2-AG levels, AA availability, and neuroinflammation. PMID:26565024

  7. Interleukin-10 Protection against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Neuro-Inflammation and Neurotoxicity in Ventral Mesencephalic Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan; Chen, Xiao; Liu, Zhan; Peng, Yu-Ping; Qiu, Yi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, is expressed in the brain and can inhibit microglial activation. Herein, we utilized lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory Parkinson’s disease (PD) cell model to determine whether microglia and astrocytes are necessary targets for IL-10 neuroprotection. Primary ventral mesencephalic (VM) cultures with different composition of neurons, microglia and astrocytes were prepared. The cells were exposed to IL-10 (15, 50 or 150 ng/mL) 1 h prior to LPS (50 ng/mL) treatment. LPS induced dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic neuronal loss in VM cultures, VM neuron-enriched cultures, and neuron-microglia co-cultures, but not in neuron-astrocyte co-cultures. IL-10 reduced LPS-induced neuronal loss particularly in single VM neuron cultures. Pro-inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2) were upregulated in both neuron-microglia and neuron-astrocyte co-cultures by LPS. In contrast, neurotrophic factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, insulin-like growth factor-1 or glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor) were downregulated in neuron-microglia co-cultures, but upregulated in neuron-astrocyte co-cultures by LPS. IL-10 reduced both the increase in production of the pro-inflammatory mediators and the decrease in production of the neurotrophic factors induced by LPS. These results suggest that astrocytes can balance LPS neurotoxicity by releasing more neurotrophic factors and that IL-10 exerts neuroprotective property by an extensive action including direct on neurons and indirect via inhibiting microglial activation. PMID:26729090

  8. Lipopolysaccharide Induces Degradation of Connexin43 in Rat Astrocytes via the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Proteolytic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chih-Kai; Jeng, Chung-Jiuan; Wang, Hwai-Shi; Wang, Shu-Huei; Wu, Jiahn-Chun

    2013-01-01

    The astrocytic syncytium plays a critical role in maintaining the homeostasis of the brain through the regulation of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC). Changes to GJIC in response to inflammatory stimuli in astrocytes may have serious effects on the brain. We have previously shown that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reduces connexin43 (Cx43) expression and GJIC in cultured rat astrocytes via a toll-like receptor 4-mediated signaling pathway. In the present study, treatment of astrocytes with LPS resulted in a significant increase in levels of the phosphorylated forms of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) -1, -2, and -3 for up to 18 h. An increase in nuclear transcription factor NF-κB levels was also observed after 8 h of LPS treatment and was sustained for up to 18 h. The LPS-induced decrease in Cx43 protein levels and inhibition of GJIC were blocked by the SAPK/JNK inhibitor SP600125, but not by the NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082. Following blockade of de novo protein synthesis by cycloheximide, LPS accelerated Cx43 degradation. Moreover, the LPS-induced downregulation of Cx43 was blocked following inhibition of 26S proteasome activity using the reversible proteasome inhibitor MG132 or the irreversible proteasome inhibitor lactacystin. Immunoprecipitation analyses revealed an increased association of Cx43 with both ubiquitin and E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4 in astrocytes after LPS stimulation for 6 h and this effect was prevented by SP600125. Taken together, these results suggest that LPS stimulation leads to downregulation of Cx43 expression and GJIC in rat astrocytes by activation of SAPK/JNK and the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway. PMID:24236122

  9. Lipopolysaccharide induces catecholamine production in mesenteric adipose tissue of rats previously exposed to immobilization stress.

    PubMed

    Vargovic, P; Laukova, M; Ukropec, J; Manz, G; Kvetnansky, R

    2016-07-01

    Catecholamines (CAs) are mainly produced by sympathoadrenal system but their de novo production has been also observed in adipose tissue cells. The aim of this work was to investigate whether immune challenge induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modulates biosynthesis of CAs in mesenteric adipose tissue (MWAT), as well as whether previous exposure to immobilization (IMO) stress could modulate this process. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to single (2 h) or repeated (2 h/7 days) IMO and afterwards injected with LPS (i.p., 100 μg/kg body weight) and sacrificed 3 h later. LPS did not alter CA biosynthesis in MWAT in control rats. Single and repeated IMO elevated CAs and expression of CA biosynthetic enzymes in MWAT, including adipocyte and stromal/vascular fractions (SVF). Repeated IMO followed by LPS treatment led to the up-regulation of CA-biosynthetic enzymes expression, elevation of CAs in SVF but depletion of norepinephrine and epinephrine in adipocyte fraction. Prior IMO caused a marked LPS-induced macrophage infiltration in MWAT as evaluated by F4/80 expression. A positive correlation between expression of tyrosine hydroxylase and F4/80 suggests macrophages as the main source of LPS-induced CA production in MWAT. Furthermore, prior exposure to the single or repeated IMO differently affected immune responses following LPS treatment by modulation of inflammatory cytokine expression. These data suggest that stress might be a significant modulator of immune response in MWAT via stimulation of the macrophage infiltration associated with cytokine response and de novo production of CAs. PMID:27314578

  10. Milk Thistle Extract and Silymarin Inhibit Lipopolysaccharide Induced Lamellar Separation of Hoof Explants in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Reisinger, Nicole; Schaumberger, Simone; Nagl, Veronika; Hessenberger, Sabine; Schatzmayr, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of laminitis is not completely identified and the role of endotoxins (lipopolysaccharides, LPS) in this process remains unclear. Phytogenic substances, like milk thistle (MT) and silymarin, are known for their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and might therefore have the potential to counteract endotoxin induced effects on the hoof lamellar tissue. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of endotoxins on lamellar tissue integrity and to test if MT and silymarin are capable of inhibiting LPS-induced effects in an in vitro/ex vivo model. In preliminary tests, LPS neutralization efficiency of these phytogenics was determined in an in vitro neutralization assay. Furthermore, tissue explants gained from hooves of slaughter horses were tested for lamellar separation after incubation with different concentrations of LPS. By combined incubation of explants with LPS and either Polymyxin B (PMB; positive control), MT or silymarin, the influence of these substances on LPS-induced effects was assessed. In the in vitro neutralization assay, MT and silymarin reduced LPS concentrations by 64% and 75%, respectively, in comparison PMB reduced 98% of the LPS concentration. In hoof explants, LPS led to a concentration dependent separation. Accordantly, separation force was significantly decreased by 10 µg/mL LPS. PMB, MT and silymarin could significantly improve tissue integrity of explants incubated with 10 µg/mL LPS. This study showed that LPS had a negative influence on the structure of hoof explants in vitro. MT and silymarin reduced endotoxin activity and inhibited LPS-induced effects on the lamellar tissue. Hence, MT and silymarin might be used to support the prevention of laminitis and should be further evaluated for this application. PMID:25290524

  11. Milk thistle extract and silymarin inhibit lipopolysaccharide induced lamellar separation of hoof explants in vitro.

    PubMed

    Reisinger, Nicole; Schaumberger, Simone; Nagl, Veronika; Hessenberger, Sabine; Schatzmayr, Gerd

    2014-10-01

    The pathogenesis of laminitis is not completely identified and the role of endotoxins (lipopolysaccharides, LPS) in this process remains unclear. Phytogenic substances, like milk thistle (MT) and silymarin, are known for their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and might therefore have the potential to counteract endotoxin induced effects on the hoof lamellar tissue. The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of endotoxins on lamellar tissue integrity and to test if MT and silymarin are capable of inhibiting LPS-induced effects in an in vitro/ex vivo model. In preliminary tests, LPS neutralization efficiency of these phytogenics was determined in an in vitro neutralization assay. Furthermore, tissue explants gained from hooves of slaughter horses were tested for lamellar separation after incubation with different concentrations of LPS. By combined incubation of explants with LPS and either Polymyxin B (PMB; positive control), MT or silymarin, the influence of these substances on LPS-induced effects was assessed. In the in vitro neutralization assay, MT and silymarin reduced LPS concentrations by 64% and 75%, respectively, in comparison PMB reduced 98% of the LPS concentration. In hoof explants, LPS led to a concentration dependent separation. Accordantly, separation force was significantly decreased by 10 µg/mL LPS. PMB, MT and silymarin could significantly improve tissue integrity of explants incubated with 10 µg/mL LPS. This study showed that LPS had a negative influence on the structure of hoof explants in vitro. MT and silymarin reduced endotoxin activity and inhibited LPS-induced effects on the lamellar tissue. Hence, MT and silymarin might be used to support the prevention of laminitis and should be further evaluated for this application. PMID:25290524

  12. Effect of Lianshu preparation on lipopolysaccharide-induced diarrhea in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Wan, Rong; Xu, Xuan-Fu; Wang, Xing-Peng; Yang, Wen-Juan; Xia, Yu-Jing; Liu, Hua; Yan, Qian-Lin; Yan, De-Xin; Guo, Chuan-Yong

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Lianshu preparation on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced diarrhea in rats. METHODS: A diarrhea model was established in Sprague Dawley rats via injection of 1 mL of 30 mg/kg LPS. A total of 40 rats were randomly divided into normal group, LPS group, LPS + Lianshu group, LPS + berberine group (n = 10 in each group). Their intestinal mucosal barrier and frequency of diarrhea were observed. Levels of glucose, serum Na+, K+, Cl- and hematocrit, plasma nitrogen monoxide (NO), diamine oxidase (DAO), and D (-)-lactate were measured. The number of IgA+ plasma cells in small intestine was detected and SIgA levels in the intestinal fluid were measured. The antipyretic activity of Lianshu preparation in rats was evaluated using Brewer’s yeast-induced pyrexia (10 mL/kg of 20% aqueous suspension). Acetaminophen (250 mg/kg, intragastric administration, bid) was used as a standard drug for comparison. Temperature was recorded 1 h before and 6 h after Brewer’s yeast injection. Finally, small intestinal transmission in mice treated with Lianshu was detected after intraperitoneal injection of methyl prostigmin (2 mg/kg). Atropine (10 g/kg) was used as a control. The ink content in intestine was determined and the total length of intestine was measured. RESULTS: The frequency of diarrhea was higher in LPS group than in LPS + Lianshu group and LPS + berberine group (36.70 ± 5.23 vs 28.50 ± 4.06 and 32.70 ± 9.30 respectively, P < 0.01), and lower in LPS + Lianshu group than in LPS + berberine group (P = 0.03). The levels of Na+, glucose, Cl-, K+ were significantly lower in LPS + Lianshu group than in LPS + berberine group (140.35 ± 3.19 mmol/L vs 131.99 ± 4.86 mmol/L, 8.49 ± 1.84 mmol/L vs 6.54 ± 2.30 mmol/L, 106.29 ± 4.41 mmol/L vs 102.5 ± 1.39 mmol/L, 5.08 ± 0.66 mmol/L vs 4.32 ± 0.62 mmol/L respectively, P < 0.05). The level of hematocrit was lower in LPS + Lianshu group than in LPS + berberine group (0.50% ± 0.07% vs 0.59% ± 0.10% respectively, P < 0.05). The plasma levels of NO, DAO and D (-)-lactate were higher in LPS group than in normal group (79.74 ± 7.39 μmol/L vs 24.94 ± 3.38 μmol/L, 2.48 ± 0.42 μ/mL vs 0.82 ± 0.33 μ/mL, 5.63 ± 0.85 μg/mL vs 2.01 ± 0.32 μg/mL respectively, P < 0.01), and lower in LPS + Lianshu group than in LPS + berberine group (48.59 ± 4.70 μmol/L vs 51.56 ± 8.38 μmol/L, 1.43 ± 0.53 μmol/mL vs 1.81 ± 0.42 μmol/mL, 4.00 ± 0.54 μg/mL vs 4.88 ± 0.77 μg/mL respectively, P < 0.05). The morphology of the intestinal mucosa showed destroyed villi in LPS group and atrophied intestinal mucosa in other groups. The pathological intestinal mucosal changes were less in LPS + Lianshu group than in LPS group. The number of IgA+ plasma cells and amount of SIgA were higher in LPS + Lianshu group than in LPS group (1.16 ± 0.19/μm2 vs 1.09 ± 0.28/μm2, P = 0.026; 0.59 ± 0.12 mg/L vs 0.15 ± 0.19 mg/L respectively, P = 0.000). Lianshu had counteractive effects on yeast-induced pyrexia and enterokinesia in rats. CONCLUSION: Lianshu preparation has therapeutic effects on LPS-induced diarrhea and enterokinesia in rats. PMID:19399935

  13. Role of proinflammatory cytokines on lipopolysaccharide-induced phase shifts in locomotor activity circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Leone, M Juliana; Marpegan, Luciano; Duhart, José M; Golombek, Diego A

    2012-07-01

    We previously reported that early night peripheral bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection produces phase delays in the circadian rhythm of locomotor activity in mice. We now assess the effects of proinflammatory cytokines on circadian physiology, including their role in LPS-induced phase shifts. First, we investigated whether differential systemic induction of classic proinflammatory cytokines could explain the time-specific behavioral effects of peripheral LPS. Induction levels for plasma interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α did not differ between animals receiving a LPS challenge in the early day or early night. We next tested the in vivo effects of central proinflammatory cytokines on circadian physiology. We found that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) delivery of TNF-α or interleukin IL-1β induced phase delays on wheel-running activity rhythms. Furthermore, we analyzed if these cytokines mediate the LPS-induced phase shifts and found that i.c.v. administration of soluble TNF-α receptor (but not an IL-1β antagonistic) prior to LPS stimulation inhibited the phase delays. Our work suggests that the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) responds to central proinflammatory cytokines in vivo, producing phase shifts in locomotor activity rhythms. Moreover, we show that the LPS-induced phase delays are mediated through the action of TNF-α at the central level, and that systemic induction of proinflammatory cytokines might be necessary, but not sufficient, for this behavioral outcome. PMID:22734572

  14. Guggulsterone Attenuated Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammatory Responses in Mouse Inner Medullary Collecting Duct-3 Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Goo; Bae, Gi-Sang; Jo, Il-Joo; Choi, Sun-Bok; Kim, Myoung-Jin; Jeong, Jun-Hyeok; Kang, Dae-Gil; Lee, Ho-Sub; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2016-02-01

    Guggulsterone (GS) is a phytosterol that has been used to treat inflammatory diseases such as colitis, obesity, and thrombosis. Although many previous studies have examined activities of GS, the effect of GS on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in mouse inner medullary collecting duct-3 (mIMCD-3) cells have not been examined. Therefore, here, we investigated the anti-inflammatory action of GS on mIMCD-3 cells exposed to LPS. LPS treatment on mIMCD-3 cells produced pro-inflammatory molecules such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) significantly; however, GS treatment significantly inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory molecules. In addition, GS inhibited the degradation of Iκ-Bα and translocation of NF-κB on mIMCD-3 cells. These results suggest that GS could inhibit inflammatory responses in collecting duct cells which could contribute to kidney injury during systemic infection. PMID:26260258

  15. Hyperketonemia during lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis affects systemic and local intramammary metabolism in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Zarrin, M; Wellnitz, O; van Dorland, H A; Gross, J J; Bruckmaier, R M

    2014-01-01

    Hyperketonemia interferes with the metabolic regulation in dairy cows. It is assumed that metabolic and endocrine changes during hyperketonemia also affect metabolic adaptations during inflammatory processes. We therefore studied systemic and local intramammary effects of elevated plasma β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) before and during the response to an intramammary lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Thirteen dairy cows received intravenously either a Na-DL-β-OH-butyrate infusion (n = 5) to achieve a constant plasma BHBA concentration (1.7 ± 0.1 mmol/L), with adjustments of the infusion rates made based on immediate measurements of plasma BHBA every 15 min, or an infusion with a 0.9% NaCl solution (control; n = 8) for 56 h. Infusions started at 0900 h on d 1 and continued until 1700 h 2 d later. Two udder quarters were challenged with 200 μg of Escherichia coli LPS and 2 udder quarters were treated with 0.9% saline solution as control quarters at 48 h after the start of infusion. Blood samples were taken at 1 wk and 2h before the start of infusions as reference samples and hourly during the infusion. Mammary gland biopsies were taken 1 wk before, and 48 and 56 h (8h after LPS challenge) after the start of infusions. The mRNA abundance of key factors related to BHBA and fatty acid metabolism, and glucose transporters was determined in mammary tissue biopsies. Blood samples were analyzed for plasma glucose, BHBA, nonesterified fatty acid, urea, insulin, glucagon, and cortisol concentrations. Differences were not different for effects of BHBA infusion on the mRNA abundance of any of the measured target genes in the mammary gland before LPS challenge. Intramammary LPS challenge increased plasma glucose, cortisol, glucagon, and insulin concentrations in both groups but increases in plasma glucose and glucagon concentration were less pronounced in the Na-DL-β-OH-butyrate infusion group than in controls. In response to LPS challenge, plasma BHBA concentration decreased in controls and decreased also slightly in the BHBA-infused animals because the BHBA concentration could not be fully maintained despite a rapid increase in BHBA infusion rate. The change in mRNA abundance of citrate synthase in LPS quarters was significant between the 2 treatment groups. The results indicate that elevated circulating BHBA concentration inhibits gluconeogenesis before and during immune response to LPS challenge, likely because BHBA can replace glucose as an energy source. PMID:24679930

  16. Activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 ameliorates systemic lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Seong Ho; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Song, Byoung-Joon

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Activation of PPARα attenuated LPS-mediated acute lung injury. •Pretreatment with Wy-14643 decreased the levels of IFN-γ and IL-6 in ALI. •Nitrosative stress and lipid peroxidation were downregulated by PPARα activation. •PPARα agonists may be potential therapeutic targets for acute lung injury. -- Abstract: Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. The activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) by its ligands, which include Wy-14643, has been implicated as a potential anti-inflammatory therapy. To address the beneficial efficacy of Wy-14643 for ALI along with systemic inflammation, the in vivo role of PPARα activation was investigated in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Using age-matched Ppara-null and wild-type mice, we demonstrate that the activation of PPARα by Wy-14643 attenuated LPS-mediated ALI. This was evidenced histologically by the significant alleviation of inflammatory manifestations and apoptosis observed in the lung tissues of wild-type mice, but not in the corresponding Ppara-null mice. This protective effect probably resulted from the inhibition of LPS-induced increases in pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitroxidative stress levels. These results suggest that the pharmacological activation of PPARα might have a therapeutic effect on LPS-induced ALI.

  17. Attenuation of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Lung Vascular Stiffening by Lipoxin Reduces Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanyong; Mambetsariev, Isa; Tian, Yufeng; Beckham, Yvonne; Meliton, Angelo; Leff, Alan; Gardel, Margaret L.; Allen, Michael J.; Birukov, Konstantin G.

    2015-01-01

    Reversible changes in lung microstructure accompany lung inflammation, although alterations in tissue micromechanics and their impact on inflammation remain unknown. This study investigated changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and tissue stiffness in a model of LPS-induced inflammation and examined the role of lipoxin analog 15-epi-lipoxin A4 (eLXA4) in the reduction of stiffness-dependent exacerbation of the inflammatory process. Atomic force microscopy measurements of live lung slices were used to directly measure local tissue stiffness changes induced by intratracheal injection of LPS. Effects of LPS on ECM properties and inflammatory response were evaluated in an animal model of LPS-induced lung injury, live lung tissue slices, and pulmonary endothelial cell (EC) culture. In vivo, LPS increased perivascular stiffness in lung slices monitored by atomic force microscopy and stimulated expression of ECM proteins fibronectin, collagen I, and ECM crosslinker enzyme, lysyl oxidase. Increased stiffness and ECM remodeling escalated LPS-induced VCAM1 and ICAM1 expression and IL-8 production by lung ECs. Stiffness-dependent exacerbation of inflammatory signaling was confirmed in pulmonary ECs grown on substrates with high and low stiffness. eLXA4 inhibited LPS-increased stiffness in lung cross sections, attenuated stiffness-dependent enhancement of EC inflammatory activation, and restored lung compliance in vivo. This study shows that increased local vascular stiffness exacerbates lung inflammation. Attenuation of local stiffening of lung vasculature represents a novel mechanism of lipoxin antiinflammatory action. PMID:24992633

  18. Impact of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation on the Disposition of the Aminocephalosporin Cefadroxil

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Yeamin; Keep, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the disposition of cefadroxil, an α-amino-containing β-lactam antibiotic, changes during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute inflammation. Six hours after LPS or saline treatment, mice received 1 nmol/g cefadroxil intravenously along with inulin for glomerular filtration rate (GFR) determination. Serial blood samples, along with tissue and urine samples, were collected at predetermined time points. In order to determine inflammation-induced changes in GFR, renal tubular secretion, and reabsorption, it was necessary to coadminister 70 mg/kg probenecid. Changes in the expression of the mRNA of transporters involved in cefadroxil disposition in the kidneys and choroid plexus were also investigated 6 h after LPS treatment. The results demonstrated marked increases in blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and tissue cefadroxil concentrations with LPS treatment. Tissue-to-blood concentration ratios were decreased by 4.6-fold in the choroid plexus and by 2.5-fold in the kidneys during LPS-induced inflammation. Renal, but not choroid plexus, mRNA expression of peptide transporter 2, organic-anion transporter 1 (OAT1), OAT3, and multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 was mildly reduced in LPS-treated mice. The renal clearance of cefadroxil was substantially decreased by LPS treatment (3-fold). GFR was also reduced by 3-fold in LPS-treated mice, but no significant differences in the fractional reabsorption of cefadroxil and renal secretion once normalized by GFR were observed. These findings demonstrated that LPS-induced inflammation has a dramatic effect on the renal excretion of cefadroxil. It appears that changes in transporter expression played a minor role during LPS treatment but that renal dysfunction, associated with GFR reduction, was responsible for the substantial increase in plasma cefadroxil concentration-time profiles. PMID:24080658

  19. Genipin protects lipopolysaccharide-induced apoptotic liver damage in D-galactosamine-sensitized mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok-Joo; Kim, Joon-Ki; Lee, Dong-Ung; Kwak, Jong-Hwan; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2010-06-10

    This study examined the effects of genipin, isolated from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, on d-galactosamine (GalN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced hepatic apoptosis and liver failure. Mice were given an intraperitoneal injection of genipin (25, 50, 100 and 200mg/kg) 1h before GalN (700mg/kg)/LPS (10microg/kg) administration. The survival rate of the genipin group was significantly higher than that of the control. Genipin markedly reduced the increases in serum aminotransferase activities and lipid peroxidation. The glutathione content decreased in GalN/LPS group, and this decrease was attenuated by genipin. Increases in serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), which were observed in GalN/LPS-treated mice, were significantly reduced by genipin. Genipin attenuated the GalN/LPS-induced apoptosis of hepatocytes, as estimated by the caspase-3 and -8 activity assay, TNF-R1 associated death domain (TRADD) protein measurement and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) method. Moreover, increased cytosolic cytochrome c protein was reduced by genipin. After 3h of GalN/LPS injection, nuclear phosphorylated c-Jun (p-c-Jun) level was significantly increased, whereas it was attenuated by genipin. Also, the increased nuclear level of nuclear factor-kappaB and the decreased cytosolic level of IkappaB-alpha protein were significantly attenuated by genipin. Our results suggest that genipin offers marked hepatoprotection against damage induced by GalN/LPS related with its antioxidative, anti-apoptotic activities, and inhibition of NF-kappaB nuclear translocation and nuclear p-c-Jun expression. PMID:20303938

  20. Galantamine protects against lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Zhou, C L; Zhou, Q S; Zou, H D

    2016-02-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia triggers the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and can cause acute lung injury (ALI). The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein plays an important role as a late mediator of sepsis and ALI. Galantamine (GAL) is a central acetylcholinesterase inhibitor that inhibits the expression of HMGB1. This study evaluated the effects of GAL by measuring levels of inflammatory mediators and observing histopathological features associated with LPS-induced ALI. Sixty 8-10 week old male Sprague-Dawley rats (200-240 g) were randomized into three groups as follows: control group, LPS group (7.5 mg/kg LPS), and LPS+GAL group (5 mg/kg GAL before LPS administration). Histopathological examination of lung specimens obtained 12 h after LPS administration was performed to analyze changes in wet-to-dry (W/D) weight ratio, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and HMGB1 expression level. Additionally, plasma concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and HMGB1 were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at 0 (baseline), 3, 6, 9, and 12 h after LPS administration. Mortality in the three groups was recorded at 72 h. LPS-induced ALI was characterized by distortion of pulmonary architecture and elevation of MPO activity, W/D weight ratio, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and HMGB1. Pretreatment with GAL significantly reduced the LPS-induced lung pathological changes, W/D weight ratio, levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and MPO activity (ANOVA). Moreover, GAL treatment significantly decreased the mortality rate (ANOVA). In conclusion, we demonstrated that GAL exerted a protective effect on LPS-induced ALI in rats. PMID:26648090

  1. Cerium oxide nanoparticles inhibit lipopolysaccharide induced MAP kinase/NF-kB mediated severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Vellaisamy; Nepal, Niraj; Rogers, Steven; Manne, Nandini D P K; Arvapalli, Ravikumar; Rice, Kevin M; Asano, Shinichi; Fankenhanel, Erin; Ma, J Y; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Maheshwari, Mani; Blough, Eric R

    2015-09-01

    The life threatening disease of sepsis is associated with high mortality. Septic patient survivability with currently available treatments has failed to improve. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced sepsis mortality and associated hepatic dysfunction can be prevented by cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2NPs) treatment in male Sprague Dawley rats. Here we provide the information about the methods processing of raw data related to our study published in Biomaterials (Selvaraj et al., Biomaterials, 2015, In press) and Data in Brief (Selvaraj et al., Data in Brief, 2015, In Press). The data present here provides confirmation of cerium oxide nanoparticle treatments ability to prevent the LPS induced sepsis associated changes in physiological, blood cell count, inflammatory protein and growth factors in vivo. In vitro assays investigation the treated of macrophages cells with different concentrations of cerium oxide nanoparticle demonstrate that concentration of cerium oxide nanoparticles below 1 µg/ml did not significantly influence cell survival as determined by the MTT assay. PMID:26217772

  2. Time-dependent changes of autophagy and apoptosis in lipopolysaccharide-induced rat acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li; Zhang, Lijun; Yu, Liangzhu; Han, Lu; Ji, Wanli; Shen, Hui; Hu, Zhenwu

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Abnormal lung cell death including autophagy and apoptosis is the central feature in acute lung injury (ALI). To identify the cellular mechanisms and the chronology by which different types of lung cell death are activated during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI, we decided to evaluate autophagy (by LC3-II and autophagosome) and apoptosis (by caspase-3) at different time points after LPS treatment in a rat model of LPS-induced ALI. Materials and Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups: control group and LPS group. ALI was induced by LPS intraperitoneal injection (3 mg/kg). The lung tissues were collected to measure lung injury score by histopathological evaluation, the protein expression of LC3-II and caspase-3 by Western blot, and microstructural changes by electron microscopy analysis. Results: During ALI, lung cell death exhibited modifications in the death process at different stages of ALI. At early stages (1 hr and 2 hr) of ALI, the mode of lung cell death started with autophagy in LPS group and reached a peak at 2 hr. As ALI process progressed, apoptosis was gradually increased in the lung tissues and reached its maximal level at later stages (6 hr), while autophagy was time-dependently decreased. Conclusion: These findings suggest that activated autophagy and apoptosis might play distinct roles at different stages of LPS-induced ALI. This information may enhance the understanding of lung pathophysiology at the cellular level during ALI and pulmonary infection, and thus help optimize the timing of innovating therapeutic approaches in future experiments with this model. PMID:27482344

  3. Escin inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shutai; Wang, Huaizhou; Qiu, Caiqing; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Taowen; Zhou, Wenjuan; Lu, Zhishan; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui; Liu, Zhonghao

    2012-11-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with gram-negative subgingival microflora infection. Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that escin exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-edematous effects. This study was designed to investigate the in vitro effects of escin on the inflammatory reaction of human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLs). hPDLs were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The cells were treated with various concentrations of escin. The viability of hPDLs was evaluated using the MTT method. The expression of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in hPDLs and the levels of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 in the supernatant were measured. Escin significantly attenuated LPS-induced cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner in hPDLs. Treatment with escin partly blocked the expression of TLR2. Escin also lowered the increase of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6) induced by LPS. The present findings show that escin exerts a protective effect against LPS-induced inflammation in hPDLs. It was also shown that escin is a promising medicine for the treatment of periodontitis. PMID:22895831

  4. Dietary L-arginine supplementation attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of dietary L-arginine (Arg) supplementation on inflammatory response and innate immunity of broilers. Experiment 1 was designed as a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement (n = 8 cages/treatment; 6 birds/cage) with 3 dietary Arg concentrations (1.05, 1.4...

  5. Dietary L-arginine supplementation modulates lipopolysaccharide-induced systemic inflammatory response in broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to evaluate whether dietary supplementation with L-arginine (Arg) could attenuate lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic inflammatory response through LPS/TLR-4 signaling pathway in broilers. The experiment was designed as a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement (n = 8 cages/treatm...

  6. Orally administered melatonin prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced neural tube defects in mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lin; Yu, Zhen; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Xia, Mi-Zhen; Wang, Hua; Zhang, Cheng; Tao, Fang-Biao; Xu, De-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been associated with adverse pregnant outcomes, including fetal demise, intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR), neural tube defects (NTDs) and preterm delivery in rodent animals. Previous studies demonstrated that melatonin protected against LPS-induced fetal demise, IUGR and preterm delivery. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of melatonin on LPS-induced NTDs. All pregnant mice except controls were intraperitoneally injected with LPS (25 µg/kg) daily from gestational day (GD)8 to GD12. Some pregnant mice were orally administered with melatonin (MT, 50 mg/kg) before each LPS injection. A five-day LPS injection resulted in 27.5% of fetuses with anencephaly, exencephaly or encephalomeningocele. Additional experiment showed that maternal LPS exposure significantly down-regulated placental proton-coupled folate transporter (pcft) and disturbed folate transport from maternal circulation through the placentas into the fetus. Interestingly, melatonin significantly attenuated LPS-induced down-regulation of placental pcft. Moreover, melatonin markedly improved the transport of folate from maternal circulation through the placentas into the fetus. Correspondingly, orally administered melatonin reduced the incidence of LPS-induced anencephaly, exencephaly or encephalomeningocele. Taken together, these results suggest that orally administered melatonin prevents LPS-induced NTDs through alleviating LPS-induced disturbance of folate transport from maternal circulation through the placenta into the fetus. PMID:25420102

  7. Valproic Acid and Other HDAC Inhibitors Induce Microglial Apoptosis and Attenuate Lipopolysaccharide- induced Dopaminergic Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po See; Wang, Chao-Chuan; Bortner, Carl D.; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Wu, Xuefei; Pang, Hao; Lu, Ru-Band; Gean, Po-Wu; Chuang, De-Maw; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2009-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA), a widely prescribed drug for seizures and bipolar disorder, has been shown to be an inhibitor of histone deacetylase (HDAC). Our previous study has demonstrated that VPA pretreatment reduces lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced dopaminergic (DA) neurotoxicity through the inhibition of microglia over-activation. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanism underlying VPA-induced attenuation of microglia over-activation. Other HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) were compared with VPA for their effects on microglial activity. We found that VPA induced apoptosis of microglia cells in a time and concentration-dependent manner. VPA-treated microglial cells showed typical apoptotic hallmarks including phosphatidylserine externalization, chromatin condensation and DNA fragmentation. Further studies revealed that trichostatin A (TSA) and sodium butyrate (SB), two structurally dissimilar HDACIs, also induced microglial apoptosis. The apoptosis of microglia was accompanied by the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and the enhancement of acetylation levels of the histone H3 protein. Moreover, pretreatment with SB or TSA caused a robust decrease in LPS-induced pro-inflammatory responses and protected DA neurons from damage in mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures. Taken together, our results shed light on a novel mechanism whereby HDACIs induce neuroprotection and underscore the potential utility of HDACIs in preventing inflammation-related neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease. PMID:17850978

  8. Saccharomyces boulardii inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of human dendritic cells and T cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, S; Przesdzing, I; Metzke, D; Schmitz, J; Radbruch, A; Baumgart, D C

    2009-01-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii (Sb) is a probiotic yeast preparation that has demonstrated efficacy in inflammatory and infectious disorders of the gastrointestinal tract in controlled clinical trials. Although patients clearly benefit from treatment with Sb, little is known on how Sb unfolds its anti-inflammatory properties in humans. Dendritic cells (DC) balance tolerance and immunity and are involved critically in the control of T cell activation. Thus, they are believed to have a pivotal role in the initiation and perpetuation of chronic inflammatory disorders, not only in the gut. We therefore decided to investigate if Sb modulates DC function. Culture of primary (native, non-monocyte-derived) human myeloid CD1c+CD11c+CD123– DC (mDC) in the presence of Sb culture supernatant (active component molecular weight < 3 kDa, as evaluated by membrane partition chromatography) reduced significantly expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD40 and CD80 (P < 0·01) and the DC mobilization marker CC-chemokine receptor CCR7 (CD197) (P < 0·001) induced by the prototypical microbial antigen lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Moreover, secretion of key proinflammatory cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL)-6 were notably reduced, while the secretion of anti-inflammatory IL-10 increased. Finally, Sb supernatant inhibited the proliferation of naive T cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction with mDC. In summary, our data suggest that Sb may exhibit part of its anti-inflammatory potential through modulation of DC phenotype, function and migration by inhibition of their immune response to bacterial microbial surrogate antigens such as LPS. PMID:19161443

  9. OPTICAL IMAGING OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY FROM HYPEROXIA AND SEPSIS

    PubMed Central

    SEPEHR, REYHANEH; AUDI, SAID H.; MALEKI, SEPIDEH; STANISZEWSKI, KEVIN; EIS, ANNIE L.; KONDURI, GIRIJA G.; RANJI, MAHSA

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many acute and chronic pulmonary disorders such as acute lung injury (ALI) in adults and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants. Bacterial infection and oxygen toxicity, which result in pulmonary vascular endothelial injury, contribute to impaired vascular growth and alveolar simplification seen in the lungs of premature infants with BPD. Hyperoxia induces ALI, reduces cell proliferation, causes DNA damage and promotes cell death by causing mitochondrial dysfunction. The objective of this study was to use an optical imaging technique to evaluate the variations in fluorescence intensities of the auto-fluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes, NADH and FAD in four different groups of rats. The ratio of these fluorescence signals (NADH/FAD), referred to as NADH redox ratio (NADH RR) has been used as an indicator of tissue metabolism in injuries. Here, we investigated whether the changes in metabolic state can be used as a marker of oxidative stress caused by hyperoxia and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in neonatal rat lungs. We examined the tissue redox states of lungs from four groups of rat pups: normoxic (21% O2) pups, hyperoxic (90% O2) pups, pups treated with LPS (normoxic + LPS), and pups treated with LPS and hyperoxia (hyperoxic + LPS). Our results show that hyperoxia oxidized the respiratory chain as reflected by a ~31% decrease in lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic lungs. LPS treatment alone or with hyperoxia had no significant effect on lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic or hyperoxic lungs, respectively. Thus, NADH RR serves as a quantitative marker of oxidative stress level in lung injury caused by two clinically important conditions: hyperoxia and LPS exposure. PMID:24672581

  10. OPTICAL IMAGING OF LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY FROM HYPEROXIA AND SEPSIS.

    PubMed

    Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Audi, Said H; Maleki, Sepideh; Staniszewski, Kevin; Eis, Annie L; Konduri, Girija G; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many acute and chronic pulmonary disorders such as acute lung injury (ALI) in adults and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants. Bacterial infection and oxygen toxicity, which result in pulmonary vascular endothelial injury, contribute to impaired vascular growth and alveolar simplification seen in the lungs of premature infants with BPD. Hyperoxia induces ALI, reduces cell proliferation, causes DNA damage and promotes cell death by causing mitochondrial dysfunction. The objective of this study was to use an optical imaging technique to evaluate the variations in fluorescence intensities of the auto-fluorescent mitochondrial metabolic coenzymes, NADH and FAD in four different groups of rats. The ratio of these fluorescence signals (NADH/FAD), referred to as NADH redox ratio (NADH RR) has been used as an indicator of tissue metabolism in injuries. Here, we investigated whether the changes in metabolic state can be used as a marker of oxidative stress caused by hyperoxia and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure in neonatal rat lungs. We examined the tissue redox states of lungs from four groups of rat pups: normoxic (21% O2) pups, hyperoxic (90% O2) pups, pups treated with LPS (normoxic + LPS), and pups treated with LPS and hyperoxia (hyperoxic + LPS). Our results show that hyperoxia oxidized the respiratory chain as reflected by a ~31% decrease in lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic lungs. LPS treatment alone or with hyperoxia had no significant effect on lung tissue NADH RR as compared to that for normoxic or hyperoxic lungs, respectively. Thus, NADH RR serves as a quantitative marker of oxidative stress level in lung injury caused by two clinically important conditions: hyperoxia and LPS exposure. PMID:24672581

  11. Activation of α2 adrenoceptor attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced hepatic injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing-Hui; Yu, Gao-Feng; Jin, Shang-Yi; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Lei, Dong-Xu; Zhou, Shao-Li; Song, Xing-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis induces hepatic injury but whether alpha-2 adrenoceptor (α2-AR) modulates the severity of sepsis-induced liver damage remains unclear. The present study used lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce hepatic injury and applied α2-AR agonist dexmedetomidine (DEX) and/or antagonist yohimbine to investigate the contribution of α2-AR in LPS-induced liver injury. Our results showed that LPS resulted in histological and functional abnormality of liver tissue (ALT and AST transaminases, lactate), higher mortality, an increase in proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 & TNF-α), as well as a change in oxidative stress (MDA, SOD). Activation of α2-AR by dexmedetomidine (DEX) attenuated LPS-induced deleterious effects on the liver and block of α2-AR by yohimbine aggravated LPS-induced liver damage. Our data suggest that α2-AR plays an important role in sepsis-induced liver damage and activation of α2-AR with DEX could be a novel therapeutic avenue to protect the liver against sepsis-induced injury. PMID:26617786

  12. Lipopolysaccharide induces multinuclear cell from RAW264.7 line with increased phagocytosis activity

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi-Matsui, Mayumi; Yano, Shio; Matsumoto, Naomi; Futai, Masamitsu

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPS induces multinuclear cells from murine macrophage-derived RAW264.7 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The multinuclear cells are formed through cell-cell fusion in the presence of Ca{sup 2+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The multinuclear cells do not express osteoclast-specific enzymes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They internalized more and larger beads than mononuclear cells and osteoclasts. -- Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an outer membrane component of Gram-negative bacteria, induces strong proinflammatory responses, including the release of cytokines and nitric oxide from macrophage. In this study, we found that a murine macrophage-derived line, RAW264.7, became multinuclear through cell-cell fusion after incubation with highly purified LPS or synthetic lipid A in the presence of Ca{sup 2+}. The same cell line is known to differentiate into multinuclear osteoclast, which expresses a specific proton pumping ATPase together with osteoclast markers on stimulation by the extracellular domain of receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand (Toyomura, T., Murata, Y., Yamamoto, A., Oka, T., Sun-Wada, G.-H., Wada, Y. and Futai, M., 2003). The LPS-induced multinuclear cells did not express osteoclast-specific enzymes including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and cathepsin K. During multinuclear cell formation, the cells internalized more and larger polystyrene beads (diameter 6-15 {mu}m) than mononuclear cells and osteoclasts. The internalized beads were located in lysosome-marker positive organelles, which were probably phagolysosomes. The LPS-induced multinuclear cell could be a good model system to study phagocytosis of large foreign bodies.

  13. Galantamine protects against lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, G.; Zhou, CL.; Zhou, QS.; Zou, HD.

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia triggers the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and can cause acute lung injury (ALI). The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein plays an important role as a late mediator of sepsis and ALI. Galantamine (GAL) is a central acetylcholinesterase inhibitor that inhibits the expression of HMGB1. This study evaluated the effects of GAL by measuring levels of inflammatory mediators and observing histopathological features associated with LPS-induced ALI. Sixty 8-10 week old male Sprague-Dawley rats (200-240 g) were randomized into three groups as follows: control group, LPS group (7.5 mg/kg LPS), and LPS+GAL group (5 mg/kg GAL before LPS administration). Histopathological examination of lung specimens obtained 12 h after LPS administration was performed to analyze changes in wet-to-dry (W/D) weight ratio, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and HMGB1 expression level. Additionally, plasma concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and HMGB1 were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at 0 (baseline), 3, 6, 9, and 12 h after LPS administration. Mortality in the three groups was recorded at 72 h. LPS-induced ALI was characterized by distortion of pulmonary architecture and elevation of MPO activity, W/D weight ratio, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and HMGB1. Pretreatment with GAL significantly reduced the LPS-induced lung pathological changes, W/D weight ratio, levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and MPO activity (ANOVA). Moreover, GAL treatment significantly decreased the mortality rate (ANOVA). In conclusion, we demonstrated that GAL exerted a protective effect on LPS-induced ALI in rats. PMID:26648090

  14. Lacritin Salvages Human Corneal Epithelial Cells from Lipopolysaccharide Induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Vantaku, Venkat Rao; Gupta, Geetika; Rapalli, Krishna Chaitanya; Karnati, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity of the corneal epithelium is conferred by proteinaceous secretions from the epithelium and associated lacrimal and meibomian glands. Lacritin, an eye-specific protein with anti-microbial, cytoprotective and wound-healing properties, predominantly secreted by lacrimal glands, is absent in conditions such as Dry eye and Keratitis. In view of the biological significance of lacritin in human eye, we investigated its role in human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced infection. LPS-challenged HCE cells demonstrated apoptosis-mediated cell death and elevated lacritin levels. The LPS-induced cell death is alleviated with exogenous supplementation of recombinant lacritin. This cytoprotective effect of lacritin is mediated through Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). This study is the first to highlight the protective role of lacritin and mechanism of its action during bacterial infection of cornea in vitro. PMID:26670139

  15. Protective effect of Salvia miltiorrhiza and Carthamus tinctorius extract against lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Li-Na; Yan, Kuo; Cui, Yuan-Lu; Fan, Guan-Wei; Wang, Yue-Fei

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the hepatoprotective effects and mechanisms of an extract of Salvia miltiorrhiza and Carthamus tinctorius in vivo. METHODS: C57BL/6J mice were randomly assigned to five groups and intraperitoneally administered 0.9% saline, Salvia miltiorrhiza and Carthamus tinctorius extract [Danhong injection (DHI), 0.75 and 3 g/kg mixed extract] or reduced glutathione for injection (RGI, 300 mg/kg) for 30 min before exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 16 mg/kg). After intraperitoneal LPS stimulation for 90 min or 6 h, the mice were sacrificed by ether anaesthesia, and serum and liver samples were collected. Histological analysis (H&E) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labelling (TUNEL) staining were performed. Alanine transferase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), total bilirubin (TBil), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), malondialdehyde (MDA), tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and caspase-3 levels were measured. Bax, Bcl-2, P-IκBα, IκBα, P-NF-κB p65, and NF-κB p65 protein levels were determined by Western blot. TNF-α, IL-6, caspase-3, Bax and Bcl-2 mRNA expression was measured by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: Hematoxylin-eosin staining and TUNEL results suggested that DHI (3 g/kg) treatment alleviated inflammatory and apoptotic (P < 0.01) injury in the liver of mice. DHI treatment dose-dependently blunted the abnormal changes in biochemical parameters such as ALT (72.53 ± 2.83 for 3 g/kg, P < 0.01), AST (76.97 ± 5.00 for 3 g/kg, P < 0.01), TBil (1.17 ± 0.10 for 3 g/kg, P < 0.01), MDA (0.81 ± 0.36 for 3 g/kg, P < 0.01), and GST (358.86 ± 12.09 for 3 g/kg, P < 0.01). Moreover, DHI (3 g/kg) remarkably decreased LPS-induced protein expression of TNF-α (340.55 ± 10.18 for 3 g/kg, P < 0.01), IL-6 (261.34 ± 10.18 for 3 g/kg, P < 0.01), and enzyme activity of caspase-3 (0.93 ± 0.029 for 3 g/kg, P < 0.01). The LPS-induced mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-6 and caspase-3 was also decreased by DHI. Western blot analysis revealed that DHI antagonised LPS-stimulated decrease of Bcl-2 and increase of Bax protein expression. Furthermore, DHI inhibited LPS-induced IκBα and NF-κB p65 phosphorylation. CONCLUSION: DHI may be a multi-function protectant against acute hepatic injury in mice through its anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic activities. PMID:26290634

  16. Lipopolysaccharide induces the expression of an autocrine prolactin loop enhancing inflammatory response in monocytes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prolactin from pituitary gland helps maintain homeostasis but it is also released in immune cells where its function is not completely understood. Pleiotropic functions of prolactin (PRL) might be mediated by different isoforms of its receptor (PRLr). Methods The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the eventual synthesis of PRL and PRLr isoforms with the inflammatory response in monocytes. We used THP-1 and monocytes isolated from healthy subjects stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Western blot, real time PCR and immunocytochemistry were performed to identify both molecules. The bioactivity of the PRL was assessed using a bioassay and ELISA to detect pro inflammatory cytokines. Results PRLr mRNA and PRL mRNA were synthesized in THP-1 monocytes activated with LPS with peaks of 300-fold and 130-fold, respectively. The long (100 kDa) and the intermediate (50 kDa) isoforms of PRLr and big PRL (60 kDa) were time-dependent upregulated for monocytes stimulated with LPS. This expression was confirmed in monocytes from healthy subjects. The PRLr intermediate isoform and the big PRL were found soluble in the culture media and later in the nucleus in THP-1 monocytes stimulated with LPS. Big PRL released by monocytes showed bioactivity in Nb2 Cells, and both PRL and PRLr, synthesized by monocytes were related with levels of nitrites and proinflammatory citokines. Conclusions Our results suggest the expression of a full-autocrine loop of PRL enhances the inflammatory response in activated monocytes. This response mediated by big PRL may contribute to the eradication of potential pathogens during innate immune response in monocytes but may also contribute to inflammatory disorders. PMID:23731754

  17. Oyster crude polysaccharides attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokines production and PPARγ expression in weanling piglets.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guangwen; Huang, Juhui; Ma, Maotao; Suo, Xun; Huang, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated whether oyster crude polysaccharides (OPS) attenuates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced immune stress in weanling piglets. Thirty healthy crossbred piglets (28 ± 1 days old) were randomly divided into five groups (6 piglets/group). Blank control and LPS groups were fed with the basal diet, while low, medium and high dose of OPS groups were fed with the basal diet supplemented with 0.5, 0.8 and 1.2 % OPS, respectively, for 30 days. LPS group, as well as low, medium and high dose of OPS groups were then injected intraperitoneally with LPS (100 μg/kg body weight), whereas the blank control group was given phosphate buffered saline. The concentrations of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in plasma were detected by ELISA. The mRNA levels of PPARγ in liver, spleen, adrenal gland and thymus were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. The results showed that compared with the blank control, LPS treatment significantly increased plasma IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α levels, which was significantly attenuated by supplementing 0.5, 0.8 or 1.2 % OPS in the diet. In addition, LPS significantly induced expression of PPARγ mRNA in liver, spleen, adrenal gland, and thymus, which was blocked by adding OPS regardless of the doses. These results indicate that dietary supplementation of OPS was able to alleviate the immune stress induced by LPS. PMID:27350914

  18. Piperine Ameliorates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury via Modulating NF-κB Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ying; Liu, Jingyao; Li, Hongyan; Gu, Lina

    2016-02-01

    Piperine, one of the active components of black pepper, has been reported to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the effects of piperine on lipolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) have not been reported. Thus, the protective effects of piperine against LPS-induced ALI were investigated in this study. LPS-induced lung injury was assessed by histological study, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and inflammatory cytokine production. Our results demonstrated that piperine attenuated LPS-induced MPO activity, lung edema, and inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β production. Histological studies showed that piperine obviously attenuated LPS-induced lung injury. In addition, piperine significantly inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB activation. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that piperine had a protective effect on LPS-induced ALI. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of piperine is through inhibition of NF-κB activation. Piperine may be a potential therapeutic agent for ALI. PMID:26410851

  19. The impact of IL-1 modulation on the development of lipopolysaccharide-induced cognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The impact of pro-inflammatory cytokines on neuroinflammation and cognitive function after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge remains elusive. Herein we provide evidence that there is a temporal correlation between high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB-1), microglial activation, and cognitive dysfunction. Disabling the interleukin (IL)-1 signaling pathway is sufficient to reduce inflammation and ameliorate the disability. Methods Endotoxemia was induced in wild-type and IL-1R-/- mice by intra peritoneal injection of E. Coli LPS (1 mg/kg). Markers of inflammation were assessed both peripherally and centrally, and correlated to behavioral outcome using trace fear conditioning. Results Increase in plasma tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) peaked at 30 minutes after LPS challenge. Up-regulation of IL-1β, IL-6 and HMGB-1 was more persistent, with detectable levels up to day three. A 15-fold increase in IL-6 and a 6.5-fold increase in IL-1β mRNA at 6 hours post intervention (P < 0.001 respectively) was found in the hippocampus. Reactive microgliosis was observed both at days one and three, and was associated with elevated HMGB-1 and impaired memory retention (P < 0.005). Preemptive administration of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) significantly reduced plasma cytokines and hippocampal microgliosis and ameliorated cognitive dysfunction without affecting HMGB-1 levels. Similar results were observed in LPS-challenged mice lacking the IL-1 receptor to those seen in LPS-challenged wild type mice treated with IL-1Ra. Conclusions These data suggest that by blocking IL-1 signaling, the inflammatory cascade to LPS is attenuated, thereby reducing microglial activation and preventing the behavioral abnormality. PMID:20470406

  20. Interleukin-10 inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced upregulation of tissue factor in canine peripheral blood monocytes.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Seigo; Stokol, Tracy

    2012-08-15

    The potentially fatal hemostatic disorder of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is initiated in bacterial sepsis by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced tissue factor (TF) expression on monocytes. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a potent inhibitory cytokine that downregulates monocyte inflammatory and procoagulant responses. We hypothesized that canine recombinant IL-10 (rIL-10) would inhibit LPS-induced TF upregulation on canine monocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), obtained by double-density gradient centrifugation, and monocytes, purified from PBMC by immunomagnetic bead separation with an anti-canine CD14 antibody (Ab), were stimulated in suspension with LPS (0.1-1000 ng/mL) for various times. Recombinant IL-10 (10-5000 pg/mL) was added with LPS or up to 2h later. Tissue factor procoagulant activity was measured by cleavage of a chromogenic substrate by activated Factor X generated by the TF-factor VII complex. We found that rIL-10, when given concurrently or 1h after LPS, strongly inhibited LPS-induced TF procoagulant activity in canine PBMC and monocytes. This inhibition was dose-dependent and blocked by an anti-canine IL-10 Ab. Our results indicate that rIL-10 effectively inhibits LPS-induced TF upregulation in canine monocytes and could potentially be useful in limiting the development of DIC in dogs with endotoxemia. PMID:22609246

  1. Nitric oxide modulates lipopolysaccharide-induced endothelial platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression via interleukin-10.

    PubMed

    Hebeda, C B; Teixeira, S A; Tamura, E K; Muscará, M N; de Mello, S B V; Markus, R P; Farsky, S H P

    2011-08-01

    We have shown previously that nitric oxide (NO) controls platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) expression on both neutrophils and endothelial cells under physiological conditions. Here, the molecular mechanism by which NO regulates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endothelial PECAM-1 expression and the role of interleukin (IL)-10 on this control was investigated. For this purpose, N-(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 20 mg/kg/day for 14 days dissolved in drinking water) was used to inhibit both constitutive (cNOS) and inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) synthase activities in LPS-stimulated Wistar rats (5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). This treatment resulted in reduced levels of serum NO. Under this condition, circulating levels of IL-10 was enhanced, secreted mainly by circulating lymphocytes, dependent on transcriptional activation, and endothelial PECAM-1 expression was reduced independently on reduced gene synthesis. The connection between NO, IL-10 and PECAM-1 expression was examined by incubating LPS-stimulated (1 µg/ml) cultured endothelial cells obtained from naive rats with supernatant of LPS-stimulated lymphocytes, which were obtained from blood of control or L-NAME-treated rats. Supernatant of LPS-stimulated lymphocytes obtained from L-NAME-treated rats, which contained higher levels of IL-10, reduced LPS-induced PECAM-1 expression by endothelial cells, and this reduction was reversed by adding the anti-IL-10 monoclonal antibody. Therefore, an association between NO, IL-10 and PECAM-1 was found and may represent a novel mechanism by which NO controls endothelial cell functions. PMID:21564091

  2. Dihydroartemisinin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone loss via the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway.

    PubMed

    Dou, C; Ding, N; Xing, J; Zhao, C; Kang, F; Hou, T; Quan, H; Chen, Y; Dai, Q; Luo, F; Xu, J; Dong, S

    2016-01-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) is a widely used antimalarial drug isolated from the plant Artemisia annua. Recent studies suggested that DHA has antitumor effects utilizing its reactive oxygen species (ROS) yielding mechanism. Here, we reported that DHA is inhibitory on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced osteoclast (OC) differentiation, fusion and bone-resorption activity in vitro. Intracellular ROS detection revealed that DHA could remarkably increase ROS accumulation during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, cell apoptosis was also increased by DHA treatment. We found that DHA-activated caspase-3 increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. Meanwhile, the translocation of apoptotic inducing factor (AIF) and the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol were observed, indicating that ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction is crucial in DHA-induced apoptosis during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. In vivo study showed that DHA treatment decreased OC number, prevents bone loss, rescues bone microarchitecture and restores bone strength in LPS-induced bone-loss mouse model. Together, our findings indicate that DHA is protective against LPS-induced bone loss through apoptosis induction of osteoclasts via ROS accumulation and the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway. Therefore, DHA may be considered as a new therapeutic candidate for treating inflammatory bone loss. PMID:27031959

  3. Dihydroartemisinin attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced osteoclastogenesis and bone loss via the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dou, C; Ding, N; Xing, J; Zhao, C; Kang, F; Hou, T; Quan, H; Chen, Y; Dai, Q; Luo, F; Xu, J; Dong, S

    2016-01-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) is a widely used antimalarial drug isolated from the plant Artemisia annua. Recent studies suggested that DHA has antitumor effects utilizing its reactive oxygen species (ROS) yielding mechanism. Here, we reported that DHA is inhibitory on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced osteoclast (OC) differentiation, fusion and bone-resorption activity in vitro. Intracellular ROS detection revealed that DHA could remarkably increase ROS accumulation during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. Moreover, cell apoptosis was also increased by DHA treatment. We found that DHA-activated caspase-3 increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. Meanwhile, the translocation of apoptotic inducing factor (AIF) and the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria into the cytosol were observed, indicating that ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction is crucial in DHA-induced apoptosis during LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis. In vivo study showed that DHA treatment decreased OC number, prevents bone loss, rescues bone microarchitecture and restores bone strength in LPS-induced bone-loss mouse model. Together, our findings indicate that DHA is protective against LPS-induced bone loss through apoptosis induction of osteoclasts via ROS accumulation and the mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway. Therefore, DHA may be considered as a new therapeutic candidate for treating inflammatory bone loss. PMID:27031959

  4. Deletion of Monoglyceride Lipase in Astrocytes Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-induced Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Grabner, Gernot F; Eichmann, Thomas O; Wagner, Bernhard; Gao, Yuanqing; Farzi, Aitak; Taschler, Ulrike; Radner, Franz P W; Schweiger, Martina; Lass, Achim; Holzer, Peter; Zinser, Erwin; Tschöp, Matthias H; Yi, Chun-Xia; Zimmermann, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Monoglyceride lipase (MGL) is required for efficient hydrolysis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglyerol (2-AG) in the brain generating arachidonic acid (AA) and glycerol. This metabolic function makes MGL an interesting target for the treatment of neuroinflammation, since 2-AG exhibits anti-inflammatory properties and AA is a precursor for pro-inflammatory prostaglandins. Astrocytes are an important source of AA and 2-AG, and highly express MGL. In the present study, we dissected the distinct contribution of MGL in astrocytes on brain 2-AG and AA metabolism by generating a mouse model with genetic deletion of MGL specifically in astrocytes (MKO(GFAP)). MKO(GFAP) mice exhibit moderately increased 2-AG and reduced AA levels in brain. Minor accumulation of 2-AG in the brain of MKO(GFAP) mice does not cause cannabinoid receptor desensitization as previously observed in mice globally lacking MGL. Importantly, MKO(GFAP) mice exhibit reduced brain prostaglandin E2 and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels upon peripheral lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. These observations indicate that MGL-mediated degradation of 2-AG in astrocytes provides AA for prostaglandin synthesis promoting LPS-induced neuroinflammation. The beneficial effect of astrocyte-specific MGL-deficiency is not fully abrogated by the inverse cannabinoid receptor 1 agonist SR141716 (Rimonabant) suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effects are rather caused by reduced prostaglandin synthesis than by activation of cannabinoid receptors. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that MGL in astrocytes is an important regulator of 2-AG levels, AA availability, and neuroinflammation. PMID:26565024

  5. Protective effect of Amaranthus spinosus against D-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide-induced hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Zeashan, Hussain; Amresh, G; Singh, Satyawan; Rao, Chandana Venkateswara

    2010-10-01

    The current study is an effort to identify the hepatoprotective activity of the 50% ethanol extract of the whole plant of Amaranthus spinosus Linn. (Amaranthaceae) against d-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide (d-GalN/LPS)-induced liver injury in rats. d-GalN/LPS (300 mg/kg body weight/30 µg/kg body weight)-induced hepatic damage was manifested by a significant (p <0.05) increase in the activities of marker enzymes (aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase and gamma glutamyl transferase) and bilirubin level in serum while phospholipids significantly decreased. All other parameters, i.e. cholesterol, triglycerides and free fatty acids were increased significantly in both serum and liver compared to the control group. Pretreatment of rats with A. spinosus extract (400 mg/kg) significantly (p <0.05) reversed these altered parameters to normal compared to the intoxicated group. The biochemical observations were supplemented by histopathological examination of liver sections. There were no significant changes in the activities of marker enzymes, bilirubin level and lipids in the rats treated with A. spinosus extract alone. Results of this study revealed that A. spinosus extract could afford a significant protection against d-GalN/LPS-induced hepatocellular injury. PMID:20860438

  6. Porphyromonas gingivalis Lipopolysaccharide Induced Proliferation and Activation of Natural Killer Cells in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuhua; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Li; Jin, Jun-O

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) lipopolysaccharide (LPS) promoted different innate immune activation than that promoted by Escherichia coli (E. coli) LPS. In this study, we examined the effect of P. gingivalis LPS on the proliferation and activation of natural killer (NK) cells in vivo and compared that function with that of E. coli LPS. Administration of P. gingivalis LPS to C57BL/6 mice induced stronger proliferation of NK cells in the spleen and submandibular lymph nodes (sLNs) and increased the number of circulating NK cells in blood compared to those treated with E. coli LPS. However, P. gingivalis LPS did not induce interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production and CD69 expression in the spleen and sLN NK cells in vivo, and this was attributed to the minimal activation of the spleen and sLN dendritic cells (DCs), including low levels of co-stimulatory molecule expression and pro-inflammatory cytokine production. Furthermore, P. gingivalis LPS-treated NK cells showed less cytotoxic activity against Yac-1 target cells than E. coli LPS-treated NK cells. Hence, these data demonstrated that P. gingivalis LPS promoted limited activation of spleen and sLN NK cells in vivo, and this may play a role in the chronic inflammatory state observed in periodontal disease. PMID:27548133

  7. Transient Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Resistance to Aerosolized Bacillus anthracis in New Zealand White Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Steven B; Dyer, David N; Twenhafel, Nancy A; Pitt, M Louise M

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that prior infection by various bacterial pathogens induces nonspecific resistance to subsequent infection by other gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial pathogens. In the present study, we evaluated whether underlying inflammation enhanced host resistance to inhalational Bacillus anthracis infection in New Zealand White rabbits (SPF; Bordetella- and Pasteurella-free). Accordingly, rabbits were pretreated with either the inflammagen bacterial LPS (60,000 EU/kg), a component of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria, or saline (vehicle). Administration of LPS resulted in brief pyrexia and a significant increase in the proinflammatory cytokine TNFα, thus confirming LPS-induced inflammation. At 24 h after LPS treatment, rabbits were exposed to aerosolized B. anthracis spores (Ames strain; approximately 300 LD50). Blood samples collected at various times after challenge were cultured. Compared with their saline-pretreated counterparts, LPS-pretreated, B. anthracis-challenged rabbits exhibited delays in 2 biomarkers of B. anthracis infection—anthrax-induced pyrexia (25 h versus 66 h after challenge, respectively) and bacteremia (26 h versus 63 h, respectively)—and survived longer (41 h versus 90 h, respectively). Similar to control animals, all LPS-pretreated, B. anthracis-challenged rabbits exhibited pathology consistent with inhalational anthrax. Taken together, these results suggest that prior or underlying stimulation of the innate immune system induces transient host resistance to subsequent B. anthracis infection in SPF New Zealand white rabbits. In particular, our results emphasize the importance of using animals that are free of underlying infections to prevent confounding data in studies for inhalational anthrax characterization and medical countermeasure evaluation. PMID:23759528

  8. Effects of a Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Inhibitor on Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu-Qing; Ma, Yong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Inflammation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of acute lung injury (ALI). Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is suggested as a vital pharmacologic target for inflammation. In this study, we determined whether a sEH inhibitor, AUDA, exerts lung protection in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI in mice. Methods Male BALB/c mice were randomized to receive AUDA or vehicle intraperitoneal injection 4 h after LPS or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) intratracheal instillation. Samples were harvested 24 h post LPS or PBS administration. Results AUDA administration decreased the pulmonary levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Improvement of oxygenation and lung edema were observed in AUDA treated group. AUDA significantly inhibited sEH activity, and elevated epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) levels in lung tissues. Moreover, LPS induced the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB was markedly dampened in AUDA treated group. Conclusion Administration of AUDA after the onset of LPS-induced ALI increased pulmonary levels of EETs, and ameliorated lung injury. sEH is a potential pharmacologic target for ALI. PMID:27490848

  9. Lacritin Salvages Human Corneal Epithelial Cells from Lipopolysaccharide Induced Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Vantaku, Venkat Rao; Gupta, Geetika; Rapalli, Krishna Chaitanya; Karnati, Roy

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity of the corneal epithelium is conferred by proteinaceous secretions from the epithelium and associated lacrimal and meibomian glands. Lacritin, an eye-specific protein with anti-microbial, cytoprotective and wound-healing properties, predominantly secreted by lacrimal glands, is absent in conditions such as Dry eye and Keratitis. In view of the biological significance of lacritin in human eye, we investigated its role in human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced infection. LPS-challenged HCE cells demonstrated apoptosis-mediated cell death and elevated lacritin levels. The LPS-induced cell death is alleviated with exogenous supplementation of recombinant lacritin. This cytoprotective effect of lacritin is mediated through Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). This study is the first to highlight the protective role of lacritin and mechanism of its action during bacterial infection of cornea in vitro. PMID:26670139

  10. Red cabbage anthocyanins as inhibitors of lipopolysaccharide-induced oxidative stress in blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Saluk, Joanna; Bijak, Michal; Posmyk, Malgorzata M; Zbikowska, Halina M

    2015-09-01

    LPS is a Gram-negative bacteria endotoxin, which is an important pro-inflammatory agent. Blood platelets take part both in inflammatory processes and in pathogenesis of septic shock following accumulation of LPS. As a platelet agonist LPS causes the intraplatelet overproduction of ROS/RNS that are responsible for adverse modifications in the structure of platelet compounds being associated with a development of platelet-dependent diseases. Existing evidence suggests that anthocyanins (ATH) are able to protect the circulatory system. The antioxidative properties of ATH are believed to be mainly responsible for their positive health effects. The main goal of the present in vitro study was to investigate the potential protective properties of red cabbage ATH against oxidative damage induced by LPS in blood platelets. Exposure of platelets to LPS resulted in carbonyl group increase, 3-nitrotyrosine formation, lipid peroxidation and O2(•-) generation. We have shown that ATH extract effectively decreased oxidative stress induced by LPSs. The in silico analysis demonstrated that both cyanin and LPS were located at the same region of human TLR4-MD-2 complex. Our findings suggest that there could be two-way ATH platelet protection mechanism, by their antioxidant properties and directly by binding with TLRs. PMID:26208857

  11. Psychotropic drugs attenuate lipopolysaccharide-induced hypothermia by altering hypothalamic levels of inflammatory mediators in rats.

    PubMed

    Nassar, Ahmad; Sharon-Granit, Yael; Azab, Abed N

    2016-07-28

    Recent evidence suggests that inflammation may contribute to the pathophysiology of mental disorders and that psychotropic drugs exert various effects on brain inflammation. The administration of bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) to mammals is associated with robust production of inflammatory mediators and pathological changes in body temperature. The objective of the present study was to examine the effects of four different psychotropic drugs on LPS-induced hypothermia and production of prostaglandin (PG) E2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and phosphorylated-p65 (P-p65) levels in hypothalamus of LPS-treated rats. Rats were treated once daily with lithium (100mg/kg), carbamazepine (40mg/kg), haloperidol (2mg/kg), imipramine (20mg/kg) or vehicle (NaCl 0.9%) for 29 days. On day 29, rats were injected with LPS (1mg/kg) or saline. At 1.5h post LPS injection body temperature was measured, rats were sacrificed, blood was collected and their hypothalami were excised, homogenized and centrifuged. PGE2, TNF-α and nuclear P-p65 levels were determined by specific ELISA kits. We found that lithium, carbamazepine, haloperidol and imipramine significantly attenuated LPS-induced hypothermia, resembling the effect of classic anti-inflammatory drugs. Moreover, lithium, carbamazepine, haloperidol and imipramine differently but significantly affected the levels of PGE2, TNF-α and P-p65 in plasma and hypothalamus of LPS-treated rats. The results suggest that psychotropic drugs attenuate LPS-induced hypothermia by reducing hypothalamic production of inflammatory constituents, particularly PGE2. The effects of psychotropic drugs on brain inflammation may contribute to their therapeutic mechanism but also to their toxicological profile. PMID:27181513

  12. Antioxidant properties of lutein contribute to the protection against lipopolysaccharide-induced uveitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lutein is an important eye-protective nutrient. This study investigates the protective effects and mechanisms of lutein on lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced uveitis in mice. Methods Lutein, suspended in drinking water at a final concentration of 12.5 and 25 mg/mL, was administered to mice at 0.1 mL/10 g body weight for five consecutive days. Control and model group received drinking water only. Uveitis was induced by injecting LPS (100 mg per mouse) into the footpad in the model and lutein groups on day 5 after the last drug administration. Eyes of the mice were collected 24 hours after the LPS injection for the detection of indicators using commercial kits and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results LPS-induced uveitis was confirmed by significant pathological damage and increased the nitric oxide level in eye tissue of BALB/C mice 24 hours after the footpad injection. The elevated nitric oxide level was significantly reduced by oral administration of lutein (125 and 500 mg/kg/d for five days) before LPS injection. Moreover, lutein decreased the malondialdehyde content, increased the oxygen radical absorbance capacity level, glutathione, the vitamin C contents and total superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. Lutein further increased expressions of copper-zinc SOD, manganese SOD and GPx mRNA. Conclusion The antioxidant properties of lutein contribute to the protection against LPS-induced uveitis, partially through the intervention of inflammation process. PMID:22040935

  13. Protective effect of catalpol on lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Fu, Kai; Piao, Taikui; Wang, Mingzhi; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Jiuyang; Wang, Xuefeng; Liu, Hongyu

    2014-12-01

    Catalpol, an iridiod glucoside isolated from Rehmannia glutinosa, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. Although anti-inflammatory activity of catalpol already reported, its involvement in lung protection has not been reported. Thus, we investigated the role of catalpol on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury in this study. Mice acute lung injury model was induced by intranasal instillation of LPS. Catalpol was administrated 1h prior to or after LPS exposure. The severity of pulmonary injury was evaluated 12h after LPS administration. The results showed that catalpol inhibited lung W/D ratio, myeloperoxidase activity of lung samples, the amounts of inflammatory cells and TNF-α, IL-6, IL-4 and IL-1β in BALF induced by LPS. The production of IL-10 in BALF was up-regulated by catalpol. In vitro, catalpol inhibited TNF-α, IL-6, IL-4 and IL-1β production and up-regulated IL-10 expression in LPS-stimulated alveolar macrophages. Moreover, western blot analysis showed that the activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways was inhibited by catalpol. Furthermore, catalpol was found to inhibit TLR4 expression induced by LPS. In conclusion, catalpol potently protected against LPS-induced ALI. The protective effect may attribute to the inhibition of TLR4-mediated NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:25063711

  14. Soyasaponin Ab inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jing; Cheng, Yanwen; Wang, Tao; Tang, Lihua; Sun, Yan; Lu, Xiuyun; Yu, Huimin

    2016-01-01

    Soyasaponin Ab (SA) has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effect. However, the effects of SA on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) have not been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of SA on LPS-induced ALI and clarify the possible mechanism. The mice were stimulated with LPS to induce ALI. SA was given 1h after LPS treatment. 12h later, lung tissues were collected to assess pathological changes and edema. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected to assess inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide (NO) production. In vitro, mice alveolar macrophages were used to investigate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of SA. Our results showed that SA attenuated LPS-induced lung pathological changes, edema, the expression of cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lung tissues, as well as TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, and NO production in mice. Meanwhile, SA up-regulated the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase decreased by LPS in mice. SA also inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β production as well as NF-κB activation in alveolar macrophages. Furthermore, SA could activate Liver X Receptor Alpha (LXRα) and knockdown of LXRα by RNAi abrogated the anti-inflammatory effects of SA. In conclusion, the current study demonstrated that SA exhibited protective effects against LPS-induced acute lung injury and the possible mechanism was involved in activating LXRα, thereby inhibiting LPS-induced inflammatory response. PMID:26672918

  15. Cyclooxygenase-1 is involved in the inhibition of hippocampal neurogenesis after lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Isabella; Amornphimoltham, Panomwat; Weigert, Roberto; Barlati, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that neuroinflammation can alter adult neurogenesis by mechanisms as yet unclear. We have previously demonstrated that the neuroinflammatory response and neuronal damage after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection is reduced in cyclooxygenase-1 deficient (COX-1-/-) mice. In this study, we investigated the role of CoX-1 on hippocampal neurogenesis during LPS-induced neuroinflammation, using COX-1-/- and wild-type (WT) mice. We found that LPS-induced neuroinflammation resulted in the decrease of proliferation, survival and differentiation of hippocampal progenitor cells in WT but not in COX-1-/- mice. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that COX-1 is involved in the inhibition of BrdU progenitor cells in proliferation and hippocampal neurogenesis after LPS. These results suggest that COX-1 may represent a viable therapeutic target to reduce neuroinflammation and promote neurogenesis in neurodegenerative diseases with a strong inflammatory component. PMID:21694498

  16. Hypertonic saline reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced mouse brain edema through inhibiting aquaporin 4 expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Three percent sodium chloride (NaCl) treatment has been shown to reduce brain edema and inhibited brain aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in bacterial meningitis induced by Escherichia coli. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main pathogenic component of E. coli. We aimed to explore the effect of 3% NaCl in mouse brain edema induced by LPS, as well as to elucidate the potential mechanisms of action. Methods Three percent NaCl was used to treat cerebral edema induced by LPS in mice in vivo. Brain water content, IL-1β, TNFα, immunoglobulin G (IgG), AQP4 mRNA and protein were measured in brain tissues. IL-1β, 3% NaCl and calphostin C (a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C) were used to treat the primary astrocytes in vitro. AQP4 mRNA and protein were measured in astrocytes. Differences in various groups were determined by one-way analysis of variance. Results Three percent NaCl attenuated the increase of brain water content, IL-1β, TNFα, IgG, AQP4 mRNA and protein in brain tissues induced by LPS. Three percent NaCl inhibited the increase of AQP4 mRNA and protein in astrocytes induced by IL-1β in vitro. Calphostin C blocked the decrease of AQP4 mRNA and protein in astrocytes induced by 3% NaCl in vitro. Conclusions Osmotherapy with 3% NaCl ameliorated LPS-induced cerebral edema in vivo. In addition to its osmotic force, 3% NaCl exerted anti-edema effects possibly through down-regulating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNFα) and inhibiting the expression of AQP4 induced by proinflammatory cytokines. Three percent NaCl attenuated the expression of AQP4 through activation of protein kinase C in astrocytes. PMID:23036239

  17. Withaferin A attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, S; Li, H; Zhou, X-Q; You, J-B; Tu, D-N; Xia, G; Jiang, J-X; Xin, C

    2015-01-01

    Withaferin A (WFA) is an active compound from Withania somnifera and has been reported to exhibit a variety of pharmacological activities such as anti—inflammatory, immunomodulatory and anti—tumor properties. In the present study, we investigated the potential protective role of WFA on acute lung injury in neonatal rats induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that WFA significantly attenuated the pathological changes of lungs induced by LPS injection. Administration with WFA obviously decreased pulmonary neutrophil infiltration accompanied with decreased MPO concentrations. WFA also reduced the expression of pro—inflammatory cytokines including MIP—2, TNF—α, IL—1β and IL—6. Meanwhile, the expression levels of anti—inflammatory mediators such as TGF—β1 and IL—10 were significantly increased following WFA administration. Moreover, WFA protected LPS—treated rats from oxidative damage via up—regulation of TBARS and H2O2 concentrations and down—regulation of ROS contents. Taken together, the present study demonstrated that WFA administration attenuated LPS—induced lung injury through inhibition of inflammatory responses and oxidative stress. PMID:26255139

  18. Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Differential Expression of miRNAs in Male and Female Rhipicephalus haemaphysaloides Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Houshuang; Zhou, Yongzhi; Cao, Jie; Zhou, Jinlin

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulates the innate immune response in arthropods. In tick vectors, LPS activates expression of immune genes, including those for antibacterial peptides. miRNAs are 21–24 nt non-coding small RNAs that regulate target mRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. However, our understanding of tick innate immunity is limited to a few cellular immune reactions and some characterized immune molecules. Moreover, there is little information on the regulation of the immune system in ticks by miRNA. Therefore, this study aimed to analyze the differential expression of miRNAs in male and female ticks after LPS injection. LPS was injected into male and female Rhipicephalus haemaphysaloides ticks to stimulate immune response, with phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-injected ticks as negative controls. miRNAs from each group were sequenced and analyzed. In the PBS- and LPS-injected female ticks, 11.46 and 12.82 million reads of 18–30 nt were obtained respectively. There were 13.92 and 15.29 million reads of 18–30 nt obtained in the PBS- and LPS-injected male ticks, respectively. Expression of miRNAs in male ticks was greater than that in female ticks. There were 955 and 984 conserved miRNA families in the PBS- and LPS-injected female ticks, respectively, and correspondingly 1684 and 1552 conserved miRNA families in male ticks. Nine novel miRNAs were detected as common miRNAs in two or more tested samples. There were 37 known miRNAs up-regulated >10-fold and 33 down-regulated >10-fold in LPS-injected female ticks; and correspondingly 52 and 59 miRNAs in male ticks. Differential expression of miRNAs in PBS- and LPS-injected samples supports their involvement in the regulation of innate immunity. These data provide an important resource for more detailed functional analysis of miRNAs in this species. PMID:26430879

  19. Cordyceps sinensis prevents apoptosis in mouse liver with D-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide-induced fulminant hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Jung; Cheng, Shiu-Min; Teng, Yi-Hsien; Shyu, Woei-Cherng; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Lee, Shin-Da

    2014-01-01

    Cordyceps sinensis (C. sinensis) has long been considered to be an herbal medicine and has been used in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases. The present study examined the cytoprotective properties of C. sinensis on D(+)-galactosamine (GalN)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fulminant hepatic failure. Mice were randomly assigned into control, GalN/LPS, CS 20 mg and CS 40 mg groups (C. sinensis, oral gavage, five days/week, four weeks). After receiving saline or C. sinensis, mice were intraperitoneally given GalN (800 mg/kg)/LPS (10 μg/kg). The effects of C. sinensis on TNF-α, IL-10, AST, NO, SOD, and apoptoticrelated proteins after the onset of endotoxin intoxication were determined. Data demonstrated that GalN/LPS increased hepatocyte degeneration, circulating AST, TNF-α, IL-10, and hepatic apoptosis and caspase activity. C. sinensis pre-treatment reduced AST, TNF-α, and NO and increased IL-10 and SOD in GalN/LPS induced fulminant hepatic failure. C. sinensis attenuated the apoptosis of hepatocytes, as evidenced by the TUNEL and capase-3, 6 activity analyses. In summary, C. sinensis alleviates GalN/LPS-induced liver injury by modulating the cytokine response and inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:24707872

  20. [Immune-regulating effect of phenibut under lipopolysaccharide-induced immune stress conditions].

    PubMed

    Samotrueva, M A; Tiurenkov, I N; Teplyĭ, D L; Kuleshevskaia, N R; Khlebtsova, E V

    2010-05-01

    The immunoregulating effect of phenibut has been demonstrated on the model of immune stress caused by the injection of lipopolysaccharide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The degree of expression of the specific (in a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction and passive hemagglutination) and nonspecific (phagocytic activity of neutrophils) links of immunomodulation was studied. The formation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced immune stress is characterized by the increase of the indicated parameters of immunity. It is found that phenibut (under intraabdominal injection of 25 mg/kg within 5 days) removes the manifestations of hyperreactivity of the cellular link of immunity, and also restores the amount of phagocytic cells, which is evidence of the immunomodulating properties of the drug under conditions of hyperimmunization. PMID:20597368

  1. Serotonin depletion does not alter lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of the rat paraventricular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Conde, G L; Renshaw, D; Lightman, S L; Harbuz, M S

    1998-02-01

    We have investigated the effects of serotonin depletion on immune-mediated activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) mRNA, c-fos mRNA and Fos peptide responses in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) together with circulating levels of corticosterone were assessed in response to i.p. injections of three doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) both in control animals and animals pretreated with p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA). Conscious animals received either an i.p. injection of 0.5 ml saline or 200 mg/kg PCPA in 0.5 ml saline on 2 consecutive days. This treatment resulted in a 93% depletion of serotonin on the fourth day. On day 4, animals received i.p. injections of LPS (2.5 mg/0.5 ml saline, 250 micrograms/0.5 ml or 50 micrograms/0.5 ml; E. coli 055:B5), or saline injections as controls. Pretreatment with PCPA had no effect on the basal levels of corticosterone, or on the elevated levels induced by the three doses, of LPS. Fos peptide and c-fos mRNA were undetectable in control animals, and Fos-like immunoreactivity increased in a dose-dependent manner following i.p. LPS in both control and PCPA-pretreated animals. C-fos mRNA expression induced by LPS was unaffected by serotonin depletion. Following the lowest dose of LPS, CRF mRNA did not change above control levels, however, the medium and high doses of LPS produced a significant (P < 0.05) increase in CRF mRNA levels in both depleted and intact animals. To confirm the temporal effects of serotonin depletion on activation of the HPA axis we collected plasma at 30 min, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 h after LPS in both intact and serotonin-depleted animals. No significant differences in plasma corticosterone levels were found at any of the time points between intact and depleted animals. It appears that, at least under these experimental conditions, serotonergic inputs do not seem to play a major role in mediating the effects of LPS on changes in mRNA levels in the PVN or on the subsequent activation of the HPA axis. PMID:9518869

  2. Rice hull smoke extract protects mice against a salmonella lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxemia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice hulls accounting for 20% of the rice crop are a byproduct of post-harvest rice processing. Endotoxemia (sepsis, septic shock) is an inflammatory, virulent often fatal disease that results mainly from infection with Salmonella and other Gram-negative bacteria. The present study investigated the...

  3. Subhepatotoxic exposure to arsenic enhances lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Arteel, Gavin E.; Guo, Luping; Schlierf, Thomas; Beier, Juliane I; Kaiser, J. Phillip; Chen, Theresa S; Liu, Marsha; Conklin, Daniel P.; Miller, Heather L.; von Montfort, Claudia; States, J. Christopher

    2008-01-01

    Exposure to arsenic via drinking water is a serious health concern in the US. Whereas studies have identified arsenic alone as an independent risk factor for liver disease, concentrations of arsenic required to damage this organ are generally higher than found in the US water supply. The purpose of the current study was to test the hypothesis that arsenic (at subhepatotoxic doses) may also sensitize the liver to a second hepatotoxin. To test this hypothesis, the effect of chronic exposure to arsenic on liver damage caused by acute lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was determined in mice. Male C57Bl/6J mice (4-6 weeks) were exposed to arsenic (49 ppm as sodium arsenite in drinking water). After 7 months of exposure, animals were injected with LPS (10 mg/kg i.p.) and sacrificed 24 h later. Arsenic alone caused no overt hepatotoxicity, as determined by plasma enzymes and histology. In contrast, arsenic exposure dramatically enhanced liver damage caused by LPS, increasing the number and size of necroinflammatory foci. This effect of arsenic was coupled with increases in indices of oxidative stress (4-HNE adducts, depletion of GSH and methionine pools). The number of apoptotic (TUNEL) hepatocytes was similar in the LPS and arsenic/LPS groups. In contrast, arsenic pre-exposure blunted the increase in proliferating (PCNA) hepatocytes caused by LPS; this change in the balance between cell death and proliferation was coupled with a robust loss of liver weight in the arsenic/LPS compared to the LPS alone group. The impairment of proliferation after LPS caused by arsenic was also coupled with alterations in the expression of key mediators of cell cycle progression (p27, p21, CDK6 and Cyclin D1). Taken together, these results suggest that arsenic, at doses that are not overtly hepatotoxic per se, significantly enhances LPS-induced liver injury. These results further suggest that arsenic levels in the drinking water may be a risk modifier for the development of chronic liver diseases. PMID:17919673

  4. Maternal molecular hydrogen administration on lipopolysaccharide-induced mouse fetal brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Tomoko; Kotani, Tomomi; Mano, Yukio; Tsuda, Hiroyuki; Imai, Kenji; Ushida, Takafumi; Li, Hua; Miki, Rika; Sumigama, Seiji; Sato, Yoshiaki; Iwase, Akira; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Asai, Masato; Toyokuni, Shinya; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2015-01-01

    Fetal brain injury is often related to prenatal inflammation; however, there is a lack of effective therapy. Recently, molecular hydrogen (H2), a specific antioxidant to hydroxyl radical and peroxynitrite, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to investigate whether maternal H2 administration could protect the fetal brain against inflammation. Pregnant C3H/HeN mice received an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on gestational day 15.5 and were provided with H2 water for 24 h prior to LPS injection. Pup brain samples were collected on gestational day 16.5, and the levels of apoptosis and oxidative damage were evaluated using immunohistochemistry. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels were examined using real-time PCR. The levels of apoptosis and oxidative damage, as well as the levels of IL-6 mRNA, increased significantly when the mother was injected with LPS than that in the control group. However, these levels were significantly reduced when H2 was administered prior to the LPS-injection. Our results suggest that LPS-induced apoptosis, oxidative damage and inflammation in the fetal brain were ameliorated by maternal H2 administration. Antenatal H2 administration might protect the premature brain against maternal inflammation. PMID:26566302

  5. Development of a rat model of D-galactosamine/lipopolysaccharide induced hepatorenal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing-Bo; Wang, Hai-Tao; Li, Lu-Ping; Yan, Ying-Chun; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jing-Yang; Zhao, Yi-Tong; Gao, Wei-Shu; Zhang, Ming-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To develop a practical and reproducible rat model of hepatorenal syndrome for further study of the pathophysiology of human hepatorenal syndrome. METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats were intravenously injected with D-galactosamine and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) via the tail vein to induce fulminant hepatic failure to develop a model of hepatorenal syndrome. Liver and kidney function tests and plasma cytokine levels were measured after D-galactosamine/LPS administration, and hepatic and renal pathology was studied. Glomerular filtration rate was detected in conscious rats using micro-osmotic pump technology with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled inulin as a surrogate marker. RESULTS: Serum levels of biochemical indicators including liver and kidney function indexes and cytokines all significantly changed, especially at 12 h after D-galactosamine/LPS administration [alanine aminotransferase, 3389.5 ± 499.5 IU/L; blood urea nitrogen, 13.9 ± 1.3 mmol/L; Cr, 78.1 ± 2.9 μmol/L; K+, 6.1 ± 0.5 mmol/L; Na+, 130.9 ± 1.9 mmol/L; Cl-, 90.2 ± 1.9 mmol/L; tumor necrosis factor-α, 1699.6 ± 599.1 pg/mL; endothelin-1, 95.9 ± 25.9 pg/mL; P < 0.05 compared with normal saline control group]. Hepatocyte necrosis was aggravated gradually, which was most significant at 12 h after treatment with D-galactosamine/LPS, and was characterized by massive hepatocyte necrosis, while the structures of glomeruli, proximal and distal tubules were normal. Glomerular filtration rate was significantly decreased to 30%-35% of the control group at 12 h after D-galactosamine/LPS administration [Glomerular filtration rate (GFR)1, 0.79 ± 0.11 mL/min; GFR2, 3.58 ± 0.49 mL/min·kgBW-1; GFR3, 0.39 ± 0.99 mL/min·gKW-1]. The decreasing timing of GFR was consistent with that of the presence of hepatocyte necrosis and liver and kidney dysfunction. CONCLUSION: The joint use of D-galactosamine and LPS can induce liver and kidney dysfunction and decline of glomerular filtration rate in rats which is a successful rat model of hepatorenal syndrome. PMID:26379397

  6. Sarcolemmal ATP-sensitive potassium channel protects cardiac myocytes against lipopolysaccharide-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xiaohua; Xiong, Yiqun; Xu, Chaoying; Liu, Xinliang; Lin, Jian; Mu, Guiping; Xu, Shaogang; Liu, Wenhe

    2016-09-01

    The sarcolemmal ATP-sensitive K+ (sarcKATP) channel plays a cardioprotective role during stress. However, the role of the sarcKATP channel in the apoptosis of cardiomyocytes and association with mitochondrial calcium remains unclear. For this purpose, we developed a model of LPS-induced sepsis in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCs). The TUNEL assay was performed in order to detect the apoptosis of cardiac myocytes and the MTT assay was performed to determine cellular viability. Exposure to LPS significantly decreased the viability of the NRCs as well as the expression of Bcl-2, whereas it enhanced the activity and expression of the apoptosis-related proteins caspase-3 and Bax, respectively. The sarcKATP channel blocker, HMR-1098, increased the apoptosis of NRCs, whereas the specific sarcKATP channel opener, P-1075, reduced the apoptosis of NRCs. The mitochondrial calcium uniporter inhibitor ruthenium red (RR) partially inhibited the pro-apoptotic effect of HMR-1098. In order to confirm the role of the sarcKATP channel, we constructed a recombinant adenovirus vector carrying the sarcKATP channel mutant subunit Kir6.2AAA to inhibit the channel activity. Kir6.2AAA adenovirus infection in NRCs significantly aggravated the apoptosis of myocytes induced by LPS. Elucidating the regulatory mechanisms of the sarcKATP channel in apoptosis may facilitate the development of novel therapeutic targets and strategies for the management of sepsis and cardiac dysfunction. PMID:27430376

  7. Protective Effect of Dihydromyricetin Against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Kidney Injury in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun-Tao; Jiao, Peng; Zhou, Yun; Liu, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Background The present study investigated the effect of dihydromyricetin (DHM) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute kidney injury in a rat model. Material/Methods Kidney injury was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by injection of LPS through the tail vein. The rats were treated with 5 μg/kg body weight DHM within 12 h of the LPS administration. The urine of the rats was collected over a period of 48 h for determination of calcium and creatinine concentrations. Blood urea nitrogen in the serum was analyzed using a BC-2800 Vet Animal Auto Biochemistry Analyzer. On day 3 after treatment, the rats were sacrificed to extract the kidneys. Results Treatment of the endotoxemia rats with DHM caused a significant (P<0.05) decrease in the level of kidney injury molecule-1 and blood urea nitrogen. DHM treatment significantly (P<0.05) decreased the level of calcium in the kidney tissues compared to those of the untreated endotoxemia rats. The level of malonaldehyde (MDA) in the kidney tissues was significantly reduced in the endotoxemia rats by DHM treatment. The results from immunohistochemistry reveled a significant decrease in the expression of osteopontin (OPN) and CD44 levels. The endotoxemia rats showed significantly higher levels of TUNEL-positive stained nuclei compared to the normal controls. However, treatment of the endotoxemia rats with DHM resulted in a significant decrease in the population of TUNEL-positive cells. Conclusions DHM may be a promising candidate for the treatment of acute kidney injury. PMID:26866356

  8. Lipopolysaccharide-induced epithelial monoamine oxidase mediates alveolar bone loss in a rat chronic wound model.

    PubMed

    Ekuni, Daisuke; Firth, James D; Nayer, Tarun; Tomofuji, Takaaki; Sanbe, Toshihiro; Irie, Koichiro; Yamamoto, Tatsuo; Oka, Takashi; Liu, Zhenzi; Vielkind, Juergen; Putnins, Edward E

    2009-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is an antimicrobial response to pathogenic challenge that may, in the case of persistent infection, have deleterious effects on the tissue of origin. A rat periodontal disease model was used to study ROS-induced chronic epithelial inflammation and bone loss. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was applied for 8 weeks into the gingival sulcus, and histological analysis confirmed the onset of chronic disease. Junctional epithelium was collected from healthy and diseased animals using laser-capture microdissection, and expression microarray analysis was performed. Of 19,730 genes changed in disease, 42 were up-regulated >/=4-fold. Three of the top 10 LPS-induced genes, monoamine oxidase B (MAO/B) and flavin-containing monooxygenase 1 and 2, are implicated in ROS signaling. LPS-associated induction of the ROS mediator H(2)O(2), as well as MAO/B and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha levels were validated in the rat histological sections and a porcine junctional epithelial cell culture model. Topical MAO inhibitors significantly counteracted LPS-associated elevation of H(2)O(2) production and TNF-alpha expression in vivo and in vitro, inhibited disease-associated apical migration and proliferation of junctional epithelium and inhibited induced systemic H(2)O(2) levels and alveolar bone loss in vivo. These results suggest that LPS induces chronic wounds via elevated MAO/B-mediated increases in H(2)O(2) and TNF-alpha activity by epithelial cells and is further associated with more distant effects on systemic oxidative stress and alveolar bone loss. PMID:19779138

  9. Beneficial effect of hyperbaric oxygen pretreatment on lipopolysaccharide-induced shock in rats.

    PubMed

    Pedoto, Alessia; Nandi, Jyotirmoy; Yang, Zhong-Jin; Wang, Jingping; Bosco, Gerardo; Oler, Albert; Hakim, Tawfic S; Camporesi, Enrico M

    2003-07-01

    1. We investigated the effect of hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO2) pretreatment on the production of exhaled nitric oxide (ENO) and the expression of lung inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced shock in an experimental rat model. 2. Rats were randomized into four groups, anaesthetized, mechanically ventilated with room air and infused with normal saline (2 mL/h) through the jugular vein for 5 h. Group 1 (NS) received only normal saline. Group 2 (HBO2-NS) was pretreated with HBO2 at 2.8 absolute atmospheres for 2 h and then received normal saline. Group 3 (LPS) received LPS, 20 mg/kg, i.v., bolus. Group 4 (HBO2-LPS) was pretreated with HBO2 for 2 h, followed by LPS. 3. Arterial blood gases, blood pressure, blood pH and ENO production were measured every 30 min. Plasma nitrite/nitrate (NOx) concentrations were assessed at the beginning (baseline) and at the end of the study. Lung myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, iNOS expression and histological scores were measured for the evaluation of lung injury. 4. Administration of LPS was associated with decreased blood pressure and pH, increased ENO production, plasma NOx concentrations, lung iNOS expression and MPO activity. 5. Pretreatment with HBO2 significantly alleviated the LPS-induced hypotension, acidosis and decreased ENO production, plasma NOx concentrations, lung MPO activity and expression of iNOS. Hyperbaric O2 had no effect on control rats. 6. Our data show that HBO2 pretreatment has beneficial haemodynamic effects in rats with endotoxin shock. The beneficial effects of HBO2 may be partially mediated by decreased ENO production via reduced LPS-induced lung iNOS expression. PMID:12823263

  10. Lipopolysaccharide-induced osteoclastogenesis in Src homology 2-domain phosphatase-1-deficient viable motheaten mice.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shin-Ichi; Tsuneto, Motokazu; Yamada, Takayuki; Nose, Michinari; Yoshino, Miya; Shultz, Leonard D; Yamazaki, Hidetoshi

    2004-06-01

    Osteoclasts are hemopoietic cells that participate in bone resorption and remodeling. Receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) are critical for development of osteoclasts. The Toll-like receptor (TLR) family shares some of the downstream signaling with RANK. The TLR4 ligand, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is reported to accelerate bone lysis; however, signaling via TLRs has never been reported to induce osteoclastogenesis without RANKL. In this study we showed that significant numbers of mature osteoclasts were generated from protein tyrosine phosphatase Src homology 2-domain phosphatase-1-defective Hcph(me-v)/Hcph(me-v) (me(v)/me(v)) bone marrow cells in the presence of M-CSF and LPS without addition of RANKL in culture. This M-CSF plus LPS-induced osteoclastogenesis was not inhibited by an anti-TNFalpha antagonistic antibody or by osteoprotegerin, a decoy receptor for RANKL. The replacement of RANKL by TLR ligands only occurred with LPS. Other ligands, a peptidoglycan for TLR2 or an unmethylated CpG oligonucleotide for TLR9, did not support osteoclast generation. The osteoclast precursors as well as RANKL-responsive osteoclast precursors were present in the Kit-positive cell-enriched fraction of bone marrow cells. Although me(v)/me(v) bone marrow cells required a comparable concentration of RANKL or TNFalpha as wild-type cells for the initiation of osteoclastogenesis, the numbers of multinucleated osteoclasts in me(v)/me(v) bone marrow cultures were significantly increased by the equivalent dose of RANKL or TNFalpha in the presence of M-CSF. These results indicate that a defect of Src homology 2-domain phosphatase-1 function not only accelerates physiological osteoclast development by RANKL/RANK, but also acquires a novel pathway for osteoclastogenesis by LPS. PMID:14988381

  11. Repeated Oronasal Exposure to Lipopolysaccharide Induced Mucosal IgA Responses in Periparturient Dairy Cows

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Summera; Zebeli, Qendrim; Mansmann, Dominik A.; Dunn, Suzanna M.; Ametaj, Burim N.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of repeated oronasal treatment with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the humoral immune responses in saliva, vaginal mucus, and the plasma markers of the acute phase response in periparturient dairy cows. One hundred pregnant Holstein cows were administered either 3 increasing doses of LPS (n = 50) as follows: 1) 0.01 µg/kg body weight (BW) on d −28, 2) 0.05 µg/kg BW on d −25, and −21, and 3) 0.1 µg/kg BW on d −18, and −14, or sterile saline solution (controls; n = 50) oronasally for 3 consecutive wk starting at 28 d before parturition. Intensive sampling was conducted on thirty cows (n = 15/group). Multiple saliva, vaginal mucus and blood samples were collected around parturition and analyzed for total immunoglobulin-(Ig)A, plasma serum amyloid A (SAA), lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP), anti-LPS IgA, IgG, IgM, tumour necrosis factor(TNF)-α, and interleukin(IL)-1. Results regarding total secretory IgA (sIgA) antibodies showed greater concentrations in the saliva and an overall tendency for higher total sIgA in the vaginal mucus of the LPS-treated cows. Treatment had no effect on plasma sIgA, IgG, IgM anti-LPS antibodies, haptoglobin, SAA, LBP, TNF-α, and IL-1. Treatments by time interactions were observed for SAA and IL-1 with lowered concentrations of both variables in the plasma of LPS-treated cows after parturition. Overall, repeated oronasal LPS treatment clearly enhanced total sIgA antibodies in the saliva, stimulated their production in vaginal mucus shortly before calving, and lowered plasma IL-1 around parturition, but showed limited effects on markers of the acute phase response in the plasma in dairy cows around parturition. PMID:25061754

  12. Effect of acute lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in intracerebroventricular-streptozotocin injected rats.

    PubMed

    Murtishaw, Andrew S; Heaney, Chelcie F; Bolton, Monica M; Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Langhardt, Michael A; Kinney, Jefferson W

    2016-02-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is often used to investigate the exacerbatory effects of an immune-related challenge in transgenic models of various neurodegenerative diseases. However, the effects of this inflammatory challenge in an insulin resistant brain state, as seen in diabetes mellitus, a major risk factor for both vascular dementia (VaD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), is not as well characterized. We investigated the effects of an LPS-induced inflammatory challenge on behavioral and biological parameters following intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of streptozotocin (STZ) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Subjects received a one-time bilateral ICV infusion of STZ (25 mg/mL, 8 μL per ventricle) or ACSF. One week following ICV infusions, LPS (1 mg/mL, i.p.) or saline was administered to activate the immune system. Behavioral testing began on the 22nd day following STZ-ICV infusion, utilizing the open field and Morris water maze (MWM) tasks. Proteins related to immune function, learning and memory, synaptic plasticity, and key histopathological markers observed in VaD and AD were evaluated. The addition of an LPS-induced immune challenge partially attenuated spatial learning and memory deficits in the MWM in STZ-ICV injected animals. Additionally, LPS administration to STZ-treated animals partially mitigated alterations observed in several protein levels in STZ-ICV alone, including NR2A, GABA(B1), and β-amyloid oligomers. These results suggest that an acute LPS-inflammatory response has a modest protective effect against some of the spatial learning and memory deficits and protein alterations associated with STZ-ICV induction of an insulin resistant brain state. PMID:26327677

  13. Simultaneous Addition of Shikonin and Its Derivatives with Lipopolysaccharide Induces Rapid Macrophage Death.

    PubMed

    Koike, Atsushi; Shibano, Makio; Mori, Hideya; Kohama, Kiyoko; Fujimori, Ko; Amano, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages play pivotal roles in inflammatory responses. Previous studies showed that various natural products exert antiinflammatory effects by regulating macrophage activation. Recent studies have shown that shikonin (SHK) and its derivatives (β-hydroxyisovalerylshikonin, acetylshikonin, and isobutylshikonin), which are 1,4-naphthoquinone pigments extracted from the roots of Lithospermum erythrorhizon, have various pharmacological, including antiinflammatory and antitumor, effects. Even though there have been many studies on the antiinflammatory activities of SHK derivatives, only a few have described their direct effects on macrophages. We investigated the effects of SHK derivatives on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated macrophages. Low doses of SHK derivatives induced significant macrophage cytotoxicity (mouse macrophage-like J774.1/JA-4 cells and mouse peritoneal macrophages) in the presence of LPS. SHK activated caspases-3 and -7, which led to DNA fragmentation, but this cytotoxicity was prevented through a pan-caspase inhibitor in LPS-treated JA-4 cells. Maximal cytotoxic effects were achieved when SHK was added immediately before LPS addition. These results indicate that SHK derivatives induce caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death of LPS-treated macrophages and suggest that SHK acts during an early stage of LPS signaling. PMID:27251498

  14. Absence of gut microbiota influences lipopolysaccharide-induced behavioral changes in mice.

    PubMed

    Campos, Alline C; Rocha, Natalia P; Nicoli, Jacques R; Vieira, Leda Q; Teixeira, Mauro M; Teixeira, Antonio L

    2016-10-01

    Changes in the microbiota composition of gastrointestinal tract are emerging as potential players in the physiopathology of neuropsychiatric disorders. In the present work we evaluated the relationship between the absence of gut microbiota and neuroinflammatory mechanisms in a murine model of LPS-induced behavioral alterations. Germ-free (GF) or conventional male mice received a single i.p. injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS i.p.; 0.83mg/Kg) or PBS, and after 24h they were tested for depressive-like behaviors (forced swimming test, tail suspension test - TST, or sucrose preference test - SPT). After behavioral evaluation, animals were analyzed for possible changes in neuroplasticity by means of BDNF, NGF and cytokines levels in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, and the expression of Iba-1 (microglial activation marker) in the hippocampus, and the cellular activity marker, ΔFosB, in the dorsal raphe nucleus. In conventional mice, LPS induced depressive-like behaviors. LPS-induced changes were followed by up-regulation of the expression of TNF and Iba-1 in the hippocampus. The same effects were not observed in GF mice. Behavioral effects of LPS were not observed in GF mice submitted to TST. GF mice present a lower response to the anhedonia-like effect induced by LPS when compared to conventional animals (SPT). There was up-regulation of ΔFosB in the dorsal raphe nucleus in the absence of gut microbiota, events not influenced by LPS treatment. Our results suggest that gut-microbiota interactions influence depressive-like behaviors, raphe nucleus activation and activation of pro-inflammatory mechanisms within the hippocampus. PMID:27316342

  15. Lipopolysaccharide-induced multinuclear cells: Increased internalization of polystyrene beads and possible signals for cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi-Matsui, Mayumi Yano, Shio; Futai, Masamitsu

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •LPS induces multinuclear cells from murine macrophage-derived RAW264.7 cells. •Large beads are internalized by cells actively fusing to become multinuclear. •The multinuclear cell formation is inhibited by anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL10. •Signal transduction for cell fusion is different from that for inflammation. -- Abstract: A murine macrophage-derived line, RAW264.7, becomes multinuclear on stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an outer membrane component of Gram-negative bacteria. These multinuclear cells internalized more polystyrene beads than mononuclear cells or osteoclasts (Nakanishi-Matsui, M., Yano, S., Matsumoto, N., and Futai, M., 2012). In this study, we analyzed the time courses of cell fusion in the presence of large beads. They were internalized into cells actively fusing to become multinuclear. However, the multinuclear cells once formed showed only low phagocytosis activity. These results suggest that formation of the multinuclear cells and bead internalization took place simultaneously. The formation of multinuclear cells was blocked by inhibitors for phosphoinositide 3-kinase, phospholipase C, calcineurin, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. In addition, interleukin 6 and 10 also exhibited inhibitory effects. These signaling molecules and cytokines may play a crucial role in the LPS-induced multinuclear cell formation.

  16. Lipopolysaccharide induces macrophage migration via prostaglandin D(2) and prostaglandin E(2).

    PubMed

    Tajima, Tsuyoshi; Murata, Takahisa; Aritake, Kosuke; Urade, Yoshihiro; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Masataka; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Hori, Masatoshi

    2008-08-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produces prostaglandins (PGs) concomitant to eliciting macrophage migration. We evaluated the role of PGs in initiating the migration of macrophages, especially focusing on PGD(2) and PGE(2). In RAW264.7 macrophages, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, CAY10404 [3-(4-methylsulphonylphenyl)-4-phenyl-5-trifluoromethylisoxazole], completely inhibited LPS-mediated migration at 4 h (early phase) but only partially inhibited the migration at 8 h (late phase), suggesting the presence of PG-dependent and -independent pathways. In the early phase, LPS up-regulated mRNA expressions of COX-2, hematopoietic PGD synthase (H-PGDS), and microsomal-PGE synthase 1, increasing PGD(2) and PGE(2) substantially. The chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on Th2 lymphocytes (CRTH2) agonist, DK-PGD(2) (13-14-dihydro-15-keto-PGD(2)), and the EP4 agonist, ONO-AE1-329 (16-{3-methoxymethyl}phenyl-omega-tetranor-3,7-dithia-prostaglandin E(1)), but not selective agonists of D prostanoid receptor, E prostanoid receptor (EP) 2, or EP3, stimulated random migration (chemokinesis). In peritoneal macrophages from CRTH2-deficient and H-PGDS-deficient mice, LPS-mediated migration was significantly inhibited at either early or late phases of the migration. The H-PGDS inhibitor, HQL-79 [4-(diphenylmethoxy)-1-[3-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)propyl-piperidine

  17. The CRTH2 agonist Pyl A prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced fetal death but induces preterm labour

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Lynne; Herbert, Bronwen R; MacIntyre, David A; Hunte, Emma; Ponnampalam, Sathana; Johnson, Mark R; Teoh, Tiong G; Bennett, Phillip R

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory prostaglandin 15-deoxy-Δ 12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15dPGJ2) delays inflammation-induced preterm labour in the mouse and improves pup survival through the inhibition of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by a mechanism yet to be elucidated. 15dPGJ2 is an agonist of the second prostaglandin D2 receptor, chemoattractant receptor homologous to the T helper 2 cell (CRTH2). In human T helper cells CRTH2 agonists induce the production of the anti-inflammatory interleukins IL-10 and IL-4. We hypothesized that CRTH2 is involved in the protective effect of 15dPGJ2 in inflammation-induced preterm labour in the murine model. We therefore studied the effects of a specific small molecule CRTH2 agonist on preterm labour and pup survival. An intrauterine injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered to CD1 mice at embryonic day 16, ± CRTH2 agonist/vehicle controls. Mice were killed at 4.5 hr to assess fetal wellbeing and to harvest myometrium and pup brain for analysis of NF-κB, and T helper type 1/2 interleukins. To examine the effects of the CRTH2 agonist on LPS-induced preterm labour, mice were allowed to labour spontaneously. Direct effects of the CRTH2 agonist on uterine contractility were examined ex vivo on contracting myometrial strips. The CRTH2 agonist increased fetal survival from 20 to 100% in LPS-treated mice, and inhibited circular muscle contractility ex vivo. However, it augmented LPS-induced labour and significantly increased myometrial NF-κB, IL-1β, KC-GRO, interferon-γ and tumour necrosis factor-α. This suggests that the action of 15dPGJ2 is not via CRTH2 and therefore small molecule CRTH2 agonists are not likely to be beneficial for the prevention of inflammation-induced preterm labour. PMID:23374103

  18. Interleukin-10 Protection against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Neuro-Inflammation and Neurotoxicity in Ventral Mesencephalic Cultures.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Chen, Xiao; Liu, Zhan; Peng, Yu-Ping; Qiu, Yi-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, is expressed in the brain and can inhibit microglial activation. Herein, we utilized lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory Parkinson's disease (PD) cell model to determine whether microglia and astrocytes are necessary targets for IL-10 neuroprotection. Primary ventral mesencephalic (VM) cultures with different composition of neurons, microglia and astrocytes were prepared. The cells were exposed to IL-10 (15, 50 or 150 ng/mL) 1 h prior to LPS (50 ng/mL) treatment. LPS induced dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic neuronal loss in VM cultures, VM neuron-enriched cultures, and neuron-microglia co-cultures, but not in neuron-astrocyte co-cultures. IL-10 reduced LPS-induced neuronal loss particularly in single VM neuron cultures. Pro-inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2) were upregulated in both neuron-microglia and neuron-astrocyte co-cultures by LPS. In contrast, neurotrophic factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, insulin-like growth factor-1 or glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor) were downregulated in neuron-microglia co-cultures, but upregulated in neuron-astrocyte co-cultures by LPS. IL-10 reduced both the increase in production of the pro-inflammatory mediators and the decrease in production of the neurotrophic factors induced by LPS. These results suggest that astrocytes can balance LPS neurotoxicity by releasing more neurotrophic factors and that IL-10 exerts neuroprotective property by an extensive action including direct on neurons and indirect via inhibiting microglial activation. PMID:26729090

  19. Synthetic Amphipathic Helical Peptides Targeting CD36 Attenuate Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Inflammation and Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Bocharov, Alexander V; Wu, Tinghuai; Baranova, Irina N; Birukova, Anna A; Sviridov, Denis; Vishnyakova, Tatyana G; Remaley, Alan T; Eggerman, Thomas L; Patterson, Amy P; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2016-07-15

    Synthetic amphipathic helical peptides (SAHPs) designed as apolipoprotein A-I mimetics are known to bind to class B scavenger receptors (SR-Bs), SR-BI, SR-BII, and CD36, receptors that mediate lipid transport and facilitate pathogen recognition. In this study, we evaluated SAHPs, selected for targeting human CD36, by their ability to attenuate LPS-induced inflammation, endothelial barrier dysfunction, and acute lung injury (ALI). L37pA, which targets CD36 and SR-BI equally, inhibited LPS-induced IL-8 secretion and barrier dysfunction in cultured endothelial cells while reducing lung neutrophil infiltration by 40% in a mouse model of LPS-induced ALI. A panel of 20 SAHPs was tested in HEK293 cell lines stably transfected with various SR-Bs to identify SAHPs with preferential selectivity toward CD36. Among several SAHPs targeting both SR-BI/BII and CD36 receptors, ELK-B acted predominantly through CD36. Compared with L37pA, 5A, and ELK SAHPs, ELK-B was most effective in reducing the pulmonary barrier dysfunction, neutrophil migration into the lung, and lung inflammation induced by LPS. We conclude that SAHPs with relative selectivity toward CD36 are more potent at inhibiting acute pulmonary inflammation and dysfunction. These data indicate that therapeutic strategies using SAHPs targeting CD36, but not necessarily mimicking all apolipoprotein A-I functions, may be considered a possible new treatment approach for inflammation-induced ALI and pulmonary edema. PMID:27316682

  20. Detrimental Effect of the Proteasome Inhibitor, Bortezomib in Bacterial Superantigen- and Lipopolysaccharide-induced Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tilahun, Ashenafi Y; Theuer, Jayne E; Patel, Robin; David, Chella S; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial superantigen (BSAg)–induced toxic shock syndrome (TSS) and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)–induced shock are characterized by severe systemic inflammation. As nuclear factor κB (NFκB) plays an important role in inflammation and bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor widely used in cancer chemotherapy, is a potent inhibitor of NFκB activation, we evaluated the therapeutic and prophylactic use of bortezomib in these conditions using murine models. Bortezomib prophylaxis significantly reduced serum levels of many cytokines and chemokines induced by BSAg. However, at 3 hours, serum level of TNF-a, an important cytokine implicated in TSS, was significantly reduced but not abolished. At 6 hours, there was no difference in the serum TNF-a levels between bortezomib treated and untreated mice challenged with staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB). Paradoxically, all mice treated with bortezomib either before or after BSAg challenge succumbed to TSS. Neither bortezomib nor BSAg was lethal if given alone. Serum biochemical parameters and histopathological findings suggested acute liver failure as the possible cause of mortality. Liver tissue from SEB-challenged mice treated with bortezomib showed a significant reduction in NFκB activation. Because NFκB-dependent antiapoptotic pathways protect hepatocytes from TNF-α-induced cell death, inhibition of NFκB brought forth by bortezomib in the face of elevated TNF-α levels caused by BSAg or LPS is detrimental. PMID:20372109

  1. Detrimental effect of the proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib in bacterial superantigen- and lipopolysaccharide-induced systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tilahun, Ashenafi Y; Theuer, Jayne E; Patel, Robin; David, Chella S; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2010-06-01

    Bacterial superantigen (BSAg)-induced toxic shock syndrome (TSS) and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced shock are characterized by severe systemic inflammation. As nuclear factor kappaB (NF kappaB) plays an important role in inflammation and bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor widely used in cancer chemotherapy, is a potent inhibitor of NF kappaB activation, we evaluated the therapeutic and prophylactic use of bortezomib in these conditions using murine models. Bortezomib prophylaxis significantly reduced serum levels of many cytokines and chemokines induced by BSAg. However, at 3 hours, serum level of TNF-a, an important cytokine implicated in TSS, was significantly reduced but not abolished. At 6 hours, there was no difference in the serum TNF-a levels between bortezomib treated and untreated mice challenged with staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB). Paradoxically, all mice treated with bortezomib either before or after BSAg challenge succumbed to TSS. Neither bortezomib nor BSAg was lethal if given alone. Serum biochemical parameters and histopathological findings suggested acute liver failure as the possible cause of mortality. Liver tissue from SEB-challenged mice treated with bortezomib showed a significant reduction in NF kappaB activation. Because NF kappaB-dependent antiapoptotic pathways protect hepatocytes from TNF-alpha-induced cell death, inhibition of NF kappaB brought forth by bortezomib in the face of elevated TNF-alpha levels caused by BSAg or LPS is detrimental. PMID:20372109

  2. Improved Hepatoprotective Effect of Liposome-Encapsulated Astaxanthin in Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Acute Hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chun-Hung; Chang, Chun-Chao; Lin, Shiang-Ting; Chyau, Charng-Cherng; Peng, Robert Y

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute hepatotoxicity is significantly associated with oxidative stress. Astaxanthin (AST), a xanthophyll carotenoid, is well known for its potent antioxidant capacity. However, its drawbacks of poor aqueous solubility and low bioavailability have limited its utility. Liposome encapsulation is considered as an effective alternative use for the improvement of bioavailability of the hydrophobic compound. We hypothesized that AST encapsulated within liposomes (LA) apparently shows improved stability and transportability compared to that of free AST. To investigate whether LA administration can efficiently prevent the LPS-induced acute hepatotoxicity, male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = six per group) were orally administered liposome-encapsulated AST at 2, 5 or 10 mg/kg-day (LA-2, LA-5, and LA-10) for seven days and then were LPS-challenged (i.p., 5 mg/kg). The LA-10 administered group, but not the other groups, exhibited a significant amelioration of serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT), glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (CRE), hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), IL-6, and hepatic nuclear NF-κB and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), suggesting that LA at a 10 mg/kg-day dosage renders hepatoprotective effects. Moreover, the protective effects were even superior to that of positive control N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 200 mg/kg-day). Histopathologically, NAC, free AST, LA-2 and LA-5 partially, but LA-10 completely, alleviated the acute inflammatory status. These results indicate that hydrophobic AST after being properly encapsulated by liposomes improves bioavailability and can also function as potential drug delivery system in treating hepatotoxicity. PMID:27428953

  3. Protective effects of ginsenoside Re on lipopolysaccharide-induced cardiac dysfunction in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong-Chang; Wang, Jian; Yang, Longpo; Sun, Gui-Bo; Sun, Xiao-Bo

    2016-05-18

    The impaired cardiac function caused by reduced myocardial contractility is a typical manifestation of sepsis/septic shock. Ginsenoside Re (GS-Re) is one of the most abundant ingredients of ginseng. This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of GS-Re on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced septic cardiac dysfunction and inflammatory response in mice. Mice were intragastrically administered with GS-Re (15 mg kg(-1)) for 1 week before the LPS challenge (10 mg kg(-1), i.p.). Cardiac function was evaluated 6 h after LPS induction. GS-Re pretreatment significantly protected against LPS-induced cardiac dysfunction. GS-Re ameliorated the imbalance between iNOS and eNOS, and prevented NF-κB activation and subsequent myocardial inflammatory responses in endotoxemic mice. The effects of GS-Re were closely associated with estrogen receptors (ERs), phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT) signaling, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway, as characterized by the GS-Re-induced preservation of ERα, ERβ, and phospho-Akt and inhibition of phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-JNK, phospho-P38. However, GS-Re had no effect on LPS-induced activation of TLR-4. All these results showed that GS-Re pretreatment significantly attenuated LPS-induced cardiac dysfunction and inflammatory response. PMID:27074714

  4. Role of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in lipopolysaccharide-induced pathologic alterations.

    PubMed Central

    Remick, D. G.; Strieter, R. M.; Eskandari, M. K.; Nguyen, D. T.; Genord, M. A.; Raiford, C. L.; Kunkel, S. L.

    1990-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) has been implicated strongly as a principal mediator in the pathogenesis of septic shock. The authors investigated the in vivo production of TNF in CBA/J and CD-1 mice that had been primed by an intraperitoneal injection of complete Freund's adjuvant followed 2 weeks later by an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). TNF bioactivity peaked in both the ascites and plasma one hour after challenge, and TNF mRNA expression in the ascites cells peaked 30 minutes after LPS. After the induction of bioactivity, an interstitial pulmonary neutrophilic infiltrate occurred that was quantitated both morphometrically and by a myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay. Peripheral blood neutrophilia and lymphopenia developed after the LPS injection (PMNs: control, 46 +/- 2%; LPS, 65 +/- 3%; Lymphs control, 53 +/- 2%; LPS, 37 +/- 3%). Treatment with dexamethasone (Dex) completely inhibited the pulmonary neutrophilic infiltrate as measured by the (MPO) assay. Because Dex will inhibit the production of several cytokines, anti-TNF antiserum was given to mice at the same time as the LPS challenge to assess specifically the role of TNF in inducing these changes. This antiserum partially blocked the pulmonary neutrophil infiltrate, and completely blocked the peripheral blood changes at one hour after LPS. These data demonstrate that TNF plays an important role in the early pathophysiologic alterations that occur after systemic exposure to LPS. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 11 PMID:2297050

  5. IL-37 inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption in vivo.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Jafari; Kitaura, Hideki; Kimura, Keisuke; Ishida, Masahiko; Sugisawa, Haruki; Ochi, Yumiko; Kishikawa, Akiko; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2016-07-01

    IL-37 is a newly defined member of the IL-1 cytokine family. It has been reported that IL-37 inhibited innate immunity and inflammatory responses in autoimmune diseases and tumors. IL-37 also inhibited Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced immunological reaction. LPS is a bacterial cell wall component that is capable of inducing osteoclast formation and pathological bone resorption. However, there is no study to investigate the effect of IL-37 on LPS-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of IL-37 in LPS-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption. LPS was administrated with or without IL-37 by subcutaneous injection on mice calvariae. The number of osteoclasts, the level of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K mRNA, the ratio of the bone resorption pits and the level of C-terminal telopeptide fragments of type I collagen cross-Links as a marker of bone resorption in mice administrated both LPS and IL-37 were lower than that in mice administrated LPS alone. Real-time RT-PCR was performed to analyze osteoclast related cytokines RANKL, TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA levels in vivo. RANKL, TNF-α and IL-1β mRNAs were increased in the LPS alone administrated mice as compared with PBS administrated groups. On the other hand, RANKL, TNF-α and IL-1β mRNAs were inhibited in the IL-37 and LPS administrated mice as compared with LPS alone administrated group. In vitro analysis, there was no effect of IL-37 in RANKL-induced osteoclast formation, TNF-α-induced osteoclast formation and cell viability from bone marrow macrophages as osteoclast precursor and LPS-induced RANKL expression from stromal cells. These results indicated that IL-37 inhibited LPS-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption via inhibition of LPS-induced osteoclast related cytokines, but might not directly inhibit osteoclast formation on osteoclast precursor and RANKL expression on stromal cells. PMID:27154248

  6. Lipopolysaccharide induces H1 receptor expression and enhances histamine responsiveness in human coronary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, Vineesh V; Tan, Xiaoyu; Sweeney, Matthew E; Levant, Beth; Slusser, Joyce; Stechschulte, Daniel J; Dileepan, Kottarappat N

    2011-04-01

    Summary Histamine is a well-recognized modulator of vascular inflammation. We have shown that histamine, acting via H1 receptors (H1R), synergizes lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of prostaglandin I(2) (PGI(2)), PGE(2) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) by endothelial cells. The synergy between histamine and LPS was partly attributed to histamine -induced expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). In this study, we examined whether LPS stimulates the H1R expression in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) with resultant enhancement of histamine responsiveness. Incubation of HCAEC with LPS (10-1000 ng/ml) resulted in two-fold to fourfold increases in H1R mRNA expression in a time-dependent and concentration-dependent fashion. In contrast, LPS treatment did not affect H2R mRNA expression. The LPS-induced H1R mRNA expression peaked by 4 hr after LPS treatment and remained elevated above the basal level for 20-24 hr. Flow cytometric and Western blot analyses revealed increased expression of H1R protein in LPS-treated cells. The specific binding of [(3)H]pyrilamine to H1R in membrane proteins from LPS-treated HCAEC was threefold higher than the untreated cells. The LPS-induced H1R expression was mediated through TLR4 as gene silencing by TLR4-siRNA and treatment with a TLR4 antagonist inhibited the LPS effect. When HCAEC were pre-treated with LPS for 24 hr, washed and challenged with histamine, 17-, 10- and 15-fold increases in PGI(2), PGE(2) and IL-6 production, respectively, were noted. Histamine-induced enhancement of the synthesis of PGI(2), PGE(2) and IL-6 by LPS-primed HCAEC was completely blocked by an H1R antagonist. The results demonstrate that LPS, through TLR4 activation, up-regulates the expression and function of H1R and amplifies histamine-induced inflammatory responses in HCAEC. PMID:21255012

  7. The role of speckle tracking echocardiography in assessment of lipopolysaccharide-induced myocardial dysfunction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ming; Gao, Yao; Zhang, Yanjuan; Zhou, Bin; Wu, Bingruo

    2015-01-01

    Background Sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction is a common and severe complication of septic shock. Conventional echocardiography often fails to reveal myocardial depression in severe sepsis due to hemodynamic changes; in contrast, decline of strain measurements by speckle tracking echocardiography (STE) may indicate impaired cardiac function. This study investigates the role of STE in detecting lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cardiac dysfunction with mouse models. Methods We evaluated cardiac function in 20 mice at baseline, 6 h (n=10) and 20 h (n=10) after LPS injection to monitor the development of heart failure induced by severe sepsis using 2-D and M-mode echocardiography. Ejection fraction (EF) and fractional shortening (FS) were measured with standard M-mode tracings, whereas circumferential and radial strain was derived from STE. Serum biochemical and cardiac histopathological examinations were performed to determine sepsis-induced myocardial injury. Results Left ventricular (LV) myocardial function was significantly reduced at 6 h after LPS treatment assessed by circumferential strain (−14.65%±3.00% to −8.48%±1.72%, P=0.006), whereas there were no significant differences between 6 and 20 h group. Conversely, EF and FS were significantly increased at 20 h when comparing to 6 h (P<0.05) accompanied with marked decreases in EF and FS 6 h following LPS administration. Consistent with strain echocardiographic results, we showed that LPS injection leaded to elevated serum level of cardiac Troponin-T (cTnT), CK-MB and rising leucocytes infiltration into myocardium within 20 h. Conclusions Altogether, these results demonstrate that, circumferential strain by STE is a specific and reliable value for evaluating LPS-induced cardiac dysfunction in mice. PMID:26793347

  8. Pharmacokinetics of florfenicol after intravenous administration in Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxaemic sheep.

    PubMed

    Pérez, R; Palma, C; Drápela, C; Sepulveda, M; Espinoza, A; Peñailillo, A K

    2015-04-01

    Experiments in different animal species have shown that febrile conditions, induced by Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), may alter the pharmacokinetic properties of drugs. The objective was to study the effects of a LPS-induced acute-phase response (APR) model on plasma pharmacokinetics of florfenicol (FFC) after its intravenous administration in sheep. Six adult clinically healthy Suffolk Down sheep, 8 months old and 35.5 ± 2.2 kg in body weight (bw), were distributed through a crossover factorial 2 × 2 design, with 4 weeks of washout. Pairs of sheep similar in body weight were assigned to experimental groups: Group 1 (LPS) was treated with three intravenous doses of 1 μg/kg bw of E. coli LPS before FFC treatment. Group 2 (control) was treated with an equivalent volume of saline solution (SS) at similar intervals as LPS. At 24 h after the first injection of LPS or SS, an intravenous bolus of 20 mg/kg bw of FFC was administered. Blood samples (5 mL) were collected before drug administration and at different times between 0.05 and 48.0 h after treatment. FFC plasma concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography. A noncompartmental pharmacokinetic model was used for data analysis, and data were compared using a Mann-Whitney U-test. The mean values of AUC0-∞ in the endotoxaemic sheep (105.9 ± 14.3 μg·h/mL) were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than values observed in healthy sheep (78.4 ± 5.2 μg·h/mL). The total mean plasma clearance (CLT ) decreased from 257.7 ± 16.9 mL·h/kg in the control group to 198.2 ± 24.1 mL·h/kg in LPS-treated sheep. A significant increase (P < 0.05) in the terminal half-life was observed in the endotoxaemic sheep (16.9 ± 3.8 h) compared to the values observed in healthy sheep (10.4 ± 3.2 h). In conclusion, the APR induced by the intravenous administration of E. coli LPS in sheep produces higher plasma concentrations of FFC due to a decrease in the total body clearance of the drug. PMID:25229993

  9. Lipopolysaccharide-induced memory impairment in rats is preventable using 7-nitroindazole.

    PubMed

    Anaeigoudari, Akbar; Shafei, Mohammad Naser; Soukhtanloo, Mohammad; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Reisi, Parham; Beheshti, Farimah; Mohebbati, Reza; Mousavi, Seyed Mojtaba; Hosseini, Mahmoud

    2015-09-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress have important roles in memory impairment. The effect of 7-nitroindazole (7NI) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced memory impairment was investigated. Rats were used, divided into four groups that were treated as follows: (1) control (saline); (2) LPS; (3) 7NI-LPS; and (4) 7NI before passive avoidance (PA). In the LPS group, the latency for entering the dark compartment was shorter than in the controls (p < 0.01 and p < 0.001); while in the 7NI-LPS group, it was longer than in the LPS group (p < 0.01 and p < 0.001). Malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) metabolite concentrations in the brain tissues of the LPS group were higher than in the controls (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05); while in the 7NI-LPS group, they were lower than in the LPS group (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05, respectively). The thiol content in the brain of the LPS group was lower than in the controls (p < 0.001); while in the 7NI-LPS group, it was higher than in the LPS group (p < 0.001). It is suggested that brain tissue oxidative damage and NO elevation have a role in the deleterious effects of LPS on memory retention that are preventable using 7NI. PMID:26352498

  10. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Deficient Mice Are Protected from Lipopolysaccharide Induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Christine M.; Rafikov, Ruslan; Kumar, Sanjiv; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Ham III, P. Benson; Meadows, Mary Louise; Cherian-Shaw, Mary; Kangath, Archana; Sridhar, Supriya; Lucas, Rudolf; Black, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria induces acute lung injury (ALI) in mice. This injury is associated with lung edema, inflammation, diffuse alveolar damage, and severe respiratory insufficiency. We have previously reported that LPS-mediated nitric oxide synthase (NOS) uncoupling, through increases in asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), plays an important role in the development of ALI through the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Therefore, the focus of this study was to determine whether mice deficient in endothelial NOS (eNOS-/-) are protected against ALI. In both wild-type and eNOS-/- mice, ALI was induced by the intratracheal instillation of LPS (2 mg/kg). After 24 hours, we found that eNOS-/-mice were protected against the LPS mediated increase in inflammatory cell infiltration, inflammatory cytokine production, and lung injury. In addition, LPS exposed eNOS-/- mice had increased oxygen saturation and improved lung mechanics. The protection in eNOS-/- mice was associated with an attenuated production of NO, NOS derived superoxide, and peroxynitrite. Furthermore, we found that eNOS-/- mice had less RhoA activation that correlated with a reduction in RhoA nitration at Tyr34. Finally, we found that the reduction in NOS uncoupling in eNOS-/- mice was due to a preservation of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) activity that prevented the LPS-mediated increase in ADMA. Together our data suggest that eNOS derived reactive species play an important role in the development of LPS-mediated lung injury. PMID:25786132

  11. Selective modulation of lipopolysaccharide-induced death and cytokine production by various muramyl peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Parant, M A; Pouillart, P; Le Contel, C; Parant, F J; Chedid, L A; Bahr, G M

    1995-01-01

    Pretreatment of animals with the adjuvant muramyl dipeptide enhances both the production of circulating tumor necrosis factor and the sensitivity to the lethal effect of a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. The present study examined the capacity of various adjuvant muramyl dipeptide derivatives to potentiate responsiveness to LPS administration. Cytokine levels in serum were determined at various time intervals after LPS administration by bioassays and immunoassays; the cytokines examined were tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and gamma interferon. The time course of cytokine response was not modified by the pretreatment, but most of the levels were strongly enhanced. However, of the four compounds which were found to be potent priming agents, only two caused an increased sensitivity to LPS lethality, showing that elevated titers of cytokines in serum were not correlated with host sensitization. Interestingly, previous studies have shown that these two compounds also display neurobiological properties, implying a possible role of the central nervous system in LPS lethality. However, two hydrophilic derivatives with low activity as priming agents were capable of decreasing the toxicity of LPS when given after the challenge in galactosamine-sensitized mice. These results illustrate the diversity of responses elicited by immunological priming. They raise unanswered questions on the importance of endogenous mediators in the pathophysiological alterations during toxic shock. PMID:7806345

  12. Lipopolysaccharide induces intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis in a TNFalpha-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Noti, Mario; Corazza, Nadia; Tuffin, Gérald; Schoonjans, Kristina; Brunner, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Stringent control of immune responses in the intestinal mucosa is critical for the maintenance of immune homeostasis and prevention of tissue damage, such as observed during inflammatory bowel disease. Intestinal epithelial cells, primarily thought to form a simple physical barrier, critically regulate intestinal immune cell functions by producing immunoregulatory glucocorticoids on T-cell activation. In this study we investigated whether stimulation of cells of the innate immune system results in the induction of intestinal glucocorticoids synthesis and what role TNF-alpha plays in this process. Stimulation of the innate immune system with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) led to an up-regulation of colonic steroidogenic enzymes and the induction of intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis. The observed induction was dependent on macrophage effector functions, as depletion of macrophages using clodronate-containing liposomes, but not absence of T and B cells, inhibited intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis. LPS-induced glucocorticoid synthesis was critically dependent on TNF-alpha as it was significantly decreased in TNF-alpha-deficient animals. Both TNF receptor-1 and -2 were found to be equally involved in LPS- and T-cell-induced intestinal GC synthesis. These results describe a novel and critical role of TNF-alpha in immune cell-induced intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis. PMID:20056718

  13. Effect of methanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus Willd. on lipopolysaccharide induced-oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mohammad Parwez; Hussain, Arshad; Siddiqui, Hefazat Hussain; Wahab, Shadma; Adak, Manoranjan

    2015-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress and impairment of normal physiological function generally categorized by increased anxiety and reduced mobility. Therefore, the present study was to find out the effect Methanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus (MEAR ) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative stress in rats . LPS-induced oxidative stress in rats was measured by locomotor activity by photoactometer test, anxiety with elevated plus maze test and also studied the oxidative stress markers, nitric oxide and cytokines. The obtained data shows that LPS markedly exhausted (p<0.001) brain- reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) significantly increased (p<0.001) the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide and the activity of cytokines in the brain. MEAR supplementation resulted in normalization of brain GSH and CAT and SOD and decreases in the levels of MDA with reduction of nitric oxide and cytokines in the brain. The action of the extract at dose of 200 mg/kg was almost similar to the standard drug, quercetin (100mg/kg, p.o.). These present study conclude that MEAR administration significantly (P<0.05) reduced LPS- induced oxidative-stress and intensely suggest that Asparagus racemosus Willd. is a functionally newer type of cerebroprotective agent. PMID:25730806

  14. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide induces osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Shamima; Hassan, Ferdaus; Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Koide, Naoki; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Mori, Isamu; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi . E-mail: yokochi@aichi-med-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-24

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a potent bone resorbing factor. The effect of LPS on osteoclast formation was examined by using murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. LPS-induced the formation of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) in RAW 264.7 cells 3 days after the exposure. MGCs were positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity. Further, MGC formed resorption pits on calcium-phosphate thin film that is a substrate for osteoclasts. Therefore, LPS was suggested to induce osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. LPS-induced osteoclast formation was abolished by anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} antibody, but not antibodies to macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL). TNF-{alpha} might play a critical role in LPS-induced osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. Inhibitors of NF-{kappa}B and stress activated protein kinase (SAPK/JNK) prevented the LPS-induced osteoclast formation. The detailed mechanism of LPS-induced osteoclast formation is discussed.

  15. Lipopolysaccharide Induces Immune Activation and SIV Replication in Rhesus Macaques of Chinese Origin

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Rong; Zhuang, Ke; Liu, Jinbiao; Wu, Jianguo; Li, Jieliang; Wang, Xu; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic immune activation is a hallmark of progressive HIV infection and a key determinant of immunodeficiency in HIV-infected individuals. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the circulation has been implicated as a key factor in HIV infection-related systemic immune activation. We thus investigate the impact of LPS on systemic immune activation in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaques of Chinese origin. Methods The animals were inoculated intravenously with SIVmac239. The levels of plasma viral load and host inflammatory cytokines in PBMC were measured by real-time RT-PCR. CD4/CD8 ratio and systemic immune activation markers were examined by flow cytometric analysis of PBMCs. White blood cell and neutrophil counts and C Reactive Protein levels were determined using biochemistry analyzer. The plasma levels of LPS were determined by Tachypleus Amebocyte Lysate (TAL) test. Results The animals inoculated with SIVmac239 became infected as evidenced by the increased plasma levels of SIV RNA and decreased CD4/CD8 ratio. LPS administration of SIV-infected animals induced a transient increase of plasma SIV RNA and immune activation, which was indicated by the elevated expression of the inflammatory cytokines and CD4+HLA-DR+ T cells in PBMCs. Conclusions These data support the concept that LPS is a driving factor in systemic immune activation of HIV disease. PMID:24918575

  16. Garlic (Allium sativum) Extracts Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Toll-Like Receptor 4 Dimerization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Garlic has been used as a folk medicine for a long history. Numerous studies demonstrated that garlic extracts and its sulfur-containing compounds inhibit nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) activation induced by various receptor agonist including lipopolysaccharide (LPS). These effects suggest that garl...

  17. Flavone as PARP-1 inhibitor: its effect on lipopolysaccharide induced gene-expression.

    PubMed

    Geraets, Liesbeth; Moonen, Harald J J; Brauers, Karen; Gottschalk, Ralph W H; Wouters, Emiel F M; Bast, Aalt; Hageman, Geja J

    2007-11-14

    The nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) which was initially known for its role in the repair of oxidative stress-induced DNA damage, has also been reported to play a mediating role in the inflammatory response. Studies with PARP-1 knockout models have shown that PARP-1 is a co-activator of Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB), although this appears not to require its enzyme activity. In addition, drug-induced inhibition of the enzyme activity of PARP-1 was observed to reduce the production of pro-inflammatory mediators. In this study, the flavonoid compound flavone was demonstrated to significantly inhibit the enzyme activity of PARP-1. Further evaluation of flavone in N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-treated human pulmonary epithelial and vascular endothelial cells revealed that both the decrease in NAD(+) levels, as well as the formation of PAR-polymers was dose-dependently attenuated by flavone. In addition, flavone was found to reduce the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced interleukin (IL)-8 production in pulmonary epithelial cells, which was confirmed by transcription analysis. Furthermore, the transcription Inhibitor kappa B alpha (of IkappaBalpha) was significantly increased by flavone. The results of the present study indicate that the flavonoid flavone could be a potential candidate for application in treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases. PARP-1 inhibition could have beneficial effects in such diseases as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and diabetes, by preservation of cellular NAD(+) levels and attenuating inflammatory conditions. PMID:17643414

  18. Alpha-lipoic acid protects mitochondrial enzymes and attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced hypothermia in mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: Hypothermia is a key symptom of sepsis and the mechanism(s) leading to hypothermia during sepsis is largely unknown. To investigate a potential mechanism and find an effective treatment for hypothermia in sepsis, we induced hypothermia in mice by lipopolysaccharide (LP...

  19. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Chicken Lipopolysaccharide-Induced TNF-alpha Factor (LITAF)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The inflammatory response to parasites, bacteria, and viruses is mediated by multiple host factors. TNF-alpha is one of the most pleiotropic cytokines in mammals, but has yet to be identified in avian species. In the current study, we isolated a full-length cDNA encoding the chicken homologue of ...

  20. Stimulation of the ceramide pathway partially mimics lipopolysaccharide-induced responses in murine peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Barber, S A; Detore, G; McNally, R; Vogel, S N

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that lipolysaccharide (LPS) stimulates cells by mimicking the second-messenger function of ceramide, a lipid generated in the cell by the action of sphingomyelinase (SMase). To examine this possibility further, we compared the abilities of LPS, SMase, and/or ceramide analogs to induce cytokine secretion, modulate gene expression, and induce endotoxin tolerance in macrophages. SMase and LPS induced secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) to comparable degrees; however, unlike LPS, SMase failed to stimulate detectable interferon activity. Cell-permeable analogs of ceramide induced the expression of many LPS-inducible genes; however, the expression of interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10) and interferon consensus sequence-binding protein (ICSBP) mRNAs was significantly lower than that induced by LPS. Both SMase-induced TNF-alpha secretion and LPS-induced TNF-alpha secretion were inhibited by pretreatment with a serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor, calyculin A. Macrophages preexposed in vitro to LPS to induce a well-characterized state of endotoxin tolerance secreted little or no TNF-alpha upon secondary challenge with either LPS or SMase, whereas macrophages preexposed to SMase secreted high levels of TNF-alpha upon secondary stimulation with LPS or SMase. Collectively, these results suggest that ceramide activates a subset of LPS-induced signaling pathways in murine peritoneal exudate macrophages. PMID:8757882

  1. Fire suppression and detection equipment

    SciTech Connect

    E.E. Bates

    2006-01-15

    Inspection and testing guidelines go beyond the 'Code of Federal Regulation'. Title 30 of the US Code of Federal Regulations (30 CFR) contains requirements and references to national standards for inspection, testing and maintenance of fire suppression and detection equipment for mine operators. However, federal requirements have not kept pace with national standards and best practices. The article lists National Fire Protection (NFPA) standards that are referenced by the US Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) in 30 CFR. It then discusses other NFPA Standards excluded from 30 CFR and explains the NFPA standard development process. 2 refs., 3 tabs., 5 photos.

  2. Distracted by cues for suppressed memories.

    PubMed

    Hertel, Paula T; Hayes, Jeffrey A

    2015-06-01

    We examined the potential cost of practicing suppression of negative thoughts on subsequent performance in an unrelated task. Cues for previously suppressed and unsuppressed (baseline) responses in a think/no-think procedure were displayed as irrelevant flankers for neutral words to be judged for emotional valence. These critical flankers were homographs with one negative meaning denoted by their paired response during learning. Responses to the targets were delayed when suppression cues (compared with baseline cues and new negative homographs) were used as flankers, but only following direct-suppression instructions and not when benign substitutes had been provided to aid suppression. On a final recall test, suppression-induced forgetting following direct suppression and the flanker task was positively correlated with the flanker effect. Experiment 2 replicated these findings. Finally, valence ratings of neutral targets were influenced by the valence of the flankers but not by the prior role of the negative flankers. PMID:25904596

  3. Suppression effects on musical and verbal memory.

    PubMed

    Schendel, Zachary A; Palmer, Caroline

    2007-06-01

    Three experiments contrasted the effects of articulatory suppression on recognition memory for musical and verbal sequences. In Experiment 1, a standard/comparison task was employed, with digit or note sequences presented visually or auditorily while participants remained silent or produced intermittent verbal suppression (saying "the") or musical suppression (singing "la"). Both suppression types decreased performance by equivalent amounts, as compared with no suppression. Recognition accuracy was lower during suppression for visually presented digits than during that for auditorily presented digits (consistent with phonological loop predictions), whereas accuracy was equivalent for visually presented notes and auditory tones. When visual interference filled the retention interval in Experiment 2, performance with visually presented notes but not digits was impaired. Experiment 3 forced participants to translate visually presented music sequences by presenting comparison sequences auditorily. Suppression effects for visually presented music resembled those for digits only when the recognition task required sensory translation of cues. PMID:17848022

  4. Water Mist fire suppression experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Water Mist commercial research program is scheduled to fly an investigation on STS-107 in 2002. This investigation will be flown as an Experimental Mounting Structure (EMS) insert into the updated Combustion Module (CM-2), a sophisticated combustion chamber plus diagnostic equipment. (The investigation hardware is shown here mounted in a non-flight frame similar to the EMS.) Water Mist is a commercial research program by the Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space (CCACS), a NASA Commercial Space Center located at the Colorado School of Mines, in Golden, CO and Industry Partner Environmental Engineering Concepts. The program is focused on developing water mist as a replacement for bromine-based chemical fire suppression agents (halons). By conducting the experiments in microgravity, interference from convection currents is minimized and fundamental knowledge can be gained. This knowledge is incorporated into models, which can be used to simulate a variety of physical environments. The immediate objective of the project is to study the effect of a fine water mist on a laminar propagating flame generated in a propane-air mixture at various equivalence ratios. The effects of droplet size and concentration on the speed of the flame front is used as a measure of the effectiveness of fire suppression in this highly controlled experimental environment.

  5. Suppressed epidemics in multirelational networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Elvis H. W.; Wang, Wei; Xu, C.; Tang, Ming; Do, Younghae; Hui, P. M.

    2015-08-01

    A two-state epidemic model in networks with links mimicking two kinds of relationships between connected nodes is introduced. Links of weights w1 and w0 occur with probabilities p and 1 -p , respectively. The fraction of infected nodes ρ (p ) shows a nonmonotonic behavior, with ρ drops with p for small p and increases for large p . For small to moderate w1/w0 ratios, ρ (p ) exhibits a minimum that signifies an optimal suppression. For large w1/w0 ratios, the suppression leads to an absorbing phase consisting only of healthy nodes within a range pL≤p ≤pR , and an active phase with mixed infected and healthy nodes for p pR . A mean field theory that ignores spatial correlation is shown to give qualitative agreement and capture all the key features. A physical picture that emphasizes the intricate interplay between infections via w0 links and within clusters formed by nodes carrying the w1 links is presented. The absorbing state at large w1/w0 ratios results when the clusters are big enough to disrupt the spread via w0 links and yet small enough to avoid an epidemic within the clusters. A theory that uses the possible local environments of a node as variables is formulated. The theory gives results in good agreement with simulation results, thereby showing the necessity of including longer spatial correlations.

  6. Chaos suppression through asymmetric coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragard, J.; Vidal, G.; Mancini, H.; Mendoza, C.; Boccaletti, S.

    2007-12-01

    We study pairs of identical coupled chaotic oscillators. In particular, we have used Roessler (in the funnel and no funnel regimes), Lorenz, and four-dimensional chaotic Lotka-Volterra models. In all four of these cases, a pair of identical oscillators is asymmetrically coupled. The main result of the numerical simulations is that in all cases, specific values of coupling strength and asymmetry exist that render the two oscillators periodic and synchronized. The values of the coupling strength for which this phenomenon occurs is well below the previously known value for complete synchronization. We have found that this behavior exists for all the chaotic oscillators that we have used in the analysis. We postulate that this behavior is presumably generic to all chaotic oscillators. In order to complete the study, we have tested the robustness of this phenomenon of chaos suppression versus the addition of some Gaussian noise. We found that chaos suppression is robust for the addition of finite noise level. Finally, we propose some extension to this research.

  7. Continuous flash suppression reduces negative afterimages.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Naotsugu; Koch, Christof

    2005-08-01

    Illusions that produce perceptual suppression despite constant retinal input are used to manipulate visual consciousness. Here we report on a powerful variant of existing techniques, continuous flash suppression. Distinct images flashed successively at approximately 10 Hz into one eye reliably suppress an image presented to the other eye. The duration of perceptual suppression is at least ten times greater than that produced by binocular rivalry. Using this tool we show that the strength of the negative afterimage of an adaptor was reduced by half when it was perceptually suppressed by input from the other eye. The more completely the adaptor was suppressed, the more strongly the afterimage intensity was reduced. Paradoxically, trial-to-trial visibility of the adaptor did not correlate with the degree of reduction. Our results imply that formation of afterimages involves neuronal structures that access input from both eyes but that do not correspond directly to the neuronal correlates of perceptual awareness. PMID:15995700

  8. Engineered decoherence: Characterization and suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, Swathi S.; Mahesh, T. S.

    2014-06-01

    Due to omnipresent environmental interferences, quantum coherences inevitably undergo irreversible transformations over certain time scales, thus leading to the loss of encoded information. This process, known as decoherence, has been a major obstacle in realizing efficient quantum information processors. Understanding the mechanism of decoherence is crucial in developing tools to inhibit it. Here we utilize a method proposed by Teklemariam et al. [Phys. Rev. A 67, 062316 (2003), 10.1103/PhysRevA.67.062316] to engineer artificial decoherence in the system qubits by randomly perturbing their surrounding ancilla qubits. Using a two-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum register, we characterize the artificial decoherence by noise spectroscopy and quantum process tomography. Further, we study the efficacy of dynamical decoupling sequences in suppressing the artificial decoherence. Here we describe the experimental results and their comparisons with theoretical simulations.

  9. MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Otsuki, Dai; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Higuchi, Chikahisa

    2015-07-31

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and is activated by its upstream kinase, MAPK kinase 5 (MEK5), which is a member of the MEK family. Although the role of MEK5 has been investigated in several fields, little is known about its role in osteoblastic differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated the role of MEK5 in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. We found that treatment with BIX02189, an inhibitor of MEK5, increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the gene expression of ALP, osteocalcin (OCN) and osterix, as well as it enhanced the calcification of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, osteoblastic cell proliferation decreased at a concentration of greater than 0.5 μM. In addition, knockdown of MEK5 using siRNA induced an increase in ALP activity and in the gene expression of ALP, OCN, and osterix. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type MEK5 decreased ALP activity and attenuated osteoblastic differentiation markers including ALP, OCN and osterix, but promoted cell proliferation. In summary, our results indicated that MEK5 suppressed the osteoblastic differentiation, but promoted osteoblastic cell proliferation. These results implied that MEK5 may play a pivotal role in cell signaling to modulate the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. Thus, inhibition of MEK5 signaling in osteoblasts may be of potential use in the treatment of osteoporosis. - Highlights: • MEK5 inhibitor BIX02189 suppresses proliferation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 knockdown and MEK5 inhibitor promote differentiation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 overexpression inhibits differentiation of osteoblasts.

  10. Genetics of barley hooded suppression.

    PubMed Central

    Roig, Cristina; Pozzi, Carlo; Santi, Luca; Müller, Judith; Wang, Yamei; Stile, Maria Rosaria; Rossini, Laura; Stanca, Michele; Salamini, Francesco

    2004-01-01

    The molecular basis of the barley dominant Hooded (K) mutant is a duplication of 305 bp in intron IV of the homeobox gene Bkn3. A chemical mutagenesis screen was carried out to identify genetical factors that participate in Bkn3 intron-mediated gene regulation. Plants from recurrently mutagenized KK seeds were examined for the suppression of the hooded awn phenotype induced by the K allele and, in total, 41 suK (suppressor of K) recessive mutants were identified. Complementation tests established the existence of five suK loci, and alleles suKB-4, suKC-33, suKD-25, suKE-74, and suKF-76 were studied in detail. All K-suppressed mutants showed a short-awn phenotype. The suK loci have been mapped by bulked segregant analysis nested in a standard mapping procedure based on AFLP markers. K suppressor loci suKB, B, E, and F all map in a short interval of chromosome 7H, while the locus suKD is assigned to chromosome 5H. A complementation test between the four suK mutants mapping on chromosome 7H and the short-awn mutant lks2, located nearby, excluded the allelism between suK loci and lks2. The last experiment made clear that the short-awn phenotype of suK mutants is due to a specific dominant function of the K allele, a function that is independent from the control on hood formation. The suK loci are discussed as candidate participants in the regulation of Bkn3 expression. PMID:15166167

  11. Mechanisms of suppression in mixed allogeneic chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, M.; Sachs, D.H.

    1988-08-01

    Cells with the ability to suppress cytotoxic T lymphocyte generation are found in the spleens of whole-body-irradiated (WBI) mixed allogeneic and syngeneic bone marrow transplant recipients in the early weeks after BMT. Previous studies have indicated that suppression is mediated by null cells similar to natural suppressor (NS) cells (1), and have ruled out several possible trivial explanations for the suppressive effect. We report here the results of additional experiments designed to assess possible mechanisms of suppression. We compared the cell populations after 5 days' incubation of cultures containing normal responding splenocytes plus irradiated allogeneic stimulator cells, with or without a cocultured suppressive chimeric splenocyte population. The data indicate that total viable cell yields are only slightly reduced, if at all, in suppressed cultures, but that the proportion of T cells is markedly reduced as measured at the end of the incubation period. Splenocytes from early BMT recipients do not appear to proliferate during the suppression of a mixed lymphocyte culture, and such populations represent only 15% of cells at the end of the 5-day incubation period. Suppression is strongest when the suppressive population is added at the initiation of MLC, and is lost if addition is delayed beyond day 3. Suppression can be overcome by T cell growth factor (TCGF)--and, to a lesser extent, by recombinant IL-2 (rIL-2), although resting suppressive populations do not consume appreciable amounts of these lymphokines. These results therefore suggest that suppression in MLC may occur primarily during the induction of helper T lymphocytes.

  12. Acoustic Suppression Systems and Related Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R. (Inventor); Kern, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An acoustic suppression system for absorbing and/or scattering acoustic energy comprising a plurality of acoustic targets in a containment is described, the acoustic targets configured to have resonance frequencies allowing the targets to be excited by incoming acoustic waves, the resonance frequencies being adjustable to suppress acoustic energy in a set frequency range. Methods for fabricating and implementing the acoustic suppression system are also provided.

  13. Deconstructing Interocular Suppression: Attention and Divisive Normalization.

    PubMed

    Li, Hsin-Hung; Carrasco, Marisa; Heeger, David J

    2015-10-01

    In interocular suppression, a suprathreshold monocular target can be rendered invisible by a salient competitor stimulus presented in the other eye. Despite decades of research on interocular suppression and related phenomena (e.g., binocular rivalry, flash suppression, continuous flash suppression), the neural processing underlying interocular suppression is still unknown. We developed and tested a computational model of interocular suppression. The model included two processes that contributed to the strength of interocular suppression: divisive normalization and attentional modulation. According to the model, the salient competitor induced a stimulus-driven attentional modulation selective for the location and orientation of the competitor, thereby increasing the gain of neural responses to the competitor and reducing the gain of neural responses to the target. Additional suppression was induced by divisive normalization in the model, similar to other forms of visual masking. To test the model, we conducted psychophysics experiments in which both the size and the eye-of-origin of the competitor were manipulated. For small and medium competitors, behavioral performance was consonant with a change in the response gain of neurons that responded to the target. But large competitors induced a contrast-gain change, even when the competitor was split between the two eyes. The model correctly predicted these results and outperformed an alternative model in which the attentional modulation was eye specific. We conclude that both stimulus-driven attention (selective for location and feature) and divisive normalization contribute to interocular suppression. PMID:26517321

  14. Issues in Numerical Simulation of Fire Suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Lopez, A.R.

    1999-04-12

    This paper outlines general physical and computational issues associated with performing numerical simulation of fire suppression. Fire suppression encompasses a broad range of chemistry and physics over a large range of time and length scales. The authors discuss the dominant physical/chemical processes important to fire suppression that must be captured by a fire suppression model to be of engineering usefulness. First-principles solutions are not possible due to computational limitations, even with the new generation of tera-flop computers. A basic strategy combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation techniques with sub-grid model approximations for processes that have length scales unresolvable by gridding is presented.

  15. ISS Update: Burning and Suppression of Solids

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update Commentator Pat Ryan interviews Paul Ferkul, Principal Investigator for the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS) experiment, about performing combustion experiments in microgravity. ...

  16. Deconstructing Interocular Suppression: Attention and Divisive Normalization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hsin-Hung; Carrasco, Marisa; Heeger, David J.

    2015-01-01

    In interocular suppression, a suprathreshold monocular target can be rendered invisible by a salient competitor stimulus presented in the other eye. Despite decades of research on interocular suppression and related phenomena (e.g., binocular rivalry, flash suppression, continuous flash suppression), the neural processing underlying interocular suppression is still unknown. We developed and tested a computational model of interocular suppression. The model included two processes that contributed to the strength of interocular suppression: divisive normalization and attentional modulation. According to the model, the salient competitor induced a stimulus-driven attentional modulation selective for the location and orientation of the competitor, thereby increasing the gain of neural responses to the competitor and reducing the gain of neural responses to the target. Additional suppression was induced by divisive normalization in the model, similar to other forms of visual masking. To test the model, we conducted psychophysics experiments in which both the size and the eye-of-origin of the competitor were manipulated. For small and medium competitors, behavioral performance was consonant with a change in the response gain of neurons that responded to the target. But large competitors induced a contrast-gain change, even when the competitor was split between the two eyes. The model correctly predicted these results and outperformed an alternative model in which the attentional modulation was eye specific. We conclude that both stimulus-driven attention (selective for location and feature) and divisive normalization contribute to interocular suppression. PMID:26517321

  17. Suppression of inflammation by a synthetic histone mimic.

    PubMed

    Nicodeme, Edwige; Jeffrey, Kate L; Schaefer, Uwe; Beinke, Soren; Dewell, Scott; Chung, Chun-Wa; Chandwani, Rohit; Marazzi, Ivan; Wilson, Paul; Coste, Hervé; White, Julia; Kirilovsky, Jorge; Rice, Charles M; Lora, Jose M; Prinjha, Rab K; Lee, Kevin; Tarakhovsky, Alexander

    2010-12-23

    Interaction of pathogens with cells of the immune system results in activation of inflammatory gene expression. This response, although vital for immune defence, is frequently deleterious to the host due to the exaggerated production of inflammatory proteins. The scope of inflammatory responses reflects the activation state of signalling proteins upstream of inflammatory genes as well as signal-induced assembly of nuclear chromatin complexes that support mRNA expression. Recognition of post-translationally modified histones by nuclear proteins that initiate mRNA transcription and support mRNA elongation is a critical step in the regulation of gene expression. Here we present a novel pharmacological approach that targets inflammatory gene expression by interfering with the recognition of acetylated histones by the bromodomain and extra terminal domain (BET) family of proteins. We describe a synthetic compound (I-BET) that by 'mimicking' acetylated histones disrupts chromatin complexes responsible for the expression of key inflammatory genes in activated macrophages, and confers protection against lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxic shock and bacteria-induced sepsis. Our findings suggest that synthetic compounds specifically targeting proteins that recognize post-translationally modified histones can serve as a new generation of immunomodulatory drugs. PMID:21068722

  18. Bone suppression technique for chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zhimin; Xu, Fan; Zhang, Jane; Zhao, Hui; Hobbs, Susan K.; Wandtke, John C.; Sykes, Anne-Marie; Paul, Narinder; Foos, David

    2014-03-01

    High-contrast bone structures are a major noise contributor in chest radiographic images. A signal of interest in a chest radiograph could be either partially or completely obscured or "overshadowed" by the highly contrasted bone structures in its surrounding. Thus, removing the bone structures, especially the posterior rib and clavicle structures, is highly desirable to increase the visibility of soft tissue density. We developed an innovative technology that offers a solution to suppress bone structures, including posterior ribs and clavicles, on conventional and portable chest X-ray images. The bone-suppression image processing technology includes five major steps: 1) lung segmentation, 2) rib and clavicle structure detection, 3) rib and clavicle edge detection, 4) rib and clavicle profile estimation, and 5) suppression based on the estimated profiles. The bone-suppression software outputs an image with both the rib and clavicle structures suppressed. The rib suppression performance was evaluated on 491 images. On average, 83.06% (±6.59%) of the rib structures on a standard chest image were suppressed based on the comparison of computer-identified rib areas against hand-drawn rib areas, which is equivalent to about an average of one rib that is still visible on a rib-suppressed image based on a visual assessment. Reader studies were performed to evaluate reader performance in detecting lung nodules and pneumothoraces with and without a bone-suppression companion view. Results from reader studies indicated that the bone-suppression technology significantly improved radiologists' performance in the detection of CT-confirmed possible nodules and pneumothoraces on chest radiographs. The results also showed that radiologists were more confident in making diagnoses regarding the presence or absence of an abnormality after rib-suppressed companion views were presented

  19. Photoperiodic Suppression of Drug Reinstatement

    PubMed Central

    Sorg, Barbara A.; Stark, Gemaine; Sergeeva, Anna; Jansen, Heiko T.

    2011-01-01

    The rewarding influence of drugs of abuse varies with time of day and appears to involve interactions between the circadian and the mesocorticolimbic dopamine systems. The circadian system is also intimately involved in measuring daylength. Thus, the present study examined the impact of changing daylength (photoperiod) on cocaine-seeking behaviors. Male Sprague Dawley rats were trained and tested on a 12L:12D light:dark schedule for cocaine-induced reinstatement of conditioned place preference (CPP) at three times of day (Zeitgeber time (ZT): 4, 12, and 20) to determine a preference score. Rats were then shifted to either shorter (6L:18D) or longer (18L:6D) photoperiods and then to constant conditions, re-tested for cocaine-induced reinstatement under each different condition, and then returned to their original photoperiod (12L:12D) and tested once more. Rats exhibited a circadian profile of preference score in constant darkness with a peak at 12h after lights-off. At both ZT4 and ZT20, but not at ZT12, shorter photoperiods profoundly suppressed cocaine reinstatement, which did not recover even after switching back to 12L:12D. In contrast, longer photoperiods did not alter reinstatement. Separate studies showed that the suppression of cocaine reinstatement was not due to repeated testing. In an additional experiment, we examined the photoperiodic regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter (DAT) proteins in drug-naive rats. These results revealed photoperiodic modulation of proteins in the prefrontal cortex and dorsal striatum, but not in the nucleus accumbens or ventral tegmental area. Together, these findings add further support to the circadian genesis of cocaine-seeking behaviors and demonstrate that drug-induced reinstatement is modulated by photoperiod. Furthermore, the results suggest that photoperiod partly contributes to the seasonal expression of certain drug-related behaviors in humans living at different latitudes and thus our

  20. 7 CFR 2902.32 - Dust suppressants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dust suppressants. 2902.32 Section 2902.32... Items § 2902.32 Dust suppressants. (a) Definition. Products formulated to reduce or eliminate the spread of dust associated with gravel roads, dirt parking lots, or similar sources of dust,...

  1. Suppressing Irrelevant Information: Knowledge Activation or Inhibition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Danielle S.; McDaniel, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    In 3 experiments, the authors examined the role of knowledge activation in the suppression of contextually irrelevant meanings for ambiguous homographs. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants with greater baseball knowledge, regardless of reading skill, more quickly suppressed the irrelevant meaning of ambiguous words in baseball-related, but not…

  2. Ferromagnetic resonance probe liftoff suppression apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Thomas J.; Tomeraasen, Paul L.

    1985-01-01

    A liftoff suppression apparatus utilizing a liftoff sensing coil to sense the amount a ferromagnetic resonance probe lifts off the test surface during flaw detection and utilizing the liftoff signal to modulate the probe's field modulating coil to suppress the liftoff effects.

  3. Identifying separate components of surround suppression

    PubMed Central

    Schallmo, Michael-Paul; Murray, Scott O.

    2016-01-01

    Surround suppression is a well-known phenomenon in which the response to a visual stimulus is diminished by the presence of neighboring stimuli. This effect is observed in neural responses in areas such as primary visual cortex, and also manifests in visual contrast perception. Studies in animal models have identified at least two separate mechanisms that may contribute to surround suppression: one that is monocular and resistant to contrast adaptation, and another that is binocular and strongly diminished by adaptation. The current study was designed to investigate whether these two mechanisms exist in humans and if they can be identified psychophysically using eye-of-origin and contrast adaptation manipulations. In addition, we examined the prediction that the monocular suppression component is broadly tuned for orientation, while suppression between eyes is narrowly tuned. Our results confirmed that when center and surrounding stimuli were presented dichoptically (in opposite eyes), suppression was orientation-tuned. Following adaptation in the surrounding region, no dichoptic suppression was observed, and monoptic suppression no longer showed orientation selectivity. These results are consistent with a model of surround suppression that depends on both low-level and higher level components. This work provides a method to assess the separate contributions of these components during spatial context processing in human vision. PMID:26756172

  4. Impacts of suppressing guide on information spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinghong; Zhang, Lin; Ma, Baojun; Wu, Ye

    2016-02-01

    It is quite common that guides are introduced to suppress the information spreading in modern society for different purposes. In this paper, an agent-based model is established to quantitatively analyze the impacts of suppressing guides on information spreading. We find that the spreading threshold depends on the attractiveness of the information and the topology of the social network with no suppressing guides at all. Usually, one would expect that the existence of suppressing guides in the spreading procedure may result in less diffusion of information within the overall network. However, we find that sometimes the opposite is true: the manipulating nodes of suppressing guides may lead to more extensive information spreading when there are audiences with the reversal mind. These results can provide valuable theoretical references to public opinion guidance on various information, e.g., rumor or news spreading.

  5. Burst suppression probability algorithms: state-space methods for tracking EEG burst suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemali, Jessica; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L.; Solt, Ken; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Burst suppression is an electroencephalogram pattern in which bursts of electrical activity alternate with an isoelectric state. This pattern is commonly seen in states of severely reduced brain activity such as profound general anesthesia, anoxic brain injuries, hypothermia and certain developmental disorders. Devising accurate, reliable ways to quantify burst suppression is an important clinical and research problem. Although thresholding and segmentation algorithms readily identify burst suppression periods, analysis algorithms require long intervals of data to characterize burst suppression at a given time and provide no framework for statistical inference. Approach. We introduce the concept of the burst suppression probability (BSP) to define the brain's instantaneous propensity of being in the suppressed state. To conduct dynamic analyses of burst suppression we propose a state-space model in which the observation process is a binomial model and the state equation is a Gaussian random walk. We estimate the model using an approximate expectation maximization algorithm and illustrate its application in the analysis of rodent burst suppression recordings under general anesthesia and a patient during induction of controlled hypothermia. Main result. The BSP algorithms track burst suppression on a second-to-second time scale, and make possible formal statistical comparisons of burst suppression at different times. Significance. The state-space approach suggests a principled and informative way to analyze burst suppression that can be used to monitor, and eventually to control, the brain states of patients in the operating room and in the intensive care unit.

  6. Hydrogen suppresses UO 2 corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbol, Paul; Fors, Patrik; Gouder, Thomas; Spahiu, Kastriot

    2009-08-01

    Release of long-lived radionuclides such as plutonium and caesium from spent nuclear fuel in deep geological repositories will depend mainly on the dissolution rate of the UO 2 fuel matrix. This dissolution rate will, in turn, depend on the redox conditions at the fuel surface. Under oxidative conditions UO 2 will be oxidised to the 1000 times more soluble UO 2.67. This may occur in a repository as the reducing deep groundwater becomes locally oxidative at the fuel surface under the effect of α-radiolysis, the process by which α-particles emitted from the fuel split water molecules. On the other hand, the groundwater corrodes canister iron generating large amounts of hydrogen. The role of molecular hydrogen as reductant in a deep bedrock repository is questioned. Here we show evidence of a surface-catalysed reaction, taking place in the H 2-UO 2-H 2O system where molecular hydrogen is able to reduce oxidants originating from α-radiolysis. In our experiment the UO 2 surface remained stoichiometric proving that the expected oxidation of UO 2.00 to UO 2.67 due to radiolytic oxidants was absent. As a consequence, the dissolution of UO 2 stopped when equilibrium was reached between the solid phase and U 4+ species in the aqueous phase. The steady-state concentration of uranium in solution was determined to be 9 × 10 -12 M, about 30 times lower than previously reported for reducing conditions. Our findings show that fuel dissolution is suppressed by H 2. Consequently, radiotoxic nuclides in spent nuclear fuel will remain immobilised in the UO 2 matrix. A mechanism for the surface-catalysed reaction between molecular hydrogen and radiolytic oxidants is proposed.

  7. MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Otsuki, Dai; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Higuchi, Chikahisa

    2015-07-31

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and is activated by its upstream kinase, MAPK kinase 5 (MEK5), which is a member of the MEK family. Although the role of MEK5 has been investigated in several fields, little is known about its role in osteoblastic differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated the role of MEK5 in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. We found that treatment with BIX02189, an inhibitor of MEK5, increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the gene expression of ALP, osteocalcin (OCN) and osterix, as well as it enhanced the calcification of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, osteoblastic cell proliferation decreased at a concentration of greater than 0.5 μM. In addition, knockdown of MEK5 using siRNA induced an increase in ALP activity and in the gene expression of ALP, OCN, and osterix. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type MEK5 decreased ALP activity and attenuated osteoblastic differentiation markers including ALP, OCN and osterix, but promoted cell proliferation. In summary, our results indicated that MEK5 suppressed the osteoblastic differentiation, but promoted osteoblastic cell proliferation. These results implied that MEK5 may play a pivotal role in cell signaling to modulate the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. Thus, inhibition of MEK5 signaling in osteoblasts may be of potential use in the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:25998381

  8. Mutual Suppression: Comment on Paulhus et Al. (2004)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Paulhus, Robins, Trzesniewski, and Tracy ("Multivariate Behavioral Research," 2004, 39, 305-328) suggested that the three types of two-predictor suppression situations--classical suppression, cooperative suppression, and net suppression--can all be considered special cases of mutual suppression, in that the magnitude of each of the two…

  9. Psychopathology and thought suppression: a quantitative review.

    PubMed

    Magee, Joshua C; Harden, K Paige; Teachman, Bethany A

    2012-04-01

    Recent theories of psychopathology have suggested that thought suppression intensifies the persistence of intrusive thoughts, and proposed that difficulty with thought suppression may differ between groups with and without psychopathology. The current meta-analytic review evaluates empirical evidence for difficulty with thought suppression as a function of the presence and specific type of psychopathology. Based on theoretical proposals from the psychopathology literature, diagnosed and analogue samples were expected to show greater recurrence of intrusive thoughts during thought suppression attempts than non-clinical samples. However, results showed no overall differences in the recurrence of thoughts due to thought suppression between groups with and without psychopathology. There was, nevertheless, variation in the recurrence of thoughts across different forms of psychopathology, including relatively less recurrence during thought suppression for samples with symptoms of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, compared to non-clinical samples. However, these differences were typically small and provided only mixed support for existing theories. Implications for cognitive theories of intrusive thoughts are discussed, including proposed mechanisms underlying thought suppression. PMID:22388007

  10. Suppression effects in feature-based attention

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yixue; Miller, James; Liu, Taosheng

    2015-01-01

    Attending to a feature enhances visual processing of that feature, but it is less clear what occurs to unattended features. Single-unit recording studies in middle temporal (MT) have shown that neuronal modulation is a monotonic function of the difference between the attended and neuron's preferred direction. Such a relationship should predict a monotonic suppressive effect in psychophysical performance. However, past research on suppressive effects of feature-based attention has remained inconclusive. We investigated the suppressive effect for motion direction, orientation, and color in three experiments. We asked participants to detect a weak signal among noise and provided a partially valid feature cue to manipulate attention. We measured performance as a function of the offset between the cued and signal feature. We also included neutral trials where no feature cues were presented to provide a baseline measure of performance. Across three experiments, we consistently observed enhancement effects when the target feature and cued feature coincided and suppression effects when the target feature deviated from the cued feature. The exact profile of suppression was different across feature dimensions: Whereas the profile for direction exhibited a “rebound” effect, the profiles for orientation and color were monotonic. These results demonstrate that unattended features are suppressed during feature-based attention, but the exact suppression profile depends on the specific feature. Overall, the results are largely consistent with neurophysiological data and support the feature-similarity gain model of attention. PMID:26067533

  11. Integrin endosomal signalling suppresses anoikis

    PubMed Central

    Alanko, Jonna; Mai, Anja; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Schauer, Kristine; Kaukonen, Riina; Saari, Markku; Goud, Bruno; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    to enhanced signalling of co-trafficked receptor tyrosine kinases10, 11 it has remained unclear whether endocytosed active integrins signal in endosomes. Here, we demonstrate that integrin signalling is not restricted to focal adhesions as previously described and that endocytosis is necessary for full ECM-induced, integrin mediated ERK, AKT and FAK signalling. We find that FAK binds directly to and can become activated on purified endosomes. Moreover, the FERM-domain of FAK is able to bind purified integrin containing endosomes, suggesting the potential for integrin signalling complexes to assemble on endosomes after internalization of active integrins. Importantly, FAK is required for anchorage-independent growth and suppression of anoikis 12. Integrin endosomal signalling correlates with reduced anoikis sensitivity in normal cells and anchorage-independent growth and metastasis in breast cancer cells. PMID:26436690

  12. Suppression and retinal correspondence in intermittent exotropia.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, J; Record, C D

    1986-01-01

    Suppression scotomas and retinal projection (retinal correspondence) were measured in six intermittent exotropes during deviation. Measurements used red-green anaglyph stimuli presented on a black background which could be varied from 3.4 minutes of arc to 3 degrees 24'. Results showed non-suppression of all points between the fovea and the diplopia point. Harmonious anomalous retinal correspondence was usually observed. Two subjects had spontaneous changes from anomalous retinal correspondence to normal retinal correspondence without a concurrent change in ocular position. Conventional testing resulted in more variable results in regard to retinal correspondence and suppression, suggesting that non-suppression and anomalous retinal correspondence occur when black backgrounds are used for testing. PMID:3756124

  13. METHOD OF SUPPRESSING GASTROINTESTINAL UREASE ACTIVITY

    DOEpatents

    Visek, W.J.

    1963-04-23

    This patent shows a method of increasing the growth rate of chicks. Certain diacyl substituted ureas such as alloxan, murexide, and barbituric acid are added to their feed, thereby suppressing gastrointestinal urease activity and thus promoting growth. (AEC)

  14. Strangeness suppression in the unquenched quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijker, Roelof; García-Tecocoatzi, Hugo; Santopinto, Elena

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we discuss the strangeness suppression in the proton in the framework of the unquenched quark model. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the values extracted from CERN and JLab experiments.

  15. Attention modulates sensory suppression during back movements.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle, Lore; Juravle, Georgiana; Spence, Charles; Crombez, Geert; Van Damme, Stefaan

    2013-06-01

    Tactile perception is often impaired during movement. The present study investigated whether such sensory suppression also occurs during back movements, and whether this would be modulated by attention. In two tactile detection experiments, participants simultaneously engaged in a movement task, in which they executed a back-bending movement, and a perceptual task, consisting of the detection of subtle tactile stimuli administered to their upper or lower back. The focus of participants' attention was manipulated by raising the probability that one of the back locations would be stimulated. The results revealed that tactile detection was suppressed during the execution of the back movements. Furthermore, the results of Experiment 2 revealed that when the stimulus was always presented to the attended location, tactile suppression was substantially reduced, suggesting that sensory suppression can be modulated by top-down attentional processes. The potential of this paradigm for studying tactile information processing in clinical populations is discussed. PMID:23454431

  16. Quadratic dynamical decoupling with nonuniform error suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Quiroz, Gregory; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2011-10-15

    We analyze numerically the performance of the near-optimal quadratic dynamical decoupling (QDD) single-qubit decoherence errors suppression method [J. West et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 130501 (2010)]. The QDD sequence is formed by nesting two optimal Uhrig dynamical decoupling sequences for two orthogonal axes, comprising N{sub 1} and N{sub 2} pulses, respectively. Varying these numbers, we study the decoherence suppression properties of QDD directly by isolating the errors associated with each system basis operator present in the system-bath interaction Hamiltonian. Each individual error scales with the lowest order of the Dyson series, therefore immediately yielding the order of decoherence suppression. We show that the error suppression properties of QDD are dependent upon the parities of N{sub 1} and N{sub 2}, and near-optimal performance is achieved for general single-qubit interactions when N{sub 1}=N{sub 2}.

  17. Flame Suppression Agent, System and Uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous droplets encapsulated in a flame retardant polymer are useful in suppressing combustion. Upon exposure to a flame, the encapsulated aqueous droplets rupture and vaporize, removing heat and displacing oxygen to retard the combustion process. The polymer encapsulant, through decomposition, may further add free radicals to the combustion atmosphere, thereby further retarding the combustion process. The encapsulated aqueous droplets may be used as a replacement to halon, water mist and dry powder flame suppression systems.

  18. Suppression of the Primordial Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumurtushaa, Gansukh; Koh, Seoktae; Lee, Bum-Hoon

    2016-07-01

    We study the primordial gravitational waves induced by space-space condensate inflation model. For modes that cross the comoving horizon during matter dominated era, we calculate the energy spectrum of gravitational waves. The energy spectrum of gravitational waves for our model has significantly suppressed in the low frequency range. The suppression occurs due to the phase transition during the early evolution of the Universe and depends on model parameter.

  19. On the suppression of vaccination dissent.

    PubMed

    Martin, Brian

    2015-02-01

    Dissenters from the dominant views about vaccination sometimes are subject to adverse actions, including abusive comment, threats, formal complaints,censorship, and de registration, a phenomenon that can be called suppression of dissent. Three types of cases are examined: scientists and physicians; a high-profile researcher; and a citizen campaigner. Comparing the methods used in these different types of cases provides a preliminary framework for understanding the dynamics of suppression in terms of vulnerabilities. PMID:24658876

  20. Neural repetition suppression reflects fulfilled perceptual expectations

    PubMed Central

    Summerfield, Christopher; Monti, Jim M.P.; Trittschuh, Emily H.; Mesulam, M.-Marsel; Egner, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    Stimulus-evoked neural activity is attenuated upon stimulus repetition (‘repetition suppression’), a phenomenon attributed to largely automatic processes in sensory neurons. By manipulating the likelihood of stimulus repetition, we show that repetition suppression in the human brain is reduced when stimulus repetitions are improbable (and thus, unexpected). These data suggest that repetition suppression reflects a relative reduction in top-down perceptual ‘prediction error’ when processing an expected compared to an unexpected stimulus. PMID:19160497

  1. Noise suppression in surface microseismic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forghani-Arani, Farnoush; Batzle, Mike; Behura, Jyoti; Willis, Mark; Haines, Seth S.; Davidson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a passive noise suppression technique, based on the τ − p transform. In the τ − p domain, one can separate microseismic events from surface noise based on distinct characteristics that are not visible in the time-offset domain. By applying the inverse τ − p transform to the separated microseismic event, we suppress the surface noise in the data. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and is superior to existing techniques for passive noise suppression in the sense that it preserves the waveform. We introduce a passive noise suppression technique, based on the τ − p transform. In the τ − p domain, one can separate microseismic events from surface noise based on distinct characteristics that are not visible in the time-offset domain. By applying the inverse τ − p transform to the separated microseismic event, we suppress the surface noise in the data. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and is superior to existing techniques for passive noise suppression in the sense that it preserves the waveform.

  2. Feature-based attention modulates surround suppression

    PubMed Central

    Flevaris, Anastasia V.; Murray, Scott O.

    2015-01-01

    Stimuli appearing in the surround of the classical receptive field (CRF) can reduce neuronal firing and perceived contrast of a preferred stimulus in the CRF, a phenomenon referred to as surround suppression. Suppression is greatest when the surrounding stimulus has the same orientation and spatial frequency (SF) as the central target. Although spatial attention has been shown to influence surround suppression, the effects of feature-based attention have yet to be characterized. Using behavioral contrast adaptation in humans, we examined center-surround interactions between SF and orientation, and asked whether attending to one feature dimension versus the other influenced suppression. A center-surround triplet comprised of a central target Gabor and two flanking Gabors were used for adaptation. The flankers could have the same SF and orientation as the target, or differ in one or both of the feature dimensions. Contrast thresholds were measured for the target before and after adapting to center-surround triplets, and postadaptation thresholds were taken as an indirect measure of surround suppression. Both feature dimensions contributed to surround suppression and did not summate. Moreover, when center and surround had the same feature value in one dimension (e.g., same orientation) but had different values in the other dimension (e.g., different SF), there was more suppression when attention was directed to the feature dimension that matched between center and surround than when attention was directed to the feature dimension that differed. These results demonstrate that feature-based attention can influence center-surround interactions by enhancing the effects of the attended dimension. PMID:25630380

  3. Suppression on Your Own Terms: Internally Generated Displays of Craving Suppression Predict Rebound Effects

    PubMed Central

    Sayers, W. Michael; Sayette, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Research on emotion suppression has shown a rebound effect, in which expression of the targeted emotion increases following a suppression attempt. In prior investigations, participants have been explicitly instructed to suppress their responses, which has drawn the act of suppression into metaconsciousness. Yet emerging research emphasizes the importance of nonconscious approaches to emotion regulation. This study is the first in which a craving rebound effect was evaluated without simultaneously raising awareness about suppression. We aimed to link spontaneously occurring attempts to suppress cigarette craving to increased smoking motivation assessed immediately thereafter. Smokers (n = 66) received a robust cued smoking-craving manipulation while their facial responses were videotaped and coded using the Facial Action Coding System. Following smoking-cue exposure, participants completed a behavioral choice task previously found to index smoking motivation. Participants evincing suppression-related facial expressions during cue exposure subsequently valued smoking more than did those not displaying these expressions, which suggests that internally generated suppression can exert powerful rebound effects. PMID:23842957

  4. 40 CFR 279.82 - Use as a dust suppressant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use as a dust suppressant. 279.82... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF USED OIL Standards for Use as a Dust Suppressant and Disposal of Used Oil § 279.82 Use as a dust suppressant. (a) The use of used oil as a dust suppressant...

  5. Wing rock suppression using forebody vortex control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, T. T.; Ong, L. Y.; Suarez, C. J.; Malcolm, G. N.

    1991-01-01

    Static and free-to-roll tests were conducted in a water tunnel with a configuration that consisted of a highly-slender forebody and 78-deg sweep delta wings. Flow visualization was performed and the roll angle histories were obtained. The fluid mechanisms governing the wing rock of this configuration were identified. Different means of suppressing wing rock by controlling the forebody vortices using small blowing jets were also explored. Steady blowing was found to be capable of suppressing wing rock, but significant vortex asymmetries had to be induced at the same time. On the other hand, alternating pulsed blowing on the left and right sides of the forebody was demonstrated to be potentially an effective means of suppressing wing rock and eliminating large asymmetric moments at high angles of attack.

  6. Modeling extreme ultraviolet suppression of electrostatic analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Gershman, Daniel J.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-04-15

    In addition to analyzing energy-per-charge ratios of incident ions, electrostatic analyzers (ESAs) for spaceborne time-of-flight mass spectrometers must also protect detectors from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons from the Sun. The required suppression rate often exceeds 1:10{sup 7} and is generally established in tests upon instrument design and integration. This paper describes a novel technique to model the EUV suppression of ESAs using photon ray tracing integrated into SIMION, the most commonly used ion optics design software for such instruments. The paper compares simulation results with measurements taken from the ESA of the Mass instrument flying onboard the Wind spacecraft. This novel technique enables an active inclusion of EUV suppression requirements in the ESA design process. Furthermore, the simulation results also motivate design rules for such instruments.

  7. Propofol and sevoflurane induce distinct burst suppression patterns in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Jonathan D.; Westover, M. Brandon; Ching, ShiNung; Brown, Emery N.; Solt, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Burst suppression is an EEG pattern characterized by alternating periods of high-amplitude activity (bursts) and relatively low amplitude activity (suppressions). Burst suppression can arise from several different pathological conditions, as well as from general anesthesia. Here we review current algorithms that are used to quantify burst suppression, its various etiologies, and possible underlying mechanisms. We then review clinical applications of anesthetic-induced burst suppression. Finally, we report the results of our new study showing clear electrophysiological differences in burst suppression patterns induced by two common general anesthetics, sevoflurane and propofol. Our data suggest that the circuit mechanisms that generate burst suppression activity may differ among general anesthetics. PMID:25565990

  8. Large-Scale Identification and Analysis of Suppressive Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cokol, Murat; Weinstein, Zohar B.; Yilancioglu, Kaan; Tasan, Murat; Doak, Allison; Cansever, Dilay; Mutlu, Beste; Li, Siyang; Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul; Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Guvenek, Aysegul; Cokol, Melike; Cetiner, Selim; Giaever, Guri; Iossifov, Ivan; Nislow, Corey; Shoichet, Brian; Roth, Frederick P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY One drug may suppress the effects of another. Although knowledge of drug suppression is vital to avoid efficacy-reducing drug interactions or discover countermeasures for chemical toxins, drug-drug suppression relationships have not been systematically mapped. Here, we analyze the growth response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to anti-fungal compound (“drug”) pairs. Among 440 ordered drug pairs, we identified 94 suppressive drug interactions. Using only pairs not selected on the basis of their suppression behavior, we provide an estimate of the prevalence of suppressive interactions between anti-fungal compounds as 17%. Analysis of the drug suppression network suggested that Bromopyruvate is a frequently suppressive drug and Staurosporine is a frequently suppressed drug. We investigated potential explanations for suppressive drug interactions, including chemogenomic analysis, coaggregation, and pH effects, allowing us to explain the interaction tendencies of Bromopyruvate. PMID:24704506

  9. Large-scale identification and analysis of suppressive drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Cokol, Murat; Weinstein, Zohar B; Yilancioglu, Kaan; Tasan, Murat; Doak, Allison; Cansever, Dilay; Mutlu, Beste; Li, Siyang; Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul; Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Guvenek, Aysegul; Cokol, Melike; Cetiner, Selim; Giaever, Guri; Iossifov, Ivan; Nislow, Corey; Shoichet, Brian; Roth, Frederick P

    2014-04-24

    One drug may suppress the effects of another. Although knowledge of drug suppression is vital to avoid efficacy-reducing drug interactions or discover countermeasures for chemical toxins, drug-drug suppression relationships have not been systematically mapped. Here, we analyze the growth response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to anti-fungal compound ("drug") pairs. Among 440 ordered drug pairs, we identified 94 suppressive drug interactions. Using only pairs not selected on the basis of their suppression behavior, we provide an estimate of the prevalence of suppressive interactions between anti-fungal compounds as 17%. Analysis of the drug suppression network suggested that Bromopyruvate is a frequently suppressive drug and Staurosporine is a frequently suppressed drug. We investigated potential explanations for suppressive drug interactions, including chemogenomic analysis, coaggregation, and pH effects, allowing us to explain the interaction tendencies of Bromopyruvate. PMID:24704506

  10. Vibration Isolation, Suppression, Steering, and Pointing (VISSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, Ben K.; Rahman, Zahidul; Kedikian, Roland

    1996-01-01

    The design of a six degree of freedom flight vibration isolation suppression and steering (VISS) subsystem for a mid-wave infrared camera on the top of a spacecraft is presented. The development of a long stroke piezoelectric, redundant, compact, low stiffness and power efficient actuator is summarized. A subsystem that could be built and validated for flight within 15 months was investigated. The goals of the VISS are 20 dB vibration isolation above 2 Hz, 15 dB vibration suppression of disturbances at about 60 Hz and 120 Hz, and +/- 0.3 deg steering at 2 Hz and 4 Hz.

  11. Task motivation influences alpha suppression following errors.

    PubMed

    Compton, Rebecca J; Bissey, Bryn; Worby-Selim, Sharoda

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the present research is to examine the influence of motivation on a novel error-related neural marker, error-related alpha suppression (ERAS). Participants completed an attentionally demanding flanker task under conditions that emphasized either speed or accuracy or under conditions that manipulated the monetary value of errors. Conditions in which errors had greater motivational value produced greater ERAS, that is, greater alpha suppression following errors compared to correct trials. A second study found that a manipulation of task difficulty did not affect ERAS. Together, the results confirm that ERAS is both a robust phenomenon and one that is sensitive to motivational factors. PMID:24673621

  12. Suppressed conductance in a metallic graphene nanojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haidong; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Yisong

    2009-01-01

    The linear conductance spectrum of a metallic graphene junction formed by interconnecting two gapless graphene nanoribbons is calculated. A strong conductance suppression appears in the vicinity of the Dirac point. We found that such a conductance suppression arises from the antiresonance effect associated with an edge state localized at the zigzag-edged shoulder of the junction. The conductance valley due to the antiresonance is rather robust in the presence of the impurity and vacancy scattering. Also the center of the conductance valley can be readily tuned by an electric field exerted on the wider nanoribbon.

  13. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1995-01-01

    Method of active suppression of nonlinear and nonstationary vibrations developed to reduce sonic fatigue and interior noise in high-speed aircraft. Structure of aircraft exhibits periodic, chaotic, and random vibrations when forced by high-intensity sound from jet engines, shock waves, turbulence, and separated flows. Method of suppressing vibrations involves feedback control: Strain gauges or other sensors mounted in paths of propagation of vibrations on structure sense vibrations; outputs of sensors processed into control signal applied to actuator mounted on structure, inducing compensatory forces.

  14. Thought Suppression in Patients With Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Miklowitz, David J.; Alatiq, Yousra; Geddes, John R.; Goodwin, Guy M.; Williams, J. Mark G.

    2010-01-01

    Suppression of negative thoughts has been observed under experimental conditions among patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) but has never been examined among patients with bipolar disorder (BD). Patients with BD (n = 36), patients with MDD (n = 20), and healthy controls (n = 20) completed a task that required unscrambling 6-word strings into 5-word sentences, leaving out 1 word. The extra word allowed the sentences to be completed in a negative, neutral, or “hyperpositive” (manic/goal-oriented) way. Participants completed the sentences under conditions of cognitive load (rehearsing a 6-digit number), reward (a bell tone), load and reward, or neither load nor reward. We hypothesized that patients with BD would engage in more active suppression of negative and hyperpositive thoughts than would controls, as revealed by their unscrambling more word strings into negative or hyperpositive sentences. Under conditions of load or reward and in the absence of either load or reward, patients with BD unscrambled more negative sentences than did controls. Under conditions of reward, patients with BD unscrambled more negative sentences than did patients with MDD. Patients with BD also reported more use of negative thought suppression than did controls. These group differences in negative biases were no longer significant when current mood states were controlled. Finally, the groups did not differ in the proportion of hyperpositive sentence completions in any condition. Thought suppression may provide a critical locus for psychological interventions in BD. PMID:20455608

  15. Sound-suppressing structure with thermal relief

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, D. O.; Holowach, J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Sound-suppressing structure comprising stacked acoustic panels wherein the inner high frequency panel is mounted for thermal expansion with respect to the outer low frequency panel is discussed. Slip joints eliminate the potential for thermal stresses, and a thermal expansion gap between the panels provides for additional relative thermal growth while reducing heat convection into the low frequency panel.

  16. Government Doublethink: Protection or Suppression in Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Miriam A.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses regulations and actions related to government withholding, suppressing, and altering information since September 11, 2001. Topics include conflicting goals of an informed citizenry versus national security, science and technology progress versus protection of sensitive information, and public health versus ideology; political pressure;…

  17. ICE FOG SUPPRESSION USING THIN CHEMICAL FILMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ice fog suppression experiments on the Fort Wainwright Power Plant cooling pond were conducted during the winters of 1974-76. Baseline information studies occupied a sizeable portion of the available ice fog weather in 1974-75. Hexadecanol was added to the pond and dramatically i...

  18. Suppressed Carrier Synchronizers for ISI Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinedi, Sami M.; Simon, Marvin K.

    1996-01-01

    We demonstrate a class of suppressed carrier synchronization loops that are motivated by MAP estimation theory and in the presence of ISI outperform the conventional I-Q loop which is designed on the basis of zero ISI (wideband assumption). The measure of comparison used is the so-called.

  19. Decoherence suppression in a resonant driving field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minns, R. S.; Kutteruf, M. R.; Commisso, M. A.; Jones, R. R.

    2008-04-01

    Resonant radio frequency (rf) control fields have been employed to suppress decoherence in single quantum bits (qubits) encoded in the probability amplitudes of np fine-structure states in Li Rydberg atoms. As described previously [1], static electric-field tuning of the spin and orbital angular momentum composition of the fine-structure eigenstates enables qubit storage in an approximate decoherence-free subspace in which phase errors due to small stray electric and magnetic fields are strongly suppressed. In addition, it was found that sequences of short electric field pulses could be utilized in a 'bang-bang' dynamic decoupling scheme to improve coherence times. We now show that a continuous resonant rf field can also suppress decoherence in this system. The rf-dressed fine-structure states form a more robust basis in which the energy splitting between the component qubit levels is locked to the drive frequency, and decoherence is essentially eliminated. Measurements of the operational range of rf frequency and field strength required to achieve decoherence suppression are in agreement with the predictions of a two-level model.

  20. Noise suppression methods for robust speech processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boll, S. F.; Kajiya, J.; Youngberg, J.; Petersen, T. L.; Ravindra, H.; Done, W.; Cox, B. V.; Cohen, E.

    1981-04-01

    Robust speech processing in practical operating environments requires effective environmental and processor noise suppression. This report describes the technical findings and accomplishments during the reporting period for the research program funded to develop real-time, compressed speech analysis-synthesis algorithms whose performance is invariant under signal contamination. Fulfillment of this requirement is necessary to insure reliable secure compressed speech transmission within realistic military command and control environments. Overall contributions resulting from this research program include the understanding of how environmental noise degrades narrow band, coded speech, development of appropriate real-time noise suppression algorithms, and development of speech parameter identification methods that consider signal contamination as a fundamental element in the estimation process. This report describes the research and results in the areas of noise suppression using the dual input adaptive noise cancellation articulation rate change techniques, spectral subtraction and a description of an experiment which demonstrated that the spectral substraction noise suppression algorithm can improve the intelligibility of 2400 bps, LPC-10 coded, helicopter speech by 10.6 points. In addition summaries are included of prior studies in Constant-Q signal analysis and synthesis, perceptual modelling, speech activity detection, and pole-zero modelling of noisy signals. Three recent studies in speech modelling using the critical band analysis-synthesis transform and using splines are then presented. Finally a list of major publications generated under this contract is given.

  1. Quantum origin of suppression for vacuum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balitsky, Ja. V.; Kiselev, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    By example of a model with a spatially global scalar field, we show that the energy density of zero-point modes is exponentially suppressed by an average number of field quanta in a finite volume with respect to the energy density in the stationary state of minimal energy. We describe cosmological implications of mechanism.

  2. Suppression of ras-transformants (review).

    PubMed

    Kuzumaki, N

    1991-01-01

    Transforming ras genes are the oncogenes most frequently identified in human cancers. This justifies the intense interest in finding ways to suppress oncogenicity in these gene family-mediated transformants. The methods of suppression can be classified as 1) genetical, 2) biological and 3) pharmacological. Most of the reagents used for the suppression inhibit rodent transformants induced by transfected viral or activated cellular ras oncogenes, but some of the reagents are also effective when applied to natural human transformants that contain activated ras oncogenes. The growth and tumorigenicity of the ras-transformants are suppressed by the inhibition of the integration, transcription, translation or post-translational modification of the ras genes and p21 ras proteins, as well as the inhibition of the expression of genes which collaborate in the ras-transformation or the enhancement of some tumor suppressor genes. These observations offer novel approaches to the investigation of malignant transformation by ras-oncogenes, and have potential application in treatment of ras-oncogene-induced tumors. PMID:2018365

  3. Radio Science Measurements with Suppressed Carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, Sami; Divsalar, Dariush; Oudrhiri, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Radio Science started when it became apparent with early Solar missions that occultations by planetary atmospheres would affect the quality of radio communications. Since then the atmospheric properties and other aspects of planetary science, solar science, and fundamental physics were studied by scientists. Radio Science data was always extracted from a received pure residual carrier (without data modulation). For some missions, it is very desirable to obtain Radio Science data from a suppressed carrier modulation. In this paper we propose a method to extract Radio Science data when a coded suppressed carrier modulation is used in deep space communications. Type of modulation can be BPSK, QPSK, OQPSK, MPSK or even GMSK. However we concentrate mostly on BPSK modulation. The proposed method for suppressed carrier simply tries to wipe out data that acts as an interference for Radio Science measurements. In order to measure the estimation errors in amplitude and phase of the Radio Science data we use Cramer-Rao bound (CRB). The CRB for the suppressed carrier modulation with non-ideal data wiping is then compared with residual carrier modulation under the same noise condition. The method of derivation of CRB for non-ideal data wiping is an innovative method that presented here. Some numerical results are provided for coded system.

  4. Polyphosphate suppresses complement via the terminal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wat, Jovian M.; Foley, Jonathan H.; Krisinger, Michael J.; Ocariza, Linnette Mae; Lei, Victor; Wasney, Gregory A.; Lameignere, Emilie; Strynadka, Natalie C.; Smith, Stephanie A.; Morrissey, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Polyphosphate, synthesized by all cells, is a linear polymer of inorganic phosphate. When released into the circulation, it exerts prothrombotic and proinflammatory activities by modulating steps in the coagulation cascade. We examined the role of polyphosphate in regulating the evolutionarily related proteolytic cascade complement. In erythrocyte lysis assays, polyphosphate comprising more than 1000 phosphate units suppressed total hemolytic activity with a concentration to reduce maximal lysis to 50% that was 10-fold lower than with monophosphate. In the ion- and enzyme-independent terminal pathway complement assay, polyphosphate suppressed complement in a concentration- and size-dependent manner. Phosphatase-treated polyphosphate lost its ability to suppress complement, confirming that polymer integrity is required. Sequential addition of polyphosphate to the terminal pathway assay showed that polyphosphate interferes with complement only when added before formation of the C5b-7 complex. Physicochemical analyses using native gels, gel filtration, and differential scanning fluorimetry revealed that polyphosphate binds to and destabilizes C5b,6, thereby reducing the capacity of the membrane attack complex to bind to and lyse the target cell. In summary, we have added another function to polyphosphate in blood, demonstrating that it dampens the innate immune response by suppressing complement. These findings further establish the complex relationship between coagulation and innate immunity. PMID:24335501

  5. Spacecraft Fire Suppression: Testing and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbud-Madrid, Angel; McKinnon, J. Thomas; Delplanque, Jean-Pierre; Kailasanath, Kazhikathra; Gokoglu, Suleyman; Wu, Ming-Shin

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this project is the testing and evaluation of the effectiveness of a variety of fire suppressants and fire-response techniques that will be used in the next generation of spacecraft (Crew Exploration Vehicle, CEV) and planetary habitats. From the many lessons learned in the last 40 years of space travel, there is common agreement in the spacecraft fire safety community that a new fire suppression system will be needed for the various types of fire threats anticipated in new space vehicles and habitats. To date, there is no single fire extinguishing system that can address all possible fire situations in a spacecraft in an effective, reliable, clean, and safe way. The testing conducted under this investigation will not only validate the various numerical models that are currently being developed, but it will provide new design standards on fire suppression that can then be applied to the next generation of spacecraft extinguishment systems. The test program will provide validation of scaling methods by conducting small, medium, and large scale fires. A variety of suppression methods will be tested, such as water mist, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen with single and multiple injection points and direct or distributed agent deployment. These injection methods cover the current ISS fire suppression method of a portable hand-held fire extinguisher spraying through a port in a rack and also next generation spacecraft units that may have a multi-point suppression delivery system built into the design. Consideration will be given to the need of a crew to clean-up the agent and recharge the extinguishers in flight in a long-duration mission. The fire suppression methods mentioned above will be used to extinguish several fire scenarios that have been identified as the most relevant to spaceflight, such as overheated wires, cable bundles, and circuit boards, as well as burning cloth and paper. Further testing will be conducted in which obstructions and

  6. Immune Suppression and Immune Activation in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D.; Evans, Dwight L.

    2010-01-01

    Depression has been characterized as a disorder of both immune suppression and immune activation. Markers of impaired cellular immunity (decreased natural killer cell cytotoxicity) and inflammation (elevated IL-6, TNFα, CRP) have been associated with depression. These immunological markers have been associated with other medical illnesses, suggesting that immune dysregulation may be a central feature common to both depression and to its frequent medical comorbidities. Yet the significant associations of findings of both immune suppression and immune activation with depression raise questions concerning the relationship between these two classes of immunological observations. Depressed populations are heterogeneous groups, and there may be differences in the immune profiles of populations that are more narrowly defined in terms of symptom profile and/or demographic features. There have been few reports concurrently investigating markers of immune suppression and immune activation in the same depressed individuals. An emerging preclinical literature suggests that chronic inflammation may directly contribute to the pathophysiology of immune suppression in the context of illnesses such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. This literature provides us with specific immunoregulatory mechanisms mediating these relationships that could also explain differences in immune disturbances between subsets of depressed individuals We propose a research agenda emphasizing the assessment of these immunoregulatory mechanisms in large samples of depressed subjects as a means to define the relationships among immune findings (suppression and/or activation) within the same depressed individuals and to characterize subsets of depressed subjects based on shared immune profiles. Such a program of research, building on and integrating our knowledge of the psychoneuroimmunology of depression, could lead to innovation in the assessment and treatment of depression and its medical comorbidities

  7. The tendency to suppress, inhibiting thoughts, and dream rebound.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Fiona; Bryant, Richard A

    2007-01-01

    Ironic control theory proposes that suppressing thoughts leads to increased occurrence of the suppressed thought because monitoring for the unwanted thought leads to intrusions. This study investigated the influence of suppressing unwanted thoughts on dream content. One hundred participants who had high or low levels of tendency to suppress unwanted thoughts nominated an intrusive thought, and half of the participants were instructed to suppress that thought for 5 min prior to sleeping. Participants completed a dream diary upon waking, which was subsequently rated by independent raters for dream content. In terms of the 79 participants who reported dreaming, more high suppressors who were instructed to suppress dreamt about the intrusive thought than high suppressors in the control condition. There was no difference between low suppressors in the suppression and control conditions. These results suggest that dream content can be influenced by attempted suppression prior to sleep, and this is particularly apparent in people with a tendency to suppress unwanted thoughts. PMID:16516140

  8. Paradoxical lateral suppression in the dolphin's auditory system: weak sounds suppress response to strong sounds.

    PubMed

    Popov, V V; Supin AYa; Klishin, V O

    1997-09-26

    A paradoxical phenomenon was found in the auditory system of dolphins: weak sounds suppressed the brain responses to much stronger sounds. This occurred when the brain evoked potentials to rhythmic sound amplitude modulations were recorded. The response was markedly suppressed by addition of another sound of higher frequency and down to 40 dB lower intensity than the amplitude-modulated signal. Only the sustained rhythmic response was suppressed while transient on-response was not, thus indicating that the suppression influenced the ability of evoked potentials to follow rapid amplitude modulations. This prevents weak sounds from being masked by stronger ones. It may help a dolphin to perceive weaker echo-signals in the background of stronger emitted pulses. PMID:9347944

  9. Suppressed visual looming stimuli are not integrated with auditory looming signals: Evidence from continuous flash suppression

    PubMed Central

    Moors, Pieter; Huygelier, Hanne; Wagemans, Johan; de-Wit, Lee; van Ee, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies using binocular rivalry have shown that signals in a modality other than the visual can bias dominance durations depending on their congruency with the rivaling stimuli. More recently, studies using continuous flash suppression (CFS) have reported that multisensory integration influences how long visual stimuli remain suppressed. In this study, using CFS, we examined whether the contrast thresholds for detecting visual looming stimuli are influenced by a congruent auditory stimulus. In Experiment 1, we show that a looming visual stimulus can result in lower detection thresholds compared to a static concentric grating, but that auditory tone pips congruent with the looming stimulus did not lower suppression thresholds any further. In Experiments 2, 3, and 4, we again observed no advantage for congruent multisensory stimuli. These results add to our understanding of the conditions under which multisensory integration is possible, and suggest that certain forms of multisensory integration are not evident when the visual stimulus is suppressed from awareness using CFS. PMID:26034573

  10. Benchmark enclosure fire suppression experiments - phase 1 test report.

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, Victor G.; Nichols, Robert Thomas; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2007-06-01

    A series of fire benchmark water suppression tests were performed that may provide guidance for dispersal systems for the protection of high value assets. The test results provide boundary and temporal data necessary for water spray suppression model development and validation. A review of fire suppression in presented for both gaseous suppression and water mist fire suppression. The experimental setup and procedure for gathering water suppression performance data are shown. Characteristics of the nozzles used in the testing are presented. Results of the experiments are discussed.

  11. SPARCL1 suppresses metastasis in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yuzhu; Qiu, Qingchao; Jiang, Ming; Jin, Renjie; Lehmann, Brian D; Strand, Douglas W; Jovanovic, Bojana; DeGraff, David J; Zheng, Yi; Yousif, Dina A; Case, Thomas C; Yi, Jia; Cates, Justin M; Virostko, John; He, Xiusheng; Jin, Xunbo; Hayward, Simon W; Matusik, Robert J; George, Alfred L; Yi, Yajun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Metastasis, the main cause of death from cancer, remains poorly understood at the molecular level. Experimental design Based on a pattern of reduced expression in human prostate cancer tissues and tumor cell lines, a candidate suppressor gene (SPARCL1) was identified. We used in vitro approaches to determine whether overexpression of SPARCL1 affects cell growth, migration, and invasiveness. We then employed xenograft mouse models to analyze the impact of SPARCL1 on prostate cancer cell growth and metastasis in vivo. Results SPARCL1 expression did not inhibit tumor cell proliferation in vitro. By contrast, SPARCL1 did suppress tumor cell migration and invasiveness in vitro and tumor metastatic growth in vivo, conferring improved survival in xenograft mouse models. Conclusions We present the first in vivo data suggesting that SPARCL1 suppresses metastasis of prostate cancer. PMID:23916135

  12. Mercury vapour suppression by various liquid media.

    PubMed

    Sutow, E J; Foong, W C; Rizkalla, A S; Jones, D W; Power, N L

    1994-09-01

    Fresh and used photographic fixer, Merconvap and water were evaluated for their ability to suppress the vapourization of mercury. Mercury vapour concentration above the four test storage liquids was measured at various times between 10 min and 335 days, using a mercury vapour measuring instrument. The data were analysed using a Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test (P = 0.05). The results showed that fresh and used fixer and Merconvap suppressed the vapourization of mercury to below the detection limit of the measuring instrument (0.01 mg/m3). Water was much less effective compared with the other liquids and showed an increase in mercury vapour concentration with log t. PMID:7996339

  13. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  14. Deciphering and Reversing Tumor Immune Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Motz, Greg T.; Coukos, George

    2013-01-01

    Generating an anti-tumor immune response is a multi-step process that is executed by effector T cells that can recognize and kill tumor targets. However, tumors employ multiple strategies to attenuate the effectiveness of T cell-mediated attack. This is achieved by interfering with nearly every step required for effective immunity, from deregulation of antigen-presenting cells, to establishment of a physical barrier at the vasculature that prevents homing of effector tumor-rejecting cells, and through the suppression of effector lymphocytes through the recruitment and activation of immunosuppressive cells like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), tolerogenic monocytes and T regulatory cells (Tregs). Here, we review the ways in which tumors exert immune suppression and highlight the new therapies that seek to reverse this phenomenon and promote anti-tumor immunity. Understanding anti-tumor immunity, and how it becomes disabled by tumors, will ultimately lead to improved immune therapies and prolonged survival of patients. PMID:23890064

  15. Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Matthew S; Mainwaring, Benjamin; Yue, Zhifeng; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances negatively impact numerous functions and have been linked to aggression and violence. However, a clear effect of sleep deprivation on aggressive behaviors remains unclear. We find that acute sleep deprivation profoundly suppresses aggressive behaviors in the fruit fly, while other social behaviors are unaffected. This suppression is recovered following post-deprivation sleep rebound, and occurs regardless of the approach to achieve sleep loss. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches suggest octopamine signaling transmits changes in aggression upon sleep deprivation, and reduced aggression places sleep-deprived flies at a competitive disadvantage for obtaining a reproductive partner. These findings demonstrate an interaction between two phylogenetically conserved behaviors, and suggest that previous sleep experiences strongly modulate aggression with consequences for reproductive fitness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07643.001 PMID:26216041

  16. Immersion diuresis without expected suppression of vasopressin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, L. C.; Silver, J. E.; Wong, N.; Spaul, W. A.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Kravik, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    There is a shift of blood from the lower parts of the body to the thoracic circulation during bed rest, water immersion, and presumably during weightlessness. On earth, this central fluid shift is associated with a profound diuresis. However, the mechanism involved is not yet well understood. The present investigation is concerned with measurements regarding the plasma vasopressin, fluid, electrolyte, and plasma renin activity (PRA) responses in subjects with normal preimmersion plasma vasopressin (PVP) concentration. In the conducted experiments, PRA was suppressed significantly at 30 min of immersion and had declined by 74 percent by the end of the experiment. On the basis of previously obtained results, it appears that sodium excretion during immersion may be independent of aldosterone action. Experimental results indicate that PVP is not suppressed by water immersion in normally hydrated subjects and that other factors may be responsible for the diuresis.

  17. Suppression of Vortex Induced Vibrations by Fairings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yue; Yan, Hongmei; Constantinides, Yiannis; Oakley, Owen; Karniadakis, George

    2013-11-01

    Fairings are nearly-neutrally buoyant devices, which are fitted along the axis of long circular risers to suppress vortex induced vibrations (VIV) and possibly reduce the drag force. Here we study numerically how VIV can be practically eliminated by using free-to-rotate fairings. Since the mass ratio and rotational inertia are both low for the fairings, direct numerical simulations based on standard flow-structure interaction algorithms fail because of the so-called added mass effect. To resolve this problem we introduce fictitious methods and successfully stabilize the simulations. In particular, we investigate the effect of rotational friction Cf on the stabilization effect of the fairings. We found that there exists a critical value for the rotational friction, and when Cf is close to this value, large oscillations and unsymmetrical trajectories can be observed for the riser but for smaller Cf values VIV are suppressed substantially.

  18. Compton suppression through rise-time analysis.

    PubMed

    Selvi, S; Celiktas, C

    2007-11-01

    We studied Compton suppression for 60Co and 137Cs radioisotopes using a signal selection criterion based on contrasting the fall time of the signals composing the photo peak with those composing the Compton continuum. The fall time criterion is employed by using the pulse shape analysis observing the change in the fall times of the gamma-ray pulses. This change is determined by measuring the changes in the rise times related to the fall time of the scintillator and the timing signals related to the fall time of the input signals. We showed that Compton continuum suppression is achieved best via the precise timing adjustment of an analog rise-time analyzer connected to a NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometer. PMID:17703943

  19. Adaptive Suppression of Noise in Voice Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozel, David; DeVault, James A.; Birr, Richard B.

    2003-01-01

    A subsystem for the adaptive suppression of noise in a voice communication system effects a high level of reduction of noise that enters the system through microphones. The subsystem includes a digital signal processor (DSP) plus circuitry that implements voice-recognition and spectral- manipulation techniques. The development of the adaptive noise-suppression subsystem was prompted by the following considerations: During processing of the space shuttle at Kennedy Space Center, voice communications among test team members have been significantly impaired in several instances because some test participants have had to communicate from locations with high ambient noise levels. Ear protection for the personnel involved is commercially available and is used in such situations. However, commercially available noise-canceling microphones do not provide sufficient reduction of noise that enters through microphones and thus becomes transmitted on outbound communication links.

  20. HIV-1 Reservoirs During Suppressive Therapy.

    PubMed

    Barton, Kirston; Winckelmann, Anni; Palmer, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    The introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) 20 years ago has dramatically reduced morbidity and mortality associated with HIV-1. Initially there was hope that ART would be curative, but it quickly became clear that even though ART was able to restore CD4(+) T cell counts and suppress viral loads below levels of detection, discontinuation of treatment resulted in a rapid rebound of infection. This is due to persistence of a small reservoir of latently infected cells with a long half-life, which necessitates life-long ART. Over the past few years, significant progress has been made in defining and characterizing the latent reservoir of HIV-1, and here we review how understanding the latent reservoir during suppressive therapy will lead to significant advances in curative approaches for HIV-1. PMID:26875617

  1. Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Matthew S; Mainwaring, Benjamin; Yue, Zhifeng; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances negatively impact numerous functions and have been linked to aggression and violence. However, a clear effect of sleep deprivation on aggressive behaviors remains unclear. We find that acute sleep deprivation profoundly suppresses aggressive behaviors in the fruit fly, while other social behaviors are unaffected. This suppression is recovered following post-deprivation sleep rebound, and occurs regardless of the approach to achieve sleep loss. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches suggest octopamine signaling transmits changes in aggression upon sleep deprivation, and reduced aggression places sleep-deprived flies at a competitive disadvantage for obtaining a reproductive partner. These findings demonstrate an interaction between two phylogenetically conserved behaviors, and suggest that previous sleep experiences strongly modulate aggression with consequences for reproductive fitness. PMID:26216041

  2. System for Suppressing Vibration in Turbomachine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R. (Inventor); Provenza, Andrew J. (Inventor); Choi, Benjamin B. (Inventor); Bakhle, Milind A. (Inventor); Min, James B (Inventor); Stefko, George L. (Inventor); Kussmann, John A (Inventor); Fougere, Alan J (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed is a system for suppressing vibration and noise mitigation in structures such as blades in turbomachinery. The system includes flexible piezoelectric patches which are secured on or imbedded in turbomachinery blades which, in one embodiment, comprises eight (8) fan blades. The system further includes a capacitor plate coupler and a power transfer apparatus, which may both be arranged into one assembly, that respectively transfer data and power. Each of the capacitive plate coupler and power transfer apparatus is configured so that one part is attached to a fixed member while another part is attached to a rotatable member with an air gap there between. The system still further includes a processor that has 16 channels, eight of which serve as sensor channels, and the remaining eight, serving as actuation channels. The processor collects and analyzes the sensor signals and, in turn, outputs corrective signals for vibration/noise suppression of the turbine blades.

  3. Overcoming fixation with repeated memory suppression.

    PubMed

    Angello, Genna; Storm, Benjamin C; Smith, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Fixation (blocks to memories or ideas) can be alleviated not only by encouraging productive work towards a solution, but, as the present experiments show, by reducing counterproductive work. Two experiments examined relief from fixation in a word-fragment completion task. Blockers, orthographically similar negative primes (e.g., ANALOGY), blocked solutions to word fragments (e.g., A_L_ _GY) in both experiments. After priming, but before the fragment completion test, participants repeatedly suppressed half of the blockers using the Think/No-Think paradigm, which results in memory inhibition. Inhibiting blockers did not alleviate fixation in Experiment 1 when conscious recollection of negative primes was not encouraged on the fragment completion test. In Experiment 2, however, when participants were encouraged to remember negative primes at fragment completion, relief from fixation was observed. Repeated suppression may nullify fixation effects, and promote creative thinking, particularly when fixation is caused by conscious recollection of counterproductive information. PMID:24575886

  4. Adaptive Modal Identification for Flutter Suppression Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Drew, Michael; Swei, Sean S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we will develop an adaptive modal identification method for identifying the frequencies and damping of a flutter mode based on model-reference adaptive control (MRAC) and least-squares methods. The least-squares parameter estimation will achieve parameter convergence in the presence of persistent excitation whereas the MRAC parameter estimation does not guarantee parameter convergence. Two adaptive flutter suppression control approaches are developed: one based on MRAC and the other based on the least-squares method. The MRAC flutter suppression control is designed as an integral part of the parameter estimation where the feedback signal is used to estimate the modal information. On the other hand, the separation principle of control and estimation is applied to the least-squares method. The least-squares modal identification is used to perform parameter estimation.

  5. Active flutter suppression using dipole filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinathkumar, S.; Waszak, Martin R.

    1992-01-01

    By using traditional control concepts of gain root locus, the active suppression of a flutter mode of a flexible wing is examined. It is shown that the attraction of the unstable mode towards a critical system zero determines the degree to which the flutter mode can be stabilized. For control situations where the critical zero is adversely placed in the complex plane, a novel compensation scheme called a 'Dipole' filter is proposed. This filter ensures that the flutter mode is stabilized with acceptable control energy. The control strategy is illustrated by designing flutter suppression laws for an active flexible wing (AFW) wind-tunnel model, where minimal control effort solutions are mandated by control rate saturation problems caused by wind-tunnel turbulence.

  6. Suppression of friction by mechanical vibrations.

    PubMed

    Capozza, Rosario; Vanossi, Andrea; Vezzani, Alessandro; Zapperi, Stefano

    2009-08-21

    Mechanical vibrations are known to affect frictional sliding and the associated stick-slip patterns causing sometimes a drastic reduction of the friction force. This issue is relevant for applications in nanotribology and to understand earthquake triggering by small dynamic perturbations. We study the dynamics of repulsive particles confined between a horizontally driven top plate and a vertically oscillating bottom plate. Our numerical results show a suppression of the high dissipative stick-slip regime in a well-defined range of frequencies that depends on the vibrating amplitude, the normal applied load, the system inertia and the damping constant. We propose a theoretical explanation of the numerical results and derive a phase diagram indicating the region of parameter space where friction is suppressed. Our results allow to define better strategies for the mechanical control of friction. PMID:19792738

  7. Fire suppression in human-crew spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Robert; Dietrich, Daniel L.

    1991-01-01

    Fire extinguishment agents range from water and foam in early-design spacecraft (Halon 1301 in the present Shuttle) to carbon dioxide proposed for the Space Station Freedom. The major challenge to spacecraft fire extinguishment design and operations is from the micro-gravity environment, which minimizes natural convection and profoundly influences combustion and extinguishing agent effectiveness, dispersal, and post-fire cleanup. Discussed here are extinguishment in microgravity, fire-suppression problems anticipated in future spacecraft, and research needs and opportunities.

  8. [Cancer immunotherapy. Importance of overcoming immune suppression].

    PubMed

    Malvicini, Mariana; Puchulo, Guillermo; Matar, Pablo; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the immune system is involved in the control of tumor progression. Effective antitumor immune response depends on the interaction between several components of the immune system, including antigen-presenting cells and different T cell subsets. However, tumor cells develop a number of mechanisms to escape recognition and elimination by the immune system. In this review we discuss these mechanisms and addres