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1

Ultrastructure and development of laticifers in Nerium oleander L. (Apocynaceae)  

E-print Network

be fatal to a human (Kingsbury, 1964). The physiological action of the toxic pzinciple of Nerium oleander is similar to that of digitalis, with symptoms occurring several hours after ingestion. These symptoms include increased pulse rate, nausea... be fatal to a human (Kingsbury, 1964). The physiological action of the toxic pzinciple of Nerium oleander is similar to that of digitalis, with symptoms occurring several hours after ingestion. These symptoms include increased pulse rate, nausea...

Stockstill, Barbara Layne

2012-06-07

2

Experimental oleander (Nerium oleander) intoxication in broiler chickens (Gallus gallus).  

PubMed

Dried leaves of oleander were orally given at a single dose of 500 mg/kg body weight to 20 clinically healthy male chickens. Clinical signs of toxicosis began to appear about 1 h after receiving the oleander and included hypersalivation, vomiting, diarrhea, deep depression, and sudden death. Also, hyperemia in the combs and wattles was obviously seen. Electrocardiograms (ECG) were repeatedly recorded at 30 min intervals. ECGs findings included increasing the QRS duration in some birds and various kinds of arrhythmias. Bradycardia was the most frequently detected finding (30.43%). During necropsy, there were congestion and hemorrhages in the visceral organs particularly in heart, liver, kidney, and lung. Histopathology revealed myocardial cell necrosis with hyperemia and hemorrhage, severe diffuse pulmonary congestion and edema, severe renal congestion and hemorrhage with tubular necrosis, and coagulative necrosis of hepatocytes with hyperemia and hemorrhage. There were also congestion, mild epithelial necrosis and desquamation with infiltration of mononuclear inflammatory cells in the proventriculus of all birds. There was also mild to moderate congestion in the intestines with scattered necrosis of surface enterocytes. The lack of information about the toxicity of oleanders in poultry was the main cause for this study. The results suggest that chickens appear to respond to oleander poisoning in a manner similar to other species. PMID:21576188

Omidi, Arash; Razavizadeh, Alireza T; Movassaghi, Ahmad R; Aslani, Mohammad R

2012-08-01

3

[Chemical burns caused by the shrub nerium oleander].  

PubMed

Nerium Oleander is a shrub that grows naturally in the Mediterranean regions. In Morocco it is found in wet places. It is famous for its risk of systemic toxicity in cases of poisoning because of the presence of two alkaloids, especially oleandrine. The literature describes cases of local use of leaves of this plant against scabies, haemorrhoids, and boils. We report two cases of chemical burns of different gravity due to Nerium Oleander. This should lead to more widely diffused information for the general population and strict regulation of its marketing. PMID:21991211

Bakkali, H; Ababou, M; Nassim Sabah, T; Moussaoui, A; Ennouhi, A; Fouadi, F Z; Siah, S; Ihrai, H

2010-09-30

4

A review of the natural history, toxinology, diagnosis and clinical management of Nerium oleander (common oleander) and Thevetia peruviana (yellow oleander) poisoning.  

PubMed

Nerium oleander (common oleander) and Thevetia peruviana (yellow oleander) are potentially lethal plants after ingestion. Poisoning by these plants is a common toxicological emergency in tropical and subtropical parts of the world and intentional self-harm using T. peruviana is prevalent in South Asian countries, especially India and Sri Lanka. All parts of these plants are toxic, and contain a variety of cardiac glycosides including neriifolin, thevetin A, thevetin B, and oleandrin. Ingestion of either oleander results in nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, dysrhythmias, and hyperkalemia. In most cases, clinical management of poisoning by either N. oleander or T. peruviana involves administration of activated charcoal and supportive care. Digoxin specific Fab fragments are an effective treatment of acute intoxication by either species. However, where limited economic resources restrict the use of such Fab fragments, treatment of severely poisoned patients is difficult. Data from case reports and clinical studies were reviewed to identify treatments supported by evidence for the management of poisoning by N. oleander and T. peruviana. PMID:20438743

Bandara, Veronika; Weinstein, Scott A; White, Julian; Eddleston, Michael

2010-09-01

5

Exploring a natural MDR reversal agent: potential of medicinal food supplement Nerium oleander leaf distillate  

PubMed Central

Objective To investigate the molecular effects of Nerium oleander leaf distillate on paclitaxel and vincristine resistant (MCF-7/Pac and MCF-7/Vinc) cells and sensitive (MCF-7/S) cell lines. Methods Nerium oleander (N. oleander) leaf extract was obtained by hydrodistillation method. The toxicological effects of N. oleander distillate, previously suggested as medicinal food supplement, on drug resistant cells were evaluated by XTT tests. MDR modulation potential of the plant material was evaluated by flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. Paclitaxel and vincristine were applied to the sublines in combination with N. oleander distillate. Results Fractional inhibitory indices show that N. oleander distillate did not increase the antiproliferative effects of anticancer drugs. N. oleander treatment in to MCF-7/Pac and MCF-7/Vinc did not inhibit P-gp activity and MDR1 gene expression level. Conclusions As a result it may be suggested that although N. oleander distillate has some medicinal effects as food supplement it may not be suitable as an MDR modulator for drug resistant breast cancer cells. PMID:23905023

Kars, Meltem Demirel; Gunduz, Ufuk; Uney, Kamil; Bas, Ahmet Levent

2013-01-01

6

[A non-fatal Nerium oleander self-poisoning: case report and discussion].  

PubMed

Nerium oleander is potentially lethal plants after ingestion. We report a case of poisoning by these plants. Our patient complained of nausea, vomiting, and diarrhoea. He had bradycardia during first twelve hours. He was discharge after 3 days. All parts of these plants are toxic and contain a variety of cardiac glycosides including oleandrin. In most cases, clinical management of poisoning by N. oleander involves administration of activated charcoal and supportive care. Digoxin specific Fab fragments are an effective treatment. PMID:21890104

Hugues, T; Arnoult, M; Beau, N; Yaici, K; Mélandri, P; Saoudi, N; Gibelin, P

2012-04-01

7

Hypolipidemic potential of flowers of Nerium oleander in high fat diet-fed Sprague Dawley rats.  

PubMed

Nerium oleander Linn. (NO), an evergreen shrub, is used in folklore medicine as a cardiotonic and exhibits a wide spectrum of bioactivities. Herein, the hypolipidemic potential of the ethanolic extract of flowers of Nerium oleander (ENO) in a minimal dose was assessed. A high fat diet (HFD) resulted in a significant increase in cardiac lipids and lipoproteins and an increase in body weight gain. Simultaneous treatment with ENO significantly lowered the increase in body weight gain, lipid and lipoprotein levels, with a concomitant increase in HDL in the plasma and heart when compared to HFD-fed rats. Likewise, the activities of lipolytic enzymes were also upheld by the ENO treatment in the heart compared to HFD-fed rats. The above findings highlight the possible mechanism of N. oleander as a hypolipidemic agent in its use in folklore medicine as a cardiotonic. PMID:21726133

Gayathri, Veeraraghavan; Ananthi, Subhash; Chandronitha, Chandranayagam; Sangeetha, Marimuthu Kannan; Vasanthi, Hannah R

2011-07-01

8

Three new cardenolides from methanol extract of stems and twigs of Nerium oleander.  

PubMed

Two new cardenolide monoglycosides, cardenolides B-1 (1) and B-2 (2) were isolated from Nerium oleander, together with oleagenin (3) which is the first isolated compound from natural sources. The structure of compounds 1-3 were established on the basis of their spectroscopic data. PMID:20686265

Bai, Liming; Zhao, Ming; Toki, Asami; Sakai, Jun-ichi; Yang, Xiao-yang; Bai, Yuhua; Ando, Mariko; Hirose, Katsutoshi; Ando, Masayoshi

2010-08-01

9

Preliminary toxicity study on the individual and combined effects of Citrullus colocynthis and Nerium oleander in rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

The toxicity of diet containing 10% of Citrullus colocynthis fruits or 10% of Nerium oleander leaves or their 1:1 mixture (5%+5%) for rats treated for 6 weeks was determined. Dullness, ruffled hair, decreased body weight gains and feed efficiency, and enterohepatonephropathy characterised treatment with C. colocynthis and N. oleander given alone. Diarrhoea was a prominent sign of C. colocynthis poisoning.

M. A. Al-Yahya; A. H. AL-Farhan; S. E. I. Adam

2000-01-01

10

Complete atrioventricular block after self-ingestion of Nerium oleander for relief of hemorrhoidal complaints.  

PubMed

Nerium oleander is a plant native only in the Mediterranean region, but it can also be cultivated worldwide, particularly in warm areas. Biologically active oleander compounds may be used for therapeutic purposes. However, when used for self-medication, it may cause serious problems including death. We present a 30-year-old otherwise healthy man who developed complete atrioventricular block after taking a syrup of N. oleander leaves for self-medication to relive hemorrhoidal complaints. The patient was treated by oral administration of charcoal combined with sodium sulfate as well as electrolyte solutions and transient use of an external cardiac pacemaker. The atrioventricular block reverted to sinus rhythm in 30 hours and he was discharged in good hemodynamic status and general condition. PMID:22710590

Küçükdurmaz, Zekeriya; Karapinar, Hekim; Gül, Ibrahim; Yilmaz, Ahmet

2012-03-01

11

Nerium oleander derived cardiac glycoside oleandrin is a novel inhibitor of HIV infectivity.  

PubMed

We evaluated the effectiveness of Anvirzel™, an aqueous extract of Nerium oleander on HIV infection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Oleandrin, the principle cardiac glycoside (CG) in Anvirzel™ has been shown to exhibit anti-cancer properties but its efficacy against HIV is unknown. Treatment with Anvirzel™ significantly reduced the infectivity of virus produced from infected cells without any change in the total amount of virus produced. This is in contrast to treatment with AZT, a potent inhibitor of HIV replication that has been shown to significantly reduce virus production. Relative to untreated cultures, virus in cultures treated with oleandrin had significantly reduced expression of the envelope protein gp120, the sole determinant of virus infectivity, suggesting a novel mechanism underlying the impaired infectivity. These results support the potential utility of the Nerium oleander aqueous extract, containing the CG oleandrin as a novel candidate anti-HIV therapeutic. PMID:23127567

Singh, Shailbala; Shenoy, Sachin; Nehete, Pramod N; Yang, Peiying; Nehete, Bharti; Fontenot, Danielle; Yang, Guojun; Newman, Robert A; Sastry, K Jagannadha

2013-01-01

12

Antioxidant Activity and Total Phenolic Content of Nerium oleander L. Grown in North of Iran.  

PubMed

IN THIS STUDY, WE HAVE EXAMINED THE ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY AND TOTAL PHENOLIC CONTENT OF DIFFERENT EXTRACTS (INCLUDING WATER, METHANOL, WATER : methanol and acetone) of Nerium oleander L. grown in the north of Iran by employing various in-vitro assay, i.e. DPPH free radical scavenging, reducing power and total antioxidant capacity through the Mo (VI) reduction. The extracts showed different levels of efficacy in each assay in a dose-dependent manner. Methanolic and aqueous methanolic extracts with the highest amount of total phenolic (by using the Folin-Ciocalteu phenol reagent method), were the most potent antioxidant in all of the assays that were used. According to the results of present study, Nerium oleander L. flowers were found to serve as a potential source of natural antioxidants. PMID:24250545

Mohadjerani, Maryam

2012-01-01

13

Antifungal activity of nettle (Urtica dioica L.), colocynth (Citrullus colocynthis L. Schrad), oleander (Nerium oleander L.) and konar (Ziziphus spina-christi L.) extracts on plants pathogenic fungi.  

PubMed

Anti-mycotic activity of the ethanol extracts from Nettle (Urtica dioica L.), Colocynth (Citrullus colocynthis L. Schrad), Konar (Ziziphus spina-christi L.) and Oleander (Nerium oleander L.) floral parts were screened in vitro against four important plant pathogenic fungi viz.; Alternaria alternate, Fusarium oxysporum, Fusarium solani and Rizoctonia solani using agar dilution bioassay. Extracts showed antifungal activity against all the tested fungi. Among the plants, Nettle and Colocynth were the most effective against A. alternate and R. solani while Oleander possesses the best inhibition on F. oxysporum and F. solani. Konar was the most effective extract by reducing the growth of Rizoctonia solani than other fungi. These results showed that extracts could be considered suitable alternatives to chemical additives for the control of fungal diseases in plants. PMID:19579919

Hadizadeh, I; Peivastegan, B; Kolahi, M

2009-01-01

14

Preliminary toxicity study on the individual and combined effects of Citrullus colocynthis and Nerium oleander in rats.  

PubMed

The toxicity of diet containing 10% of Citrullus colocynthis fruits or 10% of Nerium oleander leaves or their 1:1 mixture (5%+5%) for rats treated for 6 weeks was determined. Dullness, ruffled hair, decreased body weight gains and feed efficiency, and enterohepatonephropathy characterised treatment with C. colocynthis and N. oleander given alone. Diarrhoea was a prominent sign of C. colocynthis poisoning. Organ lesions were accompanied by leucopenia, anaemia and alterations in serum AST, ALT and ALP activities and concentrations of total protein, albumin, urea, bilirubin and other serum constituents. Feeding the mixture of C. colocynthis and N. oleander caused more marked effects and death of rats. PMID:10925008

Al-Yahya, M A; AL-Farhan, A H; Adam, S E

2000-08-01

15

Response of Najdi sheep to oral administration of Citrullus colocynthis fruits, Nerium oleander leaves or their mixture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Susceptibility of sheep to oral administration of Citrullus colocynthis fruits, Nerium oleander leaves or their mixture is described in 12 sheep assigned as untreated controls, C. colocynthis-treated at 0.25g\\/kg\\/day, N. oleander-treated at 0.25g\\/kg and plant mixture-treated at 0.25g of C.colocynthis\\/kg plus 0.25g of N. oleander\\/kg. The daily use of 0.25g of C. colocynthis\\/kg for 42 days was not fatal to

S. E. I. Adam; M. A. Al-Yahya; A. H. Al-Farhan

2001-01-01

16

Acute cardiac toxicity of nerium oleander/indicum poisoning (kaner) poisoning.  

PubMed

We present a case of oleander leaf extract poisoning manifested by vomiting, lightheadedness, and heart block. Practicing physicians should understand the potential lethal properties of oleander and its availability throughout the world. PMID:21577379

Khan, Ibraheem; Kant, Chandra; Sanwaria, Anil; Meena, Lokesh

2010-10-01

17

Cardioprotective effect of Nerium oleander flower against isoproterenol-induced myocardial oxidative stress in experimental rats.  

PubMed

Nerium oleander Linn (NOL) an evergreen shrub belonging to the Apocynaceae family has been reported to have a wide spectrum of bioactivities. In in vitro study, the free radical scavenging potential of the hydroethanolic extract of N oleander Linn (ENO) flower and its fractions (glycosidic and nonglycosidic) were studied using 2, 2(')-azino-di [3-ethylbenzthiazoline sulphonate] (ABTS(*+) ) and 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH*) scavenging assay. ENO exhibited better radical scavenging activities than its fractions. Furthermore, the cardioprotective role of ENO (10, 30, 100 mg/kg, per oral [po]) was tested against isoproterenol-induced myocardial toxicity (ISO, 120 mg/kg per day, subcutaneously [sc], for 2 days at 48 hours interval) in experimental rats when compared to propranolol (5 mg/kg, po) which was the standard. Pretreatment with ENO (10, 30, and 100 mg/kg) and propranolol for 2 weeks followed by ISO challenge in rats prevented the elevation of marker enzymes such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), ?-glutamyl transferase (GGT), creatine kinase (CK-MB and creatine phosphokinase [CPK]), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in plasma. In addition, pretreatment with ENO and propranolol significantly attenuated the lipid peroxidation by maintaining the levels of enzymatic (superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase) and nonenzymatic antioxidants (reduced glutathione and nitrite), which was also confirmed histologically. Taken together, the current study indicates that the hydroalcoholic extract of N oleander Linn flowers aid in cardioprotection probably by improving the antioxidant defense system during experimental myocardial necrosis. PMID:21191138

Gayathri, Veeraraghavan; Ananthi, Subhash; Chandronitha, Chandranayagam; Ramakrishnan, Ganapathy; Lakshmisundaram, Raman; Sundaram, Raman Lakshmi; Vasanthi, Hannah R

2011-03-01

18

AIR POLLUTION EFFECTS ON THE ACTIVITY OF ANTIOXIDANT ENZYMES IN NERIUM OLEANDER AND ROBINIA PSEUDO ACACIA PLANTS IN TEHRAN  

Microsoft Academic Search

The air pollution effects on the activity of antioxidant enzymes were investigated on Nerium oleander and Robinia pseudo acacia in Tehran. Considering the information obtained from the Department of the Environment of Iran, Sorkh Hesar Park as well as South Azadi were selected as two sampling sites representing the unpolluted and polluted area respectively. A number of plant leave samples

M. Ghorbanli; Z. Bakand; G. Bakhshi; S. Bakand

2007-01-01

19

Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis of trace elements in Nerium oleander for pollution monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This works describes the use of synchrotron radiation fluorescence analysis as a technique for monitoring trace elements in bio-indicators for environmental pollution control. The analyses were performed on leaves of Nerium oleander collected in streets with different levels of traffic flow in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with one sample from a rural zone. The leaves were collected from adult trees in December and April. The measurement was made with a white beam of synchrotron radiation calibrated with thin samples from MicroMatter. The results indicate that some metals such as Ti, V, Fe and Zn have major content in samples that were collected in places with a high traffic flow, even in the leaves that have been washed. The levels of Mn, Co, Cu and Ni did not show significant differences between the samples. The Pb level also did not vary significantly. This was expected because in Brazil gasoline without Pb has been used for many years. The results seem to indicate that the leaves from Nerium oleander absorb metals from the atmosphere and may be used as an environmental indicator.

de Jesus, E. F. O.; Simabuco, S. M.; dos Anjos, M. J.; Lopes, R. T.

2000-07-01

20

A hydroalcoholic extract from the leaves of Nerium oleander inhibits glycolysis and induces selective killing of lung cancer cells.  

PubMed

Recent evidence suggests that cardiac glycosides might be used for the treatment of cancer. The ornamental shrub Nerium oleander has been used in traditional medicine for treating several disorders including cancer, and extracts from the leaves of this plant have already entered phase I clinical trials. In this communication, we have prepared a hydroalcoholic extract from the leaves of Nerium oleander (containing 4.75 ± 0.32 % of cardenolides) and have assessed its cytotoxic activity in A549 lung cancer cells vs. MRC5 nonmalignant lung fibroblasts. The results showed that the cytotoxicity of the Nerium oleander extract against the cancer cell line was significantly higher than that against the nonmalignant cell line, with a potency and selectivity similar to those of the anticancer drug cisplatin. Pretreatment of A549 cells with the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and catalase slightly prevented the cytotoxicity of the extract, therefore suggesting that the formation of reactive oxygen species participates in its cytotoxic activity but does not play a major role. Nerium oleander extract-induced cytotoxicity and DNA damage (gamma-H2AX focus formation) were slightly higher in cells lacking BRCA2 (deficient in homologous recombination repair) than in parental cells; this indicates that the induction of DNA damage may also play a role in the cytotoxicity of the extract. Nerium oleander extract induced a marked inhibition of glycolysis (glucose consumption and lactate production) in A549 cells, comparable to that of the glycolysis inhibitor dichloroacetate (currently in clinical development for cancer therapy). Because platinum compounds are widely used in the treatment of lung cancer, we tested the cytotoxicity of several combinations of cisplatin with the extract and found a moderate synergism when Nerium oleander extract was administered after cisplatin but a moderate antagonism when it was added before cisplatin. Our results suggest that extracts from Nerium oleander might induce anticancer effects in patients with lung cancer and support their possible advancement into phase II clinical trials for the treatment of this type of cancer. PMID:23824549

Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Orta, Manuel Luis; Mateos, Santiago; López-Lázaro, Miguel

2013-08-01

21

Characterisation and bioactivity of oosporein produced by endophytic fungus Cochliobolus kusanoi isolated from Nerium oleander L.  

PubMed

Bioactive compounds comprising secondary metabolites produced by endophytic fungi have wide applications in pharmacology and agriculture. Isolation, characterisation and evaluation of biological activities of secondary metabolites were carried out from Cochliobolus kusanoi an endophytic fungus of Nerium oleander L. The fungus was identified based on 18S rDNA sequence analysis. There are no reports available on the compounds of C.kusanoi hence, antimicrobial metabolite produced by this fungus was extracted and purified by fractionation using hexane, diethyl ether, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and methanol. Out of all the solvent fractions, the methanol fraction exhibited better antimicrobial activity which was further purified and characterised as oosporein. Oosporein from C.kusanoi exhibited broad spectrum in vitro antimicrobial, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities. The characterisation and antioxidant activity of oosporein from C. kusanoi are reported for the first time. PMID:24934634

Alurappa, Ramesha; Bojegowda, Madhusudhan Reddy Muthukurpalya; Kumar, Vijith; Mallesh, Naveen Kumar; Chowdappa, Srinivas

2014-12-01

22

Response of Najdi sheep to oral administration of Citrullus colocynthis fruits, Nerium oleander leaves or their mixture.  

PubMed

Susceptibility of sheep to oral administration of Citrullus colocynthis fruits, Nerium oleander leaves or their mixture is described in 12 sheep assigned as untreated controls, C. colocynthis-treated at 0.25g/kg/day, N. oleander-treated at 0.25g/kg and plant mixture-treated at 0.25g of C. colocynthis/kg plus 0.25g of N. oleander/kg. The daily use of 0.25g of C. colocynthis/kg for 42 days was not fatal to sheep and caused slight diarrhoea, catarrhal enteritis, centrilobular hepatocellular fatty change and degeneration of the renal tubular cells. Single oral doses of 0.25g of N. oleander/kg were lethal to sheep within 18-24h and caused uneasiness, grinding of the teeth, dyspnoea, anorexia, frequent urination, ruminal bloat, ataxia and recumbency before death. The main lesions were widespread congestion and haemorrhage, pulmonary cyanosis and emphysema and severe hepatonephropathy. Rapid death was also observed in sheep receiving single doses of the mixture of the two plants. Effects were correlated with changes in the activities of serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) and aspartate transaminase (AST) and concentrations of cholesterol, bilirubin, total protein, albumin, globulin and urea and haematological parameters. PMID:11323208

Adam, S E.I.; Al-Yahya, M A.; Al-Farhan, A H.

2001-06-01

23

Metal uptake and distribution in cultured seedlings of Nerium oleander L. (Apocynaceae) from the Río Tinto (Huelva, Spain).  

PubMed

Nerium oleander L. (Apocynaceae) is a micro-nano phanerophyte that grows in the riverbanks of the Río Tinto basin (Southwest Iberian Peninsula). The waters and soils of the Río Tinto area are highly acidic and have high concentrations of heavy metals. In this environment, N. oleander naturally grows in both extreme acidic (EA) and less extreme acidic (LEA) water courses, excluding, and bioindicating certain metals. In this work, we compared and evaluated the accumulation preferences and capacities, the distribution and processes of biomineralization of metals (Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn, Mg, Ca) in the first stages of growth of EA and LEA oleanders by means of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray analyzer analysis. Seeds from both environments were grown and treated with a self-made solution simulating the most extreme red waters from the Río Tinto. LEA plants drastically reduces the metal uptake at the beginning, but later reactivates the uptake reaching concentration values in the same range as the EA plants. The results showed high Mn, Zn and Mg concentrations, accumulation of Fe and Cu in plants from both environments, differing from the metal concentrations of field-grown oleanders. Iron bioformations with traces of other metals were present inside and over epidermal cells and inside vascular cells of stems and roots. They were absent of leaves. The accumulation properties of N. oleander in its early stages of development make it a species to take in consideration in phytoremediation processes but optimized conditions are needed to ensure enough biomass production. PMID:23892697

Franco, Alejandro; Rufo, Lourdes; Zuluaga, Javier; de la Fuente, Vicenta

2013-10-01

24

Flavonoid and cardenolide glycosides and a pentacyclic triterpene from the leaves of Nerium oleander and evaluation of cytotoxicity.  

PubMed

A pentacyclic triterpene, oleanderocioic acid, two flavonoidal glycosides, quercetin-5-O-[?-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1?6)]-?-D-glucopyranoside and kaempferol-5-O-[?-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1?6)-?-D-glucopyranoside, and a cardenolide, oleandigoside, together with 11 known compounds, were isolated from the leaves of Nerium oleander. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis. The growth inhibitory and cytotoxic activities of eight compounds were evaluated against the MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line using a sulforhodamine B assay. Three compounds, oleandrin, odoroside A and B were further assayed using a panel of 57 human cancer cell lines. PMID:22281382

Siddiqui, Bina Shaheen; Khatoon, Nasima; Begum, Sabira; Farooq, Ahsana Dar; Qamar, Kehkashan; Bhatti, Huma Aslam; Ali, Syed Kashif

2012-05-01

25

Nerium oleander indirect leaf photosynthesis and light harvesting reductions after clipping injury or Spodoptera eridania herbivory: high sensitivity to injury.  

PubMed

Variable indirect photosynthetic rate (P(n)) responses occur on injured leaves after insect herbivory. It is important to understand factors that influence indirect P(n) reductions after injury. The current study examines the relationship between gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters with injury intensity (% single leaf tissue removal) from clipping or Spodoptera eridania Stoll (Noctuidae) herbivory on Nerium oleander L. (Apocynaceae). Two experiments showed intercellular [CO(2)] increases but P(n) and stomatal conductance reductions with increasing injury intensity, suggesting non-stomatal P(n) limitation. Also, P(n) recovery was incomplete at 3d post-injury. This is the first report of a negative exponential P(n) impairment function with leaf injury intensity to suggest high N. oleander leaf sensitivity to indirect P(n) impairment. Negative linear functions occurred between most other gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters with injury intensity. The degree of light harvesting impairment increased with injury intensity via lower (1) photochemical efficiency indicated lower energy transfer efficiency from reaction centers to PSII, (2) photochemical quenching indicated reaction center closure, and (3) electron transport rates indicated less energy traveling through PSII. Future studies can examine additional mechanisms (mesophyll conductance, carbon fixation, and cardenolide induction) to cause N. oleander indirect leaf P(n) reductions after injury. PMID:22325884

Delaney, Kevin J

2012-04-01

26

Compositional and Thermal Properties of Thylakoid Polar Lipids of Nerium oleander L. in Relation to Chilling Sensitivity.  

PubMed

The polar lipid classes from thylakoids of Nerium oleander L. were studied with the aim of relating changes in their composition and thermal behavior with reported changes in the transition temperature of their polar lipids and chilling sensitivity of their leaves. With an increase in growth temperature, the transition temperature of phosphatidylglycerol increased from 16 degrees C to 26 degrees C, and for sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol from 19 degrees C to 24 degrees C. Transitions in the other lipid classes were below -10 degrees C for plants grown at both growth temperature. The major changes in the molecular species of phosphatidylglycerol, with increasing growth temperature, were an increase in 1-oleoyl-2-palmitoyl phosphatidylglycerol from 21 to 39% and a decrease in 1-oleoyl-2-trans-3-hexadecanoic phosphatidylglycerol from 51 to 25%. Although the disaturated species increased from 8 to 23%, the maximum was less than that reported for chilling-sensitive plants. There was no change in the sum of the palmitic, hexadeca-trans-3-enoic and stearic acids. Dipalmitoyl sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol increased from 12 to 20% and 1-linolenoyl-2-palmitoyl sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol decreased from 40 to 30%. It is concluded that the increase in the transition temperature of the polar lipids and the sensitivity of acclimated oleander plants to chilling could not be predicted by the absolute sum of the saturated fatty acids or disaturated molecular species in phosphatidylglycerol. The polar lipid transition appears to be a product of mixing of both high and low melting-point lipids. PMID:16665412

Orr, G R; Raison, J K

1987-05-01

27

Antidiabetic activity evaluation of glimepiride and Nerium oleander extract on insulin, glucose levels and some liver enzymes activities in experimental diabetic rat model.  

PubMed

The present study is aimed to assess the therapeutic potential of sulfonylurea drug glimepiride in comparison with Nerium oleander plant extract on insulin, glucose levels and some liver enzymes activities in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Rats were rendered diabetic by intraperitoneal injection of a single dose of 50 mg kg(-1) body weight streptozotocin. Rats with serum glucose levels > 200 mg dL(-1) were subdivided into three sub-groups: the first sub-group were remained without treatment and considered as diabetics. The second and third subgroups were orally administered 0.1 mg kg(-1) body weight/day glimepiride and 250 mg kg(-1) body weight/day Nerium oleander, respectively for 4 weeks. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats showed hypoinsulinemia and hyperglycemia compared to controls. Strong negative correlation (r = -0.8) was found between serum insulin and glucose levels in diabetic rats. This correlation was +0.4 and -0.3 in glimepiride and Nerium olender-treated rats, respectively implying that glimepiride and plant extract improved insulin and glucose levels with the former was more efficient. The activities of serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase were significantly increased in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats compared to controls. Treatment of diabetic rats with glimepiride or Nerium oleander extract also improved liver enzymes activities. PMID:22514888

Mwafy, Saleh N; Yassin, Maged M

2011-11-01

28

Unexpected double lethal oleander poisoning.  

PubMed

Nerium oleander is a very popular urban ornamental plant in Europe, but it is also extremely dangerous because it contains several types of glycosides, accidental ingestion of which can cause cardiac arrhythmias and even deaths. The rarity of such cases makes it difficult to think of oleander poisoning without evidences that suggest this possibility as the cause of the unexpected death. This report concerns the discovery of the bodies of 2 young people, a man and a woman, in a forest in conditions of extreme malnutrition. Medicolegal investigations showed neither pathologic nor traumatic causes of death, but the presence of vegetal remains in the stomach was noticed. A common toxicological analysis resulted negative, but the implementation of more detailed investigations showed the presence of digoxin in the blood of both cadavers, excluding the possibility of a pharmaceutical provenience of digoxin, this laboratory result was interpreted as evidence of ingestion of oleander, which contains oleandrine, the cross reaction of which with digoxin is widely described in the literature. Identification of the 2 subjects, which occurred after 4 years, strengthened the hypothesis of accidental poisoning by oleander because it was ascertained that the 2 young people were vegans--extreme vegetarians who reject the ingestion of foods of animal origin and live by eating only what they find in nature. PMID:21926903

Papi, Luigi; Luciani, Alessandro Bassi; Forni, David; Giusiani, Mario

2012-03-01

29

Evaluation of leaf aqueous extract and synthesized silver nanoparticles using Nerium oleander against Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae).  

PubMed

Green nanoparticle synthesis has been achieved using environmentally acceptable plant extract and ecofriendly reducing and capping agents. The present study was carried out to establish the larvicidal activity of synthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using leaf extract of Nerium oleander (Apocynaceae) against the first to fourth instar larvae and pupae of malaria vector, Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae). Nanoparticles are being used in many commercial applications. It was found that aqueous silver ions can be reduced by the aqueous extract of the plant parts to generate extremely stable silver nanoparticles in water. The results were recorded from UV-Vis spectrum, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy analysis. The production of the AgNPs synthesized using leaf extract of N. oleander was evaluated through a UV-Vis spectrophotometer in a wavelength range of 200 to 700 nm. This revealed a peak at 440 nm in N. oleander leaf extracts, indicating the production of AgNPs. The FTIR spectra of AgNPs exhibited prominent peaks at 509.12 cm(-1) (C-H bend alkenes), 1,077.05 cm(-1) (C-O stretch alcohols), 1,600.63 cm(-1) (N-H bend amines), 2,736.49 and 2,479.04 cm(-1) (O-H stretch carboxylic acids), and 3,415.31 cm(-1) (N-H stretching due to amines group). An SEM micrograph showed 20-35-nm-size aggregates of spherical- and cubic-shaped nanoparticles. EDX showed the complete chemical composition of the synthesized nanoparticles of silver. Larvicidal activity of aqueous leaf extract of N. oleander and synthesized AgNPs was carried out against Anopheles stephensi, and the results showed that the highest larval mortality was found in the synthesized AgNPs against the first to fourth instar larvae and pupae of Anopheles stephensi with the following values: LC(50) of instar larvae 20.60, 24.90, 28.22, and 33.99 ppm; LC(90) of instar larvae 41.62, 50.33, 57.78, and 68.41 ppm; and LC(50) and LC(90) of pupae 39.55 and 79.10 ppm, respectively. The aqueous leaf extract exhibited larval toxicity against the first to fourth instar larvae and pupae of Anopheles stephensi with the following values: LC(50) of instar larvae 232.90, 273.71, 318.94, and 369.96 ppm; LC(90) of instar larvae 455.95, 563.10, 639.86, and 730.30 ppm; and LC(50) and LC(90) of pupae 426.01 and 805.13 ppm, respectively. The chi-square value was significant at p?oleander to synthesize silver nanoparticles is a rapid, environmentally safer, and greener approach for mosquito control. This could lead us to a new possibility in vector-control strategy. PMID:23239092

Roni, Mathath; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou

2013-03-01

30

Nerium oleander Distillate Improves Fat and Glucose Metabolism in High-Fat Diet-Fed Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats  

PubMed Central

Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (35?mg/kg bw) in all rats of five groups after being fed for 2 weeks high-fat diet. Type 2 diabetic Nerium-oleander- (NO-) administered groups received the NO distillate at a dose of 3.75, 37.5, and 375??g/0.5?mL of distilled water (NO-0.1, NO-1, NO-10, resp.); positive control group had 0.6?mg glibenclamide/kg bw/d by gavage daily for 12 weeks. Type 2 diabetic negative control group had no treatment. NO distillate administration reduced fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, insulin resistance, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, atherogenic index, triglyceride-HDL ratio, insulin, and leptin levels. Improved beta cell function and HDL concentration were observed by NO usage. HDL percentage in total cholesterol of all NO groups was similar to healthy control. NO-10 distillate enhanced mRNA expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated-receptor- (PPAR-) ?, ?, and ? in adipose tissue and PPAR-?–? in liver. The findings from both in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that the considerable beneficial effect of NO distillate administration at a dose of 375??g/0.5?mL of distilled water may offer new approaches to treatment strategies that target both fat and glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetes. PMID:23251156

Bas, Ahmet Levent; Demirci, Sule; Yazihan, Nuray; Uney, Kamil; Ermis Kaya, Ezgi

2012-01-01

31

The structure of a new cardenolide diglycoside and the biological activities of eleven cardenolide diglycosides from Nerium oleander.  

PubMed

A new cardenolide diglycoside (1) was isolated from Nerium oleander together with ten known cardenolide diglycosides 2-11. The structure of compound 1 was established on the basis of their spectroscopic data. The in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of compounds 1-11 was examined on the basis of inhibitory activity against the induction of the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Compounds 2-5 were active at an IC(50) value of less than 0.8 µM. The cytotoxicity of compounds 1-11 was evaluated against three human cell lines normal human fibroblast cells (WI-38), malignant tumor cells induced from WI-38 (VA-13), and human liver tumor cells (HepG2). Compound 3 was active toward VA-13 cells, and compounds 2-5 were active toward HepG2 cells at IC(50) values of less than 1.3 µM. The multidrug resistance (MDR)-reversal activity of compounds 1-11 was evaluated on the basis of the amount of calcein in MDR human ovarian cancer 2780AD cells in the presence of each compound. Compounds 1 and 8 showed moderate effects on calcein accumulation. PMID:21372420

Zhao, Ming; Bai, Liming; Toki, Asami; Hasegawa, Ryo; Sakai, Jun-ichi; Hasegawa, Toshiaki; Ogura, Hirotsugu; Kataoka, Takao; Bai, Yuhua; Ando, Mariko; Hirose, Katsutoshi; Ando, Masayoshi

2011-01-01

32

Nerium oleander Distillate Improves Fat and Glucose Metabolism in High-Fat Diet-Fed Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats.  

PubMed

Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (35?mg/kg bw) in all rats of five groups after being fed for 2 weeks high-fat diet. Type 2 diabetic Nerium-oleander- (NO-) administered groups received the NO distillate at a dose of 3.75, 37.5, and 375??g/0.5?mL of distilled water (NO-0.1, NO-1, NO-10, resp.); positive control group had 0.6?mg glibenclamide/kg bw/d by gavage daily for 12 weeks. Type 2 diabetic negative control group had no treatment. NO distillate administration reduced fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, insulin resistance, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein, atherogenic index, triglyceride-HDL ratio, insulin, and leptin levels. Improved beta cell function and HDL concentration were observed by NO usage. HDL percentage in total cholesterol of all NO groups was similar to healthy control. NO-10 distillate enhanced mRNA expressions of peroxisome proliferator-activated-receptor- (PPAR-) ?, ?, and ? in adipose tissue and PPAR-?-? in liver. The findings from both in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that the considerable beneficial effect of NO distillate administration at a dose of 375??g/0.5?mL of distilled water may offer new approaches to treatment strategies that target both fat and glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetes. PMID:23251156

Bas, Ahmet Levent; Demirci, Sule; Yazihan, Nuray; Uney, Kamil; Ermis Kaya, Ezgi

2012-01-01

33

Platinum and rhodium associated with the leaves of Nerium oleander L.; analytical method using voltammetry; assessment of air quality in the Palermo (Italy) area.  

PubMed

A rapid accumulation of the catalytic active noble metals in the environmental and biological matrices was observed and concern arose about potential environmental and health risks. The development of reliable analytic methods to measure very low Pt and Rh concentrations is required. The main purpose of this work was to develop a reliable method for the determination of Pt and Rh in environmental matrices because of inherent difficulties in using conventional techniques used, in particular, the ICP-OES technique. A direct determination of Pt using ICP-MS, for instance, is problematic, due to interfering signals. In this work, differential pulse voltammetry (DPV/a) and adsorptive stripping voltammetry (AdSV) were used for the determination of Pt and Rh in Nerium oleander leaves. Pt and Rh concentrations were found in the ranges 0.33-25 and 0.40-4.6 microg/kg d.w., respectively. We carried out linear regression analysis between total PAH concentrations in leaves of oleander and of Quercus ilex measured in previous researches and the data obtained in this work. The high correlation coefficients were obtained; which demonstrates that oleander leaves can be used to establish the presence and the distribution of pollutants in a chosen area. PMID:19846253

Orecchio, Santino; Amorello, Diana

2010-02-15

34

The Nerium oleander aphid Aphis nerii is tolerant to a local isolate of Aphid lethal paralysis virus (ALPV).  

PubMed

In a survey that was conducted during the year 2011, a local strain of Aphid lethal paralysis virus (ALPV) was identified and isolated from a wild population of Aphis nerii aphids living on Nerium oleander plants located in northern Israel. The new strain was tentatively named (ALPV-An). RNA extracted from the viral particles allowed the amplification and determination of the complete genome sequence. The virus genome is comprised of 9835 nucleotides. In a BLAST search analysis, the ALPV-An sequence showed 89 % nucleotide sequence identity with the whole genome of a South African ALPV and 96 and 94 % amino acid sequence identity with the ORF1 and ORF2 of that strain, respectively. In preliminary experiments, spray-applied, purified ALPV virions were highly pathogenic to the green peach aphid Myzus persicae; 95 % mortality was recorded 4 days post-infection. These preliminary results demonstrate the potential of ALPV for use as a biologic agent for some aphid control. Surprisingly, no visible ALPV pathogenic effects, such as morphological changes or paralysis, were observed in the A. nerii aphids infected with ALPV-An. The absence of clear ALPV symptoms in A. nerii led to the formulation of two hypotheses, which were partially examined in this study. The first hypothesis suggest that A. nerii is resistant or tolerant of ALPV, while the second hypothesis propose that ALPV-An may be a mild strain of ALPV. Currently, our results is in favor with the first hypothesis since ALPV-An is cryptic in A. nerii aphids and can be lethal for M. persicae aphids. PMID:23229204

Dombrovsky, Aviv; Luria, Neta

2013-04-01

35

Electrocardiographic changes during inhalational oleander toxicity.  

PubMed

Inhalational oleander toxicity was considered in a family of 4 by history of exposure to smoke from burning oleander twigs. Electrocardiography revealed first- and second-degree atrioventricular block with digoxin-like ST-T-wave changes, suggestive of oleander toxicity in the absence of exposure to digoxin or other herbal medicines, and without systemic illness. Complete blood count, biometabolic profile, chest x-ray, and echocardiography did not reveal any abnormalities. Electrocardiographies normalized within 4 days when kept away from offending agents. Because oleander plant materials are used for burning, people are exposed to inhalational oleander toxicity. Hence, practitioners shall consider such poisonings in them. PMID:21397908

Senthilkumaran, Subramanian; Meenakshisundaram, Ramachandran; Michaels, Andrew D; Thirumalaikolundusubramanian, Ponniah

2011-01-01

36

In vitro and in vivo neuroprotective activity of the cardiac glycoside oleandrin from Nerium oleander in brain slice-based stroke models.  

PubMed

The principal active constituent of the botanical drug candidate PBI-05204, a supercritical CO(2) extract of Nerium oleander, is the cardiac glycoside oleandrin. PBI-05204 shows potent anticancer activity and is currently in phase I clinical trial as a treatment for patients with solid tumors. We have previously shown that neriifolin, which is structurally related to oleandrin, provides robust neuroprotection in brain slice and whole animal models of ischemic injury. However, neriifolin itself is not a suitable drug development candidate and the FDA-approved cardiac glycoside digoxin does not cross the blood-brain barrier. We report here that both oleandrin as well as the full PBI-05204 extract can also provide significant neuroprotection to neural tissues damaged by oxygen and glucose deprivation as occurs in ischemic stroke. Critically, we show that the neuroprotective activity of PBI-05204 is maintained for several hours of delay of administration after oxygen and glucose deprivation treatment. We provide evidence that the neuroprotective activity of PBI-05204 is mediated through oleandrin and/or other cardiac glycoside constituents, but that additional, non-cardiac glycoside components of PBI-05204 may also contribute to the observed neuroprotective activity. Finally, we show directly that both oleandrin and the protective activity of PBI-05204 are blood brain barrier penetrant in a novel model for in vivo neuroprotection. Together, these findings suggest clinical potential for PBI-05204 in the treatment of ischemic stroke and prevention of associated neuronal death. PMID:21950737

Dunn, Denise E; He, Dong Ning; Yang, Peiying; Johansen, Mary; Newman, Robert A; Lo, Donald C

2011-11-01

37

Effect of Nerium oleander (N.O.) leaves extract on serum hepcidin, total iron, and infiltration of ED1 positive cells in albino rat.  

PubMed

To gain insight into the hepatohistological alterations in noninjured rat liver, Nerium oleander (N.O.) leaves extract was injected intramuscularly to induce an acute phase reaction (APR). Histopathological changes were studied after 3, 12, and 24 h time course of sterile muscle abscess. Tissue integrity and any infiltration of inflammatory cells in the liver were investigated by Hematoxylin and Eosin and ED1 peroxidase stainings. The administration of N.O. leaves extract (10 mL/kg) in H & E stained sections showed a general vacuolization of cytoplasm resulting loss of polarity with prominent nucleoli after 3 h of induction. At 12 h, eccentric nuclei were also observed in the sections. Marked infiltration of leucocytes with predominate macrophages was also found after 24 h as seen by ED1 positive staining. In the present study, a possible relationship between serum hepcidin and total iron level was also investigated in vivo. An early increase of hepcidin and total iron level (3 h) with a maximum at 12 h (P < 0.01; P < 0.001) was observed. These changes indicate that sterile muscle abscess may induce APR resulting in hepatic damage which is evident with the recruitment of inflammatory cells into the organ. PMID:24069586

Abbasi, Muddasir Hassan; Fatima, Sana; Naz, Naila; Malik, Ihtzaz A; Sheikh, Nadeem

2013-01-01

38

Effect of Nerium oleander (N.O.) Leaves Extract on Serum hepcidin, Total Iron, and Infiltration of ED1 Positive Cells in Albino Rat  

PubMed Central

To gain insight into the hepatohistological alterations in noninjured rat liver, Nerium oleander (N.O.) leaves extract was injected intramuscularly to induce an acute phase reaction (APR). Histopathological changes were studied after 3, 12, and 24?h time course of sterile muscle abscess. Tissue integrity and any infiltration of inflammatory cells in the liver were investigated by Hematoxylin and Eosin and ED1 peroxidase stainings. The administration of N.O. leaves extract (10?mL/kg) in H & E stained sections showed a general vacuolization of cytoplasm resulting loss of polarity with prominent nucleoli after 3?h of induction. At 12?h, eccentric nuclei were also observed in the sections. Marked infiltration of leucocytes with predominate macrophages was also found after 24?h as seen by ED1 positive staining. In the present study, a possible relationship between serum hepcidin and total iron level was also investigated in vivo. An early increase of hepcidin and total iron level (3?h) with a maximum at 12?h (P < 0.01; P < 0.001) was observed. These changes indicate that sterile muscle abscess may induce APR resulting in hepatic damage which is evident with the recruitment of inflammatory cells into the organ. PMID:24069586

Abbasi, Muddasir Hassan; Fatima, Sana; Naz, Naila; Malik, Ihtzaz A.

2013-01-01

39

The effect of urban ground cover on microclimate, growth and leaf gas exchange of oleander in Phoenix, Arizona  

Microsoft Academic Search

We assessed how small patches of contrasting urban ground cover [mesiscape (turf), xeriscape (gravel), concrete, and asphalt] altered the microclimate and performance of adjacent oleander ( Nerium oleander L.) plants in Phoenix, Arizona during fall\\/winter (September–February) and spring\\/summer (March–September). Ground-cover and oleander canopy surface temperatures, canopy air temperatures and pot soil temperatures tended to be lowest in the mesiscape and

Erin C. Mueller; Thomas A. Day

2005-01-01

40

The effect of urban ground cover on microclimate, growth and leaf gas exchange of oleander in Phoenix, Arizona  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We assessed how small patches of contrasting urban ground cover [mesiscape (turf), xeriscape (gravel), concrete, and asphalt] altered the microclimate and performance of adjacent oleander (Nerium oleander L.) plants in Phoenix, Arizona during fall/winter (September February) and spring/summer (March September). Ground-cover and oleander canopy surface temperatures, canopy air temperatures and pot soil temperatures tended to be lowest in the mesiscape and highest in the asphalt and concrete. Canopy air vapor pressure deficits were lowest in the mesiscape and highest in the asphalt plot. Rates of net photosynthesis of all oleander plants were highest in October and May, and declined through mid-summer (June July), when rates tended to be highest in the cooler mesiscape, particularly when water was limiting. During fall/winter, oleanders in the mesiscape produced 20% less biomass, 13% less leaf area, and had 12% lower relative growth rates (RG) than those in the other ground covers. Lower nighttime temperatures in the mesiscape in December led to oleander frost damage. During spring/summer, oleanders in the mesiscape produced 11% more biomass, 16% more leaf area, and had 3% higher RG than those in the other cover types. The effects of urban ground cover on oleander performance were season-specific; while oleander growth was greatest in the mesiscape during spring/summer, it was lowest during fall/winter and these plants experienced frost damage. Because all oleander plants produced >10 times as much biomass during the spring/summer, on an annual basis oleanders in the mesiscape produced 5 11% more biomass than plants in the warmer ground covers.

Mueller, Erin C.; Day, Thomas A.

2005-03-01

41

Cardiovascular effects of yellow oleander ingestion.  

PubMed

Yellow oleander (Thevetia neriifolia) is a commonly grown tree found widely in Eastern India. The seeds of yellow oleander are highly poisonous and contain three glycosides--thevetin, thevetoxin and peruvoside. Yellow oleander seed ingestion is usually with suicidal intent in Eastern India. Manifestations range from mild to potentially fatal. It has significant cardiovascular effects with varying rhythm abnormalities. Effects of yellow oleander seed ingestion (YOI) were studied in 300 patients from 1986 to 1990 at BS Medical College, Bankura. Majority i.e., 246 (82%) were females and 226 (75.33%) were young in the age group 11-20 years. Most reported for treatment 6 to 8 hours after ingestion of seeds. The number of seeds swallowed varied from half to fifteen. Two hundred and ninety-two (97.33%) ingested seeds in the crushed form; 156 (52%) were asymptomatic, 92 (30.66%) had vomiting and 36 (12%) had palpitation. In electrocardiogram (ECG), 138 (46%) revealed varying types of arrhythmias including sinus bradycardia in 68 cases (49.27%). Ischaemic changes were present in 118 cases (39.33%). Number of seeds ingested did not bear any relationship with ECG changes in YOI. All 14 cases of death were autopsied. Subendocardial and perivascular haemorrhage with focal myocardial oedema was present in all. Median hospital stay was 5 days (range 2 to 24). During discharge, 256 (85.33%) had normal ECG, 14 (4.66%) had sinus bradycardia and 16 (5.33%) demonstrated ischaemic changes. PMID:10638101

Bose, T K; Basu, R K; Biswas, B; De, J N; Majumdar, B C; Datta, S

1999-10-01

42

The effect of changing the composition of phosphatidylglycerol from thylakoid polar lipids of oleander and cucumber on the temperature of the transition related to chilling injury  

Microsoft Academic Search

The composition and phase behavior of some lipid classes and mixtures of thylakoid polar lipids were measured to investigate their role as determinants of the temperature of the transition associated with chilling injury. For Nerium oleander L., a plant which acclimates to growth temperature, a mixture of the phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG) showed transition temperatures of 22° and 10°

Glenda R. Orr; John K. Raison

1990-01-01

43

Rapid detection of oleander poisoning by Dimension Vista digoxin assay (Flex Reagent Cartridge).  

PubMed

Oleander poisoning can be detected by digoxin immunoassays and for last two decades the fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) has been used for rapid detection of oleander poisoning in clinical laboratories. Recently, Abbott Laboratories (Abbott Park, IL) discontinued this assay. Therefore, we explored the possibility of using another digoxin assay (Dimension Vista Flex Reagent Cartridge, Tina Quant, EMIT 2000 and old FPIA assay for comparison) for rapid detection of oleander poisoning. When aliquots of drug-free serum pools were supplemented with pure oleandrin or oleander extract, we observed the highest apparent digoxin values using Dimension Vista digoxin assay (Flex Reagent Cartridge). We also observed significant apparent digoxin values in vivo in sera of mice both 1 and 2 ?hr after feeding with oleander extract. When a serum pool prepared from patients taking digoxin was further supplemented with various amounts of oleander extract, the highest falsely elevated digoxin values were observed with Dimension Vista digoxin assay. Monitoring free digoxin using Dimension Vista digoxin assay (Flex Reagent Cartridge) did not eliminate this interference. Digibind neutralized digoxin-like factors of oleander extract and such effect can be monitored by observing significant reduction in apparent free digoxin levels in the presence of Digibind as measured in the protein-free ultrafiltrate using Dimension Vista digoxin assay (Flex Reagent Cartridge). PMID:21438002

Dasgupta, Amitava; Klein, Kimberley; Risin, Semyon A; Actor, Jeffrey K

2011-01-01

44

Rapid detection of oleander poisoning using digoxin immunoassays: comparison of five assays.  

PubMed

Oleander is an ornamental shrub that grows in the United States, Australia, India, Sri Lanka, China, and other parts of the world. All parts of the plant are poisonous because the presence of cardiac glycoside oleandrin. Despite its toxicity, oleander extract is used in folk medicines. Because of its structural similarity, oleandrin cross-reacts with the fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) for digoxin. We studied the potential of detecting oleandrin in serum using 5 common digoxin immunoassays (FPIA, MEIA, both from Abbott; Beckman digoxin assay on Synchron LX, Chemiluminescent assay, CLIA from Bayer Diagnostics) and a recently FDA-approved turbidimetric assay on the ADVIA 1650 analyzer (Bayer). Aliquots of drug-free and digoxin-like immunoreactive substances (DLIS)-free serum pools were supplemented with ethanol extract of oleander leaves or oleandrin (Sigma Chemicals) in amounts expected in vivo after severe overdose. We observed significant apparent digoxin concentration with FPIA, Beckman, and the new turbidimetric assay (1 mL drug-free serum supplemented with 5.0 microL of oleander extract: apparent digoxin 2.36 ng/mL by the FPIA, 0.32 ng/mL by the MEIA, 0.93 ng/mL by the Beckman, 0.82 ng/mL by the new turbidimetric assay). The CLIA showed no cross-reactivity. Similar observations were made when serum pools were supplemented with oleandrin. Because cross reactivity should be tested in the presence of the primary analyte, we supplemented serum pools prepared from patients receiving digoxin with oleander extract or oleandrin. The measured digoxin concentrations were falsely elevated with the FPIA, Beckman, and turbidimetric assays, the highest false elevation being observed with the FPIA. Surprisingly, apparent digoxin concentrations were falsely lowered when MEIA was used. Digibind neutralizes free apparent digoxin concentration in vitro in serum pools supplemented with oleander extract, and this effect can be measured by the FPIA. We conclude that FPIA is most sensitive to detect the presence of oleander in serum. In contrast, the CLIA (no cross-reactivity) should be used for monitoring digoxin in a patient receiving digoxin and self-medicated with a herbal remedy containing oleander. PMID:15570191

Dasgupta, Amitava; Datta, Pradip

2004-12-01

45

Eating seeds from the 'be still' tree, yet having lucky nut poisoning: a case of acute yellow oleander poisoning.  

PubMed

A 25-year-old woman was evaluated and treated for ingestion of Thevetia peruviana seeds and flower petals-a natural digoxin cross reacting cardinolide-with intent to cause self-harm. The following case report provides the clinical presentation, treatment and management of acute yellow oleander poisoning. PMID:24898992

Fentanes, Emilio

2014-01-01

46

A TaqMan-based real time PCR assay for specific detection and quantification of Xylella fastidiosa strains causing bacterial leaf scorch in oleander.  

PubMed

A TaqMan-based real-time PCR assay was developed for specific detection of strains of X. fastidiosa causing oleander leaf scorch. The assay uses primers WG-OLS-F1 and WG-OLS-R1 and the fluorescent probe WG-OLS-P1, designed based on unique sequences found only in the genome of oleander strain Ann1. The assay is specific, allowing detection of only oleander-infecting strains, not other strains of X. fastidiosa nor other plant-associated bacteria tested. The assay is also sensitive, with a detection limit of 10.4fg DNA of X. fastidiosa per reaction in vitro and in planta. The assay can also be applied to detect low numbers of X. fastidiosa in insect samples, or further developed into a multiplex real-time PCR assay to simultaneously detect and distinguish diverse strains of X. fastidiosa that may occupy the same hosts or insect vectors. Specific and sensitive detection and quantification of oleander strains of X. fastidiosa should be useful for disease diagnosis, epidemiological studies, management of oleander leaf scorch disease, and resistance screening for oleander shrubs. PMID:23165115

Guan, Wei; Shao, Jonathan; Singh, Raghuwinder; Davis, Robert E; Zhao, Tingchang; Huang, Qi

2013-02-15

47

The toxicity of yellow oleander (Thevetia neriifolia juss) seed kernels to rats.  

PubMed

Toxic effects of yellow oleander (Thevetia neriifolia Juss) seed kernels were evaluated against the roof rat (Rattus rattus Linn). Crushed ground seed kernels were fed with bait at 20 and 30% concentrations. The bait was fed up to mortality or for a maximum of 10 d. Major signs of poisoning observed were hind limb paralysis, rolling of the body on the long axis, circular flailing of the tail, muscular twitch, tetanic convulsions, tremors, collapse and death. Significant reductions in the rats' weights were observed. The observed mortalities were 16/20 and 18/20 with the above respective doses. Statistically significant reductions in hemoglobin, red blood cell count, total leucocyte count and neutrophils, and increased lymphocytes were observed. Reductions in blood glucose and serum proteins, and increased lymphocytes were observed. Reductions in blood glucose and serum proteins, and increased BUN, SGOT and LDH, were also significant. Histopathological studies showed inflammatory and degenerative changes in the liver and kidney. Severe to moderate fatty metamorphosis, congestion, hepatocytolysis, nuclear degeneration, pyknosis, and necrosis were major changes in the liver. Proliferation of glomerular endothelium, hypercellularity of the glomerulus, necrosis of convoluted tubular epithelium, disappearance of nuclei and pyknosis were important changes in the kidney cortical region. Atrophy, erosion and inflammatory changes were observed in the stomach mucosal linings. PMID:2264265

Pahwa, R; Chatterjee, V C

1990-12-01

48

The toxicity of Nerium oleander in the monkey (Cebus apella): a pathologic study  

E-print Network

superficial, the auricles and 68 ventricles fibrillate and circulation is arrested. Death may also 70 occur from heart block. Cardiac glycosides also have a direct constricting action on arter ial smooth muscle of the systemic 13, 15, 63 vascular bed... superficial, the auricles and 68 ventricles fibrillate and circulation is arrested. Death may also 70 occur from heart block. Cardiac glycosides also have a direct constricting action on arter ial smooth muscle of the systemic 13, 15, 63 vascular bed...

Schwartz, William Lewis

2012-06-07

49

Multilocus sequence typing of Xylella fastidiosa causing Pierce's disease and oleander leaf scorch in the United States.  

PubMed

Using a modified multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme for the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa based on the same seven housekeeping genes employed in a previously published MLST, we studied the genetic diversity of two subspecies, X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa and X. fastidiosa subsp. sandyi, which cause Pierce's disease and oleander leaf scorch, respectively. Typing of 85 U.S. isolates (plus one from northern Mexico) of X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa from 15 different plant hosts and 21 isolates of X. fastidiosa subsp. sandyi from 4 different hosts in California and Texas supported their subspecific status. Analysis using the MLST genes plus one cell-surface gene showed no significant genetic differentiation based on geography or host plant within either subspecies. Two cases of homologous recombination (with X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex, the third U.S. subspecies) were detected in X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa. Excluding recombination, MLST site polymorphism in X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa (0.048%) and X. fastidiosa subsp. sandyi (0.000%) was substantially lower than in X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex (0.240%), consistent with the hypothesis that X. fastidiosa subspp. fastidiosa and sandyi were introduced into the United States (probably just prior to 1880 and 1980, respectively). Using whole-genome analysis, we showed that MLST is more effective at genetic discrimination at the specific and subspecific level than other typing methods applied to X. fastidiosa. Moreover, MLST is the only technique effective in detecting recombination. PMID:20465416

Yuan, Xiaoli; Morano, Lisa; Bromley, Robin; Spring-Pearson, Senanu; Stouthamer, Richard; Nunney, Leonard

2010-06-01

50

Pharmacokinetics of digoxin cross-reacting substances in patients with acute yellow oleander (Thevetia peruviana) poisoning, including the effect of activated charcoal.  

PubMed Central

Intentional self-poisonings with seeds from the yellow oleander tree (Thevetia peruviana) are widely reported. Activated charcoal has been suggested to benefit patients with yellow oleander poisoning by reducing absorption and/or facilitating elimination. Two recent randomised controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the efficacy of activated charcoal reported conflicting outcomes in terms of mortality. The effect of activated charcoal on the pharmacokinetics of Thevetia cardenolides has not been assessed. This information may be useful for determining whether further studies are necessary. Serial blood samples were obtained from patients enrolled in a RCT assessing the relative efficacy of single dose (SDAC) and multiple doses (MDAC) of activated charcoal compared to no activated charcoal (NoAC). The concentration of Thevetia cardenolides was estimated using a digoxin immunoassay. The effect of activated charcoal on cardenolide pharmacokinetics was compared between treatment groups using the AUC24, the 24h Mean Residence Time (MRT24), and regression lines obtained from serial concentration points adjusted for exposure. Erratic and prolonged absorption patterns were noted in each patient group. The apparent terminal half-life was highly variable, with a median time of 42.9h. There was a reduction in MRT24 and the apparent terminal half-life estimated from linear regression in patients administered activated charcoal compared to the control group (NoAC). This effect was approximately equal in patients administered MDAC or SDAC. Activated charcoal appears to favourably influence the pharmacokinetic profile of Thevetia cardenolides in patients with acute self-poisoning, which may have clinical benefits. Given the conflicting clinical outcomes noted in previous RCTs, this mechanistic data supports the need for further studies to determine whether a subgroup of patients (eg. those presenting soon after poisoning) will benefit from activated charcoal. PMID:17164695

Roberts, Darren M; Southcott, Emma; Potter, Julia M; Roberts, Michael S; Eddleston, Michael; Buckley, Nick A

2008-01-01

51

7 CFR 301.92-2 - Restricted, regulated, and associated articles; lists of proven hosts and associated plant taxa.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...magnolia Manglietia insignis Red lotus tree Michelia maudiae Michelia Michelia wilsonii Michelia Nerium oleander Oleander Nothofagus obliqua Roble beech Osmanthus decorus (?Phillyrea decora; ?P. vilmoriniana )...

2010-01-01

52

Structural characterization of a pectic polysaccharide from Nerium indicum flowers.  

PubMed

A polysaccharide fraction, J6, was isolated from the hot-water extract of flowers of oleander Nerium indicum Mill., using ethanol precipitation, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) complexing, anion-exchange chromatography and gel permeation chromatography. J6 was found to contain L-rhamnose, L-arabinose, D-galactose, and D-galacturonic acid, in the ratio of 10.1:49.8:30.1:10.0. Its structure was investigated by methylation analysis, periodate oxidation, Smith degradation, partial acid hydrolysis, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopic methods. It was found that J6 is an RG-I type polysaccharide, which contains a rhamnogalacturonan backbone, with various branches attached to O-4 of L-rhamnose. The branches probably involve (1-->4)-beta-D-galactan, branched L-arabino-(1-->3)(1-->6)-beta-D-galactan, and (1-->5)-alpha-L-arabinan. J6 stimulated NO production of macrophage RAW264.7 cells in a preliminary test. PMID:20573364

Dong, Qun; Liu, Xuan; Yao, Jian; Dong, Xiaotang; Ma, Chao; Xu, Yuxia; Fang, Jinian; Ding, Kan

2010-08-01

53

Bioactivities and chemical constituents of leaves of selected Apocynaceae species in Peninsular Malaysia.  

E-print Network

??Leaves of ten Apocynaceae species (Allamanda cathartica, Alstonia angustiloba, Calotropis gigantea, Catharanthus roseus, Cerbera odollam, Dyera costulata, Kopsia fruticosa, Nerium oleander, Plumeria obtusa and Vallaris… (more)

Wong, Siu Kuin

2013-01-01

54

Development of New Environment Friendly Natural Colored Preservatives for Wood Surface Dying Derived from Different Tree and Herbaceous Plant Extracts and Determination of Their Color Parameters  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, the aim is to derive some water-based wood surface dyes which are extracted from different trees and herbaceous plants. For this purpose, wood specimens were prepared from yellow pine (Pinus sylvestris) and beech (Fagus orientalis). The extracts for dyings were derived from walnut (Juglans regia) shells skins, oleander (Nerium oleander), saffron (Crocus sativus) and madder root (Rubia

Mehmet Emin DURU; Ergün BAYSAL; Ayþen Melda ÇOLAK; Ertan ÖZEN

55

Epidemiology of intoxication of domestic animals by plants in Europe.  

PubMed

This review focuses on some of the most important poisonous plants in Europe and provides an overview of the poisoning episodes that have occurred in European countries. Poisoning of livestock and companion animals by plants is a relatively common occurrence. In Europe livestock and horses are commonly poisoned by Datura stramonium (Jimson weed), Senecio spp. (ragworts and groundsels), Quercus spp. (oak), Taxus baccata (European yew), Nerium oleander (oleander), Pteridium aquilinum (bracken fern), Robinia pseudoacacia (black locust) and Rhododendron spp. (rhododendrons and azaleas). Poisoning may occur when the fresh plant is ingested in pasture or when it contaminates hay or silage. In pets, the greatest majority of plant poisonings are the result of ingestion of house or garden plants, such as Cycas revoluta (Sago palm), Ricinus communis (castor bean), Allium spp., Euphorbia pulcherrima (poinsettia), Lilium spp., Convallaria majalis (Lily of the valley), Pyracantha spp. (firethorn), Rhododendron spp. (rhododendrons and azaleas), Melia azedarach (Chinaberry tree), Taxus baccata (European yew) and Nerium oleander (oleander). PMID:23570777

Cortinovis, Cristina; Caloni, Francesca

2013-08-01

56

Superoxide production by thylakoids during chilling and its implication in the susceptibility of plants to chilling-induced photoinhibition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Factors influencing the rate of superoxide (O2-) production by thylakoids were investigated to determine if increased production of the radical was related to injury induced by chilling at a moderate photon flux density (PFD). Plants used were Spinacia oleracea L., Cucumis sativus L. and Nerium oleander L. grown at either 200° C or 45° C. Superoxide production was determined by

Richard A. J. Hodgson; John K. Raison

1991-01-01

57

Influence of Hydration and Temperature on the Rheological Properties of Plant Cuticles and Their Impact on Plant Organ Integrity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The rheological properties of enzymatically isolated plant cuticular membranes (CM) of mature leaves of Yucca aloifolia L., Hedera helix L., Nerium oleander L., and Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. fruit were analyzed in a transient load-creep test. Cuticular membrane samples were tested dry and hydrated as submerged in distilled water. Apparent plastic extensibility turned out as delayed elastic extensibility, that is, CM

Hans G. Edelmann; Christoph Neinhuis; Hendrik Bargel

2005-01-01

58

Impact des produits de lessivage de feuilles mortes sur la teneur en oxygène de l'eau et sur la survie d'un gastéropode  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The impact of the leaching of oleander, Nerium oleander, and willow, Salix pedicellata, leaves on the aquatic environment was investigated in the laboratory. The leaves were collected on the banks of a Moroccan stream, leachate polyphenols were analysed, and leachate toxic effects on the dominant gastropod species of the stream were investigated. The following factors were considered: leaf species, dry or fresh state of the leaves, litter concentration, duration of leaching, temperature. Within the first 8-12 hrs of submersion, the litter of both species caused a great depletion of dissolved oxygen. Later, oxygen consumption decreased. Dry oleander leaves caused a greater drop in oxygen concentration than fresh oleander leaves. The opposite was observed in willow leaves, most clearly at 5 and 10°C. At higher temperatures (20 and 25°C), oxygen nearly totally disappeared under all conditions, leaving 0 to 2 mg.I -1 after 48 hours. Whether fresh or dry, oleander leaves always caused a greater oxygen depletion than willow leaves. Willow leaves contained more tannin-and non-tannin-polyphenols than oleander leaves, and their leaching released more of these compounds, especially in dry leaves. The leaching of both leaf species only had a toxic effect on the gastropods at the higher temperatures (20 and 25°C), thus suggesting that the toxic effect was mainly due to lack of oxygen in the water. At these temperatures, the toxic effect of dry leaves was greater than that of fresh leaves. Oleander proved more toxic than willow, presumably under the influence of both lack of oxygen and toxic heterosides.

Chergui, H.; Haddy, L.; Markaoui, M.; Pattee, E.

59

Applied clinical pharmacology and public health in rural Asia - preventing deaths from organophosphorus pesticide and yellow oleander poisoning  

PubMed Central

Self-poisoning with pesticides or plants is a major clinical problem in rural Asia, killing several hundred thousand people every year. Over the last 17 years, our clinical toxicology and pharmacology group has carried out clinical studies in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka to improve treatment and reduce deaths. Studies have looked at the effectiveness of anti-digoxin Fab in cardiac glycoside plant poisoning, multiple dose activated charcoal in all poisoning, and pralidoxime in moderate toxicity organophosphorus insecticide poisoning. More recently, using a Haddon matrix as a guide, we have started conducting public health and animal studies to find strategies that may work outside of the hospital. Based on the 2009 GSK Research in Clinical Pharmacology prize lecture, this review shows the evolution of the group's research from a clinical pharmacology approach to one that studies possible interventions at multiple levels, including the patient, the community and government legislation. PMID:22943579

Eddleston, Michael

2013-01-01

60

Applied clinical pharmacology and public health in rural Asia--preventing deaths from organophosphorus pesticide and yellow oleander poisoning.  

PubMed

Self-poisoning with pesticides or plants is a major clinical problem in rural Asia, killing several hundred thousand people every year. Over the last 17 years, our clinical toxicology and pharmacology group has carried out clinical studies in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka to improve treatment and reduce deaths. Studies have looked at the effectiveness of anti-digoxin Fab in cardiac glycoside plant poisoning, multiple dose activated charcoal in all poisoning, and pralidoxime in moderate toxicity organophosphorus insecticide poisoning. More recently, using a Haddon matrix as a guide, we have started conducting public health and animal studies to find strategies that may work outside of the hospital. Based on the 2009 GSK Research in Clinical Pharmacology prize lecture, this review shows the evolution of the group's research from a clinical pharmacology approach to one that studies possible interventions at multiple levels, including the patient, the community and government legislation. PMID:22943579

Eddleston, Michael

2013-05-01

61

Comparison of the suitability of two lichen species and one higher plant for monitoring airborne heavy metals.  

PubMed

We compared the capacity to accumulate airborne heavy metals of two lichens (Flavoparmelia caperata and Parmotrema chinense) and one higher plant (Nerium oleander) at a very densely populated urban site near Naples. After 15, 45, 75, and 120 days of exposure at four sites with different levels of air pollution, equal portions of thalli and 20 leaves were collected, and four environmentally significant elements, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Pb, were measured by inductively coupled plasma analysis. To compare the accumulation rates of lichens and the vascular plant, we determined an index of relative accumulation rate of pollutants during time and the ratio between the concentrations of each element in exposed samples to that of control samples (exposed-to-control ratio). Our data indicate F. caperata as being the most suitable bioaccumulator, followed by P. chinense. N. oleander was also found to be a useful heavy metal biomonitor though not suitable as a bioaccumulator. PMID:19255863

Aprile, Giuseppa Grazia; Di Salvatore, Mina; Carratù, Giovanna; Mingo, Antonio; Carafa, Anna Maria

2010-03-01

62

Pharmacological aspects of Nerium indicum Mill: A comprehensive review  

PubMed Central

Phytomedicine is the oldest medical practice known to man. Since the dawn of mankind, various plant resources are used to cure different diseases and also for a long and healthy life. The ancient knowledge of plant based medicine has transferred from generations to generations and accumulated as ethnopharmacological knowledge among different ethnic groups. India is the spanning bed of traditional phytomedicinal system where Ayurveda was born out of the knowledge of traditional medicine. In various other countries of South-Eastern Asia, South America, and in Arabian countries, still today, a great number of people rely primarily on phytomedicines to cure diseases. In the complementary and alternative medicinal systems, Nerium indicum is one such plant which is famed for its therapeutic efficiency in different diseases globally. In the present time, when the pharmaceutical companies are concentrating more toward the plant based traditional medicines to avoid the side-effects and resistance against synthetic drugs, N. indicum has proved its efficiency in different disease models. Therefore, this review comprehensively covers the medicinal and pharmacological activities of different parts of the plant N. indicum. PMID:25125887

Dey, Priyankar; Chaudhuri, Tapas Kumar

2014-01-01

63

Pharmacological aspects of Nerium indicum Mill: A comprehensive review.  

PubMed

Phytomedicine is the oldest medical practice known to man. Since the dawn of mankind, various plant resources are used to cure different diseases and also for a long and healthy life. The ancient knowledge of plant based medicine has transferred from generations to generations and accumulated as ethnopharmacological knowledge among different ethnic groups. India is the spanning bed of traditional phytomedicinal system where Ayurveda was born out of the knowledge of traditional medicine. In various other countries of South-Eastern Asia, South America, and in Arabian countries, still today, a great number of people rely primarily on phytomedicines to cure diseases. In the complementary and alternative medicinal systems, Nerium indicum is one such plant which is famed for its therapeutic efficiency in different diseases globally. In the present time, when the pharmaceutical companies are concentrating more toward the plant based traditional medicines to avoid the side-effects and resistance against synthetic drugs, N. indicum has proved its efficiency in different disease models. Therefore, this review comprehensively covers the medicinal and pharmacological activities of different parts of the plant N. indicum. PMID:25125887

Dey, Priyankar; Chaudhuri, Tapas Kumar

2014-07-01

64

Synthesis of oligosaccharide fragments of the rhamnogalacturonan of Nerium indicum.  

PubMed

Three trisaccharides, one pentasaccharide, and one heptasaccharide, namely ?-D-GalA-(1?2)-?-L-Rha-(1?4)-?-D-GalA-OC3H7 (1), ?-L-Rha-(1?4)-?-D-GalA-(1?4)-?-D-GalA-OC3H7 (2), ?-D-GalA-(1?4)-?-D-GalA-(1?2)-?-L-Rha-OC3H7 (3), ?-D-GalA-(1?2)-?-L-Rha-(1?4)-?-D-GalA-(1?2)-?-L-Rha-(1?4)-?-D-GalA-OC3H7 (4), and ?-D-GalA-(1?2)-?-L-Rha-(1?4)-?-D-GalA-(1?2)-?-L-Rha-(1?4)-?-D-GalA-(1?2)-?-L-Rha-(1?4)-?-D-GalA-OC3H7 (5), which are relevant to the fragments of the rhamnogalacturonan of Nerium indicum, were concisely synthesized. The syntheses feature highly stereoselective formation of the ?-D-GalA-linkage with GalA N-phenyltrifluoroacetimidates as donors. PMID:23811084

Ma, Yuyong; Cao, Xin; Yu, Biao

2013-08-01

65

Les Brulures Chimiques Par Le Laurier Rose  

PubMed Central

Summary Le laurier rose ou Nerium oleander est un arbuste qui pousse naturellement dans les régions méditerranéennes. Au Maroc on le trouve dans les lieux humides. Il est réputé par ses risques de toxicité systémique en cas d'empoisonnement à cause de la présence de deux alcaloïdes, surtout l'oléandrine. La littérature illustre des cas d'utilisation locale des feuilles de cette plante contre la gale, les hémorroïdes et les furoncles. Nous rapportons deux cas de brûlures chimiques par le laurier rose de gravité différente. Cela doit aboutir à une information élargie de la population, ainsi qu'une réglementation stricte de sa commercialisation. PMID:21991211

Bakkali, H.; Ababou, M.; Nassim Sabah, T.; Moussaoui, A.; Ennouhi, A.; Fouadi, F.Z.; Siah, S.; Ihrai, H.

2010-01-01

66

Detoxification of Nerium indicum roots based on Indian system of medicine: phytochemical and toxicity evaluations.  

PubMed

Indian system of medicine describes the usage of certain very toxic plant based drugs after performing a detoxification process (Shodhana samskara). Nerium indicum is traditionally used as a medicine though known to cause severe allergic symptoms, tachycardia and gastrointestinal effects leading to fatalities. In this study, the detoxification (shodhana) for Nerium indicum was scientifically validated based on phytochemical and toxicity profiles. Shodhana was performed according to traditional literature. HPTLC densitometric studies were performed for the pre- and post-shodhana powders followed by sub-acute toxicity evaluation in rats. Preparative TLC and LC-MS showed the reduction of oleandrin peak in the post-shodhana sample. Prominent features of cardiotoxicity including tachycardia were noted in the pre-shodhana Nerium treated animals along with mortality. However, no such toxicity was encountered in the post-shodhana Nerium treated animals. Hence, using the recommended detoxification (shodhana), the toxicity of an important medicinal plant was significantly nullified. Such studies provide a scientific support towards our traditional medicinal practices using modem analytical and experimental methodologies and may prove to be very useful in establishing standard scientific procedures for routine and safe use of traditional medicines. PMID:22125956

Banerjee, Aryamitra A; Vasu, Kamala K; Pancholi, Harit; Rajani, Mandapati; Nivsarkar, Manish A

2011-01-01

67

Pontibacter rhizosphera sp. nov., isolated from rhizosphere soil of an Indian medicinal plant Nerium indicum  

Microsoft Academic Search

A gram-negative, motile, straight to curved rod shaped, pink pigmented bacterium was isolated from a soil sample collected\\u000a from the rhizosphere of an Indian medicinal plant, Nerium indicum (Chuvanna arali) and subjected to a detailed polyphasic taxonomic study. The strain, designated as IMTB-1969T, matched with most of the phenotypic and chemotaxonomic properties of the genus Pontibacter and represents a novel

Revti Raichand; Ishwinder Kaur; Nitin Kumar Singh; Shanmugam Mayilraj

2011-01-01

68

Unripe red fruits may be aposematic  

PubMed Central

The unripe fruits of certain species are red. Some of these species disperse their seeds by wind (Nerium oleander, Anabasis articulata), others by adhering to animals with their spines (Emex spinosa) or prickles (Hedysarum spinosissimum). Certainly neither type uses red coloration as advertisement to attract the seed dispersing agents. Fleshy-fruited species (Rhamnus alaternus, Rubus sanguineus and Pistacia sp.), which disperse their seeds via frugivores, change fruit color from green to red while still unripe and then to black or dark blue upon ripening. The red color does not seem to function primarily in dispersal (unless red fruits form advertisement flags when there are already black ripe fruits on the plant) because the red unripe fruits of these species are poisonous, spiny, or unpalatable. The unripe red fruits of Nerium oleander are very poisonous, those of Rhamnus alaternus and Anabasis articulata are moderately poisonous, those of Rubus sanguineus are very sour, those of Pistacia sp. contain unpalatable resin and those of Emex spinosa and Hedysarum spinosissimum are prickly. We propose that these unripe red fruits are aposematic, protecting them from herbivory before seed maturation. PMID:19847110

Ne'eman, Gidi; Izhaki, Ido

2009-01-01

69

Flammability of some ornamental species in wildland-urban interfaces in southeastern France: laboratory assessment at particle level.  

PubMed

Assessment of the flammability of ornamental vegetation (particularly hedges) planted around houses is necessary in light of the increasing urbanization of the wildland-urban interfaces (WUIs) and the high fire occurrence in such areas. The structure and flammability of seven of the species most frequently planted as hedges in Provence (southeastern France) were studied at particle level. Spatial repartition of the different types of fuel particles within plants was assessed by means of the cube method. The leaf flammability was assessed using an epiradiator as a burning device, and measurements of foliar physical characteristics and gross heat of combustion (GHC) helped to explain the results of burning experiments. Co-inertia analysis revealed that species with thin leaves were quick to ignite (Pyracantha coccinea, Phyllostachys sp.) and species with high leaf GHC burned the longest (Pittosporum tobira, Nerium oleander). Species presenting high ignitability (Photinia fraseri, Phyllostachys sp. and Pyracantha coccinea) were characterized by high foliar surface area-to-volume ratio, and species presenting lower ignitability were characterized by high GHC (Pittosporum tobira, Nerium oleander, Cupressus sempervirens). Hierarchical cluster analysis of the flammability variables (ignition frequency, time-to-ignition and flaming duration) categorized the relative flammability of the seven species (including dead Cupressus sempervirens) in five clusters of species from poorly flammable (Pittosporum tobira) to extremely flammable (dead Cupressus sempervirens).This study provides useful information for reducing fire risk in WUIs in the study area. PMID:23765042

Ganteaume, Anne; Jappiot, Marielle; Lampin, Corinne; Guijarro, Mercedes; Hernando, Carmen

2013-08-01

70

Flammability of Some Ornamental Species in Wildland-Urban Interfaces in Southeastern France: Laboratory Assessment at Particle Level  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Assessment of the flammability of ornamental vegetation (particularly hedges) planted around houses is necessary in light of the increasing urbanization of the wildland-urban interfaces (WUIs) and the high fire occurrence in such areas. The structure and flammability of seven of the species most frequently planted as hedges in Provence (southeastern France) were studied at particle level. Spatial repartition of the different types of fuel particles within plants was assessed by means of the cube method. The leaf flammability was assessed using an epiradiator as a burning device, and measurements of foliar physical characteristics and gross heat of combustion (GHC) helped to explain the results of burning experiments. Co-inertia analysis revealed that species with thin leaves were quick to ignite ( Pyracantha coccinea, Phyllostachys sp.) and species with high leaf GHC burned the longest ( Pittosporum tobira, Nerium oleander). Species presenting high ignitability ( Photinia fraseri, Phyllostachys sp. and Pyracantha coccinea) were characterized by high foliar surface area-to-volume ratio, and species presenting lower ignitability were characterized by high GHC ( Pittosporum tobira, Nerium oleander, Cupressus sempervirens). Hierarchical cluster analysis of the flammability variables (ignition frequency, time-to-ignition and flaming duration) categorized the relative flammability of the seven species (including dead Cupressus sempervirens) in five clusters of species from poorly flammable ( Pittosporum tobira) to extremely flammable (dead Cupressus sempervirens).This study provides useful information for reducing fire risk in WUIs in the study area.

Ganteaume, Anne; Jappiot, Marielle; Lampin, Corinne; Guijarro, Mercedes; Hernando, Carmen

2013-08-01

71

Unripe red fruits may be aposematic.  

PubMed

The unripe fruits of certain species are red. Some of these species disperse their seeds by wind (Nerium oleander, Anabasis articulata), others by adhering to animals with their spines (Emex spinosa) or prickles (Hedysarum spinosissimum). Certainly neither type uses red coloration as advertisement to attract the seed dispersing agents. Fleshy-fruited species (Rhamnus alaternus, Rubus sanguineus and Pistacia sp.), which disperse their seeds via frugivores, change fruit color from green to red while still unripe and then to black or dark blue upon ripening. The red color does not seem to function primarily in dispersal (unless red fruits form advertisement flags when there are already black ripe fruits on the plant) because the red unripe fruits of these species are poisonous, spiny, or unpalatable. The unripe red fruits of Nerium oleander are very poisonous, those of Rhamnus alaternus and Anabasis articulata are moderately poisonous, those of Rubus sanguineus are very sour, those of Pistacia sp. contain unpalatable resin and those of Emex spinosa and Hedysarum spinosissimum are prickly. We propose that these unripe red fruits are aposematic, protecting them from herbivory before seed maturation. PMID:19847110

Lev-Yadun, Simcha; Ne'eman, Gidi; Izhaki, Ido

2009-09-01

72

Alterations in blood electrolytes of a freshwater catfish Heteropneustes fossilis in response to treatment with a botanical pesticide, Nerium indicum leaf extract.  

PubMed

The present study aimed at investigating the effects of Nerium indicum leaf extract on the blood electrolytes of Heteropneustes fossilis for short- and long term. Fish were subjected to Nerium indicum leaf extract for short term (11.27 mg/L i.e. 0.8 of 96 h LC??) and long term (2.81 mg/L i.e. 0.2 of 96 h LC??). Fish were killed on each time intervals from control and experimental (Nerium indicum) groups after 24, 48, 72, and 96 h in short-term exposure and after 7, 14, 21, and 28 days in long-term experiment. Blood samples were analyzed for calcium and inorganic phosphate levels. Acute exposure of Nerium indicum leaf extract caused a progressive decrease in the serum calcium levels after 48 h in fish H. fossilis, which persists till the close of the experiment (96 h). The serum inorganic phosphate levels remain unaffected till 48 h in the Nerium indicum leaf extract-exposed fish. After 72 and 96 h, the levels exhibit a decrease. Chronic Nerium indicum leaf extract treatment provoked a decrease in serum calcium levels at day 14. This decrease continues till 28 days. The serum phosphate level of the Nerium indicum leaf extract-treated fish decreases on day 14 and 21. However, on day 28, the levels become close to the normal values. We conclude that Nerium indicum leaf extract exposure alters the blood electrolytes of the fish, thus causing physiological disturbances which might affect seriously the normal vital functions, growth rate, reproduction, and their survival in nature. PMID:21127966

Prasad, Maniram; Kumar, Abhishek; Mishra, Diwakar; Srivastav, Sunil K; Srivastav, Ajai K

2011-09-01

73

Nerium indicum, a botanical pesticide affects ultimobranchial gland of the catfish Heteropneustes fossilis.  

PubMed

Heteropneustes fossilis were subjected to 11.27 mg L(-1) (80% of 96 h LC50 ) and 2.81 mg L(-1) (20% of 96 h LC50 ) of Nerium indicum leaf extract for short-term and long-term, respectively. After sacrificing the fish, blood was collected on 24, 48, 72, and 96 h in short-term and after 7, 14, 21, and 28 days in long-term experiment and analyzed for plasma calcium levels. Also, ultimobranchial glands (UBG) were fixed on these intervals. Serum calcium levels of H. fossilis exhibited a decline after 48 h following exposure to Nerium indicum leaf extract. This decrease continued till the end of the experiment (96 h). Ultimobranchial cells exhibited a decrease in the cytoplasmic staining response after 72 h following the treatment. The nuclear volumes of these cells were slightly decreased. These changes were exaggerated after 96 h following the treatment. Chronically exposed fish exhibited a decline in serum calcium levels of H. fossilis on day 14. The level progressively declined till the end of the experiment. Up to day 14 following the treatment there was no change in the histological structure of UBG. A decrease in the nuclear volume of ultimobranchial cells was noticed on day 21. Moreover, the cytoplasm of these cells displayed weakstaining response. The nuclear volume of these cells recorded a further decrease following 28-day treatment. Also there was noticed vacuolization and degeneration at certain places. To the best of our knowledge, the effects of any botanical pesticides on fish UBG have not been reported yet. PMID:24591107

Prasad, ManiRam; Kumar, Abhishek; Srivastav, Sunil Kumar; Srivastav, Ajai K

2013-12-01

74

Assessing and ranking the flammability of some ornamental plant species to select firewise plants for landscaping in WUI (SE France).  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The increasing urbanization of Wildland-Urban Interfaces (WUI) as well as the high fire occurrence in these areas requires the assessment and the ranking of the flammability of the ornamental vegetation surrounding houses especially that planted in hedges. Thus, the flammability of seven species, among those most frequently planted in hedges in Provence (South-Eastern France), were studied at particle level and at dead surface fuel level (litters) under laboratory conditions. The flammability parameters (ignition frequency, time-to-ignition, flaming duration) of the very fine particles (live leaves and particles <2 mm in diameter) were measured using an epiradiator as burning device. The flammability parameters (ignition frequency, time-to-ignition, flaming duration and initial flame propagation) of the undisturbed litter samples were recorded during burning experiments performed on fire bench. Burning experiments using the epiradiator showed that live leaves of Phyllostachys sp., Photinia frasei and Prunus laurocerasus had the shortest time-to-ignition and the highest ignition frequency and flaming duration whereas Pittosporum tobira and Nerium oleander were the longest to ignite with a low frequency. Phyllostachys sp. and Nerium oleander litters were the shortest to ignite while Prunus laurocerasus litter had the lowest bulk density and long time-to-ignition, but high flame propagation. Photinia fraseri litter ignited frequently and had a high flame spread while Pittosporum tobira litter ignited the least frequently and for the shortest duration. Cupressus sempervirens litter had the highest bulk density and the longest flaming duration but the lowest flame propagation. Pyracantha coccinea litter was the longest to ignite and flame propagation was low but lasted a long time. Hierarchical cluster analysis performed on the flammability parameters of live leaves and of litters ranked the seven species in four distinct clusters from the most flammable (Prunus laurocerasus and Pyracantha coccinea) to the least flammable (Pittosporum tobira and Nerium oleander); the other species displaying two groups of intermediate flammabilities (Phyllostachys sp.- Photinia fraseri and Cupressus sempervirens ). The species with highly flammable characteristics should not be used in hedges planted in WUIs in South-Eastern France.

Ganteaume, A.; Jappiot, M.; Lampin, C.

2012-04-01

75

Oleandrin: A cardiac glycosides with potent cytotoxicity.  

PubMed

Cardiac glycosides are used in the treatment of congestive heart failure and arrhythmia. Current trend shows use of some cardiac glycosides in the treatment of proliferative diseases, which includes cancer. Nerium oleander L. is an important Chinese folk medicine having well proven cardio protective and cytotoxic effect. Oleandrin (a toxic cardiac glycoside of N. oleander L.) inhibits the activity of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B chain (NF-?B) in various cultured cell lines (U937, CaOV3, human epithelial cells and T cells) as well as it induces programmed cell death in PC3 cell line culture. The mechanism of action includes improved cellular export of fibroblast growth factor-2, induction of apoptosis through Fas gene expression in tumor cells, formation of superoxide radicals that cause tumor cell injury through mitochondrial disruption, inhibition of interleukin-8 that mediates tumorigenesis and induction of tumor cell autophagy. The present review focuses the applicability of oleandrin in cancer treatment and concerned future perspective in the area. PMID:24347921

Kumar, Arvind; De, Tanmoy; Mishra, Amrita; Mishra, Arun K

2013-07-01

76

Oleandrin: A cardiac glycosides with potent cytotoxicity  

PubMed Central

Cardiac glycosides are used in the treatment of congestive heart failure and arrhythmia. Current trend shows use of some cardiac glycosides in the treatment of proliferative diseases, which includes cancer. Nerium oleander L. is an important Chinese folk medicine having well proven cardio protective and cytotoxic effect. Oleandrin (a toxic cardiac glycoside of N. oleander L.) inhibits the activity of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B chain (NF-?B) in various cultured cell lines (U937, CaOV3, human epithelial cells and T cells) as well as it induces programmed cell death in PC3 cell line culture. The mechanism of action includes improved cellular export of fibroblast growth factor-2, induction of apoptosis through Fas gene expression in tumor cells, formation of superoxide radicals that cause tumor cell injury through mitochondrial disruption, inhibition of interleukin-8 that mediates tumorigenesis and induction of tumor cell autophagy. The present review focuses the applicability of oleandrin in cancer treatment and concerned future perspective in the area. PMID:24347921

Kumar, Arvind; De, Tanmoy; Mishra, Amrita; Mishra, Arun K.

2013-01-01

77

False positivity of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase measurement in urine.  

PubMed

Although enzymuria tends to be associated to renal injury, there are no studies that have evaluated the presence of the enzyme gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) spectrophotometry in the urine using a non-nephrotoxic agent (Nerium oleander) in order to evaluate the possibility of false positive results. The urinary GGT/urinary creatinine concentration ratio (uGGT/uCr) of 10 healthy dogs was calculated and posteriorly confronted with data from clinical evaluation, hematological and serum biochemical profiles, creatinine clearance (CrC), urinalysis, urine protein/creatinine ratio (UPC), electrocardiogram, systemic blood pressure (SBP) and light and electron microscopy. The results for kidney histology, SBP, UPC and CrC were not significantly different in any of the time-points analyzed. However, uGGT/uCr was significantly higher when measured 4 hours and 24 hours after administration of N. oleander. The measurement of the urinary GGT enzyme, as performed in many studies, yielded false positive results in dogs poisoned by a non-nephrotoxic agent. PMID:24456228

Crivellenti, Leandro Zuccolotto; Mesa, Javier Sousa; Meirelles, Adriana Érica Wilkes Burton; Borin Crivellenti, Sofia; Mireya, Edna Gomes; Canola, Julio Carlos; Hatayde, Mário Roberto; Santana, Aureo Evangelista; Dantas, Márcio; Silva, Gyl Eanes Barros

2014-05-01

78

Combining experimental evolution and field population assays to study the evolution of host range breadth.  

PubMed

Adapting to specific hosts often involves trade-offs that limit performance on other hosts. These constraints may either lead to narrow host ranges (i.e. specialists, able to exploit only one host type) or wide host ranges often leading to lower performance on each host (i.e. generalists). Here, we combined laboratory experiments on field populations with experimental evolution to investigate the impact of adaptation to the host on host range evolution and associated performance over this range. We used the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, a model organism for studies on the evolution of specialization. Field mite populations were sampled on three host plant species: tomato, citrus tree and rosebay (Nerium oleander). Testing these populations in the laboratory revealed that tomato populations of mites could exploit tomato only, citrus populations could exploit citrus and tomato whereas Nerium populations could exploit all three hosts. Besides, the wider niche ranges of citrus and Nerium populations came at the cost of low performance on their non-native hosts. Experimental lines selected to live on the same three host species exhibited similar patterns of host range and relative performance. This result suggests that adaptation to a new host species may lead to wider host ranges but at the expense of decreased performance on other hosts. We conclude that experimental evolution may reliably inform on evolution in the field. PMID:24689448

Fellous, S; Angot, G; Orsucci, M; Migeon, A; Auger, P; Olivieri, I; Navajas, M

2014-05-01

79

Effect of molluscicidal components of Abrus precatorius, Argemone mexicana and Nerium indicum on certain biochemical parameters of Lymnaea acuminata.  

PubMed

Exposure to 40% and 80% of the 24 h LC50 of the molluscicidal component of Abrus precatorius (abrin and glycyrrhizin), Argemone mexicana (protopine and sanguinarine) and Nerium indicum (oleandrin) caused a significant decrease in the levels of protein, free amino acid, DNA and RNA in the nervous tissue of Lymnaea acuminata. Except for glycyrrhizin, all the above molluscicides caused a significant reduction in phospholipid levels and a simultaneous increase in the rate of lipid peroxidation in the nervous tissue of treated snails. PMID:10353159

Singh, S; Singh, D K

1999-05-01

80

Pontibacter rhizosphera sp. nov., isolated from rhizosphere soil of an Indian medicinal plant Nerium indicum.  

PubMed

A gram-negative, motile, straight to curved rod shaped, pink pigmented bacterium was isolated from a soil sample collected from the rhizosphere of an Indian medicinal plant, Nerium indicum (Chuvanna arali) and subjected to a detailed polyphasic taxonomic study. The strain, designated as IMTB-1969(T), matched with most of the phenotypic and chemotaxonomic properties of the genus Pontibacter and represents a novel species. The major fatty acids of the strain were monounsaturated iso/anteiso branched C17 fatty acids (45.1%) and iso-C15:0 (16.5%). MK-7 was the predominant isoprenoid quinone. According to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, strain IMTB-1969(T) was indicated to belonged to the phylum Bacteroidetes and further phylogenetic analysis revealed that the strain IMTB-1969(T) belongs to the family Cytophagaceae and genus Pontibacter. The highest 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity was with Pontibacter korlensis CCTCC AB 206081(T) (97.2%) and lower sequence similarity was observed with other species in the genus Pontibacter (95.9-94.0%). DNA-DNA relatedness study of the strain IMTB-1969(T) confirmed that it represents a novel species. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 52.2 (±0.5) mol%. The results of physiological and biochemical tests allowed the genotypic and phenotypic distinction of strain IMTB-1969(T) from its closest phylogenetic relatives. The strain IMTB-1969(T) should be classified as novel species of the genus Pontibacter, for which the name Pontibacter rhizosphera sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is IMTB-1969(T) (=MTCC 10673(T) = DSM 24399(T)). PMID:21409554

Raichand, Revti; Kaur, Ishwinder; Singh, Nitin Kumar; Mayilraj, Shanmugam

2011-06-01

81

Effect of various growth hormone concentration and combination on callus induction, nature of callus and callogenic response of Nerium odorum.  

PubMed

Nerium odorum, Linn. (Apocynaceae) is an important evergreen shrub. It is heat, salinity and drought tolerant. Plants with milky sap have medicinal value, mainly cardenolides, flavonoids and terpenes. It is used for wastewater purification and for restoration of riparian woodlands. In view of these facts, the study was conducted for micropropagation of N. odorum. Murashige and Skoog (MS) media supplemented with different concentrations (0.5-10.0 mg/l) of 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and kinetin (Kin) were used singly and in combinations. Among all the growth hormones, 2,4-D was the best for callus induction (75% in stem and 79% in leaf) and in combination 2,4-D and BAP (78% in stem and 81% in leaf). The day of callus induction started from the 19th to the 37th day. This variation is due to the differences in culture conditions and the age of explants. The fresh and dry weight and moisture content showed good growth of callus, which is used in further studies of alkaloid production. Micropropagation of this plant allows the production of clones at a fast rate and in continuous manner. This work can lead to the development of an efficient protocol for callus induction and other issues. PMID:24407943

Rashmi, Runa; Trivedi, Maheshwar Prasad

2014-03-01

82

Molluscicidal activity of cardiac glycosides from Nerium indicum against Pomacea canaliculata and its implications for the mechanisms of toxicity.  

PubMed

Cardiac glycosides from fresh leaves of Nerium indicum were evaluated for its molluscicidal activity against Pomacea canaliculata (golden apple snail: GAS) under laboratory conditions. The results showed that LC(50) value of cardiac glycosides against GAS was time dependent and the LC(50) value at 96 h was as low as 3.71 mg/L, which was comparable with that of metaldehyde at 72 h (3.88 mg/L). These results indicate that cardiac glycosides could be an effective molluscicide against GAS. The toxicological mechanism of cardiac glucosides on GAS was also evaluated through changes of selected biochemical parameters, including cholinesterase (ChE) and esterase (EST) activities, glycogen and protein contents in hepatopancreas tissues of GAS. Exposure to sublethal concentrations of cardiac glycosides, GAS showed lower activities of EST isozyme in the later stages of the exposure period as well as drastically decreased glycogen content, although total protein content was not affected at the end of 24 and 48 h followed by a significant depletion at the end of 72 and 96 h. The initial increase followed by a decline of ChE activity was also observed during the experiment. These results suggest that cardiac glycosides seriously impair normal physiological metabolism, resulting in fatal alterations in major biochemical constituents of hepatopancreas tissues of P. canaliculata. PMID:21843803

Dai, Lingpeng; Wang, Wanxian; Dong, Xinjiao; Hu, Renyong; Nan, Xuyang

2011-09-01

83

Particle pollution - An environmental magnetism study using biocollectors located in northern Portugal  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study the magnetic properties of tree leaves were measured in order to compare their capability to accumulate particles, to establish the relationship between magnetic properties and chemical data and to assess the particle pollution in selected locations in the cities of Braga, Porto, Valongo and Trancoso-Reboleiro, northern Portugal. In Porto, Braga and Valongo, leaves from the evergreen Nerium oleander were sampled each month during a year. N. oleander and deciduous Quercus spp. and Platanus spp. samples were collected in the same site in Porto, in order to determine the ability of these different leaves to accumulate particles. The leaves of deciduous Tilia spp. were collected in Porto and in a rural area (Trancoso-Reboleiro) so that a comparison could be established between them. The results indicated a contrast between the urban and the rural areas. The highest concentration of magnetic particles was found in the sampling site of Valongo and the lowest concentration in the sampling site of Trancoso-Reboleiro. In Porto, the results have shown that the Quercus leaves possessed the highest capability to accumulate particles even though it is a deciduous species. The IRM acquisition curves and the S-300 ratios found in the samples of the urban areas indicated the presence of magnetite-like structures. SIRM/? ratio revealed particles whose dimensions ranged between 5 ?m and 8 ?m in urban areas. The chemical elements copper and iron have a significant positive correlation with ? and SIRM, which highlights the use of magnetic properties as a proxy for the concentration of these metals in atmospheric dust. The magnetic properties were interpreted taking into consideration the rainfall peaks and then compared with the PM10 concentration levels monitored in an air quality station in Porto. Our data corroborated that magnetic properties provide a fast and inexpensive tool to evaluate long-term urban pollution from anthropogenic origin, especially heavy traffic.

Sant'Ovaia, Helena; Lacerda, Maria João; Gomes, Celeste

2012-12-01

84

Resources and Information for Parents about Braille  

MedlinePLUS

... for people with vision loss Text Size Smaller Type Larger Type Change Colors & More Bookstore My AFB Donate to ... programs. Exceptional Teaching Aids 3994 Oleander Way Castro Valley, CA 94546 Telephone: (800) 549-6999 E-Mail: ...

85

Effect of cardiac glycosides from Nerium indicum on feeding rate, digestive enzymes activity and ultrastructural alterations of hepatopancreas in Pomacea canaliculata.  

PubMed

Cardiac glycosides from Nerium indicum showed potent molluscicide activity against Pomacea canaliculata (GAS), but the toxicological mechanism is still far less understood. Effects of sublethal treatments of cardiac glycosides on feeding rate, digestive enzymes and ultrastructural alterations of the hepatopancreas in GAS were evaluated in this study. Exposure of GAS to sublethal concentrations of cardiac glycosides resulted in a significant reduction of feeding rate of GAS. The amylase, cellulose and protease activity were increase significantly at the end of 24 h followed by significant inhibition after 48 h of exposure while lipase activity was not affected significantly at the end of 24 h followed by a significant inhibition after 48 h of exposure during experimental period. The main ultrastructural alterations of hepatopancreas observed in snails under cardiac glycosides treatment comprised disruption of nuclear membrane, increased vesiculation and dilatation of endoplasmic reticulum, and vacuolization and swelling of mitochondrial compared to the untreated GAS. These results, for the first time, provide systematic evidences showing that cardiac glycosides seriously impairs the hepatopancreas tissues of GAS, resulting in inhibition of digestive enzymes activity and feeding rate and cause GAS death in the end. PMID:24361644

Dai, Lingpeng; Qian, Xiaowei; Nan, Xuyang; Zhang, Yejian

2014-01-01

86

Ephedra alte (Joint Pine): An Invasive, Problematic Weedy Species in Forestry and Fruit Tree Orchards in Jordan  

PubMed Central

A field survey was carried out to record plant species climbed by Ephedra alte in certain parts of Jordan during 2008–2010. Forty species of shrubs, ornamental, fruit, and forest trees belonging to 24 plant families suffered from the climbing habit of E. alte. Growth of host plants was adversely affected by E. alte growth that extended over their vegetation. In addition to its possible competition for water and nutrients, the extensive growth it forms over host species prevents photosynthesis, smothers growth and makes plants die underneath the extensive cover. However, E. alte did not climb all plant species, indicating a host preference range. Damaged fruit trees included Amygdalus communis, Citrus aurantifolia, Ficus carica, Olea europaea, Opuntia ficus-indica, and Punica granatum. Forestry species that were adversely affected included Acacia cyanophylla, Ceratonia siliqua, Crataegus azarolus, Cupressus sempervirens, Pinus halepensis, Pistacia atlantica, Pistacia palaestina, Quercus coccifera, Quercus infectoria, Retama raetam, Rhamnus palaestina, Rhus tripartita, and Zizyphus spina-christi. Woody ornamentals attacked were Ailanthus altissima, Hedera helix, Jasminum fruticans, Jasminum grandiflorum, Nerium oleander, and Pyracantha coccinea. Results indicated that E. alte is a strong competitive for light and can completely smother plants supporting its growth. A. communis, F. carica, R. palaestina, and C. azarolus were most frequently attacked. PMID:22645486

Qasem, Jamal R.

2012-01-01

87

Ephedra alte (joint pine): an invasive, problematic weedy species in forestry and fruit tree orchards in Jordan.  

PubMed

A field survey was carried out to record plant species climbed by Ephedra alte in certain parts of Jordan during 2008-2010. Forty species of shrubs, ornamental, fruit, and forest trees belonging to 24 plant families suffered from the climbing habit of E. alte. Growth of host plants was adversely affected by E. alte growth that extended over their vegetation. In addition to its possible competition for water and nutrients, the extensive growth it forms over host species prevents photosynthesis, smothers growth and makes plants die underneath the extensive cover. However, E. alte did not climb all plant species, indicating a host preference range. Damaged fruit trees included Amygdalus communis, Citrus aurantifolia, Ficus carica, Olea europaea, Opuntia ficus-indica, and Punica granatum. Forestry species that were adversely affected included Acacia cyanophylla, Ceratonia siliqua, Crataegus azarolus, Cupressus sempervirens, Pinus halepensis, Pistacia atlantica, Pistacia palaestina, Quercus coccifera, Quercus infectoria, Retama raetam, Rhamnus palaestina, Rhus tripartita, and Zizyphus spina-christi. Woody ornamentals attacked were Ailanthus altissima, Hedera helix, Jasminum fruticans, Jasminum grandiflorum, Nerium oleander, and Pyracantha coccinea. Results indicated that E. alte is a strong competitive for light and can completely smother plants supporting its growth. A. communis, F. carica, R. palaestina, and C. azarolus were most frequently attacked. PMID:22645486

Qasem, Jamal R

2012-01-01

88

Testing a vapour-phase model of stomatal responses to humidity.  

PubMed

This study tests two predictions from a recently proposed model for stomatal responses to humidity and temperature. The model is based on water potential equilibrium between the guard cells and the air at the bottom of the stomatal pore and contains three independent variables: gs(0), Z and ?. gs(0) is the value of stomatal conductance that would occur at saturating humidity and will vary among leaves and with CO2 and light. The value of Z is determined primarily by the resistance to heat transfer from the epidermis to the evaporating site and the value of ? is determined primarily by the resistance to water vapour diffusion from the evaporating site to the guard cells. This leads to the two predictions that were tested. Firstly, the values of Z and ? should be constant for leaves of a given species grown under given conditions, although gs(0) should vary among leaves and with light and CO2. And secondly, the ratio of Z to ? should be higher in leaves having their stomata in crypts because the distance for heat transfer is greater than that for water vapour diffusion. Data from three species, Nerium oleander, Pastinaca sativum and Xanthium strumarium support these two predictions. PMID:23072325

Mott, Keith A; Peak, David

2013-05-01

89

In vitro antifugal activity of medicinal plant extract against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici race 3 the causal agent of tomato wilt.  

PubMed

Medicinal plant extracts of five plants; Adhatoda vasica, Eucalyptus globulus, Lantana camara, Nerium oleander and Ocimum basilicum collected from Cairo, Egypt were evaluated against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici race 3 in vitro conditions using water and certain organic solvents. The results revealed that cold distilled water extracts of O. basilicum and E. globulus were the most effective ones for inhibiting the growth of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Butanolic and ethanolic extracts of the tested plants inhibited the pathogen growth to a higher extent than water extracts. Butanolic extract of O. basilicum completely inhibited the growth of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici at concentrations 1.5 and 2.0% (v/v). Butanolic extracts (2.0%) of tested plants had a strong inhibitory effect on hydrolytic enzymes; ?-glucosidase, pectin lyase and protease of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. This study has confirmed that the application of plant extracts, especially from O. basilicum for controlling F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici is environmentally safe, cost effective and does not disturb ecological balance. Investigations are in progress to test the efficacy of O. basilicum extract under in vivo conditions. PMID:24561899

Isaac, G S; Abu-Tahon, M A

2014-03-01

90

Caffeoylquinic acids in leaves of selected Apocynaceae species: Their isolation and content  

PubMed Central

Background: Three compounds isolated from the methanol (MeOH) leaf extract of Vallaris glabra (Apocynaceae) were those of caffeoylquinic acids (CQAs). This prompted a quantitative analysis of their contents in leaves of V. glabra in comparison with those of five other Apocynaceae species (Alstonia angustiloba, Dyera costulata, Kopsia fruticosa, Nerium oleander, and Plumeria obtusa), including flowers of Lonicera japonica (Japanese honeysuckle), the commercial source of chlorogenic acid (CGA). Materials and Methods: Compound were isolated by column chromatography, and identified by NMR and MS analyses. CQA content of leaf extracts was determined using reversed-phase HPLC. Results: From the MeOH leaf extract of V. glabra, 3-CQA, 4-CQA, and 5-CQA or CGA were isolated. Content of 5-CQA of V. glabra was two times higher than flowers of L. japonica, while 3-CQA and 4-CQA content was 16 times higher. Conclusion: With much higher CQA content than the commercial source, leaves of V. glabra can serve as a promising alternative source. PMID:24497746

Wong, Siu Kuin; Lim, Yau Yan; Ling, Sui Kiong; Chan, Eric Wei Chiang

2014-01-01

91

Arthrobacter siccitolerans sp. nov., a highly desiccation-tolerant, xeroprotectant-producing strain isolated from dry soil.  

PubMed

A novel desiccation-tolerant, xeroprotectant-producing bacterium, designated strain 4J27(T), was isolated from a Nerium oleander rhizosphere subjected to seasonal drought in Granada, Spain. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing placed the isolate within the genus Arthrobacter, its closest relative being Arthrobacter phenanthrenivorans Shep3 DSM 18606(T), with which it showed 99.23?% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. DNA-DNA hybridization measurements showed less than 25?% relatedness between strain 4J27(T) and Arthrobacter phenanthrenivorans DSM 18606(T). The DNA base composition of strain 4J27(T) was 65.3 mol%. The main fatty acids were anteiso C15?:?0, anteiso C17?:?0, C16?:?0 and iso C16?:?0 and the major menaquinone was MK-9 (H2). The peptidoglycan type was A3? with an l-Lys-l-Ser-l-Thr-l-Ala interpeptide bridge. The bacterium tested positive for catalase activity and negative for oxidase activity. Phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic analyses indicated that the desiccation-tolerant strain 4J27(T) represents a novel species within the genus Arthrobacter, for which the name Arthrobacter siccitolerans is proposed. The type strain is 4J27(T) (?=?CECT 8257(T)?=?LMG 27359(T)). PMID:23771623

Santacruz-Calvo, L; González-López, J; Manzanera, M

2013-11-01

92

BDNF Mediates Neuroprotection against Oxygen-Glucose Deprivation by the Cardiac Glycoside Oleandrin  

PubMed Central

We have previously shown that the botanical drug candidate PBI-05204, a supercritical CO2 extract of Nerium oleander, provides neuroprotection in both in vitro and in vivo brain slice-based models for focal ischemia (Dunn et al., 2011). Intriguingly, plasma levels of the neurotrophin BDNF were increased in patients treated with PBI-05204 in a phase I clinical trial (Bidyasar et al., 2009). We thus tested the hypothesis that neuroprotection provided by PBI-05204 to rat brain slices damaged by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) is mediated by BDNF. We found, in fact, that exogenous BDNF protein itself is sufficient to protect brain slices against OGD, whereas downstream activation of TrkB receptors for BDNF is necessary for neuroprotection provided by PBI-05204, using three independent methods. Finally, we provide evidence that oleandrin, the principal cardiac glycoside component of PBI-05204, can quantitatively account for regulation of BDNF at both the protein and transcriptional levels. Together, these findings support further investigation of cardiac glycosides in providing neuroprotection in the context of ischemic stroke. PMID:24431454

Van Kanegan, Michael J.; He, Dong Ning; Dunn, Denise E.; Yang, Peiying; Newman, Robert A.; West, Anne E.

2014-01-01

93

[Selection and purification potential evaluation of woody plant in vertical flow constructed wetlands in the subtropical area].  

PubMed

In order to solve the problem that wetland herbaceous plants tend to die during winter in subtropics areas, selection and purification potential evaluation experiments were carried out by introducing into the constructed wetlands 16 species of woody wetland plants. Cluster analysis was performed by including the morphological characteristics, physiological characteristics, as well as nitrogen and phosphorus accumulation of the woody wetland plants. The results indicated that there were significant differences among the tested woody plants in their survival rate, height increase, root length increase and vigor, Chlorophyll content, Superoxide dismutase, Malonaldehyde, Proline, Peroxidase, biomass, average concentration and accumulation of nitrogen and phosphorus. Based on the established evaluation system, the tested plants were clustered into 3 groups. The plants in the 1st group possessing high purification potentials are Nerium oleander and Hibiscus syriacus. Those in the 2nd group possessing moderate purification potentials are Trachycarpus fortune, Llex latifolia Thunb., Gardenia jasminoides, Serissa foetida and Ilex crenatacv Convexa. And those in the 3rd group with low purification potentials are Jasminum udiflorum, Hedera helix, Ligustrum vicaryi, Ligustrum lucidum, Buxus sempervives, Murraya paniculata, Osmanthus fragrans, Mahoniafortune and Photinia serrulata. PMID:24812951

Chen, Yong-Hua; Wu, Xiao-Fu; Hao, Jun; Chen, Ming-Li; Zhu, Guang-Yu

2014-02-01

94

Arthrobacter siccitolerans sp. nov., a highly desiccation-tolerant, xeroprotectant-producing strain isolated from dry soil  

PubMed Central

A novel desiccation-tolerant, xeroprotectant-producing bacterium, designated strain 4J27T, was isolated from a Nerium oleander rhizosphere subjected to seasonal drought in Granada, Spain. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing placed the isolate within the genus Arthrobacter, its closest relative being Arthrobacter phenanthrenivorans Shep3 DSM 18606T, with which it showed 99.23?% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. DNA–DNA hybridization measurements showed less than 25?% relatedness between strain 4J27T and Arthrobacter phenanthrenivorans DSM 18606T. The DNA base composition of strain 4J27T was 65.3 mol%. The main fatty acids were anteiso C15?:?0, anteiso C17?:?0, C16?:?0 and iso C16?:?0 and the major menaquinone was MK-9 (H2). The peptidoglycan type was A3? with an l-Lys–l-Ser–l-Thr–l-Ala interpeptide bridge. The bacterium tested positive for catalase activity and negative for oxidase activity. Phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and phenotypic analyses indicated that the desiccation-tolerant strain 4J27T represents a novel species within the genus Arthrobacter, for which the name Arthrobacter siccitolerans is proposed. The type strain is 4J27T (?=?CECT 8257T?=?LMG 27359T). PMID:23771623

SantaCruz-Calvo, L.; Gonzalez-Lopez, J.

2013-01-01

95

BDNF mediates neuroprotection against oxygen-glucose deprivation by the cardiac glycoside oleandrin.  

PubMed

We have previously shown that the botanical drug candidate PBI-05204, a supercritical CO2 extract of Nerium oleander, provides neuroprotection in both in vitro and in vivo brain slice-based models for focal ischemia (Dunn et al., 2011). Intriguingly, plasma levels of the neurotrophin BDNF were increased in patients treated with PBI-05204 in a phase I clinical trial (Bidyasar et al., 2009). We thus tested the hypothesis that neuroprotection provided by PBI-05204 to rat brain slices damaged by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) is mediated by BDNF. We found, in fact, that exogenous BDNF protein itself is sufficient to protect brain slices against OGD, whereas downstream activation of TrkB receptors for BDNF is necessary for neuroprotection provided by PBI-05204, using three independent methods. Finally, we provide evidence that oleandrin, the principal cardiac glycoside component of PBI-05204, can quantitatively account for regulation of BDNF at both the protein and transcriptional levels. Together, these findings support further investigation of cardiac glycosides in providing neuroprotection in the context of ischemic stroke. PMID:24431454

Van Kanegan, Michael J; He, Dong Ning; Dunn, Denise E; Yang, Peiying; Newman, Robert A; West, Anne E; Lo, Donald C

2014-01-15

96

Plant poisoning in domestic animals: epidemiological data from an Italian survey (2000-2011).  

PubMed

An Italian epidemiological study based on the human Poison Control Centre of Milan (Centro Antiveleni di Milano (CAV)) data related to domestic animal poisoning by exposure to plants, was carried out in collaboration with the Veterinary Toxicology Section of the University of Milan. It encompasses a 12-year period, from the beginning of 2000 to the end of 2011. Calls related to toxic plants accounted for 5.7 per cent of total inquiries (2150) received by CAV. The dog was the most commonly poisoned species (61.8 per cent of calls) followed by the cat (26 per cent). Little information was recorded for other species. Most exposures (73.8 per cent) resulted in mild to moderate clinical signs. The outcome was reported in only 53.7 per cent of cases, and fatal poisoning accounted for 10.6 per cent of these cases. Glycoside, alkaloid, oxalate, toxalbumin, saponin, terpene and terpenoid-containing plants were recorded and found to be responsible for intoxication. Cycas revoluta, Euphorbia pulcherrima, Hydrangea macrophylla, Nerium oleander, Rhododendron species and Prunus species were the plants most frequently involved. Epidemiological data from this Italian survey provide useful information on animal exposure to plants and confirm the importance of plants as causative agents of animal poisoning. PMID:23716536

Caloni, F; Cortinovis, C; Rivolta, M; Alonge, S; Davanzo, F

2013-06-01

97

Studies on rearing Metaphycus helvolus (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae) for augmentative release against black scale (Homoptera: Coccidae) on citrus in California  

Microsoft Academic Search

We conducted an evaluation of insectary production of black scale, Saissetia oleae (Olivier), and the encyrtid parasitoid Metaphycus helvolus (Compere) at the Fillmore Insectary in Fillmore, CA. Insectary scale, reared on 3-year-old oleander plants, tended to be smaller on leaves than those on stems and largest on green stems ?3mm in diameter. Many scale were below the optimal size range

Robert A Weppler; Robert F Luck; Joseph G Morse

2003-01-01

98

Primary Productivity at the CAP LTER Chris Martin, Thomas Day, John Briggs, Jean Stutz,  

E-print Network

. 3. Study of landscape surface on microclimate and productivity of oleander. 4. Analysis of AMF variation in age and water source. 2. Comparative study of former land use history and landscape design type irrigated residential landscapes. 6. Effects of human management practices on landscape productivity. Carbon

Hall, Sharon J.

99

Contact toxicity of some fixed plant oils and stabilized natural pyrethrum extracts against adult maize weevils (Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The contact toxicity of some selected fixed plant oils and stabilized natural pyrethrum (Chrysanthemum cinerariaefolium) blends against adult maize weevils (Sitophilus zeamais) were investigated. Natural pyrethrum extract was stabilized against ultraviolet (UV) light by blending with fixed oils extracted from Azadirachta indica A. Juss (neem tree), Thevetia peruviana (yellow oleander) and Gossypium hirsutum L. (cotton) seeds. Cottonseed oil had the

H. N. Wanyika; P. G. Kareru; J. M. Keriko; A. N. Gachanja; G. M. Kenji; N. J Mukiira

100

Mistletoes and mutant albino shoots on woody plants as mineral nutrient traps  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims Potassium, sulphur and zinc contents of mistletoe leaves are generally higher than in their hosts. This is attributed to the fact that chemical elements which are cycled between xylem and phloem in the process of phloem loading of sugars are trapped in the mistletoe, because these parasites do not feed their hosts. Here it is hypothesized that mutant albino shoots on otherwise green plants should behave similarly, because they lack photosynthesis and thus cannot recycle elements involved in sugar loading. Methods The mineral nutrition of the mistletoe Scurrula elata was compared with that of albino shoots on Citrus sinensis and Nerium oleander. The potential for selective nutrient uptake by the mistletoe was studied by comparing element contents of host leaves on infected and uninfected branches and by manipulation of the haustorium–shoot ratio in mistletoes. Phloem anatomy of albino leaves was compared with that of green leaves. Key Results Both mistletoes and albino leaves had higher contents of potassium, sulphur and zinc than hosts or green leaves, respectively. Hypothetical discrimination of nutrient elements during the uptake by the haustorium is not supported by our data. Anatomical studies of albino leaves showed characteristics of release phloem. Conclusions Both albino shoots and mistletoes are traps for elements normally recycled between xylem and phloem, because retranslocation of phloem mobile elements into the mother plant or the host is low or absent. It can be assumed that the lack of photosynthetic activity in albino shoots and thus of sugars needed in phloem loading is responsible for the accumulation of elements. The absence of phloem loading is reflected in phloem anatomy of these abnormal shoots. In mistletoes the evolution of a parasitic lifestyle has obviously eliminated substantial feeding of the host with photosynthates produced by the mistletoe. PMID:22442343

Lo Gullo, M. A.; Glatzel, G.; Devkota, M.; Raimondo, F.; Trifilo, P.; Richter, H.

2012-01-01

101

Ethnopharmacological survey of plants used in the traditional treatment of hypertension and diabetes in south-eastern Morocco (Errachidia province).  

PubMed

This survey was undertaken in the Errachidia province in south-eastern Morocco in order to inventory the main medicinal plants used in folk medicine to treat arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Four hundred individuals who knew about and/or had used the medicinal plants for the indicated diseases, including some herbal healers, were interviewed throughout different regions of the province. The inventory of medicinal plants is summarized in a synoptic table, which contains the scientific, vernacular and common name of the plant, its ecological distribution, the part of the plant and the preparation used and the therapeutic indication. Extensive investigations have brought to light 64 medicinal plants belonging to 33 families; of these, 45 are used for diabetes, 36 for hypertension, and 18 for both diseases. Of these plants, 34% grow in the wild, 44% are cultivated, and 22% are not indigenous to the area and are brought from other parts of Morocco or from outside the country. The survey shows that 78% of the patients regularly use these medicinal plants. In this region, the most frequently used plants to treat diabetes include Ajuga iva, Allium cepa, Artemisia herba-alba, Carum carvi, Lepidium sativum, Nigella sativa, Olea europaea, Peganum harmala, Phoenix dactylifera, Rosmarinus officinalis, and Zygophyllum gaetulum, and those to treat hypertension include Ajuga iva, Allium cepa, Allium sativum, Artemisia herba-alba Asso, Carum carvi, Nigella sativa, Olea europea, Rosmarinus officinalis, Origanum majorana, Peganum harmala, and Phoenix dactylifera. The local people recognize the toxic plants and are very careful in using such plants, which are Citrullus colocynthis, Datura stramonium, Nerium oleander, Nigella sativa, Peganum harmala and Zygophyllum gaetulum. Our survey shows that traditional medicine in the south-eastern Moroccan population has not only survived but has thrived in the transcultural environment and intermixture of many ethnic traditions and beliefs. PMID:17052873

Tahraoui, A; El-Hilaly, J; Israili, Z H; Lyoussi, B

2007-03-01

102

Application of optical spectroscopic techniques for disease diagnosis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Optical spectroscopy, a truly non-invasive tool for remote diagnostics, is capable of providing valuable information on the structure and function of molecules. However, most spectroscopic techniques suffer from drawbacks, which limit their application. As a part of my dissertation work, I have developed theoretical and experimental methods to address the above mentioned issues. I have successfully applied these methods for monitoring the physical, chemical and biochemical parameters of biomolecules involved in some specific life threatening diseases like lead poisoning and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). I presented optical studies of melanosomes, which are one of the vital organelles in the human eye, also known to be responsible for a disease called age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a condition of advanced degeneration which causes progressive blindness. I used Raman spectroscopy, to first chemically identify the composition of melanosome, and then monitor the changes in its functional and chemical behavior due to long term exposure to visible light. The above study, apart from explaining the role of melanosomes in AMD, also sets the threshold power for lasers used in surgeries and other clinical applications. In the second part of my dissertation, a battery of spectroscopic techniques was successfully applied to explore the different binding sites of lead ions with the most abundant carrier protein molecule in our circulatory system, human serum albumin. I applied optical spectroscopic tools for ultrasensitive detection of heavy metal ions in solution which can also be used for lead detection at a very early stage of lead poisoning. Apart from this, I used Raman microspectroscopy to study the chemical alteration occurring inside a prostate cancer cell as a result of a treatment with a low concentrated aqueous extract of a prospective drug, Nerium Oleander. The experimental methods used in this study has tremendous potential for clinical application and will gain widespread acceptance within next few years from bench to bedside as an inexpensive and non-invasive tool compared to the other technologies.

Saha, Anushree

103

Decontamination and functional reclamation of dredged brackish sediments.  

PubMed

The continuous stream of sediments, dredged from harbors and waterways for keeping shipping traffic efficiency, is a considerable ongoing problem recognized worldwide. This problem gets worse as most of the sediments dredged from commercial ports and waterways turn out to be polluted by a wide range of organic and inorganic contaminants. In this study, phytoremediation was explored as a sustainable reclamation technology for turning slightly-polluted brackish dredged sediments into a matrix feasible for productive use. To test this possibility, a phytoremediation experimentation was carried out in containers of about 0.7 m(3) each, filled with brackish dredged sediments contaminated by heavy metals and hydrocarbons. The sediments were pre-conditioned by adding an agronomic soil (30 % v/v) to improve their clayey granulometric composition, and by topping the mixture with high quality compost (4 kg m(-2)) to favour the initial adaptation of the selected vegetal species. The following plant treatments were tested: (1) Paspalum vaginatum, (2) Phragmites australis, (3) Spartium junceum + P. vaginatum, (4) Nerium oleander + P. vaginatum, (5) Tamarix gallica + P. vaginatum, and (6) unplanted control. Eighteen months after the beginning of the experimentation, all the plant species were found in healthy condition and well developed. Throughout the whole experiment, the monitored biological parameters (total microbial population and dehydrogenase activity) were generally observed as constantly increasing in all the planted sediments more than in the control, pointing out an improvement of the chemico-physical conditions of both microorganisms and plants. The concentration decrease of organic and inorganic contaminants (>35 and 20 %, respectively) in the treatments with plants, particularly in the T. gallica + P. vaginatum, confirmed the importance of the root-microorganism interaction in activating the decontamination processes. Finally, the healthy state of the plants and the sediment characteristics, approaching those of an uncontaminated natural soil (technosoil), indicated the efficiency and success of this technology for brackish sediments reclamation. PMID:23183938

Doni, S; Macci, C; Peruzzi, E; Iannelli, R; Ceccanti, B; Masciandaro, G

2013-07-01

104

Ethnopharmacological survey of wild medicinal plants in Showbak, Jordan.  

PubMed

Two main research questions are framing this investigation: (1) the main taxa of the medicinal importance value altered the Showbak forest stand and species composition? (2) The most safe species and what are the toxic ones (unsafe). These two research questions are the vital ones to draw a clear image about the wild medicinal plants of this investigated area of Showbak region in Jordan. 79 wild medicinal plant species were investigated in this study which are used in traditional medication for the treatment of various diseases. Most of the locals interviewed dealt with well-known safe medicinal plants such as Aaronsohnia factorovskyi Warb. et Eig., Achillea santolina L., Adiantum capillus-veneris L., Artemisia herba-alba L., Ceratonia siliqua L., Clematis recta L., Herniaria hirsuta L., Malva neglecta Wallr., Rosmarinus officinalis L., Ruta chalepensis L., Salvia triloba L., Sarcopoterium spinosa (L.) Spach., Thymbra capitata (L.) Hof, and Urginea maritima Barker. Many of the wild medicinal plants investigated were toxic and needed to be practiced by practitioners and herbalists rather than the local healers. These plants include Calotropis procera Willd R.Br., Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Sch., Datura stramonium L., Digitalis purpurea L., Ecballium elaterium (L.) A.Rich., Euphorbia helioscopia L., Euphorbia tinctoria Boiss., Glaucium corniculatum (L.) Curt., Hyoscyamus aureus L., Mandragora officinarum L., Nerium oleander L., Ricinus communis L., Solanum nigrum L., Withania somnifera (L.) Dunel. The conservation of medicinal plants and natural resources is becoming increasingly important, so this research is trying to collect information from local population concerning the use of medicinal plants in Showbak; identify the most important specie; determine the relative importance value of the species and calculate the informant consensus factor (ICF) for the medicinal plants. Obtaining results is relied on the interviewee's personal information and the medicinal use of specific plants. PMID:19429338

Al-Qura'n, S

2009-05-01

105

Disruption of web structure and predatory behavior of a spider by plant-derived chemical defenses of an aposematic aphid  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two toxic and bitter-tasting cardenolides (cardiac-active steroids) were sequestered by the brightly colored oleander aphid,Aphis nerii B. de F., from the neotropical milkweed host plantAsclepias curassavica L. After feeding on milkweed-reared aphids, the orb-web spiderZygiella x-notata (Clerck) built severely disrupted webs and attacked fewer nontoxic, control aphids, whereas the webs of spiders fed only nontoxic aphids remained intact. The regularity

Stephen B. Malcolm

1989-01-01

106

Interspecific Variation Within the Genus Asclepias in Response to Herbivory by a Phloem-feeding Insect Herbivore  

Microsoft Academic Search

Induced plant responses to leaf-chewing insects have been well studied, but considerably less is known about the effects of\\u000a phloem-feedings insects on induction. In a set of laboratory experiments, we examined density-dependent induction by the milkweed-oleander\\u000a aphid, Aphis nerii, of putative defenses in four milkweed species (Asclepias incarnata, Asclepias syriaca, Asclepias tuberosa, and Asclepias viridis). We hypothesized that high aphid

Caralyn B. Zehnder; Mark D. Hunter

2007-01-01

107

Diurnal variation in probability of death following self-poisoning in Sri Lanka—evidence for chronotoxicity in humans  

PubMed Central

Background The absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination of medicines are partly controlled by transporters and enzymes with diurnal variation in expression. Dose timing may be important for maximizing therapeutic and minimizing adverse effects. However, outcome data for such an effect in humans are sparse, and chronotherapeutics is consequently less practised. We examined a large prospective Sri Lankan cohort of patients with acute poisoning to seek evidence of diurnal variation in the probability of survival. Methods In all, 14?840 patients admitted to hospital after yellow oleander (Cascabela thevetia) seed or pesticide [organophosphorus (OP), carbamate, paraquat, glyphosate] self-poisoning were investigated for variation in survival according to time of ingestion. Results We found strong evidence that the outcome of oleander poisoning was associated with time of ingestion (P?oleander poisoning was over 50% lower following evening ingestion (risk ratio?=?0.40, 95% confidence interval 0.26–0.62). Variation in dose across the day was not responsible. Conclusions We have shown for the first time that timing of poison ingestion affects survival in humans. This evidence for chronotoxicity suggests chronotherapeutics should be given greater attention in drug development and clinical practice. PMID:23179303

Metcalfe, Chris; Gunnell, David; Mohamed, Fahim; Eddleston, Michael

2012-01-01

108

Effect of medicinal and aromatic plants on rumen fermentation, protozoa population and methanogenesis in vitro.  

PubMed

The potential of tannins from 21 medicinal and aromatic plant leaves as antimethanogenic additives in ruminant feeds was investigated. The effect of tannin from these leaves on rumen fermentation parameters, protozoa population and methanogenesis was studied by incubating the samples [200?mg dry matter (DM)] without and with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-6000 (400?mg DM) as a tannin binder during 24-h incubation in the in vitro Hohenheim gas method. Based on the methane percentage estimated in the total gas produced, methane production in millilitre was calculated [methane volume (ml)?=?methane %?×?total gas produced (ml) in 24?h]. In the samples, crude protein and neutral detergent fibre (g/kg DM) ranged from 113 to 172 and from 352 to 444 respectively. The total phenol (TP; g/kg DM) content was highest in Terminalia chebula (274) followed by Hemigraphis colorata (71) and Sapindus laurifolia (51) respectively. In the remaining samples, it was <43?g/kg DM. Activity of tannins, as represented by the increase in gas volume on addition of PEG, ranged from 0 to 133%, with the highest being recorded in T. chebula. The per cent increase in methane on PEG addition was 0 for Ammi majus, Aristolochia indica, Cascabela thevetia, Ipomea nil and Lantana camara, illustrating that tannins present in these samples had no effect on methane concentration. The PEG addition increased the total protozoa count by >50% in A. indica and C. thevetica. One of the important findings of our study was that of the 21 samples screened, Entodinia population increased in 12 with PEG as compared to 7 where Holotricha increased, indicating higher susceptibility of Entodinia to tannin. There was no increase in the protozoa population with PEG when incubating Cardiospermum halicacabum, Clerodendrum inerme, Dioscorea floribunda, Nerium oleander and Selastras paniculatus, which strongly suggested that methane suppression recorded in these samples was not because of a defaunating effect of their tannins per se. The fermentation pattern reflected increased total volatile fatty acid (TVFA) concentration from 0 to 28.3% with PEG addition among the leaves. Our results confirmed further observations that methanogenesis in vitro is not essentially related to density of protozoa population. Secondly, medicinal and aromatic plants such as C. inerme, Gymnema sylvestre and Sapindus laurifolia containing tannins appear to have a potential to suppress in vitro methanogenesis. PMID:22385477

Bhatta, R; Baruah, L; Saravanan, M; Suresh, K P; Sampath, K T

2013-06-01

109

Fungal Planet description sheets: 214-280.  

PubMed

Novel species of microfungi described in the present study include the following from South Africa: Cercosporella dolichandrae from Dolichandra unguiscati, Seiridium podocarpi from Podocarpus latifolius, Pseudocercospora parapseudarthriae from Pseudarthria hookeri, Neodevriesia coryneliae from Corynelia uberata on leaves of Afrocarpus falcatus, Ramichloridium eucleae from Euclea undulata and Stachybotrys aloeticola from Aloe sp. (South Africa), as novel member of the Stachybotriaceae fam. nov. Several species were also described from Zambia, and these include Chaetomella zambiensis on unknown Fabaceae, Schizoparme pseudogranati from Terminalia stuhlmannii, Diaporthe isoberliniae from Isoberlinia angolensis, Peyronellaea combreti from Combretum mossambiciensis, Zasmidium rothmanniae and Phaeococcomyces rothmanniae from Rothmannia engleriana, Diaporthe vangueriae from Vangueria infausta and Diaporthe parapterocarpi from Pterocarpus brenanii. Novel species from the Netherlands include: Stagonospora trichophoricola, Keissleriella trichophoricola and Dinemasporium trichophoricola from Trichophorum cespitosum, Phaeosphaeria poae, Keissleriella poagena, Phaeosphaeria poagena, Parastagonospora poagena and Pyrenochaetopsis poae from Poa sp., Septoriella oudemansii from Phragmites australis and Dendryphion europaeum from Hedera helix (Germany) and Heracleum sphondylium (the Netherlands). Novel species from Australia include: Anungitea eucalyptorum from Eucalyptus leaf litter, Beltraniopsis neolitseae and Acrodontium neolitseae from Neolitsea australiensis, Beltraniella endiandrae from Endiandra introrsa, Phaeophleospora parsoniae from Parsonia straminea, Penicillifer martinii from Cynodon dactylon, Ochroconis macrozamiae from Macrozamia leaf litter, Triposporium cycadicola, Circinotrichum cycadis, Cladosporium cycadicola and Acrocalymma cycadis from Cycas spp. Furthermore, Vermiculariopsiella dichapetali is described from Dichapetalum rhodesicum (Botswana), Ophiognomonia acadiensis from Picea rubens (Canada), Setophoma vernoniae from Vernonia polyanthes and Penicillium restingae from soil (Brazil), Pseudolachnella guaviyunis from Myrcianthes pungens (Uruguay) and Pseudocercospora neriicola from Nerium oleander (Italy). Novelties from Spain include: Dendryphiella eucalyptorum from Eucalyptus globulus, Conioscypha minutispora from dead wood, Diplogelasinospora moalensis and Pseudoneurospora canariensis from soil and Inocybe lanatopurpurea from reforested woodland of Pinus spp. Novelties from France include: Kellermania triseptata from Agave angustifolia, Zetiasplozna acaciae from Acacia melanoxylon, Pyrenochaeta pinicola from Pinus sp. and Pseudonectria rusci from Ruscus aculeatus. New species from China include: Dematiocladium celtidicola from Celtis bungeana, Beltrania pseudorhombica, Chaetopsina beijingensis and Toxicocladosporium pini from Pinus spp. and Setophaeosphaeria badalingensis from Hemerocallis fulva. Novel genera of Ascomycetes include Alfaria from Cyperus esculentus (Spain), Rinaldiella from a contaminated human lesion (Georgia), Hyalocladosporiella from Tectona grandis (Brazil), Pseudoacremonium from Saccharum spontaneum and Melnikomyces from leaf litter (Vietnam), Annellosympodiella from Juniperus procera (Ethiopia), Neoceratosperma from Eucalyptus leaves (Thailand), Ramopenidiella from Cycas calcicola (Australia), Cephalotrichiella from air in the Netherlands, Neocamarosporium from Mesembryanthemum sp. and Acervuloseptoria from Ziziphus mucronata (South Africa) and Setophaeosphaeria from Hemerocallis fulva (China). Several novel combinations are also introduced, namely for Phaeosphaeria setosa as Setophaeosphaeria setosa, Phoma heteroderae as Peyronellaea heteroderae and Phyllosticta maydis as Peyronellaea maydis. Morphological and culture characteristics along with ITS DNA barcodes are provided for all taxa. PMID:25264390

Crous, P W; Shivas, R G; Quaedvlieg, W; van der Bank, M; Zhang, Y; Summerell, B A; Guarro, J; Wingfield, M J; Wood, A R; Alfenas, A C; Braun, U; Cano-Lira, J F; García, D; Marin-Felix, Y; Alvarado, P; Andrade, J P; Armengol, J; Assefa, A; den Breeÿen, A; Camele, I; Cheewangkoon, R; De Souza, J T; Duong, T A; Esteve-Raventós, F; Fournier, J; Frisullo, S; García-Jiménez, J; Gardiennet, A; Gené, J; Hernández-Restrepo, M; Hirooka, Y; Hospenthal, D R; King, A; Lechat, C; Lombard, L; Mang, S M; Marbach, P A S; Marincowitz, S; Marin-Felix, Y; Montaño-Mata, N J; Moreno, G; Perez, C A; Pérez Sierra, A M; Robertson, J L; Roux, J; Rubio, E; Schumacher, R K; Stchigel, A M; Sutton, D A; Tan, Y P; Thompson, E H; van der Linde, E; Walker, A K; Walker, D M; Wickes, B L; Wong, P T W; Groenewald, J Z

2014-06-01

110

High-resolution melting analysis as a powerful tool to discriminate and genotype Pseudomonas savastanoi pathovars and strains.  

PubMed

Pseudomonas savastanoi is a serious pathogen of Olive, Oleander, Ash, and several other Oleaceae. Its epiphytic or endophytic presence in asymptomatic plants is crucial for the spread of Olive and Oleander knot disease, as already ascertained for P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi (Psv) on Olive and for pv. nerii (Psn) on Oleander, while no information is available for pv. fraxini (Psf) on Ash. Nothing is known yet about the distribution on the different host plants and the real host range of these pathovars in nature, although cross-infections were observed following artificial inoculations. A multiplex Real-Time PCR assay was recently developed to simultaneously and quantitatively discriminate in vitro and in planta these P. savastanoi pathovars, for routine culture confirmation and for epidemiological and diagnostical studies. Here an innovative High-Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA)-based assay was set up to unequivocally discriminate Psv, Psn and Psf, according to several single nucleotide polymorphisms found in their Type Three Secretion System clusters. The genetic distances among 56 P. savastanoi strains belonging to these pathovars were also evaluated, confirming and refining data previously obtained by fAFLP. To our knowledge, this is the first time that HRMA is applied to a bacterial plant pathogen, and one of the few multiplex HRMA-based assays developed so far. This protocol provides a rapid, sensitive, specific tool to differentiate and detect Psv, Psn and Psf strains, also in vivo and against other related bacteria, with lower costs than conventional multiplex Real-Time PCR. Its application is particularly suitable for sanitary certification programs for P. savastanoi, aimed at avoiding the spreading of this phytopathogen through asymptomatic plants. PMID:22295075

Gori, Andrea; Cerboneschi, Matteo; Tegli, Stefania

2012-01-01

111

Optical Parameters of Leaves of 30 Plant Species 1  

PubMed Central

Optical parameters (absorption coefficient k, infinite reflectance R?, scattering coefficient 8) are tabulated for seven wavelengths and analyzed for statistical differences for 30 plant species. The wavelengths are: 550 nm (green reflectance peak), 650 nm (chlorophyll absorption band), 850 nm (infrared reflectance plateau), 1450 nm (water absorption band), 1650 nm (reflectance peak following water absorption band at 1450 nm), 1950 nm (water absorption band), and 2200 nm (reflectance peak following water absorption band at 1950 nm). Thick, complex dorsiventral (bifacial mesophyll) leaves such as rubber plant, begonia, sedum, and privet had lower R? values than thinner, less complex dorsiventral leaves (i.e., soybean, peach, bean, rose) or essentially centric (undifferentiated mesophyll) sorghum and corn leaves. Infinite reflectance was negatively correlated with leaf thickness (?0.734**). Thick, complex dorsiventral leaves (crinum, oleander, privet, rubber plant, sedum) had higher (p 0.01) k values than thinner, less complex dorsiventral leaves (i.e., soybean, rose, peach) or essentially centric sorghum, sugarcane, and corn leaves. A coefficient of 0.718** was obtained for the correlation of k values with leaf thickness values. Complex dorsiventral oleander, orange, and crinum leaves had higher (p 0.01) 8 values than less complex dorsiventral (i.e., onion, begonia, banana) or centric leaves (i.e., corn and sugarcane). The scattering coefficient was not correlated with leaf thickness. PMID:16658499

Gausman, H. W.; Allen, W. A.

1973-01-01

112

[Effect of plant glycosides on resistance and capacitance vessels].  

PubMed

In the anaesthetized cat, SCOA ( Miroton ), a product which contains extracts from Scilla , Convallaria , Oleander and Adonis , displays not only its well-known positive inotropic effect but has also constrictor effects on veins when applied in intravenous doses of 21.5-100 GPU /kg ( GPU = guinea-pig units, i.e. cardiotoxic equivalents related to 1 g body weight of guinea-pigs). The latter effect differs in that it is somewhat more prolonged. With intraduodenal administration the doses required to achieve equal peak effects as with intravenous injection are about 4 times larger and this suggests a relatively good enteral availability in the cat. SCOA constricts not only veins but also arteries. However, this latter effect is comparatively small and occurs only after intraarterial infusion of high doses (9.1 and 91 GPU /min, respectively).--The cardiac glycosides contained in the drug product primarily account for its vasoactive qualities. The venous constrictor effect correlates with the guinea-pig units. In qualitative respects, the pure glycosides cymarin , convallatoxin , proscillaridin , and scillaren exert equal effects. There is, however, evidence that the correlation between the effect on veins and on the heart differs for the glycosides tested. Based on equal guinea-pig units, the adonis extract, for instance, acts on capacitance vessels about twice as much as scilla , oleander and convallaria extracts. Cymarin , too, has a stronger effect on veins than would be expected from its cardiotoxic effect. The action on arteries and veins are based on different mechanism.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6540100

Lehmann, H D

1984-01-01

113

Summer pheasant's eye (Adonis aestivalis) poisoning in three horses.  

PubMed

Three horses died as a result of eating grass hay containing summer pheasant's eye (Adonis aestivalis L.), a plant containing cardenolides similar to oleander and foxglove. A 9-year-old thoroughbred gelding, a 20-year-old appaloosa gelding, and a 5-year-old quarter horse gelding initially presented with signs of colic 24-48 hours after first exposure to the hay. Gastrointestinal gaseous distension was the primary finding on clinical examination of all three horses. Two horses became moribund and were euthanatized 1 day after first showing clinical signs, and the third horse was euthanatized after 4 days of medical therapy. Endocardial hemorrhage and gaseous distension of the gastrointestinal tract were the only necropsy findings in the first two horses. On microscopic examination, both horses had scattered foci of mild, acute myocardial necrosis and neutrophilic inflammation associated with endocardial and epicardial hemorrhage. The third horse that survived for 4 days had multifocal to coalescing, irregular foci of acute, subacute, and chronic myocardial degeneration and necrosis. A. aestivalis (pheasant's eye, summer adonis) was identified in the hay. Strophanthidin, the aglycone of several cardenolides present in Adonis spp., was detected by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry in gastrointestinal contents from all three horses. Although Adonis spp. contain cardiac glycosides, cardiac lesions have not previously been described in livestock associated with consumption of adonis, and this is the first report of adonis toxicosis in North America. PMID:15133169

Woods, L W; Filigenzi, M S; Booth, M C; Rodger, L D; Arnold, J S; Puschner, B

2004-05-01

114

Acute Plant Poisoning and Antitoxin Antibodies  

PubMed Central

Plant poisoning is normally a problem of young children who unintentionally ingest small quantities of toxic plants with little resulting morbidity and few deaths. In some regions of the world, however, plants are important clinical problems causing much morbidity and mortality. While deaths do occur after unintentional poisoning with plants such as Atractylis gummifera (bird-lime or blue thistle) and Blighia sapida (ackee tree), the majority of deaths globally occur following intentional self-poisoning with plants such as Thevetia peruviana (yellow oleander) and Cerbera manghas (pink-eyed cerbera or sea mango). Antitoxins developed against colchicine and cardiac glycosides would be useful for plant poisonings - anti-digoxin Fab fragments have been shown to be highly effective in T. peruviana poisoning. Unfortunately, their great cost limits their use in the developing world where they would make a major difference in patient management. Therapy for some other plant poisonings might also benefit from the development of antitoxins. However, until issues of cost and supply are worked out, plant anti-toxins are going to remain a dream in many of the areas where they are now urgently required. PMID:12807314

Eddleston, Michael; Persson, Hans

2007-01-01

115

PsasM2I, a Type II Restriction-Modification System in Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi: Differential Distribution of Carrier Strains in the Environment and the Evolutionary History of Homologous RM Systems in the Pseudomonas syringae Complex.  

PubMed

A type II restriction-modification system was found in a native plasmid of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi MLLI2. Functional analysis of the methyltransferase showed that the enzyme acts by protecting the DNA sequence CTGCAG from cleavage. Restriction endonuclease expression in recombinant Escherichia coli cells resulted in mutations in the REase sequence or transposition of insertion sequence 1A in the coding sequence, preventing lethal gene expression. Population screening detected homologous RM systems in other P. savastanoi strains and in the Pseudomonas syringae complex. An epidemiological survey carried out by sampling olive and oleander knots in two Italian regions showed an uneven diffusion of carrier strains, whose presence could be related to a selective advantage in maintaining the RM system in particular environments or subpopulations. Moreover, carrier strains can coexist in the same orchards, plants, and knot tissues with non-carriers, revealing unexpected genetic variability on a very small spatial scale. Phylogenetic analysis of the RM system and housekeeping gene sequences in the P. syringae complex demonstrated the ancient acquisition of the RM systems. However, the evolutionary history of the gene complex also showed the involvement of horizontal gene transfer between related strains and recombination events. PMID:25008981

Cinelli, Tamara; Moscetti, Ilaria; Marchi, Guido

2014-11-01

116

The Complex Biogeography of the Plant Pathogen Xylella fastidiosa: Genetic Evidence of Introductions and Subspecific Introgression in Central America  

PubMed Central

The bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is a plant pathogen with a history of economically damaging introductions of subspecies to regions where its other subspecies are native. Genetic evidence is presented demonstrating the introduction of two new taxa into Central America and their introgression into the native subspecies, X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa. The data are from 10 genetic outliers detected by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of isolates from Costa Rica. Six (five from oleander, one from coffee) defined a new sequence type (ST53) that carried alleles at six of the eight loci sequenced (five of the seven MLST loci) diagnostic of the South American subspecies Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca which causes two economically damaging plant diseases, citrus variegated chlorosis and coffee leaf scorch. The two remaining loci of ST53 carried alleles from what appears to be a new South American form of X. fastidiosa. Four isolates, classified as X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa, showed a low level of introgression of non-native DNA. One grapevine isolate showed introgression of an allele from X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca while the other three (from citrus and coffee) showed introgression of an allele with similar ancestry to the alleles of unknown origin in ST53. The presence of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca in Central America is troubling given its disease potential, and establishes another route for the introduction of this economically damaging subspecies into the US or elsewhere, a threat potentially compounded by the presence of a previously unknown form of X. fastidiosa. PMID:25379725

Nunney, Leonard; Ortiz, Beatriz; Russell, Stephanie A.; Ruiz Sánchez, Rebeca; Stouthamer, Richard

2014-01-01

117

Functional evidence for physiological mechanisms to circumvent neurotoxicity of cardenolides in an adapted and a non-adapted hawk-moth species.  

PubMed

Because cardenolides specifically inhibit the Na(+)K(+)-ATPase, insects feeding on cardenolide-containing plants need to circumvent this toxic effect. Some insects such as the monarch butterfly rely on target site insensitivity, yet other cardenolide-adapted lepidopterans such as the oleander hawk-moth, Daphnis nerii, possess highly sensitive Na(+)K(+)-ATPases. Nevertheless, larvae of this species and the related Manduca sexta are insensitive to injected cardenolides. By radioactive-binding assays with nerve cords of both species, we demonstrate that the perineurium surrounding the nervous tissue functions as a diffusion barrier for a polar cardenolide (ouabain). By contrast, for non-polar cardenolides such as digoxin an active efflux carrier limits the access to the nerve cord. This barrier can be abolished by metabolic inhibitors and by verapamil, a specific inhibitor of P-glycoproteins (PGPs). This supports that a PGP-like transporter is involved in the active cardenolide-barrier of the perineurium. Tissue specific RT-PCR demonstrated expression of three PGP-like genes in hornworm nerve cords, and immunohistochemistry further corroborated PGP expression in the perineurium. Our results thus suggest that the lepidopteran perineurium serves as a diffusion barrier for polar cardenolides and provides an active barrier for non-polar cardenolides. This may explain the high in vivo resistance to cardenolides observed in some lepidopteran larvae, despite their highly sensitive Na(+)K(+)-ATPases. PMID:23516239

Petschenka, Georg; Pick, Christian; Wagschal, Vera; Dobler, Susanne

2013-05-22

118

Functional evidence for physiological mechanisms to circumvent neurotoxicity of cardenolides in an adapted and a non-adapted hawk-moth species  

PubMed Central

Because cardenolides specifically inhibit the Na+K+-ATPase, insects feeding on cardenolide-containing plants need to circumvent this toxic effect. Some insects such as the monarch butterfly rely on target site insensitivity, yet other cardenolide-adapted lepidopterans such as the oleander hawk-moth, Daphnis nerii, possess highly sensitive Na+K+-ATPases. Nevertheless, larvae of this species and the related Manduca sexta are insensitive to injected cardenolides. By radioactive-binding assays with nerve cords of both species, we demonstrate that the perineurium surrounding the nervous tissue functions as a diffusion barrier for a polar cardenolide (ouabain). By contrast, for non-polar cardenolides such as digoxin an active efflux carrier limits the access to the nerve cord. This barrier can be abolished by metabolic inhibitors and by verapamil, a specific inhibitor of P-glycoproteins (PGPs). This supports that a PGP-like transporter is involved in the active cardenolide-barrier of the perineurium. Tissue specific RT-PCR demonstrated expression of three PGP-like genes in hornworm nerve cords, and immunohistochemistry further corroborated PGP expression in the perineurium. Our results thus suggest that the lepidopteran perineurium serves as a diffusion barrier for polar cardenolides and provides an active barrier for non-polar cardenolides. This may explain the high in vivo resistance to cardenolides observed in some lepidopteran larvae, despite their highly sensitive Na+K+-ATPases. PMID:23516239

Petschenka, Georg; Pick, Christian; Wagschal, Vera; Dobler, Susanne

2013-01-01

119

Comparison of neurological healthcare oriented educational resources for patients on the internet.  

PubMed

The internet has become a major contributor to health literacy promotion. The average American reads at 7th-8th grade level and it is recommended to write patient education materials at or below 6th grade reading level. We tried to assess the level of literacy required to read and understand online patient education materials (OPEM) for neurological diseases from various internet resources. We then compared those to an assumed reference OPEM source, namely the patient education brochures from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the world's largest professional association of neurologists. Disease specific patient education brochures were downloaded from the AAN website. OPEM for these diseases were also accessed from other common online sources determined using a predefined criterion. All OPEM were converted to Microsoft Word (Microsoft Corp., Redmond, WA, USA) and their reading level was analyzed using Readability Studio Professional Edition version 2012.1 (Oleander Software, Vandalia, OH, USA). Descriptive analysis and analysis of variance were used to compare reading levels of OPEM from different resources. Medline Plus, Mayo clinic and Wikipedia qualified for OPEM analysis. All OPEM from these resources, including the AAN, were written above the recommended 6th grade reading level. They were also found to be "fairly difficult", "difficult" or "confusing" on the Flesch Reading Ease scale. AAN OPEM on average needed lower reading level, with Wikipedia OPEM being significantly (p<0.01) more difficult to read compared to the other three resources. OPEM on neurological diseases are being written at a level of reading complexity higher than the average American and the recommended reading levels. This may be undermining the utility of these resources. PMID:25194822

Punia, Vineet; Dagar, Anjali; Agarwal, Nitin; He, Wenzhuan; Hillen, Machteld

2014-12-01

120

Patterns of hospital transfer for self-poisoned patients in rural Sri Lanka: implications for estimating the incidence of self-poisoning in the developing world.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: Most data on self-poisoning in rural Asia have come from secondary hospitals. We aimed to: assess how transfers from primary to secondary hospitals affected estimates of case-fatality ratio (CFR); determine whether there was referral bias according to gender or poison; and estimate the annual incidence of all self-poisoning, and of fatal self-poisoning, in a rural developing-world setting. METHODS: Self-poisoning patients admitted to Anuradhapura General Hospital, Sri Lanka, were reviewed on admission from 1 July to 31 December 2002. We audited medical notes of self-poisoning patients admitted to 17 of the 34 surrounding peripheral hospitals for the same period. FINDINGS: A total of 742 patients were admitted with self-poisoning to the secondary hospital; 81 died (CFR 10.9%). 483 patients were admitted to 17 surrounding peripheral hospitals. Six patients (1.2%) died in peripheral hospitals, 249 were discharged home, and 228 were transferred to the secondary hospital. There was no effect of gender or age on likelihood of transfer; however, patients who had ingested oleander or paraquat were more likely to be transferred than were patients who had taken organophosphorus pesticides or other poisons. Estimated annual incidences of self-poisoning and fatal self-poisoning were 363 and 27 per 100,000 population, respectively, with an overall CFR of 7.4% (95% confidence interval 6.0-9.0). CONCLUSION: Fifty per cent of patients admitted to peripheral hospitals were discharged home, showing that CFRs based on secondary hospital data are inflated. However, while incidence of self-poisoning is similar to that in England, fatal self-poisoning is three times more common in Sri Lanka than fatal self-harm by all methods in England. Population based data are essential for making international comparisons of case fatality and incidence, and for assessing public health interventions. PMID:16628300

Eddleston, Michael; Sudarshan, K.; Senthilkumaran, M.; Reginald, K.; Karalliedde, Lakshman; Senarathna, Lalith; de Silva, Dhammika; Rezvi Sheriff, M. H.; Buckley, Nick A.; Gunnell, David

2006-01-01

121

Density-dependent reduction and induction of milkweed cardenolides by a sucking insect herbivore.  

PubMed

The effect of aphid population size on host-plant chemical defense expression and the effect of plant defense on aphid population dynamics were investigated in a milkweed-specialist herbivore system. Density effects of the aposematic oleander aphid, Aphis nerii, on cardenolide expression were measured in two milkweed species, Asclepias curassavica and A. incarnata. These plants vary in constitutive chemical investment with high mean cardenolide concentration in A. curassavica and low to zero in A. incarnata. The second objective was to determine whether cardenolide expression in these two host plants impacts mean A. nerii colony biomass (mg) and density. Cardenolide concentration (microgram/g) of A. curassavica in both aphid-treated leaves and opposite, herbivore-free leaves decreased initially in comparison with aphid-free controls, and then increased significantly with A. nerii density. Thus, A. curassavica responds to aphid herbivory initially with density-dependent phytochemical reduction, followed by induction of cardenolides to concentrations above aphid-free controls. In addition, mean cardenolide concentration of aphid-treated leaves was significantly higher than that of opposite, herbivore-free leaves. Therefore, A. curassavica induction is strongest in herbivore-damage tissue. Conversely, A. incarnata exhibited no such chemical response to aphid herbivory. Furthermore, neither host plant responded chemically to herbivore feeding duration time (days) or to the interaction between herbivore initial density and feeding duration time. There were also no significant differences in mean colony biomass or population density of A. nerii reared on high cardenolide (A. curassavica) and low cardenolide (A. incarnata) hosts. PMID:15139307

Martel, John W; Malcolm, Stephen B

2004-03-01

122

Collective Defense of Aphis nerii and Uroleucon hypochoeridis (Homoptera, Aphididae) against Natural Enemies  

PubMed Central

The prevalent way aphids accomplish colony defense against natural enemies is a mutualistic relationship with ants or the occurrence of a specialised soldier caste typcial for eusocial aphids, or even both. Despite a group-living life style of those aphid species lacking these defense lines, communal defense against natural predators has not yet been observed there. Individuals of Aphis nerii (Oleander aphid) and Uroleucon hypochoeridis, an aphid species feeding on Hypochoeris radicata (hairy cat's ear), show a behavioral response to visual stimulation in the form of spinning or twitching, which is often accompanied by coordinated kicks executed with hind legs. Interestingly, this behaviour is highly synchronized among members of a colony and repetitive visual stimulation caused strong habituation. Observations of natural aphid colonies revealed that a collective twitching and kicking response (CTKR) was frequently evoked during oviposition attempts of the parasitoid wasp Aphidius colemani and during attacks of aphidophagous larvae. CTKR effectively interrupted oviposition attempts of this parasitoid wasp and even repelled this parasitoid from colonies after evoking consecutive CTKRs. In contrast, solitary feeding A. nerii individuals were not able to successfully repel this parasitoid wasp. In addition, CTKR was also evoked through gentle substrate vibrations. Laser vibrometry of the substrate revealed twitching-associated vibrations that form a train of sharp acceleration peaks in the course of a CTKR. This suggests that visual signals in combination with twitching-related substrate vibrations may play an important role in synchronising defense among members of a colony. In both aphid species collective defense in encounters with different natural enemies was executed in a stereotypical way and was similar to CTKR evoked through visual stimulation. This cooperative defense behavior provides an example of a surprising sociality that can be found in some aphid species that are not expected to be social at all. PMID:20454683

Hartbauer, Manfred

2010-01-01

123

Using pilot test data to refine an alternative cover design in northern California.  

PubMed

Two instrumented test sections were constructed in summer 1999 at the Kiefer Landfill near Sacramento, California to test the hydraulic performance of two proposed alternative final covers. Both test sections simulated monolithic evapotranspiration (ET) designs that differed primarily in thickness. Both were seeded with a mix of two perennial and one annual grass species. Oleander seedlings were also planted in the thicker test section. Detailed hydrologic performance monitoring of the covers was conducted from 1999 through 2005, The thicker test section met the performance criterion (average percolation of <3 mm/y). The thinner test section transmitted considerably more percolation (average of 55 mm/y). Both test sections were decommissioned in summer 2005 to investigate changes in soil hydraulic properties, geomorphology, and vegetation and to collect data to support a revised design. Field data from hydrologic monitoring and the decommissioning study were subsequently included in a hydrologic modeling study to estimate the performance of an optimized cover system for full-scale application. The decommissioning study showed that properties of the soils changed over the monitoring period (saturated hydraulic conductivity and water holding capacity increased, density decreased) and that the perennial grasses and shrubs intended for the cover were out-competed by annual species with shallower roots and lesser capacity for water uptake. Of these changes, reduced ET from the shallow-rooted annual vegetation is believed to be the primary cause for the high percolation rate from the thinner test section. Hydrologic modeling suggests that the target hydraulic performance can be achieved using an ET cover with similar thickness to the thin test section if perennial vegetation species observed in surrounding grasslands can be established. This finding underscores the importance of establishing and maintaining the appropriate vegetation on ET covers in this climate. PMID:22574382

Smesrud, Jason K; Benson, Craig H; Albright, William H; Richards, James H; Wright, Shannon; Israel, Tim; Goodrich, Keith

2012-01-01

124

A review on phytochemical, pharmacological, and pharmacognostical profile of Wrightia tinctoria: Adulterant of kurchi  

PubMed Central

Wrightia tinctoria R. Br. belongs to family Apocynaceae commonly called as Sweet Indrajao, Pala Indigo Plant, Dyer's Oleander. “Jaundice curative tree” in south India. Sweet Indrajao is a small, deciduous tree with a light gray, scaly smooth bark. Native to India and Burma, Wrightia is named after a Scottish physician and botanist William Wright (1740-1827). Sweet Indrajao is called dhudi (Hindi) because of its preservative nature. The juice of the tender leaves is used efficaciously in jaundice. Crushed fresh leaves when filled in the cavity of decayed tooth relieve toothache. In Siddha system of medicine, it is used for psoriasis and other skin diseases. Oil 777 prepared out of the fresh leaves of the plant has been assigned to analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-pyretic activities and to be effective in the treatment of psoriasis. The plant is reported to contain presence of flavanoid, glycoflavones-iso-orientin, and phenolic acids. The various chemical constituents isolated from various parts of the plant are reported as 3,4-Seco-lup-20 (29)-en-3-oic acid, lupeol, stigmasterol and campetosterol, Indigotin, indirubin, tryptanthrin, isatin, anthranillate and rutin Triacontanol, Wrightial, cycloartenone, cycloeucalenol, ?-amyrin, Alpha-Amyrin, and ?-sitosterol, 14?-methylzymosterol. Four uncommon sterols, desmosterol, clerosterol, 24-methylene-25-methylcholesterol, and 24-dehydropollinastanol, were isolated and identified in addition to several more common phytosterols. The Triterpinoids components of the leaves and pods of Wrightia tinctoria also isolated. This article intends to provide an overview of the chemical constituents present in various parts of the plants and their pharmacological actions and pharmacognostical evaluation. PMID:24600194

Srivastava, Rajani

2014-01-01

125

Passive Microwave Measurements of Salinity: The Gulf Stream Experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Passive microwave sensors at L-band (1.4 GHz) operating from aircraft have demonstrated that salinity can be measured with sufficient accuracy (I psu) to be scientifically meaningful in coastal waters. However, measuring salinity in the open ocean presents unresolved issues largely because of the much greater accuracy (approximately 0.2 psu) required of global maps to be scientifically viable. The development of a satellite microwave instrument to make global measurements of SSS (Sea Surface Salinity) is the focus of a joint JPL/GSFC/NASA ocean research program called Aquarius. In the summer of 1999 a series of measurements called, The Gulf Stream Experiment, were conducted as part of research at the Goddard Space Flight Center to test the potential for passive microwave remote sensing of salinity in the open ocean. The measurements consisted of airborne microwave instruments together with ships and drifters for surface truth. The study area was a 200 km by 100 km rectangle about 250 km east of Delaware Bay between the continental shelf waters and north wall of the Gulf Stream. The primary passive instruments were the ESTAR radiometer (L-band, H-pol) and the SLFMR radiometer (L-band, V-pol). In addition, the instruments on the aircraft included a C-band radiometer (ACMR), an ocean wave scatterometer (ROWS) and an infrared radiometer (for surface temperature). These instruments were mounted on the NASA P-3 Orion aircraft. Sea surface measurements consisted of thermosalinograph data provided by the R/V Cape Henlopen and the MN Oleander, and data from salinity and temperature sensors on three surface drifters deployed from the R/V Cape Henlopen. The primary experiment period was August 26-September 2, 1999. During this period the salinity field within the study area consisted of a gradient on the order of 2-3 psu in the vicinity of the shelf break and a warm core ring with a gradient of 1-2 psu. Detailed maps were made with the airborne sensors on August 28 and 29 and on September 2 flights were made over the surface drifters to look for effects due to a change in surface roughness resulting from the passage of Hurricane Dennis. Results show a good agreement between the microwave measurements and ship measurements of salinity. The features of the brightness temperature maps correspond well with the features of the salinity field measured by the ship and drifters and a preliminary retrieval of salinity compares well with the ship data.

LeVine, D. M.; Koblinsky, C.; Haken, M.; Howden, S.; Bingham, F.; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

126

Evaluation of soil biodesinfestation with crop and garden residues in the control of root-knot nematodes populations.  

PubMed

Fresh crop and garden residues were applied both under laboratory conditions and in commercial greenhouse in order to asses their effect on soil nematodes populations and soil fertility. In the laboratory experiments, dosages of 5 to 20 g of cabbage residues, chicken manure, cabbage residues+chicken manure, grass+chicken manure, as well as leaves and stems of orange tree, pine tree, oleander, olive tree, palm tree and boxwood were mixed with 500 g soil having root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita) and soil moisture was adjusted at field capacity. A control treatment without residues was also included. The mixtures were kept into plastic bags, with four replications, and the bags were incubated for four weeks at 30 degrees C, when nematological and soil fertility analyses were carried out. In general, all these materials significantly (P < 0.05) reduced M. incognita populations and increased saprophagous nematodes, with slight effects on soil fertility except for the K increase with residues application. Tomato plants susceptible to M. incognita were planted in pots with 300 cm3 of the treated soils and kept for five weeks in a growth chamber (24 +/- 1 degrees C, 14 hours light), when root galling indices were evaluated. Most materials applied reduced root galling indices as regards to the control. In the greenhouse experiment, cabbage residues, cabbage residues+chicken manure, grass+chicken manure and grass+cabbage residues were applied to the soil and covered with a polyethylene sheet for 5 weeks. A cabbage residues:chicken manure treatment and a control (not-amended) treatment, without polyethylene, were also included. At the end of the experiment, the nematological analysis showed that all materials successfully controlled M. incognita populations, reaching 86-100% mortality with organic amendments vs. 6% for the control. After the greenhouse biodesinfestation experiment, a tomato crop was grown for one month, when root galling indices were determined. All materials significantly reduced this value from 4.75 in the control to 1.0-2.25 with the organic amendments, except for the cabbage residues+chicken manure treatment without polyethylene (index = 4.0). Our results show that fresh crop and garden residues successfully reduced M. incognita populations and root galling indices when applied with polyethylene covers, having good potential to be considered in integrated management programs. PMID:18399508

López-Cepero, J; Piedra Buena, A; Díez-Rojo, M A; Regalado, R; Brito, E; Hernández, Z; Figueredo, M; Almendros, G; Bello, A

2007-01-01

127

Minor and trace elemental determination in the Indian herbal and other medicinal preparations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Medicinal plants described in the Indian “Ayurvedic” literature viz. Tulsi (Ocimum sanctum), Gulvel (Tinospora cardifolia), bitter Neem (Azadirachta indica), Kanher (Nerium Åndicum), Vekhand (Acorus calamus), and Peacock's feather (ash) were analyzed for minor and trace elements by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The\\u000a samples and the standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, USA and IAEA, Vienna were irradiated

Dhananjay L. Samudralwar; Amar N. Garg

1996-01-01

128

Screening of Nepalese medicinal plants for antiviral activity.  

PubMed

In an ethnopharmacological screening, plants used in Nepalese traditional medicine were evaluated for antiviral activity. Methanolic and methanolic-aqueous extracts derived of 23 species were assayed in two in vitro viral systems, influenza virus/MDCK cells and herpes simplex virus/Vero cells. Two species, Bergenia ligulata and Nerium indicum showed the highest antiinfluenzaviral activity with 50% inhibitory dose of 10 microg/ml. Holoptelia integrifolia and N. indicum exhibited considerable antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus. None of these extracts showed cytotoxic effects. Additionally for B. ligulata and H. integrifolia partial protease inhibitory activity was estimated. PMID:11274826

Rajbhandari, M; Wegner, U; Jülich, M; Schöpke, T; Mentel, R

2001-03-01

129

Toxicity of botanical insecticides on golden apple snail (Pomacea canaliculata).  

PubMed

The molluscicidal activity of crude extracts from five highly potential plants, Annona squamosa seed, Nerium indicum Leaves, Stemona tuberose root, Cyperus rotundus corm and Derris elliptica root was assessed to Pomacea canaliculata. D. elliptica root and C. rotundus corm extracts showed the highest toxicity against 3-month old snails which have LC50 as 23.68 +/- 2.96 mg/l and 133.20 +/- 7.94 mg/l, respectively. The C. rotundus corm extracts were chosen for detoxification enzyme in vivo assay which shows esterase and glutathione S-transferase activity in stomach, intestinal tracts and digestive glands of survival treated P. canaliculata were inhibited. PMID:21542482

Ruamthum, W; Visetson, S; Milne, J R; Bullangpoti, V

2010-01-01

130

Minimisation of N2O emissions from a plant-soil system under landfill leachate irrigation.  

PubMed

The irrigation of a plant-soil system with landfill leachate should promote the formation of N2O due to the introduction of organic carbon and mineralized-N and the elevation of the moisture content. Laboratory incubation was performed to minimize N2O emissions from a leachate irrigated plant-soil system by manipulating leachate NH(4)(+)-N loading, moisture content, and soil type. A field investigation, consisting of three plots planted with Cynodon dactylon, Nerium indicum Mill, and Festuca arundinacea Schreb, was then conducted to select plant species. There was almost no difference in N2O emissions between soil moisture contents of 46% and 55% water-filled pore space (WFPS), while a sharp increase occurred at 70% WFPS. N2O fluxes were significantly correlated with leachate NH4(+)-N loading. Amongst the physiochemical characteristics of the selected nine soils, only soil pH was significantly correlated with N2O fluxes. Compared with fertilizers application in other ecosystems, N2O turnover rate from the plant-soil system under leachate irrigation was relatively lower. Therefore, avoiding high NH4(+)-N loadings and excessively wet conditions (<60% WFPS) and cultivating conifer plants of stronger sunlight penetration with less litter deposit on acidic sandy soil could minimize potential N2O emissions under leachate irrigation. PMID:18835706

Zhang, Hou-Hu; He, Pin-Jing; Shao, Li-Ming; Yuan, Li

2009-03-01

131

Chemical constituents and energy content of some latex bearing plants.  

PubMed

The latex bearing plants Plumeria alba, Calotropis procera, Euphorbia nerrifolia, Nerium indicum and Mimusops elengi were evaluated as potential renewable sources of energy and chemicals. Plant parts (leaf, stem, bark) and also whole plants were analyzed for elemental composition, oil, polyphenol, hydrocarbons, crude protein, alpha-cellulose, lignin and ash. The dry biomass yields were between 4.47 and 13.74 kg/plant. The carbon contents in whole plants varied from 38.5% to 44.9%, while hydrogen and nitrogen contents varied from 5.86% to 6.72% and 1.26% to 2.34%, respectively. The bark of the plants contained the highest amount of hydrocarbons (1.78-3.93%) and the leaves contained the lowest amounts (0.26-1.82%). The unsaponifiable materials and fatty acids in the oil fractions of whole plants ranged from 22.8% to 56.4% and 24.7% to 58.7%, respectively. The highest gross heat value was exhibited by C. procera (6145 cal/g) and the lowest by N. indicum (4405 cal/g). Hydrocarbon fractions were characterized by IR and (1)H-NMR and by thermogravimetric analyses. The activation energy (E(a)) in the third stage of decomposition was the greatest in the hydrocarbon fraction obtained from M. elengi (16.40 kJ mol(-1)) and the lowest for C. procera (3.96 kJ mol(-1)). The study indicated that the plant species might be suitable as alternative source of hydrocarbons and other phytochemicals. PMID:14766154

Kalita, D; Saikia, C N

2004-05-01

132

[Pb, Zn accumulation and nutrient uptake of 15 plant species grown in abandoned mine tailings].  

PubMed

Vegetation restoration field test was carried out in the abandoned lead-zinc tailings for 3 years. The study showed that accumulation of lead (Pb), zinc (Zn) and nutrient uptake differed with plant species and organs, heavy metals, and planting time. Pb was mainly accumulated in tree roots, and its content distribution in tree organs was generally in the order of roots > leaves > stems. But Zn concentrations in leaves of several tree species were higher than those in roots and stems. Within the tested 15 species, Cercis Canadensis had the highest concentrations of Pb and Zn in roots (1 803 and 2120 mg x kg(-1), respectively). Rhus chinensis had the highest Pb concentration in stems and leaves (280 and 546 mg x kg(-1), respectively) and Zn concentration (1 507 mg x kg(-1)) in leaves. Zn concentration in stems and leaves of Salix matsudana (729 and 1 153 mg x kg(-1), respectively) were the highest. Among the tested 15 species, TF values for Pb of Liquidambar formosana, Medicago sativa, and for Zn of Salix matsudana, Rhus chinensis, Medicago sativa were higher than 1. BCF values for Pb were all lower than 0.17, while that for Zn were all lower than 0.44. The N contents in nitrogen-fixing plants, P contents in Rhus typhina and Ailanthus altissima, and K content in Nerium indicum were significantly higher than those in other plants. With the increase of planting time, concentrations of heavy metal in plant body increased significantly; however the inverse trend were observed in nutritional element content. The species have higher metal accumulation capacity, such as Rhus chinensis, Salix matsudana and those nitrogen-fixing plants have higher tolerance to metal contamination and nutrient deficiency, such as Amorpha fruticosa, Medicago sativa, Lespedeza cuneata, and Alnus cremastogyne, they were suitable as the phytostabilizers in abandoned mine tailings. PMID:22946191

Shi, Xiang; Chen, Yi-Tai; Wang, Shu-Feng; Li, Jiang-Chuan

2012-06-01

133

[Effects of artificial vegetation on the spatial heterogeneity of soil moisture and salt in coastal saline land of Chongming Dongtan, Shanghai].  

PubMed

By the methods of classical statistics and geostatistics, this paper studied the spatial heterogeneity of surface soil (0-20 cm layer) moisture and salt contents under three kinds of artificial vegetation in coastal salt land in Chongming Dongtan of Shanghai. The soil moisture content in different plots was in order of Cynodon dactylon > Taxodium distichum > Nerium indicum, and the coefficient of variation was 13.9%, 13.4% and 12.9%, respectively. The soil electric conductivity was in the order of N. indicum > C. dactylon > T. distichum, and the coefficient of variation was 79.2%, 55.4% and 15. 9%, respectively. Both the soil moisture content and the salt content were in moderate variation. The theoretical models of variogram for the soil moisture and salt contents in different plots varied, among which, the soil electric conductivity fitted better, with R2 between 0.97 and 0.99. When the artificial vegetation varied from N. indicum to T. distichum and then to C. dactylon, the spatial heterogeneity of soil moisture content changed from weak to strong, in which, the variability was random under N. indicum. When the vegetation varied from C. dactylon to T. distichum and to N. indicum, the spatial heterogeneity of soil electric conductivity changed from moderate to strong. Under different vegetations, the soil electric conductivity was mostly in positive correlation, whereas the soil moisture content was in negative correlation. The spatial pattern of soil moisture and salt contents under T. distichum was in striped distribution, that under C. dactylon was in large plaque and continuous distribution, whereas under N. indicum, the spatial pattern of soil moisture content was in small breaking plaque distribution, and that of soil salt content was in striped distribution. PMID:24380332

He, Bin; Cai, Yong-li; Ran, Wen-rui; Zhao, Xiao-lei

2013-08-01