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Sample records for oleraceae var acephala

  1. Chemical characterisation of old cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala) seed oil by liquid chromatography and different spectroscopic detection systems.

    PubMed

    Cacciola, Francesco; Beccaria, Marco; Oteri, Marianna; Utczas, Margita; Giuffrida, Daniele; Cicero, Nicola; Dugo, Giacomo; Dugo, Paola; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-07-01

    We report an extensive chemical characterisation of fatty acids, triacylglycerols, tocopherols, carotenoids and polyphenols contained in the oil extracted from old cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala) by cold-pressing of the seeds. Analyses were performed by GC-FID combined with mass spectrometry, HPLC with photodiode array, fluorescence and mass spectrometry detection. The 94% of the total fatty acids were unsaturated, rappresented by erucic acid (more than 50%) followed by linoleic, linolenic and oleic acids accounting for approximately 10% each. The most abundant triacylglycerols (>13%) were represented by erucic-gadolenic-linoleic, erucic-eruci-linoleic and erucic-erucic-oleic. Among tocopherols, γ-tocopherol accounted for over 70% of the total content. Thirteen carotenoids and 11 polyphenols were identified and measured. In particular, the total content in carotenoids was 10.9 ppm and all-E-lutein was the main component (7.7 ppm); among polyphenols, six hydroxycinnamic acids and five flavonoids, were identified by combining information from retention times, PDA and MS data. PMID:27314571

  2. Rice-straw mulch reduces the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae) populations on kale, Brassica oleracea var. acephala (Brassicaceae) plants.

    PubMed

    Silva-Filho, Reinildes; Santos, Ricardo Henrique Silva; Tavares, Wagner de Souza; Leite, Germano Leão Demolin; Wilcken, Carlos Frederico; Serrão, José Eduardo; Zanuncio, José Cola

    2014-01-01

    Organic mulches, like peel and rice-straw, besides other materials affect the UV and temperature, which cause a reduction in the aphid arrival. The aim was to evaluate the effect of covering the soil with straw on the populations of the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae on the kale, Brassica oleracea var. acephala plants. The first experiment evaluated the direct effect of the rice-straw mulch and the second its indirect effect on aphid immigration, testing the plant characteristics that could lead to the landing preference of this insect. The third experiment evaluated the direct effect of the mulch on the aphid population. In the second and third experiments, four plants, each in a 14 L polyethylene pot with holes at the bottom, were used in areas with and without soil mulching. These pots were changed between areas, after seven days, to evaluate the effects of this change on the arrival of the winged aphids to the plants. Each plant was covered with anti-aphid gauze and inoculated with one winged M. persicae. Winged and apterous adults of this insect were counted per plant after 15 days. The temperature increased in the mulched plots to a maximum of 21-36°C and to 18-32°C in the plots with or without soil covering, respectively. Plant growth reduced the numbers of the winged aphids landing before and after they were moved to the bare soil plots. The nutrient content was similar in plants in both the mulched and no mulched plots. The population growth of M. persicae was higher in the control than in the mulched plots. This was partially due to temperatures close to 30°C in these plots and changes in the plant physiology. The soil mulching with rice-straw decreased the M. persicae landing, increased the plot temperatures and improved the vegetative growth of the kale plants. PMID:24714367

  3. Rice-Straw Mulch Reduces the Green Peach Aphid, Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae) Populations on Kale, Brassica oleracea var. acephala (Brassicaceae) Plants

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Filho, Reinildes; Santos, Ricardo Henrique Silva; Tavares, Wagner de Souza; Leite, Germano Leão Demolin; Wilcken, Carlos Frederico; Serrão, José Eduardo; Zanuncio, José Cola

    2014-01-01

    Organic mulches, like peel and rice-straw, besides other materials affect the UV and temperature, which cause a reduction in the aphid arrival. The aim was to evaluate the effect of covering the soil with straw on the populations of the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae on the kale, Brassica oleracea var. acephala plants. The first experiment evaluated the direct effect of the rice-straw mulch and the second its indirect effect on aphid immigration, testing the plant characteristics that could lead to the landing preference of this insect. The third experiment evaluated the direct effect of the mulch on the aphid population. In the second and third experiments, four plants, each in a 14 L polyethylene pot with holes at the bottom, were used in areas with and without soil mulching. These pots were changed between areas, after seven days, to evaluate the effects of this change on the arrival of the winged aphids to the plants. Each plant was covered with anti-aphid gauze and inoculated with one winged M. persicae. Winged and apterous adults of this insect were counted per plant after 15 days. The temperature increased in the mulched plots to a maximum of 21–36°C and to 18–32°C in the plots with or without soil covering, respectively. Plant growth reduced the numbers of the winged aphids landing before and after they were moved to the bare soil plots. The nutrient content was similar in plants in both the mulched and no mulched plots. The population growth of M. persicae was higher in the control than in the mulched plots. This was partially due to temperatures close to 30°C in these plots and changes in the plant physiology. The soil mulching with rice-straw decreased the M. persicae landing, increased the plot temperatures and improved the vegetative growth of the kale plants. PMID:24714367

  4. Extracts from Brassica oleracea L. convar. acephala var. sabellica inhibit TNF-α stimulated neutrophil adhesion in vitro under flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Sabine; Kunz, Clemens

    2014-06-01

    The beneficial effects of vegetables such as leafy cabbage (Brassica oleracea) on health are attributed to their anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory potential. Therefore, we investigated whether curly kale extracts affect cytokine induced expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules as well as the adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells depending on their polyphenol content and composition. Curly kale leaves were extracted applying two solvents with different polarities (methanolic extracts (ME) and aqueous water extracts (WE)). The anti-oxidant capacity (TEAC-assay (Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity)), the polyphenol content and the composition were determined colorimetrically. The anti-inflammatory effects were measured in vitro using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs were pre-incubated with extracts for 24 h and thereafter stimulated for 5 h with TNF-α (10 ng mL(-1)). Finally, the expression of cell adhesion molecules E-selectin, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 was determined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and leukocyte adhesion was observed using a flow adhesion assay. ME have the highest anti-oxidant activity (ME, 66.5 ± 10.9 vs. WE, 45.5 ± 6.7 mmol L(-1) TEAC), polyphenol (ME, 25.8 ± 2.4. vs. WE, 10.8 ± 1.8 mmol L(-1) GAE), flavonoid (ME, 17.9 ± 1.7 vs. WE, 5.3 ± 2.7 mmol L(-1) RE) and flavonol concentrations (ME, 5.8 ± 0.6 vs. WE, 2.1 ± 0.5 mmol L(-1) RE) in comparison to WE. The TEAC and polyphenol values well-correlated with their effect on cell adhesion. Using 10% ME, reduced adhesion of leukocytes to HUVECs was measured (36 ± 13%), whereas 10% WE reduced cell adhesion to 57 ± 5% of the TNF-α stimulated controls (100%). Concomitant with the reduced leukocyte cell adhesion in the flow assay, ME and WE significantly reduced the TNF-α induced expression of cell adhesion molecules: E-selectin (ME, 51.3 ± 10.7 vs. WE, 76.3 ± 11.9%), ICAM-1 (ME, 74.6 ± 10.2 vs. WE, 81.6 ± 7.9%) and VCAM-1 mRNA expression (ME, 35.0 ± 14.0 vs

  5. The effects of cover crop on weed control in collard (Brassica olerecea var acephala) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Mennan, H; Ngouajio, M; Isik, D; Kose, B; Kaya, E

    2006-01-01

    Leafy vegetables are not very competitive and weed interference can cause considerable yield losses in collard (Brassica olerecea var acephala) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.). Currently there are no pre or post emergence herbicides registered for weed control in these vegetables in Turkey. For this reason, alternative weed control strategies need to be developed. Cover crop residue could represent an alternative method of weed management in these crops. Field studies were conducted in 2004 at the Black Sea Agricultural Research Institute experimental field in Samsun, Turkey. The cover crop treatments consisted of Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench, Sorghum vulgare Pers., Vicia villosa L., Amaranthus cruentus L., Pisum sativum L. and the bare ground with no cover crop. All cover crops were seeded by hand and incorporated into the soil on 11 May, 2004. Each plot was 10 m2 (2 x 5 m) and arranged in a randomized complete block design with four replications. All cover crops were incorporated into the soil by discing on 1 September 2004 at flowering stage of the cover crops. Broadleaved weed species were dominant in the experimental area. Most cover crops established well and S. bicolor biomass was the highest. The number of weed species emerging in all treatments was different at 14 DAD (days after desiccation). Similar results were observed at 28 and 56 DAD. Treatments with Vicia villosa residues had fewer weed species and lower total weed densities than other treatments. PMID:17390812

  6. Intraspecific Variation in Carotenoids of Brassica oleracea var. sabellica.

    PubMed

    Mageney, Vera; Baldermann, Susanne; Albach, Dirk C

    2016-04-27

    Carotenoids are best known as a source of natural antioxidants. Physiologically, carotenoids are part of the photoprotection in plants as they act as scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS). An important source of carotenoids in European food is Brassica oleracea. Focusing on the most abundant carotenoids, we estimated the contents of ß-carotene, (9Z)-neoxanthin, zeaxanthin, and lutein as well as those of chlorophylls a and b to assess their variability in Brassica oleracea var. sabellica. Our analyses included more than 30 cultivars categorized in five distinct sets grouped according to morphological characteristics or geographical origin. Our results demonstrated specific carotenoid patterns characteristic for American, Italian, and red-colored kale cultivars. Moreover, we demonstrated a tendency of high zeaxanthin proportions under traditional harvest conditions, which accord to low-temperature regimes. We also compared the carotenoid patterns of self-generated hybrid lines. Corresponding findings indicated that crossbreeding has a high potential for carotenoid content optimization in kale. PMID:27045759

  7. Evaluation of genotypic variation of broccoli (brassica oleracea var. italic) in response to selenium treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italic) fortified with selenium (Se) has been promoted as a functional food. Here we evaluated 38 broccoli accessions for their capacity to accumulate Se and for their responses to selenate treatment in terms of nutritional qualities and sulfur gene expression. We fo...

  8. Ointment of Brassica oleracea var. capitata Matures the Extracellular Matrix in Skin Wounds of Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Sarandy, Mariáurea Matias; Novaes, Rômulo Dias; da Matta, Sérgio Luiz Pinto; Mezencio, Jose Mario da Silveira; da Silva, Marcelo Barreto; Zanuncio, José Cola; Gonçalves, Reggiani Vilela

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex process that aims to restore damaged tissue. Phytotherapeutics, such as cabbage, Brassica oleracea var. capitata (Brassicaceae), and sunflower, Helianthus annuus L. (Asteraceae) oil, are used as wound healers. Five circular wounds, each 12 mm in diameter, were made in the dorsolateral region of each rat. The animals were divided into four groups: balsam (B. oleracea); ointment (B. oleracea); sunflower oil (Helianthus annuus); control (saline solution 0.9%). These products were applied daily for 20 days and every four days the tissues of different wounds were removed. The wound contraction area, total collagen, types I and III collagen, glycosaminoglycans, and tissue cellularity were analyzed. In the groups that received ointment and balsam there was reduction in the wound area on days 4, 8, 12, and 20. Throughout the trial period, the balsam and ointment groups showed a higher amount of total collagen, type I collagen, and glycosaminoglycan compared to the others groups. The rats in the groups treated with B. oleracea var. capitata showed a higher number of cells on days 8, 16, and 20. B. oleracea was effective in stimulating the maturation of collagen and increasing the cellularity, as also in improving the mechanical resistance of the newly formed tissue. PMID:26170889

  9. Ointment of Brassica oleracea var. capitata Matures the Extracellular Matrix in Skin Wounds of Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sarandy, Mariáurea Matias; Novaes, Rômulo Dias; da Matta, Sérgio Luiz Pinto; Mezencio, Jose Mario da Silveira; da Silva, Marcelo Barreto; Zanuncio, José Cola; Gonçalves, Reggiani Vilela

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex process that aims to restore damaged tissue. Phytotherapeutics, such as cabbage, Brassica oleracea var. capitata (Brassicaceae), and sunflower, Helianthus annuus L. (Asteraceae) oil, are used as wound healers. Five circular wounds, each 12 mm in diameter, were made in the dorsolateral region of each rat. The animals were divided into four groups: balsam (B. oleracea); ointment (B. oleracea); sunflower oil (Helianthus annuus); control (saline solution 0.9%). These products were applied daily for 20 days and every four days the tissues of different wounds were removed. The wound contraction area, total collagen, types I and III collagen, glycosaminoglycans, and tissue cellularity were analyzed. In the groups that received ointment and balsam there was reduction in the wound area on days 4, 8, 12, and 20. Throughout the trial period, the balsam and ointment groups showed a higher amount of total collagen, type I collagen, and glycosaminoglycan compared to the others groups. The rats in the groups treated with B. oleracea var. capitata showed a higher number of cells on days 8, 16, and 20. B. oleracea was effective in stimulating the maturation of collagen and increasing the cellularity, as also in improving the mechanical resistance of the newly formed tissue. PMID:26170889

  10. Chromosome Doubling of Microspore-Derived Plants from Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.) and Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica L.).

    PubMed

    Yuan, Suxia; Su, Yanbin; Liu, Yumei; Li, Zhansheng; Fang, Zhiyuan; Yang, Limei; Zhuang, Mu; Zhang, Yangyong; Lv, Honghao; Sun, Peitian

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome doubling of microspore-derived plants is an important factor in the practical application of microspore culture technology because breeding programs require a large number of genetically stable, homozygous doubled haploid plants with a high level of fertility. In the present paper, 29 populations of microspore-derived plantlets from cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata) and broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) were used to study the ploidy level and spontaneous chromosome doubling of these populations, the artificial chromosome doubling induced by colchicine, and the influence of tissue culture duration on the chromosomal ploidy of the microspore-derived regenerants. Spontaneous chromosome doubling occurred randomly and was genotype dependent. In the plant populations derived from microspores, there were haploids, diploids, and even a low frequency of polyploids and mixed-ploidy plantlets. The total spontaneous doubling in the 14 cabbage populations ranged from 0 to 76.9%, compared with 52.2 to 100% in the 15 broccoli populations. To improve the rate of chromosome doubling, an efficient and reliable artificial chromosome doubling protocol (i.e., the immersion of haploid plantlet roots in a colchicine solution) was developed for cabbage and broccoli microspore-derived haploids. The optimal chromosome doubling of the haploids was obtained with a solution of 0.2% colchicine for 9-12 h or 0.4% colchicine for 3-9 h for cabbage and 0.05% colchicine for 6-12 h for broccoli. This protocol produced chromosome doubling in over 50% of the haploid genotypes for most of the populations derived from cabbage and broccoli. Notably, after 1 or more years in tissue culture, the chromosomes of the haploids were doubled, and most of the haploids turned into doubled haploid or mixed-ploidy plants. This is the first report indicating that tissue culture duration can change the chromosomal ploidy of microspore-derived regenerants. PMID:26734028

  11. Chromosome Doubling of Microspore-Derived Plants from Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.) and Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica L.)

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Suxia; Su, Yanbin; Liu, Yumei; Li, Zhansheng; Fang, Zhiyuan; Yang, Limei; Zhuang, Mu; Zhang, Yangyong; Lv, Honghao; Sun, Peitian

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome doubling of microspore-derived plants is an important factor in the practical application of microspore culture technology because breeding programs require a large number of genetically stable, homozygous doubled haploid plants with a high level of fertility. In the present paper, 29 populations of microspore-derived plantlets from cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata) and broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) were used to study the ploidy level and spontaneous chromosome doubling of these populations, the artificial chromosome doubling induced by colchicine, and the influence of tissue culture duration on the chromosomal ploidy of the microspore-derived regenerants. Spontaneous chromosome doubling occurred randomly and was genotype dependent. In the plant populations derived from microspores, there were haploids, diploids, and even a low frequency of polyploids and mixed-ploidy plantlets. The total spontaneous doubling in the 14 cabbage populations ranged from 0 to 76.9%, compared with 52.2 to 100% in the 15 broccoli populations. To improve the rate of chromosome doubling, an efficient and reliable artificial chromosome doubling protocol (i.e., the immersion of haploid plantlet roots in a colchicine solution) was developed for cabbage and broccoli microspore-derived haploids. The optimal chromosome doubling of the haploids was obtained with a solution of 0.2% colchicine for 9–12 h or 0.4% colchicine for 3–9 h for cabbage and 0.05% colchicine for 6–12 h for broccoli. This protocol produced chromosome doubling in over 50% of the haploid genotypes for most of the populations derived from cabbage and broccoli. Notably, after 1 or more years in tissue culture, the chromosomes of the haploids were doubled, and most of the haploids turned into doubled haploid or mixed-ploidy plants. This is the first report indicating that tissue culture duration can change the chromosomal ploidy of microspore-derived regenerants. PMID:26734028

  12. Determination of trace elements in cole (Brassica oleraceae var. acephale) at Trabzon region in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tıraşoğlu, E.; Çevik, U.; Ertuğral, B.; Apaydın, G.; Baltaş, H.; Ertuğrul, M.

    2005-08-01

    The elemental analysis of cole (Brassica oleraceae var. acephale) has been carried out in the Trabzon region (Turkey) using energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometry. Cole is one of the most commonly consumed vegetables by people living in that region. The reason for this is its abundance and easy growth in four seasons. We have analyzed cole samples for 11 stations using 50 mCi Fe-55 and Am-241 radioactive sources. We have found that potassium was present in the highest concentration in cole for every station. The concentration of Cl generally changed according to the distance between the sea and the sampling station.

  13. Expression of salicylic acid-related genes in Brassica oleracea var. capitata during Plasmodiophora brassicae infection.

    PubMed

    Manoharan, Ranjith Kumar; Shanmugam, Ashokraj; Hwang, Indeok; Park, Jong-In; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-06-01

    Brassica oleracea var. capitata (cabbage) is an important vegetable crop in Asian countries such as Korea, China, and Japan. Cabbage production is severely affected by clubroot disease caused by the soil-borne plant pathogen Plasmodiophora brassicae. During clubroot development, methyl salicylate (MeSA) is biosynthesized from salicylic acid (SA) by methyltransferase. In addition, methyl salicylate esterase (MES) plays a major role in the conversion of MeSA back into free SA. The interrelationship between MES and methytransferases during clubroot development has not been fully explored. To begin to examine these relationships, we investigated the expression of MES genes in disease-susceptible and disease-resistant plants during clubroot development. We identified three MES-encoding genes potentially involved in the defense against pathogen attack. We found that SS1 was upregulated in both the leaves and roots of B. oleracea during P. brassicae infection. These results support the conclusion that SA biosynthesis is suppressed during pathogen infection in resistant plants. We also characterized the expression of a B. oleracea BSMT gene, which appears to be involved in glycosylation rather than MeSA biosynthesis. Our results provide insight into the functions and interactions of genes for MES and methyltransferase during infection. Taken together, our findings indicate that MES genes are important candidates for use to control clubroot diseases. PMID:27171821

  14. FIRST REPORT OF BACTERIAL BLIGHT OF CAULIFLOWER (BRASSICA OLERACEA VAR. BOTRYTIS) CAUSED BY PSEUDOMONAS SYRINGAE PV. ALISALENSIS IN CALIFORNIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel bacterial blight commercial romanesca (green) cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) was seen for the first time in coastal California in 2005. Koch’s postulates were completed and the etiology of the pathogen was determined. Characterization showed that pathogen was Pseudomonas syrin...

  15. First report of bacterial blight of cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.) caused by Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis in California

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel bacterial leaf blight was seen in field grown cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.) in Monterey County, California in 2006. Koch’s postulates were completed and etiology of the pathogen was determined. Physiological and molecular characterization showed that the pathogen was Pseudomon...

  16. The Effect of Dose Size on Bioavailability of Acylated and Nonacylated Anthocyanins from Red Cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies indicate that anthocyanin (ACN) intake conveys a variety of health benefits, which depend on absorption and metabolic mechanisms that deliver ACNs and their bioactive metabolites to responsive tissues. We evaluated red cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata) ACN bioavailability a...

  17. Colorless chlorophyll catabolites in senescent florets of broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica).

    PubMed

    Roiser, Matthias H; Müller, Thomas; Kräutler, Bernhard

    2015-02-11

    Typical postharvest storage of broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) causes degreening of this common vegetable with visible loss of chlorophyll (Chl). As shown here, colorless Chl-catabolites are generated. In fresh extracts of degreening florets of broccoli, three colorless tetrapyrrolic Chl-catabolites accumulated and were detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC): two "nonfluorescent" Chl-catabolites (NCCs), provisionally named Bo-NCC-1 and Bo-NCC-2, and a colorless 1,19-dioxobilin-type "nonfluorescent" Chl-catabolite (DNCC), named Bo-DNCC. Analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry of these three linear tetrapyrroles revealed their structures. In combination with a comparison of their HPL-chromatographic properties, this allowed their identification with three known catabolites from two other brassicacea, namely two NCCs from oil seed rape (Brassica napus) and a DNCC from degreened leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:25620234

  18. Colorless Chlorophyll Catabolites in Senescent Florets of Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Typical postharvest storage of broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) causes degreening of this common vegetable with visible loss of chlorophyll (Chl). As shown here, colorless Chl-catabolites are generated. In fresh extracts of degreening florets of broccoli, three colorless tetrapyrrolic Chl-catabolites accumulated and were detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC): two “nonfluorescent” Chl-catabolites (NCCs), provisionally named Bo-NCC-1 and Bo-NCC-2, and a colorless 1,19-dioxobilin-type “nonfluorescent” Chl-catabolite (DNCC), named Bo-DNCC. Analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry of these three linear tetrapyrroles revealed their structures. In combination with a comparison of their HPL-chromatographic properties, this allowed their identification with three known catabolites from two other brassicacea, namely two NCCs from oil seed rape (Brassica napus) and a DNCC from degreened leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:25620234

  19. Plastid transformation in cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L.) by the biolistic process.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Menq-Jiau; Yang, Ming-Te; Chu, Wan-Ru; Liu, Cheng-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L.) is one of the most important vegetable crops grown worldwide. Scientists are using biotechnology in addition to traditional breeding methods to develop new cabbage varieties with desirable traits. Recent biotechnological advances in chloroplast transformation technology have opened new avenues for crop improvement. In 2007, we developed a stable plastid transformation system for cabbage and reported the successful transformation of the cry1Ab gene into the cabbage chloroplast genome. This chapter describes the methods for cabbage transformation using biolistic procedures. The following sections are included in this protocol: preparation of donor materials, coating gold particles with DNA, biolistic bombardment, as well as the regeneration and selection of transplastomic cabbage plants. The establishment of a plastid transformation system for cabbage offers new possibilities for introducing new agronomic and horticultural traits into Brassica crops. PMID:24599866

  20. Interspecific hybridization, polyploidization, and backcross of Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra with B. rapa var. purpurea morphologically recapitulate the evolution of Brassica vegetables.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Liu, Tongjin; Li, Xixiang; Duan, Mengmeng; Wang, Jinglei; Qiu, Yang; Wang, Haiping; Song, Jiangping; Shen, Di

    2016-01-01

    Brassica oleracea and B. rapa are two important vegetable crops. Both are composed of dozens of subspecies encompassing hundreds of varieties and cultivars. Synthetic B. napus with these two plants has been used extensively as a research model for the investigation of allopolyploid evolution. However, the mechanism underlying the explosive evolution of hundreds of varieties of B. oleracea and B. rapa within a short period is poorly understood. In the present study, interspecific hybridization between B. oleracea var. alboglabra and B. rapa var. purpurea was performed. The backcross progeny displayed extensive morphological variation, including some individuals that phenocopied subspecies other than their progenitors. Numerous interesting novel phenotypes and mutants were identified among the backcross progeny. The chromosomal recombination between the A and C genomes and the chromosomal asymmetric segregation were revealed using Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) markers. These findings provide direct evidence in support of the hypothesis that interspecific hybridization and backcrossing have played roles in the evolution of the vast variety of vegetables among these species and suggest that combination of interspecific hybridization and backcrossing may facilitate the development of new mutants and novel phenotypes for both basic research and the breeding of new vegetable crops. PMID:26727246

  1. Interspecific hybridization, polyploidization, and backcross of Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra with B. rapa var. purpurea morphologically recapitulate the evolution of Brassica vegetables

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Liu, Tongjin; Li, Xixiang; Duan, Mengmeng; Wang, Jinglei; Qiu, Yang; Wang, Haiping; Song, Jiangping; Shen, Di

    2016-01-01

    Brassica oleracea and B. rapa are two important vegetable crops. Both are composed of dozens of subspecies encompassing hundreds of varieties and cultivars. Synthetic B. napus with these two plants has been used extensively as a research model for the investigation of allopolyploid evolution. However, the mechanism underlying the explosive evolution of hundreds of varieties of B. oleracea and B. rapa within a short period is poorly understood. In the present study, interspecific hybridization between B. oleracea var. alboglabra and B. rapa var. purpurea was performed. The backcross progeny displayed extensive morphological variation, including some individuals that phenocopied subspecies other than their progenitors. Numerous interesting novel phenotypes and mutants were identified among the backcross progeny. The chromosomal recombination between the A and C genomes and the chromosomal asymmetric segregation were revealed using Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) markers. These findings provide direct evidence in support of the hypothesis that interspecific hybridization and backcrossing have played roles in the evolution of the vast variety of vegetables among these species and suggest that combination of interspecific hybridization and backcrossing may facilitate the development of new mutants and novel phenotypes for both basic research and the breeding of new vegetable crops. PMID:26727246

  2. Compositional and proteomic analyses of genetically modified broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) harboring an agrobacterial gene.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mao-Sen; Ko, Miau-Hwa; Li, Hui-Chun; Tsai, Shwu-Jene; Lai, Ying-Mi; Chang, You-Ming; Wu, Min-Tze; Chen, Long-Fang O

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we showed improved shelf life for agrobacterial isopentenyltransferase (ipt) transgenic broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica), with yield comparable to commercial varieties, because of the protection mechanism offered by molecular chaperones and stress-related proteins. Here, we used proximate analysis to examine macronutrients, chemical and mineral constituents as well as anti-nutrient and protein changes of ipt-transgenic broccoli and corresponding controls. We also preliminarily assessed safety in mice. Most aspects were comparable between ipt-transgenic broccoli and controls, except for a significant increase in carbohydrate level and a decrease in magnesium content in ipt-transgenic lines 101, 102 and 103, as compared with non-transgenic controls. In addition, the anti-nutrient glucosinolate content was increased and crude fat content decreased in inbred control 104 and transgenic lines as compared with the parental control, "Green King". Gel-based proteomics detected more than 50 protein spots specifically found in ipt-transgenic broccoli at harvest and after cooking; one-third of these proteins showed homology to potential allergens that also play an important role in plant defense against stresses and senescence. Mice fed levels of ipt-transgenic broccoli mimicking the 120 g/day of broccoli eaten by a 60-kg human adult showed normal growth and immune function. In conclusion, the compositional and proteomic changes attributed to the transgenic ipt gene did not affect the growth and immune response of mice under the feeding regimes examined. PMID:25170807

  3. Impact of copper toxicity on stone-head cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata) in hydroponics

    PubMed Central

    Shahbaz, Muhammad; Shahzad, Ahmad Naeem; Khan, Hafiz Azhar Ali; Anees, Moazzam; Haider, Muhammad Saleem; Fatima, Ammara

    2015-01-01

    Arable soils are frequently subjected to contamination with copper as the consequence of imbalanced fertilization with manure and organic fertilizers and/or extensive use of copper-containing fungicides. In the present study, the exposure of stone-head cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata) to elevated Cu2+ levels resulted in leaf chlorosis and lesser biomass yield at ≥2 µ M. Root nitrate content was not statistically affected by Cu2+ levels, although it was substantially decreased at ≥5 µ M Cu2+ in the shoot. The decrease in nitrate contents can be related to lower nitrate uptake rates because of growth inhibition by Cu-toxicity. Shoot sulfate content increased strongly at ≥2 µ M Cu2+ indicating an increase in demand for sulfur under Cu stress. Furthermore, at ≥2 µM concentration, concentration of water-soluble non-protein thiol increased markedly in the roots and to a smaller level in the shoot. When exposed to elevated concentrations of Cu2+ the improved sulfate and water-soluble non-protein thiols need further studies for the evaluation of their direct relation with the synthesis of metal-chelating compounds (i.e., phytochelatins). PMID:26290787

  4. Impact of copper toxicity on stone-head cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata) in hydroponics.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sajid; Shahbaz, Muhammad; Shahzad, Ahmad Naeem; Khan, Hafiz Azhar Ali; Anees, Moazzam; Haider, Muhammad Saleem; Fatima, Ammara

    2015-01-01

    Arable soils are frequently subjected to contamination with copper as the consequence of imbalanced fertilization with manure and organic fertilizers and/or extensive use of copper-containing fungicides. In the present study, the exposure of stone-head cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata) to elevated Cu(2+) levels resulted in leaf chlorosis and lesser biomass yield at ≥2 µ M. Root nitrate content was not statistically affected by Cu(2+) levels, although it was substantially decreased at ≥5 µ M Cu(2+) in the shoot. The decrease in nitrate contents can be related to lower nitrate uptake rates because of growth inhibition by Cu-toxicity. Shoot sulfate content increased strongly at ≥2 µ M Cu(2+) indicating an increase in demand for sulfur under Cu stress. Furthermore, at ≥2 µM concentration, concentration of water-soluble non-protein thiol increased markedly in the roots and to a smaller level in the shoot. When exposed to elevated concentrations of Cu(2+) the improved sulfate and water-soluble non-protein thiols need further studies for the evaluation of their direct relation with the synthesis of metal-chelating compounds (i.e., phytochelatins). PMID:26290787

  5. Compositional and Proteomic Analyses of Genetically Modified Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) Harboring an Agrobacterial Gene

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mao-Sen; Ko, Miau-Hwa; Li, Hui-Chun; Tsai, Shwu-Jene; Lai, Ying-Mi; Chang, You-Ming; Wu, Min-Tze; Chen, Long-Fang O.

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we showed improved shelf life for agrobacterial isopentenyltransferase (ipt) transgenic broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica), with yield comparable to commercial varieties, because of the protection mechanism offered by molecular chaperones and stress-related proteins. Here, we used proximate analysis to examine macronutrients, chemical and mineral constituents as well as anti-nutrient and protein changes of ipt-transgenic broccoli and corresponding controls. We also preliminarily assessed safety in mice. Most aspects were comparable between ipt-transgenic broccoli and controls, except for a significant increase in carbohydrate level and a decrease in magnesium content in ipt-transgenic lines 101, 102 and 103, as compared with non-transgenic controls. In addition, the anti-nutrient glucosinolate content was increased and crude fat content decreased in inbred control 104 and transgenic lines as compared with the parental control, “Green King”. Gel-based proteomics detected more than 50 protein spots specifically found in ipt-transgenic broccoli at harvest and after cooking; one-third of these proteins showed homology to potential allergens that also play an important role in plant defense against stresses and senescence. Mice fed levels of ipt-transgenic broccoli mimicking the 120 g/day of broccoli eaten by a 60-kg human adult showed normal growth and immune function. In conclusion, the compositional and proteomic changes attributed to the transgenic ipt gene did not affect the growth and immune response of mice under the feeding regimes examined. PMID:25170807

  6. Multivariate analysis of tronchuda cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. costata DC) phenolics: influence of fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Carla; Pereira, David M; Pereira, José A; Bento, Albino; Rodrigues, M Angelo; Dopico-García, Sonia; Valentão, Patrícia; Lopes, Graciliana; Ferreres, Federico; Seabra, Rosa M; Andrade, Paula B

    2008-03-26

    A field experiment was carried out to investigate the effect of fertilization level on the phenolic composition of tronchuda cabbage ( Brassica oleracea L. var. costata DC) external and internal leaves. Eight different plots were constituted: a control without fertilization, one with organic matter, and six experiments with conventional fertilizers (nitrogen, boron, and sulfur, two levels each). The phenolic compounds were analyzed by reversed-phase HPLC-DAD. External and internal leaves revealed distinct qualitative composition. In the internal leaves were found 15 phenolics (5 kaempferol and 10 cinnamic acid derivatives), whereas the external leaves presented 3- p-coumaroylquinic acid and 13 kaempferol derivatives. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to assess the relationships between phenolic compounds, agronomical practices, and harvesting time. Samples obtained with conventional practices were quite effectively separated from organic samples, for both types of leaves. In general, samples developed without any fertilization presented the highest phenolics amounts: external and internal leaves contained 1.4- and 4.6-fold more phenolic compounds than the ones that received conventional fertilizer, respectively, and the internal leaves presented 2.4 times more phenolics than the ones grown with organic amendment. Additionally, samples from organic production exhibited higher total phenolics content than those from conventional practices, collected at the same time. Samples harvested first were revealed to be distinct from the ones collected later. The results show that it is possible to grow tronchuda cabbage without excess fertilizers, with highest amounts of phenolics and reduced environment contamination. PMID:18290619

  7. Biotechnological advancement in genetic improvement of broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica), an important vegetable crop.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pankaj; Srivastava, Dinesh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    With the advent of molecular biotechnology, plant genetic engineering techniques have opened an avenue for the genetic improvement of important vegetable crops. Vegetable crop productivity and quality are seriously affected by various biotic and abiotic stresses which destabilize rural economies in many countries. Moreover, absence of proper post-harvest storage and processing facilities leads to qualitative and quantitative losses. In the past four decades, conventional breeding has significantly contributed to the improvement of vegetable yields, quality, post-harvest life, and resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, there are many constraints in conventional breeding, which can only be overcome by advancements made in modern biology. Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica) is an important vegetable crop, of the family Brassicaceae; however, various biotic and abiotic stresses cause enormous crop yield losses during the commercial cultivation of broccoli. Thus, genetic engineering can be used as a tool to add specific characteristics to existing cultivars. However, a pre-requisite for transferring genes into plants is the availability of efficient regeneration and transformation techniques. Recent advances in plant genetic engineering provide an opportunity to improve broccoli in many aspects. The goal of this review is to summarize genetic transformation studies on broccoli to draw the attention of researchers and scientists for its further genetic advancement. PMID:26971329

  8. High-Throughput Sequencing and De Novo Assembly of Brassica oleracea var. Capitata L. for Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sangmi; Choe, Jun Kyoung; Jo, Sung-Hwan; Baek, Namkwon; Kwon, Suk-Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Background The cabbage, Brassica oleracea var. capitata L., has a distinguishable phenotype within the genus Brassica. Despite the economic and genetic importance of cabbage, there is little genomic data for cabbage, and most studies of Brassica are focused on other species or other B. oleracea subspecies. The lack of genomic data for cabbage, a non-model organism, hinders research on its molecular biology. Hence, the construction of reliable transcriptomic data based on high-throughput sequencing technologies is needed to enhance our understanding of cabbage and provide genomic information for future work. Methodology/Principal Findings We constructed cDNAs from total RNA isolated from the roots, leaves, flowers, seedlings, and calcium-limited seedling tissues of two cabbage genotypes: 102043 and 107140. We sequenced a total of six different samples using the Illumina HiSeq platform, producing 40.5 Gbp of sequence data comprising 401,454,986 short reads. We assembled 205,046 transcripts (≥ 200 bp) using the Velvet and Oases assembler and predicted 53,562 loci from the transcripts. We annotated 35,274 of the loci with 55,916 plant peptides in the Phytozome database. The average length of the annotated loci was 1,419 bp. We confirmed the reliability of the sequencing assembly using reverse-transcriptase PCR to identify tissue-specific gene candidates among the annotated loci. Conclusion Our study provides valuable transcriptome sequence data for B. oleracea var. capitata L., offering a new resource for studying B. oleracea and closely related species. Our transcriptomic sequences will enhance the quality of gene annotation and functional analysis of the cabbage genome and serve as a material basis for future genomic research on cabbage. The sequencing data from this study can be used to develop molecular markers and to identify the extreme differences among the phenotypes of different species in the genus Brassica. PMID:24682075

  9. Assessing the anticancer compounds Se-methylselenocysteine and glucosinolates in Se-biofortified broccoli (brassica oleracea L. var. italica) sprouts and florets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica) is a rich source of chemopreventive compounds. Here, we evaluated and compared the effect of selenium (Se) treatment on the accumulation of anticancer compound Se-methylselenocysteine (SeMSCys) and glucosinolates in broccoli sprouts and florets. Total Se ...

  10. In vitro cultures of Brassica oleracea L. var. costata DC: potential plant bioreactor for antioxidant phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Taveira, Marcos; Pereira, David M; Sousa, Carla; Ferreres, Federico; Andrade, Paula B; Martins, Anabela; Pereira, José A; Valentão, Patrícia

    2009-02-25

    In this work were studied the phenolic composition of in vitro material (shoots, calli, and roots) of Brassica oleracea var. costata and its antioxidant capacity. Samples were obtained in different culture medium, with distinct supplementations to verify their influence on those parameters. Phenolic determination was achieved by HPLC-DAD. Antioxidant activity was assessed against DPPH. In calli and roots no phenolic compound was identified. In shoots was verified the presence of 36 compounds, which included hydroxycinnamic acids, flavonoids (kaempferol and quercetin derivatives), and hydroxycinnamic acyl glycosides (with a predominance of synapoyl gentiobiosides). MS liquid medium supplemented with 2 mg/L benzylaminopurine (BAP) and 0.1 mg/L naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) revealed to be the best in vitro condition to produce shoot material with highest phenolic compound contents and stronger antioxidant potential, thus with a possible increase of health benefits. PMID:19192972

  11. Diversity and Inheritance of Intergenic Spacer Sequences of 45S Ribosomal DNA among Accessions of Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kiwoung; Robin, Arif Hasan Khan; Yi, Go-Eun; Lee, Jonghoon; Chung, Mi-Young; Yang, Tae-Jin; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2015-01-01

    Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of plants is present in high copy number and shows variation between and within species in the length of the intergenic spacer (IGS). The 45S rDNA of flowering plants includes the 5.8S, 18S and 25S rDNA genes, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS1 and ITS2), and the intergenic spacer 45S-IGS (25S-18S). This study identified six different types of 45S-IGS, A to F, which at 363 bp, 1121 bp, 1717 bp, 1969 bp, 2036 bp and 2111 bp in length, respectively, were much shorter than the reported reference IGS sequences in B. oleracea var. alboglabra. The shortest two IGS types, A and B, lacked the transcription initiation site, non-transcribed spacer, and external transcribed spacer. Functional behavior of those two IGS types in relation to rRNA synthesis is a subject of further investigation. The other four IGSs had subtle variations in the transcription termination site, guanine-cytosine (GC) content, and number of tandem repeats, but the external transcribed spacers of these four IGSs were quite similar in length. The 45S IGSs were found to follow Mendelian inheritance in a population of 15 F1s and their 30 inbred parental lines, which suggests that these sequences could be useful for development of new breeding tools. In addition, this study represents the first report of intra-specific (within subspecies) variation of the 45S IGS in B. oleracea. PMID:26633391

  12. Diversity of Kale (Brassica oleracea var. sabellica): Glucosinolate Content and Phylogenetic Relationships.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Christoph; Müller, Anja; Kuhnert, Nikolai; Albach, Dirk

    2016-04-27

    Recently, kale has become popular due to nutritive components beneficial for human health. It is an important source of phytochemicals such as glucosinolates that trigger associated cancer-preventive activity. However, nutritional value varies among glucosinolates and among cultivars. Here, we start a systematic determination of the content of five glucosinolates in 25 kale varieties and 11 non-kale Brassica oleracea cultivars by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS(n) and compare the profiles with results from the analysis of SNPs derived from a KASP genotyping assay. Our results demonstrate that the glucosinolate levels differ markedly among varieties of different origin. Comparison of the phytochemical data with phylogenetic relationships revealed that the common name kale refers to at least three different groups. German, American, and Italian kales differ morphologically and phytochemically. Landraces do not show outstanding glucosinolate levels. Our results demonstrate the diversity of kale and the importance of preserving a broad genepool for future breeding purposes. PMID:27028789

  13. Differential Responses of Two Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var Italica) Cultivars to Salinity and Nutritional Quality Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Zaghdoud, Chokri; Alcaraz-López, Carlos; Mota-Cadenas, César; Martínez-Ballesta, María del Carmen; Moreno, Diego A.; Ferchichi, Ali; Carvajal, Micaela

    2012-01-01

    The comparative responses of two broccoli cultivars (Brassica oleracea var. Italica, cv. Parthenon and cv. Naxos) to a 15 d exposure to different NaCl levels were investigated. Salinity led to increased concentrations of Na+ and Cl− ions in both cultivars, a disruption of the endogenous minerals levels in the shoots and roots—that varied with the cultivar and salt concentration—and decreases in the osmotic potential (Ψπ), root hydraulic conductance (L0), and stomatal conductance (Gs). The reduced biomass of Naxos at moderate NaCl indicates greater sensitivity to salinity, compared with Parthenon. Parthenon accumulated more soluble sugars, for osmotic adjustment, whereas Naxos accumulated proline, which gave the two cultivars differing nutritional characteristics. The total glucosinolates (GSLs) content was not affected by salinity in Parthenon while it decreased significantly in Naxos as a consequence of the decrease in the indole GSL. However, Naxos accumulated more aliphatic GSLs under salt stress than Parthenon, which confers on this cultivar a greater nutritional value when cultivated under salinity.These results suggest that, at distinct salinity levels, each broccoli cultivar adopts a specific strategy, indicating the crucial role of the genetic background on the organoleptic and nutritional properties that each cultivar acquires. PMID:22956893

  14. Valorization of cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis) by-products as a source of antioxidant phenolics.

    PubMed

    Llorach, Rafael; Espín, Juan Carlos; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A; Ferreres, Federico

    2003-04-01

    The present study reports the development of two extraction protocols, with potential industrial applicability, to valorize cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis) byproducts as a source of antioxidant phenolics. In addition, the nonionic polystyrene resin Amberlite XAD-2 was used to obtain purified extracts. The extract yield, phenolic content, phenolic yield, and correlation between the antioxidant activity and the phenolic content were studied. The water and ethanol protocols yield a phenolic content of 33.8 mg/g freeze-dried extract and 62.1 mg/g freeze-dried extract, respectively. This percentage increased considerably when the extracts were purified using Amberlite XAD-2 yielding a phenolic content of 186 mg/g freeze-dried extract (water extract) and 311.1 mg/g freeze-dried extract (ethanol extract). Cauliflower byproduct extracts showed significant free radical scavenging activity (vs both DPPH(*) and ABTS(*)(+) radicals), ferric reducing ability (FRAP assay), and capacity to inhibit lipid peroxidation (ferric thiocyanate assay). In addition, the antioxidant activity was linearly correlated with the phenolics content. The results obtained indicate that the cauliflower byproducts are a cheap source of antioxidant phenolics very interesting from both the industrial point of view and the possible usefulness as ingredients to functionalize foodstuffs. PMID:12670153

  15. Differential responses of two broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var Italica) cultivars to salinity and nutritional quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Zaghdoud, Chokri; Alcaraz-López, Carlos; Mota-Cadenas, César; Martínez-Ballesta, María del Carmen; Moreno, Diego A; Ferchichi, Ali; Carvajal, Micaela

    2012-01-01

    The comparative responses of two broccoli cultivars (Brassica oleracea var. Italica, cv. Parthenon and cv. Naxos) to a 15 d exposure to different NaCl levels were investigated. Salinity led to increased concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions in both cultivars, a disruption of the endogenous minerals levels in the shoots and roots-that varied with the cultivar and salt concentration-and decreases in the osmotic potential (Ψ(π)), root hydraulic conductance (L(0)), and stomatal conductance (G(s)). The reduced biomass of Naxos at moderate NaCl indicates greater sensitivity to salinity, compared with Parthenon. Parthenon accumulated more soluble sugars, for osmotic adjustment, whereas Naxos accumulated proline, which gave the two cultivars differing nutritional characteristics. The total glucosinolates (GSLs) content was not affected by salinity in Parthenon while it decreased significantly in Naxos as a consequence of the decrease in the indole GSL. However, Naxos accumulated more aliphatic GSLs under salt stress than Parthenon, which confers on this cultivar a greater nutritional value when cultivated under salinity.These results suggest that, at distinct salinity levels, each broccoli cultivar adopts a specific strategy, indicating the crucial role of the genetic background on the organoleptic and nutritional properties that each cultivar acquires. PMID:22956893

  16. In-depth analysis of internal control genes for quantitative real-time PCR in Brassica oleracea var. botrytis.

    PubMed

    Sheng, X G; Zhao, Z Q; Yu, H F; Wang, J S; Zheng, C F; Gu, H H

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is a versatile technique for the analysis of gene expression. The selection of stable reference genes is essential for the application of this technique. Cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis) is a commonly consumed vegetable that is rich in vitamin, calcium, and iron. Thus far, to our knowledge, there have been no reports on the validation of suitable reference genes for the data normalization of qRT-PCR in cauliflower. In the present study, we analyzed 12 candidate housekeeping genes in cauliflower subjected to different abiotic stresses, hormone treatment conditions, and accessions. geNorm and NormFinder algorithms were used to assess the expression stability of these genes. ACT2 and TIP41 were selected as suitable reference genes across all experimental samples in this study. When different accessions were compared, ACT2 and UNK3 were found to be the most suitable reference genes. In the hormone and abiotic stress treatments, ACT2, TIP41, and UNK2 were the most stably expressed. Our study also provided guidelines for selecting the best reference genes under various experimental conditions. PMID:27525844

  17. Molecular Cloning, Expression Pattern and Genotypic Effects on Glucoraphanin Biosynthetic Related Genes in Chinese Kale (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra Bailey).

    PubMed

    Yin, Ling; Chen, Changming; Chen, Guoju; Cao, Bihao; Lei, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Glucoraphanin is a plant secondary metabolite that is involved in plant defense and imparts health-promoting properties to cruciferous vegetables. In this study, three genes involved in glucoraphanin metabolism, branched-chain aminotransferase 4 (BCAT4), methylthioalkylmalate synthase 1 (MAM1) and dihomomethionine N-hydroxylase (CYP79F1), were cloned from Chinese kale (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra Bailey). Sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis identified these genes and confirmed the evolutionary status of Chinese kale. The transcript levels of BCAT4, MAM1 and CYP79F1 were higher in cotyledon, leaf and stem compared with flower and silique. BCAT4, MAM1 and CYP79F1 were expressed throughout leaf development with lower transcript levels during the younger stages. Glucoraphanin content varied extensively among different varieties, which ranged from 0.25 to 2.73 µmol·g(-1) DW (dry weight). Expression levels of BCAT4 and MAM1 were high at vegetative-reproductive transition phase, while CYP79F1 was expressed high at reproductive phase. BCAT4, MAM1 and CYP79F1 were expressed significantly high in genotypes with high glucoraphanin content. All the results provided a better understanding of the roles of BCAT4, MAM1 and CYP79F1 in the glucoraphanin biosynthesis of Chinese kale. PMID:26569208

  18. Biotechnological applications in in vitro plant regeneration studies of broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica), an important vegetable crop.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pankaj; Srivastava, Dinesh Kumar

    2016-04-01

    Biotechnology holds promise for genetic improvement of important vegetable crops. Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica) is an important vegetable crop of the family Brassicaceae. However, various biotic and abiotic stresses cause enormous crop yield losses during commercial cultivation of broccoli. Establishment of a reliable, reproducible and efficient in vitro plant regeneration system with cell and tissue culture is a vital prerequisite for biotechnological application of crop improvement programme. An in vitro plant regeneration technique refers to culturing, cell division, cell multiplication, de-differentiation and differentiation of cells, protoplasts, tissues and organs on defined liquid/solid medium under aseptic and controlled environment. Recent progress in the field of plant tissue culture has made this area one of the most dynamic and promising in experimental biology. There are many published reports on in vitro plant regeneration studies in broccoli including direct organogenesis, indirect organogenesis and somatic embryogenesis. This review summarizes those plant regeneration studies in broccoli that could be helpful in drawing the attention of the researchers and scientists to work on it to produce healthy, biotic and abiotic stress resistant plant material and to carry out genetic transformation studies for the production of transgenic plants. PMID:26721234

  19. Spent Mushroom Waste as a Media Replacement for Peat Moss in Kai-Lan (Brassica oleracea var. Alboglabra) Production

    PubMed Central

    Sendi, H.; Mohamed, M. T. M.; Anwar, M. P.; Saud, H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Peat moss (PM) is the most widely used growing substrate for the pot culture. Due to diminishing availability and increasing price of PM, researchers are looking for viable alternatives for peat as a growth media component for potted plants. A pot study was conducted with a view to investigate the possibility of using spent mushroom waste (SMW) for Kai-lan (Brassica oleracea var. Alboglabra) production replacing peat moss (PM) in growth media. The treatments evaluated were 100% PM (control), 100% SMW, and mixtures of SMW and PM in different ratios like 1 : 1, 1 : 2, and 2 : 1 (v/v) with/without NPK amendment. The experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design with five replications per treatment. Chemical properties like pH and salinity level (EC) of SMW were within the acceptable range of crop production but, nutrient content, especially nitrogen content was not enough to provide sufficient nutrition to plant for normal growth. Only PM (100%) and SMW and PM mixture in 1 : 1 ratio with NPK amendment performed equally in terms of Kai-lan growth. This study confirms the feasibility of replacing PM by SMW up to a maximum of 50% in the growth media and suggests that NPK supplementation from inorganic sources is to ensure a higher productivity of Kai-lan. PMID:24106452

  20. Detection of the Diversity of Cytoplasmic Male Sterility Sources in Broccoli (Brassica Oleracea var. Italica) Using Mitochondrial Markers.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jinshuai; Liu, Yumei; Li, Zhansheng; Zhang, Lili; Fang, Zhiyuan; Yang, Limei; Zhuang, Mu; Zhang, Yangyong; Lv, Honghao

    2016-01-01

    Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) is an important commercial vegetable crop. As part of an efficient pollination system, cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) has been widely used for broccoli hybrid production. Identifying the original sources of CMS in broccoli accessions has become an important part of broccoli breeding. In this study, the diversity of the CMS sources of 39 broccoli accessions, including 19 CMS lines and 20 hybrids, were analyzed using mitochondrial markers. All CMS accessions contained the ogu orf138-related DNA fragment and the key genes of nap CMS, pol CMS, and tour CMS were not detected. The 39 CMS accessions were divided into five groups using six orf138-related and two simple sequence repeat markers. We observed that ogu CMS R3 constituted 79.49% of the CMS sources. CMS6 and CMS26 were differentiated from the other accessions using a specific primer. CMS32 was distinguished from the other accessions based on a 78-nucleotide deletion at the same locus as the orf138-related sequence. When the coefficient was about 0.90, five CMS accessions (13CMS6, 13CMS23, 13CMS24, 13CMS37, and 13CMS39) exhibiting abnormal floral organs with poor seed setting were grouped together. The polymerase chain reaction amplification profiles for these five accessions differed from those of the other accessions. We identified eight useful molecular markers that can be used to detect CMS types during broccoli breeding. Our data also provide important information relevant to future studies on the possible origins and molecular mechanisms of CMS in broccoli. PMID:27446156

  1. Detection of the Diversity of Cytoplasmic Male Sterility Sources in Broccoli (Brassica Oleracea var. Italica) Using Mitochondrial Markers

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Jinshuai; Liu, Yumei; Li, Zhansheng; Zhang, Lili; Fang, Zhiyuan; Yang, Limei; Zhuang, Mu; Zhang, Yangyong; Lv, Honghao

    2016-01-01

    Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) is an important commercial vegetable crop. As part of an efficient pollination system, cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) has been widely used for broccoli hybrid production. Identifying the original sources of CMS in broccoli accessions has become an important part of broccoli breeding. In this study, the diversity of the CMS sources of 39 broccoli accessions, including 19 CMS lines and 20 hybrids, were analyzed using mitochondrial markers. All CMS accessions contained the ogu orf138-related DNA fragment and the key genes of nap CMS, pol CMS, and tour CMS were not detected. The 39 CMS accessions were divided into five groups using six orf138-related and two simple sequence repeat markers. We observed that ogu CMS R3 constituted 79.49% of the CMS sources. CMS6 and CMS26 were differentiated from the other accessions using a specific primer. CMS32 was distinguished from the other accessions based on a 78-nucleotide deletion at the same locus as the orf138-related sequence. When the coefficient was about 0.90, five CMS accessions (13CMS6, 13CMS23, 13CMS24, 13CMS37, and 13CMS39) exhibiting abnormal floral organs with poor seed setting were grouped together. The polymerase chain reaction amplification profiles for these five accessions differed from those of the other accessions. We identified eight useful molecular markers that can be used to detect CMS types during broccoli breeding. Our data also provide important information relevant to future studies on the possible origins and molecular mechanisms of CMS in broccoli. PMID:27446156

  2. Neglected Landraces of Collard (Brassica oleracea L.) from the Carolinas (USA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A common garden crop grown in the coastal plain region of North and South Carolina (United States) is the non-heading, leafy green type of Brassica oleracea L. known as collard (B. oleracea Acephala Group). Predominantly a fall and winter vegetable in this region, collard is often the only green pl...

  3. Influence of Light and Temperature on Gene Expression Leading to Accumulation of Specific Flavonol Glycosides and Hydroxycinnamic Acid Derivatives in Kale (Brassica oleracea var. sabellica).

    PubMed

    Neugart, Susanne; Krumbein, Angelika; Zrenner, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Light intensity and temperature are very important signals for the regulation of plant growth and development. Plants subjected to less favorable light or temperature conditions often respond with accumulation of secondary metabolites. Some of these metabolites have been identified as bioactive compounds, considered to exert positive effects on human health when consumed regularly. In order to test a typical range of growth parameters for the winter crop Brassica oleracea var. sabellica, plants were grown either at 400 μmol m(-2) s(-1) or 100 μmol m(-2) s(-1) at 10°C, or at 400 μmol m(-2) s(-1) with 5 or 15°C. The higher light intensity overall increased flavonol content of leaves, favoring the main quercetin glycosides, a caffeic acid monoacylated kaempferol triglycoside, and disinapoyl-gentiobiose. The higher temperature mainly increased the hydroxycinnamic acid derivative disinapoyl-gentiobiose, while at lower temperature synthesis is in favor of very complex sinapic acid acylated flavonol tetraglycosides such as kaempferol-3-O-sinapoyl-sophoroside-7-O-diglucoside. A global analysis of light and temperature dependent alterations of gene expression in B. oleracea var. sabellica leaves was performed with the most comprehensive Brassica microarray. When compared to the light experiment much less genes were differentially expressed in kale leaves grown at 5 or 15°C. A structured evaluation of differentially expressed genes revealed the expected enrichment in the functional categories of e.g. protein degradation at different light intensities or phytohormone metabolism at different temperature. Genes of the secondary metabolism namely phenylpropanoids are significantly enriched with both treatments. Thus, the genome of B. oleracea was screened for predicted genes putatively involved in the biosynthesis of flavonoids and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives. All identified B. oleracea genes were analyzed for their most specific 60-mer oligonucleotides present on the

  4. Influence of Light and Temperature on Gene Expression Leading to Accumulation of Specific Flavonol Glycosides and Hydroxycinnamic Acid Derivatives in Kale (Brassica oleracea var. sabellica)

    PubMed Central

    Neugart, Susanne; Krumbein, Angelika; Zrenner, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Light intensity and temperature are very important signals for the regulation of plant growth and development. Plants subjected to less favorable light or temperature conditions often respond with accumulation of secondary metabolites. Some of these metabolites have been identified as bioactive compounds, considered to exert positive effects on human health when consumed regularly. In order to test a typical range of growth parameters for the winter crop Brassica oleracea var. sabellica, plants were grown either at 400 μmol m−2 s−1 or 100 μmol m−2 s−1 at 10°C, or at 400 μmol m−2 s−1 with 5 or 15°C. The higher light intensity overall increased flavonol content of leaves, favoring the main quercetin glycosides, a caffeic acid monoacylated kaempferol triglycoside, and disinapoyl-gentiobiose. The higher temperature mainly increased the hydroxycinnamic acid derivative disinapoyl-gentiobiose, while at lower temperature synthesis is in favor of very complex sinapic acid acylated flavonol tetraglycosides such as kaempferol-3-O-sinapoyl-sophoroside-7-O-diglucoside. A global analysis of light and temperature dependent alterations of gene expression in B. oleracea var. sabellica leaves was performed with the most comprehensive Brassica microarray. When compared to the light experiment much less genes were differentially expressed in kale leaves grown at 5 or 15°C. A structured evaluation of differentially expressed genes revealed the expected enrichment in the functional categories of e.g. protein degradation at different light intensities or phytohormone metabolism at different temperature. Genes of the secondary metabolism namely phenylpropanoids are significantly enriched with both treatments. Thus, the genome of B. oleracea was screened for predicted genes putatively involved in the biosynthesis of flavonoids and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives. All identified B. oleracea genes were analyzed for their most specific 60-mer oligonucleotides present on the

  5. Volatile composition of Brassica oleracea L. var. costata DC leaves using solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    de Pinho, Paula Guedes; Valentão, Patrícia; Gonçalves, Rui F; Sousa, Carla; Andrade, Paula B

    2009-08-01

    Volatile and semi-volatile components of internal and external leaves of Brassica oleracea L. var. costata DC, grown under different fertilization regimens, were determined by headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) combined with gas chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry (GC/ITMS). Forty-one volatiles and non-volatile components were formally identified and thirty others were tentatively identified. Qualitative and quantitative differences were noticed between internal and external leaves. In general, internal leaves exhibited more aldehydes and sulfur volatile compounds than external ones, and less ketone, terpenes and norisoprenoid compounds. The fertilization regimens influenced considerably the volatile profile. Fertilizations with higher levels of sulfur produced Brassica leaves with more sulfur volatiles. In opposition, N and S fertilization led to leaves with lower levels of norisoprenoids and terpenes. PMID:19579264

  6. Nondestructive Optical Sensing of Flavonols and Chlorophyll in White Head Cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata subvar. alba) Grown under Different Nitrogen Regimens.

    PubMed

    Agati, Giovanni; Tuccio, Lorenza; Kusznierewicz, Barbara; Chmiel, Tomasz; Bartoszek, Agnieszka; Kowalski, Artur; Grzegorzewska, Maria; Kosson, Ryszard; Kaniszewski, Stanislaw

    2016-01-13

    A multiparametric optical sensor was used to nondestructively estimate phytochemical compounds in white cabbage leaves directly in the field. An experimental site of 1980 white cabbages (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata subvar. alba), under different nitrogen (N) treatments, was mapped by measuring leaf transmittance and chlorophyll fluorescence screening in one leaf/cabbage head. The provided indices of flavonols (FLAV) and chlorophyll (CHL) displayed the opposite response to applied N rates, decreasing and increasing, respectively. The combined nitrogen balance index (NBI = CHL/FLAV) calculated was able to discriminate all of the plots under four N regimens (0, 100, 200, and 400 kg/ha) and was correlated with the leaf N content determined destructively. CHL and FLAV were properly calibrated against chlorophyll (R(2) = 0.945) and flavonol (R(2) = 0.932) leaf contents, respectively, by using a homographic fit function. The proposed optical sensing of cabbage crops can be used to estimate the N status of plants and perform precision fertilization to maintain acceptable crop yield levels and, additionally, to rapidly detect health-promoting flavonol antioxidants in Brassica plants. PMID:26679081

  7. Wavelength-dependent photooxidation and photoreduction of protochlorophyllide and protochlorophyll in the innermost leaves of cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.).

    PubMed

    Erdei, Anna Laura; Kósa, Annamária; Kovács-Smirová, Lilla; Böddi, Béla

    2016-04-01

    The photoreduction and photooxidation processes of different protochlorophyll(ide) forms were studied in the innermost leaves of cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.) under monochromatic irradiations. Room-temperature fluorescence emission spectra were measured from the same leaf spots before and after illumination to follow the wavelength dependence of the photochemical reactions. Short-wavelength light of 7 µmol photons m(-2) s(-1) (625-630 nm) provoked mainly bleaching, and longer wavelengths (630-640 nm) caused both bleaching and photoreduction, while above 640 nm resulted in basically photoreduction. When bleached leaves were kept in darkness at room temperature, all protochlorophyll(ide) forms regenerated during 72 h. Oxygen-reduced environment decreased the extent of bleaching suggesting the involvement of reactive oxygen species. These results confirm that the short-wavelength, 628 nm absorbing, and 633 nm emitting protochlorophyll(ide) form in etiolated cabbage leaves sensibilizes photooxidation. However, the 628 nm light at low intensities stimulates the photoreduction of the longer wavelength protochlorophyllide forms. Kinetic measurements showed that photoreduction saturates at a low PFD (photon flux density) compared to bleaching, suggesting that the quantum yield of photoreduction is higher than that of bleaching. PMID:26519365

  8. Production and characterization of interspecific somatic hybrids between Brassica oleracea var. botrytis and B. nigra and their progenies for the selection of advanced pre-breeding materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gui-xiang; Tang, Yu; Yan, Hong; Sheng, Xiao-guang; Hao, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Li; Lu, Kun; Liu, Fan

    2011-10-01

    Somatic hybridization is a potential method for gene transfer from wild relatives to cultivated crops that can overcome sexual incompatibilities of two distantly related species. In this study, interspecific asymmetric somatic hybrids of Brassica oleracea var. botrytis (cauliflower) and Brassica nigra (black mustard) were obtained by protoplast fusion and their backcrossed (BC(3)) and selfed (S(3)) offspring were analyzed. Cytological analysis showed that the B. nigra chromosomes were successively eliminated in the backcrosses with cauliflower. The fertility of the hybrid progenies was quite different due to the asynchronous and abnormal chromosome behavior of pollen mother cells (PMC) during meiosis. Analysis of sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) showed that all of these hybrids mainly had the DNA banding pattern from the two parents with some alterations. Genetically, the selfed generations were closer to B. nigra, while the backcrossed generations were closer to the cauliflower parent. Analysis of cleaved amplified polymorphic sequences (CAPS) and restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) showed that all somatic hybrids in this study contained chloroplast (cp) DNA of the donor parent black mustard, while mitochondrial (mt) DNA showed evidence of recombination and variations in the regions analyzed. Furthermore, three BC(3) plants (originated from somatic hybrids 3, 4, 10) with 2-8 B. nigra-derived chromosomes shown by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) displayed a more cauliflower-like morphology and high resistance to black-rot. These plants were obtained as bridge materials for further analysis and breeding. PMID:21603996

  9. Antiamnesic Effect of Broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) Leaves on Amyloid Beta (Aβ)1-42-Induced Learning and Memory Impairment.

    PubMed

    Park, Seon Kyeong; Ha, Jeong Su; Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Jin Yong; Lee, Du Sang; Guo, Tian Jiao; Lee, Uk; Kim, Dae-Ok; Heo, Ho Jin

    2016-05-01

    To examine the antiamnesic effects of broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) leaves, we performed in vitro and in vivo tests on amyloid beta (Aβ)-induced neurotoxicity. The chloroform fraction from broccoli leaves (CBL) showed a remarkable neuronal cell-protective effect and an inhibition against acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The ameliorating effect of CBL on Aβ1-42-induced learning and memory impairment was evaluated by Y-maze, passive avoidance, and Morris water maze tests. The results indicated improving cognitive function in the CBL group. After the behavioral tests, antioxidant effects were detected by superoxide dismutase (SOD), oxidized glutathione (GSH)/total GSH, and malondialdehyde (MDA) assays, and inhibition against AChE was also presented in the brain. Finally, oxo-dihydroxy-octadecenoic acid (oxo-DHODE) and trihydroxy-octadecenoic acid (THODE) as main compounds were identified by quadrupole time-of-flight ultraperformance liquid chromatography (Q-TOF UPLC-MS) analysis. Therefore, our studies suggest that CBL could be used as a natural resource for ameliorating Aβ1-42-induced learning and memory impairment. PMID:27079470

  10. Effects of the 3D-clinorotation on endogenous substances of broccoli sprout (Brassica oleracea var. italica) and its food safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraishi, K.; Tomita-Yokotani, K.; Wakabayashi, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Miyagawa, T.; Yamashita, M.

    Habitation in outer space is one of our challenges in this century We are studying on space agriculture to provide foods for space living people However careful assessment should be made on the effects of exotic environment on the endogenous production of biologically active substances and food safety of plants cultivated in space Broccoli sprout Brassica oleracea var italica is known to produce sulforaphane 4-methylsulfinybutyl isothiocyanate which is effective to function as an antioxidant and enhance immunity Because of such substance it is recognized to be good food materials Broccoli sprouts were then cultivated for 3 days under the 3D-clinorotation The amount of sulforaphane produced by this treatment showed no significant difference compared to the ground control Secondly we examined population of microorganisms adhered on the surface of sprout cultivated under the 3D-clinorotation Number of the microorganisms colony formed was statistically higher than the control Mold species was identified to penicillium sp based on the microscopic observation Poor construction of plant cell wall elements cellulose lignin etc is well known effects of microgravity Defense function of the broccoli plant cells might be weakened against microorganism We also speculate other possible causes for the high rate of contamination such as photosynthetic activity of the plant or microclimate air flow heat transport and humidity around the seedling affected by pseudo-microgravity or the 3D-clinorotation Those factors may relate to the difference in proliferation

  11. Influence of two fertilization regimens on the amounts of organic acids and phenolic compounds of tronchuda cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. Var. costata DC).

    PubMed

    Sousa, Carla; Valentão, Patrícia; Rangel, Joana; Lopes, Graciliana; Pereira, José A; Ferreres, Federico; Seabra, Rosa M; Andrade, Paula B

    2005-11-16

    A phytochemical study was undertaken on tronchuda cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. costata DC) cultivated under conventional and organic practices and collected at different times. Six organic acids (aconitic, citric, ascorbic, malic, shikimic, and fumaric acids) were identified and quantified by HPLC-UV. Qualitative and quantitative differences were noted between internal and external leaves. Analysis of the phenolics of the internal leaves was achieved by HPLC-DAD, and the phenolic profile obtained was revealed to be distinct from that of the external leaves. By this means were identified and quantified 11 compounds: 3-p-coumaroylquinic acid, kaempferol 3-O-sophoroside-7-O-glucoside, kaempferol 3-O-(caffeoyl)sophoroside-7-O-glucoside, kaempferol 3-O-(sinapoyl)sophoroside-7-O-glucoside, kaempferol 3-O-(feruloyl)sophoroside-7-O-glucoside, kaempferol 3-O-sophoroside, two isomeric forms of 1,2-disinapoylgentiobiose, 1-sinapoyl-2-feruloylgentiobiose, 1,2,2'-trisinapoylgentiobiose, and 1,2'-disinapoyl-2-feruloylgentiobiose. In general, internal leaves exhibited more constant chemical profiles. PMID:16277412

  12. Genome-wide identification and comparative expression analysis reveal a rapid expansion and functional divergence of duplicated genes in the WRKY gene family of cabbage, Brassica oleracea var. capitata.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qiu-Yang; Xia, En-Hua; Liu, Fei-Hu; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2015-02-15

    WRKY transcription factors (TFs), one of the ten largest TF families in higher plants, play important roles in regulating plant development and resistance. To date, little is known about the WRKY TF family in Brassica oleracea. Recently, the completed genome sequence of cabbage (B. oleracea var. capitata) allows us to systematically analyze WRKY genes in this species. A total of 148 WRKY genes were characterized and classified into seven subgroups that belong to three major groups. Phylogenetic and synteny analyses revealed that the repertoire of cabbage WRKY genes was derived from a common ancestor shared with Arabidopsis thaliana. The B. oleracea WRKY genes were found to be preferentially retained after the whole-genome triplication (WGT) event in its recent ancestor, suggesting that the WGT event had largely contributed to a rapid expansion of the WRKY gene family in B. oleracea. The analysis of RNA-Seq data from various tissues (i.e., roots, stems, leaves, buds, flowers and siliques) revealed that most of the identified WRKY genes were positively expressed in cabbage, and a large portion of them exhibited patterns of differential and tissue-specific expression, demonstrating that these gene members might play essential roles in plant developmental processes. Comparative analysis of the expression level among duplicated genes showed that gene expression divergence was evidently presented among cabbage WRKY paralogs, indicating functional divergence of these duplicated WRKY genes. PMID:25481634

  13. Improvement of high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridisation mapping on chromosomes of Brassica oleracea var. capitata.

    PubMed

    Yang, K; Zhang, Y; Converse, R; Lv, J; Shi, M; Zhang, H; Zhu, L

    2016-03-01

    The low resolution of chromosome-based Fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) mapping is primarily due to the structure of the plant cell wall and cytoplasm and the compactness of regular chromosomes, which represent a significant obstacle to FISH. In order to improve spatial resolution and signal detection sensitivity, we provide a reproducible method to generate high-quality extended chromosomes that are ~13 times as long as their pachytene counterparts. We demonstrate that proteinase K used in this procedure is crucial for stretching pachytene chromosomes of Brassica oleracea in the context of a modified Carnoy's II fixative (6:1:3, ethanol:chloroform:acetic acid). The quality of super-stretched chromosomes was assessed in several FISH experiments. FISH signals from both repetitive 5S rDNA and single-copy ARC1 on super-stretched chromosomes are brighter than those on other different types of chromosome due to enhanced accessibility to targets on stretched pachytene chromosomes. In conclusion, the resulting extended chromosomes are suitable for FISH mapping for repetitive DNA sequences and the localisation of a single-copy locus, and FISH performed on super-stretched chromosomes can achieve significantly higher sensitivity and spatial resolution than other chromosome-based FISH mapping techniques. PMID:26312399

  14. Genome-wide identification and characterization of miRNAs in the hypocotyl and cotyledon of cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Geng, Meijuan; Li, Hui; Jin, Chuan; Liu, Qian; Chen, Chengbin; Song, Wenqin; Wang, Chunguo

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small endogenous, non-coding RNAs that have key regulatory functions in plant growth, development, and other biological processes. Hypocotyl and cotyledon are the two major tissues of cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis) seedlings. Tissue culture experiments have indicated that the regenerative abilities of these two tissues are significantly different. However, the characterization of miRNAs and their roles in regulating organ development in cauliflower remain unexplored. In the present study, two small RNA libraries were sequenced by Solexa sequencing technology. 99 known miRNAs belonging to 28 miRNA families were identified, in which 6 miRNA families were detected only in Brassicaceae. A total of 162 new miRNA sequences with single nucleotide substitutions corresponding to the known miRNAs, and 32 potentially novel miRNAs were also first discovered. Comparative analysis indicated that 42 of 99 known miRNAs and 17 of 32 novel miRNAs exhibited significantly differential expression between hypocotyl and cotyledon, and the differential expression of several miRNAs was further validated by stem-loop RT-PCR. In addition, 235 targets for 89 known miRNAs and 198 targets for 24 novel miRNAs were predicted, and their functions were further discussed. The expression patterns of several representative targets were also confirmed by qRT-PCR analysis. The results identified that the transcriptional expression patterns of miRNAs were negatively correlated with their targets. These findings gave new insights into the characteristics of miRNAs in cauliflower, and provided important clues to elucidate the roles of miRNAs in the tissue differentiation and development of cauliflower. PMID:24170336

  15. Ozone fumigation results in accelerated growth and persistent changes in the antioxidant system of Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata f. alba.

    PubMed

    Rozpądek, Piotr; Ślesak, Ireneusz; Cebula, Stanisław; Waligórski, Piotr; Dziurka, Michał; Skoczowski, Andrzej; Miszalski, Zbigniew

    2013-09-15

    The growth response and antioxidant capacity of Brassica oleracea var. capitata f. alba plants treated with 70ppb of ozone was examined. Four week old cabbage seedlings were fumigated with O3 for 3 days before being transplanted into the growing field. The effect of O3 treatment was determined directly after fumigation and over the course of field cultivation. Plants subjected to O3 treatment had an increased diameter of rosettes and number of leaves after 3 and 7 weeks in agriculture, respectively. In addition, the vast majority of fumigated plants reached marketable quality faster than control plants, indicating a positive role of episodes of increased O3 concentrations during vegetation on growth and yielding. Our analysis revealed that by fumigating juvenile white cabbage plants with moderate doses of O3 the activity of catalases (CAT) and peroxidases was elevated. The activity of the examined enzymes was not affected directly after fumigation, but it increased after several weeks in the experimental field. Increased CAT activity was accompanied by changes in 2 out of the 3 CAT genes CAT1 and CAT2, where CAT2 seemed to be responsible for the induced CAT activity. The biosynthesis of low-molecular stress protectants - tocopherols and the glucosinolate (GLS) sinigrin was transiently affected by ozone. γ-Tocopherol (γ-toc) content significantly increased directly after fumigation, but after 3 weeks of vegetation in the field its concentration reached values similar to control. The biosynthesis of α-tocopherol (α-toc) and sinigrin seemed to be upregulated in fumigated plants. However, the response was delayed; no differences were registered directly after treatment, but 3 weeks after transplanting the concentration of sinigrin and α-toc was elevated. PMID:23773692

  16. Influence of fermentation conditions on glucosinolates, ascorbigen, and ascorbic acid content in white cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata cv. Taler) cultivated in different seasons.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Villaluenga, C; Peñas, E; Frias, J; Ciska, E; Honke, J; Piskula, M K; Kozlowska, H; Vidal-Valverde, C

    2009-01-01

    The content of glucosinolates (GLS), ascorbigen, and ascorbic acid in white cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata cv. Taler) cultivated in different seasons (summer and winter) was determined, before and after spontaneous and starter-induced fermentation. Different salt concentrations (0.5% NaCl or 1.5% NaCl) were used for sauerkraut production. Glucoiberin, sinigrin, and glucobrassicin were dominating in raw white cabbage cultivated either in winter or summer seasons. Ascorbigen precursor, glucobrassicin, was found higher in cabbage cultivated in winter (2.54 micromol/g dw) than those grown in summer (1.83 micromol/g dw). Cabbage fermented for 7 d was found to contain only traces of some GLS irrespective of the fermentation conditions used. Ascorbigen synthesis occurred during white cabbage fermentation. Brining cabbage at low salt concentration (0.5% NaCl) improved ascorbigen content in sauerkraut after 7 d of fermentation at 25 degrees C. The highest ascorbigen concentration was observed in low-sodium (0.5% NaCl) sauerkraut produced from cabbage cultivated in winter submitted to either natural (109.0 micromol/100 g dw) or starter-induced fermentation (108.3 and 104.6 micromol/100 g dw in cabbages fermented by L. plantarum and L. mesenteroides, respectively). Ascorbic acid content was found higher in cabbage cultivated in summer and fermentation process led to significant reductions. Therefore, the selection of cabbages with high glucobrassicin content and the production of low-sodium sauerkrauts may provide enhanced health benefits towards prevention of chronic diseases. PMID:19200088

  17. Water balance and N-metabolism in broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. Italica) plants depending on nitrogen source under salt stress and elevated CO2.

    PubMed

    Zaghdoud, Chokri; Carvajal, Micaela; Ferchichi, Ali; Del Carmen Martínez-Ballesta, María

    2016-11-15

    Elevated [CO2] and salinity in the soils are considered part of the effects of future environmental conditions in arid and semi-arid areas. While it is known that soil salinization decreases plant growth, an increased atmospheric [CO2] may ameliorate the negative effects of salt stress. However, there is a lack of information about the form in which inorganic nitrogen source may influence plant performance under both conditions. Single factor responses and the interactive effects of two [CO2] (380 and 800ppm), three different NO3(-)/NH4(+) ratios in the nutrient solution (100/0, 50/50 and 0/100, with a total N concentration of 3.5mM) and two NaCl concentrations (0 and 80mM) on growth, leaf gas exchange parameters in relation to root hydraulic conductance and N-assimilating enzymes of broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. Italica) plants were determined. The results showed that a reduced NO3(-) or co-provision of NO3(-) and NH4(+) could be an optimal source of inorganic N for broccoli plants. In addition, elevated [CO2] ameliorated the effect of salt exposure on the plant growth through an enhanced rate of photosynthesis, even at low N-concentration. However, NO3(-) or NO3(-)/NH4(+) co-provision display differential plant response to salt stress regarding water balance, which was associated to N metabolism. The results may contribute to our understanding of N-fertilization modes under increasing atmospheric [CO2] to cope with salt stress, where variations in N nutrition significantly influenced plant response. PMID:27450252

  18. MALDI-TOF characterization of hGH1 produced by hairy root cultures of Brassica oleracea var. italica grown in an airlift with mesh bioreactor.

    PubMed

    López, Edgar García; Ramírez, Emma Gloria Ramos; Gúzman, Octavio Gómez; Calva, Graciano Calva; Ariza-Castolo, Armando; Pérez-Vargas, Josefina; Rodríguez, Herminia Guadalupe Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Expression systems based on plant cells, tissue, and organ cultures have been investigated as an alternative for production of human therapeutic proteins in bioreactors. In this work, hairy root cultures of Brassica oleracea var. italica (broccoli) were established in an airlift with mesh bioreactor to produce isoform 1 of the human growth hormone (hGH1) as a model therapeutic protein. The hGH1 cDNA was cloned into the pCAMBIA1105.1 binary vector to induce hairy roots in hypocotyls of broccoli plantlets via Agrobacterium rhizogenes. Most of the infected plantlets (90%) developed hairy roots when inoculated before the appearance of true leaves, and keeping the emerging roots attached to hypocotyl explants during transfer to solid Schenk and Hildebrandt medium. The incorporation of the cDNA into the hairy root genome was confirmed by PCR amplification from genomic DNA. The expression and structure of the transgenic hGH1 was assessed by ELISA, western blot, and MALDITOF-MS analysis of the purified protein extracted from the biomass of hairy roots cultivated in bioreactor for 24 days. Production of hGH1 was 5.1 ± 0.42 µg/g dry weight (DW) for flask cultures, and 7.8 ± 0.3 µg/g DW for bioreactor, with productivity of 0.68 ± 0.05 and 1.5 ± 0.06 µg/g DW*days, respectively, indicating that the production of hGH1 was not affected by the growth rate, but might be affected by the culture system. These results demonstrate that hairy root cultures of broccoli have potential as an alternative expression system for production of hGH1, and might also be useful for production of other therapeutic proteins. PMID:24124083

  19. Comparative analysis of alternative splicing, alternative polyadenylation and the expression of the two KIN genes from cytoplasmic male sterility cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L.).

    PubMed

    Tao, Peng; Huang, Xiaoyun; Li, Biyuan; Wang, Wuhong; Yue, Zhichen; Lei, Juanli; Zhong, Xinmin

    2014-06-01

    The KIN genes are crucial members of the cold-regulated gene family. They play exclusive roles during the developmental processes of many organs and respond to various abiotic stresses in plants. However, little is known about the regulation of KIN gene expression in cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) cabbages (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L.). We carried out a genome-wide analysis to identify the KIN genes in the CMS cabbage. Two non-redundant KIN genes, named BoKIN1 (Bol021262) and BoKIN2 (Bol030498), were identified. Reverse transcriptase PCR detected alternative splicing (AS) products of BoKIN1 (four AS products) and BoKIN2 (three AS products). In addition, alternative polyadenylation (APA) was observed for BoKIN1 and BoKIN2 in the CMS cabbage, resulting in variable 3'UTRs in their transcripts. Furthermore, the transcription levels of BoKIN1-0 and BoKIN2-0, the introns of which were spliced completely, were analyzed in various organs and young leaves treated by abiotic stresses. Our data indicated that BoKIN1-0 is highly expressed in various organs, whereas BoKIN2-0 is expressed exclusively in the stamen. Our study also suggested that BoKIN1-0 was upregulated significantly in young leaves of plants exposed to abscisic acid treatment, and cold and heat stress. BoKIN1 and BoKIN2 had differential AS and APA patterns in pre-mRNA processing, and showed differences in their expression patterns and transcript levels. BoKIN1 participates widely in organ development and responds to diverse abiotic stresses, whereas BoKIN2 plays a main role in stamen development in the CMS cabbage. PMID:24488150

  20. Thallium at the interface of soil and green cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L.): soil-plant transfer and influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yanlong; Xiao, Tangfu; Zhou, Guangzhu; Ning, Zengping

    2013-04-15

    Thallium (Tl) is a non-essential and toxic trace metal found in many plants, but it can accumulate at particularly high concentration in green cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L.). The aim of this study is to explore the transfer and accumulation of Tl at the interface of rhizospheric soil and green cabbage from a long-term Tl contaminated site in southwestern Guizhou Province, China. Influencing factors such as Tl distribution in various soil fractions and physical-chemical characteristics of rhizospheric soil were also investigated. Our results demonstrated that green cabbage had high accumulation of Tl, with most bioconcentration factor (BF) values exceeding 1, and up to a maximum level of 11. The enrichment of Tl in the green cabbage tissues followed a descending order, i.e. old leaves>fresh leaves>stems≈roots. The stems functioned as a channel for Tl transportation to the leaves, where most of the Tl (greater than 80%) was found to accumulate. In the rhizospheric soils, 62-95% of Tl existed in the residual fraction, while lower concentrations of Tl (on average, 1.7% of total T1 in rhizospheric soil) were found in the water and acid soluble fractions. The major fraction of labile Tl was located in the reducible fraction (9%). Our results also suggested that the uptake and enrichment of Tl in green cabbage were affected by Tl concentrations, soil water content, soil pH, soil organic material (SOM) and cation exchange capacity (CEC) in rhizospheric soil. PMID:23474259

  1. Collard Landraces are novel sources of Glucoraphanin and other Aliphatic Glucosinolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucosinolates form an important class of metabolites in Brassicas whose cognate isothiocyanates may provide chemoprotective effects in humans. Although certain B. oleracea crops have well documented glucosinolate profiles, collard (Brassica oleracea L. subsp. oleracea convar. acephala var. viridis ...

  2. Collard land races are novel sources of glucoraphanin and other aliphatic glucosinolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucosinolates form an important class of metabolites in Brassicas whose cognate isothiocyanates may provide chemoprotective effects in humans. Although certain B. oleracea crops have well documented glucosinolate profiles, collard (Brassica oleracea L. subsp. oleracea convar. acephala var. viridis)...

  3. Transcriptome sequencing of two parental lines of cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L.) and construction of an EST-based genetic map

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Expressed sequence tag (EST)-based markers are preferred because they reflect transcribed portions of the genome. We report the development of simple sequence repeat (SSR) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers derived from transcriptome sequences in cabbage, and their utility for map construction. Results Transcriptome sequences were obtained from two cabbage parental lines, C1184 and C1234, which are susceptible and resistant to black rot disease, respectively, using the 454 platform. A total of 92,255 and 127,522 reads were generated and clustered into 34,688 and 40,947 unigenes, respectively. We identified 2,405 SSR motifs from the unigenes of the black rot-resistant parent C1234. Trinucleotide motifs were the most abundant (66.15%) among the repeat motifs. In addition, 1,167 SNPs were detected between the two parental lines. A total of 937 EST-based SSR and 97 SNP-based dCAPS markers were designed and used for detection of polymorphism between parents. Using an F2 population, we built a genetic map comprising 265 loci, and consisting of 98 EST-based SSRs, 21 SNP-based dCAPS, 55 IBP markers derived from B. rapa genome sequence and 91 public SSRs, distributed on nine linkage groups spanning a total of 1,331.88 cM with an average distance of 5.03 cM between adjacent loci. The parental lines used in this study are elite breeding lines with little genetic diversity; therefore, the markers that mapped in our genetic map will have broad spectrum utility. Conclusions This genetic map provides additional genetic information to the existing B. oleracea map. Moreover, the new set of EST-based SSR and dCAPS markers developed herein is a valuable resource for genetic studies and will facilitate cabbage breeding. Additionally, this study demonstrates the usefulness of NGS transcriptomes for the development of genetic maps even with little genetic diversity in the mapping population. PMID:24559437

  4. Modification of Leaf Glucosinolate Contents in Brassica oleracea by Divergent Selection and Effect on Expression of Genes Controlling Glucosinolate Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Tamara; Velasco, Pablo; Soengas, Pilar; Rodríguez, Víctor M; Cartea, María E

    2016-01-01

    Modification of the content of secondary metabolites opens the possibility of obtaining vegetables enriched in these compounds related to plant defense and human health. We report the first results of a divergent selection for glucosinolate (GSL) content of the three major GSL in leaves: sinigrin (SIN), glucoiberin (GIB), and glucobrassicin (GBS) in order to develop six kale genotypes (Brassica oleracea var. acephala) with high (HSIN, HIGIB, HGBS) and low (LSIN, LGIB, LGBS) content. The aims were to determine if the three divergent selections were successful in leaves, how each divergent selection affected the content of the same GSLs in flower buds and seeds and to determine which genes would be involved in the modification of the content of the three GSL studied. The content of SIN and GIB after three cycles of divergent selection increased 52.5% and 77.68%, and decreased 51.9% and 45.33%, respectively. The divergent selection for GBS content was only successful and significant for decreasing the concentration, with a reduction of 39.04%. Mass selection is an efficient way of modifying the concentration of individual GSLs. Divergent selections realized in leaves had a side effect in the GSL contents of flower buds and seeds due to the novo synthesis in these organs and/or translocation from leaves. The results obtained suggest that modification in the SIN and GIB concentration by selection is related to the GSL-ALK locus. We suggest that this locus could be related with the indirect response found in the GBS concentration. Meantime, variations in the CYP81F2 gene expression could be the responsible of the variations in GBS content. The genotypes obtained in this study can be used as valuable materials for undertaking basic studies about the biological effects of the major GSLs present in kales. PMID:27471510

  5. Modification of Leaf Glucosinolate Contents in Brassica oleracea by Divergent Selection and Effect on Expression of Genes Controlling Glucosinolate Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sotelo, Tamara; Velasco, Pablo; Soengas, Pilar; Rodríguez, Víctor M.; Cartea, María E.

    2016-01-01

    Modification of the content of secondary metabolites opens the possibility of obtaining vegetables enriched in these compounds related to plant defense and human health. We report the first results of a divergent selection for glucosinolate (GSL) content of the three major GSL in leaves: sinigrin (SIN), glucoiberin (GIB), and glucobrassicin (GBS) in order to develop six kale genotypes (Brassica oleracea var. acephala) with high (HSIN, HIGIB, HGBS) and low (LSIN, LGIB, LGBS) content. The aims were to determine if the three divergent selections were successful in leaves, how each divergent selection affected the content of the same GSLs in flower buds and seeds and to determine which genes would be involved in the modification of the content of the three GSL studied. The content of SIN and GIB after three cycles of divergent selection increased 52.5% and 77.68%, and decreased 51.9% and 45.33%, respectively. The divergent selection for GBS content was only successful and significant for decreasing the concentration, with a reduction of 39.04%. Mass selection is an efficient way of modifying the concentration of individual GSLs. Divergent selections realized in leaves had a side effect in the GSL contents of flower buds and seeds due to the novo synthesis in these organs and/or translocation from leaves. The results obtained suggest that modification in the SIN and GIB concentration by selection is related to the GSL-ALK locus. We suggest that this locus could be related with the indirect response found in the GBS concentration. Meantime, variations in the CYP81F2 gene expression could be the responsible of the variations in GBS content. The genotypes obtained in this study can be used as valuable materials for undertaking basic studies about the biological effects of the major GSLs present in kales. PMID:27471510

  6. The Genetics of Brassica oleracea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    B. oleracea crops encompass a family of vegetables that are among the most important in the world. The most commonly grown vegetables in this family include common cabbage, cauliflower, and broccoli. Cabbage is the most widely produced of the three, cauliflower is less than cabbage, and broccoli i...

  7. Identification of genomic regions involved in resistance against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum from wild Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Mei, Jiaqin; Ding, Yijuan; Lu, Kun; Wei, Dayong; Liu, Yao; Disi, Joseph Onwusemu; Li, Jiana; Liu, Liezhao; Liu, Shengyi; McKay, John; Qian, Wei

    2013-02-01

    The lack of resistant source has greatly restrained resistance breeding of rapeseed (Brassica napus, AACC) against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum which causes severe yield losses in rapeseed production all over the world. Recently, several wild Brassica oleracea accessions (CC) with high level of resistance have been identified (Mei et al. in Euphytica 177:393-400, 2011), bringing a new hope to improve Sclerotinia resistance of rapeseed. To map quantitative trait loci (QTL) for Sclerotinia resistance from wild B. oleracea, an F2 population consisting of 149 genotypes, with several clones of each genotypes, was developed from one F1 individual derived from the cross between a resistant accession of wild B. oleracea (B. incana) and a susceptible accession of cultivated B. oleracea var. alboglabra. The F2 population was evaluated for Sclerotinia reaction in 2009 and 2010 under controlled condition. Significant differences among genotypes and high heritability for leaf and stem reaction indicated that genetic components accounted for a large portion of the phenotypic variance. A total of 12 QTL for leaf resistance and six QTL for stem resistance were identified in 2 years, each explaining 2.2-28.4 % of the phenotypic variation. The combined effect of alleles from wild B. oleracea reduced the relative susceptibility by 22.5 % in leaves and 15 % in stems on average over 2 years. A 12.8-cM genetic region on chromosome C09 of B. oleracea consisting of two major QTL intervals for both leaf and stem resistance was assigned into a 2.7-Mb genomic region on chromosome A09 of B. rapa, harboring about 30 putative resistance-related genes. Significant negative corrections were found between flowering time and relative susceptibility of leaf and stem. The association of flowering time with Sclerotinia resistance is discussed. PMID:23096003

  8. Evaluation of Poultry Litter Amendment to Agricultural Soils: Leaching Losses and Partitioning of Trace Elements in Collard Greens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaching of trace metals and greenhouse plant growth (Collard greens; Brassica oleracea var. acephala) response studies were conducted in two types of soils with contrasting characteristics amended with varying rates (0 to 24.70 Mg ha-1) of poultry litter (PL) or 1:1 mixture of PL and fly ash (FA). ...

  9. Genetic diversity and population structure of collard landraces collected in the Southeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Collard (Brassica oleracea L. covar. Acephala var. viridis) is a common vegetable grown throughout the southeastern United States. This non-heading, leafy-green cole crop is mostly grown during cooler seasons (e.g., fall through spring), but in some areas it is effectively grown year round. In th...

  10. Meristem identity gene expression during curd proliferation and flower initiation in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Duclos, Denise V; Björkman, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The regulation of reproductive development in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis DC) and broccoli (B. oleracea L. var. italica Plenck) is unusual in that most enlargement occurs while development is arrested at a distinct stage. Cauliflower and broccoli curds are composed of inflorescence meristems and flower buds, respectively. To determine whether this arrest is maintained by altered expression of the genes that specify these steps in Arabidopsis, the expression of each copy of their homologues (MADS-box genes BoAP1-a, BoAP1-c, BoCAL, BoFUL-a, BoFUL-b, BoFUL-c, and BoFUL-d; and non-MADS-box genes BoLFY, AP2, UFO, and BoTFL1) and the cauliflower curd-specific genes CCE1 and BoREM1 were measured simultaneously in heads that were arrested at different developmental stages by varying temperature, but had a common genotype. Transcript abundance of BoFUL paralogues and BoLFY was highest at the cauliflower stage of arrest, consistent with these genes initiating inflorescence meristems. The expression of other genes was the same regardless of the developmental stage of arrest. The expected models can therefore be excluded, wherein maintenance of arrest at the inflorescence meristem is a consequence of suppression of BoCAL, BoAP1-a, or BoLFY, or failure to suppress BoTFL1. Floral primordia and floral buds were normal in boap1-a boap1-c bocal triple mutants; therefore, other meristem identity genes can specify floral initiation (A-function) in B. oleracea. BoTFL1, a strong repressor of flowering in Arabidopsis, did not suppress the formation of the floral primordium in B. oleracea. Initiation of floral primordia and enlargement of floral buds in broccoli and cauliflower is not controlled solely by homologues of the genes that do so in Arabidopsis. PMID:18332227

  11. Brassica oleracea and B. napus.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Penny A C Hundleby Née; Irwin, Judith A

    2015-01-01

    With the accelerating advances in genetics and genomics research in Arabidopsis and Brassica, transformation technologies are now routinely being exploited to elucidate gene function as well as contributing to the development of novel enhanced crops. When a researcher's desired goal is simply to modify or introduce candidate genes into a Brassica, the availability of easy-to-follow protocols and knowledge of readily transformable genotypes becomes a valuable resource. In this chapter we outline a basic A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation method, using 4-day-old cotyledonary explants, that has been successfully applied to a range of different B. oleracea and B. napus genotypes. For demonstration purposes, we focus primarily on the diploid species B. oleracea using a model doubled haploid genotype, AG DH1012. After only 3-4 weeks on kanamycin selection the first transgenic shoots can be isolated. Transformation efficiencies are typically in the region of 15-25 % (based on 15-25 PCR-positive independent shoots from 100 inoculated explants). Most explants will produce multiple shoots (1-3+ per explant) and so the total number of transgenic shoots produced will exceed 15-25 per 100 explant experiment. The protocol is also applicable to B. napus and modifications specific to this species are highlighted accordingly. For researchers wishing to use their own plant genotype, tissue culture phenotypes that are conducive to efficient transformation are also highlighted within this chapter. PMID:25300849

  12. Fine mapping of a male sterility gene MS-cd1 in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinmei; Wu, Jian; Zhang, Hui; Ma, Yuan; Guo, Aiguang; Wang, Xiaowu

    2011-07-01

    A dominant male sterility (DGMS) line 79-399-3, developed from a spontaneous mutation in Brassica oleracea var. capitata, has been widely used in production of hybrid cultivars in China. In this line, male sterility is controlled by a dominant gene Ms-cd1. In the present study, fine mapping of Ms-cd1 was conducted by screening a segregating population Ms79-07 with 2,028 individuals developed by four times backcrossing using a male sterile Brassica oleracea var. italica line harboring Ms-cd1 as donor and Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra as the recipient. Bulked segregation analysis (BSA) was performed for the BC(4) population Ms79-07 using 26,417 SRAP primer SRAPs and 1,300 SSRs regarding of male sterility and fertility. A high-resolution map surrounding Ms-cd1 was constructed with 14 SRAPs and one SSR. The SSR marker 8C0909 was closely linked to the MS-cd1 gene with a distance of 2.06 cM. Fourteen SRAPs closely linked to the target gene were identified; the closest ones on each side were 0.18 cM and 2.16 cM from Ms-cd1. Three of these SRAPs were successfully converted to dominant SCAR markers with a distance to the Ms-cd1 gene of 0.18, 0.39 and 4.23 cM, respectively. BLAST analysis with these SCAR marker sequences identified a collinear genomic region about 600 kb in scaffold 000010 on chromosomeA10 in B. rapa and on chromosome 5 in A. thaliana. These results provide additional information for map-based cloning of the Ms-cd1 gene and will be helpful for marker-assisted selection (MAS). PMID:21538103

  13. The ectomycorrhizal morphotype Pinirhiza sclerotia is formed by Acephala macrosclerotiorum sp. nov., a close relative of Phialocephala fortinii.

    PubMed

    Münzenberger, Babette; Bubner, Ben; Wöllecke, Jens; Sieber, Thomas N; Bauer, Robert; Fladung, Matthias; Hüttl, Reinhard F

    2009-09-01

    Relatively few ectomycorrhizal fungal species are known to form sclerotia. Usually, sclerotia are initiated at the extraradical mycelium. In this study, we present anatomical and ultrastructural evidence for the formation of sclerotia directly in the hyphal mantle of the mycorrhizal morphotype Pinirhiza sclerotia. A dark-pigmented fungal strain was isolated from Pinirhiza sclerotia and identified by molecular tools as Acephala macrosclerotiorum sp. nov., a close relative of Phialocephala fortinii s.l. As dark septate fungi are known to be mostly endophytic, resyntheses with Pinus sylvestris and A. macrosclerotiorum as well as Populus tremula x Populus tremuloides and A. macrosclerotiorum or P. fortinii s.l. were performed under axenic conditions. No mycorrhizas were found when hybrid aspen was inoculated with A. macrosclerotiorum or P. fortinii. However, A. macrosclerotiorum formed true ectomycorrhizas in vitro with P. sylvestris. Anatomical and ultrastructural features of this ectomycorrhiza are presented. The natural and synthesized ectomycorrhizal morphotypes were identical and characterized by a thin hyphal mantle that bore sclerotia in a later ontogenetic stage. The Hartig net was well-developed and grew up to the endodermis. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence at the anatomical and ultrastructural level that a close relative of P. fortinii s.l. forms true ectomycorrhizas with a coniferous host. PMID:19415343

  14. Anticonvulsant properties of Euterpe oleracea in mice.

    PubMed

    Souza-Monteiro, José Rogerio; Hamoy, Moisés; Santana-Coelho, Danielle; Arrifano, Gabriela P F; Paraense, Ricardo S O; Costa-Malaquias, Allan; Mendonça, Jackson R; da Silva, Rafael F; Monteiro, Wallena S C; Rogez, Hervé; de Oliveira, Diogo L; do Nascimento, José Luiz M; Crespo-López, Maria Elena

    2015-11-01

    Açai (Euterpe oleracea Mart.), a highly consumed fruit in Amazon, is from a common palm with remarkable antioxidant properties. Because oxidative stress and seizures are intimately linked, this study investigated the potential neuroprotective and anticonvulsant effects of commercial clarified açai juice (EO). EO did not alter spontaneous locomotor activity. Four doses of EO were sufficient to increase latencies to both first myoclonic jerk and first generalized tonic-clonic seizure and significantly decrease the total duration of tonic-clonic seizures caused by pentylenetetrazol administration. Also, electrocortical alterations provoked by pentylenetetrazol were prevented, significantly decreasing amplitude of discharges and frequencies above 50 Hz. EO was also able to completely prevent lipid peroxidation in the cerebral cortex, showing a potent direct scavenging property. These results demonstrate for the first time that E. oleracea significantly protects against seizures and seizure-related oxidative stress, indicating an additional protection for humans who consume this fruit. PMID:26142570

  15. Integration of the cytogenetic and genetic linkage maps of Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Elaine C; Barker, Guy C; Jones, Gareth H; Kearsey, Michael J; King, Graham J; Kop, Erik P; Ryder, Carol D; Teakle, Graham R; Vicente, Joana G; Armstrong, Susan J

    2002-01-01

    We have assigned all nine linkage groups of a Brassica oleracea genetic map to each of the nine chromosomes of the karyotype derived from mitotic metaphase spreads of the B. oleracea var. alboglabra line A12DHd using FISH. The majority of probes were BACs, with A12DHd DNA inserts, which give clear, reliable FISH signals. We have added nine markers to the existing integrated linkage map, distributed over six linkage groups. BACs were definitively assigned to linkage map positions through development of locus-specific PCR assays. Integration of the cytogenetic and genetic linkage maps was achieved with 22 probes representing 19 loci. Four chromosomes (2, 4, 7, and 9) are in the same orientation as their respective linkage groups (O4, O7, O8, and O6) whereas four chromosomes (1, 3, 5, and 8) and linkage groups (O3, O9, O2, and O1) are in the opposite orientation. The remaining chromosome (6) is probably in the opposite orientation. The cytogenetic map is an important resource for locating probes with unknown genetic map positions and is also being used to analyze the relationships between genetic and cytogenetic maps. PMID:12136025

  16. Molecular characterization of an ABA insensitive 5 orthologue in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaona; Yuan, Feifei; Wang, Mengyao; Guo, Aiguang; Zhang, Yanfeng; Xie, Chang Gen

    2013-01-18

    ABI5 (ABA insensitive 5), a bZIP (Basic leucine zipper) transcription factor, has been shown to be a major mediator of plant ABA responses during seed germination. Although the molecular basis of ABI5-modulated processes has been well demonstrated in Arabidopsis thaliana, its identity and function in cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.) remain elusive. Here, we describe our identification of BolABI5 (an ABI5 orthologue in B.oleracea) as a functional bZIP transcription factor in the modulation of plant ABA responses. Expression of BolABI5 was dramatically induced by drought stress and exogenous ABA. Heterogeneous expression of BolABI5 rescued the insensitive phenotype of Arabidopsis abi5-1 to ABA during seed germination. Subcellular localization and trans-activation assays revealed that BolABI5 was localized in the nucleus and possessed DNA binding and trans-activation activities. Deletion of the bZIP domain generated BolABI5ΔbZIP, which no longer localized exclusively in the nucleus and had almost no detectable DNA-binding or trans-activation activities. Overall, these results suggest that BolABI5 may function as ABI5 in the positive regulation of plant ABA responses. PMID:23246838

  17. Nutritional and nutraceutical potential of rape (Brassica napus L. var. napus) and "tronchuda" cabbage (Brassica oleraceae L. var. costata) inflorescences.

    PubMed

    Batista, Cátia; Barros, Lillian; Carvalho, Ana Maria; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2011-06-01

    Two traditional cultivated vegetables highly consumed among Northern Portuguese regions were tested for their chemical composition, nutritional profile and in vitro antioxidant properties using four assays: 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals scavenging activity, reducing power, inhibition of β-carotene bleaching and inhibition of lipid peroxidation by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay. The studied varieties of two Brassica species, locally known as "grelos" (rape) and "espigos" ("tronchuda" cabbage) are nutritionally well-balanced vegetables; particularly "tronchuda" cabbage revealed the highest levels of moisture, proteins, fat, energy, β-carotene and vitamin C; rape gave the highest contents of ash, carbohydrates, sugars (including fructose, glucose, sucrose and raffinose), essential n-3 fatty acid α-linolenic acid, and the best ratios of PUFA/SFA and n-6/n-3 fatty acids, tocopherols, lycopene, chlorophylls, phenolics, flavonoids, and also the highest antioxidant properties. The health benefits associated to the antioxidant properties reinforce their contribution to a healthy and balanced diet, highlight the interest of their consumption, validate the empirical use and add new values to traditional/regional products which have been used for a long time. PMID:21376770

  18. Mitochondrial genome evolution in species belonging to the Phialocephala fortinii s.l. - Acephala applanata species complex

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial (mt) markers are successfully applied in evolutionary biology and systematics because mt genomes often evolve faster than the nuclear genomes. In addition, they allow robust phylogenetic analysis based on conserved proteins of the oxidative phosphorylation system. In the present study we sequenced and annotated the complete mt genome of P. subalpina, a member of the Phialocephala fortinii s.l. – Acephala applanata species complex (PAC). PAC belongs to the Helotiales, which is one of the most diverse groups of ascomycetes including more than 2,000 species. The gene order was compared to deduce the mt genome evolution in the Pezizomycotina. Genetic variation in coding and intergenic regions of the mtDNA was studied for PAC to assess the usefulness of mt DNA for species diagnosis. Results The mt genome of P. subalpina is 43,742 bp long and codes for 14 mt genes associated with the oxidative phosphorylation. In addition, a GIY-YIG endonuclease, the ribosomal protein S3 (Rps3) and a putative N-acetyl-transferase were recognized. A complete set of tRNA genes as well as the large and small rRNA genes but no introns were found. All protein-coding genes were confirmed by EST sequences. The gene order in P. subalpina deviated from the gene order in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, the only other helotialean species with a fully sequenced and annotated mt genome. Gene order analysis within Pezizomycotina suggests that the evolution of gene orders is mostly driven by transpositions. Furthermore, sequence diversity in coding and non-coding mtDNA regions in seven additional PAC species was pronounced and allowed for unequivocal species diagnosis in PAC. Conclusions The combination of non-interrupted ORFs and EST sequences resulted in a high quality annotation of the mt genome of P. subalpina, which can be used as a reference for the annotation of other mt genomes in the Helotiales. In addition, our analyses show that mtDNA loci will be the marker of choice

  19. Construction of Near Isogenic Lines in Brassica oleracea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The single species Brassica oleracea encompasses a remarkable diversity of morphotypes, including cauliflower, broccoli, kohlrabi, marrowstem kale, cabbage, and Brussels sprouts as well as rapid-flowering morphologically simple genotypes reminiscent of Arabidopsis. To dissect the molecular basis of ...

  20. Impact of thermal processing on sulforaphane yield from broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In broccoli, sulforaphane forms when the glucosinolate glucoraphanin is hydrolyzed by the endogenous plant thiohydrolase myrosinase. A myrosinase cofactor directs hydrolysis away from formation of bioactive sulforaphane and toward an inactive product, sulforaphane nitrile. The cofactor is more hea...

  1. Anatomic Characteristics Associated with Head Splitting in Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaonan; Choi, Su Ryun; Wang, Yunbo; Sung, Chang-keun; Im, Subin; Ramchiary, Nirala; Zhou, Guangsheng; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Cabbage belonging to Brassicaceae family is one of the most important vegetables cultivated worldwide. The economically important part of cabbage crop is head, formed by leaves which may be of splitting and non-splitting types. Cabbage varieties showing head splitting causes huge loss to the farmers and therefore finding the molecular and structural basis of splitting types would be helpful to breeders. To determine which anatomical characteristics were related to head-splitting in cabbage, we analyzed two contrasting cabbage lines and their offspring using a field emission scanning electron microscope. The inbred line “747” is an early head-splitting type, while the inbred line “748” is a head-splitting-resistant type. The petiole cells of “747” seems to be larger than those of “748” at maturity; however, there was no significant difference in petiole cell size at both pre-heading and maturity stages. The lower epidermis cells of “747” were larger than those of “748” at the pre-heading and maturity stages. “747” had thinner epidermis cell wall than “748” at maturity stage, however, there was no difference of the epidermis cell wall thickness in the two lines at the pre-heading stage. The head-splitting plants in the F1 and F2 population inherited the larger cell size and thinner cell walls of epidermis cells in the petiole. In the petiole cell walls of “747” and the F1 and F2 plants that formed splitting heads, the cellulose microfibrils were loose and had separated from each other. These findings verified that anomalous cellulose microfibrils, larger cell size and thinner-walled epidermis cells are important genetic factors that make cabbage heads prone to splitting. PMID:26536356

  2. Transcriptome analysis of ectopic chloroplast development in green curd cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. var. botrytis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chloroplasts are the green plastids where photosynthesis takes place. The biogenesis of chloroplasts requires the coordinate expression of both nuclear and chloroplast genes and is regulated by developmental and environmental signals. Despite extensive studies of this process, the genetic basis and ...

  3. Comparison of two sample preparation techniques for sniffing experiments with broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica Plenck).

    PubMed

    Ulrich, D; Krumbein, A; Schonhof, I; Hoberg, E

    1998-12-01

    The suitability of the headspace solid phase microextraction (HSSPME) for gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) with aroma extract dilution analysis in comparison to the dynamic head space sampling on a Tenax trap was tested exemplarily by the aroma volatiles of fresh broccoli. A high number of odour sensations in qualitative olfactometry was registered with both sample preparation techniques. The key aroma compounds of the fresh broccoli material are represented by high flavour dilution factors with dynamic head space sampling and headspace SPME. The SPME method has found to be a convenient and fast technique suitable especially for qualitative GC-O. The adsorption selectivity of the fiber and the substance discrimination have to be taken into account for quantitative use like aroma extract dilution analysis. PMID:9881367

  4. The role of BoFLC2 in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis L.) reproductive development.

    PubMed

    Ridge, Stephen; Brown, Philip H; Hecht, Valérie; Driessen, Ronald G; Weller, James L

    2015-01-01

    In agricultural species that are sexually propagated or whose marketable organ is a reproductive structure, management of the flowering process is critical. Inflorescence development in cauliflower is particularly complex, presenting unique challenges for those seeking to predict and manage flowering time. In this study, an integrated physiological and molecular approach was used to clarify the environmental control of cauliflower reproductive development at the molecular level. A functional allele of BoFLC2 was identified for the first time in an annual brassica, along with an allele disrupted by a frameshift mutation (boflc2). In a segregating F₂ population derived from a cross between late-flowering (BoFLC2) and early-flowering (boflc2) lines, this gene behaved in a dosage-dependent manner and accounted for up to 65% of flowering time variation. Transcription of BoFLC genes was reduced by vernalization, with the floral integrator BoFT responding inversely. Overall expression of BoFT was significantly higher in early-flowering boflc2 lines, supporting the idea that BoFLC2 plays a key role in maintaining the vegetative state. A homologue of Arabidopsis VIN3 was isolated for the first time in a brassica crop species and was up-regulated by two days of vernalization, in contrast to findings in Arabidopsis where prolonged exposure to cold was required to elicit up-regulation. The correlations observed between gene expression and flowering time in controlled-environment experiments were validated with gene expression analyses of cauliflowers grown outdoors under 'natural' vernalizing conditions, indicating potential for transcript levels of flowering genes to form the basis of predictive assays for curd initiation and flowering time. PMID:25355864

  5. Histopathology of Brassica oleracea var. capitata subvar. alba infected with Heterodera cruciferae Franklin, 1945 (Tylenchida: Heteroderidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Because anatomical changes induced by the cabbage cyst nematode (Heterodera cruciferae) have been insufficiently characterized, here we describe these changes in the root tissues of white head cabbage varieties commonly grown in the Black Sea Region of Turkey, where cabbage-growing areas are heavily...

  6. Anatomic Characteristics Associated with Head Splitting in Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.).

    PubMed

    Pang, Wenxing; Kim, Yoon-Young; Li, Xiaonan; Choi, Su Ryun; Wang, Yunbo; Sung, Chang-Keun; Im, Subin; Ramchiary, Nirala; Zhou, Guangsheng; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Cabbage belonging to Brassicaceae family is one of the most important vegetables cultivated worldwide. The economically important part of cabbage crop is head, formed by leaves which may be of splitting and non-splitting types. Cabbage varieties showing head splitting causes huge loss to the farmers and therefore finding the molecular and structural basis of splitting types would be helpful to breeders. To determine which anatomical characteristics were related to head-splitting in cabbage, we analyzed two contrasting cabbage lines and their offspring using a field emission scanning electron microscope. The inbred line "747" is an early head-splitting type, while the inbred line "748" is a head-splitting-resistant type. The petiole cells of "747" seems to be larger than those of "748" at maturity; however, there was no significant difference in petiole cell size at both pre-heading and maturity stages. The lower epidermis cells of "747" were larger than those of "748" at the pre-heading and maturity stages. "747" had thinner epidermis cell wall than "748" at maturity stage, however, there was no difference of the epidermis cell wall thickness in the two lines at the pre-heading stage. The head-splitting plants in the F1 and F2 population inherited the larger cell size and thinner cell walls of epidermis cells in the petiole. In the petiole cell walls of "747" and the F1 and F2 plants that formed splitting heads, the cellulose microfibrils were loose and had separated from each other. These findings verified that anomalous cellulose microfibrils, larger cell size and thinner-walled epidermis cells are important genetic factors that make cabbage heads prone to splitting. PMID:26536356

  7. The transfer of 'Polima' cytoplasmic male sterility from oilseed rape (Brassica napus) to broccoli (B. oleracea) by protoplast fusion.

    PubMed

    Yarrow, S A; Burnett, L A; Wildeman, R P; Kemble, R J

    1990-08-01

    Protoplast fusion was utilised to transfer Polima type cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) from Brassica napus, canola cv. Polima Karat (Pol-Karat) to B. oleracea, broccoli, var. "Green Comet". Southern and RFLP analysis confirmed that four cybrids possessed nuclear genomes of broccoli with Polima mitochondria and chloroplasts. A fifth cybrid was a nuclear hybrid between broccoli and Pol-Karat, with Polima mitochondria and chloroplasts of broccoli. The broccoli type cybrids were morphologically similar to "Green Comet", while the hybrid type was an intermediate of the two fusion parents. Flowers on the cybrids were distinctive in that although they possessed a morphology typical of Polima, they had very reduced petals. The broccoli type cybrids exhibited some female fertility, albeit low, establishing potential for F1 hybrid production. PMID:24226699

  8. Acaricide activity in vitro of Acmella oleracea against Rhipicephalus microplus.

    PubMed

    Castro, K N C; Lima, D F; Vasconcelos, L C; Leite, J R S A; Santos, R C; Paz Neto, A A; Costa-Júnior, L M

    2014-10-01

    Cattle tick control has been limited by the resistance of these parasites to synthetic acaricides. Natural products are a possible alternative as they have different mechanisms of action. Acmella oleracea is a native plant with a large cultivated area in the Amazon region and could be easily used for large-scale preparation of a commercial product. This study evaluated the in vitro action of the hexane extract of the aerial parts of A. oleracea on larvae and engorged females of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus. Spilanthol was the major constituent with a content of 14.8% in the extract. The hexane extract of A. oleracea was highly effective against larvae of R. microplus with an LC50 of 0.8 mg mL(-1). Against engorged females, hexane extract of A. oleracea reduced oviposition and hatchability of eggs with an LC50 of 79.7 mg mL(-1). Larvae and engorged females were killed by the hexane extract with high efficiency (>95%) at concentrations of 3.1 and 150.0 mg mL(-1), respectively. These results demonstrate that the hexane extract of A. oleracea has significant activity against R. microplus and has potential to be developed into formulations for tick control. PMID:25033813

  9. Red Cabbage (Brassica oleracea) Ameliorates Diabetic Nephropathy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kataya, Hazem A. H.

    2008-01-01

    The protective action against oxidative stress of red cabbage (Brassica oleracea) extract was investigated. Diabetes was induced in male Wistar rats using streptozotocin (60 mg/kg body weight). Throughout the experimental period (60 days), diabetic rats exhibited many symptoms including loss of body weight, hyperglycemia, polyuria, polydipsia, renal enlargement and renal dysfunction. Significant increase in malondialdehyde, a lipid peroxidation marker, was observed in diabetic kidney. This was accompanied by a significant increase in reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase activity and a decrease in catalase activity and in the total antioxidant capacity of the kidneys. Daily oral ingestion (1 g/kg body weight) of B. oleracea extract for 60 days reversed the adverse effect of diabetes in rats. B. oleracea extract lowered blood glucose levels and restored renal function and body weight loss. In addition, B. oleracea extract attenuated the adverse effect of diabetes on malondialdehyde, glutathione and superoxide dismutase activity as well as catalase activity and total antioxidant capacity of diabetic kidneys. In conclusion, the antioxidant and antihyperglycemic properties of B. oleracea extract may offer a potential therapeutic source for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:18830445

  10. The broccoli (Brassica oleracea) phloem tissue proteome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The transport of sugars, hormones, amino acids, proteins, sugar alcohols, and other organic compounds from the sites of synthesis to the sites of use or storage occurs through the conducting cells of the phloem. To better understand these processes a comprehensive understanding of the proteins involved is required. While a considerable amount of data has been obtained from proteomic analyses of phloem sap, this has mainly served to identify the soluble proteins that are translocated through the phloem network. Results In order to obtain more comprehensive proteomic data from phloem tissue we developed a simple dissection procedure to isolate phloem tissue from Brassica oleracea. The presence of a high density of phloem sieve elements was confirmed using light microscopy and fluorescently labeled sieve element-specific antibodies. To increase the depth of the proteomic analysis for membrane bound and associated proteins, soluble proteins were extracted first and subsequent extractions were carried out using two different detergents (SDS and CHAPSO). Across all three extractions almost four hundred proteins were identified and each extraction method added to the analysis demonstrating the utility of an approach combining several extraction protocols. Conclusions The phloem was found to be enriched in proteins associated with biotic and abiotic stress responses and structural proteins. Subsequent expression analysis identified a number of genes that appear to be expressed exclusively or at very high levels in phloem tissue, including genes that are known to express specifically in the phloem as well as novel phloem genes. PMID:24195484

  11. Portulaca oleracea L.: A Review of Phytochemistry and Pharmacological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan-Xi; Xin, Hai-Liang; Rahman, Khalid; Wang, Su-Juan; Peng, Cheng; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Portulaca oleracea L., belonging to the Portulacaceae family, is commonly known as purslane in English and Ma-Chi-Xian in Chinese. It is a warm-climate, herbaceous succulent annual plant with a cosmopolitan distribution. It is eaten extensively as a potherb and added in soups and salads around the Mediterranean and tropical Asian countries and has been used as a folk medicine in many countries. Diverse compounds have been isolated from Portulaca oleracea, such as flavonoids, alkaloids, polysaccharides, fatty acids, terpenoids, sterols, proteins vitamins and minerals. Portulaca oleracea possesses a wide spectrum of pharmacological properties such as neuroprotective, antimicrobial, antidiabetic, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiulcerogenic, and anticancer activities. However, few molecular mechanisms of action are known. This review provides a summary of phytochemistry and pharmacological effects of this plant. PMID:25692148

  12. Phylogeny of Phaeomollisia piceae gen. sp. nov.: a dark, septate, conifer-needle endophyte and its relationships to Phialocephala and Acephala.

    PubMed

    Grünig, Christoph R; Queloz, Valentin; Duò, Angelo; Sieber, Thomas N

    2009-02-01

    Dark, septate endophytes (DSE) were isolated from roots and needles of dwarf Picea abies and from roots of Vaccinium spp. growing on a permafrost site in the Jura Mountains in Switzerland. Two of the isolates sporulated after incubation for more than one year at 4 degrees C. One of them was a hitherto undescribed helotialean ascomycete Phaeomollisia piceae gen. sp. nov., the other was a new species of Phialocephala, P. glacialis sp. nov. Both species are closely related to DSE of the Phialocephala fortinii s. lat.-Acephala applanata species complex (PAC) as revealed by phylogenetic analyses of the ITS and 18S rDNA regions. Morphologically dissimilar fungi, such as Vibrissea and Loramyces species, are phylogenetically also closely linked to the new species and the PAC. Cadophora lagerbergii and C. (Phialophora) botulispora are moved to Phialocephala because Phialocephala dimorphospora and P. repens are the closest relatives. Several Mollisia species were closely related to the new species and the PAC according to ITS sequence comparisons. One DSE from needles of Abies alba and one from shoots of Castanea sativa formed Cystodendron anamorphs in culture. Their identical 18S sequences and almost identical ITS sequences indicated Mollisia species as closest relatives, suggesting that Mollisia species are highly euryoecious. PMID:19015028

  13. Portulaca oleracea extracts protect human keratinocytes and fibroblasts from UV-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Suyeon; Kim, Ki Ho; Park, Changhoon; Lee, Jong-Suk; Kim, Young Heui

    2014-10-01

    Portulaca oleracea extracts, known as Ma Chi Hyun in the traditional Korean medicine, show a variety of biomedical efficacies including those in anti-inflammation and anti-allergy. In this study, we investigate the protective activity of the P. oleracea extracts against UVB-induced damage in human epithelial keratinocytes and fibroblasts by several apoptosis-related tests. The results suggest that P. oleracea extracts have protective effects from UVB-induced apoptosis. PMID:25234830

  14. Economics of static VAR compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, F.L.; DeMarco, C.; Jung, T.H. . Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1992-09-01

    This project was initiated in anticipation of widened use of static VAR (volt-ampere-reactive) compensation on US bulk-power transmission systems to increase levels of secure power transfer. Project objectives were to deten-nine power system cost savings and reliability benefits resulting from such use. System operating cost and stability probabilities were compared with and without static VAR compensation, applying simulation techniques. For the particular system model studied, there was a 21.4 percent reduction in operating costs taking into account losses added by the static VAR compensator. A procedure was developed to compare instability probabilities for various loadings and static VAR compensator sizes on a power system. For the particular system model studied, the static VAR compensator provided a significant increase in stability but over a narrow range of loading. Static VAR compensation is one of a number of promising FACTS (Flexible AC Transmission System) technologies for handling the demands of increased power transfers on power systems where transmission lines cannot be built or as a short-term altemative to building additional lines.

  15. Mapping loci controlling flowering time in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Camargo, L E; Osborn, T C

    1996-04-01

    The timing of the transition from vegetative to reproductive phase is a major determinant of the morphology and value of Brassica oleracea crops. Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) controlling flowering time in B. oleracea were mapped using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) loci and flowering data of F3 families derived from a cabbage by broccoli cross. Plants were grown in the field, and a total of 15 surveys were made throughout the experiment at 5-15 day intervals, in which plants were inspected for the presence of flower buds or open flowers. The flowering traits used for data analysis were the proportion of annual plants (PF) within each F3 family at the end of the experiment, and a flowering-time index (FT) that combined both qualitative (annual/biennial) and quantitative (days to flowering) information. Two QTLs on different linkage groups were found associated with both PF and FT and one additional QTL was found associated only with FT. When combined in a multi-locus model, all three QTLs explained 54.1% of the phenotypic variation in FT. Epistasis was found between two genomic regions associated with FT. Comparisons of map positions of QTLs in B. oleracea with those in B. napus and B. rapa provided no evidence for conservation of genomic regions associated with flowering time between these species. PMID:24166330

  16. Quantitative proteomics reveals the importance of nitrogen source to control glucosinolate metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Marino, Daniel; Ariz, Idoia; Lasa, Berta; Santamaría, Enrique; Fernández-Irigoyen, Joaquín; González-Murua, Carmen; Aparicio Tejo, Pedro M

    2016-05-01

    Accessing different nitrogen (N) sources involves a profound adaptation of plant metabolism. In this study, a quantitative proteomic approach was used to further understand how the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana adjusts to different N sources when grown exclusively under nitrate or ammonium nutrition. Proteome data evidenced that glucosinolate metabolism was differentially regulated by the N source and that both TGG1 and TGG2 myrosinases were more abundant under ammonium nutrition, which is generally considered to be a stressful situation. Moreover, Arabidopsis plants displayed glucosinolate accumulation and induced myrosinase activity under ammonium nutrition. Interestingly, these results were also confirmed in the economically important crop broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica). Moreover, these metabolic changes were correlated in Arabidopsis with the differential expression of genes from the aliphatic glucosinolate metabolic pathway. This study underlines the importance of nitrogen nutrition and the potential of using ammonium as the N source in order to stimulate glucosinolate metabolism, which may have important applications not only in terms of reducing pesticide use, but also for increasing plants' nutritional value. PMID:27085186

  17. Site-specific gene targeting using transcription activator-like effector (TALE)-based nuclease in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zijian; Li, Nianzu; Huang, Guodong; Xu, Junqiang; Pan, Yu; Wang, Zhimin; Tang, Qinglin; Song, Ming; Wang, Xiaojia

    2013-11-01

    Site-specific recognition modules with DNA nuclease have tremendous potential as molecular tools for genome targeting. The type III transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) contain a DNA binding domain consisting of tandem repeats that can be engineered to bind user-defined specific DNA sequences. We demonstrated that customized TALE-based nucleases (TALENs), constructed using a method called "unit assembly", specifically target the endogenous FRIGIDA gene in Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L. The results indicate that the TALENs bound to the target site and cleaved double-strand DNA in vitro and in vivo, whereas the effector binding elements have a 23 bp spacer. The T7 endonuclease I assay and sequencing data show that TALENs made double-strand breaks, which were repaired by a non-homologous end-joining pathway within the target sequence. These data show the feasibility of applying customized TALENs to target and modify the genome with deletions in those organisms that are still in lacking gene target methods to provide germplasms in breeding improvement. PMID:23870552

  18. Quantitative proteomics reveals the importance of nitrogen source to control glucosinolate metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica oleracea

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Daniel; Ariz, Idoia; Lasa, Berta; Santamaría, Enrique; Fernández-Irigoyen, Joaquín; González-Murua, Carmen; Aparicio Tejo, Pedro M.

    2016-01-01

    Accessing different nitrogen (N) sources involves a profound adaptation of plant metabolism. In this study, a quantitative proteomic approach was used to further understand how the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana adjusts to different N sources when grown exclusively under nitrate or ammonium nutrition. Proteome data evidenced that glucosinolate metabolism was differentially regulated by the N source and that both TGG1 and TGG2 myrosinases were more abundant under ammonium nutrition, which is generally considered to be a stressful situation. Moreover, Arabidopsis plants displayed glucosinolate accumulation and induced myrosinase activity under ammonium nutrition. Interestingly, these results were also confirmed in the economically important crop broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica). Moreover, these metabolic changes were correlated in Arabidopsis with the differential expression of genes from the aliphatic glucosinolate metabolic pathway. This study underlines the importance of nitrogen nutrition and the potential of using ammonium as the N source in order to stimulate glucosinolate metabolism, which may have important applications not only in terms of reducing pesticide use, but also for increasing plants’ nutritional value. PMID:27085186

  19. Red cabbage (Brassica oleracea L.) mediates redox-sensitive amelioration of dyslipidemia and hepatic injury induced by exogenous cholesterol administration.

    PubMed

    Al-Dosari, Mohammed S

    2014-01-01

    The widely used culinary vegetable, red cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. Var. capitata f. rubra), of the Brassicaceae family contains biologically potent anthocyanins and a myriad of antioxidants. Previous studies have shown that the pharmacological effects of red cabbage in vivo are redox-sensitive. The present study explored whether red cabbage modulates various histopathological and biochemical parameters in rats administered with a cholesterol-rich diet (CRD). To this end, prolonged administration of a lyophilized-aqueous extract of red cabbage (250 and 500 mg/kg body weight) significantly blunted the imbalances in lipids, liver enzymes and renal osmolytes induced by the CRD. The effects of red cabbage were compared to simvastatin (30 mg/kg body weight) treated rats. Estimation of malondialdehyde and non-protein sulfhydryls revealed robust antioxidant properties of red cabbage. Histopathological analysis of livers from rats administered with red cabbage showed marked inhibition in inflammatory and necrotic changes triggered by CRD. Similarly, in vitro studies using a 2',7'-Dichlorofluorescein-based assay showed that red cabbage conferred cytoprotective effects in cultured HepG2 cells. In conclusion, the present study discloses the potential therapeutic effects of red cabbage in dyslipidemia as well as hepatic injury, that is at least, partly mediated by its antioxidant properties. PMID:24467544

  20. Ribosomal genes of Histoplasma capsulatum var. duboisii and var. farciminosum.

    PubMed

    Okeke, C N; Kappe, R; Zakikhani, S; Nolte, O; Sonntag, H G

    1998-11-01

    A total of 1704 basepairs of the 18S rDNA of Histoplasma capsulatum var. duboisii (HCD, strain CBS175.57) and H. capsulatum var. farciminosum (HCF, strain CBS478.64) were sequenced (EMBL accession no. Z75306 and no. Z75307). The 18S rDNA of HCD was 100% identical to a published sequence of H. capsulatum var. capsulatum (HCC). The 18S rDNA of HCF showed one transversional point mutation at the nucleotide position 114 (ref. Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Hybridization confirmed that, in the 18S rDNA of two out of five strains of HCF, guanine was substituted for cytosine at the nucleotide position 114. Furthermore, identical group 1C1 introns (403 bp) were found to be inserted after position 1165 in four out of five strains of HCF, including the two strains with point mutations in the 18S rDNA, and a slightly different group 1C1 intron (408 bp) was detected in one strain of HCC without this point mutation. Intraspecific sequence variability in the highly conserved 18S rDNA because of occurrence of introns and mutations as a possible source of error in molecular diagnostics is discussed. In addition, internal transcribed spacer regions between the 18S rDNA and the 5.8S rDNA (ITS1) of three strains of HCF, and one strain each of HCC and HCD showed significant sequence variability between varieties and strains of H. capsulatum. PMID:9916456

  1. Activity of phosphatidylcholine-transfer protein from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaves with mitochondria and chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Julienne, M; Vergnolle, C; Kader, J C

    1981-09-01

    A low-molecular-weight protein catalysing the transfer of phosphatidylcholine from liposomes to mitochondria and chloroplasts has been isolated from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) by chromatography on Sephadex G-75. PMID:7325986

  2. Whole-Genome Mapping Reveals Novel QTL Clusters Associated with Main Agronomic Traits of Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.).

    PubMed

    Lv, Honghao; Wang, Qingbiao; Liu, Xing; Han, Fengqing; Fang, Zhiyuan; Yang, Limei; Zhuang, Mu; Liu, Yumei; Li, Zhansheng; Zhang, Yangyong

    2016-01-01

    We describe a comprehensive quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis for 24 main agronomic traits of cabbage. Field experiments were performed using a 196-line double haploid population in three seasons in 2011 and 2012 to evaluate important agronomic traits related to plant type, leaf, and head traits. In total, 144 QTLs with LOD threshold >3.0 were detected for the 24 agronomic traits: 25 for four plant-type-related traits, 64 for 10 leaf-related traits, and 55 for 10 head-related traits; each QTL explained 6.0-55.7% of phenotype variation. Of the QTLs, 95 had contribution rates higher than 10%, and 51 could be detected in more than one season. Major QTLs included Ph 3.1 (max R (2) = 55.7, max LOD = 28.2) for plant height, Ll 3.2 (max R (2) = 31.7, max LOD = 13.95) for leaf length, and Htd 3.2 (max R (2) = 28.5, max LOD = 9.49) for head transverse diameter; these could all be detected in more than one season. Twelve QTL clusters were detected on eight chromosomes, and the most significant four included Indel481-scaffold18376 (3.20 Mb), with five QTLs for five traits; Indel64-scaffold35418 (2.22 Mb), six QTLs for six traits; scaffold39782-Indel84 (1.78 Mb), 11 QTLs for 11 traits; and Indel353-Indel245 (9.89 Mb), seven QTLs for six traits. Besides, most traits clustered within the same region were significantly correlated with each other. The candidate genes at these regions were also discussed. Robust QTLs and their clusters obtained in this study should prove useful for marker-assisted selection (MAS) in cabbage breeding and in furthering our understanding of the genetic control of these traits. PMID:27458471

  3. The potential to intensify sulforaphane formation in cooked broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) using mustard seeds (Sinapis alba).

    PubMed

    Ghawi, Sameer Khalil; Methven, Lisa; Niranjan, Keshavan

    2013-06-01

    Sulforaphane, a naturally occurring cancer chemopreventive, is the hydrolysis product of glucoraphanin, the main glucosinolate in broccoli. The hydrolysis requires myrosinase isoenzyme to be present in sufficient activity; however, processing leads to its denaturation and hence reduced hydrolysis. In this study, the effect of adding mustard seeds, which contain a more resilient isoform of myrosinase, to processed broccoli was investigated with a view to intensify the formation of sulforaphane. Thermal inactivation of myrosinase from both broccoli and mustard seeds was studied. Thermal degradation of broccoli glucoraphanin was investigated in addition to the effects of thermal processing on the formation of sulforaphane and sulforaphane nitrile. Limited thermal degradation of glucoraphanin (less than 12%) was observed when broccoli was placed in vacuum sealed bag (sous vide) and cooked in a water bath at 100°C for 8 and 12 min. Boiling broccoli in water prevented the formation of any significant levels of sulforaphane due to inactivated myrosinase. However, addition of powdered mustard seeds to the heat processed broccoli significantly increased the formation of sulforaphane. PMID:23411305

  4. Whole-Genome Mapping Reveals Novel QTL Clusters Associated with Main Agronomic Traits of Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata L.)

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Honghao; Wang, Qingbiao; Liu, Xing; Han, Fengqing; Fang, Zhiyuan; Yang, Limei; Zhuang, Mu; Liu, Yumei; Li, Zhansheng; Zhang, Yangyong

    2016-01-01

    We describe a comprehensive quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis for 24 main agronomic traits of cabbage. Field experiments were performed using a 196-line double haploid population in three seasons in 2011 and 2012 to evaluate important agronomic traits related to plant type, leaf, and head traits. In total, 144 QTLs with LOD threshold >3.0 were detected for the 24 agronomic traits: 25 for four plant-type-related traits, 64 for 10 leaf-related traits, and 55 for 10 head-related traits; each QTL explained 6.0–55.7% of phenotype variation. Of the QTLs, 95 had contribution rates higher than 10%, and 51 could be detected in more than one season. Major QTLs included Ph 3.1 (max R2 = 55.7, max LOD = 28.2) for plant height, Ll 3.2 (max R2 = 31.7, max LOD = 13.95) for leaf length, and Htd 3.2 (max R2 = 28.5, max LOD = 9.49) for head transverse diameter; these could all be detected in more than one season. Twelve QTL clusters were detected on eight chromosomes, and the most significant four included Indel481–scaffold18376 (3.20 Mb), with five QTLs for five traits; Indel64–scaffold35418 (2.22 Mb), six QTLs for six traits; scaffold39782–Indel84 (1.78 Mb), 11 QTLs for 11 traits; and Indel353–Indel245 (9.89 Mb), seven QTLs for six traits. Besides, most traits clustered within the same region were significantly correlated with each other. The candidate genes at these regions were also discussed. Robust QTLs and their clusters obtained in this study should prove useful for marker-assisted selection (MAS) in cabbage breeding and in furthering our understanding of the genetic control of these traits. PMID:27458471

  5. Weed control possibilities and harvest strategies for the Omega-3 fatty acid producing crop common purslane (Portulacca oleracea var. sativa)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common purslane is traditionally considered a weed. Recent literature suggests the potential human health benefits of omega-3 fatty acid consumption. Omega-3 fatty acids are found in flax seed oil (LNA) and fish oil (DHA and EPA), but the highest known producer of Omega-3 fatty acid in plant tissu...

  6. Expression Profiling of Glucosinolate Biosynthetic Genes in Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata Inbred Lines Reveals Their Association with Glucosinolate Content.

    PubMed

    Robin, Arif Hasan Khan; Yi, Go-Eun; Laila, Rawnak; Yang, Kiwoung; Park, Jong-In; Kim, Hye Ran; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates are the biochemical compounds that provide defense to plants against pathogens and herbivores. In this study, the relative expression level of 48 glucosinolate biosynthesis genes was explored in four morphologically-different cabbage inbred lines by qPCR analysis. The content of aliphatic and indolic glucosinolate molecules present in those cabbage lines was also estimated by HPLC analysis. The possible association between glucosinolate accumulation and related gene expression level was explored by principal component analysis (PCA). The genotype-dependent variation in the relative expression level of different aliphatic and indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis genes is the novel result of this study. A total of eight different types of glucosinolates, including five aliphatic and three indolic glucosinolates, was detected in four cabbage lines. Three inbred lines BN3383, BN4059 and BN4072 had no glucoraphanin, sinigrin and gluconapin detected, but the inbred line BN3273 had these three aliphatic glucosinolate compounds. PCA revealed that a higher expression level of ST5b genes and lower expression of GSL-OH was associated with the accumulation of these three aliphatic glucosinolate compounds. PCA further revealed that comparatively higher accumulation of neoglucobrassicin in the inbred line, BN4072, was associated with a high level of expression of MYB34 (Bol017062) and CYP81F1 genes. The Dof1 and IQD1 genes probably trans-activated the genes related to biosynthesis of glucoerucin and methoxyglucobrassicin for their comparatively higher accumulation in the BN4059 and BN4072 lines compared to the other two lines, BN3273 and BN3383. A comparatively higher progoitrin level in BN3273 was probably associated with the higher expression level of the GSL-OH gene. The cabbage inbred line BN3383 accounted for the significantly higher relative expression level for the 12 genes out of 48, but this line had comparatively lower total glucosinolates detected compared to the other three cabbage lines. The reason for the genotypic variation in gene expression and glucosinolate accumulation is a subject of further investigation. PMID:27322230

  7. Effect of water content and temperature on inactivation kinetics of myrosinase in broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica).

    PubMed

    Oliviero, T; Verkerk, R; Van Boekel, M A J S; Dekker, M

    2014-11-15

    Broccoli belongs to the Brassicaceae plant family consisting of widely eaten vegetables containing high concentrations of glucosinolates. Enzymatic hydrolysis of glucosinolates by endogenous myrosinase (MYR) can form isothiocyanates with health-promoting activities. The effect of water content (WC) and temperature on MYR inactivation in broccoli was investigated. Broccoli was freeze dried obtaining batches with WC between 10% and 90% (aw from 0.10 to 0.96). These samples were incubated for various times at different temperatures (40-70°C) and MYR activity was measured. The initial MYR inactivation rates were estimated by the first-order reaction kinetic model. MYR inactivation rate constants were lower in the driest samples (10% WC) at all studied temperatures. Samples with 67% and 90% WC showed initial inactivation rate constants all in the same order of magnitude. Samples with 31% WC showed intermediate initial inactivation rate constants. These results are useful to optimise the conditions of drying processes to produce dried broccoli with optimal MYR retention for human health. PMID:24912716

  8. Anti-Diabetic and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Green and Red Kohlrabi Cultivars (Brassica oleracea var. gongylodes)

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyun Ah; Karki, Subash; Ehom, Na-Yeon; Yoon, Mi-Hee; Kim, Eon Ji; Choi, Jae Sue

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-diabetic, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant potential, and total phenolic content (TPC) of green and red kohlrabi cultivars. Anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated via protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP1B) and rat lens aldose reductase inhibitory assays and cell-based lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) inhibitory assays in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. In addition, scavenging assays using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) radical, and peroxynitrite (ONOO−) were used to evaluate antioxidant potential and TPC was selected to assess phytochemical characteristics. Between the two kohlrabi cultivars, red kohlrabi (RK) had two times more TPC than green kohlrabi (GK) and showed significant antioxidant effects in DPPH, ABTS, and ONOO− scavenging assays. Likewise, methanol (MeOH) extracts of RK and GK inhibited LPS-induced NO production in a dose dependent manner that was further clarified by suppression of iNOS and COX-2 protein production. The MeOH extracts of RK and GK exhibited potent inhibitory activities against PTP1B with the corresponding IC50 values of 207±3.48 and 287±3.22 μg/mL, respectively. Interestingly, the RK MeOH extract exhibited significantly stronger anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, and antioxidant effects than that of GK MeOH extract. As a result, our study establishes that RK extract with a higher TPC might be useful as a potent anti-diabetic, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory agent. PMID:25580392

  9. Photoacoustic Study of Fungal Disease of Acai ( Euterpe oleracea) Seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezende, Denise V.; Nunes, O. A. C.; Oliveira, A. C.

    2009-10-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy is introduced as a promising experimental technique to investigate fungus infected Acai ( Euterpe oleracea) seeds. Photoacoustic spectra of healthy and infected Acai seeds with the fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides were recorded firstly in the modulation frequency range of 5Hz to 700 Hz, while keeping the wavelength of excitation radiation of a Xe arc-lamp constant, to ascertain the depth of penetration of infection within the seed and secondly, at variable wavelength (wavelength scanning) in the interval 250nm to 1,000 nm, while keeping the modulation frequency constant. In the former, the photoacoustic signal strength from the infected seed was found higher than that of the healthy one, and has been associated with the appearance of new biomolecules associated with the pathogen infection. In the latter, characteristics peaks and bands were observed in the range from 650 nm to 900 nm ascribed to organic compounds with carboxylates and amines (functional groups) forming the typical metabolic structures of the fungus.

  10. The risks of introduction of the Amazonian palm Euterpe oleracea in the Atlantic rainforest.

    PubMed

    Tiberio, F C S; Sampaio-E-Silva, T A; Matos, D M S; Antunes, A Z

    2016-02-01

    The introduction of a species may alter ecological processes of native populations, such as pollination and dispersal patterns, leading to changes in population structure. When the introduced and the native species are congeners, interference in pollination can also lead to hybridization. We aimed to understand the ecological aspects of Euterpe oleracea introduction in the Atlantic forest and the possible consequences for the conservation of the native congener Euterpe edulis. We analysed the population structure of palm populations, including hybrids, and observed the interaction with frugivorous birds of both palm species after E. oleracea introduction. We observed that E. edulis had significantly lower density and a smaller number of seedlings when occurring with E. oleracea. Native and introduced Euterpe species shared nine frugivorous bird species. E. oleracea and hybrids had dispersed outside the original planting area. Consequently, the risks of introduction of E. oleracea may mostly be related to the disruption of interactions between E. edulis and frugivorous birds and the spontaneous production of hybrids. Finally, the cultivation of E. oleracea and hybrids in Atlantic rainforest could affect the conservation of the already endangered E. edulis. PMID:26909625

  11. Antibacterial Attributes of Apigenin, Isolated from Portulaca oleracea L.

    PubMed Central

    Nayaka, Hanumantappa B.; Londonkar, Ramesh L.; Umesh, Madire K.; Tukappa, Asha

    2014-01-01

    The flavonoid apigenin was isolated from aerial part of P. oleracea L. The dried sample of plant was powdered and subjected to soxhlet extractor by adding 80 mL of ethanol : water (70 : 30). The extract was centrifuged at 11000 rpm for 30 min; supernatant was taken for further use. The fraction was concentrated and subjected to PTLC. The Rf value of isolated apigenin was calculated (0.82). Purified material was also subjected to its IR spectra, LC-MS, NMR, and HPLC for structural elucidation. The apigenin so-obtained was subjected to antibacterial activity on five pathogenic bacterial strains like Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter aerogenes; among all the bacterial strains, Salmonella typhimurium (17.36 ± 0.18) and Proteus mirabilis (19.12 ± 0.01) have shown maximum diameter of inhibition zone for flavonoid and remaining bacterial strains have shown moderate diameter of inhibition zone when compared with control values 14.56 ± 0.21 and 11.68 ± 0.13, respectively. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the flavonoid isolated from P. oleracea L. was tested at the concentration ranging from undiluted sample to 10 mg per mL of concentration. The minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) for the flavonoid for all tested bacterial strains was found to be >4 mg per mL. Hence, the apigenin has antibacterial property and can be used to develop antibacterial drugs. PMID:26904730

  12. Low Temperature Affects Stem Cell Maintenance in Brassica oleracea Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Jennifer; Kodde, Jan; Severing, Edouard I.; Bonnema, Guusje; Angenent, Gerco C.; Immink, Richard G. H.; Groot, Steven P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Most of the above ground tissues in higher plants originate from stem cells located in the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Several plant species can suffer from spontaneous stem cell arrest resulting in lack of further shoot development. In Brassica oleracea this SAM arrest is known as blindness and occurs in an unpredictable manner leading to considerable economic losses for plant raisers and farmers. Detailed analyses of seedlings showed that stem cell arrest is triggered by low temperatures during germination. To induce this arrest reproducibly and to study the effect of the environment, an assay was developed. The role of genetic variation on the susceptibility to develop blind seedlings was analyzed by a quantitative genetic mapping approach, using seeds from a double haploid population from a cross between broccoli and Chinese kale, produced at three locations. The analysis revealed, besides an effect of the seed production location, a region on linkage group C3 associated with blindness sensitivity. A subsequent dynamic genome-wide transcriptome analysis resulted in the identification of around 3000 differentially expressed genes early after blindness induction. A large number of cell cycle genes were en masse induced early during the development of blindness, whereas shortly after, all were down-regulated. This miss-regulation of core cell cycle genes is accompanied with a strong reduction of cells reaching the DNA replication phase. From the differentially expressed genes, 90 were located in the QTL region C3. Among them are two genes belonging to the MINICHROMOSOMAL MAINTENANCE gene family, known to be involved in DNA replication, a RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED gene, a key regulator for cell cycle initiation, and several MutS homologs genes, involved in DNA repair. These genes are potential candidates for being involved in the development of blindness in Brassica oleracea sensitive genotypes. PMID:27375654

  13. Low Temperature Affects Stem Cell Maintenance in Brassica oleracea Seedlings.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Jennifer; Kodde, Jan; Severing, Edouard I; Bonnema, Guusje; Angenent, Gerco C; Immink, Richard G H; Groot, Steven P C

    2016-01-01

    Most of the above ground tissues in higher plants originate from stem cells located in the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Several plant species can suffer from spontaneous stem cell arrest resulting in lack of further shoot development. In Brassica oleracea this SAM arrest is known as blindness and occurs in an unpredictable manner leading to considerable economic losses for plant raisers and farmers. Detailed analyses of seedlings showed that stem cell arrest is triggered by low temperatures during germination. To induce this arrest reproducibly and to study the effect of the environment, an assay was developed. The role of genetic variation on the susceptibility to develop blind seedlings was analyzed by a quantitative genetic mapping approach, using seeds from a double haploid population from a cross between broccoli and Chinese kale, produced at three locations. The analysis revealed, besides an effect of the seed production location, a region on linkage group C3 associated with blindness sensitivity. A subsequent dynamic genome-wide transcriptome analysis resulted in the identification of around 3000 differentially expressed genes early after blindness induction. A large number of cell cycle genes were en masse induced early during the development of blindness, whereas shortly after, all were down-regulated. This miss-regulation of core cell cycle genes is accompanied with a strong reduction of cells reaching the DNA replication phase. From the differentially expressed genes, 90 were located in the QTL region C3. Among them are two genes belonging to the MINICHROMOSOMAL MAINTENANCE gene family, known to be involved in DNA replication, a RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED gene, a key regulator for cell cycle initiation, and several MutS homologs genes, involved in DNA repair. These genes are potential candidates for being involved in the development of blindness in Brassica oleracea sensitive genotypes. PMID:27375654

  14. Microsomal Lyso-Phosphatidic Acid Acyltransferase from a Brassica oleracea Cultivar Incorporates Erucic Acid into the sn-2 Position of Seed Triacylglycerols.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, D. C.; Barton, D. L.; Giblin, E. M.; MacKenzie, S. L.; Van Den Berg, CGJ.; McVetty, PBE.

    1995-01-01

    Developing seeds from Brassica oleracea (L.) var botrytis cv Sesam were examined for the ability to biosynthesize and incorporate erucic acid into triacylglycerols (TAGs). Seed embryos at mid-development contained a high concentration of erucic acid in diacylglycerols and TAGs, and substantial levels were also detected in free fatty acids, acyl-coenzyme A (CoA), phosphatidic acid, and phosphatidylcholine. Homogenates and microsomal fractions from seeds at mid-development produced [14C]eicosenoyl- and [14C]erucoyl-CoAs from [14C]oleoyl-CoA in the presence of malonyl-CoA and reducing equivalents in vitro. These fatty acids were incorporated into TAGs via the Kennedy pathway. However, unlike most Brassicaceae, the B. oleracea was able to insert significant erucic acid into the sn-2 position of TAGs. It was shown that the lyso-phosphatidic acid acyltransferase (LPAT) incorporated erucic acid into the sn-2 position of lyso-phosphatidic acid. The erucoyl-CoA:LPAT activity during seed development and the sn-2 erucic acid content of the TAG fraction in mature seed were compared to those in B. napus, Tropaeolum majus, and Limnanthes douglasii. There was a correlation between the in vitro erucoyl-CoA:LPAT activity and the sn-2 erucic acid content in seed TAGs. To our knowledge, this is the first member of the Brassicaceae reported to have an LPAT able to use erucoyl-CoA. This observation has important implications for efforts being made to increase the erucic acid content in B. napus, to supply strategic industrial feedstocks. PMID:12228602

  15. TabVar: Tabulated Variables

    SciTech Connect

    Bachan, John

    2015-12-15

    TabVar: A Python library for manipulating datasets in the form of tabulated variables. Tables in tabvar contain many columns representing independent variables, but exactly one distinguished column for the dependent variable. Having a single distinguished column allows a natural lifting of arithmetic operators to tables, much (and in fact fully generalizing) multidimensional array arithmetic. The convenient syntax of whole-table arithmetic, along with the usual operations of filtering and aggregation, and all in the setting of python's interactive REPL allows for rapid exploration of datasets.

  16. TabVar: Tabulated Variables

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-12-15

    TabVar: A Python library for manipulating datasets in the form of tabulated variables. Tables in tabvar contain many columns representing independent variables, but exactly one distinguished column for the dependent variable. Having a single distinguished column allows a natural lifting of arithmetic operators to tables, much (and in fact fully generalizing) multidimensional array arithmetic. The convenient syntax of whole-table arithmetic, along with the usual operations of filtering and aggregation, and all in the setting ofmore » python's interactive REPL allows for rapid exploration of datasets.« less

  17. Bioactivities of acai (Euterpe precatoria Mart.) fruit pulp, superior antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties to Euterpe oleracea Mart

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are two predominant palm tree species producing edible fruit known as “açai” found widely dispersed through the Amazon: Euterpe oleracea Mart. and Euterpe precatoria Mart. They differ from each other in terms of how the plants grow and their phytochemical composition. E. oleracea (EO) has rece...

  18. Bioactivities of acai (Euterpe precatoria mart.) fruit pulp, superior antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties to Euterpe oleracea mart

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are two predominant palm tree species producing edible fruit known as "acai" found widely dispersed through the Amazon: Euterpe oleracea Mart. and Euterpe precatoria Mart. They differ from each other in terms of how the plants grow and phytochemical composition. E. oleracea (EO) has received c...

  19. Inhibition of chloroplastic respiration by osmotic dehydration. [Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Willeford, K.O.; Ahluwalia, K.J.K.; Gibbs, M. )

    1989-04-01

    The respiratory capacity of isolated spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) chloroplasts, measured as the rate of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolved from the oxidative pentose phosphate cycle in darkened chloroplasts exogenously supplied with ({sup 14}C)glucose, was progressively diminished by escalating osmotic dehydration with betaine or sorbitol. Comparing the inhibitions of CO{sub 2} evolution generated by osmotic dehydration in chloroplasts given C-1 and C-6 labeled glucose, 54% and 84%, respectively, indicates that osmotic dehydration effects to a greater extent the recycling of the oxidative pentose phosphate intermediates, fructose-6P and glyceraldehyde-3P. Respiratory inhibition in the darkened chloroplast could be alleviated by addition of NH{sub 4}Cl (a stromal alkylating agent), iodoacetamide (an inhibitor of glyceraldehyde-3P dehydrogenase), or glycolate-2P (an inhibitor of phosphofructokinase). It is concluded that the site which primarily mediates respiratory inhibition in the darkened chloroplast occurs at the fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase/phosphofructokinase junction.

  20. Choline oxidation by intact spinach chloroplasts. [Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, P.; Lerma, C.; Hanson, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Plants synthesize betaine by a two-step oxidation of choline (choline ..-->.. betaine aldehyde ..-->.. betaine). Protoplast-derived chloroplasts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) carry out both reactions, more rapidly in light than in darkness. We investigated the light-stimulated oxidation of choline, using spinach chloroplasts isolated directly from leaves. The rates of choline oxidation obtained (dark and light rates: 10-50 and 100-300 nanomoles per hour per milligram chlorophyll, respectively) were approximately 20-fold higher than for protoplast-derived chloroplasts. Betaine aldehyde was the main product. Choline oxidation in darkness and light was suppressed by hypoxia. Neither uncouplers not the Calvin cycle inhibitor glyceraldehyde greatly affected choline oxidation in the light, and maximal choline oxidation was attained far below light saturation of CO/sub 2/ fixation. The light stimulation of choline oxidation was abolished by the PSII inhibitors DCMU and dibromothymoquinone, and was partially restored by adding reduced diaminodurene, an electron donor to PSI. Both methyl viologen and phenazine methosulfate prevented choline oxidation. Adding dihydroxyacetone phosphate, which can generate NADPH in organello, doubled the dark rate of choline oxidation. These results indicate that choline oxidation in chloroplasts requires oxygen, and reducing power generated from PSI. Enzymic reactions consistent with these requirements are discussed.

  1. Functional properties of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) phytochemicals and bioactives.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Joseph L; Moreau, Régis

    2016-08-10

    Overwhelming evidence indicates that diets rich in fruits and vegetables are protective against common chronic diseases, such as cancer, obesity and cardiovascular disease. Leafy green vegetables, in particular, are recognized as having substantial health-promoting activities that are attributed to the functional properties of their nutrients and non-essential chemical compounds. Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) is widely regarded as a functional food due to its diverse nutritional composition, which includes vitamins and minerals, and to its phytochemicals and bioactives that promote health beyond basic nutrition. Spinach-derived phytochemicals and bioactives are able to (i) scavenge reactive oxygen species and prevent macromolecular oxidative damage, (ii) modulate expression and activity of genes involved in metabolism, proliferation, inflammation, and antioxidant defence, and (iii) curb food intake by inducing secretion of satiety hormones. These biological activities contribute to the anti-cancer, anti-obesity, hypoglycemic, and hypolipidemic properties of spinach. Despite these valuable attributes, spinach consumption remains low in comparison to other leafy green vegetables. This review examines the functional properties of spinach in cell culture, animals and humans with a focus on the molecular mechanisms by which spinach-derived non-essential phytochemicals and bioactives, such as glycolipids and thylakoids, impart their health benefits. PMID:27353735

  2. Identification of Antioxidant Capacity -Related QTLs in Brassica oleracea

    PubMed Central

    Sotelo, Tamara; Cartea, María Elena; Velasco, Pablo; Soengas, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Brassica vegetables possess high levels of antioxidant metabolites associated with beneficial health effects including vitamins, carotenoids, anthocyanins, soluble sugars and phenolics. Until now, no reports have been documented on the genetic basis of the antioxidant activity (AA) in Brassicas and the content of metabolites with AA like phenolics, anthocyanins and carotenoids. For this reason, this study aimed to: (1) study the relationship among different electron transfer (ET) methods for measuring AA, (2) study the relationship between these methods and phenolic, carotenoid and anthocyanin content, and (3) find QTLs of AA measured with ET assays and for phenolic, carotenoid and anthocyanin contents in leaves and flower buds in a DH population of B. oleracea as an early step in order to identify genes related to these traits. Low correlation coefficients among different methods for measuring AA suggest that it is necessary to employ more than one method at the same time. A total of 19 QTLs were detected for all traits. For AA methods, seven QTLs were found in leaves and six QTLs were found in flower buds. Meanwhile, for the content of metabolites with AA, two QTLs were found in leaves and four QTLs were found in flower buds. AA of the mapping population is related to phenolic compounds but also to carotenoid content. Three genomic regions determined variation for more than one ET method measuring AA. After the syntenic analysis with A. thaliana, several candidate genes related to phenylpropanoid biosynthesis are proposed for the QTLs found. PMID:25198771

  3. Evaluation of Spinacia oleracea L. leaves mucilage as an innovative suspending agent.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Amit Kumar; Pal, Dilipkumar; Pany, Dipti Ranjan; Mohanty, Biswaranjan

    2010-07-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the mucilage isolated from Spinacia oleracea L. leaves, commonly named spinach (family: Amaranthaceae) as an innovative suspending agent. Zinc oxide suspensions (20% w/v) were prepared using the mucilage of S. oleracea L. leaves as a suspending agent, and it was evaluated for its stability by using parameters like, sedimentation profile, degree of flocculation, and redispersibility. The effect of the tested mucilage on the suspension was compared with various commonly used suspending agents, such as, tragacanth, bentonite, and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (NaCMC) at concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0% w/v. The results obtained indicated that the mucilage of S. oleracea L. leaves could be used as a suspending agent, and the performance was found to be superior to both tragacanth and bentonite. PMID:22247868

  4. Evaluation of Spinacia oleracea L. leaves mucilage as an innovative suspending agent

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Amit Kumar; Pal, Dilipkumar; Pany, Dipti Ranjan; Mohanty, Biswaranjan

    2010-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the mucilage isolated from Spinacia oleracea L. leaves, commonly named spinach (family: Amaranthaceae) as an innovative suspending agent. Zinc oxide suspensions (20% w/v) were prepared using the mucilage of S. oleracea L. leaves as a suspending agent, and it was evaluated for its stability by using parameters like, sedimentation profile, degree of flocculation, and redispersibility. The effect of the tested mucilage on the suspension was compared with various commonly used suspending agents, such as, tragacanth, bentonite, and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (NaCMC) at concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0% w/v. The results obtained indicated that the mucilage of S. oleracea L. leaves could be used as a suspending agent, and the performance was found to be superior to both tragacanth and bentonite. PMID:22247868

  5. Immobilization of enzymatic extracts of Portulaca oleracea cv. roots for oxidizing aqueous bisphenol A.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Kazuki; Kaneda, Hirokazu; Harada, Kazuo; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Hirata, Kazumasa

    2015-05-01

    Water pollution from the release of industrial wastewater is a serious problem for almost every industry. Enzymes from portulaca, Portulaca oleracea cv., have been investigated for their ability to degrade bisphenol A (BPA), one of the well-known estrogenic pollutants. Enzymatic crude extracts from P. oleracea cv. roots were immobilized on aminopropyl-modified glass beads. They maintained BPA metabolic activity over a broad range of pH values and temperatures. The immobilized enzyme was reusable with more than 50 % of its initial activity retained after 12 batch reactions and no loss of activity after storage for 1 month at -30 °C. Thus, the immobilization of extracts from P. oleracea cv. roots is a useful method for removing BPA from industrial wastewater. PMID:25700813

  6. Transcriptome and methylome profiling reveals relics of genome dominance in the mesopolyploid Brassica oleracea

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Brassica oleracea is a valuable vegetable species that has contributed to human health and nutrition for hundreds of years and comprises multiple distinct cultivar groups with diverse morphological and phytochemical attributes. In addition to this phenotypic wealth, B. oleracea offers unique insights into polyploid evolution, as it results from multiple ancestral polyploidy events and a final Brassiceae-specific triplication event. Further, B. oleracea represents one of the diploid genomes that formed the economically important allopolyploid oilseed, Brassica napus. A deeper understanding of B. oleracea genome architecture provides a foundation for crop improvement strategies throughout the Brassica genus. Results We generate an assembly representing 75% of the predicted B. oleracea genome using a hybrid Illumina/Roche 454 approach. Two dense genetic maps are generated to anchor almost 92% of the assembled scaffolds to nine pseudo-chromosomes. Over 50,000 genes are annotated and 40% of the genome predicted to be repetitive, thus contributing to the increased genome size of B. oleracea compared to its close relative B. rapa. A snapshot of both the leaf transcriptome and methylome allows comparisons to be made across the triplicated sub-genomes, which resulted from the most recent Brassiceae-specific polyploidy event. Conclusions Differential expression of the triplicated syntelogs and cytosine methylation levels across the sub-genomes suggest residual marks of the genome dominance that led to the current genome architecture. Although cytosine methylation does not correlate with individual gene dominance, the independent methylation patterns of triplicated copies suggest epigenetic mechanisms play a role in the functional diversification of duplicate genes. PMID:24916971

  7. Natural habitat of Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii.

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, D H; Pfeiffer, T J

    1990-01-01

    Environmental isolations have established that Cryptococcus neoformans var. gattii appears to have a specific ecological association with Eucalyptus camaldulensis. So far, we have isolated C. neoformans var. gattii on 35 separate occasions, all from samples associated with E. camaldulensis. The global distribution of E. camaldulensis appears to correspond to the epidemiologic distribution of cryptococcosis caused by C. neoformans var. gattii. No other environmental source for the fungus has yet been detected, and no other eucalypt has the distribution pattern corresponding to reported cases caused by this fungus. These findings may provided an explanation for the high incidence of infections caused by C. neoformans var. gattii in Australian aborigines living in the Northern Territory and for its low worldwide incidence in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients. Images PMID:2199524

  8. "Var Teatre"--A Pioneer Turns 40.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Pamela L.

    1984-01-01

    Describes the Stockholm Municipal Youth and Children's theatre ("Var Teatre"), an institution of 14 theatres and attendant professional staff devoted exclusively to drama activities for children and teenagers. (PD)

  9. Metabolism of the insecticide metofluthrin in cabbage (Brassica oleracea).

    PubMed

    Ando, Daisuke; Fukushima, Masao; Fujisawa, Takuo; Katagi, Toshiyuki

    2012-03-14

    The metabolic fate of metofluthrin [2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-4-(methoxymethyl)benzyl (E,Z)-(1R,3R)-2,2-dimethyl-3-(prop-1-enyl)cyclopropanecarboxylate] separately labeled with (14)C at the carbonyl carbon and the α-position of the 4-methoxymethylbenzyl ring was studied in cabbage ( Brassica oleracea ). An acetonitrile solution of (14)C-metofluthrin at 431 g ai ha(-1) was once applied topically to cabbage leaves at head-forming stage, and the plants were grown for up to 14 days. Each isomer of metofluthrin applied onto the leaf surface rapidly volatilized into the air and was scarcely translocated to the untreated portion. On the leaf surface, metofluthrin was primarily degraded through ozonolysis of the propenyl side chain to produce the secondary ozonide, which further decomposed to the corresponding aldehyde and carboxylic acid derivatives. In the leaf tissues, the 1R-trans-Z isomer was mainly metabolized to its dihydrodiol derivative probably via an epoxy intermediate followed by saccharide conjugation in parallel with the ester cleavage, whereas no specific metabolite was dominant for the 1R-trans-E isomer. Isomerization of metofluthrin at the cyclopropyl ring was negligible for both isomers. In this study, the chemical structure of each secondary ozonide derivative was fully elucidated by the various modes of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy together with cochromatography with the synthetic standard, and their cis/trans configuration was examined by the nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) difference NMR spectrum. PMID:22224911

  10. 4D-Var Developement at GMAO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelc, Joanna S.; Todling, Ricardo; Akkraoui, Amal El

    2014-01-01

    The Global Modeling and Assimilation Offce (GMAO) is currently using an IAU-based 3D-Var data assimilation system. GMAO has been experimenting with a 3D-Var-hybrid version of its data assimilation system (DAS) for over a year now, which will soon become operational and it will rapidly progress toward a 4D-EnVar. Concurrently, the machinery to exercise traditional 4DVar is in place and it is desirable to have a comparison of the traditional 4D approach with the other available options, and evaluate their performance in the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) DAS. This work will also explore the possibility for constructing a reduced order model (ROM) to make traditional 4D-Var computationally attractive for increasing model resolutions. Part of the research on ROM will be to search for a suitably acceptable space to carry on the corresponding reduction. This poster illustrates how the IAU-based 4D-Var assimilation compares with our currently used IAU-based 3D-Var.

  11. Economics of static VAR compensation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, F.L.; DeMarco, C.; Jung, T.H.

    1992-09-01

    This project was initiated in anticipation of widened use of static VAR (volt-ampere-reactive) compensation on US bulk-power transmission systems to increase levels of secure power transfer. Project objectives were to deten-nine power system cost savings and reliability benefits resulting from such use. System operating cost and stability probabilities were compared with and without static VAR compensation, applying simulation techniques. For the particular system model studied, there was a 21.4 percent reduction in operating costs taking into account losses added by the static VAR compensator. A procedure was developed to compare instability probabilities for various loadings and static VAR compensator sizes on a power system. For the particular system model studied, the static VAR compensator provided a significant increase in stability but over a narrow range of loading. Static VAR compensation is one of a number of promising FACTS (Flexible AC Transmission System) technologies for handling the demands of increased power transfers on power systems where transmission lines cannot be built or as a short-term altemative to building additional lines.

  12. Antioxidant capacities of seven flavonoid compounds isolated from pulp of acai fruit (Euterpe oleracea)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pulp of açai fruit (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) has been demonstrated to exhibit extremely high antioxidant capacity. Seven major flavonoids were isolated from freeze-dried acai pulp by various chromatographic methods. Their structures were elucidated as orientin (1), homoorientin (2), vitexin (3), ...

  13. Phytochemical and nutrient composition of the freeze-dried amazonian palm berry, Euterpe oleraceae mart. (acai)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Euterpe oleraceae is a large palm tree indigenous to the Amazon River and its tributaries and estuaries in South America. Its fruit, known as acai, is of great economic value to native people. In this study, a standardized freeze-dried acai fruit pulp/skin powder was used for all analyses and tests....

  14. Colonization of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) by GFP-tagged verticillium dahliae.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soilborne fungus, Verticillium dahliae, causes wilt in a wide range of hosts, including spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). The interaction between a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged V. dahliae strain and spinach was studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The roots of spinach seedlings...

  15. Genetic diversity and association analysis of leafminer (Liriomyza langei) resistance in spinach (Spinacia oleracea)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leafminer (Liriomyza spp.) is a major insect pest of many important agricultural crops, including spinach (Spinacia oleracea). Use of genetic resistance is an efficient, economic and environment-friendly method to control this pest. The objective of this research was to conduct association analysis ...

  16. High Density Brassica Oleracea Linkage Map: Identification of Useful New Linkages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We constructed a 1257-marker, high-density genetic map of Brassica oleracea spanning 703cM in nine linkage groups, named LG1-LG9. It was developed in a F2 segregating population of 143 individuals obtained by crossing two double-haploid plants of broccoli Early-Big and cauliflower An-Nan Early. The...

  17. Flavonoids from acai (euterpe oleracea mart.) Pulp and their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five flavonoids, (2S,3S)-dihyrokaempferol 3-O-beta-D-glucoside (1) and its isomer (2R,3R)-dihydrokaempferol 3-O-'-D-glucoside (2) , isovitexin (3), velutin (4) and 5,4'-dihydroxy-7,3',5'-trimethoxyflavone (5), were isolated from acai (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) pulp. The structures of these compounds ...

  18. Functional alleles of the flowering time regulator FRIGIDA in the Brassica oleracea genome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Plants adopt different reproductive strategies as an adaptation to growth in a range of climates. In Arabidopsis thaliana FRIGIDA (FRI) confers a vernalization requirement and thus winter annual habit by increasing the expression of the MADS box transcriptional repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). Variation at FRI plays a major role in A. thaliana life history strategy, as independent loss-of-function alleles that result in a rapid-cycling habit in different accessions, appear to have evolved many times. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize orthologues of FRI in Brassica oleracea. Results We describe the characterization of FRI from Brassica oleracea and identify the two B. oleracea FRI orthologues (BolC.FRI.a and BolC.FRI.b). These show extensive amino acid conservation in the central and C-terminal regions to FRI from other Brassicaceae, including A. thaliana, but have a diverged N-terminus. The genes map to two of the three regions of B. oleracea chromosomes syntenic to part of A. thaliana chromosome 5 suggesting that one of the FRI copies has been lost since the ancient triplication event that formed the B. oleracea genome. This genomic position is not syntenic with FRI in A. thaliana and comparative analysis revealed a recombination event within the A. thaliana FRI promoter. This relocated A. thaliana FRI to chromosome 4, very close to the nucleolar organizer region, leaving a fragment of FRI in the syntenic location on A. thaliana chromosome 5. Our data show this rearrangement occurred after the divergence from A. lyrata. We explored the allelic variation at BolC.FRI.a within cultivated B. oleracea germplasm and identified two major alleles, which appear equally functional both to each other and A. thaliana FRI, when expressed as fusions in A. thaliana. Conclusions We identify the two Brassica oleracea FRI genes, one of which we show through A. thaliana complementation experiments is functional, and show their genomic location is

  19. Scopafungin, a Crystalline Antibiotic Produced by Streptomyces hygroscopicus var. enhygrus var. nova

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, LeRoy E.; Dietz, Alma

    1971-01-01

    Scopafungin (U-29,479) is a crystalline, nonpolyenic antimicrobial agent obtained from the culture broth of Streptomyces hygroscopicus var. enhygrus var. nova UC-2397. Scopafungin inhibits, in vitro, a variety of pathogenic fungi, yeasts, and gram-positive bacteria. PMID:4940870

  20. Changes in the Proteome of Xylem Sap in Brassica oleracea in Response to Fusarium oxysporum Stress.

    PubMed

    Pu, Zijing; Ino, Yoko; Kimura, Yayoi; Tago, Asumi; Shimizu, Motoki; Natsume, Satoshi; Sano, Yoshitaka; Fujimoto, Ryo; Kaneko, Kentaro; Shea, Daniel J; Fukai, Eigo; Fuji, Shin-Ichi; Hirano, Hisashi; Okazaki, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. conlutinans (Foc) is a serious root-invading and xylem-colonizing fungus that causes yellowing in Brassica oleracea. To comprehensively understand the interaction between F. oxysporum and B. oleracea, composition of the xylem sap proteome of the non-infected and Foc-infected plants was investigated in both resistant and susceptible cultivars using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) after in-solution digestion of xylem sap proteins. Whole genome sequencing of Foc was carried out and generated a predicted Foc protein database. The predicted Foc protein database was then combined with the public B. oleracea and B. rapa protein databases downloaded from Uniprot and used for protein identification. About 200 plant proteins were identified in the xylem sap of susceptible and resistant plants. Comparison between the non-infected and Foc-infected samples revealed that Foc infection causes changes to the protein composition in B. oleracea xylem sap where repressed proteins accounted for a greater proportion than those of induced in both the susceptible and resistant reactions. The analysis on the proteins with concentration change > = 2-fold indicated a large portion of up- and down-regulated proteins were those acting on carbohydrates. Proteins with leucine-rich repeats and legume lectin domains were mainly induced in both resistant and susceptible system, so was the case of thaumatins. Twenty-five Foc proteins were identified in the infected xylem sap and 10 of them were cysteine-containing secreted small proteins that are good candidates for virulence and/or avirulence effectors. The findings of differential response of protein contents in the xylem sap between the non-infected and Foc-infected samples as well as the Foc candidate effectors secreted in xylem provide valuable insights into B. oleracea-Foc interactions. PMID:26870056

  1. Changes in the Proteome of Xylem Sap in Brassica oleracea in Response to Fusarium oxysporum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Zijing; Ino, Yoko; Kimura, Yayoi; Tago, Asumi; Shimizu, Motoki; Natsume, Satoshi; Sano, Yoshitaka; Fujimoto, Ryo; Kaneko, Kentaro; Shea, Daniel J.; Fukai, Eigo; Fuji, Shin-Ichi; Hirano, Hisashi; Okazaki, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. conlutinans (Foc) is a serious root-invading and xylem-colonizing fungus that causes yellowing in Brassica oleracea. To comprehensively understand the interaction between F. oxysporum and B. oleracea, composition of the xylem sap proteome of the non-infected and Foc-infected plants was investigated in both resistant and susceptible cultivars using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) after in-solution digestion of xylem sap proteins. Whole genome sequencing of Foc was carried out and generated a predicted Foc protein database. The predicted Foc protein database was then combined with the public B. oleracea and B. rapa protein databases downloaded from Uniprot and used for protein identification. About 200 plant proteins were identified in the xylem sap of susceptible and resistant plants. Comparison between the non-infected and Foc-infected samples revealed that Foc infection causes changes to the protein composition in B. oleracea xylem sap where repressed proteins accounted for a greater proportion than those of induced in both the susceptible and resistant reactions. The analysis on the proteins with concentration change > = 2-fold indicated a large portion of up- and down-regulated proteins were those acting on carbohydrates. Proteins with leucine-rich repeats and legume lectin domains were mainly induced in both resistant and susceptible system, so was the case of thaumatins. Twenty-five Foc proteins were identified in the infected xylem sap and 10 of them were cysteine-containing secreted small proteins that are good candidates for virulence and/or avirulence effectors. The findings of differential response of protein contents in the xylem sap between the non-infected and Foc-infected samples as well as the Foc candidate effectors secreted in xylem provide valuable insights into B. oleracea-Foc interactions. PMID:26870056

  2. Cytotoxic effects of Euterpe oleracea Mart. in malignant cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Euterpe oleracea Mart., a plant from the Amazon region, is commonly known as açaí or juçara; it has high nutritional value and elevated levels of lipids, proteins, and minerals. Açaí is an abundant and much consumed fruit by the Amazon local population, and studies have demonstrated that it is rich in phytochemicals with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities. Therefore, the aim of this study was to test this plant for anticancer activity in different human malignant cell lines. Methods Cell lines derived from breast and colorectal adenocarcinomas were treated with 10, 20, and 40 μg/mL of bark, seed, and total açaí fruit hydroalcoholic extracts for 24 and 48 h. After treatment, cell viability was measured using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays, and cell morphological features were observed by light and transmission electron microscopy. The type of cell death was also evaluated. The data were analyzed statistically by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by Dunnett’s or Tukey’s post hoc tests, as appropriate. Results We observed that of all the cell lines tested, MCF-7 was the only line that responded to açaí treatment. The extracts caused significant reduction (p < 0.01) in cell viability and altered cell morphological features by inducing the appearance of autophagic vacuoles, as observed by transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, increased expression of LC3BII, a protein marker of autophagosome formation, was observed by western blotting. Caspase Glo™ assays and morphologic observations by DAPI nuclear staining and transmission electron microscopy did not indicate any apoptotic events. Conclusions The present study demonstrated that açaí possesses antitumorigenic potential in the MCF-7 cell line. Further studies are needed to identify the compound (s) responsible for this cytotoxic activity and the molecular target in the cell. This discovery of the

  3. Volatiles of Chrysanthemum zawadskii var. latilobum K

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Gun-Hee

    2012-01-01

    The volatile aroma constituents of Chrysanthemum zawadskii var. latilobum K. were separated by hydro distillation extraction (HDE) method using a Clevenger-type apparatus, and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The yield of C. zawadskii var. latilobum K. flower essential oil (FEO) was 0.12% (w/w) and the color was light green. Fifty-five volatile chemical components, which make up 88.38% of the total aroma composition, were tentatively characterized. C. zawadskii var. latilobum K. FEOs contained 27 hydrocarbons, 12 alcohols, 7 ketones, 4 esters, 1 aldehyde, 1 amine, and 3 miscellaneous components. The major functional groups were terpene alcohol and ketone. Borneol (12.96), (±)-7-epi-amiteol (12.60), and camphor (10.54%) were the predominant volatiles. These compounds can be used in food and pharmaceutical industries due to their active bio-functional properties. PMID:24471090

  4. Volatiles of Chrysanthemum zawadskii var. latilobum K.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kyung-Mi; Kim, Gun-Hee

    2012-09-01

    The volatile aroma constituents of Chrysanthemum zawadskii var. latilobum K. were separated by hydro distillation extraction (HDE) method using a Clevenger-type apparatus, and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The yield of C. zawadskii var. latilobum K. flower essential oil (FEO) was 0.12% (w/w) and the color was light green. Fifty-five volatile chemical components, which make up 88.38% of the total aroma composition, were tentatively characterized. C. zawadskii var. latilobum K. FEOs contained 27 hydrocarbons, 12 alcohols, 7 ketones, 4 esters, 1 aldehyde, 1 amine, and 3 miscellaneous components. The major functional groups were terpene alcohol and ketone. Borneol (12.96), (±)-7-epi-amiteol (12.60), and camphor (10.54%) were the predominant volatiles. These compounds can be used in food and pharmaceutical industries due to their active bio-functional properties. PMID:24471090

  5. Genome-wide comparative analysis of the transposable elements in the related species Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Wessler, Susan R

    2004-04-13

    Transposable elements (TEs) are the major component of plant genomes where they contribute significantly to the >1,000-fold genome size variation. To understand the dynamics of TE-mediated genome expansion, we have undertaken a comparative analysis of the TEs in two related organisms: the weed Arabidopsis thaliana (125 megabases) and Brassica oleracea ( approximately 600 megabases), a species with many crop plants. Comparison of the whole genome sequence of A. thaliana with a partial draft of B. oleracea has permitted an estimation of the patterns of TE amplification, diversification, and loss that has occurred in related species since their divergence from a common ancestor. Although we find that nearly all TE lineages are shared, the number of elements in each lineage is almost always greater in B. oleracea. Class 1 (retro) elements are the most abundant TE class in both species with LTR and non-LTR elements comprising the largest fraction of each genome. However, several families of class 2 (DNA) elements have amplified to very high copy number in B. oleracea where they have contributed significantly to genome expansion. Taken together, the results of this analysis indicate that amplification of both class 1 and class 2 TEs is responsible, in part, for B. oleracea genome expansion since divergence from a common ancestor with A. thaliana. In addition, the observation that B. oleracea and A. thaliana share virtually all TE lineages makes it unlikely that wholesale removal of TEs is responsible for the compact genome of A. thaliana. PMID:15064405

  6. VarSITI - SCOSTEP's scientific program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgieva, Katya; Shiokawa, Kazuo

    2016-07-01

    With the aim to promote international scientific activity in the different branches of solar terrestrial physics and its application for the benefit of humanity, SCOSTEP runs long-term (4-5 years) international interdisciplinary scientific programs. The current SCOSTEP's scientific program (2014-2018) is VarSITI - Variability of the Sun and Its Terrestrial Impacts. It has four scientific projects covering solar terrestrial problems all the way from the Sun through the interplanetary space, magnetosphere, ionosphere, and down to the Earth's atmosphere. We will present the VarSITI's projects and activities, and will highlight some of the results so far and plans for the future.

  7. Fluorescence detection of tyrosinase activity on dopamine-betaxanthin purified from Portulaca oleracea (common purslane) flowers.

    PubMed

    Gandía-Herrero, Fernando; Jiménez-Atiénzar, Mercedes; Cabanes, Juana; Escribano, Josefa; García-Carmona, Francisco

    2009-03-25

    Tyrosinase or polyphenol oxidase (EC 1.14.18.1) is one of the key enzymes for the biosynthesis of natural pigment betalains. These are an important class of water-soluble pigments, characteristic of plants belonging to the order Caryophyllales. In this work, dopamine-betaxanthin (also known as miraxanthin V) is reported as the pigment responsible for the bright coloration in yellow flowers of Portulaca oleracea (common purslane). The natural pigment is purified, and used as a substrate for the catecholase (diphenolase) activity of the enzyme tyrosinase. A new, continuous method to follow the activity is developed based on the fluorescent properties of the betaxanthin. Fluorescence of the enzyme activity derived products is reported for the first time. Relevance of the fluorescent phenomenon is discussed based on fluorescence images and the description of a physiological inner filter effect present in flowers of P. oleracea. The first description of the betalain content in flower pistils is also provided. PMID:19227976

  8. Negative regulation of abscisic acid signaling by the Brassica oleracea ABI1 ortholog.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Feifei; Wang, Mengyao; Hao, Hongmei; Zhang, Yanfeng; Zhao, Huixian; Guo, Aiguang; Xu, Hong; Zhou, Xiaona; Xie, Chang Gen

    2013-12-13

    ABI1 (ABA Insensitive 1) is an important component of the core regulatory network in early ABA (Abscisic acid) signaling. Here, we investigated the functions of an ABI1 ortholog in Brassica oleracea (BolABI1). The expression of BolABI1 was dramatically induced by drought, and constitutive expression of BolABI1 confers ABA insensitivity upon the wild-type. Subcellular localization and phosphatase assays reveal that BolABI1 is predominantly localized in the nucleus and harbors phosphatase activity. Furthermore, BolABI1 interacts with a homolog of OST1 (OPEN STOMATA 1) in B. oleracea (BolOST1) and can dephosphorylate ABI5 (ABA Insensitive 5) in vitro. Overall, these results suggest that BolABI1 is a functional PP2C-type protein phosphatase that is involved in the negative modulation of the ABA signaling pathway. PMID:24269821

  9. Chemical constituents from Clematis delavayi var. spinescens.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Wang, Si-Feng; Zhao, Yan-Li; Liu, Ke-Chun; Wang, Xi-Min; Yang, Yong-Ping; Li, Xiao-Li

    2009-01-01

    A new coumarin, 7-hydroxy-4,6-dimethoxy-5-methylcoumarin (1), was isolated from the aerial parts of Clematis delavayi var. spinescens together with 17 known compounds. Their structures were identified by extensive spectral analysis, especially 2D NMR techniques. Antiangiogenic effects of all compounds were evaluated using a zebrafish model. PMID:19924077

  10. Static var compensators stabilize power voltages

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, R.

    1996-06-01

    This article discusses the operation of a static var compensator as installed by Alabama Power near a steel mill with a large arc furnace load. This is expected to result in a number of benefits, including flicker reduction, dynamic power factor correction, harmonics filtering and a reduction in system losses.

  11. Bacterial endosymbionts of Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum.

    PubMed

    Azanza, Ma Patricia V; Azanza, Rhodora V; Vargas, Vanessa Mercee D; Hedreyda, Cynthia T

    2006-11-01

    The study presents evidence in support of the bacterial theory associated with the toxicity of Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum. Bacterial endosymbionts from Philippine P. bahamense var. compressum strain Pbc MZRVA 042595 were isolated and identified via 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Taxonomic diversity of the identified culturable intracellular microbiota associated with Philippine P. bahamense var. compressum was established to be limited to the Phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. Major endosymbionts identified included Moraxella spp., Erythrobacter spp., and Bacillus spp., whereas Pseudomonas putida, Micrococcus spp., and Dietzia maris were identified as minor isolates. All identified strains except D. maris, P. putida, and Micrococcus spp. were shown to contain either saxitoxin or neo saxitoxin or both at levels < or =73 ng/10(7) bacterial cells based on high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. Paralytic shellfish poisoning-like physiologic reactions in test animals used in the mouse assay were recorded for the endosymbionts except for P. putida. The study is the first to elucidate the possible contribution of bacterial endosymbionts in the toxicity of P. bahamense var. compressum isolated in the Philippines. PMID:16944340

  12. AFLP analysis of genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships of Brassica oleracea in Ireland.

    PubMed

    El-Esawi, Mohamed A; Germaine, Kieran; Bourke, Paula; Malone, Renee

    2016-01-01

    Brassica oleracea L. is one of the most economically important vegetable crop species of the genus Brassica L. This species is threatened in Ireland, without any prior reported genetic studies. The use of this species is being very limited due to its imprecise phylogeny and uncompleted genetic characterisation. The main objective of this study was to assess the genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships of a set of 25 Irish B. oleracea accessions using the powerful amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) technique. A total of 471 fragments were scored across all the 11 AFLP primer sets used, out of which 423 (89.8%) were polymorphic and could differentiate the accessions analysed. The dendrogram showed that cauliflowers were more closely related to cabbages than kales were, and accessions of some cabbage types were distributed among different clusters within cabbage subgroups. Approximately 33.7% of the total genetic variation was found among accessions, and 66.3% of the variation resided within accessions. The total genetic diversity (HT) and the intra-accessional genetic diversity (HS) were 0.251 and 0.156, respectively. This high level of variation demonstrates that the Irish B. oleracea accessions studied should be managed and conserved for future utilisation and exploitation in food and agriculture. In conclusion, this study addressed important phylogenetic questions within this species, and provided a new insight into the inclusion of four accessions of cabbages and kales in future breeding programs for improving varieties. AFLP markers were efficient for assessing genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships in Irish B. oleracea species. PMID:27156498

  13. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Harshavardhanan; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Shanmugam, Ashokraj; Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Kim, HyeRan; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Currently, understanding of their function(s) during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST) and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible) under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT) and cold susceptible (CS) lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants. PMID:27472324

  14. Phytohormone profile in Lactuca sativa and Brassica oleracea plants grown under Zn deficiency.

    PubMed

    Navarro-León, Eloy; Albacete, Alfonso; Torre-González, Alejandro de la; Ruiz, Juan M; Blasco, Begoña

    2016-10-01

    Phytohormones, structurally diverse compounds, are involved in multiple processes within plants, such as controlling plant growth and stress response. Zn is an essential micronutrient for plants and its deficiency causes large economic losses in crops. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyse the role of phytohormones in the Zn-deficiency response of two economically important species, i.e. Lactuca sativa and Brassica oleracea. For this, these two species were grown hydroponically with different Zn-application rates: 10 μM Zn as control and 0.1 μM Zn as deficiency treatment and phytohormone concentration was determined by U-HPLC-MS. Zn deficiency resulted in a substantial loss of biomass in L. sativa plants that was correlated with a decline in growth-promoting hormones such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), cytokinins (CKs), and gibberellins (GAs). However these hormones increased or stabilized their concentrations in B. oleracea and could help to maintain the biomass in this species. A lower concentration of stress-signaling hormones such as ethylene precursor aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), abscisic acid (ABA), salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) and also CKs might be involved in Zn uptake in L. sativa while a rise in GA4, isopentenyl adenine (iP), and ACC and a fall in JA and SA might contribute to a better Zn-utilization efficiency (ZnUtE), as observed in B. oleracea plants. PMID:27543253

  15. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Harshavardhanan; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Shanmugam, Ashokraj; Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Kim, HyeRan; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Currently, understanding of their function(s) during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST) and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible) under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT) and cold susceptible (CS) lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants. PMID:27472324

  16. Analysis of protein transport in the Brassica oleracea vasculature reveals protein-specific destinations.

    PubMed

    Niu, Chenxing; Anstead, James; Verchot, Jeanmarie

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the vascular transport properties of exogenously applied proteins to Brassica oleracea plants and compared their delivery to various aerial parts of the plant with carboxy fluorescein (CF) dye. We identified unique properties for each protein. Alexafluor-tagged bovine serum albumin (Alexa-BSA) and Alexafluor-tagged Histone H1 (Alexa-Histone) moved slower than CF dye throughout the plant. Interestingly, Alexa-Histone was retained in the phloem and phloem parenchyma while Alexa-BSA moved into the apoplast. One possibility is that Alexa-Histone sufficiently resembles plant endogenous proteins and is retained in the vascular stream, while Alexa-BSA is exported from the cell as a foreign protein. Both proteins diffuse from the leaf veins into the leaf lamina. Alexa-BSA accumulated in the leaf epidermis while Alexa-Histone accumulated mainly in the mesophyll layers. Fluorescein-tagged hepatitis C virus core protein (fluorescein-HCV) was also delivered to B. oleracea plants and is larger than Alexa-BSA. This protein moves more rapidly than BSA through the plant and was restricted to the leaf veins. Fluorescein-HCV failed to unload to the leaf lamina. These combined data suggest that there is not a single default pathway for the vascular transfer of exogenous proteins in B. oleracea plants. Specific protein properties appear to determine their destination and transport properties within the phloem. PMID:22476467

  17. Characterization and abiotic stress-responsive expression analysis of SGT1 genes in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Ashokraj; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Park, Jong-In; Jung, Mi Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-04-01

    SGT1 genes are involved in enhancing plant responses to various biotic and abiotic stresses. Brassica oleracea is known to contain two types of SGT1 genes, namely suppressor of G2 allele of SKP1 and suppressor of GCR2. In this study, through systematic analysis, four putative SGT1 genes were identified and characterized in B. oleracea. In phylogenetic analysis, the genes clearly formed separate groups, namely BolSGT1a, BolSGT1b (both suppressor of G2 allele of SKP1 types), and BolSGT1 (suppressor of GCR2). Functional domain analysis and organ-specific expression patterns suggested possible roles for BolSGT1 genes during stress conditions. BolSGT1 genes showed significant changes in expression in response to heat, cold, drought, salt, or ABA treatment. Interaction network analysis supported the expression analysis, and showed that the BolSGT1a and BolSGT1b genes are strongly associated with co-regulators during stress conditions. However, the BolSGT1 gene did not show any strong association. Hence, BolSGT1 might be a stress resistance-related gene that functions without a co-regulator. Our results show that BolSGT1 genes are potential target genes to improve B. oleracea resistance to abiotic stresses such as heat, cold, and salt. PMID:26966988

  18. Identification of suitable qPCR reference genes in leaves of Brassica oleracea under abiotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Brulle, Franck; Bernard, Fabien; Vandenbulcke, Franck; Cuny, Damien; Dumez, Sylvain

    2014-04-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR is nowadays a standard method to study gene expression variations in various samples and experimental conditions. However, to interpret results accurately, data normalization with appropriate reference genes appears to be crucial. The present study describes the identification and the validation of suitable reference genes in Brassica oleracea leaves. Expression stability of eight candidates was tested following drought and cold abiotic stresses by using three different softwares (BestKeeper, NormFinder and geNorm). Four genes (BolC.TUB6, BolC.SAND1, BolC.UBQ2 and BolC.TBP1) emerged as the most stable across the tested conditions. Further gene expression analysis of a drought- and a cold-responsive gene (BolC.DREB2A and BolC.ELIP, respectively), confirmed the stability and the reliability of the identified reference genes when used for normalization in the leaves of B. oleracea. These four genes were finally tested upon a benzene exposure and all appeared to be useful reference genes along this toxicological condition. These results provide a good starting point for future studies involving gene expression measurement on leaves of B. oleracea exposed to environmental modifications. PMID:24566730

  19. VAR Support from Distributed Wind Energy Resources: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Romanowitz, H.; Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Yinger, R.

    2004-07-01

    As the size and quantity of wind farms and other distributed generation facilities increase, especially in relation to local grids, the importance of a reactive power compensator or VAR support from these facilities becomes more significant. Poorly done, it can result in cycling or inadequate VAR support, and the local grid could experience excessive voltage regulation and, ultimately, instability. Improved wind turbine and distributed generation power control technologies are creating VAR support capabilities that can be used to enhance the voltage regulation and stability of local grids. Locating VAR support near the point of consumption, reducing step size, and making the control active all improve the performance of the grid. This paper presents and discusses alternatives for improving the integration of VAR support from distributed generation facilities such as wind farms. We also examine the relative effectiveness of distributed VAR support on the local grid and how it can b e integrated with the VAR support of the grid operator.

  20. Mineral content of traditional leafy vegetables from western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Orech, F O; Christensen, D L; Larsen, T; Friis, H; Aagaard-Hansen, J; Estambale, B A

    2007-12-01

    Socio-economic changes that have taken place in Africa have influenced people's eating habits in both rural and urban set-ups. Most people prefer introduced foods to traditional foods, including plant foods whose consumption is widely regarded as a primitive culture manifesting poor lifestyles. However, recent studies on traditional plant foods have shown that some are highly nutritious; containing high levels of both vitamins and minerals. They also have potential as a remedy to counter food insecurity since most are well adapted to the local environment, enabling them to resist pests, drought and diseases. This paper describes the mineral (calcium, iron and zinc) contents in some 54 traditional vegetable species collected from Nyang'oma area of Bondo district, western Kenya. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to determine the mineral content. We found that most traditional leafy vegetables, domesticated and wild, generally contain higher levels of calcium, iron and zinc compared with the introduced varieties such as spinach (Spanacia oleracea), kale (Brassica oleracea var. acephala) and cabbage (Brassica oleracea var. capitata). The results of this study could contribute towards identification, propagation and subsequent domestication and cultivation promotion of nutrient-rich and safe species within the farming systems of the local communities in Kenya, sub-Saharan Africa or elsewhere. PMID:17852510

  1. Comparative study of Zn deficiency in L. sativa and B. oleracea plants: NH4(+) assimilation and nitrogen derived protective compounds.

    PubMed

    Navarro-León, Eloy; Barrameda-Medina, Yurena; Lentini, Marco; Esposito, Sergio; Ruiz, Juan M; Blasco, Begoña

    2016-07-01

    Zinc (Zn) deficiency is a major problem in agricultural crops of many world regions. N metabolism plays an essential role in plants and changes in their availability and their metabolism could seriously affect crop productivity. The main objective of the present work was to perform a comparative analysis of different strategies against Zn deficiency between two plant species of great agronomic interest such as Lactuca sativa cv. Phillipus and Brassica oleracea cv. Bronco. For this, both species were grown in hydroponic culture with different Zn doses: 10μM Zn as control and 0.01μM Zn as deficiency treatment. Zn deficiency treatment decreased foliar Zn concentration, although in greater extent in B. oleracea plants, and caused similar biomass reduction in both species. Zn deficiency negatively affected NO3(-) reduction and NH4(+) assimilation and enhanced photorespiration in both species. Pro and GB concentrations were reduced in L. sativa but they were increased in B. oleracea. Finally, the AAs profile changed in both species, highlighting a great increase in glycine (Gly) concentration in L. sativa plants. We conclude that L. sativa would be more suitable than B. oleracea for growing in soils with low availability of Zn since it is able to accumulate a higher Zn concentration in leaves with similar biomass reduction. However, B. oleracea is able to accumulate N derived protective compounds to cope with Zn deficiency stress. PMID:27181942

  2. Analysis of the Complete Chloroplast Genome of a Medicinal Plant, Dianthus superbus var. longicalyncinus, from a Comparative Genomics Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Gurusamy; Park, SeonJoo

    2015-01-01

    Dianthus superbus var. longicalycinus is an economically important traditional Chinese medicinal plant that is also used for ornamental purposes. In this study, D. superbus was compared to its closely related family of Caryophyllaceae chloroplast (cp) genomes such as Lychnis chalcedonica and Spinacia oleracea. D. superbus had the longest large single copy (LSC) region (82,805 bp), with some variations in the inverted repeat region A (IRA)/LSC regions. The IRs underwent both expansion and constriction during evolution of the Caryophyllaceae family; however, intense variations were not identified. The pseudogene ribosomal protein subunit S19 (rps19) was identified at the IRA/LSC junction, but was not present in the cp genome of other Caryophyllaceae family members. The translation initiation factor IF-1 (infA) and ribosomal protein subunit L23 (rpl23) genes were absent from the Dianthus cp genome. When the cp genome of Dianthus was compared with 31 other angiosperm lineages, the infA gene was found to have been lost in most members of rosids, solanales of asterids and Lychnis of Caryophyllales, whereas rpl23 gene loss or pseudogization had occurred exclusively in Caryophyllales. Nevertheless, the cp genome of Dianthus and Spinacia has two introns in the proteolytic subunit of ATP-dependent protease (clpP) gene, but Lychnis has lost introns from the clpP gene. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of individual protein-coding genes infA and rpl23 revealed that gene loss or pseudogenization occurred independently in the cp genome of Dianthus. Molecular phylogenetic analysis also demonstrated a sister relationship between Dianthus and Lychnis based on 78 protein-coding sequences. The results presented herein will contribute to studies of the evolution, molecular biology and genetic engineering of the medicinal and ornamental plant, D. superbus var. longicalycinus. PMID:26513163

  3. Comparative Analysis of Disease-Linked Single Nucleotide Polymorphic Markers from Brassica rapa for Their Applicability to Brassica oleracea

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Young-Il; Ahn, Yul-Kyun; Tripathi, Swati; Kim, Jeong-Ho; Lee, Hye-Eun; Kim, Do-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been conducted in humans, and other animals, and in major crops, including rice, soybean, and Chinese cabbage. However, the number of SNP studies in cabbage is limited. In this present study, we evaluated whether 7,645 SNPs previously identified as molecular markers linked to disease resistance in the Brassica rapa genome could be applied to B. oleracea. In a BLAST analysis using the SNP sequences of B. rapa and B. oleracea genomic sequence data registered in the NCBI database, 256 genes for which SNPs had been identified in B. rapa were found in B. oleracea. These genes were classified into three functional groups: molecular function (64 genes), biological process (96 genes), and cellular component (96 genes). A total of 693 SNP markers, including 145 SNP markers [BRH—developed from the B. rapa genome for high-resolution melt (HRM) analysis], 425 SNP markers (BRP—based on the B. rapa genome that could be applied to B. oleracea), and 123 new SNP markers (BRS—derived from BRP and designed for HRM analysis), were investigated for their ability to amplify sequences from cabbage genomic DNA. In total, 425 of the SNP markers (BRP-based on B. rapa genome), selected from 7,645 SNPs, were successfully applied to B. oleracea. Using PCR, 108 of 145 BRH (74.5%), 415 of 425 BRP (97.6%), and 118 of 123 BRS (95.9%) showed amplification, suggesting that it is possible to apply SNP markers developed based on the B. rapa genome to B. oleracea. These results provide valuable information that can be utilized in cabbage genetics and breeding programs using molecular markers derived from other Brassica species. PMID:25790283

  4. Genome-Wide Comparative Analysis of 20 Miniature Inverted-Repeat Transposable Element Families in Brassica rapa and B. oleracea

    PubMed Central

    Sampath, Perumal; Murukarthick, Jayakodi; Izzah, Nur Kholilatul; Lee, Jonghoon; Choi, Hong-Il; Shirasawa, Kenta; Choi, Beom-Soon; Liu, Shengyi; Nou, Ill-Sup; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are ubiquitous, non-autonomous class II transposable elements. Here, we conducted genome-wide comparative analysis of 20 MITE families in B. rapa, B. oleracea, and Arabidopsis thaliana. A total of 5894 and 6026 MITE members belonging to the 20 families were found in the whole genome pseudo-chromosome sequences of B. rapa and B. oleracea, respectively. Meanwhile, only four of the 20 families, comprising 573 members, were identified in the Arabidopsis genome, indicating that most of the families were activated in the Brassica genus after divergence from Arabidopsis. Copy numbers varied from 4 to 1459 for each MITE family, and there was up to 6-fold variation between B. rapa and B. oleracea. In particular, analysis of intact members showed that whereas eleven families were present in similar copy numbers in B. rapa and B. oleracea, nine families showed copy number variation ranging from 2- to 16-fold. Four of those families (BraSto-3, BraTo-3, 4, 5) were more abundant in B. rapa, and the other five (BraSto-1, BraSto-4, BraTo-1, 7 and BraHAT-1) were more abundant in B. oleracea. Overall, 54% and 51% of the MITEs resided in or within 2 kb of a gene in the B. rapa and B. oleracea genomes, respectively. Notably, 92 MITEs were found within the CDS of annotated genes, suggesting that MITEs might play roles in diversification of genes in the recently triplicated Brassica genome. MITE insertion polymorphism (MIP) analysis of 289 MITE members showed that 52% and 23% were polymorphic at the inter- and intra-species levels, respectively, indicating that there has been recent MITE activity in the Brassica genome. These recently activated MITE families with abundant MIP will provide useful resources for molecular breeding and identification of novel functional genes arising from MITE insertion. PMID:24747717

  5. Genome-wide comparative analysis of 20 miniature inverted-repeat transposable element families in Brassica rapa and B. oleracea.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Perumal; Murukarthick, Jayakodi; Izzah, Nur Kholilatul; Lee, Jonghoon; Choi, Hong-Il; Shirasawa, Kenta; Choi, Beom-Soon; Liu, Shengyi; Nou, Ill-Sup; Yang, Tae-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) are ubiquitous, non-autonomous class II transposable elements. Here, we conducted genome-wide comparative analysis of 20 MITE families in B. rapa, B. oleracea, and Arabidopsis thaliana. A total of 5894 and 6026 MITE members belonging to the 20 families were found in the whole genome pseudo-chromosome sequences of B. rapa and B. oleracea, respectively. Meanwhile, only four of the 20 families, comprising 573 members, were identified in the Arabidopsis genome, indicating that most of the families were activated in the Brassica genus after divergence from Arabidopsis. Copy numbers varied from 4 to 1459 for each MITE family, and there was up to 6-fold variation between B. rapa and B. oleracea. In particular, analysis of intact members showed that whereas eleven families were present in similar copy numbers in B. rapa and B. oleracea, nine families showed copy number variation ranging from 2- to 16-fold. Four of those families (BraSto-3, BraTo-3, 4, 5) were more abundant in B. rapa, and the other five (BraSto-1, BraSto-4, BraTo-1, 7 and BraHAT-1) were more abundant in B. oleracea. Overall, 54% and 51% of the MITEs resided in or within 2 kb of a gene in the B. rapa and B. oleracea genomes, respectively. Notably, 92 MITEs were found within the CDS of annotated genes, suggesting that MITEs might play roles in diversification of genes in the recently triplicated Brassica genome. MITE insertion polymorphism (MIP) analysis of 289 MITE members showed that 52% and 23% were polymorphic at the inter- and intra-species levels, respectively, indicating that there has been recent MITE activity in the Brassica genome. These recently activated MITE families with abundant MIP will provide useful resources for molecular breeding and identification of novel functional genes arising from MITE insertion. PMID:24747717

  6. Response of NBS encoding resistance genes linked to both heat and fungal stress in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Wook; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Hur, Yoonkang; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2015-01-01

    Environmental stresses, including both abiotic and biotic stresses, cause considerable yield loss in crops and can significantly affect their development. Under field conditions, crops are exposed to a variety of concurrent stresses. Among abiotic and biotic stresses, heat and Fusarium oxysporum, are the most important factors affecting development and yield productivity of Brassica oleracea. Genes encoding the nucleotide-binding site (NBS) motif are known to be related to responses to abiotic and biotic stresses in many plants. Hence, this study was conducted to characterize the NBS encoding genes obtained from transcriptome profiles of two cabbage genotypes with contrasting responses to heat stress, and to test expression levels of selected NBS- leucine reich repeat (LRR) genes in F. oxysporum infected plants. We selected 80 up-regulated genes from a total of 264 loci, among which 17 were confirmed to be complete and incomplete members of the TIR-NBS-LRR (TNL) class families, and another identified as an NFYA-HAP2 family member. Expression analysis using qRT-PCR revealed that eight genes showed significant responses to heat shock treatment and F. oxysporum infection. Additionally, in the commercial B. oleracea cultivars with resistance to F. oxysporum, the Bol007132, Bol016084, and Bol030522 genes showed dramatically higher expression in the F. oxysporum resistant line than in the intermediate and susceptible lines. The results of this study will facilitate the identification and the development of molecular markers based on multiple stress resistance genes related to heat and fungal stress under field conditions in B. oleracea. PMID:25461701

  7. [Efficacy analysis and theoretical study on Chinese herbal properties of Açaí (Euterpe oleracea)].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-jun; Chen, Shao-hong; Zhu, Ying-li; Wang, Chun; Wang, Jing-xia; Wang, Lin-yuan; Gao, Xue-min

    2015-06-01

    Açaí (Euterpe oleracea) emerged as a source of herb has a long history in South America, which was approved by the Ministry of Health used in China and it has been introduced planting in Guangdong and Taiwan. This article summarized applied history of Açaí and its present status in China. Did theoretical study on the Chinese herbal properties of Açaí based on the Chinese traditional philosophical culture to analysis the function and symptom preliminary, combining with used for medical recordation, chemical component, biological activity. It is aiming at establishing the theoretical foundation for the application under the guidance of TCM theory. PMID:26552192

  8. Antioxidant neolignan and phenolic glucosides from the fruit of Euterpe oleracea.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian; Zhao, Jianping; Khan, Shabana I; Liu, Qiang; Liu, Yang; Ali, Zulfiqar; Li, Xing-Cong; Zhang, Shui-han; Cai, Xiong; Huang, Hui-yong; Wang, Wei; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2014-12-01

    Three new glucosides, namely, (-)-7R8S-7',8'-dihydroxy-dihydrodehydroconiferyl alcohol-9-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (1), (+)-7S8R-7',8'-dihydroxy-dihydrodehydroconiferyl alcohol-9-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (2) and 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenyl 1-O-[6-(hydrogen 3-hydroxy-3-methylpentanedioate)]-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), along with 6 known compounds were isolated from the fruit of Euterpe oleracea Mart. Their structures were elucidated based on spectroscopic analyses including NMR, HR-ESI-MS and CD. All the isolated compounds demonstrated significant antioxidant activity and 2 displayed moderate cytotoxicity against HL-60 cells. PMID:25284430

  9. Comparison of Photomorphogenic Responses to UV Light in Red and White Cabbage (Brassica oleracea L.) 1

    PubMed Central

    Lercari, Bartolomeo; Sodi, Francesco; Sbrana, Cristiana

    1989-01-01

    Photoinhibition of hypocotyl growth in white cabbage (Brassica oleracea L., cv “Bianco Brunswick”) is controlled by UV absorbing receptor(s) and the phytochrome system, while in red cabbage (cv “Rosso Olandese tardivo invernale”) phytochrome can act without any requirement for the action of a specific UV receptor. Similar results have been obtained for the photoregulation of anthocyanin production. Twenty-four hour preirradiations with UV light or 692 nanometers light lead to the same increase in responsiveness of the system toward Pfr in a following dark period, suggesting a phytochrome promotion of subsequent light induction for both. PMID:16666761

  10. Glucose kinases from Streptomyces peucetius var. caesius.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Villafán, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Sanoja, Romina; Aguilar-Osorio, Guillermo; Gosset, Guillermo; Sanchez, Sergio

    2014-07-01

    Glucose kinases (Glks) are enzymes of the glycolytic pathway involved in glucose phosphorylation. These enzymes can use various phosphoryl donors such as ATP, ADP, and polyphosphate. In several streptomycetes, ATP-glucose kinase (ATP-Glk) has been widely studied and regarded as the main glucose phosphorylating enzyme and is likely a regulatory protein in carbon catabolite repression. In cell extracts from the doxorubicin overproducing strain Streptomyces peucetius var. caesius, grown in glucose, a polyphosphate-dependent Glk (Pp-Glk) was detected by zymogram. Maximum activity was observed during the stationary growth phase (48 h) of cells grown in 100 mM glucose. No activity was detected when 20 mM glutamate was used as the only carbon source, supporting a role for glucose in inducing this enzyme. Contrary to wild-type strains of Streptomyces coelicolor, Streptomyces lividans, and Streptomyces thermocarboxydus K-155, S. peucetius var. caesius produced 1.8 times more Pp-Glk than ATP-Glk. In addition, this microorganism produced five and four times more Pp-Glk and anthracyclines, respectively, than its wild-type S. peucetius parent strain, supporting a role for this enzyme in antibiotic production in the overproducer strain. A cloned 726-bp DNA fragment from S. peucetius var. caesius encoded a putative Pp-Glk, with amino acid identities between 83 and 87 % to orthologous sequences from the above-cited streptomycetes. The cloned fragment showed the polyphosphate-binding sequences GXDIGGXXIK, TXGTGIGSA, and KEX(4)SWXXWA. Sequences for the Zn-binding motif were not detected in this fragment, suggesting that Pp-Glk is not related to the Glk ROK family of proteins. PMID:24687748

  11. Effects of Organic and Waste-Derived Fertilizers on Yield, Nitrogen and Glucosinolate Contents, and Sensory Quality of Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica).

    PubMed

    Øvsthus, Ingunn; Breland, Tor Arvid; Hagen, Sidsel Fiskaa; Brandt, Kirsten; Wold, Anne-Berit; Bengtsson, Gunnar B; Seljåsen, Randi

    2015-12-23

    Organic vegetable production attempts to pursue multiple goals concerning influence on environment, production resources, and human health. In areas with limited availability of animal manure, there is a need for considering various off-farm nutrient resources for such production. Different organic and waste-derived fertilizer materials were used for broccoli production at two latitudes (58° and 67°) in Norway during two years. The fertilizer materials were applied at two rates of total N (80 and 170 kg ha(-1)) and compared with mineral fertilizer (170 kg ha(-1)) and no fertilizer. Broccoli yield was strongly influenced by fertilizer materials (algae meal < unfertilized control < sheep manure < extruded shrimp shell < anaerobically digested food waste < mineral fertilizer). Yield, but not glucosinolate content, was linearly correlated with estimated potentially plant-available N. However, extruded shrimp shell and mineral NPK fertilizer gave higher glucosinolate contents than sheep manure and no fertilizer. Sensory attributes were less affected by fertilizer material and plant-available N. PMID:26553169

  12. Differences among cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var capitata) genotypes for Cd uptake and accumulation in fruiting portion and possible inhibition through use of silicon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soils may become progressively enriched with cadmium as a consequence of industrial activities, fertilization, and waste disposal. The current widespread interest in Cd uptake and translocation arises not only from its toxicity to plants, but also from the harmful health effects of its dietary inta...

  13. Overexpression of AtEDT1/HDG11 in Chinese Kale (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra) Enhances Drought and Osmotic Stress Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhangsheng; Sun, Binmei; Xu, Xiaoxia; Chen, Hao; Zou, Lifang; Chen, Guoju; Cao, Bihao; Chen, Changming; Lei, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Plants are constantly challenged by environmental stresses, including drought and high salinity. Improvement of drought and osmotic stress tolerance without yield decrease has been a great challenge in crop improvement. The Arabidopsis ENHANCED DROUGHT TOLERANCE1/HOMEODOMAIN GLABROUS11 (AtEDT1/HDG11), a protein of the class IV HD-Zip family, has been demonstrated to significantly improve drought tolerance in Arabidopsis, rice, and pepper. Here, we report that AtEDT1/HDG11 confers drought and osmotic stress tolerance in the Chinese kale. AtEDT1/HDG11-overexpression lines exhibit auxin-overproduction phenotypes, such as long hypocotyls, tall stems, more root hairs, and a larger root system architecture. Compared with the untransformed control, transgenic lines have significantly reduced stomatal density. In the leaves of transgenic Chinese kale plants, proline (Pro) content and reactive oxygen species-scavenging enzyme activity was significantly increased after drought and osmotic stress, particularly compared to wild kale. More importantly, AtEDT1/HDG11-overexpression leads to abscisic acid (ABA) hypersensitivity, resulting in ABA inhibitor germination and induced stomatal closure. Consistent with observed phenotypes, the expression levels of auxin, ABA, and stress-related genes were also altered under both normal and/or stress conditions. Further analysis showed that AtEDT1/HDG11, as a transcription factor, can target the auxin biosynthesis gene YUCC6 and ABA response genes ABI3 and ABI5. Collectively, our results provide a new insight into the role of AtEDT1/HDG11 in enhancing abiotic stress resistance through auxin- and ABA-mediated signaling response in Chinese kale. PMID:27625663

  14. QTL Analysis of Head Splitting Resistance in Cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata) Using SSR and InDel Makers Based on Whole-Genome Re-Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yanbin; Liu, Yumei; Li, Zhansheng; Fang, Zhiyuan; Yang, Limei; Zhuang, Mu; Zhang, Yangyong

    2015-01-01

    Head splitting resistance (HSR) in cabbage is an important trait closely related to both quality and yield of head. However, the genetic control of this trait remains unclear. In this study, a doubled haploid (DH) population derived from an intra-cross between head splitting-susceptible inbred cabbage line 79–156 and resistant line 96–100 was obtained and used to analyze inheritance and detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for HSR using a mixed major gene/polygene inheritance analysis and QTL mapping. HSR can be attributed to additive-epistatic effects of three major gene pairs combined with those of polygenes. Negative and significant correlations were also detected between head Hsr and head vertical diameter (Hvd), head transverse diameter (Htd) and head weight (Hw). Using the DH population, a genetic map was constructed with simple sequence repeat (SSR) and insertion–deletion (InDel) markers, with a total length of 1065.9 cM and average interval length of 4.4 cM between adjacent markers. Nine QTLs for HSR were located on chromosomes C3, C4, C7, and C9 based on 2 years of phenotypic data using both multiple-QTL mapping and inclusive composite interval mapping. The identified QTLs collectively explained 39.4 to 59.1% of phenotypic variation. Three major QTLs (Hsr 3.2, 4.2, 9.2) showing a relatively larger effect were robustly detected in different years or with different mapping methods. The HSR trait was shown to have complex genetic mechanisms. Results from QTL mapping and classical genetic analysis were consistent. The QTLs obtained in this study should be useful for molecular marker-assisted selection in cabbage breeding and provide a foundation for further research on HSR genetic regulation. PMID:26406606

  15. Nitrogen split dose fertilization, plant age and frost effects on phytochemical content and sensory properties of curly kale (Brassica oleracea L. var. sabellica).

    PubMed

    Groenbaek, Marie; Jensen, Sidsel; Neugart, Susanne; Schreiner, Monika; Kidmose, Ulla; Kristensen, Hanne L

    2016-04-15

    We investigated how concentrations of sensory relevant compounds: glucosinolates (GLSs), flavonoid glycosides, hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and sugars in kale responded to split dose and reduced nitrogen (N) fertilization, plant age and controlled frost exposure. In addition, frost effects on sensory properties combined with N supply were assessed. Seventeen week old kale plants showed decreased aliphatic GLSs at split dose N fertilization; whereas reduced N increased aliphatic and total GLSs. Ontogenetic effects were demonstrated for all compounds: sugars, aliphatic and total GLSs increased throughout plant development, whereas kaempferol and total flavonoid glycosides showed higher concentrations in 13 week old plants. Controlled frost exposure altered sugar composition slightly, but not GLSs or flavonoid glycosides. Reduced N supply resulted in less bitterness, astringency and pungent aroma, whereas frost exposure mainly influenced aroma and texture. N treatment explained most of the sensory variation. Producers should not rely on frost only to obtain altered sensory properties. PMID:26616985

  16. HIGH-RESOLUTION GENETIC MAPPING OF OR, A GENE THAT INDUCES BETA-CAROTENE ACCUMULATION IN CAULIFLOWER (BRASSICA OLERACEA L. VAR. BOTRYTIS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cauliflower Or gene is a semi-dominant, single-locus mutation that causes the accumulation of beta-carotene in various tissues of the plant, turning them orange. To elucidate the molecular basis of Or in the regulation of carotenoid accumulation in the plant, we initiated the isolation of Or by...

  17. Overexpression of AtEDT1/HDG11 in Chinese Kale (Brassica oleracea var. alboglabra) Enhances Drought and Osmotic Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhangsheng; Sun, Binmei; Xu, Xiaoxia; Chen, Hao; Zou, Lifang; Chen, Guoju; Cao, Bihao; Chen, Changming; Lei, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Plants are constantly challenged by environmental stresses, including drought and high salinity. Improvement of drought and osmotic stress tolerance without yield decrease has been a great challenge in crop improvement. The Arabidopsis ENHANCED DROUGHT TOLERANCE1/HOMEODOMAIN GLABROUS11 (AtEDT1/HDG11), a protein of the class IV HD-Zip family, has been demonstrated to significantly improve drought tolerance in Arabidopsis, rice, and pepper. Here, we report that AtEDT1/HDG11 confers drought and osmotic stress tolerance in the Chinese kale. AtEDT1/HDG11-overexpression lines exhibit auxin-overproduction phenotypes, such as long hypocotyls, tall stems, more root hairs, and a larger root system architecture. Compared with the untransformed control, transgenic lines have significantly reduced stomatal density. In the leaves of transgenic Chinese kale plants, proline (Pro) content and reactive oxygen species-scavenging enzyme activity was significantly increased after drought and osmotic stress, particularly compared to wild kale. More importantly, AtEDT1/HDG11-overexpression leads to abscisic acid (ABA) hypersensitivity, resulting in ABA inhibitor germination and induced stomatal closure. Consistent with observed phenotypes, the expression levels of auxin, ABA, and stress-related genes were also altered under both normal and/or stress conditions. Further analysis showed that AtEDT1/HDG11, as a transcription factor, can target the auxin biosynthesis gene YUCC6 and ABA response genes ABI3 and ABI5. Collectively, our results provide a new insight into the role of AtEDT1/HDG11 in enhancing abiotic stress resistance through auxin- and ABA-mediated signaling response in Chinese kale. PMID:27625663

  18. QTL Analysis of Head Splitting Resistance in Cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata) Using SSR and InDel Makers Based on Whole-Genome Re-Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Su, Yanbin; Liu, Yumei; Li, Zhansheng; Fang, Zhiyuan; Yang, Limei; Zhuang, Mu; Zhang, Yangyong

    2015-01-01

    Head splitting resistance (HSR) in cabbage is an important trait closely related to both quality and yield of head. However, the genetic control of this trait remains unclear. In this study, a doubled haploid (DH) population derived from an intra-cross between head splitting-susceptible inbred cabbage line 79-156 and resistant line 96-100 was obtained and used to analyze inheritance and detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for HSR using a mixed major gene/polygene inheritance analysis and QTL mapping. HSR can be attributed to additive-epistatic effects of three major gene pairs combined with those of polygenes. Negative and significant correlations were also detected between head Hsr and head vertical diameter (Hvd), head transverse diameter (Htd) and head weight (Hw). Using the DH population, a genetic map was constructed with simple sequence repeat (SSR) and insertion-deletion (InDel) markers, with a total length of 1065.9 cM and average interval length of 4.4 cM between adjacent markers. Nine QTLs for HSR were located on chromosomes C3, C4, C7, and C9 based on 2 years of phenotypic data using both multiple-QTL mapping and inclusive composite interval mapping. The identified QTLs collectively explained 39.4 to 59.1% of phenotypic variation. Three major QTLs (Hsr 3.2, 4.2, 9.2) showing a relatively larger effect were robustly detected in different years or with different mapping methods. The HSR trait was shown to have complex genetic mechanisms. Results from QTL mapping and classical genetic analysis were consistent. The QTLs obtained in this study should be useful for molecular marker-assisted selection in cabbage breeding and provide a foundation for further research on HSR genetic regulation. PMID:26406606

  19. Biogenesis of mitochondria in cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) curds subjected to temperature stress and recovery involves regulation of the complexome, respiratory chain activity, organellar translation and ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Rurek, Michal; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej M; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2015-01-01

    The biogenesis of the cauliflower curd mitochondrial proteome was investigated under cold, heat and the recovery. For the first time, two dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis was used to study the plant mitochondrial complexome in heat and heat recovery. Particularly, changes in the complex I and complex III subunits and import proteins, and the partial disintegration of matrix complexes were observed. The presence of unassembled subunits of ATP synthase was accompanied by impairment in mitochondrial translation of its subunit. In cold and heat, the transcription profiles of mitochondrial genes were uncorrelated. The in-gel activities of respiratory complexes were particularly affected after stress recovery. Despite a general stability of respiratory chain complexes in heat, functional studies showed that their activity and the ATP synthesis yield were affected. Contrary to cold stress, heat stress resulted in a reduced efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation likely due to changes in alternative oxidase (AOX) activity. Stress and stress recovery differently modulated the protein level and activity of AOX. Heat stress induced an increase in AOX activity and protein level, and AOX1a and AOX1d transcript level, while heat recovery reversed the AOX protein and activity changes. Conversely, cold stress led to a decrease in AOX activity (and protein level), which was reversed after cold recovery. Thus, cauliflower AOX is only induced by heat stress. In heat, contrary to the AOX activity, the activity of rotenone-insensitive internal NADH dehydrogenase was diminished. The relevance of various steps of plant mitochondrial biogenesis to temperature stress response and recovery is discussed. PMID:25617518

  20. Evaluation of genetic diversity in Chinese kale (Brassica oleracea L. var. alboglabra Bailey) by using rapid amplified polymorphic DNA and sequence-related amplified polymorphism markers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Zhang, L G

    2014-01-01

    Chinese kale is an original Chinese vegetable of the Cruciferae family. To select suitable parents for hybrid breeding, we thoroughly analyzed the genetic diversity of Chinese kale. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) molecular markers were used to evaluate the genetic diversity across 21 Chinese kale accessions from AVRDC and Guangzhou in China. A total of 104 bands were detected by 11 RAPD primers, of which 66 (63.5%) were polymorphic, and 229 polymorphic bands (68.4%) were observed in 335 bands amplified by 17 SRAP primer combinations. The dendrogram showed the grouping of the 21 accessions into 4 main clusters based on RAPD data, and into 6 clusters based on SRAP and combined data (RAPD + SRAP). The clustering of accessions based on SRAP data was consistent with petal colors. The Mantel test indicated a poor fit for the RAPD and SRAP data (r = 0.16). These results have an important implication for Chinese kale germplasm characterization and improvement. PMID:24615113

  1. Interaction of moderate UV-B exposure and temperature on the formation of structurally different flavonol glycosides and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives in kale (Brassica oleracea var. sabellica).

    PubMed

    Neugart, Susanne; Fiol, Michaela; Schreiner, Monika; Rohn, Sascha; Zrenner, Rita; Kroh, Lothar W; Krumbein, Angelika

    2014-05-01

    Kale has a high number of structurally different flavonol glycosides and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives. In this study we investigated the interaction of moderate UV-B radiation and temperature on these compounds. Kale plants were grown at daily mean temperatures of 5 or 15 °C and were exposed to five subsequent daily doses (each 0.25 kJ m(-2) d(-1)) of moderate UV-B radiation at 1 d intervals. Of 20 phenolic compounds, 11 were influenced by an interaction of UV-B radiation and temperature, e.g., monoacylated quercetin glycosides. Concomitantly, enhanced mRNA expression of flavonol 3'- hydroxylase showed an interaction of UV-B and temperature, highest at 0.75 kJ m(-2) and 15 °C. Kaempferol glycosides responded diversely and dependent on, e.g., the hydroxycinnamic acid residue. Compounds containing a catechol structure seem to be favored in the response to UV-B. Taken together, subsequent exposure to moderate UV-B radiation is a successful tool for enhancing the flavonoid profile of plants, and temperature should be considered. PMID:24655223

  2. Accumulation of strontium and cesium by kale as a function of age of plant

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, C.M.; Harris, N.D.; Fox, L.R.

    1981-01-01

    The accumulation of Sr and Cs throughout the growth cycle of a hydroponically grown vegetable crop (Brassica oleracea var. acephala D.C. Blue Curl) was studied. The cumulative effect of supplying the radionuclides through the nutrient solution to kale throughout the growth cycle, simulating a continuous discharge, was compared to exposure at each stage of the growth cycle to a single dose of radioactivity, simulating an accidental release. The time course of accumulation of /sup 137/Cs supplied continuously through the nutrient solution resembled the sigmoidal dry weight growth curve of the vegetable. Accumulation of this nuclide after exposure of kale to radioactivity for 48 hours at each stage of growth decreased with age of the plant. The time course of /sup 90/Sr supplied continuously resembled the pattern of the periodic 48-hour accumulation for this radionuclide, although there was a 1- to 2-week lag period between the two uptake patterns.

  3. Re-consideration of Peronospora farinosa infecting Spinacia oleracea as distinct species, Peronospora effusa.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Joon; Hong, Seung-Beom; Shin, Hyeon-Dong

    2007-04-01

    Downy mildew is probably the most widespread and potentially destructive global disease of spinach (Spinacia oleracea). The causal agent of downy mildew disease on various plants of Chenopodiaceae, including spinach, is regarded as a single species, Peronospora farinosa. In the present study, the ITS rDNA sequence and morphological data demonstrated that P. farinosa from S. oleracea is distinct from downy mildew of other chenopodiaceous hosts. Fifty-eight spinach specimens were collected or loaned from 17 countries of Asia, Europe, Oceania, North and South America, which all formed a distinct monophyletic group. No intercontinental genetic variation of the ITS rDNA within Peronospora accessions causing spinach downy mildew disease was found. Phylogenetic trees supported recognition of Peronospora from spinach as a separate species. Microscopic examination also revealed morphological differences between Peronospora specimens from Spinacia and P. farinosa s. lat. specimens from Atriplex, Bassia, Beta, and Chenopodium. Consequently, the name Peronospora effusa should be reinstated for the downy mildew fungus found on spinach. Here, a specimen of the original collections of Peronospora effusa is designated as lectotype. PMID:17509849

  4. Crystallization and structural analysis of GADPH from Spinacia oleracea in a new form

    SciTech Connect

    Cámara-Artigas, Ana; Hirasawa, Masakazu; Knaff, David B.; Wang, Meitian; Allen, James P.

    2006-11-01

    The crystallization of GADPH from S. oleracea in two different space groups has been accomplished using GAPDH samples with unusually low purity levels. One crystal form is the same as a previously reported form, while the second represents a new form. The quality of the diffraction allowed the structure to be determined at a 3 Å resolution limit. Two crystalline forms of GADPH (d-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) from Spinacia oleracea were obtained using sitting-drop vapor diffusion. Despite the very low concentration of GADPH in the solutions, two crystalline forms were obtained, one of which was the previously reported C222 space group with unit-cell parameters a = 155.3, b = 181.7, c = 107.6 Å and the other of which belonged to a new space group I4{sub 1}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 120.9, c = 154.5 Å. Diffraction data were measured from both native and derivatives, yielding structures at a resolution limit of 3.0 Å. Differences at the NAD{sup +}/NADP{sup +}-binding site seen in these structures compared with the previously reported structure with bound coenzyme suggest that conformational changes associated with pyridine-nucleotide binding may play a role in the regulation of this enzyme.

  5. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Differentially Expressed Proteins Induced by Hydrogen Sulfide in Spinacia oleracea Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juan; Liu, Ting-Wu; Hu, Wen-Jun; Simon, Martin; Wang, Wen-Hua; Chen, Juan; Liu, Xiang; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), as a potential gaseous messenger molecule, has been suggested to play important roles in a wide range of physiological processes in plants. The aim of present study was to investigate which set of proteins is involved in H2S-regulated metabolism or signaling pathways. Spinacia oleracea seedlings were treated with 100 µM NaHS, a donor of H2S. Changes in protein expression profiles were analyzed by 2-D gel electrophoresis coupled with MALDI-TOF MS. Over 1000 protein spots were reproducibly resolved, of which the abundance of 92 spots was changed by at least 2-fold (sixty-five were up-regulated, whereas 27 were down-regulated). These proteins were functionally divided into 9 groups, including energy production and photosynthesis, cell rescue, development and cell defense, substance metabolism, protein synthesis and folding, cellular signal transduction. Further, we found that these proteins were mainly localized in cell wall, plasma membrane, chloroplast, mitochondria, nucleus, peroxisome and cytosol. Our results demonstrate that H2S is involved in various cellular and physiological activities and has a distinct influence on photosynthesis, cell defense and cellular signal transduction in S. oleracea leaves. These findings provide new insights into proteomic responses in plants under physiological levels of H2S. PMID:25181351

  6. Anti-Diabetic Effect of Portulaca oleracea L. Polysaccharideandits Mechanism in Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yu; Zang, Xueli; Ma, Jinshu; Xu, Guangyu

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic syndrome caused by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Traditional Chinese medicine preparations have shown a comprehensive and function-regulating characteristic. Purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.) is an annual succulent herb. Currently, there have been some related reports on the treatment of diabetes with purslane. The current study was designed to separate and purify the polysaccharide, a systematic study of its physical and chemical properties, antioxidant activity, and anti-diabetic mechanism, in order to provide a theoretical basis for the development of drugs of purslane. A crude water soluble polysaccharide extracted from purslane was named CPOP (crude Portulaca oleracea L. polysaccharide). Effects of CPOP on bodyweight, glucose tolerance test (GTT), fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting serum insulin (FINS), insulin sensitivity index (ISI), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA), and superoxygen dehydrogenises (SOD) were investigated. The results indicate that the oral administration of CPOP could significantly increase the body weight and significantly improve the glucose tolerance in diabetic rats. Meanwhile, CPOP could significantly reduce the FBG level, and elevate the FINS level and ISI value in diabetic rats. In addition, CPOP could significantly reduce TNF-α and IL-6 levels in diabetic rats; CPOP could also reduce MDA and SOD activities in the liver tissue of diabetic rats. These results suggest that the anti-diabetic effect of CPOP may be associated with its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:27463713

  7. Anti-Diabetic Effect of Portulaca oleracea L. Polysaccharideandits Mechanism in Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu; Zang, Xueli; Ma, Jinshu; Xu, Guangyu

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic syndrome caused by multiple genetic and environmental factors. Traditional Chinese medicine preparations have shown a comprehensive and function-regulating characteristic. Purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.) is an annual succulent herb. Currently, there have been some related reports on the treatment of diabetes with purslane. The current study was designed to separate and purify the polysaccharide, a systematic study of its physical and chemical properties, antioxidant activity, and anti-diabetic mechanism, in order to provide a theoretical basis for the development of drugs of purslane. A crude water soluble polysaccharide extracted from purslane was named CPOP (crude Portulaca oleracea L. polysaccharide). Effects of CPOP on bodyweight, glucose tolerance test (GTT), fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting serum insulin (FINS), insulin sensitivity index (ISI), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA), and superoxygen dehydrogenises (SOD) were investigated. The results indicate that the oral administration of CPOP could significantly increase the body weight and significantly improve the glucose tolerance in diabetic rats. Meanwhile, CPOP could significantly reduce the FBG level, and elevate the FINS level and ISI value in diabetic rats. In addition, CPOP could significantly reduce TNF-α and IL-6 levels in diabetic rats; CPOP could also reduce MDA and SOD activities in the liver tissue of diabetic rats. These results suggest that the anti-diabetic effect of CPOP may be associated with its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:27463713

  8. Toxicity and Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metals in Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) Grown in a Controlled Environment.

    PubMed

    Alia, Naz; Sardar, Khan; Said, Muhammad; Salma, Khalid; Sadia, Alam; Sadaf, Siddique; Toqeer, Ahmed; Miklas, Scholz

    2015-07-01

    The impact of heavy metal toxicity on the shoot and root lengths, total protein, fiber characteristics, moisture content and nutrient composition of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) was evaluated. Plants were grown in pots containing soil and treated with different concentrations (mg/kg) of lead (Pb; 300, 400 and 500), cadmium (Cd; 0.5, 1 and 1.5) and zinc (Zn; 250, 500, and 700) as well as mixtures of Cd and Pb (0.5/300, 1/400, 1.5/500), Cd and Zn (0.5/250, 1/500, 1.5/700), and Pb and Zn (300/250, 400/500, 500/700). Soil contaminated by long-term irrigation with wastewater containing heavy metals was simulated. An increase in concentrations of heavy metals both individually and as mixtures significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the growth parameters and nutrient contents of S. oleracea. The uptake patterns of heavy metals in mixtures showed antagonistic impacts on each other. The toxicities of the mixtures Cd and Pb, Cd and Zn as well as Pb and Zn were higher than those observed in separate heavy metal applications but less than their additive sums. The toxicity caused by individual heavy metals was the highest for Cd followed by Pb and Zn. The highest toxicity was observed in plants grown in soil contaminated by Cd and Pb. PMID:26133131

  9. Toxicity and Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metals in Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) Grown in a Controlled Environment

    PubMed Central

    Alia, Naz; Sardar, Khan; Said, Muhammad; Salma, Khalid; Sadia, Alam; Sadaf, Siddique; Toqeer, Ahmed; Miklas, Scholz

    2015-01-01

    The impact of heavy metal toxicity on the shoot and root lengths, total protein, fiber characteristics, moisture content and nutrient composition of spinach (Spinacia oleracea) was evaluated. Plants were grown in pots containing soil and treated with different concentrations (mg/kg) of lead (Pb; 300, 400 and 500), cadmium (Cd; 0.5, 1 and 1.5) and zinc (Zn; 250, 500, and 700) as well as mixtures of Cd and Pb (0.5/300, 1/400, 1.5/500), Cd and Zn (0.5/250, 1/500, 1.5/700), and Pb and Zn (300/250, 400/500, 500/700). Soil contaminated by long-term irrigation with wastewater containing heavy metals was simulated. An increase in concentrations of heavy metals both individually and as mixtures significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the growth parameters and nutrient contents of S. oleracea. The uptake patterns of heavy metals in mixtures showed antagonistic impacts on each other. The toxicities of the mixtures Cd and Pb, Cd and Zn as well as Pb and Zn were higher than those observed in separate heavy metal applications but less than their additive sums. The toxicity caused by individual heavy metals was the highest for Cd followed by Pb and Zn. The highest toxicity was observed in plants grown in soil contaminated by Cd and Pb. PMID:26133131

  10. Antioxidant capacity and other bioactivities of the freeze-dried Amazonian palm berry, Euterpe oleraceae mart. (acai).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fruit of Euterpe oleraceae, commonly known as acai, has been demonstrated to exhibit significantly high antioxidant capacity in vitro, especially for superoxide and peroxyl scavenging, and, therefore, may have possible health benefits. In this study, the antioxidant capacities of freeze-dried ac...

  11. Antioxidant capacities and anti-inflammatory effects of flavonoid compounds isolated from acai pulp (Euterpe oleracea Mart.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acai fruit (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) has been demonstrated to exhibit extremely high antioxidant capacity. Seven major flavonoids were isolated from freeze-dried acai pulp by various chromatographic methods. Their structures were elucidated as orientin (1), homoorientin (2), vitexin (3), luteolin (4)...

  12. Development of Public Immortal Mapping Populations, Molecular Markers and Linkage Maps for Rapid Cycling Brassica rapa and B. oleracea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study we describe public immortal mapping populations of self-compatible lines, molecular markers, and linkage maps for Brassica rapa and B. oleracea. We propose that these resources are valuable reference tools for the Brassica community. The B. rapa population consists of 150 recombinant...

  13. Development of Public Immortal Mapping Populations, Molecular Markers, and Linkage Maps for Rapid Cycling Brassica rapa and B. oleracea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Past research efforts on genetic mapping in Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa have been disconnected, utilizing separate mapping populations and different sets of molecular markers. Here we present public immortal mapping populations, molecular markers and linkage maps for rapid cycling B. rapa a...

  14. Clinical Effects of Portulaca Oleracea Seeds on Dyslipidemia in Obese Adolescents: a Triple-blinded Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad; Kelishadi, Roya; Jelokhanian, Hadi; Asgary, Sedigheh; Ghannadi, Alireza; Badri, Shirinsadat

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Childhood obesity is a major public health concern worldwide while the current epidemic may be secondary to over consumption of high-fat, energy-rich foods. Purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.) has been traditionally used in medicine for several antioxidant and anti-atherogenic activities. In this study the anti-dyslipidemic effects of P.oleracea was evaluated in obese adolescents. Methods: In this triple-blinded randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial which was done from July 2011 to June 2012, obese adolescent patients whom were referred to the Isfahan Cardiovascular Research Institute (Iran) were randomly allocated to the two arms of cases and controls. The cases group was asked to take one capsule containing powdered P. oleracea seeds (500 milligrams) two times a day for one month, and the controls group were asked to take identical but placebo (lactose) capsules in the same way. Biochemical parameters including 12-hours fasting serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides (TG) were measured before the initiation and after the completion of the study protocol. Findings: Total cholesterol, LDL-C, and TG showed statistically significant changes over time (one month) in the P. oleracea group (p < 0.05). However, between-group analysis using general linear model (multivariate) test revealed that the differences in the mentioned parameters between two study groups were statistically significant just for LDL-C and TG, while others did not differ significantly. Conclusion: P. oleracea L. may have positive effects on serum lipids profile which may be attributed to its polyphenolic and antioxidant compounds. This herbal drug seems to be well-tolerated in adolescent population as well. Further studies are recommended. PMID:25568533

  15. Chemical diversity of volatiles of Teucrium orientale L. var. orientale, var. puberulens, and var. glabrescens determined by simultaneous GC-FID and GC/MS techniques.

    PubMed

    Ozek, Gulmira; Ozek, Temel; Dinç, Muhittin; Doǧu, Süleyman; Başer, Kemal H C

    2012-06-01

    In the present work, three varieties of Teucrium orientale, var. orientale, var. puberulens, and var. glabrescens, were collected and investigated for chemical composition of the oils. Subsequent gas chromatography (GC-FID) and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS) revealed high abundance of sesquiterpenes in the essential oils analyzed. All the oils contained β-caryophyllene (22.6, 8.5, and 6.3%, resp.) and hexadecanoic acid (7.9, 12.8, and 13.1%). Germacrene D (24.6 and 33.4%) and bicyclogermacrene (6.7 and 8.5%) were found to be the main constituents of var. orientale and var. puberulens, respectively. The high percentages of β-cubebene (26.9%), α-cubebene (9.0%), and α-copaene (7.2%) established the diversity of var. glabrescens. The qualitative difference between the essential oils allowed the differentiation between the varieties in agreement with the morphological observations described in Flora of Turkey for each variety studied. In addition, a cluster analysis of twelve Teucrium taxa based on the essential-oil composition has been carried out. Hovewer, the analysis did not clearly reflect the infrageneric classification of the genus, it largely confirmed the relationships between the infraspecific taxa of Teucrium orientale and T. chamaedrys. PMID:22700232

  16. 1D-VAR Retrieval Using Superchannels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xu; Zhou, Daniel; Larar, Allen; Smith, William L.; Schluessel, Peter; Mango, Stephen; SaintGermain, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Since modern ultra-spectral remote sensors have thousands of channels, it is difficult to include all of them in a 1D-var retrieval system. We will describe a physical inversion algorithm, which includes all available channels for the atmospheric temperature, moisture, cloud, and surface parameter retrievals. Both the forward model and the inversion algorithm compress the channel radiances into super channels. These super channels are obtained by projecting the radiance spectra onto a set of pre-calculated eigenvectors. The forward model provides both super channel properties and jacobian in EOF space directly. For ultra-spectral sensors such as Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) and the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed Interferometer (NAST), a compression ratio of more than 80 can be achieved, leading to a significant reduction in computations involved in an inversion process. Results will be shown applying the algorithm to real IASI and NAST data.

  17. Cytotoxic diterpenoids from Rabdosia lophanthoides var. gerardianus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chao-Zhan; Zhao, Wei; Feng, Xiu-Li; Liu, Fang-Le; Zhu, Chen-Chen

    2016-03-01

    Two new abietane diterpenoids, Gerardianin B (1) and Gerardianin C (2), one new lignan glycoside, Gerardianin D (3) and one new lupane-type triterpenoid, Gerardianol A (4), together with seven known abietane diterpenoids were isolated from the aerial parts of Rabdosia lophanthoides var. gerardianus. Their structures were determined by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic data. The cytotoxic activities of the nine diterpenoids were evaluated on human cancer cell lines. Compounds 6-11 exhibited significant cytotoxic activities against HepG2 cell lines with IC50 from 4.68 to 9.43μM and HCF-8 cell lines with IC50 from 9.12 to 13.53μM. PMID:26608401

  18. 4-D-Var or ensemble Kalman filter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnay, Eugenia; Li, Hong; Miyoshi, Takemasa; Yang, Shu-Chih; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim

    2007-10-01

    We consider the relative advantages of two advanced data assimilation systems, 4-D-Var and ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), currently in use or under consideration for operational implementation. With the Lorenz model, we explore the impact of tuning assimilation parameters such as the assimilation window length and background error covariance in 4-D-Var, variance inflation in EnKF, and the effect of model errors and reduced observation coverage. For short assimilation windows EnKF gives more accurate analyses. Both systems reach similar levels of accuracy if long windows are used for 4-D-Var. For infrequent observations, when ensemble perturbations grow non-linearly and become non-Gaussian, 4-D-Var attains lower errors than EnKF. If the model is imperfect, the 4-D-Var with long windows requires weak constraint. Similar results are obtained with a quasi-geostrophic channel model. EnKF experiments made with the primitive equations SPEEDY model provide comparisons with 3-D-Var and guidance on model error and `observation localization'. Results obtained using operational models and both simulated and real observations indicate that currently EnKF is becoming competitive with 4-D-Var, and that the experience acquired with each of these methods can be used to improve the other. A table summarizes the pros and cons of the two methods.

  19. Impact of coal mine dump contaminated soils on elemental uptake by Spinacia oleracea (spinach)

    SciTech Connect

    Chunilall, V.; Kindness, A.; Jonnalagadda, S.B.

    2006-07-01

    The elemental uptake and the growth response of Spinacia oleracea (spinach) to the soil contaminated with the South African bituminous coal mine dump soil, viz. 0%, 5%, 15%, and 25% w/w, was investigated. The contaminated soils were analyzed for pH, cation exchange capacity (CEC), soil organic matter (SOM), and concentrations of selected heavy metals. The pH, SOM, and CEC decreased with an increase in contamination indicating the acidic nature of coal mine soil and the raise in the soil binding sites. The distribution of Fe, Mn, Ni, Cd, and Pb in the roots and leaves of the plants was determined in two stages of plant growth. Spinach showed high accumulation of Fe and increased levels of Ni and Cd with an increase in contamination. No plant growth was recorded with 25% contamination.

  20. Characterization of elemental sulfur in isolated intact spinach chloroplasts. [Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Joyard, J.; Douce, R. ); Forest, E. ); Blee, E. )

    1988-12-01

    Incubation of intact spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) chloroplasts in the presence of {sup 35}SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} resulted in the light-dependent formation of a chloroform-soluble sulfur-containing compound distinct from sulfolipid. The authors have identified this compound as the most stable form (S{sub 8}) of elemental sulfur (S{sup 0}, valence state for S = O) by mass spectrometry. It is possible that elemental sulfur (S{sup 0}) was formed by oxidation of bound sulfide, i.e. after the photoreduction of sulfate to sulfide by intact chloroplasts, and released as S{sub 8} under the experimental conditions used for analysis.

  1. Fatty acids and beta-carotene in australian purslane (Portulaca oleracea) varieties.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Howe, P; Zhou, Y F; Xu, Z Q; Hocart, C; Zhan, R

    2000-09-29

    The fatty acid profile and beta-carotene content of a number of Australian varieties of purslane (Portulaca oleracea) were determined by GC and HPLC. The total fatty acid content ranged from 1.5 to 2.5 mg/g of fresh mass in leaves, 0.6 to 0.9 mg/g in stems and 80 to 170 mg/g in seeds. alpha-Linolenic acid (C18:3omega3) accounted for around 60% and 40% of the total fatty acid content in leaves and seeds, respectively. Longer-chain omega-3 fatty acids were not detected. The beta-carotene content ranged from 22 to 30 mg/g fresh mass in leaves. These results indicate that Australian purslane varieties are a rich source of alpha-linolenic acid and beta-carotene. PMID:11043602

  2. Organ-Specific Quantitative Genetics and Candidate Genes of Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in Brassica oleracea

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Marta; Ali, Mahmoud; Ferreres, Federico; Moreno, Diego A.; Velasco, Pablo; Soengas, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Phenolic compounds are proving to be increasingly important for human health and in crop development, defense and adaptation. In spite of the economical importance of Brassica crops in agriculture, the mechanisms involved in the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds presents in these species remain unknown. The genetic and metabolic basis of phenolics accumulation was dissected through analysis of total phenolics concentration and its individual components in leaves, flower buds, and seeds of a double haploid (DH) mapping population of Brassica oleracea. The quantitative trait loci (QTL) that had an effect on phenolics concentration in each organ were integrated, resulting in 33 consensus QTLs controlling phenolics traits. Most of the studied compounds had organ-specific genomic regulation. Moreover, this information allowed us to propose candidate genes and to predict the function of genes underlying the QTL. A number of previously unknown potential regulatory regions involved in phenylpropanoid metabolism were identified and this study illustrates how plant ontogeny can affect a biochemical pathway. PMID:26858727

  3. Three Novel Alkaloids from Portulaca oleracea L. and Their Anti-inflammatory Effects.

    PubMed

    Li, Cui-Yu; Meng, Yi-Han; Ying, Zhe-Ming; Xu, Nan; Hao, Dong; Gao, Ming-Zhe; Zhang, Wen-Jie; Xu, Liang; Gao, Yu-Cong; Ying, Xi-Xiang

    2016-07-27

    Three novel carbon skeleton alkaloids, named oleracimine (1), oleracimine A (2), and oleracone A (3), with one novel azulene carbon skeleton compound, oleracone B (4), and one known compound, β-carboline (5), were first isolated from Portulaca oleracea L. The structures were determined using spectroscopic methods, including one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance and high-resolution electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry techniques. In addition, oleracimine (1) was used to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages. The results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, western blot, and real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that oleracimine (1) remarkably inhibited nitric oxide production and could dose-dependently decrease the secretions of interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor α, nitric oxide, and prostaglandin E2 in cell culture supernatants as well as the mRNA of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase. PMID:27396870

  4. 4D-Var or Ensemble Kalman Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalnay, E.; Li, H.; Yang, S.; Miyoshi, T.; Ballabrera, J.

    2007-05-01

    We consider the relative advantages of two advanced data assimilation systems, 4D-Var and ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF), currently in use or considered for operational implementation. We explore the impact of tuning assimilation parameters such as the assimilation window length and background error covariance in 4D-Var, the variance inflation in EnKF, and the effect of model errors and reduced observation coverage in both systems. For short assimilation windows EnKF gives more accurate analyses. Both systems reach similar levels of accuracy if long windows are used for 4D-Var, and for infrequent observations, when ensemble perturbations grow nonlinearly and become non-Gaussian, 4D-Var attains lower errors than EnKF. Results obtained with variations of EnKF using operational models and both simulated and real observations are reviewed. A table summarizes the pros and cons of the two methods.

  5. Puccinia jaceae var.solstitialis teliospore priming on yellow starthistle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Following the introduction of Puccinia jaceae var. solstitialis to California for biological control of yellow starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis, Asteraceae), teliospores, pycnia, and multiple urediniospore generations have been observed in the field. Because urediniospores have a relatively short...

  6. Weak bus-oriented optimal multi-objective VAR planning

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.L.

    1996-11-01

    This paper presents a weak bus-oriented criterion to determine the candidate buses for installing new VAR sources in the VAR planning problem. First, an efficient method, using a voltage collapse proximity indicator, is described for identifying weak buses. Then appropriate VAR planning in those weak buses can enhance the system security margin, in particular, to prevent voltage collapse. Next, the goal attainment (GA) method based on the Simulated Annealing (SA) approach is applied to solving general multi-objective VAR planning problems by assuming that the decisionmaker (DM) has goals for each of the objective functions. The presented method can both obtain a better final solution and reduce the solution space. Results of application of the proposed method to the AEP-14 bus system as well as to a large, actual-size system are also presented.

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE PARASPORAL INCLUSION OF BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS VAR. KYUSHUENSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacillus thuringiensis var. kyushuensis synthesizes an irregularly shaped parasporal inclusion during sporulation. lectron microscopy revealed that the inclusions are composed of a relatively homogeneous appearing center surrounded by a thick, electron dense coating. urified incl...

  8. Antioxidant defense gene analysis in Brassica oleracea and Trifolium repens exposed to Cd and/or Pb.

    PubMed

    Bernard, F; Dumez, S; Brulle, F; Lemière, S; Platel, A; Nesslany, F; Cuny, D; Deram, A; Vandenbulcke, F

    2016-02-01

    This study focused on the expression analysis of antioxidant defense genes in Brassica oleracea and in Trifolium repens. Plants were exposed for 3, 10, and 56 days in microcosms to a field-collected suburban soil spiked by low concentrations of cadmium and/or lead. In both species, metal accumulations and expression levels of genes encoding proteins involved and/or related to antioxidant defense systems (glutathione transferases, peroxidases, catalases, metallothioneins) were quantified in leaves in order to better understand the detoxification processes involved following exposure to metals. It appeared that strongest gene expression variations in T. repens were observed when plants are exposed to Cd (metallothionein and ascorbate peroxidase upregulations) whereas strongest variations in B. oleracea were observed in case of Cd/Pb co-exposures (metallothionein, glutathione transferase, and peroxidase upregulations). Results also suggest that there is a benefit to use complementary species in order to better apprehend the biological effects in ecotoxicology. PMID:26514569

  9. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of black mustard (Brassica nigra; BB) and comparison with Brassica oleracea (CC) and Brassica carinata (BBCC).

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Terachi, Toru

    2014-11-01

    Crop species of Brassica (Brassicaceae) consist of three monogenomic species and three amphidiploid species resulting from interspecific hybridizations among them. Until now, mitochondrial genome sequences were available for only five of these species. We sequenced the mitochondrial genome of the sixth species, Brassica nigra (nuclear genome constitution BB), and compared it with those of Brassica oleracea (CC) and Brassica carinata (BBCC). The genome was assembled into a 232 145 bp circular sequence that is slightly larger than that of B. oleracea (219 952 bp). The genome of B. nigra contained 33 protein-coding genes, 3 rRNA genes, and 17 tRNA genes. The cox2-2 gene present in B. oleracea was absent in B. nigra. Although the nucleotide sequences of 52 genes were identical between B. nigra and B. carinata, the second exon of rps3 showed differences including an insertion/deletion (indel) and nucleotide substitutions. A PCR test to detect the indel revealed intraspecific variation in rps3, and in one line of B. nigra it amplified a DNA fragment of the size expected for B. carinata. In addition, the B. carinata lines tested here produced DNA fragments of the size expected for B. nigra. The results indicate that at least two mitotypes of B. nigra were present in the maternal parents of B. carinata. PMID:25767903

  10. Application of in vitro pollination of opened ovaries to obtain Brassica oleracea L. × B. rapa L. hybrids.

    PubMed

    Sosnowska, Katarzyna; Cegielska-Taras, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    This study presents the results of experiments concerning: (1) interspecific hybridization of Brassica oleracea × Brassica rapa via application of in vitro placental pollination and (2) embryological analysis of the process of resynthesis of Brassica napus. In order to overcome certain stigma/style barriers, B. rapa pollen was placed in vitro on an opened B. oleracea ovary (with style removed). Pollinated ovaries were cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium. After 24-d culture, the developing embryos were isolated from immature seeds and transferred onto MS medium supplemented with 0.47 μM kinetin, 0.49 μM 1-naphthaleneacetic acid, and 10% (v/v) coconut water. When the embryos had turned green, they were immediately placed onto MS medium with 100 μM kinetin. After development of the seedling, plantlets were transferred to soil. Chromosome doubling was achieved after another week. Cytometric analysis of nuclear DNA confirmed the hybrid nature of the plants. Resynthesis of B. napus can be performed through interspecific hybridization of B. oleracea × B. rapa followed by embryo rescue and genome doubling. PMID:24719550

  11. Identification of a novel MLPK homologous gene MLPKn1 and its expression analysis in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qiguo; Shi, Songmei; Liu, Yudong; Pu, Quanming; Liu, Xiaohuan; Zhang, Ying; Zhu, Liquan

    2016-09-01

    M locus protein kinase, one of the SRK-interacting proteins, is a necessary positive regulator for the self-incompatibility response in Brassica. In B. rapa, MLPK is expressed as two different transcripts, MLPKf1 and MLPKf2, and either isoform can complement the mlpk/mlpk mutation. The AtAPK1B gene has been considered to be the ortholog of BrMLPK, and AtAPK1B has no role in self-incompatibility (SI) response in A. thaliana SRK-SCR plants. Until now, what causes the MLPK and APK1B function difference during SI response in Brassica and A. thaliana SRKb-SCRb plants has remained unknown. Here, in addition to the reported MLPKf1/2, we identified the new MLPKf1 homologous gene MLPKn1 from B. oleracea. BoMLPKn1 and BoMLPKf1 shared nucleotide sequence identity as high as 84.3 %, and the most striking difference consisted in two fragment insertions in BoMLPKn1. BoMLPKn1 and BoMLPKf1 had a similar gene structure; both their deduced amino acid sequences contained a typical plant myristoylation consensus sequence and a Ser/Thr protein kinase domain. BoMLPKn1 was widely expressed in petal, sepal, anther, stigma and leaf. Genome-wide survey revealed that the B. oleracea genome contained three MLPK homologous genes: BoMLPKf1/2, BoMLPKn1 and Bol008343n. The B. rapa genome also contained three MLPK homologous genes, BrMLPKf1/2, BraMLPKn1 and Bra040929. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that BoMLPKf1/2 and BrMLPKf1/2 were phylogenetically more distant from AtAPK1A than Bol008343n, Bra040929, BraMLPKn1 and BoMLPKn1, Synteny analysis revealed that the B. oleracea chromosomal region containing BoMLPKn1 displayed high synteny with the A. thaliana chromosomal region containing APK1B, whereas the B. rapa chromosomal region containing BraMLPKn1 showed high synteny with the A. thaliana chromosomal region containing APK1B. Together, these results revealed that BoMLPKn1/BraMLPKn1, and not the formerly reported BoMLPKf1/2 (BrMLPKf1/2), was the orthologous genes of AtAPK1B, and no ortholog of Bo

  12. Immunoelectrophoretic Analysis of Mycoplasma mycoides var. mycoides

    PubMed Central

    Stone, S. S.; Razin, S.

    1973-01-01

    Acrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to show the similarities and differences in the membrane proteins of two vaccine and two virulent strains of Mycoplasma mycoides var. mycoides. Immunoelectrophoretic (IEP) analysis was also used to partially characterize the associated antigens. Antibody spectra to the antigens of M. mycoides differ in rabbit, pig, and cattle sera. Rabbits produce better precipitating antibody against the anodic migrating protein mycoplasma antigens than cattle and pigs as seen in IEP. However, rabbit anti-M. mycoides serum did not show precipitating antibody against the heat-stable carbohydrate antigen. As judged by IEP, the major carbohydrate antigen extracted from the media, or boiled whole organism, is similar to that present in the sera-infected cattle and knee joints of calves. This carbohydrate antigen has a cathodic migration in IEP at pH 8.6. Periodate oxidation, classically used to destroy carbohydrate, also destroys most of the protein antigens. Heating the antigens to 56 C for 10 min destroys many of the noncarbohydrate antigens and 100 C eliminates all but the carbohydrate antigen. Extraction of M. mycoides with chloroform-methanol, phenol, ethanol, or ethanol-acetone reduced or eliminated most of the protein antigens. Some of the isolated antigenic fractions of M. mycoides were tested to determine their activity in the diagnostic complement fixation test for contagious bovine pleuropneumonia and their inhibitory effect in this test by using bovine anti-M. mycoides antisera having precipitating antibody and circulating antigen. The complement fixation antigen is not the galactan, cannot be extracted by chloroform-methanol, but is stable to boiling at 100 C and may be extracted by phenol and partially precipitated by ethanol-acetone. Images PMID:4577417

  13. Salinity Reduction and Biomass Accumulation in Hydroponic Growth of Purslane (Portulaca oleracea).

    PubMed

    de Lacerda, Laís Pessôa; Lange, Liséte Celina; Costa França, Marcel Giovanni; Zonta, Everaldo

    2015-01-01

    In many of the world's semi-arid and arid regions, the increase in demand for good quality water associated with the gradual and irreversible salinisation of the soil and water have raised the development of techniques that facilitate the safe use of brackish and saline waters for agronomic purposes. This study aimed to evaluate the salinity reduction of experimental saline solutions through the ions uptake capability of purslane (Portulaca oleracea), as well as its biomass accumulation. The hydroponic system used contained three different nutrient solutions composed of fixed concentrations of macro and micronutrients to which three different concentrations of sodium chloride had been added. Two conditions were tested, clipped and intact plants. It was observed that despite there being a notable removal of magnesium and elevated biomass accumulation, especially in the intact plants, purslane did not present the expected removal quantity of sodium and chloride. We confirmed that in the research conditions of the present study, purslane is a saline-tolerant species but accumulation of sodium and chloride was not shown as previously described in the literature. PMID:25397981

  14. Molecular Modeling of Myrosinase from Brassica oleracea: A Structural Investigation of Sinigrin Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Park, Jong-In; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2015-01-01

    Myrosinase, which is present in cruciferous plant species, plays an important role in the hydrolysis of glycosides such as glucosinolates and is involved in plant defense. Brassicaceae myrosinases are diverse although they share common ancestry, and structural knowledge about myrosinases from cabbage (Brassica oleracea) was needed. To address this, we constructed a three-dimensional model structure of myrosinase based on Sinapis alba structures using Iterative Threading ASSEmbly Refinement server (I-TASSER) webserver, and refined model coordinates were evaluated with ProQ and Verify3D. The resulting model was predicted with β/α fold, ten conserved N-glycosylation sites, and three disulfide bridges. In addition, this model shared features with the known Sinapis alba myrosinase structure. To obtain a better understanding of myrosinase–sinigrin interaction, the refined model was docked using Autodock Vina with crucial key amino acids. The key nucleophile residues GLN207 and GLU427 were found to interact with sinigrin to form a hydrogen bond. Further, 20-ns molecular dynamics simulation was performed to examine myrosinase–sinigrin complex stability, revealing that residue GLU207 maintained its hydrogen bond stability throughout the entire simulation and structural orientation was similar to that of the docked state. This conceptual model should be useful for understanding the structural features of myrosinase and their binding orientation with sinigrin. PMID:26703735

  15. Partial purification of gibberellin oxidases from spinach leaves. [Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, S.J.; Bleecker, A.B.; Zeevaart, J.A.D.

    1987-09-01

    Four enzyme activities catalyzing the following oxidative steps in the gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic pathway have been extracted from spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves after exposure to 8 long days: GA/sub 12/ ..-->.. GA/sub 53/ ..-->.. GA/sub 44/ ..-->.. GA/sub 19/ ..-->.. GA/sub 20/. Two of these, GA/sub 53/ oxidase and GA/sup 19/ oxidase, were separable from the other two, GA/sub 44/ oxidase and GA/sub 12/ 13-hydroxylase, by anion exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Apparent molecular weights of the four enzymes as determined by gel filtration HLPL are: GA/sub 12/ 13-hydroxylase, 28,400; GA/sub 43/ oxidase, 42,500; GA/sub 44/ oxidase, 38,100; GA/sub 19/ oxidase, 39,500. GA/sub 44/ oxidase was purified approximately 100-fold in 0.3% yield by a combination of ammonium sulfate fractionation, anion exchange HPLC, phenyl-Sepharose chromatography and gel filtration HLPC.

  16. Inactivation of highly activated spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase by dephosphorylation. [Spinacia oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, J.L. ); Huber, S.C. North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh ); Hite, D.R.C.; Outlaw, W.H. Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) can be phosphorylated and inactivated in vitro with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP. Thus, it was surprising to find that SPS, extracted from leaves fed mannose in the light to highly activate the enzyme, could be inactivated in an ATP-independent manner when desalted crude extracts were preincubated at 25{degrees}C before assay. The spontaneous inactivation involved a loss in activity measured with limiting substrate concentrations in the presence of the inhibitor, Pi, without affecting maximum catalytic activity. The spontaneous inactivation was unaffected by exogenous carrier proteins and protease inhibitors, but was inhibited by inorganic phosphate, fluoride, and molybdate, suggesting that a phosphatase may be involved. Okadaic acid, a potent inhibitor of mammalian type 1 and 2A protein phosphatases, had no effect up to 5 micromolar. Inactivation was stimulated about twofold by exogenous Mg{sup 2+} and was relatively insensitive to Ca{sup 2+} and to pH over the range pH 6.5 to 8.5. Radioactive phosphate incorporated into SPS during labeling of excised leaves with ({sup 32}P)Pi (initially in the dark and then in the light with mannose) was lost with time when desalted crude extracts were incubated at 25 C, and the loss in radiolabel was substantially reduced by fluoride. These results provide direct evidence for action of an endogenous phosphatase(s) using SPS as substrate.

  17. Conversion of monogalactosyldiacylglycerols to triacylglycerols in ozone-fumigated spinach leaves. [Spinacia oleracea L

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaki, Takeshi; Saito, Kazuki; Kawaguchi, Akihiko; Kondo, Noriaki; Yamada, Mitsuhiro Keio Univ., Tokyo Univ. of Tokyo )

    1990-10-01

    Molecular species and fatty acid distribution of triacylglycerol (TG) accumulated in spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves fumigated with ozone (0.5 microliter per liter) were compared with those of monogalactosyldiacylglyerol (MGDG). Analysis of positional distribution of the fatty acids in MGDG and the accumulated TG by the enzymatic digestion method showed that hexadecatrienoate (16:3) was restricted to sn-2 position of the glycerol backbone in both MGDG and TG, whereas {alpha}-linolenate (18:3) was preferentially located at sn-1 position in MGDG, and sn-1 and/or sn-3 positions in TG, suggesting that 1,2-diacylglycerol moieties of MGDG are the direct precursor of TG in ozone-fumigated leaves. Further analysis of TG molecular species by argentation chromatography and mass spectrometry showed that TG increased with ozone fumigation consisted of approximately an equal molar ratio of sn-1,3-18:3-2-16:3 and sn-1,2,3-18:3. Because the molecular species of MGDG in spinach leaves is composed of a similar molar ratio of sn-1-18:3-2-16:3 and sn-1,2-18:3, we conducted that MGDG was converted to 1,2-diacylglycerol and acylated with 18:3 to TG in ozone-fumigated spinach leaves.

  18. Flavonoids in baby spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.): changes during plant growth and storage.

    PubMed

    Bergquist, Sara A M; Gertsson, Ulla E; Knuthsen, Pia; Olsson, Marie E

    2005-11-30

    The variation in flavonoid concentration and composition was investigated in baby spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) cv. Emilia sown on three occasions, each harvested at three growth stages at 6-day intervals. After harvest, leaves were stored in polypropylene bags at 2 or 10 degrees C. Flavonoids were analyzed by reversed phase HPLC. Twelve flavonoid peaks were detected. The main flavonoid, making up on average 43% of the total flavonoid concentration, was identified as 5,3',4'-trihydroxy-3-methoxy-6:7-methylenedioxyflavone-4'-glucuronide. Four other flavonoids each contributed 7-12% of the total flavonoid content. Total flavonoid content was relatively stable during normal retail storage conditions, although some of the individual flavonoid compounds showed considerable variation. The youngest plants had the highest flavonoid concentration, indicating that by harvesting the baby spinach a few days earlier than the current commercial stage of harvest, the flavonoid concentration in the product may be increased and the content of potentially health-promoting compounds enhanced. PMID:16302762

  19. Alternative Strategies in Response to Saline Stress in Two Varieties of Portulaca oleracea (Purslane)

    PubMed Central

    Mulry, Kristina R.; Hanson, Bryan A.; Dudle, Dana A.

    2015-01-01

    Purslane (Portulaca oleracea) is a globally-distributed plant with a long history of use in folk medicine and cooking. We have developed purslane as a model system for exploring plant responses to stress. We exposed two varieties of purslane to saline stress with the objective of identifying differences between the varieties in the plasticity of morphological and physiological traits. The varieties responded to saline stress with significantly different changes in the measured traits, which included inter alia biomass, flower counts, proline concentrations and betalain pigment concentrations. The alternative responses of the two varieties consisted of complex, simultaneous changes in multiple traits. In particular, we observed that while both varieties increased production of betalain pigments and proline under saline stress, one variety invested more in betalain pigments while the other invested more in proline. Proline and betalain pigments undoubtedly play multiple roles in plant tissues, but in this case their role as antioxidants deployed to ameliorate saline stress appears to be important. Taken holistically, our results suggest that the two varieties employ different strategies in allocating resources to cope with saline stress. This conclusion establishes purslane as a suitable model system for the study of saline stress and the molecular basis for differential responses. PMID:26398279

  20. Screening of Purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.) Accessions for High Salt Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Rafii, M. Y.; Abdul Hamid, Azizah

    2014-01-01

    Purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.) is an herbaceous leafy vegetable crop, comparatively more salt-tolerant than any other vegetables with high antioxidants, minerals, and vitamins. Salt-tolerant crop variety development is of importance due to inadequate cultivable land and escalating salinity together with population pressure. In this view a total of 25 purslane accessions were initially selected from 45 collected purslane accessions based on better growth performance and subjected to 5 different salinity levels, that is, 0.0, 10.0, 20.0, 30.0, and 40.0 dS m−1 NaCl. Plant height, number of leaves, number of flowers, and dry matter contents in salt treated purslane accessions were significantly reduced (P ≤ 0.05) and the enormity of reduction increased with increasing salinity stress. Based on dry matter yield reduction, among all 25 purslane accessions 2 accessions were graded as tolerant (Ac7 and Ac9), 6 accessions were moderately tolerant (Ac3, Ac5, Ac6, Ac10, Ac11, and Ac12), 5 accessions were moderately susceptible (Ac1, Ac2, Ac4, Ac8, and Ac13), and the remaining 12 accessions were susceptible to salinity stress and discarded from further study. The selected 13 purslane accessions could assist in the identification of superior genes for salt tolerance in purslane for improving its productivity and sustainable agricultural production. PMID:25003141

  1. Leaf Colour as a Signal of Chemical Defence to Insect Herbivores in Wild Cabbage (Brassica oleracea)

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Lucas; Osorio, Daniel; Hartley, Susan E.

    2015-01-01

    Leaf colour has been proposed to signal levels of host defence to insect herbivores, but we lack data on herbivory, leaf colour and levels of defence for wild host populations necessary to test this hypothesis. Such a test requires measurements of leaf spectra as they would be sensed by herbivore visual systems, as well as simultaneous measurements of chemical defences and herbivore responses to leaf colour in natural host-herbivore populations. In a large-scale field survey of wild cabbage (Brassica oleracea) populations, we show that variation in leaf colour and brightness, measured according to herbivore spectral sensitivities, predicts both levels of chemical defences (glucosinolates) and abundance of specialist lepidopteran (Pieris rapae) and hemipteran (Brevicoryne brassicae) herbivores. In subsequent experiments, P. rapae larvae achieved faster growth and greater pupal mass when feeding on plants with bluer leaves, which contained lower levels of aliphatic glucosinolates. Glucosinolate-mediated effects on larval performance may thus contribute to the association between P. rapae herbivory and leaf colour observed in the field. However, preference tests found no evidence that adult butterflies selected host plants based on leaf coloration. In the field, B. brassicae abundance varied with leaf brightness but greenhouse experiments were unable to identify any effects of brightness on aphid preference or performance. Our findings suggest that although leaf colour reflects both levels of host defences and herbivore abundance in the field, the ability of herbivores to respond to colour signals may be limited, even in species where performance is correlated with leaf colour. PMID:26353086

  2. Genetic diversity and association analysis of leafminer (Liriomyza langei) resistance in spinach (Spinacia oleracea).

    PubMed

    Shi, Ainong; Mou, Beiquan

    2016-08-01

    Leafminer (Liriomyza langei) is a major insect pest of many important agricultural crops, including spinach (Spinacia oleracea). Use of genetic resistance is an efficient, economic, and environment-friendly method to control this pest. The objective of this research was to conduct association analysis and identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers associated with leafminer resistance in spinach germplasm. A total of 300 USDA spinach germplasm accessions were used for the association analysis of leafminer resistance. Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) was used for genotyping and 783 SNPs from GBS were used for association analysis. The leafminer resistance showed a near normal distribution with a wide range from 1.1 to 11.7 stings per square centimeter leaf area, suggesting that the leafminer resistance in spinach is a complex trait controlled by multiple genes with minor effect in this spinach panel. Association analysis indicated that five SNP markers, AYZV02040968_7171, AYZV02076752_412, AYZV02098618_4615, AYZV02147304_383, and AYZV02271373_398, were associated with the leafminer resistance with LOD 2.5 or higher. The SNP markers may be useful for breeders to select plants and lines for leafminer resistance in spinach breeding programs through marker-assisted selection. PMID:27490441

  3. Portulaca oleracea L. as a Prospective Candidate Inhibitor of Hepatitis C Virus NS3 Serine Protease.

    PubMed

    Noreen, Sobia; Hussain, Ishtiaq; Tariq, Muhammad Ilyas; Ijaz, Bushra; Iqbal, Shahid; Qamar-ul-Zaman; Ashfaq, Usman Ali; Husnain, Tayyab

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a worldwide health problem affecting about 300 million individuals. HCV causes chronic liver disease, liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and death. Many side effects are associated with the current treatment options. Natural products that can be used as anti-HCV drugs are thus of considerable potential significance. NS3 serine protease (NS3-SP) is a target for the screening of antiviral activity against HCV. The present work explores plants with anti-HCV potential, isolating possible lead compounds. Ten plants, used for medicinal purposes against different infections in rural areas of Pakistan, were collected. The cellular toxicity effects of methanolic extracts of the plants on the viability of Huh-7 cells were studied through the Trypan blue dye exclusion method. Following this, the anti-HCV potential of phytoextracts was assessed by infecting liver cells with HCV-3a-infected serum inoculum. Only the methanolic extract of Portulaca oleracea L. (PO) exhibited more than 70% inhibition. Four fractions were obtained through bioassay-guided extraction of PO. Subsequent inhibition of all organic extract fractions against NS3 serine protease was checked to track the specific target in the virus. The results showed that the PO methanolic crude and ethyl acetate extract specifically abridged the HCV NS3 protease expression in a dose-dependent fashion. Hence, PO extract and its constituents either alone or with interferon could offer a future option to treat chronic HCV. PMID:25871297

  4. Resonance assignment of PsbP: an extrinsic protein from photosystem II of Spinacia oleracea.

    PubMed

    Rathner, Adriana; Chandra, Kousik; Rathner, Petr; Horničáková, Michaela; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Kohoutová, Jaroslava; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Müller, Norbert

    2015-10-01

    PsbP (23 kDa) is an extrinsic eukaryotic protein of photosystem II found in the thylakoid membrane of higher plants and green algae. It has been proven to be indispensable for proper functioning of the oxygen evolving complex. By interaction with other extrinsic proteins (PsbQ, PsbO and PsbR), it modulates the concentration of two cofactors of the water splitting reaction, Ca(2+) and Cl(-). The crystallographic structure of PsbP from Spinacia oleracea lacks the N-terminal part as well as two inner regions which were modelled as loops. Those unresolved parts are believed to be functionally crucial for the binding of PsbP to the thylakoid membrane. In this NMR study we report (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonance assignments of the backbone and side chain atoms of the PsbP protein. Based on these data, an estimate of the secondary structure has been made. The structural motifs found fit the resolved parts of the crystallographic structure very well. In addition, the complete assignment set provides preliminary insight into the dynamic regions. PMID:25903141

  5. An enzymatic activity isolated from Brassica oleracea specific for UV-irradiated DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, P.E.; Lenhart, J.R.; Weiss, R.B. )

    1991-03-11

    As a consequence of a breakdown in the ozone layer, an increase in the amount of DNA damage caused by ultraviolet irradiation can be expected. Organisms have evolved mechanisms to repair numerous types of DNA damages. While these DNA repair systems have been well characterized in bacteria and to a lesser extent in mammalian cells, surprisingly little is known about repair of potentially harmful DNA lesions in plants. An enzyme that recognizes and incises UV irradiated DNA has been partially purified from the leaf tissue of Brassica oleracea. Glycosylase-produced base loss sites were detected by a nitrocellulose filter-binding assay using UV-irradiated PM2 viral DNA as the substrate. The optimal temperature for maximal enzyme activity is 47C with a pH optimum between 7.0 and 7.5. In addition, the endonuclease is active in both Tris and phosphate buffers, although it is stimulated by phosphate concentrations up to 25 mM. Currently, a number of synthetic polynucleotides as well as DNAs of defined sequence are being employed as substrates to determine the nature of the UV-induced lesion and the precise mechanism of action of the enzyme.

  6. Nodularin uptake and induction of oxidative stress in spinach (Spinachia oleracea).

    PubMed

    Lehtimäki, Nina; Shunmugam, Sumathy; Jokela, Jouni; Wahlsten, Matti; Carmel, Dalton; Keränen, Mika; Sivonen, Kaarina; Aro, Eva-Mari; Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Mulo, Paula

    2011-04-15

    The bloom-forming cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena produces toxic compounds, including nodularin, which is known to have adverse effects on various organisms. We monitored the primary effects of nodularin exposure on physiological parameters in Spinachia oleracea. We present the first evidence for the uptake of nodularin by a terrestrial plant, and show that the exposure of spinach to cyanobacterial crude water extract from nodularin-producing strain AV1 results in inhibition of growth and bleaching of the leaves. Despite drastic effects on phenotype and survival, nodularin did not disturb the photosynthetic performance of plants or the structure of the photosynthetic machinery in the chloroplast thylakoid membrane. Nevertheless, the nodularin-exposed plants suffered from oxidative stress, as evidenced by a high level of oxidative modifications targeted to various proteins, altered levels of enzymes involved in scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and increased levels of α-tocopherol, which is an important antioxidant. Moreover, the high level of cytochrome oxidase (COX II), a typical marker for mitochondrial respiratory protein complexes, suggests that the respiratory capacity is increased in the leaves of nodularin-exposed plants. Actively respiring plant mitochondria, in turn, may produce ROS at high rates. Although the accumulation of ROS and induction of the ROS scavenging network enable the survival of the plant upon toxin exposure, the upregulation of the enzymatic defense system is likely to increase energetic costs, reducing growth and the ultimate fitness of the plants. PMID:21093957

  7. Brassica oleracea MATE encodes a citrate transporter and enhances aluminum tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinxin; Li, Ren; Shi, Jin; Wang, Jinfang; Sun, Qianqian; Zhang, Haijun; Xing, Yanxia; Qi, Yan; Zhang, Na; Guo, Yang-Dong

    2014-08-01

    The secretion of organic acid anions from roots is an important mechanism for plant aluminum (Al) tolerance. Here we report cloning and characterizing BoMATE (KF031944), a multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) family gene from cabbage (Brassica oleracea). The expression of BoMATE was more abundant in roots than in shoots, and it was highly induced by Al treatment. The (14)C-citrate efflux experiments in oocytes demonstrated that BoMATE is a citrate transporter. Electrophysiological analysis and SIET analysis of Xenopus oocytes expressing BoMATE indicated BoMATE is activated by Al. Transient expression of BoMATE in onion epidermal cells demonstrated that it localized to the plasma membrane. Compared with the wild-type Arabidopsis, the transgenic lines constitutively overexpressing BoMATE enhanced Al tolerance and increased citrate secretion. In addition, Arabidopsis transgenic lines had a lower K(+) efflux and higher H(+) efflux, in the presence of Al, than control wild type in the distal elongation zone (DEZ). This is the first direct evidence that MATE protein is involved in the K(+) and H(+) flux in response to Al treatment. Taken together, our results show that BoMATE is an Al-induced citrate transporter and enhances aluminum tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. PMID:24850836

  8. Indoline Amide Glucosides from Portulaca oleracea: Isolation, Structure, and DPPH Radical Scavenging Activity.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Ze-Zhao; Yue, Su; Sun, Hong-Xiang; Jin, Tian-Yun; Wang, Hai-Na; Zhu, Rong-Xiu; Xiang, Lan

    2015-11-25

    A polyamide column chromatography method using an aqueous ammonia mobile phase was developed for large-scale accumulation of water-soluble indoline amide glucosides from a medicinal plant, Portulaca oleracea. Ten new [oleraceins H, I, K, L, N, O, P, Q, R, S (1-10)] and four known [oleraceins A-D (11-14)] indoline amide glucosides were further purified and structurally characterized by various chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. The DPPH radical scavenging activities of oleraceins K (5) and L (6), with EC50 values of 15.30 and 16.13 μM, respectively, were twice that of a natural antioxidant, vitamin C; the EC50 values of the 12 other indoline amides, which ranged from 29.05 to 43.52 μM, were similar to that of vitamin C. Structure-activity relationships indicated that the DPPH radical scavenging activities of these indoline amides correlate with the numbers and positions of the phenolic hydroxy groups. PMID:26562741

  9. A Method for Evaluating Volt-VAR Optimization Field Demonstrations

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Kevin P.; Weaver, T. F.

    2014-08-31

    In a regulated business environment a utility must be able to validate that deployed technologies provide quantifiable benefits to the end-use customers. For traditional technologies there are well established procedures for determining what benefits will be derived from the deployment. But for many emerging technologies procedures for determining benefits are less clear and completely absent in some cases. Volt-VAR Optimization is a technology that is being deployed across the nation, but there are still numerous discussions about potential benefits and how they are achieved. This paper will present a method for the evaluation, and quantification of benefits, for field deployments of Volt-VAR Optimization technologies. In addition to the basic methodology, the paper will present a summary of results, and observations, from two separate Volt-VAR Optimization field evaluations using the proposed method.

  10. Correlation inequalities for two-component hypercubic /var phi//sub 4/ models

    SciTech Connect

    Soria, J.L.

    1988-08-01

    A collection of new and already known correlation inequalities is found for a family of two-component hypercubic /var phi//sub 4/ models, using techniques of duplicated variables, rotated correlation inequalities, and random walk representation. Among the interesting new inequalities are: rotated very special Dunlop-Newman inequality var phi//sub 1x//sup 2/; /var phi//sub 1z//sup 2/ + /var phi//sub 2z//sup 2/ greater than or equal to 0, rotated Griffiths I inequality var phi//sub 1x//var-phi//sub 1y/; /var phi//sub 1z//sup 2/ - /var phi//sub 2z//sup 2/> greater than or equal to 0, and anti-Lebowitz inequality u/sub 4//sup 1111/ greater than or equal to 0.

  11. BZ UMa and Var Her 04: Orphan TOADS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, A.; Howell, S.

    2005-05-01

    Both BZ UMa and Var Her 04 are cataclysmic variable stars without a home. Neither fit easily into current classification systems so may extend the population distribution of two unique CV types: UGWZ dwarf novae and intermediate polars. New outburst photometry and archival X-Ray data shed some new light on BZ UMa's high energy state and new spectral and IR observations from Spitzer of dust around the newly discovered cataclysmic variable Var Her 04 may help find it a home as well.

  12. Crude oil from the var'egansk field. [Siberia

    SciTech Connect

    Driatskaya, Z.V.; Kaminskii, E.K.; Krylova, S.M.; Mkhchiyan, M.A.

    1982-09-01

    This article presents results from an investigation of a representative sample of the crude oil of the BV group (BV/sub 6/, BV/sub 7/, BV/sub 8/, and BV/sub 9/), taken at a central gathering point in the Tyumen Oblast. It indicates that Var'egansk crude is low-sulfur, medium-resin, and medium-wax. The Var'egansk field is a single-bed field, and its deposits are confined to the Jurassic and Cretaceous systems (Valanginian and Hauterivian-Barremian stages).

  13. New Record of Mariannaea elegans var. elegans in Korea.

    PubMed

    Tang, Longqing; Hyun, Min Woo; Yun, Yeo Hong; Suh, Dong Yeon; Kim, Seong Hwan; Sung, Gi Ho

    2012-03-01

    A Mariannaea fungus was isolated during investigation of an elm tree infested with unidentified beetles. Based on morphological characteristics and molecular analysis of the internal transcribed spacer rDNA sequence, the fungus was identified as Mariannaea elegans var. elegans. Fungal growth was better on malt extract agar than on potato dextrose agar and oatmeal agar. Optimal temperature and pH for growth of the fungus were 30℃ and pH 7.0, respectively. The fungus was found to have the ability to produce extracellular enzymes such as amylase, β-glucosidase, cellulase, and protease. This is first report on M. elegans var. elegans in Korea. PMID:22783129

  14. Genome-wide identification of aquaporin encoding genes in Brassica oleracea and their phylogenetic sequence comparison to Brassica crops and Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Diehn, Till A.; Pommerrenig, Benjamin; Bernhardt, Nadine; Hartmann, Anja; Bienert, Gerd P.

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are essential channel proteins that regulate plant water homeostasis and the uptake and distribution of uncharged solutes such as metalloids, urea, ammonia, and carbon dioxide. Despite their importance as crop plants, little is known about AQP gene and protein function in cabbage (Brassica oleracea) and other Brassica species. The recent releases of the genome sequences of B. oleracea and Brassica rapa allow comparative genomic studies in these species to investigate the evolution and features of Brassica genes and proteins. In this study, we identified all AQP genes in B. oleracea by a genome-wide survey. In total, 67 genes of four plant AQP subfamilies were identified. Their full-length gene sequences and locations on chromosomes and scaffolds were manually curated. The identification of six additional full-length AQP sequences in the B. rapa genome added to the recently published AQP protein family of this species. A phylogenetic analysis of AQPs of Arabidopsis thaliana, B. oleracea, B. rapa allowed us to follow AQP evolution in closely related species and to systematically classify and (re-) name these isoforms. Thirty-three groups of AQP-orthologous genes were identified between B. oleracea and Arabidopsis and their expression was analyzed in different organs. The two selectivity filters, gene structure and coding sequences were highly conserved within each AQP subfamily while sequence variations in some introns and untranslated regions were frequent. These data suggest a similar substrate selectivity and function of Brassica AQPs compared to Arabidopsis orthologs. The comparative analyses of all AQP subfamilies in three Brassicaceae species give initial insights into AQP evolution in these taxa. Based on the genome-wide AQP identification in B. oleracea and the sequence analysis and reprocessing of Brassica AQP information, our dataset provides a sequence resource for further investigations of the physiological and molecular functions of

  15. Seed colour loci, homoeology and linkage groups of the C genome chromosomes revealed in Brassica rapa–B. oleracea monosomic alien addition lines

    PubMed Central

    Heneen, Waheeb K.; Geleta, Mulatu; Brismar, Kerstin; Xiong, Zhiyong; Pires, J. Chris; Hasterok, Robert; Stoute, Andrew I.; Scott, Roderick J.; King, Graham J.; Kurup, Smita

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Brassica rapa and B. oleracea are the progenitors of oilseed rape B. napus. The addition of each chromosome of B. oleracea to the chromosome complement of B. rapa results in a series of monosomic alien addition lines (MAALs). Analysis of MAALs determines which B. oleracea chromosomes carry genes controlling specific phenotypic traits, such as seed colour. Yellow-seeded oilseed rape is a desirable breeding goal both for food and livestock feed end-uses that relate to oil, protein and fibre contents. The aims of this study included developing a missing MAAL to complement an available series, for studies on seed colour control, chromosome homoeology and assignment of linkage groups to B. oleracea chromosomes. Methods A new batch of B. rapa–B. oleracea aneuploids was produced to generate the missing MAAL. Seed colour and other plant morphological features relevant to differentiation of MAALs were recorded. For chromosome characterization, Snow's carmine, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) were used. Key Results The final MAAL was developed. Morphological traits that differentiated the MAALs comprised cotyledon number, leaf morphology, flower colour and seed colour. Seed colour was controlled by major genes on two B. oleracea chromosomes and minor genes on five other chromosomes of this species. Homoeologous pairing was largely between chromosomes with similar centromeric positions. FISH, GISH and a parallel microsatellite marker analysis defined the chromosomes in terms of their linkage groups. Conclusions A complete set of MAALs is now available for genetic, genomic, evolutionary and breeding perspectives. Defining chromosomes that carry specific genes, physical localization of DNA markers and access to established genetic linkage maps contribute to the integration of these approaches, manifested in the confirmed correspondence of linkage groups with specific chromosomes. Applications include marker

  16. Genome-wide identification of aquaporin encoding genes in Brassica oleracea and their phylogenetic sequence comparison to Brassica crops and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Diehn, Till A; Pommerrenig, Benjamin; Bernhardt, Nadine; Hartmann, Anja; Bienert, Gerd P

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are essential channel proteins that regulate plant water homeostasis and the uptake and distribution of uncharged solutes such as metalloids, urea, ammonia, and carbon dioxide. Despite their importance as crop plants, little is known about AQP gene and protein function in cabbage (Brassica oleracea) and other Brassica species. The recent releases of the genome sequences of B. oleracea and Brassica rapa allow comparative genomic studies in these species to investigate the evolution and features of Brassica genes and proteins. In this study, we identified all AQP genes in B. oleracea by a genome-wide survey. In total, 67 genes of four plant AQP subfamilies were identified. Their full-length gene sequences and locations on chromosomes and scaffolds were manually curated. The identification of six additional full-length AQP sequences in the B. rapa genome added to the recently published AQP protein family of this species. A phylogenetic analysis of AQPs of Arabidopsis thaliana, B. oleracea, B. rapa allowed us to follow AQP evolution in closely related species and to systematically classify and (re-) name these isoforms. Thirty-three groups of AQP-orthologous genes were identified between B. oleracea and Arabidopsis and their expression was analyzed in different organs. The two selectivity filters, gene structure and coding sequences were highly conserved within each AQP subfamily while sequence variations in some introns and untranslated regions were frequent. These data suggest a similar substrate selectivity and function of Brassica AQPs compared to Arabidopsis orthologs. The comparative analyses of all AQP subfamilies in three Brassicaceae species give initial insights into AQP evolution in these taxa. Based on the genome-wide AQP identification in B. oleracea and the sequence analysis and reprocessing of Brassica AQP information, our dataset provides a sequence resource for further investigations of the physiological and molecular functions of

  17. The VarS/VarA two-component system modulates the activity of the Vibrio cholerae quorum-sensing transcriptional regulator HapR

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Amy M.; Liu, Zhi; Cai, Tao

    2011-01-01

    The human pathogen Vibrio cholerae uses quorum sensing to regulate the expression of a number of phenotypes, including virulence factor production, in response to changes in cell density. It produces small molecules called autoinducers that increase in concentration as cell density increases, and these autoinducers bind to membrane sensors once they reach a certain threshold. This binding leads to signalling through a downstream phosphorelay pathway to alter the expression of the transcriptional regulator HapR. Previously, it was shown that the VarS/VarA two-component system acts on a component of the phosphorelay pathway upstream of HapR to regulate HapR expression levels. Here, we show that in addition to this mechanism of regulation, VarS and VarA also indirectly modulate HapR protein activity. This modulation is mediated by the small RNA CsrB but is independent of the known quorum-sensing system that links the autoinducers to HapR. Thus, the VarS/VarA two-component system intersects with the quorum-sensing network at two levels. In both cases, the effect of VarS and VarA on quorum sensing is dependent on the Csr small RNAs, which regulate carbon metabolism, suggesting that V. cholerae may integrate nutrient status and cell density sensory inputs to tailor its gene expression profile more precisely to surrounding conditions. PMID:21393367

  18. [Induction and identification of polyploid of Astragalus membranaceus var. mongholicus].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuxiang; Gao, Jianping; Zhao, Xiaoming

    2003-05-01

    In this article, improved agar painting method, with semi-solid of 0.2% colchicine and 0.1% agar, was adopted to treat apical buds of Astragalus membranaceus var. mongholicus (Bge.) Hsiao seedlings. Obtained plants were proved to be tetraploids by identification of biological characteristics and chromosome numbers. PMID:14535010

  19. [Experiment on polyploid induction of Angelica dahurica var. formosana].

    PubMed

    Peng, F; Zhou, R; Liu, J

    1999-12-01

    Colchicine solution was applied to the primary adventitious buds of Angelica dahurica var. formosana in vitro to induce the polyploid. Compared with non-treated plantlet, the morphology, microhisology, and chromosome number of treated plantlets are varied. It proved that the polyploid induction was effective. PMID:12571900

  20. Indolizidine, Antiinfective and Antiparasitic Compounds from Prosopis glandulosa var. glandulosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prosopilosidine, a new potent antiinfective and antiparasitic 2,3-dihydro-1H-indolizinium chloride, (1), was isolated from Prosopis glandulosa Torr. var. glandulosa. Furthermore, three additional new and one known indolizidines, prosopilosine (2), isoprosopilosine (3), isoprosopilosidine (4) and jul...

  1. Cycloartane-Type Saponins from Astragalus tmoleus var. tmoleus.

    PubMed

    Avunduk, Sibel; Mitaine-Offer, Anne-Claire; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Tanaka, Chiaki; Lacaille-Dubois, Marie-Aleth

    2016-01-01

    Five known cycloartane-type glycosides were isolated from the roots of A. tmoleus Boiss. var. tmoleus. The identification of these compounds was mainly achieved by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques and FABMS. The results of our studies confirm that triterpene saponins with the cycloartane-type skeleton might be chemotaxonomically significant for the genus Astragalus. PMID:26996015

  2. Will chemical defenses become more effective against specialist herbivores under elevated CO2?

    PubMed

    Landosky, John M; Karowe, David N

    2014-10-01

    Elevated atmospheric CO2 is known to affect plant-insect herbivore interactions. Elevated CO2 causes leaf nitrogen to decrease, the ostensible cause of herbivore compensatory feeding. CO2 may also affect herbivore consumption by altering chemical defenses via changes in plant hormones. We considered the effects of elevated CO2, in conjunction with soil fertility and damage (simulated herbivory), on glucosinolate concentrations of mustard (Brassica nigra) and collard (B. oleracea var. acephala) and the effects of leaf nitrogen and glucosinolate groups on specialist Pieris rapae consumption. Elevated CO2 affected B. oleracea but not B. nigra glucosinolates; responses to soil fertility and damage were also species-specific. Soil fertility and damage also affected B. oleracea glucosinolates differently under elevated CO2. Glucosinolates did not affect P. rapae consumption at either CO2 concentration in B. nigra, but had CO2-specific effects on consumption in B. oleracea. At ambient CO2, leaf nitrogen had strong effects on glucosinolate concentrations and P. rapae consumption but only gluconasturtiin was a feeding stimulant. At elevated CO2, direct effects of leaf nitrogen were weaker, but glucosinolates had stronger effects on consumption. Gluconasturtiin and aliphatic glucosinolates were feeding stimulants and indole glucosinolates were feeding deterrents. These results do not support the compensatory feeding hypothesis as the sole driver of changes in P. rapae consumption under elevated CO2. Support for hormone-mediated CO2 response (HMCR) was mixed; it explained few treatment effects on constitutive or induced glucosinolates, but did explain patterns in SEMs. Further, the novel feeding deterrent effect of indole glucosinolates under elevated CO2 in B. oleracae underscores the importance of defensive chemistry in CO2 response. We speculate that P. rapae indole glucosinolate detoxification mechanisms may have been overwhelmed under elevated CO2 forcing slowed

  3. Formation of the Fe-S cluster of ferredoxin in lysed spinach chloroplasts. [Spinacia oleracea

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Mitsui, Akira; Matsubara, Hiroshi )

    1991-01-01

    In vitro formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster of ferredoxin (Fd) has been achieved by incubating apo-Fd and ({sup 35}S)cysteine with osmotically lysed chloroplasts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea). Correct integration of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster into Fd was verified on the basis of the following: (a) Under nondenaturing conditions, {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd showed the same electrophoretic mobility as authentic holo-Fd; (b) {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd showed an ability to bind Fd-NADP{sup +} reductase; (c) the {sup 35}S-labeled moiety was removed from the Fd polypeptide by TCA treatment but not by 2-mercaptoethanol treatment; (d) externally added pea II apo-Fd was converted to {sup 35}S-labeled holo-Fd. This reconstitution was dependent on both ATP and light, and formation of the {sup 35}S-labeled Fe-S cluster was observed upon addition of ATP or when an ATP generation-system was constructed in the light. In contrast, ATP-consuming systems abolished the Fe-S cluster formation. A non-hydrolyzable ATP analog was unable to serve as an ATP substitute, indicating the requirement of ATP hydrolysis for cluster formation. GTP was able to substitute for ATP, but CTP and UTP were less effective. Fe-S cluster formation in lysed chloroplasts was stimulated by light even in the presence of added ATP. Light stimulation was inhibited by DCMU or methyl viologen but not by NH{sub 4}{sup +}. NADPH was able to substitute for light, indicating that light energy is required for the production of reducing compounds such as NADPH in addition to the generation of ATP.

  4. Physiological and biochemical adverse effects of heavy metals on Brassica oleracea grown in Sanganer area, India.

    PubMed

    Marwari, Richa; Khan, T I

    2012-04-01

    The paper reveals results of a study carried out in agricultural fields of Sanganer town in India. This town is situated 20 km away from the heart of Jaipur city. In the study area (Amanishah Nalla Sanganer, Jaipur) vegetables are grown in the fields receiving sewerage and textile wastewater. Water, soil and crop (plant samples) were collected from the agricultural fields of Sanganer for analysis. Wastewater (from Amanishsh Nalla) used as irrigation water in agricultural fields of Sanganer town was found to contain 6.127 mg/ L of zinc, 7.116 mg/L of Copper, 5.114 mg/L of Chromium and 4.774 mg/L of lead as the highest amount of respective heavy metals. Soil from agricultural fields was found to contain 11.247 mg/g of zinc, 6.410 mg/g of Copper, 3.514 mg/g of Chromium and 2.619 mg/g of lead. Brassica oleracea (plant material) grown in the Sanganer area was analysed for heavy metal contents. Plant fruit contained 5.730 mg/g of zinc, 7.380 mg/g of Copper, 5.940 mg/g of Chromium and 2.170 mg/g of lead as the highest amount of heavy metals. Use of wasterwater alters the nutritional value of the vegetables grown here and in long run consumption of such vegetables may impose health hazards in human beings, which is a matter of concern. PMID:24749378

  5. Phytochemical and nutrient composition of the freeze-dried amazonian palm berry, Euterpe oleraceae mart. (acai).

    PubMed

    Schauss, Alexander G; Wu, Xianli; Prior, Ronald L; Ou, Boxin; Patel, Dinesh; Huang, Dejian; Kababick, James P

    2006-11-01

    Euterpe oleraceae is a large palm tree indigenous to the Amazon River and its tributaries and estuaries in South America. Its fruit, known as acai, is of great economic value to native people. In this study, a standardized freeze-dried acai fruit pulp/skin powder was used for all analyses and tests. Among many findings, anthocyanins (ACNs), proanthocyanidins (PACs), and other flavonoids were found to be the major phytochemicals. Two ACNs, cyandin 3-glucoside and cyanidin 3-rutinoside were found to be predominant ACNs; three others were also found as minor ACNs. The total content of ACNs was measured as 3.1919 mg/g dry weight (DW). Polymers were found to be the major PACs. The concentration of total PACs was calculated as 12.89 mg/g DW. Other flavonoids, namely, homoorientin, orientin, isovitexin, scoparin, and taxifolin deoxyhexose, along with several unknown flavonoids, were also detected. Resveratrol was found but at a very low concentration. In addition, components including fatty acids, amino acids, sterols, minerals, and other nutrients were analyzed and quantified. Total polyunsaturated fatty acid, total monounsaturated fatty acid, and total saturated fatty acids contributed to 11.1%, 60.2%, and 28.7% of total fatty acid. Oleic acid (53.9%) and palmitic acid (26.7%) were found to be the two dominant fatty acids. Nineteen amino acids were found; the total amino acid content was determined to be 7.59% of total weight. The total sterols accounted for 0.048% by weight of powder. The three sterols B-sitosterol, campesterol, and sigmasterol were identified. A complete nutrient analysis is also presented. Microbiological analysis was also performed. PMID:17061839

  6. Cytotoxic effects of extract of Acmella oleraceae (Jambú) in Rhipicephalus microplus females ticks.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Patrícia Rosa; de Carvalho Castro, Karina Neoob; Anholeto, Luis Adriano; Camargo Mathias, Maria Izabel

    2016-08-01

    The present study analyzed the effects of different concentrations of the hexane extract of A. oleraceae (HEAO) (Jambú) on the germ cells of semi-engorged Rhipicephalus microplus female ticks, through a morpho-histological study, evaluating the effectiveness of the extract in the genesis of the individuals. To perform this analysis, 100 semi-engorged females were divided into five groups with 20 individuals each: groups I and II, respectively constituted by distilled water control and 50% ethanol + 1% DMSO, and groups III, IV, and V constituted by treatment with HEAO in the concentrations of 12.5, 25.0 and 50.0 mg/mL, respectively. All the ticks were immersed in the different concentrations of the extract or in distilled water for 5 minutes, dried and conditioned in BOD incubator for 7 days. The individuals of the treatment groups revealed the action of this extract showing alterations in the germ cells of the females from the different groups when compared with those from the groups I and II (control groups). These alterations were mainly related to the size and shape of the oocytes; number of yolk granules; presence, number, size and location of vacuoles in the cytoplasm of all the germ cells; and the presence of nuclear alterations in these cells as well. Thus, it was demonstrated that the concentrations of HEAO affected the germ cells of R. microplus ticks. The effects of the extract are similar to those caused by renowned and efficient chemical products used to control these ticks. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:744-753, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27271726

  7. Characterization of the pulp and kernel oils from Syagrus oleracea, Syagrus romanzoffiana, and Acrocomia aculeata.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, Michelle Cardoso; Jorge, Neuza

    2011-10-01

    Vegetable oils are important sources of essential fatty acids. It is, therefore, important to characterize plant species that can be used as new oil sources. This study aimed to characterize the oils from guariroba (Syagrus oleracea), jerivá (Syagrus romanzoffiana), and macaúba (Acrocomia aculeata). The physicochemical characterization was performed using official analytical methods for oils and fats, free fatty acids, peroxide value, refractive index, iodine value, saponification number, and unsaponifiable matter. The oxidative stability was determined using the Rancimat at 110 °C. The fatty acid composition was performed by gas chromatography. The results were submitted to Tukey's test for the medium to 5% using the ESTAT program. The pulp oils were more unsaturated than kernel oils, as evidenced by the higher refractive index and iodine value, especially the macaúba pulp oil which gave 1.4556 and 80 g I(2) /100 g, respectively, for these indices. The kernel oils were less altered by oxidative process and had high induction period, free fatty acids below 0.5%, and peroxide value around 0.19 meq/kg. The guariroba kernel oil showed the largest induction period, 91.82 h. Practical Application:  The vegetable oils, besides being consumed directly as food, are important raw material for the chemical, pharmaceutical, and food industries. In recent years, the world market of vegetable oils has been characterized by stronger growth of demand over supply. Several species of palm trees are shown to be promising sources of oils. The characterization of oils extracted from some species, such as guariroba, jerivá, and macaúba, has not yet been fully elucidated. For this reason, it becomes important to investigate the physicochemical characterization of these oils, aiming at a possible use in food or in the industry. PMID:22417579

  8. Transcriptome Profiling of Resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans in Cabbage (Brassica oleracea) Roots

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Miaomiao; Lv, Honghao; Ma, Jian; Xu, Donghui; Li, Hailong; Yang, Limei; Kang, Jungen; Wang, Xiaowu; Fang, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans (FOC) is a destructive disease of Brassica crops, which results in severe yield losses. There is little information available about the mechanism of disease resistance. To obtain an overview of the transcriptome profiles in roots of R4P1, a Brassica oleracea variety that is highly resistant to fusarium wilt, we compared the transcriptomes of samples inoculated with FOC and samples inoculated with distilled water. RNA-seq analysis generated more than 136 million 100-bp clean reads, which were assembled into 62,506 unigenes (mean size = 741 bp). Among them, 49,959 (79.92%) genes were identified based on sequence similarity searches, including SwissProt (29,050, 46.47%), Gene Ontology (GO) (33,767, 54.02%), Clusters of Orthologous Groups (KOG) (14,721, 23.55%) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Pathway database (KEGG) (12,974, 20.76%) searches; digital gene expression analysis revealed 885 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between infected and control samples at 4, 12, 24 and 48 hours after inoculation. The DEGs were assigned to 31 KEGG pathways. Early defense systems, including the MAPK signaling pathway, calcium signaling and salicylic acid-mediated hypersensitive response (SA-mediated HR) were activated after pathogen infection. SA-dependent systemic acquired resistance (SAR), ethylene (ET)- and jasmonic (JA)-mediated pathways and the lignin biosynthesis pathway play important roles in plant resistance. We also analyzed the expression of defense-related genes, such as genes encoding pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins, UDP-glycosyltransferase (UDPG), pleiotropic drug resistance, ATP-binding cassette transporters (PDR-ABC transporters), myrosinase, transcription factors and kinases, which were differentially expressed. The results of this study may contribute to efforts to identify and clone candidate genes associated with disease resistance and to uncover the molecular mechanism underlying

  9. Genetic improvement of purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.) and its future prospects.

    PubMed

    Amirul Alam, Md; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Rafii, M Y; Hamid, Azizah Abdul; Kamal Uddin, Md; Alam, M Z; Latif, M A

    2014-11-01

    Common purslane (Portulaca oleracea), also known as pigweed, fatweed, pusle, and little hogweed, is an annual succulent herb in the family Portulacaceae that is found in most corners of the globe. From the ancient ages purslane has been treated as a major weed of vegetables as well as other crops. However, worldwide researchers and nutritionists have studied this plant as a potential vegetable crop for humans as well as animals. Purslane is a nutritious vegetable with high antioxidant properties and recently has been recognized as the richest source of α-linolenic acid, essential omega-3 and 6 fatty acids, ascorbic acid, glutathione, α-tocopherol and β-carotene. The lack of vegetable sources of ω-3 fatty acids has resulted in a growing level of attention to introduce purslane as a new cultivated vegetable. In the rapid-revolutionizing worldwide atmosphere, the ability to produce improved planting material appropriate to diverse and varying rising conditions is a supreme precedence. Though various published reports on morphological, physiological, nutritional and medicinal aspects of purslane are available, research on the genetic improvement of this promising vegetable crop are scant. Now it is necessary to conduct research for the genetic improvement of this plant. Genetic improvement of purslane is also a real scientific challenge. Scientific modernization of conventional breeding with the advent of advance biotechnological and molecular approaches such as tissue culture, protoplast fusion, genetic transformation, somatic hybridization, marker-assisted selection, qualitative trait locus mapping, genomics, informatics and various statistical representation have opened up new opportunities of revising the relationship between genetic diversity, agronomic performance and response to breeding for varietal improvement. This review is an attempt to amalgamate the assorted scientific information on purslane propagation, cultivation, varietal improvement, nutrient

  10. Effects of Portulaca oleracea ethanolic extract on reproductive system of aging female mice

    PubMed Central

    Ahangarpour, Akram; Lamoochi, Zohreh; Fathi Moghaddam, Hadi; Mansouri, Seyed Mohamad Taghi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aging contains morphological and functional deterioration in biological systems. D-galactose (D-gal) generates free radicals and accelerates aging. Portulaca oleracea (Purslane) may have protective effect against oxidative stress. Objective: Purslane ethanolic extract effects were evaluated on antioxidant indices and sex hormone in D-gal aging female mice. Materials and Methods: 48 female NMRI mice (25-35 gr) were randomly divided into, 6 groups: 1- control (normal saline for 45 days), 2- Purslane (200 mg/kg for last 3 weeks), 3-D-gal (500 mg/kg for 45 days), 4-D-gal+Purslane, 5- Aging, 6-Aging+Purslane. Sex hormones, antioxidants and malondialdehyde (MDA) level of ovary and uterus were measured. Histological assessment was also done. Results: In D-gal treated and aging animals, LH and FSH levels were significantly increased (p<0.001) while estrogen and progesterone levels were significantly reduced (p<0.001) in comparison with control group. MDA contents were significantly increased in ovaries and uterus of D-gal and aging groups (p<0.01). Superoxide dismutase (SOD) (p<0.001) and catalase (p<0.01) activities were significantly decreased in both aging and D-gal treated animals. Ovarian follicles were degenerated and atrophy on uterine wall and endometrial glands was observed in D-gal and aging groups. Alteration in hormone levels, MDA contents and antioxidant activity were significantly reversed by Purslane (p<0.05). Purslane could also improve histological changes such as atrophy of endometrium. Conclusion: These findings indicate that Purslane can attenuate aging alternations induced by D-gal and aging in female reproductive system. PMID:27294220