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Sample records for oligopeptide transporter suppress

  1. Characterization of the PT clade of oligopeptide transporters in rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oligopeptide transporters (OPTs) are a group of membrane-localized proteins with a broad range of substrate transport capabilities, and which are thought to contribute to many biological processes. Nine OPTs belonging to the peptide transport (PT) clade were identified in the rice (Oryza sativa L.) ...

  2. Electronic transport through oligopeptide chains: An artificial prototype of a molecular diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, J. I. N.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Fulco, U. L.; Mauriz, P. W.; Sarmento, R. G.

    2014-09-01

    Using an effective tight-binding model, together with a transfer matrix technique, we investigate the electronic transport through an oligopeptide chain composed by two amino acid pairs alanine-lysine (Ala-Lys) and threonine-alanine (Thr-Ala), respectively, sandwiched between two platinum electrodes. Our results show that factors such as the oligopeptide chain length and the possible combinations between the amino acids residues are crucial to the diode-like profile of the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, whose asymmetric curves were analyzed using the inverted rectification ratio (IRR).

  3. H(+)/peptide transporter (PEPT2) is expressed in human epidermal keratinocytes and is involved in skin oligopeptide transport.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Michiko; Katayoshi, Takeshi; Kobayashi-Nakamura, Kumiko; Akagawa, Mitsugu; Tsuji-Naito, Kentaro

    2016-07-01

    Peptide transporter 2 (PEPT2) is a member of the proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter family, which mediates the cellular uptake of oligopeptides and peptide-like drugs. Although PEPT2 is expressed in many tissues, its expression in epidermal keratinocytes remains unclear. We investigated PEPT2 expression profile and functional activity in keratinocytes. We confirmed PEPT2 mRNA expression in three keratinocyte lines (normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs), immortalized keratinocytes, and malignant keratinocytes) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. In contrast to PEPT1, PEPT2 expression in the three keratinocytes was similar or higher than that in HepG2 cells, used as PEPT2-positive cells. Immunolocalization analysis using human skin showed epidermal PEPT2 localization. We studied keratinocyte transport function by measuring the oligopeptide content using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Glycylsarcosine uptake in NHEKs was pH-dependent, suggesting that keratinocytes could absorb small peptides in the presence of an inward H(+) gradient. We also performed a skin-permeability test of several oligopeptides using skin substitute, suggesting that di- and tripeptides pass actively through the epidermis. In conclusion, PEPT2 is expressed in keratinocytes and involved in skin oligopeptide uptake. PMID:27216463

  4. Peptide Selectivity of the Proton-Coupled Oligopeptide Transporter from Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Neha; Aduri, Nanda G; Iqbal, Anna; Prabhala, Bala K; Mirza, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Peptide transport in living organisms is facilitated by either primary transport, hydrolysis of ATP, or secondary transport, cotransport of protons. In this study, we focused on investigating the ligand specificity of the Neisseria meningitidis proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter (NmPOT). It has been shown that the gene encoding this transporter is upregulated during infection. NmPOT conformed to the typical chain length preference as observed in prototypical transporters of this family. In contrast to prototypical transporters, it was unable to accommodate a positively charged peptide residue at the C-terminus position of the substrate peptide. Sequence analysis of the active site of NmPOT displayed a distinctive aromatic patch, which has not been observed in any other transporters from this family. This aromatic patch may be involved in providing NmPOT with its atypical preferences. This study provides important novel information towards understanding how these transporters recognize their substrates. PMID:27438044

  5. Only One of Four Oligopeptide Transport Systems Mediates Nitrogen Nutrition in Staphylococcus aureus▿

    PubMed Central

    Hiron, Aurelia; Borezée-Durant, Elise; Piard, Jean-Christophe; Juillard, Vincent

    2007-01-01

    Oligopeptides internalized by oligopeptide permease (Opp) transporters play key roles in bacterial nutrition, signaling, and virulence. To date, two opp operons, opp-1 and opp-2, have been identified in Staphylococcus aureus. Systematic in silico analysis of 11 different S. aureus genomes revealed the existence of two new opp operons, opp-3 and opp-4, plus an opp-5A gene encoding a putative peptide-binding protein. With the exception of opp-4, the opp operons were present in all S. aureus strains. Within a single strain, the different opp operons displayed little sequence similarity and distinct genetic organization. Transcriptional studies showed that opp-1, opp-2, opp-3, and opp-4 operons were polycistronic and that opp-5A is monocistronic. We designed a minimal chemically defined medium for S. aureus RN6390 and showed that all opp genes were expressed but at different levels. Where tested, OppA protein production paralleled transcriptional profiles. opp-3, which encodes proteins most similar to known peptide transport proteins, displayed the highest expression level and was the only transporter to be regulated by specific amino acids, tyrosine and phenylalanine. Defined deletion mutants in one or several peptide permeases were constructed and tested for their capacity to grow in peptide-containing medium. Among the four putative Opp systems, Opp-3 was the only system able to provide oligopeptides for growth, ranging in length from 3 to 8 amino acids. Dipeptides were imported exclusively by DtpT, a proton-driven di- and tripeptide permease. These data provide a first complete inventory of the peptide transport systems opp and dtpT of S. aureus. Among them, the newly identified Opp-3 appears to be the main Opp system supplying the cell with peptides as nutritional sources. PMID:17496096

  6. Stability, metabolism and transport of D-Asp(OBzl)-Ala--a model prodrug with affinity for the oligopeptide transporter.

    PubMed

    Steffansen, B; Lepist, E I; Taub, M E; Larsen, B D; Frokjaer, S; Lennernäs, H

    1999-04-01

    The model prodrug D-Asp(OBzl)-Ala has previously been shown to have affinity and to be transported by the oligopeptide transporter PepT1 expressed in Caco-2 cells. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the aqueous stability of D-Asp(OBzl)-Ala and its in vitro metabolism in different gastrointestinal media arising from rats and humans, as well as in human plasma. The second major aim of the study was to evaluate our previous study in Caco-2 cell culture, by determining the effective intestinal permeability (Peff) of D-Asp(OBzl)-Ala in situ using the single-pass rat perfusion model. The aqueous stability studies show water, general buffer, as well as specific acid and base catalysis of D-Asp(OBzl)-Ala. The degradation of the model prodrug was independent of ionic strength. The half-lives in rat jejunal fluid and homogenate were >3 h. In human gastric and intestinal fluids, the half-lives were >3 h and 2.3+/-0. 03 h, respectively. Using the rat single-pass perfusion technique, the effective jejunal permeability (Peff) of D-Asp(OBzl)-Ala was determined to be high (1.29+/-0.5.10-4 cm/s). The 32 times higher Peff value found in the perfusion model compared to Caco-2 cells is most likely due to a higher functional expression of the oligopeptide transporter. Rat jejuna Peff was reduced by approximately 50% in the presence of well known oligopeptide transporter substrates, such as Gly-Sar and cephalexin. It may be that D-Asp(OBzl)-Ala is primarily absorbed intact by the rat jejunal oligopeptide transporter, since the stability in the intestinal homogenate and fluids was rather high (t1/2>2.3 h). PMID:10072480

  7. Accurate Prediction of Ligand Affinities for a Proton-Dependent Oligopeptide Transporter.

    PubMed

    Samsudin, Firdaus; Parker, Joanne L; Sansom, Mark S P; Newstead, Simon; Fowler, Philip W

    2016-02-18

    Membrane transporters are critical modulators of drug pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety. One example is the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter PepT1, also known as SLC15A1, which is responsible for the uptake of the ?-lactam antibiotics and various peptide-based prodrugs. In this study, we modeled the binding of various peptides to a bacterial homolog, PepTSt, and evaluated a range of computational methods for predicting the free energy of binding. Our results show that a hybrid approach (endpoint methods to classify peptides into good and poor binders and a theoretically exact method for refinement) is able to accurately predict affinities, which we validated using proteoliposome transport assays. Applying the method to a homology model of PepT1 suggests that the approach requires a high-quality structure to be accurate. Our study provides a blueprint for extending these computational methodologies to other pharmaceutically important transporter families. PMID:27028887

  8. Accurate Prediction of Ligand Affinities for a Proton-Dependent Oligopeptide Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Samsudin, Firdaus; Parker, Joanne L.; Sansom, Mark S.P.; Newstead, Simon; Fowler, Philip W.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Membrane transporters are critical modulators of drug pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and safety. One example is the proton-dependent oligopeptide transporter PepT1, also known as SLC15A1, which is responsible for the uptake of the β-lactam antibiotics and various peptide-based prodrugs. In this study, we modeled the binding of various peptides to a bacterial homolog, PepTSt, and evaluated a range of computational methods for predicting the free energy of binding. Our results show that a hybrid approach (endpoint methods to classify peptides into good and poor binders and a theoretically exact method for refinement) is able to accurately predict affinities, which we validated using proteoliposome transport assays. Applying the method to a homology model of PepT1 suggests that the approach requires a high-quality structure to be accurate. Our study provides a blueprint for extending these computational methodologies to other pharmaceutically important transporter families. PMID:27028887

  9. Horizontally acquired oligopeptide transporters favour adaptation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast to oenological environment.

    PubMed

    Marsit, Souhir; Sanchez, Isabelle; Galeote, Virginie; Dequin, Sylvie

    2016-04-01

    In the past decade, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has emerged as a major evolutionary process that has shaped the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeasts. We recently showed that a large Torulaspora microellipsoides genomic island carrying two oligopeptide transporters encoded by FOT genes increases the fitness of wine yeast during fermentation of grape must. However, the impact of these genes on the metabolic network of S. cerevisiae remained uncharacterized. Here we show that Fot-mediated peptide uptake substantially affects the glutamate node and the NADPH/NADP(+) balance, resulting in the delayed uptake of free amino acids and altered profiles of metabolites and volatile compounds. Transcriptome analysis revealed that cells using a higher amount of oligopeptides from grape must are less stressed and display substantial variation in the expression of genes in the central pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, amino acid and protein biosynthesis, and the oxidative stress response. These regulations shed light on the molecular and metabolic mechanisms involved in the higher performance and fitness conferred by the HGT-acquired FOT genes, pinpointing metabolic effects that can positively affect the organoleptic balance of wines. PMID:26549518

  10. CgOpt1, a putative oligopeptide transporter from Colletotrichum gloeosporioides that is involved in responses to auxin and pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. aeschynomene produces high levels of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in axenic cultures and during plant infection. We generated a suppression subtractive hybridization library enriched for IAA-induced genes and identified a clone, which was highly expressed in IAA-containing medium. Results The corresponding gene showed similarity to oligopeptide transporters of the OPT family and was therefore named CgOPT1. Expression of CgOPT1 in mycelia was low, and was enhanced by external application of IAA. cgopt1-silenced mutants produced less spores, had reduced pigmentation, and were less pathogenic to plants than the wild-type strain. IAA enhanced spore formation and caused changes in colony morphology in the wild-type strain, but had no effect on spore formation or colony morphology of the cgopt1-silenced mutants. Conclusion Our results show that IAA induces developmental changes in C. gloeosporioides. These changes are blocked in cgopt1-silenced mutants, suggesting that this protein is involved in regulation of fungal response to IAA. CgOPT1 is also necessary for full virulence, but it is unclear whether this phenotype is related to auxin. PMID:19698103

  11. The identification of oppA gene homologues as part of the oligopeptide transport system in mycoplasmas.

    PubMed

    Wium, Martha; Botes, Annelise; Bellstedt, Dirk U

    2015-03-01

    The lack of an annotated oppA gene as part of many oligopeptide permease (opp) operons has questioned the necessity of the oligopeptide-binding domain (OppA) as a part of the Opp transport system in mycoplasmas. This study investigated the occurrence of an oppA gene as part of the oppBCDF operon in 42 mycoplasma genomes. Except for hemoplasma, all mycoplasmas were found to possess one or more copies of the oppBCDF operon and with the help of similarity searches their oppA genes could be identified. Phylogenetic analysis of the combined OppABCDF amino acid sequences allowed them to be grouped into three types. Each type has a unique set of conserved motifs, which are likely to reflect substrate preference and adaption strategies. Our approach allowed the identification of oppA gene homologues for all mycoplasma opp operons and thereby provides a method for re-evaluating the current annotation of oppA genes in mycoplasma genomes. PMID:25528211

  12. The Oligopeptide Permease Opp Mediates Illicit Transport of the Bacterial P-site Decoding Inhibitor GE81112 †

    PubMed Central

    Maio, Alessandro; Brandi, Letizia; Donadio, Stefano; Gualerzi, Claudio O.

    2016-01-01

    GE81112 is a tetrapeptide antibiotic that binds to the 30S ribosomal subunit and specifically inhibits P-site decoding of the mRNA initiation codon by the fMet-tRNA anticodon. GE81112 displays excellent microbiological activity against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in both minimal and complete, chemically defined, broth, but is essentially inactive in complete complex media. This is due to the presence of peptides that compete with the antibiotic for the oligopeptide permease system (Opp) responsible for its illicit transport into the bacterial cells as demonstrated in the cases of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Mutations that inactivate the Opp system and confer GE81112 resistance arise spontaneously with a frequency of ca. 1 × 10−6, similar to that of the mutants resistant to tri-l-ornithine, a known Opp substrate. On the contrary, cells expressing extrachromosomal copies of the opp genes are extremely sensitive to GE81112 in rich medium and GE81112-resistant mutations affecting the molecular target of the antibiotic were not detected upon examining >109 cells of this type. However, some mutations introduced in the 16S rRNA to confer kasugamycin resistance were found to reduce the sensitivity of the cells to GE81112. PMID:27231947

  13. The Oligopeptide Permease Opp Mediates Illicit Transport of the Bacterial P-site Decoding Inhibitor GE81112.

    PubMed

    Maio, Alessandro; Brandi, Letizia; Donadio, Stefano; Gualerzi, Claudio O

    2016-01-01

    GE81112 is a tetrapeptide antibiotic that binds to the 30S ribosomal subunit and specifically inhibits P-site decoding of the mRNA initiation codon by the fMet-tRNA anticodon. GE81112 displays excellent microbiological activity against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in both minimal and complete, chemically defined, broth, but is essentially inactive in complete complex media. This is due to the presence of peptides that compete with the antibiotic for the oligopeptide permease system (Opp) responsible for its illicit transport into the bacterial cells as demonstrated in the cases of Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Mutations that inactivate the Opp system and confer GE81112 resistance arise spontaneously with a frequency of ca. 1 × 10(-6), similar to that of the mutants resistant to tri-l-ornithine, a known Opp substrate. On the contrary, cells expressing extrachromosomal copies of the opp genes are extremely sensitive to GE81112 in rich medium and GE81112-resistant mutations affecting the molecular target of the antibiotic were not detected upon examining >10⁸ cells of this type. However, some mutations introduced in the 16S rRNA to confer kasugamycin resistance were found to reduce the sensitivity of the cells to GE81112. PMID:27231947

  14. Role of the Oligopeptide Permease ABC Transporter of Moraxella catarrhalis in Nutrient Acquisition and Persistence in the Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Megan M.; Johnson, Antoinette; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Kirkham, Charmaine; Brauer, Aimee L.; Malkowski, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a strict human pathogen that causes otitis media in children and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults, resulting in significant worldwide morbidity and mortality. M. catarrhalis has a growth requirement for arginine; thus, acquiring arginine is important for fitness and survival. M. catarrhalis has a putative oligopeptide permease ABC transport operon (opp) consisting of five genes (oppB, oppC, oppD, oppF, and oppA), encoding two permeases, two ATPases, and a substrate binding protein. Thermal shift assays showed that the purified recombinant substrate binding protein OppA binds to peptides 3 to 16 amino acid residues in length regardless of the amino acid composition. A mutant in which the oppBCDFA gene cluster is knocked out showed impaired growth in minimal medium where the only source of arginine came from a peptide 5 to 10 amino acid residues in length. Whether methylated arginine supports growth of M. catarrhalis is important in understanding fitness in the respiratory tract because methylated arginine is abundant in host tissues. No growth of wild-type M. catarrhalis was observed in minimal medium in which arginine was present only in methylated form, indicating that the bacterium requires l-arginine. An oppA knockout mutant showed marked impairment in its capacity to persist in the respiratory tract compared to the wild type in a mouse pulmonary clearance model. We conclude that the Opp system mediates both uptake of peptides and fitness in the respiratory tract. PMID:25156736

  15. Teleost fish models in membrane transport research: the PEPT1(SLC15A1) H+–oligopeptide transporter as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Alessandro; Barca, Amilcare; Storelli, Carlo; Verri, Tiziano

    2014-01-01

    Human genes for passive, ion-coupled transporters and exchangers are included in the so-called solute carrier (SLC) gene series, to date consisting of 52 families and 398 genes. Teleost fish genes for SLC proteins have also been described in the last two decades, and catalogued in preliminary SLC-like form in 50 families and at least 338 genes after systematic GenBank database mining (December 2010–March 2011). When the kinetic properties of the expressed proteins are studied in detail, teleost fish SLC transporters always reveal extraordinary ‘molecular diversity’ with respect to the mammalian counterparts, which reflects peculiar adaptation of the protein to the physiology of the species and/or to the environment where the species lives. In the case of the H+–oligopeptide transporter PEPT1(SLC15A1), comparative analysis of diverse teleost fish orthologs has shown that the protein may exhibit very eccentric properties in terms of pH dependence (e.g. the adaptation of zebrafish PEPT1 to alkaline pH), temperature dependence (e.g. the adaptation of icefish PEPT1 to sub-zero temperatures) and/or substrate specificity (e.g. the species-specificity of PEPT1 for the uptake of l-lysine-containing peptides). The revelation of such peculiarities is providing new contributions to the discussion on PEPT1 in both basic (e.g. molecular structure–function analyses) and applied research (e.g. optimizing diets to enhance growth of commercially valuable fish). PMID:23981715

  16. OLIGOPEPTIDE TRANSPORTERS AND THEIR ROLE IN FE(II)- AND FE(III)-NICOTIANAMINE TRANSPORT IN RICE (ORYZA SATIVA L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of organisms to transport small peptides (two to five amino acids) is wide-ranging, and is present in humans, bacteria, fungi, archaea, and plants. There are three major groups of peptide transporters, divided by their substrate specificity: the ATP binding cassette (ABC), the peptide tr...

  17. Photospintronics: Magnetic Field-Controlled Photoemission and Light-Controlled Spin Transport in Hybrid Chiral Oligopeptide-Nanoparticle Structures.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Prakash Chandra; Roy, Partha; Kim, Dokyun; Fullerton, Eric E; Cohen, Hagai; Naaman, Ron

    2016-04-13

    The combination of photonics and spintronics opens new ways to transfer and process information. It is shown here that in systems in which organic molecules and semiconductor nanoparticles are combined, matching these technologies results in interesting new phenomena. We report on light induced and spin-dependent charge transfer process through helical oligopeptide-CdSe nanoparticles' (NPs) architectures deposited on ferromagnetic substrates with small coercive force (∼100-200 Oe). The spin control is achieved by the application of the chirality-induced spin-dependent electron transfer effect and is probed by two different methods: spin-controlled electrochemichemistry and photoluminescence (PL) at room temperature. The injected spin could be controlled by excitation of the nanoparticles. By switching the direction of the magnetic field of the substrate, the PL intensity could be alternated. PMID:27027885

  18. Gating Topology of the Proton-Coupled Oligopeptide Symporters

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, Philip W.; Orwick-Rydmark, Marcella; Radestock, Sebastian; Solcan, Nicolae; Dijkman, Patricia M.; Lyons, Joseph A.; Kwok, Jane; Caffrey, Martin; Watts, Anthony; Forrest, Lucy R.; Newstead, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Summary Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters belong to the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) of membrane transporters. Recent crystal structures suggest the MFS fold facilitates transport through rearrangement of their two six-helix bundles around a central ligand binding site; how this is achieved, however, is poorly understood. Using modeling, molecular dynamics, crystallography, functional assays, and site-directed spin labeling combined with double electron-electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy, we present a detailed study of the transport dynamics of two bacterial oligopeptide transporters, PepTSo and PepTSt. Our results identify several salt bridges that stabilize outward-facing conformations and we show that, for all the current structures of MFS transporters, the first two helices of each of the four inverted-topology repeat units form half of either the periplasmic or cytoplasmic gate and that these function cooperatively in a scissor-like motion to control access to the peptide binding site during transport. PMID:25651061

  19. Dynamics of an antibiotic oligopeptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middendorf, H. D.; Alves, N.; Zanotti, J.-M.; Gomes, P.; Bastos, M.

    2006-11-01

    Neutron time-of-flight spectra were measured for an H 2O-hydrated and a nominally dry sample of a 15-residue antibacterial oligopeptide from 99 to 271 K. Proton mobilities, quasielastic broadenings, and changes in low-frequency inelastic intensities characterise the evolution of the peptide energy landscape as a function of momentum transfer and temperature.

  20. Prevention of skeletal muscle atrophy in vitro using anti-ubiquitination oligopeptide carried by atelocollagen.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Nobuhiko; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Maeda, Tasuku; Haruna, Marie; Shiota, Chieko; Ochi, Arisa; Abe, Tomoki; Kohno, Shohei; Ohno, Ayako; Teshima-Kondo, Sigetada; Mori, Hiroyo; Tanaka, Eiji; Nikawa, Takeshi

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy occurs when the rate of protein degradation exceeds that of protein synthesis in various catabolic conditions, such as fasting, disuse, aging, and chronic diseases. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling stimulates muscle growth and suppresses muscle protein breakdown. In atrophied muscles, ubiquitin ligase, Cbl-b, increases and stimulates the ubiquitination and degradation of IRS-1, an intermediate in IGF-1 signaling pathway, resulting in IGF-1 resistance. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of atelocollagen (ATCOL)-transported anti-ubiquitination oligopeptide (Cblin: Cbl-b inhibitor) (consisting of tyrosine phosphorylation domain of IRS-1) in starved C2C12 myotubes. The amount of IRS-1 protein was lower in starved versus unstarved myotubes. The Cblin-ATCOL complex inhibited IRS-1 degradation in a concentration-dependent manner. Myotubes incubated with Cblin-ATCOL complex showed significant resistance to starvation-induced atrophy (p<0.01). Furthermore, the Cblin-ATCOL complex significantly inhibited any decrease in Akt phosphorylation (p<0.01) and localization of FOXO3a to the nucleus in starved myotubes. These results suggest that Cblin prevented starvation-induced C2C12 myotube atrophy by maintaining the IGF-1/Akt/FOXO signaling. Therefore, attachment of anti-ubiquitination oligopeptide, Cblin, to ATCOL enhances its delivery to myotubes and could be a potentially effective strategy in the treatment of atrophic myopathies. PMID:25667084

  1. TcOPT3, a Member of Oligopeptide Transporters from the Hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens, Is a Novel Fe/Zn/Cd/Cu Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yi Ting; Ming, Feng; Chen, Wei Wei; Yan, Jing Ying; Xu, Zheng Yu; Li, Gui Xin; Xu, Chun Yan; Yang, Jian Li; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2012-01-01

    Background Thlaspi caerulescens is a natural selected heavy metal hyperaccumulator that can not only tolerate but also accumulate extremely high levels of heavy metals in the shoots. Thus, to identify the transportors involved in metal long-distance transportation is very important for understanding the mechanism of heavy metal accumulation in this hyperaccumulator. Methodology/Principal Findings We cloned and characterized a novel gene TcOPT3 of OPT family from T. caerulescens. TcOPT3 was pronouncedly expressed in aerial parts, including stem and leaf. Moreover, in situ hybridization analyses showed that TcOPT3 expressed in the plant vascular systems, especially in the pericycle cells that may be involved in the long-distance transportation. The expression of TcOPT3 was highly induced by iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) deficiency, especially in the stem and leaf. Sub-cellular localization showed that TcOPT3 was a plasma membrane-localized protein. Furthermore, heterogonous expression of TcOPT3 by mutant yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) complementation experiments demonstrated that TcOPT3 could transport Fe2+ and Zn2+. Moreover, expression of TcOPT3 in yeast increased metal (Fe, Zn, Cu and Cd) accumulation and resulted in an increased sensitivity to cadmium (Cd) and copper (Cu). Conclusions Our data demonstrated that TcOPT3 might encode an Fe/Zn/Cd/Cu influx transporter with broad-substrate. This is the first report showing that TcOPT3 may be involved in metal long-distance transportation and contribute to the heavy metal hyperaccumulation. PMID:22761683

  2. Electronic structure analysis of glycine oligopeptides and glycine-tryptophan oligopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Yu, Shuai; Yang, Mengshi; Xu, Can; Wang, Yu; Chen, Liang

    2014-03-01

    Using the density functional theory (DFT), we have studied the energy gap, charge distribution, density of states and chemical activity of glycine (Gn) oligopeptides and glycine-tryptophan (GWn) oligopeptides. The results show that: (1) with the increasing of Gn residues, the chemical activity of Gn oligopeptides focuses on the terminal amino and carboxyl groups, which may be the main cause of self-assembly behaviors in Gn oligopeptide chains; (2) the chemical reaction activity has size effect. The size effect disappears when the residue number exceeds 7. The Gn oligopeptides with 7 residues is the shortest chain which has the same reaction activity as that of longer size peptide; (3) the activity of GWn oligopeptides presents size effect and odd-even effect. However, the size effect and odd-even effect both vanish when the chain of GWn oligopeptides is longer than 12 residues. (4) It is difficult in self-assembly for GWn oligopeptide chains, because its activity mainly focuses on the indole ring and the Gn residues at the end of oligopeptides. (5) The big side groups result in the very near energy level of LUMO and LUMO+1 of GWn oligopeptide chains. It shows that the electron-accepting ability of oligopeptide chainsis composed of two orbitals addition. The results in the paper may help us understand the changes of physical and chemical properties of peptide synthesis process.

  3. Collective microdynamics and noise suppression in dispersive electron beam transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gover, Avraham; Dyunin, Egor; Duchovni, Tamir; Nause, Ariel

    2011-12-15

    A general formulation is presented for deep collective interaction micro-dynamics in dispersive e-beam transport. In the regime of transversely coherent interaction, the formulation is applicable to both coherent and random temporal modulation of the electron beam. We demonstrate its use for determining the conditions for suppressing beam current noise below the classical shot-noise level by means of transport through a dispersive section with a small momentum compaction parameter.

  4. Suppression of turbulence and transport by sheared flow

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P. W.

    2000-01-01

    The role of stable shear flow in suppressing turbulence and turbulent transport in plasmas and neutral fluids is reviewed. Localized stable flow shear produces transport barriers whose extensive and highly successful utilization in fusion devices has made them the primary experimental technique for reducing and even eliminating the rapid turbulent losses of heat and particles that characterize fusion-grade plasmas. These transport barriers occur in different plasma regions with disparate physical properties and in a range of confining configurations, indicating a physical process of unusual universality. Flow shear suppresses turbulence by speeding up turbulent decorrelation. This is a robust feature of advection whenever the straining rate of stable mean flow shear exceeds the nonlinear decorrelation rate. Shear straining lowers correlation lengths in the direction of shear and reduces turbulent amplitudes. It also disrupts other processes that feed into or result from turbulence, including the linear instability of important collective modes, the transport-producing correlations between advecting fluid and advectants, and large-scale spatially connected avalanchelike transport events. In plasmas, regions of stable flow shear can be externally driven, but most frequently are created spontaneously in critical transitions between different plasma states. Shear suppression occurs in hydrodynamics and represents an extension of rapid-distortion theory to a long-time-scale nonlinear regime in two-dimensional stable shear flow. Examples from hydrodynamics include the emergence of coherent vortices in decaying two-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence and the reduction of turbulent transport in the stratosphere. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  5. Suppression of turbulent transport in NSTX internal transport barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuh, Howard

    2008-11-01

    Electron transport will be important for ITER where fusion alphas and high-energy beam ions will primarily heat electrons. In the NSTX, internal transport barriers (ITBs) are observed in reversed (negative) shear discharges where diffusivities for electron and ion thermal channels and momentum are reduced. While neutral beam heating can produce ITBs in both electron and ion channels, High Harmonic Fast Wave (HHFW) heating can produce electron thermal ITBs under reversed magnetic shear conditions without momentum input. Interestingly, the location of the electron ITB does not necessarily match that of the ion ITB: the electron ITB correlates well with the minimum in the magnetic shear determined by Motional Stark Effect (MSE) [1] constrained equilibria, whereas the ion ITB better correlates with the maximum ExB shearing rate. Measured electron temperature gradients can exceed critical linear thresholds for ETG instability calculated by linear gyrokinetic codes in the ITB confinement region. The high-k microwave scattering diagnostic [2] shows reduced local density fluctuations at wavenumbers characteristic of electron turbulence for discharges with strongly negative magnetic shear versus weakly negative or positive magnetic shear. Fluctuation reductions are found to be spatially and temporally correlated with the local magnetic shear. These results are consistent with non-linear gyrokinetic simulations predictions showing the reduction of electron transport in negative magnetic shear conditions despite being linearly unstable [3]. Electron transport improvement via negative magnetic shear rather than ExB shear highlights the importance of current profile control in ITER and future devices. [1] F.M. Levinton, H. Yuh et al., PoP 14, 056119 [2] D.R. Smith, E. Mazzucato et al., RSI 75, 3840 [3] Jenko, F. and Dorland, W., PRL 89 225001

  6. Synthesis of analogs of L-valacyclovir and determination of their substrate activity for the oligopeptide transporter in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Friedrichsen, Gerda Marie; Chen, Weiqing; Begtrup, Mikael; Lee, Chao-Pin; Smith, Philip L; Borchardt, Ronald T

    2002-07-01

    L-Valacyclovir, a prodrug of acyclovir, is a substrate for the peptide transporter (PepT1) in the intestinal mucosa, which accounts for its higher than expected oral bioavailability. The substrate activity of L-valacyclovir for PepT1 is surprising, particularly when one considers that the molecule has the structural features of a nucleoside rather than a peptide. In an attempt to better understand the structure-transport relationships (STR) for the interactions of L-valacyclovir with PepT1, analogs of this molecule with structural changes in the guanine moiety were synthesized and their substrate activity for PepT1 in Caco-2 cell monolayers was determined. The analogs synthesized include those that had the guanine moiety of L-valacyclovir substituted with purine, benzimidazole, and 7-azaindole. All three analogs (purine, benzimidazole, and 7-azaindole) exhibited affinity for PepT1 in binding studies, but only the purine analog (as the L-valine ester) showed PepT1-associated transcellular transport across Caco-2 cell monolayers. The benzimidazole and 7-azaindole analogs (as their L-valine esters) were rapidly metabolized by esterase when applied to the apical surface of Caco-2 cells, which probably explains their low penetration as the intact prodrugs via PepT1. PMID:12113886

  7. SUPPRESSION OF ENERGETIC ELECTRON TRANSPORT IN FLARES BY DOUBLE LAYERS

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T. C.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2012-09-20

    During flares and coronal mass ejections, energetic electrons from coronal sources typically have very long lifetimes compared to the transit times across the systems, suggesting confinement in the source region. Particle-in-cell simulations are carried out to explore the mechanisms of energetic electron transport from the corona to the chromosphere and possible confinement. We set up an initial system of pre-accelerated hot electrons in contact with ambient cold electrons along the local magnetic field and let it evolve over time. Suppression of transport by a nonlinear, highly localized electrostatic electric field (in the form of a double layer) is observed after a short phase of free-streaming by hot electrons. The double layer (DL) emerges at the contact of the two electron populations. It is driven by an ion-electron streaming instability due to the drift of the back-streaming return current electrons interacting with the ions. The DL grows over time and supports a significant drop in temperature and hence reduces heat flux between the two regions that is sustained for the duration of the simulation. This study shows that transport suppression begins when the energetic electrons start to propagate away from a coronal acceleration site. It also implies confinement of energetic electrons with kinetic energies less than the electrostatic energy of the DL for the DL lifetime, which is much longer than the electron transit time through the source region.

  8. The Ubiquitin Ligase Ubr11 Is Essential for Oligopeptide Utilization in the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Nakase, Mai; Tohda, Hideki; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2012-01-01

    Uptake of extracellular oligopeptides in yeast is mediated mainly by specific transporters of the peptide transporter (PTR) and oligopeptide transporter (OPT) families. Here, we investigated the role of potential peptide transporters in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Utilization of naturally occurring dipeptides required only Ptr2/SPBC13A2.04c and none of the other 3 OPT proteins (Isp4, Pgt1, and Opt3), whereas only Isp4 was indispensable for tetrapeptide utilization. Both Ptr2 and Isp4 localized to the cell surface, but under rich nutrient conditions Isp4 localized in the Golgi apparatus through the function of the ubiquitin ligase Pub1. Furthermore, the ubiquitin ligase Ubr11 played a significant role in oligopeptide utilization. The mRNA levels of both the ptr2 and isp4 genes were significantly reduced in ubr11Δ cells, and the dipeptide utilization defect in the ubr11Δ mutant was rescued by the forced expression of Ptr2. Consistent with its role in transcriptional regulation of peptide transporter genes, the Ubr11 protein was accumulated in the nucleus. Unlike the situation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the oligopeptide utilization defect in the S. pombe ubr11Δ mutant was not rescued by inactivation of the Tup11/12 transcriptional corepressors, suggesting that the requirement for the Ubr ubiquitin ligase in the upregulation of peptide transporter mRNA levels is conserved in both yeasts; however, the actual mechanism underlying the control appears to be different. We also found that the peptidomimetic proteasome inhibitor MG132 was still operative in a strain lacking all known PTR and OPT peptide transporters. Therefore, irrespective of its peptide-like structure, MG132 is carried into cells independently of the representative peptide transporters. PMID:22226946

  9. A toolbox of oligopeptide-modified polymers for tailored elastomers.

    PubMed

    Croisier, Emmanuel; Liang, Su; Schweizer, Thomas; Balog, Sandor; Mionić, Marijana; Snellings, Ruben; Cugnoni, Joël; Michaud, Véronique; Frauenrath, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials are constructed from limited sets of building blocks but exhibit extraordinary and versatile properties, because hierarchical structure formation lets them employ identical supramolecular motifs for different purposes. Here we exert a similar degree of structural control in synthetic supramolecular elastomers and thus tailor them for a broad range of thermomechanical properties. We show that oligopeptide-terminated polymers selectively self-assemble into small aggregates or nanofibrils, depending on the length of the oligopeptides. This process is self-sorting if differently long oligopeptides are combined so that different nanostructures coexist in bulk mixtures. Blends of polymers with oligopeptides matching in length furnish reinforced elastomers that exhibit shear moduli one order of magnitude higher than the parent polymers. By contrast, novel interpenetrating supramolecular networks that display excellent vibration damping properties are obtained from blends comprising non-matching oligopeptides or unmodified polymers. Hence, blends of oligopeptide-modified polymers constitute a toolbox for tailored elastomers with versatile properties. PMID:25198134

  10. Identification of a novel compound that inhibits osteoclastogenesis by suppressing nucleoside transporters.

    PubMed

    Katsuyama, Shun; Sugino, Kumi; Sasazawa, Yukiko; Nakano, Yoshihiko; Aono, Harumi; Morishita, Keisuke; Kawatani, Makoto; Umezawa, Kazuo; Osada, Hiroyuki; Simizu, Siro

    2016-04-01

    We screened small-molecule compounds that inhibit osteoclast differentiation to find new anti-osteoporosis agents and found that a novel compound, SUKU-1, suppressed osteoclastogenesis. We also synthesized 38 derivatives of SUKU-1 and discovered that nine of them had inhibitory effects on osteoclastogenesis and that SUKU-33 was the most potent inhibitor. Next, we investigated the mechanisms by which SUKU-33 suppressed osteoclast differentiation. By measuring the uptake of [(3) H]-uridine in cells, we found that SUKU-33 suppressed both equilibrative nucleoside transporters and concentrative nucleoside transporters. These results suggest that SUKU-33 inhibits osteoclast differentiation by suppressing nucleoside transporters. PMID:27001232

  11. In Silico Approach towards Designing Virtual Oligopeptides for HRSV

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Ruchi; Piramanayagam, Shanmughavel

    2014-01-01

    HRSV (human respiratory syncytial virus) is a serious cause of lower respiratory tract illness in infants and young children. Designing inhibitors from the proteins involved in virus replication and infection process provides target for new therapeutic treatments. In the present study, in silico docking was performed using motavizumab as a template to design motavizumab derived oligopeptides for developing novel anti-HRSV agents. Additional simulations were conducted to study the conformational propensities of the oligopeptides and confirmed the hypothesis that the designed oligopeptide is highly flexible and capable of assuming stable confirmation. Our study demonstrated the best specific interaction of GEKKLVEAPKS oligopeptide for glycoprotein strain A among various screened oligopeptides. Encouraged by the results, we expect that the proposed scheme will provide rational choices for antibody reengineering which is useful for systematically identifying the possible ways to improve efficacy of existing antibody drugs. PMID:25525622

  12. Non-Statistical Oligopeptide Fragmentation by IR Photons with λ=16-18 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungclas, Hartmut; Komarov, Viacheslav V.; Popova, Anna M.; Schmidt, Lothar

    2015-12-01

    In this article we analyse the vibration excitation and following dissociation of protonated oligopeptide molecules induced by IR photons with λ=16-18 μm. The analysis is based on our previous works in which we considered a specific non-statistical dissociation process in organic molecules containing substructures consisting of chained identical diatomic dipoles such as (CH2)n. Such dipole chains can serve as IR antennas for external radiation in the IR frequency range. The acquired vibration energy accumulated in IR antennas can be large enough to dissociate molecules within a femtosecond time interval by a non-statistical process, which is driven by a radiationless low-energy transport mechanism inside the peptide molecules. We point out in this article that the suggested IR-induced dissociation mechanism can be applied to obtain sequence information of protonated oligopeptides.

  13. Effect of grafted oligopeptides on friction.

    PubMed

    Iarikov, Dmitri D; Ducker, William A

    2013-05-14

    Frictional and normal forces in aqueous solution at 25 °C were measured between a glass particle and oligopeptide films grafted from a glass plate. Homopeptide molecules consisting of 11 monomers of either glutamine, leucine, glutamic acid, lysine, or phenylalanine and one heteropolymer were each "grafted from" an oxidized silicon wafer using microwave-assisted solid-phase peptide synthesis. The peptide films were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Frictional force measurements showed that the oligopeptides increased the magnitude of friction compared to that on a bare hydrophilic silicon wafer but that the friction was a strong function of the nature of the monomer unit. Overall we find that the friction is lower for more hydrophilic films. For example, the most hydrophobic monomer, leucine, exhibited the highest friction whereas the hydrophilic monomer, polyglutamic acid, exhibited the lowest friction at zero load. When the two surfaces had opposite charges, there was a strong attraction, adhesion, and high friction between the surfaces. Friction for all polymers was lower in phosphate-buffered saline than in pure water, which was attributed to lubrication via hydrated salt ions. PMID:23594080

  14. Characterization and Evaluation of the Moraxella catarrhalis Oligopeptide Permease A as a Mucosal Vaccine Antigen▿

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Johnson, Antoinette; Murphy, Timothy F.

    2011-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is a common cause of otitis media in children and of lower respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; therefore, these two groups would benefit from a vaccine to prevent M. catarrhalis infections. A genome mining approach for vaccine antigens identified oligopeptide permease protein A (OppA), an oligopeptide binding protein of an apparent oligopeptide transport system. Analysis of the oppA gene by PCR and sequence analysis revealed that OppA is highly conserved among clinical isolates of M. catarrhalis. Recombinant OppA was expressed as a lipoprotein and purified, and an oppA knockout mutant was constructed. Antiserum raised to recombinant purified OppA recognized epitopes on the bacterial surface of the wild type but not the OppA knockout mutant. Antibodies raised to purified recombinant OppA recognized native OppA in multiple strains. Intranasal immunization of mice induced systemic and mucosal antibodies to OppA and resulted in enhanced clearance of M. catarrhalis in a mouse pulmonary clearance model. OppA is a highly conserved, immunogenic protein that expresses epitopes on the bacterial surface and that induces potentially protective immune responses in a mouse model. OppA should be evaluated further as a vaccine antigen for M. catarrhalis. PMID:21134967

  15. Formation of oligopeptides in high yield under simple programmable conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Garcia, Marc; Surman, Andrew J.; Cooper, Geoffrey J.T.; Suárez-Marina, Irene; Hosni, Zied; Lee, Michael P.; Cronin, Leroy

    2015-01-01

    Many high-yielding reactions for forming peptide bonds have been developed but these are complex, requiring activated amino-acid precursors and heterogeneous supports. Herein we demonstrate the programmable one-pot dehydration–hydration condensation of amino acids forming oligopeptide chains in around 50% yield. A digital recursive reactor system was developed to investigate this process, performing these reactions with control over parameters such as temperature, number of cycles, cycle duration, initial monomer concentration and initial pH. Glycine oligopeptides up to 20 amino acids long were formed with very high monomer-to-oligomer conversion, and the majority of these products comprised three amino acid residues or more. Having established the formation of glycine homo-oligopeptides, we then demonstrated the co-condensation of glycine with eight other amino acids (Ala, Asp, Glu, His, Lys, Pro, Thr and Val), incorporating a range of side-chain functionality. PMID:26442968

  16. The Suppression of Energy Discretization Errors in Multigroup Transport Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, Edward

    2013-06-17

    The Objective of this project is to develop, implement, and test new deterministric methods to solve, as efficiently as possible, multigroup neutron transport problems having an extremely large number of groups. Our approach was to (i) use the standard CMFD method to "coarsen" the space-angle grid, yielding a multigroup diffusion equation, and (ii) use a new multigrid-in-space-and-energy technique to efficiently solve the multigroup diffusion problem. The overall strategy of (i) how to coarsen the spatial an energy grids, and (ii) how to navigate through the various grids, has the goal of minimizing the overall computational effort. This approach yields not only the fine-grid solution, but also coarse-group flux-weighted cross sections that can be used for other related problems.

  17. Transport enhancement and suppression in turbulent magnetic reconnection: A self-consistent turbulence model

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoi, N.; Higashimori, K.; Hoshino, M.

    2013-12-15

    Through the enhancement of transport, turbulence is expected to contribute to the fast reconnection. However, the effects of turbulence are not so straightforward. In addition to the enhancement of transport, turbulence under some environment shows effects that suppress the transport. In the presence of turbulent cross helicity, such dynamic balance between the transport enhancement and suppression occurs. As this result of dynamic balance, the region of effective enhanced magnetic diffusivity is confined to a narrow region, leading to the fast reconnection. In order to confirm this idea, a self-consistent turbulence model for the magnetic reconnection is proposed. With the aid of numerical simulations where turbulence effects are incorporated in a consistent manner through the turbulence model, the dynamic balance in the turbulence magnetic reconnection is confirmed.

  18. Effects of phenylalanine and threonine oligopeptides on milk protein synthesis in cultured bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, M M; Wu, Y M; Liu, H Y; Liu, J X

    2015-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of phenylalanine (Phe) and threonine (Thr) oligopeptides on αs1 casein gene expression and milk protein synthesis in bovine mammary epithelial cells. Primary mammary epithelial cells were obtained from Holstein dairy cows and incubated in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium-F12 medium (DMEM/F12) containing lactogenic hormones (prolactin and glucocorticoids). Free Phe (117 μg/ml) was substituted partly with peptide-bound Phe (phenylalanylphenylalanine, phenylalanyl threonine, threonyl-phenylalanyl-phenylalanine) in the experimental media. After incubation with experimental medium, cells were collected for gene expression analysis and medium was collected for milk protein or amino acid determination. The results showed that peptide-bound Phe at 10% (11.7 μg/ml) significantly enhanced αs1 casein gene expression and milk protein synthesis as compared with equivalent amount of free Phe. When 10% Phe was replaced by phenylalanylphenylalanine, the disappearance of most essential amino acids increased significantly, and gene expression of peptide transporter 2 and some amino acid transporters was significantly enhanced. These results indicate that the Phe and Thr oligopeptides are important for milk protein synthesis, and peptide-bound amino acids could be utilised more efficiently in milk protein synthesis than the equivalent amount of free amino acids. PMID:25199802

  19. Effects of oligopeptide permease in group a streptococcal infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Hung; Lin, Chia-Yu; Luo, Yueh-Hsia; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Lin, Yee-Shin; Lin, Ming T; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2005-05-01

    The oligopeptide permease (Opp) of group A streptococci (GAS) is a membrane-associated protein and belongs to the ATP-binding cassette transporter family. It is encoded by a polycistronic operon containing oppA, oppB, oppC, oppD, and oppF. The biological function of these genes in GAS is poorly understood. In order to understand more about the effects of Opp on GAS virulence factors, an oppA isogenic mutant was constructed by using an integrative plasmid to disrupt the opp operon and confirmed by Southern blot hybridization. No transcript was detected in the oppA isogenic mutant by Northern blot analysis and reverse transcriptase PCR. The growth curve for the oppA isogenic mutant was similar to that for wild-type strain A-20. The oppA isogenic mutant not only decreased the transcription of speB, speX, and rofA but also increased the transcription of speF, sagA (streptolysin S-associated gene A), slo (streptolysin O), pel (pleotrophic effect locus), and dppA (dipeptide permease). No effects on the transcription of emm, sda, speJ, speG, rgg, and csrR were found. The phenotypes of the oppA mutant were restored by the oppA revertant and by the complementation strain. The oppA mutant caused less mortality and tissue damage than the wild-type strain when inoculated into BALB/c mice via an air pouch. Based on these data, we suggest that the opp operon plays an important role in the pathogenesis of GAS infection. PMID:15845494

  20. Suppression of Residual Sloshing in a Liquid Transport Container by a Bulkhead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuma, Ryu; Watanabe, Masahiro; Tanaka, Hideaki

    This paper deals with an experimental study on suppression of a residual sloshing in a liquid transport container by a bulkhead, which divides the container vertically into two sections. Inserting the bulkhead to the container, the sloshing mode is separated into two modes; the one is the sloshing mode of liquid column in a U-tube (U-tube-mode), and the other is the sloshing mode in the separated container (Bulkhead-mode). In this paper, the suppression effect by the bulkhead on residual sloshing, which is excited by sudden stop of the liquid transport container, is examined experimentally with changing aperture ratio of the bulkhead, types of the bulkhead plate with or without holes, and the size of holes. Moreover, the fluid flow in the container is visualized and the suppression mechanism by the bulkhead is discussed based on the flow visualization. As a result, detailed suppression effect by the bulkhead on the residual sloshing is clarified, and it is clarified that higher suppression effect by the bulkhead is caused by the energy dissipation due to the vortex generated at the edge of the bulkhead and swirl flow in the liquid. The vortex generated and swirl flow in the liquid play an important role in higher energy dissipation of sloshing.

  1. Oligopeptides as Biomarkers of Cyanobacterial Subpopulations. Toward an Understanding of Their Biological Role

    PubMed Central

    Agha, Ramsy; Quesada, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacterial oligopeptides comprise a wide range of bioactive and/or toxic compounds. While current research is strongly focused on exploring new oligopeptide variants and their bioactive properties, the biological role of these compounds remains elusive. Oligopeptides production abilities show a remarkably patchy distribution among conspecific strains. This observation has prompted alternative approaches to unveil their adaptive value, based on the use of cellular oligopeptide compositions as biomarkers of intraspecific subpopulations or chemotypes in freshwater cyanobacteria. Studies addressing the diversity, distribution, and dynamics of chemotypes in natural systems have provided important insights into the structure and ecology of cyanobacterial populations and the adaptive value of oligopeptides. This review presents an overview of the fundamentals of this emerging approach and its most relevant findings, and discusses our current understanding of the role of oligopeptides in the ecology of cyanobacteria. PMID:24960202

  2. 30 CFR 75.1911 - Fire suppression systems for diesel-powered equipment and fuel transportation units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... secured computer system that is not susceptible to alteration. (3) Records shall be maintained at a... transportation units. (a) The fire suppression system required by §§ 75.1907 and 75.1909 shall be a multipurpose dry chemical type (ABC) fire suppression system listed or approved by a nationally...

  3. 30 CFR 75.1911 - Fire suppression systems for diesel-powered equipment and fuel transportation units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... secured computer system that is not susceptible to alteration. (3) Records shall be maintained at a... transportation units. (a) The fire suppression system required by §§ 75.1907 and 75.1909 shall be a multipurpose dry chemical type (ABC) fire suppression system listed or approved by a nationally...

  4. 30 CFR 75.1911 - Fire suppression systems for diesel-powered equipment and fuel transportation units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... secured computer system that is not susceptible to alteration. (3) Records shall be maintained at a... transportation units. (a) The fire suppression system required by §§ 75.1907 and 75.1909 shall be a multipurpose dry chemical type (ABC) fire suppression system listed or approved by a nationally...

  5. 30 CFR 75.1911 - Fire suppression systems for diesel-powered equipment and fuel transportation units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... secured computer system that is not susceptible to alteration. (3) Records shall be maintained at a... transportation units. (a) The fire suppression system required by §§ 75.1907 and 75.1909 shall be a multipurpose dry chemical type (ABC) fire suppression system listed or approved by a nationally...

  6. Localized Turbulence Suppression and Increased Flow Shear near the q=2 Surface during Internal-Transport-Barrier Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, M. W.; McKee, G. R.; Fonck, R. J.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Austin, M. E.; Burrell, K. H.

    2009-08-14

    Broadband turbulent fluctuations in the plasma density are transiently suppressed when low-order rational q surfaces first appear in negative central magnetic shear plasmas on the DIII-D tokamak, which can lead to the formation of internal transport barriers. Increased localized flow shear is simultaneously observed. It transiently exceeds the measured turbulence decorrelation rate, providing a mechanism to trigger the formation of the transport barrier. This increased flow shear and turbulence suppression propagates radially outward, following the q=2 surface.

  7. Nonvesicular Release of Glutamate by Glial xCT Transporters Suppresses Glutamate Receptor Clustering In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Hrvoje; Grosjean, Yael; Chen, Kaiyun; Sheng, Qi; Featherstone, David E.

    2008-01-01

    We hypothesized that cystine/glutamate transporters (xCTs) might be critical regulators of ambient extracellular glutamate levels in the nervous system and that misregulation of this glutamate pool might have important neurophysiological and/or behavioral consequences. To test this idea, we identified and functionally characterized a novel Drosophila xCT gene, which we subsequently named “genderblind” (gb). Genderblind is expressed in a previously overlooked subset of peripheral and central glia. Genetic elimination of gb causes a 50% reduction in extracellular glutamate concentration, demonstrating that xCT transporters are important regulators of extracellular glutamate. Consistent with previous studies showing that extracellular glutamate regulates postsynaptic glutamate receptor clustering, gb mutants show a large (200–300%) increase in the number of postsynaptic glutamate receptors. This increase in postsynaptic receptor abundance is not accompanied by other obvious synaptic changes and is completely rescued when synapses are cultured in wild-type levels of glutamate. Additional in situ pharmacology suggests that glutamate-mediated suppression of glutamate receptor clustering depends on receptor desensitization. Together, our results suggest that (1) xCT transporters are critical for regulation of ambient extracellular glutamate in vivo; (2) ambient extracellular glutamate maintains some receptors constitutively desensitized in vivo; and (3) constitutive desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors suppresses their ability to cluster at synapses. PMID:17202478

  8. Chemical Interference with Iron Transport Systems to Suppress Bacterial Growth of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Li, Nan; Han, Junlong; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Xuesong; He, Qing-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for the growth of most bacteria. To obtain iron, bacteria have developed specific iron-transport systems located on the membrane surface to uptake iron and iron complexes such as ferrichrome. Interference with the iron-acquisition systems should be therefore an efficient strategy to suppress bacterial growth and infection. Based on the chemical similarity of iron and ruthenium, we used a Ru(II) complex R-825 to compete with ferrichrome for the ferrichrome-transport pathway in Streptococcus pneumoniae. R-825 inhibited the bacterial growth of S. pneumoniae and stimulated the expression of PiuA, the iron-binding protein in the ferrichrome-uptake system on the cell surface. R-825 treatment decreased the cellular content of iron, accompanying with the increase of Ru(II) level in the bacterium. When the piuA gene (SPD_0915) was deleted in the bacterium, the mutant strain became resistant to R-825 treatment, with decreased content of Ru(II). Addition of ferrichrome can rescue the bacterial growth that was suppressed by R-825. Fluorescence spectral quenching showed that R-825 can bind with PiuA in a similar pattern to the ferrichrome-PiuA interaction in vitro. These observations demonstrated that Ru(II) complex R-825 can compete with ferrichrome for the ferrichrome-transport system to enter S. pneumoniae, reduce the cellular iron supply, and thus suppress the bacterial growth. This finding suggests a novel antimicrobial approach by interfering with iron-uptake pathways, which is different from the mechanisms used by current antibiotics. PMID:25170896

  9. Suppression of Arbuscule Degeneration in Medicago truncatula phosphate transporter4 Mutants Is Dependent on the Ammonium Transporter 2 Family Protein AMT2;3

    PubMed Central

    Breuillin-Sessoms, Florence; Floss, Daniela S.; Gomez, S. Karen; Pumplin, Nathan; Ding, Yi; Levesque-Tremblay, Veronique; Noar, Roslyn D.; Daniels, Dierdra A.; Bravo, Armando; Eaglesham, James B.; Benedito, Vagner A.; Udvardi, Michael K.; Harrison, Maria J.

    2015-01-01

    During arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, the plant gains access to phosphate (Pi) and nitrogen delivered by its fungal symbiont. Transfer of mineral nutrients occurs at the interface between branched hyphae called arbuscules and root cortical cells. In Medicago truncatula, a Pi transporter, PT4, is required for symbiotic Pi transport, and in pt4, symbiotic Pi transport fails, arbuscules degenerate prematurely, and the symbiosis is not maintained. Premature arbuscule degeneration (PAD) is suppressed when pt4 mutants are nitrogen-deprived, possibly the result of compensation by PT8, a second AM-induced Pi transporter. However, PAD is also suppressed in nitrogen-starved pt4 pt8 double mutants, negating this hypothesis and furthermore indicating that in this condition, neither of these symbiotic Pi transporters is required for symbiosis. In M. truncatula, three AMT2 family ammonium transporters are induced during AM symbiosis. To test the hypothesis that suppression of PAD involves AMT2 transporters, we analyzed double and triple Pi and ammonium transporter mutants. ATM2;3 but not AMT2;4 was required for suppression of PAD in pt4, while AMT2;4, but not AMT2;3, complemented growth of a yeast ammonium transporter mutant. In summary, arbuscule life span is influenced by PT4 and ATM2;3, and their relative importance varies with the nitrogen status of the plant. PMID:25841038

  10. Suppression of Arbuscule Degeneration in Medicago truncatula phosphate transporter4 Mutants is Dependent on the Ammonium Transporter 2 Family Protein AMT2;3.

    PubMed

    Breuillin-Sessoms, Florence; Floss, Daniela S; Gomez, S Karen; Pumplin, Nathan; Ding, Yi; Levesque-Tremblay, Veronique; Noar, Roslyn D; Daniels, Dierdra A; Bravo, Armando; Eaglesham, James B; Benedito, Vagner A; Udvardi, Michael K; Harrison, Maria J

    2015-04-01

    During arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, the plant gains access to phosphate (Pi) and nitrogen delivered by its fungal symbiont. Transfer of mineral nutrients occurs at the interface between branched hyphae called arbuscules and root cortical cells. In Medicago truncatula, a Pi transporter, PT4, is required for symbiotic Pi transport, and in pt4, symbiotic Pi transport fails, arbuscules degenerate prematurely, and the symbiosis is not maintained. Premature arbuscule degeneration (PAD) is suppressed when pt4 mutants are nitrogen-deprived, possibly the result of compensation by PT8, a second AM-induced Pi transporter. However, PAD is also suppressed in nitrogen-starved pt4 pt8 double mutants, negating this hypothesis and furthermore indicating that in this condition, neither of these symbiotic Pi transporters is required for symbiosis. In M. truncatula, three AMT2 family ammonium transporters are induced during AM symbiosis. To test the hypothesis that suppression of PAD involves AMT2 transporters, we analyzed double and triple Pi and ammonium transporter mutants. ATM2;3 but not AMT2;4 was required for suppression of PAD in pt4, while AMT2;4, but not AMT2;3, complemented growth of a yeast ammonium transporter mutant. In summary, arbuscule life span is influenced by PT4 and ATM2;3, and their relative importance varies with the nitrogen status of the plant. PMID:25841038

  11. Suppression by Trypanosoma brucei of anaphylaxis-mediated ion transport in the small intestine of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Gould, S S; Castro, G A

    1994-01-01

    The hypothesis that failure of hosts infected with Trypanosoma brucei to express type 1 hypersensitivity is related to this parasite's ability to down-regulate IgE production, and not to an innate lack of allergenicity of T. brucei antigens, was tested by studying anaphylaxis-induced changes in net epithelial ion transport in rats. Transport changes were quantified electrophysiologically in vitro, as a change in transmural short-circuit current when sensitized intestine was challenged with homologous antigen. Rats injected parenterally with trypanosome antigen elicited intestinal anaphylaxis in response to antigenic challenge, whereas the intestine of rats infected with T. brucei failed to respond. Infection with T. brucei also suppressed the anaphylactic response in rats sensitized to and challenged with ovalbumin and T. spiralis-derived antigens. In these cases suppression was related to the ability of T. brucei to block production of IgE, and not to the physiological failure of the epithelial response. However, in rats sensitized by infection with T. spiralis, neither the anaphylactic response nor IgE production were inhibited by T. brucei. Furthermore, intestinal mastocytosis normally associated with trichinosis was unaffected by the trypanosome infection. Results support the conclusion that the failure to express anaphylaxis in T. brucei-infected rats is due to the inhibition of IgE production and not to the lack of allergenicity of trypanosome antigens. PMID:8206518

  12. ‘Transient’ Genetic Suppression Facilitates Generation of Hexose Transporter Null Mutants in Leishmania mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiuhong; Rodriguez-Contreras, Dayana; Polley, Tamsen; Lye, Lon-Fye; Scott, David; Burchmore, Richard J.S.; Beverley, Stephen M.; Landfear, Scott M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The genome of Leishmania mexicana encompasses a cluster of three glucose transporter genes designated LmxGT1, LmxGT2, and LmxGT3. Functional and genetic studies of a cluster null mutant (Δlmxgt1-3) have dissected the roles of these proteins in Leishmania metabolism and virulence. However, null mutants were recovered at very low frequency, and comparative genome hybridizations revealed that Δlmxgt1-3 mutants contained a linear extrachromosomal 40 kb amplification of a region on chromosome 29 not amplified in WT parasites. These data suggested a model where this 29–40k amplicon encoded a second site suppressor contributing to parasite survival in the absence of GT1-3 function. To test this, we quantified the frequency of recovery of knockouts in the presence of individual overexpressed ORFs covering the 29–40k amplicon. The data mapped the suppressor activity to PIFTC3, encoding a component of the intraflagellar transport pathway. We discuss possible models by which PIFTC3 might act to facilitate loss of GTs specifically. Surprisingly, by plasmid segregation we showed that continued PIFTC3 overexpression was not required for Δlmxgt1-3 viability. These studies provide the first evidence that genetic suppression can occur by providing critical biological functions transiently. This novel form of genetic suppression may extend to other genes, pathways and organisms. PMID:23170981

  13. Hypotensive and vasorelaxant effects of sericin-derived oligopeptides in rats.

    PubMed

    Onsa-Ard, Amnart; Shimbhu, Dawan; Tocharus, Jiraporn; Sutheerawattananonda, Manote; Pantan, Rungusa; Tocharus, Chainarong

    2013-01-01

    Sericin-derived oligopeptides obtained from silk cocoons were investigated for the in vivo hypotensive effect and investigated for the underlying mechanism involved in vasodilation in isolated rat thoracic aorta. In normotensive anesthetized rats, oligopeptides induced an immediate and transient hypotensive activity. In rat aortic rings, oligopeptides induced a concentration-dependent vasorelaxation in vessels precontracted with both KCl and phenylephrine (PE) with endothelium-intact or endothelium-denuded rings. In endothelium-intact rings, pretreatment with N ω -Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME, 100 µM), an inhibitor of the NO synthase (NOS) or 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 1 µM), a selective inhibitor of the guanylyl cyclase enzyme, significantly reduced the relaxant effect of oligopeptides. However, indomethacin, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase, had no effect on oligopeptides-induced relaxation. In addition, pretreatment with tetraethylammonium (TEA, 5 mM) reduced the maximal relaxant effect induced by oligopeptides. By contrast, relaxation was not affected by 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 1 mM), glibenclamide (10 µM), or barium chloride (BaCl2, 1 mM). In depolarization Ca(2+)-free solution, oligopeptides inhibited calcium chloride- (CaCl2-) induced contraction in endothelium-denuded rings in a concentration-dependent manner. Nevertheless, oligopeptides attenuated transient contractions in Ca(2+)-free medium containing EGTA (1 mM) induced by 1 µM PE, but they were not affected by 20 mM caffeine. It is obvious that potent vasodilation effect of oligopeptides is mediated through both the endothelium and the vascular smooth muscle. PMID:24312733

  14. Suppression of Baryon Diffusion and Transport in a Baryon Rich Strongly Coupled Quark-Gluon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rougemont, Romulo; Noronha, Jorge; Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn

    2015-11-01

    Five dimensional black hole solutions that describe the QCD crossover transition seen in (2 +1 ) -flavor lattice QCD calculations at zero and nonzero baryon densities are used to obtain predictions for the baryon susceptibility, baryon conductivity, baryon diffusion constant, and thermal conductivity of the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma in the range of temperatures 130 MeV ≤T ≤300 MeV and baryon chemical potentials 0 ≤μB≤400 MeV . Diffusive transport is predicted to be suppressed in this region of the QCD phase diagram, which is consistent with the existence of a critical end point at larger baryon densities. We also calculate the fourth-order baryon susceptibility at zero baryon chemical potential and find quantitative agreement with recent lattice results. The baryon transport coefficients computed in this Letter can be readily implemented in state-of-the-art hydrodynamic codes used to investigate the dense QGP currently produced at RHIC's low energy beam scan.

  15. Suppression of Baryon Diffusion and Transport in a Baryon Rich Strongly Coupled Quark-Gluon Plasma.

    PubMed

    Rougemont, Romulo; Noronha, Jorge; Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn

    2015-11-13

    Five dimensional black hole solutions that describe the QCD crossover transition seen in (2+1)-flavor lattice QCD calculations at zero and nonzero baryon densities are used to obtain predictions for the baryon susceptibility, baryon conductivity, baryon diffusion constant, and thermal conductivity of the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma in the range of temperatures 130  MeV≤T≤300  MeV and baryon chemical potentials 0≤μ(B)≤400  MeV. Diffusive transport is predicted to be suppressed in this region of the QCD phase diagram, which is consistent with the existence of a critical end point at larger baryon densities. We also calculate the fourth-order baryon susceptibility at zero baryon chemical potential and find quantitative agreement with recent lattice results. The baryon transport coefficients computed in this Letter can be readily implemented in state-of-the-art hydrodynamic codes used to investigate the dense QGP currently produced at RHIC's low energy beam scan. PMID:26613433

  16. Convective Transport Suppression in the Scrape-Off Layer Using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating on the ASDEX Upgrade Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Antar, G.; Assas, S.; Bobkov, V.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Wolfrum, E.; Herrmann, A.; Rohde, V.

    2010-10-15

    Turbulence properties in the scrape-off layer (SOL) in the presence of ion cyclotron frequency heating (ICRH) are compared to instances where it is absent. The discharges are all in a high-confinement mode (H-mode) regime. During ICRH, the SOL plasma density increases whereas turbulence large-scale and convective structures are shown to be suppressed. The probability distribution function is thus recorded to be closer to a Gaussian, and a net decrease in the low-frequency density fluctuations is reflected in the power spectra. Consequently, the level of turbulent fluctuations decreases significantly. Turbulence suppression is also reported during edge localized modes (ELMs) where both the ELMs-induced transport and duration are strongly affected. The increase of neutrals by gas puffing did not alter this behavior. We deduce that ICRH can be used as to suppress convective transport and reduce the ELM's amplitude.

  17. Oligopeptide-heavy metal interaction monitoring by hybrid gold nanoparticle based assay.

    PubMed

    Politi, Jane; Spadavecchia, Jolanda; Iodice, Mario; de Stefano, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Phytochelatins are small peptides that can be found in several organisms, which use these oligopeptides to handle heavy metal elements. Here, we report a method for monitoring interactions between lead(ii) ions in aqueous solutions and phytochelatin 6 oligopeptide bioconjugated onto pegylated gold nanorods (PEG-AuNrs). This study is the first step towards a high sensitive label free optical biosensor to quantify heavy metal pollution in water. PMID:25360445

  18. Evaluating the effects of charged oligopeptide motifs coupled with RGD on osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Feng-Yi; Yin, Wei-Na; Fan, Jin-Xuan; Tao, Li; Qin, Si-Yong; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells, due to their multilineage differentiation potential, have emerged as a promising cell candidate for cell-based therapy. In recent years, biomaterials were artificially synthesized to control the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. In this study, a series of charged or neutral oligopeptide motifs coupled with RGD were synthesized and used for surface modification using quartz substrates as model. Cell behaviors on the modified surfaces with different charged oligopeptide motifs were studied. It was found that these different charged oligopeptide motifs coupled with RGD were biocompatible for cell proliferation and adhesion. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the positively charged oligopeptide motif could inhibit osteogenic differentiation, while the negatively charged and neutral oligopeptide motifs could enhance osteogenic differentiation in the presence of RGD. This work may bring us enlightenment that different charged oligopeptide motifs coupled with RGD may be used for biomaterial surface modification for different stem cell-based therapies. PMID:25748883

  19. Turbulence and transport suppression scaling with flow shear on the Large Plasma Device

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffner, D. A.; Carter, T. A.; Rossi, G. D.; Guice, D. S.; Maggs, J. E.; Vincena, S.; Friedman, B.

    2013-05-15

    Continuous control over azimuthal flow and shear in the edge of the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) [W. Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instr. 62, 2875 (1991)] has been achieved using a biasable limiter. This flow control has allowed a careful study of the effect of flow shear on pressure-gradient-driven turbulence and particle transport in LAPD. The combination of externally controllable shear in a turbulent plasma along with the detailed spatial diagnostic capabilities on LAPD makes the experiment a useful testbed for validation of shear suppression models. Motivated by these models, power-law fits are made to the density and radial velocity fluctuation amplitudes, particle flux, density-potential crossphase, and radial correlation length. The data show a break in the trend of these quantities when the shearing rate (γ{sub s}=∂V{sub θ}/∂r) is comparable to the turbulent decorrelation rate (1/τ{sub ac}). No one model captures the trends in the all turbulent quantities for all values of the shearing rate, but some models successfully match the trend in either the weak (γ{sub s}τ{sub ac}<1) or strong (γ{sub s}τ{sub ac}>1) shear limits.

  20. Expression of the Oligopeptide Permease Operon of Moraxella catarrhalis Is Regulated by Temperature and Nutrient Availability.

    PubMed

    Jones, Megan M; Murphy, Timothy F

    2015-09-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis causes otitis media in children and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults. Together, these two conditions contribute to enormous morbidity and mortality worldwide. The oligopeptide permease (opp) ABC transport system is a nutritional virulence factor important for the utilization of peptides. The substrate binding protein OppA, which binds peptides for uptake, is a potential vaccine antigen, but little was known about the regulation of gene expression. The five opp genes oppB, oppC, oppD, oppF, and oppA are in the same open reading frame. Sequence analysis predicted two promoters, one located upstream of oppB and one within the intergenic region between oppF and oppA. We have characterized the gene cluster as an operon with two functional promoters and show that cold shock at 26°C for ≤ 0.5 h and the presence of a peptide substrate increase gene transcript levels. Additionally, the putative promoter upstream of oppA contributes to the transcription of oppA but is not influenced by the same environmental cues as the promoter upstream of oppB. We conclude that temperature and nutrient availability contribute to the regulation of the Opp system, which is an important nutritional virulence factor in M. catarrhalis. PMID:26099587

  1. Molecular interactions between dipeptides, drugs and the human intestinal H+ -oligopeptide cotransporter hPEPT1.

    PubMed

    Sala-Rabanal, Monica; Loo, Donald D F; Hirayama, Bruce A; Turk, Eric; Wright, Ernest M

    2006-07-01

    The human intestinal proton-coupled oligopeptide transporter hPEPT1 has been implicated in the absorption of pharmacologically active compounds. We have investigated the interactions between a comprehensive selection of drugs, and wild-type and variant hPEPT1s expressed in Xenopus oocytes, using radiotracer uptake and electrophysiological methods. The beta-lactam antibiotics ampicillin, amoxicillin, cephalexin and cefadroxil, the antineoplastics delta-aminolevulinic acid (delta-ALA) and bestatin, and the neuropeptide N-acetyl-Asp-Glu (NAAG), were transported, as judged by their ability to evoke inward currents. When the drugs were added in the presence of the typical substrate glycylsarcosine (Gly-Sar), the inward currents were equal or less than that induced by Gly-Sar alone. This suggests that the drugs are transported at a lower turnover rate than Gly-Sar, but may also point towards complex interactions between dipeptides, drugs and the transporter. Gly-Sar and the drugs also modified the kinetics of hPEPT1 presteady-state charge movement, by causing a reduction in maximum charge (Qmax) and a shift of the midpoint voltage (V0.5) to more negative potentials. Our results indicate that the substrate selectivity of hPEPT1 is: Gly-Sar > NAAG, delta-ALA, bestatin > cefadroxil, cephalexin > ampicillin, amoxicillin. Based on steady-state and presteady-state analysis of Gly-Sar and cefadroxil transport, we proposed an extension of the 6-state kinetic model for hPEPT1 function that globally accounts for the observed presteady-state and steady-state kinetics of neutral dipeptide and drug transport. Our model suggests that, under saturating conditions, the rate-limiting step of the hPEPT1 transport cycle is the reorientation of the empty carrier within the membrane. Variations in rates of drug cotransport are predicted to be due to differences in affinity and turnover rate. Oral availability of drugs may be reduced in the presence of physiological concentrations of dietary

  2. Distribution and biological role of the oligopeptide-binding protein (OppA) in Xanthomonas species.

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Elisa E; Tavares, Milene B; Suzuki, Celso F; Pimenta, Daniel C; Angeli, Claudia B; de Oliveira, Julio C F; Ferro, Maria I T; Ferreira, Luis C S; Ferreira, Rita C C

    2010-04-01

    In this study we investigated the prevalence of the oppA gene, encoding the oligopeptide binding protein (OppA) of the major bacterial oligopeptide uptake system (Opp), in different species of the genus Xanthomonas. The oppA gene was detected in two Xanthomonas axonopodis strains among eight tested Xanthomonas species. The generation of an isogenic oppA-knockout derivative of the Xac 306 strain, showed that the OppA protein neither plays a relevant role in oligopeptide uptake nor contributes to the infectivity and multiplication of the bacterial strain in leaves of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) and Rangpur lime (Citrus limonia). Taken together these results suggest that the oppA gene has a recent evolutionary history in the genus and does not contribute in the physiology or pathogenesis of X. axonopodis. PMID:21637492

  3. Putative antiparasite defensive system involving ribosomal and nonribosomal oligopeptides in cyanobacteria of the genus Planktothrix.

    PubMed

    Rohrlack, Thomas; Christiansen, Guntram; Kurmayer, Rainer

    2013-04-01

    Parasitic chytrid fungi can inflict significant mortality on cyanobacteria but frequently fail to keep cyanobacterial dominance and bloom formation in check. Our study tested whether oligopeptide production, a common feature in many cyanobacteria, can be a defensive mechanism against chytrid parasitism. The study employed the cyanobacterial strain Planktothrix NIVA-CYA126/8 and its mutants with knockout mutations for microcystins, anabaenopeptins, and microviridins, major oligopeptide classes to be found in NIVA-CYA126/8. Four chytrid strains were used as parasite models. They are obligate parasites of Planktothrix and are unable to exploit alternative food sources. All chytrid strains were less virulent to the NIVA-CYA126/8 wild type than to at least one of its oligopeptide knockout mutants. One chytrid strain even failed to infect the wild type, while exhibiting considerable virulence to all mutants. It is therefore evident that producing microcystins, microviridins, and/or anabaenopeptins can reduce the virulence of chytrids to Planktothrix, thereby increasing the host's chance of survival. Microcystins and anabaenopeptins are nonribosomal oligopeptides, while microviridins are produced ribosomally, suggesting that Planktothrix resists chytrids by relying on metabolites that are produced via distinct biosynthetic pathways. Chytrids, on the other hand, can adapt to the oligopeptides produced by Planktothrix in different ways. This setting most likely results in an evolutionary arms race, which would probably lead to Planktothrix and chytrid population structures that closely resemble those actually found in nature. In summary, the findings of the present study suggest oligopeptide production in Planktothrix to be part of a defensive mechanism against chytrid parasitism. PMID:23396340

  4. Proline rich-oligopeptides: diverse mechanisms for antihypertensive action.

    PubMed

    Morais, Katia L P; Ianzer, Danielle; Miranda, José Rodolfo R; Melo, Robson L; Guerreiro, Juliano R; Santos, Robson A S; Ulrich, Henning; Lameu, Claudiana

    2013-10-01

    Bradykinin-potentiating peptides from Bothrops jararaca (Bj) discovered in the early 1960s, were the first natural inhibitors of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). These peptides belong to a large family of snake venom proline-rich oligopeptides (PROs). One of these peptides, Bj-PRO-9a, was essential for defining ACE as effective drug target and development of captopril, an active site-directed inhibitor of ACE used worldwide for the treatment of human arterial hypertension. Recent experimental evidences demonstrated that cardiovascular effects exerted by different Bj-PROs are due to distinct mechanisms besides of ACE inhibition. In the present work, we have investigated the cardiovascular actions of four Bj-PROs, namely Bj-PRO-9a, -11e, -12b and -13a. Bj-PRO-9a acts upon ACE and BK activities to promote blood pressure reduction. Although the others Bj-PROs are also able to inhibit the ACE activity and to potentiate the BK effects, our results indicate that antihypertensive effect evoked by them involve new mechanisms. Bj-PRO-11e and Bj-PRO-12b involves induction of [Ca(2+)]i transients by so far unknown receptor proteins. Moreover, we have suggested argininosuccinate synthetase and M3 muscarinic receptor as targets for cardiovascular effects elicited by Bj-PRO-13a. In summary, the herein reported results provide evidence that Bj-PRO-mediated effects are not restricted to ACE inhibition or potentiation of BK-induced effects and suggest different actions for each peptide for promoting arterial pressure reduction. The present study reveals the complexity of the effects exerted by Bj-PROs for cardiovascular control, opening avenues for the better understanding of blood pressure regulation and for the development of novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:23933300

  5. Pretranslational Suppression of an Insulin-Responsive Glucose Transporter in Rats with Diabetes Mellitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvey, W. Timothy; Huecksteadt, Thomas P.; Birnbaum, Morris J.

    1989-07-01

    A prominent feature of diabetes mellitus is the inability of insulin to appropriately increase the transport of glucose into target tissues. The contributions of different glucose transport proteins to insulin resistance in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes was evaluated. A glucose transporter messenger RNA and its cognate protein that are exclusively expressed in muscle and adipose tissue were specifically depleted in diabetic animals, and these effects were reversed after insulin therapy; a different glucose transporter and its messenger RNA that exhibit a less restricted tissue distribution were not specifically modulated in this way. Depletion of the muscle- and adipose-specific glucose transporter species correlates with and may account for the major portion of cellular insulin resistance in diabetes in these animals.

  6. Solid-Phase Organic Synthesis and Combinatorial Chemistry: A Laboratory Preparation of Oligopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truran, George A.; Aiken, Karelle S.; Fleming, Thomas R.; Webb, Peter J.; Hodge Markgraf, J.

    2002-01-01

    The principles and practice of solid-phase organic synthesis and combinatorial chemistry are utilized in a laboratory preparation of oligopeptides. A parallel synthesis scheme is used to generate a series of tripeptides. A divergent synthesis scheme is used to prepare two pentapeptides, one of which is leucine enkephalin, a neurotransmitter known to be an analgesic agent.

  7. Influence of fermentation level and geographical origin on cocoa bean oligopeptide pattern.

    PubMed

    Caligiani, Augusta; Marseglia, Angela; Prandi, Barbara; Palla, Gerardo; Sforza, Stefano

    2016-11-15

    Peptides and amino acids generated during cocoa bean fermentation are the most important precursors for the development of cocoa aroma, however cocoa oligopeptide fraction is under-investigated. In this study, we perform a deep investigation of the presence of oligopeptides in unfermented, under fermented, and well-fermented cocoa beans from all of the main producing countries, with the aim to obtain a better definition of cocoa quality and a deeper comprehension of biochemical changes occurring during fermentation. Oligopeptides were determined by UPLC/ESI-MS and 35 low-molecular weight peptides were identified and subjected to semi-quantitative analysis. Results showed that fermented cocoas can be differentiated from unfermented cocoas by their possession of a higher total amount of oligopeptides and a lower ratio of vicilin to 21kDa cocoa seed albumin peptides. A variability in the peptide pattern was observed also among well-fermented cocoa samples of different geographical origin, suggesting diversified proteolytic activities. PMID:27283652

  8. Interleukin-1β Suppresses the Transporter Genes Ank and Ent1 Expression in Stromal Progenitor Cells Retaining Mineralization.

    PubMed

    Ezura, Yoichi; Lin, Xin; Hatta, Arina; Izu, Yayoi; Noda, Masaki

    2016-08-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) in various tissues evokes clinical problems. Inflammatory responses of the stromal progenitor cells may be involved in its etiology. Previous report indicated that pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-1β enhanced the in vitro calcification of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), by suppressing the expression of ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase-1 gene (ENPP1). However, possible contribution of other related factors had not been investigated. Here, we investigated the expression of regulators of extracellular pyrophosphate and nucleosides including Enpp1, Nt5e, Ank, Enptds, and Ent1, examining various connective tissue stromal progenitor cells, including bone marrow stromal cells and synovium derived cells from mouse, or bone marrow MSCs from human. Consistent with previous studies, we observed characteristic suppression of the osteoblastic marker genes by IL-1β during the osteogenic culture for 20 days. In addition, we observed a reduced expression of the important transporter genes, Ank and Ent1, whereas the alteration in Enpp1 and Nt5e levels was not always consistent among the cell types. Our results suggest that IL-1β suppresses not only the osteoblastic but also the negative regulators of soft-tissue calcification, including Ank and Ent1 in stromal progenitor cells, which may contribute to the mechanisms of HO in various disorders. PMID:27086348

  9. Suppressed intrinsic catalytic activity of GLUT1 glucose transporters in insulin-sensitive 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, S.A.; Buxton, J.M.; Czech, M.P. )

    1991-09-01

    Previous studies indicated that the erythroid-type (GLUT1) glucose transporter isoform contributes to basal but not insulin-stimulated hexose transport in mouse 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In the present studies it was found that basal hexose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes was about 50% lower than that in 3T3-L1 or CHO-K1 fibroblasts. Intrinsic catalytic activities of GLUT1 transporters in CHO-K1 and 3T3-L1 cells were compared by normalizing these hexose transport rates to GLUT1 content on the cell surface, as measured by two independent methods. Cell surface GLUT1 levels in 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and adipocytes were about 10- and 25-fold higher, respectively, than in CHO-K1 fibroblasts, as assessed with an anti-GLUT1 exofacial domain antiserum, delta. The large excess of cell surface GLUT1 transporters in 3T3-L1 adipocytes relative to CHO-K1 fibroblasts was confirmed by GLUT1 protein immunoblot analysis and by photoaffinity labeling (with 3-({sup 125}I)iodo-4-azidophenethylamido-7-O-succinyldeacetylforskolin) of glucose transporters in isolated plasma membranes. Thus, GLUT1 intrinsic activity is markedly reduced in 3T3-L1 fibroblasts compared with the CHO-K1 fibroblasts, and further reduction occurs upon differentiation to adipocytes. The authors conclude that a mechanism that markedly suppresses basal hexose transport catalyzed by GLUT1 is a major contributor to the dramatic insulin sensitivity of glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

  10. Hesperidin Suppresses Melanosome Transport by Blocking the Interaction of Rab27A-Melanophilin

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bora; Lee, Jee-Young; Lee, Ha-Yeon; Nam, Ky-Youb; Park, JongIl; Lee, Su Min; Kim, Jin Eun; Lee, Joo Dong; Hwang, Jae Sung

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the inhibitory effects of hesperidin on melanogenesis. To find melanosome transport inhibitor from natural products, we collected the structural information of natural products from Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA) and performed pharmacophore-based in silico screening for Rab27A and melanophilin (MLPH). Hesperidin did not inhibit melanin production in B16F10 murine melanoma cells stimulated with α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), and also did not affect the catalytic activity of tyrosinase. But, hesperidin inhibited melanosome transport in melanocyte and showed skin lightening effect in pigmented reconstructed epidermis model. Therefore, we suggest that hesperidin is a useful inhibitor of melanosome transport and it might be applied to whitening agent. PMID:24244821

  11. Suppression of glymphatic fluid transport in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Weiguo; Achariyar, Thiyagarajan M; Li, Baoman; Liao, Yonghong; Mestre, Humberto; Hitomi, Emi; Regan, Sean; Kasper, Tristan; Peng, Sisi; Ding, Fengfei; Benveniste, Helene; Nedergaard, Maiken; Deane, Rashid

    2016-09-01

    Glymphatic transport, defined as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) peri-arterial inflow into brain, and interstitial fluid (ISF) clearance, is reduced in the aging brain. However, it is unclear whether glymphatic transport affects the distribution of soluble Aβ in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In wild type mice, we show that Aβ40 (fluorescently labeled Aβ40 or unlabeled Aβ40), was distributed from CSF to brain, via the peri-arterial space, and associated with neurons. In contrast, Aβ42 was mostly restricted to the peri-arterial space due mainly to its greater propensity to oligomerize when compared to Aβ40. Interestingly, pretreatment with Aβ40 in the CSF, but not Aβ42, reduced CSF transport into brain. In APP/PS1 mice, a model of AD, with and without extensive amyloid-β deposits, glymphatic transport was reduced, due to the accumulation of toxic Aβ species, such as soluble oligomers. CSF-derived Aβ40 co-localizes with existing endogenous vascular and parenchymal amyloid-β plaques, and thus, may contribute to the progression of both cerebral amyloid angiopathy and parenchymal Aβ accumulation. Importantly, glymphatic failure preceded significant amyloid-β deposits, and thus, may be an early biomarker of AD. By extension, restoring glymphatic inflow and ISF clearance are potential therapeutic targets to slow the onset and progression of AD. PMID:27234656

  12. Inhibition of monocarboxylate transporter 1 suppresses the proliferation of glioblastoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Takada, Tetsuya; Takata, Kazuyuki; Ashihara, Eishi

    2016-09-01

    Recent evidence suggests that a minor subset of cancer cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs), have self-renewal and tumorigenic potential. Therefore, the characterization of CSCs is important for developing therapeutic strategies against cancer. Cancer cells rely on anaerobic glycolysis to produce ATP even under normoxic conditions, resulting in the generation of excess acidic substances. Cancer cells maintain a weakly alkaline intracellular pH to support functions. Glioblastoma is an aggressive malignancy with a poor 5-year survival rate. Based on the hypothesis that ion transport-related molecules regulate the viability and function of CSCs, we investigated the expression of ion transport-related molecules in glioblastoma CSCs (GSCs). Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that monocarboxylate transporter1 (MCT1) were upregulated in GSCs, and inhibition of MCT1 decreased the viability of GSCs compared with that of non-GSCs. Our findings indicate that MCT1 is involved in the maintenance of GSCs and is a promising therapeutic target for glioblastoma. PMID:26902636

  13. Disrupting Hypoxia-Induced Bicarbonate Transport Acidifies Tumor Cells and Suppresses Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Alan; Hulikova, Alzbeta; Ledaki, Ioanna; Snell, Cameron; Singleton, Dean; Steers, Graham; Seden, Peter; Jones, Dylan; Bridges, Esther; Wigfield, Simon; Li, Ji-Liang; Russell, Angela; Swietach, Pawel; Harris, Adrian L

    2016-07-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated clinically with therapeutic resistance and poor patient outcomes. One feature of tumor hypoxia is activated expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9), a regulator of pH and tumor growth. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that impeding the reuptake of bicarbonate produced extracellularly by CA9 could exacerbate the intracellular acidity produced by hypoxic conditions, perhaps compromising cell growth and viability as a result. In 8 of 10 cancer cell lines, we found that hypoxia induced the expression of at least one bicarbonate transporter. The most robust and frequent inductions were of the sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters SLC4A4 and SLC4A9, which rely upon both HIF1α and HIF2α activity for their expression. In cancer cell spheroids, SLC4A4 or SLC4A9 disruption by either genetic or pharmaceutical approaches acidified intracellular pH and reduced cell growth. Furthermore, treatment of spheroids with S0859, a small-molecule inhibitor of sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters, increased apoptosis in the cell lines tested. Finally, RNAi-mediated attenuation of SLC4A9 increased apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer spheroids and dramatically reduced growth of MDA-MB-231 breast tumors or U87 gliomas in murine xenografts. Our findings suggest that disrupting pH homeostasis by blocking bicarbonate import might broadly relieve the common resistance of hypoxic tumors to anticancer therapy. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3744-55. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197160

  14. Inclusion of Cu nano-cluster 1D arrays inside a C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide via co-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ruiying; Li, Fei; Yang, Chunpeng; Wan, Xiaobo

    2015-12-01

    A peptide sequence N3-GVGV-OMe (G: glycine; V: valine) was attached to a benzene 1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) derivative via ``click chemistry'' to afford a C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide. The key feature of this oligopeptide is that the binding sites (triazole groups formed by click reaction) are located at the center, while the three oligopeptide arms with a strong tendency to assemble are located around it, which provides inner space to accommodate nanoparticles via self-assembly. The inclusion of Cu nanoclusters and the formation of one-dimensional (1D) arrays inside the nanofibers of the C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide assembly were observed, which is quite different from the commonly observed nanoparticle growth on the surface of the pre-assembled oligopeptide nanofibers via the coordination sites located outside. Our finding provides an instructive concept for the design of other stable organic-inorganic hybrid 1D arrays with the inorganic nanoparticles inside.A peptide sequence N3-GVGV-OMe (G: glycine; V: valine) was attached to a benzene 1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) derivative via ``click chemistry'' to afford a C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide. The key feature of this oligopeptide is that the binding sites (triazole groups formed by click reaction) are located at the center, while the three oligopeptide arms with a strong tendency to assemble are located around it, which provides inner space to accommodate nanoparticles via self-assembly. The inclusion of Cu nanoclusters and the formation of one-dimensional (1D) arrays inside the nanofibers of the C3-symmetric artificial oligopeptide assembly were observed, which is quite different from the commonly observed nanoparticle growth on the surface of the pre-assembled oligopeptide nanofibers via the coordination sites located outside. Our finding provides an instructive concept for the design of other stable organic-inorganic hybrid 1D arrays with the inorganic nanoparticles inside. Electronic

  15. Synthetic oligopeptide substrates: their diagnostic application in blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and other pathologic states

    SciTech Connect

    Huseby, R.M.; Smith, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    This review article with 522 references, focuses on the use of synthetic oligopepide substrates to measure the activity of proteoytic enzymes in human physiology and pathology. A classification of proteinases based on their mechanism of action is presented. The application of these synthetic oligopeptide substrates to understand the disorders of the blood coagulation and fibrinolytic system is reviewed. Intracellular functioning proteinases were also assessed in relation to certain pathologies where their abnormal activity is recognized.

  16. Mineral-enhanced hydrothermal oligopeptide formation at the second time scale.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Kunio; Takeya, Hitoshi; Kushibe, Takao; Koizumi, Yuka

    2011-06-01

    Accumulation of biopolymers should have been an essential step for the emergence of life on primitive Earth. However, experimental simulations for submarine hydrothermal vent systems in which high-temperature water spouts through minerals within a short time scale have not been attempted. Here, we show that enhancement of hydrothermal oligopeptide elongation by naturally occurring minerals was successfully verified for the first time by using a mineral-mediated hydrothermal flow reactor system (MMHF). MMHF consists of a narrow tubular reactor packed with mineral particles, and the enhancement or inhibitory activities of 10 types of naturally occurring minerals were successfully evaluated for an elongation reaction from (Ala)(4) to (Ala)(5) and higher oligopeptides in the absence of condensation reagents. It was unexpected that calcite and dolomite facilitated the elongation from (Ala)(4) to (Ala)(5) and higher oligopeptides with 28% yield at pH 7, while tourmaline, galena, apatite, mica, sphalerite, quartz, chalcopyrite, and pyrite did not show enhancement activities. These facts suggest the importance of carbonate minerals for the accumulation of peptide in primitive Earth environments. PMID:21671764

  17. Mineral-Enhanced Hydrothermal Oligopeptide Formation at the Second Time Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Kunio; Takeya, Hitoshi; Kushibe, Takao; Koizumi, Yuka

    2011-06-01

    Accumulation of biopolymers should have been an essential step for the emergence of life on primitive Earth. However, experimental simulations for submarine hydrothermal vent systems in which high-temperature water spouts through minerals within a short time scale have not been attempted. Here, we show that enhancement of hydrothermal oligopeptide elongation by naturally occurring minerals was successfully verified for the first time by using a mineral-mediated hydrothermal flow reactor system (MMHF). MMHF consists of a narrow tubular reactor packed with mineral particles, and the enhancement or inhibitory activities of 10 types of naturally occurring minerals were successfully evaluated for an elongation reaction from (Ala)4 to (Ala)5 and higher oligopeptides in the absence of condensation reagents. It was unexpected that calcite and dolomite facilitated the elongation from (Ala)4 to (Ala)5 and higher oligopeptides with 28% yield at pH 7, while tourmaline, galena, apatite, mica, sphalerite, quartz, chalcopyrite, and pyrite did not show enhancement activities. These facts suggest the importance of carbonate minerals for the accumulation of peptide in primitive Earth environments.

  18. Controlled trial of oligopeptide versus amino acid diet in treatment of active Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, J C; Giaffer, M H; Holdsworth, C D

    1995-01-01

    Elemental diets are effective in inducing remission in active Crohn's disease, but how they exert this therapeutic effect is unclear. In a previous study a whole protein containing diet proved less effective than one in which food antigens were excluded, suggesting that exclusion of food antigens from the gut was a possible mechanism. This study was designed to test whether an oligopeptide diet of hydrolysed proteins was as effective as an amino acid based diet. These diets were equally antigen free but with different nitrogen sources. Forty four patients with active Crohn's disease were randomised in a controlled trial of amino acid versus oligopeptide diet. The feeds were given by nasogastric tube in equicaloric quantities and were the sole form of nutrition. Treatment was continued for four weeks although failure to improve by day 10 resulted in withdrawal. Quantitative leucocyte scintigraphy was used to investigate the effect of diet treatment on gut inflammation. Clinical and nutritional responses to treatment were also measured. Sixteen patients entered remission (including withdrawal of corticosteroids), six patients could not tolerate the nasogastric tube, and 22 patients failed to respond. The two diets were equally effective. Patients who responded had a rapid drop in clinical index of disease activity and a major reduction in the bowel uptake of leucocytes on scintigraphy. The oligopeptide and amino acid based enteral feeds were equally effective at inducing remission in active Crohn's disease. With both diets clinical improvement was accompanied by a reduction in intestinal inflammation. Images Figure 3 PMID:7890238

  19. Molecular characterization of group A streptococcal (GAS) oligopeptide permease (opp) and its effect on cysteine protease production.

    PubMed

    Podbielski, A; Pohl, B; Woischnik, M; Körner, C; Schmidt, K H; Rozdzinski, E; Leonard, B A

    1996-09-01

    Bacterial oligopeptide permeases are membrane-associated complexes of five proteins belonging to the ABC-transporter family, which have been found to be involved in obtaining nutrients, cell-wall metabolism, competence, and adherence to host cells. A lambda library of the strain CS101 group A streptococcal (GAS) genome was used to sequence 10,192 bp containing the five genes oppA to oppF of the GAS opp operon. The deduced amino acid sequences exhibited 50-84% homology to pneumococcal AmiA to AmiF sequences. The operon organization of the five genes was confirmed by transcriptional analysis and an additional shorter oppA transcript was detected. Insertional inactivation was used to create serotype M49 strains which did not express either the oppA gene or the ATPase genes, oppD and oppF. The mutation in oppA confirmed that the additional shorter oppA transcript originated from the opp operon and was probably due to an intra-operon transcription terminator site located downstream of oppA. While growth kinetics, binding of serum proteins, and attachment to eukaryotic cells were unaffected, the oppD/F mutants showed reduced production of the cysteine protease, SpeB, and a change in the pattern of secreted proteins. Thus, the GAS opp operon appears to contribute to both protease production and export/processing of secreted proteins. PMID:8885277

  20. Hypouricemic effects of novel concentrative nucleoside transporter 2 inhibitors through suppressing intestinal absorption of purine nucleosides.

    PubMed

    Hiratochi, Masahiro; Tatani, Kazuya; Shimizu, Kazuo; Kuramochi, Yu; Kikuchi, Norihiko; Kamada, Noboru; Itoh, Fumiaki; Isaji, Masayuki

    2012-09-01

    We have developed concentrative nucleoside transporter 2 (CNT2) inhibitors as a novel pharmacological approach for improving hyperuricemia by inhibiting intestinal absorption of purines. Dietary purine nucleosides are absorbed in the small intestines by CNTs expressed in the apical membrane. In humans, the absorbed purine nucleosides are rapidly degraded to their final end product, uric acid, by xanthine oxidase. Based on the expression profile of human CNTs in digestive tract tissues, we established a working hypothesis that mainly CNT2 contributes to the intestinal absorption of purine nucleosides. In order to confirm this possibility, we developed CNT2 inhibitors and found that (2R,3R,4S,5R)-2-(6-amino-8-{[3'-(3-aminopropoxy)-biphenyl-4-ylmethyl]-amino}-9H-purin-9-yl)-5-hydroxymethyl-tetrahydrofuran-3,4-diol (KGO-2142) and 1-[3-(5-{[1-((2R,3R,4S,5R)-3,4-dihydroxy-5-hydroxymethyl-tetrahydrofuran-2-yl)-1H-benzimidazol-2-ylamino]-methyl}-2-ethoxyphenoxy)-propyl]-piperidine-4-carboxylic acid amide (KGO-2173) were inhibitory. These CNT2 inhibitors had potent inhibitory activity against inosine uptake via human CNT2, but they did not potently interfere with nucleoside uptake via human CNT1, CNT3 or equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) in vitro. After oral administration of KGO-2173 along with [(14)C]-inosine, KGO-2173 significantly decreased the urinary excretion of radioactivity at 6 and 24h in rats. Since dietary purine nucleosides are not utilized in the body and are excreted into the urine rapidly, this decrease in radioactivity in the urine represented the inhibitory activity of KGO-2173 toward the absorption of [(14)C]-inosine in the small intestines. KGO-2142 almost completely inhibited dietary RNA-induced hyperuricemia and the increase in urinary excretion of uric acid in cebus monkeys. These novel CNT2 inhibitors, KGO-2142 and KGO-2173, could be useful therapeutic options for the treatment of hyperuricemia. PMID:22709993

  1. Charge transport model in solid-state avalanche amorphous selenium and defect suppression design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheuermann, James R.; Miranda, Yesenia; Liu, Hongyu; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) in a layer of High Gain Avalanche Rushing Photoconductor (HARP) is being investigated for its use in large area medical imagers. Avalanche multiplication of photogenerated charge requires electric fields greater than 70 V μm-1. For a-Se to withstand this high electric field, blocking layers are used to prevent the injection of charge carriers from the electrodes. Blocking layers must have a high injection barrier and deep trapping states to reduce the electric field at the interface. In the presence of a defect in the blocking layer, a distributed resistive layer (DRL) must be included into the structure to build up space charge and reduce the electric field in a-Se and the defect. A numerical charge transport model has been developed to optimize the properties of blocking layers used in various HARP structures. The model shows the incorporation of a DRL functionality into the p-layer can reduce dark current at a point defect by two orders of magnitude by reducing the field in a-Se to the avalanche threshold. Hole mobility in a DRL of ˜10-8 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 100 V μm-1 as demonstrated by the model can be achieved experimentally by varying the hole mobility of p-type organic or inorganic semiconductors through doping, e.g., using Poly(9-vinylcarbozole) doped with 1%-3% (by weight) of poly(3-hexylthiopene).

  2. Inhibition of Large Neutral Amino Acid Transporters Suppresses Kynurenic Acid Production Via Inhibition of Kynurenine Uptake in Rodent Brain.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Airi; Kuroki, Yusuke; Urata, Tomomi; Mori, Noriyuki; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2016-09-01

    The tryptophan metabolite, kynurenic acid (KYNA), is a preferential antagonist of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor at endogenous brain concentrations. Recent studies have suggested that increases of brain KYNA levels are involved in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression, and regulation of KYNA production has become a new target for treatment of these diseases. Kynurenine (KYN), the immediate precursor of KYNA, is transported into astrocytes via large neutral amino acid transporters (LATs). In the present study, the effect of LATs regulation on KYN uptake and KYNA production was investigated in vitro and in vivo using an LATs inhibitor, 2-aminobicyclo-(2,2,1)-heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH). In the in vitro study, cortical slices of rat brain were incubated with a physiological concentration of KYN and 3 µmol/L-3 mmol/L BCH. BCH inhibited KYNA production and KYN uptake in a dose-dependent manner, and their IC50 values were 90.7 and 97.4 µmol/L, respectively. In the in vivo study, mice were administered KYN (50 mg/kg BW) orally and BCH (200 mg/kg BW) intravenously. Administration of KYN increased brain KYN and KYNA levels compared with the mice treated with vehicle, whereas additional administration of BCH suppressed KYN-induced elevations in KYN and KYNA levels to 50 and 70 % in the brain. These results suggest that inhibition of LATs prevented the increase of KYNA production via blockade of KYN uptake in the brain in vitro and in vivo. LATs can be a target to modulate brain function by regulation of KYNA production in the brain. PMID:27161376

  3. Knockdown of the sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporter 2b (NPT2b) suppresses lung tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seong-Ho; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Chang, Seung-Hee; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Lee, Somin; Lee, Ah-Young; Seo, Hwi Won; Chae, Chanhee; Beck, George R; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2013-01-01

    The sodium-dependent phosphate co-transporter 2b (NPT2b) plays an important role in maintaining phosphate homeostasis. In previous studies, we have shown that high dietary inorganic phosphate (Pi) consumption in mice stimulated lung tumorigenesis and increased NPT2b expression. NPT2b has also been found to be highly expressed in human lung cancer tissues. The association of high expression of NPT2b in the lung with poor prognosis in oncogenic lung diseases prompted us to test whether knockdown of NPT2b may regulate lung cancer growth. To address this issue, aerosols that contained small interfering RNA (siRNA) directed against NPT2b (siNPT2b) were delivered into the lungs of K-ras (LA1) mice, which constitute a murine model reflecting human lung cancer. Our results clearly showed that repeated aerosol delivery of siNPT2b successfully suppressed lung cancer growth and decreased cancer cell proliferation and angiogenesis, while facilitating apoptosis. These results strongly suggest that NPT2b plays a role lung tumorigenesis and represents a novel target for lung cancer therapy. PMID:24194864

  4. Suppression pattern of neutral pions at high transverse momentum in Au + Au collisions at sqrt[sNN]=200 GeV and constraints on medium transport coefficients.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Al-Jamel, A; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Chai, J-S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J-L; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Cianciolo, V; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Dahms, T; Das, K; David, G; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fung, S-Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hamagaki, H; Han, R; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Heuser, J M; He, X; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kawagishi, T; Kawall, D; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, Y-S; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kroon, P J; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y-S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Le Bornec, Y; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Lim, H; Liska, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Li, X; Li, X H; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Masek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Mikes, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Norman, B E; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, H; Okada, K; Oka, M; Omiwade, O O; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakata, H; Samsonov, V; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shevel, A; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shohjoh, T; Shoji, K; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Slunecka, M; Smith, W C; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sullivan, J P; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tojo, J; Tomásek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Vertesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Walker, D; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wessels, J; White, S N; Willis, N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yanovich, A; Yasin, Z; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

    2008-12-01

    For Au + Au collisions at 200 GeV, we measure neutral pion production with good statistics for transverse momentum, pT, up to 20 GeV/c. A fivefold suppression is found, which is essentially constant for 5 < pT < 20 GeV/c. Experimental uncertainties are small enough to constrain any model-dependent parametrization for the transport coefficient of the medium, e.g., q in the parton quenching model. The spectral shape is similar for all collision classes, and the suppression does not saturate in Au + Au collisions. PMID:19113542

  5. Focal accumulation of an apolipoprotein B-based synthetic oligopeptide in the healing rabbit arterial wall

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, I.L.; Lees, R.S.; Chang, M.Y.; Lees, A.M. )

    1990-02-01

    The functions of surface-accessible domains of apolipoprotein (apo) B, the protein moiety of low density lipoprotein (LDL), are unknown, aside from the LDL receptor-binding domain, which lies toward the carboxyl-terminal end of apoB. Since LDL accumulation in arterial lesions does not depend on recognition of LDLs by a cell-surface receptor, we synthesized an oligopeptide with the sequence of the trypsin-accessible domain of apoB that lies closest to the amino-terminal end of the protein and compared its biological activity to that of another synthetic oligopeptide with the sequence of the heparin- and apoB/apoE receptor-binding domains of apoE. (Tyrosine was added at the amino-terminal end of each peptide to facilitate radiolabeling.) The 18-amino acid apoB-based peptide included residues 1000-1016 of apoB, for which no function has been previously described. In radioautographs, the 125I-labeled peptide accumulated focally at the healing edges of regenerating endothelial islands in the balloon-catheter deendothelialized rabbit aorta. In contrast, the 21-residue apoE-based peptide, which included residues 129-148 of apoE, accumulated diffusely and uniformly throughout the deendothelialized areas of the aorta. The data show that focal binding of the apoB-based peptide can delineate arterial lesions and suggest that this arterial wall-binding domain of apoB mediates accumulation of LDLs in arterial lesions.

  6. Oligopeptide complex for targeted non-viral gene delivery to adipocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Young-Wook; Adhikary, Partho Protim; Lim, Kwang Suk; Kim, Hyung Jin; Kim, Jang Kyoung; Kim, Yong-Hee

    2014-12-01

    Commercial anti-obesity drugs acting in the gastrointestinal tract or the central nervous system have been shown to have limited efficacy and severe side effects. Anti-obesity drug development is thus focusing on targeting adipocytes that store excess fat. Here, we show that an adipocyte-targeting fusion-oligopeptide gene carrier consisting of an adipocyte-targeting sequence and 9-arginine (ATS-9R) selectively transfects mature adipocytes by binding to prohibitin. Injection of ATS-9R into obese mice confirmed specific binding of ATS-9R to fat vasculature, internalization and gene expression in adipocytes. We also constructed a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) for silencing fatty-acid-binding protein 4 (shFABP4), a key lipid chaperone in fatty-acid uptake and lipid storage in adipocytes. Treatment of obese mice with ATS-9R/shFABP4 led to metabolic recovery and body-weight reduction (>20%). The ATS-9R/shFABP4 oligopeptide complex could prove to be a safe therapeutic approach to regress and treat obesity as well as obesity-induced metabolic syndromes.

  7. Optimization of Enzymatic Production of Oligopeptides from Apricot Almonds Meal with Neutrase and N120P

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunyan; Wang, Qiang; Tian, Jinqiang

    2010-01-01

    Neutrase 0.8L and N120P proteases were used for oligopeptide production from apricot almonds meal, and response surface design was carried out to optimize the effect of hydrolysis conditions on hydrolysis degree (DH) and oligopeptide yield rate. Four independent variables were used to optimize the hydrolysis process: hydrolysis temperature (X1), enzyme-to substrate ratio (E/S) (X2), substrate concentration (X3) and reaction time (X4). Statistical analysis indicated that the four variables, quadratic terms of X1, X3, and X4, and the interaction terms with X1 had a significant (p < 0.05) effect on DH. The yield rate was also significantly affected by the four variables and quadratic terms of X1, X2 and X4. Two mathematical models with high determination coefficient were obtained and could be employed to optimize protein hydrolysis. The optimal hydrolysis conditions were determined as follows: hydrolysis temperature 52.5 °C; enzyme-to-substrate ratio (E/S) 7200 U/g; substrate concentration 2%; reaction time 173 min. The initial pH 6.5 and Neutrase-to-N120P dosage ratio 2:1 were fixed in this study according to the preliminary research. Under these conditions, the experimental DH and yield rate were 34.10 ± 5.25% and 72.42 ± 2.27%, respectively. PMID:21614184

  8. Directed self-assembly of π-conjugated oligopeptides for supramolecular electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Li, Songsong; Zhou, Yuecheng; Tovar, John; Wilson, William; Schroeder, Charles

    The directed mesoscale engineering of nanoscale building blocks holds enormous promise to catalyze a revolution in new functional materials for advanced electronics. Bio-inspired systems can play a key role in this effort due to their inherent ``programmable'' function. In this work, oligopeptide with defined flanking sequences was appended to π-conjugated units, thereby directing their assembly processes in a designed manner. By utilizing custom-designed microfluidic devices and controlled acid vapor diffusion, the self-assembly rate was directed and precisely tuned. Notably, the kinetics was found to play a key role in the morphology of self-assembled π-conjugated oligopeptides. The influence of flanking peptide sequences and π-conjugated core-core interactions on the self-assembly nanostructure was systematically investigated. Importantly, the electronic properties of the synthetic peptide assembly was explored by integration as the active layer of a field effect transistor. The presented study offers insights to the design and fabrication of supramolecular electronics.

  9. Viscoelastic properties and nanoscale structures of composite oligopeptide-polysaccharide hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Hyland, Laura L; Taraban, Marc B; Feng, Yue; Hammouda, Boualem; Yu, Y Bruce

    2012-03-01

    Biocompatible and biodegradable peptide hydrogels are drawing increasing attention as prospective materials for human soft tissue repair and replacement. To improve the rather unfavorable mechanical properties of our pure peptide hydrogels, in this work we examined the possibility of creating a double hydrogel network. This network was created by means of the coassembly of mutually attractive, but self-repulsive oligopeptides within an already-existing fibrous network formed by the charged, biocompatible polysaccharides chitosan, alginate, and chondroitin. Using dynamic oscillatory rheology experiments, it was found that the coassembly of the peptides within the existing polysaccharide network resulted in a less stiff material as compared to the pure peptide networks (the elastic modulus G' decreased from 90 to 10 kPa). However, these composite oligopeptide-polysaccharide hydrogels were characterized by a greater resistance to deformation (the yield strain γ grew from 4 to 100%). Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the 2D cross-sectional shapes of the fibers, their dimensional characteristics, and the mesh sizes of the fibrous networks. Differences in material structures found with SANS experiments confirmed rheology data, showing that incorporation of the peptides dramatically changed the morphology of the polysaccharide network. The resulting fibers were structurally very similar to those forming the pure peptide networks, but formed less stiff gels because of their markedly greater mesh sizes. Together, these findings suggest an approach for the development of highly deformation-resistant biomaterials. PMID:21994046

  10. Intercalation of amino acids and oligopeptides into Zn Al layered double hydroxide by coprecipitation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisawa, Sumio; Sasaki, Shuji; Takahashi, Satoshi; Hirahara, Hidetoshi; Nakayama, Hirokazu; Narita, Eiichi

    2006-05-01

    The coprecipitation of amino acids and oligopeptides with the Zn Al LDH was investigated using phenylalanine (Phe), phenylalanyl-phenylalanine (Phe-Phe), glycyl-phenylalanine (Gly Phe), glycine (Gly), glycyl-glycine (Gly Gly), glycyl-glycyl-glycine (Gly Gly Gly) and N-(N-γ-glutamyl-cysteinyl)-glycine (GSH) as guest species. The coprecipitation behavior of amino acids and oligopeptides was found to be influenced by the solution pH and the kind of their side chain groups, and reached the maximum at pH 8 or 9. The basal spacing, d003, of the Phe, Phe-Phe and GSH/LDH was 1.81, 2.41 and 1.64 nm, supporting that guests were arranged vertical to the LDH basal layer. Acceding to the basal spacing of the Gly, Gly Gly and Gly Gly Gly/LDH (d003=0.84 0.88 nm), these guests were oriented horizontal to the LDH basal layer with the co-intercalated NO3-. Moreover, the amount of Phe-Phe, Gly Gly and Gly Gly Gly intercalated was almost the same as that of Phe and Gly despite increasing the number peptide bond and the molecular size. GSH was intercalated into the LDH interlayer space as GSH oxidized form with bridged LDH layers by their carboxylate groups.

  11. Viscoelastic Properties and Nano-scale Structures of Composite Oligopeptide-Polysaccharide Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Hyland, Laura L.; Taraban, Marc B.; Feng, Yue; Hammouda, Boualem; Yu, Y. Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Biocompatible and biodegradable peptide hydrogels are drawing increasing attention as prospective materials for human soft tissue repair and replacement. To improve the rather unfavorable mechanical properties of our pure peptide hydrogels, in this work we examined the possibility of creating a double hydrogel network. This network was created by means of the co-assembly of mutually attractive but self-repulsive oligopeptides within an already existing fibrous network formed by the charged, biocompatible polysaccharides chitosan, alginate, and chondroitin. Using dynamic oscillatory rheology experiments, it was found that the co-assembly of the peptides within the existing polysaccharide network resulted in a less stiff material as compared to the pure peptide networks (the elastic modulus G′ decreased from 90 kPa to 10 kPa). However, these composite oligopeptide-polysaccharide hydrogels were characterized by a greater resistance to deformation (the yield strain γ grew from 4 % to 100 %). Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used to study the 2D cross-sectional shapes of the fibers, their dimensional characteristics and the mesh sizes of the fibrous networks. Differences in material structures found with SANS experiments confirmed rheology data showing that incorporation of the peptides dramatically changed the morphology of the polysaccharide network. The resulting fibers were structurally very similar to those forming the pure peptide networks, but formedless stiff gels because of their markedly greater mesh sizes. Together, these findings suggest an approach for the development of highly deformation-resistant biomaterials. PMID:21994046

  12. Linoleic acid suppresses cholesterol efflux and ATP-binding cassette transporters in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), possibly associated with elevated plasma free fatty acid concentrations. Paradoxically, evidence suggests that unsaturated, compared to saturated fatty acids, suppress macrophage chole...

  13. Chemical and enzymatic catalytic routes to polyesters and oligopeptides biobased materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianhui

    My Ph.D research focuses on the synthesis and property studies of different biobased materials, including polyesters, polyurethanes and oligopeptides. The first study describes the synthesis, crystal structure and physico-mechanical properties of a bio-based polyester prepared from 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) and 1,4-butanediol. Melt-polycondensation experiments were conducted by a two-stage polymerization using titanium tetraisopropoxide (Ti[OiPr] 4) as catalyst. Polymerization conditions (catalyst concentration, reaction time and 2nd stage reaction temperature) were varied to optimize poly(butylene furan dicarboxylate), PBF, molecular weight. A series of PBFs with different Mw were characterized by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA), X-Ray diffraction and tensile testing. Influence of molecular weight and melting/crystallization enthalpy on PBF material tensile properties was explored. Cold-drawing tensile tests at room temperature for PBF with Mw 16K to 27K showed a brittle-to-ductile transition. When Mw reaches 38K, the Young's Modulus of PBF remains above 900 MPa, and the elongation at break increases to above 1000%. The mechanical properties, thermal properties and crystal structures of PBF were similar to petroleum derived poly(butylenes terephthalate), PBT. Fiber diagrams of uniaxially stretched PBF films were collected, indexed, and the unit cell was determined as triclinic (a=4.78(3) A, b=6.03(5) A, c=12.3(1) A, alpha=110.1(2)°, beta=121.1(3)°, gamma=100.6(2)°). A crystal structure was derived from this data and final atomic coordinates are reported. We concluded that there is a close similarity of the PBF structure to PBT alpha- and beta-forms. In the second study, a biobased long chain polyester polyol (PC14-OH) was synthesized from o-hydroxytetradecanoic acid (o-HOC14) and 1,4-butanediol. The first section about polyester polyurethanes describes the synthesis

  14. Cell Lysis in S. pombe ura4 Mutants Is Suppressed by Loss of Functional Pub1, Which Regulates the Uracil Transporter Fur4

    PubMed Central

    Nishino, Kohei; Kushima, Misaki; Matsuo, Yuzy; Matsuo, Yasuhiro; Kawamukai, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Δura4 cells lyse when grown on YPD medium. A S. pombe non-essential gene deletion library was screened to determine suppressors of the lysis phenotype. Deletion of the pub1 gene, which encoded E3 ubiquitin ligase, strongly suppressed cell lysis in Δura4 cells. The Δpub1 cells displayed high sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil, a toxic analog of uracil, and this sensitivity was suppressed by deletion of fur4, which encoded a uracil transporter. Fur4 localized primarily to the Golgi apparatus and vacuoles in wild-type cells, but localization was predominantly at the plasma membrane in Δpub1 cells. Fur4 was necessary for the utilization of extracellular uracil, cytosine, or UMP. Uracil uptake activity increased in the Δpub1 strain in a Fur4-dependent manner. In addition, uracil starvation was critical for induction of cell lysis of Δura4 strains and uracil supplementation suppressed lysis. In summary, the increased uracil uptake ability of Δpub1 cells, where Fur4 was predominantly localized to the plasma membrane, resulted in suppression of cell lysis in the Δura4 background. PMID:26536126

  15. Structural Analysis of Semi-specific Oligosaccharide Recognition by a Cellulose-binding Protein of Thermotoga maritima Reveals Adaptations for Functional Diversification of the Oligopeptide Periplasmic Binding Protein Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Beese, Lorena S.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2010-05-25

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) constitute a protein superfamily that binds a wide variety of ligands. In prokaryotes, PBPs function as receptors for ATP-binding cassette or tripartite ATP-independent transporters and chemotaxis systems. In many instances, PBPs bind their cognate ligands with exquisite specificity, distinguishing, for example, between sugar epimers or structurally similar anions. By contrast, oligopeptide-binding proteins bind their ligands through interactions with the peptide backbone but do not distinguish between different side chains. The extremophile Thermotoga maritima possesses a remarkable array of carbohydrate-processing metabolic systems, including the hydrolysis of cellulosic polymers. Here, we present the crystal structure of a T. maritima cellobiose-binding protein (tm0031) that is homologous to oligopeptide-binding proteins. T. maritima cellobiose-binding protein binds a variety of lengths of {beta}(1 {yields} 4)-linked glucose oligomers, ranging from two rings (cellobiose) to five (cellopentaose). The structure reveals that binding is semi-specific. The disaccharide at the nonreducing end binds specifically; the other rings are located in a large solvent-filled groove, where the reducing end makes several contacts with the protein, thereby imposing an upper limit of the oligosaccharides that are recognized. Semi-specific recognition, in which a molecular class rather than individual species is selected, provides an efficient solution for the uptake of complex mixtures.

  16. 30 CFR 75.1911 - Fire suppression systems for diesel-powered equipment and fuel transportation units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... dry chemical type (ABC) fire suppression system listed or approved by a nationally recognized independent testing laboratory and appropriate for installation on diesel-powered equipment and fuel... required by the nationally recognized independent testing laboratory listing or approval, and be...

  17. Suppression of roll-off characteristics of organic light-emitting diodes by narrowing current injection/transport area to 50 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Kyohei Inoue, Munetomo; Yoshida, Kou; Nakanotani, Hajime; Mikhnenko, Oleksandr; Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen E-mail: adachi@cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Adachi, Chihaya E-mail: adachi@cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2015-03-02

    Using e-beam nanolithography, the current injection/transport area in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) was confined into a narrow linear structure with a minimum width of 50 nm. This caused suppression of Joule heating and partial separation of polarons and excitons, so the charge density where the electroluminescent efficiency decays to the half of the initial value (J{sub 0}) was significantly improved. A device with a narrow current injection width of 50 nm exhibited a J{sub 0} that was almost two orders of magnitude higher compared with that of the unpatterned OLED.

  18. Suppression of NDA-Type Alternative Mitochondrial NAD(P)H Dehydrogenases in Arabidopsis thaliana Modifies Growth and Metabolism, but not High Light Stimulation of Mitochondrial Electron Transport

    PubMed Central

    Wallström, Sabá V.; Florez-Sarasa, Igor; Araújo, Wagner L.; Escobar, Matthew A.; Geisler, Daniela A.; Aidemark, Mari; Lager, Ida; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Ribas-Carbó, Miquel; Rasmusson, Allan G.

    2014-01-01

    The plant respiratory chain contains several pathways which bypass the energy-conserving electron transport complexes I, III and IV. These energy bypasses, including type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenases and the alternative oxidase (AOX), may have a role in redox stabilization and regulation, but current evidence is inconclusive. Using RNA interference, we generated Arabidopsis thaliana plants simultaneously suppressing the type II NAD(P)H dehydrogenase genes NDA1 and NDA2. Leaf mitochondria contained substantially reduced levels of both proteins. In sterile culture in the light, the transgenic lines displayed a slow growth phenotype, which was more severe when the complex I inhibitor rotenone was present. Slower growth was also observed in soil. In rosette leaves, a higher NAD(P)H/NAD(P)+ ratio and elevated levels of lactate relative to sugars and citric acid cycle metabolites were observed. However, photosynthetic performance was unaffected and microarray analyses indicated few transcriptional changes. A high light treatment increased AOX1a mRNA levels, in vivo AOX and cytochrome oxidase activities, and levels of citric acid cycle intermediates and hexoses in all genotypes. However, NDA-suppressing plants deviated from the wild type merely by having higher levels of several amino acids. These results suggest that NDA suppression restricts citric acid cycle reactions, inducing a shift towards increased levels of fermentation products, but do not support a direct association between photosynthesis and NDA proteins. PMID:24486764

  19. Chemical and enzymatic catalytic routes to polyesters and oligopeptides biobased materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianhui

    My Ph.D research focuses on the synthesis and property studies of different biobased materials, including polyesters, polyurethanes and oligopeptides. The first study describes the synthesis, crystal structure and physico-mechanical properties of a bio-based polyester prepared from 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) and 1,4-butanediol. Melt-polycondensation experiments were conducted by a two-stage polymerization using titanium tetraisopropoxide (Ti[OiPr] 4) as catalyst. Polymerization conditions (catalyst concentration, reaction time and 2nd stage reaction temperature) were varied to optimize poly(butylene furan dicarboxylate), PBF, molecular weight. A series of PBFs with different Mw were characterized by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA), X-Ray diffraction and tensile testing. Influence of molecular weight and melting/crystallization enthalpy on PBF material tensile properties was explored. Cold-drawing tensile tests at room temperature for PBF with Mw 16K to 27K showed a brittle-to-ductile transition. When Mw reaches 38K, the Young's Modulus of PBF remains above 900 MPa, and the elongation at break increases to above 1000%. The mechanical properties, thermal properties and crystal structures of PBF were similar to petroleum derived poly(butylenes terephthalate), PBT. Fiber diagrams of uniaxially stretched PBF films were collected, indexed, and the unit cell was determined as triclinic (a=4.78(3) A, b=6.03(5) A, c=12.3(1) A, alpha=110.1(2)°, beta=121.1(3)°, gamma=100.6(2)°). A crystal structure was derived from this data and final atomic coordinates are reported. We concluded that there is a close similarity of the PBF structure to PBT alpha- and beta-forms. In the second study, a biobased long chain polyester polyol (PC14-OH) was synthesized from o-hydroxytetradecanoic acid (o-HOC14) and 1,4-butanediol. The first section about polyester polyurethanes describes the synthesis

  20. Investigation Into Efficiency of a Novel Glycol Chitosan-Bestatin Conjugate to Protect Thymopoietin Oligopeptides From Enzymatic Degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Feng, Jiao; Cui, Lili; Zhang, Yuebin; Li, Wenzhao; Li, Chunlei; Shi, Nianqiu; Chen, Yan; Kong, Wei

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a novel glycol chitosan (GCS)-bestatin conjugate was synthesized and evaluated to demonstrate its efficacy in protecting thymopoietin oligopeptides from aminopeptidase-mediated degradation. Moreover, the mechanism and relative susceptibility of three thymopoietin oligopeptides, thymocartin (TP4), thymopentin (TP5), and thymotrinan (TP3), to enzymatic degradation were investigated and compared at the molecular level. Initial investigations indicated that formation of the GCS-bestatin conjugate, with a substitution degree of 7.0% (moles of bestatin per mole of glycol glucosamine unit), could significantly protect all 3 peptides from aminopeptidase-mediated degradation in a concentration-dependent manner. The space hindrance and loss of one pair of hydrogen bonds, resulting from the covalent conjugation of chitosan with bestatin, did not affect the specific interaction between bestatin and aminopeptidase. Moreover, TP4 displayed a higher degradation clearance compared with those of TP5 and TP3 under the same experimental conditions. The varying levels of susceptibility of these 3 peptides to aminopeptidase (TP4 > TP5 > TP3) were closely related to differences in their binding energies to enzyme, which mainly involved Van der Waals forces and electrostatic interactions, as supported by the results of molecular dynamics simulations. These results suggest that GCS-bestatin conjugate might be useful in the delivery of thymopoietin oligopeptides by mucosal routes, and that TP3 and TP5 are better alternatives to TP4 for delivery because of their robust resistance against enzymatic degradation. PMID:26173563

  1. Application of reverse-phase HPLC to quantify oligopeptide acetylation eliminates interference from unspecific acetyl CoA hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Evjenth, Rune; Hole, Kristine; Ziegler, Mathias; Lillehaug, Johan R

    2009-01-01

    Protein acetylation is a common modification that plays a central role in several cellular processes. The most widely used methods to study these modifications are either based on the detection of radioactively acetylated oligopetide products or an enzyme-coupled reaction measuring conversion of the acetyl donor acetyl CoA to the product CoASH. Due to several disadvantages of these methods, we designed a new method to study oligopeptide acetylation. Based on reverse phase HPLC we detect both reaction products in a highly robust and reproducible way. The method reported here is also fully compatible with subsequent product analysis, e.g. by mass spectroscopy. The catalytic subunit, hNaa30p, of the human NatC protein N-acetyltransferase complex was used for N-terminal oligopeptide acetylation. We show that unacetylated and acetylated oligopeptides can be efficiently separated and quantified by the HPLC-based analysis. The method is highly reproducible and enables reliable quantification of both substrates and products. It is therefore well-suited to determine kinetic parameters of acetyltransferases. PMID:19660098

  2. Suppressing electron turbulence and triggering internal transport barriers with reversed magnetic shear in the National Spherical Torus Experimenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, J. L.; Bell, R.; Candy, J.; Guttenfelder, W.; Hammett, G. W.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H. Y.

    2012-05-01

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] can achieve high electron plasma confinement regimes that are super-critically unstable to the electron temperature gradient driven (ETG) instability. These plasmas, dubbed electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs), occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. Using the gyrokinetic code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)], the first nonlinear ETG simulations of NSTX e-ITB plasmas reinforce this observation. Local simulations identify a strongly upshifted nonlinear critical gradient for thermal transport that depends on magnetic shear. Global simulations show e-ITB formation can occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. While the ETG-driven thermal flux at the outer edge of the barrier is large enough to be experimentally relevant, the turbulence cannot propagate past the barrier into the plasma interior.

  3. Suppressing electron turbulence and triggering internal transport barriers with reversed magnetic shear in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J. L.; Bell, R.; Guttenfelder, W.; Hammett, G. W.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Candy, J.; Smith, D. R.; Yuh, H. Y.

    2012-05-15

    The National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] can achieve high electron plasma confinement regimes that are super-critically unstable to the electron temperature gradient driven (ETG) instability. These plasmas, dubbed electron internal transport barriers (e-ITBs), occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. Using the gyrokinetic code GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)], the first nonlinear ETG simulations of NSTX e-ITB plasmas reinforce this observation. Local simulations identify a strongly upshifted nonlinear critical gradient for thermal transport that depends on magnetic shear. Global simulations show e-ITB formation can occur when the magnetic shear becomes strongly negative. While the ETG-driven thermal flux at the outer edge of the barrier is large enough to be experimentally relevant, the turbulence cannot propagate past the barrier into the plasma interior.

  4. Suppression of asymmetric acid efflux and gravitropism in maize roots treated with auxin transport inhibitors of sodium orthovanadate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulkey, T. J.; Evans, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    In gravitropically stimulated roots of maize (Zea mays L., hybrid WF9 x 38MS), there is more acid efflux on the rapidly growing upper side than on the slowly growing lower side. In light of the Cholodny/Went hypothesis of gravitropism which states that gravitropic curvature results from lateral redistribution of auxin, the effects of auxin transport inhibitors on the development of acid efflux asymmetry and curvature in gravistimulated roots were examined. All the transport inhibitors tested prevented both gravitropism and the development of asymmetric acid efflux in gravistimulated roots. The results indicate that auxin redistribution may cause the asymmetry of acid efflux, a finding consistent with the Cholodny/Went hypothesis of gravitropism. As further evidence that auxin-induced acid efflux asymmetry may mediate gravitropic curvature, sodium orthovanadate, an inhibitor of auxin-induced H+ efflux was found to prevent both gravitropism and the development of asymmetric acid efflux in gravistimulated roots.

  5. Tumor Cellular Proteasome Inhibition and Growth Suppression by 8-Hydroxyquinoline and Clioquinol Requires Their Capabilities to Bind Copper and Transport Copper into Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Shumei; Yang, Lei; Cui, Qiuzhi Cindy; Sun, Ying; Dou, Q. Ping; Yan, Bing

    2009-01-01

    We have previously reported that when mixed with copper, 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-OHQ) and its analog clioquinol (CQ) inhibited the proteasomal activity and proliferation in cultured human cancer cells. CQ treatment of high copper-containing human tumor xenografts also caused cancer suppression, associated with proteasome inhibition in vivo. However, the nature of copper dependence of these events has not been elucidated experimentally. In the current study, by using chemical probe molecules that mimic structures of 8-OHQ and CQ, but have no copper binding capability, we dissected the complex cellular processes elicited by 8-OHQ-Cu or CQ-Cu mixture and revealed that copper-binding to 8-OHQ or CQ is required for transportation of copper complex into human breast cancer cells and the consequent proteasome-inhibitory, growth-suppressive and apoptosis-inducing activities. In contrast, the non-copper-binding analogs of 8-OHQ or CQ blocked the very first step – copper binding in this chain of events mediated by 8-OHQ-Cu or CQ-Cu. PMID:19809836

  6. Protective Effects of Soy Oligopeptides in Ultraviolet B-Induced Acute Photodamage of Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li-wen; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Jia-an; Xu, Yang; Wu, Di; Permatasari, Felicia

    2016-01-01

    Aim. We explored the effects of soy oligopeptides (SOP) in ultraviolet B- (UVB-) induced acute photodamage of human skin in vivo and foreskin ex vivo. Methods. We irradiated the forearm with 1.5 minimal erythemal dose (MED) of UVB for 3 consecutive days, establishing acute photodamage of skin, and topically applied SOP. Erythema index (EI), melanin index, stratum corneum hydration, and transepidermal water loss were measured by using Multiprobe Adapter 9 device. We irradiated foreskin ex vivo with the same dose of UVB (180 mJ/cm2) for 3 consecutive days and topically applied SOP. Sunburn cells were detected by using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Apoptotic cells were detected by using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), p53 protein, Bax protein, and Bcl-2 protein were detected by using immunohistochemical staining. Results. Compared with UVB group, UVB-irradiated skin with topically applied SOP showed significantly decreased EI. Compared with UVB group, topical SOP significantly increased Bcl-2 protein expression and decreased CPDs-positive cells, sunburn cells, apoptotic cells, p53 protein expression, and Bax protein expressions in the epidermis of UVB-irradiated foreskin. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated that topical SOP can protect human skin against UVB-induced photodamage. PMID:27478534

  7. Protective Effects of Soy Oligopeptides in Ultraviolet B-Induced Acute Photodamage of Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bing-Rong; Ma, Li-Wen; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Jia-An; Xu, Yang; Wu, Di; Permatasari, Felicia; Luo, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Aim. We explored the effects of soy oligopeptides (SOP) in ultraviolet B- (UVB-) induced acute photodamage of human skin in vivo and foreskin ex vivo. Methods. We irradiated the forearm with 1.5 minimal erythemal dose (MED) of UVB for 3 consecutive days, establishing acute photodamage of skin, and topically applied SOP. Erythema index (EI), melanin index, stratum corneum hydration, and transepidermal water loss were measured by using Multiprobe Adapter 9 device. We irradiated foreskin ex vivo with the same dose of UVB (180 mJ/cm(2)) for 3 consecutive days and topically applied SOP. Sunburn cells were detected by using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Apoptotic cells were detected by using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), p53 protein, Bax protein, and Bcl-2 protein were detected by using immunohistochemical staining. Results. Compared with UVB group, UVB-irradiated skin with topically applied SOP showed significantly decreased EI. Compared with UVB group, topical SOP significantly increased Bcl-2 protein expression and decreased CPDs-positive cells, sunburn cells, apoptotic cells, p53 protein expression, and Bax protein expressions in the epidermis of UVB-irradiated foreskin. Conclusion. Our study demonstrated that topical SOP can protect human skin against UVB-induced photodamage. PMID:27478534

  8. Oligopeptide elicitor-mediated defense gene activation in cultured parsley cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hahlbrock, K; Scheel, D; Logemann, E; Nürnberger, T; Parniske, M; Reinold, S; Sacks, W R; Schmelzer, E

    1995-01-01

    We have used suspension-cultured parsley cells (Petroselinum crispum) and an oligopeptide elicitor derived from a surface glycoprotein of the phytopathogenic fungus Phytophthora megasperma f.sp. glycinea to study the signaling pathway from elicitor recognition to defense gene activation. Immediately after specific binding of the elicitor by a receptor in the plasma membrane, large and transient increases in several inorganic ion fluxes (Ca2+, H+, K+, Cl-) and H2O2 formation are the first detectable plant cell responses. These are rapidly followed by transient changes in the phosphorylation status of various proteins and by the activation of numerous defense-related genes, concomitant with the inactivation of several other, non-defense-related genes. A great diversity of cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors appears to be involved in elicitor-mediated gene regulation, similar to the apparently complex nature of the signal transduced intracellularly. With few exceptions, all individual defense responses analyzed in fungus-infected parsley leaves have been found to be closely mimicked in elicitor-treated, cultured parsley cells, thus validating the use of the elicitor/cell culture system as a valuable model system for these types of study. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:7753777

  9. Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers modified with short oligopeptides for early endosomal escape and enhanced gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Thuy, Le Thi; Mallick, Sudipta; Choi, Joon Sig

    2015-08-15

    Recently, non-viral vectors have become a popular research topic in the field of gene therapy. In this study, we conjugated short oligopeptides to polyamidoamine-generation 4 (PAMAM G4) to achieve higher transfection efficiency. Previous reports have shown that the PAMAM G4-histidine (H)-arginine (R) dendrimer enhances gene delivery by improving cell penetration and internalization mechanisms. Therefore, we synthesized PAMAM G4-H phenylalanine (F) R, PAMAM G4-FHR and PAMAM G4-FR derivatives to determine the best gene carrier with the lowest toxicity. Physicochemical studies were performed to determine mean diameters and surface charge of PAMAM derivatives/pDNA polyplexes. DNA condensation was confirmed using a gel retardation assay. Cytotoxicity and transfection efficiency were analyzed using human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) and human liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells. Similar levels of transfection were achieved in both cell lines by using gold standard transfection reagent PEI 25 kD. Therefore, our results show that these carriers are promising and may help achieve higher transfection with negligible cytotoxicity. PMID:26187169

  10. Crystal structure of a putative oligopeptide-binding periplasmic protein from a hyperthermophile.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hye-Jin; Kim, Hee Jung; Mikami, Bunzo; Yu, Yeon Gyu; Lee, Hyung Ho

    2016-09-01

    Oligopeptide-binding proteins (Opps) are part of the ATP-binding cassette system, playing a crucial role in nutrient uptake and sensing the external environment in bacteria, including hyperthermophiles. Opps serve as a binding platform for diverse peptides; however, how these peptides are recognized by Opps is still largely unknown and few crystal structures of Opps from hyperthermophiles have been determined. To facilitate such an understanding, the crystal structure of a putative Opp, OppA from Thermotoga maritima (TmOppA), was solved at 2.6-Å resolution in the open conformation. TmOppA is composed of three domains. The N-terminal domain consists of twelve strands, nine helices, and four 310 helices, and the C-terminal domain consists of five strands, ten helices, and one 310 helix. These two domains are connected by the linker domain, which consists of two strands, three helices, and three 310 helices. Based on structural comparisons of TmOppA with other OppAs and binding studies, we suggest that TmOppA might be a periplasmic Opp. The most distinct feature of TmOppA is the insertion of two helices, which are lacking in other OppAs. A cavity volume between the N-terminal and C-terminal domains is suggested to be responsible for binding peptides of various lengths. PMID:27377296

  11. Thermodynamics, morphology, and kinetics of early- stage self-assembly of pi-conjugated oligopeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thurston, Bryce; Tovar, John; Ferguson, Andrew

    Synthetic oligopeptides containing π-conjugated cores self-assemble novel materials with attractive electronic and photophysical properties. All-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of Asp-Phe-Ala-Gly-OPV3-Gly-Ala-Phe-Asp peptides were used to parameterize an implicit solvent model to simulate self-assembly. At low-pH conditions, peptides assemble into β-sheet-like stacks with strongly favorable monomer association free energies of ΔF ~ - 25kB T . Aggregation at high-pH produces disordered aggregates destabilized by Coulombic repulsion between negatively charged Asp termini. We model simulations of hundereds of monomers as a continuous-time Markov process. We infer transition rates between different aggregate sizes and microsecond relaxation times for early-stage assembly. Our data suggests a hierarchical model of assembly in which peptides coalesce into small clusters over tens of nanoseconds followed by structural ripening and diffusion limited aggregation on longer time scales. This work provides new molecular-level understanding of early-stage assembly, and a means to study the impact of peptide chemistry upon the thermodynamics, assembly kinetics, and morphology of the supramolecular aggregates. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Award DE-SC0004857. Molecular simulations partially conducted on University of Illinois Computational Science and Engineering Program parallel computing resources.

  12. Abiotic Protein Fragmentation by Manganese Oxide: Implications for a Mechanism to Supply Soil Biota with Oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Reardon, Patrick N; Chacon, Stephany S; Walter, Eric D; Bowden, Mark E; Washton, Nancy M; Kleber, Markus

    2016-04-01

    The ability of plants and microorganisms to take up organic nitrogen in the form of free amino acids and oligopeptides has received increasing attention over the last two decades, yet the mechanisms for the formation of such compounds in soil environments remain poorly understood. We used Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopies to distinguish the reaction of a model protein with a pedogenic oxide (Birnessite, MnO2) from its response to a phyllosilicate (Kaolinite). Our data demonstrate that birnessite fragments the model protein while kaolinite does not, resulting in soluble peptides that would be available to soil biota and confirming the existence of an abiotic pathway for the formation of organic nitrogen compounds for direct uptake by plants and microorganisms. The absence of reduced Mn(II) in the solution suggests that birnessite acts as a catalyst rather than an oxidant in this reaction. NMR and EPR spectroscopies are shown to be valuable tools to observe these reactions and capture the extent of protein transformation together with the extent of mineral response. PMID:26974439

  13. Mammalian ion-coupled solute transporters.

    PubMed Central

    Hediger, M A; Kanai, Y; You, G; Nussberger, S

    1995-01-01

    Active transport of solutes into and out of cells proceeds via specialized transporters that utilize diverse energy-coupling mechanisms. Ion-coupled transporters link uphill solute transport to downhill electrochemical ion gradients. In mammals, these transporters are coupled to the co-transport of H+, Na+, Cl- and/or to the countertransport of K+ or OH-. By contrast, ATP-dependent transporters are directly energized by the hydrolysis of ATP. The development of expression cloning approaches to select cDNA clones solely based on their capacity to induce transport function in Xenopus oocytes has led to the cloning of several ion-coupled transporter cDNAs and revealed new insights into structural designs, energy-coupling mechanisms and physiological relevance of the transporter proteins. Different types of mammalian ion-coupled transporters are illustrated by discussing transporters isolated in our own laboratory such as the Na+/glucose co-transporters SGLT1 and SGLT2, the H(+)-coupled oligopeptide transporters PepT1 and PepT2, and the Na(+)- and K(+)-dependent neuronal and epithelial high affinity glutamate transporter EAAC1. Most mammalian ion-coupled organic solute transporters studied so far can be grouped into the following transporter families: (1) the predominantly Na(+)-coupled transporter family which includes the Na+/glucose co-transporters SGLT1, SGLT2, SGLT3 (SAAT-pSGLT2) and the inositol transporter SMIT, (2) the Na(+)- and Cl(-)-coupled transporter family which includes the neurotransmitter transporters of gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA), serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, glycine and proline as well as transporters of beta-amino acids, (3) the Na(+)- and K(+)-dependent glutamate/neurotransmitter family which includes the high affinity glutamate transporters EAAC1, GLT-1, GLAST, EAAT4 and the neutral amino acid transporters ASCT1 and SATT1 reminiscent of system ASC and (4) the H(+)-coupled oligopeptide transporter family which includes the intestinal H

  14. Redox activity and multiple copper(I) coordination of 2His-2Cys oligopeptide.

    PubMed

    Choi, DongWon; Alshahrani, Aisha A; Vytla, Yashodharani; Deeconda, Manogna; Serna, Victor J; Saenz, Robert F; Angel, Laurence A

    2015-02-01

    Copper binding motifs with their molecular mechanisms of selective copper(I) recognition are essential molecules for acquiring copper ions, trafficking copper to specific locations and controlling the potentially damaging redox activities of copper in biochemical processes. The redox activity and multiple Cu(I) binding of an analog methanobactin peptide-2 (amb2) with the sequence acetyl-His1-Cys2-Tyr3-Pro4-His5-Cys6 was investigated using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and UV-Vis spectrophotometry analyses. The Cu(II) titration of amb2 showed oxidation of amb2 via the formation of intra- and intermolecular Cys-Cys disulfide bridges and the multiple Cu(I) coordination by unoxidized amb2 or the partially oxidized dimer and trimer of amb2. The principal product of these reactions was [amb2 + 3Cu(I)](+) which probably coordinates the three Cu(I) ions via two bridging thiolate groups of Cys2 and Cys6 and the δN6 of the imidazole groups of His6, as determined by geometry optimized structures at the B3LYP/LanL2DZ level of theory. The products observed by IM-MS showed direct correlation to spectral changes associated with disulfide bond formation in the UV-Vis spectrophotometric study. The results show that IM-MS analysis is a powerful technique for unambiguously determining the major ion species produced during the redox and metal binding chemistry of oligopeptides. PMID:25800013

  15. A Novel Vasoactive Proline-Rich Oligopeptide from the Skin Secretion of the Frog Brachycephalus ephippium.

    PubMed

    Arcanjo, Daniel Dias Rufino; Vasconcelos, Andreanne Gomes; Comerma-Steffensen, Simón Gabriel; Jesus, Joilson Ramos; Silva, Luciano Paulino; Pires Júnior, Osmindo Rodrigues; Costa-Neto, Claudio Miguel; Oliveira, Eduardo Brandt; Migliolo, Ludovico; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Restini, Carolina Baraldi Araújo; Paulo, Michele; Bendhack, Lusiane Maria; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Oliveira, Aldeidia Pereira; Simonsen, Ulf; Leite, José Roberto de Souza de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Proline-rich oligopeptides (PROs) are a large family which comprises the bradykinin-potentiating peptides (BPPs). They inhibit the activity of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and have a typical pyroglutamyl (Pyr)/proline-rich structure at the N- and C-terminus, respectively. Furthermore, PROs decrease blood pressure in animals. In the present study, the isolation and biological characterization of a novel vasoactive BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the frog Brachycephalus ephippium is described. This new PRO, termed BPP-Brachy, has the primary structure WPPPKVSP and the amidated form termed BPP-BrachyNH2 inhibits efficiently ACE in rat serum. In silico molecular modeling and docking studies suggest that BPP-BrachyNH2 is capable of forming a hydrogen bond network as well as multiple van der Waals interactions with the rat ACE, which blocks the access of the substrate to the C-domain active site. Moreover, in rat thoracic aorta BPP-BrachyNH2 induces potent endothelium-dependent vasodilatation with similar magnitude as captopril. In DAF-FM DA-loaded aortic cross sections examined by confocal microscopy, BPP-BrachyNH2 was found to increase the release of nitric oxide (NO). Moreover, BPP-BrachyNH2 was devoid of toxicity in endothelial and smooth muscle cell cultures. In conclusion, the peptide BPP-BrachyNH2 has a novel sequence being the first BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the Brachycephalidae family. This opens for exploring amphibians as a source of new biomolecules. The BPP-BrachyNH2 is devoid of cytotoxicity and elicits endothelium-dependent vasodilatation mediated by NO. These findings open for the possibility of potential application of these peptides in the treatment of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26661890

  16. A Novel Vasoactive Proline-Rich Oligopeptide from the Skin Secretion of the Frog Brachycephalus ephippium

    PubMed Central

    Arcanjo, Daniel Dias Rufino; Vasconcelos, Andreanne Gomes; Comerma-Steffensen, Simón Gabriel; Jesus, Joilson Ramos; Silva, Luciano Paulino; Pires, Osmindo Rodrigues; Costa-Neto, Claudio Miguel; Oliveira, Eduardo Brandt; Migliolo, Ludovico; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Restini, Carolina Baraldi Araújo; Paulo, Michele; Bendhack, Lusiane Maria; Bemquerer, Marcelo Porto; Oliveira, Aldeidia Pereira; Simonsen, Ulf; Leite, José Roberto de Souza de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Proline-rich oligopeptides (PROs) are a large family which comprises the bradykinin-potentiating peptides (BPPs). They inhibit the activity of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) and have a typical pyroglutamyl (Pyr)/proline-rich structure at the N- and C-terminus, respectively. Furthermore, PROs decrease blood pressure in animals. In the present study, the isolation and biological characterization of a novel vasoactive BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the frog Brachycephalus ephippium is described. This new PRO, termed BPP-Brachy, has the primary structure WPPPKVSP and the amidated form termed BPP-BrachyNH2 inhibits efficiently ACE in rat serum. In silico molecular modeling and docking studies suggest that BPP-BrachyNH2 is capable of forming a hydrogen bond network as well as multiple van der Waals interactions with the rat ACE, which blocks the access of the substrate to the C-domain active site. Moreover, in rat thoracic aorta BPP-BrachyNH2 induces potent endothelium-dependent vasodilatation with similar magnitude as captopril. In DAF-FM DA-loaded aortic cross sections examined by confocal microscopy, BPP-BrachyNH2 was found to increase the release of nitric oxide (NO). Moreover, BPP-BrachyNH2 was devoid of toxicity in endothelial and smooth muscle cell cultures. In conclusion, the peptide BPP-BrachyNH2 has a novel sequence being the first BPP isolated from the skin secretion of the Brachycephalidae family. This opens for exploring amphibians as a source of new biomolecules. The BPP-BrachyNH2 is devoid of cytotoxicity and elicits endothelium-dependent vasodilatation mediated by NO. These findings open for the possibility of potential application of these peptides in the treatment of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26661890

  17. Supramolecular assemblies of histidinylated β-cyclodextrin for enhanced oligopeptide delivery into osteoclast precursors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xuejin; Wang, Rui; Xu, Hong; Chi, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Much attention has been given to the problem of drug delivery through the cell membrane in order to treat and manage bone diseases recently. The aim of this study was to develop nanoparticles made of amino- and histidinyl-modified amphiphilic β-cyclodextrins (β-CDs) entrapping osteoclast inhibitor, a hydrophobic oligopeptides drug, across the membrane of bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs). Drug-loaded β-CDs nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by the emulsion solvent evaporation technique and fully characterized for size, zeta potential, and entrapment efficiency. Spherical NPs displaying a hydrodynamic radius of about 295 nm which did not change upon storage as an aqueous dispersion, a positive zeta potential, and entrapment efficiency of drug very close to 98% were produced. Flow cytometry and spectrofluorimetry analysis indicated that the model drug itself was not taken up by the BMMs; however, NP systems underwent significant cellular uptake. In particular, histidinyl group-modified CD (β-CD-H) NPs were taken up more efficiently than amino group-modified (β-CD-A) ones. Cellular uptake mechanism study demonstrated that the permeability of drug-loaded NPs across the membrane of BMMs is probably due to macropinocytosis pathway. Cell viability studies showed that both β-CD-A and β-CD-H exhibited no significant cytotoxicity up to 1.0 mg/ml against the cells. These results highlight the developed β-CD-H NPs have great potential in safely and effectively delivering osteoclast inhibitors and other therapeutic agents toward bone disease. PMID:26907470

  18. Transport phenomena in intrinsic semiconductors and insulators at high current densities: Suppression of the broken neutrality drift

    SciTech Connect

    Mnatsakanov, T. T.; Tandoev, A. G.; Yurkov, S. N.; Levinshtein, M. E.

    2013-08-14

    It is shown that, in addition to the diffusion and broken neutrality drift (BND) modes well-known for insulators and very lightly doped semiconductors, the quasineutral drift (QND) mode is possible. The transition from the BND to QND mode is accompanied by the appearance of a portion with a very sharp current rise in the current-voltage characteristic. This effect is observed in a new type of semiconductor detectors (CIDs, Current Injected Detectors) of high-intensity neutron and proton radiation, suggested, in particular, for Large Hadron Collider. The effect is unambiguously attributed now to the presence of radiation-induced deep centers in a semiconductor. It is shown, however, in this paper that the effect of a very sharp rise in current upon a slight increase in voltage is even possible when there are no deep centers. An equation adequately describing the possible transport modes in intrinsic semiconductors and insulators is derived. The results of an analytical study are confirmed by an adequate simulation.

  19. Transport phenomena in intrinsic semiconductors and insulators at high current densities: Suppression of the broken neutrality drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mnatsakanov, T. T.; Levinshtein, M. E.; Tandoev, A. G.; Yurkov, S. N.

    2013-08-01

    It is shown that, in addition to the diffusion and broken neutrality drift (BND) modes well-known for insulators and very lightly doped semiconductors, the quasineutral drift (QND) mode is possible. The transition from the BND to QND mode is accompanied by the appearance of a portion with a very sharp current rise in the current-voltage characteristic. This effect is observed in a new type of semiconductor detectors (CIDs, Current Injected Detectors) of high-intensity neutron and proton radiation, suggested, in particular, for Large Hadron Collider. The effect is unambiguously attributed now to the presence of radiation-induced deep centers in a semiconductor. It is shown, however, in this paper that the effect of a very sharp rise in current upon a slight increase in voltage is even possible when there are no deep centers. An equation adequately describing the possible transport modes in intrinsic semiconductors and insulators is derived. The results of an analytical study are confirmed by an adequate simulation.

  20. Meclofenamate elicits a nephropreventing effect in a rat model of ischemic acute kidney injury by suppressing indoxyl sulfate production and restoring renal organic anion transporters.

    PubMed

    Saigo, Chika; Nomura, Yui; Yamamoto, Yuko; Sagata, Masataka; Matsunaga, Rika; Jono, Hirofumi; Nishi, Kazuhiko; Saito, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    Indoxyl sulfate (IS), a putative low-molecular weight uremic toxin, is excreted in the urine under normal kidney function, but is retained in the circulation and tissues during renal dysfunction in acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease. IS, which is one of the most potent inducers of oxidative stress in the kidney and cardiovascular system, is enzymatically produced in the liver from indole by cytochrome P450-mediated hydroxylation to indoxyl, followed by sulfotransferase-mediated sulfate conjugation. We used rat liver S9 fraction to identify inhibitors of IS production. After testing several compounds, including phytochemical polyphenols, we identified meclofenamate as a potent inhibitor of IS production with an apparent IC50 value of 1.34 μM. Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) of rat kidney caused a marked elevation in the serum IS concentration 48 hours after surgery. However, intravenous administration of meclofenamate (10 mg/kg) significantly suppressed this increase in the serum level of IS. Moreover, IS concentrations in both kidney and liver were dramatically elevated by renal I/R treatment, but this increase was blocked by meclofenamate. Serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen were markedly elevated in rats after renal I/R treatment, but these increases were significantly restored by administration of meclofenamate. Renal expression of both basolateral membrane-localized organic anion transporters rOAT1 and rOAT3 was downregulated by I/R treatment. However, expression of rOAT1 and rOAT3 recovered after administration of meclofenamate, which is associated with the inhibition of I/R-evoked elevation of prostaglandin E2. Our results suggest that meclofenamate inhibits hepatic sulfotransferase-mediated production of IS, thereby suppressing serum and renal accumulation of IS. Meclofenamate also prevents the prostaglandin E2-dependent downregulation of rOAT1 and rOAT3 expression. In conclusion, meclofenamate was found to elicit a nephropreventive effect in

  1. Meclofenamate elicits a nephropreventing effect in a rat model of ischemic acute kidney injury by suppressing indoxyl sulfate production and restoring renal organic anion transporters

    PubMed Central

    Saigo, Chika; Nomura, Yui; Yamamoto, Yuko; Sagata, Masataka; Matsunaga, Rika; Jono, Hirofumi; Nishi, Kazuhiko; Saito, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    Indoxyl sulfate (IS), a putative low-molecular weight uremic toxin, is excreted in the urine under normal kidney function, but is retained in the circulation and tissues during renal dysfunction in acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease. IS, which is one of the most potent inducers of oxidative stress in the kidney and cardiovascular system, is enzymatically produced in the liver from indole by cytochrome P450-mediated hydroxylation to indoxyl, followed by sulfotransferase-mediated sulfate conjugation. We used rat liver S9 fraction to identify inhibitors of IS production. After testing several compounds, including phytochemical polyphenols, we identified meclofenamate as a potent inhibitor of IS production with an apparent IC50 value of 1.34 μM. Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) of rat kidney caused a marked elevation in the serum IS concentration 48 hours after surgery. However, intravenous administration of meclofenamate (10 mg/kg) significantly suppressed this increase in the serum level of IS. Moreover, IS concentrations in both kidney and liver were dramatically elevated by renal I/R treatment, but this increase was blocked by meclofenamate. Serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen were markedly elevated in rats after renal I/R treatment, but these increases were significantly restored by administration of meclofenamate. Renal expression of both basolateral membrane-localized organic anion transporters rOAT1 and rOAT3 was downregulated by I/R treatment. However, expression of rOAT1 and rOAT3 recovered after administration of meclofenamate, which is associated with the inhibition of I/R-evoked elevation of prostaglandin E2. Our results suggest that meclofenamate inhibits hepatic sulfotransferase-mediated production of IS, thereby suppressing serum and renal accumulation of IS. Meclofenamate also prevents the prostaglandin E2-dependent downregulation of rOAT1 and rOAT3 expression. In conclusion, meclofenamate was found to elicit a nephropreventive effect in

  2. The multicopy sRNA LhrC controls expression of the oligopeptide-binding protein OppA in Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Sievers, Susanne; Lund, Anja; Menendez-Gil, Pilar; Nielsen, Aaraby; Storm Mollerup, Maria; Lambert Nielsen, Stine; Buch Larsson, Pernille; Borch-Jensen, Jonas; Johansson, Jörgen; Kallipolitis, Birgitte Haahr

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of the foodborne disease listeriosis. During infection, L. monocytogenes produces an array of non-coding RNAs, including the multicopy sRNA LhrC. These five, nearly identical sRNAs are highly induced in response to cell envelope stress and target the virulence adhesin lapB at the post-transcriptional level. Here, we demonstrate that LhrC controls expression of additional genes encoding cell envelope-associated proteins with virulence function. Using transcriptomics and proteomics, we identified a set of genes affected by LhrC in response to cell envelope stress. Three targets were significantly down-regulated by LhrC at both the RNA and protein level: lmo2349, tcsA and oppA. All three genes encode membrane-associated proteins: A putative substrate binding protein of an amino acid ABC transporter (Lmo2349); the CD4+ T cell-stimulating antigen TcsA, and the oligopeptide binding protein OppA, of which the latter 2 are required for full virulence of L. monocytogenes. For OppA, we show that LhrC acts by direct base paring to the ribosome binding site of the oppA mRNA, leading to an impediment of its translation and a decreased mRNA level. The sRNA-mRNA interaction depends on 2 of 3 CU-rich regions in LhrC allowing binding of 2 oppA mRNAs to a single LhrC molecule. Finally, we found that LhrC contributes to infection in macrophage-like cells. These findings demonstrate a central role for LhrC in controlling the level of OppA and other virulence-associated cell envelope proteins in response to cell envelope stress. PMID:26176322

  3. The multicopy sRNA LhrC controls expression of the oligopeptide-binding protein OppA in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Sievers, Susanne; Lund, Anja; Menendez-Gil, Pilar; Nielsen, Aaraby; Storm Mollerup, Maria; Lambert Nielsen, Stine; Buch Larsson, Pernille; Borch-Jensen, Jonas; Johansson, Jörgen; Kallipolitis, Birgitte Haahr

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of the foodborne disease listeriosis. During infection, L. monocytogenes produces an array of non-coding RNAs, including the multicopy sRNA LhrC. These five, nearly identical sRNAs are highly induced in response to cell envelope stress and target the virulence adhesin lapB at the post-transcriptional level. Here, we demonstrate that LhrC controls expression of additional genes encoding cell envelope-associated proteins with virulence function. Using transcriptomics and proteomics, we identified a set of genes affected by LhrC in response to cell envelope stress. Three targets were significantly down-regulated by LhrC at both the RNA and protein level: lmo2349, tcsA and oppA. All three genes encode membrane-associated proteins: A putative substrate binding protein of an amino acid ABC transporter (Lmo2349); the CD4+ T cell-stimulating antigen TcsA, and the oligopeptide binding protein OppA, of which the latter 2 are required for full virulence of L. monocytogenes. For OppA, we show that LhrC acts by direct base paring to the ribosome binding site of the oppA mRNA, leading to an impediment of its translation and a decreased mRNA level. The sRNA-mRNA interaction depends on 2 of 3 CU-rich regions in LhrC allowing binding of 2 oppA mRNAs to a single LhrC molecule. Finally, we found that LhrC contributes to infection in macrophage-like cells. These findings demonstrate a central role for LhrC in controlling the level of OppA and other virulence-associated cell envelope proteins in response to cell envelope stress. PMID:26176322

  4. Holographic microscopy provides new insights into the settlement of zoospores of the green alga Ulva linza on cationic oligopeptide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Vater, Svenja M; Finlay, John; Callow, Maureen E; Callow, James A; Ederth, Thomas; Liedberg, Bo; Grunze, Michael; Rosenhahn, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Interaction of zoospores of Ulva linza with cationic, arginine-rich oligopeptide self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) is characterized by rapid settlement. Some spores settle (ie permanently attach) in a 'normal' manner involving the secretion of a permanent adhesive, retraction of the flagella and cell wall formation, whilst others undergo 'pseudosettlement' whereby motile spores are trapped (attached) on the SAM surface without undergoing the normal metamorphosis into a settled spore. Holographic microscopy was used to record videos of swimming zoospores in the vicinity of surfaces with different cationic oligopeptide concentrations to provide time-resolved insights into processes associated with attachment of spores. The data reveal that spore attachment rate increases with increasing cationic peptide content. Accordingly, the decrease in swimming activity in the volume of seawater above the surface accelerated with increasing surface charge. Three-dimensional trajectories of individual swimming spores showed a 'hit and stick' motion pattern, exclusively observed for the arginine-rich peptide SAMs, whereby spores were immediately trapped upon contact with the surface. PMID:25875964

  5. Binding capability of the enediyne-associated apoprotein to human tumors and constitution of a ligand oligopeptide-integrated protein.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lin; Chen, Hongxia; Miao, Qingfang; Wu, Shuying; Shang, Yue; Zhen, Yongsu

    2009-10-26

    The molecule of lidamycin that belongs to the chromoprotein family of antitumor antibiotics is composed of an apoprotein (LDP) and an enediyne chromophore. The enediyne moiety of the molecule is responsible for the potent cytotoxicity; however, the biological function of the apoprotein moiety, particularly its interaction with cancer cells, remains unclear. In present study, the binding capability of LDP to human tumors was detected for the first time by tissue microarray. LDP bound to various human tumors with significant difference from the corresponding normal tissues. Positive correlation between binding activity and the overexpression of VEGF and EGFR was confirmed by lung carcinoma tissue microarray. A fusion protein LG-LDP that consists of LDP and a ligand oligopeptide to EGFR was constructed by DNA recombination. LG-LDP showed augmented binding to EGFR-overexpressing cancer cells. Furthermore, an energized fusion protein LG-LDP-AE was prepared by integrating the active enediyne (AE) into LG-LDP molecule. By MTT assay, LG-LDP-AE displayed extremely potent cytotoxicity to cancer cells with IC50 approximate to 0.01nM. The results indicate that LDP binds to various human tumors and it might serve as a delivery carrier by integration of ligand oligopeptide to manufacture motif-based, targeted fusion proteins for cancer. PMID:19737585

  6. A genetic algorithm encoded with the structural information of amino acids and dipeptides for efficient conformational searches of oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Ru, Xiao; Song, Ce; Lin, Zijing

    2016-05-15

    The genetic algorithm (GA) is an intelligent approach for finding minima in a highly dimensional parametric space. However, the success of GA searches for low energy conformations of biomolecules is rather limited so far. Herein an improved GA scheme is proposed for the conformational search of oligopeptides. A systematic analysis of the backbone dihedral angles of conformations of amino acids (AAs) and dipeptides is performed. The structural information is used to design a new encoding scheme to improve the efficiency of GA search. Local geometry optimizations based on the energy calculations by the density functional theory are employed to safeguard the quality and reliability of the GA structures. The GA scheme is applied to the conformational searches of Lys, Arg, Met-Gly, Lys-Gly, and Phe-Gly-Gly representative of AAs, dipeptides, and tripeptides with complicated side chains. Comparison with the best literature results shows that the new GA method is both highly efficient and reliable by providing the most complete set of the low energy conformations. Moreover, the computational cost of the GA method increases only moderately with the complexity of the molecule. The GA scheme is valuable for the study of the conformations and properties of oligopeptides. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26833761

  7. Effect of condensation agents and minerals for oligopeptide formation under mild and hydrothermal conditions in related to chemical evolution of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Kunio; Takeya, Hitoshi; Kushibe, Takao

    2009-07-01

    The role of condensation agents and minerals for oligopeptide formation was inspected to see whether minerals possess catalytic activity under mild and hydrothermal conditions. Under mild conditions, oligopeptide formation from negatively charged amino acids (Asp and Glu) using different minerals and the elongation of alanine oligopeptides ((Ala) 2-(Ala) 5) were attempted using apatite minerals. Oligo(Asp) up to 10 amino acid units from Asp were observed in the presence of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide (EDC). Notable influence of minerals was not detected for the oligo(Asp) formation. Oligo(Asp) was gradually degraded by the further incubation in the presence of EDC in both the absence and presence of minerals. The formation of oligo(Glu) was less efficient in the presence of carbonyldiimidazole. The elongation from (Ala) 3, (Ala) 4, and (Ala) 5 and the formation of diketopiperazine from (Ala) 2 proceeded immediately in the presence of EDC in the meantime of the sample preparations. In addition, it was unexpected that the disappearance of the products and the reformation of the reactants occurred by the further incubation for 24 h; for instance, (Ala) 5 decreased but (Ala) 4 increased with increasing the reaction time in the reaction of (Ala) 4 with EDC. These facts suggest that the activation of the reactant amino acids or peptides immediately occurs. Under the simulated hydrothermal conditions, EDC did not enhance the formation of oligopeptides from Asp, Glu or Ala nor the spontaneous formation of (Ala) 5 from (Ala) 4.

  8. Suppression Pattern of Neutral Pions at High Transverse Momentum in Au+Au Collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV and Constraints on Medium Transport Coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Bickley, A. A.; Ellinghaus, F.; Kelly, S.; Kinney, E.; Nagle, J. L.; Seele, J.; Wysocki, M.; Afanasiev, S.; Isupov, A.; Litvinenko, A.; Malakhov, A.; Peresedov, V.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Zolin, L.; Aidala, C.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Chi, C. Y.; Cole, B. A.; D'Enterria, D.

    2008-12-05

    For Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV, we measure neutral pion production with good statistics for transverse momentum, p{sub T}, up to 20 GeV/c. A fivefold suppression is found, which is essentially constant for 5transport coefficient of the medium, e.g., in the parton quenching model. The spectral shape is similar for all collision classes, and the suppression does not saturate in Au+Au collisions.

  9. Fluorescent monitoring of copper-occupancy in His-ended catalytic oligo-peptides.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Reina; Kawano, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    Controlled generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is widely beneficial to various medical, environmental, and agricultural studies. As inspired by the functional motifs in natural proteins, our group has been engaged in development of catalytically active oligo-peptides as minimum-sized metalloenzymes for generation of superoxide anion, an active member of ROS. In such candidate molecules, catalytically active metal-binding minimal motif was determined to be X-X-H, where X can be most amino acids followed by His. Based on above knowledge, we have designed a series of minimal copper-binding peptides designated as G n H series peptides, which are composed of oligo-glycyl chains ended with C-terminal His residue such as GGGGGH sequence (G5H). In order to further study the role of copper binding to the peptidic catalysts sharing the X-X-H motif such as G5H-conjugated peptides, we should be able to score the occupancy of the peptide population by copper ion in the reaction mixture. Here, model peptides with Cu-binding affinity which show intrinsic fluorescence due to tyrosyl residue (Y) in the UV region (excitation at ca. 230 and 280 nm, and emission at ca. 320 nm) were synthesized to score the effect of copper occupancy. Synthesized peptides include GFP-derived fluorophore sequence, TFSYGVQ (designated as Gfp), and Gfp sequence fused to C-terminal G5H (Gfp-G5H). In addition, two Y-containing tri-peptides derived from natural GFP fluorophores, namely, TYG and SYG were fused to the G5H (TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H). Conjugation of metal-binding G5H sequence to GFP-fluorophore peptide enhanced the action of Cu(2+) on quenching of intrinsic fluorescence due to Y residue. Two other Y-containing peptides, TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H, also showed intrinsic fluorescence which is sensitive to addition of Cu(2+). There was linear relationship between the loading of Cu(2+) and the quenching of fluorescence in these peptide, suggesting that Cu(2+)-dependent quenching of Y

  10. Fluorescent monitoring of copper-occupancy in His-ended catalytic oligo-peptides

    PubMed Central

    Inokuchi, Reina; Kawano, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Controlled generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is widely beneficial to various medical, environmental, and agricultural studies. As inspired by the functional motifs in natural proteins, our group has been engaged in development of catalytically active oligo-peptides as minimum-sized metalloenzymes for generation of superoxide anion, an active member of ROS. In such candidate molecules, catalytically active metal-binding minimal motif was determined to be X-X-H, where X can be most amino acids followed by His. Based on above knowledge, we have designed a series of minimal copper-binding peptides designated as GnH series peptides, which are composed of oligo-glycyl chains ended with C-terminal His residue such as GGGGGH sequence (G5H). In order to further study the role of copper binding to the peptidic catalysts sharing the X-X-H motif such as G5H-conjugated peptides, we should be able to score the occupancy of the peptide population by copper ion in the reaction mixture. Here, model peptides with Cu-binding affinity which show intrinsic fluorescence due to tyrosyl residue (Y) in the UV region (excitation at ca. 230 and 280 nm, and emission at ca. 320 nm) were synthesized to score the effect of copper occupancy. Synthesized peptides include GFP-derived fluorophore sequence, TFSYGVQ (designated as Gfp), and Gfp sequence fused to C-terminal G5H (Gfp-G5H). In addition, two Y-containing tri-peptides derived from natural GFP fluorophores, namely, TYG and SYG were fused to the G5H (TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H). Conjugation of metal-binding G5H sequence to GFP-fluorophore peptide enhanced the action of Cu2+ on quenching of intrinsic fluorescence due to Y residue. Two other Y-containing peptides, TYG-G5H and SYG-G5H, also showed intrinsic fluorescence which is sensitive to addition of Cu2+. There was linear relationship between the loading of Cu2+ and the quenching of fluorescence in these peptide, suggesting that Cu2+-dependent quenching of Y

  11. Modification of ion transport in lipid bilayer membranes in the presence of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. II. Suppression of tetraphenylborate conductance and changes of interfacial potentials.

    PubMed Central

    Smejtek, P; Paulis-Illangasekare, M

    1979-01-01

    It has been shown that the blocking of negatively charged tetraphenylborate ion transport in phosphatidylcholine (PC)-cholesterol membranes by the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is dominated by suppression of TPhB- diffusion across the membrane interior, rather than by the decrease of adsorption of TPhB- ions at the membrane surface. The blocking effect can be associated with the decrease of electric potential inside the membrane with respect to that of the aqueous medium, this decreases being proportional to the concentration of 2,4-D in the aqueous solution. It has been estimated that 25 - 30% of the total 2,4-D-induced change of the potential difference is between the plane of absorption of TPhB- and the aqueous solution, and the remaining fraction is between the membrane interior and the absorption plane. The results of this study support the dipolar hypothesis of 2,4-D action in lipid membranes. These conclusions are further supported by measurements changes of electric potential difference across air/water and air/lipid monolayer/water interfaces. It has been found that the electric potential of the nonpolar side of the interface decreases in the presence of neutral molecules of 2,4-D and that this effect becomes more prominent in presence of electrolyte. We have confirmed that PC-cholesterol monolayer cannot be considered as a model for half of the bilayer membrane because of the disagreement between the changes of the interfacial potential difference of PC-cholesterol monolayers and those determined from studied of transport of positive and negative ions across bilayer membranes. In contract, we have found close agreement between the 2,4-D-induced changes of electric potential of the lipid hydrocarbon region in glycerolmonooleate (GMO) membranes and GMO monolayers. We suggest that the action of 2,4-D in lipid membranes is not associated with the changes of orientation of dipoles of lipids constituting the membranes, but rather with a layer

  12. Modification of ion transport in lipid bilayer membranes in the presence of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. II. Suppression of tetraphenylborate conductance and changes of interfacial potentials.

    PubMed

    Smejtek, P; Paulis-Illangasekare, M

    1979-06-01

    It has been shown that the blocking of negatively charged tetraphenylborate ion transport in phosphatidylcholine (PC)-cholesterol membranes by the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is dominated by suppression of TPhB- diffusion across the membrane interior, rather than by the decrease of adsorption of TPhB- ions at the membrane surface. The blocking effect can be associated with the decrease of electric potential inside the membrane with respect to that of the aqueous medium, this decreases being proportional to the concentration of 2,4-D in the aqueous solution. It has been estimated that 25 - 30% of the total 2,4-D-induced change of the potential difference is between the plane of absorption of TPhB- and the aqueous solution, and the remaining fraction is between the membrane interior and the absorption plane. The results of this study support the dipolar hypothesis of 2,4-D action in lipid membranes. These conclusions are further supported by measurements changes of electric potential difference across air/water and air/lipid monolayer/water interfaces. It has been found that the electric potential of the nonpolar side of the interface decreases in the presence of neutral molecules of 2,4-D and that this effect becomes more prominent in presence of electrolyte. We have confirmed that PC-cholesterol monolayer cannot be considered as a model for half of the bilayer membrane because of the disagreement between the changes of the interfacial potential difference of PC-cholesterol monolayers and those determined from studied of transport of positive and negative ions across bilayer membranes. In contract, we have found close agreement between the 2,4-D-induced changes of electric potential of the lipid hydrocarbon region in glycerolmonooleate (GMO) membranes and GMO monolayers. We suggest that the action of 2,4-D in lipid membranes is not associated with the changes of orientation of dipoles of lipids constituting the membranes, but rather with a layer

  13. Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with transportation and energy use. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss the implication of energy usage as it applies to the area of transportation. Some topics covered are efficiencies of various transportation…

  14. Separation of basic oligopeptides by ion-pairing reversed-phase chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wenchun

    The present thesis consist of five chapters. Chapter I introduces background information on the ion-pairing reversed-phase chromatography and liquid chromatography in the critical condition. Chapter II decribes our study on the isocratic separation of oligolysine (dp = 2 to 8) using a fixed content of acetonitrile (ACN) (23%) and different concentrations of HFBA in the mobile phase (0.6-30.6 mM) on a Waters XBridge Shield RP18® column. We found that the retention time of oligolysine increases as the dp increases, because of an increased number of HFBA bound to the peptides. Furthermore, when [HFBA] increased, the retention time increased at different rates. The greater the dp, the faster the rate. Based on a closed pairing model that presumes an equilibrium between an unpaired state and the paired state with a fixed number of HFBA molecules, an equation was derived for the retention factor of oligolysine. In Chapter III, we compare retention behaviors of oligolysine (dp = 2 to 8) and oligoarginine (dp = 2 to 8) when they are separated on the Waters XBridge Shield RP18® using fixed a ACN content (23%) and difference concentrations of HFBA (0.4-30.6 mM) in the mobile phase. The retention time of oligoarginine also increased at different rates as [HFBA] increased. The greater the dp, the faster the rate. The retention time of oligolysine is shorter than that of oligarginine having the dame dp. We applied Eq.1 to analyze the plot of ln k as a function of [HFBA] for each oligopeptide component to obtain the values for n, Kip,m, and βKd,ip. For oligolysine, n increases linearly as dp increase and oligoarginine exhibits an accelerated increase in n as dp rises. The plot of ln βKd,ip against dp followed a linear relationship for both peptides. In Chapter IV, we study the effect of mobile phase composition on the retention of oligolysine (dp = 2 to 8) on the Waters XBridge Shield RP18 ®. The ACN content was changed from 20% to 33% and the HFBA concentration from 0.7 to

  15. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  16. Photospintronics: Magnetic Field-Controlled Photoemission and Light-Controlled Spin Transport in Hybrid Chiral Oligopeptide-Nanoparticle Structures

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The combination of photonics and spintronics opens new ways to transfer and process information. It is shown here that in systems in which organic molecules and semiconductor nanoparticles are combined, matching these technologies results in interesting new phenomena. We report on light induced and spin-dependent charge transfer process through helical oligopeptide–CdSe nanoparticles’ (NPs) architectures deposited on ferromagnetic substrates with small coercive force (∼100–200 Oe). The spin control is achieved by the application of the chirality-induced spin-dependent electron transfer effect and is probed by two different methods: spin-controlled electrochemichemistry and photoluminescence (PL) at room temperature. The injected spin could be controlled by excitation of the nanoparticles. By switching the direction of the magnetic field of the substrate, the PL intensity could be alternated. PMID:27027885

  17. Homochiral oligopeptides via surface recognition and enantiomeric cross impediment in the polymerization of racemic phenylalanine N-carboxyanhydride crystals suspended in water.

    PubMed

    Nery, Jose Geraldo; Eliash, Ran; Bolbach, Gerard; Weissbuch, Isabelle; Lahav, Meir

    2007-08-01

    As part of our program on the search of possible prebiotic routes for the formation of oligopeptides of homochiral sequence (isotactic) from racemic precursors in aqueous environment, we report the polymerization of racemic crystals of phenylalanine N-carboxyanhydrides, enantioselectively tagged with five deuterium atoms, suspended in water containing various amine initiators. Racemic mixtures of isotactic oligopeptides, comprising up to 25 repeat units of the same handedness, as the dominant component for each length, were observed in a MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis. The racemic mixtures of the peptides could be desymmetrized by initiating the polymerization reaction with water-soluble methyl esters of either enantiopure alpha-amino acids or dipeptides. A three-step mechanism is proposed to account for these results: (i) Surface recognition of the chiral initiator by the chiral sites present at specific faces of the crystal; (ii) Oligopeptide elongation at the polymer/crystal interface; and (iii) Self-assembly of the short isotactic peptides into racemic antiparallel beta-sheets as templates followed by cross-enantiomeric impediment in the growth of enantiomeric chains at the peptide beta-sheet/crystal interface. PMID:17354263

  18. Multiple Sites of the Cleavage of 21- and 25-Mer Encephalytogenic Oligopeptides Corresponding to Human Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) by Specific Anti-MBP Antibodies from Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Timofeeva, Anna M.; Dmitrenok, Pavel S.; Konenkova, Ludmila P.; Buneva, Valentina N.; Nevinsky, Georgy A.

    2013-01-01

    IgGs from patients with multiple sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) purified on MBP-Sepharose in contrast to canonical proteases hydrolyze effectively only myelin basic protein (MBP), but not many other tested proteins. Here we have shown for the first time that anti-MBP SLE IgGs hydrolyze nonspecific tri- and tetrapeptides with an extreme low efficiency and cannot effectively hydrolyze longer 20-mer nonspecific oligopeptides corresponding to antigenic determinants (AGDs) of HIV-1 integrase. At the same time, anti-MBP SLE IgGs efficiently hydrolyze oligopeptides corresponding to AGDs of MBP. All sites of IgG-mediated proteolysis of 21-and 25-mer encephalytogenic oligopeptides corresponding to two known AGDs of MBP were found by a combination of reverse-phase chromatography, TLC, and MALDI spectrometry. Several clustered major, moderate, and minor sites of cleavage were revealed in the case of 21- and 25-mer oligopeptides. The active sites of anti-MBP abzymes are localised on their light chains, while heavy chains are responsible for the affinity of protein substrates. Interactions of intact globular proteins with both light and heavy chains of abzymes provide high affinity to MBP and specificity of this protein hydrolysis. The affinity of anti-MBP abzymes for intact MBP is approximately 1000-fold higher than for the oligopeptides. The data suggest that all oligopeptides interact mainly with the light chains of different monoclonal abzymes of total pool of IgGs, which possesses a lower affinity for substrates, and therefore, depending on the oligopeptide sequences, their hydrolysis may be less specific than globular protein and can occur in several sites. PMID:23520443

  19. Studies of Transport Properties and Critical Temperature Suppression Mechanism in Yttrium BARIUM(2) COPPER(3) Oxygen(x) Thin Films Irradiated with 20 TO 120 KEV Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jiunn-Yuan

    1995-11-01

    We present comprehensive studies of the effects of 20 to 120 keV electron irradiation on rm YBa_2Cu_3O_{x} thin films. Above 60 keV, T_{c } of irradiated samples is suppressed accompanied by a significant increase in residual resistivity, while the carrier concentration remains relatively unchanged. The plane oxygen defects produced by irradiation are found to be responsible for T_{c} suppression. The II suppression mechanism is discussed within several theoretical frameworks. Though in qualitative agreement with d-wave pairing symmetry, our results show a T_{c} suppression rate three times as slow as predicted by the theory when resistivity data are used to extract the impurity scattering rate. Alternatively, phase fluctuations theory gives a qualitative description as well. The displacement energy of plane oxygen is found to be 8.3 eV, which corresponds to a threshold electron energy 58 keV. Finally, an empirical relation is proposed to describe the temperature dependence of the Hall coefficient.

  20. Calculation of Relative Binding Free Energy in the Water-Filled Active Site of Oligopeptide-Binding Protein A.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Manuela; de Beer, Stephanie B A; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The periplasmic oligopeptide binding protein A (OppA) represents a well-known example of water-mediated protein-ligand interactions. Here, we perform free-energy calculations for three different ligands binding to OppA, using a thermodynamic integration approach. The tripeptide ligands share a high structural similarity (all have the sequence KXK), but their experimentally-determined binding free energies differ remarkably. Thermodynamic cycles were constructed for the ligands, and simulations conducted in the bound and (freely solvated) unbound states. In the unbound state, it was observed that the difference in conformational freedom between alanine and glycine leads to a surprisingly slow convergence, despite their chemical similarity. This could be overcome by increasing the softness parameter during alchemical transformations. Discrepancies remained in the bound state however, when comparing independent simulations of the three ligands. These difficulties could be traced to a slow relaxation of the water network within the active site. Fluctuations in the number of water molecules residing in the binding cavity occur mostly on a timescale larger than the simulation time along the alchemical path. After extensive simulations, relative binding free energies that were converged to within thermal noise could be obtained, which agree well with available experimental data. PMID:27092480

  1. Influence of Free Amino Acids, Oligopeptides, and Polypeptides on the Formation of Pyrazines in Maillard Model Systems.

    PubMed

    Scalone, Gustavo Luis Leonardo; Cucu, Tatiana; De Kimpe, Norbert; De Meulenaer, Bruno

    2015-06-10

    Pyrazines are specific Maillard reaction compounds known to contribute to the unique aroma of many products. Most studies concerning the generation of pyrazines in the Maillard reaction have focused on amino acids, while little information is available on the impact of peptides and proteins. The present study investigated the generation of pyrazines in model systems containing whey protein, hydrolyzed whey protein, amino acids, and glucose. The impact of thermal conditions, ratio of reagents, and water activity (a(w)) on pyrazine formation was measured by headspace solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/MS. The presence of oligopeptides from hydrolyzed whey protein contributed significantly to an increased amount of pyrazines, while in contrast free amino acids generated during protein hydrolysis contributed to a lesser extent. The generation of pyrazines was enhanced at low a(w) (0.33) and high temperatures (>120 °C). This study showed that the role of peptides in the generation of pyrazines in Maillard reaction systems has been dramatically underestimated. PMID:25971942

  2. P2X7 Receptor Activation Impairs Exogenous MHC Class I Oligopeptides Presentation in Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) on antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a potent molecule to activate CD8+ T cells and initiate immunity. P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) are present on the plasma membrane of APCs to sense the extracellular danger signal adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP). P2X7R activates the inflammasome and the release of IL-1β in macrophages and other immune cells to initiate the inflammatory response. Here we show that P2X7R stimulation by ATP in APCs decreased the amount of MHC I at the plasma membrane. Specific antagonism or genetic ablation of P2X7R inhibited the effects of ATP on levels of cellular MHC I. Furthermore, P2X7R stimulation was able to inhibit activation of CD8+ T cells via specific MHC I-oligopeptide complexes. Our study suggests that P2X7R activation on APCs is a novel inhibitor of adaptive CD8+ T cell immunity. PMID:23940597

  3. P2X7 receptor activation impairs exogenous MHC class I oligopeptides presentation in antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Barberà-Cremades, Maria; Pelegrín, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) on antigen presenting cells (APCs) is a potent molecule to activate CD8(+) T cells and initiate immunity. P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs) are present on the plasma membrane of APCs to sense the extracellular danger signal adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP). P2X7R activates the inflammasome and the release of IL-1β in macrophages and other immune cells to initiate the inflammatory response. Here we show that P2X7R stimulation by ATP in APCs decreased the amount of MHC I at the plasma membrane. Specific antagonism or genetic ablation of P2X7R inhibited the effects of ATP on levels of cellular MHC I. Furthermore, P2X7R stimulation was able to inhibit activation of CD8(+) T cells via specific MHC I-oligopeptide complexes. Our study suggests that P2X7R activation on APCs is a novel inhibitor of adaptive CD8(+) T cell immunity. PMID:23940597

  4. Sea cucumber (Codonopsis pilosula) oligopeptides: immunomodulatory effects based on stimulating Th cells, cytokine secretion and antibody production.

    PubMed

    He, Li-Xia; Zhang, Zhao-Feng; Sun, Bin; Chen, Qi-He; Liu, Rui; Ren, Jin-Wei; Wang, Jun-Bo; Li, Yong

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the immunomodulating activity of small molecule oligopeptides from sea cucumber (Codonopsis pilosula) (SOP) in mice. Seven assays were performed to determine the immunomodulatory effects, including splenic lymphocyte proliferation and delayed-type hypersensitivity assays (cell-mediated immunity), IgM antibody response of spleen to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and serum hemolysin level assays (humoral immunity), the carbon clearance assay and the phagocytic capacity of peritoneal cavity phagocytes assay (macrophage phagocytosis), and the NK cell activity assay. Spleen T lymphocyte subpopulations, multiplex sandwich immunoassays of serum cytokine and immunoglobulin levels and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for small intestinal secretory immunoglobulin were performed to study the mechanism by which SOP affects the immune system. We found that SOP could improve immune functions in mice, which may be due to the enhancement of the functions of cell-mediated immunity, humoral immunity, macrophage phagocytosis and NK cell activity. From the cellular and molecular assays, we postulated that the immunomodulatory effects are most likely attributed to the stimulation of Th cells, cytokine secretion and antibody production. PMID:26838796

  5. Multi-responsive Hydrogels Derived from the Self-assembly of Tethered Allyl-functionalized Racemic Oligopeptides

    PubMed Central

    He, Xun; Fan, Jingwei; Zhang, Fuwu; Li, Richen; Pollack, Kevin A.; Raymond, Jeffery E.; Zou, Jiong; Wooley, Karen L.

    2014-01-01

    A multi-responsive triblock hydrogelator oligo(dl-allylglycine)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)-block-oligo(dl-allylglycine) (ODLAG-b-PEG-b-ODLAG) was synthesized facilely by ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of DLAG N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) with a diamino-terminated PEG as the macroinitiator. This system exhibited heat-induced sol-to-gel transitions and either sonication- or enzyme-induced gel-to-sol transitions. The β-sheeting of the oligopeptide segments was confirmed by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The β-sheets further displayed tertiary ordering into fibrillar structures that, in turn generated a porous and interconnected hydrogel matrix, as observed via transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The reversible macroscopic sol-to-gel transitions triggered by heat and gel-to-sol transitions triggered by sonication were correlated with the transformation of nanostructural morphologies, with fibrillar structures observed in gel and spherical aggregates in sol, respectively. The enzymatic breakdown of the hydrogels was also investigated. This allyl-functionalized hydrogelator can serve as a platform for the design of smart hydrogels, appropriate for expansion into biological systems as bio-functional and bio-responsive materials. PMID:25485113

  6. Quantitative constraints on the transport properties of hot partonic matter from semi-inclusive single high transverse momentum pion suppression in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Bickley, A. A.; Ellinghaus, F.; Kelly, S.; Kinney, E.; Nagle, J. L.; Seele, J.; Wysocki, M.; Afanasiev, S.; Isupov, A.; Litvinenko, A.; Malakhov, A.; Peresedov, V.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Zolin, L.; Aidala, C.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Chi, C. Y.; Cole, B. A.; D'Enterria, D.

    2008-06-15

    The PHENIX experiment has measured the suppression of semi-inclusive single high-transverse-momentum {pi}{sup 0}'s in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV. The present understanding of this suppression is in terms of energy loss of the parent (fragmenting) parton in a dense color-charge medium. We have performed a quantitative comparison between various parton energy-loss models and our experimental data. The statistical point-to-point uncorrelated as well as correlated systematic uncertainties are taken into account in the comparison. We detail this methodology and the resulting constraint on the model parameters, such as the initial color-charge density dN{sup g}/dy, the medium transport coefficient , or the initial energy-loss parameter {epsilon}{sub 0}. We find that high-transverse-momentum {pi}{sup 0} suppression in Au+Au collisions has sufficient precision to constrain these model-dependent parameters at the {+-}20-25% (one standard deviation) level. These constraints include only the experimental uncertainties, and further studies are needed to compute the corresponding theoretical uncertainties.

  7. Preliminary evaluation of turbofan cycle parameters and acoustical suppression on the noise and direct operating cost of a commercial Mach 0.85 transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisenberg, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    A study was made of the effects of turbofan cycle parameters and the use of acoustic noise suppression material to quiet 200 passenger, Mach 0.85 trijets having design ranges of 2778, 4630, and 9260 kilometers (1500, 2500, and 5000 n. mi). Aircraft gross weight and direct operating cost, which varied with amount of suppression and cycle selection, are presented as functions of both EPNdB traded and 90 EPNdB contour footprint area. Noise levels 10.9 EPNdB below FAR 36 requirements result in a 5 percent increase in DOC for an aircraft designed for a range of 9260 kilometers (5000 n. mi.). An aircraft designed for a 2778 kilometer (1500 n. mi.) range would have an EPNdB level 14 below FAR 36 for this same economic penalty. In this range of noise level, fan-machinery noise is the principal source.

  8. Three-dimensional equilibria and island energy transport due to resonant magnetic perturbation edge localized mode suppression on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, J. D.; Strait, E. J.; Nazikian, R.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Eldon, D.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Ferraro, N. M.; Hanson, J. M.; Haskey, S. R.; La Haye, R. J.; Lanctot, M. J.; Lazerson, S. A.; Logan, N. C.; Liu, Y. Q.; Okabayashi, M.; Park, J.-K.; Shiraki, D.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2015-11-01

    Experiments in the DIII-D tokamak show that the plasma responds to resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with toroidal mode numbers of n = 2 and n = 3 without field line reconnection, consistent with resistive magnetohydrodynamic predictions, while a strong nonlinear bifurcation is apparent when edge localized modes (ELMs) are suppressed. The magnetic response associated with this bifurcation is localized to the high field side of the machine and exhibits a dominant n = 1 component despite the application of a constant amplitude, slowly toroidally rotating, n = 2 applied field. The n = 1 mode is born locked to the vacuum vessel wall, while the n = 2 mode is entrained to the rotating field. Based on these magnetic response measurements and Thomson scattering measurements of flattening of the electron temperature profile, it is likely that these modes are magnetic island chains near the H-mode pedestal. The reduction in ∇Te occurs near the q = 4 and 5 rational surfaces, suggesting five unique islands are possible (m = 8, 9, or 10 for n = 2) and (m = 4 or 5 for n = 1). In all cases, the island width is estimated to be 2-3 cm. The Chang-Callen calculated confinement degradation due to the presence of an individual island of this size is 8%-12%, which is close to the 13%-14% measured between the ELMs and suppressed states. This suggests that edge tearing modes may alter the pedestal causing peeling-ballooning stability during RMP induced ELM suppression.

  9. Suppression of c-Myc is involved in multi-walled carbon nanotubes' down-regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters in human colon adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhaojing; Xu, Yonghong; Meng, Xiangning; Watari, Fumio; Liu, Hudan; Chen, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Over-expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, a large family of integral membrane proteins that decrease cellular drug uptake and accumulation by active extrusion, is one of the major causes of cancer multi-drug resistance (MDR) that frequently leads to failure of chemotherapy. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs)-based drug delivery devices hold great promise in enhancing the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. However, CNTs' effects on the ABC transporters remain under-investigated. In this study, we found that multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reduced transport activity and expression of ABC transporters including ABCB1/Pgp and ABCC4/MRP4 in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Proto-oncogene c-Myc, which directly regulates ABC gene expression, was concurrently decreased in MWCNT-treated cells and forced over-expression of c-Myc reversed MWCNTs' inhibitory effects on ABCB1 and ABCC4 expression. MWCNT-cell membrane interaction and cell membrane oxidative damage were observed. However, antioxidants such as vitamin C, β-mecaptoethanol and dimethylthiourea failed to antagonize MWCNTs' down-regulation of ABC transporters. These data suggest that MWCNTs may act on c-Myc, but not through oxidative stress, to down-regulate ABC transporter expression. Our findings thus shed light on CNTs' novel cellular effects that may be utilized to develop CNTs-based drug delivery devices to overcome ABC transporter-mediated cancer chemoresistance.

  10. Three-dimensional equilibria and island energy transport due to resonant magnetic perturbation edge localized mode suppression on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    King, J. D.; Strait, E. J.; Nazikian, R.; Paz-Soldan, Carlos; Eldon, D.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Ferraro, N. M.; Hanson, J. M.; Haskey, S. R.; La Haye, R. J.; Lanctot, Matthew J.; Lazerson, Sam A.; Logan, N. C.; Liu, Y. Q.; Okabayashi, M.; Park, J. -K.; Turnbull, A. D.

    2015-11-16

    In this research, we conducted experiments in the DIII-D tokamak that show that the plasma responds to resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with toroidalmode numbers of n=2 and n=3 without field line reconnection, consistent with resistive magnetohydrodynamic predictions, while a strong nonlinear bifurcation is apparent when edge localized modes(ELMs) are suppressed. The magnetic response associated with this bifurcation is localized to the high field side of the machine and exhibits a dominant n=1 component despite the application of a constant amplitude, slowly toroidally rotating, n=2 applied field. The n=1 mode is born locked to the vacuum vessel wall, while the n=2 mode is entrained to the rotating field. Based on these magnetic response measurements and Thomson scattering measurements of flattening of the electron temperature profile, it is likely that these modes are magnetic island chains near the H-mode pedestal. The reduction in ∇Te occurs near the q=4 and 5 rational surfaces, suggesting five unique islands are possible (m=8, 9, or 10 for n=2) and (m=4 or 5 for n=1). In all cases, the island width is estimated to be 2–3 cm. The Chang-Callen calculated confinement degradation due to the presence of an individual island of this size is 8%–12%, which is close to the 13%–14% measured between the ELMs and suppressed states. In conclusion, this suggests that edge tearing modes may alter the pedestal causing peeling-ballooning stability during RMP induced ELM suppression.

  11. Three-dimensional equilibria and island energy transport due to resonant magnetic perturbation edge localized mode suppression on DIII-D

    DOE PAGESBeta

    King, J. D.; Strait, E. J.; Nazikian, R.; Paz-Soldan, Carlos; Eldon, D.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Ferraro, N. M.; Hanson, J. M.; Haskey, S. R.; La Haye, R. J.; et al

    2015-11-16

    In this research, we conducted experiments in the DIII-D tokamak that show that the plasma responds to resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with toroidalmode numbers of n=2 and n=3 without field line reconnection, consistent with resistive magnetohydrodynamic predictions, while a strong nonlinear bifurcation is apparent when edge localized modes(ELMs) are suppressed. The magnetic response associated with this bifurcation is localized to the high field side of the machine and exhibits a dominant n=1 component despite the application of a constant amplitude, slowly toroidally rotating, n=2 applied field. The n=1 mode is born locked to the vacuum vessel wall, while the n=2more » mode is entrained to the rotating field. Based on these magnetic response measurements and Thomson scattering measurements of flattening of the electron temperature profile, it is likely that these modes are magnetic island chains near the H-mode pedestal. The reduction in ∇Te occurs near the q=4 and 5 rational surfaces, suggesting five unique islands are possible (m=8, 9, or 10 for n=2) and (m=4 or 5 for n=1). In all cases, the island width is estimated to be 2–3 cm. The Chang-Callen calculated confinement degradation due to the presence of an individual island of this size is 8%–12%, which is close to the 13%–14% measured between the ELMs and suppressed states. In conclusion, this suggests that edge tearing modes may alter the pedestal causing peeling-ballooning stability during RMP induced ELM suppression.« less

  12. Specific oligopeptides in fermented soybean extract inhibit NF-κB-dependent iNOS and cytokine induction by toll-like receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo Hyung; Wu, Hong Min; Lee, Chan Gyu; Sung, Dae Il; Song, Hye Jung; Matsui, Toshiro; Kim, Han Bok; Kim, Sang Geon

    2014-11-01

    The ethanol extract of fermented soybean from Glycine max (chungkookjang, CHU) has been claimed to have chemopreventive and cytoprotective effects. In the present study, we examined the inhibitory effect of CHU on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cytokine induction by toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands treatment and attempted to identify the responsible active components. Nitric oxide (NO) content and iNOS levels in the media or RAW264.7 cells were measured using the Griess reagent and real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. CHU treatment inhibited NO production and iNOS induction elicited by lipopolysaccharide (LPS, TLR4L) in a concentration-dependent manner. Tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 productions were also diminished. Peptidoglycans (TLR2/6L) and CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides (TLR9L) from CHU inhibited iNOS induction, but not poly I:C (TLR3L) or loxoribine (TLF7L). The anti-inflammatory effect resulted from the inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) through the inhibition of inhibitory-κB degradation. Of the representative components in CHU, specific oligopeptides (AFPG and GVAWWMY) had the ability to inhibit iNOS induction by LPS, whereas others failed to do so. Daidzein, an isoflavone used for comparative purposes, was active at a relatively higher concentration. In an animal model, oral administration of CHU to rats significantly diminished carrageenan-induced paw edema and iNOS induction. Our results demonstrate that CHU has anti-inflammatory effects against TLR ligands by inhibiting NF-κB activation, which may result from specific oligopeptide components in CHU. Since CHU is orally effective, dietary applications of CHU and/or the identified oligopeptides may be of use in the prevention of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25184943

  13. Histidine-Rich Oligopeptides To Lessen Copper-Mediated Amyloid-β Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Ana B; Terol-Ordaz, Laia; Espargaró, Alba; Vázquez, Guillem; Nicolás, Ernesto; Sabaté, Raimon; Gamez, Patrick

    2016-05-17

    Brain copper imbalance plays an important role in amyloid-β aggregation, tau hyperphosphorylation, and neurotoxicity observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, the administration of biocompatible metal-binding agents may offer a potential therapeutic solution to target mislocalized copper ions and restore metallostasis. Histidine-containing peptides and proteins are excellent metal binders and are found in many natural systems. The design of short peptides showing optimal binding properties represents a promising approach to capture and redistribute mislocalized metal ions, mainly due to their biocompatibility, ease of synthesis, and the possibility of fine-tuning their metal-binding affinities in order to suppress unwanted competitive binding with copper-containing proteins. In the present study, three peptides, namely HWH, HK(C) H, and HAH, have been designed with the objective of reducing copper toxicity in AD. These tripeptides form highly stable albumin-like complexes, showing higher affinity for Cu(II) than that of Aβ(1-40). Furthermore, HWH, HK(C) H, and HAH act as very efficient inhibitors of copper-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and prevent the copper-induced overproduction of toxic oligomers in the initial steps of amyloid aggregation in the presence of Cu(II) ions. These tripeptides, and more generally small peptides including the sequence His-Xaa-His at the N-terminus, may therefore be considered as promising motifs for the future development of new and efficient anti-Alzheimer drugs. PMID:27071336

  14. XPS investigation on the structure of two dipeptides studied as models of self-assembling oligopeptides: comparison between experiments and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battocchio, C.; Iucci, G.; Dettin, M.; Monti, S.; Carravetta, V.; Polzonetti, G.

    2008-03-01

    The adsorption on TiO2 surface of two dipeptides AE (L-alanine-L-glutamic acid) and AK (L-alanine-L-lysine), that are 'building blocks' of the more complex self-complementary amphiphilic oligopeptides and are therefore a good model in the interpretation of the complex peptide spectra, has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The chemical structure and composition of thin films of both dipeptides on TiO2 were investigated by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). Theoretical ab-initio calculations (ΔSCF) were also performed to simulate the spectra allowing a direct comparison between experiment and theory.

  15. Suppression of Parallel Transport in Turbulent Magnetized Plasmas and Its Impact on the Non-thermal and Thermal Aspects of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Nicolas H.; Kontar, Eduard P.; Emslie, A. Gordon

    2016-06-01

    The transport of the energy contained in electrons, both thermal and suprathermal, in solar flares plays a key role in our understanding of many aspects of the flare phenomenon, from the spatial distribution of hard X-ray emission to global energetics. Motivated by recent RHESSI observations that point to the existence of a mechanism that confines electrons to the coronal parts of flare loops more effectively than Coulomb collisions, we here consider the impact of pitch-angle scattering off turbulent magnetic fluctuations on the parallel transport of electrons in flaring coronal loops. It is shown that the presence of such a scattering mechanism in addition to Coulomb collisional scattering can significantly reduce the parallel thermal and electrical conductivities relative to their collisional values. We provide illustrative expressions for the resulting thermoelectric coefficients that relate the thermal flux and electrical current density to the temperature gradient and the applied electric field. We then evaluate the effect of these modified transport coefficients on the flare coronal temperature that can be attained, on the post-impulsive-phase cooling of heated coronal plasma, and on the importance of the beam-neutralizing return current on both ambient heating and the energy loss rate of accelerated electrons. We also discuss the possible ways in which anomalous transport processes have an impact on the required overall energy associated with accelerated electrons in solar flares.

  16. PKCε inhibits isolation and stemness of side population cells via the suppression of ABCB1 transporter and PI3K/Akt, MAPK/ERK signaling in renal cell carcinoma cell line 769P.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bin; Fu, Shun Jun; Fan, Wen Zhe; Wang, Zhong Hua; Chen, Ze Bin; Guo, Sheng Jie; Chen, Jun Xing; Qiu, Shao Peng

    2016-06-28

    Protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε), a member of the novel PKC family, is known to be a transforming oncogene and tumor biomarker for many human solid cancers including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). We isolated side population (SP) cells from the RCC 769P cell line, and proved that those cells possess cancer stem cell (CSC) characteristics. In this study, to identify the function of PKCε in cancer stemness of 769P SP cells, we reduced the expression of PKCε in those cells, following the results demonstrated that PKCε depletion had a negative correlation with the existence of SP cells in 769P cell line. Down-regulation of PKCε also suppresses the CSC potential of sorted 769P SP cells in several ways: proliferation potential, resistance to chemotherapeutics and in vivo tumor formation ability. Our study also reveals that PKCε is associated with ABCB1 and this association probably contributed to the SP cells isolation from 769P cell line. Furthermore, the expression of ABCB1 is directly regulated by PKCε. Additionally, after the depletion of PKCε, the phosphorylation of pAkt, pStat3 and pERK was apparently suppressed in 769P SP cells, whereas PKCε overexpression could promote the phosphorylation of AKT, STAT3 and ERK in 769P Non-SP cells. Overall, PKCε down-regulation suppresses sorting and the cancer stem-like phenotype of RCC 769P SP cells through the regulation of ABCB1 transporter and the PI3K/Akt, Stat3 and MAPK/ERK pathways that are dependent on the phosphorylation effects. Thus, PKCε may work as an important mediator in cancer stem cell pathogenesis of renal cell cancer. PMID:27037060

  17. Hysteresis-Suppressed High-Efficiency Flexible Perovskite Solar Cells Using Solid-State Ionic-Liquids for Effective Electron Transport.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong; Yang, Ruixia; Ren, Xiaodong; Zhu, Xuejie; Yang, Zhou; Li, Can; Liu, Shengzhong Frank

    2016-07-01

    An efficiency of flexible perovskite solar cells (Pvs-SCs) of 16.09% is achieved, the highest value reported for flexible Pvs-SCs to date. The outstanding performance is attributed to the superior features of alternative electron-transport materials, such as antireflection, a suitable work function, high electron mobility, and a reduced trap-state density of the perovskite material. PMID:27147394

  18. Suppression of Parallel Transport in Turbulent Magnetized Plasmas and Its Impact on Non-Thermal and Thermal Aspects of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emslie, A. Gordon; Bian, Nicolas H.; Kontar, Eduard

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by recent RHESSI observations that point to the existence of a mechanism that confines electrons to the coronal parts of flare loops more effectively than Coulomb collisions, we consider the impact of pitch-angle scattering off turbulent magnetic fluctuations on the parallel transport of electrons in flaring coronal loops. It is shown that the presence of such a scattering mechanism in addition to Coulomb collisional scattering can significantly reduce the parallel thermal and electrical conductivities relative to their collisional values. We provide illustrative expressions for the resulting thermoelectric coefficients that relate the thermal flux and electrical current density to the temperature gradient and the applied electric field. We then evaluate the effect of these modified transport coefficients on several items of interest to the modeling of flares, including: the peak flare coronal temperature that can be attained, the post-impulsive-phase cooling time of heated coronal plasma, and the importance of the beam-neutralizing return current on both ambient heating and the energy loss rate of accelerated electrons. We also discuss the ways in which anomalous transport processes have an impact on the required overall energy content of accelerated electrons in solar flares.

  19. Mass spectrometry of oligopeptides in the presence of large amounts of alkali halides using desorption/ionization induced by neutral cluster impact.

    PubMed

    Portz, André; Baur, Markus; Gebhardt, Christoph R; Dürr, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Oligopeptides in the presence of large amounts of salt were desorbed and ionized using desorption/ionization induced by neutral clusters (DINeC) for further analysis by means of mass spectrometry (MS). Using oligopeptides in alkali halide solutions as a model system, DINeC was shown to yield clear and fragmentation free mass spectra of the biomolecules even from environments with a large excess of salt. The results were traced back to a phase separation between salt and biomolecules during sample preparation. The ratio between alkali metal complexes [M+A](+) and bare biomolecules [M+H](+) was controlled using different preparation schemes. DINeC was applied to the products of a tryptic digest of bovine serum albumin in the presence of sodium chloride; the results of a mass fingerprint analysis did not show a major difference for the spectra with and without salt in the original solution. The metal-ion/peptide interaction was further investigated by means of tandem-MS. PMID:26825286

  20. Expression of a putative ATPase suppresses the growth defect of a yeast potassium transport mutant: identification of a mammalian member of the Clp/HSP104 family.

    PubMed

    Périer, F; Radeke, C M; Raab-Graham, K F; Vandenberg, C A

    1995-01-23

    A cDNA encoding a novel mammalian member of the Clp/HSP104 family was isolated from a mouse macrophage-like cell line (J774.1) cDNA library by suppression of the growth defect of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae trk1 trk2 double mutant. The full-length version of this cDNA, termed SKD3, encodes a putative 76-kDa protein of 677 amino acids (aa). The deduced aa sequence of the SKD3 polypeptide contains four ankyrin-like repeats in the N-terminal domain and a single ATP-binding consensus site in the C-terminal domain. The 378-aa C-terminal domain of SKD3 has 57-64% similarity (30-40% identity) with members of the Clp/HSP104 family, including the ClpA regulatory subunit of the Clp protease and S. cerevisiae heat-shock protein 104. Northern analysis showed that the 2.3-kb SKD3 transcript is present in a wide variety of tissues, is abundant in mouse heart, skeletal muscle and kidney, and is most abundant in testis. Members of the Clp/HSP104 family have been identified previously from bacteria, yeast and chloroplasts, and are ATPases regulating Clp protease activity and specificity, or mediating cellular responses involved in thermotolerance. SKD3 is the first member of this protein family identified in a higher eukaryote. PMID:7835694

  1. Determination of Oligopeptide Diversity within a Natural Population of Microcystis spp. (Cyanobacteria) by Typing Single Colonies by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Fastner, Jutta; Erhard, Marcel; von Döhren, Hans

    2001-01-01

    Besides the most prominent peptide toxin, microcystin, the cyanobacteria Microcystis spp. have been shown to produce a large variety of other bioactive oligopeptides. We investigated for the first time the oligopeptide diversity within a natural Microcystis population by analyzing single colonies directly with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The results demonstrate a high diversity of known cyanobacterial peptides such as microcystins, anabaenopeptins, microginins, aeruginosins, and cyanopeptolins, but also many unknown substances in the Microcystis colonies. Oligopeptide patterns were mostly related to specific Microcystis taxa. Microcystis aeruginosa (Kütz.) Kütz. colonies contained mainly microcystins, occasionally accompanied by aeruginosins. In contrast, microcystins were not detected in Microcystis ichthyoblabe Kütz.; instead, colonies of this species contained anabaenopeptins and/or microginins or unknown peptides. Within a third group, Microcystis wesenbergii (Kom.) Kom. in Kondr., chiefly a cyanopeptolin and an unknown peptide were found. Similar patterns, however, were also found in colonies which could not be identified to species level. The significance of oligopeptides as a chemotaxonomic tool within the genus Microcystis is discussed. It could be demonstrated that the typing of single colonies by MALDI-TOF MS may be a valuable tool for ecological studies of the genus Microcystis as well as in early warning of toxic cyanobacterial blooms. PMID:11679328

  2. Paeonol suppresses lipid accumulation in macrophages via upregulation of the ATP‑binding cassette transporter A1 and downregulation of the cluster of differentiation 36.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiuying; Zhou, Yuanda; Yu, Chao; Yang, Hui; Zhang, Chengzhi; Ye, Yun; Xiao, Shunlin

    2015-02-01

    Paeonol, a potent antioxidant isolated from cortex moutan, possesses athero‑protective activity, yet the detailed mechanisms are not fully investigated. This study was conducted to explore the role of paeonol and its underlying mechanisms in RAW264.7 macrophages and apolipoprotein E‑deficient (ApoE(‑/‑)) mice. Paeonol treatment significantly attenuated intracellular lipid accumulation in macrophages, which may be the result of decreased oxidized low‑density lipoprotein (ox‑LDL) uptake and increased cholesterol efflux. Additionally, paeonol markedly inhibited the mRNA and protein expression of the cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) by decreasing nuclear translocation of c‑Jun [a subunit of activator protein‑1 (AP‑1)]. Moreover, paeonol upregulated the protein stability of ATP‑binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) by inhibiting calpain activity, while ABCA1 mRNA expression was not altered. Furthermore, small hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting haem oxygenase‑1 (HO‑1) inhibited the paeonol‑mediated beneficial effects on the expression of c‑Jun, CD36, ABCA1, calpain activity and lipid accumulation in macrophages. Accordingly, paeonol retarded the progress of atherosclerosis in ApoE(‑/‑) mice and modulated the expression of CD36 and ABCA1 in aortas similarly to that observed in macrophages. These results indicate that paeonol provides protective effects on foam cell formation by a novel HO‑1‑dependent mediation of cholesterol efflux and lipid accumulation in macrophages. PMID:25405950

  3. Cheese peptidomics: a detailed study on the evolution of the oligopeptide fraction in Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese from curd to 24 months of aging.

    PubMed

    Sforza, S; Cavatorta, V; Lambertini, F; Galaverna, G; Dossena, A; Marchelli, R

    2012-07-01

    In this work, we performed a detailed evaluation of the evolution of the oligopeptide fractions in samples of Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese from the curd up to 24 mo of aging. The samples were taken from wheels produced the same day, in the same factory, from the same milk, during the same caseification process, thus simplifying the natural variability of a whey-based starter fermentation. This unique and homogeneous sampling plan, never reported before in the literature, provided a detailed study of the peptides produced by enzymatic events during Parmigiano-Reggiano aging. Given the large dimensions of the 35-kg wheels of Parmigiano-Reggiano, samples were taken from both the internal and external parts of the cheese, to evidence eventual differences in the oligopeptide composition of the different parts. Fifty-seven peptides were considered, being among the most abundant during at least one of the periods of ripening considered, and their semiquantification indicated that the peptide fraction of Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese constantly evolves during the aging period. Five trends in its evolution were outlined, which could be clearly correlated to the enzymatic activities present in the cheese, making it possible to discriminate cheeses according to their aging time. Several known bioactive peptides were also found to be present in Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese samples, and for the first time, the age at which they are most abundant has been identified. Aged cheeses have been shown to be dominated by nonproteolytic aminoacyl derivatives, a new class of peptide-like molecules recently reported. Finally, the changing peptide pattern may be related to the changing enzymatic activities occurring inside the cheeses during the aging period, which, in turn, are also related to the microbiological composition. PMID:22720910

  4. Astragaloside IV facilitates glucose transport in C2C12 myotubes through the IRS1/AKT pathway and suppresses the palmitate-induced activation of the IKK/IκBα pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rongfeng; Zheng, Jianjun; Chen, Lizhen; Gu, Bin; Huang, Shengli

    2016-06-01

    Astragaloside IV is a monomer isolated from Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch.) Bunge, which is one of the most widely used plant-derived drugs in traditional Chinese medicine for diabetes therapy. In the present study, we aimed to examine the effects of astragaloside IV on glucose in C2C12 myotubes and the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for these effects. Four-day differentiated C2C12 myotubes were exposed to palmitate for 16 h in order to establish a model of insulin resistance and 3H glucose uptake, using 2-Deoxy‑D‑[1,2-3H(N)]-glucose (radiolabeled 2-DG), was detected. Astragaloside IV was added 2 h prior to palmitate exposure. The translocation of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) was evaluated by subcellular fractionation, and the expression of insulin signaling molecules such as insulin receptor β (IRβ), insulin receptor substrate (IRS)1/protein kinase B (AKT) and inhibitory κB kinase (IKK)/inhibitor-κBα (IκBα), which are associated with insulin signal transduction, were assessed in the basal or the insulin‑stimulated state using western blot analysis or RT-PCR. We also examined the mRNA expression of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and Toll‑like receptor 4 (TLR4). Taken together, these findings demonstrated that astragaloside IV facilitates glucose transport in C2C12 myotubes through a mechanism involving the IRS1/AKT pathway, and suppresses the palmitate-induced activation of the IKK/IκBα pathway. PMID:27082050

  5. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is being suppressed by high blood sugar. ... away. The lab measures the glucose and growth hormone (GH) levels in each sample.

  6. Dexamethasone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    Dexamethasone suppression test measures whether adrenocorticotrophic hormone ( ACTH ) secretion by the pituitary can be suppressed. ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong ... your blood is drawn so that the cortisol level in your blood ...

  7. Dexamethasone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    DST; ACTH suppression test; Cortisol suppression test ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong man-made (synthetic) glucocorticoid medication. Afterward, your blood is drawn ...

  8. Growth hormone suppression test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production is ...

  9. Fire Suppression and Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruff, Gary A.

    2004-01-01

    This report is concerned with the following topics regarding fire suppression:What is the relative effectiveness of candidate suppressants to extinguish a representative fire in reduced gravity, including high-O2 mole fraction, low -pressure environments? What are the relative advantages and disadvantages of physically acting and chemically-acting agents in spacecraft fire suppression? What are the O2 mole fraction and absolute pressure below which a fire cannot exist? What effect does gas-phase radiation play in the overall fire and post-fire environments? Are the candidate suppressants effective to extinguish fires on practical solid fuels? What is required to suppress non-flaming fires (smoldering and deep seated fires) in reduced gravity? How can idealized space experiment results be applied to a practical fire scenario? What is the optimal agent deployment strategy for space fire suppression?

  10. Peptide bonds affect the formation of haloacetamides, an emerging class of N-DBPs in drinking water: free amino acids versus oligopeptides.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wenhai; Li, Xin; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang; Yin, Daqiang; Li, Dongmei; Chu, Tengfei

    2015-01-01

    Haloacetamides (HAcAms), an emerging class of nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) of health concern, have been frequently identified in drinking waters. It has long been appreciated that free amino acids (AAs), accounting for a small fraction of the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) pool, can form dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) during chlorination. However, the information regarding the impacts of combined AAs, which contribute to the greatest identifiable DON portion in natural waters, is limited. In this study, we compared the formation of HAcAms from free AAs (tyrosine [Tyr] and alanine [Ala]) and combined AAs (Tyr-Ala, Ala-Tyr, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr, Ala-Ala-Ala), and found that HAcAm formation from the chlorination of AAs in combined forms (oligopeptides) significantly exhibited a different pattern with HAcAm formation from free AAs. Due to the presence of peptide bonds in tripeptides, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr and Ala-Ala-Ala produced trichloroacetamide (TCAcAm) in which free AAs was unable to form TCAcAm during chlorination. Moreover, peptide bond in tripeptides formed more tri-HAcAms than di-HAcAms in the presence of bromide. Therefore, the peptide bond may be an important indicator to predict the formation of specific N-DBPs in chlorination. The increased use of algal- and wastewater-impacted water as drinking water sources will increase health concerns over exposure to HAcAms in drinking water. PMID:26394759

  11. Peptide bonds affect the formation of haloacetamides, an emerging class of N-DBPs in drinking water: free amino acids versus oligopeptides

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Wenhai; Li, Xin; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang; Yin, Daqiang; Li, Dongmei; Chu, Tengfei

    2015-01-01

    Haloacetamides (HAcAms), an emerging class of nitrogenous disinfection by-products (N-DBPs) of health concern, have been frequently identified in drinking waters. It has long been appreciated that free amino acids (AAs), accounting for a small fraction of the dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) pool, can form dichloroacetamide (DCAcAm) during chlorination. However, the information regarding the impacts of combined AAs, which contribute to the greatest identifiable DON portion in natural waters, is limited. In this study, we compared the formation of HAcAms from free AAs (tyrosine [Tyr] and alanine [Ala]) and combined AAs (Tyr-Ala, Ala-Tyr, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr, Ala-Ala-Ala), and found that HAcAm formation from the chlorination of AAs in combined forms (oligopeptides) significantly exhibited a different pattern with HAcAm formation from free AAs. Due to the presence of peptide bonds in tripeptides, Tyr-Tyr-Tyr and Ala-Ala-Ala produced trichloroacetamide (TCAcAm) in which free AAs was unable to form TCAcAm during chlorination. Moreover, peptide bond in tripeptides formed more tri-HAcAms than di-HAcAms in the presence of bromide. Therefore, the peptide bond may be an important indicator to predict the formation of specific N-DBPs in chlorination. The increased use of algal- and wastewater-impacted water as drinking water sources will increase health concerns over exposure to HAcAms in drinking water. PMID:26394759

  12. Preparation and functional evaluation of oligopeptide-enriched hydrolysate from shrimp (Acetes chinensis) treated with crude protease from Bacillus sp. SM98011.

    PubMed

    He, Hailun; Chen, Xiulan; Sun, Caiyun; Zhang, Yuzhong; Gao, Peiji

    2006-02-01

    Marine organisms are potentially an untapped source of drugs and value-added food production. Currently, Acetes chinensis is an underutilized shrimp species with low commercial value from the Bo Hai Gulf of China. In this paper, the shrimp was digested by a crude protease from Bacillus sp. SM98011 and filtered through a 3 kDa ultrafiltration membrane. Biological functions of the hydrolysate and ultrafiltrate were then assayed. The analyses showed that 41% of the oligopeptides in the ultrafiltrate had a molecular mass lower than 3 kDa. The antioxidant activities of the hydrolysate and ultrafiltrate were determined through the scavenger activity of the hydroxyl radical, with inhibitions of 42.38% and 67.95%, respectively. The hydrolysate and ultrafiltrate also had good Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity, with IC50 values of 0.98 mg/ml and 0.22 mg/ml, respectively. In addition, Chitin and chitosan were recovered from the hydrolytic sediment using a much smaller volume of strong acids and bases than is normally needed. With this method, we have shown that A. chinensis can be utilized to generate a high value-added product, and have revealed its hidden potential in the production of functional foods and ACE inhibitory peptides. PMID:15935656

  13. Molecular recognition between oligopeptides and nucleic acids: DNA binding specificity of a series of bis netropsin analogues deduced from footprinting analysis.

    PubMed

    Kissinger, K L; Dabrowiak, J C; Lown, J W

    1990-01-01

    A series of tether-linked bis netropsins have been synthesized in order to assess the phasing problem, which arises because of the lack of dimensional correspondence between oligopeptides and oligonucleotides in DNA binding characteristics. The consequences of incorporating variable-length flexible and rigid tethers [poly(methylene), Z and E ethylene, m- and p-phenylene] between the two netropsin-like moieties on the DNA binding properties were assessed by DNase I footprinting. The conformational freedom associated with two netropsins linked by a flexible methylene tether allows ligand binding in both a mono- and bidentate fashion, with bidentate binding requiring a minimum linker length of (CH2)3. For compounds possessing rigid tethers, for example, cis and trans ethylene moieties, the cis geometry excludes bidentate ligation while the trans structure favors it. Bis netropsins possessing aryl linking groups have reduced DNA binding affinities. This is most plausibly due to the aryl groups, which are not coplanar with the netropsin moieties, thus blocking the ligand from penetrating deeply into the minor groove of DNA. PMID:1966670

  14. An Arabidopsis peptide transporter is a member of a new class of membrane transport proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, H Y; Song, W; Zhang, L; Naider, F; Becker, J M; Stacey, G

    1994-01-01

    An Arabidopsis peptide transport gene was cloned from an Arabidopsis cDNA library by functionally complementing a yeast peptide transport mutant. The Arabidopsis plant peptide transporter (AtPTR2) allowed growth of yeast cells on dipeptides and tripeptides but not peptides four residues and higher. The plant peptide transporter also conferred sensitivity to a number of ethionine-containing, toxic peptides of chain length three or less and restored the ability to take up radiolabeled dileucine at levels similar to that of the wild type. Dileucine uptake was reduced by the addition of a variety of growth-promoting peptides. The sequence of a cDNA insert of 2.8 kb indicated an open reading frame encoding a 610-amino acid polypeptide (67.5 kD). Hydropathy analysis predicted a highly hydrophobic protein with a number of potential transmembrane segments. At the amino acid level, the Arabidopsis plant peptide transporter shows 24.6, 28.5, and 45.2% identity to the Arabidopsis nitrate-inducible nitrate transporter (CHL1), the rabbit small intestine oligopeptide transporter (PepT1), and the yeast peptide transporter (Ptr2p), respectively, but little identity to other proteins known to be involved in peptide transport. Root growth of Arabidopsis seedlings exposed to ethionine-containing toxic peptides was inhibited, and growth was restored by the addition of certain peptides shown to compete with dileucine uptake in yeast expressing the Arabidopsis transport gene. Consistent with the observed inhibition of root growth by toxic peptides, the peptide transporter is expressed in the roots of Arabidopsis seedlings. This study represents the characterization of a plant peptide transporter that is a member of a new class of related membrane transport proteins. PMID:7919993

  15. Different modes of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (CD26) inhibition by oligopeptides derived from the N-terminus of HIV-1 Tat indicate at least two inhibitor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Lorey, Susan; Stöckel-Maschek, Angela; Faust, Jürgen; Brandt, Wolfgang; Stiebitz, Beate; Gorrell, Mark D; Kähne, Thilo; Mrestani-Klaus, Carmen; Wrenger, Sabine; Reinhold, Dirk; Ansorge, Siegfried; Neubert, Klaus

    2003-05-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DP IV, CD26) plays an essential role in the activation and proliferation of lymphocytes, which is shown by the immunosuppressive effects of synthetic DP IV inhibitors. Similarly, both human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) Tat protein and the N-terminal peptide Tat(1-9) inhibit DP IV activity and T cell proliferation. Therefore, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of HIV-1 Tat is important for the inhibition of DP IV. Recently, we characterized the thromboxane A2 receptor peptide TXA2-R(1-9), bearing the N-terminal MWP sequence motif, as a potent DP IV inhibitor possibly playing a functional role during antigen presentation by inhibiting T cell-expressed DP IV [Wrenger, S., Faust, J., Mrestani-Klaus, C., Fengler, A., Stöckel-Maschek, A., Lorey, S., Kähne, T., Brandt, W., Neubert, K., Ansorge, S. & Reinhold, D. (2000) J. Biol. Chem.275, 22180-22186]. Here, we demonstrate that amino acid substitutions at different positions of Tat(1-9) can result in a change of the inhibition type. Certain Tat(1-9)-related peptides are found to be competitive, and others linear mixed-type or parabolic mixed-type inhibitors indicating different inhibitor binding sites on DP IV, at the active site and out of the active site. The parabolic mixed-type mechanism, attributed to both non-mutually exclusive inhibitor binding sites of the enzyme, is described in detail. From the kinetic investigations and molecular modeling experiments, possible interactions of the oligopeptides with specified amino acids of DP IV are suggested. These findings give new insights for the development of more potent and specific peptide-based DP IV inhibitors. Such inhibitors could be useful for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:12752434

  16. BOP: a basic phenylalanine-rich oligo-peptide located on the surface of glycolate oxidase influences its pI values.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Du, Yingqing; Ma, Guangzhi; Xu, Jie

    2010-06-01

    Glycolate oxidase (GO) consists of identical subunits and therefore should show one definite pI value, but the isolated GO exhibited a range of pIs. This study investigated the underlying cause of this phenomenon. GO was purified and showed a molecular weight of 40 kDa by SDS-PAGE. Elution behavior on DEAE-cellulose chromatography and cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis indicated that the purified GO was highly basic (pI>10.0). Repeated IEF and cIEF analysis showed that the pI of the purified GO was in the range of 10.0-3.25, either in a smear form or as distinct bands. 2-DE analysis showed that the 40 kDa subunit of GO displayed variable pIs from 9.6 to 3.65. It was likely that the purified GO was actually a complex consisted of GO and an unknown protein. CE-SDS, SDS-cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis and amino acid compositions indicated that the unknown protein was a highly basic polymer (BP) consisting of basic and phenylalanine-rich oligo-peptide (BOP). Many BOPs are located on the surface of the acidic GO via ionic and hydrophobic interactions and formed GO-BOP complex (GC), resulting in a highly basic GC although GO itself was acidic. This hypothesis was further supported by the facts that anti-GC serum failed to recognize GO, and GC showed a peak at 257 nm although GO has few phenylalanine residues. Irregular and incomplete disassociation between GO and BOP was observed in IEF and cIEF, resulting in various intermediates with different ratios of GO/BOP, which could be the reason for the range of pIs observed for GO. PMID:20496344

  17. Cough suppression disorders spectrum.

    PubMed

    Reich, Jerome M

    2014-02-01

    Volitional cough suppression, identified exclusively in females, is an unusual causal mechanism for instances of lobar atalectasis and bronchiectasis. It is a postulated mechanism for the genesis of Lady Windermere Syndrome. PMID:24462261

  18. A novel nuclear DnaJ protein, DNAJC8, can suppress the formation of spinocerebellar ataxia 3 polyglutamine aggregation in a J-domain independent manner.

    PubMed

    Ito, Norie; Kamiguchi, Kenjiro; Nakanishi, Katsuya; Sokolovskya, Alice; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Tamura, Yasuaki; Murai, Aiko; Yamamoto, Eri; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Kochin, Vitaly; Chiba, Susumu; Shimohama, Shun; Sato, Noriyuki; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-06-10

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases comprise neurodegenerative disorders caused by expression of expanded polyQ-containing proteins. The cytotoxicity of the expanded polyQ-containing proteins is closely associated with aggregate formation. In this study, we report that a novel J-protein, DNAJ (HSP40) Homolog, Subfamily C, Member 8 (DNAJC8), suppresses the aggregation of polyQ-containing protein in a cellular model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3), which is also known as Machado-Joseph disease. Overexpression of DNAJC8 in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells significantly reduced the polyQ aggregation and apoptosis, and DNAJC8 was co-localized with the polyQ aggregation in the cell nucleus. Deletion mutants of DNAJC8 revealed that the C-terminal domain of DNAJC8 was essential for the suppression of polyQ aggregation, whereas the J-domain was dispensable. Furthermore, 22-mer oligopeptide derived from C-termilal domain could suppress the polyQ aggregation. These results indicate that DNAJC8 can suppress the polyQ aggregation via a distinct mechanism independent of HSP70-based chaperone machinery and have a unique protective role against the aggregation of expanded polyQ-containing proteins such as pathogenic ataxin-3 proteins. PMID:27133716

  19. STE6, the yeast a-factor transporter.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, S

    1993-02-01

    In eukaryotic cells, most extracellular proteins exit the cell via the classical secretory pathway (ER-->Golgi-->secretory vesicles). A notable exception to this pattern is the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating pheromone alpha-factor, an isoprenylated, methylated, oligopeptide signaling molecule which uses a distinctly non-classical mechanism for secretion. Export of alpha-factor from the yeast cell is mediated by STE6, a member of the ABC protein superfamily. STE6 is one of the few eukaryotic ABC proteins for which a true physiological substrate is known. The ability to carry out molecular manipulations with ease in yeast, together with the possibility of probing substrate-transporter interactions via genetic analysis, affords an excellent opportunity to rigorously dissect the workings of this ABC family member. PMID:8095825

  20. Improved gene expression in resting macrophages using an oligopeptide derived from Vpr of human immunodeficiency virus type-1

    SciTech Connect

    Mizoguchi, Izuru; Ooe, Yoshihiro; Hoshino, Shigeki; Shimura, Mari; Kasahara, Tadashi; Kano, Shigeyuki; Ohta, Toshiko; Takaku, Fumimaro; Nakayama, Yasuhide; Ishizaka, Yukihito . E-mail: zakay@ri.imcj.go.jp

    2005-12-23

    Vpr, an accessory gene product of human immunodeficiency virus type-1, is thought to transport a viral DNA from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in resting macrophages. Previously, we reported that a peptide encompassing amino acids 52-78 of Vpr (C45D18) promotes the nuclear trafficking of recombinant proteins that are conjugated with C45D18. Here, we present evidence that C45D18, when conjugated with a six-branched cationic polymer of poly(N,N-dimethylaminopropylacrylamide)-block-oligo(4-aminostyrene) (SV: star vector), facilitates gene expression in resting macrophages. Although there was no difference between SV alone and C45D18-SV with respect to gene transduction into growing cells, C45D18-SV resulted in more than 40-fold greater expression of the exogenous gene upon transduction into chemically differentiated macrophages and human quiescent monocyte-derived macrophages. The data suggest that C45D18 contributes to improving the ability of a non-viral vector to transduce macrophages with exogenous genes and we discuss its further application.

  1. A redox-sensitive, oligopeptide-guided, self-assembling, and efficiency-enhanced (ROSE) system for functional delivery of microRNA therapeutics for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qida; Wang, Kai; Sun, Xu; Li, Yang; Fu, Qihan; Liang, Tingbo; Tang, Guping

    2016-10-01

    Lack of efficient adjuvant therapy contributes to a high incidence of recurrence and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A novel therapeutic is required for adjuvant treatment of HCC. We developed a polymer-based nanosystem (ROSE) for functional gene therapy by synthesizing a supramolecular complex self-assembled from polycations and functional adamantyl modules. The ROSE system condensing tumor suppressor microRNA-34a (miR-34a) therapeutics becomes ROSE/miR-34a nanoparticles that could facilitate gene transfection in HCC cells with satisfied stability and efficiency, possibly due to proton sponge effect by polycations, PEGlyation protection, and controlled release by breakdown of disulfide bonds. Meanwhile, modification with a targeting oligopeptide SP94 in ROSE/miR-34a enables approximately higher affinity for LM3 HCC cells than hepatocytes in vitro and greater HCC specificity in vivo. Furthermore, ROSE/miR-34a nanoparticles significantly inhibits HCC cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth, representing a notable effect improvement over conventional gene delivery strategies. ROSE/miR-34a, featuring redox-responsiveness, oligopeptide-guided specificity, self-assembly, and enhanced transfection, is therefore a potential therapeutic agent in future adjuvant therapy for HCC treatment. PMID:27459325

  2. Thermopower signatures and spectroscopy of the canyon of conductance suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiršanskas, G.; Hammarberg, S.; Karlström, O.; Wacker, A.

    2016-07-01

    Interference effects in quantum dots between different transport channels can lead to a strong suppression of conductance, which cuts like a canyon through the common conductance plot [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 186804 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.104.186804]. In the present work we consider the thermoelectric transport properties of the canyon of conductance suppression using the second-order von Neumann approach. We observe a characteristic signal for the zeros of the thermopower. This demonstrates that thermoelectric measurements are an interesting complimentary tool to study complex phenomena for transport through confined systems.

  3. Explosion suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Sapko, Michael J.; Cortese, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

  4. Predictions of Cleavability of Calpain Proteolysis by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis Using Newly Determined Cleavage Sites and Catalytic Efficiencies of an Oligopeptide Array*

    PubMed Central

    Shinkai-Ouchi, Fumiko; Koyama, Suguru; Ono, Yasuko; Hata, Shoji; Ojima, Koichi; Shindo, Mayumi; duVerle, David; Ueno, Mika; Kitamura, Fujiko; Doi, Naoko; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Calpains are intracellular Ca2+-regulated cysteine proteases that are essential for various cellular functions. Mammalian conventional calpains (calpain-1 and calpain-2) modulate the structure and function of their substrates by limited proteolysis. Thus, it is critically important to determine the site(s) in proteins at which calpains cleave. However, the calpains' substrate specificity remains unclear, because the amino acid (aa) sequences around their cleavage sites are very diverse. To clarify calpains' substrate specificities, 84 20-mer oligopeptides, corresponding to P10-P10′ of reported cleavage site sequences, were proteolyzed by calpains, and the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) were globally determined by LC/MS. This analysis revealed 483 cleavage site sequences, including 360 novel ones. The kcat/Kms for 119 sites ranged from 12.5–1,710 M−1s−1. Although most sites were cleaved by both calpain-1 and −2 with a similar kcat/Km, sequence comparisons revealed distinct aa preferences at P9-P7/P2/P5′. The aa compositions of the novel sites were not statistically different from those of previously reported sites as a whole, suggesting calpains have a strict implicit rule for sequence specificity, and that the limited proteolysis of intact substrates is because of substrates' higher-order structures. Cleavage position frequencies indicated that longer sequences N-terminal to the cleavage site (P-sites) were preferred for proteolysis over C-terminal (P′-sites). Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses using partial least-squares regression and >1,300 aa descriptors achieved kcat/Km prediction with r = 0.834, and binary-QSAR modeling attained an 87.5% positive prediction value for 132 reported calpain cleavage sites independent of our model construction. These results outperformed previous calpain cleavage predictors, and revealed the importance of the P2, P3′, and P4′ sites, and P1-P2 cooperativity. Furthermore, using our

  5. Predictions of Cleavability of Calpain Proteolysis by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis Using Newly Determined Cleavage Sites and Catalytic Efficiencies of an Oligopeptide Array.

    PubMed

    Shinkai-Ouchi, Fumiko; Koyama, Suguru; Ono, Yasuko; Hata, Shoji; Ojima, Koichi; Shindo, Mayumi; duVerle, David; Ueno, Mika; Kitamura, Fujiko; Doi, Naoko; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    Calpains are intracellular Ca(2+)-regulated cysteine proteases that are essential for various cellular functions. Mammalian conventional calpains (calpain-1 and calpain-2) modulate the structure and function of their substrates by limited proteolysis. Thus, it is critically important to determine the site(s) in proteins at which calpains cleave. However, the calpains' substrate specificity remains unclear, because the amino acid (aa) sequences around their cleavage sites are very diverse. To clarify calpains' substrate specificities, 84 20-mer oligopeptides, corresponding to P10-P10' of reported cleavage site sequences, were proteolyzed by calpains, and the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) were globally determined by LC/MS. This analysis revealed 483 cleavage site sequences, including 360 novel ones. Thekcat/Kms for 119 sites ranged from 12.5-1,710 M(-1)s(-1) Although most sites were cleaved by both calpain-1 and -2 with a similarkcat/Km, sequence comparisons revealed distinct aa preferences at P9-P7/P2/P5'. The aa compositions of the novel sites were not statistically different from those of previously reported sites as a whole, suggesting calpains have a strict implicit rule for sequence specificity, and that the limited proteolysis of intact substrates is because of substrates' higher-order structures. Cleavage position frequencies indicated that longer sequences N-terminal to the cleavage site (P-sites) were preferred for proteolysis over C-terminal (P'-sites). Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses using partial least-squares regression and >1,300 aa descriptors achievedkcat/Kmprediction withr= 0.834, and binary-QSAR modeling attained an 87.5% positive prediction value for 132 reported calpain cleavage sites independent of our model construction. These results outperformed previous calpain cleavage predictors, and revealed the importance of the P2, P3', and P4' sites, and P1-P2 cooperativity. Furthermore, using our binary-QSAR model

  6. Monoclonal anti-acid-labile subunit oligopeptide antibodies and their use in a two-site immunoassay for ALS measurement in humans.

    PubMed

    Stadler, S; Wu, Z; Dressendörfer, R A; Morrison, K M; Khare, A; Lee, P D; Strasburger, C J

    2001-06-01

    Quantification of the acid-labile subunit (ALS) has to date been restricted to immunoassays utilizing polyclonal antibodies. By immunization with N-terminal and C-terminal specific ALS oligopeptides, we generated monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target ALS-specific sequences outside the nonspecific leucine-rich repeats in the ALS molecule. For mAb selection, a special screening method was developed. Monoclonal antibody 5C9, which targets the N-terminus of ALS, is immobilized and the anti-ALS mAb 7H3, directed against the C-terminus, is biotinylated and used as tracer Ab. Due to the extreme pH-lability of ALS, changes in immunorecognition of ALS were investigated after acidification for protein unfolding in different pH ranges and in a time-dependent manner. It was determined that acidification of the serum samples to pH 2.7 for 30 min, followed by neutralization and dilution to 1:100 was the optimal acid-neutralization method. For standardization purposes, a serum pool derived from healthy volunteers was assigned the value 1 U/ml ALS. The sandwich assay has a working range with a linear dose-response curve in a log/log system between 0.005 and 10 U/ml. ALS levels in seven acromegalic patients ranged from 2.0 to 4.2 U/ml, and in 12 untreated growth hormone deficient patients from 0.036 to 0.986 U/ml (mean=0.45 U/ml). After 12 months of growth hormone therapy, ALS levels increased significantly to 1.18+/-0.45 U/ml (mean+/-SD; p<0.0006). The increase ranged from 0.48 to 1.4 U/ml. The change in ALS with growth hormone (GH) therapy correlated closer with the change in IGF-I (r=0.798, p=0.0057; Spearman rank correlation) than with the change in insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP3; r=0.549, p=0.057). This specific sandwich assay for the measurement of ALS provides a potentially valuable indicator of growth hormone secretory status. With this mAb-based immunofluorometric assay, the nonspecific detection of other proteins containing leucine-rich repeat

  7. Photoimmune suppression and photocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Stephen E

    2002-03-01

    The primary cause of non-melanoma skin cancer, the most prevalent form of human neoplasia, is the ultraviolet (UV) radiation found in sunlight. Exposing mice to UV radiation induces skin cancers that are highly antigenic. Upon transfer of an UV-induced skin cancer to a normal syngeneic mouse, the tumor cells are recognized and rapidly destroyed by the immune system of the recipient. This raises the question of how these cancers avoided immune destruction during their development in the UV-irradiated host. This question was answered when it was discovered that in addition to being carcinogenic, UV radiation was also immunosuppressive. Studies with immune suppressed transplantation recipients, and biopsy proven skin cancer patients have confirmed that UV-induced immune suppression is a risk factor for skin cancer development in humans. It is of great importance, therefore, to understand the mechanisms underlying UV-induced immune suppression. The focus of this manuscript will be to use some examples from the more recent scientific literature to review the mechanisms by which UV radiation suppresses the immune response and allows for the progressive outgrowth of antigenic skin tumors. PMID:11861222

  8. Parasitic suppressing circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, J. T.; Raposa, F. L. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A circuit for suppressing parasitic oscillations across an inductor operating in a resonant mode is described. The circuit includes a switch means and resistive means connected serially across the inductor. A unidirectional resistive-capacitive network is also connected across the inductor and to the switch means to automatically render the switch means conducting when inductive current through the inductor ceases to flow.

  9. A spray-suppression model for turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect

    DESJARDIN,PAUL E.; TIESZEN,SHELDON R.; GRITZO,LOUIS A.

    2000-02-14

    A spray-suppression model that captures the effects of liquid suppressant on a turbulent combusting flow is developed and applied to a turbulent diffusion flame with water spray suppression. The spray submodel is based on a stochastic separated flow approach that accounts for the transport and evaporation of liquid droplets. Flame extinguishment is accounted for by using a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR) submodel of turbulent combustion. PSR pre-calculations of flame extinction times are determined using CHEMKIN and are compared to local turbulent time scales of the flow to determine if local flame extinguishment has occurred. The PSR flame extinguishment and spray submodels are incorporated into Sandia's flow fire simulation code, VULCAN, and cases are run for the water spray suppression studies of McCaffrey for turbulent hydrogen-air jet diffusion flames. Predictions of flame temperature decrease and suppression efficiency are compared to experimental data as a function of water mass loading using three assumed values of drop sizes. The results show that the suppression efficiency is highly dependent on the initial droplet size for a given mass loading. A predicted optimal suppression efficiency was observed for the smallest class of droplets while the larger drops show increasing suppression efficiency with increasing mass loading for the range of mass loadings considered. Qualitative agreement to the experiment of suppression efficiency is encouraging, however quantitative agreement is limited due to the uncertainties in the boundary conditions of the experimental data for the water spray.

  10. High polar organic-inorganic hybrid coating stir bar sorptive extraction combined with high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the speciation of seleno-amino acids and seleno-oligopeptides in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiangju; Hu, Bin; He, Man; Chen, Beibei

    2012-09-21

    In this work, partially sulfonated polystyrene-titania (PSP-TiO(2)) organic-inorganic hybrid stir bar coating was prepared by sol-gel and blending methods, and a new method of PSP-TiO(2) coating stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE)-high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was established for the analysis of seleno-amino acids (selenocystine (SeCys(2)), methylseleno-cysteine (MeSeCys), selenomethionine (SeMet) and selenoethionine (SeEt)) and seleno-oligopeptides (γ-glutamyl-Se-methyl-selenocysteine (γ-GluMeSeCys) and selenodiglutathione (GS-Se-SG)) in biological samples. The prepared high polar PSP-TiO(2) hybrid coating avoided the swelling of PSP and cracking of TiO(2) coating by combining the good film-forming property of PSP with the high mechanical strength of TiO(2). The scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed that no obvious swelling and damage occurred for the PSP-TiO(2) hybrid stir bar coating after 30 extraction/desorption cycles. The preparation reproducibility of PSP-TiO(2) coated stir bar, evaluated with the relative standard deviations (RSDs), was in the range of 6.7-12.6% (n=5) in one batch, and 9.9-17.6% (n=7) among different batches. The limits of detection (LODs) of the developed method for six target selenium species were in the range of 50.2-185.5 ngL(-1) (as (77)Se) and 45.9-158.8 ngL(-1) (as (82)Se) with the RSDs within 4.9-11.7%. The dynamic linear range was found to cover three orders of magnitude with correlation coefficient of 0.9995-0.9999. The developed method was applied for the analysis of Certified Reference Material SELM-1 selenium enriched yeast and the determined values were in good agreement with the certified values. The method has also been applied for the analysis of seleno-amino acids and seleno-oligopeptides in human urine and garlic samples. Different from the conventional organic polymer SBSE coatings (such as polydimethylsiloxane, PDMS), the extraction mechanism

  11. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.; Townsend, Harold E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

  12. Pressure suppression containment system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

    1994-03-15

    A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

  13. Menstrual suppression: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hillard, Paula Adams

    2014-01-01

    Menstrual suppression to provide relief of menstrual-related symptoms or to manage medical conditions associated with menstrual morbidity or menstrual exacerbation has been used clinically since the development of steroid hormonal therapies. Options range from the extended or continuous use of combined hormonal oral contraceptives, to the use of combined hormonal patches and rings, progestins given in a variety of formulations from intramuscular injection to oral therapies to intrauterine devices, and other agents such as gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonists. The agents used for menstrual suppression have variable rates of success in inducing amenorrhea, but typically have increasing rates of amenorrhea over time. Therapy may be limited by side effects, most commonly irregular, unscheduled bleeding. These therapies can benefit women’s quality of life, and by stabilizing the hormonal milieu, potentially improve the course of underlying medical conditions such as diabetes or a seizure disorder. This review addresses situations in which menstrual suppression may be of benefit, and lists options which have been successful in inducing medical amenorrhea. PMID:25018654

  14. Vibrotactile suppression of tinnitus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenhardt, Martin L.

    2002-05-01

    At the Society's 142nd meeting, the efficacy of high frequency bone conducted stimulation in suppressing tinnitus was presented. The hypothesized mechanism was the reprogramming of frequency tuning of auditory neurons in the central nervous system, secondarily to peripheral hearing loss. This mechanism is unlikely in cases of tinnitus in the presence of normal audiometric sensitivity. There is the possibility that hearing loss above 10 kHz can play a role in tinnitus, an association not thoroughly explored. Somatomotor stimulation influencing the quality of tinnitus has been reported, as have interconnections of the auditory and somatosensory systems. There would appear to be an evolutionary advantage of linking the sensorimotor organization of the external ear and the auditory function of the brainstem in sound localization. Thus, stimulation of the pinna and post auricular area may be a means of suppressing tinnitus. To that end a thin aluminum ceramic bimorph was constructed to fit on the inner surface of the pinna. When driven by low (<100 Hz) and high (>10 kHz) frequencies multiplied by MHz carriers, demodulation in the skin resulted in vibrotactile stimulation. Tactile stimulation was an adjunct to the high frequencies resulting in a multimodal suppressive effect in a small pilot study.

  15. Oligopeptide cyclophilin inhibitors: a reassessment.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Michael; Jahreis, Günther; Kahlert, Viktoria; Lücke, Christian; Fischer, Gunter

    2011-11-01

    Potent cyclophilin A (CypA) inhibitors such as non-immunosuppressive cyclosporin A (CsA) derivatives have been already used in clinical trials in patients with viral infections. CypA is a peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) that catalyzes slow prolyl bond cis/trans interconversions of the backbone of substrate peptides and proteins. In this study we investigate whether the notoriously low affinity inhibitory interaction of linear proline-containing peptides with the active site of CypA can be increased through a combination of a high cis/trans ratio and a negatively charged C-terminus as has been recently reported for Trp-Gly-Pro. Surprisingly, isothermal titration calorimetry did not reveal formation of an inhibitory CypA/Trp-Gly-Pro complex previously described within a complex stability range similar to CsA, a nanomolar CypA inhibitor. Moreover, despite of cis content of 41% at pH 7.5 Trp-Gly-Pro cannot inhibit CypA-catalyzed standard substrate isomerization up to high micromolar concentrations. However, in the context of the CsA framework a net charge of -7 clustered at the amino acid side chain of position 1 resulted in slightly improved CypA inhibition. PMID:21963115

  16. Next generation fire suppressants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Jerry A.

    1995-01-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral ban microprocessors controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  17. Next generation fire suppressants

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.A.

    1995-03-01

    Spectrex, Inc., located in Cedar Grove, NJ is a manufacturer of fire detection and suppression equipment. Spectrex is one of the original pioneers in high speed fire detection and suppression systems for combat vehicles. Spectrex has installed fire suppressions systems in thousands of combat vehicles and ships throughout the world. Additionally, they manufacture flame explosion detectors, ship damage control systems, and optical gas and vapor detectors. The culmination of several years of research and development has recently produced an innovative electro-optical continuous monitoring systems called SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) and SAFEYE that provide fast and reliable gas, vapor, aerosol, flame, and explosion detection. SharpEye 20/20I IR(sup 3) is a self-contained triple spectrum flame detector which scans for oscillating IR radiation (1 to 10 Hz) in the spectral bands ranging from 4.0 to 5.0 microns and uses programmed algorithms to check the ratio and correlation of data received by the three sensors to make the system highly immune to false alarms. It is extremely sensitive as it can detect a 1 x 1 square foot gasoline pan fire at 200 feet in less than 3 seconds. The sensitivity is user programmable, offering 4 ranges of detection. SAFEYE is comprised of a selected number of multispectral band microprocessor controlled detectors which are in communication with one or more radiation sources that is projected along a 600 feet optical path. The signals from the selected narrow bands are processed and analyzed by highly sophisticated algorithms. It is ideal for high risk, remote, large areas such as petroleum and chemical manufacturing sites, waste dumps, aircraft cargo bays, and ship compartments. The SAFEYE will perform direct readings of the presence or rate of rise of concentrations of gases, vapors, or aerosols at the range of parts per million and provide alarms at various set points at different levels of concentrations.

  18. Suppression of flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An active aerodynamic control system to control flutter over a large range of oscillatory frequencies is described. The system is not affected by mass, stiffness, elastic axis, or center of gravity location of the system, mode of vibration, or Mach number. The system consists of one or more pairs of leading edge and trailing edge hinged or deformable control surfaces, each pair operated in concert by a stability augmentation system. Torsion and bending motions are sensed and converted by the stability augmentation system into leading and trailing edge control surface deflections which produce lift forces and pitching moments to suppress flutter.

  19. Planck-suppressed operators

    SciTech Connect

    Assassi, Valentin; Baumann, Daniel; Green, Daniel; McAllister, Liam E-mail: dbaumann@damtp.cam.ac.uk E-mail: mcallister@cornell.edu

    2014-01-01

    We show that the recent Planck limits on primordial non-Gaussianity impose strong constraints on light hidden sector fields coupled to the inflaton via operators suppressed by a high mass scale Λ. We study a simple effective field theory in which a hidden sector field is coupled to a shift-symmetric inflaton via arbitrary operators up to dimension five. Self-interactions in the hidden sector lead to non-Gaussianity in the curvature perturbations. To be consistent with the Planck limit on local non-Gaussianity, the coupling to any hidden sector with light fields and natural cubic couplings must be suppressed by a very high scale Λ > 10{sup 5}H. Even if the hidden sector has Gaussian correlations, nonlinearities in the mixing with the inflaton still lead to non-Gaussian curvature perturbations. In this case, the non-Gaussianity is of the equilateral or orthogonal type, and the Planck data requires Λ > 10{sup 2}H.

  20. Giant suppression of flux-flow resistivity in heavy-ion irradiated Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3O10 films - Influence of linear defects on vortex transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budhani, R. C.; Suenaga, M.; Liou, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    A large shift of the onset of flux-flow resistivity and the irreversibility line H(irr)(T) to higher temperatures is observed in Tl2Ba2Ca2Cu3O10 films containing linear defects created by Ag(+21) ion irradiation. The H(irr)(T), which has a characteristic L shape in highly anisotropic Tl and Bi based cuprates, becomes more like that of YBa2Cu3O7 in the presence of these defects. The Jc at 77 K also shows a large increase as a result of flux localization at the defects. The transport data indicate that in the H-T plane above H(irr)(T) of the unirradiated material, an ensemble of unoccupied defects is required for effective pinning of each flux line in the system.

  1. Photoperiodic Suppression of Drug Reinstatement

    PubMed Central

    Sorg, Barbara A.; Stark, Gemaine; Sergeeva, Anna; Jansen, Heiko T.

    2011-01-01

    The rewarding influence of drugs of abuse varies with time of day and appears to involve interactions between the circadian and the mesocorticolimbic dopamine systems. The circadian system is also intimately involved in measuring daylength. Thus, the present study examined the impact of changing daylength (photoperiod) on cocaine-seeking behaviors. Male Sprague Dawley rats were trained and tested on a 12L:12D light:dark schedule for cocaine-induced reinstatement of conditioned place preference (CPP) at three times of day (Zeitgeber time (ZT): 4, 12, and 20) to determine a preference score. Rats were then shifted to either shorter (6L:18D) or longer (18L:6D) photoperiods and then to constant conditions, re-tested for cocaine-induced reinstatement under each different condition, and then returned to their original photoperiod (12L:12D) and tested once more. Rats exhibited a circadian profile of preference score in constant darkness with a peak at 12h after lights-off. At both ZT4 and ZT20, but not at ZT12, shorter photoperiods profoundly suppressed cocaine reinstatement, which did not recover even after switching back to 12L:12D. In contrast, longer photoperiods did not alter reinstatement. Separate studies showed that the suppression of cocaine reinstatement was not due to repeated testing. In an additional experiment, we examined the photoperiodic regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter (DAT) proteins in drug-naive rats. These results revealed photoperiodic modulation of proteins in the prefrontal cortex and dorsal striatum, but not in the nucleus accumbens or ventral tegmental area. Together, these findings add further support to the circadian genesis of cocaine-seeking behaviors and demonstrate that drug-induced reinstatement is modulated by photoperiod. Furthermore, the results suggest that photoperiod partly contributes to the seasonal expression of certain drug-related behaviors in humans living at different latitudes and thus our

  2. Factors influencing dust suppressant effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, C.R.; Eisele, T.C.; Chesney, D.J.; Kawatra, S.K.

    2008-11-15

    Water sprays are a common method used to reduce particulate matter (PM) emissions. Various factors such as wettability, surface area coverage, fine particle engulfment rates, interparticle adhesion forces, suppressant penetration and suppressant longevity have all been suggested as critical factors in achieving effective PM control. However, it has not been established which of these factors are the most important. Experimental work indicated that suppressant penetration is the most critical of these factors. The length of time after application that suppressants were effective was also improved by using hygroscopic reagents that retained moisture to prevent evaporation. Maximizing suppressant penetration and improving suppressant longevity led to an average 86% reduction in PM10 concentrations in laboratory dust tower tests.

  3. ZERO SUPPRESSION FOR RECORDERS

    DOEpatents

    Fort, W.G.S.

    1958-12-30

    A zero-suppression circuit for self-balancing recorder instruments is presented. The essential elements of the circuit include a converter-amplifier having two inputs, one for a reference voltage and the other for the signal voltage under analysis, and a servomotor with two control windings, one coupled to the a-c output of the converter-amplifier and the other receiving a reference input. Each input circuit to the converter-amplifier has a variable potentiometer and the sliders of the potentiometer are ganged together for movement by the servoinotor. The particular noveity of the circuit resides in the selection of resistance values for the potentiometer and a resistor in series with the potentiometer of the signal circuit to ensure the full value of signal voltage variation is impressed on a recorder mechanism driven by servomotor.

  4. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1994-10-04

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein. 3 figs.

  5. Interference suppression of SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanov, V P

    2011-01-24

    The theory of three-wave SRS is developed, which takes into account nonlinear dispersion of a medium for arbitrary phases of the pump waves at the input to the medium. The effect of interference suppression of SRS is predicted for values of the total phase of the three-wave pump (2n+1){pi} (n=0, {+-}1, {+-}2...), the effect being caused by the destructive interference of polarisations of the nonresonant dipole-allowed transitions. The relation between the contributions of the linear and nonlinear dispersions to the SRS is found. It is shown that at a sufficiently large wave detuning, the anti-Stokes wave amplitude experiences spatial oscillations. (nonlinear-optics phenomena)

  6. Pressure suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1994-01-01

    A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein.

  7. Optical frequency tripling with improved suppression and sideband selection.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Manoj P; Medeiros, Maria C R; Laurêncio, Paula; Mitchell, John E

    2011-12-12

    A novel optical dispersion tolerant millimetre-wave radio-over-fibre system using optical frequency tripling technique with enhanced and selectable sideband suppression is demonstrated. The implementation utilises cascaded optical modulators to achieve either an optical single sideband (OSSB) or double sideband-suppressed carrier (DSB-SC) signal with high sideband suppression. Our analysis and simulation results indicate that the achievable suppression ratio of this configuration is only limited by other system factors such as optical noise and drifting of the operational conditions. The OSSB transmission system performance is assessed experimentally by the transport of 4 WiMax channels modulating a 10 GHz optical upconverted RF carrier as well as for optical frequency doubling and tripling. The 10 GHz and tripled carrier at 30 GHz are dispersion tolerant resulting both in an average relative constellation error (RCE) of -28.7 dB after 40 km of fibre. PMID:22274056

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR FIRE SUPPRESSANT FLUID FLOW.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of the project is to develop a computer code capable of predicting single and two phase hydrodynamic behavior of fire suppressant fluids during transport through piping systems. This new code will be able to predict pressure losses and flow rates for a wide variety ...

  9. Suppression and restoration of primordial germ cell marker gene expression in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, using knockdown constructs regulated by copper transport protein gene promoters: Potential for reversible transgenic sterilization.

    PubMed

    Su, Baofeng; Shang, Mei; Grewe, Peter M; Patil, Jawahar G; Peatman, Eric; Perera, Dayan A; Cheng, Qi; Li, Chao; Weng, Chia-Chen; Li, Ping; Liu, Zhanjiang; Dunham, Rex A

    2015-12-01

    Complementary DNA overexpression and short hairpin RNA interference approaches were evaluated for decreasing expression of primordial germ cell (PGC) marker genes and thereby sterilizing channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, by delivering knockdown constructs driven by a constitutive promoter from yeast and a copper transport protein gene into fish embryos by electroporation. Two PGC marker genes, nanos and dead end, were the target knockdown genes, and their expressions, along with that of an off-target gene, vasa, were evaluated temporally using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Copper sulfate was evaluated as a repressor compound. Some of the constructs knocked down PGC marker gene expression, and some of the constructs were partially repressed by application of 0.1-ppm copper sulfate. When the rate of sexual maturity was compared for three-year-old broodfish that had been exposed to the sterilizing constructs during embryologic development and controls that had not been exposed, several treatments had reduced sexual maturity for the exposed fish. Of two promoter systems evaluated, the one which had been designed to be less sensitive to copper generally was more effective at achieving sterilization and more responsive to repression. Knockdown constructs based on 3' nanos short hairpin RNA interference appeared to result in the best repression and restoration of normal sexual maturity. We conclude that these copper-based systems exhibited good potential for repressible transgenic sterilization. Optimization of this system could allow environmentally safe application of transgenic technology and might be applicable to other applications for aquatic organisms. PMID:26341409

  10. Pathways of Transport Protein Evolution: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Vincent H.; Lee, Jong-Hoon; Silverio, Abe; Chan, Henry; Gomolplitinant, Kenny M.; Povolotsky, Tatyana L.; Orlova, Ekaterina; Sun, Eric I.; Welliver, Carl H.; Saier, Milton H.

    2014-01-01

    We herein report recent advances in our understanding of transport protein evolution. The Drug-Metabolite Transporter (DMT) superfamily (TC# 2.A.7) arose from a 2TMS precursor to give 4TMS proteins which then added one and duplicated to give 10. The proposed pathway is 2 –> 4 –> 5 –> 10. This superfamily provides a rare example where all proposed topological intermediates in this evolutionary pathway have been identified in current protein databases. Another family, the Oligopeptide Transporter (OPT) family (TC# 2.A.67), also started with a 2 TMS peptide precursor, but it followed the pathway: Only 16 and 17 TMS OPT family members have been identified in current databases. The TRIC family of K+ channels, characterized in animals, arose via the pathway: where the seventh TMS was added c-terminally to the 6 TMS precursor that resulted from a 3 TMS duplication. Surprisingly, animal TRIC channels proved to have numerous 7 TMS homologues in prokaryotes, none of which had been identified previously. We found that two families of integral membrane proteins gave rise to multiple current topological types. Members of the SdpC killer factor immunity protein family, SdpI (TC# 9.A.32) probably arose via the pathway: while members of the Heme Handling Protein (HHP) Family (TC# 9.B.14) arose via the pathway: Predictions are also made for an evolutionary pathway giving rise to the seven topological types of P-type ATPases so far identified in the P-ATPase superfamily. Finally, the ubiquitous CDF carriers (TC# 1.A.4) of 6TMSs probably gave rise to CRAC channels of 4TMSs by loss of the first two TMSs an unusual example of retroevolution. PMID:21194372

  11. An Alternative to Thought Suppression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boice, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "Setting free the bears: Escape from thought suppression," by D. M. Wegner (see record 2011-25622-008). While Wegner supposed that we might have to learn to live with bad thoughts, the present author discusses the use of imagination and guided imagery as an alternative to forced thought suppression.

  12. STRV Cryocooler Tip Motion Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R.; Ross, R. G., Jr.; Johnson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV-1b) scheduled to fly at the beginning of June 1994, has a cryocooler vibration suppression experiment aboard doing motion suppression of the tip of the coldfinger. STRV-1b is a bread box sized satellite to be launched on the next flight of the Ariane-4.

  13. Nonanesthetics can suppress learning.

    PubMed

    Kandel, L; Chortkoff, B S; Sonner, J; Laster, M J; Eger, E I

    1996-02-01

    Nonanesthetic gases or vapors do not abolish movement in response to noxious stimuli despite partial pressures and affinities for lipids that would, according to the Meyer-Overton hypothesis, predict such abolition. We investigated whether nonanesthetics depress learning and memory (i.e., provide amnesia). To define learning, we used a "fear-potentiated startle paradigm": rats trained to associate light with a noxious stimulus (footshock) will startle more, as measured by an accelerometer, when a startle-eliciting stimulus (e.g., a noise) is paired with light than when the startle-eliciting stimulus is presented alone. We imposed light-shock pairings on 98 rats under three conditions: no anesthesia (control); 0.20, 0.29, and 0.38 times the minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) of desflurane; or two nonanesthetics (1,2-dichloroperfluorocyclobutane and perfluoropentane) at partial pressures predicted from their lipid solubilities to be between 0.2 and 1 MAC. Desflurane produced a dose-related depression of learning with abolition of learning at 0.28 MAC. Perfluoropentane at 0.2-predicted MAC had the same effect as 0.28 MAC desflurane. 1,2-Dichloroperfluorocyclobutane at 0.5- to 1-predicted MAC abolished learning. Because nonanesthetics suppress learning but not movement (the two critical components of anesthesia), they may prove useful in discriminating between mechanisms and sites of action of anesthetics. PMID:8561335

  14. Inducing amnesia through systemic suppression

    PubMed Central

    Hulbert, Justin C.; Henson, Richard N.; Anderson, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal damage profoundly disrupts the ability to store new memories of life events. Amnesic windows might also occur in healthy people due to disturbed hippocampal function arising during mental processes that systemically reduce hippocampal activity. Intentionally suppressing memory retrieval (retrieval stopping) reduces hippocampal activity via control mechanisms mediated by the lateral prefrontal cortex. Here we show that when people suppress retrieval given a reminder of an unwanted memory, they are considerably more likely to forget unrelated experiences from periods surrounding suppression. This amnesic shadow follows a dose-response function, becomes more pronounced after practice suppressing retrieval, exhibits characteristics indicating disturbed hippocampal function, and is predicted by reduced hippocampal activity. These findings indicate that stopping retrieval engages a suppression mechanism that broadly compromises hippocampal processes and that hippocampal stabilization processes can be interrupted strategically. Cognitively triggered amnesia constitutes an unrecognized forgetting process that may account for otherwise unexplained memory lapses following trauma. PMID:26977589

  15. Inducing amnesia through systemic suppression.

    PubMed

    Hulbert, Justin C; Henson, Richard N; Anderson, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal damage profoundly disrupts the ability to store new memories of life events. Amnesic windows might also occur in healthy people due to disturbed hippocampal function arising during mental processes that systemically reduce hippocampal activity. Intentionally suppressing memory retrieval (retrieval stopping) reduces hippocampal activity via control mechanisms mediated by the lateral prefrontal cortex. Here we show that when people suppress retrieval given a reminder of an unwanted memory, they are considerably more likely to forget unrelated experiences from periods surrounding suppression. This amnesic shadow follows a dose-response function, becomes more pronounced after practice suppressing retrieval, exhibits characteristics indicating disturbed hippocampal function, and is predicted by reduced hippocampal activity. These findings indicate that stopping retrieval engages a suppression mechanism that broadly compromises hippocampal processes and that hippocampal stabilization processes can be interrupted strategically. Cognitively triggered amnesia constitutes an unrecognized forgetting process that may account for otherwise unexplained memory lapses following trauma. PMID:26977589

  16. Sound can suppress visual perception.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, Souta; Ide, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    In a single modality, the percept of an input (e.g., voices of neighbors) is often suppressed by another (e.g., the sound of a car horn nearby) due to close interactions of neural responses to these inputs. Recent studies have also suggested that close interactions of neural responses could occur even across sensory modalities, especially for audio-visual interactions. However, direct behavioral evidence regarding the audio-visual perceptual suppression effect has not been reported in a study with humans. Here, we investigated whether sound could have a suppressive effect on visual perception. We found that white noise bursts presented through headphones degraded visual orientation discrimination performance. This auditory suppression effect on visual perception frequently occurred when these inputs were presented in a spatially and temporally consistent manner. These results indicate that the perceptual suppression effect could occur across auditory and visual modalities based on close and direct neural interactions among those sensory inputs. PMID:26023877

  17. Effect of Proline-Containing Oligopeptides PGP and RGP on Proliferative and Protein-Synthesizing Activity of Cultured Pulmonary Fibroblasts under Conditions of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Tolstenok, I V; Fleishman, M Yu; Sazonova, E N; Lebed'ko, O A; Maltseva, I M; Myasoedov, N F; Timoshin, S S

    2016-05-01

    We studied the effect of glyprolines Pro-Gly-Pro (PGP) and Arg-Gly-Pro (RGP) on the primary culture of pulmonary fibroblasts from newborn albino rats under normal conditions and during oxidative stress. Under physiological conditions, the peptides had no effect on parameters of cell division. Hydrogen peroxide induced intensive oxidative stress accompanied by suppression of protein-synthesizing function. When hydrogen peroxide was added to the culture containing the test peptides, correction of the oxidative status was observed accompanied by activation of DNA-synthesizing activity and inhibition of lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence. PMID:27265140

  18. Enantioselective Synthesis of (2R, 3S)- and (2S, 3R)-4,4,4-trifluoro-N-Fmoc-O-tert-butyl-threonine and their Racemization-free Incorporation into Oligopeptides via Solid-phase Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Nu; Jiang, Zhong-Xing; Yu, Y. Bruce

    2010-01-01

    An efficient method for the enantioselective synthesis of (2R, 3S)- and (2S, 3R)-4,4,4-trifluoro-N-Fmoc-O-tert-butyl-threonine (tfT) on multi-gram scales was developed. Absolute configurations of the two stereoisomers were ascertained by X-ray crystallography. Racemization-free coupling conditions for the incorporation of tfT into oligopeptides were then explored. For solution-phase synthesis, tfT racemization was not an issue under conventional coupling conditions. For solid-phase synthesis, the following conditions were identified to achieve racemization-free synthesis: if tfT (3.0 eq.) was not the first amino acid to be linked to the resin (1.0 eq.), the condition is: 2.7 eq. DIC/3.0 eq. HOBt as the coupling reagent at 0 °C for 20 h; if tfT (3.0 eq.) was the first amino acid to be linked to the resin (1.0 eq.), then 1.0 eq. of CuCl2 needs to be added to the coupling reagent. PMID:17702025

  19. Coating Thermoelectric Devices To Suppress Sublimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Caillat, Thierry; Fleurial, Jean-Pierre; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    . This was a considerable improvement, considering that uncoated CoSb3 had been found to decompose to form the lowest antimonide at the surface at only 600 C. Evidently, because the mean free path of Sb at the given temperature and pressure was of the order of tens of centimeters, any barrier closer than tens of centimeters (as was the niobium foil) would have suppressed transport of Sb vapor, thereby suppressing sublimation of Sb

  20. Suppressive drug interactions between antifungals.

    PubMed

    de Vos, Marjon G J; Bollenbach, Tobias

    2014-04-24

    In this issue of Chemistry & Biology, Cokol and colleagues report a systematic study of drug interactions between antifungal compounds. Suppressive drug interactions occur more frequently than previously realized and come in different flavors with interesting implications. PMID:24766845

  1. Substrate specificity and mapping of residues critical for transport in the high-affinity glutathione transporter Hgt1p.

    PubMed

    Zulkifli, Mohammad; Yadav, Shambhu; Thakur, Anil; Singla, Shiffalli; Sharma, Monika; Bachhawat, Anand Kumar

    2016-08-01

    The high-affinity glutathione transporter Hgt1p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae belongs to a relatively new and structurally uncharacterized oligopeptide transporter (OPT) family. To understand the structural features required for interaction with Hgt1p, a quantitative investigation of substrate specificity of Hgt1p was carried out. Hgt1p showed a higher affinity for reduced glutathione (GSH), whereas it transported oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and other glutathione conjugates with lower affinity. To identify the residues of Hgt1p critical for substrate binding and translocation, all amino acid residues of the 13 predicted transmembrane domains (TMDs) have been subjected to mutagenesis. Functional evaluation of these 269 mutants by growth and biochemical assay followed by kinetic analysis of the severely defective mutants including previous mutagenic studies on this transporter have led to the identification of N124 (TMD1), V185 (TMD3), Q222, G225 and Y226 (TMD4), P292 (TMD5), Y374 (TMD6), L429 (TMD7) and F523 and Q526 (TMD9) as critical for substrate binding with at least 3-fold increase in Km upon mutagenesis to alanine. In addition residues Y226 and Y374 appeared to be important for differential substrate specificity. An ab initio model of Hgt1p was built and refined using these mutagenic data that yielded a helical arrangement that includes TMD3, TMD4, TMD5, TMD6, TMD7, TMD9 and TMD13 as pore-lining helices with the functionally important residues in a channel-facing orientation. Taken together the results of this study provides the first mechanistic insights into glutathione transport by a eukaryotic high-affinity glutathione transporter. PMID:27252386

  2. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Snoek, Hella Leonie

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  3. Line defect induced conductance suppression in graphene nanojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haidong; Li, Ruixue; Yu, Qiongyan; Kang, Xiubao; Ding, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Line defect induced conductance suppression in graphene nanojunction is investigated by means of Landauer-Bütikker formula and the nonequilibrium Green's function technique. With the increase of the longitudinal size of the device region, the conductance value decreases and tends to form two conductance valleys. Then we prove that the line defect can lead to localize states in the device region, which contributes to conductance valley at the point far away from Dirac point. And the zero conductance at the Dirac point is associated with the edge state localized at the zigzag-edged shoulder of the nanojunctions. The staggered potential can change energy spectrum structure of the device region, and produce strong conductance suppression. The line defect can efficiently enhance the conductance suppression, which can be utilized to realize the electron transport manipulation.

  4. Resolving the mystery of transport within internal transport barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Staebler, G. M.; Belli, E. A.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.; Greenfield, C. M.; Lao, L. L.; Smith, S. P.; Kinsey, J. E.; Grierson, B. A.; Chrystal, C.

    2014-05-15

    The Trapped Gyro-Landau Fluid (TGLF) quasi-linear model [G. M. Staebler, et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 102508 (2005)], which is calibrated to nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations, is now able to predict the electron density, electron and ion temperatures, and ion toroidal rotation simultaneously for internal transport barrier (ITB) discharges. This is a strong validation of gyrokinetic theory of ITBs, requiring multiple instabilities responsible for transport in different channels at different scales. The mystery of transport inside the ITB is that momentum and particle transport is far above the predicted neoclassical levels in apparent contradiction with the expectation from the theory of suppression of turbulence by E×B velocity shear. The success of TGLF in predicting ITB transport is due to the inclusion of ion gyro-radius scale modes that become dominant at high E×B velocity shear and to improvements to TGLF that allow momentum transport from gyrokinetic turbulence to be faithfully modeled.

  5. Visual Surround Suppression in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Tibber, Marc S.; Anderson, Elaine J.; Bobin, Tracy; Antonova, Elena; Seabright, Alice; Wright, Bernice; Carlin, Patricia; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.; Dakin, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    Compared to unaffected observers patients with schizophrenia (SZ) show characteristic differences in visual perception, including a reduced susceptibility to the influence of context on judgments of contrast – a manifestation of weaker surround suppression (SS). To examine the generality of this phenomenon we measured the ability of 24 individuals with SZ to judge the luminance, contrast, orientation, and size of targets embedded in contextual surrounds that would typically influence the target’s appearance. Individuals with SZ demonstrated weaker SS compared to matched controls for stimuli defined by contrast or size, but not for those defined by luminance or orientation. As perceived luminance is thought to be regulated at the earliest stages of visual processing our findings are consistent with a suppression deficit that is predominantly cortical in origin. In addition, we propose that preserved orientation SS in SZ may reflect the sparing of broadly tuned mechanisms of suppression. We attempt to reconcile these data with findings from previous studies. PMID:23450069

  6. The amphetamine appetite suppressant saga.

    PubMed

    2004-02-01

    (1) In 1999, all amphetamine derivatives still sold in France as appetite suppressants were withdrawn from the market because of serious cardiovascular adverse effects. Sibutramine, marketed in France since 2001, is closely related to this group of drugs. (2) The adverse effects shared by these drugs are mainly neuropsychiatric (due to a psychostimulant action) and cardiovascular (arterial hypertension and tachycardia). (3) More specific cardiovascular adverse effects, such as pulmonary hypertension and severe cardiac valve damage, emerged after several years of use. The first reports date back to the 1960s. (4) The pulmonary hypertension associated with appetite suppressants can be fatal or necessitate transplantation. (5) Cardiac valve damage due to appetite suppressants is generally irreversible and sometimes requires surgery. PMID:15055225

  7. Vibration suppression using smart structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Ephrahim; Inman, Daniel J.; Dosch, Jeffrey

    1991-01-01

    The control of structures for vibration suppression is discussed in the context of using smart materials and structures. Here the use of smart structures refers to using embedded piezoelectric devices as both control actuators and sensors. Using embedded sensors and actuators allows great improvements in performance over traditional structures (both passive and active) for vibration suppression. The application of smart structures to three experimental flexible structures is presented. The first is a flexible beam, the second is a flexible beam undergoing slewing motion, the third is a ribbed antenna. A simple model of a piezoelectric actuator/sensor is presented. The equations of motion for each structure is presented. The control issues considered as those associated with multi-input, multi-output control, PID control and LQR control implementation. A modern control analysis illustrates the usefulness of smart structures for vibration suppression.

  8. Background suppression in MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jeffery L.; Beck, Larry W.; Ferguson, David B.; Haw, James F.

    Pulse sequences for suppressing background signals from spinning modules used in magic-angle spinning NMR are described. These pulse sequences are based on spatially selective composite 90° pulses originally reported by Bax, which provide for no net excitation of spins outside the homogeneous region of the coil. We have achieved essentially complete suppression of background signals originating from our Vespel spinning module (which uses a free-standing coil) in both 1H and 13C spectra without notable loss in signal intensity. Successful modification of both Bloch decay and cross-polarization pulse sequences to include spatially selective pulses was essential to acquire background-free spectra for weak samples. Background suppression was also found to be particularly valuable for both T1 and T1 ϱ, relaxation measurements.

  9. Leptin Suppresses Mouse Taste Cell Responses to Sweet Compounds.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ryusuke; Noguchi, Kenshi; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Takahashi, Ichiro; Margolskee, Robert F; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2015-11-01

    Leptin is known to selectively suppress neural and behavioral responses to sweet-tasting compounds. However, the molecular basis for the effect of leptin on sweet taste is not known. Here, we report that leptin suppresses sweet taste via leptin receptors (Ob-Rb) and KATP channels expressed selectively in sweet-sensitive taste cells. Ob-Rb was more often expressed in taste cells that expressed T1R3 (a sweet receptor component) than in those that expressed glutamate-aspartate transporter (a marker for Type I taste cells) or GAD67 (a marker for Type III taste cells). Systemically administered leptin suppressed taste cell responses to sweet but not to bitter or sour compounds. This effect was blocked by a leptin antagonist and was absent in leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice and mice with diet-induced obesity. Blocking the KATP channel subunit sulfonylurea receptor 1, which was frequently coexpressed with Ob-Rb in T1R3-expressing taste cells, eliminated the effect of leptin on sweet taste. In contrast, activating the KATP channel with diazoxide mimicked the sweet-suppressing effect of leptin. These results indicate that leptin acts via Ob-Rb and KATP channels that are present in T1R3-expressing taste cells to selectively suppress their responses to sweet compounds. PMID:26116698

  10. Aging and repeated thought suppression success.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Ann E; Smyth, Frederick L; Beadel, Jessica R; Teachman, Bethany A

    2013-01-01

    Intrusive thoughts and attempts to suppress them are common, but while suppression may be effective in the short-term, it can increase thought recurrence in the long-term. Because intentional suppression involves controlled processing, and many aspects of controlled processing decline with age, age differences in thought suppression outcomes may emerge, especially over repeated thought suppression attempts as cognitive resources are expended. Using multilevel modeling, we examined age differences in reactions to thought suppression attempts across four thought suppression sequences in 40 older and 42 younger adults. As expected, age differences were more prevalent during suppression than during free monitoring periods, with younger adults indicating longer, more frequent thought recurrences and greater suppression difficulty. Further, younger adults' thought suppression outcomes changed over time, while trajectories for older adults' were relatively stable. Results are discussed in terms of older adults' reduced thought recurrence, which was potentially afforded by age-related changes in reactive control and distractibility. PMID:23776442

  11. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Xue, Yongjun

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans.

  12. RAGE Suppresses ABCG1-Mediated Macrophage Cholesterol Efflux in Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Daffu, Gurdip; Shen, Xiaoping; Senatus, Laura; Thiagarajan, Devi; Abedini, Andisheh; Hurtado Del Pozo, Carmen; Rosario, Rosa; Song, Fei; Friedman, Richard A; Ramasamy, Ravichandran; Schmidt, Ann Marie

    2015-12-01

    Diabetes exacerbates cardiovascular disease, at least in part through suppression of macrophage cholesterol efflux and levels of the cholesterol transporters ATP binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and ABCG1. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is highly expressed in human and murine diabetic atherosclerotic plaques, particularly in macrophages. We tested the hypothesis that RAGE suppresses macrophage cholesterol efflux and probed the mechanisms by which RAGE downregulates ABCA1 and ABCG1. Macrophage cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A1 and HDL and reverse cholesterol transport to plasma, liver, and feces were reduced in diabetic macrophages through RAGE. In vitro, RAGE ligands suppressed ABCG1 and ABCA1 promoter luciferase activity and transcription of ABCG1 and ABCA1 through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARG)-responsive promoter elements but not through liver X receptor elements. Plasma levels of HDL were reduced in diabetic mice in a RAGE-dependent manner. Laser capture microdissected CD68(+) macrophages from atherosclerotic plaques of Ldlr(-/-) mice devoid of Ager (RAGE) displayed higher levels of Abca1, Abcg1, and Pparg mRNA transcripts versus Ager-expressing Ldlr(-/-) mice independently of glycemia or plasma levels of total cholesterol and triglycerides. Antagonism of RAGE may fill an important therapeutic gap in the treatment of diabetic macrovascular complications. PMID:26253613

  13. Stimulus Fractionation by Interocular Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Zadbood, Asieh; Lee, Sang-Hun; Blake, Randolph

    2011-01-01

    Can human observers distinguish physical removal of a visible stimulus from phenomenal suppression of that stimulus during binocular rivalry? As so often happens, simple questions produce complex answers, and that is the case in the study reported here. Using continuous flash suppression to produce binocular rivalry, we were able to identify stimulus conditions where most – but not all – people utterly fail to distinguish physical from phenomenal stimulus removal, although we can be certain that those two equivalent perceptual states are accompanied by distinct neural events. More interestingly, we find subtle variants of the task where distinguishing the two states is trivially easy, even for people who utterly fail under the original conditions. We found that stimulus features are differentially vulnerable to suppression. Observers are able to be aware of existence/removal of some stimulus attributes (flicker) but not others (orientation), implying that interocular suppression breaks down the unitary awareness of integrated features belonging to a visual object. These findings raise questions about the unitary nature of awareness and, also, place qualifications on the utility of binocular rivalry as a tool for studying the neural concomitants of conscious visual awareness. PMID:22102839

  14. Charmonium suppression in nuclear collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Gavin, S. |

    1996-11-01

    Measurements of {psi} and {psi}{prime} production from experiment NA50 at the CERN SPS are compared to calculations based on a hadronic model of charmonium suppression developed previously. Data on centrality dependence and total cross sections are in good accord with these predictions. Uncertainties in theoretical quantities such as NA50`s L parameter are discussed.

  15. Suppressing explosive synchronization by contrarians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiyun; Guan, Shuguang; Zou, Yong; Chen, Xiaosong; Liu, Zonghua

    2016-01-01

    Explosive synchronization (ES) has recently received increasing attention and studies have mainly focused on the conditions of its onset so far. However, its inverse problem, i.e. the suppression of ES, has not been systematically studied so far. As ES is usually considered to be harmful in certain circumstances such as the cascading failure of power grids and epileptic seizure, etc., its suppression is definitely important and deserves to be studied. We here study this inverse problem by presenting an efficient approach to suppress ES from a first-order to second-order transition, without changing the intrinsic network structure. We find that ES can be suppressed by only changing a small fraction of oscillators into contrarians with negative couplings and the critical fraction for the transition from the first order to the second order increases with both the network size and the average degree. A brief theory is presented to explain the underlying mechanism. This finding underlines the importance of our method to improve the understanding of neural interactions underlying cognitive processes.

  16. Conditioned suppression, punishment, and aversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme-Johnson, D. W.; Yarczower, M.

    1974-01-01

    The aversive action of visual stimuli was studied in two groups of pigeons which received response-contingent or noncontingent electric shocks in cages with translucent response keys. Presentation of grain for 3 sec, contingent on key pecking, was the visual stimulus associated with conditioned punishment or suppression. The responses of the pigeons in three different experiments are compared.

  17. DENDRITIC POLYMERS AS FIRE SUPPRESSANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes an evaluation of the applicability of one of the latest advances in polymer technology (dendritic polymers) to suppressing fires, one of the greatest survivability threats to military personnel and vehicles. Certain types of alkali and transition metal compl...

  18. Multiple cilia suppress tumour formation.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Primary cilia are cellular structures that have important functions in development and disease. The suppression of multiciliate differentiation of choroid plexus precursors, and maintenance of a single primary cilium by Notch1, is now shown to be involved in choroid plexus tumour formation. PMID:27027488

  19. Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Urbatsch, Todd James

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  20. High temperature suppression of dioxins.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Ming-Xiu; Chen, Tong; Fu, Jian-Ying; Lin, Xiao-Qing; Lu, Sheng-Yong; Li, Xiao-Dong; Yan, Jian-Hua; Buekens, Alfons

    2016-03-01

    Combined Sulphur-Nitrogen inhibitors, such as sewage sludge decomposition gases (SDG), thiourea and amidosulphonic acid have been observed to suppress the de novo synthesis of dioxins effectively. In this study, the inhibition of PCDD/Fs formation from model fly ash was investigated at unusually high temperatures (650 °C and 850 °C), well above the usual range of de novo tests (250-400 °C). At 650 °C it was found that SDG evolving from dried sewage sludge could suppress the formation of 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDD/Fs with high efficiency (90%), both in weight units and in I-TEQ units. Additionally, at 850 °C, three kinds of sulphur-amine or sulphur-ammonium compounds were tested to inhibit dioxins formation during laboratory-scale tests, simulating municipal solid waste incineration. The suppression efficiencies of PCDD/Fs formed through homogeneous gas phase reactions were all above 85% when 3 wt. % of thiourea (98.7%), aminosulphonic acid (96.0%) or ammonium thiosulphate (87.3%) was added. Differences in the ratio of PCDFs/PCDDs, in weight average chlorination level and in the congener distribution of the 17 toxic PCDD/Fs indicated that the three inhibitors tested followed distinct suppression pathways, possibly in relation to their different functional groups of nitrogen. Furthermore, thiourea reduced the (weight) average chlorinated level. In addition, the thermal decomposition of TUA was studied by means of thermogravimetry-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (TG-FTIR) and the presence of SO2, SO3, NH3 and nitriles (N≡C bonds) was shown in the decomposition gases; these gaseous inhibitors might be the primary dioxins suppressants. PMID:26716881

  1. Transportation Planning with Immune System Derived Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Kenji; Yaji, Yasuhito; Ootsuki, John Takuya; Fujimoto, Yasutaka; Sekiguchi, Takashi

    This paper presents an immune system derived approach for planning transportation of materials between manufacturing processes in the factory. Transportation operations are modeled by Petri Net, and divided into submodels. Transportation orders are derived from the firing sequences of those submodels through convergence calculation by the immune system derived excitation and suppression operations. Basic evaluation of this approach is conducted by simulation-based investigation.

  2. Pupil Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stollar, Dewey H.

    The purpose of this NEFP satellite study is to provide an overview of pupil transportation. The first phase of the study discusses the early legal and financial bases for student transportation, the second the current status of student transportation, and the third the future status of student transportation needs and financing for 1980.…

  3. Fire alarm system/fire suppression system for mobile tactical shelters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, F. K.; Lecours, C. A.; Radcliff, O.

    1985-08-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a fire detection/suppression capability for DoD standard family mobile tactical shelters. The systems developed and tested provide complete protection during all employment conditions; in garrison use, storage, transportation, and deployed field conditions. The reports outlines the requirement and the test and evaluation program. Two manufacturers of detection systems and two manufacturers of suppression systems were identified and qualified to meet the fire protection requirements for mobile tactical shelters.

  4. Suppression of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability in the Presence of a Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect

    Ravi Samtaney

    2003-03-21

    We present numerical evidence from two dimensional simulations that the growth of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is suppressed in the presence of a magnetic field. A bifurcation occurs during the refraction of the incident shock on the density interface which transports baroclinically generated vorticity away from the interface to a pair of slow or intermediate magnetosonic shocks. Consequently, the density interface is devoid of vorticity and its growth and associated mixing is completely suppressed.

  5. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Xue, Y.

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans. 13 figs.

  6. M-COPA, a novel Golgi system disruptor, suppresses apoptosis induced by Shiga toxin.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Takayuki; Watanabe-Takahashi, Miho; Shiina, Isamu; Ohashi, Yoshimi; Dan, Shingo; Nishikawa, Kiyotaka; Yamori, Takao; Naito, Mikihiko

    2016-08-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) is a main virulence factor of Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) that contributes to diarrhea and hemorrhagic colitis and occasionally to fatal systemic complications. Therefore, the development of an antidote to neutralize Stx toxicity is urgently needed. After internalization into cells, Stx is transferred to the Golgi apparatus via a retrograde vesicular transport system. We report here that 2-methylcoprophilinamide (M-COPA), a compound that induces disassembly of the Golgi apparatus by inactivating ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (Arf1), suppresses Stx-induced apoptosis. M-COPA inhibited transport of Stx from the plasma membrane to the Golgi apparatus and suppressed degradation of anti-apoptotic proteins and the activation of caspases. These findings suggest that inhibition of Stx retrograde transport by M-COPA could be a novel approach to suppress Stx toxicity. PMID:27302278

  7. Isoform-selective Inhibition of Facilitative Glucose Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Hresko, Richard C.; Kraft, Thomas E.; Tzekov, Anatoly; Wildman, Scott A.; Hruz, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacologic HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) and structurally related oligopeptides are known to reversibly bind and inactivate the insulin-responsive facilitative glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). Several PIs exhibit isoform selectivity with little effect on GLUT1. The ability to target individual GLUT isoforms in an acute and reversible manner provides novel means both to investigate the contribution of individual GLUTs to health and disease and to develop targeted treatment of glucose-dependent diseases. To determine the molecular basis of transport inhibition, a series of chimeric proteins containing transmembrane and cytosolic domains from GLUT1 and GLUT4 and/or point mutations were generated and expressed in HEK293 cells. Structural integrity was confirmed via measurement of N-[2-[2-[2-[(N-biotinylcaproylamino)ethoxy)ethoxyl]-4-[2-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]benzoyl]-1,3-bis(mannopyranosyl-4-yloxy)-2-propylamine (ATB-BMPA) labeling of the chimeric proteins in low density microsome fractions isolated from stably transfected 293 cells. Functional integrity was assessed via measurement of zero-trans 2-deoxyglucose (2-DOG) uptake. ATB-BMPA labeling studies and 2-DOG uptake revealed that transmembrane helices 1 and 5 contain amino acid residues that influence inhibitor access to the transporter binding domain. Substitution of Thr-30 and His-160 in GLUT1 to the corresponding positions in GLUT4 is sufficient to completely transform GLUT1 into GLUT4 with respect to indinavir inhibition of 2-DOG uptake and ATB-BMPA binding. These data provide a structural basis for the selectivity of PIs toward GLUT4 over GLUT1 that can be used in ongoing novel drug design. PMID:24706759

  8. A dendrite-suppressing composite ion conductor from aramid nanofibres.

    PubMed

    Tung, Siu-On; Ho, Szushen; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Ruilin; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2015-01-01

    Dendrite growth threatens the safety of batteries by piercing the ion-transporting separators between the cathode and anode. Finding a dendrite-suppressing material that combines high modulus and high ionic conductance has long been considered a major technological and materials science challenge. Here we demonstrate that these properties can be attained in a composite made from Kevlar-derived aramid nanofibres assembled in a layer-by-layer manner with poly(ethylene oxide). Importantly, the porosity of the membranes is smaller than the growth area of the dendrites so that aramid nanofibres eliminate 'weak links' where the dendrites pierce the membranes. The aramid nanofibre network suppresses poly(ethylene oxide) crystallization detrimental for ion transport, giving a composite that exhibits high modulus, ionic conductivity, flexibility, ion flux rates and thermal stability. Successful suppression of hard copper dendrites by the composite ion conductor at extreme discharge conditions is demonstrated, thereby providing a new approach for the materials engineering of solid ion conductors. PMID:25626170

  9. Altered srf expression in Bacillus subtilis resulting from changes in culture pH is dependent on the Spo0K oligopeptide permease and the ComQX system of extracellular control.

    PubMed

    Cosby, W M; Vollenbroich, D; Lee, O H; Zuber, P

    1998-03-01

    The expression of the srf operon of Bacillus subtilis, encoding surfactin synthetase and the competence regulatory protein ComS, was observed to be reduced when cells were grown in a rich glucose- and glutamine-containing medium in which late-growth culture pH was 5.0 or lower. The production of the surfactin synthetase subunits and of surfactin itself was also reduced. Raising the pH to near neutrality resulted in dramatic increases in srf expression and surfactin production. This apparent pH-dependent induction of srf expression required spo0K, which encodes the oligopeptide permease that functions in cell-density-dependent control of sporulation and competence, but not CSF, the competence-inducing pheromone that regulates srf expression in a Spo0K-dependent manner. Both ComP and ComA, the two-component regulatory pair that stimulates cell-density-dependent srf transcription, were required for optimal expression of srf at low and high pHs, but ComP was not required for pH-dependent srf induction. The known negative regulators of srf, RapC and CodY, were found not to function significantly in pH-dependent srf expression. Late-growth culture supernatants at low pH were not active in inducing srf expression in cells of low-density cultures but were rendered active when their pH was raised to near neutrality. ComQ (and very likely the srf-inducing pheromone ComX) and Spo0K were found to be required for the extracellular induction of srf-lacZ at neutral pH. The results suggest that srf expression, in response to changes in culture pH, requires Spo0K and another, as yet unidentified, extracellular factor. The study also provides evidence consistent with the hypothesis that ComP acts both positively and negatively in the regulation of ComA and that both activities are controlled by the ComX pheromone. PMID:9515911

  10. Suppression of edge-localized modes by magnetic field perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Kleva, Robert G.; Guzdar, Parvez N.

    2010-11-15

    Transport bursts in simulations of edge-localized modes (ELMs) in tokamaks are suppressed by the application of magnetic field perturbations. The amplitude of the applied magnetic field perturbations is characterized by a stochasticity parameter S. When S>1, magnetic flux surfaces are destroyed and the magnetic field lines diffuse in minor radius. As S increases in the simulations, the magnitude of the ELM bursts decreases. The size of bursts is reduced to a very small value while S is still less than unity and most of the magnetic flux surfaces are still preserved. Magnetic field line stochasticity is not a requirement for the stabilization of ELMs by the magnetic field perturbations. The magnetic field perturbations act by suppressing the growth of the resistive ballooning instability that underlies the ELM bursts.

  11. Transport: Introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, William; Rosenberg, Sanders D.

    1992-01-01

    Space transportation requirements for the NASA baseline scenario for future space missions are discussed. Spacecraft/propulsion technologies required for surface-to-orbit, orbit-to-orbit, and surface (lunar) transportation are addressed.

  12. Fire suppression and detection equipment

    SciTech Connect

    E.E. Bates

    2006-01-15

    Inspection and testing guidelines go beyond the 'Code of Federal Regulation'. Title 30 of the US Code of Federal Regulations (30 CFR) contains requirements and references to national standards for inspection, testing and maintenance of fire suppression and detection equipment for mine operators. However, federal requirements have not kept pace with national standards and best practices. The article lists National Fire Protection (NFPA) standards that are referenced by the US Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) in 30 CFR. It then discusses other NFPA Standards excluded from 30 CFR and explains the NFPA standard development process. 2 refs., 3 tabs., 5 photos.

  13. Distracted by cues for suppressed memories.

    PubMed

    Hertel, Paula T; Hayes, Jeffrey A

    2015-06-01

    We examined the potential cost of practicing suppression of negative thoughts on subsequent performance in an unrelated task. Cues for previously suppressed and unsuppressed (baseline) responses in a think/no-think procedure were displayed as irrelevant flankers for neutral words to be judged for emotional valence. These critical flankers were homographs with one negative meaning denoted by their paired response during learning. Responses to the targets were delayed when suppression cues (compared with baseline cues and new negative homographs) were used as flankers, but only following direct-suppression instructions and not when benign substitutes had been provided to aid suppression. On a final recall test, suppression-induced forgetting following direct suppression and the flanker task was positively correlated with the flanker effect. Experiment 2 replicated these findings. Finally, valence ratings of neutral targets were influenced by the valence of the flankers but not by the prior role of the negative flankers. PMID:25904596

  14. Suppression effects on musical and verbal memory.

    PubMed

    Schendel, Zachary A; Palmer, Caroline

    2007-06-01

    Three experiments contrasted the effects of articulatory suppression on recognition memory for musical and verbal sequences. In Experiment 1, a standard/comparison task was employed, with digit or note sequences presented visually or auditorily while participants remained silent or produced intermittent verbal suppression (saying "the") or musical suppression (singing "la"). Both suppression types decreased performance by equivalent amounts, as compared with no suppression. Recognition accuracy was lower during suppression for visually presented digits than during that for auditorily presented digits (consistent with phonological loop predictions), whereas accuracy was equivalent for visually presented notes and auditory tones. When visual interference filled the retention interval in Experiment 2, performance with visually presented notes but not digits was impaired. Experiment 3 forced participants to translate visually presented music sequences by presenting comparison sequences auditorily. Suppression effects for visually presented music resembled those for digits only when the recognition task required sensory translation of cues. PMID:17848022

  15. School Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Executive Educator, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This special section on student transportation offers a case study of a school system that recycles buses for safety drills; articles on fuel-saving strategies, the pros and cons of contracting for transportation services or operating a publicly owned bus fleet, and advice on full cost accounting for transportation costs; and a transportation…

  16. Transport Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Timothy M.; Wuebbles, Donald J.; Boering, Kristie A.; Eckman, Richard S.; Lerner, Jean; Plumb, R. Alan; Rind, David H.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Waugh, Darryn W.; Wei, Chu-Feng

    1999-01-01

    MM II defined a series of experiments to better understand and characterize model transport and to assess the realism of this transport by comparison to observations. Measurements from aircraft, balloon, and satellite, not yet available at the time of MM I [Prather and Remsberg, 1993], provide new and stringent constraints on model transport, and address the limits of our transport modeling abilities. Simulations of the idealized tracers the age spectrum, and propagating boundary conditions, and conserved HSCT-like emissions probe the relative roles of different model transport mechanisms, while simulations of SF6 and C02 make the connection to observations. Some of the tracers are related, and transport diagnostics such as the mean age can be derived from more than one of the experiments for comparison to observations. The goals of the transport experiments are: (1) To isolate the effects of transport in models from other processes; (2) To assess model transport for realistic tracers (such as SF6 and C02) for comparison to observations; (3) To use certain idealized tracers to isolate model mechanisms and relationships to atmospheric chemical perturbations; (4) To identify strengths and weaknesses of the treatment of transport processes in the models; (5) To relate evaluated shortcomings to aspects of model formulation. The following section are included:Executive Summary, Introduction, Age Spectrum, Observation, Tropical Transport in Models, Global Mean Age in Models, Source-Transport Covariance, HSCT "ANOY" Tracer Distributions, and Summary and Conclusions.

  17. ABC transporters and neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Denise M T; Huynh, Tony; Truong, Alan M; Haber, Michelle; Norris, Murray D

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common cancer of infancy and accounts for 15% of all pediatric oncology deaths. Survival rates of high-risk neuroblastoma remain less than 50%, with amplification of the MYCN oncogene the most important aberration associated with poor outcome. Direct transcriptional targets of MYCN include a number of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, of which ABCC1 (MRP1), ABCC3 (MRP3), and ABCC4 (MRP4) are the best characterized. These three transporter genes have been shown to be strongly prognostic of neuroblastoma outcome in primary untreated neuroblastoma. In addition to their ability to efflux a number of chemotherapeutic drugs, evidence suggests that these transporters also contribute to neuroblastoma outcome independent of any role in cytotoxic drug efflux. Endogenous substrates of ABCC1 and ABCC4 that may be potential candidates affecting neuroblastoma biology include molecules such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes. These bioactive lipid mediators have the ability to influence biological processes contributing to cancer initiation and progression, such as angiogenesis, cell signaling, inflammation, proliferation, and migration and invasion. ABCC1 and ABCC4 are thus potential targets for therapeutic suppression in high-risk neuroblastoma, and recently developed small-molecule inhibitors may be an effective strategy in treating aggressive forms of this cancer, as well as other cancers that express high levels of these transporters. PMID:25640269

  18. Water Mist fire suppression experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Water Mist commercial research program is scheduled to fly an investigation on STS-107 in 2002. This investigation will be flown as an Experimental Mounting Structure (EMS) insert into the updated Combustion Module (CM-2), a sophisticated combustion chamber plus diagnostic equipment. (The investigation hardware is shown here mounted in a non-flight frame similar to the EMS.) Water Mist is a commercial research program by the Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space (CCACS), a NASA Commercial Space Center located at the Colorado School of Mines, in Golden, CO and Industry Partner Environmental Engineering Concepts. The program is focused on developing water mist as a replacement for bromine-based chemical fire suppression agents (halons). By conducting the experiments in microgravity, interference from convection currents is minimized and fundamental knowledge can be gained. This knowledge is incorporated into models, which can be used to simulate a variety of physical environments. The immediate objective of the project is to study the effect of a fine water mist on a laminar propagating flame generated in a propane-air mixture at various equivalence ratios. The effects of droplet size and concentration on the speed of the flame front is used as a measure of the effectiveness of fire suppression in this highly controlled experimental environment.

  19. Suppressed epidemics in multirelational networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Elvis H. W.; Wang, Wei; Xu, C.; Tang, Ming; Do, Younghae; Hui, P. M.

    2015-08-01

    A two-state epidemic model in networks with links mimicking two kinds of relationships between connected nodes is introduced. Links of weights w1 and w0 occur with probabilities p and 1 -p , respectively. The fraction of infected nodes ρ (p ) shows a nonmonotonic behavior, with ρ drops with p for small p and increases for large p . For small to moderate w1/w0 ratios, ρ (p ) exhibits a minimum that signifies an optimal suppression. For large w1/w0 ratios, the suppression leads to an absorbing phase consisting only of healthy nodes within a range pL≤p ≤pR , and an active phase with mixed infected and healthy nodes for p pR . A mean field theory that ignores spatial correlation is shown to give qualitative agreement and capture all the key features. A physical picture that emphasizes the intricate interplay between infections via w0 links and within clusters formed by nodes carrying the w1 links is presented. The absorbing state at large w1/w0 ratios results when the clusters are big enough to disrupt the spread via w0 links and yet small enough to avoid an epidemic within the clusters. A theory that uses the possible local environments of a node as variables is formulated. The theory gives results in good agreement with simulation results, thereby showing the necessity of including longer spatial correlations.

  20. Chaos suppression through asymmetric coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragard, J.; Vidal, G.; Mancini, H.; Mendoza, C.; Boccaletti, S.

    2007-12-01

    We study pairs of identical coupled chaotic oscillators. In particular, we have used Roessler (in the funnel and no funnel regimes), Lorenz, and four-dimensional chaotic Lotka-Volterra models. In all four of these cases, a pair of identical oscillators is asymmetrically coupled. The main result of the numerical simulations is that in all cases, specific values of coupling strength and asymmetry exist that render the two oscillators periodic and synchronized. The values of the coupling strength for which this phenomenon occurs is well below the previously known value for complete synchronization. We have found that this behavior exists for all the chaotic oscillators that we have used in the analysis. We postulate that this behavior is presumably generic to all chaotic oscillators. In order to complete the study, we have tested the robustness of this phenomenon of chaos suppression versus the addition of some Gaussian noise. We found that chaos suppression is robust for the addition of finite noise level. Finally, we propose some extension to this research.

  1. Mechanistic insights into PEPT1-mediated transport of a novel antiepileptic, NP-647.

    PubMed

    Khomane, Kailas S; Nandekar, Prajwal P; Wahlang, Banrida; Bagul, Pravin; Shaikh, Naeem; Pawar, Yogesh B; Meena, Chhuttan Lal; Sangamwar, Abhay T; Jain, Rahul; Tikoo, K; Bansal, Arvind K

    2012-09-01

    The present study, in general, is aimed to uncover the properties of the transport mechanism or mechanisms responsible for the uptake of NP-647 into Caco-2 cells and, in particular, to understand whether it is a substrate for the intestinal oligopeptide transporter, PEPT1 (SLC15A1). NP-647 showed a carrier-mediated, saturable transport with Michaelis-Menten parameters K(m) = 1.2 mM and V(max) = 2.2 μM/min. The effect of pH, sodium ion (Na(+)), glycylsarcosine and amoxicillin (substrates of PEPT1), and sodium azide (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase inhibitor) on the flux rate of NP-647 was determined. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies were carried out to investigate molecular interactions of NP-647 with transporter using homology model of human PEPT1. The permeability coefficient (P(appCaco-2)) of NP-647 (32.5 × 10(-6) cm/s) was found to be four times higher than that of TRH. Results indicate that NP-647 is transported into Caco-2 cells by means of a carrier-mediated, proton-dependent mechanism that is inhibited by Gly-Sar and amoxicillin. In turn, NP-647 also inhibits the uptake of Gly-Sar into Caco-2 cells and, together, this evidence suggests that PEPT1 is involved in the process. Docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies indicate high affinity of NP-647 toward PEPT1 binding site as compared to TRH. High permeability of NP-647 over TRH is attributed to its increased hydrophobicity which increases its affinity toward PEPT1 by interacting with the hydrophobic pocket of the transporter through hydrophobic forces. PMID:22779445

  2. Suppression of energetic particle driven instabilities with HHFW heating

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Taylor, G.; Bertelli, N.; Darrow, D. S.; Gorelenkov, N.; Kramer, G.; Liu, D.; Crocker, N. A.; Kubota, S.; White, R.

    2015-01-01

    In plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557] heated with neutral beams, the beam ions typically excite Energetic Particle Modes (EPMs or fishbones), and Toroidal, Global or Compressional Alfvén Eigenmodes (TAE, GAE, CAE). These modes can redistribute the energetic beam ions, altering the beam driven current profile and the plasma heating profile, or they may affect electron thermal transport or cause losses of the beam ions. In this paper we present experimental results where these instabilities, driven by the super-thermal beam ions, are suppressed with the application of High Harmonic Fast Wave heating.

  3. Continuous flash suppression reduces negative afterimages.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Naotsugu; Koch, Christof

    2005-08-01

    Illusions that produce perceptual suppression despite constant retinal input are used to manipulate visual consciousness. Here we report on a powerful variant of existing techniques, continuous flash suppression. Distinct images flashed successively at approximately 10 Hz into one eye reliably suppress an image presented to the other eye. The duration of perceptual suppression is at least ten times greater than that produced by binocular rivalry. Using this tool we show that the strength of the negative afterimage of an adaptor was reduced by half when it was perceptually suppressed by input from the other eye. The more completely the adaptor was suppressed, the more strongly the afterimage intensity was reduced. Paradoxically, trial-to-trial visibility of the adaptor did not correlate with the degree of reduction. Our results imply that formation of afterimages involves neuronal structures that access input from both eyes but that do not correspond directly to the neuronal correlates of perceptual awareness. PMID:15995700

  4. Engineered decoherence: Characterization and suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, Swathi S.; Mahesh, T. S.

    2014-06-01

    Due to omnipresent environmental interferences, quantum coherences inevitably undergo irreversible transformations over certain time scales, thus leading to the loss of encoded information. This process, known as decoherence, has been a major obstacle in realizing efficient quantum information processors. Understanding the mechanism of decoherence is crucial in developing tools to inhibit it. Here we utilize a method proposed by Teklemariam et al. [Phys. Rev. A 67, 062316 (2003), 10.1103/PhysRevA.67.062316] to engineer artificial decoherence in the system qubits by randomly perturbing their surrounding ancilla qubits. Using a two-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance quantum register, we characterize the artificial decoherence by noise spectroscopy and quantum process tomography. Further, we study the efficacy of dynamical decoupling sequences in suppressing the artificial decoherence. Here we describe the experimental results and their comparisons with theoretical simulations.

  5. MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Otsuki, Dai; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Higuchi, Chikahisa

    2015-07-31

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and is activated by its upstream kinase, MAPK kinase 5 (MEK5), which is a member of the MEK family. Although the role of MEK5 has been investigated in several fields, little is known about its role in osteoblastic differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated the role of MEK5 in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. We found that treatment with BIX02189, an inhibitor of MEK5, increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the gene expression of ALP, osteocalcin (OCN) and osterix, as well as it enhanced the calcification of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, osteoblastic cell proliferation decreased at a concentration of greater than 0.5 μM. In addition, knockdown of MEK5 using siRNA induced an increase in ALP activity and in the gene expression of ALP, OCN, and osterix. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type MEK5 decreased ALP activity and attenuated osteoblastic differentiation markers including ALP, OCN and osterix, but promoted cell proliferation. In summary, our results indicated that MEK5 suppressed the osteoblastic differentiation, but promoted osteoblastic cell proliferation. These results implied that MEK5 may play a pivotal role in cell signaling to modulate the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. Thus, inhibition of MEK5 signaling in osteoblasts may be of potential use in the treatment of osteoporosis. - Highlights: • MEK5 inhibitor BIX02189 suppresses proliferation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 knockdown and MEK5 inhibitor promote differentiation of osteoblasts. • MEK5 overexpression inhibits differentiation of osteoblasts.

  6. Genetics of barley hooded suppression.

    PubMed Central

    Roig, Cristina; Pozzi, Carlo; Santi, Luca; Müller, Judith; Wang, Yamei; Stile, Maria Rosaria; Rossini, Laura; Stanca, Michele; Salamini, Francesco

    2004-01-01

    The molecular basis of the barley dominant Hooded (K) mutant is a duplication of 305 bp in intron IV of the homeobox gene Bkn3. A chemical mutagenesis screen was carried out to identify genetical factors that participate in Bkn3 intron-mediated gene regulation. Plants from recurrently mutagenized KK seeds were examined for the suppression of the hooded awn phenotype induced by the K allele and, in total, 41 suK (suppressor of K) recessive mutants were identified. Complementation tests established the existence of five suK loci, and alleles suKB-4, suKC-33, suKD-25, suKE-74, and suKF-76 were studied in detail. All K-suppressed mutants showed a short-awn phenotype. The suK loci have been mapped by bulked segregant analysis nested in a standard mapping procedure based on AFLP markers. K suppressor loci suKB, B, E, and F all map in a short interval of chromosome 7H, while the locus suKD is assigned to chromosome 5H. A complementation test between the four suK mutants mapping on chromosome 7H and the short-awn mutant lks2, located nearby, excluded the allelism between suK loci and lks2. The last experiment made clear that the short-awn phenotype of suK mutants is due to a specific dominant function of the K allele, a function that is independent from the control on hood formation. The suK loci are discussed as candidate participants in the regulation of Bkn3 expression. PMID:15166167

  7. Mechanisms of suppression in mixed allogeneic chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    Sykes, M.; Sachs, D.H.

    1988-08-01

    Cells with the ability to suppress cytotoxic T lymphocyte generation are found in the spleens of whole-body-irradiated (WBI) mixed allogeneic and syngeneic bone marrow transplant recipients in the early weeks after BMT. Previous studies have indicated that suppression is mediated by null cells similar to natural suppressor (NS) cells (1), and have ruled out several possible trivial explanations for the suppressive effect. We report here the results of additional experiments designed to assess possible mechanisms of suppression. We compared the cell populations after 5 days' incubation of cultures containing normal responding splenocytes plus irradiated allogeneic stimulator cells, with or without a cocultured suppressive chimeric splenocyte population. The data indicate that total viable cell yields are only slightly reduced, if at all, in suppressed cultures, but that the proportion of T cells is markedly reduced as measured at the end of the incubation period. Splenocytes from early BMT recipients do not appear to proliferate during the suppression of a mixed lymphocyte culture, and such populations represent only 15% of cells at the end of the 5-day incubation period. Suppression is strongest when the suppressive population is added at the initiation of MLC, and is lost if addition is delayed beyond day 3. Suppression can be overcome by T cell growth factor (TCGF)--and, to a lesser extent, by recombinant IL-2 (rIL-2), although resting suppressive populations do not consume appreciable amounts of these lymphokines. These results therefore suggest that suppression in MLC may occur primarily during the induction of helper T lymphocytes.

  8. Acoustic Suppression Systems and Related Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R. (Inventor); Kern, Dennis L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An acoustic suppression system for absorbing and/or scattering acoustic energy comprising a plurality of acoustic targets in a containment is described, the acoustic targets configured to have resonance frequencies allowing the targets to be excited by incoming acoustic waves, the resonance frequencies being adjustable to suppress acoustic energy in a set frequency range. Methods for fabricating and implementing the acoustic suppression system are also provided.

  9. Crystal Structures of the Extracellular Domain from PepT1 and PepT2 Provide Novel Insights into Mammalian Peptide Transport.

    PubMed

    Beale, John H; Parker, Joanne L; Samsudin, Firdaus; Barrett, Anne L; Senan, Anish; Bird, Louise E; Scott, David; Owens, Raymond J; Sansom, Mark S P; Tucker, Stephen J; Meredith, David; Fowler, Philip W; Newstead, Simon

    2015-10-01

    Mammals obtain nitrogen via the uptake of di- and tri-peptides in the gastrointestinal tract through the action of PepT1 and PepT2, which are members of the POT family of proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters. PepT1 and PepT2 also play an important role in drug transport in the human body. Recent crystal structures of bacterial homologs revealed a conserved peptide-binding site and mechanism of transport. However, a key structural difference exists between bacterial and mammalian homologs with only the latter containing a large extracellular domain, the function of which is currently unknown. Here, we present the crystal structure of the extracellular domain from both PepT1 and PepT2 that reveal two immunoglobulin-like folds connected in tandem, providing structural insight into mammalian peptide transport. Functional and biophysical studies demonstrate that these domains interact with the intestinal protease trypsin, suggesting a role in clustering proteolytic activity to the site of peptide transport in eukaryotic cells. PMID:26320580

  10. Crystal Structures of the Extracellular Domain from PepT1 and PepT2 Provide Novel Insights into Mammalian Peptide Transport

    PubMed Central

    Beale, John H.; Parker, Joanne L.; Samsudin, Firdaus; Barrett, Anne L.; Senan, Anish; Bird, Louise E.; Scott, David; Owens, Raymond J.; Sansom, Mark S.P.; Tucker, Stephen J.; Meredith, David; Fowler, Philip W.; Newstead, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mammals obtain nitrogen via the uptake of di- and tri-peptides in the gastrointestinal tract through the action of PepT1 and PepT2, which are members of the POT family of proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters. PepT1 and PepT2 also play an important role in drug transport in the human body. Recent crystal structures of bacterial homologs revealed a conserved peptide-binding site and mechanism of transport. However, a key structural difference exists between bacterial and mammalian homologs with only the latter containing a large extracellular domain, the function of which is currently unknown. Here, we present the crystal structure of the extracellular domain from both PepT1 and PepT2 that reveal two immunoglobulin-like folds connected in tandem, providing structural insight into mammalian peptide transport. Functional and biophysical studies demonstrate that these domains interact with the intestinal protease trypsin, suggesting a role in clustering proteolytic activity to the site of peptide transport in eukaryotic cells. PMID:26320580

  11. Deconstructing Interocular Suppression: Attention and Divisive Normalization.

    PubMed

    Li, Hsin-Hung; Carrasco, Marisa; Heeger, David J

    2015-10-01

    In interocular suppression, a suprathreshold monocular target can be rendered invisible by a salient competitor stimulus presented in the other eye. Despite decades of research on interocular suppression and related phenomena (e.g., binocular rivalry, flash suppression, continuous flash suppression), the neural processing underlying interocular suppression is still unknown. We developed and tested a computational model of interocular suppression. The model included two processes that contributed to the strength of interocular suppression: divisive normalization and attentional modulation. According to the model, the salient competitor induced a stimulus-driven attentional modulation selective for the location and orientation of the competitor, thereby increasing the gain of neural responses to the competitor and reducing the gain of neural responses to the target. Additional suppression was induced by divisive normalization in the model, similar to other forms of visual masking. To test the model, we conducted psychophysics experiments in which both the size and the eye-of-origin of the competitor were manipulated. For small and medium competitors, behavioral performance was consonant with a change in the response gain of neurons that responded to the target. But large competitors induced a contrast-gain change, even when the competitor was split between the two eyes. The model correctly predicted these results and outperformed an alternative model in which the attentional modulation was eye specific. We conclude that both stimulus-driven attention (selective for location and feature) and divisive normalization contribute to interocular suppression. PMID:26517321

  12. Issues in Numerical Simulation of Fire Suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Lopez, A.R.

    1999-04-12

    This paper outlines general physical and computational issues associated with performing numerical simulation of fire suppression. Fire suppression encompasses a broad range of chemistry and physics over a large range of time and length scales. The authors discuss the dominant physical/chemical processes important to fire suppression that must be captured by a fire suppression model to be of engineering usefulness. First-principles solutions are not possible due to computational limitations, even with the new generation of tera-flop computers. A basic strategy combining computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation techniques with sub-grid model approximations for processes that have length scales unresolvable by gridding is presented.

  13. ISS Update: Burning and Suppression of Solids

    NASA Video Gallery

    ISS Update Commentator Pat Ryan interviews Paul Ferkul, Principal Investigator for the Burning and Suppression of Solids (BASS) experiment, about performing combustion experiments in microgravity. ...

  14. Deconstructing Interocular Suppression: Attention and Divisive Normalization

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hsin-Hung; Carrasco, Marisa; Heeger, David J.

    2015-01-01

    In interocular suppression, a suprathreshold monocular target can be rendered invisible by a salient competitor stimulus presented in the other eye. Despite decades of research on interocular suppression and related phenomena (e.g., binocular rivalry, flash suppression, continuous flash suppression), the neural processing underlying interocular suppression is still unknown. We developed and tested a computational model of interocular suppression. The model included two processes that contributed to the strength of interocular suppression: divisive normalization and attentional modulation. According to the model, the salient competitor induced a stimulus-driven attentional modulation selective for the location and orientation of the competitor, thereby increasing the gain of neural responses to the competitor and reducing the gain of neural responses to the target. Additional suppression was induced by divisive normalization in the model, similar to other forms of visual masking. To test the model, we conducted psychophysics experiments in which both the size and the eye-of-origin of the competitor were manipulated. For small and medium competitors, behavioral performance was consonant with a change in the response gain of neurons that responded to the target. But large competitors induced a contrast-gain change, even when the competitor was split between the two eyes. The model correctly predicted these results and outperformed an alternative model in which the attentional modulation was eye specific. We conclude that both stimulus-driven attention (selective for location and feature) and divisive normalization contribute to interocular suppression. PMID:26517321

  15. Hidden Symmetries, Instabilities, and Current Suppression in Brownian Ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubero, David; Renzoni, Ferruccio

    2016-01-01

    The operation of Brownian motors is usually described in terms of out-of-equilibrium and symmetry-breaking settings, with the relevant spatiotemporal symmetries identified from the analysis of the equations of motion for the system at hand. When the appropriate conditions are satisfied, symmetry-related trajectories with opposite current are thought to balance each other, yielding suppression of transport. The direction of the current can be precisely controlled around these symmetry points by finely tuning the driving parameters. Here we demonstrate, by studying a prototypical Brownian ratchet system, the existence of hidden symmetries, which escape identification by the standard symmetry analysis, and which require different theoretical tools for their revelation. Furthermore, we show that system instabilities may lead to spontaneous symmetry breaking with unexpected generation of directed transport.

  16. Turbulence Suppression by ExB Shear in JET Optimized Shear Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Beer; R.V. Budny; C.D. Challis; G. Conway; C. Gomezano; et al

    1999-07-01

    We calculate microinstability growth rates in JET optimized shear plasmas with a comprehensive gyrofluid model, including sheared E x B flows, trapped electrons, and all dominant ion species in realistic magnetic geometry. We find good correlation between E x B shear suppression of microinstabilities and both the formation and collapse of the internal transport barrier.

  17. Turbulence suppression by E x B shear in JET optimized shear pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, M.A.; Budny, R.V.; Challis, C.D.; Conway, G.

    2000-01-06

    The authors calculate microinstability growth rates in JET optimized shear plasmas with a comprehensive gyrofluid model, including sheared E x B flows, trapped electrons, and all dominant ion species in realistic magnetic geometry. They find good correlation between E x B shear suppression of microinstabilities and both the formation and collapse of the internal transport barrier.

  18. Listeria monocytogenes CtaP is a multifunctional cysteine transport-associated protein required for bacterial pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xayarath, Bobbi; Marquis, Hélène; Port, Gary C.; Freitag, Nancy E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes survives under a myriad of conditions in the outside environment and within the human host where infections can result in severe disease. Bacterial life within the host requires the expression of genes with roles in nutrient acquisition as well as the biosynthesis of bacterial products required to support intracellular growth. A gene product identified as the substrate-binding component of a novel oligopeptide transport system (encoded by lmo0135) was recently shown to be required for L. monocytogenes virulence. Here we demonstrate that lmo0135 encodes a multifunctional protein that is associated with cysteine transport, acid resistance, bacterial membrane integrity, and adherence to host cells. The lmo0135 gene product (designated CtaP, for cysteine transport associated protein) was required for bacterial growth in the presence of low concentrations of cysteine in vitro, but was not required for bacterial replication within the host cytosol. Loss of CtaP increased membrane permeability and acid sensitivity, and reduced bacterial adherence to host cells. ctaP deletion mutants were severely attenuated following intragastric and intravenous inoculation of mice. Taken together, the data presented indicates that CtaP contributes to multiple facets of L. monocytogenes physiology, growth, and survival both inside and outside of animal cells. PMID:19818015

  19. Bone suppression technique for chest radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Zhimin; Xu, Fan; Zhang, Jane; Zhao, Hui; Hobbs, Susan K.; Wandtke, John C.; Sykes, Anne-Marie; Paul, Narinder; Foos, David

    2014-03-01

    High-contrast bone structures are a major noise contributor in chest radiographic images. A signal of interest in a chest radiograph could be either partially or completely obscured or "overshadowed" by the highly contrasted bone structures in its surrounding. Thus, removing the bone structures, especially the posterior rib and clavicle structures, is highly desirable to increase the visibility of soft tissue density. We developed an innovative technology that offers a solution to suppress bone structures, including posterior ribs and clavicles, on conventional and portable chest X-ray images. The bone-suppression image processing technology includes five major steps: 1) lung segmentation, 2) rib and clavicle structure detection, 3) rib and clavicle edge detection, 4) rib and clavicle profile estimation, and 5) suppression based on the estimated profiles. The bone-suppression software outputs an image with both the rib and clavicle structures suppressed. The rib suppression performance was evaluated on 491 images. On average, 83.06% (±6.59%) of the rib structures on a standard chest image were suppressed based on the comparison of computer-identified rib areas against hand-drawn rib areas, which is equivalent to about an average of one rib that is still visible on a rib-suppressed image based on a visual assessment. Reader studies were performed to evaluate reader performance in detecting lung nodules and pneumothoraces with and without a bone-suppression companion view. Results from reader studies indicated that the bone-suppression technology significantly improved radiologists' performance in the detection of CT-confirmed possible nodules and pneumothoraces on chest radiographs. The results also showed that radiologists were more confident in making diagnoses regarding the presence or absence of an abnormality after rib-suppressed companion views were presented

  20. Suppression of fibroblast proliferation by oral spirochetes.

    PubMed Central

    Boehringer, H; Taichman, N S; Shenker, B J

    1984-01-01

    Soluble sonic extracts of several strains of Treponema denticola and Treponema vincentii were examined for their abilities to alter proliferation of both murine and human fibroblasts. We found that sonic extracts of all tested strains of T. denticola caused a dose-dependent inhibition of murine and human fibroblast proliferation when assessed by both DNA synthesis ([3H]thymidine incorporation) and direct cell counts. T. vincentii had only a minimal inhibitory effect at comparable doses. No inhibition was observed when sonic extracts were added simultaneously with [3H]thymidine, indicating that suppression was not due to the presence of excessive amounts of cold thymidine in the extract, nonspecific effects on thymidine utilization by the cells (transport and incorporation), or degradation of label. RNA ([3H]uridine incorporation) and protein ([3H]leucine incorporation) synthesis were similarly altered after exposure to the T. denticola sonic extracts. There was no effect on cell viability as measured by trypan blue exclusion. Inhibition could be reversed by extensive washing of the cells within the first few hours of exposure to sonic extracts. Preliminary characterization and purification indicated that the inhibitory factor(s) is not endotoxin since it is heat labile, and elutes in a single, well-defined peak on a Sephadex G-150 chromatography column corresponding to a molecular weight of approximately 50,000. Since oral spirochetes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontal disorders, it is possible that they contribute to the disease process by inhibition of fibroblast growth and therefore may, at least in part, account for the loss of collagen seen in diseased tissue. PMID:6735466

  1. Suppression of current fluctuations in an intense electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J. R.; Lewellen, J. W.

    2010-10-15

    When an intense beam encounters an aperture, the transmitted current depends on the properties of the beam and the transport channel, as well as those of the aperture itself. In some cases, an increase in the incident beam current will be exactly compensated by an increase in the incident beam area, so that the current density at the aperture remains unchanged. When this occurs, the transmitted beam current becomes independent of changes in the incident beam current, providing a passive means for suppressing current fluctuations in the beam. In this article, a key requirement for the existence of this condition is derived. This requirement is shown to be fulfilled in the case of an idealized uniform focusing channel in the small-signal limit, but to be violated when the current fluctuations are not small. Even in this case, the apertured transport system retains the ability to suppress--but not totally eliminate--fluctuations in the transmitted beam current for a wide range of incident beam currents.

  2. School Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Executive Educator, 1989

    1989-01-01

    A special report on school transportation covers the following topics: (1) a school bus safety update; (2) equipping school buses with motion detectors; (3) state training requirements for school bus drivers; (4) recruiting and retaining drivers; (5) regulations covering underground fuel-storage tanks; and (6) a transportation directory. (MLF)

  3. Transport Phenomena.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCready, Mark J.; Leighton, David T.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the problems created in graduate chemical engineering programs when students enter with a wide diversity of understandings of transport phenomena. Describes a two-semester graduate transport course sequence at the University of Notre Dame which focuses on fluid mechanics and heat and mass transfer. (TW)

  4. 7 CFR 2902.32 - Dust suppressants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dust suppressants. 2902.32 Section 2902.32... Items § 2902.32 Dust suppressants. (a) Definition. Products formulated to reduce or eliminate the spread of dust associated with gravel roads, dirt parking lots, or similar sources of dust,...

  5. Suppressing Irrelevant Information: Knowledge Activation or Inhibition?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Danielle S.; McDaniel, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    In 3 experiments, the authors examined the role of knowledge activation in the suppression of contextually irrelevant meanings for ambiguous homographs. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants with greater baseball knowledge, regardless of reading skill, more quickly suppressed the irrelevant meaning of ambiguous words in baseball-related, but not…

  6. Ferromagnetic resonance probe liftoff suppression apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Thomas J.; Tomeraasen, Paul L.

    1985-01-01

    A liftoff suppression apparatus utilizing a liftoff sensing coil to sense the amount a ferromagnetic resonance probe lifts off the test surface during flaw detection and utilizing the liftoff signal to modulate the probe's field modulating coil to suppress the liftoff effects.

  7. Identifying separate components of surround suppression

    PubMed Central

    Schallmo, Michael-Paul; Murray, Scott O.

    2016-01-01

    Surround suppression is a well-known phenomenon in which the response to a visual stimulus is diminished by the presence of neighboring stimuli. This effect is observed in neural responses in areas such as primary visual cortex, and also manifests in visual contrast perception. Studies in animal models have identified at least two separate mechanisms that may contribute to surround suppression: one that is monocular and resistant to contrast adaptation, and another that is binocular and strongly diminished by adaptation. The current study was designed to investigate whether these two mechanisms exist in humans and if they can be identified psychophysically using eye-of-origin and contrast adaptation manipulations. In addition, we examined the prediction that the monocular suppression component is broadly tuned for orientation, while suppression between eyes is narrowly tuned. Our results confirmed that when center and surrounding stimuli were presented dichoptically (in opposite eyes), suppression was orientation-tuned. Following adaptation in the surrounding region, no dichoptic suppression was observed, and monoptic suppression no longer showed orientation selectivity. These results are consistent with a model of surround suppression that depends on both low-level and higher level components. This work provides a method to assess the separate contributions of these components during spatial context processing in human vision. PMID:26756172

  8. Impacts of suppressing guide on information spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinghong; Zhang, Lin; Ma, Baojun; Wu, Ye

    2016-02-01

    It is quite common that guides are introduced to suppress the information spreading in modern society for different purposes. In this paper, an agent-based model is established to quantitatively analyze the impacts of suppressing guides on information spreading. We find that the spreading threshold depends on the attractiveness of the information and the topology of the social network with no suppressing guides at all. Usually, one would expect that the existence of suppressing guides in the spreading procedure may result in less diffusion of information within the overall network. However, we find that sometimes the opposite is true: the manipulating nodes of suppressing guides may lead to more extensive information spreading when there are audiences with the reversal mind. These results can provide valuable theoretical references to public opinion guidance on various information, e.g., rumor or news spreading.

  9. Adenosine transporters.

    PubMed

    Thorn, J A; Jarvis, S M

    1996-06-01

    1. In mammals, nucleoside transport is an important determinant of the pharmacokinetics, plasma and tissue concentration, disposition and in vivo biological activity of adenosine as well as nucleoside analogues used in antiviral and anticancer therapies. 2. Two broad types of adenosine transporter exist, facilitated-diffusion carriers and active processes driven by the transmembrane sodium gradient. 3. Facilitated-diffusion adenosine carriers may be sensitive (es) or insensitive (ei) to nanomolar concentrations of the transport inhibitor nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBMPR). Dipyridamole, dilazep and lidoflazine analogues are also more potent inhibitors of the es carrier than the ei transporter in cells other than those derived from rat tissues. 4. The es transporter has a broad substrate specificity (apparent Km for adenosine approximately 25 microM in many cells at 25 degrees C), is a glycoprotein with an average apparent Mr of 57,000 in human erythrocytes that has been purified to near homogeneity and may exist in situ as a dimer. However, there is increasing evidence to suggest the presence of isoforms of the es transporter in different cells and species, based on kinetic and molecular properties. 5. The ei transporter also has a broad substrate specificity with a lower affinity for some nucleoside permeants than the es carrier, is genetically distinct from es but little information exists as to the molecular properties of the protein. 6. Sodium-dependent adenosine transport is present in many cell types and catalysed by four distinct systems, N1-N4, distinguished by substrate specificity, sodium coupling and tissue distribution. 7. Two genes have been identified which encode sodium-dependent adenosine transport proteins, SNST1 from the sodium/glucose cotransporter (SGLT1) gene family and the rat intestinal N2 transporter (cNT1) from a novel gene family including a bacterial nucleoside carrier (NupC). Transcripts of cNT1, which encodes a 648-residue protein, are

  10. Burst suppression probability algorithms: state-space methods for tracking EEG burst suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemali, Jessica; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L.; Solt, Ken; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Burst suppression is an electroencephalogram pattern in which bursts of electrical activity alternate with an isoelectric state. This pattern is commonly seen in states of severely reduced brain activity such as profound general anesthesia, anoxic brain injuries, hypothermia and certain developmental disorders. Devising accurate, reliable ways to quantify burst suppression is an important clinical and research problem. Although thresholding and segmentation algorithms readily identify burst suppression periods, analysis algorithms require long intervals of data to characterize burst suppression at a given time and provide no framework for statistical inference. Approach. We introduce the concept of the burst suppression probability (BSP) to define the brain's instantaneous propensity of being in the suppressed state. To conduct dynamic analyses of burst suppression we propose a state-space model in which the observation process is a binomial model and the state equation is a Gaussian random walk. We estimate the model using an approximate expectation maximization algorithm and illustrate its application in the analysis of rodent burst suppression recordings under general anesthesia and a patient during induction of controlled hypothermia. Main result. The BSP algorithms track burst suppression on a second-to-second time scale, and make possible formal statistical comparisons of burst suppression at different times. Significance. The state-space approach suggests a principled and informative way to analyze burst suppression that can be used to monitor, and eventually to control, the brain states of patients in the operating room and in the intensive care unit.

  11. Hydrogen suppresses UO 2 corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbol, Paul; Fors, Patrik; Gouder, Thomas; Spahiu, Kastriot

    2009-08-01

    Release of long-lived radionuclides such as plutonium and caesium from spent nuclear fuel in deep geological repositories will depend mainly on the dissolution rate of the UO 2 fuel matrix. This dissolution rate will, in turn, depend on the redox conditions at the fuel surface. Under oxidative conditions UO 2 will be oxidised to the 1000 times more soluble UO 2.67. This may occur in a repository as the reducing deep groundwater becomes locally oxidative at the fuel surface under the effect of α-radiolysis, the process by which α-particles emitted from the fuel split water molecules. On the other hand, the groundwater corrodes canister iron generating large amounts of hydrogen. The role of molecular hydrogen as reductant in a deep bedrock repository is questioned. Here we show evidence of a surface-catalysed reaction, taking place in the H 2-UO 2-H 2O system where molecular hydrogen is able to reduce oxidants originating from α-radiolysis. In our experiment the UO 2 surface remained stoichiometric proving that the expected oxidation of UO 2.00 to UO 2.67 due to radiolytic oxidants was absent. As a consequence, the dissolution of UO 2 stopped when equilibrium was reached between the solid phase and U 4+ species in the aqueous phase. The steady-state concentration of uranium in solution was determined to be 9 × 10 -12 M, about 30 times lower than previously reported for reducing conditions. Our findings show that fuel dissolution is suppressed by H 2. Consequently, radiotoxic nuclides in spent nuclear fuel will remain immobilised in the UO 2 matrix. A mechanism for the surface-catalysed reaction between molecular hydrogen and radiolytic oxidants is proposed.

  12. MEK5 suppresses osteoblastic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Shoichi; Otsuki, Dai; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Higuchi, Chikahisa

    2015-07-31

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 (ERK5) is a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and is activated by its upstream kinase, MAPK kinase 5 (MEK5), which is a member of the MEK family. Although the role of MEK5 has been investigated in several fields, little is known about its role in osteoblastic differentiation. In this study, we have demonstrated the role of MEK5 in osteoblastic differentiation in mouse preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and bone marrow stromal ST2 cells. We found that treatment with BIX02189, an inhibitor of MEK5, increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the gene expression of ALP, osteocalcin (OCN) and osterix, as well as it enhanced the calcification of the extracellular matrix. Moreover, osteoblastic cell proliferation decreased at a concentration of greater than 0.5 μM. In addition, knockdown of MEK5 using siRNA induced an increase in ALP activity and in the gene expression of ALP, OCN, and osterix. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type MEK5 decreased ALP activity and attenuated osteoblastic differentiation markers including ALP, OCN and osterix, but promoted cell proliferation. In summary, our results indicated that MEK5 suppressed the osteoblastic differentiation, but promoted osteoblastic cell proliferation. These results implied that MEK5 may play a pivotal role in cell signaling to modulate the differentiation and proliferation of osteoblasts. Thus, inhibition of MEK5 signaling in osteoblasts may be of potential use in the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:25998381

  13. Mutual Suppression: Comment on Paulhus et Al. (2004)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Carol

    2008-01-01

    Paulhus, Robins, Trzesniewski, and Tracy ("Multivariate Behavioral Research," 2004, 39, 305-328) suggested that the three types of two-predictor suppression situations--classical suppression, cooperative suppression, and net suppression--can all be considered special cases of mutual suppression, in that the magnitude of each of the two…

  14. Psychopathology and thought suppression: a quantitative review.

    PubMed

    Magee, Joshua C; Harden, K Paige; Teachman, Bethany A

    2012-04-01

    Recent theories of psychopathology have suggested that thought suppression intensifies the persistence of intrusive thoughts, and proposed that difficulty with thought suppression may differ between groups with and without psychopathology. The current meta-analytic review evaluates empirical evidence for difficulty with thought suppression as a function of the presence and specific type of psychopathology. Based on theoretical proposals from the psychopathology literature, diagnosed and analogue samples were expected to show greater recurrence of intrusive thoughts during thought suppression attempts than non-clinical samples. However, results showed no overall differences in the recurrence of thoughts due to thought suppression between groups with and without psychopathology. There was, nevertheless, variation in the recurrence of thoughts across different forms of psychopathology, including relatively less recurrence during thought suppression for samples with symptoms of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, compared to non-clinical samples. However, these differences were typically small and provided only mixed support for existing theories. Implications for cognitive theories of intrusive thoughts are discussed, including proposed mechanisms underlying thought suppression. PMID:22388007

  15. Suppression effects in feature-based attention

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yixue; Miller, James; Liu, Taosheng

    2015-01-01

    Attending to a feature enhances visual processing of that feature, but it is less clear what occurs to unattended features. Single-unit recording studies in middle temporal (MT) have shown that neuronal modulation is a monotonic function of the difference between the attended and neuron's preferred direction. Such a relationship should predict a monotonic suppressive effect in psychophysical performance. However, past research on suppressive effects of feature-based attention has remained inconclusive. We investigated the suppressive effect for motion direction, orientation, and color in three experiments. We asked participants to detect a weak signal among noise and provided a partially valid feature cue to manipulate attention. We measured performance as a function of the offset between the cued and signal feature. We also included neutral trials where no feature cues were presented to provide a baseline measure of performance. Across three experiments, we consistently observed enhancement effects when the target feature and cued feature coincided and suppression effects when the target feature deviated from the cued feature. The exact profile of suppression was different across feature dimensions: Whereas the profile for direction exhibited a “rebound” effect, the profiles for orientation and color were monotonic. These results demonstrate that unattended features are suppressed during feature-based attention, but the exact suppression profile depends on the specific feature. Overall, the results are largely consistent with neurophysiological data and support the feature-similarity gain model of attention. PMID:26067533

  16. Pacing hazards in helicopter aeromedical transport.

    PubMed

    Sumchai, A; Sternbach, G; Eliastam, M; Liem, L B

    1988-05-01

    A 62-year-old man with third-degree atrioventricular block and hemodynamically unstable ventricular tachycardia had a cardiac arrest during helicopter transport to a specialized cardiac care unit. Before transport, his ventricular tachycardia had been successfully terminated by a rapid overdrive pacing technique. The failure of "burst suppression" and the absence of pacer spike artifact on the electrocardiographic monitor raise questions about the potential hazards of using various pacing techniques during helicopter transports. Most significantly, this case points to the possibility of interference by exogenous electromagnetic signals in the medical compartment of the helicopter. PMID:3370099

  17. Kinesin superfamily motor proteins and intracellular transport.

    PubMed

    Hirokawa, Nobutaka; Noda, Yasuko; Tanaka, Yosuke; Niwa, Shinsuke

    2009-10-01

    Intracellular transport is fundamental for cellular function, survival and morphogenesis. Kinesin superfamily proteins (also known as KIFs) are important molecular motors that directionally transport various cargos, including membranous organelles, protein complexes and mRNAs. The mechanisms by which different kinesins recognize and bind to specific cargos, as well as how kinesins unload cargo and determine the direction of transport, have now been identified. Furthermore, recent molecular genetic experiments have uncovered important and unexpected roles for kinesins in the regulation of such physiological processes as higher brain function, tumour suppression and developmental patterning. These findings open exciting new areas of kinesin research. PMID:19773780

  18. Nonexocytotic serotonin release tonically suppresses serotonergic neuron activity

    PubMed Central

    Montalbano, Alberto; Baccini, Gilda; Tatini, Francesca; Palmini, Rolando Berlinguer; Corradetti, Renato

    2015-01-01

    The firing activity of serotonergic neurons in raphe nuclei is regulated by negative feedback exerted by extracellular serotonin (5-HT)o acting through somatodendritic 5-HT1A autoreceptors. The steady-state [5-HT]o, sensed by 5-HT1A autoreceptors, is determined by the balance between the rates of 5-HT release and reuptake. Although it is well established that reuptake of 5-HTo is mediated by 5-HT transporters (SERT), the release mechanism has remained unclear. It is also unclear how selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants increase the [5-HT]o in raphe nuclei and suppress serotonergic neuron activity, thereby potentially diminishing their own therapeutic effect. Using an electrophysiological approach in a slice preparation, we show that, in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), continuous nonexocytotic 5-HT release is responsible for suppression of phenylephrine-facilitated serotonergic neuron firing under basal conditions as well as for autoinhibition induced by SSRI application. By using 5-HT1A autoreceptor-activated G protein–gated inwardly rectifying potassium channels of patched serotonergic neurons as 5-HTo sensors, we show substantial nonexocytotic 5-HT release under conditions of abolished firing activity, Ca2+ influx, vesicular monoamine transporter 2–mediated vesicular accumulation of 5-HT, and SERT-mediated 5-HT transport. Our results reveal a cytosolic origin of 5-HTo in the DRN and suggest that 5-HTo may be supplied by simple diffusion across the plasma membrane, primarily from the dense network of neurites of serotonergic neurons surrounding the cell bodies. These findings indicate that the serotonergic system does not function as a sum of independently acting neurons but as a highly interdependent neuronal network, characterized by a shared neurotransmitter pool and the regulation of firing activity by an interneuronal, yet activity-independent, nonexocytotic mechanism. PMID:25712017

  19. Suppression of dark current through barrier engineer for solution-processed colloidal quantum-dots infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Zhenyu E-mail: jianxu@engr.psu.edu; Liu, Yan; Mo, Chen; Wang, Li; Atalla, Mahmoud R. M.; Liu, Jie; Kurhade, Kandhar K.; Xu, Jian E-mail: jianxu@engr.psu.edu; Hu, Wenjia; Zhang, Wenjun; You, Guanjun; Zhang, Yu

    2015-08-31

    In an attempt to suppress the dark current, the barrier layer engineer for solution-processed PbSe colloidal quantum-dot (CQD) photodetectors has been investigated in the present study. It was found that the dark current can be significantly suppressed by implementing two types of carrier blocking layers, namely, hole blocking layer and electron blocking layer, sandwiched in between two active PbSe CQD layers. Meanwhile no adverse impact has been observed for the photo current. Our study suggests that this improvement resides on the transport pathway created via carrier recombination at intermediate layer, which provides wide implications for the suppression of dark current for infrared photodetectors.

  20. Flutter suppression and gust alleviation using active controls - Review of developments and applications based on the aerodynamic energy concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.

    1978-01-01

    The state of the art of the aerodynamic energy concept, involving the use of active controls for flutter suppression, is reviewed. Applications of the concept include the suppression of external-store flutter of three different configurations of the YF-17 flutter model using a single trailing edge control surface activated by a single fixed-gain control law. Consideration is also given to some initial results concerning the flutter suppression of the 1/20 scale low speed wind-tunnel model of the Boeing 2707-300 supersonic transport using an activated trailing edge control surface.

  1. Integrin endosomal signalling suppresses anoikis

    PubMed Central

    Alanko, Jonna; Mai, Anja; Jacquemet, Guillaume; Schauer, Kristine; Kaukonen, Riina; Saari, Markku; Goud, Bruno; Ivaska, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    to enhanced signalling of co-trafficked receptor tyrosine kinases10, 11 it has remained unclear whether endocytosed active integrins signal in endosomes. Here, we demonstrate that integrin signalling is not restricted to focal adhesions as previously described and that endocytosis is necessary for full ECM-induced, integrin mediated ERK, AKT and FAK signalling. We find that FAK binds directly to and can become activated on purified endosomes. Moreover, the FERM-domain of FAK is able to bind purified integrin containing endosomes, suggesting the potential for integrin signalling complexes to assemble on endosomes after internalization of active integrins. Importantly, FAK is required for anchorage-independent growth and suppression of anoikis 12. Integrin endosomal signalling correlates with reduced anoikis sensitivity in normal cells and anchorage-independent growth and metastasis in breast cancer cells. PMID:26436690

  2. Ligand binding analyses of the putative peptide transporter YjdL from E. coli display a significant selectivity towards dipeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, Heidi A.; Pham, Antony; Hald, Helle; Kastrup, Jette S.; Rahman, Moazur; Mirza, Osman

    2009-11-06

    Proton-dependent oligopeptide transporters (POTs) are secondary active transporters that couple the inwards translocation of di- and tripeptides to inwards proton translocation. Escherichia coli contains four genes encoding the putative POT proteins YhiP, YdgR, YjdL and YbgH. We have over-expressed the previously uncharacterized YjdL and investigated the peptide specificity by means of uptake inhibition. The IC{sub 50} value for the dipeptide Ala-Ala was measured to 22 mM while Ala-Ala-Ala was not able to inhibit uptake. In addition, IC{sub 50} values of 0.3 mM and 1.5 mM were observed for Ala-Lys and Tyr-Ala, respectively, while the alanyl-extended tripeptides Ala-Lys-Ala, Ala-Ala-Lys, Ala-Tyr-Ala and Tyr-Ala-Ala displayed values of 8, >50, 31 and 31 mM, respectively. These results clearly indicate that unlike most POT members characterized to date, including YdgR and YhiP, YjdL shows significantly higher specificity towards dipeptides.

  3. Momentum Injection in Tokamak Plasmas and Transitions to Reduced Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, F. I.; Highcock, E. G.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Barnes, M.

    2011-03-18

    The effect of momentum injection on the temperature gradient in tokamak plasmas is studied. A plausible scenario for transitions to reduced transport regimes is proposed. The transition happens when there is sufficient momentum input so that the velocity shear can suppress or reduce the turbulence. However, it is possible to drive too much velocity shear and rekindle the turbulent transport. The optimal level of momentum injection is determined. The reduction in transport is maximized in the regions of low or zero magnetic shear.

  4. Suppression and retinal correspondence in intermittent exotropia.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, J; Record, C D

    1986-01-01

    Suppression scotomas and retinal projection (retinal correspondence) were measured in six intermittent exotropes during deviation. Measurements used red-green anaglyph stimuli presented on a black background which could be varied from 3.4 minutes of arc to 3 degrees 24'. Results showed non-suppression of all points between the fovea and the diplopia point. Harmonious anomalous retinal correspondence was usually observed. Two subjects had spontaneous changes from anomalous retinal correspondence to normal retinal correspondence without a concurrent change in ocular position. Conventional testing resulted in more variable results in regard to retinal correspondence and suppression, suggesting that non-suppression and anomalous retinal correspondence occur when black backgrounds are used for testing. PMID:3756124

  5. METHOD OF SUPPRESSING GASTROINTESTINAL UREASE ACTIVITY

    DOEpatents

    Visek, W.J.

    1963-04-23

    This patent shows a method of increasing the growth rate of chicks. Certain diacyl substituted ureas such as alloxan, murexide, and barbituric acid are added to their feed, thereby suppressing gastrointestinal urease activity and thus promoting growth. (AEC)

  6. Strangeness suppression in the unquenched quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijker, Roelof; García-Tecocoatzi, Hugo; Santopinto, Elena

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we discuss the strangeness suppression in the proton in the framework of the unquenched quark model. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the values extracted from CERN and JLab experiments.

  7. Attention modulates sensory suppression during back movements.

    PubMed

    Van Hulle, Lore; Juravle, Georgiana; Spence, Charles; Crombez, Geert; Van Damme, Stefaan

    2013-06-01

    Tactile perception is often impaired during movement. The present study investigated whether such sensory suppression also occurs during back movements, and whether this would be modulated by attention. In two tactile detection experiments, participants simultaneously engaged in a movement task, in which they executed a back-bending movement, and a perceptual task, consisting of the detection of subtle tactile stimuli administered to their upper or lower back. The focus of participants' attention was manipulated by raising the probability that one of the back locations would be stimulated. The results revealed that tactile detection was suppressed during the execution of the back movements. Furthermore, the results of Experiment 2 revealed that when the stimulus was always presented to the attended location, tactile suppression was substantially reduced, suggesting that sensory suppression can be modulated by top-down attentional processes. The potential of this paradigm for studying tactile information processing in clinical populations is discussed. PMID:23454431

  8. Quadratic dynamical decoupling with nonuniform error suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Quiroz, Gregory; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2011-10-15

    We analyze numerically the performance of the near-optimal quadratic dynamical decoupling (QDD) single-qubit decoherence errors suppression method [J. West et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 130501 (2010)]. The QDD sequence is formed by nesting two optimal Uhrig dynamical decoupling sequences for two orthogonal axes, comprising N{sub 1} and N{sub 2} pulses, respectively. Varying these numbers, we study the decoherence suppression properties of QDD directly by isolating the errors associated with each system basis operator present in the system-bath interaction Hamiltonian. Each individual error scales with the lowest order of the Dyson series, therefore immediately yielding the order of decoherence suppression. We show that the error suppression properties of QDD are dependent upon the parities of N{sub 1} and N{sub 2}, and near-optimal performance is achieved for general single-qubit interactions when N{sub 1}=N{sub 2}.

  9. Flame Suppression Agent, System and Uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Aqueous droplets encapsulated in a flame retardant polymer are useful in suppressing combustion. Upon exposure to a flame, the encapsulated aqueous droplets rupture and vaporize, removing heat and displacing oxygen to retard the combustion process. The polymer encapsulant, through decomposition, may further add free radicals to the combustion atmosphere, thereby further retarding the combustion process. The encapsulated aqueous droplets may be used as a replacement to halon, water mist and dry powder flame suppression systems.

  10. Suppression of the Primordial Gravitational Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumurtushaa, Gansukh; Koh, Seoktae; Lee, Bum-Hoon

    2016-07-01

    We study the primordial gravitational waves induced by space-space condensate inflation model. For modes that cross the comoving horizon during matter dominated era, we calculate the energy spectrum of gravitational waves. The energy spectrum of gravitational waves for our model has significantly suppressed in the low frequency range. The suppression occurs due to the phase transition during the early evolution of the Universe and depends on model parameter.

  11. On the suppression of vaccination dissent.

    PubMed

    Martin, Brian

    2015-02-01

    Dissenters from the dominant views about vaccination sometimes are subject to adverse actions, including abusive comment, threats, formal complaints,censorship, and de registration, a phenomenon that can be called suppression of dissent. Three types of cases are examined: scientists and physicians; a high-profile researcher; and a citizen campaigner. Comparing the methods used in these different types of cases provides a preliminary framework for understanding the dynamics of suppression in terms of vulnerabilities. PMID:24658876

  12. Neural repetition suppression reflects fulfilled perceptual expectations

    PubMed Central

    Summerfield, Christopher; Monti, Jim M.P.; Trittschuh, Emily H.; Mesulam, M.-Marsel; Egner, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    Stimulus-evoked neural activity is attenuated upon stimulus repetition (‘repetition suppression’), a phenomenon attributed to largely automatic processes in sensory neurons. By manipulating the likelihood of stimulus repetition, we show that repetition suppression in the human brain is reduced when stimulus repetitions are improbable (and thus, unexpected). These data suggest that repetition suppression reflects a relative reduction in top-down perceptual ‘prediction error’ when processing an expected compared to an unexpected stimulus. PMID:19160497

  13. Noise suppression in surface microseismic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forghani-Arani, Farnoush; Batzle, Mike; Behura, Jyoti; Willis, Mark; Haines, Seth S.; Davidson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a passive noise suppression technique, based on the τ − p transform. In the τ − p domain, one can separate microseismic events from surface noise based on distinct characteristics that are not visible in the time-offset domain. By applying the inverse τ − p transform to the separated microseismic event, we suppress the surface noise in the data. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and is superior to existing techniques for passive noise suppression in the sense that it preserves the waveform. We introduce a passive noise suppression technique, based on the τ − p transform. In the τ − p domain, one can separate microseismic events from surface noise based on distinct characteristics that are not visible in the time-offset domain. By applying the inverse τ − p transform to the separated microseismic event, we suppress the surface noise in the data. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and is superior to existing techniques for passive noise suppression in the sense that it preserves the waveform.

  14. Overexpression of Sly41 suppresses COPII vesicle–tethering deficiencies by elevating intracellular calcium levels

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Indrani; Barlowe, Charles

    2016-01-01

    SLY41 was identified as a multicopy suppressor of loss of Ypt1, a Rab GTPase essential for COPII vesicle tethering at the Golgi complex. SLY41 encodes a polytopic membrane protein with homology to a class of solute transporter proteins, but how overexpression suppresses vesicle-tethering deficiencies is not known. Here we show that Sly41 is efficiently packaged into COPII vesicles and actively cycles between the ER and Golgi compartments. SLY41 displays synthetic negative genetic interactions with PMR1, which encodes the major Golgi-localized Ca2+/Mn2+ transporter and suggests that Sly41 influences cellular Ca2+ and Mn2+ homeostasis. Experiments using the calcium probe aequorin to measure intracellular Ca2+ concentrations in live cells reveal that Sly41 overexpression significantly increases cytosolic calcium levels. Although specific substrates of the Sly41 transporter were not identified, our findings indicate that localized overexpression of Sly41 to the early secretory pathway elevates cytosolic calcium levels to suppress vesicle-tethering mutants. In vitro SNARE cross-linking assays were used to directly monitor the influence of Ca2+ on tethering and fusion of COPII vesicles with Golgi membranes. Strikingly, calcium at suppressive concentrations stimulated SNARE-dependent membrane fusion when vesicle-tethering activity was reduced. These results show that calcium positively regulates the SNARE-dependent fusion stage of ER–Golgi transport. PMID:27030673

  15. Quantum Transport Enhancement by Time-Reversal Symmetry Breaking

    PubMed Central

    Zimborás, Zoltán; Faccin, Mauro; Kádár, Zoltán; Whitfield, James D.; Lanyon, Ben P.; Biamonte, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Quantum mechanics still provides new unexpected effects when considering the transport of energy and information. Models of continuous time quantum walks, which implicitly use time-reversal symmetric Hamiltonians, have been intensely used to investigate the effectiveness of transport. Here we show how breaking time-reversal symmetry of the unitary dynamics in this model can enable directional control, enhancement, and suppression of quantum transport. Examples ranging from exciton transport to complex networks are presented. This opens new prospects for more efficient methods to transport energy and information. PMID:23917452

  16. Feedback between interacting transport channels.

    PubMed

    Brandes, T

    2015-05-01

    A model of particle transport through a large number of channels is introduced. Interactions among the particles can lead to a strong suppression of fluctuations in the particle number statistics. Within a mean-field-type limit, this becomes equivalent to a time-dependent (nonautonomous) collective feedback control mechanism. The dynamics can be interpreted as a diffusive spreading of a feedback signal across the channels that displays scaling, can be quantified via the flow of information, and becomes visible, e.g., in the spectral function of the particle noise. PMID:26066161

  17. Vasopressin Effectively Suppresses Male Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Woo-Sung; Park, Yoo-Jin; Kim, Yun-Hee; You, Young-Ah; Kim, In Cheul; Pang, Myung-Geol

    2013-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (VP) is neurohypophysial hormone has been implicated in stimulating contractile activity of the male reproductive tract in the testis. Higher levels of VP decrease sperm count and motility. However, very little is known about the involvement of VP in controlling mammalian reproductive process. The goal of this study was to confirm that effect of VP receptor (AVPR2) on sperm function in capacitation condition. Deamino [Cys 1, D-ArgS] vasopressin (dDAVP), an AVPR2 agonist that operates only on AVPR2, was used. Also, Mouse spermatozoa were incubated with various concentrations of dDAVP (10−11–10−5 M) and sperm motility, capacitation status, Protein Kinase A activity (PKA), tyrosine phosphorylation, fertilization, and embryo development were assessed using computer-assisted sperm analysis, Combined Hoechst 33258/chlortetracycline fluorescence, Western blotting, and in vitro fertilization, respectively. AVPR2 was placed on the acrosome region and mid-piece in cauda epididymal spermatozoa, but the caput epididymal spermatozoa was mid-piece only. The high dDAVP treatment (10−8 and 10−5 M) significantly decreased sperm motility, intracellular pH and PKA substrates (approximately 55 and 22 kDa) and increased Ca2+ concentration. The highest concentration treatment significantly decreased PKA substrate (approximately 23 kDa) and tyrosine phosphorylation (approximately 30 kDa). VP detrimentally affected capacitation, acrosome reaction, and embryo development. Treatment with the lowest concentration (10−11 M) was not significantly different. Our data have shown that VP stimulates ion transport across sperm membrane through interactions with AVPR2. VP has a detrimental effect in sperm function, fertilization, and embryonic development, suggesting its critical role in the acquisition of fertilizing ability of mouse spermatozoa. These research findings will enable further study to determine molecular mechanism associated with fertility in

  18. Could carnosine or related structures suppress Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Hipkiss, Alan R

    2007-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, copper and zinc ions, glycating agents and reactive aldehydes, protein cross-linking and proteolytic dysfunction may all contribute to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Carnosine (beta-alanyl-L-histidine) is a naturally-occurring, pluripotent, homeostatic agent. The olfactory lobe is normally enriched in carnosine and zinc. Loss of olfactory function and oxidative damage to olfactory tissue are early symptoms of AD. Amyloid peptide aggregates in AD brain are enriched in zinc ions. Carnosine can chelate zinc ions. Protein oxidation and glycation are integral components of the AD pathophysiology. Carnosine can suppress amyloid-beta peptide toxicity, inhibit production of oxygen free-radicals, scavenge hydroxyl radicals and reactive aldehydes, and suppresses protein glycation. Glycated protein accumulates in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of AD patients. Homocarnosine levels in human CSF dramatically decline with age. CSF composition and turnover is controlled by the choroid plexus which possesses a specific transporter for carnosine and homocarnosine. Carnosine reacts with protein carbonyls and suppress the reactivity of glycated proteins. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity is diminished in AD patient brains. Administration of CA activators improves learning in animals. Carnosine is a CA activator. Protein cross-links (gamma-glutamyl-epsilon-amino) are present in neurofibrillary tangles in AD brain. gamma-Glutamyl-carnosine has been isolated from biological tissue. Carnosine stimulates vimentin expression in cultured human fibroblasts. The protease oxidised-protein-hydrolase is co-expressed with vimentin. Carnosine stimulates proteolysis in cultured myocytes and senescent cultured fibroblasts. These observations suggest that carnosine and related structures should be explored for therapeutic potential towards AD and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:17522447

  19. Ion transporters in brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Damin; Zhu, Wen; Kuo, John S.; Hu, Shaoshan; Sun, Dandan

    2015-01-01

    Ion transporters are important in regulation of ionic homeostasis, cell volume, and cellular signal transduction under physiological conditions. They have recently emerged as important players in cancer progression. In this review, we discussed two important ion transporter proteins, sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter isoform 1 (NKCC-1) and sodium-hydrogen exchanger isoform 1 (NHE-1) in Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and other malignant tumors. NKCC-1 is a Na+-dependent Cl− transporter that mediates the movement of Na+, K+, and Cl− ions across the plasma membrane and maintains cell volume and intracellular K+ and Cl− homeostasis. NHE-1 is a ubiquitously expressed cell membrane protein which regulates intracellular pH (pHi) and extracellular microdomain pH (pHe) homeostasis and cell volume. Here, we summarized recent pre-clinical experimental studies on NKCC-1 and NHE-1 in GBM and other malignant tumors, such as breast cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, and lung cancer. These studies illustrated that pharmacological inhibition or down-regulation of these ion transporter proteins reduces proliferation, increases apoptosis, and suppresses migration and invasion of cancer cells. These new findings reveal the potentials of these ion transporters as new targets for cancer diagnosis and/or treatment. PMID:25620102

  20. Suppression of Electron Temperature Gradient Turbulence via Negative Magnetic Shear in NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Yuh, H. Y.; Levinton, F. M.; Kaye, S. M.; Mazzucato, E.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Bell, R. E.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Peterson, J. L.; Smith, D. R.; Park, H. K.; Lee, W.

    2011-02-04

    Negative magnetic shear is found to suppress electron turbulence and improve electron thermal transport for plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Sufficiently negative magnetic shear results in a transition out of a stiff profile regime. Density fluctuation measurements from high-k microwave scattering are verified to be the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode by matching measured rest frequency and linear growth rate to gyrokinetic calculations. Fluctuation suppression under negligible ExB shear conditions confirm that negative magnetic shear alone is sufficient for ETG suppression. Measured electron temperature gradients can significantly exceed ETG critical gradients with ETG mode activity reduced to intermittent bursts, while electron thermal diffusivity improves to below 0.1 electron gyro-Bohms.

  1. Suppression of electron temperature gradient turbulence via negative magnetic shear in NSTX.

    PubMed

    Yuh, H Y; Kaye, S M; Levinton, F M; Mazzucato, E; Mikkelsen, D R; Smith, D R; Bell, R E; Hosea, J C; LeBlanc, B P; Peterson, J L; Park, H K; Lee, W

    2011-02-01

    Negative magnetic shear is found to suppress electron turbulence and improve electron thermal transport for plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Sufficiently negative magnetic shear results in a transition out of a stiff profile regime. Density fluctuation measurements from high-k microwave scattering are verified to be the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode by matching measured rest frequency and linear growth rate to gyrokinetic calculations. Fluctuation suppression under negligible E×B shear conditions confirm that negative magnetic shear alone is sufficient for ETG suppression. Measured electron temperature gradients can significantly exceed ETG critical gradients with ETG mode activity reduced to intermittent bursts, while electron thermal diffusivity improves to below 0.1 electron gyro-Bohms. PMID:21405404

  2. MPLM fire detection and suppression: architecture and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Balocco, P.; Potenza, F.; Cafero, E. |

    1993-12-31

    The Mini Pressurized Logistics Module (MPLM) is a servicer of the Space Station Freedom (SSF), whose purpose is to provide location for both subsystems and payload racks (active racks i.e. namely a freezer and a freezer/refrigerator, is to be serviced, and passive racks). The MPLM will be used to supply and return a pressurized cargo to and from the SSF via the National Space Transportation System (NSTS), optimizing the NSTS cargo capabilities. Being a pressurized module, the MPLM is characterized by an Environmental Control System that consists of two sections: The Enviromental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) and the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS). The ECLSS is constituted by other subsections, among which is the Fire Detection and Suppression (FDS) Subsystem. The fire suppression method, selected at SSF level, is the CO2 discharge and diffusion in the affected enclosed areas. As far as the mathematical simulation of the FDS aspects is concerned, a big effort has been made and is still on-going. The related mathematical modelization is quite complex, involving two-phase phenomena, chocked flow and gas diffusion: this means the implementation and running of dedicated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models. The diffusion analysis is particularly time-consuming, due to the complexity of the geometry with respect to modelization capability.

  3. Extensions to PIFCGT: Multirate output feedback and optimal disturbance suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broussard, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    New control synthesis procedures for digital flight control systems were developed. The theoretical developments are the solution to the problem of optimal disturbance suppression in the presence of windshear. Control synthesis is accomplished using a linear quadratic cost function, the command generator tracker for trajectory following and the proportional-integral-filter control structure for practical implementation. Extensions are made to the optimal output feedback algorithm for computing feedback gains so that the multirate and optimal disturbance control designs are computed and compared for the advanced transport operating system (ATOPS). The performance of the designs is demonstrated by closed-loop poles, frequency domain multiinput sigma and eigenvalue plots and detailed nonlinear 6-DOF aircraft simulations in the terminal area in the presence of windshear.

  4. Suppression of energetic particle driven instabilities with HHFW heating

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Taylor, G.; Bertelli, N.; Darrow, D. S.; Gorelenkov, N.; Kramer, G.; Liu, D.; Crocker, N. A.; Kubota, S.; White, R.

    2015-01-01

    In plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557] heated with neutral beams, the beam ions typically excite Energetic Particle Modes (EPMs or fishbones), and Toroidal, Global or Compressional Alfvén Eigenmodes (TAE, GAE, CAE). These modes can redistribute the energetic beam ions, altering the beam driven current profile and the plasma heating profile, or they may affect electron thermal transport or cause losses of the beam ions. In this paper we present experimental results where these instabilities, driven by the super-thermal beam ions, are suppressed with the application of High Harmonic Fastmore » Wave heating.« less

  5. Functional inhibition of UQCRB suppresses angiogenesis in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Yoon Sun; Jung, Hye Jin; Seok, Seung Hyeok; Payumo, Alexander Y.; Chen, James K.; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: ► This is the first functional characterization of UQCRB in vivo model. ► Angiogenesis is inhibited with UQCRB loss of function in zebrafish. ► UQCRB is introduced as a prognostic marker for mitochondria- and angiogenesis-related diseases. -- Abstract: As a subunit of mitochondrial complex III, UQCRB plays an important role in complex III stability, electron transport, and cellular oxygen sensing. Herein, we report UQCRB function regarding angiogenesis in vivo with the zebrafish (Danio rerio). UQCRB knockdown inhibited angiogenesis in zebrafish leading to the suppression of VEGF expression. Moreover, the UQCRB-targeting small molecule terpestacin also inhibited angiogenesis and VEGF levels in zebrafish, supporting the role of UQCRB in angiogenesis. Collectively, UQCRB loss of function by either genetic and pharmacological means inhibited angiogenesis, indicating that UQCRB plays a key role in this process and can be a prognostic marker of angiogenesis- and mitochondria-related diseases.

  6. Charmonium suppression with cc¯ dissociation by strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiss, J.; Greiner, C.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.; Cassing, W.; Mosel, U.

    1999-02-01

    We study the production of cc¯ pairs in nuclear reactions at SPS energies within the covariant transport approach HSD. The production of cc¯ pairs is treated perturbatively employing experimental cross sections while the interactions of cc¯ pairs with baryons are included by conventional cascade-type two-body collisions. Adopting 6 mb for the cc¯-baryon cross section the data on J/Ψ suppression in p+A reactions are reproduced in line with calculations based on the Glauber model. Additionally the dissociation of the cc¯ pairs by strings is included in a purely geometrical way. We find good agreement with the experimental data from the NA38 and NA50 Collaborations with an estimate for the string radius of Rs~0.2-0.25 fm.

  7. The suppression of the large magnetoresistance in thin WTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jie; Woods, John; Cha, Judy

    The layered nature of WTe2 suggests the possibility of making a single layer WTe2 memory device that exploits the recently observed large magnetoresistance. Presently, the origin of the magnetoresistance is attributed to the charge balance between the electron and hole carriers, yet the exact underlying physical mechanism is unclear. Here we show a systematic suppression of the large magnetoresistance, as well as turn-on temperature, with decreasing thickness of WTe2. We attribute the thickness-dependent transport properties to undesirable parasitic effects that become dominant in thin films of WTe2. Our results highlight the increasing importance of characterizing the parasitic effects for 2D layered materials in a single- to a few-layer thick limit. Finally, our observations support the hypothesis that the origin of the large magnetoresistance may be due to the charge balance between the electron and the hole carriers.

  8. How to suppress the backscattering of conduction electrons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibis, O. V.

    2014-09-01

    It is shown theoretically that the strong coupling of electrons to a high-frequency electromagnetic field results in the nulling of electron backscattering within the Born approximation. The conditions of the effect depend only on field parameters and do not depend on the concrete form of the scattering potential. As a consequence, this phenomenon is of universal physical nature and can take place in various conducting systems. Since the suppression of electron backscattering results in decreasing electrical resistance, the solved quantum-mechanical problem opens a new way to control electronic transport properties of conductors by a laser-generated field. Particularly, the elaborated theory is applicable to nanostructures exposed to a strong monochromatic electromagnetic wave.

  9. Enhancement and Suppression of Heat Transfer by MHD Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarian, A.

    2006-07-01

    We study the effect of turbulence on heat transfer within magnetized plasmas for energy injection velocities both larger and smaller than the Alfvén speed. We find that in the latter regime the heat transfer is partially suppressed, while in the former regime the effects of turbulence depend on the intensity of driving. In fact, the scale lA at which the turbulent velocity is equal to the Alfvén velocity is an important new parameter. When the electron mean free path λ is larger than lA, the stronger the turbulence, the lower the thermal conductivity by electrons. The turbulent motions, however, induce their own advective heat transport, which, for the parameters of intracluster medium, provides effective heat diffusivity that exceeds the classical Spitzer value.

  10. Feature-based attention modulates surround suppression

    PubMed Central

    Flevaris, Anastasia V.; Murray, Scott O.

    2015-01-01

    Stimuli appearing in the surround of the classical receptive field (CRF) can reduce neuronal firing and perceived contrast of a preferred stimulus in the CRF, a phenomenon referred to as surround suppression. Suppression is greatest when the surrounding stimulus has the same orientation and spatial frequency (SF) as the central target. Although spatial attention has been shown to influence surround suppression, the effects of feature-based attention have yet to be characterized. Using behavioral contrast adaptation in humans, we examined center-surround interactions between SF and orientation, and asked whether attending to one feature dimension versus the other influenced suppression. A center-surround triplet comprised of a central target Gabor and two flanking Gabors were used for adaptation. The flankers could have the same SF and orientation as the target, or differ in one or both of the feature dimensions. Contrast thresholds were measured for the target before and after adapting to center-surround triplets, and postadaptation thresholds were taken as an indirect measure of surround suppression. Both feature dimensions contributed to surround suppression and did not summate. Moreover, when center and surround had the same feature value in one dimension (e.g., same orientation) but had different values in the other dimension (e.g., different SF), there was more suppression when attention was directed to the feature dimension that matched between center and surround than when attention was directed to the feature dimension that differed. These results demonstrate that feature-based attention can influence center-surround interactions by enhancing the effects of the attended dimension. PMID:25630380

  11. Membrane Transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The selective movement and redistribution of ions and small organic molecules is essential for plant growth and cellular homeostasis. Because of this, plants have evolved numerous proteins that facilitate the transport of minerals, sugars, metabolites, and other compounds through the limiting membra...

  12. Pupil Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bete, Tim, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Presents the opinions of four transportation experts on issues related to school buses. The experts respond to the following questions: will advertisements placed on buses be used to generate district revenue; will compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas become standard fuel for school buses; and will school bus seat belts be mandatory and…

  13. Acetic acid suppresses the increase in disaccharidase activity that occurs during culture of caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, N; Satsu, H; Watanabe, H; Fukaya, M; Tsukamoto, Y; Miyamoto, Y; Shimizu, M

    2000-03-01

    To understand how blood glucose level is lowered by oral administration of vinegar, we examined effects of acetic acid on glucose transport and disaccharidase activity in Caco-2 cells. Cells were cultured for 15 d in a medium containing 5 mmol/L of acetic acid. This chronic treatment did not affect cell growth or viability, and furthermore, apoptotic cell death was not observed. Glucose transport, evaluated with a nonmetabolizable substrate, 3-O-methyl glucose, also was not affected. However, the increase of sucrase activity observed in control cells (no acetic acid) was significantly suppressed by acetic acid (P < 0.01). Acetic acid suppressed sucrase activity in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Similar treatments (5 mmol/L and 15 d) with other organic acids such as citric, succinic, L-maric, L-lactic, L-tartaric and itaconic acids, did not suppress the increase in sucrase activity. Acetic acid treatment (5 mmol/L and 15 d) significantly decreased the activities of disaccharidases (sucrase, maltase, trehalase and lactase) and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme, whereas the activities of other hydrolases (alkaline phosphatase, aminopeptidase-N, dipeptidylpeptidase-IV and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase) were not affected. To understand mechanisms underlying the suppression of disaccharidase activity by acetic acid, Northern and Western analyses of the sucrase-isomaltase complex were performed. Acetic acid did not affect the de novo synthesis of this complex at either the transcriptional or translational levels. The antihyperglycemic effect of acetic acid may be partially due to the suppression of disaccharidase activity. This suppression seems to occur during the post-translational processing. PMID:10702577

  14. Suppression of the HPA Axis During Cholestasis Can Be Attributed to Hypothalamic Bile Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    McMillin, Matthew; Frampton, Gabriel; Quinn, Matthew; Divan, Ali; Grant, Stephanie; Patel, Nisha; Newell-Rogers, Karen; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2015-12-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been shown to occur during cholestatic liver injury. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that in a model of cholestasis, serum bile acids gain entry into the brain via a leaky blood brain barrier and that hypothalamic bile acid content is increased. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine the effects of bile acid signaling on the HPA axis. The data presented show that HPA axis suppression during cholestatic liver injury, specifically circulating corticosterone levels and hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) expression, can be attenuated by administration of the bile acid sequestrant cholestyramine. Secondly, treatment of hypothalamic neurons with various bile acids suppressed CRH expression and secretion in vitro. However, in vivo HPA axis suppression was only evident after the central injection of the bile acids taurocholic acid or glycochenodeoxycholic acid but not the other bile acids studied. Furthermore, we demonstrate that taurocholic acid and glycochenodeoxycholic acid are exerting their effects on hypothalamic CRH expression after their uptake through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and subsequent activation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Taken together with previous studies, our data support the hypothesis that during cholestatic liver injury, bile acids gain entry into the brain, are transported into neurons through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and can activate the glucocorticoid receptor to suppress the HPA axis. These data also lend themselves to the broader hypothesis that bile acids may act as central modulators of hypothalamic peptides that may be altered during liver disease. PMID:26431088

  15. Wind barriers suppress fugitive dust and soil-derived airborne particles in arid regions

    SciTech Connect

    Grantz, D.A.; Vaughn, D.L.; Farber, R.J.; Kim, B.; Ashbaugh, L.; Van Curen, T.; Campbell, R.

    1998-07-01

    Areas of abandoned agricultural land in the Antelope Valley, western Mojave (high) desert of California have proven in the previous studies to be recalcitrant to conventional tillage and revegetation strategies designed to suppress wind erosion of soil and transport of sediment and fugitive dust. These areas represented a continuing source of drifting sand and of coarse and respirable suspended particulate matter. The traditional techniques failed because furrows collapsed and the water holding capacity of the overburden was too low to support seed germination and transplant survival. In this study a variety of wind barriers were evaluated for suppression of sediment transport. Airborne particles were measured with an array of coarse particle samplers at heights of 0.2, 1.0, and 2.0 m above the soil surface. Discrete artificial wind barriers, consisting of widely spaced roughness elements were effective in suppressing fugitive emissions. Wind fences established along the leeward edge of an area of blowing sand, perpendicular to the prevailing wind, significantly decreased fugitive emissions. Control was greatest and precision of the measurements was highest under high wind conditions. These techniques provide rapid and effective suppression of fugitive emissions of soil-derived particles under conditions that resist conventional tillage and revegetation techniques. A simple, indirect procedure for determining local wind velocity erosion thresholds requiring only sampling of wind run and suspended particulate mass compared favorably with direct measurement of saltation as a function of wind velocity.

  16. ELM Suppression in Low Edge Collisionality H-Mode Discharges Using n=3 Magnetic Perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Burrell, K H; Evans, T E; Doyle, E J; Fenstermacher, M E; Groebner, R J; Leonard, A W; Moyer, R A; Osborne, T H; Schaffer, M J; Snyder, P B; Thomas, P R; West, W P; Boedo, J A; Garofalo, A M; Gohil, P; Jackson, G L; La Haye, R J; Lasnier, C J; Reimerdes, H; Rhodes, T L; Scoville, J T; Solomon, W M; Thomas, D M; Wang, G; Watkins, J G; Zeng, L

    2005-07-11

    Using resonant magnetic perturbations with toroidal mode number n = 3, we have produced H-mode discharges without edge localized modes (ELMs) which run with constant density and radiated power for periods up to about 2550 ms (17 energy confinement times). These ELM suppression results are achieved at pedestal collisionalities close to those desired for next step burning plasma experiments such as ITER and provide a means of eliminating the rapid erosion of divertor components in such machines which could be caused by giant ELMs. The ELM suppression is due to an enhancement in the edge particle transport which reduces the edge pressure gradient and pedestal current density below the threshold for peeling-ballooning modes. These n = 3 magnetic perturbations provide a means of active control of edge plasma transport.

  17. Suppression on Your Own Terms: Internally Generated Displays of Craving Suppression Predict Rebound Effects

    PubMed Central

    Sayers, W. Michael; Sayette, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Research on emotion suppression has shown a rebound effect, in which expression of the targeted emotion increases following a suppression attempt. In prior investigations, participants have been explicitly instructed to suppress their responses, which has drawn the act of suppression into metaconsciousness. Yet emerging research emphasizes the importance of nonconscious approaches to emotion regulation. This study is the first in which a craving rebound effect was evaluated without simultaneously raising awareness about suppression. We aimed to link spontaneously occurring attempts to suppress cigarette craving to increased smoking motivation assessed immediately thereafter. Smokers (n = 66) received a robust cued smoking-craving manipulation while their facial responses were videotaped and coded using the Facial Action Coding System. Following smoking-cue exposure, participants completed a behavioral choice task previously found to index smoking motivation. Participants evincing suppression-related facial expressions during cue exposure subsequently valued smoking more than did those not displaying these expressions, which suggests that internally generated suppression can exert powerful rebound effects. PMID:23842957

  18. Transport experiments with Dirac electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checkelsky, Joseph George

    This thesis presents transport experiments performed on solid state systems in which the behavior of the charge carriers can be described by the Dirac equation. Unlike the massive carriers in a typical material, in these systems the carriers behave like massless fermions with a photon-like dispersion predicted to greatly modify their spin and charge transport properties. The first system studied is graphene, a crystalline monolayer of carbon arranged in a hexagonal lattice. The band structure calculated from the hexagonal lattice has the form of the massless Dirac Hamiltonian. At the charge neutral Dirac point, we find that application of a magnetic field drives a transition to an insulating state. We also study the thermoelectric properties of graphene and find that the states near the Dirac point have a unique response compared to those at higher charge density. The second system is the 3D topological insulator Bi2Se3, where a Dirac-like dispersion for states on the 2D surface of the insulating 3D crystal arises as a result of the topology of the 3D bands and time reversal symmetry. To access the transport properties of the 2D states, we suppress the remnant bulk conduction channel by chemical doping and electrostatic gating. In bulk crystals we find strong quantum corrections to transport at low temperature when the bulk conduction channel is maximally suppressed. In microscopic crystals we are able better to isolate the surface conduction channel properties. We identify in-gap conducting states that have relatively high mobility compared to the bulk and exhibit weak anti-localization, consistent with predictions for protected 2D surface states with strong spin-orbit coupling.

  19. 40 CFR 279.82 - Use as a dust suppressant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use as a dust suppressant. 279.82... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF USED OIL Standards for Use as a Dust Suppressant and Disposal of Used Oil § 279.82 Use as a dust suppressant. (a) The use of used oil as a dust suppressant...

  20. Wing rock suppression using forebody vortex control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, T. T.; Ong, L. Y.; Suarez, C. J.; Malcolm, G. N.

    1991-01-01

    Static and free-to-roll tests were conducted in a water tunnel with a configuration that consisted of a highly-slender forebody and 78-deg sweep delta wings. Flow visualization was performed and the roll angle histories were obtained. The fluid mechanisms governing the wing rock of this configuration were identified. Different means of suppressing wing rock by controlling the forebody vortices using small blowing jets were also explored. Steady blowing was found to be capable of suppressing wing rock, but significant vortex asymmetries had to be induced at the same time. On the other hand, alternating pulsed blowing on the left and right sides of the forebody was demonstrated to be potentially an effective means of suppressing wing rock and eliminating large asymmetric moments at high angles of attack.

  1. Modeling extreme ultraviolet suppression of electrostatic analyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Gershman, Daniel J.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-04-15

    In addition to analyzing energy-per-charge ratios of incident ions, electrostatic analyzers (ESAs) for spaceborne time-of-flight mass spectrometers must also protect detectors from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons from the Sun. The required suppression rate often exceeds 1:10{sup 7} and is generally established in tests upon instrument design and integration. This paper describes a novel technique to model the EUV suppression of ESAs using photon ray tracing integrated into SIMION, the most commonly used ion optics design software for such instruments. The paper compares simulation results with measurements taken from the ESA of the Mass instrument flying onboard the Wind spacecraft. This novel technique enables an active inclusion of EUV suppression requirements in the ESA design process. Furthermore, the simulation results also motivate design rules for such instruments.

  2. Propofol and sevoflurane induce distinct burst suppression patterns in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Jonathan D.; Westover, M. Brandon; Ching, ShiNung; Brown, Emery N.; Solt, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Burst suppression is an EEG pattern characterized by alternating periods of high-amplitude activity (bursts) and relatively low amplitude activity (suppressions). Burst suppression can arise from several different pathological conditions, as well as from general anesthesia. Here we review current algorithms that are used to quantify burst suppression, its various etiologies, and possible underlying mechanisms. We then review clinical applications of anesthetic-induced burst suppression. Finally, we report the results of our new study showing clear electrophysiological differences in burst suppression patterns induced by two common general anesthetics, sevoflurane and propofol. Our data suggest that the circuit mechanisms that generate burst suppression activity may differ among general anesthetics. PMID:25565990

  3. Suppression of Sensitivity to Drugs and Antibiotics by High External Cation Concentrations in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Shabro, Aidin; Sunnerhagen, Per

    2015-01-01

    Background Potassium ion homeostasis plays an important role in regulating membrane potential and therefore resistance to cations, antibiotics and chemotherapeutic agents in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and other yeasts. However, the precise relationship between drug resistance in S. pombe and external potassium concentrations (particularly in its natural habitats) remains unclear. S. pombe can tolerate a wide range of external potassium concentrations which in turn affect plasma membrane polarization. We thus hypothesized that high external potassium concentrations suppress the sensitivity of this yeast to various drugs. Methods We have investigated the effect of external KCl concentrations on the sensitivity of S. pombe cells to a wide range of antibiotics, antimicrobial agents and chemotherapeutic drugs. We employed survival assays, immunoblotting and microscopy for these studies. Results We demonstrate that KCl, and to a lesser extent NaCl and RbCl can suppress the sensitivity of S. pombe to a wide range of antibiotics. Ammonium chloride and potassium hydrogen sulphate also suppressed drug sensitivity. This effect appears to depend in part on changes to membrane polarization and membrane transport proteins. Interestingly, we have found little relationship between the suppressive effect of KCl on sensitivity and the structure, polarity or solubility of the various compounds investigated. Conclusions High concentrations of external potassium and other cations suppress sensitivity to a wide range of drugs in S. pombe. Potassium-rich environments may thus provide S. pombe a competitive advantage in nature. Modulating potassium ion homeostasis may sensitize pathogenic fungi to antifungal agents. PMID:25793410

  4. Large-Scale Identification and Analysis of Suppressive Drug Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cokol, Murat; Weinstein, Zohar B.; Yilancioglu, Kaan; Tasan, Murat; Doak, Allison; Cansever, Dilay; Mutlu, Beste; Li, Siyang; Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul; Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Guvenek, Aysegul; Cokol, Melike; Cetiner, Selim; Giaever, Guri; Iossifov, Ivan; Nislow, Corey; Shoichet, Brian; Roth, Frederick P.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY One drug may suppress the effects of another. Although knowledge of drug suppression is vital to avoid efficacy-reducing drug interactions or discover countermeasures for chemical toxins, drug-drug suppression relationships have not been systematically mapped. Here, we analyze the growth response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to anti-fungal compound (“drug”) pairs. Among 440 ordered drug pairs, we identified 94 suppressive drug interactions. Using only pairs not selected on the basis of their suppression behavior, we provide an estimate of the prevalence of suppressive interactions between anti-fungal compounds as 17%. Analysis of the drug suppression network suggested that Bromopyruvate is a frequently suppressive drug and Staurosporine is a frequently suppressed drug. We investigated potential explanations for suppressive drug interactions, including chemogenomic analysis, coaggregation, and pH effects, allowing us to explain the interaction tendencies of Bromopyruvate. PMID:24704506

  5. Large-scale identification and analysis of suppressive drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Cokol, Murat; Weinstein, Zohar B; Yilancioglu, Kaan; Tasan, Murat; Doak, Allison; Cansever, Dilay; Mutlu, Beste; Li, Siyang; Rodriguez-Esteban, Raul; Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Guvenek, Aysegul; Cokol, Melike; Cetiner, Selim; Giaever, Guri; Iossifov, Ivan; Nislow, Corey; Shoichet, Brian; Roth, Frederick P

    2014-04-24

    One drug may suppress the effects of another. Although knowledge of drug suppression is vital to avoid efficacy-reducing drug interactions or discover countermeasures for chemical toxins, drug-drug suppression relationships have not been systematically mapped. Here, we analyze the growth response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to anti-fungal compound ("drug") pairs. Among 440 ordered drug pairs, we identified 94 suppressive drug interactions. Using only pairs not selected on the basis of their suppression behavior, we provide an estimate of the prevalence of suppressive interactions between anti-fungal compounds as 17%. Analysis of the drug suppression network suggested that Bromopyruvate is a frequently suppressive drug and Staurosporine is a frequently suppressed drug. We investigated potential explanations for suppressive drug interactions, including chemogenomic analysis, coaggregation, and pH effects, allowing us to explain the interaction tendencies of Bromopyruvate. PMID:24704506

  6. Copper transport.

    PubMed

    Linder, M C; Wooten, L; Cerveza, P; Cotton, S; Shulze, R; Lomeli, N

    1998-05-01

    In adult humans, the net absorption of dietary copper is approximately 1 mg/d. Dietary copper joins some 4-5 mg of endogenous copper flowing into the gastrointestinal tract through various digestive juices. Most of this copper returns to the circulation and to the tissues (including liver) that formed them. Much lower amounts of copper flow into and out of other major parts of the body (including heart, skeletal muscle, and brain). Newly absorbed copper is transported to body tissues in two phases, borne primarily by plasma protein carriers (albumin, transcuprein, and ceruloplasmin). In the first phase, copper goes from the intestine to the liver and kidney; in the second phase, copper usually goes from the liver (and perhaps also the kidney) to other organs. Ceruloplasmin plays a role in this second phase. Alternatively, liver copper can also exit via the bile, and in a form that is less easily reabsorbed. Copper is also present in and transported by other body fluids, including those bathing the brain and central nervous system and surrounding the fetus in the amniotic sac. Ceruloplasmin is present in these fluids and may also be involved in copper transport there. The concentrations of copper and ceruloplasmin in milk vary with lactational stage. Parallel changes occur in ceruloplasmin messenger RNA expression in the mammary gland (as determined in pigs). Copper in milk ceruloplasmin appears to be particularly available for absorption, at least in rats. PMID:9587137

  7. Vibration Isolation, Suppression, Steering, and Pointing (VISSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, Ben K.; Rahman, Zahidul; Kedikian, Roland

    1996-01-01

    The design of a six degree of freedom flight vibration isolation suppression and steering (VISS) subsystem for a mid-wave infrared camera on the top of a spacecraft is presented. The development of a long stroke piezoelectric, redundant, compact, low stiffness and power efficient actuator is summarized. A subsystem that could be built and validated for flight within 15 months was investigated. The goals of the VISS are 20 dB vibration isolation above 2 Hz, 15 dB vibration suppression of disturbances at about 60 Hz and 120 Hz, and +/- 0.3 deg steering at 2 Hz and 4 Hz.

  8. Task motivation influences alpha suppression following errors.

    PubMed

    Compton, Rebecca J; Bissey, Bryn; Worby-Selim, Sharoda

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the present research is to examine the influence of motivation on a novel error-related neural marker, error-related alpha suppression (ERAS). Participants completed an attentionally demanding flanker task under conditions that emphasized either speed or accuracy or under conditions that manipulated the monetary value of errors. Conditions in which errors had greater motivational value produced greater ERAS, that is, greater alpha suppression following errors compared to correct trials. A second study found that a manipulation of task difficulty did not affect ERAS. Together, the results confirm that ERAS is both a robust phenomenon and one that is sensitive to motivational factors. PMID:24673621

  9. Suppressed conductance in a metallic graphene nanojunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haidong; Wang, Lin; Zheng, Yisong

    2009-01-01

    The linear conductance spectrum of a metallic graphene junction formed by interconnecting two gapless graphene nanoribbons is calculated. A strong conductance suppression appears in the vicinity of the Dirac point. We found that such a conductance suppression arises from the antiresonance effect associated with an edge state localized at the zigzag-edged shoulder of the junction. The conductance valley due to the antiresonance is rather robust in the presence of the impurity and vacancy scattering. Also the center of the conductance valley can be readily tuned by an electric field exerted on the wider nanoribbon.

  10. Active Suppression Of Vibrations On Aircraft Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1995-01-01

    Method of active suppression of nonlinear and nonstationary vibrations developed to reduce sonic fatigue and interior noise in high-speed aircraft. Structure of aircraft exhibits periodic, chaotic, and random vibrations when forced by high-intensity sound from jet engines, shock waves, turbulence, and separated flows. Method of suppressing vibrations involves feedback control: Strain gauges or other sensors mounted in paths of propagation of vibrations on structure sense vibrations; outputs of sensors processed into control signal applied to actuator mounted on structure, inducing compensatory forces.

  11. Gyroaverage effects on nontwist Hamiltonians: separatrix reconnection and chaos suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Martinell, J.

    2012-01-01

    A study of nite Larmor radius (FLR) eects on E B test particle chaotic transport in non- monotonic zonal ows with drift waves in magnetized plasmas is presented. Due to the non- monotonicity of the zonal ow, the Hamiltonian does not satisfy the twist condition. The electro- static potential is modeled as a linear superposition of a zonal ow and regular neutral modes of the Hasegawa-Mima equation. FLR eects are incorporated by gyro-averaging the EB Hamiltonian. It is shown that there is a critical value the Larmor radius for which the zonal ow transitions from a prole with one maximum to a prole with two maxima and a minimum. This bifurcation leads to the creation of additional shearless curves and resonances. The gyroaveraged nontwist Hamiltonian exhibits complex patterns of separatrix reconnection. A change in the Larmor ra- dius can lead to heteroclinic-homoclinic bifurcations and dipole formation. For Larmor radii for which the zonal ow has bifurcated, double heteroclinic-heteroclinic, homoclinic-homoclinic and heteroclinic-homoclinic topologies are observed. It is also shown that chaotic transport is typically reduced as the Larmor radius increases. Poincare sections shows that, for large enough Larmor radius, chaos can be practically suppressed. In particular, small changes on the Larmor radius can restore the shearless curve.

  12. Gyroaverage effects on nontwist Hamiltonians: Separatrix reconnection and chaos suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego B; Martinell, J.

    2012-01-01

    A study of finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects on E x B test particle chaotic transport in non-monotonic zonal flows with drift waves in magnetized plasmas is presented. Due to the non-monotonicity of the zonal flow, the Hamiltonian does not satisfy the twist condition. The electrostatic potential is modeled as a linear superposition of a zonal flow and the regular neutral modes of the Hasegawa-Mima equation. FLR effects are incorporated by gyro-averaging the E x B Hamiltonian. It is shown that there is a critical value of the Larmor radius for which the zonal flow transitions from a profile with one maximum to a profile with two maxima and a minimum. This bifurcation leads to the creation of additional shearless curves and resonances. The gyroaveraged nontwist Hamiltonian exhibits complex patterns of separatrix reconnection. A change in the Larmor radius can lead to heteroclinic-homoclinic bifurcations and dipole formation. For Larmor radii for which the zonal flow has bifurcated, double heteroclinic-heteroclinic, homoclinic-homoclinic and heteroclinic-homoclinic separatrix topologies are observed. It is also shown that chaotic transport is typically reduced as the Larmor radius increases. Poincare sections show that, for large enough Larmor radius, chaos can be practically suppressed. In particular, changes of the Larmor radius can restore the shearless curve.

  13. Propulsion technology for an advanced subsonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beheim, M. A.; Antl, R. J.; Povolny, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Engine design studies for future subsonic commercial transport aircraft were conducted in parallel with airframe studies. These studies surveyed a broad distribution of design variables, including aircraft configuration, payload, range, and speed, with particular emphasis on reducing noise and exhaust emissions without severe economic and performance penalties. The results indicated that an engine for an advanced transport would be similar to the currently emerging turbofan engines. Application of current technology in the areas of noise suppression and combustors imposed severe performance and economic penalties.

  14. The Altered Renal and Hepatic Expression of Solute Carrier Transporters (SLCs) in Type 1 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chenghao; Zhu, Ling; Chan, Ting; Lu, Xiaoxi; Shen, Weiyong; Gillies, Mark C.; Zhou, Fanfan

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder that significantly affects human health and well-being. The Solute carrier transporters (SLCs), particularly the Organic anion/cation transporters (Oats/Octs/Octns), Organic anion transporting polypeptides (Oatps) and Oligopeptide transporters (Pepts) are essential membrane proteins responsible for cellular uptake of many endogenous and exogenous substances such as clinically important drugs. They are widely expressed in mammalian key organs especially the kidney and liver, in which they facilitate the influx of various drug molecules, thereby determining their distribution and elimination in body. The altered expression of SLCs in diabetes mellitus could have a profound and clinically significant influence on drug therapies. In this study, we extensively investigated the renal and hepatic expression of twenty essential SLCs in the type 1 diabetic Ins2Akita murine model that develops both hyperglycemia and diabetes-related complications using real-time PCR and immunoblotting analysis. We found that the renal expression of mOatp1a1, mOatp1a6, mOat1, mOat3, mOat5, mOct2 and mPept2 was decreased; while that of mPept1 was increased at the mRNA level in the diabetic mice compared with non-diabetic controls. We found up-regulated mRNA expression of mOatp1a4, mOatp1c1, mOctn2, mOct3 and mPept1 as well as down-regulation of mOatp1a1 in the livers of diabetic mice. We confirmed the altered protein expression of several SLCs in diabetic mice, especially the decreased renal and hepatic expression of mOatp1a1. We also found down-regulated protein expression of mOat3 and mOctn1 in the kidneys as well as increased protein expression of mOatp1a4 and mOct3 in the livers of diabetic mice. Our findings contribute to better understanding the modulation of SLC transporters in type 1 diabetes mellitus, which is likely to affect the pharmacokinetic performance of drugs that are transported by these transporters and therefore, forms the

  15. Thought Suppression in Patients With Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Miklowitz, David J.; Alatiq, Yousra; Geddes, John R.; Goodwin, Guy M.; Williams, J. Mark G.

    2010-01-01

    Suppression of negative thoughts has been observed under experimental conditions among patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) but has never been examined among patients with bipolar disorder (BD). Patients with BD (n = 36), patients with MDD (n = 20), and healthy controls (n = 20) completed a task that required unscrambling 6-word strings into 5-word sentences, leaving out 1 word. The extra word allowed the sentences to be completed in a negative, neutral, or “hyperpositive” (manic/goal-oriented) way. Participants completed the sentences under conditions of cognitive load (rehearsing a 6-digit number), reward (a bell tone), load and reward, or neither load nor reward. We hypothesized that patients with BD would engage in more active suppression of negative and hyperpositive thoughts than would controls, as revealed by their unscrambling more word strings into negative or hyperpositive sentences. Under conditions of load or reward and in the absence of either load or reward, patients with BD unscrambled more negative sentences than did controls. Under conditions of reward, patients with BD unscrambled more negative sentences than did patients with MDD. Patients with BD also reported more use of negative thought suppression than did controls. These group differences in negative biases were no longer significant when current mood states were controlled. Finally, the groups did not differ in the proportion of hyperpositive sentence completions in any condition. Thought suppression may provide a critical locus for psychological interventions in BD. PMID:20455608

  16. Sound-suppressing structure with thermal relief

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, D. O.; Holowach, J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Sound-suppressing structure comprising stacked acoustic panels wherein the inner high frequency panel is mounted for thermal expansion with respect to the outer low frequency panel is discussed. Slip joints eliminate the potential for thermal stresses, and a thermal expansion gap between the panels provides for additional relative thermal growth while reducing heat convection into the low frequency panel.

  17. Government Doublethink: Protection or Suppression in Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Miriam A.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses regulations and actions related to government withholding, suppressing, and altering information since September 11, 2001. Topics include conflicting goals of an informed citizenry versus national security, science and technology progress versus protection of sensitive information, and public health versus ideology; political pressure;…

  18. ICE FOG SUPPRESSION USING THIN CHEMICAL FILMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ice fog suppression experiments on the Fort Wainwright Power Plant cooling pond were conducted during the winters of 1974-76. Baseline information studies occupied a sizeable portion of the available ice fog weather in 1974-75. Hexadecanol was added to the pond and dramatically i...

  19. Suppressed Carrier Synchronizers for ISI Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinedi, Sami M.; Simon, Marvin K.

    1996-01-01

    We demonstrate a class of suppressed carrier synchronization loops that are motivated by MAP estimation theory and in the presence of ISI outperform the conventional I-Q loop which is designed on the basis of zero ISI (wideband assumption). The measure of comparison used is the so-called.

  20. Decoherence suppression in a resonant driving field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minns, R. S.; Kutteruf, M. R.; Commisso, M. A.; Jones, R. R.

    2008-04-01

    Resonant radio frequency (rf) control fields have been employed to suppress decoherence in single quantum bits (qubits) encoded in the probability amplitudes of np fine-structure states in Li Rydberg atoms. As described previously [1], static electric-field tuning of the spin and orbital angular momentum composition of the fine-structure eigenstates enables qubit storage in an approximate decoherence-free subspace in which phase errors due to small stray electric and magnetic fields are strongly suppressed. In addition, it was found that sequences of short electric field pulses could be utilized in a 'bang-bang' dynamic decoupling scheme to improve coherence times. We now show that a continuous resonant rf field can also suppress decoherence in this system. The rf-dressed fine-structure states form a more robust basis in which the energy splitting between the component qubit levels is locked to the drive frequency, and decoherence is essentially eliminated. Measurements of the operational range of rf frequency and field strength required to achieve decoherence suppression are in agreement with the predictions of a two-level model.

  1. Noise suppression methods for robust speech processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boll, S. F.; Kajiya, J.; Youngberg, J.; Petersen, T. L.; Ravindra, H.; Done, W.; Cox, B. V.; Cohen, E.

    1981-04-01

    Robust speech processing in practical operating environments requires effective environmental and processor noise suppression. This report describes the technical findings and accomplishments during the reporting period for the research program funded to develop real-time, compressed speech analysis-synthesis algorithms whose performance is invariant under signal contamination. Fulfillment of this requirement is necessary to insure reliable secure compressed speech transmission within realistic military command and control environments. Overall contributions resulting from this research program include the understanding of how environmental noise degrades narrow band, coded speech, development of appropriate real-time noise suppression algorithms, and development of speech parameter identification methods that consider signal contamination as a fundamental element in the estimation process. This report describes the research and results in the areas of noise suppression using the dual input adaptive noise cancellation articulation rate change techniques, spectral subtraction and a description of an experiment which demonstrated that the spectral substraction noise suppression algorithm can improve the intelligibility of 2400 bps, LPC-10 coded, helicopter speech by 10.6 points. In addition summaries are included of prior studies in Constant-Q signal analysis and synthesis, perceptual modelling, speech activity detection, and pole-zero modelling of noisy signals. Three recent studies in speech modelling using the critical band analysis-synthesis transform and using splines are then presented. Finally a list of major publications generated under this contract is given.

  2. Quantum origin of suppression for vacuum fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balitsky, Ja. V.; Kiselev, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    By example of a model with a spatially global scalar field, we show that the energy density of zero-point modes is exponentially suppressed by an average number of field quanta in a finite volume with respect to the energy density in the stationary state of minimal energy. We describe cosmological implications of mechanism.

  3. Suppression of ras-transformants (review).

    PubMed

    Kuzumaki, N

    1991-01-01

    Transforming ras genes are the oncogenes most frequently identified in human cancers. This justifies the intense interest in finding ways to suppress oncogenicity in these gene family-mediated transformants. The methods of suppression can be classified as 1) genetical, 2) biological and 3) pharmacological. Most of the reagents used for the suppression inhibit rodent transformants induced by transfected viral or activated cellular ras oncogenes, but some of the reagents are also effective when applied to natural human transformants that contain activated ras oncogenes. The growth and tumorigenicity of the ras-transformants are suppressed by the inhibition of the integration, transcription, translation or post-translational modification of the ras genes and p21 ras proteins, as well as the inhibition of the expression of genes which collaborate in the ras-transformation or the enhancement of some tumor suppressor genes. These observations offer novel approaches to the investigation of malignant transformation by ras-oncogenes, and have potential application in treatment of ras-oncogene-induced tumors. PMID:2018365

  4. Radio Science Measurements with Suppressed Carrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asmar, Sami; Divsalar, Dariush; Oudrhiri, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Radio Science started when it became apparent with early Solar missions that occultations by planetary atmospheres would affect the quality of radio communications. Since then the atmospheric properties and other aspects of planetary science, solar science, and fundamental physics were studied by scientists. Radio Science data was always extracted from a received pure residual carrier (without data modulation). For some missions, it is very desirable to obtain Radio Science data from a suppressed carrier modulation. In this paper we propose a method to extract Radio Science data when a coded suppressed carrier modulation is used in deep space communications. Type of modulation can be BPSK, QPSK, OQPSK, MPSK or even GMSK. However we concentrate mostly on BPSK modulation. The proposed method for suppressed carrier simply tries to wipe out data that acts as an interference for Radio Science measurements. In order to measure the estimation errors in amplitude and phase of the Radio Science data we use Cramer-Rao bound (CRB). The CRB for the suppressed carrier modulation with non-ideal data wiping is then compared with residual carrier modulation under the same noise condition. The method of derivation of CRB for non-ideal data wiping is an innovative method that presented here. Some numerical results are provided for coded system.

  5. Polyphosphate suppresses complement via the terminal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wat, Jovian M.; Foley, Jonathan H.; Krisinger, Michael J.; Ocariza, Linnette Mae; Lei, Victor; Wasney, Gregory A.; Lameignere, Emilie; Strynadka, Natalie C.; Smith, Stephanie A.; Morrissey, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Polyphosphate, synthesized by all cells, is a linear polymer of inorganic phosphate. When released into the circulation, it exerts prothrombotic and proinflammatory activities by modulating steps in the coagulation cascade. We examined the role of polyphosphate in regulating the evolutionarily related proteolytic cascade complement. In erythrocyte lysis assays, polyphosphate comprising more than 1000 phosphate units suppressed total hemolytic activity with a concentration to reduce maximal lysis to 50% that was 10-fold lower than with monophosphate. In the ion- and enzyme-independent terminal pathway complement assay, polyphosphate suppressed complement in a concentration- and size-dependent manner. Phosphatase-treated polyphosphate lost its ability to suppress complement, confirming that polymer integrity is required. Sequential addition of polyphosphate to the terminal pathway assay showed that polyphosphate interferes with complement only when added before formation of the C5b-7 complex. Physicochemical analyses using native gels, gel filtration, and differential scanning fluorimetry revealed that polyphosphate binds to and destabilizes C5b,6, thereby reducing the capacity of the membrane attack complex to bind to and lyse the target cell. In summary, we have added another function to polyphosphate in blood, demonstrating that it dampens the innate immune response by suppressing complement. These findings further establish the complex relationship between coagulation and innate immunity. PMID:24335501

  6. Spacecraft Fire Suppression: Testing and Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbud-Madrid, Angel; McKinnon, J. Thomas; Delplanque, Jean-Pierre; Kailasanath, Kazhikathra; Gokoglu, Suleyman; Wu, Ming-Shin

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this project is the testing and evaluation of the effectiveness of a variety of fire suppressants and fire-response techniques that will be used in the next generation of spacecraft (Crew Exploration Vehicle, CEV) and planetary habitats. From the many lessons learned in the last 40 years of space travel, there is common agreement in the spacecraft fire safety community that a new fire suppression system will be needed for the various types of fire threats anticipated in new space vehicles and habitats. To date, there is no single fire extinguishing system that can address all possible fire situations in a spacecraft in an effective, reliable, clean, and safe way. The testing conducted under this investigation will not only validate the various numerical models that are currently being developed, but it will provide new design standards on fire suppression that can then be applied to the next generation of spacecraft extinguishment systems. The test program will provide validation of scaling methods by conducting small, medium, and large scale fires. A variety of suppression methods will be tested, such as water mist, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen with single and multiple injection points and direct or distributed agent deployment. These injection methods cover the current ISS fire suppression method of a portable hand-held fire extinguisher spraying through a port in a rack and also next generation spacecraft units that may have a multi-point suppression delivery system built into the design. Consideration will be given to the need of a crew to clean-up the agent and recharge the extinguishers in flight in a long-duration mission. The fire suppression methods mentioned above will be used to extinguish several fire scenarios that have been identified as the most relevant to spaceflight, such as overheated wires, cable bundles, and circuit boards, as well as burning cloth and paper. Further testing will be conducted in which obstructions and

  7. Mesoscopic electronics beyond DC transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Carlo, Leonardo

    Since the inception of mesoscopic electronics in the 1980's, direct current (dc) measurements have underpinned experiments in quantum transport. Novel techniques complementing dc transport are becoming paramount to new developments in mesoscopic electronics, particularly as the road is paved toward quantum information processing. This thesis describes seven experiments on GaAs/AlGaAs and graphene nanostructures unified by experimental techniques going beyond traditional dc transport. Firstly, dc current induced by microwave radiation applied to an open chaotic quantum dot is investigated. Asymmetry of mesoscopic fluctuations of induced current in perpendicular magnetic field is established as a tool for separating the quantum photovoltaic effect from classical rectification. A differential charge sensing technique is next developed using integrated quantum point contacts to resolve the spatial distribution of charge inside a double quantum clot. An accurate method for determining interdot tunnel coupling and electron temperature using charge sensing is demonstrated. A two-channel system for detecting current noise in mesoscopic conductors is developed, enabling four experiments where shot noise probes transmission properties not available in dc transport and Johnson noise serves as an electron thermometer. Suppressed shot noise is observed in quantum point contacts at zero parallel magnetic field, associated with the 0.7 structure in conductance. This suppression evolves with increasing field into the shot-noise signature of spin-lifted mode degeneracy. Quantitative agreement is found with a phenomenological model for density-dependent mode splitting. Shot noise measurements of multi-lead quantum-dot structures in the Coulomb blockade regime distill the mechanisms by which Coulomb interaction and quantum indistinguishability correlate electron flow. Gate-controlled sign reversal of noise cross correlation in two capacitively-coupled dots is observed, and shown to

  8. Immune Suppression and Immune Activation in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D.; Evans, Dwight L.

    2010-01-01

    Depression has been characterized as a disorder of both immune suppression and immune activation. Markers of impaired cellular immunity (decreased natural killer cell cytotoxicity) and inflammation (elevated IL-6, TNFα, CRP) have been associated with depression. These immunological markers have been associated with other medical illnesses, suggesting that immune dysregulation may be a central feature common to both depression and to its frequent medical comorbidities. Yet the significant associations of findings of both immune suppression and immune activation with depression raise questions concerning the relationship between these two classes of immunological observations. Depressed populations are heterogeneous groups, and there may be differences in the immune profiles of populations that are more narrowly defined in terms of symptom profile and/or demographic features. There have been few reports concurrently investigating markers of immune suppression and immune activation in the same depressed individuals. An emerging preclinical literature suggests that chronic inflammation may directly contribute to the pathophysiology of immune suppression in the context of illnesses such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. This literature provides us with specific immunoregulatory mechanisms mediating these relationships that could also explain differences in immune disturbances between subsets of depressed individuals We propose a research agenda emphasizing the assessment of these immunoregulatory mechanisms in large samples of depressed subjects as a means to define the relationships among immune findings (suppression and/or activation) within the same depressed individuals and to characterize subsets of depressed subjects based on shared immune profiles. Such a program of research, building on and integrating our knowledge of the psychoneuroimmunology of depression, could lead to innovation in the assessment and treatment of depression and its medical comorbidities

  9. A current view of serotonin transporters.

    PubMed

    De Felice, Louis J

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin transporters (SERTs) are largely recognized for one aspect of their function-to transport serotonin back into the presynaptic terminal after its release. Another aspect of their function, however, may be to generate currents large enough to have physiological consequences. The standard model for electrogenic transport is the alternating access model, in which serotonin is transported with a fixed ratio of co-transported ions resulting in net charge per cycle. The alternating access model, however, cannot account for all the observed currents through SERT or other monoamine transporters.  Furthermore, SERT agonists like ecstasy or antagonists like fluoxetine generate or suppress currents that the standard model cannot support.  Here we survey evidence for a channel mode of transport in which transmitters and ions move through a pore. Available structures for dopamine and serotonin transporters, however, provide no evidence for a pore conformation, raising questions of whether the proposed channel mode actually exists or whether the structural data are perhaps missing a transient open state. PMID:27540474

  10. A current view of serotonin transporters

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Louis J.

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin transporters (SERTs) are largely recognized for one aspect of their function—to transport serotonin back into the presynaptic terminal after its release. Another aspect of their function, however, may be to generate currents large enough to have physiological consequences. The standard model for electrogenic transport is the alternating access model, in which serotonin is transported with a fixed ratio of co-transported ions resulting in net charge per cycle. The alternating access model, however, cannot account for all the observed currents through SERT or other monoamine transporters.  Furthermore, SERT agonists like ecstasy or antagonists like fluoxetine generate or suppress currents that the standard model cannot support.  Here we survey evidence for a channel mode of transport in which transmitters and ions move through a pore. Available structures for dopamine and serotonin transporters, however, provide no evidence for a pore conformation, raising questions of whether the proposed channel mode actually exists or whether the structural data are perhaps missing a transient open state. PMID:27540474

  11. The tendency to suppress, inhibiting thoughts, and dream rebound.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Fiona; Bryant, Richard A

    2007-01-01

    Ironic control theory proposes that suppressing thoughts leads to increased occurrence of the suppressed thought because monitoring for the unwanted thought leads to intrusions. This study investigated the influence of suppressing unwanted thoughts on dream content. One hundred participants who had high or low levels of tendency to suppress unwanted thoughts nominated an intrusive thought, and half of the participants were instructed to suppress that thought for 5 min prior to sleeping. Participants completed a dream diary upon waking, which was subsequently rated by independent raters for dream content. In terms of the 79 participants who reported dreaming, more high suppressors who were instructed to suppress dreamt about the intrusive thought than high suppressors in the control condition. There was no difference between low suppressors in the suppression and control conditions. These results suggest that dream content can be influenced by attempted suppression prior to sleep, and this is particularly apparent in people with a tendency to suppress unwanted thoughts. PMID:16516140

  12. Proton Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The transport of protons across membranes is an essential process for both bioenergetics of modern cells and the origins of cellular life. All living systems make use of proton gradients across cell walls to convert environmental energy into a high-energy chemical compound, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), synthesized from adenosine diphosphate. ATP, in turn, is used as a source of energy to drive many cellular reactions. The ubiquity of this process in biology suggests that even the earliest cellular systems were relying on proton gradient for harvesting environmental energy needed to support their survival and growth. In contemporary cells, proton transfer is assisted by large, complex proteins embedded in membranes. The issue addressed in this Study was: how the same process can be accomplished with the aid of similar but much simpler molecules that could have existed in the protobiological milieu? The model system used in the study contained a bilayer membrane made of phospholipid, dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) which is a good model of the biological membranes forming cellular boundaries. Both sides of the bilayer were surrounded by water which simulated the environment inside and outside the cell. Embedded in the membrane was a fragment of the Influenza-A M$_2$ protein and enough sodium counterions to maintain system neutrality. This protein has been shown to exhibit remarkably high rates of proton transport and, therefore, is an excellent model to study the formation of proton gradients across membranes. The Influenza M$_2$ protein is 97 amino acids in length, but a fragment 25 amino acids long. which contains a transmembrane domain of 19 amino acids flanked by three amino acids on each side. is sufficient to transport protons. Four identical protein fragments, each folded into a helix, aggregate to form small channels spanning the membrane. Protons are conducted through a narrow pore in the middle of the channel in response to applied voltage. This

  13. Paradoxical lateral suppression in the dolphin's auditory system: weak sounds suppress response to strong sounds.

    PubMed

    Popov, V V; Supin AYa; Klishin, V O

    1997-09-26

    A paradoxical phenomenon was found in the auditory system of dolphins: weak sounds suppressed the brain responses to much stronger sounds. This occurred when the brain evoked potentials to rhythmic sound amplitude modulations were recorded. The response was markedly suppressed by addition of another sound of higher frequency and down to 40 dB lower intensity than the amplitude-modulated signal. Only the sustained rhythmic response was suppressed while transient on-response was not, thus indicating that the suppression influenced the ability of evoked potentials to follow rapid amplitude modulations. This prevents weak sounds from being masked by stronger ones. It may help a dolphin to perceive weaker echo-signals in the background of stronger emitted pulses. PMID:9347944

  14. Suppressed visual looming stimuli are not integrated with auditory looming signals: Evidence from continuous flash suppression

    PubMed Central

    Moors, Pieter; Huygelier, Hanne; Wagemans, Johan; de-Wit, Lee; van Ee, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies using binocular rivalry have shown that signals in a modality other than the visual can bias dominance durations depending on their congruency with the rivaling stimuli. More recently, studies using continuous flash suppression (CFS) have reported that multisensory integration influences how long visual stimuli remain suppressed. In this study, using CFS, we examined whether the contrast thresholds for detecting visual looming stimuli are influenced by a congruent auditory stimulus. In Experiment 1, we show that a looming visual stimulus can result in lower detection thresholds compared to a static concentric grating, but that auditory tone pips congruent with the looming stimulus did not lower suppression thresholds any further. In Experiments 2, 3, and 4, we again observed no advantage for congruent multisensory stimuli. These results add to our understanding of the conditions under which multisensory integration is possible, and suggest that certain forms of multisensory integration are not evident when the visual stimulus is suppressed from awareness using CFS. PMID:26034573

  15. Advances in the Understanding of ELM Suppression by Resonant Magnetic Perturbations (RMPs) in DIII-D and Implications for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Nazikian, R.

    2014-09-01

    Experiments on DIII-D have expanding the operating window for RMP ELM suppression to higher q95 with dominant electron heating and fully non-inductive current drive relevant to advanced modes of ITER operation. Robust ELM suppression has also been obtained with a reduced coil set, mitigating the risk of coil failure in maintaining ELM suppression in ITER. These results significantly expand the operating space and reduce risk for obtaining RMP ELM suppression in ITER. Efforts have also been made to search for 3D cause of ELM suppression. No internal non-axisymmetric structure is detected at the top of the pedestal, indicating that the dominant effect of the RMP is to produce an n=0 transport modification of the profiles. Linear two fluid MHD simulations using M3D-C1 indicate resonant field penetration and significant magnetic stochasticity at the top of the pedestal, consistent with the absence of detectable 3D structure in that region. A profile database was developed to compare the scaling of the pedestal and global confinement with the applied 3D field strength in ELM suppressed and ELM mitigated plasmas. The EPED pedestal model accurately predicts the measured pedestal pressure at the threshold of ELM suppression, increasing confidence in theoretical projections to ITER pedestal conditions. Both the H-factor (H(sub)98y2) and thermal energy confinement time do not degrade substantially with applied RMP fields near the threshold of ELM suppression, enhancing confidence in the compatibility of ITER high performance operation with RMP ELM suppression.

  16. Benchmark enclosure fire suppression experiments - phase 1 test report.

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, Victor G.; Nichols, Robert Thomas; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2007-06-01

    A series of fire benchmark water suppression tests were performed that may provide guidance for dispersal systems for the protection of high value assets. The test results provide boundary and temporal data necessary for water spray suppression model development and validation. A review of fire suppression in presented for both gaseous suppression and water mist fire suppression. The experimental setup and procedure for gathering water suppression performance data are shown. Characteristics of the nozzles used in the testing are presented. Results of the experiments are discussed.

  17. Evolutionary suppression of erythropoiesis via the modulation of TGF-β signalling in an Antarctic icefish.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qianghua; Cai, Chang; Hu, Xingxing; Liu, Yun; Guo, Yanan; Hu, Peng; Chen, Zuozhou; Peng, Sihua; Zhang, Dongsheng; Jiang, Shouwen; Wu, Zhichao; Chan, Jiulin; Chen, Liangbiao

    2015-09-01

    The Antarctic icefish, a family (Channichthyidae) of teleosts within the perciform suborder Notothenioidei, are the only known vertebrates without oxygen-transporting haemoglobins and that are largely devoid of circulating erythrocytes. To elucidate the evo-devo mechanisms underpinning the suppressed erythropoiesis in the icefish, we conducted comparative studies on the transcriptomes and microRNAomes of the primary haematopoietic tissues between an icefish (Chionodraco hamatus) and two red-blooded notothenioids (Trematomus bernacchii and Gymnodraco acuticeps). We identified substantial remodelling of the haematopoietic programs in the icefish through which erythropoiesis is selectively suppressed. Experimental verification showed that erythropoietic suppression in the icefish may be attributable to the upregulation of TGF-β signalling, which coincides with reductions in multiple transcription factors essential for erythropoiesis and the upregulation of hundreds of microRNAs, the majority (> 80%) of which potentially target erythropoiesis regulating factors. Of the six microRNAs selected for verification, three miRNAs (miR-152, miR-1388 and miR-16b) demonstrated suppressive functions on GATA1 and ALAS2, which are two factors important for erythroid differentiation, resulting in reduced numbers of erythroids in microinjected zebra fish embryos. Codon substitution analyses of the genes of the TGF-β superfamily revealed signs of positive selection in TGF-β1 and endoglin in the lineages leading to Antarctic notothenioids. Both genes are previously known to function in erythropoietic suppression. These findings implied a general trend of erythropoietic suppression in the cold-adapted notothenioid lineages through evolutionary modulation of the multi-functional TGF-β signalling pathway. This trend is more pronounced in the haemoglobin-less icefish, which may pre-emptively hinder the otherwise defective erythroids from production. PMID:26268413

  18. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Suppression of HIV Infectivity and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Tami; Lynch, Kevin; Dubé, Benoit; Gettes, David R.; Tustin, Nancy B.; Lai, Jian Ping; Metzger, David S.; Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D.; Evans, Dwight L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram would down regulate HIV infectivity and that the greatest effects would be seen in people with depression. Depression is a risk factor for morbidity and mortality in HIV/AIDS. Serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathobiology of depression, and pharmacologic therapies for depression target this system. The 5-HT transporter and 5-HT receptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous and immune systems. Depression has been associated with suppression of natural killer cells (NK) cells and CD8+ lymphocytes, key regulators of HIV infection. Methods Ex-vivo models for acute and chronic HIV infection were used to study the effects of citalopram on HIV viral infection and replication, in 48 depressed and non-depressed women. For both the acute and chronic infection models, HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) activity was measured in the citalopram treatment condition and the control condition. Results The SSRI significantly downregulated the RT response in both the acute and chronic infection models. Specifically, citalopram significantly decreased the acute HIV infectivity of macrophages. Citalopram also significantly decreased HIV viral replication in the latently infected T-cell line and in the latently infected macrophage cell line. There was no difference in down-regulation by depression status. Conclusions These studies suggest that an SSRI enhances NK/CD8 non-cytolytic HIV suppression in HIV/AIDS and decreases HIV viral infectivity of macrophages, ex vivo, suggesting the need for in vivo studies to determine a potential role for agents targeting serotonin in the host defense against HIV. PMID:20947783

  19. Turbulent transport across shear layers in magnetically confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nold, B.; Ramisch, M.; Manz, P.; Birkenmeier, G.; Ribeiro, T. T.; Müller, H. W.; Scott, B. D.; Fuchert, G.; Stroth, U.

    2014-10-15

    Shear layers modify the turbulence in diverse ways and do not only suppress it. A spatial-temporal investigation of gyrofluid simulations in comparison with experiments allows to identify further details of the transport process across shear layers. Blobs in and outside a shear layer merge, thereby exchange particles and heat and subsequently break up. Via this mechanism particles and heat are transported radially across shear layers. Turbulence spreading is the immanent mechanism behind this process.

  20. SPARCL1 suppresses metastasis in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yuzhu; Qiu, Qingchao; Jiang, Ming; Jin, Renjie; Lehmann, Brian D; Strand, Douglas W; Jovanovic, Bojana; DeGraff, David J; Zheng, Yi; Yousif, Dina A; Case, Thomas C; Yi, Jia; Cates, Justin M; Virostko, John; He, Xiusheng; Jin, Xunbo; Hayward, Simon W; Matusik, Robert J; George, Alfred L; Yi, Yajun

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Metastasis, the main cause of death from cancer, remains poorly understood at the molecular level. Experimental design Based on a pattern of reduced expression in human prostate cancer tissues and tumor cell lines, a candidate suppressor gene (SPARCL1) was identified. We used in vitro approaches to determine whether overexpression of SPARCL1 affects cell growth, migration, and invasiveness. We then employed xenograft mouse models to analyze the impact of SPARCL1 on prostate cancer cell growth and metastasis in vivo. Results SPARCL1 expression did not inhibit tumor cell proliferation in vitro. By contrast, SPARCL1 did suppress tumor cell migration and invasiveness in vitro and tumor metastatic growth in vivo, conferring improved survival in xenograft mouse models. Conclusions We present the first in vivo data suggesting that SPARCL1 suppresses metastasis of prostate cancer. PMID:23916135

  1. Mercury vapour suppression by various liquid media.

    PubMed

    Sutow, E J; Foong, W C; Rizkalla, A S; Jones, D W; Power, N L

    1994-09-01

    Fresh and used photographic fixer, Merconvap and water were evaluated for their ability to suppress the vapourization of mercury. Mercury vapour concentration above the four test storage liquids was measured at various times between 10 min and 335 days, using a mercury vapour measuring instrument. The data were analysed using a Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test (P = 0.05). The results showed that fresh and used fixer and Merconvap suppressed the vapourization of mercury to below the detection limit of the measuring instrument (0.01 mg/m3). Water was much less effective compared with the other liquids and showed an increase in mercury vapour concentration with log t. PMID:7996339

  2. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  3. Deciphering and Reversing Tumor Immune Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Motz, Greg T.; Coukos, George

    2013-01-01

    Generating an anti-tumor immune response is a multi-step process that is executed by effector T cells that can recognize and kill tumor targets. However, tumors employ multiple strategies to attenuate the effectiveness of T cell-mediated attack. This is achieved by interfering with nearly every step required for effective immunity, from deregulation of antigen-presenting cells, to establishment of a physical barrier at the vasculature that prevents homing of effector tumor-rejecting cells, and through the suppression of effector lymphocytes through the recruitment and activation of immunosuppressive cells like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), tolerogenic monocytes and T regulatory cells (Tregs). Here, we review the ways in which tumors exert immune suppression and highlight the new therapies that seek to reverse this phenomenon and promote anti-tumor immunity. Understanding anti-tumor immunity, and how it becomes disabled by tumors, will ultimately lead to improved immune therapies and prolonged survival of patients. PMID:23890064

  4. Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Matthew S; Mainwaring, Benjamin; Yue, Zhifeng; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances negatively impact numerous functions and have been linked to aggression and violence. However, a clear effect of sleep deprivation on aggressive behaviors remains unclear. We find that acute sleep deprivation profoundly suppresses aggressive behaviors in the fruit fly, while other social behaviors are unaffected. This suppression is recovered following post-deprivation sleep rebound, and occurs regardless of the approach to achieve sleep loss. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches suggest octopamine signaling transmits changes in aggression upon sleep deprivation, and reduced aggression places sleep-deprived flies at a competitive disadvantage for obtaining a reproductive partner. These findings demonstrate an interaction between two phylogenetically conserved behaviors, and suggest that previous sleep experiences strongly modulate aggression with consequences for reproductive fitness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07643.001 PMID:26216041

  5. Immersion diuresis without expected suppression of vasopressin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keil, L. C.; Silver, J. E.; Wong, N.; Spaul, W. A.; Greenleaf, J. E.; Kravik, S. E.

    1984-01-01

    There is a shift of blood from the lower parts of the body to the thoracic circulation during bed rest, water immersion, and presumably during weightlessness. On earth, this central fluid shift is associated with a profound diuresis. However, the mechanism involved is not yet well understood. The present investigation is concerned with measurements regarding the plasma vasopressin, fluid, electrolyte, and plasma renin activity (PRA) responses in subjects with normal preimmersion plasma vasopressin (PVP) concentration. In the conducted experiments, PRA was suppressed significantly at 30 min of immersion and had declined by 74 percent by the end of the experiment. On the basis of previously obtained results, it appears that sodium excretion during immersion may be independent of aldosterone action. Experimental results indicate that PVP is not suppressed by water immersion in normally hydrated subjects and that other factors may be responsible for the diuresis.

  6. Suppression of Vortex Induced Vibrations by Fairings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yue; Yan, Hongmei; Constantinides, Yiannis; Oakley, Owen; Karniadakis, George

    2013-11-01

    Fairings are nearly-neutrally buoyant devices, which are fitted along the axis of long circular risers to suppress vortex induced vibrations (VIV) and possibly reduce the drag force. Here we study numerically how VIV can be practically eliminated by using free-to-rotate fairings. Since the mass ratio and rotational inertia are both low for the fairings, direct numerical simulations based on standard flow-structure interaction algorithms fail because of the so-called added mass effect. To resolve this problem we introduce fictitious methods and successfully stabilize the simulations. In particular, we investigate the effect of rotational friction Cf on the stabilization effect of the fairings. We found that there exists a critical value for the rotational friction, and when Cf is close to this value, large oscillations and unsymmetrical trajectories can be observed for the riser but for smaller Cf values VIV are suppressed substantially.

  7. Compton suppression through rise-time analysis.

    PubMed

    Selvi, S; Celiktas, C

    2007-11-01

    We studied Compton suppression for 60Co and 137Cs radioisotopes using a signal selection criterion based on contrasting the fall time of the signals composing the photo peak with those composing the Compton continuum. The fall time criterion is employed by using the pulse shape analysis observing the change in the fall times of the gamma-ray pulses. This change is determined by measuring the changes in the rise times related to the fall time of the scintillator and the timing signals related to the fall time of the input signals. We showed that Compton continuum suppression is achieved best via the precise timing adjustment of an analog rise-time analyzer connected to a NaI(Tl) scintillation spectrometer. PMID:17703943

  8. Adaptive Suppression of Noise in Voice Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozel, David; DeVault, James A.; Birr, Richard B.

    2003-01-01

    A subsystem for the adaptive suppression of noise in a voice communication system effects a high level of reduction of noise that enters the system through microphones. The subsystem includes a digital signal processor (DSP) plus circuitry that implements voice-recognition and spectral- manipulation techniques. The development of the adaptive noise-suppression subsystem was prompted by the following considerations: During processing of the space shuttle at Kennedy Space Center, voice communications among test team members have been significantly impaired in several instances because some test participants have had to communicate from locations with high ambient noise levels. Ear protection for the personnel involved is commercially available and is used in such situations. However, commercially available noise-canceling microphones do not provide sufficient reduction of noise that enters through microphones and thus becomes transmitted on outbound communication links.

  9. HIV-1 Reservoirs During Suppressive Therapy.

    PubMed

    Barton, Kirston; Winckelmann, Anni; Palmer, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    The introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) 20 years ago has dramatically reduced morbidity and mortality associated with HIV-1. Initially there was hope that ART would be curative, but it quickly became clear that even though ART was able to restore CD4(+) T cell counts and suppress viral loads below levels of detection, discontinuation of treatment resulted in a rapid rebound of infection. This is due to persistence of a small reservoir of latently infected cells with a long half-life, which necessitates life-long ART. Over the past few years, significant progress has been made in defining and characterizing the latent reservoir of HIV-1, and here we review how understanding the latent reservoir during suppressive therapy will lead to significant advances in curative approaches for HIV-1. PMID:26875617

  10. Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Matthew S; Mainwaring, Benjamin; Yue, Zhifeng; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances negatively impact numerous functions and have been linked to aggression and violence. However, a clear effect of sleep deprivation on aggressive behaviors remains unclear. We find that acute sleep deprivation profoundly suppresses aggressive behaviors in the fruit fly, while other social behaviors are unaffected. This suppression is recovered following post-deprivation sleep rebound, and occurs regardless of the approach to achieve sleep loss. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches suggest octopamine signaling transmits changes in aggression upon sleep deprivation, and reduced aggression places sleep-deprived flies at a competitive disadvantage for obtaining a reproductive partner. These findings demonstrate an interaction between two phylogenetically conserved behaviors, and suggest that previous sleep experiences strongly modulate aggression with consequences for reproductive fitness. PMID:26216041

  11. System for Suppressing Vibration in Turbomachine Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R. (Inventor); Provenza, Andrew J. (Inventor); Choi, Benjamin B. (Inventor); Bakhle, Milind A. (Inventor); Min, James B (Inventor); Stefko, George L. (Inventor); Kussmann, John A (Inventor); Fougere, Alan J (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed is a system for suppressing vibration and noise mitigation in structures such as blades in turbomachinery. The system includes flexible piezoelectric patches which are secured on or imbedded in turbomachinery blades which, in one embodiment, comprises eight (8) fan blades. The system further includes a capacitor plate coupler and a power transfer apparatus, which may both be arranged into one assembly, that respectively transfer data and power. Each of the capacitive plate coupler and power transfer apparatus is configured so that one part is attached to a fixed member while another part is attached to a rotatable member with an air gap there between. The system still further includes a processor that has 16 channels, eight of which serve as sensor channels, and the remaining eight, serving as actuation channels. The processor collects and analyzes the sensor signals and, in turn, outputs corrective signals for vibration/noise suppression of the turbine blades.

  12. Overcoming fixation with repeated memory suppression.

    PubMed

    Angello, Genna; Storm, Benjamin C; Smith, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Fixation (blocks to memories or ideas) can be alleviated not only by encouraging productive work towards a solution, but, as the present experiments show, by reducing counterproductive work. Two experiments examined relief from fixation in a word-fragment completion task. Blockers, orthographically similar negative primes (e.g., ANALOGY), blocked solutions to word fragments (e.g., A_L_ _GY) in both experiments. After priming, but before the fragment completion test, participants repeatedly suppressed half of the blockers using the Think/No-Think paradigm, which results in memory inhibition. Inhibiting blockers did not alleviate fixation in Experiment 1 when conscious recollection of negative primes was not encouraged on the fragment completion test. In Experiment 2, however, when participants were encouraged to remember negative primes at fragment completion, relief from fixation was observed. Repeated suppression may nullify fixation effects, and promote creative thinking, particularly when fixation is caused by conscious recollection of counterproductive information. PMID:24575886

  13. Adaptive Modal Identification for Flutter Suppression Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan T.; Drew, Michael; Swei, Sean S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we will develop an adaptive modal identification method for identifying the frequencies and damping of a flutter mode based on model-reference adaptive control (MRAC) and least-squares methods. The least-squares parameter estimation will achieve parameter convergence in the presence of persistent excitation whereas the MRAC parameter estimation does not guarantee parameter convergence. Two adaptive flutter suppression control approaches are developed: one based on MRAC and the other based on the least-squares method. The MRAC flutter suppression control is designed as an integral part of the parameter estimation where the feedback signal is used to estimate the modal information. On the other hand, the separation principle of control and estimation is applied to the least-squares method. The least-squares modal identification is used to perform parameter estimation.

  14. Active flutter suppression using dipole filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinathkumar, S.; Waszak, Martin R.

    1992-01-01

    By using traditional control concepts of gain root locus, the active suppression of a flutter mode of a flexible wing is examined. It is shown that the attraction of the unstable mode towards a critical system zero determines the degree to which the flutter mode can be stabilized. For control situations where the critical zero is adversely placed in the complex plane, a novel compensation scheme called a 'Dipole' filter is proposed. This filter ensures that the flutter mode is stabilized with acceptable control energy. The control strategy is illustrated by designing flutter suppression laws for an active flexible wing (AFW) wind-tunnel model, where minimal control effort solutions are mandated by control rate saturation problems caused by wind-tunnel turbulence.

  15. Suppression of friction by mechanical vibrations.

    PubMed

    Capozza, Rosario; Vanossi, Andrea; Vezzani, Alessandro; Zapperi, Stefano

    2009-08-21

    Mechanical vibrations are known to affect frictional sliding and the associated stick-slip patterns causing sometimes a drastic reduction of the friction force. This issue is relevant for applications in nanotribology and to understand earthquake triggering by small dynamic perturbations. We study the dynamics of repulsive particles confined between a horizontally driven top plate and a vertically oscillating bottom plate. Our numerical results show a suppression of the high dissipative stick-slip regime in a well-defined range of frequencies that depends on the vibrating amplitude, the normal applied load, the system inertia and the damping constant. We propose a theoretical explanation of the numerical results and derive a phase diagram indicating the region of parameter space where friction is suppressed. Our results allow to define better strategies for the mechanical control of friction. PMID:19792738

  16. Fire suppression in human-crew spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, Robert; Dietrich, Daniel L.

    1991-01-01

    Fire extinguishment agents range from water and foam in early-design spacecraft (Halon 1301 in the present Shuttle) to carbon dioxide proposed for the Space Station Freedom. The major challenge to spacecraft fire extinguishment design and operations is from the micro-gravity environment, which minimizes natural convection and profoundly influences combustion and extinguishing agent effectiveness, dispersal, and post-fire cleanup. Discussed here are extinguishment in microgravity, fire-suppression problems anticipated in future spacecraft, and research needs and opportunities.

  17. [Cancer immunotherapy. Importance of overcoming immune suppression].

    PubMed

    Malvicini, Mariana; Puchulo, Guillermo; Matar, Pablo; Mazzolini, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the immune system is involved in the control of tumor progression. Effective antitumor immune response depends on the interaction between several components of the immune system, including antigen-presenting cells and different T cell subsets. However, tumor cells develop a number of mechanisms to escape recognition and elimination by the immune system. In this review we discuss these mechanisms and address possible therapeutic approaches to overcome the immune suppression generated by tumors. PMID:21163748

  18. Currently available cough suppressants for chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kian Fan

    2008-01-01

    Chronic cough is a common symptom but only a fraction of patients seek medical attention. Addressing the causes of chronic cough may lead to control of cough; however, this approach is not always successful since there is a certain degree of failure even when the cause(s) of cough are adequately treated; in idiopathic cough, there is no cause to treat. Persistent cough may be associated with deterioration of quality of life, and treatment with cough suppressants is indicated. Currently available cough suppressants include the centrally acting opioids such as morphine, codeine, and dextromethorphan. Peripherally acting antitussives include moguisteine and levodropropizine. Early studies report success in reducing cough in patients with chronic bronchitis or COPD; however, a carefully conducted study showed no effect of codeine on cough of COPD. Success with these cough suppressants can be achieved at high doses that are associated with side effects. Slow-release morphine has been reported to be useful in controlling intractable cough with good tolerance to constipation and drowsiness. There have been case reports of the success of centrally acting drugs such as amitryptiline, paroxetine, gabapentin, and carbamezepine in chronic cough. New opioids such as nociceptin or antagonists of TRPV1 may turn out to be more effective. Efficacy of cough suppressants must be tested in double-blind randomised trials using validated measures of cough in patients with chronic cough not responding to specific treatments. Patients with chronic cough are in desperate need of effective antitussives that can be used either on demand or on a long-term basis. PMID:17909897

  19. Neural-Network Controller For Vibration Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boussalis, Dhemetrios; Wang, Shyh Jong

    1995-01-01

    Neural-network-based adaptive-control system proposed for vibration suppression of flexible space structures. Controller features three-layer neural network and utilizes output feedback. Measurements generated by various sensors on structure. Feed forward path also included to speed up response in case plant exhibits predominantly linear dynamic behavior. System applicable to single-input single-output systems. Work extended to multiple-input multiple-output systems as well.

  20. Isoform-selective inhibition of facilitative glucose transporters: elucidation of the molecular mechanism of HIV protease inhibitor binding.

    PubMed

    Hresko, Richard C; Kraft, Thomas E; Tzekov, Anatoly; Wildman, Scott A; Hruz, Paul W

    2014-06-01

    Pharmacologic HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) and structurally related oligopeptides are known to reversibly bind and inactivate the insulin-responsive facilitative glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). Several PIs exhibit isoform selectivity with little effect on GLUT1. The ability to target individual GLUT isoforms in an acute and reversible manner provides novel means both to investigate the contribution of individual GLUTs to health and disease and to develop targeted treatment of glucose-dependent diseases. To determine the molecular basis of transport inhibition, a series of chimeric proteins containing transmembrane and cytosolic domains from GLUT1 and GLUT4 and/or point mutations were generated and expressed in HEK293 cells. Structural integrity was confirmed via measurement of N-[2-[2-[2-[(N-biotinylcaproylamino)ethoxy)ethoxyl]-4-[2-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]benzoyl]-1,3-bis(mannopyranosyl-4-yloxy)-2-propylamine (ATB-BMPA) labeling of the chimeric proteins in low density microsome fractions isolated from stably transfected 293 cells. Functional integrity was assessed via measurement of zero-trans 2-deoxyglucose (2-DOG) uptake. ATB-BMPA labeling studies and 2-DOG uptake revealed that transmembrane helices 1 and 5 contain amino acid residues that influence inhibitor access to the transporter binding domain. Substitution of Thr-30 and His-160 in GLUT1 to the corresponding positions in GLUT4 is sufficient to completely transform GLUT1 into GLUT4 with respect to indinavir inhibition of 2-DOG uptake and ATB-BMPA binding. These data provide a structural basis for the selectivity of PIs toward GLUT4 over GLUT1 that can be used in ongoing novel drug design. PMID:24706759

  1. Neural Networks for Mindfulness and Emotion Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Katsunuma, Ruri; Oba, Kentaro; Terasawa, Yuri; Motomura, Yuki; Mishima, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Mindfulness, an attentive non-judgmental focus on “here and now” experiences, has been incorporated into various cognitive behavioral therapy approaches and beneficial effects have been demonstrated. Recently, mindfulness has also been identified as a potentially effective emotion regulation strategy. On the other hand, emotion suppression, which refers to trying to avoid or escape from experiencing and being aware of one’s own emotions, has been identified as a potentially maladaptive strategy. Previous studies suggest that both strategies can decrease affective responses to emotional stimuli. They would, however, be expected to provide regulation through different top-down modulation systems. The present study was aimed at elucidating the different neural systems underlying emotion regulation via mindfulness and emotion suppression approaches. Twenty-one healthy participants used the two types of strategy in response to emotional visual stimuli while functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted. Both strategies attenuated amygdala responses to emotional triggers, but the pathways to regulation differed across the two. A mindful approach appears to regulate amygdala functioning via functional connectivity from the medial prefrontal cortex, while suppression uses connectivity with other regions, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Thus, the two types of emotion regulation recruit different top-down modulation processes localized at prefrontal areas. These different pathways are discussed. PMID:26083379

  2. Modified Beamformers for Coherent Source Region Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Sekihara, Kensuke; Nagarajan, Srikantan S.

    2011-01-01

    Many tomographic source localization algorithms used in biomagnetic imaging assume, explicitly or sometimes implicitly, that the source activity at different brain locations are either independent or that the correlation structure between sources is known. Among these algorithms is a class of adaptive spatial filters known as beamformers, which have superior spatiotemporal resolution abilities. The performance of beamformers is robust to weakly coherent sources. However, these algorithms are extremely sensitive to the presence of strongly coherent sources. A frequent mode of failure in beamformers occurs with reconstruction of auditory evoked fields (AEFs), in which bilateral auditory cortices are highly coherent in their activation. Here, we present a novel beamformer that suppresses activation from regions with interfering coherent sources. First, a volume containing the interfering sources is defined. The lead field matrix for this volume is computed and reduced into a few significant columns using singular value decomposition (SVD). A vector beamformer is then constructed by rejecting the contribution of sources in the suppression region while allowing for source reconstruction at other specified regions. Performance of this algorithm was first validated with simulated data. Subsequent tests of this modified beamformer were performed on bilateral AEF data. An unmodified vector beamformer using whole head coverage misplaces the source medially. After defining a suppression region containing the temporal cortex on one side, the described method consistently results in clear focal activations at expected regions of the contralateral superior temporal plane. PMID:16830939

  3. Effective rapid airframe suppression evaluation (ERASE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Michel

    1993-08-01

    This paper presents an analytical method to effectively and rapidly evaluate the impact of airframe suppression on electro-optical/infrared (E-O/IR) system lock-on range. This method is known as the Effective Rapid Airframe Suppression Evaluation (ERASE). It can be used to perform tradeoff analyses with respect to IR suppression systems and evaluate the impact of these systems on E-O/IR systems. This paper discusses a new set of dimensionless equations and how these equations are used to evaluate changes in airframe area, temperature, emissivity, and reflectivity (as a function of earthshine, solar reflections, and skyshine). Since the ERASE code has been formulated as a rapid computational tool (capable of generating over 1000 design variations in minutes), it is ideal for performing design tradeoffs against airframe shaping, thermal control systems, and diffuse reflectivity/emissivity control. Results from the ERASE code are presented using Grumman's System for IR Evaluation/Contrast Generator Code (SIRE/CONGEN) as input.

  4. Echolocation versus echo suppression in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wallmeier, Ludwig; Geßele, Nikodemus; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have shown that blind humans can gather spatial information through echolocation. However, when localizing sound sources, the precedence effect suppresses spatial information of echoes, and thereby conflicts with effective echolocation. This study investigates the interaction of echolocation and echo suppression in terms of discrimination suppression in virtual acoustic space. In the ‘Listening’ experiment, sighted subjects discriminated between positions of a single sound source, the leading or the lagging of two sources, respectively. In the ‘Echolocation’ experiment, the sources were replaced by reflectors. Here, the same subjects evaluated echoes generated in real time from self-produced vocalizations and thereby discriminated between positions of a single reflector, the leading or the lagging of two reflectors, respectively. Two key results were observed. First, sighted subjects can learn to discriminate positions of reflective surfaces echo-acoustically with accuracy comparable to sound source discrimination. Second, in the Listening experiment, the presence of the leading source affected discrimination of lagging sources much more than vice versa. In the Echolocation experiment, however, the presence of both the lead and the lag strongly affected discrimination. These data show that the classically described asymmetry in the perception of leading and lagging sounds is strongly diminished in an echolocation task. Additional control experiments showed that the effect is owing to both the direct sound of the vocalization that precedes the echoes and owing to the fact that the subjects actively vocalize in the echolocation task. PMID:23986105

  5. Is Infant Immunity Actively Suppressed or Immature?

    PubMed Central

    Gervassi, Ana L; Horton, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Almost 7 million children under the age 5 die each year, and most of these deaths are attributable to vaccine-preventable infections. Young infants respond poorly to infections and vaccines. In particular, dendritic cells secrete less IL-12 and IL-18, CD8pos T cells and NK cells have defective cytolysis and cytokine production, and CD4pos T cell responses tend to bias towards a Th2 phenotype and promotion of regulatory T cells (Tregs). The basis for these differences is not well understood and may be in part explained by epigenetic differences, as well as immaturity of the infant’s immune system. Here we present a third possibility, which involves active suppression by immune regulatory cells and place in context the immune suppressive pathways of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), CD5pos B cells, and Tregs. The immune pathways that these immune regulatory cells inhibit are similar to those that are defective in the infant. Therefore, the immune deficiencies seen in infants could be explained, in part, by active suppressive cells, indicating potential new avenues for intervention. PMID:25429207

  6. Suppression of Ostwald Ripening by Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwicker, David; Hyman, Anthony A.; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-03-01

    Emulsions consisting of droplets immersed in a fluid are typically unstable and coarsen over time. One important coarsening process is Ostwald ripening, which is driven by the surface tension of the droplets. Ostwald ripening must thus be suppressed to stabilize emulsions, e.g. to control the properties of pharmaceuticals, food, or cosmetics. Suppression of Ostwald ripening is also important in biological cells, which contain stable liquid-like compartments, e.g. germ granules, Cajal-bodies, and centrosomes. Such systems are often driven away from equilibrium by chemical reactions and can thus be called active emulsions. Here, we show that non-equilibrium chemical reactions can suppress Ostwald Ripening, leading to stable, monodisperse emulsions. We derive analytical approximations of the typical droplet size, droplet count, and time scale of the dynamics from a coarse-grained description of the droplet dynamics. We also compare these results to numerical simulations of the continuous concentration fields. Generally, we thus show how chemical reactions can be used to stabilize emulsions and to control their properties in technology and nature.

  7. Quantum Transport in Hybrid Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysokiński, K. I.; Domański, T.; Szukiewicz, B.; Michałek, Grzegorz; Bułka, Bogdan R.

    The study of charge, heat and spin transport in nanodevices is of theoretical and practical interest. The presence of ferromagnetic and/or superconducting electrodes adds new functionalities to the device and at the same time allows the observation of the interplay between various many body effects like e.g. Kondo effect and Andreev scattering. Here we shall consider nanosystems containing quantum dot (or a molecule) coupled to two or three external leads and analyze their local and non-local transport properties. The pairing correlations are induced in the quantum dot coupled to a superconducting lead via the proximity effect. For subgap voltages one observes the anomalous transport by means of direct and crossed Andreev reflections, whereas the usual single particle electronic transfer is suppressed. The interactions of electrons on the dot, leading to such phenomena as e.g. the Coulomb blockade severely modify the currents flowing in the system. Non-local effects in three terminal device have also been discussed and the experiments which could detect them have been proposed.

  8. System and method for suppressing sublimation using opacified aerogel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeff S. (Inventor); Snyder, G. Jeffrey (Inventor); Calliat, Thierry (Inventor); Fleurial, Jean-Pierre (Inventor); Jones, Steven M. (Inventor); Palk, Jong-Ah (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to a castable, aerogel-based, ultra-low thermal conductivity opacified insulation to suppress sublimation. More specifically, the present invention relates to an aerogel opacified with various opacifying or reflecting constituents to suppress sublimation and provide thermal insulation in thermoelectric modules. The opacifying constituent can be graded within the aerogel for increased sublimation suppression, and the density of the aerogel can similarly be graded to achieve optimal thermal insulation and sublimation suppression.

  9. Protective effect of carnosine after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion possibly through suppressing astrocyte activation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jing; Chen, Jihui; Bo, Shuhong; Lu, Xiaotong; Zhang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD) induced by chronic hypoperfusion is a common cause of vascular dementia. The aim of this study was to determine whether the protective effect of carnosine on white matter lesion after chronic cerebral hypoperfusion through suppressing astrocyte activation. Methods: Adult male mice (C57BL/6 strain) were subjected to permanent occlusion of the right unilateral common carotid arteries (rUCCAO) and treated with carnosine or histidine. Open field test, freezing test, Klüver-Barrera staining, immunohistochemical analyses and western blot were performed after rUCCAO. Results: We found that carnosine ameliorated white matter lesion and cognitive impairment after rUCCAO. Carnosine suppressed the activation of astrocyte in both wide type mice and histidine decarboxylase knockout mice. However, administration of histidine did not show the same effect. We found that there were no differences between rUCCAO group and sham group for the expression of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) and glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST). Furthermore, carnosine significantly attenuated the increase of inflammatory cytokine interferon gama. Conclusion: These data suggest carnosine induced neuroprotection during SIVD in mice is not dependent on the histaminergic pathway or the regulation of the expression of GLT-1 and GLAST, but may be due to a suppression of astrocyte activation and inflammatory cytokine release. PMID:26885268

  10. ESCRT-0 Is Not Required for Ectopic Notch Activation and Tumor Suppression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Tognon, Emiliana; Wollscheid, Nadine; Cortese, Katia; Tacchetti, Carlo; Vaccari, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Multivesicular endosome (MVE) sorting depends on proteins of the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT) family. These are organized in four complexes (ESCRT-0, -I, -II, -III) that act in a sequential fashion to deliver ubiquitylated cargoes into the internal luminal vesicles (ILVs) of the MVE. Drosophila genes encoding ESCRT-I, -II, -III components function in sorting signaling receptors, including Notch and the JAK/STAT signaling receptor Domeless. Loss of ESCRT-I, -II, -III in Drosophila epithelia causes altered signaling and cell polarity, suggesting that ESCRTs genes are tumor suppressors. However, the nature of the tumor suppressive function of ESCRTs, and whether tumor suppression is linked to receptor sorting is unclear. Unexpectedly, a null mutant in Hrs, encoding one of the components of the ESCRT-0 complex, which acts upstream of ESCRT-I, -II, -III in MVE sorting is dispensable for tumor suppression. Here, we report that two Drosophila epithelia lacking activity of Stam, the other known components of the ESCRT-0 complex, or of both Hrs and Stam, accumulate the signaling receptors Notch and Dome in endosomes. However, mutant tissue surprisingly maintains normal apico-basal polarity and proliferation control and does not display ectopic Notch signaling activation, unlike cells that lack ESCRT-I, -II, -III activity. Overall, our in vivo data confirm previous evidence indicating that the ESCRT-0 complex plays no crucial role in regulation of tumor suppression, and suggest re-evaluation of the relationship of signaling modulation in endosomes and tumorigenesis. PMID:24718108

  11. Optimization Studies of a Compton Suppression Spectrometer Using Experimentally Validated Monte Carlo Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    W. Scates; W. Scates; M. E. Mc Ilwain; R. Aryaeinejad

    2005-10-01

    Recent developments associated with room temperature semiconductor detectors and inorganic scintillators suggest that these detectors may be viable alternatives for the primary detector in a Compton Suppression Spectrometer (CSS). The room temperature operation of these detectors allows removal of a substantial amount of material from between primary and secondary detector and if properly designed and should afford substantially better suppression factors than can be achieved by germanium-based spectrometers. We have chosen to study the optimum properties of a CSS with a LaX3:Ce scintillator (where X is chloride or bromide) as the primary gamma ray detector. A Monte Carlo photon transport model is used to determine the optimum geometric properties of this spectrometer. To validate the assumptions and basic design of the Monte Carlo simulations, the energy distribution of a 137Cs point source is measured and simulated for two experimental systems. Comparison of the suppression factors for the measured and simulated data validates the model accuracy. A range of CSS physical parameters are studied to determine optimal detector geometry and to maximize the Compton suppression factor. These physical parameters and their optimum values are discussed.

  12. Optimization studies of a Compton suppression spectrometer using experimentally validated Monte Carlo Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Michael E. McIlwain; W. Scate; J. K. Hartwell; R. Aryaeinejad

    2006-01-01

    Recent developments associated with room temperature semiconductor detectors and inorganic scintillators suggest that these detectors may be viable alternatives for the primary detector in a Compton Suppression Spectrometer (CSS). The room temperature operation of these detectors allows removal of a substantial amount of material from between primary and secondary detector, if properly designed and should afford substantially better suppression factors than can be achieved by germanium-based spectrometers. We have chosen to study the optimum properties of a CSS with a LaX3:Ce scintillator (where X is chloride or bromide) as the primary gamma ray detector. A Monte Carlo photon transport model is used to determine the optimum geometric properties of this spectrometer. To validate the assumptions and basic design of the Monte Carlo simulations, the energy distribution of a 137Cs point source is measured and simulated for two experimental systems. Comparison of the suppression factors for the measured and simulated data validates the model accuracy. A range of CSS physical parameters are studied to determine optimal detector geometry and to maximize the Compton suppression factor. These physical parameters and their optimum values are discussed.

  13. Robotic transportation.

    PubMed

    Lob, W S

    1990-09-01

    Mobile robots perform fetch-and-carry tasks autonomously. An intelligent, sensor-equipped mobile robot does not require dedicated pathways or extensive facility modification. In the hospital, mobile robots can be used to carry specimens, pharmaceuticals, meals, etc. between supply centers, patient areas, and laboratories. The HelpMate (Transitions Research Corp.) mobile robot was developed specifically for hospital environments. To reach a desired destination, Help-Mate navigates with an on-board computer that continuously polls a suite of sensors, matches the sensor data against a pre-programmed map of the environment, and issues drive commands and path corrections. A sender operates the robot with a user-friendly menu that prompts for payload insertion and desired destination(s). Upon arrival at its selected destination, the robot prompts the recipient for a security code or physical key and awaits acknowledgement of payload removal. In the future, the integration of HelpMate with robot manipulators, test equipment, and central institutional information systems will open new applications in more localized areas and should help overcome difficulties in filling transport staff positions. PMID:2208684

  14. Effects of suppression and appraisals on thought frequency and distress.

    PubMed

    Corcoran, Kathleen M; Woody, Sheila R

    2009-12-01

    Cognitive theories of obsessions highlight appraisals of personal significance and thought suppression in the development and maintenance of intrusive thoughts. The current study examined the role of personal significance within the context of a thought suppression paradigm. The primary aim was to examine whether suppression would have differential effects for target thoughts appraised as personally meaningful versus relatively unimportant. A blasphemous thought served as the target thought, and highly religious and nonreligious participants were recruited. Participants completed a two-interval thought suppression task; during interval 1 they were randomly assigned to suppress or not suppress the target thought and during interval 2, all participants were given "do not suppress" instructions. Suppression resulted in sustained frequency of thoughts in contrast to the decline in thought frequency observed for non-suppression. Differential effects of suppression were found across the two groups. Moreover, suppression was associated with increased negative mood and anxiety. Results suggest that suppression of personally meaningful thoughts is a counterproductive strategy. PMID:19765684

  15. 30 CFR 75.1107 - Fire suppression devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fire suppression devices. 75.1107 Section 75... HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection Fire Suppression Devices and Fire-Resistant Hydraulic Fluids on Underground Equipment § 75.1107 Fire suppression devices. On...

  16. The ups and downs of J/psi suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R.

    2000-10-17

    An overview of the present status of J/psi suppression in pA and nucleus-nucleus interactions is presented. In both cases, model predictions are summarized and compared to the data. The ''anomalous'' J/psi suppression in Pb+Pb collisions is discussed in some detail. Predictions are also shown for quarkonium suppression at collider energies.

  17. Manipulation of Rhizosphere Bacterial Communities to Induce Suppressive Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease suppressive soils have been documented in a variety of cropping systems, and in many instances the biological attributes contributing to suppressiveness have been identified. While these studies have often yielded an understanding of operative mechanisms leading to the suppressive state, si...

  18. 14 CFR 460.13 - Smoke detection and fire suppression.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Smoke detection and fire suppression. 460... Crew § 460.13 Smoke detection and fire suppression. An operator or crew must have the ability to detect smoke and suppress a cabin fire to prevent incapacitation of the flight crew....

  19. 14 CFR 460.13 - Smoke detection and fire suppression.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Smoke detection and fire suppression. 460... Crew § 460.13 Smoke detection and fire suppression. An operator or crew must have the ability to detect smoke and suppress a cabin fire to prevent incapacitation of the flight crew....

  20. 14 CFR 460.13 - Smoke detection and fire suppression.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Smoke detection and fire suppression. 460... Crew § 460.13 Smoke detection and fire suppression. An operator or crew must have the ability to detect smoke and suppress a cabin fire to prevent incapacitation of the flight crew....

  1. 14 CFR 460.13 - Smoke detection and fire suppression.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Smoke detection and fire suppression. 460... Crew § 460.13 Smoke detection and fire suppression. An operator or crew must have the ability to detect smoke and suppress a cabin fire to prevent incapacitation of the flight crew....

  2. 14 CFR 460.13 - Smoke detection and fire suppression.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Smoke detection and fire suppression. 460... Crew § 460.13 Smoke detection and fire suppression. An operator or crew must have the ability to detect smoke and suppress a cabin fire to prevent incapacitation of the flight crew....

  3. Charge Transport of MoS2 Supported by Thiol-Decorated Self-Assembled Monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naveh, Doron; Artel, Vlada; Kirshner, Moshe

    2015-03-01

    Intrinsic charge transport in MoS2 supported by thiols was recently reported and was attributed to passivation of sulfur vacancies and suppression of charged impurities from the dielectric substrate. In this talk we will present the transport characteristics of single layer and few-layer MoS2 on thiol-decorated self-assembled alkyl-siloxane monolayer.

  4. Transporting particulate material

    DOEpatents

    Aldred, Derek Leslie; Rader, Jeffrey A.; Saunders, Timothy W.

    2011-08-30

    A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

  5. Transport of Fusion Alpha Particles in ITER Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, E. M.; Waltz, R. E.

    2014-10-01

    We predict the fusion-born alpha particle density in steady-state and hybrid (reverse shear) ITER scenarios with an integrated 1D transport model. The model combines ``stiff'' critical gradient alpha-driven Alfvén eigenmode (AE) transport with a quasilinear approximation of microturbulent transport. In an ITER baseline case, AE transport is found to redistribute alphas within the core but not propagate to the loss boundary. The remaining microturbulence at the edge causes negligible alpha-channel energy flux there (neglecting ripple loss). We set the AE stiff transport critical gradient threshold at gAE =gITG , below which microturbulence can nonlinearly suppress AE transport, and the more stringent condition gAE = 0 . Work supported in part by the US DOE under GA-Grant No. DE-FG02-95ER54309 and SciDAC-GSEP Grant No DE-FC02-08ER54977.

  6. Neoclassical momentum transport in an impure rotating tokamak plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, S.; Helander, P.

    2006-01-15

    It is widely believed that transport barriers in tokamak plasmas are caused by radial electric-field shear, which is governed by angular momentum transport. Turbulence is suppressed in the barrier, and ion thermal transport is comparable to the neoclassical prediction, but experimentally angular momentum transport has remained anomalous. With this motivation, the collisional transport matrix is calculated for a low collisionality plasma with collisional impurity ions. The bulk plasma toroidal rotation velocity is taken to be subsonic, but heavy impurities undergo poloidal redistribution due to the centrifugal force. The impurities give rise to off-diagonal terms in the transport matrix, which cause the plasma to rotate spontaneously. At conventional aspect ratio, poloidal impurity redistribution increases the angular momentum flux by a factor up to {epsilon}{sup -3/2} over previous predictions, making it comparable to the 'banana' regime heat flux. The flux is primarily driven by radial pressure and temperature gradients.

  7. Analysis and testing of stability augmentation systems. [for supersonic transport aircraft wing and B-52 aircraft control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sevart, F. D.; Patel, S. M.; Wattman, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Testing and evaluation of stability augmentation systems for aircraft flight control were conducted. The flutter suppression system analysis of a scale supersonic transport wing model is described. Mechanization of the flutter suppression system is reported. The ride control synthesis for the B-52 aeroelastic model is discussed. Model analyses were conducted using equations of motion generated from generalized mass and stiffness data.

  8. Transporting Handicapped Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Dayton Ray

    The book presents guidelines for adaptive transportation measures for handicapped students. Part 1 considers the transportation cycle as a means to evaluate individual student competencies at all logical points during the transportation experience. The transportation cycle is reviewed from deciding to transport the student to gaining access to…

  9. Suppressing turbulence and enhancing liquid suspension flow in pipelines with electrorheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, R.; Gu, G. Q.

    2015-01-01

    Flows through pipes, such as crude oil through pipelines, are the most common and important method of transportation of fluids. To enhance the flow output along the pipeline requires reducing viscosity and suppressing turbulence simultaneously and effectively. Unfortunately, no method is currently available to accomplish both goals simultaneously. Here we show that electrorheology provides an efficient solution. When a strong electric field is applied along the flow direction in a small section of pipeline, the field polarizes and aggregates the particles suspended inside the base liquid into short chains along the flow direction. Such aggregation breaks the rotational symmetry and makes the fluid viscosity anisotropic. In the directions perpendicular to the flow, the viscosity is substantially increased, effectively suppressing the turbulence. Along the flow direction, the viscosity is significantly reduced; thus the flow along the pipeline is enhanced. Recent field tests with a crude oil pipeline fully confirm the theoretical results.

  10. Suppression of erythropoiesis by dietary nitrate

    PubMed Central

    Ashmore, Tom; Fernandez, Bernadette O.; Evans, Colin E.; Huang, Yun; Branco-Price, Cristina; Griffin, Julian L.; Johnson, Randall S.; Feelisch, Martin; Murray, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, hypoxia-triggered erythropoietin release increases red blood cell mass to meet tissue oxygen demands. Using male Wistar rats, we unmask a previously unrecognized regulatory pathway of erythropoiesis involving suppressor control by the NO metabolite and ubiquitous dietary component nitrate. We find that circulating hemoglobin levels are modulated by nitrate at concentrations achievable by dietary intervention under normoxic and hypoxic conditions; a moderate dose of nitrate administered via the drinking water (7 mg NaNO3/kg body weight/d) lowered hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit after 6 d compared with nonsupplemented/NaCl-supplemented controls. The underlying mechanism is suppression of hepatic erythropoietin expression associated with the downregulation of tissue hypoxia markers, suggesting increased pO2. At higher nitrate doses, however, a partial reversal of this effect occurred; this was accompanied by increased renal erythropoietin expression and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factors, likely brought about by the relative anemia. Thus, hepatic and renal hypoxia-sensing pathways act in concert to modulate hemoglobin in response to nitrate, converging at an optimal minimal hemoglobin concentration appropriate to the environmental/physiologic situation. Suppression of hepatic erythropoietin expression by nitrate may thus act to decrease blood viscosity while matching oxygen supply to demand, whereas renal oxygen sensing could act as a brake, averting a potentially detrimental fall in hematocrit.—Ashmore, T., Fernandez, B. O., Evans, C. E., Huang, Y., Branco-Price, C., Griffin, J. L., Johnson, R. S., Feelisch, M., Murray, A. J. Suppression of erythropoiesis by dietary nitrate. PMID:25422368

  11. UAV visual signature suppression via adaptive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Ron; Melkert, Joris

    2005-05-01

    Visual signature suppression (VSS) methods for several classes of aircraft from WWII on are examined and historically summarized. This study shows that for some classes of uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAVs), primary mission threats do not stem from infrared or radar signatures, but from the amount that an aircraft visually stands out against the sky. The paper shows that such visual mismatch can often jeopardize mission success and/or induce the destruction of the entire aircraft. A psycho-physioptical study was conducted to establish the definition and benchmarks of a Visual Cross Section (VCS) for airborne objects. This study was centered on combining the effects of size, shape, color and luminosity or effective illumance (EI) of a given aircraft to arrive at a VCS. A series of tests were conducted with a 6.6ft (2m) UAV which was fitted with optically adaptive electroluminescent sheets at altitudes of up to 1000 ft (300m). It was shown that with proper tailoring of the color and luminosity, the VCS of the aircraft dropped from more than 4,200cm2 to less than 1.8cm2 at 100m (the observed lower limit of the 20-20 human eye in this study). In laypersons terms this indicated that the UAV essentially "disappeared". This study concludes with an assessment of the weight and volume impact of such a Visual Suppression System (VSS) on the UAV, showing that VCS levels on this class UAV can be suppressed to below 1.8cm2 for aircraft gross weight penalties of only 9.8%.

  12. Weed Suppression by Seven Clover Species

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Shirley M.; King, Jane R.; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; O'Donovan, John T.

    2001-01-01

    Used as cover crops, clover species may differ in their ability to suppress weed growth. Field trials were conducted in Alberta, Canada to measure the growth of brown mustard [Brassica juncea (L.) Czern.], in mowed and nonmowed production, as influenced by alsike (Trifolium hybridum L.), balansa [T. michelianum Savi var. balansae (Boiss.) Azn.], berseem (T. alexandrinum L.), crimson [T. incarnatum (Boiss.) Azn.], berseem (T. alexandrinum L.), crimson (T. incarnatum L.), Persian (T. resupinatum L.), red (T. pratense L.), and white Dutch (T. repens L.) clover and fall rye (Secale cereale L.). In 1997, clovers reduced mustard biomass in nonmowed treatments by 29% on a high- fertility soil (Typic Cryoboroll) at Edmonton and by 57% on a low- fertility soil (Typic Cryoboralf) at Breton. At Edmonton, nonmowed mustard biomass was reduced by alsike and berseem clover in 1996 and by alsike, balansa, berseem, and crimson clover in 1997. At Breton, all seven clover species suppressed weed biomass. A negative correlation was noted among clover and mustard biomass at Edmonton but not at Breton. The effects of mowing varied with location, timing, and species. Mowing was beneficial to crop/weed proportion at Edmonton but not at Breton. Mowing at early flowering of mustard large-seeded legumes and sweetclover (Melilotus offici) produced greater benefit than mowing at late flowering. With early mowing, all clover species suppressed mustard growth at Edmonton. Clovers reduced mustard regrowth (g plant21 ) and the number of mustard plants producing regrowth. The characteristics of berseem clover (upright growth, long stems, high biomass, and late flowering) would support its use as a cover crop or forage in north-central Alberta.

  13. Leuprolide acetate suppresses pedophilic urges and arousability.

    PubMed

    Schober, Justine M; Kuhn, Phyllis J; Kovacs, Paul G; Earle, James H; Byrne, Peter M; Fries, Ruth A

    2005-12-01

    Cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy was compared with cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy augmented by leuprolide acetate (LA) for suppression of pedophilic behavior. Five male pedophiles (M age, 50 years; range, 36-58) were administered LA by Depo injection for 12 months, followed by saline placebo for 12 months. Testosterone levels, sexual interest preference by visual reaction time (Abel Assessment), penile tumescence (Monarch Penile Plethysmography, PPG), as well as strong sexual urges toward children and masturbatory frequency involving thoughts of children (polygraph), were measured every 3 months. On LA, testosterone decreased to castrate levels. Penile tumescence was significantly suppressed compared with baseline, but sufficient response remained to detect pedophilic interest. Pedophilic interest was also detected by visual reaction times. When asked about having pedophilic urges and masturbating to thoughts of children, all subjects self-reported a decrease. Polygraph responses indicated subjects were not deceptive. On placebo, testosterone and physiologic arousal eventually rose to baseline. As noted by polygraph, at baseline and on placebo, subjects were deceptive regarding increased pedophilic urges and masturbatory frequency. Interest preference, as measured by Abel Assessment and Monarch PPG, was generally unchanged throughout the study. Cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy augmented with LA significantly reduced pedophilic fantasies, urges, and masturbation; however, pedophilic interest did not change during 1 year of therapy. Deceptive responses by polygraph suggested that self-report was unreliable. Follow-up utilizing objective measures is essential for monitoring efficacy of treatment in pedophilia. Our study supports the premise that suppression of pedophilic behavior is possible. LA may augment cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy and help break the sequence leading to a re-offense. PMID:16362253

  14. Glechoma hederacea Suppresses RANKL-mediated Osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, J.K.; Erkhembaatar, M.; Gu, D.R.; Lee, S.H.; Lee, C.H.; Shin, D.M.; Lee, Y.R.; Kim, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    Glechoma hederacea (GH), commonly known as ground-ivy or gill-over-the-ground, has been extensively used in folk remedies for relieving symptoms of inflammatory disorders. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the therapeutic action of GH are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that GH constituents inhibit osteoclastogenesis by abrogating receptor activator of nuclear κ-B ligand (RANKL)-induced free cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) oscillations. To evaluate the effect of GH on osteoclastogenesis, we assessed the formation of multi-nucleated cells (MNCs), enzymatic activity of tartrate-resistant acidic phosphatase (TRAP), expression of nuclear factor of activated T-cells cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1), and [Ca2+]i alterations in response to treatment with GH ethanol extract (GHE) in primarily cultured bone marrow–derived macrophages (BMMs). Treatment of RANKL-stimulated or non-stimulated BMMs with GHE markedly suppressed MNC formation, TRAP activity, and NFATc1 expression in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, GHE treatment induced a large transient elevation in [Ca2+]i while suppressing RANKL-induced [Ca2+]i oscillations, which are essential for NFATc1 activation. GHE-evoked increase in [Ca2+]i was dependent on extracellular Ca2+ and was inhibited by 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP), inhibitor of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels (VGCCs), but was independent of store-operated Ca2+ channels. Notably, after transient [Ca2+] elevation, treatment with GHE desensitized the VGCCs, resulting in an abrogation of RANKL-induced [Ca2+]i oscillations and MNC formation. These findings demonstrate that treatment of BMMs with GHE suppresses RANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis by activating and then desensitizing DHP-sensitive VGCCs, suggesting potential applications of GH in the treatment of bone disorders, such as periodontitis, osteoporosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:24850617

  15. Cough Suppressant and Pharmacologic Protussive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bolser, Donald C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Cough-suppressant therapy, previously termed nonspecific antitussive therapy, incorporates the use of pharmacologic agents with mucolytic effects and/or inhibitory effects on the cough reflex itself. The intent of this type of therapy is to reduce the frequency and/or intensity of coughing on a short-term basis. Methods Data for this review were obtained from several National Library of Medicine (PubMed) searches (from 1960 to 2004), which were performed between May and September 2004, of the literature published in the English language, limited to human studies, using combinations of the search terms “cough,” “double-blind placebo-controlled,” “antitussive,” “mucolytic,” “cough clearance,” “common cold,” “protussive,” “guaifenesin,” “glycerol,” and “zinc.” Results Mucolytic agents are not consistently effective in ameliorating cough in patients with bronchitis, although they may be of benefit to this population in other ways. Peripheral and central antitussive agents can be useful in patients with chronic bronchitis, but can have little efficacy in patients with cough due to upper respiratory infection. Some protussive agents are effective in increasing cough clearance, but their long-term effectiveness has not been established. DNase is not effective as a protussive agent in patients with cystic fibrosis. Inhaled mannitol is acutely effective in this patient population, but its therapeutic potential must be investigated further. Conclusions These findings suggest that suppressant therapy is most effective when used for the short-term reduction of coughing. Relatively few drugs are effective as cough suppressants. PMID:16428717

  16. Optimization of sodium fire suppression system

    SciTech Connect

    1985-02-01

    This report describes the major areas of revision and optimization of the design of the CRBRP Sodium Fire Suppression System (SFSS) following the confirmatory testing program. The design temperatures for the SFSS were substantially increased after the Large Scale Sodium Fire Test (LSSFT) making the original design inadequate. A redesign of the main features was performed in which the experience in the construction of the LSSFT test article was also utilized for optimization. The design criteria, loads and load combinations and revised design are discussed.

  17. Coherent error suppression in multiqubit entangling gates.

    PubMed

    Hayes, D; Clark, S M; Debnath, S; Hucul, D; Inlek, I V; Lee, K W; Quraishi, Q; Monroe, C

    2012-07-13

    We demonstrate a simple pulse shaping technique designed to improve the fidelity of spin-dependent force operations commonly used to implement entangling gates in trapped ion systems. This extension of the Mølmer-Sørensen gate can theoretically suppress the effects of certain frequency and timing errors to any desired order and is demonstrated through Walsh modulation of a two qubit entangling gate on trapped atomic ions. The technique is applicable to any system of qubits coupled through collective harmonic oscillator modes. PMID:23030141

  18. Method for suppressing noise in measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, Paul J. (Inventor); Madsen, Louis A. (Inventor); Leskowitz, Garett M. (Inventor); Weitekamp, Daniel P. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Techniques of combining separate but correlated measurements to form a second-order or higher order correlation function to suppress the effects of noise in the initial condition of a system capable of retaining memory of an initial state of the system with a characteristic relaxation time. At least two separate measurements are obtained from the system. The temporal separation between the two separate measurements is preferably comparable to or less than the characteristic relaxation time and is adjusted to allow for a correlation between two measurements.

  19. Suppressing dislocations in normalized hypercubic smearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGrand, Thomas; Shamir, Yigal; Svetitsky, Benjamin

    2014-09-01

    Normalized hypercubic smearing improves the behavior of dynamical Wilson-clover fermions, but has the unwanted side effect that it can occasionally produce spikes in the fermion force. These spikes originate in the chain rule connecting the derivative with respect to the smeared links to the derivative with respect to the dynamical links, and are associated with the presence of dislocations in the dynamical gauge field. We propose and study an action designed to suppress these dislocations. We present evidence for improved performance of the hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm. A side benefit is improvement in the properties of valence chiral fermions.

  20. Suppressed $B_s$ decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Dorigo, Mirco

    2011-05-01

    We review three recent results of the CDF collaboration on B{sub s}{sup 0} suppressed decays: the first search for CP-violation in the B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{phi} decay, where two CP-violating asymmetries expected to be zero in the Standard Model are measured, and the observation and the branching ratio measurements of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{Psi} f{sub 0}(980) and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{Psi} K{sup (*)} decays.

  1. The LDCM actuator for vibration suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ide, Eric N.; Lindner, Douglas K.

    1988-01-01

    A linear dc motor (LDCM) has been proposed as an actuator for the COFS I mast and the COFS program ground test Mini-Mast. The basic principles of operation of the LDCM as an actuator for vibration suppression in large flexible structures are reviewed. Because of force and stroke limitations, control loops are required to stabilize the actuator, which results in a non-standard actuator-plant configuration. A simulation model that includes LDCM actuator control loops and a finite element model of the Mast is described, with simulation results showing the excitation capability of the actuator.

  2. Suppression of Fermi acceleration in composite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, Kellen Manoela; de Aguiar, Marcus Aloizio Martinez

    2016-09-01

    We study the motion of a composite particle in a one-dimensional billiard with a moving wall. The particle is modeled by two point masses coupled by a harmonic spring. We show that the energy gained by the composite particle is greatly reduced with respect to a single point particle. We show that the amount of energy transferred to the system at each collision with the walls is independent of the spring constant. However, the presence of the spring is responsible for the energy suppression because it diminishes the number of collisions by storing part of the system's energy and reducing the velocity of the particle's center of mass.

  3. Optimal control techniques for active noise suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Keeling, S. L.; Silcox, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    Active suppression of noise in a bounded enclosure is considered within the framework of optimal control theory. A sinusoidal pressure field due to exterior offending noise sources is assumed to be known in a neighborhood of interior sensors. The pressure field due to interior controlling sources is assumed to be governed by a nonhomogeneous wave equation within the enclosure and by a special boundary condition designed to accommodate frequency-dependent reflection properties of the enclosure boundary. The form of the controlling sources is determined by considering the steady-state behavior of the system, and it is established that the control strategy proposed is stable and asymptotically optimal.

  4. Suppressing Electron Cloud in Future Linear Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M; Kirby, R.E.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Le Pimpec, F.; /PSI, Villigen

    2005-05-27

    Any accelerator circulating positively charged beams can suffer from a build-up of an electron cloud (EC) in the beam pipe. The cloud develops through ionization of residual gases, synchrotron radiation and secondary electron emission and, when severe, can cause instability, emittance blow-up or loss of the circulating beam. The electron cloud is potentially a luminosity limiting effect for both the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). For the ILC positron damping ring, the development of the electron cloud must be suppressed. This paper discusses the state-of-the-art of the ongoing SLAC and international R&D program to study potential remedies.

  5. Silicon oxynitride: A field emission suppression coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodore, Nimel D.

    We have studied coatings deposited using our inductively-coupled RF plasma ion implantation and desposition system to suppress field emission from large, 3-D electrode structures used in high voltage applications, like those used by Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in their DC-field photoelectron gun. Currently time and labor-intensive hand-polishing procedures are used to minimize field emission from these structures. Previous work had shown that the field emission from polished stainless steel (27 muA of field-emitted current at 15 MV/m) could be drastically reduced with simultaneous deposition of sputtered silicon dioxide during nitrogen implantation (167 pA of field-emitted current at 30 MV/m). We have determined that this unique implantation and deposition procedure produces high-purity silicon oxynitride films that can suppress field emission from stainless steel regardless of their initial surface polish. However, when this implantation procedure was applied to large, 3-D substrates, arcs occurred, damaging the coating and causing unreliable and unrepeatable field emission suppression. We have developed a novel reactive sputtering procedure to deposit high-purity silicon oxynitride coatings without nitrogen ion implantation. We can control the stoichometry and deposition rate of these coatings by adjusting the nitrogen pressure and incident RF-power. Using profilometry, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, elastic recoil detection analysis, and current-voltage measurements, we have determined that the elemental composition, chemical bonding, density, and electrical properties of the reactively-sputtered silicon oxynitride coatings are similar to those produced by nitrogen implantation during silicon dioxide deposition. Furthermore, high voltage tests determined that both coatings similarly suppress field emission from 6" diameter, polished

  6. Troglitazone suppresses glutamine metabolism through a PPAR-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Miriam R.; Clem, Brian F.

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced glutamine metabolism is required for tumor cell growth and survival, which suggests that agents targeting glutaminolysis may have utility within anti-cancer therapies. Troglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, exhibits significant anti-tumor activity and can alter glutamine metabolism in multiple cell types. Therefore, we examined whether troglitazone would disrupt glutamine metabolism in tumor cells and whether its action was reliant on PPARγ activity. We found that troglitazone treatment suppressed glutamine uptake and the expression of the glutamine transporter, ASCT2, and glutaminase. In addition, troglitazone reduced 13C-glutamine incorporation into the TCA cycle, decreased [ATP], and resulted in an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). Further, troglitazone treatment decreased tumor cell growth, which was partially rescued with the addition of the TCA-intermediate, alpha-ketoglutarate, or the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine. Importantly, troglitazone’s effects on glutamine uptake or viable cell number were found to be PPARγ-independent. In contrast, troglitazone caused a decrease in c-Myc levels, while the proteasomal inhibitor, MG132, rescued c-Myc, ASCT2 and GLS1 expression, as well as glutamine uptake and cell number. Lastly, combinatorial treatment of troglitazone and metformin resulted in a synergistic decrease in cell number. Therefore, characterizing new anti-tumor properties of previously approved FDA therapies supports the potential for repurposing of these agents. PMID:25872876

  7. Suppressing molecular vibrations in organic semiconductors by inducing strain

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Takayoshi; Häusermann, Roger; Tsurumi, Junto; Soeda, Junshi; Okada, Yugo; Yamashita, Yu; Akamatsu, Norihisa; Shishido, Atsushi; Mitsui, Chikahiko; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Yanagisawa, Susumu; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Takeya, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Organic molecular semiconductors are solution processable, enabling the growth of large-area single-crystal semiconductors. Improving the performance of organic semiconductor devices by increasing the charge mobility is an ongoing quest, which calls for novel molecular and material design, and improved processing conditions. Here we show a method to increase the charge mobility in organic single-crystal field-effect transistors, by taking advantage of the inherent softness of organic semiconductors. We compress the crystal lattice uniaxially by bending the flexible devices, leading to an improved charge transport. The mobility increases from 9.7 to 16.5 cm2 V−1 s−1 by 70% under 3% strain. In-depth analysis indicates that compressing the crystal structure directly restricts the vibration of the molecules, thus suppresses dynamic disorder, a unique mechanism in organic semiconductors. Since strain can be easily induced during the fabrication process, we expect our method to be exploited to build high-performance organic devices. PMID:27040501

  8. Suppressing molecular vibrations in organic semiconductors by inducing strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Takayoshi; Häusermann, Roger; Tsurumi, Junto; Soeda, Junshi; Okada, Yugo; Yamashita, Yu; Akamatsu, Norihisa; Shishido, Atsushi; Mitsui, Chikahiko; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Yanagisawa, Susumu; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Takeya, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Organic molecular semiconductors are solution processable, enabling the growth of large-area single-crystal semiconductors. Improving the performance of organic semiconductor devices by increasing the charge mobility is an ongoing quest, which calls for novel molecular and material design, and improved processing conditions. Here we show a method to increase the charge mobility in organic single-crystal field-effect transistors, by taking advantage of the inherent softness of organic semiconductors. We compress the crystal lattice uniaxially by bending the flexible devices, leading to an improved charge transport. The mobility increases from 9.7 to 16.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 by 70% under 3% strain. In-depth analysis indicates that compressing the crystal structure directly restricts the vibration of the molecules, thus suppresses dynamic disorder, a unique mechanism in organic semiconductors. Since strain can be easily induced during the fabrication process, we expect our method to be exploited to build high-performance organic devices.

  9. Suppressing molecular vibrations in organic semiconductors by inducing strain.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takayoshi; Häusermann, Roger; Tsurumi, Junto; Soeda, Junshi; Okada, Yugo; Yamashita, Yu; Akamatsu, Norihisa; Shishido, Atsushi; Mitsui, Chikahiko; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Yanagisawa, Susumu; Matsui, Hiroyuki; Takeya, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Organic molecular semiconductors are solution processable, enabling the growth of large-area single-crystal semiconductors. Improving the performance of organic semiconductor devices by increasing the charge mobility is an ongoing quest, which calls for novel molecular and material design, and improved processing conditions. Here we show a method to increase the charge mobility in organic single-crystal field-effect transistors, by taking advantage of the inherent softness of organic semiconductors. We compress the crystal lattice uniaxially by bending the flexible devices, leading to an improved charge transport. The mobility increases from 9.7 to 16.5 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) by 70% under 3% strain. In-depth analysis indicates that compressing the crystal structure directly restricts the vibration of the molecules, thus suppresses dynamic disorder, a unique mechanism in organic semiconductors. Since strain can be easily induced during the fabrication process, we expect our method to be exploited to build high-performance organic devices. PMID:27040501

  10. Troglitazone suppresses glutamine metabolism through a PPAR-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Miriam R; Clem, Brian F

    2015-08-01

    Enhanced glutamine metabolism is required for tumor cell growth and survival, which suggests that agents targeting glutaminolysis may have utility within anti-cancer therapies. Troglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, exhibits significant anti-tumor activity and can alter glutamine metabolism in multiple cell types. Therefore, we examined whether troglitazone would disrupt glutamine metabolism in tumor cells and whether its action was reliant on PPARγ activity. We found that troglitazone treatment suppressed glutamine uptake and the expression of the glutamine transporter, ASCT2, and glutaminase. In addition, troglitazone reduced 13C-glutamine incorporation into the TCA cycle, decreased [ATP], and resulted in an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). Further, troglitazone treatment decreased tumor cell growth, which was partially rescued with the addition of the TCA-intermediate, α-ketoglutarate, or the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. Importantly, troglitazone's effects on glutamine uptake or viable cell number were found to be PPARγ-independent. In contrast, troglitazone caused a decrease in c-Myc levels, while the proteasomal inhibitor, MG132, rescued c-Myc, ASCT2 and GLS1 expression, as well as glutamine uptake and cell number. Lastly, combinatorial treatment of troglitazone and metformin resulted in a synergistic decrease in cell number. Therefore, characterizing new anti-tumor properties of previously approved FDA therapies supports the potential for repurposing of these agents. PMID:25872876

  11. Interfacial Study To Suppress Charge Carrier Recombination for High Efficiency Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Nirmal; Dubey, Ashish; Khatiwada, Devendra; Mitul, Abu Farzan; Wang, Qi; Venkatesan, Swaminathan; Iefanova, Anastasiia; Zai, Jiantao; Qian, Xuefeng; Kumar, Mukesh; Qiao, Qiquan

    2015-12-01

    We report effects of an interface between TiO2-perovskite and grain-grain boundaries of perovskite films prepared by single step and sequential deposited technique using different annealing times at optimum temperature. Nanoscale kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurement shows that charge transport in a perovskite solar cell critically depends upon the annealing conditions. The KPFM results of single step and sequential deposited films show that the increase in potential barrier suppresses the back-recombination between electrons in TiO2 and holes in perovskite. Spatial mapping of the surface potential within perovskite film exhibits higher positive potential at grain boundaries compared to the surface of the grains. The average grain boundary potential of 300-400 mV is obtained upon annealing for sequentially deposited films. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra indicate the formation of a PbI2 phase upon annealing which suppresses the recombination. Transient analysis exhibits that the optimum device has higher carrier lifetime and short carrier transport time among all devices. An optimum grain boundary potential and proper band alignment between the TiO2 electron transport layer (ETL) and the perovskite absorber layer help to increase the overall device performance. PMID:26579732

  12. Dynamics of double layers, ion acceleration, and heat flux suppression during solar flares

    SciTech Connect

    Li, T. C.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.

    2014-09-20

    Observations of flare-heated electrons in the corona typically suggest confinement of electrons. The confinement mechanism, however, remains unclear. The transport of coronal hot electrons into ambient plasma was recently investigated by particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Electron transport was significantly suppressed by the formation of a highly localized, nonlinear electrostatic potential in the form of a double layer (DL). In this work large-scale PIC simulations are performed to explore the dynamics of DLs in larger systems where, instead of a single DL, multiple DLs are generated. The primary DL accelerates return current electrons, resulting in high velocity electron beams that interact with ambient ions. This forms a Buneman unstable system that spawns more DLs. Trapping of heated return current electrons between multiple DLs strongly suppresses electron transport. DLs also accelerate ambient ions and produce strong ion flows over an extended region. This clarifies the mechanism by which hot electrons in the corona couple to and accelerate ions to form the solar wind. These new dynamics in larger systems reveal a more likely picture of DL development and their impact on the ambient plasma in the solar corona. They are applicable to the preparation for in situ coronal space missions like the Solar Probe Plus.

  13. Basic Physics of Tokamak Transport Final Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Amiya K.

    2014-05-12

    neoclassical values by combined mechanisms of ExB and diamagnetic flow shear suppression of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instabilities. However, even when the ion transport is strongly suppressed, the electron transport remains highly anomalous. The most plausible physics scenario for the anomalous electron transport is based on electron temperature gradient (ETG) instabilities. This instability is an electron analog of and nearly isomorphic to the ITG instability, which we had studied before extensively. However, this isomorphism is broken nonlinearily. It is noted that as the typical ETG mode growth rates are larger (in contrast to ITG modes) than ExB shearing rates in usual tokamaks, the flow shear suppression of ETG modes is highly unlikely. This motivated a broader range of investigations of other physics scenarios of nonlinear saturation and transport scaling of ETG modes.

  14. Transportation of hazardous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    This report discusses the following: data and information systems for hazardous-materials; containers for hazardous-materials transportation; hazardous-materials transportation regulation; and training for hazardous-materials transportation enforcement and emergency response.

  15. Suppression of Weibel Instabilities in Advanced Fast Ignition Laser Fusion Pellets by Two Cone-Guided Relativistic Laser Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V.

    2007-11-01

    I propose utilization of two cone-guided relativistic laser beams in antiparallel interaction with the fusion pellet as a novel approach for the suppression of Weibel instabilities in the core of advanced fast ignition pellets.ootnotetextM. Tabak, J. Hammer, M.E. Glinsky, W.L. Kruer, S. C. Wilks, J. Woodworth, E. M. Campbell, and M.D. Perry, Phys. Plasmas 1 (5), 1626 (1994). The propagation of generated suprathermal electron beam toward the core may lead to the appearance of colossal (˜10MG), small scale (L˜velocity of light/local electron plasma frequencyootnotetextV. Stefan, Suppression of Weibel Instabilities by High-Harmonic Electron Bernstein Modes in Advanced Fast Ignition Laser Fusion Pellets.APS-2006. October 30-November 3, 2006; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. magnetic fields. This would suppress the transport of magnetic fields into the core of the pellet and may eliminate the difficulties in the nonlinear-relativistic treatment of magnetized core plasma.

  16. miR-340 suppresses glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Huang, Daquan; Qiu, Shuwei; Ge, Ruiguang; He, Lei; Li, Mei; Li, Yi; Peng, Ying

    2015-04-20

    Deregulation of microRNAs (miRs) contributes to tumorigenesis. Down-regulation of miR-340 is observed in multiple types of cancers. However, the biological function of miR-340 in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains largely unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated that expression of miR-340 was downregulated in both glioma cell lines and tissues. Survival of GBM patients with high levels of miR-340 was significantly extended in comparison to patients expressing low miR-340 levels. Biological functional experiments showed that the restoration of miR-340 dramatically inhibited glioma cell proliferation, induced cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis, suppressed cell motility and promoted autophagy and terminal differentiation. Mechanistic studies disclosed that, miR-340 over-expression suppressed several oncogenes including p-AKT, EZH2, EGFR, BMI1 and XIAP. Furthermore, ROCK1 was validated as a direct functional target miR-340 and silencing of ROCK1 phenocopied the anti-tumor effect of mR-340. Our findings indicate an important role of miR-340 as a glioma killer, and suggest a potential prognosis biomarker and therapeutic target for GBM. PMID:25831237

  17. Suppression of Coronavirus Replication by Cyclophilin Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Sato, Yuka; Sasaki, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Coronaviruses infect a variety of mammalian and avian species and cause serious diseases in humans, cats, mice, and birds in the form of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), mouse hepatitis, and avian infectious bronchitis, respectively. No effective vaccine or treatment has been developed for SARS-coronavirus or FIP virus, both of which cause lethal diseases. It has been reported that a cyclophilin inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA), could inhibit the replication of coronaviruses. CsA is a well-known immunosuppressive drug that binds to cellular cyclophilins to inhibit calcineurin, a calcium-calmodulin-activated serine/threonine-specific phosphatase. The inhibition of calcineurin blocks the translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells from the cytosol into the nucleus, thus preventing the transcription of genes encoding cytokines such as interleukin-2. Cyclophilins are peptidyl-prolyl isomerases with physiological functions that have been described for many years to include chaperone and foldase activities. Also, many viruses require cyclophilins for replication; these include human immunodeficiency virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and hepatitis C virus. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the suppression of viral replication differ for different viruses. This review describes the suppressive effects of CsA on coronavirus replication. PMID:23698397

  18. Suppression of coronavirus replication by cyclophilin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Sato, Yuka; Sasaki, Takashi

    2013-05-01

    Coronaviruses infect a variety of mammalian and avian species and cause serious diseases in humans, cats, mice, and birds in the form of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), mouse hepatitis, and avian infectious bronchitis, respectively. No effective vaccine or treatment has been developed for SARS-coronavirus or FIP virus, both of which cause lethal diseases. It has been reported that a cyclophilin inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA), could inhibit the replication of coronaviruses. CsA is a well-known immunosuppressive drug that binds to cellular cyclophilins to inhibit calcineurin, a calcium-calmodulin-activated serine/threonine-specific phosphatase. The inhibition of calcineurin blocks the translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells from the cytosol into the nucleus, thus preventing the transcription of genes encoding cytokines such as interleukin-2. Cyclophilins are peptidyl-prolyl isomerases with physiological functions that have been described for many years to include chaperone and foldase activities. Also, many viruses require cyclophilins for replication; these include human immunodeficiency virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and hepatitis C virus. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the suppression of viral replication differ for different viruses. This review describes the suppressive effects of CsA on coronavirus replication. PMID:23698397

  19. Suppression of soil nitrification by plants.

    PubMed

    Subbarao, Guntur Venkata; Yoshihashi, Tadashi; Worthington, Margaret; Nakahara, Kazuhiko; Ando, Yasuo; Sahrawat, Kanwar Lal; Rao, Idupulapati Madhusudhana; Lata, Jean-Christophe; Kishii, Masahiro; Braun, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-01

    Nitrification, the biological oxidation of ammonium to nitrate, weakens the soil's ability to retain N and facilitates N-losses from production agriculture through nitrate-leaching and denitrification. This process has a profound influence on what form of mineral-N is absorbed, used by plants, and retained in the soil, or lost to the environment, which in turn affects N-cycling, N-use efficiency (NUE) and ecosystem health and services. As reactive-N is often the most limiting in natural ecosystems, plants have acquired a range of mechanisms that suppress soil-nitrifier activity to limit N-losses via N-leaching and denitrification. Plants' ability to produce and release nitrification inhibitors from roots and suppress soil-nitrifier activity is termed 'biological nitrification inhibition' (BNI). With recent developments in methodology for in-situ measurement of nitrification inhibition, it is now possible to characterize BNI function in plants. This review assesses the current status of our understanding of the production and release of biological nitrification inhibitors (BNIs) and their potential in improving NUE in agriculture. A suite of genetic, soil and environmental factors regulate BNI activity in plants. BNI-function can be genetically exploited to improve the BNI-capacity of major food- and feed-crops to develop next-generation production systems with reduced nitrification and N2O emission rates to benefit both agriculture and the environment. The feasibility of such an approach is discussed based on the progresses made. PMID:25711823

  20. Suppression of fertility in adult dogs.

    PubMed

    Maenhoudt, C; Santos, N R; Fontbonne, A

    2014-06-01

    Unfortunately, the overpopulation of dogs is still a problem in the majority of countries and even though surgical methods of sterilization, the most traditional and commonly used technique, have been intensively performed, the impact on the dog population is negligible. The neutering of companion animals as ovariohysterectomy (spaying) or orchidectomy (castration) has its limitations because of the cost, the need of a surgical environment and the risk of surgical and/or anaesthetical complications (ACCD 2009). In fact, surgical castration has been banished in some northern European countries and has limited acceptance in other countries. In a survey performed in Sao Paulo, Brazil, 56.5% of the owners of adopted shelter dogs were against the surgical procedure for different reasons (Soto et al. 2005). Currently, the options for contraception, defined as suppression of fertility are based on hormonal treatment. The treatments can be divided into analogues of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), progestins and androgens. Other possibilities of contraception are via the immunological system with vaccinations against GnRH, the luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor and the zona pellucida proteins. Finally, there is also the intra-epididymal or intratesticular injection of sclerosing substances in dogs. Mechanical devices to disrupt fertility are not used anymore due to the side effects. Suppression of fertility in adult dogs will be reviewed in order of use and possible impact on the dog population. PMID:24947862

  1. Suppression of Ostwald ripening in active emulsions.

    PubMed

    Zwicker, David; Hyman, Anthony A; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Emulsions consisting of droplets immersed in a fluid are typically unstable since they coarsen over time. One important coarsening process is Ostwald ripening, which is driven by the surface tension of the droplets. Stability of emulsions is relevant not only in complex fluids but also in biological cells, which contain liquidlike compartments, e.g., germ granules, Cajal bodies, and centrosomes. Such cellular systems are driven away from equilibrium, e.g., by chemical reactions, and thus can be called active emulsions. In this paper, we study such active emulsions by developing a coarse-grained description of the droplet dynamics, which we analyze for two different chemical reaction schemes. We first consider the simple case of first-order reactions, which leads to stable, monodisperse emulsions in which Ostwald ripening is suppressed within a range of chemical reaction rates. We then consider autocatalytic droplets, which catalyze the production of their own droplet material. Spontaneous nucleation of autocatalytic droplets is strongly suppressed and their emulsions are typically unstable. We show that autocatalytic droplets can be nucleated reliably and their emulsions stabilized by the help of chemically active cores, which catalyze the production of droplet material. In summary, different reaction schemes and catalytic cores can be used to stabilize emulsions and to control their properties. PMID:26274171

  2. Suppression of Ostwald ripening in active emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwicker, David; Hyman, Anthony A.; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Emulsions consisting of droplets immersed in a fluid are typically unstable since they coarsen over time. One important coarsening process is Ostwald ripening, which is driven by the surface tension of the droplets. Stability of emulsions is relevant not only in complex fluids but also in biological cells, which contain liquidlike compartments, e.g., germ granules, Cajal bodies, and centrosomes. Such cellular systems are driven away from equilibrium, e.g., by chemical reactions, and thus can be called active emulsions. In this paper, we study such active emulsions by developing a coarse-grained description of the droplet dynamics, which we analyze for two different chemical reaction schemes. We first consider the simple case of first-order reactions, which leads to stable, monodisperse emulsions in which Ostwald ripening is suppressed within a range of chemical reaction rates. We then consider autocatalytic droplets, which catalyze the production of their own droplet material. Spontaneous nucleation of autocatalytic droplets is strongly suppressed and their emulsions are typically unstable. We show that autocatalytic droplets can be nucleated reliably and their emulsions stabilized by the help of chemically active cores, which catalyze the production of droplet material. In summary, different reaction schemes and catalytic cores can be used to stabilize emulsions and to control their properties.

  3. Suppression of erythropoiesis by dietary nitrate.

    PubMed

    Ashmore, Tom; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Evans, Colin E; Huang, Yun; Branco-Price, Cristina; Griffin, Julian L; Johnson, Randall S; Feelisch, Martin; Murray, Andrew J

    2015-03-01

    In mammals, hypoxia-triggered erythropoietin release increases red blood cell mass to meet tissue oxygen demands. Using male Wistar rats, we unmask a previously unrecognized regulatory pathway of erythropoiesis involving suppressor control by the NO metabolite and ubiquitous dietary component nitrate. We find that circulating hemoglobin levels are modulated by nitrate at concentrations achievable by dietary intervention under normoxic and hypoxic conditions; a moderate dose of nitrate administered via the drinking water (7 mg NaNO3/kg body weight/d) lowered hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit after 6 d compared with nonsupplemented/NaCl-supplemented controls. The underlying mechanism is suppression of hepatic erythropoietin expression associated with the downregulation of tissue hypoxia markers, suggesting increased pO2. At higher nitrate doses, however, a partial reversal of this effect occurred; this was accompanied by increased renal erythropoietin expression and stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factors, likely brought about by the relative anemia. Thus, hepatic and renal hypoxia-sensing pathways act in concert to modulate hemoglobin in response to nitrate, converging at an optimal minimal hemoglobin concentration appropriate to the environmental/physiologic situation. Suppression of hepatic erythropoietin expression by nitrate may thus act to decrease blood viscosity while matching oxygen supply to demand, whereas renal oxygen sensing could act as a brake, averting a potentially detrimental fall in hematocrit. PMID:25422368

  4. Adaptive flutter suppression, analysis and test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. H.; Hwang, C.; Joshi, D. S.; Harvey, C. A.; Huttsell, L. T.; Farmer, M. G.

    1983-01-01

    Methods of adaptive control have been applied to suppress a potentially violent flutter condition of a half-span model of a lightweight figher aircraft. This marked the confluence of several technologies with active flutter suppression, digital control and adaptive control theory the primary contributors. The control algorithm was required to adapt both to slowly varying changes, corresponding to changes in the flight condition or fuel loading and to rapid changes, corresponding to a store release or the transition from a stable to an unstable flight condition. The development of the adaptive control methods was followed by a simulation and checkout of the complete system and a wind tunnel demonstration. As part of the test, a store was released from the model wing tip, transforming the model abruptly from a stable configuration to a violent flutter condition. The adaptive algorithm recognized the unstable nature of the resulting configuration and implemented a stabilizing control law in a fraction of a second. The algorithm was also shown to provide system stability over a range of wind tunnel Mach numbers and dynamic pressures.

  5. Novel aqueous foams for suppressing VOC emission.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Pankaj S; Mohanty, Kishore K

    2004-05-01

    Reducing volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from crude oil/gasoline distribution and storage facilities is important in controlling environmental pollution and enhancing workplace safety. Stable aqueous foam formulations are developed to provide a mass transfer barrier to the emission of VOCs during loading of gasoline. Experiments are carried out in a bench-scale foam cell using liquid hexane as oil. The foam columns of 32 cm in height were able to suppress the plateau concentration of hexane vapors in the effluent by 87% under experimental conditions tested. Vapor suppression increased with foam height but was almost insensitive to liquid viscosity. These experiments are then upscaled from bench-scale to a vessel having an exposed surface area of roughly 2 orders of magnitude higher. Gasoline is used as oil in the upscaled experiments, and the concentrations of volatile hydrocarbons in the effluent are measured during oil loading. A 40-cm-thick foam column is found to reduce the emissions by 96% for foams prepared with deionized water and by 93.8% for foams prepared with 3.5 wt % NaCl brine for 10 h of oil loading. PMID:15180071

  6. Inhibition of SIRT2 suppresses hepatic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Maribel; Shang, Na; Ding, Xianzhong; Yong, Sherri; Cotler, Scott J; Denning, Mitchell F; Shimamura, Takashi; Breslin, Peter; Lüscher, Bernhard; Qiu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Liver fibrosis can progress to cirrhosis and result in serious complications of liver disease. The pathogenesis of liver fibrosis involves the activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), the underlying mechanisms of which are not fully known. Emerging evidence suggests that the classic histone deacetylases play a role in liver fibrosis, but the role of another subfamily of histone deacetylases, the sirtuins, in the development of hepatic fibrosis remains unknown. In this study, we found that blocking the activity of sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) by using inhibitors or shRNAs significantly suppressed fibrogenic gene expression in HSCs. We further demonstrated that inhibition of SIRT2 results in the degradation of c-MYC, which is important for HSC activation. In addition, we discovered that inhibition of SIRT2 suppresses the phosphorylation of ERK, which is critical for the stabilization of c-MYC. Moreover, we found that Sirt2 deficiency attenuates the hepatic fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) and thioacetamide (TAA). Furthermore, we showed that SIRT2, p-ERK, and c-MYC proteins are all overexpressed in human hepatic fibrotic tissues. These data suggest a critical role for the SIRT2/ERK/c-MYC axis in promoting hepatic fibrogenesis. Inhibition of the SIRT2/ERK/c-MYC axis represents a novel strategy to prevent and to potentially treat liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. PMID:27125275

  7. Error suppression and correction for quantum annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidar, Daniel

    While adiabatic quantum computing and quantum annealing enjoy a certain degree of inherent robustness against excitations and control errors, there is no escaping the need for error correction or suppression. In this talk I will give an overview of our work on the development of such error correction and suppression methods. We have experimentally tested one such method combining encoding, energy penalties and decoding, on a D-Wave Two processor, with encouraging results. Mean field theory shows that this can be explained in terms of a softening of the closing of the gap due to the energy penalty, resulting in protection against excitations that occur near the quantum critical point. Decoding recovers population from excited states and enhances the success probability of quantum annealing. Moreover, we have demonstrated that using repetition codes with increasing code distance can lower the effective temperature of the annealer. References: K.L. Pudenz, T. Albash, D.A. Lidar, ``Error corrected quantum annealing with hundreds of qubits'', Nature Commun. 5, 3243 (2014). K.L. Pudenz, T. Albash, D.A. Lidar, ``Quantum annealing correction for random Ising problems'', Phys. Rev. A. 91, 042302 (2015). S. Matsuura, H. Nishimori, T. Albash, D.A. Lidar, ``Mean Field Analysis of Quantum Annealing Correction''. arXiv:1510.07709. W. Vinci et al., in preparation.

  8. Suppression pheromone and cockroach rank formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Rong; Chang, Huan-Wen; Chen, Shu-Chun; Ho, Hsiao-Yung

    2009-06-01

    Although agonistic behaviors in the male lobster cockroach ( Nauphoeta cinerea) are well known, the formation of an unstable hierarchy has long been a puzzle. In this study, we investigate how the unstable dominance hierarchy in N. cinerea is maintained via a pheromone signaling system. In agonistic interactions, aggressive posture (AP) is an important behavioral index of aggression. This study showed that, during the formation of a governing hierarchy, thousands of nanograms of 3-hydroxy-2-butanone (3H-2B) were released by the AP-adopting dominant in the first encounter fight, then during the early domination period and that this release of 3H-2B was related to rank maintenance, but not to rank establishment. For rank maintenance, 3H-2B functioned as a suppression pheromone, which suppressed the fighting capability of rivals and kept them in a submissive state. During the period of rank maintenance, as the dominant male gradually decreased his 3H-2B release, the fighting ability of the subordinate gradually developed, as shown by the increasing odds of a subordinate adopting an AP (OSAP). The OSAP was negatively correlated with the amount of 3H-2B released by the dominant and positively correlated with the number of domination days. The same OSAP could be achieved earlier by reducing the amount of 3H-2B released by the dominant indicates that whether the subordinate adopts an offensive strategy depends on what the dominant is doing.

  9. Antisense RNA suppression of peroxidase gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lagrimini, L.M.; Bradford, S.; De Leon, F.D. )

    1989-04-01

    The 5{prime} half the anionic peroxidase cDNA of tobacco was inserted into a CaMV 35S promoter/terminator expression cassette in the antisense configuration. This was inserted into the Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation vector pCIBIO which includes kanamycin selection, transformed into two species of tobacco (N. tabacum and M. sylvestris), and plants were subsequently regenerated on kanamycin. Transgenic plants were analyzed for peroxidase expression and found to have 3-5 fold lower levels of peroxidase than wild-type plants. Isoelectric focusing demonstrated that the antisense RNA only suppressed the anionic peroxidase. Wound-induced peroxidase expression was found not to be affected by the antisense RNA. Northern blots show a greater than 5 fold suppression of anionic peroxidase mRNA in leaf tissue, and the antisense RNA was expressed at a level 2 fold over the endogenous mRNA. Plants were self-pollinated and F1 plants showed normal segregation. N. sylvestris transgenic plants with the lowest level of peroxidase are epinastic, and preliminary results indicate elevated auxin levels. Excised pith tissue from both species of transgenic plants rapidly collapse when exposed to air, while pith tissue from wild-type plants showed little change when exposed to air. Further characterization of these phenotypes is currently being made.

  10. Jet noise suppression by porous plug nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, A. B.; Kibens, V.; Wlezien, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    Jet noise suppression data presented earlier by Maestrello for porous plug nozzles were supplemented by the testing of a family of nozzles having an equivalent throat diameter of 11.77 cm. Two circular reference nozzles and eight plug nozzles having radius ratios of either 0.53 or 0.80 were tested at total pressure ratios of 1.60 to 4.00. Data were taken both with and without a forward motion or coannular flow jet, and some tests were made with a heated jet. Jet thrust was measured. The data were analyzed to show the effects of suppressor geometry on nozzle propulsive efficiency and jet noise. Aerodynamic testing of the nozzles was carried out in order to study the physical features that lead to the noise suppression. The aerodynamic flow phenomena were examined by the use of high speed shadowgraph cinematography, still shadowgraphs, extensive static pressure probe measurements, and two component laser Doppler velocimeter studies. The different measurement techniques correlated well with each other and demonstrated that the porous plug changes the shock cell structure of a standard nozzle into a series of smaller, periodic cell structures without strong shock waves. These structures become smaller in dimension and have reduced pressure variations as either the plug diameter or the porosity is increased, changes that also reduce the jet noise and decrease thrust efficiency.

  11. SLC transporters as a novel class of tumour suppressors: identity, function and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bhutia, Yangzom D.; Babu, Ellappan; Ramachandran, Sabarish; Yang, Shengping; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2016-01-01

    The role of plasma membrane transporters in cancer is receiving increasing attention in recent years. Several transporters for essential nutrients are up-regulated in cancer and serve as tumour promoters. Transporters could also function as tumour suppressors. To date, four transporters belonging to the SLC gene family have been identified as tumour suppressors. SLC5A8 is a Na+-coupled transporter for monocarboxylates. Among its substrates are the bacterial fermentation products butyrate and propionate and the ubiquitous metabolite pyruvate. The tumour-suppressive function of this transporter relates to the ability of butyrate, propionate and pyruvate to inhibit histone deacetylases (HDAC). SLC5A8 functions as a tumour suppressor in most tissues studied thus far, and provides a molecular link to Warburg effect, a characteristic feature in most cancers. It also links colonic bacteria and dietary fibre to the host. SLC26A3 as a tumour suppressor is restricted to colon; it is a Cl-/HCO3- exchanger, facilitating the efflux of HCO3-. The likely mechanism for the tumour-suppressive function of SLC26A3 is related to intracellular pH regulation. SLC39A1 is a Zn2+ transporter and its role in tumour suppression has been shown in prostate. Zn2+ is present at high concentrations in normal prostate where it elicits its tumour-suppressive function. SLC22A18 is possibly an organic cation transporter, but the identity of its physiological substrates is unknown. As such, there is no information on molecular pathways responsible for the tumour-suppressive function of this transporter. It is likely that additional SLC transporters will be discovered as tumour suppressors in the future. PMID:27118869

  12. Wireless Inductive Power Device Suppresses Blade Vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Choi, Benjamin B.; Bakhle, Milind A.; Min, James B.; Stefko, George L.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Fougers, Alan J.

    2011-01-01

    Vibration in turbomachinery can cause blade failures and leads to the use of heavier, thicker blades that result in lower aerodynamic efficiency and increased noise. Metal and/or composite fatigue in the blades of jet engines has resulted in blade destruction and loss of lives. Techniques for suppressing low-frequency blade vibration, such as gtuned circuit resistive dissipation of vibratory energy, h or simply "passive damping," can require electronics incorporating coils of unwieldy dimensions and adding unwanted weight to the rotor. Other approaches, using vibration-dampening devices or damping material, could add undesirable weight to the blades or hub, making them less efficient. A wireless inductive power device (WIPD) was designed, fabricated, and developed for use in the NASA Glenn's "Dynamic Spin Rig" (DSR) facility. The DSR is used to simulate the functionality of turbomachinery. The relatively small and lightweight device [10 lb (approx.=4.5 kg)] replaces the existing venerable and bulky slip-ring. The goal is the eventual integration of this technology into actual turbomachinery such as jet engines or electric power generators, wherein the device will facilitate the suppression of potentially destructive vibrations in fan blades. This technology obviates slip rings, which require cooling and can prove unreliable or be problematic over time. The WIPD consists of two parts: a remote element, which is positioned on the rotor and provides up to 100 W of electrical power to thin, lightweight piezoelectric patches strategically placed on/in fan blades; and a stationary base unit that wirelessly communicates with the remote unit. The base unit supplies inductive power, and also acts as an input and output corridor for wireless measurement, and active control command to the remote unit. Efficient engine operation necessitates minimal disturbance to the gas flow across the turbine blades in any effort to moderate blade vibration. This innovation makes it

  13. Test results of lithium pool-air reaction suppression systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppson, D.W.

    1987-02-01

    Engineered reaction suppression systems were demonstrated to be effective in suppressing lithium pool-air reactions for lithium quantities up to 100 kg. Lithium pool-air reaction suppression system tests were conducted to evaluate suppression system effectiveness for potential use in fusion facilities in mitigating consequences of postulated lithium spills. Small-scale perforated and sacrificial cover plate suppression systems with delayed inert gas purging proved effective in controlling the lithium-air interaction for lithium quantities near 15 kg at initial temperatures up to 450/sup 0/C. A large-scale suppression system with a sacrificial cover, a diverter plate, an inert gas atmosphere, and remotely retrievable catch pans proved effective in controlling lithium pool-air interaction for a 100-kg lithium discharge at an initial temperature of 550/sup 0/C. This suppression system limited the maximum pool temperature to about 600/sup 0/C less than that expected for a similar lithium pool-air reaction without a suppression system. Lithium aerosol release from this large-scale suppression system was a factor of about 10,000 less than that expected for a lithium pool-air reaction with no suppression system. Remote retrieval techniques for lithium cleanup, such as (1) in-place lithium siphoning and overhead crane dismantling, and (2) lithium catch pan removal by use of an overhead crane, were demonstrated as part of this large-scale test.

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of Treg-Mediated T Cell Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Angelika; Oberle, Nina; Krammer, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) can suppress other immune cells and, thus, are critical mediators of peripheral self-tolerance. On the one hand, Tregs avert autoimmune disease and allergies. On the other hand, Tregs can prevent immune reactions against tumors and pathogens. Despite the importance of Tregs, the molecular mechanisms of suppression remain incompletely understood and controversial. Proliferation and cytokine production of CD4+CD25− conventional T cells (Tcons) can be inhibited directly by Tregs. In addition, Tregs can indirectly suppress Tcon activation via inhibition of the stimulatory capacity of antigen presenting cells. Direct suppression of Tcons by Tregs can involve immunosuppressive soluble factors or cell contact. Different mechanisms of suppression have been described, so far with no consensus on one universal mechanism. Controversies might be explained by the fact that different mechanisms may operate depending on the site of the immune reaction, on the type and activation state of the suppressed target cell as well as on the Treg activation status. Further, inhibition of T cell effector function can occur independently of suppression of proliferation. In this review, we summarize the described molecular mechanisms of suppression with a particular focus on suppression of Tcons and rapid suppression of T cell receptor-induced calcium (Ca2+), NFAT, and NF-κB signaling in Tcons by Tregs. PMID:22566933

  15. Detection and Description of Soils with Specific Nematode Suppressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    Soils with specific suppressiveness to plant-parasitic nematodes are of interest to define the mechanisms that regulate population density. Suppressive soils prevent nematodes from establishing and from causing disease, and they diminish disease severity after initial nematode damage in continuous culturing of a host. A range of non-specific and specific soil treatments, followed by infestation with a target nematode, have been employed to identify nematode-suppressive soils. Biocidal treatments, soil transfer tests, and baiting approaches together with observations of the plant-parasitic nematode in the root zone of susceptible host plants have improved the understanding of nematode-suppressive soils. Techniques to demonstrate specific soil suppressiveness against plant-parasitic nematodes are compared in this review. The overlap of studies on soil suppressiveness with recent advances in soil health and quality is briefly discussed. The emphasis is on methods (or criteria) used to detect and identify soils that maintain specific soil suppressiveness to plant-parasitic nematodes. While biocidal treatments can detect general and specific soil suppressiveness, soil transfer studies, by definition, apply only to specific soil suppressiveness. Finally, potential strategies to exploit suppressive soils are presented. PMID:19262851

  16. Therapeutic potential of monoamine transporter substrates.

    PubMed

    Rothman, Richard B; Baumann, Michael H

    2006-01-01

    Monoamine transporter proteins are targets for many psychoactive compounds, including therapeutic and abused stimulant drugs. This paper reviews recent work from our laboratory investigating the interaction of stimulants with transporters in brain tissue. We illustrate how determining the precise mechanism of stimulant drug action (uptake inhibitor vs. substrate) can provide unique opportunities for medication discovery. An important lesson learned from this work is that drugs which display equipotent substrate activity at dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) transporters have minimal abuse liability and few stimulant side-effects, yet are able to suppress ongoing drug-seeking behavior. As a specific example, we describe the development of PAL-287 (alpha-methylnapthylethylamine), a dual DA/5-HT releasing agent that suppresses cocaine self-administration in rhesus monkeys, without the adverse effects associated with older phenylethylamine 5-HT releasers (e.g., fenfluramine) and DA releasers (e.g., amphetamine). Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of developing non-amphetamine releasing agents as potential treatments for substance abuse disorders and other psychiatric conditions. PMID:17017961

  17. Fuzzy Model-based Pitch Stabilization and Wing Vibration Suppression of Flexible Wing Aircraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayoubi, Mohammad A.; Swei, Sean Shan-Min; Nguyen, Nhan T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a fuzzy nonlinear controller to regulate the longitudinal dynamics of an aircraft and suppress the bending and torsional vibrations of its flexible wings. The fuzzy controller utilizes full-state feedback with input constraint. First, the Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy linear model is developed which approximates the coupled aeroelastic aircraft model. Then, based on the fuzzy linear model, a fuzzy controller is developed to utilize a full-state feedback and stabilize the system while it satisfies the control input constraint. Linear matrix inequality (LMI) techniques are employed to solve the fuzzy control problem. Finally, the performance of the proposed controller is demonstrated on the NASA Generic Transport Model (GTM).

  18. Suppression of bulk conductivity in InAs/GaSb broken gap composite quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Charpentier, Christophe; Fält, Stefan; Reichl, Christian; Nichele, Fabrizio; Nath Pal, Atindra; Pietsch, Patrick; Ihn, Thomas; Ensslin, Klaus; Wegscheider, Werner

    2013-09-09

    The two-dimensional topological insulator state in InAs/GaSb quantum wells manifests itself by topologically protected helical edge channel transport relying on an insulating bulk. This work investigates a way of suppressing bulk conductivity by using gallium source materials of different degrees of impurity concentrations. While highest-purity gallium is accompanied by clear conduction through the sample bulk, intentional impurity incorporation leads to a bulk resistance over 1 MΩ, independent of applied magnetic fields. In addition, ultra high electron mobilities for GaAs/AlGaAs structures fabricated in a molecular beam epitaxy system used for the growth of Sb-based samples are reported.

  19. Nature of Transport across Sheared Zonal Flows in Electrostatic Ion-Temperature-Gradient Gyrokinetic Plasma Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.; Newman, D. E.; Leboeuf, J.-N.; Decyk, V. K.; Carreras, B. A.

    2008-11-14

    It is shown that the usual picture for the suppression of turbulent transport across a stable sheared flow based on a reduction of diffusive transport coefficients is, by itself, incomplete. By means of toroidal gyrokinetic simulations of electrostatic, collisionless ion-temperature-gradient turbulence, it is found that the nature of the transport is altered fundamentally, changing from diffusive to anticorrelated and subdiffusive. Additionally, whenever the flows are self-consistently driven by turbulence, the transport gains an additional non-Gaussian character. These results suggest that a description of transport across sheared flows using effective diffusivities is oversimplified.

  20. Nature of Transport across Sheared Zonal Flows in Electrostatic Ion-Temperature-Gradient Gyrokinetic Plasma Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Raul; Newman, David E; Leboeuf, Jean-Noel; Decyk, Viktor; Carreras, Benjamin A

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that the usual picture for the suppression of turbulent transport across a stable sheared flow based on a reduction of diffusive transport coefficients is, by itself, incomplete. By means of toroidal gyrokinetic simulations of electrostatic, collisionless ion-temperature-gradient turbulence, it is found that the nature of the transport is altered fundamentally, changing from diffusive to anticorrelated and subdiffusive. Additionally, whenever the flows are self-consistently driven by turbulence, the transport gains an additional non-Gaussian character. These results suggest that a description of transport across sheared flows using effective diffusivities is oversimplified.

  1. Suppression of thermopower of NaxCoO2 by an external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, H. J.; Singh, David J

    2007-01-01

    We calculate the thermopower in Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} using the standard Boltzmann transport theory and first principles electronic structures with spin polarization taken into account. The thermopower is found to be smaller when the system is polarized, which thereby provides an alternative reasonable explanation for the suppression of thermopower in a magnetic field. The role of the spin-orbit coupling on the thermoelectricity is also discussed.

  2. Thought suppression failures in combat PTSD: a cognitive load hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Aikins, Deane E; Johnson, Douglas C; Borelli, Jessica L; Klemanski, David H; Morrissey, Paul M; Benham, Todd L; Southwick, Steven M; Tolin, David F

    2009-09-01

    The present study investigated the relation between thought suppression of emotionally neutral content [i.e., Wegner's (1994) "white bear"], incidental traumatic thought intrusion, and skin conductance responses in combat-related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Participants included service members who either: a) had PTSD following an Operation Iraqi Freedom deployment; b) were free of psychiatric diagnosis following deployment (Combat Equivalent), or c) were pre-deployed and without psychiatric diagnosis (Pre-Deployed). PTSD Service Members reported the greatest intrusion of combat thoughts during the suppression task and demonstrated a post-suppression rebound effect with a neutral thought. Non-specific skin conductance responses indicated that the suppression task was related to similar levels of increased sympathetic activity for both the PTSD and Pre-Deployed groups, whereas the Combat Equivalent group showed no increased activation during thought suppression. Intrusive traumatic thoughts combined with failures in neutral thought suppression may be a consequence of increased cognitive load in PTSD. PMID:19586619

  3. Inhibiting macrophage proliferation suppresses atherosclerotic plaque inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jun; Lobatto, Mark E.; Hassing, Laurien; van der Staay, Susanne; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Calcagno, Claudia; Braza, Mounia S.; Baxter, Samantha; Fay, Francois; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Sager, Hendrik B.; Astudillo, Yaritzy M.; Leong, Wei; Ramachandran, Sarayu; Storm, Gert; Pérez-Medina, Carlos; Reiner, Thomas; Cormode, David P.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Swirski, Filip K.; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation drives atherosclerotic plaque progression and rupture, and is a compelling therapeutic target. Consequently, attenuating inflammation by reducing local macrophage accumulation is an appealing approach. This can potentially be accomplished by either blocking blood monocyte recruitment to the plaque or increasing macrophage apoptosis and emigration. Because macrophage proliferation was recently shown to dominate macrophage accumulation in advanced plaques, locally inhibiting macrophage proliferation may reduce plaque inflammation and produce long-term therapeutic benefits. To test this hypothesis, we used nanoparticle-based delivery of simvastatin to inhibit plaque macrophage proliferation in apolipoprotein E–deficient mice (Apoe−/−) with advanced atherosclerotic plaques. This resulted in the rapid reduction of plaque inflammation and favorable phenotype remodeling. We then combined this short-term nanoparticle intervention with an 8-week oral statin treatment, and this regimen rapidly reduced and continuously suppressed plaque inflammation. Our results demonstrate that pharmacologically inhibiting local macrophage proliferation can effectively treat inflammation in atherosclerosis. PMID:26295063

  4. Circuit protection devices for transient suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childers, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The Electromer Corporation has developed a series of transient voltage suppression components based on a patented, specially formulated PolyClamp (trademark) material. PolyClamp components are a new class of transient voltage surge suppressors that extend the range of protection offered by transients protectors. The PolyClamp transient surge suppressors provide low capacitance, high energy capability, and packaging flexibility. A wide variety of applications can be protected. A tube and ferrule configuration was designed to be used with MIL/Aerospace style connectors and is designed to meet the applicable environmental, mechanical, and electrical requirements as defined by the United States and European defence standards performance requirements. Here, PolyClamp is compared with current transient surge suppressors. Typical performance and design are discussed.

  5. Notum deacylates Wnts to suppress signalling activity

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Steve; Chang, Tao-Hsin; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Bineva, Ganka; O’Reilly, Nicola; Snijders, Ambrosius P.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Signalling by Wnts is finely balanced to ensure normal development and tissue homeostasis while avoiding diseases such as cancer. This is achieved in part by Notum, a highly conserved secreted feedback antagonist. Notum has been thought to act as a phospholipase, shedding glypicans and associated Wnts from the cell surface. However, this view fails to explain specificity since glypicans bind many extracellular ligands. Here we provide genetic evidence in Drosophila that Notum requires glypicans to suppress Wnt signalling, but does not cleave their glycophosphatidylinositol anchor. Structural analyses reveal glycosaminoglycan binding sites on Notum, which likely help Notum colocalise with Wnts. They also identify, at the active site of human and Drosophila Notum, a large hydrophobic pocket that accommodates palmitoleate. Kinetic and mass spectrometric analyses of human proteins show that Notum is a carboxylesterase that removes an essential palmitoleate moiety from Wnts and thus constitutes the first known extracellular protein deacylase. PMID:25731175

  6. Pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Dane, Clifford B.; Hackel, Lloyd A.; George, Edward V.; Miller, John L.; Krupke, William F.

    1993-01-01

    A pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus (10) for time compressing the output of a laser (14). A pump pulse (46) is separated from a seed pulse (48) by a first polarized beam splitter (20) according to the orientation of a half wave plate (18). The seed pulse (48) is directed into an SBS oscillator (44) by two plane mirrors (22, 26) and a corner mirror (24), the corner mirror (24) being movable to adjust timing. The pump pulse (46) is directed into an SBS amplifier 34 wherein SBS occurs. The seed pulse (48), having been propagated from the SBS oscillator (44), is then directed through the SBS amplifier (34) wherein it sweeps the energy of the pump pulse (46) out of the SBS amplifier (34) and is simultaneously compressed, and the time compressed pump pulse (46) is emitted as a pulse output (52). A second polarized beam splitter (38) directs any undepleted pump pulse 58 away from the SBS oscillator (44).

  7. Pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.; George, E.V.; Miller, J.L.; Krupke, W.F.

    1993-11-09

    A pulse compression and prepulse suppression apparatus (10) for time compressing the output of a laser (14). A pump pulse (46) is separated from a seed pulse (48) by a first polarized beam splitter (20) according to the orientation of a half wave plate (18). The seed pulse (48) is directed into an SBS oscillator (44) by two plane mirrors (22, 26) and a corner mirror (24), the corner mirror (24) being movable to adjust timing. The pump pulse (46) is directed into an SBS amplifier 34 wherein SBS occurs. The seed pulse (48), having been propagated from the SBS oscillator (44), is then directed through the SBS amplifier (34) wherein it sweeps the energy of the pump pulse (46) out of the SBS amplifier (34) and is simultaneously compressed, and the time compressed pump pulse (46) is emitted as a pulse output (52). A second polarized beam splitter (38) directs any undepleted pump pulse 58 away from the SBS oscillator (44).

  8. Suppressed conductometric capillary electrophoresis separation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, P.K.; Bao, L. )

    1993-04-15

    A tubular cation-exchange membrane is installed at the end of a 60-cm-long 75-[mu]m-bore fused-silica capillary. A static dilute acid regenerant solution surrounds the membranes that functions as a suppressor. With positive high voltage applied to the capillary inlet and the regenerant solution grounded, effective suppression of electrolytes such as solutions of alkalic metal borate, glycinate, or cyanide is observed. Electroosmotic flow carries the capillary effluent past the suppressor into a conductivity detection cell constituted by two platinum wires inserted through the wall of a poly(vinyl chloride) capillary. The system provides detection limits in the 10--20 [mu]g/L range for a variety of anions; a typical separation requires 15 min. Applicability to a variety of real samples is demonstrated. 26 refs., 10 figs.

  9. Apparatus and method for jet noise suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maestrello, L.

    1983-08-01

    A method and apparatus for jet noise suppression through control of the static pressure of the jet and control of the rate of entrainment of ambient fluid into the jet downstream of the exhaust nozzle is disclosed. The momentum flux over an extended region of the jet is regulated, affecting Reynolds stresses in the jet and the spreading angle of the jet. Static pressure is controlled through a long hollow, porous nozzle plug centerbody which may be selectively vented to ambient conditions, connected to a vacuum source, or supplied with fluids of various densities for injection into the stream. Sound in the jet may be channeled along the nozzle plug centerbody by injecting coolant such as a cryogenic fluid throughout the center-body into the jet.

  10. Capsinoids suppress fat accumulation via lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hong, Qin; Xia, Chen; Xiangying, Hu; Quan, Yuan

    2015-03-01

    Capsaicin, found in red peppers, has been reported to have anti‑obesity, anti‑hypertension, anti‑diabetes and anti‑inflammatory functions. In the present study, we determined the effect of non‑pungent capsinoids on the metabolism of adipocytes. We demonstrated that capsinoids suppressed fat accumulation in vivo and in vitro in mice. Liver, the main tissue of lipid metabolism, was treated by capsinoids, and HMG‑CoA reductase, CPT‑1, FAT/CD36 and GLUT4 were found to be increased significantly, which demonstrated promotion of the lipid metabolism in liver and adipose tissues. In addition, by adding capsinoids, the induced adipocytes also demonstrated significantly increased levels of HMG‑CoA reductase, CPT‑1, FAT/CD36 and GLUT4. Oil red O staining also demonstrated that capsinoids decreased fat accumulation in the adipocytes. In conclusion, these results indicate that capsinoids may be worth investigating as a potential cure for obesity. PMID:25421144

  11. Exploiting Symmetry for Quantum Error Suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Yunseong; Blümel, Reinhold

    2016-05-01

    In light of recent experimental progress in quantum computing, the time is ripe to discuss quantum computer hardware optimization. Taking the digital/analog hybrid nature of quantum computers into account, choosing a proper processor architecture for a given quantum algorithm becomes crucial in making quantum computing a practical reality. As a first step in this direction, we investigate the robustness of quantum adders with respect to naturally occurring hardware defects and errors. In particular, we compare the robustness of the ripple-carry adder to that of the quantum Fourier adder. We show that, surprisingly, when used in Shor's algorithm, the quantum Fourier adder may well be more robust than the ripple-carry adder. We present a noise suppression scheme, called symmetric noise, applicable to the quantum Fourier architecture, that, measured in terms of fidelity, results in an order-of-magnitude performance boost.

  12. Fever: suppress or let it ride?

    PubMed

    Ray, Juliet J; Schulman, Carl I

    2015-12-01

    While our ability to detect and manage fever has evolved since its conceptualization in the 5(th) century BC, controversy remains over the best evidence-based practices regarding if and when to treat this physiologic derangement in the critically ill. There are two basic fields of thought: (I) fever should be suppressed because its metabolic costs outweigh its potential physiologic benefit in an already stressed host; vs. (II) fever is a protective adaptive response that should be allowed to run its course under most circumstances. The latter approach, sometime referred to as the "let it ride" philosophy, has been supported by several recent randomized controlled trials like that of Young et al. [2015], which are challenging earlier observational studies and may be pushing the pendulum away from the Pavlovian treatment response. PMID:26793378

  13. Fever: suppress or let it ride?

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Juliet J.

    2015-01-01

    While our ability to detect and manage fever has evolved since its conceptualization in the 5th century BC, controversy remains over the best evidence-based practices regarding if and when to treat this physiologic derangement in the critically ill. There are two basic fields of thought: (I) fever should be suppressed because its metabolic costs outweigh its potential physiologic benefit in an already stressed host; vs. (II) fever is a protective adaptive response that should be allowed to run its course under most circumstances. The latter approach, sometime referred to as the “let it ride” philosophy, has been supported by several recent randomized controlled trials like that of Young et al. [2015], which are challenging earlier observational studies and may be pushing the pendulum away from the Pavlovian treatment response. PMID:26793378

  14. Suppression of Drug Resistance in Dengue Virus

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, Roberto; Nagamine, Claude M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue virus is a major human pathogen responsible for 400 million infections yearly. As with other RNA viruses, daunting challenges to antiviral design exist due to the high error rates of RNA-dependent RNA synthesis. Indeed, treatment of dengue virus infection with a nucleoside analog resulted in the expected genetic selection of resistant viruses in tissue culture and in mice. However, when the function of the oligomeric core protein was inhibited, no detectable selection of drug resistance in tissue culture or in mice was detected, despite the presence of drug-resistant variants in the population. Suppressed selection of drug-resistant virus correlated with cooligomerization of the targeted drug-susceptible and drug-resistant core proteins. The concept of “dominant drug targets,” in which inhibition of oligomeric viral assemblages leads to the formation of drug-susceptible chimeras, can therefore be used to prevent the outgrowth of drug resistance during dengue virus infection. PMID:26670386

  15. Eigenspace techniques for active flutter suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrard, William L.; Liebst, Bradley S.; Farm, Jerome A.

    1987-01-01

    The use of eigenspace techniques for the design of an active flutter suppression system for a hypothetical research drone is discussed. One leading edge and two trailing edge aerodynamic control surfaces and four sensors (accelerometers) are available for each wing. Full state control laws are designed by selecting feedback gains which place closed loop eigenvalues and shape closed loop eigenvectors so as to stabilize wing flutter and reduce gust loads at the wing root while yielding accepatable robustness and satisfying constrains on rms control surface activity. These controllers are realized by state estimators designed using an eigenvalue placement/eigenvector shaping technique which results in recovery of the full state loop transfer characteristics. The resulting feedback compensators are shown to perform almost as well as the full state designs. They also exhibit acceptable performance in situations in which the failure of an actuator is simulated.

  16. NMR solvent peak suppression by nonlinear excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, Malcolm H.

    1988-03-01

    Most existing NMR solvent peak suppression sequences provide a satisfactory dependence of the intensity of excited signals on frequency but poor phase characteristics. In practice this leads to spectral distortions which generally become more severe as the frequency selectivity of the sequence is increased. However, it is shown that by working well outside the linear response regime, excitation schemes which combine high frequency selectivity with good phase properties may be devised. Sequences of six rectangular radio-frequency pulses were discovered using a combination of coherent averaging theory to treat the near-resonant behavior and numerical simulation further from resonance. Extensive use of symmetry greatly simplifies both the coherent averaging calculations and the numerical simulations. The new pulse sequences have been given the acronym NERO (nonlinear excitation rejecting on-resonance). Experimental spectra of an enzyme in dilute aqueous solution are shown.

  17. Are Claims of Global Warming Being Suppressed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, Thomas J.

    2006-02-01

    Over the last few years, I have heard many rumors that climate science relevant to the global warming discussion is being suppressed by the Bush Administration. One cannot do much about third-hand information. However, on 29 January, the New York Times published a front page article on NASA efforts to suppress statements about global warming by James Hansen, director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies. A claim by one government scientist, though, no matter how distinguished, still requires examples from other scientists before a general conclusion can be drawn about the overall scope of the problem. But if the charges are more widespread, then some government scientists might be reluctant to make such claims, because they might feel that their positions were jeopardized. Therefore, an alternate way may be needed to determine the scope of the issue, while still safeguarding government workers from possible retaliation. -On 30 January, Rep. Sherwood Boehlert (R-N.Y.), chairman of the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science, wrote a letter to NASA Administrator Michael Griffin addressing many of the concerns Crowley has raised. Boehlert wrote,``It ought to go without saying that government scientists must be free to describe their scientific conclusions and the implications of those conclusions to their fellow scientists, policymakers and the general public.'' He continued,``Good science cannot long persist in an atmosphere of intimidation. Political figures ought to be reviewing their public statements to make sure they are consistent with the best available science; scientists should not be reviewing their statements to make sure they are consistent with the current political orthodoxy.'' I commend Rep. Boehlert for his quick and clear statement of the importance of unfettered communication of science. -FRED SPILHAUS, Editor

  18. Eye gaze adaptation under interocular suppression.

    PubMed

    Stein, Timo; Peelen, Marius V; Sterzer, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    The perception of eye gaze is central to social interaction in that it provides information about another person's goals, intentions, and focus of attention. Direction of gaze has been found to reflexively shift the observer's attention in the corresponding direction, and prolonged exposure to averted eye gaze adapts the visual system, biasing perception of subsequent gaze in the direction opposite to the adapting face. Here, we tested the role of conscious awareness in coding eye gaze directions. To this end, we measured aftereffects induced by adapting faces with different eye gaze directions that were presented during continuous flash suppression, a potent interocular suppression technique. In some trials the adapting face was rendered fully invisible, whereas in others it became partially visible. In Experiment 1, the adapting and test faces were presented in identical sizes and to the same eye. Even fully invisible faces were capable of inducing significant eye gaze aftereffects, although these were smaller than aftereffects from partially visible faces. When the adapting and test faces were shown to different eyes in Experiment 2, significant eye gaze aftereffects were still observed for the fully invisible faces, thus showing interocular transfer. Experiment 3 disrupted the spatial correspondence between adapting and test faces by introducing a size change. Under these conditions, aftereffects were restricted to partially visible adapting faces. These results were replicated in Experiment 4 using a blocked adaptation design. Together, these findings indicate that size-dependent low-level components of eye gaze can be represented without awareness, whereas object-centered higher-level representations of eye gaze directions depend on visual awareness. PMID:22753441

  19. SUPPRESSION OF STAR FORMATION IN NGC 1266

    SciTech Connect

    Alatalo, Katherine; Lanz, Lauranne; Bitsakis, Theodoros; Appleton, Philip N.; Ogle, Patrick M.; Lacy, Mark; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Nyland, Kristina; Meier, David S.; Cales, Sabrina L.; Chang, Philip; Davis, Timothy A.; De Zeeuw, P. T.; Martín, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    NGC 1266 is a nearby lenticular galaxy that harbors a massive outflow of molecular gas powered by the mechanical energy of an active galactic nucleus (AGN). It has been speculated that such outflows hinder star formation (SF) in their host galaxies, providing a form of feedback to the process of galaxy formation. Previous studies, however, indicated that only jets from extremely rare, high-power quasars or radio galaxies could impart significant feedback on their hosts. Here we present detailed observations of the gas and dust continuum of NGC 1266 at millimeter wavelengths. Our observations show that molecular gas is being driven out of the nuclear region at M-dot {sub out}≈110 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup –1}, of which the vast majority cannot escape the nucleus. Only 2 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} is actually capable of escaping the galaxy. Most of the molecular gas that remains is very inefficient at forming stars. The far-infrared emission is dominated by an ultra-compact (≲ 50 pc) source that could either be powered by an AGN or by an ultra-compact starburst. The ratio of the SF surface density (Σ{sub SFR}) to the gas surface density (Σ{sub H{sub 2}}) indicates that SF is suppressed by a factor of ≈50 compared to normal star-forming galaxies if all gas is forming stars, and ≈150 for the outskirt (98%) dense molecular gas if the central region is powered by an ultra-compact starburst. The AGN-driven bulk outflow could account for this extreme suppression by hindering the fragmentation and gravitational collapse necessary to form stars through a process of turbulent injection. This result suggests that even relatively common, low-power AGNs are able to alter the evolution of their host galaxies as their black holes grow onto the M-σ relation.

  20. Suppressive effects of ketamine on macrophage functions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yi; Chen, T.-L.; Sheu, J.-R.; Chen, R.-M. . E-mail: rmchen@tmu.edu.tw

    2005-04-01

    Ketamine is an intravenous anesthetic agent. Clinically, induction of anesthesia with ketamine can cause immunosuppression. Macrophages play important roles in host defense. In this study, we attempted to evaluate the effects of ketamine on macrophage functions and its possible mechanism using mouse macrophage-like Raw 264.7 cells as the experimental model. Exposure of macrophages to 10 and 100 {mu}M ketamine, which correspond to 0.1 and 1 times the clinically relevant concentration, for 1, 6, and 24 h had no effect on cell viability or lactate dehydrogenase release. When the administered concentration reached 1000 {mu}M, ketamine caused a release of lactate dehydrogenase and cell death. Ketamine, at 10 and 100 {mu}M, did not affect the chemotactic activity of macrophages. Administration of 1000 {mu}M ketamine in macrophages resulted in a decrease in cell migration. Treatment of macrophages with ketamine reduced phagocytic activities. The oxidative ability of macrophages was suppressed by ketamine. Treatment with lipopolysaccharide induced TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, and IL-6 mRNA in macrophages. Administration of ketamine alone did not influence TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, or IL-6 mRNA production. Meanwhile, cotreatment with ketamine and lipopolysaccharide significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, and IL-6 mRNA levels. Exposure to ketamine led to a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential. However, the activity of mitochondrial complex I NADH dehydrogenase was not affected by ketamine. This study shows that a clinically relevant concentration of ketamine (100 {mu}M) can suppress macrophage function of phagocytosis, its oxidative ability, and inflammatory cytokine production possibly via reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential instead of direct cellular toxicity.