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Sample records for oncogenic transcription factor

  1. Oncogenic Transcription Factors: Cornerstones of Inflammation-Linked Pancreatic Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, Sandra; Ellenrieder, Volker; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.

    2012-01-01

    Transcription factors are proteins that regulate gene expression by modulating the synthesis of messenger RNA. Since this process is frequently one dominant control point in the production of many proteins, transcription factors represent the key regulators of numerous cellular functions, including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Pancreatic cancer progression is characterized by the activation of inflammatory signaling pathways converging on a limited set of transcription factors that fine-tune gene expression patterns contributing to the growth and maintenance of these tumors. Thus, strategies targeting these transcriptional networks activated in pancreatic cancer cells could block the effects of upstream inflammatory responses participating in pancreatic tumorigenesis. In this article we review this field of research and summarize current strategies to target oncogenic transcription factors and their activating signaling networks in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:21997559

  2. A Computational Drug Repositioning Approach for Targeting Oncogenic Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Gayvert, Kaitlyn M; Dardenne, Etienne; Cheung, Cynthia; Boland, Mary Regina; Lorberbaum, Tal; Wanjala, Jackline; Chen, Yu; Rubin, Mark A; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Rickman, David S; Elemento, Olivier

    2016-06-14

    Mutations in transcription factor (TF) genes are frequently observed in tumors, often leading to aberrant transcriptional activity. Unfortunately, TFs are often considered undruggable due to the absence of targetable enzymatic activity. To address this problem, we developed CRAFTT, a computational drug-repositioning approach for targeting TF activity. CRAFTT combines ChIP-seq with drug-induced expression profiling to identify small molecules that can specifically perturb TF activity. Application to ENCODE ChIP-seq datasets revealed known drug-TF interactions, and a global drug-protein network analysis supported these predictions. Application of CRAFTT to ERG, a pro-invasive, frequently overexpressed oncogenic TF, predicted that dexamethasone would inhibit ERG activity. Dexamethasone significantly decreased cell invasion and migration in an ERG-dependent manner. Furthermore, analysis of electronic medical record data indicates a protective role for dexamethasone against prostate cancer. Altogether, our method provides a broadly applicable strategy for identifying drugs that specifically modulate TF activity. PMID:27264179

  3. A Computational Drug Repositioning Approach for Targeting Oncogenic Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Gayvert, Kaitlyn; Dardenne, Etienne; Cheung, Cynthia; Boland, Mary Regina; Lorberbaum, Tal; Wanjala, Jackline; Chen, Yu; Rubin, Mark; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Rickman, David; Elemento, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mutations in transcription factors (TFs) genes are frequently observed in tumors, often leading to aberrant transcriptional activity. Unfortunately, TFs are often considered undruggable due to the absence of targetable enzymatic activity. To address this problem, we developed CRAFTT, a Computational drug-Repositioning Approach For Targeting Transcription factor activity. CRAFTT combines ChIP-seq with drug-induced expression profiling to identify small molecules that can specifically perturb TF activity. Application to ENCODE ChIP-seq datasets revealed known drug-TF interactions and a global drug-protein network analysis further supported these predictions. Application of CRAFTT to ERG, a pro-invasive, frequently over-expressed oncogenic TF predicted that dexamethasone would inhibit ERG activity. Indeed, dexamethasone significantly decreased cell invasion and migration in an ERG-dependent manner. Furthermore, analysis of Electronic Medical Record data indicates a protective role for dexamethasone against prostate cancer. Altogether, our method provides a broadly applicable strategy to identify drugs that specifically modulate TF activity. PMID:27264179

  4. The transcription factor LSF: a novel oncogene for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Santhekadur, Prasanna K; Rajasekaran, Devaraja; Siddiq, Ayesha; Gredler, Rachel; Chen, Dong; Schaus, Scott E; Hansen, Ulla; Fisher, Paul B; Sarkar, Devanand

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factor LSF (Late SV40 Factor), also known as TFCP2, belongs to the LSF/CP2 family related to Grainyhead family of proteins and is involved in many biological events, including regulation of cellular and viral promoters, cell cycle, DNA synthesis, cell survival and Alzheimer’s disease. Our recent studies establish an oncogenic role of LSF in Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). LSF overexpression is detected in human HCC cell lines and in more than 90% cases of human HCC patients, compared to normal hepatocytes and liver, and its expression level showed significant correlation with the stages and grades of the disease. Forced overexpression of LSF in less aggressive HCC cells resulted in highly aggressive, angiogenic and multi-organ metastatic tumors in nude mice. Conversely, inhibition of LSF significantly abrogated growth and metastasis of highly aggressive HCC cells in nude mice. Microarray studies revealed that as a transcription factor LSF modulated specific genes regulating invasion, angiogenesis, chemoresistance and senescence. LSF transcriptionally regulates thymidylate synthase (TS) gene, thus contributing to cell cycle regulation and chemoresistance. Our studies identify a network of proteins, including osteopontin (OPN), Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), c-Met and complement factor H (CFH), that are directly regulated by LSF and play important role in LSF-induced hepatocarcinogenesis. A high throughput screening identified small molecule inhibitors of LSF DNA binding and the prototype of these molecules, Factor Quinolinone inhibitor 1 (FQI1), profoundly inhibited cell viability and induced apoptosis in human HCC cells without exerting harmful effects to normal immortal human hepatocytes and primary mouse hepatocytes. In nude mice xenograft studies, FQI1 markedly inhibited growth of human HCC xenografts as well as angiogenesis without exerting any toxicity. These studies establish a key role of LSF in hepatocarcinogenesis and usher in a

  5. The Activating Transcription Factor 3 Protein Suppresses the Oncogenic Function of Mutant p53 Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Saisai; Wang, Hongbo; Lu, Chunwan; Malmut, Sarah; Zhang, Jianqiao; Ren, Shumei; Yu, Guohua; Wang, Wei; Tang, Dale D.; Yan, Chunhong

    2014-01-01

    Mutant p53 proteins (mutp53) often acquire oncogenic activities, conferring drug resistance and/or promoting cancer cell migration and invasion. Although it has been well established that such a gain of function is mainly achieved through interaction with transcriptional regulators, thereby modulating cancer-associated gene expression, how the mutp53 function is regulated remains elusive. Here we report that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) bound common mutp53 (e.g. R175H and R273H) and, subsequently, suppressed their oncogenic activities. ATF3 repressed mutp53-induced NFKB2 expression and sensitized R175H-expressing cancer cells to cisplatin and etoposide treatments. Moreover, ATF3 appeared to suppress R175H- and R273H-mediated cancer cell migration and invasion as a consequence of preventing the transcription factor p63 from inactivation by mutp53. Accordingly, ATF3 promoted the expression of the metastasis suppressor SHARP1 in mutp53-expressing cells. An ATF3 mutant devoid of the mutp53-binding domain failed to disrupt the mutp53-p63 binding and, thus, lost the activity to suppress mutp53-mediated migration, suggesting that ATF3 binds to mutp53 to suppress its oncogenic function. In line with these results, we found that down-regulation of ATF3 expression correlated with lymph node metastasis in TP53-mutated human lung cancer. We conclude that ATF3 can suppress mutp53 oncogenic function, thereby contributing to tumor suppression in TP53-mutated cancer. PMID:24554706

  6. The importance of oncogenic transcription factors for oral cancer pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Yedida, Govinda Raju; Nagini, Siddavaram; Mishra, Rajakishore

    2013-08-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current experimental evidence shows that most important risk factors for oral cancer include tobacco use and excessive alcohol consumption and less well-defined risks include viral infection and a diet deficient in antioxidants. The positive correlation between various risk/etiologic factors of oral cancer and the activation of various transcription factors (TFs) has been reported in the literature. Although initially, TFs were considered to be very difficult targets for use in clinical treatment, recent technological advances have provided the ability to control these factors of cancer progression. This review focuses on the role of oncogenic transcription factors in oral cancer, their modes of activation through various biological pathways, the promises and pitfalls in viewing them as potent oncotargets, the way they can be controlled based on the current understanding, and the future research to be done in this area. PMID:23619350

  7. RNA helicase A activity is inhibited by oncogenic transcription factor EWS-FLI1

    PubMed Central

    Erkizan, Hayriye Verda; Schneider, Jeffrey A.; Sajwan, Kamal; Graham, Garrett T.; Griffin, Brittany; Chasovskikh, Sergey; Youbi, Sarah E.; Kallarakal, Abraham; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan; Casey, John L.; Üren, Aykut; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    RNA helicases impact RNA structure and metabolism from transcription through translation, in part through protein interactions with transcription factors. However, there is limited knowledge on the role of transcription factor influence upon helicase activity. RNA helicase A (RHA) is a DExH-box RNA helicase that plays multiple roles in cellular biology, some functions requiring its activity as a helicase while others as a protein scaffold. The oncogenic transcription factor EWS-FLI1 requires RHA to enable Ewing sarcoma (ES) oncogenesis and growth; a small molecule, YK-4-279 disrupts this complex in cells. Our current study investigates the effect of EWS-FLI1 upon RHA helicase activity. We found that EWS-FLI1 reduces RHA helicase activity in a dose-dependent manner without affecting intrinsic ATPase activity; however, the RHA kinetics indicated a complex model. Using separated enantiomers, only (S)-YK-4-279 reverses the EWS-FLI1 inhibition of RHA helicase activity. We report a novel RNA binding property of EWS-FLI1 leading us to discover that YK-4-279 inhibition of RHA binding to EWS-FLI1 altered the RNA binding profile of both proteins. We conclude that EWS-FLI1 modulates RHA helicase activity causing changes in overall transcriptome processing. These findings could lead to both enhanced understanding of oncogenesis and provide targets for therapy. PMID:25564528

  8. Ablation of the oncogenic transcription factor ERG by deubiquitinase inhibition in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; Kollipara, Rahul K.; Srivastava, Nishi; Li, Rui; Ravindranathan, Preethi; Hernandez, Elizabeth; Freeman, Eva; Humphries, Caroline G.; Kapur, Payal; Lotan, Yair; Fazli, Ladan; Gleave, Martin E.; Plymate, Stephen R.; Raj, Ganesh V.; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Kittler, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor E-twenty-six related gene (ERG), which is overexpressed through gene fusion with the androgen-responsive gene transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2) in ∼40% of prostate tumors, is a key driver of prostate carcinogenesis. Ablation of ERG would disrupt a key oncogenic transcriptional circuit and could be a promising therapeutic strategy for prostate cancer treatment. Here, we show that ubiquitin-specific peptidase 9, X-linked (USP9X), a deubiquitinase enzyme, binds ERG in VCaP prostate cancer cells expressing TMPRSS2-ERG and deubiquitinates ERG in vitro. USP9X knockdown resulted in increased levels of ubiquitinated ERG and was coupled with depletion of ERG. Treatment with the USP9X inhibitor WP1130 resulted in ERG degradation both in vivo and in vitro, impaired the expression of genes enriched in ERG and prostate cancer relevant gene signatures in microarray analyses, and inhibited growth of ERG-positive tumors in three mouse xenograft models. Thus, we identified USP9X as a potential therapeutic target in prostate cancer cells and established WP1130 as a lead compound for the development of ERG-depleting drugs. PMID:24591637

  9. Ablation of the oncogenic transcription factor ERG by deubiquitinase inhibition in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shan; Kollipara, Rahul K; Srivastava, Nishi; Li, Rui; Ravindranathan, Preethi; Hernandez, Elizabeth; Freeman, Eva; Humphries, Caroline G; Kapur, Payal; Lotan, Yair; Fazli, Ladan; Gleave, Martin E; Plymate, Stephen R; Raj, Ganesh V; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Kittler, Ralf

    2014-03-18

    The transcription factor E-twenty-six related gene (ERG), which is overexpressed through gene fusion with the androgen-responsive gene transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2) in ∼40% of prostate tumors, is a key driver of prostate carcinogenesis. Ablation of ERG would disrupt a key oncogenic transcriptional circuit and could be a promising therapeutic strategy for prostate cancer treatment. Here, we show that ubiquitin-specific peptidase 9, X-linked (USP9X), a deubiquitinase enzyme, binds ERG in VCaP prostate cancer cells expressing TMPRSS2-ERG and deubiquitinates ERG in vitro. USP9X knockdown resulted in increased levels of ubiquitinated ERG and was coupled with depletion of ERG. Treatment with the USP9X inhibitor WP1130 resulted in ERG degradation both in vivo and in vitro, impaired the expression of genes enriched in ERG and prostate cancer relevant gene signatures in microarray analyses, and inhibited growth of ERG-positive tumors in three mouse xenograft models. Thus, we identified USP9X as a potential therapeutic target in prostate cancer cells and established WP1130 as a lead compound for the development of ERG-depleting drugs. PMID:24591637

  10. The oncogenic transcription factor c-Jun regulates glutaminase expression and sensitizes cells to glutaminase-targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lukey, Michael J.; Greene, Kai Su; Erickson, Jon W.; Wilson, Kristin F.; Cerione, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Many transformed cells exhibit altered glucose metabolism and increased utilization of glutamine for anabolic and bioenergetic processes. These metabolic adaptations, which accompany tumorigenesis, are driven by oncogenic signals. Here we report that the transcription factor c-Jun, product of the proto-oncogene JUN, is a key regulator of mitochondrial glutaminase (GLS) levels. Activation of c-Jun downstream of oncogenic Rho GTPase signalling leads to elevated GLS gene expression and glutaminase activity. In human breast cancer cells, GLS protein levels and sensitivity to GLS inhibition correlate strongly with c-Jun levels. We show that c-Jun directly binds to the GLS promoter region, and is sufficient to increase gene expression. Furthermore, ectopic overexpression of c-Jun renders breast cancer cells dependent on GLS activity. These findings reveal a role for c-Jun as a driver of cancer cell metabolic reprogramming, and suggest that cancers overexpressing JUN may be especially sensitive to GLS-targeted therapies. PMID:27089238

  11. An integrated database of genes responsive to the Myc oncogenic transcription factor: identification of direct genomic targets

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Karen I; Jegga, Anil G; Aronow, Bruce J; O'Donnell, Kathryn A; Dang, Chi V

    2003-01-01

    We report a database of genes responsive to the Myc oncogenic transcription factor. The database Myc Target Gene prioritizes candidate target genes according to experimental evidence and clusters responsive genes into functional groups. We coupled the prioritization of target genes with phylogenetic sequence comparisons to predict c-Myc target binding sites, which are in turn validated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. This database is essential for the understanding of the genetic regulatory networks underlying the genesis of cancers. PMID:14519204

  12. Synergetic regulatory networks mediated by oncogene-driven microRNAs and transcription factors in serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Sun, Jingchun; Zhao, Zhongming

    2013-01-01

    Although high-grade serous ovarian cancer (OVC) is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy in women, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms in the cellular processes that lead to this cancer. Recently, accumulated lines of evidence have shown that the interplay between transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) is critical in cellular regulation during tumorigenesis. A comprehensive investigation of TFs and miRNAs, and their target genes, may provide a deeper understanding of the regulatory mechanisms in the pathology of OVC. In this study, we have integrated three complementary algorithms into a framework, aiming to infer the regulation by miRNAs and TFs in conjunction with gene expression profiles. We demonstrated the utility of our framework by inferring 67 OVC-specific regulatory feed-forward loops (FFL) initiated by miRNAs or TFs in high-grade serous OVC. By analyzing these regulatory behaviors, we found that all the 67 FFLs are consistent in their regulatory effects on genes that jointly targeted by miRNAs and TFs. Remarkably, we unveiled an unbalanced distribution of FFLs with different oncogenic effects. In total, 31 of the 67 coherent FFLs were mainly initiated by oncogenes. On the contrary, only 4 of the FFLs were initiated by tumor suppressor genes. These overwhelmingly observed oncogenic genes were further detected in a sub-network with 32 FFLs centered by miRNA let-7b and TF TCF7L1 to regulate cell differentiation. Closer inspection of 32 FFLs revealed that 75% of the miRNAs reportedly play functional roles in cell differentiation, especially when enriched in epithelial–mesenchymal transitions. This study provides a comprehensive pathophysiological overview of recurring coherent circuits in OVC that are co-regulated by miRNAs and TFs. The prevalence of oncogenic coherent FFLs in serous OVC suggests that oncogene-driven regulatory motifs could cooperatively act upon critical cellular process such as cell differentiation in a highly

  13. Flavopiridol induces BCL-2 expression and represses oncogenic transcription factors in leukemic blasts from adults with refractory acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Dwella M.; Joseph, Biju; Hillion, Joelle; Segal, Jodi; Karp, Judith E.; Resar, Linda M. S.

    2011-01-01

    Flavopiridol is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor that induces cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and clinical responses in selected patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A better understanding of the molecular pathways targeted by flavopiridol is needed to design optimal combinatorial therapy. Here, we report that in vivo administration of flavopiridol induced expression of the BCL-2 anti-apoptotic gene in leukemic blasts from adult patients with refractory AML. Moreover, flavopiridol repressed the expression of genes encoding oncogenic transcription factors (HMGA1, STAT3, E2F1) and the major subunit of RNA Polymerase II. Our results provide mechanistic insight into the cellular pathways targeted by flavopiridol and suggest that blocking anti-apoptotic pathways could enhance cytotoxicity and improve outcomes in patients treated with flavopiridol. PMID:21728742

  14. Long Noncoding RNA MALAT1 Controls Cell Cycle Progression by Regulating the Expression of Oncogenic Transcription Factor B-MYB

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Vidisha; Shen, Zhen; Chakraborty, Arindam; Giri, Sumanprava; Freier, Susan M.; Wu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Yongqing; Gorospe, Myriam; Prasanth, Supriya G.; Lal, Ashish; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V.

    2013-01-01

    The long noncoding MALAT1 RNA is upregulated in cancer tissues and its elevated expression is associated with hyper-proliferation, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. We demonstrate that MALAT1 levels are regulated during normal cell cycle progression. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses in normal human diploid fibroblasts reveal that MALAT1 modulates the expression of cell cycle genes and is required for G1/S and mitotic progression. Depletion of MALAT1 leads to activation of p53 and its target genes. The cell cycle defects observed in MALAT1-depleted cells are sensitive to p53 levels, indicating that p53 is a major downstream mediator of MALAT1 activity. Furthermore, MALAT1-depleted cells display reduced expression of B-MYB (Mybl2), an oncogenic transcription factor involved in G2/M progression, due to altered binding of splicing factors on B-MYB pre-mRNA and aberrant alternative splicing. In human cells, MALAT1 promotes cellular proliferation by modulating the expression and/or pre-mRNA processing of cell cycle–regulated transcription factors. These findings provide mechanistic insights on the role of MALAT1 in regulating cellular proliferation. PMID:23555285

  15. Bookmarking Target Genes in Mitosis: A Shared Epigenetic Trait of Phenotypic Transcription Factors and Oncogenes?

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Grandy, Rodrigo A.; Lopez-Camacho, Cesar; Montecino, Martin M.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Lian, Jane B.; Stein, Janet L.; Stein, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    The regulatory information for phenotype, proliferation, and growth of normal and tumor cells must be maintained through genome replication in the S-phase and cell division during mitosis. Epigenetic mechanisms that include DNA methylation, posttranslational modifications of histones, selective utilization of histone variants, and inheritable RNA molecules play pivotal roles in maintaining cellular identity through mitotic divisions. Recent studies demonstrate that mitotic occupancy of genes, which are determinants of cell fate, growth and proliferation, by lineage restricted transcription factors is a key epigenetic mechanism for retention and transmission of cellular expression memory. Evidence is emerging for the presence of distinct transcriptional regulatory microenvironments in mitotic chromosomes where the genes bookmarked for reactivation post-mitotically reside. Importantly, some oncoproteins are present in mitotic microenvironments where they occupy target genes during mitosis and may contribute to perpetuating the transformed phenotype. We will discuss emerging regulatory implications of epigenetically bookmarking genes during mitosis for physiological control as well as for the onset and progression of cancer. PMID:24408924

  16. STAT3 transcription factor is constitutively activated and is oncogenic in nasal-type NK/T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Coppo, Paul; Gouilleux-Gruart, Valérie; Huang, Yenlin; Bouhlal, Hicham; Bouamar, Hakim; Bouchet, Sandrine; Perrot, Christine; Vieillard, Vincent; Dartigues, Peggy; Gaulard, Philippe; Agbalika, Félix; Douay, Luc; Lassoued, Kaiss; Gorin, Norbert-Claude

    2009-01-01

    Nasal-type natural killer (NK) cell lymphoma is an infrequent aggressive malignant disease with very poor prognosis. We aimed to explore the possible role of the transcription factor STAT3 in the pathophysiology of this malignancy, as it was involved in oncogenesis and chemoresistance. For this, we established and characterized a continuous interleukin 2-dependent NK cell line (MEC04) from a patient with a fatal nasal-type NK cell lymphoma. Cells harbored poor cytotoxic activity against K562 cells, and spontaneously secreted interferon-γ, IL-10 and vascular-endothelium growth factor in vitro. STAT3 was phosphorylated in Y705 dimerization residue in MEC04 cells and restricted to the nucleus. Y705 STAT3 phosphorylation involved JAK2, since exposure of cells to AG490 inhibitor inhibited Y705 STAT3 phosphorylation. By using recombinant transducible TAT-STAT3β (βisoform), TAT-STAT3Y705F (a STAT3 protein mutated on Y705 residue which prevents STAT3 dimerization), and peptides inhibiting specifically STAT3 dimerization, we inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation and cell growth, with cell death induction. Finally, STAT3 was phosphorylated in Y705 residue in the nuclei of lymphoma cells in 8/9 patients with nasal-type NK/T cell lymphoma and in YT, another NK cell line. Our results suggest that STAT3 protein has a major role in the oncogenic process of nasal-type NK cell lymphomas, and may represent a promising therapeutical target. PMID:19421230

  17. Triplex targeting of human PDGF-B (c-sis, proto-oncogene) promoter specifically inhibits factors binding and PDGF-B transcription

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Xu, Ren-Huan; Jin, You-Xin; Wang, De-Bao

    2001-01-01

    Human c-sis/PDGF-B proto-oncogene has been shown to be overexpressed in a large percentage of human tumor cells establishing a growth-promoting, autocrine growth circuit. Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) can recognize and bind sequences in duplex DNA, and have received considerable attention because of their potential for targeting specific genomic sites. The c-sis/PDGF-B promoter contains a unique homopurine/homopyrimidine sequence (SIS proximal element, SPE), which is crucial for binding nuclear factors that provoke transcription. In order to develop specific transcriptional inhibitors of the human c-sis/PDGF-B proto-oncogene, 20 potential TFOs targeting part or all of the SPE were screened by gel mobility analysis. DNase I footprinting shows that the TFOs we designed can form a sequence-specific triplex with the target. Protein binding assays demonstrate that triplex formation inhibits nuclear factors binding the c-sis/PDGF-B promoter. Both transient and stable transfection experiments demonstrate that the transcriptional activity of the promoter is considerably inhibited by the TFOs. We propose that TFOs represent a therapeutic potential to specifically diminish the expression of c-sis/PDGF-B proto-oncogene in various pathologic settings where constitutive expression of this gene has been observed. PMID:11160902

  18. Tumor suppressor p53 inhibits transcriptional activation of invasion gene thromboxane synthase mediated by the proto-oncogenic factor ets-1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ella; Günther, Willy; Yoshizato, Kimio; Meissner, Hildegard; Zapf, Srenja; Nüsing, Rolf M; Yamamoto, Hirotaka; Van Meir, Erwin G; Deppert, Wolfgang; Giese, Alf

    2003-10-30

    Cancer formation and progression is a complex process determined by several mechanisms that promote cell growth, invasiveness, neo-angiogenesis, and render neoplastic cells resistant to apoptosis. The tumor suppressor p53 and the proto-oncogenic factor ets-1 are important regulators of such mechanisms. While it is well established that p53 and ets-1 influence various aspects of cell behavior by regulating the transcription of specific genes, little is known about the functional relationship between these transcription factors. We found that the gene encoding thromboxane synthase (TXSA), which we recently identified as a factor promoting invasion and resistance to apoptosis in gliomas, is a novel target gene for both p53 and ets-1. We demonstrate that p53 and ets-1 coregulate TXSA in an antagonistic and inter-related manner, with ets-1 being a potent transcriptional activator and p53 inhibiting ets-1-dependent transcription. Negative interference with ets-1 transcription requires functional p53 and is lost in mutant p53 proteins. We show that ets-1 and p53 associate physically in vitro and in vivo and that their interaction, rather than a direct binding of p53 to the TXSA promoter, is required for transcriptional repression of TXSA by wild-type p53. An important implication of our findings is that the loss of p53-mediated negative control over ets-1-dependent transcription may lead to the acquisition of an invasive phenotype in tumor cells. PMID:14586398

  19. Specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 are non-oncogene addiction genes in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hedrick, Erik; Cheng, Yating; Jin, Un-Ho; Kim, Kyounghyun; Safe, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Specificity protein (Sp) transcription factor (TF) Sp1 is overexpressed in multiple tumors and is a negative prognostic factor for patient survival. Sp1 and also Sp3 and Sp4 are highly expressed in cancer cells and in this study, we have used results of RNA interference (RNAi) to show that the three TFs individually play a role in the growth, survival and migration/invasion of breast, kidney, pancreatic, lung and colon cancer cell lines. Moreover, tumor growth in athymic nude mice bearing L3.6pL pancreatic cancer cells as xenografts were significantly decreased in cells depleted for Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 (combined) or Sp1 alone. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) of changes in gene expression in Panc1 pancreatic cancer cells after individual knockdown of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 demonstrates that these TFs regulate genes and pathways that correlated with the functional responses observed after knockdown but also some genes and pathways that inversely correlated with the functional responses. However, causal IPA analysis which integrates all pathway-dependent changes in all genes strongly predicted that Sp1-, Sp3- and Sp4-regulated genes were associated with the pro-oncogenic activity. These functional and genomic results coupled with overexpression of Sp transcription factors in tumor vs. non-tumor tissues and decreased Sp1 expression with age indicate that Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 are non-oncogene addiction (NOA) genes and are attractive drug targets for individual and combined cancer chemotherapies. PMID:26967243

  20. Oncogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Compans, R.W.; Cooper, M.; Koprowski, H.; McConell, I.; Melchers, F.; Nussenzweig, V.; Oldstone, M.; Olsnes, S.; Saedler, H.; Vogt, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: Roles of drosophila proto-oncogenes and growth factor homologs during development of the fly; Interaction of oncogenes with differentiation programs; Genetics of src: structure and functional organization of a protein tyrosine kinase; Structures and activities of activated abl oncogenes; Eukaryotic RAS proteins and yeast proteins with which they interact. This book presents up-to-data review articles on oncogenes. The editor includes five contributions which critically evaluate recent research in the field.

  1. The T-box transcription factor 3 is a promising biomarker and a key regulator of the oncogenic phenotype of a diverse range of sarcoma subtypes.

    PubMed

    Willmer, T; Cooper, A; Sims, D; Govender, D; Prince, S

    2016-01-01

    Sarcomas represent a complex group of malignant neoplasms of mesenchymal origin and their heterogeneity poses a serious diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. There is therefore a need to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underpinning the pathogenesis of the more than 70 distinguishable sarcoma subtypes. The transcription factor TBX3, a critical developmental regulator, is overexpressed in several cancers of epithelial origin where it contributes to tumorigenesis by different molecular mechanisms. However, the status and role of TBX3 in sarcomas have not been reported. Here we show that a diverse subset of soft tissue and bone sarcoma cell lines and patient-derived sarcoma tissues express high levels of TBX3. We further explore the significance of this overexpression using a small interferring RNA approach and demonstrate that TBX3 promotes the migratory ability of chondrosarcoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and liposarcoma cells but inhibits fibrosarcoma cell migration. This suggested that TBX3 may play a key role in the development of different sarcoma subtypes by functioning as either an oncoprotein or as a brake to prevent tumour progression. To further explore this, TBX3 knockdown and overexpression cell culture models were established using chondrosarcoma and fibrosarcoma cells as representatives of each scenario, and the resulting cells were characterized with regard to key features of tumorigenesis. Results from in vitro and in vivo assays reveal that, while TBX3 promotes substrate-dependent and -independent cell proliferation, migration and tumour formation in chondrosarcoma cells, it discourages fibrosarcoma formation. Our findings provide novel evidence linking TBX3 to cancers of mesenchymal origin. Furthermore, we show that TBX3 may be a biomarker for the diagnosis of histologically dynamic sarcoma subtypes and that it impacts directly on their oncogenic phenotype. Indeed, we reveal that TBX3 may exhibit oncogene or tumour suppressor activity in sarcomas, which

  2. THE CANNABINOID WIN 55,212-2 DECREASES SPECIFICITY PROTEIN (Sp) TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS AND THE ONCOGENIC CAP PROTEIN eIF4E IN COLON CANCER CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Sreevalsan, Sandeep; Safe, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    2,3-Dihydro-5-methyl-3-([morpholinyl]methyl)pyrollo(1,2,3-de)-1,4-benzoxazinyl]-[1-naphthaleny]methanone [WIN 55,212-2 (WIN)] is a synthetic cannabinoid that inhibits RKO, HT-29 and SW480 cell growth, induced apoptosis, and downregulated expression of survivin, cyclin D1, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor (VEGFR1). WIN also decreased expression of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4, and this is consistent with the observed downregulation of the aforementioned Sp-regulated genes. In addition, we also observed by RNA interference (RNAi) that the oncogenic cap protein eIF4E was an Sp-regulated gene also downregulated by WIN in colon cancer cells. WIN-mediated repression of Sp proteins was not affected by CB receptor antagonists or by knockdown of the receptor but was attenuated by the phosphatase inhibitor sodium orthovanadate or by knockdown of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). WIN-mediated repression of Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 was due to PP2A-dependent downregulation of microRNA-27a (miR-27a) and induction of miR-27a-regulated ZBTB10 which has previously been characterized as an “Sp repressor”. The results demonstrate that the anticancer activity of WIN is due, in part, to PP2A-dependent disruption of miR-27a:ZBTB10 and ZBTB10-mediated repression of Sp transcription factors and Sp-regulated genes including eIF4E. PMID:24030632

  3. The Oncogenic MicroRNA Hsa-miR-155-5p Targets the Transcription Factor ELK3 and Links It to the Hypoxia Response

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, E. Douglas; Wasylyk, Christine; Ye, Tao; Jung, Alain C.; Wasylyk, Bohdan

    2014-01-01

    The molecular response to hypoxia is a critical cellular process implicated in cancer, and a target for drug development. The activity of the major player, HIF1α, is regulated at different levels by various factors, including the transcription factor ELK3. The molecular mechanisms of this intimate connection remain largely unknown. Whilst investigating global ELK3-chromatin interactions, we uncovered an unexpected connection that involves the microRNA hsa-miR-155-5p, a hypoxia-inducible oncomir that targets HIF1α. One of the ELK3 chromatin binding sites, detected by Chromatin Immuno-Precipitation Sequencing (ChIP-seq) of normal Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC), is located at the transcription start site of the MIR155HG genes that expresses hsa-miR-155-5p. We confirmed that ELK3 binds to this promoter by ChIP and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR). We showed that ELK3 and hsa-miR-155-5p form a double-negative regulatory loop, in that ELK3 depletion induced hsa-miR-155-5p expression and hsa-miR-155-5p expression decreased ELK3 expression at the RNA level through a conserved target sequence in its 3′-UTR. We further showed that the activities of hsa-miR-155-5p and ELK3 are functionally linked. Pathway analysis indicates that both factors are implicated in related processes, including cancer and angiogenesis. Hsa-miR-155-5p expression and ELK3 depletion have similar effects on expression of known ELK3 target genes, and on in-vitro angiogenesis and wound closure. Bioinformatic analysis of cancer RNA-seq data shows that hsa-miR-155-5p and ELK3 expression are significantly anti-correlated, as would be expected from hsa-miR-155-5p targeting ELK3 RNA. Finally, hypoxia (0% oxygen) down-regulates ELK3 mRNA in a microRNA and hsa-miR-155-5p dependent manner. These results tie ELK3 into the hypoxia response pathway through an oncogenic microRNA and into a circuit implicated in the dynamics of the hypoxic response. This crosstalk could be important

  4. The oncogenic MicroRNA Hsa-miR-155-5p targets the transcription factor ELK3 and links it to the hypoxia response.

    PubMed

    Robertson, E Douglas; Wasylyk, Christine; Ye, Tao; Jung, Alain C; Wasylyk, Bohdan

    2014-01-01

    The molecular response to hypoxia is a critical cellular process implicated in cancer, and a target for drug development. The activity of the major player, HIF1α, is regulated at different levels by various factors, including the transcription factor ELK3. The molecular mechanisms of this intimate connection remain largely unknown. Whilst investigating global ELK3-chromatin interactions, we uncovered an unexpected connection that involves the microRNA hsa-miR-155-5p, a hypoxia-inducible oncomir that targets HIF1α. One of the ELK3 chromatin binding sites, detected by Chromatin Immuno-Precipitation Sequencing (ChIP-seq) of normal Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC), is located at the transcription start site of the MIR155HG genes that expresses hsa-miR-155-5p. We confirmed that ELK3 binds to this promoter by ChIP and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR). We showed that ELK3 and hsa-miR-155-5p form a double-negative regulatory loop, in that ELK3 depletion induced hsa-miR-155-5p expression and hsa-miR-155-5p expression decreased ELK3 expression at the RNA level through a conserved target sequence in its 3'-UTR. We further showed that the activities of hsa-miR-155-5p and ELK3 are functionally linked. Pathway analysis indicates that both factors are implicated in related processes, including cancer and angiogenesis. Hsa-miR-155-5p expression and ELK3 depletion have similar effects on expression of known ELK3 target genes, and on in-vitro angiogenesis and wound closure. Bioinformatic analysis of cancer RNA-seq data shows that hsa-miR-155-5p and ELK3 expression are significantly anti-correlated, as would be expected from hsa-miR-155-5p targeting ELK3 RNA. Finally, hypoxia (0% oxygen) down-regulates ELK3 mRNA in a microRNA and hsa-miR-155-5p dependent manner. These results tie ELK3 into the hypoxia response pathway through an oncogenic microRNA and into a circuit implicated in the dynamics of the hypoxic response. This crosstalk could be important for

  5. GATA Transcription Factors and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Rena; Blobel, Gerd A.

    2010-01-01

    It has been almost a quarter century since it was first appreciated that a class of oncogenes contained in rapidly transforming avian retroviruses encoded DNA-binding transcription factors. As with other oncogenes, genetic recombination with the viral genome led to their overexpression or functional alteration. In the years that followed, alterations of numerous transcription factors were shown to be causatively involved in various cancers in human patients and model organisms. Depending on their normal cellular functions, these factors were subsequently categorized as proto-oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. This review focuses on the role of GATA transcription factors in carcinogenesis. GATA factors are zinc finger DNA binding proteins that control the development of diverse tissues by activating or repressing transcription. GATA factors thus coordinate cellular maturation with proliferation arrest and cell survival. Therefore, a role of this family of genes in human cancers is not surprising. Prominent examples include structural mutations in GATA1 that are found in almost all megakaryoblastic leukemias in patients with Down syndrome; loss of GATA3 expression in aggressive, dedifferentiated breast cancers; and silencing of GATA4 and GATA5 expression in colorectal and lung cancers. Here, we discuss possible mechanisms of carcinogenesis vis-à-vis the normal functions of GATA factors as they pertain to human patients and mouse models of cancer. PMID:21779441

  6. INO80 governs superenhancer-mediated oncogenic transcription and tumor growth in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bingying; Wang, Li; Zhang, Shu; Bennett, Brian D; He, Fan; Zhang, Yan; Xiong, Chengliang; Han, Leng; Diao, Lixia; Li, Pishun; Fargo, David C; Cox, Adrienne D; Hu, Guang

    2016-06-15

    Superenhancers (SEs) are large genomic regions with a high density of enhancer marks. In cancer, SEs are found near oncogenes and dictate cancer gene expression. However, how oncogenic SEs are regulated remains poorly understood. Here, we show that INO80, a chromatin remodeling complex, is required for SE-mediated oncogenic transcription and tumor growth in melanoma. The expression of Ino80, the SWI/SNF ATPase, is elevated in melanoma cells and patient melanomas compared with normal melanocytes and benign nevi. Furthermore, Ino80 silencing selectively inhibits melanoma cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, tumorigenesis, and tumor maintenance in mouse xenografts. Mechanistically, Ino80 occupies >90% of SEs, and its occupancy is dependent on transcription factors such as MITF and Sox9. Ino80 binding reduces nucleosome occupancy and facilitates Mediator recruitment, thus promoting oncogenic transcription. Consistently, genes co-occupied by Ino80 and Med1 are selectively expressed in melanomas compared with melanocytes. Together, our results reveal an essential role of INO80-dependent chromatin remodeling in SE function and suggest a novel strategy for disrupting SEs in cancer treatment. PMID:27340176

  7. Novel role of Engrailed 1 as a prosurvival transcription factor in basal-like breast cancer and engineering of interference peptides block its oncogenic function

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, A S; Graves, L M; Blancafort, P

    2014-01-01

    Basal-like breast tumors are aggressive cancers associated with high proliferation and metastasis. Chemotherapy is currently the only treatment option; however, resistance often occurs resulting in recurrence and patient death. Some extremely aggressive cancers are also associated with hypoxia, inflammation and high leukocyte infiltration. Herein, we discovered that the neural-specific transcription factor, Engrailed 1 (EN1), is exclusively overexpressed in these tumors. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of EN1 triggered potent and selective cell death. In contrast, ectopic overexpression of EN1 in normal cells activated survival pathways and conferred resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Exogenous expression of EN1 cDNA reprogrammed the breast epithelial cells toward a long-lived, neural-like phenotype displaying dopaminergic markers. Gene expression microarrays demonstrated that the EN1 cDNA altered transcription of a high number of inflammatory molecules, notably chemokines and chemokine receptors, which could mediate prosurvival pathways. To block EN1 function, we engineered synthetic interference peptides (iPeps) comprising the EN1-specific sequences that mediate essential protein-protein interactions necessary for EN1 function and an N-terminal cell-penetrating peptide/nuclear localization sequence. These EN1-iPeps rapidly mediated a strong apoptotic response in tumor cells overexpressing EN1, with no toxicity to normal or non EN1-expressing cells. Delivery of EN1-iPeps into basal-like cancer cells significantly decreased the fifty percent inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of chemotherapeutic drugs routinely used to treat breast cancer. Lastly, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry and immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that EN1-iPeps captured targets involved in transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Importantly, the EN1-iPeps bound the glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetase (EPRS) target, which

  8. STAT5 Outcompetes STAT3 To Regulate the Expression of the Oncogenic Transcriptional Modulator BCL6

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Sarah R.; Nelson, Erik A.; Yeh, Jennifer E.; Pinello, Luca; Yuan, Guo-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Inappropriate activation of the transcription factors STAT3 and STAT5 has been shown to drive cancer pathogenesis through dysregulation of genes involved in cell survival, growth, and differentiation. Although STAT3 and STAT5 are structurally related, they can have opposite effects on key genes, including BCL6. BCL6, a transcriptional repressor, has been shown to be oncogenic in diffuse large B cell lymphoma. BCL6 also plays an important role in breast cancer pathogenesis, a disease in which STAT3 and STAT5 can be activated individually or concomitantly. To determine the mechanism by which these oncogenic transcription factors regulate BCL6 transcription, we analyzed their effects at the levels of chromatin and gene expression. We found that STAT3 increases expression of BCL6 and enhances recruitment of RNA polymerase II phosphorylated at a site associated with transcriptional initiation. STAT5, in contrast, represses BCL6 expression below basal levels and decreases the association of RNA polymerase II at the gene. Furthermore, the repression mediated by STAT5 is dominant over STAT3-mediated induction. STAT5 exerts this effect by displacing STAT3 from one of the two regulatory regions to which it binds. These findings may underlie the divergent biology of breast cancers containing activated STAT3 alone or in conjunction with activated STAT5. PMID:23716595

  9. The BTB-zinc Finger Transcription Factor Abrupt Acts as an Epithelial Oncogene in Drosophila melanogaster through Maintaining a Progenitor-like Cell State

    PubMed Central

    Turkel, Nezaket; Sahota, Virender K.; Bolden, Jessica E.; Goulding, Karen R.; Doggett, Karen; Willoughby, Lee F.; Blanco, Enrique; Martin-Blanco, Enrique; Corominas, Montserrat; Ellul, Jason; Aigaki, Toshiro; Richardson, Helena E.; Brumby, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of tumour cells to maintain continual overgrowth potential has been linked to the commandeering of normal self-renewal pathways. Using an epithelial cancer model in Drosophila melanogaster, we carried out an overexpression screen for oncogenes capable of cooperating with the loss of the epithelial apico-basal cell polarity regulator, scribbled (scrib), and identified the cell fate regulator, Abrupt, a BTB-zinc finger protein. Abrupt overexpression alone is insufficient to transform cells, but in cooperation with scrib loss of function, Abrupt promotes the formation of massive tumours in the eye/antennal disc. The steroid hormone receptor coactivator, Taiman (a homologue of SRC3/AIB1), is known to associate with Abrupt, and Taiman overexpression also drives tumour formation in cooperation with the loss of Scrib. Expression arrays and ChIP-Seq indicates that Abrupt overexpression represses a large number of genes, including steroid hormone-response genes and multiple cell fate regulators, thereby maintaining cells within an epithelial progenitor-like state. The progenitor-like state is characterised by the failure to express the conserved Eyes absent/Dachshund regulatory complex in the eye disc, and in the antennal disc by the failure to express cell fate regulators that define the temporal elaboration of the appendage along the proximo-distal axis downstream of Distalless. Loss of scrib promotes cooperation with Abrupt through impaired Hippo signalling, which is required and sufficient for cooperative overgrowth with Abrupt, and JNK (Jun kinase) signalling, which is required for tumour cell migration/invasion but not overgrowth. These results thus identify a novel cooperating oncogene, identify mammalian family members of which are also known oncogenes, and demonstrate that epithelial tumours in Drosophila can be characterised by the maintenance of a progenitor-like state. PMID:23874226

  10. Recurrent Fusions in MYB and MYBL1 Define a Common, Transcription Factor-Driven Oncogenic Pathway in Salivary Gland Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Brayer, Kathryn J.; Frerich, Candace A.; Kang, Huining; Ness, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma (ACC), the second most common malignancy of salivary glands, is a rare tumor with bleak prognosis for which therapeutic targets are unavailable. We used RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) to analyze low-quality RNA from archival, formaldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples. In addition to detecting the most common ACC translocation, t(6;9) fusing the MYB proto-oncogene to NFIB, we also detected previously unknown t(8;9) and t(8;14) translocations fusing the MYBL1 gene to the NFIB and RAD51B genes, respectively. RNA-seq provided information about gene fusions, alternative RNA splicing and gene expression signatures. Interestingly, tumors with MYB and MYBL1 translocations displayed similar gene expression profiles, and the combined MYB and MYBL1 expression correlated with outcome, suggesting that the related Myb proteins are interchangeable oncogenic drivers in ACC. Our results provide important details about the biology of ACC and illustrate how archival tissue samples can be used for detailed molecular analyses of rare tumors. PMID:26631070

  11. Inhibition of Oncogenic Transcription Factor REL by the Natural Product Derivative Calafianin Monomer 101 Induces Proliferation Arrest and Apoptosis in Human B-Lymphoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Alan T.; Chennamadhavuni, Spandan; Whitty, Adrian; Porco, John A.; Gilmore, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    Increased activity of transcription factor NF-κB has been implicated in many B-cell lymphomas. We investigated effects of synthetic compound calafianin monomer (CM101) on biochemical and biological properties of NF-κB. In human 293 cells, CM101 selectively inhibited DNA binding by overexpressed NF-κB subunits REL (human c-Rel) and p65 as compared to NF-κB p50, and inhibition of REL and p65 DNA binding by CM101 required a conserved cysteine residue. CM101 also inhibited DNA binding by REL in human B-lymphoma cell lines, and the sensitivity of several B-lymphoma cell lines to CM101-induced proliferation arrest and apoptosis correlated with levels of cellular and nuclear REL. CM101 treatment induced both phosphorylation and decreased expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-XL, a REL target gene product, in sensitive B-lymphoma cell lines. Ectopic expression of Bcl-XL protected SUDHL-2 B-lymphoma cells against CM101-induced apoptosis, and overexpression of a transforming mutant of REL decreased the sensitivity of BJAB B-lymphoma cells to CM101-induced apoptosis. Lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of NF-κB signaling upstream components occurred in RAW264.7 macrophages at CM101 concentrations that blocked NF-κB DNA binding. Direct inhibitors of REL may be useful for treating B-cell lymphomas in which REL is active, and may inhibit B-lymphoma cell growth at doses that do not affect some immune-related responses in normal cells. PMID:25915462

  12. [Development genes encoding transcription factors and dysmorphology].

    PubMed

    Lacombe, Didier

    2009-04-01

    Studies of children with developmental abnormalities of genetic origin are necessary for accurate diagnosis, prognostication, patient management, and genetic counseling. Such studies can also help to identify genes involved in normal and abnormal morphogenesis, which often act as patterning genes and are also potential oncogenes. Many encode transcription factors that regulate other genes during embryonic development. PMID:20120282

  13. Plant transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Meshi, T; Iwabuchi, M

    1995-12-01

    Transcriptional regulation of gene expression relies on the recognition of promoter elements by transcription factors. In the past several years, a considerable number of (putative) transcription factors have been identified in plants. Some genes coding for these factors were isolated by south-western screening with oligonucleotides as a probe or by homology-based screening, and others were initially isolated by genetic means and subsequently identified as the genes for transcription factors. These transcription factors often form families of structurally related proteins with similar DNA-binding specificities and in addition, they are sometimes involved in related phenomena. Some groups of factors homo- and/or heterodimerize to increase the length and variability of the target sequences. Transcriptional activators, in general, comprise a modular activation domain. The activities of the transcription factors are controlled by post-translational modification, like phosphorylation and glycosylation, as well as at the levels of nuclear transport, oligomerization, etc. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of plant transcription factors to help understand the mechanistic aspects of the transcriptional regulation of genes. PMID:8589926

  14. Identification of MYC-Dependent Transcriptional Programs in Oncogene-Addicted Liver Tumors.

    PubMed

    Kress, Theresia R; Pellanda, Paola; Pellegrinet, Luca; Bianchi, Valerio; Nicoli, Paola; Doni, Mirko; Recordati, Camilla; Bianchi, Salvatore; Rotta, Luca; Capra, Thelma; Ravà, Micol; Verrecchia, Alessandro; Radaelli, Enrico; Littlewood, Trevor D; Evan, Gerard I; Amati, Bruno

    2016-06-15

    Tumors driven by activation of the transcription factor MYC generally show oncogene addiction. However, the gene expression programs that depend upon sustained MYC activity remain unknown. In this study, we employed a mouse model of liver carcinoma driven by a reversible tet-MYC transgene, combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation and gene expression profiling to identify MYC-dependent regulatory events. As previously reported, MYC-expressing mice exhibited hepatoblastoma- and hepatocellular carcinoma-like tumors, which regressed when MYC expression was suppressed. We further show that cellular transformation, and thus initiation of liver tumorigenesis, were impaired in mice harboring a MYC mutant unable to associate with the corepressor protein MIZ1 (ZBTB17). Notably, switching off the oncogene in advanced carcinomas revealed that MYC was required for the continuous activation and repression of distinct sets of genes, constituting no more than half of all genes deregulated during tumor progression and an even smaller subset of all MYC-bound genes. Altogether, our data provide the first detailed analysis of a MYC-dependent transcriptional program in a fully developed carcinoma and offer a guide to identifying the critical effectors contributing to MYC-driven tumor maintenance. Cancer Res; 76(12); 3463-72. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197165

  15. WRKY transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Madhunita; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators found exclusively in plants. They have diverse biological functions in plant disease resistance, abiotic stress responses, nutrient deprivation, senescence, seed and trichome development, embryogenesis, as well as additional developmental and hormone-controlled processes. WRKYs can act as transcriptional activators or repressors, in various homo- and heterodimer combinations. Here we review recent progress on the function of WRKY transcription factors in Arabidopsis and other plant species such as rice, potato, and parsley, with a special focus on abiotic, developmental, and hormone-regulated processes. PMID:24492469

  16. Oncogene transcription in normal human IMR-90 fibroblasts: induction by serum and tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, E.A.; Kaji, H.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report studies of oncogene transcription induced by the addition of serum to quiescent cultures of human IMR-90 fibroblasts. Oncogene messenger RNAs for c-myc, c-erbB and c-ras were increased in a specific temporal sequence after the addition of serum. Compounds that are proposed to exert their actions by the stimulation of cell growth were tested for their effect on oncogene transcription in IMR-90 fibroblasts. The tumor promoter tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA) was found to selectively induce the transcription of c-myc without observable effect on the transcription of the other oncogenes studied, and without inducing cell division. The inactive analog, phorbol didecanoate (PDD), and two complete carcinogens dimethylbenzanthracene (DMBA) and 4-nitro quinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) were without effect on the transcription of the genes studied. These results suggest that the complete ordered sequence of gene transcription is necessary to achieve the physiologic response of cell division, and that classical promoters and complete carcinogens achieve their effects through different pathways.

  17. MicroRNAs and oncogenic transcriptional regulatory networks controlling metabolic reprogramming in cancers.

    PubMed

    Pinweha, Pannapa; Rattanapornsompong, Khanti; Charoensawan, Varodom; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut

    2016-01-01

    Altered cellular metabolism is a fundamental adaptation of cancer during rapid proliferation as a result of growth factor overstimulation. We review different pathways involving metabolic alterations in cancers including aerobic glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, de novo fatty acid synthesis, and serine and glycine metabolism. Although oncoproteins, c-MYC, HIF1α and p53 are the major drivers of this metabolic reprogramming, post-transcriptional regulation by microRNAs (miR) also plays an important role in finely adjusting the requirement of the key metabolic enzymes underlying this metabolic reprogramming. We also combine the literature data on the miRNAs that potentially regulate 40 metabolic enzymes responsible for metabolic reprogramming in cancers, with additional miRs from computational prediction. Our analyses show that: (1) a metabolic enzyme is frequently regulated by multiple miRs, (2) confidence scores from prediction algorithms might be useful to help narrow down functional miR-mRNA interaction, which might be worth further experimental validation. By combining known and predicted interactions of oncogenic transcription factors (TFs) (c-MYC, HIF1α and p53), sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1), 40 metabolic enzymes, and regulatory miRs we have established one of the first reference maps for miRs and oncogenic TFs that regulate metabolic reprogramming in cancers. The combined network shows that glycolytic enzymes are linked to miRs via p53, c-MYC, HIF1α, whereas the genes in serine, glycine and one carbon metabolism are regulated via the c-MYC, as well as other regulatory organization that cannot be observed by investigating individual miRs, TFs, and target genes. PMID:27358718

  18. RNA-binding protein IGF2BP3 targeting of oncogenic transcripts promotes hematopoietic progenitor proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Palanichamy, Jayanth Kumar; Tran, Tiffany M.; Howard, Jonathan M.; Contreras, Jorge R.; Fernando, Thilini R.; Sterne-Weiler, Timothy; Katzman, Sol; Toloue, Masoud; Yan, Weihong; Sanford, Jeremy R.; Rao, Dinesh S.

    2016-01-01

    Posttranscriptional control of gene expression is important for defining both normal and pathological cellular phenotypes. In vitro, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have recently been shown to play important roles in posttranscriptional regulation; however, the contribution of RBPs to cell specification is not well understood. Here, we determined that the RBP insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3) is specifically overexpressed in mixed lineage leukemia–rearranged (MLL-rearranged) B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), which constitutes a subtype of this malignancy associated with poor prognosis and high risk of relapse. IGF2BP3 was required for the survival of B-ALL cell lines, as knockdown led to decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. Enforced expression of IGF2BP3 provided murine BM cells with a strong survival advantage, led to proliferation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and skewed hematopoietic development to the B cell/myeloid lineage. Cross-link immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing uncovered the IGF2BP3-regulated transcriptome, which includes oncogenes MYC and CDK6 as direct targets. IGF2BP3 regulated transcripts via targeting elements within 3′ untranslated regions (3′UTR), and enforced IGF2BP3 expression in mice resulted in enhanced expression of Myc and Cdk6 in BM. Together, our data suggest that IGF2BP3-mediated targeting of oncogenic transcripts may represent a critical pathogenetic mechanism in MLL-rearranged B-ALL and support IGF2BP3 and its cognate RNA-binding partners as potential therapeutic targets in this disease. PMID:26974154

  19. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe. PMID:22458515

  20. The transcription factor encyclopedia.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T D; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Ramos, Oscar H P; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S C; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma D C; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W Z; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe. PMID:22458515

  1. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 represses transcription of p21CIP1 by inhibition of transcription activation by p53 and Sp1.

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Eun; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Se Hoon; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-05-01

    Aberrant transcriptional repression through chromatin remodeling and histone deacetylation has been postulated as the driving force for tumorigenesis. FBI-1 (formerly called Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a critical oncogenic factor that specifically represses transcription of the tumor suppressor gene ARF, potentially leading indirectly to p53 inactivation. Our investigations on transcriptional repression of the p53 pathway revealed that FBI-1 represses transcription of ARF, Hdm2 (human analogue of mouse double minute oncogene), and p21CIP1 (hereafter indicated as p21) but not of p53. FBI-1 showed a more potent repressive effect on p21 than on p53. Our data suggested that FBI-1 is a master controller of the ARF-Hdm2-p53-p21 pathway, ultimately impinging on cell cycle arrest factor p21, by inhibiting upstream regulators at the transcriptional and protein levels. FBI-1 acted as a competitive transcriptional repressor of p53 and Sp1 and was shown to bind the proximal Sp1-3 GC-box and the distal p53-responsive elements of p21. Repression involved direct binding competition of FBI-1 with Sp1 and p53. FBI-1 also interacted with corepressors, such as mSin3A, NCoR, and SMRT, thereby deacetylating Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 histones at the promoter. FBI-1 caused cellular transformation, promoted cell cycle proliferation, and significantly increased the number of cells in S phase. FBI-1 is aberrantly overexpressed in many human solid tumors, particularly in adenocarcinomas and squamous carcinomas. The role of FBI-1 as a master controller of the p53 pathway therefore makes it an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:19244234

  2. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 Represses Transcription of p21CIP1 by Inhibition of Transcription Activation by p53 and Sp1*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kim, Pyung-Hwan; Kim, Sung-Eun; Choi, Kang-Yell; Kim, Se Hoon; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant transcriptional repression through chromatin remodeling and histone deacetylation has been postulated as the driving force for tumorigenesis. FBI-1 (formerly called Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of transcriptional repressors. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a critical oncogenic factor that specifically represses transcription of the tumor suppressor gene ARF, potentially leading indirectly to p53 inactivation. Our investigations on transcriptional repression of the p53 pathway revealed that FBI-1 represses transcription of ARF, Hdm2 (human analogue of mouse double minute oncogene), and p21CIP1 (hereafter indicated as p21) but not of p53. FBI-1 showed a more potent repressive effect on p21 than on p53. Our data suggested that FBI-1 is a master controller of the ARF-Hdm2-p53-p21 pathway, ultimately impinging on cell cycle arrest factor p21, by inhibiting upstream regulators at the transcriptional and protein levels. FBI-1 acted as a competitive transcriptional repressor of p53 and Sp1 and was shown to bind the proximal Sp1–3 GC-box and the distal p53-responsive elements of p21. Repression involved direct binding competition of FBI-1 with Sp1 and p53. FBI-1 also interacted with corepressors, such as mSin3A, NCoR, and SMRT, thereby deacetylating Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 histones at the promoter. FBI-1 caused cellular transformation, promoted cell cycle proliferation, and significantly increased the number of cells in S phase. FBI-1 is aberrantly overexpressed in many human solid tumors, particularly in adenocarcinomas and squamous carcinomas. The role of FBI-1 as a master controller of the p53 pathway therefore makes it an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:19244234

  3. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon) and SREBP-1 synergistically activate transcription of fatty-acid synthase gene (FASN).

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Park, Hyejin; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Yeon-Sook; Koh, Dong-In; Kim, Myung-Hwa; Kim, Yu-Ri; Lee, Choong-Eun; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Osborne, Timothy F; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-10-24

    FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a proto-oncogenic transcription factor of the BTB/POZ (bric-à-brac, tramtrack, and broad complex and pox virus zinc finger) domain family. Recent evidence suggested that FBI-1 might be involved in adipogenic gene expression. Coincidentally, expression of FBI-1 and fatty-acid synthase (FASN) genes are often increased in cancer and immortalized cells. Both FBI-1 and FASN are important in cancer cell proliferation. SREBP-1 is a major regulator of many adipogenic genes, and FBI-1 and SREBP-1 (sterol-responsive element (SRE)-binding protein 1) interact with each other directly via their DNA binding domains. FBI-1 enhanced the transcriptional activation of SREBP-1 on responsive promoters, pGL2-6x(SRE)-Luc and FASN gene. FBI-1 and SREBP-1 synergistically activate transcription of the FASN gene by acting on the proximal GC-box and SRE/E-box. FBI-1, Sp1, and SREBP-1 can bind to all three SRE, GC-box, and SRE/E-box. Binding competition among the three transcription factors on the GC-box and SRE/E-box appears important in the transcription regulation. FBI-1 is apparently changing the binding pattern of Sp1 and SREBP-1 on the two elements in the presence of induced SREBP-1 and drives more Sp1 binding to the proximal promoter with less of an effect on SREBP-1 binding. The changes induced by FBI-1 appear critical in the synergistic transcription activation. The molecular mechanism revealed provides insight into how proto-oncogene FBI-1 may attack the cellular regulatory mechanism of FASN gene expression to provide more phospholipid membrane components needed for rapid cancer cell proliferation. PMID:18682402

  4. Pervasive transcription read-through promotes aberrant expression of oncogenes and RNA chimeras in renal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, Ana R; Leite, Ana P; Carvalho, Sílvia; Matos, Mafalda R; Martins, Filipa B; Vítor, Alexandra C; Desterro, Joana MP; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria; de Almeida, Sérgio F

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant expression of cancer genes and non-canonical RNA species is a hallmark of cancer. However, the mechanisms driving such atypical gene expression programs are incompletely understood. Here, our transcriptional profiling of a cohort of 50 primary clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) reveals that transcription read-through beyond the termination site is a source of transcriptome diversity in cancer cells. Amongst the genes most frequently mutated in ccRCC, we identified SETD2 inactivation as a potent enhancer of transcription read-through. We further show that invasion of neighbouring genes and generation of RNA chimeras are functional outcomes of transcription read-through. We identified the BCL2 oncogene as one of such invaded genes and detected a novel chimera, the CTSC-RAB38, in 20% of ccRCC samples. Collectively, our data highlight a novel link between transcription read-through and aberrant expression of oncogenes and chimeric transcripts that is prevalent in cancer. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09214.001 PMID:26575290

  5. RNA polymerase III transcription--a battleground for tumour suppressors and oncogenes.

    PubMed

    White, R J

    2004-01-01

    This review provides a summary of the European Association for Cancer Research Award Lecture, presented at the ECCO12 meeting in Copenhagen in September 2003. It describes what we have learnt about the mechanisms responsible for deregulating RNA polymerase III transcription in transformed cells. A network has been discovered of unanticipated links to key tumour suppressors and oncogenes. Novel functions have been revealed for RB, p53 and c-Myc, that may help explain their profound biological effects. PMID:14687785

  6. MUC1 alters oncogenic events and transcription in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hattrup, Christine L; Gendler, Sandra J

    2006-01-01

    Introduction MUC1 is an oncoprotein whose overexpression correlates with aggressiveness of tumors and poor survival of cancer patients. Many of the oncogenic effects of MUC1 are believed to occur through interaction of its cytoplasmic tail with signaling molecules. As expected for a protein with oncogenic functions, MUC1 is linked to regulation of proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and transcription. Methods To clarify the role of MUC1 in cancer, we transfected two breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-468 and BT-20) with small interfering (si)RNA directed against MUC1 and analyzed transcriptional responses and oncogenic events (proliferation, apoptosis and invasion). Results Transcription of several genes was altered after transfection of MUC1 siRNA, including decreased MAP2K1 (MEK1), JUN, PDGFA, CDC25A, VEGF and ITGAV (integrin αv), and increased TNF, RAF1, and MMP2. Additional changes were seen at the protein level, such as increased expression of c-Myc, heightened phosphorylation of AKT, and decreased activation of MEK1/2 and ERK1/2. These were correlated with cellular events, as MUC1 siRNA in the MDA-MB-468 line decreased proliferation and invasion, and increased stress-induced apoptosis. Intriguingly, BT-20 cells displayed similar levels of apoptosis regardless of siRNA, and actually increased proliferation after MUC1 siRNA. Conclusion These results further the growing knowledge of the role of MUC1 in transcription, and suggest that the regulation of MUC1 in breast cancer may be more complex than previously appreciated. The differences between these two cell lines emphasize the importance of understanding the context of cell-specific signaling events when analyzing the oncogenic functions of MUC1, and caution against generalizing the results of individual cell lines without adequate confirmation in intact biological systems. PMID:16846534

  7. Transcriptional regulation of the human ALDH1A1 promoter by the oncogenic homeoprotein TLX1/HOX11

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Kim L.; Heidari, Mansour; Taplin, Ross H.; Kees, Ursula R.; Greene, Wayne K.

    2009-01-01

    The homeoprotein TLX1, which is essential to spleen organogenesis and oncogenic when aberrantly expressed in immature T cells, functions as a bifunctional transcriptional regulator, being capable of activation or repression depending on cell type and/or promoter context. However, the detailed mechanisms by which it regulates the transcription of target genes such as ALDH1A1 remains to be elucidated. We therefore functionally assessed the ability of TLX1 to regulate ALDH1A1 expression in two hematopoietic cell lines, PER-117 T-leukemic cells and human erythroleukemic (HEL) cells, by use of luciferase reporter and mobility shift assays. We showed that TLX1 physically interacts with the general transcription factor TFIIB via its homeodomain, and identified two activities in respect to TLX1-mediated regulation of the CCAAT box-containing ALDH1A1 promoter. The first involved CCAAT-dependent transcriptional repression via perturbation of GATA factor-containing protein complexes assembled at a non-canonical TATA (GATA) box. A structurally intact homeodomain was essential for repression by TLX1 although direct DNA binding was not required. The second activity, which involved CCAAT-independent transcriptional activation did not require an intact homeodomain, indicating that the activation and repression functions of TLX1 are distinct. These findings confirm ALDH1A1 gene regulation by TLX1 and support an indirect model for TLX1 function, in which protein-protein interactions, rather than DNA binding at specific sites, are crucial for its transcriptional activity.

  8. Hepatoma-derived growth factor/nucleolin axis as a novel oncogenic pathway in liver carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, San-Cher; Hu, Tsung-Hui; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Kung, Mei-Lang; Chu, Tian-Huei; Yi, Li-Na; Huang, Shih-Tsung; Chan, Hoi-Hung; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Liu, Li-Feng; Wu, Han-Chung; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chang, Min-Chi; Tai, Ming-Hong

    2015-06-30

    Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) overexpression is involved in liver fibrosis and carcinogenesis. However, the receptor(s) and signaling for HDGF remain unclear. By using affinity chromatography and proteomic techniques, nucleolin (NCL) was identified and validated as a HDGF-interacting membrane protein in hepatoma cells. Exogenous HDGF elicited the membrane NCL accumulation within 0.5 hour by protein stabilization and transcriptional NCL upregulation within 24 hours. Blockade of surface NCL by antibodies neutralization potently suppressed HDGF uptake and HDGF-stimulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling in hepatoma cells. By using rescectd hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues, immunohistochemical analysis revealed NCL overexpression was correlated with tumour grades, vascular invasion, serum alpha-fetoprotein levels and the poor survival in HCC patients. Multivariate analysis showed NCL was an independent prognostic factor for survival outcome of HCC patients after surgery. To delineate the role of NCL in liver carcinogenesis, ectopic NCL overexpression promoted the oncogenic behaviours and induced PI3K/Akt activation in hepatoma cells. Conversely, NCL knockdown by RNA interference attenuated the oncogenic behaviours and PI3K/Akt signaling, which could be partially rescued by exogenous HDGF supply. In summary, this study provides the first evidence that surface NCL transmits the oncogenic signaling of HDGF and facilitates a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for HCC. PMID:25938538

  9. Hepatoma-derived growth factor/nucleolin axis as a novel oncogenic pathway in liver carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao-Cheng; Kung, Mei-Lang; Chu, Tian-Huei; Yi, Li-Na; Huang, Shih-Tsung; Chan, Hoi-Hung; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Liu, Li-Feng; Wu, Han-Chung; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chang, Min-Chi; Tai, Ming-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) overexpression is involved in liver fibrosis and carcinogenesis. However, the receptor(s) and signaling for HDGF remain unclear. By using affinity chromatography and proteomic techniques, nucleolin (NCL) was identified and validated as a HDGF-interacting membrane protein in hepatoma cells. Exogenous HDGF elicited the membrane NCL accumulation within 0.5 hour by protein stabilization and transcriptional NCL upregulation within 24 hours. Blockade of surface NCL by antibodies neutralization potently suppressed HDGF uptake and HDGF-stimulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling in hepatoma cells. By using rescectd hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues, immunohistochemical analysis revealed NCL overexpression was correlated with tumour grades, vascular invasion, serum alpha-fetoprotein levels and the poor survival in HCC patients. Multivariate analysis showed NCL was an independent prognostic factor for survival outcome of HCC patients after surgery. To delineate the role of NCL in liver carcinogenesis, ectopic NCL overexpression promoted the oncogenic behaviours and induced PI3K/Akt activation in hepatoma cells. Conversely, NCL knockdown by RNA interference attenuated the oncogenic behaviours and PI3K/Akt signaling, which could be partially rescued by exogenous HDGF supply. In summary, this study provides the first evidence that surface NCL transmits the oncogenic signaling of HDGF and facilitates a novel diagnostic and therapeutic target for HCC. PMID:25938538

  10. Targeting transcription factor STAT3 for cancer prevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Chai, Edna Zhi Pei; Shanmugam, Muthu K; Arfuso, Frank; Dharmarajan, Arunasalam; Wang, Chao; Kumar, Alan Prem; Samy, Ramar Perumal; Lim, Lina H K; Wang, Lingzhi; Goh, Boon Cher; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Hui, Kam Man; Sethi, Gautam

    2016-06-01

    Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STATs) comprise an important class of transcription factors that have been implicated in a wide variety of essential cellular functions related to proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis. Among various STAT members, STAT3 is frequently overexpressed in tumor cells as well as tissue samples, and regulates the expression of numerous oncogenic genes controlling the growth and metastasis of tumor cells. The current review briefly discusses the importance of STAT3 as a potential target for cancer therapy and also provides novel insights into various classes of existing pharmacological inhibitors of this transcription factor that can be potentially developed as anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26478441

  11. Mitotic bookmarking by transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mitosis is accompanied by dramatic changes in chromatin organization and nuclear architecture. Transcription halts globally and most sequence-specific transcription factors and co-factors are ejected from mitotic chromatin. How then does the cell maintain its transcriptional identity throughout the cell division cycle? It has become clear that not all traces of active transcription and gene repression are erased within mitotic chromatin. Many histone modifications are stable or only partially diminished throughout mitosis. In addition, some sequence-specific DNA binding factors have emerged that remain bound to select sites within mitotic chromatin, raising the possibility that they function to transmit regulatory information through the transcriptionally silent mitotic phase, a concept that has been termed “mitotic bookmarking.” Here we review recent approaches to studying potential bookmarking factors with regards to their mitotic partitioning, and summarize emerging ideas concerning the in vivo functions of mitotically bound nuclear factors. PMID:23547918

  12. Deregulated transcription factors in leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shima, Yutaka; Kitabayashi, Issay

    2011-08-01

    Specific chromosomal translocations and other mutations associated with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) often involve transcription factors and transcriptional coactivators. Such target genes include AML1, C/EBPα, RARα, MOZ, p300/CBP, and MLL, all of which are important in the regulation of hematopoiesis. The resultant fusion or mutant proteins deregulate the transcription of the affected genes and disrupt their essential role in hematopoiesis, causing differentiation block and abnormal proliferation and/or survival. This review focuses on such transcription factors and coactivators, and describes their roles in leukemogenesis and hematopoiesis. PMID:21823042

  13. The crystal structure of the DNA-binding domain of vIRF-1 from the oncogenic KSHV reveals a conserved fold for DNA binding and reinforces its role as a transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Hew, Kelly; Venkatachalam, Rajakannan; Nasertorabi, Fariborz; Lim, Bee Ting; Cornvik, Tobias; Nordlund, Pär

    2013-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus encodes four viral homologues to cellular interferon regulatory factors (IRFs), where the most studied is vIRF-1. Even though vIRF-1 shows sequence homology to the N-terminal DNA-binding domain (DBD) of human IRFs, a specific role for this domain in vIRF-1’s function has remained uncertain. To provide insights into the function of the vIRF-1 DBD, we have determined the crystal structure of it in complex with DNA and in its apo-form. Using a thermal stability shift assay (TSSA), we show that the vIRF-1 DBD binds DNA, whereas full-length vIRF-1 does not, suggesting a cis-acting regulatory mechanism in similarity to human IRFs. The complex structure of vIRF-1 DBD reveals interactions with the DNA backbone and the positioning of two arginines for specific recognition in the major grove. A superimposition with human IRF-3 reveals a similar positioning of the two specificity-determining arginines, and additional TSSAs indicate binding of vIRF-1 to an IRF-3 operator consensus sequence. The results from this study, therefore, provide support that vIRF-1 has evolved to bind DNA and plays a role in DNA binding in the context of transcriptional regulation and might act on some of the many operator sequences controlled by human IRF-3. PMID:23435230

  14. CREB Binding Protein Interacts with Nucleoporin-Specific FG Repeats That Activate Transcription and Mediate NUP98-HOXA9 Oncogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, Lawryn H.; Brindle, Paul K.; Schnabel, Catherine A.; Pritchard, Colin E. J.; Cleary, Michael L.; van Deursen, Jan M. A.

    1999-01-01

    Genes encoding the Phe-Gly (FG) repeat-containing nucleoporins NUP98 and CAN/NUP214 are at the breakpoints of several chromosomal translocations associated with human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but their role in oncogenesis is unclear. Here we demonstrate that the NUP98-HOXA9 fusion gene encodes two nuclear oncoproteins with either 19 or 37 NUP98 FG repeats fused to the DNA binding and PBX heterodimerization domains of the transcription factor HOXA9. Both NUP98-HOXA9 chimeras transformed NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, and this transformation required the HOXA9 domains for DNA binding and PBX interaction. Surprisingly, the FG repeats acted as very potent transactivators of gene transcription. This NUP98-derived activity is essential for transformation and can be replaced by the bona fide transactivation domain of VP16. Interestingly, FG repeat-containing segments derived from the nucleoporins NUP153 and CAN/NUP214 functioned similarly to those from NUP98. We further demonstrate that transactivation by FG repeat-rich segments of NUP98 correlates with their ability to interact functionally and physically with the transcriptional coactivators CREB binding protein (CBP) and p300. This finding shows, for the first time, that a translocation-generated fusion protein appears to recruit CBP/p300 as an important step of its oncogenic mechanism. Together, our results suggest that NUP98-HOXA9 chimeras are aberrant transcription factors that deregulate HOX-responsive genes through the transcriptional activation properties of nucleoporin-specific FG repeats that recruit CBP/p300. Indeed, FG repeat-mediated transactivation may be a shared pathogenic function of nucleoporins implicated human AML. PMID:9858599

  15. The putative oncogene, CRNDE, is a negative prognostic factor in ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Grzybowska, Ewa Anna; Pienkowska-Grela, Barbara; Podgorska, Agnieszka; Zub, Renata; Olbryt, Magdalena; Pamula-Pilat, Jolanta; Lisowska, Katarzyna M.; Grzybowska, Ewa; Rubel, Tymon; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Konopka, Bozena; Kulesza, Magdalena; Lukasik, Martyna

    2015-01-01

    The CRNDE gene seems to play an oncogenic role in cancers, though its exact function remains unknown. Here, we tried to assess its usefulness as a molecular prognostic marker in ovarian cancer. Based on results of our microarray studies, CRNDE transcripts were further analyzed by Real-Time qPCR-based profiling of their expression. The qPCR study was conducted with the use of personally designed TaqMan assays on 135 frozen tissue sections of ovarian carcinomas from patients treated with platinum compounds and either cyclophosphamide (PC, N = 32) or taxanes (TP, N = 103). Elevated levels of two different CRNDE transcripts were a negative prognostic factor; they increased the risk of death and recurrence in the group of patients treated with TP, but not PC (DNA-damaging agents only). Higher associations were found for overexpression of the short CRNDE splice variant (FJ466686): HR 6.072, 95% CI 1.814–20.32, p = 0.003 (the risk of death); HR 15.53, 95% CI 3.812–63.28, p < 0.001 (the risk of recurrence). Additionally, accumulation of the TP53 protein correlated with decreased expression of both CRNDE transcripts in tumor cells. Our results depict CRNDE as a potential marker of poor prognosis in women with ovarian carcinomas, and suggest that its significance depends on the therapeutic regimen used. PMID:26556866

  16. Dnmt1/Transcription Factor Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hervouet, Eric; Vallette, François M.; Cartron, Pierre-François

    2010-01-01

    DNA methylation inheritance is the process of copying, via the DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1), the pre-existing methylation patterns onto the new DNA strand during DNA replication. Experiments of chromatin immunoprecipitation, measurement of maintenance methyltransferase activity, proximity ligation in situ assays (P-LISA, Duolink/Olink), and transcription factor arrays demonstrate that Dnmt1 interacts with transcription factors to promote site-specific DNA methylation inheritance, while the Dnmt1-PCNA-UHRF1 complex promotes the DNA methylation inheritance without site preference. We also show that the Dnmt1-PCNA-UHRF1 and Dnmt1/transcription factor complexes methylate DNA by acting as a single player or in cooperation. Thus, our data establish that the copying of the pre-existing methylation pattern is governed by the orchestration of the untargeted and the targeted mechanisms of DNA methylation inheritance, which are themselves dictated by the partners of Dnmt1. PMID:21779454

  17. Stilbenoids remodel the DNA methylation patterns in breast cancer cells and inhibit oncogenic NOTCH signaling through epigenetic regulation of MAML2 transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    Lubecka, Katarzyna; Kurzava, Lucinda; Flower, Kirsty; Buvala, Hannah; Zhang, Hao; Teegarden, Dorothy; Camarillo, Ignacio; Suderman, Matthew; Kuang, Shihuan; Andrisani, Ourania; Flanagan, James M.; Stefanska, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    DNA hypomethylation was previously implicated in cancer progression and metastasis. The purpose of this study was to examine whether stilbenoids, resveratrol and pterostilbene thought to exert anticancer effects, target genes with oncogenic function for de novo methylation and silencing, leading to inactivation of related signaling pathways. Following Illumina 450K, genome-wide DNA methylation analysis reveals that stilbenoids alter DNA methylation patterns in breast cancer cells. On average, 75% of differentially methylated genes have increased methylation, and these genes are enriched for oncogenic functions, including NOTCH signaling pathway. MAML2, a coactivator of NOTCH targets, is methylated at the enhancer region and transcriptionally silenced in response to stilbenoids, possibly explaining the downregulation of NOTCH target genes. The increased DNA methylation at MAML2 enhancer coincides with increased occupancy of repressive histone marks and decrease in activating marks. This condensed chromatin structure is associated with binding of DNMT3B and decreased occupancy of OCT1 transcription factor at MAML2 enhancer, suggesting a role of DNMT3B in increasing methylation of MAML2 after stilbenoid treatment. Our results deliver a novel insight into epigenetic regulation of oncogenic signals in cancer and provide support for epigenetic-targeting strategies as an effective anticancer approach. PMID:27207652

  18. Stilbenoids remodel the DNA methylation patterns in breast cancer cells and inhibit oncogenic NOTCH signaling through epigenetic regulation of MAML2 transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Lubecka, Katarzyna; Kurzava, Lucinda; Flower, Kirsty; Buvala, Hannah; Zhang, Hao; Teegarden, Dorothy; Camarillo, Ignacio; Suderman, Matthew; Kuang, Shihuan; Andrisani, Ourania; Flanagan, James M; Stefanska, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    DNA hypomethylation was previously implicated in cancer progression and metastasis. The purpose of this study was to examine whether stilbenoids, resveratrol and pterostilbene thought to exert anticancer effects, target genes with oncogenic function for de novo methylation and silencing, leading to inactivation of related signaling pathways. Following Illumina 450K, genome-wide DNA methylation analysis reveals that stilbenoids alter DNA methylation patterns in breast cancer cells. On average, 75% of differentially methylated genes have increased methylation, and these genes are enriched for oncogenic functions, including NOTCH signaling pathway. MAML2, a coactivator of NOTCH targets, is methylated at the enhancer region and transcriptionally silenced in response to stilbenoids, possibly explaining the downregulation of NOTCH target genes. The increased DNA methylation at MAML2 enhancer coincides with increased occupancy of repressive histone marks and decrease in activating marks. This condensed chromatin structure is associated with binding of DNMT3B and decreased occupancy of OCT1 transcription factor at MAML2 enhancer, suggesting a role of DNMT3B in increasing methylation of MAML2 after stilbenoid treatment. Our results deliver a novel insight into epigenetic regulation of oncogenic signals in cancer and provide support for epigenetic-targeting strategies as an effective anticancer approach. PMID:27207652

  19. Transcription factor-based biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, Jeffrey A; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

  20. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon) and SREBP-1 Synergistically Activate Transcription of Fatty-acid Synthase Gene (FASN)*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Park, Hyejin; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Yeon-Sook; Koh, Dong-In; Kim, Myung-Hwa; Kim, Yu-Ri; Lee, Choong-Eun; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Osborne, Timothy F.; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-01-01

    FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a proto-oncogenic transcription factor of the BTB/POZ (bric-à-brac, tramtrack, and broad complex and pox virus zinc finger) domain family. Recent evidence suggested that FBI-1 might be involved in adipogenic gene expression. Coincidentally, expression of FBI-1 and fatty-acid synthase (FASN) genes are often increased in cancer and immortalized cells. Both FBI-1 and FASN are important in cancer cell proliferation. SREBP-1 is a major regulator of many adipogenic genes, and FBI-1 and SREBP-1 (sterol-responsive element (SRE)-binding protein 1) interact with each other directly via their DNA binding domains. FBI-1 enhanced the transcriptional activation of SREBP-1 on responsive promoters, pGL2-6x(SRE)-Luc and FASN gene. FBI-1 and SREBP-1 synergistically activate transcription of the FASN gene by acting on the proximal GC-box and SRE/E-box. FBI-1, Sp1, and SREBP-1 can bind to all three SRE, GC-box, and SRE/E-box. Binding competition among the three transcription factors on the GC-box and SRE/E-box appears important in the transcription regulation. FBI-1 is apparently changing the binding pattern of Sp1 and SREBP-1 on the two elements in the presence of induced SREBP-1 and drives more Sp1 binding to the proximal promoter with less of an effect on SREBP-1 binding. The changes induced by FBI-1 appear critical in the synergistic transcription activation. The molecular mechanism revealed provides insight into how proto-oncogene FBI-1 may attack the cellular regulatory mechanism of FASN gene expression to provide more phospholipid membrane components needed for rapid cancer cell proliferation. PMID:18682402

  1. Transcriptional down regulation of the nov proto-oncogene in fibroblasts transformed by p60v-src.

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, G; Martinerie, C; Perbal, B; Hanafusa, H

    1996-01-01

    We have sought to identify genes whose expression is altered as a consequence of transformation by p60v-src. Using the mRNA differential display method, we have identified the nov proto-oncogene as one gene that is down regulated in chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) transformed by p60v-src. nov transcripts were also found to be present at only very low levels in proliferating CEFs in comparison with quiescent CEFs. Serum stimulation of quiescent CEFs also resulted in a decline in the steady-state level of nov transcripts. Taken together, these findings suggest that the nov gene is expressed only in quiescent fibroblasts and that its down regulation may contribute to cellular transformation by the v-src oncogene. Down regulation of the nov gene appears to occur at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Results obtained from experiments with a protein kinase inhibitor suggest that protein kinase C may be a key downstream effector in mediating the down regulation of nov transcripts in response to activation of p60src or serum stimulation. In addition, we found that transcription of an unknown gene is required for the decline in the steady-state level of nov transcripts in response to serum stimulation. PMID:8552074

  2. AKT activation drives the nuclear localization of CSE1L and a pro-oncogenic transcriptional activation in ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Biolatti, Marta; Delogu, Giuseppe; Capobianco, Giampiero; Farace, Cristiano; Dessole, Salvatore; Cossu, Antonio; Tanda, Francesco; Madeddu, Roberto; Olivero, Martina; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2013-10-15

    The human homolog of the yeast cse1 gene (CSE1L) is over-expressed in ovarian cancer. CSE1L forms complex with Ran and importin-α and has roles in nucleocytoplasmic traffic and gene expression. CSE1L accumulated in the nucleus of ovarian cancer cell lines, while it was localized also in the cytoplasm of other cancer cell lines. Nuclear localization depended on AKT, which was constitutively active in ovarian cancer cells, as the CSE1L protein translocated to the cytoplasm when AKT was inactivated. Moreover, the expression of a constitutively active AKT forced the translocation of CSE1L from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in other cancer cells. Nuclear accrual of CSE1L was associated to the nuclear accumulation of the phosphorylated Ran Binding protein 3 (RanBP3), which depended on AKT as well. Also in samples of human ovarian cancer, AKT activation was associated to nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and phosphorylation of RanBP3. Expression profiling of ovarian cancer cells after CSE1L silencing showed that CSE1L was required for the expression of genes promoting invasion and metastasis. In agreement, CSE1L silencing impaired motility and invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells. Altogether these data show that in ovarian cancer cells activated AKT by affecting RanBP3 phosphorylation determines the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and likely the nuclear concentration of transcription factors conveying pro-oncogenic signals. - highlights: • CSE1L is a key player in nucleocytoplasmic traffic by forming complex with Ran. • AKT phosphorylates RanBP3 that regulates the nucleocytoplasmic gradient of Ran. • The activated oncogenic AKT drives the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L. • CSE1L in the nucleus up-regulates genes conveying pro-oncogenic signals. • CSE1L might contribute to tumor progression driven by the activated oncogenic AKT.

  3. Targeting Transcription Factors in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Anand S.; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are commonly deregulated in the pathogenesis of human cancer and are a major class of cancer cell dependencies. Consequently, targeting of TFs can be highly effective in treating particular malignancies, as highlighted by the clinical efficacy of agents that target nuclear hormone receptors. In this review we discuss recent advances in our understanding of TFs as drug targets in oncology, with an emphasis on the emerging chemical approaches to modulate TF function. The remarkable diversity and potency of TFs as drivers of cell transformation justifies a continued pursuit of TFs as therapeutic targets for drug discovery. PMID:26645049

  4. NSD2 contributes to oncogenic RAS-driven transcription in lung cancer cells through long-range epigenetic activation.

    PubMed

    García-Carpizo, Verónica; Sarmentero, Jacinto; Han, Bomie; Graña, Osvaldo; Ruiz-Llorente, Sergio; Pisano, David G; Serrano, Manuel; Brooks, Harold B; Campbell, Robert M; Barrero, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    The histone methyltransferase NSD2/WHSC1/MMSET is overexpressed in a number of solid tumors but its contribution to the biology of these tumors is not well understood. Here, we describe that NSD2 contributes to the proliferation of a subset of lung cancer cell lines by supporting oncogenic RAS transcriptional responses. NSD2 knock down combined with MEK or BRD4 inhibitors causes co-operative inhibitory responses on cell growth. However, while MEK and BRD4 inhibitors converge in the downregulation of genes associated with cancer-acquired super-enhancers, NSD2 inhibition affects the expression of clusters of genes embedded in megabase-scale regions marked with H3K36me2 and that contribute to the RAS transcription program. Thus, combinatorial therapies using MEK or BRD4 inhibitors together with NSD2 inhibition are likely to be needed to ensure a more comprehensive inhibition of oncogenic RAS-driven transcription programs in lung cancers with NSD2 overexpression. PMID:27604143

  5. NSD2 contributes to oncogenic RAS-driven transcription in lung cancer cells through long-range epigenetic activation

    PubMed Central

    García-Carpizo, Verónica; Sarmentero, Jacinto; Han, Bomie; Graña, Osvaldo; Ruiz-Llorente, Sergio; Pisano, David G.; Serrano, Manuel; Brooks, Harold B.; Campbell, Robert M.; Barrero, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    The histone methyltransferase NSD2/WHSC1/MMSET is overexpressed in a number of solid tumors but its contribution to the biology of these tumors is not well understood. Here, we describe that NSD2 contributes to the proliferation of a subset of lung cancer cell lines by supporting oncogenic RAS transcriptional responses. NSD2 knock down combined with MEK or BRD4 inhibitors causes co-operative inhibitory responses on cell growth. However, while MEK and BRD4 inhibitors converge in the downregulation of genes associated with cancer-acquired super-enhancers, NSD2 inhibition affects the expression of clusters of genes embedded in megabase-scale regions marked with H3K36me2 and that contribute to the RAS transcription program. Thus, combinatorial therapies using MEK or BRD4 inhibitors together with NSD2 inhibition are likely to be needed to ensure a more comprehensive inhibition of oncogenic RAS-driven transcription programs in lung cancers with NSD2 overexpression. PMID:27604143

  6. ZIP: a novel transcription repressor, represses EGFR oncogene and suppresses breast carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruifang; Zhang, Hua; Yu, Wenhua; Chen, Yupeng; Gui, Bin; Liang, Jing; Wang, Yan; Sun, Luyang; Yang, Xiaohan; Zhang, Yu; Shi, Lei; Li, Yanyan; Shang, Yongfeng

    2009-01-01

    Despite the importance of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in animal development and malignant transformation, surprisingly little is known about the regulation of its expression. Here, we report a novel zinc finger and G-patch domain-containing protein, ZIP. We demonstrated that ZIP acts as a transcription repressor through the recruitment of the nucleosome remodelling and deacetylase complex. Transcriptional target analysis revealed that ZIP regulates several cellular signalling pathways including EGFR pathways that are critically involved in cell proliferation, survival, and migration. We showed that ZIP inhibits cell proliferation and suppresses breast carcinogenesis, and that ZIP depletion leads to a drastic tumour growth in vivo. We found that ZIP is downregulated in breast carcinomas and that its level of expression is negatively correlated with that of EGFR. Our data indicate that ZIP is a novel transcription repressor and a potential tumour suppressor. These findings may shed new light on the EGFR-related breast carcinogenesis and might offer a potential new target for breast cancer therapy. PMID:19644445

  7. Genistein, a dietary isoflavone, down-regulates the MDM2 oncogene at both transcriptional and posttranslational levels.

    PubMed

    Li, Mao; Zhang, Zhuo; Hill, Donald L; Chen, Xinbin; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2005-09-15

    Although genistein has chemopreventive effects in several human malignancies, including cancers of the breast, colon, and prostate, the mechanisms of action are not fully understood. Herein we report novel mechanisms whereby genistein down-regulates the MDM2 oncogene, perhaps explaining some of its anticancer activities. In a dose- and time-dependent manner, genistein reduced MDM2 protein and mRNA levels in human cell lines of breast, colon, and prostate cancer; primary fibroblasts; and breast epithelial cells. The inhibitory effects were found at both transcriptional and posttranslational levels and were independent of tyrosine kinase pathways. We found that the NFAT transcription site in the region between -132 and +33 in the MDM2 P2 promoter was responsive to genistein. At the posttranslational level, genistein induced ubiquitination of MDM2, which led to its degradation. Additionally, genistein induced apoptosis and G2 arrest and inhibited proliferation in a variety of human cancer cell lines, regardless of p53 status. We further showed that MDM2 overexpression abrogated genistein-induced apoptosis in vitro and that genistein inhibited MDM2 expression and tumor growth in PC3 xenografts. In conclusion, genistein directly down-regulates the MDM2 oncogene, representing a novel mechanism of its action that may have implications for its chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic effects. PMID:16166295

  8. Transcriptional factors, Mafs and their biological roles

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Mariko; Misaka, Ryoichi; Nitta, Kosaku; Tsuchiya, Ken

    2015-01-01

    The Maf family of transcription factors is characterized by a typical bZip structure; these transcription factors act as important regulators of the development and differentiation of many organs and tissues, including the kidney. The Maf family consists of two subgroups that are characterized according to their structure: large Maf transcription factors and small Maf transcription factors. The large Maf subgroup consists of four proteins, designated as MAFA, MAFB, c-MAF and neural retina-specific leucine zipper. In particular, MAFA is a distinct molecule that has been attracting the attention of researchers because it acts as a strong transactivator of insulin, suggesting that Maf transcription factors are likely to be involved in systemic energy homeostasis. In this review, we focused on the regulation of glucose/energy balance by Maf transcription factors in various organs. PMID:25685288

  9. A genomic explanation connecting "Mediterranean diet", olive oil and cancer: oleic acid, the main monounsaturated fatty acid of olive oil, induces formation of inhibitory "PEA3 transcription factor-PEA3 DNA binding site" complexes at the Her-2/neu (erbB-2) oncogene promoter in breast, ovarian and stomach cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Javier A; Papadimitropoulou, Adriana; Vellon, Luciano; Lupu, Ruth

    2006-10-01

    Olive oil is an integral ingredient of the "Mediterranean diet" and accumulating evidence suggests that it may have a potential role in lowering risk of several cancers. We recently hypothesized that the anti-cancer actions of olive oil may relate to its monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) oleic acid (OA; 18:1n-9) content to specifically regulate oncogenes. In this study, transient transfection experiments with human Her-2/neu promoter-driven luciferase gene established the ability of OA to specifically repress the transcriptional activity of Her-2/neu gene. Gene repression was seen in tumour-derived cell lines with Her-2/neu gene amplification and overexpression, including SK-Br3 (56% reduction), SK-OV3 (75% reduction) and NCI-N87 (55% reduction) breast, ovarian and stomach cancer cell lines, respectively. Also marginal decreases in promoter activity were observed in cancer cells expressing physiological levels of Her-2/neu (20% reduction in MCF-7 breast cancer cells). Remarkably, OA treatment in Her-2/neu-overexpressing cancer cells was found to induce up-regulation of the Ets protein polyomavirus enhancer activator 3 (PEA3), a transcriptional repressor of Her-2/neu promoter. Also, an intact PEA3 DNA-binding-site at endogenous Her-2/neu gene promoter was essential for OA-induced repression of this gene. Moreover, OA treatment failed to decrease Her-2/neu protein levels in MCF-7/Her2-18 transfectants, which stably express full-length human Her-2/neu cDNA controlled by a SV40 viral promoter. OA-induced transcriptional repression of Her-2/neu through the action of PEA3 protein at the promoter level may represent a novel mechanism linking "Mediterranean diet" and cancer. PMID:16406575

  10. Prunus transcription factors: breeding perspectives.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Valmor J; Rubio, Manuel; Trainotti, Livio; Verde, Ignazio; Bonghi, Claudio; Martínez-Gómez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Many plant processes depend on differential gene expression, which is generally controlled by complex proteins called transcription factors (TFs). In peach, 1533 TFs have been identified, accounting for about 5.5% of the 27,852 protein-coding genes. These TFs are the reference for the rest of the Prunus species. TF studies in Prunus have been performed on the gene expression analysis of different agronomic traits, including control of the flowering process, fruit quality, and biotic and abiotic stress resistance. These studies, using quantitative RT-PCR, have mainly been performed in peach, and to a lesser extent in other species, including almond, apricot, black cherry, Fuji cherry, Japanese apricot, plum, and sour and sweet cherry. Other tools have also been used in TF studies, including cDNA-AFLP, LC-ESI-MS, RNA, and DNA blotting or mapping. More recently, new tools assayed include microarray and high-throughput DNA sequencing (DNA-Seq) and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). New functional genomics opportunities include genome resequencing and the well-known synteny among Prunus genomes and transcriptomes. These new functional studies should be applied in breeding programs in the development of molecular markers. With the genome sequences available, some strategies that have been used in model systems (such as SNP genotyping assays and genotyping-by-sequencing) may be applicable in the functional analysis of Prunus TFs as well. In addition, the knowledge of the gene functions and position in the peach reference genome of the TFs represents an additional advantage. These facts could greatly facilitate the isolation of genes via QTL (quantitative trait loci) map-based cloning in the different Prunus species, following the association of these TFs with the identified QTLs using the peach reference genome. PMID:26124770

  11. Prunus transcription factors: breeding perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Valmor J.; Rubio, Manuel; Trainotti, Livio; Verde, Ignazio; Bonghi, Claudio; Martínez-Gómez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Many plant processes depend on differential gene expression, which is generally controlled by complex proteins called transcription factors (TFs). In peach, 1533 TFs have been identified, accounting for about 5.5% of the 27,852 protein-coding genes. These TFs are the reference for the rest of the Prunus species. TF studies in Prunus have been performed on the gene expression analysis of different agronomic traits, including control of the flowering process, fruit quality, and biotic and abiotic stress resistance. These studies, using quantitative RT-PCR, have mainly been performed in peach, and to a lesser extent in other species, including almond, apricot, black cherry, Fuji cherry, Japanese apricot, plum, and sour and sweet cherry. Other tools have also been used in TF studies, including cDNA-AFLP, LC-ESI-MS, RNA, and DNA blotting or mapping. More recently, new tools assayed include microarray and high-throughput DNA sequencing (DNA-Seq) and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). New functional genomics opportunities include genome resequencing and the well-known synteny among Prunus genomes and transcriptomes. These new functional studies should be applied in breeding programs in the development of molecular markers. With the genome sequences available, some strategies that have been used in model systems (such as SNP genotyping assays and genotyping-by-sequencing) may be applicable in the functional analysis of Prunus TFs as well. In addition, the knowledge of the gene functions and position in the peach reference genome of the TFs represents an additional advantage. These facts could greatly facilitate the isolation of genes via QTL (quantitative trait loci) map-based cloning in the different Prunus species, following the association of these TFs with the identified QTLs using the peach reference genome. PMID:26124770

  12. FOXO transcription factors in cancer development and therapy.

    PubMed

    Coomans de Brachène, Alexandra; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-03-01

    The forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors are considered as tumor suppressors that limit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. FOXO gene alterations have been described in a limited number of human cancers, such as rhabdomyosarcoma, leukemia and lymphoma. In addition, FOXO proteins are inactivated by major oncogenic signals such as the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase pathway and MAP kinases. Their expression is also repressed by micro-RNAs in multiple cancer types. FOXOs are mediators of the tumor response to various therapies. However, paradoxical roles of FOXOs in cancer progression were recently described. FOXOs contribute to the maintenance of leukemia-initiating cells in acute and chronic myeloid leukemia. These factors may also promote invasion and metastasis of subsets of colon and breast cancers. Resistance to treatment was also ascribed to FOXO activation in multiple cases, including targeted therapies. In this review, we discuss the complex role of FOXOs in cancer development and response to therapy. PMID:26686861

  13. Cell Fate Determination by Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Gurdon, John B

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors fulfill a key role in the formation and maintenance of different cell-types during development. It is known that transcription factors largely dissociate from chromosomes during mitosis. We found, previously, that mitosis is also a time when somatic nuclei can be far more easily reprogrammed after nuclear transfer than the nuclei of interphase cells. We refer to this as a mitotic advantage. Here, the rate of exchange of a transcription factor on its designated DNA-binding site is discussed. It is proposed that the Xenopus oocyte could serve as an experimental system in which the duration of binding site occupancy could be usefully analyzed. In particular, the Xenopus oocyte has several characteristics which make it possible to determine accurately the concentration and duration of transcription factor binding. It is proposed that the concentration and time are the key variables which govern the action of transcription factors when they activate genes needed for cell lineage determination. PMID:26970633

  14. Profiling of transcripts and proteins modulated by K-ras oncogene in the lung tissues of K-ras transgenic mice by omics approaches.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sojung; Kang, Jungwoo; Cho, Minchul; Seo, Eunhee; Choi, Heesook; Kim, Eunjin; Kim, Junghee; Kim, Heejong; Kang, Gum Yong; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Park, Young-Ho; Yu, Dae-Yeul; Yum, Young Na; Park, Sue-Nie; Yoon, Do-Young

    2009-01-01

    The mutated K-ras gene is involved in approximately 30% of human cancers. In order to search for K-ras oncogene-induced modulators in lung tissues of K-ras transgenic mice, we performed microarray and proteomics (LC/ESI-MS/MS) analysis. Genes (RAB27b RAS family, IL-1RA, IL-33, chemokine ligand 6, epiregulin, EGF-like domain and cathepsin) related to cancer development (Wnt signaling pathway) and inflammation (chemokine/cytokine signaling pathway, Toll receptor signaling) were up-regulated while genes (troponin, tropomodulin 2, endothelial lipase, FGFR4, integrin alpha8 and adenylate cyclase 8) related to the tumor suppression such as p53 pathway, TGF-beta signaling pathway and cadherin signaling pathway were down-regulated by K-ras oncogene. Proteomics approach revealed that up-regulated proteins in lung adenomas of K-ras mice were classified as follows: proteins related to the metabolism/catabolism (increased from 7 to 22% by K-ras gene), proteins related to translation/transcription and nucleotide (from 4 to 6%), proteins related to signal transduction (from 3 to 5%), proteins related to phosphorylation (from 1 to 2%). ATP synthase, Ras oncogene family, cytochrome c oxidase, flavoprotein, TEF 1, adipoprotein A-1 BP, glutathione oxidase, fatty acid BP 4, diaphorase 1, MAPK4 and transgelin were up-regulated by K-ras oncogene. However, integrin alpha1, Ras-interacting protein (Rain), endothelin-converting enzyme-1d and splicing factor 3b were down-regulated. These studies suggest that genes related to cancer development and inflammation were up-regulated while genes related to the tumor suppression were down-regulated by K-ras, resulting in the tumor growth. Putative biomarkers such as cell cycle related genes (Cdc37), cancer cell adhesion (Glycam 1, integrin alpha8, integrin alphaX and Clec4n), signal transduction (Tlr2, IL-33, and Ccbp2), migration (Ccr1, Ccl6, and diaphorase 1 (Cyb5r3) and cancer development (epiregulin) can be useful for diagnosis and as

  15. Regulation of endochondral ossification by transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Riko; Hata, Kenji; Ono, Koichiro; Amano, Katsuhiko; Takigawa, Yoko; Wakabayashi, Makoto; Takashima, Rikako; Yoneda, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    Endochondral ossification is very unique and complex biological event which is associated with skeletal development and tissue partnering. Genetic studies and gene-targeting approaches identified several transcription factors that play important roles in endochondral ossification. These transcription factors sequentially and harmoniously regulate each step of endochondral ossification, and consequently maintain the spatio-temporal control of the program. Importantly, these transcription factors form large protein complex to control chromatin remodeling, histone modification, transcription and splicing steps during endochondral ossification. It is also important to understand how these transcription factors regulate expression of their target genes. Biochemical and molecular cloning techniques largely contributed to identification of the components of the transcriptional complex and the target genes. Most recently, importance of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in endochondral ossification has been reported. A transcription factor, BBF2H7, functions as an ER stress sensor in chondrocytes through regulation of appropriate secretion of chondrogenic matrices. We would like to discuss how the transcription factors regulate endochondral ossification. PMID:22652803

  16. Convergence of developmental and oncogenic signaling pathways at transcriptional super-enhancers.

    PubMed

    Hnisz, Denes; Schuijers, Jurian; Lin, Charles Y; Weintraub, Abraham S; Abraham, Brian J; Lee, Tong Ihn; Bradner, James E; Young, Richard A

    2015-04-16

    Super-enhancers and stretch enhancers (SEs) drive expression of genes that play prominent roles in normal and disease cells, but the functional importance of these clustered enhancer elements is poorly understood, so it is not clear why genes key to cell identity have evolved regulation by such elements. Here, we show that SEs consist of functional constituent units that concentrate multiple developmental signaling pathways at key pluripotency genes in embryonic stem cells and confer enhanced responsiveness to signaling of their associated genes. Cancer cells frequently acquire SEs at genes that promote tumorigenesis, and we show that these genes are especially sensitive to perturbation of oncogenic signaling pathways. Super-enhancers thus provide a platform for signaling pathways to regulate genes that control cell identity during development and tumorigenesis. PMID:25801169

  17. Multiple-Integrations of HPV16 Genome and Altered Transcription of Viral Oncogenes and Cellular Genes Are Associated with the Development of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mao; Duan, Ping; Ye, Lulu; Chen, Jun; Chen, Xiangmin; Zhang, Lifang; Xue, Xiangyang

    2014-01-01

    The constitutive expression of the high-risk HPV E6 and E7 viral oncogenes is the major cause of cervical cancer. To comprehensively explore the composition of HPV16 early transcripts and their genomic annotation, cervical squamous epithelial tissues from 40 HPV16-infected patients were collected for analysis of papillomavirus oncogene transcripts (APOT). We observed different transcription patterns of HPV16 oncogenes in progression of cervical lesions to cervical cancer and identified one novel transcript. Multiple-integration events in the tissues of cervical carcinoma (CxCa) are significantly more often than those of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Moreover, most cellular genes within or near these integration sites are cancer-associated genes. Taken together, this study suggests that the multiple-integrations of HPV genome during persistent viral infection, which thereby alters the expression patterns of viral oncogenes and integration-related cellular genes, play a crucial role in progression of cervical lesions to cervix cancer. PMID:24992025

  18. Oncogenic potential of guanine nucleotide stimulatory factor alpha subunit in thyroid glands of transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Michiels, F M; Caillou, B; Talbot, M; Dessarps-Freichey, F; Maunoury, M T; Schlumberger, M; Mercken, L; Monier, R; Feunteun, J

    1994-01-01

    Transgenic mice have been used to address the issue of the oncogenic potential of mutant guanine nucleotide stimulatory factor (Gs) alpha subunit in the thyroid gland. The expression of the mutant Arg-201-->His Gs alpha subunit transgene has been directed to murine thyroid epithelial cells by bovine thyroglobulin promoter. The transgenic animals develop hyperfunctioning thyroid adenomas with increased intracellular cAMP levels and high uptake of [125I]iodine and produced elevated levels of circulating triiodothyronine and thyroxine. These animals demonstrate that the mutant form of Gs alpha subunit carries an oncogenic activity, thus supporting the model that deregulation of cAMP level alters growth control in thyroid epithelium. These animals represent models for humans with autonomously functioning thyroid nodules. Images PMID:7937980

  19. G-quadruplex formation within the promoter of the KRAS proto-oncogene and its effect on transcription

    PubMed Central

    Cogoi, Susanna; Xodo, Luigi E.

    2006-01-01

    In human and mouse, the promoter of the KRAS gene contains a nuclease hypersensitive polypurine–polypyrimidine element (NHPPE) that is essential for transcription. An interesting feature of the polypurine G-rich strand of NHPPE is its ability to assume an unusual DNA structure that, according to circular dichroism (CD) and DMS footprinting experiments, is attributed to an intramolecular parallel G-quadruplex, consisting of three G-tetrads and three loops. The human and mouse KRAS NHPPE G-rich strands display melting temperature of 64 and 73°C, respectively, as well as a K+-dependent capacity to arrest DNA polymerase. Photocleavage and CD experiments showed that the cationic porphyrin TMPyP4 stacks to the external G-tetrads of the KRAS quadruplexes, increasing the Tm by ∼20°C. These findings raise the intriguing question that the G-quadruplex formed within the NHPPE of KRAS may be involved in the regulation of transcription. Indeed, transfection experiments showed that the activity of the mouse KRAS promoter is reduced to 20% of control, in the presence of the quadruplex-stabilizing TMPyP4. In addition, we found that G-rich oligonucleotides mimicking the KRAS quadruplex, but not the corresponding 4-base mutant sequences or oligonucleotides forming quadruplexes with different structures, competed with the NHPPE duplex for binding to nuclear proteins. When vector pKRS-413, containing CAT driven by the mouse KRAS promoter, and KRAS quadruplex oligonucleotides were co-transfected in 293 cells, the expression of CAT was found to be downregulated to 40% of the control. On the basis of these data, we propose that the NHPPE of KRAS exists in equilibrium between a double-stranded form favouring transcription and a folded quadruplex form, which instead inhibits transcription. Such a mechanism, which is probably adopted by other growth-related genes, provides useful hints for the rational design of anticancer drugs against the KRAS oncogene. PMID:16687659

  20. Phylogenetic and Transcription Analysis of Chrysanthemum WRKY Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Song, Aiping; Li, Peiling; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei; Li, Huiyun; Zeng, Jun; Shao, Yafeng; Zhu, Lu; Zhang, Zhaohe; Chen, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors are known to function in a number of plant processes. Here we have characterized 15 WRKY family genes of the important ornamental species chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum morifolium). A total of 15 distinct sequences were isolated; initially internal fragments were amplified based on transcriptomic sequence, and then the full length cDNAs were obtained using RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) PCR. The transcription of these 15 genes in response to a variety of phytohormone treatments and both biotic and abiotic stresses was characterized. Some of the genes behaved as would be predicted based on their homology with Arabidopsis thaliana WRKY genes, but others showed divergent behavior. PMID:25196345

  1. The transcription factor NF-E2-related Factor 2 (Nrf2): a protooncogene?

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Phillip; Jaiswal, Anil K.

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor Nrf2 is responsible for regulating a battery of antioxidant and cellular protective genes, primarily in response to oxidative stress. A member of the cap 'n' collar family of transcription factors, Nrf2 activation is tightly controlled by a series of signaling events. These events can be separated into the basal state, a preinduction response, gene induction, and finally a postinduction response, culminating in the restoration of redox homeostasis. However, despite the immensely intricate level of control the cellular environment imposes on Nrf2 activity, there are many opportunities for perturbations to arise in the signaling events that favor carcinogenesis and, therefore, implicate Nrf2 as both a tumor suppressor and a protooncogene. Herein, we highlight the ways in which Nrf2 is regulated, and discuss some of the Nrf2-inducible antioxidant (NQO1, NQO2, HO-1, GCLC), antiapoptotic (Bcl-2), metabolic (G6PD, TKT, PPARγ), and drug efflux transporter (ABCG2, MRP3, MRP4) genes. In addition, we focus on how Nrf2 functions as a tumor suppressor under normal conditions and how its ability to detoxify the cellular environment makes it an attractive target for other oncogenes either via stabilization or degradation of the transcription factor. Finally, we discuss some of the ways in which Nrf2 is being considered as a therapeutic target for cancer treatment.—Shelton, P., Jaiswal, A. K. The transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2): a protooncogene? PMID:23109674

  2. High throughput assays for analyzing transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianqiang; Jiang, Xin; Yaoi, Takuro

    2006-06-01

    Transcription factors are a group of proteins that modulate the expression of genes involved in many biological processes, such as cell growth and differentiation. Alterations in transcription factor function are associated with many human diseases, and therefore these proteins are attractive potential drug targets. A key issue in the development of such therapeutics is the generation of effective tools that can be used for high throughput discovery of the critical transcription factors involved in human diseases, and the measurement of their activities in a variety of disease or compound-treated samples. Here, a number of innovative arrays and 96-well format assays for profiling and measuring the activities of transcription factors will be discussed. PMID:16834538

  3. Eukaryotic translation initiator protein 1A isoform, CCS-3, enhances the transcriptional repression of p21CIP1 by proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A).

    PubMed

    Choi, Won-Il; Kim, Youngsoo; Kim, Yuri; Yu, Mi-young; Park, Jungeun; Lee, Choong-Eun; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Koh, Dong-In; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-01-01

    FBI-1, a member of the POK (POZ and Kruppel) family of transcription factors, plays a role in differentiation, oncogenesis, and adipogenesis. eEF1A is a eukaryotic translation elongation factor involved in several cellular processes including embryogenesis, oncogenic transformation, cell proliferation, and cytoskeletal organization. CCS-3, a potential cervical cancer suppressor, is an isoform of eEF1A. We found that eEF1A forms a complex with FBI-1 by co-immunoprecipitation, SDS-PAGE, and MALDI-TOF Mass analysis of the immunoprecipitate. GST fusion protein pull-downs showed that FBI-1 directly interacts with eEF1A and CCS-3 via the zinc finger and POZ-domain of FBI-1. FBI-1 co-localizes with either eEF1A or CCS-3 at the nuclear periplasm. CCS-3 enhances transcriptional repression of the p21CIP1 gene (hereafter referred to as p21) by FBI-1. The POZ-domain of FBI-1 interacts with the co-repressors, SMRT and BCoR. We found that CCS-3 also interacts with the co-repressors independently. The molecular interaction between the co-repressors and CCS-3 at the POZ-domain of FBI-1 appears to enhance FBI-1 mediated transcriptional repression. Our data suggest that CCS-3 may be important in cell differentiation, tumorigenesis, and oncogenesis by interacting with the proto-oncogene FBI-1 and transcriptional co-repressors. PMID:19471103

  4. The transcription factor Pokemon: a new key player in cancer pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Takahiro; Hobbs, Robin M; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2005-10-01

    Learning how critical cell regulatory pathways are controlled may lead to new opportunities for cancer treatment. We recently identified the transcription factor Pokemon as a central regulator of the important tumor suppressor ARF. Pokemon is overexpressed in multiple human cancers and cells lacking Pokemon are refractory to oncogenic transformation. These findings suggest that Pokemon may offer an effective new target for cancer therapeutics. PMID:16204018

  5. Transcriptional activation in yeast cells lacking transcription factor IIA.

    PubMed Central

    Chou, S; Chatterjee, S; Lee, M; Struhl, K

    1999-01-01

    The general transcription factor IIA (TFIIA) forms a complex with TFIID at the TATA promoter element, and it inhibits the function of several negative regulators of the TATA-binding protein (TBP) subunit of TFIID. Biochemical experiments suggest that TFIIA is important in the response to transcriptional activators because activation domains can interact with TFIIA, increase recruitment of TFIID and TFIIA to the promoter, and promote isomerization of the TFIID-TFIIA-TATA complex. Here, we describe a double-shut-off approach to deplete yeast cells of Toa1, the large subunit of TFIIA, to <1% of the wild-type level. Interestingly, such TFIIA-depleted cells are essentially unaffected for activation by heat shock factor, Ace1, and Gal4-VP16. However, depletion of TFIIA causes a general two- to threefold decrease of transcription from most yeast promoters and a specific cell-cycle arrest at the G2-M boundary. These results indicate that transcriptional activation in vivo can occur in the absence of TFIIA. PMID:10581267

  6. Different mechanisms contribute to the E2-mediated transcriptional repression of human papillomavirus type 18 viral oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Demeret, C; Desaintes, C; Yaniv, M; Thierry, F

    1997-12-01

    Transcription of the human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV18) E6 and E7 oncogenes is repressed by the viral E2 protein. In C33 cells, we have previously shown that of the four E2 binding sites (E2 BS) present in the HPV18 long control region (LCR), only the binding site adjacent to the TATA box (E2 BS 1) was involved in E2-mediated repression. In the present study, we sought to determine whether this phenomenon was conserved in other cell lines. We first showed that all three E2 BS proximal to the P105 promoter were required for full repression of its activity in HeLa and HaCaT cells. Repression by E2 at E2 BS 2 occurred through the displacement of Sp1. Second, a truncated E2 product, lacking the N-terminal transactivation domain, repressed transcription more efficiently than the full-length protein. Repression was abolished when the N-terminal domain of E2 was replaced by the activation domain of VP16. The VP16-E2 chimeric protein could activate transcription from an LCR mutated in its TATA box. DNA-protein binding studies showed that E2 associates with its four binding sites in the LCR with similar affinities. However, challenge of such complexes with excess binding sites demonstrated that interaction with E2 BS 4 was the most stable while interaction with E2 BS 1 was the least stable. Furthermore, complexes with the full-length E2 were less stable than those formed with the N-terminally truncated protein. PMID:9371593

  7. Optogenetic Inhibitor of the Transcription Factor CREB.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmed M; Reis, Jakeb M; Xia, Yan; Rashid, Asim J; Mercaldo, Valentina; Walters, Brandon J; Brechun, Katherine E; Borisenko, Vitali; Josselyn, Sheena A; Karanicolas, John; Woolley, G Andrew

    2015-11-19

    Current approaches for optogenetic control of transcription do not mimic the activity of endogenous transcription factors, which act at numerous sites in the genome in a complex interplay with other factors. Optogenetic control of dominant negative versions of endogenous transcription factors provides a mechanism for mimicking the natural regulation of gene expression. Here we describe opto-DN-CREB, a blue-light-controlled inhibitor of the transcription factor CREB created by fusing the dominant negative inhibitor A-CREB to photoactive yellow protein (PYP). A light-driven conformational change in PYP prevents coiled-coil formation between A-CREB and CREB, thereby activating CREB. Optogenetic control of CREB function was characterized in vitro, in HEK293T cells, and in neurons where blue light enabled control of expression of the CREB targets NR4A2 and c-Fos. Dominant negative inhibitors exist for numerous transcription factors; linking these to optogenetic domains offers a general approach for spatiotemporal control of native transcriptional events. PMID:26590638

  8. Transcriptional regulation of gilthead seabream bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2 gene by bone- and cartilage-related transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Marques, Cátia L; Cancela, M Leonor; Laizé, Vincent

    2016-01-15

    Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 2 belongs to the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily of cytokines and growth factors. While it plays important roles in embryo morphogenesis and organogenesis, BMP2 is also critical to bone and cartilage formation. Protein structure and function have been remarkably conserved throughout evolution and BMP2 transcription has been proposed to be tightly regulated, although few data is available. In this work we report the cloning and functional analysis of gilthead seabream BMP2 promoter. As in other vertebrates, seabream BMP2 gene has a 5′ non-coding exon, a feature already present in DPP gene, the fruit fly ortholog of vertebrate BMP2 gene, and maintained throughout evolution. In silico analysis of seabream BMP2 promoter revealed several binding sites for bone and cartilage related transcription factors (TFs) and their functionality was evaluated using promoter-luciferase constructions and TF-expressing vectors. Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3) was shown to negatively regulate BMP2 transcription and combination with the core binding factor β (CBFβ) further reduced transcriptional activity of the promoter. Although to a lesser extent, myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) had also a negative effect on the regulation of BMP2 gene transcription, when associated with SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (SOX9b). Finally, v-ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1 (ETS1) was able to slightly enhance BMP2 transcription. Data reported here provides new insights toward the better understanding of the transcriptional regulation of BMP2 gene in a bone and cartilage context. PMID:26456102

  9. Transcriptional Regulation of Oncogenic Protein Kinase Cϵ (PKCϵ) by STAT1 and Sp1 Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, HongBin; Gutierrez-Uzquiza, Alvaro; Garg, Rachana; Barrio-Real, Laura; Abera, Mahlet B.; Lopez-Haber, Cynthia; Rosemblit, Cinthia; Lu, Huaisheng; Abba, Martin; Kazanietz, Marcelo G.

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of PKCϵ, a kinase associated with tumor aggressiveness and widely implicated in malignant transformation and metastasis, is a hallmark of multiple cancers, including mammary, prostate, and lung cancer. To characterize the mechanisms that control PKCϵ expression and its up-regulation in cancer, we cloned an ∼1.6-kb promoter segment of the human PKCϵ gene (PRKCE) that displays elevated transcriptional activity in cancer cells. A comprehensive deletional analysis established two regions rich in Sp1 and STAT1 sites located between −777 and −105 bp (region A) and −921 and −796 bp (region B), respectively, as responsible for the high transcriptional activity observed in cancer cells. A more detailed mutagenesis analysis followed by EMSA and ChIP identified Sp1 sites in positions −668/−659 and −269/−247 as well as STAT1 sites in positions −880/−869 and −793/−782 as the elements responsible for elevated promoter activity in breast cancer cells relative to normal mammary epithelial cells. RNAi silencing of Sp1 and STAT1 in breast cancer cells reduced PKCϵ mRNA and protein expression, as well as PRKCE promoter activity. Moreover, a strong correlation was found between PKCϵ and phospho-Ser-727 (active) STAT1 levels in breast cancer cells. Our results may have significant implications for the development of approaches to target PKCϵ and its effectors in cancer therapeutics. PMID:24825907

  10. Activation of phospholipase D by growth factors and oncogenes in murine fibroblasts follow alternative but cross-talking pathways.

    PubMed Central

    del Peso, L; Lucas, L; Esteve, P; Lacal, J C

    1997-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is activated by a variety of stimuli, including mitogenic stimulation by growth factors and oncogene transformation. Activation of PLD by growth factors requires protein kinase C (PKC) since depletion of the enzyme by down-regulation or direct inhibition by specific drugs completely abrogates this effect. Transformation by the ras and src oncogenes is also associated with an increase in basal PLD activity. However, this effect is not dependent on PKC, suggesting that growth factors and oncogenes may activate PLD by two independent mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that activation of PLD by phorbol esters is greatly enhanced in ras-transformed cells, suggesting synergistic activation of PLD by ras oncogenes and PKC. Also, ras-transformed cells showed a dramatic attenuation of the PLD activation induced by growth factors, although receptor function was still detectable. This attenuation paralleled the specific uncoupling of the phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) pathway, indicating that activation of PLD by growth factors may be mediated by PI-PLC and PKC activation. Attenuation of PLD activation by platelet-derived growth factor was also observed in several oncogene-transformed cells, as well as the uncoupling of the PI-PLC pathway. Neither the co-operation with PKC activation nor the attenuation of the PLD response to growth factors in ras-transformed cells was a general consequence of cell transformation, since cells transformed by other oncogenes showed a normal response to either treatment. These results support the existence of at least two alternative signalling routes for the activation of PLD, one mediated by the PI-PLC/diacylglycerol/PKC pathway and a second one mediated by several oncogenes, independent of the PKC pathway, which synergizes with the PI-PLC/PKC-dependent pathway. PMID:9065772

  11. Screening of Transcription Factors Involved in Fetal Hemoglobin Regulation Using Phylogenetic Footprinting

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Carrocini, Gisele Cristine; Venancio, Larissa Paola Rodrigues; Bonini-Domingos, Claudia Regina

    2015-01-01

    Fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) is an important genetic modulator of the beta-hemoglobinopathies. The regulation of Hb F levels is influenced by transcription factors. We used phylogenetic footprinting to screen transcription factors that have binding sites in HBG1 and HBG2 genes’ noncoding regions in order to know the genetic determinants of the Hb F expression. Our analysis showed 354 conserved motifs in the noncoding regions of HBG1 gene and 231 motifs in the HBG2 gene between the analyzed species. Of these motifs, 13 showed relation to Hb F regulation: cell division cycle-5 (CDC5), myelo-blastosis viral oncogene homolog (c-MYB), transcription factor CP2 (TFCP2), GATA binding protein 1 (GATA-1), GATA binding protein 2 (GATA-2), nuclear factor erythroid 2 (NF-E2), nuclear transcription factor Y (NF-Y), runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX-1), T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia 1 (TAL-1), YY1 transcription factor (YY1), beta protein 1 (BP1), chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II (COUP-TFII), and paired box 1 (PAX-1). The last three motifs were conserved only in the noncoding regions of the HBG1 gene. The understanding of genetic elements involved in the maintenance of high Hb F levels may provide new efficient therapeutic strategies in the beta-hemoglobinopathies treatment, promoting reduction in clinical complications of these genetic disorders. PMID:26543346

  12. Functional Analysis of Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2009-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate the expression of genes at the transcriptional level. Modification of TF activity dynamically alters the transcriptome, which leads to metabolic and phenotypic changes. Thus, functional analysis of TFs using ‘omics-based’ methodologies is one of the most important areas of the post-genome era. In this mini-review, we present an overview of Arabidopsis TFs and introduce strategies for the functional analysis of plant TFs, which include both traditional and recently developed technologies. These strategies can be assigned to five categories: bioinformatic analysis; analysis of molecular function; expression analysis; phenotype analysis; and network analysis for the description of entire transcriptional regulatory networks. PMID:19478073

  13. Transcription Factors in Xylem Development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sederoff, Ronald; Whetten, Ross; O'Malley, David; Campbell, Malcolm

    1999-07-01

    Answers to the following questions are answered in this report. do the two pine Byb proteins previously identified as candidate transcription factors bind to DNA and activate transcription? In what cell types are tehse Myb proteins expressed? Are these proteins localized to the nucleus? Do other proteins in pine xylem interact with these Myb proteins? Does altered expression of these genes have an impact on xylogenesis, specifically the expression of monolignol biosynthetic genes?

  14. Depletion of the transcriptional coactivators megakaryoblastic leukaemia 1 and 2 abolishes hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft growth by inducing oncogene-induced senescence

    PubMed Central

    Hampl, Veronika; Martin, Claudia; Aigner, Achim; Hoebel, Sabrina; Singer, Stephan; Frank, Natalie; Sarikas, Antonio; Ebert, Oliver; Prywes, Ron; Gudermann, Thomas; Muehlich, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Megakaryoblastic leukaemia 1 and 2 (MKL1/2) are coactivators of the transcription factor serum response factor (SRF). Here, we provide evidence that depletion of MKL1 and 2 abolishes hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) xenograft growth. Loss of the tumour suppressor deleted in liver cancer 1 (DLC1) and the subsequent activation of RhoA were prerequisites for MKL1/2 knockdown-mediated growth arrest. We identified oncogene-induced senescence as the molecular mechanism underlying the anti-proliferative effect of MKL1/2 knockdown. MKL1/2 depletion resulted in Ras activation, elevated p16 expression and hypophosphorylation of the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein in DLC1-deficient HCC cells. Interestingly, reconstitution of HuH7 HCC cells with DLC1 also induced senescence. Evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy of MKL1/2 knockdown in vivo revealed that systemic treatment of nude mice bearing HuH7 tumour xenografts with MKL1/2 siRNAs complexed with polyethylenimine (PEI) completely abolished tumour growth. The regression of the xenografts was associated with senescence. Importantly, PEI-complexed MKL1 siRNA alone was sufficient for complete abrogation of HCC xenograft growth. Thus, MKL1/2 represent promising novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of HCCs characterized by DLC1 loss. PMID:23853104

  15. Molecular Evolution of the Yap/Yorkie Proto-Oncogene and Elucidation of Its Core Transcriptional Program

    PubMed Central

    Ikmi, Aissam; Gaertner, Bjoern; Seidel, Christopher; Srivastava, Mansi; Zeitlinger, Julia; Gibson, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Throughout Metazoa, developmental processes are controlled by a surprisingly limited number of conserved signaling pathways. Precisely how these signaling cassettes were assembled in early animal evolution remains poorly understood, as do the molecular transitions that potentiated the acquisition of their myriad developmental functions. Here we analyze the molecular evolution of the proto-oncogene yes-associated protein (Yap)/Yorkie, a key effector of the Hippo signaling pathway that controls organ size in both Drosophila and mammals. Based on heterologous functional analysis of evolutionarily distant Yap/Yorkie orthologs, we demonstrate that a structurally distinct interaction interface between Yap/Yorkie and its partner TEAD/Scalloped became fixed in the eumetazoan common ancestor. We then combine transcriptional profiling of tissues expressing phylogenetically diverse forms of Yap/Yorkie with ChIP-seq validation to identify a common downstream gene expression program underlying the control of tissue growth in Drosophila. Intriguingly, a subset of the newly identified Yorkie target genes are also induced by Yap in mammalian tissues, thus revealing a conserved Yap-dependent gene expression signature likely to mediate organ size control throughout bilaterian animals. Combined, these experiments provide new mechanistic insights while revealing the ancient evolutionary history of Hippo signaling. PMID:24509725

  16. Molecular evolution of the Yap/Yorkie proto-oncogene and elucidation of its core transcriptional program.

    PubMed

    Ikmi, Aissam; Gaertner, Bjoern; Seidel, Christopher; Srivastava, Mansi; Zeitlinger, Julia; Gibson, Matthew C

    2014-06-01

    Throughout Metazoa, developmental processes are controlled by a surprisingly limited number of conserved signaling pathways. Precisely how these signaling cassettes were assembled in early animal evolution remains poorly understood, as do the molecular transitions that potentiated the acquisition of their myriad developmental functions. Here we analyze the molecular evolution of the proto-oncogene yes-associated protein (Yap)/Yorkie, a key effector of the Hippo signaling pathway that controls organ size in both Drosophila and mammals. Based on heterologous functional analysis of evolutionarily distant Yap/Yorkie orthologs, we demonstrate that a structurally distinct interaction interface between Yap/Yorkie and its partner TEAD/Scalloped became fixed in the eumetazoan common ancestor. We then combine transcriptional profiling of tissues expressing phylogenetically diverse forms of Yap/Yorkie with ChIP-seq validation to identify a common downstream gene expression program underlying the control of tissue growth in Drosophila. Intriguingly, a subset of the newly identified Yorkie target genes are also induced by Yap in mammalian tissues, thus revealing a conserved Yap-dependent gene expression signature likely to mediate organ size control throughout bilaterian animals. Combined, these experiments provide new mechanistic insights while revealing the ancient evolutionary history of Hippo signaling. PMID:24509725

  17. Cell fate control by pioneer transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Iwafuchi-Doi, Makiko; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2016-06-01

    Distinct combinations of transcription factors are necessary to elicit cell fate changes in embryonic development. Yet within each group of fate-changing transcription factors, a subset called 'pioneer factors' are dominant in their ability to engage silent, unmarked chromatin and initiate the recruitment of other factors, thereby imparting new function to regulatory DNA sequences. Recent studies have shown that pioneer factors are also crucial for cellular reprogramming and that they are implicated in the marked changes in gene regulatory networks that occur in various cancers. Here, we provide an overview of the contexts in which pioneer factors function, how they can target silent genes, and their limitations at regions of heterochromatin. Understanding how pioneer factors regulate gene expression greatly enhances our understanding of how specific developmental lineages are established as well as how cell fates can be manipulated. PMID:27246709

  18. Interplay between Transcription Factors and the Epigenome: Insight from the Role of RUNX1 in Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Brettingham-Moore, Kate H; Taberlay, Phillippa C; Holloway, Adele F

    2015-01-01

    The genome has the ability to respond in a precise and co-ordinated manner to cellular signals. It achieves this through the concerted actions of transcription factors and the chromatin platform, which are targets of the signaling pathways. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms through which transcription factors and the chromatin landscape each control gene activity has expanded dramatically over recent years, and attention has now turned to understanding the complex, multifaceted interplay between these regulatory layers in normal and disease states. It has become apparent that transcription factors as well as the components and modifiers of the epigenetic machinery are frequent targets of genomic alterations in cancer cells. Through the study of these factors, we can gain unique insight into the dynamic interplay between transcription factors and the epigenome, and how their dysregulation leads to aberrant gene expression programs in cancer. Here, we will highlight how these factors normally co-operate to establish and maintain the transcriptional and epigenetic landscape of cells, and how this is reprogramed in cancer, focusing on the RUNX1 transcription factor and oncogenic derivative RUNX1-ETO in leukemia as paradigms of transcriptional and epigenetic reprograming. PMID:26483790

  19. The Role of Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 Alpha in Bypassing Oncogene-Induced Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Kilic Eren, Mehtap; Tabor, Vedrana

    2014-01-01

    Oncogene induced senescence (OIS) is a sustained anti-proliferative response acutely induced in primary cells via activation of mitogenic oncogenes such as Ras/BRAF. This mechanism acts as an initial barrier preventing normal cells transformation into malignant cell. Besides oncogenic activation and DNA damage response (DDR), senescence is modulated by a plethora of other factors, and one of the most important one is oxygen tension of the tissue. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of hypoxia on RasV12-induced senescence in human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs). We showed here that hypoxia prevents execution of oncogene induced senescence (OIS), through a strong down-regulation of senescence hallmarks, such as SA- β-galactosidase, H3K9me3, HP1γ, p53, p21CIP1 and p16INK4a in association with induction of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). In addition, hypoxia also decreased marks of H-RasV12-induced DDR in both cell lines through down-regulation of ATM/ATR, Chk1 and Chk2 phosphorylation as well as decreased γ-H2AX positivity. Utilizing shRNA system targeting HIF-1α we show that HIF-1α is directly involved in down regulation of p53 and its target p21CIP1 but not p16INK4a. In line with this finding we found that knock down of HIF-1α leads to a strong induction of apoptotic response, but not restoration of senescence in Ras expressing HDFs in hypoxia. This indicates that HIF-1α is an important player in early steps of tumorigenesis, leading to suppression of senescence through its negative regulation of p53 and p21CIP1. In our work we describe a mechanism through which hypoxia and specifically HIF-1α preclude cells from maintaining senescence-driven anti proliferative response. These findings indicate the possible mechanism through which hypoxic environment helps premalignant cells to evade impingement of cellular failsafe pathways. PMID:24984035

  20. The PDZ-binding motif of Yes-associated protein is required for its co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription and oncogenic cell transforming activity

    SciTech Connect

    Shimomura, Tadanori; Miyamura, Norio; Hata, Shoji; Miura, Ryota; Hirayama, Jun Nishina, Hiroshi

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Loss of the PDZ-binding motif inhibits constitutively active YAP (5SA)-induced oncogenic cell transformation. •The PDZ-binding motif of YAP promotes its nuclear localization in cultured cells and mouse liver. •Loss of the PDZ-binding motif inhibits YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF transcription in cultured cells and mouse liver. -- Abstract: YAP is a transcriptional co-activator that acts downstream of the Hippo signaling pathway and regulates multiple cellular processes, including proliferation. Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation of YAP negatively regulates its function. Conversely, attenuation of Hippo-mediated phosphorylation of YAP increases its ability to stimulate proliferation and eventually induces oncogenic transformation. The C-terminus of YAP contains a highly conserved PDZ-binding motif that regulates YAP’s functions in multiple ways. However, to date, the importance of the PDZ-binding motif to the oncogenic cell transforming activity of YAP has not been determined. In this study, we disrupted the PDZ-binding motif in the YAP (5SA) protein, in which the sites normally targeted by Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation are mutated. We found that loss of the PDZ-binding motif significantly inhibited the oncogenic transformation of cultured cells induced by YAP (5SA). In addition, the increased nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and its enhanced activation of TEAD-dependent transcription of the cell proliferation gene CTGF were strongly reduced when the PDZ-binding motif was deleted. Similarly, in mouse liver, deletion of the PDZ-binding motif suppressed nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF expression. Taken together, our results indicate that the PDZ-binding motif of YAP is critical for YAP-mediated oncogenesis, and that this effect is mediated by YAP’s co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription.

  1. Regulation of transcription factors by nitric oxide in neurons and in neural-derived tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Contestabile, Antonio

    2008-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a diffusible molecule acting as an intercellular and intracellular messenger in many tissues, plays multiple roles in the nervous system. In addition to regulating proliferation, survival and differentiation of neurons, NO is also involved in synaptic activity, neural plasticity and memory formation. Long-lasting effects of NO, a simple and unstable molecule, occur through regulation of transcription factors and modulation of gene expression. cAMP-response-element-binding (CREB) protein is an important transcription factor that regulates the expression of several genes involved in survival and neuroprotection as well as in synaptic plasticity and memory formation. Nitric oxide promotes survival and differentiation of neural cells, both activating through cGMP signaling CREB phosphorylation-dependent transcriptional activity and promoting S-nitrosylation of nuclear proteins that favor CREB binding to its promoters on target genes. Among oncogenic transcription factors, N-Myc is important in neurogenesis and in regulating proliferation of neural-derived tumor cells, such as neuroblastomas and medulloblastomas. Nitric oxide negatively regulates the proliferation of neuronal precursors, as well as the proliferation of neuroblastoma cells, by downregulating N-Myc expression through cGMP signaling. Other oncogenic transcription factors, such as c-fos and c-jun, zinc-finger transcription factors, such as egr-1, and NF-kappaB are regulated by NO signaling in cGMP-dependent way or through nitrosative conformational changes. The present survey of how NO signaling influences neural cells through regulation of transcription factors allows us to predict that better knowledge of these interactions will provide a better understanding of the physiological role of NO in the nervous system in order to conceive novel therapies for neural-derived tumors. PMID:18308460

  2. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Park, Seyeon

    2015-11-01

    A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor-DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1), c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf)). PMID:26529010

  3. Transcription factors that interact with p53 and Mdm2.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Kazushi; Fry, Elizabeth A; Frazier, Donna P

    2016-04-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is activated upon cellular stresses such as DNA damage, oncogene activation, hypoxia, which transactivates sets of genes that induce DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or autophagy, playing crucial roles in the prevention of tumor formation. The central regulator of the p53 pathway is Mdm2 which inhibits transcriptional activity, nuclear localization and protein stability. More than 30 cellular p53-binding proteins have been isolated and characterized including Mdm2, Mdm4, p300, BRCA1/2, ATM, ABL and 53BP-1/2. Most of them are nuclear proteins; however, not much is known about p53-binding transcription factors. In this review, we focus on transcription factors that directly interact with p53/Mdm2 through direct binding including Dmp1, E2F1, YB-1 and YY1. Dmp1 and YB-1 bind only to p53 while E2F1 and YY1 bind to both p53 and Mdm2. Dmp1 has been shown to bind to p53 and block all the known functions for Mdm2 on p53 inhibition, providing a secondary mechanism for tumor suppression in Arf-null cells. Although E2F1-p53 binding provides a checkpoint mechanism to silence hyperactive E2F1, YB-1 or YY1 interaction with p53 subverts the activity of p53, contributing to cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis. Thus, the modes and consequences for each protein-protein interaction vary from the viewpoint of tumor development and suppression. PMID:26132471

  4. The MITF family of transcription factors: Role in endolysosomal biogenesis, Wnt signaling, and oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ploper, Diego; De Robertis, Edward M

    2015-09-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling influences cellular fate and proliferation through inhibition of Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK3) and the subsequent stabilization of its many substrates, most notably β-Catenin, a transcriptional co-activator. MITF, a melanoma oncogene member of the microphthalmia family of transcription factors (MiT), was recently found to contain novel GSK3 phosphorylation sites and to be stabilized by Wnt. Other MiT members, TFEB and TFE3, are known to play important roles in cellular clearance pathways by transcriptionally regulating the biogenesis of lysosomes and autophagosomes via activation of CLEAR elements in gene promoters of target genes. Recent studies suggest that MITF can also upregulate many lysosomal genes. MiT family members are dysregulated in cancer and are considered oncogenes, but the underlying oncogenic mechanisms remain unclear. Here we review the role of MiT members, including MITF, in lysosomal biogenesis, and how cancers overexpressing MITF, TFEB or TFE3 could rewire the lysosomal pathway, inhibit cellular senescence, and activate Wnt signaling by increasing sequestration of negative regulators of Wnt signaling in multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Microarray studies suggest that MITF expression inhibits macroautophagy. In melanoma the MITF-driven increase in MVBs generates a positive feedback loop between MITF, Wnt, and MVBs. PMID:26003288

  5. Hey bHLH transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Weber, David; Wiese, Cornelia; Gessler, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Hey bHLH transcription factors are direct targets of canonical Notch signaling. The three mammalian Hey proteins are closely related to Hes proteins and they primarily repress target genes by either directly binding to core promoters or by inhibiting other transcriptional activators. Individual candidate gene approaches and systematic screens identified a number of Hey target genes, which often encode other transcription factors involved in various developmental processes. Here, we review data on interaction partners and target genes and conclude with a model for Hey target gene regulation. Furthermore, we discuss how expression of Hey proteins affects processes like cell fate decisions and differentiation, e.g., in cardiovascular, skeletal, and neural development or oncogenesis and how this relates to the observed developmental defects and phenotypes observed in various knockout mice. PMID:25248480

  6. AKT activation drives the nuclear localization of CSE1L and a pro-oncogenic transcriptional activation in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Biolatti, Marta; Delogu, Giuseppe; Capobianco, Giampiero; Farace, Cristiano; Dessole, Salvatore; Cossu, Antonio; Tanda, Francesco; Madeddu, Roberto; Olivero, Martina; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2013-10-15

    The human homolog of the yeast cse1 gene (CSE1L) is over-expressed in ovarian cancer. CSE1L forms complex with Ran and importin-α and has roles in nucleocytoplasmic traffic and gene expression. CSE1L accumulated in the nucleus of ovarian cancer cell lines, while it was localized also in the cytoplasm of other cancer cell lines. Nuclear localization depended on AKT, which was constitutively active in ovarian cancer cells, as the CSE1L protein translocated to the cytoplasm when AKT was inactivated. Moreover, the expression of a constitutively active AKT forced the translocation of CSE1L from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in other cancer cells. Nuclear accrual of CSE1L was associated to the nuclear accumulation of the phosphorylated Ran Binding protein 3 (RanBP3), which depended on AKT as well. Also in samples of human ovarian cancer, AKT activation was associated to nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and phosphorylation of RanBP3. Expression profiling of ovarian cancer cells after CSE1L silencing showed that CSE1L was required for the expression of genes promoting invasion and metastasis. In agreement, CSE1L silencing impaired motility and invasiveness of ovarian cancer cells. Altogether these data show that in ovarian cancer cells activated AKT by affecting RanBP3 phosphorylation determines the nuclear accumulation of CSE1L and likely the nuclear concentration of transcription factors conveying pro-oncogenic signals. PMID:23948303

  7. Overexpressed homeobox B9 regulates oncogenic activities by transforming growth factor-β1 in gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Liping; Xu, Yinghui; Zou, Lijuan

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • HOXB9 is overexpressed in gliomas. • HOXB9 over expression had shorter survival time than down expression in gliomas. • HOXB9 stimulated the proliferation, migration and sphere formation of glioma cells. • Activation of TGF-β1 contributed to HOXB9-induced oncogenic activities. - Abstract: Glioma is the leading cause of deaths related to tumors in the central nervous system. The mechanisms of gliomagenesis remain elusive to date. Homeobox B9 (HOXB9) has a crucial function in the regulation of gene expression and cell survival, but its functions in glioma formation and development have yet to be elucidated. This study showed that HOXB9 expression in glioma tissues was significantly higher than that in nontumor tissues. Higher HOXB9 expression was also significantly associated with advanced clinical stage in glioma patients. HOXB9 overexpression stimulated the proliferation, migration, and sphere formation of glioma cells, whereas HOXB9 knockdown elicited an opposite effect. HOXB9 overexpression also increased the tumorigenicity of glioma cells in vivo. Moreover, the activation of transforming growth factor-β1 contributed to HOXB9-induced oncogenic activities. HOXB9 could be used as a predictable biomarker to be detected in different pathological and histological subtypes in glioma for diagnosis or prognosis.

  8. Steering tumor progression through the transcriptional response to growth factors and stroma.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Morris E; Yarden, Yosef

    2014-08-01

    Tumor progression can be understood as a collaborative effort of mutations and growth factors, which propels cell proliferation and matrix invasion, and also enables evasion of drug-induced apoptosis. Concentrating on EGFR, we discuss downstream signaling and the initiation of transcriptional events in response to growth factors. Specifically, we portray a wave-like program, which initiates by rapid disappearance of two-dozen microRNAs, followed by an abrupt rise of immediate early genes (IEGs), relatively short transcripts encoding transcriptional regulators. Concurrent with the fall of IEGs, some 30-60 min after stimulation, a larger group, the delayed early genes, is up-regulated and its own fall overlaps the rise of the final wave of late response genes. This late wave persists and determines long-term phenotype acquisition, such as invasiveness. Key regulatory steps in the orderly response to growth factors provide a trove of potential oncogenes and tumor suppressors. PMID:24873881

  9. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seyeon

    2015-01-01

    A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor–DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein–protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1), c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf)). PMID:26529010

  10. Evaluation of Factors Affecting Vaccine Efficacy of Recombinant Marek's Disease Virus Lacking the Meq Oncogene in Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously reported that deletion of Meq gene from oncogenic rMd5 virus rendered it apathogenic for chickens. Here we examined multiple factors affecting Marek’s disease (MD) vaccine efficacy of this non-pathogenic recombinant Meq null rMd5 virus (rMd5deltaMeq). These factors included host g...

  11. The ciliopathy disease protein NPHP9 promotes nuclear delivery and activation of the oncogenic transcriptional regulator TAZ.

    PubMed

    Habbig, Sandra; Bartram, Malte P; Sägmüller, Josef G; Griessmann, Anabel; Franke, Mareike; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Schwarz, Ricarda; Hoehne, Martin; Bergmann, Carsten; Tessmer, Claudia; Reinhardt, H Christian; Burst, Volker; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard

    2012-12-15

    Nephronophthisis (NPH) is a genetically heterogenous kidney disease and represents the most common genetic cause for end-stage renal disease in children. It is caused by the mutation of genes encoding for the nephrocystin proteins (NPHPs) which localize to primary cilia or centrosomes, classifying this disease as a 'ciliopathy'. Recently, it has been shown that NPHP4 acts as a potent negative regulator of mammalian Hippo signalling by interacting with the Lats protein kinase and controlling the phosphorylation of the oncogenic transcriptional activator TAZ. Here, we demonstrate that NPHP9, another NPH family member, also controls TAZ activity by a distinct mechanism. NPHP9, which is also called NEK8, directly interacted with TAZ and induced nuclear translocation of the TAZ/NPHP9 protein complex. Binding of NPHP9 to TAZ was enhanced in a TAZ mutant that lost its ability to bind 14-3-3, suggesting that 14-3-3 and NPHP9 may compete for TAZ binding, with 14-3-3 favouring cytoplasmic retention and NPHP9 mediating nuclear delivery. Consistently, co-expression of NPHP4, which inhibits TAZ phosphorylation at the 14-3-3 binding site through the inhibition of Lats kinase activity, induced efficient nuclear delivery of the TAZ/NPHP9 protein pair. Consistent with a role for TAZ in controlling proliferation and tumorigenesis, the downregulation of NPHP9 inhibited the TAZ-dependent proliferation of hippo-responsive normal epithelial and also breast cancer cells. As NPHP9 has been shown to be upregulated in breast cancer, these data do not only support a critical role for TAZ/hippo signalling in the pathogenesis of NPH but may also imply a possible role for NPHP9 in TAZ-mediated tumorigenesis. PMID:23026745

  12. A relational database of transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, D

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of eukaryotic gene regulation have produced an extensive body of transcriptionally-related sequence information in the biological literature, and have created a need for computing structures that organize and manage this information. The 'relational model' represents an approach that is finding increasing application in the design of biological databases. This report describes the compilation of information regarding eukaryotic transcription factors, the organization of this information into five tables, the computational applications of the resultant relational database that are of theoretical as well as experimental interest, and possible avenues of further development. PMID:2186365

  13. Activating transcription factor 2 in mesenchymal tumors.

    PubMed

    Endo, Makoto; Su, Le; Nielsen, Torsten O

    2014-02-01

    Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) is a member of activator protein 1 superfamily, which can heterodimerize with other transcription factors regulating cell differentiation and survival. ATF2 assembles into a complex with the synovial sarcoma translocation, chromosome 18 (SS18)-synovial sarcoma, X breakpoint (SSX) fusion oncoprotein, and the transducin-like enhancer of split 1 (TLE1) corepressor, driving oncogenesis in synovial sarcoma. The fusion oncoproteins in many other translocation-associated sarcomas incorporate transcription factors from the ATF/cAMP response element binding or E26 families, which potentially form heterodimers with ATF2 to regulate transcription. ATF2 may therefore play an important role in the oncogenesis of many mesenchymal tumors, but as yet, little is known about its protein expression in patient specimens. Herein we perform immunohistochemical analyses using a validated specific antibody for ATF2 expression and intracellular localization on a cohort of 594 malignant and 207 benign mesenchymal tumors representing 47 diagnostic entities. Melanoma served as a positive control for nuclear and cytoplasmic staining. High nuclear ATF2 expression was mainly observed in translocation-associated and/or spindle cell sarcomas including synovial sarcoma, desmoplastic small round cell tumor, endometrial stromal sarcoma, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and solitary fibrous tumor. Cytoplasmic ATF2 expression was less frequently seen than nuclear expression in malignant mesenchymal tumors. Benign mesenchymal tumors mostly showed much lower nuclear and cytoplasmic ATF2 expression. PMID:24289970

  14. ABF transcription factors of Thellungiella salsuginea

    PubMed Central

    Vysotskii, Denis A.; de Vries-van Leeuwen, Ingrid J.; Souer, Erik; Babakov, Alexei V.; de Boer, Albertus H.

    2013-01-01

    ABF transcription factors are the key regulators of ABA signaling. Using RACE-PCR, we identified and sequenced the coding regions of four genes that encode ABF transcription factors in the extremophile plant Thellungiella salsuginea, a close relative of Arabidopsis thaliana that possesses high tolerance to abiotic stresses. An analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that the similarity between Thellungiella and Arabidopsis ABFs ranged from 71% to 88%. Similar to their Arabidopsis counterparts, Thellungiella ABFs share a bZIP domain and four conservative domains, including a highly conservative motif at the C-terminal tail, which was reported to be a canonical site for binding by 14-3-3 regulatory proteins. Gene expression analysis by real-time PCR revealed a rapid transcript induction of three of the ABF genes in response to salt stress. To check whether Thellungiella ABF transcription factors can interact with abundant 14-3-3 proteins, multiple constructs were designed, and yeast two-hybrid experiments were conducted. Six of the eight tested Ts14-3-3 proteins were able to bind the TsABFs in an isoform-specific manner. A serine-to-alanine substitution in the putative 14-3-3 binding motif resulted in the complete loss of interaction between the 14-3-3 proteins and the ABFs. The role of 14-3-3 interaction with ABFs in the salt and ABA signaling pathways is discussed in the context of Thellungiella survivability. PMID:23221757

  15. CREB in the Pathophysiology of Cancer: Implications for Targeting Transcription Factors for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Kathleen M.; Frank, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Transcription factors are key regulators of the pattern of gene expression in a cell and directly control central processes such as proliferation, survival, self-renewal, and invasion. Given this critical role, the function of transcription factors is normally regulated closely, often through transient phosphorylation. Although transcription factors are not often directly modified by mutations in cancer cells, they frequently become activated constitutively through mutations affecting “upstream” pathways. By continually driving the expression of key target genes, these oncogenic transcription factors play a central role in tumor pathogenesis. One such transcription factor is the cAMP-regulatory element-binding protein (CREB), which can be activated through phosphorylation by a number of kinases, including Akt, p90Rsk, protein kinase A, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases and regulates genes whose deregulated expression promotes oncogenesis, including cyclins, Bcl-2 family members, and Egr-1. CREB is overexpressed and constitutively phosphorylated in a number of forms of human cancer, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and non – small cell lung cancer, and appears to play a direct role in disease pathogenesis and prognosis. Although transcription factors have not been a central focus of drug development, recent advances suggest that CREB and other such proteins may be worthwhile targets for cancer therapy. PMID:19351775

  16. FOXO transcription factors throughout T cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Hedrick, Stephen M.; Michelini, Rodrigo Hess; Doedens, Andrew L.; Goldrath, Ananda W.; Stone, Erica L.

    2013-01-01

    The outcome of an infection with any given pathogen varies according to the dosage and route of infection, but, in addition, the physiological state of the host can determine the efficacy of clearance, the severity of infection and the extent of immunopathology. Here we propose that the forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factor family — which is central to the integration of growth factor signalling, oxidative stress and inflammation — provides connections between physical well-being and the form and magnitude of an immune response. We present a case that FOXO transcription factors guide T cell differentiation and function in a context-driven manner, and might provide a link between metabolism and immunity. PMID:22918467

  17. Nur transcription factors in stress and addiction

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Melo, Danae; Galleguillos, Danny; Sánchez, Natalia; Gysling, Katia; Andrés, María E.

    2013-01-01

    The Nur transcription factors Nur77 (NGFI-B, NR4A1), Nurr1 (NR4A2), and Nor-1 (NR4A3) are a sub-family of orphan members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. These transcription factors are products of immediate early genes, whose expression is rapidly and transiently induced in the central nervous system by several types of stimuli. Nur factors are present throughout the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis where are prominently induced in response to stress. Drugs of abuse and stress also induce the expression of Nur factors in nuclei of the motivation/reward circuit of the brain, indicating their participation in the process of drug addiction and in non-hypothalamic responses to stress. Repeated use of addictive drugs and chronic stress induce long-lasting dysregulation of the brain motivation/reward circuit due to reprogramming of gene expression and enduring alterations in neuronal function. Here, we review the data supporting that Nur transcription factors are key players in the molecular basis of the dysregulation of neuronal circuits involved in chronic stress and addiction. PMID:24348325

  18. The oncogene EVI1 enhances transcriptional and biological responses of human myeloid cells to all-trans retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Birgit; Hackl, Hubert; Slabáková, Eva; Schwarzinger, Ilse; Smějová, Monika; Spittler, Andreas; Arbesu, Itziar; Shehata, Medhat; Souček, Karel; Wieser, Rotraud

    2014-01-01

    The product of the ecotropic virus integration site 1 (EVI1) gene, whose overexpression is associated with a poor prognosis in myeloid leukemias and some epithelial tumors, regulates gene transcription both through direct DNA binding and through modulation of the activity of other sequence specific transcription factors. Previous results from our laboratory have shown that EVI1 influenced transcription regulation in response to the myeloid differentiation inducing agent, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), in a dual manner: it enhanced ATRA induced transcription of the RARβ gene, but repressed the ATRA induction of the EVI1 gene itself. In the present study, we asked whether EVI1 would modulate the ATRA regulation of a larger number of genes, as well as biological responses to this agent, in human myeloid cells. U937 and HL-60 cells ectopically expressing EVI1 through retroviral transduction were subjected to microarray based gene expression analysis, and to assays measuring cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. These experiments showed that EVI1 modulated the ATRA response of several dozens of genes, and in fact reinforced it in the vast majority of cases. A particularly strong synergy between EVI1 and ATRA was observed for GDF15, which codes for a member of the TGF-β superfamily of cytokines. In line with the gene expression results, EVI1 enhanced cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in response to ATRA, and knockdown of GDF15 counteracted some of these effects. The potential clinical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:25486480

  19. The oncogene EVI1 enhances transcriptional and biological responses of human myeloid cells to all-trans retinoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Birgit; Hackl, Hubert; Slabáková, Eva; Schwarzinger, Ilse; Smějová, Monika; Spittler, Andreas; Arbesu, Itziar; Shehata, Medhat; Souček, Karel; Wieser, Rotraud

    2014-01-01

    The product of the ecotropic virus integration site 1 (EVI1) gene, whose overexpression is associated with a poor prognosis in myeloid leukemias and some epithelial tumors, regulates gene transcription both through direct DNA binding and through modulation of the activity of other sequence specific transcription factors. Previous results from our laboratory have shown that EVI1 influenced transcription regulation in response to the myeloid differentiation inducing agent, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), in a dual manner: it enhanced ATRA induced transcription of the RARβ gene, but repressed the ATRA induction of the EVI1 gene itself. In the present study, we asked whether EVI1 would modulate the ATRA regulation of a larger number of genes, as well as biological responses to this agent, in human myeloid cells. U937 and HL-60 cells ectopically expressing EVI1 through retroviral transduction were subjected to microarray based gene expression analysis, and to assays measuring cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. These experiments showed that EVI1 modulated the ATRA response of several dozens of genes, and in fact reinforced it in the vast majority of cases. A particularly strong synergy between EVI1 and ATRA was observed for GDF15, which codes for a member of the TGF-β superfamily of cytokines. In line with the gene expression results, EVI1 enhanced cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in response to ATRA, and knockdown of GDF15 counteracted some of these effects. The potential clinical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:25486480

  20. A compendium of Caenhorabditis elegans regulatory transcription factors: a resource for mapping transcription regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Reece-Hoyes, John S; Deplancke, Bart; Shingles, Jane; Grove, Christian A; Hope, Ian A; Walhout, Albertha JM

    2005-01-01

    Background Transcription regulatory networks are composed of interactions between transcription factors and their target genes. Whereas unicellular networks have been studied extensively, metazoan transcription regulatory networks remain largely unexplored. Caenorhabditis elegans provides a powerful model to study such metazoan networks because its genome is completely sequenced and many functional genomic tools are available. While C. elegans gene predictions have undergone continuous refinement, this is not true for the annotation of functional transcription factors. The comprehensive identification of transcription factors is essential for the systematic mapping of transcription regulatory networks because it enables the creation of physical transcription factor resources that can be used in assays to map interactions between transcription factors and their target genes. Results By computational searches and extensive manual curation, we have identified a compendium of 934 transcription factor genes (referred to as wTF2.0). We find that manual curation drastically reduces the number of both false positive and false negative transcription factor predictions. We discuss how transcription factor splice variants and dimer formation may affect the total number of functional transcription factors. In contrast to mouse transcription factor genes, we find that C. elegans transcription factor genes do not undergo significantly more splicing than other genes. This difference may contribute to differences in organism complexity. We identify candidate redundant worm transcription factor genes and orthologous worm and human transcription factor pairs. Finally, we discuss how wTF2.0 can be used together with physical transcription factor clone resources to facilitate the systematic mapping of C. elegans transcription regulatory networks. Conclusion wTF2.0 provides a starting point to decipher the transcription regulatory networks that control metazoan development and function

  1. Dynamics of Transcription Factor Binding Site Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Tuğrul, Murat; Paixão, Tiago; Barton, Nicholas H.; Tkačik, Gašper

    2015-01-01

    Evolution of gene regulation is crucial for our understanding of the phenotypic differences between species, populations and individuals. Sequence-specific binding of transcription factors to the regulatory regions on the DNA is a key regulatory mechanism that determines gene expression and hence heritable phenotypic variation. We use a biophysical model for directional selection on gene expression to estimate the rates of gain and loss of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in finite populations under both point and insertion/deletion mutations. Our results show that these rates are typically slow for a single TFBS in an isolated DNA region, unless the selection is extremely strong. These rates decrease drastically with increasing TFBS length or increasingly specific protein-DNA interactions, making the evolution of sites longer than ∼ 10 bp unlikely on typical eukaryotic speciation timescales. Similarly, evolution converges to the stationary distribution of binding sequences very slowly, making the equilibrium assumption questionable. The availability of longer regulatory sequences in which multiple binding sites can evolve simultaneously, the presence of “pre-sites” or partially decayed old sites in the initial sequence, and biophysical cooperativity between transcription factors, can all facilitate gain of TFBS and reconcile theoretical calculations with timescales inferred from comparative genomics. PMID:26545200

  2. Transcription factors of Lotus: regulation of isoflavonoid biosynthesis requires coordinated changes in transcription factor activity.

    PubMed

    Shelton, Dale; Stranne, Maria; Mikkelsen, Lisbeth; Pakseresht, Nima; Welham, Tracey; Hiraka, Hideki; Tabata, Satoshi; Sato, Shusei; Paquette, Suzanne; Wang, Trevor L; Martin, Cathie; Bailey, Paul

    2012-06-01

    Isoflavonoids are a class of phenylpropanoids made by legumes, and consumption of dietary isoflavonoids confers benefits to human health. Our aim is to understand the regulation of isoflavonoid biosynthesis. Many studies have shown the importance of transcription factors in regulating the transcription of one or more genes encoding enzymes in phenylpropanoid metabolism. In this study, we coupled bioinformatics and coexpression analysis to identify candidate genes encoding transcription factors involved in regulating isoflavonoid biosynthesis in Lotus (Lotus japonicus). Genes encoding proteins belonging to 39 of the main transcription factor families were examined by microarray analysis of RNA from leaf tissue that had been elicited with glutathione. Phylogenetic analyses of each transcription factor family were used to identify subgroups of proteins that were specific to L. japonicus or closely related to known regulators of the phenylpropanoid pathway in other species. R2R3MYB subgroup 2 genes showed increased expression after treatment with glutathione. One member of this subgroup, LjMYB14, was constitutively overexpressed in L. japonicus and induced the expression of at least 12 genes that encoded enzymes in the general phenylpropanoid and isoflavonoid pathways. A distinct set of six R2R3MYB subgroup 2-like genes was identified. We suggest that these subgroup 2 sister group proteins and those belonging to the main subgroup 2 have roles in inducing isoflavonoid biosynthesis. The induction of isoflavonoid production in L. japonicus also involves the coordinated down-regulation of competing biosynthetic pathways by changing the expression of other transcription factors. PMID:22529285

  3. Involvement of V-Ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2 in regulation of transcription activity of MDR1 gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Zeng, Xiaoqing; Luo, Tiancheng; Jin, Wei; Chen, Shiyao

    2012-09-01

    Over-expression of MDR1 confers multidrug resistance (MDR) in cancers and remains a major cause for the failure of chemotherapy. In the present study, we found that V-Ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2 (ETS2) could activate MDR1 transcription and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression in SGC7901 cells. Knockdown of ETS2 attenuated MDR1 transcription and P-gp expression, and increased the sensitivity of MDR cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs that were transported by P-gp in SGC7901/VCR cells. ETS2 could bind to the ETS2 sites on the MDR1 promoter and activate its transcription. The regulation of MDR1 expression by ETS2 may provide potential ways to overcome MDR in cancer treatment. PMID:22819965

  4. MEF2 transcription factors: developmental regulators and emerging cancer genes

    PubMed Central

    Pon, Julia R.; Marra, Marco A.

    2016-01-01

    The MEF2 transcription factors have roles in muscle, cardiac, skeletal, vascular, neural, blood and immune system cell development through their effects on cell differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, migration, shape and metabolism. Altered MEF2 activity plays a role in human diseases and has recently been implicated in the development of several cancer types. In particular, MEF2B, the most divergent and least studied protein of the MEF2 family, has a role unique from its paralogs in non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The use of genome-scale technologies has enabled comprehensive MEF2 target gene sets to be identified, contributing to our understanding of MEF2 proteins as nodes in complex regulatory networks. This review surveys the molecular interactions of MEF2 proteins and their effects on cellular and organismal phenotypes. We include a discussion of the emerging roles of MEF2 proteins as oncogenes and tumor suppressors of cancer. Throughout this article we highlight similarities and differences between the MEF2 family proteins, including a focus on functions of MEF2B. PMID:26506234

  5. Gankyrin is a predictive and oncogenic factor in well-differentiated and dedifferentiated liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Ju-Ae; Yang, Heung-Mo; Hong, Doo-Pyo; Joo, Sung-Yeon; Choi, Yoon-La; Park, Joo-Hung; Lazar, Alexander J; Pollock, Raphael E; Lev, Dina; Kim, Sung Joo

    2014-10-15

    Liposarcoma is one of the most common histologic types of soft tissue sarcoma and is frequently an aggressive cancer with poor outcome. Hence, alternative approaches other than surgical excision are necessary to improve treatment of well-differentiated/dedifferentiated liposarcoma (WDLPS/DDLPS). For this reason, we performed a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS) analysis to identify new factors for WDLPS and DDLPS. Among the selected candidate proteins, gankyrin, known to be an oncoprotein, showed a significantly high level of expression pattern and inversely low expression of p53/p21 in WDLPS and DDLPS tissues, suggesting possible utility as a new predictive factor. Moreover, inhibition of gankyrin not only led to reduction of in vitro cell growth ability including cell proliferation, colony-formation, and migration, but also in vivo DDLPS cell tumorigenesis, perhaps via downregulation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene and its p21 target and also reduction of AKT/mTOR signal activation. This study identifies gankyrin, for the first time, as new potential predictive and oncogenic factor of WDLPS and DDLPS, suggesting the potential for service as a future LPS therapeutic approach. PMID:25238053

  6. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) represses transcription of the tumor suppressor Rb gene via binding competition with Sp1 and recruitment of co-repressors.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, Won-Il; Lee, Choong-Eun; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-11-28

    FBI-1 (also called Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a BTB/POZ-domain Krüppel-like zinc-finger transcription factor. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a proto-oncogenic protein, which represses tumor suppressor ARF gene transcription. The expression of FBI-1 is increased in many cancer tissues. We found that FBI-1 potently represses transcription of the Rb gene, a tumor suppressor gene important in cell cycle arrest. FBI-1 binds to four GC-rich promoter elements (FREs) located at bp -308 to -188 of the Rb promoter region. The Rb promoter also contains two Sp1 binding sites: GC-box 1 (bp -65 to -56) and GC-box 2 (bp -18 to -9), the latter of which is also bound by FBI-1. We found that FRE3 (bp -244 to -236) is also a Sp1 binding element. FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene not only by binding to the FREs, but also by competing with Sp1 at the GC-box 2 and the FRE3. By binding to the FREs and/or the GC-box, FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene through its POZ-domain, which recruits a co-repressor-histone deacetylase complex and deacetylates histones H3 and H4 at the Rb gene promoter. FBI-1 inhibits C2C12 myoblast cell differentiation by repressing Rb gene expression. PMID:18801742

  7. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) Represses Transcription of the Tumor Suppressor Rb Gene via Binding Competition with Sp1 and Recruitment of Co-repressors*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, Won-Il; Lee, Choong-Eun; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-01-01

    FBI-1 (also called Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a BTB/POZ-domain Krüppel-like zinc-finger transcription factor. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a proto-oncogenic protein, which represses tumor suppressor ARF gene transcription. The expression of FBI-1 is increased in many cancer tissues. We found that FBI-1 potently represses transcription of the Rb gene, a tumor suppressor gene important in cell cycle arrest. FBI-1 binds to four GC-rich promoter elements (FREs) located at bp –308 to –188 of the Rb promoter region. The Rb promoter also contains two Sp1 binding sites: GC-box 1 (bp –65 to –56) and GC-box 2 (bp –18 to –9), the latter of which is also bound by FBI-1. We found that FRE3 (bp –244 to –236) is also a Sp1 binding element. FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene not only by binding to the FREs, but also by competing with Sp1 at the GC-box 2 and the FRE3. By binding to the FREs and/or the GC-box, FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene through its POZ-domain, which recruits a co-repressor-histone deacetylase complex and deacetylates histones H3 and H4 at the Rb gene promoter. FBI-1 inhibits C2C12 myoblast cell differentiation by repressing Rb gene expression. PMID:18801742

  8. MicroRNA-711 is a prognostic factor for poor overall survival and has an oncogenic role in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    HU, JING-YE; YI, WEI; ZHANG, MEI-YIN; XU, RUI; ZENG, LI-SI; LONG, XIAO-RAN; ZHOU, XIAO-MIN; ZHENG, XIAO-FENG STEVEN; KANG, YIBIN; WANG, HUI-YUN

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are important in cancer development and progression. In the present study, the clinical significance and function of microRNA-711 (miR-711) expression in breast cancer were investigated. The expression level of miR-711 was analyzed in breast cancer tissue samples using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Cell proliferation, colony formation, apoptosis and Transwell assays were performed in breast cancer cell lines transfected with miR-711 mimics or inhibitors, or control sequence. miR-711 was found to be upregulated in 30 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded breast cancer tissue samples compared with paired non-cancerous breast tissues (P<0.05). Furthermore, a higher miR-711 expression was demonstrated to be associated with poor overall and disease-free survival times in 161 breast cancer patients, and miR-711 was identified as an independent prognostic factor using multivariate Cox regression analysis. In vitro, overexpression of miR-711 resulted in a significant increase in proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion of breast cancer cells. By contrast, downregulating miR-711 inhibited cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion and enhanced the rate of apoptosis of breast cancer cells. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that miR-711 is an independent prognostic factor and serves an important oncogenic function in breast cancer, suggesting that miR-711 is a potential biomarker of prognosis and a molecular therapeutic target in breast cancer. PMID:26998141

  9. Predicting tissue specific transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies of gene regulation often utilize genome-wide predictions of transcription factor (TF) binding sites. Most existing prediction methods are based on sequence information alone, ignoring biological contexts such as developmental stages and tissue types. Experimental methods to study in vivo binding, including ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq, can only study one transcription factor in a single cell type and under a specific condition in each experiment, and therefore cannot scale to determine the full set of regulatory interactions in mammalian transcriptional regulatory networks. Results We developed a new computational approach, PIPES, for predicting tissue-specific TF binding. PIPES integrates in vitro protein binding microarrays (PBMs), sequence conservation and tissue-specific epigenetic (DNase I hypersensitivity) information. We demonstrate that PIPES improves over existing methods on distinguishing between in vivo bound and unbound sequences using ChIP-seq data for 11 mouse TFs. In addition, our predictions are in good agreement with current knowledge of tissue-specific TF regulation. Conclusions We provide a systematic map of computationally predicted tissue-specific binding targets for 284 mouse TFs across 55 tissue/cell types. Such comprehensive resource is useful for researchers studying gene regulation. PMID:24238150

  10. TATA-binding protein and transcription factor IIB induce transcript slipping during early transcription by RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Benjamin; Drullinger, Linda F; Kugel, Jennifer F; Goodrich, James A

    2009-04-01

    To better understand the mechanism of steps in early transcription by RNA polymerase II (pol II), we investigated the molecular determinants of transcript slipping within complexes assembled on promoters containing a pre-melted transcription bubble from -9 to +3. Transcript slippage occurs when an RNA transcript contains a repetitive sequence that allows the transcript to slip back and pair with the template strand of the DNA at a new register before transcription continues. We established the contributions of individual transcription factors, DNA elements, and RNA length to slipping on a heteroduplex template using a highly purified human pol II transcription system. We found that transcripts slip at a very defined point in the transcription reaction, after pol II completes phosphodiester bond synthesis at register +5. This point is set by the position of the polymerase active site on the DNA template, as opposed to the length of the transcript, as well as by a repetitive CUCU sequence that must occur from +2 to +5. Interestingly, slipping at this juncture is induced by TATA-binding protein and transcription factor IIB and requires a TATA box but not a transcription factor IIB recognition sequence. We propose a model in which transcribing complexes, upon completing phosphodiester bond synthesis at register +5, enter one of two branches in which they either complete productive synthesis of the transcript or undergo multiple rounds of transcript slipping. PMID:19193635

  11. MiR-744 functions as a proto-oncogene in nasopharyngeal carcinoma progression and metastasis via transcriptional control of ARHGAP5.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuan; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Wang, Jian; Li, Na; Li, Dianhe; Sakib, Nazmus; Sha, Zhou; Song, Wen

    2015-05-30

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a highly invasive and metastasis-prone epithelial cancer. The paucity of effective treatment strategies for recurrent and metastatic NPC is the major cause for stagnating survival rate of NPC. Therefore, it's urgent to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying NPC progression and identify novel avenues for targeted therapy. It has emerged recently that microRNAs are potential pro-tumorigenic or tumor-suppressive factors that participate in oncogenesis. In this study, we found that miR-744 expression was upregulated in NPC specimens compared to nasopharyngeal epithelium (NPE) tissue, and miR- 744 upregulation was significantly associated with TNM stage, tumorigenesis and metastasis. Functional studies revealed that miR-744 acts as a novel tumor promotor in NPC. Moreover, we determined that miR-744 targets ARHGAP5 (Rho GTPase activating protein 5), a protumorigenic gene, by directly interacting with its promoter and thereby regulating its expression at transcriptional level. Reintroduction of ARHGAP5 resembled the effects of miR-744 and silencing of ARHGAP5 clearly abrogated miR-744-induced enhancement of cell migration and invasion. High level of ARHGAP5 was positively correlated with that of miR-744 and with advanced stages of NPC, as well as with lymph node metastasis. Taken together, these data reveal for the first time that miR-744 exerts its proto-oncogenic function by directly targeting ARHGAP5 promoter. This newly identified miR-744/ARHGAP5 pathway provides further insight into the progression and metastasis of NPC and indicates potential novel therapeutic targets for NPC. PMID:25961434

  12. Forkhead transcription factors regulate mosquito reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Immo A.; Sieglaff, Douglas H.; Munro, James B.; Shiao, Shin-Hong; Cruz, Josefa; Lee, Iris W.; Heraty, John M.; Raikhel, Alexander S.

    2007-01-01

    Forkhead box (Fox) genes encode a family of transcription factors defined by a ‘winged helix’ DNA-binding domain. In this study we aimed to identify Fox factors that are expressed within the fat body of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti, and determine whether any of these are involved in the regulation of mosquito yolk protein gene expression. The Ae. aegypti genome contains eighteen loci that encode putative Fox factors. Our stringent cladistic analysis has profound implications for the use of Fox genes as phylogenetic markers. Twelve Ae. aegypti Fox genes are expressed within various tissues of adult females, six of which are expressed within the fat body. All six Fox genes expressed in the fat body displayed dynamic expression profiles following a blood meal. We knocked down the ’fat body Foxes’ through RNAi to determine whether these “knockdowns” hindered amino acid-induced vitellogenin gene expression. We also determined the effect of these knockdowns on the number of eggs deposited following a blood meal. Knockdown of FoxN1, FoxN2, FoxL, and FoxO, had a negative effect on amino acid- induced vitellogenin gene expression and resulted in significantly fewer eggs laid. Our analysis stresses the importance of Fox transcription factors in regulating mosquito reproduction. PMID:17681238

  13. PAX transcription factors in neural crest development.

    PubMed

    Monsoro-Burq, Anne H

    2015-08-01

    The nine vertebrate PAX transcription factors (PAX1-PAX9) play essential roles during early development and organogenesis. Pax genes were identified in vertebrates using their homology with the Drosophila melanogaster paired gene DNA-binding domain. PAX1-9 functions are largely conserved throughout vertebrate evolution, in particular during central nervous system and neural crest development. The neural crest is a vertebrate invention, which gives rise to numerous derivatives during organogenesis, including neurons and glia of the peripheral nervous system, craniofacial skeleton and mesenchyme, the heart outflow tract, endocrine and pigment cells. Human and mouse spontaneous mutations as well as experimental analyses have evidenced the critical and diverse functions of PAX factors during neural crest development. Recent studies have highlighted the role of PAX3 and PAX7 in neural crest induction. Additionally, several PAX proteins - PAX1, 3, 7, 9 - regulate cell proliferation, migration and determination in multiple neural crest-derived lineages, such as cardiac, sensory, and enteric neural crest, pigment cells, glia, craniofacial skeleton and teeth, or in organs developing in close relationship with the neural crest such as the thymus and parathyroids. The diverse PAX molecular functions during neural crest formation rely on fine-tuned modulations of their transcriptional transactivation properties. These modulations are generated by multiple means, such as different roles for the various isoforms (formed by alternative splicing), or posttranslational modifications which alter protein-DNA binding, or carefully orchestrated protein-protein interactions with various co-factors which control PAX proteins activity. Understanding these regulations is the key to decipher the versatile roles of PAX transcription factors in neural crest development, differentiation and disease. PMID:26410165

  14. Regulation of transcription factors via natural decoys in genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Kemme, Catherine A; Nguyen, Dan; Chattopadhyay, Abhijnan; Iwahara, Junji

    2016-08-01

    Eukaryotic genomic DNA contains numerous high-affinity sites for transcription factors. Only a small fraction of these sites directly regulates target genes. Other high-affinity sites can serve as naturally present decoys that sequester transcription factors. Such natural decoys in genomic DNA may provide novel regulatory mechanisms for transcription factors. PMID:27384377

  15. Splicing factor hnRNPH drives an oncogenic splicing switch in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    LeFave, Clare V; Squatrito, Massimo; Vorlova, Sandra; Rocco, Gina L; Brennan, Cameron W; Holland, Eric C; Pan, Ying-Xian; Cartegni, Luca

    2011-01-01

    In tumours, aberrant splicing generates variants that contribute to multiple aspects of tumour establishment, progression and maintenance. We show that in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) specimens, death-domain adaptor protein Insuloma-Glucagonoma protein 20 (IG20) is consistently aberrantly spliced to generate an antagonist, anti-apoptotic isoform (MAP-kinase activating death domain protein, MADD), which effectively redirects TNF-α/TRAIL-induced death signalling to promote survival and proliferation instead of triggering apoptosis. Splicing factor hnRNPH, which is upregulated in gliomas, controls this splicing event and similarly mediates switching to a ligand-independent, constitutively active Recepteur d′Origine Nantais (RON) tyrosine kinase receptor variant that promotes migration and invasion. The increased cell death and the reduced invasiveness caused by hnRNPH ablation can be rescued by the targeted downregulation of IG20/MADD exon 16- or RON exon 11-containing variants, respectively, using isoform-specific knockdown or splicing redirection approaches. Thus, hnRNPH activity appears to be involved in the pathogenesis and progression of malignant gliomas as the centre of a splicing oncogenic switch, which might reflect reactivation of stem cell patterns and mediates multiple key aspects of aggressive tumour behaviour, including evasion from apoptosis and invasiveness. PMID:21915099

  16. Transcription factor binding energy vs. biological function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjevic, M.; Grotewold, E.

    2007-03-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are proteins that bind to DNA and regulate expression of genes. Identification of transcription factor binding sites within the regulatory segments of genomic DNA is an important step towards understanding of gene regulatory networks. Recent theoretical advances that we developed [1,2], allow us to infer TF-DNA interaction parameters from in-vitro selection experiments [3]. We use more than 6000 binding sequences [3], assembled under controlled conditions, to obtain protein-DNA interaction parameters for a mammalian TF with up to now unprecedented accuracy. Can one accurately identify biologically functional TF binding sites (i.e. the binding sites that regulate gene expression), even with the best possible protein-DNA interaction parameters? To address this issue we i) compare our prediction of protein binding with gene expression data, ii) use evolutionary comparison between related mammalian genomes. Our results strongly suggest that in a genome there exists a large number of randomly occurring high energy binding sites that are not biologically functional. [1] M Djordjevic, submitted to Biomol. Eng. [2] M. Djordjevic and A. M. Sengupta, Phys. Biol. 3: 13, 2006. [3] E. Roulet et al., Nature Biotech. 20: 831, 2002.

  17. Gene amplification of the transcription factor DP1 and CTNND1 in human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Sandra D; Angulo, Barbara; Suarez-Gauthier, Ana; Melchor, Lorenzo; Medina, Pedro P; Sanchez-Verde, Lydia; Torres-Lanzas, Juan; Pita, Guillermo; Benitez, Javier; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montse

    2010-09-01

    The search for novel oncogenes is important because they could be the target of future specific anticancer therapies. In the present paper we report the identification of novel amplified genes in lung cancer by means of global gene expression analysis. To screen for amplicons, we aligned the gene expression data according to the position of transcripts in the human genome and searched for clusters of over-expressed genes. We found several clusters with gene over-expression, suggesting an underlying genomic amplification. FISH and microarray analysis for DNA copy number in two clusters, at chromosomes 11q12 and 13q34, confirmed the presence of amplifications spanning about 0.4 and 1 Mb for 11q12 and 13q34, respectively. Amplification at these regions each occurred at a frequency of 3%. Moreover, quantitative RT-PCR of each individual transcript within the amplicons allowed us to verify the increased in gene expression of several genes. The p120ctn and DP1 proteins, encoded by two candidate oncogenes, CTNND1 and TFDP1, at 11q12 and 13q amplicons, respectively, showed very strong immunostaining in lung tumours with gene amplification. We then focused on the 13q34 amplicon and in the TFDP1 candidate oncogene. To further determine the oncogenic properties of DP1, we searched for lung cancer cell lines carrying TFDP1 amplification. Depletion of TFDP1 expression by small interference RNA in a lung cancer cell line (HCC33) with TFDP1 amplification and protein over-expression reduced cell viability by 50%. In conclusion, we report the identification of two novel amplicons, at 13q34 and 11q12, each occurring at a frequency of 3% of non-small cell lung cancers. TFDP1, which encodes the E2F-associated transcription factor DP1 is a candidate oncogene at 13q34. The data discussed in this publication have been deposited in NCBIs Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/) and are accessible through GEO Series Accession No. GSE21168. PMID:20556744

  18. Transcriptional repression of Sin3B by Bmi-1 prevents cellular senescence and is relieved by oncogene activation.

    PubMed

    DiMauro, T; Cantor, D J; Bainor, A J; David, G

    2015-07-23

    The Polycomb group protein Bmi-1 is an essential regulator of cellular senescence and is believed to function largely through the direct repression of the Ink4a/Arf locus. However, concurrent deletion of Ink4a/Arf does not fully rescue the defects detected in Bmi-1(-/-) mice, indicating that additional Bmi-1 targets remain to be identified. The expression of the chromatin-associated Sin3B protein is stimulated by oncogenic stress, and is required for oncogene-induced senescence. Here we demonstrate that oncogenic stress leads to the dissociation of Bmi-1 from the Sin3B locus, resulting in increased Sin3B expression and subsequent entry into cellular senescence. Furthermore, Sin3B is required for the senescent phenotype and elevated levels of reactive oxygen species elicited upon Bmi-1 depletion. Altogether, these results identify Sin3B as a novel direct target of Bmi-1, and establish Bmi-1-driven repression of Sin3B as an essential regulator of cellular senescence. PMID:25263442

  19. Transcriptional repression of Sin3B by Bmi-1 prevents cellular senescence and is relieved by oncogene activation

    PubMed Central

    Bainor, Anthony J.; David, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    The Polycomb group protein Bmi-1 is an essential regulator of cellular senescence and is believed to function largely through the direct repression of the Ink4a/Arf locus. However, concurrent deletion of Ink4a/Arf does not fully rescue the defects detected in Bmi-1−/− mice, indicating that additional Bmi-1 targets remain to be identified. The expression of the chromatin associated Sin3B protein is stimulated by oncogenic stress, and is required for oncogene-induced senescence. Here we demonstrate that oncogenic stress leads to the dissociation of Bmi-1 from the Sin3B locus, resulting in increased Sin3B expression and subsequent entry into cellular senescence. Furthermore, Sin3B is required for the senescent phenotype and elevated levels of reactive oxygen species elicited upon Bmi-1 depletion. Altogether, these results identify Sin3B as a novel direct target of Bmi-1, and establish Bmi-1-driven repression of Sin3B as an essential regulator of cellular senescence. PMID:25263442

  20. The Oct1 transcription factor and epithelial malignancies: Old protein learns new tricks.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Arreguín, Karina; Tantin, Dean

    2016-06-01

    The metazoan-specific POU domain transcription factor family comprises activities underpinning developmental processes such as embryonic pluripotency and neuronal specification. Some POU family proteins efficiently bind an 8-bp DNA element known as the octamer motif. These proteins are known as Oct transcription factors. Oct1/POU2F1 is the only widely expressed POU factor. Unlike other POU factors it controls no specific developmental or organ system. Oct1 was originally described to operate at target genes associated with proliferation and immune modulation, but more recent results additionally identify targets associated with oxidative and cytotoxic stress resistance, metabolic regulation, stem cell function and other unexpected processes. Oct1 is pro-oncogenic in multiple contexts, and several recent reports provide broad evidence that Oct1 has prognostic and therapeutic value in multiple epithelial tumor settings. This review focuses on established and emerging roles of Oct1 in epithelial tumors, with an emphasis on mechanisms of transcription regulation by Oct1 that may underpin these findings. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The Oct Transcription Factor Family, edited by Dr. Dean Tantin. PMID:26877236

  1. The Forkhead Transcription Factor FOXK2 Promotes AP-1-Mediated Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zongling; Donaldson, Ian J.; Liu, Jingru; Hayes, Andrew; Zeef, Leo A. H.

    2012-01-01

    The transcriptional control circuitry in eukaryotic cells is complex and is orchestrated by combinatorially acting transcription factors. Forkhead transcription factors often function in concert with heterotypic transcription factors to specify distinct transcriptional programs. Here, we demonstrate that FOXK2 participates in combinatorial transcriptional control with the AP-1 transcription factor. FOXK2 binding regions are widespread throughout the genome and are often coassociated with AP-1 binding motifs. FOXK2 acts to promote AP-1-dependent gene expression changes in response to activation of the AP-1 pathway. In this context, FOXK2 is required for the efficient recruitment of AP-1 to chromatin. Thus, we have uncovered an important new molecular mechanism that controls AP-1-dependent gene expression. PMID:22083952

  2. Transcription factor binding predicts histone modifications in human cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Benveniste, Dan; Sonntag, Hans-Joachim; Sanguinetti, Guido; Sproul, Duncan

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression in higher organisms is thought to be regulated by a complex network of transcription factor binding and chromatin modifications, yet the relative importance of these two factors remains a matter of debate. Here, we show that a computational approach allows surprisingly accurate prediction of histone modifications solely from knowledge of transcription factor binding both at promoters and at potential distal regulatory elements. This accuracy significantly and substantially exceeds what could be achieved by using DNA sequence as an input feature. Remarkably, we show that transcription factor binding enables strikingly accurate predictions across different cell lines. Analysis of the relative importance of specific transcription factors as predictors of specific histone marks recapitulated known interactions between transcription factors and histone modifiers. Our results demonstrate that reported associations between histone marks and gene expression may be indirect effects caused by interactions between transcription factors and histone-modifying complexes. PMID:25187560

  3. EGFR Mutation Promotes Glioblastoma through Epigenome and Transcription Factor Network Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Hon, Gary C; Villa, Genaro R; Turner, Kristen M; Ikegami, Shiro; Yang, Huijun; Ye, Zhen; Li, Bin; Kuan, Samantha; Lee, Ah Young; Zanca, Ciro; Wei, Bowen; Lucey, Greg; Jenkins, David; Zhang, Wei; Barr, Cathy L; Furnari, Frank B; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Yong, William H; Gahman, Timothy C; Shiau, Andrew K; Cavenee, Webster K; Ren, Bing; Mischel, Paul S

    2015-10-15

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene amplification and mutations are the most common oncogenic events in glioblastoma (GBM), but the mechanisms by which they promote aggressive tumor growth are not well understood. Here, through integrated epigenome and transcriptome analyses of cell lines, genotyped clinical samples, and TCGA data, we show that EGFR mutations remodel the activated enhancer landscape of GBM, promoting tumorigenesis through a SOX9 and FOXG1-dependent transcriptional regulatory network in vitro and in vivo. The most common EGFR mutation, EGFRvIII, sensitizes GBM cells to the BET-bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 in a SOX9, FOXG1-dependent manner. These results identify the role of transcriptional/epigenetic remodeling in EGFR-dependent pathogenesis and suggest a mechanistic basis for epigenetic therapy. PMID:26455392

  4. Recombinant Marek's disease virus (MDV) lacking Meq oncogene confers protection against challenge with a very virulent plus strain of MDV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) encodes a basic leucine-zipper protein, Meq that shares homology with Jun/Fos family of transcriptional factors. Evidence that Meq is an oncogene of MDV came from the recent studies of a Meq-null virus, rMd5'Meq. This virus replicated well in vitro, but was non-oncogenic ...

  5. The regulatory c1 locus of Zea mays encodes a protein with homology to myb proto-oncogene products and with structural similarities to transcriptional activators.

    PubMed Central

    Paz-Ares, J; Ghosal, D; Wienand, U; Peterson, P A; Saedler, H

    1987-01-01

    The structure of the wild-type c1 locus of Zea mays was determined by sequence analysis of one genomic and two cDNA clones. The coding region is composed of three exons (150 bp, 129 bp and one, at least 720 bp) and two small introns (88 bp and 145 bp). Transcription of the mRNAs corresponding to the two cDNA clones cLC6 (1.1 kb) and cLC28 (2.1 kb) starts from the same promoter. Both cDNAs are identical except that cLC28 extends further at its 3' end. A putative protein, 273 amino acids in length was deduced from the sequence of both transcripts. It contains two domains, one basic and the other acidic and might function as a transcriptional activator. The basic domain of this c1-encoded protein shows 40% sequence homology to the protein products of animal myb proto-oncogenes. Images Fig. 3. PMID:3428265

  6. In vivo delivery of transcription factors with multifunctional oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kunwoo; Rafi, Mohammad; Wang, Xiaojian; Aran, Kiana; Feng, Xuli; Lo Sterzo, Carlo; Tang, Richard; Lingampalli, Nithya; Kim, Hyun Jin; Murthy, Niren

    2015-07-01

    Therapeutics based on transcription factors have the potential to revolutionize medicine but have had limited clinical success as a consequence of delivery problems. The delivery of transcription factors is challenging because it requires the development of a delivery vehicle that can complex transcription factors, target cells and stimulate endosomal disruption, with minimal toxicity. Here, we present a multifunctional oligonucleotide, termed DARTs (DNA assembled recombinant transcription factors), which can deliver transcription factors with high efficiency in vivo. DARTs are composed of an oligonucleotide that contains a transcription-factor-binding sequence and hydrophobic membrane-disruptive chains that are masked by acid-cleavable galactose residues. DARTs have a unique molecular architecture, which allows them to bind transcription factors, trigger endocytosis in hepatocytes, and stimulate endosomal disruption. The DARTs have enhanced uptake in hepatocytes as a result of their galactose residues and can disrupt endosomes efficiently with minimal toxicity, because unmasking of their hydrophobic domains selectively occurs in the acidic environment of the endosome. We show that DARTs can deliver the transcription factor nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) to the liver, catalyse the transcription of Nrf2 downstream genes, and rescue mice from acetaminophen-induced liver injury.

  7. Hematopoietic transcription factor mutations and inherited platelet dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Songdej, Natthapol

    2015-01-01

    The molecular and genetic mechanisms in most patients with inherited platelet dysfunction are unknown. There is increasing evidence that mutations in hematopoietic transcription factors are major players in the pathogenesis of defective megakaryopoiesis and platelet dysfunction in patients with inherited platelet disorders. These hematopoietic transcription factors include RUNX1, FLI1, GATA-1, and GFI1B. Mutations involving these transcription factors affect diverse aspects of platelet production and function at the genetic and molecular levels, culminating in clinical manifestations of thrombocytopenia and platelet dysfunction. This review focuses on these hematopoietic transcription factors in the pathobiology of inherited platelet dysfunction. PMID:26097739

  8. Transcription Factor HBP1 Enhances Radiosensitivity by Inducing Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yicheng; Wang, Yueping; Yu, Yanlan; Xu, Liwei; Zhang, Youyun; Yu, Shicheng; Li, Gonghui; Zhang, Zhigeng

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy for prostate cancer has been gradually carried out in recent years; however, acquired radioresistance often occurred in some patients after radiotherapy. HBP1 (HMG-box transcription factor 1) is a transcriptional inhibitor which could inhibit the expression of dozens of oncogenes. In our previous study, we showed that the expression level of HBP1 was closely related to prostate cancer metastasis and prognosis, but the relationship between HBP1 and radioresistance for prostate cancer is largely unknown. In this study, the clinical data of patients with prostate cancer was compared, and the positive correlation was revealed between prostate cancer brachytherapy efficacy and the expression level of HBP1 gene. Through research on prostate cancer cells in vitro, we found that HBP1 expression levels were negatively correlated with oncogene expression levels. Furthermore, HBP1 overexpression could sensitize prostate cancer cells to radiation and increase apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. In addition, animal model was employed to analyze the relationship between HBP1 gene and prostate cancer radiosensitivity in vivo; the result showed that knockdown of HBP1 gene could decrease the sensitivity to radiation of xenograft. These studies identified a specific molecular mechanism underlying prostate cancer radiosensitivity, which suggested HBP1 as a novel target in prostate cancer radiotherapy. PMID:26942107

  9. Initiation of transcription from the minute virus of mice P4 promoter is stimulated in rat cells expressing a c-Ha-ras oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Spegelaere, P; van Hille, B; Spruyt, N; Faisst, S; Cornelis, J J; Rommelaere, J

    1991-01-01

    Transformation of FR3T3 rat fibroblasts by a c-Ha-ras oncogene but not by bovine papillomavirus type 1 is associated with an increase in the abundance of mRNAs from prototype strain MVMp of infecting minute virus of mice, an oncosuppressive parvovirus. This differential parvovirus gene expression correlates with the reported sensitization of ras- but not bovine papillomavirus type 1-transformed cells to the killing effect of MVMp (N. Salomé, B. van Hille, N. Duponchel, G. Meneguzzi, F. Cuzin, J. Rommelaere, and J. Cornelis, Oncogene 5:123-130, 1990). Experiments were performed to determine at which level parvovirus expression is up-regulated in ras transformants. An MVMp "attenuation" sequence responsible for the premature arrest of RNA elongation was either placed or not placed in front of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene and brought under the control of MVMp early promoter P4. Although the MVMp attenuator reduced P4-driven chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression, the extent of attenuation was similar in normal and ras-transformed cells. Moreover, the analysis of P4-directed viral RNAs in MVMp-infected cultures by RNase protection and nuclear run-on assays also revealed a transcription elongation block of a similar amplitude in both types of cells. In addition, the stabilities of the three major parvoviral mRNAs did not vary significantly between normal and ras-transformed cells. Hence, it is concluded that the ras-induced increase in the accumulation of parvoviral mRNAs is mainly controlled at the level of transcription. Consistently, the TATA motif of the P4 promoter proved to have a differential photoreactivity when tested by in vivo UV footprinting assays in ras-transformed versus normal cells. Images PMID:1651412

  10. Modeling the Transcriptional Consequences of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Ablation in Ras-Initiated Squamous Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Lisa Nolan; Ryscavage, Andrew; Merlino, Glenn; Yuspa, Stuart H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose EGFR targeted therapy is in clinical use to treat squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and other cancers of lining epithelium. Ras mutations in these tumors are a negative prognostic factor for response and skin inflammation is an adverse reaction to therapy. We investigated transcriptional and biochemical changes that could account for the confounding effects of RAS activation and inflammation in a squamous tissue. Experimental Design We performed gene expression profiling on oncogenic Ras transformed and wildtype mouse and human keratinocytes with EGFR ablated chronically by genetic deletion or acutely by drug treatment and followed leads provided by pathway analysis with biochemical studies. Results We identified a 25 gene signature specific to the Ras-EGFR ablation interaction and a distinct 19 gene EGFR ablation signature on normal keratinocytes. EGFR ablation in the context of wildtype Ras reduces ontologies favoring cell cycle control and transcription while oncogenic Ras enriches ontologies for ion channels and membrane transporters, particularly focused on calcium homeostasis. Ontologies between chronic EGFR ablation and acute pharmacological ablation were unique, both with and without Ras activation. p38α is activated in response to abrogation of EGFR signaling under conditions of Ras activation in both mouse and human keratinocytes and in RAS transformed tumor orthografts of EGFR ablated mouse keratinocytes. EGFR ablation in the absence of oncogenic Ras revealed Erk and IL-1β related pathways. Conclusion These findings reveal unrecognized interactions between Ras and EGFR signaling in squamous tumor cells that could influence the therapeutic response to EGFR ablation therapy. PMID:22068661

  11. Platelet-activating factor induces phospholipid turnover, calcium flux, arachidonic acid liberation, eicosanoid generation, and oncogene expression in a human B cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Schulam, P.G.; Kuruvilla, A.; Putcha, G.; Mangus, L.; Franklin-Johnson, J.; Shearer, W.T. )

    1991-03-01

    Platelet-activating factor is a potent mediator of the inflammatory response. Studies of the actions of platelet-activating factor have centered mainly around neutrophils, monocytes, and platelets. In this report we begin to uncover the influence of platelet-activating factor on B lymphocytes. Employing the EBV-transformed human B cell line SKW6.4, we demonstrate that platelet-activating factor significantly alters membrane phospholipid metabolism indicated by the incorporation of 32P into phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidic acid but not significantly into phosphatidylethanolamine at concentrations ranging from 10(-9) to 10(-6) M. The inactive precursor, lyso-platelet-activating factor, at a concentration as high as 10(-7) M had no effect on any of the membrane phospholipids. We also show that platelet-activating factor from 10(-12) to 10(-6) M induced rapid and significant elevation in intracellular calcium levels, whereas lyso-platelet-activating factor was again ineffective. We further demonstrate the impact of platelet-activating factor binding to B cells by measuring platelet-activating factor induced arachidonic acid release and 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid production. Moreover, platelet-activating factor was capable of inducing transcription of the nuclear proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-jun. Finally we explored the possible role of 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid as a regulator of arachidonic acid liberation demonstrating that endogenous 5-lipoxygenase activity modulates platelet-activating factor induced arachidonic acid release perhaps acting at the level of phospholipase A2. In summary, platelet-activating factor is shown here to have a direct and profound effect on a pure B cell line.

  12. Mechanisms of transcription factor evolution in Metazoa.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Jonathan F; Zimmer, Fabian; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich

    2016-07-27

    Transcriptions factors (TFs) are pivotal for the regulation of virtually all cellular processes, including growth and development. Expansions of TF families are causally linked to increases in organismal complexity. Here we study the evolutionary dynamics, genetic causes and functional implications of the five largest metazoan TF families. We find that family expansions dominate across the whole metazoan tree; however, some branches experience exceptional family-specific accelerated expansions. Additionally, we find that such expansions are often predated by modular domain rearrangements, which spur the expansion of a new sub-family by separating it from the rest of the TF family in terms of protein-protein interactions. This separation allows for radical shifts in the functional spectrum of a duplicated TF. We also find functional differentiation inside TF sub-families as changes in expression specificity. Furthermore, accelerated family expansions are facilitated by repeats of sequence motifs such as C2H2 zinc fingers. We quantify whole genome duplications and single gene duplications as sources of TF family expansions, implying that some, but not all, TF duplicates are preferentially retained. We conclude that trans-regulatory changes (domain rearrangements) are instrumental for fundamental functional innovations, that cis-regulatory changes (affecting expression) accomplish wide-spread fine tuning and both jointly contribute to the functional diversification of TFs. PMID:27288445

  13. Hepatitis B virus X protein inhibits p53 sequence-specific DNA binding, transcriptional activity, and association with transcription factor ERCC3.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X W; Forrester, K; Yeh, H; Feitelson, M A; Gu, J R; Harris, C C

    1994-01-01

    Chronic active hepatitis caused by infection with hepatitis B virus, a DNA virus, is a major risk factor for human hepatocellular carcinoma. Since the oncogenicity of several DNA viruses is dependent on the interaction of their viral oncoproteins with cellular tumor-suppressor gene products, we investigated the interaction between hepatitis B virus X protein (HBX) and human wild-type p53 protein. HBX complexes with the wild-type p53 protein and inhibits its sequence-specific DNA binding in vitro. HBX expression also inhibits p53-mediated transcriptional activation in vivo and the in vitro association of p53 and ERCC3, a general transcription factor involved in nucleotide excision repair. Therefore, HBX may affect a wide range of p53 functions and contribute to the molecular pathogenesis of human hepatocellular carcinoma. Images PMID:8134379

  14. Mitochondrial Ca2+ Remodeling is a Prime Factor in Oncogenic Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Rimessi, Alessandro; Patergnani, Simone; Bonora, Massimo; Wieckowski, Mariusz R.; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is sustained by defects in the mechanisms underlying cell proliferation, mitochondrial metabolism, and cell death. Mitochondrial Ca2+ ions are central to all these processes, serving as signaling molecules with specific spatial localization, magnitude, and temporal characteristics. Mutations in mtDNA, aberrant expression and/or regulation of Ca2+-handling/transport proteins and abnormal Ca2+-dependent relationships among the cytosol, endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria can cause the deregulation of mitochondrial Ca2+-dependent pathways that are related to these processes, thus determining oncogenic behavior. In this review, we propose that mitochondrial Ca2+ remodeling plays a pivotal role in shaping the oncogenic signaling cascade, which is a required step for cancer formation and maintenance. We will describe recent studies that highlight the importance of mitochondria in inducing pivotal “cancer hallmarks” and discuss possible tools to manipulate mitochondrial Ca2+ to modulate cancer survival. PMID:26161362

  15. Signal-Induced Functions of the Transcription Factor TFII-I

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Ananda L

    2007-01-01

    We have learned a great deal over the last several years about the molecular mechanisms that govern cell growth, cell division and cell death. Normal cells pass through cell cycle (growth) and divide in response to mitogenic signals that are transduced through their cognate cell surface receptors to the nucleus. Despite the fact that cellular growth and division are mechanistically distinct steps, they are usually coordinately regulated, which is critical for normal cellular proliferation. The precise mechanistic basis for this coordinated regulation is unclear. TFII-I is a unique, signal induced multifunctional transcription factor that is activated upon a variety of signaling pathways and appears to participate in distinct phases of cell growth. For instance, TFII-I is required for growth factor-induced transcriptional activation of the c-fos gene, which is essential for cell cycle entry. Two alternatively spliced isoforms of TFII-I exhibit opposing but necessary functions for mitogen-induced transcriptional activation of c-fos. Besides transcriptional activation of the c-fos proto-oncogene and eventual entry into cell cycle, TFII-I also appears to have a role in later phases of the cell cycle and cell division. Here we discuss how a multitude of signaling inputs target TFII-I isoforms, which may exert their functions in distinct phases of the cell cycle and play a key role in the coordinated regulation of cellular proliferation. PMID:17976384

  16. Dopamine receptor regulating factor, DRRF: a zinc finger transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Hwang, C K; D'Souza, U M; Eisch, A J; Yajima, S; Lammers, C H; Yang, Y; Lee, S H; Kim, Y M; Nestler, E J; Mouradian, M M

    2001-06-19

    Dopamine receptor genes are under complex transcription control, determining their unique regional distribution in the brain. We describe here a zinc finger type transcription factor, designated dopamine receptor regulating factor (DRRF), which binds to GC and GT boxes in the D1A and D2 dopamine receptor promoters and effectively displaces Sp1 and Sp3 from these sequences. Consequently, DRRF can modulate the activity of these dopamine receptor promoters. Highest DRRF mRNA levels are found in brain with a specific regional distribution including olfactory bulb and tubercle, nucleus accumbens, striatum, hippocampus, amygdala, and frontal cortex. Many of these brain regions also express abundant levels of various dopamine receptors. In vivo, DRRF itself can be regulated by manipulations of dopaminergic transmission. Mice treated with drugs that increase extracellular striatal dopamine levels (cocaine), block dopamine receptors (haloperidol), or destroy dopamine terminals (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine) show significant alterations in DRRF mRNA. The latter observations provide a basis for dopamine receptor regulation after these manipulations. We conclude that DRRF is important for modulating dopaminergic transmission in the brain. PMID:11390978

  17. Intragenic integration in DLC1 sustains factor VIII expression in primary human cells without insertional oncogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Sivalingam, J; Phan, T T; Kon, O L

    2014-01-01

    Techniques enabling precise genome modifications enhance the safety of gene-based therapy. DLC1 is a hot spot for phiC31 integrase-mediated transgene integration in vitro and in vivo. Here we show that integration of a coagulation factor VIII transgene into intron 7 of DLC1 supports durable expression of factor VIII in primary human umbilical cord-lining epithelial cells. Oligoclonal cells with factor VIII transgene integrated in DLC1 did not have altered expression of DLC1 or neighbouring genes within a 1-Mb interval. Only 1.9% of all expressed genes were transcriptionally altered; most were downregulated and mapped to cell cycle and DNA repair pathways. DLC1-integrated cells were not tumourigenic in vivo and were normal by high-resolution genomic DNA copy number analysis. Our data identify DLC1 as a locus for durable transgene expression that does not incur features of insertional oncogenesis, thus expanding options for developing ex vivo cell therapy mediated by site-specific integration methods. PMID:24553346

  18. Metformin inhibits pancreatic cancer cell and tumor growth and downregulates Sp transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Pathi, Satya; Jutooru, Indira; Sreevalsan, Sandeep; Basha, Riyaz; Abdelrahim, Maen; Samudio, Ismael; Safe, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Metformin is a widely used antidiabetic drug, and epidemiology studies for pancreatic and other cancers indicate that metformin exhibits both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities. Several metformin-induced responses and genes are similar to those observed after knockdown of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 by RNA interference, and we hypothesized that the mechanism of action of metformin in pancreatic cancer cells was due, in part, to downregulation of Sp transcription factors. Treatment of Panc1, L3.6pL and Panc28 pancreatic cancer cells with metformin downregulated Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and several pro-oncogenic Sp-regulated genes including bcl-2, survivin, cyclin D1, vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor, and fatty acid synthase. Metformin induced proteasome-dependent degradation of Sps in L3.6pL and Panc28 cells, whereas in Panc1 cells metformin decreased microRNA-27a and induced the Sp repressor, ZBTB10, and disruption of miR-27a:ZBTB10 by metformin was phosphatase dependent. Metformin also inhibited pancreatic tumor growth and downregulated Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in tumors in an orthotopic model where L3.6pL cells were injected directly into the pancreas. The results demonstrate for the first time that the anticancer activities of metformin are also due, in part, to downregulation of Sp transcription factors and Sp-regulated genes. PMID:23803693

  19. Metformin inhibits pancreatic cancer cell and tumor growth and downregulates Sp transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Safe, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Metformin is a widely used antidiabetic drug, and epidemiology studies for pancreatic and other cancers indicate that metformin exhibits both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities. Several metformin-induced responses and genes are similar to those observed after knockdown of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 by RNA interference, and we hypothesized that the mechanism of action of metformin in pancreatic cancer cells was due, in part, to downregulation of Sp transcription factors. Treatment of Panc1, L3.6pL and Panc28 pancreatic cancer cells with metformin downregulated Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 proteins and several pro-oncogenic Sp-regulated genes including bcl-2, survivin, cyclin D1, vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor, and fatty acid synthase. Metformin induced proteasome-dependent degradation of Sps in L3.6pL and Panc28 cells, whereas in Panc1 cells metformin decreased microRNA-27a and induced the Sp repressor, ZBTB10, and disruption of miR-27a:ZBTB10 by metformin was phosphatase dependent. Metformin also inhibited pancreatic tumor growth and downregulated Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 in tumors in an orthotopic model where L3.6pL cells were injected directly into the pancreas. The results demonstrate for the first time that the anticancer activities of metformin are also due, in part, to downregulation of Sp transcription factors and Sp-regulated genes. PMID:23803693

  20. The oncoprotein HBXIP upregulates PDGFB via activating transcription factor Sp1 to promote the proliferation of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yingyi; Zhao, Yu; Li, Leilei; Shen, Yu; Cai, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Lihong

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •HBXIP is able to upregulate the expression of PDGFB in breast cancer cells. •HBXIP serves as a coactivator of activating transcription factor Sp1. •HBXIP stimulates the PDGFB promoter via activating transcription factor Sp1. •HBXIP promotes the proliferation of breast cancer cell via upregulating PDGFB. -- Abstract: We have reported that the oncoprotein hepatitis B virus X-interacting protein (HBXIP) acts as a novel transcriptional coactivator to promote proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells. Previously, we showed that HBXIP was able to activate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in breast cancer cells. As an oncogene, the platelet-derived growth factor beta polypeptide (PDGFB) plays crucial roles in carcinogenesis. In the present study, we found that both HBXIP and PDGFB were highly expressed in breast cancer cell lines. Interestingly, HBXIP was able to increase transcriptional activity of NF-κB through PDGFB, suggesting that HBXIP is associated with PDGFB in the cells. Moreover, HBXIP was able to upregulate PDGFB at the levels of mRNA, protein and promoter in the cells. Then, we identified that HBXIP stimulated the promoter of PDGFB through activating transcription factor Sp1. In function, HBXIP enhanced the proliferation of breast cancer cells through PDGFB in vitro. Thus, we conclude that HBXIP upregulates PDGFB via activating transcription factor Sp1 to promote proliferation of breast cancer cells.

  1. Molecular architecture of transcription factor hotspots in early adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Baek, Songjoon; Rabiee, Atefeh; Nielsen, Ronni; Traynor, Sofie; Clark, Nicholas; Sandelin, Albin; Jensen, Ole N; Sung, Myong-Hee; Hager, Gordon L; Mandrup, Susanne

    2014-06-12

    Transcription factors have recently been shown to colocalize in hotspot regions of the genome, which are further clustered into super-enhancers. However, the detailed molecular organization of transcription factors at hotspot regions is poorly defined. Here, we have used digital genomic footprinting to precisely define factor localization at a genome-wide level during the early phase of 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation, which allows us to obtain detailed molecular insight into how transcription factors target hotspots. We demonstrate the formation of ATF-C/EBP heterodimers at a composite motif on chromatin, and we suggest that this may be a general mechanism for integrating external signals on chromatin. Furthermore, we find evidence of extensive recruitment of transcription factors to hotspots through alternative mechanisms not involving their known motifs and demonstrate that these alternative binding events are functionally important for hotspot formation and activity. Taken together, these findings provide a framework for understanding transcription factor cooperativity in hotspots. PMID:24857666

  2. Inhibitor of differentiation 1 transcription factor promotes metabolic reprogramming in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bal Krishan; Kolhe, Ravindra; Black, Stephen M; Keller, Jonathan R; Mivechi, Nahid F; Satyanarayana, Ande

    2016-01-01

    Reprograming of metabolism is one of the central hallmarks of cancer. The majority of cancer cells depend on high rates of glycolysis and glutaminolysis for their growth and survival. A number of oncogenes and tumor suppressors have been connected to the regulation of altered glucose and glutamine metabolism in cancer cells. For example, the oncogene c-Myc plays vital roles in cancer cell metabolic adaptation by directly regulating various genes that participate in aerobic glycolysis and glutaminolysis. Inhibitor of differentiation 1 (Id1) is a helix-loop-helix transcription factor that plays important roles in cell proliferation, differentiation, and cell fate determination. Overexpression of Id1 causes intestinal adenomas and thymic lymphomas in mice, suggesting that Id1 could function as an oncogene. Despite it being an oncogene, whether Id1 plays any prominent role in cancer cell metabolic reprograming is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Id1 is strongly expressed in human and mouse liver tumors and in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines, whereas its expression is very low or undetectable in normal liver tissues. In HCC cells, Id1 expression is regulated by the MAPK/ERK pathway at the transcriptional level. Knockdown of Id1 suppressed aerobic glycolysis and glutaminolysis, suggesting that Id1 promotes a metabolic shift toward aerobic glycolysis. At the molecular level, Id1 mediates its metabolic effects by regulating the expression levels of c-Myc. Knockdown of Id1 resulted in down-regulation (∼75%) of c-Myc, whereas overexpression of Id1 strongly induced (3-fold) c-Myc levels. Interestingly, knockdown of c-Myc resulted in down-regulation (∼60%) of Id1, suggesting a positive feedback-loop regulatory mechanism between Id1 and c-Myc. Under anaerobic conditions, both Id1 and c-Myc are down-regulated (50-70%), and overexpression of oxygen-insensitive hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (Hif1α) or its downstream target Mxi1 resulted in a significant reduction

  3. Pioneer transcription factors, chromatin dynamics, and cell fate control.

    PubMed

    Zaret, Kenneth S; Mango, Susan E

    2016-04-01

    Among the diverse transcription factors that are necessary to elicit changes in cell fate, both in embryonic development and in cellular reprogramming, a subset of factors are capable of binding to their target sequences on nucleosomal DNA and initiating regulatory events in silent chromatin. Such 'pioneer transcription factors' initiate cooperative interactions with other regulatory proteins to elicit changes in local chromatin structure. As a consequence of pioneer factor binding, the local chromatin can either become open and competent for activation, closed and repressed, or transcriptionally active. Understanding how pioneer factors initiate chromatin dynamics and how such can be blocked at heterochromatic sites provides insights into controlling cell fate transitions at will. PMID:26826681

  4. In silico Analysis of Transcription Factor Repertoire and Prediction of Stress Responsive Transcription Factors in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Mochida, Keiichi; Yoshida, Takuhiro; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2009-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) are often termed as ‘master regulators’ which bind to DNA and either activate or repress gene transcription. We have computationally analysed the soybean genome sequence data and constructed a proper set of TFs based on the Hidden Markov Model profiles of DNA-binding domain families. Within the soybean genome, we identified 4342 loci encoding 5035 TF models which grouped into 61 families. We constructed a database named SoybeanTFDB (http://soybeantfdb.psc.riken.jp) containing the full compilation of soybean TFs and significant information such as: functional motifs, full-length cDNAs, domain alignments, promoter regions, genomic organization and putative regulatory functions based on annotations of gene ontology (GO) inferred by comparative analysis with Arabidopsis. With particular interest in abiotic stress signalling, we analysed the promoter regions for all of the TF encoding genes as a means to identify abiotic stress responsive cis-elements as well as all types of cis-motifs provided by the PLACE database. SoybeanTFDB enables scientists to easily access cis-element and GO annotations to aid in the prediction of TF function and selection of TFs with functions of interest. This study provides a basic framework and an important user-friendly public information resource which enables analyses of transcriptional regulation in soybean. PMID:19884168

  5. The physical size of transcription factors is key to transcriptional regulation in chromatin domains.

    PubMed

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Kaizu, Kazunari; Tamura, Sachiko; Nozaki, Tadasu; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Takahashi, Koichi

    2015-02-18

    Genetic information, which is stored in the long strand of genomic DNA as chromatin, must be scanned and read out by various transcription factors. First, gene-specific transcription factors, which are relatively small (∼50 kDa), scan the genome and bind regulatory elements. Such factors then recruit general transcription factors, Mediators, RNA polymerases, nucleosome remodellers, and histone modifiers, most of which are large protein complexes of 1-3 MDa in size. Here, we propose a new model for the functional significance of the size of transcription factors (or complexes) for gene regulation of chromatin domains. Recent findings suggest that chromatin consists of irregularly folded nucleosome fibres (10 nm fibres) and forms numerous condensed domains (e.g., topologically associating domains). Although the flexibility and dynamics of chromatin allow repositioning of genes within the condensed domains, the size exclusion effect of the domain may limit accessibility of DNA sequences by transcription factors. We used Monte Carlo computer simulations to determine the physical size limit of transcription factors that can enter condensed chromatin domains. Small gene-specific transcription factors can penetrate into the chromatin domains and search their target sequences, whereas large transcription complexes cannot enter the domain. Due to this property, once a large complex binds its target site via gene-specific factors it can act as a 'buoy' to keep the target region on the surface of the condensed domain and maintain transcriptional competency. This size-dependent specialization of target-scanning and surface-tethering functions could provide novel insight into the mechanisms of various DNA transactions, such as DNA replication and repair/recombination. PMID:25563431

  6. The physical size of transcription factors is key to transcriptional regulation in chromatin domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Kaizu, Kazunari; Tamura, Sachiko; Nozaki, Tadasu; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Takahashi, Koichi

    2015-02-01

    Genetic information, which is stored in the long strand of genomic DNA as chromatin, must be scanned and read out by various transcription factors. First, gene-specific transcription factors, which are relatively small (˜50 kDa), scan the genome and bind regulatory elements. Such factors then recruit general transcription factors, Mediators, RNA polymerases, nucleosome remodellers, and histone modifiers, most of which are large protein complexes of 1-3 MDa in size. Here, we propose a new model for the functional significance of the size of transcription factors (or complexes) for gene regulation of chromatin domains. Recent findings suggest that chromatin consists of irregularly folded nucleosome fibres (10 nm fibres) and forms numerous condensed domains (e.g., topologically associating domains). Although the flexibility and dynamics of chromatin allow repositioning of genes within the condensed domains, the size exclusion effect of the domain may limit accessibility of DNA sequences by transcription factors. We used Monte Carlo computer simulations to determine the physical size limit of transcription factors that can enter condensed chromatin domains. Small gene-specific transcription factors can penetrate into the chromatin domains and search their target sequences, whereas large transcription complexes cannot enter the domain. Due to this property, once a large complex binds its target site via gene-specific factors it can act as a ‘buoy’ to keep the target region on the surface of the condensed domain and maintain transcriptional competency. This size-dependent specialization of target-scanning and surface-tethering functions could provide novel insight into the mechanisms of various DNA transactions, such as DNA replication and repair/recombination.

  7. Understanding variation in transcription factor binding by modeling transcription factor genome-epigenome interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chieh-Chun; Xiao, Shu; Xie, Dan; Cao, Xiaoyi; Song, Chun-Xiao; Wang, Ting; He, Chuan; Zhong, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Despite explosive growth in genomic datasets, the methods for studying epigenomic mechanisms of gene regulation remain primitive. Here we present a model-based approach to systematically analyze the epigenomic functions in modulating transcription factor-DNA binding. Based on the first principles of statistical mechanics, this model considers the interactions between epigenomic modifications and a cis-regulatory module, which contains multiple binding sites arranged in any configurations. We compiled a comprehensive epigenomic dataset in mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells, including DNA methylation (MeDIP-seq and MRE-seq), DNA hydroxymethylation (5-hmC-seq), and histone modifications (ChIP-seq). We discovered correlations of transcription factors (TFs) for specific combinations of epigenomic modifications, which we term epigenomic motifs. Epigenomic motifs explained why some TFs appeared to have different DNA binding motifs derived from in vivo (ChIP-seq) and in vitro experiments. Theoretical analyses suggested that the epigenome can modulate transcriptional noise and boost the cooperativity of weak TF binding sites. ChIP-seq data suggested that epigenomic boost of binding affinities in weak TF binding sites can function in mES cells. We showed in theory that the epigenome should suppress the TF binding differences on SNP-containing binding sites in two people. Using personal data, we identified strong associations between H3K4me2/H3K9ac and the degree of personal differences in NFκB binding in SNP-containing binding sites, which may explain why some SNPs introduce much smaller personal variations on TF binding than other SNPs. In summary, this model presents a powerful approach to analyze the functions of epigenomic modifications. This model was implemented into an open source program APEG (Affinity Prediction by Epigenome and Genome, http://systemsbio.ucsd.edu/apeg). PMID:24339764

  8. Yeast GAL11 protein is a distinctive type transcription factor that enhances basal transcription in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, H; Hiraoka, Y; Fukasawa, T

    1993-01-01

    The yeast auxiliary transcription factor GAL11, a candidate for the coactivator, was partially purified from yeast cells, and its function was characterized in a cell-free transcription system. The partially purified GAL11 protein stimulated basal transcription from the CYC1 core promoter by a factor of 4-5 at the step of preinitiation complex formation. GAL11 protein also enhanced transcription activated by general regulatory factor 1, GAL4-AH, or GAL4-VP16 to the same extent as the basal transcription. Therefore, the apparent potentiation of the activators by GAL11 was attributable to the stimulation of basal transcription. The wild-type GAL11 protein (but not a mutant-type protein) produced in bacteria stimulated transcription as effectively as GAL11 from yeast. These results suggest that GAL11 functions as a positive cofactor of basal and activator-induced transcription in a cell-free transcription system. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8378310

  9. Mammalian transcription factor A is a core component of the mitochondrial transcription machinery.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yonghong; Dierckx, Anke; Wanrooij, Paulina H; Wanrooij, Sjoerd; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Wilhelmsson, L Marcus; Falkenberg, Maria; Gustafsson, Claes M

    2012-10-01

    Transcription factor A (TFAM) functions as a DNA packaging factor in mammalian mitochondria. TFAM also binds sequence-specifically to sites immediately upstream of mitochondrial promoters, but there are conflicting data regarding its role as a core component of the mitochondrial transcription machinery. We here demonstrate that TFAM is required for transcription in mitochondrial extracts as well as in a reconstituted in vitro transcription system. The absolute requirement of TFAM can be relaxed by conditions that allow DNA breathing, i.e., low salt concentrations or negatively supercoiled DNA templates. The situation is thus very similar to that described in nuclear RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription, in which the free energy of supercoiling can circumvent the need for a subset of basal transcription factors at specific promoters. In agreement with these observations, we demonstrate that TFAM has the capacity to induce negative supercoils in DNA, and, using the recently developed nucleobase analog FRET-pair tC(O)-tC(nitro), we find that TFAM distorts significantly the DNA structure. Our findings differ from recent observations reporting that TFAM is not a core component of the mitochondrial transcription machinery. Instead, our findings support a model in which TFAM is absolutely required to recruit the transcription machinery during initiation of transcription. PMID:23012404

  10. A Novel POK Family Transcription Factor, ZBTB5, Represses Transcription of p21CIP1 Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Dong-In; Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Lee, Choong-Eun; Yun, Chae-Ok; Hur, Man-Wook

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional repression through chromatin remodeling and histone deacetylation has been postulated as a driving force for tumorigenesis. We isolated and characterized a novel POZ domain Krüppel-like zinc finger transcription repressor, ZBTB5 (zinc finger and BTB domain-containing 5). Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) analysis showed that ZBTB5 expression is higher in retinoblastoma and muscle cancer tissues. Immunocytochemistry showed that ZBTB5 was localized to the nucleus, particularly nuclear speckles. ZBTB5 directly repressed transcription of cell cycle arrest gene p21 by binding to the proximal GC-box 5/6 elements and the two distal p53-responsive elements (bp −2323 ∼ −2299; bp −1416 ∼ −1392). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that ZBTB5 and p53 competed with each other in occupying the p53 binding elements. ZBTB5 interacted with co-repressor-histone deacetylase complexes such as BCoR (BCL-6-interacting corepressor), NCoR (nuclear receptor corepressor), and SMRT (silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid receptors) via its POZ domain. These interactions resulted in deacetylation of histones Ac-H3 and Ac-H4 at the proximal promoter, which is important in the transcriptional repression of p21. MTT (3-(4,5-di meth yl thi azol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assays and fluorescent-activated cell sorter analysis revealed that ZBTB5 stimulated both cell proliferation and cell cycle progression, significantly increasing the number of cells in S-phase. Overall, our data suggest that ZBTB5 is a potent transcription repressor of cell cycle arrest gene p21 and a potential proto-oncogene stimulating cell proliferation. PMID:19491398

  11. The Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b Is an Essential Cofactor for the Activation of Transcription by Myocyte Enhancer Factor 2

    PubMed Central

    Nojima, Masanori; Huang, Yehong; Tyagi, Mudit; Kao, Hung-Ying; Fujinaga, Koh

    2014-01-01

    The positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), composed of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 and cyclin T1, stimulates the elongation of transcription by hyperphosphorylating the C-terminal region of RNA polymerase II. Aberrant activation of P-TEFb results in manifestations of cardiac hypertrophy in mice, suggesting that P-TEFb is an essential factor for cardiac myocyte function and development. Here, we present evidence that P-TEFb selectively activates transcription mediated by the myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) family of transcription factors, key regulatory factors for myocyte development. Knockdown of endogenous cyclin T1 in murine C2C12 cells abolishes MEF2-dependent reporter gene expression as well as transcription of endogenous MEF2 target genes, whereas overexpression of P-TEFb enhances MEF2-dependent transcription. P-TEFb interacts with MEF2 both in vitro and in vivo. Activation of MEF2-dependent transcription induced by serum starvation is mediated by a rapid dissociation of P-TEFb from its inhibitory subunit, HEXIM1, and a subsequent recruitment of P-TEFb to MEF2 binding sites in the promoter region of MEF2 target genes. These results indicate that recruitment of P-TEFb is a critical step for stimulation of MEF2-dependent transcription, therefore providing a fundamentally important regulatory mechanism underlying the transcriptional program in muscle cells. PMID:18662700

  12. Targeted Disruption of Heparan Sulfate Interaction with Hepatocyte and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors Blocks Normal and Oncogenic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cecchi, Fabiola; Pajalunga, Deborah; Fowler, C. Andrew; Uren, Aykut; Rabe, Daniel C.; Peruzzi, Benedetta; MacDonald, Nicholas J.; Blackman, Davida K.; Stahl, Stephen J.; Byrd, R. Andrew; Bottaro, Donald P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) regulate normal development and homeostasis, and drive disease progression in many forms of cancer. Both proteins signal by binding to receptor tyrosine kinases and heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans on target cell surfaces. Basic residues comprising the primary HS binding sites on HGF and VEGF provide similar surface charge distributions without underlying structural similarity. Combining three acidic amino acid substitutions in these sites in the HGF isoform NK1 or the VEGF isoform VEGF165 transformed each into potent, selective competitive antagonists of their respective normal and oncogenic signaling pathways. Our findings illustrate the importance of HS in growth factor driven cancer progression and reveal an efficient strategy for therapeutic antagonist development. PMID:22897854

  13. Beyond microarrays: Finding key transcription factors controlling signal transduction pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kel, Alexdander; Voss, Nico; Jauregui, Ruy; Kel-Margoulis, Olga; Wingender, Edgar

    2006-01-01

    Background Massive gene expression changes in different cellular states measured by microarrays, in fact, reflect just an "echo" of real molecular processes in the cells. Transcription factors constitute a class of the regulatory molecules that typically require posttranscriptional modifications or ligand binding in order to exert their function. Therefore, such important functional changes of transcription factors are not directly visible in the microarray experiments. Results We developed a novel approach to find key transcription factors that may explain concerted expression changes of specific components of the signal transduction network. The approach aims at revealing evidence of positive feedback loops in the signal transduction circuits through activation of pathway-specific transcription factors. We demonstrate that promoters of genes encoding components of many known signal transduction pathways are enriched by binding sites of those transcription factors that are endpoints of the considered pathways. Application of the approach to the microarray gene expression data on TNF-alpha stimulated primary human endothelial cells helped to reveal novel key transcription factors potentially involved in the regulation of the signal transduction pathways of the cells. Conclusion We developed a novel computational approach for revealing key transcription factors by knowledge-based analysis of gene expression data with the help of databases on gene regulatory networks (TRANSFAC® and TRANSPATH®). The corresponding software and databases are available at . PMID:17118134

  14. The transcription factor c-Myb affects pre-mRNA splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Orvain, Christophe; Matre, Vilborg; Gabrielsen, Odd S.

    2008-07-25

    c-Myb is a transcription factor which plays a key role in haematopoietic proliferation and lineage commitment. We raised the question of whether c-Myb may have abilities beyond the extensively studied transcriptional activation function. In this report we show that c-Myb influences alternative pre-mRNA splicing. This was seen by its marked effect on the 5'-splice site selection during E1A alternative splicing, while no effect of c-Myb was observed when reporters for the 3'-splice site selection or for the constitutive splicing process were tested. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation experiments provided evidence for interactions between c-Myb and distinct components of the splicing apparatus, such as the general splicing factor U2AF{sup 65} and hnRNPA1 involved in the 5'-splice site selection. The effect on 5'-splice site selection was abolished in the oncogenic variant v-Myb. Altogether, these data provide evidence that c-Myb may serve a previously unappreciated role in the coupling between transcription and splicing.

  15. Regulation of the protein stability of EMT transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, VM; Viñas-Castells, R; García de Herreros, A

    2014-01-01

    The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) consists of a rapid change of cell phenotype, characterized by the loss of epithelial characteristics and the acquisition of a more invasive phenotype. Transcription factors regulating EMT (Snail, Twist and Zeb) are extremely labile proteins, rapidly degraded by the proteasome system. In this review we analyze the current mechanisms controlling degradation of EMT transcription factors, focusing on the role of new E3 ubiquitin-ligases involved in EMT. We also summarize the regulation of the stability of these EMT transcription factors, specially observed in different stress conditions, such as hypoxia, chemotherapeutic drugs, oxidative stress or γ-irradiation. PMID:25482633

  16. Regulation of hematopoietic development by ZBTB transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Takahiro

    2016-09-01

    Hematopoietic development is governed by the coordinated expression of lineage- and differentiation stage-specific genes. Transcription factors play major roles in this process and their perturbation may underlie hematologic and immunologic disorders. Nearly 1900 transcription factors are encoded in the human genome: of these, 49 BTB (for broad-complex, tram-track and bric à brac)-zinc finger transcription factors referred to as ZBTB or POK proteins have been identified. ZBTB proteins, including BCL6, PLZF, ThPOK and LRF, exhibit a broad spectrum of functions in normal and malignant hematopoiesis. This review summarizes developmental and molecular functions of ZBTB proteins relevant to hematology. PMID:27250345

  17. Experimental determination of the evolvability of a transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Maerkl, Sebastian J; Quake, Stephen R

    2009-11-01

    Sequence-specific binding of a transcription factor to DNA is the central event in any transcriptional regulatory network. However, relatively little is known about the evolutionary plasticity of transcription factors. For example, the exact functional consequence of an amino acid substitution on the DNA-binding specificity of most transcription factors is currently not predictable. Furthermore, although the major structural families of transcription factors have been identified, the detailed DNA-binding repertoires within most families have not been characterized. We studied the sequence recognition code and evolvability of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor family by creating all possible 95 single-point mutations of five DNA-contacting residues of Max, a human helix-loop-helix transcription factor and measured the detailed DNA-binding repertoire of each mutant. Our results show that the sequence-specific repertoire of Max accessible through single-point mutations is extremely limited, and we are able to predict 92% of the naturally occurring diversity at these positions. All naturally occurring basic regions were also found to be accessible through functional intermediates. Finally, we observed a set of amino acids that are functional in vitro but are not found to be used naturally, indicating that functionality alone is not sufficient for selection. PMID:19841254

  18. Transcription factors as master regulator for cancer stemness: remove milk from fox?

    PubMed

    Nakano, Ichiro

    2014-08-01

    Some cancers display a cellular hierarchy of varying differentiation states, as if they phenocopy the normal organ development processes. Accumulating evidence suggests that the molecular signals that control carcinogenesis, at least partially, overlap with those involved in organogenesis. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) at the apex of cellular hierarchy are likely one, if not the only, critical therapeutic target in cancers. The proto-oncogene FOXM1 is a transcription factor (TF) defined as a master regulator for a broad array of genes required for CSCs and therefore FOXM1 is overexpressed in various cancers. In general, therapeutic development for TFs is a challenging task. Recently, on the other hand, novel insight has been brought by the discovery of a protein complex of FOXM1 with the mitotic kinase MELK in CSCs in brain cancers, as this protein complex appears to be cancer-specific. This editorial describes FOXM1 signaling in cancers and its potential therapeutic development. PMID:25017123

  19. AMP-activated Protein Kinase Directly Phosphorylates and Destabilizes Hedgehog Pathway Transcription Factor GLI1 in Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yen-Hsing; Luo, Jia; Mosley, Yung-Yi C.; Hedrick, Victoria E.; Paul, Lake N.; Chang, Julia; Zhang, GuangJun; Wang, Yu-Kuo; Banko, Max R.; Brunet, Anne; Kuang, Shihuan; Wu, Jen-Leih; Chang, Chun-Ju; Scott, Matthew P.; Yang, Jer-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway regulates cell differentiation and proliferation during development by controlling the Gli transcription factors. Cell fate decisions and progression toward organ and tissue maturity must be coordinated and how energy sensor regulates Hh pathway is not clear. AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) is an important sensor of energy stores that controls protein synthesis and other energy-intensive processes. AMPK is directly responsive to intracellular AMP levels, inhibiting a wide range of cell activities if ATP is low and AMP is high. Thus, AMPK can affect development by influencing protein synthesis and other processes needed for growth and differentiation. Activation of AMPK reduces GLI1 protein levels and stability, thus blocking Sonic hedgehog-induced transcriptional activity. AMPK phosphorylates GLI1 at serines 102 and 408 and threonine 1074. Mutation of these three sites into alanine prevents phosphorylation by AMPK. This in turn leads to increased GLI1 protein stability, transcriptional activity, and oncogenic potency. PMID:26190112

  20. Selection for a dominant oncogene and large male size as a risk factor for melanoma in the Xiphophorus animal model

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, André A.; Bowser, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Adult height is a risk factor in numerous human cancers that involve aberrant receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling. However, its importance is debated due to conflicting epidemiological studies and the lack of useful in vivo models. In Xiphophorus fishes (Platyfishes/Swordtails), a functional RTK, Xiphophorus melanoma receptor kinase (Xmrk), serves as the dominant oncogene and has been maintained for several million years despite being deleterious and in an extremely unstable genomic region. Here we show that the Xmrk genotype is positively correlated with standard length in male and female wild caught Xiphophorus cortezi sampled throughout their phylogeographic distribution. Histopathology confirms the occurrence of malignant melanomas in both sexes; however, melanoma incidence was extremely male biased. Furthermore, males collected with malignant melanomas in the field were significantly larger than both Xmrk males collected without melanomas and wildtype (Xmrk deficient) males. These results not only provide a novel selective mechanism for the persistence of the germline Xmrk oncogene but also create an innovative avenue of melanoma research within the Xiphophorus fishes. Wildlife cancer in natural systems is a growing concern, therefore, future research investigating life history characteristics associated with certain phenotypes and genotypes that predispose an individual to cancer will be fundamental to increasing our understanding of the evolutionary biology of cancer in nature as well as in humans. PMID:20618898

  1. Distinct roles of transcription factors TFIIIB and TFIIIC in RNA polymerase III transcription reinitiation.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Roberto; Rivetti, Claudio; Acker, Joël; Dieci, Giorgio

    2004-09-14

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerase (Pol) III is recruited to target promoters by a stable preinitiation complex containing transcription factors TFIIIC and TFIIIB. After the first transcription cycle, reinitiation proceeds through facilitated recycling, a process by which the terminating Pol III rapidly reloads onto the same transcription unit. Here, we show that Pol III is repeatedly recaptured in vitro by the first transcribed gene, even in the presence of a juxtaposed competitor promoter complex, thus suggesting that facilitated recycling is not merely due to a stochastic reassociation process favored by the small size of class III genes. The transcription factor requirements for facilitated reinitiation were investigated by taking advantage of Pol III templates that support both TFIIIC-dependent and TFIIIC-independent transcription. A TFIIIC-less transcription system, in which TFIIIB was reconstituted from recombinant TATA box-binding protein and Brf1 proteins and a crude fraction containing the Bdp1 component, was sufficient to direct efficient Pol III recycling on short ( approximately 100 bp) class III genes. Unexpectedly, however, on longer (>300 bp) transcription units, reinitiation in the presence of TFIIIB alone was compromised, and TFIIIC was further required to reestablish a high reinitiation rate. Transcription reinitiation was also severely impaired when recombinant Bdp1 protein replaced the corresponding crude fraction in reconstituted TFIIIB. The data reveal an unexpected complexity in the Pol III reinitiation mechanism and suggest the existence of a handing-back network between Pol III, TFIIIC, and TFIIIB on actively transcribed class III genes. PMID:15347814

  2. Ab Initio Prediction of Transcription Factor Targets Using Structural Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Tommy; Friedman, Nir; Margalit, Hanah

    2005-01-01

    Current approaches for identification and detection of transcription factor binding sites rely on an extensive set of known target genes. Here we describe a novel structure-based approach applicable to transcription factors with no prior binding data. Our approach combines sequence data and structural information to infer context-specific amino acid–nucleotide recognition preferences. These are used to predict binding sites for novel transcription factors from the same structural family. We demonstrate our approach on the Cys2His2 Zinc Finger protein family, and show that the learned DNA-recognition preferences are compatible with experimental results. We use these preferences to perform a genome-wide scan for direct targets of Drosophila melanogaster Cys2His2 transcription factors. By analyzing the predicted targets along with gene annotation and expression data we infer the function and activity of these proteins. PMID:16103898

  3. Transcriptional expression of Epstein-Barr virus genes and proto-oncogenes in north African nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sbih-Lammali, F; Djennaoui, D; Belaoui, H; Bouguermouh, A; Decaussin, G; Ooka, T

    1996-05-01

    Cases of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) from North Africa show an unusual bimodal age distribution. As elsewhere, the tumor is closely associated with the presence of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The expression of EBV genes and c-onc genes was studied in biopsy specimens from tumors at different clinical stages from 11 young (10 to 30-year-old) and 11 adult (30 to 65-year-old) patients. It was found that the two age groups do not differ in their pattern of gene expression, that there is a tendency for later stage biopsies to express more viral and c-onc transcripts, and that samples expressing larger numbers of EBV genes also tend to express many different c-onc specificities. PMID:8732865

  4. Identification of polymorphisms and transcriptional activity of the proto-oncogene KIT located on both autosomal and B chromosomes of the Chinese raccoon dog.

    PubMed

    Li, Y M; Zhang, Y; Zhu, W J; Yan, S Q; Sun, J H

    2016-01-01

    B chromosomes are dispensable and co-exist with autosomal and sex chromosomes. The karyotype of the Chinese raccoon dog (Nyctereutes procyonoides procyonoides) comprises 0-4 B chromosomes. The proto-oncogene KIT is found on all B chromosomes of the Chinese raccoon dog. In the present study, partial DNA and mRNA sequences of KIT were amplified and sequenced from four individuals containing B chromosomes. Sequence analyses revealed that polymorphisms including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and inserts/deletions were rich in the KIT gene of Chinese raccoon dog at the genomic level. However, no polymorphism was detected at the mRNA level. A comparison of mRNA sequences from Chinese raccoon dogs with the corresponding sequences derived from arctic fox and dog, which do not contain B chromosomes, revealed the mRNA sequences of the 10 SNPs to be identical between these three species. Therefore, these findings suggest that KIT located on the B chromosomes in Chinese raccoon dog lacks transcriptional activity. PMID:26909958

  5. Cooperative activation of Xenopus rhodopsin transcription by paired-like transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In vertebrates, rod photoreceptor-specific gene expression is regulated by the large Maf and Pax-like transcription factors, Nrl/LNrl and Crx/Otx5. The ubiquitous occurrence of their target DNA binding sites throughout rod-specific gene promoters suggests that multiple transcription factor interactions within the promoter are functionally important. Cooperative action by these transcription factors activates rod-specific genes such as rhodopsin. However, a quantitative mechanistic explanation of transcriptional rate determinants is lacking. Results We investigated the contributions of various paired-like transcription factors and their cognate cis-elements to rhodopsin gene activation using cultured cells to quantify activity. The Xenopus rhodopsin promoter (XOP) has a bipartite structure, with ~200 bp proximal to the start site (RPP) coordinating cooperative activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 and the adjacent 5300 bp upstream sequence increasing the overall expression level. The synergistic activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 also occurred when XOP was stably integrated into the genome. We determined that Crx/Otx5 synergistically activated transcription independently and additively through the two Pax-like cis-elements, BAT1 and Ret4, but not through Ret1. Other Pax-like family members, Rax1 and Rax2, do not synergistically activate XOP transcription with Nrl/LNrl and/or Crx/Otx5; rather they act as co-activators via the Ret1 cis-element. Conclusions We have provided a quantitative model of cooperative transcriptional activation of the rhodopsin promoter through interaction of Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl at two paired-like cis-elements proximal to the NRE and TATA binding site. Further, we have shown that Rax genes act in cooperation with Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl as co-activators of rhodopsin transcription. PMID:24499263

  6. Determination of Acetylation of the Gli Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Coni, Sonia; Di Magno, Laura; Canettieri, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    The Gli transcription factors (Gli1, Gli2, and Gli3) are the final effectors of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling and play a key role in development and cancer. The activity of the Gli proteins is finely regulated by covalent modifications, such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and acetylation. Both Gli1 and Gli2 are acetylated at a conserved lysine, and this modification causes the inhibition of their transcriptional activity. Thus, the acetylation status of these proteins represents a useful marker to monitor Hh activation in pathophysiological conditions. Herein we describe the techniques utilized to detect in vitro and intracellular acetylation of the Gli transcription factors. PMID:26179046

  7. Small-molecule regulators that mimic transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martínez, José A.; Peterson-Kaufman, Kimberly J.; Ansari, Aseem Z.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are responsible for decoding and expressing the information stored in the genome, which dictates cellular function. Creating artificial transcription factors (ATFs) that mimic endogenous TFs is a major goal at the interface of biology, chemistry, and molecular medicine. Such molecular tools will be essential for deciphering and manipulating transcriptional networks that lead to particular cellular states. In this minireview, the framework for the design of functional ATFs is presented and current challenges in the successful implementation of ATFs are discussed. PMID:20804876

  8. Potential Role of Activating Transcription Factor 5 during Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vicari, Luisa; Calabrese, Giovanna; Forte, Stefano; Giuffrida, Raffaella; Colarossi, Cristina; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; Memeo, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells are an abundant population of stem cells readily isolated from human adipose tissue that can differentiate into connective tissue lineages including bone, cartilage, fat, and muscle. Activating transcription factor 5 is a transcription factor of the ATF/cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) family. It is transcribed in two types of mRNAs (activating transcription factor 5 isoform 1 and activating transcription factor 5 isoform 2), encoding the same single 30-kDa protein. Although it is well demonstrated that it regulates the proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, little is known about its potential role in osteogenic differentiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression levels of the two isoforms and protein during osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells. Our data indicate that activating transcription factor 5 is differentially expressed reaching a peak of expression at the stage of bone mineralization. These findings suggest that activating transcription factor 5 could play an interesting regulatory role during osteogenesis, which would provide a powerful tool to study bone physiology. PMID:26770207

  9. Regulons of global transcription factors in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Koichi; Inui, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum, a high GC content gram-positive soil bacterium in Actinobacteria, has been used for the industrial production of amino acids and engineered to produce various compounds, including polymer building blocks and biofuels. Since its genome sequence was first published, its versatile metabolic pathways and their genetic components and regulatory mechanisms have been extensively studied. Previous studies on transcriptional factors, including two-component systems and σ factors, in the bacterium have revealed transcriptional regulatory links among the metabolic pathways and those among the stress response systems, forming a complex transcriptional regulatory network. The regulatory links are based on knowledge of the transcription factors, such as their target genes (regulons), DNA sequence motifs for recognition, and effector molecules controlling their activities, all of which are fundamental for understanding their physiological functions. Recent advances in chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-based genome-wide analyses provide an opportunity to comprehensively identify the transcription factor regulon, composed of its direct target genes, and its precise consensus binding motif. A common feature among the regulon constituents may provide clues to identify an effector molecule targeting the factor. In this mini-review, we summarize the current knowledge of the regulons of the C. glutamicum transcription factors that have been analyzed via ChIP-based technologies. The regulons consisting of direct target genes revealed new physiological roles of the transcription factors and new regulatory interactions, contributing to refinement and expansion of the transcriptional regulatory network and the development of guidelines and genetic tools for metabolic engineering of C. glutamicum. PMID:26496920

  10. Ab initio prediction of transcription factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Liu, L Angela; Bader, Joel S

    2007-01-01

    Transcription factors are DNA-binding proteins that control gene transcription by binding specific short DNA sequences. Experiments that identify transcription factor binding sites are often laborious and expensive, and the binding sites of many transcription factors remain unknown. We present a computational scheme to predict the binding sites directly from transcription factor sequence using all-atom molecular simulations. This method is a computational counterpart to recent high-throughput experimental technologies that identify transcription factor binding sites (ChIP-chip and protein-dsDNA binding microarrays). The only requirement of our method is an accurate 3D structural model of a transcription factor-DNA complex. We apply free energy calculations by thermodynamic integration to compute the change in binding energy of the complex due to a single base pair mutation. By calculating the binding free energy differences for all possible single mutations, we construct a position weight matrix for the predicted binding sites that can be directly compared with experimental data. As water-bridged hydrogen bonds between the transcription factor and DNA often contribute to the binding specificity, we include explicit solvent in our simulations. We present successful predictions for the yeast MAT-alpha2 homeodomain and GCN4 bZIP proteins. Water-bridged hydrogen bonds are found to be more prevalent than direct protein-DNA hydrogen bonds at the binding interfaces, indicating why empirical potentials with implicit water may be less successful in predicting binding. Our methodology can be applied to a variety of DNA-binding proteins. PMID:17990512

  11. Multiple Transcription Factor Families Regulate Axon Growth and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Darcie L.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding axon regenerative failure remains a major goal in neuroscience, and reversing this failure remains a major goal for clinical neurology. While an inhibitory CNS environment clearly plays a role, focus on molecular pathways within neurons has begun to yield fruitful insights. Initial steps forward investigated the receptors and signaling pathways immediately downstream of environmental cues, but recent work has also shed light on transcriptional control mechanisms that regulate intrinsic axon growth ability, presumably through whole cassettes of gene target regulation. Here we will discuss transcription factors that regulate neurite growth in vitro and in vivo, including p53, SnoN, E47, CREB, STAT3, NFAT, c-Jun, ATF3, Sox11, NFκB, and Kruppel-like factors (KLFs). Revealing the similarities and differences among the functions of these transcription factors may further our understanding of the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation in axon growth and regeneration. PMID:21674813

  12. Role of transcription factors in peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Patodia, Smriti; Raivich, Gennadij

    2012-01-01

    Following axotomy, the activation of multiple intracellular signaling cascades causes the expression of a cocktail of regeneration-associated transcription factors which interact with each other to determine the fate of the injured neurons. The nerve injury response is channeled through manifold and parallel pathways, integrating diverse inputs, and controlling a complex transcriptional output. Transcription factors form a vital link in the chain of regeneration, converting injury-induced stress signals into downstream protein expression via gene regulation. They can regulate the intrinsic ability of axons to grow, by controlling expression of whole cassettes of gene targets. In this review, we have investigated the functional roles of a number of different transcription factors - c-Jun, activating transcription factor 3, cAMP response element binding protein, signal transducer, and activator of transcription-3, CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins β and δ, Oct-6, Sox11, p53, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cell, and ELK3 - in peripheral nerve regeneration. Studies involving use of conditional mutants, microarrays, promoter region mapping, and different injury paradigms, have enabled us to understand their distinct as well as overlapping roles in achieving anatomical and functional regeneration after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:22363260

  13. Epigenetic program and transcription factor circuitry of dendritic cell development.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiong; Chauvistré, Heike; Costa, Ivan G; Gusmao, Eduardo G; Mitzka, Saskia; Hänzelmann, Sonja; Baying, Bianka; Klisch, Theresa; Moriggl, Richard; Hennuy, Benoit; Smeets, Hubert; Hoffmann, Kurt; Benes, Vladimir; Seré, Kristin; Zenke, Martin

    2015-11-16

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that develop from hematopoietic stem cells through successive steps of lineage commitment and differentiation. Multipotent progenitors (MPP) are committed to DC restricted common DC progenitors (CDP), which differentiate into specific DC subsets, classical DC (cDC) and plasmacytoid DC (pDC). To determine epigenetic states and regulatory circuitries during DC differentiation, we measured consecutive changes of genome-wide gene expression, histone modification and transcription factor occupancy during the sequel MPP-CDP-cDC/pDC. Specific histone marks in CDP reveal a DC-primed epigenetic signature, which is maintained and reinforced during DC differentiation. Epigenetic marks and transcription factor PU.1 occupancy increasingly coincide upon DC differentiation. By integrating PU.1 occupancy and gene expression we devised a transcription factor regulatory circuitry for DC commitment and subset specification. The circuitry provides the transcription factor hierarchy that drives the sequel MPP-CDP-cDC/pDC, including Irf4, Irf8, Tcf4, Spib and Stat factors. The circuitry also includes feedback loops inferred for individual or multiple factors, which stabilize distinct stages of DC development and DC subsets. In summary, here we describe the basic regulatory circuitry of transcription factors that drives DC development. PMID:26476451

  14. Epigenetic program and transcription factor circuitry of dendritic cell development

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qiong; Chauvistré, Heike; Costa, Ivan G.; Gusmao, Eduardo G.; Mitzka, Saskia; Hänzelmann, Sonja; Baying, Bianka; Klisch, Theresa; Moriggl, Richard; Hennuy, Benoit; Smeets, Hubert; Hoffmann, Kurt; Benes, Vladimir; Seré, Kristin; Zenke, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen presenting cells that develop from hematopoietic stem cells through successive steps of lineage commitment and differentiation. Multipotent progenitors (MPP) are committed to DC restricted common DC progenitors (CDP), which differentiate into specific DC subsets, classical DC (cDC) and plasmacytoid DC (pDC). To determine epigenetic states and regulatory circuitries during DC differentiation, we measured consecutive changes of genome-wide gene expression, histone modification and transcription factor occupancy during the sequel MPP-CDP-cDC/pDC. Specific histone marks in CDP reveal a DC-primed epigenetic signature, which is maintained and reinforced during DC differentiation. Epigenetic marks and transcription factor PU.1 occupancy increasingly coincide upon DC differentiation. By integrating PU.1 occupancy and gene expression we devised a transcription factor regulatory circuitry for DC commitment and subset specification. The circuitry provides the transcription factor hierarchy that drives the sequel MPP-CDP-cDC/pDC, including Irf4, Irf8, Tcf4, Spib and Stat factors. The circuitry also includes feedback loops inferred for individual or multiple factors, which stabilize distinct stages of DC development and DC subsets. In summary, here we describe the basic regulatory circuitry of transcription factors that drives DC development. PMID:26476451

  15. Role of large MAF transcription factors in the mouse endocrine pancreas

    PubMed Central

    ABDELLATIF, Ahmed M.; OGATA, Kiyohito; KUDO, Takashi; XIAFUKAITI, Gulibaikelamu; CHANG, Yu-Hsin; KATOH, Megumi C.; EL-MORSY, Salah E.; OISHI, Hisashi; TAKAHASHI, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    The members of the MAF family of transcription factors are homologs of v-Maf –the oncogenic component of the avian retrovirus AS42. The MAF family is subdivided into 2 groups, small and large MAFs. To elucidate the role of the large MAF transcription factors in the endocrine pancreas, we analyzed large MAF gene knockout mice. It has been shown that Mafa−/− mice develop phenotypes including abnormal islet structure soon after birth. This study revealed that Ins1 and Ins2 transcripts and the protein contents were significantly reduced in Mafa−/− mice at embryonic day 18.5. In addition, Mafa−/−;Mafb−/− mice contained less than 10% of the insulin transcript and protein of those of wild-type mice, suggesting that Mafa and Mafb cooperate to maintain insulin levels at the embryonic stage. On the other hand, the number of insulin-positive cells in Mafa−/− mice was comparable to that of wild-type mice, and even under a Mafb-deficient background the number of insulin-positive cells was not decreased, suggesting that Mafb plays a dominant role in embryonic β-cell development. We also found that at 20 weeks of age Mafa−/−;Mafb+/− mice showed a higher fasting blood glucose level than single Mafa−/− mice. In summary, our results indicate that Mafa is necessary for the maintenance of normal insulin levels even in embryos and that Mafb is important for the maintenance of fasting blood glucose levels in the Mafa-deficient background in adults. PMID:25912440

  16. HOTAIR IS A NEGATIVE PROGNOSTIC FACTOR AND EXHIBITS PRO-ONCOGENIC ACTIVITY IN PANCREATIC CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyounghyun; Jutooru, Indira; Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Johnson, Greg; Frank, James; Burghardt, Robert; Kim, Sangbae; Safe, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    HOTAIR is a long intervening non-coding RNA (lincRNA) that associates with the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) and overexpression is correlated with poor survival for breast, colon and liver cancer patients. In this study, we show that HOTAIR expression is increased in pancreatic tumors compared to non-tumor tissue and is associated with more aggressive tumors. Knockdown of HOTAIR (siHOTAIR) by RNA interference shows that HOTAIR plays an important role in pancreatic cancer cell invasion and as reported in other cancer cell lines. In contrast, HOTAIR knockdown in Panc1 and L3.6pL pancreatic cancer cells that overexpress this lincRNA decreased cell proliferation, altered cell cycle progression, and induced apoptosis, demonstrating an expanded function for HOTAIR in pancreatic cancer cells compared to other cancer cell lines. Results of gene array studies showed that there was minimal overlap between HOTAIR-regulated genes in pancreatic vs. breast cancer cells and HOTAIR uniquely suppressed several interferon-related genes and gene sets related to cell cycle progression in pancreatic cancer cells and tumors. Analysis of selected genes suppressed by HOTAIR in Panc1 and L3.6 pL cells showed by knockdown of EZH2 and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays that HOTAIR-mediated gene repression was both PRC2-dependent and -independent. HOTAIR knockdown in L3.6pL cells inhibited tumor growth in mouse xenograft model, further demonstrating the pro-oncogenic function of HOTAIR in pancreatic cancer. PMID:22614017

  17. Circuitry and dynamics of human transcription factor regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Neph, Shane; Stergachis, Andrew B.; Reynolds, Alex; Sandstrom, Richard; Borenstein, Elhanan; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The combinatorial cross-regulation of hundreds of sequence-specific transcription factors defines a regulatory network that underlies cellular identity and function. Here we use genome-wide maps of in vivo DNaseI footprints to assemble an extensive core human regulatory network comprising connections among 475 sequence-specific transcription factors, and to analyze the dynamics of these connections across 41 diverse cell and tissue types. We find that human transcription factor networks are highly cell-selective and are driven by cohorts of factors that include regulators with previously unrecognized roles in control of cellular identity. Moreover, we identify many widely expressed factors that impact transcriptional regulatory networks in a cell-selective manner. Strikingly, in spite of their inherent diversity, all cell type regulatory networks independently converge on a common architecture that closely resembles the topology of living neuronal networks. Together, our results provide the first description of the circuitry, dynamics, and organizing principles of the human transcription factor regulatory network. PMID:22959076

  18. Transcription factors ETS2 and MESP1 transdifferentiate human dermal fibroblasts into cardiac progenitors.

    PubMed

    Islas, Jose Francisco; Liu, Yu; Weng, Kuo-Chan; Robertson, Matthew J; Zhang, Shuxing; Prejusa, Allan; Harger, John; Tikhomirova, Dariya; Chopra, Mani; Iyer, Dinakar; Mercola, Mark; Oshima, Robert G; Willerson, James T; Potaman, Vladimir N; Schwartz, Robert J

    2012-08-01

    Unique insights for the reprograming of cell lineages have come from embryonic development in the ascidian Ciona, which is dependent upon the transcription factors Ci-ets1/2 and Ci-mesp to generate cardiac progenitors. We tested the idea that mammalian v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2 (ETS2) and mesoderm posterior (MESP) homolog may be used to convert human dermal fibroblasts into cardiac progenitors. Here we show that murine ETS2 has a critical role in directing cardiac progenitors during cardiopoiesis in embryonic stem cells. We then use lentivirus-mediated forced expression of human ETS2 to convert normal human dermal fibroblasts into replicative cells expressing the cardiac mesoderm marker KDR(+). However, although neither ETS2 nor the purported cardiac master regulator MESP1 can by themselves generate cardiac progenitors de novo from fibroblasts, forced coexpression of ETS2 and MESP1 or cell treatment with purified proteins reprograms fibroblasts into cardiac progenitors, as shown by the de novo appearance of core cardiac transcription factors, Ca(2+) transients, and sarcomeres. Our data indicate that ETS2 and MESP1 play important roles in a genetic network that governs cardiopoiesis. PMID:22826236

  19. Gene Expression in Mouse Thyrotrope Adenoma: Transcription Elongation Factor Stimulates Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Gergics, Peter; Christian, Helen C; Choo, Monica S; Ajmal, Adnan; Camper, Sally A

    2016-09-01

    Thyrotrope hyperplasia and hypertrophy are common responses to primary hypothyroidism. To understand the genetic regulation of these processes, we studied gene expression changes in the pituitaries of Cga(-/-) mice, which are deficient in the common α-subunit of TSH, LH, and FSH. These mice have thyrotrope hypertrophy and hyperplasia and develop thyrotrope adenoma. We report that cell proliferation is increased, but the expression of most stem cell markers is unchanged. The α-subunit is required for secretion of the glycoprotein hormone β-subunits, and mutants exhibit elevated expression of many genes involved in the unfolded protein response, consistent with dilation and stress of the endoplasmic reticulum. Mutants have elevated expression of transcription factors that are important in thyrotrope function, such as Gata2 and Islet 1, and those that stimulate proliferation, including Nupr1, E2f1, and Etv5. We characterized the expression and function of a novel, overexpressed gene, transcription elongation factor A (SII)-like 5 (Tceal5). Stable expression of Tceal5 in a pituitary progenitor cell line is sufficient to increase cell proliferation. Thus, Tceal5 may act as a proto-oncogene. This study provides a rich resource for comparing pituitary transcriptomes and an analysis of gene expression networks. PMID:27580811

  20. Oncogene swap as a novel mechanism of acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Suda, Kenichi; Murakami, Isao; Sakai, Kazuko; Sato, Katsuaki; Kobayashi, Yoshihisa; Shimoji, Masaki; Chiba, Masato; Sesumi, Yuichi; Tomizawa, Kenji; Takemoto, Toshiki; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Nishio, Kazuto; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    Mutant selective epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), such as rociletinib and AZD9291, are effective for tumors with T790M secondary mutation that become refractory to first-generation EGFR-TKI. However, acquired resistance to these prospective drugs is anticipated considering the high adaptability of cancer cells and the mechanisms remain largely obscure. Here, CNX-2006 (tool compound of rociletinib) resistant sublines were established by chronic exposure of HCC827EPR cells harboring exon 19 deletion and T790M to CNX-2006. Through the analyses of these resistant subclones, we identified two resistant mechanisms accompanied by MET amplification. One was bypass signaling by MET amplification in addition to T790M, which was inhibited by the combination of CNX-2006 and MET-TKI. Another was loss of amplified EGFR mutant allele including T790M while acquiring MET amplification. Interestingly, MET-TKI alone was able to overcome this resistance, suggesting that oncogenic dependence completely shifted from EGFR to MET. We propose describing this phenomenon as an "oncogene swap." Furthermore, we analyzed multiple lesions from a patient who died of acquired resistance to gefitinib, then found a clinical example of an oncogene swap in which the EGFR mutation was lost and a MET gene copy was gained. In conclusion, an "oncogene swap" from EGFR to MET is a novel resistant mechanism to the EGFR-TKI. This novel mechanism should be considered in order to avoid futile inhibition of the original oncogene. PMID:26845230

  1. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    PubMed

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis. PMID:26038756

  2. A heteromeric transcription factor required for mammalian RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, S; Tanaka, Y; Kawaguchi, T; Nagaoka, T; Weissman, S M; Yasukochi, Y

    1990-01-01

    A general transcription factor, FC, essential for specific initiation of in vitro transcription by mammalian RNA polymerase II was identified and a procedure developed to purify it to near homogeneity from HeLa cell nuclei. Purified FC is composed of two polypeptides of apparent molecular masses 80 kDa and 30 kDa, on SDS-PAGE, and has a native size of 280 kDa estimated by gel filtration column. Both polypeptides were shown to be essential for reconstituting in vitro transcription activity. Biochemical analysis showed that the 80 kDa and 30 kDa components were present in a 1:1 molar ratio. FC was also demonstrated to interact directly or indirectly with purified RNA polymerase II. Similarities between FC and transcription factors reported by others from human, rat or Drosophila cells are discussed. Images PMID:2395645

  3. Selective Activation of Transcription by a Novel CCAAT Binding Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Sankar N.; Golumbek, Paul T.; Karsenty, Gerard; de Crombrugghe, Benoit

    1988-07-01

    A novel CCAAT binding factor (CBF) composed of two different subunits has been extensively purified from rat liver. Both subunits are needed for specific binding to DNA. Addition of this purified protein to nuclear extracts of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts stimulates transcription from several promoters including the α 2(I) collagen, the α 1(I) collagen, the Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat (RSV-LTR), and the adenovirus major late promoter. Point mutations in the CCAAT motif that show either no binding or a decreased binding of CBF likewise abolish or reduce activation of transcription by CBF. Activation of transcription requires, therefore, the specific binding of CBF to its recognition sites.

  4. Oncogene regulation. An oncogenic super-enhancer formed through somatic mutation of a noncoding intergenic element.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Marc R; Abraham, Brian J; Anders, Lars; Berezovskaya, Alla; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Durbin, Adam D; Etchin, Julia; Lawton, Lee; Sallan, Stephen E; Silverman, Lewis B; Loh, Mignon L; Hunger, Stephen P; Sanda, Takaomi; Young, Richard A; Look, A Thomas

    2014-12-12

    In certain human cancers, the expression of critical oncogenes is driven from large regulatory elements, called super-enhancers, that recruit much of the cell's transcriptional apparatus and are defined by extensive acetylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27ac). In a subset of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cases, we found that heterozygous somatic mutations are acquired that introduce binding motifs for the MYB transcription factor in a precise noncoding site, which creates a super-enhancer upstream of the TAL1 oncogene. MYB binds to this new site and recruits its H3K27 acetylase-binding partner CBP, as well as core components of a major leukemogenic transcriptional complex that contains RUNX1, GATA-3, and TAL1 itself. Additionally, most endogenous super-enhancers found in T-ALL cells are occupied by MYB and CBP, which suggests a general role for MYB in super-enhancer initiation. Thus, this study identifies a genetic mechanism responsible for the generation of oncogenic super-enhancers in malignant cells. PMID:25394790

  5. Stromal control of oncogenic traits expressed in response to the overexpression of GLI2, a pleiotropic oncogene.

    PubMed

    Snijders, A M; Huey, B; Connelly, S T; Roy, R; Jordan, R C K; Schmidt, B L; Albertson, D G

    2009-02-01

    Hedgehog signaling is often activated in tumors, yet it remains unclear how GLI2, a transcription factor activated by this pathway, acts as an oncogene. We show that GLI2 is a pleiotropic oncogene. The overexpression induces genomic instability and blocks differentiation, likely mediated in part by enhanced expression of the stem cell gene SOX2. GLI2 also induces transforming growth factor (TGF)B1-dependent transdifferentiation of foreskin and tongue, but not gingival fibroblasts into myofibroblasts, creating an environment permissive for invasion by keratinocytes, which are in various stages of differentiation having downregulated GLI2. Thus, upregulated GLI2 expression is sufficient to induce a number of the acquired characteristics of tumor cells; however, the stroma, in a tissue-specific manner, determines whether certain GLI2 oncogenic traits are expressed. PMID:19015636

  6. Mechanistic duality of transcription factor function in phytochrome signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phytochrome (phy) family of sensory photoreceptors (phyA–E in Arabidopsis) elicit changes in gene expression after light-induced migration to the nucleus, where they interact with basic helix–loop–helix transcription factors, such as phytochrome-interacting factor 3 (PIF3). The mechanism by whic...

  7. The molecular biology and nomenclature of the activating transcription factor/cAMP responsive element binding family of transcription factors: activating transcription factor proteins and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hai, T; Hartman, M G

    2001-07-25

    The mammalian ATF/CREB family of transcription factors represents a large group of basic region-leucine zipper (bZip) proteins which was originally defined in the late 1980s by their ability to bind to the consensus ATF/CRE site 'TGACGTCA'. Over the past decade, cDNA clones encoding identical or homologous proteins have been isolated by different laboratories and given different names. These proteins can be grouped into subgroups according to their amino acid similarity. In this review, we will briefly describe the classification of these proteins with a historical perspective of their nomenclature. We will then review three members of the ATF/CREB family of proteins: ATF3, ATF4 and ATF6. We will address four issues for each protein: (a) homologous proteins and alternative names, (b) dimer formation with other bZip proteins, (c) transcriptional activity, and (d) potential physiological functions. Although the name Activating Transcription Factor (ATF) implies that they are transcriptional activators, some of these proteins are transcriptional repressors. ATF3 homodimer is a transcriptional repressor and ATF4 has been reported to be either an activator or a repressor. We will review the reports on the transcriptional activities of ATF4, and propose potential explanations for the discrepancy. Although the physiological functions of these proteins are not well understood, some clues can be gained from studies with different approaches. When the data are available, we will address the following questions. (a) How is the expression (at the mRNA level or protein level) regulated? (b) How are the transcriptional activities regulated? (c) What are the interacting proteins (other than bZip partners)? (d) What are the consequences of ectopically expressing the gene (gain-of-function) or deleting the gene (loss-of-function)? Although answers to these questions are far from being complete, together they provide clues to the functions of these ATF proteins. Despite the

  8. Theory on the dynamic memory in the transcription-factor-mediated transcription activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, R.

    2011-04-01

    We develop a theory to explain the origin of the static and dynamical memory effects in transcription-factor-mediated transcription activation. Our results suggest that the following inequality conditions should be satisfied to observe such memory effects: (a) τL≫max(τR,τE), (b) τLT≫τT, and (c) τI⩾(τEL+τTR) where τL is the average time required for the looping-mediated spatial interactions of enhancer—transcription-factor complex with the corresponding promoter—RNA-polymerase or eukaryotic RNA polymerase type II (PolII in eukaryotes) complex that is located L base pairs away from the cis-acting element, (τR,τE) are respectively the search times required for the site-specific binding of the RNA polymerase and the transcription factor with the respective promoter and the cis-regulatory module, τLT is the time associated with the relaxation of the looped-out segment of DNA that connects the cis-acting site and promoter, τT is the time required to generate a complete transcript, τI is the transcription initiation time, τEL is the elongation time, and τTR is the termination time. We have theoretically derived the expressions for the various searching, looping, and loop-relaxation time components. Using the experimentally determined values of various time components we further show that the dynamical memory effects cannot be experimentally observed whenever the segment of DNA that connects the cis-regulatory element with the promoter is not loaded with bulky histone bodies. Our analysis suggests that the presence of histone-mediated compaction of the connecting segment of DNA can result in higher values of looping and loop-relaxation times, which is the origin of the static memory in the transcription activation that is mediated by the memory gene loops in eukaryotes.

  9. Activation of archaeal transcription mediated by recruitment of transcription factor B.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Simon M; Thumann, Sybille; Richau, Renate; Weirauch, Matt T; Lowe, Todd M; Thomm, Michael; Hausner, Winfried

    2012-05-25

    Archaeal promoters consist of a TATA box and a purine-rich adjacent upstream sequence (transcription factor B (TFB)-responsive element (BRE)), which are bound by the transcription factors TATA box-binding protein (TBP) and TFB. Currently, only a few activators of archaeal transcription have been experimentally characterized. The best studied activator, Ptr2, mediates activation by recruitment of TBP. Here, we present a detailed biochemical analysis of an archaeal transcriptional activator, PF1088, which was identified in Pyrococcus furiosus by a bioinformatic approach. Operon predictions suggested that an upstream gene, pf1089, is polycistronically transcribed with pf1088. We demonstrate that PF1088 stimulates in vitro transcription by up to 7-fold when the pf1089 promoter is used as a template. By DNase I and hydroxyl radical footprinting experiments, we show that the binding site of PF1088 is located directly upstream of the BRE of pf1089. Mutational analysis indicated that activation requires the presence of the binding site for PF1088. Furthermore, we show that activation of transcription by PF1088 is dependent upon the presence of an imperfect BRE and is abolished when the pf1089 BRE is replaced with a BRE from a strong archaeal promoter. Gel shift experiments showed that TFB recruitment to the pf1089 operon is stimulated by PF1088, and TFB seems to stabilize PF1088 operator binding even in the absence of TBP. Taken together, these results represent the first biochemical evidence for a transcriptional activator working as a TFB recruitment factor in Archaea, for which the designation TFB-RF1 is suggested. PMID:22496454

  10. Specification of the Cardiac Conduction System by Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Hatcher, Cathy J.; Basson, Craig T.

    2009-01-01

    Diseases of the cardiovascular system that cause sudden cardiac deaths are often caused by lethal arrhythmias that originate from defects in the cardiac conduction system. Development of the cardiac conduction system is a complex biological process that can be wrought with problems. Although several genes involved in mature conduction system function have been identified, their association with development of specific subcomponents of the cardiac conduction system remains challenging. Several transcription factors, including homeodomain proteins and T-box proteins, are essential for cardiac conduction system morphogenesis and activation or repression of key regulatory genes. In addition, several transcription factors modify expression of genes encoding the ion channel proteins that contribute to the electrophysiological properties of the conduction system and govern contraction of the surrounding myocardium. Loss of transcriptional regulation during cardiac development has detrimental effects on cardiogenesis that may lead to arrhythmias. Human genetic mutations in some of these transcription factors have been identified and are known to cause congenital heart diseases that include cardiac conduction system malformations. In this review, we summarize the contributions of several key transcription factors to specification, patterning, maturation and function of the cardiac conduction system. Further analysis of the molecular programs involved in this process should lead to improved diagnosis and therapy of conduction system disease. PMID:19797194

  11. Transcription factors in late megakaryopoiesis and related platelet disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tijssen, M R; Ghevaert, C

    2013-01-01

    Cell type-specific transcription factors regulate the repertoire of genes expressed in a cell and thereby determine its phenotype. The differentiation of megakaryocytes, the platelet progenitors, from hematopoietic stem cells is a well-known process that can be mimicked in culture. However, the efficient formation of platelets in culture remains a challenge. Platelet formation is a complicated process including megakaryocyte maturation, platelet assembly and platelet shedding. We hypothesize that a better understanding of the transcriptional regulation of this process will allow us to influence it such that sufficient numbers of platelets can be produced for clinical applications. After an introduction to gene regulation and platelet formation, this review summarizes the current knowledge of the regulation of platelet formation by the transcription factors EVI1, GATA1, FLI1, NFE2, RUNX1, SRF and its co-factor MKL1, and TAL1. Also covered is how some platelet disorders including myeloproliferative neoplasms, result from disturbances of the transcriptional regulation. These disorders give us invaluable insights into the crucial role these transcription factors play in platelet formation. Finally, there is discussion of how a better understanding of these processes will be needed to allow for efficient production of platelets in vitro. PMID:23311859

  12. SoxD Transcription Factors: Multifaceted Players of Neural Development

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Eun Hye; Kim, Jaesang

    2016-01-01

    SoxD transcription factor subfamily includes three members, Sox5, Sox6, and Sox13. Like other Sox genes, they contain the High-Mobility-Group (HMG) box as the DNA binding domain but in addition feature the subgroup-specific leucine zipper motif. SoxD genes are expressed in diverse cell types in multiple organs during embryogenesis and in adulthood. Among the cells expressing them are those present in the developing nervous system including neural stem (or progenitor) cells as well as differentiating neurons and oligodendrocytes. SoxD transcription factors do not contain distinct activator or repressor domain, and they are believed to function in modulation of other transcription factors in promoter-specific manners. This brief review article will attempt to summarize the latest studies on the function of SoxD genes in embryogenesis with a particular emphasis on the regulation of neural development. PMID:27426080

  13. Transcription factors in the development of inner ear hair cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuna; Qian, Wei; Jiang, Guochang; Ma, Yongming

    2016-01-01

    Inner ear hair cells are the sensory receptors that detect and convert sound vibrations and head movements into neural signals. However, in humans, these cells are unable to regenerate if they are damaged or lost. Over thepast decade,there has been an exponential increase in interest and progress in understanding of the development of the inner ear and of hair cells, aiming to gain insights into hair cell repair or even regeneration. In hair cell development, various transcription factors have been found to be involved in the processes of hair cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Among these transcription factors, Math1, Gata3, Sox2 and Atoh1 have been highlighted for their crucial role in the fate of hair cells. In this article, we will summarize the current understanding of the role of transcription factors in hair cell development, focusing on the role and possible mechanisms of Math1, Gata3, Sox2 and Atoh1. PMID:27100495

  14. Identifying genetic modulators of the connectivity between transcription factors and their transcriptional targets

    PubMed Central

    Fazlollahi, Mina; Muroff, Ivor; Lee, Eunjee; Causton, Helen C.; Bussemaker, Harmen J.

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression by transcription factors (TFs) is highly dependent on genetic background and interactions with cofactors. Identifying specific context factors is a major challenge that requires new approaches. Here we show that exploiting natural variation is a potent strategy for probing functional interactions within gene regulatory networks. We developed an algorithm to identify genetic polymorphisms that modulate the regulatory connectivity between specific transcription factors and their target genes in vivo. As a proof of principle, we mapped connectivity quantitative trait loci (cQTLs) using parallel genotype and gene expression data for segregants from a cross between two strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We identified a nonsynonymous mutation in the DIG2 gene as a cQTL for the transcription factor Ste12p and confirmed this prediction empirically. We also identified three polymorphisms in TAF13 as putative modulators of regulation by Gcn4p. Our method has potential for revealing how genetic differences among individuals influence gene regulatory networks in any organism for which gene expression and genotype data are available along with information on binding preferences for transcription factors. PMID:26966232

  15. Transcriptional regulation of drought response: a tortuous network of transcriptional factors

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Dhriti; Laxmi, Ashverya

    2015-01-01

    Drought is one of the leading factors responsible for the reduction in crop yield worldwide. Due to climate change, in future, more areas are going to be affected by drought and for prolonged periods. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying the drought response is one of the major scientific concerns for improving crop yield. Plants deploy diverse strategies and mechanisms to respond and tolerate drought stress. Expression of numerous genes is modulated in different plants under drought stress that help them to optimize their growth and development. Plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a major role in plant response and tolerance by regulating the expression of many genes under drought stress. Transcription factors being the major regulator of gene expression play a crucial role in stress response. ABA regulates the expression of most of the target genes through ABA-responsive element (ABRE) binding protein/ABRE binding factor (AREB/ABF) transcription factors. Genes regulated by AREB/ABFs constitute a regulon termed as AREB/ABF regulon. In addition to this, drought responsive genes are also regulated by ABA-independent mechanisms. In ABA-independent regulation, dehydration-responsive element binding protein (DREB), NAM, ATAF, and CUC regulons play an important role by regulating many drought-responsive genes. Apart from these major regulons, MYB/MYC, WRKY, and nuclear factor-Y (NF-Y) transcription factors are also involved in drought response and tolerance. Our understanding about transcriptional regulation of drought is still evolving. Recent reports have suggested the existence of crosstalk between different transcription factors operating under drought stress. In this article, we have reviewed various regulons working under drought stress and their crosstalk with each other. PMID:26579147

  16. Mitochondrial transcription termination factor 1 directs polar replication fork pausing

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yonghong; Posse, Viktor; Zhu, Xuefeng; Hyvärinen, Anne K.; Jacobs, Howard T.; Falkenberg, Maria; Gustafsson, Claes M.

    2016-01-01

    During replication of nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA), clashes with the transcription apparatus can cause replication fork collapse and genomic instability. To avoid this problem, a replication fork barrier protein is situated downstream of rDNA, there preventing replication in the direction opposite rDNA transcription. A potential candidate for a similar function in mitochondria is the mitochondrial transcription termination factor 1 (MTERF1, also denoted mTERF), which binds to a sequence just downstream of the ribosomal transcription unit. Previous studies have shown that MTERF1 prevents antisense transcription over the ribosomal RNA genes, a process which we here show to be independent of the transcription elongation factor TEFM. Importantly, we now demonstrate that MTERF1 arrests mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication with distinct polarity. The effect is explained by the ability of MTERF1 to act as a directional contrahelicase, blocking mtDNA unwinding by the mitochondrial helicase TWINKLE. This conclusion is also supported by in vivo evidence that MTERF1 stimulates TWINKLE pausing. We conclude that MTERF1 can direct polar replication fork arrest in mammalian mitochondria. PMID:27112570

  17. Transcription factor trapping by RNA in gene regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Sigova, Alla A; Abraham, Brian J; Ji, Xiong; Molinie, Benoit; Hannett, Nancy M; Guo, Yang Eric; Jangi, Mohini; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Sharp, Phillip A; Young, Richard A

    2015-11-20

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind specific sequences in promoter-proximal and -distal DNA elements to regulate gene transcription. RNA is transcribed from both of these DNA elements, and some DNA binding TFs bind RNA. Hence, RNA transcribed from regulatory elements may contribute to stable TF occupancy at these sites. We show that the ubiquitously expressed TF Yin-Yang 1 (YY1) binds to both gene regulatory elements and their associated RNA species across the entire genome. Reduced transcription of regulatory elements diminishes YY1 occupancy, whereas artificial tethering of RNA enhances YY1 occupancy at these elements. We propose that RNA makes a modest but important contribution to the maintenance of certain TFs at gene regulatory elements and suggest that transcription of regulatory elements produces a positive-feedback loop that contributes to the stability of gene expression programs. PMID:26516199

  18. Transcription factor trapping by RNA in gene regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Sigova, Alla A.; Abraham, Brian J.; Ji, Xiong; Molinie, Benoit; Hannett, Nancy M.; Eric Guo, Yang; Jangi, Mohini; Giallourakis, Cosmas C.; Sharp, Phillip A.; Young, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind specific sequences in promoter-proximal and distal DNA elements in order to regulate gene transcription. RNA is transcribed from both of these DNA elements, and some DNA-binding TFs bind RNA. Hence, RNA transcribed from regulatory elements may contribute to stable TF occupancy at these sites. We show that the ubiquitously expressed TF YY1 binds to both gene regulatory elements and also to their associated RNA species genome-wide. Reduced transcription of regulatory elements diminishes YY1 occupancy whereas artificial tethering of RNA enhances YY1 occupancy at these elements. We propose that RNA makes a modest but important contribution to the maintenance of certain TFs at gene regulatory elements and suggest that transcription of regulatory elements produces a positive feedback loop that contributes to the stability of gene expression programs. PMID:26516199

  19. SIRT1 inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells expressing pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, by suppression of {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Il-Rae; Koh, Sang Seok; Malilas, Waraporn; Srisuttee, Ratakorn; Moon, Jeong; Choi, Young-Whan; Horio, Yoshiyuki; Oh, Sangtaek; Chung, Young-Hwa

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 inhibits protein levels of {beta}-catenin and its transcriptional activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for the decrease of {beta}-catenin expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin is not required for GSK-3{beta} and Siah-1 but for proteosome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 activation inhibits proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells expressing PAUF. -- Abstract: Because we found in a recent study that pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF), a novel oncogene, induces a rapid proliferation of pancreatic cells by up-regulation of {beta}-catenin, we postulated that {beta}-catenin might be a target molecule for pancreatic cancer treatment. We thus speculated whether SIRT1, known to target {beta}-catenin in a colon cancer model, suppresses {beta}-catenin in those pancreatic cancer cells that express PAUF (Panc-PAUF). We further evaluated whether such suppression would lead to inhibition of the proliferation of these cells. The ectopic expression of either SIRT1 or resveratrol (an activator of SIRT1) suppressed levels of {beta}-catenin protein and its transcriptional activity in Panc-PAUF cells. Conversely, suppression of SIRT1 expression by siRNA enhanced {beta}-catenin expression and transcriptional activity. SIRT1 mutant analysis showed that nuclear localization of SIRT1 is not required for reduction of {beta}-catenin. Treatment with MG132, a proteasomal inhibitor, restored {beta}-catenin protein levels, suggesting that SIRT1-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin requires proteasomal activity. It was reported that inhibition of GSK-3{beta} or Siah-1 stabilizes {beta}-catenin in colon cancer cells, but suppression of GSK-3{beta} or Siah-1 using siRNA in the presence of resveratrol instead diminished {beta}-catenin protein levels in Panc-PAUF cells. This suggests that GSK-3{beta} and Siah-1 are not involved in SIRT1

  20. Genetic Interactions Between Transcription Factors Cause Natural Variation in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Gerke, Justin; Lorenz, Kim; Cohen, Barak

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the genetic basis of phenotypic diversity is limited by the paucity of examples in which multiple, interacting loci have been identified. We show that natural variation in the efficiency of sporulation, the program in yeast that initiates the sexual phase of the life cycle, between oak tree and vineyard strains is due to allelic variation between four nucleotide changes in three transcription factors: IME1, RME1, and RSF1. Furthermore, we identified that selection has shaped quantitative variation in yeast sporulation between strains. These results illustrate how genetic interactions between transcription factors are a major source of phenotypic diversity within species. PMID:19164747

  1. Homeodomain transcription factor and tumor suppressor Prep1 is required to maintain genomic stability.

    PubMed

    Iotti, Giorgio; Longobardi, Elena; Masella, Silvia; Dardaei, Leila; De Santis, Francesca; Micali, Nicola; Blasi, Francesco

    2011-07-19

    Prep1 is a homeodomain transcription factor that is essential in embryonic development and functions in the adult as a tumor suppressor. We show here that Prep1 is involved in maintaining genomic stability and preventing neoplastic transformation. Hypomorphic homozygous Prep1(i/i) fetal liver cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) exhibit increased basal DNA damage and normal DNA damage response after γ-irradiation compared with WT. Cytogenetic analysis shows the presence of numerous chromosomal aberrations and aneuploidy in very early-passage Prep1(i/i) MEFs. In human fibroblasts, acute Prep1 down-regulation by siRNA induces DNA damage response, like in Prep1(i/i) MEFs, together with an increase in heterochromatin-associated modifications: rapid increase of histone methylation and decreased transcription of satellite DNA. Ectopic expression of Prep1 rescues DNA damage and heterochromatin methylation. Inhibition of Suv39 activity blocks the chromatin but not the DNA damage phenotype. Finally, Prep1 deficiency facilitates cell immortalization, escape from oncogene-induced senescence, and H-Ras(V12)-dependent transformation. Importantly, the latter can be partially rescued by restoration of Prep1 level. The results show that the tumor suppressor role of Prep1 is associated with the maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:21715654

  2. The NF-M transcription factor is related to C/EBP beta and plays a role in signal transduction, differentiation and leukemogenesis of avian myelomonocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Katz, S; Kowenz-Leutz, E; Müller, C; Meese, K; Ness, S A; Leutz, A

    1993-04-01

    Retroviral oncogenes encode nuclear regulators of gene expression or signal transduction molecules, such as protein kinases, which stimulate the activity of cellular transcription factors. Here we describe the cloning of NF-M, a myeloid-specific transcription factor related to C/EBP beta, which is a target of activated protein kinases. NF-M stimulates the expression of the gene encoding cMGF, a myeloid cell-specific growth factor, creating an autocrine growth loop crucial to oncogene transformation of myeloid cells. The NF-M protein bound directly to the cMGF gene promoter and activated its transcription, even in erythroid cells where the promoter is usually inactive. In addition, a truncated, dominant-negative form of NF-M inhibited cMGF expression in macrophages, indicating that NF-M is required for the normal activation of the gene. When multipotent hematopoietic progenitor cells were stimulated to differentiate, NF-M expression was induced at a very early stage, suggesting that the transcription factor plays a role in lineage commitment. The stimulation of transformed myelomonocytic cells or of normal peripheral blood macrophages with kinases or LPS or TPA respectively, led to the rapid redistribution of NF-M protein from the cell bodies to the nucleus, consistent with the notion that NF-M was directly affected by such treatments. Our data indicate that NF-M plays a key role in myelomonocytic differentiation, in signal transduction during macrophage activation and in the development of myelogenous leukemia. PMID:8467792

  3. Transcription factors controlling development and function of innate lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Tanriver, Yakup; Diefenbach, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a heterogeneous group of lymphocytes, which play an important role in tissue homeostasis at epithelial surfaces. They are scarce in spleen and lymph nodes, but substantial numbers can be found in the intestinal mucosa even at steady state. There, they represent the first line of defence against invading pathogens and contribute to lymphorganogenesis, tissue repair and, when inappropriately activated, immune pathology. Lineage-specific development, function and maintenance of these cells depend on a restricted set of transcription factors that partially emerged as a result of diversification and selection during vertebrate evolution. The differential expression of transcription factors regulates unique developmental programs, which endow the different ILC subsets with specific effector functions. Despite this division of labour, ILCs are considered to share a common origin, as they all are progeny of the common lymphoid progenitor, rely on the common γ-chain (γc) used by various cytokine receptors and show a developmental requirement for the transcriptional regulator Id2 (inhibitor of DNA binding 2). Here, we review the transcriptional programs required for the development and function of ILCs and give an overview of the evolution of transcription factors and cytokines expressed by ILCs. PMID:24585669

  4. Regulation of CDX4 gene transcription by HoxA9, HoxA10, the Mll-Ell oncogene and Shp2 during leukemogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bei, L; Shah, C; Wang, H; Huang, W; Platanias, L C; Eklund, E A

    2014-01-01

    Cdx and Hox proteins are homeodomain transcription factors that regulate hematopoiesis. Transcription of the HOX and CDX genes decreases during normal myelopoiesis, but is aberrantly sustained in leukemias with translocation or partial tandem duplication of the MLL1 gene. Cdx4 activates transcription of the HOXA9 and HOXA10 genes, and HoxA10 activates CDX4 transcription. The events that break this feedback loop, permitting a decreased Cdx4 expression during normal myelopoiesis, were previously undefined. In the current study, we find that HoxA9 represses CDX4 transcription in differentiating myeloid cells, antagonizing activation by HoxA10. We determine that tyrosine phosphorylation of HoxA10 impairs transcriptional activation of CDX4, but tyrosine phosphorylation of HoxA9 facilitates repression of this gene. As HoxA9 and HoxA10 are phosphorylated during myelopoiesis, this provides a mechanism for differentiation stage-specific Cdx4 expression. HoxA9 and HoxA10 are increased in cells expressing Mll-Ell, a leukemia-associated MLL1 fusion protein. We find that Mll-Ell induces a HoxA10-dependent increase in Cdx4 expression in myeloid progenitor cells. However, Cdx4 decreases in a HoxA9-dependent manner on exposure of Mll-Ell-expressing cells to differentiating cytokines. Leukemia-associated, constitutively active mutants of Shp2 block cytokine-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of HoxA9 and HoxA10. In comparison with myeloid progenitor cells that are expressing Mll-Ell alone, we find increased CDX4 transcription and Cdx4 expression in cells co-expressing Mll-Ell plus constitutively active Shp2. Increased Cdx4 expression is sustained on exposure of these cells to differentiating cytokines. Our results identify a mechanism for increased and sustained CDX4 transcription in leukemias co-overexpressing HoxA9 and HoxA10 in combination with constitutive activation of Shp2. This is clinically relevant, because MLL1 translocations and constitutive Shp2 activation co-exist in

  5. Subcellular Partitioning of Transcription Factors in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Geoff P.; Meredith, Donna H.; Lewis, Peter J.

    2006-01-01

    RNA polymerase (RNAP) requires the interaction of various transcription elongation factors to efficiently transcribe RNA. During transcription of rRNA operons, RNAP forms highly processive antitermination complexes by interacting with NusA, NusB, NusG, NusE, and possibly several unidentified factors to increase elongation rates to around twice those observed for mRNA. In previous work we used cytological assays with Bacillus subtilis to identify the major sites of rRNA synthesis within the cell, which are called transcription foci. Using this cytological assay, in conjunction with both quantitative native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting, we investigated the total protein levels and the ratios of NusB and NusG to RNAP in both antitermination and mRNA transcription complexes. We determined that the ratio of RNAP to NusG was 1:1 in both antitermination and mRNA transcription complexes, suggesting that NusG plays important regulatory roles in both complexes. A ratio of NusB to RNAP of 1:1 was calculated for antitermination complexes with just a 0.3:1 ratio in mRNA complexes, suggesting that NusB is restricted to antitermination complexes. We also investigated the cellular abundance and subcellular localization of transcription restart factor GreA. We found no evidence which suggests that GreA is involved in antitermination complex formation and that it has a cellular abundance which is around twice that of RNAP. Surprisingly, we found that the vast majority of GreA is associated with RNAP, suggesting that there is more than one binding site for GreA on RNAP. These results indicate that transcription elongation complexes are highly dynamic and are differentially segregated within the nucleoid according to their functions. PMID:16707701

  6. Uncovering Transcriptional Regulatory Networks by Sparse Bayesian Factor Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jia; Zhang, Jianqiu(Michelle); Qi, Yuan(Alan); Chen, Yidong; Huang, Yufei

    2010-12-01

    The problem of uncovering transcriptional regulation by transcription factors (TFs) based on microarray data is considered. A novel Bayesian sparse correlated rectified factor model (BSCRFM) is proposed that models the unknown TF protein level activity, the correlated regulations between TFs, and the sparse nature of TF-regulated genes. The model admits prior knowledge from existing database regarding TF-regulated target genes based on a sparse prior and through a developed Gibbs sampling algorithm, a context-specific transcriptional regulatory network specific to the experimental condition of the microarray data can be obtained. The proposed model and the Gibbs sampling algorithm were evaluated on the simulated systems, and results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed approach. The proposed model was then applied to the breast cancer microarray data of patients with Estrogen Receptor positive ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]) status and Estrogen Receptor negative ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]) status, respectively.

  7. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light–oxygen–voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na+-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na+ currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases. PMID:26699507

  8. Regulation of neural gene transcription by optogenetic inhibition of the RE1-silencing transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Paonessa, Francesco; Criscuolo, Stefania; Sacchetti, Silvio; Amoroso, Davide; Scarongella, Helena; Pecoraro Bisogni, Federico; Carminati, Emanuele; Pruzzo, Giacomo; Maragliano, Luca; Cesca, Fabrizia; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics provides new ways to activate gene transcription; however, no attempts have been made as yet to modulate mammalian transcription factors. We report the light-mediated regulation of the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor (REST), a master regulator of neural genes. To tune REST activity, we selected two protein domains that impair REST-DNA binding or recruitment of the cofactor mSin3a. Computational modeling guided the fusion of the inhibitory domains to the light-sensitive Avena sativa light-oxygen-voltage-sensing (LOV) 2-phototrophin 1 (AsLOV2). By expressing AsLOV2 chimeras in Neuro2a cells, we achieved light-dependent modulation of REST target genes that was associated with an improved neural differentiation. In primary neurons, light-mediated REST inhibition increased Na(+)-channel 1.2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcription and boosted Na(+) currents and neuronal firing. This optogenetic approach allows the coordinated expression of a cluster of genes impinging on neuronal activity, providing a tool for studying neuronal physiology and correcting gene expression changes taking place in brain diseases. PMID:26699507

  9. Transcription factors: molecular targets for prostate cancer intervention by phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manjinder; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2007-06-01

    With increasing incidence of cancer at most of the sites, and growing economic burden and associated psychological and emotional trauma, it is becoming clearer that more efforts are needed for cancer cure. Since most of the chemotherapeutic drugs are non-selective because they are also toxic to the normal cells, new and improved strategies are needed that selectively target the killing of cancer cells. Since aberrant activation of numerous signaling pathways is a key element of cancer cell survival and growth, blocking all of them is not that practical, which leads to the step where most of them commonly converge; the transcription factors. Recent research efforts, therefore, are also directed on targeting the activity and activation of transcription factors, which ultimately control the expression of genes that are involved in almost all aspects of cell biology. One class of agents that is becoming increasingly successful, not only in targeting signaling cascades, but also transcription factors is phytochemicals present in diet and those consumed as supplement. The added advantage with these agents is that they are mostly non-toxic when compared to chemotherapeutic agents. This review focuses on the efficacy of various phytochemicals in targeting transcription factors such as AR, Sp1, STATs, E2F, Egr1, c-Myc, HIF-1 alpha, NF-kappaB, AP-1, ETS2, GLI and p53 in the context of prostate cancer intervention. PMID:17979630

  10. A Recommendation for Naming Transcription Factor Proteins in the Grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcription factors are central for the exquisite temporal and spatial expression patterns of many genes. These proteins are characterized by their ability to be tethered to particular regulatory sequences in the genes that they control. While many other proteins participate in the regulation of g...

  11. The WRKY transcription factor family and senescence in switchgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Early aerial senescence in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) can significantly limit biomass yields. WRKY transcription factors that can regulate senescence could be used to reprogram senescence and enhance biomass yields. Methods: All potential WRKY genes present in the version 1.0 of the...

  12. Identification of High-Impact cis-Regulatory Mutations Using Transcription Factor Specific Random Forest Models

    PubMed Central

    Svetlichnyy, Dmitry; Imrichova, Hana; Fiers, Mark; Kalender Atak, Zeynep; Aerts, Stein

    2015-01-01

    Cancer genomes contain vast amounts of somatic mutations, many of which are passenger mutations not involved in oncogenesis. Whereas driver mutations in protein-coding genes can be distinguished from passenger mutations based on their recurrence, non-coding mutations are usually not recurrent at the same position. Therefore, it is still unclear how to identify cis-regulatory driver mutations, particularly when chromatin data from the same patient is not available, thus relying only on sequence and expression information. Here we use machine-learning methods to predict functional regulatory regions using sequence information alone, and compare the predicted activity of the mutated region with the reference sequence. This way we define the Predicted Regulatory Impact of a Mutation in an Enhancer (PRIME). We find that the recently identified driver mutation in the TAL1 enhancer has a high PRIME score, representing a “gain-of-target” for MYB, whereas the highly recurrent TERT promoter mutation has a surprisingly low PRIME score. We trained Random Forest models for 45 cancer-related transcription factors, and used these to score variations in the HeLa genome and somatic mutations across more than five hundred cancer genomes. Each model predicts only a small fraction of non-coding mutations with a potential impact on the function of the encompassing regulatory region. Nevertheless, as these few candidate driver mutations are often linked to gains in chromatin activity and gene expression, they may contribute to the oncogenic program by altering the expression levels of specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. PMID:26562774

  13. Identification of High-Impact cis-Regulatory Mutations Using Transcription Factor Specific Random Forest Models.

    PubMed

    Svetlichnyy, Dmitry; Imrichova, Hana; Fiers, Mark; Kalender Atak, Zeynep; Aerts, Stein

    2015-11-01

    Cancer genomes contain vast amounts of somatic mutations, many of which are passenger mutations not involved in oncogenesis. Whereas driver mutations in protein-coding genes can be distinguished from passenger mutations based on their recurrence, non-coding mutations are usually not recurrent at the same position. Therefore, it is still unclear how to identify cis-regulatory driver mutations, particularly when chromatin data from the same patient is not available, thus relying only on sequence and expression information. Here we use machine-learning methods to predict functional regulatory regions using sequence information alone, and compare the predicted activity of the mutated region with the reference sequence. This way we define the Predicted Regulatory Impact of a Mutation in an Enhancer (PRIME). We find that the recently identified driver mutation in the TAL1 enhancer has a high PRIME score, representing a "gain-of-target" for MYB, whereas the highly recurrent TERT promoter mutation has a surprisingly low PRIME score. We trained Random Forest models for 45 cancer-related transcription factors, and used these to score variations in the HeLa genome and somatic mutations across more than five hundred cancer genomes. Each model predicts only a small fraction of non-coding mutations with a potential impact on the function of the encompassing regulatory region. Nevertheless, as these few candidate driver mutations are often linked to gains in chromatin activity and gene expression, they may contribute to the oncogenic program by altering the expression levels of specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. PMID:26562774

  14. Regulation by transcription factors in bacteria: beyond description.

    PubMed

    Balleza, Enrique; López-Bojorquez, Lucia N; Martínez-Antonio, Agustino; Resendis-Antonio, Osbaldo; Lozada-Chávez, Irma; Balderas-Martínez, Yalbi I; Encarnación, Sergio; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2009-01-01

    Transcription is an essential step in gene expression and its understanding has been one of the major interests in molecular and cellular biology. By precisely tuning gene expression, transcriptional regulation determines the molecular machinery for developmental plasticity, homeostasis and adaptation. In this review, we transmit the main ideas or concepts behind regulation by transcription factors and give just enough examples to sustain these main ideas, thus avoiding a classical ennumeration of facts. We review recent concepts and developments: cis elements and trans regulatory factors, chromosome organization and structure, transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) and transcriptomics. We also summarize new important discoveries that will probably affect the direction of research in gene regulation: epigenetics and stochasticity in transcriptional regulation, synthetic circuits and plasticity and evolution of TRNs. Many of the new discoveries in gene regulation are not extensively tested with wetlab approaches. Consequently, we review this broad area in Inference of TRNs and Dynamical Models of TRNs. Finally, we have stepped backwards to trace the origins of these modern concepts, synthesizing their history in a timeline schema. PMID:19076632

  15. Regulation by transcription factors in bacteria: beyond description

    PubMed Central

    Balleza, Enrique; López-Bojorquez, Lucia N; Martínez-Antonio, Agustino; Resendis-Antonio, Osbaldo; Lozada-Chávez, Irma; Balderas-Martínez, Yalbi I; Encarnación, Sergio; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2009-01-01

    Transcription is an essential step in gene expression and its understanding has been one of the major interests in molecular and cellular biology. By precisely tuning gene expression, transcriptional regulation determines the molecular machinery for developmental plasticity, homeostasis and adaptation. In this review, we transmit the main ideas or concepts behind regulation by transcription factors and give just enough examples to sustain these main ideas, thus avoiding a classical ennumeration of facts. We review recent concepts and developments: cis elements and trans regulatory factors, chromosome organization and structure, transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) and transcriptomics. We also summarize new important discoveries that will probably affect the direction of research in gene regulation: epigenetics and stochasticity in transcriptional regulation, synthetic circuits and plasticity and evolution of TRNs. Many of the new discoveries in gene regulation are not extensively tested with wetlab approaches. Consequently, we review this broad area in Inference of TRNs and Dynamical Models of TRNs. Finally, we have stepped backwards to trace the origins of these modern concepts, synthesizing their history in a timeline schema. PMID:19076632

  16. The Transcription Factor ATF5 Mediates a Mammalian Mitochondrial UPR.

    PubMed

    Fiorese, Christopher J; Schulz, Anna M; Lin, Yi-Fan; Rosin, Nadine; Pellegrino, Mark W; Haynes, Cole M

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is pervasive in human pathologies such as neurodegeneration, diabetes, cancer, and pathogen infections as well as during normal aging. Cells sense and respond to mitochondrial dysfunction by activating a protective transcriptional program known as the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)), which includes genes that promote mitochondrial protein homeostasis and the recovery of defective organelles [1, 2]. Work in Caenorhabditis elegans has shown that the UPR(mt) is regulated by the transcription factor ATFS-1, which is regulated by organelle partitioning. Normally, ATFS-1 accumulates within mitochondria, but during respiratory chain dysfunction, high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), or mitochondrial protein folding stress, a percentage of ATFS-1 accumulates in the cytosol and traffics to the nucleus where it activates the UPR(mt) [2]. While similar transcriptional responses have been described in mammals [3, 4], how the UPR(mt) is regulated remains unclear. Here, we describe a mammalian transcription factor, ATF5, which is regulated similarly to ATFS-1 and induces a similar transcriptional response. ATF5 expression can rescue UPR(mt) signaling in atfs-1-deficient worms requiring the same UPR(mt) promoter element identified in C. elegans. Furthermore, mammalian cells require ATF5 to maintain mitochondrial activity during mitochondrial stress and promote organelle recovery. Combined, these data suggest that regulation of the UPR(mt) is conserved from worms to mammals. PMID:27426517

  17. An Arabidopsis Transcriptional Regulatory Map Reveals Distinct Functional and Evolutionary Features of Novel Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jinpu; He, Kun; Tang, Xing; Li, Zhe; Lv, Le; Zhao, Yi; Luo, Jingchu; Gao, Ge

    2015-07-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) play key roles in both development and stress responses. By integrating into and rewiring original systems, novel TFs contribute significantly to the evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks. Here, we report a high-confidence transcriptional regulatory map covering 388 TFs from 47 families in Arabidopsis. Systematic analysis of this map revealed the architectural heterogeneity of developmental and stress response subnetworks and identified three types of novel network motifs that are absent from unicellular organisms and essential for multicellular development. Moreover, TFs of novel families that emerged during plant landing present higher binding specificities and are preferentially wired into developmental processes and these novel network motifs. Further unveiled connection between the binding specificity and wiring preference of TFs explains the wiring preferences of novel-family TFs. These results reveal distinct functional and evolutionary features of novel TFs, suggesting a plausible mechanism for their contribution to the evolution of multicellular organisms. PMID:25750178

  18. A decade of transcription factor-mediated reprogramming to pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2016-03-01

    The past 10 years have seen great advances in our ability to manipulate cell fate, including the induction of pluripotency in vitro to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). This process proved to be remarkably simple from a technical perspective, only needing the host cell and a defined cocktail of transcription factors, with four factors - octamer-binding protein 3/4 (OCT3/4), SOX2, Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) and MYC (collectively referred to as OSKM) - initially used. The mechanisms underlying transcription factor-mediated reprogramming are still poorly understood; however, several mechanistic insights have recently been obtained. Recent years have also brought significant progress in increasing the efficiency of this technique, making it more amenable to applications in the fields of regenerative medicine, disease modelling and drug discovery. PMID:26883003

  19. The CREB Transcription Factor Controls Transcriptional Activity of the Human RIC8B Gene.

    PubMed

    Maureira, Alejandro; Sánchez, Rodolfo; Valenzuela, Nicole; Torrejón, Marcela; Hinrichs, María V; Olate, Juan; Gutiérrez, José L

    2016-08-01

    Proper regulation of gene expression is essential for normal development, cellular growth, and differentiation. Differential expression profiles of mRNA coding for vertebrate Ric-8B during embryo and adult stages have been observed. In addition, Ric-8B is expressed in few cerebral nuclei subareas. These facts point to a dynamic control of RIC8B gene expression. In order to understand the transcriptional regulation of this gene, we searched for cis-elements in the sequence of the human RIC8B promoter region, identifying binding sites for the basic/leucine zipper (bZip) CREB transcription factor family (CRE sites) and C/EBP transcription factor family (C/EBP sites). CRE sites were found clustered near the transcription start site, while the C/EBP sites were found clustered at around 300 bp upstream the CRE sites. Here, we demonstrate the ability of CREB1 and C/EBPβ to bind their respective elements identified in the RIC8B promoter. Comparative protein-DNA interaction analyses revealed only the proximal elements as high affinity sites for CREB1 and only the distal elements as high affinity sites for C/EBPβ. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses, carried out using a human neuroblastoma cell line, confirmed the preferential association of CREB to the proximal region of the RIC8B promoter. By performing luciferase reporter assays, we found the CRE sites as the most relevant elements for its transcriptional activity. Taken together, these data show the existence of functional CREB and C/EBP binding sites in the human RIC8B gene promoter, a particular distribution of these sites and demonstrate a relevant role of CREB in stimulating transcriptional activity of this gene. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1797-1805, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26729411

  20. E2F-Rb Complexes Assemble and Inhibit cdc25A Transcription in Cervical Carcinoma Cells following Repression of Human Papillomavirus Oncogene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lingling; Goodwin, Edward C.; Naeger, Lisa Kay; Vigo, Elena; Galaktionov, Konstantin; Helin, Kristian; DiMaio, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein in cervical carcinoma cells represses expression of integrated human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogenes, followed by repression of the cdc25A gene and other cellular genes required for cell cycle progression, resulting in dramatic growth arrest. To explore the mechanism of repression of cell cycle genes in cervical carcinoma cells following E6/E7 repression, we analyzed regulation of the cdc25A promoter, which contains two consensus E2F binding sites and a consensus E2 binding site. The wild-type E2 protein inhibited expression of a luciferase gene linked to the cdc25A promoter in HT-3 cervical carcinoma cells. Mutation of the distal E2F binding site in the cdc25A promoter abolished E2-induced repression, whereas mutation of the proximal E2F site or the E2 site had no effect. None of these mutations affected the activity of the promoter in the absence of E2 expression. Expression of the E2 protein also led to posttranscriptional increase in the level of E2F4, p105Rb, and p130 and induced the formation of nuclear E2F4-p130 and E2F4-p105Rb complexes. This resulted in marked rearrangement of the protein complexes that formed at the distal E2F site in the cdc25A promoter, including the replacement of free E2F complexes with E2F4-p105Rb complexes. These experiments indicated that repression of E2F-responsive promoters following HPV E6/E7 repression was mediated by activation of the Rb tumor suppressor pathway and the assembly of repressing E2F4-Rb DNA binding complexes. Importantly, these experiments revealed that HPV-induced alterations in E2F transcription complexes that occur during cervical carcinogenesis are reversed by repression of HPV E6/E7 expression. PMID:10982822

  1. Controlling for Gene Expression Changes in Transcription Factor Protein Networks*

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Charles A. S.; Lee, Zachary T.; Boanca, Gina; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Groppe, Brad D.; Wen, Zhihui; Hattem, Gaye L.; Seidel, Chris W.; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    The development of affinity purification technologies combined with mass spectrometric analysis of purified protein mixtures has been used both to identify new protein–protein interactions and to define the subunit composition of protein complexes. Transcription factor protein interactions, however, have not been systematically analyzed using these approaches. Here, we investigated whether ectopic expression of an affinity tagged transcription factor as bait in affinity purification mass spectrometry experiments perturbs gene expression in cells, resulting in the false positive identification of bait-associated proteins when typical experimental controls are used. Using quantitative proteomics and RNA sequencing, we determined that the increase in the abundance of a set of proteins caused by overexpression of the transcription factor RelA is not sufficient for these proteins to then co-purify non-specifically and be misidentified as bait-associated proteins. Therefore, typical controls should be sufficient, and a number of different baits can be compared with a common set of controls. This is of practical interest when identifying bait interactors from a large number of different baits. As expected, we found several known RelA interactors enriched in our RelA purifications (NFκB1, NFκB2, Rel, RelB, IκBα, IκBβ, and IκBε). We also found several proteins not previously described in association with RelA, including the small mitochondrial chaperone Tim13. Using a variety of biochemical approaches, we further investigated the nature of the association between Tim13 and NFκB family transcription factors. This work therefore provides a conceptual and experimental framework for analyzing transcription factor protein interactions. PMID:24722732

  2. Effect of dietary protein restriction on liver transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Marten, N W; Sladek, F M; Straus, D S

    1996-01-01

    The transcription of several genes that are preferentially expressed in the liver, including the serum albumin, transthyretin and carbamyl phosphate synthetase-I genes, is specifically decreased in animals consuming inadequate amounts of dietary protein. The high level of transcription of these genes in the liver is directed in part by a number of liver-enriched transcription factors, including hepatocyte nuclear factors (HNF)-1, -3, and -4, and proteins of the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) family. In the present study, we investigated the possibility that the co-ordinate decrease in transcription of the nutritionally sensitive genes in protein-deprived rats results from altered activity of one or more of the liver-enriched transcription factors. For HNF-4, Western blots indicated no change in the level of nuclear HNF-4 protein in liver of protein-deprived animals, whereas we observed a 40% reduction in the DNA binding activity of HNF-4 as measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Furthermore, the binding affinity of HNF-4 for DNA was unaltered by dietary protein deprivation, while the number of HNF-4 molecules able to bind to DNA (Bmax) was reduced, as determined by Scatchard analysis. This indicates that in the protein-restricted rats a portion of the pool of HNF-4 protein is inactivated or otherwise prevented from binding to DNA. The overall DNA binding activity of C/EBP alpha and beta was increased in protein-restricted animals. This change occurred in the absence of a change in the amount of the full-length forms of these two proteins, quantified by Western blotting. Interestingly, dietary protein restriction specifically increased the level of a truncated form of C/EBP beta (liver-enriched transcriptional inhibitory protein, LIP), which is a protein dominant negative inhibitor of C/EBP function. Analysis of HNF-3 DNA-binding activity by EMSA revealed that HNF-3 alpha and beta DNA binding was increased and that HNF-3 gamma DNA

  3. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, H. Susana; Real, Carla; Cyrne, Luísa; Soares, Helena; Antunes, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR), lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4) and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1) are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1) synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii) stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii) cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv) DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for highly

  4. Transcription factors mediate long-range enhancer–promoter interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nolis, Ilias K.; McKay, Daniel J.; Mantouvalou, Eva; Lomvardas, Stavros; Merika, Menie; Thanos, Dimitris

    2009-01-01

    We examined how remote enhancers establish physical communication with target promoters to activate gene transcription in response to environmental signals. Although the natural IFN-β enhancer is located immediately upstream of the core promoter, it also can function as a classical enhancer element conferring virus infection-dependent activation of heterologous promoters, even when it is placed several kilobases away from these promoters. We demonstrated that the remote IFN-β enhancer “loops out” the intervening DNA to reach the target promoter. These chromatin loops depend on sequence-specific transcription factors bound to the enhancer and the promoter and thus can explain the specificity observed in enhancer–promoter interactions, especially in complex genetic loci. Transcription factor binding sites scattered between an enhancer and a promoter can work as decoys trapping the enhancer in nonproductive loops, thus resembling insulator elements. Finally, replacement of the transcription factor binding sites involved in DNA looping with those of a heterologous prokaryotic protein, the λ repressor, which is capable of loop formation, rescues enhancer function from a distance by re-establishing enhancer–promoter loop formation. PMID:19923429

  5. Repression of chimeric transcripts emanating from endogenous retrotransposons by a sequence-specific transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Retroviral elements are pervasively transcribed and dynamically regulated during development. While multiple histone- and DNA-modifying enzymes have broadly been associated with their global silencing, little is known about how the many diverse retroviral families are each selectively recognized. Results Here we show that the zinc finger protein Krüppel-like Factor 3 (KLF3) specifically silences transcription from the ORR1A0 long terminal repeat in murine fetal and adult erythroid cells. In the absence of KLF3, we detect widespread transcription from ORR1A0 elements driven by the master erythroid regulator KLF1. In several instances these aberrant transcripts are spliced to downstream genic exons. One such chimeric transcript produces a novel, dominant negative isoform of PU.1 that can induce erythroid differentiation. Conclusions We propose that KLF3 ensures the integrity of the murine erythroid transcriptome through the selective repression of a particular retroelement and is likely one of multiple sequence-specific factors that cooperate to achieve global silencing. PMID:24946810

  6. Analysis of Genomic Sequence Motifs for Deciphering Transcription Factor Binding and Transcriptional Regulation in Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boeva, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes contain a variety of structured patterns: repetitive elements, binding sites of DNA and RNA associated proteins, splice sites, and so on. Often, these structured patterns can be formalized as motifs and described using a proper mathematical model such as position weight matrix and IUPAC consensus. Two key tasks are typically carried out for motifs in the context of the analysis of genomic sequences. These are: identification in a set of DNA regions of over-represented motifs from a particular motif database, and de novo discovery of over-represented motifs. Here we describe existing methodology to perform these two tasks for motifs characterizing transcription factor binding. When applied to the output of ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments, or to promoter regions of co-modulated genes, motif analysis techniques allow for the prediction of transcription factor binding events and enable identification of transcriptional regulators and co-regulators. The usefulness of motif analysis is further exemplified in this review by how motif discovery improves peak calling in ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments and, when coupled with information on gene expression, allows insights into physical mechanisms of transcriptional modulation. PMID:26941778

  7. Analysis of Genomic Sequence Motifs for Deciphering Transcription Factor Binding and Transcriptional Regulation in Eukaryotic Cells.

    PubMed

    Boeva, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes contain a variety of structured patterns: repetitive elements, binding sites of DNA and RNA associated proteins, splice sites, and so on. Often, these structured patterns can be formalized as motifs and described using a proper mathematical model such as position weight matrix and IUPAC consensus. Two key tasks are typically carried out for motifs in the context of the analysis of genomic sequences. These are: identification in a set of DNA regions of over-represented motifs from a particular motif database, and de novo discovery of over-represented motifs. Here we describe existing methodology to perform these two tasks for motifs characterizing transcription factor binding. When applied to the output of ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments, or to promoter regions of co-modulated genes, motif analysis techniques allow for the prediction of transcription factor binding events and enable identification of transcriptional regulators and co-regulators. The usefulness of motif analysis is further exemplified in this review by how motif discovery improves peak calling in ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments and, when coupled with information on gene expression, allows insights into physical mechanisms of transcriptional modulation. PMID:26941778

  8. Transcription profile of Escherichia coli: genomic SELEX search for regulatory targets of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Ishihama, Akira; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial genomes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), which achieves gene selectivity through interaction with sigma factors that recognize promoters, and transcription factors (TFs) that control the activity and specificity of RNAP holoenzyme. To understand the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, the identification of regulatory targets is needed for all these factors. We then performed genomic SELEX screenings of targets under the control of each sigma factor and each TF. Here we describe the assembly of 156 SELEX patterns of a total of 116 TFs performed in the presence and absence of effector ligands. The results reveal several novel concepts: (i) each TF regulates more targets than hitherto recognized; (ii) each promoter is regulated by more TFs than hitherto recognized; and (iii) the binding sites of some TFs are located within operons and even inside open reading frames. The binding sites of a set of global regulators, including cAMP receptor protein, LeuO and Lrp, overlap with those of the silencer H-NS, suggesting that certain global regulators play an anti-silencing role. To facilitate sharing of these accumulated SELEX datasets with the research community, we compiled a database, ‘Transcription Profile of Escherichia coli’ (www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/tec/). PMID:26843427

  9. Transcription profile of Escherichia coli: genomic SELEX search for regulatory targets of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Ishihama, Akira; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2016-03-18

    Bacterial genomes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), which achieves gene selectivity through interaction with sigma factors that recognize promoters, and transcription factors (TFs) that control the activity and specificity of RNAP holoenzyme. To understand the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, the identification of regulatory targets is needed for all these factors. We then performed genomic SELEX screenings of targets under the control of each sigma factor and each TF. Here we describe the assembly of 156 SELEX patterns of a total of 116 TFs performed in the presence and absence of effector ligands. The results reveal several novel concepts: (i) each TF regulates more targets than hitherto recognized; (ii) each promoter is regulated by more TFs than hitherto recognized; and (iii) the binding sites of some TFs are located within operons and even inside open reading frames. The binding sites of a set of global regulators, including cAMP receptor protein, LeuO and Lrp, overlap with those of the silencer H-NS, suggesting that certain global regulators play an anti-silencing role. To facilitate sharing of these accumulated SELEX datasets with the research community, we compiled a database, 'Transcription Profile of Escherichia coli' (www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/tec/). PMID:26843427

  10. The Transcription Factor Titration Effect Dictates Level of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Brewster, Robert C.; Weinert, Franz M.; Garcia, Hernan G.; Song, Dan; Rydenfelt, Mattias; Phillips, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Models of transcription are often built around a picture of RNA polymerase and transcription factors (TFs) acting on a single copy of a promoter. However, most TFs are shared between multiple genes with varying binding affinities. Beyond that, genes often exist at high copy number; in multiple, identical copies on the chromosome or on plasmids or viral vectors with copy numbers in the hundreds. Using a thermodynamic model, we characterize the interplay between TF copy number and the demand for that TF. We demonstrate the parameter-free predictive power of this model as a function of the copy number of the TF and the number and affinities of the available specific binding sites; such predictive control is important for the understanding of transcription and the desire to quantitatively design the output of genetic circuits. Finally we use these experiments to dynamically measure plasmid copy number through the cell cycle. PMID:24612990