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Sample records for open cell metal

  1. Geometric classification of open-cell metal foams using X-ray micro-computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bock, Jessica Jacobi, Anthony M.

    2013-01-15

    The geometry of foams has long been an area of interest, and a number of idealized geometric descriptions have been proposed. In order to acquire detailed, quantitative, geometric data for aluminum open-cell metal foams, X-ray {mu}CT is employed. The X-ray {mu}CT images are analyzed using specialized software, FoamView Registered-Sign , from which geometric information including strut length and pore shapes are extracted. The X-ray {mu}CT analysis allows comparison of the ideal geometric models to the actual geometric characteristics of the metal foam samples. The results reveal a high variability in ligament length, as well as features supporting the ideal geometry known as the Weaire-Phelan unit cell. The geometric findings provide information useful for improving current models of open-cell metal foam. Applications can range from predicting heat transfer or load failure to predicting liquid retention. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aluminum open-cell metal foams are geometrically classified Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray micro-computed tomography and specialized software are used to gather geometric data Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The foams are shown to have a high variability in strut length Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Weaire-Phelan unit cell is shown to be a better representative of these foams.

  2. Metal foams application to enhance cooling of open cathode polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajid Hossain, Mohammad; Shabani, Bahman

    2015-11-01

    Conventional channel flow fields of open cathode Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) introduce some challenges linked to humidity, temperature, pressure and oxygen concentration gradients along the conventional flow fields that reduce the cell performance. According to previous experimental reports, with conventional air flow fields, hotspot formation due to water accumulation in Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) is common. Unlike continuous long flow passages in conventional channels, metal foams provide randomly interrupted flow passages. Re-circulation of fluid, due to randomly distributed tortuous ligaments, enhances temperature and humidity uniformity in the fluid. Moreover, the higher electrical conductivity of metal foams compared to non-metal current collectors and their very low mass density compared to solid metal materials are expected to increase the electrical performance of the cell while significantly reducing its weight. This article reviews the existing cooling systems and identifies the important parameters on the basis of reported literature in the air cooling systems of PEMFCs. This is followed by investigating metal foams as a possible option to be used within the structure of such PEMFCs as an option that can potentially address cooling and flow distribution challenges associated with using conventional flow channels, especially in air-cooled PEMFCs.

  3. Neutrons attenuation on composite metal foams and hybrid open-cell Al foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuo; Bourham, Mohamed; Rabiei, Afsaneh

    2015-04-01

    A comprehensive investigation of monochromatic neutron attenuation effectiveness for close-cell composite metal foams (CMFs) and open-cell Al foam infiltrated with variety of second phase materials is presented using both experimental and theoretical methods. The experimental results indicated higher neutron flux reduction in open-cell Al foam with fillers compared to the close-cell CMFs due to their large percentage of low Z elements such as hydrogen, boron and carbon, with superior neutron attenuation performance, in their filler materials. The main factor controlling the shielding effectiveness of steel-steel CMFs is found to be the ratio of the thickness of the sphere wall to the sphere radius while the intermetallic phases in the matrix of Al-steel CMFs seem to have a major role on their shielding properties. Successful models that link the observed material properties and microstructure have been developed using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) to verify the accuracy of the experimental results. Close-cell CMFs were proposed through three different sphere arrangements: simple cubic, body center cubic and face center cubic, whereas open-cell Al foam with fillers was represented by creating a three-dimensional structure using periodic unit cell through two approaches. The simulation results were found to be in good agreement with the experimental values. This research indicates the potential of utilizing light-weight close-cell CMFs and open-cell Al foam with fillers as nuclear shields replacing conventional materials to achieve a specified shielding level with additional benefits of excellent energy absorption and thermal isolation.

  4. Properties of open-cell porous metals and alloys for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Gladius

    2013-10-01

    One shortcoming of metals and alloys used to fabricate various components of orthopaedic systems, such as the femoral stem of a total hip joint replacement and the tibial plate of a total knee joint replacement, is well-recognized. This is that the material modulus of elasticity (E') is substantially larger than that of the contiguous cancellous bone, a consequence of which is stress shielding which, in turn, has been postulated to be implicated in a cascade of events that culminates in the principal life-limiting phenomenon of these systems, namely, aseptic loosening. Thus, over the years, a host of research programs have focused on the synthesis of metallic biomaterials whose E' can be tailored to match that of cancellous bone. The present work is a review of the extant large volume of literature on these materials, which are called open-cell porous metals/alloys (or, sometimes, metal foams or cellular materials). As such, its range is wide, covering myriad aspects such as production methods, characterization studies, in vitro evaluations, and in vivo performance. The review also includes discussion of seven areas for future research, such as parametric studies of the influence of an assortment of process variables (such as the space holder material and the laser power in the space holder method and the laser-engineered net-shaping process, respectively) on various properties (notably, permeability, fatigue strength, and corrosion resistance) of a given porous metal/alloy, innovative methods of determining fatigue strength, and modeling of corrosion behavior. PMID:23851927

  5. Numerical Study of Liquid Sloshing on Anti-sloshing Device Using Open Cell Metal Foams in Oil Tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Qu, Z. G.; Tao, W. Q.; Lu, T. J.

    2010-03-01

    A new baffle structure design named open-cell metal foams baffle for anti-sloshing device in oil tank is presented in this study. Numerical simulation study on the liquid sloshing with various baffles is carried out using FLUENT with the volume-of-fluid (VOF) model. Four types of baffles were studied, namely non-baffle (type A), conventional parallel-baffle (type B), cross-baffle (type C) and open- cell metal foams baffles (type D). The oil velocity distribution, centroid and oil occupancy in the sloshing process is revealed in the case of vehicle speeding up and turning respectively. It is found that type D reduce velocity of oil, increase the value of oil occupancy in the suction pipe entrance of the oil tank and lower the centroid of oil obviously comparing with the other types. As for the same open-cell metal foam pore density, lower open-cell metal foam porosity has much better effect of inhibition of liquid sloshing, but there is little deviation among different porosity for the absolute value. Moreover, according to the same porosity, the oil centroid can be lowered obviously with the increase of pore density. The results of type D show practical significance and referable guideline for baffles design to improve the safety and stability of vehicle.

  6. Analytical and Numerical Modeling of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer through Open-Cell Metal Foam Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taheri, Mehrdad

    In this thesis analytical and numerical investigations of fluid flow and heat transfer through open cell metal foam heat exchangers are presented. Primarily, different representative unit cell approximations, i.e, tetrakaidecahedron, dodecahedron and cubic are discussed. By applying the thermal resistance analogy, a novel formulation for evaluation of the effective thermal conductivity of metal foams is proposed. The model improves previous models based on cubic or hexagonal cells. By using computer tomography images of a nickel foam sample a realistic 3D geometry is created and the foam's geometrical properties (i.e., porosity and surface area to volume ratio) and effective thermal conductivity are obtained. By using the experimentally found values of permeability, Forchheimer coefficient and solid-fluid interfacial convection coefficient, mathematical models for fluid flow and heat transfer in metal foams are developed. Two different assumptions: local thermal equilibrium (LTE) and local thermal non-equilibrium (LTNE), are used. LTNE yields more accurate results. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of metal foam is made and validated against the experimental data for a square cross sectional nickel foam heat exchanger channel heated from the side walls while cooling air passes through the foam. The simulations are carried out for constant temperature or heat flux and different foam materials with pore densities of 10 and 40 pores per inch. The results show that the bonding of the foam to the walls has a considerable impact on the heat transfer rate. Convective heat transfer coefficients in terms of Nusselt number as functions of Reynolds number are also obtained. The design and CFD modeling of metal foam cross flow heat exchangers are also discussed. The results indicate both effectiveness and number of transfer units (NTU) for the metal foam heat exchangers are higher than those of a hollow channel; however, the effectiveness-NTU curves

  7. Final Report - Subfreezing Start/Stop Protocol for an Advanced Metallic Open Flowfield Fuel Cell Stack

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, Amedeo

    2010-09-28

    For fuel cells to be commercially viable as powerplants in automotive applications, the ability to survive and start reliably in cold climates (as low as -40C) is a must. Since fuel cells are water-based energy systems, this requirement is a significant technical challenge. Water transport studies are imperative for achieving DOE targets for fuel cell startup time from subfreezing conditions. Stack components must be selected that endure thermal and humidity cycling over the operating range, and operating strategies must be devised that enable the fuel cell to start, i.e. generate power and heat up sufficiently before ice extinguishes the galvanic reactions, and afford evacuation of a sufficient amount of water, using a limited amount of auxiliary power, at shutdown. The objective of the CIRRUS program was to advance the state of the art in fuel cell operability under subfreezing conditions, consistent with requirements for applications involving such conditions (e.g. automotive, forklifts, backup power systems, and APUs) and DOE targets, specifically to: • Demonstrate repeatable achievement of 50% rated power in less than 30 seconds from a -20C start condition, using less than 5 MJ auxiliary energy over the complete start/stop cycle. • Demonstrate unassisted start capability from an initial temperature of -40C.

  8. Metal halogen electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Bellows, Richard J.; Kantner, Edward

    1988-08-23

    It has now been discovered that reduction in the coulombic efficiency of metal halogen cells can be minimized if the microporous separator employed in such cells is selected from one which is preferably wet by the aqueous electrolyte and is not wet substantially by the cathodic halogen.

  9. Closed cell metal foam method

    DOEpatents

    Patten, James W.

    1978-01-01

    Foamed metals and metal alloys which have a closed cellular structure are prepared by heating a metal body containing entrapped inert gas uniformly distributed throughout to a temperature above the melting point of the metal and maintaining the body at this temperature a period of time sufficient to permit the entrapped gas to expand, forming individual cells within the molten metal, thus expanding and foaming the molten metal. After cell formation has reached the desired amount, the foamed molten metal body is cooled to below the melting temperature of the metal. The void area or density of the foamed metal is controlled by predetermining the amount of inert gas entrapped in the metal body and by the period of time the metal body is maintained in the molten state. This method is useful for preparing foamed metals and metal alloys from any metal or other material of which a body containing entrapped inert gas can be prepared.

  10. Metallization problems with concentrator cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iles, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    Cells used with concentrators have similar contact requirements to other cells, but operation at high intensity imposes more than the usual demands on the metallization. Overall contact requirements are listed and concentrator cell requirements are discussed.

  11. Silver-copper nanoalloys-an efficient sensitizer for metal-cluster-sensitized solar cells delivering stable current and high open circuit voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, Naveed; Chen, Fuyi; He, Lirong; Li, Weiyin; Wang, Hongkai

    2015-10-01

    Metal clusters (CLs) are recognized as a new class of sensitizers in a metal-cluster-sensitized solar cell (MCSC) which is an extension to well-recognized dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The function performed by dyes in DSSCs has predominately been executed by metal CLs in MCSCs. The distinct behavior of CLs at nano-scaled level can enhance their significance in photovoltaic applications. Recently, metal CLs have been explored as sensitizers in a solar cell, and the efficiency of the cell has been reported to be more than 2%. Herein, we present glutathione-protected Ag-Cu bimetallic CLs (alloyed CLs or nanoalloys) as sensitizer in MCSCs. Spray-coating technique has been employed to deposit CLs on photoanodes. The TiO2 modified with Cu rich alloyed CLs exhibit the short circuit photocurrent (Jsc) of 2.87 mAcm-2 with Voc of 691 mV. EIS and Mott-Schottky analysis have been performed to explicate the processes occurring inside MCSCs. Comparative study has been conducted to elucidate the effect of alloying on photo-electrochemical (PEC) response. Our results lay the foundations for exploring other nanoalloys as sensitizers in solar cells because nanoalloys present a greater degree of flexibility in properties, structure, size, and the composition of the constituent elements.

  12. Self-discharge in bimetallic cells containing alkali metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, M. S.; Hesson, J. C.; Shimotake, H.

    1969-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of thermally regenerative bimetallic cells with alkali metal anodes shows a relation between the current drawn and the rate of discharge under open-circuit conditions. The self-discharge rate of the cell is due to the dissolution and ionization of alkali metal atoms in the fused-salt electrolyte

  13. Coated metal fiber coalescing cell

    SciTech Connect

    Rutz, W.D.; Swain, R.J.

    1980-12-23

    A cell is described for coalescing oil droplets dispersed in a water emulsion including an elongated perforated tube core into which the emulsion is injected, layers of oleophilic plastic covered metal mat wound about the core through which the emulsion is forced to pass, the fibers of the metal mat being covered by oleophilic plastic such as vinyl, acrylic, polypropylene, polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, the metal being in the form of layers of expanded metal or metal fibers, either aluminum or stainless steel. In manufacturing the cell a helix wound wire is formed around the cylindrical plastic coated metal to retain it in place and resist pressure drop of fluid flowing through the metal fibers. In addition, the preferred arrangement includes the use of an outer sleeve formed of a mat of fibrous material such as polyester fibers, acrylic fibers, modacrylic fibers and mixtures thereof.

  14. Open-celled polyurethane foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, L. W.

    1970-01-01

    Open-celled polyurethane foam has a density of 8.3 pounds per cubic foot and a compressive strength of 295 to 325 psi. It is useful as a porous spacer in layered insulation and as an insulation material in vacuum tight systems.

  15. On the metallicity of open clusters. III. Homogenised sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netopil, M.; Paunzen, E.; Heiter, U.; Soubiran, C.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Open clusters are known as excellent tools for various topics in Galactic research. For example, they allow accurately tracing the chemical structure of the Galactic disc. However, the metallicity is known only for a rather low percentage of the open cluster population, and these values are based on a variety of methods and data. Therefore, a large and homogeneous sample is highly desirable. Aims: In the third part of our series we compile a large sample of homogenised open cluster metallicities using a wide variety of different sources. These data and a sample of Cepheids are used to investigate the radial metallicity gradient, age effects, and to test current models. Methods: We used photometric and spectroscopic data to derive cluster metallicities. The different sources were checked and tested for possible offsets and correlations. Results: In total, metallicities for 172 open cluster were derived. We used the spectroscopic data of 100 objects for a study of the radial metallicity distribution and the age-metallicity relation. We found a possible increase of metallicity with age, which, if confirmed, would provide observational evidence for radial migration. Although a statistical significance is given, more studies are certainly needed to exclude selection effects, for example. The comparison of open clusters and Cepheids with recent Galactic models agrees well in general. However, the models do not reproduce the flat gradient of the open clusters in the outer disc. Thus, the effect of radial migration is either underestimated in the models, or an additional mechanism is at work. Conclusions: Apart from the Cepheids, open clusters are the best tracers for metallicity over large Galactocentric distances in the Milky Way. For a sound statistical analysis, a sufficiently large and homogeneous sample of cluster metallicities is needed. Our compilation is currently by far the largest and provides the basis for several basic studies such as the statistical

  16. Bypassing An Open-Circuit Power Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wannemacher, Harry E.

    1994-01-01

    Collection of bypass circuits enables battery consisting series string of cells to continue to function when one of its cells fails in open-circuit (high-resistance) condition. Basic idea simply to shunt current around defective cell to prevent open circuit from turning off battery altogether. Bypass circuits dissipate little power and are nearly immune to false activation.

  17. Dual-template synthesis of N-doped macro/mesoporous carbon with an open-pore structure as a metal-free catalyst for dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Longjun; Wang, Chih-Liang; Liao, Jin-Yun; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2015-12-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have attracted world-wide attention due to their low cost, high conversion efficiency, and environmental friendliness. Pt catalyst is usually used as the catalyst in the counter electrode of DSSCs due to its high electrochemical catalytic activity toward tri-iodide reduction. However, the high cost and scarcity of Pt prevent its large-scale application in DSSCs. It is highly desirable to replace Pt with low-cost catalysts made from earth-abundant elements. Here, we report a dual-template synthesis of N-doped macro/mesoporous carbon (macro/meso-NC) with an open-pore structure as the catalyst in the counter electrode of DSSCs. The catalytic activity of macro/meso-NC toward tri-iodide reduction has been tested by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and photocurrent-voltage (J-V) curves. It is found that the macro/meso-NC possesses excellent electrochemical catalytic activity with higher open-circuit voltage and cell efficiency than Pt. A high energy conversion efficiency of 7.27% has been achieved based on the metal-free macro/meso-NC, demonstrating as a promising catalyst for low-cost DSSCs.

  18. Localized spoof surface plasmons in textured open metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhen; Gao, Fei; Xu, Hongyi; Zhang, Youming; Zhang, Baile

    2016-05-15

    We experimentally demonstrate that textured open metal surfaces, i.e., the ultrathin fan-shaped metallic strips, are able to support spoof localized surface plasmons (spoof-LSPs) in the microwave frequencies. Unlike conventional spoof-LSPs supported on textured closed metal surfaces, which originate from the interference of clockwise and counterclockwise propagating surface modes, spoof-LSPs on textured open metal surfaces arise from the Fabry-Perot-like resonances due to the terminations of the open surfaces. We show that both the number of modes and the resonance frequencies of spoof-LSPs on textured open metal surfaces can be engineered through tuning the grating numbers (or total length) of the structured fan-shaped metallic strip. This enables the tuning of the spoof-plasmonic resonator by simply changing its length, rather than the complete geometry, simplifying the design to just one degree of freedom. Experimental evidence of the spoof-LSP Fabry-Perot resonators in the microwave regimes is presented with near-field response spectra and mode profiles imaged directly. PMID:27176957

  19. Open Zinc Freezing-Point Cell Assembly and Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žužek, V.; Batagelj, V.; Drnovšek, J.; Bojkovski, J.

    2014-07-01

    An open metal freezing-point cell design has been developed in the Laboratory of Metrology and Quality. According to our design, a zinc cell was successfully assembled. The paper presents the needed parts for the cell, the cleaning process, and sealing of the cell. The assembled cell was then evaluated by comparison with two commercial closed zinc cells of different manufacturers. The freezing plateaus of the cells were measured, and a direct cell comparison was made. It was shown that the assembled open cell performed better than the used closed cell and was close to the brand new closed cell. The nominal purity of the zinc used for the open cell was 7 N, but the freezing plateau measurement suggests a higher impurity concentration. It was assumed that the zinc was contaminated to some extent during the process of cutting as its original shape was an irregular cylinder. The uncertainty due to impurities for the assembled cell is estimated to be 0.3 mK. Furthermore, the immersion profile and the pressure coefficient were measured. Both results are close to their theoretical values.

  20. Towards a photometric metallicity scale for open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netopil, M.; Paunzen, E.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Open clusters are a useful tool when investigating several topics connected with stellar evolution; for example the age or distance can be more accurately determined than for field stars. However, one important parameter, the metallicity, is only known for a marginal percentage of open clusters. Aims: We aim at a consistent set of parameters for the open clusters investigated in our photometric Δa survey of chemically peculiar stars. Special attention is paid to expanding our knowledge of cluster metallicities and verifying their scale. Methods: Making use of a previously developed method based on normalised evolutionary grids and photometric data, the distance, age, reddening, and metallicity of open clusters were derived. To transform photometric measurements into effective temperatures to use as input for our method, a set of temperature calibrations for the most commonly used colour indices and photometric systems was compiled. Results: We analysed 58 open clusters in total. Our derived metallicity values were in excellent agreement with about 30 spectroscopically studied targets. The mean value of the absolute deviations was found to be 0.03 dex, with no noticeable offset or gradient. The method was also applied using recent evolutionary models based on the currently accepted lower solar abundance value Z ~ 0.014. No significant differences were found compared to grids using the former adopted solar value Z = 0.02. Furthermore, some divergent photometric datasets were identified and discussed. Conclusions: The method provides an accurate way of obtaining properly scaled metallicity values for open clusters. In light of present and future homogeneous photometric sky surveys, the sample of stellar clusters can be extended to the outskirts of the Milky Way, where spectroscopic studies are almost impossible. This will help for determining galactic metallicity gradients in more detail. Figure 7 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. Mechanical behavior of open cell aluminum foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jikou

    Open cell metallic foams are relatively new materials with increasingly applications due to their attractive combinations of physical, chemical, mechanical and optical properties. Since plastic deformation in the struts involves dislocation motion, dislocation slip bands are used to track the initiation/propagation and locations of plastic deformation in individual struts. We find that the onset of plastic deformation in struts is far beyond the observable strut/cell shape changes, and both plastic bending and buckling are strut deformation modes. To measure the strut mechanical properties, an existing micro-scale tensile tester was updated to test the individual struts extracted from foams using electro-discharged machining. The micro-tensile testing results show that the foam struts are typically more ductile and one time stronger than the corresponding fully dense alloy. To integrate the measured strut and foam properties, a four-strut structure unit is identified as a structural representative of the open cell foam structure. Based on the observed strut deformation modes, mechanics analysis is performed on the structure unit to predict the foam stiffness and strength. The predictions are in good agreement with the measured data, suggesting the significance of the studies on the foam strut properties and deformation. This model also predicts the bounds of the foam strengths. Under cyclic compression, foams fail due to damage accumulation in individual struts, in which surface cracks initiate and grow. At low stress levels, surface cracks are formed in multiple struts that are distributed across the foam block. This results in an abrupt strain jump due to the crush of foam block, upon foam failure. To meet applications requirements, open cell aluminum foams are usually annealed or strengthened. The studies are carried out in the foams in the as-fabricated (F), annealed (O) and T6-strengthed (T6) conditions. We find that annealing and T6 strengthening

  2. Laser-assisted solar cell metallization processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, S.

    1984-01-01

    Laser assisted processing techniques utilized to produce the fine line, thin metal grid structures that are required to fabricate high efficiency solar cells are investigated. The tasks comprising these investigations are summarized. Metal deposition experiments are carried out utilizing laser assisted pyrolysis of a variety of metal bearing polymer films and metalloorganic inks spun onto silicon substrates. Laser decomposition of spun on silver neodecanoate ink yields very promising results. Solar cell comb metallization patterns are written using this technique.

  3. Metal-organic frameworks: A thin film opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumby, Christopher J.

    2016-04-01

    The properties of metal-organic frameworks -- promising for a myriad of applications -- can be commonly tuned by judicious choice of the building blocks used to prepare the material. Now, simply downsizing a rigid, non-porous MOF to a thin film has been shown to endow it with dynamic, gate-opening-type guest uptake behaviour.

  4. Laser-assisted solar cell metallization processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohatgi, A.; Gupta, S.; Mcmullin, P. G.; Palaschak, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    Laser-assisted processing techniques for producing high-quality solar cell metallization patterns are being investigated, developed, and characterized. The tasks comprising these investigations are outlined.

  5. Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor Nanowire Network Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Oener, Sebastian Z; van de Groep, Jorik; Macco, Bart; Bronsveld, Paula C P; Kessels, W M M; Polman, Albert; Garnett, Erik C

    2016-06-01

    Metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) junctions provide the charge separating properties of Schottky junctions while circumventing the direct and detrimental contact of the metal with the semiconductor. A passivating and tunnel dielectric is used as a separation layer to reduce carrier recombination and remove Fermi level pinning. When applied to solar cells, these junctions result in two main advantages over traditional p-n-junction solar cells: a highly simplified fabrication process and excellent passivation properties and hence high open-circuit voltages. However, one major drawback of metal-insulator-semiconductor solar cells is that a continuous metal layer is needed to form a junction at the surface of the silicon, which decreases the optical transmittance and hence short-circuit current density. The decrease of transmittance with increasing metal coverage, however, can be overcome by nanoscale structures. Nanowire networks exhibit precisely the properties that are required for MIS solar cells: closely spaced and conductive metal wires to induce an inversion layer for homogeneous charge carrier extraction and simultaneously a high optical transparency. We experimentally demonstrate the nanowire MIS concept by using it to make silicon solar cells with a measured energy conversion efficiency of 7% (∼11% after correction), an effective open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 560 mV and estimated short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 33 mA/cm(2). Furthermore, we show that the metal nanowire network can serve additionally as an etch mask to pattern inverted nanopyramids, decreasing the reflectivity substantially from 36% to ∼4%. Our extensive analysis points out a path toward nanowire based MIS solar cells that exhibit both high Voc and Jsc values. PMID:27172429

  6. Three-Electrode Metal Oxide Reduction Cell

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.; Ackerman, John P.

    2005-06-28

    A method of electrochemically reducing a metal oxide to the metal in an electrochemical cell is disclosed along with the cell. Each of the anode and cathode operate at their respective maximum reaction rates. An electrolyte and an anode at which oxygen can be evolved, and a cathode including a metal oxide to be reduced are included as is a third electrode with independent power supplies connecting the anode and the third electrode and the cathode and the third electrode.

  7. Three-electrode metal oxide reduction cell

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.; Ackerman, John P.

    2008-08-12

    A method of electrochemically reducing a metal oxide to the metal in an electrochemical cell is disclosed along with the cell. Each of the anode and cathode operate at their respective maximum reaction rates. An electrolyte and an anode at which oxygen can be evolved, and a cathode including a metal oxide to be reduced are included as is a third electrode with independent power supplies connecting the anode and the third electrode and the cathode and the third electrode.

  8. Metal-free ring-opening metathesis polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kelli A; Goetz, Adam E; Boydston, Andrew J

    2015-02-01

    We have developed a method to achieve ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) mediated by oxidation of organic initiators in the absence of any transition metals. Radical cations, generated via one-electron oxidation of vinyl ethers, were found to react with norbornene to give polymeric species with microstructures essentially identical to those traditionally obtained via metal-mediated ROMP. We found that vinyl ether oxidation could be accomplished under mild conditions using an organic photoredox mediator. This led to high yields of polymer and generally good correlation between M(n) values and initial monomer to catalyst loadings. Moreover, temporal control over reinitiation of polymer growth was achieved during on/off cycles of light exposure. This method demonstrates the first metal-free method for controlled ROMP. PMID:25573294

  9. Cell design for lithium alloy/metal sulfide battery

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1985-01-01

    The disclosed lithium alloy/iron sulfide cell design provides loop-like positive and negative sheet metal current collectors electrically insulated from one another by separator means, the positive collector being located outwardly of the negative collector. The collectors are initially secured within an open-ended cell housing, which allows for collector pretesting for electrical shorts prior to adding any electrode materials and/or electrolyte to the cell. Separate chambers are defined outwardly of the positive collector and inwardly of the negative collector open respectively in opposite directions toward the open ends of the cell housing; and positive and negative electrode materials can be extruded into these respective chambers via the opposite open housing ends. The chambers and cell housing ends can then be sealed closed. A cross wall structurally reinforces the cell housing and also thereby defines two cavities, and paired positive and negative collectors are disposed in each cavity and electrically connected in parallel. The cell design provides for a high specific energy output and improved operating life in that any charge-discharge cycle swelling of the positive electrode material will be inwardly against only the positive collector to minimize shorts caused by the collectors shifting relative to one another.

  10. Improved cell design for lithium alloy/metal sulfide battery

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1984-03-30

    The disclosed lithium alloy/iron sulfide cell design provides loop-like positive and negative sheet metal current collectors electrically insulated from one another by separator means, the positive collector being located outwardly of the negative collector. The collectors are initially secured within an open-ended cell housing, which allows for collector pretesting for electrical shorts prior to adding any electrode materials and/or electrolyte to the cell. Separate chambers are defined outwardly of the positive collector and inwardly of the negative collector open respectively in opposite directions toward the open ends of the cell housing; and positive and negative electrode materials can be extruded into these respective chambers via the opposite open housing ends. The chambers and cell housing ends can then be sealed closed. A cross wall structurally reinforces the cell housing and also thereby defines two cavities, and paired positive and negative collectors are disposed in each cavity and electrically connected in parallel. The cell design provides for a high specific energy output and improved operating life in that any charge-discharge cycle swelling of the positive electrode material will be inwardly against only the positive collector to minimize shorts caused by the collectors shifting relative to one another.

  11. Transition metal catalysis in the mitochondria of living cells.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Gamasa, María; Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Couceiro, José R; Mascareñas, José L

    2016-01-01

    The development of transition metal catalysts capable of promoting non-natural transformations within living cells can open significant new avenues in chemical and cell biology. Unfortunately, the complexity of the cell makes it extremely difficult to translate standard organometallic chemistry to living environments. Therefore, progress in this field has been very slow, and many challenges, including the possibility of localizing active metal catalysts into specific subcellular sites or organelles, remain to be addressed. Herein, we report a designed ruthenium complex that accumulates preferentially inside the mitochondria of mammalian cells, while keeping its ability to react with exogenous substrates in a bioorthogonal way. Importantly, we show that the subcellular catalytic activity can be used for the confined release of fluorophores, and even allows selective functional alterations in the mitochondria by the localized transformation of inert precursors into uncouplers of the membrane potential. PMID:27600651

  12. Phytoplankton responses to atmospheric metal deposition in the coastal and open-ocean Sargasso Sea.

    PubMed

    Mackey, Katherine R M; Buck, Kristen N; Casey, John R; Cid, Abigail; Lomas, Michael W; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Paytan, Adina

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of atmospheric metal deposition on natural phytoplankton communities at open-ocean and coastal sites in the Sargasso Sea during the spring bloom. Locally collected aerosols with different metal contents were added to natural phytoplankton assemblages from each site, and changes in nitrate, dissolved metal concentration, and phytoplankton abundance and carbon content were monitored. Addition of aerosol doubled the concentrations of cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), and nickel (Ni) in the incubation water. Over the 3-day experiments, greater drawdown of dissolved metals occurred in the open ocean water, whereas little metal drawdown occurred in the coastal water. Two populations of picoeukaryotic algae and Synechococcus grew in response to aerosol additions in both experiments. Particulate organic carbon increased and was most sensitive to changes in picoeukaryote abundance. Phytoplankton community composition differed depending on the chemistry of the aerosol added. Enrichment with aerosol that had higher metal content led to a 10-fold increase in Synechococcus abundance in the oceanic experiment but not in the coastal experiment. Enrichment of aerosol-derived Co, Mn, and Ni were particularly enhanced in the oceanic experiment, suggesting the Synechococcus population may have been fertilized by these aerosol metals. Cu-binding ligand concentrations were in excess of dissolved Cu in both experiments, and increased with aerosol additions. Bioavailable free hydrated Cu(2+) concentrations were below toxicity thresholds throughout both experiments. These experiments show (1) atmospheric deposition contributes biologically important metals to seawater, (2) these metals are consumed over time scales commensurate with cell growth, and (3) growth responses can differ between distinct Synechococcus or eukaryotic algal populations despite their relatively close geographic proximity and taxonomic similarity

  13. Phytoplankton responses to atmospheric metal deposition in the coastal and open-ocean Sargasso Sea

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Katherine R. M.; Buck, Kristen N.; Casey, John R.; Cid, Abigail; Lomas, Michael W.; Sohrin, Yoshiki; Paytan, Adina

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of atmospheric metal deposition on natural phytoplankton communities at open-ocean and coastal sites in the Sargasso Sea during the spring bloom. Locally collected aerosols with different metal contents were added to natural phytoplankton assemblages from each site, and changes in nitrate, dissolved metal concentration, and phytoplankton abundance and carbon content were monitored. Addition of aerosol doubled the concentrations of cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), and nickel (Ni) in the incubation water. Over the 3-day experiments, greater drawdown of dissolved metals occurred in the open ocean water, whereas little metal drawdown occurred in the coastal water. Two populations of picoeukaryotic algae and Synechococcus grew in response to aerosol additions in both experiments. Particulate organic carbon increased and was most sensitive to changes in picoeukaryote abundance. Phytoplankton community composition differed depending on the chemistry of the aerosol added. Enrichment with aerosol that had higher metal content led to a 10-fold increase in Synechococcus abundance in the oceanic experiment but not in the coastal experiment. Enrichment of aerosol-derived Co, Mn, and Ni were particularly enhanced in the oceanic experiment, suggesting the Synechococcus population may have been fertilized by these aerosol metals. Cu-binding ligand concentrations were in excess of dissolved Cu in both experiments, and increased with aerosol additions. Bioavailable free hydrated Cu2+ concentrations were below toxicity thresholds throughout both experiments. These experiments show (1) atmospheric deposition contributes biologically important metals to seawater, (2) these metals are consumed over time scales commensurate with cell growth, and (3) growth responses can differ between distinct Synechococcus or eukaryotic algal populations despite their relatively close geographic proximity and taxonomic similarity. PMID

  14. Laser-assisted solar cell metallization processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, S.

    1984-01-01

    Laser-assisted processing techniques utilized to produce the fine line, thin metal grid structures that are required to fabricate high efficiency solar cells are examined. Two basic techniques for metal deposition are investigated; (1) photochemical decomposition of liquid or gas phase organometallic compounds utilizing either a focused, CW ultraviolet laser (System 1) or a mask and ultraviolet flood illumination, such as that provided by a repetitively pulsed, defocused excimer laser (System 2), for pattern definition, and (2) thermal deposition of metals from organometallic solutions or vapors utilizing a focused, CW laser beam as a local heat source to draw the metallization pattern.

  15. Open end protection for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Zafred, Paolo R.; Dederer, Jeffrey T.; Tomlins, Gregory W.; Toms, James M.; Folser, George R.; Schmidt, Douglas S.; Singh, Prabhakar; Hager, Charles A.

    2001-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell (40) having a closed end (44) and an open end (42) operates in a fuel cell generator (10) where the fuel cell open end (42) of each fuel cell contains a sleeve (60, 64) fitted over the open end (42), where the sleeve (60, 64) extends beyond the open end (42) of the fuel cell (40) to prevent degradation of the interior air electrode of the fuel cell by fuel gas during operation of the generator (10).

  16. Transition metals activate TFEB in overexpressing cells

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Karina A.; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal toxicity is an important factor in the pathogenesis of numerous human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Lysosomes have emerged as important factors in transition metal toxicity because they handle transition metals via endocytosis, autophagy, absorption from the cytoplasm and exocytosis. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) regulates lysosomal biogenesis and the expression of lysosomal proteins in response to lysosomal and/or metabolic stresses. Since transition metals cause lysosomal dysfunction, we proposed that TFEB may be activated to drive gene expression in response to transition metal exposure and that such activation may influence transition metal toxicity. We found that transition metals copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) activate recombinant TFEB and stimulate the expression of TFEB-dependent genes in TFEB-overexpressing cells. In cells that show robust lysosomal exocytosis, TFEB was cytoprotective at moderate levels of Cu exposure, decreasing oxidative stress as reported by the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene. However, at high levels of Cu exposure, particularly in cells with low levels of lysosomal exocytosis, activation of overexpressed TFEB was toxic, increasing oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Based on these data, we conclude that TFEB-driven gene network is a component of the cellular response to transition metals. These data suggest limitations and disadvantages of TFEB overexpression as a therapeutic approach. PMID:26251447

  17. The metal interconnected cascade solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    LaRue, R.A.; Borden, P.G.; Dietze, W.T.; Gregory, P.E.; Ludowise, M.J.

    1982-09-01

    A cascade cell employing a new type of interconnect is described. It uses a groove etch and metallization process to connect the base of the top cell to the emitter of the bottom cell. The best cell yielded 21.3% efficiency under conditions of AM3, 130 suns, 50/sup 0/C, with the result not corrected for grid coverage. Other features include a 1.2-micron thick 1.82-eV ALGaAs top cell with a BSF under the base and an n/p heteroface GaAs bottom cell that is stable during top cell growth.

  18. Molten-Metal Electrodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, A.; Vohs, J. M.; Gorte, R. J.

    2010-11-03

    Molten In, Pb, and Sb were examined as anodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) that operate between 973 and 1173 K. The results for these metals were compared with those reported previously for molten Sn electrodes. Cells were operated under “battery” conditions, with dry He or N2 flow in the anode compartment, to characterize the electrochemical oxidation of the metals at the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-electrolyte interface. In most cases, the open-circuit voltages (OCVs) were close to that based on equilibrium between the metals and their oxides. With Sn and In, the cell impedances increased dramatically at all temperatures after drawing current due to formation of insulating, oxide barriers at the electrolyte interface. Similar results were observed for Pb at 973 and 1073 K, but the impedance remained low even after PbO formation at 1173 K because this is above the melting temperature of PbO. Similarly, the impedances of molten Sb electrodes at 973 K were low and unaffected by current flow because of the low melting temperature of Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The potential of using molten-metal electrodes for direct-carbon fuel cells and for energy-storage systems is discussed.

  19. Development of nickel-metal hydride cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuwajima, Saburo; Kamimori, Nolimits; Nakatani, Kensuke; Yano, Yoshiaki

    1993-01-01

    National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) has conducted the research and development (R&D) of battery cells for space use. A new R&D program about a Nickel-Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) cell for space use from this year, based on good results in evaluations of commercial Ni-MH cells in Tsukuba Space Center (TKSC), was started. The results of those commercial Ni-MH cell's evaluations and recent status about the development of Ni-MH cells for space use are described.

  20. Integrating Sphere Alkali-Metal Vapor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuyer, Bart; Ben-Kish, Amit; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2010-03-01

    An integrating sphere is an optical multi-pass cavity that uses diffuse reflection to increase the optical path length. Typically applied in photometry and radiometry, integrating spheres have previously been used to detect trace gases and to cool and trap alkali-metal atoms. Here, we investigate the potential for integrating spheres to enhance optical absorption in optically thin alkali-metal vapor cells. In particular, we consider the importance of dielectric effects due to a glass container for the alkali-metal vapor. Potential applications include miniature atomic clocks and magnetometers, where multi-passing could reduce the operating temperature and power consumption.

  1. Fuel cells and the theory of metals.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bocciarelli, C. V.

    1972-01-01

    Metal theory is used to study the role of metal catalysts in electrocatalysis, with particular reference to alkaline hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells. Use is made of a simple model, analogous to that used to interpret field emission in vacuum. Theoretical values for all the quantities in the Tafel equation are obtained in terms of bulk properties of the metal catalysts (such as free electron densities and Fermi level). The reasons why some processes are reversible (H-electrodes) and some irreversible (O-electrodes) are identified. Selection rules for desirable properties of catalytic materials are established.

  2. NGC 1252: a high altitude, metal poor open cluster remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, R.; de la Fuente Marcos, C.; Moni Bidin, C.; Carraro, G.; Costa, E.

    2013-09-01

    If stars form in clusters but most stars belong to the field, understanding the details of the transition from the former to the latter is imperative to explain the observational properties of the field. Aging open clusters are one of the sources of field stars. The disruption rate of open clusters slows down with age but, as an object gets older, the distinction between the remaining cluster or open cluster remnant (OCR) and the surrounding field becomes less and less obvious. As a result, finding good OCR candidates or confirming the OCR nature of some of the best candidates still remain elusive. One of these objects is NGC 1252, a scattered group of about 20 stars in Horologium. Here we use new wide-field photometry in the UBVI passbands, proper motions from the Yale/San Juan SPM 4.0 catalogue and high-resolution spectroscopy concurrently with results from N-body simulations to decipher NGC 1252's enigmatic character. Spectroscopy shows that most of the brightest stars in the studied area are chemically, kinematically and spatially unrelated to each other. However, after analysing proper motions, we find one relevant kinematic group. This sparse object is relatively close (˜1 kpc), metal poor and is probably not only one of the oldest clusters (3 Gyr) within 1.5 kpc from the Sun but also one of the clusters located farthest from the disc, at an altitude of nearly -900 pc. That makes NGC 1252 the first open cluster that can be truly considered a high Galactic altitude OCR: an unusual object that may hint at a star formation event induced on a high Galactic altitude gas cloud. We also conclude that the variable TW Horologii and the blue straggler candidate HD 20286 are unlikely to be part of NGC 1252. NGC 1252 17 is identified as an unrelated, Population II cannonball star moving at about 400 km s-1.

  3. Solar cell having improved front surface metallization

    SciTech Connect

    Lillington, D.R.; Mardesich, N.; Dill, H.G.; Garlick, G.F.J.

    1987-09-15

    This patent describes a solar cell comprising: a first layer of gallium arsenide semiconductor material of an N+ conductivity; a second layer of gallium arsenide semiconductor material of an N conductivity overlying the first layer; a third layer of gallium arsenide semiconductor material of a P conductivity overlying the N conductivity layer and forming a P-N junction therebetween. A layer of aluminium gallium arsenide semiconductor material of a p conductivity overlying the front major surface of the P conductivity third layer and having an exposed surface essentially parallel to the front major surface and at least one edge; a plurality of metallic contact lines made of a first metal alloy composition and being spaced apart by a first predetermined distance traversing the exposed surface and extending through the aluminium gallium arsenide layer to the front major surface and making electrical contact to the third layer; a plurality of longitudinally disposed metallic grid lines made of a second metal alloy composition and being spaced apart by a second predetermined distance located on the exposed surface of the aluminium gallium arsenide layer and which cross the metallic contact lines and make electrical contact to the metallic lines; a flat metallic strip disposed on the aluminium gallium arsenide layer exposed surface near the edge, the strip electrically coupling the metallic grid lines to one another; and a back contact located on the back major surface.

  4. The old, metal-poor, anticentre open cluster Trumpler 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, P.; Cocozza, G.; Bragaglia, A.; Pancino, E.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Carrera, R.; Tosi, M.

    2015-01-01

    As part of a long-term programme, we analyse the evolutionary status and properties of the old and populous open cluster Trumpler 5 (Tr 5), located in the Galactic anticentre direction, almost on the Galactic plane. Tr 5 was observed with Wide Field Imager@MPG/ESO Telescope using the Bessel U, B, and V filters. The cluster parameters have been obtained using the synthetic colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) method, i.e. the direct comparison of the observational CMD with a library of synthetic CMDs generated with different stellar evolution sets (Padova, FRANEC, and FST). Age, reddening, and distance are derived through the synthetic CMD method using stellar evolutionary models with subsolar metallicity (Z = 0.004 or Z = 0.006). Additional spectroscopic observations with Ultraviolet VLT Echelle Spectrograph@Very Large Telescope of three red clump stars of the cluster were used to determine more robustly the chemical properties of the cluster. Our analysis shows that Tr 5 has subsolar metallicity, with [Fe/H] = -0.403 ± 0.006 dex (derived from spectroscopy), age between 2.9 and 4 Gyr (the lower age is found using stellar models without core overshooting), reddening E(B - V) in the range 0.60-0.66 mag complicated by a differential pattern (of the order of ˜±0.1 mag), and distance modulus (m - M)0 = 12.4 ± 0.1 mag.

  5. Static impedance behavior of programmable metallization cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, S.; Saremi, M.; Barnaby, H. J.; Edwards, A.; Kozicki, M. N.; Mitkova, M.; Mahalanabis, D.; Gonzalez-Velo, Y.; Mahmud, A.

    2015-04-01

    Programmable metallization cell (PMC) devices work by growing and dissolving a conducting metallic bridge across a chalcogenide glass (ChG) solid electrolyte, which changes the resistance of the cell. PMC operation relies on the incorporation of metal ions in the ChG films via photo-doping to lower the off-state resistance and stabilize resistive switching, and subsequent transport of these ions by electric fields induced from an externally applied bias. In this paper, the static on- and off-state resistance of a PMC device composed of a layered (Ag-rich/Ag-poor) Ge30Se70 ChG film with active Ag and inert Ni electrodes is characterized and modeled using three dimensional simulation code. Calibrating the model to experimental data enables the extraction of device parameters such as material bandgaps, workfunctions, density of states, carrier mobilities, dielectric constants, and affinities.

  6. Metal electrode for amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell having an N-type region wherein the contact to the N-type region is composed of a material having a work function of about 3.7 electron volts or less. Suitable materials include strontium, barium and magnesium and rare earth metals such as gadolinium and yttrium.

  7. Open-cell glass crystalline porous material

    DOEpatents

    Anshits, Alexander G.; Sharonova, Olga M.; Vereshchagina, Tatiana A.; Zykova, Irina D.; Revenko, Yurii A.; Tretyakov, Alexander A.; Aloy, Albert S.; Lubtsev, Rem I.; Knecht, Dieter A.; Tranter, Troy J.; Macheret, Yevgeny

    2002-01-01

    An open-cell glass crystalline porous material made from hollow microspheres which are cenospheres obtained from fly ash, having an open-cell porosity of up to 90 vol. % is produced. The cenospheres are separated into fractions based on one or more of grain size, density, magnetic or non-magnetic, and perforated or non-perforated. Selected fractions are molded and agglomerated by sintering with a binder at a temperature below the softening temperature, or without a binder at a temperature about, or above, the softening temperature but below the temperature of liquidity. The porous material produced has an apparent density of 0.3-0.6 g/cm.sup.3, a compressive strength in the range of 1.2-3.5 MPa, and two types of openings: through-flow wall pores in the cenospheres of 0.1-30 micrometers, and interglobular voids between the cenospheres of 20-100 micrometers. The porous material of the invention has properties useful as porous matrices for immobilization of liquid radioactive waste, heat-resistant traps and filters, supports for catalysts, adsorbents and ion-exchangers.

  8. Open-cell glass crystalline porous material

    DOEpatents

    Anshits, Alexander G.; Sharonova, Olga M.; Vereshchagina, Tatiana A.; Zykova, Irina D.; Revenko, Yurii A.; Tretyakov, Alexander A.; Aloy, Albert S.; Lubtsev, Rem I.; Knecht, Dieter A.; Tranter, Troy J.; Macheret, Yevgeny

    2003-12-23

    An open-cell glass crystalline porous material made from hollow microspheres which are cenospheres obtained from fly ash, having an open-cell porosity of up to 90 vol. % is produced. The cenospheres are separated into fractions based on one or more of grain size, density, magnetic or non-magnetic, and perforated or non-perforated. Selected fractions are molded and agglomerated by sintering with a binder at a temperature below the softening temperature, or without a binder at a temperature about, or above, the softening temperature but below the temperature of liquidity. The porous material produced has an apparent density of 0.3-0.6 g/cm.sup.3, a compressive strength in the range of 1.2-3.5 MPa, and two types of openings: through-flow wall pores in the cenospheres of 0.1-30 micrometers, and interglobular voids between the cenospheres of 20-100 micrometers. The porous material of the invention has properties useful as porous matrices for immobilization of liquid radioactive waste, heat-resistant traps and filters, supports for catalysts, adsorbents and ion-exchangers.

  9. Lateral Programmable Metallization Cell Devices And Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Minghan

    2011-12-01

    Programmable Metallization Cell (PMC) is a technology platform which utilizes mass transport in solid or liquid electrolyte coupled with electrochemical (redox) reactions to form or remove nanoscale metallic electrodeposits on or in the electrolyte. The ability to redistribute metal mass and form metallic nanostructure in or on a structure in situ, via the application of a bias on laterally placed electrodes, creates a large number of promising applications. A novel PMC-based lateral microwave switch was fabricated and characterized for use in microwave systems. It has demonstrated low insertion loss, high isolation, low voltage operation, low power and low energy consumption, and excellent linearity. Due to its non-volatile nature the switch operates with fewer biases and its simple planar geometry makes possible innovative device structures which can be potentially integrated into microwave power distribution circuits. PMC technology is also used to develop lateral dendritic metal electrodes. A lateral metallic dendritic network can be grown in a solid electrolyte (GeSe) or electrodeposited on SiO2 or Si using a water-mediated method. These dendritic electrodes grown in a solid electrolyte (GeSe) can be used to lower resistances for applications like self-healing interconnects despite its relatively low light transparency; while the dendritic electrodes grown using water-mediated method can be potentially integrated into solar cell applications, like replacing conventional Ag screen-printed top electrodes as they not only reduce resistances but also are highly transparent. This research effort also laid a solid foundation for developing dendritic plasmonic structures. A PMC-based lateral dendritic plasmonic structure is a device that has metallic dendritic networks grown electrochemically on SiO2 with a thin layer of surface metal nanoparticles in liquid electrolyte. These structures increase the distribution of particle sizes by connecting pre-deposited Ag

  10. The Old, Super-Metal-Rich Open Cluster, NGC 6791

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesgaard, Ann Merchant; Lum, Michael G. G.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.

    2015-08-01

    Stellar evolution and Galactic evolution have both been greatly advanced by the study of star clusters. In addition the elemental abundance results from clusters have revealed information about Galactic chemical evolution and nucleosynthesis. The cluster, NGC 6791, has a number of bizarre properties that make it especially interesting for comparative cluster studies. It is old (8.3 Gyr) yet metal-rich ([Fe/H] = +0.30). It has a heliocentric distance of 4 kpc and a galactic latitude of +11 degrees which makes it 1 kpc above the galactic plane. Its boxy orbit has a high eccentricity (~0.5) with a perigalactic distance of 3 kpc and an apogalactic distance of 10 kpc. The orbital period of ~130 Myr indicates that it has crossed the Galactic plane several times yet has remained as an intact cluster. We have determined abundances from high-resolution (R = 46,000) Keck/HIRES spectra of turn-off stars in this open cluster NGC 6791. We have a solid determination of [Fe/H] = +0.30 +/-0.02 from measurements of some 40 unblended, unsaturated lines of both Fe I and Fe II in eight turn-off stars. Our O abundances come from the O I triplet near 7774 Å and are corrected for small nLTE effects. We find consistent ratios of [O/Fe]n with a mean of -0.06 +/-0.02, indicating a single population of stars. Our results for the alpha elements [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe] and [Ti/Fe] are near solar and compare well with those of old, metal-rich field stars. The Fe-peak elements, Cr and Ni, have values of [Cr/Fe] = +0.05 +/-0.02 and [Ni/Fe] = +0.04 +/-0.01. Determinations of upper limits were found for Li by spectrum synthesis; this is consistent with the upper limits in this temperature range for turn-off/subgiant stars in the relatively old, super-metal-rich cluster NGC 6253. We speculate that no stars in NGC 6791 have retained the Li with which they formed.

  11. Open cell fire-resistant foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. E.; Wittman, J. W.; Reynard, K. A.

    1976-01-01

    Candidate polyphosphazene polymers were investigated to develop a fire-resistant, thermally stable and flexible open cell foam. The copolymers were prepared in several mole ratios of the substituent side chains and a (nominal) 40:60 derivative was selected for formulation studies. Synthesis of the polymers involved solution by polymerization of hexachlorophosphazene to soluble high molecular weight poly(dichlorophosphazene), followed by derivatization of the resultant polymer in a normal fashion to give polymers in high yield and high molecular weight. Small amounts of a cure site were incorporated into the polymer for vulcanization purposes. The poly(aryloxyphosphazenes) exhibited good thermal stability and the first polymer mentioned above exhibited the best thermal behavior of all the candidate polymers studied.

  12. Laser-assisted solar-cell metallization processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, S.

    1984-01-01

    A photolytic metal deposition system using a focused continuous wave ultraviolet laser, a photolytic metal deposition system using a mask and ultraviolet flood illumination, and a pyrolytic metal deposition system using a focused continuous wave laser were studied. Fabrication of solar cells, as well as characterization to determine the effects of transient heat on solar cell junctions were investigated.

  13. Laser-assisted solar cell metallization processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the laser-assisted solar cell metallization processing is described. Metallo-organic silver films were spun-on by argon ion laser beam pyrolysis. The metallo-organic decomposition (MOD) film was spun-on an evaporated Ti/Pd film to produce tood adhesion. In a maskless process, the argon ion laser writes the contact pattern. The film is then built up to obtain the required conductivity using conventional silverplating process. The Ti/Pd film in the field is chemically etched using the plated silver film as the mask. The width of the contact pattern is determined by the power of the laser. Widths as thin as 20 microns were obtained using 0.66 W of laser power. Cells fabricated with the 50 micron line widths of 4 ohm-cm floating zone (Fz) silicon-produced efficiencies of 16.6% (no passivation) which were equivalent to the best cells using conventional metallization/lithography and no passivation.

  14. Precious Metal Recovery from Fuel Cell MEA's

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Shore

    2004-04-25

    In 2003, Engelhard Corporation received a DOE award to develop a cost-effective, environmentally friendly approach to recover Pt from fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies (MEA’s). The most important precious metal used in fuel cells is platinum, but ruthenium is also added to the anode electrocatalyst if CO is present in the hydrogen stream. As part of the project, a large number of measurements of Pt and Ru need to be made. A low-cost approach to measuring Pt is using the industry standard spectrophotometric measurement of Pt complexed with stannous chloride. The interference of Ru can be eliminated by reading the Pt absorbance at 450 nm. Spectrophotometric methods for measuring Ru, while reported in the literature, are not as robust. This paper will discuss the options for measuring Pt and Ru using the method of UV-VIS spectrophotometry

  15. Voltage effects on cells cultured on metallic biomedical implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerihosseini, Seyed Morteza

    Electrochemical voltage shifts in metallic biomedical implants occur in-vivo due to a number of processes including mechanically assisted corrosion. Surface potential of biomedical implants and excursions from resting open circuit potential (OCP), which is the voltage they attain while in contact with an electrolyte, can significantly change the interfacial properties of the metallic surfaces and alter the behavior of the surrounding cells, compromising the biocompatibility of metallic implants. Voltages can also be controlled to modulate cell function and fate. To date, the details of the physico-chemical phenomena and the role of different biomaterial parameters involved in the interaction between cells and metallic surfaces under cathodic bias have not been fully elucidated. In this work, changes in the interfacial properties of a CoCrMo biomedical alloy (ASTM F-1537) in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (pH 7.4) at different voltages was studied. Step polarization impedance spectroscopy technique was used to apply 50 mV voltage steps to samples, and the time-based current transients were recorded. A new equation was derived based on capacitive discharge through a Tafel element and generalized to deal with non-ideal impedance behavior. The new function compared to the KWW-Randles function, better matched the time-transient response. The results also showed a voltage dependent oxide resistance and capacitance behavior. Additionally, the in-vitro effect of static voltages on the behavior of MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts cultured on CoCrMo alloy (ASTM-1537) was studied to determine the range of cell viability and mode of cell death beyond the viable range. Cell viability and morphology, changes in actin cytoskeleton, adhesion complexes and nucleus, and mode of cell death (necrosis, or intrinsic or extrinsic apoptosis) were characterized at different voltages ranging from -1000 to +500 mV (Ag/AgCl). Moreover, electrochemical currents and metal ion concentrations at each

  16. Molten metal electrodes in solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javadekar, Ashay Dileep

    Molten metal electrodes in solid oxide fuel cells are electrochemically characterized for their possible use in direct carbon oxidation and energy storage. The cells were operated in the battery mode at 973 K, without added fuel, in order to understand the oxidation characteristics of Sb alloys as anodes at electrolyte interfaces. The cells using 50-mol% In-Sb and Sn-Sb mixtures exhibited open-circuit voltages (OCV) of 1.0 and 0.93 V, values similar to those of cells with pure In and Sn anodes respectively, and insulating In2O3 and SnO2 layers formed at the electrolyte interface. The 50-mol% Sb-Bi cell had an OCV of 0.73 V initially, close to that with pure Sb anode. The OCV remained constant until all of the Sb had been oxidized, after which it dropped to 0.43 V, similar to the value for pure Bi. SEM analysis of the spent cell showed two distinct phases, with metallic Bi at the bottom and Sb2O3 at the top. The cell with 50-mol% Sb-Pb anode exhibited an OCV that changed continuously with conversion, from 0.73 V initially to 0.67 V following the addition of charge equivalent to oxidation of 120% the Sb. The total cell impedance remained low for this entire period. EDS measurements on the sectioned Sb-Pb cell suggested formation of a mixed oxide of Pb and Sb. An energy-storage concept using molten Sb as the fuel in a reversible solid-oxide electrochemical cell was tested using a button cell with a Sc-stabilized zirconia electrolyte at 973 K, by measuring the impedances under fuel-cell and electrolyzer conditions for a range of stirred Sb-Sb2O 3 compositions. The Sb-Sb2O3 electrode impedances were found to be on the order of 0.15 ohm.cm2 for both fuel-cell and electrolyzer conditions, for compositions up to 30% Sb and 70% Sb2O3. The OCVs were 0.75 V, independent of conversion. The use of molten neat Ag and alloyed Ag-Sb for direct-carbon anodes in SOFCs has been examined at 1273 K. For Ag, an OCV typical of that expected for carbon oxidation, 1.12 V, was observed when

  17. Cellular Dewetting: Opening of Macroapertures in Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Maddugoda, Madhavi P.; Stefani, Caroline; Janel, Sebastien; Lafont, Frank; Cuvelier, Damien; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Brochard-Wyart, Françoise

    2012-05-01

    Pathogenic bacteria can cross from blood vessels to host tissues by opening transendothelial cell macroapertures (TEMs). To induce TEM opening, bacteria intoxicate endothelial cells with proteins that disrupt the contractile cytoskeletal network. Cell membrane tension is no longer resisted by contractile fibers, leading to the opening of TEMs. Here we model the opening of TEMs as a new form of dewetting. While liquid dewetting is irreversible, we show that cellular dewetting is transient. Our model predicts the minimum radius for hole nucleation, the maximum TEM size, and the dynamics of TEM opening, in good agreement with experimental data. The physical model is then coupled with biological experimental data to reveal that the protein missing in metastasis (MIM) controls the line tension at the rim of the TEM and opposes its opening.

  18. Testing Metal Chlorides For Use In Sodium-Cell Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Attia, Alan I.; Halpert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetric curves of transition-metal wires in molten NaAlCl4 electrolyte used to eliminate suitability of transition metals as cathodes in sodium cells. Cyclic voltammetry used in conjunction with measurement of galvanostatic polarization curves determines whether given metal chloride suitable as cathode material in such cell. Cells useful in such high-energy-density and high-power-density applications as leveling loads on electric-power plants, supplying power to electric ground vehicles, and aerospace applications.

  19. Electrochemical cell utilizing molten alkali metal electrode-reactant

    DOEpatents

    Virkar, Anil V.; Miller, Gerald R.

    1983-11-04

    An improved electrochemical cell comprising an additive-modified molten alkali metal electrode-reactant and/or electrolyte is disclosed. Various electrochemical cells employing a molten alkali metal, e.g., sodium, electrode in contact with a cationically conductive ceramic membrane experience a lower resistance and a lower temperature coefficient of resistance whenever small amounts of selenium are present at the interface of the electrolyte and the molten alkali metal. Further, cells having small amounts of selenium present at the electrolyte-molten metal interface exhibit less degradation of the electrolyte under long term cycling conditions.

  20. Coiled sheet metal strip opens into tubular configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. J.

    1966-01-01

    Copper alloy is converted into a spring material that can be rolled into a compact coil which will spontaneously open to form a tube in the long direction of the strip. The copper alloy is passed through a furnace at a prescribed temperature while restraining the strip in the desired tubular configuration.

  1. Cell Surface-based Sensing with Metallic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ziwen; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2015-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles provide versatile scaffolds for biosensing applications. In this review, we focus on the use of metallic nanoparticles for cell surface sensings. Examples of the use of both specific recognition and array-based “chemical nose” approaches to cell surface sensing will be discussed. PMID:25853985

  2. A new method of metallization for silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macha, M.

    1979-01-01

    The new metallization process based on Mo-Sn system was studied. The reaction mechanism of MoO3 and its mixture with Sn was examined. The basic ink composition was modified in order to obtain a low ohmic contact to the cell. The electrical characteristics of the cells were comparable with the existing metallization processes. However, in comparison with the standard processes using silver as the contacting metal, the saving obtained by the use of the new process was substantial.

  3. The old, massive, metal rich open cluster NGC 6791

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    NGC~6791 is a rich open cluster that attracted a lot of attention in the last decade. Recent estimates indicate that the mass is even larger, around 5000\\,$\\mathrm{M}_{\\odot}$. This is quite remarkable: the cluster is in fact 8\\,Gyr old, while the typical dissolution time for Galactic open clusters is a few Myr only. This might imply that the cluster managed to survive so long either because its original mass was much larger, or because it moved along a preferential orbit. In any case, such combination of old age and large mass is unique among Galactic open clusters, especially for clusters located in the inner regions of the Galactic disk. This is not the only special property of NGC 6791. Its abundance in iron is [Fe/H] $\\sim$ +0.40. again unique among Galactic star clusters of the same age range. Significant dispersions in various elements have been detected, that are not routinely found in Galactic open clusters. The combined UV flux of the few hot HB stars makes the cluster the closest proxy of an elliptical galaxy. This surprising result might indeed indicate that NGC 6791 was massive enough at origin to experience a strong burst of star formation and a fast enrichment.This pletora of unique properties renders NGC 6791 an extremely important object to study and understand.How and where could such a stellar system have formed? Is NGC 6791 just an open cluster? Did it form close to the bulge? How could have survived in the adverse, high-density, environment of the inner Galactic disk?These are difficult questions to answer to, of course. One of the still missing key observational evidence is whether the cluster suffered from tidal interaction, that could have significantly decreased its mass. We find such evidences, and use them as an argument to support a scenario in which the cluster formed as a massive object. We also estimate, using approximate analytic description based on available $N$-body models, how much mass NGC~6791 lost, and which was its

  4. Molybdenum-tin as a solar cell metallization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, D. W.; Radics, C.

    The operations of solar cell manufacture are briefly examined. The formation of reliable, ohmic, low-loss, and low-cost metal contacts on solar cells is a critical process step in cell manufacturing. In a commonly used process, low-cost metallization is achieved by screen printing a metal powder-glass frit ink on the surface of the Si surface and the conductive metal powder. A technique utilizing a molybdenum-tin alloy for the metal contacts appears to lower the cost of materials and to reduce process complexity. The ink used in this system is formulated from MoO3 with Sn powder and a trace amount of titanium resonate. Resistive losses of the resulting contacts are low because the ink contains no frit. The MoO3 is finally melted and reduced in forming gas (N2+H2) to Mo metal. The resulting Mo is highly reactive which facilitates the Mo-Si bonding.

  5. Molybdenum-tin as a solar cell metallization system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. W.; Radics, C.

    1981-01-01

    The operations of solar cell manufacture are briefly examined. The formation of reliable, ohmic, low-loss, and low-cost metal contacts on solar cells is a critical process step in cell manufacturing. In a commonly used process, low-cost metallization is achieved by screen printing a metal powder-glass frit ink on the surface of the Si surface and the conductive metal powder. A technique utilizing a molybdenum-tin alloy for the metal contacts appears to lower the cost of materials and to reduce process complexity. The ink used in this system is formulated from MoO3 with Sn powder and a trace amount of titanium resonate. Resistive losses of the resulting contacts are low because the ink contains no frit. The MoO3 is finally melted and reduced in forming gas (N2+H2) to Mo metal. The resulting Mo is highly reactive which facilitates the Mo-Si bonding.

  6. Cell surface engineering of microorganisms towards adsorption of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng-Song; Tao, Hu-Chun

    2015-06-01

    Heavy metal contamination has become a worldwide environmental concern due to its toxicity, non-degradability and food-chain bioaccumulation. Conventional physical and chemical treatment methods for heavy metal removal have disadvantages such as cost-intensiveness, incomplete removal, secondary pollution and the lack of metal specificity. Microbial biomass-based biosorption is one of the approaches gaining increasing attention because it is effective, cheap, and environmental friendly and can work well at low concentrations. To enhance the adsorption properties of microbial cells to heavy metal ions, the cell surface display of various metal-binding proteins/peptides have been performed using a cell surface engineering approach. The surface engineering of Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria and yeast towards the adsorption of heavy metals are reviewed in this article. The problems and future perspectives of this technology are discussed. PMID:23915280

  7. Metal organic frameworks for enzyme immobilization in biofuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodell, JaDee

    Interest in biofuel cells has been rapidly expanding as an ever-growing segment of the population gains access to electronic devices. The largest areas of growth for new populations using electronic devices are often in communities without electrical infrastructure. This lack of infrastructure in remote environments is one of the key driving factors behind the development of biofuel cells. Biofuel cells employ biological catalysts such as enzymes to catalyze oxidation and reduction reactions of select fuels to generate power. There are several benefits to using enzymes to catalyze reactions as compared to traditional fuel cells which use metal catalysts. First, enzymes are able to catalyze reactions at or near room temperature, whereas traditional metal catalysts are only efficient at very high temperatures. Second, biofuel cells can operate under mild pH conditions which is important for the eventual design of safe, commercially viable devices. Also, biofuel cells allow for implantable and flexible technologies. Finally, enzymes exhibit high selectivity and can be combined to fully oxidize or reduce the fuel which can generate several electrons from a single molecule of fuel, increasing the overall device efficiency. One of the main challenges which persist in biofuel cells is the instability of enzymes over time which tend to denature after hours or days. For a viable commercial biofuel cell to be produced, the stability of enzymes must be extended to months or years. Enzymes have been shown to have improved stability after being immobilized. The focus of this research was to find a metal organic framework (MOF) structure which could successfully immobilize enzymes while still allowing for electron transport to occur between the catalytic center of the enzyme and the electrode surface within a biofuel cell for power generation. Four MOF structures were successfully synthesized and were subsequently tested to determine the MOF's ability to immobilize the following

  8. Experimental Cosserat elasticity in open-cell polymer foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueger, Zach; Lakes, Roderic S.

    2016-01-01

    Reticulated open-cell polymer foams exhibit substantial size effects in torsion and bending: slender specimens are more rigid than anticipated via classical elasticity. Such size effects are predicted by Cosserat (micropolar) elasticity, which allows points to rotate as well as translate and incorporates distributed moments (couple stresses). The Cosserat characteristic length is larger than the cell size. The Cosserat coupling coefficient is larger than in dense closed-cell foams and approaches 1 for foam with 0.4 mm cells.

  9. Development of an all-metal thick film cost affective metallization system for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, B.

    1981-01-01

    An economical thick film solar cell contact for high volume production of low cost silicon solar array modules was investigated. All metal screenable pastes using base metals were studied. Solar cells with junction depths varying by a factor of 3.3, with and without a deposited oxide coating were used. Cells were screened and fired by a two step firing process. Adhesion and metallurgical results are unsatisfactory. No electrical information is obtained due to inadequate contact adhesion.

  10. New transition metal complexes and their ring-opened polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apodaca, Paula

    An exciting new class of metallacycle (eta5-C5 H4Fe) (CO)2CH2SiR2 that undergoes ring-opening polymerization was recently reported by Sharma et al. [1]. We are interested in further expanding this research area by synthesizing related cyclopentadienyl derivatives containing Fe, Mo, and W in combination with other elements of the group 14. We report here the synthesis and crystal structure characterization of new germa-metallacyclobutanes of Mo and W. In addition, we have successfully synthesized and characterized new ring-opening polymers of the related germanium systems [(eta5-C5 H4Fe)(CO) 2(CH2GeR2)] n. The new polymers were characterized using various spectroscopic techniques and gel permeation chromatography. The recent report on the synthesis of a new class of siloxane polymers based upon base-catalyzed ring opening of phenylene-bridged cyclic siloxanes [2] encouraged us to investigate the related ferrocenyl (Fc, (C5H 5)Fe(C5H4)) siloxane systems. The incorporation of ferrocene could provide new materials with all the interesting properties usually associated with these groups such as thermal and photochemical stability, electrochemical activity and potentially conducting materials. Thus far a new required organometallic monomer containing Fc-R, where R = disilaoxacyclopentene 5 has been synthesized and completely characterized. Based-induced ring-opening polymerizations of 5 were attempted under different reaction conditions and produced, inter alia: (C5H5)Fe(C 5H4)C(SiMe2OH)=CH(SiMe2R), R = nBu (2), tBu (3), Ph (4). The single crystal X-ray structures and full spectroscopic analysis of such products has been accomplished. Furthermore, the reactivity of the ferrocenyl silanols concerning condensation and their behavior under acidic conditions has been investigated. 1Sharma, H.; Cervantes-Lee, F.; Pannell, K. H. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2004, 126, 1326. 2 Loy, A. D.; Rahimian, K.; Samara, M. Angew. Chem. 1999, 38, 45.

  11. Open framework metal chalcogenides as efficient photocatalysts for reduction of CO2 into renewable hydrocarbon fuel.

    PubMed

    Sasan, Koroush; Lin, Qipu; Mao, Chengyu; Feng, Pingyun

    2016-06-01

    Open framework metal chalcogenides are a family of porous semiconducting materials with diverse chemical compositions. Here we show that these materials containing covalent three-dimensional superlattices of nanosized supertetrahedral clusters can function as efficient photocatalysts for the reduction of CO2 to CH4. Unlike dense semiconductors, metal cations are successfully incorporated into the channels of the porous semiconducting materials to further tune the physical properties of the materials such as electrical conductivity and band gaps. In terms of the photocatalytic properties, the metal-incorporated porous chalcogenides demonstrated enhanced solar energy absorption and higher electrical conductivity and improved photocatalytic activity. PMID:27186825

  12. LITHIUM ABUNDANCES OF THE SUPER-METAL-RICH OPEN CLUSTER NGC 6253

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, Jeffrey D.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.; Maderak, Ryan M.; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara; Twarog, Bruce E-mail: con@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: bjat@ku.edu

    2012-11-01

    High-resolution CTIO 4 m/HYDRA spectroscopy of the super-metal-rich open cluster NGC 6253 ([Fe/H] = +0.43 {+-} 0.01) has been used to study the stellar lithium (Li) abundances near the cluster's turnoff. NGC 6253 greatly expands the range of [Fe/H] for clusters that have a Li abundance analysis. This is important for studying the complicated effects of, and potential correlations with, stellar Fe abundance on surface Li abundance. Comparisons to the younger and less-metal-rich Hyades and to the similarly aged but solar-metallicity M67 show that NGC 6253's Li abundances are qualitatively consistent with the prediction, from Standard Stellar Evolution Theory, that higher-metallicity stars have a greater Li depletion. Comparison with M67 provides evidence that the more-metal-rich NGC 6253 had a higher initial Li, which is consistent with expectations from models of Galactic Li production. NGC 6253 is also compared to the intermediate-aged NGC 3680, NGC 752, and IC 4651 open clusters. Comparison of the Li-gap positions in all six clusters shows that (1) the gap's position in T{sub eff} is independent of metallicity, but (2) higher-metallicity clusters have their gaps in higher-mass stars. In addition, the Li gap's position is shown not to evolve with age, which provides an important constraint for the non-standard depletion mechanisms that may create the Li gap.

  13. Fuel cell with metal screen flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Zawodzinski, Christine

    2001-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is provided with electrodes supplied with a reactant on each side of a catalyzed membrane assembly (CMA). The fuel cell includes a metal mesh defining a rectangular flow-field pattern having an inlet at a first corner and an outlet at a second corner located on a diagonal from the first corner, wherein all flow paths from the inlet to the outlet through the square flow field pattern are equivalent to uniformly distribute the reactant over the CMA. In a preferred form of metal mesh, a square weave screen forms the flow-field pattern. In a particular characterization of the present invention, a bipolar plate electrically connects adjacent fuel cells, where the bipolar plate includes a thin metal foil having an anode side and a cathode side; a first metal mesh on the anode side of the thin metal foil; and a second metal mesh on the cathode side of the thin metal foil. In another characterization of the present invention, a cooling plate assembly cools adjacent fuel cells, where the cooling plate assembly includes an anode electrode and a cathode electrode formed of thin conducting foils; and a metal mesh flow field therebetween for distributing cooling water flow over the electrodes to remove heat generated by the fuel cells.

  14. Fuel cell with metal screen flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.

    1998-08-25

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is provided with electrodes supplied with a reactant on each side of a catalyzed membrane assembly (CMA). The fuel cell includes a metal mesh defining a rectangular flow-field pattern having an inlet at a first corner and an outlet at a second corner located on a diagonal from the first corner, wherein all flow paths from the inlet to the outlet through the square flow field pattern are equivalent to uniformly distribute the reactant over the CMA. In a preferred form of metal mesh, a square weave screen forms the flow-field pattern. In a particular characterization of the present invention, a bipolar plate electrically connects adjacent fuel cells, where the bipolar plate includes a thin metal foil having an anode side and a cathode side; a first metal mesh on the anode side of the thin metal foil; and a second metal mesh on the cathode side of the thin metal foil. In another characterization of the present invention, a cooling plate assembly cools adjacent fuel cells, where the cooling plate assembly includes an anode electrode and a cathode electrode formed of thin conducting foils; and a metal mesh flow field there between for distributing cooling water flow over the electrodes to remove heat generated by the fuel cells. 11 figs.

  15. Fuel cell with metal screen flow-field

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Zawodzinski, Christine

    1998-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is provided with electrodes supplied with a reactant on each side of a catalyzed membrane assembly (CMA). The fuel cell includes a metal mesh defining a rectangular flow-field pattern having an inlet at a first corner and an outlet at a second corner located on a diagonal from the first corner, wherein all flow paths from the inlet to the outlet through the square flow field pattern are equivalent to uniformly distribute the reactant over the CMA. In a preferred form of metal mesh, a square weave screen forms the flow-field pattern. In a particular characterization of the present invention, a bipolar plate electrically connects adjacent fuel cells, where the bipolar plate includes a thin metal foil having an anode side and a cathode side; a first metal mesh on the anode side of the thin metal foil; and a second metal mesh on the cathode side of the thin metal foil. In another characterization of the present invention, a cooling plate assembly cools adjacent fuel cells, where the cooling plate assembly includes an anode electrode and a cathode electrode formed of thin conducting foils; and a metal mesh flow field therebetween for distributing cooling water flow over the electrodes to remove heat generated by the fuel cells.

  16. Ozone inhibits guard cell K+ channels implicated in stomatal opening

    PubMed Central

    Torsethaugen, Gro; Pell, Eva J.; Assmann, Sarah M.

    1999-01-01

    Ozone (O3) deleteriously affects organisms ranging from humans to crop plants, yet little is understood regarding the underlying mechanisms. In plants, O3 decreases CO2 assimilation, but whether this could result from direct O3 action on guard cells remained unknown. Potassium flux causes osmotically driven changes in guard cell volume that regulate apertures of associated microscopic pores through which CO2 is supplied to the photosynthetic mesophyll tissue. We show in Vicia faba that O3 inhibits (i) guard cell K+ channels that mediate K+ uptake that drives stomatal opening; (ii) stomatal opening in isolated epidermes; and (iii) stomatal opening in leaves, such that CO2 assimilation is reduced without direct effects of O3 on photosynthetic capacity. Direct O3 effects on guard cells may have ecological and agronomic implications for plant productivity and for response to other environmental stressors including drought. PMID:10557363

  17. Development of an all-metal thick film cost effective metallization system for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, B.; Parker, J.

    1983-01-01

    Improved thick film solar cell contacts for the high volume production of low cost silicon solar arrays are needed. All metal screenable pastes made from economical base metals and suitable for application to low to high conductivity silicon were examined. Silver fluoride containing copper pastes and fluorocarbon containing copper pastes were discussed. The effect of hydrogen on the adhesion of metals to silicon was investigated. A cost analysis of various paste materials is provided.

  18. Assessment of heavy metal contamination in soil due to leachate migration from an open dumping site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanmani, S.; Gandhimathi, R.

    2013-03-01

    The concentration of heavy metals was studied in the soil samples collected around the municipal solid waste (MSW) open dumpsite, Ariyamangalam, Tiruchirappalli, Tamilnadu to understand the heavy metal contamination due to leachate migration from an open dumping site. The dump site receives approximately 400-470 tonnes of municipal solid waste. Solid waste characterization was carried out for the fresh and old municipal solid waste to know the basic composition of solid waste which is dumped in the dumping site. The heavy metal concentration in the municipal solid waste fine fraction and soil samples were analyzed. The heavy metal concentration in the collected soil sample was found in the following order: Mn > Pb > Cu > Cd. The presence of heavy metals in soil sample indicates that there is appreciable contamination of the soil by leachate migration from an open dumping site. However, these pollutants species will continuously migrated and attenuated through the soil strata and after certain period of time they might contaminate the groundwater system if there is no action to be taken to prevent this phenomenon.

  19. Stabilizing metal components in electrodes of electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Spengler, Charles J.; Ruka, Roswell J.

    1989-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of reducing the removal or transfer into a gas phase of a current carrying metal in an apparatus, such as an electrochemical cell 2 having a porous fuel electrode 6 containing metal particles 11, where the metal is subject to removal or transfer into a gaseous phase, the method characterized in that (1) a metal organic compound that decomposes to form an electronically conducting oxide coating when heated is applied to the metal and porous electrode, and (2) the compound on the metal is then heated to a temperature sufficient to decompose the compound into an oxide coating 13 by increasing the temperature at a rate that is longer than 1 hour between room temperature and 600.degree. C., resulting in at least one continuous layer 13, 14 of the oxide coating on the metal.

  20. Back contact to film silicon on metal for photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Branz, Howard M.; Teplin, Charles; Stradins, Pauls

    2013-06-18

    A crystal oriented metal back contact for solar cells is disclosed herein. In one embodiment, a photovoltaic device and methods for making the photovoltaic device are disclosed. The photovoltaic device includes a metal substrate with a crystalline orientation and a heteroepitaxial crystal silicon layer having the same crystal orientation of the metal substrate. A heteroepitaxial buffer layer having the crystal orientation of the metal substrate is positioned between the substrate and the crystal silicon layer to reduce diffusion of metal from the metal foil into the crystal silicon layer and provide chemical compatibility with the heteroepitaxial crystal silicon layer. Additionally, the buffer layer includes one or more electrically conductive pathways to electrically couple the crystal silicon layer and the metal substrate.

  1. Environmental tests of metallization systems for terrestrial photovoltaic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, P., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Seven different solar cell metallization systems were subjected to temperature cycling tests and humidity tests. Temperature cycling excursions were -50 deg C to 150 deg C per cycle. Humidity conditions were 70 deg C at 98% relative humidity. The seven metallization systems were: Ti/Ag, Ti/Pd/Ag, Ti/Pd/Cu, Ni/Cu, Pd/Ni/Solder, Cr/Pd/Ag, and thick film Ag. All metallization systems showed a slight to moderate decrease in cell efficiencies after subjection to 1000 temperature cycles. Six of the seven metallization systems also evidenced slight increases in cell efficiencies after moderate numbers of cycles, generally less than 100 cycles. The copper based systems showed the largest decrease in cell efficiencies after temperature cycling. All metallization systems showed moderate to large decreases in cell efficiencies after 123 days of humidity exposure. The copper based systems again showed the largest decrease in cell efficiencies after humidity exposure. Graphs of the environmental exposures versus cell efficiencies are presented for each metallization system, as well as environmental exposures versus fill factors or series resistance.

  2. Thermal characterization of an AMTEC recirculating test cell. [Alkali Metal ThermoElectric Converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Bankston, C. P.

    1990-01-01

    An alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) recirculating test cell has been operated in order to determine the magnitudes of the primary heat losses of the cell and the value of the emissivity of the condenser surface. The energy balance included radiation losses, conductive losses, and losses due to the flow of sodium into the cell. The radiative heat flux dominated the heat loss mechanism of the cell at open circuit, and the condenser emissivity was calculated to be about 0.1. It is shown that, if this emissivity can be reduced to 0.02, then parasitic losses in an AMTEC recirculating test cell operating near peak power would be less than 40 percent of the heat required by the cell. The condenser emissivity decreases with elapsed time, resulting in improved thermal performance of the cell.

  3. FIB/SEM cell sectioning for intracellular metal granules characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Marziale; Brundu, Claudia; Santisi, Grazia; Savoia, Claudio; Tatti, Francesco

    2009-05-01

    Focused Ion Beams (FIBs) provide a cross-sectioning tool for submicron dissection of cells and subcellular structures. In combination with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), FIB provides complementary morphological information, that can be further completed by EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy). This study focus onto intracellular microstructures, particularly onto metal granules (typically Zn, Cu and Fe) and on the possibility of sectioning digestive gland cells of the terrestrial isopod P. scaber making the granules available for a compositional analysis with EDX. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of metal granules size, amount and distribution are performed. Information is made available of the cellular storing pattern and, indirectly, metal metabolism. The extension to human level is of utmost interest since some pathologies of relevance are metal related. Apart from the common metal-overload-diseases (hereditary hemochromatosis, Wilson's and Menkes disease) it has been demonstrated that metal in excess can influence carcinogenesis in liver, kidney and breast. Therefore protocols will be established for the observation of mammal cells to improve our knowledge about the intracellular metal amount and distribution both in healthy cells and in those affected by primary or secondary metal overload or depletion.

  4. Cage Opening of a Carborane Ligand by Metal Cluster Complexes.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard D; Kiprotich, Joseph; Peryshkov, Dmitry V; Wong, Yuen Onn

    2016-05-01

    The reaction of Os3 (CO)10 (NCMe)2 with closo-o-C2 B10 H10 has yielded two interconvertible isomers Os3 (CO)9 (μ3 -4,5,9-C2 B10 H8 )(μ-H)2 (1 a) and Os3 (CO)9 (μ3 -3,4,8-C2 B10 H8 )(μ-H)2 (1 b) formed by the loss of the two NCMe ligands and one CO ligand from the Os3 cluster. Two BH bonds of the o-C2 B10 H10 were activated in its addition to the osmium cluster. A second triosmium cluster was added to the 1 a/1 b mixture to yield the complex Os3 (CO)9 (μ-H)2 (μ3 -4,5,9-μ3 -7,11,12-C2 B10 H7 )Os3 (CO)9 (μ-H)3 (2) that contains two triosmium triangles attached to the same carborane cage. When heated, 2 was transformed to the complex Os3 (CO)9 (μ-H)(μ3 -3,4,8-μ3 -7,11,12-C2 B10 H8 )Os3 (CO)9 (μ-H) (3) by a novel opening of the carborane cage with loss of H2 . PMID:26971388

  5. Tuning Metal-Organic Frameworks with Open-Metal Sites and Its Origin for Enhancing CO2 Affinity by Metal Substitution.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonho; Kim, Heejin; Han, Sang Soo; Jung, Yousung

    2012-04-01

    Reducing anthropogenic carbon emission is a problem that requires immediate attention. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have emerged as a promising new materials platform for carbon capture, of which Mg-MOF-74 offers chemospecific affinity toward CO2 because of the open Mg sites. Here we tune the binding affinity of CO2 for M-MOF-74 by metal substitution (M = Mg, Ca, and the first transition metal elements) and show that Ti- and V-MOF-74 can have an enhanced affinity compared to Mg-MOF-74 by 6-9 kJ/mol. Electronic structure calculations suggest that the origin of the major affinity trend is the local electric field effect of the open metal site that stabilizes CO2, but forward donation from the lone-pair electrons of CO2 to the empty d-levels of transition metals as in a weak coordination bond makes Ti and V have an even higher binding strength than Mg, Ca, and Sc. PMID:26286404

  6. Open framework metal chalcogenides as efficient photocatalysts for reduction of CO2 into renewable hydrocarbon fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasan, Koroush; Lin, Qipu; Mao, Chengyu; Feng, Pingyun

    2016-05-01

    Open framework metal chalcogenides are a family of porous semiconducting materials with diverse chemical compositions. Here we show that these materials containing covalent three-dimensional superlattices of nanosized supertetrahedral clusters can function as efficient photocatalysts for the reduction of CO2 to CH4. Unlike dense semiconductors, metal cations are successfully incorporated into the channels of the porous semiconducting materials to further tune the physical properties of the materials such as electrical conductivity and band gaps. In terms of the photocatalytic properties, the metal-incorporated porous chalcogenides demonstrated enhanced solar energy absorption and higher electrical conductivity and improved photocatalytic activity.Open framework metal chalcogenides are a family of porous semiconducting materials with diverse chemical compositions. Here we show that these materials containing covalent three-dimensional superlattices of nanosized supertetrahedral clusters can function as efficient photocatalysts for the reduction of CO2 to CH4. Unlike dense semiconductors, metal cations are successfully incorporated into the channels of the porous semiconducting materials to further tune the physical properties of the materials such as electrical conductivity and band gaps. In terms of the photocatalytic properties, the metal-incorporated porous chalcogenides demonstrated enhanced solar energy absorption and higher electrical conductivity and improved photocatalytic activity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The synthetic procedure, facilities information, EDX patterns and UV-Vis data. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02525k

  7. Positive electrode current collector for liquid metal cells

    DOEpatents

    Shimotake, Hiroshi; Bartholme, Louis G.

    1984-01-01

    A current collector for the positive electrode of an electrochemical cell with a positive electrode including a sulfide. The cell also has a negative electrode and a molten salt electrolyte including halides of a metal selected from the alkali metals and the alkaline earth metals in contact with both the positive and negative electrodes. The current collector has a base metal of copper, silver, gold, aluminum or alloys thereof with a coating thereon of iron, nickel, chromium or alloys thereof. The current collector when subjected to cell voltage forms a sulfur-containing compound on the surface thereby substantially protecting the current collector from further attack by sulfur ions during cell operation. Both electroless and electrolytic processes may be used to deposit coatings.

  8. Positive-electrode current collector for liquid-metal cells

    DOEpatents

    Shimotake, H.; Bartholme, L.G.

    1982-09-27

    A current collector for the positive electrode of an electrochemical cell with a positive electrode including a sulfide. The cell also has a negative electrode and a molten salt electrolyte including halides of a metal selected from the alkali metals and the alkaline earth metals in contact with both the positive and negative electrodes. The current collector has a base metal of copper, silver, gold, aluminum or alloys thereof with a coating thereon of iron, nickel, chromium or alloys thereof. The current collector when subjected to cell voltage forms a sulfur-containing compound on the surface thereby substantially protecting the current collector from further attack by sulfur ions during cell operation. Both electroless and electrolytic processes may be used to deposit coatings.

  9. Highly Dispersed Metal Catalyst for Fuel Cell Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a study that will bring industrial catalyst experience to fuel cell research. Specifically, industrial catalysts, such as those used in platforming, utilize precious metal platinum as an active component in a finely dispersed form.

  10. Metal-air cell with ion exchange material

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, Cody A.; Wolfe, Derek; Johnson, Paul Bryan

    2015-08-25

    Embodiments of the invention are related to anion exchange membranes used in electrochemical metal-air cells in which the membranes function as the electrolyte material, or are used in conjunction with electrolytes such as ionic liquid electrolytes.

  11. Effects of metal ions on fibroblasts and spiral ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Paasche, G; Ceschi, P; Löbler, M; Rösl, C; Gomes, P; Hahn, A; Rohm, H W; Sternberg, K; Lenarz, T; Schmitz, K-P; Barcikowski, S; Stöver, T

    2011-04-01

    Degeneration of spiral ganglion cells (SGC) after deafness and fibrous tissue growth around the electrode carrier after cochlear implantation are two of the major challenges in current cochlear implant research. Metal ions are known to possess antimicrobial and antiproliferative potential. The use of metal ions could therefore provide a way to reduce tissue growth around the electrode array after cochlear implantation. Here, we report on in vitro experiments with different concentrations of metal salts with antiproliferative and toxic effects on fibroblasts, PC-12 cells, and freshly isolated spiral ganglion cells, the target cells for electrical stimulation by a cochlear implant. Standard cell lines (NIH/3T3 and L-929 fibroblasts and PC-12 cells) and freshly isolated SGC were incubated with concentrations of metal ions between 0.3 μmol/liter and 10 mmol/liter for 48 hr. Cell survival was investigated by neutral red uptake, CellQuantiBlue assay, or counting of stained surviving neurons. Silver ions exhibited distinct thresholds for proliferating and confluent cells. For zinc ions, the effective concentration was lower for fibroblasts than for PC-12 cells. SGC showed comparable thresholds for reduced cell survival not only for silver and zinc ions but also for copper(II) ions, indicating that these ions might be promising for reducing tissue growth on the surface of CI electrode arrays. These effects were also observed when combinations of two of these ions were investigated. PMID:21312225

  12. Electrochemical cell having an alkali-metal-nitrate electrode

    DOEpatents

    Roche, M.F.; Preto, S.K.

    1982-06-04

    A power-producing secondary electrochemical cell includes a molten alkali metal as the negative-electrode material and a molten-nitrate salt as the positive-electrode material. The molten material in the respective electrodes are separated by a solid barrier of alkali-metal-ion conducting material. A typical cell includes active materials of molten sodium separated from molten sodium nitrate and other nitrates in mixture by a layer of sodium ..beta..'' alumina.

  13. Enhancing H[subscript 2] Uptake by 'Close-Packing' Alignment of Open Copper Sites in Metal-Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xi-Sen; Ma, Shengqian; Forster, Paul M.; Yuan, Daqiang; Eckert, Juergen; López, Joseph J.; Murphy, Brandon J.; Parise, John B.; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2010-10-15

    Inspired by close-packing of spheres, to strengthen the framework-H{sub 2} interaction in MOFs (metal-organic frameworks), a strategy is devised to increase the number of nearest neighboring open metal sites ofe ach H{sub 2}-hosting cage, and to align the open metal sites toward the H{sub 2} molecules. Two MOF polymorphs were made, one exhibiting a record high hydrogen uptake of 3.0 wt% at 1 bar and 77 k.

  14. XFM of ``Trace Metals'' in Cultured Cells: Framing the Picture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolford, J.; Chishti, Y.; Ward, J.; Vogt, S.; Finney, L.

    2011-09-01

    Encouraged by our recent x-ray fluorescence microprobe analysis revealing subcellular metal relocation in two special cell types, we are working to identify the role of zinc and copper in these cells. In verifying that metal ion dynamics are not artifactual, particularly where some samples have been chemically fixed, a comparison of our past results with samples studied with cryofixation and immunofluorescence add validation to our previous findings. Our work demonstrating cryofixation in human microvascular endothelial cells and metallothionein immunofluorescence in stem cells is presented.

  15. Metal catalyst technique for texturing silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Ruby, Douglas S.; Zaidi, Saleem H.

    2001-01-01

    Textured silicon solar cells and techniques for their manufacture utilizing metal sources to catalyze formation of randomly distributed surface features such as nanoscale pyramidal and columnar structures. These structures include dimensions smaller than the wavelength of incident light, thereby resulting in a highly effective anti-reflective surface. According to the invention, metal sources present in a reactive ion etching chamber permit impurities (e.g. metal particles) to be introduced into a reactive ion etch plasma resulting in deposition of micro-masks on the surface of a substrate to be etched. Separate embodiments are disclosed including one in which the metal source includes one or more metal-coated substrates strategically positioned relative to the surface to be textured, and another in which the walls of the reaction chamber are pre-conditioned with a thin coating of metal catalyst material.

  16. Boundary conditions for the solution of the three-dimensional Poisson equation in open metallic enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Debabrata; Singh, Gaurav; Kumar, Raghwendra

    2015-09-01

    Numerical solution of the Poisson equation in metallic enclosures, open at one or more ends, is important in many practical situations, such as high power microwave or photo-cathode devices. It requires imposition of a suitable boundary condition at the open end. In this paper, methods for solving the Poisson equation are investigated for various charge densities and aspect ratios of the open ends. It is found that a mixture of second order and third order local asymptotic boundary conditions is best suited for large aspect ratios, while a proposed non-local matching method, based on the solution of the Laplace equation, scores well when the aspect ratio is near unity for all charge density variations, including ones where the centre of charge is close to an open end or the charge density is non-localized. The two methods complement each other and can be used in electrostatic calculations where the computational domain needs to be terminated at the open boundaries of the metallic enclosure.

  17. Boundary conditions for the solution of the three-dimensional Poisson equation in open metallic enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Debabrata; Singh, Gaurav; Kumar, Raghwendra

    2015-09-15

    Numerical solution of the Poisson equation in metallic enclosures, open at one or more ends, is important in many practical situations, such as high power microwave or photo-cathode devices. It requires imposition of a suitable boundary condition at the open end. In this paper, methods for solving the Poisson equation are investigated for various charge densities and aspect ratios of the open ends. It is found that a mixture of second order and third order local asymptotic boundary conditions is best suited for large aspect ratios, while a proposed non-local matching method, based on the solution of the Laplace equation, scores well when the aspect ratio is near unity for all charge density variations, including ones where the centre of charge is close to an open end or the charge density is non-localized. The two methods complement each other and can be used in electrostatic calculations where the computational domain needs to be terminated at the open boundaries of the metallic enclosure.

  18. Recycled Cell Phones - A Treasure Trove of Valuable Metals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, Daniel E.

    2006-01-01

    This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Fact Sheet examines the potential value of recycling the metals found in obsolete cell phones. Cell phones seem ubiquitous in the United States and commonplace throughout most of the world. There were approximately 1 billion cell phones in use worldwide in 2002. In the United States, the number of cell phone subscribers increased from 340,000 in 1985 to 180 million in 2004. Worldwide, cell phone sales have increased from slightly more than 100 million units per year in 1997 to an estimated 779 million units per year in 2005. Cell phone sales are projected to exceed 1 billion units per year in 2009, with an estimated 2.6 billion cell phones in use by the end of that year. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimated that, by 2005, as many as 130 million cell phones would be retired annually in the United States. The nonprofit organization INFORM, Inc., anticipated that, by 2005, a total of 500 million obsolete cell phones would have accumulated in consumers' desk drawers, store rooms, or other storage, awaiting disposal. Typically, cell phones are used for only 1 1/2 years before being replaced. Less than 1 percent of the millions of cell phones retired and discarded annually are recycled. When large numbers of cell phones become obsolete, large quantities of valuable metals end up either in storage or in landfills. The amount of metals potentially recoverable would make a significant addition to total metals recovered from recycling in the United States and would supplement virgin metals derived from mining.

  19. Sorption of heavy metals by prepared bacterial cell surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, S.A.; Walters, J.V.; Churchill, P.F.

    1995-10-01

    Prepared biomass from two Gram-negative and one Gram-positive bacterial strains was examined for single, binary, and quaternary mixtures of polyvalent metal cation binding to cell surfaces. The biosorption of {sub 24}Cr{sup 3+}, {sub 27}Co{sup 2+}, {sub 28}Ni{sup 2+}, and {sub 29}Cu{sup 2+} for each bacterial cell type was evaluated using a batch equilibrium method. The binding of each metal by all three bacterial cells could be described by the Freundlich sorption model. The isotherm binding constants suggest that E. coli cells are the most efficient at binding copper, chromium, and nickel; and M. luteus adsorbs cobalt most efficiently. The K-values for copper bound to P. aeruginosa and E. coli are > 2-fold and > 8-fold greater, respectively, than previous reported for intact cells. The general metal-affinity series observed was Cr{sup 3+} > Cu{sup 2+} > Ni{sup 2+} > Co{sup 2+}. There was a marked lower affinity of all biosorbents for Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+}. M. luteus and E. coli had a strong preference for Co{sup 2+} over Ni{sup 2+}. Metal-binding enhancement could be ascribed to increased cell barrier surface porosity to metal-bearing solutions.

  20. Open-cell cloud formation over the Bahamas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    What atmospheric scientists refer to as open cell cloud formation is a regular occurrence on the back side of a low-pressure system or cyclone in the mid-latitudes. In the Northern Hemisphere, a low-pressure system will draw in surrounding air and spin it counterclockwise. That means that on the back side of the low-pressure center, cold air will be drawn in from the north, and on the front side, warm air will be drawn up from latitudes closer to the equator. This movement of an air mass is called advection, and when cold air advection occurs over warmer waters, open cell cloud formations often result. This MODIS image shows open cell cloud formation over the Atlantic Ocean off the southeast coast of the United States on February 19, 2002. This particular formation is the result of a low-pressure system sitting out in the North Atlantic Ocean a few hundred miles east of Massachusetts. (The low can be seen as the comma-shaped figure in the GOES-8 Infrared image from February 19, 2002.) Cold air is being drawn down from the north on the western side of the low and the open cell cumulus clouds begin to form as the cold air passes over the warmer Caribbean waters. For another look at the scene, check out the MODIS Direct Broadcast Image from the University of Wisconsin. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  1. Practical anti-reflection coating for metal semiconductor solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, Y.-C. M.; Stirn, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The metal-semiconductor solar cell is a possible candidate for converting solar to electrical energy for terrestrial application. A method is given for obtaining optical parameters of practical antireflection coatings for the metal-semiconductor solar cell. This method utilizes the measured refractive index obtained from ellipsometry since the surface to be AR coated has a multilayer structure. Both the experimental results and theoretical calculation of optical parameters for Ta2O5 antireflection coatings on Au-GaAs and Au-GaAs(0.78)P(0.22) solar cells are presented for comparison.

  2. Monitoring metal concentrations in tissues and single cells using ultramicrosensors.

    PubMed Central

    Malinski, T; Grunfeld, S; Taha, Z; Tomboulian, P

    1994-01-01

    Intercellular and extracellular metal concentrations were measured using carbon fiber ultramicrosensors plated with mercury or with polymeric porphyrinic p-type semiconductors. Concentrations of unbound nickel and lead ions were studied within individual BC3H-1 myocytes, and H4-11-C3 rat hepatoma cells. Unbound ions are predominantly solvated inorganic ions not coordinated to biological cellular components. Fabrication of ultramicrosensors appropriate for the cells under investigation is described, including procedures for sharpening and waxing the microsensors in order to control the shape, area, and dimensions of the electroactive surface. Metal ion movement through cell membranes and intracellular ion diffusion in aorta tissue were studied. Images Figure 2. PMID:7843090

  3. Nanodisperse transition metal electrodes (NTME) for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Striebel, Kathryn A.; Wen, Shi-Jie

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed are transition metal electrodes for electrochemical cells using gel-state and solid-state polymers. The electrodes are suitable for use in primary and secondary cells. The electrodes (either negative electrode or positive electrode) are characterized by uniform dispersion of the transition metal at the nanoscale in the polymer. The transition metal moiety is structurally amorphous, so no capacity fade should occur due to lattice expansion/contraction mechanisms. The small grain size, amorphous structure and homogeneous distribution provide improved charge/discharge cycling performance, and a higher initial discharge rate capability. The cells can be cycled at high current densities, limited only by the electrolyte conductivity. A method of making the electrodes (positive and negative), and their usage in electrochemical cells are disclosed.

  4. Nanodisperse transition metal electrodes (NTME) for electrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Striebel, Kathryn A.; Wen, Shi-Jie

    1998-12-01

    Disclosed are transition metal electrodes for electrochemical cells using gel-state and solid-state polymers. The electrodes are suitable for use in primary and secondary cells. The electrodes (either negative electrode or positive electrode) are characterized by uniform dispersion of the transition metal at the nanoscale in the polymer. The transition metal moiety is structurally amorphous, so no capacity fade should occur due to lattice expansion/contraction mechanisms. The small grain size, amorphous structure and homogeneous distribution provide improved charge/discharge cycling performance, and a higher initial discharge rate capability. The cells can be cycled at high current densities, limited only by the electrolyte conductivity. A method of making the electrodes (positive and negative), and their usage in electrochemical cells are disclosed.

  5. Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell with thin doped region adjacent metal Schottky barrier

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.; Wronski, Christopher R.

    1979-01-01

    A Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a thin highly doped p-type region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon disposed between a Schottky barrier high work function metal and the intrinsic region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon wherein said high work function metal and said thin highly doped p-type region forms a surface barrier junction with the intrinsic amorphous silicon layer. The thickness and concentration of p-type dopants in said p-type region are selected so that said p-type region is fully ionized by the Schottky barrier high work function metal. The thin highly doped p-type region has been found to increase the open circuit voltage and current of the photovoltaic device.

  6. Metal binding proteins, recombinant host cells and methods

    DOEpatents

    Summers, Anne O.; Caguiat, Jonathan J.

    2004-06-15

    The present disclosure provides artificial heavy metal binding proteins termed chelons by the inventors. These chelons bind cadmium and/or mercuric ions with relatively high affinity. Also disclosed are coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and recombinant host cells comprising those recombinant DNA molecules for expression of the chelon proteins. In the recombinant host cells or transgenic plants, the chelons can be used to bind heavy metals taken up from contaminated soil, groundwater or irrigation water and to concentrate and sequester those ions. Recombinant enteric bacteria can be used within the gastrointestinal tracts of animals or humans exposed to toxic metal ions such as mercury and/or cadmium, where the chelon recombinantly expressed in chosen in accordance with the ion to be rededicated. Alternatively, the chelons can be immobilized to solid supports to bind and concentrate heavy metals from a contaminated aqueous medium including biological fluids.

  7. Study of a Thermophysical System with Two Time Constants Using an Open Photoacoustic Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonno, B.; Zeninari, V.; Joly, L.; Parvitte, B.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper a study of a thermophysical system with two time constants, an electronic time constant and a thermal relaxation time constant, is presented. The system under study is a thin metallic sample coupled to an open photoacoustic (PA) cell, the resulting signal being measured by a lock-in amplifier or by a data acquisition device. All operations are performed by a computer-based automatic measurement system. A time- and frequency-domain theoretical analysis of the photothermal signal is given combining the usual PA scheme to the energy balance equation of the system. The experimental results are in very good agreement with the developed theory.

  8. Scandium in the open ocean: A comparison with other group 3 trivalent metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, C. E.; Brown, M. T.; Bruland, K. W.

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the distribution of scandium (Sc) in the open ocean. Since the 1970s there has been only one published depth profile of dissolved Sc. The work presented here reports depth profiles of dissolved Sc from GEOTRACES cruises in the North Atlantic, North Pacific, and South Pacific. This work also compares the reactivity of Sc with its trivalent periodic table groupmates in Group IIIB, yttrium (Y) and lanthanum (La), and Group IIIA, aluminum (Al) and gallium (Ga). Yttrium and La are classic nutrient-type metals that increase in concentration in aging deep water; Al and Ga are classic scavenged-type metals that do the opposite. Results indicate that Sc is a hybrid-type metal with an inferred residence time on the order of 1000 years, and that Sc's inorganic speciation and reactivity are similar to Fe's and have the potential to give insights into the nonnutrient side of oceanic Fe cycling.

  9. Effects of Metal Particles Decoration on n-Type Chalcogenides Processed by Open Die Pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanciulli, C.; Codecasa, M.; Passaretti, F.; Vasilevskiy, D.

    2014-06-01

    The effects of copper particles dispersed into Bi1.9Sb0.1Te2.85Se0.15 nanopowders and sintered by open die pressing (ODP) have been investigated. Submicrometric copper particles were obtained by decomposing copper acetate molecules dispersed into chalcogenides nanopowders. The acetate powders were decomposed during the sintering process at 390 °C obtaining a fine dispersion of copper particles with dimensions in the order of 500 nm. Contents up to 0.2 wt.% of copper were investigated. ODP, previously introduced as a forming process for sintering and texturing p-type (Bi0.2Sb0.8)2Te3 nanopowders, has been applied to n-type chalcogenide: the mixed alloy nanopowders and copper acetate were compacted inside a metallic protective shell and fast pressed between two heated plates, keeping the composite under load for sintering. ODP processing ensures complete consolidation of nanopowders and material texturing with the basal (00 l) planes of the hexagonal crystal cell oriented parallel to the plates. The X-ray diffraction pattern shows an orientation factor, f, obtained by the Lotgering method, up to 64 %. Thermoelectric performance of the samples was measured by the Harman method in the range of 20-170 °C. Figure of merit ( ZT) behavior with temperature was improved in copper-dispersed samples showing a shift of the maximum value at higher temperatures. This effect can be mainly associated with an improvement of electrical conductivity, due to the presence of the copper particles.

  10. Combined toxicity of heavy metal mixtures in liver cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xialu; Gu, Yuanliang; Zhou, Qi; Mao, Guochuan; Zou, Baobo; Zhao, Jinshun

    2016-09-01

    With rapid industrialization, China is now facing great challenges in heavy metal contamination in the environment. Human exposure to heavy metals through air, water and food commonly involves a mixture consisting of multiple heavy metals. In this study, eight common heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Hg, Cu, Zn, Mn, Cr, Ni) that cause environmental contamination were selected to investigate the combined toxicity of different heavy metal mixtures in HL7702 cells. Toxicity (24 h LC50 ) of each individual metal on the cells ranked Hg > Cr = Cd > Cu > Zn > Ni > Mn > Pb; toxicity of the different mixtures ranked: M5 > M3PbHgCd > M5+Mn > M5+Cu > M2CdNi > M4A > M8-Mn > M8 > M5+Zn > M4B > M8-Cr > M8-Zn > M8-Cu > M8-Pb > M8-Cd > M8-Hg > M8-Ni > M3PbHgNi > M3CuZnMn. The cytotoxicity data of individual metals were successfully used to build the additive models of two- to eight-component metal mixtures. The comparison between additive model and combination model or partly additive model was useful to evaluate the combined effects in mixture. Synergistic, antagonistic or additive effects of the toxicity were observed in different mixtures. These results suggest that the combined effects should be considered in the risk assessment of heavy metal co-exposure, and more comprehensive investigations on the combined effects of different heavy metal mixtures are needed in the future. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26865462

  11. Investigation of different contact geometries for partial rear metal contact of high-efficiency silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Suchismita; Ghosh, Hemanta; Saha, Hiranmay; Datta, Swapan Kumar

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the dependence of the parameters of partial rear metal contact (PRC) solar cells on two commonly used geometrical configurations, viz. grid contact and square contact. It is demonstrated that while the geometry of rear metallic contact having the same fractional coverage changes the base spreading resistance significantly, rear surface passivation and back reflectance depend only on the fractional coverage of the real metal contact and are independent of the geometry of the contact. The performed analysis indicates that the base spreading resistance is much higher for square contact cells compared to that of grid contact cells having the same fractional coverage. While open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current are found to be essentially independent of the contact geometry, the fill factor is significantly affected by the geometry, indicating that the design of high-efficiency cells with partial rear grid contact is less critical in comparison to that of square contact cells for optimized performance. Results indicate that for a 180 μm cell, an efficiency enhancement of 14% is possible for  <10% fractional rear metallization over the baseline efficiency of about 19% for solar cells having full-area rear metallization. For 50 μm thin cells, the corresponding improvement in efficiency is 17%, leading to 22% efficiency solar cells.

  12. Parasitic corrosion resistant anode for use in metal/air or metal/O.sub.2 cells

    DOEpatents

    Joy, Richard W.; Smith, David F.

    1983-01-01

    A consumable metal anode which is used in refuelable electrochemical cells and wherein at least a peripheral edge portion of the anode is protected against a corrosive alkaline environment of the cell by the application of a thin metal coating, the coating being formed of metals such as nickel, silver, and gold.

  13. Parasitic corrosion-resistant anode for use in metal/air or metal/O/sub 2/ cells

    DOEpatents

    Joy, R.W.; Smith, D.F.

    1982-09-20

    A consumable metal anode is described which is used in refuelable electrochemical cells and wherein at least a peripheral edge portion of the anode is protected against a corrosive alkaline environment of the cell by the application of a thin metal coating, the coating being formed of metals such as nickel, silver, and gold.

  14. Cell surface reactivity of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002: Implications for metal sorption from seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuxia; Alessi, D. S.; Owttrim, G. W.; Petrash, D. A.; Mloszewska, A. M.; Lalonde, S. V.; Martinez, R. E.; Zhou, Qixing; Konhauser, K. O.

    2015-11-01

    The past two decades have seen a significant advancement in our understanding of bacterial surface chemistry and the ability of microbes to bind metals from aqueous solutions. Much of this work has been aimed at benthic, mat-forming species in an effort to model the mechanisms by which microbes may exert control over metal contaminant transport in soils and groundwater. However, there is a distinct paucity of information pertaining to the surface chemistry of marine planktonic species, and their ability to bind trace metals from the ocean's photic zone. To this end, the surface properties of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 were studied as this genus is one of the dominant marine phytoplankton, and as such, contributes significantly to metal cycling in the ocean's photic zone. Zeta potential measurement indicates that the cell surfaces display a net negative charge. This was supported by potentiometric titration and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses demonstrating that the cells are dominated by surface proton releasing ligands, including carboxyl, phosphoryl and amino functional groups, with a total ligand density of 34.18 ± 1.62 mmol/g (dry biomass). Cd adsorption experiments further reveal that carboxyl groups play a primary role in metal adsorption, with 1.0 g of dry biomass binding an equivalent of 7.05 × 10-5 M of Cd from solution at pH = 8. To put this value into context, in 1 L of seawater, and with an open-ocean population of Synechococcus of 105 cells/mL in the photic zone, approximately 10 nmol of Cd could potentially be adsorbed by the cyanobacteria; an amount equivalent to seawater Cd concentrations. Although we have only focused on one microbial species and one metal cation, and we have not considered trace element assimilation, our results highlight the potential role of surface sorption by phytoplankton in the cycling of metals in the ocean.

  15. Metal chelate catalysts for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, M.; Darby, R.; White, R.; Albelo, G.; Deininger, P.; Balliew, J.

    1980-08-01

    An aromatic dialdehyde, 9,9-dimethyl-4,5-xanthene-dicaroxaldehyde, suitable for the synthesis of a stacked polymer of meso-tetraphenyl-porphyrin was synthesized in high yield. From this, a dimer was formed. The cobalt complex of this dimer, along with metal complexes of polymers of phthalocyanine and TAA were tested for catalytic activity for the reduction of oxygen. The stacked dimer of TPP and the sheet polymer of TPP exhibited greater catalytic activity as the cobalt complexes than all other compounds tested with the exception of CoTAA.

  16. Generating a Metal-responsive Transcriptional Regulator to Test What Confers Metal Sensing in Cells.

    PubMed

    Osman, Deenah; Piergentili, Cecilia; Chen, Junjun; Chakrabarti, Buddhapriya; Foster, Andrew W; Lurie-Luke, Elena; Huggins, Thomas G; Robinson, Nigel J

    2015-08-01

    FrmR from Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium (a CsoR/RcnR-like transcriptional de-repressor) is shown to repress the frmRA operator-promoter, and repression is alleviated by formaldehyde but not manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, or Zn(II) within cells. In contrast, repression by a mutant FrmRE64H (which gains an RcnR metal ligand) is alleviated by cobalt and Zn(II). Unexpectedly, FrmR was found to already bind Co(II), Zn(II), and Cu(I), and moreover metals, as well as formaldehyde, trigger an allosteric response that weakens DNA affinity. However, the sensory metal sites of the cells' endogenous metal sensors (RcnR, ZntR, Zur, and CueR) are all tighter than FrmR for their cognate metals. Furthermore, the endogenous metal sensors are shown to out-compete FrmR. The metal-sensing FrmRE64H mutant has tighter metal affinities than FrmR by approximately 1 order of magnitude. Gain of cobalt sensing by FrmRE64H remains enigmatic because the cobalt affinity of FrmRE64H is substantially weaker than that of the endogenous cobalt sensor. Cobalt sensing requires glutathione, which may assist cobalt access, conferring a kinetic advantage. For Zn(II), the metal affinity of FrmRE64H approaches the metal affinities of cognate Zn(II) sensors. Counter-intuitively, the allosteric coupling free energy for Zn(II) is smaller in metal-sensing FrmRE64H compared with nonsensing FrmR. By determining the copies of FrmR and FrmRE64H tetramers per cell, then estimating promoter occupancy as a function of intracellular Zn(II) concentration, we show how a modest tightening of Zn(II) affinity, plus weakened DNA affinity of the apoprotein, conspires to make the relative properties of FrmRE64H (compared with ZntR and Zur) sufficient to sense Zn(II) inside cells. PMID:26109070

  17. Generating a Metal-responsive Transcriptional Regulator to Test What Confers Metal Sensing in Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Deenah; Piergentili, Cecilia; Chen, Junjun; Chakrabarti, Buddhapriya; Foster, Andrew W.; Lurie-Luke, Elena; Huggins, Thomas G.; Robinson, Nigel J.

    2015-01-01

    FrmR from Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium (a CsoR/RcnR-like transcriptional de-repressor) is shown to repress the frmRA operator-promoter, and repression is alleviated by formaldehyde but not manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, or Zn(II) within cells. In contrast, repression by a mutant FrmRE64H (which gains an RcnR metal ligand) is alleviated by cobalt and Zn(II). Unexpectedly, FrmR was found to already bind Co(II), Zn(II), and Cu(I), and moreover metals, as well as formaldehyde, trigger an allosteric response that weakens DNA affinity. However, the sensory metal sites of the cells' endogenous metal sensors (RcnR, ZntR, Zur, and CueR) are all tighter than FrmR for their cognate metals. Furthermore, the endogenous metal sensors are shown to out-compete FrmR. The metal-sensing FrmRE64H mutant has tighter metal affinities than FrmR by approximately 1 order of magnitude. Gain of cobalt sensing by FrmRE64H remains enigmatic because the cobalt affinity of FrmRE64H is substantially weaker than that of the endogenous cobalt sensor. Cobalt sensing requires glutathione, which may assist cobalt access, conferring a kinetic advantage. For Zn(II), the metal affinity of FrmRE64H approaches the metal affinities of cognate Zn(II) sensors. Counter-intuitively, the allosteric coupling free energy for Zn(II) is smaller in metal-sensing FrmRE64H compared with nonsensing FrmR. By determining the copies of FrmR and FrmRE64H tetramers per cell, then estimating promoter occupancy as a function of intracellular Zn(II) concentration, we show how a modest tightening of Zn(II) affinity, plus weakened DNA affinity of the apoprotein, conspires to make the relative properties of FrmRE64H (compared with ZntR and Zur) sufficient to sense Zn(II) inside cells. PMID:26109070

  18. Metallic nanoparticle deposition techniques for enhanced organic photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacha, Brian Joseph Gonda

    Energy generation via organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells provide many advantages over alternative processes including flexibility and price. However, more efficient OPVs are required in order to be competitive for applications. One way to enhance efficiency is through manipulation of exciton mechanisms within the OPV, for example by inserting a thin film of bathocuproine (BCP) and gold nanoparticles between the C60/Al and ZnPc/ITO interfaces, respectively. We find that BCP increases efficiencies by 330% due to gains of open circuit voltage (Voc) by 160% and short circuit current (Jsc) by 130%. However, these gains are complicated by the anomalous photovoltaic effect and an internal chemical potential. Exploration in the tuning of metallic nanoparticle deposition on ITO was done through four techniques. Drop casting Ag nanoparticle solution showed arduous control on deposited morphology. Spin-coating deposited very low densities of nanoparticles. Drop casting and spin-coating methods showed arduous control on Ag nanoparticle morphology due to clustering and low deposition density, respectively. Sputtered gold on glass was initially created to aid the adherence of Ag nanoparticles but instead showed a quick way to deposit aggregated gold nanoparticles. Electrodeposition of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) proved a quick method to tune nanoparticle morphology on ITO substrates. Control of deposition parameters affected AuNP size and distribution. AFM images of electrodeposited AuNPs showed sizes ranging from 39 to 58 nm. UV-Vis spectroscopy showed the presence of localized plasmon resonance through absorption peaks ranging from 503 to 614 nm. A linear correlation between electrodeposited AuNP size and peak absorbance was seen with a slope of 3.26 wavelength(nm)/diameter(nm).

  19. Microstructure based model for sound absorption predictions of perforated closed-cell metallic foams.

    PubMed

    Chevillotte, Fabien; Perrot, Camille; Panneton, Raymond

    2010-10-01

    Closed-cell metallic foams are known for their rigidity, lightness, thermal conductivity as well as their low production cost compared to open-cell metallic foams. However, they are also poor sound absorbers. Similarly to a rigid solid, a method to enhance their sound absorption is to perforate them. This method has shown good preliminary results but has not yet been analyzed from a microstructure point of view. The objective of this work is to better understand how perforations interact with closed-cell foam microstructure and how it modifies the sound absorption of the foam. A simple two-dimensional microstructural model of the perforated closed-cell metallic foam is presented and numerically solved. A rough three-dimensional conversion of the two-dimensional results is proposed. The results obtained with the calculation method show that the perforated closed-cell foam behaves similarly to a perforated solid; however, its sound absorption is modulated by the foam microstructure, and most particularly by the diameters of both perforation and pore. A comparison with measurements demonstrates that the proposed calculation method yields realistic trends. Some design guides are also proposed. PMID:20968350

  20. Metal chelate catalysts for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darby, R.; White, R.; Yamana, M.; Tsutsue, M.

    1981-07-01

    A variety of metal chelates were synthesized and evaluated for their activity as oxygen cathode electrocatalysts in strong acidic electrolytes. It was found that Cobalt tetraazaanulene (CoTAA) and iron phthalocyanine (FePc) exhibit the best activity of all the metal chelates synthesized, but have very limited stability. The proposed solution to this problem is the synthesis of polymeric forms of these chelates, with comparable active and considerably greater stability than the monomers. Three methods for stability testing were developed: (1) Potentiostatic, with periodic measurement of the current potential characteristic; (2) potentiostatic, with continuous monitoring of the current, and; (3) galvanostatic, with continuous monitoring of potential. Each method provides a good evaluation of activity versus time, and the method to be used depends upon the objective of the test. A polymeric form of Co(TAA) was synthesized by means of an acetylene terminated monomer, which in turn was made via a Co(TAA)Br2 intermediate. The activity of the polymer was found to be comparable to that of Co(TAA) monomer, and significantly greater than that of either the stacked or sheet polymeric forms of Cobalt tetraphenylporphrine (CoTPP) previously synthesized and tested.

  1. Admit One: How Essential and Nonessential Metals Gain Entrance into the Cell

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Finley, Ebany J.; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Fretham, Stephanie; Aschner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Metals can have a number of detrimental or beneficial effects in the cell, but first they must get in. Organisms have evolved transport mechanisms to get metals that are required, or essential into the cell. Nonessential metals often enter the cell through use of the machinery provided for essential metals. Much work has been done to advance our understanding of how these metals are transported across the plasma and organelle membranes. This review provides an overview of these metal transport processes. PMID:22337135

  2. Construction of an open tin cell at Inmetro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, R.; Teixeira, R. N.

    2013-09-01

    For the last decade, the Thermometry Laboratory of the National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (INMETRO) has been developing its own primary standards. In late 2010, a brand new fixed point cell containing high purity tin (99.9999 %) was constructed as the continuation of a project for constructing metal fixed-point cells in the positive range, in accordance with the temperature fixed-points described by the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90) [1]. This is the fourth temperature fixed-point constructed by the laboratory team, which enables the performance of some calibrations without having to rely solely on commercially available cells. The materials and their preparation, the design, the procedures for the construction of the cell, the equipment, the investigation on its performance and its results will be detailed in the present paper. In addition, it is worth mentioning that this cell has recently taken part in a bilateral comparison with the National Physical Laboratory - NPL.

  3. Low Cost PEM Fuel Cell Metal Bipolar Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Conghua

    2013-05-30

    Bipolar plate is an important component in fuel cell stacks and accounts for more than 75% of stack weight and volume. The technology development of metal bipolar plates can effectively reduce the fuel cells stack weight and volume over 50%. The challenge is the metal plate corrosion protection at low cost for the broad commercial applications. This project is aimed to develop innovative technological solutions to overcome the corrosion barrier of low cost metal plates. The feasibility of has been demonstrated and patented (US Patent 7,309,540). The plan is to further reduce the cost, and scale up the technology. The project is built on three pillars: 1) robust experimental evidence demonstrating the feasibility of our technology, 2) a team that consists of industrial leaders in fuel cell stack application, design, and manufactures; 3) a low-risk, significant-milestone driven program that proves the feasibility of meeting program objectives The implementation of this project will reduce the fuel cell stack metal bipolar separator plate cost which accounts 15-21% of the overall stack cost. It will contribute to the market adoption of fuel cell technologies. In addition, this corrosion protection technology can be used similar energy devices, such as batteries and electrolyzers. Therefore, the success of the project will be benefit in broad markets.

  4. Cell metal interactions: A comparison of natural uranium to other common metals in renal cells and bone osteoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milgram, S.; Carrière, M.; Thiebault, C.; Berger, P.; Khodja, H.; Gouget, B.

    2007-07-01

    Uranium acute intoxication has been documented to induce nephrotoxicity. Kidneys are the main target organs after short term exposures to high concentrations of the toxic, while chronic exposures lead to its accumulation in the skeleton. In this paper, chemical toxicity of uranium is investigated for rat osteoblastic bone cells and compared to results previously obtained on renal cells. We show that bone cells are less sensitive to uranium than renal cells. The influence of the chemical form on U cytotoxicity is demonstrated. For both cell types, a comparison of uranium toxicity with other metals or metalloids toxicities (Mn, Ni, Co, Cu, Zn, Se and Cd) permits classification of Cd, Zn, Se IV and Cu as the most toxic and Ni, Se VI, Mn and U as the least toxic. Chemical toxicity of natural uranium proves to be far less than that of cadmium. To try to explain the differences in sensitivities observed between metals and different cell types, cellular accumulations in cell monolayers are quantified by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), function of time or function of dose: lethal doses which simulate acute intoxications and sub-lethal doses which are more realistic with regard to environmentally metals concentrations. In addition to being more resistant, bone cells accumulated much more uranium than did renal cells. Moreover, for both cell models, Mn, U-citrate and U-bicarbonate are strongly accumulated whereas Cu, Zn and Ni are weakly accumulated. On the other hand, a strong difference in Cd behaviour between the two cell types is shown: whereas Cd is very weakly accumulated in bone cells, it is very strongly accumulated in renal cells. Finally, elemental distribution of the toxics is determined on a cellular scale using nuclear microprobe analysis. For both renal and osteoblastic cells, uranium was accumulated in as intracellular precipitates similar to those observed previously by SEM/EDS.

  5. Methods for improving solar cell open circuit voltage

    DOEpatents

    Jordan, John F.; Singh, Vijay P.

    1979-01-01

    A method for producing a solar cell having an increased open circuit voltage. A layer of cadmium sulfide (CdS) produced by a chemical spray technique and having residual chlorides is exposed to a flow of hydrogen sulfide (H.sub.2 S) heated to a temperature of 400.degree.-600.degree. C. The residual chlorides are reduced and any remaining CdCl.sub.2 is converted to CdS. A heterojunction is formed over the CdS and electrodes are formed. Application of chromium as the positive electrode results in a further increase in the open circuit voltage available from the H.sub.2 S-treated solar cell.

  6. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kim, Jaekook

    2006-11-14

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2M'O.sub.3 in which 0cells or batteries are disclosed with anode, cathode and electrolyte as are batteries of several cells connected in parallel or series or both.

  7. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kim, Jaekook

    2004-01-13

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2 M'O.sub.3 in which 0cells or batteries are disclosed with anode, cathode and electrolyte as are batteries of several cells connected in parallel or series or both.

  8. Crystallographic Evidence for Direct Metal-Metal Bonding in a Stable Open-Shell La2 @Ih -C80 Derivative.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lipiao; Chen, Muqing; Pan, Changwang; Yamaguchi, Takahisa; Kato, Tatsuhisa; Olmstead, Marilyn M; Balch, Alan L; Akasaka, Takeshi; Lu, Xing

    2016-03-18

    Endohedral metallofullerenes (EMFs) have novel structures and properties that are closely associated with the internal metallic species. Benzyl radical additions have been previously shown to form closed-shell adducts by attaching an odd number of addends to open-shell EMFs (such as Sc3 C2 @Ih -C80 ) whereas an even number of groups are added to closed-shell EMFs (for example Sc3 N@Ih -C80 ). Herein we report that benzyl radical addition to the closed-shell La2 @Ih -C80 forms a stable, open-shell monoadduct instead of the anticipated closed-shell bisadduct. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction results show the formation of a stable radical species. In this species, the La-La distance is comparable to the theoretical value of a La-La covalent bond and is shorter than reported values for other La2 @Ih -C80 derivatives, providing unambiguous evidence for the formation of direct La-La bond. PMID:26918907

  9. An Elongated Tetrakaidecahedron Model for Open-Celled Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Lerch, Bradley A.

    2007-01-01

    A micro-mechanics model for non-isotropic, open-celled foams is developed using an elongated tetrakaidecahedron (Kelvin model) as the repeating unit cell. The micro-mechanics model employs an elongated Kelvin model geometry which is more general than that employed by previous authors. Assuming the cell edges possess axial and bending rigidity, the mechanics of deformation of the elongated tetrakaidecahedron lead to a set of equations for the Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio and strength of the foam in the principal material directions. These equations are written as a function of the cell edge lengths and cross-section properties, the inclination angle and the strength and stiffness of the solid material. The model is applied to predict the strength and stiffness of several polymeric foams. Good agreement is observed between the model results and the experimental measurements.

  10. Improved anode design for metal-oxygen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrance, F. C.; Robertson, W. A.; Rosa, A. G.

    1969-01-01

    Method for returning electrolyte to the anode compartment in metal-oxygen second battery cells eliminates the problem of the anode drying out during charge-discharge cycling. Electrolyte forced out of the separator is returned to the anode by a microporous insert and wicking material.

  11. Coated metal sintering carriers for fuel cell electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Donelson, Richard; Bryson, E. S.

    1998-01-01

    A carrier for conveying components of a fuel cell to be sintered through a sintering furnace. The carrier comprises a metal sheet coated with a water-based carbon paint, the water-based carbon paint comprising water, powdered graphite, an organic binder, a wetting agent, a dispersing agent and a defoaming agent.

  12. Coated metal sintering carriers for fuel cell electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Donelson, R.; Bryson, E.S.

    1998-11-10

    A carrier is described for conveying components of a fuel cell to be sintered through a sintering furnace. The carrier comprises a metal sheet coated with a water-based carbon paint, the water-based carbon paint comprising water, powdered graphite, an organic binder, a wetting agent, a dispersing agent and a defoaming agent.

  13. Molybdenum In Cathodes Of Sodium/Metal Chloride Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Attia, Alan I.; Halpert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetric curves of molybdenum wire in NaAlCl4 melt indicate molybdenum chloride useful as cathode material in rechargeable sodium/metal chloride electrochemical cells. Batteries used in electric vehicles, for electric-power load leveling, and other applications involving high energy and power densities.

  14. Microleakage of Four Dental Cements in Metal Ceramic Restorations With Open Margins

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar Ashtiani, Reza; Farzaneh, Babak; Azarsina, Mohadese; Aghdashi, Farzad; Dehghani, Nima; Afshari, Aisooda; Mahshid, Minu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fixed prosthodontics is a routine dental treatment and microleakage is a major cause of its failure. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the marginal microleakage of four cements in metal ceramic restorations with adapted and open margins. Materials and Methods: Sixty sound human premolars were selected for this experimental study performed in Tehran, Iran and prepared for full-crown restorations. Wax patterns were formed leaving a 300 µm gap on one of the proximal margins. The crowns were cast and the samples were randomly divided into four groups based on the cement used. Copings were cemented using zinc phosphate cement (Fleck), Fuji Plus resin-modified glass ionomer, Panavia F2.0 resin cement, or G-Cem resin cement, according to the manufacturers’ instructions. Samples were immersed in 2% methylene blue solution. After 24 hours, dye penetration was assessed under a stereomicroscope and analyzed using the respective software. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, paired t-tests, and Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon, and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: The least microleakage occurred in the Panavia F2.0 group (closed margin, 0.18 mm; open margin, 0.64 mm) and the maximum was observed in the Fleck group (closed margin, 1.92 mm; open margin, 3.32 mm). The Fleck group displayed significantly more microleakage compared to the Fuji Plus and Panavia F2.0 groups (P < 0.001) in both closed and open margins. In open margins, differences in microleakage between the Fuji Plus and G-Cem as well as between the G-Cem and Panavia F2.0 groups were significant (P < 0.001). In closed margins, only the G-Cem group displayed significantly more microleakage as compared to the Panavia F2.0 group (P < 0.05). Paired t-test results showed significantly more microleakage in open margins compared to closed margins, except in the Fuji Plus group (P = 0.539). Conclusions: Fuji Plus cement exhibited better sealing ability in closed and open margins compared to G-Cem and Fleck

  15. Catalytic glucose isomerization by porous coordination polymers with open metal sites.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, George; Matsuda, Ryotaro; Sato, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2014-10-01

    Highly efficient catalytic isomerization reactions from glucose to fructose in aqueous media using porous coordination polymers (PCPs) or metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is reported for the first time. The catalytic activity of PCPs functionalized with -NH2, -(CH3)2, -NO2, and -SO3H groups on the pore surface is systematically tested. The catalytic activity can be tuned by the acidity of open metal sites (OMSs) by modifying the organic linkers with the functional groups. As a result, it is demonstrated that MIL-101 functionalized with -SO3H not only shows high conversion of glucose but also selectively produces fructose. Further, catalytic one-pot conversion of amylose to fructose is achieved, thanks to the high stability of the framework in an acidic solution. These results show that MOF/PCP compounds having OMSs are promising materials for various useful heterogeneous catalytic reactions, in particular in the biomass field. PMID:25080129

  16. Ionothermal synthesis of chiral metal phosphite open frameworks with in situ generated organic templates.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Ming; Cheng, Kai; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Jian

    2013-05-20

    Two novel three-dimensional chiral metal phosphite open frameworks with 4-connected quartz topology, [Me2-DABCO][M2(HPO3)3] [M = Co (1), Zn (2); Me2-DABCO = N,N'-dimethyl-1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane], have been ionothermally synthesized in deep eutectic solvents (choline chloride/1,3-dimethylurea). It is interesting that the organic template, Me2-DABCO, is in situ generated from the alkylation reaction of 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane and dimethyl phosphites. PMID:23621695

  17. On the lithium dip in the metal poor open cluster NGC 2243

    SciTech Connect

    François, P.; Pasquini, L.; Palsa, R.; Biazzo, K.; Bonifacio, P.

    2014-05-02

    Lithium is a key element for studying the mixing mechanisms operating in stellar interiors. It can also be used to probe the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and the Big Bang nucleosynthesis. Measuring the abundance of Lithium in stars belonging to Open Clusters (hereafter OC) allows a detailed comparison with stellar evolutionary models. NGC 2243 is particularly interesting thanks to its relative low metallicity ([Fe/H]=−0.54 ± 0.10 dex). We performed a detailed analysis of high-resolution spectra obtained with the multi-object facility FLAMES at the VLT 8.2m telescope. Lithium abundance has been measured in 27 stars. We found a Li dip center of 1.06 M{sub ⊙}, which is significantly smaller than that observed in solar metallicity and metal-rich clusters. This finding confirms and strengthens the conclusion that the mass of the stars in the Li dip strongly depends on stellar metallicity. The mean Li abundance of the cluster is log n(Li) = 2.70 dex, which is substantially higher than that observed in 47 Tue. We derived an iron abundance of [Fe/H]=−0.54±0.10 dex for NGC 2243, in agreement (within the errors) with previous findings.

  18. Novel Approach for Selective Emitter Formation and Front Side Metallization of Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Baomin

    2010-07-26

    In this project we will explore the possibility of forming the front side metallization and selective emitter layer for the crystalline silicon solar cells through using selective laser ablation to create contact openings on the front surface and a screen printer to make connections with conductive paste. Using this novel approach we expect to reduce the specific contact resistance of the silver gridlines by about one order of magnitude compared to the state-of-art industrial crystalline silicon solar cells to below 1 mΩ∙cm2, and use lightly doped n+ emitter layer with sheet resistance of not smaller than 100 Ω. This represents an enabling improvement on crystalline silicon solar cell performance and can increase the absolute efficiency of the solar cell by about 1%. In this scientific report we first present our result on the selective laser ablation of the nitride layer to make contact openings. Then we report our work on the solar cell fabrication by using the laser ablated contact openings with self-doping paste. Through various electrical property characterization and SIMS analysis, the factors limiting the cell performance have been discussed. While through this proof-of-concept project we could not reach the target on cell efficiency improvement, the process to fabricate 125mm full-sized silicon solar cells using laser ablation and self-doping paste has been developed, and a much better understanding of technical challenges has been achieved. Future direction to realize the potential of the new technology has been clearly defined.

  19. Aluminum low temperature smelting cell metal collection

    DOEpatents

    Beck, Theodore R.; Brown, Craig W.

    2002-07-16

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte. The method comprises the steps of providing a molten salt electrolyte in an electrolytic cell having an anodic liner for containing the electrolyte, the liner having an anodic bottom and walls including at least one end wall extending upwardly from the anodic bottom, the anodic liner being substantially inert with respect to the molten electrolyte. A plurality of non-consumable anodes is provided and disposed vertically in the electrolyte. A plurality of cathodes is disposed vertically in the electrolyte in alternating relationship with the anodes. The anodes are electrically connected to the anodic liner. An electric current is passed through the anodic liner to the anodes, through the electrolyte to the cathodes, and aluminum is deposited on said cathodes. Oxygen bubbles are generated at the anodes and the anodic liner, the bubbles stirring the electrolyte. Molten aluminum is collected from the cathodes into a tubular member positioned underneath the cathodes. The tubular member is in liquid communication with each cathode to collect the molten aluminum therefrom while excluding electrolyte. Molten aluminum is delivered through the tubular member to a molten aluminum reservoir located substantially opposite the anodes and cathodes. The molten aluminum is collected from the cathodes and delivered to the reservoir while avoiding contact of the molten aluminum with the anodic bottom.

  20. Metal mutagenesis in transgenic Chinese hamster cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Klein, C B; Kargacin, B; Su, L; Cosentino, S; Snow, E T; Costa, M

    1994-01-01

    Metals are toxic agents for which genotoxic effects are often difficult to demonstrate. To study metal mutagenesis, we have used two stable hprt/gpt+ transgenic cell lines that were derived from Chinese hamster V79 cells. Both the G12 and G10 cell lines are known to be very sensitive to clastogens such as X-rays and bleomycin, with the mutagenic response of the integrated xanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (gpt) gene in G10 usually exceeding that of the same gene in the transgenic G12 cells. In studies with carcinogenic insoluble nickel compounds, a high level of mutagenesis was found at the gpt locus of G12 cells but not at the endogenous hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus of V79 cells. We have since demonstrated the similar recovery of a high frequency of viable G12 mutants with other insoluble nickel salts including nickel oxides (black and green). The relative mutant yield for the insoluble nickel compounds (G12 > G10) is the opposite of that obtained with nonmetal clastogens (G10 > G12). In the G12 cells, nickel mutagenesis may be related to the integration of the gpt sequence into a heterochromatic region of the genome. For some of the insoluble nickel compounds, significant inhibition of both cytotoxicity and mutant yield resulted when the G12 cells were pretreated with vitamin E. In comparison with the nickel studies, the mutagenic responses to chromium compounds in these cell lines were not as dramatic. Mutagenesis of the gpt target could not be demonstrated with other metals such as mercury or vanadium. PMID:7843139

  1. Numerical study of metal oxide Schottky type solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Shao, G.; Luo, J. K.

    2012-07-01

    Metal oxide (MO) semiconductors hold the promise for the development of high efficiency solar cells with low cost. Currently heterostructure type MO solar cells have been theoretically and experimentally studied, demonstrated their potential for applications. This paper highlights a numerical investigation on Schottky type MO solar cells using CuO as the absorption layer. It is shown that the doping concentration, absorption layer thickness, barrier height and back surface field have significant effects on the performance of the devices. Under the optimal structure and doping, the Schottky barrier solar cells, if can be fabricated with suitable techniques, can have a conversion efficiency up to 18.5%, comparable to MO heterojunction solar cells, but at a much simpler structure and lower cost. Some guidelines about the materials selection and structure design for MO Schottky barrier solar cells are summarized.

  2. Metals as electron acceptors in single-chamber microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Wu, Yining; Puranik, Sampada; Lei, Yu; Vadas, Timothy; Li, Baikun

    2014-12-01

    Two typical oxidized-status metals (Fe(III) and Cr(VI)) were studied as electron acceptors on cathodes in single chamber microbial fuel cells (SCMFCs) to explore novel sustainable technology for metal treatment. The batch-mode tests indicated that the voltages of SCMFCs steadily increased with Fe(III) concentrations (10, 30, and 50 mg L-1) and Cr(VI) concentrations (1, 3, and 10 mg L-1). The maximum power density was 658 ± 6 mW m-2 at 50 mg L-1 of Fe(III), and 419 ± 4 mW m-2 at 10 mg L-1 Cr(VI). The conversion efficiency of Cr(VI) and Fe(III) were high (>89%), and coulombic efficiency ranged 23-100%. Cr(VI) concentration of 10 mg L-1 started to irreversibly inhibit SCMFCs. The open circuit potentials (OCPs) well reflected the organic substrate removal in anode and metal reduction on cathode. Cathode liner sweep voltammetry (LSV) showed the electrochemical activity increased with metal concentrations, and the cathode of Fe(III) had better LSV performance than Cr(VI). Microbial community analysis of biofilms showed that the DNA band patterns of anode biofilms were similar, while cathode biofilms varied with electron acceptors. This study demonstrated the high power generation of SCMFCs with metals as electron acceptors, and revealed the great potential of expanding MFCs for diverse waste treatment.

  3. Burp Charging Nickel Metal Hydride Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darcy, Eric; Pollard, Richard

    1997-01-01

    The SKYNET 4 constellation consists of three spacecraft which were launched between December 1988 and August 1990. The spacecraft are three-axis stabilized geostationary earth-orbiting military communications satellites with a design life of seven years on station. With the mission objective achieved all the batteries continue to give excellent performance. This paper presents a review of the history of the six batteries from cell procurement to the end of their design life and beyond. Differences in operational strategies are discussed and the lifetime trends in performance are analyzed. The combination of procurement acceptance criteria and the on-station battery management strategy utilized are presented as the prime factors in achieving completely successful battery performance throughout the mission.

  4. Open-cell silicon foam for ultralightweight mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortini, Arthur J.

    1999-09-01

    Elemental silicon is a lightweight material that shows great promise for optical applications. Specifically, open-cell silicon foam can be used as a core material for ultralightweight mirrors by bonding single-crystal silicon faceplates to the foam. Not only does silicon have a low density, but it also has a low thermal expansion coefficient and a high thermal conductivity. Further, because of its widespread use in the semiconductor industry, it is an extremely well-characterized material. The fabrication of silicon foam begins with open-cell polyurethane foam, which is available in a wide variety of cell sizes ranging from 3 to 100 pores per linear inch. After chemical conversion to a glassy carbon foam, the individual ligaments are coated with silicon by chemical vapor deposition/infiltration (CVD/CVI), and the carbon cores are removed by oxidation. The end result is an open-cell foam composed exclusively of silicon. CVD/CVI is a very versatile process because it allows the amount of silicon in the foam to be varied. As the relative density of the foam increase, so does its strength and stiffness. Consequently, the mechanical properties of the foam can be tailored to meet the needs of a given application. For example, for space-based applications where light weight is critical, lower density foams can be used. For terrestrial applications requiring high stiffness, higher density foams can be used. In all cases, the relative density of the foam is a parameter that can be optimized to meet the needs of a particular application.

  5. Cell Division and Targeted Cell Cycle Arrest Opens and Stabilizes Basement Membrane Gaps

    PubMed Central

    Matus, David Q.; Chang, Emily; Makohon-Moore, Sasha C.; Hagedorn, Mary A.; Chi, Qiuyi; Sherwood, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Large gaps in basement membrane (BM) occur during organ remodeling and cancer cell invasion. Whether dividing cells, which temporarily reduce their attachment to BM, influence these breaches is unknown. Here we analyse uterine-vulval attachment during development across 21 species of rhabditid nematodes and find that the BM gap that forms between these organs is always bounded by a non-dividing vulval cell. Through cell cycle manipulation and live cell imaging in Caenorhabditis elegans, we show that actively dividing vulval cells facilitate enlargement of this breach by promoting BM movement. In contrast, targeted cell-cycle arrest halts BM movement and limits gap opening. Further, we demonstrate that the BM component laminin accumulates at the BM gap edge and promotes increased integrin levels in non-dividing vulval cells, stabilizing gap position. Together, these studies reveal that cell division can be used as a mechanism to regulate BM breaches, thus controlling the exchange of cells between tissues. PMID:24924309

  6. Dendritic cell development-History, advances, and open questions.

    PubMed

    Puhr, Sarah; Lee, Jaeyop; Zvezdova, Ekaterina; Zhou, Yu J; Liu, Kang

    2015-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are uniquely potent in orchestrating T cell immune response, thus they are indispensable immune sentinels. They originate from progenitors in the bone marrow through hematopoiesis, a highly regulated developmental process involving multiple cellular and molecular events. This review highlights studies of DC development-from the discovery of DCs as glass-adherent antigen presenting cells to the debate and resolution of their origin and lineage map. In particular, we summarize the roles of lineage-specific cytokines, the placement of distinct hematopoietic progenitors within the DC lineage and transcriptional programs governing DC development, which together have allowed us to diagram the current view of DC hematopoiesis. Important open questions and debates on the DC development and relevant models are also discussed. PMID:27040276

  7. A New Method of Metallization for Silicon Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macha, M.

    1979-01-01

    A low cost ohmic contact on silicon solar cells based on molybdenum-tin metal systems was developed. The approach is based on the formulation of a screenable ink composed from molybdenum oxide and tin mixture. The reduction of Mo03 into Mo and the establishment of Mo 03:Sn ratio is studied. Both tasks were done in an experimental station constructed for this purpose. The results show that molybdenum was formed from its oxide at 800 C. and improved in bonding to silicon at 900 C. A 20% Mo03-80%Sn mixture was converted into metallic coating within this temperature range.

  8. Pd-grafted open metal site copper-benzene-1,4-dicarboxylate metal organic frameworks (Cu-BDC MOF's) as promising interfacial catalysts for sustainable Suzuki coupling.

    PubMed

    Rostamnia, Sadegh; Alamgholiloo, Hassan; Liu, Xiao

    2016-05-01

    In this work, open metal site metal-organic framework of Cu-BDC was selected as a support for the multi-step grafting of palladium. The palladium ions was coordinated onto the Schiff base-decorated Cu-BDC pore cage, that this bifunctional Pd@Cu-BDC/Py-SI catalyst was successfully applied for Suzuki cross-coupling reaction. Recyclability test for the Pd@Cu-BDC/Py-SI catalyst showed a successful reusability for 7 runs. PMID:26897567

  9. Harnessing Lewis acidic open metal sites of metal-organic frameworks: the foremost route to achieve highly selective benzene sorption over cyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Soumya; Manna, Biplab; Desai, Aamod V; Yin, Yuefeng; Krishna, Rajamani; Babarao, Ravichandar; Ghosh, Sujit K

    2016-07-01

    π-Complexation triggered Lewis acid-base interactions between open metal sites (OMS) of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), and π-e(-) rich adsorptive benzene (Bz) is exploited to establish M-MOF-74 as the best Bz-selective MOF sorbent, marking the first report of utilizing OMS behind benzene/cyclohexane separation; a key advance from the energy-economy standpoint of industrial separation. PMID:27188914

  10. (abstract) Alkali Metal Diffusion Through Porous Metal Electrodes in AMTEC Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kisor, A.; Kikkert, S.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of mass transport of an alkali metal through porous metal electrodes in alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter AMTEC cells is important in optimizing these high current density devices, but also affords the opportunity to investigate a variety of simple mass transport modes at high temperatures via electrochemical techniques. We have previously reported evidence of ionic, free molecular flow, and surface transport of sodium in several types of AMTEC electrodes. Quantitative investigations of Na transport through WPt(sub 3.5) via surface or grain boundary diffusion, and K transport through porous Mo electrodes by free molecular flow, over large ranges of temperature have been performed. WPt(sub 3.5) has especially low transport impedance over the 950 to 1200K temperature range. New results are the Na through porous WPt(sub 3.5) and K through porous Mo diffusion rates and mechanisms.

  11. Silicon solar cells with nickel/solder metallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, R. C.; Muleo, A.

    1981-01-01

    The use of nickel plus solder is shown to be feasible for contact metallization for silicon solar cells by offering a relatively inexpensive method of making electrical contact with the cell surfaces. Nickel is plated on silicon solar cells using an electroless chemical deposition method to give contacts with good adhesion, and in some cases where adhesion is poor initially, sintering under relatively mild conditions will dramatically improve the quality of the bond without harming the p-n junction of the cell. The cells can survive terrestrial environment stresses, which is demonstrated by a 1000 hour test at 85 C and 85% relative humidity under constant forward bias of 0.45 volt.

  12. Cell responses to metallic nanostructure arrays with complex geometries.

    PubMed

    Jahed, Zeinab; Molladavoodi, Sara; Seo, Brandon B; Gorbet, Maud; Tsui, Ting Y; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2014-11-01

    Metallic nanopillar/nanowires are emerging as promising platforms for biological applications, as they allow for the direct characterization and regulation of cell function. Herein we study the response of cells to a versatile nanopillar platform. Nanopillar arrays of various shape, size, and spacing and different nanopillar-substrate interfacial strengths were fabricated and interfaced with fibroblasts and several unique cell-nanopillar interactions were observed using high resolution scanning electron microscopy. Nanopillar penetration, engulfment, tilting, lift off and membrane thinning, were observed by manipulating nanopillar material, size, shape and spacing. These unique cell responses to various nanostructures can be employed for a wide range of applications including the design of highly sensitive nano-electrodes for single-cell probing. PMID:25123921

  13. Ink jet printable silver metallization with zinc oxide for front side metallization for micro crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurk, Robert; Fritsch, Marco; Eberstein, Markus; Schilm, Jochen; Uhlig, Florian; Waltinger, Andreas; Michaelis, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Ink jet printable water based inks are prepared by a new silver nanoparticle synthesis and the addition of nanoscaled ZnO particles. For the formation of front side contacts the inks are ink jet printed on the front side of micro crystalline silicon solar cells, and contact the cell directly during the firing step by etching through the wafers’ anti-reflection coating (ARC). In terms of Ag dissolution and precipitation the mechanism of contact formation can be compared to commercial glass containing thick film pastes. This avoids additional processing steps, like laser ablation, which are usually necessary to open the ARC prior to ink jet printing. As a consequence process costs can be reduced. In order to optimize the ARC etching and contact formation during firing, zinc oxide nanoparticles are investigated as an ink additive. By utilization of in situ contact resistivity measurements the mechanism of contacting was explored. Our results show that silver inks containing ZnO particles realize a specific contact resistance below 10 mΩṡcm2. By using a multi-pass ink jet printing and plating process a front side metallization of commercial 6  ×  6 inch2 standard micro crystalline silicone solar cells with emitter resistance of 60 Ω/◽ was achieved and showed an efficiency of 15.7%.

  14. INKJET PRINTING OF NICKEL AND SILVER METAL SOLAR CELL CONTACTS

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquarelli, R.; Curtis, C.; Van Hest, M.

    2008-01-01

    With about 125,000 terawatts of solar power striking the earth at any given moment, solar energy may be the only renewable energy resource with enough capacity to meet a major portion of our future energy needs. Thin-fi lm technologies and solution deposition processes seek to reduce manufacturing costs in order to compete with conventional coal-based electricity. Inkjet printing, as a derivative of the direct-write process, offers the potential for low-cost, material-effi cient deposition of the metals for photovoltaic contacts. Advances in contact metallizations are important because they can be employed on existing silicon technology and in future-generation devices. We report on the atmospheric, non-contact deposition of nickel (Ni) and silver (Ag) metal patterns on glass, Si, and ZnO substrates at 180–220°C from metal-organic precursor inks using a Dimatix inkjet printer. Near-bulk conductivity Ag contacts were successfully printed up to 4.5 μm thick and 130 μm wide on the silicon nitride antirefl ective coating of silicon solar cells. Thin, high-resolution Ni adhesion-layer lines were printed on glass and zinc oxide at 80 μm wide and 55 nm thick with a conductivity two orders of magnitude less than the bulk metal. Additionally, the ability to print multi-layered metallizations (Ag on Ni) on transparent conducting oxides was demonstrated and is promising for contacts in copper-indium-diselenide (CIS) solar cells. Future work will focus on further improving resolution, printing full contact devices, and investigating copper inks as a low-cost replacement for Ag contacts.

  15. Mechanical and Numerical Analysis Concerning Compressive Properties of Tin-Lead Open-Cell Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belhadj, Abd-Elmouneïm; Gavrus, Adinel; Bernard, Fabrice; Azzaz, Mohammed

    2015-10-01

    The design of new or innovative materials has to meet two essential criteria: increased mechanical performance and minimization of the mass. This dual requirement leads to interest in the study of various classes of metallic foams. The actual research is focused on open-cell Tin-Lead foams manufactured by replication process using NaCl preform. A mechanical press equipped with a load cell and a local extensometer with a controlled deformation rate is used. Experimental tests were carried out in order to study the influences of both the cell size and of the relative density on the mechanical behavior during a compression deformation and to analyze the obtained properties variation within a new framework. This study has three main sections which start with the manufacturing description and mechanical characterization of the proposed metallic foams followed by the understanding and modeling of their response to a compression load via a Gibson-Ashby model, a Féret law, a proposed simple Avrami model, and a generalized Avrami model. Finally, an exposition of a numerical simulation analyzing the compression of the Sn-Pb foams concerning the variation of the relative densities with respect to the plastic strain is proposed.

  16. A sliding cell technique for diffusion measurements in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Yongliang; Zhu, Chunao; Zhang, Bo

    2014-03-01

    The long capillary and shear cell techniques are the usual methods for diffusion measurements in liquid metals. Here we present a new "sliding cell technique" to measure interdiffusion in liquid alloys, which combines the merits of these two methods. Instead of a number of shear cells, as used in the shear cell method, only one sliding cell is designed to separate and join the liquid diffusion samples. Using the sliding cell technique, the influence of the heating process (which affects liquid diffusion measurements in the conventional long capillary method) can be eliminated. Time-dependent diffusion measurements at the same isothermal temperature were carried out in Al-Cu liquids. Compared with the previous results measured by in-situ X-ray radiography, the obtained liquid diffusion coefficient in this work is believed to be influenced by convective flow. The present work further supports the idea that to obtain accurate diffusion constants in liquid metals, the measurement conditions must be well controlled, and there should be no temperature gradients or other disturbances.

  17. A sliding cell technique for diffusion measurements in liquid metals

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Yongliang; Zhu, Chunao; Zhang, Bo

    2014-03-15

    The long capillary and shear cell techniques are the usual methods for diffusion measurements in liquid metals. Here we present a new “sliding cell technique” to measure interdiffusion in liquid alloys, which combines the merits of these two methods. Instead of a number of shear cells, as used in the shear cell method, only one sliding cell is designed to separate and join the liquid diffusion samples. Using the sliding cell technique, the influence of the heating process (which affects liquid diffusion measurements in the conventional long capillary method) can be eliminated. Time-dependent diffusion measurements at the same isothermal temperature were carried out in Al-Cu liquids. Compared with the previous results measured by in-situ X-ray radiography, the obtained liquid diffusion coefficient in this work is believed to be influenced by convective flow. The present work further supports the idea that to obtain accurate diffusion constants in liquid metals, the measurement conditions must be well controlled, and there should be no temperature gradients or other disturbances.

  18. Removal of Machine Oil from Metal Surface by Mesoplasma Jet under Open Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Haruki; Shiki, Hajime; Tsujii, Kenichi; Oke, Shinichiro; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Okawa, Takashi; Yamanaka, Shigenobu

    2009-08-01

    An attempt was made to employ the plasma-energized jet (PEN-jet) generated by pulsed arc discharge, one of the atmospheric-pressure mesoplasmas, for removal of machine oil from the surface of electrically-grounded aluminum (Al) alloy substrate under open atmosphere. Three types of nozzle configurations were examined; a metal nozzle, ceramic nozzle, and electrically-floated metal nozzle. Electric input power to the pulsed arc plasma discharge was 700 W constant. First, free-burning of the PEN-jet was observed as a function of air gas flow. When the PEN-jets were irradiated to the clean substrate, the PEN-jet with the metal nozzle caused substrate damage by the arc spot due to transferring arc discharge. Then the PEN-jet with the ceramic nozzle was irradiated to the oily substrate. The adhesion strength of sealant and water contact angle of the treated surface were then measured. As a result, these values of the oily substrate treated by the PEN-jet were almost the same as those of clean substrate. The treated surface was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and reflectance spectroscopy. Their spectral profiles clearly indicated oil removal from the surface by PEN-jet.

  19. The acoustical structure of highly porous open-cell foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    This work concerns both the theoretical prediction and measurement of structural parameters in open-cell highly porous polyurethane foams. Of particular interest are the dynamic flow resistance, thermal time constant, and mass structure factor and their dependence on frequency and geometry of the cellular structure. The predictions of cell size parameters, static flow resistance, and heat transfer as accounted for by a Nusselt number are compared with measurement. Since the static flow resistance and inverse thermal time constant are interrelated via the 'mean' pore size parameter of Biot, only two independent measurements such as volume porosity and mean filament diameter are required to make the predictions for a given fluid condition. The agreements between this theory and nonacoustical experiments are excellent.

  20. Giant-cell interstitial pneumonia and hard-metal pneumoconiosis. A clinicopathologic study of four cases and review of the literature

    SciTech Connect

    Ohori, N.P.; Sciurba, F.C.; Owens, G.R.; Hodgson, M.J.; Yousem, S.A.

    1989-07-01

    We report four cases of giant-cell interstitial pneumonia that occurred in association with exposure to hard metals. All patients presented with chronic interstitial lung disease and had open-lung biopsies that revealed marked interstitial fibrosis, cellular interstitial infiltrates, and prominent intraalveolar macrophages as well as giant cells displaying cellular cannibalism. We also review the literature to determine the sensitivity and specificity of giant-cell interstitial pneumonia for hard-metal pneumoconiosis. Although hard-metal pneumoconiosis may take the form of usual interstitial pneumonia, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and giant-cell interstitial pneumonia, the finding of giant-cell interstitial pneumonia is almost pathognomonic of hard-metal disease and should provoke an investigation of occupational exposure. 25 references.

  1. Dynamic properties of high structural integrity auxetic open cell foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpa, F.; Ciffo, L. G.; Yates, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    This paper illustrates various dynamic characteristics of open cell compliant polyurethane foam with auxetic (negative Poisson's ratio) behaviour. The foam is obtained from off-the-shelf open cell polyurethane grey foam with a manufacturing process based on mechanical deformation on a mould in a temperature-controlled oven. The Poisson's ratio is measured with an image processing technique based on edge detection with wavelet methods. Foam samples have been tested in a viscoelastic analyser tensile test machine to determine the Young's modulus and loss factor for small dynamic strains. The same samples have also been tested in an acoustic impedance tube to measure acoustic absorption and specific acoustic resistance and reactance with a transmissibility technique. Another set of tests has been set up on a cam plastometer machine for constant strain rate dynamic crushing analysis. All the tests have been carried out on auxetic and normal foam samples to provide a comparison between the two types of cellular solids. The results from the experimental tests are discussed and interpreted using microstructure models for cellular materials existing in the literature. The negative Poisson's ratio foam presented in this paper shows an overall superiority regarding damping and acoustic properties compared to the original conventional foam. Its dynamic crushing performance is also significantly superior to the normal foam, suggesting a possible use in structural integrity compliant elements.

  2. Hypervelocity Impact Performance of Open Cell Foam Core Sandwich Panel Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Shannon; Christiansen, Eric; Lear, Dana

    2009-01-01

    Metallic foams are a relatively new class of materials with low density and novel physical, mechanical, thermal, electrical and acoustic properties. Although incompletely characterized, they offer comparable mechanical performance to traditional spacecraft structural materials (i.e. honeycomb sandwich panels) without detrimental through-thickness channeling cells. There are two competing types of metallic foams: open cell and closed cell. Open cell foams are considered the more promising technology due to their lower weight and higher degree of homogeneity. Leading micrometeoroid and orbital debris shields (MMOD) incorporate thin plates separated by a void space (i.e. Whipple shield). Inclusion of intermediate fabric layers, or multiple bumper plates have led to significant performance enhancements, yet these shields require additional non-ballistic mass for installation (fasteners, supports, etc.) that can consume up to 35% of the total shield weight [1]. Structural panels, such as open cell foam core sandwich panels, that are also capable of providing sufficient MMOD protection, represent a significant potential for increased efficiency in hypervelocity impact shielding from a systems perspective through a reduction in required non-ballistic mass. In this paper, the results of an extensive impact test program on aluminum foam core sandwich panels are reported. The effect of pore density, and core thickness on shielding performance have been evaluated over impact velocities ranging from 2.2 - 9.3 km/s at various angles. A number of additional tests on alternate sandwich panel configurations of comparable-weight have also been performed, including aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels (see Figure 1), Nomex honeycomb core sandwich panels, and 3D aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels. A total of 70 hypervelocity impact tests are reported, from which an empirical ballistic limit equation (BLE) has been derived. The BLE is in the standard form suitable for implementation in

  3. Lithium metal oxide electrodes for lithium cells and batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil

    2008-12-23

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2M'O.sub.3 in which 0cells or batteries are disclosed with anode, cathode and electrolyte as are batteries of several cells connected in parallel or series or both.

  4. Lithium Metal Oxide Electrodes For Lithium Cells And Batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Johnson, Christopher S.; Amine, Khalil; Kim, Jaekook

    2004-01-20

    A lithium metal oxide positive electrode for a non-aqueous lithium cell is disclosed. The cell is prepared in its initial discharged state and has a general formula xLiMO.sub.2.(1-x)Li.sub.2 M'O.sub.3 in which 0cells or batteries are disclosed with anode, cathode and electrolyte as are batteries of several cells connected in parallel or series or both.

  5. Metal-accelerated oxidation in plant cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Czuba, M. )

    1993-05-01

    Cadmium and mercury toxicity is further enhanced by external oxidizing conditions O[sub 3] or inherent plant processes. Lepidium sativum L, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill., or Phaseolus vulgaris L, were grown inpeat-lite to maturity under continuous cadmium exposure followed by one oxidant (O[sub 3]-6 hr. 30 pphm) exposure, with or without foliar calcium pretreatments. In comparison, Daucus carota, L and other species grown in a 71-V suspension, with or without 2,4-D were exposed continuously to low levels of methylmercury during exponential growth and analyzed in aggregates of distinct populations. Proteins were extracted and analyzed. Mechanisms of toxicity and eventual cell death are Ca-mediated and involve chloroplast, stomatal-water relations and changes in oxidant-anti-oxidant components in cells. Whether the metal-accelerated oxidative damage proceeds to cell death, depends on the species and its differential biotransformation system and cell association component.

  6. High-aspect-ratio silicon-cell metallization technical status report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Two features of the silicon concentrator solar cell are addressed which affect output at high concentration levels. The first is the development of narrow but high electroplated grid lines with improved conductivity. The object is a reduction in cell series resistance without increase in shadowing. This goal is accomplished by electroplating through a thick photo resist mask to produce lines .7 mil wide by .7 mil high. Advance pulse plating techniques are combined with pure silver plating baths to produce a deposit conductivity equal to the bulk silver conductivity (a 1.5 to 2 X improvement over conventional silver plating). The second feature is a double diffused selectively textured front surface. This development employs a deep diffusion in the silicon under the grid lines. Only the non grid line open area is selectively texture etched removing the deep junction. This open textured area is then given a second shallow diffusion for optimum cell efficiency. This selective procedure maintains the original highly polished wafer surface under the grid lines so that high resolution narrow grid lines are possible. The double diffusion protects the junction from metal diffusion while enabling the optimum shallow junction in the illuminated regions. Combining these two features has produced a large area concentrator cells (8 cm/sup 2/) with peak efficiency above 16% and exhibiting a broad peak efficiency extending from 50 to 175 suns above 15%.

  7. Hypervelocity Impact Performance of Open Cell Foam Core Sandwich Panel Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, S.; Ordonez, E.; Christiansen, E. L.; Lear, D. M.

    2010-01-01

    Open cell metallic foam core sandwich panel structures are of interest for application in spacecraft micrometeoroid and orbital debris shields due to their novel form and advantageous structural and thermal performance. Repeated shocking as a result of secondary impacts upon individual foam ligaments during the penetration process acts to raise the thermal state of impacting projectiles ; resulting in fragmentation, melting, and vaporization at lower velocities than with traditional shielding configurations (e.g. Whipple shield). In order to characterize the protective capability of these structures, an extensive experimental campaign was performed by the Johnson Space Center Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility, the results of which are reported in this paper. Although not capable of competing against the protection levels achievable with leading heavy shields in use on modern high-risk vehicles (i.e. International Space Station modules), metallic foam core sandwich panels are shown to provide a substantial improvement over comparable structural panels and traditional low weight shielding alternatives such as honeycomb sandwich panels and metallic Whipple shields. A ballistic limit equation, generalized in terms of panel geometry, is derived and presented in a form suitable for application in risk assessment codes.

  8. Thermal Stress in HFEF Hot Cell Windows Due to an In-Cell Metal Fire

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Solbrig, Charles W.; Warmann, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates an accident during the pyrochemical extraction of Uranium and Plutonium from PWR spent fuel in an argon atmosphere hot cell. In the accident, the heavy metals (U and Pu) being extracted are accidentally exposed to air from a leaky instrument penetration which goes through the cell walls. The extracted pin size pieces of U and Pu metal readily burn when exposed to air. Technicians perform the electrochemical extraction using manipulators through a 4 foot thick hot cell concrete wall which protects them from the radioactivity of the spent fuel. Four foot thick windows placed in the wallmore » allow the technicians to visually control the manipulators. These windows would be exposed to the heat of the metal fire. As a result, this analysis determines if the thermal stress caused by the fire would crack the windows and if the heat would degrade the window seals allowing radioactivity to escape from the cell.« less

  9. Thermal Stress in HFEF Hot Cell Windows Due to an In-Cell Metal Fire

    SciTech Connect

    Solbrig, Charles W.; Warmann, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates an accident during the pyrochemical extraction of Uranium and Plutonium from PWR spent fuel in an argon atmosphere hot cell. In the accident, the heavy metals (U and Pu) being extracted are accidentally exposed to air from a leaky instrument penetration which goes through the cell walls. The extracted pin size pieces of U and Pu metal readily burn when exposed to air. Technicians perform the electrochemical extraction using manipulators through a 4 foot thick hot cell concrete wall which protects them from the radioactivity of the spent fuel. Four foot thick windows placed in the wall allow the technicians to visually control the manipulators. These windows would be exposed to the heat of the metal fire. As a result, this analysis determines if the thermal stress caused by the fire would crack the windows and if the heat would degrade the window seals allowing radioactivity to escape from the cell.

  10. Vacuum-free and metal electrode-free organic tandem solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Jinhui; Xiong, Sixing; Li, Zaifang; Jiang, Fangyuan; Mao, Lin; Meng, Wei; Zhou, Yinhua

    2015-02-01

    We report on vacuum-free and metal electrode-free organic tandem solar cells that use conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) as the top electrode. The PEDOT:PSS top electrode was deposited via film-transfer lamination that does not need high-vacuum processing. The fabricated tandem solar cells exhibit an open-circuit voltage of 1.62 V, which is nearly the sum of the VOC of individual subcells, a high fill factor up to 0.72, and averaged power conversion efficiency of 3.6% under 100 mW cm-2 AM 1.5 illumination. The effect of the patterning of charge recombination layer and electrodes on the device performance has also been discussed.

  11. The Pd2Si - /Pd/ - Ni - solder plated metallization system for silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coleman, M. G.; Pryor, R. A.; Sparks, T. G.

    1978-01-01

    The rationale and application of a plated metal system, Pd2Si Pd - Ni - solder, is presented. This metallization system is particularly useful on shallow p-n junction solar cells. The advantages of such plated solar cell contacts are discussed. A process sequence for applying the metallization system is outlined. A specific example is presented, including chemical plating solution formulations and detailed process step descriptions. Electrical test data for solar cells metallized with the palladium-nickel-solder system are provided.

  12. Visualizing Nanoscale Distribution of Corrosion Cells by Open-Loop Electric Potential Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Honbo, Kyoko; Ogata, Shoichiro; Kitagawa, Takuya; Okamoto, Takahiro; Kobayashi, Naritaka; Sugimoto, Itto; Shima, Shohei; Fukunaga, Akira; Takatoh, Chikako; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-02-23

    Corrosion is a traditional problem but still one of the most serious problems in industry. To reduce the huge economic loss caused by corrosion, tremendous effort has been made to understand, predict and prevent it. Corrosion phenomena are generally explained by the formation of corrosion cells at a metal-electrolyte interface. However, experimental verification of their nanoscale distribution has been a major challenge owing to the lack of a method able to visualize the local potential distribution in an electrolytic solution. In this study, we have investigated the nanoscale corrosion behavior of Cu fine wires and a duplex stainless steel by in situ imaging of local corrosion cells by open-loop electric potential microscopy (OL-EPM). For both materials, potential images obtained by OL-EPM show nanoscale contrasts, where areas of higher and lower potential correspond to anodic areas (i.e., corrosion sites) and cathodic areas, respectively. This imaging capability allows us to investigate the real-time transition of local corrosion sites even when surface structures show little change. This is particularly useful for investigating reactions under surface oxide layers or highly corrosion-resistant materials as demonstrated here. The proposed technique should be applicable to the study of other redox reactions on a battery electrode or a catalytic material. The results presented here open up such future applications of OL-EPM in nanoscale electrochemistry. PMID:26811989

  13. Metal induced crystallization of amorphous silicon for photovoltaic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Gestel, D.; Gordon, I.; Poortmans, J.

    A silicon thin-film technology could lead to less expensive modules by the use of less silicon material and by the implementation of monolithic module processes. A technology based on polycrystalline-silicon thin-films with a grain size between 1 μm and 1 mm (pc-Si), seems particularly promising since it combines the low-cost potential of a thin-film technology with the high efficiency potential of crystalline silicon. One of the possible approaches to fabricate pc-Si absorber layers is metal induced crystallization (MIC). For solar cell applications mainly aluminium is investigated as metal because 1) it forms a eutectic system with silicon instead of a silicide-metal system like e.g. Ni 2) only shallow level defects are formed in the forbidden bandgap of silicon and 3) a layer exchange process can be obtained in combination with a-Si. Aluminum induced crystallization (AIC) of a-Si on non-silicon substrates can results in grains with a preferential (100) orientation and a maximum grain sizes above 50 micrometer. These layers can act as seed layers for further epitaxial growth. Based on this two-step approach (AIC + epitaxial growth) we made solar cells with an energy conversion efficiency of 8%. Based on TEM, EBIC, SEM, defect etch and EBSD measurements we showed that the efficiency is nowadays mainly limited by the presence of electrical intragrain defects.

  14. Low-density open-cell foams in the NiTi system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grummon, David S.; Shaw, John A.; Gremillet, Antoine

    2003-04-01

    It is shown that open-cell metallic foams having very low density, and that display martensite transformations required for shape memory and superelastic behavior, can be fabricated using a powder-metallurgy technique. Results are presented on experiments in which a polymeric precursor foam was coated with an equiatomic NiTi powder slurry and subsequently sintered to yield foams with relative densities as low as 0.039. Although contaminated with interstitial impurities, they displayed unambiguous calorimetric signature of the B2→B19' transformation. The results are of considerable significance to potential applications requiring ultralightweight structures with the unusual dissipative and strain-recovery properties of NiTi shape-memory materials.

  15. Development of nickel-metal hydride cell: An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuwajima, S.; Kusawake, Hiroaki; Nakatani, Kensuke; Yano, Y.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents in viewgraph format an overview of NASDA's evaluation of commercial nickel metal-hydride (Ni-MH) cells and the development and testing of Ni-MH cells for use in space. The commercial cells are concluded to be feasible and suitable for use in LEO; for GEO, the durability for overcharge is needed because long-term charge retention is required. For the aerospace Ni-MH cell design, two activation procedures are applied to evaluate the effect of the difference in the amount of overcharge protection and precharge. Specific energy of the Ni-MH cell is nearly accomplished at 50 Wh/kg. Initial characteristics indicate the effect derived from precharge. Thirty-five amp-hour class Ni-MH cells have good performance for LEO cycle of 25 and 40 percent DOD up to 3000 cycles as similar to commercial cells. The effect of the difference in the amount of overcharge protection will appear in life test.

  16. Numerical study of metal oxide heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.; Shao, G.; Luo, J. K.

    2011-08-01

    Metal oxide (MO) semiconductors have great potential for photovoltaic (PV) application owing to some optimal bandgaps and a variety of possible combinations of the materials. The progress is limited due to lack of high-quality materials, reliable process and theoretical study and models which can guide the development. This paper reports on the numerical modelling of MO semiconductor PV cells. The effects of the bandgap structure, material, doping concentration and layer thickness on the proposed oxide solar cells have been investigated. It was found that, in an ideal case of no defects and no interface states, wide-gap MO, CuO and Cu2O can form a heterostructure n+/p/p+ cell with efficiency up to 28.6%, demonstrating great potential for development.

  17. The Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of Open Sites on Metal Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigra, Michael Mark

    undercoordinated sites led me to synthesize small gold clusters consisting of a high fraction of coordinatively unsaturated open sites. This was enabled through an approach that utilized bulky calix[4]arene ligands that are bound to a gold core. Since the size of the calix[4]arene ligand is commensurate with the size of the gold cluster core, the calix[4]arene ligand does not pack closely together on the gold cluster surface. This in turn results in areas of accessible gold atom sites between ligands. Additionally, these calix[4]arene ligands prevent cluster aggregation and electronically tune the gold core in a manner conceptually similar to enzymes affecting reactivity through organic side-chains acting as ligands. I quantified the number of open sites that result from this packing problem on the gold cluster surface, using fluorescence probe chemisorption experiments. The results of these chemisorption measurements support the mechanical model of accessibility whereby accessibility is not dependent on the identity of the functional group, whether it be calixarene phosphines or N-heterocyclic carbenes, bound to the gold surface, but rather to the relative radii of curvature of bound ligands and the gold cluster core. Additional materials characterization was completed with transmission electron microscopy in both bright-field imaging of zeolites, in MCM-22 and delaminated ITQ-2 and UCB-1 materials, and in dark field imaging of glucan coatings on oxide particles. These materials could prove to be interesting materials as to use as supports for the calixarene-bound metal clusters described above or for other metal clusters.

  18. High and Reversible Ammonia Uptake in Mesoporous Azolate Metal-Organic Frameworks with Open Mn, Co, and Ni Sites.

    PubMed

    Rieth, Adam J; Tulchinsky, Yuri; Dincă, Mircea

    2016-08-01

    A series of new mesoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) made from extended bisbenzenetriazolate linkers exhibit coordinatively unsaturated metal sites that are responsible for high and reversible uptake of ammonia. Isostructural Mn, Co, and Ni materials adsorb 15.47, 12.00, and 12.02 mmol of NH3/g, respectively, at STP. Importantly, these near-record capacities are reversible for at least three cycles. These results demonstrate that azolate MOFs are sufficiently thermally and chemically stable to find uses in recyclable sorption, storage, and potentially separation of chemically challenging and/or corrosive gases, especially when designed to exhibit a high density of open metal sites. PMID:27420652

  19. A tomato stem cell extract, containing antioxidant compounds and metal chelating factors, protects skin cells from heavy metal-induced damages.

    PubMed

    Tito, Annalisa; Carola, Antonietta; Bimonte, Marida; Barbulova, Ani; Arciello, Stefania; de Laurentiis, Francesco; Monoli, Irene; Hill, Jacqueline; Gibertoni, Simone; Colucci, Gabriella; Apone, Fabio

    2011-12-01

    Heavy metals can cause several genotoxic effects on cells, including oxidative stress, DNA sequence breakage and protein modification. Among the body organs, skin is certainly the most exposed to heavy metal stress and thus the most damaged by the toxic effects that these chemicals cause. Moreover, heavy metals, in particular nickel, can induce the over-expression of collagenases (enzymes responsible for collagen degradation), leading to weakening of the skin extracellular matrix. Plants have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to protect their cells from heavy metal toxicity, including the synthesis of metal chelating proteins and peptides, such as metallothioneins and phytochelatins (PC), which capture the metals and prevent the damages on the cellular structures. To protect human skin cells from heavy metal toxicity, we developed a new cosmetic active ingredient from Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) cultured stem cells. This product, besides its high content of antioxidant compounds, contained PC, effective in the protection of skin cells towards heavy metal toxicity. We have demonstrated that this new product preserves nuclear DNA integrity from heavy metal damages, by inducing genes responsible for DNA repair and protection, and neutralizes the effect of heavy metals on collagen degradation, by inhibiting collagenase expression and inducing the synthesis of new collagen. PMID:21609336

  20. Carbon composites with metal nanoparticles for Alcohol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventrapragada, Lakshman; Siddhardha, R. S.; Podilla, Ramakrishna; Muthukumar, V. S.; Creager, Stephen; Rao, A. M.; Ramamurthy, Sai Sathish

    2015-03-01

    Graphene due to its high surface area and superior conductivity has attracted wide attention from both industrial and scientific communities. We chose graphene as a substrate for metal nanoparticle deposition for fuel cell applications. There are many chemical routes for fabrication of metal-graphene composites, but they have an inherent disadvantage of low performance due to the usage of surfactants, that adsorb on their surface. Here we present a design for one pot synthesis of gold nanoparticles and simultaneous deposition on graphene with laser ablation of gold strip and functionalized graphene. In this process there are two natural advantages, the nanoparticles are synthesized without any surfactants, therefore they are pristine and subsequent impregnation on graphene is linker free. These materials are well characterized with electron microscopy to find their morphology and spectroscopic techniques like Raman, UV-Vis. for functionality. This gold nanoparticle decorated graphene composite has been tested for its electrocatalytic oxidation of alcohols for alkaline fuel cell applications. An electrode made of this composite showed good stability for more than 200 cycles of operation and reported a low onset potential of 100 mV more negative, an important factor for direct ethanol fuel cells.

  1. Enantioselective ring-opening of meso-epoxides by aromatic amines catalyzed by a homochiral metal-organic framework.

    PubMed

    Regati, Sridhar; He, Yabing; Thimmaiah, Muralidhara; Li, Peng; Xiang, Shengchang; Chen, Banglin; Zhao, John Cong-Gui

    2013-10-28

    The enantioselective ring-opening of meso-epoxides by aromatic amines was achieved by using a new chiral metal-organic framework . The corresponding α-hydroxyamines were obtained with good yields and ee values (up to 89% ee). PMID:24030658

  2. A New Type of Metal Recognition by Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gamerdinger, Katharina; Moulon, Corinne; Karp, David R.; van Bergen, Jeroen; Koning, Frits; Wild, Doris; Pflugfelder, Ulrike; Weltzien, Hans Ulrich

    2003-01-01

    In spite of high frequencies of metal allergies, the structural basis for major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted metal recognition is among the unanswered questions in the field of T cell activation. For the human T cell clone SE9, we have identified potential Ni contact sites in the T cell receptor (TCR) and the restricting human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR structure. The specificity of this HLA-DR–promiscuous VA22/VB17+ TCR is primarily harbored in its α chain. Ni reactivity is neither dependent on protein processing in antigen-presenting cells nor affected by the nature of HLA-DR–associated peptides. However, SE9 activation by Ni crucially depends on Tyr29 in CDR1α, an N-nucleotide–encoded Tyr94 in CDR3α, and a conserved His81 in the HLA-DR β chain. These data indicate that labile, nonactivating complexes between the SE9 TCR and most HLA-DR/peptide conjugates might supply sterically optimized coordination sites for Ni ions, three of which were identified in this study. In such complexes Ni may effectively bridge the TCR α chain to His81 of most DR molecules. Thus, in analogy to superantigens, Ni may directly link TCR and MHC in a peptide-independent manner. However, unlike superantigens, Ni requires idiotypic, i.e., CDR3α-determined TCR amino acids. This new type of TCR–MHC linkage might explain the high frequency of Ni-reactive T cells in the human population. PMID:12756270

  3. Application of fuel cell for pyrite and heavy metal containing mining waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keum, H.; Ju, W. J.; Jho, E. H.; Nam, K.

    2015-12-01

    Once pyrite and heavy metal containing mining waste reacts with water and air it produces acid mine drainage (AMD) and leads to the other environmental problems such as contamination of surrounding soils. Pyrite is the major source of AMD and it can be controlled using a biological-electrochemical dissolution method. By enhancing the dissolution of pyrite using fuel cell technology, not only mining waste be beneficially utilized but also be treated at the same time by. As pyrite-containing mining waste is oxidized in the anode of the fuel cell, electrons and protons are generated, and electrons moves through an external load to cathode reducing oxygen to water while protons migrate to cathode through a proton exchange membrane. Iron-oxidizing bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, which can utilize Fe as an electron donor promotes pyrite dissolution and hence enhances electrochemical dissolution of pyrite from mining waste. In this study mining waste from a zinc mine in Korea containing 17 wt% pyrite and 9% As was utilized as a fuel for the fuel cell inoculated with A. ferrooxidans. Electrochemically dissolved As content and chemically dissolved As content was compared. With the initial pH of 3.5 at 23℃, the dissolved As concentration increased (from 4.0 to 13 mg/L after 20 d) in the fuel cell, while it kept decreased in the chemical reactor (from 12 to 0.43 mg/L after 20 d). The fuel cell produced 0.09 V of open circuit voltage with the maximum power density of 0.84 mW/m2. Dissolution of As from mining waste was enhanced through electrochemical reaction. Application of fuel cell technology is a novel treatment method for pyrite and heavy metals containing mining waste, and this method is beneficial for mining environment as well as local community of mining areas.

  4. Vacuolar accumulation of heavy metals in Datura cultured cells is metal concentration dependent

    SciTech Connect

    Krotz, R.M.; Wagner, G.J.

    1987-04-01

    Vacuolar-extravacuolar compartmentation studies were performed to determine if the vacuole serves as an accumulation site for Cd, Zn, and Ni, after growth of Datura cultured cells in trace and high levels of these metals. After 3 to 4 days growth with 0.12 ..mu..M Cd or 0.02 ..mu..M Ni (radiolabeled) no evidence was obtained for vacuolar accumulation of these metals. In contrast, growth with 30 or 45 ..mu..M Cd, 11 ..mu..M Ni (with or without trace radiolabel), or 300 and 500 ..mu..M Zn resulted in isolated vacuoles which were enriched in metal. Compartmentation after exposure to low levels of Zn and also Cu is being investigated as is the subcellular site(s) of Cd-binding peptide formed during growth in high Cd. The hypothesis that Zn is accumulated as vacuolar organic acid salts is being tested directly because no evidence was found for formation of substantial ligand of Cd-peptide in response to Zn exposure.

  5. OpenCFU, a New Free and Open-Source Software to Count Cell Colonies and Other Circular Objects

    PubMed Central

    Geissmann, Quentin

    2013-01-01

    Counting circular objects such as cell colonies is an important source of information for biologists. Although this task is often time-consuming and subjective, it is still predominantly performed manually. The aim of the present work is to provide a new tool to enumerate circular objects from digital pictures and video streams. Here, I demonstrate that the created program, OpenCFU, is very robust, accurate and fast. In addition, it provides control over the processing parameters and is implemented in an intuitive and modern interface. OpenCFU is a cross-platform and open-source software freely available at http://opencfu.sourceforge.net. PMID:23457446

  6. An assessment of the levels of phthalate esters and metals in the Muledane open dump, Thohoyandou, Limpopo Province, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Adeniyi, Adeleke; Dayomi, Matthew; Siebe, Pitso; Okedeyi, Olumuyiwa

    2008-01-01

    Background This work reports the determination of the levels of phthalate esters (dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), dibutyl phthalate (DBP), diethyl hexyl phthalate (DEHP)) and metals (lead, cadmium, manganese, zinc, iron, calcium) in composite soil samples. The soil samples were collected randomly within the Muledane open dump, Thohoyandou, Limpopo province, South Africa. Control samples were collected about 200 m away from the open dump. The phthalate esters were separated and determined by capillary gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector, whilst the metals were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results Open dump values for the phthalate esters and metals to be generally higher in comparison to control samples for DMP, DEP, DBP and DEHP – the mean values calculated were 0.31 ± 0.12, 0.21 ± 0.05, 0.30 ± 0.07, and 0.03 ± 0.01 mg/kg, respectively, for the open dump soil samples. Nonetheless, the mean open dump values for lead, cadmium, manganese, zinc, iron and calcium were 0.07 ± 0.04, 0.003 ± 0.001, 5.02 ± 1.92, 0.31 ± 0.02, 11.62 ± 9.48 and 0.12 ± 0.13 mg/kg, respectively. The results were compared statistically. Conclusion Our results revealed that the discarding of wastes into the open dump is a potential source of soil contamination in the immediate vicinity and beyond, via dispersal. Increased levels of phthalate esters and metals in the soil pose a risk to public health, plants and animals. Sustained monitoring of these contaminants is recommended, in addition to upgrading the facility to a landfill. PMID:18474112

  7. Water as foaming agent for open cell polyurethane structures.

    PubMed

    Haugen, H; Ried, V; Brunner, M; Will, J; Wintermantel, E

    2004-04-01

    The problem of moisture in polymer processing is known to any polymer engineer, as air bubbles may be formed. Hence granulates are generally dried prior to manufacturing. This study tried to develop a novel processing methods for scaffolds with controlled moisture content in thermoplastic polyurethane. The common foaming agents for polyurethane are organic solvents, whose residues remaining in the scaffold may be harmful to adherent cells, protein growth factors or nearby tissues. Water was used as a foaming agent and NaCl was used as porogens to achieve an open-cell structure. The polyether-polyurethane samples were processed in a heated press, and achieved a porosity of 64%. The pore size ranged between 50 and 500 microm. Human fibroblasts adhered and proliferate in the scaffold. A non-toxic production process was developed to manufacture a porous structure with a thermoplastic polyether-polyurethane. The process enables a mass-production of samples with adjustable pore size and porosity. In contrast to an existing method (solvent casting), the processing of the samples was not limited by its thickness. The process parameters, which attribute mostly to the pore building, were filling volume, temperature, NaCl-concentration and water-uptake rate. PMID:15332597

  8. Platinum redispersion on metal oxides in low temperature fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Tripković, Vladimir; Cerri, Isotta; Nagami, Tetsuo; Bligaard, Thomas; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2013-03-01

    We have analyzed the aptitude of several metal oxide supports (TiO(2), SnO(2), NbO(2), ZrO(2), SiO(2), Ta(2)O(5) and Nb(2)O(5)) to redisperse platinum under electrochemical conditions pertinent to the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) cathode. The redispersion on oxide supports in air has been studied in detail; however, due to different operating conditions it is not straightforward to link the chemical and the electrochemical environment. The largest differences reflect in (1) the oxidation state of the surface (the oxygen species coverage), (2) temperature and (3) the possibility of platinum dissolution at high potentials and the interference of redispersion with normal working potential of the PEMFC cathode. We have calculated the PtO(x) (x = 0, 1, 2) adsorption energies on different metal oxides' surface terminations as well as inside the metal oxides' bulk, and we have concluded that NbO(2) might be a good support for platinum redispersion at PEMFC cathodes. PMID:23358311

  9. An exploration of plastic deformation dependence of cell viability and adhesion in metallic implant materials.

    PubMed

    Uzer, B; Toker, S M; Cingoz, A; Bagci-Onder, T; Gerstein, G; Maier, H J; Canadinc, D

    2016-07-01

    The relationship between cell viability and adhesion behavior, and micro-deformation mechanisms was investigated on austenitic 316L stainless steel samples, which were subjected to different amounts of plastic strains (5%, 15%, 25%, 35% and 60%) to promote a variety in the slip and twin activities in the microstructure. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) revealed that cells most favored the samples with the largest plastic deformation, such that they spread more and formed significant filopodial extensions. Specifically, brain tumor cells seeded on the 35% deformed samples exhibited the best adhesion performance, where a significant slip activity was prevalent, accompanied by considerable slip-twin interactions. Furthermore, maximum viability was exhibited by the cells seeded on the 60% deformed samples, which were particularly designed in a specific geometry that could endure greater strain values. Overall, the current findings open a new venue for the production of metallic implants with enhanced biocompatibility, such that the adhesion and viability of the cells surrounding an implant can be optimized by tailoring the surface relief of the material, which is dictated by the micro-deformation mechanism activities facilitated by plastic deformation imposed by machining. PMID:26807771

  10. The Biomechanisms of Metal and Metal-Oxide Nanoparticles’ Interactions with Cells

    PubMed Central

    Teske, Sondra S.; Detweiler, Corrella S.

    2015-01-01

    Humans are increasingly exposed to nanoparticles (NPs) in medicine and in industrial settings, where significant concentrations of NPs are common. However, NP interactions with and effects on biomolecules and organisms have only recently been addressed. Within we review the literature regarding proposed modes of action for metal and metal-oxide NPs, two of the most prevalent types manufactured. Iron-oxide NPs, for instance, are used as tracers for magnetic resonance imaging of oncological tumors and as vehicles for therapeutic drug delivery. Factors and theories that determine the physicochemical and biokinetic behaviors of NPs are discussed, along with the observed toxicological effects of NPs on cells. Key thermodynamic and kinetic models that explain the sources of energy transfer from NPs to biological targets are summarized, in addition to quantitative structural activity relationship (QSAR) modeling efforts. Future challenges for nanotoxicological research are discussed. We conclude that NP studies based on cell culture are often inconsistent and underestimate the toxicity of NPs. Thus, the effect of NPs needs to be examined in whole animal systems. PMID:25648173

  11. Effect of chemical surface treatments on non-native (Bi/sub 2/O/sub 3/) GaAs metal-insulator-semiconductor solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.Y.; Pandelisev, K.A.

    1981-07-01

    GaAs metal-insulator-semiconductor solar cells with a physically deposited Bi/sub 2/O/sub 3/ interfacial layer have been investigated. The deposition techniques used in the study were electron beam and boat thermal evaporation. The cells fabricated with interfacial layers of Bi/sub 2/O/sub 3/ showed a substantial improvement in open-circuit voltage over cells made without the physically deposited oxide layer. An etch has been used which yields an irregular ''textured'' surface. Cells employing this surface had a higher short-circuit current than those made with smooth, polished surfaces. The open-circuit voltages of these textured cells were lower than those with smooth surfaces. Calculations of the dependence of open-circuit voltage on pinhole density are in agreement with these results since a rough surface has a greater probability of pinholes.

  12. High performance, high durability non-precious metal fuel cell catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Thomas E.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Schmoeckel, Alison K.

    2016-03-15

    This invention relates to non-precious metal fuel cell cathode catalysts, fuel cells that contain these catalysts, and methods of making the same. The fuel cell cathode catalysts are highly nitrogenated carbon materials that can contain a transition metal. The highly nitrogenated carbon materials can be supported on a nanoparticle substrate.

  13. Technology of GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, R. J.; Yeh, Y. C. M.

    1977-01-01

    The growth of an oxide interfacial layer was recently found to increase the open-circuit voltage (OCV) and efficiency by up to 60 per cent in GaAs metal-semiconductor solar cells. Details of oxidation techniques to provide the necessary oxide thickness and chemical structure and using ozone, water-vapor-saturated oxygen, or oxygen gas discharges are described, as well as apparent crystallographic orientation effects. Preliminary results of the oxide chemistry obtained from X-ray, photoelectron spectroscopy are given. Ratios of arsenic oxide to gallium oxide of unity or less seem to be preferable. Samples with the highest OVC predominantly have As(+3) in the arsenic oxide rather than As(+5). A major difficulty at this time is a reduction in OCV by 100-200 mV when the antireflection coating is vacuum deposited.

  14. Improve the operational stability of the inverted organic solar cells using bilayer metal oxide structure.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jingjing; Lin, Zhenhua; Jiang, Changyun; Zhang, Jie; Zhu, Chunxiang; Wu, Jishan

    2014-11-12

    Operational stability is a big obstacle for the application of inverted organic solar cells (OSCs), however, less talked about in the research reports. Due to photoinduced degradation of the metal oxide interlayer, which can cause shunts generation and degeneration in ZnO interlayer, a significant degradation of open circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF) has been observed by in situ periodic measurements of the device current density-voltage (J-V) curves with light illumination. By combining TiOx and ZnO to form bilayer structures on ITO, the photovoltaic performance is improved and the photoinduced degradation is reduced. It was found that the device based on ZnO/TiOx bilayer structure achieved better operational stability as compared to that with ZnO or TiOx interlayer. PMID:25299062

  15. Metallized polymeric foam material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birnbaum, B. A.; Bilow, N.

    1974-01-01

    Open-celled polyurethane foams can be coated uniformly with thin film of metal by vapor deposition of aluminum or by sensitization of foam followed by electroless deposition of nickel or copper. Foam can be further processed to increase thickness of metal overcoat to impart rigidity or to provide inert surface with only modest increase in weight.

  16. Open cluster Dolidze 25: Stellar parameters and the metallicity in the Galactic anticentre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negueruela, I.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Lorenzo, J.; Castro, N.; Herrero, A.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The young open cluster Dolidze 25, in the direction of the Galactic anticentre, has been attributed a very low metallicity, with typical abundances between -0.5 and -0.7 dex below solar. Aims: We intend to derive accurate cluster parameters and accurate stellar abundances for some of its members. Methods: We have obtained a large sample of intermediate- and high-resolution spectra for stars in and around Dolidze 25. We used the fastwind code to generate stellar atmosphere models to fit the observed spectra. We derive stellar parameters for a large number of OB stars in the area, and abundances of oxygen and silicon for a number of stars with spectral types around B0. Results: We measure low abundances in stars of Dolidze 25. For the three stars with spectral types around B0, we find 0.3 dex (Si) and 0.5 dex (O) below the values typical in the solar neighbourhood. These values, even though not as low as those given previously, confirm Dolidze 25 and the surrounding H ii region Sh2-284 as the most metal-poor star-forming environment known in the Milky Way. We derive a distance 4.5 ± 0.3 kpc to the cluster (rG ≈ 12.3 kpc). The cluster cannot be older than ~3 Myr, and likely is not much younger. One star in its immediate vicinity, sharing the same distance, has Si and O abundances at most 0.15 dex below solar. Conclusions: The low abundances measured in Dolidze 25 are compatible with currently accepted values for the slope of the Galactic metallicity gradient, if we take into account that variations of at least ±0.15 dex are observed at a given radius. The area traditionally identified as Dolidze 25 is only a small part of a much larger star-forming region that comprises the whole dust shell associated with Sh2-284 and very likely several other smaller H ii regions in its vicinity. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, the Mercator Telescope, and the telescopes of the Isaac Newton Group.

  17. Transition-Metal Additives For Long-Life Na/NiCI(2) Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Surampudi, Subbarao; Halpert, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    Transition-metal additives in cathodes of Na/NiCI(2) high-temperature, rechargeable electrochemical cells found to slow premature fading of charge/discharge capacity. Decline in capacity of cell attributed to agglomeration of Ni particles at cathode: this agglomeration reduces electrochemical area of cathode. Depending on choice of transition-metal additive for particular cell, additive might even participate in desired electrochemical reactions in cell, contributing to specific energy of cell.

  18. Direct alcohol fuel cells: Increasing platinum performance by modification with sp-group metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, Marta C.; Sorsa, Olli; Doan, Nguyet; Pohjalainen, Elina; Hildebrand, Helga; Schmuki, Patrik; Wilson, Benjamin P.; Kallio, Tanja

    2015-02-01

    By using sp group metals as modifiers, the catalytic properties of Pt can be improved toward alcohols oxidation. In this work we report the performance increase of direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFC) fuelled with ethanol or 2-propanol with platinum based anode electrodes modified with Bi and Sb adatoms. For example, by simply adding Sb to the Pt/C based anode ink during membrane electrode assembly fabrication of a direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) its performance is improved three-fold, with more than 100 mV increase in the open circuit potential. For the fuel cell fuelled with 2-propanol high power densities are obtained at very high potentials with these catalyst materials suggesting a great improvement for practical applications. Particularly in the case of Pt/C-Bi, the improvement is such that within 0.6 V (from 0.7 to 0.1 V) the power densities are between 7 and 9 mW/cm2. The results obtained with these catalysts are in the same range as those obtained with other bimetallic catalysts comprising of PtRu and PtSn, which are currently considered to be the best for these type of fuel cells and that are obtained by more complicated (and consequently more expensive) methods.

  19. Blood Flow through an Open-Celled Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Jason; Maitland, Duncan

    2011-11-01

    The Hazen-Dupuit-Darcy (HDD) equation is commonly used in engineering applications to model the pressure gradient of flow through a porous media. One major advantage of this equation is that it simplifies the complex geometric details of the porous media into two coefficients: the permeability, K, and form factor, C. However through this simplification, the flow details within the porous media are no longer accessible, making it difficult to study the phenomena that contribute to changes in K and C due to clotting of blood flow. To obtain a more detailed understanding of blood flow through a porous media, a direct assessment of the complex interstitial geometry and flow is required. In this study, we solve the Navier-Stokes equations for Newtonian and non-Newtonian blood flow through an open-celled foam geometry obtained from a micro-CT scan. The nominal strut size of the foam sample is of O(10e-5) m and the corresponding Reynolds number based upon this length ranges up to O(10). Fitting the pressure gradient vs. Darcy velocity data with the HDD equation demonstrates that both viscous and inertial forces play an important role in the flow through the foam at these Reynolds numbers. Recirculation zones are observed to form in the wake of the pore struts, producing regions of flow characterized by both low shear rates and long fluid residence times, factors of which have been shown in previous studies to promote blood clotting.

  20. Effective Thermal Conductivity of High Porosity Open Cell Nickel Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullins, Alan D.; Daryabeigi, Kamran

    2001-01-01

    The effective thermal conductivity of high-porosity open cell nickel foam samples was measured over a wide range of temperatures and pressures using a standard steady-state technique. The samples, measuring 23.8 mm, 18.7 mm, and 13.6 mm in thickness, were constructed with layers of 1.7 mm thick foam with a porosity of 0.968. Tests were conducted with the specimens subjected to temperature differences of 100 to 1000 K across the thickness and at environmental pressures of 10(exp -4) to 750 mm Hg. All test were conducted in a gaseous nitrogen environment. A one-dimensional finite volume numerical model was developed to model combined radiation/conduction heat transfer in the foam. The radiation heat transfer was modeled using the two-flux approximation. Solid and gas conduction were modeled using standard techniques for high porosity media. A parameter estimation technique was used in conjunction with the measured and predicted thermal conductivities at pressures of 10(exp -4) and 750 mm Hg to determine the extinction coefficient, albedo of scattering, and weighting factors for modeling the conduction thermal conductivity. The measured and predicted conductivities over the intermediate pressure values differed by 13%.

  1. High reduction of interfacial charge recombination in colloidal quantum dot solar cells by metal oxide surface passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jin; Kuga, Yuki; Mora-Seró, Iván; Toyoda, Taro; Ogomi, Yuhei; Hayase, Shuzi; Bisquert, Juan; Shen, Qing

    2015-03-01

    Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells based on colloidal QDs and metal oxide nanowires (NWs) possess unique and outstanding advantages in enhancing light harvesting and charge collection in comparison to planar architectures. However, the high surface area of the NW structure often brings about a large amount of recombination (especially interfacial recombination) and limits the open-circuit voltage in BHJ solar cells. This problem is solved here by passivating the surface of the metal oxide component in PbS colloidal quantum dot solar cells (CQDSCs). By coating thin TiO2 layers onto ZnO-NW surfaces, the open-circuit voltage and power conversion efficiency have been improved by over 40% in PbS CQDSCs. Characterization by transient photovoltage decay and impedance spectroscopy indicated that the interfacial recombination was significantly reduced by the surface passivation strategy. An efficiency as high as 6.13% was achieved through the passivation approach and optimization for the length of the ZnO-NW arrays (device active area: 16 mm2). All solar cells were tested in air, and exhibited excellent air storage stability (without any performance decline over more than 130 days). This work highlights the significance of metal oxide passivation in achieving high performance BHJ solar cells. The charge recombination mechanism uncovered in this work could shed light on the further improvement of PbS CQDSCs and/or other types of solar cells.Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells based on colloidal QDs and metal oxide nanowires (NWs) possess unique and outstanding advantages in enhancing light harvesting and charge collection in comparison to planar architectures. However, the high surface area of the NW structure often brings about a large amount of recombination (especially interfacial recombination) and limits the open-circuit voltage in BHJ solar cells. This problem is solved here by passivating the surface of the metal oxide component in PbS colloidal quantum dot solar

  2. Modeling Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in Marine Open- and Closed-Cell Stratocumulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Feingold, G.

    2008-12-01

    Satellite imagery shows the recurrence of striking images of cellular structures exhibiting both closed- and open-cell patterns in marine stratocumulus fields. The open-cell region has much lower cloud albedo than closed cells. Aside from that, previous observational and modeling studies have suggested that open- and closed-cell regions are different in many other aspects, such as concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), cloud droplet number and size, precipitation efficiency, and cloud dynamics. In this work, aerosol- cloud interactions and dynamical feedbacks are investigated within a large eddy simulation (LES) modeling framework to study the activation, cloud scavenging, mixing and transport of CCN in the open- and closed- cell boundary layer and near the open/closed-cell boundaries. The model domain size of 120 km by 60 km is large enough to represent mesoscale organizations that are associated with different cellular structures and that are promoted by CCN perturbation from ship emissions. Simulation results show that depletion of CCN by collision and coalescence in clouds is critical to the formation of precipitation and open-cell structure in a stratocumulus deck. Once the open cellular structure has formed in the clean environment, a substantial increase of CCN transported from a neighboring polluted environment or from ship emissions do not close it during the 12-hour simulation due to the lack of dynamical and moisture support in the open-cell cloud-free region. However, the contaminated open cells are not able to self-sustain as a result of shutoff of precipitation. This points to the critical role of precipitation-triggered circulations in maintaining an open-cellular structure.

  3. Metal ion bombardment of onion skin cell wall

    SciTech Connect

    Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Vilaithong, T.; Yu, L.D.; Verdaguer, A.; Ratera, I.; Ogletree, D.F.; Monteiro, O.R.; Brown, I.G.

    2004-05-10

    Ion bombardment of living cellular material is a novel subfield of ion beam surface modification that is receiving growing attention from the ion beam and biological communities. Although it has been demonstrated that the technique is sound, in that an adequate fraction of the living cells can survive both the vacuum environment and energetic ion bombardment, there remains much uncertainty about the process details. Here we report on our observations of onion skin cells that were subjected to ion implantation, and propose some possible physical models that tend to support the experimental results. The ion beams used were metallic (Mg, Ti, Fe, Ni, Cu), mean ion energy was typically 30keV, and the implantation fluence was in the range 1014 1016 ions/cm2. The cells were viewed using Atomic Force Microscopy, revealing the formation of microcrater-like structures due to ion bombardment. The implantation depth profile was measured with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and compared to the results of the TRIM, T-DYN and PROFILE computer codes.

  4. Moderate temperature sodium cells. I - Transition metal disulfide cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, K. M.; Pitts, L.; Schiff, R.

    1980-01-01

    TiS2, VS2, and Nb(1.1)S2 transition metal disulfides were evaluated as cathode materials for a moderate temperature rechargeable Na cell operating at 130 C. The 1st discharge of TiS2 results in a capacity of 0.85 eq/mole; approximately half of the Na in the 1st phase spanning the Na range from zero to 0.30 and almost all the Na in the 2nd phase spanning the 0.37 to 0.80 range are rechargeable. VS2 intercalates up to one mole of Na/mole of VS2 in the 1st discharge; the resulting Na(x)VS2 ternary consists of 3 phases in the 3 ranges of Na from zero to 1. Niobium disulfide undergoes a phase change in the 1st discharge; the average rechargeable capacity in extended cycling of this cathode is 0.50 eq/mole.

  5. Metal-sulfur type cell having improved positive electrode

    DOEpatents

    Dejonghe, Lutgard C.; Visco, Steven J.; Mailhe, Catherine C.; Armand, Michel B.

    1989-01-01

    An novel metal-sulfur type cell operable at a temperature of 200.degree. C. or less with an energy density of 150 Whrs/Kg or better is disclosed characterized by an organo-sulfur cathode formed from an organic-sulfur compound having the general formula, in its charged state, of (R(S).sub.y).sub.n wherein y=1 to 6; n=2 to 20; and R is one or more different aliphatic or aromatic organic moieties having 1 to 20 carbon atoms, which may include one or more oxygen, sulfur, or nitrogen heteroatoms when R comprisises one of more aromatic rings, or one or more oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, or fluorine atoms associtated with the chain when R comprises an aliphatic chain, wherein the aliphatic group may be linear or branched, saturated or unsaturated, and wherein either the aliphatic chain or the aromatic ring may have substituted groups thereon.

  6. Metal-sulfur type cell having improved positive electrode

    DOEpatents

    DeJonghe, L.C.; Visco, S.J.; Mailhe, C.C.; Armand, M.B.

    1988-03-31

    A novel metal-sulfur type cell operable at a temperature of 200/degree/C or less with an energy density of 150 Whrs/Kg or better is disclosed characterized by an organo-sulfur cathode formed from an organic-sulfur compound having the general formula, in its charged state, of (R(S)/sub y/)n wherein y = 1 to 6; n = 2 to 20; and R is one or more different aliphatic or aromatic organic moieties having 1 to 20 carbon atoms, which may include one or more oxygen, sulfur, or nitrogen heteroatoms when R comprises one or more aromatic rings, or one or more oxygen, sulfur, nitrogen, or fluorine atoms associated with the chain when R comprises an aliphatic chain, wherein the aliphatic group may be linear or branched, saturated or unsaturated, and wherein either the aliphatic chain or the aromatic ring may have substituted groups thereon. 4 figs.

  7. On-chip fabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, K.; Ban, K.; Hirai, Y.; Sugano, K.; Tsuchiya, T.; Mizutani, N.; Tabata, O.

    2013-11-01

    We describe a novel on-chip microfabrication technique for the alkali-metal vapor cell of an optically pumped atomic magnetometer (OPAM), utilizing an alkali-metal source tablet (AMST). The newly proposed AMST is a millimeter-sized piece of porous alumina whose considerable surface area holds deposited alkali-metal chloride (KCl) and barium azide (BaN6), source materials that effectively produce alkali-metal vapor at less than 400 °C. Our experiments indicated that the most effective pore size of the AMST is between 60 and 170 µm. The thickness of an insulating glass spacer holding the AMST was designed to confine generated alkali metal to the interior of the vapor cell during its production, and an integrated silicon heater was designed to seal the device using a glass frit, melted at an optimum temperature range of 460-490 °C that was determined by finite element method thermal simulation. The proposed design and AMST were used to successfully fabricate a K cell that was then operated as an OPAM with a measured sensitivity of 50 pT. These results demonstrate that the proposed concept for on-chip microfabrication of alkali-metal vapor cells may lead to effective replacement of conventional glassworking approaches.

  8. Evaluation of Open Cell Foam Heat Transfer Enhancement for Liquid Rocket Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, J. N.; Tully, Landon; Kim, Jung Hwan; Jones, Gregg W.; Watkins, William

    2006-01-01

    As NASA pursues the exploration mission, advanced propulsion for the next generation of spacecraft will be needed. These new propulsion systems will require higher performance and increased durability, despite current limitations on materials. A break-through technology is needed in the thrust chamber. In this paper the idea of using a porous metallic foam is examined for its potential cooling enhancement capabilities. The goal is to increase the chamber wall cooling without creating an additional pressure drop penalty. A feasibility study based on experiments at laboratory-scale conditions was performed and analysis at rocket conditions is underway. In the experiment, heat transfer and pressure drop data were collected using air as the coolant in a copper or nickel foam filled annular channel. The foam-channel performance was evaluated based on comparison with conventional microchannel cooling passages under equal pressure drop conditions. The heat transfer enhancement of the foam channel over the microchannel ranges from 130% to 172%. The enhancement is relatively independent of the pressure drop and increases with decreasing pore size. A direct numerical simulation model of the foam heat exchange has been built. The model is based on the actual metal foam microstructure of thin ligaments (0.2- 0.3 mm in diameter) that form a network of interconnected open-cells. The cell dimension is around 2 mm. The numerical model was built using the FLUENT CFD code. Comparison of the pressure drop results predicted by the current model with those experimental data of Leong and Jin [8] shows favorable comparisons. Pressure drop predictions have been made using hydrogen as a coolant at typical rocket conditions. Conjugate heat transfer analysis using the foam filled channel is planned for the future.

  9. EFFECTS OF METALS BOUND TO PARTICULATE MATTER ON HUMAN LUNG EPITHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    While focusing on coal ash and its metal content, the investigators expect to find evidence that transition metals (metals that can participate in possibly toxic oxidative reactions) associated with particulate matter are released within lung epithelial cells and catalyze t...

  10. High-efficiency organometallic vapor phase epitaxy AlGaAs/GaAs monolithic cascade solar cell using metal interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Ludowise, M.J.; LaRue, R.A.; Borden, P.G.; Gregory, P.E.; Dietze, W.T.

    1982-09-15

    A two-junction solar cell has been fabricated using an Al/sub 0.30/Ga/sub 0.70/As (1.82 eV) tap cell and a GaAs (1.43 eV) bottom cell. A processed metal interconnect is used to connect the two cells together in series. An efficiency of 21.5% at 980 mW/cm/sup 2/ has been measured in a solar simulator with an open circuit voltage of 2.35 V, a short circuit current of 118.6 mA/cm/sup 2/, and a fill factor of 0.76. An efficiency of 22% has been measured under 130 AM3 sun in a solar tracking concentrator. Organometallic vapor phase epitaxy is used to grow the entire nine-layer device.

  11. Highly Selective Adsorption of Ethylene over Ethane in a MOF Featuring the Combination of Open Metal Site and -Complexation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Yiming; Li, Baiyan; Wu, Zili; Ma, Shengqian

    2015-01-09

    The introduction of the combination of open metal site (OMS) and -complexation into MOF has led to very high ethylene/ethane adsorption selectivity at 318K, as illustrated in the context of MIL-101-Cr-SO3Ag. The interactions with ethylene from both OMS and -complexation in MIL-101-Cr-SO3Ag have been investigated by in situ IR spectroscopic studies and computational calculations, which suggest -complexation contributes dominantly to the high ethylene/ethane adsorption selectivity.

  12. Assessment and modelling of heavy metal contamination from Madneuli open-pit mine, Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchelidze, T.; Melikadze, G.; Leveinen, J.; Kaija, J.; Kumpalainen, S.

    2003-04-01

    Acid mine drainage from banked waste rocks (150 million m^3) and sulfide ore tailings of the Madneuli Cu-Au open-pit mine have created major environmental pollution problem in Bolnisi district, Georgia. Intensive leaching of exposed rocks and direct discharge of mine waters to nearby watercourses have lead to strong heavy metal pollution of groundwater and Rivers Kazretula, Poladauri and Mashavera. Increased concentrations of Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni, Mn, Cr, Cd and Hg exceeding maximum permissible values by 3-2000 times, are registered almost everywhere. Polluted surface waters are used intensively for irrigation. Besides, contaminated groundwater is pumped for irrigation and drinking water supply in alluvial deposits along the rivers. Because the spread of contamination is a slow process, the adverse health effects may not yet have emerged in the investigation area. The transport modelling was used in the framework of risk assessment to estimate the direction, rate and extent of chemical migration in the contaminated site in order to support environmental management and decisionmaking involving identification of high-risk areas, protection from pollutants, and planning of remediation work. Geochemical and contamination transport modelling conducted in this study suggest that the present contamination levels will eventually reach the total investigation area causing serious health risks to the local population in long terms. Mineral lifetime estimates suggest that the contamination might continue for centuries with current pollution loads. Furthermore, geochemical modelling showed that there is no reason to expect the natural attenuation of the contamination. The potential impacts of preventive actions were studied by preparing a model scenario where the present heavy metal contamination level was lowered to 0.1 mg/l in two streams entering the model area. The model results suggest that within 5 years, already significant reduction of concentrations can be reached. The

  13. Direct Structural Identification of Gas Induced Gate-Opening Coupled with Commensurate Adsorption in a Microporous Metal-Organic Framework.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Debasis; Wang, Hao; Plonka, Anna M; Emge, Thomas J; Parise, John B; Li, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Gate-opening is a unique and interesting phenomenon commonly observed in flexible porous frameworks, where the pore characteristics and/or crystal structures change in response to external stimuli such as adding or removing guest molecules. For gate-opening that is induced by gas adsorption, the pore-opening pressure often varies for different adsorbate molecules and, thus, can be applied to selectively separate a gas mixture. The detailed understanding of this phenomenon is of fundamental importance to the design of industrially applicable gas-selective sorbents, which remains under investigated due to the lack of direct structural evidence for such systems. We report a mechanistic study of gas-induced gate-opening process of a microporous metal-organic framework, [Mn(ina)2 ] (ina=isonicotinate) associated with commensurate adsorption, by a combination of several analytical techniques including single crystal X-ray diffraction, in situ powder X-ray diffraction coupled with differential scanning calorimetry (XRD-DSC), and gas adsorption-desorption methods. Our study reveals that the pronounced and reversible gate opening/closing phenomena observed in [Mn(ina)2 ] are coupled with a structural transition that involves rotation of the organic linker molecules as a result of interaction of the framework with adsorbed gas molecules including carbon dioxide and propane. The onset pressure to open the gate correlates with the extent of such interaction. PMID:27385527

  14. Trace metal content in distinct genotypes of human neuroblastoma cells: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, R.; Gouget, B.; Moretto, Ph.; Michelet, C.; Bénard, J.; Sergeant, C.; Llabador, Y.; Simonoff, M.

    1997-07-01

    Some transition metals play important regulatory roles in gene expression. The disturbance of their cellular levels could be involved in oncogene expression and tumorigenesis. Nuclear Microprobe Analysis (NMPA) was used to measure cellular trace metal levels (Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn) in two human neuroblastoma cell lines characterized by distinct genotypes. In this paper, a specific protocol established for sample preparation of neuronal cultured cells is described. Trace metal concentrations in SK-N-SH and IGR-N-91 cells exhibiting respectively a single copy, and 60 copies, of the N- myc oncogene are reported. A brief discussion on experiment design for NMPA of trace metal functions in gene expression is also presented.

  15. Gravure-Offset Printed Metallization of Multi-Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells with Low Metal-Line Width for Mass Production.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghwan; Jeong, Chaehwan

    2016-05-01

    The gravure offset method has been developed toward an industrially viable printing technique for electronic circuitry. In this paper, a roller type gravure offset manufacturing process was developed to fabricate fine line for using front electrode for solar cells. In order to obtain the optimum metallization printing lines, thickness of 20 μm which is narrow line is required. The main targets are the reduction of metallized area to reduce the shading loss, and a high conductivity to transport the current as loss free as possible out of the cell. However, it is well known that there is a poor contact resistance between the front Ag electrode and the n(+) emitter. Nickel plating was conducted to prevent the increase of contact resistance and the increase of fill factor (FF). The performance of n-Si/Ag (seed layer)/Ni solar cells were observed in 609 mV of open circuit voltage, 35.54 mA/cm2 of short circuit current density, 75.75% of fill factor, and 16.04% of conversion efficiency. PMID:27483859

  16. Metal-Free Sensitizers for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Sumit; Lin, Jiann T

    2016-06-01

    This review focuses on our work on metal-free sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Sensitizers based on D-A'-π-A architecture (D is a donor, A is an acceptor, A' is an electron-deficient entity) exhibit better light harvesting than D-π-A-type sensitizers. However, appropriate molecular design is needed to avoid excessive aggregation of negative charge at the electron-deficient entity upon photoexcitation. Rigidified aromatics, including aromatic segments comprising fused electron-excessive and -deficient units in the spacer, allow effective electronic communication, and good photoinduced charge transfer leads to excellent cell performance. Sensitizers with two anchors/acceptors, D(-π-A)2 , can more efficiently harvest light, inject electrons, and suppress dark current compared with congeners with a single anchor. Appropriate incorporation of heteroaromatic units in the spacer is beneficial to DSSC performance. High-performance, aqueous-based DSSCs can be achieved with a dual redox couple comprising imidazolium iodide and 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-N-oxyl, and/or using dyes of improved wettability through the incorporation of a triethylene oxide methyl ether chain. PMID:27114164

  17. Strains and photovoltaic response in Ta-sputtered Si metal-insulator-semiconductor solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalevic, B.; Murty, K.; Ito, T.; Kalman, Z. H.; Weissmann, S.

    1981-07-01

    Deformation by bending of Si or Si-SiO2 wafers is achieved by sputter deposition of tantalum films. Strains induced at Si-SiO2 interface and in Ta films are investigated using a combination of X-ray diffraction, electron diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Thin Ta film deposits are found to have predominantly a fcc structure, while thicker films have the normal bcc structure with certain admixture of fcc. Film strains generated by the coexistence of the polymorph structure are accommodated by formation of misfit dislocations at the film-Si substrate interface. The effect of the induced stress on the electronic parameters characterizing the Si-SiO2 interface is studied in the metal-oxide-semiconductor structure, and for the effect on photovoltaic response a metal-insulator-semiconductor solar cell configuration is used. Large changes with increasing stress are observed in the values of recombination time, capture cross section, and diffusion length and in sharply decreased conversion efficiency, fill factor, open-circuit voltage, and short-circuit current.

  18. A metallic interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, Diane Mildred

    A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) electrochemically converts the chemical energy of reaction into electrical energy. The commercial success of planar, SOFC stack technology has a number of challenges, one of which is the interconnect that electrically and physically connects the cathode of one cell to the anode of an adjacent cell in the SOFC stack and in addition, separates the anodic and cathodic gases. An SOFC stack operating at intermediate temperatures, between 600°C and 800°C, can utilize a metallic alloy as an interconnect material. Since the interconnect of an SOFC stack must operate in both air and fuel environments, the oxidation kinetics, adherence and electronic resistance of the oxide scales formed on commercial alloys were investigated in air and wet hydrogen under thermal cycling conditions to 800°C. The alloy, Haynes 230, exhibited the slowest oxidation kinetics and the lowest area-specific resistance as a function of oxidation time of all the alloys in air at 800°C. However, the area-specific resistance of the oxide scale formed on Haynes 230 in wet hydrogen was unacceptably high after only 500 hours of oxidation, which was attributed to the high resistivity of Cr2O3 in a reducing atmosphere. A study of the electrical conductivity of the minor phase manganese chromite, MnXCr3-XO4, in the oxide scale of Haynes 230, revealed that a composition closer to Mn2CrO4 had significantly higher electrical conductivity than that closer to MnCr 2O4. Haynes 230 was coated with Mn to form a phase closer to the Mn2CrO4 composition for application on the fuel side of the interconnect. U.S. Patent No. 6,054,231 is pending. Although coating a metallic alloy is inexpensive, the stringent economic requirements of SOFC stack technology required an alloy without coating for production applications. As no commercially available alloy, among the 41 alloys investigated, performed to the specifications required, a new alloy was created and designated DME-A2. The oxide scale

  19. Sustainable landfilling in tropical conditions: comparison between open and closed cell approach.

    PubMed

    Visvanathan, C; Karthikeyan, Obuli P; Park, K H

    2011-04-01

    Two landfill test cells were constructed in a tropical climate using locally available low-cost materials. One cell was operated without a cover on the municipal solid waste to simulate 'open landfill' conditions and the other cell was covered to create 'closed landfill' conditions. Both test cells were monitored over a period of 290 days under rainy, dry and artificial wetting conditions. Due to the relatively high compaction density of waste in the closed test cell, the substrate settlement was gradual and comparatively lower than in the open test cell. Multiple top covers in the closed test cell resulted in significant run-off of incident precipitation during the rainy season, which delayed the waste stabilization and subsequently produced a lesser volume of leachate. On the other hand, operation of the open test cell was found to be advantageous in terms of leachate management and substrate settlement along with waste stabilization pattern. Infiltration of rain-water into the waste mass leached out the maximum organic pollutants and oxidized the nitrogen content, which is deemed to be a benefit of operating an open cell landfill under tropical conditions. Artificial wetting during dry periods by recirculation of stored leachate notably accelerated the waste stabilization and secondary substrate settlement in the open test cell. The continuous monitoring of ground-water quality from the site showed only seasonal variations. PMID:20855353

  20. Guard Cell Chloroplasts Are Essential for Blue Light-Dependent Stomatal Opening in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Takami, Tsuneaki; Ebisu, Yuuta; Watanabe, Harutaka; Iiboshi, Chihoko; Doi, Michio; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Blue light (BL) induces stomatal opening through the activation of H+-ATPases with subsequent ion accumulation in guard cells. In most plant species, red light (RL) enhances BL-dependent stomatal opening. This RL effect is attributable to the chloroplasts of guard cell, the only cells in the epidermis possessing this organelle. To clarify the role of chloroplasts in stomatal regulation, we investigated the effects of RL on BL-dependent stomatal opening in isolated epidermis, guard cell protoplasts, and intact leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. In isolated epidermal tissues and intact leaves, weak BL superimposed on RL enhanced stomatal opening while BL alone was less effective. In guard cell protoplasts, RL enhanced BL-dependent H+-pumping and DCMU, a photosynthetic electron transport inhibitor, eliminated this effect. RL enhanced phosphorylation levels of the H+-ATPase in response to BL, but this RL effect was not suppressed by DCMU. Furthermore, DCMU inhibited both RL-induced and BL-dependent stomatal opening in intact leaves. The photosynthetic rate in leaves correlated positively with BL-dependent stomatal opening in the presence of DCMU. We conclude that guard cell chloroplasts provide ATP and/or reducing equivalents that fuel BL-dependent stomatal opening, and that they indirectly monitor photosynthetic CO2 fixation in mesophyll chloroplasts by absorbing PAR in the epidermis. PMID:25250952

  1. Guard cell chloroplasts are essential for blue light-dependent stomatal opening in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Takami, Tsuneaki; Ebisu, Yuuta; Watanabe, Harutaka; Iiboshi, Chihoko; Doi, Michio; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    Blue light (BL) induces stomatal opening through the activation of H+-ATPases with subsequent ion accumulation in guard cells. In most plant species, red light (RL) enhances BL-dependent stomatal opening. This RL effect is attributable to the chloroplasts of guard cell, the only cells in the epidermis possessing this organelle. To clarify the role of chloroplasts in stomatal regulation, we investigated the effects of RL on BL-dependent stomatal opening in isolated epidermis, guard cell protoplasts, and intact leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. In isolated epidermal tissues and intact leaves, weak BL superimposed on RL enhanced stomatal opening while BL alone was less effective. In guard cell protoplasts, RL enhanced BL-dependent H+-pumping and DCMU, a photosynthetic electron transport inhibitor, eliminated this effect. RL enhanced phosphorylation levels of the H+-ATPase in response to BL, but this RL effect was not suppressed by DCMU. Furthermore, DCMU inhibited both RL-induced and BL-dependent stomatal opening in intact leaves. The photosynthetic rate in leaves correlated positively with BL-dependent stomatal opening in the presence of DCMU. We conclude that guard cell chloroplasts provide ATP and/or reducing equivalents that fuel BL-dependent stomatal opening, and that they indirectly monitor photosynthetic CO2 fixation in mesophyll chloroplasts by absorbing PAR in the epidermis. PMID:25250952

  2. Fluorescent metal nanoshell and CK19 detection on single cell image

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Fu, Yi; Li, Ge; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Zhao, Richard Y.

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} Novel metal nanoshell as fluorescence imaging agent. {yields} Fluorescent mAb-metal complex with enhanced intensity and shortened lifetime. {yields} Immuno-interactions of mAb-metal complexes with CK19 molecules on CNCAP and HeLa cell surfaces. {yields} Isolation of conjugated mAb-metal complexes from cellular autofluorescence on cell image. -- Abstract: In this article, we report the synthesis strategy and optical properties of a novel type of fluorescence metal nanoshell when it was used as imaging agent for fluorescence cell imaging. The metal nanoshells were made with 40 nm silica cores and 10 nm silver shells. Unlike typical fluorescence metal nanoshells which contain the organic dyes in the cores, novel metal nanoshells were composed of Cy5-labelled monoclonal anti-CK19 antibodies (mAbs) on the external surfaces of shells. Optical measurements to the single nanoparticles showed that in comparison with the metal free labelled mAbs, the mAb-Ag complexes displayed significantly enhanced emission intensity and dramatically shortened lifetime due to near-field interactions of fluorophores with metal. These metal nanoshells were found to be able to immunoreact with target cytokeratin 19 (CK19) molecules on the surfaces of LNCAP and HeLa cells. Fluorescence cell images were recorded on a time-resolved confocal microscope. The emissions from the metal nanoprobes could be clearly isolated from the cellular autofluorescence backgrounds on the cell images as either individuals or small clusters due to their stronger emission intensities and shorter lifetimes. These emission signals could also be precisely counted on single cell images. The count number may provide an approach for quantifying the target molecules in the cells.

  3. Optical design of transparent metal grids for plasmonic absorption enhancement in ultrathin organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Inho; Lee, Taek Seong; Jeong, Doo Seok; Lee, Wook Seong; Kim, Won Mok; Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2013-07-01

    Transparent metal grid combining with plasmonic absorption enhancement is a promising replacement to indium tin oxide thin films. We numerically demonstrate metal grids in one or two dimension lead to plasmonic absorption enhancements in ultrathin organic solar cells. In this paper, we study optical design of metal grids for plasmonic light trapping and identify different plasmonic modes of the surface plasmon polaritons excited at the interfaces of glass/metal grids, metal grids/active layers, and the localized surface plasmon resonance of the metal grids using numerical calculations. One dimension metal grids with the optimal design of a width and a period lead to the absorption enhancement in the ultrathin active layers of 20 nm thickness by a factor of 2.6 under transverse electric polarized light compared to the case without the metal grids. Similarly, two dimensional metal grids provide the absorption enhancement by a factor of 1.8 under randomly polarized light. PMID:24104493

  4. Using CellML with OpenCMISS to Simulate Multi-Scale Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, David P.; Ladd, David; Hussan, Jagir R.; Safaei, Soroush; Suresh, Vinod; Hunter, Peter J.; Bradley, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    OpenCMISS is an open-source modeling environment aimed, in particular, at the solution of bioengineering problems. OpenCMISS consists of two main parts: a computational library (OpenCMISS-Iron) and a field manipulation and visualization library (OpenCMISS-Zinc). OpenCMISS is designed for the solution of coupled multi-scale, multi-physics problems in a general-purpose parallel environment. CellML is an XML format designed to encode biophysically based systems of ordinary differential equations and both linear and non-linear algebraic equations. A primary design goal of CellML is to allow mathematical models to be encoded in a modular and reusable format to aid reproducibility and interoperability of modeling studies. In OpenCMISS, we make use of CellML models to enable users to configure various aspects of their multi-scale physiological models. This avoids the need for users to be familiar with the OpenCMISS internal code in order to perform customized computational experiments. Examples of this are: cellular electrophysiology models embedded in tissue electrical propagation models; material constitutive relationships for mechanical growth and deformation simulations; time-varying boundary conditions for various problem domains; and fluid constitutive relationships and lumped-parameter models. In this paper, we provide implementation details describing how CellML models are integrated into multi-scale physiological models in OpenCMISS. The external interface OpenCMISS presents to users is also described, including specific examples exemplifying the extensibility and usability these tools provide the physiological modeling and simulation community. We conclude with some thoughts on future extension of OpenCMISS to make use of other community developed information standards, such as FieldML, SED-ML, and BioSignalML. Plans for the integration of accelerator code (graphical processing unit and field programmable gate array) generated from CellML models is also

  5. Chromatin Condensation and Enucleation in Red Blood Cells: An Open Question.

    PubMed

    Baron, Margaret H; Barminko, Jeffrey

    2016-03-01

    Differentiating erythroid cells undergo dramatic changes in morphology, with reduction in cell size, chromatin and nuclear condensation, and enucleation. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Zhao et al. (2016) show that these events are associated with the formation of transient, recurring nuclear openings and selective histone release mediated by caspase-3. PMID:26954541

  6. Metal Preferences and Metallation*

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Andrew W.; Osman, Deenah; Robinson, Nigel J.

    2014-01-01

    The metal binding preferences of most metalloproteins do not match their metal requirements. Thus, metallation of an estimated 30% of metalloenzymes is aided by metal delivery systems, with ∼25% acquiring preassembled metal cofactors. The remaining ∼70% are presumed to compete for metals from buffered metal pools. Metallation is further aided by maintaining the relative concentrations of these pools as an inverse function of the stabilities of the respective metal complexes. For example, magnesium enzymes always prefer to bind zinc, and these metals dominate the metalloenzymes without metal delivery systems. Therefore, the buffered concentration of zinc is held at least a million-fold below magnesium inside most cells. PMID:25160626

  7. Automatic tracking of red blood cells in micro channels using OpenCV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Vânia; Rodrigues, Pedro J.; Pereira, Ana I.; Lima, Rui

    2013-10-01

    The present study aims to developan automatic method able to track red blood cells (RBCs) trajectories flowing through a microchannel using the Open Source Computer Vision (OpenCV). The developed method is based on optical flux calculation assisted by the maximization of the template-matching product. The experimental results show a good functional performance of this method.

  8. Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure and method of processing

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Jr., Jesse J.; Hirschfeld, Deidre A.; Li, Tingkai

    1993-12-07

    Alkali corrosion resistant coatings and ceramic foams having superfine open cell structure are created using sol-gel processes. The processes have particular application in creating calcium magnesium zirconium phosphate, CMZP, coatings and foams.

  9. Screenable all-metal solar cell electrodes of nickel and copper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, B.; Bickler, D. B.

    1981-01-01

    Screenable thick film solar cell electrodes are made using the all-metal electrode system, which eliminates the commonly used glass frit and substitutes an oxide scavenger such as silver fluoride. The low temperature firing copper metal systems give good results on solar cells obtaining cell efficiencies of 13% AM1, and adhering sintered structures are demonstrated with nickel systems. The potential effect of copper upon cell performance at elevated temperatures over long periods of time is determined, and it is found that the formation of a copper-silicon eutectic at 550 C produces needle-like structures with broad bases on the silicon, extending into and occasionally through the metallization layer.

  10. Transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.

    1984-11-29

    A transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon semiconductors includes a thin layer of metal, such as aluminum or other low work function metal, coated on the amorphous silicon with an antireflective layer coated on the metal. A transparent substrate, such as glass, is positioned on the light reflective layer. The metallic layer is preferably thin enough to transmit at least 50% of light incident thereon, yet thick enough to conduct electricity. The antireflection layer is preferably a transparent material that has a refractive index in the range of 1.8 to 2.2 and is approximately 550A to 600A thick.

  11. Novel Aluminum (Al)-Carbon Nanotube (CNT) Open-Cell Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsi, K.; Krommenhoek, Max; Shamma, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents for the first time the processing of aluminum (Al)-carbon nanotube (CNT) open-cell foams. Al-2wt pct CNT and Al foams were successfully produced using a spark plasma sintering and dissolution process. Al-CNT foams with porosity levels of ~78 pct were produced. The mechanical response of the open-cell foams reveals initial evidence of enhanced damage tolerance of Al-CNT foams over Al foams produced in this study.

  12. Metal foam heat exchangers for thermal management of fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odabaee, M.; Hooman, K.

    2012-05-01

    The present study explores the possibility of using metal foams for thermal management of fuel cells so that air-cooled fuel cell stacks can be commercialized as replacements for currently-available water-cooled counterparts. Experimental studies have been conducted to examine the heat transfer enhancement from a thin metal foam layer sandwiched between two bipolar plates of a cell. To do this, effects of the key parameters including the free stream velocity and characteristics of metal foam such as porosity, permeability, and form drag coefficient on heat and fluid flow are investigated. The improvements as a result of the application of metal foam layers on fuel cell systems efficiency have been analyzed and discussed. Non-optimized results have shown that to remove the same amount of generated heat, the air-cooled fuel cell systems using aluminum foams require half of the pumping power compared to water-cooled fuel cell systems.

  13. THE OPEN CLUSTER CHEMICAL ANALYSIS AND MAPPING SURVEY: LOCAL GALACTIC METALLICITY GRADIENT WITH APOGEE USING SDSS DR10

    SciTech Connect

    Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Thompson, Benjamin; Jackson, Kelly M. E-mail: b.a.thompson1@tcu.edu; and others

    2013-11-01

    The Open Cluster Chemical Analysis and Mapping (OCCAM) survey aims to produce a comprehensive, uniform, infrared-based data set for hundreds of open clusters, and constrain key Galactic dynamical and chemical parameters from this sample. This first contribution from the OCCAM survey presents analysis of 141 members stars in 28 open clusters with high-resolution metallicities derived from a large uniform sample collected as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III/Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment. This sample includes the first high-resolution metallicity measurements for 22 open clusters. With this largest ever uniformly observed sample of open cluster stars we investigate the Galactic disk gradients of both [M/H] and [α/M]. We find basically no gradient in [α/M] across 7.9 kpc ≤ R {sub GC} ≤ 14.5 kpc, but [M/H] does show a gradient for R {sub GC} < 10 kpc and a significant flattening beyond R {sub GC} = 10 kpc. In particular, whereas fitting a single linear trend yields an [M/H] gradient of –0.09 ± 0.03 dex kpc{sup –1}—similar to previously measure gradients inside 13 kpc—by independently fitting inside and outside 10 kpc separately we find a significantly steeper gradient near the Sun (7.9 ≤ R {sub GC} ≤ 10) than previously found (–0.20 ± 0.08 dex kpc{sup –1}) and a nearly flat trend beyond 10 kpc (–0.02 ± 0.09 dex kpc{sup –1})

  14. Enhanced bioaccumulation of heavy metal ions by bacterial cells due to surface display of short metal binding peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Kotrba, P.; Ruml, T.; Doleckova, L.; Lorenzo, V. de

    1999-03-01

    Metal binding peptides of sequences Gly-His-His-Pro-His-Gly (named HP) and Gly-Cys-Gly-Cys-Pro-Cys-Gly-Cys-Gly (named CP) were genetically engineered into LamB protein and expressed in Escherichia coli. The Cd{sup 2+}-to-HP and Cd{sup 2+}-to-CP stoichiometries of peptides were 1:1 and 3:1, respectively. Hybrid LamB proteins were found to be properly folded in the outer membrane of E. coli. Isolated cell envelopes of E. coli bearing newly added metal binding peptides showed an up to 1.8-fold increase in Cd{sup 2+} binding capacity. The bioaccumulation of Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} by E. coli was evaluated. Surface display of CP multiplied the ability of E. coli to bind Cd{sup 2+} from growth medium fourfold. Display of HP peptide did not contribute to an increase in the accumulation of Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}. However, Cu{sup 2+} ceased contribution of HP for Cd{sup 2+} accumulation, probably due to the strong binding of Cu{sup 2+} to HP. Thus, considering the cooperation of cell structures with inserted peptides, the relative affinities of metal binding peptide and, for example, the cell wall to metal ion should be taken into account in the rational design of peptide sequences possessing specificity for a particular metal.

  15. Enhanced Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metal Ions by Bacterial Cells Due to Surface Display of Short Metal Binding Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kotrba, Pavel; Dolečková, Lucie; de Lorenzo, Víctor; Ruml, Tomas

    1999-01-01

    Metal binding peptides of sequences Gly-His-His-Pro-His-Gly (named HP) and Gly-Cys-Gly-Cys-Pro-Cys-Gly-Cys-Gly (named CP) were genetically engineered into LamB protein and expressed in Escherichia coli. The Cd2+-to-HP and Cd2+-to-CP stoichiometries of peptides were 1:1 and 3:1, respectively. Hybrid LamB proteins were found to be properly folded in the outer membrane of E. coli. Isolated cell envelopes of E. coli bearing newly added metal binding peptides showed an up to 1.8-fold increase in Cd2+ binding capacity. The bioaccumulation of Cd2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+ by E. coli was evaluated. Surface display of CP multiplied the ability of E. coli to bind Cd2+ from growth medium fourfold. Display of HP peptide did not contribute to an increase in the accumulation of Cu2+ and Zn2+. However, Cu2+ ceased contribution of HP for Cd2+ accumulation, probably due to the strong binding of Cu2+ to HP. Thus, considering the cooperation of cell structures with inserted peptides, the relative affinities of metal binding peptide and, for example, the cell wall to metal ion should be taken into account in the rational design of peptide sequences possessing specificity for a particular metal. PMID:10049868

  16. Electroless Ni-Cu-P plating onto open cell stainless steel foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Aal, A.; Shehata Aly, M.

    2009-04-01

    Metallic foams with a high fraction of porosity, low density and high energy absorption capacity, are a rapidly emerging class of novel ultralightweight materials for various engineering applications. Development of these materials with Ni-Cu-P coatings is expected to widespread their industrial utilizations. This article aims to apply Ni-Cu-P coatings onto open cell stainless steel foams from Ni-P bath containing CuSO 4·5H 2O as a source of Cu ions. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis were used to investigate the microstructure and chemical composition of the deposited coatings, respectively. The influence of CuSO 4·5H 2O addition on the deposition rate, chemical composition and surface morphology of coatings was studied. The corrosion performance of coated foam was examined in 1 M HCl using weight loss technique. The results revealed that wt.% of Cu in deposit increases with CuSO 4·5H 2O concentration, while wt.% of Ni and P is reduced. Better corrosion resistance, finer-grained deposit and lower deposition rate were observed by increasing Cu content into Ni-P matrix.

  17. Laser beam welding of CuZn open-cell foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biffi, C. A.; Colombo, D.; Tuissi, A.

    2014-11-01

    Porous metallic materials with cellular structures combine many physical and functional characteristics. This mixture of different properties makes these materials very attractive for the development of advanced applications, which are especially important in the biomedical, structural and functional engineering, and electrochemical fields. Because of their cellular structure, unconventional processing is becoming increasingly important for promoting the industrial applications of these materials. In this work, the welding of open-cell Cu60Zn40 [wt%] foams using a 1 kW continuous-wave fibre laser was investigated. During welding tests performed in the bead-on-plate configuration, a deterioration of the cellular structure was observed, with poor evidence for the joining of surfaces. In contrast, tests performed in the lap-joint configuration resulted in successful welding using a 1-mm-thick plate of the same material as the foams. The effect of the process speed on the geometrical characteristics of the transverse section of the joints was studied, and the heat-affected zone was evaluated via a hardness test. Finally, a compositional analysis of the weld bead was performed using a scanning electron microscope coupled with an energy dispersive spectrometer. The results of this study indicate that welding processes using a fibre laser can be utilised to join Cu-based foams. Weld beads in the lap-joint configuration were achieved due to the thin plate material filling the pore voids.

  18. Fluorescent metal nanoshell and CK19 detection on single cell image.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Fu, Yi; Li, Ge; Lakowicz, Joseph R; Zhao, Richard Y

    2011-09-16

    In this article, we report the synthesis strategy and optical properties of a novel type of fluorescence metal nanoshell when it was used as imaging agent for fluorescence cell imaging. The metal nanoshells were made with 40 nm silica cores and 10nm silver shells. Unlike typical fluorescence metal nanoshells which contain the organic dyes in the cores, novel metal nanoshells were composed of Cy5-labelled monoclonal anti-CK19 antibodies (mAbs) on the external surfaces of shells. Optical measurements to the single nanoparticles showed that in comparison with the metal free labelled mAbs, the mAb-Ag complexes displayed significantly enhanced emission intensity and dramatically shortened lifetime due to near-field interactions of fluorophores with metal. These metal nanoshells were found to be able to immunoreact with target cytokeratin 19 (CK19) molecules on the surfaces of LNCAP and HeLa cells. Fluorescence cell images were recorded on a time-resolved confocal microscope. The emissions from the metal nanoprobes could be clearly isolated from the cellular autofluorescence backgrounds on the cell images as either individuals or small clusters due to their stronger emission intensities and shorter lifetimes. These emission signals could also be precisely counted on single cell images. The count number may provide an approach for quantifying the target molecules in the cells. PMID:21867692

  19. Effects of metals Cu, Fe, Ni, V, and Zn on rat lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Riley, Mark R; Boesewetter, Dianne E; Kim, Aana M; Sirvent, Francisco P

    2003-08-28

    Inhalation of combustion-derived particulate matter can have a variety of negative impacts on human health. Metals are known to play a substantial role in these effects, however, the interactions between cellular responses caused by multiple metals is not well understood. The impact of metals (Zn, Cu, Ni, V, and Fe) individually and in combination on a rat lung epithelial cell line (RLE-6TN) was evaluated. Quantifications involved measurement of inhibition of cell culture metabolism (mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase activity), cell death, mechanisms of cell death, and cytokine secretion. The ranking of metal toxicity based on TC(50) values is V>Zn>Cu>Ni>Fe. Interactions were observed for exposures containing multiple metals: Zn+V, Zn+Cu, Zn+Fe, and Zn+Ni. Zn appears to diminish the negative impact of V and Cu; has an additive effect with Ni, and has no substantial effect on Fe toxicity. PMID:12927373

  20. Efficient Nanostructured 'Black' Silicon Solar Cell by Copper-Catalyzed Metal-Assisted Etching

    SciTech Connect

    Toor, Fatima; Oh, Jihun; Branz, Howard M.

    2014-09-13

    Here, we produce low-reflectivity nanostructured ‘black’ silicon (bSi) using copper (Cu) nanoparticles as the catalyst for metal-assisted etching and demonstrate a 17.0%-efficient Cu-etched bSi solar cell without any vacuum-deposited anti-reflection coating. We found that the concentration ratio of HF to H2O2 in the etch solution provides control of the nanostructure morphology. The solar-spectrum-weighted average reflection (Rave) for bSi is as low as 3.1% on Cu-etched planar samples; we achieve lower reflectivity by nanostructuring of micron-scale pyramids. Successful Cu-based anti-reflection etching requires a concentration ratio [HF]/[H2O2] ≥ 3. Our 17.0%-efficient Cu-etched bSi photovoltaic cell with a pyramid-texture has a Rave of 3% and an open circuit voltage (Voc) of 616 mV that might be further improved by reducing near-surface phosphorus (P) densities.

  1. The isolation of cell derived extracellular matrix constructs using sacrificial open-cell foams.

    PubMed

    Wolchok, Jeffrey C; Tresco, Patrick A

    2010-12-01

    Extracellular matrix derived from human and animal tissues is being used to repair and reconstruct a variety of tissues clinically. The utility of such constructs is limited by the geometry, composition and constitutive properties of the tissue or organ from which the ECM is harvested. To address this limitation, we have developed an approach to isolate extracellular matrix in bulk from populations of living cells grown in culture on three-dimensional substrates. Human biopsy derived fibroblasts were seeded within open-cell foams and cultured in-vitro for periods up to three weeks, after which the synthetic component was removed by incubation in a water miscible solvent. After several wash steps and lyophilization, a white, lacy, multi-molecular construct was isolated. Tandem mass spectroscopy showed that it contained 22 extracellular matrix constituents, including such proteins and proteoglycans as collagen type I and type III, fibronectin, transforming growth factor beta, decorin and biglycan among others. On average 47 mg of construct was isolated for each gram of synthetic substrate initially seeded with cells. The biomaterial harvested from human tracheal fibroblasts had an elastic modulus (250 kPa) and a composition similar to that of human vocal fold tissue, and supported reseeding with human tracheal derived fibroblasts. An important finding was that the approach was useful in isolating ECM from a variety of cell lineages and developmental stages including skin fibroblasts, brain derived astrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells. The results, together with the archival literature, suggest that the approach can be used to produce a range of cell derived constructs with unique physical and chemical attributes for a variety of research and medical applications. PMID:20950855

  2. Visualizing metal ions in cells: an overview of analytical techniques, approaches, and probes

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Kevin M.; Qin, Yan; Palmer, Amy E.

    2012-01-01

    Quantifying the amount and defining the location of metal ions in cells and organisms are critical steps in understanding metal homeostasis and how dyshomeostasis causes or is a consequence of disease. A number of recent advances have been made in the development and application of analytical methods to visualize metal ions in biological specimens. Here, we briefly summarize these advances before focusing in more depth on probes for examining transition metals in living cells with high spatial and temporal resolution using fluorescence microscopy. PMID:22521452

  3. Metal ion transport quantified by ICP-MS in intact cells

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Julio A. Landero; Stiner, Cory A.; Radzyukevich, Tatiana L.; Heiny, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    The use of ICP-MS to measure metal ion content in biological tissues offers a highly sensitive means to study metal-dependent physiological processes. Here we describe the application of ICP-MS to measure membrane transport of Rb and K ions by the Na,K-ATPase in mouse skeletal muscles and human red blood cells. The ICP-MS method provides greater precision and statistical power than possible with conventional tracer flux methods. The method is widely applicable to studies of other metal ion transporters and metal-dependent processes in a range of cell types and conditions. PMID:26838181

  4. Openings

    PubMed Central

    Selwyn, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing his clinic patient schedule for the day, a physician reflects on the history of a young woman he has been caring for over the past 9 years. What starts out as a routine visit then turns into a unique opening for communication and connection. A chance glimpse out the window of the exam room leads to a deeper meditation on parenthood, survival, and healing, not only for the patient but also for the physician. How many missed opportunities have we all had, without even realizing it, to allow this kind of fleeting but profound opening? PMID:26195687

  5. Openings.

    PubMed

    Selwyn, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing his clinic patient schedule for the day, a physician reflects on the history of a young woman he has been caring for over the past 9 years. What starts out as a routine visit then turns into a unique opening for communication and connection. A chance glimpse out the window of the exam room leads to a deeper meditation on parenthood, survival, and healing, not only for the patient but also for the physician. How many missed opportunities have we all had, without even realizing it, to allow this kind of fleeting but profound opening? PMID:26195687

  6. Shear Modulus for Nonisotropic, Open-Celled Foams Using a General Elongated Kelvin Foam Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2008-01-01

    An equation for the shear modulus for nonisotropic, open-celled foams in the plane transverse to the elongation (rise) direction is derived using an elongated Kelvin foam model with the most general geometric description. The shear modulus was found to be a function of the unit cell dimensions, the solid material properties, and the cell edge cross-section properties. The shear modulus equation reduces to the relation derived by others for isotropic foams when the unit cell is equiaxed.

  7. Engineered metal nanoparticles in the sub-nanomolar levels kill cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Vodyanoy, Vitaly; Daniels, Yasmine; Pustovyy, Oleg; MacCrehan, William A; Muramoto, Shin; Stan, Gheorghe

    2016-01-01

    Background Small metal nanoparticles obtained from animal blood were observed to be toxic to cultured cancer cells, whereas noncancerous cells were much less affected. In this work, engineered zinc and copper metal nanoparticles were produced from bulk metal rods by an underwater high-voltage discharge method. The metal nanoparticles were characterized by atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The metal nanoparticles, with estimated diameters of 1 nm–2 nm, were determined to be more than 85% nonoxidized. A cell viability assay and high-resolution light microscopy showed that exposure of RG2, cultured rat brain glioma cancer cells, to the zinc and copper nanoparticles resulted in cell morphological changes, including decreased cell adherence, shrinking/rounding, nuclear condensation, and budding from cell bodies. The metal-induced cell injuries were similar to the effects of staurosporine, an active apoptotic reagent. The viability experiments conducted for zinc and copper yielded values of dissociation constants of 0.22±0.08 nmol/L (standard error [SE]) and 0.12±0.02 nmol/L (SE), respectively. The noncancerous astrocytes were not affected at the same conditions. Because metal nanoparticles were lethal to the cancer cells at sub-nanomolar concentrations, they are potentially important as nanomedicine. Purpose Lethal concentrations of synthetic metal nanoparticles reported in the literature are a few orders of magnitude higher than the natural, blood-isolated metal nanoparticles; therefore, in this work, engineered metal nanoparticles were examined to mimic the properties of endogenous metal nanoparticles. Materials and methods RG2, rat brain glioma cells CTX TNA2 brain rat astrocytes, obtained from the American Type Culture Collection, high-voltage discharge, atomic force microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution light microscopy, zeta potential measurements, and 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium

  8. Opening Study on the Development of a New Biosensor for Metal Toxicity Based on Pseudomonas fluorescens Pyoverdine.

    PubMed

    Chiadò, Alessandro; Varani, Luca; Bosco, Francesca; Marmo, Luca

    2013-01-01

    To date, different kinds of biosensing elements have been used effectively for environmental monitoring. Microbial cells seem to be well-suited for this task: they are cheap, adaptable to variable field conditions and give a measurable response to a broad number of chemicals. Among different pollutants, heavy metals are still a major problem for the environment. A reasonable starting point for the selection of a biorecognition element to develop a biosensor for metals could be that of a microorganism that exhibits good mechanisms to cope with metals. Pseudomonads are characterized by the secretion of siderophores (e.g., pyoverdine), low-molecular weight compounds that chelate Fe3+ during iron starvation. Pyoverdine is easily detected by colorimetric assay, and it is suitable for simple online measurements. In this work, in order to evaluate pyoverdine as a biorecognition element for metal detection, the influence of metal ions (Fe3+, Cu2+, Zn2+), but also of temperature, pH and nutrients, on microbial growth and pyoverdine regulation has been studied in P. fluorescens. Each of these variables has been shown to influence the synthesis of siderophore: for instance, the lower the temperature, the higher the production of pyoverdine. Moreover, the concentration of pyoverdine produced in the presence of metals has been compared with the maximum allowable concentrations indicated in international regulations (e.g., 98/83/EC), and a correlation that could be useful to build a colorimetric biosensor has been observed. PMID:25586414

  9. Opening Study on the Development of a New Biosensor for Metal Toxicity Based on Pseudomonas fluorescens Pyoverdine

    PubMed Central

    Chiadò, Alessandro; Varani, Luca; Bosco, Francesca; Marmo, Luca

    2013-01-01

    To date, different kinds of biosensing elements have been used effectively for environmental monitoring. Microbial cells seem to be well-suited for this task: they are cheap, adaptable to variable field conditions and give a measurable response to a broad number of chemicals. Among different pollutants, heavy metals are still a major problem for the environment. A reasonable starting point for the selection of a biorecognition element to develop a biosensor for metals could be that of a microorganism that exhibits good mechanisms to cope with metals. Pseudomonads are characterized by the secretion of siderophores (e.g., pyoverdine), low-molecular weight compounds that chelate Fe3+ during iron starvation. Pyoverdine is easily detected by colorimetric assay, and it is suitable for simple online measurements. In this work, in order to evaluate pyoverdine as a biorecognition element for metal detection, the influence of metal ions (Fe3+, Cu2+, Zn2+), but also of temperature, pH and nutrients, on microbial growth and pyoverdine regulation has been studied in P. fluorescens. Each of these variables has been shown to influence the synthesis of siderophore: for instance, the lower the temperature, the higher the production of pyoverdine. Moreover, the concentration of pyoverdine produced in the presence of metals has been compared with the maximum allowable concentrations indicated in international regulations (e.g., 98/83/EC), and a correlation that could be useful to build a colorimetric biosensor has been observed. PMID:25586414

  10. Graphene on a metal surface with an h-BN buffer layer: gap opening and N-doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Lu, Yunhao; Feng, Y. P.

    2016-04-01

    Graphene grown on a metal surface, Cu(111), with a boron-nitride (h-BN) buffer layer is studied. Our first-principles calculations reveal that charge is transferred from the copper substrate to graphene through the h-BN buffer layer which results in n-doped graphene in the absence of a gate voltage. More importantly, a gap of 0.2 eV, which is comparable to that of a typical narrow gap semiconductor, opens just 0.5 eV below the Fermi level at the Dirac point. The Fermi level can be easily shifted inside this gap to make graphene a semiconductor, which is crucial for graphene-based electronic devices. A graphene-based p-n junction can be realized with graphene eptaxially grown on a metal surface.

  11. Highly Selective Adsorption of Ethylene over Ethane in a MOF Featuring the Combination of Open Metal Site and -Complexation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yiming; Li, Baiyan; Wu, Zili; Ma, Shengqian

    2015-01-09

    The introduction of the combination of open metal site (OMS) and -complexation into MOF has led to very high ethylene/ethane adsorption selectivity at 318K, as illustrated in the context of MIL-101-Cr-SO3Ag. The interactions with ethylene from both OMS and -complexation in MIL-101-Cr-SO3Ag have been investigated by in situ IR spectroscopic studies and computational calculations, which suggest -complexation contributes dominantly to the high ethylene/ethane adsorption selectivity.

  12. Comparison of Selected Metals Content in Cambodian Striped Snakehead Fish (Channa striata) Using Solar Drying System and Open Sun Drying

    PubMed Central

    Abu Bakar, Nur Faizah; Fudholi, Ahmad; Ruslan, Mohd Hafidz; Saroeun, Im

    2015-01-01

    The content of 12 elements in Cambodian dried striped snakehead fish was determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The present study compares the level of the trace toxic metals and nutritional trace elements in the fish processed using solar drying system (SDS) and open sun drying (OSD). The skin of SDS fish has lower level of As, Pb, and Cd compared to the OSD sample. As such, the flesh of the fish accumulated higher amount of toxic metals during OSD compared to SDS. However, arsenic was detected in both samples within the safe limit. The nutritional elements (Fe, Mn, Mg, Se, Mo, Cu, Ni, and Cr) were higher in the skin sample SDS fish compared to OSD fish. These beneficial metals were not accumulated in the flesh sample SDS fish demonstrating lower level compared to drying under conventional system. The reddish coloration of the SDS fish was due to the presence of high Cu content in both the skin and flesh samples which possibly account for no mold formation 5 days after packaging. As conclusion, drying of Cambodian C. striata using solar-assisted system has proven higher content of the nutritious elements compared to using the conventional system despite only slight difference in the toxic metals level between the two systems. PMID:25688274

  13. Soil criteria to protect terrestrial wildlife and open-range livestock from metal toxicity at mining sites.

    PubMed

    Ford, Karl L; Beyer, W Nelson

    2014-03-01

    Thousands of hard rock mines exist in the western USA and in other parts of the world as a result of historic and current gold, silver, lead, and mercury mining. Many of these sites in the USA are on public lands. Typical mine waste associated with these sites are tailings and waste rock dumps that may be used by wildlife and open-range livestock. This report provides wildlife screening criteria levels for metals in soil and mine waste to evaluate risk and to determine the need for site-specific risk assessment, remediation, or a change in management practices. The screening levels are calculated from toxicity reference values based on maximum tolerable levels of metals in feed, on soil and plant ingestion rates, and on soil to plant uptake factors for a variety of receptors. The metals chosen for this report are common toxic metals found at mining sites: arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, and zinc. The resulting soil screening values are well above those developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The difference in values was mainly a result of using toxicity reference values that were more specific to the receptors addressed rather than the most sensitive receptor. PMID:24310366

  14. Comparison of selected metals content in Cambodian striped snakehead fish (Channa striata) using solar drying system and open sun drying.

    PubMed

    Basri, Dayang Fredalina; Abu Bakar, Nur Faizah; Fudholi, Ahmad; Ruslan, Mohd Hafidz; Saroeun, Im

    2015-01-01

    The content of 12 elements in Cambodian dried striped snakehead fish was determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The present study compares the level of the trace toxic metals and nutritional trace elements in the fish processed using solar drying system (SDS) and open sun drying (OSD). The skin of SDS fish has lower level of As, Pb, and Cd compared to the OSD sample. As such, the flesh of the fish accumulated higher amount of toxic metals during OSD compared to SDS. However, arsenic was detected in both samples within the safe limit. The nutritional elements (Fe, Mn, Mg, Se, Mo, Cu, Ni, and Cr) were higher in the skin sample SDS fish compared to OSD fish. These beneficial metals were not accumulated in the flesh sample SDS fish demonstrating lower level compared to drying under conventional system. The reddish coloration of the SDS fish was due to the presence of high Cu content in both the skin and flesh samples which possibly account for no mold formation 5 days after packaging. As conclusion, drying of Cambodian C. striata using solar-assisted system has proven higher content of the nutritious elements compared to using the conventional system despite only slight difference in the toxic metals level between the two systems. PMID:25688274

  15. Development of inexpensive metal macrocyclic complexes for use in fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.; Kosek, J.A.; Cropley, C.C.; Hamdan, M.

    1998-01-01

    Several metal macrocyclic complexes were synthesized for use as catalysts in fuel cells. An initial evaluation of their ability to catalyze the fuel cell reactions were completed. Based on this initial evaluation, one metal macrocyclic catalyst was selected and long-term stability testing in a fuel cell was initiated. The fuel cell employing this catalyst was operated continuously for one year with little signs of catalyst degradation. The effect of synthetic reformates on the performance of the catalyst in the fuel cell environment also demonstrated high tolerance of this catalyst for common contaminants and poisons.

  16. Density functional theory embedding for correlated wavefunctions: Improved methods for open-shell systems and transition metal complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodpaster, Jason D.; Barnes, Taylor A.; Manby, Frederick R.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2012-12-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) embedding provides a formally exact framework for interfacing correlated wave-function theory (WFT) methods with lower-level descriptions of electronic structure. Here, we report techniques to improve the accuracy and stability of WFT-in-DFT embedding calculations. In particular, we develop spin-dependent embedding potentials in both restricted and unrestricted orbital formulations to enable WFT-in-DFT embedding for open-shell systems, and develop an orbital-occupation-freezing technique to improve the convergence of optimized effective potential calculations that arise in the evaluation of the embedding potential. The new techniques are demonstrated in applications to the van-der-Waals-bound ethylene-propylene dimer and to the hexa-aquairon(II) transition-metal cation. Calculation of the dissociation curve for the ethylene-propylene dimer reveals that WFT-in-DFT embedding reproduces full CCSD(T) energies to within 0.1 kcal/mol at all distances, eliminating errors in the dispersion interactions due to conventional exchange-correlation (XC) functionals while simultaneously avoiding errors due to subsystem partitioning across covalent bonds. Application of WFT-in-DFT embedding to the calculation of the low-spin/high-spin splitting energy in the hexaaquairon(II) cation reveals that the majority of the dependence on the DFT XC functional can be eliminated by treating only the single transition-metal atom at the WFT level; furthermore, these calculations demonstrate the substantial effects of open-shell contributions to the embedding potential, and they suggest that restricted open-shell WFT-in-DFT embedding provides better accuracy than unrestricted open-shell WFT-in-DFT embedding due to the removal of spin contamination.

  17. Trace metal determinations by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis in the open Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Diether; Gerwinski, Wolfgang; Radke, Ina

    1993-02-01

    The Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC), as a major component of its programme "Global Investigation of Pollution in the Marine Environment" (GIPME), maintains a long-standing project on "Open Ocean Baseline Studies of Trace Contaminants". Initially, the Atlantic Ocean and trace metals were selected. A first cruise with the RVMeteor to the eastern parts of the south and north Atlantic Ocean was successfully organized, in March and April 1990, from Cape Town (South Africa) to Funchal (Madeira, Portugal). Thirteen scientists from laboratories in Europe and North America participated with the first author as coordinator. Four deep-water stations in the Cape Basin, Angola Basin, Cape Verde Abyssal Plain and Seine Abyssal Plain were regularly sampled for at least 36 depths. Additional samples were taken between stations. Samples were distributed to participants and a similar number of additional laboratories. As a central part of our own contribution to the project, we determined the trace heavy metals manganese, nickel, copper, zinc and lead and the lighter selenium by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis. Additional methods applied, interalia, were anodic stripping voltammetry for lead and cadmium and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) for cadmium, using two different extraction procedures. For the TXRF, the pre-enrichment of the trace metals and the separation from the salt matrix were performed by complexation with sodium dibenzyldithiocarbamate and reverse-phase chromatography. Generally, very low levels of trace elements were found in filtered and unaltered water samples from these remote areas of the open Atlantic Ocean. Typical examples of the distributions of trace metal concentrations on depth profiles from the four deep-water stations as well as intercomparisons between the stations are presented.

  18. Thin-film solar cell fabricated on a flexible metallic substrate

    DOEpatents

    Tuttle, John R.; Noufi, Rommel; Hasoon, Falah S.

    2006-05-30

    A thin-film solar cell (10) is provided. The thin-film solar cell (10) comprises a flexible metallic substrate (12) having a first surface and a second surface. A back metal contact layer (16) is deposited on the first surface of the flexible metallic substrate (12). A semiconductor absorber layer (14) is deposited on the back metal contact. A photoactive film deposited on the semiconductor absorber layer (14) forms a heterojunction structure and a grid contact (24) deposited on the heterjunction structure. The flexible metal substrate (12) can be constructed of either aluminium or stainless steel. Furthermore, a method of constructing a solar cell is provided. The method comprises providing an aluminum substrate (12), depositing a semiconductor absorber layer (14) on the aluminum substrate (12), and insulating the aluminum substrate (12) from the semiconductor absorber layer (14) to inhibit reaction between the aluminum substrate (12) and the semiconductor absorber layer (14).

  19. Thin-Film Solar Cell Fabricated on a Flexible Metallic Substrate

    DOEpatents

    Tuttle, J. R.; Noufi, R.; Hasoon, F. S.

    2006-05-30

    A thin-film solar cell (10) is provided. The thin-film solar cell (10) comprises a flexible metallic substrate (12) having a first surface and a second surface. A back metal contact layer (16) is deposited on the first surface of the flexible metallic substrate (12). A semiconductor absorber layer (14) is deposited on the back metal contact. A photoactive film deposited on the semiconductor absorber layer (14) forms a heterojunction structure and a grid contact (24) deposited on the heterjunction structure. The flexible metal substrate (12) can be constructed of either aluminium or stainless steel. Furthermore, a method of constructing a solar cell is provided. The method comprises providing an aluminum substrate (12), depositing a semiconductor absorber layer (14) on the aluminum substrate (12), and insulating the aluminum substrate (12) from the semiconductor absorber layer (14) to inhibit reaction between the aluminum substrate (12) and the semiconductor absorber layer (14).

  20. Studies of silicon p-n junction solar cells. [open circuit photovoltage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.

    1976-01-01

    Single crystal silicon p-n junction solar cells made with low resistivity substrates show poorer solar energy conversion efficiency than traditional theory predicts. The physical mechanisms responsible for this discrepancy are identified and characterized. The open circuit voltage in shallow junction cells of about 0.1 ohm/cm substrate resistivity is investigated under AMO (one sun) conditions.

  1. 77 FR 18243 - Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC); Notice of Open Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC); Notice of Open Meeting AGENCY: Office of Energy... announces a meeting of the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory Committee (HTAC). The Federal Advisory...., Washington, DC 20585. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of the Committee: The Hydrogen and Fuel...

  2. Metal complex-based electron-transfer mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, C. Michael; Sapp, Shawn A.; Bignozzi, Carlo Alberto; Contado, Cristiano; Caramori, Stefano

    2006-03-28

    This present invention provides a metal-ligand complex and methods for using and preparing the same. In particular, the metal-ligand complex of the present invention is of the formula: L.sub.a-M-X.sub.b where L, M, X, a, and b are those define herein. The metal-ligand complexes of the present invention are useful in a variety of applications including as electron-transfer mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells and related photoelectrochromic devices.

  3. Giant cell interstitial pneumonia in a hard-metal worker. Cytologic, histologic and analytical electron microscopic investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Tabatowski, K.; Roggli, V.L.; Fulkerson, W.J.; Langley, R.L.; Benning, T.; Johnston, W.W.

    1988-03-01

    A case of biopsy-proven giant cell interstitial pneumonia in a patient with occupational exposure to hard-metal dust is reported. Bronchial washings performed several days prior to open-lung biopsy yielded an almost exclusive population of nonpigmented alveolar macrophages and pleomorphic, phagocytic multinucleated giant cells. Microorganisms, viral inclusions in the giant cells, epithelioid histiocytes and well-formed granulomas were not seen. This cytologic picture strongly suggests the presence of giant cell interstitial pneumonia in a patient with restrictive lung disease, particularly when exposure to hard-metal dust is known or suspected. A specific diagnosis early in the course of the disease may facilitate removal of the individual from the workplace and forestall the development of end-stage interstitial fibrosis. Additionally, the working environment may be modified to minimize inhalational exposure. Recognition of this entity by the cytopathologist may direct diagnostic efforts toward accurate histologic evaluation and the identification of particulates by microprobe analysis of either cellular or biopsy material.

  4. Open questions: The disrupted circuitry of the cancer cell

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, H. Steven

    2014-10-18

    Every new decade of biology brings with it a change in outlook driven by new technologies and fresh perspectives. Such is the case for cancer and how we consider the disease. The advent of molecular biology led to the identification of altered signaling molecules and 'oncogenes' that were proposed to drive uncontrolled cell proliferation. The rise of cell biology and new imaging and culturing technologies led to the idea that disruptions in the extracellular environment prime cells for transformation. In the current genomics era, cancer is most commonly seen as a genetic disorder where an unstable genome gives rise to a variety of different cell variants that are selected for proliferation and survival. All of these views are partially correct, of course, and are simply different ways of saying that genetic alterations in cancer cells result in a loss of growth homeostasis. They also take the view that molecular changes 'drive' a cell to grow uncontrollably, rather than tip the balance from one normal state (quiescence) to another (proliferation). Underlying this oversimplification is a profound ignorance of what controls homeostatic cell growth in the first place and how specific mutations impact it. Normal, proliferation-competent cells can accurately monitor their environment and respond appropriately to perturbation, whether it is a loss of neighbors or an inflammatory stimulus. Cancer cells either proliferate or refuse to die where and when they should not, which clearly indicates that they have problems in detecting or responding to their environment. Thus, an enormous amount of effort has gone into defining the signaling pathways that can trigger a proliferative response and the biochemical mechanisms underlying these pathways. Far less work has focused on understanding the higher-order logic of these pathways and the roles played by all of the components as part of an integrated system. In other words, we do not really understand how cells process

  5. Metal ion-induced toxic histamine release from human basophils and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Schedle, A; Samorapoompichit, P; Füreder, W; Rausch-Fan, X H; Franz, A; Sperr, W R; Sperr, W; Slavicek, R; Simak, S; Klepetko, W; Ellinger, A; Ghannadan, M; Baghestanian, M; Valent, P

    1998-03-15

    Recent data suggest that distinct metal ions can be released from dental alloys or other biomaterials, and may cause toxic effects on various cells. In this study, the effects of 14 metal ions on histamine release from human blood basophils (n = 4), isolated tissue mast cells (lung n = 8, uterus n = 2, skin n = 1, gingiva n = 1), the basophil cell line KU-812, and the mast cell line HMC-1 were analyzed. Of the 14 metal ions, Ag+ (0.33 mM) and Hg2+ (0.33 mM) were found to induce release of histamine in blood basophils, KU-812, mast cells, and HMC-1. The effects of Ag+ and Hg2+ were dose dependent and were observed within 60 min of incubation. In primary mast cells and basophils, AU3+ (0.33 mM) also induced histamine release, whereas no effects of Au3+ on HMC-1 or KU-812 cells were seen. The other metal ions showed no effects on primary or immortal cells within 60 min. However, Pt4+ (0.33 mM) induced histamine liberation in HMC-1 and lung mast cells after 12 h. The Ag+- and Hg2+-induced rapid release of histamine from HMC-1 was associated with ultrastructural signs of necrosis, but not apoptosis. In contrast, prolonged exposure to Pt4+ (0.33 mM, 14 h) induced apoptotic cell death in HMC-1 cells, as assessed by electron microscopy and DNA analysis. Together, certain metal ions induce distinct cytopathogenic effects in mast cells and basophils. Whereas Ag+, Hg2+, and Au3+ cause direct toxicity, Pt4 causes cell death through induction of apoptosis. Whether such effects contribute to local adverse reactions to metal-containing biomaterials in vivo remains to be determined. PMID:9492216

  6. Metallic sulfide additives for positive electrode material within a secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Walsh, William J.; McPheeters, Charles C.; Yao, Neng-ping; Koura, Kobuyuki

    1976-01-01

    An improved active material for use within the positive electrode of a secondary electrochemical cell includes a mixture of iron disulfide and a sulfide of a polyvalent metal. Various metal sulfides, particularly sulfides of cobalt, nickel, copper, cerium and manganese, are added in minor weight proportion in respect to iron disulfide for improving the electrode performance and reducing current collector requirements.

  7. Simplified process for leaching precious metals from fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Shore, Lawrence; Matlin, Ramail

    2009-12-22

    The membrane electrode assemblies of fuel cells are recycled to recover the catalyst precious metals from the assemblies. The assemblies are cryogenically embrittled and pulverized to form a powder. The pulverized assemblies are then mixed with a surfactant to form a paste which is contacted with an acid solution to leach precious metals from the pulverized membranes.

  8. Metallic Nickel Nanoparticles May Exhibit Higher Carcinogenic Potential than Fine Particles in JB6 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Linda; Zou, Baobo; Mao, Guochuan; Xu, Jin; Castranova, Vincent; Zhao, Jinshun; Ding, Min

    2014-01-01

    While numerous studies have described the pathogenic and carcinogenic effects of nickel compounds, little has been done on the biological effects of metallic nickel. Moreover, the carcinogenetic potential of metallic nickel nanoparticles is unknown. Activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) have been shown to play pivotal roles in tumor initiation, promotion, and progression. Mutation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene is considered to be one of the steps leading to the neoplastic state. The present study examines effects of metallic nickel fine and nanoparticles on tumor promoter or suppressor gene expressions as well as on cell transformation in JB6 cells. Our results demonstrate that metallic nickel nanoparticles caused higher activation of AP-1 and NF-κB, and a greater decrease of p53 transcription activity than fine particles. Western blot indicates that metallic nickel nanoparticles induced a higher level of protein expressions for R-Ras, c-myc, C-Jun, p65, and p50 in a time-dependent manner. In addition, both metallic nickel nano- and fine particles increased anchorage-independent colony formation in JB6 P+ cells in the soft agar assay. These results imply that metallic nickel fine and nanoparticles are both carcinogenetic in vitro in JB6 cells. Moreover, metallic nickel nanoparticles may exhibit higher carcinogenic potential, which suggests that precautionary measures should be taken in the use of nickel nanoparticles or its compounds in nanomedicine. PMID:24691273

  9. ROS Regulation of Polar Growth in Plant Cells1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mangano, Silvina; Juárez, Silvina Paola Denita

    2016-01-01

    Root hair cells and pollen tubes, like fungal hyphae, possess a typical tip or polar cell expansion with growth limited to the apical dome. Cell expansion needs to be carefully regulated to produce a correct shape and size. Polar cell growth is sustained by oscillatory feedback loops comprising three main components that together play an important role regulating this process. One of the main components are reactive oxygen species (ROS) that, together with calcium ions (Ca2+) and pH, sustain polar growth over time. Apoplastic ROS homeostasis controlled by NADPH oxidases as well as by secreted type III peroxidases has a great impact on cell wall properties during cell expansion. Polar growth needs to balance a focused secretion of new materials in an extending but still rigid cell wall in order to contain turgor pressure. In this review, we discuss the gaps in our understanding of how ROS impact on the oscillatory Ca2+ and pH signatures that, coordinately, allow root hair cells and pollen tubes to expand in a controlled manner to several hundred times their original size toward specific signals. PMID:27208283

  10. Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Based Multimodal Sensor for In vivo Brain Function Imaging with a Function for Simultaneous Cell Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagawa, Ayato; Mitani, Masahiro; Minami, Hiroki; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2010-04-01

    We have developed a multimodal complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor device embedded with Au electrodes for fluorescent imaging and cell stimulation in the deep brain of mice. The Au electrodes were placed on the pixel array of the image sensor. Windows over the photodiodes were opened in the electrode area for simultaneous fluorescent imaging and cell stimulation in the same area of the brain tissue. The sensor chip was shaped like a shank and was packaged by two packaging methods for high strength or minimal invasion. The experimental results showed that the 90 ×90 µm2 Au electrodes with windows were capable of injecting theta burst stimulation (TBS)-like current pulses at 0.2-1 mA in a saline solution. We successfully demonstrated that fluorescent imaging and TBS-like current injection can be simultaneously performed in the electrode area of a brain phantom.

  11. Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Based Multimodal Sensor for In vivo Brain Function Imaging with a Function for Simultaneous Cell Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayato Tagawa,; Masahiro Mitani,; Hiroki Minami,; Toshihiko Noda,; Kiyotaka Sasagawa,; Takashi Tokuda,; Jun Ohta,

    2010-04-01

    We have developed a multimodal complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) sensor device embedded with Au electrodes for fluorescent imaging and cell stimulation in the deep brain of mice. The Au electrodes were placed on the pixel array of the image sensor. Windows over the photodiodes were opened in the electrode area for simultaneous fluorescent imaging and cell stimulation in the same area of the brain tissue. The sensor chip was shaped like a shank and was packaged by two packaging methods for high strength or minimal invasion. The experimental results showed that the 90 × 90 μm2 Au electrodes with windows were capable of injecting theta burst stimulation (TBS)-like current pulses at 0.2-1 mA in a saline solution. We successfully demonstrated that fluorescent imaging and TBS-like current injection can be simultaneously performed in the electrode area of a brain phantom.

  12. Casting protocols for the production of open cell aluminum foams by the replication technique and the effect on porosity.

    PubMed

    Elizondo Luna, Erardo M; Barari, Farzad; Woolley, Robert; Goodall, Russell

    2014-01-01

    Metal foams are interesting materials from both a fundamental understanding and practical applications point of view. Uses have been proposed, and in many cases validated experimentally, for light weight or impact energy absorbing structures, as high surface area heat exchangers or electrodes, as implants to the body, and many more. Although great progress has been made in understanding their structure-properties relationships, the large number of different processing techniques, each producing material with different characteristics and structure, means that understanding of the individual effects of all aspects of structure is not complete. The replication process, where molten metal is infiltrated between grains of a removable preform material, allows a markedly high degree of control and has been used to good effect to elucidate some of these relationships. Nevertheless, the process has many steps that are dependent on individual "know-how", and this paper aims to provide a detailed description of all stages of one embodiment of this processing method, using materials and equipment that would be relatively easy to set up in a research environment. The goal of this protocol and its variants is to produce metal foams in an effective and simple way, giving the possibility to tailor the outcome of the samples by modifying certain steps within the process. By following this, open cell aluminum foams with pore sizes of 1-2.36 mm diameter and 61% to 77% porosity can be obtained. PMID:25548938

  13. The role of high work-function metallic nanodots on the performance of a-Si:H solar cells: offering ohmic contact to light trapping.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeehwan; Abou-Kandil, Ahmed; Fogel, Keith; Hovel, Harold; Sadana, Devendra K

    2010-12-28

    Addition of carbon into p-type "window" layers in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells enhances short circuit currents and open circuit voltages by a great deal. However, a-Si:H solar cells with high carbon-doped "window" layers exhibit poor fill factors due to a Schottky barrier-like impedance at the interface between a-SiC:H windows and transparent conducting oxides (TCO), although they show maximized short circuit currents and open circuit voltages. The impedance is caused by an increasing mismatch between the work function of TCO and that of p-type a-SiC:H. Applying ultrathin high-work-function metals at the interface between the two materials results in an effective lowering of the work function mismatch and a consequent ohmic behavior. If the metal layer is sufficiently thin, then it forms nanodots rather than a continuous layer which provides light-scattering effect. We demonstrate 31% efficiency enhancement by using high-work-function materials for engineering the work function at the key interfaces to raise fill factors as well as photocurrents. The use of metallic interface layers in this work is a clear contrast to previous work where attempts were made to enhance the photocurrent using plasmonic metal nanodots on the solar cell surface. PMID:21090670

  14. Development of an all-metal thick film cost effective metallization system for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, B.

    1981-01-01

    The objectives of the investigation were to provide all-metal screenable pastes using economical base metals, suitable for application to low-to-high conductivity silicon of either conductivity type and possibly to aluminum surfaces. Experiments were conducted with variations in paste parameters, firing conditions, including gas ambients, furnace furniture, silicon surface and others. A liquid medium, intended to provide transport during the carbon fluoride decomposition was incorporated in the paste with promising results.

  15. Open-source computational model of a solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, Steven B.; Choi, Hae-Won; Pharoah, Jon G.; Roth, Helmut K.; Jasak, Hrvoje; Jeon, Dong Hyup

    2016-03-01

    The solid oxide fuel cell is an electro-chemical device which converts chemical energy into electricity and heat. To compete in today's market, design improvements, in terms of performance and life cycle, are required. Numerical prototypes can accelerate design and development progress. In this programme of research, a three-dimensional solid oxide fuel cell prototype, openFuelCell, based on open-source computational fluid dynamics software was developed and applied to a single cell. Transport phenomena, combined with the solution to the local Nernst equation for the open-circuit potential, as well as the Kirchhoff-Ohm relationship for the local current density, allow local electro-chemistry, fluid flow, multi-component species transport, and multi-region thermal analysis to be considered. The underlying physicochemical hydrodynamics, including porous-electrode and electro-chemical effects are described in detail. The openFuelCell program is developed in an object-oriented open-source C++ library. The code is available at

  16. Open questions: The disrupted circuitry of the cancer cell

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, H. S.

    2014-10-24

    Every new decade of biology brings with it a change in outlook driven by new technologies and fresh perspectives. Such is the case for cancer and how we consider the disease. The advent of molecular biology led to the identification of altered signaling molecules and 'oncogenes' that were proposed to drive uncontrolled cell proliferation. The rise of cell biology and new imaging and culturing technologies led to the idea that disruptions in the extracellular environment prime cells for transformation. In the current genomics era, cancer is most commonly seen as a genetic disorder where an unstable genome gives rise to a variety of different cell variants that are selected for proliferation and survival. All of these views are partially correct, of course, and are simply different ways of saying that genetic alterations in cancer cells result in a loss of growth homeostasis. They also take the view that molecular changes 'drive' a cell to grow uncontrollably, rather than tip the balance from one normal state (quiescence) to another (proliferation). Underlying this oversimplification is a profound ignorance of what controls homeostatic cell growth in the first place and how specific mutations impact it.

  17. Evaluation of an infrared open-path spectrometer using an exposure chamber and a calibration cell.

    PubMed

    Todd, L; Ramachandran, G

    1995-02-01

    This study evaluated the use of a controlled exposure chamber and calibration cell to investigate the performance of open-path remote sensing instruments for workplace monitoring of pollutants. An open-path infrared spectrometer was deployed in a chamber, and a range of homogeneous air concentrations were generated using the tracer gas sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). Open-path measurements were compared with point-sample measurements taken along the beam and analyzed using an infrared (IR) and electron capture detector (ECD). A five-compartment calibration cell placed in the optical path was used to simulate heterogeneous concentrations of pollutants. Fifteen concentration patterns were created by injecting different volumes of SF6 into each compartment. Open-path spectrometer measurements were compared with compartment concentrations measured using an ECD. Results indicated that stable homogeneous and heterogeneous concentrations of SF6 were generated in the controlled exposure chamber and five-compartment calibration cell, respectively. Overall, individual open-path measurements were within 20% of point samples measured with the IR and ECDs. The open-path spectrometer measurements had a consistent positive bias of about 12%. Exposure chamber experiments uncovered remote sensing instrument design aspects that could adversely impact its use for indoor monitoring. The weight and size of the instrument make it useable only in a fixed position, thus limiting spatial coverage of the beam in a room. The instrument components were not air-tight, resulting in overestimation of some open-path concentrations. A controlled test chamber and a long calibration cell placed in the optical path are useful tools for evaluating a variety of open-path spectrometer instrument performance issues relevant to industrial hygiene monitoring. PMID:7856516

  18. Open questions: The disrupted circuitry of the cancer cell

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wiley, H. Steven

    2014-10-18

    Every new decade of biology brings with it a change in outlook driven by new technologies and fresh perspectives. Such is the case for cancer and how we consider the disease. The advent of molecular biology led to the identification of altered signaling molecules and 'oncogenes' that were proposed to drive uncontrolled cell proliferation. The rise of cell biology and new imaging and culturing technologies led to the idea that disruptions in the extracellular environment prime cells for transformation. In the current genomics era, cancer is most commonly seen as a genetic disorder where an unstable genome gives rise tomore » a variety of different cell variants that are selected for proliferation and survival. All of these views are partially correct, of course, and are simply different ways of saying that genetic alterations in cancer cells result in a loss of growth homeostasis. They also take the view that molecular changes 'drive' a cell to grow uncontrollably, rather than tip the balance from one normal state (quiescence) to another (proliferation). Underlying this oversimplification is a profound ignorance of what controls homeostatic cell growth in the first place and how specific mutations impact it. Normal, proliferation-competent cells can accurately monitor their environment and respond appropriately to perturbation, whether it is a loss of neighbors or an inflammatory stimulus. Cancer cells either proliferate or refuse to die where and when they should not, which clearly indicates that they have problems in detecting or responding to their environment. Thus, an enormous amount of effort has gone into defining the signaling pathways that can trigger a proliferative response and the biochemical mechanisms underlying these pathways. Far less work has focused on understanding the higher-order logic of these pathways and the roles played by all of the components as part of an integrated system. In other words, we do not really understand how cells process

  19. Cytotoxicity of Metal Ions Released from Nitinol Alloys on Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, W.; Munroe, N.; Tek, V.; Gill, P. K. S.; Tang, Y.; McGoron, A. J.

    2011-07-01

    Most implantable medical devices are expected to function in the body over an extended period of time. Therefore, immersion tests under simulated conditions can be useful for assessing the amount of metal ions released in situ. In this investigation, dissolved ions from as-received binary and ternary Nitinol alloys in cell culture media were periodically measured under static and dynamic conditions. Endothelial cells were grown in aliquots of culture media obtained and the effect of dissolved ions on cell proliferation and viability of endothelial cells (HUVEC) was studied by cytotoxicity assays. The concentration of metal ions in the media was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

  20. Study of Plant Cell Wall Polymers Affected by Metal Accumulation Using Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Shi-You

    2015-03-02

    This project aims to employ newly-developed chemical imaging techniques to measure, in real-time, the concentration, dynamics and spatial distribution of plant cell wall polymers during biomass growth with inoculation of transgenic symbiotic fungi, and to explore a new pathway of delivering detoxified metal to plant apoplast using transgenic symbiotic fungi, which will enhance metal accumulation from soil, and potentially these metals may in turn be used as catalysts to improve the efficiency of biomass conversion to biofuels. The proposed new pathway of biomass production will: 1) benefit metal and radionuclide contaminant mobility in subsurface environments, and 2) potentially improve biomass production and process for bioenergy

  1. Collaborative Triple Framework Interpenetration and Immobilization of Open Metal Sites within a Microporous Mixed Metal-Organic Framework for Highly Selective Gas Adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhangjing; Xiang, Sheng-Chang; Hong, Kunlun; Das, Madhab; Arman, Hadi; Garcia, Maya; Mondal, Jalal; Chen, Banglin

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional triply interpenetrated mixed metal-organic framework, Zn{sub 2}(BBA){sub 2}(CuPyen) {center_dot} G{sub x} (M'MOF-20; BBA = biphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylate; G = guest solvent molecules), of primitive cubic net was obtained through the solvothermal reaction of Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, biphenyl-4,4'-dicarboxylic acid, and the salen precursor Cu(PyenH{sub 2})(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} by a metallo-ligand approach. The triple framework interpenetration has stabilized the framework in which the activated M'MOF-20a displays type-I N{sub 2} gas sorption behavior with a Langmuir surface area of 62 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}. The narrow pores of about 3.9 {angstrom} and the open metal sites on the pore surfaces within M'MOF-20a collaboratively induce its highly selective C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} gas separation at ambient temperature.

  2. Nitride Conversion: A Novel Approach to c-Si Solar Cell Metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, David Henry

    Metallization of commercial-grade c-Si solar cells is currently accomplished by screen-printing fine lines of a Ag/PbO-glass paste amalgam (Ag-frit) onto the insulating SiNx antireflective coating (ARC) that lies atop the shallow n-type emitter layer of the cell. Upon annealing, the glass etches SiNx and permits the crystallization of Ag near the electrically-active emitter interface, thus contacting the cell. While entirely functional, the contact interface produced by Ag-frit metallization is non-ideal, and Ag metal itself is expensive; its use adds to overall solar cell costs. The following work explores the use of Ti-containing alloys as metallization media for c-Si solar cells. There is a -176 kJ [mol N]--1 free energy change associated with the conversion of Si3N4 to TiN. By combining Ti with a low-melting point metal, this reaction can take place at temperatures as low as 750°C in the bulk. Combinations of Ti with Cu, Sn, Ag, and Pb ternary and binary systems are investigated. On unmetallized, c-Si textured solar cells it is shown that 900 nm of stoichiometric Ti6Sn 5 is capable of converting the SiNx ARC to TiN and Ti5Si3, both of which are conducting materials with electrically low-barriers to contact with n-type Si. Alongside electron microscopy, specific contact resistivity (rho c) measurements are used to determine the interfacial quality of TiN/Ti5Si3 contacts to n-Si. Circular transmission line model (CTLM) measurements are utilized for the characterization of reacted Ag0.05Cu0.69Ti0.26, Sn0.35 Ag0.27Ti0.38, and Ti6Sn5 contacts. rhoc values as low as 26 muOcm 2 are measured for reacted Ti6Sn5-SiN x on conventional c-Si solar cells. This value is approximately 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than rhoc of contacts produced by traditional Ag-frit metallization. Viable 1x1 cm, Ti6Sn5-metallized solar cells on 5x5 cm substrates were fabricated through a collaboration with the Georgia Institute of Technology (GA Tech). Front-side metallization was performed

  3. Rapid enrichment of rare-earth metals by carboxymethyl cellulose-based open-cellular hydrogel adsorbent from HIPEs template.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongfeng; Wang, Wenbo; Zheng, Yian; Wang, Feng; Wang, Aiqin

    2016-04-20

    A series of monolithic open-cellular hydrogel adsorbents based on carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) were prepared through high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) and used to enrich the rare-earth metals La(3+) and Ce(3+). The changes of pore structure, and the effects of pH, contact time, initial concentration on the adsorption performance were systematically studied. The results show that the as-prepared monolithic hydrogel adsorbents possess good open-cellular framework structure and have fast adsorption kinetics and high adsorption capacity for La(3+) and Ce(3+). The involved adsorption system can reach equilibrium within 30min and the maximal adsorption capacity is determined to be 384.62mg/g for La(3+) and 333.33mg/g for Ce(3+). Moreover, these porous hydrogel adsorbents show an excellent adsorptive reusability for La(3+) and Ce(3+) through five adsorption-desorption cycles. Such a pore hierarchy structure makes this monolithic open-cellular hydrogel adsorbent be an effective adsorbent for effective enrichment of La(3+) and Ce(3+) from aqueous solution. PMID:26876827

  4. Metal mixture (As-Cd-Pb)-induced cell transformation is modulated by OLA1.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Baeza, Elia; Rojas, Emilio; Valverde, Mahara

    2016-07-01

    Environmental pollutants are complex mixtures in which metals are ubiquitous. Metal mixtures of arsenic, cadmium and lead are present in the occupational environment and generate health effects such as cardiovascular, renal and cancer diseases. Cell transformation induced by metal mixtures that depend on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, cell viability maintenance and avoidance of senescence was previously reported by our group. The aim of the present study was to explore the role of a Obg-like ATPase1 (OLA1) in the cell transformation of BALB/c 3T3 A31-1-1 clonal cells induced by a metal mixture (2 µM NaAsO2, 2 µM CdCl2 and 5 µM Pb(C2H3O2)2 3H2O) through ROS generation. The interest in OLA1 is justified because this protein has been proposed to be a negative regulator of the cellular antioxidant response. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to knockdown OLA1 before the initiation stage of the transformation assay. We evaluated (ROS) and OLA1 protein expression throughout the initiation and promotion stages of transformation. OLA1 knockdown modulated metal mixture-induced cell transformation more strongly when the metal mixture was an initiator stimulus than when it was a promoter. The ability of the metal mixture to initiate cell transformation was diminished by OLA1 knockdown, an effect that depended on intracellular ROS levels. The effect of OLA1 was synergistic with N-Acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) co-treatment. Oxidative stress-associated transcription factors Egr1 and Smad were also down-regulated by the OLA1 knockdown, contributing to the rescue of metal mixture cell transformation. PMID:26984302

  5. Closed and open-ended stacking fault tetrahedra formation along the interfaces of Cu-Al nanolayered metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruizhi; Beng Chew, Huck

    2015-09-01

    Stacking fault tetrahedra (SFTs) are volume defects that typically form by the clustering of vacancies in face-centred cubic (FCC) metals. Here, we report a dislocation-based mechanism of SFT formation initiated from the semi-coherent interfaces of Cu-Al nanoscale multilayered metals subjected to out-of-plane tension. Our molecular dynamics simulations show that Shockley partials are first emitted into the Cu interlayers from the dissociated misfit dislocations along the Cu-Al interface and interact to form SFTs above the triangular intrinsic stacking faults along the interface. Under further deformation, Shockley partials are also emitted into the Al interlayers and interact to form SFTs above the triangular FCC planes along the interface. The resulting dislocation structure comprises closed SFTs within the Cu interlayers which are tied across the Cu-Al interfaces to open-ended SFTs within the Al interlayers. This unique plastic deformation mechanism results in considerable strain hardening of the Cu-Al nanolayered metal, which achieves its highest tensile strength at a critical interlayer thickness of ~4 nm corresponding to the highest possible density of complete SFTs within the nanolayer structure.

  6. Equivalent diagram of a solar cell, based on short-circuit and open-circuit tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slonim, Michael A.; Tslaf, Avraam L.

    1987-12-01

    A novel equivalent diagram of a solar cell is developed. A solar cell array is represented by a voltage source E and two internal resistances r(sc) and r(oc) which are determined from short-cirucit and open-circuit tests. E is constant and does not depend on irradiation; r(sc) is constant for given irradiation; r(oc) is constant for given irradiation under the open-circuit condition but changes its value with varying load. An example is presented for calculation of the parameters in the equivalent diagram using the experimental output characteristic of a cell. An analysis is made of the trend in parameters of modern solar cells for the developed diagram. The diagram allows the use of ordinary calculation and design techniques for the analysis of circuits with solar cells.

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF EMISSIONS FROM THE SIMULATED OPEN-BURNING OF NON-METALLIC AUTOMOBILE SHREDDER RESIDUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study in which the open combustion of a nonmetallic waste product called "fluff" was simulated and the resulting emissions collected and characterized to gain insight into the types and quantities of these air pollutants. (NOTE: The reclamation proce...

  8. Chemical and enzymatic extraction of heavy metal binding polymers from isolated cell walls of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, D.; Stoll, A.D.; Starke, L.; Duncan, J.R. . Dept. of Biochemistry and Microbiology)

    1994-07-01

    Isolated cell walls of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were treated by either chemical (alkali and acid) or enzymatic (protease, mannanase or [beta]-glucuronidase) processes to yield partially purified products. These products were partially characterized by infrared analysis. They were subsequently reacted with heavy metal cation solutions and the quantity of metal accumulated by the cell wall material determined. The Cu[sup 2+] ion (0.24, 0.36, 1.12, and 0.60 [mu]mol/mg) was accumulated to a greater extent than either Co[sup 2+] (0.13, 0.32, 0.43, and 0.32 [mu]mol/mg) or Cd[sup 2+] (0.17, 0.34, 0.39, and 0.46 [mu]mol/mg) by yeast cell walls, glucan, mannan, and chitin, respectively. The isolated components each accumulated greater quantities of the cations than the intact cell wall. Removal of the protein component of the yeast cell wall by Pronase caused a 29.5% decrease in metal accumulation by yeast cell walls per mass, indicating that protein is a heavy metal accumulating component. The data indicate that the outer mannan-protein layer of the yeast cell wall is more important than the inner glucan-chitin layer in heavy metal cation accumulation.

  9. Metal-based bracken-like single-sided dye-sensitized solar cells with horizontal separation.

    PubMed

    Behrouznejad, F; Taghavinia, N; Pazoki, M; Tajabadi, F

    2016-02-21

    One of the drawbacks of typical dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) is their high cost and the high electrical resistance of the transparent conducting substrate. In conventional sandwich-type DSCs, only one of the FTO substrates can be replaced by a metal substrate. We investigated an all-metal-electrode single-sided DSC in which interpenetrated bracken-like Cr electrodes were created using photolithography; mesoporous TiO2 and Pt films were deposited on the laterally separated electrodes. Thermal Pt deposition and electrodeposition methods were investigated and it was found that a cyclic electrodeposition method resulted in selective Pt deposition at room temperature with a higher device performance. Cu or ZnO sacrificial layers and TiO2 or TiO2/SiO2 porous layers were used for the spacer layer that keeps the Pt electrode away from the TiO2 mesoporous layer and the optimum results were obtained when a TiO2/SiO2 layer was used. The best device had a current density of 8.47 mA cm(-2), an open circuit voltage of 0.685 V and an efficiency of 2.44%. The results of open circuit voltage decay and electrochemical impedance spectrometry showed the formation of a high-resistivity blocking layer, which was attributed to the Cr oxide formed during thermal treatment. The efficiency may be improved further by developing low-temperature fabrication processes. PMID:26813516

  10. Considerably improved photovoltaic performance of carbon nanotube-based solar cells using metal oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feijiu; Kozawa, Daichi; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Hiraoka, Kazushi; Mouri, Shinichiro; Ohno, Yutaka; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2015-02-01

    Carbon nanotube-based solar cells have been extensively studied from the perspective of potential application. Here we demonstrated a significant improvement of the carbon nanotube solar cells by the use of metal oxide layers for efficient carrier transport. The metal oxides also serve as an antireflection layer and an efficient carrier dopant, leading to a reduction in the loss of the incident solar light and an increase in the photocurrent, respectively. As a consequence, the photovoltaic performance of both p-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/n-Si and n-SWNT/p-Si heterojunction solar cells using MoOx and ZnO layers is improved, resulting in very high photovoltaic conversion efficiencies of 17.0 and 4.0%, respectively. These findings regarding the use of metal oxides as multifunctional layers suggest that metal oxide layers could improve the performance of various electronic devices based on carbon nanotubes.

  11. Considerably improved photovoltaic performance of carbon nanotube-based solar cells using metal oxide layers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feijiu; Kozawa, Daichi; Miyauchi, Yuhei; Hiraoka, Kazushi; Mouri, Shinichiro; Ohno, Yutaka; Matsuda, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube-based solar cells have been extensively studied from the perspective of potential application. Here we demonstrated a significant improvement of the carbon nanotube solar cells by the use of metal oxide layers for efficient carrier transport. The metal oxides also serve as an antireflection layer and an efficient carrier dopant, leading to a reduction in the loss of the incident solar light and an increase in the photocurrent, respectively. As a consequence, the photovoltaic performance of both p-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/n-Si and n-SWNT/p-Si heterojunction solar cells using MoOx and ZnO layers is improved, resulting in very high photovoltaic conversion efficiencies of 17.0 and 4.0%, respectively. These findings regarding the use of metal oxides as multifunctional layers suggest that metal oxide layers could improve the performance of various electronic devices based on carbon nanotubes. PMID:25692264

  12. Surface acoustic admittance of highly porous open-cell, elastic foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    This work presents a comprehensive study of the surface acoustic admittance properties of graded sizes of open-cell foams that are highly porous and elastic. The intrinsic admittance as well as properties of samples of finite depth were predicted and then measured for sound at normal incidence over a frequency range extending from about 35-3500 Hz. The agreement between theory and experiment for a range of mean pore size and volume porosity is excellent. The implications of fibrous structure on the admittance of open-cell foams is quite evident from the results.

  13. Close the Textbook & Open "The Cell: An Image Library"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Cheston; Taylor, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Many students leave the biology classroom with misconceptions centered on cellular structure. This article presents an activity in which students utilize images from an online database called "The Cell: An Image Library" (http://www.cellimagelibrary. org/) to gain a greater understanding of the diversity of cellular structure and the…

  14. Dynamics of Metal Partitioning at the Cell-Solution Interface: Implications for Toxicity Assessment under Growth-Inhibiting Conditions.

    PubMed

    Duval, Jérôme F L; Paquet, Nathalie; Lavoie, Michel; Fortin, Claude

    2015-06-01

    Metal toxicity toward microorganisms is usually evaluated by determining growth inhibition. To achieve a mechanistic interpretation of such toxic effects, the intricate coupling between cell growth kinetics and metal partitioning dynamics at the cell-solution interface over time must be considered on a quantitative level. A formalism is elaborated to evaluate cell-surface-bound, internalized, and extracellular metal fractions in the limit where metal uptake kinetics is controlled by internalization under noncomplexing medium conditions. Cell growth kinetics is tackled using the continuous logistic equation modified to include growth inhibition by metal accumulation to intracellular or cell surface sites. The theory further includes metal-proton competition for adsorption at cell-surface binding sites, as well as possible variation of cell size during exposure to metal ions. The formalism elucidates the dramatic impacts of initial cell concentration on metal bioavailability and toxicity over time, in agreement with reported algae bioassays. It further highlights that appropriate definition of toxicity endpoints requires careful inspection of the ratio between exposure time scale and time scale of metal depletion from bulk solution. The latter depends on metal internalization-excretion rate constants, microorganism growth, and the extent of metal adsorption on nonspecific, transporter, and growth inhibitory sites. As an application of the theory, Cd toxicity in the algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata is interpreted from constrained modeling of cell growth kinetics and of interfacial Cd-partitioning dynamics measured under various exposure conditions. PMID:25945520

  15. Cell Death Control by Matrix Metalloproteinases1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Dirk; Sieferer, Elke; Pfannstiel, Jens

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that play important roles in the remodeling of the extracellular matrix in animals, the proteases responsible for dynamic modifications of the plant cell wall are largely unknown. A possible involvement of MMPs was addressed by cloning and functional characterization of Sl2-MMP and Sl3-MMP from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). The two tomato MMPs were found to resemble mammalian homologs with respect to gelatinolytic activity, substrate preference for hydrophobic amino acids on both sides of the scissile bond, and catalytic properties. In transgenic tomato seedlings silenced for Sl2/3-MMP expression, necrotic lesions were observed at the base of the hypocotyl. Cell death initiated in the epidermis and proceeded to include outer cortical cell layers. In later developmental stages, necrosis spread, covering the entire stem and extending into the leaves of MMP-silenced plants. The subtilisin-like protease P69B was identified as a substrate of Sl2- and Sl3-MMP. P69B was shown to colocalize with Sl-MMPs in the apoplast of the tomato hypocotyl, it exhibited increased stability in transgenic plants silenced for Sl-MMP activity, and it was cleaved and inactivated by Sl-MMPs in vitro. The induction of cell death in Sl2/3-MMP-silenced plants depended on P69B, indicating that Sl2- and Sl3-MMP act upstream of P69B in an extracellular proteolytic cascade that contributes to the regulation of cell death in tomato. PMID:27208293

  16. WIYN Open Cluster Study. LXIII. Abundances in the Super-metal-rich Open Cluster NGC 6253 from Hydra Spectroscopy of the 7774 Å Oxygen Triplet Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maderak, Ryan M.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J.; Twarog, Bruce A.; Cummings, Jeffery D.; King, Jeremy R.; Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.

    2015-04-01

    We present a spectroscopic abundance analysis of the old, super-metal-rich open cluster NGC 6253, with emphasis on its O abundance. High-dispersion, 7774 Å O i triplet region spectra of 47 stars were obtained using Hydra II on the CTIO Blanco 4 m. Radial velocity analysis confirms 39 stars consistent with single star membership, primarily at the turnoff. Thirty-six of these are included in our abundance analysis. Our differential analysis relative to the Sun yields primarily scaled-solar values, with weighted cluster averages of [O/H] = +0.440 ± 0.020, [Fe/H] = +0.445 ± 0.014, [Al/H] = +0.487 ± 0.020, [Si/H] = +0.504 ± 0.018, and [Ni/H] = +0.702 ± 0.018 (where the errors are {{σ }μ }). We discuss possible origins for the three known super-metal-rich clusters based upon their abundance patterns, Galactic locations, and space motions. The abundance patterns of NGC 6253 are very similar to those of NGC 6791 and NGC 6583. With the possible exception of oxygen, the abundances of these clusters are all close to scaled-solar, and they are similar to patterns seen in metal-rich disk dwarfs and giants. However, they also seem to differ from those of metal-rich bulge stars. We demonstrate that NGC 6253 is unusually oxygen rich (in [O/H]) for its 3.3 Gyr age. While we find [O/Fe] to be scaled-solar for NGC 6253, the more recently reported values for NGC 6791 show a large variation, from values close to scaled-solar down to values at least a factor of two below scaled-solar. We discuss the possibility that the scaled-solar [O/Fe] abundances of NGC 6253 and NGC 6791 might reflect a flattening of the Galactic [O/Fe] versus [Fe/H] relationship. This possibility may be consistent with disk star abundance data, which show an apparent “floor” at [O/Fe] ˜ -0.1 for [Fe/H] \\gt 0, and with chemical evolution model results, which may predict such a flattening due to a decrease in supernova Fe yields at super-solar-metallicities. Orbit solutions for NGC 6791 allow that it

  17. Nanostructured metallic rear reflectors for thin solar cells: balancing parasitic absorption in metal and large-angle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disney, Claire E. R.; Pillai, Supriya; Green, Martin A.

    2015-12-01

    Rear reflectors for solar cells comprised of metal films with periodic arrays of nanoscale features on their surface can provide significantly enhanced light trapping in the absorber layer. However these structures can also result in significantly increased parasitic absorption into the metal layer at various wavelengths of light. Conversely these highly absorbing resonances can also coincide with the wavelengths which display the largest enhancement to the cell's photocurrent. As such it is important to understand the underlying causes for such photocurrent enhancements and losses in the metal in order to design the optimum structure for use. 3D Finite-difference-time-domain simulations have been used to model a variety of structures and analyze the spatial distribution of absorption within different materials which make up the structure, the angles at which light will be scattered from the rear surface, as well as the idealized short circuit current from each structure integrated across the AM1.5 spectrum. These reveal the properties of these modes at resonant wavelengths at which absorption into both materials is enhanced. Despite the enhanced coupling of light into the metal at these wavelengths, the amount of light scattered back into the absorber at large angles is also significantly boosted. For a large variety of geometries, the impact of this large angle scattering dominates leading to significant increases to a cell's photocurrent. Our simulations allow us to understand the contributions of multiple plasmonic effects occurring in such structures, allowing selection of the most suitable geometries to achieve large-angle scattering in a desired wavelength range.

  18. Making Positive Electrodes For Sodium/Metal Chloride Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Distefano, Salvador; Bankston, C. Perry

    1992-01-01

    High coulombic yields provided by sodium/metal chloride battery in which cathode formed by impregnating sintered nickel plaque with saturated solution of nickel chloride. Charge/discharge cycling of nickel chloride electrode results in very little loss of capacity. Used in spacecraft, electric land vehicles, and other applications in which high-energy-density power systems required.

  19. Compact reaction cell for homogenizing and down-blending highly enriched uranium metal

    DOEpatents

    McLean, W. II; Miller, P.E.; Horton, J.A.

    1995-05-02

    The invention is a specialized reaction cell for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide. In a preferred form, the reaction cell comprises a reaction chamber with increasing diameter along its length (e.g. a cylindrical chamber having a diameter of about 2 inches in a lower portion and having a diameter of from about 4 to about 12 inches in an upper portion). Such dimensions are important to achieve the necessary conversion while at the same time affording criticality control and transportability of the cell and product. The reaction chamber further comprises an upper port and a lower port, the lower port allowing for the entry of reactant gases into the reaction chamber, the upper port allowing for the exit of gases from the reaction chamber. A diffuser plate is attached to the lower port of the reaction chamber and serves to shape the flow of gas into the reaction chamber. The reaction cell further comprises means for introducing gases into the reaction chamber and a heating means capable of heating the contents of the reaction chamber. The present invention also relates to a method for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide in the reaction cell of the present invention. The invention is useful for down-blending highly enriched uranium metal by the simultaneous conversion of highly enriched uranium metal and natural or depleted uranium metal to uranium oxide within the reaction cell. 4 figs.

  20. N- myc oncogene amplification is correlated to trace metal concentrations in neuroblastoma cultured cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouget, B.; Sergeant, C.; Benard, J.; Llabador, Y.; Simonoff, M.

    2000-10-01

    N- myc oncogene amplification is a powerful predictor of aggressive behavior of neuroblastoma (NB), the most common solid tumor of the early childhood. Since N- myc overexpression - subsequent to amplification - determines a phenotype of invasiveness and metastatic spreading, it is assumed that N- myc amplified neuroblasts synthesize zinc metalloenzymes leading to tumor invasion and formation of metastases. In order to test a possible relation between N- myc oncogene amplification and trace metal contents in human NB cells, Fe, Cu and Zn concentrations have been measured by nuclear microprobe analysis in three human neuroblastoma cell lines with various degrees of N- myc amplification. Elemental determinations show uniform distribution of trace metals within the cells, but variations of intracellular trace metal concentrations with respect to the degree of N- myc amplification are highly dependent on the nature of the element. Zinc concentration is higher in both N- myc amplified cell lines (IMR-32 and IGR-N-91) than in the non-amplified cells (SK-N-SH). In contrast, intracellular iron content is particularly low in N- myc amplified cell lines. Moreover, copper concentrations showed an increase with the degree of N- myc amplification. These results indicate that a relationship exists between intracellular trace metals and N- myc oncogene amplification. They further suggest that trace metals very probably play a determinant role in mechanisms of the neuroblastoma invasiveness.

  1. Compact reaction cell for homogenizing and down-blanding highly enriched uranium metal

    DOEpatents

    McLean, II, William; Miller, Philip E.; Horton, James A.

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a specialized reaction cell for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide. In a preferred form, the reaction cell comprises a reaction chamber with increasing diameter along its length (e.g. a cylindrical chamber having a diameter of about 2 inches in a lower portion and having a diameter of from about 4 to about 12 inches in an upper portion). Such dimensions are important to achieve the necessary conversion while at the same time affording criticality control and transportability of the cell and product. The reaction chamber further comprises an upper port and a lower port, the lower port allowing for the entry of reactant gasses into the reaction chamber, the upper port allowing for the exit of gasses from the reaction chamber. A diffuser plate is attached to the lower port of the reaction chamber and serves to shape the flow of gas into the reaction chamber. The reaction cell further comprises means for introducing gasses into the reaction chamber and a heating means capable of heating the contents of the reaction chamber. The present invention also relates to a method for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide in the reaction cell of the present invention. The invention is useful for down-blending highly enriched uranium metal by the simultaneous conversion of highly enriched uranium metal and natural or depleted uranium metal to uranium oxide within the reaction cell.

  2. Tailoring open metal sites for selective capture of CO2 in isostructural metalloporphyrin porous organic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hwa Seob; Jeon, Hyung Joon; Choi, Jung Hoon; Lee, Gyu-Heon; Kang, Jeung Ku

    2015-11-01

    Porphyrin-based isostructural porous organic networks have been synthesized by varying the central metal atoms to cobalt, nickel and copper. Their selectivities for CO2 capture over N2 and Ar are found to be enhanced as the heats of adsorption for CO2 are increased in the order of Co, Ni and Cu, while the pore structures are well maintained.Porphyrin-based isostructural porous organic networks have been synthesized by varying the central metal atoms to cobalt, nickel and copper. Their selectivities for CO2 capture over N2 and Ar are found to be enhanced as the heats of adsorption for CO2 are increased in the order of Co, Ni and Cu, while the pore structures are well maintained. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05696a

  3. Development of metallization process: FSA project, cell and module formation research area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, A., III

    1983-01-01

    The use of CO in place of H2 for the reducing step did not appreciably increase solderability of interconnects. Cells were also made printing the pastes on top of ITO coatings. Some of these cells were the best electrically but the metallization was still not adhering. Sequential use of H2 and CO had no effect on adhesion (or lack of it).

  4. Assessment of a 42 metal salts chemical library in mouse embryonic stem cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    The developmental effects of xenobiotics on differentiation can be profiled using mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). The adherent cell differentiation and cytotoxicity (ACDC) technique was used to evaluate a library of 42 metal and metaloid salts. Jl mESCs were allowed to prolif...

  5. Detection of CXCR4 receptors on cell surface using a fluorescent metal nanoshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Fu, Yi; Li, Ge; Zhao, Richard Y.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence cell imaging can be used for disease diagnosis and cellular signal transduction. Using a metal nanoshell as molecular imaging agent, we develop a cellular model system to detect CXCR4 chemokine receptor on T-lymphatic cell surface. These metal nanoshells are observed to express enhanced emission intensity and shortened lifetimes due to the near-field interactions. They are covalently bound with anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibodies for immunoreactions with the target sites of the CXCR4 receptors on the CEM-SS cells. The fluorescence intensity and lifetime cell images are recorded with a time-resolved confocal microscopy. As expected, the emission signals from the metal nanoshells are clearly isolated from the cellular autofluorescence due to strong intensities and distinctive lifetimes. The number of emission spots on the single cell image is estimated by direct count to the emission signals. Analyzing a pool of cell images, a maximal count number is obtained in a range of 200+/-50. Because there is an average of ~6000 binding sites on the cell surface, we estimate that one emission spot from the metal nanoshell may represent ~30 CXCR5 receptors. In addition, the CXCR4 receptors are estimated to distribute on ~70% area of the cell surface.

  6. Supramolecular metal displacement allows on-fluorescence analysis of manganese(II) in living cells.

    PubMed

    Gruppi, Francesca; Liang, Jian; Bartelle, Benjamin B; Royzen, Maksim; Turnbull, Daniel H; Canary, James W

    2012-11-11

    Due to the importance of Mn(2+) ions in biological processes, it is of growing interest to develop protocols for analysis of Mn(2+) uptake and distribution in cells. A supramolecular metal displacement assay can provide ratiometric fluorescence detection of Mn(2+), allowing for quantitative and longitudinal analysis of Mn(2+) uptake in living cells. PMID:23023093

  7. Patterned 3-dimensional metal grid electrodes as alternative electron collectors in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chua, Julianto; Mathews, Nripan; Jennings, James R; Yang, Guangwu; Wang, Qing; Mhaisalkar, Subodh G

    2011-11-21

    We describe the application of 3-dimensional metal grid electrodes (3D-MGEs) as electron collectors in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) as a replacement for fluorinated tin oxide (FTO) electrodes. Requirements, structure, advantages, and limitations of the metal grid electrodes are discussed. Solar conversion efficiencies of 6.2% have been achieved in 3D-MGE based solar cells, comparable to that fabricated on FTO (7.1%). The charge transport properties and collection efficiencies in these novel solar cells have been studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. PMID:21989708

  8. Atmospheric and Aqueous Deposition of Polycrystalline Metal Oxides Using Mist-CVD for Highly Efficient Inverted Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaodan; Kawaharamura, Toshiyuki; Stieg, Adam Z; Biswas, Chandan; Li, Lu; Ma, Zhu; Zurbuchen, Mark A; Pei, Qibing; Wang, Kang L

    2015-08-12

    Large scale, cost-effective processing of metal oxide thin films is critical for the fabrication of many novel thin film electronics. To date, however, most of the reported solution-based techniques require either extended thermal anneals or additional synthetic steps. Here we report mist chemical vapor deposition as a solution-based, readily scalable, and open-air method to produce high-quality polycrystalline metal oxide thin films. Continuous, smooth, and conformal deposition of metal oxide thin films is achieved by tuning the solvent chemistry of Leidenfrost droplets to promote finer control over the surface-local dissociation process of the atomized zinc-bearing precursors. We demonstrate the deposited ZnO as highly efficient electron transport layers for inverted polymer solar cells to show the power of the approach. A highest efficiency of 8.7% is achieved with a fill factor of 73%, comparable to that of conventional so-gel ZnO, which serves as an indication of the efficient vertical transport and electron collection achievable using this material. PMID:26146797

  9. Transparent conducting oxide contacts and textured metal back reflectors for thin film silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franken, R. H.-J.

    2006-09-01

    With the growing population and the increasing environmental problems of the 'common' fossil and nuclear energy production, the need for clean and sustainable energy sources is evident. Solar energy conversion, such as in photovoltaic (PV) systems, can play a major role in the urgently needed energy transition in electricity production. At the present time PV module production is dominated by the crystalline wafer technology. Thin film silicon technology is an alternative solar energy technology that operates at lower efficiencies, however, it has several significant advantages, such as the possibility of deposition on cheap (flexible) substrates and the much smaller silicon material consumption. Because of the small thickness of the solar cells, light trapping schemes are needed in order to obtain enough light absorption and current generation. This thesis describes the research on thin film silicon solar cells with the focus on the optimization of the transparent conducting oxide (TCO) layers and textured metal Ag substrate layers for the use as enhanced light scattering back reflectors in n-i-p type of solar cells. First we analyzed ZnO:Al (TCO) layers deposited in an radio frequent (rf) magnetron deposition system equipped with a 7 inch target. We have focused on the improvement of the electrical properties without sacrificing the optical properties by increasing the mobility and decreasing the grain boundary density. Furthermore, we described some of the effects on light trapping of ZnO:Al enhanced back reflectors. The described effects are able to explain the observed experimental data. Furthermore, we present a relation between the surface morphology of the Ag back contact and the current enhancement in microcrystalline (muc-Si:H) solar cells. We show the importance of the lateral feature sizes of the Ag surface on the light scattering and introduce a method to characterize the quality of the back reflector by combining the vertical and lateral feature sizes

  10. Assessment of heavy metal content and DNA damage in Hypsiboas faber (anuran amphibian) in coal open-casting mine.

    PubMed

    Zocche, Jairo José; Damiani, Adriani Paganini; Hainzenreder, Giana; Mendonça, Rodrigo Ávila; Peres, Poliana Bernardo; Santos, Carla Eliete Iochims Dos; Debastiani, Rafaela; Dias, Johnny Ferraz; Andrade, Vanessa Moraes de

    2013-07-01

    The aims of the study were to determine the heavy metal content in the tissues of Hypsiboas faber from a coal mining area and to compare the DNA damage in the blood cells of these animals with that of animals living in an unpolluted area. The heavy metal content was detected according to the technique of Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and the DNA damage was assessed by the Comet assay. Our results reveal that the specimens of H. faber collected from the coal mining area exhibited elements of order Fe>Cu>Al>Zn>Rb>Mn>Br, independently of the organ. The values of Comet assay parameters (DNA damage index and DNA damage frequency) were significantly higher in specimens collected from the coal mining area than in the reference animals. Our study concludes that the coal mining residues are genotoxic to amphibians and may have adverse effects on soil, water, vegetation and wild animals. PMID:23619523

  11. Spatial, Hysteretic, and Adaptive Host-Guest Chemistry in a Metal-Organic Framework with Open Watson-Crick Sites.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hong; Li, Mian; Lin, Xiao-Rong; Chen, Wei; Chen, Guang-Hui; Huang, Xiao-Chun; Li, Dan

    2015-09-01

    Biological and artificial molecules and assemblies capable of supramolecular recognition, especially those with nucleobase pairing, usually rely on autonomous or collective binding to function. Advanced site-specific recognition takes advantage of cooperative spatial effects, as in local folding in protein-DNA binding. Herein, we report a new nucleobase-tagged metal-organic framework (MOF), namely ZnBTCA (BTC=benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxyl, A=adenine), in which the exposed Watson-Crick faces of adenine residues are immobilized periodically on the interior crystalline surface. Systematic control experiments demonstrated the cooperation of the open Watson-Crick sites and spatial effects within the nanopores, and thermodynamic and kinetic studies revealed a hysteretic host-guest interaction attributed to mild chemisorption. We further exploited this behavior for adenine-thymine binding within the constrained pores, and a globally adaptive response of the MOF host was observed. PMID:26178173

  12. Photorespiration and temperature dependence of oxygen evolution in tomato plants monitored by open photoacoustic cell technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas-Luna, M.; Madueño, L.; Gutiérrez-Juárez, G.; Bernal-Alvarado, J.; Sosa, M.; González-Solís, J. L.; Sánchez-Rocha, S.; Olalde-Portugal, V.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Campos, P.

    2003-01-01

    The open photoacoustic cell was used to monitor the evolution rate of oxygen from tomato leaves. Estimates of the relative amount of released oxygen in vivo and in situ conditions as influenced by ambient temperature are being presented. Photorespiration phenomenon is shown to dominate above a critical temperature. The evolution of this critical point is analyzed as a function of the environmental temperature.

  13. Solar cells: A laboratory experiment on the temperature dependence of the open-circuit voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Khoury, A.; Charles, J.; Charette, J.; Fieux, M.; Mialhe, P.

    1984-05-01

    This paper describes a simple demonstration of the effect of an increase in temperature upon the performance of solar cells under concentrated light. It is shown that the expected increase of the open-circuit voltage is offset by the temperature effect. This experiment should be quite relevant as an introduction to the study of concentration for undergraduate physics laboratories.

  14. Metal nanoparticles enhanced optical absorption in thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wanlu; Liu, Fang; Qu, Di; Xu, Qi; Huang, Yidong

    2011-12-01

    The plasmonic enhanced absorption for thin film solar cells with silver nanoparticles (NPs) deposited on top of the amorphous silicon film (a-Si:H) solar cells and embedded inside the active layer of organic solar cells (OSCs) has been simulated and analyzed. Obvious optical absorption enhancement is obtained not only at vertical incidence but also at oblique incidence. By properly adjusting the period and size of NPs, an increased absorption enhancement of about 120% and 140% is obtained for a-Si:H solar cells and OSCs, respectively.

  15. Cell overcharge testing inside sodium metal halide battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frutschy, Kris; Chatwin, Troy; Bull, Roger

    2015-09-01

    Testing was conducted to measure electrical performance and safety of the General Electric Durathon™ E620 battery module (600 V class 20 kWh) during cell overcharge. Data gathered from this test was consistent with SAE Electric Vehicle Battery Abuse Testing specification J2464 [1]. After cell overcharge failure and 24 A current flow for additional 60 minutes, battery was then discharged at 7.5 KW average power to 12% state of charge (SOC) and recharged back to 100% SOC. This overcharging test was performed on two cells. No hydrogen chloride (HCl) gas was detected during front cell (B1) test, and small amount (6.2 ppm peak) was measured outside the battery after center cell (F13) overcharge. An additional overcharge test was performed per UL Standard 1973 - Batteries for Use in Light Electric Rail (LER) Applications and Stationary Applications[2]. With the battery at 11% SOC and 280 °C float temperature, an individual cell near the front (D1) was deliberately imbalanced by charging it to 62% SOC. The battery was then recharged to 100% SOC. In all three tests, the battery cell pack was stable and individual cell failure did not propagate to other cells. Battery discharge performance, charge performance, and electrical isolation were normal after all three tests.

  16. The electronic structure of metal oxide/organo metal halide perovskite junctions in perovskite based solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Dymshits, Alex; Henning, Alex; Segev, Gideon; Rosenwaks, Yossi; Etgar, Lioz

    2015-01-01

    Cross-sections of a hole-conductor-free CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cell were characterized with Kelvin probe force microscopy. A depletion region width of about 45 nm was determined from the measured potential profiles at the interface between CH3NH3PbI3 and nanocrystalline TiO2, whereas a negligible depletion was measured at the CH3NH3PbI3/Al2O3 interface. A complete solar cell can be realized with the CH3NH3PbI3 that functions both as light harvester and hole conductor in combination with a metal oxide. The band diagrams were estimated from the measured potential profile at the interfaces, and are critical findings for a better understanding and further improvement of perovskite based solar cells. PMID:25731963

  17. Rubisco Activity in Guard Cells Compared with the Solute Requirement for Stomatal Opening 1

    PubMed Central

    Reckmann, Udo; Scheibe, Renate; Raschke, Klaus

    1990-01-01

    We investigated whether the reductive pentose phosphate path in guard cells of Pisum sativum had the capacity to contribute significantly to the production of osmotica during stomatal opening in the light. Amounts of ribulose 1,5-bisphophate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) were determined by the [14C]carboxyarabinitol bisphosphate assay. A guard cell contained about 1.2 and a mesophyll cell about 324 picograms of the enzyme; the ratio was 1:270. The specific activities of Rubisco in guard cells and in mesophyll cells were equal; there was no indication of a specific inhibitor of Rubisco in guard cells. Rubisco activity was 115 femtomol per guard-cell protoplast and hour. This value was different from zero with a probability of 0.99. After exposure of guard-cell protoplasts to 14CO2 for 2 seconds in the light, about one-half of the radioactivity was in phosphorylated compounds and <10% in malate. Guard cells in epidermal strips produced a different labelling pattern; in the light, <10% of the label was in phosphorylated compounds and about 60% in malate. The rate of solute accumulation in intact guard cells was estimated to have been 900 femto-osmol per cell and hour. If Rubisco operated at full capacity in guard cells, and hexoses were produced as osmotica, solutes could be supplied at a rate of 19 femto-osmol per cell and hour, which would constitute 2% of the estimated requirement. The capacity of guard-cell Rubisco to meet the solute requirement for stomatal opening in leaves of Pisum sativum is insignificant. Images Figure 1 PMID:16667255

  18. Rubisco activity in guard cells compared with the solute requirement for stomatal opening. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Reckmann, U.; Scheibe, R.; Raschke, K. )

    1990-01-01

    We investigated whether the reductive pentose phosphate path in guard cells of Pisum sativum had the capacity to contribute significantly to the production of osmotica during stomatal opening in the light. Amounts of ribulose 1,5-bisphophate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) were determined by the ({sup 14}C) carboxyarabinitol bisphosphate assay. A guard cell contained about 1.2 and a mesophyll cell about 324 picograms of the enzyme; the ratio was 1:270. The specific activities of Rubisco in guard cells and in mesophyll cells were equal; there was no indication of a specific inhibitor of Rubisco in guard cells. Rubisco activity was 115 femtomol per guard-cell protoplast and hour. This value was different from zero with a probability of 0.99. After exposure of guard-cell protoplasts to {sup 14}CO{sub 2} for 2 seconds in the light, about one-half of the radioactivity was in phosphorylated compounds and <10% in malate. Guard cells in epidermal strips produced a different labelling pattern; in the light, <10% of the label was in phosphorylated compounds and about 60% in malate. The rate of solute accumulation in intact guard cells was estimated to have been 900 femto-osmol per cell and hour. If Rubisco operated at full capacity in guard cells, and hexoses were produced as osmotica, solutes could be supplied at a rate of 19femto-osmol per cell and hour, which would constitute 2% of the estimated requirement. The capacity of guard-cell Rubisco to meet the solute requirement for stomatal opening in leaves of Pisum sativum is insignificant.

  19. Manufacturing and characterization of metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blennow, Peter; Hjelm, Johan; Klemensø, Trine; Ramousse, Severine; Kromp, Alexander; Leonide, André; Weber, André

    A metal-supported solid oxide fuel cell design offers competitive advantages, for example reduced material costs and improved robustness. This paper reports the performance and stability of a recently developed metal-supported cell design, based on a novel cermet anode, on a 25 cm 2 (1 cm 2/16 cm 2 active area) cell level. An electrochemical performance comparable to state-of-the-art anode-supported cells is demonstrated. Detailed electrochemical analysis allowed assignment of the overall polarization losses quantitatively to gas diffusion in the metal support, electrooxidation in the anode functional layer, oxygen reduction in the mixed ionic-electronic conducting cathode and an additional polarization process with a rather high relaxation frequency, which may be assigned to an insulating corrosion interlayer. The durability of the cells was investigated by means of galvanostatic operation for periods of up to 1000 h as well as the dynamic behavior, such as redox-, load- and thermal cycling tests. The galvanostatic stability tests indicated a fair, but significant degradation rate (∼5% decrease in cell voltage/1000 h at 650 °C and 0.25 A cm -2). Furthermore, the metal-supported cells underwent an endurance test of 100 redox cycles at 800 °C without severe degradation nor total failure.

  20. NRF2 Oxidative Stress Induced by Heavy Metals is Cell Type Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Steven O; Fan, Chun-Yang; Yeoman, Kim; Wakefield, John; Ramabhadran, Ram

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to metallic environmental toxicants has been demonstrated to induce a variety of oxidative stress responses in mammalian cells. The transcription factor Nrf2 is activated in response to oxidative stress and coordinates the expression of antioxidant gene products. In this study, we describe the development of an Nrf2-specific reporter gene assay that can be used to study the oxidative stress response in multiple cell types. Using five different cell lines, the Nrf2-activating potency of twenty metals was assessed across a range of concentrations. While ten of the metals tested (cadmium, cobalt, copper, gold, iron, lead, mercury, silver, sodium arsenite and zinc) stimulated Nrf2-dependent transcriptional activity in at least three of the engineered cell lines, only three (cadmium, copper and sodium arsenite) were active in all five cell lines. A comparison of metal-induced Nrf2 transcriptional activation revealed significant differences in the absolute magnitude of activation as well as the relative potencies between the cell lines tested. However, there was no direct correlation between activity and potency. Taken together, these results show that the capacity to stimulate Nrf2 activity and relative potencies of these test compounds are highly dependent on the cell type tested. Since oxidative stress is thought to be involved in the mode of action of many toxicological studies, this observation may inform the design of paradigms for toxicity testing for toxicant prioritization and characterization. PMID:21643505

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: On the metallicity of open clusters. III. (Netopil+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netopil, M.; Paunzen, E.; Heiter, U.; Soubiran, C.

    2016-03-01

    In Paper II (Heiter et al., Paper II 2014A&A...561A..93H) we have evaluated available spectroscopic iron abundance determinations of open cluster stars and presented mean values for 78 open clusters. The results are based on high-resolution data (R>=25000) with high signal-to-noise ratios (S/N>=50). Furthermore, quality criteria were introduced by adopting only [Fe/H] measurements of stars with Teff=4400-6500K and logg>=2.0dex. We have to note that the mean iron abundance for Berkeley 29, listed in Paper II, also incorporates some measurements based upon lower S/N data. In the present paper we therefore list the correct values for the higher and lower quality data. Since publication of Paper II, some new studies were made (Boesgaard et al., 2013ApJ...775...58B; Bocek Topcu et al., 2015, Cat. J/MNRAS/446/3562; Carraro et al., 2014A&A...568A..86C; Donati et al., 2015, Cat. J/MNRAS/446/1411; Magrini et al.. 2014A&A...563A..44M, 2015A&A...580A..85M; Molenda-Zakowicz et al., 2014MNRAS.445.2446M; Monaco et al., 2014A&A...564L...6M; Reddy et al., 2015MNRAS.450.4301R), which we examined the same way as described in Paper II. This adds ten open clusters to our list (Berkeley 81, NGC 1342, NGC 1662, NGC 1912, NGC 2354, NGC 4337, NGC 4815, NGC 6811, Trumpler 5, and Trumpler 20) and supplementary data for NGC 752, NGC 2447, NGC 2632, and NGC 6705. (1 data file).

  2. Antioxidant Enzyme Inhibitor Role of Phosphine Metal Complexes in Lung and Leukemia Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Keleş, Tuğba; Serindağ, Osman

    2014-01-01

    Phosphine metal complexes have been recently evaluated in the field of cancer therapy. In this research, the cytotoxic effects of some metal phosphines {[PdCl2((CH2OH)2PCH2)2NCH3] (C1), [RuCl2(((CH2OH)2PCH2)2NCH3)2] (C2), [PtCl2((Ph2PCH2)2NCH3)(timin)2] (C3)} on K562 (human myelogenous leukemia cell line) and A549 (adenocarcinomic human alveolar basal epithelial cells) cells were investigated using the MTT test. C1 and C2 are water-soluble metal complexes, which may have some advantages in in vitro and in vivo studies. The effects of the above-mentioned metal complexes on thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) (EC: 1.8.1.9), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) (EC: 1.11.1.9), and catalase (Cat) (EC: 1.11.1.6) enzymes were also tested. The results of this research showed that all three metal complexes indicated dose-dependent cytotoxicity on A549 and K562 cell lines and that the complexes inhibited different percentages of the TrxR, GPx, and Cat enzymes of these tumor cells. PMID:25610346

  3. Silicon Nanowire Array Solar Cell Prepared by Metal-Induced Electroless Etching with a Novel Processing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han-Don Um,; Jin-Young Jung,; Hong-Seok Seo,; Kwang-Tae Park,; Sang-Won Jee,; S. A. Moiz,; Jung-Ho Lee,

    2010-04-01

    We inexpensively fabricated vertically aligned Si nanowire solar cells using metal-induced electroless etching and a novel doping technique. Co-doping of boron and phosphorus was achieved using a spin-on-doping method for the simultaneous formation of a front-side emitter and a back surface field in a one-step thermal cycle. Nickel electroless deposition was also performed in order to form a continuous metal grid electrode on top of an array of vertically aligned Si nanowires. A highly dense array of Si nanowires with low reflectivity was obtained using Ag nanoparticles of optimal size (60-90 nm). We also obtained an open circuit voltage of 544 mV, a short circuit current of 14.68 mA/cm2, and a cell conversion efficiency of 5.25% at 1.5AM illumination. The improved photovoltaic performance was believed to be the result of the excellent optical absorption of the Si nanowires and the improved electrical properties of the electroless deposited electrode.

  4. Open-Framework Oxysulfide Based on the Supertetrahedral [In4Sn16O10S34](12-) Cluster and Efficient Sequestration of Heavy Metals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian-Ming; Sarma, Debajit; Wu, Ya-Qin; Wang, Li; Ning, Zhi-Xue; Zhang, Fu-Qiang; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2016-05-01

    The new ion-exchange oxy-sulfide material has a three-dimensional open framework comprising the pseudo-T4 supertetrahedral [In4Sn16O10S34](12-) cluster. This material has large pores and is a fast ion exchanger. It exhibits high selectivity in sequestering heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions including solutions containing heavy concentrations of sodium, calcium, ammonium, magnesium, zinc, carbonate, phosphate, and acetate ions. Moreover, the ion-exchange efficiency in competitive ion-exchange experiments involving mixtures of metal ions is significantly higher than for solutions of single metal ions. PMID:27082786

  5. Influence of metal-covered area on performance of solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Es-Slassi, A. R.; Nguiyen, P. H.; Bottin, J.; Easwarakhantan, T.; Ravelet, S.

    1984-08-01

    A simple method is proposed for computing the values of current and voltage at the maximum power point as well as the fill factor of solar cells using a new theoretical model. This model, which incorporates the metal-covered region, demonstrates the importance of the metallized area A(m). If A(m) increases, the efficiency and the fill factor decrease, but if A(m) decreases below a certain value, the efficiency and the fill factor also decrease.

  6. Performance evaluation and characterization of metallic bipolar plates in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Yue

    Bipolar plate and membrane electrode assembly (MEA) are the two most repeated components of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack. Bipolar plates comprise more than 60% of the weight and account for 30% of the total cost of a fuel cell stack. The bipolar plates perform as current conductors between cells, provide conduits for reactant gases, facilitate water and thermal management through the cell, and constitute the backbone of a power stack. In addition, bipolar plates must have excellent corrosion resistance to withstand the highly corrosive environment inside the fuel cell, and they must maintain low interfacial contact resistance throughout the operation to achieve optimum power density output. Currently, commercial bipolar plates are made of graphite composites because of their relatively low interfacial contact resistance (ICR) and high corrosion resistance. However, graphite composite's manufacturability, permeability, and durability for shock and vibration are unfavorable in comparison to metals. Therefore, metals have been considered as a replacement material for graphite composite bipolar plates. Since bipolar plates must possess the combined advantages of both metals and graphite composites in the fuel cell technology, various methods and techniques are being developed to combat metallic corrosion and eliminate the passive layer formed on the metal surface that causes unacceptable power reduction and possible fouling of the catalyst and the electrolyte. The main objective of this study was to explore the possibility of producing efficient, cost-effective and durable metallic bipolar plates that were capable of functioning in the highly corrosive fuel cell environment. Bulk materials such as Poco graphite, graphite composite, SS310, SS316, incoloy 800, titanium carbide and zirconium carbide were investigated as potential bipolar plate materials. In this work, different alloys and compositions of chromium carbide coatings on aluminum and SS316

  7. Solar cell welded interconnection development program. [parallel gap and ultrasonic metal-metal bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzeff, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    Parallel gap welding and ultrasonic bonding techniques were developed for joining selected interconnect materials (silver, aluminum, copper, silver plated molybdenum and Kovar) to silver-titanium and aluminum contact cells. All process variables have been evaluated leading to establishment of optimum solar cell, interconnect, electrodes and equipment criteria for obtainment of consistent high quality welds. Applicability of nondestructive testing of solar cell welds has been studied. A pre-weld monitoring system is being built and will be utilized in the numerically controlled parallel gap weld station.

  8. Removing heavy metals from synthetic effluents using "kamikaze" Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Ruta, Lavinia; Paraschivescu, Codruta; Matache, Mihaela; Avramescu, Sorin; Farcasanu, Ileana Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    One key step of the bioremediation processes designed to clean up heavy metal contaminated environments is growing resistant cells that accumulate the heavy metals to ensure better removal through a combination of biosorption and continuous metabolic uptake after physical adsorption. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells can easily act as cation biosorbents, but isolation of mutants that are both hyperaccumulating and tolerant to heavy metals proved extremely difficult. Instead, mutants that are hypersensitive to heavy metals due to increased and continuous uptake from the environment were considered, aiming to use such mutants to reduce the heavy metal content of contaminated waters. In this study, the heavy metal hypersensitive yeast strain pmr1Delta was investigated for the ability to remove Mn2+, Cu2+, Co2+, or Cd2+ from synthetic effluents. Due to increased metal accumulation, the mutant strain was more efficient than the wild-type in removing Mn2+, Cu2+, or Co2+ from synthetic effluents containing 1-2 mM cations, with a selectivity and also in removing Mn2+ and Cd2+ from synthetic effluents containing 20-50 microM cations, with a selectivity Mn2+ > Cd2+. PMID:19795117

  9. Thermocleavable materials for polymer solar cells with high open circuit voltage-a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Tromholt, Thomas; Gevorgyan, Suren A; Jørgensen, Mikkel; Krebs, Frederik C; Sylvester-Hvid, Kristian O

    2009-12-01

    The search for polymer solar cells giving a high open circuit voltage was conducted through a comparative study of four types of bulk-heterojunction solar cells employing different photoactive layers. As electron donors the thermo-cleavable polymer poly-(3-(2-methylhexyloxycarbonyl)dithiophene) (P3MHOCT) and unsubstituted polythiophene (PT) were used, the latter of which results from thermo cleaving the former at 310 degrees C. As reference, P3HT solar cells were built in parallel. As electron acceptors, either PCBM or bis-[60]PCBM were used. In excess of 300 solar cells were produced under as identical conditions as possible, varying only the material combination of the photo active layer. It was observed that on replacing PCBM with bis[60]PCBM, the open circuit voltage on average increased by 100 mV for P3MHOCT and 200 mV for PT solar cells. Open circuit voltages approaching 1 V were observed for the PT:bis[60]PCBM solar cells and a maximum conversion efficiency of 1.3% was obtained for solar cells with P3MHOCT:PCBM as the photoactive material. For the reference solar cells maximum efficiencies of 2.1 and 2.4% were achieved for P3HT:PCBM and P3HT:bis[60]PCBM, respectively. Despite special measures taken in terms of substrate design and device processing, a substantial spread in the photovoltaic properties was generally observed. This spread could not be correlated with the optical properties of the solar cells, the thickness of the photo active layer or the electrode deposition conditions of the aluminum top electrode. PMID:20356155

  10. A Chemical Route to Activation of Open Metal Sites in the Copper-Based Metal-Organic Framework Materials HKUST-1 and Cu-MOF-2.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong Ki; Yun, Won Seok; Kim, Min-Bum; Kim, Jeung Yoon; Bae, Youn-Sang; Lee, JaeDong; Jeong, Nak Cheon

    2015-08-12

    Open coordination sites (OCSs) in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) often function as key factors in the potential applications of MOFs, such as gas separation, gas sorption, and catalysis. For these applications, the activation process to remove the solvent molecules coordinated at the OCSs is an essential step that must be performed prior to use of the MOFs. To date, the thermal method performed by applying heat and vacuum has been the only method for such activation. In this report, we demonstrate that methylene chloride (MC) itself can perform the activation role: this process can serve as an alternative "chemical route" for the activation that does not require applying heat. To the best of our knowledge, no previous study has demonstrated this function of MC, although MC has been popularly used in the pretreatment step prior to the thermal activation process. On the basis of a Raman study, we propose a plausible mechanism for the chemical activation, in which the function of MC is possibly due to its coordination with the Cu(2+) center and subsequent spontaneous decoordination. Using HKUST-1 film, we further demonstrate that this chemical activation route is highly suitable for activating large-area MOF films. PMID:26197386

  11. Investigation of the open-circuit voltage in solar cells doped with quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Tayagaki, Takeshi; Hoshi, Yusuke; Usami, Noritaka

    2013-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have attracted much attention for use in photovoltaic applications because of their potential for overcoming the limits of conventional single-junction devices. One problem associated with solar cells using QDs is that the open-circuit voltage (Voc) always decreases with the addition of QDs with respect to the reference cell without QDs. Here, we report the investigation of current–voltage characteristics in Ge/Si QD solar cells in the temperature range from 100 to 300 K. We show that even though Voc decreases with increasing temperature, it depends on the nominal Ge thickness, indicating that Voc reduction is primarily caused by a decrease in the bandgap energy of the cell. From photoluminescence decay measurements, we found that rapid carrier extraction from QDs occurred in the solar cells; this process eliminates the quasi-Fermi energy splitting between the QDs and the host semiconductor and causes Voc reduction in QD solar cells. PMID:24067805

  12. Shear Moduli for Non-Isotropic, Open Cell Foams Using a General Elongated Kelvin Foam Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.; Ghosn, Louis J.

    2009-01-01

    Equations for calculating the shear modulus of non-isotropic, open cell foams in the plane perpendicular to the rise direction and in a plane parallel to the rise direction are derived using an elongated Kelvin foam model. This Kelvin foam model is more general than that employed by previous authors as the size and shape of the unit cell are defined by specifying three independent cell dimensions. The equations for the shear compliances are derived as a function of three unit cell dimensions and the section properties of the cell edges. From the compliance equations, the shear modulus equations are obtained and written as a function of the relative density and two unit cell shape parameters. The dependence of the two shear moduli on the relative density and the two shape parameters is demonstrated.

  13. Solar cells in bulk InP using an open tube diffusion process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parat, K. K.; Bothra, S.; Borrego, J. M.; Ghandhi, S. K.

    1987-01-01

    A simple open tube diffusion technique for the fabrication of n+p junction solar cells is described. Large area (greater than 0.25 square cm) solar cells have been made by this process with a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 15.2 percent under simulated AMO illumination. An ideality factor is 1.04 and a saturation current density of 9.6 times 10 to the minus 16th power A/square cm have been observed for these cells. These are the lowest (best) values reported to date for diffused structures in bulk InP.

  14. Comment on {open_quotes}Magnetic-coherence-length scaling in metallic multilayers{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Aarts, J.

    1997-10-01

    In a recent paper [Phys. Rev. B {bold 54}, 515 (1996)], Koperdraad and Lodder compare calculations of the parallel critical field H{sub c2}{sup {parallel}} in superconductor{endash}normal-metal multilayers with experimental data taken from the literature. The poor agreement leads them to introduce a scaling factor {alpha} in the superconducting coherence length. The aim of this Comment is to point out the importance of the boundary conditions of the problem. Free sample surfaces will yield different results than an infinite stack of layers. The effect of free surfaces on the temperature of the dimensional crossover in H{sub c2}{sup {parallel}} is shown to be similar to the effect of {alpha}, making the need for the latter parameter questionable. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. A microporous Cu-MOF with optimized open metal sites and pore spaces for high gas storage and active chemical fixation of CO2.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao-Ying; Tian, Hong-Rui; Ai, Jing; Li, Lei-Jiao; Dang, Song; Lan, Ya-Qian; Sun, Zhong-Ming

    2016-09-25

    A microporous Cu-MOF with optimized open metal sites and pore space was constructed based on a designed bent ligand; it exhibits high-capacity multiple gas storage under atmospheric pressure and efficient catalytic activity for chemical fixation of CO2 under mild conditions. PMID:27550833

  16. Recombinant D. radiodurans cells for bioremediation of heavy metals from acidic/neutral aqueous wastes.

    PubMed

    Misra, Chitra Seetharam; Appukuttan, Deepti; Kantamreddi, Venkata Siva Satyanarayana; Rao, Amara S; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The stability and superior metal bioremediation ability of genetically engineered Deinococcus radiodurans cells, expressing a non-specific acid phosphatase, PhoN in high radiation environment has already been established. The lyophilized recombinant DrPhoN cells retained PhoN activity and uranium precipitation ability. Such cells also displayed an extended shelf life of 6 months during storage at room temperature and showed surface associated precipitation of uranium as well as other metals like cadmium. Lyophilized cells, immobilized in polyacrylamide gels could be used for uranium bioprecipitation in a flow through system resulting in 70% removal from 1mM input uranium solution and a loading of 1 g uranium/g dry weight cells. Compared with a batch process which achieved a loading of 5.7 g uranium/g biomass, the efficiency of the column process was low due to clogging of the column by the precipitate. PMID:22179144

  17. Ink jet assisted metallization for low cost flat plate solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, K. F.; Vest, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Computer-controlled ink-jet-assisted metallization of the front surface of solar cells with metalorganic silver inks offers a maskless alternative method to conventional photolithography and screen printing. This method can provide low cost, fine resolution, reduced process complexity, avoidance of degradation of the p-n junction by firing at lower temperature, and uniform line film on rough surface of solar cells. The metallization process involves belt furnace firing and thermal spiking. With multilayer ink jet printing and firing, solar cells of about 5-6 percent efficiency without antireflection (AR) coating can be produced. With a titanium thin-film underlayer as an adhesion promoter, solar cells of average efficiency 8.08 percent without AR coating can be obtained. This efficiency value is approximately equal to that of thin-film solar cells of the same lot. Problems with regard to lower inorganic content of the inks and contact resistance are noted.

  18. Metal Foam Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper compares the ballistic performance of metallic foam sandwich structures with honeycomb structures. Honeycomb sandwich structures, consisting of metallic or composite facesheets and honeycomb cores, are often used in spacecraft construction due to their light-weight and structural stiffness. Honeycomb panels, however, are considered rather poor candidates for protection from micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) particles because the honeycomb channels the debris cloud from MMOD impacts on outer facesheet causing a concentrated load on the second facesheet. Sandwich structures with light-weight, open-cell metallic cores and metal or composite facesheets provide improved MMOD protection because channeling does not occur and because the core is more effective at disrupting hypervelocity impacts then honeycomb. This paper describes hypervelocity impact tests on metallic foam sandwich structures (aluminum and titanium) with metallic facesheets, compare them to equivalent mass and thickness honeycomb panels, based on the results of hypervelocity impact tests.

  19. Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, M.M.; Peng, M.Y.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.C.

    1996-09-24

    An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M{sub x}Z{sub y}Mn{sub (1{minus}y)}O{sub 2}, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell. 11 figs.

  20. Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, Marca M.; Peng, Marcus Y.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    1996-01-01

    An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M.sub.x Z.sub.y Mn.sub.(1-y) O.sub.2, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell.

  1. Engineering metal-impurity nanodefects for low-cost solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Buonassisi, Tonio; Istratov, Andrei A.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Lai, Barry; Cai, Zhonghou; Heald, Steve M.; Weber, Eicke R.

    2005-09-30

    As the demand for high-quality solar-cell feedstock exceeds supply and drives prices upwards, cheaper but dirtier alternative feedstock materials are being developed. Successful use of these alternative feedstocks requires that one rigorously control the deleterious effects of the more abundant metallic impurities. In this study, we demonstrate how metal nanodefect engineering can be used to reduce the electrical activity of metallic impurities, resulting in dramatic enhancements of performance even in heavily contaminated solar-cell material. Highly sensitive synchrotron-based measurements directly confirm that the spatial and size distributions of metal nanodefects regulate the minority-carrier diffusion length, a key parameter for determining the actual performance of solar-cell devices. By engineering the distributions of metal-impurity nanodefects in a controlled fashion, the minority-carrier diffusion length can be increased by up to a factor of four, indicating that the use of lower-quality feedstocks with proper controls may be a viable alternative to producing cost-effective solar cells.

  2. Plasmonically sensitized metal-oxide electron extraction layers for organic solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Trost, S.; Becker, T.; Zilberberg, K.; Behrendt, A.; Polywka, A.; Heiderhoff, R.; Görrn, P.; Riedl, T.

    2015-01-01

    ZnO and TiOx are commonly used as electron extraction layers (EELs) in organic solar cells (OSCs). A general phenomenon of OSCs incorporating these metal-oxides is the requirement to illuminate the devices with UV light in order to improve device characteristics. This may cause severe problems if UV to VIS down-conversion is applied or if the UV spectral range (λ < 400 nm) is blocked to achieve an improved device lifetime. In this work, silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are used to plasmonically sensitize metal-oxide based EELs in the vicinity (1–20 nm) of the metal-oxide/organic interface. We evidence that plasmonically sensitized metal-oxide layers facilitate electron extraction and afford well-behaved highly efficient OSCs, even without the typical requirement of UV exposure. It is shown that in the plasmonically sensitized metal-oxides the illumination with visible light lowers the WF due to desorption of previously ionosorbed oxygen, in analogy to the process found in neat metal oxides upon UV exposure, only. As underlying mechanism the transfer of hot holes from the metal to the oxide upon illumination with hν < Eg is verified. The general applicability of this concept to most common metal-oxides (e.g. TiOx and ZnO) in combination with different photoactive organic materials is demonstrated. PMID:25592174

  3. Radial velocities and metallicities from infrared Ca ii triplet spectroscopy of open clusters. II. Berkeley 23, King 1, NGC 559, NGC 6603, and NGC 7245

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera, R.; Casamiquela, L.; Ospina, N.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Jordi, C.; Monteagudo, L.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Open clusters are key to studying the formation and evolution of the Galactic disc. However, there is a deficiency of radial velocity and chemical abundance determinations for open clusters in the literature. Aims: We intend to increase the number of determinations of radial velocities and metallicities from spectroscopy for open clusters. Methods: We acquired medium-resolution spectra (R ~ 8000) in the infrared region Ca ii triplet lines (~8500 Å) for several stars in five open clusters with the long-slit IDS spectrograph on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope (Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, Spain). Radial velocities were obtained by cross-correlation fitting techniques. The relationships available in the literature between the strength of infrared Ca ii lines and metallicity were also used to derive the metallicity for each cluster. Results: We obtain ⟨Vr⟩ = 48.6 ± 3.4, -58.4 ± 6.8, 26.0 ± 4.3, and -65.3 ± 3.2 km s-1 for Berkeley 23, NGC 559, NGC 6603, and NGC 7245, respectively. We found [ Fe/H ] = -0.25 ± 0.14 and -0.15 ± 0.18 for NGC 559 and NGC 7245, respectively. Berkeley 23 has low metallicity, [ Fe/H ] = -0.42 ± 0.13, which is similar to other open clusters in the outskirts of the Galactic disc. In contrast, we derived high metallicity ([ Fe/H ] = +0.43 ± 0.15) for NGC 6603, which places this system among the most metal-rich known open clusters. To our knowledge, this is the first determination of radial velocities and metallicities from spectroscopy for these clusters, except NGC 6603, for which radial velocities had been previously determined. We have also analysed ten stars in the line of sight to King 1. Because of the large dispersion obtained in both radial velocity and metallicity, we cannot be sure that we have sampled true cluster members. Based on observations made with the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the

  4. Metal etching with reactive gas cluster ion beams using pickup cell

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoda, Noriaki; Yamada, Isao

    2012-11-06

    Mixed gas cluster ion beams were formed using pickup cell for metal etching. O{sub 2} neutral clusters pick up acetic acid and formed mixed cluster beam. By using O{sub 2}-GCIB with acetic acid, enhancement of Cu etching was observed. Because of dense energy deposition by GCIB, etching of Cu proceeds by CuO formation, enhancement of chemical reaction with acetic acid and desorption of etching products. Surface roughening was not observed on poly crystalline Cu because of the small dependence of etching rate on crystal orientation. Halogen free and low-temperature metal etching with GCIB using pickup cell is possible.

  5. Method for removal of metal atoms from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Torres, deceased, Agapito P.; Delhaize, Emmanuel

    1992-01-01

    The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells were also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

  6. Process for reducing series resistance of solar cell metal contact systems with a soldering flux etchant

    DOEpatents

    Coyle, R. T.; Barrett, Joy M.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for substantially reducing the series resistance of a solar cell having a thick film metal contact assembly thereon while simultaneously removing oxide coatings from the surface of the assembly prior to applying solder therewith. The process includes applying a flux to the contact assembly and heating the cell for a period of time sufficient to substantially remove the series resistance associated with the assembly by etching the assembly with the flux while simultaneously removing metal oxides from said surface of said assembly.

  7. Oxidative damage in human epithelial alveolar cells exposed in vitro to oil fly ash transition metals.

    PubMed

    Di Pietro, Angela; Visalli, Giuseppa; Munaò, Fortunato; Baluce, Barbara; La Maestra, Sebastiano; Primerano, Patrizia; Corigliano, Francesco; De Flora, Silvio

    2009-03-01

    Among particulate matter emissions from combustion processes, oil fly ash (OFA) displays a marked oxidative and inflammogenic reactivity, due to the high content of bioavailable transition metals. In the present study, we evaluated the biological effects of an OFA water solution, composed of the transition metals Fe (57.5%), V (32.4%), and Ni (10.1%), in human epithelial alveolar cells (A549 line). The fluorimetric analysis by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein showed a significant, dose- and time-dependent induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) triggered by OFA metal components at subtoxic doses. The metal chelator deferoxamine and the radical scavenger dimethylsulfoxide attenuated the metal-induced generation of ROS. Confocal microscopy observations strengthened these findings and showed an intense cytoplasmic fluorescence with perinuclear thickenings in A549 cells, in the absence of morphological damage. Metal-induced generation of ROS was significantly correlated with a dose- and time-dependent DNA damage, as assessed by single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). Catalase was able to decrease dramatically DNA damage. Fluorimetric analyses by diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine showed a parallelism between generation of ROS and formation of lipid peroxides. The results obtained in the experiments evaluating the effects of individual metal solutions did not show any significant difference in DNA damage between Fe(III) and V(IV), but highlighted the higher capability of V(IV) to increase ROS in the cytoplasmic compartment. The different behavior of these two elements, confirmed by the weak Fe-induced lipid peroxidation, may be ascribed to the presence of Fe-binding proteins, such as ferritin, in the cytoplasm. Finally, Ni(II) had negligible effects on ROS production. On the whole, the results obtained in this study show the strong capability of transition metals adsorbed to OFA to cause widespread damage to biological macromolecules, and suggest potential

  8. Study of metallic materials for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Zeng, Z.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-04-24

    Metallic interconnect acts as a gas separator and a gas distributor and therefore, it needs to function adequately in two widely different environments. The interconnect material will be exposed to air on one side and natural gas or coal-derived synthesis gas on the other side. The viable material for the interconnect application must be resistant not only to oxidation but also carburization in hydrocarbon containing low-oxygen environments. In addition, the scales that develop on the exposed surfaces must possess adequate electrical conductivity for them to function as current leads over long service life of the fuel cell. This report addresses five topics of interest for the development of metallic interconnects with adequate performance in fuel cells for long service life. The research conducted over the years and the conclusions reached were used to identify additional areas of research on materials for improved performance of components, especially metallic interconnects, in the complex fuel cell environments. This report details research conducted in the following areas: measurement of area specific electrical resistivity, corrosion performance in dual gas environments by experiments using alloy 446, long term corrosion performance of ferritic and austenitic alloys in hydrogen and methane-reformed synthesis fuel-gas environments, approaches to reduce the area resistance of metallic interconnect, and reduction of electrical resistivity of alumina scales on metallic interconnect. Based on the key requirements for metallic interconnects and the data developed on the corrosion behavior of candidate materials in meeting those requirements, several areas are recommended for further research to develop metallic interconnects with acceptable and reliable long-term performance in solid oxide fuel cells.

  9. Investigation of novel electrolyte systems for advanced metal/air batteries and fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hui

    It is a worldwide challenge to develop advanced green power sources for modern portable devices, transportation and stationary power generation. Metal/air batteries and fuel cells clearly stand out in view of their high specific energy, high energy efficiency and environment-friendliness. Advanced metal/air batteries based on metal ion conductors and proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells operated at elevated temperatures (>120°C) can circumvent the limitations of current technologies and bring considerable advantages. The key is to develop suitable electrolytes to enable these new technologies. In this thesis research, investigation of novel electrolytes systems for advanced metal/air batteries and PEM fuel cells is conducted. Novel polymer gel electrolyte systems, [metal salt/ionic liquid/polymer] and [metal salt/liquid polyether/polymer] are prepared. Such systems contain no volatile solvents, conduct metal ions (Li+ or Zn 2+) with high ionic conductivity, possess wide electrochemical stability windows, and exhibit wide operating temperature ranges. They promise to enable non-aqueous, all-solid-state, thin-film Li/air batteries and Zn/air batteries. They are advantageous for application in other battery systems as well, such as rechargeable lithium and lithium ion batteries. In the case of proton exchange membranes, polymer gel electrolyte systems [acid/ionic liquid/polymer] are prepared. Especially, H3PO4/PMIH2PO 4/PBI is demonstrated as prospective proton exchange membranes for PEM fuel cells operating at elevated temperatures. Comprehensive electrochemical characterization, thermal analysis (TGA and DSC) and spectroscopy analysis (NMR and FTIR) are carried out to investigate these novel electrolyte systems and their ion transport mechanisms. The design and synthesis of novel ionic liquids and electrolyte systems based on them for advantageous application in various electrochemical power sources are highlighted in this work.

  10. Microbial Cells as Biosorbents for Heavy Metals: Accumulation of Uranium by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Strandberg, Gerald W.; Shumate, Starling E.; Parrott, John R.

    1981-01-01

    Uranium accumulated extracellularly on the surfaces of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The rate and extent of accumulation were subject to environmental parameters, such as pH, temperature, and interference by certain anions and cations. Uranium accumulation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurred intracellularly and was extremely rapid (<10 s), and no response to environmental parameters could be detected. Metabolism was not required for metal uptake by either organism. Cell-bound uranium reached a concentration of 10 to 15% of the dry cell weight, but only 32% of the S. cerevisiae cells and 44% of the P. aeruginosa cells within a given population possessed visible uranium deposits when examined by electron microscopy. Rates of uranium uptake by S. cerevisiae were increased by chemical pretreatment of the cells. Uranium could be removed chemically from S. cerevisiae cells, and the cells could then be reused as a biosorbent. Images PMID:16345691

  11. Review on Metallic and Plastic Flexible Dye Sensitized Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yugis, A. R.; Mansa, R. F.; Sipaut, C. S.

    2015-04-01

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are a promising alternative for the development of a new generation of photovoltaic devices. DSSCs have promoted intense research due to their low cost and eco-friendly advantage over conventional silicon-based crystalline solar cells. In recent years, lightweight flexible types of DSSCs have attracted much intention because of drastic reduction in production cost and more extensive application. The substrate that used as electrode of the DSSCs has a dominant impact on the methods and materials that can be applied to the cell and consequently on the resulting performance of DSSCs. Furthermore, the substrates influence significantly the stability of the device. Although the power conversion efficiency still low compared to traditional glass based DSSCs, flexible DSSCs still have potential to be the most efficient and easily implemented technology.

  12. [Advance in the bioavailability monitoring of heavy metal based on microbial whole-cell sensor].

    PubMed

    Hou, Qi-Hui; Ma, An-Shou; Zhuang, Xiu-Liang; Zhuang, Guo-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Microbial whole-cell biosensor is an excellent tool to assess the bioavailability of heavy metal in soil and water. However, the traditional physicochemical instruments are applied to detect the total metal. Furthermore, microbial whole-cell biosensor is simple, rapid and economical in manipulating, and is thus a highly qualified candidate for emergency detection of pollution incidents. The biological component of microbial whole-cell biosensor mostly consists of metalloregulatory proteins and reporter genes. In detail, metalloregulatory proteins mainly include the MerR family, ArsR family and RS family, and reporter genes mainly include gfp, lux and luc. Metalloregulatory protein and reporter gene are related to the sensitivity, specificity and properties in monitoring. The bioavailability of heavy metals is alterable under different conditions, influenced by pH, chelate and detection methods and so on. Increasing the accumulation of intracellular heavy metal, modifying the metalloregulatory proteins and optimizing the detecting conditions are important for improving the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the microbial whole-cell biosensor. The future direction of microbial whole-cell biosensor is to realize the monitoring of pollutions in situ and on line. PMID:23487961

  13. Study of metal bioaccumulation by nuclear microprobe analysis of algae fossils and living algae cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, P.; Wang, J.; Li, X.; Zhu, J.; Reinert, T.; Heitmann, J.; Spemann, D.; Vogt, J.; Flagmeyer, R.-H.; Butz, T.

    2000-03-01

    Microscopic ion-beam analysis of palaeo-algae fossils and living green algae cells have been performed to study the metal bioaccumulation processes. The algae fossils, both single cellular and multicellular, are from the late Neoproterozonic (570 million years ago) ocean and perfectly preserved within a phosphorite formation. The biosorption of the rare earth element ions Nd 3+ by the green algae species euglena gracilis was investigated with a comparison between the normal cells and immobilized ones. The new Leipzig Nanoprobe, LIPSION, was used to produce a proton beam with 2 μm size and 0.5 nA beam current for this study. PIXE and RBS techniques were used for analysis and imaging. The observation of small metal rich spores ( <10 μm) surrounding both of the fossils and the living cells proved the existence of some specific receptor sites which bind metal carrier ligands at the microbic surface. The bioaccumulation efficiency of neodymium by the algae cells was 10 times higher for immobilized algae cells. It confirms the fact that the algae immobilization is an useful technique to improve its metal bioaccumulation.

  14. Metal-air cell with performance enhancing additive

    SciTech Connect

    Friesen, Cody A; Buttry, Daniel

    2015-11-10

    Systems and methods drawn to an electrochemical cell comprising a low temperature ionic liquid comprising positive ions and negative ions and a performance enhancing additive added to the low temperature ionic liquid. The additive dissolves in the ionic liquid to form cations, which are coordinated with one or more negative ions forming ion complexes. The electrochemical cell also includes an air electrode configured to absorb and reduce oxygen. The ion complexes improve oxygen reduction thermodynamics and/or kinetics relative to the ionic liquid without the additive.

  15. Single metallic nanoparticle imaging for protein detection in cells

    PubMed Central

    Cognet, L.; Tardin, C.; Boyer, D.; Choquet, D.; Tamarat, P.; Lounis, B.

    2003-01-01

    We performed a visualization of membrane proteins labeled with 10-nm gold nanoparticles in cells, using an all-optical method based on photothermal interference contrast. The high sensitivity of the method and the stability of the signals allows 3D imaging of individual nanoparticles without the drawbacks of photobleaching and blinking inherent to fluorescent markers. A simple analytical model is derived to account for the measurements of the signal amplitude and the spatial resolution. The photothermal interference contrast method provides an efficient, reproducible, and promising way to visualize low amounts of proteins in cells by optical means. PMID:13679586

  16. Lacking chloroplasts in guard cells of crumpled leaf attenuates stomatal opening: both guard cell chloroplasts and mesophyll contribute to guard cell ATP levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Wei; Li, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Lu; Yang, Hai-Qiang; Han, Xue-Fei; Liu, Zhao-Hui; Shang, Zhong-Lin; Asano, Tomoya; Yoshioka, Yasushi; Zhang, Chun-Guang; Chen, Yu-Ling

    2014-09-01

    Controversies regarding the function of guard cell chloroplasts and the contribution of mesophyll in stomatal movements have persisted for several decades. Here, by comparing the stomatal opening of guard cells with (crl-ch) or without chloroplasts (crl-no ch) in one epidermis of crl (crumpled leaf) mutant in Arabidopsis, we showed that stomatal apertures of crl-no ch were approximately 65-70% those of crl-ch and approximately 50-60% those of wild type. The weakened stomatal opening in crl-no ch could be partially restored by imposing lower extracellular pH. Correspondingly, the external pH changes and K(+) accumulations following fusicoccin (FC) treatment were greatly reduced in the guard cells of crl-no ch compared with crl-ch and wild type. Determination of the relative ATP levels in individual cells showed that crl-no ch guard cells contained considerably lower levels of ATP than did crl-ch and wild type after 2 h of white light illumination. In addition, guard cell ATP levels were lower in the epidermis than in leaves, which is consistent with the observed weaker stomatal opening response to white light in the epidermis than in leaves. These results provide evidence that both guard cell chloroplasts and mesophyll contribute to the ATP source for H(+) extrusion by guard cells. PMID:24506786

  17. Magnetic survey of the Risher Road Open Metal Pit Waste Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Cumbest, R.J.

    1995-07-01

    The Risher Road Waste Unit is located at the base of a small bluff (approximately 30 ft high) composed of sand and gravel. Due to collapse of the face of the bluff a steep slope of colluvium has formed at the base. The area of investigation is located on the slope of colluvium, and is marked by the presence of two pin flags spaced approximately 25 ft apart parallel to the bluff face. In order to investigate the presence of buried metallic material that might indicate waste containers or other wash beneath the colluvial slope a magnetometer survey was conducted in and around the vicinity of the pin flags. The survey consisted of a 5-ft by 5-ft square grid node pattern in a 40-ft by 60-ft rectangle. Magnetic field and gradient anomalies were detected in the locations of the pin flags and can be attributed to the ferric composition of the pin flag shafts. Other magnetic field and gradient variations are at background levels and do not indicate the presence of buried ferric objects of any significant size.

  18. Origin of photogenerated carrier recombination at the metal-active layer interface in polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Dubey, Ashish; Reza, Khan Mamun; Adhikari, Nirmal; Qiao, Qiquan; Bommisetty, Venkat

    2015-11-01

    The role of the metal-active layer interface in photogenerated recombination has been investigated using nanoscale current sensing atomic force microscopy (CS-AFM) and intensity modulated photocurrent spectroscopy (IMPS) in as-deposited, pre-annealed and post-annealed bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells. Aluminum (Al) confined post-annealed BHJ solar cells exhibited a significantly improved device efficiency compared to pre-annealed BHJ solar cells having similar photocarrier harvesting ability in the active layer. The nanoscale topography and CS-AFM results indicate a uniform PCBM rich phase at the metal-active layer interface in the post-annealed cells, but PCBM segregation in the pre-annealed cells. These two different annealing processes showed different carrier dynamics revealed using IMPS under various light intensities. The IMPS results suggest reduced photo generated carrier recombination in uniform PCBM rich post-annealed BHJ solar cells. This study reveals the importance of the metal-bend interface in BHJ solar cells in order to obtain efficient charge carrier extraction for high efficiency. PMID:26431263

  19. High Efficiency Pb-In Binary Metal Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Kui; Li, Meng; Yang, Ying-Guo; Hu, Yun; Ma, Heng; Gao, Xing-Yu; Liao, Liang-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    Mixed Pb-In perovskite solar cells are fabricated by using lead(II) chloride and indium(III) chloride with methylammonium iodide. A maximum power conversion efficiency as high as 17.55% is achieved owing to the high quality of perovskites with multiple ordered crystal orientations. PMID:27184107

  20. RESPONSES OF LUNG CELLS TO METALS IN MANUFACTURED NANOPARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro assays with lung epithelial cells were used to compare pairs of micron-sized and nano-sized particles with the same nominal chemical composition for cytotoxicity and induction of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6.  Results suggested ...

  1. Influences of current collector foils with different opening ratios in passive polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumbholz, S.; Kaiser, J.; Weiland, M.; Hahn, R.; Reichl, H.

    Even if many fuel cell applications are ready to start into the market, more research needs to be done to improve the currently achieved power density further. In the power range of about 10-20 W micro-PEM fuel cells have a high improvement potential concerning the current collector design and the design of the passive air supply. These two points have a high impact on the water management of a PEM fuel cell and allow a significant decrease of the fuel cell system in size and weight. The current work shows calculations for the fuel cell impedance based on a mathematical resistance model which was already presented for similarly constructed direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) [4]. Selected publications on water uptake and membrane humidification for the used Gore MEAs [6,7] are taken into account. The model is evaluated with realized versions of cathode side current collector designs, which influence the maximum power density and the self-heating of the fuel cell stack. Several measurement results are presented, which can confirm the validity of the used model. A very low opening ratio of less than 0.1 induces a very high concentration gradient of the generated water in relation to the net water outtake. From this it follows that the cell impedance is very low and the membrane has a very high ionic conductivity. Additionally it can be shown that the power density of these fuel cells is twice as high as for the cells with an opening ratio greater than 0.45.

  2. Possible Immune Regulation of Natural Killer T Cells in a Murine Model of Metal Ion-Induced Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai, Kenichi; Horikawa, Tatsuya; Shigematsu, Hiroaki; Matsubara, Ryota; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Eguchi, Takanori; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Nakasone, Yasunari; Sato, Koichiro; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Satsuki; Hamada, Yoshiki; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2016-01-01

    Metal often causes delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions, which are possibly mediated by accumulating T cells in the inflamed skin, called irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. However, accumulating T cells during development of a metal allergy are poorly characterized because a suitable animal model is unavailable. We have previously established novel murine models of metal allergy and found accumulation of both metal-specific T cells and natural killer (NK) T cells in the inflamed skin. In our novel models of metal allergy, skin hypersensitivity responses were induced through repeated sensitizations by administration of metal chloride and lipopolysaccharide into the mouse groin followed by metal chloride challenge in the footpad. These models enabled us to investigate the precise mechanisms of the immune responses of metal allergy in the inflamed skin. In this review, we summarize the immune responses in several murine models of metal allergy and describe which antigen-specific responses occur in the inflamed skin during allergic contact dermatitis in terms of the T cell receptor. In addition, we consider the immune regulation of accumulated NK T cells in metal ion–induced allergic contact dermatitis. PMID:26771600

  3. Open-Porous Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Adult Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schmelzer, Eva; Over, Patrick; Nettleship, Ian; Gerlach, Joerg C.

    2016-01-01

    Liver cell culture within three-dimensional structures provides an improved culture system for various applications in basic research, pharmacological screening, and implantable or extracorporeal liver support. Biodegradable calcium-based scaffolds in such systems could enhance liver cell functionality by providing endothelial and hepatic cell support through locally elevated calcium levels, increased surface area for cell attachment, and allowing three-dimensional tissue restructuring. Open-porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds were fabricated and seeded with primary adult human liver cells, which were embedded within or without gels of extracellular matrix protein collagen-1 or hyaluronan. Metabolic functions were assessed after 5, 15, and 28 days. Longer-term cultures exhibited highest cell numbers and liver specific gene expression when cultured on hydroxyapatite scaffolds in collagen-1. Endothelial gene expression was induced in cells cultured on scaffolds without extracellular matrix proteins. Hydroxyapatite induced gene expression for cytokeratin-19 when cells were cultured in collagen-1 gel while culture in hyaluronan increased cytokeratin-19 gene expression independent of the use of scaffold in long-term culture. The implementation of hydroxyapatite composites with extracellular matrices affected liver cell cultures and cell differentiation depending on the type of matrix protein and the presence of a scaffold. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds enable scale-up of hepatic three-dimensional culture models for regenerative medicine applications. PMID:27403430

  4. Blue Light Induces a Distinct Starch Degradation Pathway in Guard Cells for Stomatal Opening.

    PubMed

    Horrer, Daniel; Flütsch, Sabrina; Pazmino, Diana; Matthews, Jack S A; Thalmann, Matthias; Nigro, Arianna; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Lawson, Tracy; Santelia, Diana

    2016-02-01

    Stomatal pores form a crucial interface between the leaf mesophyll and the atmosphere, controlling water and carbon balance in plants [1]. Major advances have been made in understanding the regulatory networks and ion fluxes in the guard cells surrounding the stomatal pore [2]. However, our knowledge on the role of carbon metabolism in these cells is still fragmentary [3-5]. In particular, the contribution of starch in stomatal opening remains elusive [6]. Here, we used Arabidopsis thaliana as a model plant to provide the first quantitative analysis of starch turnover in guard cells of intact leaves during the diurnal cycle. Starch is present in guard cells at the end of night, unlike in the rest of the leaf, but is rapidly degraded within 30 min of light. This process is critical for the rapidity of stomatal opening and biomass production. We exploited Arabidopsis molecular genetics to define the mechanism and regulation of guard cell starch metabolism, showing it to be mediated by a previously uncharacterized pathway. This involves the synergistic action of β-amylase 1 (BAM1) and α-amylase 3 (AMY3)-enzymes that are normally not required for nighttime starch degradation in other leaf tissues. This pathway is under the control of the phototropin-dependent blue-light signaling cascade and correlated with the activity of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. Our results show that guard cell starch degradation has an important role in plant growth by driving stomatal responses to light. PMID:26774787

  5. Noninvasive Evaluation of Heavy Metal Uptake and Storage in Micoralgae Using a Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer-Based Heavy Metal Biosensor1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rajamani, Sathish; Torres, Moacir; Falcao, Vanessa; Ewalt Gray, Jaime; Coury, Daniel A.; Colepicolo, Pio; Sayre, Richard

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based heavy metal biosensor for the quantification of bioavailable free heavy metals in the cytoplasm of the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The biosensor is composed of an end-to-end fusion of cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), chicken metallothionein II (MT-II), and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). In vitro measurements of YFP/CFP fluorescence emission ratios indicated that the addition of metals to the purified biosensor enhanced FRET between CFP and YFP, consistent with heavy metal-induced folding of MT-II. A maximum YFP/CFP FRET ratio of 2.8 was observed in the presence of saturating concentrations of heavy metals. The sensitivity of the biosensor was greatest for Hg2+ followed by Cd2+ ≈ Pb2+ > Zn2+ > Cu2+. The heavy metal biosensor was unresponsive to metals that do not bind to MT-II (Na+ and Mg2+). When expressed in C. reinhardtii, we observed a differential metal-dependent response to saturating external concentrations (1.6 mm) of heavy metals (Pb2+ > Cd2+) that was unlike that observed for the isolated biosensor (in vitro). Significantly, analysis of metal uptake kinetics indicated that equilibration of the cytoplasm with externally applied heavy metals occurred within seconds. Our results also indicated that algae have substantial buffering capacity for free heavy metals in their cytosol, even at high external metal concentrations. PMID:24368336

  6. Development of an all-metal thick film cost effective metallization system for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, B.; Parker, J.

    1982-01-01

    Electrodes made with pastes produced under the previous contract were analyzed and compared with raw materials. A needle-like structure observed on the electroded solar cell was identified as eutectic copper-silicon, a phase considered to benefit the electrical and metallurgical properties of the contact. Electrodes made from copper fluorocarbon and copper silver fluoride also contained this phase but had poor adhesion. A liquid medium, intended to provide transport during carbon fluoride decomposition was incorporated into the paste resulting in better adhesion. The product survived preliminary environmental tests. A 2 cm by 2 cm solar cell made with fluorocarbon activated copper electrodes and gave 7% AMI efficiency (without AR coating). Both silver fluoride and fluorocarbon screened paste electrodes can be produced for approximately $0.04 per watt.

  7. Nanoimprint-assisted fabrication of high haze metal mesh electrode for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwahashi, Takashi; Yang, Rong; Okabe, Noriaki; Sakurai, Junpei; Lin, Jun; Matsunaga, Daisuke

    2014-12-01

    We propose a concept of transparent electrode for solar cells surpassing conventional transparent conductive oxide. Transparent electrode requires low electrical resistivity, high optical transparency, and high optical haze. Although transparent conductive oxide by chemical vapor deposition is widely used as a transparent electrode for solar cells, a breakthrough of the trade-off between electrical and optical properties is required for further improvement of solar cell efficiency. We demonstrate solution-processed electrode fabrication by using nanoimprint technology and metal nanoparticle ink. Silver mesh electrode is self-aligned on nanoimprinted texture with concave pattern as a template for mesh grid. Our electrode concept can realize desired high optical haze by nanoimprinted texture, as well as low electrical resistivity and high optical transparency by metal mesh electrode simultaneously, which boosts solar cell efficiency.

  8. Light-scattering Characteristics of Metal Nanoparticles on a Single Bacterial Cell.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Takamasa; Kiso, Keita; LE, Dung Q; Shiigi, Hiroshi; Nagaoka, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Metal nanoparticles express unique light-scattering characteristics based on the localized surface plasmon resonance, which depends on the metal species, particle size, and aggregation state of the nanoparticles. Therefore, we focused on the light-scattering characteristics of metal nanoparticles, such as silver, gold, and copper oxide, adsorbed on a bacterium. Monodisperse silver nanoparticles expressed the strongest scattered light among them, and showed various colors of scattered light. Although a monodisperse gold nanoparticle produced monochromatic light (green color), the color of the scattered light strongly depended on the aggregation state of the nanoparticles on a bacterium. On the other hand, copper oxide nanoparticles expressed monochromatic light (blue color), regardless of their aggregation states on a bacterium. We examined details concerning the light-scattering characteristics of metal nanoparticles, and discussed the possibility of their applications to bacterial cell imaging. PMID:26960609

  9. Ionothermal synthesis of open-framework metal phosphates with a Kagome lattice network exhibiting canted anti-ferromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guangmei; Valldor, Martin; Mallick, Bert; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2014-01-01

    Four open-framework transition-metal phosphates; (NH4)2Co3(HPO4)2F4 (1), (NH4)Co3(HPO4)2(H2PO4)F2 (2), KCo3(HPO4)2(H2PO4)F2 (3), and KFe3(HPO4)2(H2PO4)F2 (4); are prepared by ionothermal synthesis using pyridinium hexafluorophosphate as the ionic liquid. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that the four compounds contain cobalt/iron–oxygen/fluoride layers with Kagomé topology composed of interlinked face-sharing MO3F3/MO4F2 octahedra. PO3OH pseudo-tetrahedral groups augment the [M3O6F4] (1)/[M3O8F2] layers on both sides to give M3(HPO4)2F4 (1) and M3(HPO4)2F2 (2–4) layers. These layers are stacked along the a axis in a sequence AA…, resulting in the formation of a layer structure for (NH4)2Co3(HPO4)2F4(1). In NH4Co3(HPO4)2(H2PO4)F2 and KM3(HPO4)2(H2PO4)F2, the M3(HPO4)2F2 layers are stacked along the a axis in a sequence AAi… and are connected by [PO3(OH)] tetrahedra, giving rise to a 3-D open framework structure with 10-ring channels along the [001] direction. The negative charges of the inorganic framework are balanced by K+/NH4+ ions located within the channels. The magnetic transition metal cations themselves form layers with stair-case Kagomé topology. Magnetic susceptibility and magnetization measurements reveal that all four compounds exhibit a canted anti-ferromagnetic ground state (Tc = 10 or 13 K for Co and Tc = 27 K for Fe) with different canting angles. The full orbital moment is observed for both Co2+ and Fe2+.

  10. Heavy metal interference with growth hormone signalling in trout hepatoma cells RTH-149.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Barbara; Burlando, Bruno; Panfoli, Isabella; Dondero, Francesco; Viarengo, Aldo; Gallo, Gabriella

    2005-04-01

    We have studied the effects of heavy metals (Hg2+, Cu2+, Cd2+) on growth hormone (GH) activation of tyrosine kinase and Ca2+ signaling in the trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatoma cell line RTH-149. Molecular cloning techniques using primer designed on Oncorhynchus spp. growth hormone receptor (GHR) genes allowed to isolate a highly homologous cDNA fragment from RTH-149 mRNA. Thereafter, cells were analysed by Western blotting or, alternatively, with Ca2+ imaging using fura-2/AM. Exposure of cells to ovine GH alone produced a stimulation of the JAK2/STAT5 pathway and intracellular free Ca2+ variations similar to what has been observed in mammalian models. Cell pre-exposure to Cu2+, Hg2+ or Cd2+ affected cell response to GH by enhancing (Cu2+) or inhibiting (Cd2+) the phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT5. Heavy metals induced the activation of the MAP kinase p38, and pre-exposure to Hg2+ or Cu2+ followed by GH enhanced the effect of metal alone. Image analysis of fura2-loaded cells indicated that pre-treatment with Hg2+ prior to GH produced a considerable increase of the [Ca2+]i variation produced by either element, while using Cu2+ or Cd2+ the result was similar but much weaker. Data suggest that heavy metals interfere with GH as follows: Hg2+ is nearly ineffective on JAK/STAT and strongly synergistic on Ca2+ signaling; Cu2+ is activatory on JAK/STAT and slightly activatory on Ca2+; Cd2+ is strongly inhibitory on JAK/STAT and slightly activatory on Ca2+; heavy metals could partially activate STAT via p38 independently from GH interaction. PMID:15954744

  11. Development of metallization process. FSA project, cell and module formation research area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, A., III

    1984-01-01

    New pastes were evaluated that contained additives to aid in the silicon-to-metallization contact. None were completely successful. A reevaluation of the molybdenum oxide paste and the two-step screen printing process was done. The oxide paste did not show promise. The two-step process enabled soldering of the cells but the cells still had a high series resistance. Pastes are on order from a different manufacturer.

  12. Mechanisms of Contact-Mediated Killing of Yeast Cells on Dry Metallic Copper Surfaces▿

    PubMed Central

    Quaranta, Davide; Krans, Travis; Santo, Christophe Espírito; Elowsky, Christian G.; Domaille, Dylan W.; Chang, Christopher J.; Grass, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Surfaces made of copper or its alloys have strong antimicrobial properties against a wide variety of microorganisms. However, the molecular mode of action responsible for the antimicrobial efficacy of metallic copper is not known. Here, we show that dry copper surfaces inactivate Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae within minutes in a process called contact-mediated killing. Cellular copper ion homeostasis systems influenced the kinetics of contact-mediated killing in both organisms. Deregulated copper ion uptake through a hyperactive S. cerevisiae Ctr1p (ScCtr1p) copper uptake transporter in Saccharomyces resulted in faster inactivation of mutant cells than of wild-type cells. Similarly, lack of the C. albicans Crp1p (CaCrp1p) copper-efflux P-type ATPase or the metallothionein CaCup1p caused more-rapid killing of Candida mutant cells than of wild-type cells. Candida and Saccharomyces took up large quantities of copper ions as soon as they were in contact with copper surfaces, as indicated by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) analysis and by the intracellular copper ion-reporting dye coppersensor-1. Exposure to metallic copper did not cause lethality through genotoxicity, deleterious action on a cell's genetic material, as indicated by a mutation assay with Saccharomyces. Instead, toxicity mediated by metallic copper surfaces targeted membranes in both yeast species. With the use of Live/Dead staining, onset of rapid and extensive cytoplasmic membrane damage was observed in cells from copper surfaces. Fluorescence microscopy using the indicator dye DiSBaC2(3) indicated that cell membranes were depolarized. Also, during contact-mediated killing, vacuoles first became enlarged and then disappeared from the cells. Lastly, in metallic copper-stressed yeasts, oxidative stress in the cytoplasm and in mitochondria was elevated. PMID:21097600

  13. High temperature corrosion of metallic materials in molten carbonate fuel cells environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, G.; Vegni, S.; Capobianco, P.; Golgovici, F.

    Molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFCs) are electrochemical devices that convert energy of a chemical reaction into electricity without any kind of combustion. So, MCFCs are promising for their high efficiency and their low environmental pollution. A limiting aspect for reaching the goal of 40,000 h of life-time is the corrosion of metallic parts of MCFC, especially for current collectors and separator plates. Generally, this corrosion leads to metal loss and to an important increase of the electrical resistance due to the formation of resistive oxides. One of the most critic components in a MCFC is the anodic side metallic components. More used choice for these components is actually a sheet of AISI310S cladded at both sides by a Ni layer. The analysis of the behaviour of this material after different steps of corrosion in a typical molten carbonate fuel cell environment could be important to understand some phenomena that cause the damage of the anodic current collector.

  14. [Nitric oxide and electrogenic metals (Ca, Na, K) in epidermal cells].

    PubMed

    Petukhov, V I; Baumane, L K; Dmitriev, E V; Vanin, A F

    2015-01-01

    Using atomic emission spectrometry and EPR analysis metal-ligand homeostasis (MLH) has been studied in epidermal cells of 954 liquidators of the Chernobyl accident and 947 healthy individuals. A possible association of the redox status with the quantitative changes in the MLH, which could be used as discriminators of oxidative/nitrosative stress, attracts special interest. Characteristic features of oxidative stress mainly related to electrogenic metals (Ca, K, Na), were found not only among the liquidators examined, but also in some healthy individuals (18.1%); this suggests the presence of oxidative/nitrosative stress of non-radiation origin. Correlation between intracellular production of nitric oxide (NO) with quantitative changes in the electrogenic metals may indicate the possible involvement of NO in the generation of an electric potential of the cell. PMID:26350742

  15. Development of Li-Metal Battery Cell Chemistries at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lvovich, Vadim F.

    2015-01-01

    State-of-the-Art lithium-ion battery technology is limited by specific energy and thus not sufficiently advanced to support the energy storage necessary for aerospace needs, such as all-electric aircraft and many deep space NASA exploration missions. In response to this technological gap, our research team at NASA Glenn Research Center has been active in formulating concepts and developing testing hardware and components for Li-metal battery cell chemistries. Lithium metal anodes combined with advanced cathode materials could provide up to five times the specific energy versus state-of-the-art lithium-ion cells (1000 Whkg versus 200 Whkg). Although Lithium metal anodes offer very high theoretical capacity, they have not been shown to successfully operate reversibly.

  16. Fabrication of Open-Cell Al Foams and Evaluation of their Mechanical Response under Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michailidis, N.; Stergioudi, F.; Omar, H.; Tsipas, D. N.

    2010-01-01

    In the present paper a novel procedure for describing the solid geometry of open cell foams is introduced, facilitating the establishment of a corresponding FEM model for simulating the material behaviour in micro-tension. Open-cell Al-foams were fabricated using the polymer impregnating method. A serial sectioning image-based process is described to capture, reproduce and visualize the exact three-dimensional (3D) microstructure of the examined foam. The generated 3D geometry of the Al-foam, derived from the synthesis of digital cross sectional images of the foam, was appropriately adjusted to build a FE model simulating the deformation conditions of the Al-foam under micro-tension loads. The obtained results enabled the visualisation of the stress fields in the Al-foam, allowing for a full investigation of its mechanical behaviour.

  17. Suitability of LN2 impregnated Open-Cell Foam as Electric Insulant for Superconducting Power Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumereder, C.; Mifka, M.; Muhr, M.

    2006-06-01

    The suitability of an open-cell foam is investigated for the application as electric insulant in superconducting power equipment. The tested foam is made from melamine resin, a thermoset plastic from the aminoplastics group; it is a mechanical very flexible material with excellence compatibility to high and low temperature. The aim of these investigations was to test the aptitude of the liquid nitrogen impregnated open-cell foam with respect to the dielectric properties and the electric strength under different conditions. In this paper the results of permittivity measurements and ramp voltage tests are discussed and an outlook for future applications is given. The tests showed excellence mechanical and thermal characteristics for the application in LN2 vessels. The ACBV of the LN2 impregnated foam was 50 % less than the ACBV of pure LN2.

  18. Method for cleaning a solar cell surface opening made with a solar etch paste

    DOEpatents

    Rohatgi, Ajeet; Meemongkolkiat, Vichai

    2010-06-22

    A thin silicon solar cell having a back dielectric passivation and rear contact with local back surface field is described. Specifically, the solar cell may be fabricated from a crystalline silicon wafer having a thickness from 50 to 500 micrometers. A barrier layer and a dielectric layer are applied at least to the back surface of the silicon wafer to protect the silicon wafer from deformation when the rear contact is formed. At least one opening is made to the dielectric layer. An aluminum contact that provides a back surface field is formed in the opening and on the dielectric layer. The aluminum contact may be applied by screen printing an aluminum paste having from one to 12 atomic percent silicon and then applying a heat treatment at 750 degrees Celsius.

  19. Characterization of compressive and short beam shear strength of bamboo opened cell foam core sandwich composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setyawan, Paryanto Dwi; Sugiman, Saputra, Yudhi

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents the compressive and the short beam shear strength of a sandwich composite with opened cell foam made of bamboo fiber as the core and plywood as the skins. The core thickness was varied from 10 mm to 40 mm keeping the volume fraction of fiber constant. Several test s were carried out including the core density, flatwise compressive and the short beam shear testing in three point bending. The results show that the density of bamboo opened cell foam is comparable with commercial plastic foam, such as polyurethane foam. The compressive strength tends to increase linearly with increasing the core thickness. The short beam shear failure load of the sandwich composite increases with the increase of core thickness, however on the contrary, the short beam shear strength which tends to sharply decrease from the thickness of 10 mm to 30 mm and then becomes flat.

  20. Propagation of sound in highly porous open-cell elastic foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    This work presents both theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of attenuation and progressive phase constants of sound in open-cell, highly porous, elastic polyurethane foams. The foams are available commercially in graded pore sizes for which information about the static flow resistance, thermal time constant, volume porosity, dynamic structure factor, and speed of sound is known. The analysis is specialized to highly porous foams which can be efficient sound absorbers at audio frequencies. Negligible effect of internal wave coupling on attenuation and phase shift for the frequency range 16-6000 Hz was predicted and no experimentally significant effects were observed in the bulk samples studied. The agreement between predictions and measurements in bulk materials is excellent. The analysis is applicable to both the regular and compressed elastic open-cell foams.

  1. Polymer defect states modulate open-circuit voltage in bulk-heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ripolles, Teresa S.; Guerrero, Antonio; Garcia-Belmonte, Germà

    2013-12-09

    Defect states influence the operation of organic solar cells altering transport, recombination, and energetic mechanisms. This work investigates how processing conditions induce morphology-related, electrically active defects in the donor polymer of bulk-heterojunction solar cells. Structural order is inferred from absorption and X-ray diffraction data, while defect density is determined from capacitance methods. A correlation is observed between the polymer nanocrystallite size, the defect concentration, and the output voltage. For the case of poly(3-hexylthiophene), processing that promote crystallinity is beneficial for the device performance as it decreases the defect density (energy disorder) that finally enlarges the maximum achievable open-circuit voltage. Defect states within the effective bandgap modulate the downshift of the hole Fermi level upon illumination that in turn establishes the achievable open-circuit voltage.

  2. Molecular solution processing of metal chalcogenide thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenbing

    The barrier to utilize solar generated electricity mainly comes from their higher cost relative to fossil fuels. However, innovations with new materials and processing techniques can potentially make cost effective photovoltaics. One such strategy is to develop solution processed photovoltaics which avoid the expensive vacuum processing required by traditional solar cells. The dissertation is mainly focused on two absorber material system for thin film solar cells: chalcopyrite CuIn(S,Se)2 (CISS) and kesterite Cu2ZnSn(S,Se) 4 organized in chronological order. Chalcopyrite CISS is a very promising material. It has been demonstrated to achieve the highest efficiency among thin film solar cells. Scaled-up industry production at present has reached the giga-watt per year level. The process however mainly relies on vacuum systems which account for a significant percentage of the manufacturing cost. In the first section of this dissertation, hydrazine based solution processed CISS has been explored. The focus of the research involves the procedures to fabricate devices from solution. The topics covered in Chapter 2 include: precursor solution synthesis with a focus on understanding the solution chemistry, CISS absorber formation from precursor, properties modification toward favorable device performance, and device structure innovation toward tandem device. For photovoltaics to have a significant impact toward meeting energy demands, the annual production capability needs to be on TW-level. On such a level, raw materials supply of rare elements (indium for CIS or tellurium for CdTe) will be the bottleneck limiting the scalability. Replacing indium with zinc and tin, earth abundant kesterite CZTS exhibits great potential to reach the goal of TW-level with no limitations on raw material availability. Chapter 3 shows pioneering work towards solution processing of CZTS film at low temperature. The solution processed devices show performances which rival vacuum

  3. NRF2 Oxidative Stress Induced by Heavy Metals is Cell Type Dependent

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to metallic environmental toxicants has been demonstrated to induce a variety of oxidative stress responses in mammalian cells. The transcription factor Nrf2 is activated in response to oxidative stress and coordinates the expression of antioxidant gene products. In this...

  4. Dual-color encoded DNAzyme nanostructures for multiplexed detection of intracellular metal ions in living cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenjiao; Liang, Wenbing; Li, Daxiu; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun

    2016-11-15

    The detection of intracellular metal ions is of great importance in understanding metal homeostasis in cells and related diseases, and yet it remains a significant challenge to achieve this goal. Based on a new self-assembled and dual-color encoded DNAzyme nanostructure, we describe here an approach for multiplexed sensing of UO2(2+) and Pb(2+) in living cells. The fluorescently quenched nanoprobes can be prepared by simple thermal annealing of four ssDNAs containing the metal ion-dependent enzymatic and substrate sequences. The self-assembly formation of the nanostructures are verified by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The target metal ions can cleave the substrate sequences in the DNAzyme nanostructures to recover fluorescent emissions at different wavelengths for sensitive and selective in vitro multiplexed detection of UO2(2+) and Pb(2+) with the detection limits of 0.6nM and 3.9nM, respectively. Importantly, we demonstrate that these nanoprobes are stable in cell lysates and can enter cells without the aid of any transfection agents for simultaneous imaging intracellular UO2(2+) and Pb(2+). Moreover, the nanoprobes offer excellent biocompatibility and non-cytotoxicity. With these unique features, the dual-color encoded nanostructures presented here can thus offer new opportunities for multiplexed detection of specific intracellular species. PMID:27236722

  5. ACTIVATION OF THE EGF RECEPTOR SIGNALING PATHWAY IN HUMAN AIRWAY EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that exposure to combustion-derived metals rapidly (within 20 min) activated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), in the human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS. To study the mechanisms respons...

  6. Alkaline polymer electrolyte fuel cells completely free from noble metal catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shanfu; Pan, Jing; Huang, Aibin; Zhuang, Lin; Lu, Juntao

    2008-01-01

    In recent decades, fuel cell technology has been undergoing revolutionary developments, with fundamental progress being the replacement of electrolyte solutions with polymer electrolytes, making the device more compact in size and higher in power density. Nowadays, acidic polymer electrolytes, typically Nafion, are widely used. Despite great success, fuel cells based on acidic polyelectrolyte still depend heavily on noble metal catalysts, predominantly platinum (Pt), thus increasing the cost and hampering the widespread application of fuel cells. Here, we report a type of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC) employing a hydroxide ion-conductive polymer, quaternary ammonium polysulphone, as alkaline electrolyte and nonprecious metals, chromium-decorated nickel and silver, as the catalyst for the negative and positive electrodes, respectively. In addition to the development of a high-performance alkaline polymer electrolyte particularly suitable for fuel cells, key progress has been achieved in catalyst tailoring: The surface electronic structure of nickel has been tuned to suppress selectively the surface oxidative passivation with retained activity toward hydrogen oxidation. This report of a H2–O2 PEFC completely free from noble metal catalysts in both the positive and negative electrodes represents an important advancement in the research and development of fuel cells.

  7. Nanoscale investigation of the interface situation of plated nickel and thermally formed nickel silicide for silicon solar cell metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondon, A.; Wang, D.; Zuschlag, A.; Bartsch, J.; Glatthaar, M.; Glunz, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    In the context of nickel silicide formation from plated nickel layers for solar cell metallization, there are several open questions regarding contact adhesion and electrical properties. Nanoscale characterization by transmission electron microscopy has been employed to support these investigations. Interfacial oxides and silicide phases were investigated on differently prepared samples by different analytical methods associated with transmission electron microscopy analysis. Processing variations included the pre-treatment of samples before nickel plating, the used plating solution and the thermal budget for the nickel-silicon solid-state reaction. It was shown that interface oxides of only few nm thickness on both silicon and nickel silicide are present on the samples, depending on the chosen process sequence, which have been shown to play an important role in adhesion of nickel on silicide in an earlier publication. From sample pretreatment variations, conclusions about the role of an interfacial oxide in silicide formation and its influence on phase formation were drawn. Such an oxide layer hinders silicide formation except for pinhole sites. This reduces the availability of Ni and causes a silicide with low Ni content to form. Without an interfacial oxide a continuous nickel silicide of greater depth, polycrystalline modification and expected phase according to thermal budget is formed. Information about the nature of silicide growth on typical solar cell surfaces could be obtained from silicide phase and geometric observations, which were supported by FIB tomography. The theory of isotropic NiSi growth and orientation dependent NiSi2 growth was derived. By this, a very well performing low-cost metallization for silicon solar cells has been brought an important step closer to industrial introduction.

  8. Development of an All-Metal Thick Film Cost Effective Metallization System for Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, B.

    1980-01-01

    Materials including copper powders, silver-fluoride, and silicon wafers were procured and copper pastes were prepared. Electrodes made with copper pastes were analyzed and compared with the raw materials. A needle-like structure was observed on the electroded solar cells, and was identified as eutectic copper-silicon by electron probe X-ray spectroscopy. The existence of this phase was thought to benefit electrical and metallurgical properties of the contact. Subsequently electrodes made from new material were also shown to contain this phase while simultaneously having poor adhesion.

  9. Effect of embedded metal nanocrystals on the resistive switching characteristics in NiN-based resistive random access memory cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Min Ju; Kim, Hee-Dong; Man Hong, Seok; Hyun Park, Ju; Su Jeon, Dong; Geun Kim, Tae

    2014-03-07

    The metal nanocrystals (NCs) embedded-NiN-based resistive random access memory cells are demonstrated using several metal NCs (i.e., Pt, Ni, and Ti) with different physical parameters in order to investigate the metal NC's dependence on resistive switching (RS) characteristics. First, depending on the electronegativity of metal, the size of metal NCs is determined and this affects the operating current of memory cells. If metal NCs with high electronegativity are incorporated, the size of the NCs is reduced; hence, the operating current is reduced owing to the reduced density of the electric field around the metal NCs. Second, the potential wells are formed by the difference of work function between the metal NCs and active layer, and the barrier height of the potential wells affects the level of operating voltage as well as the conduction mechanism of metal NCs embedded memory cells. Therefore, by understanding these correlations between the active layer and embedded metal NCs, we can optimize the RS properties of metal NCs embedded memory cells as well as predict their conduction mechanisms.

  10. Binding of heavy metal ions in aggregates of microbial cells, EPS and biogenic iron minerals measured in-situ using metal- and glycoconjugates-specific fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Likai; Guo, Yuan; Byrne, James M.; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Schmid, Gregor; Ingino, Pablo; Li, Jianli; Neu, Thomas R.; Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Kappler, Andreas; Obst, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Aggregates consisting of bacterial cells, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and Fe(III) minerals formed by Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria are common at bulk or microscale chemical interfaces where Fe cycling occurs. The high sorption capacity and binding capacity of cells, EPS, and minerals controls the mobility and fate of heavy metals. However, it remains unclear to which of these component(s) the metals will bind in complex aggregates. To clarify this question, the present study focuses on 3D mapping of heavy metals sorbed to cells, glycoconjugates that comprise the majority of EPS constituents, and Fe(III) mineral aggregates formed by the phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria Rhodobacter ferrooxidans SW2 using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in combination with metal- and glycoconjugates-specific fluorophores. The present study evaluated the influence of glycoconjugates, microbial cell surfaces, and (biogenic) Fe(III) minerals, and the availability of ferrous and ferric iron on heavy metal sorption. Analyses in this study provide detailed knowledge on the spatial distribution of metal ions in the aggregates at the sub-μm scale, which is essential to understand the underlying mechanisms of microbe-mineral-metal interactions. The heavy metals (Au3+, Cd2+, Cr3+, CrO42-, Cu2+, Hg2+, Ni2+, Pd2+, tributyltin (TBT) and Zn2+) were found mainly sorbed to cell surfaces, present within the glycoconjugates matrix, and bound to the mineral surfaces, but not incorporated into the biogenic Fe(III) minerals. Statistical analysis revealed that all ten heavy metals tested showed relatively similar sorption behavior that was affected by the presence of sorbed ferrous and ferric iron. Results in this study showed that in addition to the mineral surfaces, both bacterial cell surfaces and the glycoconjugates provided most of sorption sites for heavy metals. Simultaneously, ferrous and ferric iron ions competed with the heavy metals for sorption sites on the organic

  11. Combinatorial electrochemical cell array for high throughput screening of micro-fuel-cells and metal/air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Rongzhong

    2007-07-01

    An electrochemical cell array was designed that contains a common air electrode and 16 microanodes for high throughput screening of both fuel cells (based on polymer electrolyte membrane) and metal/air batteries (based on liquid electrolyte). Electrode materials can easily be coated on the anodes of the electrochemical cell array and screened by switching a graphite probe from one cell to the others. The electrochemical cell array was used to study direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), including high throughput screening of electrode catalysts and determination of optimum operating conditions. For screening of DMFCs, there is about 6% relative standard deviation (percentage of standard deviation versus mean value) for discharge current from 10to20mA/cm2. The electrochemical cell array was also used to study tin/air batteries. The effect of Cu content in the anode electrode on the discharge performance of the tin/air battery was investigated. The relative standard deviations for screening of metal/air battery (based on zinc/air) are 2.4%, 3.6%, and 5.1% for discharge current at 50, 100, and 150mA/cm2, respectively.

  12. Combinatorial electrochemical cell array for high throughput screening of micro-fuel-cells and metal/air batteries.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rongzhong

    2007-07-01

    An electrochemical cell array was designed that contains a common air electrode and 16 microanodes for high throughput screening of both fuel cells (based on polymer electrolyte membrane) and metal/air batteries (based on liquid electrolyte). Electrode materials can easily be coated on the anodes of the electrochemical cell array and screened by switching a graphite probe from one cell to the others. The electrochemical cell array was used to study direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), including high throughput screening of electrode catalysts and determination of optimum operating conditions. For screening of DMFCs, there is about 6% relative standard deviation (percentage of standard deviation versus mean value) for discharge current from 10 to 20 mAcm(2). The electrochemical cell array was also used to study tin/air batteries. The effect of Cu content in the anode electrode on the discharge performance of the tin/air battery was investigated. The relative standard deviations for screening of metal/air battery (based on zinc/air) are 2.4%, 3.6%, and 5.1% for discharge current at 50, 100, and 150 mAcm(2), respectively. PMID:17672740

  13. Ferromagnetic Bare Metal Stent for Endothelial Cell Capture and Retention.

    PubMed

    Uthamaraj, Susheil; Tefft, Brandon J; Hlinomaz, Ota; Sandhu, Gurpreet S; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Rapid endothelialization of cardiovascular stents is needed to reduce stent thrombosis and to avoid anti-platelet therapy which can reduce bleeding risk. The feasibility of using magnetic forces to capture and retain endothelial outgrowth cells (EOC) labeled with super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) has been shown previously. But this technique requires the development of a mechanically functional stent from a magnetic and biocompatible material followed by in-vitro and in-vivo testing to prove rapid endothelialization. We developed a weakly ferromagnetic stent from 2205 duplex stainless steel using computer aided design (CAD) and its design was further refined using finite element analysis (FEA). The final design of the stent exhibited a principal strain below the fracture limit of the material during mechanical crimping and expansion. One hundred stents were manufactured and a subset of them was used for mechanical testing, retained magnetic field measurements, in-vitro cell capture studies, and in-vivo implantation studies. Ten stents were tested for deployment to verify if they sustained crimping and expansion cycle without failure. Another 10 stents were magnetized using a strong neodymium magnet and their retained magnetic field was measured. The stents showed that the retained magnetism was sufficient to capture SPION-labeled EOC in our in-vitro studies. SPION-labeled EOC capture and retention was verified in large animal models by implanting 1 magnetized stent and 1 non-magnetized control stent in each of 4 pigs. The stented arteries were explanted after 7 days and analyzed histologically. The weakly magnetic stents developed in this study were capable of attracting and retaining SPION-labeled endothelial cells which can promote rapid healing. PMID:26436434

  14. Edaravone protects osteoblastic cells from dexamethasone through inhibiting oxidative stress and mPTP opening.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen-xiao; Zheng, Hai-ya; Lan, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Existing evidences have emphasized an important role of oxidative stress in dexamethasone (Dex)-induced osteoblastic cell damages. Here, we investigated the possible anti-Dex activity of edaravone in osteoblastic cells, and studied the underlying mechanisms. We showed that edaravone dose-dependently attenuated Dex-induced death and apoptosis of established human or murine osteoblastic cells. Further, Dex-mediated damages to primary murine osteoblasts were also alleviated by edaravone. In osteoblastic cells/osteoblasts, Dex induced significant oxidative stresses, tested by increased levels of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation, which were remarkably inhibited by edaravone. Meanwhile, edaravone repressed Dex-induced mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening, or mitochondrial membrane potential reduction, in osteoblastic cells/osteoblasts. Significantly, edaravone-induced osteoblast-protective activity against Dex was alleviated with mPTP inhibition through cyclosporin A or cyclophilin-D siRNA. Together, we demonstrate that edaravone protects osteoblasts from Dex-induced damages probably through inhibiting oxidative stresses and following mPTP opening. PMID:26179849

  15. Enhanced Open-Circuit Voltage of PbS Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Woojun; Boercker, Janice E.; Lumb, Matthew P.; Placencia, Diogenes; Foos, Edward E.; Tischler, Joseph G.

    2013-01-01

    Nanocrystal quantum dots (QD) show great promise toward improving solar cell efficiencies through the use of quantum confinement to tune absorbance across the solar spectrum and enable multi-exciton generation. Despite this remarkable potential for high photocurrent generation, the achievable open-circuit voltage (Voc) is fundamentally limited due to non-radiative recombination processes in QD solar cells. Here we report the highest open-circuit voltages to date for colloidal QD based solar cells under one sun illumination. This Voc of 692 ± 7 mV for 1.4 eV PbS QDs is a result of improved passivation of the defective QD surface, demonstrating as a function of the QD bandgap (Eg). Comparing experimental Voc variation with the theoretical upper-limit obtained from one diode modeling of the cells with different Eg, these results clearly demonstrate that there is a tremendous opportunity for improvement of Voc to values greater than 1 V by using smaller QDs in QD solar cells. PMID:23868514

  16. Mild ring-opening coupling of liquid-phase cyclohexane to diesel components using sulfated metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Mao, Wei; Ma, Hongzhu; Wang, Bo

    2010-04-15

    We have investigated a mild simple synthesis method for ring-opening coupling of liquid-phase cyclohexane to diesel components using various sulfated metal oxides [SO(4)(2-)/Fe(2)O(3) (SF), SO(4)(2-)/TiO(2) (ST) and SO(4)(2-)/ZrO(2) (SZ)] under low temperature (333K) and atmospheric pressure. Neither solvent nor promoters are needed in the reaction system so as to be a clean approach. Operating under these reaction conditions, a maximum activity of 6% was obtained with SF as catalyst, and a significantly high selectivity of 74.5% for nicer diesel components (n-C(14)-C(18)) was obtained simultaneously. Whereas, ST and SZ displayed low activity for cyclohexane reaction. By utilization of the temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia (NH(3)-TPD) measurement and the N(2) adsorption method, the results suggested that a satisfied acid strength distribution and high density of acid sites appeared in SF catalyst in comparison with other catalysts, which may play an important role in the reaction. PMID:19962237

  17. Open volume defects and magnetic phase transition in Fe{sub 60}Al{sub 40} transition metal aluminide

    SciTech Connect

    Liedke, M. O. Anwand, W.; Butterling, M.; Wagner, A.; Bali, R.; Cornelius, S.; Potzger, K.; Trinh, T. T.; Salamon, S.; Walecki, D.; Smekhova, A.; Wende, H.

    2015-04-28

    Magnetic phase transition in the Fe{sub 60}Al{sub 40} transition metal aluminide from the ferromagnetic disordered A2-phase to the paramagnetic ordered B2-phase as a function of annealing up to 1000 °C has been investigated by means of magneto-optical and spectroscopy techniques, i.e., Kerr effect, positron annihilation, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The positron annihilation spectroscopy has been performed in-situ sequentially after each annealing step at the Apparatus for In-situ Defect Analysis that is a unique tool combining positron annihilation spectroscopy with temperature treatment, material evaporation, ion irradiation, and sheet resistance measurement techniques. The overall goal was to investigate the importance of the open volume defects onto the magnetic phase transition. No evidence of variation in the vacancy concentration in matching the magnetic phase transition temperature range (400–600 °C) has been found, whereas higher temperatures showed an increase in the vacancy concentration.

  18. In situ rapid preparation of homochiral metal-organic framework coated column for open tubular capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Pan, Congjie; Wang, Weifeng; Chen, Xingguo

    2016-01-01

    Fabricating metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with the use of nucleating agents in the microenvironment have attracted increasing attention recently. Herein, a simple and rapid synthesis method was developed to in situ fabricate homochiral MOF [Zn(s-nip)2]n in the capillary inner wall by using ZnO nanoparticles as efficient nucleating agents for open tubular capillary electrochromatography (OT-CEC) separation of monoamine neurotransmitters enantiomers of epinephrine, isoprenaline and synephrine, the diastereoisomers of ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, the isomers of nitrophenols and analogues of bisphenols with good resolution. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for the analytes migration time of intra-day, inter-day and column-to-column were in the range of 0.8-2.1% (n=10), 0.3-3.2% (n=3) and 3.2-9.3% (n=3), respectively. Additionally, the homochiral MOF [Zn(s-nip)2]n coated capillary column could be successively used over 260 runs without observable change in the separation efficiency. PMID:26702592

  19. An immobilized carboxyl containing metal-organic framework-5 stationary phase for open-tubular capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Bao, Tao; Tang, Pingxiu; Mao, Zhenkun; Chen, Zilin

    2016-07-01

    A novel capillary column with metal-organic framework-5 (MOF-5) as the stationary phase was prepared for open-tubular capillary electrochromatography (OT-CEC). To grow MOF-5, the fused-silica capillary was functionalized firstly using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and glutaraldehyde as covalent linkers; and then MOF-5 would be immobilized on the inner wall of COOH-terminated capillary by epitaxial growth, to produce a MOF-5-modified capillary. The successful growth of MOF-5 has been characterized and confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, X-Ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectra. The influence of pH value and methanol on electroosmotic flow (EOF) of the MOF-5-modified capillary column was investigated. The EOF showed a pH-dependent from anode to cathode. The immobilization of MOF-5 improved the interactions between analytes and layer on inner wall of the capillary. Excellent separations of substituted benzenes and acidic and basic analytes were obtained on the fabricated capillary columns. The MOF-5-modified capillary columns exhibited good repeatability, with relative standard deviations for intra-day, inter-day runs and column-to-column less than 1.87%, 3.53%, and 8.49%, respectively. Our successful application of MOF-5 paved the way for introducing series of dicarboxylate-based isoreticular MOFs to OT-CEC as novel stationary phase. PMID:27154687

  20. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), General Electric Phase 1. Volume 2: Advanced energy conversion systems. Part 1: Open-cycle gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. H.; Corman, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Ten energy conversion systems are defined and analyzed in terms of efficiency. These include: open-cycle gas turbine recuperative; open-cycle gas turbine; closed-cycle gas turbine; supercritical CO2 cycle; advanced steam cycle; liquid metal topping cycle; open-cycle MHD; closed-cycle inert gas MHD; closed-cycle liquid metal MHD; and fuel cells. Results are presented.

  1. Material characterization of open-cell foams by finite element based micromechanics methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiyagasundaram, Prasanna

    Finite element based micromechanics methods have been used for predicting elastic properties, failure strengths, mode-I, mode-II and mixed mode fracture toughness of open-cell foams. In predicting the orthotropic elastic properties, foams with both equisided and Kelvin-elongated tetrakaidecahedron unit cells are studied. Periodic Boundary Conditions (PBCs) exploiting the special repeating microstructural geometry for these materials have been derived and have been applied on the micromechanical model to calculate the elastic properties. It is shown that the results for the elastic constants from these finite element based models agree well with the available analytical models. Further studies such as effect of a varying strut cross-section over a uniform strut cross-section on the elastic properties are also done in the same context. Next, the procedures used for predicting the above elastic properties are extended to predict multi-axial failure strengths of these low density open cell foams with a microstructure made out of tetrakaidecahedral unit cells. Again, foams with both equisided tetrakaidecahedron and Kelvin-elongated tetrakaidecahedron as unit cells are studied. Failure strengths in different material directions are computed using direct Micromechanics based Methods (DMM). Further, the effect of a varying strut cross section over a uniform strut cross section on failure strengths is also presented. Bi-axial failure envelopes for foams with equisided tetrakaidecahedron unit cells are shown to take the shape of a regular hexagon in the hydrostatic plane. The tri-axial failure envelope for foams made out of equisided tetrakaidecahedron unit cells is shown to have a shape of a double hexagonal pyramid. The bi-axial and tri-axial failure envelopes of foams with elongated tetrakaidecahedron unit cells are also plotted and the effect of anisotropy in foams with these unit cells on the failure envelopes is also discussed. Next, global-local models are developed

  2. Toxicity of 11 Metal Oxide Nanoparticles to Three Mammalian Cell Types In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Ivask, Angela; Titma, Tiina; Visnapuu, Meeri; Vija, Heiki; Kakinen, Aleksandr; Sihtmae, Mariliis; Pokhrel, Suman; Madler, Lutz; Heinlaan, Margit; Kisand, Vambola; Shimmo, Ruth; Kahru, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge on potential harmful effects of metallic nanomaterials lags behind their increased use in consumer products and therefore, the safety data on various nanomaterials applicable for risk assessment are urgently needed. In this study, 11 metal oxide nanoparticles (MeOx NPs) prepared using flame pyrolysis method were analyzed for their toxicity against human alveolar epithelial cells A549, human epithelial colorectal cells Caco2 and murine fibroblast cell line Balb/c 3T3. The cell lines were exposed for 24 h to suspensions of 3-100 μg/mL MeOx NPs and cellular viability was evaluated using. Neutral Red Uptake (NRU) assay. In parallel to NPs, toxicity of soluble salts of respective metals was analyzed, to reveal the possible cellular effects of metal ions shedding from the NPs. The potency of MeOx to produce reactive oxygen species was evaluated in the cell-free assay. The used three cell lines showed comparable toxicity responses to NPs and their metal ion counterparts in the current test setting. Six MeOx NPs (Al2O3, Fe3O4, MgO, SiO2, TiO2, WO3) did not show toxic effects below 100 µg/mL. For five MeOx NPs, the averaged 24 h IC50 values for the three mammalian cell lines were 16.4 µg/mL for CuO, 22.4 µg/mL for ZnO, 57.3 µg/mL for Sb2O3, 132.3 µg/mL for Mn3O4 and 129 µg/mL for Co3O4. Comparison of the dissolution level of MeOx and the toxicity of soluble salts allowed to conclude that the toxicity of CuO, ZnO and Sb2O3 NPs was driven by release of metal ions. The toxic effects of Mn3O4 and Co3O4 could be attributed to the ROS-inducing ability of these NPs. All the NPs were internalized by the cells according to light microscopy studies but also proven by TEM, and internalization of Co3O4 NPs seemed to be most prominent in this aspect. In conclusion, this work provides valuable toxicological data for a library of 11 MeOx NPs. Combining the knowledge on toxic or non-toxic nature of nanomaterials may be used for safe-by-design approach. PMID:25961521

  3. Cell Culture in Microgravity: Opening the Door to Space Cell Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Adaptational response of human cell populations to microgravity is investigated using simulation, short-term Shuttle experiments, and long-term microgravity. Simulation consists of a clinostatically-rotated cell culture system. The system is a horizontally-rotated cylinder completely filled with culture medium. Low speed rotation results in continuous-fall of the cells through the fluid medium. In this setting, cells: 1) aggregate, 2) propagate in three dimensions, 3) synthesize matrix, 4) differentiate, and 5) form sinusoids that facilitate mass transfer. Space cell culture is conducted in flight bioreactors and in static incubators. Cells grown in microgravity are: bovine cartilage, promyelocytic leukemia, kidney proximal tubule cells, adrenal medulla, breast and colon cancer, and endothelium. Cells were cultured in space to test specific hypotheses. Cartilage cells were used to determine structural differences in cartilage grown in space compared to ground-based bioreactors. Results from a 130-day experiment on Mir revealed that cartilage grown in space was substantially more compressible due to insufficient glycosaminoglycan in the matrix. Interestingly, earth-grown cartilage conformed better to the dimensions of the scaffolding material, while the Mir specimens were spherical. The other cell populations are currently being analyzed for cell surface properties, gene expression, and differentiation. Results suggest that some cells spontaneously differentiate in microgravity. Additionally, vast changes in gene expression may occur in response to microgravity. In conclusion, the transition to microgravity may constitute a physical perturbation in cells resulting in unique gene expressions, the consequences of which may be useful in tissue engineering, disease modeling, and space cell biology.

  4. Adsorption and ring-opening of lactide on the chiral metal surface Pt(321){sup S} studied by density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, J.-H.; Kosov, D. S.

    2015-01-28

    We study the adsorption and ring-opening of lactide on the naturally chiral metal surface Pt(321){sup S}. Lactide is a precursor for polylactic acid ring-opening polymerization, and Pt is a well known catalyst surface. We study, here, the energetics of the ring-opening of lactide on a surface that has a high density of kink atoms. These sites are expected to be present on a realistic Pt surface and show enhanced catalytic activity. The use of a naturally chiral surface also enables us to study potential chiral selectivity effects of the reaction at the same time. Using density functional theory with a functional that includes the van der Waals forces in a first-principles manner, we find modest adsorption energies of around 1.4 eV for the pristine molecule and different ring-opened states. The energy barrier to be overcome in the ring-opening reaction is found to be very small at 0.32 eV and 0.30 eV for LL- and its chiral partner DD-lactide, respectively. These energies are much smaller than the activation energy for a dehydrogenation reaction of 0.78 eV. Our results thus indicate that (a) ring-opening reactions of lactide on Pt(321) can be expected already at very low temperatures, and Pt might be a very effective catalyst for this reaction; (b) the ring-opening reaction rate shows noticeable enantioselectivity.

  5. Heavy metal and growth hormone pathways in metallothionein regulation in fish RTH-149 cell line.

    PubMed

    Vergani, Laura; Lanza, Cristina; Scarabelli, Linda; Canesi, Laura; Gallo, Gabriella

    2009-05-01

    Interference between heavy metals and growth hormone (GH) on cell signaling has been previously demonstrated in fish cells. This study was aimed at assessing their effects on expression of the metallothionein isoforms MT-A and MT-B. The results indicate that all heavy metals induce MT-A more markedly than MT-B, but differences appeared when metals were combined with GH. For MT-B induction, a positive interference between metals and GH was observed for Zn(2+)/GH and Cd(2+)/GH, a negative interference for Hg(2+)/GH. With regards to MT-A, no interference was observed for Zn(2+)/GH and Hg(2+)/GH, while a negative interference occurred with Cu(2+)/GH and a positive interference with Cd(2+)/GH. The possible mechanisms underlying the differential regulation of metallothioneins include different signaling pathways. The results show that STAT5 and ERKs responded differently to different combinations, and Zn(2+)/GH and Cd(2+)/GH exerted a slight positive interference on ERK activation. On the other hand, a synergic rise in [Ca(2+)](i) occurred for all combinations except for Cu(2+)/GH. Our data suggest that the cross-talk between heavy metals and GH resulting in MT transcription modulation does not strictly depend on Ca(2+) signalling; (ii)ERK activation may represent the point of cross-talk between Zn(2+) or Cd(2+) and GH, converging on MT-B transcription, probably through a differential recruitment of transcription factors. PMID:19154796

  6. Ethylene bisdithiocarbamate pesticides Maneb and Mancozeb cause metal overload in human colon cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Lisa; Trombetta, Louis; Hardej, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that ethylene bisdithiocarbamate (EBDC) fungicides Maneb and Mancozeb are equipotent gastrointestinal toxicants that produce cell loss and metal accumulation within HT-29 and Caco2 colon cells. Nabam, MnCl2, CuCl2 and ZnCl2 exposure produced no loss of viability up to 200 μM and increases in metal levels were noted but not to the same extent as Maneb and Mancozeb. EBDC exposure caused increases in copper levels (20-200 μM). Maneb and Mancozeb treatment also caused increases in manganese and zinc concentrations (20-200 μM). Nabam plus MnCl2 and Nabam and MnCl2 plus ZnCl2 caused decreases in viability and increases in metal levels comparable to Maneb and Mancozeb. Decreases in the ratio of reduced glutathione to glutathione disulfide were observed with Maneb and Mancozeb (20-200 μM). Maneb and Mancozeb treatment results in intracellular metal accumulation leading to the oxidative stress. The metal moiety and the organic portion of EBDCs contribute to toxicity. PMID:26650801

  7. Metal plasmon-coupled fluorescence imaging and label free coenzyme detection in cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Fu, Yi; Li, Ge; Zhao, Richard Y.

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metal nanoparticle for fluorescence cell imaging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-invasive emission detection of coenzyme in cell on time-resolved confocal microscope. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Near-field interaction of flavin adenine dinucleotide with silver substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolation of emissions by coenzymes from cellular autofluorescence on fluorescence cell imaging. -- Abstract: Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is a key metabolite in cellular energy conversion. Flavin can also bind with some enzymes in the metabolic pathway and the binding sites may be changed due to the disease progression. Thus, there is interest on studying its expression level, distribution, and redox state within the cells. FAD is naturally fluorescent, but it has a modest extinction coefficient and quantum yield. Hence the intrinsic emission from FAD is generally too weak to be isolated distinctly from the cellular backgrounds in fluorescence cell imaging. In this article, the metal nanostructures on the glass coverslips were used as substrates to measure FAD in cells. Particulate silver films were fabricated with an optical resonance near the absorption and the emission wavelengths of FAD which can lead to efficient coupling interactions. As a result, the emission intensity and quantum yield by FAD were greatly increased and the lifetime was dramatically shortened resulting in less interference from the longer lived cellular background. This feature may overcome the technical limits that hinder the direct observation of intrinsically fluorescent coenzymes in the cells by fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescence cell imaging on the metallic particle substrates may provide a non-invasive strategy for collecting the information of coenzymes in cells.

  8. Hydrophobic Organic Hole Transporters for Improved Moisture Resistance in Metal Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Leijtens, Tomas; Giovenzana, Tommaso; Habisreutinger, Severin N; Tinkham, Jonathan S; Noel, Nakita K; Kamino, Brett A; Sadoughi, Golnaz; Sellinger, Alan; Snaith, Henry J

    2016-03-01

    Solar cells based on organic-inorganic perovskite semiconductor materials have recently made rapid improvements in performance, with the best cells performing at over 20% efficiency. With such rapid progress, questions such as cost and solar cell stability are becoming increasingly important to address if this new technology is to reach commercial deployment. The moisture sensitivity of commonly used organic-inorganic metal halide perovskites has especially raised concerns. Here, we demonstrate that the hygroscopic lithium salt commonly used as a dopant for the hole transport material in perovskite solar cells makes the top layer of the devices hydrophilic and causes the solar cells to rapidly degrade in the presence of moisture. By using novel, low cost, and hydrophobic hole transporters in conjunction with a doping method incorporating a preoxidized salt of the respective hole transporters, we are able to prepare efficient perovskite solar cells with greatly enhanced water resistance. PMID:26859777

  9. Significant light absorption enhancement in silicon thin film tandem solar cells with metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Boyuan; Li, Xiangping; Zhang, Yinan; Jia, Baohua

    2016-05-01

    Enhancing the light absorption in microcrystalline silicon bottom cell of a silicon-based tandem solar cell for photocurrent matching holds the key to achieving the overall solar cell performance breakthroughs. Here, we present a concept for significantly improving the absorption of both subcells simultaneously by simply applying tailored metallic nanoparticles both on the top and at the rear surfaces of the solar cells. Significant light absorption enhancement as large as 56% has been achieved in the bottom subcells. More importantly the thickness of the microcrystalline layer can be reduced by 57% without compromising the optical performance of the tandem solar cell, providing a cost-effective strategy for high performance tandem solar cells.

  10. Significant light absorption enhancement in silicon thin film tandem solar cells with metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cai, Boyuan; Li, Xiangping; Zhang, Yinan; Jia, Baohua

    2016-05-13

    Enhancing the light absorption in microcrystalline silicon bottom cell of a silicon-based tandem solar cell for photocurrent matching holds the key to achieving the overall solar cell performance breakthroughs. Here, we present a concept for significantly improving the absorption of both subcells simultaneously by simply applying tailored metallic nanoparticles both on the top and at the rear surfaces of the solar cells. Significant light absorption enhancement as large as 56% has been achieved in the bottom subcells. More importantly the thickness of the microcrystalline layer can be reduced by 57% without compromising the optical performance of the tandem solar cell, providing a cost-effective strategy for high performance tandem solar cells. PMID:27040376

  11. A New Method of Metallization for Silicon Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macha, M.

    1979-01-01

    The determination of the firing cycle in a horizontal tube furnace for MoO3: Sn ink composition applied by silk screening process on P or N structured solar cells is presented. In comparison with the strip heater used to determine the reaction mechanism, the reduction of MoO3 in the tube furnace progresses at a much faster rate and the Sn:Mo alloy forms at a much lower temperature. The device characteristics determined by the V-I curve showed a high resistance (approx. 10 Ohms) at peak temperatures between 600 C and 800 C. The high series resistance is attributed to the lack of formation of MoSi2 within the used temperature range.

  12. Influence of the Piping-material-originated Metal-ion on Cell Degradation of Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amitani, Chieko; Ishikawa, Masahiko; Mori, Kouya; Tanaka, Kenji; Hori, Michio

    Influences of metal-ion adulterations into Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells (PEFC) were examined on PEFC generation characteristics and structural changes. Cupper and aluminun, novel candidate materials for forthcoming PEFC system, were introduced into polymer electrolyte membranes (PEM) by ion-exchange method as contaminants, and ca. 500-hour generation tests of PEFC cells with these PEMs were conducted in this study. Introduced metal ions were to be combined to sulfonic acid groups in PEMs by electrostatic forces. For the cell containing cupric ions (Cu2+) equivalent to 1000 pmm of supfonic acid groups in PEM, a decrease in deteriorating rate of cell voltage was observed to be 83 mV/kh during 500-hour generation, in comparison with the cell without metal-ion comtamination showing 154 mV/kh. On the other hand, an increase in deteriorating rates were observed for the cells containing 10 % Cu2+ or 1000 ppm aluminum ions (Al3+). Al3+ adulteration in PEFC set off increases in activation overpotential and fluoride ion release rate (FRR) with proceeding genaration test. An increase in activation overpotentials was supressed in 1000 ppm Cu2+-adulterated cell and the reverse was observed in 10 % Cu2+-adulterated one, though Cu2+ adulterations suppressed growths of platinum catalyst particles in size and FRR regardless of Cu2+ concentration. Restriction effect of 1000 ppm Cu2+-adulteration into PEM on PEFC voltage deterioration has found to be the unprecedented knoledge with respect to PEFC degradation phenomena. Mechanisms of those influences were also discussed.

  13. Tubular solid oxide fuel cells with porous metal supports and ceramic interconnections

    DOEpatents

    Huang, Kevin; Ruka, Roswell J.

    2012-05-08

    An intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell structure capable of operating at from 600.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. having a very thin porous hollow elongated metallic support tube having a thickness from 0.10 mm to 1.0 mm, preferably 0.10 mm to 0.35 mm, a porosity of from 25 vol. % to 50 vol. % and a tensile strength from 700 GPa to 900 GPa, which metallic tube supports a reduced thickness air electrode having a thickness from 0.010 mm to 0.2 mm, a solid oxide electrolyte, a cermet fuel electrode, a ceramic interconnection and an electrically conductive cell to cell contact layer.

  14. Stem Cell-Based Cell Carrier for Targeted Oncolytic Virotherapy: Translational Opportunity and Open Questions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Janice; Hall, Robert R; Lesniak, Maciej S; Ahmed, Atique U

    2015-12-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy for cancer is an innovative therapeutic option where the ability of a virus to promote cell lysis is harnessed and reprogrammed to selectively destroy cancer cells. Such treatment modalities exhibited antitumor activity in preclinical and clinical settings and appear to be well tolerated when tested in clinical trials. However, the clinical success of oncolytic virotherapy has been significantly hampered due to the inability to target systematic metastasis. This is partly due to the inability of the therapeutic virus to survive in the patient circulation, in order to target tumors at distant sites. An early study from various laboratories demonstrated that cells infected with oncolytic virus can protect the therapeutic payload form the host immune system as well as function as factories for virus production and enhance the therapeutic efficacy of oncolytic virus. While a variety of cell lineages possessed potential as cell carriers, copious investigation has established stem cells as a very attractive cell carrier system in oncolytic virotherapy. The ideal cell carrier desire to be susceptible to viral infection as well as support viral infection, maintain immunosuppressive properties to shield the loaded viruses from the host immune system, and most importantly possess an intrinsic tumor homing ability to deliver loaded viruses directly to the site of the metastasis-all qualities stem cells exhibit. In this review, we summarize the recent work in the development of stem cell-based carrier for oncolytic virotherapy, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of a variety of cell carriers, especially focusing on why stem cells have emerged as the leading candidate, and finally propose a future direction for stem cell-based targeted oncolytic virotherapy that involves its establishment as a viable treatment option for cancer patients in the clinical setting. PMID:26633462

  15. Stem Cell-Based Cell Carrier for Targeted Oncolytic Virotherapy: Translational Opportunity and Open Questions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Janice; Hall, Robert R.; Lesniak, Maciej S.; Ahmed, Atique U.

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy for cancer is an innovative therapeutic option where the ability of a virus to promote cell lysis is harnessed and reprogrammed to selectively destroy cancer cells. Such treatment modalities exhibited antitumor activity in preclinical and clinical settings and appear to be well tolerated when tested in clinical trials. However, the clinical success of oncolytic virotherapy has been significantly hampered due to the inability to target systematic metastasis. This is partly due to the inability of the therapeutic virus to survive in the patient circulation, in order to target tumors at distant sites. An early study from various laboratories demonstrated that cells infected with oncolytic virus can protect the therapeutic payload form the host immune system as well as function as factories for virus production and enhance the therapeutic efficacy of oncolytic virus. While a variety of cell lineages possessed potential as cell carriers, copious investigation has established stem cells as a very attractive cell carrier system in oncolytic virotherapy. The ideal cell carrier desire to be susceptible to viral infection as well as support viral infection, maintain immunosuppressive properties to shield the loaded viruses from the host immune system, and most importantly possess an intrinsic tumor homing ability to deliver loaded viruses directly to the site of the metastasis—all qualities stem cells exhibit. In this review, we summarize the recent work in the development of stem cell-based carrier for oncolytic virotherapy, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of a variety of cell carriers, especially focusing on why stem cells have emerged as the leading candidate, and finally propose a future direction for stem cell-based targeted oncolytic virotherapy that involves its establishment as a viable treatment option for cancer patients in the clinical setting. PMID:26633462

  16. Accelerated cycle life performance for ovonic nickel-metal hydride cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otzinger, Burton M.

    1991-01-01

    Nickel-Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) rechargeable batteries have emerged as the leading candidate for commercial replacement of nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) batteries. An important incentive is that the Ni-MH cell provides approximately twice the capacity of a Ni-Cd cell for a given size. A six-cell battery was committed to an accelerated cycle life test to determine the effect of separation type on performance. Results of the test may also show the Ni-MH battery to be a replacement candidate for the aerospace Ni-Cd battery.

  17. Metallic single-unit-cell orthorhombic cobalt diselenide atomic layers: robust water-electrolysis catalysts.

    PubMed

    Liang, Liang; Cheng, Hao; Lei, Fengcai; Han, Jun; Gao, Shan; Wang, Chengming; Sun, Yongfu; Qamar, Shaista; Wei, Shiqiang; Xie, Yi

    2015-10-01

    The bottleneck in water electrolysis lies in the kinetically sluggish oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Herein, conceptually new metallic non-metal atomic layers are proposed to overcome this drawback. Metallic single-unit-cell CoSe2 sheets with an orthorhombic phase are synthesized by thermally exfoliating a lamellar CoSe2 -DETA hybrid. The metallic character of orthorhombic CoSe2 atomic layers, verified by DFT calculations and temperature-dependent resistivities, allows fast oxygen evolution kinetics with a lowered overpotential of 0.27 V. The single-unit-cell thickness means 66.7 % of the Co(2+) ions are exposed on the surface and serve as the catalytically active sites. The lowered Co(2+) coordination number down to 1.3 and 2.6, gives a lower Tafel slope of 64 mV dec(-1) and higher turnover frequency of 745 h(-1) . Thus, the single-unit-cell CoSe2 sheets have around 2 and 4.5 times higher catalytic activity compared with the lamellar CoSe2 -DETA hybrid and bulk CoSe2 . PMID:26235276

  18. Metal decoration of exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP) for fuel cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, In-Hwan

    The synthesis and characterization of metal particles at nanometer length scale has been the object of much research in modern nanotechnology due to their great impact on new nanoscale scientific and technological applications. Nanoscale metal particles possess unique optical, thermal, electronic, magnetic properties and chemical reactivity since the size of the resulting materials is on the same order as the fundamental interaction distances that give rise to physical properties and thus shows the quantum size effect which is not observed in their bulky status. Therefore, an effective synthetic method is required to obtain uniform small metal powders with controlled size and a narrow size distribution and also to produce nanocomposites consisting of either metals or metal oxides supported on carbons or metals dispersed on metal oxides for a variety of applications in chemical industries, automobiles, energy and power generating devices, hydrogen economy as well as for sensors. On the other hand, although their excellent mechanical, thermal and electrical conductivity, excellent corrosion and oxidation resistance, and low impurity levels which are required as a breakthrough material to increase performance of next generation energy devices, exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet (xGnP) has not been studied as deeply as recent new nano structured carbon materials such as single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT), multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNT), carbon nanohorn (CNH), graphite nanofiber (GNF), and fullerenes. In addition, xGnP is much cost-effective compared to other carbon nanostructures. Hence, it is interesting to evaluate the applicability of xGnP as a support material for fuel cell which is one of promising energy devices for the future. In this research, a new simple, efficient and economic way is presented for the synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles such as Pt, Ru, Pd, etc and their deposition on various carbon supports and metal oxides via microwave heating in the

  19. Note: Novel diamond anvil cell for electrical measurements using boron-doped metallic diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, R; Sasama, Y; Fujioka, M; Irifune, T; Tanaka, M; Yamaguchi, T; Takeya, H; Takano, Y

    2016-07-01

    A novel diamond anvil cell suitable for electrical transport measurements under high pressure has been developed. A boron-doped metallic diamond film was deposited as an electrode on a nano-polycrystalline diamond anvil using a microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition technique combined with electron beam lithography. The maximum pressure that can be achieved by this assembly is above 30 GPa. We report electrical transport measurements of Pb up to 8 GPa. The boron-doped metallic diamond electrodes showed no signs of degradation after repeated compression. PMID:27475610

  20. Note: Novel diamond anvil cell for electrical measurements using boron-doped metallic diamond electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, R.; Sasama, Y.; Fujioka, M.; Irifune, T.; Tanaka, M.; Yamaguchi, T.; Takeya, H.; Takano, Y.

    2016-07-01

    A novel diamond anvil cell suitable for electrical transport measurements under high pressure has been developed. A boron-doped metallic diamond film was deposited as an electrode on a nano-polycrystalline diamond anvil using a microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition technique combined with electron beam lithography. The maximum pressure that can be achieved by this assembly is above 30 GPa. We report electrical transport measurements of Pb up to 8 GPa. The boron-doped metallic diamond electrodes showed no signs of degradation after repeated compression.

  1. The effects on bone cells of metal ions released from orthopaedic implants. A review

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Valerio; Pagani, Davide; Melato, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Summary The increasing use of orthopedic implants and, in particular, of hip and knee joint replacements for young and active patients, has stimulated interest and concern regarding the chronic, long-term effects of the materials used. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the adverse biologic reactions to metal particles released from orthopaedic implants in vivo and in vitro. More specifically, the purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the current literature about the adverse effects of metal particles on bone cells and peri-implant bone. PMID:23858309

  2. Self-sustained reduction of multiple metals in a microbial fuel cell-microbial electrolysis cell hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wu, Yining; Liu, Bingchuan; Luan, Hongwei; Vadas, Timothy; Guo, Wanqian; Ding, Jie; Li, Baikun

    2015-09-01

    A self-sustained hybrid bioelectrochemical system consisting of microbial fuel cell (MFC) and microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) was developed to reduce multiple metals simultaneously by utilizing different reaction potentials. Three heavy metals representing spontaneous reaction (chromium, Cr) and unspontaneous reaction (lead, Pb and nickel, Ni) were selected in this batch-mode study. The maximum power density of the MFC achieved 189.4 mW m(-2), and the energy recovery relative to the energy storage circuit (ESC) was ∼ 450%. At the initial concentration of 100 mg L(-1), the average reduction rate of Cr(VI) was 30.0 mg L(-1) d(-1), Pb(II) 32.7 mg L(-1) d(-1), and Ni(II) 8.9 mg L(-1) d(-1). An electrochemical model was developed to predict the change of metal concentration over time. The power output of the MFC was sufficient to meet the requirement of the ESC and MEC, and the "self-sustained metal reduction" was achieved in this hybrid system. PMID:26038328

  3. Correlation of energy disorder and open-circuit voltage in hybrid perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yuchuan; Yuan, Yongbo; Huang, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    Organometal trihalide perovskites have been demonstrated as excellent light absorbers for high-efficiency photovoltaic applications. Previous approaches to increasing the solar cell efficiency have focused on optimization of the grain morphology of perovskite thin films. Here, we show that the structural order of the electron transport layers also has a significant impact on solar cell performance. We demonstrate that the power conversion efficiency of CH3NH3PbI3 planar heterojunction photovoltaic cells increases from 17.1 to 19.4% when the energy disorder in the fullerene electron transport layer is reduced by a simple solvent annealing process. The increase in efficiency is the result of the enhancement in open-circuit voltage from 1.04 to 1.13 V without sacrificing the short-circuit current and fill factor. These results shed light on the origin of open-circuit voltage in perovskite solar cells, and provide a path to further increase their efficiency.

  4. Engineered Metal-Phenolic Capsules Show Tunable Targeted Delivery to Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yi; Cui, Jiwei; Sun, Huanli; Müllner, Markus; Dai, Yunlu; Guo, Junling; Bertleff-Zieschang, Nadja; Suma, Tomoya; Richardson, Joseph J; Caruso, Frank

    2016-06-13

    We engineered metal-phenolic capsules with both high targeting and low nonspecific cell binding properties. The capsules were prepared by coating phenolic-functionalized hyaluronic acid (HA) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) on calcium carbonate templates, followed by cross-linking the phenolic groups with metal ions and removing the templates. The incorporation of HA significantly enhanced binding and association with a CD44 overexpressing (CD44+) cancer cell line, while the incorporation of PEG reduced nonspecific interactions with a CD44 minimal-expressing (CD44-) cell line. Moreover, high specific targeting to CD44+ cells can be balanced with low nonspecific binding to CD44- cells simply by using an optimized feed-ratio of HA and PEG to vary the content of HA and PEG incorporated into the capsules. Loading an anticancer drug (i.e., doxorubicin) into the obtained capsules resulted in significantly higher cytotoxicity to CD44+ cells but lower cytotoxicity to CD44- cells. PMID:27249228

  5. Evaluation of transition metal oxide as carrier-selective contacts for silicon heterojunction solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, L.; Boccard, Matthieu; Holman, Zachary; Bertoni, M.

    2015-04-06

    "Reducing light absorption in the non-active solar cell layers, while enabling the extraction of the photogenerated minority carriers at quasi-Fermi levels are two key factors to improve current generation and voltage, and therefore efficiency of silicon heterojunction solar devices. To address these two critical aspects, transition metal oxide materials have been proposed as alternative to the n- and p-type amorphous silicon used as electron and hole selective contacts, respectively. Indeed, transition metal oxides such as molybdenum oxide, titanium oxide, nickel oxide or tungsten oxide combine a wide band gap typically over 3 eV with a band structure and theoretical band alignment with silicon that results in high transparency to the solar spectrum and in selectivity for the transport of only one carrier type. Improving carrier extraction or injection using transition metal oxide has been a topic of investigation in the field of organic solar cells and organic LEDs; from these pioneering works a lot of knowledge has been gained on materials properties, ways to control these during synthesis and deposition, and their impact on device performance. Recently, the transfer of some of this knowledge to silicon solar cells and the successful application of some metal oxide to contact heterojunction devices have gained much attention. In this contribution, we investigate the suitability of various transition metal oxide films (molybdenum oxide, titanium oxide, and tungsten oxide) deposited either by thermal evaporation or sputtering as transparent hole or electron selective transport layer for silicon solar cells. In addition to systematically characterize their optical and structural properties, we use photoemission spectroscopy to relate compound stoichiometry to band structure and characterize band alignment to silicon. The direct silicon/metal oxide interface is further analyzed by quasi-steady state photoconductance decay method to assess the quality of surface

  6. Potential for leaching of heavy metals in open-burning bottom ash and soil from a non-engineered solid waste landfill.

    PubMed

    Gwenzi, Willis; Gora, Dorcas; Chaukura, Nhamo; Tauro, Tonny

    2016-03-01

    Bottom ash from open-burning of municipal waste practised in developing countries poses a risk of heavy metal leaching into groundwater. Compared to incineration ash, there is limited information on heavy metal leaching from open-burning ash and soil from non-engineered landfills. Batch and column experiments were conducted to address three specific objectives; (1) to determine aqua regia extractable concentrations of heavy metals in fresh ash, old ash and soil from beneath the landfill, (2) to determine the relationship between heavy metal leaching, initial and final pH of leaching solution, and aqua regia extractable concentrations, and (3) to determine the breakthrough curves of heavy metals in ashes and soil. Aqua regia extractable concentrations of Cd, Zn, Mn, Cu, Ni and Pb were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in fresh and old ashes than soil beneath landfill and uncontaminated soil (control). Increasing initial solution pH from 5 and 7 to 9 significantly reduced the mobility of Pb, Zn and Cu but not Cd whose mobility peaked at pH 7 and 9. Concentrations of desorbed heavy metals were not correlated with aqua regia extractable concentrations. Final pH of leachate rebounded to close to original pH of the material, suggesting a putative high buffering capacity for all materials. Both batch and column leaching showed that concentrations of leached heavy metals were disproportionately lower (<5%) than aqua regia extractable concentrations in most cases. The retardation of heavy metals was further evidenced by sigmoidal breakthrough curves. Heavy metal retention was attributed to precipitation, pH-dependent adsorption and formation of insoluble organo-metallic complexes at near-neutral to alkaline pH. Overall, the risk of heavy metal leaching from ash and soil from the waste dump into groundwater was low. The high pH and the presence of Zn, Fe, Mn and Cu make ash an ideal low-cost liming material and source of micronutrients particularly on acidic soils prevalent

  7. Light-Induced Stomatal Opening Is Affected by the Guard Cell Protein Kinase APK1b

    PubMed Central

    Elhaddad, Nagat S.; Hunt, Lee; Sloan, Jennifer; Gray, Julie E.

    2014-01-01

    Guard cells allow land plants to survive under restricted or fluctuating water availability. They control the exchange of gases between the external environment and the interior of the plant by regulating the aperture of stomatal pores in response to environmental stimuli such as light intensity, and are important regulators of plant productivity. Their turgor driven movements are under the control of a signalling network that is not yet fully characterised. A reporter gene fusion confirmed that the Arabidopsis APK1b protein kinase gene is predominantly expressed in guard cells. Infrared gas analysis and stomatal aperture measurements indicated that plants lacking APK1b are impaired in their ability to open their stomata on exposure to light, but retain the ability to adjust their stomatal apertures in response to darkness, abscisic acid or lack of carbon dioxide. Stomatal opening was not specifically impaired in response to either red or blue light as both of these stimuli caused some increase in stomatal conductance. Consistent with the reduction in maximum stomatal conductance, the relative water content of plants lacking APK1b was significantly increased under both well-watered and drought conditions. We conclude that APK1b is required for full stomatal opening in the light but is not required for stomatal closure. PMID:24828466

  8. Light-induced stomatal opening is affected by the guard cell protein kinase APK1b.

    PubMed

    Elhaddad, Nagat S; Hunt, Lee; Sloan, Jennifer; Gray, Julie E

    2014-01-01

    Guard cells allow land plants to survive under restricted or fluctuating water availability. They control the exchange of gases between the external environment and the interior of the plant by regulating the aperture of stomatal pores in response to environmental stimuli such as light intensity, and are important regulators of plant productivity. Their turgor driven movements are under the control of a signalling network that is not yet fully characterised. A reporter gene fusion confirmed that the Arabidopsis APK1b protein kinase gene is predominantly expressed in guard cells. Infrared gas analysis and stomatal aperture measurements indicated that plants lacking APK1b are impaired in their ability to open their stomata on exposure to light, but retain the ability to adjust their stomatal apertures in response to darkness, abscisic acid or lack of carbon dioxide. Stomatal opening was not specifically impaired in response to either red or blue light as both of these stimuli caused some increase in stomatal conductance. Consistent with the reduction in maximum stomatal conductance, the relative water content of plants lacking APK1b was significantly increased under both well-watered and drought conditions. We conclude that APK1b is required for full stomatal opening in the light but is not required for stomatal closure. PMID:24828466

  9. Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy Studies of a Fluorophore-Labeled Dirhodium Compound: Visualizing Metal–Metal Bonded Molecules in Lung Cancer (A549) Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The new dirhodium compound [Rh2(μ-O2CCH3)2(η1-O2CCH3)(phenbodipy)(H2O)3][O2CCH3] (1), which incorporates a bodipy fluorescent tag, was prepared and studied by confocal fluorescence microscopy in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells. It was determined that 1 localizes mainly in lysosomes and mitochondria with no apparent nuclear localization in the 1–100 μM range. These results support the conclusion that cellular organelles rather than the nucleus can be targeted by modification of the ligands bound to the Rh24+ core. This is the first study of a fluorophore-labeled metal–metal bonded compound, work that opens up new venues for the study of intracellular distribution of dinuclear transition metal anticancer complexes. PMID:24854400

  10. Performance evaluation and characterization of metallic bipolar plates in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Yue

    Bipolar plate and membrane electrode assembly (MEA) are the two most repeated components of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack. Bipolar plates comprise more than 60% of the weight and account for 30% of the total cost of a fuel cell stack. The bipolar plates perform as current conductors between cells, provide conduits for reactant gases, facilitate water and thermal management through the cell, and constitute the backbone of a power stack. In addition, bipolar plates must have excellent corrosion resistance to withstand the highly corrosive environment inside the fuel cell, and they must maintain low interfacial contact resistance throughout the operation to achieve optimum power density output. Currently, commercial bipolar plates are made of graphite composites because of their relatively low interfacial contact resistance (ICR) and high corrosion resistance. However, graphite composite's manufacturability, permeability, and durability for shock and vibration are unfavorable in comparison to metals. Therefore, metals have been considered as a replacement material for graphite composite bipolar plates. Since bipolar plates must possess the combined advantages of both metals and graphite composites in the fuel cell technology, various methods and techniques are being developed to combat metallic corrosion and eliminate the passive layer formed on the metal surface that causes unacceptable power reduction and possible fouling of the catalyst and the electrolyte. The main objective of this study was to explore the possibility of producing efficient, cost-effective and durable metallic bipolar plates that were capable of functioning in the highly corrosive fuel cell environment. Bulk materials such as Poco graphite, graphite composite, SS310, SS316, incoloy 800, titanium carbide and zirconium carbide were investigated as potential bipolar plate materials. In this work, different alloys and compositions of chromium carbide coatings on aluminum and SS316

  11. Metal Interconnects for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    S. Elangovan

    2006-04-01

    Interconnect development is identified by the US Department of energy as a key technical area requiring focused research to meet the performance and cost goals under the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance initiative. In the Phase I SECA Core Technology Program, Ceramatec investigated a commercial ferritic stainless steel composition for oxidation resistance properties by measuring the weight gain when exposed to air at the fuel cell operating temperature. A pre-treatment process that results in a dense, adherent scale was found to reduce the oxide scale growth rate significantly. A process for coating the surface of the alloy in order to reduce the in-plane resistance and potentially inhibit chromium oxide evaporation was also identified. The combination of treatments provided a very low resistance through the scale. The resistance measured was as low as 10 milliohm-cm2 at 750 C in air. The oxide scale was also found to be stable in humidified air at 750 C. The resistance value was stable over several thermal cycles. A similar treatment and coating for the fuel side of the interconnect also showed an exceptionally low resistance of one milliohm-cm2 in humidified hydrogen at 750 c, and was stable through multiple thermal cycles. Measurement of interconnect resistance when it was exposed to both air and humidified hydrogen on opposite sides also showed low, stable resistance after additional modification to the pre-treatment process. Resistance stacks, using an interconnect stack with realistic gas flows, also provided favorable results. Chromium evaporation issue however requires testing of fuel stacks and was outside of the scope of this project. based on results to-date, the alloy selection and the treatment processes appear to be well suited for SOFC interconnect application.

  12. Comparison of the sensitivity of three lung derived cell lines to metals from combustion derived particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Riley, Mark R; Boesewetter, Dianne E; Turner, Rachael A; Kim, Aana M; Collier, Jayne M; Hamilton, Amy

    2005-04-01

    While the effects of inhalation of combustion-derived particulate matter have received extensive study, there remains no reliable means to rapidly quantify inhalation toxicity outside of a laboratory setting. Cell-based biosensors provide a potential solution, but few comparisons have been made of the sensitivity of various cell lines to the wide range of inhalation health hazards that are likely to be encountered. This work compares the response of three immortalized lung cell lines (A549 human epithelia, RLE-6TN rat type II epithelia, and NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages) to metals commonly present in combustion-derived particulate matter. Quantifications of the cell response involved measurement of inhibition of cell culture metabolism (mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase activity) and cell death (release of lactate dehydrogenase). While these three cell types generally ranked metals in ED50 values similarly (Vmetals leading to a 50% reduction in cell population health differed significantly. Macrophages were most sensitive to metals by nearly an order of magnitude in metal concentration, followed by RLE-6TN rat epithelia, then A549 human cells. This comparison of the sensitivity of three cell types provides a basis for selection of cell types for use in cell-based biosensors. PMID:15713548

  13. Perovskite Solar Cells: High Efficiency Pb-In Binary Metal Perovskite Solar Cells (Adv. Mater. 31/2016).

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao-Kui; Li, Meng; Yang, Ying-Guo; Hu, Yun; Ma, Heng; Gao, Xing-Yu; Liao, Liang-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    On page 6695, X. Y. Gao, L.-S. Liao, and co-workers describe the fabrication of mixed Pb-In perovskite solar cells, using indium (III) chloride and lead (II) chloride with methylammonium iodide. A maximum power conversion efficiency as high as 17.55% is achieved owing to the high quality of the perovskites with multiple ordered crystal orientations. This work demonstrates the possibility of substituting the Pb (II) by using In (III), which opens a broad route to fabricating alloy perovskite solar cells with mitigated ecological impact. PMID:27511533

  14. Metal-air cells comprising collapsible foam members and means for minimizing internal pressure buildup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, Glenn (Inventor); Putt, Ronald A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention provides a prismatic zinc-air cell including, in general, a prismatic container having therein an air cathode, a separator and a zinc anode. The container has one or more oxygen access openings, and the air cathode is disposed in the container in gaseous communication with the oxygen access openings so as to allow access of oxygen to the cathode. The separator has a first side in electrolytic communication with the air cathode and a second side in electrolytic communication with the zinc anode. The separator isolates the cathode and the zinc anode from direct electrical contact and allows passage of electrolyte therebetween. An expansion chamber adjacent to the zinc anode is provided which accommodates expansion of the zinc anode during discharge of the cell. A suitable collapsible foam member generally occupies the expansion space, providing sufficient resistance tending to oppose movement of the zinc anode away from the separator while collapsing upon expansion of the zinc anode during discharge of the cell. One or more vent openings disposed in the container are in gaseous communication with the expansion space, functioning to satisfactorily minimize the pressure buildup within the container by venting gasses expelled as the foam collapses during cell discharge.

  15. Fracture of Open-Cell Nickel Foams Under Quasi-Static Tensile Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehata Aly, Mohamed

    2010-12-01

    Open-cell nickel foams with average pore size of 600 μm have been subjected to room temperature tensile tests to explore their tensile properties. Using a state of the art extensometer of noncontact type, foam properties as ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and the Young's modulus ( E) have been measured accurately. The reason behind the usage of this kind of extensometer is to avoid completely any minor deformation that might be caused by the attachment of conventional extensometer to the sample's surface prior to testing. The function of this extensometer is based on the usage of a laser (CCD) camera that detects and records the dimensional changes as soon as the load is applied. A series of cyclic loading-unloading tests was performed to determine the foam's Young's modulus. The fracture behavior of foam cells was observed to be ductile. Complete separation of struts or cell walls took place successively by necking.

  16. High open circuit voltages of solar cells based on quantum dot and dye hybrid-sensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yujie; Zhao, Wanyu; Chen, Jingkuo; Li, Huayang; Fu, Wuyou E-mail: fuwy56@163.com; Sun, Guang; Cao, Jianliang; Zhang, Zhanying; Bala, Hari E-mail: fuwy56@163.com

    2014-01-06

    A type of solar cell based on quantum dot (QD) and dye hybrid-sensitized mesoporous TiO{sub 2} film electrode was designed and reported. The electrode was consisted of a TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle (NP) thin film layer sensitized with CdS quantum dot (QD) and an amorphous TiO{sub 2} coated TiO{sub 2} NP thin film layer that sensitized with C106 dye. The amorphous TiO{sub 2} layer was obtained by TiCl{sub 4} post-treatment to improve the properties of solar cells. Research showed that the solar cells fabricated with as-prepared hybrid-sensitized electrode exhibited excellent photovoltaic performances and a fairly high open circuit voltage of 796 mV was achieved.

  17. High open circuit voltages of solar cells based on quantum dot and dye hybrid-sensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yujie; Bala, Hari; Zhao, Wanyu; Chen, Jingkuo; Li, Huayang; Fu, Wuyou; Sun, Guang; Cao, Jianliang; Zhang, Zhanying

    2014-01-01

    A type of solar cell based on quantum dot (QD) and dye hybrid-sensitized mesoporous TiO2 film electrode was designed and reported. The electrode was consisted of a TiO2 nanoparticle (NP) thin film layer sensitized with CdS quantum dot (QD) and an amorphous TiO2 coated TiO2 NP thin film layer that sensitized with C106 dye. The amorphous TiO2 layer was obtained by TiCl4 post-treatment to improve the properties of solar cells. Research showed that the solar cells fabricated with as-prepared hybrid-sensitized electrode exhibited excellent photovoltaic performances and a fairly high open circuit voltage of 796 mV was achieved.

  18. Interaction of various gas molecules with paddle-wheel-type open metal sites of porous coordination polymers: theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Hijikata, Yuh; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi

    2014-03-01

    We theoretically evaluated binding energies (Eb's) between various gas molecules and the Cu center open metal site (Cu-OMS) of Cu paddle-wheel units, [Cu2(O2CR)4] (R = H, Me, or Ph) using density functional theory (DFT) and MP2-MP4. The optimized geometry of the model system [Cu2(O2CPh)4] agrees with the experimental structure. The Eb of CO with [Cu2(O2CH)4] is only slightly different between the open-shell singlet and triplet states. The calculated Eb decreases in the order MeNC > H2O > MeCN > C2H4 > C2H2 > CO > CO2 > N2 > CH4 > H2. The trend is discussed in terms of the electrostatic interaction energy (ES), exchange repulsion energy (EX), and charge-transfer (CT) + polarization (Pol) interaction energy at the Hartree-Fock level and the electron correlation effect. The ES increases linearly with an increase in Eb, while the EX decreases linearly with an increase in Eb. These relationships indicate that the ES compensates for the EX. In other words, the Eb does not depend on the sum of ES and EX, which corresponds to the static energy. The electron correlation effect contributes little to the above-mentioned decreasing order of Eb. The total Eb roughly increases with an increase in the CT+Pol term, suggesting that the CT+Pol term plays important roles in determining the trend of Eb. The shift of the stretching frequency of adsorbed gas molecules on the Cu-OMS is reproduced well by the DFT calculation with the model system [Cu2(O2CH)4(L)2] (L = gas molecule). We found that the positive charge on the Cu significantly contributes to the shift in the end-on coordination gas molecules such as CO, MeNC, MeCN, and N2. Although the shift has been generally discussed in terms of donation and back-donation, the present result indicates that the electrostatic potential field in the porous coordination polymer should be considered in the discussion of the frequency shift. PMID:24512503

  19. Understanding of the low temperature auto-oxidation scheme of sec-alcohols based on a Cu(II)-MOF with open metal sites.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian-Ping; Zhao, Chao-Wei; Wang, Shen-Qing; Zhang, Jin-Ping; Niu, Xue; Dong, Yu-Bin

    2015-10-01

    A Cu(II)-MOF (1') with open metal sites was readily obtained by removing the coordinated water molecule at 120 °C. It can be used as a probe to evidence the sec-alkyl hydroperoxide species generated from room temperature sec-alcohol auto-oxidation in air. The formed alkyl hydroperoxides can be effectively catalyzed by 1' to decompose into molecular oxygen and corresponding sec-alcohols under ambient conditions. PMID:26216657

  20. Cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by different metallic nanoparticles on human kidney cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Some manufactured nanoparticles are metal-based and have a wide variety of applications in electronic, engineering and medicine. Until now, many studies have described the potential toxicity of NPs on pulmonary target, while little attention has been paid to kidney which is considered to be a secondary target organ. The objective of this study, on human renal culture cells, was to assess the toxicity profile of metallic nanoparticles (TiO2, ZnO and CdS) usable in industrial production. Comparative studies were conducted, to identify whether particle properties impact cytotoxicity by altering the intracellular oxidative status. Results Nanoparticles were first characterized by size, surface charge, dispersion and solubility. Cytotoxicity of NPs was then evaluated in IP15 (glomerular mesangial) and HK-2 (epithelial proximal) cell lines. ZnO and CdS NPs significantly increased the cell mortality, in a dose-dependent manner. Cytotoxic effects were correlated with the physicochemical properties of NPs tested and the cell type used. Analysis of reactive oxygen species and intracellular levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione revealed that particles induced stress according to their composition, size and solubility. Protein involved in oxidative stress such as NF-κb was activated with ZnO and CdS nanoparticles. Such effects were not observed with TiO2 nanoparticles. Conclusion On glomerular and tubular human renal cells, ZnO and CdS nanoparticles exerted cytotoxic effects that were correlated with metal composition, particle scale and metal solubility. ROS production and oxidative stress induction clearly indicated their nephrotoxic potential. PMID:21371295

  1. A Novel Metal-Ferroelectric-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor Memory Cell Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; Bailey, Mark; Ho, Fat Duen

    2004-01-01

    The use of a Metal-Ferroelectric-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor (MFSFET) in a resistive-load SRAM memory cell has been investigated A typical two-transistor resistive-load SRAM memory cell architecture is modified by replacing one of the NMOS transistors with an n-channel MFSFET. The gate of the MFSFET is connected to a polling voltage pulse instead of the other NMOS transistor drain. The polling voltage pulses are of sufficient magnitude to saturate the ferroelectric gate material and force the MFSFET into a particular logic state. The memory cell circuit is further modified by the addition of a PMOS transistor and a load resistor in order to improve the retention characteristics of the memory cell. The retention characteristics of both the "1" and "0" logic states are simulated. The simulations show that the MFSFET memory cell design can maintain both the "1" and "0" logic states for a long period of time.

  2. Bipolar plating of metal contacts onto oxide interconnection for solid oxide electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, A.O.

    1987-03-10

    Disclosed is a method of forming an adherent metal deposit on a conducting layer of a tube sealed at one end. The tube is immersed with the sealed end down into an aqueous solution containing ions of the metal to be deposited. An ionically conducting aqueous fluid is placed inside the tube and a direct current is passed from a cathode inside the tube to an anode outside the tube. Also disclosed is a multi-layered solid oxide fuel cell tube which consists of an inner porous ceramic support tube, a porous air electrode covering the support tube, a non-porous electrolyte covering a portion of the air electrode, a non-porous conducting interconnection covering the remaining portion of the electrode, and a metal deposit on the interconnection. 1 fig.

  3. Bipolar plating of metal contacts onto oxide interconnection for solid oxide electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.

    1987-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of forming an adherent metal deposit on a conducting layer of a tube sealed at one end. The tube is immersed with the sealed end down into an aqueous solution containing ions of the metal to be deposited. An ionically conducting aqueous fluid is placed inside the tube and a direct current is passed from a cathode inside the tube to an anode outside the tube. Also disclosed is a multi-layered solid oxide fuel cell tube which consists of an inner porous ceramic support tube, a porous air electrode covering the support tube, a non-porous electrolyte covering a portion of the air electrode, a non-porous conducting interconnection covering the remaining portion of the electrode, and a metal deposit on the interconnection.

  4. Fabrication and electromagnetic interference shielding performance of open-cell foam of a Cu-Ni alloy integrated with CNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Keju; Zhao, Huihui; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Jia; Dai, Zhendong

    2014-08-01

    A lightweight multi-layered electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding material made of open-cell foam of a Cu-Ni alloy integrated with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was prepared by electroless copper plating, then nickel electroplating, and finally electrophoretic deposition of CNTs. The foamed Cu-Ni-CNT composite comprises, from inside to outside, Cu, Ni, and CNT layers. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and EMI tests were employed to characterize the morphology, composition, and EMI performance of the composite, respectively. The results indicated that the shielding effectiveness (SE) of the composite increased with increasing pore density (indicated as pores per inch (PPI)) and increasing thickness. A specimen with a PPI of 110 and a 1.5-mm thickness had a maximum SE of up to 54.6 dB, and a SE as high as 47.5 dB on average in the 8-12 GHz range. Integrating the inherent superiority of Cu, Ni, and CNTs, the porous structure of the composite can attenuate the incident electromagnetic microwaves by reflecting, scattering, and absorbing them between the metallic skeleton and the CNT layer. The multiple reflections and absorptions make it difficult for the microwaves to escape from the composite before being absorbed, thereby making the composite a potential shielding material.

  5. Cytotoxicity of metals common in mining effluent to rainbow trout cell lines and to the ciliated protozoan, Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Dayeh, Vivian R; Lynn, Denis H; Bols, Niels C

    2005-04-01

    As fish cell lines and ciliates are potential alternatives to whole animals in testing environmental samples for toxicity, two cell lines from rainbow trout, RTgill-W1 and RTL-W1, and the ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila, were compared for their sensitivity to the toxicity of five metals that are commonly found in mining effluents: copper, cadmium, zinc, nickel, and iron. Adding copper to growth medium for either cell system failed to elicit toxicity. Therefore, metal exposures were done in simple buffers, which allowed all metals to exert toxicity, except for nickel on fish cells. Cell viability was measured successfully with alamar Blue (AB) for metabolic activity and 5'-carboxyfluoroscein diacetate acetoxymethyl ester (CFDA-AM) for membrane integrity, whereas neutral red uptake, which was quantified fluorometrically, gave confounding results with copper. Cadmium was the most toxic metal to Tetrahymena and killed the ciliate at approximately a 10-fold lower concentration than needed to kill fish cells. Fish cells were more sensitive than Tetrahymena to the cytotoxic action of zinc. Copper and iron were cytotoxic to fish cells and Tetrahymena at similar concentrations. Therefore, the relative sensitivity of fish cells and Tetrahymena to the cytotoxicity of metals depended on the metal, being similar for some but very different for others. PMID:15713547

  6. C-MOS bulk metal design handbook. [LSI standard cell (circuits)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edge, T. M.

    1977-01-01

    The LSI standard cell array technique was used in the fabrication of more than 20 CMOS custom arrays. This technique consists of a series of computer programs and design automation techniques referred to as the Computer Aided Design And Test (CADAT) system that automatically translate a partitioned logic diagram into a set of instructions for driving an automatic plotter which generates precision mask artwork for complex LSI arrays of CMOS standard cells. The standard cell concept for producing LSI arrays begins with the design, layout, and validation of a group of custom circuits called standard cells. Once validated, these cells are given identification or pattern numbers and are permanently stored. To use one of these cells in a logic design, the user calls for the desired cell by pattern number. The Place, Route in Two Dimension (PR2D) computer program is then used to automatically generate the metalization and/or tunnels to interconnect the standard cells into the required function. Data sheets that describe the function, artwork, and performance of each of the standard cells, the general procedure for implementation of logic in CMOS standard cells, and additional detailed design information are presented.

  7. Perforin Expression in Peripheral Blood Lymphatic Cells of Patients Subjected to Laparoscopic or Open Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Grbas, Harry; Mrakovčić-Šutić, Ines; Depolo, Arsen; Radošević-Stašić, Biserka

    2009-01-01

    Perforin-(P-) related characteristics of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells were investigated in peripheral blood of patients subjected to open (OC; n = 23) or laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC; n = 21) and healthy controls (n = 20). Blood samples were obtained preoperatively and 24 hours after the surgeries, and the data were correlated with the intensity of cholestasis and concomitant inflammation, determined by functional hepatic tests. Postoperative differences were found to be minimal: OC decreased only the percentage of CD56+ cells, while LC decreased the fraction of CD8+P+ cells and augmented the mean fluorescence intensity of P in CD56 cells. Patients elected for OC had, however, higher preoperative numbers of total P+, CD3+P+, and CD4+P+ cells than patients elected for LC and healthy controls, while both groups of patients, preoperatively, had lower fraction of CD16+P+ and CD56+P+ cells. These changes were in high correlation with blood concentrations of CRP, AP, and ALT, emphasizing the link between the preoperative cholestasis and inflammation and P-dependent cytotoxic mechanisms. PMID:19436761

  8. Open data set of live cyanobacterial cells imaged using an X-ray laser.

    PubMed

    van der Schot, Gijs; Svenda, Martin; Maia, Filipe R N C; Hantke, Max F; DePonte, Daniel P; Seibert, M Marvin; Aquila, Andrew; Schulz, Joachim; Kirian, Richard A; Liang, Mengning; Stellato, Francesco; Bari, Sadia; Iwan, Bianca; Andreasson, Jakob; Timneanu, Nicusor; Bielecki, Johan; Westphal, Daniel; Nunes de Almeida, Francisca; Odić, Duško; Hasse, Dirk; Carlsson, Gunilla H; Larsson, Daniel S D; Barty, Anton; Martin, Andrew V; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Carron, Sebastian; Ferguson, Ken; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Epp, Sascha W; Foucar, Lutz; Rudek, Benedikt; Erk, Benjamin; Hartmann, Robert; Kimmel, Nils; Holl, Peter; Englert, Lars; Loh, N Duane; Chapman, Henry N; Andersson, Inger; Hajdu, Janos; Ekeberg, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Structural studies on living cells by conventional methods are limited to low resolution because radiation damage kills cells long before the necessary dose for high resolution can be delivered. X-ray free-electron lasers circumvent this problem by outrunning key damage processes with an ultra-short and extremely bright coherent X-ray pulse. Diffraction-before-destruction experiments provide high-resolution data from cells that are alive when the femtosecond X-ray pulse traverses the sample. This paper presents two data sets from micron-sized cyanobacteria obtained at the Linac Coherent Light Source, containing a total of 199,000 diffraction patterns. Utilizing this type of diffraction data will require the development of new analysis methods and algorithms for studying structure and structural variability in large populations of cells and to create abstract models. Such studies will allow us to understand living cells and populations of cells in new ways. New X-ray lasers, like the European XFEL, will produce billions of pulses per day, and could open new areas in structural sciences. PMID:27479514

  9. Open data set of live cyanobacterial cells imaged using an X-ray laser

    PubMed Central

    van der Schot, Gijs; Svenda, Martin; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.; Hantke, Max F.; DePonte, Daniel P.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Aquila, Andrew; Schulz, Joachim; Kirian, Richard A.; Liang, Mengning; Stellato, Francesco; Bari, Sadia; Iwan, Bianca; Andreasson, Jakob; Timneanu, Nicusor; Bielecki, Johan; Westphal, Daniel; Nunes de Almeida, Francisca; Odić, Duško; Hasse, Dirk; Carlsson, Gunilla H.; Larsson, Daniel S.D.; Barty, Anton; Martin, Andrew V.; Schorb, Sebastian; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D.; Carron, Sebastian; Ferguson, Ken; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Epp, Sascha W.; Foucar, Lutz; Rudek, Benedikt; Erk, Benjamin; Hartmann, Robert; Kimmel, Nils; Holl, Peter; Englert, Lars; Loh, N. Duane; Chapman, Henry N.; Andersson, Inger; Hajdu, Janos; Ekeberg, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Structural studies on living cells by conventional methods are limited to low resolution because radiation damage kills cells long before the necessary dose for high resolution can be delivered. X-ray free-electron lasers circumvent this problem by outrunning key damage processes with an ultra-short and extremely bright coherent X-ray pulse. Diffraction-before-destruction experiments provide high-resolution data from cells that are alive when the femtosecond X-ray pulse traverses the sample. This paper presents two data sets from micron-sized cyanobacteria obtained at the Linac Coherent Light Source, containing a total of 199,000 diffraction patterns. Utilizing this type of diffraction data will require the development of new analysis methods and algorithms for studying structure and structural variability in large populations of cells and to create abstract models. Such studies will allow us to understand living cells and populations of cells in new ways. New X-ray lasers, like the European XFEL, will produce billions of pulses per day, and could open new areas in structural sciences. PMID:27479514

  10. DEVELOPING A CAPE-OPEN COMPLIANT METAL FINISHING FACILITY POLLUTION PREVENTION TOOL (CO-MFFP2T)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA is developing a Computer Aided Process Engineering (CAPE) software tool for the metal finishing industry that helps users design efficient metal finishing processes that are less polluting to the environment. Metal finishing process lines can be simulated and evaluated...

  11. Heteroepitaxial Cu2O thin film solar cell on metallic substrates.

    PubMed

    Wee, Sung Hun; Huang, Po-Shun; Lee, Jung-Kun; Goyal, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Heteroepitaxial, single-crystal-like Cu2O films on inexpensive, flexible, metallic substrates can potentially be used as absorber layers for fabrication of low-cost, high-performance, non-toxic, earth-abundant solar cells. Here, we report epitaxial growth of Cu2O films on low cost, flexible, textured metallic substrates. Cu2O films were deposited on the metallic templates via pulsed laser deposition under various processing conditions to study the influence of processing parameters on the structural and electronic properties of the films. It is found that pure, epitaxial Cu2O phase without any trace of CuO phase is only formed in a limited deposition window of P(O2) - temperature. The (00l) single-oriented, highly textured, Cu2O films deposited under optimum P(O2) - temperature conditions exhibit excellent electronic properties with carrier mobility in the range of 40-60 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and carrier concentration over 10(16) cm(-3). The power conversion efficiency of 1.65% is demonstrated from a proof-of-concept Cu2O solar cell based on epitaxial Cu2O film prepared on the textured metal substrate. PMID:26541499

  12. Efficient organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites and doped metal oxide heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaojuan

    Organic-Inorganic hybrid perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 has recently attracted much attention for its high efficient solar energy conversion. This semiconducting pigment with a direct bandgap of 1.55 eV has made it an interesting optical and electronic material over the whole visible solar emission spectrum. The role of hole conducting has been found in this semiconductor that allows perovskite solar cell (PSC) to be formed by CH3NH3PbI3/TiO2 heterojunctions that use TiO2 as scaffold, and carbon as a back contact. We will report a double layer metal doped TiO2/Al2O3 mesoporous scaffold covered by the p-type semiconducting pigment to form a high efficient PSC through solution method. TiO2 and Al2O3 are both large band gap semiconductors that affect conducting and recombination rate in solar cells. One improvement work is doping other metal elements in TiO2 to raise the mobility while extend the recombination time. It has suggested that optimal amounts of doped metals such as Cu, Co, Mn can suppress the reduction of Ti4 + resulting better transportation. TiO2 thin films doped with metals are subjected to the EPR analysis and the results will be correlated with measurements of electronic-optical properties.

  13. Heteroepitaxial Cu2O thin film solar cell on metallic substrates

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Sung Hun; Huang, Po-Shun; Lee, Jung-Kun; Goyal, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Heteroepitaxial, single-crystal-like Cu2O films on inexpensive, flexible, metallic substrates can potentially be used as absorber layers for fabrication of low-cost, high-performance, non-toxic, earth-abundant solar cells. Here, we report epitaxial growth of Cu2O films on low cost, flexible, textured metallic substrates. Cu2O films were deposited on the metallic templates via pulsed laser deposition under various processing conditions to study the influence of processing parameters on the structural and electronic properties of the films. It is found that pure, epitaxial Cu2O phase without any trace of CuO phase is only formed in a limited deposition window of P(O2) - temperature. The (00l) single-oriented, highly textured, Cu2O films deposited under optimum P(O2) - temperature conditions exhibit excellent electronic properties with carrier mobility in the range of 40–60 cm2 V−1 s−1 and carrier concentration over 1016 cm−3. The power conversion efficiency of 1.65% is demonstrated from a proof-of-concept Cu2O solar cell based on epitaxial Cu2O film prepared on the textured metal substrate. PMID:26541499

  14. Method and making group IIB metal - telluride films and solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Basol, Bulent M.; Kapur, Vijay K.

    1990-08-21

    A technique is disclosed forming thin films (13) of group IIB metal-telluride, such as Cd.sub.x Zn.sub.1-x Te (0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1), on a substrate (10) which comprises depositing Te (18) and at least one of the elements (19) of Cd, Zn, and Hg onto a substrate and then heating the elements to form the telluride. A technique is also provided for doping this material by chemically forming a thin layer of a dopant on the surface of the unreacted elements and then heating the elements along with the layer of dopant. A method is disclosed of fabricating a thin film photovoltaic cell which comprises depositing Te and at least one of the elements of Cd, Zn, and Hg onto a substrate which contains on its surface a semiconductor film (12) and then heating the elements in the presence of a halide of the Group IIB metals, causing the formation of solar cell grade Group IIB metal-telluride film and also causing the formation of a rectifying junction, in situ, between the semiconductor film on the substrate and the Group IIB metal-telluride layer which has been formed.

  15. Tanacetum vulgare as a bioindicator of trace-metal contamination: a study of a naturally colonized open-pit lignite mine.

    PubMed

    Jasion, Mateusz; Samecka-Cymerman, Aleksandra; Kolon, Krzysztof; Kempers, Alexander J

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the possibility of use of Tanacetum vulgare (tansy) as an ecological indicator of metal concentration in a naturally colonized open-pit lignite mine in Bełchatów (Poland). Tanacetum vulgare is the only species growing abundantly and spontaneously in the lignite mine waste dumps. Metal concentrations in roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and soil were measured in dump sites differing in type and time of reclamation and therefore differing in pollution levels. Tanacetum vulgare appeared to be an accumulator of chromium and iron in roots, whereas highest concentrations of manganese and zinc were found in leaves. A high bioaccumulation factor for cadmium (Cd) was observed in dumps and control sites, indicating that even small amounts of Cd in the environment may result in significant uptake by the plant. The lowest concentrations of metals were found in plants from sites situated on dumps reclaimed with argillaceous limestone. PMID:23748998

  16. Open Stomata 1 (OST1) is limiting in abscisic acid responses of Arabidopsis guard cells.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Biswa R; Jeon, Byeong Wook; Zhang, Wei; Assmann, Sarah M

    2013-12-01

    Open Stomata 1 (OST1) (SnRK2.6 or SRK2E), a serine/threonine protein kinase, is a positive regulator in abscisic acid (ABA)-mediated stomatal response, but OST1-regulation of K(+) and Ca(2+) currents has not been studied directly in guard cells and it is unknown whether OST1 activity is limiting in ABA-mediated stomatal responses. We employed loss-of-function and gain-of-function approaches to study native ABA responses of Arabidopsis guard cells. We performed stomatal aperture bioassays, patch clamp analyses and reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurements. ABA inhibition of inward K(+) channels and light-induced stomatal opening are reduced in ost1 mutants while transgenic plants overexpressing OST1 show ABA hypersensitivity in these responses. ost1 mutants are insensitive to ABA-induced stomatal closure, regulation of slow anion currents, Ca(2+) -permeable channel activation and ROS production while OST1 overexpressing lines are hypersensitive for these responses, resulting in accelerated stomatal closure in response to ABA. Overexpression of OST1 in planta in the absence of ABA application does not affect basal apertures or ion currents. Moreover, we demonstrate the physical interaction of OST1 with the inward K(+) channel KAT1, the anion channel SLAC1, and the NADPH oxidases AtrbohD and AtrbohF. Our findings support OST1 as a critical limiting component in ABA regulation of stomatal apertures, ion channels and NADPH oxidases in Arabidopsis guard cells. PMID:24033256

  17. Toxicological Responses of Environmental Mixtures: Environmental Metals Mixtures Display Synergistic Induction of Metal-Responsive and Oxidative Stress Genes in Placental Cells

    PubMed Central

    Adebambo, Oluwadamilare A.; Ray, Paul D.; Shea, Damian; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to elevated levels of the toxic metals inorganic arsenic (iAs) and cadmium (Cd) represents a major global health problem. These metals often occur as mixtures in the environment, creating the potential for interactive or synergistic biological effects different from those observed in single exposure conditions. In the present study, environmental mixtures collected from two waste sites in China and comparable mixtures prepared in the laboratory were tested for toxicogenomic response in placental JEG-3 cells. These cells serve as a model for evaluating cellular responses to exposures during pregnancy. One of the mixtures was predominated by iAs and one by Cd. Six gene biomarkers were measured in order to evaluate the effects from the metals mixtures using dose and time-course experiments including: heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and metallothionein isoforms (MT1A, MT1F and MT1G) previously shown to be preferentially induced by exposure to either iAs or Cd, and metal transporter genes aquaporin-9 (AQP9) and ATPase, Cu2+ transporting, beta polypeptide (ATP7B). There was a significant increase in the mRNA expression levels of ATP7B, HO-1, MT1A, MT1F, and MT1G in mixture-treated cells compared to the iAs or Cd only-treated cells. Notably, the genomic responses were observed at concentrations significantly lower than levels found at the environmental collection sites. These data demonstrate that metal mixtures increase the expression of gene biomarkers in placental JEG-3 cells in a synergistic manner. Taken together, the data suggest that toxic metals that co-occur may induce detrimental health effects that are currently underestimated when analyzed as single metals. PMID:26472158

  18. Metal chloride-treated graphene oxide to produce high-performance polymer solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Eun-Su; Noh, Yong-Jin; Kwon, Sung-Nam; Na, Seok-In; Jeon, Ye-Jin; Kim, Seok-Soon; Kim, Tae-Wook

    2015-07-13

    We introduce a simple but effective graphene oxide (GO) modification with metal chloride treatments to produce high-performance polymer solar cells (PSCs). The role of various metal chlorides on GO and their effects on device performances of PSCs was investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, and current-voltage measurement studies demonstrated that metal chloride can induce a p-doping effect and increase the GO work-function, thus resulting in an improved built-in potential and interfacial resistance in PSCs. The resultant PSCs with metal chloride exhibited improved device efficiency than those with the neat GO. Furthermore, with the metal chloride-doped GO, we finally achieved an excellent PSC-efficiency of 6.58% and a very desirable device stability, which constitute a highly similar efficiency but much better PSC life-time to conventional device with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS). This study could be a valuable way to produce various PEDOT:PSS alternatives and beneficial for producing high-performance and cost-efficient polymeric devices.

  19. Decreased fluidity of cell membranes causes a metal ion deficiency in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae producing carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peitong; Sun, Liang; Sun, Yuxia; Shang, Fei; Yan, Guoliang

    2016-04-01

    The genome-wide transcriptional responses of S. cerevisiae to heterologous carotenoid biosynthesis were investigated using DNA microarray analysis. The results show that the genes involved in metal ion transport were specifically up-regulated in the recombinant strain, and metal ions, including Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Mn(2+), and Mg(2+), were deficient in the recombinant strain compared to the ion content of the parent strain. The decrease in metal ions was ascribed to a decrease in cell membrane (CM) fluidity caused by lower levels of unsaturated fatty acids and ergosterol. This was confirmed by the observation that metal ion levels were restored when CM fluidity was increased by supplying linoleic acid. In addition, a 24.3 % increase in the β-carotene concentration was observed. Collectively, our results suggest that heterologous production of carotenoids in S. cerevisiae can induce cellular stress by rigidifying the CM, which can lead to a deficiency in metal ions. Due to the importance of CM fluidity in cellular physiology, maintaining normal CM fluidity might be a potential approach to improving carotenoid production in genetically engineered S. cerevisiae. PMID:26749524

  20. Metal-catalyst-free carbohydrazide fuel cells with three-dimensional graphene anodes.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ji; Benipal, Neeva; Wang, Hui; Chadderdon, David J; Jiang, Yibo; Wei, Wei; Hu, Yun Hang; Li, Wenzhen

    2015-04-13

    As a potential solution to concerns on sustainable energy, the wide spread commercialization of fuel cell has long been hindered by limited reserves and relatively high costs of metal catalysts. 3D graphene, a carbon-only catalyst prepared by reduction of carbon monoxide with lithium oxide, is found to electrochemically catalyze carbohydrazide oxidation reaction efficiently. A prototype of a completely metal-catalyst-free anion exchange membrane fuel cell (AEMFC) with a 3D graphene anode catalyst and an N-doped CNT (N-CNT) cathode catalyst generate a peak power density of 24.9 mW cm(-2) . The average number of electrons electrochemically extracted from one carbohydrazide molecule is 4.9, indicating the existence of CN bond activation, which is a key factor contributing to high fuel utilization efficiency. PMID:25469500

  1. Protein Labelling with Versatile Phosphorescent Metal Complexes for Live Cell Luminescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Connell, Timothy U; James, Janine L; White, Anthony R; Donnelly, Paul S

    2015-09-28

    To take advantage of the luminescent properties of d(6) transition metal complexes to label proteins, versatile bifunctional ligands were prepared. Ligands that contain a 1,2,3-triazole heterocycle were synthesised using Cu(I) catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition "click" chemistry and were used to form phosphorescent Ir(III) and Ru(II) complexes. Their emission properties were readily tuned, by changing either the metal ion or the co-ligands. The complexes were tethered to the metalloprotein transferrin using several conjugation strategies. The Ir(III)/Ru(II)-protein conjugates could be visualised in cancer cells using live cell imaging for extended periods without significant photobleaching. These versatile phosphorescent protein-labelling agents could be widely applied to other proteins and biomolecules and are useful alternatives to conventional organic fluorophores for several applications. PMID:26264214

  2. Facile and Gram-scale Synthesis of Metal-free Catalysts: Toward Realistic Applications for Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ok-Hee; Cho, Yong-Hun; Chung, Dong Young; Kim, Min Jeong; Yoo, Ji Mun; Park, Ji Eun; Choe, Heeman; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2015-03-01

    Although numerous reports on nonprecious metal catalysts for replacing expensive Pt-based catalysts have been published, few of these studies have demonstrated their practical application in fuel cells. In this work, we report graphitic carbon nitride and carbon nanofiber hybrid materials synthesized by a facile and gram-scale method via liquid-based reactions, without the use of toxic materials or a high pressure-high temperature reactor, for use as fuel cell cathodes. The resulting materials exhibited remarkable methanol tolerance, selectivity, and stability even without a metal dopant. Furthermore, these completely metal-free catalysts exhibited outstanding performance as cathode materials in an actual fuel cell device: a membrane electrode assembly with both acidic and alkaline polymer electrolytes. The fabrication method and remarkable performance of the single cell produced in this study represent progressive steps toward the realistic application of metal-free cathode electrocatalysts in fuel cells.

  3. Facile and Gram-scale Synthesis of Metal-free Catalysts: Toward Realistic Applications for Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ok-Hee; Cho, Yong-Hun; Chung, Dong Young; Kim, Min Jeong; Yoo, Ji Mun; Park, Ji Eun; Choe, Heeman; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous reports on nonprecious metal catalysts for replacing expensive Pt-based catalysts have been published, few of these studies have demonstrated their practical application in fuel cells. In this work, we report graphitic carbon nitride and carbon nanofiber hybrid materials synthesized by a facile and gram-scale method via liquid-based reactions, without the use of toxic materials or a high pressure-high temperature reactor, for use as fuel cell cathodes. The resulting materials exhibited remarkable methanol tolerance, selectivity, and stability even without a metal dopant. Furthermore, these completely metal-free catalysts exhibited outstanding performance as cathode materials in an actual fuel cell device: a membrane electrode assembly with both acidic and alkaline polymer electrolytes. The fabrication method and remarkable performance of the single cell produced in this study represent progressive steps toward the realistic application of metal-free cathode electrocatalysts in fuel cells. PMID:25728910

  4. Flexible perovskite solar cells based on the metal-insulator-semiconductor structure.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing; Li, Heng; Zhao, Yicheng; Zhou, Wenke; Fu, Rui; Pan, Huiyue; Zhao, Qing

    2016-09-14

    The metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) structure is applied to perovskite solar cells, in which the traditional compact layer TiO2 is replaced by Al2O3 as the hole blocking material to realize an all-low-temperature process. Flexible devices based on this structure are also realized with excellent flexibility, which hold 85% of their initial efficiency after bending 100 times. PMID:27524362

  5. Final Report: Sintered CZTS Nanoparticle Solar Cells on Metal Foil; July 26, 2011 - July 25, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Leidholm, C.; Hotz, C.; Breeze, A.; Sunderland, C.; Ki, W.; Zehnder, D.

    2012-09-01

    This is the final report covering 12 months of this subcontract for research on high-efficiency copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS)-based thin-film solar cells on flexible metal foil. Each of the first three quarters of the subcontract has been detailed in quarterly reports. In this final report highlights of the first three quarters will be provided and details will be given of the final quarter of the subcontract.

  6. Acceleration of a Particle-in-Cell Code for Space Plasma Simulations with OpenACC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano; Vaivads, Andris; Vencels, Juris; Deca, Jan; Lapenta, Giovanni; Hart, Alistair; Laure, Erwin

    2015-04-01

    We simulate space plasmas with the Particle-in-cell (PIC) method that uses computational particles to mimic electrons and protons in solar wind and in Earth magnetosphere. The magnetic and electric fields are computed by solving the Maxwell's equations on a computational grid. In each PIC simulation step, there are four major phases: interpolation of fields to particles, updating the location and velocity of each particle, interpolation of particles to grids and solving the Maxwell's equations on the grid. We use the iPIC3D code, which was implemented in C++, using both MPI and OpenMP, for our case study. By November 2014, heterogeneous systems using hardware accelerators such as Graphics Processing Unit (GPUs) and the Many Integrated Core (MIC) coprocessors for high performance computing continue growth in the top 500 most powerful supercomputers world wide. Scientific applications for numerical simulations need to adapt to using accelerators to achieve portability and scalability in the coming exascale systems. In our work, we conduct a case study of using OpenACC to offload the computation intensive parts: particle mover and interpolation of particles to grids, in a massively parallel Particle-in-Cell simulation code, iPIC3D, to multi-GPU systems. We use MPI for inter-node communication for halo exchange and communicating particles. We identify the most promising parts suitable for GPUs accelerator by profiling using CrayPAT. We implemented manual deep copy to address the challenges of porting C++ classes to GPU. We document the necessary changes in the exiting algorithms to adapt for GPU computation. We present the challenges and findings as well as our methodology for porting a Particle-in-Cell code to multi-GPU systems using OpenACC. In this work, we will present the challenges, findings and our methodology of porting a Particle-in-Cell code for space applications as follows: We profile the iPIC3D code by Cray Performance Analysis Tool (CrayPAT) and identify

  7. Scaling Equation for yield strength of nanoporous open-cell foams

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, A M; Biener, J; Hayes, J R; Bythrow, P M; A.Volkert, C; Hamza, A V

    2006-05-25

    A comprehensive study on the relationship between yield strength, relative density and ligament sizes is presented for nanoporous Au foams. Depth-sensing nanoindentation tests were performed on nanoporous foams ranging from 20 to 42% relative density with ligament sizes ranging from 10 to 900 nm. The Gibson and Ashby yield strength equation for open-cell macro-cellular foams is modified in order to incorporate ligament size effects. This study demonstrates that at the nanoscale, foam strength is governed by ligament size, in addition to relative density. Furthermore, we present the ligament length scale as a new parameter to tailor foam properties and achieve high strength at low densities.

  8. Selective Deposition of Insulating Metal Oxide in Perovskite Solar Cells with Enhanced Device Performance.

    PubMed

    Yue, Youfeng; Yang, Xudong; Wu, Yongzhen; Salim, Noviana Tjitra; Islam, Ashraful; Noda, Takeshi; Han, Liyuan

    2015-08-24

    We report a simple methodology for the selective deposition of an insulating layer on the nanoparticulate TiO2 (np-TiO2) mesoporous layer of perovskite solar cells. The deposited MgO insulating layer mainly covered the bottom part of the np-TiO2 layer with less coverage at the top. The so-called quasi-top-open structure is introduced to act as an efficient hole-blocking layer to prevent charge recombination at the physical contact of the transparent conducting oxide with the perovskite. This leads to an open-circuit voltage higher than that of the reference cell with a compact TiO2 hole-blocking layer. Moreover, such a quasi-top-open structure can facilitate the electron injection from perovskite into the np-TiO2 mesoporous layer and improve the spectral response at longer wavelength because of the less covered insulating layer at the top. This work provides an alternative way to fabricate perovskite solar cells without the need to use a conventional compact TiO2 layer. PMID:26230988

  9. Predicted energy densitites for nickel-hydrogen and silver-hydrogen cells embodying metallic hydrides for hydrogen storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easter, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    Simplified design concepts were used to estimate gravimetric and volumetric energy densities for metal hydrogen battery cells for assessing the characteristics of cells containing metal hydrides as compared to gaseous storage cells, and for comparing nickel cathode and silver cathode systems. The silver cathode was found to yield superior energy densities in all cases considered. The inclusion of hydride forming materials yields cells with very high volumetric energy densities that also retain gravimetric energy densities nearly as high as those of gaseous storage cells.

  10. Cytotoxicity effects of metal oxide nanoparticles in human tumor cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, T.; Rey, M.; Rojas, E.; Moya, S.; Fleddermann, J.; Estrela-Lopis, I.; Donath, E.; Wang, B.; Mao, Z.; Gao, C.; González-Fernández, África

    2011-07-01

    Metallic and metal oxide nanoparticles (Nps) have a wide range of applications in various settings including household, cosmetics and chemical industries, as well as for coatings. Nevertheless, an in-depth study of the potential toxic effects of these Nps is still needed, in order to fulfill the mandatory requirement of ensuring the safety of workers, patients and the general public. In this study, Quick Cell colorimetric assays were used to evaluate the in vitro toxicity of different metal oxide Nps [Fe(II,III)Ox, TiOx, ZnO and CeO2] in several cell lines. The ZnO Nps were found to be highly toxic, with a lethal dose <=100 μg/ml for all the cell lines studied. Western blot was also used to test the ability of the different Nps to activate the complement pathway. However, no activation of this cascade was observed when the Nps were added. In addition, the aggregation state and charge of the Nps in culture media was studied by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and measurement of zeta potential. Transmission Electron Microscopy was used to analyze Np uptake and localization at the cellular level.

  11. Beyond optical enhancement due to embedded metal nanoparticles in thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy Mopurisetty, Sundara; Bajaj, Mohit; Ganguly, Swaroop

    2016-03-01

    Metal nanoparticles (MNPs) inside the active layer of thin-film solar cells are considered promising for light trapping, but they have also engendered concerns over their adverse impact on transport properties. Contrary to expectations, coupled optical and electrical simulations indicate that a purely electrical effect due to MNPs might result in an enhancement of the cell performance in addition to the gain from optical (plasmonic) effects. This electrical enhancement strongly depends on the MNP/semiconductor barrier height. On the other hand, the anticipated degradation due to trap states and surface recombination at the MNP/semiconductor interface may in fact be negligible.

  12. Mechanical behavior of regular open-cell porous biomaterials made of diamond lattice unit cells.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, S M; Campoli, G; Amin Yavari, S; Sajadi, B; Wauthle, R; Schrooten, J; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2014-06-01

    Cellular structures with highly controlled micro-architectures are promising materials for orthopedic applications that require bone-substituting biomaterials or implants. The availability of additive manufacturing techniques has enabled manufacturing of biomaterials made of one or multiple types of unit cells. The diamond lattice unit cell is one of the relatively new types of unit cells that are used in manufacturing of regular porous biomaterials. As opposed to many other types of unit cells, there is currently no analytical solution that could be used for prediction of the mechanical properties of cellular structures made of the diamond lattice unit cells. In this paper, we present new analytical solutions and closed-form relationships for predicting the elastic modulus, Poisson׳s ratio, critical buckling load, and yield (plateau) stress of cellular structures made of the diamond lattice unit cell. The mechanical properties predicted using the analytical solutions are compared with those obtained using finite element models. A number of solid and porous titanium (Ti6Al4V) specimens were manufactured using selective laser melting. A series of experiments were then performed to determine the mechanical properties of the matrix material and cellular structures. The experimentally measured mechanical properties were compared with those obtained using analytical solutions and finite element (FE) models. It has been shown that, for small apparent density values, the mechanical properties obtained using analytical and numerical solutions are in agreement with each other and with experimental observations. The properties estimated using an analytical solution based on the Euler-Bernoulli theory markedly deviated from experimental results for large apparent density values. The mechanical properties estimated using FE models and another analytical solution based on the Timoshenko beam theory better matched the experimental observations. PMID:24566381

  13. Open source software for quantification of cell migration, protrusions, and fluorescence intensities

    PubMed Central

    Barry, David J.; Durkin, Charlotte H.; Abella, Jasmine V.

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is frequently accompanied by changes in cell morphology (morphodynamics) on a range of spatial and temporal scales. Despite recent advances in imaging techniques, the application of unbiased computational image analysis methods for morphodynamic quantification is rare. For example, manual analysis using kymographs is still commonplace, often caused by lack of access to user-friendly, automated tools. We now describe software designed for the automated quantification of cell migration and morphodynamics. Implemented as a plug-in for the open-source platform, ImageJ, ADAPT is capable of rapid, automated analysis of migration and membrane protrusions, together with associated fluorescently labeled proteins, across multiple cells. We demonstrate the ability of the software by quantifying variations in cell population migration rates on different extracellular matrices. We also show that ADAPT can detect and morphologically profile filopodia. Finally, we have used ADAPT to compile an unbiased description of a “typical” bleb formed at the plasma membrane and quantify the effect of Arp2/3 complex inhibition on bleb retraction. PMID:25847537

  14. Optical enhancement of the open-circuit voltage in high quality GaAs solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, M. A.; Geisz, J. F.; García, I.; Friedman, D. J.; Duda, A.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2013-03-01

    The self-absorption of radiated photons increases the minority carrier concentration in semiconductor optoelectronic devices such as solar cells. This so-called photon recycling leads to an increase in the external luminescent efficiency, the fraction of internally radiated photons that are able to escape through the front surface. An increased external luminescent efficiency in turn correlates with an increased open-circuit voltage and ultimately conversion efficiency. We develop a detailed ray-optical model that calculates Voc for real, non-idealized solar cells, accounting for isotropic luminescence, parasitic losses, multiple photon reflections within the cell and wavelength-dependent indices of refraction for the layers in the cell. We have fabricated high quality GaAs solar cells, systematically varying the optical properties including the back reflectance, and have demonstrated Voc = 1.101 ± 0.002 V and conversion efficiencies of (27.8 ± 0.8)% under the global solar spectrum. The trends shown by the model are in good agreement with the data.

  15. Creep resistant, metal-coated LiFeO.sub.2 anodes for molten carbonated fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Khandkar, Ashok C.

    1994-01-01

    A porous, creep-resistant, metal-coated, LiFeO.sub.2 ceramic electrode for fuel cells is disclosed. The electrode is particularly useful for molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) although it may have utilities in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) as well.

  16. Creep resistant, metal-coated LiFeO[sub 2] anodes for molten carbonated fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Khandkar, A.C.

    1994-08-23

    A porous, creep-resistant, metal-coated, LiFeO[sub 2] ceramic electrode for fuel cells is disclosed. The electrode is particularly useful for molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) although it may have utilities in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) as well. 11 figs.

  17. Functional Analysis of Cellulose and Xyloglucan in the Walls of Stomatal Guard Cells of Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Yue; Anderson, Charles T.

    2016-01-01

    Stomatal guard cells are pairs of specialized epidermal cells that control water and CO2 exchange between the plant and the environment. To fulfill the functions of stomatal opening and closure that are driven by changes in turgor pressure, guard cell walls must be both strong and flexible, but how the structure and dynamics of guard cell walls enable stomatal function remains poorly understood. To address this question, we applied cell biological and genetic analyses to investigate guard cell walls and their relationship to stomatal function in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Using live-cell spinning disk confocal microscopy, we measured the motility of cellulose synthase (CESA)-containing complexes labeled by green fluorescent protein (GFP)-CESA3 and observed a reduced proportion of GFP-CESA3 particles colocalizing with microtubules upon stomatal closure. Imaging cellulose organization in guard cells revealed a relatively uniform distribution of cellulose in the open state and a more fibrillar pattern in the closed state, indicating that cellulose microfibrils undergo dynamic reorganization during stomatal movements. In cesa3je5 mutants defective in cellulose synthesis and xxt1 xxt2 mutants lacking the hemicellulose xyloglucan, stomatal apertures, changes in guard cell length, and cellulose reorganization were aberrant during fusicoccin-induced stomatal opening or abscisic acid-induced stomatal closure, indicating that sufficient cellulose and xyloglucan are required for normal guard cell dynamics. Together, these results provide new insights into how guard cell walls allow stomata to function as responsive mediators of gas exchange at the plant surface. PMID:26729799

  18. Merging open metal sites and Lewis basic sites in a NbO-type metal-organic framework for improved C2H2/CH4 and CO2/CH4 separation.

    PubMed

    Song, Chengling; Hu, Jiayi; Ling, Yajing; Feng, Yunlong; Chen, De-Li; He, Yabing

    2015-09-01

    A new three-dimensional NbO-type porous metal-organic framework ZJNU-47 was synthesized via a solvothermal reaction of Cu(NO3)2·3H2O and a Lewis basic nitrogen donor site-rich tetracarboxylate, namely, 5,5'-(pyridazine-3,6-diyl)-diisophthalate, and the structure was characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction to be isostructural with NOTT-101. With the synergistic effect of open metal sites, Lewis basic sites and a suitable pore space, the MOF material ZJNU-47a after activation can take up a large amount of C2H2 and CO2. The gravimetric C2H2 uptake of 214 cm(3) (STP) g(-1) at room temperature and 1 atm is the highest among all reported MOFs to date, and the gravimetric CO2 uptake of 108 cm(3) (STP) g(-1) is also among the highest reported for MOFs. Compared to the isostructural MOF NOTT-101a, ZJNU-47a exhibits a significant increase in C2H2 and CO2 uptake and thus improved C2H2/CH4 and CO2/CH4 separations. Significantly, comprehensive DFT studies of C2H2 and CO2 adsorption have revealed that the open nitrogen donor sites are comparable and even superior to open metal sites regarding the adsorption sites. This work demonstrated that the simultaneous introduction of Lewis basic nitrogen donor sites and Lewis acidic metal sites into the framework is a promising approach to improve the gas sorption toward CO2 and C2H2 and thus to produce materials possessing enhanced C2H2/CH4 and CO2/CH4 separation performance. PMID:26223674

  19. Impact of mesoscale order on open-circuit voltage in organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Poelking, Carl; Tietze, Max; Elschner, Chris; Olthof, Selina; Hertel, Dirk; Baumeier, Björn; Würthner, Frank; Meerholz, Klaus; Leo, Karl; Andrienko, Denis

    2015-04-01

    Structural order in organic solar cells is paramount: it reduces energetic disorder, boosts charge and exciton mobilities, and assists exciton splitting. Owing to spatial localization of electronic states, microscopic descriptions of photovoltaic processes tend to overlook the influence of structural features at the mesoscale. Long-range electrostatic interactions nevertheless probe this ordering, making local properties depend on the mesoscopic order. Using a technique developed to address spatially aperiodic excitations in thin films and in bulk, we show how inclusion of mesoscale order resolves the controversy between experimental and theoretical results for the energy-level profile and alignment in a variety of photovoltaic systems, with direct experimental validation. Optimal use of long-range ordering also rationalizes the acceptor-donor-acceptor paradigm for molecular design of donor dyes. We predict open-circuit voltages of planar heterojunction solar cells in excellent agreement with experimental data, based only on crystal structures and interfacial orientation. PMID:25532071

  20. An observational study of giant cell interstitial pneumonia and lung fibrosis in hard metal lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Junichi; Moriyama, Hiroshi; Terada, Masaki; Takada, Toshinori; Suzuki, Eiichi; Narita, Ichiei; Kawabata, Yoshinori; Yamaguchi, Tetsuo; Hebisawa, Akira; Sakai, Fumikazu; Arakawa, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Background Hard metal lung disease has various pathological patterns including giant cell interstitial pneumonia (GIP) and usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). Although the UIP pattern is considered the prominent feature in advanced disease, it is unknown whether GIP finally progresses to the UIP pattern. Objectives To clarify clinical, pathological and elemental differences between the GIP and UIP patterns in hard metal lung disease. Methods A cross-sectional study of patients from 17 institutes participating in the 10th annual meeting of the Tokyo Research Group for Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Diseases, 2009. Nineteen patients (seven female) diagnosed with hard metal lung disease by the presence of tungsten in lung specimens were studied. Results Fourteen cases were pathologically diagnosed as GIP or centrilobular inflammation/fibrosing. The other five cases were the UIP pattern or upper lobe fibrosis. Elemental analyses of lung specimens of GIP showed tungsten throughout the centrilobular fibrotic areas. In the UIP pattern, tungsten was detected in the periarteriolar area with subpleural fibrosis, but no association with centrilobular fibrosis or inflammatory cell infiltration. The GIP group was younger (43.1 vs 58.6 years), with shorter exposure duration (73 vs 285 months; p<0.01), lower serum KL-6 (398 vs 710 U/mL) and higher lymphocyte percentage in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (31.5% vs 3.22%; p<0.05) than the fibrosis group. Conclusions The UIP pattern or upper lobe fibrosis is remarkably different from GIP in distribution of hard metal elements, associated interstitial inflammation and fibrosis, and clinical features. In hard metal lung disease, the UIP pattern or upper lobe fibrosis may not be an advanced form of GIP. PMID:24674995

  1. Effect of plasma reflection on open-circuit voltage of a solar cell at ultrahigh light intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Tewary, V.K.; Kothari, L.S.; Jain, S.C.

    1980-07-01

    It is shown that the observed decrease of open-circuit voltage of a silicon solar cell for ruby laser light at intensities beyond 10/sup 5/ W/cm/sup 2/ can be explained by incorporating the effect of plasma reflection of light from the surface of the solar cell.

  2. Analysis of aging of commercial composite metal oxide - Li4Ti5O12 battery cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svens, Pontus; Eriksson, Rickard; Hansson, Jörgen; Behm, Mårten; Gustafsson, Torbjörn; Lindbergh, Göran

    2014-12-01

    Commercial battery cells with Li4Ti5O12 negative electrode and composite metal oxide positive electrode have been analyzed with respect to aging mechanisms. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), differential capacity analysis (dQ/dV), differential voltage analysis (dV/dQ) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) were used to identify different ageing mechanisms such as lithium inventory loss, loss of active electrode material and surface film growth. The active material of the positive electrode was also examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Aging mechanisms were studied for both calendar-aged and cycle-aged cells. Data from half cells prepared from post mortem harvested electrode material, using lithium foil as negative electrode and pouch material as encapsulation, were used as reference to full cell data. Electrochemical analysis of full and half cells combined with material analysis showed to be a powerful method to identify aging mechanisms in this type of commercial cells. The calendar-aged cell showed insignificant aging while the cycle-aged cell showed noticeable loss of positive electrode active material and loss of cyclable lithium, but only minor loss of negative electrode active material. The results imply that Li4Ti5O12 negative electrode material is a good alternative to other materials if high energy density is not the primary goal.

  3. Whole‐cell biosensors for detection of heavy metal ions in environmental samples based on metallothionein promoters from Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Amaro, Francisco; Turkewitz, Aaron P.; Martín‐González, Ana; Gutiérrez, Juan‐Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Summary Heavy metals are among the most serious pollutants, and thus there is a need to develop sensitive and rapid biomonitoring methods for heavy metals in the environment. Critical parameters such as bioavailability, toxicity and genotoxicity cannot be tested using chemical analysis, but only can be assayed using living cells. A whole‐cell biosensor uses the whole cell as a single reporter incorporating both bioreceptor and transducer elements. In the present paper, we report results with two gene constructs using the Tetrahymena thermophila MTT1 and MTT5 metallothionein promoters linked with the eukaryotic luciferase gene as a reporter. This is the first report of a ciliated protozoan used as a heavy metal whole‐cell biosensor. T. thermophila transformed strains were created as heavy metal whole‐cell biosensors, and turn on bioassays were designed to detect, in about 2 h, the bioavailable heavy metals in polluted soil or aquatic samples. Validation of these whole‐cell biosensors was carried out using both artificial and natural samples, including methods for detecting false positives and negatives. Comparison with other published cell biosensors indicates that the Tetrahymena metallothionein promoter‐based biosensors appear to be the most sensitive eukaryotic metal biosensors and compare favourably with some prokaryotic biosensors as well. PMID:21366892

  4. DIVALENT METAL TRANSPORTER-1 REGULATION BY IRON AND VANADIUM MODULATES HYDROGEN PEROXIDE-INDUCED DNA DAMAGE IN LUNG CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) participates in the detoxification of metals that can damage lung epithelium. Elevated iron levels increase the expression of DMT1 in bronchial epithelial cells stimulating its uptake and storage in ferritin, thus making iron unavailable t...

  5. Parallelisation of storage cell flood models using OpenMP and accelerator cards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, J.; Fewtrell, T.; Trigg, M.; Bates, P.

    2009-04-01

    Recent developments in computer processors have moved away from increasing clock speed towards multi-core approaches. For computationally intensive flood inundation models this development shift will need to be exploited if simulation runtimes are to be reduced in the near future. This work describes the implementation and benchmarking of a parallel version of the LISFLOOD-FP coupled 1D-2D hydraulic model. The motivation behind the study was that reducing model run time through parallelisation would increase the utility of such models by expanding the domains or resolutions over which they can be practically implemented, allowing previously inaccessible scientific questions to be addressed. Of the many parallelisation methods only two were considered here: The first used the shared memory Open Multi Processor (OpenMP) application programming interface (API) to achieved parallelisation on standard CPU's. The second method used Clearspeed accelerator boards to run the computationally intensive 2D floodplain component of the model, whilst the computationally less intensive 1D channel model runs at a longer time step on a standard CPU. Parallel speedup with OpenMP was calculated for 13 models distributed over seven study sites and implemented on one, two, four and eight processor cores. Selected cases were then run on one core with a Clearspeed CSX600 accelerator board. A key advantage of OpenMP, with an explicit rather than implicit model, was the ease of implementation and minimal code changes required to run simulations in parallel. Using the Clearspeed accelerator boards required selected functions to be re-written in the Cn parallel programming language (an extension of the C language) and an interface based on Clearspeeds CSPX Accelerator Interface Library for calling these remote functions from the host code where the rest of the model was running. Preliminary results indicate that both approaches can be used to parallelise storage cell flood inundation models

  6. Atomistic simulations of electrochemical metallization cells: mechanisms of ultra-fast resistance switching in nanoscale devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Guzman, David; Strachan, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    We describe a new method that enables reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of electrochemical processes and apply it to study electrochemical metallization cells (ECMs). The model, called EChemDID, extends the charge equilibration method to capture the effect of external electrochemical potential on partial atomic charges and describes its equilibration over connected metallic structures, on-the-fly, during the MD simulation. We use EChemDID to simulate resistance switching in nanoscale ECMs; these devices consist of an electroactive metal separated from an inactive electrode by an insulator and can be reversibly switched to a low-resistance state by the electrochemical formation of a conducting filament between electrodes. Our structures use Cu as the active electrode and SiO2 as the dielectric and have dimensions at the foreseen limit of scalability of the technology, with a dielectric thickness of approximately 1 nm. We explore the effect of device geometry on switching timescales and find that nanowires with an electroactive shell, where ions migrate towards a smaller inactive electrode core, result in faster switching than planar devices. We observe significant device-to-device variability in switching timescales and intermittent switching for these nanoscale devices. To characterize the evolution in the electronic structure of the dielectric as dissolved metallic ions switch the device, we perform density functional theory calculations on structures obtained from an EChemDID MD simulation. These results confirm the appearance of states around the Fermi energy as the metallic filament bridges the electrodes and show that the metallic ions and not defects in the dielectric contribute to the majority of those states.

  7. Atomistic simulations of electrochemical metallization cells: mechanisms of ultra-fast resistance switching in nanoscale devices.

    PubMed

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Guzman, David; Strachan, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    We describe a new method that enables reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of electrochemical processes and apply it to study electrochemical metallization cells (ECMs). The model, called EChemDID, extends the charge equilibration method to capture the effect of external electrochemical potential on partial atomic charges and describes its equilibration over connected metallic structures, on-the-fly, during the MD simulation. We use EChemDID to simulate resistance switching in nanoscale ECMs; these devices consist of an electroactive metal separated from an inactive electrode by an insulator and can be reversibly switched to a low-resistance state by the electrochemical formation of a conducting filament between electrodes. Our structures use Cu as the active electrode and SiO2 as the dielectric and have dimensions at the foreseen limit of scalability of the technology, with a dielectric thickness of approximately 1 nm. We explore the effect of device geometry on switching timescales and find that nanowires with an electroactive shell, where ions migrate towards a smaller inactive electrode core, result in faster switching than planar devices. We observe significant device-to-device variability in switching timescales and intermittent switching for these nanoscale devices. To characterize the evolution in the electronic structure of the dielectric as dissolved metallic ions switch the device, we perform density functional theory calculations on structures obtained from an EChemDID MD simulation. These results confirm the appearance of states around the Fermi energy as the metallic filament bridges the electrodes and show that the metallic ions and not defects in the dielectric contribute to the majority of those states. PMID:27218609

  8. Limitations of the open circuit voltage of induced junction silicon solar cells due to surface recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girisch, R.; Mertens, R. P.; van Overstraeten, R.

    Surface recombination is investigated both theoretically and experimentally under the positively charged insulator between the grating fingers in an induced-junction grating-type solar cell. The numerical solution for the recombination current as a function of internal voltage in the air-insulator-silicon system has been obtained, using generalized equations. The impact of a fixed insulator charge and of the distribution and density of interface states on the recombination current is investigated. In order to verify the calculations, a grating-type cell with a semitransparent electrode was developed. In this structure, the amount of inversion layer charge can be controlled by the voltage applied to the electrode. It is shown that (1) surface recombination may become a limiting mechanism in reaching high open circuit voltages; (2) high open circuit voltages are possible, provided a proper combination is chosen of insulator charge and interface state density; and (3) even when the interface state density increases linearly with the fixed insulator charge, the device performance improves with increasing insulator charge.

  9. The production and characterization of topologically and mechanically gradient open-cell thermoplastic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanami, M.; Alderson, A.; Alderson, K. L.; McDonald, S. A.; Mottershead, B.; Withers, P. J.

    2014-05-01

    The development of longitudinally and radially gradient open-cell polyurethane foams is reported. Local and global mechanical properties and pore structure have been characterized using video extensometry with x-y strain-mapping capability, and x-ray microtomography (CT) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The local axial Poisson’s ratio varies in a smoothly continuous manner along the length of the longitudinally gradient foam from large negative (auxetic), through zero, to positive (conventional) values. The production of radially gradient foams having a coaxial core-sheath structure is reported for the first time. Two radially gradient foams have been produced, each displaying similar global negative axial Poisson’s ratio responses but with markedly different local axial Poisson’s ratio and local axial Young’s modulus behaviours. One of the radially gradient foams displays a positive Poisson’s ratio core and an auxetic sheath resulting from conventional and higher density re-entrant open-cell pore structures, respectively.

  10. Spontaneous opening of the acetylcholine receptor channel in developing muscle cells from normal and dystrophic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Obregon, A.; Lansman, J.B.

    1995-12-31

    Single-channel activity was recorded from cell-attached patches on skeletal muscle cells isolated from wild-type mice and from mice carrying the dy or mdx mutations. Spontaneous openings of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor channel (nAChR) were detected in virtually all recordings from either 4v/dy or dyl + myotubes. but only infrequently from wild-type or mdx myotubes. Spontaneous openings were also present in most recordings from undifferentiated myoblasts from all of the mouse strains studied. The biophysical properties of the spontaneous activity were similar to those of the embryonic form of the nAChR in the presence of acetylcholine (ACh). Examination of the single-channel currents evoked by low concentrations of ACh showed a reduced sensitivity to the agonist in the dystrophic dy and mdx myotubes. but not in wild- type myotubes. The results suggest that alterations in nAChR function are associated with the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy in the dy mouse.

  11. The reorganization of actin filaments is required for vacuolar fusion of guard cells during stomatal opening in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Juan; Ren, Fei; Gao, Xin-Qi; Wei, Peng-Cheng; Wang, Xue-Chen

    2013-02-01

    The reorganization of actin filaments (AFs) and vacuoles in guard cells is involved in the regulation of stomatal movement. However, it remains unclear whether there is any interaction between the reorganization of AFs and vacuolar changes during stomatal movement. Here, we report the relationship between the reorganization of AFs and vacuolar fusion revealed in pharmacological experiments, and characterizing stomatal opening in actin-related protein 2 (arp2) and arp3 mutants. Our results show that cytochalasin-D-induced depolymerization or phalloidin-induced stabilization of AFs leads to an increase in small unfused vacuoles during stomatal opening in wild-type (WT) Arabidopsis plants. Light-induced stomatal opening is retarded and vacuolar fusion in guard cells is impaired in the mutants, in which the reorganization and the dynamic parameters of AFs are aberrant compared with those of the WT. In WT, AFs tightly surround the small separated vacuoles, forming a ring that encircles the boundary membranes of vacuoles partly fused during stomatal opening. In contrast, in the mutants, most AFs and actin patches accumulate abnormally around the nuclei of the guard cells, which probably further impair vacuolar fusion and retard stomatal opening. Our results suggest that the reorganization of AFs regulates vacuolar fusion in guard cells during stomatal opening. PMID:22891733

  12. The expression of the open reading frame of "Arabidopsis" CAX1, but not its cDNA, confers metal tolerance in yeast

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biochemical properties and regulation of several plant CAX (CAtion eXchanger)-type vacuolar Ca (2+)/H (+) exchangers have been extensively analyzed in yeast expression assays. In the present study, we compare and contrast the phenotypes of yeast cells expressing the CAX1 cDNA and open reading fr...

  13. Transition Metal-Oxide Free Perovskite Solar Cells Enabled by a New Organic Charge Transport Layer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sehoon; Han, Ggoch Ddeul; Weis, Jonathan G; Park, Hyoungwon; Hentz, Olivia; Zhao, Zhibo; Swager, Timothy M; Gradečak, Silvija

    2016-04-01

    Various electron and hole transport layers have been used to develop high-efficiency perovskite solar cells. To achieve low-temperature solution processing of perovskite solar cells, organic n-type materials are employed to replace the metal oxide electron transport layer (ETL). Although PCBM (phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester) has been widely used for this application, its morphological instability in films (i.e., aggregation) is detrimental. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of a new fullerene derivative (isobenzofulvene-C60-epoxide, IBF-Ep) that serves as an electron transporting material for methylammonium mixed lead halide-based perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3-xClx) solar cells, both in the normal and inverted device configurations. We demonstrate that IBF-Ep has superior morphological stability compared to the conventional acceptor, PCBM. IBF-Ep provides higher photovoltaic device performance as compared to PCBM (6.9% vs 2.5% in the normal and 9.0% vs 5.3% in the inverted device configuration). Moreover, IBF-Ep devices show superior tolerance to high humidity (90%) in air. By reaching power conversion efficiencies up to 9.0% for the inverted devices with IBF-Ep as the ETL, we demonstrate the potential of this new material as an alternative to metal oxides for perovskite solar cells processed in air. PMID:26947400

  14. Analysis of front metal contact for plated Ni/Cu silicon solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Doo; Kwon, Hyuk Yong; Lee, Soo Hong

    2011-12-01

    Commercial solar cells with screen printed front contacts are formed by using Ag paste. This has caused high shading loss and low conductivity because of high contact resistance. One of the front metal contact solar cells is Ni/Cu metal contact, made by using plating that is easily available so as to allow simple and inexpensive production techniques to be applied to mass production. Ni has been shown to be a suitable barrier to Cu diffusion into the silicon. Also, it is possible to use Ni silicide for the sintering process. Ni silicide has been reported have compositions of Ni2Si (200°C ˜ 300°C), NiSi (300°C ˜ 700°C), and NiSi2 (700°C ˜ 900°C). Especially, NiSi has been shown to have low contact resistance (14 ˜ 16 mW·cm) between surface and electrode. Finally, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis show experimental results in which electroless plating of Ni and Ni silicide can be seen. The efficiency of plated Ni/Cu contact solar cells was improved by 0.8% over that of screen printed solar cells.

  15. Modifying infrared scattering effects of single yeast cells with plasmonic metal mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Marvin A.; Prakash, Suraj; Heer, Joseph M.; Corwin, Lloyd D.; Cilwa, Katherine E.; Coe, James V.

    2010-11-01

    The scattering effects in the infrared (IR) spectra of single, isolated bread yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) on a ZnSe substrate and in metal microchannels have been probed by Fourier transform infrared imaging microspectroscopy. Absolute extinction [(3.4±0.6)×10-7 cm2 at 3178 cm-1], scattering, and absorption cross sections for a single yeast cell and a vibrational absorption spectrum have been determined by comparing it to the scattering properties of single, isolated, latex microspheres (polystyrene, 5.0 μm in diameter) on ZnSe, which are well modeled by the Mie scattering theory. Single yeast cells were then placed into the holes of the IR plasmonic mesh, i.e., metal films with arrays of subwavelength holes, yielding "scatter-free" IR absorption spectra, which have undistorted vibrational lineshapes and a rising generic IR absorption baseline. Absolute extinction, scattering, and absorption spectral profiles were determined for a single, ellipsoidal yeast cell to characterize the interplay of these effects.

  16. Method and electrochemical cell for synthesis and treatment of metal monolayer electrocatalysts metal, carbon, and oxide nanoparticles ion batch, or in continuous fashion

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Zhang, Junliang; Sasaki, Kotaro

    2015-04-28

    An apparatus and method for synthesis and treatment of electrocatalyst particles in batch or continuous fashion is provided. In one embodiment, the apparatus comprises a sonication bath and a two-compartment chamber submerged in the sonication bath. The upper and lower compartments are separated by a microporous material surface. The upper compartment comprises a cover and a working electrode (WE) connected to a Pt foil contact, with the foil contact connected to the microporous material. The upper chamber further comprises reference counter electrodes. The lower compartment comprises an electrochemical cell containing a solution of metal ions. In one embodiment, the method for synthesis of electrocatalysts comprises introducing a plurality of particles into the apparatus and applying sonication and an electrical potential to the microporous material connected to the WE. After the non-noble metal ions are deposited onto the particles, the non-noble metal ions are displaced by noble-metal ions by galvanic displacement.

  17. Recovery of Metal Values from Spent Zinc-Carbon Dry Cell Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Majharul Haque; Gulshan, Fahmida; Kurny, A. S. W.

    2013-04-01

    Spent zinc-carbon dry cell batteries were characterized in the process of recovery of metal values. Zinc, manganese and steel were the major metallic materials constituting 63 % of the weight of spent batteries. Different components of the spent batteries were separately processed to extract the metallic values. A maximum of 92 % of total amount of zinc contained in the anodes could be extracted with a purity of over 99.0 % from the anodes by heating at 600 °C for 10 min in presence of 12 % NH4Cl flux. Spent electrolyte paste containing manganese and zinc as major metallic elements, was leached in sulfuric acid solution in presence of hydrogen peroxide as a reducing agent. The optimum condition for leaching was found to be concentration of sulfuric acid: 2.5 M, concentration of hydrogen peroxide: 10 %, temperature: 60 °C, stirring speed: 600 rpm and solid/liquid ratio 1:12. A maximum of 88 % manganese contained in the paste could be dissolved within 27 min of leaching under the optimized conditions. Dissolution of zinc under the same conditions was 97 %. A maximum of 69.89 % of manganese and 83.29 % of zinc contained in the leach liquor could be precipitated in the form of manganese carbonate and zinc oxalate.

  18. Solid state cell with alkali metal halo-alkali thiocyanate electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, B. M.; Silbernagel, B. G.

    1980-02-26

    A novel electrochemical cell is disclosed utilizing: (A) an anode which contains an alkali metal as an anode-active material; (B) a cathode and (C) an electrolyte comprising an electrolytically effective amount of one or more compounds having the formula: (Ax)ma'scn wherein a is an alkali metal, X is a halogen, a' is an alkali metal and 0.1 < or = N < or = 10. Preferred systems include lithium-containing anodes, lithium-containing electrolytes and cathodes which contain cathode-active material selected from the group consisting of cathode-active sulfurs, halogens, halides, chromates, phosphates, oxides and chalcogenides, especially those chalcogenides of the empirical formula mzm wherein M is one or more metals selected from the group consisting of iron, titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum and vanadium, Z is one or more chalcogens selected from the group consisting of oxygen, sulfur, selenium and tellurium, and M is a numerical value between about 1.8 and about 3.2.

  19. Electro-thermal impedance spectroscopy applied to an open-cathode polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engebretsen, Erik; Robinson, James B.; Obeisun, Oluwamayowa; Mason, Tom; Finegan, Donal; Hinds, Gareth; Shearing, Paul R.; Brett, Daniel J. L.

    2016-01-01

    The development of in-situ diagnostic techniques is critical to ensure safe and effective operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cell systems. Infrared thermal imaging is an established technique which has been extensively applied to fuel cells; however, the technique is limited to measuring surface temperatures and is prone to errors arising from emissivity variations and reflections. Here we demonstrate that electro-thermal impedance spectroscopy can be applied to enhance infrared thermal imaging and mitigate its limitations. An open-cathode polymer electrolyte fuel cell is used as a case study. The technique operates by imposing a periodic electrical stimulus to the fuel cell and measuring the consequent surface temperature response (phase and amplitude). In this way, the location of heat generation from within the component can be determined and the thermal conduction properties of the materials and structure between the point of heat generation and the point of measurement can be determined. By selectively 'locking-in' to a suitable modulation frequency, spatially resolved images of the relative amplitude between the current stimulus and temperature can be generated that provide complementary information to conventional temporal domain thermograms.

  20. Tuning Open-Circuit Voltage in Organic Solar Cells with Molecular Orientation.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Brent; Awartani, Omar; Kline, R Joseph; McAfee, Terry; Ade, Harald; O'Connor, Brendan T

    2015-06-24

    The role of molecular orientation of a polar conjugated polymer in polymer-fullerene organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells is investigated. A planar heterojunction (PHJ) OPV cell composed of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) is used as a model system to isolate the effect of the interfacial orientation on the photovoltaic properties. The molecular orientation of the aggregate P3HT relative to the PCBM layer is varied from highly edge-on (conjugated ring plane perpendicular to the interface plane) to appreciably face-on (ring plane parallel to the interface). It is found that as the P3HT stacking becomes more face-on there is a positive correlation to the OPV open-circuit voltage (V(OC)), attributed to a shift in the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energy level of P3HT. In addition, the PHJ OPV cell with a broad P3HT stacking orientation distribution has a V(OC) comparable to an archetypal bulk heterojunction (BHJ) device. These results suggest that, in the BHJ OPV cell, the hole energy level in the charge transfer state is defined in part by the orientation distribution of the P3HT at the interface with PCBM. Finally, the photoresponses of the devices are also shown to have a dependence on P3HT stacking orientation. PMID:26027430