Science.gov

Sample records for open charm muoproduction

  1. Open and hidden charm muoproduction. [209 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.R.; Johnson, K.J.; Kerth, L.T.

    1980-09-01

    New results are presented on open and hidden charm and bottom production by 209-GeV muons interacting in a magnetized steel calorimeter. The upper limit on the production of T states by muons is sigma(..mu..N ..-->.. ..mu..UPSILONX)B(UPSILON ..-->.. ..mu mu..) < 22 x 10/sup -39/ cm/sup 2/ (90% confidence level). The distributions of elastically produced psi's are consistent with s-channel helicity conservation (SCHC) and disagree with psi dominance. From analysis of dimuon final states the cross section for diffractive charm muoproduction is 6.9/sub -1.4/sup +1.9/ nb. The structure function F/sub 2/(c anti c) for diffractive charmed-quark pair production is presented. 5 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Leading and next-to-leading order gluon polarization in the nucleon and longitudinal double spin asymmetries from open charm muoproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Alekseev, M. G.; Alexakhin, V. Yu.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Antonov, A. A.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bettinelli, M.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Das, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Heß, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Horikawa, N.; Höppner, Ch.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, O.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Lauser, L.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Mann, A.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Morreale, A.; Mutter, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Perevalova, E.; Pesaro, G.; Peshekhonov, D. V.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Rajotte, J.-F.; Ramos, S.; Rapatsky, V.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rondio, E.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, K.; Schmitt, L.; Schmïden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A. N.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G. I.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Tkatchev, L. G.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N. V.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wiślicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zhuravlev, N.; Zvyagin, A.

    2013-03-01

    The gluon polarization in the nucleon was measured using open charm production by scattering 160GeV/c polarized muons off longitudinally polarized protons or deuterons. The data were taken by the COMPASS Collaboration between 2002 and 2007. A detailed account is given of the analysis method that includes the application of neural networks. Several decay channels of D0 mesons are investigated. Longitudinal spin asymmetries of the D meson production cross sections are extracted in bins of D0 transverse momentum and energy. At leading order QCD accuracy, the average gluon polarization is determined as ⟨Δg/g⟩LO=-0.06±0.21(stat.)±0.08(syst.) at the scale ⟨μ2⟩≈13(GeV/c)2 and an average gluon momentum fraction ⟨x⟩≈0.11. The average gluon polarization is also obtained at next-to-leading order QCD accuracy as ⟨Δg/g⟩ NLO=-0.13±0.15(stat.)±0.15(syst.) at the scale ⟨μ2⟩≈13(GeV/c)2 and ⟨x⟩≈0.20.

  3. Polarization effects in double open-charm production at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echevarría, Miguel G.; Kasemets, Tomas; Mulders, Piet J.; Pisano, Cristian

    2015-04-01

    Double open-charm production is one of the most promising channels to disentangle single from double parton scattering (DPS) and study different properties of DPS. Several studies of the DPS contributions have been made. A missing ingredient so far has been the study of polarization effects, arising from spin correlations between the two partons inside an unpolarized proton. We investigate the impact polarization has on the double open-charm cross section. We show that the longitudinally polarized gluons can give significant contributions to the cross section, but for most of the considered kinematic region only have a moderate effect on the shape. We compare our findings to the LHCb data in the D 0 D 0 final state, identify observables where polarization does have an impact on the distribution of the final state particles, and suggest measurements which could lead to first experimental indications of, or limits on, polarization in DPS.

  4. Study of B Decays to Open Charm Final States With the BaBar Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Calderini, Giovanni; /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U.

    2011-09-14

    Recent results from the BaBar Collaboration in the sector of B decays to open Charm are presented. Some of the results represent new precision measurements and QCD tests, some other analysis is aimed to the study of rare decays and search for new physics. Branching fractions for the modes observed for the first time are highlighted. A few results are presented also in the baryon sector.

  5. Trigluon correlations and single transverse spin asymmetry in open charm production

    SciTech Connect

    Kang Zhongbo; Qiu Jianwei

    2009-08-04

    We study the single transverse-spin asymmetry for open charm production in the semiinclusive lepton-hadron deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) and pp collision. Within collinear factorization approach, we find that the asymmetry is sensitive to the twist-3 trigluon correlation functions in the proton. With a simple model for the trigluon correlation functions, we estimate the asymmetry in SIDIS for both COMPASS and eRHIC kinematics, as well as in pp collision at RHIC energy. We discuss the possibilities of extracting the trigluon correlation functions in these experiments.

  6. Study of open charm production in proton+proton collisions at center of mass energies = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butsyk, Sergey

    2005-11-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) with its unique electron identification system enables us to perform high precision measurements of electron yields. By measuring electron production at high transverse momentum, we can disentangle the contribution of electrons originating from semi-leptonic decays of heavy quarks (charm or bottom) from the less interesting "photonic" decay modes of light mesons. D/B mesons carry single heavy valence quarks and are usually referred to as "Open Charm" and "Open Bottom" particles, differentiating them from Closed Flavor particles such as J/psi, and Y mesons. Due to the large mass of the heavy quarks, their production mechanisms can be adequately explained by perturbative QCD (pQCD) theory. This dissertation presents the measurement of electrons from heavy flavor decays in proton + proton collisions at RHIC at collision energy s = 200 GeV over a wide range of transverse moment (0.4 < pT < 5 GeV/c). Two independent analysis techniques of signal extraction were performed. The "Cocktail" subtraction is based on the calculation and subtraction of the expected "photon-related" electron background based upon measured yields of light mesons. The "Converter" subtraction is based upon a direct measurement of photon yields achieved introducing additional material in the PHENIX acceptance and deducing the photon abundance by measuring the increase in electron yield. This is the first measurement of the Open Charm crossection at this collision energy and it is an important baseline measurement for comparison with nucleus + nucleus collisions. The modification of Open Charm production in heavy ion collisions compared to the presented p + p result can be used to study the final state interaction of the heavy quarks with hot dense matter inside the collisions. The results of the Open Charm measurements are compared to current pQCD predictions both in Leading Order (LO) O a2s and Next-to-Leading Order (NLO) O a3s

  7. Measurement of the Gluon Polarization {delta}g/g from Open Charm at COMPASS

    SciTech Connect

    Kunne, Fabienne

    2009-08-04

    We have measured the gluon polarization in the nucleon by detecting charm production via D{sup 0} meson decay to charged K and {pi} in polarized muon scattering off a longitudinally polarized deuteron target. The dominant process for charm production is the photon gluon fusion into a charm anti-charm quark pair. By using all deuteron statistics from COMPASS accumulated between 2002 and 2006, we extract double spin asymmetries in bins of the transverse momentum and the energy of the D{sup 0} meson and we perform a leading order analysis of the data to extract the gluon polarization <{delta}g/g> = -0.49{+-}0.27(stat){+-}0.11(syst) at a Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) scale {mu}{sup 2} = 13 GeV{sup 2} and at a gluon momentum fraction = 0.11.

  8. Open Charm Yields in d+Au Collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; De Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumda, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.F.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; et al.

    2005-01-07

    Mid-rapidity open charm spectra from direct reconstruction of D{sup 0}({bar D}{sup 0}) {yields} K{sup {-+}} {pi}{sup {+-}} in d+Au collisions and indirect electron/positron measurements via charm semileptonic decays in p+p and d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV are reported. The D{sup 0}({bar D}{sup 0}) spectrum covers a transverse momentum (p{sub T}) range of 0.1 < p{sub T} < 3 GeV/c whereas the electron spectra cover a range of 1 < p{sub T} < 4 GeV/c. The electron spectra show approximate binary collision scaling between p+p and d+Au collisions. From these two independent analyses, the differential cross section per nucleon-nucleon binary interaction at mid-rapidity for open charm production from d+Au collisions at RHIC is d{sigma}{sub c{bar c}}{sup NN}/dy = 0.30 {+-} 0.04 (stat.) {+-} 0.09(syst.) mb. The results are compared to theoretical calculations. Implications for charmonium results in A+A collisions are discussed.

  9. Charm photoproduction dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Garbincius, P.H.

    1995-03-01

    Photoproduction of open charm is reviewed, both as a tool for studying the properties of charm particles such as spectroscopy, decays, and lifetimes, and as a testing ground for theoretical calculations of production dynamics. Many characteristics of charm photoproduction are described in terms of the leading order (LO) {alpha}{sub EM}{alpha}{sub S} Photon-Gluon Fusion (PGF) model. The next-to-leading order (NLO) corrections of strength {alpha}{sub EM}{alpha}{sub S}{sup 2} due to radiation of additional gluons are then added. The sensitivities of the NLO calculations on the mass of the charm quark, m{sub c}, and on the choice of the gluon structure function of the nucleon are illustrated for the energy dependence of the cross section for charm photoproduction. These are compared with fixed target data and new HERA data. The single charm particle inclusive distributions in x{sub f} and p{sub {perpendicular}}{sup 2}, along with {sigma}({gamma}N {yields} c{anti c}X) give good estimates of m{sub c} and n{sub g}, the shape parameter for the gluon distribution within the nucleon. As in hadroproduction, some disagreements between prediction and observation begin to appear in trying to simultaneously match the distributions in both p{sub {perpendicular}}{sup 2} for single charm particles and in the {Delta}{Phi} acoplanarity angle between pairs of charm particles. These can be partially remedied by modifying the fragmentation function for c-quarks into charm particles, and by including extra k{sub {perpendicular}}{sup 2} transverse smearing of the gluon distributions within the target nucleon. Initial studies of the relative production between charm particles and anti-particles indicate disagreement with the predictions of the independent string fragmentation model.

  10. Charm and Charm Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Santoro, Valentina; /Ferrara U.

    2011-11-23

    Recent developements in D mixing physics and charm spectroscopy will be discussed. Focus will be on the BaBar experimental results for the D mixing: first evidence of the D{sup 0}-mixing (hadronic D{sup 0} decays), lifetime difference and time-dependent Dalitz plot analysis of D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}. Then, recent results on charm spectroscopy will be presented with particular focus on the new Ds states that have been discovered in the last few years. Some of these states were not expected theoretically: their masses, widths, quantum numbers, and decay modes do not fit the existing spectroscopic classication, which is based mostly on potential model calculations.

  11. Single- and central-diffractive production of open charm and bottom mesons at the LHC: Theoretical predictions and experimental capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łuszczak, Marta; Maciuła, Rafał; Szczurek, Antoni

    2015-03-01

    We discuss diffractive production of open charm and bottom mesons at the LHC. The differential cross sections for single- and central-diffractive mechanisms for c c ¯ and b b ¯ pair production are calculated in the framework of the Ingelman-Schlein model corrected for absorption effects. In this approach, one assumes that the Pomeron has a well-defined partonic structure, and that the hard process takes place in a Pomeron-proton or proton-Pomeron (single diffraction) or Pomeron-Pomeron (central diffraction) process. Here, leading-order gluon-gluon fusion and quark-antiquark annihilation partonic subprocesses are taken into consideration, which are calculated within standard collinear approximation. Both Pomeron flux factors as well as parton distributions in the Pomeron are taken from the H1 Collaboration analysis of diffractive structure function and diffractive dijets at HERA. The extra corrections from subleading Reggeon exchanges are explicitly calculated and are also taken into consideration. Several quark-level differential distributions are shown. The hadronization of charm and bottom quarks is taken into account by means of fragmentation function technique. Predictions for single- and central-diffractive production in the case of inclusive D and B mesons, as well as D D ¯ pairs, are presented, including detector acceptance of the ATLAS, CMS, and LHCb collaborations. The experimental aspects of possible standard and dedicated measurements are carefully discussed.

  12. Charm production by muons and its role in scale-noninvariance

    SciTech Connect

    Gollin, G D

    1981-01-01

    Interactions of 209 GeV muons in the Multimuon Spectrometer at Fermilab have yielded more than 8 x 10/sup 4/ events with two muons in the final state. After reconstruction and cuts, the data contain 20,072 events with (81 +- 10)% attributed to the diffractive production of charmed states decaying to muons. The cross section for diffractive charm muoproduction is 6.9(+1.9,-1.4) nb where the error includes systematic uncertainties. Extrapolated to Q/sup 2/ = 0 with sigma(Q/sup 2/) = sigma(0)(1 + Q/sup 2//..lambda../sup 2/)/sup -2/, the effective cross section for 178 (100) GeV photons is 750(+180,-130) (560(+200,-120)) nb and the parameter ..lambda.. is 3.3 +- 0.2 (2.9 +- 0.2) GeV/c. The ..nu.. dependence of the cross section is similar to that of the photon-gluon-fusion model. A first determination of the structure function for diffractive charm production indicates that charm accounts for approximately 1/3 of the scale-noninvariance observed in inclusive muon-nucleon scattering at low Bjorken x. Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka selection rules and unitarity allow the muon data to set a 90%-confidence lower limit on the psi N total cross section of 0.9 mb.

  13. Nuclear Filtering of Intrinsic Charm

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan

    2010-11-12

    Nuclei are transparent for a heavy intrinsic charm (IC) component of the beam hadrons, what leads to an enhanced nuclear dependence of open charm production at large Feynman x{sub F}. Indeed, such an effect is supported by data from the SELEX experiment published recently [1]. Our calculations reproduce well the data, providing strong support for the presence of IC in hadrons in amount less than 1%. Moreover, we performed an analysis of nuclear effects in J/{Psi} production and found at large x{sub F} a similar, albeit weaker effect, which does not contradict data.

  14. Spectroscopy of charmed baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Solovieva, E. I.

    2015-12-15

    Apresent-day classification of charmed baryons is presented, a quark model for ground states is briefly described, and the energy levels of excited states are analyzed. In addition, a survey of experimentally observed states of charmed baryons is given.

  15. Production of associated Y and open charm hadrons in pp collisions at √{s}=7 and 8 TeV via double parton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-07-01

    Associated production of bottomonia and open charm hadrons in pp collisions at √{s}=7 and 8 TeV is observed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1 accumulated with the LHCb detector. The observation of five combinations, Y(1S)D0, Y(2S)D0, Y(1S)D+, Y(2S)D+ and Y(1S)D s + , is reported. Production crosssections are measured for Y(1S)D0 and Y(1S)D+ pairs in the forward region. The measured cross-sections and the differential distributions indicate the dominance of double parton scattering as the main production mechanism. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  16. Charm, beauty and top at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behnke, O.; Geiser, A.; Lisovyi, M.

    2015-09-01

    Results on open charm and beauty production and on the search for top production in high-energy electron-proton collisions at HERA are reviewed. This includes a discussion of relevant theoretical aspects, a summary of the available measurements and measurement techniques, and their impact on improved understanding of QCD and its parameters, such as parton density functions and charm- and beauty-quark masses. The impact of these results on measurements at the LHC and elsewhere is also addressed.

  17. Charming Mesons with Baryons and Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolos, Laura

    2013-11-01

    The properties of charmed mesons in nuclear matter and nuclei are reviewed. Different frameworks are discussed paying a special attention to unitarized coupled-channel approaches which incorporate heavy-quark spin symmetry. Several charmed baryon states with negative parity are generated dynamically by the s-wave interaction between pseudoscalar and vector meson multiplets with 1/2+ and 3/2+ baryons. These states are compared to experimental data. Moreover, the properties of open-charm mesons in matter are analyzed. The in-medium solution accounts for Pauli blocking effects, and for the meson self-energies in a self-consistent manner. The behavior in the nuclear medium of the rich spectrum of dynamically-generated baryon states is studied as well as their influence in the self-energy and, hence, the spectral function of open charm. The possible experimental signatures of the in-medium properties of open charm are finally addressed, such as the formation of charmed nuclei, in connection with the future FAIR facility.

  18. Charm Baryon Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistov, R.

    2016-02-01

    B-factories Belle and BaBar during its operation made not only measurements connected with B-meson decays but also numerous observation and measurements in charm physics. In particular, their results on charm baryon decays and spectroscopy have enlarged and enriched the current picture of heavy flavour hadrons. In this talk we overview current status of charm baryons and their excited states.

  19. Charm degrees of freedom in the quark gluon plasma

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mukherjee, Swagato; Petreczky, Peter; Sharma, Sayantan

    2016-01-11

    The lattice QCD studies on fluctuations and correlations of charm quantum number have established that deconfinement of charm degrees of freedom sets in around the chiral crossover temperature, Tc; i.e., charm degrees of freedom carrying fractional baryonic charge start to appear. When we reexamine those same lattice QCD data we show that, in addition to the contributions from quarklike excitations, the partial pressure of charm degrees of freedom may still contain significant contributions from open-charm-meson- and baryonlike excitations associated with integral baryonic charges for temperatures up to 1.2Tc. Finally, charm-quark quasiparticles become the dominant degrees of freedom for temperatures T>1.2Tc.

  20. Physics of the Charm Quark

    SciTech Connect

    Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Elsa Fabiola

    2006-09-25

    This is a brief summary about the development of the charm quark physics in the area of experimental physics. The summary is centered in what is done by mexican physicists, particularly in the E791 and the FOCUS Experiment at FERMILAB. FOCUS (or E831) was designed to detect states of matter combining one or more charm quarks with light quarks (strange, up, down). The experiment created 10 times as many such particles as in previous experiments and investigated several topics on charm physics including high precision studies of charm semileptonic decays, studies of hadronic charm decays (branching ratios and Daltiz analyses), lifetime measurements of all charm particles, searches for mixing, CP/CPT violation, rare and forbidden decays, spectroscopy of excited charm mesons and baryons, charm production asymmetry measurements, light quark diffractive studies, QCD studies using charm pair events and searches for and upper limits on: charm pentaquarks, double charm baryons, DSJ(2632)

  1. In-medium decay widths of hidden and open charm vector mesons in a field theoretic model for composite hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Amruta; Misra, S. P.; Greiner, W.

    2015-07-01

    We calculate the decay widths of the charmonium states, J/ψ, ψ(3686) and ψ(3770), to D\\bar {D} pairs, as well as the decay width of D* → Dπ, in isospin asymmetric strange hadronic matter, using a field theoretical model for composite hadrons with quark constituents. For this purpose, we use the quark-antiquark pair creation term of the free Dirac Hamiltonian written in terms of the constituent quark field operators, and use explicit charmonium, D, \\bar {D}, D* and π states to evaluate the matrix elements for the charmonium as well as D* decay amplitudes. The medium modifications of the partial decay widths of charmonium to D\\bar {D} pair, arising from the mass modifications of the D(\\bar {D}) and the charmonium states calculated in a chiral effective model, are also included. The results of the present investigations are then compared with the decay widths computed earlier, in a model using light quark pair creation in 3P0 state. As in 3P0 model, the decay amplitude in the present model is multiplied with a strength parameter for the light quark pair creation, which is fitted from the observed vacuum decay width. The effects of the isospin asymmetry, the strangeness fraction of the hadronic matter on the masses of the charmonium states and D(\\bar {D}) mesons and hence on the decay widths, have also been studied. The isospin asymmetry effect is observed to be dominant for high densities, leading to appreciable difference in the decay channels of the charmonium to D+ D- and D0 \\bar {D0} pairs. The decay width of D* → Dπ in the hadronic matter has also been calculated within the composite quark model in the present work, accounting for the medium modifications of the D and D* masses. The density modifications of the charmonium states and D(D*) mesons, which are observed to be appreciable at high densities, will be of relevance in the compressed baryonic matter (CBM) experiments at the future facility of FAIR, GSI, where charmed hadrons will be produced

  2. Discovery of Charm

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Goldhaber, G.

    1984-11-01

    In my talk I will cover the period 1973 to 1976 which saw the discoveries of the J/psi and psi' resonances and most of the Psion spectroscopy, the tau lepton and the D0030099,D0015599 charmed meson doublet. Occasionally I will refer briefly to more recent results. Since this conference is on the history of the weak-interactions I will deal primarily with the properties of naked charm and in particular the weakly decaying doublet of charmed mesons. Most of the discoveries I will mention were made with the SLAC-LBL Magnetic Detector or MARK I which we operated at SPEAR from 1973 to 1976.

  3. Charms of radiation research.

    SciTech Connect

    Inokuti, M.; Physics

    2005-01-01

    Most of my professional efforts over nearly five decades have been devoted to radiation research, that is, studies of the physical, chemical, and biological actions of high-energy radiation on matter. (By the term 'high-energy radiation' I mean here x rays, .GAMMA. rays, neutrons, and charged particles of high enough energies to produce ionization in matter. I exclude visible light, infrared waves, microwaves, and sound waves.) Charms of radiation research lie in its interdisciplinary character; although my training was in basic physics, the scope of my interest has gradually increased to cover many other areas, to my deep satisfaction. High-energy radiation is an important component of the universe, and of our environment. It often provides an effective avenue for characterizing matter and understanding its behavior. Near Earth's surface this radiation is normally present in exceptionally low quantity, and yet it plays a significant role in some atmospheric phenomena such as auroras, and also in the evolution of life. The recent advent of various devices for producing high-energy radiation has opened up the possibility of many applications, including medical and industrial uses. I have worked on some aspects of those uses. At every opportunity to address a broad audience I try to convey a sense of intellectual fun, together with some of the elements of the basic science involved. A goal of radiation education might be to make the word 'radiation' as common and familiar as words such as 'fire' and 'electricity' through increased usage.

  4. Charm (and Beauty) Production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Rademacker, Jonas; /Bristol U.

    2007-11-01

    The authors present recent results on heavy flavor production at Tevatron Run II for typically {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of analyzed p{bar p} data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This includes results on single and correlated open charm and bottom cross sections, charm pair production kinematics, J/{psi}, {psi}(2S) and {chi}{sub cJ} cross sections and polarization measurements in J/{psi}, {psi}(2S), {Upsilon}(1S), and {Upsilon}(2S).

  5. Charmed Hadron Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Liuming

    2009-07-01

    We calculate the scattering lengths of the scattering processes where one or both hadrons contain charm quarks in full lattice QCD. We use relativistic Fermilab formulation for the charm quark. For the light quark, we use domain-wall fermions in the valence sector and improved Kogut- Susskind sea quarks. In J = Psi - N and D - K channels, we observe attractive interactions. In D - D* channel, the sign of the scattering length changes, which suggests a bound state.

  6. Strangeness and charm in nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolos, Laura; Cabrera, Daniel; Garcia-Recio, Carmen; Molina, Raquel; Nieves, Juan; Oset, Eulogio; Ramos, Angels; Romanets, Olena; Salcedo, Lorenzo Luis

    2013-09-01

    The properties of strange (K, Kbar and K) and open-charm (D, Dbar and D*) mesons in dense matter are studied using a unitary approach in coupled channels for meson-baryon scattering. In the strangeness sector, the interaction with nucleons always comes through vector-meson exchange, which is evaluated by chiral and hidden gauge Lagrangians. For the interaction of charmed mesons with nucleons we extend the SU(3) Weinberg-Tomozawa Lagrangian to incorporate spin-flavor symmetry and implement a suitable flavor symmetry breaking. The in-medium solution for the scattering amplitude accounts for Pauli blocking effects and meson self-energies. On one hand, we obtain the K, Kbar and K spectral functions in the nuclear medium and study their behaviour at finite density, temperature and momentum. We also make an estimate of the transparency ratio of the γA→K+KA‧ reaction, which we propose as a tool to detect in-medium modifications of the K meson. On the other hand, in the charm sector, several resonances with negative parity are generated dynamically by the s-wave interaction between pseudoscalar and vector meson multiplets with 1/2+ and 3/2+ baryons. The properties of these states in matter are analyzed and their influence on the open-charm meson spectral functions is studied. We finally discuss the possible formation of D-mesic nuclei at FAIR energies.

  7. Charm Factories: Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweber, Peter

    2009-12-01

    The next generation tau-charm factory, the third Beijing Electron Spectrometer (BESIII) at the new Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPCII), has begun data collection. I discuss the flavor physics reach of the BESIII charm program and conclude with a discussion on future proposed tau-charm facilities.

  8. Charm production in DPMJET

    SciTech Connect

    Berghaus, P; Montaruli, T; Ranft, J E-mail: montaruli@ba.infn.it

    2008-06-15

    In this work, charm production in the DPMJET hadronic jet simulation is compared to experimental data. Since the major application of DPMJET is the simulation of cosmic-ray-induced air showers, the version of the code integrated in the CORSIKA simulation package has been used for the comparison. Wherever necessary, adjustments have been made to improve agreement between simulation and data. With the availability of new muon/neutrino detectors that combine a large fiducial volume with large amounts of shielding, investigation of prompt muons and neutrinos from cosmic ray interactions will be feasible for the first time. Furthermore, above {approx}>100 TeV charmed particle decay becomes the dominant background for diffuse extraterrestrial neutrino flux searches. A reliable method to simulate charm production in high-energy proton-nucleon interactions is therefore required.

  9. Charmed Bottom Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Zachary S; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-01

    The spectrum of doubly and triply heavy baryons remains experimentally unexplored to a large extent. Although the detection of such heavy particle states may lie beyond the reach of exper- iments for some time, it is interesting compute this spectrum from QCD and compare results between lattice calculations and continuum theoretical models. Several lattice calculations ex- ist for both doubly and triply charmed as well as doubly and triply bottom baryons. Here, we present preliminary results from the first lattice calculation of doubly and triply heavy baryons including both charm and bottom quarks. We use domain wall fermions for 2+1 flavors (up down and strange) of sea and valence quarks, a relativistic heavy quark action for the charm quarks, and non-relativistic QCD for the heavier bottom quarks. We present preliminary results for the ground state spectrum.

  10. Spectroscopy of doubly charmed baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Vijande, J.; Valcarce, A.; Fernandez, F.; Garcilazo, H.

    2006-02-11

    We study the mass spectrum of baryons with two and three charmed quarks. For double charm baryons the spin splitting is found to be smaller than standard quark-model potential predictions. This splitting is not influenced either by the particular form of the confining potential or by the regularization taken for the contact term of the spin-spin potential. We consistently predict the spectra for triply charmed baryons.

  11. Charmed Bottom Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zachary Brown, William Detmold, Stefan Meinel, Konstantinos Orginos

    2012-09-01

    The arena of doubly and triply heavy baryons remains experimentally unexplored to a large extent. This has led to a great deal of theoretical effort being put forth in the calculation of mass spectra in this sector. Although the detection of such heavy particle states may lie beyond the reach of experiments for some time, it is interesting to compare results between lattice QCD computations and continuum theoretical models. Several recent lattice QCD calculations exist for both doubly and triply charmed as well as doubly and triply bottom baryons. In this work we present preliminary results from the first lattice calculation of the mass spectrum of doubly and triply heavy baryons including both charm and bottom quarks. The wide range of quark masses in these systems require that the various flavors of quarks be treated with different lattice actions. We use domain wall fermions for 2+1 flavors (up down and strange) of sea and valence quarks, a relativistic heavy quark action for the charm quarks, and non-relativistic QCD for the heavier bottom quarks. The calculation of the ground state spectrum is presented and compared to recent models.

  12. A Phase 1 Randomized, Open Label, Rectal Safety, Acceptability, Pharmacokinetic, and Pharmacodynamic Study of Three Formulations of Tenofovir 1% Gel (the CHARM-01 Study)

    PubMed Central

    Mcgowan, Ian; Cranston, Ross D.; Duffill, Kathryn; Siegel, Aaron; Engstrom, Jarret C.; Nikiforov, Alexyi; Jacobson, Cindy; Rehman, Khaja K.; Elliott, Julie; Khanukhova, Elena; Abebe, Kaleab; Mauck, Christine; Spiegel, Hans M. L.; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Rohan, Lisa C.; Marzinke, Mark A.; Hiruy, Hiwot; Hendrix, Craig W.; Richardson-Harman, Nicola; Anton, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The CHARM-01 study characterized the safety, acceptability, pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics (PD) of three tenofovir (TFV) gels for rectal application. The vaginal formulation (VF) gel was previously used in the CAPRISA 004 and VOICE vaginal microbicide Phase 2B trials and the RMP-02/MTN-006 Phase 1 rectal safety study. The reduced glycerin VF (RGVF) gel was used in the MTN-007 Phase 1 rectal microbicide trial and is currently being evaluated in the MTN-017 Phase 2 rectal microbicide trial. A third rectal specific formulation (RF) gel was also evaluated in the CHARM-01 study. Methods Participants received 4 mL of the three TFV gels in a blinded, crossover design: seven daily doses of RGVF, seven daily doses of RF, and six daily doses of placebo followed by one dose of VF, in a randomized sequence. Safety, acceptability, compartmental PK, and explant PD were monitored throughout the trial. Results All three gels were found to be safe and acceptable. RF and RGVF PK were not significantly different. Median mucosal mononuclear cell (MMC) TFV-DP trended toward higher values for RF compared to RGVF (1136 and 320 fmol/106 cells respectively). Use of each gel in vivo was associated with significant inhibition of ex vivo colorectal tissue HIV infection. There was also a significant negative correlation between the tissue levels of TFV, tissue TFV-DP, MMC TFV-DP, rectal fluid TFV, and explant HIV-1 infection. Conclusions All three formulations were found to be safe and acceptable. However, the safety profile of the VF gel was only based on exposure to one dose whereas participants received seven doses of the RGVF and RF gels. There was a trend towards higher tissue MMC levels of TFV-DP associated with use of the RF gel. Use of all gels was associated with significant inhibition of ex vivo tissue HIV infection. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01575405 PMID:25942472

  13. The total charm cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R

    2007-09-14

    We assess the theoretical uncertainties on the total charm cross section. We discuss the importance of the quark mass, the scale choice and the parton densities on the estimate of the uncertainty. We conclude that the uncertainty on the total charm cross section is difficult to quantify.

  14. Excited Charm States

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, S.

    1994-12-31

    Characteristics of mass spectra and decays of orbitally excited charm mesons and baryons, expected on the basis of quark models and Heavy Quark Symmetry, are briefly described. The difficulties associated with measurements on these excited states are discussed. The accuracy and reliability of currently available experimental information is examined. The reasons, for the widely accepted spin-parity assignments to the observed excited mesons and baryons, are stated. Finally, the experimental data, with the accepted spin-parity assignments, is compared with expectations based on quark models and Heavy Quark Symmetry.

  15. Charmed baryon spectroscopy from CLEO at CESR

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M. Sajjad

    1999-02-17

    Charmed baryon spectroscopy has been unfolding since the discovery of the first charmed baryon in 1975. The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has now established itself as a charmed particle factory. In this report, we present results on charmed baryon production at CESR using the CLEO detector.

  16. Charm counting in b decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Alemany, R.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bonvicini, G.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Moneta, L.; Oest, T.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Giehl, I.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Bauer, C.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Denis, R. St.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Choi, Y.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, A. M.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    The inclusive production of charmed particles in Z → b overlineb decays has been measured from the yield of D0, D+, Ds+ and Λc+ decays in a sample of q overlineq events with high b purity collected with the ALEPH detector from 1992 to 1995. From these measurements, adding the charmonia production rate and an estimate of the charmed strange baryon contribution, the average number of charm quarks per b decay is determined to be nc = 1.230 ± 0.036 ± 0.038 ± 0.053, where the uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects and branching ratios, respectively.

  17. Nuclear dependence of charm production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; Engelfried, J.; Akgun, U.; Alkhazov, G.; Amaro-Reyes, J.; Atamantchouk, A. G.; Ayan, A. S.; Balatz, M. Y.; Bondar, N. F.; Cooper, P. S.; Dauwe, L. J.; Davidenko, G. V.; Dersch, U.; Dolgolenko, A. G.; Dzyubenko, G. B.; Edelstein, R.; Emediato, L.; Endler, A. M. F.; Eschrich, I.; Escobar, C. O.; Estrada, N.; Evdokimov, A. V.; Filimonov, I. S.; Flores-Castillo, A.; Garcia, F. G.; Golovtsov, V. L.; Gouffon, P.; Gülmez, E.; Iori, M.; Jun, S. Y.; Kaya, M.; Kilmer, J.; Kim, V. T.; Kochenda, L. M.; Konorov, I.; Kozhevnikov, A. P.; Krivshich, A. G.; Krüger, H.; Kubantsev, M. A.; Kubarovsky, V. P.; Kulyavtsev, A. I.; Kuropatkin, N. P.; Kurshetsov, V. F.; Kushnirenko, A.; Lach, J.; Landsberg, L. G.; Larin, I.; Leikin, E. M.; López-Hinojosa, G.; Lungov, T.; Maleev, V. P.; Mao, D.; Mathew, P.; Mattson, M.; Matveev, V.; McCliment, E.; Moinester, M. A.; Molchanov, V. V.; Morelos, A.; Nemitkin, A. V.; Neoustroev, P. V.; Newsom, C.; Nilov, A. P.; Nurushev, S. B.; Ocherashvili, A.; Onel, Y.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Penzo, A.; Petrenko, S. V.; Procario, M.; Prutskoi, V. A.; Razmyslovich, B. V.; Rud, V. I.; Russ, J.; Sánchez-López, J. L.; Simon, J.; Sitnikov, A. I.; Smith, V. J.; Srivastava, M.; Steiner, V.; Stepanov, V.; Stutte, L.; Svoiski, M.; Terentyev, N. K.; Torres, I.; Uvarov, L. N.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vavilov, D. V.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.; Verebryusov, V. S.; Victorov, V. A.; Vishnyakov, V. E.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Vorwalter, K.; You, J.; Zukanovich-Funchal, R.

    2009-12-01

    Using data taken by SELEX during the 1996-1997 fixed target run at Fermilab, we study the production of charmed hadrons on copper and carbon targets with Σ -, p, π -, and π + beams. Parametrizing the dependence of the inclusive production cross section on the atomic number A as A α , we determine α for D +, D 0, D {/s +}, D +(2010), Λ {/c +}, and their respective anti-particles, as a function of their transverse momentum p t and scaled longitudinal momentum x F . Within our statistics there is no dependence of α on x F for any charm species for the interval 0.1< x F <1.0. The average value of α for charm production by pion beams is α meson=0.850±0.028. This is somewhat larger than the corresponding average α baryon=0.755±0.016 for charm production by baryon beams ( Σ -, p).

  18. Observation of neutrino-induced neutral current charm events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alton, Andrew Knight

    We report results from the analysis of wrong sign muon (WSM) events in deep inelastic nmN and nmN scattering with the NuTeV experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. These measurements are made possible by the high-purity NuTeV sign-selected beams. Using the anti-neutrino mode (WSM) sample we extract the normalizations for all known sources of beam impurities. The corrected charm production at the target measures the cross section, sp+p-->cc using linear atomic mass dependence. Using a boson-gluon fusion model and the neutrino mode WSM sample open neutral current charm production in neutrino scattering has been observed, and the charm mass is determined to be mc=1.40+0.83- 0.36+/-0.2 6 GeV/c2. The average energy of neutrinos which produce a pair of charm quarks is 154 GeV, and at this energy the cross section is sn+N-->cc =(2.14+1.76- 1.54)×10 -1fb . A search for Flavor-Changing Neutral-Current (FCNC) production of bottom and charm has demonstrated a new method of placing limits on FCNC. These limits are of comparable sensitivity to the current best limits, and effectively limit other decay modes.

  19. Penta-Quark States with Strangeness, Hidden Charm and Beauty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jia-Jun; Zou, Bing-Song

    The classical quenched quark models with three constituent quarks provide a good description for the baryon spatial ground states, but fail to reproduce the spectrum of baryon excited states. More and more evidences suggest that unquenched effects with multi-quark dynamics are necessary ingredients to solve the problem. Several new hyperon resonances reported recently could fit in the picture of penta-quark states. Based on this picture, some new hyperon excited states were predicted to exist; meanwhile with extension from strangeness to charm and beauty, super-heavy narrow N* and Λ* resonances with hidden charm or beauty were predicted to be around 4.3 and 11 GeV, respectively. Recently, two of such N* with hidden charm might have been observed by the LHCb experiment. More of those states are expected to be observed in near future. This opens a new window in order to study hadronic dynamics for the multi-quark states.

  20. A Tau-Charm Factory at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, K.K.

    1994-04-01

    It is proposed that a Tau Charm Factory represents a natural extension of CEBAF into higher energy domains. The exciting nature of the physics of charm quarks and tau leptons is briefly reviewed and it is suggested that the concept of a linac-ring collider as a Tau Charm Factory at CEBAF should be seriously studied.

  1. Properties of excited charm and charm-strange mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrey, Stephen; Moats, Kenneth

    2016-02-01

    We calculate the properties of excited charm and charm-strange mesons. We use the relativized quark model to calculate their masses and wave functions that are used to calculate radiative transition partial widths and the 3P0 quark-pair-creation model to calculate their strong decay widths. We use these results to make quark model spectroscopic assignments for recently observed charm and charm-strange mesons. In particular, we find that the properties of the DJ(2550 )0 and DJ*(2600 )0 are consistent with those of the 2 1S0 (c u ¯) and the 2 3S1 (c u ¯) states respectively, and the D1*(2760 )0, D3*(2760 )-,and DJ(2750 )0with those of the 1 3D1 (c u ¯), 1 3D3 (d c ¯), and 1 D2(c u ¯) states respectively. We tentatively identify the DJ*(3000 )0 as the 1 3F4 (c u ¯ ) and favor the DJ(3000 )0 to be the 3 1S0 (c u ¯ ) although we do not rule out the 1 F3 and 1 F3' assignment. For the recently observed charm-strange mesons we identify the Ds1 *(2709 )±,Ds1 *(2860 )-,andDs3 *(2860 )-as the 2 3S1 (c s ¯), 1 3D1 (s c ¯), and 1 3D3 (s c ¯) states respectively and suggest that the Ds J(3044 )± is most likely the Ds 1(2 P1' ) or Ds 1(2 P1) state although it might be the Ds2 *(2 3P2 ) with the D K final state too small to be observed with current statistics. Based on the predicted properties of excited states, that they do not have too large a total width and that they have a reasonable branching ratio to simple final states, we suggest states that should be able to be found in the near future. We expect that the tables of properties summarizing our results will be useful for interpreting future observations of charm and charm-strange mesons.

  2. Nuclear Dependence of Charm Production

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Covarrubias, A.; Engelfried, J.; Akgun, U.; Alkhazov, G.; Amaro-Reyes, J.; Atamantchouk, A.G.; Ayan, A.S.; Balatz, M.Y.; Bondar, N.F.; Cooper, P.S.; Dauwe, Loretta J.; /Michigan U., Flint /Moscow, ITEP

    2009-02-01

    With data taken by SELEX, which accumulated data during the 1996-1997 fixed target run at Fermilab, we study the production of charmed hadrons on copper and carbon targets with {Sigma}{sup -}, p, {pi}{sup -}, and {pi}{sup +} beams. Parameterizing the production cross section {infinity} A{sup {alpha}}, A being the atomic number, we determine {alpha} for D{sup +}, D{sup 0}, D{sub s}{sup +}, D{sup +}(2010), {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}, and their respective anti-particles, as a function of their transverse momentum p{sub t} and scaled longitudinal momentum x{sub F}. Within our statistics there is no dependence of {alpha} on x{sub F} for any charm species for the interval 0.1 < x{sub F} < 1.0. The average value of {alpha} for charm production by pion beams is {alpha}{sub meson} = 0.850 {+-} 0.028. This is somewhat larger than the corresponding average {alpha}{sub baryon} = 0.755 {+-} 0.016 for charm production by baryon beams ({Sigma}{sup -}, p).

  3. New states above charm threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Eichten, Estia J.; Lane, Kenneth; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2005-11-01

    We revise and extend expectations for the properties of charmonium states that lie above charm threshold, in light of new experimental information. We refine the Cornell coupled-channel model for the coupling of c{bar c} levels to two-meson states, defining resonance masses and widths by pole positions in the complex energy plane, and suggest new targets for experiment.

  4. Theoretical understanding of charm decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bigi, I.I.

    1986-08-01

    A detailed description of charm decays has emerged. The various concepts involved are sketched. Although this description is quite successful in reproducing the data the chapter on heavy flavour decays is far from closed. Relevant questions like on th real strength of weak annihilation, Penguin operators, etc. are still unanswered. Important directions in future work, both on the experimental and theoretical side are identified.

  5. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Snoek, Hella Leonie

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  6. Phenomenology of nonperturbative charm in the nucleon

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hobbs, T. J.; Londergan, J. T.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2014-04-02

    We perform a comprehensive analysis of the role of nonperturbative (or intrinsic) charm in the nucleon, generated through Fock state expansions of the nucleon wave function involving five-quark virtual states represented by charmed mesons and baryons. We consider contributions from a variety of charmed meson-baryon states and find surprisingly dominant effects from the D¯*0 Λc+ configuration. We pay particular attention to the existence and persistence of high-x structure for intrinsic charm, and the x dependence of the c-c¯ asymmetry predicted in meson-baryon models. We discuss how studies of charmed baryons and mesons in hadronic reactions can be used to constrainmore » models, and outline future measurements that could further illuminate the intrinsic charm component of the nucleon.« less

  7. Phenomenology of nonperturbative charm in the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, T. J.; Londergan, J. T.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2014-04-02

    We perform a comprehensive analysis of the role of nonperturbative (or intrinsic) charm in the nucleon, generated through Fock state expansions of the nucleon wave function involving five-quark virtual states represented by charmed mesons and baryons. We consider contributions from a variety of charmed meson-baryon states and find surprisingly dominant effects from the D¯*0 Λc+ configuration. We pay particular attention to the existence and persistence of high-x structure for intrinsic charm, and the x dependence of the c-c¯ asymmetry predicted in meson-baryon models. We discuss how studies of charmed baryons and mesons in hadronic reactions can be used to constrain models, and outline future measurements that could further illuminate the intrinsic charm component of the nucleon.

  8. Charmed Mesons in Nuclei with Heavy-Quark Spin Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolos, L.; Garcia-Recio, C.; Nieves, J.; Romanets, O.; Salcedo, L. L.

    2013-08-01

    We study the properties of charmed pseudoscalar and vector mesons in dense matter within a unitary meson-baryon coupled-channel model which incorporates heavy-quark spin symmetry. This is accomplished by extending the SU(3) Weinberg-Tomozawa Lagrangian to incorporate spin-flavor symmetry and implement a suitable flavor symmetry breaking. Several resonances with negative parity are generated dynamically by the s-wave interaction between pseudoscalar and vector meson multiplets with 1/2+ and 3/2+ baryons. Those states are then compared to experimental data as well as theoretical models. Next, Pauli-blocking effects and meson self-energies are introduced in a self-consistent manner to obtain the open-charm meson spectral functions in a dense nuclear environment. We finally discuss the formation of D-mesic nuclei.

  9. Doubly charmful baryonic B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.-Y.; Chua, C.-K.; Tsai, S.-Y.

    2006-04-01

    There are two apparent puzzles connected with the two-body and three-body doubly charmed baryonic B decays. First, earlier calculations based on QCD sum rules or the diquark model predict B(B{sup 0}{yields}{xi}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -}){approx_equal}B(B{sup 0}{yields}B{sub c}N), while experimentally the former has a rate 2 orders of magnitude larger than the latter. Second, a naive estimate of the branching ratio O(10{sup -9}) for the color-suppressed three-body decay B{yields}{lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -}K, which is highly suppressed by phase space, is too small by 5 to 6 orders of magnitude compared to the experiment. We show that the great suppression for the {lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{lambda}{sub c}{sup -}K production can be alleviated provided that there exists a narrow hidden charm bound state with a mass near the {lambda}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c} threshold. This new state that couples strongly to the charmed baryon pair can be searched for in B decays and in pp collisions by studying the mass spectrum of D{sup (*)}D{sup (*)} or {lambda}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c}. The doubly charmful decay B{yields}{xi}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c} has a configuration more favorable than the singly charmful one such as B{sup 0}{yields}{lambda}{sub c}p since no hard gluon is needed to produce the energetic {xi}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c} pair in the former decay, while two hard gluons are needed for the latter process. Assuming that a soft qq quark pair is produced through the {sigma} and {pi} meson exchanges in the configuration for B{yields}{xi}{sub c}{lambda}{sub c}, it is found that its branching ratio is of order 10{sup -3}, in agreement with the experiment.

  10. Charm and beauty physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Lipton, R.

    1992-01-01

    The status of charm and beauty physics studies at Fermilab is reviewed. Data from fixed target experiments on charm production, semi-leptonic decay, and Cabibbo suppressed decays as well as charmonium studies in antiproton annihilation are described. In addition beauty results from CDF and E653 are reviewed and prospects for studies of B physics at collider detectors are discussed.

  11. Charm Baryon Results from BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, Veronique; /SLAC

    2012-04-27

    We present experimental results from the BaBar experiment on charm baryon spectroscopy and production studies, including studies of excited cascades produced in charm baryon decays. We review the discovery of new decay modes of known states and searches for predicted states.

  12. Charm Baryon Results from BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, Veronique

    2011-10-24

    We present experimental results from the BaBar experiment on charm baryon spectroscopy and production studies, including studies of excited cascades produced in charm baryon decays. We review the discovery of new decay modes of known states and searches for predicted states.

  13. Charm Physics at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chunhui; /Maryland U.

    2005-06-29

    Large production of the c{bar c} pairs and high integrated luminosity make the PEPII B Factory an excellent place for studying the charm hadrons. In this paper, we present a few most recent results from BaBar collaboration in charm sector.

  14. Geometrical scaling in charm structure function ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroun, G. R.; Rezaei, B.

    2014-09-01

    By using a Laplace-transform technique, we solve the next-to-leading-order master equation for charm production and derive a compact formula for the ratio Rc = FLccbar/F2ccbar, which is useful for extracting the charm structure function from the reduced charm cross section, in particular, at DESY HERA, at small x. Our results show that this ratio is independent of x at small x. In this method of determining the ratios, we apply geometrical scaling in charm production in deep inelastic scattering (DIS). Our analysis shows that the renormalization scales have a sizable impact on the ratio Rc at high Q2. Our results for the ratio of the charm structure functions are in a good agreement with some phenomenological models.

  15. Recent charm physics results from CLEO

    SciTech Connect

    Fujino, D.H.; CLEO Collaboration

    1997-07-01

    In this talk I present recent charm physics results from the CLEO experiment. Final state interactions and W-annihilation effects in charmed mesons decays are discussed. These include an isospin analysis of D {yields} K{anti K}, observation of the candidate W- annihilation decay D{sup +}{sub s} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup +}, and evidence of non-factorizable effects in D{sup +}{sub s} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup +}, {eta}`{pi}{sup +}, {eta}{rho}{sup +}, and {eta}`{rho}{sup +} decays. Presented next are CLEO`s observations of the spin 3/2 {sup +} excited charmed baryons {Sigma}{sup *++}{sub c} and {Sigma}{sup *0}{sub c}, and the excited charmed-strange baryons {Xi}{sup *+}{sub c} and {Xi}{sup *0}{sub c}. I conclude with future prospects in charm physics with CLEO`s new silicon detector.

  16. Charmed hadron photoproduction at COMPASS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Yun; Guskov, Alexey

    2016-06-01

    Photoproduction of the charmonium-like state Zc(4200) and the charmed baryon Λ_c^* (2940) is investigated with an effective Lagrangian approach and the Regge trajectories applying to the COMPASS experiment. Combining the experimental data from COMPASS and our theoretical model we estimate the upper limit of ΓZc(4200)→J/ψπ to be of about 37 MeV. Moreover, the possibility to produce Λ_c^* (2940) at COMPASS is discussed. It seems one can try to search for this hadron in the missing mass spectrum since the t-channel is dominating for the Λ_c^* (2940) photoproduction.

  17. J =3 /2 charmed hypertriton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcilazo, H.; Valcarce, A.; Caramés, T. F.

    2015-08-01

    By solving exact three-body equations, we study the three-baryon system with charm +1 . We look for possible bound states using baryon-baryon interactions obtained from a chiral constituent quark model. The smaller effect of the Λc↔Σc conversion reverses the order of the (I ,J )=(0 ,1 /2 ) and (I ,J )=(0 ,3 /2 ) states, rather close on the strange sector. The diminishing of the kinetic energy due to the large reduced mass gives rise to a bound state in the (I ,J )=(0 ,3 /2 ) channel. After correcting for Coulomb effects, the binding energy would be between 140 and 715 keV.

  18. A pseudoscalar glueball and charmed mesons in the extended linear sigma model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshraim, Walaa I.

    2015-05-01

    In the framework of the so-called extended linear sigma model (eLSM), we include a pseudoscalar glueball with a mass of 2.6 GeV (as predicted by Lattice-QCD simulations) and we compute the two- and three-body decays into scalar and pseudoscalar mesons. This study is relevant for the future PANDA experiment at the FAIR facility. As a second step, we extend the eLSM by including the charm quark according to the global U(4)R × U(4)L chiral symmetry. We compute the masses, weak decay constants and strong decay widths of open charmed mesons. The precise description of the decays of open charmed states is important for the CBM experiment at FAIR.

  19. CHARM 2010: Experiment summary and future charm facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, Jeffrey A.; /Fermilab

    2010-12-01

    The CHARM 2010 meeting had over 30 presentations of experimental results, plus additional future facilities talks just before this summary talk. Since there is not enough time to even summarize all that has been shown from experiments and to recognize all the memorable plots and results - tempting as it is to reproduce the many clean signals and data vs theory figures, the quantum correlations plots, and the D-mixing plots before and after the latest CLEO-c data is added. So, this review will give only my personal observations, exposing my prejudices and my areas of ignorance, no doubt. This overview will be at a fairly high level of abstraction - no re-showing individual plots or results. I ask the forgiveness of those who will have been slighted in this way - meaning all the presents.

  20. From the {psi} to charmed mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Goldhaber, G. |

    1994-11-01

    This talk deals with the author`s recollections about the discoveries of the J/{psi} the {psi}{prime} as well as psion spectroscopy and charmed mesons. He gives a chronology for the {psi} and {psi}{prime} discoveries. He also discusses the events which led to the charmed meson discovery as well as detailed discussions on the proof that the resonance observed in the K{sup {minus}} {pi}{sup +} system, at 1,865 MeV, was indeed the predicted charmed meson.

  1. Terraforming and the coming charm industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Frederick

    We will only begin to develop a truly spacefaring civilization when it is in our interest to do so. One key issue is what constitutes a human ``interest'' and even more important, how will human interests change during the coming era in which planetary engineering will become feasible. The European exploration of the Americas is a valuable analogy; the true beneficiaries of the Columbian discovery were not the aristocrats, sailors and warriors but the farmers and planters that followed them. If we are to get an accurate picture of the potential wealth to be gained from the solar system, we must recognize the successive waves of economic energy through which our civilization is passing. It is already clear that the shrinkage of employment and investment that occurred in farming is already happening to the extractive and manufacturing sectors and will happen to the information industries and the biotech/nanotech industries that will succeed them. Finally, we will be left with the irreducibly labor- and capital-intensive human industries of what we might call ``charm''. The chief natural resources required for these industries are empty space and empty time, which would be plentiful in the new planetary habitats opened up by terraforming. The paper will explore a few of the practical and visionary possibilities of such a perspective.

  2. Decays of doubly charmed meson molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, R.; Nagahiro, H.; Hosaka, A.

    2016-01-01

    If the X(3872), Y(3940) and X(4160) are D*D ¯+c .c ., D*D ¯* and DS*D¯S* molecules, respectively, there should be doubly charmed mesons (D(*)D(*)). In this talk we predict two states with JP = 1+ in the charm = 2 sector, one DD* state around 3850 MeV, other D*D* state with mass around 3970 MeV, and other two similar states in the (charm = 2; strangeness = sector. Besides that, we evaluate the decay widths of doubly charm mesons D*D*(1+), into DDπ and DDγ. These decays are mediated by anomalous couplings D*D* - DD*, with the subsequent decay of D* into Dπ or Dγ.

  3. New results on CLEO`s heavy quarks - bottom and charm

    SciTech Connect

    Menary, S.

    1997-01-01

    While the top quark is confined to virtual reality for CLEO, the increased luminosity of the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) and the improved photon detection capabilities of the CLEO`s {open_quotes}heavy{close_quotes} quarks - bottom and charm. I will describe new results in the B meson sector including the first observation of exclusive b {yields} ulv decays, upper limits on gluonic penguin decay rates, and precise measurements of semileptonic and hadronic b {yields} c branching fractions. The charmed hadron results that are discussed include the observation of isospin violation in D{sub s}*{sup +} decays, an update on measurements of the D{sub s}{sup +} decay constant, and the observation of a new excited {Xi}{sub c} charmed baryon. These measurements have had a large impact on our understanding of heavy quark physics.

  4. Probing new physics in rare charm processes

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, J.L.

    1994-09-01

    The possibility of using the charm system to search for new physics is addressed. Phenomena such as D{sup 0} - {bar D}{sup 0} mixing and rare decays of charmed mesons are first examined in the Standard Model to test the present understanding and to serve as benchmarks for signals from new sources. The effects of new physics from various classes of non-standard dynamical models on D{sup 0} - {bar D}{sup 0} mixing are investigated.

  5. A Study of Double-Charm and Charm-Strange Baryons inElectron-Positron Annihilations

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Adam J.; /SLAC

    2007-10-15

    In this dissertation I describe a study of double-charm and charm-strange baryons based on data collected with the BABAR Detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. In this study I search for new baryons and make precise measurements of their properties and decay modes. I seek to verify and expand upon double-charm and charm-strange baryon observations made by other experiments. The BABAR Detector is used to measure subatomic particles that are produced at the PEP-II storage rings. I analyze approximately 300 million e+e- {yields} c{bar c} events in a search for the production of double-charm baryons. I search for the double-charm baryons {Xi}{sup +}{sub cc} (containing the quarks ccd) and {Xi}{sup ++}{sub cc} (ccu) in decays to {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}, respectively. No statistically significant signals for their production are found, and upper limits on their production are determined. Statistically significant signals for excited charm-strange baryons are observed with my analysis of approximately 500 million e+e- {yields} c{bar c} events. The charged charm-strange baryons {Xi}{sub c}(2970){sup +}, {Xi}{sub c}(3055){sup +}, {Xi}{sub c}(3123){sup +} are found in decays to {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, the same decay mode used in the {Xi}{sup +}{sub cc} search. The neutral charm-strange baryon {Xi}{sub c}(3077){sup 0} is observed in decays to {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sub 8}{pi}{sup -}. I also search for excited charm-strange baryon decays to {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sub 8}, {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}, {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sub 8}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, and {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. No significant charm-strange baryon signals a f h these decay modes. For each excited charm-strange baryon state that I observe, I measure its mass, natural width (lifetime), and production rate. The properties of these excited charm-strange baryons and their

  6. Finding the charm in 800 GeV/c p-Cu and p-Be single muon spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Klinksiek, Stephen A.; /New Mexico U.

    2005-01-01

    Fermilab Experiment 866 took single muon data from 800 GeV/c ({radical}s = 38.8 GeV) p-Cu and p-Be interactions in an attempt to extract the inclusive nuclear open charm/anti-charm (D/{bar D}) differential cross sections as a function of p{sub T}. The muons were decay products from semi-leptonic decays of open charm mesons as well as decays from lighter non-charmed mesons ({pi}'s and K's). Data were taken simultaneously from two interaction regions; one of two thin nuclear targets and a copper beam dump 92 inches downstream. The open decay length for hadrons produced in the targets increased the contribution to the muon spectrum from light hadron decays, relative to those from the dump. Production cross sections for light hadrons from previous experiments were used in conjunction with parameterized open charm cross sections to produce total Monte Carlo single muon spectra that were subsequently fit to the data. The sensitivity of this measurement covered an open charm hadron p{sub T} range of approximately 2 to 7 GeV/c, center-of-mass rapidity, y{sub cm}, between 0 and 2, and x{sub F} between 0.2 and 0.8. Previous experimental results for p-p or p-A open charm production at comparable energy was limited to {radical}5 GeV/ Three functions describing the shape of the open charm/anti-charm cross sections were fit to the data; an exponential, A{sub 1} exp (-B p{sub T}), and two polynomials, A{sub 2}/p{sub T}{sup 2} + {alpha}m{sub c}{sup 2}{sup n} and A{sub 2} (1-p{sub T}/p{sub beam}){sup m}/(p{sub T}{sup 2} + {alpha}m{sub c}{sup 2}){sup n}. The first polynomial was fit with the parameter n as a free parameter, and constant with three integer values, 4, 5 and 6. The second was fit with n held fixed at the constant integer values only. The best results were with the first polynomial with n around 6. All three parameterizations resulted in good fits. Extrapolation of the cross sections to small p{sub T} shows good agreement with previous experiments. The power {alpha} of

  7. Search for threshold enhancement in the. gamma. p. -->. charmed baryon+charmed meson cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Bacon, T.C.; Bingham, H.H.; Brau, J.E.; Braune, K.; Brick, D.; Bugg, W.M.; Butler, J.M.; Cameron, W.; Cohen, H.O.; Colley, D.C.; Dado, S.; Dingus, P.; Erickson, R.; Field, R.C.; Franek, B.; Gearhart, R.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, I.M.; Hall, G.; Hancock, E.R.; Hargis, H.J.; Hart, E.L.; Harwin, M.J.; Hasegawa, K.; Hulsizer, R.I.; Jobes, M.; Kafka, T.; Kalmus, G.E.; Kelsey, D.P.; Kitagaki, T.; Levy, A.; Merenyi, R.; Murray, J.J.; O'Dell, V.; Pless, I.A.; Rankin, P.; Ronat, E.; Sagawa, H.; Sewell, S.J.; Shank, J.; Shimony, J.; Tamai, K.; Tanaka, S.; Waide, D.A.; Widgoff, M.; Wolbers, S.; Woods, C.A.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yamamoto, R.K.; Yost, G.P.; Yuta, H.

    1984-08-01

    Results of a search for a predicted enhancement of several microbarns in the charm-photoproduction cross section just above threshold are reported. No charm decays were detected, from which an upper limit to the charm cross section of 94 nb (90% C.L.) at E/sub ..gamma../approx. =10 GeV was obtained. Upper limits in the range 270 to 450 nb were also obtained for the peak cross sections for threshold enhancements in ..gamma..p..-->..D/sup -/..sigma../sub c//sup + +/ and similar channels.

  8. Probing the Charm Quark Yukawa Coupling in Higgs+Charm Production.

    PubMed

    Brivio, Ilaria; Goertz, Florian; Isidori, Gino

    2015-11-20

    We propose a new method for determining the coupling of the Higgs boson to charm quarks, via Higgs production in association with a charm-tagged jet: pp→hc. As a first estimate, we find that at the LHC with 3000 fb^{-1}, it should be possible to derive a constraint of order one, relative to the standard model (SM) value of the charm Yukawa coupling. As a by-product of this analysis, we present an estimate of the exclusive pp→hD^{(*)} electroweak cross section. Within the SM, the latter turns out to be not accessible at the LHC even in the high-luminosity phase. PMID:26636844

  9. Single electrons from semileptonic charm meson decays in p+p collisions at 200GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinhua

    2003-10-01

    The suppression of quarkonium production is predicted as one of the characteristics of a potential phase transition of nuclear matter from confined to deconfined quarks and gluons. The measurement of open charm production in pp collisions provides an important baseline for charmonium measurements in dAu as well as heavy ion collisions. There, various competing nuclear effects such as shadowing, heavy quark energy loss, color screening, and charm recombination need to be disentangled. The PHENIX experiment has collected samples of pp collisions at 200 GeV in the last two runs at RHIC. Special converter runs were taken to directly measure electrons from photonic sources. Particles carrying open charm can be studied by the contributions from their semileptonic decays, e.g. Darrow eKν, to single electron spectra. Following this approach, we will present the current status of the analysis of run2 and run3 data.

  10. Update on hadroproduced charm at TPL

    SciTech Connect

    Thorne, Keith

    1992-06-01

    Two experiments have now been run at Fermilab using the Tagged Photon Laboratory (TPL) spectrometer with an incident hadron beam to study heavy quark physics. Results (preliminary) from the first experiment, E-769, on charm hadroproduction dependence on the target atomic number, x{sub F} and p{sub t} are presented. The next experiment, E-791, just completed data-taking with an upgraded spectrometer and data-acquisition system to collect a high-statistics sample of charm decays. Preliminary plots and estimates of final sample size are presented.

  11. Charm and beauty production at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Bishai, M.; /Brookhaven

    2005-01-01

    Using the data samples collected with the CDF Run II detector during 2002 and early 2003, new measurements of the production cross sections of charm and beauty hadrons at {radical}s = 1960 GeV are presented. New measurements of the cross sections of centrally produced b-hadrons and J/{psi} mesons down to zero transverse momenta have been carried out. The large charm signals made available by the silicon vertex track trigger have enabled the measurement of the cross sections of D{sup 0}, D*, D{sup {+-}}, and D{sub s} mesons.

  12. Charm and Beauty in Photoproduction at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobre, Monica

    2014-04-01

    The photoproduction of beauty and charm quarks at the ep collider HERA are presented. The b-quarks production was investigated in the bb → eeX' channel and the differential production cross section was measured as a function of the average transverse momentum of the beauty quarks down to the threshold. The cross section of D* meson decaying in the golden channel was determined both inclusively and in D*-tagged dijet events. Exploiting the characteristics of the heavy-flavoured hadron decays, beauty and charm quark cross sections were also measured in dijet events using secondary vertices or semi-muonic decays.

  13. Thermal charm and charmonium production in quark gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kai; Chen, Zhengyu; Greiner, Carsten; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2016-07-01

    We study the effect of thermal charm production on charmonium regeneration in high energy nuclear collisions. By solving the kinetic equations for charm quark and charmonium distributions in Pb+Pb collisions, we calculate the global and differential nuclear modification factors RAA (Npart) and RAA (pt) for J / ψ s. Due to the thermal charm production in hot medium, the charmonium production source changes from the initially created charm quarks at SPS, RHIC and LHC to the thermally produced charm quarks at Future Circular Collider (FCC), and the J / ψ suppression (RAA < 1) observed so far will be replaced by a strong enhancement (RAA > 1) at FCC at low transverse momentum.

  14. Spectroscopy and decays of charm and bottom

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, J.N.

    1997-10-01

    After a brief review of the quark model, we discuss our present knowledge of the spectroscopy of charm and bottom mesons and baryons. We go on to review the lifetimes, semileptonic, and purely leptonic decays of these particles. We conclude with a brief discussion B and D mixing and rare decays.

  15. Charm contribution to the atmospheric neutrino flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halzen, Francis; Wille, Logan

    2016-07-01

    We revisit the estimate of the charm particle contribution to the atmospheric neutrino flux that is expected to dominate at high energies because long-lived high-energy pions and kaons interact in the atmosphere before decaying into neutrinos. We focus on the production of forward charm particles which carry a large fraction of the momentum of the incident proton. In the case of strange particles, such a component is familiar from the abundant production of K+Λ pairs. These forward charm particles can dominate the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux in underground experiments. Modern collider experiments have no coverage in the very large rapidity region where charm forward pair production dominates. Using archival accelerator data as well as IceCube measurements of atmospheric electron and muon neutrino fluxes, we obtain an upper limit on forward D¯0Λc pair production and on the associated flux of high-energy atmospheric neutrinos. We conclude that the prompt flux may dominate the much-studied central component and represent a significant contribution to the TeV atmospheric neutrino flux. Importantly, it cannot accommodate the PeV flux of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, or the excess of events observed by IceCube in the 30-200 TeV energy range indicating either structure in the flux of cosmic accelerators, or a presence of more than one component in the cosmic flux observed.

  16. Predicting the Total Charm Cross Section

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R

    2008-05-29

    We discuss the energy dependence of the total charm cross section and some of its theoretical uncertainties including the quark mass, scale choice and the parton densities. Extracting the total charm cross section from data is a non-trivial task. To go from a finite number of measured D mesons in a particular decay channel to the total c{bar c} cross section one must: divide by the branching ratio for that channel; correct for the luminosity, {sigma}{sub D} = N{sub D}/Lt; extrapolate to full phase space from the finite detector acceptance; divide by two to get the pair cross section from the single Ds; and multiply by a correction factor to account for unmeasured charm hadrons. Early fixed-target data were at rather low p{sub T}, making the charm quark mass the most relevant scale. At proton and ion colliders, although the RHIC experiments can access the full pT range and thus the total cross section, the data reach rather high p{sub T}, p{sub T} >> m, making p{sub T} (m{sub T}) the most relevant scale. Here we focus on the total cross section calculation where the quark mass is the only relevant scale.

  17. Photoproduction of charm particles at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Cumalat, John P.

    1997-03-15

    A brief description of the Fermilab Photoproduction Experiment E831 or FOCUS is presented. The experiment concentrates on the reconstruction of charm particles. The FOCUS collaboration has participants from several Central American and Latin American institutions; CINVESTAV and Universidad Autonoma de Puebla from Mexico, University of Puerto Rico from the United States, and Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas in Rio de Janeiro from Brasil.

  18. Ten Charming Delusions About Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, Garrett

    1975-01-01

    Presents an open ended list of delusions about population which are based on expansionist economics and contends that dispelling these delusions, and others, will allow us to come to grip with the population problem. Some of the delusions presented concern birth control, sharing the wealth, and energy shortages. (BR)

  19. Measurement of absolute branching fractions of inclusive semileptonic decays of charm and charmed-strange mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, D. M.; Edwards, K. W.; Reed, J.; Robichaud, A. N.; Tatishvili, G.; White, E. J.; Briere, R. A.; Vogel, H.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Das, S.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hunt, J. M.

    2010-03-01

    We have measured the inclusive semileptonic branching fractions of D{sup 0}, D{sup +}, and D{sub s}{sup +} mesons. For these measurements, we have used the full CLEO-c open-charm data samples, 818 pb{sup -1} at E{sub CM}=3.774 GeV, giving D{sup 0}D{sup 0} and D{sup +}D{sup -} events, and 602 pb{sup -1} at E{sub CM}=4.170 GeV, giving D{sub s}*{sup {+-}D}{sub s}{sup {+-}}events. We obtain B(D{sup 0{yields}}Xe{sup +{nu}}{sub e})=(6.46{+-}0.09{+-}0.11)%, B(D{sup +{yields}}Xe{sup +{nu}}{sub e})=(16.13{+-}0.10{+-}0.29)%, and B(D{sub s}{sup +{yields}}Xe{sup +{nu}}{sub e})=(6.52{+-}0.39{+-}0.15)%, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second are systematic. From these and lifetimes obtained elsewhere, we obtain the ratios of semileptonic decay widths {Gamma}(D{sup +{yields}}Xe{sup +{nu}}{sub e})/{Gamma}(D{sup 0{yields}}Xe{sup +{nu}}{sub e})=0.985{+-}0.015{+-}0.024 and {Gamma}(D{sub s}{sup +{yields}}Xe{sup +{nu}}{sub e})/{Gamma}(D{sup 0{yields}}Xe{sup +{nu}}{sub e})=0.828{+-}0.051{+-}0.025. The ratio of D{sup +} and D{sup 0} is consistent with the isospin symmetry prediction of unity, and the ratio of D{sub s}{sup +} and D{sup 0} differs from unity, as expected.

  20. Leading Charm in Hadron-Nucleus Interaction in the Intrinsic Charm Model

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, T.; Vogt, R.

    1998-08-03

    Leading charm hadrons produced in hadron-nucleus interactions cannot be adequately described within the parton fusion model. Recent results on charm baryon production in Sigma{sup -} A interactions at 330 GeV with the WA89 detector disagree with fusion predictions. Intrinsic heavy quark pairs in the Sigma{sup -}(dds) wave function provide a simple mechanism for producing fast charm hadrons. We calculate leading charm baryon production from Sigma{sup -}, pi{sup -} and p projectiles in a two component model combining partonfusion with intrinsic charm. Final state D{sup -}, Sigma{sub c}{sup 0}, Xi{sub c}{sup +}, and Lambda{sub c}{sup +} d sigma/dx{sub F} distributions and D{sup -}/D{sup +}, D{sub s}{sup -}/D{sub s}{sup +} and Lambda{sub c}{sup +}/overline Lambda{sub c}{sup +} asymmetries are compared to WA89 data. Predictions are made for 650 GeV Sigma{sup -} A and pi{sup -} A interactions in the SELEX detector at Fermilab and for 800 GeV pA interactions.

  1. Charmed-strange mesons revisited: Mass spectra and strong decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qin-Tao; Chen, Dian-Yong; Liu, Xiang; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2015-03-01

    Inspired by the present experimental status of charmed-strange mesons, we perform a systematic study of the charmed-strange meson family in which we calculate the mass spectra of the charmed-strange meson family by taking a screening effect into account in the Godfrey-Isgur model and investigate the corresponding strong decays via the quark pair creation model. These phenomenological analyses of charmed-strange mesons not only shed light on the features of the observed charmed-strange states, but also provide important information on future experimental search for the missing higher radial and orbital excitations in the charmed-strange meson family, which will be a valuable task in LHCb, the forthcoming Belle II, and PANDA.

  2. Charm Spectroscopy at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Poireau, Vincent; /Annecy, LAPP

    2007-12-21

    We present a mini-review on charm spectroscopy at the BABAR experiment. We first report on the c{bar s} meson spectrum, and present precise measurements of the D{sub s1}(2536) meson as well as the properties of the many new states discovered since 2003 (D*{sub s0}(2317), D{sub s1}(2460), D*{sub sJ}(2860), and D{sub sJ}(2700) mesons). We then discuss about charmed baryons observed recently in the BABAR experiment: {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} and {Omega}*{sub c}{sup 0} css baryons, {Lambda}{sub c}(2940){sup +} udc baryon and the {Xi}{sub c} usc/dsc baryons.

  3. Kondo effect in charm and bottom nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Shigehiro

    2016-06-01

    The Kondo effect for isospin-exchange interaction between a D ¯, B meson and a valence nucleon in charm and bottom atomic nuclei including the discrete energy levels for valence nucleons is discussed. To investigate the binding energy by the Kondo effect, I introduce the mean-field approach for the bound state of the D ¯, B meson in charm and bottom nuclei. Assuming a simple model, I examine the validity of the mean-field approximation by comparing the results with the exact solutions. The effect of the quantum fluctuation is estimated beyond the mean-field approximation. The competition between the Kondo effect and the other correlations in valence nucleons, the isospin symmetry breaking and the nucleon pairings, are discussed.

  4. Charming penguin contributions to B{r_arrow}K{pi}

    SciTech Connect

    Isola, C.; Ladisa, M.; Nardulli, G.; Pham, T. N.; Santorelli, P.

    2001-07-01

    We present calculations of the charming-penguin long-distance contributions to B{r_arrow}K{pi} decays due to intermediate charmed meson states. Our calculation is based on the chiral effective Lagrangian for light and heavy mesons, corrected for the hard pion and kaon momenta. We find that the charming-penguin contributions increase significantly the B{r_arrow}K{pi} decay rates in comparison with the short-distance contributions, giving results in better agreement with experimental data.

  5. Babar: Sin(2beta) With Charm

    SciTech Connect

    Grenier, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique /Clermont-Ferrand U.

    2006-04-12

    We present measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries of neutral B decays to several charm and charmonium final states. Data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. In the absence of penguin contribution, the Standard Model predicts the time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters S and C are to be {eta}{sub CP} sin(2{beta}) and 0, respectively.

  6. Radiative decays of dynamically generated charmed baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Gamermann, D.; Jimenez-Tejero, C. E.; Ramos, A.

    2011-04-01

    In this work we study the radiative decay of dynamically generated J{sup P}=(1{sup -}/2) charm baryons into the ground state J{sup P}=(1{sup +}/2) baryons. Since different theoretical interpretations of these baryonic resonances and, in particular, of the {Lambda}{sub c}(2595), give different predictions, a precise experimental measurement of these decays would be an important step for understanding their nature.

  7. Unsolved problems in hadronic charm decay

    SciTech Connect

    Browder, T.E.

    1989-08-01

    This paper describes several outstanding problems in the study of hadronic decays of charmed mesons where further experimental work and theoretical understanding is needed. Four topics are stressed: double Cabibbo suppressed decays (DCSD) of D/sup +/ mesons, hadronic D/sub s/ decays, weak hadronic quasi-two-body decays to pairs of vector mesons, and penguin decays of D mesons. 24 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Charm production in neutron-nucleon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tzeng, L.; McBride, P.L.; Cooper, P.S.; Li, Y.; Majka, R.D.; Sandweiss, J.; Slaughter, A.J.; Taft, H.D.; Teig, L.J.; Johnson, M.E.

    1985-09-09

    Hadronic production of charmed particles in association with muons from their semileptonic decay has been observed in a high-resolution streamer-chamber experiment performed at Fermilab. A miss-distance analysis of the pictures gives a signal of 17.3 +- 4.7 events. Depending on the production model this corresponds to a range of neutron-nucleon cross sections from 8 to 50 ..mu..b, assuming an A/sup 2/3/ dependence.

  9. The charm quark on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronfeld, Andreas S.

    1993-03-01

    We formulate lattice fermions in a way that encompasses Wilson fermions as well as the static and non-relativistic approximations. In particular, we treat mqα systematically ( mq is the fermion mass) showing show how to understand the Wilson action as an effective action for systems with p≪ mq. The results show how to extract matrix elements and the spectrum from simulations with mqa ≈ 1, which is relevant for the charm quark.

  10. Lifetimes of charm and beauty hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, G.; Bigi, I. I.; Dornan, P. J.

    1997-10-01

    Major breakthroughs have been achieved in the determination of the lifetimes of charm and beauty hadrons. Much larger data samples than previously have become available and new experimental devices and techniques have been developed and employed. The lifetimes of all weakly decaying singly charmed hadrons have been measured, some with an accuracy of a few percent. The difference in the shortest lifetime - τ(Ω c) - and the longest one - τ( D+) - is given by a factor of close to ten. The experimental status of beauty lifetimes, while less complete, has still reached a new level of quality and is now better than 5% for the commoner states. New theoretical tools, based mainly on heavy quark expansions, have been developed; they incorporate as well as transcend earlier phenomenological descriptions. The observed pattern in the charm lifetime ratios is reproduced in a semi-quantitative manner as well as could be expected; as far as the beauty lifetime ratios are concerned some problems may well be emerging. The maturity level achieved in the measurements bodes quite well for future challenges where reliable and efficient tracking of the decay vertices will be crucial.

  11. Testing discrete symmetries at a super τ -charm factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevan, Adrian John

    2016-02-01

    Tests of discrete symmetry violation have played an important role in understanding the structure of weak interactions in the Standard Model of particle physics. Historically, these measurements have been extensively performed in experiments with large samples of K and B mesons. A high luminosity τ-charm facility presents physicists with the opportunity to comprehensively explore discrete symmetry violation and test the Standard Model using τ leptons, charm mesons, and charmed baryons. This paper discusses several possible measurements for a future τ-charm factory.

  12. Direct probe of the intrinsic charm content of the proton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Tom; Ilten, Philip; Williams, Mike

    2016-04-01

    Measurement of Z bosons produced in association with charm jets (Z c ) in proton-proton collisions in the forward region provides a direct probe of a potential nonperturbative (intrinsic) charm component in the proton wave function. We provide a detailed study of the potential to measure Z c production at the LHCb experiment in Runs 2 and 3 of the LHC. The sensitivity to valence-like (sea-like) intrinsic charm is predicted to be ⟨x ⟩IC≳0.3 %(1 %). The impact of intrinsic charm on Higgs production at the LHC, including H c , is also discussed in detail.

  13. SELEX: Recent Progress in the Analysis of Charm-Strange and Double-Charm Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Engelfried, Jurgen

    2007-02-01

    SELEX (Fermilab Experiment 781) [1] employs beams of {Sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -}, and protons at around 600 GeV/c to study production and decay properties of charmed baryons. It took data in the 1996/7 fixed target run and is currently analyzing those data. Here they focus on recently obtained results concerning the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} lifetime and the doubly-charmed baryons {Xi}{sub cc}{sup +} and {Xi}{sub cc}{sup ++}.

  14. Measurements of CP violation and mixing in charm decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contu, A.; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    LHCb has collected the world's largest sample of charmed hadrons. This sample is used to search for direct and indirect CP violation in charm, and to measure D0 mixing parameters. New and updated measurements are presented, with complementary time-dependent and time-integrated analyses of D0 meson decays.

  15. Results on charm hadroproduction from CERN experiment WA82

    SciTech Connect

    Antinori, F.; Barberis, D.; Beusch, W.; Davenport, M.; Dufey, J.P.; French, B.R.; Harrison, K.; Jacholkowski, A.; Kirk, A.; Lamanna, E.; Lassalle, J.C.; Muller, F.; Redaelli, N.; Roda, C.; Weymann, M. ); Forino, A.; Gessaroli, R.; Mazzanti, P.; Quareni, A.; Viaggi, F. ); Anselmi, R.; Casanova, V.; Dameri, M.; Hurst, R.; Novelli, P.; Osculati, B.; Rossi, L.; Tomasini, G. ); Buys, A.; Grard, F.; Legros, P. ); Adamovich, M.; Alexandrov, Y.; Kharlamov, S.; Nechaeva, P.; Zavertyaev, M. )

    1992-02-01

    Experiment WA82 has collected data from 1987 to 1989 with the [Omega][prime] spectrometer at the CERN SPS. The aim of WA82 was a high statistics study of charm hadroproduction, using a silicon microstrip vertex detector and an impact parameter trigger. Latest results on the nuclear dependence of charm production and on the [ital x][sub [ital F

  16. Production of charmed mesons in Z decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Mattison, T.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Chai, Y.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bonvicini, G.; Boudreau, J.; Casper, D.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Ganis, G.; Gay, C.; Girone, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Maggi, M.; Markou, C.; Martinez, M.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Perlas, J. A.; Perrodo, P.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Veenhof, R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wiedemann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Johnson, S. D.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, B.; Fouque, G.; Passalacqua, L.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Focardi, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Ikeda, M.; Jaffe, D. E.; Levinthal, D.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Pepe=Altarelli, M.; Salomone, S.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Karger, C.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, M.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Hassard, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Patton, S.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Wright, A. G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Vogl, R.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttal, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Walther, S. M.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, B.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Drinkard, J.; Etienne, F.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Roos, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Adlung, S.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cattaneo, P.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Jakobs, K.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, G.; Richter, R.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, H.; Stiegler, U.; Denis, R. St.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Janot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Musolino, G.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Abbaneo, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Luisiani, A.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Valassi, A.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; March, P. V.; Medcalf, T.; Mir, Ll. M.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; Bertin, V.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Babbage, W.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Thompson, L. F.; Barberio, E.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Rivera, F.; Schäfer, U.; Smolik, L.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Bobbo, B.; Pitis, L.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Chen, W.; Conway, J. S.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Nachtman, J. M.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I.; Sharma, V.; Shi, Z. H.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.

    1994-03-01

    The production of charmed mesonsmathop {D^0 }limits^{( - )} , D ± , and D *± is studied in a sample of 478,000 hadronic Z decays. The production rates are measured to be 10052_2005_Article_BF01559519_TeX2GIFE1.gif begin{gathered} {Γ (Z to D^{* ± } X)}/{Γ _{had }} = 0.187 ± 0.015(exp .) ± 0.013(BR), \\ {Γ (Z to D^ ± X)}/{Γ _{had }} = 0.251 ± 0.026(exp .) ± 0.025(BR), \\ {Γ (Z to mathop {D^0 }limits^{( - )} X)}/{Γ _{had }} = 0.518 ± 0.052(exp .) ± 0.035(BR), \\ where the errors from this analysis are separated from those coming from the D branching ratios (BR). The D *± momentum distribution is extracted separately forZ to cbar c andZ to bbar b events with the help of event shape variables. It is consistent with the prediction of the JETSET Monte Carlo program after adjustment of the charm fragmentation function. Constraining the shape of theZ to bbar b contribution, the average fraction of the beam energy taken by a D * meson produced in the fragmentation of a charm quark is extracted by a parametric fit to be < X E > c =0.495±0.011±0.007. Evidence for D **0 ( D 1(2420)0 and/or D {2/*}(2460)0) production is found in theD^{* ± } π ^ mp channel, accounting for a fraction (18±5±2)% of all D *± production. The relative production of vector and pseudoscalar mesons is dicussed, together with the possible effects of D ** production. The c-quark forward-backward Z-pole asymmetry is detrmined from that of high momentum D *± to be A {/FB 0,c }=(7.7±4.4)%.

  17. Charge asymmetry in charmed-meson photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhnoy, A. V. Likhoded, A. K.

    2006-01-15

    Within the perturbative-recombination model, the charge asymmetries in the D*{sup +}-D*{sup -}, D*{sup 0}-D*{sup 0}, and D{sup +}{sub s}-D{sup -}{sub s} yields are estimated under the kinematical conditions of the COMPASS experiment. Corrections that arise owing to the mass of a light quark in a charmed meson are taken into account. The yield of D{sup +}{sub s} mesons is predicted to be large in relation to the yield of D{sup -}{sub s} mesons.

  18. The Italian Tau/charm project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enrica Biagini, Maria

    2014-06-01

    A τ/charm Factory, an e + e- collider with very high luminosity at the 2-4.6 GeV center of mass energy, to be built on the Rome University at Tor Vergata campus, was studied by the Consortium Nicola Cabibbo Laboratory and the INFN Frascati Laboratories. This project is the natural evolution of the flagship Italian project SuperB Factory, funded by the Italian Government in 2010 with a budget that turned out to be insufficient to cover the total costs of the project. The study of rare events at the τ/charm energy was already planned as a Phase-II of SuperB [1]. This design keeps all the unique features of SuperB, including the polarization of the electron beam, with the possibility to take data in a larger energy range, with reduced accelerator dimensions and construction and operation costs. A Report on the accelerator design has been published in September 2013 [2].

  19. Charm hadroproduction results from Fermilab E-400

    SciTech Connect

    Coteus, P.; Binkley, M.; Bossi, F.; Butler, J.; Cumalat, J.P.; DiCorato, M.; Diesburg, M.; Enagonio, J.; Filaseta, J.; Frabetti, P.L.

    1987-09-01

    Results are presented from Fermilab E-400 on the production of charmed baryons and mesons at a mean energy of 640 GeV. We show evidence for the charm-strange baryon, ..xi../sub c//sup +/, and present our measurements of its mass, width, lifetime, cross section and relative branching fractions, and the A, x/sub f/, p/sub t/, and particle/antiparticle dependence of the state. We show evidence for both the ..sigma../sub c//sup 2 +/ and ..sigma../sub c//sup 0/, and present measurements of three mass differences, ..sigma../sub c//sup 2 +/ - ..sigma../sub c//sup 0/, ..sigma../sub c//sup 0/ - ..lambda../sub c//sup +/, and ..sigma../sub c//sup 2 +/ - ..lambda../sub c//sup +/. Measurements of the A dependence and particle/antiparticle ratios for ..sigma../sub c/ production are also presented. We show preliminary results on the ratio of two decay modes of the D/sup 0/, D/sup 0/ ..-->.. K/sup +/K/sup -/ and D/sup 0/ ..-->.. K/sub 0/anti K/sub 0/. The latter mode has not been previously observed. 8 refs., 10 figs.

  20. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brown, Zachary S.; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physicalmore » pion mass using SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.« less

  1. Lattice calculation of nonleptonic charm decays

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, J.N.

    1991-11-01

    The decays of charmed mesons into two body nonleptonic final states are investigated. Weak interaction amplitudes of interest in these decays are extracted from lattice four-point correlation functions using a effective weak Hamiltonian including effects to order G{sub f} in the weak interactions yet containing effects to all orders in the strong interactions. The lattice calculation allows a quantitative examination of non-spectator processes in charm decays helping to elucidate the role of effects such as color coherence, final state interactions and the importance of the so called weak annihilation process. For D {yields} K{pi}, we find that the non-spectator weak annihilation diagram is not small, and we interpret this as evidence for large final state interactions. Moreover, there is indications of a resonance in the isospin {1/2} channel to which the weak annihilation process contributes exclusively. Findings from the lattice calculation are compared to results from the continuum vacuum saturation approximation and amplitudes are examined within the framework of the 1/N expansion. Factorization and the vacuum saturation approximation are tested for lattice amplitudes by comparing amplitudes extracted from lattice four-point functions with the same amplitude extracted from products of two-point and three-point lattice correlation functions arising out of factorization and vacuum saturation.

  2. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Zachary S.; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physical pion mass using SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.

  3. Improving data discovery and usability through commentary and user feedback: the CHARMe project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alegre, R.; Blower, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    CHARMe project has implemented a set of open-source tools to create, store and explore commentary information, using open Web standards. In this presentation we will describe the application of the CHARMe system to the particular case of the climate data community; however the techniques and technologies are generic and can be applied in many fields.

  4. Opportunities for high-sensitivity charm physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.M.; Burnstein, R.A.; Lederman, L.M.; Rubin, H.A.; Brown, C.N.; Christian, D.C.; Gelfand, N.M.; Kwan, S.W.; Chen, T.Y.; He, M.; Koetke, D.D.; Napier, A.; Papavassiliou, V.; Yu, X.Q.

    1996-07-01

    The CO initiative under consideration at Fermilab makes feasible a charm experiment reconstructing >10{sup 9} charm decays, four orders - of magnitude beyond the largest extant sample. The experiment might commence data-taking as early as 1999. In addition to programmatic charm physics such as spectroscopy, lifetimes, and QCD tests, it will have significant new-physics reach in the areas of CP violation, flavor-changing neutral-current and lepton-number-violating decays, and D{sup o} {bar D} {bar {sup o}} mixing, and should observe direct CP violation in Cabibbo-suppressed D decays if it occurs at the level predicted by the Standard Model.

  5. DO -- antiMixing and Rare Charm Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Jeanne M; Burdman, Gustavo

    2003-10-06

    We review the current status of flavor-changing neutral currents in the charm sector. We focus on the standard-model predictions and identify the main sources of theoretical uncertainties in both charm mixing and rare charm decays. The potential of these observables for constraining short-distance physics in the standard model and its extensions is compromised by the presence of large nonperturbative effects. We examine the possible discovery windows in which short-distance physics can be tested and study the effects of various extensions of the standard model. The current experimental situation and future prospects are reviewed.

  6. Discovery of naked charm particles and lifetime differences among charm species using nuclear emulsion techniques innovated in Japan

    PubMed Central

    NIU, Kiyoshi

    2008-01-01

    This is a historical review of the discovery of naked charm particles and lifetime differences among charm species. These discoveries in the field of cosmic-ray physics were made by the innovation of nuclear emulsion techniques in Japan. A pair of naked charm particles was discovered in 1971 in a cosmic-ray interaction, three years prior to the discovery of the hidden charm particle, J/Ψ, in western countries. Lifetime differences between charged and neutral charm particles were pointed out in 1975, which were later re-confirmed by the collaborative Experiment E531 at Fermilab. Japanese physicists led by K.Niu made essential contributions to it with improved emulsion techniques, complemented by electronic detectors. This review also discusses the discovery of artificially produced naked charm particles by us in an accelerator experiment at Fermilab in 1975 and of multiple-pair productions of charm particles in a single interaction in 1987 by the collaborative Experiment WA75 at CERN. PMID:18941283

  7. Recent results on D decays and lepton, photon, (and hadron) production of charm

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, T.

    1983-09-01

    After a brief introduction to the experiments with results included in this review, we will discuss, in turn, production of psi and psi', production of open charm in lepton and photon beams, D decays, and give a brief token mention of recent hadroproduction results. Emphasis will be on results reported since the Paris conference (August, 1982), but we will try to include all results since the last Lepton Photon Conference at Bonn (August, 1981) as well as earlier results when necessary for comparison. 42 references.

  8. Rare charm and B decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Julia Thom

    2003-12-15

    We present results on rare charm and B decays using 65pb{sup -1} of data taken with the CDF detector in Run II. Three results are discussed, a measurement of the relative branching ratios {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{pi}) and {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{pi}) and the direct CP-violating decay rate asymmetry, and a limit on the branching ratio of the FCNC decay D{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. We also discuss the prospects for the search for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decays.

  9. Spectroscopy of charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of singly, doubly and triply charmed baryons by using dynamical lattice QCD. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice and are obtained after subduction from their continuum analogues are utilized. Using novel computational techniques correlation functions of these operators are generated and the variational method is exploited to extract excited states. The lattice spectra that we obtain have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the low lying states remarkably resemble the expectations of quantum numbers from SU(6) x O(3) symmetry. Various energy splittings between the extracted states, including splittings due to hyperfine as well as spin-orbit coupling, are considered and those are also compared against similar energy splittings at other quark masses.

  10. Puzzles in hyperon, charm and beauty physics.

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H. J.

    2002-10-21

    Puzzles awaiting better experiments and better theory include: (1) the contradiction between good and bad SU(3) baryon wave functions in fitting Cabibbo theory for hyperon decays, strangeness suppression in the sea and the violation of the Gottfried Sum rule--no model fits all; (2) Anomalously enhanced Cabibbo-suppressed D{sup +} {yields} K*{sup +} (s{bar d}) decays; (3) anomalously enhanced and suppressed B {yields} {eta}{prime} X decays; (4) the OZI rule in weak decays; (5) Vector dominance (W {yields} {pi}, {rho}, a{sub 1}, D{sub s}, D*{sub s}) in weak decays; (6) puzzles in doubly-cabibbo-suppressed charm decays; and (7) problems in obtaining {Lambda} spin structure from polarization measurements of produced {Lambda}'s.

  11. Charm form factors in hadronic interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bracco, M. E.; Navarra, F. S.; Nielsen, M.; Chiapparini, M.

    2010-12-28

    We calculate the form factors and the coupling constants in vertices with charm mesons, such as {rho}D*D*, in the framework of QCD sum rules. We first discuss the applications of these form factors in heavy ion collisions and in B decays. We then present an introduction to the method of QCD sum rules and describe how to work with the three-point function. We give special attention to the procedure employed to extrapolate results obtained in the deep euclidean region to the poles of the particles, located in the time-like region. Finally we present a table of ready-to-use parametrizations of all the form factors, which are relevant for the processes mentioned in the introduction. We also give the coupling constants.

  12. Mesonic Decay of Charm Hypernuclei Λc+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Fontoura, Carlos E.; Krein, Gastão

    2016-03-01

    Λc+ hypernuclei are expected to have binding energies and other properties similar to those of strange hypernuclei in view of the similarity between the quark structures of the strange and charmed hyperons, namely Λ(uds) and Λc+(udc). One striking difference however occurs in their mesonic decays, as there is almost no Pauli blocking in the nucleonic decay of a charm hypernucleus because the final-state nucleons leave the nucleus at high energies. The nuclear medium nevertheless affects the mesonic decays of charm hypernucleus because the nuclear mean fields modify the masses of the charm hyperon. In the present communication we present results of a first investigation of the effects of finite baryon density on different weak mesonic decay channels of the Λc+ baryon. We found a non-negligible reduction of the decay widths as compared to their vacuum values.

  13. The hidden-charm pentaquark and tetraquark states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua-Xing; Chen, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2016-06-01

    In the past decade many charmonium-like states were observed experimentally. Especially those charged charmonium-like Zc states and bottomonium-like Zb states cannot be accommodated within the naive quark model. These charged Zc states are good candidates of either the hidden-charm tetraquark states or molecules composed of a pair of charmed mesons. Recently, the LHCb Collaboration discovered two hidden-charm pentaquark states, which are also beyond the quark model. In this work, we review the current experimental progress and investigate various theoretical interpretations of these candidates of the multiquark states. We list the puzzles and theoretical challenges of these models when confronted with the experimental data. We also discuss possible future measurements which may distinguish the theoretical schemes on the underlying structures of the hidden-charm multiquark states.

  14. Argonne Tau-charm factory collider design study

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.; Crosbie, E.A.; Norem, J.

    1995-12-01

    The design approach and design principles for a Tau-charm Factory at Argonne were studied. These studies led to a set of preliminary parameters and tentative component features as presented in this paper.

  15. Beauty and charm production at fixed-target experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Erik E. Gottschalk

    2003-12-10

    Fixed-target experiments continue to provide insights into the physics of particle production in strong interactions. The experiments are performed with different types of beam particles of varying energies, and many different target materials. Studies of beauty and charm production are of particular interest, since experimental results can be compared to perturbative QCD calculations. It is in this context that recent results from fixed-target experiments on beauty and charm production will be reviewed.

  16. Physics of a high-luminosity Tau-Charm Factory

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.E.

    1992-10-01

    This paper highlights the physics capabilities of a Tau-Charm Factory; i.e., high luminosity ({approximately}10{sup 33}cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}) e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider operating in the center-of-mass energy range of 3-5 GeV, with a high-precision, general-purpose detector. Recent developments in {tau} and charm physics are emphasized.

  17. Charm and bottom hadronic form factors with QCD sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Bracco, M. E.; Rodrigues, B. O.; Cerqueira, A. Jr.

    2013-03-25

    We present a brief review of some calculations of form factors and coupling constants in vertices with charm and bottom mesons in the framework of QCD sum rules. We first discuss the motivation for this work, describing possible applications of these form factors to charm and bottom decays processes. We first make a summarize of the QCD sum rules method. We give special attention to the uncertainties of the method introducing by the intrinsic variation of the parameters. Finally we conclude.

  18. CHARMMing: A new, flexible, web portal for CHARMM

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Benjamin T.; Singh, Rishi P.; Klauda, Jeffery B.; Hodošček, Milan; Brooks, Bernard R.; Woodcock, H. Lee

    2009-01-01

    A new web portal for the CHARMM macromolecular modeling package, CHARMMing (CHARMM interface and graphics, http://www.charmming.org), is presented. This tool provides a user friendly interface for the preparation, submission, monitoring, and visualization of molecular simulations (i.e., energy minimization, solvation, and dynamics). The infrastructure used to implement the web application is described. Two additional programs have been developed and integrated with CHARMMing: GENRTF, which is employed to define structural features not supported by the standard CHARMM force field, and a job broker, which is used to provide a portable method for using grid and cluster computing with CHARMMing. The use of the program is described with three proteins: 1YJP, 1O1O and 1UFY. Source code is provided allowing CHARMMing to be downloaded, installed, and used by supercomputing centers and research groups that have a CHARMM license. Although no software can replace a scientist’s own judgment and experience, CHARMMing eases the introduction of newcomers to the molecular modeling discipline by providing a graphical method for running simulations. PMID:18698840

  19. Intrinsic charm content of the nucleon and charmness-nucleon sigma term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Shaorong; An, C. S.; Saghai, B.

    2016-06-01

    In the extended chiral constituent quark model, the intrinsic c c ¯ content of the nucleon is investigated. The probabilities of the quark-antiquark components in the nucleon wave functions are calculated by taking the nucleon to be admixtures of three- and five-quark components, with the relevant transitions handled via the 3P0 mechanism. Predictions for the probability of the c c ¯ in the nucleon wave function and the charmness-nucleon sigma term are presented. Our numerical results turn out to be consistent with the predictions from various other approaches reported in the literature.

  20. Charm CP violation and mixing at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rok Ko, Byeong; Belle Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    We present charm CP violation and mixing measurements at Belle. They are the first observation of D0 - bar D0 mixing in e+e- collisions from D0 → K+π- decays, the most precise mixing and indirect CP violation parameters from D0 → K0Sπ+π- decays, and the timeintegrated CP asymmetries in D0 → π0π0 and D0 → K0Sπ0 decays. Our mixing measurement in D0 → K+π- decays excludes the no-mixing hypothesis at the 5.1 standard deviation level. The mixing parameters x = (0.56 ± 0.19+0.03+0.06-0.09-0.09)%, y = (0.30 ± 0.15+0.04+0.03-0.05-0.06)% and indirect CP violation parameters |q/p| = (0.90+0.16+0.05+0.06-0.15-0.04-0.05)%, arg(q/p) = (-6 ± 11 ± 3+3-4)° measured from D0 → K0Sπ+π- decays, and the time-integrated CP asymmetries AD0→π0π0CP = (-0.03 ± 0.64 ± 0.10)% and AD0→K0Sπ0CP = (-0.21 ± 0.16 ± 0.07)% are the most precisemeasurements to date. Our measurements here are consistent with predictions of the standard model.

  1. Charm physics at Fermilab E791

    SciTech Connect

    Amato, S.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Costa, I.; de Mello Neto, J.R.T.; de Miranda, J.; Santoro, A.F.S.; Souza, M.H.G.; Blaylock, G.; Burchat, P.R.; Gagnon, P.; Sugano, K.; de Oliveira, A.J.; Santha, A.; Sokoloff, M.D.; Appel, J.A.; Banerjee, S.; Carter, T.; Denisenko, K.; Halling, M.; James, C.; Kwan, S.; Lundberg, B.; Thorne, K.; Burnstein, R.; Kasper, P.A.; Peng, K.C.; Rubin, H.; Summers, D.J.; Aitala, E.M.; Gounder, K.; Rafatian, A.; Reidy, J.J.; Yi, D.; Granite, D.; Nguyen, A.; Reay, N.W.; Reibel, K.; Sidwell, R.; Stanton, N.; Tripathi, A.; Witchey, N.; Purohit, M.V.; Schwartz, A.; Wiener, J.; Almeida, F.M.L.; Ramalho, A.J.; da Silva Carvalho, H.; Ashery, D.; Gerzon, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; May-Tal-Beck, S.; Trumer, D.; Bracker, S.B.; Astorga, J.; Milburn, R.; Napier, A.; Radeztsky, S.; Sheaff, M.; Darling, C.; Slaughter, J.; Takach, S.; Wolin, E.

    1992-05-26

    Experiment 791 at Fermilab`s Tagged Photon Laboratory has just accumulated a high statistics charm sample by recording 20 billion events on 24000 8mm tapes. A 500 GeV/c {pi}{sup {minus}} beam was used with a fixed target and a magnetic spectrometer which now includes 23 silicon microstrip planes for vertex reconstruction. A new data acquisition system read out 9000 events/sec during the part of the Tevatron cycle that delivered beam. Digitization and readout took 50 {mu}S per event. Data was buffered in eight large FIFO memories to allow continuous event building and continuous tape writing to a wall of 42 Exabytes at 9.6 MB/sec. The 50 terabytes of data buffered to tape is now being filtered on RISC CPUs. Preliminary results show D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +} and D{sup +} {yields} K{sup {minus}}{pi}{pi}{sup +} decays. Rarer decays will be pursued.

  2. Dark photons from charm mesons at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilten, Philip; Thaler, Jesse; Williams, Mike; Xue, Wei

    2015-12-01

    We propose a search for dark photons A' at the LHCb experiment using the charm meson decay D*(2007 )0→D0A'. At nominal luminosity, D*0→D0γ decays will be produced at about 700 kHz within the LHCb acceptance, yielding over 5 trillion such decays during Run 3 of the LHC. Replacing the photon with a kinetically mixed dark photon, LHCb is then sensitive to dark photons that decay as A'→e+e-. We pursue two search strategies in this paper. The displaced strategy takes advantage of the large Lorentz boost of the dark photon and the excellent vertex resolution of LHCb, yielding a nearly background-free search when the A' decay vertex is significantly displaced from the proton-proton primary vertex. The resonant strategy takes advantage of the large event rate for D*0→D0A' and the excellent invariant-mass resolution of LHCb, yielding a background-limited search that nevertheless covers a significant portion of the A' parameter space. Both search strategies rely on the planned upgrade to a triggerless-readout system at LHCb in Run 3, which will permit the identification of low-momentum electron-positron pairs online during data taking. For dark photon masses below about 100 MeV, LHCb can explore nearly all of the dark photon parameter space between existing prompt-A' and beam-dump limits.

  3. A high-rate fixed-target charm experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.M.

    1994-07-01

    In the P865 Letter of Intent, we have proposed a fixed-target experiment aimed at achieving high sensitivity to decays both of charm and of beauty. I describe here a revised version which is somewhat more optimized for charm and less so for beauty. The rationale for this change of emphasis is two-fold: by the time a new fixed-target experiment might run ({approx} Year 2000), it is likely that studies of beauty at the level proposed in P865 win no longer be competitive; furthermore, it may well be that charm is even more interesting than beauty since the background to rare processes beyond the Standard Model is so much smaller in charm than in beauty. At this workshop, Pakvasa has emphasized that rare and forbidden processes such as D{sup o} mixing, charm-changing neutral currents, and lepton-family-violating currents must exist at some level if we are ever to have an understanding of the fermion masses and mixings; some extensions of the Standard Model predict effects detectable at the level of sensitivity discussed here.

  4. E789 and P865: High-rate fixed-target studies of charm and beauty

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.M.

    1993-06-01

    Experiment 789 at Fermilab used the high-rate E605/E772 spectrometer to study low-multiplicity charm and beauty decays. Preliminary results on charm and beauty production are presented based on analysis of [approx] 100% of the charm data and [approx] 50% of the beauty data. A new experiment is proposed to improve charm and beauty sensitivity by several orders of magnitude.

  5. Charm Meson Spectroscopy at BaBar and CLEO-C

    SciTech Connect

    Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP

    2007-10-16

    In this mini-review we report on the most recent progress in charm meson spectroscopy. We discuss the precision measurements performed by the BABAR and CLEO-c experiments in the non strange charm meson part and we present the newly discovered strange charmed meson excited states.

  6. Towards Exotic Hidden-Charm Pentaquarks in QCD.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua-Xing; Chen, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Steele, T G; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2015-10-23

    Inspired by P(c)(4380) and P(c)(4450) recently observed by LHCb, a QCD sum rule investigation is performed, by which they can be identified as exotic hidden-charm pentaquarks composed of an anticharmed meson and a charmed baryon. Our results suggest that P(c)(4380) and P(c)(4450) have quantum numbers J(P)=3/2(-) and 5/2(+), respectively. Furthermore, two extra hidden-charm pentaqurks with configurations D̅Σ(c)(*) and D̅(*)Σ(c)(*) are predicted, which have spin-parity quantum numbers J(P)=3/2(-) and J(P)=5/2(+), respectively. As an important extension, the mass predictions of hidden-bottom pentaquarks are also given. Searches for these partners of P(c)(4380) and P(c)(4450) are especially accessible at future experiments like LHCb and BelleII. PMID:26551105

  7. The Tau-Charm Factory and tau physics

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1989-04-01

    An international group of physicists is developing the concept and design of a Tau-Charm Factory: a two-ring, electron-positron, circular collider with 1.5 /< =/ /radical/s /< =/ 4.2 GeV and a design luminosity of 10/sup 33/ cm/sup /minus/2/ s/sup /minus/1/. This paper presents the concept of the facility and outlines the tau lepton physics which can be done. A companion talk by R. Schindler discusses the D/sup 0/, D/sup /+-//, and D/sub s/ physics at a Tau-Charm Factory. 25 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. D0-D bar 0 mixing and rare charm decays

    SciTech Connect

    Burdman, Gustavo; Shipsey, Ian

    2003-10-08

    We review the current status of flavor-changing neutral currents in the charm sector. We focus on the standard-model predictions and identify the main sources of theoretical uncertainties in both D{sup 0} - {bar D}{sup 0} mixing and rare charm decays. The potential of these observables for constraining short-distance physics in the standard model and its extensions is compromised by the presence of large nonperturbative effects. We examine the possible discovery windows in which short-distance physics can be tested and study the effects of various extensions of the standard model. The current experimental situation and future prospects are reviewed.

  9. Towards an understanding of the new charm and charm-strange mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrey, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    The observation of the DsJ*(2317), DsJ(2460), and SELEX DsJ*(2632) states with properties differing considerably from what was expected has led to a renewed interest in hadron spectroscopy. In addition to these states, non-strange partners of the DsJ states have also been observed. Understanding the D0* and D1' states can provide important insights into the DsJ states. In this contribution I examine quark model predictions for the D0* and D1' states and discuss experimental measurements that can shed light on them. I find that these states are well described as the broad, j = 1/2 non-strange charmed P-wave mesons. In the latter part of this writeup I discuss the cbar s possibilities for the SELEX DsJ*(2632) and measurements that can shed light on it.

  10. Proposed Standards for Variable Harmonization Documentation and Referencing: A Case Study Using QuickCharmStats 1.1.

    PubMed

    Winters, Kristi; Netscher, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Comparative statistical analyses often require data harmonization, yet the social sciences do not have clear operationalization frameworks that guide and homogenize variable coding decisions across disciplines. When faced with a need to harmonize variables researchers often look for guidance from various international studies that employ output harmonization, such as the Comparative Survey of Election Studies, which offer recoding structures for the same variable (e.g. marital status). More problematically there are no agreed documentation standards or journal requirements for reporting variable harmonization to facilitate a transparent replication process. We propose a conceptual and data-driven digital solution that creates harmonization documentation standards for publication and scholarly citation: QuickCharmStats 1.1. It is free and open-source software that allows for the organizing, documenting and publishing of data harmonization projects. QuickCharmStats starts at the conceptual level and its workflow ends with a variable recording syntax. It is therefore flexible enough to reflect a variety of theoretical justifications for variable harmonization. Using the socio-demographic variable 'marital status', we demonstrate how the CharmStats workflow collates metadata while being guided by the scientific standards of transparency and replication. It encourages researchers to publish their harmonization work by providing researchers who complete the peer review process a permanent identifier. Those who contribute original data harmonization work to their discipline can now be credited through citations. Finally, we propose peer-review standards for harmonization documentation, describe a route to online publishing, and provide a referencing format to cite harmonization projects. Although CharmStats products are designed for social scientists our adherence to the scientific method ensures our products can be used by researchers across the sciences. PMID:26859494

  11. Proposed Standards for Variable Harmonization Documentation and Referencing: A Case Study Using QuickCharmStats 1.1

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Kristi; Netscher, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Comparative statistical analyses often require data harmonization, yet the social sciences do not have clear operationalization frameworks that guide and homogenize variable coding decisions across disciplines. When faced with a need to harmonize variables researchers often look for guidance from various international studies that employ output harmonization, such as the Comparative Survey of Election Studies, which offer recoding structures for the same variable (e.g. marital status). More problematically there are no agreed documentation standards or journal requirements for reporting variable harmonization to facilitate a transparent replication process. We propose a conceptual and data-driven digital solution that creates harmonization documentation standards for publication and scholarly citation: QuickCharmStats 1.1. It is free and open-source software that allows for the organizing, documenting and publishing of data harmonization projects. QuickCharmStats starts at the conceptual level and its workflow ends with a variable recording syntax. It is therefore flexible enough to reflect a variety of theoretical justifications for variable harmonization. Using the socio-demographic variable ‘marital status’, we demonstrate how the CharmStats workflow collates metadata while being guided by the scientific standards of transparency and replication. It encourages researchers to publish their harmonization work by providing researchers who complete the peer review process a permanent identifier. Those who contribute original data harmonization work to their discipline can now be credited through citations. Finally, we propose peer-review standards for harmonization documentation, describe a route to online publishing, and provide a referencing format to cite harmonization projects. Although CharmStats products are designed for social scientists our adherence to the scientific method ensures our products can be used by researchers across the sciences. PMID

  12. Single electron yields from semileptonic charm and bottom hadron decays in Au +Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, S.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isinhue, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Krizek, F.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Maruyama, T.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Midori, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nukariya, A.; Nyanin, A. S.; Obayashi, H.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seidl, R.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Voas, B.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Whitaker, S.; White, A. S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The PHENIX Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured open heavy flavor production in minimum bias Au +Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV via the yields of electrons from semileptonic decays of charm and bottom hadrons. Previous heavy flavor electron measurements indicated substantial modification in the momentum distribution of the parent heavy quarks owing to the quark-gluon plasma created in these collisions. For the first time, using the PHENIX silicon vertex detector to measure precision displaced tracking, the relative contributions from charm and bottom hadrons to these electrons as a function of transverse momentum are measured in Au +Au collisions. We compare the fraction of electrons from bottom hadrons to previously published results extracted from electron-hadron correlations in p +p collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV and find the fractions to be similar within the large uncertainties on both measurements for pT>4 GeV/c . We use the bottom electron fractions in Au +Au and p +p along with the previously measured heavy flavor electron RA A to calculate the RA A for electrons from charm and bottom hadron decays separately. We find that electrons from bottom hadron decays are less suppressed than those from charm for the region 3

  13. Search for a strongly decaying neutral charmed pentaquark

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P.; /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol. /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez /South Carolina U. /Tennessee U. /Vanderbilt U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-06-01

    We present a search for a charmed pentaquark decaying strongly to D{sup (*)}-p. Finding no evidence for such a state, we set limits on the cross section times branching ratio relative to D*{sup -} and D{sup -} under particular assumptions about the production mechanism.

  14. Charm and Charmonium Spectroscopy in BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Negrini, M.; /Ferrara U.

    2008-02-06

    The BABAR experiment at the PEP-II B-factory offers excellent opportunities in charm and charmonium spectroscopy. The recent observation of new states in the D{sub s} and in the charmonium mass regions revived the interest in this field. Recent BABAR results are presented.

  15. Enhancement of new physics signal sensitivity with mistagged charm quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doojin; Park, Myeonghun

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the potential for enhancing search sensitivity for signals having charm quarks in the final state, using the sizable bottom-mistagging rate for charm quarks at the LHC. Provided that the relevant background processes contain light quarks instead of charm quarks, the application of b-tagging on charm quark-initiated jets enables us to reject more background events than signal ones due to the relatively small mistagging rate for light quarks. The basic idea is tested with two rare top decay processes: i) t → ch → cb b bar and ii) t → bH+ → b b bar c where h and H+ denote the Standard Model-like higgs boson and a charged higgs boson, respectively. The major background source is a hadronic top quark decay such as t → bW+ → b s bar c. We test our method with Monte Carlo simulation at the LHC 14 TeV, and find that the signal-over-background ratio can be increased by a factor of O (6- 7) with a suitably designed (heavy) flavor tagging algorithm and scheme.

  16. Medical treatment and medicinal charms mentioned in the atharvanic literature.

    PubMed

    Bhide, V V

    1981-07-01

    The ancient Vedic texts Provides us with valuable information and guide lines on various multi-faced aspects of human life. The present discussion is limited to the medical treatment and medicinal charms mentioned in the Atharvanic literature with specific consideration to Kausikasutra for better understanding of the rites and actions mentioned in Atharvanaveda. PMID:22556455

  17. Charm and beauty measurements at Fermilab fixed target

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, C.S.

    1993-10-01

    Eighteen months after a successful run of the Fermilab fixed target program, interesting results from several experiments are available. This is the first time that more than one Fermilab fixed target experiment has reported the observation of beauty mesons. In this paper we review recent results from charm and beauty fixed target experiments at Fermilab.

  18. Role of 'intrinsic charm' in semileptonic B-meson decays

    SciTech Connect

    Breidenbach, C.; Feldmann, T.; Turczyk, S.; Mannel, T.

    2008-07-01

    We discuss the role of so-called 'intrinsic-charm' operators in semileptonic B-meson decays, which appear first at order 1/m{sub b}{sup 3} in the heavy quark expansion. We show by explicit calculation that - at scales {mu}{<=}m{sub c} - the contributions from 'intrinsic-charm' effects can be absorbed into short-distance coefficient functions multiplying, for instance, the Darwin term. Then, the only remnant of 'intrinsic charm' are logarithms of the form ln(m{sub c}{sup 2}/m{sub b}{sup 2}), which can be resummed by using renormalization-group techniques. As long as the dynamics at the charm-quark scale is perturbative, {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub c})<<1, this implies that no additional nonperturbative matrix elements aside from the Darwin and the spin-orbit term have to be introduced at order 1/m{sub b}{sup 3}. Hence, no sources for additional hadronic uncertainties have to be taken into account. Similar arguments may be made for higher orders in the 1/m{sub b} expansion.

  19. The energy dependence of the total charm cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R

    2007-10-18

    We discuss the energy dependence of the total charm cross section and some of its theoretical uncertainties including the quark mass, scale choice and the parton densities. We compare the next-to-leading order calculation of the total cross section with results obtained using PYTHIA.

  20. Recognition Failure and the Composite Memory Trace in CHARM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalfe, Janet

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between recognition and recall, especially the orderly recognition-failure function relating recognition and the recognizability of recallable words, was investigated using a composite holographic associative recall-recognition memory model (CHARM) in 10 series of computer simulations. Support for the model is demonstrated. (SLD)

  1. Lattice considerations for a tau-charm factory

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.; Crosbie, E.A.

    1995-06-01

    The magnet lattice appropriate for a tau-charm factory had been studied extensively. Here we discuss two possible simplifying features which make the design, construction, and operation of the machine simpler without sacrificing performance. These two features may be characterized and identified as (a) luminosity optimization in the ``monochromatic`` mode, and (b) chromaticity correction with sextupoles only in the arcs.

  2. Final state interaction for non-leptonic exclusive charm decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccella, F.

    2001-12-01

    An approach to the PP and PV exclusive channel for non-leptonic charmed decays, where final state interaction and annihilation contributions play an important role and account for the large SU(3) violations found experimentally, is compared with the most recent and more precise experimental results. The test is particularly successful for the Cabibbo first forbidden rates.

  3. Openings

    PubMed Central

    Selwyn, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing his clinic patient schedule for the day, a physician reflects on the history of a young woman he has been caring for over the past 9 years. What starts out as a routine visit then turns into a unique opening for communication and connection. A chance glimpse out the window of the exam room leads to a deeper meditation on parenthood, survival, and healing, not only for the patient but also for the physician. How many missed opportunities have we all had, without even realizing it, to allow this kind of fleeting but profound opening? PMID:26195687

  4. Openings.

    PubMed

    Selwyn, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing his clinic patient schedule for the day, a physician reflects on the history of a young woman he has been caring for over the past 9 years. What starts out as a routine visit then turns into a unique opening for communication and connection. A chance glimpse out the window of the exam room leads to a deeper meditation on parenthood, survival, and healing, not only for the patient but also for the physician. How many missed opportunities have we all had, without even realizing it, to allow this kind of fleeting but profound opening? PMID:26195687

  5. Why most flavor-dependence predictions for nonleptonic charm decays are wrong: flavor symmetry and final-state interactions in nonleptonic decays of charmed hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1980-09-01

    Nonleptonic weak decays of strange hadrons are complicated by the interplay of weak and strong interactions. Models based either on symmetry properties or on the selection of certain types of diagrams are both open to criticism. The symmetries used are all broken in strong interactions, and the selection of some diagrams and neglect of others is never seriously justified. Furthermore, the number of related decays of strange hadrons is small, so that experimental data are insufficient for singificant tests of phenomenological models with a few free parameters. The discovery of charmed particles with many open channels for nonleptonic decays has provided a new impetus for a theoretical understanding of these processes. The GIM current provides a well defined weak hamiltonian, which can justifiably be used to first order. The QCD approach to strong interactions gives flavor-indpendent couplings and flavor symmetry broken only by quark masses. In a model with n generations of quarks and 2n flavors, a flavor symmetry group SU(2n) can be defined which is broken only by H/sub weak/ and the quark masses.Here again, the same two approaches by symmetry and dynamics have been used. But both types of treatment tend to consider only the symmetry properties or dominant diagrams of the weak interaction, including some subtle effects, while overlooking rather obvious effects of strong interactions.

  6. CHARMS: The Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Bradley; Leviton, Douglas

    2004-01-01

    The success of numerous upcoming NASA infrared (IR) missions will rely critically on accurate knowledge of the IR refractive indices of their constituent optical components at design operating temperatures. To satisfy the demand for such data, we have built a Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS), which, for typical 1R materials. can measure the index of refraction accurate to (+ or -) 5 x 10sup -3 . This versatile, one-of-a-kind facility can also measure refractive index over a wide range of wavelengths, from 0.105 um in the far-ultraviolet to 6 um in the IR, and over a wide range of temperatures, from 10 K to 100 degrees C, all with comparable accuracies. We first summarize the technical challenges we faced and engineering solutions we developed during the construction of CHARMS. Next we present our "first light," index of refraction data for fused silica and compare our data to previously published results.

  7. The consideration of Tau-Charm Factory construction in China

    SciTech Connect

    Zhipeng, Zheng

    1994-10-01

    This paper presents a proposal to extend the present Beijing Electron Positron Collider into a Tau Charm Factory. To achieve this aim the author points out that a number of things need to come together, and to be successfully communicated to the Chinese government. Such a machine is a logical extension of the present BEPC device. The physics which can be accomplished at such a device, is important, and cannot be duplicated in planned meson factories, due to the presence of resonances and thresholds which allow minimization of systematic errors. The author stresses the need for international coorperation on this project, to have hope of it coming to fruition. The whole concept of such a Tau Charm Factory needs more support from the high energy physics community.

  8. Anomalies in cosmic rays: New particles versus charm?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balayan, G. L.; Khodjamirian, A. Y.; Oganessian, A. G.

    1985-01-01

    For a long time two anomalies are observed in cosmic rays at energies E approx. = 100 TeV: (1) the generation of long-flying cascades in the hadron calorimeter (the so-called Tien-Shan effect) and; (2) the enhancement of direct muon yield as compared with the accelerator energy region. The aim is to discuss the possibility that both anomalies have common origins arising from production and decays of the same particles. the main conclusions are the following: (1) direct muons cannot be generated by any new particles with mass exceeding 10+20 GeV; and (2) if both effects are originated from the charmed hadrons, then the needed charm hadroproduction cross section is unexpectedly large as compared with the quark-gluon model predictions.

  9. New results in charm meson spectroscopy from FOCUS and SELEX

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Peter S.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    I will review recent results in charmed meson spectroscopy from the Fermilab fixed target charm photo-production and hadro-production experiments, FOCUS and SELEX. FOCUS reports new measurements of the masses and widths of the D*{sub 2}{sup +} and D*{sub 2} mesons, evidence for D*{sub 0}{sup +} and D*{sub 0} broad states and a confirming observation of the D{sub sJ}{sup +}(2317) and other recently observed high mass D{sub sJ}{sup +} states. SELEX has recently reported evidence for a new D{sub sJ}{sup +}(2632) state in both the D{sub s}{sup +} {eta}{sup 0} and D{sup 0}K{sup +} final states.

  10. Fragmentation production of charmed hadrons in electron-positron annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Novoselov, A. A.

    2010-10-15

    Processes involving the production of D* mesons and {Lambda}{sub c} baryons in electron-positron annihilation at the energies of 10.58 and 91.18 GeV are considered. At the energy of 10.58 GeV, the production of pairs of B mesons that is followed by their decay to charmed particles is analyzed along with direct charm production. The violation of scaling in the respective fragmentation functions is taken into account in the next-to-leading-logarithmic approximation of perturbative QCD. The required nonperturbative fragmentation functions are extracted numerically from experimental data obtained at B factories and are approximated by simple analytic expressions. It is shown that the difference in the nonperturbative fragmentation functions for transitions to mesons and baryons can readily be explained on the basis of the quark-counting rules.

  11. Prediction of narrow N* and {Lambda}* with hidden charm

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jiajun; Molina, R.; Oset, E.; Zou, B. S.

    2011-10-24

    The interaction between various charmed mesons and charmed baryons, such as D-bar{Sigma}{sub c}-D-bar{Lambda}{sub c}, D-bar*{Sigma}{sub c}-D-bar*{Lambda}{sub c}, and related strangeness channels, are studied within the framework of the coupled channel unitary approach with the local hidden gauge formalism. Six narrow N* and {Lambda}* resonances are dynamically generated with mass above 4 GeV and width smaller than 100 MeV. These predicted new resonances definitely cannot be accommodated by quark models with three constituent quarks. We make estimates of production cross sections of these predicted resonances in p-barp collisions for PANDA at the forthcoming FAIR facility.

  12. Semileptonic B and Bs decays into orbitally excited charmed mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segovia, J.; Albertus, C.; Entem, D. R.; Fernández, F.; Hernández, E.; Pérez-García, M. A.

    2011-11-01

    The BABAR Collaboration has recently reported products of branching fractions that include B meson semileptonic decays into final states with charged and neutral D1(2420) and D2*(2460), two narrow orbitally excited charmed mesons. We evaluate these branching fractions, together with those concerning D0*(2400) and D1'(2430) mesons, within the framework of a constituent quark model. The calculation is performed in two steps, one of which involves a semileptonic decay and the other is mediated by a strong process. Our results are in agreement with the experimental data. We also extend the study to semileptonic decays of Bs into orbitally excited charmed-strange mesons, providing predictions to the possible measurements to be carried out at LHC.

  13. On charm decays: Present status and future goals

    SciTech Connect

    Bigi, I.I.

    1987-06-01

    After a qualitative introduction into the dynamics underlying charm decays the author describes in some detail three different theoretical treatments: the Stech et al. description based on factorization, the 1/N approach and an ansatz employing QCD sum rules. The overall agreement of the emerging theoretical picture with the data is rather encouraging and indicates that the effects of hadronization on these decays are under reasonable control. Yet more and more detailed data are needed to confirm (hopefully) this simple picture. The author lists the processes most relevant in this respect and emphasizes the need for increasing our theoretical sophistication. Once this is achieved we have on one hand acquired the theoretical tools to deal with B physics; on the other hand we will then be ready to exploit charm physics to the fullest in searching for exotic D decays, D/sup 0/ - anti D/sup 0/ mixing and CP violation.

  14. Combined analysis of charm-quark fragmentation-fraction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Verbytskyi, Andrii; Zenaiev, Oleksandr

    2016-07-01

    A summary of measurements of the fragmentation of charm quarks into a specific hadron is given. Measurements performed in photoproduction and deep inelastic scattering in e± p, pp and e+e‒ collisions are compared, using up-to-date branching ratios. Within uncertainties, all measurements agree, supporting the hypothesis that fragmentation is independent of the specific production process. Averages of the fragmentation fractions over all measurements are presented. The average has significantly reduced uncertainties compared to individual measurements.

  15. On charm and beauty decays: A theorist's perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Bigi, I.I.

    1987-10-01

    The present understanding of charm and bottom decays is reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on discussing the theoretical uncertainties in view of the particularly rich harvest of new data from the last year. A semi-quantitative description of D decays has emerged enabling us to address rather detailed and relatively subtle questions there, like on once and twice Cabibbo suppressed decays. Beauty physics having left its infancy is now in its adolescence; its future development towards maturity is analyzed.

  16. Hadron spectroscopy from strangeness to charm and beauty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, B. S.

    2013-09-01

    Quarks of different flavors have different masses, which will cause breaking of flavor symmetries of QCD. Flavor symmetries and their breaking in hadron spectroscopy play important role for understanding the internal structures of hadrons. Hadron spectroscopy with strangeness reveals the importance of unquenched quark dynamics. Systematic study of hadron spectroscopy with strange, charm and beauty quarks would be very revealing and essential for understanding the internal structure of hadrons and its underlying quark dynamics.

  17. Charmed Meson Production in 800 GEV Proton-Proton Interactions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senko, Mark Frederick

    The purpose of this dissertation is to present the results of a study concerning the energy dependence of charmed meson production properties as a test of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). This experiment was performed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, using a rapid cycling bubble chamber (LEBC) as a hydrogen target and high resolution vertex detector, in combination with the Fermilab Multiparticle Spectrometer (FMPS). The multiplicity trigger was unbiased, and spectrometer acceptance was good at x_ {F} >=q 0. A comparison of the results from previous experiments at center of mass energies sqrt{s} <=q 27 GeV and sqrt {s} >=q 53 GeV implies a total charm particle production cross section which rises rapidly as a function of sqrt{s} . The result of our experiment, sigma (D/| D) = 42.7 +/- 7.8 mub at sqrt{s} = 38 GeV, indicates a slower rise, in agreement with QCD predictions. A maximum likelihood fit to the parameterization of the differential cross section as d^2sigma/dx_{F}dp _sp{|}{2} ~ (1 - | x_{F }|)^{n}e^{-bp _sp{|}{2}} gives the results n = 8.4_sp {-1.9}{+2.2}, b = 0.78_sp{-0.16}{+0.19} (GeV/c)^{-2}, and < pbot > = 1.1_sp{-0.1}{+0.2} GeV/c. When compared with results from the lower energy experiments, these values indicate charm production becoming more central and < pbot > being consistent with the charmed quark mass. These results are once again consistent with QCD predictions. Lastly, analysis has shown that sigma(D ^*^+/-)/sigma(D^0) is governed primarily by spin statistics, displaying no energy dependence. The resulting cross section for D^*^+/- production is sigma(D^*^+/-) = 13.31 +/- 5.74 mub.

  18. Analysis of charm pair production at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, D.; Brook, N. H.

    2016-01-01

    The Dokshitzer, Gribov, Lipatov, Alterelli, Parisi and Ciafaloni, Catani, Fiorani, Marchesini approaches to perturbative QCD evolution have been investigated by examining correlations of charmed hadron pairs in pp collisions at \\sqrt{s}=7 TeV. The theoretical models are compared to the data taken by the LHCb experiment. Differences in the parton kinematics between the two approaches are discussed. In general a model incorporating next-leading-order diagrams matched to parton showers describes the data best.

  19. Hadronic decays of beauty and charm from CLEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jorge L.

    1999-02-01

    A selection of recent results on hadronic charm and beauty decays from the CLEO experiment are presented. We report preliminary evidence for the existence of final state interactions in B decays and the first observation of the decay B0→D*+D*- with a branching fraction of (7.8-3.8+5.4±1.5)×10-4. We also present preliminary results on the first observation of the broad, JP=1+, charmed meson resonance with a mass of mD1(j=1/2)0=2.461-0.34+0.41±0.010±0.032 GeV and a width of Γ=290-79+101±26±36 MeV and branching fraction measurements of the B-→DJ0π-1 decay. Finally, we report on our search for the radial excitation of a spin 1 charmed meson, the D*'1, and on an improved measurement of the ratio of decay rates Γ(D0→K+π-)/Γ(D0→K-π+).

  20. Constraining the charm Yukawa and Higgs-quark coupling universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Gilad; Soreq, Yotam; Stamou, Emmanuel; Tobioka, Kohsaku

    2015-08-01

    We introduce four different types of data-driven analyses with different levels of robustness that constrain the size of the Higgs-charm Yukawa coupling: (i) Recasting the vector-boson associated V h analyses that search for the bottom-pair final state. We use this mode to directly and model independently constrain the Higgs-to-charm coupling, yc/ycSM≲234 . (ii) The direct measurement of the total width, yc/ycSM≲120 - 140 . (iii) The search for h →J /ψ γ , yc/ycSM≲220 . (iv) A global fit to the Higgs signal strengths, yc/ycSM≲6.2 . A comparison with t t ¯h data allows us to show that the Higgs does not couple to quarks in a universal way, as is expected in the Standard Model. Finally, we demonstrate how the experimental collaborations can further improve our direct bound by roughly an order of magnitude by charm tagging, as is already used in new-physics searches.

  1. B, Lambda{sub b} and charm results from the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    F. Azfar

    2003-09-18

    Recent results on B{sub d}, B{sub u}{sup {+-}}, B{sub s}, {Lambda}{sub b} and Charm hadrons are reported from {approx} 75 pb{sup -1} and {approx} 40 pb{sup -1} of data accumulated at the upgraded CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron {bar p}-p collider, during Run-II. These include lifetime and mass measurements of B and Charm hadrons, searches for rare decays in charm and B hadrons and CP-violation in Charm decays. Results relevant to CP-violation in B-decays are also reported.

  2. The QCD equation of state with charm quarks from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Michael

    Recently, there have been several calculations of the QCD equation of state (EoS) on the lattice. These calculations take into account the two light quarks and the strange quark, but have ignored the effects of the charm quark, assuming that the charm mass (mc ≈ 1300 MeV) is exponentially suppressed at the temperatures which are explored. However, future heavy ion collisions, such as those planned at the LHC, may well probe temperature regimes where the charm quarks play an important role in the dynamics of the QGP. We present a calculation of the charm quark contribution to the QCD EoS using p4-improved staggered fermions at Nt = 4, 6, 8. This calculation is done with a quenched charm quark, i.e. the relevant operators are measured using a valence charm quark mass on a 2+1 flavor gauge field background. The charm quark masses are determined by calculating charmonium masses (metac and mJ/Psi) and fixing these mesons to their physical masses. The interaction measure, pressure, energy density, and entropy density are calculated. We find that the charm contribution makes a significant contribution, even down to temperatures as low as the pseudo-critical temperature, Tc. However, there are significant scaling corrections at the lattice spacings that we use, preventing a reliable continuum extrapolation.

  3. Indirect evidences for existence of exotic mesons in hadronic weak decays of K and charm mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Terasaki, K.

    1998-05-29

    It is demonstrated that hadronic weak decays of K and charm mesons are intimately related to hadron spectroscopy. Long standing puzzles in hadronic weak decays of charm mesons can be solved by taking account of dynamical contributions of various hadrons including non-qq-bar mesons.

  4. Excelling at selling: The charming personality style predicts occupational activities, sales performance, and persuasive competence.

    PubMed

    Kazén, Miguel; Kuhl, Julius; Boermans, Sylvie; Koole, Sander L

    2013-08-01

    The present research investigates how individual differences in charming personality are related to occupational activities, sales performance, and persuasive competence. Study 1 showed that sales representatives had higher scores on the charming personality style than executive managers. Study 2 showed that the charming personality style predicted actual sales performance among branch managers of a large German insurance company over a period of 2 years; the explicit power motivation served as a mediator in this relation. Finally, Study 3, carried out in a laboratory setting, confirmed the hypothesis that a charming personality is associated with persuasive competence, which suggests that this style is more relevant for sales representatives than for executive managers. The authors conclude that the charming personality style represents an important psychological resource for organizations. PMID:26271180

  5. Spectroscopy of triply charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2014-10-14

    The spectrum of excitations of triply-charmed baryons is computed using lattice QCD including dynamical light quark fields. The spectrum obtained has baryonic states with well-defined total spin up to 7/2 and the low-lying states closely resemble the expectation from models with an SU(6) x O(3) symmetry. As a result, energy splittings between extracted states, including those due to spin-orbit coupling in the heavy quark limit are computed and compared against data at other quark masses.

  6. Intrinsic charm in a matched general-mass scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Richard D.; Bertone, Valerio; Bonvini, Marco; Forte, Stefano; Groth Merrild, Patrick; Rojo, Juan; Rottoli, Luca

    2016-03-01

    The FONLL general-mass variable-flavour number scheme provides a framework for the matching of a calculation in which a heavy quark is treated as a massless parton to one in which the mass dependence is retained throughout. We describe how the usual formulation of FONLL can be extended in such a way that the heavy quark parton distribution functions are freely parameterized at some initial scale, rather than being generated entirely perturbatively. We specifically consider the case of deep-inelastic scattering, in view of applications to PDF determination, and the possible impact of a fitted charm quark distribution on F2c is assessed.

  7. Evidence for a narrow anti-charmed baryon state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Asmone, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bähr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J. C.; Böhme, J.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brisson, V.; Bröker, H.-B.; Brown, D. P.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J. G.; Coppens, Y. R.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cox, B. E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y. H.; Flucke, G.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formánek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garutti, E.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Grab, C.; Grässler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grindhammer, G.; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Heuer, R.-D.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Höting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Koblitz, B.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Kückens, J.; Kuhr, T.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leißner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lueders, H.; Lüke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michine, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz, I.; Milstead, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morozov, I.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Ossoskov, G.; Ozerov, D.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakyt≐, R.; Pöschl, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Raicevic, N.; Ratiani, Z.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauvan, E.; Schätzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlák, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, M.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Winter, G.-G.; Wissing, Ch.; Woehrling, E.-E.; Wolf, R.; Wünsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; H1 Collaboration

    2004-05-01

    A narrow resonance in D∗ -p and D∗ +p¯ invariant mass combinations is observed in inelastic electron-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 300 GeV and 320 GeV at HERA. The resonance has a mass of 3099±3(stat.)±5(syst.) MeV and a measured Gaussian width of 12±3(stat.) MeV, compatible with the experimental resolution. The resonance is interpreted as an anti-charmed baryon with a minimal constituent quark composition of uuddc¯, together with the charge conjugate.

  8. Heavy-light charm mesons spectroscopy and decay widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Alka; Batra, Meenakshi; Gupta, Pallavi

    2016-05-01

    We present the mass formula for heavy-light charm meson at one loop, using heavy quark effective theory. Formulating an effective Lagrangian, the masses of the ground state heavy mesons have been studied in the heavy quark limit, including leading corrections from finite heavy quark masses and nonzero light quark masses, using a constrained fit for the eight equations with 11 parameters including three coupling constants g, h, and g^' }. Masses determined using this approach are fitted to the experimentally known decay widths to estimate the strong coupling constants, showing a better match with available theoretical and experimental data.

  9. Diffusion of hidden charm mesons in hadronic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sukanya; Ghosh, Sabyasachi; Das, Santosh K.; Sarkar, Sourav; Alam, Jan-e.

    2016-07-01

    The drag and diffusion coefficients of a hot hadronic medium have been evaluated by using hidden charm mesons as probes. The scattering amplitudes required for the evaluation of these coefficients are calculated using an effective theory and scattering lengths obtained from lattice QCD calculations. It is found that although the magnitude of the transport coefficients are small their temperature variation is strong. The insignificant momentum diffusion of J / ψ in the hadronic medium keeps their momentum distribution largely unaltered. Therefore, the task of characterization of quark gluon plasma by using the observed suppression of J / ψ at high momentum will be comparatively easier.

  10. Charmed-strange meson spectrum: Old and new problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segovia, Jorge; Entem, David R.; Fernández, Francisco

    2015-05-01

    The LHCb Collaboration has recently reported the observation for the first time of a spin-3 resonance in the heavy quark sector. They have shown that the D¯0K- structure seen in the Bs0→D¯0K-π+ reaction and with invariant mass 2.86 GeV is an admixture of a spin-1 and a spin-3 resonance. Motivated by the good agreement between our theoretical predictions some time ago and the properties extracted from the experiment of the Ds1 *(2860 ) and Ds3 *(2860 ) states, we perform an extension of the study of the strong decay properties of the DsJ *(2860 ) and present the same analysis for the Ds1 *(2700 ) and Ds J(3040 ) mesons. This provides a unified and simultaneous description of the three higher excited charmed-strange resonances observed until now. For completeness, we present theoretical results for masses and strong decays of the low-lying charmed-strange mesons and those experimental missing states which belong to the spin multiplets of the discovered Ds1 *(2700 ), DsJ *(2860 ) and Ds J(3040 ) resonances. The theoretical framework used is a constituent quark model which successfully describes hadron phenomenology from light to heavy quark sectors.

  11. The Experimental Discovery of Double-Charm Baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelfried, Jürgen; Selex Collaboration

    2005-04-01

    In 2002, the SELEX [The SELEX (Fermilab E781) Collaboration: Ball State University, Bogazici University, Carnegie-Mellon University, Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Fermilab, Institute For High Energy Physics (Protvino), Institute of High Energy Physics (Beijing), Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Moscow), Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Tel Aviv University, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, University of Iowa, University of Michigan-Flint, University of Rochester, University of Rome La Sapienza and INFN, University of São Paulo, University of Trieste and INFN. http://www-selex.fnal.gov] Experiment (Fermilab E781) reported the first observation of a member of the family of doubly charmed baryons [SELEX Collaboration, M. Mattson et al.: First observation of the doubly charmed baryonΞcc+. Phys. Rev. Letters 89 (2002) 112001, [ arXiv:hep-ex/0208014

  12. Charmed baryon strong decays in a chiral quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong Xianhui; Zhao Qiang

    2008-04-01

    Charmed baryon strong decays are studied in a chiral quark model. The data for the decays of {lambda}{sub c}{sup +}(2593), {lambda}{sub c}{sup +}(2625), {sigma}{sub c}{sup ++,+,0}, and {sigma}{sub c}{sup +,0}(2520) are accounted for successfully, which allows one to fix the pseudoscalar-meson-quark couplings in an effective chiral Lagrangian. Extending this framework to analyze the strong decays of the newly observed charmed baryons, we classify that {lambda}{sub c}(2880) and {lambda}{sub c}(2940) as D-wave states in the N=2 shell; {lambda}{sub c}(2880) could be |{lambda}{sub c}{sup 2}D{sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}(3/2){sup +}> and {lambda}{sub c}(2940) could be |{lambda}{sub c}{sup 2}D{sub {lambda}}{sub {lambda}}(5/2){sup +}>. Our calculation also suggests that {lambda}{sub c}(2765) is very likely a {rho}-mode P-wave excited state in the N=1 shell, and favors a |{lambda}{sub c}{sup 4}P{sub {rho}}(1/2){sup -}> configuration. The {sigma}{sub c}(2800) favors being a |{sigma}{sub c}{sup 2}P{sub {lambda}}(1/2){sup -}> state. But its being |{sigma}{sub c}{sup ++4}P{sub {lambda}}(5/2){sup -}> cannot be ruled out.

  13. Spectroscopy of doubly charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2015-05-06

    This study presents the ground and excited state spectra of doubly charmed baryons from lattice QCD with dynamical quark fields. Calculations are performed on anisotropic lattices of size 16³ × 128, with inverse spacing in temporal direction at⁻¹=5.67(4) GeV and with a pion mass of about 390 MeV. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice yet which retain a memory of their continuum analogues are used. These operators transform as irreducible representations of SU(3)F symmetry for flavor, SU(4) symmetry for Dirac spins of quarks and O(3) for spatial symmetry. The distillation method is utilized to generate baryon correlation functions which are analyzed using the variational fitting method to extract excited states. The lattice spectra obtained have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the pattern of low-lying states does not support the diquark picture for doubly charmed baryons. On the contrary the calculated spectra are remarkably similar to the expectations from models with an SU(6)×O(3) symmetry. Various spin-dependent energy splittings between the extracted states are also evaluated.

  14. Hints for Enhanced b -> sg From Charm and Kaon Counting

    SciTech Connect

    Rathsman, Johan

    2003-05-09

    Previously, motivation for enhanced b {yields} sg from new flavor physics has centered on discrepancies between theory and experiment. Here two experimental hints are considered: (1) updated measurements of the charm multiplicity and {Beta}({bar B} {yields} X{sub c{bar c}s}) at the {Upsilon}(4S) imply {Beta}(B {yields} X{sub no charm}) {approx} 12.4 {+-} 5.6%, (2) the {bar B} {yields} K{sup -}X and {bar B} {yields} K{sup +}/K{sup -}X branching fractions are in excess of conventional {bar B} {yields} X{sub c} {yields} KX yields by about 16.9 {+-} 5.6% and 18 {+-} 5.3%, respectively. JETSET 7.4 was used to estimate kaon yields from s{bar s} popping in {bar B} {yields} X{sub c{bar u}d} decays. JETSET 7.4 Monte Carlos for {Beta}({bar B} {yields} X{sub sg}) {approx} 15% imply that the additional kaon production would lead to 1{sigma} agreement with observed charged and neutral kaon yields. The K{sub s} momentum spectrum would be consistent with recent CLEO bounds in the end point region. Search strategies for enhanced b {yields} sg are discussed in light of large theoretical uncertainty in the standard model fast kaon background from b {yields} s penguin operators.

  15. Charmed tetraquarks Tcc and Tcs from dynamical lattice QCD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yoichi; Charron, Bruno; Aoki, Sinya; Doi, Takumi; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Inoue, Takashi; Ishii, Noriyoshi; Murano, Keiko; Nemura, Hidekatsu; Sasaki, Kenji

    2014-02-01

    Charmed tetraquarks Tcc=(ccubardbar) and Tcs=(csubardbar) are studied through the S-wave meson-meson interactions, D-D, Kbar-D, D-D* and Kbar-D*, on the basis of the (2+1)-flavor lattice QCD simulations with the pion mass mπ≃410, 570 and 700 MeV. For the charm quark, the relativistic heavy quark action is employed to treat its dynamics on the lattice. Using the HAL QCD method, we extract the S-wave potentials in lattice QCD simulations, from which the meson-meson scattering phase shifts are calculated. The phase shifts in the isospin triplet (I=1) channels indicate repulsive interactions, while those in the I=0 channels suggest attraction, growing as mπ decreases. This is particularly prominent in the Tcc (JP=1+,I=0) channel, though neither bound state nor resonance are found in the range mπ=410-700 MeV. We make a qualitative comparison of our results with the phenomenological diquark picture.

  16. Searches for Rare or Forbidden Semileptonic Charm Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.

    2011-08-15

    We present searches for rare or forbidden charm decays of the form X{sub c}{sup +} {yields} h{sup {+-}}{ell}{sup {-+}}{ell}{sup ({prime})+}, where X{sub c}{sup +} is a charm hardron (D{sup +}, D{sub s}{sup +}, or {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}), h{sup {+-}} is a pion, kaon, or proton, and {ell}{sup ({prime}){+-}} is an electron or muon. The analysis is based on 384 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation data collected at or close to the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. No significant signal is observed for any of the 35 decay modes that are investigated. We establish 90% confidence-level upper limits on the branching fractions between 1 x 10{sup -6} and 44 x 10{sup -6} depending on the channel. In most cases, these results represent either the first limits or significant improvements on existing limits for the decay modes studied.

  17. Spectroscopy of doubly charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael; Hadron Spectrum Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of doubly charmed baryons from lattice QCD with dynamical quark fields. Calculations are performed on anisotropic lattices of size 1 63×128 , with inverse spacing in temporal direction at-1=5.67 (4 ) GeV and with a pion mass of about 390 MeV. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice yet which retain a memory of their continuum analogues are used. These operators transform as irreducible representations of SU(3 ) F symmetry for flavor, SU(4) symmetry for Dirac spins of quarks and O(3) for spatial symmetry. The distillation method is utilized to generate baryon correlation functions which are analyzed using the variational fitting method to extract excited states. The lattice spectra obtained have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7 /2 and the pattern of low-lying states does not support the diquark picture for doubly charmed baryons. On the contrary the calculated spectra are remarkably similar to the expectations from models with an SU (6 )×O (3 ) symmetry. Various spin-dependent energy splittings between the extracted states are also evaluated.

  18. Effect of quark gluon plasma on charm quark produced in relativistic heavy ion collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younus, Mohammed; Srivastava, Dinesh K.; Bass, Steffen A.

    2014-05-01

    Charm quarks are produced mainly in the pre-equilibrium stage of heavy ion collision and serve as excellent probes entering the thermalized medium. They come out with altogether different momenta and energies and fragments into D-mesons and decay into non-photonic electrons which are observed experimentally. Here we present the effect of QGP on charm quark production using two different models: first one based on Wang-Huang-Sarcevic model of multiple scattering of partons and the second one is based on Parton Cascade Model with Boltzmann transport equation used for charm quark evolution in QGP.

  19. Measurement of charm and beauty photoproduction at HERA using D* μ correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bähr, J.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Brown, D. P.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cox, B. E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, W.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y. H.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formánek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, S.; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Goyon, C.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grindhammer, G.; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Kückens, J.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leißner, B.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Lüke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauvan, E.; Schätzel, S.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlák, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, M.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Vujicic, B.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Wigmore, C.; Winter, G.-G.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wünsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, J.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; H1 Collaboration

    2005-08-01

    A measurement of charm and beauty photoproduction at the electron proton collider HERA is presented based on the simultaneous detection of a D*± meson and a muon. The correlation between the D* meson and the muon serves to separate the charm and beauty contributions and the analysis provides comparable sensitivity to both. The total and differential experimental cross sections are compared to LO and NLO QCD calculations. The measured charm cross section is in good agreement with QCD predictions including higher order effects while the beauty cross section is higher.

  20. Measurement of charm and beauty photoproduction at HERA using Dμ correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    H1 Collaboration; Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bähr, J.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Brown, D. P.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cox, B. E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Demirchyan, R.; de Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, W.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y. H.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formánek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, S.; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Goyon, C.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grindhammer, G.; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Kückens, J.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leißner, B.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Lüke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauvan, E.; Schätzel, S.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schröder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlák, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, M.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Vujicic, B.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Wigmore, C.; Winter, G.-G.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wünsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, J.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2005-08-01

    A measurement of charm and beauty photoproduction at the electron proton collider HERA is presented based on the simultaneous detection of a D meson and a muon. The correlation between the D meson and the muon serves to separate the charm and beauty contributions and the analysis provides comparable sensitivity to both. The total and differential experimental cross sections are compared to LO and NLO QCD calculations. The measured charm cross section is in good agreement with QCD predictions including higher order effects while the beauty cross section is higher.

  1. Prediction of Narrow N* and {Lambda}* Resonances with Hidden Charm above 4 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jiajun; Molina, R.; Oset, E.; Zou, B. S.

    2010-12-03

    The interaction between various charmed mesons and charmed baryons is studied within the framework of the coupled-channel unitary approach with the local hidden gauge formalism. Several meson-baryon dynamically generated narrow N{sup *} and {Lambda}{sup *} resonances with hidden charm are predicted with mass above 4 GeV and width smaller than 100 MeV. The predicted new resonances definitely cannot be accommodated by quark models with three constituent quarks and can be looked for in the forthcoming PANDA/FAIR experiments.

  2. Charm physics with a nonperturbatively determined relativistic heavy quark action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huey-Wen

    We explore the methodology of a nonperturbative approach on the lattice to heavy quark calculations. We discuss the application of the regularization-independent (RI) scheme of Rome/Southampton to determining the normalization of heavy quark operators nonperturbatively using the Fermilab action. We study the fermion action needed to accurately describe the low-energy physics of systems including heavy quarks in lattice QCD, even when the heavy fermion mass m is on the order of, or larger than, the inverse lattice spacing: m ≥ 1/a. We carry out an expansion through first order in | p⃗ |a and all orders in ma, refining the analysis of the Fermilab and Tsukuba groups. We demonstrate that the spectrum of heavy quark bound states can be determined accurately through | p⃗ |a and (ma)n for arbitrary exponent n by using a lattice action containing only three unknown coefficients: m0, zeta and cP (a generalization of cSW), which are functions of ma. We propose to determine the coefficients of the relativistic heavy quark action by matching the finite-volume on-shell spectrum with one determined in an exact relativistic theory. The matching relativistic amplitudes may be determined from finite-volume step-scaling recursion. The results will be presented from a step-scaling determination of the coefficients in the relativistic heavy quark action. By matching finite-volume heavy-heavy and heavy-light meson masses, we attempt to determine the three parameters ( m0, zeta, cP) in the on-shell-improved heavy quark action. These calculations are carried out on 163 and 243 spatial volumes for a heavy quark mass approximately that of the charm quark. We use nonperturbative coefficients obtained from the step-scaling method to calculate the charmed meson spectrum on 243, a -1 = 2.4 GeV lattices. The charmonium state masses, including radial excited states, are in reasonable agreement with the experimentally observed spectrum. We find the hyperfine splitting is 77.8(15) MeV with

  3. Pentaquarks from intrinsic charms in Λb decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Y. K.; Geng, C. Q.

    2015-12-01

    We study the three-body Λb decays of Λb → J / ψpM with M =K- and π-. The two new states Pc1 ≡Pc(4380) + and Pc2 ≡Pc(4450) + observed recently as the resonances in the J / ψp invariant mass spectrum of Λb → J / ψpK- can be identified to consist of five quarks, uudc c bar , being consistent with the existence of the pentaquark states. We argue that, in the doubly charmful Λb decays of Λb → J / ψpK- through b → c c bar s, apart from those through the non-resonant Λb → pK- and resonant Λb →Λ* → pK- transitions, the third contribution with the non-factorizable effects is not the dominant part for the resonant Λb →K-P c 1 , c 2 ,P c 1 , c 2 → J / ψp processes, such that we propose that the P c 1 , c 2 productions are mainly from the charmless Λb decays through b → u bar us, in which the c c bar content in P c 1 , c 2 arises from the intrinsic charms within the Λb baryon. We hence predict the observables related to the branching ratios and the direct CP violating asymmetries to be B (Λb →π- (P c 1 , c 2 →) J / ψp) / B (Λb →K- (P c 1 , c 2 →) J / ψp) = 0.58 ± 0.05, ACP (Λb →π- (P c 1 , c 2 →) J / ψp) = (- 7.4 ± 0.9)%, and ACP (Λb →K- (P c 1 , c 2 →) J / ψp) = (+ 6.3 ± 0.2)%, which can alleviate the inconsistency between the theoretical expectations from the three contributions in the doubly charmful Λb decays and the observed data.

  4. Identification of beauty and charm quark jets at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The LHCb Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    Identification of jets originating from beauty and charm quarks is important for measuring Standard Model processes and for searching for new physics. The performance of algorithms developed to select b- and c-quark jets is measured using data recorded by LHCb from proton-proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV in 2011 and at √s = 8 TeV in 2012. The efficiency for identifying a b(c) jet is about 65%(25%) with a probability for misidentifying a light-parton jet of 0.3% for jets with transverse momentum pT > 20GeV and pseudorapidity 2.2 < η < 4.2. The dependence of the performance on the pT and η of the jet is also measured.

  5. Charming CP violation and dipole operators from RS flavor anarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaunay, Cédric; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Perez, Gilad; Randall, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Recently the LHCb collaboration reported evidence for direct CP violation in charm decays. The value is sufficiently large that either substantially enhanced Standard Model contributions or non-Standard Model physics is required to explain it. In the latter case only a limited number of possibilities would be consistent with other existing flavor-changing constraints. We show that warped extra dimensional models that explain the quark spectrum through flavor anarchy can naturally give rise to contributions of the size required to explain the the LHCb result. The D meson asymmetry arises through a sizable CP-violating contribution to a chromomagnetic dipole operator. This happens naturally without introducing inconsistencies with existing constraints in the up quark sector. We discuss some subtleties in the loop calculation that are similar to those in Higgs to γγ. Loop-induced dipole operators in warped scenarios and their composite analogs exhibit non-trivial dependence on the Higgs profile, with the contributions monotonically decreasing when the Higgs is pushed away from the IR brane. We show that the size of the dipole operator quickly saturates as the Higgs profile approaches the IR brane, implying small dependence on the precise details of the Higgs profile when it is quasi IR localized. We also explain why the calculation of the coefficient of the lowest dimension 5D operator is guaranteed to be finite. This is true not only in the charm sector but also with other radiative processes such as electric dipole moments, b → sγ, ɛ '/ ɛ K and μ → eγ. We furthermore discuss the interpretation of this contribution within the framework of partial compositeness in four dimensions and highlight some qualitative differences between the generic result of composite models and that obtained for dynamics that reproduces the warped scenario.

  6. Phenomenological implications of the intrinsic charm in the Z boson production at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailas, G.; Gonçalves, V. P.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we study the Z, Z+ jet, Z+c, and Z+c+ jet production in pp collisions at the LHC considering different models for the intrinsic charm content of the proton. We analyze the impact of the intrinsic charm in the rapidity and transverse momentum distributions for these different processes. Our results indicated that differently from the other processes, the Z+c cross section is strongly affected by the presence of the intrinsic charm. Moreover, we propose the analysis of the ratios R(Z+c/Z) ≡ σ (Z+c)/σ (Z) and R(Z+c/Z+{ jet }) ≡ σ (Z+c)/σ (Z+{ jet }) and we demonstrate that these observables can be used as a probe of the intrinsic charm.

  7. CHARM: A CubeSat Water Vapor Radiometer for Earth Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Boon; Mauro, David; DeRosee, Rodolphe; Sorgenfrei, Matthew; Vance, Steve

    2012-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and Ames Research Center (ARC) are partnering in the CubeSat Hydrometric Atmospheric Radiometer Mission (CHARM), a water vapor radiometer integrated on a 3U CubeSat platform, selected for implementation under NASA Hands-On Project Experience (HOPE-3). CHARM will measure 4 channels at 183 GHz water vapor line, subsets of measurements currently performed by larger and more costly spacecraft (e.g. ATMS, AMSU-B and SSMI/S). While flying a payload that supports SMD science objectives, CHARM provides a hands-on opportunity to develop technical, leadership, and project skills. CHARM will furthermore advance the technology readiness level (TRL) of the 183 GHz receiver subsystem from TRL 4 to TRL 6 and the CubeSat 183 GHz radiometer system from TRL 4 to TRL 7.

  8. Status of the Tau-Charm Factory Project and aspects of the detector design

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, R.H.

    1992-10-01

    This paper reviews the status of the Tau-Charm Factory Project being proposed for construction in Spain. The paper also reviews characteristics of the detector design, and the issues surrounding the present choices of technologies.

  9. Conference summary: 6th International conference on hyperons, charm, and beauty hadrons (BEACH04)

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Joel N.; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    The 6th International Conference on Hyperons, Charm, and Beauty Hadrons (BEACH04) treated us to a wonderful array of new results. Here the author attempts to summarize the talks and discuss the conference highlights.

  10. Mixing and CP violation in the beauty and charm sectors at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López March, Neus

    2014-04-01

    The LHCb detector is a dedicated heavy flavour experiment operating at the Large Hadron Collider designed to pursue an extensive study of CP violation in the beauty and charm sectors. In the first part of this contribution, important milestones towards the measurement of CP violation in the beauty sector using B± and Bs0 decays are presented. In the second part, highlights of the searches of CP violation in the charm sector are reported.

  11. Regarding the Charmed-Strange Member of the 23S1 Meson State

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xue-Chao; Chen, Jing

    2013-01-01

    By employing the mass relations derived from the mass matrix and Regge trajectory, we investigate the masses of charmed and charmed-strange members of the 23S1 meson. The masses are compared with the values predicted by other theoretical approaches and experimental data. The results may be useful for the discovery of the unobserved meson and the determination of the quantum number of the newly discovered states. PMID:24250272

  12. Charm production in Pb + Pb collisions at energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Taesoo; Berrehrah, Hamza; Cabrera, Daniel; Cassing, Wolfgang; Bratkovskaya, Elena

    2016-03-01

    We study charm production in Pb +Pb collisions at √{sN N}=2.76 TeV in the parton-hadron-string-dynamics (PHSD) transport approach and the charm dynamics in the partonic and hadronic medium. The charm quarks are produced through initial binary nucleon-nucleon collisions by using the pythia event generator, taking into account the (anti-)shadowing incorporated in the eps09 package. The produced charm quarks interact with off-shell massive partons in the quark-gluon plasma and are hadronized into D mesons through coalescence or fragmentation close to the critical energy density, and then interact with hadrons in the final hadronic stage with scattering cross sections calculated in an effective Lagrangian approach with heavy-quark spin symmetry. The PHSD results show a reasonable RAA and elliptic flow of D mesons in comparison to the experimental data for Pb +Pb collisions at √{sN N}=2.76 TeV from the ALICE Collaboration. We also study the effect of temperature-dependent off-shell charm quarks in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We find that the scattering cross sections are only moderately affected by off-shell charm degrees of freedom. However, the position of the peak of RAA for D mesons depends on the strength of the scalar partonic forces which also have an impact on the D meson elliptic flow. The comparison with experimental data on the RAA suggests that the repulsive force is weaker for off-shell charm quarks as compared to that for light quarks. Furthermore, the effects from radiative charm energy loss appear to be low compared to the collisional energy loss up to transverse momenta of ˜15 GeV/c .

  13. The role and detectability of the charm contribution to ultra high energy neutrino fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, Raj; Samanta, Abhijit; Watanabe, Atsushi E-mail: abhijit@hri.res.in

    2009-09-01

    It is widely believed that charm meson production and decay may play an important role in high energy astrophysical sources of neutrinos, especially those that are baryon-rich, providing an environment conducive to pp interactions. Using slow-jet supernovae (SJS) as an example of such a source, we study the detectability of high-energy neutrinos, paying particular attention to those produced from charmed-mesons. We highlight important distinguishing features in the ultra-high energy neutrino flux which would act as markers for the role of charm in the source. In particular, charm leads to significant event rates at higher energies, after the conventional (π,K) neutrino fluxes fall off. We calculate event rates both for a nearby single source and for diffuse SJS fluxes for an IceCube-like detector. By comparing muon event rates for the conventional and prompt fluxes in different energy bins, we demonstrate the striking energy dependence in the rates induced by the presence of charm. We also show that it leads to an energy dependant flux ratio of shower to muon events, providing an additional important diagnostic tool for the presence of prompt neutrinos. Motivated by the infusion of high energy anti-electron neutrinos into the flux by charm decay, we also study the detectability of the Glashow resonance due to these sources.

  14. In Medium Properties of Charmed Strange Mesons in Dense Hadron ic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sushil

    2015-05-01

    The medium modifications of the charmed strange mesons in the dense hadronic matter are investigated within chiral S U(4) model. The charmed strange meson properties modifies due to their interactions with the nucleons, hyperons and the scalar mesons (scalar-isoscalar mesons ( σ, ζ), scalar isovector meson ( δ)) in the dense hadronic medium. The various parameters used in the chiral model are obtained by fitting the vacuum baryon masses and saturation properties of nuclear matter. The non-linear coupled equations of the scalar fields are solved to obtain their baryon density, isospin and strangeness dependent values. Furthermore, the dispersion relations are derived for charmed strange mesons. Effects of isospin asymmetry and strangeness on the energies of charmed strange mesons are investigated. The in medium properties of charmed strange mesons can be particularly relevant to the experiments with neutron rich beams at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI, Germany, as well as to experiments at the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) laboratory, USA. The present study of the in medium properties of charmed strange mesons will be of direct relevance for the observables from the compressed baryonic matter, resulting from the heavy ion collision experiments.

  15. Recent results from COMPASS on exclusive muoproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandacz, Andrzej

    2016-02-01

    The 160 GeV polarised muon beam available at CERN, with positive or negative charge, makes COMPASS a unique place for GPD studies. The first GPD related COMPASS results come from exclusive vector meson production on transversely polarised protons and deuterons. The data were taken in 2003-2010 with large solid-state polarised targets, although without detection of recoil particles. Results on various transverse target spin dependent azimuthal asymmetries are presented and their relations to GPDs are discussed. The dedicated COMPASS GPD program started in 2012 with commissioning of a new long liquid hydrogen target and new detectors such as the large recoil proton detector and the large-angle electromagnetic calorimeter. It was followed by a short pilot 'DVCS run'. The performance of the setup and first results on DVCS and exclusive π0 channels have been demonstrated. The full data taking for the GPD program approved within COMPASS-II proposal is planned for 2016 and 2017.

  16. Muoproduction of J/psi(3100)

    SciTech Connect

    Markiewicz, T.W.

    1981-10-01

    Interactions of 209-GeV muons within an instrumented magnetized-steel calorimeter have produced 4374 +- 87 ..mu../sup +/..mu../sup -/ pairs from J/psi decay, corresponding to the cross section sigma(..mu..N ..-->.. ..mu.. psi X) = 0.64 +- 0.10 nb. These interactions are classified as either elastic (sigma = 0.36 +- 0.07 nb) or inelastic (sigma = 0.28 +- 0.06 nb) based primarily on the calorimetric determination of E/sub X/. The cross section for elastic psi production by virtual photons, sigma/sub eff/(..gamma../sub V/N), rises with energy nu as log nu. Its dependence on Q/sup 2/ fits the vector-meson dominance form P(..lambda..) = (1 + Q/sup 2//..lambda../sup 2/)/sup -2/, with ..lambda.. = (2.0 - 2.4) +- 0.15 GeV, where the spread in values arises from considering the possibility of a Q/sup 2/ dependence in the decay angular distribution W (theta,phi) and in the nuclear shadowing factor. We find that W(theta,phi) is consistent with the form expected if the reaction ..gamma../sub V/N ..-->.. psiN conserves helicity in the s channel through natural-parity exchange in the t channel. After correction for nuclear effects, d sigma/sub eff//dt is described by the sum of two exponential terms in t, with average t slope b = 2.56 (+0.35 or - 0.32). The photon-gluon fusion (..gamma..g ..-->.. psi) perturbative quantum chromodynamic model for psi production provides an excellent description of the nu dependence of sigma/sub eff/, but cannot simultaneously explain the observed cross section and value of ..lambda... The differential cross section d/sup 2/sigma/sub eff//dzdp/sub perpindicular//sup 2/ for inelastically produced psi's rises approximately linearly with elasticity z identical with E/sub psi//nu. The p/sub perpendicular//sup 2/ dependence is flatter than that of d sigma/dt for elastic events, with average p/sub perpendicular//sup 2/ slope b = 1.46 +- 0.10. The Q/sup 2/ dependence of sigma/sub eff/ is that of P(..lambda..) with ..lambda.. = 3.0 +- 0.2 GeV, and the nu dependence is similar to that observed for elastic production. 101 references, 33 figures, 20 tables.

  17. Charmed meson physics accessible to an L = 10/sup 33/ cm/sup /minus/2/ sec/sup /minus/1/ e/sup +/e/sup /minus// collider operating near charm threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, R.H.

    1989-06-01

    In this report, the potential for dedicated charmed D/sup 0/, D/sup +/ and D/sub s/ meson physics in a high-luminosity e/sup +/e/sup /minus// collider operated near charm threshold is explored. The construction of such a high-luminosity collider or Tau-Charm Factory in conjunction with a new detector whose design draws heavily on the extensive operational experience of previous detectors at SPEAR, could achieve three orders-of-magnitude improvement in sensitivity in most areas of charmed meson studies. 27 refs., 10 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. Inter-Comparison of CHARM Data and WSR-88D Storm Integrated Rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedlovec, Gary J.; Meyer, Paul J.; Guillory, Anthony R.; Stellman, Keith; Limaye, Ashutosh; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A localized precipitation network has been established over a 4000 sq km region of northern Alabama in support of local weather and climate research at the Global Hydrology and Climate Center (GHCC) in Huntsville. This Cooperative Huntsville-Area Rainfall Measurement (CHARM) network is comprised of over 80 volunteers who manually take daily rainfall measurements from 85 sites. The network also incorporates 20 automated gauges that report data at 1-5 minute intervals on a 24 h a day basis. The average spacing of the gauges in the network is about 6 kin, however coverage in some regions benefit from gauges every 1-2 km. The 24 h rainfall totals from the CHARM network have been used to validate Stage III rainfall estimates of daily and storm totals derived from the WSR-88D radars that cover northern Alabama. The Stage III rainfall product is produced by the Lower Mississippi River Forecast Center (LMRFC) in support of their daily forecast operations. The intercomparisons between the local rain gauge and the radar estimates have been useful to understand the accuracy and utility of the Stage III data. Recently, the Stage III and CHARM rainfall measurements have been combined to produce an hourly rainfall dataset at each CHARM observation site. The procedure matches each CHARM site with a time sequence of Stage III radar estimates of precipitation. Hourly stage III rainfall estimates were used to partition the rain gauge values to the time interval over which they occurred. The new hourly rain gauge dataset is validated at selected points where 1-5 minute rainfall measurements have been made. This procedure greatly enhances the utility of the CHARM data for local weather and hydrologic modeling studies. The conference paper will present highlights of the Stage III intercomparison and some examples of the combined radar / rain gauge product demonstrating its accuracy and utility in deriving an hourly rainfall product from the 24 h CHARM totals.

  19. CONSTRAINED-TRANSPORT MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS WITH ADAPTIVE MESH REFINEMENT IN CHARM

    SciTech Connect

    Miniati, Francesco; Martin, Daniel F. E-mail: DFMartin@lbl.gov

    2011-07-01

    We present the implementation of a three-dimensional, second-order accurate Godunov-type algorithm for magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in the adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) cosmological code CHARM. The algorithm is based on the full 12-solve spatially unsplit corner-transport-upwind (CTU) scheme. The fluid quantities are cell-centered and are updated using the piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), while the magnetic field variables are face-centered and are evolved through application of the Stokes theorem on cell edges via a constrained-transport (CT) method. The so-called multidimensional MHD source terms required in the predictor step for high-order accuracy are applied in a simplified form which reduces their complexity in three dimensions without loss of accuracy or robustness. The algorithm is implemented on an AMR framework which requires specific synchronization steps across refinement levels. These include face-centered restriction and prolongation operations and a reflux-curl operation, which maintains a solenoidal magnetic field across refinement boundaries. The code is tested against a large suite of test problems, including convergence tests in smooth flows, shock-tube tests, classical two- and three-dimensional MHD tests, a three-dimensional shock-cloud interaction problem, and the formation of a cluster of galaxies in a fully cosmological context. The magnetic field divergence is shown to remain negligible throughout.

  20. Search for T violation in charm meson decays

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Castromonte, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P.; /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol. /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez /South Carolina U. /Tennessee U. /Vanderbilt U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-06-01

    Using data from the FOCUS (E831) experiment, they have searched for T violation in charm meson decays using the four-body decay channels D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup +} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, D{sup +} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, and D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. The T violation asymmetry is obtained using triple-product correlations and assuming the validity of the CPT theorem. They find the asymmetry values to be A{sub T{sub viol}}(D{sup 0}) = 0.010 {+-} 0.057(stat.) {+-} 0.037(syst.), A{sub T{sub viol}}(D{sup +}) = 0.023 {+-} 0.062(stat.) {+-} 0.022(syst.), and A{sub T{sub viol}}(D{sub s}{sup +}) = -0.036 {+-} 0.067(stat.) {+-} 0.023(syst.). Each measurement is consistent with no T violation. New measurements of the CP asymmetries for some of these decay modes are also presented.

  1. Constrained-transport Magnetohydrodynamics with Adaptive Mesh Refinement in CHARM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniati, Francesco; Martin, Daniel F.

    2011-07-01

    We present the implementation of a three-dimensional, second-order accurate Godunov-type algorithm for magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in the adaptive-mesh-refinement (AMR) cosmological code CHARM. The algorithm is based on the full 12-solve spatially unsplit corner-transport-upwind (CTU) scheme. The fluid quantities are cell-centered and are updated using the piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), while the magnetic field variables are face-centered and are evolved through application of the Stokes theorem on cell edges via a constrained-transport (CT) method. The so-called multidimensional MHD source terms required in the predictor step for high-order accuracy are applied in a simplified form which reduces their complexity in three dimensions without loss of accuracy or robustness. The algorithm is implemented on an AMR framework which requires specific synchronization steps across refinement levels. These include face-centered restriction and prolongation operations and a reflux-curl operation, which maintains a solenoidal magnetic field across refinement boundaries. The code is tested against a large suite of test problems, including convergence tests in smooth flows, shock-tube tests, classical two- and three-dimensional MHD tests, a three-dimensional shock-cloud interaction problem, and the formation of a cluster of galaxies in a fully cosmological context. The magnetic field divergence is shown to remain negligible throughout.

  2. Mixing and CP Violation in Charm Meson Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, B; /Cincinnati U.

    2010-08-26

    Mixing and CP violation (CPV ) in the neutral D system were first discussed over thirty years ago but mixing was observed for the first time only very recently. Since then, these observations have been confirmed in other experiments and in other D{sup 0} decay modes. Unlike the K, B and B{sub s} systems, for which mixing was observed years earlier, the short distance ({Delta}C = 2) amplitude contributing to mixing in the D system arises from box diagrams with down- rather than up-type quarks in the loops. The d and s components are GIM-suppressed, and the b component is suppressed by the small V{sub ub} CKM coupling. In the standard model (SM), therefore, long range, non-perturbative effects, a coherent sum over intermediate states accessible to both D{sup 0} and {bar D}{sup 0}, are the main contribution to mixing. These are hard to compute reliably, however. The phenomenon of mixing in neutral meson systems has now been observed in all flavours, but only in the past year in the D{sup 0} system. The standard model anticipated that, for the charm sector, the mixing rate would be small, and also that CP violation, either in mixing or in direct decay, would be below the present levels of observability. It is hoped that further study of these phenomena might reveal signs of new physics. A review of recently available, experimental results is given.

  3. Beauty, charm, and F{sub L} at HERA: New data vs. Early predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, N. N.; Zoller, V. R.

    2010-04-15

    One of the well-known effects of the asymptotic freedom is splitting of the leading-log BFKL pomeron into a series of isolated poles in complex angular momentum plane. Following our earlier works we explore the phenomenological consequences of the emerging BFKL-Regge factorized expansion for the small-x charm (F{sub 2}{sup c}) and beauty (F{sub 2}{sup b}) structure functions of the proton. As we found earlier, the colordipole approach to the BFKL dynamics predicts uniquely decoupling of subleading hard BFKL exchanges from F{sub 2}{sup c} at moderately large Q{sup 2}. We predicted precocious BFKL asymptotics of F{sub 2}{sup c} (x,Q{sup 2}) with intercept of the rightmost BFKL pole {alpha}{sub P}(0) - 1 = {Delta}{sub P} {approx} 0.4. High-energy open beauty photo- and electroproduction probes the vacuum exchange at much smaller distances and detects significant corrections to the BFKL asymptotics coming from the subleading vacuum poles. In view of the accumulation of the experimental data on small -xF{sub 2}{sup c} and F{sub 2}{sup b} we extended our early predictions to the kinematical domain covered by new HERA measurements. Our structure functions obtained in 1999 agree well with the determination of both F{sub 2}{sup c} and F{sub 2}{sup b} by the H1 published in 2006 but contradict very recent (2008, preliminary)H1 results on F{sub 2}{sup b}. We present also comparison of our early predictions for the longitudinal structure function F{sub L} with recent H1 data (2008) taken at very low Bjorken x. We comment on the electromagnetic corrections to the Okun-Pomeranchuk theorem.

  4. First Airborne Lidar Measurements of Methane and Carbon Dioxide Applying the MERLIN Demonstrator CHARM-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amediek, Axel; Büdenbender, Christian; Ehret, Gerhard; Fix, Andreas; Gerbig, Christoph; Kiemle, Chritstoph; Quatrevalet, Mathieu; Wirth, Martin

    2016-04-01

    CHARM-F is the new airborne four-wavelengths lidar for simultaneous soundings of atmospheric CO2 and CH4. Due to its high technological conformity it is also a demonstrator for MERLIN, the French-German satellite mission providing a methane lidar. MERLIN's Preliminary Design Review was successfully passed recently. The launch is planned for 2020. First CHARM-F measurements were performed in Spring 2015 onboard the German research aircraft HALO. The aircraft's maximum flight altitude of 15 km and special features of the lidar, such as a relatively large laser ground spot, result in data similar to those obtained by a spaceborne system. The CHARM-F and MERLIN lidars are designed in the IPDA (integrated path differential absorption) configuration using short double pulses, which gives column averaged gas mixing ratios between the system and ground. The successfully completed CHARM-F flight measurements provide a valuable dataset, which supports the retrieval algorithm development for MERLIN notably. Furthermore, the dataset allows detailed analyses of measurement sensitivities, general studies on the IPDA principle and on system design questions. These activities are supported by another instrument onboard the aircraft during the flight campaign: a cavity ring down spectrometer, providing in-situ data of carbon dioxide, methane and water vapor with high accuracy and precision, which is ideal for validation purposes of the aircraft lidar. For the near future, detailed characterizations of CHARM-F are planned, further support of the MERLIN design, as well as the scientific aircraft campaign CoMet.

  5. Recent Results on Charm and Tau Physics from BaBar And Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Salvatore, Fabrizio F.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London

    2007-10-15

    Recent results on charm and tau physics obtained at the BABAR and Belle experiments are presented in this article. The charm section will be focused on the most recent results on D{sup 0}{bar D}{sup 0} mixing at Belle and on the measurement of the pseudoscalar decay constant f{sub Ds} using charm tagged e+e- events at BABAR. In the tau section the recent results on Lepton Flavor Violation from tau decays will be discussed, as well as the recent result on the rare decay {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3{pi}{sup -}2{pi}{sup +}2{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} at BABAR and the measurement of the {tau} lepton mass at Belle.

  6. Object-Oriented Implementation of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks using Charm++

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, Sanjeev; Bhandarkar, Milind; Kale, Laxmikant V.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes experiences with implementing the NAS Computational Fluid Dynamics benchmarks using a parallel object-oriented language, Charm++. Our main objective in implementing the NAS CFD kernel benchmarks was to develop a code that could be used to easily experiment with different domain decomposition strategies and dynamic load balancing. We also wished to leverage the object-orientation provided by the Charm++ parallel object-oriented language, to develop reusable abstractions that would simplify the process of developing parallel applications. We first describe the Charm++ parallel programming model and the parallel object array abstraction, then go into detail about each of the Scalar Pentadiagonal (SP) and Lower/Upper Triangular (LU) benchmarks, along with performance results. Finally we conclude with an evaluation of the methodology used.

  7. Search for Popcorn Mesons in Events with Two Charmed Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Hartfiel, Brandon; /SLAC

    2006-07-07

    The physics of this note is divided into two parts. The first part measures the {Lambda}{sub c} {yields} {pi}kp continuum momentum spectrum at a center of mass energy of 10.54 GeV/c. The data sample consists of 15,400 {Lambda}{sub c} baryons from 9.46 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. With more than 13 times more data than the best previous measurement, we are able to exclude some of the simpler, one parameter fragmentation functions. In the second part, we add the {Lambda}{sub c} {yields} K{sup 0}p mode, and look for events with a {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} and a {bar {Lambda}}{sub c}{sup -} in order to look for ''popcorn'' mesons formed between the baryon and antibaryon. We add on-resonance data, with a kinematic cut to eliminate background from B decays, as well as BaBar run 3 and 4 data to increase the total data size to 219.70 fb{sup -1}. We find 619 events after background subtraction. After a subtraction of 1.06 {+-} .09 charged pions coming from decays of known resonances to {Lambda}{sub c} + {eta}{pi}, we are left with 2.63 {+-} .21 additional charged pions in each of these events. This is significantly higher than the .5 popcorn mesons per baryon pair used in the current tuning of Pythia 6.2, the most widely used Monte Carlo generator. The extra mesons we find appear to be the first direct evidence of popcorn mesons, although some of them could be arising from hypothetical unresolved, unobserved charmed baryon resonances contributing decay mesons to our data. To contribute a significant fraction, this hypothesis requires a large number of such broad unresolved states and seems unlikely, but can not be completely excluded.

  8. Search for popcorn mesons in events with two charmed baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartfiel, Brandon

    The physics of this dissertation is divided into two parts. The first part measures the Λc → pi kp continuum momentum spectrum at a center of mass energy of 10.54 GeV/c, which is just below the Υ(4s) resonance. The data sample consists of 15,400 Λc baryons from 9.46 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. With more than 13 times more data than the best previous measurement, we are able to exclude some of the simpler, one parameter fragmentation functions. In the second part, we add the Λc → K0p mode, and look for events with a Λc+ and a Λ c- in order to look for "popcorn" mesons formed between the baryon and antibaryon. We add on-resonance data, with a kinematic cut to eliminate background from B decays, as well as BaBar run 3 and 4 data to increase the total data size to 219.70 fb-1. We find 619 events after background subtraction. After a subtraction of 1.06+/-.09 charged pions coming from decays of known resonances to Λc + npi, we are left with 2.63+/-.21 additional charged pious in each of these events. This is significantly higher than the .5 popcorn mesons per bayon pair used in the current tuning of Pythia 6.2, the most widely used Monte Carlo generator. The extra mesons we find appear to be the first direct evidence of popcorn mesons, although some of them could be arising from hypothetical unresolved, unobserved charmed baryon resonances contributing decay mesons to our data. To contribute a significant fraction, this hypothesis requires a large number of such broad unresolved states and seems unlikely, but can not be completely excluded.

  9. Charm mixing and CPV at B{sub A}B{sub AR} experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Milanes, Diego A.

    2008-11-23

    Searches of D{sup 0}-D-bar{sup 0} mixing and CP violation in the charm sector are strongly motivated by the possibility of observing a signal from new physics leading to bigger effects than those expected in Standard Model. Recent experimental results have shown strong evidence of D{sup 0}-D-bar{sup 0} mixing and many efforts are made within the BABAR collaboration to confirm and improve these results. We will discuss the main results in charm mixing and CP violation analyses with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B-factory.

  10. Model-independent analysis of CP violation in charmed meson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-06-01

    We present a model-independent analysis of CP violation, inspired by recent experimental observations, in charmed meson decays. The topological diagram approach is used to study direct CP asymmetries for singly Cabibbo-suppressed two-body hadronic decays of charmed mesons. We extract the magnitudes and relative phases of the corresponding topological amplitudes from available experimental information. In order to get more precise and reliable estimates of direct CP asymmetries, we take into account contributions from all possible strong penguin amplitudes, including the internal b-quark penguin contributions. We also study flavor SU(3) symmetry breaking effects in these decay modes and consequently predict direct CP asymmetries of unmeasured modes.

  11. Charm quark energy loss in infinite QCD matter using a parton cascade model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younus, Mohammed; Coleman-Smith, Christopher E.; Bass, Steffen A.; Srivastava, Dinesh K.

    2015-02-01

    We utilize the parton cascade model to study the evolution of charm quarks propagating through a thermal brick of QCD matter. We determine the energy loss and the transport coefficient q ̂ for charm quarks. The calculations are done at a constant temperature of 350 MeV and the results are compared to analytical calculations of heavy-quark energy loss in order to validate the applicability of using a parton cascade model for the study of heavy-quark dynamics in hot and dense QCD matter.

  12. Comment on "New limits on intrinsic charm in the nucleon from global analysis of parton distributions"

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Gardner, Susan

    2015-07-20

    Intrinsic heavy quarks in hadrons emerge from the non-perturbative structure of a hadron bound state and are a rigorous prediction of QCD. Lattice QCD calculations indicate significant intrinsic charm and strangeness probabilities. Since the light-front momentum distribution of the Fock states is maximal at equal rapidity, intrinsic heavy quarks carry significant fractions of the hadron momentum. The presence of Fock states with intrinsic strange, charm, or bottom quarks in hadrons lead to an array of novel physics phenomena. Accurate determinations of the heavy-quark distributions in the proton are needed to interpret Tevatron and LHC measurements as probed of physics beyond the Standard Model.

  13. Measuring C P violation and mixing in charm with inclusive self-conjugate multibody decay modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malde, S.; Thomas, C.; Wilkinson, G.

    2015-05-01

    Time-dependent studies of inclusive charm decays to multibody self-conjugate final states can be used to determine the indirect C P -violating observable AΓ and the mixing observable yC P , provided that the fractional C P -even content of the final state, F+ , is known. This approach can yield significantly improved sensitivity compared with the conventional method that relies on decays to C P eigenstates. In particular, D →π+π-π0 appears to be an especially powerful channel, given its relatively large branching fraction and the high value of F+ that has recently been measured at charm threshold.

  14. Measurement of Beauty and Charm Photoproduction at H1 using inclusive lifetime tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Finke, L.

    2005-10-06

    A measurement of the charm and beauty photoproduction cross sections at the ep collider HERA is presented. The lifetime signature of c and b-flavoured hadrons is exploited to determine the fractions of events in the sample containing charm or beauty. Differential cross sections as a function of the jet transverse momentum, the rapidity and x{sub {gamma}}{sup obs} are measured in the photoproduction region Q2 < 1 GeV2, with inelasticity 0.15 < y < 0.8. The results are compared with calculations in next-to-leading order perturbative QCD and Monte Carlo models as implemented in PYTHIA and CASCADE.

  15. Semileptonic decays of B meson into charmed meson

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, N. )

    1989-12-15

    Recent results on semileptonic decays of {ital B} meson into charmed meson using the CLEO detector at CESR are summarized. Ratios of the inclusive semileptonic branching fractions, B(B{sup {minus}}{r arrow}{ital D}{sup 0}{ital Xl}{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}}), B({ital {bar B}}{sup 0}{r arrow}{ital D}{sup +}{ital Xl}{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}}{ital Xl}{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}}), and B({ital {bar B}}{sup 0}{r arrow}{ital D}{sup +}) average {ital B} meson semileptonic branching fraction are reported. The branching fractions of the exclusive final states, {ital B}{sup {minus}}{r arrow}{ital D}{sup 0}{ital l}{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}}, {ital B}{sup {minus}}{r arrow}{ital D}{sup 0}{ital l}{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}}, and {ital {bar B}}{sup 0}{r arrow}{ital D}{sup +}{ital l}{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}} are measured. The ratio of B({ital B}{sup {minus}}{r arrow}{ital D}{sup 0}{ital l}{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}}) to B(B{sup {minus}}{r arrow}{ital D}{sup 0}{ital l}{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}}) and the polarization of the {ital D}*{sup +} are obtained and compared with theoretical models. The value of {vert bar}{ital V}{sub {ital c}{ital b}}{vert bar} is calculated from the exclusive branching fractions for various models. Finally, the lifetime ratio of the charged and neutral {ital B}'s ({tau}{sup +}/{tau}{sup 0}) is determined from the ratio of B({ital B}{sup {minus}}{r arrow}{ital D}{sup 0}{ital l}{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}}) to B({ital {bar B}}{sup 0}{r arrow}{ital D}{sup +}{ital l}{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}}) to be 0.85{plus minus}0.20{sup +0.22}{sub {minus}0.16}.

  16. Multibunch Instability Investigations for a Tau-Charm Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, Michael S.

    1989-05-01

    In the design of high-luminosity colliders for high-energy physics, it has become clear that multibunch instabilities will be one of the primary effects that limit beam intensity, and hence luminosity. This paper reports on a series of calculations of multibunch growth rates, using the LBL accelerator physics code ZAP, that illustrate the seriousness of the effect for typical design parameters of a Tau-Charm Factory. A common feature of high-luminosity machines is the requirement of a small beta function at the interaction point. To maintain the advantages of a low beta function, however, requires that the rms bunch length, {sigma}{sub {ell}}, be smaller than {beta}*. This leads, in general, to several inconvenient aspects: (1) The requirement for short bunches leads to the need for a substantial amount of RF hardware-introducing just the narrow-band (high-Q) impedance that generates multibunch instabilities in the first place. (2) The need for short bunches means that bunch lengthening from the longitudinal microwave instability must be avoided. Since the longitudinal impedance Z{sub {parallel}}/n cannot be reduced indefinitely, there is a clear benefit to using many bunches, with lower current per bunch. (3) The short bunches have a Fourier spectrum extending up to very high frequencies, thus effectively sampling impedances in this regime that would be essentially invisible to longer bunches. This aspect can be seen in the exponential cutoff factor, proportional to ({sigma}{sub {ell}/R}){sup 2}, in the expressions for the effective impedance given. In practice, it is difficult to achieve a high luminosity without having a high average beam current in the rings. Because the multibunch growth rates scale linearly with average current, the resulting-rates tend to be very high. It might be imagined that, for sufficient bunch separation and low enough Q values for the higher-order cavity modes, the wake fields have time to die away between successive bunches, thus

  17. Production of charm mesons by high energy neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Shipbaugh, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    The charmed mesons D/sup /plus minus//, D/sup 0/, and D/sub s//sup /plus minus//, have been observed in neutron-nucleus collisions at the FNAL Tevatron. A sample of 134 /plus minus/ 19 events as investigated in the decay D/sup /plus minus// /yields/ D/sup 0//pi//sup /plus minus// with the subsequent decay mode D/sup 0/ /yields/ K/sup +/K/sup /minus//. The cross section per nucleon for D/sup /plus minus//, at most probable energy /radical/s = 35 GeV, was measured to be 2.11 /plus minus/ .43 (plusreverse arrowminus/.63)/mu/b/nucleon for 0.0 < x/sub f/ < 0.14 (/bar x//sub f/ = .07). The branching ratio (BR) is defined as: BR /identicalreverse arrowto/ Br(D /yields/ D/pi/) /times/ BR(D /yields/ K/sup +/K/sup /minus//). The dependence of the cross section per nucleus on number of nucleons in target was fit to a form A /sup /alpha// and it was found that /alpha/ = .96 /plusreverse arrowminus/ .17. A sample of 64 /plusreverse arrowminus/ 16 D/sub s//sup /plus minus// events was investigates for the decay D/sub s//sup /plus minus// /yields/ /phi//pi//sup /plus minus//. The differential cross section for D/sub s//sup /plus minus// production averaged over the particle and antiparticle states is: BR.(1/2)(d/sigma/(D/sub s//sup +/)/dx/sub f/ + d/sigma/(D/sub s//sup /minus//) = 2.85 /plusreverse arrowminus/ 0.80 /plusreverse arrowminus/ .86 /mu/b/nucleon at x/sub f/ = 0.175 where the first errors is statistical and the second error is systematic. The branching fraction is defined as BR /equivalentreverse arrowto/ BR(D/sub s/ /yields/ /phi//pi/), and a linear A dependence was assumed. An estimate of relative cross section is: 0.19 /plusreverse arrowminus/ 0.09 at x/sub f/ = 0. 36 refs., 43 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Production of charm mesons by high-energy neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Shipbaugh, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    The charmed mesons ED{sup *{plus minus}}, D{sup 0}, and D{sub s}{sup {plus minus}} have been observed in neutron-nucleus collisions at the FNAL Tevatron. A sample of 134 {plus minus} 19 events was investigated in the decay mode D{sup *{plus minus}} {yields} D{sup 0} {pi}{sup {plus minus}} with the subsequent decay mode D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}}. The cross section per nucleon for D{sup *}{plus minus}, at most probable energy {radical}s = 35 GeV, was measured to be: d{sigma}(xf)/dxf {center dot} BR = 2.11 {plus minus} .43({plus minus}63){mu}b/nucleon for 0.0 < x{sub f} < 0.14 (x{sub f} = .07). The branching ratio (BR) is defined as: BR {identical to} BR(D{sup *} {yields} D{sub {pi}}) {times} BR(D {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}}). The dependence of the cross section per nucleus on number of nucleons in the target was fit to a form A{sup {alpha}} and it was found that {alpha} = .96 {plus minus} .17. A sample of 64 {plus minus} 16 D{sub s}{sup {plus minus}} events was investigated for the decay D{sub s}{sup {plus minus}} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup {plus minus}}. The differential cross section for D{sub s}{sup {plus minus}} production averaged over the particle and antiparticle states is: BR {center dot} {1/2} d{sigma}D{sub s}{sup +}/dxf + d{sigma}(D{sub s}{sup {minus}}/dxf) = 2.8 {plus minus} 0.80 {plus minus} .86 {mu}b/nucleon at x{sub f} = 0.175 where the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic. The branching fraction is defined as BR {identical to} BR(D{sub s} {yields} {phi}{pi}), and a linear A dependence was assumed.

  19. Measurement of charm meson production in Au+Au collisions at √S NN =200 GEV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintero, Amilkar

    The study and characterization of nuclear matter under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure, and a full understanding of deconfined partonic matter, the Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP), are major goals of modern high-energy nuclear physics. Heavy quarks (charm and bottom) are formed mainly in the early stages of the collision. Open heavy flavor measurements, e.g. D0, D+/-, DS, are excellent tools to probe and study the hot and dense medium formed in heavy ion collisions. Details of their interaction with the surrounding medium can be studied through energy loss and elliptic flow measurements thus providing valuable information about the nature of the medium and its degree of thermalization. Initial indirect reconstruction studies of heavy quark particles using the electrons from heavy flavor decays, showed a large magnitude of energy loss that was inconsistent with model predictions and assumptions, at the time. Precise measurements of fully reconstructed heavy mesons would provide better understanding of the energy loss mechanisms and the properties of the formed medium. In relativistic heavy ion collisions, the relatively low abundance of heavy quarks and their short lifetimes makes them difficult to distinguish from the event vertex and the combinatorial background; therefore the need for a high precision vertex detector to reconstruct their decay particles. In 2014 a new micro vertex detector was installed in the STAR experiment at Brookhaven National Lab. The Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) was designed to perform direct topological reconstruction of the weak decays of heavy flavor particles. The HFT improves STAR track pointing resolution from a few millimeters to ˜30 microns for 1 GeV/c pions, allowing direct reconstruction of short lifetime particles. Although the results of the open charm meson reconstruction using the HFT improved dramatically there is still a lot of room for optimization, especially for reconstructed particles with low transverse momentum

  20. The future of tau physics and tau-charm detector and factory design

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1991-02-01

    Future research on the tau lepton requires large statistics, thorough investigation of systematic errors, and direct experimental knowledge of backgrounds. Only a tau-charm factory with a specially designed detector can provide all the experimental conditions to meet these requirements. This paper is a summary of three lectures delivered at the 1991 Lake Louise Winter Institute.

  1. Charm photoproduction at 20 GeV including preliminary lifetime results with improved optical resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Colley, D.C.; Brick, D.; Bacon, T.C.; Cohn, H.O.; Franek, B.; Armenteros, R.; Abe, K.; Kafka, T.; Bingham, H.H.; Brau, J.E.

    1984-07-01

    Sixty five charm events have been observed in an exposure, during 1983, of the SLAC Hybrid Facility (SHF) to a backward scattered laser beam. Preliminary results for the charmed meson lifetimes have been obtained based on 19 neutral and 22 charged decays thereby doubling our earlier data. These lifetimes are consistent with our published results and the two data samples have been combined. From the resulting 42 neutral, 45 charged and 13 topologically ambiguous decays the charmed meson lifetimes are measured to be tau/sub D/sup 0// = (6.4/sub -0.9//sup +1.1/ +- 0.5) x 10/sup -13/s and tau/sub D/sup + -// = (8.2/sub -1.1//sup +1.3/ +- 0.6) x 10/sup -13/s and their ratio tau/sub D//sup + -///tau/sub D/sup 0// = 1.3/sub -0.3/sup +0.5/. The inclusive charm cross-section at a photon energy of 20 GeV has been measured to be 60 +- 8 +- 21) nb.

  2. Measurement of the cross section of charmed hadrons and the nuclear dependence alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Blanco-Covarrubias, Ernesto Alejandro

    2009-12-03

    With data from the SELEX experiment we study charm hadro-production. We report the differential production cross sections as function of the longitudinal and transverse momentum, as well as for two different target materials, of 14 charmed hadron and/or their decay modes. This is the most extensive study to date. SELEX is a fixed target experiment at Fermilab with high forward acceptance; it took data during 1996-1997 with 600 GeV/c Σ- and π-, and 540 GeV/c proton and π+ beams. It used 5 target foils (two copper and three diamond). We use the results to determine α, used in parametrizing the production cross section as ∞ Aα, where A is the mass number of the target nuclei. We found within our statistics that α is independent of the longitudinal momentum fraction xF in the interval 0.1 < xF < 1.0, with α = 0.778 ± 0.014. The average value of α} for charm production by pion beams is α meson = 0.850 ± 0.028. This is somewhat larger than the corresponding average αbaryon = 0.755 ± 0.016 for charm production by baryon beams (Σ- and protons).

  3. A Photographic Essay of Apache Clothing, War Charms, and Weapons, Volume 2-Part D.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Doris; Jacobs, Ben

    As part of a series of guides designed for instruction of American Indian children and youth, this resource guide constitutes a pictorial essay on Apache clothing, war charms, and weaponry. A brief historical introduction is followed by 21 question suggestions for classroom use. Each of the 12 photographic topics is accompanied by a descriptive…

  4. Production of doubly charmed baryons at energy {radical}s=10.58 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Kiselev, V.V.; Likhoded, A.K.; Shevlyagin, M.V.

    1995-06-01

    The cross section for the production of doubly charmed baryons at a B-factory is estimated on the basis of perturbative QCD calculations of the cross sections for cc-diquark production and of the quark-hadron duality. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Quasielastic production of charmed baryons in neutrino-nucleon interaction processes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhizhin, E.D.; Nikitin, Y.P.; Fanchenko, M.S.

    1983-06-01

    The processes of quasielastic production of the charmed baryons ..lambda../sup +//sub c/, ..sigma../sup +//sub c/, and ..sigma../sup + +//sub c/ in neutrino-nucleon reactions are considered. Calculations are made of the differential and total cross sections for two sets of the parameters M/sub V/ and M/sub A/ which determine the form factors of weak transitions of nucleons into charmed baryons. The chosen parameter values make it possible to obtain for the cross sections results which completely span the currently existing range of uncertainties in the theoretical predictions. Attention is drawn to an important kinematic effect which restricts the emission angles of the charmed baryons to the range thetacharmed baryons.

  6. New insights into the Ds0 *(2317 ) and other charm scalar mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhi-Hui; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Yao, De-Liang

    2015-11-01

    Through the scattering of light-pseudoscalar mesons (π ,K ,η ,η' ) off charmed mesons (D ,Ds) , we study the Ds0 *(2317 ) state and other relevant charm scalar mesons in a unitarized chiral effective field theory approach. We investigate the charm scalar meson poles with different strangeness (S ) and isospin (I ) quantum numbers as well as their corresponding residues, which provide the coupling strengths of the charm scalar mesons. Both the light-quark mass and NC dependences of the pole positions of the Ds0 *(2317 ) and the poles with (S ,I )=(0 ,1 /2 ) are analyzed in detail in this work. Interestingly we observe quite similar pion mass trajectories for the resonance pole at around 2.1 GeV with (S ,I )=(0 ,1 /2 ) to those of the f0(500 ) given in the literature. When increasing the values of NC we find that a bound state and a virtual state in the (S ,I )=(1 ,0 ) channel asymmetrically approach the D K threshold for NC<6 , and they meet at this threshold at NC=6 . When NC>6 , the bound and virtual states move into the complex plane on the second Riemann sheet and become a symmetric pair of resonance poles. For large enough values of NC, neither the Ds0 *(2317 ) pole nor the poles with (S ,I )=(0 ,1 /2 ) tend to fall down to the real axis, indicating that they do not behave like a standard quark-antiquark meson at large NC.

  7. Web-based computational chemistry education with CHARMMing I: Lessons and tutorial.

    PubMed

    Miller, Benjamin T; Singh, Rishi P; Schalk, Vinushka; Pevzner, Yuri; Sun, Jingjun; Miller, Carrie S; Boresch, Stefan; Ichiye, Toshiko; Brooks, Bernard R; Woodcock, H Lee

    2014-07-01

    This article describes the development, implementation, and use of web-based "lessons" to introduce students and other newcomers to computer simulations of biological macromolecules. These lessons, i.e., interactive step-by-step instructions for performing common molecular simulation tasks, are integrated into the collaboratively developed CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing) web user interface (http://www.charmming.org). Several lessons have already been developed with new ones easily added via a provided Python script. In addition to CHARMMing's new lessons functionality, web-based graphical capabilities have been overhauled and are fully compatible with modern mobile web browsers (e.g., phones and tablets), allowing easy integration of these advanced simulation techniques into coursework. Finally, one of the primary objections to web-based systems like CHARMMing has been that "point and click" simulation set-up does little to teach the user about the underlying physics, biology, and computational methods being applied. In response to this criticism, we have developed a freely available tutorial to bridge the gap between graphical simulation setup and the technical knowledge necessary to perform simulations without user interface assistance. PMID:25057988

  8. Web-Based Computational Chemistry Education with CHARMMing I: Lessons and Tutorial

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Benjamin T.; Singh, Rishi P.; Schalk, Vinushka; Pevzner, Yuri; Sun, Jingjun; Miller, Carrie S.; Boresch, Stefan; Ichiye, Toshiko; Brooks, Bernard R.; Woodcock, H. Lee

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development, implementation, and use of web-based “lessons” to introduce students and other newcomers to computer simulations of biological macromolecules. These lessons, i.e., interactive step-by-step instructions for performing common molecular simulation tasks, are integrated into the collaboratively developed CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing) web user interface (http://www.charmming.org). Several lessons have already been developed with new ones easily added via a provided Python script. In addition to CHARMMing's new lessons functionality, web-based graphical capabilities have been overhauled and are fully compatible with modern mobile web browsers (e.g., phones and tablets), allowing easy integration of these advanced simulation techniques into coursework. Finally, one of the primary objections to web-based systems like CHARMMing has been that “point and click” simulation set-up does little to teach the user about the underlying physics, biology, and computational methods being applied. In response to this criticism, we have developed a freely available tutorial to bridge the gap between graphical simulation setup and the technical knowledge necessary to perform simulations without user interface assistance. PMID:25057988

  9. 75 FR 76036 - Charming Shoppes of Delaware, Inc. Accounts Payable, Rent, Merchandise Disbursement Divisions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Charming Shoppes of Delaware, Inc. Accounts Payable, Rent, Merchandise Disbursement Divisions, and Payroll Department Within the Shared Service Center, Bensalem, PA; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To...

  10. Study of correlations between photoproduced pairs of charmed particles at Experiment E831/FOCUS

    SciTech Connect

    Castromonte Flores, Cesar Manuel

    2008-08-01

    The authors present the study of the charm-pair correlations produced in photon-nucleon interactions at $\\langle$Eγ$\\rangle$ = 175 GeV/c, by the Fermilab fixed target experiment E831/FOCUS. The E831/FOCUS experiment produced and reconstructed over one million charm particles. This high statistics allows the reconstruction of more than 7000 charm-pair mesons D$\\bar{D}$, 10 times the statistic of former experiments, and also allows to get, for the first time, about 600 totally reconstructed charm-pairs in the DDs and DΛc channels. They were able to study, with some detail, the kinematical correlations between the charm and anticharm particle forming a pair, in the square transverse momentum (pT2), azimuthal angle difference (ΔΦ), rapidity difference (Δy) and the charm-pair mass variables. They observe some correlation for the longitudinal momenta, and a significant correlation for the transverse momenta of the charm and anticharm particles. They compare the experimental distributions with theoretical predictions based on the photon-gluon fusion model (PGF), for the production of c$\\bar{c}$ quarks, and the standard Lund hadronization model. These models are implemented by the PYTHIA Monte Carlo event generator. The PYTHIA program allows the inclusion, in the simulation, of non-perturbative effects that have been shown to be important for charm production. In order to compare data and simulation, they have generated two Monte Carlo samples, the first one set to favor the production of D$\\bar{D}$ pairs (MCDD2), and the second one set to favor the production of DDsand DΛc pairs, where each one uses different functions and parameters values for the theoretical models in the simulation. They observe, for the correlation distributions, that the set of parameters used by the MCDD2 model together with the intrinsic transverse momentum (k$\\perp$) of the partons inside the

  11. Open charm meson spectroscopy: Where to place the latest piece of the puzzle

    SciTech Connect

    Colangelo, Pietro; De Fazio, Fulvia

    2010-05-01

    We discuss how to classify the cs meson D{sub sJ}(3040) recently discovered by the BABAR Collaboration. We consider four possible assignments, together with signatures useful to distinguish among them.

  12. Production of associated χb and open charm at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhoded, A. K.; Luchinsky, A. V.; Poslavsky, S. V.

    2016-04-01

    In the present paper we study the production of χb + c c bar at the LHC within single parton scattering approach. A special attention is paid to the feed-down from χb states to the associated ϒ + c c bar production, which was recently studied by the LHCb. We have found that this feed-down is about percents of the total cross section seen in the experiment. It is shown that the shapes of the differential distributions are almost the same for single and double parton scattering approaches except for the azimuthal asymmetry, which is the most distinguishing feature of the latter one. We conclude that the precise study of the single parton scattering contributions is necessary for the correct isolation of the double parton scattering role.

  13. CHARMe Commentary metadata for Climate Science: collecting, linking and sharing user feedback on climate datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blower, Jon; Lawrence, Bryan; Kershaw, Philip; Nagni, Maurizio

    2014-05-01

    The research process can be thought of as an iterative activity, initiated based on prior domain knowledge, as well on a number of external inputs, and producing a range of outputs including datasets, studies and peer reviewed publications. These outputs may describe the problem under study, the methodology used, the results obtained, etc. In any new publication, the author may cite or comment other papers or datasets in order to support their research hypothesis. However, as their work progresses, the researcher may draw from many other latent channels of information. These could include for example, a private conversation following a lecture or during a social dinner; an opinion expressed concerning some significant event such as an earthquake or for example a satellite failure. In addition, other sources of information of grey literature are important public such as informal papers such as the arxiv deposit, reports and studies. The climate science community is not an exception to this pattern; the CHARMe project, funded under the European FP7 framework, is developing an online system for collecting and sharing user feedback on climate datasets. This is to help users judge how suitable such climate data are for an intended application. The user feedback could be comments about assessments, citations, or provenance of the dataset, or other information such as descriptions of uncertainty or data quality. We define this as a distinct category of metadata called Commentary or C-metadata. We link C-metadata with target climate datasets using a Linked Data approach via the Open Annotation data model. In the context of Linked Data, C-metadata plays the role of a resource which, depending on its nature, may be accessed as simple text or as more structured content. The project is implementing a range of software tools to create, search or visualize C-metadata including a JavaScript plugin enabling this functionality to be integrated in situ with data provider portals

  14. Charm mixing in a model-independent analysis of correlated D{sup 0}D{sup 0} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bondar, Alex; Vorobiev, Vitaly; Poluektov, Anton

    2010-08-01

    We investigate the impact of charm mixing on a model-independent {gamma} measurement using the Dalitz plot analysis of the three-body D decay from the B{sup +}{yields}DK{sup +} process, and show that ignoring the mixing at all stages of the analysis is safe up to a sub-degree level of precision. We also find that in the coherent production of the D{sup 0}D{sup *0} system in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions, the effect of charm mixing is enhanced, and propose a model-independent method to measure charm mixing parameters in time-integrated Dalitz plot analysis at charm factories.

  15. Exotic Effects at the Charm Threshold and Other Novel Physics Topics at JLab-12 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-05-03

    I briefly survey a number of novel hadron physics topics which can be investigated with the 12 GeV upgrade at J-Lab. The topics include new the formation of exotic heavy quark resonances accessible above the charm threshold, intrinsic charm and strangeness phenomena, the exclusive Sivers effect, hidden-color Fock states of nuclei, local two-photon interactions in deeply virtual Compton scattering, and non-universal antishadowing.

  16. Reply to comment on ''New limits on intrinsic charm in the nucleon from global analysis of parton distribution''

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro; Hobbs, Timothy J.; Londergan, J. T.; Melnitchouk, Wally

    2016-01-05

    We reply to the Comment of Brodsky and Gardner on our paper "New limits on intrinsic charm in the nucleon from global analysis of parton distributions" [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 082002 (2015)]. We address a number of incorrect claims made about our fitting methodology, and elaborate how global QCD analysis of all available high-energy data provides no evidence for a large intrinsic charm component of the nucleon.

  17. Development and implementation of (Q)SAR modeling within the CHARMMing web-user interface.

    PubMed

    Weidlich, Iwona E; Pevzner, Yuri; Miller, Benjamin T; Filippov, Igor V; Woodcock, H Lee; Brooks, Bernard R

    2015-01-01

    Recent availability of large publicly accessible databases of chemical compounds and their biological activities (PubChem, ChEMBL) has inspired us to develop a web-based tool for structure activity relationship and quantitative structure activity relationship modeling to add to the services provided by CHARMMing (www.charmming.org). This new module implements some of the most recent advances in modern machine learning algorithms-Random Forest, Support Vector Machine, Stochastic Gradient Descent, Gradient Tree Boosting, so forth. A user can import training data from Pubchem Bioassay data collections directly from our interface or upload his or her own SD files which contain structures and activity information to create new models (either categorical or numerical). A user can then track the model generation process and run models on new data to predict activity. PMID:25362883

  18. Measurement of inclusive charm production in two-photon collisions at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Alan L., Jr.

    The cross section of inclusive charm production in two- photon collisions s(e+e--->e +e- ccX) is measured at the Large Electron Positron (LEP) collider at the European Center for Nuclear and Particle Physics (CERN). The data was obtained with the L3 detector at the center-of-mass energy of 91 GeV (LEP1) and for the first time at the center-of-mass energies from 130-183 GeV (LEP2). Charmed hadrons are identified by electrons and muons from semileptonic decays. The measured cross section agrees with next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD calculations. The direct process gg-->cc is found to be insufficient to describe the data. The measured cross section values and event distributions require contributions from resolved processes, which are sensitive to the gluon density in the photon.

  19. Semileptonic B and B{sub s} decays into orbitally excited charmed mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Segovia, J.; Albertus, C.; Entem, D. R.; Fernandez, F.; Hernandez, E.; Perez-Garcia, M. A.

    2011-11-01

    The BABAR Collaboration has recently reported products of branching fractions that include B meson semileptonic decays into final states with charged and neutral D{sub 1}(2420) and D{sub 2}*(2460), two narrow orbitally excited charmed mesons. We evaluate these branching fractions, together with those concerning D{sub 0}*(2400) and D{sub 1}{sup '}(2430) mesons, within the framework of a constituent quark model. The calculation is performed in two steps, one of which involves a semileptonic decay and the other is mediated by a strong process. Our results are in agreement with the experimental data. We also extend the study to semileptonic decays of B{sub s} into orbitally excited charmed-strange mesons, providing predictions to the possible measurements to be carried out at LHC.

  20. Beauty-quark and charm-quark pair production asymmetries at LHCb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauld, Rhorry; Haisch, Ulrich; Pecjak, Ben D.; Re, Emanuele

    2015-08-01

    The LHCb Collaboration has recently performed a first measurement of the angular production asymmetry in the distribution of beauty quarks and antiquarks at a hadron collider. We calculate the corresponding standard model prediction for this asymmetry at fixed order in perturbation theory. Our results show good agreement with the data, which are provided differentially for three bins in the invariant mass of the b b ¯ system. We also present similar predictions for both beauty-quark and charm-quark final states within the LHCb acceptance for a collision energy of √{s }=13 TeV . We finally point out that a measurement of the ratio of the b b ¯ and c c ¯ cross sections may be useful for experimentally validating charm-tagging efficiencies.

  1. Development and implementation of (Q)SAR modeling within the CHARMMing Web-user interface

    PubMed Central

    Weidlich, Iwona E.; Pevzner, Yuri; Miller, Benjamin T.; Filippov, Igor V.; Woodcock, H. Lee; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent availability of large publicly accessible databases of chemical compounds and their biological activities (PubChem, ChEMBL) has inspired us to develop a Web-based tool for SAR and QSAR modeling to add to the services provided by CHARMMing (www.charmming.org). This new module implements some of the most recent advances in modern machine learning algorithms – Random Forest, Support Vector Machine (SVM), Stochastic Gradient Descent, Gradient Tree Boosting etc. A user can import training data from Pubchem Bioassay data collections directly from our interface or upload his or her own SD files which contain structures and activity information to create new models (either categorical or numerical). A user can then track the model generation process and run models on new data to predict activity. PMID:25362883

  2. Study of asymmetry parameters of {\\Lambda }_{c}^{+} decays in a τ-charm factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Ping, Rong-Gang; Li, Hai-Bo

    2015-09-01

    An enhancement of cross section for {e}+{e}-\\to {Λ }c+{\\bar{Λ }}c- pair production near their threshold provides an opportunity to study the charm baryon {Λ }c+/{\\bar{Λ }}c- at a τ-charm factory with {e}+{e}- collisions. We estimate the prospects of searching for the CP violation in the decays {Λ }c+\\to Λ {π }+ and {\\bar{Λ }}c-\\to \\bar{Λ }{π }-. Helicity amplitude analysis shows that the asymmetry parameters, {α }{Λ c+} and {α }{\\bar{Λ }c-}, can be directly accessed by looking at the angular proton and antiproton distributions in their helicity systems. A Monte Carlo estimation shows that data with the integrated luminosity of 530 {{pb}}-1 yields a statistical precision of about 25% for the {CP} asymmetry parameter {A}. To improve the precision to better than 0.1%, an integrated luminosity of at least 1800 fb-1 of data is required.

  3. Masses of doubly charmed baryons in the extended on-mass-shell renormalization scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhi-Feng; Vacas, M. J. Vicente

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we investigate the mass corrections of the doubly charmed baryons up to N2L O in the extended-on-mass-shell (EOMS) renormalization scheme, comparing with the results of heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory. We find that the terms from the heavy baryon approach are a subset of those obtained in the EOMS scheme. By fitting the lattice data, we can determine the parameters m ˜, α , c1 and c7 from the Lagrangian, while in the heavy baryon approach no information on c1 can be obtained from the baryons mass. Correspondingly, the masses of mΞcc and mΩcc are predicted, in the EOMS scheme, extrapolating the results from different values of the charm quark and the pion masses of the lattice QCD calculations.

  4. Resonant scattering and charm showers in ultrahigh-energy neutrino interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilczek, F.

    1985-01-01

    Electron antineutrinos with energy of about 7 x 10 to the 6th GeV have much-enhanced cross sections due to W-boson production off electrons. Possible signals due to cosmic-ray sources are estimated. Higher-energy antineutrinos can efficiently produce a W accompanied by radiation. Another possibility, which could lead to shadowing at modest depths, is resonant production of a charged Higgs particle. The importance of muon production by charm showers in rock is pointed out.

  5. Charmed spectroscopy from a nonperturbatively determined relativistic heavy quark action in full QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin

    2006-07-28

    We present a preliminary calculation of the charmed meson spectrum using the 2+1 flavor domain wall fermion lattice configurations currently being generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations. The calculation is performed using the 3-parameter, relativistic heavy quark action with nonperturbatively determined coefficients. We will also demonstrate a step-scaling procedure for determining these coefficients nonperturbatively using a series of quenched, gauge field ensembles generated for three different lattice spacings.

  6. Present theoretical uncertainties on charm hadroproduction in QCD and prompt neutrino fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzelli, M. V.; Moch, S.; Sigl, G.

    2016-04-01

    Prompt neutrino fluxes are basic backgrounds in the search of high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin, performed by means of full-size neutrino telescopes located at Earth, under ice or under water. Predictions for these fluxes are provided on the basis of up-to-date theoretical results for charm hadroproduction in perturbative QCD, together with a comprehensive discussion of the various sources of theoretical uncertainty affecting their computation, and a quantitative estimate of each uncertainty contribution.

  7. Studies of charmed hadronic B decays with the early LHCb data and prospects for {gamma} measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nardulli, J.

    2010-12-22

    We present the first studies of decays of the type B{yields}DX, where D represents a charmed meson (D{sup 0}, D{sup (*)+}, or D{sub s}) from the LHCb experiment at CERN. Our studies use data accumulated during the 2010 run of the LHC. This work represents the first steps on a programme towards a precision measurement of the angle {gamma} of the CKM Unitarity Triangle. The prospects for this {gamma} measurement will be reviewed.

  8. Neutrino Production of a Charmed Meson and the Transverse Spin Structure of the Nucleon.

    PubMed

    Pire, B; Szymanowski, L

    2015-08-28

    We calculate the amplitude for exclusive neutrino production of a charmed meson on an unpolarized target in the collinear QCD approach, where generalized parton distributions (GPDs) factorize from perturbatively calculable coefficient functions. We demonstrate that the transversity chiral odd GPDs contribute to the transverse cross section if the hard amplitude is calculated up to order m_{c}/Q. We show how to access these GPDs through the azimuthal dependence of the νN→μ^{-}D^{+}N differential cross section. PMID:26371643

  9. Line shapes of the exotic charm-anticharm mesons X(3872) and Z(4430)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Meng

    The B-factory experiments have recently discovered a series of new cc mesons, including the X(3872) and the first manifestly exotic meson Z +/-(4430). The proximity of the mass of the X to the D*0D 0 threshold has motivated its identification as a loosely-bound hadronic molecule whose constituents are a superposition of the charm mesons pairs D*0D 0 and D0D* 0. Factorization formulas for its line shapes are derived by taking advantage of the universality of S-wave resonances near a 2-particle threshold and by including the effects from the nonzero width of D* meson and the inelastic scattering channels of the charm mesons. The best fit to the line shapes of X in the J/psipi +pi- and D0 D0pi0 channels measured by the Belle Collaboration corresponds to the X being a bound state whose mass is just below the D*0 D0 threshold. The differences between the line shapes of X produced in B+ decays and B0 decays as well as in decay channels J/psipi+pi-, J /psipi+pi-pi0 , and D0D 0pi0 are further derived by taking into account the effects from the closeby channel composed of charged charm mesons. A more speculative application of the universality of S-wave resonances near a 2-particle threshold is to the Z+/-(4430), which is interpreted as a charm meson molecule composed of a superposition of D+1D*0 and D*+D01 . The small ratio of the binding energy of the Z + to the width of its constituent D1 is exploited to obtained simple predictions for its line shapes in the channels psi(2S)pi + and D*D*pi.

  10. Charmed-meson production in 800-GeV P-P interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Senko, M.F.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to present the results of a study concerning the energy dependence of charmed meson production properties as a test of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). This experiment was performed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, using a rapid cycling bubble chamber (LEBC) as a hydrogen target and high resolution vertex detector, in combination with the Fermilab Multiparticle Spectrometer (FMPS). The multiplicity trigger was unbiased, and spectrometer acceptance was good at x{sub F} {ge} 0. A comparison of the results from previous experiments at center of mass energies {radical}s {le} 27 GeV and {radical}s {ge} 53 GeV implies a total charm particle production cross section which rises rapidly as a function of {radical}s. The result of the experiment, {sigma}(D/{bar D}) = 42.7 {plus minus} 7.8 {mu}b at {radical}s = 38 GeV, indicates a slower rise, in agreement with QCD predictions. A maximum likelihood fit to the parameterization of the differential cross section as d{sup 2}{sigma}/dx{sub F}dp{sub {perpendicular}}{sup 2} {approximately} (1 {minus} {vert bar}x{sub F}{vert bar}){sup n}e{sup {minus}bp{sub {perpendicular}}{sup 2}} gives the results n = 8.4{sub {minus}1.9}{sup +2.2}, b= 0.78{sub {minus}0.16}{sup +0.19} (GeV/c){sup {minus}2}, and {l angle}p{perpendicular}{r angle} = 1.1{sub {minus} 0.1}{sup +0.2} GeV/c. When compared with results from the lower energy experiments, these values indicate charm production becoming more central and {l angle}p{perpendicular}{r angle} being consistent with the charmed quark mass. These results are once again consistent with QCD predictions.

  11. Web-based computational chemistry education with CHARMMing II: Coarse-grained protein folding.

    PubMed

    Pickard, Frank C; Miller, Benjamin T; Schalk, Vinushka; Lerner, Michael G; Woodcock, H Lee; Brooks, Bernard R

    2014-07-01

    A lesson utilizing a coarse-grained (CG) Gō-like model has been implemented into the CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing) web portal (www.charmming.org) to the Chemistry at HARvard Macromolecular Mechanics (CHARMM) molecular simulation package. While widely used to model various biophysical processes, such as protein folding and aggregation, CG models can also serve as an educational tool because they can provide qualitative descriptions of complex biophysical phenomena for a relatively cheap computational cost. As a proof of concept, this lesson demonstrates the construction of a CG model of a small globular protein, its simulation via Langevin dynamics, and the analysis of the resulting data. This lesson makes connections between modern molecular simulation techniques and topics commonly presented in an advanced undergraduate lecture on physical chemistry. It culminates in a straightforward analysis of a short dynamics trajectory of a small fast folding globular protein; we briefly describe the thermodynamic properties that can be calculated from this analysis. The assumptions inherent in the model and the data analysis are laid out in a clear, concise manner, and the techniques used are consistent with those employed by specialists in the field of CG modeling. One of the major tasks in building the Gō-like model is determining the relative strength of the nonbonded interactions between coarse-grained sites. New functionality has been added to CHARMMing to facilitate this process. The implementation of these features into CHARMMing helps automate many of the tedious aspects of constructing a CG Gō model. The CG model builder and its accompanying lesson should be a valuable tool to chemistry students, teachers, and modelers in the field. PMID:25058338

  12. Web-Based Computational Chemistry Education with CHARMMing II: Coarse-Grained Protein Folding

    PubMed Central

    Schalk, Vinushka; Lerner, Michael G.; Woodcock, H. Lee; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    A lesson utilizing a coarse-grained (CG) G-like model has been implemented into the CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing) web portal (www.charmming.org) to the Chemistry at HARvard Macromolecular Mechanics (CHARMM) molecular simulation package. While widely used to model various biophysical processes, such as protein folding and aggregation, CG models can also serve as an educational tool because they can provide qualitative descriptions of complex biophysical phenomena for a relatively cheap computational cost. As a proof of concept, this lesson demonstrates the construction of a CG model of a small globular protein, its simulation via Langevin dynamics, and the analysis of the resulting data. This lesson makes connections between modern molecular simulation techniques and topics commonly presented in an advanced undergraduate lecture on physical chemistry. It culminates in a straightforward analysis of a short dynamics trajectory of a small fast folding globular protein; we briefly describe the thermodynamic properties that can be calculated from this analysis. The assumptions inherent in the model and the data analysis are laid out in a clear, concise manner, and the techniques used are consistent with those employed by specialists in the field of CG modeling. One of the major tasks in building the G-like model is determining the relative strength of the nonbonded interactions between coarse-grained sites. New functionality has been added to CHARMMing to facilitate this process. The implementation of these features into CHARMMing helps automate many of the tedious aspects of constructing a CG G model. The CG model builder and its accompanying lesson should be a valuable tool to chemistry students, teachers, and modelers in the field. PMID:25058338

  13. Exploring the role of the charm quark in the Δ I =1 /2 rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endress, E.; Pena, C.

    2014-11-01

    We study the dependence on the charm quark mass of the leading-order low-energy constants of the Δ S =1 effective Hamiltonian, with the aim of elucidating the role of the charm mass scale in the Δ I =1 /2 rule for K →π π decay. To that purpose, finite-volume chiral perturbation theory predictions are matched to QCD simulations, performed in the quenched approximation with overlap fermions and mu=md=ms . Light quark masses range between a few MeV up to around one third of the physical strange mass, while charm masses range between mu and a few hundred MeV. Novel variance reduction techniques are used to obtain a signal for penguin contractions in correlation functions involving four-fermion operators. The important role played by the subtractions required to construct renormalized amplitudes for mc≠mu is discussed in detail. We find evidence that the moderate enhancement of the Δ I =1 /2 amplitude previously found in the GIM limit mc=mu increases only slightly as mc abandons the light quark regime. Hints of a stronger enhancement for even higher values of mc are also found, but their confirmation requires a better understanding of the subtraction terms.

  14. Formation spectra of charmed meson-nucleus systems using an antiproton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagata-Sekihara, J.; Garcia-Recio, C.; Nieves, J.; Salcedo, L. L.; Tolos, L.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the structure and formation of charmed meson-nucleus systems, with the aim of understanding the charmed meson-nucleon interactions and the properties of the charmed mesons in the nuclear medium. The D bar mesic nuclei are of special interest, since they have tiny decay widths due to the absence of strong decays for the D bar N pair. Employing an effective model for the D bar N and DN interactions and solving the Klein-Gordon equation for D bar and D in finite nuclei, we find that the D--11B system has 1s and 2p mesic nuclear states and that the D0-11B system binds in a 1s state. In view of the forthcoming experiments by the PANDA and CBM Collaborations at the future FAIR facility and the J-PARC upgrade, we calculate the formation spectra of the [D--11B] and [D0-11B] mesic nuclei for an antiproton beam on a 12C target. Our results suggest that it is possible to observe the 2pD- mesic nuclear state with an appropriate experimental setup.

  15. Strong decays of excited 1D charmed(-strange) mesons in the covariant oscillator quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Tomohito; Yoshida, Kento; Yamada, Kenji; Ishida, Shin; Oda, Masuho

    2016-05-01

    Recently observed charmed mesons, D1* (2760), D3* (2760) and charmed-strange mesons, Ds1 * (2860), Ds3 * (2860), by BaBar and LHCb collaborations are considered to be plausible candidates for c q ¯ 13 DJ (q = u, d, s) states. We calculate the strong decays with one pion (kaon) emission of these states including well-established 1S and 1P charmed(-strange) mesons within the framework of the covariant oscillator quark model. The results obtained are compared with the experimental data and the typical nonrelativistic quark-model calculations. Concerning the results for 1S and 1P states, we find that, thanks to the relativistic effects of decay form factors, our model parameters take reasonable values, though our relativistic approach and the nonrelativistic quark model give similar decay widths in agreement with experiment. While the results obtained for 13 DJ=1,3 states are roughly consistent with the present data, they should be checked by the future precise measurement.

  16. A study of P wave charm mesons, a search for radially excited charm mesons and a study of microstrip gas chambers with polymer substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Naresh Nandrumar

    Using approximately 4 × 106e +e- --> cc¯ events at √ s = 10.5GeVc2 obtained with the CLEO II.V detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have investigated properties of the two narrow L = 1 charmed mesons, D 1(2420)0 and D*2 (2460)0. We observe and measure the mass and decay width of the two mesons in the charmed continuum by studying D +π- and D*+π - final states. We measure B(D*0 2-->D+p- )/B(D* 02-->D* +p-) = 2.94 +/- 0.40(stat.) +/- 0.44( sys.) +/- 0.25( B ). All these parameters have historically been poorly determined and our measurements have precisions which are better than the combined world average. We also search for the forbidden decay mode D 1 --> D+π- and find no evidence for this ( B ( D01 --> D+π-)/ B ( D01 --> D*+π-) <= 0.069 at 90% C.L.). Using approximately 107e+ e- --> cc¯ events at √s = 10.5GeV/c2 obtained with the CLEO II and CLEO II. V detectors we present our results for the search for a narrow radially excited charmed meson D*'+ . The DELPHI collaboration presented first evidence for a narrow radially excited charm meson in the summer of 1997 by comparing their D*'+ signal to their DJ0 production (s(e+e- -->Z--> D*'+)B(D *'+-->D*+ p+p- ))/ (s(e+e- --> Z-->DJ0)B (DJ0 -->D*+p- )) = 0.49 +/- 0.18(stat.) +/- 0.10( syst.). We find no evidence for a narrow D*'+ signal in the decay modes of D*'+-->D*+p -p+(s(e +e- -->D*'+) B(D*'+ -->D*+p+p -)/(s(e+e--->DJ0) B(DJ 0-->D*+p- )) <= 0.09 at 90% C.L.) and D*'+-->DJ 0p+(s(e +e- -->D*'+) B(D*'+ -->DJ0p +) /(s(e+e--->DJ 0)B(DJ 0-->D*+p- ) <= 0.053 at 90% C.L.). For the latter analysis we use data obtained with the CLEO II.V detector only. We presented preliminary results with the CLEO II data set at ICHEP'98. The upper limits presented above supersedes the previous results and is approximately 60% smaller. We report on the study of Microstrip Gas Chambers (MSGCs) with Polymer substrates. We discuss the applicability of these detectors to two dimensional imaging of photons (X- rays) and

  17. Search for Scalar Charm Quark Pair Production in p p Collisions at √{s }=8 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao de Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Bucci, F.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charfeddine, D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; da Cunha Sargedas de Sousa, M. J.; da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davignon, O.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; de, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Castro, S.; de Cecco, S.; de Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; de la Torre, H.; de Lorenzi, F.; de Nooij, L.; de Pedis, D.; de Salvo, A.; de Sanctis, U.; de Santo, A.; de Vivie de Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; Della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; Demarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; di Ciaccio, A.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Domenico, A.; di Donato, C.; di Girolamo, A.; di Girolamo, B.; di Mattia, A.; di Micco, B.; di Nardo, R.; di Simone, A.; di Sipio, R.; di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T. A.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; Do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dwuznik, M.; Dyndal, M.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Engelmann, R.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de La Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K.-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grishkevich, Y. V.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Gupta, S.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guttman, N.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamer, M.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Heller, M.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holmes, T. R.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, D.; Hu, Q.; Hu, X.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. A.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikematsu, K.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Inamaru, Y.; Ince, T.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Ivarsson, J.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M. R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jakubek, J.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansky, R. 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G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D. H.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simoniello, R.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Siragusa, G.; Sircar, A.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, K. M.; Smith, M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanasijczuk, A. J.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van den Wollenberg, W.; van der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W.-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.; Atlas Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The results of a dedicated search for pair production of scalar partners of charm quarks are reported. The search is based on an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 of p p collisions at √{s }=8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The search is performed using events with large missing transverse momentum and at least two jets, where the two leading jets are each tagged as originating from c quarks. Events containing isolated electrons or muons are vetoed. In an R -parity-conserving minimal supersymmetric scenario in which a single scalar-charm state is kinematically accessible, and where it decays exclusively into a charm quark and a neutralino, 95% confidence-level upper limits are obtained in the scalar-charm-neutralino mass plane such that, for neutralino masses below 200 GeV, scalar-charm masses up to 490 GeV are excluded.

  18. Gluon and charm content of the {eta}{sup {prime}} meson and instantons

    SciTech Connect

    Shuryak, E.V. |; Zhitnitsky, A.R. |

    1998-02-01

    Motivated by recent CLEO measurements of the B{r_arrow}{eta}{sup {prime}}K decay, we evaluate the gluon and charm content of the {eta}{sup {prime}} meson using the interacting instanton liquid model of the QCD vacuum. Our main result is {l_angle}0{vert_bar}g{sup 3}f{sup abc}G{sub {mu}{nu}}{sup a}{tilde G}{sub {nu}{alpha}}{sup b}G{sub {alpha}{mu}}{sup c}{vert_bar}{eta}{sup {prime}}{r_angle}={minus}(2.3{endash}3.3) GeV{sup 2}{times}{l_angle}0{vert_bar}g{sup 2}G{sub {mu}{nu}}{sup a}{tilde G}{sub {mu}{nu}}{sup a}{vert_bar}{eta}{sup {prime}}{r_angle}. It is very large due to the strong field of small-size instantons. We show that it provides quantitative explanations of the CLEO data on the B{r_arrow}{eta}{sup {prime}}K decay rate (as well as the inclusive process B{r_arrow}{eta}{sup {prime}}+X), via a virtual Cabibbo-unsuppressed decay into a {bar c}c pair which then becomes {eta}{sup {prime}}. If so, a significant charm component may be present in other hadrons also: We briefly discuss the contribution of the charmed quark to the {ital polarized} deep-inelastic scattering on a proton. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Search for rare and forbidden Charm Meson decays D0 --> Vl+l- and hhll.

    PubMed

    Aitala, E M; Amato, S; Anjos, J C; Appel, J A; Ashery, D; Banerjee, S; Bediaga, I; Blaylock, G; Bracker, S B; Burchat, P R; Burnstein, R A; Carter, T; Carvalho, H S; Copty, N K; Cremaldi, L M; Darling, C; Denisenko, K; Devmal, S; Fernandez, A; Fox, G F; Gagnon, P; Gobel, C; Gounder, K; Halling, A M; Herrera, G; Hurvits, G; James, C; Kasper, P A; Kwan, S; Langs, D C; Leslie, J; Lundberg, B; Magnin, J; MayTal-Beck, S; Meadows, B; de Mello Neto, J R; Mihalcea, D; Milburn, R H; de Miranda, J M; Napier, A; Nguyen, A; d'Oliveira, A B; O'Shaughnessy, K; Peng, K C; Perera, L P; Purohit, M V; Quinn, B; Radeztsky, S; Rafatian, A; Reay, N W; Reidy, J J; dos Reis, A C; Rubin, H A; Sanders, D A; Santha, A K; Santoro, A F; Schwartz, A J; Sheaff, M; Sidwell, R A; Slaughter, A J; Sokoloff, M D; Solano, J; Stanton, N R; Stefanski, R J; Stenson, K; Summers, D J; Takach, S; Thorne, K; Tripathi, A K; Watanabe, S; Weiss-Babai, R; Wiener, J; Witchey, N; Wolin, E; Yang, S M; Yi, D; Yoshida, S; Zaliznyak, R; Zhang, C

    2001-04-30

    We report results of a search for flavor-changing neutral current (FCNC), lepton flavor, and lepton-number violating decays of the D0 (and its antiparticle) into three and four bodies. Using data from Fermilab charm hadroproduction experiment E791, we examine modes with two leptons (muons or electrons) and a rho(0), K( *0), or straight phi vector meson or a nonresonant pi(pi), Kpi, or KK pair of pseudoscalar mesons. No evidence for any of these decays is found. Therefore, we present branching-fraction upper limits at 90% confidence level for the 27 decay modes examined (18 new). PMID:11328072

  20. Observation of Hadronic Charm Production in a High Resolution Streamer Chamber Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Sandweiss, J.; et al.

    1980-01-01

    Short-lived particles produced in association with muons have been observed in the interactions of 350-GeV/c protons with neon in a high-resolution streamer chamber. The characteristics of these events are consistent with the expected properties of charmed particles if the average lifetime lies between 10/sup -13/ and 2 x 10/sup -12/ sec. With the assumption that the observed events are mainly D/sup + -/ mesons with lieftimes of approximately 10/sup -12/ sec, the production cross section is estimated to lie between 20 and 50 ..mu..b per nucleon.

  1. The forward-backward asymmetry for charm quarks at the Z pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Casper, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Palla, F.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Girone, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; X., Huang; J., Lin; Ouyang, Q.; T., Wang; Y., Xie; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bonvicini, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Comas, P.; Coyle, P.; Drevermann, H.; Engelhardt, A.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Maggi, M.; Markou, C.; Martin, E. B.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Oest, T.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rensing, P.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Venturi, A.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Passalacqua, L.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Ten Have, I.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; Morton, W. T.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, F.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Becker, U.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Konstantinidis, N.; Moneta, L.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Stacey, A. M.; Dissertori, G.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Sloan, T.; Whelan, E. P.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Wanke, R.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Thulasidas, M.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Abt, I.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Gotzhein, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; St. Denis, R.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Courault, F.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Musolino, G.; Nikolic, I.; Park, H. J.; Park, I. C.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; Medcalf, T.; Mir, Ll. M.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; Bertin, V.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Beddall, A.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Koksal, A.; Letho, M.; Newton, W. M.; Rankin, C.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Feigl, E.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Minguet-Rodriguez, J.; Rivera, F.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Ganis, G.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Pitis, L.; Ragusa, F.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Bellantoni, L.; Elmer, P.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; González, S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; H., Hu; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I. J.; Sharma, V.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Sau, Lan Wu; X, Wu; Yamartino, J. M.; M., Zheng; Zobernig, G.

    1995-02-01

    From 1.4 million hadronic Z decays collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP, an enriched sample of Z → cc¯ events is extracted by requiring the presence of a high momentum D ∗±. The charm quark forward-backward charge asymmetry at the Z pole is measured to be AFB0. c = (8.0 ± 2.4) % corresponding to an effective electroweak mixing angle of sin 2θWeff = 0.2302 ± 0.0054.

  2. The forward-backward asymmetry for charm quarks at the Z

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Boix, G.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Graugès, E.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Becker, U.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Casper, D.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ciulli, V.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Halley, A. W.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Lehraus, I.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Chazelle, G.; Deschamps, O.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.-C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Buchmüller, O.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Marinelli, N.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Buck, P. G.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Robertson, N. A.; Williams, M. I.; Giehl, I.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Etienne, F.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Antonelli, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Büscher, V.; Cowan, G.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Lütjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Boccali, T.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A., III; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    1998-08-01

    The data set collected with the ALEPH detector from 1991 to 1995 at LEP has been analysed to measure the charm forward-backward asymmetry at the Z. Out of a total of 4.1 million hadronic Z decays, about 36000 high momentum D*+, D+ and D0 decays were reconstructed, of which 80% originate from Z-->cc¯ events. The forward-backward asymmetry was measured at three energy points:From this analysis, a value of the effective electroweak mixing angle sin2θeffW=0.2321+/- 0.0016 is extracted.

  3. Production of the charmed strange baryon. xi. /sub c//sup +/ by neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    We report on the observation of a narrow resonance at a mass of 2450 MeV/c/sup 2/ in the final states ..lambda..K/sup -/..pi../sup +/..pi../sup +/ and ..sigma../sup 0/K/sup -/..pi../sup +/..pi../sup +/. The mass, width, lifetime, and decay modes support the interpretation of a hadronically produced charm-strange baryon, the ..xi../sub c//sup +/. We present our preliminary measurements of the lifetime, and the ..lambda.., x/sub feynman,/ and p/sub t/ dependence of the state.

  4. Radiative transitions in charm-strange meson from Nf = 2 twisted mass lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Wu, Ya-Jie

    2016-07-01

    We present an exploratory study on the radiative transition for the charm-strange meson: Ds∗→ D sγ using Nf = 2 twisted mass lattice quantum chromodynamics gauge configurations. The form factor for Ds meson is also determined. The simulation is performed on lattices with lattice spacings a = 0.067 fm and lattice size 323 × 64, and a = 0.085 fm and lattice size 243 × 48, respectively. Our numerical results for radiative decay width and the experimental data overlap within the margin of error.

  5. HHChPT Applied to the Charmed-Strange Parity Partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, R. P.

    2007-10-01

    We apply heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory (HHChPT) to study the properties of the even- and odd-parity charmed-strange mesons. We find that the experimental masses and electromagnetic decay rates are consistent with HHChPT. We consider the hypothesis that the even-parity states are molecules. An RG analysis shows that once the HHChPT parameter set overlaps with the parity doubling model, the parameters remain at those values. Finally, the implications for the bottom-strange system are described.

  6. Direct CP violation in charm and flavor mixing beyond the SM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradisi, Paride

    2013-08-01

    We discuss the impact of physics beyond the Standard Model on direct CP violation in charm. On general grounds, models in which the primary source of flavor violation is linked to the breaking of chiral symmetry (left-right flavor mixing) are natural candidates to explain this effect, via enhanced chromomagnetic operators. In the case of super-symmetric models, we identify two motivated scenarios: disoriented A-terms and split families. Non-supersymmetric models with Z-mediated and scalar-mediated FCNC are also discussed.

  7. Automation, Operation, and Data Analysis in the Cryogenic, High Accuracy, Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Bradley J.; Leviton, Douglas B.

    2005-01-01

    The Cryogenic High Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center has been enhanced in a number of ways in the last year to allow the system to accurately collect refracted beam deviation readings automatically over a range of temperatures from 15 K to well beyond room temperature with high sampling density in both wavelength and temperature. The engineering details which make this possible are presented. The methods by which the most accurate angular measurements are made and the corresponding data reduction methods used to reduce thousands of observed angles to a handful of refractive index values are also discussed.

  8. Automation, Operation, and Data Analysis in the Cryogenic, High Accuracy, Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Bradley; Leviton, Duoglas

    2005-01-01

    The Cryogenic High Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center has been enhanced in a number of ways in the last year to allow the system to accurately collect refracted beam deviation readings automatically over a range of temperatures from 15 K to well beyond room temperature with high sampling density in both wavelength and temperature. The engineering details which make this possible are presented. The methods by which the most accurate angular measurements are made and the corresponding data reduction methods used to reduce thousands of observed angles to a handful of refractive index values are also discussed.

  9. Searches for Rare Leptonic and Semileptonic Charm Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Paul D.; /Ohio State U.

    2007-01-17

    Recent results from leptonic and semi-leptonic charm decays at the BABAR B-factory are presented. The measurement of f{sub D{sub s}} from the D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu} channel is presented. Form-factor studies from the D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e} channel are described along with a search for flavor-changing neutral-current X{sub c}{sup +} {yields} h{sup +}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{prime}{sup -} decays.

  10. Search for Rare and Forbidden Charm Meson Decays D0 --> Vl+l- and hhll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Copty, N. K.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Devmal, S.; Fernandez, A.; Fox, G. F.; Gagnon, P.; Gobel, C.; Gounder, K.; Halling, A. M.; Herrera, G.; Hurvits, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lundberg, B.; Magnin, J.; Maytal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B.; de Mello Neto, J. R.; Mihalcea, D.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; Nguyen, A.; D'Oliveira, A. B.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sanders, D. A.; Santha, A. K.; Santoro, A. F.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sheaff, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Solano, J.; Stanton, N. R.; Stefanski, R. J.; Stenson, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss-Babai, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yang, S. M.; Yi, D.; Yoshida, S.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.

    2001-04-01

    We report results of a search for flavor-changing neutral current (FCNC), lepton flavor, and lepton-number violating decays of the D0 (and its antiparticle) into three and four bodies. Using data from Fermilab charm hadroproduction experiment E791, we examine modes with two leptons (muons or electrons) and a ρ0, K¯ *0, or φ vector meson or a nonresonant ππ, Kπ, or KK pair of pseudoscalar mesons. No evidence for any of these decays is found. Therefore, we present branching-fraction upper limits at 90% confidence level for the 27 decay modes examined (18 new).

  11. Even- and Odd-Parity Charmed Meson Masses in Heavy Hadron Chiral Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Mehen; Roxanne Springer

    2005-03-01

    We derive mass formulae for the ground state, J{sup P} = 0{sup -} and 1{sup -}, and first excited even-parity, J{sup P} = 0{sup +} and 1{sup +}, charmed mesons including one loop chiral corrections and {Omicron}(1/m{sub c}) counterterms in heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory. We show a variety of fits to the current data. We find that certain parameter relations in the parity doubling model are not renormalized at one loop, providing a natural explanation for the equality of the hyperfine splittings of ground state and excited doublets.

  12. Charm-Quark Production in Deep-Inelastic Neutrino Scattering at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Edmond L.; Gao, Jun; Li, Chong Sheng; Liu, Ze Long; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2016-05-01

    We present a fully differential next-to-next-to-leading order calculation of charm-quark production in charged-current deep-inelastic scattering, with full charm-quark mass dependence. The next-to-next-to-leading order corrections in perturbative quantum chromodynamics are found to be comparable in size to the next-to-leading order corrections in certain kinematic regions. We compare our predictions with data on dimuon production in (anti)neutrino scattering from a heavy nucleus. Our results can be used to improve the extraction of the parton distribution function of a strange quark in the nucleon.

  13. Hadron Physics at the Charm and Bottom Thresholds and Other Novel QCD Physics Topics at the NICA Accelerator Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-06-20

    The NICA collider project at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna will have the capability of colliding protons, polarized deuterons, and nuclei at an effective nucleon-nucleon center-of mass energy in the range {radical}s{sub NN} = 4 to 11 GeV. I briefly survey a number of novel hadron physics processes which can be investigated at the NICA collider. The topics include the formation of exotic heavy quark resonances near the charm and bottom thresholds, intrinsic strangeness, charm, and bottom phenomena, hidden-color degrees of freedom in nuclei, color transparency, single-spin asymmetries, the RHIC baryon anomaly, and non-universal antishadowing.

  14. Charm-Quark Production in Deep-Inelastic Neutrino Scattering at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order in QCD.

    PubMed

    Berger, Edmond L; Gao, Jun; Li, Chong Sheng; Liu, Ze Long; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2016-05-27

    We present a fully differential next-to-next-to-leading order calculation of charm-quark production in charged-current deep-inelastic scattering, with full charm-quark mass dependence. The next-to-next-to-leading order corrections in perturbative quantum chromodynamics are found to be comparable in size to the next-to-leading order corrections in certain kinematic regions. We compare our predictions with data on dimuon production in (anti)neutrino scattering from a heavy nucleus. Our results can be used to improve the extraction of the parton distribution function of a strange quark in the nucleon. PMID:27284650

  15. Spectroscopy of doubly and triply-charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2013-11-01

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of doubly and triply-charmed baryons by using lattice QCD with dynamical clover fermions. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice and are obtained after subduction from their continuum analogues are utilized. Using novel computational techniques correlation functions of these operators are generated and the variational method is exploited to extract excited states. The lattice spectra that we obtain have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the low lying states remarkably resemble the expectations of quantum numbers from SU(6) Ⓧ O(3) symmetry. Various energy splittings between the extracted states, including splittings due to hyperfine as well as spin-orbit coupling, are considered and those are also compared against similar energy splittings at other quark masses. Using those splittings for doubly-charmed baryons, and taking input of experimental Bc meson mass, we predict the mass splittings of B*c-Bc to be about 80 ± 8 MeV and mΩccb=8050±10 MeV.

  16. Semileptonic decays of charmed and beauty baryons with heavy sterile neutrinos in the final state

    SciTech Connect

    Ramazanov, Sabir

    2009-04-01

    We obtain tree-level estimates of various differential branching ratios of heavy baryon decays with massive sterile neutrinos {nu}{sub x} in the final state. Generally, charmed baryons are found to be less promising than charmed mesons, in contrast to b hadrons. In the latter case, branching ratios of beauty mesons and baryons into sterile neutrinos are of the same order. As a consequence, at high energies beauty baryons give contribution to sterile neutrino production comparable to the contribution of beauty mesons (up to about 15%). Experimental limits on active-to-sterile mixing are quite strong for neutrinos lighter than D mesons but for heavier neutrinos they are weaker. As an example, for neutrino masses in the range 2 GeV < or approx. m{sub {nu}{sub x}} < or approx. 2.5 GeV, current data imply that the bounds on {lambda}{sub b}-hyperon branching ratios into sterile neutrinos are Br({lambda}{sub b}{yields}{lambda}{sub c}+e{sup -}+{nu}{sub x}) < or approx. 1.3x10{sup -5}-1.7x10{sup -6} and Br({lambda}{sub b}{yields}{lambda}{sub c}+{mu}{sup -}+{nu}{sub x}) < or approx. 3.9x10{sup -7}-1.4x10{sup -7}.

  17. Compositeness of the strange, charm, and beauty odd parity Λ states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Recio, C.; Hidalgo-Duque, C.; Nieves, J.; Salcedo, L. L.; Tolos, L.

    2015-08-01

    We study the dependence on the quark mass of the compositeness of the lowest-lying odd parity hyperon states. Thus, we pay attention to Λ -like states in the strange, charm, and beauty sectors which are dynamically generated using a unitarized meson-baryon model. In the strange sector we use a SU(6) extension of the Weinberg-Tomozawa meson-baryon interaction, and we further implement the heavy-quark spin symmetry to construct the meson-baryon interaction when charmed or beauty hadrons are involved. In the three examined flavor sectors, we obtain two JP=1 /2- and one JP=3 /2- Λ states. We find that the Λ states which are bound states (the three Λb) or narrow resonances [one Λ (1405 ) and one Λc(2595 )] are well described as molecular states composed of s -wave meson-baryon pairs. The 1/2- wide Λ (1405 ) and Λc(2595 ) as well as the 3/2- Λ (1520 ) and Λc(2625 ) states display smaller compositeness so they would require new mechanisms, such as d -wave interactions.

  18. Singly and Doubly Charmed $J=1/2$ Baryon Spectrum from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Liuming Liu; Lin, Huey-Wen; Orginos, Kostas; Walker-Loud, Andre

    2010-05-01

    We compute the masses of the singly and doubly charmed baryons in full QCD using the relativistic Fermilab action for the charm quark. For the light quarks we use domain-wall fermions in the valence sector and improved Kogut-Susskind sea quarks. We use the low-lying charmonium spectrum to tune our heavy-quark action and as a guide to understanding the discretization errors associated with the heavy quark. Our results are in good agreement with experiment within our systematicss, except for the spin-1/2 $\\Xi_{cc}$, for which we predict the isospin averaged mass to be $M_{\\Xi_{cc}} = 3665 \\pm17 \\pm14\\, {}^{+0}_{-35}$~{MeV} (here the first uncertainty is statistical, the second systematic and the third an estimate of lattice discretization errors). In addition, we predict the splitting of the (isospin averaged) spin-1/2 $\\O_{cc}$ with the $\\Xi_{cc}$ to be $M_{\\O_{cc}} - M_{\\Xi_{cc}} = 98 \\pm9 \\pm22$~{MeV} (in this mass splitting, the leading discretization errors cancel). This corresponds to a prediction of $M_{\\O_{cc}} = 3763\\pm9\\pm44\\, {}^{+0}_{-35}$~{MeV}.

  19. Web-Based Computational Chemistry Education with CHARMMing III: Reduction Potentials of Electron Transfer Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, B. Scott; Miller, Benjamin T.; Schalk, Vinushka; Woodcock, H. Lee; Brooks, Bernard R.; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2014-01-01

    A module for fast determination of reduction potentials, E°, of redox-active proteins has been implemented in the CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing) web portal (www.charmming.org). The free energy of reduction, which is proportional to E°, is composed of an intrinsic contribution due to the redox site and an environmental contribution due to the protein and solvent. Here, the intrinsic contribution is selected from a library of pre-calculated density functional theory values for each type of redox site and redox couple, while the environmental contribution is calculated from a crystal structure of the protein using Poisson-Boltzmann continuum electrostatics. An accompanying lesson demonstrates a calculation of E°. In this lesson, an ionizable residue in a [4Fe-4S]-protein that causes a pH-dependent E° is identified, and the E° of a mutant that would test the identification is predicted. This demonstration is valuable to both computational chemistry students and researchers interested in predicting sequence determinants of E° for mutagenesis. PMID:25058418

  20. Web-based computational chemistry education with CHARMMing III: Reduction potentials of electron transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Perrin, B Scott; Miller, Benjamin T; Schalk, Vinushka; Woodcock, H Lee; Brooks, Bernard R; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2014-07-01

    A module for fast determination of reduction potentials, E°, of redox-active proteins has been implemented in the CHARMM INterface and Graphics (CHARMMing) web portal (www.charmming.org). The free energy of reduction, which is proportional to E°, is composed of an intrinsic contribution due to the redox site and an environmental contribution due to the protein and solvent. Here, the intrinsic contribution is selected from a library of pre-calculated density functional theory values for each type of redox site and redox couple, while the environmental contribution is calculated from a crystal structure of the protein using Poisson-Boltzmann continuum electrostatics. An accompanying lesson demonstrates a calculation of E°. In this lesson, an ionizable residue in a [4Fe-4S]-protein that causes a pH-dependent E° is identified, and the E° of a mutant that would test the identification is predicted. This demonstration is valuable to both computational chemistry students and researchers interested in predicting sequence determinants of E° for mutagenesis. PMID:25058418

  1. Design considerations for a /hacek C/erenkov ring imaging detector at the tau-charm factory

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliff, B.N.

    1989-08-01

    A schematic design of a /hacek C/erenkov ring imaging detector for use at a /tau/-charm factory is described. The performance of this device and its implications for the other parts of the spectrometer are discussed. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Voodoo Dolls, Charms, and Spells in the Classroom: Teaching, Screening, and Deconstructing the Misrepresentation of the African Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuber, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    "New Orleans voodoo," also called "créole voodoo," is an amalgamation of an honoring of the spirits of the dead, a respect for the elderly and the spiritual life, African knowledge of herbs and charms, and European elements of Catholicism. It is a religion of ancestor worship that is unknown to us, and that we are not…

  3. Charm and beauty searches using electron -D{sup 0} azimuthal correlations and microvertexing techniques in STAR experiment at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Geromitsos, Artemios

    2010-12-22

    The energy loss of heavy quarks in the hot and dense matter created at RHIC, can be used to probe the properties of the medium. Both charm and beauty quarks contribute to the non-photonic electrons through their semi-leptonic decays. It is essential to determine experimentally the relative contribution of charm and beauty quarks to understand the suppression of heavy flavors at high p{sub T} in central Au+Au collisions. The azimuthal angular correlations of non-photonic electrons with the reconstructed D{sup 0} allow to disentangle the contribution of charm and beauty and to reduce the background below the D{sup 0} invariant mass as well. We discuss the STAR measurement of non-photonic electron and D{sup 0{yields}}K{sup -{pi}+} azimuthal correlations in p+p collisions at 200 GeV. Furthermore, we show results from the application of microvertexing techniques for charm and beauty searches in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV using the information of the Silicon tracker of STAR.

  4. Project of a Super Charm-Tau factory at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics in Novosibirsk

    SciTech Connect

    Bondar, A. E.

    2013-09-15

    A project of a Super Charm-Tau factory is being developed at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences) in Novosibirsk. The electron-positron collider to be employed will operate at c.m. energies in the range between 2 and 5 GeV at an unprecedentedly high luminosity of 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} with a longitudinal electron polarization at the beam-interaction point. The main objective of experiments at the Super Charm-Tau factory is to study processes involving the production and properties of charmed quarks and tau leptons. A high luminosity of this setup will make it possible to obtain a statistical data sample that will be three to four orders of magnitude vaster than that from any other experiment performed thus far. Experiments at this setup are assumed to be sensitive to effects of new physics beyond the Standard Model. Investigations to be carried out at the Super-Charm-Tau factory will supplement future experiments at Super-B factories under construction in Italy and in Japan.

  5. Production Behaviors of Open-Bottom Hadrons and Suppression of Λ b+-PRODUCTION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, P.

    This paper investigates production behaviors of the 0- and (1)/(2)+ open-bottom hadrons predicted by the standard six-quark model. To be specific, it points out which ones of these hadrons are expected to be freely produced and which ones of them must undergo suppressed production. Also, it has been stressed that suppression must be witnessed in production Λ b0 of unlike its charm counterpart Λ c+ which seems to be freely produced.

  6. 'Charm' Strawberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Charm’ is a new June-bearing (short-day) strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa Duchesne ex Rozier) cultivar from the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) breeding program in Corvallis, OR, released in cooperation with the Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station and the Wa...

  7. Nonperturbative charming penguin contributions to isospin asymmetries in radiative B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chul; Mehen, Thomas; Leibovich, Adam K.

    2008-09-01

    Recent experimental data on the radiative decays B{yields}V{gamma}, where V is a light vector meson, find small isospin violation in B{yields}K*{gamma} while isospin asymmetries in B{yields}{rho}{gamma} are of order 20%, with large uncertainties. Using soft-collinear effective theory, we calculate isospin asymmetries in these radiative B decays up to O(1/m{sub b}), also including O(v{alpha}{sub s}) contributions from nonperturbative charming penguins (NPCP). In the absence of NPCP contributions, the theoretical predictions for the asymmetries are a few percent or less. Including the NPCP can significantly increase the isospin asymmetries for both B{yields}V{gamma} modes. We also consider the effect of the NPCP on the branching ratio and CP asymmetries in B{sup {+-}}{yields}V{sup {+-}}{gamma}.

  8. Charm and beauty quark masses in the MMHT2014 global PDF analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harland-Lang, L. A.; Martin, A. D.; Motylinski, P.; Thorne, R. S.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the variation in the MMHT2014 PDFs when we allow the heavy-quark masses m_c and m_b to vary away from their default values. We make PDF sets available in steps of Δ m_c =0.05 GeV and Δ m_b =0.25 GeV, and present the variation in the PDFs and in the predictions. We examine the comparison to the HERA data on charm and beauty structure functions and note that in each case the heavy-quark data, and the inclusive data, have a slight preference for lower masses than our default values. We provide PDF sets with three and four active quark flavours, as well as the standard value of five flavours. We use the pole mass definition of the quark masses, as in the default MMHT2014 analysis, but briefly comment on the overline{MS} definition.

  9. Evidence for B Semileptonic Decays into the Lambda_c Charm Baryon

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-11-05

    We present the first evidence for B semileptonic decays into the charmed baryon {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} based on 420 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. Events are tagged by fully reconstructing one of the B mesons in a hadronic decay mode. We measure the relative branching fraction {Beta}({bar B} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} X{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}})/{Beta}({bar B} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}/{bar {Lambda}}{sub c}{sup -}X) = (3.2 {+-} 0.9{sub stat.} {+-} 0.9{sub syst.})%. The significance of the signal including the systematic uncertainty is 4.9 standard deviations.

  10. Axial charges of hyperons and charmed baryons using Nf=2 +1 +1 twisted mass fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrou, C.; Hadjiyiannakou, K.; Kallidonis, C.

    2016-08-01

    The axial couplings of the low lying baryons are evaluated using a total of five ensembles of dynamical twisted mass fermion gauge configurations. The simulations are performed using the Iwasaki gauge action and two degenerate flavors of light quarks, and a strange and a charm quark fixed to approximately their physical values at two values of the coupling constant. The lattice spacings, determined using the nucleon mass, are a =0.082 fm and a =0.065 fm , and the simulations cover a pion mass in the range of about 210 MeV to 430 MeV. We study the dependence of the axial couplings on the pion mass in the range of about 210 MeV to 430 MeV as well as the SU(3) breaking effects as we decrease the light quark mass toward its physical value.

  11. Estimate of the charmed 0{sup --} hybrid meson spectrum from quenched lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yan; Luo Xiangqian

    2006-03-01

    We compute from quenched lattice QCD the ground state masses of the charmed hybrid mesons ccg, with exotic quantum numbers J{sup PC}=1{sup -+}, 0{sup +-} and 0{sup --}. The 0{sup --} hybrid meson spectrum has never been provided by lattice simulations due to the difficulties to extract high gluonic excitations from noise. We employ improved gauge and fermion actions on the anisotropic lattice, which reduce greatly the lattice artifacts, and lead to very good signals. The data are extrapolated to the continuum limit, with finite size effects under well control. For 1{sup -+} and 0{sup +-} hybrid mesons, the ground state masses are 4.405(38) GeV and 4.714(52) GeV. We predict for the first time from lattice QCD, the ground state mass of 0{sup --} to be 5.883(146) GeV.

  12. Observation of an Excited Charm Baryon Ωc* Decaying to Ωc0γ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Gill, M. S.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadyk, J. A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Ronan, M. T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Barrett, M.; Ford, K. E.; Hart, A. J.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Watson, A. T.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schroeder, T.; Steinke, M.; Boyd, J. T.; Burke, J. P.; Cottingham, W. N.; Walker, D.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Knecht, N. S.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Saleem, M.; Sherwood, D. J.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Foulkes, S. D.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Wang, K.; Zhang, L.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, S.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Cunha, A.; Dahmes, B.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Nesom, G.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spradlin, P.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dvoretskii, A.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Chen, S.; Ford, W. T.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Kreisel, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Ruddick, W. O.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zhang, J.; Chen, A.; Eckhart, E. A.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Winklmeier, F.; Zeng, Q.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Brandt, T.; Klose, V.; Lacker, H. M.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Robertson, A. I.; Xie, Y.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Prencipe, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Brandenburg, G.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Wu, J.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Flack, R. L.; Nash, J. A.; Nikolich, M. B.; Vazquez, W. Panduro; Bard, D. J.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Meyer, N. T.; Ziegler, V.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Schott, G.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Oyanguren, A.; Pruvot, S.; Rodier, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, W. F.; Wormser, G.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Forster, I. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, K. A.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Schofield, K. C.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; di Lodovico, F.; Menges, W.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Jackson, P. S.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Lafferty, G. D.; Naisbit, M. T.; Williams, J. C.; Yi, J. I.; Chen, C.; Hulsbergen, W. D.; Jawahery, A.; Lae, C. K.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Li, X.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Sekula, S. J.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Kim, H.; McLachlin, S. E.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Côté, D.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Losecco, J. M.; Allmendinger, T.; Benelli, G.; Corwin, L. A.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Pompili, A.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; Hamon, O.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Leruste, Ph.; Malclès, J.; Ocariz, J.; Roos, L.; Therin, G.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Mazur, M. A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Wagoner, D. E.; Biesiada, J.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lau, Y. P.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; D'Orazio, A.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Legendre, M.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Berger, N.; Claus, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Cristinziani, M.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Halyo, V.; Hast, C.; Hryn'Ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; van Bakel, N.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Jain, V.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Wappler, F. R.; Zain, S. B.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Satpathy, A.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Cossutti, F.; Ricca, G. Della; Dittongo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Pappagallo, M.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Cheng, B.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Flood, K. T.; Hollar, J. J.; Kutter, P. E.; Mellado, B.; Mihalyi, A.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2006-12-01

    We report the first observation of an excited singly charmed baryon Ωc* (css) in the radiative decay Ωc0γ, where the Ωc0 baryon is reconstructed in the decays to the final states Ω-π+, Ω-π+π0, Ω-π+π-π+, and Ξ-K-π+π+. This analysis is performed using a data set of 230.7fb-1 collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The mass difference between the Ωc* and the Ωc0 baryons is measured to be 70.8±1.0(stat)±1.1(syst)MeV/c2. We also measure the ratio of inclusive production cross sections of Ωc* and Ωc0 in e+e- annihilation.

  13. Excited-state spectroscopy of singly, doubly and triply-charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2014-07-01

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of singly, doubly and triply-charmed baryons by using dynamical lattice QCD. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice and are obtained after subduction from their continuum analogues are utilized. These operators transform as irreducible representations of SU(3)F symmetry for flavour, SU(4) symmetry for Dirac spins of quarks and O(3) symmetry for orbital angular momenta. Using novel computational techniques correlation functions of these operators are generated and the variational method is exploited to extract excited states. The lattice spectra that we obtain have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the low lying states remarkably resemble the expectations of quantum numbers from SU(6)ⓍO(3) symmetry.

  14. Formation of hidden-charm pentaquarks in photon-nucleon collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kubarovsky, Valery P.; Voloshin, M. B.

    2015-08-01

    The cross section for formation in γ + ρ collisions of the recently found hidden-charm pentaquark states Ρc(4380) and Ρc(4450) is discussed and estimated. The studies of these resonances in photon beam experiments can be complementary to those in the LHCb experiment setting, and may be more advantageous for measurement of their additional decay channels. It is pointed out that both the relative importance of such decays and the yield of the resonances in the γ + ρ collisions are sensitive to the internal dynamics of the pentaquarks and can resolve between theoretical models. Specific numerical estimates are discussed withinmore » a simple ‘baryocharmonium’ model, where the the observed Ρc resonances are composites of J/ψ and excited nucleon states with the quantum numbers of Ν(1440) and Ν(1520).« less

  15. Formation of hidden-charm pentaquarks in photon-nucleon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Kubarovsky, Valery P.; Voloshin, M. B.

    2015-08-01

    The cross section for formation in γ + ρ collisions of the recently found hidden-charm pentaquark states Ρc(4380) and Ρc(4450) is discussed and estimated. The studies of these resonances in photon beam experiments can be complementary to those in the LHCb experiment setting, and may be more advantageous for measurement of their additional decay channels. It is pointed out that both the relative importance of such decays and the yield of the resonances in the γ + ρ collisions are sensitive to the internal dynamics of the pentaquarks and can resolve between theoretical models. Specific numerical estimates are discussed within a simple ‘baryocharmonium’ model, where the the observed Ρc resonances are composites of J/ψ and excited nucleon states with the quantum numbers of Ν(1440) and Ν(1520).

  16. Observation of an excited charm baryon Omega c* decaying to Omega c0gamma.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Hart, A J; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Bard, D J; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-12-01

    We report the first observation of an excited singly charmed baryon Omega c* (css) in the radiative decay Omega c0gamma, where the Omega c0 baryon is reconstructed in the decays to the final states Omega(-)pi+, Omega(-)pi+pi0, Omega(-)pi+pi(-)pi+, and Xi(-)K(-)pi+pi+. This analysis is performed using a data set of 230.7 fb(-1) collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The mass difference between the Omega c* and the Omega c0 baryons is measured to be 70.8+/-1.0(stat)+/-1.1(syst) MeV/c2. We also measure the ratio of inclusive production cross sections of Omega c* and Omega c0 in e+e(-) annihilation. PMID:17280195

  17. Towards the quark-gluon plasma Equation of State with dynamical strange and charm quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Florian; Ilgenfritz, Ernst-Michael; Lombardo, Maria Paola; Müller-Preussker, Michael; Trunin, Anton

    2016-01-01

    We present an ongoing project aimed at determining the thermodynamic Equation of State (EoS) of quark-gluon matter from lattice QCD with two generations of dynamical quarks. We employ the Wilson twisted mass implementation for the fermionic fields and the improved Iwasaki gauge action. Relying on T = 0 data obtained by the ETM Collaboration the strange and charm quark masses are fixed at their physical values, while the pion mass takes four values in the range from 470 MeV down to 210 MeV. The temperature is varied within a fixed-lattice scale approach. The values for the pseudocritical temperature are obtained from various observables. For the EoS we show preliminary results for the pure gluonic contribution obtained at the pion mass value 370 MeV, where we can compare with previously obtained results with Nf = 2 degenerate light flavours.

  18. Search for rare and forbidden charm meson decays at Fermilab E791

    SciTech Connect

    Donald J. Summers et al.

    2000-09-29

    The authors report the results of a blind search for flavor-changing neutral current, lepton-flavor violating, and lepton-number violating decays of D{sup +}, D{sub s}{sup +}, and D{sup 0} mesons (and their antiparticles) into modes containing muons and electrons. Using data from Fermilab charm hadroproduction experiment E791, they examine the {pi}{ell}{ell} and K{ell}{ell} decay modes of D{sup +} and D{sub s}{sup +} and the {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup {minus}} decay modes of D{sup 0}. No evidence for any of these decays is found. Therefore, they present branching-fraction upper limits at 90% confidence level for the 24 decay modes examined. Eight of these modes have no previously reported limits, and fourteen are reported with significant improvements over previously published results.

  19. High Accuracy, Absolute, Cryogenic Refractive Index Measurements of Infrared Lens Materials for JWST NIRCam using CHARMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas; Frey, Bradley

    2005-01-01

    The current refractive optical design of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) uses three infrared materials in its lenses: LiF, BaF2, and ZnSe. In order to provide the instrument s optical designers with accurate, heretofore unavailable data for absolute refractive index based on actual cryogenic measurements, two prismatic samples of each material were measured using the cryogenic, high accuracy, refraction measuring system (CHARMS) at NASA GSFC, densely covering the temperature range from 15 to 320 K and wavelength range from 0.4 to 5.6 microns. Measurement methods are discussed and graphical and tabulated data for absolute refractive index, dispersion, and thermo-optic coefficient for these three materials are presented along with estimates of uncertainty. Coefficients for second order polynomial fits of measured index to temperature are provided for many wavelengths to allow accurate interpolation of index to other wavelengths and temperatures.

  20. Charmed partner of the exotic X (5568 ) state and its properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaev, S. S.; Azizi, K.; Sundu, H.

    2016-05-01

    The mass, decay constant, and width of a hypothetical charmed partner Xc of the newly observed exotic Xb(5568 ) state are calculated using the technique of the QCD sum rule method. The Xc=[s u ][c ¯ d ¯ ] state with JP=0+ is described, employing two types of the diquark-antidiquark interpolating currents. The evaluation of the mass mXc and decay constant fXc is carried out utilizing the two-point sum rule method by including vacuum condensates up to eight dimensions. The widths of the decay channels Xc→Ds-π+ and Xc→D0K0 are also found. To this end, the strong couplings gXcDsπ and gXcDK are computed by means of QCD sum rules on the light-cone and soft-meson approximation.

  1. Monte Carlo study of CP asymmetry measurement of a Tau-Charm Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Karshon, U.

    1989-07-01

    It is shown that, for D/sup 0//bar D//sup 0/ mixing of order /approximately/ 1%, it may be possible to observe in a Tau-Charm Factory a CP violation effect in the D/sup 0//bar D//sup 0/ system via a CP asymmetry. The method used is to tag one D by its semi-leptonic decay and to look for decays of the other D into CP eigenstates. It is estimated that within 1 year of running at the designed luminosity of L = 10/sup 33/ cm/sup /minus/2/sec/sup /minus/1/, /approximately/ 6600 such events can be collected. 8 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Bottom and charm masses and lifetimes at the Tevatron; and a pentaquark search

    SciTech Connect

    B. Todd Huffman

    2003-06-09

    The Fermilab Tevatron, operating at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, provides a rich environment for the study of the bottom and charmed hadrons and for searches of other bound states. Presented here are recent measurements of the masses of the following states using fully reconstructed events: B{sup +}, B{sup 0}, B{sub s}, {Lambda}{sub b}, and the neutral B**. Lifetimes from both CDF and D0 in exclusive decays for all of these modes are also presented (sans the B**). A search was conducted at CDF for the {Xi}{sup 2} and {Xi}{sup 0} pentaquark states in the decay {Xi}(1860) {yields} {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup {+-}} setting a limit on their production in p-{bar p} collisions relative to the number of {Xi}(1530) baryons seen.

  3. New limits on intrinsic charm in the nucleon from global analysis of parton distributions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jimenez-Delgado, P.; Hobbs, T. J.; Londergan, J. T.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2015-02-27

    We present a new global QCD analysis of parton distribution functions, allowing for possible intrinsic charm (IC) contributions in the nucleon inspired by light-front models. The analysis makes use of the full range of available high-energy scattering data for Q2 ≥ 1 GeV2 and W2 ≥ 3.5 GeV2, including fixed-target proton and deuteron deep cross sections at lower energies that were excluded in previously global analyses. The expanded data set places more stringent constraints on the momentum carried by IC, with (x)IC at most 0.5% (corresponding to an IC normalization of ~1%) at the 4σ level for ΔX2 = 1.more » We also assess the impact of older EMC measurements of Fc2c at large x, which favor a nonzero IC, but with very large X2 values.« less

  4. Production of doubly charmed tetraquarks with exotic color configurations in electron-positron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyodo, Tetsuo; Liu, Yan-Rui; Oka, Makoto; Sudoh, Kazutaka; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2013-04-01

    Structure and production of doubly charmed tetraquarks Tcc (cc ubardbar) are studied from the viewpoint of color configurations. Based on the diquark correlation, the tetraquark Tcc with I (JP) = 0 (1+) is considered to be stable against strong decay. We discuss that the mixing probability of color antitriplet and sextet cc components in Tcc is suppressed by 1 / mc2, so the two configurations are separately realized in the heavy quark limit. Utilizing the nonrelativistic QCD framework, we evaluate the production cross sections of Tcc in electron-positron collisions. The momentum dependence of the cross section of color antitriplet is found to be different from that of sextet, which can be used to discriminate the color structure of the Tcc states in experimental measurements.

  5. Charm quark energy loss in proton-proton collisions at LHC energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Sascha; Gossiaux, Pol Bernard; Werner, Klaus; Aichelin, Jörg

    2013-03-01

    Heavy quarks, i.e. charm and bottom quarks are one of the crucial probes in the high energy nuclear collision program at current day accelerators. It has been shown at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) that heavy quarks show a remarkable medium suppression despite their high mass. In these proceedings we report on a study of heavy quark energy loss in high multiplicity proton-proton collisions at energies accessible to the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Recent experimental results from the LHC collaborations have shown that the notion of creating an interacting system is not completely off limits. The higher energies in LHC proton-proton collisions lead to multiplicities comparable to Cu+Cu collisions at RHIC. Within this environment high-momentum heavy quarks experience a non-negligible energy loss.

  6. Raman distributed temperature measurement at CERN high energy accelerator mixed field radiation test facility (CHARM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toccafondo, Iacopo; Nannipieri, Tiziano; Signorini, Alessandro; Guillermain, Elisa; Kuhnhenn, Jochen; Brugger, Markus; Di Pasquale, Fabrizio

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present a validation of distributed Raman temperature sensing (RDTS) at the CERN high energy accelerator mixed field radiation test facility (CHARM), newly developed in order to qualify electronics for the challenging radiation environment of accelerators and connected high energy physics experiments. By investigating the effect of wavelength dependent radiation induced absorption (RIA) on the Raman Stokes and anti-Stokes light components in radiation tolerant Ge-doped multi-mode (MM) graded-index optical fibers, we demonstrate that Raman DTS used in loop configuration is robust to harsh environments in which the fiber is exposed to a mixed radiation field. The temperature profiles measured on commercial Ge-doped optical fibers is fully reliable and therefore, can be used to correct the RIA temperature dependence in distributed radiation sensing systems based on P-doped optical fibers.

  7. Wilson Prize Lecture: The Novosibirsk Tau/Charm Factory Project: prospect/status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrinsky, Alexander

    2002-04-01

    For a long time at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, we develop step-by-step our electron-electron and electron-positron colliders. Now, the VEPP-4M collider (total energy up to 11 GeV), with a special emphasis on Two-Photon hadron physics, is in operation. The new VEPP-2000 collider, as direct extension of our VEPP-2M collider (which finished its very productive life in 2000) to the energy up to 2 GeV total, should start its commissioning phase in 2002. But our main goal in the field (for quite a few years already) is development and construction of Tau/Charm Factory (VEPP-5 collider). There are 3 main modes of operation foreseen: Maximal luminosity - up to 1 \\cdot 10^34 cm-2 sec-1. For reaching of this ambitious goal we intend to use ``round beam'' approach. The approach will be used and studied at VEPP-2000. Longitudinally polarized collisions (proposed and proved theoretically in Novosibirsk still in 1969) with luminosity 1 \\cdot 10^33 cm-2 sec-1. High monochromaticity option (down to few 10 of keV). Now the new injector complex, which would produce intense low emittance bunches of positrons and electrons (for VEPP-5, VEPP-4M and VEPP-2000 efficient operation) is nearing completion. Fraction of the VEPP-5 tunnel is constructed. We hope, when the VEPP-5 collider would become closer to completion, to attract international collaborators to use unique features of our Tau/Charm Factory.

  8. Charm decays and high energy photoproduction. Final report, April 1994--May 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.M.

    1997-12-31

    This project involved continued participation by the Physics Department at the Mayaguez Campus of the University of Puerto Rico (UPR) in high energy physics experiments carried out at Fermilab. The UPR is a member of the E831 collaboration which includes Fermilab and leading US, Italian, Brazilian and Korean universities. E831 is an upgrade to the E687 spectrometer with the goal of a tenfold increase in the statistics for the study of the photoproduction and decay of charmed particles. This spectrometer has been significantly upgraded to maintain and expand its capabilities even at considerably higher beam intensities. E687 completed its last data run in January 1992. Approximately 100,000 charm events were fully reconstructed from this data and results of the analysis have appeared in several publications. The UPR has been participating in E687 since 1985 when the experiment was in its early stages of construction. A grant from the DOE Division of High Energy Physics (starting in April 1994) and another from the DOE EPSCoR Program (starting in October 1994) allowed a considerable increase in the activities of the UPR group. Given the group`s capable performance, the responsibilities assigned to it by the collaboration have increased to the point where they now include four major detectors in E831. All four detectors were ready on time for the start of the E831 run in July 1996. This is a remarkable performance if one considers that there is only one senior member in the group and that the students are all MS or undergraduate students. The group has also been active in the development of simulation, data acquisition and analysis software.

  9. Measurement of the production rate of the charm jet recoiling against the W boson using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Ahsan, Mahsana; /Kansas State U.

    2008-05-01

    This dissertation describes a measurement of the rate of associated production of the W boson with the charm jet in the proton and anti-proton collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurement has direct sensitivity to the strange quark content inside the proton. A direct measurement of the momentum distribution of the strange quark inside the proton is essential for a reliable calculation of new physics signal as well as the background processes at the collider experiments. The identification of events containing a W boson and a charm jet is based on the leptonic decays of the W boson together with a tagging technique for the charm jet identification based on the semileptonic decay of the charm quark into the muon. The charm jet recoiling against the W boson must have a minimum transverse momentum of 20 GeV and an absolute value of pseudorapidity less than 2.5. This measurement utilizes the data collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Collider. The measured rate of the charm jet production in association with the W boson in the inclusive jet production with the W boson is 0.074 {+-} 0.023, which is in agreement with the theoretical predictions at the leading order in Quantum Chromodynamics.

  10. Transverse target spin asymmetries in exclusive ρ0 muoproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alekseev, M. G.; Alexakhin, V. Yu.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hahne, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Heß, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Höppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Joerg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kral, Z.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Orlov, I.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pesek, M.; Peshekhonov, D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rodionov, V.; Rondio, E.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, K.; Schmitt, L.; Schmïden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Vondra, J.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wiślicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhuravlev, N.; Ziembicki, M.

    2014-04-01

    Exclusive production of ρ0 mesons was studied at the COMPASS experiment by scattering 160 GeV/c muons off transversely polarised protons. Five single-spin and three double-spin azimuthal asymmetries were measured as a function of Q2, x, or pT2. The sin ϕS asymmetry is found to be -0.019±0.008(stat.)±0.003(syst.). All other asymmetries are also found to be of small magnitude and consistent with zero within experimental uncertainties. Very recent calculations using a GPD-based model agree well with the present results. The data is interpreted as evidence for the existence of chiral-odd, transverse generalized parton distributions.

  11. Transverse target spin asymmetries in exclusive ρ0 muoproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Katharina; Nowak, Wolf-Dieter

    2014-06-01

    COMPASS has studied exclusive production of ρ0 mesons using a 160 GeV/c muon beam and a transversely polarised NH3 target. Five single-spin and three double-spin azimuthal aymmetries were measured in dependence on Q2, xBj, or pT2. Except the sin ϕS asymmetry, obtained to be - 0.019 ± 0.008(stat.) ± 0.003(syst.), all others were found to be consistent with zero within experimental uncertainties. Phenomenological GPD-based model calculations agree well with the data and interpret the result as evidence for the existence of chiral-odd, transverse generalised parton distributions.

  12. Exclusive ρ0 muoproduction on transversely polarised protons and deuterons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Alekseev, M. G.; Alexakhin, V. Yu.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Antonov, A. A.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bettinelli, M.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Das, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Heß, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Horikawa, N.; Höppner, Ch.; d'Hose, N.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, O.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Jegou, G.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Lauser, L.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Mann, A.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Moinester, M. A.; Morreale, A.; Mutter, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Negrini, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Perevalova, E.; Pesaro, G.; Peshekhonov, D. V.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Rajotte, J.-F.; Ramos, S.; Rapatsky, V.; Reicherz, G.; Richter, A.; Rocco, E.; Rondio, E.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, K.; Schmitt, L.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Schröder, W.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A. N.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G. I.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Tkatchev, L. G.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N. V.; Wang, L.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wiślicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zhuravlev, N.; Zvyagin, A.

    2012-12-01

    The transverse target spin azimuthal asymmetry AUTsin(ϕ-ϕS) in hard exclusive production of ρ0 mesons was measured at COMPASS by scattering 160 GeV/c muons off transversely polarised protons and deuterons. The measured asymmetry is sensitive to the nucleon helicity-flip generalised parton distributions Eq, which are related to the orbital angular momentum of quarks in the nucleon. The Q2, xBj and pT2 dependence of AUTsin(ϕ-ϕS) is presented in a wide kinematic range: 1 (

  13. Measurement of strong phases, D-overline D mixing, and CP violation using quantum correlation at charm threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rama, Matteo

    2016-02-01

    We review the measurements of the D decay strong-phase parameters based on quantum-correlated D 0 overline D 0 pairs produced in the e + e - → Ψ(3770) → D 0 overline D 0 process, and we discuss their role in the measurements of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle γ and D-overline D mixing. In addition, we present estimates of the size of quantum-correlated datasets necessary to support the γ and charm mixing measurements conducted at the LHCb and Belle II experiments. Finally, we review the methods for measuring the D-overline D mixing and CP violation parameters at a high-luminosity charm factory, giving sensitivity estimates.

  14. Gluon transverse momenta and charm quark-antiquark pair production in p-p collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Luszczak, M.; Szczurek, A.

    2006-03-01

    We discuss and compare different approaches to include gluon transverse momenta for heavy quark-antiquark pair production. The correlations in azimuthal angle and in the heavy quark, heavy antiquark transverse momenta are studied in detail. The results are illustrated with the help of different unintegrated gluon distribution functions (UGDF) from the literature. We compare results obtained with on-shell and off-shell matrix elements and kinematics and quantify where these effects are negligible and where they are essential. We concentrate on the region of asymmetric transverse momenta of charm quark and charm antiquark. Most of UGDFs lead in this corner of the phase space to almost full decorrelation in the azimuthal angle. We propose correlation observables to be best suited in order to test the existing models of UGDFs.

  15. Latest results on charmed baryons. xi. /sup +//sub /ital c// and. cap omega. /sup 0//sub /ital c//

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, V. J.

    1989-04-25

    The observation of charmed-strange baryons ..xi../sup +//sub /ital c//(nee /ital A//sup +/)and ..cap omega../sup 0//sub /ital c// (nee T/sup 0/) at the Cern-SPS and Fermilab is discussed.Some questions about the production and decay of these particles are mentioned,and currently proposed experiments to address these questions are brieflypresented.

  16. Fragment-Based Docking: Development of the CHARMMing Web User Interface as a Platform for Computer-Aided Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Web-based user interfaces to scientific applications are important tools that allow researchers to utilize a broad range of software packages with just an Internet connection and a browser.1 One such interface, CHARMMing (CHARMM interface and graphics), facilitates access to the powerful and widely used molecular software package CHARMM. CHARMMing incorporates tasks such as molecular structure analysis, dynamics, multiscale modeling, and other techniques commonly used by computational life scientists. We have extended CHARMMing’s capabilities to include a fragment-based docking protocol that allows users to perform molecular docking and virtual screening calculations either directly via the CHARMMing Web server or on computing resources using the self-contained job scripts generated via the Web interface. The docking protocol was evaluated by performing a series of “re-dockings” with direct comparison to top commercial docking software. Results of this evaluation showed that CHARMMing’s docking implementation is comparable to many widely used software packages and validates the use of the new CHARMM generalized force field for docking and virtual screening. PMID:25151852

  17. Measurement of associated W + charm production in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 7 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-02-04

    Measurements are presented of the associated production of a W boson and a charm-quark jet (W + c) in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The analysis is conducted with a data sample corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 5 inverse femtobarns, collected by the CMS detector at the LHC. W boson candidates are identified by their decay into a charged lepton (muon or electron) and a neutrino. The W + c measurements are performed for charm-quark jets in the kinematic regionmore » $$p_T^{jet} \\gt$$ 25 GeV, $$|\\eta^{jet}| \\lt$$ 2.5, for two different thresholds for the transverse momentum of the lepton from the W-boson decay, and in the pseudorapidity range $$|\\eta^{\\ell}| \\lt$$ 2.1. Hadronic and inclusive semileptonic decays of charm hadrons are used to measure the following total cross sections: $$\\sigma(pp \\to W + c + X) \\times B(W \\to \\ell \

  18. Measurement of associated W + charm production in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-02-04

    Measurements are presented of the associated production of a W boson and a charm-quark jet (W + c) in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The analysis is conducted with a data sample corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 5 inverse femtobarns, collected by the CMS detector at the LHC. W boson candidates are identified by their decay into a charged lepton (muon or electron) and a neutrino. The W + c measurements are performed for charm-quark jets in the kinematic region $p_T^{jet} \\gt$ 25 GeV, $|\\eta^{jet}| \\lt$ 2.5, for two different thresholds for the transverse momentum of the lepton from the W-boson decay, and in the pseudorapidity range $|\\eta^{\\ell}| \\lt$ 2.1. Hadronic and inclusive semileptonic decays of charm hadrons are used to measure the following total cross sections: $\\sigma(pp \\to W + c + X) \\times B(W \\to \\ell \

  19. Study of Charm and Beauty using electron-D{sup 0} azimuthal correlations in the STAR experiment at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Kabana, Sonia

    2011-05-23

    The energy loss of heavy quarks in the hot and dense matter created in high-energy nuclear collisions at RHIC, can be used to probe the properties of the medium. Both charm and beauty quarks contribute to the non-photonic electrons through their semi-leptonic decays. It is essential to determine experimentally the relative contributions of charm and beauty quarks to understand the observed suppression of non-photonic electrons at high p{sub T} in central Au+Au collisions. The azimuthal angular correlations of non-photonic electrons with hadrons as well as with the reconstructed D{sup 0} allow to disentangle the contributions of charm and beauty to the electron spectrum. We discuss the STAR measurement of non-photonic electron-D{sup 0} and non-photonic electron-hadron azimuthal correlations in p+p collisions at 200 GeV and explore the consequences for the heavy flavour suppression in heavy ion collisions at RHIC.

  20. Measurement of beauty and charm production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA and measurement of the beauty-quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Bokhonov, V.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; D'Agostini, G.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Drugakov, V.; Dusini, S.; Ferrando, J.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Khein, L. A.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Martin, J. F.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mujkic, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nigro, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Samojlov, V.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Temiraliev, T.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2014-09-01

    The production of beauty and charm quarks in ep interactions has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA for exchanged four-momentum squared 5 < Q 2 < 1000 GeV2 using an integrated luminosity of 354 pb-1. The beauty and charm content in events with at least one jet have been extracted using the invariant mass of charged tracks associated with secondary vertices and the decay-length significance of these vertices. Differential cross sections as a function of Q 2, Bjorken x, jet trans- verse energy and pseudorapidity were measured and compared with next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The beauty and charm contributions to the proton structure functions were extracted from the double-differential cross section as a function of x and Q 2. The running beauty-quark mass, m b at the scale m b , was determined from a QCD fit at next-to-leading order to HERA data for the first time and found to be m b ( m b ) = 4.07 ± 0.14 (fit){-/0.07 + 0.01}(mod.){-/0.00 + 0.05}(param.){-/0.05 + 0.08}(theo.) GeV.

  1. Measurement of beauty and charm production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA and measurement of the beauty-quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Bokhonov, V.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; D'Agostini, G.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Drugakov, V.; Dusini, S.; Ferrando, J.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hartner, G.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Khein, L. A.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Martin, J. F.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mujkic, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nigro, A.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Samojlov, V.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Temiraliev, T.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2014-10-01

    The production of beauty and charm quarks in ep interactions has been studied with the ZEUS detector at HERA for exchanged four-momentum squared 5 < Q 2 < 1000 GeV2 using an integrated luminosity of 354 pb-1. The beauty and charm content in events with at least one jet have been extracted using the invariant mass of charged tracks associated with secondary vertices and the decay-length significance of these vertices. Differential cross sections as a function of Q 2, Bjorken x, jet trans- verse energy and pseudorapidity were measured and compared with next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The beauty and charm contributions to the proton structure functions were extracted from the double-differential cross section as a function of x and Q 2. The running beauty-quark mass, m b at the scale m b , was determined from a QCD fit at next-to-leading order to HERA data for the first time and found to be m b ( m b ) = 4.07 ± 0.14 (fit){-/0.07 + 0.01}(mod.){-/0.00 + 0.05}(param.){-/0.05 + 0.08}(theo.) GeV.

  2. Up, down, strange and charm quark masses with Nf=2+1+1 twisted mass lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, N.; Deuzeman, A.; Dimopoulos, P.; Frezzotti, R.; Giménez, V.; Herdoiza, G.; Lami, P.; Lubicz, V.; Palao, D.; Picca, E.; Reker, S.; Riggio, L.; Rossi, G. C.; Sanfilippo, F.; Scorzato, L.; Simula, S.; Tarantino, C.; Urbach, C.; Wenger, U.

    2014-10-01

    We present a lattice QCD calculation of the up, down, strange and charm quark masses performed using the gauge configurations produced by the European Twisted Mass Collaboration with Nf=2+1+1 dynamical quarks, which include in the sea, besides two light mass degenerate quarks, also the strange and charm quarks with masses close to their physical values. The simulations are based on a unitary setup for the two light quarks and on a mixed action approach for the strange and charm quarks. The analysis uses data at three values of the lattice spacing and pion masses in the range 210-450 MeV, allowing for accurate continuum limit and controlled chiral extrapolation. The quark mass renormalization is carried out non-perturbatively using the RI‧-MOM method. The results for the quark masses converted to the MSbar scheme are: mud(2 GeV)=3.70(17) MeV, ms(2 GeV)=99.6(4.3) MeV and mc(mc)=1.348(46) GeV. We obtain also the quark mass ratios ms/mud=26.66(32) and mc/ms=11.62(16). By studying the mass splitting between the neutral and charged kaons and using available lattice results for the electromagnetic contributions, we evaluate mu/md=0.470(56), leading to mu=2.36(24) MeV and md=5.03(26) MeV.

  3. Nonleptonic Cabibbo favoured B-decays and CP-asymmetries for charmed final hadron states in Isgur and Wise theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccella, F.; Lombardi, F.; Miele, G.; Santorelli, P.

    1993-09-01

    The Cabibbo allowed non-leptonic B-decays in two hadrons are studied, within the factorization hypothesis, in the framework of Isgur and Wise theory for the matrix elements of the Δ B=-Δ C=±1 weak currents. The SU(2) HF symmetry relates |Δ B|=1 to |Δ C|=1 currents, which have been measured in the semileptonic strange decays of charmed particles. By assuming colour screening and allowing for SU(3) invariant contributions from the annihilation terms with charmed final states one is able to comply with the present experimental knowledge. The CP violating asymmetries in neutral B decays are given charmed final states in terms of the K-M angles. With the central values found for the annihilation parameters there is a destructive (constructive) interference between the direct and annihilation terms in the Cabibbo allowed (doubly forbidden) amplitudes for the decays into D 0( D *0)π0 and { D 0ρ0 so that they may be of the same order. This would imply large asymmetries, for which however our present knowledge on the amplitudes does not allow to predict even their sign. We have better confidence in our predictions for the charged final states than the neutral ones and can draw the conclusion that the detection of the corresponding asymmetries requires, at least, 106 tagged neutral B-particles.

  4. Measurement of the form factor ratios in semileptonic decays of charm mesons

    SciTech Connect

    R. Zaliznyak

    1999-01-26

    I have measured the form factor ratios r{sub 2} = A{sub 2} (0)/A{sub 1} (0) and r{sub V} = V (0)/A{sub 1} (0) in the semileptonic charm meson decay D{sup +} {yields} {anti K}{sup *0} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e} from data collected by the Fermilab E791 collaboration. Form factors are introduced in the calculation of the hadronic current in semileptonic decays of strange, charm, or bottom mesons, such as D{sup +} {yields} {anti K}{sup *0} e{sup +} {nu}{sub e} . Semileptonic decays provide insight into quark coupling to the W boson since the leptonic and hadronic amplitudes in the Feynman diagram for the decay are completely separate. There are no strong interactions between the final state leptons and quarks. A number of theoretical models predict the values of the form factors for D{sup +} {yields} {anti K}{sup *0} e{sup +} {nu}{sub e} , though there is a large range of predictions. E791 is a hadroproduction experiment that recorded over 20 billion interactions with a 500 GeV {pi}{sup -} beam incident on five thin targets during the 1991-92 Fermilab fixed-target run. Approximately 3000 D{sup +} {yields} {anti K}{sup *0} e{sup +} {nu}{sub e} decays are fully reconstructed. In order to extract the form factor ratios from the data, I implement a multidimensional unbinned maximum likelihood fit with a large sample of simulated (Monte Carlo) D{sup +} {yields} {anti K}{sup *0} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e} events. The large E791 data sample provides the most precise measurement of the form factor ratios to date. The measured values for the form factor ratios are r{sub 2} = 0.71 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.09 and r{sub V} = 1.84 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.08. These results are in good agreement with some Lattice Gauge calculations. However the agreement with quark model predictions is not as good.

  5. New limits on intrinsic charm in the nucleon from global analysis of parton distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Delgado, P.; Hobbs, T. J.; Londergan, J. T.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2015-02-27

    We present a new global QCD analysis of parton distribution functions, allowing for possible intrinsic charm (IC) contributions in the nucleon inspired by light-front models. The analysis makes use of the full range of available high-energy scattering data for Q2 ≥ 1 GeV2 and W2 ≥ 3.5 GeV2, including fixed-target proton and deuteron deep cross sections at lower energies that were excluded in previously global analyses. The expanded data set places more stringent constraints on the momentum carried by IC, with (x)IC at most 0.5% (corresponding to an IC normalization of ~1%) at the 4σ level for ΔX2 = 1. We also assess the impact of older EMC measurements of Fc2c at large x, which favor a nonzero IC, but with very large X2 values.

  6. Observation of an isotriplet of excited charmed baryons decaying to lambda+c pi.

    PubMed

    Mizuk, R; Abe, K; Abe, K; Aihara, H; Akatsu, M; Asano, Y; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Ban, Y; Banerjee, S; Bedny, I; Bitenc, U; Bizjak, I; Blyth, S; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Brodzicka, J; Browder, T E; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chistov, R; Choi, S-K; Choi, Y; Chuvikov, A; Cole, S; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, M; Dragic, J; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Fratina, S; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Gershon, T; Gokhroo, G; Haba, J; Hastings, N C; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Hokuue, T; Hoshi, Y; Hou, S; Hou, W-S; Hsiung, Y B; Iijima, T; Imoto, A; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kapusta, P; Katayama, N; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Khan, H R; Kichimi, H; Kim, H J; Kim, J H; Kim, S K; Kim, S M; Koppenburg, P; Korpar, S; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kulasiri, R; Kuo, C C; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y-J; Lee, S E; Lee, S H; Lesiak, T; Li, J; Lin, S-W; Liventsev, D; Majumder, G; Mandl, F; Matsumoto, T; Mitaroff, W; Miyake, H; Miyata, H; Mohapatra, D; Mori, T; Nagamine, T; Nagasaka, Y; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Okabe, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ostrowicz, W; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Palka, H; Park, C W; Park, H; Parslow, N; Pestotnik, R; Piilonen, L E; Sagawa, H; Sakai, Y; Schietinger, T; Schneider, O; Schönmeier, P; Schümann, J; Semenov, S; Senyo, K; Seuster, R; Shibuya, H; Singh, J B; Somov, A; Soni, N; Stamen, R; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, S Y; Tajima, O; Takasaki, F; Tamura, N; Tanaka, M; Teramoto, Y; Tian, X C; Uehara, S; Uglov, T; Ueno, K; Uno, S; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Villa, S; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Wang, M-Z; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yang, Heyoung; Ying, J; Zhang, C C; Zhang, J; Zhang, L M; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zontar, D; Zürcher, D

    2005-04-01

    We report the observation of an isotriplet of excited charmed baryons, decaying into Lambda(+)(c)pi(-), Lambda(+)(c)pi(0), and Lambda(+)(c)pi(+). We measure the mass differences M(Lambda(+)(c)pi)-M(Lambda(+)(c)) and widths to be 515.4(+3.2+2.1)(-3.1-6.0) MeV/c(2), 61(+18+22)(-13-13) MeV for the neutral state; 505.4(+5.8+12.4)(-4.6-2.0) MeV/c(2), 62(+37+52)(-23-38) MeV for the charged state; and 514.5(+3.4+2.8)(-3.1-4.9) MeV/c(2), 75(+18+12)(-13-11) MeV for the doubly charged state, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. These results are obtained from a 281 fb(-1) data sample collected with the Belle detector near the Upsilon(4S) resonance, at the KEKB asymmetric energy e(+)e(-) collider. PMID:15903907

  7. Constrained-Transport Magnetohydrodynamics with Adaptive-Mesh-Refinement in CHARM

    SciTech Connect

    Miniatii, Francesco; Martin, Daniel

    2011-05-24

    We present the implementation of a three-dimensional, second order accurate Godunov-type algorithm for magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD), in the adaptivemesh-refinement (AMR) cosmological code CHARM. The algorithm is based on the full 12-solve spatially unsplit Corner-Transport-Upwind (CTU) scheme. Thefluid quantities are cell-centered and are updated using the Piecewise-Parabolic- Method (PPM), while the magnetic field variables are face-centered and areevolved through application of the Stokes theorem on cell edges via a Constrained- Transport (CT) method. The so-called ?multidimensional MHD source terms?required in the predictor step for high-order accuracy are applied in a simplified form which reduces their complexity in three dimensions without loss of accuracyor robustness. The algorithm is implemented on an AMR framework which requires specific synchronization steps across refinement levels. These includeface-centered restriction and prolongation operations and a reflux-curl operation, which maintains a solenoidal magnetic field across refinement boundaries. Thecode is tested against a large suite of test problems, including convergence tests in smooth flows, shock-tube tests, classical two- and three-dimensional MHD tests,a three-dimensional shock-cloud interaction problem and the formation of a cluster of galaxies in a fully cosmological context. The magnetic field divergence isshown to remain negligible throughout. Subject headings: cosmology: theory - methods: numerical

  8. Testing lepton flavor universality in terms of BESIII and charm-tau factory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Zhao, Ming-Gang; Sun, Ke-Sheng; Li, Xue-Qian

    2013-07-01

    The recent measurements on RK and Rπ imply that there exists a possible violation of the leptonic flavor universality which is one of the cornerstones of the Standard Model. It is suggested that a mixing between sterile and active neutrinos might induce such a violation. In this work we consider the scenarios with one or two sterile neutrinos to explicitly realize the data while the constraints from the available experiments have been taken into account. Moreover, as indicated in literature, the deviation of the real PMNS matrix from the symmetric patterns may be due to a μ-τ asymmetry, therefore the measurements on RD(Ds)eμ = Γ(D(Ds) → e+νe)/Γ(D(Ds) → μ+νμ) and RD(Ds)μτ = Γ(D(Ds) → μ+νμ)/Γ(D(Ds) → τ+ντ) (and for some other heavy mesons B± and Bc etc.) may shed more light on the physics responsible for the violation of the leptonic flavor universality. The data of BESIII are available to test the universality and that of future charm-tau factories will provide more accurate information. In this work, we will discuss RD(Ds)eμ and RD(Ds)μτ in detail and also briefly consider the cases for B± and Bc.

  9. Observation of an Excited Charm Baryon Omega^*_C Decaying to Omega^0_C Gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B

    2006-11-15

    The authors report the first observation of an excited singly-charmed baryon {Omega}*{sub c} (css) in the radiative decay {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0}{gamma}, where the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} baryon is reconstructed in the decays to the final states {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {Omega}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, and {Xi}{sup -} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. This analysis is performed using a dataset of 230.7 fb{sup -1} collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The mass difference between the {Omega}*{sub c} and the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} baryons is measured to be 70.8 {+-} 1.0(stat) {+-} 1.1(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. They also measure the ratio of inclusive production cross sections of {Omega}*{sub c} and {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation.

  10. Heavy-Quark Symmetry and the Electromagnetic Decays of Excited Charmed Strange Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Mehen; Roxanne P. Springer

    2004-10-01

    Heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory (HH{chi}PT) is applied to the decays of the even-parity charmed strange mesons, D{sub s0}(2317) and D{sub s1}(2460). Heavy-quark spin symmetry predicts the branching fractions for the three electromagnetic decays of these states to the ground states D{sub s} and D{sub s}* in terms of a single parameter. The resulting predictions for two of the branching fractions are significantly higher than current upper limits from the CLEO experiment. Leading corrections to the branching ratios from chiral loop diagrams and spin-symmetry violating operators in the HH{chi}PT Lagrangian can naturally account for this discrepancy. Finally the proposal that the D{sub s0}(2317) (D{sub s1}(2460)) is a hadronic bound state of a D (D*) meson and a kaon is considered. Leading order predictions for electromagnetic branching ratios in this molecular scenario are in very poor agreement with existing data.

  11. Study of W boson production in association with beauty and charm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.

    2015-09-01

    The associated production of a W boson with a jet originating from either a light parton or heavy-flavor quark is studied in the forward region using proton-proton collisions. The analysis uses data corresponding to integrated luminosities of 1.0 and 2.0 fb-1 collected with the LHCb detector at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, respectively. The W bosons are reconstructed using the W →μ ν decay and muons with a transverse momentum, pT, larger than 20 GeV in the pseudorapidity range 2.0 <η <4.5 . The partons are reconstructed as jets with pT>20 GeV and 2.2 <η <4.2 . The sum of the muon and jet momenta must satisfy pT>20 GeV . The fraction of W +jet events that originate from beauty and charm quarks is measured, along with the charge asymmetries of the W +b and W +c production cross sections. The ratio of the W +jet to Z +jet production cross sections is also measured using the Z →μ μ decay. All results are in agreement with Standard Model predictions.

  12. Strong decays of charmed baryons in heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory: An update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hai-Yang; Chua, Chun-Khiang

    2015-10-01

    We first give a brief overview of the charmed baryon spectroscopy and discuss their possible structure and spin-parity assignments in the quark model. With the new Belle measurement of the widths of Σc(2455 ) and Σc(2520 ) and the recent CDF measurement of the strong decays of Λc(2595 ) and Λc(2625 ), we give updated coupling constants in heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory. We find g2=0.56 5-0.024+0.011 for P -wave transitions between s -wave and s -wave baryons, and h2, one of the couplings responsible for S -wave transitions between s -wave and p -wave baryons, is extracted from Λc(2595 )+→Λc+π π to be 0.63 ±0.07 . It is substantially enhanced compared to the old value of order 0.437. With the help from the quark model, two of the couplings h10 and h11 responsible for D -wave transitions between s -wave and p -wave baryons are determined from Σc(2880 ) decays. There is a tension for the coupling h2 as its value extracted from Λc(2595 )+→Λc+ππ will imply Ξc(2790 )0→Ξc'π and Ξc(2815 )+→Ξc*π rates slightly above the current limits. It is conceivable that SU(3) flavor symmetry breaking can help account for the discrepancy.

  13. Search for Scalar Charm Quark Pair Production in pp Collisions at sqrt[s]=8  TeV with the ATLAS Detector.

    PubMed

    Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdel Khalek, S; Abdinov, O; Aben, R; Abi, B; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abreu, R; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Agustoni, M; Ahlen, S P; Ahmadov, F; Aielli, G; Akerstedt, H; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Alberghi, G L; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Alconada Verzini, M J; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexandre, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Alimonti, G; Alio, L; Alison, J; Allbrooke, B M M; Allison, L J; Allport, P P; Aloisio, A; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Alpigiani, C; Altheimer, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Alviggi, M G; Amako, K; Amaral Coutinho, Y; Amelung, C; Amidei, D; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amram, N; Amundsen, G; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Anduaga, X S; Angelidakis, S; Angelozzi, I; Anger, P; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A V; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antos, J; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Aperio Bella, L; Arabidze, G; Arai, Y; Araque, J P; Arce, A T H; Arduh, F A; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, S; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnal, V; Arnold, H; Arratia, M; Arslan, O; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Asai, S; Asbah, N; Ashkenazi, A; Åsman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astalos, R; Atkinson, M; Atlay, N B; Auerbach, B; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Avolio, G; Axen, B; Ayoub, M K; Azuelos, G; Baak, M A; Baas, A E; Bacci, C; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Bagiacchi, P; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Balek, P; Balestri, T; Balli, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, Sw; Bannoura, A A E; Bansil, H S; Barak, L; Baranov, S P; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnes, S L; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Barnovska, Z; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartos, P; Bassalat, A; Basye, A; Bates, R L; Batista, S J; Batley, J R; Battaglia, M; Bauce, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beacham, J B; Beattie, M D; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, K; Becker, S; Beckingham, M; Becot, C; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C P; Beemster, L J; Beermann, T A; Begel, M; Behr, K; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, P J; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellerive, A; Bellomo, M; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bender, M; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benhar Noccioli, E; Benitez Garcia, J A; Benjamin, D P; Bensinger, J R; Bentvelsen, S; Beresford, L; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Beringer, J; Bernard, C; Bernard, N R; Bernius, C; Bernlochner, F U; Berry, T; Berta, P; Bertella, C; Bertoli, G; Bertolucci, F; Bertsche, C; Bertsche, D; Besana, M I; Besjes, G J; Bessidskaia Bylund, O; Bessner, M; Besson, N; Betancourt, C; Bethke, S; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, R M; Bianchini, L; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Bieniek, S P; Biglietti, M; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Black, C W; Black, J E; Black, K M; Blackburn, D; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J-B; Blanco, J E; Blazek, T; Bloch, I; Blocker, C; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Bock, C; Boddy, C R; Boehler, M; Bogaerts, J A; Bogdanchikov, A G; Bohm, C; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Boldyrev, A S; Bomben, M; Bona, M; Boonekamp, M; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borroni, S; Bortfeldt, J; Bortolotto, V; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boudreau, J; Bouffard, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boumediene, D; Bourdarios, C; Bousson, N; Boutouil, S; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bozic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brazzale, S F; Brendlinger, K; Brennan, A J; Brenner, L; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Bristow, K; Bristow, T M; Britton, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Bronner, J; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, T; Brooks, W K; Brosamer, J; Brost, E; Brown, J; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Bryngemark, L; Buanes, T; Buat, Q; Bucci, F; Buchholz, P; Buckley, A G; Buda, S I; Budagov, I A; Buehrer, F; Bugge, L; Bugge, M K; Bulekov, O; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burghgrave, B; Burke, S; Burmeister, I; Busato, E; Büscher, D; Büscher, V; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Butt, A I; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Butti, P; Buttinger, W; Buzatu, A; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cakir, O; Calafiura, P; Calandri, A; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Caloba, L P; Calvet, D; Calvet, S; Camacho Toro, R; Camarda, S; Cameron, D; Caminada, L M; Caminal Armadans, R; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Campoverde, A; Canale, V

    2015-04-24

    The results of a dedicated search for pair production of scalar partners of charm quarks are reported. The search is based on an integrated luminosity of 20.3  fb^{-1} of pp collisions at sqrt[s]=8  TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The search is performed using events with large missing transverse momentum and at least two jets, where the two leading jets are each tagged as originating from c quarks. Events containing isolated electrons or muons are vetoed. In an R-parity-conserving minimal supersymmetric scenario in which a single scalar-charm state is kinematically accessible, and where it decays exclusively into a charm quark and a neutralino, 95% confidence-level upper limits are obtained in the scalar-charm-neutralino mass plane such that, for neutralino masses below 200 GeV, scalar-charm masses up to 490 GeV are excluded. PMID:25955046

  14. Centrality Dependence of Charm Production from a Measurement of Single Electrons in Au+Au Collisions at √(sNN)=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, S. S.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Alexander, J.; Amirikas, R.; Aphecetche, L.; Aronson, S. H.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, R.; Babintsev, V.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhagavatula, S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Borel, H.; Borenstein, S.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bruner, N.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Camard, X.; Chai, J.-S.; Chand, P.; Chang, W. C.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Chujo, T.; Cianciolo, V.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Constantin, P.; D'Enterria, D. G.; David, G.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Devismes, A.; Dietzsch, O.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Du Rietz, R.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Efremenko, Y. V.; El Chenawi, K.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Ewell, L.; Fields, D. E.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fox, B. D.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fung, S.-Y.; Garpman, S.; Ghosh, T. K.; Glenn, A.; Gogiberidze, G.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Guryn, W.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hamagaki, H.; Hansen, A. G.; Hartouni, E. P.; Harvey, M.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, N.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Heuser, J. M.; Hibino, M.; Hill, J. C.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoover, A.; Ichihara, T.; Ikonnikov, V. V.; Imai, K.; Isenhower, D.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Jacak, B. V.; Jang, W. Y.; Jeong, Y.; Jia, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Johnson, S. C.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kang, J. H.; Kapoor, S. S.; Katou, K.; Kelly, S.; Khachaturov, B.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, E.; Kim, G.-B.; Kim, H. J.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Kiyoyama, K.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kobayashi, H.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Koehler, D.; Kohama, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kuberg, C. H.; Kurita, K.; Kuroki, Y.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Ladygin, V.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, S.; Leitch, M. J.; Li, X. H.; Lim, H.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, M. X.; Liu, Y.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mao, Y.; Martinez, G.; Marx, M. D.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; Matsumoto, T.; McGaughey, P. L.; Melnikov, E.; Messer, F.; Miake, Y.; Milan, J.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, R. E.; Mishra, G. C.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Mühlbacher, F.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Muniruzzaman, M.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Nakamura, T.; Nandi, B. K.; Nara, M.; Newby, J.; Nilsson, P.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Okada, K.; Ono, M.; Onuchin, V.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P.; Pantuev, V. S.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J.; Parmar, A.; Pate, S. F.; Peitzmann, T.; Peng, J.-C.; Peresedov, V.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Plasil, F.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Roche, G.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosnet, P.; Ryu, S. S.; Sadler, M. E.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, M.; Sakai, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanfratello, L.; Santo, R.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schutz, Y.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Shaw, M. R.; Shea, T. K.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shiina, T.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Sivertz, M.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sullivan, J. P.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tamai, M.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarján, P.; Tepe, J. D.; Thomas, T. L.; Tojo, J.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuruoka, H.; Tuli, S. K.; Tydesjö, H.; Tyurin, N.; van Hecke, H. W.; Velkovska, J.; Velkovsky, M.; Veszprémi, V.; Villatte, L.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Volkov, M. A.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, Y.; White, S. N.; Wohn, F. K.; Woody, C. L.; Xie, W.; Yang, Y.; Yanovich, A.; Yokkaichi, S.; Young, G. R.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zhou, S. J.; Zolin, L.

    2005-03-01

    The PHENIX experiment has measured midrapidity transverse momentum spectra (0.4charm at lower pT. For all centralities, the charm production cross section is found to scale with the nuclear overlap function, TAA. For minimum-bias collisions the charm cross section per binary collision is Ncc¯/TAA=622±57(stat)±160(syst) μb.

  15. Centrality dependence of charm production from a measurement of single electrons in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

    2005-03-01

    The PHENIX experiment has measured midrapidity transverse momentum spectra (0.4charm at lower p(T). For all centralities, the charm production cross section is found to scale with the nuclear overlap function, T(AA). For minimum-bias collisions the charm cross section per binary collision is N(cc )/T(AA)=622+/-57(stat)+/-160(syst) microb. PMID:15783878

  16. A Search for Charm and Beauty in a Very Strange World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamin, Jason Adrian

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) was built to produce and study the extremely hot and dense phase of matter called Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) in which the degrees of freedom are individual partons rather than composite hadrons. Since 2000, RHIC has collided various species of particles in order to disentangle and isolate the properties of the strongly interacting QGP: p+p to set a baseline, d+Au to establish a control experiment, Au+Au to definitively create the QGP, and Cu+Cu to bridge the gap between d+Au and Au+Au. Electron-positron pairs are a particularly effective probe of the QGP because they carry no color charge. Therefore, once created, these leptons do not interact strongly with the medium. As a result, they retain characteristics of the full time evolution and dynamics of the system. There are many features of interest in the dielectron invariant mass spectrum. The low mass region (< 1 GeV/c2) consists primarily of pairs from Dalitz decays of light hadrons and direct decays of vector mesons that can be modified by the medium, while the intermediate (1 < m < 3 GeV/c2) and high (4 < m < 8 GeV/c2) mass regions are dominated by pairs from mesons containing charm and beauty respectively. Of the multitude of measurements that PHENIX has produced over the last decade, one of the more mysterious and intriguing is a large enhancement of pairs in the low mass region in central Au+Au collisions compared to the p+p reference. Current theories are unable to explain the origin of this excess and a lingering question within the field is whether the presence of "cold" nuclear matter in the initial state of the collision, independent of the formation of a QGP, could possibly account for this increased yield. To answer this question, this thesis explores the dielectron spectra in

  17. First Airborne IPDA Lidar Measurements of Methane and Carbon Dioxide Applying the DLR Greenhouse Gas Sounder CHARM-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amediek, A.; Ehret, G.; Fix, A.; Wirth, M.; Quatrevalet, M.; Büdenbender, C.; Kiemle, C.; Loehring, J.; Gerbig, C.

    2015-12-01

    First airborne measurement using CHARM-F, the four-wavelengths lidar for simultaneous soundings of atmospheric CO2 and CH4, were performed in Spring 2015 onboard the German research aircraft HALO. The lidar is designed in the IPDA (integrated path differential absorption) configuration using short double pulses, which gives column averaged gas mixing ratios between aircraft and ground. HALO's maximum flight altitude of 15 km and special features of the lidar, such as a relatively large laser ground spot, enable the CHARM-F system to be an airborne demonstrator for future spaceborne greenhouse gas lidars. Due to a high technological conformity this applies in particular to the French-German satellite mission MERLIN, the spaceborne methane IPDA lidar. The successfully completed flight measurements provide a valuable dataset, which supports the retrieval algorithm development for MERLIN notably. The flights covered different ground cover types, different orography types as well as the sea. Additionally, we captured different cloud conditions, at which the broken cloud case is a matter of particular interest. This dataset allows detailed analyses of measurement sensitivities, general studies on the IPDA principle and on technical details of the system. These activities are supported by another instrument onboard: a cavity ring down spectrometer, providing in-situ data of carbon dioxide, methane and water vapor with high accuracy and precision, which is ideal for validation purposes of the lidar. Additionally the onboard instrumentation of HALO gives information about pressure and temperature for cross-checking the ECMWF data, which are intended to be used for calculating the weighting function, the key quantity for the retrieval of gas column mixing ratios from the measured gas optical depths. In combination with dedicated descents into the boundary layer and subsequent ascents, a self-contained dataset for characterizations of CHARM-F is available.

  18. Hyperon AND Hyperon Resonance Properties From Charm Baryon Decays At BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, Veronique; /Iowa U.

    2007-07-03

    This report describes studies of hyperons and hyperon resonances produced in charm baryon decays at BABAR. Using two-body decays of the {Xi}{sub c}{sup 0} and {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0}, it is shown, for the first time, that the spin of the {omega}{sup -} is 3/2. The {Omega}{sup -} analysis procedures are extended to three-body final states and properties of the {Xi}(1690){sup 0} are extracted from a detailed isobar model analysis of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}{bar K}{sup 0}K{sup +} Dalitz plot. The mass and width values of the {Xi}(1690){sup 0} are measured with much greater precision than attained previously. The hypothesis that the spin of the {Xi}(1690) resonance is 1/2 yields an excellent description of the data, while spin values 3/2 and 5/2 are disfavored. The {Lambda}a{sub 0}(980){sup +} decay mode of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} is observed for the first time. Similar techniques are then used to study {Xi}(1530){sup 0} production in {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} decay. The spin of the {Xi}(1530) is established for the first time to be 3/2. The existence of an S-wave amplitude in the {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} system is shown, and its interference with the {Xi}(1530){sup 0} amplitude provides the first clear demonstration of the Breit-Wigner phase motion expected for the {Xi}(1530). The {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} mass distribution in the vicinity of the {Xi}(1690){sup 0} exhibits interesting structure which may be interpreted as indicating that the {Xi}(1690) has negative parity.

  19. Strangeness and charmness content of the nucleon from overlap fermions on 2+1-flavor domain-wall fermion configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, M.; Alexandru, A.; Chen, Y.; Doi, T.; Dong, S. J.; Draper, T.; Freeman, W.; Glatzmaier, M.; Li, A.; Liu, K. F.; Liu, Z.

    2013-07-01

    We present a calculation of the strangeness and charmness contents ⟨N|s¯s|N⟩ and ⟨N|c¯c|N⟩ of the nucleon from dynamical lattice QCD with 2+1 flavors. The calculation is performed with overlap valence quarks on 2+1-flavor domain-wall fermion gauge configurations. The configurations are generated by the RBC collaboration on a 243×64 lattice with sea-quark mass aml=0.005, ams=0.04, and inverse lattice spacing a-1=1.73GeV. Both actions have chiral symmetry which is essential in avoiding contamination due to the operator mixing with other flavors. The nucleon propagator and the quark loops are both computed with stochastic grid sources, while low-mode substitution and low-mode averaging methods are used respectively which substantially improve the signal-to-noise ratio. We obtain the strangeness matrix element fTs=ms⟨N|s¯s|N⟩/MN=0.0334(62), and the charmness content fTc=mc⟨N|c¯c|N⟩/MN=0.094(31) which is resolved from zero by 3σ precision for the first time.

  20. {epsilon}{sub K} at next-to-next-to-leading order: The charm-top-quark contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Brod, Joachim; Gorbahn, Martin

    2010-11-01

    We perform a next-to-next-to-leading order QCD analysis of the charm-top-quark contribution {eta}{sub ct} to the effective |{Delta}S|=2 Hamiltonian in the standard model. {eta}{sub ct} represents an important part of the short distance contribution to the parameter {epsilon}{sub K}. We calculate the three-loop anomalous dimension of the leading operator Q-tilde{sub S2}, the three-loop mixing of the current-current and penguin operators into Q-tilde{sub S2}, and the corresponding two-loop matching conditions at the electroweak, the bottom-quark, and the charm-quark scale. As our final numerical result we obtain {eta}{sub ct}=0.496{+-}0.047, which is roughly 7% larger than the next-to-leading-order (NLO) value {eta}{sub ct}{sup NLO}=0.457{+-}0.073. This results in a prediction for |{epsilon}{sub K}|=(1.90{+-}0.26)x10{sup -3}, which corresponds to an enhancement of approximately 3% with respect to the value obtained using {eta}{sub ct}{sup NLO}.

  1. Measurements of prompt charm production cross-sections in pp collisions at sqrt{s}=13 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-03-01

    Production cross-sections of prompt charm mesons are measured with the first data from pp collisions at the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.98 ± 0.19 pb-1 collected by the LHCb experiment. The production cross-sections of D 0, D +, D s + , and D *+ mesons are measured in bins of charm meson transverse momentum, p T, and rapidity, y, and cover the range 0 < p T < 15GeV/c and 2.0 < y < 4.5. The inclusive cross-sections for the four mesons, including charge conjugation, within the range of 1 < p T < 8 GeV/c are found to be begin{array}{l}σ left(ppto {D}^0Xright)=2460± 3± 130\\upmu b \\ {}σ left(ppto {D}+Xright)=1000± 3± 110\\upmu b \\ {}σ left(ppto {D}_s+Xright)=460± 13± 100\\upmu b \\ {}σ left(ppto {D}^{ast +}Xright)=880± 5± 140\\upmu b where the uncertainties are due to statistical and systematic uncertainties, respectively. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. J/\\psi suppression in p-A collisions from charm quark energy loss in cold nuclear matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, L. H.; Duan, C. G.

    2016-02-01

    The energy loss effect of charm quarks in cold nuclear matter on J/\\psi suppression in p-A collisions is studied. By means of two parametrizations of quark energy loss, the leading-order computations for J/\\psi production cross section ratios {R}W({{Fe})/{{Be}}}({x}F) are presented and compared with the selected E866 experimental data, with the c\\bar{c} remaining colored on its entire path in the medium. It is found that the energy loss of the color octet c\\bar{c} is an important effect in J/\\psi suppression; however, whether it is linear or quadratic with the path length cannot be determined. The successful description of J/\\psi suppression in 0.2\\lt {x}F\\lt 0.65 gives the charm quark mean energy loss per unit path length α =1.49+/- 0.37 {{GeV}}/fm. Using the same quark energy loss model, we further give the phenomenological analysis at the leading order for J/\\psi production cross section ratios as a function of y for the Large Hadron Collider experimental data.

  3. Multiple-neutral-meson decays of the /tau/ lepton and electromagnetic calorimeter requirements at Tau-Charm Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, K.K.

    1989-08-01

    This is a study of the physics sensitivity to the multiple-neutral-meson decays of the /tau/ lepton at the Tau-Charm Factory. The sensitivity is compared for a moderate and an ultimate electromagnetic calorimeter. With the high luminosity of the Tau- Charm Factory, a very large sample of the decays /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus//2/pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau// and /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus//3/pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau// can be collected with both detectors. However, with the ultimate detector, 2/pi//sup 0/ and 3/pi//sup 0/ can be unambiguously reconstructed with very little background. For the suppressed decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus///eta//pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau//, only the ultimate detector has the sensitivity. The ultimate detector is also sensitive to the more suppressed decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ K/sup /minus///eta//nu//sub /tau// and the moderate detector may have the sensitivity if the hadronic background is not significantly larger than that predicted by Lund. In the case of the highly suppressed second-class-current decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus///eta//nu//sub /tau//, only the ultimate detector has sensitivity. The sensitivity can be greatly enhanced with a small-angle photon veto. 16 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. OPE, charm-quark mass, and decay constants of D and Ds mesons from QCD sum rules

    PubMed Central

    Lucha, Wolfgang; Melikhov, Dmitri; Simula, Silvano

    2011-01-01

    We present a sum-rule extraction of the decay constants of the charmed mesons D and Ds from the two-point correlator of pseudoscalar currents. First, we compare the perturbative expansion for the correlator and the decay constant performed in terms of the pole and the running MS¯ masses of the charm quark. The perturbative expansion in terms of the pole mass shows no signs of convergence whereas reorganizing this very expansion in terms of the MS¯ mass leads to a distinct hierarchy of the perturbative expansion. Furthermore, the decay constants extracted from the pole-mass correlator turn out to be considerably smaller than those obtained by means of the MS¯-mass correlator. Second, making use of the OPE in terms of the MS¯ mass, we determine the decay constants of both D and Ds mesons with an emphasis on the uncertainties in these quantities related both to the input QCD parameters and to the limited accuracy of the method of sum rules. PMID:21949465

  5. PREFACE: XI Conference on Beauty, Charm, Hyperons in Hadronic Interactions BEACH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzo, Marco

    2014-11-01

    This volume contains the invited and contributed papers presented at the 11th International Conference on Hyperons, Charm and Beauty Hadrons, currently known as the BEACH Conferences. The BEACH conferences cover a broad range of physics topics in the field of Hyperon and heavy-flavor physics. This conference continues the BEACH series, which began with a meeting in Strasbourg in 1995 and since then offers a biennial opportunity for both theorists and experimentalists from the high-energy physics community to discuss all aspects of flavour physics. The 11th Conference took place in the Lecture Theatre of the Physics West Building of the University of Birmingham (United Kingdom) from July 22nd to July 26th and was attended by 107 participants. All of the sessions were plenary sessions accommodating review talks and shorter contributions discussing both theory and recent experiments. At the end of the conference Valerie Gibson (Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, UK) and Sebastian Jaeger (School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, UK) summarized and put in context all the presentations of the conference giving two very interesting Summary talks. These Conference Proceedings are particularly interesting since, due to the long shutdown of the LHC in Geneva (CH), most of the data presented were from the entire data set available. This volume in fact offers an interesting panorama of the present situation and allows a comparison of the experimental data and the theory in a field that is always in continuous evolution. The conference was impeccably organized by the Local Organizing Committee chaired by Cristina Lazzeroni (Birmingham Univeristy, Birmingham, UK) that I want to thank particularly here. Many from the University Staff have contributed to the smooth running of the conference. We would like to thank the Local Scientific Secretariat for their invaluable help in making the conference a truly enjoyable and unforgettable event; a special thanks

  6. Study of B-Meson Decays to Final States with a Single Charm Baryon

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, Stephanie A.

    2007-08-01

    A study of B-meson decays to final states with a single charm baryon is presented based on data recorded by the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Although the B meson is the lightest bottom-flavored meson, it is heavy enough to decay to a baryon made of three quarks and an antibaryon made of three antiquarks. By studying the baryonic weak decays of the B meson, we can investigate baryon production mechanisms in heavy meson decays. In particular, we measure the rates of the decays B- → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$π- and $\\bar{B}$0 → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$. Comparing these rates, we confirm an observed trend in baryonic B decays that the decay with the lower energy release, B- → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$π-, is favored over $\\bar{B}$0 → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$. The dynamics of the baryon-antibaryon (Λ+c$\\bar{p}$) system in the three-body decay also provide insight into baryon-antibaryon production mechanisms. The B- → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$π- system is a laboratory for searches for excited #c baryon states; we observe the resonant decays B- → Σc(2455) 0$\\bar{p}$ and B- → Σc(2800) 0$\\bar{p}$. This is the first observation of the decay B- → Σc(2800) 0$\\bar{p}$; however, the mass of the observed #c(2800)0 state is inconsistent with previous measurements. Finally, we examine the angular distribution of the B- → Σc(2455) 0$\\bar{p}$ decays and measure the spin of the B- → Σc(2455) 0$\\bar{p}$ baryon to be J = 1/2, as predicted by the quark model.

  7. ADHydro: A Parallel Implementation of a Large-scale High-Resolution Multi-Physics Distributed Water Resources Model Using the Charm++ Run Time System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, R. C.; Ogden, F. L.; Lai, W.; Moreno, H. A.; Pureza, L. G.

    2014-12-01

    Physics-based watershed models are useful tools for hydrologic studies, water resources management and economic analyses in the contexts of climate, land-use, and water-use changes. This poster presents a parallel implementation of a quasi 3-dimensional, physics-based, high-resolution, distributed water resources model suitable for simulating large watersheds in a massively parallel computing environment. Developing this model is one of the objectives of the NSF EPSCoR RII Track II CI-WATER project, which is joint between Wyoming and Utah EPSCoR jurisdictions. The model, which we call ADHydro, is aimed at simulating important processes in the Rocky Mountain west, including: rainfall and infiltration, snowfall and snowmelt in complex terrain, vegetation and evapotranspiration, soil heat flux and freezing, overland flow, channel flow, groundwater flow, water management and irrigation. Model forcing is provided by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, and ADHydro is coupled with the NOAH-MP land-surface scheme for calculating fluxes between the land and atmosphere. The ADHydro implementation uses the Charm++ parallel run time system. Charm++ is based on location transparent message passing between migrateable C++ objects. Each object represents an entity in the model such as a mesh element. These objects can be migrated between processors or serialized to disk allowing the Charm++ system to automatically provide capabilities such as load balancing and checkpointing. Objects interact with each other by passing messages that the Charm++ system routes to the correct destination object regardless of its current location. This poster discusses the algorithms, communication patterns, and caching strategies used to implement ADHydro with Charm++. The ADHydro model code will be released to the hydrologic community in late 2014.

  8. Open, Openness, Opening, Opened--What is Your Style?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queen, Renee

    This paper presents in descriptive and practical terms a rationale for working towards openness in the classroom. Open education is defined as a humanistic approach designed to offer support to the children in their move towards self-realization. More than classroom structure, open education is a way of thinking about children, learning, self and…

  9. Spin (1/2){sup +}, spin (3/2){sup +}, and transition magnetic moments of low lying and charmed baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Neetika; Dahiya, Harleen; Chatley, P. K.; Gupta, Manmohan

    2010-04-01

    Magnetic moments of the low lying and charmed spin (1/2){sup +} and spin (3/2){sup +} baryons have been calculated in the SU(4) chiral constituent quark model ({chi}CQM) by including the contribution from cc fluctuations. Explicit calculations have been carried out for the contribution coming from the valence quarks, ''quark sea'' polarizations and their orbital angular momentum. The implications of such a model have also been studied for magnetic moments of the low lying spin (3/2){sup +{yields}}(1/2){sup +} and (1/2){sup +{yields}}(1/2){sup +} transitions as well as the transitions involving charmed baryons. The predictions of {chi}CQM not only give a satisfactory fit for the baryons where experimental data is available but also show improvement over the other models. In particular, for the case of {mu}(p), {mu}({Sigma}{sup +}), {mu}({Xi}{sup 0}), {mu}({Lambda}), Coleman-Glashow sum rule for the low lying spin (1/2){sup +} baryons and {mu}({Delta}{sup +}), {mu}({Omega}{sup -}) for the low lying spin (3/2){sup +} baryons, we are able to achieve an excellent agreement with data. For the spin (1/2){sup +} and spin (3/2){sup +} charmed baryon magnetic moments, our results are consistent with the predictions of the QCD sum rules, light cone sum rules and spectral sum rules. For the cases where light quarks dominate in the valence structure, the sea and orbital contributions are found to be fairly significant however, they cancel in the right direction to give the correct magnitude of the total magnetic moment. On the other hand, when there is an excess of heavy quarks, the contribution of the quark sea is almost negligible, for example, {mu}({Omega}{sub c}{sup 0}), {mu}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}), {mu}({Xi}{sub c}{sup +}), {mu}({Xi}{sub c}{sup 0}), {mu}({Omega}{sub cc}{sup +}), {mu}({Omega}{sup -}), {mu}({Omega}{sub c}*{sup 0}), {mu}({Omega}{sub cc}*{sup +}), and {mu}({Omega}{sub ccc}*{sup ++}). The effects of configuration mixing and quark masses have also been

  10. Open Content in Open Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansa, Sarah Whitcher; Kansa, Eric C.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the challenges and rewards of sharing research content through a discussion of Open Context, a new open access data publication system for field sciences and museum collections. Open Context is the first data repository of its kind, allowing self-publication of research data, community commentary through tagging, and clear…

  11. Measurement of the doubly Cabibbo suppressed decay D0 ---> K+ pi- and a search for charm mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Link, J.M.; Yager, P.M.; Anjos, J.C.; Bediaga, I.; Gobel, C.; Machado, A.A.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; de Miranda, J.M.; Pepe, I.M.; Polycarpo, E.; dos Reis, A.C.; Carrillo, S.; Casimiro, E.; Cuautle, E.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Uribe, C.; Vazquez, F.; Agostino, L.; Cinquini, L.; Cumalat, J.P. /Colorado U. /Fermilab /Frascati /Guanajuato U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Indiana U. /Korea U. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /North Carolina U. /Pavia U. /INFN, Pavia /Puerto Rico U., Mayaguez /South Carolina U. /Tennessee U. /Vanderbilt U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2004-12-01

    The authors present an analysis of the decay D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} based on FOCUS data. From a sample of 234 signal events, they find a branching ratio of {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = (0.429{sub -0.061}{sup +0-.063} {+-} 0.027)% under the assumptions of no mixing and no CP violation. Allowing for CP violation, the find a branching ratio of (0.435{sub -0.061}{sup +0.063} {+-} 0.028)% and a CP asymmetry of 0.178{sub -0.141}{sup +0.144} {+-} 0.041. The branching ratio for the case of mixing with no CP violation is (0.381{sub -0.163}{sup +0.167} {+-} 0.092)%. They also present limits on charm mixing.

  12. Observation and study of bottom-meson decays to a charm meson, a proton-antiproton pair, and pions

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tae Min

    2010-04-27

    Bottom-meson decays with baryons show two unusual features—the branching fractions are enhanced for multibody decays and the baryon-antibaryon subsystem recoils against the other decay products—and their reasons are not yet well understood. Moreover, measurements using explicit reconstruction techniques constitute only about 1% out of about 8% of such decays. This Dissertation reports the study of ten bottom-meson decays (labeled 0– 9) to a proton-antiproton pair, a charm meson, and a system of up to two pions, using the BABAR Experiment’s 455×106 BB pairs produced with the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center.

  13. Dynamically generated N* and {Lambda}* resonances in the hidden charm sector around 4.3 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jiajun; Molina, R.; Oset, E.; Zou, B. S.

    2011-07-15

    The interactions of D-bar{Sigma}{sub c}-D-bar{Lambda}{sub c}, D-bar*{Sigma}{sub c}-D-bar*{Lambda}{sub c}, and related strangeness channels, are studied within the framework of the coupled-channel unitary approach with the local hidden gauge formalism. A series of meson-baryon dynamically generated relatively narrow N* and {Lambda}* resonances are predicted around 4.3 GeV in the hidden charm sector. We make estimates of production cross sections of these predicted resonances in p-barp collisions for the experiment of antiproton annihilation at Darmstadt (PANDA) at the forthcoming GSI Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) facility.

  14. The impact of the intrinsic charm quark content of a proton on the differential \\gamma +c cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostami, S.; Khorramian, A.; Aleedaneshvar, A.

    2016-06-01

    We present a comparative analysis of the impact of the non-perturbative intrinsic charm quark content of a proton on the differential cross section of a γ + c-jet in pp and p\\bar{p} collisions, for the kinematic regions that are sensitive to this contribution. We discuss the Q 2 evolution of intrinsic quark distributions at the next-to-leading order (NLO) and present a code which provides these distributions as a function of x and Q 2 for any arbitrary Fock state probability. For the p\\bar{p} collisions at the Tevatron, the results are compared with recent experimental data at \\sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV and also predictions for pp collisions at \\sqrt{s}=8 TeV and \\sqrt{s}=13 TeV for the Large Hadron Collider.

  15. Flavor-changing top-charm associated productions at the ILC in the littlest Higgs model with T parity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yanju; Lu Gongru; Wang Xuelei

    2011-04-01

    The littlest Higgs model with T parity has new flavor-changing couplings with the standard model quarks, which do not suffer strong constraints from electroweak precision data. So these flavor-changing interactions may enhance the cross sections of some flavor-changing neutral-current processes. In this work, we study the flavor-changing top-charm associated productions via the e{sup -}{gamma} collision at the ILC. We find that the cross sections are sensitive to the mirror quark masses. With reasonable values of the parameters, the cross sections may reach the detectable level and provide useful information about the relevant parameters in the littlest Higgs model with T parity, especially in setting an upper limit on the mirror quark masses.

  16. The Λb → J/ψK- p reaction: Λ(1405) and hidden charm pentaquark formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oset, Eulogio; Roca, Luis; Mai, Maxim; Nieves, Juan

    2016-05-01

    In this talk we present an approach to the Λb → J/ψK- p reaction, where we look at the invariant mass of K- p and also πΣ, with a view to determine the shape and production rate of the Λ(1405) resonance. We compare the results obtained with the analysis of the same reaction, made a posteriori by the LHCb collaboration, in which two pentaquark states were claimed. At the same time we show the results of another work, prompted by the findings of the LHCb collaboration, where we show that there is consistency with the results obtained in the study of the Λb → J/ψK- p reaction with other results previously reported about a hidden charm baryon state.

  17. First Observation of the Doubly Cabibbo-Suppressed Decay of a Charmed Baryon: Λ_{c}^{+}→pK^{+}π^{-}.

    PubMed

    Yang, S B; Tanida, K; Kim, B H; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Asner, D M; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Babu, V; Badhrees, I; Bakich, A M; Barberio, E; Bhardwaj, V; Bhuyan, B; Biswal, J; Bonvicini, G; Bozek, A; Bračko, M; Browder, T E; Červenkov, D; Chekelian, V; Chen, A; Cheon, B G; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Cho, K; Chobanova, V; Choi, Y; Cinabro, D; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, N; Doležal, Z; Drásal, Z; Dutta, D; Eidelman, S; Farhat, H; Fast, J E; Ferber, T; Fulsom, B G; Gabyshev, N; Garmash, A; Gaur, V; Gillard, R; Goh, Y M; Goldenzweig, P; Greenwald, D; Grygier, J; Haba, J; Hamer, P; Hara, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hou, W-S; Iijima, T; Inami, K; Inguglia, G; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, Y; Jacobs, W W; Jaegle, I; Jeon, H B; Joo, K K; Julius, T; Kang, K H; Kato, E; Katrenko, P; Kiesling, C; Kim, D Y; Kim, H J; Kim, J B; Kim, K T; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S K; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Kobayashi, N; Kodyš, P; Korpar, S; Križan, P; Krokovny, P; Kuhr, T; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y-J; Lange, J S; Lee, I S; Li, C H; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Libby, J; Liventsev, D; Lubej, M; Masuda, M; Matvienko, D; Miyabayashi, K; Miyata, H; Mizuk, R; Mohanty, G B; Moll, A; Moon, H K; Mussa, R; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nanut, T; Nath, K J; Nayak, M; Negishi, K; Niiyama, M; Nisar, N K; Nishida, S; Ogawa, S; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Pakhlova, G; Pal, B; Park, C W; Park, H; Pedlar, T K; Pestotnik, R; Petrič, M; Piilonen, L E; Pulvermacher, C; Rauch, J; Ritter, M; Rostomyan, A; Ryu, S; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Sandilya, S; Santelj, L; Sanuki, T; Sato, Y; Savinov, V; Schlüter, T; Schneider, O; Schnell, G; Schwanda, C; Schwartz, A J; Seino, Y; Senyo, K; Seon, O; Seong, I S; Sevior, M E; Shebalin, V; Shibata, T-A; Shiu, J-G; Shwartz, B; Simon, F; Sohn, Y-S; Sokolov, A; Stanič, S; Starič, M; Stypula, J; Sumihama, M; Sumiyoshi, T; Takizawa, M; Tamponi, U; Teramoto, Y; Trabelsi, K; Trusov, V; Uchida, M; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Usov, Y; Vanhoefer, P; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vinokurova, A; Vossen, A; Wagner, M N; Wang, C H; Wang, M-Z; Wang, P; Wang, X L; Watanabe, Y; Williams, K M; Won, E; Yamaoka, J; Yashchenko, S; Ye, H; Yelton, J; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2016-07-01

    We report the first observation of the decay Λ_{c}^{+}→pK^{+}π^{-} using a 980  fb^{-1} data sample collected by the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e^{+}e^{-} collider. This is the first observation of a doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay of a charmed baryon. We measure the branching ratio of this decay with respect to its Cabibbo-favored counterpart to be B(Λ_{c}^{+}→pK^{+}π^{-})/B(Λ_{c}^{+}→pK^{-}π^{+})=(2.35±0.27±0.21)×10^{-3}, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. PMID:27419562

  18. Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suber, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Internet lets us share perfect copies of our work with a worldwide audience at virtually no cost. We take advantage of this revolutionary opportunity when we make our work "open access": digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions. Open access is made possible by the Internet and copyright-holder…

  19. The Cryogenic, High-Accuracy, Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS): A New Facility for Cryogenic Infrared through Vacuum Far-Ultraviolet Refractive Index Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frey, Bradley J.; Leviton, Douglas B.

    2004-01-01

    The optical designs of future NASA infrared (IR) missions and instruments, such as the James Webb Space Telescope's (JWST) Near-Mixed Camera (NIRCam), will rely on accurate knowledge of the index of refraction of various IR optical materials at cryogenic temperatures. To meet this need, we have developed a Cryogenic, High-Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS). In this paper we discuss the completion of the design and construction of CHARMS as well as the engineering details that constrained the final design and hardware implementation. In addition, we will present our first light, cryogenic, IR index of refraction data for LiF, BaF2, and CaF2, and compare our results to previously published data for these materials.

  20. Measurement of single electrons and implications for charm production in Au+Au collisions at square root[s(NN)] = 130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adcox, K; Adler, S S; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Y; Botelho, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Klinksiek, S; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J; Makdisi, Y I; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Osterman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Petridis, A N; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiriak, I G; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sorensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; Van Hecke, H W; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S

    2002-05-13

    Transverse momentum spectra of electrons from Au+Au collisions at square root[s(NN)] = 130 GeV have been measured at midrapidity by the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The spectra show an excess above the background from photon conversions and light hadron decays. The electron signal is consistent with that expected from semileptonic decays of charm. The yield of the electron signal dN(e)/dy for p(T) > 0.8 GeV/c is 0.025+/-0.004(stat)+/-0.010(syst) in central collisions, and the corresponding charm cross section is 380+/-60(stat)+/-200(syst) microb per binary nucleon-nucleon collision. PMID:12005627

  1. First measurement of W boson production in association with a single Charm quark in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Bednar, P; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giakoumopolou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Koay, S A; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Luci, C; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Mangano, M L; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyria, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Denis, R St; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wagner, W; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2008-03-01

    We present the first measurement of the production cross section of a W boson with a single charm quark (c) in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV, using soft muon tagging of c jets. In a data sample of approximately 1.8 fb(-1), recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, we select events with W+1 or 2 jets. We use the charge correlation between the W and the muon from the semileptonic decay of a charm hadron to extract the Wc signal. We measure sigma Wc(PTc >20 GeV/c,|eta c|<1.5) x BR(W-->l nu)=9.8+/-3.2 pb, in agreement with theoretical expectations. PMID:18352698

  2. Combined heavy-quark symmetry and large-Nc operator analysis for 2-body counterterms in the chiral Lagrangian with D mesons and charmed baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samart, Daris; Nualchimplee, Chakrit; Yan, Yupeng

    2016-06-01

    In this work we construct a chiral SU(3) Lagrangian with D mesons of spin JP=0- and JP=1- and charmed baryons of spin JP=1 /2+ and JP=3 /2+. There are 42 leading two-body counterterms involving two charmed baryon fields and two D meson fields in the constructed Lagrangian. The heavy-quark spin symmetry leads to 35 sum rules, while the large-Nc operator analysis predicts 29 at the next-to leading order of the 1 /Nc expansion. The combination of the sum rules from both the heavy-quark symmetry and the large-Nc analysis results in 38 independent sum rules, which reduces the number of free parameters in the chiral Lagrangian to only four. This is a remarkable result demonstrating the consistency of the heavy-quark symmetry and large-Nc operator analysis.

  3. Looking for a hidden-charm pentaquark state with strangeness S =-1 from Ξb- decay into J /ψ K-Λ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua-Xing; Geng, Li-Sheng; Liang, Wei-Hong; Oset, Eulogio; Wang, En; Xie, Ju-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Assuming that the recently observed hidden-charm pentaquark state, Pc(4450 ) , is of molecular nature as predicted in the unitary approach, we propose to study the decay of Ξb-→J /ψ K-Λ to search for the strangeness counterpart of the Pc(4450 ) . There are three ingredients in the decay mechanism: the weak decay mechanism, the hadronization mechanism, and the final state interactions in the meson-baryon system of strangeness S =-2 and isospin I =1 /2 and of the J /ψ Λ . All these have been tested extensively. As a result, we provide a genuine prediction of the invariant mass distributions where a strangeness hidden-charm pentaquark state, the counterpart of the Pc(4450 ) , can be clearly seen. The decay rate is estimated to be of similar magnitude as the Λb0→J /ψ K-p measured by the LHCb Collaboration.

  4. Measurement of prompt charm meson production cross sections in pp collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Ahn, M H; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Bailey, S; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Booth, P S L; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carron, S; Carosi, R; Casarsa, M; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerri, C; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chu, M L; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Coca, M N; Connolly, A; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; De Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Doksus, P; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Drollinger, V; Ebina, K; Eddy, N; Ely, R; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flanagan, G; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Frisch, H; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gerdes, D W; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grim, G; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guimaraes Da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hall, C; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heider, E; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jarrell, J; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jones, M; Jun, S Y; Junk, T; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kartal, S; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khazins, D; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; King, B T; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Kobayashi, H; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Lazzizzera, I; Le, Y; Lecci, C; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lyons, L; Lys, J; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Manca, G; Marginean, R; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martinez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Moore, R; Morello, M; Moulik, T; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakamura, I; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Necula, V; Niell, F; Nielsen, J; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Newman-Holmes, C; Nicollerat, A-S; Nigmanov, T; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Oesterberg, K; Ogawa, T; Oh, S; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Poukhov, O; Prakoshyn, F; Pratt, T; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reichold, A; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schemitz, P; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schofield, G; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Sidoti, A; Siket, M; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spiegel, L; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Stadie, H; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takach, S F; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tamburello, P; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tannenbaum, B; Tanimoto, N; Tapprogge, S; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thurman-Keup, R; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Trischuk, W; Tseng, J; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Turner, M; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, T; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; Von Der Mey, M; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallace, N; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilkes, T; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yoon, P; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zsenei, A; Zucchelli, S

    2003-12-12

    We report on measurements of differential cross sections dsigma/dp(T) for prompt charm meson production in ppmacr; collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV using 5.8+/-0.3 pb(-1) of data from the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The data are collected with a new trigger that is sensitive to the long lifetime of hadrons containing heavy flavor. The charm meson cross sections are measured in the central rapidity region |y|K-pi(+), D(*+)-->D0pi(+), D+-->K-pi(+)pi(+), D(+)(s)-->phipi(+), and their charge conjugates. The measured cross sections are compared to theoretical calculations. PMID:14683110

  5. A Measurement of the Pseudoscalar DecayConstant fDs using Charm-Tagged Events in e+e- Collisions at the Y(4S)

    SciTech Connect

    Stelzer, Jorg; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-10-10

    The decay constant f{sub D{sub s}} of the pseudoscalar strange charm meson D{sub s}{sup +} is an important benchmark test of the theoretical methods that quantitatively describe the nonperturbative low-energy regime of QCD, the theory of the strong interaction. A confirmation of the validity of these predictive methods, foremost lattice QCD, in the sector of heavy-light meson decay constants increases trust in the calculation of f{sub B}, which is an important number for the measurement of the CKM matrix element V{sub td} in B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0}-mixing events. From October 1999 through July 2004, the BABAR experiment, located at the PEP-II storage ring at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, collected 230.2 fb{sup -1} of data in e{sup +}e{sup -} collision at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV. In this thesis, these data are searched for e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} events by identifying sets of charged and neutral pions and charged kaons, consistent with the decay of a charm meson, D{sup 0}, D{sup +}, D{sub s}{sup +}, or D*{sup +}. A sample of 510,000 charmed mesons with a momentum consistent with e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} events is identified.

  6. Newly observed D{sub sJ}(3040) and the radial excitations of P-wave charmed-strange mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Zhifeng; Liu Xiang

    2009-10-01

    Inspired by the newly observed D{sub sJ}(3040){sup +} state, in this work we systemically study the two-body strong decays of P-wave charmed-strange mesons with the first radial excitation. Under the assignment of 1{sup +}(j{sup P}=(1/2){sup +}), i.e. the first radial excitation of D{sub s1}(2460){sup +}, we find that the width of D{sub sJ}(3040){sup +} is close to the lower limit of the BABAR measurement. This indicates that it is reasonable to interpret D{sub sJ}(3040){sup +} as the first radial excitation of D{sub s1}(2460){sup +}. Our calculation further predicts that 0{sup -}+1{sup -} channels, e.g., D{sup +}K*{sup 0}, D{sup 0}K*{sup +}, and D{sub s}{sup +}{phi}, are important for the search for D{sub sJ}(3040){sup +}. To help future experiments find the remaining three P-wave charmed-strange mesons with the first radial excitation, we present the predictions for the strong decays of these three P-wave charmed-strange mesons.

  7. New Results from Frequency and Energy Reference Measurements during the first Test Flight with the Airborne Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar System CHARM-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehret, G.; Fix, A.; Amediek, A.; Quatrevalet, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) technique is regarded as a suitable means for the measurement of methane and carbon dioxide columns from satellite or aircraft platforms with unprecedented accuracy. Currently, the German-French methane mission MERLIN (Methan Remote Lidar Mission) is prepared. At the same time CHARM-F, an aircraft installed system has been developed at DLR as an airborne demonstrator for a spaceborne greenhouse gas mission. Both use e.g. optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) in a double-pulse mode as the transmitter. Of particular importance for both instruments are the sub-modules required for the frequency stabilization of the transmitter wavelength and, since the IPDA technique, in contrast to DIAL, requires the exact knowledge of the energy ratio of outgoing on-line. The coherence of the lidar transmitter gives rise to speckle effects which have to be considered for the monitoring of the energy ratio of outgoing on- and off-line pulses. For the frequency reference of CHARM-F, a very successful stabilization scheme has been developed which will also serve as the reference for MERLIN. In Spring 2015, CHARM-F was flown aboard the German HALO aircraft for the first time which enables a detailed view on the performance of both the energy calibration and frequency reference subsystems under real flight conditions. As an initial quality check we will compared the airborne results to previous lab measurements which have been performed under stable environmental conditions.

  8. Open Education and the Open Science Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Openness as a complex code word for a variety of digital trends and movements has emerged as an alternative mode of "social production" based on the growing and overlapping complexities of open source, open access, open archiving, open publishing, and open science. This paper argues that the openness movement with its reinforcing structure of…

  9. New flavor production in. gamma. ,. mu. ,. nu. , and hadron beams. [Review

    SciTech Connect

    Wojcicki, S.

    1980-01-01

    During the last few years the main emphasis in the study of heavy particle production (mainly charm) by means other than e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation has been on the production mechanisms. This review concentrates mainly on the production data in ..gamma.., ..mu.., ..nu.., and hadron beams. The heavy flavor searches divide themselves naturally into three categories, each one characterized by its own peculiar advantages and shortcomings; these are summarized briefly. Then the following topics are taken up: charm production by hadrons (central production, forward production - ..lambda../sub c/ and D production, anomalies and discrepancies), charm production by photons and muons, new flavor production by neutrinos, status of heavier flavors, and production bound flavors (eta/sub c/ search, UPSILON muoproduction, J/psi and UPSILON hadroproduction, J/psi muoproduction). In his outlook for the future, the author presents a few words concerning the status of detectors: emulsions, high-resolution streamer chambers, high-resolution bubble chambers, and solid-state detectors. 83 references, 36 figures, 4 tables. (RWR)

  10. Sexual counselling for patients with cardiovascular disease: protocol for a pilot study of the CHARMS sexual counselling intervention

    PubMed Central

    Mc Sharry, Jenny; Casey, Dympna; Doherty, Sally; Gillespie, Paddy; Jaarsma, Tiny; Murphy, Andrew W; Newell, John; O'Donnell, Martin; Steinke, Elaine E; Toomey, Elaine; Byrne, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sexual problems are common with cardiovascular disease, and can negatively impact quality of life. To address sexual problems, guidelines have identified the importance of sexual counselling during cardiac rehabilitation, yet this is rarely provided. The Cardiac Health and Relationship Management and Sexuality (CHARMS) intervention aims to improve the provision of sexual counselling in cardiac rehabilitation in Ireland. Methods and analysis This is a multicentre pilot study for the CHARMS intervention, a complex, multilevel intervention delivered within hospital-based cardiac rehabilitation programmes. The intervention includes (1) training in sexual counselling for staff, (2) a staff-led patient education and support intervention embedded within the cardiac rehabilitation programme, (3) a patient information booklet and (4) an awareness raising poster. The intervention will be delivered in two randomly selected cardiac rehabilitation centres. In each centre 30 patients will be recruited, and partners will also be invited to participate. Data will be collected from staff and patients/partners at T1 (study entry), T2 (3-month follow-up) and T3 (6-month follow-up). The primary outcome for patients/partners will be scores on the Sexual Self-Perception and Adjustment Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes for patients/partners will include relationship satisfaction; satisfaction with and barriers to sexual counselling in services; sexual activity, functioning and knowledge; physical and psychological well-being. Secondary outcomes for staff will include sexuality-related practice; barriers to sexual counselling; self-ratings of capability, opportunity and motivation; sexual attitudes and beliefs; knowledge of cardiovascular disease and sex. Fidelity of intervention delivery will be assessed using trainer self-reports, researcher-coded audio recordings and exit interviews. Longitudinal feasibility data will be gathered from patients/partners and staff via

  11. Evaluation of the Charm maximum residue limit β-lactam and tetracycline test for the detection of antibiotics in ewe and goat milk.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, M C; Romero, T; Althaus, R L; Molina, M P

    2013-05-01

    The Charm maximum residue limit β-lactam and tetracycline test (Charm MRL BLTET; Charm Sciences Inc., Lawrence, MA) is an immunoreceptor assay utilizing Rapid One-Step Assay lateral flow technology that detects β-lactam or tetracycline drugs in raw commingled cow milk at or below European Union maximum residue levels (EU-MRL). The Charm MRL BLTET test procedure was recently modified (dilution in buffer and longer incubation) by the manufacturers to be used with raw ewe and goat milk. To assess the Charm MRL BLTET test for the detection of β-lactams and tetracyclines in milk of small ruminants, an evaluation study was performed at Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnologia Animal of Universitat Politècnica de València (Spain). The test specificity and detection capability (CCβ) were studied following Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Specificity results obtained in this study were optimal for individual milk free of antimicrobials from ewes (99.2% for β-lactams and 100% for tetracyclines) and goats (97.9% for β-lactams and 100% for tetracyclines) along the entire lactation period regardless of whether the results were visually or instrumentally interpreted. Moreover, no positive results were obtained when a relatively high concentration of different substances belonging to antimicrobial families other than β-lactams and tetracyclines were present in ewe and goat milk. For both types of milk, the CCβ calculated was lower or equal to EU-MRL for amoxicillin (4 µg/kg), ampicillin (4 µg/kg), benzylpenicillin (≤ 2 µg/kg), dicloxacillin (30 µg/kg), oxacillin (30 µg/kg), cefacetrile (≤ 63 µg/kg), cefalonium (≤ 10 µg/kg), cefapirin (≤ 30 µg/kg), desacetylcefapirin (≤ 30 µg/kg), cefazolin (≤ 25 µg/kg), cefoperazone (≤ 25 µg/kg), cefquinome (20 µg/kg), ceftiofur (≤ 50 µg/kg), desfuroylceftiofur (≤ 50µg/kg), and cephalexin (≤ 50 µg/kg). However, this test could neither detect cloxacillin nor nafcillin at or below EU-MRL (CCβ >30 µg/kg). The

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS-DR8 galaxies classified by WND-CHARM (Kuminski+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuminski, E.; Shamir, L.

    2016-06-01

    The image analysis method used to classify the images is WND-CHARM (wndchrm; Shamir et al. 2008, BMC Source Code for Biology and Medicine, 3: 13; 2010PLSCB...6E0974S; 2013ascl.soft12002S), which first computes 2885 numerical descriptors from each SDSS image such as textures, edges, shapes), the statistical distribution of the pixel intensities, the polynomial decomposition of the image, and fractal features. These features are extracted from the raw pixels, as well as the image transforms and multi-order image transforms. See section 2 for further explanations. In a similar way than the catalog we also compiled a catalog of all objects with spectra in DR8. For each object, that catalog contains the spec ObjID, the R.A., the decl., the z, z error, the certainty of classification as elliptical, the certainty of classification as spiral, and the certainty of classification as a star. See section 3.1 for further explanations. (2 data files).

  13. Multiwire proportional chambers in M1 and M3 spectrometers of charmed baryon experiment (E781) at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kaya, Mithat; /Iowa U.

    1997-08-01

    The status of the multiwire proportional chambers in the FERMILAB E781 experiment and a general description of the readout system are given. This essay will describe the system of multiwire proportional chambers (MWPC) that are part of the Fermilab experiment E781 setup. Multiwire proportional chambers are often used in particle physics experiments because they can determine the position of charged particles very accurately (less than a millimeter). The E781 experiment which is also called SELEX (SEgmented LargE-X) is a spectrometer designed to study the production and decay of charmed baryons. MWPCs are part of the 3-stage charged particle spectrometer (Figure 1). Each spectrometer stage includes a bending magnet and chambers. More information about E781 experiment is given in the Appendix. In the following, some basic concepts of MWPCs will be given briefly. After that the multiwire proportional chambers (M1PWC and M3PWC) that are used in the E781 fixed target experiment will be described. Then a general description of the readout system for both M1PWC and M3PWC setups will follow. Finally the tests done on both sets of chambers will be explained in detail.

  14. Analysis of two-body charmed B meson decays in factorization-assisted topological-amplitude approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Si-Hong; Wei, Yan-Bing; Qin, Qin; Li, Ying; Yu, Fu-Sheng; Lü, Cai-Dian

    2015-11-01

    Within the factorization-assisted topological-amplitude approach, we study the two-body charmed B meson decays Bu ,d ,s→D(*)M , with M denoting a light pseudoscalar (or vector) meson. The meson decay constants and transition form factors are factorized out from the hadronic matrix element of topological diagrams. Therefore, the effect of SU(3) symmetry breaking is retained, which is different from the conventional topological diagram approach. The number of free nonperturbative parameters to be fitted from experimental data is also much less. Only four universal nonperturbative parameters χC, ϕC, χE and ϕE are introduced to describe the contribution of the color-suppressed tree and W -exchanged diagrams for all the decay channels. With the fitted parameters from 31 decay modes induced by b →c transition, we then predict the branching fractions of 120 decay modes induced by both b →c and b →u transitions. Our results are well consistent with the measured data or to be tested in the LHCb and Belle-II experiments in the future. Besides, the SU(3) symmetry breaking, isospin violation and C P asymmetry are also investigated.

  15. Prediction of isoscalar charmoniumlike structures in the hidden-charm di-eta decays of higher charmonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dian-Yong; Liu, Xiang; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Considering the situation that a single chiral particle, η is initially emitted, we study the hidden-charm di-eta decays of the charmoniumlike state Y(4660) and the predicted charmonium \\psi (4790), i.e., Y(4660)/\\psi (4790)\\to J/\\psi η η through the inetermediates η [{{D}(*)}{{\\bar{D}}(*)}] and/or η [Ds+(*)Ds-(*)], and answer the important question of whether there exist isoscalar charmoniumlike structures in the {{D}(*)}{{\\bar{D}}(*)} and/or Ds+(*)Ds-(*) channels. Our results predict that there will be enhancement structures near D{{\\bar{D}}*}, {{D}*}{{\\bar{D}}*} and {{D}s}\\bar{D}s* thresholds for Y(4660) and near {{D}*}{{\\bar{D}}*}, {{D}s}\\bar{D}s* and Ds*\\bar{D}s* thresholds for \\psi (4790) in the {{M}max }(J/\\psi η ) distributions of Y(4660)/\\psi (4790)\\to η η J/\\psi , respectively. These peaks are accessible in future experiments, especially BESIII, Belle, BaBar, and the forthcoming BelleII.

  16. Searching for τ → μ γ lepton-flavor-violating decay at super Charm-Tau factory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hao; Zhang, Ren-You; Han, Liang; Ma, Wen-Gan; Guo, Lei; Chen, Chong

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the possibility of searching the lepton-flavor-violating (LFV) τ → μ γ rare decay at the Super Charm-Tau Factory (CTF). By comparing the kinematic distributions of the LFV signal and the standard model background, we develop an optimized event selection criterion which can significantly reduce the background events. It is concluded that the new 2 σ upper limit of about 1.9 × 10^{-9} on Br(τ → μ γ ) can be obtained at the CTF, which is beyond the capability of Super-B factory in searching τ lepton rare decay. Within the framework of the scalar leptoquark model, a joint constraint on λ _1 λ _2 and M_{LQ} can be derived from the upper bound on Br(τ → μ γ ). With 1000 fb^{-1} data expected at the CTF, we get λ _1λ _2 < 7.2 × 10^{-2} (M_{LQ} = 800 GeV) and M_{LQ} > 900 GeV (λ _1 λ _2 = 9 × 10^{-2}) at 95 % confidence level.

  17. Opening Remarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldin, Daniel S.

    2005-01-01

    In these opening remarks to a symposium reflecting on forty years of U.S. Human Spaceflight, NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin, reviews the impact that Alan Shepard had on him personally, to NASA, and to the whole idea of manned spaceflight. Mr Goldin cites Shepard as an example of the past and future of manned spaceflight.

  18. Opening remarks

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, S.G.

    1994-09-01

    Included in this paper are the opening remarks of S.G. Hildebrand, from Environmental Science Division, ORNL, to a conference on water resources and water resource issues. Wetlands are the focus of this talk, with an emphasis on conservation and land use to conserve wetland functions and values.

  19. Charm quark contribution to K+ ---> pi+ nu anti-nu at next-to-next-to-leading order

    SciTech Connect

    Buras, Andrzej J.; Gorbahn, Martin; Haisch, Ulrich; Nierste, Ulrich; /Karlsruhe U., TTP /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    The authors calculate the complete next-to-next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the charm contribution of the rare decay K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}. They encounter several new features, which were absent in lower orders. They discuss them in detail and present the results for the two-loop matching conditions of the Wilson coefficients, the three-loop anomalous dimensions, and the two-loop matrix elements of the relevant operators that enter the next-to-next-to-leading order renormalization group analysis of the Z-penguin and the electroweak box contribution. The inclusion of the next-to-next-to-leading order QCD corrections leads to a significant reduction of the theoretical uncertainty from {+-} 9.8% down to {+-} 2.4% in the relevant parameter P{sub c}(X), implying the leftover scale uncertainties in {Beta}(K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}) and in the determination of |V{sub td}|, sin 2{beta}, and {gamma} from the K {yields} {pi}{nu}{bar {nu}} system to be {+-} 1.3%, {+-} 1.0%, {+-} 0.006, and {+-} 1.2{sup o}, respectively. For the charm quark {ovr MS} mass m{sub c}(m{sub c}) = (1.30 {+-} 0.05) GeV and |V{sub us}| = 0.2248 the next-to-leading order value P{sub c}(X) = 0.37 {+-} 0.06 is modified to P{sub c}(X) = 0.38 {+-} 0.04 at the next-to-next-to-leading order level with the latter error fully dominated by the uncertainty in m{sub c}(m{sub c}). They present tables for P{sub c}(X) as a function of m{sub c}(m{sub c}) and {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub z}) and a very accurate analytic formula that summarizes these two dependences as well as the dominant theoretical uncertainties. Adding the recently calculated long-distance contributions they find {Beta}(K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}) = (8.0 {+-} 1.1) x 10{sup -11} with the present uncertainties in m{sub c}(m{sub c}) and the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa elements being the dominant individual sources in the quoted error. They also emphasize that improved calculations of the long

  20. A Study of Excited Charm-Strange Baryons withEvidence for new Baryons Xi_c(3055)+ and Xi_c(3123)+

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration, The BABAR; Aubert, B.

    2007-10-30

    We present a study of excited charm-strange baryon states produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at or near a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV, in a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 384 fb{sup -1} recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e storage rings at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We study strong decays of charm-strange baryons to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sub S}{sup 0}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. This study confirms the existence of the states {Xi}{sub c}(2980){sup +}, {Xi}{sub c}(3077){sup +}, and {Xi}{sub c}(3077){sup -}, with a more accurate determination of the {Xi}{sub c}(2980){sup +} mass and width. We also present evidence for two new states, {Xi}{sub c}(3055){sup +} and {Xi}{sub c}(3123){sup +}, decaying through the intermediate resonant modes {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++}K{sup -} and {Sigma}{sub c}(2520){sup ++}K{sup -}, respectively. For each of these baryons, we measure the yield in each final state, determine the statistical significance, and calculate the product of the production cross-section and branching fractions. We also measure the masses and widths of these excited charm-strange baryons.

  1. [Hadroproduction of charmed and bottom mesons (Fermilab experiment E-653): Progress report, April 1, 1982--March 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    1983-12-31

    This progress report describes several projects that U of Oklahoma has participated in. The first is a muon background calculation from decay of charged pions and kaons, using ISR data at center of mass energies of 31 and 53 GeV. These calculations were compared with a number of different events. A copy of an agreement between Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and participants in experiment E-653 is enclosed. This experiment tags charm and beauty particles by observing their decay lengths. The agreement sets out the items which need to be done in order to properly execute this experiment. A program to construct and test prototype silicon stripe detectors is also described. Preliminary detectors are in hand for testing, some are installed for actual beams for testing, and on the basis of these results the group expects to specify the design for a new system. The goals at present are to check charge collection, to check track point resolution, and to check vertex reconstruction resolution. A copy of a letter of intent to submit a proposal to LEP is included. The group proposes to submit a proposal to build an experiment with approximately 1% momentum resolution at 50 GeV/c for identifying photons, electrons, and muons. This proposal would aim at scalar particles, where accurate measures of small branching ratio decays are important. Some preliminary results from Monte Carlo simulation and data analysis of experiment E-516 are presented. In addition one group participant was involved in a CLEO experiment, which is an ongoing extension of work on a shower detector system. At present OU has the offline CLEO analysis software running and is supporting an effort with Rutgers to completer the inclusive electron measurements in the {gamma}(4S) resonance region. This involves proper operation of the shower detector, and development of analysis software.

  2. Search for charmed F mesons in e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions with the crystal ball

    SciTech Connect

    Horisberger, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    In this work an experimental search for the production of the charmed F and F* mesons in e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions is presented. The data for this analysis were obtained over a center of mass energy region from 3.86 GeV to 4.5 GeV with the Crystal Ball detector at SPEAR. The inclusive eta production cross section has been measured as a function of the center of mass energy. It was found to be almost constant with no indication for an significant increase which was cited as evidence for F production by a previous experiment. A search for F anti F, F* anti F and F* anti F* production with the decay F/sup + -/ ..-->.. eta..pi../sup + -/ has also been made, but no signal was observed. Upper limits for sigma/sub F(*) anti F(*)/ BR(F/sup + -/ ..-->.. eta..pi../sup + -/) are given for various F and F* masses. The measurements presented here are inconsistent with results from earlier experiments which had been used to establish the existence of the F mesons. The inclusive ..gamma.. spectrum at E/sub cm/ = 4.33 GeV has also been used to obtain upper limits on F* production. These results disagree with theoretical expectations for the F* anti F* production cross section for the F and F* masses quoted by other experiments. In connection with this analysis the cross section for D* production was also measured at E/sub cm/ = 4.33 GeV and was found to be 7.4nb +- 1.3nb.

  3. Analysing recurrent hospitalisations in heart failure: a review of statistical methodology, with application to CHARM-Preserved

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jennifer K.; Pocock, Stuart J.; McMurray, John J.V.; Granger, Christopher B; Michelson, Eric L; Östergren, Jan; Pfeffer, Marc A; Solomon, Scott; Swedberg, Karl; Yusuf, Salim

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart failure is characterised by recurrent hospitalisations, but often only the first event is considered in clinical trial reports. In chronic diseases, such as heart failure, analysing all events gives a more complete picture of treatment benefit. We describe methods of analysing repeat hospitalisations, and illustrate their value in one major trial. Methods and Results The Candesartan in Heart failure Assessment of Reduction in Mortality and morbidity (CHARM)-Preserved study compared candesartan with placebo in 3023 patients with heart failure and preserved systolic function. The heart failure hospitalisation rates were 12.5 and 8.9 per 100 patient years in the placebo and candesartan groups respectively. The repeat hospitalisations were analysed using the Andersen-Gill, Poisson and Negative Binomial methods. Death was incorporated into analyses by treating it as an additional event. The win ratio method and a method that jointly models hospitalisations and mortality were also considered. Using repeat events gave larger treatment benefits than time to first event analysis. The Negative Binomial method for the composite of recurrent heart failure hospitalisations and cardiovascular death gave a rate ratio of 0.75 (95% CI 0.62-0.91, P=0.003), and the hazard ratio for time to first heart failure hospitalisation or cardiovascular death was 0.86 (95% CI 0.74-1.00, P=0.050). Conclusions In patients with preserved ejection fraction, candesartan reduces the rate of admissions for worsening heart failure, to a greater extent than from analysing only first hospitalisations. Recurrent events should be routinely incorporated into the analysis of future clinical trials in heart failure. PMID:24453096

  4. First Observation of the Doubly Cabibbo-Suppressed Decay of a Charmed Baryon: Λc+→p K+π-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S. B.; Tanida, K.; Kim, B. H.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dash, N.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Gaur, V.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Greenwald, D.; Grygier, J.; Haba, J.; Hamer, P.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hou, W.-S.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jaegle, I.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Katrenko, P.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Kobayashi, N.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, I. S.; Li, C. H.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lubej, M.; Masuda, M.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nath, K. J.; Nayak, M.; Negishi, K.; Niiyama, M.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Rauch, J.; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schlüter, T.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Seino, Y.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Seong, I. S.; Sevior, M. E.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Stypula, J.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takizawa, M.; Tamponi, U.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Trusov, V.; Uchida, M.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vinokurova, A.; Vossen, A.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Ye, H.; Yelton, J.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    We report the first observation of the decay Λc+→p K+π- using a 980 fb-1 data sample collected by the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. This is the first observation of a doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay of a charmed baryon. We measure the branching ratio of this decay with respect to its Cabibbo-favored counterpart to be B (Λc+→p K+π-)/B (Λc+→p K-π+)=(2.35 ±0.27 ±0.21 )×10-3 , where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively.

  5. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetries for charm- and bottom-quark pair productions at = 58 GeV with electron tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, E.; Enomoto, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Abe, K.; Abe, T.; Adachi, I.; Adachi, K.; Aoki, M.; Aoki, M.; Awa, S.; Belusevic, R.; Emi, K.; Fujii, H.; Fujii, K.; Fujii, T.; Fujimoto, J.; Fujita, K.; Fujiwara, N.; Hayashii, H.; Howell, B.; Iida, N.; Ikeda, H.; Itoh, R.; Inoue, Y.; Iwasaki, H.; Kaneyuki, K.; Kajikawa, R.; Kato, S.; Kawabata, S.; Kichimi, H.; Kobayashi, M.; Koltick, D.; Levine, I.; Minami, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyamoto, A.; Muramatsu, K.; Nagai, K.; Nakabayashi, K.; Nitoh, O.; Noguchi, S.; Ochi, A.; Ochiai, F.; Ohishi, N.; Ohnishi, Y.; Ohshima, Y.; Okuno, H.; Okusawa, T.; Shinohara, T.; Sugiyama, A.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, S.; Takahashi, K.; Takahashi, T.; Tanimori, T.; Tauchi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Toomi, N.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tsumura, O.; Uno, S.; Watanabe, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamauchi, M.; Topaz Collaboration

    1994-12-01

    We have measured, with electron tagging, the forward-backward asymmetries of charm- and bottom-quark pair productions at < s> = 58.01 GeV, based on 23,783 hadronic events selected from a data sample of 197 pb - taken with the TOPAZ detector at TRISTAN. The measured forward-backward asymmetries are AFBc = 0.49±0.20(stat.)±0.08(sys.) and AFBb = -0.64±0.35(stat)±0.13(sys.), which are consistent with the standard model predictions.

  6. Numerical calculation of radiative corrections to the. beta. energy spectrum of semileptonic decays of light- and charm-quark charged baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez V., A.; Juarez W., S.R. ); Garcia, A. )

    1992-07-01

    In this paper we calculate, for the {beta} energy spectrum of several semileptonic decays of interest, the numerical values of the radiative correction coefficients of an analytic expression previously obtained. The results can be readily used in a Monte Carlo simulation in an experimental analysis of those decays. We estimate the theoretical uncertainty involved in the analytic expression and show that it remains small even in high-{ital q} decays. Therefore, that expression is valid for charm-baryon semileptonic decays, to a high degree of precision.

  7. Hadronic Matrix Elements with Heavy Quarks: The Charm-Loop Effect in B{yields}K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Khodjamirian, Alexander

    2010-12-22

    I present the summary of our recent work on the long-distance effect in B{yields}K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -}, generated by the four-quark operators with charmed quarks. In addition to the factorized c-barc loop, the soft-gluon emission from the loop is calculated in the framework of light-cone OPE, applying light-cone QCD sum rules. The resulting contribution of this effect to the B{yields}K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -}, decay amplitude is cast in a form of the correction to the leading Wilson coefficient C{sub 9}.

  8. Light-cone wave function approach to open heavy flavor dynamics in QCD matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rishi; Vitev, Ivan; Zhang, Ben-Wei

    2009-11-01

    We calculate the lowest-order charm and beauty parton distribution functions in and fragmentation functions into D and B mesons using the operator definitions of factorized perturbative quantum chromodynamics (QCD). In the vacuum, we find the leading corrections that arise from the structure of the final-state hadrons. Quark-antiquark potentials extracted from the lattice are employed to demonstrate the existence of open heavy flavor bound-state solutions in the quark-gluon plasma in the vicinity of the critical temperature. We provide first results for the in-medium modification of the heavy-quark distribution and decay probabilities in a comoving plasma. In an improved perturbative QCD description of heavy-flavor dynamics in the thermal medium, we combine D- and B-meson formation and dissociation with parton-level charm and beauty quark quenching to obtain predictions for the heavy-meson and nonphotonic-electron suppression in Cu+Cu and Pb+Pb collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the Large Hadron Collider, respectively.

  9. Opening education.

    PubMed

    Smith, Marshall S

    2009-01-01

    Spurred by the publication of Massachusetts Institute of Technology OpenCourseWare in 2002, the open educational resources (OER) movement, which has rapidly expanded and captured the imagination and energy of millions of creators and users throughout the world, now faces many opportunities and substantial challenges as it moves to become an integral part of the world's educational environment. The confluence of the Web and a spirit of sharing intellectual property have fueled a worldwide movement to make knowledge and education materials open to all for use. OER are content (courses, books, lesson plans, articles, etc.), tools (virtual laboratories, simulations, and games), and software that support learning and educational practice. OER are free on the Web, and most have licenses that allow copyright holders to retain ownership while providing specified rights for use in original and modified forms. At the least, OER have helped to level the distribution of knowledge across the world. A second promise of OER is to help transform educational practices. This article explores the history of and promises and challenges for OER. PMID:19119226

  10. OpenER, a Dutch Initiative in Open Educational Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuwer, Robert; Mulder, Fred

    2009-01-01

    Over the period 2006-2008, the Dutch Open Universiteit Nederland conducted an experiment in which Open Educational Resources (OER) were offered in an effort to bridge the gap between informal and formal learning and to establish a new style of entry portal to higher education with no barriers at all. OpenER received considerable attention both in…

  11. Search for the Charmed Pentaquark Candidate Theta_c(3100)^0 in e^+e^- Annihilations at \\sqrt{s}=10.58 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-04-07

    We search for the charmed pentaquark candidate reported by the H1 collaboration, the {Theta}{sub c}(3100){sup o}, in e{sup +}e{sup -} interactions at a center-of-mass (c.m.) energy of 10.58 GeV, using 124 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} facility at SLAC. We find no evidence for such a state in the same pD*{sup -} decay mode reported by H1, and we set limits on its production cross section times branching fraction into pD*{sup -} as a function of c.m. momentum. The corresponding limit on its total rate per e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} q{bar q} event, times branching fraction, is about three orders of magnitude lower than rates measured for the charmed {Lambda}{sub c} and {Sigma}{sub c} baryons in such events.

  12. Interactions of Charmed Mesons with Light Pseudoscalar Mesons from Lattice QCD and Implications on the Nature of the D*s0(2317)

    SciTech Connect

    Liuming, Liu; Orginos, Kostas; Guo, Feng-Kun; Hanhart, Christoph; Meissner, Ulf-G

    2014-11-01

    We study the scattering of light pseudoscalar mesons ( p , K ) off charmed mesons ( D , D s ) in full lattice QCD. The S -wave scattering lengths are calculated using Luscher’s finite volume technique. We use a relativistic formulation for the charm quark. For the light quark, we use domain- wall fermions in the valence sector and improved Kogut-Susskind sea quarks. We calculate the scattering lengths of isospin-3/2 Dπ , D sπ , D s K , isospin-0 DK and isospin-1 DK channels on the lattice. For the chiral extrapolation, we use a chiral unitary approach to next-to-leading order, which at the same time allows us to give predictions for other channels. It turns out that our results support the interpretation of the D*s0( 2317 ) as a DK molecule. At the same time, we also update a prediction for the isospin breaking hadronic decay width G ( D*s0( 2317 )→ D sπ ) to ( 133± 22 ) keV.

  13. Open University

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    Michel Pentz est née en Afrique du Sud et venu au Cern en 1957 comme physicien et président de l'associaion du personnel. Il est également fondateur du mouvement Antiapartheid de Genève et a participé à la fondation de l'Open University en Grande-Bretagne. Il nous parle des contextes pédagogiques, culturels et nationaux dans lesquels la méthode peut s'appliquer.

  14. Open Standards, Open Source, and Open Innovation: Harnessing the Benefits of Openness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Committee for Economic Development, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Digitization of information and the Internet have profoundly expanded the capacity for openness. This report details the benefits of openness in three areas--open standards, open-source software, and open innovation--and examines the major issues in the debate over whether openness should be encouraged or not. The report explains each of these…

  15. Open Inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawking, S. W.

    In February this year, Neil Turok and I proposed a new model for inflation. The distinctive feature was that it produced an infinite, open universe, yet it satisfied the no boundary condition and came from an instanton of finite size, with a mass of the order of one gram. Our paper aroused a lot of interest, as shown by 37 citations on HEP-TH, but it brought a lot of opposition. This centered on three features of our model.First, we were attacked for using the no boundary proposal. People like Linde and Vilenkin, claimed that one should use the quantum tunneling wave function instead.Second, we were criticized because our instanton contained a singularity. It was said this was contrary to the spirit of the no boundary proposal; that the singularity would be naked and would make the universe non predictable.Third, we invoked the anthropic principle, to avoid the model predicting a totally empty universe. We were attacked both for using anthropic arguments, and for the very low value for the density of the universe, that they seemed to lead to.In this talk, I will describe the open inflation model that Neil and I proposed, and answer some of the objections that have been raised.

  16. CHARM-F: An airborne Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) LIDAR for the simultaneous measurement of CO2 and CH4 Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, M.; Amediek, A.; Büdenbender, C.; Ehret, G.; Fix, A.; Kiemle, C.; Quatrevalet, M.; Hoffmann, D.; Löhring, J.; Klein, V.; Schöggl, R.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) - in collaboration with Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik (ILT) and Kayser-Threde GmbH (KT) - is developing CHARM-F, an Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) LIDAR for simultaneous measurement of CO2 and CH4 columns. Design goal is a compact and rugged instrument optimized for airborne use on board of DLR's long range research aircraft HALO. The main scientific goal of the instrument is to provide precise column measurements of CO2 and CH4 to infer fluxes of these important greenhouse gases by means of inverse modeling. For this purpose, very stringent requirements concerning accuracy and precision have to be met since typical surface sources and sinks alter the total column only by a few percent. To achieve this, CHARM-F uses laser sources emitting pulse-pairs with nanosecond duration which allows for a precise ranging and a proper separation of atmospheric influences (i.e. aerosol and clouds) from the ground return leading to an unambiguously defined column (no airmass factors involved). Two laser systems - one for each trace gas - are employed using highly efficient and robust Nd:YAG lasers to pump optical parametric oscillators (OPO) which convert the pump radiation to the desired measurement wavelengths in the near infrared. Each laser system emits a pulse pair having different wavelengths. One is tuned to an absorption line of the trace gas under consideration and the other one to a nearby wavelength with much less absorption. The close temporal pulse separation of 250 μs together with a relatively large spot size of 30 m on ground ensures that nearly the same area is illuminated by both pulses. To achieve single-mode operation, both the pump and the OPO are injection seeded. The seed lasers are locked to a gas cell filled with a mixture of CO2 and CH4 to ensure an absolute wavelength calibration. Furthermore, deviations of the wavelength between outgoing laser pulse and the seed lasers

  17. Music Hath Charms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Dana

    1988-01-01

    The article describes a program which introduced classical music to 18 students in a residential treatment program for adolescents with a history of substance abuse. Use as background music progressed to students requesting tape copies for personal use and group attendance at a symphony rehearsal and concert. (DB)

  18. Openness initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, S.S.

    1995-12-31

    Although antinuclear campaigns seem to be effective, public communication and education efforts on low-level radioactive waste have mixed results. Attempts at public information programs on low-level radioactive waste still focus on influencing public opinion. A question then is: {open_quotes}Is it preferable to have a program focus on public education that will empower individuals to make informed decisions rather than trying to influence them in their decisions?{close_quotes} To address this question, a case study with both quantitative and qualitative data will be used. The Ohio Low-Level Radioactive Waste Education Program has a goal to provide people with information they want/need to make their own decisions. The program initiated its efforts by conducting a statewide survey to determine information needed by people and where they turned for that information. This presentation reports data from the survey and then explores the program development process in which programs were designed and presented using the information. Pre and post data from the programs reveal attitude and knowledge shifts.

  19. Opening addresses.

    PubMed

    Chukudebelu, W O; Lucas, A O; Ransome-kuti, O; Akinla, O; Obayi, G U

    1988-01-01

    The theme of the 3rd International Conference of the Society of Gynecology and Obstetrics of Nigeria (SOGON) held October 26, 1986 in Enugu was maternal morbidity and mortality in Africa. The opening addresses emphasize the high maternal mortality rate in Africa and SOGON's dedication to promoting women's health and welfare. In order to reduce maternal mortality, the scope of this problem must be made evident by gathering accurate mortality rates through maternity care monitoring and auditing. Governments, health professionals, educators, behavioral scientists, and communication specialists have a responsibility to improve maternal health services in this country. By making the population aware of this problem through education, measures can be taken to reduce the presently high maternal mortality rates. Nigerian women are physically unprepared for childbirth; therefore, balanced diets and disease prevention should be promoted. Since about 40% of deliveries are unmanaged, training for traditional birth attendants should be provided. Furthermore, family planning programs should discourage teenage pregnancies, encourage birth spacing and small families, and promote the use of family planning techniques among men. The problem of child bearing and rearing accompanied by hard work should also be investigated. For practices to change so that maternal mortality rates can be reduced, attitudes must be changed such that the current rates are viewed as unacceptable. PMID:12179275

  20. Measurement of associated production of z bosons with charm quark jets in pp collisions at √s=1.96  TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agnew, J P; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Augsten, K; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Buszello, C P; Camacho-Pérez, E; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Caughron, S; Chakrabarti, S; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-González, J A; Gavrilov, V; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Holzbauer, J L; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jayasinghe, A; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kiselevich, I; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Lammers, S; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lei, X; Lellouch, J; Li, D; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, H; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mansour, J; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nguyen, H T; Nunnemann, T; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Pleier, M-A; Podstavkov, V M; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shaw, S; Shchukin, A A; Simak, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verkheev, A Y; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yang, S; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Youn, S W; Yu, J M; Zennamo, J; Zhao, T G; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2014-01-31

    We present the first measurements of the ratios of cross sections σ(pp → Z+c jet)/σ(pp → Z+jet) and σ(pp → Z+c jet)/σ(pp → Z+b jet) for the associated production of a Z boson with at least one charm or bottom quark jet. Jets have transverse momentum ​pT(jet)​>20  GeV and pseudorapidity |​η(jet)​|<2.5. These cross section ratios are measured differentially as a function of jet and Z boson transverse momenta, based on 9.7  fb(-1) of pp collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s=1.96  TeV. The measurements show significant deviations from perturbative QCD calculations and predictions from various event generators. PMID:24580440

  1. Measurement of Associated Production of Z Bosons with Charm Quark Jets in pp¯ Collisions at √s =1.96 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; D0 Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    We present the first measurements of the ratios of cross sections σ(pp¯→Z +c jet)/σ(pp¯→Z +jet) and σ(pp¯→Z +c jet)/σ(pp¯→Z +b jet) for the associated production of a Z boson with at least one charm or bottom quark jet. Jets have transverse momentum ​pTjet​>20 GeV and pseudorapidity |​ηjet​|<2.5. These cross section ratios are measured differentially as a function of jet and Z boson transverse momenta, based on 9.7 fb-1 of pp¯ collisions collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s =1.96 TeV. The measurements show significant deviations from perturbative QCD calculations and predictions from various event generators.

  2. Observation of a Charmed Baryon Decaying to D;{0}p at a Mass Near 2.94 GeV/c;{2}.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Schafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yu Todyshev, K; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gristan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Potter, C T; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blout, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hyrn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2007-01-01

    A search for charmed baryons decaying to D(0)p reveals two states: the Lambdac(2880)+ baryon and a previously unobserved state at a mass of [2939.8+/-1.3(stat)+/-1.0(syst)] MeV/c2 and with an intrinsic width of [17.5+/-5.2(stat)+/-5.9(syst)] MeV. Consistent and significant signals are observed for the K(-)pi(+) and K(-)pi(+)pi(-)pi(+) decay modes of the D0 in 287 fb(-1) annihilation data recorded by the BABAR detector at a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV. There is no evidence in the D+p spectrum of doubly charged partners. The mass and intrinsic width of the Lambdac(2880)+ baryon and relative yield of the two baryons are also measured. PMID:17358468

  3. Production and fragmentation of the D sup *0 charm meson in e sup + e sup minus annihilations at radical s = 29 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Low, H.L.

    1987-01-01

    In this thesis, the neutral vector charm meson D{sup *0} has been studied. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 300 pb{sup {minus}1}, were collected using the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS). The HRS is located at the PEP e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} storage ring at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The detector subsystems relevant to the analysis are the seventeen layer drift chamber system and the barrel calorimeter system. Both of these devices are located within a solenoidal magnetic field of 1.62 Tesla. The charged particle momentum resolution is {sigma}{sub p}/p {approx} 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}p (p in GeV) for the momentum range used in this analysis. The electromagnetic energy resolution of the barrel shower counter system is {sigma}{sub E}/E {approx} 0.16/{radical}E (E in GeV). The radiative decay of the D{sup {asterisk}0} into a scalar charm meson, D{sup 0}, and a photon, {gamma}, where the D{sup 0} decays into a kaon and a pion (K{sup {minus}} {pi}{sup +}) has been observed. The production cross section in units of the point cross section is 0.63 {plus minus} 0.22 for fractional energy Z {ge} 0.5. This results is compared with the result form the JADE collaboration. The fragmentation function is compared with that of the D{sup *+} meson, also measured with the HRS.

  4. Open Source, Openness, and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, David

    2006-01-01

    In this article David Wiley provides an overview of how the general expansion of open source software has affected the world of education in particular. In doing so, Wiley not only addresses the development of open source software applications for teachers and administrators, he also discusses how the fundamental philosophy of the open source…

  5. How To Dance through Time. Volume VI: A 19th Century Ball--The Charm of Group Dances. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teten, Carol

    This 48-minute VHS videotape is the sixth in a series of "How To Dance Through Time" videos. It shows the festivity of the 19th century group dances, enabling the viewer to plan and participate in the elegant opening to the ball, a refined square dance, and flirtatious Cotillion dancing games. Professional dancers demonstrate the patterns with…

  6. Opening Address

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, T.

    2014-12-01

    Ladies and Gentlemen, it is my great honor and pleasure to present an opening address of the 3rd International Workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics"(SOTANCP3). On the behalf of the organizing committee, I certainly welcome all your visits to KGU Kannai Media Center belonging to Kanto Gakuin University, and stay in Yokohama. In particular, to whom come from abroad more than 17 countries, I would appreciate your participations after long long trips from your homeland to Yokohama. The first international workshop on "State of the Art in Nuclear Cluster Physics", called SOTANCP, was held in Strasbourg, France, in 2008, and the second one was held in Brussels, Belgium, in 2010. Then the third workshop is now held in Yokohama. In this period, we had the traditional 10th cluster conference in Debrecen, Hungary, in 2012. Thus we have the traditional cluster conference and SOTANCP, one after another, every two years. This obviously shows our field of nuclear cluster physics is very active and flourishing. It is for the first time in about 10 years to hold the international workshop on nuclear cluster physics in Japan, because the last cluster conference held in Japan was in Nara in 2003, about 10 years ago. The president in Nara conference was Prof. K. Ikeda, and the chairpersons were Prof. H. Horiuchi and Prof. I. Tanihata. I think, quite a lot of persons in this room had participated at the Nara conference. Since then, about ten years passed. So, this workshop has profound significance for our Japanese colleagues. The subjects of this workshop are to discuss "the state of the art in nuclear cluster physics" and also discuss the prospect of this field. In a couple of years, we saw significant progresses of this field both in theory and in experiment, which have brought better and new understandings on the clustering aspects in stable and unstable nuclei. I think, the concept of clustering has been more important than ever. This is true also in the

  7. Open for Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voyles, Bennett

    2007-01-01

    People know about the Sakai Project (open source course management system); they may even know about Kuali (open source financials). So, what is the next wave in open source software? This article discusses business intelligence (BI) systems. Though open source BI may still be only a rumor in most campus IT departments, some brave early adopters…

  8. First measurement of the production of a W boson in association with a single charm quark in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; /Illinois U., Urbana /Fermilab

    2007-11-01

    The authors present the first measurement of the production cross section of a W boson with a single charm quark (c) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, using soft muon tagging of c jets. In a data sample of {approx} 1.8 fb{sup -1}, recorded with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, they select events with W + 1 or 2 jets. They use the charge correlation between the W and the muon from the semileptonic decay of a charm hadron to extract the We signal. They measure {sigma}{sub Wc} (p{sub Tc} > 20 GeV/c, |{eta}{sub c}| < 1.5) x BR(W {yields} {ell}{nu}) = 9.8 {+-} 3.2 pb, in agreement with theoretical expectations.

  9. The mission CHARM-SSB, a new perspective for active remote sensing of methane and vegetation height using DLR's Standard Satellite Bus SSB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, Ehret; Kiemle, Christoph; Börner, Anko; Günther, Kurt; Trautmann, Thomas; Schwarzer, Horst; Thimo Grundmann, Dipl.-Ing. Jan; Kazeminejad, Bobby; Montenegro, Sergio; Spietz, Peter

    Methane (CH4 ) is a powerful greenhouse gas which has a Greenhouse Warming Potential (GWP) of 23 relative to carbon dioxide (CO2 ) on a time scale of 100 years. Thus radiative forcing caused by methane contributes to the warming of the atmosphere significantly. In view of the relative small number of stations on ground, monitoring of methane suffers from sparse coverage and large observational gaps which makes prediction of the behaviour of the methane sources on a global scale highly uncertain. The goal of the mission CHARM-SSB (CH4 SpAce-borne Remote Monitoring on Small Satellite Bus) is the improvement of the understanding of the Global Methane Cycle and the exploration of the nature of the processes which govern the exchange of methane between atmosphere and biosphere. For this, global measurements of the weighted dry air column mixing ratio of methane with emphasize on the troposphere are foreseen by making use of the space-borne Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar method. Such an instrument embarked on a satellite platform measures the light scattered and reflected from ground surfaces and clouds which are illuminated by laser pulses having slightly different frequencies denoted as on-line and off-line. The on-line frequency is accurately positioned on a CH4 absorption line in the 1. 6µm spectral region with optionally well-defined detuning from line centre to meet a favourable weighting function for the lower troposphere. Sounding at the off-line frequency serves as the reference measurement with negligible CH4 absorption. From the ratio of the lidar echoes the differential optical depth and with that the column averaged CH4 volume mixing ratio are calculated along the viewing direction of the instrument. The measured data will be assimilated into transport models and inverse modelling will by applied to determine the strength of the sources. From analysis of the waveform of the backscattered pulses, additional information on the vertical

  10. Openness, Web 2.0 Technology, and Open Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Open science is a term that is being used in the literature to designate a form of science based on open source models or that utilizes principles of open access, open archiving and open publishing to promote scientific communication. Open science increasingly also refers to open governance and more democratized engagement and control of science…

  11. Open access and open source in chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Matthew H

    2007-01-01

    Scientific data are being generated and shared at ever-increasing rates. Two new mechanisms for doing this have developed: open access publishing and open source research. We discuss both, with recent examples, highlighting the differences between the two, and the strengths of both. PMID:17939849

  12. Open access, open education resources and open data in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Salvo, Ivana Di; Mwoka, Meggie; Kwaga, Teddy; Rukundo, Priscilla Aceng; Ernest, Dennis Ssesanga; Osaheni, Louis Aikoriogie; John, Kasibante; Shafik, Kasirye; de Sousa, Agostinho Moreira

    2015-01-01

    As a follow up to OpenCon 2014, International Federation of Medical Students’ Associations (IFMSA) students organized a 3 day workshop Open Access, Open Education Resources and Open Data in Kampala from 15-18 December 2014. One of the aims of the workshop was to engage the Open Access movement in Uganda which encompasses the scientific community, librarians, academia, researchers and students. The IFMSA students held the workshop with the support of: Consortium for Uganda University Libraries (CUUL), The Right to Research Coalition, Electronic Information for Libraries (EIFL), Makerere University, International Health Sciences University (IHSU), Pan African Medical Journal (PAMJ) and the Centre for Health Human Rights and Development (CEHURD). All these organizations are based or have offices in Kampala. The event culminated in a meeting with the Science and Technology Committee of Parliament of Uganda in order to receive the support of the Ugandan Members of Parliament and to make a concrete change for Open Access in the country. PMID:26327966

  13. Open access, open education resources and open data in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Salvo, Ivana Di; Mwoka, Meggie; Kwaga, Teddy; Rukundo, Priscilla Aceng; Ernest, Dennis Ssesanga; Osaheni, Louis Aikoriogie; John, Kasibante; Shafik, Kasirye; de Sousa, Agostinho Moreira

    2015-01-01

    As a follow up to OpenCon 2014, International Federation of Medical Students' Associations (IFMSA) students organized a 3 day workshop Open Access, Open Education Resources and Open Data in Kampala from 15-18 December 2014. One of the aims of the workshop was to engage the Open Access movement in Uganda which encompasses the scientific community, librarians, academia, researchers and students. The IFMSA students held the workshop with the support of: Consortium for Uganda University Libraries (CUUL), The Right to Research Coalition, Electronic Information for Libraries (EIFL), Makerere University, International Health Sciences University (IHSU), Pan African Medical Journal (PAMJ) and the Centre for Health Human Rights and Development (CEHURD). All these organizations are based or have offices in Kampala. The event culminated in a meeting with the Science and Technology Committee of Parliament of Uganda in order to receive the support of the Ugandan Members of Parliament and to make a concrete change for Open Access in the country. PMID:26327966

  14. Pediatric Open Fractures.

    PubMed

    Trionfo, Arianna; Cavanaugh, Priscilla K; Herman, Martin J

    2016-07-01

    Open fractures in children are rare and are typically associated with better prognoses compared with their adult equivalents. Regardless, open fractures pose a challenge because of the risk of healing complications and infection, leading to significant morbidity even in the pediatric population. Therefore, the management of pediatric open fractures requires special consideration. This article comprehensively reviews the initial evaluation, classification, treatment, outcomes, and controversies of open fractures in children. PMID:27241379

  15. Observation of a Charmed Baryon Decaying to D0 p at a Mass Near 2.94 GeV/c2

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-03-29

    A search for charmed baryons decaying to D{sup 0}p reveals two states: the {Lambda}{sub c}(2880){sup +} baryon and a previously unobserved state at a mass of [2939.8 {+-} 1.3 (stat.) {+-} 1.0 (syst.)] MeV/c{sup 2} and with an intrinsic width of [17.5 {+-} 5.2 (stat.) {+-} 5.9 (syst.)] MeV. Consistent and significant signals are observed for the K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decay modes of the D{sup 0} in 287 fb{sup -1} annihilation data recorded by the BABAR detector at a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV. There is no evidence in the D{sup +}p spectrum of doubly-charged partners. The mass and intrinsic width of the {Lambda}{sub c}(2880){sup +} baryon and relative yield of the two baryons are also measured.

  16. Studying double charm decays of B{sub u,d} and B{sub s} mesons in the MSSM with R-parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C. S.; Wang Rumin; Yang Yadong

    2009-03-01

    Motivated by the possible large direct CP asymmetry of B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}D{sup +}D{sup -} decays measured by the Belle Collaboration, we investigate double charm B{sub u,d} and B{sub s} decays in the minimal supersymmetric standard model with R-parity violation. We derive the bounds on relevant R-parity violating couplings from the current experimental data, which show quite consistent measurements among relative collaborations. Using the constrained parameter spaces, we explore R-parity violating effects on other observables in these decays, which have not been measured or have not been well measured yet. We find that the R-parity violating effects on the mixing-induced CP asymmetries of B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}D{sup (}*{sup )+}D{sup (}*{sup )-} and B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}D{sub s}{sup (}*{sup )+}D{sub s}{sup (}*{sup )-} decays could be very large; nevertheless, the R-parity violating effects on the direct CP asymmetries could not be large enough to explain the large direct CP violation of B{sub d}{sup 0}{yields}D{sup +}D{sup -} from Belle. Our results could be used to probe R-parity violating effects and will correlate with searches for direct R-parity violating signals in future experiments.

  17. Charmed Baryon Spectroscopy and Search for $CP$ Violation in $D^0 \\to K_S^0\\,\\pi^+\\,\\pi^-$ at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, Felix

    2011-10-28

    In this thesis two different analyses are presented, namely the measurements of the properties of $\\Lambda_c(2595)^+$, $\\Lambda_c(2625)^+$, $\\Sigma_c(2455)^{++,0}$, and $\\Sigma_c(2520)^{++,0}$ baryons as well as the search for $CP$ violation in the Dalitz plot of the decay $D^0 \\to K_S^0\\,\\pi^+\\,\\pi^-$. Both studies are performed using data corresponding to 5.2\\,\\invfb respective 6.0\\,\\invfb of integrated luminosity from $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96\\,TeV, collected with the CDF~II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The masses and decay widths of the mentioned charmed baryon resonances are measured with uncertainties comparable to the world averages for $\\Sigma_c$ states, and significantly smaller uncertainties than the world averages for excited $\\Lambda_c^+$ states. No hints for any $CP$ violating effects in the resonant substructure of $D^0 \\to K_S^0\\,\\pi^+\\,\\pi^-$ are found.

  18. Open Access Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Open access publishing is a hot topic today. But open access publishing can have many different definitions, and pros and cons vary with the definitions. Open access publishing is especially attractive to companies and small colleges or universities that are likely to have many more readers than authors. A downside is that a membership fee sounds…

  19. Openness as infrastructure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The advent of open access to peer reviewed scholarly literature in the biomedical sciences creates the opening to examine scholarship in general, and chemistry in particular, to see where and how novel forms of network technology can accelerate the scientific method. This paper examines broad trends in information access and openness with an eye towards their applications in chemistry. PMID:21999327

  20. Asian Open Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, John

    1983-01-01

    The appearance of open universities in Asia is of interest to Australian educators, particularly since the Asian institutions differ in some respects from the British model which combined open entry to all and extensively employed the electronic media. The Asian Open Universities have provided access to higher education for many. (SSH)

  1. In Brief: Open government

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-03-01

    U.S. President Barack Obama's Memorandum on Transparency and Open Government requires federal agencies to take steps toward increased transparency, public participation, and collaboration. Agencies are accepting suggestions until 19 March 2010. For more information, visit http://www.whitehouse.gov/open and http://www.usa.gov/webcontent/open/tool_poc.shtml.

  2. Looking south at the open hearth steelmaking plant; open hearth ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking south at the open hearth steelmaking plant; open hearth stockhouse in foreground and open hearth furnace building in background - U.S. Steel Edgar Thomson Works, Open Hearth Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Braddock, Allegheny County, PA

  3. The Open Future: Openness as Catalyst for an Educational Reformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, David

    2010-01-01

    The word "open" is receiving a lot of attention in education circles. For over a decade, "open" has been used as an adjective to modify a variety of nouns that describe teaching and learning materials. For example, open content, open educational resources, open courseware, and open textbooks are all part of the current higher education discourse.…

  4. Measurement of charm and beauty production at central rapidity versus charged-particle multiplicity in proton-proton collisions at √{s}=7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Ball, M.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.

    2015-09-01

    Prompt D meson and non-prompt J/ ψ yields are studied as a function of the multiplicity of charged particles produced in inelastic proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √{s}=7 TeV. The results are reported as a ratio between yields in a given multiplicity interval normalised to the multiplicity-integrated ones (relative yields). They are shown as a function of the multiplicity of charged particles normalised to the average value for inelastic collisions (relative charged-particle multiplicity). D0, D+ and D*+ mesons are measured in five p T intervals from 1 GeV/ c to 20 GeV/ c and for | y| < 0.5 via their hadronic decays. The D-meson relative yield is found to increase with increasing charged-particle multiplicity. For events with multiplicity six times higher than the average multiplicity of inelastic collisions, a yield enhancement of a factor about 15 relative to the multiplicity-integrated yield in inelastic collisions is observed. The yield enhancement is independent of transverse momentum within the uncertainties of the measurement. The D0-meson relative yield is also measured as a function of the relative multiplicity at forward pseudo-rapidity. The non-prompt J/ ψ, i.e. the B hadron, contribution to the inclusive J/ ψ production is measured in the di-electron decay channel at central rapidity. It is evaluated for p T > 1.3 GeV/c and | y| < 0.9, and extrapolated to p T > 0. The fraction of non-prompt J/ ψ in the inclusive J/ ψ yields shows no dependence on the charged-particle multiplicity at central rapidity. Charm and beauty hadron relative yields exhibit a similar increase with increasing charged-particle multiplicity. The measurements are compared to PYTHIA 8, EPOS 3 and percolation calculations. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. The open cloak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hua; Qu, Shaobo; Xu, Zhuo; Wang, Jiafu

    2009-03-01

    By adopting the coordinate transformation theory and the corresponding numerical approach, we investigated the method of designing open cloaks that have one or more windows to exchange information and matter with the outer environment. Compared with close cloaks, open cloaks have the quasiperfect cloaking performance and are applied to any objects especially to the moving ones that must communicate and exchange matter with the outer region, which thus opens up possibilities for practical applications of cloak technologies developed recently.

  6. Measurement of the pseudoscalar decay constant fDs using charm-tagged events in e+e- collisions at square root s=10.58 GeV.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Vetere, M Lo; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Vazquez, W Panduro; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Potter, C T; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M

    2007-04-01

    Using 230.2 fb-1 of e+e- annihilation data collected with the BABAR detector at and near the peak of the Upsilon(4S) resonance, 489+/-55 events containing the pure leptonic decay Ds+-->micro;+numicro have been isolated in charm-tagged events. The ratio of partial widths Gamma(D+-->micro+numicro)/Gamma(Ds+-->phipi+) is measured to be 0.143+/-0.018+/-0.006 allowing a determination of the pseudoscalar decay constant fDs=(283+/-17+/-7+/-14) MeV. The errors are statistical, systematic, and from the Ds+-->phipi+ branching ratio, respectively. PMID:17501265

  7. Open Babel: An open chemical toolbox

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A frequent problem in computational modeling is the interconversion of chemical structures between different formats. While standard interchange formats exist (for example, Chemical Markup Language) and de facto standards have arisen (for example, SMILES format), the need to interconvert formats is a continuing problem due to the multitude of different application areas for chemistry data, differences in the data stored by different formats (0D versus 3D, for example), and competition between software along with a lack of vendor-neutral formats. Results We discuss, for the first time, Open Babel, an open-source chemical toolbox that speaks the many languages of chemical data. Open Babel version 2.3 interconverts over 110 formats. The need to represent such a wide variety of chemical and molecular data requires a library that implements a wide range of cheminformatics algorithms, from partial charge assignment and aromaticity detection, to bond order perception and canonicalization. We detail the implementation of Open Babel, describe key advances in the 2.3 release, and outline a variety of uses both in terms of software products and scientific research, including applications far beyond simple format interconversion. Conclusions Open Babel presents a solution to the proliferation of multiple chemical file formats. In addition, it provides a variety of useful utilities from conformer searching and 2D depiction, to filtering, batch conversion, and substructure and similarity searching. For developers, it can be used as a programming library to handle chemical data in areas such as organic chemistry, drug design, materials science, and computational chemistry. It is freely available under an open-source license from http://openbabel.org. PMID:21982300

  8. Opening Up Access to Open Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Ross

    2008-01-01

    As the corpus of gray literature grows and the price of serials rises, it becomes increasingly important to explore ways to integrate the free and open Web seamlessly into one's collections. Users, after all, are discovering these materials all the time via sites such as Google Scholar and Scirus or by searching arXiv.org or CiteSeer directly.…

  9. Creating Open Source Conversation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, Kate

    2009-01-01

    Darien Library, where the author serves as head of knowledge and learning services, launched a new website on September 1, 2008. The website is built with Drupal, an open source content management system (CMS). In this article, the author describes how she and her colleagues overhauled the library's website to provide an open source content…

  10. Open Source Vision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villano, Matt

    2006-01-01

    Increasingly, colleges and universities are turning to open source as a way to meet their technology infrastructure and application needs. Open source has changed life for visionary CIOs and their campus communities nationwide. The author discusses what these technologists see as the benefits--and the considerations.

  11. OpenSearch Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Doug; Silva, Sam; Mitchell, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We will present an overview of our OpenSearch efforts over the past 6 months. We will discuss our Best Practices and those of CEOS concentrating on the compatibility issues between the two. We will also discuss the state of earth data OpenSearch implementations and their adherence to the standards, extensions and best practices available.

  12. The Argument for Open

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Rob

    2008-01-01

    Is open source business intelligence (OS BI) software ready for prime time? The author thoroughly investigated each of three OS BI toolsets--Pentaho BI Suite, Jaspersoft BI Suite, and Talend Open Studio--by installing the OS BI tools himself, by interviewing technologists at academic institutions who had implemented these OS BI solutions, and by…

  13. Demystifying Open Access

    SciTech Connect

    Mele, Salvatore

    2007-05-14

    The tenets of Open Access are to grant anyone, anywhere and anytime free access to the results of scientific research. HEP spearheaded the Open Access dissemination of scientific results with the mass mailing of preprints in the pre-WWW era and with the launch of the arXiv preprint system at the dawn of the '90s. The HEP community is now ready for a further push to Open Access while retaining all the advantages of the peer-review system and, at the same time, bring the spiralling cost of journal subscriptions under control. I will present a possible plan for the conversion to Open Access of HEP peer-reviewed journals, through a consortium of HEP funding agencies, laboratories and libraries: SCOAP3 (Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics). SCOAP3 will engage with scientific publishers towards building a sustainable model for Open Access publishing, which is as transparent as possible for HEP authors. The current system in which journals income comes from subscription fees is replaced with a scheme where SCOAP3 compensates publishers for the costs incurred to organise the peer-review service and give Open Access to the final version of articles. SCOAP3 will be funded by all countries active in HEP under a 'fair share' scenario, according to their production of HEP articles. In this talk I will present a short overview of the history of Open Access in HEP, the details of the SCOAP3 model and the outlook for its implementation.

  14. Opening up Education: The Collective Advancement of Education through Open Technology, Open Content, and Open Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iiyoshi, Toru, Ed.; Kumar, M. S. Vijay, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Given the abundance of open education initiatives that aim to make educational assets freely available online, the time seems ripe to explore the potential of open education to transform the economics and ecology of education. Despite the diversity of tools and resources already available--from well-packaged course materials to simple games, for…

  15. Demystifying Open Access

    SciTech Connect

    Mele, Salvatore

    2007-05-14

    The tenets of Open Access are to grant anyone, anywhere and anytime free access to the results of scientific research. HEP spearheaded the Open Access dissemination of scientific results with the mass mailing of preprints in the pre-WWW era and with the launch of the arXiv preprint system at the dawn of the '90s. The HEP community is now ready for a further push to Open Access while retaining all the advantages of the peer-review system and, at the same time, bring the spiralling cost of journal subscriptions under control. I will present a possible plan for the conversion to Open Access of HEP peer-reviewed journals, through a consortium of HEP funding agencies, laboratories and libraries: SCOAP3 (Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics). SCOAP3 will engage with scientific publishers towards building a sustainable model for Open Access publishing, which is as transparent as possible for HEP authors. The current system in which journals income comes from subscription fees is replaced with a scheme where SCOAP3 compensates publishers for the costs incurred to organise the peer-review service and give Open Access to the final version of articles. SCOAP3 will be funded by all countries active in HEP under a "fair share" scenario, according to their production of HEP articles. In this talk I will present a short overview of the history of Open Access in HEP, the details of the SCOAP3 model and the outlook for its implementation.

  16. Open Rotor Aeroacoustic Modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2012-01-01

    Owing to their inherent fuel efficiency, there is renewed interest in developing open rotor propulsion systems that are both efficient and quiet. The major contributor to the overall noise of an open rotor system is the propulsor noise, which is produced as a result of the interaction of the airstream with the counter-rotating blades. As such, robust aeroacoustic prediction methods are an essential ingredient in any approach to designing low-noise open rotor systems. To that end, an effort has been underway at NASA to assess current open rotor noise prediction tools and develop new capabilities. Under this effort, high-fidelity aerodynamic simulations of a benchmark open rotor blade set were carried out and used to make noise predictions via existing NASA open rotor noise prediction codes. The results have been compared with the aerodynamic and acoustic data that were acquired for this benchmark open rotor blade set. The emphasis of this paper is on providing a summary of recent results from a NASA Glenn effort to validate an in-house open noise prediction code called LINPROP which is based on a high-blade-count asymptotic approximation to the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings Equation. The results suggest that while predicting the absolute levels may be difficult, the noise trends are reasonably well predicted by this approach.

  17. Open Rotor Aeroacoustic Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Envia, Edmane

    2012-01-01

    Owing to their inherent fuel efficiency, there is renewed interest in developing open rotor propulsion systems that are both efficient and quiet. The major contributor to the overall noise of an open rotor system is the propulsor noise, which is produced as a result of the interaction of the airstream with the counter-rotating blades. As such, robust aeroacoustic prediction methods are an essential ingredient in any approach to designing low-noise open rotor systems. To that end, an effort has been underway at NASA to assess current open rotor noise prediction tools and develop new capabilities. Under this effort, high-fidelity aerodynamic simulations of a benchmark open rotor blade set were carried out and used to make noise predictions via existing NASA open rotor noise prediction codes. The results have been compared with the aerodynamic and acoustic data that were acquired for this benchmark open rotor blade set. The emphasis of this paper is on providing a summary of recent results from a NASA Glenn effort to validate an in-house open noise prediction code called LINPROP which is based on a high-blade-count asymptotic approximation to the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings Equation. The results suggest that while predicting the absolute levels may be difficult, the noise trends are reasonably well predicted by this approach.

  18. CAPE-OPEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The CAPE-OPEN standard is the de facto standard for interfacing process modeling software components for use in the design and operation of chemical processes. It is based on universally recognized software technologies, such as COM and CORBA. The CO standard is open, multi-platf...

  19. Opening a New Door

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, John K.

    2007-01-01

    A growing number of K-12 districts are taking the open source plunge, both to cope with tight budgets and to escape proprietary vendor lock-in and expensive upgrade cycles. With the potential for cost savings and a growing number of educational applications, open source software is proving to be an effective alternative for schools willing to make…

  20. Triggered plasma opening switch

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C W

    1988-02-23

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  1. Triggered plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, Clifford W.

    1988-01-01

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  2. Egress door opening assister

    DOEpatents

    Allison, Thomas L.

    2015-10-06

    A door opening spring assistance apparatus is set forth that will automatically apply a door opening assistance force using a combination of rods and coil springs. The release of the rods by the coil springs reduces the force required to set the door in motion.

  3. Automated detection of open magnetic field regions in EUV images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krista, Larisza Diana; Reinard, Alysha

    2016-05-01

    Open magnetic regions on the Sun are either long-lived (coronal holes) or transient (dimmings) in nature, but both appear as dark regions in EUV images. For this reason their detection can be done in a similar way. As coronal holes are often large and long-lived in comparison to dimmings, their detection is more straightforward. The Coronal Hole Automated Recognition and Monitoring (CHARM) algorithm detects coronal holes using EUV images and a magnetogram. The EUV images are used to identify dark regions, and the magnetogam allows us to determine if the dark region is unipolar – a characteristic of coronal holes. There is no temporal sensitivity in this process, since coronal hole lifetimes span days to months. Dimming regions, however, emerge and disappear within hours. Hence, the time and location of a dimming emergence need to be known to successfully identify them and distinguish them from regular coronal holes. Currently, the Coronal Dimming Tracker (CoDiT) algorithm is semi-automated – it requires the dimming emergence time and location as an input. With those inputs we can identify the dimming and track it through its lifetime. CoDIT has also been developed to allow the tracking of dimmings that split or merge – a typical feature of dimmings.The advantage of these particular algorithms is their ability to adapt to detecting different types of open field regions. For coronal hole detection, each full-disk solar image is processed individually to determine a threshold for the image, hence, we are not limited to a single pre-determined threshold. For dimming regions we also allow individual thresholds for each dimming, as they can differ substantially. This flexibility is necessary for a subjective analysis of the studied regions. These algorithms were developed with the goal to allow us better understand the processes that give rise to eruptive and non-eruptive open field regions. We aim to study how these regions evolve over time and what environmental

  4. Open-Minded Cognition.

    PubMed

    Price, Erika; Ottati, Victor; Wilson, Chase; Kim, Soyeon

    2015-11-01

    The present research conceptualizes open-minded cognition as a cognitive style that influences how individuals select and process information. An open-minded cognitive style is marked by willingness to consider a variety of intellectual perspectives, values, opinions, or beliefs-even those that contradict the individual's opinion. An individual's level of cognitive openness is expected to vary across domains (such as politics and religion). Four studies develop and validate a novel measure of open-minded cognition, as well as two domain-specific measures of religious and political open-minded cognition. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis (controlling for acquiescence bias) are used to develop the scales in Studies 1 to 3. Study 4 demonstrates that these scales possess convergent and discriminant validity. Study 5 demonstrates the scale's unique predictive validity using the outcome of Empathic Concern (Davis, 1980). Study 6 demonstrates the scale's unique predictive validity using the outcomes of warmth toward racial, religious, and sexual minorities. PMID:26315581

  5. Measurement of bottom versus charm as a function of transverse momentum with electron-hadron correlations in p + p collisions at square root of s = 200 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Chang, B S; Chang, W C; Charvet, J-L; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Das, K; David, G; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Han, R; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; He, X; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Kawall, D; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, S H; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y-S; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Layton, D; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, K B; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Liebing, P; Liska, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Li, X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mikes, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Mohanty, A K; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Niita, T; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Okada, H; Okada, K; Oka, M; Omiwade, O O; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ruzicka, P; Rykov, V L; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakashita, K; Sakata, H; Samsonov, V; Sato, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shevel, A; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Slunecka, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Themann, H; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tojo, J; Tomásek, L; Tomita, Y; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vertesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Walker, D; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wei, F; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yamaura, K; Yang, R; Yanovich, A; Yasin, Z; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

    2009-08-21

    The momentum distribution of electrons from semileptonic decays of charm and bottom quarks for midrapidity |y|<0.35 in p+p collisions at square root of s=200 GeV is measured by the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider over the transverse momentum range 2charm is presented. The ratio is determined using partial D/D-->e(+/-)K(-/+)X (K unidentified) reconstruction. It is found that the yield of electrons from bottom becomes significant above 4 GeV/c in pT. A fixed-order-plus-next-to-leading-log perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculation agrees with the data within the theoretical and experimental uncertainties. The extracted total bottom production cross section at this energy is sigma(bb)=3.2(-1.1)(+1.2)(stat)(-1.3)(+1.4)(syst)mub. PMID:19792719

  6. Measurement of Bottom Versus Charm as a Function of Transverse Momentum with Electron-Hadron Correlations in p+p Collisions at sq root(s)=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.; Bickley, A. A.; Ellinghaus, F.; Glenn, A.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Seele, J.; Wysocki, M.; Afanasiev, S.; Isupov, A.; Litvinenko, A.; Malakhov, A.; Peresedov, V.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Zolin, L.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Alexander, J.; Chung, P.

    2009-08-21

    The momentum distribution of electrons from semileptonic decays of charm and bottom quarks for midrapidity |y|<0.35 in p+p collisions at sq root(s)=200 GeV is measured by the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider over the transverse momentum range 2charm is presented. The ratio is determined using partial D/D->e{sup +}-K{sup +}-X (K unidentified) reconstruction. It is found that the yield of electrons from bottom becomes significant above 4 GeV/c in p{sub T}. A fixed-order-plus-next-to-leading-log perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculation agrees with the data within the theoretical and experimental uncertainties. The extracted total bottom production cross section at this energy is sigma{sub bb}=3.2{sub -1.1}{sup +1.2}(stat){sub -1.3}{sup +1.4}(syst)mub.

  7. Study of charm production in the forward cone at energy ELab ˜ 75 TeV with a two-storey X-ray emulsion chamber exposed at, mountain altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, A. S.; Chubenko, A. P.; Denisova, V. G.; Galkin, V. I.; Guseva, Z. M.; Kanevskaya, E. A.; Kogan, M. G.; Kulikov, V. N.; Morozov, A. E.; Mukhamedshin, R. A.; Puchkov, V. S.; Nazarov, S. I.; Pyatovsky, S. E.; Shoziyoev, G. P.; Smirnova, M. D.; Vargasov, A. V.

    2015-08-01

    The origin of the cosmic ray hadron excess observed in a deep uniform lead X-ray emulsion chamber (XREC) at depths larger than 70 radiation lengths is analyzed. We present preliminary experimental data on the absorption of cosmic ray hadrons in the two-storey XREC with a large air gap exposed at the Tien Shan mountains. The design of the chamber was especially invented to prove the hypothesis on a substantial increase of the charm particle production cross section with energy at ELab ˜ 75 TeV as the main source of the darkness spot excess observed on X-ray films. Experimental data obtained with both a 2-storey XREC and a deep uniform XREC are compared with simulation results calculated with the FANSY 1.0 model. The comparison reveals a qualitative agreement between experimental and simulated data under the assumption of high values of charm particle production cross section at ELab ˜ 75 TeV in the forward kinematic region at xLab > 0.1.

  8. Seismic hazard models for the central Apennines constrained by GPS and InSAR: mid-term review results of the ESA Pathfinder project CHARMING

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merryman Boncori, John Peter; Pezzo, Giuseppe; Visini, Francesco; Carafa, Michele; Devoti, Roberto; Atzori, Simone; Kastelic, Vanja; Berardino, Paolo; Fornaro, Gianfranco; Riguzzi, Federica; Pietrantonio, Grazia; d'Amico, Vera; Meletti, Carlo; Salvi, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    The contribution of space geodetic techniques to earthquake rate estimation, and thus seismic hazard modelling, has been recognized since two decades and made possible in more recent years by the increased availability and accuracy of geodetic measurements. We present the mid-term review results of a feasibility study named "Constraining Seismic Hazard Models with InSAR and GPS (CHARMING)", funded by the European Space Agency's (ESA) Support to Science Element (STSE) Pathfinders 2013 project. The area of interest considered at this stage of the project comprises a 200 km x 200 km area, covering the Abruzzi region (central Italy). In a later stage this area shall be extended to comprise a large portion of central and southern Italy, including most of the highest strain regions identified by recent studies. We present the interseismic velocities derived by ~60 permanent GPS stations and measurements derived from coast-to-coast strips of Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery from the ERS-1/2 AMI, ENVISAT ASAR and ALOS PALSAR sensors. The latter are processed with the Intermittent Small Baseline Subset (ISBAS) techniques, which greatly improves the measurement coverage compared to previous studies. Corrections are applied concerning tropospheric propagation errors, using ENVISAT MERIS precipitable water vapour maps and ERA-Interim numerical weather model parameters, as well as for the recently discovered oscillator drift of the ENVISAT ASAR sensor. Finally, measurements from individual SAR tracks are calibrated using GPS to ensure a common reference frame. For a set of composite seismogenic sources extracted from the DISS v.3.1.1 catalogue (Database of Italian Seismogenic Sources), we use the kinematic finite element NeoKinema model to derive long term average velocity fields and slip rates. We then derive earthquake rates, i.e. the number of earthquakes in a given time period above an established magnitude threshold, following the Seismic Hazard Inferred From Tectonics

  9. Opening CEM vendor databases

    SciTech Connect

    Long, A.; Patel, D.

    1995-12-31

    CEM database performance requirements (i.e., voluminous data storage, rapid response times) often conflict with the concept of an open, accessible database. Utilities would like to use their CEM data for more purposes than simply submitting environmental reports. But in most cases, other uses are inhibited because today`s sophisticated CEM systems incorporate databases that have forsaken openness and accessibility in favor of performance. Several options are available for CEM vendors wishing to move in the direction of open, accessible CEM databases.

  10. Gallbladder removal - open

    MedlinePlus

    ... open surgery: Unexpected bleeding during the laparoscopic operation Obesity Pancreatitis (inflammation in the pancreas) Pregnancy (third trimester) Severe liver problems Past surgeries in the same area of your belly

  11. Gallbladder removal - open

    MedlinePlus

    ... and kidney tests) Chest x-ray or electrocardiogram ( EKG ), for some patients Several x-rays of the ... Procedure You may stay in the hospital for 3 to 5 days after open gallbladder removal. During ...

  12. Open Rotor Spin Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    An open rotor, also known as a high-speed propeller, is tested in a wind tunnel. The propeller moves much more quickly than a standard propeller, and the blades of the propeller are shaped differen...

  13. Defining Open Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walberg, Herbert J.; Thomas, Susan Christie

    1974-01-01

    Authors believed that sharper definitions of open education can keep the current movement authentic to its early consensus ideals while avoiding dogma, orthodoxy, discipleships: charisma, and latter-day carpetbagging. (Author/RK)

  14. Open cycle thermoacoustics

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, Robert Stowers

    2000-01-01

    A new type of thermodynamic device combining a thermodynamic cycle with the externally applied steady flow of an open thermodynamic process is discussed and experimentally demonstrated. The gas flowing through this device can be heated or cooled in a series of semi-open cyclic steps. The combination of open and cyclic flows makes possible the elimination of some or all of the heat exchangers (with their associated irreversibility). Heat is directly exchanged with the process fluid as it flows through the device when operating as a refrigerator, producing a staging effect that tends to increase First Law thermodynamic efficiency. An open-flow thermoacoustic refrigerator was built to demonstrate this concept. Several approaches are presented that describe the physical characteristics of this device. Tests have been conducted on this refrigerator with good agreement with a proposed theory.

  15. OpenTopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baru, C.; Arrowsmith, R.; Crosby, C.; Nandigam, V.; Phan, M.; Cowart, C.

    2012-04-01

    OpenTopography is a cyberinfrastructure-based facility for online access to high-resolution topography and tools. The project is an outcome of the Geosciences Network (GEON) project, which was a research project funded several years ago in the US to investigate the use of cyberinfrastructure to support research and education in the geosciences. OpenTopography provides online access to large LiDAR point cloud datasets along with services for processing these data. Users are able to generate custom DEMs by invoking DEM services provided by OpenTopography with custom parameter values. Users can track the progress of their jobs, and a private myOpenTopo area retains job information and job outputs. Data available at OpenTopography are provided by a variety of data acquisition groups under joint agreements and memoranda of understanding (MoU). These include national facilities such as the National Center for Airborne Lidar Mapping, as well as local, state, and federal agencies. OpenTopography is also being designed as a hub for high-resolution topography resources. Datasets and services available at other locations can also be registered here, providing a "one-stop shop" for such information. We will describe the OpenTopography system architecture and its current set of features, including the service-oriented architecture, a job-tracking database, and social networking features. We will also describe several design and development activities underway to archive and publish datasets using digital object identifiers (DOIs); create a more flexible and scalable high-performance environment for processing of large datasets; extend support for satellite-based and terrestrial lidar as well as synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data; and create a "pluggable" infrastructure for third-party services. OpenTopography has successfully created a facility for sharing lidar data. In the next phase, we are developing a facility that will also enable equally easy and successful sharing of

  16. PWC Opens up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2011-01-01

    Coming up with the latest and greatest learning curriculum for employees year after year can be overwhelming--especially if one works for a small or mid-size company with minimal resources. Fortunately, there is a burgeoning trend that three-time No. 1 Top 125er PwC is helping to "open" up. In creating PwC Open University, the professional…

  17. Open coil traction system.

    PubMed

    Vibhute, Pavankumar Janardan

    2012-01-01

    Sliding mechanics have become a popular method for space closure, with the development of preadjusted edgewise appliances. Furthermore, various space closing auxiliaries have been developed and extensively evaluated for their clinical efficiency. Their effectiveness is enhanced with optimum force magnitude and low load deflection rate/force decay. With the advent of nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) springs in orthodontics, load deflection rates have been markedly reduced. To use Ni-Ti springs, clinicians have to depend upon prefabricated closed coil springs. The open coil traction system, or open coil retraction spring, is developed utilizing Ni-Ti open coil springs for orthodontic space closure. This article describes the fabrication and clinical application of the open coil traction system, which has a number of advantages. It sustains a low load deflection rate with optimum force magnitude, and its design is adjustable for a desired length and force level. It is fail-safe for both activation and deactivation (ie, it cannot be overactivated, and the decompression limit of the open coil is controlled by the operator). The open coil traction system can be offset from the mucosa to help reduce soft tissue impingement. PMID:22567645

  18. Analysis of the charmed semileptonic decay D+→ ρ0 μ+ v

    SciTech Connect

    Luiggi, Eduardo E.

    2008-12-01

    The search for the fundamental constituents of matter has been pursued and studied since the dawn of civilization. As early as the fourth century BCE, Democritus, expanding the teachings of Leucippus, proposed small, indivisible entities called atoms, interacting with each other to form the Universe. Democritus was convinced of this by observing the environment around him. He observed, for example, how a collection of tiny grains of sand can make out smooth beaches. Today, following the lead set by Democritus more than 2500 years ago, at the heart of particle physics is the hypothesis that everything we can observe in the Universe is made of a small number of fundamental particles interacting with each other. In contrast to Democritus, for the last hundred years we have been able to perform experiments that probe deeper and deeper into matter in the search for the fundamental particles of nature. Today's knowledge is encapsulated in the Standard Model of particle physics, a model describing the fundamental particles and their interactions. It is within this model that the work in this thesis is presented. This work attempts to add to the understanding of the Standard Model by measuring the relative branching fraction of the charmed semileptonic decay D+ → ρ0μ+v with respect to D+ → $\\bar{K}$*0μ+v. Many theoretical models that describe hadronic interactions predict the value of this relative branching fraction, but only a handful of experiments have been able to measure it with any precision. By making a precise measurement of this relative branching fraction theorists can distinguish between viable models as well as refine existing ones. In this thesis we presented the measurement of the branching fraction ratio of the Cabibbo suppressed semileptonic decay mode D+ → ρ0μ+v with respect to the Cabibbo favored mode D+ → $\\bar{K}$*0

  19. Open Energy Info (OpenEI) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-12-01

    The Open Energy Information (OpenEI.org) initiative is a free, open-source, knowledge-sharing platform. OpenEI was created to provide access to data, models, tools, and information that accelerate the transition to clean energy systems through informed decisions.

  20. Commentary: open access, open business, closed fairness!

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    A strong trend to move from print to online publication is largely perceived in scientific and nonscientific fields. A growing number of publishers increasingly opt for online publication as an option or a compulsory alternative. From readers' perspective, this is a highly appreciated facility, but from the author's, things are different mainly because of excessive article processing charges (APC) that make the open access system sometimes as a hindrance for many authors but a lucrative enterprise for many shareholders, enticing the most traditional and conservative publishers. PMID:25897769

  1. openPMD-viewer

    SciTech Connect

    Lehe, Remi

    2015-10-01

    Many simulation software produce data in the form of a set of field values or of a set of particle positions. (one such example is that of particle-in-cell codes, which produce data on the electromagnetic fields that they simulate.) However, each particular software uses its own particular format and layout, for the output data. This makes it difficult to compare the results of different simulation software, or to have a common visualization tool for these results. However, a standardized layout for fields and particles has recently been developed: the openPMD format ( HYPERLINK "http://www.openpmd.org/"www.openpmd.org) This format is open- source, and specifies a standard way in which field data and particle data should be written. The openPMD format is already implemented in the particle-in-cell code Warp (developed at LBL) and in PIConGPU (developed at HZDR, Germany). In this context, the proposed software (openPMD-viewer) is a Python package, which allows to access and visualize any data which has been formatted according to the openPMD standard. This package contains two main components: - a Python API, which allows to read and extract the data from a openPMD file, so as to be able to work with it within the Python environment. (e.g. plot the data and reprocess it with particular Python functions) - a graphical interface, which works with the ipython notebook, and allows to quickly visualize the data and browse through a set of openPMD files. The proposed software will be typically used when analyzing the results of numerical simulations. It will be useful to quickly extract scientific meaning from a set of numerical data.

  2. openPMD-viewer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-10-01

    Many simulation software produce data in the form of a set of field values or of a set of particle positions. (one such example is that of particle-in-cell codes, which produce data on the electromagnetic fields that they simulate.) However, each particular software uses its own particular format and layout, for the output data. This makes it difficult to compare the results of different simulation software, or to have a common visualization tool for thesemore » results. However, a standardized layout for fields and particles has recently been developed: the openPMD format ( HYPERLINK "http://www.openpmd.org/"www.openpmd.org) This format is open- source, and specifies a standard way in which field data and particle data should be written. The openPMD format is already implemented in the particle-in-cell code Warp (developed at LBL) and in PIConGPU (developed at HZDR, Germany). In this context, the proposed software (openPMD-viewer) is a Python package, which allows to access and visualize any data which has been formatted according to the openPMD standard. This package contains two main components: - a Python API, which allows to read and extract the data from a openPMD file, so as to be able to work with it within the Python environment. (e.g. plot the data and reprocess it with particular Python functions) - a graphical interface, which works with the ipython notebook, and allows to quickly visualize the data and browse through a set of openPMD files. The proposed software will be typically used when analyzing the results of numerical simulations. It will be useful to quickly extract scientific meaning from a set of numerical data.« less

  3. Open Education: Critique and Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Vincent R., Ed.; Church, Bud, Ed.

    This publication is a collection of eight articles concerned with the open education movement in the United States. The articles include "The Concept of Openness: An Introduction," by Vincent Rogers and Bud Church; "Open Education and American Values: A Tentative Exploration," by Bud Church; "A British View of Open Education in the U.S.," by…

  4. Global OpenSearch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, D. J.; Mitchell, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    At AGU 2014, NASA EOSDIS demonstrated a case-study of an OpenSearch framework for Earth science data discovery. That framework leverages the IDN and CWIC OpenSearch API implementations to provide seamless discovery of data through the 'two-step' discovery process as outlined by the Federation for Earth Sciences (ESIP) OpenSearch Best Practices. But how would an Earth Scientist leverage this framework and what are the benefits? Using a client that understands the OpenSearch specification and, for further clarity, the various best practices and extensions, a scientist can discovery a plethora of data not normally accessible either by traditional methods (NASA Earth Data Search, Reverb, etc) or direct methods (going to the source of the data) We will demonstrate, via the CWICSmart web client, how an earth scientist can access regional data on a regional phenomena in a uniform and aggregated manner. We will demonstrate how an earth scientist can 'globalize' their discovery. You want to find local data on 'sea surface temperature of the Indian Ocean'? We can help you with that. 'European meteorological data'? Yes. 'Brazilian rainforest satellite imagery'? That too. CWIC allows you to get earth science data in a uniform fashion from a large number of disparate, world-wide agencies. This is what we mean by Global OpenSearch.

  5. Molecular aspects of charm physics

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, F.; Ortega, P. G.; Entem, D. R.

    2013-03-25

    We study the influence of possible molecular structures in the charmonium spectrum. We focus on the 0{sup ++}, 1{sup ++} and 1{sup --} sectors. In the first one we coupled the 2{sup 3}P{sub 0}cc pair with DD, J/{psi}{omega}, D{sub s}D{sub s} and J/{psi}{phi} channels and we obtain two states compatibles with the X(3945) and the Y(3940). In the second one we couple the 2{sup 3}P{sub 1}cc state with the DD{sup *} channel and we obtain a dressed state compatible with the X(3940) and a new state that we assign to the X(3872). In the third one we include the 3{sup 3}S{sub 1} and 2{sup 3}D{sub 1} charmonium states coupled to DD, DD{sup *}, D{sup *}D{sup *}, D{sub s}D{sub s}, D{sub s}D{sup *}s and D{sup *}{sub s}D{sup *}{sub s}. In this calculation we obtain a new molecular state that could be the G(3900) or the controversial Y(4008) and two cc states dressed by the molecular components assigned to the {psi}(4040) and the {psi}(4160). Finally we perform a calculation in the five quark sector where we can describe the {Lambda}{sub c}(2940){sup +} as a ND{sup *} molecular state and predict a {Lambda}{sub b}(6248){sup +} state.

  6. The Charm of Community Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruisen, Xu

    2011-01-01

    Music education in communities is a newly sprouted thing and is gradually catching people's attention. Music education seeks to promote community members' aesthetic senses. Music and the arts, the best tools for moving people's souls, link different hearts across various boundaries, affecting all aspects of social life. Music education can serve…

  7. Mainstreaming Open Textbooks: Educator Perspectives on the Impact of OpenStax College Open Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitt, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of collaborative research between open textbook provider OpenStax College (OSC) and the OER Research Hub (OERRH), a Hewlett funded mixed methods open research project examining the impact of open educational resources (OER) on learning and teaching. The paper focuses primarily on the results of two surveys that were…

  8. Bargaining for Open Skies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojahn, Oliver W.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the bargaining problem between countries when negotiating bilateral air service agreements. To do so, we use the methods of bargaining and game theory. We give special attention to the case where a liberal minded country is trying to convince a less liberal country to agree to bilateral open skies, and the liberal country might also unilaterally open up its market. The following analysis is positive in the sense that the results help explain and predict the outcome of negotiations under different payoffs and structures of the bargaining process. They are normative in the sense that adequate manipulation of the bargaining conditions can ensure a desired outcome.

  9. Open system environment procurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Gary

    1994-01-01

    Relationships between the request for procurement (RFP) process and open system environment (OSE) standards are described. A guide was prepared to help Federal agency personnel overcome problems in writing an adequate statement of work and developing realistic evaluation criteria when transitioning to an OSE. The guide contains appropriate decision points and transition strategies for developing applications that are affordable, scalable and interoperable across a broad range of computing environments. While useful, the guide does not eliminate the requirement that agencies posses in-depth expertise in software development, communications, and database technology in order to evaluate open systems.

  10. Probabilistic Open Set Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Lalit Prithviraj

    Real-world tasks in computer vision, pattern recognition and machine learning often touch upon the open set recognition problem: multi-class recognition with incomplete knowledge of the world and many unknown inputs. An obvious way to approach such problems is to develop a recognition system that thresholds probabilities to reject unknown classes. Traditional rejection techniques are not about the unknown; they are about the uncertain boundary and rejection around that boundary. Thus traditional techniques only represent the "known unknowns". However, a proper open set recognition algorithm is needed to reduce the risk from the "unknown unknowns". This dissertation examines this concept and finds existing probabilistic multi-class recognition approaches are ineffective for true open set recognition. We hypothesize the cause is due to weak adhoc assumptions combined with closed-world assumptions made by existing calibration techniques. Intuitively, if we could accurately model just the positive data for any known class without overfitting, we could reject the large set of unknown classes even under this assumption of incomplete class knowledge. For this, we formulate the problem as one of modeling positive training data by invoking statistical extreme value theory (EVT) near the decision boundary of positive data with respect to negative data. We provide a new algorithm called the PI-SVM for estimating the unnormalized posterior probability of class inclusion. This dissertation also introduces a new open set recognition model called Compact Abating Probability (CAP), where the probability of class membership decreases in value (abates) as points move from known data toward open space. We show that CAP models improve open set recognition for multiple algorithms. Leveraging the CAP formulation, we go on to describe the novel Weibull-calibrated SVM (W-SVM) algorithm, which combines the useful properties of statistical EVT for score calibration with one-class and binary

  11. Open Learning and ESOL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voss, Liz

    Suggestions are presented that are drawn from basic skills instruction at the English Learning Centre at Gloucestershire College of Arts and Technology (England), an open learning center geared specifically for ESOL students. Funded for 2 years as a special project by the Adult Literacy and Basic Skills Unit, the center examines procedures that…

  12. Massive and Open

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fasimpaur, Karen

    2013-01-01

    MOOCs--massive open online courses--are all the rage these days, with hundreds of thousands of participants signing up and investors plunking down millions to get a piece of the pie. Why is there so much excitement about this new disruptive form of online learning, and how does this model apply to professional learning for teachers? Traditional…

  13. Open Systems Interconnection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denenberg, Ray

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the need for standards allowing computer-to-computer communication and gives examples of technical issues. The seven-layer framework of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) Reference Model is explained and illustrated. Sidebars feature public data networks and Recommendation X.25, OSI standards, OSI layer functions, and a glossary.…

  14. Open Source in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakhan, Shaheen E.; Jhunjhunwala, Kavita

    2008-01-01

    Educational institutions have rushed to put their academic resources and services online, beginning the global community onto a common platform and awakening the interest of investors. Despite continuing technical challenges, online education shows great promise. Open source software offers one approach to addressing the technical problems in…

  15. Open Mind Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Alexander H.

    1995-01-01

    Open Mind, The Association for the achievement of diversity in higher education, met in conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico, between October 16 and 18, 1992. A number of workgroups met to discuss the goals, structure, and generally evaluate the Association and its achievements. A summary of the workgroup sessions and their minutes are included.

  16. Presto: Open Inquiry!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermann, Ronald S.; Miranda, Rommel J.

    2010-01-01

    Although inquiry-based science teaching has been around since the 1960s, many teachers are slow to incorporate inquiry principles into their science lessons. The authors address this issue by using an analogy between a magician's card trick and open inquiry. This analogy was chosen to portray a difference of perspective and demonstrate how the…

  17. Control Dewar Open Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1993-10-04

    In the process of developing a design for the design report, side questions or comments arose which were not completely answered or investigated because the work was outside the scope of developing a base design. I have pored over my meeting notes and tried to list all such control dewar 'open issues' in this engineering note.

  18. Chimney Open Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1993-10-04

    In the process of developing a design for the design report, many side questions or comments arose which were not completely answered or investigated because the work was outside the scope of developing a base design. I have pored over my meeting notes and tried to list all such chimney 'open issues' in this engineering note.

  19. Entrepreneurship in Open Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Donna; Pyke, Les H.

    1992-01-01

    Examples of entrepreneurship in open education include (1) Australian courses molded to reflect industry needs; (2) Australian and Canadian rural outreach programs using telecommunications, interactive video, and information technology; and (3) the Institute of New Venture Creation at Australia's Canning Senior College, developed in conjunction…

  20. Open Space Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Clifford E.

    1976-01-01

    Describes a science activity in which students are given an opportunity to consider the values of open space. The program includes direct involvement as communicators of feelings and facts, leading students to a position of making wise decisions for land use in the future. (EB)

  1. Surgical wound care - open

    MedlinePlus

    Surgical incision care; Open wound care ... your wound again with sutures, you need to care for it at home, since it may take ... Your health care provider will tell you how often to change your dressing . To prepare for the dressing change: Clean your ...

  2. Openers for Biology Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gridley, C. Robert R.

    This teaching guide contains 200 activities that are suitable for openers and demonstrations in biology classes. Details are provided regarding the use of these activities. Some of the broad topics under which the activities are organized include algae, amphibians, bacteria, biologists, crustaceans, dinosaurs, ecology, evolution, flowering plants,…

  3. Evaluating Open Source Portals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goh, Dion; Luyt, Brendan; Chua, Alton; Yee, See-Yong; Poh, Kia-Ngoh; Ng, How-Yeu

    2008-01-01

    Portals have become indispensable for organizations of all types trying to establish themselves on the Web. Unfortunately, there have only been a few evaluative studies of portal software and even fewer of open source portal software. This study aims to add to the available literature in this important area by proposing and testing a checklist for…

  4. Open Access and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Shawn; Schmidt, Christian; Das, Chhaya; Tucker, Philip W

    2006-01-01

    Uncensored exchange of scientific results hastens progress. Open Access does not stop at the removal of price and permission barriers; still, censorship and reading disabilities, to name a few, hamper access to information. Here, we invite the scientific community and the public to discuss new methods to distribute, store and manage literature in order to achieve unfettered access to literature. PMID:16956402

  5. TIRES, OPEN BURNING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter describes available information on the health effects from open burning of rubber tires. It concentrates on the three known sources of detailed measurements: (1) a small-scale emissions characterization study performed by the U.S. EPA in a facility designed to simulat...

  6. Open-Source Colorimeter

    PubMed Central

    Anzalone, Gerald C.; Glover, Alexandra G.; Pearce, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    The high cost of what have historically been sophisticated research-related sensors and tools has limited their adoption to a relatively small group of well-funded researchers. This paper provides a methodology for applying an open-source approach to design and development of a colorimeter. A 3-D printable, open-source colorimeter utilizing only open-source hardware and software solutions and readily available discrete components is discussed and its performance compared to a commercial portable colorimeter. Performance is evaluated with commercial vials prepared for the closed reflux chemical oxygen demand (COD) method. This approach reduced the cost of reliable closed reflux COD by two orders of magnitude making it an economic alternative for the vast majority of potential users. The open-source colorimeter demonstrated good reproducibility and serves as a platform for further development and derivation of the design for other, similar purposes such as nephelometry. This approach promises unprecedented access to sophisticated instrumentation based on low-cost sensors by those most in need of it, under-developed and developing world laboratories. PMID:23604032

  7. Videoconferencing in Open Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomadaki, Eleftheria; Quick, Kevin A.; Scott, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the use of videoconferencing as a tool to enhance collaboration amongst online learners in an open learning context. We present quantitative data from a longitudinal study of naturalistic videoconferencing interactions held via the FM videoconference tool, indicating its global use. The case study presented is analysed…

  8. Clouds over Open Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The heavy concentration of these cirrocumulus and nimbostratus clouds over open ocean - location unknown, indicate that a heavy downpouring of rain is occuring on the Earth's surface below. Towering anvils, seen rising high above the base cloud cover and casting long shadows, also indicate high winds and possible tornado activity.

  9. Opening the books.

    PubMed

    Case, J

    1997-01-01

    For years, small companies have experimented with forms of open-book management. Open-book systems have smoothed change efforts by giving workers the why instead of just the how of initiatives; they have enabled employees to think like owners. Now divisions of large organizations such as R.R. Donnelley & Sons and Amoco Canada are finding opening the books can work for them, too. It isn't easy, and companies must adapt the principles to their own situations. AES Corporation, for example, found that it had to declare all its employees "insiders" when it went public. One of the reasons for large companies' interest in open-book management is the success of a role-model company, Missouri-based Springfield ReManufacturing. Leaders of divisions of large companies have been able to visit and ask questions. Other early adopters are also showing competitive advantages. Among them are Wabash National, now the nation's leading truck and tractor manufacturer, and Physician Sales & Service, a distributor of supplies to doctors' office. Open-book principles are the same whether a company is large or small: every employee must receive all relevant financial information and be taught to understand it; managers must hold employees accountable for making their unit's goals; and the compensation system must reward everyone for the overall success of the business. Hexacomb Corporation is one large organization that has done well. Workers at the company's seven plants are inspired by a system of splitting profits over budget fifty-fifty: half goes to the company and half to the bonus pool. Such companies are learning the benefits of having everyone work to push the numbers in the right direction. PMID:10165446

  10. The OpenSHMEM Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez, Oscar

    2014-07-30

    The OpenSHMEM Analyzer is a compiler-based tool that can help users detect errors and provide useful analyses about their OpenSHMEM applications. The tool is built on top of the OpenUH compiler (a branch of Open64 compiler) and presents OpenSHMEM information as feedback to the user. Some of the analyses it provides include checks for correct usage of symmetric variables in OpenSHMEM calls, out-of-bounds checks for symmetric data, checks for the correct initialization of pointers to symmetric data, and symmetric data alias information.

  11. The OpenSHMEM Analyzer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-07-30

    The OpenSHMEM Analyzer is a compiler-based tool that can help users detect errors and provide useful analyses about their OpenSHMEM applications. The tool is built on top of the OpenUH compiler (a branch of Open64 compiler) and presents OpenSHMEM information as feedback to the user. Some of the analyses it provides include checks for correct usage of symmetric variables in OpenSHMEM calls, out-of-bounds checks for symmetric data, checks for the correct initialization of pointers tomore » symmetric data, and symmetric data alias information.« less

  12. Opening Reproducible Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nüst, Daniel; Konkol, Markus; Pebesma, Edzer; Kray, Christian; Klötgen, Stephanie; Schutzeichel, Marc; Lorenz, Jörg; Przibytzin, Holger; Kussmann, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    Open access is not only a form of publishing such that research papers become available to the large public free of charge, it also refers to a trend in science that the act of doing research becomes more open and transparent. When science transforms to open access we not only mean access to papers, research data being collected, or data being generated, but also access to the data used and the procedures carried out in the research paper. Increasingly, scientific results are generated by numerical manipulation of data that were already collected, and may involve simulation experiments that are completely carried out computationally. Reproducibility of research findings, the ability to repeat experimental procedures and confirm previously found results, is at the heart of the scientific method (Pebesma, Nüst and Bivand, 2012). As opposed to the collection of experimental data in labs or nature, computational experiments lend themselves very well for reproduction. Some of the reasons why scientists do not publish data and computational procedures that allow reproduction will be hard to change, e.g. privacy concerns in the data, fear for embarrassment or of losing a competitive advantage. Others reasons however involve technical aspects, and include the lack of standard procedures to publish such information and the lack of benefits after publishing them. We aim to resolve these two technical aspects. We propose a system that supports the evolution of scientific publications from static papers into dynamic, executable research documents. The DFG-funded experimental project Opening Reproducible Research (ORR) aims for the main aspects of open access, by improving the exchange of, by facilitating productive access to, and by simplifying reuse of research results that are published over the Internet. Central to the project is a new form for creating and providing research results, the executable research compendium (ERC), which not only enables third parties to

  13. Open Universities in India 2000: Brief Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhushan, Bharat, Comp.; Lele, Nalini A., Comp.; Rausaria, R. R., Comp.

    This report contains information on the following open universities in India: (1) Indira Gandhi National Open University; (2) Dr. B.R. Ambedkar Open University; (3) Kota Open University; (4) Nalanda Open University; (5) Yashwantrao Chavan Maharashtra Open University; (6) Madhya Pradesh Bhoj (Open) University; (7) Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Open…

  14. Limits to Open Class Performance?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the limits to open class performance. The contents include: 1) Standard Class; 2) 15m/Racing Class; 3) Open Class; and 4) Design Solutions associated with assumptions, limiting parameters, airfoil performance, current trends, and analysis.

  15. Infant open heart surgery (image)

    MedlinePlus

    During open-heart surgery an incision is made through the breastbone (sternum) while the child is under general anesthesia. ... During open-heart surgery an incision is made through the breastbone (sternum) while the child is under general anesthesia.

  16. FAST OPENING SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Bender, M.; Bennett, F.K.; Kuckes, A.F.

    1963-09-17

    A fast-acting electric switch is described for rapidly opening a circuit carrying large amounts of electrical power. A thin, conducting foil bridges a gap in this circuit and means are provided for producing a magnetic field and eddy currents in the foil, whereby the foil is rapidly broken to open the circuit across the gap. Advantageously the foil has a hole forming two narrow portions in the foil and the means producing the magnetic field and eddy currents comprises an annular coil having its annulus coaxial with the hole in the foil and turns adjacent the narrow portions of the foil. An electrical current flows through the coil to produce the magnetic field and eddy currents in the foil. (AEC)

  17. Open architecture CNC system

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, J.; Lopez, A.; Edwards, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    In this paper, an alternative solution to the traditional CNC machine tool controller has been introduced. Software and hardware modules have been described and their incorporation in a CNC control system has been outlined. This type of CNC machine tool controller demonstrates that technology is accessible and can be readily implemented into an open architecture machine tool controller. Benefit to the user is greater controller flexibility, while being economically achievable. PC based, motion as well as non-motion features will provide flexibility through a Windows environment. Up-grading this type of controller system through software revisions will keep the machine tool in a competitive state with minimal effort. Software and hardware modules are mass produced permitting competitive procurement and incorporation. Open architecture CNC systems provide diagnostics thus enhancing maintainability, and machine tool up-time. A major concern of traditional CNC systems has been operator training time. Training time can be greatly minimized by making use of Windows environment features.

  18. Plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Savage, Mark E.; Mendel, Jr., Clifford W.

    2001-01-01

    A command triggered plasma opening switch assembly using an amplification stage. The assembly surrounds a coaxial transmission line and has a main plasma opening switch (POS) close to the load and a trigger POS upstream from the main POS. The trigger POS establishes two different current pathways through the assembly depended on whether it has received a trigger current pulse. The initial pathway has both POS's with plasma between their anodes and cathodes to form a short across the transmission line and isolating the load. The final current pathway is formed when the trigger POS receives a trigger current pulse which energizes its fast coil to push the conductive plasma out from between its anode and cathode, allowing the main transmission line current to pass to the fast coil of the main POS, thus pushing its plasma out the way so as to establish a direct current pathway to the load.

  19. Naval open systems architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guertin, Nick; Womble, Brian; Haskell, Virginia

    2013-05-01

    For the past 8 years, the Navy has been working on transforming the acquisition practices of the Navy and Marine Corps toward Open Systems Architectures to open up our business, gain competitive advantage, improve warfighter performance, speed innovation to the fleet and deliver superior capability to the warfighter within a shrinking budget1. Why should Industry care? They should care because we in Government want the best Industry has to offer. Industry is in the business of pushing technology to greater and greater capabilities through innovation. Examples of innovations are on full display at this conference, such as exploring the impact of difficult environmental conditions on technical performance. Industry is creating the tools which will continue to give the Navy and Marine Corps important tactical advantages over our adversaries.

  20. OMG: Open Molecule Generator

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation has been used for decades to discover the chemical structure of unknown compounds. In this work we introduce the first open source structure generator, Open Molecule Generator (OMG), which for a given elemental composition produces all non-isomorphic chemical structures that match that elemental composition. Furthermore, this structure generator can accept as additional input one or multiple non-overlapping prescribed substructures to drastically reduce the number of possible chemical structures. Being open source allows for customization and future extension of its functionality. OMG relies on a modified version of the Canonical Augmentation Path, which grows intermediate chemical structures by adding bonds and checks that at each step only unique molecules are produced. In order to benchmark the tool, we generated chemical structures for the elemental formulas and substructures of different metabolites and compared the results with a commercially available structure generator. The results obtained, i.e. the number of molecules generated, were identical for elemental compositions having only C, O and H. For elemental compositions containing C, O, H, N, P and S, OMG produces all the chemically valid molecules while the other generator produces more, yet chemically impossible, molecules. The chemical completeness of the OMG results comes at the expense of being slower than the commercial generator. In addition to being open source, OMG clearly showed the added value of constraining the solution space by using multiple prescribed substructures as input. We expect this structure generator to be useful in many fields, but to be especially of great importance for metabolomics, where identifying unknown metabolites is still a major bottleneck. PMID:22985496