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Sample records for open quantum system

  1. Quantum Entanglement in Open Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Isar, Aurelian

    2008-01-24

    In the framework of the theory of open systems based on completely positive quantum dynamical semigroups, the master equation for two independent harmonic oscillators interacting with an environment is solved in the asymptotic long-time regime. Using the Peres-Simon necessary and sufficient condition for separability of two-mode Gaussian states, we show that the two non-interacting systems become asymptotically entangled for certain environments, so that in the long-time regime they manifest non-local quantum correlations. We calculate also the logarithmic negativity characterizing the degree of entanglement of the asymptotic state.

  2. Quasiequilibria in open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, Jamie D.

    2010-03-15

    In this work, the steady-state or quasiequilibrium resulting from periodically modulating the Liouvillian of an open quantum system, L-circumflex-circumflex(t), is investigated. It is shown that differences between the quasiequilibrium and the instantaneous equilibrium occur due to nonadiabatic contributions from the gauge field connecting the instantaneous eigenstates of L-circumflex-circumflex(t) to a fixed basis. These nonadiabatic contributions are shown to result in an additional rotation and/or depolarization for a single spin-1/2 in a time-dependent magnetic field and to affect the thermal mixing of two coupled spins interacting with a time-dependent magnetic field.

  3. Adiabaticity in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venuti, Lorenzo Campos; Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A.; Zanardi, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    We provide a rigorous generalization of the quantum adiabatic theorem for open systems described by a Markovian master equation with time-dependent Liouvillian L (t ) . We focus on the finite system case relevant for adiabatic quantum computing and quantum annealing. Adiabaticity is defined in terms of closeness to the instantaneous steady state. While the general result is conceptually similar to the closed-system case, there are important differences. Namely, a system initialized in the zero-eigenvalue eigenspace of L (t ) will remain in this eigenspace with a deviation that is inversely proportional to the total evolution time T . In the case of a finite number of level crossings, the scaling becomes T-η with an exponent η that we relate to the rate of the gap closing. For master equations that describe relaxation to thermal equilibrium, we show that the evolution time T should be long compared to the corresponding minimum inverse gap squared of L (t ) . Our results are illustrated with several examples.

  4. Repeated interactions in open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bruneau, Laurent; Joye, Alain; Merkli, Marco

    2014-07-15

    Analyzing the dynamics of open quantum systems has a long history in mathematics and physics. Depending on the system at hand, basic physical phenomena that one would like to explain are, for example, convergence to equilibrium, the dynamics of quantum coherences (decoherence) and quantum correlations (entanglement), or the emergence of heat and particle fluxes in non-equilibrium situations. From the mathematical physics perspective, one of the main challenges is to derive the irreversible dynamics of the open system, starting from a unitary dynamics of the system and its environment. The repeated interactions systems considered in these notes are models of non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics. They are relevant in quantum optics, and more generally, serve as a relatively well treatable approximation of a more difficult quantum dynamics. In particular, the repeated interaction models allow to determine the large time (stationary) asymptotics of quantum systems out of equilibrium.

  5. Mechanism for quantum speedup in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai-Bin; Yang, W. L.; An, Jun-Hong; Xu, Zhen-Yu

    2016-02-01

    The quantum speed limit (QSL) time for open system characterizes the most efficient response of the system to the environmental influences. Previous results showed that the non-Markovianity governs the quantum speedup. Via studying the dynamics of a dissipative two-level system, we reveal that the non-Markovian effect is only the dynamical way of the quantum speedup, while the formation of the system-environment bound states is the essential reason for the quantum speedup. Our attribution of the quantum speedup to the energy-spectrum character can supply another vital path for experiments when the quantum speedup shows up without any dynamical calculations. The potential experimental observation of our quantum speedup mechanism in the circuit QED system is discussed. Our results may be of both theoretical and experimental interest in exploring the ultimate QSL in realistic environments, and may open new perspectives for devising active quantum speedup devices.

  6. Quantum Simulation for Open-System Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Sheng; de Oliveira, Marcos Cesar; Berry, Dominic; Sanders, Barry

    2013-03-01

    Simulations are essential for predicting and explaining properties of physical and mathematical systems yet so far have been restricted to classical and closed quantum systems. Although forays have been made into open-system quantum simulation, the strict algorithmic aspect has not been explored yet is necessary to account fully for resource consumption to deliver bounded-error answers to computational questions. An open-system quantum simulator would encompass classical and closed-system simulation and also solve outstanding problems concerning, e.g. dynamical phase transitions in non-equilibrium systems, establishing long-range order via dissipation, verifying the simulatability of open-system dynamics on a quantum Turing machine. We construct an efficient autonomous algorithm for designing an efficient quantum circuit to simulate many-body open-system dynamics described by a local Hamiltonian plus decoherence due to separate baths for each particle. The execution time and number of gates for the quantum simulator both scale polynomially with the system size. DSW funded by USARO. MCO funded by AITF and Brazilian agencies CNPq and FAPESP through Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia-Informacao Quantica (INCT-IQ). DWB funded by ARC Future Fellowship (FT100100761). BCS funded by AITF, CIFAR, NSERC and USARO.

  7. Zeno dynamics in quantum open systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Ran; Fan, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Quantum Zeno effect shows that frequent observations can slow down or even stop the unitary time evolution of an unstable quantum system. This effect can also be regarded as a physical consequence of the statistical indistinguishability of neighboring quantum states. The accessibility of quantum Zeno dynamics under unitary time evolution can be quantitatively estimated by quantum Zeno time in terms of Fisher information. In this work, we investigate the accessibility of quantum Zeno dynamics in quantum open systems by calculating noisy Fisher information when a trace preserving and completely positive map is assumed. We firstly study the consequences of non-Markovian noise on quantum Zeno effect and give the exact forms of the dissipative Fisher information and the quantum Zeno time. Then, for the operator-sum representation, an achievable upper bound of the quantum Zeno time is given with the help of the results in noisy quantum metrology. It is of significance that the noise reducing the accuracy in the entanglement-enhanced parameter estimation can conversely be favorable for the accessibility of quantum Zeno dynamics of entangled states. PMID:26099840

  8. Quantum Entanglement and Quantum Discord in Gaussian Open Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Isar, Aurelian

    2011-10-03

    In the framework of the theory of open systems based on completely positive quantum dynamical semigroups, we give a description of the continuous-variable quantum entanglement and quantum discord for a system consisting of two noninteracting modes embedded in a thermal environment. Entanglement and discord are used to quantify the quantum correlations of the system. For all values of the temperature of the thermal reservoir, an initial separable Gaussian state remains separable for all times. In the case of an entangled initial Gaussian state, entanglement suppression (entanglement sudden death) takes place for non-zero temperatures of the environment. Only for a zero temperature of the thermal bath the initial entangled state remains entangled for finite times. We analyze the time evolution of the Gaussian quantum discord, which is a measure of all quantum correlations in the bipartite state, including entanglement, and show that quantum discord decays asymptotically in time under the effect of the thermal bath.

  9. Open quantum systems and random matrix theory

    SciTech Connect

    Mulhall, Declan

    2014-10-15

    A simple model for open quantum systems is analyzed with RMT. The system is coupled to the continuum in a minimal way. In this paper we see the effect of opening the system on the level statistics, in particular the level spacing, width distribution and Δ{sub 3}(L) statistic are examined as a function of the strength of this coupling. The usual super-radiant state is observed, and it is seen that as it is formed, the level spacing and Δ{sub 3}(L) statistic exhibit the signatures of missed levels.

  10. Quantum state engineering in hybrid open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Chaitanya; Larson, Jonas; Spiller, Timothy P.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a possibility to generate nonclassical states in light-matter coupled noisy quantum systems, namely, the anisotropic Rabi and Dicke models. In these hybrid quantum systems, a competing influence of coherent internal dynamics and environment-induced dissipation drives the system into nonequilibrium steady states (NESSs). Explicitly, for the anisotropic Rabi model, the steady state is given by an incoherent mixture of two states of opposite parities, but as each parity state displays light-matter entanglement, we also find that the full state is entangled. Furthermore, as a natural extension of the anisotropic Rabi model to an infinite spin subsystem, we next explored the NESS of the anisotropic Dicke model. The NESS of this linearized Dicke model is also an inseparable state of light and matter. With an aim to enrich the dynamics beyond the sustainable entanglement found for the NESS of these hybrid quantum systems, we also propose to combine an all-optical feedback strategy for quantum state protection and for establishing quantum control in these systems. Our present work further elucidates the relevance of such hybrid open quantum systems for potential applications in quantum architectures.

  11. Relativistic Quantum Metrology in Open System Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zehua; Wang, Jieci; Fan, Heng; Jing, Jiliang

    2015-01-01

    Quantum metrology studies the ultimate limit of precision in estimating a physical quantity if quantum strategies are exploited. Here we investigate the evolution of a two-level atom as a detector which interacts with a massless scalar field using the master equation approach for open quantum system. We employ local quantum estimation theory to estimate the Unruh temperature when probed by a uniformly accelerated detector in the Minkowski vacuum. In particular, we evaluate the Fisher information (FI) for population measurement, maximize its value over all possible detector preparations and evolution times, and compare its behavior with that of the quantum Fisher information (QFI). We find that the optimal precision of estimation is achieved when the detector evolves for a long enough time. Furthermore, we find that in this case the FI for population measurement is independent of initial preparations of the detector and is exactly equal to the QFI, which means that population measurement is optimal. This result demonstrates that the achievement of the ultimate bound of precision imposed by quantum mechanics is possible. Finally, we note that the same configuration is also available to the maximum of the QFI itself. PMID:25609187

  12. Evolution of Quantum Entanglement in Open Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Isar, A.

    2010-08-04

    In the framework of the theory of open systems based on completely positive quantum dynamical semigroups, we give a description of the continuous-variable entanglement for a system consisting of two uncoupled harmonic oscillators interacting with a thermal environment. Using Peres-Simon necessary sufficient criterion for separability of two-mode Gaussian states, we show that for some values of diffusion coefficient, dissipation constant and temperature of the environment, the state keeps for all times its initial type: separable or entangled. In other cases, entanglement generation, entanglement sudden death or a periodic collapse revival of entanglement take place.

  13. A stochastic approach to open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Biele, R; D'Agosta, R

    2012-07-11

    Stochastic methods are ubiquitous to a variety of fields, ranging from physics to economics and mathematics. In many cases, in the investigation of natural processes, stochasticity arises every time one considers the dynamics of a system in contact with a somewhat bigger system, an environment with which it is considered in thermal equilibrium. Any small fluctuation of the environment has some random effect on the system. In physics, stochastic methods have been applied to the investigation of phase transitions, thermal and electrical noise, thermal relaxation, quantum information, Brownian motion and so on. In this review, we will focus on the so-called stochastic Schrödinger equation. This is useful as a starting point to investigate the dynamics of open quantum systems capable of exchanging energy and momentum with an external environment. We discuss in some detail the general derivation of a stochastic Schrödinger equation and some of its recent applications to spin thermal transport, thermal relaxation, and Bose-Einstein condensation. We thoroughly discuss the advantages of this formalism with respect to the more common approach in terms of the reduced density matrix. The applications discussed here constitute only a few examples of a much wider range of applicability. PMID:22713734

  14. Colloquium: Non-Markovian dynamics in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, Heinz-Peter; Laine, Elsi-Mari; Piilo, Jyrki; Vacchini, Bassano

    2016-04-01

    The dynamical behavior of open quantum systems plays a key role in many applications of quantum mechanics, examples ranging from fundamental problems, such as the environment-induced decay of quantum coherence and relaxation in many-body systems, to applications in condensed matter theory, quantum transport, quantum chemistry, and quantum information. In close analogy to a classical Markovian stochastic process, the interaction of an open quantum system with a noisy environment is often modeled phenomenologically by means of a dynamical semigroup with a corresponding time-independent generator in Lindblad form, which describes a memoryless dynamics of the open system typically leading to an irreversible loss of characteristic quantum features. However, in many applications open systems exhibit pronounced memory effects and a revival of genuine quantum properties such as quantum coherence, correlations, and entanglement. Here recent theoretical results on the rich non-Markovian quantum dynamics of open systems are discussed, paying particular attention to the rigorous mathematical definition, to the physical interpretation and classification, as well as to the quantification of quantum memory effects. The general theory is illustrated by a series of physical examples. The analysis reveals that memory effects of the open system dynamics reflect characteristic features of the environment which opens a new perspective for applications, namely, to exploit a small open system as a quantum probe signifying nontrivial features of the environment it is interacting with. This Colloquium further explores the various physical sources of non-Markovian quantum dynamics, such as structured environmental spectral densities, nonlocal correlations between environmental degrees of freedom, and correlations in the initial system-environment state, in addition to developing schemes for their local detection. Recent experiments addressing the detection, quantification, and control of non-Markovian quantum dynamics are also briefly discussed.

  15. Identification of open quantum systems from observable time traces

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, Jun; Sarovar, Mohan

    2015-05-27

    Estimating the parameters that dictate the dynamics of a quantum system is an important task for quantum information processing and quantum metrology, as well as fundamental physics. In our paper we develop a method for parameter estimation for Markovian open quantum systems using a temporal record of measurements on the system. Furthermore, the method is based on system realization theory and is a generalization of our previous work on identification of Hamiltonian parameters.

  16. Quantum coherence and noise in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazir, Ahsan

    2013-03-01

    Recent experiments demonstrating signatures of quantum coherence in the excitonic energy transfer dynamics of a variety of systems have sparked renewed interest in the theoretical modelling of energy transfer processes within a dissipative environment. A major challenge remains the development of techniques that allow one to probe the diverse parameter regimes relevant to such systems. Master equation methods provide useful tools with which to efficiently analyse energy transfer dynamics in open quantum systems. However, they are often valid only in rather restrictive parameter regimes, limiting their applicability in the present context. Here, I shall present a versatile variational master equation approach to the non-equilibrium dynamics of dissipative excitonic quantum systems, which allows for the exploration of a wide range of parameter regimes within a single formalism. Derived through the combination of a variationally optimised unitary transformation and the time-local projection operator technique, the master equation can be applied to a range of bath spectral densities, temperatures, and system-bath coupling strengths, and accounts for both non-Markovian and non-equilibrium environmental effects. Applying the formalism in the case of excitonic energy transfer, I shall show that while it correctly reproduces Redfield, polaron, and Foerster dynamics in the appropriate limits, it can also be used in intermediate regimes where none of these theories may be applicable. I shall also discuss the extension of the theory to many-site energy transfer systems Variational master equations thus represent a promising avenue for the exploration of (essentially non-perturbative) dissipative dynamics in a variety of physical systems.

  17. Open systems dynamics for propagating quantum fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baragiola, Ben Quinn

    In this dissertation, I explore interactions between matter and propagating light. The electromagnetic field is modeled as a Markovian reservoir of quantum harmonic oscillators successively streaming past a quantum system. Each weak and fleeting interaction entangles the light and the system, and the light continues its course. In the context of quantum tomography or metrology one attempts, using measure- ments of the light, to extract information about the quantum state of the system. An inevitable consequence of these measurements is a disturbance of the system's quantum state. These ideas focus on the system and regard the light as ancillary. It serves its purpose as a probe or as a mechanism to generate interesting dynamics or system states but is eventually traced out, leaving the reduced quantum state of the system as the primary mathematical subject. What, then, when the state of light itself harbors intrinsic self-entanglement? One such set of states, those where a traveling wave packet is prepared with a defi- nite number of photons, is a focal point of this dissertation. These N-photon states are ideal candidates as couriers in quantum information processing device. In con- trast to quasi-classical states, such as coherent or thermal fields, N-photon states possess temporal mode entanglement, and local interactions in time have nonlocal consequences. The reduced state of a system probed by an N-photon state evolves in a non-Markovian way, and to describe its dynamics one is obliged to keep track of the field's evolution. I present a method to do this for an arbitrary quantum system using a set of coupled master equations. Many models set aside spatial degrees of freedom as an unnecessary complicating factor. By doing so the precision of predictions is limited. Consider a ensemble of cold, trapped atomic spins dispersively probed by a paraxial laser beam. Atom-light coupling across the ensemble is spatially inhomogeneous as is the radiation pattern of scattered light. To achieve strong entanglement between the atoms and photons, one must match the spatial mode of the collective radiation from the ensemble to the mode of the laser beam while minimizing the effects of decoherence due to optical pumping. In this dissertation, I present a three-dimensional model for a quantum light-matter interface for propagating quantum fields specifically equipped to address these issues. The reduced collective atomic state is described by a stochastic master equation that includes coherent collective scattering into paraxial modes, decoher- ence by local inhomogeneous diffuse scattering, and measurement backaction due to continuous observation of the light. As the light is measured, backaction transmutes atom-light entanglement into entanglement between the atoms of the ensemble. This formalism is used to study the impact of spatial modes in the squeezing of a collec- tive atomic spin wave via continuous measurement. The largest squeezing occurs precisely in parameter regimes with significant spatial inhomogeneities, far from the limit in which the interface is well approximated by a one-dimensional, homogeneous model.

  18. Identification of open quantum systems from observable time traces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Sarovar, Mohan

    2015-05-01

    Estimating the parameters that dictate the dynamics of a quantum system is an important task for quantum information processing and quantum metrology, as well as fundamental physics. In this paper we develop a method for parameter estimation for Markovian open quantum systems using a temporal record of measurements on the system. The method is based on system realization theory and is a generalization of our previous work on identification of Hamiltonian parameters [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 080401 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.080401].

  19. Dynamics of open bosonic quantum systems in coherent state representation

    SciTech Connect

    Dalvit, D. A. R.; Berman, G. P.; Vishik, M.

    2006-01-15

    We consider the problem of decoherence and relaxation of open bosonic quantum systems from a perspective alternative to the standard master equation or quantum trajectories approaches. Our method is based on the dynamics of expectation values of observables evaluated in a coherent state representation. We examine a model of a quantum nonlinear oscillator with a density-density interaction with a collection of environmental oscillators at finite temperature. We derive the exact solution for dynamics of observables and demonstrate a consistent perturbation approach.

  20. Driven harmonic oscillator as a quantum simulator for open systems

    SciTech Connect

    Piilo, Jyrki; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2006-09-15

    We show theoretically how a driven harmonic oscillator can be used as a quantum simulator for the non-Markovian damped harmonic oscillator. In the general framework, our results demonstrate the possibility to use a closed system as a simulator for open quantum systems. The quantum simulator is based on sets of controlled drives of the closed harmonic oscillator with appropriately tailored electric field pulses. The non-Markovian dynamics of the damped harmonic oscillator is obtained by using the information about the spectral density of the open system when averaging over the drives of the closed oscillator. We consider single trapped ions as a specific physical implementation of the simulator, and we show how the simulator approach reveals physical insight into the open system dynamics, e.g., the characteristic quantum mechanical non-Markovian oscillatory behavior of the energy of the damped oscillator, usually obtained by the non-Lindblad-type master equation, can have a simple semiclassical interpretation.

  1. Investigating non-Markovian dynamics of quantum open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yusui

    Quantum open system coupled to a non-Markovian environment has recently attracted widespread interest for its important applications in quantum information processing and quantum dissipative systems. New phenomena induced by the non-Markovian environment have been discovered in variety of research areas ranging from quantum optics, quantum decoherence to condensed matter physics. However, the study of the non-Markovian quantum open system is known a difficult problem due to its technical complexity in deriving the fundamental equation of motion and elusive conceptual issues involving non-equilibrium dynamics for a strong coupled environment. The main purpose of this thesis is to introduce several new techniques of solving the quantum open systems including a systematic approach to dealing with non-Markovian master equations from a generic quantum-state diffusion (QSD) equation. In the first part of this thesis, we briefly introduce the non-Markovian quantum-state diffusion approach, and illustrate some pronounced non-Markovian quantum effects through numerical investigation on a cavity-QED model. Then we extend the non-Markovian QSD theory to an interesting model where the environment has a hierarchical structure, and find out the exact non-Markovian QSD equation of this model system. We observe the generation of quantum entanglement due to the interplay between the non-Markovian environment and the cavity. In the second part, we show an innovative method to obtain the exact non-Markovian master equations for a set of generic quantum open systems based on the corresponding non-Markovian QSD equations. Multiple-qubit systems and multilevel systems are discussed in details as two typical examples. Particularly, we derive the exact master equation for a model consisting of a three-level atom coupled to an optical cavity and controlled by an external laser field. Additionally, we discuss in more general context the mathematical similarity between the multiple-qubit systems and multilevel systems. Based on our systematic method, we also show how to solve different types of models. In the last part, we use Heisenberg equations of motion and quantum trajectory approach to obtain the exact master equation for a quantum harmonic oscillator chains coupled to two finite temperature environments. The derived exact non-Markovian master equation is useful for exploration of quantum transport and quantum coherence dynamics.

  2. Quantum Information Biology: From Theory of Open Quantum Systems to Adaptive Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Masanari; Basieva, Irina; Khrennikov, Andrei; Ohya, Masanori; Tanaka, Yoshiharu; Yamato, Ichiro

    This chapter reviews quantum(-like) information biology (QIB). Here biology is treated widely as even covering cognition and its derivatives: psychology and decision making, sociology, and behavioral economics and finances. QIB provides an integrative description of information processing by bio-systems at all scales of life: from proteins and cells to cognition, ecological and social systems. Mathematically QIB is based on the theory of adaptive quantum systems (which covers also open quantum systems). Ideologically QIB is based on the quantum-like (QL) paradigm: complex bio-systems process information in accordance with the laws of quantum information and probability. This paradigm is supported by plenty of statistical bio-data collected at all bio-scales. QIB re ects the two fundamental principles: a) adaptivity; and, b) openness (bio-systems are fundamentally open). In addition, quantum adaptive dynamics provides the most generally possible mathematical representation of these principles.

  3. Control of decoherence in open quantum systems using feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Narayan

    Decoherence, which is caused due to the interaction of a quantum system with its environment plagues all quantum systems and leads to the loss of quantum properties that are vital for quantum computation and quantum information processing. In this work we propose a novel strategy using techniques from systems theory to completely eliminate decoherence and also provide conditions under which it can be done so. A novel construction employing an auxiliary system, the bait, which is instrumental to decoupling the system from the environment is presented. Almost all the earlier work on decoherence control employ density matrix and stochastic master equations to analyze the problem. Our approach to decoherence control involves the bilinear input affine model of quantum control system which lends itself to various techniques from classical control theory, but with non-trivial modifications to the quantum regime. The elegance of this approach yields interesting results on open loop decouplability and Decoherence Free Subspaces (DFS). Additionally, the feedback control of decoherence may be related to disturbance decoupling for classical input affine systems, which entails careful application of the methods by avoiding all the quantum mechanical pitfalls. The two concepts are contrasted and an improved theory of disturbance decoupling for general input affine systems is developed. In the process of calculating a suitable feedback the system has to be restructured due to its tensorial nature of interaction with the environment, which is unique to quantum systems. Finally the results are also shown to be superior to the ones obtained via master equations. In order to apply feedback a reliable information extraction scheme is presented that employs continuous indirect measurements with the help of a quantum probe. Finally, a methodology to synthesize feedback parameters itself is given, that technology permitting, could be implemented for practical 2-qubit systems to perform decoherence free Quantum Computing.

  4. Controlling open quantum systems: tools, achievements, and limitations.

    PubMed

    Koch, Christiane P

    2016-06-01

    The advent of quantum devices, which exploit the two essential elements of quantum physics, coherence and entanglement, has sparked renewed interest in the control of open quantum systems. Successful implementations face the challenge of preserving relevant nonclassical features at the level of device operation. A major obstacle is decoherence, which is caused by interaction with the environment. Optimal control theory is a tool that can be used to identify control strategies in the presence of decoherence. Here we review recent advances in optimal control methodology that allow typical tasks in device operation for open quantum systems to be tackled and discuss examples of relaxation-optimized dynamics. Optimal control theory is also a useful tool to exploit the environment for control. We discuss examples and point out possible future extensions. PMID:27143501

  5. Measure of the Quantum Speedup in Closed and Open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhen-Yu

    We construct a general measure for detecting the quantum speedup in both closed and open systems. This speed measure is based on the changing rate of the position of quantum states on a manifold with appropriate monotone Riemannian metrics. Any increase in speed is a clear signature of real dynamical speedup. To clarify the mechanisms of quantum speedup, we first introduce the concept of longitudinal and transverse types of speedup, and then apply the proposed measure to several typical closed and open quantum systems, illustrating that entanglement and the memory effect of the environment together can become resources for longitudinally or transversely accelerating dynamical evolution under certain conditions. Remarkably, a direct measurement of such speedup is feasible without the need for a tomographic reconstruction of the density matrix, which greatly enhances the feasibility of practical experimental tests. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11204196).

  6. Nonlocal Memory Effects in the Dynamics of Open Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, Elsi-Mari; Breuer, Heinz-Peter; Piilo, Jyrki; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2012-05-01

    We explore the possibility to generate nonlocal dynamical maps of an open quantum system through local system-environment interactions. Employing a generic decoherence process induced by a local interaction Hamiltonian, we show that initial correlations in a composite environment can lead to nonlocal open system dynamics which exhibit strong memory effects, although the local dynamics is Markovian. In a model of two entangled photons interacting with two dephasing environments, we find a direct connection between the degree of memory effects and the amount of correlation in the initial environmental state. The results demonstrate that, contrary to conventional wisdom, enlarging an open system can change the dynamics from Markovian to non-Markovian.

  7. Eigenvalue problem of the Liouvillian of open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Naomichi; Petrosky, Tomio

    2015-03-10

    It is argued that the Liouvillian that appears in the Liouville-von Neumann equation for open quantum systems can have complex eigenvalues. Attention is paid to the question whether the Liouvillian has an eigenvalue that are not given by the difference of the two Hamiltonian eigenvalues.

  8. Equilibration properties of a disordered interacting open quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Nieuwenburg, Evert; Huber, Sebastian

    The central question in the field of many body localization is if a closed interacting quantum system effectively thermalizes in the presence of disorder. However, any experimental test necessarily involves the opening of the ideally closed quantum system. Both from a fundamental point of view as well as for concrete experimental investigations of many body localization phenomena, a solid understanding of the effect of an attached bath is of significant importance. We study the equilibration properties of disordered interacting open quantum systems. On the one hand we consider the equilibration of such a many body localized system by coupling baths to the ends of a 1D spin chain. We find non-monotonous behaviour of the slowest relaxation time towards equilibrium. On the other hand, we take the bath itself to be a disordered interacting open quantum system and investigate the dephasing of a single qubit coupled to it. The model for the bath has a many body localization transition, affecting the dephasing of the single qubit.

  9. Preparation of Quantum Gates for Open Quantum Systems by Lyapunov Control Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jie; Cong, Shuang

    2016-03-01

    In this paper the control laws of preparing quantum gates are designed based on Lyapunov stability theorem for two level open quantum systems. We propose a novel Lyapunov function according to the matrix logarithm function, which has higher accuracy and faster convergence speed by comparing them with those of the Lyapunov function of distance. Based on the proposed function, we design two types of control laws to prepare quantum gates for different systems including Markovian quantum systems with phase damping and amplitude damping, non-Markovian quantum systems and closed quantum systems. Furthermore, the system robustness when the Hamiltonian contains uncertainty is further investigated. In order to verify the superiorities of proposed function and control method, NOT gates are prepared by the designed control laws for different systems in the numerical experiments, and the results are comparatively analyzed.

  10. Coherently tracking the covariance matrix of an open quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Zibo; Hush, Michael R.; James, Matthew R.

    2015-07-01

    Coherent feedback control of quantum systems has demonstrable advantages over measurement-based control, but so far there has been little work done on coherent estimators and more specifically coherent observers. Coherent observers are input the coherent output of a specified quantum plant and are designed such that some subset of the observer's and plant's expectation values converge in the asymptotic limit. We previously developed a class of mean tracking (MT) observers for open harmonic oscillators that only converged in mean position and momentum; here we develop a class of covariance matrix tracking (CMT) coherent observers that track both the mean and the covariance matrix of a quantum plant. We derive necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of a CMT observer and find that there are more restrictions on a CMT observer than there are on a MT observer. We give examples where we demonstrate how to design a CMT observer and show that it can be used to track properties like the entanglement of a plant. As the CMT observer provides more quantum information than a MT observer, we expect it will have greater application in future coherent feedback schemes mediated by coherent observers. Investigation of coherent quantum estimators and observers is important in the ongoing discussion of quantum measurement because they provide an estimation of a system's quantum state without explicit use of the measurement postulate in their derivation.

  11. Time evolution of open quantum many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overbeck, Vincent R.; Weimer, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    We establish a generic method to analyze the time evolution of open quantum many-body systems. Our approach is based on a variational integration of the quantum master equation describing the dynamics and naturally connects to a variational principle for its nonequilibrium steady state. We successfully apply our variational method to study dissipative Rydberg gases, finding very good quantitative agreement with small-scale simulations of the full quantum master equation. We observe that correlations related to non-Markovian behavior play a significant role during the relaxation dynamics towards the steady state. We further quantify this non-Markovianity and find it to be closely connected to an information-theoretical measure of quantum and classical correlations.

  12. The Kitaev-Feynman clock for open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tempel, David G.; Aspuru-Guzik, Aln

    2014-11-01

    We show that Kitaev's construction of Feynman's clock, in which the time-evolution of a closed quantum system is encoded as a ground state problem, can be extended to open quantum systems. In our formalism, the ground states of an ensemble of non-Hermitian Kitaev-Feynman clock Hamiltonians yield stochastic trajectories, which unravel the evolution of a Lindblad master equation. In this way, one can use the Kitaev-Feynman clock not only to simulate the evolution of a quantum system, but also its interaction with an environment such as a heat bath or measuring apparatus. A simple numerical example of a two-level atom undergoing spontaneous emission is presented and analyzed.

  13. Open Quantum Systems with Applications to Precision Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tieri, David

    A spectrally pure coherent light source is an important component in precision measurement applications, such as an atomic clock. The more spectrally pure the coherent light source, or the narrower the linewidth of its power spectrum, the better for atomic clock experiments. A coherent light light source, such as a laser, is intrinsically an open quantum system, meaning that it gains and loses energy from an external environment. The aim of this thesis is to study various open quantum systems in an attempt to discover a scheme in which an extremely spectrally pure coherent light source might be realized. Therefore, this thesis begins by introducing the two main approaches to treating open quantum systems, the quantum master equation approach, and the quantum Langevin equation approach. In addition to deriving these from first principles, many of the solution methods to these approaches are given and then demonstrated using computer simulations. These include the quantum jump algorithm, the quantum state diffusion algorithm, the cumulant expansion method, and the method of c-number Langevin equations. Using these methods, the theory of the crossover between lasing and steady state superradiance is presented. It is shown that lasing and steady state superradiance might be demonstrated in the same physical system, but in different parameter regimes. The parameter space between these two extreme limits is explored, and the benefits and drawbacks of operating a system at a given set of parameters, i.e. to achieve the most spectrally pure light source, are discussed. We also consider the phase stability of a laser that is locked to a cavity QED system comprised of atoms with an ultra-narrow optical transition. Although the atomic motion introduces Doppler broadening, the standing wave nature of the cavity causes saturated absorption, which can be used to achieve an extremely high degree of phase stabilization. The inhomogeneity introduced by finite atomic velocities can also cause optical bistability to disappear, resulting in no regions of dynamic instability that would otherwise restrict operational parameters in the experiment to be tuned outside of the optimum region where the minimum linewidth occurs.

  14. Stochastic theory of non-Markovian open quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xinyu

    In this thesis, a stochastic approach to solving non-Markovian open quantum system called "non-Markovian quantum state diffusion" (NMQSD) approach is discussed in details. The NMQSD approach can serve as an analytical and numerical tool to study the dynamics of the open quantum systems. We explore three main topics of the NMQSD approach. First, we extend the NMQSD approach to many-body open systems such as two-qubit system and coupled N-cavity system. Based on the exact NMQSD equations and the corresponding master equations, we investigate several interesting non-Markovian features due to the memory effect of the environment such as the entanglement generation in two-qubit system and the coherence and entanglement transfer between cavities. Second, we extend the original NMQSD approach to the case that system is coupled to a fermionic bath or a spin bath. By introducing the anti-commutative Grassmann noise and the fermionic coherent state, we derive a fermionic NMQSD equation and the corresponding master equation. The fermionic NMQSD is illustrated by several examples. In a single qubit dissipative example, we have explicitly demonstrated that the NMQSD approach and the ordinary quantum mechanics give rise to the exactly same results. We also show the difference between fermionic bath and bosonic bath. Third, we combine the bosonic and fermionic NMQSD approach to develop a unified NMQSD approach to study the case that an open system is coupled to a bosonic bath and a fermionic bath simultaneously. For all practical purposes, we develop a set of useful computer programs (NMQSD Toolbox) to implement the NMQSD equation in realistic computations. In particular, we develop an algorithm to calculate the exact O operator involved in the NMQSD equation. The NMQSD toolbox is designed to be user friendly, so it will be especially valuable for a non-expert who has interest to employ the NMQSD equation to solve a practical problem. Apart from the central topics on the NMQSD approach, we also study the environment-assisted error correction (EAEC) scheme. We have proposed two new schemes beyond the original EAEC scheme. Our schemes can be used to recover an unknown entangled initial state for a dephasing channel and recover an arbitrary unknown initial state for a dissipative channel using a generalized quantum measurement.

  15. Partly invariant steady state of two interacting open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernd, Jzsef Zsolt; Torres, Juan Mauricio

    2015-12-01

    We investigate two interacting open quantum systems whose time evolutions are governed by Markovian master equations. We show a class of coupled systems whose interaction leaves invariant the steady state of one of the systems, i.e., only one of the reduced steady states is sensitive to the interactions. A detailed proof with the help of the Trotter product formula is presented. We apply this general statement to a few models, one of which is the optomechanical coupling model where an optical cavity is coupled to a small mechanical oscillator.

  16. Dynamical invariants and nonadiabatic geometric phases in open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sarandy, M. S.; Duzzioni, E. I.; Moussa, M. H. Y.

    2007-11-15

    We introduce an operational framework to analyze nonadiabatic Abelian and non-Abelian, cyclic and noncyclic, geometric phases in open quantum systems. In order to remove the adiabaticity condition, we generalize the theory of dynamical invariants to the context of open systems evolving under arbitrary convolutionless master equations. Geometric phases are then defined through the Jordan canonical form of the dynamical invariant associated with the superoperator that governs the master equation. As a by-product, we provide a sufficient condition for the robustness of the phase against a given decohering process. We illustrate our results by considering a two-level system in a Markovian interaction with the environment, where we show that the nonadiabatic geometric phase acquired by the system can be constructed in such a way that it is robust against both dephasing and spontaneous emission.

  17. Scar and antiscar quantum effects in open chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, L.

    1999-05-01

    We predict and numerically observe strong periodic orbit effects in the properties of weakly open quantum systems with a chaotic classical limit. Antiscars lead to a large number of exponentially narrow isolated resonances when the single-channel (or tunneling) opening is located on a short unstable orbit of the closed system; the probability to remain in the system at long times is thus exponentially enhanced over the random matrix theory prediction. The distribution of resonance widths and the probability to remain are quantitatively given in terms of only the stability matrix of the orbit on which the opening is placed. The long-time remaining probability density is nontrivially distributed over the available phase space; it can be enhanced or suppressed near orbits other than the one on which the lead is located, depending on the periods and classical actions of these other orbits. These effects of the short periodic orbits on quantum decay rates have no classical counterpart, and first appear on times scales much larger than the Heisenberg time of the system. All the predictions are quantitatively compared with numerical data.

  18. Boundary driven open quantum many-body systems

    SciTech Connect

    Prosen, Tomaž

    2014-01-08

    In this lecture course I outline a simple paradigm of non-eqjuilibrium quantum statistical physics, namely we shall study quantum lattice systems with local, Hamiltonian (conservative) interactions which are coupled to the environment via incoherent processes only at the system's boundaries. This is arguably the simplest nontrivial context where one can study far from equilibrium steady states and their transport properties. We shall formulate the problem in terms of a many-body Markovian master equation (the so-called Lindblad equation, and some of its extensions, e.g. the Redfield eqaution). The lecture course consists of two main parts: Firstly, and most extensively we shall present canonical Liouville-space many-body formalism, the so-called 'third quantization' and show how it can be implemented to solve bi-linear open many-particle problems, the key peradigmatic examples being the XY spin 1/2 chains or quasi-free bosonic (or harmonic) chains. Secondly, we shall outline several recent approaches on how to approach exactly solvable open quantum interacting many-body problems, such as anisotropic Heisenberg ((XXZ) spin chain or fermionic Hubbard chain.

  19. Dynamics of incompatibility of quantum measurements in open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addis, Carole; Heinosaari, Teiko; Kiukas, Jukka; Laine, Elsi-Mari; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2016-02-01

    The nonclassical nature of quantum states, often illustrated using entanglement measures or quantum discord, constitutes a resource for quantum information protocols. However, the nonclassicality of a quantum system cannot be seen as a property of the state alone, as the set of available measurements used to extract information on the system is typically restricted. In this work we study how the nonclassicality of quantum measurements, quantified via their incompatibility, is influenced by quantum noise and how a non-Markovian environment can be useful for maintaining the measurement resources.

  20. Tomograms for open quantum systems: In(finite) dimensional optical and spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thapliyal, Kishore; Banerjee, Subhashish; Pathak, Anirban

    2016-03-01

    Tomograms are obtained as probability distributions and are used to reconstruct a quantum state from experimentally measured values. We study the evolution of tomograms for different quantum systems, both finite and infinite dimensional. In realistic experimental conditions, quantum states are exposed to the ambient environment and hence subject to effects like decoherence and dissipation, which are dealt with here, consistently, using the formalism of open quantum systems. This is extremely relevant from the perspective of experimental implementation and issues related to state reconstruction in quantum computation and communication. These considerations are also expected to affect the quasiprobability distribution obtained from experimentally generated tomograms and nonclassicality observed from them.

  1. Landauer's Principle in Multipartite Open Quantum System Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, S; McCloskey, R; Ciccarello, F; Paternostro, M; Palma, G M

    2015-09-18

    We investigate the link between information and thermodynamics embodied by Landauer's principle in the open dynamics of a multipartite quantum system. Such irreversible dynamics is described in terms of a collisional model with a finite temperature reservoir. We demonstrate that Landauer's principle holds, for such a configuration, in a form that involves the flow of heat dissipated into the environment and the rate of change of the entropy of the system. Quite remarkably, such a principle for heat and entropy power can be explicitly linked to the rate of creation of correlations among the elements of the multipartite system and, in turn, the non-Markovian nature of their reduced evolution. Such features are illustrated in two exemplary cases. PMID:26430974

  2. Landauer's Principle in Multipartite Open Quantum System Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, S.; McCloskey, R.; Ciccarello, F.; Paternostro, M.; Palma, G. M.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the link between information and thermodynamics embodied by Landauer's principle in the open dynamics of a multipartite quantum system. Such irreversible dynamics is described in terms of a collisional model with a finite temperature reservoir. We demonstrate that Landauer's principle holds, for such a configuration, in a form that involves the flow of heat dissipated into the environment and the rate of change of the entropy of the system. Quite remarkably, such a principle for heat and entropy power can be explicitly linked to the rate of creation of correlations among the elements of the multipartite system and, in turn, the non-Markovian nature of their reduced evolution. Such features are illustrated in two exemplary cases.

  3. Non-Markovian dynamics of open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, Chris H.

    An open quantum system is a quantum system that interacts with some environment whose degrees of freedom have been coarse grained away. This model describes non-equilibrium processes more general than scattering-matrix formulations. Furthermore, the microscopically-derived environment provides a model of noise, dissipation and decoherence far more general than Markovian (white noise) models. The latter are fully characterized by Lindblad equations and can be motivated phenomenologically. Non-Markovian processes consistently account for backreaction with the environment and can incorporate effects such as finite temperature and spatial correlations. We consider linear systems with bilinear coupling to the environment, or quantum Brownian motion, and nonlinear systems with weak coupling to the environment. For linear systems we provide exact solutions with analytical results for a variety of spectral densities. Furthermore, we point out an important mathematical subtlety which led to incorrect master-equation coefficients in earlier derivations, given nonlocal dissipation. For nonlinear systems we provide perturbative solutions by translating the formalism of canonical perturbation theory into the context of master equations. It is shown that unavoidable degeneracy causes an unfortunate reduction in accuracy between perturbative master equations and their solutions. We also extend the famous theorem of Lindblad, Gorini, Kossakowski and Sudarshan on completely positivity to non-Markovian master equations. Our application is primarily to model atoms interacting via a common electromagnetic field. The electromagnetic field contains correlations in both space and time, which are related to its relativistic (photon-mediated) nature. As such, atoms residing in the same field experience different environmental effects depending upon their relative position and orientation. Our more accurate solutions were necessary to assess sudden death of entanglement at zero temperature. In contrast to previous claims, we found that all initial states of two-level atoms undergo finite-time disentanglement. We were also able to access regimes which cannot be described by Lindblad equations and other simpler methods, such as near resonance. Finally we revisit the infamous Abraham-Lorentz force, wherein a single particle in motion experiences backreaction from the electromagnetic field. This leads to a number of well-known problems including pre-acceleration and runaway solutions. We found a more a more-suitable open-system treatment of the nonrelativistic particle to be perfectly causal and dissipative without any extraneous requirements for finite size of the particle, weak coupling to the field, etc..

  4. Jumplike unravelings for non-Markovian open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gambetta, Jay; Askerud, T.; Wiseman, H.M.

    2004-05-01

    Non-Markovian evolution of an open quantum system can be 'unraveled' into pure state trajectories generated by a non-Markovian stochastic (diffusive) Schroedinger equation, as introduced by Diosi, Gisin, and Strunz. Recently we have shown that such equations can be derived using the modal (hidden variable) interpretation of quantum mechanics. In this paper we generalize this theory to treat jumplike unravelings. To illustrate the jumplike behavior we consider a simple system: a classically driven (at Rabi frequency {omega}) two-level atom coupled linearly to a three mode optical bath, with a central frequency equal to the frequency of the atom, {omega}{sub 0}, and the two side bands have frequencies {omega}{sub 0}{+-}{omega}. In the large {omega} limit we observed that the jumplike behavior is similar to that observed in this system with a Markovian (broad band) bath. This is expected as in the Markovian limit the fluorescence spectrum for a strongly driven two level atom takes the form of a Mollow triplet. However, the length of time for which the Markovian-like behavior persists depends upon which jumplike unraveling is used.

  5. Revealing electronic open quantum systems with subsystem TDDFT.

    PubMed

    Krishtal, Alisa; Pavanello, Michele

    2016-03-28

    Open quantum systems (OQSs) are perhaps the most realistic systems one can approach through simulations. In recent years, describing OQSs with Density Functional Theory (DFT) has been a prominent avenue of research with most approaches based on a density matrix partitioning in conjunction with an ad-hoc description of system-bath interactions. We propose a different theoretical approach to OQSs based on partitioning of the electron density. Employing the machinery of subsystem DFT (and its time-dependent extension), we provide a novel way of isolating and analyzing the various terms contributing to the coupling between the system and the surrounding bath. To illustrate the theory, we provide numerical simulations on a toy system (a molecular dimer) and on a condensed phase system (solvated excimer). The simulations show that non-Markovian dynamics in the electronic system-bath interactions are important in chemical applications. For instance, we show that the superexchange mechanism of transport in donor-bridge-acceptor systems is a non-Markovian interaction between the donor-acceptor (OQS) with the bridge (bath) which is fully characterized by real-time subsystem time-dependent DFT. PMID:27036438

  6. Revealing electronic open quantum systems with subsystem TDDFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishtal, Alisa; Pavanello, Michele

    2016-03-01

    Open quantum systems (OQSs) are perhaps the most realistic systems one can approach through simulations. In recent years, describing OQSs with Density Functional Theory (DFT) has been a prominent avenue of research with most approaches based on a density matrix partitioning in conjunction with an ad-hoc description of system-bath interactions. We propose a different theoretical approach to OQSs based on partitioning of the electron density. Employing the machinery of subsystem DFT (and its time-dependent extension), we provide a novel way of isolating and analyzing the various terms contributing to the coupling between the system and the surrounding bath. To illustrate the theory, we provide numerical simulations on a toy system (a molecular dimer) and on a condensed phase system (solvated excimer). The simulations show that non-Markovian dynamics in the electronic system-bath interactions are important in chemical applications. For instance, we show that the superexchange mechanism of transport in donor-bridge-acceptor systems is a non-Markovian interaction between the donor-acceptor (OQS) with the bridge (bath) which is fully characterized by real-time subsystem time-dependent DFT.

  7. Quantum-to-Classical Crossover of Quasibound States in Open Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomerus, Henning; Tworzydło, Jakub

    2004-10-01

    In the semiclassical limit of open ballistic quantum systems, we demonstrate the emergence of instantaneous decay modes guided by classical escape faster than the Ehrenfest time. The decay time of the associated quasibound states is smaller than the classical time of flight. The remaining long-lived quasibound states obey random-matrix statistics, renormalized in compliance with the recently proposed fractal Weyl law for open systems [

    W. T. Lu, S. Sridhar, and M. Zworski, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 154101 (2003)]PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.91.154101
    . We validate our theory numerically for a model system, the open kicked rotator.

  8. Finding and pinpointing exceptional points of an open quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdin, Raam; Lefebvre, Roland

    2010-12-01

    An exceptional point (EP) is a point in the parameter space of an open quantum system in which the two eigenstates of the effectively non-Hermitian system coalesce and a topological effect can be observed. In this work we use the properties of the energy eigenvalues near the EP at three different points in order to find the exact EP location in the parameter space. This method does not require the two parameters of the system to be grouped as a single complex parameter, so it can easily be applied to Floquet operators. Finally, it is shown that by applying the Hellmann-Feynman theorem, the EP position can be obtained from a single point. The benefits of using the 3-point approach or the 1-point approach are discussed. These simple techniques may be of use in the search for new EPs in various physical systems. To demonstrate the utility of the method, we find an EP for an H+2 molecule driven by a monochromatic laser and for a laser-driven Gaussian potential.

  9. Minimal evolution time and quantum speed limit of non-Markovian open systems

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiangyi; Wu, Chengjun; Guo, Hong

    2015-01-01

    We derive a sharp bound as the quantum speed limit (QSL) for the minimal evolution time of quantum open systems in the non-Markovian strong-coupling regime with initial mixed states by considering the effects of both renormalized Hamiltonian and dissipator. For a non-Markovian quantum open system, the possible evolution time between two arbitrary states is not unique, among the set of which we find that the minimal one and its QSL can decrease more steeply by adjusting the coupling strength of the dissipator, which thus provides potential improvements of efficiency in many quantum physics and quantum information areas. PMID:26565062

  10. Minimal evolution time and quantum speed limit of non-Markovian open systems.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangyi; Wu, Chengjun; Guo, Hong

    2015-01-01

    We derive a sharp bound as the quantum speed limit (QSL) for the minimal evolution time of quantum open systems in the non-Markovian strong-coupling regime with initial mixed states by considering the effects of both renormalized Hamiltonian and dissipator. For a non-Markovian quantum open system, the possible evolution time between two arbitrary states is not unique, among the set of which we find that the minimal one and its QSL can decrease more steeply by adjusting the coupling strength of the dissipator, which thus provides potential improvements of efficiency in many quantum physics and quantum information areas. PMID:26565062

  11. Width bifurcation and dynamical phase transitions in open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Eleuch, Hichem; Rotter, Ingrid

    2013-05-01

    The states of an open quantum system are coupled via the environment of scattering wave functions. The complex coupling coefficients ω between system and environment arise from the principal value integral and the residuum. At high-level density where the resonance states overlap, the dynamics of the system is determined by exceptional points. At these points, the eigenvalues of two states are equal and the corresponding eigenfunctions are linearly dependent. It is shown in the present paper that Im(ω) and Re(ω) influence the system properties differently in the surrounding of exceptional points. Controlling the system by a parameter, the eigenvalues avoid crossing in energy near an exceptional point under the influence of Re(ω) in a similar manner as it is well known from discrete states. Im(ω), however, leads to width bifurcation and finally (when the system is coupled to one channel, i.e., to one common continuum of scattering wave functions), to a splitting of the system into two parts with different characteristic time scales. The role of observer states is discussed. Physically, the system is stabilized by this splitting since the lifetimes of some states are longer than before, while that of one state is shorter. In the cross section the short-lived state appears as a background term in high-resolution experiments. The wave functions of the long-lived states are mixed in those of the original ones in a comparably large parameter range. Numerical results for the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions are shown for N=2,4, and 10 states coupled mostly to one channel. PMID:23767516

  12. Designing and Probing Open Quantum Systems: Quantum Annealing, Excitonic Energy Transfer, and Nonlinear Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdomo, Alejandro

    The 20th century saw the first revolution of quantum mechanics, setting the rules for our understanding of light, matter, and their interaction. The 21st century is focused on using these quantum mechanical laws to develop technologies which allows us to solve challenging practical problems. One of the directions is the use quantum devices which promise to surpass the best computers and best known classical algorithms for solving certain tasks. Crucial to the design of realistic devices and technologies is to account for the open nature of quantum systems and to cope with their interactions with the environment. In the first part of this dissertation, we show how to tackle classical optimization problems of interest in the physical sciences within one of these quantum computing paradigms, known as quantum annealing (QA). We present the largest implementation of QA on a biophysical problem (six different experiments with up to 81 superconducting quantum bits). Although the cases presented here can be solved on a classical computer, we present the first implementation of lattice protein folding on a quantum device under the Miyazawa-Jernigan model. This is the first step towards studying optimization problems in biophysics and statistical mechanics using quantum devices. In the second part of this dissertation, we focus on the problem of excitonic energy transfer. We provide an intuitive platform for engineering exciton transfer dynamics and we show that careful consideration of the properties of the environment leads to opportunities to engineer the transfer of an exciton. Since excitons in nanostructures are proposed for use in quantum information processing and artificial photosynthetic designs, our approach paves the way for engineering a wide range of desired exciton dynamics. Finally, we develop the theory for a two-dimensional electronic spectroscopic technique based on fluorescence (2DFS) and challenge previous theoretical results claiming its equivalence to the two-dimensional photon echo (2DPE) technique which is based on polarization. Experimental realization of this technique confirms our theoretical predictions. The new technique is more sensitive than 2DPE as a tool for conformational determination of excitonically coupled chromophores and offers the possibility of applying two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy to single-molecules.

  13. Conservation law of operator current in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmilehto, J.; Solinas, P.; Möttönen, M.

    2012-03-01

    We derive a fundamental conservation law of operator current for master equations describing reduced quantum systems. If this law is broken, the temporal integral of the current operator of an arbitrary system observable does not yield in general the change of that observable in the evolution. We study Lindblad-type master equations as examples and prove that the application of the secular approximation during their derivation results in a violation of the conservation law. We show that generally any violation of the law leads to artificial corrections to the complete quantum dynamics, thus questioning the accuracy of the particular master equation.

  14. Exceptional points for parameter estimation in open quantum systems: analysis of the Bloch equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Am-Shallem, Morag; Kosloff, Ronnie; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2015-11-01

    We suggest to employ the dissipative nature of open quantum systems for the purpose of parameter estimation: the dynamics of open quantum systems is typically described by a quantum dynamical semigroup generator {L}. The eigenvalues of {L} are complex, reflecting unitary as well as dissipative dynamics. For certain values of parameters defining {L}, non-Hermitian degeneracies emerge, i.e. exceptional points (EP). The dynamical signature of these EPs corresponds to a unique time evolution. This unique feature can be employed experimentally to locate the EPs and thereby to determine the intrinsic system parameters with a high accuracy. This way we turn the disadvantage of the dissipation into an advantage. We demonstrate this method in the open system dynamics of a two-level system described by the Bloch equation, which has become the paradigm of diverse fields in physics, from NMR to quantum information and elementary particles.

  15. Dissipative quantum computing with open quantum walks

    SciTech Connect

    Sinayskiy, Ilya; Petruccione, Francesco

    2014-12-04

    An open quantum walk approach to the implementation of a dissipative quantum computing scheme is presented. The formalism is demonstrated for the example of an open quantum walk implementation of a 3 qubit quantum circuit consisting of 10 gates.

  16. Nature of heat in strongly coupled open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Massimiliano; Ochoa, Maicol A.; Galperin, Michael

    2015-12-01

    We show that any heat definition expressed as an energy change in the reservoir energy plus any fraction of the system-reservoir interaction is not an exact differential when evaluated along reversible isothermal transformations, except when that fraction is zero. Even in that latter case the reversible heat divided by temperature, namely entropy, does not satisfy the third law of thermodynamics and diverges in the low temperature limit. These results are found within the framework of nonequilibrium Green functions (NEGF) using a single level quantum dot strongly coupled to fermionic reservoirs and subjected to a time-dependent protocol modulating the dot energy as well as the dot-reservoir coupling strength.

  17. Rise and fall of quantum and classical correlations in open-system dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Khasin, Michael; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2007-07-15

    Interacting quantum systems evolving from an uncorrelated composite initial state generically develop quantum correlations--entanglement. As a consequence, a local description of interacting quantum systems is impossible as a rule. A unitarily evolving (isolated) quantum system generically develops extensive entanglement: the magnitude of the generated entanglement will increase without bounds with the effective Hilbert space dimension of the system. It is conceivable that coupling of the interacting subsystems to local dephasing environments will restrict the generation of entanglement to such extent that the evolving composite system may be considered as approximately disentangled. This conjecture is addressed in the context of some common models of a bipartite system with linear and nonlinear interactions and local coupling to dephasing environments. Analytical and numerical results obtained imply that the conjecture is generally false. Open dynamics of the quantum correlations is compared to the corresponding evolution of the classical correlations and a qualitative difference is found.

  18. Effects of initial system-environment correlations on open-quantum-system dynamics and state preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Chang; Goan, Hsi-Sheng

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the preparation of a target initial state for a two-level (qubit) system from a system-environment equilibrium or correlated state by an external field. The system-environment equilibrium or correlated state results from the inevitable interaction of the system with its environment. An efficient method in an extended auxiliary Liouville space is introduced to describe the dynamics of the non-Markovian open quantum system in the presence of a strong field and an initial system-environment correlation. By using the time evolutions of the population difference, the state trajectory in the Bloch sphere representation, and the trace distance between two reduced system states of the open quantum system, the effect of initial system-environment correlations on the preparation of a system state is studied. We introduce an upper bound and a lower bound for the trace distance within our perturbation formalism to describe the diverse behaviors of the dynamics of the trace distance between various correlated states after the system state preparation. These bounds, that are much more computable than similar bounds in the literature, give a sufficient condition and a necessary condition for the increase of the trace distance and are related to the witnesses of non-Markovianity and initial system-bath correlation.

  19. Geometric phase for an adiabatically evolving open quantum system

    SciTech Connect

    Kamleitner, Ingo; Cresser, James D.; Sanders, Barry C.

    2004-10-01

    We derive a solution for a two-level system evolving adiabatically under the influence of a driving field, which includes open system effects. This solution, which is obtained by working in the representation corresponding to the eigenstates of the time-dependent Hermitian Hamiltonian, enables the dynamic and geometric phases of the evolving density matrix to be separated. The dynamic phase can be canceled in the limit of weak coupling to the environment, thereby allowing the geometric phase to be readily extracted both mathematically and operationally.

  20. Real-time transport in open quantum systems from PT-symmetric quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elenewski, Justin E.; Chen, Hanning

    2014-08-01

    Nanoscale electronic transport is of intense technological interest, with applications ranging from semiconducting devices and molecular junctions to charge migration in biological systems. Most explicit theoretical approaches treat transport using a combination of density functional theory (DFT) and nonequilibrium Green's functions. This is a static formalism, with dynamic response properties accommodated only through complicated extensions. To circumvent this limitation, the carrier density may be propagated using real-time time-dependent DFT (RT-TDDFT), with boundary conditions corresponding to an open quantum system. Complex absorbing potentials can emulate outgoing particles at the simulation boundary, although these do not account for introduction of charge density. It is demonstrated that the desired positive particle flux is afforded by a class of PT-symmetric generating potentials that are characterized by anisotropic transmission resonances. These potentials add density every time a particle traverses the cell boundary, and may be used to engineer a continuous pulse train for incident packets. This is a first step toward developing a complete transport formalism unique to RT-TDDFT.

  1. Canonical versus noncanonical equilibration dynamics of open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun-Jie; An, Jun-Hong; Luo, Hong-Gang; Li, Yading; Oh, C H

    2014-08-01

    In statistical mechanics, any quantum system in equilibrium with its weakly coupled reservoir is described by a canonical state at the same temperature as the reservoir. Here, by studying the equilibration dynamics of a harmonic oscillator interacting with a reservoir, we evaluate microscopically the condition under which the equilibration to a canonical state is valid. It is revealed that the non-Markovian effect and the availability of a stationary state of the total system play a profound role in the equilibration. In the Markovian limit, the conventional canonical state can be recovered. In the non-Markovian regime, when the stationary state is absent, the system equilibrates to a generalized canonical state at an effective temperature; whenever the stationary state is present, the equilibrium state of the system cannot be described by any canonical state anymore. Our finding of the physical condition on such noncanonical equilibration might have significant impact on statistical physics. A physical scheme based on circuit QED is proposed to test our results. PMID:25215704

  2. Equivalence of matrix product ensembles of trajectories in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiukas, Jukka; GuÅ£ǎ, Mǎdǎlin; Lesanovsky, Igor; Garrahan, Juan P.

    2015-07-01

    The equivalence of thermodynamic ensembles is at the heart of statistical mechanics and central to our understanding of equilibrium states of matter. Recently, a formal connection has been established between the dynamics of open quantum systems and statistical mechanics in an extra dimension: an open system dynamics generates a matrix product state (MPS) encoding all possible quantum jump trajectories which allows to construct generating functions akin to partition functions. For dynamics generated by a Lindblad master equation, the corresponding MPS is a so-called continuous MPS which encodes the set of continuous measurement records terminated at some fixed total observation time. Here, we show that if one instead terminates trajectories after a fixed total number of quantum jumps, e.g., emission events into the environment, the associated MPS is discrete. The continuous and discrete MPS correspond to different ensembles of quantum trajectories, one characterized by total time, the other by total number of quantum jumps. Hence, they give rise to quantum versions of different thermodynamic ensembles, akin to "grand canonical" and "isobaric," but for trajectories. Here, we prove that these trajectory ensembles are equivalent in a suitable limit of long time or large number of jumps. This is in direct analogy to equilibrium statistical mechanics where equivalence between ensembles is only strictly established in the thermodynamic limit. An intrinsic quantum feature is that the equivalence holds only for all observables that commute with the number of quantum jumps.

  3. Solving non-Markovian open quantum systems with multi-channel reservoir coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, Curtis J.; Jing, Jun; Yu, Ting; Eberly, Joseph H.

    2012-08-01

    We extend the non-Markovian quantum state diffusion (QSD) equation to open quantum systems which exhibit multi-channel coupling to a harmonic oscillator reservoir. Open quantum systems which have multi-channel reservoir coupling are those in which canonical transformation of reservoir modes cannot reduce the number of reservoir operators appearing in the interaction Hamiltonian to one. We show that the non-Markovian QSD equation for multi-channel reservoir coupling can, in some cases, lead to an exact master equation which we derive. We then derive the exact master equation for the three-level system in a vee-type configuration which has multi-channel reservoir coupling and give the analytical solution. Finally, we examine the evolution of the three-level vee-type system with generalized Ornstein-Uhlenbeck reservoir correlations numerically.

  4. Lyapunov control on quantum open systems in decoherence-free subspaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Wang, L. C.; Yi, X. X.

    2010-09-15

    A scheme to drive and manipulate a finite-dimensional quantum system in decoherence-free subspaces (DFSs) by Lyapunov control is proposed. Control fields are established by the Lyapunov function. This proposal can drive the open quantum system into DFSs and manipulate it to any desired eigenstate of the free Hamiltonian. An example which consists of a four-level system with three long-lived states driven by two lasers is presented to demonstrate the scheme. We have performed numerical simulations of the dynamics of the four-level system, which show that the scheme works well.

  5. A dissertation on open quantum system dynamics for describing state transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuniga-Hansen, Nayeli

    In principle a quantum system could be used to simulate another quantum system. The purpose of such a simulation would be to obtain information about problems which are difficult to simulate on a classical computer due to the exponential increase of the Hilbert space with the size of the system, and which cannot be readily measured or controlled in an experiment. A quantum simulator is, however, an open quantum system that will interact with the surrounding environment, which in this case are other particles in the system, and will be implemented using imperfect controls, making it subject to noise. It has been suggested that noise does not need to be controlled to the same extent as it must be for general quantum information processing. However, the effects of noise in quantum simulations are not well understood and how best to treat them in most cases is not known. In the present work we study an existing quantum algorithm for the simulation of the one-dimensional Fano-Anderson model. This algorithm was proposed for a liquid-state NMR device. We examine models of noise in the evolution using different initial states in the original model. We also add interacting spins to simulate realistic situation where an environment of spins is present. We find that states which are entangled with their environment, and sometimes correlated but not necessarily entangled have an evolution which is described by maps which are not completely positive. We discuss the conditions for this to occur and also the implications.

  6. The open quantum Brownian motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Michel; Bernard, Denis; Tilloy, Antoine

    2014-09-01

    Using quantum parallelism on random walks as the original seed, we introduce new quantum stochastic processes, the open quantum Brownian motions. They describe the behaviors of quantum walkers—with internal degrees of freedom which serve as random gyroscopes—interacting with a series of probes which serve as quantum coins. These processes may also be viewed as the scaling limit of open quantum random walks and we develop this approach along three different lines: the quantum trajectory, the quantum dynamical map and the quantum stochastic differential equation. We also present a study of the simplest case, with a two level system as an internal gyroscope, illustrating the interplay between the ballistic and diffusive behaviors at work in these processes. Notation H_z : orbital (walker) Hilbert space, {C}^{{Z}} in the discrete, L^2({R}) in the continuum H_c : internal spin (or gyroscope) Hilbert space H_sys=H_z\\otimesH_c : system Hilbert space H_p : probe (or quantum coin) Hilbert space, H_p={C}^2 \\rho^tot_t : density matrix for the total system (walker + internal spin + quantum coins) \\bar \\rho_t : reduced density matrix on H_sys : \\bar\\rho_t=\\int dxdy\\, \\bar\\rho_t(x,y)\\otimes | x \\rangle _z\\langle y | \\hat \\rho_t : system density matrix in a quantum trajectory: \\hat\\rho_t=\\int dxdy\\, \\hat\\rho_t(x,y)\\otimes | x \\rangle _z\\langle y | . If diagonal and localized in position: \\hat \\rho_t=\\rho_t\\otimes| X_t \\rangle _z\\langle X_t | ρt: internal density matrix in a simple quantum trajectory Xt: walker position in a simple quantum trajectory Bt: normalized Brownian motion ξt, \\xi_t^\\dagger : quantum noises

  7. General response formula and application to topological insulator in quantum open system.

    PubMed

    Shen, H Z; Qin, M; Shao, X Q; Yi, X X

    2015-11-01

    It is well-known that the quantum linear response theory is based on the first-order perturbation theory for a system in thermal equilibrium. Hence, this theory breaks down when the system is in a steady state far from thermal equilibrium and the response up to higher order in perturbation is not negligible. In this paper, we develop a nonlinear response theory for such quantum open system. We first formulate this theory in terms of general susceptibility, after which we apply it to the derivation of Hall conductance for open system at finite temperature. As an example, the Hall conductance of the two-band model is derived. Then we calculate the Hall conductance for a two-dimensional ferromagnetic electron gas and a two-dimensional lattice model. The calculations show that the transition points of topological phase are robust against the environment. Our results provide a promising platform for the coherent manipulation of the nonlinear response in quantum open system, which has potential applications for quantum information processing and statistical physics. PMID:26651662

  8. QuTiP: An open-source Python framework for the dynamics of open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, J. R.; Nation, P. D.; Nori, Franco

    2012-08-01

    We present an object-oriented open-source framework for solving the dynamics of open quantum systems written in Python. Arbitrary Hamiltonians, including time-dependent systems, may be built up from operators and states defined by a quantum object class, and then passed on to a choice of master equation or Monte Carlo solvers. We give an overview of the basic structure for the framework before detailing the numerical simulation of open system dynamics. Several examples are given to illustrate the build up to a complete calculation. Finally, we measure the performance of our library against that of current implementations. The framework described here is particularly well suited to the fields of quantum optics, superconducting circuit devices, nanomechanics, and trapped ions, while also being ideal for use in classroom instruction. Catalogue identifier: AEMB_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMB_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 16 482 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 213 438 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python Computer: i386, x86-64 Operating system: Linux, Mac OSX, Windows RAM: 2+ Gigabytes Classification: 7 External routines: NumPy (http://numpy.scipy.org/), SciPy (http://www.scipy.org/), Matplotlib (http://matplotlib.sourceforge.net/) Nature of problem: Dynamics of open quantum systems. Solution method: Numerical solutions to Lindblad master equation or Monte Carlo wave function method. Restrictions: Problems must meet the criteria for using the master equation in Lindblad form. Running time: A few seconds up to several tens of minutes, depending on size of underlying Hilbert space.

  9. Fast resonator reset in circuit QED using open quantum system optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, Samuel; Andersen, Christian Kraglund; Venkatraman, Jayameenakshi; Blais, Alexandre

    Practical implementations of quantum information processing requires repetitive qubit readout. In circuit QED, where readout is performed using a resonator dispersively coupled to the qubits, the measurement repetition rate is limited by the resonator reset time. This reset is usually performed passively by waiting several resonator decay times. Alternatively, it was recently shown that a simple pulse sequence allows to decrease the reset time to twice the resonator decay time. In this work, we show how to further optimize the ring-down pulse sequence by using optimal control theory for open quantum systems. Using a new implementation of the open GRAPE algorithm that is well suited to large Hilbert spaces, we find active resonator reset procedures that are faster than a single resonator decay time. Simple quantum speed limits for this kind of active reset processes will be discussed

  10. Absorption and injection models for open time-dependent quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traversa, F. L.; Zhan, Z.; Oriols, X.

    2014-08-01

    In the time-dependent simulation of pure states dealing with transport in open quantum systems, the initial state is located outside of the active region of interest. Using the superposition principle and the analytical knowledge of the free time evolution of such a state outside the active region, together with absorbing layers and remapping, a model for a very significant reduction of the computational burden associated with the numerical simulation of open time-dependent quantum systems is presented. The model is specially suited to study (many-particle and high-frequency effects) quantum transport, but it can also be applied to any other research field where the initial time-dependent pure state is located outside of the active region. From numerical simulations of open quantum systems described by the (effective mass) Schrödinger and (atomistic) tight-binding equations, a reduction of the computational burden of about two orders of magnitude for each spatial dimension of the domain with a negligible error is presented.

  11. Superradiance, disorder, and the non-Hermitian Hamiltonian in open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Celardo, G. L.; Biella, A.; Giusteri, G. G.; Mattiotti, F.; Zhang, Y.; Kaplan, L.

    2014-10-15

    We first briefly review the non-Hermitian effective Hamiltonian approach to open quantum systems and the associated phenomenon of superradiance. We next discuss the superradiance crossover in the presence of disorder and the relationship between superradiance and the localization transition. Finally, we investigate the regime of validity of the energy-independent effective Hamiltonian approximation and show that the results obtained by these methods are applicable to realistic physical systems.

  12. Solving non-Markovian open quantum systems with multi-channel reservoir coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Broadbent, Curtis J.; Jing, Jun; Yu, Ting; Eberly, Joseph H.

    2012-08-15

    We extend the non-Markovian quantum state diffusion (QSD) equation to open quantum systems which exhibit multi-channel coupling to a harmonic oscillator reservoir. Open quantum systems which have multi-channel reservoir coupling are those in which canonical transformation of reservoir modes cannot reduce the number of reservoir operators appearing in the interaction Hamiltonian to one. We show that the non-Markovian QSD equation for multi-channel reservoir coupling can, in some cases, lead to an exact master equation which we derive. We then derive the exact master equation for the three-level system in a vee-type configuration which has multi-channel reservoir coupling and give the analytical solution. Finally, we examine the evolution of the three-level vee-type system with generalized Ornstein-Uhlenbeck reservoir correlations numerically. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The concept of multi-channel vs. single-channel reservoir coupling is rigorously defined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The non-Markovian quantum state diffusion equation for arbitrary multi-channel reservoir coupling is derived. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An exact time-local master equation is derived under certain conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The analytical solution to the three-level system in a vee-type configuration is found. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The evolution of the three-level system under generalized Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise is plotted for many parameter regimes.

  13. Nonequilibrium steady state in open quantum systems: Influence action, stochastic equation and power balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiang, J.-T.; Hu, B. L.

    2015-11-01

    The existence and uniqueness of a steady state for nonequilibrium systems (NESS) is a fundamental subject and a main theme of research in statistical mechanics for decades. For Gaussian systems, such as a chain of classical harmonic oscillators connected at each end to a heat bath, and for classical anharmonic oscillators under specified conditions, definitive answers exist in the form of proven theorems. Answering this question for quantum many-body systems poses a challenge for the present. In this work we address this issue by deriving the stochastic equations for the reduced system with self-consistent backaction from the two baths, calculating the energy flow from one bath to the chain to the other bath, and exhibiting a power balance relation in the total (chain + baths) system which testifies to the existence of a NESS in this system at late times. Its insensitivity to the initial conditions of the chain corroborates to its uniqueness. The functional method we adopt here entails the use of the influence functional, the coarse-grained and stochastic effective actions, from which one can derive the stochastic equations and calculate the average values of physical variables in open quantum systems. This involves both taking the expectation values of quantum operators of the system and the distributional averages of stochastic variables stemming from the coarse-grained environment. This method though formal in appearance is compact and complete. It can also easily accommodate perturbative techniques and diagrammatic methods from field theory. Taken all together it provides a solid platform for carrying out systematic investigations into the nonequilibrium dynamics of open quantum systems and quantum thermodynamics.

  14. Probability-current analysis of energy transport in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, Jan J. J.; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a probability-current analysis of excitation energy transfer between states of an open quantum system. Expressing the energy transfer through currents of excitation probability between the states in a site representation enables us to gain key insights into the energy transfer dynamics. In particular, the analysis yields direct identification of the pathways of energy transport in large networks of sites and quantifies their relative weights, as well as the respective contributions of unitary dynamics, coherence, dephasing, and relaxation and dissipation processes to the energy transfer. It thus provides much more information than studying only excitation probabilities of the states as a function of time. Our analysis is general and can be readily applied to a broad range of dynamical descriptions of open quantum system dynamics with coupling to non-Markovian or Markovian environments.

  15. Application of the theory of open quantum systems to nuclear physics problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Kanokov, Z.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum diffusion equations with transport coefficients explicitly depending on time are derived from the generalized non-Markovian Langevin equations. The asymptotic behavior of the friction and diffusion coefficients is investigated in the case of the FC and RWA couplings between the collective and internal subsystems. An asymptotic expression is obtained for the propagator of the density matrix of the open quantum system with the general quadratic Hamiltonian, linearly coupled (in coordinate and momentum) to internal degrees of freedom. The effect of different sets of transport coefficients on the decoherence and decay rate of the metastable state is investigated using the master equation for the reduced density matrix of open quantum systems. The developed approach is used to study the capture of the projectile nucleus by the target nucleus at energies near the Coulomb barrier. Capture cross sections in asymmetric reactions are well described with allowance for the calculated capture probabilities. Particular cases where dissipation favors penetration through the potential barrier are found. The generalized Kramers formula for the quasi-stationary decay rate of the quantum metastable systems is analytically derived.

  16. Generic features of the dynamics of complex open quantum systems: statistical approach based on averages over the unitary group.

    PubMed

    Gessner, Manuel; Breuer, Heinz-Peter

    2013-04-01

    We obtain exact analytic expressions for a class of functions expressed as integrals over the Haar measure of the unitary group in d dimensions. Based on these general mathematical results, we investigate generic dynamical properties of complex open quantum systems, employing arguments from ensemble theory. We further generalize these results to arbitrary eigenvalue distributions, allowing a detailed comparison of typical regular and chaotic systems with the help of concepts from random matrix theory. To illustrate the physical relevance and the general applicability of our results we present a series of examples related to the fields of open quantum systems and nonequilibrium quantum thermodynamics. These include the effect of initial correlations, the average quantum dynamical maps, the generic dynamics of system-environment pure state entanglement and, finally, the equilibration of generic open and closed quantum systems. PMID:23679393

  17. Identifying a cooperative control mechanism between an applied field and the environment of open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fang; Rey-de-Castro, Roberto; Wang, Yaoxiong; Rabitz, Herschel; Shuang, Feng

    2016-05-01

    Many systems under control with an applied field also interact with the surrounding environment. Understanding the control mechanisms has remained a challenge, especially the role played by the interaction between the field and the environment. In order to address this need, here we expand the scope of the Hamiltonian-encoding and observable-decoding (HE-OD) technique. HE-OD was originally introduced as a theoretical and experimental tool for revealing the mechanism induced by control fields in closed quantum systems. The results of open-system HE-OD analysis presented here provide quantitative mechanistic insights into the roles played by a Markovian environment. Two model open quantum systems are considered for illustration. In these systems, transitions are induced by either an applied field linked to a dipole operator or Lindblad operators coupled to the system. For modest control yields, the HE-OD results clearly show distinct cooperation between the dynamics induced by the optimal field and the environment. Although the HE-OD methodology introduced here is considered in simulations, it has an analogous direct experimental formulation, which we suggest may be applied to open systems in the laboratory to reveal mechanistic insights.

  18. Coherent Dynamics of Open Quantum System in the Presence of Majorana Fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assuncao, Maryzaura O.; Diniz, Ginetom S.; Vernek, Edson; Souza, Fabricio M.

    In recent years the research on quantum coherent dynamics of open systems has attracted great attention due to its relevance for future implementation of quantum computers. In the present study we apply the Kadanoff-Baym formalism to simulate the population dynamics of a double-dot molecular system attached to both a superconductor and fermionic reservoirs. We solve both analytically and numerically a set of coupled differential equations that account for crossed Andreev reflection (CAR), intramolecular hopping and tunneling. We pay particular attention on how Majorana bound states can affect the population dynamics of the molecule. We investigate on how initial state configuration affects the dynamics. For instance, if one dot is occupied and the other one is empty, the dynamics is dictated by the inter dot tunneling. On the other hand, for initially empty dots, the CAR dominates. We also investigate how the source and drain currents evolve in time. This work was supporte by FAPEMIG, CNPq and CAPES.

  19. A Perturbative Method for Nonequilibrium Steady State of Open Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuge, Tatsuro; Sugita, Ayumu

    2015-01-01

    We develop a method of calculating the nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) of an open quantum system that is weakly coupled to reservoirs in different equilibrium states. We describe the system using a Redfield-type quantum master equation (QME). We decompose the Redfield QME into a Lindblad-type QME and the remaining part R. Regarding the steady state of the Lindblad QME as the unperturbed solution, we perform a perturbative calculation with respect to R to obtain the NESS of the Redfield QME. The NESS thus determined is exact up to the first order in the system-reservoir coupling strength (pump/loss rate), which is the same as the order of validity of the QME. An advantage of the proposed method in numerical computation is its applicability to systems larger than those in methods of directly solving the original Redfield QME. We apply the method to a noninteracting fermion system to obtain an analytical expression of the NESS density matrix. We also numerically demonstrate the method in a nonequilibrium quantum spin chain.

  20. Creation of Two-Particle Entanglement in Open Macroscopic Quantum Systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Merkli, M.; Berman, G. P.; Borgonovi, F.; Tsifrinovich, V. I.

    2012-01-01

    We considermore » an open quantum system of N not directly interacting spins (qubits) in contact with both local and collective thermal environments. The qubit-environment interactions are energy conserving. We trace out the variables of the thermal environments and N − 2 qubits to obtain the time-dependent reduced density matrix for two arbitrary qubits. We numerically simulate the reduced dynamics and the creation of entanglement (concurrence) as a function of the parameters of the thermal environments and the number of qubits, N . Our results demonstrate that the two-qubit entanglement generally decreases as N increases. We show analytically that, in the limit N → ∞ , no entanglement can be created. This indicates that collective thermal environments cannot create two-qubit entanglement when many qubits are located within a region of the size of the environment coherence length. We discuss possible relevance of our consideration to recent quantum information devices and biosystems.« less

  1. Thermofield-based chain-mapping approach for open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vega, Inés; Bañuls, Mari-Carmen

    2015-11-01

    We consider a thermofield approach to analyze the evolution of an open quantum system coupled to an environment at finite temperature. In this approach, the finite-temperature environment is exactly mapped onto two virtual environments at zero temperature. These two environments are then unitarily transformed into two different chains of oscillators, leading to a one-dimensional structure that can be numerically studied using tensor network techniques. Compared to previous approaches using a single chain mapping, our strategy offers the advantage of an exact description of the initial state at arbitrary temperatures, which results in a gain in computational efficiency and a reduced truncation error.

  2. Bound states, scattering states, and resonant states in PT -symmetric open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmon, Savannah; Gianfreda, Mariagiovanna; Hatano, Naomichi

    2015-08-01

    We study a simple open quantum system with a PT -symmetric defect potential as a prototype in order to illustrate a number of general features of PT -symmetric open quantum systems; however, the potential itself could be mimicked by a number of PT systems that have been experimentally studied quite recently. One key feature is the resonance in continuum (RIC), which appears in both the discrete spectrum and the scattering spectrum of such systems. The RIC wave function forms a standing wave extending throughout the spatial extent of the system and in this sense represents a resonance between the open environment associated with the leads of our model and the central PT -symmetric potential. We also illustrate that as one deforms the system parameters, the RIC may exit the continuum by splitting into a bound state and a virtual bound state at the band edge, a process which should be experimentally observable. We also study the exceptional points appearing in the discrete spectrum at which two eigenvalues coalesce; we categorize these as either EP2As, at which two real-valued solutions coalesce before becoming complex-valued, and EP2Bs, for which the two solutions are complex on either side of the exceptional point. The EP2As are associated with PT -symmetry breaking; we argue that these are more stable against parameter perturbation than the EP2Bs. We also study complex-valued solutions of the discrete spectrum for which the wave function is nevertheless spatially localized, something that is not allowed in traditional open quantum systems; we illustrate that these may form quasibound states in continuum under some circumstances. We also study the scattering properties of the system, including states that support invisible propagation and some general features of perfect transmission states. We finally use our model as a prototype for the construction of scattering states that satisfy PT -symmetric boundary conditions; while these states do not conserve the traditional probability current, we introduce the PT current which is preserved. The perfect transmission states appear as a special case of the PT -symmetric scattering states.

  3. General Formalism of Decision Making Based on Theory of Open Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, M.; Ohya, M.; Basieva, I.; Khrennikov, A.

    2013-01-01

    We present the general formalism of decision making which is based on the theory of open quantum systems. A person (decision maker), say Alice, is considered as a quantum-like system, i.e., a system which information processing follows the laws of quantum information theory. To make decision, Alice interacts with a huge mental bath. Depending on context of decision making this bath can include her social environment, mass media (TV, newspapers, INTERNET), and memory. Dynamics of an ensemble of such Alices is described by Gorini-Kossakowski-Sudarshan-Lindblad (GKSL) equation. We speculate that in the processes of evolution biosystems (especially human beings) designed such "mental Hamiltonians" and GKSL-operators that any solution of the corresponding GKSL-equation stabilizes to a diagonal density operator (In the basis of decision making.) This limiting density operator describes population in which all superpositions of possible decisions has already been resolved. In principle, this approach can be used for the prediction of the distribution of possible decisions in human populations.

  4. Ultracold Mixtures of Rubidium and Ytterbium for Open Quantum System Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, Creston David

    Exquisite experimental control of quantum systems has led to sharp growth of basic quantum research in recent years. Controlling dissipation has been crucial in producing ultracold, trapped atomic samples. Recent theoretical work has suggested dissipation can be a useful tool for quantum state preparation. Controlling not only how a system interacts with a reservoir, but the ability to engineer the reservoir itself would be a powerful platform for open quantum system research. Toward this end, we have constructed an apparatus to study ultracold mixtures of rubidium (Rb) and ytterbium (Yb). We have developed a Rb-blind optical lattice at 423.018(7) nm, which will enable us to immerse a lattice of Yb atoms (the system) into a Rb BEC (superfluid reservoir). We have produced Bose-Einstein condensates of 170Yb and 174Yb, two of the five bosonic isotopes of Yb, which also has two fermionic isotopes. Flexible optical trapping of Rb and Yb was achieved with a two-color dipole trap of 532 and 1064 nm, and we observed thermalization in ultracold mixtures of Rb and Yb. Using the Rb-blind optical lattice, we measured very small light shifts of 87Rb BECs near the light shift zero-wavelengths adjacent the 6p electronic states, through a coherent series of lattice pulses. The positions of the zero-wavelengths are sensitive to the electric dipole matrix elements between the 5s and 6p states, and we made the first experimental measurement of their strength. By measuring a light shift, we were not sensitive to excited state branching ratios, and we achieved a precision better than 0.3%.

  5. Critical exponent of a quantum-noise-driven phase transition: The open-system Dicke model

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, D.; Szirmai, G.; Domokos, P.

    2011-10-15

    The quantum phase transition of the Dicke model has been observed recently in a system formed by motional excitations of a laser-driven Bose-Einstein condensate coupled to an optical cavity [Baumann et al., Nature (London) 464, 1301 (2010)]. The cavity-based system is intrinsically open: photons leak out of the cavity where they are detected. Even at zero temperature, the continuous weak measurement of the photon number leads to an irreversible dynamics toward a steady state. In the framework of a generalized Bogoliubov theory, we show that the steady state exhibits a dynamical quantum phase transition. We find that the critical point and the mean field are only slightly modified with respect to the phase transition in the ground state. However, the critical exponents of the singular quantum correlations are significantly different in the two cases. There is also a drastic modification of the atom-field entanglement, since the divergence of the logarithmic negativity of the ground state at the critical point is suppressed and a finite entanglement is found in the steady state.

  6. Problem-free time-dependent variational principle for open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert-Doriol, Loïc; Izmaylov, Artur F.

    2015-04-07

    Methods of quantum nuclear wave-function dynamics have become very efficient in simulating large isolated systems using the time-dependent variational principle (TDVP). However, a straightforward extension of the TDVP to the density matrix framework gives rise to methods that do not conserve the energy in the isolated system limit and the total system population for open systems where only energy exchange with environment is allowed. These problems arise when the system density is in a mixed state and is simulated using an incomplete basis. Thus, the basis set incompleteness, which is inevitable in practical calculations, creates artificial channels for energy and population dissipation. To overcome this unphysical behavior, we have introduced a constrained Lagrangian formulation of TDVP applied to a non-stochastic open system Schrödinger equation [L. Joubert-Doriol, I. G. Ryabinkin, and A. F. Izmaylov, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 234112 (2014)]. While our formulation can be applied to any variational ansatz for the system density matrix, derivation of working equations and numerical assessment is done within the variational multiconfiguration Gaussian approach for a two-dimensional linear vibronic coupling model system interacting with a harmonic bath.

  7. Problem-free time-dependent variational principle for open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joubert-Doriol, Loïc; Izmaylov, Artur F.

    2015-04-01

    Methods of quantum nuclear wave-function dynamics have become very efficient in simulating large isolated systems using the time-dependent variational principle (TDVP). However, a straightforward extension of the TDVP to the density matrix framework gives rise to methods that do not conserve the energy in the isolated system limit and the total system population for open systems where only energy exchange with environment is allowed. These problems arise when the system density is in a mixed state and is simulated using an incomplete basis. Thus, the basis set incompleteness, which is inevitable in practical calculations, creates artificial channels for energy and population dissipation. To overcome this unphysical behavior, we have introduced a constrained Lagrangian formulation of TDVP applied to a non-stochastic open system Schrödinger equation [L. Joubert-Doriol, I. G. Ryabinkin, and A. F. Izmaylov, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 234112 (2014)]. While our formulation can be applied to any variational ansatz for the system density matrix, derivation of working equations and numerical assessment is done within the variational multiconfiguration Gaussian approach for a two-dimensional linear vibronic coupling model system interacting with a harmonic bath.

  8. A review of progress in the physics of open quantum systems: theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotter, I.; Bird, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    This report on progress explores recent advances in our theoretical and experimental understanding of the physics of open quantum systems (OQSs). The study of such systems represents a core problem in modern physics that has evolved to assume an unprecedented interdisciplinary character. OQSs consist of some localized, microscopic, region that is coupled to an external environment by means of an appropriate interaction. Examples of such systems may be found in numerous areas of physics, including atomic and nuclear physics, photonics, biophysics, and mesoscopic physics. It is the latter area that provides the main focus of this review, an emphasis that is driven by the capacity that exists to subject mesoscopic devices to unprecedented control. We thus provide a detailed discussion of the behavior of mesoscopic devices (and other OQSs) in terms of the projection-operator formalism, according to which the system under study is considered to be comprised of a localized region (Q), embedded into a well-defined environment (P) of scattering wavefunctions (with Q   +   P   =   1). The Q subspace must be treated using the concepts of non-Hermitian physics, and of particular interest here is: the capacity of the environment to mediate a coupling between the different states of Q; the role played by the presence of exceptional points (EPs) in the spectra of OQSs; the influence of EPs on the rigidity of the wavefunction phases, and; the ability of EPs to initiate a dynamical phase transition (DPT). EPs are singular points in the continuum, at which two resonance states coalesce, that is where they exhibit a non-avoided crossing. DPTs occur when the quantum dynamics of the open system causes transitions between non-analytically connected states, as a function of some external control parameter. Much like conventional phase transitions, the behavior of the system on one side of the DPT does not serve as a reliable indicator of that on the other. In addition to discussing experiments on mesoscopic quantum point contacts that provide evidence of the environmentally-mediated coupling of quantum states, we also review manifestations of DPTs in mesoscopic devices and other systems. These experiments include observations of resonance-trapping behavior in microwave cavities and open quantum dots, phase lapses in tunneling through single-electron transistors, and spin swapping in atomic ensembles. Other possible manifestations of this phenomenon are presented, including various superradiant phenomena in low-dimensional semiconductors. From these discussions a generic picture of OQSs emerges in which the environmentally-mediated coupling between different quantum states plays a critical role in governing the system behavior. The ability to control or manipulate this interaction may even lead to new applications in photonics and electronics.

  9. A review of progress in the physics of open quantum systems: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Rotter, I; Bird, J P

    2015-11-01

    This report on progress explores recent advances in our theoretical and experimental understanding of the physics of open quantum systems (OQSs). The study of such systems represents a core problem in modern physics that has evolved to assume an unprecedented interdisciplinary character. OQSs consist of some localized, microscopic, region that is coupled to an external environment by means of an appropriate interaction. Examples of such systems may be found in numerous areas of physics, including atomic and nuclear physics, photonics, biophysics, and mesoscopic physics. It is the latter area that provides the main focus of this review, an emphasis that is driven by the capacity that exists to subject mesoscopic devices to unprecedented control. We thus provide a detailed discussion of the behavior of mesoscopic devices (and other OQSs) in terms of the projection-operator formalism, according to which the system under study is considered to be comprised of a localized region (Q), embedded into a well-defined environment (P) of scattering wavefunctions (with Q   +   P   =   1). The Q subspace must be treated using the concepts of non-Hermitian physics, and of particular interest here is: the capacity of the environment to mediate a coupling between the different states of Q; the role played by the presence of exceptional points (EPs) in the spectra of OQSs; the influence of EPs on the rigidity of the wavefunction phases, and; the ability of EPs to initiate a dynamical phase transition (DPT). EPs are singular points in the continuum, at which two resonance states coalesce, that is where they exhibit a non-avoided crossing. DPTs occur when the quantum dynamics of the open system causes transitions between non-analytically connected states, as a function of some external control parameter. Much like conventional phase transitions, the behavior of the system on one side of the DPT does not serve as a reliable indicator of that on the other. In addition to discussing experiments on mesoscopic quantum point contacts that provide evidence of the environmentally-mediated coupling of quantum states, we also review manifestations of DPTs in mesoscopic devices and other systems. These experiments include observations of resonance-trapping behavior in microwave cavities and open quantum dots, phase lapses in tunneling through single-electron transistors, and spin swapping in atomic ensembles. Other possible manifestations of this phenomenon are presented, including various superradiant phenomena in low-dimensional semiconductors. From these discussions a generic picture of OQSs emerges in which the environmentally-mediated coupling between different quantum states plays a critical role in governing the system behavior. The ability to control or manipulate this interaction may even lead to new applications in photonics and electronics. PMID:26510115

  10. Lyapunov control on quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L. C.; Yi, X. X.

    2014-12-01

    We review the scheme of quantum Lyapunov control and its applications into quantum systems. After a brief review on the general method of quantum Lyapunov control in closed and open quantum systems, we apply it into controlling quantum states and quantum operations. The control of a spin-1/2 quantum system, driving an open quantum system into its decoherence free subspace (DFS), constructing single qubit and two-qubit logic gates are taken to illustrate the scheme. The optimalization of the Lyapunov control is also reviewed in this article.

  11. The rigorous stochastic matrix multiplication scheme for the calculations of reduced equilibrium density matrices of open multilevel quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xin

    2014-04-21

    Understanding the roles of the temporary and spatial structures of quantum functional noise in open multilevel quantum molecular systems attracts a lot of theoretical interests. I want to establish a rigorous and general framework for functional quantum noises from the constructive and computational perspectives, i.e., how to generate the random trajectories to reproduce the kernel and path ordering of the influence functional with effective Monte Carlo methods for arbitrary spectral densities. This construction approach aims to unify the existing stochastic models to rigorously describe the temporary and spatial structure of Gaussian quantum noises. In this paper, I review the Euclidean imaginary time influence functional and propose the stochastic matrix multiplication scheme to calculate reduced equilibrium density matrices (REDM). In addition, I review and discuss the Feynman-Vernon influence functional according to the Gaussian quadratic integral, particularly its imaginary part which is critical to the rigorous description of the quantum detailed balance. As a result, I establish the conditions under which the influence functional can be interpreted as the average of exponential functional operator over real-valued Gaussian processes for open multilevel quantum systems. I also show the difference between the local and nonlocal phonons within this framework. With the stochastic matrix multiplication scheme, I compare the normalized REDM with the Boltzmann equilibrium distribution for open multilevel quantum systems.

  12. The rigorous stochastic matrix multiplication scheme for the calculations of reduced equilibrium density matrices of open multilevel quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin

    2014-04-01

    Understanding the roles of the temporary and spatial structures of quantum functional noise in open multilevel quantum molecular systems attracts a lot of theoretical interests. I want to establish a rigorous and general framework for functional quantum noises from the constructive and computational perspectives, i.e., how to generate the random trajectories to reproduce the kernel and path ordering of the influence functional with effective Monte Carlo methods for arbitrary spectral densities. This construction approach aims to unify the existing stochastic models to rigorously describe the temporary and spatial structure of Gaussian quantum noises. In this paper, I review the Euclidean imaginary time influence functional and propose the stochastic matrix multiplication scheme to calculate reduced equilibrium density matrices (REDM). In addition, I review and discuss the Feynman-Vernon influence functional according to the Gaussian quadratic integral, particularly its imaginary part which is critical to the rigorous description of the quantum detailed balance. As a result, I establish the conditions under which the influence functional can be interpreted as the average of exponential functional operator over real-valued Gaussian processes for open multilevel quantum systems. I also show the difference between the local and nonlocal phonons within this framework. With the stochastic matrix multiplication scheme, I compare the normalized REDM with the Boltzmann equilibrium distribution for open multilevel quantum systems.

  13. Optimal control of open quantum systems: A combined surrogate Hamiltonian optimal control theory approach applied to photochemistry on surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Asplund, Erik; Kluener, Thorsten

    2012-03-28

    In this paper, control of open quantum systems with emphasis on the control of surface photochemical reactions is presented. A quantum system in a condensed phase undergoes strong dissipative processes. From a theoretical viewpoint, it is important to model such processes in a rigorous way. In this work, the description of open quantum systems is realized within the surrogate Hamiltonian approach [R. Baer and R. Kosloff, J. Chem. Phys. 106, 8862 (1997)]. An efficient and accurate method to find control fields is optimal control theory (OCT) [W. Zhu, J. Botina, and H. Rabitz, J. Chem. Phys. 108, 1953 (1998); Y. Ohtsuki, G. Turinici, and H. Rabitz, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 5509 (2004)]. To gain control of open quantum systems, the surrogate Hamiltonian approach and OCT, with time-dependent targets, are combined. Three open quantum systems are investigated by the combined method, a harmonic oscillator immersed in an ohmic bath, CO adsorbed on a platinum surface, and NO adsorbed on a nickel oxide surface. Throughout this paper, atomic units, i.e., ({Dirac_h}/2{pi})=m{sub e}=e=a{sub 0}= 1, have been used unless otherwise stated.

  14. Quantum theory of open systems based on stochastic differential equations of generalized Langevin (non-Wiener) type

    SciTech Connect

    Basharov, A. M.

    2012-09-15

    It is shown that the effective Hamiltonian representation, as it is formulated in author's papers, serves as a basis for distinguishing, in a broadband environment of an open quantum system, independent noise sources that determine, in terms of the stationary quantum Wiener and Poisson processes in the Markov approximation, the effective Hamiltonian and the equation for the evolution operator of the open system and its environment. General stochastic differential equations of generalized Langevin (non-Wiener) type for the evolution operator and the kinetic equation for the density matrix of an open system are obtained, which allow one to analyze the dynamics of a wide class of localized open systems in the Markov approximation. The main distinctive features of the dynamics of open quantum systems described in this way are the stabilization of excited states with respect to collective processes and an additional frequency shift of the spectrum of the open system. As an illustration of the general approach developed, the photon dynamics in a single-mode cavity without losses on the mirrors is considered, which contains identical intracavity atoms coupled to the external vacuum electromagnetic field. For some atomic densities, the photons of the cavity mode are 'locked' inside the cavity, thus exhibiting a new phenomenon of radiation trapping and non-Wiener dynamics.

  15. Quantum speedup of uncoupled multiqubit open system via dynamical decoupling pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ya-Ju; Kuang, Le-Man; Tan, Qing-Shou

    2016-03-01

    We present a method to accelerate the dynamical evolution of mutltiqubit open system by employing dynamical decoupling pulses (DDPs) when the qubits are initially in W-type states. Here the qubits are independent and coupled to local Lorentzian reservoirs. It is found that this speedup evolution can be achieved in both the weak-coupling regime and the strong-coupling regime. The essential physical mechanism behind the acceleration evolution is explained as a result of the joint action of the non-Markovianity of reservoirs and the excited-state population of qubits. It is shown that both the non-Markovianity and the excited-state population can be controlled by DDPs to realize the quantum speedup.

  16. Limits in the characteristic-function description of non-Lindblad-type open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2005-08-15

    In this paper I investigate the usability of the characteristic functions for the description of the dynamics of open quantum systems focussing on non-Lindblad-type master equations. I consider, as an example, a non-Markovian generalized master equation containing a memory kernel which may lead to nonphysical time evolutions characterized by negative values of the density matrix diagonal elements [S. M. Barnett and S. Stenholm, Phys. Rev. A 64, 033808 (2001)]. The main result of the paper is to demonstrate that there exist situations in which the symmetrically ordered characteristic function is perfectly well-defined while the corresponding density matrix loses positivity. Therefore, nonphysical situations may not show up in the characteristic function. As a consequence, the characteristic function cannot be considered an alternative complete description of the non-Lindblad dynamics.

  17. Casimir force for absorbing media in an open quantum system framework: Scalar model

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, Fernando C.; Rubio Lopez, Adrian E.; Mazzitelli, Francisco D.

    2011-11-15

    In this article we compute the Casimir force between two finite-width mirrors at finite temperature, working in a simplified model in 1+1 dimensions. The mirrors, considered as dissipative media, are modeled by a continuous set of harmonic oscillators which in turn are coupled to an external environment at thermal equilibrium. The calculation of the Casimir force is performed in the framework of the theory of open quantum systems. It is shown that the Casimir interaction has two different contributions: the usual radiation pressure from the vacuum, which is obtained for ideal mirrors without dissipation or losses, and a Langevin force associated with the noise induced by the interaction between dielectric atoms in the slabs and the thermal bath. Both contributions to the Casimir force are needed in order to reproduce the analogous Lifshitz formula in 1+1 dimensions. We also discuss the relationship between the electromagnetic properties of the mirrors and the spectral density of the environment.

  18. Real-time dynamics of open quantum spin systems driven by dissipative processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebenstreit, F.; Banerjee, D.; Hornung, M.; Jiang, F.-J.; Schranz, F.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2015-07-01

    We study the real-time evolution of large open quantum spin systems in two spatial dimensions, whose dynamics is entirely driven by a dissipative coupling to the environment. We consider different dissipative processes and investigate the real-time evolution from an ordered phase of the Heisenberg or XY model towards a disordered phase at late times, disregarding unitary Hamiltonian dynamics. The corresponding Kossakowski-Lindblad equation is solved via an efficient cluster algorithm. We find that the symmetry of the dissipative process determines the time scales, which govern the approach towards a new equilibrium phase at late times. Most notably, we find a slow equilibration if the dissipative process conserves any of the magnetization Fourier modes. In these cases, the dynamics can be interpreted as a diffusion process of the conserved quantity.

  19. Entanglement evolution in the open quantum systems consisting of asymmetric oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshar, Davood; Mehrabankar, Somayeh; Abbasnezhad, Farkhondeh

    2016-03-01

    Using the theory of open quantum systems, we study the entanglement evolution in two and three-mode systems consisting of uncoupled harmonic oscillators which interact with a thermal bath as the environment. The evolution of the system is obtained with the use of the master equation in the Lindblad form with the Markovian approximation. The coherent states of a spinless charged particle in an anisotropic harmonic potential and a uniform magnetic field are considered as the initial states of two and three-mode systems. Then by the use of the positive partial transpose criterion for three-mode system and the logarithmic negativity for two-mode system, the entanglement evolution is obtained as a function of the temperature, dissipation coefficient, magnetic field and asymmetric parameter. In both two and three-mode systems, by increasing the dissipation coefficient and temperature, the entanglement sudden death occurs sooner. Also, for certain values of the magnetic field and asymmetric parameter which depend on the other parameters, the entanglement survives the most.

  20. Quantum Fisher information of an open and noisy system in the steady state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altintas, Azmi Ali

    2016-04-01

    We study the quantum Fisher information (QFI) per particle of an open (particles can enter and leave the system) and dissipative (far from thermodynamical equilibrium) steady state system of two qubits in a noise which is decoherence. We show the behavior of QFI per particle of the system due to changes of reset and decoherence parameters r and γ respectively. The parameter r is the strength of the reset mechanism, γ is the strength of decoherence and in our case it is dephasing channel. The parameters γ and r are real numbers. We observe that the reset parameter must be bigger than decoherence parameter. We have found that by choosing coupling parameter g as 5 γ the QFI per particle is 1.00226 which is greater than shot noise limit at γ = 0.5 and r = 14. Also the concurrence and negativity of the such state have been calculated and they are found as 0.0992486 and 0.0496243 respectively. We have shown that when the concurrence and negativity of some specific states different than zero, which means the state is entangled, the QFI of the system is greater than 1. The QFI per particle, concurrence and negativity shows that the chosen case is weakly entangled. We discovered that the optimal direction depends on the parameters r and γ and a change in the direction affects the behavior of the QFI of the system.

  1. Dynamical Processes in Open Quantum Systems from a TDDFT Perspective: Resonances and Electron Photoemission.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Ask Hjorth; De Giovannini, Umberto; Rubio, Angel

    2016-01-01

    We present a review of different computational methods to describe time-dependent phenomena in open quantum systems and their extension to a density-functional framework. We focus the discussion on electron emission processes in atoms and molecules addressing excited-state lifetimes and dissipative processes. Initially we analyze the concept of an electronic resonance, a central concept in spectroscopy associated with a metastable state from which an electron eventually escapes (electronic lifetime). Resonances play a fundamental role in many time-dependent molecular phenomena but can be rationalized from a time-independent context in terms of scattering states. We introduce the method of complex scaling, which is used to capture resonant states as localized states in the spirit of usual bound-state methods, and work on its extension to static and time-dependent density-functional theory. In a time-dependent setting, complex scaling can be used to describe excitations in the continuum as well as wave packet dynamics leading to electron emission. This process can also be treated by using open boundary conditions which allow time-dependent simulations of emission processes without artificial reflections at the boundaries (i.e., borders of the simulation box). We compare in detail different schemes to implement open boundaries, namely transparent boundaries using Green functions, and absorbing boundaries in the form of complex absorbing potentials and mask functions. The last two are regularly used together with time-dependent density-functional theory to describe the electron emission dynamics of atoms and molecules. Finally, we discuss approaches to the calculation of energy and angle-resolved time-dependent pump-probe photoelectron spectroscopy of molecular systems. PMID:25860253

  2. Remarks on time-dependent [current]-density functional theory for open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Yuen-Zhou, Joel; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2013-08-14

    Time-dependent [current]-density functional theory for open quantum systems (OQS) has emerged as a formalism that can incorporate dissipative effects in the dynamics of many-body quantum systems. Here, we review and clarify some formal aspects of these theories that have been recently questioned in the literature. In particular, we provide theoretical support for the following conclusions: (1) contrary to what we and others had stated before, within the master equation framework, there is in fact a one-to-one mapping between vector potentials and current densities for fixed initial state, particle-particle interaction, and memory kernel; (2) regardless of the first conclusion, all of our recently suggested Kohn-Sham (KS) schemes to reproduce the current and particle densities of the original OQS, and in particular, the use of a KS closed driven system, remains formally valid; (3) the Lindblad master equation maintains the positivity of the density matrix regardless of the time-dependence of the Hamiltonian or the dissipation operators; (4) within the stochastic Schrödinger equation picture, a one-to-one mapping from stochastic vector potential to stochastic current density for individual trajectories has not been proven so far, except in the case where the vector potential is the same for every member of the ensemble, in which case, it reduces to the Lindblad master equation picture; (5) master equations may violate certain desired properties of the density matrix, such as positivity, but they remain as one of the most useful constructs to study OQS when the environment is not easily incorporated explicitly in the calculation. The conclusions support our previous work as formally rigorous, offer new insights into it, and provide a common ground to discuss related theories. PMID:23787804

  3. Time-reversal symmetric resolution of unity without background integrals in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatano, Naomichi; Ordonez, Gonzalo

    2014-12-01

    We present a new complete set of states for a class of open quantum systems, to be used in expansion of the Green's function and the time-evolution operator. A remarkable feature of the complete set is that it observes time-reversal symmetry in the sense that it contains decaying states (resonant states) and growing states (anti-resonant states) parallelly. We can thereby pinpoint the occurrence of the breaking of time-reversal symmetry at the choice of whether we solve Schrödinger equation as an initial-condition problem or a terminal-condition problem. Another feature of the complete set is that in the subspace of the central scattering area of the system, it consists of contributions of all states with point spectra but does not contain any background integrals. In computing the time evolution, we can clearly see contribution of which point spectrum produces which time dependence. In the whole infinite state space, the complete set does contain an integral but it is over unperturbed eigenstates of the environmental area of the system and hence can be calculated analytically. We demonstrate the usefulness of the complete set by computing explicitly the survival probability and the escaping probability as well as the dynamics of wave packets. The origin of each term of matrix elements is clear in our formulation, particularly, the exponential decays due to the resonance poles.

  4. Controlling the Dynamics of an Open Many-Body Quantum System with Localized Dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barontini, G.; Labouvie, R.; Stubenrauch, F.; Vogler, A.; Guarrera, V.; Ott, H.

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally investigate the action of a localized dissipative potential on a macroscopic matter wave, which we implement by shining an electron beam on an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). We measure the losses induced by the dissipative potential as a function of the dissipation strength observing a paradoxical behavior when the strength of the dissipation exceeds a critical limit: for an increase of the dissipation rate the number of atoms lost from the BEC becomes lower. We repeat the experiment for different parameters of the electron beam and we compare our results with a simple theoretical model, finding excellent agreement. By monitoring the dynamics induced by the dissipative defect we identify the mechanisms which are responsible for the observed paradoxical behavior. We finally demonstrate the link between our dissipative dynamics and the measurement of the density distribution of the BEC allowing for a generalized definition of the Zeno effect. Because of the high degree of control on every parameter, our system is a promising candidate for the engineering of fully governable open quantum systems.

  5. Multiple timescale analysis of dynamical evolution near two coalescing eigenvalues in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garmon, Savannah; Ordonez, Gonzalo

    Recently the physics of coalescing eigenvalues at an exceptional point (EP) has been studied in a wide range of physical contexts, including open quantum systems. At an EP N at which N eigenvalues coalesce the Hamiltonian can no longer be diagonalized but instead only reduced to a Jordan block of dimension N. In order to describe the survival probability P (t) for an initially prepared state in the vicinity of two coalescing levels, we further subdivide the EP2 case into the EP2A and EP2B, where the EP2A involves the coalesce of two virtual bound states to form a resonance/anti-resonance pair and the EP2B occurs when two resonances collide to form two new resonances. We show that in the vicinity of the EP2B the usual exponential decay appearing for resonances on intermediate timescales is modified as P (t) ~ te-Γt . However, the long-time evolution near the EP2B follows a 1 /t3 power law decay. Meanwhile the evolution for the EP2A is non-exponential on all timescales, and may be strongly influenced by continuum threshold effects.

  6. QuTiP 2: A Python framework for the dynamics of open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, J. R.; Nation, P. D.; Nori, Franco

    2013-04-01

    We present version 2 of QuTiP, the Quantum Toolbox in Python. Compared to the preceding version [J.R. Johansson, P.D. Nation, F. Nori, Comput. Phys. Commun. 183 (2012) 1760.], we have introduced numerous new features, enhanced performance, and made changes in the Application Programming Interface (API) for improved functionality and consistency within the package, as well as increased compatibility with existing conventions used in other scientific software packages for Python. The most significant new features include efficient solvers for arbitrary time-dependent Hamiltonians and collapse operators, support for the Floquet formalism, and new solvers for Bloch-Redfield and Floquet-Markov master equations. Here we introduce these new features, demonstrate their use, and give a summary of the important backward-incompatible API changes introduced in this version. Catalog identifier: AEMB_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMB_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 33625 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 410064 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Python. Computer: i386, x86-64. Operating system: Linux, Mac OSX. RAM: 2+ Gigabytes Classification: 7. External routines: NumPy, SciPy, Matplotlib, Cython Catalog identifier of previous version: AEMB_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 183 (2012) 1760 Does the new version supercede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Dynamics of open quantum systems Solution method: Numerical solutions to Lindblad, Floquet-Markov, and Bloch-Redfield master equations, as well as the Monte Carlo wave function method. Reasons for new version: Compared to the preceding version we have introduced numerous new features, enhanced performance, and made changes in the Application Programming Interface (API) for improved functionality and consistency within the package, as well as increased compatibility with existing conventions used in other scientific software packages for Python. The most significant new features include efficient solvers for arbitrary time-dependent Hamiltonians and collapse operators, support for the Floquet formalism, and new solvers for Bloch-Redfield and Floquet-Markov master equations. Restrictions: Problems must meet the criteria for using the master equation in Lindblad, Floquet-Markov, or Bloch-Redfield form. Running time: A few seconds up to several tens of hours, depending on size of the underlying Hilbert space.

  7. Connecting two jumplike unravelings for non-Markovian open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Luoma, Kimmo; Suominen, Kalle-Antti; Piilo, Jyrki

    2011-09-15

    The development and use of Monte Carlo algorithms plays a visible role in the study of non-Markovian quantum dynamics due to the provided insight and powerful numerical methods for solving the system dynamics. In the Markovian case, the connections between the various types of methods are fairly well understood while, for the non-Markovian case, there has so far been only a few studies. We focus here on two jumplike unravelings of non-Markovian dynamics: the non-Markovian quantum jump (NMQJ) method and the property state method by Gambetta, Askerud, and Wiseman (GAW). The results for simple quantum optical systems illustrate the connections between the realizations of the two methods and also highlight how the probability currents between the system and environment, or between the property states of the total system, are associated with the decay rates of time-local master equations and, consequently, with the jump rates of the NMQJ method.

  8. Optical signatures of non-Markovian behavior in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCutcheon, Dara P. S.

    2016-02-01

    We derive an extension to the quantum regression theorem which facilitates the calculation of two-time correlation functions and emission spectra for systems undergoing non-Markovian evolution. The derivation exploits projection operator techniques, with which we obtain explicit equations of motion for the correlation functions, making only a second-order expansion in the system-environment coupling strength and invoking the Born approximation at a fixed initial time. The results are used to investigate a driven semiconductor quantum dot coupled to an acoustic phonon bath, where we find the non-Markovian nature of the dynamics has observable signatures in the form of phonon sidebands in the resonance fluorescence emission spectrum. Furthermore, we use recently developed non-Markovianity measures to demonstrate an associated flow of information from the phonon bath back into the quantum dot exciton system.

  9. FeynDyn: A MATLAB program for fast numerical Feynman integral calculations for open quantum system dynamics on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattani, Nikesh S.

    2013-12-01

    This MATLAB program calculates the dynamics of the reduced density matrix of an open quantum system modeled either by the Feynman-Vernon model or the Caldeira-Leggett model. The user gives the program a Hamiltonian matrix that describes the open quantum system as if it were in isolation, a matrix of the same size that describes how that system couples to its environment, and a spectral distribution function and temperature describing the environment’s influence on it, in addition to the open quantum system’s initial density matrix and a grid of times. With this, the program returns the reduced density matrix of the open quantum system at all moments specified by that grid of times (or just the last moment specified by the grid of times if the user makes this choice). This overall calculation can be divided into two stages: the setup of the Feynman integral, and the actual calculation of the Feynman integral for time propagation of the density matrix. When this program calculates this propagation on a multi-core CPU, it is this propagation that is usually the rate-limiting step of the calculation, but when it is calculated on a GPU, the propagation is calculated so quickly that the setup of the Feynman integral can actually become the rate-limiting step. The overhead of transferring information from the CPU to the GPU and back seems to have a negligible effect on the overall runtime of the program. When the required information cannot fit on the GPU, the user can choose to run the entire program on a CPU. Catalogue identifier: AEPX_v1_0. Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEPX_v1_0.html. Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland. Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html. No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 703. No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 11026. Distribution format: tar.gz. Programming language: MATLAB R2012a. Computer: See “Operating system”. Operating system: Any operating system that can run MATLAB R2007a or above. Classification: 4.4. Nature of problem: Calculating the dynamics of the reduced density operator of an open quantum system. Solution method: Numerical Feynman integral. Running time: Depends on the input parameters. See the main text for examples.

  10. Probing the quantum-classical connection with open quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, D. K.; Akis, R.; Brunner, R.

    2015-10-01

    Open quantum dots provide a natural system in which to study both classical and quantum features of transport. From the classical point of view these dots possess a mixed phase space which yields families of closed, regular orbits as well as an expansive sea of chaos. As a closed test bed, they provide a natural system with a very rich set of eigen-states. When coupled to the environment through a pair of quantum point contacts, each of which passes several modes, the original quantum environment evolves into a set of decoherent and coherent states, which eventually couple to the classical states discussed above. The manner of this connection is governed strongly by decoherence theory. The remaining coherent states possess all the properties of pointer states. Here, we discuss the quantum-classical connection and how it appears within the experimental world.

  11. Statistically preferred basis of an open quantum system: its relation to the eigenbasis of a renormalized self-Hamiltonian.

    PubMed

    He, Lewei; Wang, Wen-Ge

    2014-02-01

    We study the problem of the basis of an open quantum system, under a quantum chaotic environment, which is preferred in view of its stationary reduced density matrix (RDM), that is, the basis in which the stationary RDM is diagonal. It is shown that, under an initial condition composed of sufficiently many energy eigenstates of the total system, such a basis is given by the eigenbasis of a renormalized self-Hamiltonian of the system, in the limit of large Hilbert space of the environment. Here, the renormalized self-Hamiltonian is given by the unperturbed self-Hamiltonian plus a certain average of the interaction Hamiltonian over the environmental degrees of freedom. Numerical simulations performed in two models, both with the kicked rotor as the environment, give results consistent with the above analytical predictions. PMID:25353440

  12. Statistically preferred basis of an open quantum system: Its relation to the eigenbasis of a renormalized self-Hamiltonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lewei; Wang, Wen-ge

    2014-02-01

    We study the problem of the basis of an open quantum system, under a quantum chaotic environment, which is preferred in view of its stationary reduced density matrix (RDM), that is, the basis in which the stationary RDM is diagonal. It is shown that, under an initial condition composed of sufficiently many energy eigenstates of the total system, such a basis is given by the eigenbasis of a renormalized self-Hamiltonian of the system, in the limit of large Hilbert space of the environment. Here, the renormalized self-Hamiltonian is given by the unperturbed self-Hamiltonian plus a certain average of the interaction Hamiltonian over the environmental degrees of freedom. Numerical simulations performed in two models, both with the kicked rotor as the environment, give results consistent with the above analytical predictions.

  13. Wigner distribution function and entropy of the damped harmonic oscillator within the theory of the open quantum systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isar, Aurelian

    1995-01-01

    The harmonic oscillator with dissipation is studied within the framework of the Lindblad theory for open quantum systems. By using the Wang-Uhlenbeck method, the Fokker-Planck equation, obtained from the master equation for the density operator, is solved for the Wigner distribution function, subject to either the Gaussian type or the delta-function type of initial conditions. The obtained Wigner functions are two-dimensional Gaussians with different widths. Then a closed expression for the density operator is extracted. The entropy of the system is subsequently calculated and its temporal behavior shows that this quantity relaxes to its equilibrium value.

  14. Demonstration of Jarzynski's equality in open quantum systems using a stepwise pulling protocol.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Van A; Haas, Stephan

    2012-09-01

    We present a generalization of Jarzynski's equality, applicable to quantum systems, that is related to discretized mechanical work and free-energy changes. The theory is based on a stepwise pulling protocol. We find that work distribution functions can be constructed from fluctuations of a reaction coordinate along a reaction pathway in the stepwise pulling protocol. We also propose two sets of equations to determine the two possible optimal pathways that provide the most significant contributions to free-energy changes. We find that the transitions along these most optimal pathways, satisfying both sets of equations, follow the principle of detailed balance. We then test the theory by explicitly computing the free-energy changes for a one-dimensional quantum harmonic oscillator. This approach suggests a feasible way of measuring the fluctuations to experimentally test Jarzynski's equality in many-body systems, such as Bose-Einstein condensates. PMID:23030886

  15. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in an open quantum system: Master equation approach

    SciTech Connect

    Scala, M.; Militello, B.; Messina, A.; Vitanov, N. V.

    2010-05-15

    A master equation approach to the study of environmental effects in the adiabatic population transfer in three-state systems is presented. A systematic comparison with the non-Hermitian Hamiltonian approach [Vitanov and Stenholm, Phys. Rev. A 56, 1463 (1997)] shows that, in the weak-coupling limit, the two treatments lead to essentially the same results. In contrast, in the strong-damping limit the predictions are quite different: In particular, the counterintuitive sequences in the STIRAP scheme turn out to be much more efficient than expected before. This point is explained in terms of quantum Zeno dynamics.

  16. Sufficient condition for the openness of a many-electron quantum system from the violation of a generalized Pauli exclusion principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Romit; Mazziotti, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Information about the interaction of a many-electron quantum system with its environment, we show, is encoded within the one-electron density matrix (1-RDM). While the 1-RDM from an ensemble many-electron quantum system must obey the Pauli exclusion principle, the 1-RDM must obey additional constraints known as generalized Pauli conditions when it corresponds to a closed system describable by a single wave function. By examining the 1-RDM's violation of these generalized Pauli conditions, we obtain a sufficient condition at the level of a single electron for a many-electron quantum system's openness. In an application to exciton dynamics in photosynthetic light harvesting we show that the interaction of the system with the environment (quantum noise) relaxes significant constraints imposed on the exciton dynamics by the generalized Pauli conditions. This relaxation provides a geometric (kinematic) interpretation for the role of noise in enhancing exciton transport in quantum systems.

  17. Master equation and control of an open quantum system with leakage.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lian-Ao; Kurizki, Gershon; Brumer, Paul

    2009-02-27

    Given a multilevel system coupled to a bath, we use a Feshbach P, Q partitioning technique to derive an exact trace-nonpreserving master equation for a subspace S_{i} of the system. The resultant equation properly treats the leakage effect from S_{i} into the remainder of the system space. Focusing on a second-order approximation, we show that a one-dimensional master equation is sufficient to study problems of quantum state storage and is a good approximation, or exact, for several analytical models. It allows a natural definition of a leakage function and its control and provides a general approach to study and control decoherence and leakage. Numerical calculations on an harmonic oscillator coupled to a room temperature harmonic bath show that the leakage can be suppressed by the pulse control technique without requiring ideal pulses. PMID:19257726

  18. Master Equation and Control of an Open Quantum System with Leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Lian-Ao; Kurizki, Gershon; Brumer, Paul

    2009-02-01

    Given a multilevel system coupled to a bath, we use a Feshbach P, Q partitioning technique to derive an exact trace-nonpreserving master equation for a subspace Si of the system. The resultant equation properly treats the leakage effect from Si into the remainder of the system space. Focusing on a second-order approximation, we show that a one-dimensional master equation is sufficient to study problems of quantum state storage and is a good approximation, or exact, for several analytical models. It allows a natural definition of a leakage function and its control and provides a general approach to study and control decoherence and leakage. Numerical calculations on an harmonic oscillator coupled to a room temperature harmonic bath show that the leakage can be suppressed by the pulse control technique without requiring ideal pulses.

  19. Theory of the Decoherence Effect in Finite and Infinite Open Quantum Systems Using the Algebraic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Philippe; Hellmich, Mario; Ługiewicz, Piotr; Olkiewicz, Robert

    Quantum mechanics is the greatest revision of our conception of the character of the physical world since Newton. Consequently, David Hilbert was very interested in quantum mechanics. He and John von Neumann discussed it frequently during von Neumann's residence in Göttingen. He published in 1932 his book Mathematical Foundations of Quantum Mechanics. In Hilbert's opinion it was the first exposition of quantum mechanics in a mathematically rigorous way. The pioneers of quantum mechanics, Heisenberg and Dirac, neither had use for rigorous mathematics nor much interest in it. Conceptually, quantum theory as developed by Bohr and Heisenberg is based on the positivism of Mach as it describes only observable quantities. It first emerged as a result of experimental data in the form of statistical observations of quantum noise, the basic concept of quantum probability.

  20. Simulating open quantum dynamics with time-dependent variational matrix product states: Towards microscopic correlation of environment dynamics and reduced system evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, Florian A. Y. N.; Chin, Alex W.

    2016-02-01

    We report the development of an efficient many-body algorithm for simulating open quantum system dynamics that utilizes a time-dependent variational principle for matrix product states to evolve large system-environment states. Capturing all system-environment correlations, we reproduce the nonperturbative, quantum-critical dynamics of the zero-temperature spin-boson model, and then exploit the many-body information to visualize the complete time-frequency spectrum of the environmental excitations. Our "environmental spectra" reveal correlated vibrational motion in polaronic modes which preserve their vibrational coherence during incoherent spin relaxation, demonstrating how environment information could yield valuable insights into complex quantum dissipative processes.

  1. Investigation of properties of time-dependent bell inequalities in Wigner’s form for nonstationary and open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, N. V. Sotnikov, V.P.; Toms, K. S.

    2015-10-15

    A radically new class of Bell inequalities in Wigner’s form was obtained on the basis of Kolmorov’s axiomatization of probability theory and the hypothesis of locality. These inequalities take explicitly into account the dependence on time (time-dependent Bell inequalities in Wigner’s form). By using these inequalities, one can propose a means for experimentally testing Bohr’ complementarity principle in the relativistic region. The inequalities in question open broad possibilities for studying correlations of nonrelativistic and relativistic quantum systems in external fields. The violation of the time-dependent inequalities in quantum mechanics was studied by considering the behavior of a pair of anticorrelated spins in a constant external magnetic field and oscillations of neutral pseudoscalar mesons. The decay of a pseudoscalar particle to a fermion–antifermion pair is considered within quantum field theory. In order to test experimentally the inequalities proposed in the present study, it is not necessary to perform dedicated noninvasive measurements required in the Leggett–Garg approach, for example.

  2. Nonequilibrium Phase Transition in a Two-Dimensional Driven Open Quantum System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagvadorj, G.; Fellows, J. M.; Matyja?kiewicz, S.; Marchetti, F. M.; Carusotto, I.; Szyma?ska, M. H.

    2015-10-01

    The Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless mechanism, in which a phase transition is mediated by the proliferation of topological defects, governs the critical behavior of a wide range of equilibrium two-dimensional systems with a continuous symmetry, ranging from spin systems to superconducting thin films and two-dimensional Bose fluids, such as liquid helium and ultracold atoms. We show here that this phenomenon is not restricted to thermal equilibrium, rather it survives more generally in a dissipative highly nonequilibrium system driven into a steady state. By considering a quantum fluid of polaritons of an experimentally relevant size, in the so-called optical parametric oscillator regime, we demonstrate that it indeed undergoes a phase transition associated with a vortex binding-unbinding mechanism. Yet, the exponent of the power-law decay of the first-order correlation function in the (algebraically) ordered phase can exceed the equilibrium upper limit: this shows that the ordered phase of driven-dissipative systems can sustain a higher level of collective excitations before the order is destroyed by topological defects. Our work suggests that the macroscopic coherence phenomena, observed recently in interacting two-dimensional light-matter systems, result from a nonequilibrium phase transition of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless rather than the Bose-Einstein condensation type.

  3. The role of interparticle interaction and environmental coupling in a two-particle open quantum system.

    PubMed

    Laguna, Humberto G; Sagar, Robin P; Tempel, David G; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2016-01-01

    The effects of bath coupling on an interacting two-particle quantum system are studied using tools from information theory. Shannon entropies of the one (reduced) and two-particle distribution functions in position, momentum and separable phase-space are examined. Results show that the presence of the bath leads to a delocalization of the distribution functions in position space, and a localization in momentum space. This can be interpreted as a loss of information in position space and a gain of information in momentum space. The entropy sum of the system, in the presence of a bath, is shown to be dependent on the strength of the interparticle potential and also on the strength of the coupling to the bath. The statistical correlation between the particles, and its dependence on the bath and interparticle potential, is examined using mutual information. A stronger repulsive potential between particles, in the presence of the bath, yields a smaller correlation between the particles positions, and a larger one between their momenta. PMID:26616490

  4. Note on entropies for quantum dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Noboru

    2016-05-28

    Quantum entropy and channel are fundamental concepts for quantum information theory progressed recently in various directions. We will review the fundamental aspects of mean entropy and mean mutual entropy and calculate them for open system dynamics. PMID:27091165

  5. A model of epigenetic evolution based on theory of open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Asano, Masanari; Basieva, Irina; Khrennikov, Andrei; Ohya, Masanori; Tanaka, Yoshiharu; Yamato, Ichiro

    2013-12-01

    We present a very general model of epigenetic evolution unifying (neo-)Darwinian and (neo-)Lamarckian viewpoints. The evolution is represented in the form of adaptive dynamics given by the quantum(-like) master equation. This equation describes development of the information state of epigenome under the pressure of an environment. We use the formalism of quantum mechanics in the purely operational framework. (Hence, our model has no direct relation to quantum physical processes inside a cell.) Thus our model is about probabilities for observations which can be done on epigenomes and it does not provide a detailed description of cellular processes. Usage of the operational approach provides a possibility to describe by one model all known types of cellular epigenetic inheritance. PMID:24432153

  6. Perturbative approach to open circuit QED systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Andy C. Y.; Petruccione, Francesco; Koch, Jens

    2014-03-01

    Perturbation theory (PT) is a powerful and commonly used tool in the investigation of closed quantum systems. In the context of open quantum systems, PT based on the Markovian quantum master equation is much less developed. The investigation of open systems mostly relies on exact diagonalization of the Liouville superoperator or quantum trajectories. In this approach, the system size is rather limited by current computational capabilities. Analogous to closed-system PT, we develop a PT suitable for open quantum systems. The proposed method is useful in the analytical understanding of open systems as well as in the numerical calculation of system observables, which would otherwise be impractical. This enables us to investigate a variety of open circuit QED systems, including the open Jaynes-Cummings lattice model.

  7. Generalized Kac lemma for recurrence time in iterated open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinkovicz, P.; Kiss, T.; Asbóth, J. K.

    2016-05-01

    We consider recurrence to the initial state after repeated actions of a quantum channel. After each iteration a projective measurement is applied to check recurrence. The corresponding return time is known to be an integer for the special case of unital channels, including unitary channels. We prove that for a more general class of quantum channels the expected return time can be given as the inverse of the weight of the initial state in the steady state. This statement is a generalization of the Kac lemma for classical Markov chains.

  8. Nitrous Oxide Emission Flux Measurements for Ecological Systems with an Open-Path Quantum Cascade Laser-Based Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, L.; Sun, K.; Cavigelli, M. A.; Gelfand, I.; Zenone, T.; Cui, M.; Miller, D. J.; Khan, M. A.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    The ambient concentration of nitrous oxide (N2O), the fourth most abundant greenhouse gas, is rapidly increasing with emissions from both natural and anthropogenic sources [1]. Soil and aquatic areas are important sources and sinks for N2O due to complicated biogenic processes. However, N2O emissions are poorly constrained in space and time, despite its importance to global climate change and ozone depletion. We report our recent N2O emission measurements with an open-path quantum cascade laser (QCL)-based sensor for ecological systems. The newly emergent QCLs have been used to build compact, sensitive trace gas sensors in the mid-IR spectral region. A compact open-path QCL based sensor was developed to detect atmospheric N2O and CO at ~ 4.5 μm using wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) to achieve a sensitivity of 0.26 ppbv of N2O and 0.24 ppbv of CO in 1 s with a power consumption of ~50 W [2]. This portable sensor system has been used to perform N2O emission flux measurement both with a static flux chamber and on an eddy covariance (EC) flux tower. In the flux chamber measurements, custom chambers were used to host the laser sensor, while gas samples for gas chromatograph (GC) were collected at the same time in the same chamber for validation and comparison. Different soil treatments have been applied in different chambers to study the relationship between N2O emission and the amount of fertilizer (and water) addition. Measurements from two methods agreed with each other (95% or higher confidence interval) for emission flux results, while laser sensor gave measurements with a much high temporal resolution. We have also performed the first open-path eddy covariance N2O flux measurement at Kellogg research station, Michigan State University for a month in June, 2012. Our sensor was placed on a 4-meter tower in a corn field and powered by batteries (connected with solar panels). We have observed the diurnal cycle of N2O flux. During this deployment, an inter-comparison between our sensor and a commercial gas sensor was done to check the sensor's performance. Overall, our sensor showed a good performance with both static chamber measurement and EC flux measurement of N2O. Its open-path, compact and portable design with low power consumption provides lots of advantages for N2O emission flux measurement in the ecological systems. [1] S. A. Montzka, E. J. Dlugokencky, and J. H. Butler, "Non-CO2 greenhouse gases and climate change," Nature 476, 43-50 (2011). [2] L. Tao, K, Sun, D. J. Miller, M. A. Khan and M.A. Zondlo, "Optimizations for simultaneous detection of atmospheric N2O and CO with a quantum cascade laser," CLEO, 2012

  9. Quantum computing Hyper Terahertz Facility opens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Chadha, Kulvinder

    2016-01-01

    A new facility has opened at the University of Surrey to use terahertz radiation for quantum computing. The Hyper Terahertz Facility (HTF) is a joint collaboration between the University of Surrey and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL).

  10. Generalized Open Quantum Walks on Apollonian Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pawela, Łukasz; Gawron, Piotr; Miszczak, Jarosław Adam; Sadowski, Przemysław

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the model of generalized open quantum walks on networks using the Transition Operation Matrices formalism. We focus our analysis on the mean first passage time and the average return time in Apollonian networks. These results differ significantly from a classical walk on these networks. We show a comparison of the classical and quantum behaviour of walks on these networks. PMID:26177452

  11. Mappings of open quantum systems onto chain representations and Markovian embeddings

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, M. P.; Groux, R.; Chin, A. W.; Huelga, S. F.; Plenio, M. B.

    2014-03-15

    We study systems coupled linearly to a bath of oscillators. In an iterative process, the bath is transformed into a chain of oscillators with nearest neighbour interactions. A systematic procedure is provided to obtain the spectral density of the residual bath in each step, and it is shown that under general conditions these data converge. That is, the asymptotic part of the chain is universal, translation invariant with semicircular spectral density. The methods are based on orthogonal polynomials, in which we also solve the outstanding so-called “sequence of secondary measures problem” and give them a physical interpretation.

  12. Open quantum system approach to the modeling of spin recombination reactions.

    PubMed

    Tiersch, M; Steiner, U E; Popescu, S; Briegel, H J

    2012-04-26

    In theories of spin-dependent radical pair reactions, the time evolution of the radical pair, including the effect of the chemical kinetics, is described by a master equation in the Liouville formalism. For the description of the chemical kinetics, a number of possible reaction operators have been formulated in the literature. In this work, we present a framework that allows for a unified description of the various proposed mechanisms and the forms of reaction operators for the spin-selective recombination processes. On the basis of the concept that master equations can be derived from a microscopic description of the spin system interacting with external degrees of freedom, it is possible to gain insight into the underlying microscopic processes and develop a systematic approach toward determining the specific form of the reaction operator in concrete scenarios. PMID:22401141

  13. Order O (1) algorithm for first-principles transient current through open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, King Tai; Yu, Zhizhou; Fu, Bin; Wang, Jian

    First principles transient current through molecular devices is known to be extremely time consuming with typical computational complexity T3N3 where N and T are the dimension of the scattering system and the number of time steps respectively. Various algorithms have been developed which eventually brings the complexity down to cTN3 , a linear scaling in T, where c is a large coefficient comparable to N. Here we provide an order O (1) algorithm that reduces it further to c1N3 +c2 TN2 where c1 and c2 are ~50 and 0.1 respectively. Hence for T < N , the transient calculation is independent of T, thus order O (1) is achieved. To make this happening four important ingredients are essential: (1). availability of exact solution based on non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) that goes beyond wideband limit; (2). the use of complex absorbing potential (CAP) so that all the pole of Green's function can be found; (3). the exact solution is separable between real space and time domain; (4). the exploit of Vandermonde matrix further reduces the scaling of TN2 to TlnTN for T > N . Benchmark calculation has been done on graphene nanoribbons using Tight-binding (TB) Hamiltonian with a huge speed up factor of 100 T , confirmed the O (1) scaling.

  14. Sorting quantum systems efficiently.

    PubMed

    Ionicioiu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the state of a quantum system is a fundamental process in quantum mechanics and plays an essential role in quantum information and quantum technologies. One method to measure a quantum observable is to sort the system in different spatial modes according to the measured value, followed by single-particle detectors on each mode. Examples of quantum sorters are polarizing beam-splitters (PBS) - which direct photons according to their polarization - and Stern-Gerlach devices. Here we propose a general scheme to sort a quantum system according to the value of any d-dimensional degree of freedom, such as spin, orbital angular momentum (OAM), wavelength etc. Our scheme is universal, works at the single-particle level and has a theoretical efficiency of 100%. As an application we design an efficient OAM sorter consisting of a single multi-path interferometer which is suitable for a photonic chip implementation. PMID:27142705

  15. Sorting quantum systems efficiently

    PubMed Central

    Ionicioiu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the state of a quantum system is a fundamental process in quantum mechanics and plays an essential role in quantum information and quantum technologies. One method to measure a quantum observable is to sort the system in different spatial modes according to the measured value, followed by single-particle detectors on each mode. Examples of quantum sorters are polarizing beam-splitters (PBS) – which direct photons according to their polarization – and Stern-Gerlach devices. Here we propose a general scheme to sort a quantum system according to the value of any d-dimensional degree of freedom, such as spin, orbital angular momentum (OAM), wavelength etc. Our scheme is universal, works at the single-particle level and has a theoretical efficiency of 100%. As an application we design an efficient OAM sorter consisting of a single multi-path interferometer which is suitable for a photonic chip implementation. PMID:27142705

  16. An Application of the Theory of Open Quantum Systems to Model the Dynamics of Party Governance in the US Political System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrennikova, Polina; Haven, Emmanuel; Khrennikov, Andrei

    2014-04-01

    The Gorini-Kossakowski-Sudarshan-Lindblad equation allows us to model the process of decision making in US elections. The crucial point we attempt to make is that the voter's mental state can be represented as a superposition of two possible choices for either republicans or democrats. However, reality dictates a more complicated situation: typically a voter participates in two elections, i.e. the congress and the presidential elections. In both elections the voter has to decide between two choices. This very feature of the US election system requires that the mental state is represented by a 2-qubit state corresponding to the superposition of 4 different choices. The main issue is to describe the dynamics of the voters' mental states taking into account the mental and political environment. What is novel in this paper is that we apply the theory of open quantum systems to social science. The quantum master equation describes the resolution of uncertainty (represented in the form of superposition) to a definite choice.

  17. Quantum coherence and correlations in quantum system

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Zhengjun; Li, Yongming; Fan, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Criteria of measure quantifying quantum coherence, a unique property of quantum system, are proposed recently. In this paper, we first give an uncertainty-like expression relating the coherence and the entropy of quantum system. This finding allows us to discuss the relations between the entanglement and the coherence. Further, we discuss in detail the relations among the coherence, the discord and the deficit in the bipartite quantum system. We show that, the one-way quantum deficit is equal to the sum between quantum discord and the relative entropy of coherence of measured subsystem. PMID:26094795

  18. Communication: Satisfying fermionic statistics in the modeling of open time-dependent quantum systems with one-electron reduced density matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head-Marsden, Kade; Mazziotti, David A.

    2015-02-01

    For an open, time-dependent quantum system, Lindblad derived the most general modification of the quantum Liouville equation in the Markovian approximation that models environmental effects while preserving the non-negativity of the system's density matrix. While Lindblad's modification is correct for N-electron density matrices, solution of the Liouville equation with a Lindblad operator causes the one-electron reduced density matrix (1-RDM) to violate the Pauli exclusion principle. Consequently, after a short time, the 1-RDM is not representable by an ensemble N-electron density matrix (not ensemble N-representable). In this communication, we derive the necessary and sufficient constraints on the Lindbladian matrix within the Lindblad operator to ensure that the 1-RDM remains N-representable for all time. The theory is illustrated by considering the relaxation of an excitation in several molecules F2, N2, CO, and BeH2 subject to environmental noise.

  19. Communication: satisfying fermionic statistics in the modeling of open time-dependent quantum systems with one-electron reduced density matrices.

    PubMed

    Head-Marsden, Kade; Mazziotti, David A

    2015-02-01

    For an open, time-dependent quantum system, Lindblad derived the most general modification of the quantum Liouville equation in the Markovian approximation that models environmental effects while preserving the non-negativity of the system's density matrix. While Lindblad's modification is correct for N-electron density matrices, solution of the Liouville equation with a Lindblad operator causes the one-electron reduced density matrix (1-RDM) to violate the Pauli exclusion principle. Consequently, after a short time, the 1-RDM is not representable by an ensemble N-electron density matrix (not ensemble N-representable). In this communication, we derive the necessary and sufficient constraints on the Lindbladian matrix within the Lindblad operator to ensure that the 1-RDM remains N-representable for all time. The theory is illustrated by considering the relaxation of an excitation in several molecules F2, N2, CO, and BeH2 subject to environmental noise. PMID:25662627

  20. Theory of open quantum systems with bath of electrons and phonons and spins: Many-dissipaton density matrixes approach

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, YiJing

    2014-02-07

    This work establishes a strongly correlated system-and-bath dynamics theory, the many-dissipaton density operators formalism. It puts forward a quasi-particle picture for environmental influences. This picture unifies the physical descriptions and algebraic treatments on three distinct classes of quantum environments, electron bath, phonon bath, and two-level spin or exciton bath, as their participating in quantum dissipation processes. Dynamical variables for theoretical description are no longer just the reduced density matrix for system, but remarkably also those for quasi-particles of bath. The present theoretical formalism offers efficient and accurate means for the study of steady-state (nonequilibrium and equilibrium) and real-time dynamical properties of both systems and hybridizing environments. It further provides universal evaluations, exact in principle, on various correlation functions, including even those of environmental degrees of freedom in coupling with systems. Induced environmental dynamics could be reflected directly in experimentally measurable quantities, such as Fano resonances and quantum transport current shot noise statistics.

  1. Quantum electromechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milburn, Gerard J.; Polkinghorne, Rodney

    2001-11-01

    We discuss the conditions under which electromechanical systems, fabricated on a sub micron scale, require a quantum description. We illustrate the discussion with the example of a mechanical electroscope for which the resonant frequency of a cantilever changes in response to a local charge. We show how such devices may be used as a quantum noise limited apparatus for detection of a single charge or spin with applications to quantum computing.

  2. Open quantum reaction-diffusion dynamics: Absorbing states and relaxation.

    PubMed

    van Horssen, Merlijn; Garrahan, Juan P

    2015-03-01

    We consider an extension of classical stochastic reaction-diffusion (RD) dynamics to open quantum systems. We study a class of models of hard-core particles on a one-dimensional lattice whose dynamics is generated by a quantum master operator. Particle hopping is coherent while reactions, such as pair annihilation or pair coalescence, are dissipative. These are quantum open generalizations of the A+A→⌀ and A+A→A classical RD models. We characterize the relaxation of the state towards the stationary regime via a decomposition of the system Hilbert space into transient and recurrent subspaces. We provide a complete classification of the structure of the recurrent subspace (and the nonequilibrium steady states) in terms of the dark states associated to the quantum master operator and its general spectral properties. We also show that, in one dimension, relaxation towards these absorbing dark states is slower than that predicted by a mean-field analysis due to fluctuation effects, in analogy with what occurs in classical RD systems. Numerical simulations of small systems suggest that the decay of the density in one dimension, in both the open quantum A+A→⌀ and A+A→A systems, behaves asymptotically as t-b with 1/2

  3. Central limit theorem for reducible and irreducible open quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadowski, Przemysław; Pawela, Łukasz

    2016-04-01

    In this work we aim at proving central limit theorems for open quantum walks on {{Z}}^d . We study the case when there are various classes of vertices in the network. In particular, we investigate two ways of distributing the vertex classes in the network. First, we assign the classes in a regular pattern. Secondly, we assign each vertex a random class with a transition invariant distribution. For each way of distributing vertex classes, we obtain an appropriate central limit theorem, illustrated by numerical examples. These theorems may have application in the study of complex systems in quantum biology and dissipative quantum computation.

  4. Microscopic derivation of open quantum Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruccione, Francesco; Sinayskiy, Ilya; UKZN Team

    2015-03-01

    Recently a model of open quantum Brownian motion (OQBM) [M. Bauer, D. Bernard, A. Tilloy, Phys. Rev. A 88 (2013) 062340] was introduced as a scaling limit of Open Quantum Walks (OQWs) [S. Attal, F. Petruccione, C. Sabot, I. Sinayskiy, J. Stat. Phys. 147 (20120 832]. OQBM is a new type of quantum Brownian motion where the dynamics of the Brownian particle not only depends on the interactions with a thermal environment, but also depends on the state of the internal degrees of freedom of the Brownian particle. Here, we present the microscopic derivation of the OQBM for a Brownian particle with two internal degrees of freedom. Examples of the dynamics for initial Gaussian and non-Gaussian distributions are presented. This work is based upon research supported by the South African Research Chair Initiative of the Department of Science and Technology and National Research Foundation.

  5. Quantum Measurement of a Single System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alter, Orly; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2001-06-01

    A groundbreaking look at the nature of quantum mechanics With new technologies permitting the observation and manipulation of single quantum systems, the quantum theory of measurement is fast becoming a subject of experimental investigation in laboratories worldwide. This original new work addresses open fundamental questions in quantum mechanics in light of these experimental developments. Using a novel analytical approach developed by the authors, Quantum Measurement of a Single System provides answers to three long-standing questions that have been debated by such thinkers as Bohr, Einstein, Heisenberg, and Schrodinger. It establishes the quantum theoretical limits to information obtained in the measurement of a single system on the quantum wavefunction of the system, the time evolution of the quantum observables associated with the system, and the classical potentials or forces which shape this time evolution. The technological relevance of the theory is also demonstrated through examples from atomic physics, quantum optics, and mesoscopic physics. Suitable for professionals, students, or readers with a general interest in quantum mechanics, the book features recent formulations as well as humorous illustrations of the basic concepts of quantum measurement. Researchers in physics and engineering will find Quantum Measurement of a Single System a timely guide to one of the most stimulating fields of science today.

  6. Quantum Dynamics in Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Sangwoo

    In the first part of this dissertation, recent efforts to understand quantum mechanical effects in biological systems are discussed. Especially, long-lived quantum coherences observed during the electronic energy transfer process in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex at physiological condition are studied extensively using theories of open quantum systems. In addition to the usual master equation based approaches, the effect of the protein structure is investigated in atomistic detail through the combined application of quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics simulations. To evaluate the thermalized reduced density matrix, a path-integral Monte Carlo method with a novel importance sampling approach is developed for excitons coupled to an arbitrary phonon bath at a finite temperature. In the second part of the thesis, simulations of molecular systems and applications to vibrational spectra are discussed. First, the quantum dynamics of a molecule is simulated by combining semiclassical initial value representation and density funcitonal theory with analytic derivatives. A computationally-tractable approximation to the sum-of-states formalism of Raman spectra is subsequently discussed.

  7. On Quantum Integrable Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Danilov, Viatcheslav; Nagaitsev, Sergei; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    Many quantum integrable systems are obtained using an accelerator physics technique known as Ermakov (or normalized variables) transformation. This technique was used to create classical nonlinear integrable lattices for accelerators and nonlinear integrable plasma traps. Now, all classical results are carried over to a nonrelativistic quantum case. In this paper we have described an extension of the Ermakov-like transformation to the Schroedinger and Pauli equations. It is shown that these newly found transformations create a vast variety of time dependent quantum equations that can be solved in analytic functions, or, at least, can be reduced to time-independent ones.

  8. Control of Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, John W.; Lucarelli, Dennis G.; Tarn, Tzyh-Jong

    2002-12-01

    A quantum system subject to external fields is said to be controllable if these fields can be adjusted to guide the state vector to a desired destination in the state space of the system. Fundamental results on controllability are reviewed against the background of recent ideas and advances in two seemingly disparate endeavours: (i) laser control of chemical reactions and (ii) quantum computation. Using Lie-algebraic methods, sufficient conditions have been derived for global controllability on a finite-dimensional manifold of an infinite-dimensional Hilbert space, in the case that the Hamiltonian and control operators, possibly unbounded, possess a common dense domain of analytic vectors. Some simple examples are presented. A synergism between quantum control and quantum computation is creating a host of exciting new opportunities for both activities. The impact of these developments on computational many-body theory could be profound.

  9. Open-path quantum cascade laser-based system for simultaneous remote sensing of methane, nitrous oxide, and water vapor using chirped-pulse differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Paulo; Diaz, Adrian; Thomas, Benjamin; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2015-10-01

    Methane and Nitrous Oxide are long-lived greenhouse gases in the atmosphere with significant global warming effects. We report on application of chirped-pulsed quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) to simultaneous measurements of these trace gases in both open-path fence-line and backscatter systems. The intra-pulse thermal frequency chip in a QCL can be time resolved and calibrated to allow for high resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy over the spectral window of the chip, which for a DFB-QCL can be reach ~2cm-1 for a 500 nsec pulse. The spectral line-shape of the output from these lasers are highly stable from pulse to pulse over long period of time (> 1 day), and the system does not require frequent calibrations.

  10. Quantum degenerate systems

    SciTech Connect

    Micheli, Fiorenza de; Zanelli, Jorge

    2012-10-15

    A degenerate dynamical system is characterized by a symplectic structure whose rank is not constant throughout phase space. Its phase space is divided into causally disconnected, nonoverlapping regions in each of which the rank of the symplectic matrix is constant, and there are no classical orbits connecting two different regions. Here the question of whether this classical disconnectedness survives quantization is addressed. Our conclusion is that in irreducible degenerate systems-in which the degeneracy cannot be eliminated by redefining variables in the action-the disconnectedness is maintained in the quantum theory: there is no quantum tunnelling across degeneracy surfaces. This shows that the degeneracy surfaces are boundaries separating distinct physical systems, not only classically, but in the quantum realm as well. The relevance of this feature for gravitation and Chern-Simons theories in higher dimensions cannot be overstated.

  11. Open quantum dots—probing the quantum to classical transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, D. K.; Burke, A. M.; Akis, R.; Brunner, R.; Day, T. E.; Meisels, R.; Kuchar, F.; Bird, J. P.; Bennett, B. R.

    2011-04-01

    Quantum dots provide a natural system in which to study both quantum and classical features of transport. As a closed testbed, they provide a natural system with a very rich set of eigenstates. When coupled to the environment through a pair of quantum point contacts, each of which passes several modes, the original quantum environment evolves into a set of decoherent and coherent states, which classically would compose a mixed phase space. The manner of this breakup is governed strongly by Zurek's decoherence theory, and the remaining coherent states possess all the properties of his pointer states. These states are naturally studied via traditional magnetotransport at low temperatures. More recently, we have used scanning gate (conductance) microscopy to probe the nature of the coherent states, and have shown that families of states exist through the spectrum in a manner consistent with quantum Darwinism. In this review, we discuss the nature of the various states, how they are formed, and the signatures that appear in magnetotransport and general conductance studies.

  12. Equilibration and thermalization in finite quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, V. I.

    2011-07-01

    Experiments with trapped atomic gases have opened novel possibilities for studying the evolution of nonequilibrium finite quantum systems, which revived the necessity of reconsidering and developing the theory of such processes. This review analyzes the basic approaches to describing the phenomena of equilibration, thermalization, and decoherence in finite quantum systems. Isolated, nonisolated, and quasi-isolated quantum systems are considered. The relations between equilibration, decoherence, and the existence of time arrow are emphasized. The possibility for the occurrence of rare events, preventing complete equilibration, are mentioned.

  13. Rapid Swept-Wavelength External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser for Open Path Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Brumfield, Brian E.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2015-07-01

    A rapidly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser system is used for open path sensing. The system permits acquisition of transient absorption spectra over a 125 cm-1 tuning range in less than 0.01 s.

  14. Biorthogonal quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Curtright, Thomas; Mezincescu, Luca

    2007-09-15

    Models of PT symmetric quantum mechanics provide examples of biorthogonal quantum systems. The latter incorporate all the structure of PT symmetric models, and allow for generalizations, especially in situations where the PT construction of the dual space fails. The formalism is illustrated by a few exact results for models of the form H=(p+{nu}){sup 2}+{sigma}{sub k>0}{mu}{sub k} exp(ikx). In some nontrivial cases, equivalent Hermitian theories are obtained and shown to be very simple: They are just free (chiral) particles. Field theory extensions are briefly considered.

  15. Response to ``Comment on `Indications of energetic consequences of decoherence at short times for scattering from open quantum systems''' [AIP Advances 1, 049101 (2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzidimitriou-Dreismann, C. A.; Gray, E. MacA.; Blach, T. P.

    2011-12-01

    The Comment by Mayers and Reiter criticizes our work on two counts. Firstly, it is claimed that the quantum decoherence effects that we report in consequence of our experimental analysis of neutron Compton scattering from H in gaseous H2 are not, as we maintain, outside the framework of conventional neutron scattering theory. Secondly, it is claimed that we did not really observe such effects, owing to a faulty analysis of the experimental data, which are claimed to be in agreement with conventional theory. We focus in this response on the critical issue of the reliability of our experimental results and analysis. Using the same standard Vesuvio instrument programs used by Mayers et al., we show that, if the experimental results for H in gaseous H2 are in agreement with conventional theory, then those for D in gaseous D2 obtained in the same way cannot be, and vice-versa. We expose a flaw in the calibration methodology used by Mayers et al. that leads to the present disagreement over the behaviour of H, namely the ad hoc adjustment of the measured H peak positions in TOF during the calibration of Vesuvio so that agreement is obtained with the expectation of conventional theory. We briefly address the question of the necessity to apply the theory of open quantum systems.

  16. Communication: Satisfying fermionic statistics in the modeling of open time-dependent quantum systems with one-electron reduced density matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Head-Marsden, Kade; Mazziotti, David A.

    2015-02-07

    For an open, time-dependent quantum system, Lindblad derived the most general modification of the quantum Liouville equation in the Markovian approximation that models environmental effects while preserving the non-negativity of the system’s density matrix. While Lindblad’s modification is correct for N-electron density matrices, solution of the Liouville equation with a Lindblad operator causes the one-electron reduced density matrix (1-RDM) to violate the Pauli exclusion principle. Consequently, after a short time, the 1-RDM is not representable by an ensemble N-electron density matrix (not ensemble N-representable). In this communication, we derive the necessary and sufficient constraints on the Lindbladian matrix within the Lindblad operator to ensure that the 1-RDM remains N-representable for all time. The theory is illustrated by considering the relaxation of an excitation in several molecules F{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO, and BeH{sub 2} subject to environmental noise.

  17. Universal Control of Decoupled Quantum Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Viola, Lorenza; Lloyd, Seth; Knill, Emanuel

    1999-12-06

    We show that if one can perform a restricted set of fast manipulations on a quantum system, one can implement a large class of dynamical evolutions by effectively removing or introducing selected Hamiltonians. The procedure can be used to achieve universal noise-tolerant control based on purely unitary open-loop transformations of the dynamics. As a result, it is in principle possible to perform noise-protected universal quantum computation using no extra space resources. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  18. Hybrid Quantum Systems with Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, David

    2012-02-01

    Quantum Information Processing presents daunting challenges, with competing requirements of fast manipulation, long storage, and long distance transport of fragile quantum states. In aggregate, many of the challenges quantum computation have been met with nanosecond manipulations (quantum circuits), coherence times measured in seconds (atomic ions/nuclear spins), and entanglement transported over kilometers (linear optics), yet thus far no system has achieved all of the necessary components simultaneously. One promising direction is to leverage the best aspects of each system in a hybrid system, much as is done in a conventional computer, where transistors provide fast processing, magnetic memory provides massive long term storage, and information is transmitted via microwaves or fiber optics. A review of the constituent quantum systems, and the types of couplings between them will be presented. The coupling of a superconducting cavity/qubit system to electrons floating on helium will be discussed as an example of how to construct a hybrid system. Recent results on trapping and detection of electrons on helium using a superconducting cavity will be presented.

  19. Global solutions of restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock theory from semidefinite programming with applications to strongly correlated quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Veeraraghavan, Srikant; Mazziotti, David A

    2014-03-28

    We present a density matrix approach for computing global solutions of restricted open-shell Hartree-Fock theory, based on semidefinite programming (SDP), that gives upper and lower bounds on the Hartree-Fock energy of quantum systems. While wave function approaches to Hartree-Fock theory yield an upper bound to the Hartree-Fock energy, we derive a semidefinite relaxation of Hartree-Fock theory that yields a rigorous lower bound on the Hartree-Fock energy. We also develop an upper-bound algorithm in which Hartree-Fock theory is cast as a SDP with a nonconvex constraint on the rank of the matrix variable. Equality of the upper- and lower-bound energies guarantees that the computed solution is the globally optimal solution of Hartree-Fock theory. The work extends a previously presented method for closed-shell systems [S. Veeraraghavan and D. A. Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. A 89, 010502-R (2014)]. For strongly correlated systems the SDP approach provides an alternative to the locally optimized Hartree-Fock energies and densities with a certificate of global optimality. Applications are made to the potential energy curves of C2, CN, Cr2, and NO2. PMID:24697423

  20. Quantum game theory and open access publishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanauske, Matthias; Bernius, Steffen; Dugall, Berndt

    2007-08-01

    The digital revolution of the information age and in particular the sweeping changes of scientific communication brought about by computing and novel communication technology, potentiate global, high grade scientific information for free. The arXiv, for example, is the leading scientific communication platform, mainly for mathematics and physics, where everyone in the world has free access on. While in some scientific disciplines the open access way is successfully realized, other disciplines (e.g. humanities and social sciences) dwell on the traditional path, even though many scientists belonging to these communities approve the open access principle. In this paper we try to explain these different publication patterns by using a game theoretical approach. Based on the assumption, that the main goal of scientists is the maximization of their reputation, we model different possible game settings, namely a zero sum game, the prisoners’ dilemma case and a version of the stag hunt game, that show the dilemma of scientists belonging to “non-open access communities”. From an individual perspective, they have no incentive to deviate from the Nash equilibrium of traditional publishing. By extending the model using the quantum game theory approach it can be shown, that if the strength of entanglement exceeds a certain value, the scientists will overcome the dilemma and terminate to publish only traditionally in all three settings.

  1. Momentum Distribution as a Fingerprint of Quantum Delocalization in Enzymatic Reactions: Open-Chain Path-Integral Simulations of Model Systems and the Hydride Transfer in Dihydrofolate Reductase.

    PubMed

    Engel, Hamutal; Doron, Dvir; Kohen, Amnon; Major, Dan Thomas

    2012-04-10

    The inclusion of nuclear quantum effects such as zero-point energy and tunneling is of great importance in studying condensed phase chemical reactions involving the transfer of protons, hydrogen atoms, and hydride ions. In the current work, we derive an efficient quantum simulation approach for the computation of the momentum distribution in condensed phase chemical reactions. The method is based on a quantum-classical approach wherein quantum and classical simulations are performed separately. The classical simulations use standard sampling techniques, whereas the quantum simulations employ an open polymer chain path integral formulation which is computed using an efficient Monte Carlo staging algorithm. The approach is validated by applying it to a one-dimensional harmonic oscillator and symmetric double-well potential. Subsequently, the method is applied to the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) catalyzed reduction of 7,8-dihydrofolate by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate hydride (NADPH) to yield S-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate and NADP(+). The key chemical step in the catalytic cycle of DHFR involves a stereospecific hydride transfer. In order to estimate the amount of quantum delocalization, we compute the position and momentum distributions for the transferring hydride ion in the reactant state (RS) and transition state (TS) using a recently developed hybrid semiempirical quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics potential energy surface. Additionally, we examine the effect of compression of the donor-acceptor distance (DAD) in the TS on the momentum distribution. The present results suggest differential quantum delocalization in the RS and TS, as well as reduced tunneling upon DAD compression. PMID:26596739

  2. Classical transients and the support of open quantum maps.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Gabriel G; Wisniacki, D A; Ermann, Leonardo; Benito, R M; Borondo, F

    2013-01-01

    The basic ingredients in a semiclassical theory are the classical invariant objects serving as a support for quantization. Recent studies, mainly obtained on quantum maps, have led to the commonly accepted belief that the classical repeller-the set of nonescaping orbits in the future and past evolution-is the object that suitably plays this role in open scattering systems. In this paper we present numerical evidence warning that this may not always be the case. For this purpose we study recently introduced families of tribaker maps [L. Ermann, G. G. Carlo, J. M. Pedrosa, and M. Saraceno, Phys. Rev. E 85, 066204 (2012)], which share the same asymptotic properties but differ in their short-time behavior. We have found that although the eigenvalue distribution of the evolution operator of these maps follows the fractal Weyl law prediction, the theory of short periodic orbits for open maps fails to describe the resonance eigenfunctions of some of them. This is a strong indication that new elements must be included in the semiclassical description of open quantum systems. We provide an interpretation of the results in order to have hints about them. PMID:23410406

  3. Open system environment procurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Gary

    1994-01-01

    Relationships between the request for procurement (RFP) process and open system environment (OSE) standards are described. A guide was prepared to help Federal agency personnel overcome problems in writing an adequate statement of work and developing realistic evaluation criteria when transitioning to an OSE. The guide contains appropriate decision points and transition strategies for developing applications that are affordable, scalable and interoperable across a broad range of computing environments. While useful, the guide does not eliminate the requirement that agencies posses in-depth expertise in software development, communications, and database technology in order to evaluate open systems.

  4. Darwinism in quantum systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, A.; Toor, A. H.

    2002-03-01

    We investigate the role of quantum mechanical effects in the central stability concept of evolutionary game theory, i.e., an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS). Using two and three-player symmetric quantum games we show how the presence of quantum phenomenon of entanglement can be crucial to decide the course of evolutionary dynamics in a population of interacting individuals.

  5. Open systems and databases

    SciTech Connect

    Martire, G.S. ); Nuttall, D.J.H. )

    1993-05-01

    This paper is part of a series of papers invited by the IEEE POWER CONTROL CENTER WORKING GROUP concerning the changing designs of modern control centers. Papers invited by the Working Group discuss the following issues: Benefits of Openness, Criteria for Evaluating Open EMS Systems, Hardware Design, Configuration Management, Security, Project Management, Databases, SCADA, Inter- and Intra-System Communications and Man-Machine Interfaces,'' The goal of this paper is to provide an introduction to the issues pertaining to Open Systems and Databases.'' The intent is to assist understanding of some of the underlying factors that effect choices that must be made when selecting a database system for use in a control room environment. This paper describes and compares the major database information models which are in common use for database systems and provides an overview of SQL. A case for the control center community to follow the workings of the non-formal standards bodies is presented along with possible uses and the benefits of commercially available databases within the control center. The reasons behind the emergence of industry supported standards organizations such as the Open Software Foundation (OSF) and SQL Access are presented.

  6. Open Systems Interconnection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denenberg, Ray

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the need for standards allowing computer-to-computer communication and gives examples of technical issues. The seven-layer framework of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) Reference Model is explained and illustrated. Sidebars feature public data networks and Recommendation X.25, OSI standards, OSI layer functions, and a glossary.…

  7. Open architecture CNC system

    SciTech Connect

    Tal, J.; Lopez, A.; Edwards, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    In this paper, an alternative solution to the traditional CNC machine tool controller has been introduced. Software and hardware modules have been described and their incorporation in a CNC control system has been outlined. This type of CNC machine tool controller demonstrates that technology is accessible and can be readily implemented into an open architecture machine tool controller. Benefit to the user is greater controller flexibility, while being economically achievable. PC based, motion as well as non-motion features will provide flexibility through a Windows environment. Up-grading this type of controller system through software revisions will keep the machine tool in a competitive state with minimal effort. Software and hardware modules are mass produced permitting competitive procurement and incorporation. Open architecture CNC systems provide diagnostics thus enhancing maintainability, and machine tool up-time. A major concern of traditional CNC systems has been operator training time. Training time can be greatly minimized by making use of Windows environment features.

  8. Classical command of quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, Ben W; Unger, Falk; Vazirani, Umesh

    2013-04-25

    Quantum computation and cryptography both involve scenarios in which a user interacts with an imperfectly modelled or 'untrusted' system. It is therefore of fundamental and practical interest to devise tests that reveal whether the system is behaving as instructed. In 1969, Clauser, Horne, Shimony and Holt proposed an experimental test that can be passed by a quantum-mechanical system but not by a system restricted to classical physics. Here we extend this test to enable the characterization of a large quantum system. We describe a scheme that can be used to determine the initial state and to classically command the system to evolve according to desired dynamics. The bipartite system is treated as two black boxes, with no assumptions about their inner workings except that they obey quantum physics. The scheme works even if the system is explicitly designed to undermine it; any misbehaviour is detected. Among its applications, our scheme makes it possible to test whether a claimed quantum computer is truly quantum. It also advances towards a goal of quantum cryptography: namely, the use of 'untrusted' devices to establish a shared random key, with security based on the validity of quantum physics. PMID:23619692

  9. Quantum Effects in Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sisir

    2014-07-01

    The debates about the trivial and non-trivial effects in biological systems have drawn much attention during the last decade or so. What might these non-trivial sorts of quantum effects be? There is no consensus so far among the physicists and biologists regarding the meaning of "non-trivial quantum effects". However, there is no doubt about the implications of the challenging research into quantum effects relevant to biology such as coherent excitations of biomolecules and photosynthesis, quantum tunneling of protons, van der Waals forces, ultrafast dynamics through conical intersections, and phonon-assisted electron tunneling as the basis for our sense of smell, environment assisted transport of ions and entanglement in ion channels, role of quantum vacuum in consciousness. Several authors have discussed the non-trivial quantum effects and classified them into four broad categories: (a) Quantum life principle; (b) Quantum computing in the brain; (c) Quantum computing in genetics; and (d) Quantum consciousness. First, I will review the above developments. I will then discuss in detail the ion transport in the ion channel and the relevance of quantum theory in brain function. The ion transport in the ion channel plays a key role in information processing by the brain.

  10. Quantum technologies with hybrid systems.

    PubMed

    Kurizki, Gershon; Bertet, Patrice; Kubo, Yuimaru; Mølmer, Klaus; Petrosyan, David; Rabl, Peter; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2015-03-31

    An extensively pursued current direction of research in physics aims at the development of practical technologies that exploit the effects of quantum mechanics. As part of this ongoing effort, devices for quantum information processing, secure communication, and high-precision sensing are being implemented with diverse systems, ranging from photons, atoms, and spins to mesoscopic superconducting and nanomechanical structures. Their physical properties make some of these systems better suited than others for specific tasks; thus, photons are well suited for transmitting quantum information, weakly interacting spins can serve as long-lived quantum memories, and superconducting elements can rapidly process information encoded in their quantum states. A central goal of the envisaged quantum technologies is to develop devices that can simultaneously perform several of these tasks, namely, reliably store, process, and transmit quantum information. Hybrid quantum systems composed of different physical components with complementary functionalities may provide precisely such multitasking capabilities. This article reviews some of the driving theoretical ideas and first experimental realizations of hybrid quantum systems and the opportunities and challenges they present and offers a glance at the near- and long-term perspectives of this fascinating and rapidly expanding field. PMID:25737558

  11. Quantum technologies with hybrid systems

    PubMed Central

    Kurizki, Gershon; Bertet, Patrice; Kubo, Yuimaru; Mølmer, Klaus; Petrosyan, David; Rabl, Peter; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    An extensively pursued current direction of research in physics aims at the development of practical technologies that exploit the effects of quantum mechanics. As part of this ongoing effort, devices for quantum information processing, secure communication, and high-precision sensing are being implemented with diverse systems, ranging from photons, atoms, and spins to mesoscopic superconducting and nanomechanical structures. Their physical properties make some of these systems better suited than others for specific tasks; thus, photons are well suited for transmitting quantum information, weakly interacting spins can serve as long-lived quantum memories, and superconducting elements can rapidly process information encoded in their quantum states. A central goal of the envisaged quantum technologies is to develop devices that can simultaneously perform several of these tasks, namely, reliably store, process, and transmit quantum information. Hybrid quantum systems composed of different physical components with complementary functionalities may provide precisely such multitasking capabilities. This article reviews some of the driving theoretical ideas and first experimental realizations of hybrid quantum systems and the opportunities and challenges they present and offers a glance at the near- and long-term perspectives of this fascinating and rapidly expanding field. PMID:25737558

  12. A secure open system?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, James A.

    1993-08-01

    The notion of a large distributed computing system in support of a program like EOSDIS, carries with it the requirement that the system provide the user with guarantees about the integrity of the data and certain assurances about the security of the network of computing systems. This paper examines the challenges of providing a `secure' open system and how these challenges may be addressed from both an architectural as well as functional viewpoint. The role of discretionary access control, mandatory access control, and detection and control of computer viruses is discussed. It has often been observed that the role of the security engineer is one of restricting access to data, whereas the role of the system architect, of an open system that is encouraging research, should make data easy to obtain and utilize. This paradox is manifest in a system such a EOSDIS where to be useful, the systems data must be easy to obtain, but to ensure the integrity of the data it must exercise some level of security. This paper address the use and role of the Security Services of the OSF Distributed Computing Environment in support of networked applications, such as those that may be used in the implementation of the EOS Science Network. It further examines the role of mandatory access control mechanisms to provide data integrity guarantees. The paper further discusses how a system like EOSDIS may prevent computer viruses using a system of automated detection mechanisms and configuration control.

  13. Energy Cost of Controlling Mesoscopic Quantum Systems.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Jordan M; Jacobs, Kurt

    2015-09-25

    We determine the minimum energy required to control the evolution of any mesoscopic quantum system in the presence of arbitrary Markovian noise processes. This result provides the mesoscopic equivalent of the fundamental cost of refrigeration, sets the minimum power consumption of mesoscopic devices that operate out of equilibrium, and allows one to calculate the efficiency of any control protocol, whether it be open-loop or feedback control. As examples, we calculate the energy cost of maintaining a qubit in the ground state and the efficiency of resolved-sideband cooling of nano-mechanical resonators, and discuss the energy cost of quantum information processing. PMID:26451540

  14. Energy Cost of Controlling Mesoscopic Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Jordan M.; Jacobs, Kurt

    2015-09-01

    We determine the minimum energy required to control the evolution of any mesoscopic quantum system in the presence of arbitrary Markovian noise processes. This result provides the mesoscopic equivalent of the fundamental cost of refrigeration, sets the minimum power consumption of mesoscopic devices that operate out of equilibrium, and allows one to calculate the efficiency of any control protocol, whether it be open-loop or feedback control. As examples, we calculate the energy cost of maintaining a qubit in the ground state and the efficiency of resolved-sideband cooling of nano-mechanical resonators, and discuss the energy cost of quantum information processing.

  15. Quantum models of classical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hj?ek, P.

    2015-07-01

    Quantum statistical methods that are commonly used for the derivation of classical thermodynamic properties are extended to classical mechanical properties. The usual assumption that every real motion of a classical mechanical system is represented by a sharp trajectory is not testable and is replaced by a class of fuzzy models, the so-called maximum entropy (ME) packets. The fuzzier are the compared classical and quantum ME packets, the better seems to be the match between their dynamical trajectories. Classical and quantum models of a stiff rod will be constructed to illustrate the resulting unified quantum theory of thermodynamic and mechanical properties.

  16. Decoherence in infinite quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, Philippe; Hellmich, Mario

    2012-09-01

    We review and discuss a notion of decoherence formulated in the algebraic framework of quantum physics. Besides presenting some sufficient conditions for the appearance of decoherence in the case of Markovian time evolutions we provide an overview over possible decoherence scenarios. The framework for decoherence we establish is sufficiently general to accommodate quantum systems with infinitely many degrees of freedom.

  17. Heat bath algorithmic cooling using electron-nuclear spin ensemble in the solid state: characterization of the open quantum system control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyungdeock; Darabad, Robabeh; Feng, Guanru; Labruyere, Stephane; Baugh, Jonathan; Laflamme, Raymond

    2015-03-01

    The ability to perform multiple rounds of Quantum Error Correction (QEC) is an essential task for scalable quantum information processing, but experimental realizations of it are still in their infancy. Key requirements for QEC are high control fidelity and the ability to extract entropy from ancilla qubits. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) quantum processors have demonstrated high control fidelity with up to 12 qubits. A remaining challenge is to prepare nearly pure ancilla qubits to enable QEC. Heat Bath Algorithmic Cooling (HBAC) is an efficient tool for extracting entropy from qubits that interact with a heat bath, allowing cooling below the bath temperature. For implementing HBAC with spins, a hyperfine coupled electron-nuclear system in a single crystal is more advantageous than conventional NMR systems since the electron, with higher polarization and faster relaxation, can act as a heat bath. We characterize 3 and 5 qubit spin systems in gamma-irradiated malonic acid and present simulation and experimental results of HBAC to benchmark our quantum control. Two control schemes are compared: electron nuclear double resonance and indirect control of nuclei via the anisotropic hyperfine interaction.

  18. Naval open systems architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guertin, Nick; Womble, Brian; Haskell, Virginia

    2013-05-01

    For the past 8 years, the Navy has been working on transforming the acquisition practices of the Navy and Marine Corps toward Open Systems Architectures to open up our business, gain competitive advantage, improve warfighter performance, speed innovation to the fleet and deliver superior capability to the warfighter within a shrinking budget1. Why should Industry care? They should care because we in Government want the best Industry has to offer. Industry is in the business of pushing technology to greater and greater capabilities through innovation. Examples of innovations are on full display at this conference, such as exploring the impact of difficult environmental conditions on technical performance. Industry is creating the tools which will continue to give the Navy and Marine Corps important tactical advantages over our adversaries.

  19. Experimental test of Jarzynski equality in a quasi-open quantum using a trapped ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yao; An, Shuoming; Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Jing-Ning; Quan, H. T.; Smith, A. M.; Jarzynski, Christopher; Kim, Kihwan

    2015-05-01

    We report on an experimental test of the Jarzynski equality in a quantum system consisting of a single 171Yb+ ion that undergoes dephasing. The Jarzynski equality, which relates equilibrium free energy differences to nonequilibrium work distributions, has been tested in many classical open systems and recently in isolated quantum systems. For open quantum systems, however, the definitions of work and heat are not fully settled, which hinders experimental verification. Here, we study a quantum system that interacts with an environment which causes dephasing (or decoherence) without dissipation. We observe that although the work distribution varies with the strength of dephasing, the Jarzynski equality remains valid. Our investigation constitutes the first experimental test of the quantum Jarzynski equality in an effectively open quantum system. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China under Grants No. 2011CBA00300 (No. 2011CBA00301), the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grants No. 11374178 and 11375012, and the US National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR 1206971.

  20. Periodic Scarred States in Open Quantum Dots as Evidence of Quantum Darwinism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, A. M.; Akis, R.; Day, T. E.; Speyer, Gil; Ferry, D. K.; Bennett, B. R.

    2010-04-01

    Scanning gate microscopy (SGM) is used to image scar structures in an open quantum dot, which is created in an InAs quantum well by electron-beam lithography and wet etching. The scanned images demonstrate periodicities in magnetic field that correlate to those found in the conductance fluctuations. Simulations have shown that these magnetic transform images bear a strong resemblance to actual scars found in the dot that replicate through the modes in direct agreement with quantum Darwinism.

  1. Periodic scarred States in open quantum dots as evidence of quantum Darwinism.

    PubMed

    Burke, A M; Akis, R; Day, T E; Speyer, Gil; Ferry, D K; Bennett, B R

    2010-04-30

    Scanning gate microscopy (SGM) is used to image scar structures in an open quantum dot, which is created in an InAs quantum well by electron-beam lithography and wet etching. The scanned images demonstrate periodicities in magnetic field that correlate to those found in the conductance fluctuations. Simulations have shown that these magnetic transform images bear a strong resemblance to actual scars found in the dot that replicate through the modes in direct agreement with quantum Darwinism. PMID:20482124

  2. Approximation, Proof Systems, and Correlations in a Quantum World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharibian, Sevag

    2013-01-01

    This thesis studies three topics in quantum computation and information: The approximability of quantum problems, quantum proof systems, and non-classical correlations in quantum systems. In the first area, we demonstrate a polynomial-time (classical) approximation algorithm for dense instances of the canonical QMA-complete quantum constraint satisfaction problem, the local Hamiltonian problem. In the opposite direction, we next introduce a quantum generalization of the polynomial-time hierarchy, and define problems which we prove are not only complete for the second level of this hierarchy, but are in fact hard to approximate. In the second area, we study variants of the interesting and stubbornly open question of whether a quantum proof system with multiple unentangled quantum provers is equal in expressive power to a proof system with a single quantum prover. Our results concern classes such as BellQMA(poly), and include a novel proof of perfect parallel repetition for SepQMA(m) based on cone programming duality. In the third area, we study non-classical quantum correlations beyond entanglement, often dubbed "non-classicality". Among our results are two novel schemes for quantifying non-classicality: The first proposes the new paradigm of exploiting local unitary operations to study non-classical correlations, and the second introduces a protocol through which non-classical correlations in a starting system can be "activated" into distillable entanglement with an ancilla system. An introduction to all required linear algebra and quantum mechanics is included.

  3. Quantum hacking: attacking practical quantum key distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Bing; Fung, Chi-Hang Fred; Zhao, Yi; Ma, Xiongfeng; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Chen, Christine; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2007-09-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) can, in principle, provide unconditional security based on the fundamental laws of physics. Unfortunately, a practical QKD system may contain overlooked imperfections and violate some of the assumptions in a security proof. Here, we report two types of eavesdropping attacks against a practical QKD system. The first one is "time-shift" attack, which is applicable to QKD systems with gated single photon detectors (SPDs). In this attack, the eavesdropper, Eve, exploits the time mismatch between the open windows of the two SPDs. She can acquire a significant amount of information on the final key by simply shifting the quantum signals forwards or backwards in time domain. Our experimental results in [9] with a commercial QKD system demonstrate that, under this attack, the original QKD system is breakable. This is the first experimental demonstration of a feasible attack against a commercial QKD system. This is a surprising result. The second one is "phase-remapping" attack [10]. Here, Eve exploits the fact that a practical phase modulator has a finite response time. In principle, Eve could change the encoded phase value by time-shifting the signal pulse relative to the reference pulse.

  4. Optimal quantum parameter estimation in a pulsed quantum optomechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiang; Yao, Yao; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    We propose that a pulsed quantum optomechanical system can be applied to the problem of quantum parameter estimation, which targets yielding a higher precision of parameter estimation utilizing quantum resources than using classical methods. Concentrating mainly on the quantum Fisher information with respect to the mechanical frequency, we find that the corresponding precision of parameter estimation for the mechanical frequency can be enhanced by applying applicable optical resonant pulsed driving to the cavity of the optomechanical system. Further investigation shows that the mechanical squeezing resulting from the optical pulsed driving is the quantum resource used in optimal quantum estimation of the frequency.

  5. Rapid readout of a register of qubits using open-loop quantum control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, Joshua; Denney, Aaron; Wiseman, Howard M.

    2015-02-01

    Measurements are a primitive for characterizing quantum systems. Reducing the time taken to perform a measurement may be beneficial in many areas of quantum information processing. We show that permuting the eigenvalues of the state matrix in the logical basis, using open-loop control, provides an O (n ) reduction in the measurement time, where n is the number of qubits in the register. This reduction is of the same order as the (previously introduced) locally optimal feedback protocol. The advantage of the open-loop protocol is that it is far less difficult experimentally. Because the control commutes with the measured observable at all times, our rapid measurement protocol could be used for characterizing a quantum system, by state or process tomography, or to implement measurement-based quantum error correction.

  6. Quantum statistics of overlapping modes in open resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Hackenbroich, Gregor; Viviescas, Carlos; Haake, Fritz

    2003-12-01

    We study the quantum dynamics of optical fields in weakly confining resonators with overlapping modes. Employing a recently developed quantization scheme involving a discrete set of resonator modes and continua of external modes we derive Langevin equations and a master equation for the resonator modes. Langevin dynamics and the master equation are proved to be equivalent in the Markovian limit. Our open-resonator dynamics may be used as a starting point for a quantum theory of random lasers.

  7. Geodesic paths for quantum many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomka, Michael; Souza, Tiago; Rosenberg, Steve; Kolodrubetz, Michael; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    The quantum length is a distance between parameter-dependent eigenstates of an adiabatically driven quantum system. Its associated metric has many intriguing properties, for example it is related to the fidelity susceptibility, an important quantity in the study of quantum phase transitions. The metric also appears as the leading adiabatic correction of the energy fluctuations of a quantum system and gives rise to a time-energy uncertainty principle and a geometric interpretation of time. The adiabatic response of an open quantum system can as well be expressed through this metric. Further, the quantum length introduces the notion of Riemannian geometry to the manifold of eigenstates and hence allows one to define geodesics in parameter space. We study the geodesics in parameter space of certain quantum many-body systems, emerging from this quantum distance. These geodesic paths provide a well-defined optimal control protocol on how to drive the system's parameters in time, to get from one eigenstate to another. Generating optimal evolution plays a central role in quantum information technology, adiabatic quantum computing and quantum metrology. Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF).

  8. Quantum walk public-key cryptographic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachou, C.; Rodrigues, J.; Mateus, P.; Paunković, N.; Souto, A.

    2015-12-01

    Quantum Cryptography is a rapidly developing field of research that benefits from the properties of Quantum Mechanics in performing cryptographic tasks. Quantum walks are a powerful model for quantum computation and very promising for quantum information processing. In this paper, we present a quantum public-key cryptographic system based on quantum walks. In particular, in the proposed protocol the public-key is given by a quantum state generated by performing a quantum walk. We show that the protocol is secure and analyze the complexity of public key generation and encryption/decryption procedures.

  9. Quantum energy teleportation in a quantum Hall system

    SciTech Connect

    Yusa, Go; Izumida, Wataru; Hotta, Masahiro

    2011-09-15

    We propose an experimental method for a quantum protocol termed quantum energy teleportation (QET), which allows energy transportation to a remote location without physical carriers. Using a quantum Hall system as a realistic model, we discuss the physical significance of QET and estimate the order of energy gain using reasonable experimental parameters.

  10. Universal Braess paradox in open quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, A L R; Bazeia, D; Ramos, J G G S

    2014-10-01

    We present analytical and numerical results that demonstrate the presence of the Braess paradox in chaotic quantum dots. The paradox that we identify, originally perceived in classical networks, shows that the addition of more capacity to the network can suppress the current flow in the universal regime. We investigate the weak localization term, showing that it presents the paradox encoded in a saturation minimum of the conductance, under the presence of hyperflow in the external leads. In addition, we demonstrate that the weak localization suffers a transition signal depending on the overcapacity lead and presents an echo on the magnetic crossover before going to zero due to the full time-reversal symmetry breaking. We also show that the quantum interference contribution can dominate the Ohm term in the presence of constrictions and that the corresponding Fano factor engenders an anomalous behavior. PMID:25375575

  11. Universal Braess paradox in open quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, A. L. R.; Bazeia, D.; Ramos, J. G. G. S.

    2014-10-01

    We present analytical and numerical results that demonstrate the presence of the Braess paradox in chaotic quantum dots. The paradox that we identify, originally perceived in classical networks, shows that the addition of more capacity to the network can suppress the current flow in the universal regime. We investigate the weak localization term, showing that it presents the paradox encoded in a saturation minimum of the conductance, under the presence of hyperflow in the external leads. In addition, we demonstrate that the weak localization suffers a transition signal depending on the overcapacity lead and presents an echo on the magnetic crossover before going to zero due to the full time-reversal symmetry breaking. We also show that the quantum interference contribution can dominate the Ohm term in the presence of constrictions and that the corresponding Fano factor engenders an anomalous behavior.

  12. The classical skeleton of open quantum chaotic maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raviola, Lisandro A.; Rivas, Alejandro M. F.; Carlo, Gabriel G.

    2011-11-01

    We have studied two complementary decoherence measures, purity and fidelity, for a generic diffusive noise in two different chaotic systems (the baker map and the cat map). For both quantities, we have found classical structures in quantum mechanics-the scar functions-that are specially stable when subjected to environmental perturbations. We show that these quantum states constructed on classical invariants are the most robust significant quantum distributions in generic dissipative maps.

  13. Averaging in SU(2) open quantum random walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clement, Ampadu

    2014-03-01

    We study the average position and the symmetry of the distribution in the SU(2) open quantum random walk (OQRW). We show that the average position in the central limit theorem (CLT) is non-uniform compared with the average position in the non-CLT. The symmetry of distribution is shown to be even in the CLT.

  14. Opening up three quantum boxes causes classically undetectable wavefunction collapse

    PubMed Central

    George, Richard E.; Robledo, Lucio M.; Maroney, Owen J. E.; Blok, Machiel S.; Bernien, Hannes; Markham, Matthew L.; Twitchen, Daniel J.; Morton, John J. L.; Briggs, G. Andrew D.; Hanson, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    One of the most striking features of quantum mechanics is the profound effect exerted by measurements alone. Sophisticated quantum control is now available in several experimental systems, exposing discrepancies between quantum and classical mechanics whenever measurement induces disturbance of the interrogated system. In practice, such discrepancies may frequently be explained as the back-action required by quantum mechanics adding quantum noise to a classical signal. Here, we implement the “three-box” quantum game [Aharonov Y, et al. (1991) J Phys A Math Gen 24(10):2315–2328] by using state-of-the-art control and measurement of the nitrogen vacancy center in diamond. In this protocol, the back-action of quantum measurements adds no detectable disturbance to the classical description of the game. Quantum and classical mechanics then make contradictory predictions for the same experimental procedure; however, classical observers are unable to invoke measurement-induced disturbance to explain the discrepancy. We quantify the residual disturbance of our measurements and obtain data that rule out any classical model by ≳7.8 standard deviations, allowing us to exclude the property of macroscopic state definiteness from our system. Our experiment is then equivalent to the test of quantum noncontextuality [Kochen S, Specker E (1967) J Math Mech 17(1):59–87] that successfully addresses the measurement detectability loophole. PMID:23412336

  15. The quantum Hall effect in quantum dot systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltukov, Y. M.; Greshnov, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    It is proposed to use quantum dots in order to increase the temperatures suitable for observation of the integer quantum Hall effect. A simple estimation using Fock-Darwin spectrum of a quantum dot shows that good part of carriers localized in quantum dots generate the intervals of plateaus robust against elevated temperatures. Numerical calculations employing local trigonometric basis and highly efficient kernel polynomial method adopted for computing the Hall conductivity reveal that quantum dots may enhance peak temperature for the effect by an order of magnitude, possibly above 77 K. Requirements to potentials, quality and arrangement of the quantum dots essential for practical realization of such enhancement are indicated. Comparison of our theoretical results with the quantum Hall measurements in InAs quantum dot systems from two experimental groups is also given.

  16. OpenSM Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, T. A.

    2015-04-17

    The OpenSM Monitoring System includes a collection of diagnostic and monitoring tools for use on Infiniband networks. The information this system gathers is obtained from a service, which in turn is obtained directly from the OpenSM subnet manager.

  17. Quantum Indeterminacy of Cosmic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Craig J.

    2013-12-30

    It is shown that quantum uncertainty of motion in systems controlled mainly by gravity generally grows with orbital timescale $H^{-1}$, and dominates classical motion for trajectories separated by distances less than $\\approx H^{-3/5}$ in Planck units. For example, the cosmological metric today becomes indeterminate at macroscopic separations, $H_0^{-3/5}\\approx 60$ meters. Estimates suggest that entangled non-localized quantum states of geometry and matter may significantly affect fluctuations during inflation, and connect the scale of dark energy to that of strong interactions.

  18. Open Systems: A Second Opinion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, James

    1987-01-01

    Describes the advantages of the development of open systems, i.e., a configuration which combines software and hardware from separate vendors into a single system, as a means of increasing the possible applications of library automation. (CLB)

  19. Classical and quantum correlative capacities of quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Li Nan; Luo Shunlong

    2011-10-15

    How strongly can one system be correlated with another? In the classical world, this basic question concerning correlative capacity has a very satisfying answer: The ''effective size'' of the marginal system, as quantified by the Shannon entropy, sets a tight upper bound to the correlations, as quantified by the mutual information. Although in the quantum world bipartite correlations, like their classical counterparts, are also well quantified by mutual information, the similarity ends here: The correlations in a bipartite quantum system can be twice as large as the marginal entropy. In the paradigm of quantum discord, the correlations are split into classical and quantum components, and it was conjectured that both the classical and quantum correlations are (like the classical mutual information) bounded above by each subsystem's entropy. In this work, by exploiting the interplay between entanglement of formation, mutual information, and quantum discord, we disprove that conjecture. We further indicate a scheme to restore harmony between quantum and classical correlative capacities. The results illustrate dramatically the asymmetric nature of quantum discord and highlight some subtle and unusual features of quantum correlations.

  20. Open quantum random walks: Bistability on pure states and ballistically induced diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Michel; Bernard, Denis; Tilloy, Antoine

    2013-12-01

    Open quantum random walks (OQRWs) deal with quantum random motions on a line for systems with internal and orbital degrees of freedom. The internal system behaves as a quantum random gyroscope coding for the direction of the orbital moves. We reveal the existence of a transition, depending on OQRW moduli, in the internal system behaviors from simple oscillations to random flips between two unstable pure states. This induces a transition in the orbital motions from the usual diffusion to ballistically induced diffusion with a large mean free path and large effective diffusion constant at large times. We also show that mixed states of the internal system are converted into random pure states during the process. We touch upon possible experimental realizations.

  1. Quantum dissipation theory and applications to quantum transport and quantum measurement in mesoscopic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ping

    The thesis comprises two major themes of quantum statistical dynamics. One is the development of quantum dissipation theory (QDT). It covers the establishment of some basic relations of quantum statistical dynamics, the construction of several nonequivalent complete second-order formulations, and the development of exact QDT. Another is related to the applications of quantum statistical dynamics to a variety of research fields. In particular, unconventional but novel theories of the electron transfer in Debye solvents, quantum transport, and quantum measurement are developed on the basis of QDT formulations. The thesis is organized as follows. In Chapter 1, we present some background knowledge in relation to the aforementioned two themes of this thesis. The key quantity in QDT is the reduced density operator rho(t) ≡ trBrho T(t); i.e., the partial trace of the total system and bath composite rhoT(t) over the bath degrees of freedom. QDT governs the evolution of reduced density operator, where the effects of bath are treated in a quantum statistical manner. In principle, the reduced density operator contains all dynamics information of interest. However, the conventional quantum transport theory is formulated in terms of nonequilibrium Green's function. The newly emerging field of quantum measurement in relation to quantum information and quantum computing does exploit a sort of QDT formalism. Besides the background of the relevant theoretical development, some representative experiments on molecular nanojunctions are also briefly discussed. In chapter 2, we outline some basic (including new) relations that highlight several important issues on QDT. The content includes the background of nonequilibrium quantum statistical mechanics, the general description of the total composite Hamiltonian with stochastic system-bath interaction, a novel parameterization scheme for bath correlation functions, a newly developed exact theory of driven Brownian oscillator (DBO) systems, and its closely related solvation mode transformation of system-bath coupling Hamiltonian in general. The exact QDT of DBO systems is also used to clarify the validity of conventional QDT formulations that involve Markovian approximation. In Chapter 3, we develop three nonequivalent but all complete second-order QDT (CS-QDT) formulations. Two of them are of the conventional prescriptions in terms of time-local dissipation and memory kernel, respectively. The third one is called the correlated driving-dissipation equations of motion (CODDE). This novel CS-QDT combines the merits of the former two for its advantages in both the application and numerical implementation aspects. Also highlighted is the importance of correlated driving-dissipation effects on the dynamics of the reduced system. In Chapter 4, we construct an exact QDT formalism via the calculus on path integrals. The new theory aims at the efficient evaluation of non-Markovian dissipation beyond the weak system-bath interaction regime in the presence of time-dependent external field. By adopting exponential-like expansions for bath correlation function, hierarchical equations of motion formalism and continued fraction Liouville-space Green's function formalism are established. The latter will soon be used together with the Dyson equation technique for an efficient evaluation of non-perturbative reduced density matrix dynamics. The interplay between system-bath interaction strength, non-Markovian property, and the required level of hierarchy is also studied with the aid of simple spin-boson systems, together with the three proposed schemes to truncate the infinite hierarchy. In Chapter 5, we develop a nonperturbative theory of electron transfer (ET) in Debye solvents. The resulting exact and analytical rate expression is constructed on the basis of the aforementioned continued fraction Liouville-space Green's function formalism, together with the Dyson equation technique. Not only does it recover the celebrated Marcus' inversion and Kramers' turnover behaviors, the new theory also shows some distinct quantum solvation effects that can alter the ET mechanism. Moreover, the present theory predicts further for the ET reaction thermodynamics, such as equilibrium Gibbs free-energy and entropy, some interesting solvent-dependent features that are calling for experimental verification. In Chapter 6, we discuss the constructed QDTs, in terms of their unified mathematical structure that supports a linear dynamics space, and thus facilitates their applications to various physical problems. The involving details are exemplified with the CODDE form of QDT. As the linear space is concerned, we identify the Schrodinger versus Heisenberg picture and the forward versus backward propagation of the reduced, dissipative Liouville dynamics. For applications we discuss the reduced linear response theory and the optimal control problems, in which the correlated effects of non-Markovian dissipation and field driving are shown to be important. In Chapter 7, we turn to quantum transport, i.e., electric current through molecular or mesoscopic systems under finite applied voltage. By viewing the nonequilibrium transport setup as a quantum open system, we develop a reduced-density-matrix approach to quantum transport. The resulting current is explicitly expressed in terms of the molecular reduced density matrix by tracing out the degrees of freedom of the electrodes at finite bias and temperature. We propose a conditional quantum master equation theory, which is an extension of the conventional (or unconditional) QDT by tracing out the well-defined bath subsets individually, instead of the entire bath degrees of freedom. Both the current and the noise spectrum can be conveniently analyzed in terms of the conditional reduced density matrix dynamics. By far, the QDT (including the conditional one) has only been exploited in second-order form. A self-consistent Born approximation for the system-electrode coupling is further proposed to recover all existing nonlinear current-voltage behaviors including the nonequilibrium Kondo effect. Transport theory based on the exact QDT formalism will be developed in future. In Chapter 8, we study the quantum measurement of a qubit with a quantum-point-contact detector. On the basis of a unified quantum master equation (a form of QDT), we study the measurement-induced relaxation and dephasing of the qubit. Our treatment pays particular attention on the detailed-balance relation, which is a consequence of properly accounting for the energy exchange between the qubit and detector during the measurement process. We also derive a conditional quantum master equation for quantum measurement in general, and study the readout characteristics of the qubit measurement. Our theory is applicable to the quantum measurement at arbitrary voltage and temperature. A number of remarkable new features are found and highlighted in concern with their possible relevance to future experiments. In Chapter 9, we discuss the further development of QDT, aiming at an efficient evaluation of many-electron systems. This will be carried out by reducing the many-particle (Fermion or Boson) QDT to a single-particle one by exploring, e.g. the Wick's contraction theorem. It also results in a time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) for transport through complex large-scale (e.g. molecules) systems. Primary results of the TDDFT-QDT are reported. In Chapter 10, we summary the thesis, and comment and remark on the future work on both the theoretical and application aspects of QDT.

  2. Supersymmetric biorthogonal quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Curtright, Thomas; Mezincescu, Luca; Schuster, David

    2007-09-15

    We discuss supersymmetric biorthogonal systems, with emphasis given to the periodic solutions that occur at spectral singularities of PT symmetric models. For these periodic solutions, the dual functions are associated polynomials that obey inhomogeneous equations. We construct in detail some explicit examples for the supersymmetric pairs of potentials V{sub {+-}}(z)=-U(z){sup 2}{+-}z(d/dz)U(z) where U(z){identical_to}{sigma}{sub k>0}{upsilon}{sub k}z{sup k}. In particular, we consider the cases generated by U(z)=z and z/(1-z). We also briefly consider the effects of magnetic vector potentials on the partition functions of these systems.

  3. Acclimation of tobacco leaves to high light intensity drives the plastoquinone oxidation system--relationship among the fraction of open PSII centers, non-photochemical quenching of Chl fluorescence and the maximum quantum yield of PSII in the dark.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Chikahiro; Amako, Katsumi; Shiraishi, Naomasa; Sugimoto, Toshio

    2009-04-01

    Responses of the reduction-oxidation level of plastoquinone (PQ) in the photosynthetic electron transport (PET) system of chloroplasts to growth light intensity were evaluated in tobacco plants. Plants grown in low light (150 micromol photons m-2 s-1) (LL plants) were exposed to a high light intensity (1,100 micromol photons m-2 s-1) for 1 d. Subsequently, the plants exposed to high light (LH plants) were returned back again to the low light condition: these plants were designated as LHL plants. Both LH and LHL plants showed higher values of non-photochemical quenching of Chl fluorescence (NPQ) and the fraction of open PSII centers (qL), and lower values of the maximum quantum yield of PSII in the dark (Fv/Fm), compared with LL plants. The dependence of qL on the quantum yield of PSII [Phi(PSII)] in LH and LHL plants was higher than that in LL plants. To evaluate the effect of an increase in NPQ and decrease in Fv/Fm on qL, we derived an equation expressing qL in relation to both NPQ and Fv/Fm, according to the lake model of photoexcitation of the PSII reaction center. As a result, the heat dissipation process, shown as NPQ, did not contribute greatly to the increase in qL. On the other hand, decreased Fv/Fm did contribute to the increase in qL, i.e. the enhanced oxidation of PQ under photosynthesis-limited conditions. Thylakoid membranes isolated from LH plants, having high qL, showed a higher tolerance against photoinhibition of PSII, compared with those from LL plants. We propose a 'plastoquinone oxidation system (POS)', which keeps PQ in an oxidized state by suppressing the accumulation of electrons in the PET system in such a way as to regulate the maximum quantum yield of PSII. PMID:19251745

  4. RKKY interaction in a chirally coupled double quantum dot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, A. W.; Tutuc, D.; Zwicknagl, G.; Schuh, D.; Wegscheider, W.; Haug, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    The competition between the Kondo effect and the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yoshida (RKKY) interaction is investigated in a double quantum dots system, coupled via a central open conducting region. A perpendicular magnetic field induces the formation of Landau Levels which in turn give rise to the so-called Kondo chessboard pattern in the transport through the quantum dots. The two quantum dots become therefore chirally coupled via the edge channels formed in the open conducting area. In regions where both quantum dots exhibit Kondo transport the presence of the RKKY exchange interaction is probed by an analysis of the temperature dependence. The thus obtained Kondo temperature of one dot shows an abrupt increase at the onset of Kondo transport in the other, independent of the magnetic field polarity, i.e. edge state chirality in the central region.

  5. RKKY interaction in a chirally coupled double quantum dot system

    SciTech Connect

    Heine, A. W.; Tutuc, D.; Haug, R. J.; Zwicknagl, G.; Schuh, D.; Wegscheider, W.

    2013-12-04

    The competition between the Kondo effect and the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yoshida (RKKY) interaction is investigated in a double quantum dots system, coupled via a central open conducting region. A perpendicular magnetic field induces the formation of Landau Levels which in turn give rise to the so-called Kondo chessboard pattern in the transport through the quantum dots. The two quantum dots become therefore chirally coupled via the edge channels formed in the open conducting area. In regions where both quantum dots exhibit Kondo transport the presence of the RKKY exchange interaction is probed by an analysis of the temperature dependence. The thus obtained Kondo temperature of one dot shows an abrupt increase at the onset of Kondo transport in the other, independent of the magnetic field polarity, i.e. edge state chirality in the central region.

  6. Logical entropy of quantum dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimzadeh, Abolfazl

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces the concepts of logical entropy and conditional logical entropy of hnite partitions on a quantum logic. Some of their ergodic properties are presented. Also logical entropy of a quantum dynamical system is dehned and ergodic properties of dynamical systems on a quantum logic are investigated. Finally, the version of Kolmogorov-Sinai theorem is proved.

  7. Optimal protocols for slowly driven quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Zulkowski, Patrick R; DeWeese, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    The design of efficient quantum information processing will rely on optimal nonequilibrium transitions of driven quantum systems. Building on a recently developed geometric framework for computing optimal protocols for classical systems driven in finite time, we construct a general framework for optimizing the average information entropy for driven quantum systems. Geodesics on the parameter manifold endowed with a positive semidefinite metric correspond to protocols that minimize the average information entropy production in finite time. We use this framework to explicitly compute the optimal entropy production for a simple two-state quantum system coupled to a heat bath of bosonic oscillators, which has applications to quantum annealing. PMID:26465432

  8. Quantum chaos in nanoelectromechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusso, André; da Luz, M. G. E.; Rego, Luis G. C.

    2006-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electron-phonon coupling in suspended nanoelectromechanical systems and investigate the resulting quantum chaotic behavior. The phonons are associated with the vibrational modes of a suspended rectangular dielectric plate, with free or clamped boundary conditions, whereas the electrons are confined to a large quantum dot (QD) on the plate’s surface. The deformation potential and piezoelectric interactions are considered. By performing standard energy-level statistics we demonstrate that the spectral fluctuations exhibit the same distributions as those of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble or the Gaussian unitary ensemble (GUE), therefore evidencing the emergence of quantum chaos. That is verified for a large range of material and geometry parameters. In particular, the GUE statistics occurs only in the case of a circular QD. It represents an anomalous phenomenon, previously reported for just a small number of systems, since the problem is time-reversal invariant. The obtained results are explained through a detailed analysis of the Hamiltonian matrix structure.

  9. Maxwell's demons in multipartite quantum correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Helena C.; Rulli, Clodoaldo C.; de Oliveira, Thiago R.; Sarandy, Marcelo S.

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the extraction of thermodynamic work by a Maxwell's demon in a multipartite quantum correlated system. We begin by adopting the standard model of a Maxwell's demon as a Turing machine, either in a classical or quantum setup depending on its ability to implement classical or quantum conditional dynamics. Then, for an n -partite system (A1,A2,⋯,An) , we introduce a protocol of work extraction that bounds the advantage of the quantum demon over its classical counterpart through the amount of multipartite quantum correlation present in the system, as measured by a thermal version of the global quantum discord. This result is illustrated for an arbitrary n -partite pure state of qubits with Schmidt decomposition, where it is shown that the thermal global quantum discord exactly quantifies the quantum advantage. Moreover, we also consider the work extraction via mixed multipartite states, where examples of tight upper bounds can be obtained.

  10. Stability of Local Quantum Dissipative Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubitt, Toby S.; Lucia, Angelo; Michalakis, Spyridon; Perez-Garcia, David

    2015-08-01

    Open quantum systems weakly coupled to the environment are modeled by completely positive, trace preserving semigroups of linear maps. The generators of such evolutions are called Lindbladians. In the setting of quantum many-body systems on a lattice it is natural to consider Lindbladians that decompose into a sum of local interactions with decreasing strength with respect to the size of their support. For both practical and theoretical reasons, it is crucial to estimate the impact that perturbations in the generating Lindbladian, arising as noise or errors, can have on the evolution. These local perturbations are potentially unbounded, but constrained to respect the underlying lattice structure. We show that even for polynomially decaying errors in the Lindbladian, local observables and correlation functions are stable if the unperturbed Lindbladian has a unique fixed point and a mixing time that scales logarithmically with the system size. The proof relies on Lieb-Robinson bounds, which describe a finite group velocity for propagation of information in local systems. As a main example, we prove that classical Glauber dynamics is stable under local perturbations, including perturbations in the transition rates, which may not preserve detailed balance.

  11. Localization in chaotic systems with a single-channel opening.

    PubMed

    Lippolis, Domenico; Ryu, Jung-Wan; Kim, Sang Wook

    2015-07-01

    We introduce a single-channel opening in a random Hamiltonian and a quantized chaotic map: localization on the opening occurs as a sensible deviation of the wave-function statistics from the predictions of random matrix theory, even in the semiclassical limit. Increasing the coupling to the open channel in the quantum model, we observe a similar picture to resonance trapping, made of a few fast-decaying states, whose left (right) eigenfunctions are entirely localized on the (preimage of the) opening, and plentiful long-lived states, whose probability density is instead suppressed at the opening. For the latter, we derive and test a linear relation between the wave-function intensities and the decay rates, similar to the Breit-Wigner law. We then analyze the statistics of the eigenfunctions of the corresponding (discretized) classical propagator, finding a similar behavior to the quantum system only in the weak-coupling regime. PMID:26274261

  12. A generalized fidelity amplitude for open systems.

    PubMed

    Gorin, T; Moreno, H J; Seligman, T H

    2016-06-13

    We consider a central system which is coupled via dephasing to an open system, i.e. an intermediate system which in turn is coupled to another environment. Considering the intermediate and far environment as one composite system, the coherences in the central system are given in the form of fidelity amplitudes for a certain perturbed echo dynamics in the composite environment. On the basis of the Born-Markov approximation, we derive a master equation for the reduction of that dynamics to the intermediate system alone. In distinction to an earlier paper (Moreno et al 2015 Phys. Rev. A 92, 030104. (doi:10.1103/PhysRevA.92.030104)), where we discussed the stabilizing effect of the far environment on the decoherence in the central system, we focus here on the possibility of using the measurable coherences in the central system for probing the open quantum dynamics in the intermediate system. We illustrate our results for the case of chaotic dynamics in the near environment, where we compare random matrix simulations with our analytical result. PMID:27140969

  13. A general transfer-function approach to noise filtering in open-loop quantum control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Lorenza

    2015-03-01

    Hamiltonian engineering via unitary open-loop quantum control provides a versatile and experimentally validated framework for manipulating a broad class of non-Markovian open quantum systems of interest, with applications ranging from dynamical decoupling and dynamically corrected quantum gates, to noise spectroscopy and quantum simulation. In this context, transfer-function techniques directly motivated by control engineering have proved invaluable for obtaining a transparent picture of the controlled dynamics in the frequency domain and for quantitatively analyzing performance. In this talk, I will show how to identify a computationally tractable set of ``fundamental filter functions,'' out of which arbitrary filter functions may be assembled up to arbitrary high order in principle. Besides avoiding the infinite recursive hierarchy of filter functions that arises in general control scenarios, this fundamental set suffices to characterize the error suppression capabilities of the control protocol in both the time and frequency domain. I will show, in particular, how the resulting notion of ``filtering order'' reveals conceptually distinct, albeit complementary, features of the controlled dynamics as compared to the ``cancellation order,'' traditionally defined in the Magnus sense. Implications for current quantum control experiments will be discussed. Work supported by the U.S. Army Research Office under Contract No. W911NF-14-1-0682.

  14. Thermodynamics of Weakly Measured Quantum Systems.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Jose Joaquin; Lutz, Eric; Romito, Alessandro

    2016-02-26

    We consider continuously monitored quantum systems and introduce definitions of work and heat along individual quantum trajectories that are valid for coherent superposition of energy eigenstates. We use these quantities to extend the first and second laws of stochastic thermodynamics to the quantum domain. We illustrate our results with the case of a weakly measured driven two-level system and show how to distinguish between quantum work and heat contributions. We finally employ quantum feedback control to suppress detector backaction and determine the work statistics. PMID:26967399

  15. Thermodynamics of Weakly Measured Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Jose Joaquin; Lutz, Eric; Romito, Alessandro

    2016-02-01

    We consider continuously monitored quantum systems and introduce definitions of work and heat along individual quantum trajectories that are valid for coherent superposition of energy eigenstates. We use these quantities to extend the first and second laws of stochastic thermodynamics to the quantum domain. We illustrate our results with the case of a weakly measured driven two-level system and show how to distinguish between quantum work and heat contributions. We finally employ quantum feedback control to suppress detector backaction and determine the work statistics.

  16. Quantum coherence and entanglement control for atom-cavity systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Wenchong

    Coherence and entanglement play a significant role in the quantum theory. Ideal quantum systems, "closed" to the outside world, remain quantum forever and thus manage to retain coherence and entanglement. Real quantum systems, however, are open to the environment and are therefore susceptible to the phenomenon of decoherence and disentanglement which are major hindrances to the effectiveness of quantum information processing tasks. In this thesis we have theoretically studied the evolution of coherence and entanglement in quantum systems coupled to various environments. We have also studied ways and means of controlling the decay of coherence and entanglement. We have studied the exact qubit entanglement dynamics of some interesting initial states coupled to a high-Q cavity containing zero photon, one photon, two photons and many photons respectively. We have found that an initially correlated environmental state can serve as an enhancer for entanglement decay or generation processes. More precisely, we have demonstrated that the degree of entanglement, including its collapse as well as its revival times, can be significantly modified by the correlated structure of the environmental modes. We have also studied dynamical decoupling (DD) technique --- a prominent strategy of controlling decoherence and preserving entanglement in open quantum systems. We have analyzed several DD control methods applied to qubit systems that can eliminate the system-environment coupling and prolong the quantum coherence time. Particularly, we have proposed a new DD sequence consisting a set of designed control operators that can universally protected an unknown qutrit state against colored phase and amplitude environment noises. In addition, in a non-Markovian regime, we have reformulated the quantum state diffusion (QSD) equation to incorporate the effect of the external control fields. Without any assumptions on the system-environment coupling and the size of environment, we have consistently solved the control dynamics of open quantum systems using this stochastic QSD approach. By implementing the QSD equation, our numerical results have revealed that how the control efficacy depends on the designed time points and shapes of the applied control pulses, and the environment memory time scale.

  17. Relativistic quantum Darwinism in Dirac fermion and graphene systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Xuan; Huang, Liang; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Pecora, Louis

    2012-02-01

    We solve the Dirac equation in two spatial dimensions in the setting of resonant tunneling, where the system consists of two symmetric cavities connected by a finite potential barrier. The shape of the cavities can be chosen to yield both regular and chaotic dynamics in the classical limit. We find that certain pointer states about classical periodic orbits can exist, which are signatures of relativistic quantum Darwinism (RQD). These localized states suppress quantum tunneling, and the effect becomes less severe as the underlying classical dynamics in the cavity is chaotic, leading to regularization of quantum tunneling. Qualitatively similar phenomena have been observed in graphene. A physical theory is developed to explain relativistic quantum Darwinism and its effects based on the spectrum of complex eigenenergies of the non-Hermitian Hamiltonian describing the open cavity system.

  18. Quantum mechanics in complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehn, Ross Douglas

    This document should be considered in its separation; there are three distinct topics contained within and three distinct chapters within the body of works. In a similar fashion, this abstract should be considered in three parts. Firstly, we explored the existence of multiply-charged atomic ions by having developed a new set of dimensional scaling equations as well as a series of relativistic augmentations to the standard dimensional scaling procedure and to the self-consistent field calculations. Secondly, we propose a novel method of predicting drug efficacy in hopes to facilitate the discovery of new small molecule therapeutics by modeling the agonist-protein system as being similar to the process of Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy. Finally, we facilitate the instruction in basic quantum mechanical topics through the use of quantum games; this method of approach allows for the generation of exercises with the intent of conveying the fundamental concepts within a first year quantum mechanics classroom. Furthermore, no to be mentioned within the body of the text, yet presented in appendix form, certain works modeling the proliferation of cells types within the confines of man-made lattices for the purpose of facilitating artificial vascular transplants. In Chapter 2, we present a theoretical framework which describes multiply-charged atomic ions, their stability within super-intense laser fields, also lay corrections to the systems due to relativistic effects. Dimensional scaling calculations with relativistic corrections for systems: H, H-, H 2-, He, He-, He2-, He3- within super-intense laser fields were completed. Also completed were three-dimensional self consistent field calculations to verify the dimensionally scaled quantities. With the aforementioned methods the system's ability to stably bind 'additional' electrons through the development of multiple isolated regions of high potential energy leading to nodes of high electron density is shown. These nodes are spaced far enough from each other to minimized the electronic repulsion of the electrons, while still providing adequate enough attraction so as to bind the excess elections into orbitals. We have found that even with relativistic considerations these species are stably bound within the field. It was also found that performing the dimensional scaling calculations for systems within the confines of laser fields to be a much simpler and more cost-effective method than the supporting D=3 SCF method. The dimensional scaling method is general and can be extended to include relativistic corrections to describe the stability of simple molecular systems in super-intense laser fields. Chapter 3, we delineate the model, and aspects therein, of inelastic electron tunneling and map this model to the protein environment. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large family of receptors that sense molecules outside of a cell and activate signal transduction pathways inside the cell. Modeling how an agonist activates such a receptor is important for understanding a wide variety of physiological processes and it is of tremendous value for pharmacology and drug design. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) has been proposed as the mechanism by which olfactory GPCRs are activated by an encapsulated agonist. In this note we apply this notion to GPCRs within the mammalian nervous system using ab initio quantum chemical modeling. We found that non-endogenous agonists of the serotonin receptor share a singular IET spectral aspect both amongst each other and with the serotonin molecule: a peak that scales in intensity with the known agonist activities. We propose an experiential validation of this model by utilizing lysergic acid dimethylamide (DAM-57), an ergot derivative, and its isotopologues in which hydrogen atoms are replaced by deuterium. If validated our theory may provide new avenues for guided drug design and better in silico prediction of efficacies. Our final chapter, explores methods which may be explored to assist in the early instruction in quantum mechanics. The learning of quantum mechanics is contingent upon an understanding of the physical significance of the mathematics that one must perform. Concepts such as normalization, superposition, interference, probability amplitude and entanglement can prove challenging for the beginning student. This paper outlines several class exercises that use a non-classical version of tic-tac-toe to instruct several topics in an undergraduate quantum mechanics course. Quantum tic-tac-toe (QTTT) is a quantum analogue of classical tic-tac-toe (CTTT) benefiting from the use of superposition in movement, qualitative (and later quantitative) displays of entanglement and state collapse due to observation. QTTT can be used for the benefit of the students understanding in several other topics with the aid of proper discussion.

  19. Topics in quantum integrable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikami, Kazuhiro; Wadati, Miki

    2003-08-01

    Recent developments in the theory of quantum integrable particle systems in one-dimension with inverse square interactions are reviewed. First the Yangian symmetry is introduced and the energy spectra of the related spin models are discussed. The character of the su(n)1 WZNW theory is shown to be closely related with the Rogers-Szegö polynomial. Second, the infinite dimensional representation for solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation and the reflection equation is given. Based on the representation, the Dunkl operators associated with the classical root systems are constructed. The Macdonald polynomial and its generalization are discussed in connection with the eigenstates for the trigonometric case. Finally, some results on short-range interacting systems are mentioned.

  20. Stimulated recombination in open systems

    SciTech Connect

    Muoz-Cobo, J.L.; Verdu, G.; Jimenez, P.; Pea, J.

    1986-09-01

    In this comment we study the problem of the stimulated recombination in an open system from a stochastic point of view. We set up the bivariate master equation for the number of photons and ions inside the system. Then we perform a systematic expansion, with the system volume as an expansion parameter, and we obtain the fluctuations of the number of photons and ions around its macroscopic values in the linear noise approximation; the stationary solution is also investigated.

  1. Superconductor-Diamond Hybrid Quantum System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semba, Kouichi; Yoshihara, Fumiki; Johansson, Jan E. S.; Zhu, Xiaobo; Mizuochi, Norikazu; Munro, William J.; Saito, Shiro; Kakuyanagi, Kosuke; Matsuzaki, Yuichiro

    This chapter describes recent progress on research into superconducting flux qubit, NV diamond, and superconductor-diamond hybrid quantum systems. First, we describe important physical properties of superconducting macroscopic artificial atoms i.e., the tunability of the qubit energy level spacing, the coherence property, an example of strong coupling to another quantum system such as an LC harmonic oscillator, and qubit state readout through a Josephson bifurcation amplifier. We then introduce the NV center in diamond as an intriguing candidate for quantum information processing, which offers excellent multiple accessibility via visible light, microwaves and magnetic fields. Finally, we describe the superconducting flux qubit - NV centers in a diamond hybrid quantum system.

  2. Open-system dynamics of entanglement: a key issues review.

    PubMed

    Aolita, Leandro; de Melo, Fernando; Davidovich, Luiz

    2015-04-01

    One of the greatest challenges in the fields of quantum information processing and quantum technologies is the detailed coherent control over each and every constituent of quantum systems with an ever increasing number of particles. Within this endeavor, harnessing of many-body entanglement against the detrimental effects of the environment is a major pressing issue. Besides being an important concept from a fundamental standpoint, entanglement has been recognized as a crucial resource for quantum speed-ups or performance enhancements over classical methods. Understanding and controlling many-body entanglement in open systems may have strong implications in quantum computing, quantum simulations of many-body systems, secure quantum communication or cryptography, quantum metrology, our understanding of the quantum-to-classical transition, and other important questions of quantum foundations.In this paper we present an overview of recent theoretical and experimental efforts to underpin the dynamics of entanglement under the influence of noise. Entanglement is thus taken as a dynamic quantity on its own, and we survey how it evolves due to the unavoidable interaction of the entangled system with its surroundings. We analyze several scenarios, corresponding to different families of states and environments, which render a very rich diversity of dynamical behaviors.In contrast to single-particle quantities, like populations and coherences, which typically vanish only asymptotically in time, entanglement may disappear at a finite time. In addition, important classes of entanglement display an exponential decay with the number of particles when subject to local noise, which poses yet another threat to the already-challenging scaling of quantum technologies. Other classes, however, turn out to be extremely robust against local noise. Theoretical results and recent experiments regarding the difference between local and global decoherence are summarized. Control and robustness-enhancement techniques, scaling laws, statistical and geometrical aspects of multipartite-entanglement decay are also reviewed; all in order to give a broad picture of entanglement dynamics in open quantum systems addressed to both theorists and experimentalists inside and outside the field of quantum information. PMID:25811809

  3. Open system evolution and 'memory dressing'

    SciTech Connect

    Knezevic, Irena; Ferry, David K.

    2004-01-01

    Due to recent advances in quantum information, as well as in mesoscopic and nanoscale physics, the interest in the theory of open systems and decoherence has significantly increased. In this paper, we present an interesting approach to solving a time-convolutionless equation of motion for the open system reduced density matrix beyond the limit of weak coupling with the environment. Our approach is based on identifying an effective, memory-containing interaction in the equations of motion for the representation submatrices of the evolution operator (these submatices are written in a special basis, adapted for the 'partial-trace-free' approach, in the system+environment Liouville space). We then identify the 'memory dressing', a quantity crucial for solving the equation of motion for the reduced density matrix, which separates the effective from the real physical interaction. The memory dressing obeys a self-contained nonlinear equation of motion, which we solve exactly. The solution can be represented in a diagrammatic fashion after introducing an 'information exchange propagator', a quantity that describes the transfer of information to and from the system, so the cumulative effect of the information exchange results in the memory dressing. In the case of weak system-environment coupling, we present the expansion of the reduced density matrix in terms of the physical interaction up to the third order. However, our approach is capable of going beyond the weak-coupling limit, and we show how short-time behavior of an open system can be analyzed for arbitrary coupling strength. We illustrate the approach with a simple numerical example of single-particle level broadening for a two-particle interacting system on short time scales. Furthermore, we point out a way to identify the structure of decoherence-free subspaces using the present approach.

  4. Tailoring superradiance to design artificial quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Paolo; Keitel, Christoph H.; Evers, Jörg

    2016-03-01

    Cooperative phenomena arising due to the coupling of individual atoms via the radiation field are a cornerstone of modern quantum and optical physics. Recent experiments on x-ray quantum optics added a new twist to this line of research by exploiting superradiance in order to construct artificial quantum systems. However, so far, systematic approaches to deliberately design superradiance properties are lacking, impeding the desired implementation of more advanced quantum optical schemes. Here, we develop an analytical framework for the engineering of single-photon superradiance in extended media applicable across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, and show how it can be used to tailor the properties of an artificial quantum system. This “reverse engineering” of superradiance not only provides an avenue towards non-linear and quantum mechanical phenomena at x-ray energies, but also leads to a unified view on and a better understanding of superradiance across different physical systems.

  5. Tailoring superradiance to design artificial quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Longo, Paolo; Keitel, Christoph H; Evers, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Cooperative phenomena arising due to the coupling of individual atoms via the radiation field are a cornerstone of modern quantum and optical physics. Recent experiments on x-ray quantum optics added a new twist to this line of research by exploiting superradiance in order to construct artificial quantum systems. However, so far, systematic approaches to deliberately design superradiance properties are lacking, impeding the desired implementation of more advanced quantum optical schemes. Here, we develop an analytical framework for the engineering of single-photon superradiance in extended media applicable across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, and show how it can be used to tailor the properties of an artificial quantum system. This "reverse engineering" of superradiance not only provides an avenue towards non-linear and quantum mechanical phenomena at x-ray energies, but also leads to a unified view on and a better understanding of superradiance across different physical systems. PMID:27009604

  6. Tailoring superradiance to design artificial quantum systems

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Paolo; Keitel, Christoph H.; Evers, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Cooperative phenomena arising due to the coupling of individual atoms via the radiation field are a cornerstone of modern quantum and optical physics. Recent experiments on x-ray quantum optics added a new twist to this line of research by exploiting superradiance in order to construct artificial quantum systems. However, so far, systematic approaches to deliberately design superradiance properties are lacking, impeding the desired implementation of more advanced quantum optical schemes. Here, we develop an analytical framework for the engineering of single-photon superradiance in extended media applicable across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, and show how it can be used to tailor the properties of an artificial quantum system. This “reverse engineering” of superradiance not only provides an avenue towards non-linear and quantum mechanical phenomena at x-ray energies, but also leads to a unified view on and a better understanding of superradiance across different physical systems. PMID:27009604

  7. Coherent versus Measurement Feedback: Linear Systems Theory for Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naoki

    2014-10-01

    To control a quantum system via feedback, we generally have two options in choosing a control scheme. One is the coherent feedback, which feeds the output field of the system, through a fully quantum device, back to manipulate the system without involving any measurement process. The other one is measurement-based feedback, which measures the output field and performs a real-time manipulation on the system based on the measurement results. Both schemes have advantages and disadvantages, depending on the system and the control goal; hence, their comparison in several situations is important. This paper considers a general open linear quantum system with the following specific control goals: backaction evasion, generation of a quantum nondemolished variable, and generation of a decoherence-free subsystem, all of which have important roles in quantum information science. Some no-go theorems are proven, clarifying that those goals cannot be achieved by any measurement-based feedback control. On the other hand, it is shown that, for each control goal there exists a coherent feedback controller accomplishing the task. The key idea to obtain all the results is system theoretic characterizations of the above three notions in terms of controllability and observability properties or transfer functions of linear systems, which are consistent with their standard definitions.

  8. An Open Source Simulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slack, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    An investigation into the current state of the art of open source real time programming practices. This document includes what technologies are available, how easy is it to obtain, configure, and use them, and some performance measures done on the different systems. A matrix of vendors and their products is included as part of this investigation, but this is not an exhaustive list, and represents only a snapshot of time in a field that is changing rapidly. Specifically, there are three approaches investigated: 1. Completely open source on generic hardware, downloaded from the net. 2. Open source packaged by a vender and provided as free evaluation copy. 3. Proprietary hardware with pre-loaded proprietary source available software provided by the vender as for our evaluation.

  9. Dynamics of an Open System for Repeated Harmonic Perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Hiroshi; Zagrebnov, Valentin A.

    2016-05-01

    We use the Kossakowski-Lindblad-Davies formalism to study an open dynamical system defined as Markovian extension of the one-mode quantum resonator S, perturbed by repeated harmonic interaction with a chain of multi-level harmonic atoms C. The long-time asymptotic behaviour and correlations of various subsystems of the system S + C are treated in the framework of the W^*-dynamical system approach.

  10. Understanding electronic systems in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftja, Orion

    2013-11-01

    Systems of confined electrons are found everywhere in nature in the form of atoms where the orbiting electrons are confined by the Coulomb attraction of the nucleus. Advancement of nanotechnology has, however, provided us with an alternative way to confine electrons by using artificial confining potentials. A typical structure of this nature is the quantum dot, a nanoscale system which consists of few confined electrons. There are many types of quantum dots ranging from self-assembled to miniaturized semiconductor quantum dots. In this work we are interested in electrostatically confined semiconductor quantum dot systems where the electrostatic confining potential that traps the electrons is generated by external electrodes, doping, strain or other factors. A large number of semiconductor quantum dots of this type are fabricated by applying lithographically patterned gate electrodes or by etching on two-dimensional electron gases in semiconductor heterostructures. Because of this, the whole structure can be treated as a confined two-dimensional electron system. Quantum confinement profoundly affects the way in which electrons interact with each other, and external parameters such as a magnetic field. Since a magnetic field affects both the orbital and the spin motion of the electrons, the interplay between quantum confinement, electron-electron correlation effects and the magnetic field gives rise to very interesting physical phenomena. Thus, confined systems of electrons in a semiconductor quantum dot represent a unique opportunity to study fundamental quantum theories in a controllable atomic-like setup. In this work, we describe some common theoretical models which are used to study confined systems of electrons in a two-dimensional semiconductor quantum dot. The main emphasis of the work is to draw attention to important physical phenomena that arise in confined two-dimensional electron systems under various quantum regimes.

  11. Slightly anharmonic systems in quantum optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimov, Andrey B.; Chumakov, Sergey M.

    1995-01-01

    We consider an arbitrary atomic system (n-level atom or many such atoms) interacting with a strong resonant quantum field. The approximate evolution operator for a quantum field case can be produced from the atomic evolution operator in an external classical field by a 'quantization prescription', passing the operator arguments to Wigner D-functions. Many important phenomena arising from the quantum nature of the field can be described by such a way.

  12. Floquet theorem with open systems and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, C. M.; Shi, Z. C.; Yi, X. X.

    2016-03-01

    For a closed quantum system described by a time-periodic Hamiltonian, Floquet theorem says that the time evolution operator can be written as U (t ,0 ) ≡P (t ) e-i/ℏ HFt with P (t +T )=P (t ) , and HF is Hermitian and time independent and called the Floquet Hamiltonian. In this work, we extend the Floquet theorem from closed to open systems described by a time-periodic Lindblad master equation with period T =2/π ω . We derive an expansion for the Lindbladian in powers of 1/ω . Two examples are presented to illustrate the theorem. We find that the results given by the Lindbladian expansion based on the open system Floquet theorem agree well with the exact dynamics in the high-frequency limit. It may find applications in quantum engineering with systems subject to decoherence.

  13. Simulation of n-qubit quantum systems. V. Quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, T.; Fritzsche, S.

    2010-02-01

    The FEYNMAN program has been developed during the last years to support case studies on the dynamics and entanglement of n-qubit quantum registers. Apart from basic transformations and (gate) operations, it currently supports a good number of separability criteria and entanglement measures, quantum channels as well as the parametrizations of various frequently applied objects in quantum information theory, such as (pure and mixed) quantum states, hermitian and unitary matrices or classical probability distributions. With the present update of the FEYNMAN program, we provide a simple access to (the simulation of) quantum measurements. This includes not only the widely-applied projective measurements upon the eigenspaces of some given operator but also single-qubit measurements in various pre- and user-defined bases as well as the support for two-qubit Bell measurements. In addition, we help perform generalized and POVM measurements. Knowing the importance of measurements for many quantum information protocols, e.g., one-way computing, we hope that this update makes the FEYNMAN code an attractive and versatile tool for both, research and education. New version program summaryProgram title: FEYNMAN Catalogue identifier: ADWE_v5_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADWE_v5_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 27 210 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 960 471 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Maple 12 Computer: Any computer with Maple software installed Operating system: Any system that supports Maple; the program has been tested under Microsoft Windows XP and Linux Classification: 4.15 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADWE_v4_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Commun. 179 (2008) 647 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: During the last decade, the field of quantum information science has largely contributed to our understanding of quantum mechanics, and has provided also new and efficient protocols that are used on quantum entanglement. To further analyze the amount and transfer of entanglement in n-qubit quantum protocols, symbolic and numerical simulations need to be handled efficiently. Solution method: Using the computer algebra system Maple, we developed a set of procedures in order to support the definition, manipulation and analysis of n-qubit quantum registers. These procedures also help to deal with (unitary) logic gates and (nonunitary) quantum operations and measurements that act upon the quantum registers. All commands are organized in a hierarchical order and can be used interactively in order to simulate and analyze the evolution of n-qubit quantum systems, both in ideal and noisy quantum circuits. Reasons for new version: Until the present, the FEYNMAN program supported the basic data structures and operations of n-qubit quantum registers [1], a good number of separability and entanglement measures [2], quantum operations (noisy channels) [3] as well as the parametrizations of various frequently applied objects, such as (pure and mixed) quantum states, hermitian and unitary matrices or classical probability distributions [4]. With the current extension, we here add all necessary features to simulate quantum measurements, including the projective measurements in various single-qubit and the two-qubit Bell basis, and POVM measurements. Together with the previously implemented functionality, this greatly enhances the possibilities of analyzing quantum information protocols in which measurements play a central role, e.g., one-way computation. Running time: Most commands require ⩽10 seconds of processor time on a Pentium 4 processor with ⩾2 GHz RAM or newer, if they work with quantum registers with five or less qubits. Moreover, about 5-20 MB of working memory is typically needed (in addition to the memory for the Maple environment itself). However, especially when working with symbolic expressions, the requirements on the CPU time and memory critically depend on the size of the quantum registers owing to the exponential growth of the dimension of the associated Hilbert space. For example, complex (symbolic) noise models, i.e. with several Kraus operators, may result in very large expressions that dramatically slow down the evaluation of e.g. distance measures or the final-state entropy, etc. In these cases, Maple's assume facility sometimes helps to reduce the complexity of the symbolic expressions, but more often than not only a numerical evaluation is feasible. Since the various commands can be applied to quite different scenarios, no general scaling rule can be given for the CPU time or the request of memory. References:[1] T. Radtke, S. Fritzsche, Comput. Phys. Commun. 173 (2005) 91.[2] T. Radtke, S. Fritzsche, Comput. Phys. Commun. 175 (2006) 145.[3] T. Radtke, S. Fritzsche, Comput. Phys. Commun. 176 (2007) 617.[4] T. Radtke, S. Fritzsche, Comput. Phys. Commun. 179 (2008) 647.

  14. TRIQS: A toolbox for research on interacting quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parcollet, Olivier; Ferrero, Michel; Ayral, Thomas; Hafermann, Hartmut; Krivenko, Igor; Messio, Laura; Seth, Priyanka

    2015-11-01

    We present the TRIQS library, a Toolbox for Research on Interacting Quantum Systems. It is an open-source, computational physics library providing a framework for the quick development of applications in the field of many-body quantum physics, and in particular, strongly-correlated electronic systems. It supplies components to develop codes in a modern, concise and efficient way: e.g. Green's function containers, a generic Monte Carlo class, and simple interfaces to HDF5. TRIQS is a C++/Python library that can be used from either language. It is distributed under the GNU General Public License (GPLv3). State-of-the-art applications based on the library, such as modern quantum many-body solvers and interfaces between density-functional-theory codes and dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) codes are distributed along with it.

  15. Quantum contextuality in N-boson systems

    SciTech Connect

    Benatti, Fabio; Floreanini, Roberto; Genovese, Marco; Olivares, Stefano

    2011-09-15

    Quantum contextuality in systems of identical bosonic particles is explicitly exhibited via the maximum violation of a suitable inequality of Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt type. Unlike the approaches considered so far, which make use of single-particle observables, our analysis involves collective observables constructed using multiboson operators. An exemplifying scheme to test this violation with a quantum optical setup is also discussed.

  16. Geometric control of quantum mechanical and nonlinear classical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Richard Joseph

    1999-10-01

    Geometric control refers to the judicious use of the non- commuting nature of inputs and natural dynamics as the basis for control. The last few decades in control system theory have seen the application of differential geometry in proving several important properties of systems, including controllability and observability. Until recently, however, the results of this mathematical geometry have rarely been used as the basis for designing and implementing an actual controller. This thesis demonstrates the application of a judicious selection of inputs, so that if the system is proven to be controllable using geometric methods, one can design input sequences using the same geometry. A demonstration of this method is shown in simulating the attitude control of a satellite: a highly non-linear, non- holonomic control problem. Although not a practical method for large re-orientations of a typical satellite, the approach can be applied to other nonlinear systems. The method is also applied to the closed-loop performance of a quantum mechanical system to demonstrate the feasibility of coherent quantum feedback-something impossible using a conventional controller. Finally, the method is applied in the open-loop control of a quantum mechanical system: in this case, the creation of Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger correlations among the nuclei of an ensemble of alanine molecules in a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. In each case, the data demonstrate the usefulness of a geometric approach to control. In addition to demonstrations of geometric control in practice, the quantum mechanical experiments also demonstrate for the first time peculiar quantum correlations, including GHZ correlations, that have no classical analog. The quantum experiments further establish nuclear magnetic resonance as a viable and accessible testbed of quantum predictions and processes. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14- 0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.)

  17. Avoiding irreversible dynamics in quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasik, Raisa Iosifovna

    2009-10-01

    Devices that exploit laws of quantum physics offer revolutionary advances in computation and communication. However, building such devices presents an enormous challenge, since it would require technologies that go far beyond current capabilities. One of the main obstacles to building a quantum computer and devices needed for quantum communication is decoherence or noise that originates from the interaction between a quantum system and its environment, and which leads to the destruction of the fragile quantum information. Encoding into decoherence-free subspaces (DFS) provides an important strategy for combating decoherence effects in quantum systems and constitutes the focus of my dissertation. The theory of DFS relies on the existence of certain symmetries in the decoherence process, which allow some states of a quantum system to be completely decoupled from the environment and thus to experience no decoherence. In this thesis I describe various approaches to DFS that are developed in the current literature. Although the general idea behind various approaches to DFS is the same, I show that different mathematical definitions of DFS actually have different physical meaning. I provide a rigorous definition of DFS for every approach, explaining its physical meaning and relation to other definitions. I also examine the theory of DFS for Markovian systems. These are systems for which the environment has no memory, i.e., any change in the environment affects the quantum system instantaneously. Examples of such systems include many systems in quantum optics that have been proposed for implementation of a quantum computer, such as atomic and molecular gases, trapped ions, and quantum dots. Here I develop a rigorous theory that provides necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of DFS. This theory allows us to identify a special new class of DFS that was not known before. Under particular circumstances, dynamics of a quantum system can connive together with the interactions between the system and its environment in a special way to reduce decoherence. This property is used to discover new DFS that rely on rather counterintuitive phenomenon, which I call an "incoherent generation of coherences." I also provide examples of physical systems that support such states. These DFS can be used to suppress & coherence, but may not be sufficient for performing full quantum computation. I also explore the possibility of physically generating the DFS that are useful for quantum computation. For quantum computation we need to preserve at least two quantum states to encode the quantum analogue of classical bits. Here I aim to generate DFS in a system composed from a large collection of atoms or molecules and I need to determine how one should position atoms or molecules in 3D space so that the overall system possesses a DFS with at least two states (i.e., non-trivial DFS). I show that for many Markovian systems, non-trivial DFS can exist only when particles are located in exactly the same position in space. This, of course, is not possible in the real world. For these systems, I also show that states in DFS are states with infinite lifetime. However, for all practical applications we just need long-lived states. Thus in reality, we do just need to bring quantum particles close together to generate an imperfect DFS, i.e. a collection of long-lived states. This can be achieved, for example, for atoms within a single molecule.

  18. Galilei invariant technique for quantum system description

    SciTech Connect

    Kamuntavičius, Gintautas P.

    2014-04-15

    Problems with quantum systems models, violating Galilei invariance are examined. The method for arbitrary non-relativistic quantum system Galilei invariant wave function construction, applying a modified basis where center-of-mass excitations have been removed before Hamiltonian matrix diagonalization, is developed. For identical fermion system, the Galilei invariant wave function can be obtained while applying conventional antisymmetrization methods of wave functions, dependent on single particle spatial variables.

  19. Quantum correlations in a clusterlike system

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yixin; Li Shengwen; Yin Zhi

    2010-11-15

    We discuss a clusterlike one-dimensional system with triplet interaction. We study the topological properties of this system. We find that the degeneracy depends on the topology of the system and is well protected against external local perturbations. All these facts show that the system is topologically ordered. We also find a string order parameter to characterize the quantum phase transition. Besides, we investigate two-site correlations including entanglement, quantum discord, and mutual information. We study the different divergence behaviors of the correlations. The quantum correlation decays exponentially in both topological and magnetic phases, and diverges in reversed power law at the critical point. And we find that in topological order systems, the global difference of topology induced by dimension can be reflected in local quantum correlations.

  20. Software-defined Quantum Communication Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; Sadlier, Ronald J

    2013-01-01

    We show how to extend the paradigm of software-defined communication to include quantum communication systems. We introduce the decomposition of a quantum communication terminal into layers separating the concerns of the hardware, software, and middleware. We provide detailed descriptions of how each component operates and we include results of an implementation of the super-dense coding protocol. We argue that the versatility of software-defined quantum communication test beds can be useful for exploring new regimes in communication and rapidly prototyping new systems.

  1. Mapping the Schroedinger picture of open quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Thomas F.; Shaji, Anil; Sudarshan, E. C. G.

    2006-01-15

    For systems described by finite matrices, an affine form is developed for the maps that describe evolution of density matrices for a quantum system that interacts with another. This is established directly from the Heisenberg picture. It separates elements that depend only on the dynamics from those that depend on the state of the two systems. While the equivalent linear map is generally not completely positive, the homogeneous part of the affine maps is, and is shown to be composed of multiplication operations that come simply from the Hamiltonian for the larger system. The inhomogeneous part is shown to be zero if and only if the map does not increase the trace of the square of any density matrix. Properties are worked out in detail for two-qubit examples.

  2. Multi-valley effective mass theory for device-level modeling of open quantum dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, N. Tobias; Baczewski, Andrew D.; Frees, Adam; Gamble, John King; Montano, Ines; Moussa, Jonathan E.; Muller, Richard P.; Nielsen, Erik

    2015-03-01

    Simple models for semiconductor-based quantum information processors can provide useful qualitative descriptions of device behavior. However, as experimental implementations have matured, more specific guidance from theory has become necessary, particularly in the form of quantitatively reliable yet computationally efficient modeling. Besides modeling static device properties, improved characterization of noisy gate operations requires a more sophisticated description of device dynamics. Making use of recent developments in multi-valley effective mass theory, we discuss device-level simulations of the open system quantum dynamics of a qubit interacting with phonons and other noise sources. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the US Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Bound states in the continuum in open quantum billiards with a variable shape

    SciTech Connect

    Sadreev, Almas F.; Bulgakov, Evgeny N.; Rotter, Ingrid

    2006-06-15

    We show the existence of bound states in the continuum (BICs) in quantum billiards (QBs) that are opened by attaching single-channel leads to them. They may be observed by varying an external parameter continuously, e.g., the shape of the QB. At some values of the parameter, resonance states with vanishing decay width (the BICs) occur. They are localized almost completely in the interior of the closed system. The phenomenon is shown analytically to exist in the simplest case of a two level QB and is complemented by numerical calculations for a real QB.

  4. Combinatorial Approach to Modeling Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornyak, Vladimir V.

    2016-02-01

    Using the fact that any linear representation of a group can be embedded into permutations, we propose a constructive description of quantum behavior that provides, in particular, a natural explanation of the appearance of complex numbers and unitarity in the formalism of the quantum mechanics. In our approach, the quantum behavior can be explained by the fundamental impossibility to trace the identity of the indistinguishable objects in their evolution. Any observation only provides information about the invariant relations between such objects. The trajectory of a quantum system is a sequence of unitary evolutions interspersed with observations—non-unitary projections. We suggest a scheme to construct combinatorial models of quantum evolution. The principle of selection of the most likely trajectories in such models via the large numbers approximation leads in the continuum limit to the principle of least action with the appropriate Lagrangians and deterministic evolution equations

  5. Ultracold Molecules in Crystals of Light: A Highly Tunable System for Exploring Novel Materials, Quantum Dynamics, and Quantum Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Lincoln; Maeda, Kenji; Wall, Michael L.

    2015-03-01

    Ultracold molecules trapped in optical lattices present a new regime of physical chemistry and a new state of matter: complex dipolar matter. Such systems open up the prospect of tunable quantum complexity. We present models for the quantum many-body statics and dynamics of present experiments on polar bi-alkali dimer molecules. We are developing Hamiltonians and simulations for upcoming experiments on dimers beyond the alkali metals, including biologically and chemically important naturally occurring free radicals like the hydroxyl free radical (OH), as well as symmetric top polyatomic molecules like methyl fluoride (CH3F). These systems offer surprising opportunities in modeling and design of new materials. For example, symmetric top polyatomics can be used to study quantum molecular magnets and quantum liquid crystals. We use matrix-product-state (MPS) algorithms, supplemented by exact diagonalization, variational, perturbative, and other approaches. MPS algorithms not only produce experimentally measurable quantum phase diagrams but also explore the dynamical interplay between internal and external degrees of freedom inherent in complex dipolar matter. We maintain open source code (openTEBD and openMPS) available freely and used widely. Funded by NSF and AFOSR.

  6. Software-defined Quantum Communication Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; Sadlier, Ronald J

    2014-01-01

    Quantum communication systems harness modern physics through state-of-the-art optical engineering to provide revolutionary capabilities. An important concern for quantum communication engineering is designing and prototyping these systems to prototype proposed capabilities. We apply the paradigm of software-defined communica- tion for engineering quantum communication systems to facilitate rapid prototyping and prototype comparisons. We detail how to decompose quantum communication terminals into functional layers defining hardware, software, and middleware concerns, and we describe how each layer behaves. Using the super-dense coding protocol as a test case, we describe implementations of both the transmitter and receiver, and we present results from numerical simulations of the behavior. We find that while the theoretical benefits of super dense coding are maintained, there is a classical overhead associated with the full implementation.

  7. Maximal atom-photon entanglement in a double- quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordi, Zeinab; Ghanbari, Saeed; Mahmoudi, Mohammad

    2015-06-01

    The atom-photon entanglement of a dressed atom and its spontaneous emission in a double- closed-loop atomic system is studied under multi-photon resonance condition. It is shown that even in the absence of quantum interference due to the spontaneous emission, the von Neumann entropy is phase-sensitive and it can be controlled by either intensity or relative phase of the applied fields. It is demonstrated that for the special case of Rabi frequency of the applied fields, the system is maximally entangled. Moreover, an open-loop configuration is considered, and it is shown that the degree of entanglement can be controlled by intensity of the applied fields. Furthermore, in electromagnetically induced transparency condition, the system is disentangled. Such a system can be used for quantum information processing via entanglement using optical switching.

  8. Robust observer for uncertain linear quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Naoki

    2006-09-15

    In the theory of quantum dynamical filtering, one of the biggest issues is that the underlying system dynamics represented by a quantum stochastic differential equation must be known exactly in order that the corresponding filter provides an optimal performance; however, this assumption is generally unrealistic. Therefore, in this paper, we consider a class of linear quantum systems subjected to time-varying norm-bounded parametric uncertainties and then propose a robust observer such that the variance of the estimation error is guaranteed to be within a certain bound. Although in the linear case much of classical control theory can be applied to quantum systems, the quantum robust observer obtained in this paper does not have a classical analog due to the system's specific structure with respect to the uncertainties. Moreover, by considering a typical quantum control problem, we show that the proposed robust observer is fairly robust against a parametric uncertainty of the system even when the other estimators--the optimal Kalman filter and risk-sensitive observer--fail in the estimation.

  9. Superconducting circuitry for quantum electromechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaHaye, Matthew D.; Rouxinol, Francisco; Hao, Yu; Shim, Seung-Bo; Irish, Elinor K.

    2015-05-01

    Superconducting systems have a long history of use in experiments that push the frontiers of mechanical sensing. This includes both applied and fundamental research, which at present day ranges from quantum computing research and e orts to explore Planck-scale physics to fundamental studies on the nature of motion and the quantum limits on our ability to measure it. In this paper, we first provide a short history of the role of superconducting circuitry and devices in mechanical sensing, focusing primarily on efforts in the last decade to push the study of quantum mechanics to include motion on the scale of human-made structures. This background sets the stage for the remainder of the paper, which focuses on the development of quantum electromechanical systems (QEMS) that incorporate superconducting quantum bits (qubits), superconducting transmission line resonators and flexural nanomechanical elements. In addition to providing the motivation and relevant background on the physical behavior of these systems, we discuss our recent efforts to develop a particular type of QEMS that is based upon the Cooper-pair box (CPB) and superconducting coplanar waveguide (CPW) cavities, a system which has the potential to serve as a testbed for studying the quantum properties of motion in engineered systems.

  10. Molecular controlled of quantum nano systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paltiel, Yossi

    2014-03-01

    A century ago quantum mechanics created a conceptual revolution whose fruits are now seen in almost any aspect of our day-to-day life. Lasers, transistors and other solid state and optical devices represent the core technology of current computers, memory devices and communication systems. However, all these examples do not exploit fully the quantum revolution as they do not take advantage of the coherent wave-like properties of the quantum wave function. Controlled coherent system and devices at ambient temperatures are challenging to realize. We are developing a novel nano tool box with control coupling between the quantum states and the environment. This tool box that combines nano particles with organic molecules enables the integration of quantum properties with classical existing devices at ambient temperatures. The nano particles generate the quantum states while the organic molecules control the coupling and therefore the energy, charge, spin, or quasi particle transfer between the layers. Coherent effects at ambient temperatures can be measured in the strong coupling regime. In the talk I will present our nano tool box and show studies of charge transfer, spin transfer and energy transfer in the hybrid layers as well as collective transfer phenomena. These enable the realization of room temperature operating quantum electro optical devices. For example I will present in details, our recent development of a new type of chiral molecules based magnetless universal memory exploiting selective spin transfer.

  11. Intrinsic structure of state space of a quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhi-Hao; Zhu, Sen

    2011-03-01

    Quantum states play a fundamental role in quantum physics; so it is necessary to study intrinsic structure of quantum states. In this paper, we study topological structure and measurable structure of state space of a quantum system, and find that almost all physical important properties on quantum states coincide.

  12. Equilibration of quantum systems and subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Anthony J.

    2011-05-01

    We unify two recent results concerning equilibration in quantum theory. We first generalize a proof of Reimann (2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 190403), that the expectation value of 'realistic' quantum observables will equilibrate under very general conditions, and discuss its implications for the equilibration of quantum systems. We then use this to re-derive an independent result of Linden et al (2009 Phys. Rev. E 79 061103), showing that small subsystems generically evolve to an approximately static equilibrium state. Finally, we consider subspaces in which all initial states effectively equilibrate to the same state.

  13. Dicke model for quantum Hall systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hama, Y.; Fauzi, M. H.; Nemoto, K.; Hirayama, Y.; Ezawa, Z. F.

    2016-02-01

    In GaAs quantum Hall (QH) systems, electrons are coupled with nuclear spins through the hyperfine interaction, which is normally not strong enough to change the dynamics of electrons and nuclear spins. The dynamics of the QH systems, however, may drastically change when the nuclear spins interact with low-energy collective excitation modes of the electron spins. We theoretically investigate the nuclear-electron spin interaction in the QH systems as hybrid quantum systems driven by the hyperfine interaction. In particular, we study the interaction between the nuclear spins and the Nambu–Goldstone (NG) mode with the linear dispersion relation associated with the U(1) spin rotational symmetry breaking. We show that such an interaction is described as nuclear spins collectively coupled to the NG mode, and can be effectively described by the Dicke model. Based on the model we suggest that various collective spin phenomena realized in quantum optical systems can also emerge in the QH systems.

  14. Quantum optical properties in plasmonic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond

    2015-04-24

    Plasmonic metallic particle (MP) can affect the optical properties of a quantum system (QS) in a remarkable way. We develop a general quantum nonlinear formalism with exact vectorial description for the scattered photons by the QS. The formalism enables us to study the variations of the dielectric function and photon spectrum of the QS with the particle distance between QS and MP, exciting laser direction, polarization and phase in the presence of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in the MP. The quantum formalism also serves as a powerful tool for studying the effects of these parameters on the nonclassical properties of the scattered photons. The plasmonic effect of nanoparticles has promising possibilities as it provides a new way for manipulating quantum optical properties of light in nanophotonic systems.

  15. Note on quantum groups and integrable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popolitov, A.

    2016-01-01

    The free-field formalism for quantum groups [preprint ITEP-M3/94, CRM-2202 hep-th/9409093] provides a special choice of coordinates on a quantum group. In these coordinates the construction of associated integrable system [arXiv:1207.1869] is especially simple. This choice also fits into general framework of cluster varieties [math.AG/0311245]—natural changes in coordinates are cluster mutations.

  16. Quantum discord in matrix product systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Zhaoyu; Li Liang; Du Guihuan; Yao Kailun; Liu Jiwei; Luo Bo; Li Neng; Li Haina

    2010-09-15

    We consider a class of quantum systems with spin-flip symmetry and derive the quantum correlation measured by the quantum discord (QD). As an illustration, we investigate the QD in a three-body interaction model and an XYZ interaction model, whose ground states can be expressed as matrix product states, and the QD is exactly soluble. We show that the QD behaves differently than the quantum entanglement (QE) in many ways; for example, they may show opposite monotonicity and completely different finite-size effects. Furthermore, we compare the capability of the QD and the QE to detect quantum phase transitions (QPTs) and find that the QD is more reliable than the QE for signaling QPTs in these models: In the three-body interaction model, the QE is singular at the quantum critical point, however, it exhibits an additional singularity in the noncritical region, while the analyticity of the QD can be used to identify the quantum critical point perfectly; and in the XYZ interaction model, the QE vanishes in the thermodynamic limit, thus losing its ability to detect QPTs, while the QD still functions very well.

  17. Quantum Flexoelectricity in Low Dimensional Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, Sergei V; Meunier, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    Symmetry breaking at surfaces and interfaces and the capability to support large strain gradients in nanoscale systems enable new forms of electromechanical coupling. Here we introduce the concept of quantum flexoelectricity, a phenomenon that is manifested when the mechanical deformation of non-polar quantum systems results in the emergence of net dipole moments and hence linear electromechanical coupling proportional to local curvature. The concept is illustrated in carbon systems, including polyacetylene and nano graphitic ribbons. Using density functional theory calculations for systems made of up to 400 atoms, we determine the flexoelectric coefficients to be of the order of ~ 0.1 e, in agreement with the prediction of linear theory. The implications of quantum flexoelectricity on electromechanical device applications, and physics of carbon based materials are discussed.

  18. Simulation of n-qubit quantum systems. IV. Parametrizations of quantum states, matrices and probability distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, T.; Fritzsche, S.

    2008-11-01

    Entanglement is known today as a key resource in many protocols from quantum computation and quantum information theory. However, despite the successful demonstration of several protocols, such as teleportation or quantum key distribution, there are still many open questions of how entanglement affects the efficiency of quantum algorithms or how it can be protected against noisy environments. The investigation of these and related questions often requires a search or optimization over the set of quantum states and, hence, a parametrization of them and various other objects. To facilitate this kind of studies in quantum information theory, here we present an extension of the FEYNMAN program that was developed during recent years as a toolbox for the simulation and analysis of quantum registers. In particular, we implement parameterizations of hermitian and unitary matrices (of arbitrary order), pure and mixed quantum states as well as separable states. In addition to being a prerequisite for the study of many optimization problems, these parameterizations also provide the necessary basis for heuristic studies which make use of random states, unitary matrices and other objects. Program summaryProgram title: FEYNMAN Catalogue identifier: ADWE_v4_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADWE_v4_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 24 231 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 416 085 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Maple 11 Computer: Any computer with Maple software installed Operating system: Any system that supports Maple; program has been tested under Microsoft Windows XP, Linux Classification: 4.15 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: During the last decades, quantum information science has contributed to our understanding of quantum mechanics and has provided also new and efficient protocols, based on the use of entangled quantum states. To determine the behavior and entanglement of n-qubit quantum registers, symbolic and numerical simulations need to be applied in order to analyze how these quantum information protocols work and which role the entanglement plays hereby. Solution method: Using the computer algebra system Maple, we have developed a set of procedures that support the definition, manipulation and analysis of n-qubit quantum registers. These procedures also help to deal with (unitary) logic gates and (nonunitary) quantum operations that act upon the quantum registers. With the parameterization of various frequently-applied objects, that are implemented in the present version, the program now facilitates a wider range of symbolic and numerical studies. All commands can be used interactively in order to simulate and analyze the evolution of n-qubit quantum systems, both in ideal and noisy quantum circuits. Reasons for new version: In the first version of the FEYNMAN program [1], we implemented the data structures and tools that are necessary to create, manipulate and to analyze the state of quantum registers. Later [2,3], support was added to deal with quantum operations (noisy channels) as an ingredient which is essential for studying the effects of decoherence. With the present extension, we add a number of parametrizations of objects frequently utilized in decoherence and entanglement studies, such that as hermitian and unitary matrices, probability distributions, or various kinds of quantum states. This extension therefore provides the basis, for example, for the optimization of a given function over the set of pure states or the simple generation of random objects. Running time: Most commands that act upon quantum registers with five or less qubits take ⩽10 seconds of processor time on a Pentium 4 processor with ⩾2GHz or newer, and about 5-20 MB of working memory (in addition to the memory for the Maple environment). Especially when working with symbolic expressions, however, the requirements on CPU time and memory critically depend on the size of the quantum registers, owing to the exponential growth of the dimension of the associated Hilbert space. For example, complex (symbolic) noise models, i.e. with several symbolic Kraus operators, result for multi-qubit systems often in very large expressions that dramatically slow down the evaluation of e.g. distance measures or the final-state entropy, etc. In these cases, Maple's assume facility sometimes helps to reduce the complexity of the symbolic expressions, but more often only a numerical evaluation is possible eventually. Since the complexity of the various commands of the FEYNMAN program and the possible usage scenarios can be very different, no general scaling law for CPU time or the memory requirements can be given. References: [1] T. Radtke, S. Fritzsche, Comput. Phys. Comm. 173 (2005) 91. [2] T. Radtke, S. Fritzsche, Comput. Phys. Comm. 175 (2006) 145. [3] T. Radtke, S. Fritzsche, Comput. Phys. Comm. 176 (2007) 617.

  19. Dynamical response theory for driven-dissipative quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos Venuti, Lorenzo; Zanardi, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    We discuss dynamical response theory of driven-dissipative quantum systems described by Markovian master equations generating semigroups of maps. In this setting thermal equilibrium states are replaced by nonequilibrium steady states, and dissipative perturbations are considered in addition to the Hamiltonian ones. We derive explicit expressions for the linear dynamical response functions for generalized dephasing channels and for Davies thermalizing generators. We introduce the notion of maximal harmonic response and compute it exactly for a single-qubit channel. Finally, we analyze linear response near dynamical phase transitions in quasifree open quantum systems. It is found that the effect of the dynamical phase transition shows up in a peak at the edge of the spectrum in the imaginary part of the dynamical response function.

  20. Distribution of Quantum Coherence in Multipartite Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Chandrashekar; Parthasarathy, Manikandan; Jambulingam, Segar; Byrnes, Tim

    2016-04-01

    The distribution of coherence in multipartite systems is examined. We use a new coherence measure with entropic nature and metric properties, based on the quantum Jensen-Shannon divergence. The metric property allows for the coherence to be decomposed into various contributions, which arise from local and intrinsic coherences. We find that there are trade-off relations between the various contributions of coherence, as a function of parameters of the quantum state. In bipartite systems the coherence resides on individual sites or is distributed among the sites, which contribute in a complementary way. In more complex systems, the characteristics of the coherence can display more subtle changes with respect to the parameters of the quantum state. In the case of the X X Z Heisenberg model, the coherence changes from a monogamous to a polygamous nature. This allows us to define the shareability of coherence, leading to monogamy relations for coherence.

  1. Portable open-path chemical sensor using a quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrigan, Paul; Lwin, Maung; Huntley, Reuven; Chhabra, Amandeep; Moshary, Fred; Gross, Barry; Ahmed, Samir

    2009-05-01

    Remote sensing of enemy installations or their movements by trace gas detection is a critical but challenging military objective. Open path measurements over ranges of a few meters to many kilometers with sensitivity in the parts per million or billion regime are crucial in anticipating the presence of a threat. Previous approaches to detect ground level chemical plumes, explosive constituents, or combustion have relied on low-resolution, short range Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), or low-sensitivity near-infrared differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). As mid-infrared quantum cascade laser (QCL) sources have improved in cost and performance, systems based on QCL's that can be tailored to monitor multiple chemical species in real time are becoming a viable alternative. We present the design of a portable, high-resolution, multi-kilometer open path trace gas sensor based on QCL technology. Using a tunable (1045-1047cm-1) QCL, a modeled atmosphere and link-budget analysis with commercial component specifications, we show that with this approach, accuracy in parts per billion ozone or ammonia can be obtained in seconds at path lengths up to 10 km. We have assembled an open-path QCL sensor based on this theoretical approach at City College of New York, and we present preliminary results demonstrating the potential of QCLs in open-path sensing applications.

  2. Open architecture in control system integration

    SciTech Connect

    Wysor, R.W.; Carnal, C.L.; Igou, R.E.

    1993-09-01

    Open architecture offers the manufacturing community a number of advantages in the integration of future machine control systems. Among these advantages is the ability to upgrade and take advantage of innovative new control strategies. A key enabling technology in open architecture control systems is the digital signal processor (DSP). DSPs can be used to provide a complete control system or can enhance the computational capability of larger control systems. The use of DSPs in the integration of open architecture control systems is discussed, including their impact on reliability and control system functionality. In addition, the role of DSPs in control system architecture is addressed.

  3. Information security considerations in open systems architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, S.A. ); Menendez, J.N. )

    1993-02-01

    This paper is part of a series of papers invited by the IEEE POWER CONTROL CENTER WORKING GROUP concerning the changing designs of modern control centers. Papers invited by the Working Group discuss the following issues: Benefits of Openness, Criteria for Evaluating Open EMS Systems, Hardware Design, Configuration Management, Security, Project Management, Data Bases, SCADA, Inter and Intra-System Communications, and Man Machine Interfaces.'' This paper discusses information security and issues related to its achievement in open systems architectures. Beginning with a discussion of the goals of information security and their relation to open systems, the paper provides examples of the threats to electric utility computer systems and the consequences associated with these threats, presents basic countermeasures applicable to all computer systems, and discusses issues specific to open systems architectures.

  4. Quantum Langevin equations for optomechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barchielli, Alberto; Vacchini, Bassano

    2015-08-01

    We provide a fully quantum description of a mechanical oscillator in the presence of thermal environmental noise by means of a quantum Langevin formulation based on quantum stochastic calculus. The system dynamics is determined by symmetry requirements and equipartition at equilibrium, while the environment is described by quantum Bose fields in a suitable non-Fock representation which allows for the introduction of temperature. A generic spectral density of the environment can be described by introducing its state through a suitable P-representation. Including interaction of the mechanical oscillator with a cavity mode via radiation pressure we obtain a description of a simple optomechanical system in which, besides the Langevin equations for the system, one has the exact input-output relations for the quantum noises. The whole theory is valid at arbitrarily low temperature. This allows the exact calculation of the stationary value of the mean energy of the mechanical oscillator, as well as both homodyne and heterodyne spectra. The present analysis allows in particular to study possible cooling scenarios and to obtain the exact connection between observed spectra and fluctuation spectra of the position of the mechanical oscillator.

  5. Heisenberg picture approach to the stability of quantum Markov systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Yu E-mail: zibo.miao@anu.edu.au; Miao, Zibo E-mail: zibo.miao@anu.edu.au; Amini, Hadis; Gough, John; Ugrinovskii, Valery; James, Matthew R.

    2014-06-15

    Quantum Markovian systems, modeled as unitary dilations in the quantum stochastic calculus of Hudson and Parthasarathy, have become standard in current quantum technological applications. This paper investigates the stability theory of such systems. Lyapunov-type conditions in the Heisenberg picture are derived in order to stabilize the evolution of system operators as well as the underlying dynamics of the quantum states. In particular, using the quantum Markov semigroup associated with this quantum stochastic differential equation, we derive sufficient conditions for the existence and stability of a unique and faithful invariant quantum state. Furthermore, this paper proves the quantum invariance principle, which extends the LaSalle invariance principle to quantum systems in the Heisenberg picture. These results are formulated in terms of algebraic constraints suitable for engineering quantum systems that are used in coherent feedback networks.

  6. Heisenberg picture approach to the stability of quantum Markov systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yu; Amini, Hadis; Miao, Zibo; Gough, John; Ugrinovskii, Valery; James, Matthew R.

    2014-06-01

    Quantum Markovian systems, modeled as unitary dilations in the quantum stochastic calculus of Hudson and Parthasarathy, have become standard in current quantum technological applications. This paper investigates the stability theory of such systems. Lyapunov-type conditions in the Heisenberg picture are derived in order to stabilize the evolution of system operators as well as the underlying dynamics of the quantum states. In particular, using the quantum Markov semigroup associated with this quantum stochastic differential equation, we derive sufficient conditions for the existence and stability of a unique and faithful invariant quantum state. Furthermore, this paper proves the quantum invariance principle, which extends the LaSalle invariance principle to quantum systems in the Heisenberg picture. These results are formulated in terms of algebraic constraints suitable for engineering quantum systems that are used in coherent feedback networks.

  7. Quons in a quantum dissipative system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taejin

    2016-03-01

    String theory proves to be an imperative tool to explore the critical behavior of the quantum dissipative system. We discuss the quantum particles moving in two dimensions, in the presence of a uniform magnetic field, subject to a periodic potential and a dissipative force, which are described by the dissipative Wannier-Azbel-Hofstadter (DWAH) model. Using string theory formulation of the model, we find that the elementary excitations of the system at the generic points of the off-critical regions, in the zero temperature limit are quons, which satisfy q-deformed statistics.

  8. Simulation of n-qubit quantum systems. I. Quantum registers and quantum gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, T.; Fritzsche, S.

    2005-12-01

    During recent years, quantum computations and the study of n-qubit quantum systems have attracted a lot of interest, both in theory and experiment. Apart from the promise of performing quantum computations, however, these investigations also revealed a great deal of difficulties which still need to be solved in practice. In quantum computing, unitary and non-unitary quantum operations act on a given set of qubits to form (entangled) states, in which the information is encoded by the overall system often referred to as quantum registers. To facilitate the simulation of such n-qubit quantum systems, we present the FEYNMAN program to provide all necessary tools in order to define and to deal with quantum registers and quantum operations. Although the present version of the program is restricted to unitary transformations, it equally supports—whenever possible—the representation of the quantum registers both, in terms of their state vectors and density matrices. In addition to the composition of two or more quantum registers, moreover, the program also supports their decomposition into various parts by applying the partial trace operation and the concept of the reduced density matrix. Using an interactive design within the framework of MAPLE, therefore, we expect the FEYNMAN program to be helpful not only for teaching the basic elements of quantum computing but also for studying their physical realization in the future. Program summaryTitle of program:FEYNMAN Catalogue number:ADWE Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADWE Program obtainable from:CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:None Computers for which the program is designed:All computers with a license of the computer algebra system MAPLE [Maple is a registered trademark of Waterlo Maple Inc.] Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested:Linux, MS Windows XP Programming language used:MAPLE 9.5 (but should be compatible with 9.0 and 8.0, too) Memory and time required to execute with typical data:Storage and time requirements critically depend on the number of qubits, n, in the quantum registers due to the exponential increase of the associated Hilbert space. In particular, complex algebraic operations may require large amounts of memory even for small qubit numbers. However, most of the standard commands (see Section 4 for simple examples) react promptly for up to five qubits on a normal single-processor machine ( ⩾1GHz with 512 MB memory) and use less than 10 MB memory. No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 8864 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 493 182 Distribution format: tar.gz Nature of the physical problem:During the last decade, quantum computing has been found to provide a revolutionary new form of computation. The algorithms by Shor [P.W. Shor, SIAM J. Sci. Statist. Comput. 26 (1997) 1484] and Grover [L.K. Grover, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79 (1997) 325. [2

  9. Open-system geometric phase based on system-reservoir joint state evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Shi-Biao

    2014-06-01

    The geometric phase is of fundamental interest and plays an important role in quantum information processing. However, the definition and calculation of this phase for open systems remain problematic due to the lack of agreement on generalizations of the parallel transport condition to mixed-state nonunity evolutions. Here we tackle this problem by associating the open-system geometric phase with the parallel transport of the joint system-reservoir state and find that the associated geometric phase can be calculated when the total Hamiltonian is time independent. Our approach not only provides a way around the nonunitary evolution obstacle, but also sheds light on the relation between the geometric phase and the system-reservoir entanglement. Based on this approach, we calculate the geometric phase of different quantum systems subject to energy decay, showing that it is robust against decoherence, which is in distinct contrast with previous results.

  10. Quantum Hall effect in semiconductor systems with quantum dots and antidots

    SciTech Connect

    Beltukov, Ya. M.; Greshnov, A. A.

    2015-04-15

    The integer quantum Hall effect in systems of semiconductor quantum dots and antidots is studied theoretically as a factor of temperature. It is established that the conditions for carrier localization in quantum-dot systems favor the observation of the quantum Hall effect at higher temperatures than in quantum-well systems. The obtained numerical results show that the fundamental plateau corresponding to the transition between the ground and first excited Landau levels can be retained up to a temperature of T ∼ 50 K, which is an order of magnitude higher than in the case of quantum wells. Implementation of the quantum Hall effect at such temperatures requires quantum-dot systems with controllable characteristics, including the optimal size and concentration and moderate geometrical and composition fluctuations. In addition, ordered arrangement is desirable, hence quantum antidots are preferable.

  11. Open Quantum Dynamics Calculations with the Hierarchy Equations of Motion on Parallel Computers

    PubMed Central

    Strümpfer, Johan; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Calculating the evolution of an open quantum system, i.e., a system in contact with a thermal environment, has presented a theoretical and computational challenge for many years. With the advent of supercomputers containing large amounts of memory and many processors, the computational challenge posed by the previously intractable theoretical models can now be addressed. The hierarchy equations of motion present one such model and offer a powerful method that remained under-utilized so far due to its considerable computational expense. By exploiting concurrent processing on parallel computers the hierarchy equations of motion can be applied to biological-scale systems. Herein we introduce the quantum dynamics software PHI, that solves the hierarchical equations of motion. We describe the integrator employed by PHI and demonstrate PHI’s scaling and efficiency running on large parallel computers by applying the software to the calculation of inter-complex excitation transfer between the light harvesting complexes 1 and 2 of purple photosynthetic bacteria, a 50 pigment system. PMID:23105920

  12. Open Quantum Dynamics Calculations with the Hierarchy Equations of Motion on Parallel Computers.

    PubMed

    Strmpfer, Johan; Schulten, Klaus

    2012-08-14

    Calculating the evolution of an open quantum system, i.e., a system in contact with a thermal environment, has presented a theoretical and computational challenge for many years. With the advent of supercomputers containing large amounts of memory and many processors, the computational challenge posed by the previously intractable theoretical models can now be addressed. The hierarchy equations of motion present one such model and offer a powerful method that remained under-utilized so far due to its considerable computational expense. By exploiting concurrent processing on parallel computers the hierarchy equations of motion can be applied to biological-scale systems. Herein we introduce the quantum dynamics software PHI, that solves the hierarchical equations of motion. We describe the integrator employed by PHI and demonstrate PHI's scaling and efficiency running on large parallel computers by applying the software to the calculation of inter-complex excitation transfer between the light harvesting complexes 1 and 2 of purple photosynthetic bacteria, a 50 pigment system. PMID:23105920

  13. Quantum Discord for d⊗2 Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhihao; Chen, Zhihua; Fanchini, Felipe Fernandes; Fei, Shao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytical solution for classical correlation, defined in terms of linear entropy, in an arbitrary system when the second subsystem is measured. We show that the optimal measurements used in the maximization of the classical correlation in terms of linear entropy, when used to calculate the quantum discord in terms of von Neumann entropy, result in a tight upper bound for arbitrary systems. This bound agrees with all known analytical results about quantum discord in terms of von Neumann entropy and, when comparing it with the numerical results for 106 two-qubit random density matrices, we obtain an average deviation of order 10−4. Furthermore, our results give a way to calculate the quantum discord for arbitrary n-qubit GHZ and W states evolving under the action of the amplitude damping noisy channel. PMID:26036771

  14. Witnessing Quantum Coherence: from solid-state to biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Che-Ming; Lambert, Neill; Chen, Yueh-Nan; Chen, Guang-Yin; Nori, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Quantum coherence is one of the primary non-classical features of quantum systems. While protocols such as the Leggett-Garg inequality (LGI) and quantum tomography can be used to test for the existence of quantum coherence and dynamics in a given system, unambiguously detecting inherent “quantumness” still faces serious obstacles in terms of experimental feasibility and efficiency, particularly in complex systems. Here we introduce two “quantum witnesses” to efficiently verify quantum coherence and dynamics in the time domain, without the expense and burden of non-invasive measurements or full tomographic processes. Using several physical examples, including quantum transport in solid-state nanostructures and in biological organisms, we show that these quantum witnesses are robust and have a much finer resolution in their detection window than the LGI has. These robust quantum indicators may assist in reducing the experimental overhead in unambiguously verifying quantum coherence in complex systems. PMID:23185690

  15. Quantum temporal probabilities in tunneling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anastopoulos, Charis Savvidou, Ntina

    2013-09-15

    We study the temporal aspects of quantum tunneling as manifested in time-of-arrival experiments in which the detected particle tunnels through a potential barrier. In particular, we present a general method for constructing temporal probabilities in tunneling systems that (i) defines ‘classical’ time observables for quantum systems and (ii) applies to relativistic particles interacting through quantum fields. We show that the relevant probabilities are defined in terms of specific correlation functions of the quantum field associated with tunneling particles. We construct a probability distribution with respect to the time of particle detection that contains all information about the temporal aspects of the tunneling process. In specific cases, this probability distribution leads to the definition of a delay time that, for parity-symmetric potentials, reduces to the phase time of Bohm and Wigner. We apply our results to piecewise constant potentials, by deriving the appropriate junction conditions on the points of discontinuity. For the double square potential, in particular, we demonstrate the existence of (at least) two physically relevant time parameters, the delay time and a decay rate that describes the escape of particles trapped in the inter-barrier region. Finally, we propose a resolution to the paradox of apparent superluminal velocities for tunneling particles. We demonstrate that the idea of faster-than-light speeds in tunneling follows from an inadmissible use of classical reasoning in the description of quantum systems. -- Highlights: •Present a general methodology for deriving temporal probabilities in tunneling systems. •Treatment applies to relativistic particles interacting through quantum fields. •Derive a new expression for tunneling time. •Identify new time parameters relevant to tunneling. •Propose a resolution of the superluminality paradox in tunneling.

  16. Dynamics of time correlation functions and stochastic quantum trajectories methods in Non-Markovian systems

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, Daniel; Vega, Ines de

    2010-06-15

    Open quantum systems are often encountered in many different physical situations. From quantum optics to statistical mechanics, they are fundamental in the understanding of a great variety of different phenomena. Some of the most common examples are the relaxation to equilibrium, the existence of nonequilibrium stationary states, and the dynamics of atoms in interaction with electromagnetic fields. A crucial step in the analysis is to consider the quantum open system and its environment as the two mutually interacting components of a larger isolated system. Thereafter, the so-called Markov approximation is often considered, which consists on assuming that the time scales associated to the dynamics of the quantum open system are larger than those of the environment. It is the interplay of the different time scales associated with the system and the environment what determines the validity of the different approximations made. In this paper we will discuss the dynamics of a open quantum system in contact with a reservoir when the Markov approximation is not valid, and we have to include some non-Markovian or memory effects.

  17. Semiclassical analysis of quantum systems with constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsobanjan, Artur

    This dissertation addresses the problem of constructing true degrees of freedom in quantum mechanical systems with constraints. The method developed relies on assuming the behavior of the system of interest is "nearly classical", or semiclassical, in a precise quantitative sense. The approximation is formulated as a perturbative hierarchy of the expectation values of quantum observables and their non-linear combinations, such as spreads and correlations. We formulate the constraint conditions and additional quantum gauge transformations that arise directly on the aforementioned quantities. We specialize this framework to several situations of particular interest. The first situation considered is the case of a constraint that commutes with all quantum observables, which is appropriate for quantization of a Lie algebra with a single Casimir polynomial. Through explicit order-by order counting argue that the true degrees of freedom are captured correctly at each order of the approximation. The rest of the models considered are motivated by the canonical approach to quantizing general relativity. The homogeneous sector of general relativity splits into classes of models, according to topology, which are described by a finite number of degrees of freedom and can therefore be quantized as quantum mechanical systems, making our construction directly applicable. In the Hamiltonian formulation the dynamics of these systems is governed by the Hamiltonian constraint, which, in the quantum theory, gives rise to several conceptual and technical issues collectively known as the Problem of Time. One of the aspects of this problem that does not possess a general solution is the dynamical interpretation of the theory. We use our construction, truncated at the leading order in quantum corrections, together with the intuition gained from dealing with constrained systems in classical mechanics, to define local notion of dynamics relative to a chosen configuration clock variable. We consider a class of models, where the chosen clock in not globally valid, eventually leading to singular dynamics. Within these models we construct an explicit transformation between dynamical evolution relative to two distinct clocks, thus providing a consistent local dynamical interpretation of the true degrees of freedom of the quantum theory.

  18. EDITORIAL: CAMOP: Quantum Non-Stationary Systems CAMOP: Quantum Non-Stationary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodonov, Victor V.; Man'ko, Margarita A.

    2010-09-01

    Although time-dependent quantum systems have been studied since the very beginning of quantum mechanics, they continue to attract the attention of many researchers, and almost every decade new important discoveries or new fields of application are made. Among the impressive results or by-products of these studies, one should note the discovery of the path integral method in the 1940s, coherent and squeezed states in the 1960-70s, quantum tunneling in Josephson contacts and SQUIDs in the 1960s, the theory of time-dependent quantum invariants in the 1960-70s, different forms of quantum master equations in the 1960-70s, the Zeno effect in the 1970s, the concept of geometric phase in the 1980s, decoherence of macroscopic superpositions in the 1980s, quantum non-demolition measurements in the 1980s, dynamics of particles in quantum traps and cavity QED in the 1980-90s, and time-dependent processes in mesoscopic quantum devices in the 1990s. All these topics continue to be the subject of many publications. Now we are witnessing a new wave of interest in quantum non-stationary systems in different areas, from cosmology (the very first moments of the Universe) and quantum field theory (particle pair creation in ultra-strong fields) to elementary particle physics (neutrino oscillations). A rapid increase in the number of theoretical and experimental works on time-dependent phenomena is also observed in quantum optics, quantum information theory and condensed matter physics. Time-dependent tunneling and time-dependent transport in nano-structures are examples of such phenomena. Another emerging direction of study, stimulated by impressive progress in experimental techniques, is related to attempts to observe the quantum behavior of macroscopic objects, such as mirrors interacting with quantum fields in nano-resonators. Quantum effects manifest themselves in the dynamics of nano-electromechanical systems; they are dominant in the quite new and very promising field of circuit QED. Another rapidly growing research field (although its origin can be traced to the beginning of the 1980s) is the quantum control of evolution at the microscopic level. These examples show that quantum non-stationary systems continue to be a living and very interesting part of quantum physics, uniting researchers from many different areas. Thus it is no mere chance that several special scientific meetings devoted to these topics have been organized recently. One was the international seminar 'Time-Dependent Phenomena in Quantum Mechanics' organized by Manfred Kleber and Tobias Kramer in 2007 at Blaubeuren, Germany. The proceedings of that event were published in 2008 as volume 99 of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Another recent meeting was the International Workshop on Quantum Non-Stationary Systems, held on 19-23 October 2009 at the International Center for Condensed Matter Physics (ICCMP) in Brasilia, Brazil. It was organized and directed by Victor Dodonov (Institute of Physics, University of Brasilia, Brazil), Vladimir Man'ko (P N Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow, Russia) and Salomon Mizrahi (Physics Department, Federal University of Sao Carlos, Brazil). This event was accompanied by a satellite workshop 'Quantum Dynamics in Optics and Matter', organized by Salomon Mizrahi and Victor Dodonov on 25-26 October 2009 at the Physics Department of the Federal University of Sao Carlos, Brazil. These two workshops, supported by the Brazilian federal agencies CAPES and CNPq and the local agencies FAP-DF and FAPESP, were attended by more than 120 participants from 16 countries. Almost 50 invited talks and 20 poster presentations covered a wide area of research in quantum mechanics, quantum optics and quantum information. This special issue of CAMOP/Physica Scripta contains contributions presented by some invited speakers and participants of the workshop in Brasilia. Although they do not cover all of the wide spectrum of problems related to quantum non-stationary systems, they nonetheless show some general trends. However, readers should remember that these comments represent the personal points of view of their authors. About a third of the comments are devoted to the evolution of quantum systems in the presence of dissipation or other sources of decoherence. This area, started by Landau in 1927, still contains many extremely interesting and unsolved problems. Here they are discussed in view of such different applications as the dynamics of quantum entanglement, cavity QED, optomechanics and the dynamical Casimir effect. Another group of comments deals with different (e.g. geometrical, tomographic, PT-symmetric) approaches to the dynamics of quantum systems, which have been developed in the past two decades. In particular, the problem of transition from quantum to classical description is considered and the inequalities generalizing the standard uncertainty relations are discussed in this connection. Three comments are devoted to the applications of nonclassical states, analytic representations and the algebraic techniques for resolving problems in quantum information and quantum statistical physics. The other contributions are related to different aspects of the dynamics of concrete physical systems, such as the wave-packet approach to the description of transport phenomena in mesoscopic systems, tunneling phenomena in low-dimensional semiconductor structures and resonance states of two-electron quantum dots. We thank all the authors and referees for their efforts in preparing this special issue. We hope that the comments in this collection will be useful for interested readers.

  19. Cavity optomechanics mediated by a quantum two-level system

    PubMed Central

    Pirkkalainen, J.-M.; Cho, S.U.; Massel, F.; Tuorila, J.; Heikkilä, T.T.; Hakonen, P.J.; Sillanpää, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Coupling electromagnetic waves in a cavity and mechanical vibrations via the radiation pressure of photons is a promising platform for investigations of quantum–mechanical properties of motion. A drawback is that the effect of one photon tends to be tiny, and hence one of the pressing challenges is to substantially increase the interaction strength. A novel scenario is to introduce into the setup a quantum two-level system (qubit), which, besides strengthening the coupling, allows for rich physics via strongly enhanced nonlinearities. Here we present a design of cavity optomechanics in the microwave frequency regime involving a Josephson junction qubit. We demonstrate boosting of the radiation–pressure interaction by six orders of magnitude, allowing to approach the strong coupling regime. We observe nonlinear phenomena at single-photon energies, such as an enhanced damping attributed to the qubit. This work opens up nonlinear cavity optomechanics as a plausible tool for the study of quantum properties of motion. PMID:25912295

  20. First Experimental Evidence for Quantum Echoes in Scattering Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dembowski, C.; Dietz, B.; Friedrich, T.; Gräf, H.-D.; Heine, A.; Mejía-Monasterio, C.; Miski-Oglu, M.; Richter, A.; Seligman, T. H.

    2004-09-01

    A self-pulsing effect termed quantum echoes has been observed in experiments with an open superconducting and a normal conducting microwave billiard whose geometry provides soft chaos, i.e., a mixed phase space portrait with a large stable island. For such systems a periodic response to an incoming pulse has been predicted. Its period has been associated with the degree of development of a horseshoe describing the topology of the classical dynamics. The experiments confirm this picture and reveal the topological information.

  1. Local thermoelectric probes of nonequilibrium quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, Charles

    A theory of local temperature and voltage measurement in an interacting quantum system far from equilibrium is developed. We prove that a steady-state measurement by a floating thermoelectric probe is unique if it exists. Furthermore, we show that a solution exists provided there is no net local population inversion. In the case of population inversion, the system may be assigned a (unique) negative temperature. An expression for the local entropy of a nonequilibrium quantum system is introduced that, together with the local temperature and voltage, allows for a complete analysis of the local thermodynamics of the thermoelectric processes in the system. The Clausius form of the second law and the third law are shown to hold exactly locally, while the zeroth and first laws are shown to be valid to leading order in the Sommerfeld expansion. The local quantum thermodynamics underlying the enhancement of thermoelectricity by quantum interference is discussed. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Award No. DE-SC0006699.

  2. Nonseparability and noncommutativity in quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Torre, A. C.; Catuogno, P.; Ferrando, S.

    1991-02-01

    The quantum covariance function is calculated in some EPR-like systems for commuting observables in order to illustrate the nonseparability contribution to the incompatibility between commuting operators. It is shown that an attempt to eliminate the noncommutativity contribution to incompatibility fails in finite-dimensional cases and would require a nonseparable Hilbert space (nonseparable in the mathematical sense).

  3. Coherent control in simple quantum systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prants, Sergey V.

    1995-01-01

    Coherent dynamics of two, three, and four-level quantum systems, simultaneously driven by concurrent laser pulses of arbitrary and different forms, is treated by using a nonperturbative, group-theoretical approach. The respective evolution matrices are calculated in an explicit form. General aspects of controllability of few-level atoms by using laser fields are treated analytically.

  4. Lithography system using quantum entangled photons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Colin (Inventor); Dowling, Jonathan (Inventor); della Rossa, Giovanni (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A system of etching using quantum entangled particles to get shorter interference fringes. An interferometer is used to obtain an interference fringe. N entangled photons are input to the interferometer. This reduces the distance between interference fringes by n, where again n is the number of entangled photons.

  5. Classical system boundaries cannot be determined within quantum Darwinism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Chris

    Multiple observers who interact with environmental encodings of the states of a macroscopic quantum system S as required by quantum Darwinism cannot demonstrate that they are jointly observing S without a joint a priori assumption of a classical boundary separating S from its environment E. Quantum Darwinism cannot, therefore, be regarded as providing a purely quantum-mechanical explanation of the "emergence" of classicality.

  6. Non-Markovian theory of open systems in classical limit.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, A A

    2004-08-01

    A fully classical limit of the recently published quantum-classical approximation [A. A. Neufeld, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 2488 (2003)] is obtained and analyzed. The resulting kinetic equations are capable of describing the evolution of an open system on the entire time axis, including the short-time non-Markovian stage, and are valid beyond linear response regime. We have shown, that proceeding to the classical mechanics limit we restrict the class of allowed correlations between an open system and a canonical bath, so that the initial conditions and the relaxation operator has to be appropriately modified (projected). Disregard of the projection may lead to unphysical behavior, since mechanism of the decay of some correlations is essentially of quantum-mechanical nature, and is not correctly described by classical mechanics. The projection (quantum correction to the kinetics) is particularly important for the non-Markovian regime of relaxation towards canonical equilibrium. The conformity of the developed method to the conventional approaches is demonstrated using a model of Brownian motion (heavy particle in the bath of light ones), for which the obtained non-Markovian equations are reduced to the standard Fokker-Planck equation in phase space. PMID:15281851

  7. Quantum cryptographic system with reduced data loss

    DOEpatents

    Lo, H.K.; Chau, H.F.

    1998-03-24

    A secure method for distributing a random cryptographic key with reduced data loss is disclosed. Traditional quantum key distribution systems employ similar probabilities for the different communication modes and thus reject at least half of the transmitted data. The invention substantially reduces the amount of discarded data (those that are encoded and decoded in different communication modes e.g. using different operators) in quantum key distribution without compromising security by using significantly different probabilities for the different communication modes. Data is separated into various sets according to the actual operators used in the encoding and decoding process and the error rate for each set is determined individually. The invention increases the key distribution rate of the BB84 key distribution scheme proposed by Bennett and Brassard in 1984. Using the invention, the key distribution rate increases with the number of quantum signals transmitted and can be doubled asymptotically. 23 figs.

  8. Quantum cryptographic system with reduced data loss

    DOEpatents

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong; Chau, Hoi Fung

    1998-01-01

    A secure method for distributing a random cryptographic key with reduced data loss. Traditional quantum key distribution systems employ similar probabilities for the different communication modes and thus reject at least half of the transmitted data. The invention substantially reduces the amount of discarded data (those that are encoded and decoded in different communication modes e.g. using different operators) in quantum key distribution without compromising security by using significantly different probabilities for the different communication modes. Data is separated into various sets according to the actual operators used in the encoding and decoding process and the error rate for each set is determined individually. The invention increases the key distribution rate of the BB84 key distribution scheme proposed by Bennett and Brassard in 1984. Using the invention, the key distribution rate increases with the number of quantum signals transmitted and can be doubled asymptotically.

  9. Open Source, Open Standards, and Health Care Information Systems

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of the improvements in patient safety, quality of patient care, and efficiency that health care information systems have the potential to bring has led to significant investment. Globally the sale of health care information systems now represents a multibillion dollar industry. As policy makers, health care professionals, and patients, we have a responsibility to maximize the return on this investment. To this end we analyze alternative licensing and software development models, as well as the role of standards. We describe how licensing affects development. We argue for the superiority of open source licensing to promote safer, more effective health care information systems. We claim that open source licensing in health care information systems is essential to rational procurement strategy. PMID:21447469

  10. An impurity-induced gap system as a quantum data bus for quantum state transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bing; Li, Yong; Song, Z.; Sun, C.-P.

    2014-09-15

    We introduce a tight-binding chain with a single impurity to act as a quantum data bus for perfect quantum state transfer. Our proposal is based on the weak coupling limit of the two outermost quantum dots to the data bus, which is a gapped system induced by the impurity. By connecting two quantum dots to two sites of the data bus, the system can accomplish a high-fidelity and long-distance quantum state transfer. Numerical simulations for finite system show that the numerical and analytical results of the effective coupling strength agree well with each other. Moreover, we study the robustness of this quantum communication protocol in the presence of disorder in the couplings between the nearest-neighbor quantum dots. We find that the gap of the system plays an important role in robust quantum state transfer.

  11. Open path atmospheric spectroscopy using room temperature operated pulsed quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Taslakov, M; Simeonov, V; van den Bergh, H

    2006-04-01

    We report the application of a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser for 5.8 km long open path spectroscopic monitoring of ozone, water vapor and CO(2). The thermal chirp during a 140 or 200 ns long excitation pulse is used for fast wavelength scanning. The fast wavelength scanning has the advantage of the measured spectra not being affected by atmospheric turbulence, which is essential for long open path measurements. An almost linear tuning of about 0.6 and 1.2 cm(-1) is achieved, respectively. Lines from the nu(3) vibrational band of the ozone spectra centered at 1,031 and 1,049 cm(-1) is used for ozone detection by differential absorption. The lowest column densities (LCD) for ozone of the order of 0.3 ppmm retrieved from the absorption spectra for averaging times less than 20s are better then the LCD value of 2 ppmm measured with UV DOAS systems. The intrinsic haze immunity of mid-IR laser sources is an additional important advantage of mid-IR open path spectroscopy, compared with standard UV-vis DOAS. The third major advantage of the method is the possibility to measure more inorganic and organic atmospheric species compared to the UV-vis DOAS. PMID:16503192

  12. Open Problems in the Theory of Nuclear Open Quantum Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, N.; Nazarewicz, Witold; Okolowicz, J.; Ploszajczak, M.

    2010-01-01

    Is there a connection between the branch point singularity at the particle emission threshold and the appearance of cluster states which reveal the structure of a corresponding reaction channel? Which nuclear states are most impacted by the coupling to the scattering continuum? What should be the most important steps in developing the theory that will truly unify nuclear structure and nuclear reactions? The common denominator of these questions is the continuum shell-model approach to bound and unbound nuclear states, nuclear decays, and reactions.

  13. Uncertainty relation for non-Hamiltonian quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2013-01-15

    General forms of uncertainty relations for quantum observables of non-Hamiltonian quantum systems are considered. Special cases of uncertainty relations are discussed. The uncertainty relations for non-Hamiltonian quantum systems are considered in the Schroedinger-Robertson form since it allows us to take into account Lie-Jordan algebra of quantum observables. In uncertainty relations, the time dependence of quantum observables and the properties of this dependence are discussed. We take into account that a time evolution of observables of a non-Hamiltonian quantum system is not an endomorphism with respect to Lie, Jordan, and associative multiplications.

  14. Open Marriage: Implications for Human Service Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Nena; O'Neill, George

    1973-01-01

    The authors of Open Marriage reiterate the meaning and possibilities of the open marriage concept and advance suggestions for change in the areas of residence, work, child care, and educational patterns. Human service systems must search out the universal values to be maintained in all human relationships. (Editor)

  15. Exact non-Markovian master equations for multiple qubit systems: Quantum-trajectory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yusui; You, J. Q.; Yu, Ting

    2014-11-01

    A wide class of exact master equations for a multiple qubit system can be explicitly constructed by using the corresponding exact non-Markovian quantum-state diffusion equations. These exact master equations arise naturally from the quantum decoherence dynamics of qubit system as a quantum memory coupled to a collective colored noisy source. The exact master equations are also important in optimal quantum control, quantum dissipation, and quantum thermodynamics. In this paper, we show that the exact non-Markovian master equation for a dissipative N -qubit system can be derived explicitly from the statistical average of the corresponding non-Markovian quantum trajectories. We illustrated our general formulation by an explicit construction of a three-qubit system coupled to a non-Markovian bosonic environment. This multiple qubit master equation offers an accurate time evolution of quantum systems in various domains, and paves the way to investigate the memory effect of an open system in a non-Markovian regime without any approximation.

  16. An E-payment system based on quantum group signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaojun, Wen

    2010-12-01

    Security and anonymity are essential to E-payment systems. However, existing E-payment systems will easily be broken into soon with the emergence of quantum computers. In this paper, we propose an E-payment system based on quantum group signature. In contrast to classical E-payment systems, our quantum E-payment system can protect not only the users' anonymity but also the inner structure of customer groups. Because of adopting the two techniques of quantum key distribution, a one-time pad and quantum group signature, unconditional security of our E-payment system is guaranteed.

  17. Open System Architecture design for planet surface systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petri, D. A.; Pieniazek, L. A.; Toups, L. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Open System Architecture is an approach to meeting the needs for flexibility and evolution of the U.S. Space Exploration Initiative program of the manned exploration of the solar system and its permanent settlement. This paper investigates the issues that future activities of the planet exploration program must confront, defines the basic concepts that provide the basis for establishing an Open System Architecture, identifies the appropriate features of such an architecture, and discusses examples of Open System Architectures.

  18. Charge and momentum in quantum electromechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Steven D.

    We address theoretical questions in quantum nanoelectromechanical systems. These are systems where a mechanical oscillator is coupled to a conductor in which single electrons or the quantum coherence of electrons plays an important role. The interplay of quantum electronics with the motion of a relatively macroscopic object provides a way to probe both the mechanics and the electronics with extraordinary sensitivity. We address three problems based on monitoring either the electronic or mechanical component to measure quantum properties of the coupled system. First, we study the full charge transfer statistics and correlations in a tunnel junction coupled to a mechanical oscillator, viewing the current measured through the junction as a detector of the oscillator position. We find several surprising results that are not obtained in a study of only the average and variance of tunneled charge. Even when the oscillator is weakly coupled to the tunnel junction, it can lead to highly non-Gaussian tunneling statistics; moreover, non-Gaussian correlations between the oscillator motion and transferred charge show that the backaction of tunneling electrons on the oscillator cannot be fully described as coupling the oscillator to an effective thermal bath. Second, we use a general scattering approach to study the backaction of a quantum point contact position detector on a mechanical oscillator. Our results remain valid far from the tunneling limit, an important experimental regime and where previous calculations of backaction break down. We obtain the backaction damping and heating directly in terms of the scattering matrix, and find that not only the transmission but also the scattering phases play an important role. Finally, we study a quantum dot capacitively coupled to an oscillating cantilever. In this case, the damping of the mechanical oscillator is monitored to measure quantum electronic properties of the dot. For weak electromechanical coupling, we find an effective temperature-dependent level repulsion of Coulomb blockade peaks in the damping versus gate voltage, and show that this is a result of degenerate energy levels on the dot. We further consider the regime of strong coupling, where the cantilever motion strongly and nonlinearly affects the charge on the dot. In this regime, the lineshape asymmetry of Coulomb blockade peaks in the damping, also a result of degeneracy, is dramatically enhanced. These results are in excellent agreement with experimental observations.

  19. Observable measure of quantum coherence in finite dimensional systems.

    PubMed

    Girolami, Davide

    2014-10-24

    Quantum coherence is the key resource for quantum technology, with applications in quantum optics, information processing, metrology, and cryptography. Yet, there is no universally efficient method for quantifying coherence either in theoretical or in experimental practice. I introduce a framework for measuring quantum coherence in finite dimensional systems. I define a theoretical measure which satisfies the reliability criteria established in the context of quantum resource theories. Then, I present an experimental scheme implementable with current technology which evaluates the quantum coherence of an unknown state of a d-dimensional system by performing two programmable measurements on an ancillary qubit, in place of the O(d2) direct measurements required by full state reconstruction. The result yields a benchmark for monitoring quantum effects in complex systems, e.g., certifying nonclassicality in quantum protocols and probing the quantum behavior of biological complexes. PMID:25379903

  20. Focus on coherent control of complex quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whaley, Birgitta; Milburn, Gerard

    2015-10-01

    The rapid growth of quantum information sciences over the past few decades has fueled a corresponding rise in high profile applications in fields such as metrology, sensors, spintronics, and attosecond dynamics, in addition to quantum information processing. Realizing this potential of today’s quantum science and the novel technologies based on this requires a high degree of coherent control of quantum systems. While early efforts in systematizing methods for high fidelity quantum control focused on isolated or closed quantum systems, recent advances in experimental design, measurement and monitoring, have stimulated both need and interest in the control of complex or large scale quantum systems that may also be coupled to an interactive environment or reservoir. This focus issue brings together new theoretical and experimental work addressing the formulation and implementation of quantum control for a broad range of applications in quantum science and technology today.

  1. EDITORIAL: Focus on Mechanical Systems at the Quantum Limit FOCUS ON MECHANICAL SYSTEMS AT THE QUANTUM LIMIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspelmeyer, Markus; Schwab, Keith

    2008-09-01

    The last five years have witnessed an amazing development in the field of nano- and micromechanics. What was widely considered fantasy ten years ago is about to become an experimental reality: the quantum regime of mechanical systems is within reach of current experiments. Two factors (among many) have contributed significantly to this situation. As part of the widespread effort into nanoscience and nanofabrication, it is now possible to produce high-quality nanomechanical and micromechanical resonators, spanning length scales of millimetres to nanometres, and frequencies from kilohertz to gigahertz. Researchers coupled these mechanical elements to high-sensitivity actuation and readout systems such as single-electron transistors, quantum dots, atomic point contacts, SQUID loops, high-finesse optical or microwave-cavities etc. Some of these ultra-sensitive readout schemes are in principle capable of detection at the quantum limit and a large part of the experimental effort is at present devoted to achieving this. On the other hand, the fact that the groups working in the field come from various different physics backgrounds—the authors of this editorial are a representative sample—has been a constant source of inspiration for helpful theoretical and experimental tools that have been adapted from other fields to the mechanical realm. To name just one example: ideas from quantum optics have led to the recent demonstration (both in theory and experiment) that coupling a mechanical resonator to a high-finesse optical cavity can be fully analogous to the well-known sideband-resolved laser cooling of ions and hence is capable in principle of cooling a mechanical mode into its quantum ground state. There is no doubt that such interdisciplinarity has been a crucial element for the development of the field. It is interesting to note that a very similar sociological phenomenon occurred earlier in the quantum information community, an area which is deeply enriched by the diverse backgrounds and approaches of the researchers. As diverse as the approaches are the manifold of goals and perspectives for operating mechanical systems close to or within the quantum regime. Already now, nanomechanical sensors achieve single-molecule mass detection and magnetic resonance force detection from single-electron spins although they are operated far from quantum. Quantum-limited mechanical devices promise a new technology with hitherto unachieved performance for high-resolution sensing. This is also of high relevance for macroscopic mechanical resonators used in gravitational wave detectors. Furthermore, the increasing capability to couple mechanical modes to individual quantum systems raises the interesting question of whether mechanics can serve as a quantum bus in hybrid implementations of quantum information processing. Finally, the possibility of generating quantum superposition states that involve displacements of a massive macroscopic object (such as the center of mass of a mechanical beam) provides a completely new parameter regime for testing quantum theory over the amazing range from nanomechanical objects of several picograms up to gram-scale mirrors used in gravitational wave interferometers. We are looking forward to these fascinating developments! This Focus Issue is intended to highlight the present status of the field and to provide both introduction and motivation for students and researchers who want to get familiar with this exciting area or even want to join it. It also complements the conference activities of our community during the last year, where a series of dedicated invited sessions at several international conferences (APS March Meeting 2008, CLEO/QELS 2008, OSA Frontiers in Optics 2008, PQE 2008/2009 etc) culminated in the first Gordon Conference on 'Mechanical Systems at the Quantum Limit'. Given the fast development of the field it was not surprising to see that during the collection of the following contributions new progress was reported almost on a monthly basis and new groups entered the field. We intend to keep submission to this Focus Issue open for some time and invite everyone to share their latest results with us. And finally, a note to our fellow colleagues: keep up the good work! We would like to call the next Focus Issue 'Mechanical Systems IN the Quantum Regime'. Focus on Mechanical Systems at the Quantum Limit Contents Classical to quantum transition of a driven nonlinear nanomechanical resonator Itamar Katz, Ron Lifshitz, Alex Retzker and Raphael Straub Experimental optomechanics with silicon micromirrors Olivier Arcizet, Chiara Molinelli, Tristan Briant, Pierre-François Cohadon, Antoine Heidmann, Jean-Marie Mackowski, Christophe Michel, Laurent Pinard, Olivier Français and Lionel Rousseau Nonlinear quantum metrology using coupled nanomechanical resonators M J Woolley, G J Milburn and Carlton M Caves All mechanical mixing by means of orthogonally coupled cantilevers A Knoll, O Züger and U Duerig Parametric coupling between macroscopic quantum resonators L Tian, M S Allman and R W Simmonds Quantum noise in a nanomechanical Duffing resonator E Babourina-Brooks, A Doherty and G J Milburn Creating and verifying a quantum superposition in a micro-optomechanical system Dustin Kleckner, Igor Pikovski, Evan Jeffrey, Luuk Ament, Eric Eliel, Jeroen van den Brink and Dirk Bouwmeester Ground-state cooling of a nanomechanical resonator via a Cooper-pair box qubit Konstanze Jaehne, Klemens Hammerer and Margareta Wallquist Dissipation in circuit quantum electrodynamics: lasing and cooling of a low-frequency oscillator Julian Hauss, Arkady Fedorov, Stephan André, Valentina Brosco, Carsten Hutter, Robin Kothari, Sunil Yeshwanth, Alexander Shnirman and Gerd Schön Route to ponderomotive entanglement of light via optically trapped mirrors Christopher Wipf, Thomas Corbitt, Yanbei Chen and Nergis Mavalvala Nanomechanical-resonator-assisted induced transparency in a Cooper-pair box system Xiao-Zhong Yuan, Hsi-Sheng Goan, Chien-Hung Lin, Ka-Di Zhu and Yi-Wen Jiang High-sensitivity monitoring of micromechanical vibration using optical whispering gallery mode resonators A Schliesser, G Anetsberger, R Rivière, O Arcizet and T J Kippenberg Optomechanical to mechanical entanglement transformation Giovanni Vacanti, Mauro Paternostro, G Massimo Palma and Vlatko Vedral The optomechanical instability in the quantum regime Max Ludwig, Björn Kubala and Florian Marquardt Quantum limits of photothermal and radiation pressure cooling of a movable mirror M Pinard and A Dantan Mechanical feedback in the high-frequency limit R El Boubsi, O Usmani and Ya M Blanter Back-action evasion and squeezing of a mechanical resonator using a cavity detector A A Clerk, F Marquardt and K Jacobs Simultaneous cooling and entanglement of mechanical modes of a micromirror in an optical cavity Claudiu Genes, David Vitali and Paolo Tombesi Dispersive optomechanics: a membrane inside a cavity A M Jayich, J C Sankey, B M Zwickl, C Yang, J D Thompson, S M Girvin, A A Clerk, F Marquardt and J G E Harris Cavity-assisted backaction cooling of mechanical resonators I Wilson-Rae, N Nooshi, J Dobrindt, T J Kippenberg and W Zwerger Cavity cooling of a nanomechanical resonator by light scattering I Favero and K Karrai Probing the quantum coherence of a nanomechanical resonator using a superconducting qubit: II. Implementation M P Blencowe and A D Armour Probing the quantum coherence of a nanomechanical resonator using a superconducting qubit: I. Echo scheme A D Armour and M P Blencowe Nanoelectromechanics of suspended carbon nanotubes A K Hüttel, M Poot, B Witkamp and H S J van der Zant Prospects for cooling nanomechanical motion by coupling to a superconducting microwave resonator J D Teufel, C A Regal and K W Lehnert

  2. Multiple-state quantum Otto engine, 1D box system

    SciTech Connect

    Latifah, E.; Purwanto, A.

    2014-03-24

    Quantum heat engines produce work using quantum matter as their working substance. We studied adiabatic and isochoric processes and defined the general force according to quantum system. The processes and general force are used to evaluate a quantum Otto engine based on multiple-state of one dimensional box system and calculate the efficiency. As a result, the efficiency depends on the ratio of initial and final width of system under adiabatic processes.

  3. OpenRIMS: an open architecture radiology informatics Management system.

    PubMed

    Langer, Steve G

    2002-01-01

    The following are benefits of an integrated picture archiving and communication system/radiology information system archive built with open-source tools and methods: open source, inexpensive interfaces can be updated as needed, and reduced risk of redundant and inconsistent data. Also, wide adoption would promote standard data mining tools, reducing user needs to learn multiple methods to perform the same task. A model has been constructed capable of accepting orders, performing exam resource scheduling, providing Digital communications in Medicine (DICOM) work list information to modalities, archiving studies, and supporting DICOM query/retrieve from third-party viewing software. The multitiered architecture uses a single database communicating via an open database connectivity bridge to a Linux server with Health Level 7 (HL7), DICOM, and HTTP connections. Human interaction is supported via a browser, whereas other informatics systems communicate over the HL7 and DICOM links. The system is still under development, but the primary database schema is complete, as are key pieces of the Web user interface. Additional work is needed on the DICOM/HL7 interface broker and completion of the base DICOM service classes. PMID:12105742

  4. Path integrals for dimerized quantum spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foussats, Adriana; Greco, Andrés; Muramatsu, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Dimerized quantum spin systems may appear under several circumstances, e.g. by a modulation of the antiferromagnetic exchange coupling in space, or in frustrated quantum antiferromagnets. In general, such systems display a quantum phase transition to a Néel state as a function of a suitable coupling constant. We present here two path-integral formulations appropriate for spin S=1/2 dimerized systems. The first one deals with a description of the dimers degrees of freedom in an SO(4) manifold, while the second one provides a path-integral for the bond-operators introduced by Sachdev and Bhatt. The path-integral quantization is performed using the Faddeev-Jackiw symplectic formalism for constrained systems, such that the measures and constraints that result from the algebra of the operators is provided in both cases. As an example we consider a spin-Peierls chain, and show how to arrive at the corresponding field-theory, starting with both an SO(4) formulation and bond-operators.

  5. Quantum phase transitions in frustrated magnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wölfle, P.; Schmitteckert, P.

    2015-07-01

    We review our recent work on quantum phase transitions in frustrated magnetic systems. In the first part a Pseudo Fermion Functional Renormalization Group (PFFRG) method is presented. By using an exact representation of spin 1/2 operators in terms of pseudofermions a quantum spin Hamiltonian may be mapped onto an interacting fermion system. For the latter an FRG treatment is employed. The results for the J1-J2 model and similar models of frustrated interaction show phase diagrams in agreement with those obtained by other methods, but give more detailed information on the nature of correlations, in particular in the non-magnetic phases. Applications of PFFRG to geometrically frustrated systems and to highly anisotropic Kitaev type models are also reported. In the second part the derivation of quantum spin models from the microscopic many-body Hamiltonian is discussed. The results for multiband systems with strong spin-orbit interaction encountered in the iridates class of compounds are shown to resolve some of the questions posed by experiment.

  6. Vibrational modes in the quantum Hall system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Rachel; Yan, Bin; Daily, Kevin; Greene, Chris H.

    The hyperspherical adiabatic technique is more familiar to atomic and nuclear few-body systems, but can also be applied with high accuracy to the many-body quantum Hall problem. This technique reformulates the Schrödinger equation for N electrons into hyperspherical coordinates, which, after extracting the trivial center of mass, describes the system in terms of a single global size coordinate known as the hyperradius R, and 2 N - 3 remaining internal angular coordinates. The solutions are approximately separable in the hyperradial coordinate, and solutions in the system are found by treating the hyperradius as an adiabatic coordinate. The approximate separability of the wave functions in this coordinate suggests the presence of hyperradial vibrational modes which are not described in conventional theories. The vibrationally excited states share the internal geometry of their quantum Hall ground states, and their excitation frequencies may vary with the number of participating particles or the strength of the confinement. We plan to discuss the features of these vibrational modes and their possible detection in quantum Hall systems. NSF.

  7. Quantum phase transitions in magnetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nohadani, Omid

    Phase transitions in quantum antiferromagnets offer exciting and novel insights into the critical behavior of matter at ultra-low temperatures. In this thesis, we apply the stochastic series expansion quantum Monte Carlo method to study the critical properties of ensembles of antiferromagnetically coupled spins subject to quantum phase transitions. The zero-temperature phase diagram, describing various phase transitions induced by an applied magnetic field, is constructed. The corresponding quantum critical points are determined to highest accuracy, allowing a conclusive interpretation of recent experimental measurements. Moreover, the scaling properties of uniform magnetization and staggered transverse magnetizationin magnetic fields are calculated, allowing the determination of the universality class of the system. The associated critical exponents are derived from Ginzburg-Landau theory as well. We find excellent agreement between the quantum Monte Carlo simulations and the analytical results, as well as previous bond-operator calculations. Furthermore, the critical scaling exponent, which governs the power-law dependence of the transition temperature on the applied magnetic field, is extracted from the numerical data. We show that this exponent is independent of material specific inter-constituent interactions. Moreover, it converges to the value predicted for Bose-Einstein condensation of magnons. These results are of direct relevance to compounds such as TlCuCl3 and KCuCl 3, and explain the broad range of exponents reported my exponents for field-induced ordering transitions. Finally, we introduce geometric randomness into a model of coupled dimers. The calculations show that at finite randomness, field-induced quantum phase transitions into and out of ordered Bose-Einstein condensates pass through a Bose-Glass phase. The localization of the bosons and their finite compressibility manifests this unique regime. Once delocalized, the bosons condense, and long-range order sets in. We further detect that an intermediate magnetization plateau can occur for a parameter range, in which the spins of the doped bonds become fully polarized. This rich field-dependence is expected to be experimentally observable in weakly coupled dimer compounds with small doping and negligible spin-orbit coupling or directionality effects. The calculations in this thesis cover fundamental phases and transitions between them, as they can occur in antiferromagnetic quantum spin systems.

  8. On Mathematical Modeling Of Quantum Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Achuthan, P.; Narayanankutty, Karuppath

    2009-07-02

    The world of physical systems at the most fundamental levels is replete with efficient, interesting models possessing sufficient ability to represent the reality to a considerable extent. So far, quantum mechanics (QM) forming the basis of almost all natural phenomena, has found beyond doubt its intrinsic ingenuity, capacity and robustness to stand the rigorous tests of validity from and through appropriate calculations and experiments. No serious failures of quantum mechanical predictions have been reported, yet. However, Albert Einstein, the greatest theoretical physicist of the twentieth century and some other eminent men of science have stated firmly and categorically that QM, though successful by and large, is incomplete. There are classical and quantum reality models including those based on consciousness. Relativistic quantum theoretical approaches to clearly understand the ultimate nature of matter as well as radiation have still much to accomplish in order to qualify for a final theory of everything (TOE). Mathematical models of better, suitable character as also strength are needed to achieve satisfactory explanation of natural processes and phenomena. We, in this paper, discuss some of these matters with certain apt illustrations as well.

  9. Exchange fluctuation theorem for correlated quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jevtic, Sania; Rudolph, Terry; Jennings, David; Hirono, Yuji; Nakayama, Shojun; Murao, Mio

    2015-10-01

    We extend the exchange fluctuation theorem for energy exchange between thermal quantum systems beyond the assumption of molecular chaos, and describe the nonequilibrium exchange dynamics of correlated quantum states. The relation quantifies how the tendency for systems to equilibrate is modified in high-correlation environments. In addition, a more abstract approach leads us to a "correlation fluctuation theorem". Our results elucidate the role of measurement disturbance for such scenarios. We show a simple application by finding a semiclassical maximum work theorem in the presence of correlations. We also present a toy example of qubit-qudit heat exchange, and find that non-classical behaviour such as deterministic energy transfer and anomalous heat flow are reflected in our exchange fluctuation theorem.

  10. Exchange fluctuation theorem for correlated quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Jevtic, Sania; Rudolph, Terry; Jennings, David; Hirono, Yuji; Nakayama, Shojun; Murao, Mio

    2015-10-01

    We extend the exchange fluctuation theorem for energy exchange between thermal quantum systems beyond the assumption of molecular chaos, and describe the nonequilibrium exchange dynamics of correlated quantum states. The relation quantifies how the tendency for systems to equilibrate is modified in high-correlation environments. In addition, a more abstract approach leads us to a "correlation fluctuation theorem". Our results elucidate the role of measurement disturbance for such scenarios. We show a simple application by finding a semiclassical maximum work theorem in the presence of correlations. We also present a toy example of qubit-qudit heat exchange, and find that non-classical behaviour such as deterministic energy transfer and anomalous heat flow are reflected in our exchange fluctuation theorem. PMID:26565174

  11. On-manifold localization in open quantum maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippolis, Domenico; Ryu, Jung-Wan; Lee, Soo-Young; Kim, Sang Wook

    2012-12-01

    A quantized chaotic map exhibiting localization of wave function intensity is opened. We investigate how such patterns as scars in the Husimi distributions are influenced by the losses through a number of numerical experiments. We find the scars to relocate on the stable or unstable manifolds depending on the position of the opening, and provide a classical argument to explain the observations. For asymmetrically introduced openings mode interaction contributes to determine the localization patterns. We finally show examples of similar localization in a simulated dielectric microcavity.

  12. Time fractional development of quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertik, Hüseyin; Demirhan, Doǧan; Şirin, Hüseyin; Büyükkılıç, Fevzi

    2010-08-01

    In this study, the effect of time fractionalization on the development of quantum systems is taken under consideration by making use of fractional calculus. In this context, a Mittag-Leffler function is introduced as an important mathematical tool in the generalization of the evolution operator. In order to investigate the time fractional evolution of the quantum (nano) systems, time fractional forms of motion are obtained for a Schrödinger equation and a Heisenberg equation. As an application of the concomitant formalism, the wave functions, energy eigenvalues, and probability densities of the potential well and harmonic oscillator are time fractionally obtained via the fractional derivative order α, which is a measure of the fractality of time. In the case α =1, where time becomes homogenous and continuous, traditional physical conclusions are recovered. Since energy and time are conjugate to each other, the fractional derivative order α is relevant to time. It is understood that the fractionalization of time gives rise to energy fluctuations of the quantum (nano) systems.

  13. Preparing ground states of quantum many-body systems on a quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulin, David

    2009-03-01

    The simulation of quantum many-body systems is a notoriously hard problem in condensed matter physics, but it could easily be handled by a quantum computer [4,1]. There is however one catch: while a quantum computer can naturally implement the dynamics of a quantum system --- i.e. solve Schr"odinger's equation --- there was until now no general method to initialize the computer in a low-energy state of the simulated system. We present a quantum algorithm [5] that can prepare the ground state and thermal states of a quantum many-body system in a time proportional to the square-root of its Hilbert space dimension. This is the same scaling as required by the best known algorithm to prepare the ground state of a classical many-body system on a quantum computer [3,2]. This provides strong evidence that for a quantum computer, preparing the ground state of a quantum system is in the worst case no more difficult than preparing the ground state of a classical system. 1 D. Aharonov and A. Ta-Shma, Adiabatic quantum state generation and statistical zero knowledge, Proc. 35th Annual ACM Symp. on Theo. Comp., (2003), p. 20. F. Barahona, On the computational complexity of ising spin glass models, J. Phys. A. Math. Gen., 15 (1982), p. 3241. C. H. Bennett, E. Bernstein, G. Brassard, and U. Vazirani, Strengths and weaknessess of quantum computing, SIAM J. Comput., 26 (1997), pp. 1510--1523, quant-ph/9701001. S. Lloyd, Universal quantum simulators, Science, 273 (1996), pp. 1073--1078. D. Poulin and P. Wocjan, Preparing ground states of quantum many-body systems on a quantum computer, 2008, arXiv:0809.2705.

  14. Observation of dark states in a superconductor diamond quantum hybrid system

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaobo; Matsuzaki, Yuichiro; Amsüss, Robert; Kakuyanagi, Kosuke; Shimo-Oka, Takaaki; Mizuochi, Norikazu; Nemoto, Kae; Semba, Kouichi; Munro, William J.; Saito, Shiro

    2014-01-01

    The hybridization of distinct quantum systems has opened new avenues to exploit the best properties of these individual systems. Superconducting circuits and electron spin ensembles are one such example. Strong coupling and the coherent transfer and storage of quantum information has been achieved with nitrogen vacancy centres in diamond. Recently, we have observed a remarkably sharp resonance (~1 MHz) at 2.878 GHz in the spectrum of flux qubit negatively charged nitrogen vacancy diamond hybrid quantum system under zero external magnetic field. This width is much narrower than that of both the flux qubit and spin ensemble. Here we show that this resonance is evidence of a collective dark state in the ensemble, which is coherently driven by the superposition of clockwise and counter-clockwise macroscopic persistent supercurrents flowing in the flux qubit. The collective dark state is a unique physical system and could provide a long-lived quantum memory. PMID:24709792

  15. Coarse-grained kinetic equations for quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, E. G.

    2013-01-01

    The nonequilibrium density matrix method is employed to derive a master equation for the averaged state populations of an open quantum system subjected to an external high frequency stochastic field. It is shown that if the characteristic time τstoch of the stochastic process is much lower than the characteristic time τsteady of the establishment of the system steady state populations, then on the time scale Δ t ˜ τsteady, the evolution of the system populations can be described by the coarse-grained kinetic equations with the averaged transition rates. As an example, the exact averaging is carried out for the dichotomous Markov process of the kangaroo type.

  16. Quantum entanglement in multiparticle systems of two-level atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Deb, Ram Narayan

    2011-09-15

    We propose the necessary and sufficient condition for the presence of quantum entanglement in arbitrary symmetric pure states of two-level atomic systems. We introduce a parameter to quantify quantum entanglement in such systems. We express the inherent quantum fluctuations of a composite system of two-level atoms as a sum of the quantum fluctuations of the individual constituent atoms and their correlation terms. This helps to separate out and study solely the quantum correlations among the atoms and obtain the criterion for the presence of entanglement in such multiatomic systems.

  17. Energy concentration in composite quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kurcz, Andreas; Beige, Almut; Capolupo, Antonio; Vitiello, Giuseppe; Del Giudice, Emilio

    2010-06-15

    The spontaneous emission of photons from optical cavities and from trapped atoms has been studied extensively in the framework of quantum optics. Theoretical predictions based on the rotating wave approximation (RWA) are, in general, in very good agreement with experimental findings. However, current experiments aim at combining better and better cavities with large numbers of tightly confined atoms. Here we predict an energy concentrating mechanism in the behavior of such a composite quantum system which cannot be described by the RWA. Its result is the continuous leakage of photons through the cavity mirrors, even in the absence of external driving. We conclude with a discussion of the predicted phenomenon in the context of thermodynamics.

  18. Josephson tunneling in bilayer quantum Hall system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezawa, Z. F.; Tsitsishvili, G.; Sawada, A.

    2012-07-01

    A Bose-Einstein condensation is formed by composite bosons in the quantum Hall state. A composite boson carries the fundamental charge (-e). We investigate Josephson tunneling of such charges in the bilayer quantum Hall system at the total filling ν=1. We show the existence of the critical current for the tunneling current to be coherent and dissipationless. Our results explain recent experiments due to [L. Tiemann, Y. Yoon, W. Dietsche, K. von Klitzing, W. Wegscheider, Phys. Rev. B 80 (2009) 165120] and due to [Y. Yoon, L. Tiemann, S. Schmult, W. Dietsche, K. von Klitzing, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104 (2010) 116802]. We predict also how the critical current changes as the sample is tilted in the magnetic field.

  19. Topological characterization of periodically driven quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitagawa, Takuya; Berg, Erez; Rudner, Mark; Demler, Eugene

    2010-12-01

    Topological properties of physical systems can lead to robust behaviors that are insensitive to microscopic details. Such topologically robust phenomena are not limited to static systems but can also appear in driven quantum systems. In this paper, we show that the Floquet operators of periodically driven systems can be divided into topologically distinct (homotopy) classes and give a simple physical interpretation of this classification in terms of the spectra of Floquet operators. Using this picture, we provide an intuitive understanding of the well-known phenomenon of quantized adiabatic pumping. Systems whose Floquet operators belong to the trivial class simulate the dynamics generated by time-independent Hamiltonians, which can be topologically classified according to the schemes developed for static systems. We demonstrate these principles through an example of a periodically driven two-dimensional hexagonal lattice tight-binding model which exhibits several topological phases. Remarkably, one of these phases supports chiral edge modes even though the bulk is topologically trivial.

  20. Teaching the environment to control quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pechen, Alexander; Rabitz, Herschel

    2006-06-15

    A nonequilibrium, generally time-dependent, environment whose form is deduced by optimal learning control is shown to provide a means for incoherent manipulation of quantum systems. Incoherent control by the environment (ICE) can serve to steer a system from an initial state to a target state, either mixed or in some cases pure, by exploiting dissipative dynamics. Implementing ICE with either incoherent radiation or a gas as the control is explicitly considered, and the environmental control is characterized by its distribution function. Simulated learning control experiments are performed with simple illustrations to find the shape of the optimal nonequilibrium distribution function that best affects the posed dynamical objectives.

  1. Quantum Random Access Codes Using Single d -Level Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Armin; Hameedi, Alley; Marques, Breno; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2015-05-01

    Random access codes (RACs) are used by a party to, with limited communication, access an arbitrary subset of information held by another party. Quantum resources are known to enable RACs that break classical limitations. Here, we study quantum and classical RACs with high-level communication. We derive average performances of classical RACs and present families of high-level quantum RACs. Our results show that high-level quantum systems can significantly increase the advantage of quantum RACs over their classical counterparts. We demonstrate our findings in an experimental realization of a quantum RAC with four-level communication.

  2. The spectrum and properties of the scattering cross section of electrons in open spherical quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Tkach, N. V. Seti, Ju.

    2009-03-15

    In the effective mass approximation in the model of rectangular potentials, the scattering cross section of electrons in an open spherical quantum dot is calculated for the first time. It is shown that, for such a nanosystem with a barrier of several monolayers, the experimental measurements of the scattering cross section allow adequate identification of the resonance energies and the widths of resonance states in the low-energy region of the quasi-stationary electron spectrum. It is also shown that, for an open spherical quantum dot with a low-strength potential barrier, the adequate spectral parameters of the quasi-stationary spectrum are the generalized resonance energies and widths determined via the probability of an electron being inside the quantum dot.

  3. Opening up the Quantum Three-Box Problem with Undetectable Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Richard; Robledo, Lucio; Maroney, Owen; Blok, Machiel; Bernien, Hannes; Twitchen, Daniel; Markham, Matthew; Morton, John; Briggs, Andrew; Hanson, Ronald

    2013-03-01

    One of the most striking features of quantum mechanics is the profound effect exerted by measurements alone. Sophisticated quantum control is now available in several experimental systems, exposing discrepancies between quantum and classical mechanics whenever measurement induces disturbance of the interrogated system. In practice, such discrepancies may frequently be explained as the back-action required by quantum mechanics adding quantum noise to a classical signal. Here we implement the `three-box' quantum game (Aharonov, et al. 1991) by utilising state-of-the-art control and measurement of the nitrogen vacancy centre in diamond. In this protocol, the back-action of quantum measurements add no detectable disturbance to the classical description of the game. Quantum and classical mechanics then make contradictory predictions for the same experimental procedure, however classical observers are unable to invoke measurement-induced disturbance to explain the discrepancy. We quantify the disturbance of our measurements and obtain data ruling out any classical model by 7.8 sigma, excluding state-definiteness from our system. Our experiment is then equivalent to a Kochen-Spekker test of quantum non-contextuality that successfully addresses the measurement detectability loophole.

  4. Observation of Non-Hermitian Quantum Correlation Criterion in Mesoscopic Optomechanical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenlin; Zhang, Fengyang; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2016-04-01

    Although many quantum correlation criteria have been proposed successively in recent years, it is still an open question how to observe these criteria with the non-Hermitian terms in themselves. We propose an indirect scheme in this paper to observe non-Hermitian criteria and to judge whether or not quantum correlation exists in the system even though the expectation value measurement of non-Hermitian operator is invalid in quantum mechanics system. Our idea is to establish a critical state of mesoscopic oscillator under mean-field approximation, and the oscillator state will take place transition when the quantum correlation destroys the mean-field approximation. The non-Hermitian measurement will replace the position measurement in this process and it can be seen as a non-destructive detection. We give an example to explain this idea in a designed mesoscopic optomechanical system.

  5. Quantum Rotational Effects in Nanomagnetic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keeffe, Michael F.

    Quantum tunneling of the magnetic moment in a nanomagnet must conserve the total angular momentum. For a nanomagnet embedded in a rigid body, reversal of the magnetic moment will cause the body to rotate as a whole. When embedded in an elastic environment, tunneling of the magnetic moment will cause local elastic twists of the crystal structure. In this thesis, I will present a theoretical study of the interplay between magnetization and rotations in a variety of nanomagnetic systems which have some degree of rotational freedom. We investigate the effect of rotational freedom on the tunnel splitting of a nanomagnet which is free to rotate about its easy axis. Calculating the exact instanton of the coupled equations of motion shows that mechanical freedom of the particle renormalizes the easy axis anisotropy, increasing the tunnel splitting. To understand magnetization dynamics in free particles, we study a quantum mechanical model of a tunneling spin embedded in a rigid rotor. The exact energy levels for a symmetric rotor exhibit first and second order quantum phase transitions between states with different values the magnetic moment. A quantum phase diagram is obtained in which the magnetic moment depends strongly on the moments of inertia. An intrinsic contribution to decoherence of current oscillations of a flux qubit must come from the angular momentum it transfers to the surrounding body. Within exactly solvable models of a qubit embedded in a rigid body and an elastic medium, we show that slow decoherence is permitted if the solid is macroscopically large. The spin-boson model is one of the simplest representations of a two-level system interacting with a quantum harmonic oscillator, yet has eluded a closed-form solution. I investigate some possible approaches to understanding its spectrum. The Landau-Zener dynamics of a tunneling spin coupled to a torsional resonator show that for certain parameter ranges the system exhibits multiple Landau-Zener transitions. These transitions coincide in time with changes in the oscillator dynamics. A large number of spins on a single oscillator coupled only through the in-phase oscillations behaves as a single large spin, greatly enhancing the spin-phonon coupling.

  6. Open-Path High Sensitivity Atmospheric Ammonia Sensing with a Quantum Cascade Laser Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, D. J.; Dirisu, A.; Rafferty, K.; Parkes, B.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric trace-gas sensing with quantum cascade laser (QCL) spectroscopy offers the potential for high sensitivity, fast, selective mid-infrared absorption measurements of atmospheric species such as ammonia (NH3). As the third most abundant nitrogen species and most gaseous base in the atmosphere, ammonia plays important roles in neutralizing acidic species and as a gas-phase precursor to ammoniated fine particulate matter. High precision gas phase measurements are necessary to constrain highly uncertain emission sources and sinks with implications for understanding how chemical components of fine particulate matter affect air quality and climate as well as nitrogen deposition to ecosystems. Conventional ammonia sensors employing chemical ionization, denuder or filter techniques are labor-intensive, not gas-selective and exhibit low time resolution. As an advantageous alternative to conventional measurement techniques, we develop an open-path quantum cascade laser-based ammonia sensor operating at 9.06 μm for ground-based measurements. A continuous wave, thermoelectrically cooled quantum cascade laser is used to perform wavelength modulation absorption spectroscopy (WMS). Room-temperature, unattended operation with minimal surface adsorption effects due to the open-path configuration represent significant improvements over cryogenically cooled, closed path systems. The feasibility of a cylindrical mirror multi-pass optical cell for achieving long path lengths near 50 m in a compact design is also assessed. Meaningful ammonia measurements require fast sub-ppbv detection limits due to ammonia’s large dynamic range and temporal and spatial atmospheric variability. When fully developed, our instrument will achieve high time resolution (up to 10 Hz) measurements with ammonia detection limits in the 100 pptv range. Initial results include ambient laboratory ammonia detection at 58 ppbv relative to a 0.4% ammonia reference cell based on the WMS signal integrated area. We estimate a limit of detection based on our signal to noise ratio of ~400 pptv NH3. Non-cryogenic, unattended operation of this compact sensor offers the potential for applications in particulate matter gas-phase precursor monitoring networks. Future sensor measurements can also be utilized for evaluations of and data assimilation into air quality and aerosol forecast models of particular importance for regions where ammonia plays a critical role in fine particulate matter formation.

  7. Imaging a coupled quantum dot-quantum point contact system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildemeister, A. E.; Ihn, T.; Schleser, R.; Ensslin, K.; Driscoll, D. C.; Gossard, A. C.

    2007-10-01

    We have quantitatively studied the effect of charge traps on the electrical conductance of a quantum dot and a capacitively coupled quantum point contact. Using the sharp metallic tip of a low-temperature scanning force microscope as a scanned gate, we could localize the traps. The quantum point contact served as a charge detector and allowed us to distinguish single electron charging events in several traps from charging events on the dot. We used the quantum dot to analyze the tip-induced potential quantitatively and found its shape to be independent of the voltage applied to the tip within a certain range of parameters. We estimate that the trap density is below 0.1% of the doping density, that the charging energy of a trap is three times higher than that of the quantum dot, and that the interaction energy between the quantum dot and a trap is a significant portion of the dot's charging energy. Possibly, such charge traps are the reason for frequently observed parametric charge rearrangements.

  8. A toy model of a macroscopic quantum coherent system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muoz-Vega, R.; Flores-Godoy, J. J.; Fernndez-Anaya, G.; Salinas-Hernndez, E.

    2013-03-01

    This paper deals with macroscopic quantum coherence while using only basic quantum mechanics. A square double well is used to illustrate Leggett-Caldeira oscillations. The effect of thermal radiation on two-level systems is discussed. The concept of decoherence is introduced at an elementary level. Reference values are deduced for the energy, temperature and time scales involved in macroscopic quantum coherence.

  9. Self-powered smart window controlled by a high open-circuit voltage InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well solar cell.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Ching; Liou, Jian-Chiun; Diao, Chien-Chen

    2015-08-14

    A self-powered complementary electrochromic device (CECD) driven by a high open-circuit voltage InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) solar cell has been designed. The coloration and bleaching time of the system were 5 and 8 s, respectively. PMID:26158586

  10. Comparison of quantum discord and relative entropy in some bipartite quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdian, M.; Arjmandi, M. B.

    2016-04-01

    The study of quantum correlations in high-dimensional bipartite systems is crucial for the development of quantum computing. We propose relative entropy as a distance measure of correlations may be measured by means of the distance from the quantum state to the closest classical-classical state. In particular, we establish relations between relative entropy and quantum discord quantifiers obtained by means of orthogonal projection measurements. We show that for symmetrical X-states density matrices the quantum discord is equal to relative entropy. At the end of paper, various examples of X-states such as two-qubit and qubit-qutrit have been demonstrated.

  11. OpenRIMS: an open architecture radiology informatics management system.

    PubMed

    Langer, Steve

    2002-06-01

    The benefits of an integrated picture archiving and communication system/radiology information system (PACS/RIS) archive built with open source tools and methods are 2-fold. Open source permits an inexpensive development model where interfaces can be updated as needed, and the code is peer reviewed by many eyes (analogous to the scientific model). Integration of PACS/RIS functionality reduces the risk of inconsistent data by reducing interfaces among databases that contain largely redundant information. Also, wide adoption would promote standard data mining tools--reducing user needs to learn multiple methods to perform the same task. A model has been constructed capable of accepting HL7 orders, performing examination and resource scheduling, providing digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) worklist information to modalities, archiving studies, and supporting DICOM query/retrieve from third party viewing software. The multitiered architecture uses a single database communicating via an ODBC bridge to a Linux server with HL7, DICOM, and HTTP connections. Human interaction is supported via a web browser, whereas automated informatics services communicate over the HL7 and DICOM links. The system is still under development, but the primary database schema is complete as well as key pieces of the web user interface. Additional work is needed on the DICOM/HL7 interface broker and completion of the base DICOM service classes. PMID:12297975

  12. Quantum Mechanics and the Role of Time:. are Quantum Systems Markovian?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durt, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    The predictions of the Quantum Theory have been verified so far with astonishingly high accuracy. Despite of its impressive successes, the theory still presents mysterious features such as the border line between the classical and quantum world, or the deep nature of quantum nonlocality. These open questions motivated in the past several proposals of alternative and/or generalized approaches. We shall discuss in the present paper alternative theories that can be infered from a reconsideration of the status of time in quantum mechanics. Roughly speaking, quantum mechanics is usually formulated as a memory free (Markovian) theory at a fundamental level, but alternative, nonMarkovian, formulations are possible, and some of them can be tested in the laboratory. In our paper we shall give a survey of these alternative proposals, describe related experiments that were realized in the past and also formulate new experimental proposals.

  13. Rahman Prize Talk: Pushing the frontier in the simulation of correlated quantum many body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Matthias

    Amazing progress in the simulation of correlated quantum many body systems has been achieved in the past two decades by combining significant advances in new algorithms with efficient implementations on ever faster supercomputers. This has enabled the accurate simulation of an increasing number of problems and helped settle many open questions. I will review a selection of results that my collaborators and I have worked on, from quantum phase transitions in quantum magnets, over supersolidity of bosons in lattice models and Helium-4 to recent simulations of correlated fermions and quantum gases. I will then provide an outlook to the future and discuss how in the short term analog quantum simulators can help tackle problems for which no efficient simulation algorithms exist and how in the longer term quantum computers can be used to solve many of the still open questions in the field. I will finally connect to the topic of the remainder of this symposium by touching on how the design of new topological materials will help in the construction of these quantum computers.

  14. Rewriting Modulo SMT and Open System Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rocha, Camilo; Meseguer, Jose; Munoz, Cesar

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes rewriting modulo SMT, a new technique that combines the power of SMT solving, rewriting modulo theories, and model checking. Rewriting modulo SMT is ideally suited to model and analyze infinite-state open systems, i.e., systems that interact with a non-deterministic environment. Such systems exhibit both internal non-determinism, which is proper to the system, and external non-determinism, which is due to the environment. In a reflective formalism, such as rewriting logic, rewriting modulo SMT can be reduced to standard rewriting. Hence, rewriting modulo SMT naturally extends rewriting-based reachability analysis techniques, which are available for closed systems, to open systems. The proposed technique is illustrated with the formal analysis of: (i) a real-time system that is beyond the scope of timed-automata methods and (ii) automatic detection of reachability violations in a synchronous language developed to support autonomous spacecraft operations.

  15. Dynamics of quantum discord for a two-qubit system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiong; Xiao, Jia-hua

    2013-01-01

    We study the dynamics of quantum discord of a two-qubit system coupled to a common structured reservoir at zero temperature. The conditions to maximize reservoir-induced quantum discord for the two-qubit system wiht an initially factorized state are derived. In particular, when the two qubits are placed in a lossy cavity, high values of quantum discord can be obtained in the dispersive regime, even in the bad-cavity limit. Finally, we show that under certain conditions, the quantum discord dynamics exhibits quantum beats.

  16. Partitioning technique for discrete quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, L.; Song, Z.

    2011-06-15

    We develop the partitioning technique for quantum discrete systems. The graph consists of several subgraphs: a central graph and several branch graphs, with each branch graph being rooted by an individual node on the central one. We show that the effective Hamiltonian on the central graph can be constructed by adding additional potentials on the branch-root nodes, which generates the same result as does the the original Hamiltonian on the entire graph. Exactly solvable models are presented to demonstrate the main points of this paper.

  17. On quantum Lie algebras and quantum root systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delius, Gustav W.; Hüffmann, Andreas

    1996-04-01

    As a natural generalization of ordinary Lie algebras we introduce the concept of quantum Lie algebras 0305-4470/29/8/018/img1. We define these in terms of certain adjoint submodules of quantized enveloping algebras 0305-4470/29/8/018/img2 endowed with a quantum Lie bracket given by the quantum adjoint action. The structure constants of these algebras depend on the quantum deformation parameter q and they go over into the usual Lie algebras when q = 1. The notions of q-conjugation and q-linearity are introduced. q-linear analogues of the classical antipode and Cartan involution are defined and a generalized Killing form, q-linear in the first entry and linear in the second, is obtained. These structures allow the derivation of symmetries between the structure constants of quantum Lie algebras. The explicitly worked out examples of 0305-4470/29/8/018/img3 and 0305-4470/29/8/018/img4 illustrate the results.

  18. Measuring entanglement entropy in a quantum many-body system.

    PubMed

    Islam, Rajibul; Ma, Ruichao; Preiss, Philipp M; Tai, M Eric; Lukin, Alexander; Rispoli, Matthew; Greiner, Markus

    2015-12-01

    Entanglement is one of the most intriguing features of quantum mechanics. It describes non-local correlations between quantum objects, and is at the heart of quantum information sciences. Entanglement is now being studied in diverse fields ranging from condensed matter to quantum gravity. However, measuring entanglement remains a challenge. This is especially so in systems of interacting delocalized particles, for which a direct experimental measurement of spatial entanglement has been elusive. Here, we measure entanglement in such a system of itinerant particles using quantum interference of many-body twins. Making use of our single-site-resolved control of ultracold bosonic atoms in optical lattices, we prepare two identical copies of a many-body state and interfere them. This enables us to directly measure quantum purity, Rényi entanglement entropy, and mutual information. These experiments pave the way for using entanglement to characterize quantum phases and dynamics of strongly correlated many-body systems. PMID:26632587

  19. Measuring entanglement entropy in a quantum many-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Rajibul; Ma, Ruichao; Preiss, Philipp M.; Eric Tai, M.; Lukin, Alexander; Rispoli, Matthew; Greiner, Markus

    2015-12-01

    Entanglement is one of the most intriguing features of quantum mechanics. It describes non-local correlations between quantum objects, and is at the heart of quantum information sciences. Entanglement is now being studied in diverse fields ranging from condensed matter to quantum gravity. However, measuring entanglement remains a challenge. This is especially so in systems of interacting delocalized particles, for which a direct experimental measurement of spatial entanglement has been elusive. Here, we measure entanglement in such a system of itinerant particles using quantum interference of many-body twins. Making use of our single-site-resolved control of ultracold bosonic atoms in optical lattices, we prepare two identical copies of a many-body state and interfere them. This enables us to directly measure quantum purity, Rényi entanglement entropy, and mutual information. These experiments pave the way for using entanglement to characterize quantum phases and dynamics of strongly correlated many-body systems.

  20. Spectra of nonlocally bound quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowa, A.

    2011-06-01

    We discuss a class of nonlinear and nonlocal models for the dynamics of a composite quantum system. The models in question depend on the following constituents: on two subsystem Hamiltonians (denoted by H and Ĥ), an analytic function ( f), and a real parameter ( s). As demonstrated elsewhere before, the stationary states can be described in these models fairly explicitly. In this article, we build upon that result, and discuss the topological as well as statistical characteristics of the spectra. Here, we concentrate on the special case f = log. It turns out that an energy spectrum of the nonlocally bound system substantially differs from that of its components. Indeed, we show rigorously that, if H is the harmonic oscillator and Ĥ is completely degenerate with one energy level, then the energy spectrum of the composite system has the topology of the Cantor set (for s > 2). In addition, we show that, if H is replaced by the logarithm of the harmonic oscillator, then the spectrum consists of finitely many intervals separated by gaps (for s sufficiently large). In the last case, the key analytic object is the series Σ n - s . In particular, as an interesting offshoot, this structure furnishes a nontautological immersion of fundamental number-theoretic functions into the quantum formalism.

  1. Optimal dynamics for quantum-state and entanglement transfer through homogeneous quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Banchi, L.; Apollaro, T. J. G.; Cuccoli, A.; Vaia, R.; Verrucchi, P.

    2010-11-15

    The capability of faithfully transmit quantum states and entanglement through quantum channels is one of the key requirements for the development of quantum devices. Different solutions have been proposed to accomplish such a challenging task, which, however, require either an ad hoc engineering of the internal interactions of the physical system acting as the channel or specific initialization procedures. Here we show that optimal dynamics for efficient quantum-state and entanglement transfer can be attained in generic quantum systems with homogeneous interactions by tuning the coupling between the system and the two attached qubits. We devise a general procedure to determine the optimal coupling, and we explicitly implement it in the case of a channel consisting of a spin-(1/2)XY chain. The quality of quantum-state and entanglement transfer is found to be very good and, remarkably, almost independent of the channel length.

  2. Open Hardware for CERN's accelerator control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bij, E.; Serrano, J.; Wlostowski, T.; Cattin, M.; Gousiou, E.; Alvarez Sanchez, P.; Boccardi, A.; Voumard, N.; Penacoba, G.

    2012-01-01

    The accelerator control systems at CERN will be upgraded and many electronics modules such as analog and digital I/O, level converters and repeaters, serial links and timing modules are being redesigned. The new developments are based on the FPGA Mezzanine Card, PCI Express and VME64x standards while the Wishbone specification is used as a system on a chip bus. To attract partners, the projects are developed in an `Open' fashion. Within this Open Hardware project new ways of working with industry are being evaluated and it has been proven that industry can be involved at all stages, from design to production and support.

  3. Level statistics for quantum Hall systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagalovsky, V.; Horovitz, B.; Avishai, Y.

    2005-03-01

    Level statistics for two classes of disordered systems at criticality are analyzed in terms of different realizations of the Chalker-Coddington network model. These include: 1) Re-examination of the standard U(1) model describing dynamics of electrons on the lowest Landau level in the quantum Hall effect, where it is shown that after proper local unfolding the nearest-neighbor spacing distribution (NNSD) at the critical energy follows the Wigner surmise for Gaussian unitary ensembles (GUE). 2) Quasi-particles in disordered superconductors with broken time reversal and spin rotation invariance (in the language of random matrix theory this system is a representative of symmetry class D in the classification scheme of Altland and Zirnbauer). Here again the NNSD obeys the Wigner surmise for GUE, reflecting therefore only "basic" discrete symmetries of the system (time reversal violation) and ignoring particle-hole symmetries and other finer details (criticality). In the localized regime level repulsion is suppressed.

  4. Software-defined quantum communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humble, Travis S.; Sadlier, Ronald J.

    2014-08-01

    Quantum communication (QC) systems harness modern physics through state-of-the-art optical engineering to provide revolutionary capabilities. An important concern for QC engineering is designing and prototyping these systems to evaluate the proposed capabilities. We apply the paradigm of software-defined communication for engineering QC systems to facilitate rapid prototyping and prototype comparisons. We detail how to decompose QC terminals into functional layers defining hardware, software, and middleware concerns, and we describe how each layer behaves. Using the superdense coding protocol as an example, we describe implementations of both the transmitter and receiver, and we present results from numerical simulations of the behavior. We conclude that the software-defined QC provides a robust framework in which to explore the large design space offered by this new regime of communication.

  5. Quantum revivals and magnetization tunneling in effective spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krizanac, M.; Altwein, D.; Vedmedenko, E. Y.; Wiesendanger, R.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum mechanical objects or nano-objects have been proposed as bits for information storage. While time-averaged properties of magnetic, quantum-mechanical particles have been extensively studied experimentally and theoretically, experimental investigations of the real time evolution of magnetization in the quantum regime were not possible until recent developments in pump-probe techniques. Here we investigate the quantum dynamics of effective spin systems by means of analytical and numerical treatments. Particular attention is paid to the quantum revival time and its relation to the magnetization tunneling. The quantum revival time has been initially defined as the recurrence time of a total wave-function. Here we show that the quantum revivals of wave-functions and expectation values in spin systems may be quite different which gives rise to a more sophisticated definition of the quantum revival within the realm of experimental research. Particularly, the revival times for integer spins coincide which is not the case for half-integer spins. Furthermore, the quantum revival is found to be shortest for integer ratios between the on-site anisotropy and an external magnetic field paving the way to novel methods of anisotropy measurements. We show that the quantum tunneling of magnetization at avoided level crossing is coherent to the quantum revival time of expectation values, leading to a connection between these two fundamental properties of quantum mechanical spins.

  6. Characterizing and quantifying frustration in quantum many-body systems.

    PubMed

    Giampaolo, S M; Gualdi, G; Monras, A; Illuminati, F

    2011-12-23

    We present a general scheme for the study of frustration in quantum systems. We introduce a universal measure of frustration for arbitrary quantum systems and we relate it to a class of entanglement monotones via an exact inequality. If all the (pure) ground states of a given Hamiltonian saturate the inequality, then the system is said to be inequality saturating. We introduce sufficient conditions for a quantum spin system to be inequality saturating and confirm them with extensive numerical tests. These conditions provide a generalization to the quantum domain of the Toulouse criteria for classical frustration-free systems. The models satisfying these conditions can be reasonably identified as geometrically unfrustrated and subject to frustration of purely quantum origin. Our results therefore establish a unified framework for studying the intertwining of geometric and quantum contributions to frustration. PMID:22243147

  7. Exploiting Quantum Parallelism to Simulate Quantum Random Many-Body Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Paredes, B.; Cirac, J.I.; Verstraete, F.

    2005-09-30

    We present an algorithm that exploits quantum parallelism to simulate randomness in a quantum system. In our scheme, all possible realizations of the random parameters are encoded quantum mechanically in a superposition state of an auxiliary system. We show how our algorithm allows for the efficient simulation of dynamics of quantum random spin chains with known numerical methods. We propose an experimental realization based on atoms in optical lattices in which disorder could be simulated in parallel and in a controlled way through the interaction with another atomic species.

  8. Kinetic equations for a nonideal quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornath, Th.; Kremp, D.; Kraeft, W. D.; Schlanges, M.

    1996-10-01

    In the framework of real-time Green's functions, the general kinetic equations are investigated in a first-order gradient expansion. Within this approximation, the problem of the reconstruction of the two-time correlation functions from the one-time Wigner function was solved. For the Wigner function, a cluster expansion is found in terms of a quasiparticle distribution function. In equilibrium, this expansion leads to the well-known generalized Beth-Uhlenbeck expression of the second virial coefficient. As a special case, the T-matrix approximation for the self-energy is investigated. The quantum kinetic equation derived thus has, besides the (Markovian) Boltzmann collision integral, additional terms due to the retardation expansion which reflect memory effects. Special interest is paid to the case that bound states exist in the system. It is shown that the bound state contribution, which can be introduced via a bilinear expansion of the two-particle T matrix, follows from the first-order retardation term in the general kinetic equation. The full Wigner function is now a sum of one function describing the unbound particles and another one for the bound state contribution. The latter two functions have to be determined from a coupled set of kinetic equations. In contrast to the quantum Boltzmann equation, energy and density of a nonideal system are conserved.

  9. Repetitive Interrogation of 2-Level Quantum Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Chung, Sang K.

    2010-01-01

    Trapped ion clocks derive information from a reference atomic transition by repetitive interrogations of the same quantum system, either a single ion or ionized gas of many millions of ions. Atomic beam frequency standards, by contrast, measure reference atomic transitions in a continuously replenished "flow through" configuration where initial ensemble atomic coherence is zero. We will describe some issues and problems that can arise when atomic state selection and preparation of the quantum atomic system is not completed, that is, optical pumping has not fully relaxed the coherence and also not fully transferred atoms to the initial state. We present a simple two-level density matrix analysis showing how frequency shifts during the state-selection process can cause frequency shifts of the measured clock transition. Such considerations are very important when a low intensity lamp light source is used for state selection, where there is relatively weak relaxation and re-pumping of ions to an initial state and much weaker 'environmental' relaxation of the atomic coherence set-up in the atomic sample.

  10. Open Quantum Transport and Non-Hermitian Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elenewski, Justin; Zhao, Yanxiang; Chen, Hanning

    Sub-nanometer electronic devices are notoriously difficult to simulate, with the most widely adopted transport schemes predicting currents that diverge from experiment by several orders of magnitude. This deviation arises from numerous factors, including the inability of these methods to accommodate dynamic processes such as charge reorganization. A promising alternative entails the direct propagation of an electronic structure calculation, as exemplified by real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT). Unfortunately this framework is inherently that of a closed system, and modifications must be made to handle incoming and outgoing particle fluxes. To this end, we establish a formal correspondence between the quantum master equation for an open, many-particle system and its description in terms of RT-TDDFT and non-Hermitian boundary potentials. By dynamically constraining the particle density within the boundary regions corresponding to the device leads, a simulation may be selectively converged to the non-equilibrium steady state associated with a given electrostatic bias. Our numerical tests demonstrate that this algorithm is both highly stable and readily integrated into existing electronic structure frameworks

  11. Coulomb crystallization in classical and quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonitz, Michael

    2007-11-01

    Coulomb crystallization occurs in one-component plasmas when the average interaction energy exceeds the kinetic energy by about two orders of magnitude. A simple road to reach such strong coupling consists in using external confinement potentials the strength of which controls the density. This has been succsessfully realized with ions in traps and storage rings and also in dusty plasma. Recently a three-dimensional spherical confinement could be created [1] which allows to produce spherical dust crystals containing concentric shells. I will give an overview on our recent results for these ``Yukawa balls'' and compare them to experiments. The shell structure of these systems can be very well explained by using an isotropic statically screened pair interaction. Further, the thermodynamic properties of these systems, such as the radial density distribution are discussed based on an analytical theory [3]. I then will discuss Coulomb crystallization in trapped quantum systems, such as mesoscopic electron and electron hole plasmas in coupled layers [4,5]. These systems show a very rich correlation behavior, including liquid and solid like states and bound states (excitons, biexcitons) and their crystals. On the other hand, also collective quantum and spin effects are observed, including Bose-Einstein condensation and superfluidity of bound electron-hole pairs [4]. Finally, I consider Coulomb crystallization in two-component neutral plasmas in three dimensions. I discuss the necessary conditions for crystals of heavy charges to exist in the presence of a light component which typically is in the Fermi gas or liquid state. It can be shown that their exists a critical ratio of the masses of the species of the order of 80 [5] which is confirmed by Quantum Monte Carlo simulations [6]. Familiar examples are crystals of nuclei in the core of White dwarf stars, but the results also suggest the existence of other crystals, including proton or α-particle crystals in dense matter and of hole crystals in semiconductors. [1] O. Arp, D. Block, A. Piel, and A. Melzer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 165004 (2004). [2] M. Bonitz, D. Block, O. Arp, V. Golubnychiy, H. Baumgartner, P. Ludwig, A. Piel, and A. Filinov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 075001 (2006). [3] C. Henning, H. Baumgartner, A. Piel, P. Ludwig, V. Golubnychiy, M. Bonitz, and D. Block, Phys. Rev. E 74, 056403 (2006) and Phys. Rev. E (2007). [4] A. Filinov, M. Bonitz, and Yu. Lozovik, Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 3851 (2001). [5] M. Bonitz, V. Filinov, P. Levashov, V. Fortov, and H. Fehske, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 235006 (2005) and J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39, 4717 (2006). [6] Introduction to Computational Methods for Many-Body Systems, M. Bonitz and D. Semkat (eds.), Rinton Press, Princeton (2006)

  12. Data Architecture in an Open Systems Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernbom, Gerald; Cromwell, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    The conceptual basis for structured data architecture, and its integration with open systems technology at Indiana University, are described. Key strategic goals guiding these efforts are discussed: commitment to improved data access; migration to relational database technology, and deployment of a high-speed, multiprotocol network; and…

  13. The Open Systems University and Organizational Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Counelis, James Steve

    The open systems model of the university defines the function of institutional research to be a cybernetic one. The internal and external reality-testing function is a vital duty and a moral charge. Though policy makers and educational practitioners can carry on for a considerable length of time with organizational intelligence of low validity,…

  14. Holonomic Quantum Control with Continuous Variable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Victor V.; Shu, Chi; Krastanov, Stefan; Shen, Chao; Liu, Ren-Bao; Yang, Zhen-Biao; Schoelkopf, Robert J.; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, Michel H.; Jiang, Liang

    2016-04-01

    Universal computation of a quantum system consisting of superpositions of well-separated coherent states of multiple harmonic oscillators can be achieved by three families of adiabatic holonomic gates. The first gate consists of moving a coherent state around a closed path in phase space, resulting in a relative Berry phase between that state and the other states. The second gate consists of "colliding" two coherent states of the same oscillator, resulting in coherent population transfer between them. The third gate is an effective controlled-phase gate on coherent states of two different oscillators. Such gates should be realizable via reservoir engineering of systems that support tunable nonlinearities, such as trapped ions and circuit QED.

  15. Open-system dynamics of entanglement:a key issues review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aolita, Leandro; de Melo, Fernando; Davidovich, Luiz

    2015-04-01

    One of the greatest challenges in the fields of quantum information processing and quantum technologies is the detailed coherent control over each and every constituent of quantum systems with an ever increasing number of particles. Within this endeavor, harnessing of many-body entanglement against the detrimental effects of the environment is a major pressing issue. Besides being an important concept from a fundamental standpoint, entanglement has been recognized as a crucial resource for quantum speed-ups or performance enhancements over classical methods. Understanding and controlling many-body entanglement in open systems may have strong implications in quantum computing, quantum simulations of many-body systems, secure quantum communication or cryptography, quantum metrology, our understanding of the quantum-to-classical transition, and other important questions of quantum foundations. In this paper we present an overview of recent theoretical and experimental efforts to underpin the dynamics of entanglement under the influence of noise. Entanglement is thus taken as a dynamic quantity on its own, and we survey how it evolves due to the unavoidable interaction of the entangled system with its surroundings. We analyze several scenarios, corresponding to different families of states and environments, which render a very rich diversity of dynamical behaviors. In contrast to single-particle quantities, like populations and coherences, which typically vanish only asymptotically in time, entanglement may disappear at a finite time. In addition, important classes of entanglement display an exponential decay with the number of particles when subject to local noise, which poses yet another threat to the already-challenging scaling of quantum technologies. Other classes, however, turn out to be extremely robust against local noise. Theoretical results and recent experiments regarding the difference between local and global decoherence are summarized. Control and robustness-enhancement techniques, scaling laws, statistical and geometrical aspects of multipartite-entanglement decay are also reviewed; all in order to give a broad picture of entanglement dynamics in open quantum systems addressed to both theorists and experimentalists inside and outside the field of quantum information.

  16. Stochastic approach to quantum light-matter systems: Application to a BEC in a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandt, Stephan; Sadri, Darius; Kulkarni, Manas; Tureci, Hakan

    2015-03-01

    The engineering of light-matter interaction has become an active area of research with applications as diverse as quantum simulation with cold atoms or ions, correlated photovoltaics, and quantum computing; numerical methods are faced with the problem of vast Hilbert spaces. We have developed a novel stochastic approach to model the dynamics of open spin-boson networks. This method relies on a generalization of the positive P representation for systems involving spin. We emphasize the use of this method to describe a Bose gas placed in a leaky cavity and driven by a laser. This system, in the limit of large number of bosonic atoms, can be well described by an open Dicke model. We compare the dynamics obtained by our numerically exact stochastic method to semi-classical results, thereby identifying the quantum effects especially near the open quantum phase transition point. The stochastic method is also shown to be a strong approach to describe the BEC-Cavity system when connected to a finite temperature bath.

  17. Computable measure of total quantum correlations of multipartite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behdani, Javad; Akhtarshenas, Seyed Javad; Sarbishaei, Mohsen

    2016-04-01

    Quantum discord as a measure of the quantum correlations cannot be easily computed for most of density operators. In this paper, we present a measure of the total quantum correlations that is operationally simple and can be computed effectively for an arbitrary mixed state of a multipartite system. The measure is based on the coherence vector of the party whose quantumness is investigated as well as the correlation matrix of this part with the remainder of the system. Being able to detect the quantumness of multipartite systems, such as detecting the quantum critical points in spin chains, alongside with the computability characteristic of the measure, makes it a useful indicator to be exploited in the cases which are out of the scope of the other known measures.

  18. The Quixote project: Collaborative and Open Quantum Chemistry data management in the Internet age

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Computational Quantum Chemistry has developed into a powerful, efficient, reliable and increasingly routine tool for exploring the structure and properties of small to medium sized molecules. Many thousands of calculations are performed every day, some offering results which approach experimental accuracy. However, in contrast to other disciplines, such as crystallography, or bioinformatics, where standard formats and well-known, unified databases exist, this QC data is generally destined to remain locally held in files which are not designed to be machine-readable. Only a very small subset of these results will become accessible to the wider community through publication. In this paper we describe how the Quixote Project is developing the infrastructure required to convert output from a number of different molecular quantum chemistry packages to a common semantically rich, machine-readable format and to build respositories of QC results. Such an infrastructure offers benefits at many levels. The standardised representation of the results will facilitate software interoperability, for example making it easier for analysis tools to take data from different QC packages, and will also help with archival and deposition of results. The repository infrastructure, which is lightweight and built using Open software components, can be implemented at individual researcher, project, organisation or community level, offering the exciting possibility that in future many of these QC results can be made publically available, to be searched and interpreted just as crystallography and bioinformatics results are today. Although we believe that quantum chemists will appreciate the contribution the Quixote infrastructure can make to the organisation and and exchange of their results, we anticipate that greater rewards will come from enabling their results to be consumed by a wider community. As the respositories grow they will become a valuable source of chemical data for use by other disciplines in both research and education. The Quixote project is unconventional in that the infrastructure is being implemented in advance of a full definition of the data model which will eventually underpin it. We believe that a working system which offers real value to researchers based on tools and shared, searchable repositories will encourage early participation from a broader community, including both producers and consumers of data. In the early stages, searching and indexing can be performed on the chemical subject of the calculations, and well defined calculation meta-data. The process of defining more specific quantum chemical definitions, adding them to dictionaries and extracting them consistently from the results of the various software packages can then proceed in an incremental manner, adding additional value at each stage. Not only will these results help to change the data management model in the field of Quantum Chemistry, but the methodology can be applied to other pressing problems related to data in computational and experimental science. PMID:21999363

  19. Realization of quantum state privacy amplification in a nuclear magnetic resonance quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liang; Wang, Chuan; Long, Gui Lu

    2010-06-01

    Quantum state privacy amplification (QSPA) is the quantum analogue of classical privacy amplification. If the state information of a series of single-particle states has some leakage, QSPA reduces this leakage by condensing the state information of two particles into the state of one particle. Recursive applications of the operations will eliminate the quantum state information leakage to a required minimum level. In this paper, we report the experimental implementation of a quantum state privacy amplification protocol in a nuclear magnetic resonance system. The density matrices of the states are constructed in the experiment, and the experimental results agree well with theory.

  20. Performance comparison between classical and quantum control for a simple quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Zairong; Jin, Guangsheng

    2008-02-01

    Brańczyk et al. pointed out that the quantum control scheme is superior to the classical control scheme for a simple quantum system using simulation [A.M. Brańczyk, P.E.M.F. Mendonca, A. Gilchrist, A.C. Doherty, S.D. Barlett, Quantum control theory of a single qubit, Physical Review A 75 (2007) 012329 or arXiv e-print quant-ph/0608037]. Here we rigorously prove the result. Furthermore we will show that any quantum operation does not universally “correct” the dephasing noise.

  1. Automated drawing system of quantum energy levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampoultzis, M.; Sinatkas, J.; Tsakstara, V.; Kosmas, T. S.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to derive an automated system that provides advantageous drawings of energy spectra for quantum systems (nuclei, atoms, molecules, etc.) required in various physical sciences. The automation involves the development of appropriate computational code and graphical imaging system based on raw data insertion, theoretical calculations and experimental or bibliographic data insertion. The system determines the appropriate scale to depict graphically with the best possible way in the available space. The presently developed code operates locally and the results are displayed on the screen and can be exported to a PostScript file. We note its main features to arrange and visualize in the available space the energy levels with their identity, taking care the existence in the final diagram the least auxiliary deviations. Future improvements can be the use of Java and the availability on the Internet. The work involves the automated plotting of energy levels in molecules, atoms, nuclei and other types of quantized energy spectra. The automation involves the development of an appropriate computational code and graphical imaging system.

  2. Quantum Interference Induced Photon Blockade in a Coupled Single Quantum Dot-Cavity System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jing; Geng, Weidong; Xu, Xiulai

    2015-03-01

    We propose an experimental scheme to implement a strong photon blockade with a single quantum dot coupled to a nanocavity. The photon blockade effect can be tremendously enhanced by driving the cavity and the quantum dot simultaneously with two classical laser fields. This enhancement of photon blockade is ascribed to the quantum interference effect to avoid two-photon excitation of the cavity field. Comparing with Jaynes-Cummings model, the second-order correlation function at zero time delay g(2)(0) in our scheme can be reduced by two orders of magnitude and the system sustains a large intracavity photon number. A red (blue) cavity-light detuning asymmetry for photon quantum statistics with bunching or antibunching characteristics is also observed. The photon blockade effect has a controllable flexibility by tuning the relative phase between the two pumping laser fields and the Rabi coupling strength between the quantum dot and the pumping field. Moreover, the photon blockade scheme based on quantum interference mechanism does not require a strong coupling strength between the cavity and the quantum dot, even with the pure dephasing of the system. This simple proposal provides an effective way for potential applications in solid state quantum computation and quantum information processing.

  3. Quantum interference induced photon blockade in a coupled single quantum dot-cavity system.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Geng, Weidong; Xu, Xiulai

    2015-01-01

    We propose an experimental scheme to implement a strong photon blockade with a single quantum dot coupled to a nanocavity. The photon blockade effect can be tremendously enhanced by driving the cavity and the quantum dot simultaneously with two classical laser fields. This enhancement of photon blockade is ascribed to the quantum interference effect to avoid two-photon excitation of the cavity field. Comparing with Jaynes-Cummings model, the second-order correlation function at zero time delay g((2))(0) in our scheme can be reduced by two orders of magnitude and the system sustains a large intracavity photon number. A red (blue) cavity-light detuning asymmetry for photon quantum statistics with bunching or antibunching characteristics is also observed. The photon blockade effect has a controllable flexibility by tuning the relative phase between the two pumping laser fields and the Rabi coupling strength between the quantum dot and the pumping field. Moreover, the photon blockade scheme based on quantum interference mechanism does not require a strong coupling strength between the cavity and the quantum dot, even with the pure dephasing of the system. This simple proposal provides an effective way for potential applications in solid state quantum computation and quantum information processing. PMID:25783560

  4. Quantum Interference Induced Photon Blockade in a Coupled Single Quantum Dot-Cavity System

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jing; Geng, Weidong; Xu, Xiulai

    2015-01-01

    We propose an experimental scheme to implement a strong photon blockade with a single quantum dot coupled to a nanocavity. The photon blockade effect can be tremendously enhanced by driving the cavity and the quantum dot simultaneously with two classical laser fields. This enhancement of photon blockade is ascribed to the quantum interference effect to avoid two-photon excitation of the cavity field. Comparing with Jaynes-Cummings model, the second-order correlation function at zero time delay g(2)(0) in our scheme can be reduced by two orders of magnitude and the system sustains a large intracavity photon number. A red (blue) cavity-light detuning asymmetry for photon quantum statistics with bunching or antibunching characteristics is also observed. The photon blockade effect has a controllable flexibility by tuning the relative phase between the two pumping laser fields and the Rabi coupling strength between the quantum dot and the pumping field. Moreover, the photon blockade scheme based on quantum interference mechanism does not require a strong coupling strength between the cavity and the quantum dot, even with the pure dephasing of the system. This simple proposal provides an effective way for potential applications in solid state quantum computation and quantum information processing. PMID:25783560

  5. De Finetti representation theorem for infinite-dimensional quantum systems and applications to quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Renner, R; Cirac, J I

    2009-03-20

    We show that the quantum de Finetti theorem holds for states on infinite-dimensional systems, provided they satisfy certain experimentally verifiable conditions. This result can be applied to prove the security of quantum key distribution based on weak coherent states or other continuous variable states against general attacks. PMID:19392183

  6. Quantum Liquid Crystal Phases in Strongly Correlated Fermionic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Kai

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the investigation of the quantum liquid crystal phases in strongly correlated electronic systems. Such phases are characterized by their partially broken spatial symmetries and are observed in various strongly correlated systems as being summarized in Chapter 1. Although quantum liquid crystal phases often involve

  7. Quantum Liquid Crystal Phases in Strongly Correlated Fermionic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Kai

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the investigation of the quantum liquid crystal phases in strongly correlated electronic systems. Such phases are characterized by their partially broken spatial symmetries and are observed in various strongly correlated systems as being summarized in Chapter 1. Although quantum liquid crystal phases often involve…

  8. Quantum number theoretic transforms on multipartite finite systems.

    PubMed

    Vourdas, A; Zhang, S

    2009-06-01

    A quantum system composed of p-1 subsystems, each of which is described with a p-dimensional Hilbert space (where p is a prime number), is considered. A quantum number theoretic transform on this system, which has properties similar to those of a Fourier transform, is studied. A representation of the Heisenberg-Weyl group in this context is also discussed. PMID:19488175

  9. Experimental quantum simulation of entanglement in many-body systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingfu; Wei, Tzu-Chieh; Laflamme, Raymond

    2011-07-01

    We employ a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quantum information processor to simulate the ground state of an XXZ spin chain and measure its NMR analog of entanglement, or pseudoentanglement. The observed pseudoentanglement for a small-size system already displays a singularity, a signature which is qualitatively similar to that in the thermodynamical limit across quantum phase transitions, including an infinite-order critical point. The experimental results illustrate a successful approach to investigate quantum correlations in many-body systems using quantum simulators. PMID:21797528

  10. Process tomography via sequential measurements on a single quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassa, Humairah; Goyal, Sandeep K.; Choudhary, Sujit K.; Uys, Hermann; Diósi, Lajos; Konrad, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    We utilize a discrete (sequential) measurement protocol to investigate quantum process tomography of a single two-level quantum system, with an unknown initial state, undergoing Rabi oscillations. The ignorance of the dynamical parameters is encoded into a continuous-variable classical system which is coupled to the two-level quantum system via a generalized Hamiltonian. This combined estimate of the quantum state and dynamical parameters is updated by using the information obtained from sequential measurements on the quantum system and, after a sufficient waiting period, faithful state monitoring and parameter determination is obtained. Numerical evidence is used to demonstrate the convergence of the state estimate to the true state of the hybrid system.

  11. Detective quantum efficiency of the LODOX system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Villiers, Mattieu; de Jager, Gerhard

    2003-06-01

    The Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) of a digital x-ray imaging system describes how much of the signal to noise ratio of the incident radiation is sustained in the resultant digital image. This measure of dose efficiency is suitable for the comparison of detectors produced by different manufacturers. The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) stipulates standard methods and conditions for the measurement of the DQE for single exposure imaging systems such as flat panel detectors. This paper shows how the calculation is adapted for DQE measurements of scanning systems. In this paper it is described how to measure the presampled Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) using an edge test method and how to extract the horizontal and vertical components of the Noise Power Spectrum (NPS) in a way that is insensitive to structured noise patterns often found in scanned images. The calculation of the total number of incident photons from the radiation dose measurement is explained and results are provided for the Lodox low dose full body digital x-ray scanning system which is developed in South Africa.

  12. Tunable polaritonic molecules in an open microcavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufferwiel, S.; Li, Feng; Trichet, A. A. P.; Giriunas, L.; Walker, P. M.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Smith, J. M.; Skolnick, M. S.; Krizhanovskii, D. N.

    2015-11-01

    We experimentally demonstrate tunable coupled cavities based upon open access zero-dimensional hemispherical microcavities. The modes of the photonic molecules are strongly coupled with quantum well excitons forming a system of tunable polaritonic molecules. The cavity-cavity coupling strength, which is determined by the degree of modal overlap, is controlled through the fabricated centre-to-centre distance and tuned in-situ through manipulation of both the exciton-photon and cavity-cavity detunings by using nanopositioners to vary the mirror separation and angle between them. We demonstrate micron sized confinement combined with high photonic Q-factors of 31 000 and lower polariton linewidths of 150 μeV at resonance along with cavity-cavity coupling strengths between 2.5 meV and 60 μeV for the ground cavity state.

  13. Fate of classical solitons in one-dimensional quantum systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Pustilnik, M.; Matveev, K. A.

    2015-11-23

    We study one-dimensional quantum systems near the classical limit described by the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation. The excitations near this limit are the well-known solitons and phonons. The classical description breaks down at long wavelengths, where quantum effects become dominant. Focusing on the spectra of the elementary excitations, we describe analytically the entire classical-to-quantum crossover. We show that the ultimate quantum fate of the classical KdV excitations is to become fermionic quasiparticles and quasiholes. We discuss in detail two exactly solvable models exhibiting such crossover, the Lieb-Liniger model of bosons with weak contact repulsion and the quantum Toda model, and argue that the results obtained for these models are universally applicable to all quantum one-dimensional systems with a well-defined classical limit described by the KdV equation.

  14. Development of the Open Items Tracking System

    SciTech Connect

    Riggi, V.

    1994-06-01

    The West Valley Demonstration Project, located on the site of the only commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing facility to have operated in USA, has the directed objectives of solidifying the high-level radioactive waste into a durable, solid form for shipment; decontaminating and decommissioning the tanks and facilities; and disposing of the resulting low-level and transuranic wastes. Since an escalating trend of open work items was noticed in the Fall of 1988, and there was no control mechanism for tracking and closing the open items, a Work Control System was developed for this purpose. It is self-contained system on a mainframe ARTEMIS 9000, which tracks, monitors, and closes out external commitments in a timely manner. Audits, surveillances, site appraisals, preventive maintenance, instrument calibration recall, and scheduling are covered.

  15. Maps and inverse maps in open quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Thomas F.

    2010-10-15

    Two kinds of maps that describe evolution of states of a subsystem coming from dynamics described by a unitary operator for a larger system, maps defined for fixed mean values and maps defined for fixed correlations, are found to be quite different for the same unitary dynamics in the same situation in the larger system. An affine form is used for both kinds of maps to find necessary and sufficient conditions for inverse maps. All the different maps with the same homogeneous part in their affine forms have inverses if and only if the homogeneous part does. Some of these maps are completely positive; others are not, but the homogeneous part is always completely positive. The conditions for an inverse are the same for maps that are not completely positive as for maps that are. For maps defined for fixed mean values, the homogeneous part depends only on the unitary operator for the dynamics of the larger system, not on any state or mean values or correlations. Necessary and sufficient conditions for an inverse are stated several different ways: in terms of the maps of matrices, basis matrices, density matrices, or mean values. The inverse maps are generally not tied to the dynamics the way the maps forward are. A trace-preserving completely positive map that is unital cannot have an inverse that is obtained from any dynamics described by any unitary operator for any states of a larger system.

  16. Strong polygamy of quantum correlations in multi-party quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Kim, Jeong

    2014-10-01

    We propose a new type of polygamy inequality for multi-party quantum entanglement. We first consider the possible amount of bipartite entanglement distributed between a fixed party and any subset of the rest parties in a multi-party quantum system. By using the summation of these distributed entanglements, we provide an upper bound of the distributed entanglement between a party and the rest in multi-party quantum systems. We then show that this upper bound also plays as a lower bound of the usual polygamy inequality, therefore the strong polygamy of multi-party quantum entanglement. For the case of multi-party pure states, we further show that the strong polygamy of entanglement implies the strong polygamy of quantum discord.

  17. Control of the quantum interference in a superconducting qubit system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Hao; Luo, Da-Wei; Xu, Jing-Bo

    2013-10-01

    We propose a scheme to control quantum interference pattern in a system of a superconducting qubit coupled to its own data bus by applying a controllable time-dependent electromagnetic field. It is shown that the quantum interference induced by the initial phase difference is closely related to the quantum correlations between two superconducting qubits which are coupled to their own data bus and the geometric discord can also be increased by applying the controllable electromagnetic field.

  18. Quantum study of the H3 system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhengwei

    In this thesis, an ab initio quantum; study of both electronic and nuclear motions of the H3 system is presented. Results of the ab initio calculations for the lowest four electronic potential energy surfaces of the H3 system are given, as well as for the electric dipole transition moments between them. The calculated Rydberg spectra compare well with previous calculations and with known experimental results. The ground state and the third excited state surfaces have been fitted using the rotated Morse cubic spline (RMCS) method. The ro-vibrational eigenstates of H3 on the upper sheet of the Double Many Body Expansion (DMBE) surface were calculated using a variational method and a new hyperspherical coordinate propagation method. The full P3 nuclear permutation symmetry and the molecular Aharonov-Bohm (MAB) (or geometric phase) effect were included in the hyperspherical coordinate propagation method. The MAB effect has a profound influence on the bound ro-vibrational states of the H3 system. The ro-vibrational bound states of H3 in the third excited 2pz 2A"2 electronic state were also studied. The Rydberg nature of this electronic state leads to ro-vibrational nuclear motion similar to that of the H+3 ion. The comparison between the calculated values of the ro-vibrational constants and the corresponding experimental results suggests that the 2pz 2A"2 RMCS surface still needs some improvement.

  19. An open system for intravascular ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Weibao; Chen, Yan; Li, Xiang; Yu, Yanyan; Cheng, Wang Fai; Tsang, Fu Keung; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K Kirk; Dai, Jiyan; Sun, Lei

    2012-10-01

    Visualization of the blood vessels can provide valuable morphological information for diagnosis and therapy strategies for cardiovascular disease. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is able to delineate internal structures of vessel wall with fine spatial resolution. However, the developed IVUS is insufficient to identify the fibrous cap thickness and tissue composition of atherosclerotic lesions. Novel imaging strategies have been proposed, such as increasing the center frequency of ultrasound or using a modulated excitation technique to improve the accuracy of diagnosis. Dual-mode tomography combining IVUS with optical tomography has also been developed to determine tissue morphology and characteristics. The implementation of these new imaging methods requires an open system that allows users to customize the system for various studies. This paper presents the development of an IVUS system that has open structures to support various imaging strategies. The system design is based on electronic components and printed circuit board, and provides reconfigurable hardware implementation, programmable image processing algorithms, flexible imaging control, and raw RF data acquisition. In addition, the proposed IVUS system utilized a miniaturized ultrasound transducer constructed using PMNPT single crystal for better piezoelectric constant and electromechanical coupling coefficient than traditional lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics. Testing results showed that the IVUS system could offer a minimum detectable signal of 25 μV, allowing a 51 dB dynamic range at 47 dB gain, with a frequency range from 20 to 80 MHz. Finally, phantom imaging, in vitro IVUS vessel imaging, and multimodality imaging with photoacoustics were conducted to demonstrate the performance of the open system. PMID:23143570

  20. An Open System for Intravascular Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Weibao; Chen, Yan; Li, Xiang; Yu, Yanyan; Cheng, Wang Fai; Tsang, Fu Keung; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Dai, Jiyan; Sun, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Visualization of the blood vessels can provide valuable morphological information for diagnosis and therapy strategies for cardiovascular disease. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is able to delineate internal structures of vessel wall with fine spatial resolution. However, the developed IVUS is insufficient to identify the fibrous cap thickness and tissue composition of atherosclerotic lesions. Novel imaging strategies have been proposed, such as increasing the center frequency of ultrasound or using a modulated excitation technique to improve the accuracy of diagnosis. Dual-mode tomography combining IVUS with optical tomography has also been developed to determine tissue morphology and characteristics. The implementation of these new imaging methods requires an open system that allows users to customize the system for various studies. This paper presents the development of an IVUS system that has open structures to support various imaging strategies. The system design is based on electronic components and printed circuit board, and provides reconfigurable hardware implementation, programmable image processing algorithms, flexible imaging control, and raw RF data acquisition. In addition, the proposed IVUS system utilized a miniaturized ultrasound transducer constructed using PMN-PT single crystal for better piezoelectric constant and electromechanical coupling coefficient than traditional lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramics. Testing results showed that the IVUS system could offer a minimum detectable signal of 25 μV, allowing a 51 dB dynamic range at 47 dB gain, with a frequency range from 20 to 80 MHz. Finally, phantom imaging, in vitro IVUS vessel imaging, and multimodality imaging with photoacoustics were conducted to demonstrate the performance of the open system. PMID:23143570

  1. Persistent Hall response after a quantum quench in Dirac systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Justin; Song, Justin; Refael, Gil

    The geometry and topology of quantum states play a central role in producing novel types of responses, such as the quantum anomalous Hall effect. These have featured prominently in topological materials in equilibrium as well as driven systems in the steady state. Here we unveil how quantum geometry yields radically new types of responses in systems far from equilibrium such as that realized in a quantum quench. To illustrate this, we consider quenches of two-band systems with spin-orbit coupling (e.g. Dirac systems). We find that quenching a time-reversal broken gap gives a Hall-type response that persists even at long times. Intimately tied to the quantum geometry of the underlying Hilbert space, the unconventional persistent Hall response yield clear signatures in quench protocols that can be implemented in cold atoms set-ups.

  2. Average entanglement dynamics in open two-qubit systems with continuous monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara, Ivonne; Viviescas, Carlos

    2014-07-01

    We present a comprehensive implementation of the quantum trajectory theory for the description of the entanglement dynamics in a Markovian open quantum system made of two qubits. We introduce the average concurrence to characterize the entanglement in the system and derive a deterministic evolution equation for it that depends on the ways in which information is read from the environment. This buildt-in flexibility of the method is used to address two actual issues in quantum information: entanglement protection and entanglement estimation. We identify general physical situations in which an entanglement protection protocol based on local monitoring of the environment can be implemented. Additionally, we methodically find unravelings of the system dynamics providing analytical tight bounds for the unmonitored entanglement in the system at all times. We conclude by showing the independence of the method from the choice of entanglement measure.

  3. Density matrix of strongly coupled quantum dot - microcavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hop, Nguyen

    2009-09-01

    Any two-level quantum system can be used as a quantum bit (qubit)-the basic element of all devices and systems for quantum information and quantum computation. Recently it was proposed to study the strongly coupled system consisting of a two-level quantum dot and a monoenergetic photon gas in a microcavity-the strongly coupled quantum dot-microcavity (QD-MC) system for short, with the Jaynes-Cumming total Hamiltonian, for the application in the quantum information processing. Different approximations were applied in the theoretical study of this system. In this work, on the basis of the exact solution of the Schrodinger equation for this system without dissipation we derive the exact formulae for its density matrix. The realization of a qubit in this system is discussed. The solution of the system of rate equation for the strongly coupled QD-MC system in the presence of the interaction with the environment was also established in the first order approximation with respect to this interaction.

  4. Minimized open-circuit voltage reduction in GaAs/InGaAs quantum well solar cells with bandgap-engineered graded quantum well depths

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaohan; Dasika, Vaishno D.; Li, Ping-Chun; Ji, Li; Bank, Seth R.; Yu, Edward T.

    2014-09-22

    The use of InGaAs quantum wells with composition graded across the intrinsic region to increase open-circuit voltage in p-i-n GaAs/InGaAs quantum well solar cells is demonstrated and analyzed. By engineering the band-edge energy profile to reduce photo-generated carrier concentration in the quantum wells at high forward bias, simultaneous increases in both open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current density are achieved, compared to those for a structure with the same average In concentration, but constant rather than graded quantum well composition across the intrinsic region. This approach is combined with light trapping to further increase short-circuit current density.

  5. OCSEGen: Open Components and Systems Environment Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tkachuk, Oksana

    2014-01-01

    To analyze a large system, one often needs to break it into smaller components.To analyze a component or unit under analysis, one needs to model its context of execution, called environment, which represents the components with which the unit interacts. Environment generation is a challenging problem, because the environment needs to be general enough to uncover unit errors, yet precise enough to make the analysis tractable. In this paper, we present a tool for automated environment generation for open components and systems. The tool, called OCSEGen, is implemented on top of the Soot framework. We present the tool's current support and discuss its possible future extensions.

  6. Adiabatic response and quantum thermoelectrics for ac-driven quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludovico, María Florencia; Battista, Francesca; von Oppen, Felix; Arrachea, Liliana

    2016-02-01

    We generalize the theory of thermoelectrics to include coherent electron systems under adiabatic ac driving, accounting for quantum pumping of charge and heat, as well as for the work exchanged between the electron system and driving potentials. We derive the relevant response coefficients in the adiabatic regime and show that they obey generalized Onsager reciprocity relations. We analyze the consequences of our generalized thermoelectric framework for quantum motors, generators, heat engines, and heat pumps, characterizing them in terms of efficiencies and figures of merit. We illustrate these concepts in a model for a quantum pump.

  7. Enhanced Fault-Tolerant Quantum Computing in d -Level Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Earl T.

    2014-12-01

    Error-correcting codes protect quantum information and form the basis of fault-tolerant quantum computing. Leading proposals for fault-tolerant quantum computation require codes with an exceedingly rare property, a transversal non-Clifford gate. Codes with the desired property are presented for d -level qudit systems with prime d . The codes use n =d -1 qudits and can detect up to ˜d /3 errors. We quantify the performance of these codes for one approach to quantum computation known as magic-state distillation. Unlike prior work, we find performance is always enhanced by increasing d .

  8. Experimental simulation of quantum tunneling in small systems

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guan-Ru; Lu, Yao; Hao, Liang; Zhang, Fei-Hao; Long, Gui-Lu

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that quantum computers are superior to classical computers in efficiently simulating quantum systems. Here we report the first experimental simulation of quantum tunneling through potential barriers, a widespread phenomenon of a unique quantum nature, via NMR techniques. Our experiment is based on a digital particle simulation algorithm and requires very few spin-1/2 nuclei without the need of ancillary qubits. The occurrence of quantum tunneling through a barrier, together with the oscillation of the state in potential wells, are clearly observed through the experimental results. This experiment has clearly demonstrated the possibility to observe and study profound physical phenomena within even the reach of small quantum computers. PMID:23958996

  9. Control of quantum correlations in solid state systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrada, K.

    2015-11-01

    The quantum correlations between two independent qubits immersed in an anisotropic and isotropic photonic band-gab (PBG) crystal have been studied without Born or Markovian approximation. We show that the amount of the entanglement and quantum discord between the qubits in the photonic crystal is greatly different from that of qubits in vacuum or that subjected to the usual non-Markovian reservoir. The results also show that, for PBG materials as environment, high values of quantum correlation trapping can be achieved and thus prevention of correlation sudden drop occurs, which seriously enhances the coherence and increase the amount of the correlations. Moreover, we show that the quantum correlations in the isotropic PBG are more easily preserved than that in the anisotropic PBG under the same condition. These features make the quantum systems in PBG materials as a good candidate for implementation of different schemes of quantum optics and information with high performance.

  10. NANONIS TRAMEA - A Quantum Transport Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampen, Thorsten; Thissen, Andreas; Schaff, Oliver; Pioda, Alessandro

    Nanonis Tramea is a quantum leap with respect to increased speed for transport measurements taking research onto a new level. Measurements which took several hours in the past can now be done in minutes without compromising signal quality. Tramea uses its fast, high-resolution, high-precision and ultra-low-noise outputs and inputs to generate and acquire up to 20000 data points per second on 24 channels in parallel. This is not only up to 1000 x faster than typical measurement systems but it is also time deterministic with highest precision. Here, the time separation between points is constant so that artefacts caused by unequal point spacings in non-deterministic measurement systems are avoided. The emphasis here is the real-time relation. Tramea comes with a built-in interface which allows for control of the instruments' basic functions from any programming environment. For users requiring more functionality and higher speeds a full-featured LabVIEW-based programming interface or scripting module are available as add-on modules. Due to the modularity and flexibility of the hardware and software architecture of Tramea upgrades with standardized add-on modules are possible. Non-standard requests can still be handled by the various programming options.

  11. Chebyshev Expansion Applied to Dissipative Quantum Systems.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Bogdan; Rahman, Hasan; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich

    2016-05-19

    To determine the dynamics of a molecular aggregate under the influence of a strongly time-dependent perturbation within a dissipative environment is still, in general, a challenge. The time-dependent perturbation might be, for example, due to external fields or explicitly treated fluctuations within the environment. Methods to calculate the dynamics in these cases do exist though some of these approaches assume that the corresponding correlation functions can be written as a weighted sum of exponentials. One such theory is the hierarchical equations of motion approach. If the environment, however, is described by a complex spectral density or if its temperature is low, these approaches become very inefficient. Therefore, we propose a scheme based on a Chebyshev decomposition of the bath correlation functions and detail the respective quantum master equations within second-order perturbation theory in the environmental coupling. Similar approaches have recently been proposed for systems coupled to Fermionic reservoirs. The proposed scheme is tested for a simple two-level system and compared to existing results. Furthermore, the advantages and disadvantages of the present Chebyshev approach are discussed. PMID:26845380

  12. Optimal Correlations in Many-Body Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amico, L.; Rossini, D.; Hamma, A.; Korepin, V. E.

    2012-06-01

    Information and correlations in a quantum system are closely related through the process of measurement. We explore such relation in a many-body quantum setting, effectively bridging between quantum metrology and condensed matter physics. To this aim we adopt the information-theory view of correlations and study the amount of correlations after certain classes of positive-operator-valued measurements are locally performed. As many-body systems, we consider a one-dimensional array of interacting two-level systems (a spin chain) at zero temperature, where quantum effects are most pronounced. We demonstrate how the optimal strategy to extract the correlations depends on the quantum phase through a subtle interplay between local interactions and coherence.

  13. Quantum correlations in B and K meson systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Subhashish; Alok, Ashutosh Kumar; MacKenzie, Richard

    2016-05-01

    The interplay between the various measures of quantum correlations is well known in stable optical and electronic systems. Here we study such foundational issues in unstable quantum systems. Specifically we study meson-antimeson systems ( Kbar{K}, Bd bar{B}d and Bsbar{B}s, which are produced copiously in meson factories. In particular, the nonclassicality of quantum correlations which can be characterized in terms of nonlocality (which is the strongest condition), entanglement, teleportation fidelity or weaker nonclassicality measures like quantum discord are analyzed. We also study the impact of decoherence on these measures of quantum correlations, using the semigroup formalism. A comparison of these measures brings out the fact that the relations between them can be nontrivially different from those of their stable counterparts such as neutrinos.

  14. A quantum many-body spin system in an optical lattice clock.

    PubMed

    Martin, M J; Bishof, M; Swallows, M D; Zhang, X; Benko, C; von-Stecher, J; Gorshkov, A V; Rey, A M; Ye, Jun

    2013-08-01

    Strongly interacting quantum many-body systems arise in many areas of physics, but their complexity generally precludes exact solutions to their dynamics. We explored a strongly interacting two-level system formed by the clock states in (87)Sr as a laboratory for the study of quantum many-body effects. Our collective spin measurements reveal signatures of the development of many-body correlations during the dynamical evolution. We derived a many-body Hamiltonian that describes the experimental observation of atomic spin coherence decay, density-dependent frequency shifts, severely distorted lineshapes, and correlated spin noise. These investigations open the door to further explorations of quantum many-body effects and entanglement through use of highly coherent and precisely controlled optical lattice clocks. PMID:23929976

  15. Security proof for quantum key distribution using qudit systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, Lana; Scarani, Valerio

    2010-09-15

    We provide security bounds against coherent attacks for two families of quantum key distribution protocols that use d-dimensional quantum systems. In the asymptotic regime, both the secret key rate for fixed noise and the robustness to noise increase with d. The finite key corrections are found to be almost insensitive to d < or approx. 20.

  16. Quantum-Classical Connection for Hydrogen Atom-Like Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syam, Debapriyo; Roy, Arup

    2011-01-01

    The Bohr-Sommerfeld quantum theory specifies the rules of quantization for circular and elliptical orbits for a one-electron hydrogen atom-like system. This article illustrates how a formula connecting the principal quantum number "n" and the length of the major axis of an elliptical orbit may be arrived at starting from the quantum…

  17. Quantum Feynman Ratchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Ketan; Kawai, Ryoichi

    As nanotechnology advances, understanding of the thermodynamic properties of small systems becomes increasingly important. Such systems are found throughout physics, biology, and chemistry manifesting striking properties that are a direct result of their small dimensions where fluctuations become predominant. The standard theory of thermodynamics for macroscopic systems is powerless for such ever fluctuating systems. Furthermore, as small systems are inherently quantum mechanical, influence of quantum effects such as discreteness and quantum entanglement on their thermodynamic properties is of great interest. In particular, the quantum fluctuations due to quantum uncertainty principles may play a significant role. In this talk, we investigate thermodynamic properties of an autonomous quantum heat engine, resembling a quantum version of the Feynman Ratchet, in non-equilibrium condition based on the theory of open quantum systems. The heat engine consists of multiple subsystems individually contacted to different thermal environments.

  18. Enzyme efficiency: An open reaction system perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Kinshuk; Bhattacharyya, Kamal

    2015-12-01

    A measure of enzyme efficiency is proposed for an open reaction network that, in suitable form, applies to closed systems as well. The idea originates from the description of classical enzyme kinetics in terms of cycles. We derive analytical expressions for the efficiency measure by treating the network not only deterministically but also stochastically. The latter accounts for any significant amount of noise that can be present in biological systems and hence reveals its impact on efficiency. Numerical verification of the results is also performed. It is found that the deterministic equation overestimates the efficiency, the more so for very small system sizes. Roles of various kinetics parameters and system sizes on the efficiency are thoroughly explored and compared with the standard definition k2/KM. Study of substrate fluctuation also indicates an interesting efficiency-accuracy balance.

  19. Certifying single-system steering for quantum-information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Che-Ming; Chen, Yueh-Nan; Lambert, Neill; Chiu, Ching-Yi; Nori, Franco

    2015-12-01

    Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering describes how different ensembles of quantum states can be remotely prepared by measuring one particle of an entangled pair. Here, we investigate quantum steering for single quantum d -dimensional systems (qudits) and devise efficient conditions to certify the steerability therein, which we find are applicable both to single-system steering and EPR steering. In the single-system case our steering conditions enable the unambiguous ruling out of generic classical means of mimicking steering. Ruling out "false-steering" scenarios has implications for securing channels against both cloning-based individual attack and coherent attacks when implementing quantum key distribution using qudits. We also show that these steering conditions also have applications in quantum computation, in that they can serve as an efficient criterion for the evaluation of quantum logic gates of arbitrary size. Finally, we describe how the nonlocal EPR variant of these conditions also function as tools for identifying faithful one-way quantum computation, secure entanglement-based quantum communication, and genuine multipartite EPR steering.

  20. The Power of Quantum Systems on a Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonov, Dorit; Gottesman, Daniel; Irani, Sandy; Kempe, Julia

    2009-04-01

    We study the computational strength of quantum particles (each of finite dimensionality) arranged on a line. First, we prove that it is possible to perform universal adiabatic quantum computation using a one-dimensional quantum system (with 9 states per particle). This might have practical implications for experimentalists interested in constructing an adiabatic quantum computer. Building on the same construction, but with some additional technical effort and 12 states per particle, we show that the problem of approximating the ground state energy of a system composed of a line of quantum particles is QMA-complete; QMA is a quantum analogue of NP. This is in striking contrast to the fact that the analogous classical problem, namely, one-dimensional MAX-2-SAT with nearest neighbor constraints, is in P. The proof of the QMA-completeness result requires an additional idea beyond the usual techniques in the area: Not all illegal configurations can be ruled out by local checks, so instead we rule out such illegal configurations because they would, in the future, evolve into a state which can be seen locally to be illegal. Our construction implies (assuming the quantum Church-Turing thesis and that quantum computers cannot efficiently solve QMA-complete problems) that there are one-dimensional systems which take an exponential time to relax to their ground states at any temperature, making them candidates for being one-dimensional spin glasses.

  1. High open circuit voltages of solar cells based on quantum dot and dye hybrid-sensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yujie; Zhao, Wanyu; Chen, Jingkuo; Li, Huayang; Fu, Wuyou E-mail: fuwy56@163.com; Sun, Guang; Cao, Jianliang; Zhang, Zhanying; Bala, Hari E-mail: fuwy56@163.com; College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Inner Mongolia University for the Nationalities, Tongliao 028043

    2014-01-06

    A type of solar cell based on quantum dot (QD) and dye hybrid-sensitized mesoporous TiO{sub 2} film electrode was designed and reported. The electrode was consisted of a TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle (NP) thin film layer sensitized with CdS quantum dot (QD) and an amorphous TiO{sub 2} coated TiO{sub 2} NP thin film layer that sensitized with C106 dye. The amorphous TiO{sub 2} layer was obtained by TiCl{sub 4} post-treatment to improve the properties of solar cells. Research showed that the solar cells fabricated with as-prepared hybrid-sensitized electrode exhibited excellent photovoltaic performances and a fairly high open circuit voltage of 796 mV was achieved.

  2. High open circuit voltages of solar cells based on quantum dot and dye hybrid-sensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yujie; Bala, Hari; Zhao, Wanyu; Chen, Jingkuo; Li, Huayang; Fu, Wuyou; Sun, Guang; Cao, Jianliang; Zhang, Zhanying

    2014-01-01

    A type of solar cell based on quantum dot (QD) and dye hybrid-sensitized mesoporous TiO2 film electrode was designed and reported. The electrode was consisted of a TiO2 nanoparticle (NP) thin film layer sensitized with CdS quantum dot (QD) and an amorphous TiO2 coated TiO2 NP thin film layer that sensitized with C106 dye. The amorphous TiO2 layer was obtained by TiCl4 post-treatment to improve the properties of solar cells. Research showed that the solar cells fabricated with as-prepared hybrid-sensitized electrode exhibited excellent photovoltaic performances and a fairly high open circuit voltage of 796 mV was achieved.

  3. Toxicity of quantum dots on respiratory system.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tianshu; Tang, Meng

    2014-02-01

    Quantum dots (QDs), as advanced nanotechnology products, are widely used in the bio-medical field for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes due to their unique properties. Therefore, it becomes important for researchers to elucidate the adverse effects of QDs on human beings. This essay provides an overview of the toxic effects of QDs on respiratory system, which are summarized into two main parts: in vitro toxicity, including reduction of cell viability, genetic material damage and disordered immune cell reactions; as well as in vivo toxicity, involving accumulation of QDs, lung injury and inflammation, and potential long-term adverse effects. As the toxic severity of a QD type depends on its composition, dose, size, surface chemistry and structure, it is a big challenge to determine a benchmark of QDs. Thus, we have to remember that each QD type is a unique nanocrystal, which needs to be assessed individually. However, there are still some feasible recommendations for minimizing the toxicity provided in this review. Overall, more and more large-scale well-organized toxicity studies of different QD types on different species need to be conducted in order to provide guidelines of QDs' safety application. PMID:24495248

  4. The Dalton quantum chemistry program system

    PubMed Central

    Aidas, Kestutis; Angeli, Celestino; Bak, Keld L; Bakken, Vebjørn; Bast, Radovan; Boman, Linus; Christiansen, Ove; Cimiraglia, Renzo; Coriani, Sonia; Dahle, Pål; Dalskov, Erik K; Ekström, Ulf; Enevoldsen, Thomas; Eriksen, Janus J; Ettenhuber, Patrick; Fernández, Berta; Ferrighi, Lara; Fliegl, Heike; Frediani, Luca; Hald, Kasper; Halkier, Asger; Hättig, Christof; Heiberg, Hanne; Helgaker, Trygve; Hennum, Alf Christian; Hettema, Hinne; Hjertenæs, Eirik; Høst, Stinne; Høyvik, Ida-Marie; Iozzi, Maria Francesca; Jansík, Branislav; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa; Jonsson, Dan; Jørgensen, Poul; Kauczor, Joanna; Kirpekar, Sheela; Kjærgaard, Thomas; Klopper, Wim; Knecht, Stefan; Kobayashi, Rika; Koch, Henrik; Kongsted, Jacob; Krapp, Andreas; Kristensen, Kasper; Ligabue, Andrea; Lutnæs, Ola B; Melo, Juan I; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Myhre, Rolf H; Neiss, Christian; Nielsen, Christian B; Norman, Patrick; Olsen, Jeppe; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus H; Osted, Anders; Packer, Martin J; Pawlowski, Filip; Pedersen, Thomas B; Provasi, Patricio F; Reine, Simen; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Ruden, Torgeir A; Ruud, Kenneth; Rybkin, Vladimir V; Sałek, Pawel; Samson, Claire C M; de Merás, Alfredo Sánchez; Saue, Trond; Sauer, Stephan P A; Schimmelpfennig, Bernd; Sneskov, Kristian; Steindal, Arnfinn H; Sylvester-Hvid, Kristian O; Taylor, Peter R; Teale, Andrew M; Tellgren, Erik I; Tew, David P; Thorvaldsen, Andreas J; Thøgersen, Lea; Vahtras, Olav; Watson, Mark A; Wilson, David J D; Ziolkowski, Marcin; Ågren, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Dalton is a powerful general-purpose program system for the study of molecular electronic structure at the Hartree–Fock, Kohn–Sham, multiconfigurational self-consistent-field, Møller–Plesset, configuration-interaction, and coupled-cluster levels of theory. Apart from the total energy, a wide variety of molecular properties may be calculated using these electronic-structure models. Molecular gradients and Hessians are available for geometry optimizations, molecular dynamics, and vibrational studies, whereas magnetic resonance and optical activity can be studied in a gauge-origin-invariant manner. Frequency-dependent molecular properties can be calculated using linear, quadratic, and cubic response theory. A large number of singlet and triplet perturbation operators are available for the study of one-, two-, and three-photon processes. Environmental effects may be included using various dielectric-medium and quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics models. Large molecules may be studied using linear-scaling and massively parallel algorithms. Dalton is distributed at no cost from http://www.daltonprogram.org for a number of UNIX platforms. PMID:25309629

  5. The Dalton quantum chemistry program system.

    PubMed

    Aidas, Kestutis; Angeli, Celestino; Bak, Keld L; Bakken, Vebjørn; Bast, Radovan; Boman, Linus; Christiansen, Ove; Cimiraglia, Renzo; Coriani, Sonia; Dahle, Pål; Dalskov, Erik K; Ekström, Ulf; Enevoldsen, Thomas; Eriksen, Janus J; Ettenhuber, Patrick; Fernández, Berta; Ferrighi, Lara; Fliegl, Heike; Frediani, Luca; Hald, Kasper; Halkier, Asger; Hättig, Christof; Heiberg, Hanne; Helgaker, Trygve; Hennum, Alf Christian; Hettema, Hinne; Hjertenæs, Eirik; Høst, Stinne; Høyvik, Ida-Marie; Iozzi, Maria Francesca; Jansík, Branislav; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa; Jonsson, Dan; Jørgensen, Poul; Kauczor, Joanna; Kirpekar, Sheela; Kjærgaard, Thomas; Klopper, Wim; Knecht, Stefan; Kobayashi, Rika; Koch, Henrik; Kongsted, Jacob; Krapp, Andreas; Kristensen, Kasper; Ligabue, Andrea; Lutnæs, Ola B; Melo, Juan I; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Myhre, Rolf H; Neiss, Christian; Nielsen, Christian B; Norman, Patrick; Olsen, Jeppe; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus H; Osted, Anders; Packer, Martin J; Pawlowski, Filip; Pedersen, Thomas B; Provasi, Patricio F; Reine, Simen; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Ruden, Torgeir A; Ruud, Kenneth; Rybkin, Vladimir V; Sałek, Pawel; Samson, Claire C M; de Merás, Alfredo Sánchez; Saue, Trond; Sauer, Stephan P A; Schimmelpfennig, Bernd; Sneskov, Kristian; Steindal, Arnfinn H; Sylvester-Hvid, Kristian O; Taylor, Peter R; Teale, Andrew M; Tellgren, Erik I; Tew, David P; Thorvaldsen, Andreas J; Thøgersen, Lea; Vahtras, Olav; Watson, Mark A; Wilson, David J D; Ziolkowski, Marcin; Agren, Hans

    2014-05-01

    Dalton is a powerful general-purpose program system for the study of molecular electronic structure at the Hartree-Fock, Kohn-Sham, multiconfigurational self-consistent-field, Møller-Plesset, configuration-interaction, and coupled-cluster levels of theory. Apart from the total energy, a wide variety of molecular properties may be calculated using these electronic-structure models. Molecular gradients and Hessians are available for geometry optimizations, molecular dynamics, and vibrational studies, whereas magnetic resonance and optical activity can be studied in a gauge-origin-invariant manner. Frequency-dependent molecular properties can be calculated using linear, quadratic, and cubic response theory. A large number of singlet and triplet perturbation operators are available for the study of one-, two-, and three-photon processes. Environmental effects may be included using various dielectric-medium and quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics models. Large molecules may be studied using linear-scaling and massively parallel algorithms. Dalton is distributed at no cost from http://www.daltonprogram.org for a number of UNIX platforms. PMID:25309629

  6. Simulation of Quantum Operations in a Three-Level System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jason; Lababidi, Mahmoud; Tian, Mingzhen

    2009-05-01

    Lambda-type three-level systems have been studied as potential qubits for quantum computation and quantum memory. Quantum state manipulation through optically controlled quantum operation plays an important role in these settings. In order to understand the physical processes involved and to analyze the state and operation fidelity we developed a theoretical model based on semi-classical theory, which describes the state evolution of the three-level atom driven by the laser pulses. We investigated the fidelity of the quantum operations, which is controlled by laser and atomic parameters in the process, including atomic coherence time, initial state, frequency detuning, amplitude, and phase of the laser control pulses. The simulation encompasses realistic parameters to gauge optimal operation conditions, by optimizing parameters of the laser and atom. We will present the simulation results in comparison to the experiment data. The theoretical model can also be applied to a broader range of processes in three-level systems.

  7. Universal quantum gates for atomic systems assisted by Faraday rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Guo-Zhu; Zhang, Mei

    2015-08-01

    Both cavity quantum electrodynamics and photons are promising candidates for quantum information processing. Here we present two efficient schemes for universal quantum gates, that is, Fredkin gates and \\sqrt{\\text{SWAP}} gates on atomic systems, assisted by Faraday rotation catalyzed by an auxiliary single photon. These gates are achieved by successfully reflecting an auxiliary single photon from an optical cavity with a single-trapped atom. They do not require additional qubits and they only need some linear-optical elements besides the nonlinear interaction between the flying photon and the atoms in the optical cavities. Moreover, these two universal quantum gates are robust. A high fidelity can be achieved in our schemes with current experimental technology. They may be very useful in quantum information processing in future, with the great progress on controlling atomic systems.

  8. Protection of quantum information and optimal singlet conversion through higher-dimensional quantum systems and environment monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarenhas, E.; Marques, B.; Santos, M. Franca; Cavalcanti, D.; Cunha, M. Terra

    2010-03-15

    We study how to protect quantum information in quantum systems subjected to local dissipation. We show that combining the use of three-level systems, environment monitoring, and local feedback can fully and deterministically protect any available quantum information, including entanglement initially shared by different parties. These results can represent a gain in resources and/or distances in quantum communication protocols such as quantum repeaters and teleportation as well as time for quantum memories. Finally, we show that monitoring local environments physically implements the optimum singlet conversion protocol, which is essential for classical entanglement percolation.

  9. Closed-loop and robust control of quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunlin; Wang, Lin-Cheng; Wang, Yuanlong

    2013-01-01

    For most practical quantum control systems, it is important and difficult to attain robustness and reliability due to unavoidable uncertainties in the system dynamics or models. Three kinds of typical approaches (e.g., closed-loop learning control, feedback control, and robust control) have been proved to be effective to solve these problems. This work presents a self-contained survey on the closed-loop and robust control of quantum systems, as well as a brief introduction to a selection of basic theories and methods in this research area, to provide interested readers with a general idea for further studies. In the area of closed-loop learning control of quantum systems, we survey and introduce such learning control methods as gradient-based methods, genetic algorithms (GA), and reinforcement learning (RL) methods from a unified point of view of exploring the quantum control landscapes. For the feedback control approach, the paper surveys three control strategies including Lyapunov control, measurement-based control, and coherent-feedback control. Then such topics in the field of quantum robust control as H(∞) control, sliding mode control, quantum risk-sensitive control, and quantum ensemble control are reviewed. The paper concludes with a perspective of future research directions that are likely to attract more attention. PMID:23997680

  10. Information Theory Density Matrix for a Simple Quantum System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titus, William J.

    1979-01-01

    Derives the density matrix that best describes, according to information theory, a one-dimensional single particle quantum system when the only information available is the values for the linear and quadratic position-momentum moments. (Author/GA)

  11. Quantum teleportation of composite systems via mixed entangled states

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, Somshubhro; Sanders, Barry C.

    2006-09-15

    We analyze quantum teleportation for composite systems, specifically for concatenated teleporation (decomposing a large composite state into smaller states of dimension commensurate with the channel) and partial teleportation (teleporting one component of a larger quantum state). We obtain an exact expression for teleportation fidelity that depends solely on the dimension and singlet fraction for the entanglement channel and entanglement (measures by I concurrence) for the state; in fact quantum teleportation for composite systems provides an operational interpretation for I concurrence. In addition we obtain tight bounds on teleportation fidelity and prove that the average fidelity approaches the lower bound of teleportation fidelity in the high-dimension limit.

  12. Operator Method for Nonperturbative Description of Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feranchuk, Ilya; Ivanov, Alexey

    2004-11-01

    A nonperturbative method for describing quantum systems -- the operator method (OM) and the conception of a uniformly suitable estimation (USE) are considered for a series of real physical systems. It is shown that the OM zeroth-order approximation permits one to find the analytical approximation for eigenfunctions and eigenvalues with high accuracy within the entire range of the Hamiltonian parameters and any quantum numbers. The OM subsequent approximations converge rapidly to the exact solutions of the Schrödinger equation. The generalization of OM for quantum statistics is also developed.

  13. Quantum Brayton cycle with coupled systems as working substance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X. L.; Wang, L. C.; Yi, X. X.

    2013-01-01

    We explore the quantum version of the Brayton cycle with a composite system as the working substance. The actual Brayton cycle consists of two adiabatic and two isobaric processes. Two pressures can be defined in our isobaric process; one corresponds to the external magnetic field (characterized by Fx) exerted on the system, while the other corresponds to the coupling constant between the subsystems (characterized by Fy). As a consequence, we can define two types of quantum Brayton cycle for the composite system. We find that the subsystem experiences a quantum Brayton cycle in one quantum Brayton cycle (characterized by Fx), whereas the subsystem's cycle is quantum Otto cycle in another Brayton cycle (characterized by Fy). The efficiency for the composite system equals to that for the subsystem in both cases, but the work done by the total system is usually larger than the sum of the work done by the two subsystems. The other interesting finding is that for the cycle characterized by Fy, the subsystem can be a refrigerator, while the total system is a heat engine. The result in this paper can be generalized to a quantum Brayton cycle with a general coupled system as the working substance.

  14. Quantum Brayton cycle with coupled systems as working substance.

    PubMed

    Huang, X L; Wang, L C; Yi, X X

    2013-01-01

    We explore the quantum version of the Brayton cycle with a composite system as the working substance. The actual Brayton cycle consists of two adiabatic and two isobaric processes. Two pressures can be defined in our isobaric process; one corresponds to the external magnetic field (characterized by F(x)) exerted on the system, while the other corresponds to the coupling constant between the subsystems (characterized by F(y)). As a consequence, we can define two types of quantum Brayton cycle for the composite system. We find that the subsystem experiences a quantum Brayton cycle in one quantum Brayton cycle (characterized by F(x)), whereas the subsystem's cycle is quantum Otto cycle in another Brayton cycle (characterized by F(y)). The efficiency for the composite system equals to that for the subsystem in both cases, but the work done by the total system is usually larger than the sum of the work done by the two subsystems. The other interesting finding is that for the cycle characterized by F(y), the subsystem can be a refrigerator, while the total system is a heat engine. The result in this paper can be generalized to a quantum Brayton cycle with a general coupled system as the working substance. PMID:23410319

  15. BEC-Cryostat Interface: A Novel Platform for Hybrid Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Date, Aditya; Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Schwab, Keith; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2015-05-01

    We present our experimental progress towards the implementation of a unique BEC-cryostat interface. This apparatus allows for the control and manipulation of ultracold atoms in close proximity to cryogenic surfaces. Such a system enables us to realize a hybrid quantum system consisting of a BEC strongly coupled magnetically to an ultra-high Q mechanical resonator, thus enabling precise atomic sensing of mechanical motion. Furthermore, the unprecedented sensitivities afforded by our atomic system open avenues to surface studies of correlated electronic systems at cryogenic temperatures. This work is supported by the DARPA QuASAR program through a grant from the ARO.

  16. Using Local Perturbations To Manipulate and Control Pointer States in Quantum Dot Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akis, Richard; Speyer, Gil; Ferry, David; Brunner, Roland

    2012-02-01

    Recently, scanning gate microscopy (SGM) was used to image scarred wave functions in an open InAs quantum dot[1]. The SGM tip provides a local potential perturbation and imaging is performed by measuring changes in conductance. Scarred wave functions, long associated with quantum chaos, have been shown in open dots to correspond to pointer states[2], eigenstates that survive the decoherence process that occurs via coupling to the environment. Pointer states modulate the conductance, yielding periodic fluctuations and the scars, normally thought unstable, are stabilized by quantum Darwinism [3]. We shall show that, beyond probing, pointer states can be manipulated by local perturbations. Particularly interesting effects occur in coupled quantum dot arrays, where a pointer state localized in one dot can be shifted over into another with a perturbation in a completely different part of the system. These nonlocal effects may perhaps be exploited to give such systems an exotic functionality. [1] A. M. Burke, R. Akis, T. E. Day, Gil Speyer, D. K. Ferry, and B. R. Bennett, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 176801 (2010). [2] D. K. Ferry, R. Akis, and J. P. Bird, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 176801 (2004). [3] R. Brunner, R. Akis,D. K. Ferry, F. Kuchar,and R. Meisels, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 024102 (2008).

  17. Equivalence of the measures of non-Markovianity for open two-level systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Haosheng; Tang Ning; Zheng Yanping; Wang Guoyou

    2011-09-15

    Different measures have been presented to depict the deviation of quantum time evolution in open systems from Markovian processes. We demonstrate that the measure proposed by Breuer, Laine, and Piilo [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 210401 (2009)] and the two measures proposed by Rivas, Huelga, and Plenio [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 050403 (2010)] have exactly the same non-Markovian time-evolution intervals and thus are really equivalent to each other when they are applied to open two-level systems coupled to environments via the Jaynes-Cummings or dephasing models. This equivalence implies that the three measures, in different ways, capture the intrinsic character of the non-Markovianity of quantum evolutional processes. We also show that the maximization in the definition of the first measure can be actually removed for the considered models without influencing the sensibility of the measure to detect non-Markovianity.

  18. Invisibility of quantum systems to tunneling of matter waves

    SciTech Connect

    Cordero, Sergio; Garcia-Calderon, Gaston

    2009-05-15

    We show that an appropriate choice of the potential parameters in one-dimensional quantum systems allows for unity transmission of the tunneling particle at all incident tunneling energies, except at controllable exceedingly small incident energies. The corresponding dwell time and the transmission amplitude are indistinguishable from those of a free particle in the unity-transmission regime. This implies the possibility of designing quantum systems that are invisible to tunneling by a passing wave packet.

  19. Genuine quantum and classical correlations in multipartite systems.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Gian Luca; Bellomo, Bruno; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta

    2011-11-01

    Generalizing the quantifiers used to classify correlations in bipartite systems, we define genuine total, quantum, and classical correlations in multipartite systems. The measure we give is based on the use of relative entropy to quantify the distance between two density matrices. Moreover, we show that, for pure states of three qubits, both quantum and classical bipartite correlations obey a ladder ordering law fixed by two-body mutual informations, or, equivalently, by one-qubit entropies. PMID:22181588

  20. Plausibility of quantum coherent states in biological systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salari, V.; Tuszynski, J.; Rahnama, M.; Bernroider, G.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we briefly discuss the necessity of using quantum mechanics as a fundamental theory applicable to some key functional aspects of biological systems. This is especially relevant to three important parts of a neuron in the human brain, namely the cell membrane, microtubules (MT) and ion channels. We argue that the recently published papers criticizing the use of quantum theory in these systems are not convincing.

  1. Self-assembled quantum dots in a nanowire system for quantum photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiss, M.; Fontana, Y.; Gustafsson, A.; Wüst, G.; Magen, C.; O'Regan, D. D.; Luo, J. W.; Ketterer, B.; Conesa-Boj, S.; Kuhlmann, A. V.; Houel, J.; Russo-Averchi, E.; Morante, J. R.; Cantoni, M.; Marzari, N.; Arbiol, J.; Zunger, A.; Warburton, R. J.; Fontcuberta I Morral, A.

    2013-05-01

    Quantum dots embedded within nanowires represent one of the most promising technologies for applications in quantum photonics. Whereas the top-down fabrication of such structures remains a technological challenge, their bottom-up fabrication through self-assembly is a potentially more powerful strategy. However, present approaches often yield quantum dots with large optical linewidths, making reproducibility of their physical properties difficult. We present a versatile quantum-dot-in-nanowire system that reproducibly self-assembles in core-shell GaAs/AlGaAs nanowires. The quantum dots form at the apex of a GaAs/AlGaAs interface, are highly stable, and can be positioned with nanometre precision relative to the nanowire centre. Unusually, their emission is blue-shifted relative to the lowest energy continuum states of the GaAs core. Large-scale electronic structure calculations show that the origin of the optical transitions lies in quantum confinement due to Al-rich barriers. By emitting in the red and self-assembling on silicon substrates, these quantum dots could therefore become building blocks for solid-state lighting devices and third-generation solar cells.

  2. Self-assembled quantum dots in a nanowire system for quantum photonics.

    PubMed

    Heiss, M; Fontana, Y; Gustafsson, A; Wüst, G; Magen, C; O'Regan, D D; Luo, J W; Ketterer, B; Conesa-Boj, S; Kuhlmann, A V; Houel, J; Russo-Averchi, E; Morante, J R; Cantoni, M; Marzari, N; Arbiol, J; Zunger, A; Warburton, R J; Fontcuberta i Morral, A

    2013-05-01

    Quantum dots embedded within nanowires represent one of the most promising technologies for applications in quantum photonics. Whereas the top-down fabrication of such structures remains a technological challenge, their bottom-up fabrication through self-assembly is a potentially more powerful strategy. However, present approaches often yield quantum dots with large optical linewidths, making reproducibility of their physical properties difficult. We present a versatile quantum-dot-in-nanowire system that reproducibly self-assembles in core-shell GaAs/AlGaAs nanowires. The quantum dots form at the apex of a GaAs/AlGaAs interface, are highly stable, and can be positioned with nanometre precision relative to the nanowire centre. Unusually, their emission is blue-shifted relative to the lowest energy continuum states of the GaAs core. Large-scale electronic structure calculations show that the origin of the optical transitions lies in quantum confinement due to Al-rich barriers. By emitting in the red and self-assembling on silicon substrates, these quantum dots could therefore become building blocks for solid-state lighting devices and third-generation solar cells. PMID:23377293

  3. EDITORIAL: How to control decoherence and entanglement in quantum complex systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akulin, V. M.; Kurizki, G.; Lidar, D. A.

    2007-05-01

    Theory and experiment have not fully resolved the apparent dichotomy, which has agonized physics for the past eighty years: on the one hand, the description of microsystems by quantum mechanics and, on the other, the description of macrosystems by classical dynamics or statistical mechanics. Derivations of the time-irreversible Liouville equation for an open quantum system, based on projecting out its environment, have narrowed the gap between the quantum and classical descriptions. Yet our `classical' intuition continues to be confronted by quantum-mechanical results like the Einstein--Podolsky--Rosen paradox that challenges the classical notion of locality, or the quantum Zeno effect which suggests that the isolation of a system is not the only way to preserve its quantum state. There are two key concepts in any discussion of such issues. The first, which is responsible for the most salient nonclassical properties, is entanglement, that is partial or complete correlation or, more generally, inseparability of the elements comprising a quantum ensemble. Even after their interaction has ceased, this inseparability, originating from their past interaction, can affect the state of one element when another element is subject to a nonunitary action, such as its measurement, tracing- out, or thermalization. The second key concept is decoherence of open quantum systems, which is the consequence of their entanglement with their environment, a `meter' or a thermal `reservoir', followed by the tracing-out of the latter. Despite new insights into entanglement and decoherence, there are still no complete, unequivocal answers to the fundamental questions of the transition from quantal to classical behaviour: how do irreversibility and classicality emerge from unitarity as systems and their environments become increasingly complex? At what stage does system--meter entanglement give rise to a classical readout of the meter? Is there an upper limit on the size or complexity of systems displaying entanglement? Major developments have opened new vistas into controlled entanglement, which is the resource of quantum information processing. However, these developments have mainly focused on ensembles of simple two- and three-level systems that are thoroughly isolated from their environments. Treatments of coherence in quantum computing have mostly assumed that only a single or a few the elements of the quantum ensemble may simultaneously undergo an uncontrolled intervention---a quantum error. Decoherence-control protocols for more general types of errors are still incomplete. In order to resolve the outstanding issues of the quantum--classical transition, and study the control of entanglement and decoherence without the foregoing restrictions, we must venture into the domain of Quantum Complex Systems (QUACS), either consisting of a large number of inseparable elements or having many coupled degrees of freedom. Our conviction is that fundamental understanding and manipulation of entanglement within QUACS or their entanglement with the environment or a meter, call for the creation of a new conceptual framework or paradigm, that would encompass phenomena common to cold atoms in laser fields, large molecules, Josephson junctions, quantum gases and solids, with the view of employing these systems for quantum information processing and computing. Progress within this paradigm should allow us to answer the questions: does entanglement play an essential role in the evolution of large collections of complex systems? What are the size and complexity limits of systems and ensembles still controllable by an external intervention? What are the most appropriate decoherence protection schemes and control algorithms? This special issue addresses the challenge of understanding in depth and manipulating the basic quantum properties of optical, atomic, molecular and condensed-matter QUACS, and large ensembles thereof. In view of the interdisciplinary character of this issue, we find it expedient to look at the presented articles not only according to the physical objects they describe, but also from a unifying standpoint. Several unifying themes may be discerned: memory effects in dephasing and relaxation; protection of quantum information by its distribution throughout the ensemble; control of decoherence and entanglement by time-dependent interventions or measurements; manifestations of entanglement in scattering off statistical ensembles; measurment-induced dynamics. The concerted discussion of the topics outlined above should help us advance the new paradigm that addresses our abilities to diagnose and manipulate the entangled states of complex quantum objects and their robustness against decoherence. These abilities are required for quantum information (QI) applications in matter--wave interferometry in molecular, semiconducting or superconducting systems. On the fundamental level, this book may help establish the notion of dynamical information exchange between quantum systems and chart in detail the route from unitarity to classicality. Further developments within the outlined paradigm should yield novel, advantageous QI processing schemes and high-sensitivity interferometers, owing to decoherence suppression and effective control of many degrees of freedom. In the long run, these strategies may prove to be the first step towards the (hitherto unattempted) use of entanglement in nanotechnology, metrology and chemistry, with potentially remarkable novel applications.

  4. Comment on {open_quotes}Local responsivity in quantum well photodetectors{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhii, M.; Khmyrova, I.

    2001-06-01

    The response of multiple quantum well (QW) infrared photodetectors (QW) to the photoexcitation of one QW selected from many identical QWs was recently modeled [M. Ershov, J. Appl. Phys. 86, 7059 (1999)]. We point out here that the presented analysis based on the use of drift-diffusion model for a system with a few electrons is incorrect. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Contexts, Systems and Modalities: A New Ontology for Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auffèves, Alexia; Grangier, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    In this article we present a possible way to make usual quantum mechanics fully compatible with physical realism, defined as the statement that the goal of physics is to study entities of the natural world, existing independently from any particular observer's perception, and obeying universal and intelligible rules. Rather than elaborating on the quantum formalism itself, we propose a new quantum ontology, where physical properties are attributed jointly to the system, and to the context in which it is embedded. In combination with a quantization principle, this non-classical definition of physical reality sheds new light on counter-intuitive features of quantum mechanics such as the origin of probabilities, non-locality, and the quantum-classical boundary.

  6. Neutron interferometry for precise characterization of quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarenac, Dusan; Shahi, Chandra; Mineeva, Taisiya; Wood, Christopher J.; Huber, Michael G.; Arif, Muhammad; Clark, Charles W.; Cory, David G.; Pushin, Dmitry A.

    Neutron interferometry (NI) is among the most precise techniques used to test the postulates of quantum mechanics. It has demonstrated coherent spinor rotation and superposition, gravitationally induced quantum interference, the Aharonov-Casher effect, violation of a Bell-like inequality, and generation of a single-neutron entangled state. As massive, penetrating and neutral particles neutrons now provide unique capabilities in classical imaging applications that we seek to extend to the quantum domain. We present recent results on NI measurements of quantum discord in a bipartite quantum system and neutron orbital angular momentum multiplexing, and review progress on our commissioning of a decoherence-free-subspace NI user facility at the NIST Center for Neutron Research. Supported in part by CERC, CIFAR, NSERC and CREATE.

  7. Open, reconfigurable cytometric acquisition system: ORCAS.

    PubMed

    Naivar, Mark A; Parson, Jimmie D; Wilder, Mark E; Habbersett, Robert C; Edwards, Bruce S; Sklar, Larry; Nolan, John P; Graves, Steven W; Martin, John C; Jett, James H; Freyer, James P

    2007-11-01

    A digital signal processing (DSP)-based digital data acquisition system has been developed to support novel flow cytometry efforts. The system flexibility includes how it detects, captures, and processes event data. Custom data capture boards utilizing analog to digital converters (ADCs) and field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) detect events and capture correlated event data. A commercial DSP board processes the captured data and sends the results over the IEEE 1394 bus to the host computer that provides a user interface for acquisition, display, analysis, and storage. The system collects list mode data, correlated pulse shapes, or streaming data from a variety of detector types using Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows host computers. It extracts pulse features not found on commercial systems with excellent sensitivity and linearity over a wide dynamic range. List mode data are saved in FCS 3.0 formatted files while streaming or correlated waveform data are saved in custom format files for postprocessing. Open, reconfigurable cytometric acquisition system is compact, scaleable, flexible, and modular. Programmable feature extraction algorithms have exciting possibilities for both new and existing applications. The recent availability of a commercial data capture board will enable general availability of similar systems. PMID:17680705

  8. Scavenging quantum information: Multiple observations of quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rapcan, P.; Calsamiglia, J.; Munoz-Tapia, R.; Bagan, E.; Buzek, V.

    2011-09-15

    Given an unknown state of a qudit that has already been measured optimally, can one still extract any information about the original unknown state? Clearly, after a maximally informative measurement, the state of the system collapses into a postmeasurement state from which the same observer cannot obtain further information about the original state of the system. However, the system still encodes a significant amount of information about the original preparation for a second observer who is unaware of the actions of the first one. We study how a series of independent observers can obtain, or can scavenge, information about the unknown state of a system (quantified by the fidelity) when they sequentially measure it. We give closed-form expressions for the estimation fidelity when one or several qudits are available to carry information about the single-qudit state, and we study the classical limit when an arbitrarily large number of observers can obtain (nearly) complete information on the system. In addition to the case where all observers perform most informative measurements, we study the scenario where a finite number of observers estimates the state with equal fidelity, regardless of their position in the measurement sequence and the scenario where all observers use identical measurement apparatuses (up to a mutually unknown orientation) chosen so that a particular observer's estimation fidelity is maximized.

  9. Tampering detection system using quantum-mechanical systems

    DOEpatents

    Humble, Travis S.; Bennink, Ryan S.; Grice, Warren P.

    2011-12-13

    The use of quantum-mechanically entangled photons for monitoring the integrity of a physical border or a communication link is described. The no-cloning principle of quantum information science is used as protection against an intruder's ability to spoof a sensor receiver using a `classical` intercept-resend attack. Correlated measurement outcomes from polarization-entangled photons are used to protect against quantum intercept-resend attacks, i.e., attacks using quantum teleportation.

  10. Quantum filtering for multiple input multiple output systems driven by arbitrary zero-mean jointly Gaussian input fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurdin, H. I.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we treat the quantum filtering problem for multiple input multiple output (MIMO) Markovian open quantum systems coupled to multiple boson fields in an arbitrary zero-mean jointly Gaussian state, using the reference probability approach formulated by Bouten and van Handel as a quantum version of a well-known method of the same name from classical nonlinear filtering theory, and exploiting the generalized Araki-Woods representation of Gough. This includes Gaussian field states such as vacuum, squeezed vacuum, thermal, and squeezed thermal states as special cases. The contribution is a derivation of the general quantum filtering equation (or stochastic master equation as they are known in the quantum optics community) in the full MIMO setup for any zero-mean jointly Gaussian input field states, up to some mild rank assumptions on certain matrices relating to the measurement vector.

  11. Planar quantum squeezing in spin-1/2 systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puentes, Graciana

    2015-12-01

    Planar quantum squeezed (PQS) states, i.e. quantum states which are squeezed in two orthogonal spin components on a plane, have recently attracted attention due to their applications in atomic interferometry and quantum information [1, 2]. In this paper we present an application of the framework described by Puentes et al [3] for planar quantum squeezing via quantum nondemolition (QND) measurement, for the particular case of spin-1/2 systems and nonzero covariance between orthogonal spin components. Our regime, consisting of spin-1/2 entangled planar-squeezed (EPQS) states, is of interest as it can present higher precision for quantum parameter estimation and quantum magnetometry at finite intervals. We show that entangled planar-squeezed states (EPQS) can be used to reconstruct a specific quantum parameter, such as a phase or a magnetic field, within a finite interval with higher precision than PQS states, and without iterative procedures. EPQS is of interest in cases where limited prior knowledge about the specific subinterval location for a phase is available, but it does not require knowledge of the exact phase a priori, as in the case of squeezing on a single spin component.

  12. Quantum Magnets and Matrix Lorenz Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranchida, J.; Thibaudeau, P.; Nicolis, S.

    2015-01-01

    The Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations for the evolution of the magnetization, in presence of an external torque, can be cast in the form of the Lorenz equations and, thus, can describe chaotic fluctuations. To study quantum effects, we describe the magnetization by matrices, that take values in a Lie algebra. The finite dimensionality of the representation encodes the quantum fluctuations, while the non-linear nature of the equations can describe chaotic fluctuations. We identify a criterion, for the appearance of such non-linear terms. This depends on whether an invariant, symmetric tensor of the algebra can vanish or not. This proposal is studied in detail for the fundamental representation of u(2) = u(1) × su(2). We find a knotted structure for the attractor, a bimodal distribution for the largest Lyapunov exponent and that the dynamics takes place within the Cartan subalgebra, that does not contain only the identity matrix, thereby can describe the quantum fluctuations.

  13. Information processing in quantum spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landahl, Andrew; Christandl, Matthias; Datta, Nilanjana; Ekert, Artur

    2004-11-01

    We present a class of spin networks that act as perfect quantum wires—quantum states transfer across these networks with unit fidelity in a time proportional to the network's size. No couplings need to be switched on and off during this process. We prove that N-spin hypercube networks with equal-strength nearest-neighbor Heisenberg and XY couplings have a maximal perfect communication distance of 2log3N. We show how to engineer coupling strengths in linear Heisenberg and XY spin chains to efficiently achieve perfect state transfer over arbitrarily long distances. Finally, we show how to augment these linear spin chain networks with more complex, but static, interactions to achieve universal quantum computation.

  14. Mixed quantum-classical versus full quantum dynamics: Coupled quasiparticle-oscillator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanz, Holger; Esser, Bernd

    1997-05-01

    The relation between the dynamical properties of a coupled quasiparticle-oscillator system in the mixed quantum-classical and fully quantized descriptions is investigated. The system is considered as a model for applying a stepwise quantization. Features of the nonlinear dynamics in the mixed description such as the presence of a separatrix structure or regular and chaotic motion are shown to be reflected in the evolu- tion of the quantum state vector of the fully quantized system. In particular, it is demonstrated how wave packets propagate along the separatrix structure of the mixed description, and that chaotic dynamics leads to a strongly entangled quantum state vector. Special emphasis is given to viewing the system from a dyn- amical Born-Oppenheimer approximation defining integrable reference oscillators, and elucidating the role of the nonadiabatic couplings which complement this approximation into a rigorous quantization scheme.

  15. Controllable multiple-quantum transitions in a T-shaped small quantum dot-ring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiongwen; Chen, Baoju; Song, Kehui; Zhou, Guanghui

    2016-05-01

    Based on the tight-binding model and the slave boson mean field approximation, we investigate the electron transport properties in a small quantum dot (QD)-ring system. Namely, a strongly correlated QD not only attaches directly to two normal metallic electrodes, but also forms a magnetic control Aharonov-Bohm quantum ring with a few noninteracting QDs. We show that the parity effect, the Kondo effect, and the multiple Fano effects coexist in our system. Moreover, the parities, defined by the odd- and even-numbered energy levels in this system, can be switched by adjusting magnetic flux phase ϕ located at the center of the quantum ring, which induces multiple controllable Fano-interference energy pathways. Therefore, the constructive and destructive multi-Fano interference transition, the Kondo and Fano resonance transition at the Fermi level, the Fano resonance and ani-resonance transition are realized in the even parity system. They can also be observed in the odd parity system when one adjusts the phase ϕ and the gate voltage Vg applied to the noninteracting QDs. The multi-quantum transitions determine some interesting transport properties such as the current switch and its multi-flatsteps, the differential conductance switch at zero bias voltage and its oscillation or quantization at the low bias voltage. These results may be useful for the observation of multiple quantum effect interplays experimentally and the design of controllable QD-based device.

  16. Enhanced Open-Circuit Voltage of PbS Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Woojun; Boercker, Janice E.; Lumb, Matthew P.; Placencia, Diogenes; Foos, Edward E.; Tischler, Joseph G.

    2013-01-01

    Nanocrystal quantum dots (QD) show great promise toward improving solar cell efficiencies through the use of quantum confinement to tune absorbance across the solar spectrum and enable multi-exciton generation. Despite this remarkable potential for high photocurrent generation, the achievable open-circuit voltage (Voc) is fundamentally limited due to non-radiative recombination processes in QD solar cells. Here we report the highest open-circuit voltages to date for colloidal QD based solar cells under one sun illumination. This Voc of 692 ± 7 mV for 1.4 eV PbS QDs is a result of improved passivation of the defective QD surface, demonstrating as a function of the QD bandgap (Eg). Comparing experimental Voc variation with the theoretical upper-limit obtained from one diode modeling of the cells with different Eg, these results clearly demonstrate that there is a tremendous opportunity for improvement of Voc to values greater than 1 V by using smaller QDs in QD solar cells. PMID:23868514

  17. Quantum fluctuations and CMB anisotropies in one-bubble open inflation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Misao; Tanaka, Takahiro

    1996-10-01

    We first develop a method to calculate a complete set of mode functions that describe the quantum fluctuations generated in one-bubble open inflation models. We consider two classes of models. One is a single scalar field model proposed by Bucher, Goldhaber, and Turok and by us as an example of the open inflation scenario, and the other is a two-field model such as the ``supernatural'' inflation proposed by Linde and Mezhlumian. In both cases we assume the difference in the vacuum energy density between inside and outside the bubble is negligible. There are two kinds of mode functions. One kind has the usual continuous spectrum and the other has a discrete spectrum with characteristic wavelengths exceeding the spatial curvature scale. The latter can be further divided into two classes in terms of its origin. One is called the de Sitter supercurvature mode, which arises due to the global spacetime structure of de Sitter space, and the other is due to fluctuations of the bubble wall. We calculate the spectrum of quantum fluctuations in these models and evaluate the resulting large angular scale CMB anisotropies. We find there are ranges of model parameters that are consistent with observed CMB anisotropies.

  18. Nonequilibrium potential and fluctuation theorems for quantum maps.

    PubMed

    Manzano, Gonzalo; Horowitz, Jordan M; Parrondo, Juan M R

    2015-09-01

    We derive a general fluctuation theorem for quantum maps. The theorem applies to a broad class of quantum dynamics, such as unitary evolution, decoherence, thermalization, and other types of evolution for quantum open systems. The theorem reproduces well-known fluctuation theorems in a single and simplified framework and extends the Hatano-Sasa theorem to quantum nonequilibrium processes. Moreover, it helps to elucidate the physical nature of the environment that induces a given dynamics in an open quantum system. PMID:26465448

  19. Nonequilibrium potential and fluctuation theorems for quantum maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzano, Gonzalo; Horowitz, Jordan M.; Parrondo, Juan M. R.

    2015-09-01

    We derive a general fluctuation theorem for quantum maps. The theorem applies to a broad class of quantum dynamics, such as unitary evolution, decoherence, thermalization, and other types of evolution for quantum open systems. The theorem reproduces well-known fluctuation theorems in a single and simplified framework and extends the Hatano-Sasa theorem to quantum nonequilibrium processes. Moreover, it helps to elucidate the physical nature of the environment that induces a given dynamics in an open quantum system.

  20. Quantum Error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidar, Daniel A.; Brun, Todd A.

    2013-09-01

    Prologue; Preface; Part I. Background: 1. Introduction to decoherence and noise in open quantum systems Daniel Lidar and Todd Brun; 2. Introduction to quantum error correction Dave Bacon; 3. Introduction to decoherence-free subspaces and noiseless subsystems Daniel Lidar; 4. Introduction to quantum dynamical decoupling Lorenza Viola; 5. Introduction to quantum fault tolerance Panos Aliferis; Part II. Generalized Approaches to Quantum Error Correction: 6. Operator quantum error correction David Kribs and David Poulin; 7. Entanglement-assisted quantum error-correcting codes Todd Brun and Min-Hsiu Hsieh; 8. Continuous-time quantum error correction Ognyan Oreshkov; Part III. Advanced Quantum Codes: 9. Quantum convolutional codes Mark Wilde; 10. Non-additive quantum codes Markus Grassl and Martin Rötteler; 11. Iterative quantum coding systems David Poulin; 12. Algebraic quantum coding theory Andreas Klappenecker; 13. Optimization-based quantum error correction Andrew Fletcher; Part IV. Advanced Dynamical Decoupling: 14. High order dynamical decoupling Zhen-Yu Wang and Ren-Bao Liu; 15. Combinatorial approaches to dynamical decoupling Martin Rötteler and Pawel Wocjan; Part V. Alternative Quantum Computation Approaches: 16. Holonomic quantum computation Paolo Zanardi; 17. Fault tolerance for holonomic quantum computation Ognyan Oreshkov, Todd Brun and Daniel Lidar; 18. Fault tolerant measurement-based quantum computing Debbie Leung; Part VI. Topological Methods: 19. Topological codes Héctor Bombín; 20. Fault tolerant topological cluster state quantum computing Austin Fowler and Kovid Goyal; Part VII. Applications and Implementations: 21. Experimental quantum error correction Dave Bacon; 22. Experimental dynamical decoupling Lorenza Viola; 23. Architectures Jacob Taylor; 24. Error correction in quantum communication Mark Wilde; Part VIII. Critical Evaluation of Fault Tolerance: 25. Hamiltonian methods in QEC and fault tolerance Eduardo Novais, Eduardo Mucciolo and Harold Baranger; 26. Critique of fault-tolerant quantum information processing Robert Alicki; References; Index.

  1. Locality and nonlocality of classical restrictions of quantum spin systems with applications to quantum large deviations and entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    De Roeck, W. E-mail: christian.maes@fys.kuleuven.be E-mail: marius.schutz@fys.kuleuven.be; Maes, C. E-mail: christian.maes@fys.kuleuven.be E-mail: marius.schutz@fys.kuleuven.be; Schütz, M. E-mail: christian.maes@fys.kuleuven.be E-mail: marius.schutz@fys.kuleuven.be; Netočný, K. E-mail: christian.maes@fys.kuleuven.be E-mail: marius.schutz@fys.kuleuven.be

    2015-02-15

    We study the projection on classical spins starting from quantum equilibria. We show Gibbsianness or quasi-locality of the resulting classical spin system for a class of gapped quantum systems at low temperatures including quantum ground states. A consequence of Gibbsianness is the validity of a large deviation principle in the quantum system which is known and here recovered in regimes of high temperature or for thermal states in one dimension. On the other hand, we give an example of a quantum ground state with strong nonlocality in the classical restriction, giving rise to what we call measurement induced entanglement and still satisfying a large deviation principle.

  2. A LONE code for the sparse control of quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciaramella, G.; Borzì, A.

    2016-03-01

    In many applications with quantum spin systems, control functions with a sparse and pulse-shaped structure are often required. These controls can be obtained by solving quantum optimal control problems with L1-penalized cost functionals. In this paper, the MATLAB package LONE is presented aimed to solving L1-penalized optimal control problems governed by unitary-operator quantum spin models. This package implements a new strategy that includes a globalized semi-smooth Krylov-Newton scheme and a continuation procedure. Results of numerical experiments demonstrate the ability of the LONE code in computing accurate sparse optimal control solutions.

  3. Quantum chaotic scattering in graphene systems in the absence of invariant classical dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guang-Lei; Ying, Lei; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

    2013-05-01

    Quantum chaotic scattering is referred to as the study of quantum behaviors of open Hamiltonian systems that exhibit transient chaos in the classical limit. Traditionally a central issue in this field is how the elements of the scattering matrix or their functions fluctuate as a system parameter, e.g., the electron Fermi energy, is changed. A tacit hypothesis underlying previous works was that the underlying classical phase-space structure remains invariant as the parameter varies, so semiclassical theory can be used to explain various phenomena in quantum chaotic scattering. There are, however, experimental situations where the corresponding classical chaotic dynamics can change characteristically with some physical parameter. Multiple-terminal quantum dots are one such example where, when a magnetic field is present, the classical chaotic-scattering dynamics can change between being nonhyperbolic and being hyperbolic as the Fermi energy is changed continuously. For such systems semiclassical theory is inadequate to account for the characteristics of conductance fluctuations with the Fermi energy. To develop a general framework for quantum chaotic scattering associated with variable classical dynamics, we use multi-terminal graphene quantum-dot systems as a prototypical model. We find that significant conductance fluctuations occur with the Fermi energy even for fixed magnetic field strength, and the characteristics of the fluctuation patterns depend on the energy. We propose and validate that the statistical behaviors of the conductance-fluctuation patterns can be understood by the complex eigenvalue spectrum of the generalized, complex Hamiltonian of the system which includes self-energies resulted from the interactions between the device and the semi-infinite leads. As the Fermi energy is increased, complex eigenvalues with extremely smaller imaginary parts emerge, leading to sharp resonances in the conductance. PMID:23767599

  4. The effect of measurements, randomly distributed in time, on quantum systems: stochastic quantum Zeno effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shushin, A. I.

    2011-02-01

    The manifestation of measurements, randomly distributed in time, on the evolution of quantum systems are analyzed in detail. The set of randomly distributed measurements (RDM) is modeled within the renewal theory, in which the distribution is characterized by the probability density function (PDF) W(t) of times t between successive events (measurements). The evolution of the quantum system affected by the RDM is shown to be described by the density matrix satisfying the stochastic Liouville equation. This equation is applied to the analysis of the RDM effect on the evolution of a two-level system for different types of RDM statistics, corresponding to different PDFs W(t). Obtained general results are illustrated as applied to the cases of the Poissonian (W(t) \\sim \\,e^{-w_r t}) and anomalous (W(t) ~ 1/t1 + α, α <= 1) RDM statistics. In particular, specific features of the quantum and inverse Zeno effects, resulting from the RDM, are thoroughly discussed.

  5. Superconducting quantum spin Hall systems with giant orbital g factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinthaler, R. W.; Tkachov, G.; Hankiewicz, E. M.

    2015-10-01

    Topological aspects of superconductivity in quantum spin Hall systems (QSHSs) such as thin layers of three-dimensional topological insulators (TIs) or two-dimensional TIs are the focus of current research. Here, we describe a superconducting quantum spin Hall effect (quantum spin Hall system in proximity to an s -wave superconductor and in orbital in-plane magnetic fields), which is protected against elastic backscattering by combined time-reversal and particle-hole symmetry. This effect is characterized by spin-polarized edge states, which can be manipulated in weak magnetic fields due to a giant effective orbital g factor, allowing the generation of spin currents. The phenomenon provides a solution to the outstanding challenge of detecting the spin polarization of the edge states. Here we propose the detection of the edge polarization in a three-terminal junction using unusual transport properties of the superconducting quantum Hall effect: a nonmonotonic excess current and a zero-bias conductance peak splitting.

  6. Fermion-parity duality and energy relaxation in interacting open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulenborg, J.; Saptsov, R. B.; Haupt, F.; Splettstoesser, J.; Wegewijs, M. R.

    2016-02-01

    We study the transient heat current out of a confined electron system into a weakly coupled electrode in response to a voltage switch. We show that the decay of the Coulomb interaction energy for this repulsive system exhibits signatures of electron-electron attraction, and is governed by an interaction-independent rate. This can only be understood from a general duality that relates the nonunitary evolution of a quantum system to that of a dual model with inverted energies. Deriving from the fermion-parity superselection postulate, this duality applies to a large class of open systems.

  7. Josephson inplane and tunneling currents in bilayer quantum Hall system

    SciTech Connect

    Ezawa, Z. F.; Tsitsishvili, G.; Sawada, A.

    2013-12-04

    A Bose-Einstein condensation is formed by composite bosons in the quantum Hall state. A composite boson carries the fundamental charge (–e). We investigate Josephson tunneling of such charges in the bilayer quantum Hall system at the total filling ν = 1. We show the existence of the critical current for the tunneling current to be coherent and dissipationless in tunneling experiments with various geometries.

  8. Real-time monitoring of Lévy flights in a single quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issler, M.; Höller, J.; Imamoǧlu, A.

    2016-02-01

    Lévy flights are random walks where the dynamics is dominated by rare events. Even though they have been studied in vastly different physical systems, their observation in a single quantum system has remained elusive. Here we analyze a periodically driven open central spin system and demonstrate theoretically that the dynamics of the spin environment exhibits Lévy flights. For the particular realization in a single-electron charged quantum dot driven by periodic resonant laser pulses, we use Monte Carlo simulations to confirm that the long waiting times between successive nuclear spin-flip events are governed by a power-law distribution; the corresponding exponent η =-3 /2 can be directly measured in real time by observing the waiting time distribution of successive photon emission events. Remarkably, the dominant intrinsic limitation of the scheme arising from nuclear quadrupole coupling can be minimized by adjusting the magnetic field or by implementing spin echo.

  9. Explorations with a new qubit system: Exchange Interactions between Quantum Dot Spin Qubits and Quantum Well Excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Peter

    2015-03-01

    In this talk I will present some of our recent work on constructing and optically investigating nanostructures consisting of quantum dots coupled to a nearby quantum well, all embedded in a planar microcavity. The overall goal of this line of work is to develop a platform in which long-range (~ 1 micron) two-qubit interactions between quantum dots are possible, following the pioneering proposal of Piermarocchi, Chen, Sham, and Steel. We have succeeded in demonstrating several fundamental aspects of this platform. We have realized a coupled quantum-dot-quantum-well system in a microcavity, and show that quantum dots in this system can be charged (allowing the storage of a spin qubit), and show that both the quantum dots and the quantum well retain favourable optical properties. Most importantly, we have fairly strong evidence suggesting that the operative mechanism of the theoretical proposals, the spin-dependent exchange interaction between a trapped electron in a quantum dot, and an exciton in the quantum well, is observable, and can be engineered to be of the magnitude required for the implementation of universal quantum gates and measurement operations. I will discuss these results, and highlight other recent (unrelated) work on site-controlled quantum dots, including with quantum dots in positioned nanowires. This work was primarily supported by the JSPS through its FIRST program.

  10. Method for adding nodes to a quantum key distribution system

    DOEpatents

    Grice, Warren P

    2015-02-24

    An improved quantum key distribution (QKD) system and method are provided. The system and method introduce new clients at intermediate points along a quantum channel, where any two clients can establish a secret key without the need for a secret meeting between the clients. The new clients perform operations on photons as they pass through nodes in the quantum channel, and participate in a non-secret protocol that is amended to include the new clients. The system and method significantly increase the number of clients that can be supported by a conventional QKD system, with only a modest increase in cost. The system and method are compatible with a variety of QKD schemes, including polarization, time-bin, continuous variable and entanglement QKD.

  11. Simulation of n-qubit quantum systems. II. Separability and entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, T.; Fritzsche, S.

    2006-07-01

    Studies on the entanglement of n-qubit quantum systems have attracted a lot of interest during recent years. Despite the central role of entanglement in quantum information theory, however, there are still a number of open problems in the theoretical characterization of entangled systems that make symbolic and numerical simulation on n-qubit quantum registers indispensable for present-day research. To facilitate the investigation of the separability and entanglement properties of n-qubit quantum registers, here we present a revised version of the FEYNMAN program in the framework of the computer algebra system MAPLE. In addition to all previous capabilities of this MAPLE code for defining and manipulating quantum registers, the program now provides various tools which are necessary for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of entanglement in n-qubit quantum registers. A simple access, in particular, is given to several algebraic separability criteria as well as a number of entanglement measures and related quantities. As in the previous version, symbolic and numeric computations are equally supported. Program summaryTitle of program:FEYNMAN Catalogue identifier:ADWE_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADWE_v2_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:None Computers for which the program is designed: All computers with a license of the computer algebra system MAPLE [Maple is a registered trademark of Waterloo Maple Inc.] Operating systems under which the program has been tested: Linux, MS Windows XP Programming language used:MAPLE 10 Typical time and memory requirements:Most commands acting on quantum registers with five or less qubits take ⩽10 seconds of processor time (on a Pentium 4 with ⩾2 GHz or equivalent) and 5-20 MB of memory. However, storage and time requirements critically depend on the number of qubits, n, in the quantum registers due to the exponential increase of the associated Hilbert space. No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:3107 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:13 859 Distribution format:tar.gz Reasons for new version:The first program version established the data structures and commands which are needed to build and manipulate quantum registers. Since the (evolution of) entanglement is a central aspect in quantum information processing the current version adds the capability to analyze separability and entanglement of quantum registers by implementing algebraic separability criteria and entanglement measures and related quantities. Does this version supersede the previous version: Yes Nature of the physical problem: Entanglement has been identified as an essential resource in virtually all aspects of quantum information theory. Therefore, the detection and quantification of entanglement is a necessary prerequisite for many applications, such as quantum computation, communications or quantum cryptography. Up to the present, however, the multipartite entanglement of n-qubit systems has remained largely unexplored owing to the exponential growth of complexity with the number of qubits involved. Method of solution: Using the computer algebra system MAPLE, a set of procedures has been developed which supports the definition and manipulation of n-qubit quantum registers and quantum logic gates [T. Radtke, S. Fritzsche, Comput. Phys. Comm. 173 (2005) 91]. The provided hierarchy of commands can be used interactively in order to simulate the behavior of n-qubit quantum systems (by applying a number of unitary or non-unitary operations) and to analyze their separability and entanglement properties. Restrictions onto the complexity of the problem: The present version of the program facilitates the setup and the manipulation of quantum registers by means of (predefined) quantum logic gates; it now also provides the tools for performing a symbolic and/or numeric analysis of the entanglement for the quantum states of such registers. Owing to the rapid increase in the computational complexity of multi-qubit systems, however, the time and memory requirements often grow rapidly, especially for symbolic computations. This increase of complexity limits the application of the program to about 6 or 7 qubits on a standard single processor (Pentium 4 with ⩾2 GHz or equivalent) machine with ⩽1 GB of memory. Unusual features of the program: The FEYNMAN program has been designed within the framework of MAPLE for interactive (symbolic or numerical) simulations on n-qubit quantum registers with no other restriction than given by the memory and processor resources of the computer. Whenever possible, both representations of quantum registers in terms of their state vectors and/or density matrices are equally supported by the program. Apart from simulating quantum gates and quantum operations, the program now facilitates also investigations on the separability and the entanglement properties of quantum registers.

  12. Advances in quantum teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirandola, S.; Eisert, J.; Weedbrook, C.; Furusawa, A.; Braunstein, S. L.

    2015-10-01

    Quantum teleportation is one of the most important protocols in quantum information. By exploiting the physical resource of entanglement, quantum teleportation serves as a key primitive across a variety of quantum information tasks and represents an important building block for quantum technologies, with a pivotal role in the continuing progress of quantum communication, quantum computing and quantum networks. Here we summarize the basic theoretical ideas behind quantum teleportation and its variant protocols. We focus on the main experiments, together with the technical advantages and disadvantages associated with the use of the various technologies, from photonic qubits and optical modes to atomic ensembles, trapped atoms and solid-state systems. After analysing the current state-of-the-art, we finish by discussing open issues, challenges and potential future implementations.

  13. Double Ramification Cycles and Quantum Integrable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buryak, Alexandr; Rossi, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we define a quantization of the Double Ramification Hierarchies of Buryak (Commun Math Phys 336:1085-1107, 2015) and Buryak and Rossi (Commun Math Phys, 2014), using intersection numbers of the double ramification cycle, the full Chern class of the Hodge bundle and psi-classes with a given cohomological field theory. We provide effective recursion formulae which determine the full quantum hierarchy starting from just one Hamiltonian, the one associated with the first descendant of the unit of the cohomological field theory only. We study various examples which provide, in very explicit form, new (1+1)-dimensional integrable quantum field theories whose classical limits are well-known integrable hierarchies such as KdV, Intermediate Long Wave, extended Toda, etc. Finally, we prove polynomiality in the ramification multiplicities of the integral of any tautological class over the double ramification cycle.

  14. Double Ramification Cycles and Quantum Integrable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buryak, Alexandr; Rossi, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we define a quantization of the Double Ramification Hierarchies of Buryak (Commun Math Phys 336:1085-1107, 2015) and Buryak and Rossi (Commun Math Phys, 2014), using intersection numbers of the double ramification cycle, the full Chern class of the Hodge bundle and psi-classes with a given cohomological field theory. We provide effective recursion formulae which determine the full quantum hierarchy starting from just one Hamiltonian, the one associated with the first descendant of the unit of the cohomological field theory only. We study various examples which provide, in very explicit form, new (1+1)-dimensional integrable quantum field theories whose classical limits are well-known integrable hierarchies such as KdV, Intermediate Long Wave, extended Toda, etc. Finally, we prove polynomiality in the ramification multiplicities of the integral of any tautological class over the double ramification cycle.

  15. Quantum.Ligand.Dock: protein-ligand docking with quantum entanglement refinement on a GPU system.

    PubMed

    Kantardjiev, Alexander A

    2012-07-01

    Quantum.Ligand.Dock (protein-ligand docking with graphic processing unit (GPU) quantum entanglement refinement on a GPU system) is an original modern method for in silico prediction of protein-ligand interactions via high-performance docking code. The main flavour of our approach is a combination of fast search with a special account for overlooked physical interactions. On the one hand, we take care of self-consistency and proton equilibria mutual effects of docking partners. On the other hand, Quantum.Ligand.Dock is the the only docking server offering such a subtle supplement to protein docking algorithms as quantum entanglement contributions. The motivation for development and proposition of the method to the community hinges upon two arguments-the fundamental importance of quantum entanglement contribution in molecular interaction and the realistic possibility to implement it by the availability of supercomputing power. The implementation of sophisticated quantum methods is made possible by parallelization at several bottlenecks on a GPU supercomputer. The high-performance implementation will be of use for large-scale virtual screening projects, structural bioinformatics, systems biology and fundamental research in understanding protein-ligand recognition. The design of the interface is focused on feasibility and ease of use. Protein and ligand molecule structures are supposed to be submitted as atomic coordinate files in PDB format. A customization section is offered for addition of user-specified charges, extra ionogenic groups with intrinsic pK(a) values or fixed ions. Final predicted complexes are ranked according to obtained scores and provided in PDB format as well as interactive visualization in a molecular viewer. Quantum.Ligand.Dock server can be accessed at http://87.116.85.141/LigandDock.html. PMID:22669908

  16. Non-local propagation of correlations in quantum systems with long-range interactions.

    PubMed

    Richerme, Philip; Gong, Zhe-Xuan; Lee, Aaron; Senko, Crystal; Smith, Jacob; Foss-Feig, Michael; Michalakis, Spyridon; Gorshkov, Alexey V; Monroe, Christopher

    2014-07-10

    The maximum speed with which information can propagate in a quantum many-body system directly affects how quickly disparate parts of the system can become correlated and how difficult the system will be to describe numerically. For systems with only short-range interactions, Lieb and Robinson derived a constant-velocity bound that limits correlations to within a linear effective 'light cone'. However, little is known about the propagation speed in systems with long-range interactions, because analytic solutions rarely exist and because the best long-range bound is too loose to accurately describe the relevant dynamical timescales for any known spin model. Here we apply a variable-range Ising spin chain Hamiltonian and a variable-range XY spin chain Hamiltonian to a far-from-equilibrium quantum many-body system and observe its time evolution. For several different interaction ranges, we determine the spatial and time-dependent correlations, extract the shape of the light cone and measure the velocity with which correlations propagate through the system. This work opens the possibility for studying a wide range of many-body dynamics in quantum systems that are otherwise intractable. PMID:25008525

  17. A generalization of Fermat's principle for classical and quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, Tarek A.

    2014-09-01

    The analogy between dynamics and optics had a great influence on the development of the foundations of classical and quantum mechanics. We take this analogy one step further and investigate the validity of Fermat's principle in many-dimensional spaces describing dynamical systems (i.e., the quantum Hilbert space and the classical phase and configuration space). We propose that if the notion of a metric distance is well defined in that space and the velocity of the representative point of the system is an invariant of motion, then a generalized version of Fermat's principle will hold. We substantiate this conjecture for time-independent quantum systems and for a classical system consisting of coupled harmonic oscillators. An exception to this principle is the configuration space of a charged particle in a constant magnetic field; in this case the principle is valid in a frame rotating by half the Larmor frequency, not the stationary lab frame.

  18. Applications of fidelity measures to complex quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Wimberger, Sandro

    2016-06-13

    We revisit fidelity as a measure for the stability and the complexity of the quantum motion of single-and many-body systems. Within the context of cold atoms, we present an overview of applications of two fidelities, which we call static and dynamical fidelity, respectively. The static fidelity applies to quantum problems which can be diagonalized since it is defined via the eigenfunctions. In particular, we show that the static fidelity is a highly effective practical detector of avoided crossings characterizing the complexity of the systems and their evolutions. The dynamical fidelity is defined via the time-dependent wave functions. Focusing on the quantum kicked rotor system, we highlight a few practical applications of fidelity measurements in order to better understand the large variety of dynamical regimes of this paradigm of a low-dimensional system with mixed regular-chaotic phase space. PMID:27140967

  19. Work extraction and thermodynamics for individual quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzypczyk, Paul; Short, Anthony J.; Popescu, Sandu

    2014-06-01

    Thermodynamics is traditionally concerned with systems comprised of a large number of particles. Here we present a framework for extending thermodynamics to individual quantum systems, including explicitly a thermal bath and work-storage device (essentially a ‘weight’ that can be raised or lowered). We prove that the second law of thermodynamics holds in our framework, and gives a simple protocol to extract the optimal amount of work from the system, equal to its change in free energy. Our results apply to any quantum system in an arbitrary initial state, in particular including non-equilibrium situations. The optimal protocol is essentially reversible, similar to classical Carnot cycles, and indeed, we show that it can be used to construct a quantum Carnot engine.

  20. Plasma confinement studies in open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsu, Kiyoshi

    1999-03-01

    Studies in open systems in the world are reviewed from viewpoints of the potential confinement and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability. The tandem mirror GAMMA 10 has shown the potential confinement of a high-ion-temperature plasma from an analysis of the time evolution of end-loss ion current and end-loss ion energy distributions. The central cell density was increased by 50% by the potential confinement. In the HIEI tandem mirror H-mode-like phenomena were observed with an increase in density and diamagnetic signal in a limiter biasing experiment. Potential formation phenomena in plasmas are studied by 0741-3335/41/3A/024/img1-like Upgrade under different magnetic field configurations and plasma conditions. The fully axisymmetric tandem mirror AMBAL-M is under construction and its end mirror system has been assembled. Heating experiments of a plasma gun produced plasma by neutral beam injection and ICRF heating are in progress. The gas dynamic trap (GDT) experiment has successfully produced an MHD-stable high-temperature, high-density plasma. In GOL-3-II, a high-density plasma with several 100 eV temperature is created by powerful relativistic electron beam injection. Construction of HANBIT has been completed and experiments on plasma production and ICRF heating have begun.

  1. Quantum maximum entropy principle for a system of identical particles

    SciTech Connect

    Trovato, M.; Reggiani, L.

    2010-02-15

    By introducing a functional of the reduced density matrix, we generalize the definition of a quantum entropy which incorporates the indistinguishability principle of a system of identical particles. With the present definition, the principle of quantum maximum entropy permits us to solve the closure problem for a quantum hydrodynamic set of balance equations corresponding to an arbitrary number of moments in the framework of extended thermodynamics. The determination of the reduced Wigner function for equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions is found to become possible only by assuming that the Lagrange multipliers can be expanded in powers of (Planck constant/2pi){sup 2}. Quantum contributions are expressed in powers of (Planck constant/2pi){sup 2} while classical results are recovered in the limit (Planck constant/2pi)->0.

  2. Nexus: A modular workflow management system for quantum simulation codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krogel, Jaron T.

    2016-01-01

    The management of simulation workflows represents a significant task for the individual computational researcher. Automation of the required tasks involved in simulation work can decrease the overall time to solution and reduce sources of human error. A new simulation workflow management system, Nexus, is presented to address these issues. Nexus is capable of automated job management on workstations and resources at several major supercomputing centers. Its modular design allows many quantum simulation codes to be supported within the same framework. Current support includes quantum Monte Carlo calculations with QMCPACK, density functional theory calculations with Quantum Espresso or VASP, and quantum chemical calculations with GAMESS. Users can compose workflows through a transparent, text-based interface, resembling the input file of a typical simulation code. A usage example is provided to illustrate the process.

  3. Nexus: a modular workflow management system for quantum simulation codes

    SciTech Connect

    Krogel, Jaron T.

    2015-08-24

    The management of simulation workflows is a significant task for the individual computational researcher. Automation of the required tasks involved in simulation work can decrease the overall time to solution and reduce sources of human error. A new simulation workflow management system, Nexus, is presented to address these issues. Nexus is capable of automated job management on workstations and resources at several major supercomputing centers. Its modular design allows many quantum simulation codes to be supported within the same framework. Current support includes quantum Monte Carlo calculations with QMCPACK, density functional theory calculations with Quantum Espresso or VASP, and quantum chemical calculations with GAMESS. Users can compose workflows through a transparent, text-based interface, resembling the input file of a typical simulation code. A usage example is provided to illustrate the process.

  4. Communication theory of quantum systems. Ph.D. Thesis, 1970

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, H. P. H.

    1971-01-01

    Communication theory problems incorporating quantum effects for optical-frequency applications are discussed. Under suitable conditions, a unique quantum channel model corresponding to a given classical space-time varying linear random channel is established. A procedure is described by which a proper density-operator representation applicable to any receiver configuration can be constructed directly from the channel output field. Some examples illustrating the application of our methods to the development of optical quantum channel representations are given. Optimizations of communication system performance under different criteria are considered. In particular, certain necessary and sufficient conditions on the optimal detector in M-ary quantum signal detection are derived. Some examples are presented. Parameter estimation and channel capacity are discussed briefly.

  5. Propagation of quantum information through a spin system

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, Tobias J.; Linden, Noah

    2004-05-01

    It has been recently suggested that the dynamics of a quantum spin system may provide a natural mechanism for transporting quantum information. We show that one-dimensional rings of qubits with fixed (time-independent) interactions, constant around the ring, allow high-fidelity communication of quantum states. We show that the problem of maximizing the fidelity of the quantum communication is related to a classical problem in Fourier wave analysis. By making use of this observation we find that if both communicating parties have access to limited numbers of qubits in the ring (a fraction that vanishes in the limit of large rings) it is possible to make the communication arbitrarily good.

  6. Fluorescence from a quantum dot and metallic nanosphere hybrid system

    SciTech Connect

    Schindel, Daniel G.; Singh, Mahi R.

    2014-03-31

    We present energy absorption and interference in a quantum dot-metallic nanosphere system embedded on a dielectric substrate. A control field is applied to induce dipole moments in the nanosphere and the quantum dot, and a probe field is applied to monitor absorption. Dipole moments in the quantum dot or the metal nanosphere are induced, both by the external fields and by each other's dipole fields. Thus, in addition to direct polarization, the metal nanosphere and the quantum dot will sense one another via the dipole-dipole interaction. The density matrix method was used to show that the absorption spectrum can be split from one peak to two peaks by the control field, and this can also be done by placing the metal sphere close to the quantum dot. When the two are extremely close together, a self-interaction in the quantum dot produces an asymmetry in the absorption peaks. In addition, the fluorescence efficiency can be quenched by the addition of a metal nanosphere. This hybrid system could be used to create ultra-fast switching and sensing nanodevices.

  7. A Lower Bound of Quantum Discord for 2-Qutrit Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qianhui; Wang, Jing; Shen, Shuqian; Li, Ming

    2016-04-01

    We study the lower bound of quantum discord for 2-qutrit systems. By computing the mutual information and the classical correlations of a class of states for 2-qutrit system, an analytical and computable lower bound of discord has been derived. By selecting different coefficients as examples, we can compute the lower bound of discord for 2-qutrit systems directly. The result can be generalized to the case of high-dimensional quantum state and will help us understand and explore the discord of the high-dimensional state.

  8. Quantum parameter identification for a chaotic atom ensemble system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenlin; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2016-02-01

    We propose an indirect method based on an adaptive technique for analyzing the chaos behavior of a general quantum system with complex nonlinear evolution. Using this method, we design an identification function that effectively recognizes the uncertain parameters in a chaotic quantum system only by measuring the system outputs. As an example, we study an atom ensemble in an optical cavity and we obtain a specific parameter identification scheme after analyzing the chaos behaviors. We also verify the accuracy of the identification scheme using numerical simulations and we discuss the influence of different types of errors on the accuracy.

  9. An Online Banking System Based on Quantum Cryptography Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ri-gui; Li, Wei; Huan, Tian-tian; Shen, Chen-yi; Li, Hai-sheng

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, an online banking system has been built. Based on quantum cryptography communication, this system is proved unconditional secure. Two sets of GHZ states are applied, which can ensure the safety of purchase and payment, respectively. In another word, three trading participants in each triplet state group form an interdependent and interactive relationship. In the meantime, trading authorization and blind signature is introduced by means of controllable quantum teleportation. Thus, an effective monitor is practiced on the premise that the privacy of trading partners is guaranteed. If there is a dispute or deceptive behavior, the system will find out the deceiver immediately according to the relationship mentioned above.

  10. Uhrig dynamical control of a three-level system via non-Markovian quantum state diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Wenchong; Zhao, Xinyu; Jing, Jun; Wu, Lian-Ao; Yu, Ting

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we use the quantum state diffusion (QSD) equation to implement the Uhrig dynamical decoupling to a three-level quantum system coupled to a non-Markovian reservoir comprising of infinite numbers of degrees of freedom. For this purpose, we first reformulate the non-Markovian QSD to incorporate the effect of the external control fields. With this stochastic QSD approach, we demonstrate that an unknown state of the three-level quantum system can be universally protected against both coloured phase and amplitude noises when the control-pulse sequences and control operators are properly designed. The advantage of using non-Markovian QSD equations is that the control dynamics of open quantum systems can be treated exactly without using Trotter product formula and be efficiently simulated even when the environment is comprised of infinite numbers of degrees of freedom. We also show how the control efficacy depends on the environment memory time and the designed time points of applied control pulses.

  11. Open Source Course Management Systems: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remy, Eric

    2005-01-01

    In Fall 2003, Randolph-Macon Woman's College rolled out Claroline, an Open Source course management system for all the classes on campus. This document will cover some background on both Open Source in general and course management systems in specific, discuss technical challenges in the introduction and integration of the system and give some

  12. Quantum Processes and Dynamic Networks in Physical and Biological Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudziak, Martin Joseph

    Quantum theory since its earliest formulations in the Copenhagen Interpretation has been difficult to integrate with general relativity and with classical Newtonian physics. There has been traditionally a regard for quantum phenomena as being a limiting case for a natural order that is fundamentally classical except for microscopic extrema where quantum mechanics must be applied, more as a mathematical reconciliation rather than as a description and explanation. Macroscopic sciences including the study of biological neural networks, cellular energy transports and the broad field of non-linear and chaotic systems point to a quantum dimension extending across all scales of measurement and encompassing all of Nature as a fundamentally quantum universe. Theory and observation lead to a number of hypotheses all of which point to dynamic, evolving networks of fundamental or elementary processes as the underlying logico-physical structure (manifestation) in Nature and a strongly quantized dimension to macroscalar processes such as are found in biological, ecological and social systems. The fundamental thesis advanced and presented herein is that quantum phenomena may be the direct consequence of a universe built not from objects and substance but from interacting, interdependent processes collectively operating as sets and networks, giving rise to systems that on microcosmic or macroscopic scales function wholistically and organically, exhibiting non-locality and other non -classical phenomena. The argument is made that such effects as non-locality are not aberrations or departures from the norm but ordinary consequences of the process-network dynamics of Nature. Quantum processes are taken to be the fundamental action-events within Nature; rather than being the exception quantum theory is the rule. The argument is also presented that the study of quantum physics could benefit from the study of selective higher-scale complex systems, such as neural processes in the brain, by virtue of mathematical and computational models that may be transferred from the macroscopic domain to the microscopic. A consequence of this multi-faceted thesis is that there may be mature analytical tools and techniques that have heretofore not been adequately recognized for their value to quantum physics. These may include adaptations of neural networks, cellular automata, chaotic attractors, and parallel processing systems. Conceptual and practical architectures are presented for the development of software and hardware environments to employ massively parallel computing for the modeling of large populations of dynamic processes.

  13. Quantum State Smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Howard

    2015-03-01

    Under noisy observations, one can estimate the state of the measured system, if its a priori statistics are given. In the continuous time situation, three different types of estimation can be distinguished: filtering, which is estimating of the state at time t from earlier records; retro-filtering, which is estimating it from later records; and smoothing, which is estimating it from both earlier and later records. Of the three, smoothing allows the greatest precision. Smoothing has been well developed in classical systems, but its application to quantum systems is very recent. Previous works have used the term ``quantum smoothing'' to mean estimating classical parameters, [Tsang, Phys. Rev. Lett 102, 250403 (2009); Yonezawa et al., Science 337, 1514-1517 (2012)]. This is essentially classical smoothing in which the noisy observation of the classical parameters is mediated by a quantum system. Here we introduce quantum state smoothing, where the state of a partially observed open quantum system itself is smoothed. We achieve this by applying classical smoothing to a hypothetical unobserved noisy measurement record that induces (in part) the stochastic dynamics (``quantum trajectories'') of the system. Using the formalism of linear quantum trajectories, we simulate quantum state smoothing for a qubit, and quantify how well it works. Our investigations shed new light on the nature of open quantum systems and the applicability of classical concepts. Applications to continuous measurement of solid-state qubits will be presented. Supported by the Australian Research Council Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology.

  14. New Method for Studying Localization effects in Quantum Hall Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, R. N.; Geraedts, Scott

    Disorder is central to the study of the fractional quantum Hall effect. It is responsible for the finite width of the quantum Hall plateaus, and it is of course present in experiment. Numerical studies of the disordered fractional quantum Hall effect are nonetheless very difficult, because the lack of symmetry present in clean systems limits the size of systems that can be studied. We introduce a new method for studying the integer and fractional quantum Hall effect in the presence of disorder that allows larger system sizes to be studied. The method relies on truncating the single particle Hilbert space, which leads to an exponential reduction in the Hilbert space of the many-particle system while preserving the essential topological nature of the state. We apply the model to the study of disorder transitions in the quantum Hall effect, both for the ground state and excited states. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, through Grant DE-SC0002140.

  15. Quantum transport through the system of parallel quantum dots with Majorana bound states

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ning; Li, Yuxian; Lv, Shuhui

    2014-02-28

    We study the tunneling transport properties through a system of parallel quantum dots which are coupled to Majorana bound states (MBSs). The conductance and spectral function are computed using the retarded Green's function method based on the equation of motion. The conductance of the system is 2e{sup 2}/h at zero Fermi energy and is robust against the coupling between the MBSs and the quantum dots. The dependence of the Fermi energy on the spectral function is different for the first dot (dot1) than for the second dot (dot2) with fixed dot2-MBSs coupling. The influence of the Majorana bound states on the spectral function was studied for the series and parallel configurations of the system. It was found that when the configuration is in series, the Majorana bound states play an important role, resulting in a spectral function with three peaks. However, the spectral function shows two peaks when the system is in a parallel configuration. The zero Fermi energy spectral function is always 1/2 not only in series but also in the parallel configuration and robust against the coupling between the MBSs and the quantum dots. The phase diagram of the Fermi energy versus the quantum dot energy levels was also investigated.

  16. Magnetic and superconducting quantum critical behavior of itinerant electronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sknepnek, Rastko

    Quantum phase transitions occur at zero temperature as a function of some non-thermal parameter, e.g., pressure or chemical composition. In addition to being of fundamental interest, quantum phase transitions are important because they are believed to underlie a number of interesting low temperature phenomena. Quantum phase transitions differ from the classical phase transitions in many important aspects, two of them being (i) the mode-coupling effects and (ii) the behavior in the presence of disorder. We devote two projects of this dissertation to each of the two. First, we investigate the quantum phase transition of itinerant electrons from a paramagnet to a state which displays long-period helical structures due to a Dzyaloshinskii instability of the ferromagnetic state. In particular, we study how the self generated effective long-range interaction recently identified in itinerant quantum ferromagnets is cut-off by the helical ordering. Second, we discuss a quantum phase transition between a disordered metal and an exotic (non-s-wave) superconductor. Like in the case of ferromagnetic quantum phase transition mode coupling effects lead to an effective long-range interaction between the anomalous density fluctuations. We find that the asymptotic critical region is characterized by run-away flow to large disorder. However, for weak coupling, this region is very narrow, and it is preempted by a wide crossover regime with mean-field critical behavior. Then, we present results of large-scale Monte Carlo simulations for a 3d Ising model with short range interactions and planar defects. We show that the phase transition in this system is smeared, i.e., there is no single critical temperature, but different parts of the system order at different temperatures. Our Monte-Carlo results are in good agreement with a recent theory. Finally, we present large-scale Monte-Carlo simulations of a 2d bilayer quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet with random dimer dilution. In contrast to the exotic scaling scenarios found in many other random quantum systems, the quantum phase transition in this system is characterized by a finite-disorder fixed point with power-law scaling. After accounting for strong corrections to scaling, we find universal, i.e., disorder-independent, critical exponents.

  17. Investigation of the open-circuit voltage in solar cells doped with quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Tayagaki, Takeshi; Hoshi, Yusuke; Usami, Noritaka

    2013-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have attracted much attention for use in photovoltaic applications because of their potential for overcoming the limits of conventional single-junction devices. One problem associated with solar cells using QDs is that the open-circuit voltage (Voc) always decreases with the addition of QDs with respect to the reference cell without QDs. Here, we report the investigation of current–voltage characteristics in Ge/Si QD solar cells in the temperature range from 100 to 300 K. We show that even though Voc decreases with increasing temperature, it depends on the nominal Ge thickness, indicating that Voc reduction is primarily caused by a decrease in the bandgap energy of the cell. From photoluminescence decay measurements, we found that rapid carrier extraction from QDs occurred in the solar cells; this process eliminates the quasi-Fermi energy splitting between the QDs and the host semiconductor and causes Voc reduction in QD solar cells. PMID:24067805

  18. Continuity of the entropy of macroscopic quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Swendsen, Robert H

    2015-11-01

    The proper definition of entropy is fundamental to the relationship between statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. It also plays a major role in the recent debate about the validity of the concept of negative temperature. In this paper, I analyze and calculate the thermodynamic entropy for large but finite quantum mechanical systems. A special feature of this analysis is that the thermodynamic energy of a quantum system is shown to be a continuous variable, rather than being associated with discrete energy eigenvalues. Calculations of the entropy as a function of energy can be carried out with a Legendre transform of thermodynamic potentials obtained from a canonical ensemble. The resultant expressions for the entropy are able to describe equilibrium between quantum systems having incommensurate energy-level spacings. This definition of entropy preserves all required thermodynamic properties, including satisfaction of all postulates and laws of thermodynamics. It demonstrates the consistency of the concept of negative temperature with the principles of thermodynamics. PMID:26651650

  19. Continuity of the entropy of macroscopic quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swendsen, Robert H.

    2015-11-01

    The proper definition of entropy is fundamental to the relationship between statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. It also plays a major role in the recent debate about the validity of the concept of negative temperature. In this paper, I analyze and calculate the thermodynamic entropy for large but finite quantum mechanical systems. A special feature of this analysis is that the thermodynamic energy of a quantum system is shown to be a continuous variable, rather than being associated with discrete energy eigenvalues. Calculations of the entropy as a function of energy can be carried out with a Legendre transform of thermodynamic potentials obtained from a canonical ensemble. The resultant expressions for the entropy are able to describe equilibrium between quantum systems having incommensurate energy-level spacings. This definition of entropy preserves all required thermodynamic properties, including satisfaction of all postulates and laws of thermodynamics. It demonstrates the consistency of the concept of negative temperature with the principles of thermodynamics.

  20. Coulomb drag in graphene quantum Hall bilayer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaomeng; Wang, Lei; Fong, Kin Chung; Gao, Yuanda; Maher, Patrick; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Hone, James; Dean, Cory; Kim, Philip

    2015-03-01

    Coulomb drag between electrons in closely spaced two-dimensional electron systems has provided an exciting avenue for research on quantum Hall bilayer systems. Employing dual-gated, encapsulated graphene double layers separated by a thin hBN dielectric, we investigate density tunable magneto and Hall drag in quantum Hall bilayer systems. Large variations of magneto-drag and Hall-drag are observed, which can be related to the Landau level (LL) filling status of both driving and drag layers. The measured drag resistivity tensor can be associated with the tensor product of the differential magneto-resistivity tensors of the drive and drag layers. The temperature and field dependence of magneto-drag can be described in terms of the phase space for Coulomb scattering between LLs in the drag and drive layers. In the strong interaction regime and ultra-low temperature, we observe the effect of symmetry broken integer quantum Hall States in magneto and Hall drag signals.

  1. Controllable quantum information network with a superconducting system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng-yang; Liu, Bao; Chen, Zi-hong; Wu, Song-lin; Song, He-shan

    2014-07-15

    We propose a controllable and scalable architecture for quantum information processing using a superconducting system network, which is composed of current-biased Josephson junctions (CBJJs) as tunable couplers between the two superconducting transmission line resonators (TLRs), each coupling to multiple superconducting qubits (SQs). We explicitly demonstrate that the entangled state, the phase gate, and the information transfer between any two selected SQs can be implemented, respectively. Lastly, numerical simulation shows that our scheme is robust against the decoherence of the system. -- Highlights: An architecture for quantum information processing is proposed. The quantum information transfer between any two selected SQs is implemented. This proposal is robust against the decoherence of the system. This architecture can be fabricated on a chip down to the micrometer scale.

  2. Quantum ergodicity for a class of non-generic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi, P.; Bakhshinezhad, F.; Rezakhani, A. T.

    2016-02-01

    We examine quantum normal typicality and ergodicity properties for quantum systems whose dynamics are generated by Hamiltonians which have residual degeneracy in their spectrum and resonance in their energy gaps. Such systems can be considered atypical in the sense that degeneracy, which is usually a sign of symmetry, is naturally broken in typical systems due to stochastic perturbations. In particular, we prove a version of von Neumanns quantum ergodic theorem, where a modified condition needs to hold in order to have normal typicality and ergodicity. As a result, we show that degeneracy of spectrum does not considerably modify the condition of the theorem, whereas the existence of resonance is more dominant for obstructing ergodicity.

  3. Quantum walks on a circle with optomechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moqadam, Jalil Khatibi; Portugal, Renato; de Oliveira, Marcos Cesar

    2015-10-01

    We propose an implementation of a quantum walk on a circle in an optomechanical system by encoding the walker on the phase space of a radiation field and the coin on a two-level state of a mechanical resonator. The dynamics of the system is obtained by applying Suzuki-Trotter decomposition. We numerically show that the system displays typical behaviors of quantum walks, namely the probability distribution evolves ballistically and the standard deviation of the phase distribution is linearly proportional to the number of steps. We also analyze the effects of decoherence by using the phase-damping channel on the coin space, showing the possibility to implement the quantum walk with present-day technology.

  4. Persistent currents in quantum chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Shiro

    1999-05-01

    The persistent current of ballistic chaotic billiards is considered with the help of the Gutzwiller trace formula. We derive the semiclassical formula of a typical persistent current Ityp for a single billiard and an average persistent current for an ensemble of billiards at finite temperature. These formulas are used to show that the persistent current for chaotic billiards is much smaller than that for integrable ones. The persistent currents in the ballistic regime therefore become an experimental tool to search for the quantum signature of classical chaotic and regular dynamics.

  5. Quantum field theory of interacting plasmon-photon-phonon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hieu Nguyen, Van; Nguyen, Bich Ha

    2015-09-01

    This work is devoted to the construction of the quantum field theory of the interacting system of plasmons, photons and phonons on the basis of general fundamental principles of electrodynamics and quantum field theory of many-body systems. Since a plasmon is a quasiparticle appearing as a resonance in the collective oscillation of the interacting electron gas in solids, the starting point is the total action functional of the interacting system comprising electron gas, electromagnetic field and phonon fields. By means of the powerful functional integral technique, this original total action is transformed into that of the system of the quantum fields describing plasmons, transverse photons, acoustic as well as optic longitudinal and transverse phonons. The collective oscillations of the electron gas is characterized by a real scalar field φ(x) called the collective oscillation field. This field is split into the static background field φ0(x) and the fluctuation field ζ(x). The longitudinal phonon fields {{{Q}}al}(x), {{{Q}}ol}(x) are also split into the background fields {Q}0al(x), {Q}0ol(x) and dynamical fields {{{q}}al}(x), {{{q}}ol}(x) while the transverse phonon fields {{{Q}}at}(x), {{{Q}}ot}(x) themselves are dynamical fields {{{q}}at}(x), {{{q}}ot}(x) without background fields. After the canonical quantization procedure, the background fields φ0(x), {Q}0al(x), {Q}0ol(x) remain the classical fields, while the fluctuation fields ζ(x) and dynamical phonon fields {{{q}}al}(x), {{{q}}at}(x), {{{q}}ol}(x), {{{q}}ot}(x) become quantum fields. In quantum theory, a plasmon is the quantum of Hermitian scalar field σ(x) called the plasmon field, longitudinal phonons as complex spinless quasiparticles are the quanta of the effective longitudinal phonon Hermitian scalar fields {{θ }a}(x), {{θ }0}(x), while transverse phonons are the quanta of the original Hermitian transverse phonon vector fields {{{q}}at}(x), {{{q}}ot}(x). By means of the functional integral technique the original action functional of the interacting system comprising electron gas, electromagnetic field and phonon fields is transformed into the total action functional of the resultant system comprising plasmon scalar quantum field σ(x), longitudinal phonon effective scalar quantum fields {{θ }a}(x), {{θ }0}(x) and transverse phonon vector quantum fields {{{q}}at}(x), {{{q}}ot}(x).

  6. Comment on [open quotes]Nonlocality, counterfactuals, and quantum mechanics[close quotes

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P. )

    1999-09-01

    A recent proof [H. P. Stapp, Am. J. Phys. [bold 65], 300 (1997)], formulated in the symbolic language of modal logic, claims to show that contemporary quantum theory, viewed as a set of rules that allow us to calculate statistical predictions among certain kinds of observations, cannot be imbedded in any rational framework that conforms to the principles that (1) the experimenters[close quote] choices of which experiments they will perform can be considered to be free choices, (2) outcomes of measurements are unique, and (3) the free choices just mentioned have no backward-in-time effects of any kind. This claim is similar to Bell[close quote]s theorem, but much stronger, because no reality assumption alien to quantum philosophy is used. The paper being commented on [W. Unruh, Phys. Rev. A [bold 59], 126 (1999)] argues that some such reality assumption has been [open quotes]smuggled[close quotes] in. That argument is examined here and shown, I believe, to be defective. [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital The American Physical Society

  7. Quantum sweeps, synchronization, and Kibble-Zurek physics in dissipative quantum spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriet, Loïc; Le Hur, Karyn

    2016-02-01

    We address dissipation effects on the nonequilibrium quantum dynamics of an ensemble of spins-1/2 coupled via an Ising interaction. Dissipation is modeled by a (Ohmic) bath of harmonic oscillators at zero temperature and correspond either to the sound modes of a one-dimensional Bose-Einstein (quasi-)condensate or to the zero-point fluctuations of a long transmission line. We consider the dimer comprising two spins and the quantum Ising chain with long-range interactions and develop an (mathematically and numerically) exact stochastic approach to address nonequilibrium protocols in the presence of an environment. For the two-spin case, we first investigate the dissipative quantum phase transition induced by the environment through quantum quenches and study the effect of the environment on the synchronization properties. Then we address Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg-Majorana protocols for two spins and for the spin array. In this latter case, we adopt a stochastic mean-field point of view and present a Kibble-Zurek-type argument to account for interaction effects in the lattice. Such dissipative quantum spin arrays can be realized in ultracold atoms, trapped ions, and mesoscopic systems and are related to Kondo lattice models.

  8. Quantum Simulation of Quantum Field Theory with a Trapped Ion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Kuan; Shen, Yangchao; Zhang, Jingning; Yung, Man-Hong; Kim, Kihwan; Simon, Julen; Lamata, Lucas; Solano, Enrique; Casanova, Jorge

    2015-05-01

    We report on the experimental quantum simulation of interacting bosonic and fermionic quantum field modes with a trapped ion system. We consider a basic model of only one fermion and one anti-fermion interacting through a bosonic field mode, which reveals interesting features such as self-interactions, particle creation and annihilation and non-perturbative regimes. We experimentally study these phenomena by manipulating the internal degrees of freedom of a multi-level single 171Yb+ ion and its motional state, based on the proposal of Ref.. Our experimental scheme is a scalable approach and can be extended beyond the limit of classical computation of quantum field theory when more fermions and bosons are included. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China under Grants No. 2011CBA00300 (No. 2011CBA00301), the National Natural Science Foundation of China 11374178.

  9. Active standoff detection of CH4 and N2O leaks using hard-target backscattered light using an open-path quantum cascade laser sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Adrian; Thomas, Benjamin; Castillo, Paulo; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2016-05-01

    Fugitive gas emissions from agricultural or industrial plants and gas pipelines are an important environmental concern as they contribute to the global increase of greenhouse gas concentrations. Moreover, they are also a security and safety concern because of possible risk of fire/explosion or toxicity. This study presents standoff detection of CH4 and N2O leaks using a quantum cascade laser open-path system that retrieves path-averaged concentrations by collecting the backscattered light from a remote hard target. It is a true standoff system and differs from other open-path systems that are deployed as point samplers or long-path transmission systems that use retroreflectors. The measured absorption spectra are obtained using a thermal intra-pulse frequency chirped DFB quantum cascade laser at ~7.7 µm wavelength range with ~200 ns pulse width. Making fast time resolved observations, the system simultaneously realizes high spectral resolution and range to the target, resulting in path-averaged concentration retrieval. The system performs measurements at high speed ~15 Hz and sufficient range (up to 45 m, ~148 feet) achieving an uncertainty of 3.1 % and normalized sensitivity of 3.3 ppm m Hz-1/2 for N2O and 9.3 % and normalized sensitivity of 30 ppm m Hz-1/2 for CH4 with a 0.31 mW average power QCL. Given these characteristics, this system is promising for mobile or multidirectional search and remote detection of gas leaks.

  10. On the physical realizability of quantum stochastic walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketani, Bruno; Govia, Luke; Schuhmacher, Peter; Wilhelm, Frank

    Quantum walks are a promising framework that can be used to both understand and implement quantum information processing tasks. The recently developed quantum stochastic walk combines the concepts of a quantum walk and a classical random walk through open system evolution of a quantum system, and have been shown to have applications in as far reaching fields as artificial intelligence. However, nature puts significant constraints on the kind of open system evolutions that can be realized in a physical experiment. In this work, we discuss the restrictions on the allowed open system evolution, and the physical assumptions underpinning them. We then introduce a way to circumvent some of these restrictions, and simulate a more general quantum stochastic walk on a quantum computer, using a technique we call quantum trajectories on a quantum computer. We finally describe a circuit QED approach to implement discrete time quantum stochastic walks.

  11. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system

    SciTech Connect

    Wittig, J.M.

    1980-02-19

    An improved open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system is described including a flash evaporator for vaporizing relatively warm ocean surface water and an axial flow, elastic fluid turbine having a vertical shaft and axis of rotation. The warm ocean water is transmitted to the evaporator through a first prestressed concrete skirtconduit structure circumferentially situated about the axis of rotation. The unflashed warm ocean water exits the evaporator through a second prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure located circumferentially about and radially within the first skirt-conduit structure. The radially inner surface of the second skirt conduit structure constitutes a cylinder which functions as the turbine's outer casing and obviates the need for a conventional outer housing. The turbine includes a radially enlarged disc element attached to the shaft for supporting at least one axial row of radially directed blades through which the steam is expanded. A prestressed concrete inner casing structure of the turbine has upstream and downstream portions respectively situated upstream and downstream from the disc element. The radially outer surfaces of the inner casing portions and radially outer periphery of the axially interposed disc cooperatively form a downwardly radially inwardly tapered surface. An annular steam flowpath of increasing flow area in the downward axial direction is radially bounded by the inner and outer prestressed concrete casing structures. The inner casing portions each include a tranversely situated prestressed concrete circular wall for rotatably supporting the turbine shaft and associated structure.

  12. New melting transition in Quantum Hall systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simion, George; Lin, Tsuging; Watson, John D.; Manfra, Michael J.; Csathy, Gabor; Rokhinson, Leonid; Lyanda-Geller, Yuli

    2014-03-01

    We discover a new melting transition caused by topological excitations of two dimensional electrons in the quantum Hall regime. Experimentally, strain dependence of resistivity changes sign upon crossing filling-factor-specified boundaries of reentrant integer quantum Hall effect (RIQHE) states. This observation violates the symmetry of electron bubble crystal, whose melting was thought to be responsible for insulator to metal transition in the range of RIQHE filling factors. We demonstrate theoretically that electron bubbles become elongated in the vicinity of charge defects and form textures of finite size. Textures lower the energy of excitations. In the two-electron bubble crystal these textures form hedgehogs (vortices) around defects having (lacking) one extra electron. At low density these textures form an insulating Abrikosov lattice. At densities sufficient to cause the textures to overlap, their interactions are described by the XY-model and the defect lattice melts. This explains the sharp metal-insulator transition observed in finite temperature conductivity measurements. In this regime, melting is a function of several variables and forms a continuous phase boundary in the field-temperature (B - T) plane. Research was partially supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Awards DE-SC0010544 (Y.L-G), DE-SC0008630 (L.P.R.), DE-SC0006671 (G.S. and M.M.).

  13. New topological excitations in quantum Hall systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyanda-Geller, Yuli; Lin, Tsuging; Simion, George; Watson, John D.; Manfra, Michael J.; Csathy, Gabor; Rokhinson, Leonid

    2014-03-01

    We discover new topological excitations of two dimensional electrons in the quantum Hall regime. The strain dependence of resistivity observed experimentally is shown to change sign upon crossing filling-factor-specified boundaries of reentrant integer quantum Hall effect (RIQHE) states. This observation violates the known symmetry of electron bubbles thought to be responsible for the RIQHE. We demonstrate theoretically that electron bubbles become elongated in the vicinity of charge defects and form textures of finite size. Calculations confirm that textures lower the energy of excitations. In the two-electron bubble crystal these textures form two-dimensional hedgehogs around defects having one extra electron, and vortices around defects lacking one electron. Strain affects vortices and hedgehogs differently, explaining striking strain-dependent resistivity. The sharp transition from insulating RIQHE state to conducting state is caused by melting of Abrikosov crystal comprised of the defects. The proposed physical mechanism of conductivity due to topological defects is shown to lead to an unusually large magnitude of the strain effect on resistivity in the range of RIQHE filling factors, in agreement with experiment. Research was partially supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Awards DE-SC0010544 (Y.L-G), DE-SC0008630 (L.P.R.), DE-SC0006671 (G.S. and M.M.).

  14. Efficient free energy calculations of quantum systems through computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Alex; Ramirez, Rafael; Herrero, Carlos; Hernandez, Eduardo

    2009-03-01

    In general, the classical limit is assumed in computer simulation calculations of free energy. This approximation, however, is not justifiable for a class of systems in which quantum contributions for the free energy cannot be neglected. The inclusion of quantum effects is important for the determination of reliable phase diagrams of these systems. In this work, we present a new methodology to compute the free energy of many-body quantum systems [1]. This methodology results from the combination of the path integral formulation of statistical mechanics and efficient non-equilibrium methods to estimate free energy, namely, the adiabatic switching and reversible scaling methods. A quantum Einstein crystal is used as a model to show the accuracy and reliability the methodology. This new method is applied to the calculation of solid-liquid coexistence properties of neon. Our findings indicate that quantum contributions to properties such as, melting point, latent heat of fusion, entropy of fusion, and slope of melting line can be up to 10% of the calculated values using the classical approximation. [1] R. M. Ramirez, C. P. Herrero, A. Antonelli, and E. R. Hernández, Journal of Chemical Physics 129, 064110 (2008)

  15. Libra: An open-Source "methodology discovery" library for quantum and classical dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Akimov, Alexey V

    2016-06-30

    The "methodology discovery" library for quantum and classical dynamics simulations is presented. One of the major foci of the code is on nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations with model and atomistic Hamiltonians treated on the same footing. The essential aspects of the methodology, design philosophy, and implementation are discussed. The code capabilities are demonstrated on a number of model and atomistic test cases. It is demonstrated how the library can be used to study methodologies for quantum and classical dynamics, as well as a tool for performing detailed atomistic studies of nonadiabatic processes in molecular systems. The source code and additional information are available on the Web at http://www.acsu.buffalo.edu/~alexeyak/libra/index.html. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27016373

  16. Classical simulation of quantum many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yichen

    Classical simulation of quantum many-body systems is in general a challenging problem for the simple reason that the dimension of the Hilbert space grows exponentially with the system size. In particular, merely encoding a generic quantum many-body state requires an exponential number of bits. However, condensed matter physicists are mostly interested in local Hamiltonians and especially their ground states, which are highly non-generic. Thus, we might hope that at least some physical systems allow efficient classical simulation. Starting with one-dimensional (1D) quantum systems (i.e., the simplest nontrivial case), the first basic question is: Which classes of states have efficient classical representations? It turns out that this question is quantitatively related to the amount of entanglement in the state, for states with "little entanglement'' are well approximated by matrix product states (a data structure that can be manipulated efficiently on a classical computer). At a technical level, the mathematical notion for "little entanglement'' is area law, which has been proved for unique ground states in 1D gapped systems. We establish an area law for constant-fold degenerate ground states in 1D gapped systems and thus explain the effectiveness of matrix-product-state methods in (e.g.) symmetry breaking phases. This result might not be intuitively trivial as degenerate ground states in gapped systems can be long-range correlated. Suppose an efficient classical representation exists. How can one find it efficiently? The density matrix renormalization group is the leading numerical method for computing ground states in 1D quantum systems. However, it is a heuristic algorithm and the possibility that it may fail in some cases cannot be completely ruled out. Recently, a provably efficient variant of the density matrix renormalization group has been developed for frustration-free 1D gapped systems. We generalize this algorithm to all (i.e., possibly frustrated) 1D gapped systems. Note that the ground-state energy of 1D gapless Hamiltonians is computationally intractable even in the presence of translational invariance. It is tempting to extend methods and tools in 1D to two and higher dimensions (2+D), e.g., matrix product states are generalized to tensor network states. Since an area law for entanglement (if formulated properly) implies efficient matrix product state representations in 1D, an interesting question is whether a similar implication holds in 2+D. Roughly speaking, we show that an area law for entanglement (in any reasonable formulation) does not always imply efficient tensor network representations of the ground states of 2+D local Hamiltonians even in the presence of translational invariance. It should be emphasized that this result does not contradict with the common sense that in practice quantum states with more entanglement usually require more space to be stored classically; rather, it demonstrates that the relationship between entanglement and efficient classical representations is still far from being well understood. Excited eigenstates participate in the dynamics of quantum systems and are particularly relevant to the phenomenon of many-body localization (absence of transport at finite temperature in strongly correlated systems). We study the entanglement of excited eigenstates in random spin chains and expect that its singularities coincide with dynamical quantum phase transitions. This expectation is confirmed in the disordered quantum Ising chain using both analytical and numerical methods. Finally, we study the problem of generating ground states (possibly with topological order) in 1D gapped systems using quantum circuits. This is an interesting problem both in theory and in practice. It not only characterizes the essential difference between the entanglement patterns that give rise to trivial and nontrivial topological order, but also quantifies the difficulty of preparing quantum states with a quantum computer (in experiments).

  17. Generation of cluster states in optomechanical quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houhou, Oussama; Aissaoui, Habib; Ferraro, Alessandro

    2015-12-01

    We consider an optomechanical quantum system composed of a single cavity mode interacting with N mechanical resonators. We propose a scheme for generating continuous-variable graph states of arbitrary size and shape, including the so-called cluster states for universal quantum computation. The main feature of this scheme is that, differently from previous approaches, the graph states are hosted in the mechanical degrees of freedom rather than in the radiative ones. Specifically, via a 2 N -tone drive, we engineer a linear Hamiltonian which is instrumental to dissipatively drive the system to the desired target state. The robustness of this scheme is assessed against finite interaction times and mechanical noise, confirming it as a valuable approach towards quantum state engineering for continuous-variable computation in a solid-state platform.

  18. Quantum Bound States in a C-C60 System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, R. M.; Sofianos, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the quantum mechanical system of a carbon "test atom" in the proximity of a C60 molecule, both inside and outside the fullerene "cage". Two sets of bound states are found to exist, a deeply bound set inside the cage and another weakly bound set outside it. Tunnelling between these regions is highly unlikely to happen because of the extreme height and width of the potential barrier. However, we predict that a layer of atoms could be adsorbed onto C60 by forming a quantum mechanical bound state, with the adsorbed atoms being concentrated above the "panels" of the buckyball, consistent with "bucky onions" observed experimentally. Until now analysis of such fullerene systems has been via classical mechanics, but a quantum approach reveals new insights.

  19. Locality, entanglement, and thermalization of isolated quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlebnikov, S.; Kruczenski, M.

    2014-11-01

    A way to understand thermalization in an isolated system is to interpret it as an increase in entanglement between subsystems. Here we test this idea through a combination of analytical and Krylov-subspace-based numerical methods applied to a quantum gas of bosons. We find that the entanglement entropy of a subsystem is rapidly generated at the initial state of the evolution, to quickly approach the thermal value. Our results also provide an accurate numerical test of the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis (ETH), according to which a single energy eigenstate of an isolated system behaves in certain respects as a thermal state. In the context of quantum black holes, we propose that the ETH is a quantum version of the classical no-hair theorem.

  20. Secret sharing with a single d -level quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Armin; Herbauts, Isabelle; Żukowski, Marek; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    We give an example of a wide class of problems for which quantum-information protocols based on multisystem entanglement can be mapped into much simpler ones involving one system. Secret sharing is a cryptographic primitive which plays a central role in various secure multiparty computation tasks and management of keys in cryptography. In secret sharing protocols, a classical message is divided into shares given to recipient parties in such a way that some number of parties need to collaborate in order to reconstruct the message. Quantum protocols for the task commonly rely on multipartite GHZ entanglement. We present a multiparty secret sharing protocol which requires only sequential communication of a single quantum d -level system (for any prime d ). It has huge advantages in scalability and can be realized with state-of-the-art technology.