Science.gov

Sample records for open software development

  1. Communal Resources in Open Source Software Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaeth, Sebastian; Haefliger, Stefan; von Krogh, Georg; Renzl, Birgit

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: Virtual communities play an important role in innovation. The paper focuses on the particular form of collective action in virtual communities underlying as Open Source software development projects. Method: Building on resource mobilization theory and private-collective innovation, we propose a theory of collective action in…

  2. Embracing Open Software Development in Solar Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughitt, V. K.; Ireland, J.; Christe, S.; Mueller, D.

    2012-12-01

    We discuss two ongoing software projects in solar physics that have adopted best practices of the open source software community. The first, the Helioviewer Project, is a powerful data visualization tool which includes online and Java interfaces inspired by Google Maps (tm). This effort allows users to find solar features and events of interest, and download the corresponding data. Having found data of interest, the user now has to analyze it. The dominant solar data analysis platform is an open-source library called SolarSoft (SSW). Although SSW itself is open-source, the programming language used is IDL, a proprietary language with licensing costs that are prohibative for many institutions and individuals. SSW is composed of a collection of related scripts written by missions and individuals for solar data processing and analysis, without any consistent data structures or common interfaces. Further, at the time when SSW was initially developed, many of the best software development processes of today (mirrored and distributed version control, unit testing, continuous integration, etc.) were not standard, and have not since been adopted. The challenges inherent in developing SolarSoft led to a second software project known as SunPy. SunPy is an open-source Python-based library which seeks to create a unified solar data analysis environment including a number of core datatypes such as Maps, Lightcurves, and Spectra which have consistent interfaces and behaviors. By taking advantage of the large and sophisticated body of scientific software already available in Python (e.g. SciPy, NumPy, Matplotlib), and by adopting many of the best practices refined in open-source software development, SunPy has been able to develop at a very rapid pace while still ensuring a high level of reliability. The Helioviewer Project and SunPy represent two pioneering technologies in solar physics - simple yet flexible data visualization and a powerful, new data analysis environment. We

  3. Open Source Software Development Models—A State of Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Parminder; Singh, Hardeep

    2011-12-01

    The objective of Open Source as well as Free Software is to encourage the involvement in the form of improvement, modification and distribution of the licensed work. Open source software proved itself highly suited, both as a software product and as a development methodology. The Open source software development model supports all aspects of various processes like defining requirements, system—level design, detailed design, implementation, integration, field testing, and support in order to produce high quality products implementing client requirements. This paper analysis open source development models on the basis of common attributes like parallel development, peer review, prompt feedback to user, parallel debugging, user involvement, and developer contributions.

  4. Developing an Open Source Option for NASA Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Patrick J.; Parks, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    We present arguments in favor of developing an Open Source option for NASA software; in particular we discuss how Open Source is compatible with NASA's mission. We compare and contrast several of the leading Open Source licenses, and propose one - the Mozilla license - for use by NASA. We also address some of the related issues for NASA with respect to Open Source. In particular, we discuss some of the elements in the External Release of NASA Software document (NPG 2210.1A) that will likely have to be changed in order to make Open Source a reality withm the agency.

  5. OpenADR Open Source Toolkit: Developing Open Source Software for the Smart Grid

    SciTech Connect

    McParland, Charles

    2011-02-01

    Demand response (DR) is becoming an increasingly important part of power grid planning and operation. The advent of the Smart Grid, which mandates its use, further motivates selection and development of suitable software protocols to enable DR functionality. The OpenADR protocol has been developed and is being standardized to serve this goal. We believe that the development of a distributable, open source implementation of OpenADR will benefit this effort and motivate critical evaluation of its capabilities, by the wider community, for providing wide-scale DR services

  6. An Investigation of an Open-Source Software Development Environment in a Software Engineering Graduate Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ge, Xun; Huang, Kun; Dong, Yifei

    2010-01-01

    A semester-long ethnography study was carried out to investigate project-based learning in a graduate software engineering course through the implementation of an Open-Source Software Development (OSSD) learning environment, which featured authentic projects, learning community, cognitive apprenticeship, and technology affordances. The study…

  7. Integrating HCI Specialists into Open Source Software Development Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedberg, Henrik; Iivari, Netta

    Typical open source software (OSS) development projects are organized around technically talented developers, whose communication is based on technical aspects and source code. Decision-making power is gained through proven competence and activity in the project, and non-technical end-user opinions are too many times neglected. In addition, also human-computer interaction (HCI) specialists have encountered difficulties in trying to participate in OSS projects, because there seems to be no clear authority and responsibility for them. In this paper, based on HCI and OSS literature, we introduce an extended OSS development project organization model that adds a new level of communication and roles for attending human aspects of software. The proposed model makes the existence of HCI specialists visible in the projects, and promotes interaction between developers and the HCI specialists in the course of a project.

  8. Open environment for image processing and software development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasure, John R.; Young, Mark

    1992-04-01

    The main goal of the Khoros software project is to create and provide an integrated software development environment for information processing and data visualization. The Khoros software system is now being used as a foundation to improve productivity and promote software reuse in a wide variety of application domain. A powerful feature of the Khoros system is the high-level, abstract visual language that can be employed to significantly boost the productivity of the researcher. Central to the Khoros system is the need for a consistent yet flexible user interface development system that provides cohesiveness to the vast number of programs that make up the Khoros system. Automated tools assist in maintenance as well as development of programs. The software structure that embodies this system provides for extensibility and portability, and allows for easy tailoring to target specific application domains and processing environments. First, an overview of the Khoros software environment is given. Then this paper presents the abstract applications programmer interface, API, the data services that are provided in Khoros to support it, and the Khoros visualization and image file format. The authors contend that Khoros is an excellent environment for the exploration and implementation of imaging standards.

  9. Open Source Software Development and Lotka's Law: Bibliometric Patterns in Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newby, Gregory B.; Greenberg, Jane; Jones, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Applies Lotka's Law to metadata on open source software development. Authoring patterns found in software development productivity are found to be comparable to prior studies of Lotka's Law for scientific and scholarly publishing, and offer promise in predicting aggregate behavior of open source developers. (Author/LRW)

  10. Open Crowdsourcing: Leveraging Community Software Developers for IT Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phair, Derek

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative exploratory single-case study was designed to examine and understand the use of volunteer community participants as software developers and other project related roles, such as testers, in completing a web-based application project by a non-profit organization. This study analyzed the strategic decision to engage crowd…

  11. Common characteristics of open source software development and applicability for drug discovery: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Innovation through an open source model has proven to be successful for software development. This success has led many to speculate if open source can be applied to other industries with similar success. We attempt to provide an understanding of open source software development characteristics for researchers, business leaders and government officials who may be interested in utilizing open source innovation in other contexts and with an emphasis on drug discovery. Methods A systematic review was performed by searching relevant, multidisciplinary databases to extract empirical research regarding the common characteristics and barriers of initiating and maintaining an open source software development project. Results Common characteristics to open source software development pertinent to open source drug discovery were extracted. The characteristics were then grouped into the areas of participant attraction, management of volunteers, control mechanisms, legal framework and physical constraints. Lastly, their applicability to drug discovery was examined. Conclusions We believe that the open source model is viable for drug discovery, although it is unlikely that it will exactly follow the form used in software development. Hybrids will likely develop that suit the unique characteristics of drug discovery. We suggest potential motivations for organizations to join an open source drug discovery project. We also examine specific differences between software and medicines, specifically how the need for laboratories and physical goods will impact the model as well as the effect of patents. PMID:21955914

  12. Developing Open Source Software To Advance High End Computing. Report to the President.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Coordination Office for Information Technology Research and Development, Arlington, VA.

    This is part of a series of reports to the President and Congress developed by the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee (PITAC) on key contemporary issues in information technology. This report defines open source software, explains PITAC's interest in this model, describes the process used to investigate issues in open source…

  13. Reflection on the Process of Open Sourcing Software Based on Ten Years of Development of RAPID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, C. H.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Yang, Z. L.; Habets, F.; Maidment, D.

    2015-12-01

    As the number and size of geoscience datasets persist in their constant rise, geoscientists increasingly express their yearning for further sharing of their data and software, and for facilitation of the associated academic credits. We present here our experience based on the open source development of an Earth System Model focusing on the propagation of water flow waves in large river networks: the Routing Application for Parallel computatIon of Discharge (RAPID). Since inception of RAPID ten years ago in January 2006, the community of its users has grown slowly but steadily, and now includes researchers in industry, academia, and government organizations. This growth of the RAPID users community can be explained - at least in part - by its open availability. However, despite an increasing support for open science (software and data), the mechanics of sharing still remain mysterious to many geoscientists… as they were for the authors. The purpose of this presentation is therefore to shed light on the steps involved in opening software and data based on a decade of experience related to the development and release of an Earth System Model. Three distinct steps of open sourcing are highlighted here: opening, exposing, and automatic testing. Each one of these steps is presented as an independent and tractable increment at various stages of development that is justified based on the size of the users community. Topics covered include software and data licenses, code and data repositories, unit testing, and continuous integration.

  14. The Five 'R's' for Developing Trusted Software Frameworks to increase confidence in, and maximise reuse of, Open Source Software.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Ryan; Gross, Lutz; Wyborn, Lesley; Evans, Ben; Klump, Jens

    2015-04-01

    Recent investments in HPC, cloud and Petascale data stores, have dramatically increased the scale and resolution that earth science challenges can now be tackled. These new infrastructures are highly parallelised and to fully utilise them and access the large volumes of earth science data now available, a new approach to software stack engineering needs to be developed. The size, complexity and cost of the new infrastructures mean any software deployed has to be reliable, trusted and reusable. Increasingly software is available via open source repositories, but these usually only enable code to be discovered and downloaded. As a user it is hard for a scientist to judge the suitability and quality of individual codes: rarely is there information on how and where codes can be run, what the critical dependencies are, and in particular, on the version requirements and licensing of the underlying software stack. A trusted software framework is proposed to enable reliable software to be discovered, accessed and then deployed on multiple hardware environments. More specifically, this framework will enable those who generate the software, and those who fund the development of software, to gain credit for the effort, IP, time and dollars spent, and facilitate quantification of the impact of individual codes. For scientific users, the framework delivers reviewed and benchmarked scientific software with mechanisms to reproduce results. The trusted framework will have five separate, but connected components: Register, Review, Reference, Run, and Repeat. 1) The Register component will facilitate discovery of relevant software from multiple open source code repositories. The registration process of the code should include information about licensing, hardware environments it can be run on, define appropriate validation (testing) procedures and list the critical dependencies. 2) The Review component is targeting on the verification of the software typically against a set of

  15. Develop Direct Geo-referencing System Based on Open Source Software and Hardware Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. S.; Liao, H. M.

    2015-08-01

    Direct geo-referencing system uses the technology of remote sensing to quickly grasp images, GPS tracks, and camera position. These data allows the construction of large volumes of images with geographic coordinates. So that users can be measured directly on the images. In order to properly calculate positioning, all the sensor signals must be synchronized. Traditional aerial photography use Position and Orientation System (POS) to integrate image, coordinates and camera position. However, it is very expensive. And users could not use the result immediately because the position information does not embed into image. To considerations of economy and efficiency, this study aims to develop a direct geo-referencing system based on open source software and hardware platform. After using Arduino microcontroller board to integrate the signals, we then can calculate positioning with open source software OpenCV. In the end, we use open source panorama browser, panini, and integrate all these to open source GIS software, Quantum GIS. A wholesome collection of data - a data processing system could be constructed.

  16. User Driven Development of Software Tools for Open Data Discovery and Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlobinski, Sascha; Keppel, Frank; Dihe, Pascal; Boot, Gerben; Falkenroth, Esa

    2016-04-01

    The use of open data in research faces challenges not restricted to inherent properties such as data quality, resolution of open data sets. Often Open data is catalogued insufficiently or fragmented. Software tools that support the effective discovery including the assessment of the data's appropriateness for research have shortcomings such as the lack of essential functionalities like support for data provenance. We believe that one of the reasons is the neglect of real end users requirements in the development process of aforementioned software tools. In the context of the FP7 Switch-On project we have pro-actively engaged the relevant user user community to collaboratively develop a means to publish, find and bind open data relevant for hydrologic research. Implementing key concepts of data discovery and exploration we have used state of the art web technologies to provide an interactive software tool that is easy to use yet powerful enough to satisfy the data discovery and access requirements of the hydrological research community.

  17. Inequalities in Open Source Software Development: Analysis of Contributor’s Commits in Apache Software Foundation Projects

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    While researchers are becoming increasingly interested in studying OSS phenomenon, there is still a small number of studies analyzing larger samples of projects investigating the structure of activities among OSS developers. The significant amount of information that has been gathered in the publicly available open-source software repositories and mailing-list archives offers an opportunity to analyze projects structures and participant involvement. In this article, using on commits data from 263 Apache projects repositories (nearly all), we show that although OSS development is often described as collaborative, but it in fact predominantly relies on radically solitary input and individual, non-collaborative contributions. We also show, in the first published study of this magnitude, that the engagement of contributors is based on a power-law distribution. PMID:27096157

  18. Development of a web application for water resources based on open source software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delipetrev, Blagoj; Jonoski, Andreja; Solomatine, Dimitri P.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents research and development of a prototype web application for water resources using latest advancements in Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), open source software and web GIS. The web application has three web services for: (1) managing, presenting and storing of geospatial data, (2) support of water resources modeling and (3) water resources optimization. The web application is developed using several programming languages (PhP, Ajax, JavaScript, Java), libraries (OpenLayers, JQuery) and open source software components (GeoServer, PostgreSQL, PostGIS). The presented web application has several main advantages: it is available all the time, it is accessible from everywhere, it creates a real time multi-user collaboration platform, the programing languages code and components are interoperable and designed to work in a distributed computer environment, it is flexible for adding additional components and services and, it is scalable depending on the workload. The application was successfully tested on a case study with concurrent multi-users access.

  19. Open Source Software Development Experiences on the Students' Resumes: Do They Count?--Insights from the Employers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Ju

    2009-01-01

    Open Source Software (OSS) is a major force in today's Information Technology (IT) landscape. Companies are increasingly using OSS in mission-critical applications. The transparency of the OSS technology itself with openly available source codes makes it ideal for students to participate in the OSS project development. OSS can provide unique…

  20. A Stigmergy Collaboration Approach in the Open Source Software Developer Community

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Xiaohui; Pullum, Laura L; Treadwell, Jim N; Potok, Thomas E

    2009-01-01

    The communication model of some self-organized online communities is significantly different from the traditional social network based community. It is problematic to use social network analysis to analyze the collaboration structure and emergent behaviors in these communities because these communities lack peer-to-peer connections. Stigmergy theory provides an explanation of the collaboration model of these communities. In this research, we present a stigmergy approach for building an agent-based simulation to simulate the collaboration model in the open source software (OSS) developer community. We used a group of actors who collaborate on OSS projects through forums as our frame of reference and investigated how the choices actors make in contributing their work on the projects determines the global status of the whole OSS project. In our simulation, the forum posts serve as the digital pheromone and the modified Pierre-Paul Grasse pheromone model is used for computing the developer agents behavior selection probability.

  1. Design and Development of an Open Source Software Application for the Characterization of Spatially Variable Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunnell, D. K.; Osorio-Murillo, C. A.; Over, M. W.; Frystacky, H.; Ames, D. P.; Rubin, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The characterization of the structural parameters of spatially variable fields (SVFs) is essential to understanding the variability of hydrological processes such as infiltration, evapotranspiration, groundwater contaminant transport, etc. SVFs can be characterized using a Bayesian inverse method called Method of Anchored Distributions (MAD). This method characterizes the structural parameters of SVFs using prior information of structural parameter fields, indirect measurements, and simulation models allowing the transfer of valuable information to a target variable field. An example SVF in hydrology is hydraulic conductivity, which may be characterized by head pressure measurements through a simulation model such as MODFLOW. This poster will present the design and development of a free and open source inverse modeling desktop software application and extension framework called MAD# for the characterization of the structural parameters of SVFs using MAD. The developed software is designed with a flexible architecture to support different simulation models and random field generators and includes geographic information system (GIS) interfaces for representing, analyzing, and understanding SVFs. This framework has also been made compatible with Mono, a cross-platform implementation of C#, for a wider usability.

  2. Applying Open Source Software in a Development Context: Expectations and Experiences. A Case Study of a University in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Reijswoud, Victor; Mulo, Emmanuel

    2006-01-01

    Over recent years the issue of free and open source software (FOSS) for development in less developed countries (LDCs) has received increasing attention. In the beginning the benefits of FOSS for lower developed countries was only stressed by small groups of idealists like Richard Stallman. Now, however, it is moving into the hands of large…

  3. The Emergence of Open-Source Software in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Guohua; Bonk, Curtis J.

    2007-01-01

    The open-source software movement is gaining increasing momentum in China. Of the limited numbers of open-source software in China, "Red Flag Linux" stands out most strikingly, commanding 30 percent share of Chinese software market. Unlike the spontaneity of open-source movement in North America, open-source software development in China, such as…

  4. Development of an Open Source Image-Based Flow Modeling Software - SimVascular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Updegrove, Adam; Merkow, Jameson; Schiavazzi, Daniele; Wilson, Nathan; Marsden, Alison; Shadden, Shawn

    2014-11-01

    SimVascular (www.simvascular.org) is currently the only comprehensive software package that provides a complete pipeline from medical image data segmentation to patient specific blood flow simulation. This software and its derivatives have been used in hundreds of conference abstracts and peer-reviewed journal articles, as well as the foundation of medical startups. SimVascular was initially released in August 2007, yet major challenges and deterrents for new adopters were the requirement of licensing three expensive commercial libraries utilized by the software, a complicated build process, and a lack of documentation, support and organized maintenance. In the past year, the SimVascular team has made significant progress to integrate open source alternatives for the linear solver, solid modeling, and mesh generation commercial libraries required by the original public release. In addition, the build system, available distributions, and graphical user interface have been significantly enhanced. Finally, the software has been updated to enable users to directly run simulations using models and boundary condition values, included in the Vascular Model Repository (vascularmodel.org). In this presentation we will briefly overview the capabilities of the new SimVascular 2.0 release. National Science Foundation.

  5. Open Source Software and the Intellectual Commons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorman, David

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the Open Source Software method of software development and its relationship to control over information content. Topics include digital library resources; reference services; preservation; the legal and economic status of information; technical standards; access to digital data; control of information use; and copyright and patent laws.…

  6. Agile Software Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biju, Soly Mathew

    2008-01-01

    Many software development firms are now adopting the agile software development method. This method involves the customer at every level of software development, thus reducing the impact of change in the requirement at a later stage. In this article, the principles of the agile method for software development are explored and there is a focus on…

  7. The Emergence of Open-Source Software in North America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Guohua; Bonk, Curtis J.

    2007-01-01

    Unlike conventional models of software development, the open source model is based on the collaborative efforts of users who are also co-developers of the software. Interest in open source software has grown exponentially in recent years. A "Google" search for the phrase open source in early 2005 returned 28.8 million webpage hits, while less than…

  8. Open architectures for formal reasoning and deductive technologies for software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, John; Manna, Zohar; Mason, Ian; Pnueli, Amir; Talcott, Carolyn; Waldinger, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this project is to develop an open architecture for formal reasoning systems. One goal is to provide a framework with a clear semantic basis for specification and instantiation of generic components; construction of complex systems by interconnecting components; and for making incremental improvements and tailoring to specific applications. Another goal is to develop methods for specifying component interfaces and interactions to facilitate use of existing and newly built systems as 'off the shelf' components, thus helping bridge the gap between producers and consumers of reasoning systems. In this report we summarize results in several areas: our data base of reasoning systems; a theory of binding structures; a theory of components of open systems; a framework for specifying components of open reasoning system; and an analysis of the integration of rewriting and linear arithmetic modules in Boyer-Moore using the above framework.

  9. Development and evaluation of an open source software tool for deidentification of pathology reports

    PubMed Central

    Beckwith, Bruce A; Mahaadevan, Rajeshwarri; Balis, Ulysses J; Kuo, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Background Electronic medical records, including pathology reports, are often used for research purposes. Currently, there are few programs freely available to remove identifiers while leaving the remainder of the pathology report text intact. Our goal was to produce an open source, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) compliant, deidentification tool tailored for pathology reports. We designed a three-step process for removing potential identifiers. The first step is to look for identifiers known to be associated with the patient, such as name, medical record number, pathology accession number, etc. Next, a series of pattern matches look for predictable patterns likely to represent identifying data; such as dates, accession numbers and addresses as well as patient, institution and physician names. Finally, individual words are compared with a database of proper names and geographic locations. Pathology reports from three institutions were used to design and test the algorithms. The software was improved iteratively on training sets until it exhibited good performance. 1800 new pathology reports were then processed. Each report was reviewed manually before and after deidentification to catalog all identifiers and note those that were not removed. Results 1254 (69.7 %) of 1800 pathology reports contained identifiers in the body of the report. 3439 (98.3%) of 3499 unique identifiers in the test set were removed. Only 19 HIPAA-specified identifiers (mainly consult accession numbers and misspelled names) were missed. Of 41 non-HIPAA identifiers missed, the majority were partial institutional addresses and ages. Outside consultation case reports typically contain numerous identifiers and were the most challenging to deidentify comprehensively. There was variation in performance among reports from the three institutions, highlighting the need for site-specific customization, which is easily accomplished with our tool. Conclusion We have

  10. Open Source Software to Control Bioflo Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Burdge, David A.; Libourel, Igor G. L.

    2014-01-01

    Bioreactors are designed to support highly controlled environments for growth of tissues, cell cultures or microbial cultures. A variety of bioreactors are commercially available, often including sophisticated software to enhance the functionality of the bioreactor. However, experiments that the bioreactor hardware can support, but that were not envisioned during the software design cannot be performed without developing custom software. In addition, support for third party or custom designed auxiliary hardware is often sparse or absent. This work presents flexible open source freeware for the control of bioreactors of the Bioflo product family. The functionality of the software includes setpoint control, data logging, and protocol execution. Auxiliary hardware can be easily integrated and controlled through an integrated plugin interface without altering existing software. Simple experimental protocols can be entered as a CSV scripting file, and a Python-based protocol execution model is included for more demanding conditional experimental control. The software was designed to be a more flexible and free open source alternative to the commercially available solution. The source code and various auxiliary hardware plugins are publicly available for download from https://github.com/LibourelLab/BiofloSoftware. In addition to the source code, the software was compiled and packaged as a self-installing file for 32 and 64 bit windows operating systems. The compiled software will be able to control a Bioflo system, and will not require the installation of LabVIEW. PMID:24667828

  11. Open source software to control Bioflo bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Burdge, David A; Libourel, Igor G L

    2014-01-01

    Bioreactors are designed to support highly controlled environments for growth of tissues, cell cultures or microbial cultures. A variety of bioreactors are commercially available, often including sophisticated software to enhance the functionality of the bioreactor. However, experiments that the bioreactor hardware can support, but that were not envisioned during the software design cannot be performed without developing custom software. In addition, support for third party or custom designed auxiliary hardware is often sparse or absent. This work presents flexible open source freeware for the control of bioreactors of the Bioflo product family. The functionality of the software includes setpoint control, data logging, and protocol execution. Auxiliary hardware can be easily integrated and controlled through an integrated plugin interface without altering existing software. Simple experimental protocols can be entered as a CSV scripting file, and a Python-based protocol execution model is included for more demanding conditional experimental control. The software was designed to be a more flexible and free open source alternative to the commercially available solution. The source code and various auxiliary hardware plugins are publicly available for download from https://github.com/LibourelLab/BiofloSoftware. In addition to the source code, the software was compiled and packaged as a self-installing file for 32 and 64 bit windows operating systems. The compiled software will be able to control a Bioflo system, and will not require the installation of LabVIEW. PMID:24667828

  12. Developing open source, self-contained disease surveillance software applications for use in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Emerging public health threats often originate in resource-limited countries. In recognition of this fact, the World Health Organization issued revised International Health Regulations in 2005, which call for significantly increased reporting and response capabilities for all signatory nations. Electronic biosurveillance systems can improve the timeliness of public health data collection, aid in the early detection of and response to disease outbreaks, and enhance situational awareness. Methods As components of its Suite for Automated Global bioSurveillance (SAGES) program, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory developed two open-source, electronic biosurveillance systems for use in resource-limited settings. OpenESSENCE provides web-based data entry, analysis, and reporting. ESSENCE Desktop Edition provides similar capabilities for settings without internet access. Both systems may be configured to collect data using locally available cell phone technologies. Results ESSENCE Desktop Edition has been deployed for two years in the Republic of the Philippines. Local health clinics have rapidly adopted the new technology to provide daily reporting, thus eliminating the two-to-three week data lag of the previous paper-based system. Conclusions OpenESSENCE and ESSENCE Desktop Edition are two open-source software products with the capability of significantly improving disease surveillance in a wide range of resource-limited settings. These products, and other emerging surveillance technologies, can assist resource-limited countries compliance with the revised International Health Regulations. PMID:22950686

  13. Gammasphere software development

    SciTech Connect

    Piercey, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    Activities of the nuclear physics group are described. Progress was made in organizing the Gammasphere Software Working Group, establishing a nuclear computing facility, participating in software development at Lawrence Berkeley, developing a common data file format, and adapting the ORNL UPAK software to run at Gammasphere. A universal histogram object was developed that defines a file format and provides for an objective-oriented programming model. An automated liquid nitrogen fill system was developed for Gammasphere (110 Ge detectors comprise the sphere).

  14. Involving Software Engineering Students in Open Source Software Projects: Experiences from a Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sowe, Sulayman K.; Stamelos, Ioannis G.

    2007-01-01

    Anecdotal and research evidences show that the Free and Open Source Software (F/OSS) development model has produced a paradigm shift in the way we develop, support, and distribute software. This shift is not only redefining the software industry but also the way we teach and learn in our software engineering (SE) courses. But for many universities…

  15. Weather forecasting with open source software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rautenhaus, Marc; Dörnbrack, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    To forecast the weather situation during aircraft-based atmospheric field campaigns, we employ a tool chain of existing and self-developed open source software tools and open standards. Of particular value are the Python programming language with its extension libraries NumPy, SciPy, PyQt4, Matplotlib and the basemap toolkit, the NetCDF standard with the Climate and Forecast (CF) Metadata conventions, and the Open Geospatial Consortium Web Map Service standard. These open source libraries and open standards helped to implement the "Mission Support System", a Web Map Service based tool to support weather forecasting and flight planning during field campaigns. The tool has been implemented in Python and has also been released as open source (Rautenhaus et al., Geosci. Model Dev., 5, 55-71, 2012). In this presentation we discuss the usage of free and open source software for weather forecasting in the context of research flight planning, and highlight how the field campaign work benefits from using open source tools and open standards.

  16. Software Model Of Software-Development Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chi Y.; Synott, Debra J.; Levary, Reuven R.

    1990-01-01

    Collection of computer programs constitutes software tool for simulation of medium- to large-scale software-development projects. Necessary to include easily identifiable and more-readily quantifiable characteristics like costs, times, and numbers of errors. Mathematical model incorporating these and other factors of dynamics of software-development process implemented in the Software Life Cycle Simulator (SLICS) computer program. Simulates dynamics of software-development process. In combination with input and output expert software systems and knowledge-based management software system, develops information for use in managing large software-development project. Intended to aid managers in planning, managing, and controlling software-development processes by reducing uncertainties in budgets, required personnel, and schedules.

  17. Cleanroom software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, M.; Mills, H. D.

    1981-01-01

    The 'cleanroom' software development process is a technical and organizational approach to developing software with certifiable reliability. Key ideas behind the process are well structured software specifications, randomized testing methods and the introduction of statistical controls; but the main point is to deny entry for defects during the development of software. This latter point suggests the use of the term 'cleanroom' in analogy to the defect prevention controls used in the manufacturing of high technology hardware. In the 'cleanroom', the entire software development process is embedded within a formal statistical design, in contrast to executing selected tests and appealing to the randomness of operational settings for drawing statistical inferences. Instead, random testing is introduced as a part of the statistical design itself so that when development and testing are completed, statistical inferences are made about the operation of the system.

  18. UWB Tracking Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Julia; Arndt, Dickey; Ngo, Phong; Phan, Chau; Dusl, John; Ni, Jianjun; Rafford, Melinda

    2006-01-01

    An Ultra-Wideband (UWB) two-cluster Angle of Arrival (AOA) tracking prototype system is currently being developed and tested at NASA Johnson Space Center for space exploration applications. This talk discusses the software development efforts for this UWB two-cluster AOA tracking system. The role the software plays in this system is to take waveform data from two UWB radio receivers as an input, feed this input into an AOA tracking algorithm, and generate the target position as an output. The architecture of the software (Input/Output Interface and Algorithm Core) will be introduced in this talk. The development of this software has three phases. In Phase I, the software is mostly Matlab driven and calls C++ socket functions to provide the communication links to the radios. This is beneficial in the early stage when it is necessary to frequently test changes in the algorithm. Phase II of the development is to have the software mostly C++ driven and call a Matlab function for the AOA tracking algorithm. This is beneficial in order to send the tracking results to other systems and also to improve the tracking update rate of the system. The third phase is part of future work and is to have the software completely C++ driven with a graphics user interface. This software design enables the fine resolution tracking of the UWB two-cluster AOA tracking system.

  19. Adopting Open Source Software to Address Software Risks during the Scientific Data Life Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinay, S.; Downs, R. R.

    2012-12-01

    Software enables the creation, management, storage, distribution, discovery, and use of scientific data throughout the data lifecycle. However, the capabilities offered by software also present risks for the stewardship of scientific data, since future access to digital data is dependent on the use of software. From operating systems to applications for analyzing data, the dependence of data on software presents challenges for the stewardship of scientific data. Adopting open source software provides opportunities to address some of the proprietary risks of data dependence on software. For example, in some cases, open source software can be deployed to avoid licensing restrictions for using, modifying, and transferring proprietary software. The availability of the source code of open source software also enables the inclusion of modifications, which may be contributed by various community members who are addressing similar issues. Likewise, an active community that is maintaining open source software can be a valuable source of help, providing an opportunity to collaborate to address common issues facing adopters. As part of the effort to meet the challenges of software dependence for scientific data stewardship, risks from software dependence have been identified that exist during various times of the data lifecycle. The identification of these risks should enable the development of plans for mitigating software dependencies, where applicable, using open source software, and to improve understanding of software dependency risks for scientific data and how they can be reduced during the data life cycle.

  20. Speakeasy software development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskinger, Patricia J.; Ozarow, Larry; Chruscicki, Mary C.

    1993-08-01

    The Speakeasy Software Development Project had three primary objectives. The first objective was to perform Independent Verification and Validation (IV & V) of the software and documentation associated with the signal processor being developed by Hazeltine and TRW under the Speakeasy program. The IV & V task also included an analysis and assessment of the ability of the signal processor software to provide LPI communications functions. The second objective was to assist in the enhancement and modification of an existing Rome Lab signal processor workstation. Finally, TASC developed project management support tools and provided program management support to the Speakeasy Program Office.

  1. Free for All: Open Source Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Karen

    2008-01-01

    Open source software has become a catchword in libraryland. Yet many remain unclear about open source's benefits--or even what it is. So what is open source software (OSS)? It's software that is free in every sense of the word: free to download, free to use, and free to view or modify. Most OSS is distributed on the Web and one doesn't need to…

  2. A study of clinically related open source software projects.

    PubMed

    Hogarth, Michael A; Turner, Stuart

    2005-01-01

    Open source software development has recently gained significant interest due to several successful mainstream open source projects. This methodology has been proposed as being similarly viable and beneficial in the clinical application domain as well. However, the clinical software development venue differs significantly from the mainstream software venue. Existing clinical open source projects have not been well characterized nor formally studied so the 'fit' of open source in this domain is largely unknown. In order to better understand the open source movement in the clinical application domain, we undertook a study of existing open source clinical projects. In this study we sought to characterize and classify existing clinical open source projects and to determine metrics for their viability. This study revealed several findings which we believe could guide the healthcare community in its quest for successful open source clinical software projects. PMID:16779056

  3. Space Flight Software Development Software for Intelligent System Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis C.; Crumbley, Tim

    2004-01-01

    The slide presentation examines the Marshall Space Flight Center Flight Software Branch, including software development projects, mission critical space flight software development, software technical insight, advanced software development technologies, and continuous improvement in the software development processes and methods.

  4. Open Source Software and Design-Based Research Symbiosis in Developing 3D Virtual Learning Environments: Examples from the iSocial Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Matthew; Galyen, Krista; Laffey, James; Babiuch, Ryan; Schmidt, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Design-based research (DBR) and open source software are both acknowledged as potentially productive ways for advancing learning technologies. These approaches have practical benefits for the design and development process and for building and leveraging community to augment and sustain design and development. This report presents a case study of…

  5. VOUS Software Facilitates Development Of Other Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliger, Joseph; Pichumani, Ramini; Ponceleon, Dulce

    1992-01-01

    Visual Object Oriented Unification System (VOUS) computer program provides facility for development of other, high-level software. Does not replace, but rather extends, preexisting software tools for development of other software. Provides comprehensive, graphical, interactive medium for all phases in development of computer code from early exploration of concepts, through detailed coding-and-error-checking process, to final reporting of finished code and compilation of instruction manual for its use. Simplifies and partly automates programmer's task.

  6. Open Source Software Licenses for Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, L.

    2000-08-10

    This paper attempts to develop supporting material in an effort to provide new options for licensing Laboratory-created software. Where employees and the Lab wish to release software codes as so-called ''Open Source'', they need, at a minimum, new licensing language for their released products. Several open source software licenses are reviewed to understand their common elements, and develop recommendations regarding new language.

  7. Open Source Testing Capability for Geospatial Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez, L. E.

    2013-12-01

    Geospatial Software enables scientists to discover, access and process information for better understanding of the Earth. Hundreds, if not thousands, of geospatial software packages exist today. Many of these implement open standards. The OGC Implementation Statistics page [1] reports, for example, more than 450 software products that implement the OGC Web Map Service (WMS) 1.1.1 standard. Even though organizations voluntarily report their products as implementing the WMS standard, not all of these implementations can interoperate with each other. For example, a WMS client may not interact with all these WMS servers in the same functional way. Making the software work with other software, even when implementing the same standard, still remains a challenge, and the main reason is that not all implementations implement the standard correctly. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Compliance Program provides a testing infrastructure to test for the correct implementation of OGC standards in interfaces and encodings that enable communication between geospatial clients and servers. The OGC testing tool and the tests are all freely available, including the source code and access to the testing facility. The Test, Evaluation, And Measurement (TEAM) Engine is a test harness that executes test suites written using the OGC Compliance Testing Language (CTL) or the TestNG framework. TEAM Engine is available in Sourceforge. OGC hosts an official stable [2] deployment of TEAM Engine with the approved test suites. OGC also hosts a Beta TEAM Engine [3] with the tests in Beta and with new TEAM Engine functionality. Both deployments are freely available to everybody. The OGC testing infrastructure not only enables developers to test OGC standards, but it can be configured to test profiles of OGC standards and community-developed application agreements. These agreements can be any interface and encoding agreement, not only OGC based. The OGC Compliance Program is thus an important

  8. On the Prospects and Concerns of Integrating Open Source Software Environment in Software Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamthan, Pankaj

    2007-01-01

    Open Source Software (OSS) has introduced a new dimension in software community. As the development and use of OSS becomes prominent, the question of its integration in education arises. In this paper, the following practices fundamental to projects and processes in software engineering are examined from an OSS perspective: project management;…

  9. Development of a web GIS application for emissions inventory spatial allocation based on open source software tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkatzoflias, Dimitrios; Mellios, Giorgos; Samaras, Zissis

    2013-03-01

    Combining emission inventory methods and geographic information systems (GIS) remains a key issue for environmental modelling and management purposes. This paper examines the development of a web GIS application as part of an emission inventory system that produces maps and files with spatial allocated emissions in a grid format. The study is not confined in the maps produced but also presents the features and capabilities of a web application that can be used by every user even without any prior knowledge of the GIS field. The development of the application was based on open source software tools such as MapServer for the GIS functions, PostgreSQL and PostGIS for the data management and HTML, PHP and JavaScript as programming languages. In addition, background processes are used in an innovative manner to handle the time consuming and computational costly procedures of the application. Furthermore, a web map service was created to provide maps to other clients such as the Google Maps API v3 that is used as part of the user interface. The output of the application includes maps in vector and raster format, maps with temporal resolution on daily and hourly basis, grid files that can be used by air quality management systems and grid files consistent with the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme Grid. Although the system was developed and validated for the Republic of Cyprus covering a remarkable wide range of pollutant and emissions sources, it can be easily customized for use in other countries or smaller areas, as long as geospatial and activity data are available.

  10. Automated software development workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Engineering software development was automated using an expert system (rule-based) approach. The use of this technology offers benefits not available from current software development and maintenance methodologies. A workstation was built with a library or program data base with methods for browsing the designs stored; a system for graphical specification of designs including a capability for hierarchical refinement and definition in a graphical design system; and an automated code generation capability in FORTRAN. The workstation was then used in a demonstration with examples from an attitude control subsystem design for the space station. Documentation and recommendations are presented.

  11. Astronomers as Software Developers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pildis, Rachel A.

    2016-01-01

    Astronomers know that their research requires writing, adapting, and documenting computer software. Furthermore, they often have to learn new computer languages and figure out how existing programs work without much documentation or guidance and with extreme time pressure. These are all skills that can lead to a software development job, but recruiters and employers probably won't know that. I will discuss all the highly useful experience that astronomers may not know that they already have, and how to explain that knowledge to others when looking for non-academic software positions. I will also talk about some of the pitfalls I have run into while interviewing for jobs and working as a developer, and encourage you to embrace the curiosity employers might have about your non-standard background.

  12. Payload software technology: Software technology development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Programmatic requirements for the advancement of software technology are identified for meeting the space flight requirements in the 1980 to 1990 time period. The development items are described, and software technology item derivation worksheets are presented along with the cost/time/priority assessments.

  13. Software For Simulation Of Development Of Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    SOFTREL is prototype software package simulating creation, detection, and repair of defects and faults during software-development project. Personnel, resources, errors, and other realistic factors represented in simulation. Available in executable form only for IBM PC. SOFTREL is copyrighted work with all copyright vested in NASA.

  14. Software development in Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, V. R.; Katz, E. E.

    1985-01-01

    Ada will soon become a part of systems developed for the US Department of Defense. NASA must determine whether it will become part of its environment and particularly whether it will become a part fo the space station development. However, there are several issues about Ada which should be considered before this decision is made. One means of considering these issues is the examination of other developments in Ada. Unfortunately, few full scale developments have been completed or made publicly available for observation. Therefore, it will probably be necessary to study an Ada development in a NASA environment. Another means related to the first is the development of Ada metrics which can be used to characterize and evaluate Ada developments. These metrics need not be confined to full scale developments and could be used to evaluate on going projects as well. An early development in Ada, some observations from that development, metrics which were developed for use with Ada, and future directions for research into the use of Ada in software development in general and in the NASA Goddard environment in particular are described.

  15. The case for open-source software in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    DeLano, Warren L

    2005-02-01

    Widespread adoption of open-source software for network infrastructure, web servers, code development, and operating systems leads one to ask how far it can go. Will "open source" spread broadly, or will it be restricted to niches frequented by hopeful hobbyists and midnight hackers? Here we identify reasons for the success of open-source software and predict how consumers in drug discovery will benefit from new open-source products that address their needs with increased flexibility and in ways complementary to proprietary options. PMID:15708536

  16. Software Development Life Cycle Security Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Daljit; Kaur, Parminder

    2011-12-01

    Security is now-a-days one of the major problems because of many reasons. Security is now-a-days one of the major problems because of many reasons. The main cause is that software can't withstand security attacks because of vulnerabilities in it which are caused by defective specifications design and implementation. We have conducted a survey asking software developers, project managers and other people in software development about their security awareness and implementation in Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC). The survey was open to participation for three weeks and this paper explains the survey results.

  17. Opening up Library Automation Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breeding, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Throughout the history of library automation, the author has seen a steady advancement toward more open systems. In the early days of library automation, when proprietary systems dominated, the need for standards was paramount since other means of inter-operability and data exchange weren't possible. Today's focus on Application Programming…

  18. Software developments for gammasphere

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritsen, T.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M.P.

    1995-08-01

    This year marked the year when data acquisition development for Gammasphere evolved from planning to accomplishment, both in hardware and software. Two VME crates now contain about 10 crate-processors which are used to handle the data from VXI processors - which in turn collect the data from germanium and BGO detectors in the array. The signals from the detectors are processed and digitized in custom-built electronics boards. The processing power in the VME crates is used to digitally filter the data before they are written to tape. The goal is to have highly processed data flowing to tape, eliminating the off-line filtering and manipulation of data that was standard procedure in earlier experiments.

  19. Gammasphere software development. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Piercey, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the activities of the nuclear physics group at Mississippi State University which were performed during 1993. Significant progress has been made in the focus areas: chairing the Gammasphere Software Working Group (SWG); assisting with the porting and enhancement of the ORNL UPAK histogramming software package; and developing standard formats for Gammasphere data products. In addition, they have established a new public ftp archive to distribute software and software development tools and information.

  20. Software Training Classes Now Open | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer                                            Data Management Services, Inc. (DMS), has announced the opening of its spring session of software training classes, available to all employees at NCI at Frederick. Classes begin on March 31 and run through June 30.

  1. Implementing Rakim: Open Source Chat Reference Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caraway, Shawn; Payne, Susan

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the conception, implementation, and current status of Rakim open source software at Midlands Technical college in Columbia, SC. Midlands Technical College (MTC) is a 2-year school in Columbia, S.C. It has two large campuses and three smaller campuses. Although the library functions as a single unit, there are separate…

  2. JSMAA: open source software for SMAA computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tervonen, Tommi

    2014-01-01

    Most software for multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) implement a small set of compatible methods as a closed monolithic program. With such software tools, the decision models have to be input by hand. In some applications, however, the model can be generated using external information sources, and thus it would be beneficial if the MCDA software could integrate in the comprehensive information infrastructure. This article motivates for the need of model generation in the methodological context of stochastic multicriteria acceptability analysis (SMAA), and describes the JSMAA software that implements SMAA-2, SMAA-O and SMAA-TRI methods. JSMAA is an open source and divided in separate graphical user interface and library components, enabling its use in systems with a model generation subsystem.

  3. A Requirements-Based Exploration of Open-Source Software Development Projects--Towards a Natural Language Processing Software Analysis Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vlas, Radu Eduard

    2012-01-01

    Open source projects do have requirements; they are, however, mostly informal, text descriptions found in requests, forums, and other correspondence. Understanding such requirements provides insight into the nature of open source projects. Unfortunately, manual analysis of natural language requirements is time-consuming, and for large projects,…

  4. Gammasphere software development. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Piercey, R.B.

    1993-05-01

    Activities of the nuclear physics group are described. Progress was made in organizing the Gammasphere Software Working Group, establishing a nuclear computing facility, participating in software development at Lawrence Berkeley, developing a common data file format, and adapting the ORNL UPAK software to run at Gammasphere. A universal histogram object was developed that defines a file format and provides for an objective-oriented programming model. An automated liquid nitrogen fill system was developed for Gammasphere (110 Ge detectors comprise the sphere).

  5. Software Architectures Expressly Designed to Promote Open Source Development: Using the Hyrax Data Server as a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, J.; West, P.; Potter, N.; Johnson, M.

    2009-12-01

    Data providers are continually looking for new, faster, and more functional ways of providing data to researchers in varying scientific communities. To help achieve this, OPeNDAP has developed a modular framework that provides the ability to pick and choose existing module plug-ins, as well as develop new module plug-ins, to construct customizable data servers. The data server framework uses the Data Access Protocol as the basis of its network interface, so any client application that can read that protocol can read data from one of these servers. In this poster/presentation we explore three new capabilities recently developed using new plug-in modules and how the framework's architecture enables considerable economy of design and implementation for those plug-in modules. The three capabilities are to return data packaged in a specific file format, regardless of the original format in which the data were stored; combining an existing data set with new metadata information without modifying the original data; and building and returning an RDF representation for data. In all cases these new features are independent of the data's native storage format, meaning that they will work both with all of the existing format modules as well as modules as yet undeveloped. In addition, we discuss how this architecture has characteristics that are very desirable for a highly distributed open source project where individual developers have minimal (or no) person-to-person contact. Such a design enables a project to make the most of open source development's strengths.

  6. NASA's Open Source Software for Serving and Viewing Global Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J. T.; Alarcon, C.; Boller, R. A.; Cechini, M. F.; Gunnoe, T.; Hall, J. R.; Huang, T.; Ilavajhala, S.; King, J.; McGann, M.; Murphy, K. J.; Plesea, L.; Schmaltz, J. E.; Thompson, C. K.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS), which provide open access to an enormous archive of historical and near real time imagery from NASA supported satellite instruments, has also released most of its software to the general public as open source. The software packages, originally developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Goddard Space Flight Center, currently include: 1) the Meta Raster Format (MRF) GDAL driver—GDAL support for a specialized file format used by GIBS to store imagery within a georeferenced tile pyramid for exceptionally fast access; 2) OnEarth—a high performance Apache module used to serve tiles from MRF files via common web service protocols; 3) Worldview—a web mapping client to interactively browse global, full-resolution satellite imagery and download underlying data. Examples that show developers how to use GIBS with various mapping libraries and programs are also available. This stack of tools is intended to provide an out-of-the-box solution for serving any georeferenced imagery.Scientists as well as the general public can use the open source software for their own applications such as developing visualization interfaces for improved scientific understanding and decision support, hosting a repository of browse images to help find and discover satellite data, or accessing large datasets of geo-located imagery in an efficient manner. Open source users may also contribute back to NASA and the wider Earth Science community by taking an active role in evaluating and developing the software.This presentation will discuss the experiences of developing the software in an open source environment and useful lessons learned. To access the open source software repositories, please visit: https://github.com/nasa-gibs/

  7. Development methodology for scientific software

    SciTech Connect

    Cort, G.; Goldstone, J.A.; Nelson, R.O.; Poore, R.V.; Miller, L.; Barrus, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    We present the details of a software development methodology that addresses all phases of the software life cycle, yet is well suited for application by small projects with limited resources. The methodology has been developed at the Los Alamos Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) Facility and was utilized during the recent development of the WNR Data Acquisition Command Language. The methodology emphasizes the development and maintenance of comprehensive documentation for all software components. The impact of the methodology upon software quality and programmer productivity is assessed.

  8. Managers Handbook for Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agresti, W.; Mcgarry, F.; Card, D.; Page, J.; Church, V.; Werking, R.

    1984-01-01

    Methods and aids for the management of software development projects are presented. The recommendations are based on analyses and experiences with flight dynamics software development. The management aspects of organizing the project, producing a development plan, estimation costs, scheduling, staffing, preparing deliverable documents, using management tools, monitoring the project, conducting reviews, auditing, testing, and certifying are described.

  9. Starlink Software Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, P. W.; Allan, A.; Berry, D. S.; Currie, M. J.; Giaretta, D.; Rankin, S.; Gray, N.; Taylor, M. B.

    2005-12-01

    Various recent changes to the software produced by Starlink are demonstrated. These cover areas such as table handling, time-series analysis, pipeline processing, astrometric calibration, spectral and cube visualisation, and ports to the Mac OS X and Cygwin environments. Particular emphasis was given to the applicability to the Virtual Observatory.

  10. Open-Source Software in Computational Research: A Case Study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Syamlal, Madhava; O'Brien, Thomas J.; Benyahia, Sofiane; Gel, Aytekin; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2008-01-01

    A case study of open-source (OS) development of the computational research software MFIX, used for multiphase computational fluid dynamics simulations, is presented here. The verification and validation steps required for constructing modern computational software and the advantages of OS development in those steps are discussed. The infrastructure used for enabling the OS development of MFIX is described. The impact of OS development on computational research and education in gas-solids flow, as well as the dissemination of information to other areas such as geophysical and volcanology research, is demonstrated. This study shows that the advantages of OS development were realized inmore » the case of MFIX: verification by many users, which enhances software quality; the use of software as a means for accumulating and exchanging information; the facilitation of peer review of the results of computational research.« less

  11. Open-Source Software in Computational Research: A Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Syamlal, Madhava; O'Brien, Thomas J.; Benyahia, Sofiane; Gel, Aytekin; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2008-01-01

    A case study of open-source (OS) development of the computational research software MFIX, used for multiphase computational fluid dynamics simulations, is presented here. The verification and validation steps required for constructing modern computational software and the advantages of OS development in those steps are discussed. The infrastructure used for enabling the OS development of MFIX is described. The impact of OS development on computational research and education in gas-solids flow, as well as the dissemination of information to other areas such as geophysical and volcanology research, is demonstrated. This study shows that the advantages of OS development were realized in the case of MFIX: verification by many users, which enhances software quality; the use of software as a means for accumulating and exchanging information; the facilitation of peer review of the results of computational research.

  12. Managing the Software Development Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubelczyk, J.; Parra, A.

    The goal of any software development project is to produce a product that is delivered on time, within the allocated budget, and with the capabilities expected by the customer and unfortunately, this goal is rarely achieved. However, a properly managed project in a mature software engineering environment can consistently achieve this goal. In this paper we provide an introduction to three project success factors, a properly managed project, a competent project manager, and a mature software engineering environment. We will also present an overview of the benefits of a mature software engineering environment based on 24 years of data from the Software Engineering Lab, and suggest some first steps that an organization can take to begin benefiting from this environment. The depth and breadth of software engineering exceeds this paper, various references are cited with a goal of raising awareness and encouraging further investigation into software engineering and project management practices.

  13. Managing the Software Development Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubelczky, Jeffrey T.; Parra, Amy

    1999-01-01

    The goal of any software development project is to produce a product that is delivered on time, within the allocated budget, and with the capabilities expected by the customer and unfortunately, this goal is rarely achieved. However, a properly managed project in a mature software engineering environment can consistently achieve this goal. In this paper we provide an introduction to three project success factors, a properly managed project, a competent project manager, and a mature software engineering environment. We will also present an overview of the benefits of a mature software engineering environment based on 24 years of data from the Software Engineering Lab, and suggest some first steps that an organization can take to begin benefiting from this environment. The depth and breadth of software engineering exceeds this paper, various references are cited with a goal of raising awareness and encouraging further investigation into software engineering and project management practices.

  14. Trends and challenges in open source software (Presentation Video)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aylward, Stephen

    2013-10-01

    Over the past decade, the field of medical image analysis research has undergone a rapid evolution. It was a collection of disconnected efforts that were burdened by mundane coding and file I/O tasks. It is now a collaborative community that has embraced open-source software as a shared foundation, reducing mundane coding and I/O burdens, promoting replicable research, and accelerating the pace of research and product development. This talk will review the history and current state of open-source software in medical image analysis research, will discuss the role of intellectual property in research, and will present emerging trends and technologies relevant to the growing importance of open-source software.

  15. Automated Software Development Workstation (ASDW)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridge, Ernie

    1990-01-01

    Software development is a serious bottleneck in the construction of complex automated systems. An increase of the reuse of software designs and components has been viewed as a way to relieve this bottleneck. One approach to achieving software reusability is through the development and use of software parts composition systems. A software parts composition system is a software development environment comprised of a parts description language for modeling parts and their interfaces, a catalog of existing parts, a composition editor that aids a user in the specification of a new application from existing parts, and a code generator that takes a specification and generates an implementation of a new application in a target language. The Automated Software Development Workstation (ASDW) is an expert system shell that provides the capabilities required to develop and manipulate these software parts composition systems. The ASDW is now in Beta testing at the Johnson Space Center. Future work centers on responding to user feedback for capability and usability enhancement, expanding the scope of the software lifecycle that is covered, and in providing solutions to handling very large libraries of reusable components.

  16. OpenROCS: a software tool to control robotic observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomé, Josep; Sanz, Josep; Vilardell, Francesc; Ribas, Ignasi; Gil, Pere

    2012-09-01

    We present the Open Robotic Observatory Control System (OpenROCS), an open source software platform developed for the robotic control of telescopes. It acts as a software infrastructure that executes all the necessary processes to implement responses to the system events that appear in the routine and non-routine operations associated to data-flow and housekeeping control. The OpenROCS software design and implementation provides a high flexibility to be adapted to different observatory configurations and event-action specifications. It is based on an abstract model that is independent of the specific hardware or software and is highly configurable. Interfaces to the system components are defined in a simple manner to achieve this goal. We give a detailed description of the version 2.0 of this software, based on a modular architecture developed in PHP and XML configuration files, and using standard communication protocols to interface with applications for hardware monitoring and control, environment monitoring, scheduling of tasks, image processing and data quality control. We provide two examples of how it is used as the core element of the control system in two robotic observatories: the Joan Oró Telescope at the Montsec Astronomical Observatory (Catalonia, Spain) and the SuperWASP Qatar Telescope at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (Canary Islands, Spain).

  17. Educational Software: A Developer's Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Timothy C.; Loane, Russell F.

    1994-01-01

    Examines the current status and short-term future of computer software development in higher education. Topics discussed include educational advantages of software; current program development techniques, including object oriented programming; and market trends, including IBM versus Macintosh and multimedia programs. (LRW)

  18. Government Technology Acquisition Policy: The Case of Proprietary versus Open Source Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemphill, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    This article begins by explaining the concepts of proprietary and open source software technology, which are now competing in the marketplace. A review of recent individual and cooperative technology development and public policy advocacy efforts, by both proponents of open source software and advocates of proprietary software, subsequently…

  19. Resource utilization during software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses resource utilization over the life cycle of software development and discusses the role that the current 'waterfall' model plays in the actual software life cycle. Software production in the NASA environment was analyzed to measure these differences. The data from 13 different projects were collected by the Software Engineering Laboratory at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and analyzed for similarities and differences. The results indicate that the waterfall model is not very realistic in practice, and that as technology introduces further perturbations to this model with concepts like executable specifications, rapid prototyping, and wide-spectrum languages, we need to modify our model of this process.

  20. Software Development at Belle II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhr, Thomas; Hauth, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Belle II is a next generation B-factory experiment that will collect 50 times more data than its predecessor Belle. This requires not only a major upgrade of the detector hardware, but also of the simulation, reconstruction, and analysis software. The challenges of the software development at Belle II and the tools and procedures to address them are reviewed in this article.

  1. Software development without languages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osborne, Haywood S.

    1988-01-01

    Automatic programming generally involves the construction of a formal specification; i.e., one which allows unambiguous interpretation by tools for the subsequent production of the corresponding software. Previous practical efforts in this direction have focused on the serious problems of: (1) designing the optimum specification language; and (2) mapping (translating or compiling) from this specification language to the program itself. The approach proposed bypasses the above problems. It postulates that the specification proper should be an intermediate form, with the sole function of containing information sufficient to facilitate construction of programs and also of matching documentation. Thus, the means of forming the intermediary becomes a human factors task rather than a linguistic one; human users will read documents generated from the specification, rather than the specification itself.

  2. Open source data analysis and visualization software for optical engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Greg A.; Lewis, Benjamin J.; Palmer, Michael; Kim, Dae Wook; Loeff, Adrian R.; Burge, James H.

    2012-10-01

    SAGUARO is open-source software developed to simplify data assimilation, analysis, and visualization by providing a single framework for disparate data sources from raw hardware measurements to optical simulation output. Developed with a user-friendly graphical interface in the MATLABTM environment, SAGUARO is intended to be easy for the enduser in search of useful optical information as well as the developer wanting to add new modules and functionalities. We present here the flexibility of the SAGUARO software and discuss how it can be applied to the wider optical engineering community.

  3. Documenting the Development of Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Some routine supervisory functions performed automatically. Program Management Facility (PMF) computer program integrated software-development and control system. Applicable to large software systems involving as many as several hundred programmers and one million lines of codes, it ensures timely and orderly planning, development, implementation, and documentation of software. Designed as support tool. Has many features providing efficient processing and utilization of space for development programmer. Incorporates security system to prevent improper maintenance. Provides full set of cross-referenced reports and supervisory functions for detailed management information. Written in assembler. IBM program TSO required.

  4. Software Development Standard Processes (SDSP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavin, Milton L.; Wang, James J.; Morillo, Ronald; Mayer, John T.; Jamshidian, Barzia; Shimizu, Kenneth J.; Wilkinson, Belinda M.; Hihn, Jairus M.; Borgen, Rosana B.; Meyer, Kenneth N.; Crean, Kathleen A.; Rinker, George C.; Smith, Thomas P.; Lum, Karen T.; Hanna, Robert A.; Erickson, Daniel E.; Gamble, Edward B., Jr.; Morgan, Scott C.; Kelsay, Michael G.; Newport, Brian J.; Lewicki, Scott A.; Stipanuk, Jeane G.; Cooper, Tonja M.; Meshkat, Leila

    2011-01-01

    A JPL-created set of standard processes is to be used throughout the lifecycle of software development. These SDSPs cover a range of activities, from management and engineering activities, to assurance and support activities. These processes must be applied to software tasks per a prescribed set of procedures. JPL s Software Quality Improvement Project is currently working at the behest of the JPL Software Process Owner to ensure that all applicable software tasks follow these procedures. The SDSPs are captured as a set of 22 standards in JPL s software process domain. They were developed in-house at JPL by a number of Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) residing primarily within the Engineering and Science Directorate, but also from the Business Operations Directorate and Safety and Mission Success Directorate. These practices include not only currently performed best practices, but also JPL-desired future practices in key thrust areas like software architecting and software reuse analysis. Additionally, these SDSPs conform to many standards and requirements to which JPL projects are beholden.

  5. Open source software engineering for geoscientific modeling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilke, L.; Rink, K.; Fischer, T.; Kolditz, O.

    2012-12-01

    OpenGeoSys (OGS) is a scientific open source project for numerical simulation of thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in porous and fractured media. The OGS software development community is distributed all over the world and people with different backgrounds are contributing code to a complex software system. The following points have to be addressed for successful software development: - Platform independent code - A unified build system - A version control system - A collaborative project web site - Continuous builds and testing - Providing binaries and documentation for end users OGS should run on a PC as well as on a computing cluster regardless of the operating system. Therefore the code should not include any platform specific feature or library. Instead open source and platform independent libraries like Qt for the graphical user interface or VTK for visualization algorithms are used. A source code management and version control system is a definite requirement for distributed software development. For this purpose Git is used, which enables developers to work on separate versions (branches) of the software and to merge those versions at some point to the official one. The version control system is integrated into an information and collaboration website based on a wiki system. The wiki is used for collecting information such as tutorials, application examples and case studies. Discussions take place in the OGS mailing list. To improve code stability and to verify code correctness a continuous build and testing system, based on the Jenkins Continuous Integration Server, has been established. This server is connected to the version control system and does the following on every code change: - Compiles (builds) the code on every supported platform (Linux, Windows, MacOS) - Runs a comprehensive test suite of over 120 benchmarks and verifies the results Runs software development related metrics on the code (like compiler warnings, code complexity

  6. Impact of Agile Software Development Model on Software Maintainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gawali, Ajay R.

    2012-01-01

    Software maintenance and support costs account for up to 60% of the overall software life cycle cost and often burdens tightly budgeted information technology (IT) organizations. Agile software development approach delivers business value early, but implications on software maintainability are still unknown. The purpose of this quantitative study…

  7. Models for Deploying Open Source and Commercial Software to Support Earth Science Data Processing and Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yetman, G.; Downs, R. R.

    2011-12-01

    Software deployment is needed to process and distribute scientific data throughout the data lifecycle. Developing software in-house can take software development teams away from other software development projects and can require efforts to maintain the software over time. Adopting and reusing software and system modules that have been previously developed by others can reduce in-house software development and maintenance costs and can contribute to the quality of the system being developed. A variety of models are available for reusing and deploying software and systems that have been developed by others. These deployment models include open source software, vendor-supported open source software, commercial software, and combinations of these approaches. Deployment in Earth science data processing and distribution has demonstrated the advantages and drawbacks of each model. Deploying open source software offers advantages for developing and maintaining scientific data processing systems and applications. By joining an open source community that is developing a particular system module or application, a scientific data processing team can contribute to aspects of the software development without having to commit to developing the software alone. Communities of interested developers can share the work while focusing on activities that utilize in-house expertise and addresses internal requirements. Maintenance is also shared by members of the community. Deploying vendor-supported open source software offers similar advantages to open source software. However, by procuring the services of a vendor, the in-house team can rely on the vendor to provide, install, and maintain the software over time. Vendor-supported open source software may be ideal for teams that recognize the value of an open source software component or application and would like to contribute to the effort, but do not have the time or expertise to contribute extensively. Vendor-supported software may

  8. Alone Together: A Socio-Technical Theory of Motivation, Coordination and Collaboration Technologies in Organizing for Free and Open Source Software Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howison, James

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation presents evidence that the production of Free and Open Source Software (FLOSS) is far more alone than together; it is far more often individual work done "in company" than it is teamwork. When tasks appear too large for an individual they are more likely to be deferred until they are easier rather than be undertaken through…

  9. IT Policies for Development: Analysis and Recommendations of Free Libre Open Source Software Initiatives of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maldonado Rangel, Edgar A.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years the two concepts of economic development and technological advancement have become entwined so that they have, in many cases, come to mean the same thing. For countries seeking economic development through engagement with the Information Economy, policies supporting technological development claim privileged positions in national…

  10. Productive high-performance software for OpenCL devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melonakos, John M.; Yalamanchili, Pavan; McClanahan, Chris; Arshad, Umar; Landes, Michael; Jamboti, Shivapriya; Joshi, Abhijit; Mohammed, Shehzan; Spafford, Kyle; Venugopalakrishnan, Vishwanath; Malcolm, James

    2013-05-01

    Over the last three decades, CPUs have continued to produce large performance improvements from one generation to the next. However, CPUs have recently hit a performance wall and need parallel computing to move forward. Parallel computing over the next decade will become increasingly defined by heterogeneous computing, involving the use of accelerators in addition to CPUs to get computational tasks done. In order to use an accelerator, software changes must be made. Regular x86-based compilers cannot compile code to run on accelerators without these needed changes. The amount of software change required varies depending upon the availability of and reliance upon software tools that increase performance and productivity. Writing software that leverages the best parallel computing hardware, adapts well to the rapid pace of hardware updates, and minimizes developer muscle is the industry's goal. OpenCL is the standard around which developers are able to achieve parallel performance. OpenCL itself is too difficult to program to receive general adoptions, but productive high-performing software libraries are becoming increasingly popular and capable in delivering lasting value to user applications.

  11. An Analysis of Open Source Security Software Products Downloads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barta, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the continued demand for open source security software, a gap in the identification of success factors related to the success of open source security software persists. There are no studies that accurately assess the extent of this persistent gap, particularly with respect to the strength of the relationships of open source software…

  12. Analyzing huge pathology images with open source software

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Digital pathology images are increasingly used both for diagnosis and research, because slide scanners are nowadays broadly available and because the quantitative study of these images yields new insights in systems biology. However, such virtual slides build up a technical challenge since the images occupy often several gigabytes and cannot be fully opened in a computer’s memory. Moreover, there is no standard format. Therefore, most common open source tools such as ImageJ fail at treating them, and the others require expensive hardware while still being prohibitively slow. Results We have developed several cross-platform open source software tools to overcome these limitations. The NDPITools provide a way to transform microscopy images initially in the loosely supported NDPI format into one or several standard TIFF files, and to create mosaics (division of huge images into small ones, with or without overlap) in various TIFF and JPEG formats. They can be driven through ImageJ plugins. The LargeTIFFTools achieve similar functionality for huge TIFF images which do not fit into RAM. We test the performance of these tools on several digital slides and compare them, when applicable, to standard software. A statistical study of the cells in a tissue sample from an oligodendroglioma was performed on an average laptop computer to demonstrate the efficiency of the tools. Conclusions Our open source software enables dealing with huge images with standard software on average computers. They are cross-platform, independent of proprietary libraries and very modular, allowing them to be used in other open source projects. They have excellent performance in terms of execution speed and RAM requirements. They open promising perspectives both to the clinician who wants to study a single slide and to the research team or data centre who do image analysis of many slides on a computer cluster. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http

  13. Management of Astronomical Software Projects with Open Source Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briegel, F.; Bertram, T.; Berwein, J.; Kittmann, F.

    2010-12-01

    In this paper we will offer an innovative approach to managing the software development process with free open source tools, for building and automated testing, a system to automate the compile/test cycle on a variety of platforms to validate code changes, using virtualization to compile in parallel on various operating system platforms, version control and change management, enhanced wiki and issue tracking system for online documentation and reporting and groupware tools as they are: blog, discussion and calendar. Initially starting with the Linc-Nirvana instrument a new project and configuration management tool for developing astronomical software was looked for. After evaluation of various systems of this kind, we are satisfied with the selection we are using now. Following the lead of Linc-Nirvana most of the other software projects at the MPIA are using it now.

  14. Open Source Software Reuse in the Airborne Cloud Computing Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudikyan, S. E.; Hart, A. F.; Hardman, S.; Freeborn, D.; Davoodi, F.; Resneck, G.; Mattmann, C. A.; Crichton, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    Earth science airborne missions play an important role in helping humans understand our climate. A challenge for airborne campaigns in contrast to larger NASA missions is that their relatively modest budgets do not permit the ground-up development of data management tools. These smaller missions generally consist of scientists whose primary focus is on the algorithmic and scientific aspects of the mission, which often leaves data management software and systems to be addressed as an afterthought. The Airborne Cloud Computing Environment (ACCE), developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to support Earth Science Airborne Program, is a reusable, multi-mission data system environment for NASA airborne missions. ACCE provides missions with a cloud-enabled platform for managing their data. The platform consists of a comprehensive set of robust data management capabilities that cover everything from data ingestion and archiving, to algorithmic processing, and to data delivery. Missions interact with this system programmatically as well as via browser-based user interfaces. The core components of ACCE are largely based on Apache Object Oriented Data Technology (OODT), an open source information integration framework at the Apache Software Foundation (ASF). Apache OODT is designed around a component-based architecture that allows for selective combination of components to create highly configurable data management systems. The diverse and growing community that currently contributes to Apache OODT fosters on-going growth and maturation of the software. ACCE's key objective is to reduce cost and risks associated with developing data management systems for airborne missions. Software reuse plays a prominent role in mitigating these problems. By providing a reusable platform based on open source software, ACCE enables airborne missions to allocate more resources to their scientific goals, thereby opening the doors to increased scientific discovery.

  15. Advanced Software Development Workstation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Daniel

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Software Development Workstation Project, funded by Johnson Space Center, is investigating knowledge-based techniques for software reuse in NASA software development projects. Two prototypes have been demonstrated and a third is now in development. The approach is to build a foundation that provides passive reuse support, add a layer that uses domain-independent programming knowledge, add a layer that supports the acquisition of domain-specific programming knowledge to provide active support, and enhance maintainability and modifiability through an object-oriented approach. The development of new application software would use specification-by-reformulation, based on a cognitive theory of retrieval from very long-term memory in humans, and using an Ada code library and an object base. Current tasks include enhancements to the knowledge representation of Ada packages and abstract data types, extensions to support Ada package instantiation knowledge acquisition, integration with Ada compilers and relational databases, enhancements to the graphical user interface, and demonstration of the system with a NASA contractor-developed trajectory simulation package. Future work will focus on investigating issues involving scale-up and integration.

  16. Post-Modern Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filman, Robert E.

    2005-01-01

    The history of software development includes elements of art, science, engineering, and fashion(though very little manufacturing). In all domains, old ideas give way or evolve to new ones: in the fine arts, the baroque gave way to rococo, romanticism, modernism, postmodernism, and so forth. What is the postmodern programming equivalent? That is, what comes after object orientation?

  17. Software development environment, appendix F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddle, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    The current status in the area of software development environments is assessed. The purposes of environments, the types of environments, the constituents of an environment, the issue of environment integration, and the problems which must be solved in preparing an environment are discussed. Some general maxims to guide near-term future work are proposed.

  18. Open Source Software in Medium Size Organizations: Key Factors for Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Jerry T.

    2010-01-01

    For-profit organizations are constantly evaluating new technologies to gain competitive advantage. One such technology, application software, has changed significantly over the past 25 years with the introduction of Open Source Software (OSS). In contrast to commercial software that is developed by private companies and sold to organizations, OSS…

  19. Agile Methods for Open Source Safety-Critical Software

    PubMed Central

    Enquobahrie, Andinet; Ibanez, Luis; Cheng, Patrick; Yaniv, Ziv; Cleary, Kevin; Kokoori, Shylaja; Muffih, Benjamin; Heidenreich, John

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of software technology in a life-dependent environment requires the development team to execute a process that ensures a high level of software reliability and correctness. Despite their popularity, agile methods are generally assumed to be inappropriate as a process family in these environments due to their lack of emphasis on documentation, traceability, and other formal techniques. Agile methods, notably Scrum, favor empirical process control, or small constant adjustments in a tight feedback loop. This paper challenges the assumption that agile methods are inappropriate for safety-critical software development. Agile methods are flexible enough to encourage the right amount of ceremony; therefore if safety-critical systems require greater emphasis on activities like formal specification and requirements management, then an agile process will include these as necessary activities. Furthermore, agile methods focus more on continuous process management and code-level quality than classic software engineering process models. We present our experiences on the image-guided surgical toolkit (IGSTK) project as a backdrop. IGSTK is an open source software project employing agile practices since 2004. We started with the assumption that a lighter process is better, focused on evolving code, and only adding process elements as the need arose. IGSTK has been adopted by teaching hospitals and research labs, and used for clinical trials. Agile methods have matured since the academic community suggested they are not suitable for safety-critical systems almost a decade ago, we present our experiences as a case study for renewing the discussion. PMID:21799545

  20. Agile Methods for Open Source Safety-Critical Software.

    PubMed

    Gary, Kevin; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Ibanez, Luis; Cheng, Patrick; Yaniv, Ziv; Cleary, Kevin; Kokoori, Shylaja; Muffih, Benjamin; Heidenreich, John

    2011-08-01

    The introduction of software technology in a life-dependent environment requires the development team to execute a process that ensures a high level of software reliability and correctness. Despite their popularity, agile methods are generally assumed to be inappropriate as a process family in these environments due to their lack of emphasis on documentation, traceability, and other formal techniques. Agile methods, notably Scrum, favor empirical process control, or small constant adjustments in a tight feedback loop. This paper challenges the assumption that agile methods are inappropriate for safety-critical software development. Agile methods are flexible enough to encourage the rightamount of ceremony; therefore if safety-critical systems require greater emphasis on activities like formal specification and requirements management, then an agile process will include these as necessary activities. Furthermore, agile methods focus more on continuous process management and code-level quality than classic software engineering process models. We present our experiences on the image-guided surgical toolkit (IGSTK) project as a backdrop. IGSTK is an open source software project employing agile practices since 2004. We started with the assumption that a lighter process is better, focused on evolving code, and only adding process elements as the need arose. IGSTK has been adopted by teaching hospitals and research labs, and used for clinical trials. Agile methods have matured since the academic community suggested they are not suitable for safety-critical systems almost a decade ago, we present our experiences as a case study for renewing the discussion. PMID:21799545

  1. Managing MDO Software Development Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. C.; Salas, A. O.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past decade, the NASA Langley Research Center developed a series of 'grand challenge' applications demonstrating the use of parallel and distributed computation and multidisciplinary design optimization. All but the last of these applications were focused on the high-speed civil transport vehicle; the final application focused on reusable launch vehicles. Teams of discipline experts developed these multidisciplinary applications by integrating legacy engineering analysis codes. As teams became larger and the application development became more complex with increasing levels of fidelity and numbers of disciplines, the need for applying software engineering practices became evident. This paper briefly introduces the application projects and then describes the approaches taken in project management and software engineering for each project; lessons learned are highlighted.

  2. Zherlock: an open source data analysis software.

    PubMed

    Alsberg, B K; Kirkhus, L; Hagen, R; Knudsen, O; Tangstad, T; Anderssen, E

    2003-01-01

    Zherlock is an open source software that provides state-of-the-art data analysis tools to the user in an intuitive and flexible way. It is a front-end to different numerical "engines" to produce a seamless integration of algorithms written in different computer languages. Of particular interest is creating an interface to high-level scientific languages such as Octave (a Matlab clone) and R (an S-PLUS clone) to enable efficient porting of new data analytical methods. Zherlock uses advanced scientific visualization tools in 2-D and 3-D and has been extended to work on virtual reality (VR) systems. Central to Zherlock is a visual programming environment (VPE) which enables diagram based programming. These diagrams consist of nodes and connection lines where each node is an operator or a method and lines describe the flow of data between nodes. A VPE is chosen for Zherlock because it forms an effective way to control the processing pipeline in complex data analyses. The VPE is similar in functionality to other programs such as IRIS Explorer, AVS or LabVIEW. PMID:14758979

  3. The Value of Open Source Software Tools in Qualitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Gary

    2011-01-01

    In an era of global networks, researchers using qualitative methods must consider the impact of any software they use on the sharing of data and findings. In this essay, I identify researchers' main areas of concern regarding the use of qualitative software packages for research. I then examine how open source software tools, wherein the publisher…

  4. Software Development as Music Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Andrew R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses how software development can be used as a method for music education research. It explains how software development can externalize ideas, stimulate action and reflection, and provide evidence to support the educative value of new software-based experiences. Parallels between the interactive software development process and…

  5. OpenFLUID: an open-source software environment for modelling fluxes in landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabre, Jean-Christophe; Rabotin, Michaël; Crevoisier, David; Libres, Aline; Dagès, Cécile; Moussa, Roger; Lagacherie, Philippe; Raclot, Damien; Voltz, Marc

    2013-04-01

    Integrative landscape functioning has become a common concept in environmental management. Landscapes are complex systems where many processes interact in time and space. In agro-ecosystems, these processes are mainly physical processes, including hydrological-processes, biological processes and human activities. Modelling such systems requires an interdisciplinary approach, coupling models coming from different disciplines, developed by different teams. In order to support collaborative works, involving many models coupled in time and space for integrative simulations, an open software modelling platform is a relevant answer. OpenFLUID is an open source software platform for modelling landscape functioning, mainly focused on spatial fluxes. It provides an advanced object-oriented architecture allowing to i) couple models developed de novo or from existing source code, and which are dynamically plugged to the platform, ii) represent landscapes as hierarchical graphs, taking into account multi-scale, spatial heterogeneities and landscape objects connectivity, iii) run and explore simulations in many ways : using the OpenFLUID software interfaces for users (command line interface, graphical user interface), or using external applications such as GNU R through the provided ROpenFLUID package. OpenFLUID is developed in C++ and relies on open source libraries only (Boost, libXML2, GLib/GTK, OGR/GDAL, …). For modelers and developers, OpenFLUID provides a dedicated environment for model development, which is based on an open source toolchain, including the Eclipse editor, the GCC compiler and the CMake build system. OpenFLUID is distributed under the GPLv3 open source license, with a special exception allowing to plug existing models licensed under any license. It is clearly in the spirit of sharing knowledge and favouring collaboration in a community of modelers. OpenFLUID has been involved in many research applications, such as modelling of hydrological network

  6. Transforming High School Classrooms with Free/Open Source Software: "It's Time for an Open Source Software Revolution"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaffman, Jay

    2008-01-01

    Free/Open Source Software (FOSS) applications meet many of the software needs of high school science classrooms. In spite of the availability and quality of FOSS tools, they remain unknown to many teachers and utilized by fewer still. In a world where most software has restrictions on copying and use, FOSS is an anomaly, free to use and to…

  7. Understanding How the "Open" of Open Source Software (OSS) Will Improve Global Health Security.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Erin; Blazes, David; Lewis, Sheri

    2016-01-01

    Improving global health security will require bold action in all corners of the world, particularly in developing settings, where poverty often contributes to an increase in emerging infectious diseases. In order to mitigate the impact of emerging pandemic threats, enhanced disease surveillance is needed to improve early detection and rapid response to outbreaks. However, the technology to facilitate this surveillance is often unattainable because of high costs, software and hardware maintenance needs, limited technical competence among public health officials, and internet connectivity challenges experienced in the field. One potential solution is to leverage open source software, a concept that is unfortunately often misunderstood. This article describes the principles and characteristics of open source software and how it may be applied to solve global health security challenges. PMID:26889576

  8. Software based controls module development

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, v.b.; kelley, g; welch, j.c.

    1999-12-10

    A project was initiated at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant to implement software geometric error compensation within a PC-based machine tool controller from Manufacturing Data Systems, Inc. This project may be the first in which this type of compensation system was implemented in a commercially available machine tool controller totally in software. Previous implementations typically required using an external computer and hardware to interface through the position feedback loop of the controller because direct access to the controller software was not available. The test-bed machine for this project was a 2-axis Excello 921 T-base lathe. A mathematical error model of the lathe was created using homogeneous transformation matrices to relate the positions of the machine's slides to each other and to a world reference system. Equations describing the effects of the geometric errors were derived from the model. A software architecture was developed to support geometric error compensation for machine tools with up to 3 linear axes. Rotary axes were not supported in this implementation, but the developed architecture would not preclude their support in the future. Specific implementations will be dependent upon the configuration of the machine tool. A laser measuring system from Automated Precision, Inc. was used to characterize the lathe's geometric errors as functions of axis position and direction of motion. Multiple data files generated by the laser system were combined into a single Error File that was read at system startup and used by the compensation system to provide real-time position adjustments to the axis servos. A Renishaw Ballbar was used to evaluate the compensation system. Static positioning tests were conducted in an attempt to observe improved positioning accuracy with the compensation system enabled. These tests gave inconsistent results due to the lathe's inability to position the tool repeatably. The development of the architecture and compensation

  9. A survey on open source software testing tools: a preliminary study in 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emami, Seyed Amir; Sim, Jason Chin Lung; Sim, Kwan Yong

    2011-12-01

    Software Testing is a costly and time consuming process in software development. Therefore, software testing tools are often deployed to automate the process in order to reduce cost and improve efficiency. However, many of them are proprietary and expensive. Hence, open source software testing tools could be an appealing alternative. In this paper, we survey the current states of open source software testing tools from three aspects, namely, their availability for different programming platforms and types testing activities, maintenance of the tools and license limitations. From the 152 tools surveyed, we found that open source software testing tools not only are widely available for popular programming platforms, but also support a wide range of testing activities. Furthermore, we also found that more than half of the tools surveyed have been actively maintained and updated by the open source communities. Finally, these tools have very few licensing limitations for commercial use, customization and redistribution.

  10. OpenEIS. Developer Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Lutes, Robert G.; Neubauer, Casey C.; Haack, Jereme N.; Carpenter, Brandon J.; Monson, Kyle E.; Allwardt, Craig H.; Sharma, Poorva; Akyol, Bora A.

    2015-03-31

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Office (BTO) is supporting the development of an open-source software tool for analyzing building energy and operational data: OpenEIS (open energy information system). This tool addresses the problems of both owners of building data and developers of tools to analyze this data. Building owners and managers have data but lack the tools to analyze it while tool developers lack data in a common format to ease development of reusable data analysis tools. This document is intended for developers of applications and explains the mechanisms for building analysis applications, accessing data, and displaying data using a visualization from the included library. A brief introduction to the visualizations can be used as a jumping off point for developers familiar with JavaScript to produce their own. Several example applications are included which can be used along with this document to implement algorithms for performing energy data analysis.

  11. Open source IPSEC software in manned and unmanned space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Jacob

    Network security is a major topic of research because cyber attackers pose a threat to national security. Securing ground-space communications for NASA missions is important because attackers could endanger mission success and human lives. This thesis describes how an open source IPsec software package was used to create a secure and reliable channel for ground-space communications. A cost efficient, reproducible hardware testbed was also created to simulate ground-space communications. The testbed enables simulation of low-bandwidth and high latency communications links to experiment how the open source IPsec software reacts to these network constraints. Test cases were built that allowed for validation of the testbed and the open source IPsec software. The test cases also simulate using an IPsec connection from mission control ground routers to points of interest in outer space. Tested open source IPsec software did not meet all the requirements. Software changes were suggested to meet requirements.

  12. A Legal Guide for the Software Developer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Small Business Assistance Office, St. Paul.

    This booklet has been prepared to familiarize the inventor, creator, or developer of a new computer software product or software invention with the basic legal issues involved in developing, protecting, and distributing the software in the United States. Basic types of software protection and related legal matters are discussed in detail,…

  13. Evolution of Apache Open Source Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Haoran; D'Souza, Raissa M.; Saul, Zachary M.; Filkov, Vladimir

    Our modern infrastructure relies increasingly on computation and computers. Accompanying this is a rise in the prevalence and complexity of computer programs. Current software systems (composed of an interacting collection of programs, functions, classes, etc.) implement a tremendous range of functionality, from simple mathematical operations to intricate control systems. Software systems are inherently extendable and tend to gain new functionality over time. Modern computers and programming languages are Turing complete and, thus, capable of implementing any computable function no matter how complex. The interdependencies between the elements of a software system form a network, and, therefore, we believe software systems can provide useful prototypic examples of how to build complex networked systems which require minimal maintenance, are robust bugs to and yet are readily extendable. Thus we ask: What makes for good design in software systems?

  14. Evaluation of Open-Source Hard Real Time Software Packages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattei, Nicholas S.

    2004-01-01

    replacing this somewhat costly implementation is the focus of one of the SA group s current research projects. The explosion of open source software in the last ten years has led to the development of a multitude of software solutions which were once only produced by major corporations. The benefits of these open projects include faster release and bug patching cycles as well as inexpensive if not free software solutions. The main packages for hard real time solutions under Linux are Real Time Application Interface (RTAI) and two varieties of Real Time Linux (RTL), RTLFree and RTLPro. During my time here at NASA I have been testing various hard real time solutions operating as layers on the Linux Operating System. All testing is being run on an Intel SBC 2590 which is a common embedded hardware platform. The test plan was provided to me by the Software Assurance group at the start of my internship and my job has been to test the systems by developing and executing the test cases on the hardware. These tests are constructed so that the Software Assurance group can get hard test data for a comparison between the open source and proprietary implementations of hard real time solutions.

  15. Software Development Group. Software Review Center. Microcomputing Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkey, Nadine; Smith, Shirley C.

    Two papers describe the roles of the Software Development Group (SDG) and the Software Review Center (SRC) at Drexel University. The first paper covers the primary role of the SDG, which is designed to assist Drexel faculty with the technical design and programming of courseware for the Apple Macintosh microcomputer; the relationship of the SDG…

  16. Long distance education for croatian nurses with open source software.

    PubMed

    Radenovic, Aleksandar; Kalauz, Sonja

    2006-01-01

    Croatian Nursing Informatics Association (CNIA) has been established as result of continuing work on promoting nursing informatics in Croatia. Main goals of CNIA are promoting nursing informatics and education of nurses about nursing informatics and using information technology in nursing process. CNIA in start of work is developed three courses from nursing informatics all designed with support of long distance education with open source software. Courses are: A - 'From Data to Wisdom', B - 'Introduction to Nursing Informatics' and C - 'Nursing Informatics I'. Courses A and B are obligatory for C course. Technology used to implement these online courses is based on the open source Learning Management System (LMS), Claroline, free online collaborative learning platform. Courses are divided in two modules/days. First module/day participants have classical approach to education and second day with E-learning from home. These courses represent first courses from nursing informatics' and first long distance education for nurses also. PMID:17102315

  17. Math Description Engine Software Development Kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelton, Robert O.; Smith, Stephanie L.; Dexter, Dan E.; Hodgson, Terry R.

    2010-01-01

    The Math Description Engine Software Development Kit (MDE SDK) can be used by software developers to make computer-rendered graphs more accessible to blind and visually-impaired users. The MDE SDK generates alternative graph descriptions in two forms: textual descriptions and non-verbal sound renderings, or sonification. It also enables display of an animated trace of a graph sonification on a visual graph component, with color and line-thickness options for users having low vision or color-related impairments. A set of accessible graphical user interface widgets is provided for operation by end users and for control of accessible graph displays. Version 1.0 of the MDE SDK generates text descriptions for 2D graphs commonly seen in math and science curriculum (and practice). The mathematically rich text descriptions can also serve as a virtual math and science assistant for blind and sighted users, making graphs more accessible for everyone. The MDE SDK has a simple application programming interface (API) that makes it easy for programmers and Web-site developers to make graphs accessible with just a few lines of code. The source code is written in Java for cross-platform compatibility and to take advantage of Java s built-in support for building accessible software application interfaces. Compiled-library and NASA Open Source versions are available with API documentation and Programmer s Guide at http:/ / prim e.jsc.n asa. gov.

  18. Managing Digital Archives Using Open Source Software Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barve, S.; Dongare, S.

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes the use of open source software tools such as MySQL and PHP for creating database-backed websites. Such websites offer many advantages over ones built from static HTML pages. This paper will discuss how OSS tools are used and their benefits, and after the successful implementation of these tools how the library took the initiative in implementing an institutional repository using DSpace open source software.

  19. The Case for Open Source Software in Digital Forensics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanero, Stefano; Huebner, Ewa

    In this introductory chapter we discuss the importance of the use of open source software (OSS), and in particular of free software (FLOSS) in computer forensics investigations including the identification, capture, preservation and analysis of digital evidence; we also discuss the importance of OSS in computer forensics

  20. YAM- A Framework for Rapid Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Abhinandan; Biesiadecki, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    YAM is a software development framework with tools for facilitating the rapid development and integration of software in a concurrent software development environment. YAM provides solutions for thorny development challenges associated with software reuse, managing multiple software configurations, the development of software product-lines, multiple platform development and build management. YAM uses release-early, release-often development cycles to allow developers to incrementally integrate their changes into the system on a continual basis. YAM facilitates the creation and merging of branches to support the isolated development of immature software to avoid impacting the stability of the development effort. YAM uses modules and packages to organize and share software across multiple software products. It uses the concepts of link and work modules to reduce sandbox setup times even when the code-base is large. One side-benefit is the enforcement of a strong module-level encapsulation of a module s functionality and interface. This increases design transparency, system stability as well as software reuse. YAM is in use by several mid-size software development teams including ones developing mission-critical software.

  1. Designing Software to Shape Open Government Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Harlan Ming-Tun

    2012-01-01

    Modern information technologies have transformed the meaning and promise of "open government." The term originally stood for the ideas of government transparency and public accountability. But with the rise of the Internet, "open government" has grown to encompass a wide range of civic goals--greater public participation and…

  2. Open source software and web services for designing therapeutic molecules.

    PubMed

    Singla, Deepak; Dhanda, Sandeep Kumar; Chauhan, Jagat Singh; Bhardwaj, Anshu; Brahmachari, Samir K; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2013-01-01

    Despite the tremendous progress in the field of drug designing, discovering a new drug molecule is still a challenging task. Drug discovery and development is a costly, time consuming and complex process that requires millions of dollar and 10-15 years to bring new drug molecules in the market. This huge investment and long-term process are attributed to high failure rate, complexity of the problem and strict regulatory rules, in addition to other factors. Given the availability of 'big' data with ever improving computing power, it is now possible to model systems which is expected to provide time and cost effectiveness to drug discovery process. Computer Aided Drug Designing (CADD) has emerged as a fast alternative method to bring down the cost involved in discovering a new drug. In past, numerous computer programs have been developed across the globe to assist the researchers working in the field of drug discovery. Broadly, these programs can be classified in three categories, freeware, shareware and commercial software. In this review, we have described freeware or open-source software that are commonly used for designing therapeutic molecules. Major emphasis will be on software and web services in the field of chemo- or pharmaco-informatics that includes in silico tools used for computing molecular descriptors, inhibitors designing against drug targets, building QSAR models, and ADMET properties. PMID:23647540

  3. Reliable software and communication 2: Controlling the software development process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalal, Siddhartha R.; Horgan, Joseph R.; Kettenring, Jon R.

    1994-01-01

    The software created by industrial, educational, and research organizations is increasingly large and complex. It also occupies a central role in the reliability and safety of many essential services. We examine the software development process and suggest opportunities for improving the process by using a combination of statistical and other process control techniques. Data, analysis of data, and tools for collecting data are crucial to our approach. Although our views are based upon experiences with large telecommunications systems, they are likely to be useful to many other developers of large software systems.

  4. Autonomous robot software development using simple software components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Thomas M.; Chung, Chan-Jin

    2004-10-01

    Developing software to control a sophisticated lane-following, obstacle-avoiding, autonomous robot can be demanding and beyond the capabilities of novice programmers - but it doesn"t have to be. A creative software design utilizing only basic image processing and a little algebra, has been employed to control the LTU-AISSIG autonomous robot - a contestant in the 2004 Intelligent Ground Vehicle Competition (IGVC). This paper presents a software design equivalent to that used during the IGVC, but with much of the complexity removed. The result is an autonomous robot software design, that is robust, reliable, and can be implemented by programmers with a limited understanding of image processing. This design provides a solid basis for further work in autonomous robot software, as well as an interesting and achievable robotics project for students.

  5. Experimental Internet Environment Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddux, Gary A.

    1998-01-01

    Geographically distributed project teams need an Internet based collaborative work environment or "Intranet." The Virtual Research Center (VRC) is an experimental Intranet server that combines several services such as desktop conferencing, file archives, on-line publishing, and security. Using the World Wide Web (WWW) as a shared space paradigm, the Graphical User Interface (GUI) presents users with images of a lunar colony. Each project has a wing of the colony and each wing has a conference room, library, laboratory, and mail station. In FY95, the VRC development team proved the feasibility of this shared space concept by building a prototype using a Netscape commerce server and several public domain programs. Successful demonstrations of the prototype resulted in approval for a second phase. Phase 2, documented by this report, will produce a seamlessly integrated environment by introducing new technologies such as Java and Adobe Web Links to replace less efficient interface software.

  6. Closing gaps between open software and public data in a hackathon setting: User-centered software prototyping.

    PubMed

    Busby, Ben; Lesko, Matthew; Federer, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    In genomics, bioinformatics and other areas of data science, gaps exist between extant public datasets and the open-source software tools built by the community to analyze similar data types.  The purpose of biological data science hackathons is to assemble groups of genomics or bioinformatics professionals and software developers to rapidly prototype software to address these gaps.  The only two rules for the NCBI-assisted hackathons run so far are that 1) data either must be housed in public data repositories or be deposited to such repositories shortly after the hackathon's conclusion, and 2) all software comprising the final pipeline must be open-source or open-use.  Proposed topics, as well as suggested tools and approaches, are distributed to participants at the beginning of each hackathon and refined during the event.  Software, scripts, and pipelines are developed and published on GitHub, a web service providing publicly available, free-usage tiers for collaborative software development. The code resulting from each hackathon is published at https://github.com/NCBI-Hackathons/ with separate directories or repositories for each team. PMID:27134733

  7. Closing gaps between open software and public data in a hackathon setting: User-centered software prototyping

    PubMed Central

    Busby, Ben; Lesko, Matthew; Federer, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    In genomics, bioinformatics and other areas of data science, gaps exist between extant public datasets and the open-source software tools built by the community to analyze similar data types.  The purpose of biological data science hackathons is to assemble groups of genomics or bioinformatics professionals and software developers to rapidly prototype software to address these gaps.  The only two rules for the NCBI-assisted hackathons run so far are that 1) data either must be housed in public data repositories or be deposited to such repositories shortly after the hackathon’s conclusion, and 2) all software comprising the final pipeline must be open-source or open-use.  Proposed topics, as well as suggested tools and approaches, are distributed to participants at the beginning of each hackathon and refined during the event.  Software, scripts, and pipelines are developed and published on GitHub, a web service providing publicly available, free-usage tiers for collaborative software development. The code resulting from each hackathon is published at https://github.com/NCBI-Hackathons/ with separate directories or repositories for each team. PMID:27134733

  8. Case study on selecting an environment for software development

    SciTech Connect

    Doak, J.

    1997-05-01

    To explore the various issues and options surrounding software development, the author has selected a specific Safeguards Systems Group (NIS-7) project to serve as a case study. The opinions expressed are solely those of the author and any reference to {open_quotes}we{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}our{close_quotes} refers to this single author. The goal of the selected project is to produce software that can accurately analyze data from sensors in tanks containing solutions of nuclear material (solution monitoring). This project focuses on data from Japanese reprocessing facilities. The software is to be used by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors back at headquarters in Vienna after obtaining data from a site. I feel that the ideas presented in this paper may be applicable to numerous software developers whose project requirements are similar to those for this project. Two considerations for developing software for use by others are discussed. (1) What software tools should be used during the development process? (2) What is the most effective way of distributing the software and documentation? The requirements for the software environment and distribution of software and documentation include the following: portability; cross-platform compatibility; graphical user interface and builder, creating modular/reusable software components; generic libraries; environment should facilitate development of solutions to large real-world problems; no special privileges are necessary to access the software and documentation; software should be visible to a large number of people; documentation should be in a format that everyone can read and should support equations and graphics; transmission of software and documentation should be hands-off.

  9. Open source software integrated into data services of Japanese planetary explorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Ishihara, Y.; Otake, H.; Imai, K.; Masuda, K.

    2015-12-01

    Scientific data obtained by Japanese scientific satellites and lunar and planetary explorations are archived in DARTS (Data ARchives and Transmission System). DARTS provides the data with a simple method such as HTTP directory listing for long-term preservation while DARTS tries to provide rich web applications for ease of access with modern web technologies based on open source software. This presentation showcases availability of open source software through our services. KADIAS is a web-based application to search, analyze, and obtain scientific data measured by SELENE(Kaguya), a Japanese lunar orbiter. KADIAS uses OpenLayers to display maps distributed from Web Map Service (WMS). As a WMS server, open source software MapServer is adopted. KAGUYA 3D GIS (KAGUYA 3D Moon NAVI) provides a virtual globe for the SELENE's data. The main purpose of this application is public outreach. NASA World Wind Java SDK is used to develop. C3 (Cross-Cutting Comparisons) is a tool to compare data from various observations and simulations. It uses Highcharts to draw graphs on web browsers. Flow is a tool to simulate a Field-Of-View of an instrument onboard a spacecraft. This tool itself is open source software developed by JAXA/ISAS, and the license is BSD 3-Caluse License. SPICE Toolkit is essential to compile FLOW. SPICE Toolkit is also open source software developed by NASA/JPL, and the website distributes many spacecrafts' data. Nowadays, open source software is an indispensable tool to integrate DARTS services.

  10. It's Time to Consider Open Source Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaffman, Jay

    2007-01-01

    In 1985 Richard Stallman, a computer programmer, released "The GNU Manifesto" in which he proclaimed a golden rule: One must share computer programs. Software vendors required him to agree to license agreements that forbade sharing programs with others, but he refused to "break solidarity" with other computer users whom he assumed also wanted to…

  11. Teaching Robotics Software with the Open Hardware Mobile Manipulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vona, M.; Shekar, N. H.

    2013-01-01

    The "open hardware mobile manipulator" (OHMM) is a new open platform with a unique combination of features for teaching robotics software and algorithms. On-board low- and high-level processors support real-time embedded programming and motor control, as well as higher-level coding with contemporary libraries. Full hardware designs and…

  12. Getting Open Source Software into Schools: Strategies and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hepburn, Gary; Buley, Jan

    2006-01-01

    In this article Gary Hepburn and Jan Buley outline different approaches to implementing open source software (OSS) in schools; they also address the challenges that open source advocates should anticipate as they try to convince educational leaders to adopt OSS. With regard to OSS implementation, they note that schools have a flexible range of…

  13. Modular Infrastructure for Rapid Flight Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pires, Craig

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of modular infrastructure to assist in the development of flight software. A feature of this program is the use of model based approach for application unique software. A review of two programs that this approach was use on are: the development of software for Hover Test Vehicle (HTV), and Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Experiment (LADEE).

  14. Learning Human Aspects of Collaborative Software Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadar, Irit; Sherman, Sofia; Hazzan, Orit

    2008-01-01

    Collaboration has become increasingly widespread in the software industry as systems have become larger and more complex, adding human complexity to the technological complexity already involved in developing software systems. To deal with this complexity, human-centric software development methods, such as Extreme Programming and other agile…

  15. Development of a comprehensive software engineering environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartrum, Thomas C.; Lamont, Gary B.

    1987-01-01

    The generation of a set of tools for software lifecycle is a recurring theme in the software engineering literature. The development of such tools and their integration into a software development environment is a difficult task because of the magnitude (number of variables) and the complexity (combinatorics) of the software lifecycle process. An initial development of a global approach was initiated in 1982 as the Software Development Workbench (SDW). Continuing efforts focus on tool development, tool integration, human interfacing, data dictionaries, and testing algorithms. Current efforts are emphasizing natural language interfaces, expert system software development associates and distributed environments with Ada as the target language. The current implementation of the SDW is on a VAX-11/780. Other software development tools are being networked through engineering workstations.

  16. Free and Open Source Software for land degradation vulnerability assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbrenda, Vito; Calamita, Giuseppe; Coluzzi, Rosa; D'Emilio, Mariagrazia; Lanfredi, Maria Teresa; Perrone, Angela; Ragosta, Maria; Simoniello, Tiziana

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays the role of FOSS software in scientific research is becoming increasingly important. Besides the important issues of reduced costs for licences, legality and security there are many other reasons that make FOSS software attractive. Firstly, making the code opened is a warranty of quality permitting to thousands of developers around the world to check the code and fix bugs rather than rely on vendors claims. FOSS communities are usually enthusiastic about helping other users for solving problems and expand or customize software (flexibility). Most important for this study, the interoperability allows to combine the user-friendly QGIS with the powerful GRASS-GIS and the richness of statistical methods of R in order to process remote sensing data and to perform geo-statistical analysis in one only environment. This study is focused on the land degradation (i.e. the reduction in the capacity of the land to provide ecosystem goods and services and assure its functions) and in particular on the estimation of the vulnerability levels in order to suggest appropriate policy actions to reduce/halt land degradation impacts, using the above mentioned software. The area investigated is the Basilicata Region (Southern Italy) where large natural areas are mixed with anthropized areas. To identify different levels of vulnerability we adopted the Environmentally Sensitive Areas (ESAs) model, based on the combination of indicators related to soil, climate, vegetation and anthropic stress. Such indicators were estimated by using the following data-sources: - Basilicata Region Geoportal to assess soil vulnerability; - DESERTNET2 project to evaluate potential vegetation vulnerability and climate vulnerability; - NDVI-MODIS satellite time series (2000-2010) with 250m resolution, available as 16-day composite from the NASA LP DAAC to characterize the dynamic component of vegetation; - Agricultural Census data 2010, Corine Land Cover 2006 and morphological information to assess

  17. Software requirements: Guidance and control software development specification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Withers, B. Edward; Rich, Don C.; Lowman, Douglas S.; Buckland, R. C.

    1990-01-01

    The software requirements for an implementation of Guidance and Control Software (GCS) are specified. The purpose of the GCS is to provide guidance and engine control to a planetary landing vehicle during its terminal descent onto a planetary surface and to communicate sensory information about that vehicle and its descent to some receiving device. The specification was developed using the structured analysis for real time system specification methodology by Hatley and Pirbhai and was based on a simulation program used to study the probability of success of the 1976 Viking Lander missions to Mars. Three versions of GCS are being generated for use in software error studies.

  18. Developing Software for Corpus Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Despite the central role of the computer in corpus research, programming is generally not seen as a core skill within corpus linguistics. As a consequence, limitations in software for text and corpus analysis slow down the progress of research while analysts often have to rely on third party software or even manual data analysis if no suitable…

  19. Implementation of an OAIS Repository Using Free, Open Source Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flathers, E.; Gessler, P. E.; Seamon, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Northwest Knowledge Network (NKN) is a regional data repository located at the University of Idaho that focuses on the collection, curation, and distribution of research data. To support our home institution and others in the region, we offer services to researchers at all stages of the data lifecycle—from grant application and data management planning to data distribution and archive. In this role, we recognize the need to work closely with other data management efforts at partner institutions and agencies, as well as with larger aggregation efforts such as our state geospatial data clearinghouses, data.gov, DataONE, and others. In the past, one of our challenges with monolithic, prepackaged data management solutions is that customization can be difficult to implement and maintain, especially as new versions of the software are released that are incompatible with our local codebase. Our solution is to break the monolith up into its constituent parts, which offers us several advantages. First, any customizations that we make are likely to fall into areas that can be accessed through Application Program Interfaces (API) that are likely to remain stable over time, so our code stays compatible. Second, as components become obsolete or insufficient to meet new demands that arise, we can replace the individual components with minimal effect on the rest of the infrastructure, causing less disruption to operations. Other advantages include increased system reliability, staggered rollout of new features, enhanced compatibility with legacy systems, reduced dependence on a single software company as a point of failure, and the separation of development into manageable tasks. In this presentation, we describe our application of the Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) design paradigm to assemble a data repository that conforms to the Open Archival Information System (OAIS) Reference Model primarily using a collection of free and open-source software. We detail the design

  20. OpenStereo: Open Source, Cross-Platform Software for Structural Geology Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grohmann, C. H.; Campanha, G. A.

    2010-12-01

    Free and open source software (FOSS) are increasingly seen as synonyms of innovation and progress. Freedom to run, copy, distribute, study, change and improve the software (through access to the source code) assure a high level of positive feedback between users and developers, which results in stable, secure and constantly updated systems. Several software packages for structural geology analysis are available to the user, with commercial licenses or that can be downloaded at no cost from the Internet. Some provide basic tools of stereographic projections such as plotting poles, great circles, density contouring, eigenvector analysis, data rotation etc, while others perform more specific tasks, such as paleostress or geotechnical/rock stability analysis. This variety also means a wide range of data formating for input, Graphical User Interface (GUI) design and graphic export format. The majority of packages is built for MS-Windows and even though there are packages for the UNIX-based MacOS, there aren't native packages for *nix (UNIX, Linux, BSD etc) Operating Systems (OS), forcing the users to run these programs with emulators or virtual machines. Those limitations lead us to develop OpenStereo, an open source, cross-platform software for stereographic projections and structural geology. The software is written in Python, a high-level, cross-platform programming language and the GUI is designed with wxPython, which provide a consistent look regardless the OS. Numeric operations (like matrix and linear algebra) are performed with the Numpy module and all graphic capabilities are provided by the Matplolib library, including on-screen plotting and graphic exporting to common desktop formats (emf, eps, ps, pdf, png, svg). Data input is done with simple ASCII text files, with values of dip direction and dip/plunge separated by spaces, tabs or commas. The user can open multiple file at the same time (or the same file more than once), and overlay different elements of

  1. Building Scientific Workflows for the Geosciences with Open Community Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, M. E.; Marru, S.; Weerawarana, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    We describe the design and development of the Apache Airavata scientific workflow software and its application to problems in geosciences. Airavata is based on Service Oriented Architecture principles and is developed as general purpose software for managing large-scale science applications on supercomputing resources such as the NSF's XSEDE. Based on the NSF-funded EarthCube Workflow Working Group activities, we discuss the application of this software relative to specific requirements (such as data stream data processing, event triggering, dealing with large data sets, and advanced distributed execution patterns involved in data mining). We also consider the role of governance in EarthCube software development and present the development of Airavata software through the Apache Software Foundation's community development model. We discuss the potential impacts on software accountability and sustainability using this model.

  2. Guidance and Control Software Project Data - Volume 2: Development Documents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J. (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    The Guidance and Control Software (GCS) project was the last in a series of software reliability studies conducted at Langley Research Center between 1977 and 1994. The technical results of the GCS project were recorded after the experiment was completed. Some of the support documentation produced as part of the experiment, however, is serving an unexpected role far beyond its original project context. Some of the software used as part of the GCS project was developed to conform to the RTCA/DO-178B software standard, "Software Considerations in Airborne Systems and Equipment Certification," used in the civil aviation industry. That standard requires extensive documentation throughout the software development life cycle, including plans, software requirements, design and source code, verification cases and results, and configuration management and quality control data. The project documentation that includes this information is open for public scrutiny without the legal or safety implications associated with comparable data from an avionics manufacturer. This public availability has afforded an opportunity to use the GCS project documents for DO-178B training. This report provides a brief overview of the GCS project, describes the 4-volume set of documents and the role they are playing in training, and includes the development documents from the GCS project. Volume 2 contains three appendices: A. Guidance and Control Software Development Specification; B. Design Description for the Pluto Implementation of the Guidance and Control Software; and C. Source Code for the Pluto Implementation of the Guidance and Control Software

  3. Wolf Testing: Open Source Testing Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braasch, P.; Gay, P. L.

    2004-12-01

    Wolf Testing is software for easily creating and editing exams. Wolf Testing allows the user to create an exam from a database of questions, view it on screen, and easily print it along with the corresponding answer guide. The questions can be multiple choice, short answer, long answer, or true and false varieties. This software can be accessed securely from any location, allowing the user to easily create exams from home. New questions, which can include associated pictures, can be added through a web-interface. After adding in questions, they can be edited, deleted, or duplicated into multiple versions. Long-term test creation is simplified, as you are able to quickly see what questions you have asked in the past and insert them, with or without editing, into future tests. All tests are archived in the database. Written in PHP and MySQL, this software can be installed on any UNIX / Linux platform, including Macintosh OS X. The secure interface keeps students out, and allows you to decide who can create tests and who can edit information already in the database. Tests can be output as either html with pictures or rich text without pictures, and there are plans to add PDF and MS Word formats as well. We would like to thank Dr. Wolfgang Rueckner and the Harvard University Science Center for providing incentive to start this project, computers and resources to complete this project, and inspiration for the project's name. We would also like to thank Dr. Ronald Newburgh for his assistance in beta testing.

  4. Effective Software Engineering Leadership for Development Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cagle West, Marsha

    2010-01-01

    Software is a critical component of systems ranging from simple consumer appliances to complex health, nuclear, and flight control systems. The development of quality, reliable, and effective software solutions requires the incorporation of effective software engineering processes and leadership. Processes, approaches, and methodologies for…

  5. Teaching Agile Software Development: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devedzic, V.; Milenkovic, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the authors' experience of teaching agile software development to students of computer science, software engineering, and other related disciplines, and comments on the implications of this and the lessons learned. It is based on the authors' eight years of experience in teaching agile software methodologies to various groups…

  6. Insights into software development in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, Lorraine M.

    1992-01-01

    The interdependence of the U.S.-Japanese economies makes it imperative that we in the United States understand how business and technology developments take place in Japan. We can gain insight into these developments in software engineering by studying the context in which Japanese software is developed, the practices that are used, the problems encountered, the setting surrounding these problems, and the resolution of these problems. Context includes the technological and sociological characteristics of the software development environment, the software processes applied, personnel involved in the development process, and the corporate and social culture surrounding the development. Presented in this paper is a summary of results of a study that addresses these issues. Data for this study was collected during a three month visit to Japan where the author interviewed 20 software managers representing nine companies involved in developing software in Japan. These data are compared to similar data from the United States in which 12 managers from five companies were interviewed.

  7. Continuous Software Integration and Quality Control during Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettl, M.; Neidhardt, A.; Brisken, W.; Dassing, R.

    2012-12-01

    Modern software has to be stable, portable, fast, and reliable. This requires a sophisticated infrastructure supporting and providing the developers with additional information about the state and the quality of the project. That is why we have created a centralized software repository, where the whole code-base is managed and version controlled on a centralized server. Based on this, a hierarchical build system has been developed where each project and their sub-projects can be compiled by simply calling the top level Makefile. On the top of this, a nightly build system has been created where the top level Makefiles of each project are called every night. The results of the build including the compiler warnings are reported to the developers using generated HTML pages. In addition, all the source code is automatically checked using a static code analysis tool, called "cppcheck". This tool produces warnings, similar to those of a compiler, but more pedantic. The reports of this analysis are translated to HTML and reported to the developers similar to the nightly builds. Armed with this information,the developers can discover issues in their projects at an early development stage. In combination it reduces the number of possible issues in our software to ensure quality of our projects at different development stages. These checks are also offered to the community. They are currently used within the DiFX software correlator project.

  8. OpenSim: open-source software to create and analyze dynamic simulations of movement.

    PubMed

    Delp, Scott L; Anderson, Frank C; Arnold, Allison S; Loan, Peter; Habib, Ayman; John, Chand T; Guendelman, Eran; Thelen, Darryl G

    2007-11-01

    Dynamic simulations of movement allow one to study neuromuscular coordination, analyze athletic performance, and estimate internal loading of the musculoskeletal system. Simulations can also be used to identify the sources of pathological movement and establish a scientific basis for treatment planning. We have developed a freely available, open-source software system (OpenSim) that lets users develop models of musculoskeletal structures and create dynamic simulations of a wide variety of movements. We are using this system to simulate the dynamics of individuals with pathological gait and to explore the biomechanical effects of treatments. OpenSim provides a platform on which the biomechanics community can build a library of simulations that can be exchanged, tested, analyzed, and improved through a multi-institutional collaboration. Developing software that enables a concerted effort from many investigators poses technical and sociological challenges. Meeting those challenges will accelerate the discovery of principles that govern movement control and improve treatments for individuals with movement pathologies. PMID:18018689

  9. An explicit-solvent conformation search method using open software

    PubMed Central

    Gaalswyk, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Computer modeling is a popular tool to identify the most-probable conformers of a molecule. Although the solvent can have a large effect on the stability of a conformation, many popular conformational search methods are only capable of describing molecules in the gas phase or with an implicit solvent model. We have developed a work-flow for performing a conformation search on explicitly-solvated molecules using open source software. This method uses replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) to sample the conformational states of the molecule efficiently. Cluster analysis is used to identify the most probable conformations from the simulated trajectory. This work-flow was tested on drug molecules α-amanitin and cabergoline to illustrate its capabilities and effectiveness. The preferred conformations of these molecules in gas phase, implicit solvent, and explicit solvent are significantly different. PMID:27280078

  10. An explicit-solvent conformation search method using open software.

    PubMed

    Gaalswyk, Kari; Rowley, Christopher N

    2016-01-01

    Computer modeling is a popular tool to identify the most-probable conformers of a molecule. Although the solvent can have a large effect on the stability of a conformation, many popular conformational search methods are only capable of describing molecules in the gas phase or with an implicit solvent model. We have developed a work-flow for performing a conformation search on explicitly-solvated molecules using open source software. This method uses replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) to sample the conformational states of the molecule efficiently. Cluster analysis is used to identify the most probable conformations from the simulated trajectory. This work-flow was tested on drug molecules α-amanitin and cabergoline to illustrate its capabilities and effectiveness. The preferred conformations of these molecules in gas phase, implicit solvent, and explicit solvent are significantly different. PMID:27280078

  11. Recommended approach to software development, revision 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Linda; Waligora, Sharon; Mcgarry, Frank; Pajerski, Rose; Stark, Mike; Johnson, Kevin Orlin; Cover, Donna

    1992-01-01

    Guidelines for an organized, disciplined approach to software development that is based on studies conducted by the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) since 1976 are presented. It describes methods and practices for each phase of a software development life cycle that starts with requirements definition and ends with acceptance testing. For each defined life cycle phase, guidelines for the development process and its management, and for the products produced and their reviews are presented.

  12. Manager's handbook for software development, revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Methods and aids for the management of software development projects are presented. The recommendations are based on analyses and experiences of the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) with flight dynamics software development. The management aspects of the following subjects are described: organizing the project, producing a development plan, estimating costs, scheduling, staffing, preparing deliverable documents, using management tools, monitoring the project, conducting reviews, auditing, testing, and certifying.

  13. Software development: A paradigm for the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, Victor R.

    1989-01-01

    A new paradigm for software development that treats software development as an experimental activity is presented. It provides built-in mechanisms for learning how to develop software better and reusing previous experience in the forms of knowledge, processes, and products. It uses models and measures to aid in the tasks of characterization, evaluation and motivation. An organization scheme is proposed for separating the project-specific focus from the organization's learning and reuse focuses of software development. The implications of this approach for corporations, research and education are discussed and some research activities currently underway at the University of Maryland that support this approach are presented.

  14. The distributed development environment for SDSS software

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, E.; Gurbani, V.; Mackinnon, B.; Newberg, H.; Nicinski, T.; Petravick, D.; Pordes, R.; Sergey, G.; Stoughton, C.; Lupton, R.

    1994-04-01

    The authors present an integrated science software development environment, code maintenance and support system for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) now being actively used throughout the collaboration.

  15. Open Source Next Generation Visualization Software for Interplanetary Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimble, Jay; Rinker, George

    2016-01-01

    Mission control is evolving quickly, driven by the requirements of new missions, and enabled by modern computing capabilities. Distributed operations, access to data anywhere, data visualization for spacecraft analysis that spans multiple data sources, flexible reconfiguration to support multiple missions, and operator use cases, are driving the need for new capabilities. NASA's Advanced Multi-Mission Operations System (AMMOS), Ames Research Center (ARC) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) are collaborating to build a new generation of mission operations software for visualization, to enable mission control anywhere, on the desktop, tablet and phone. The software is built on an open source platform that is open for contributions (http://nasa.github.io/openmct).

  16. Instrumentino: An Open-Source Software for Scientific Instruments.

    PubMed

    Koenka, Israel Joel; Sáiz, Jorge; Hauser, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    Scientists often need to build dedicated computer-controlled experimental systems. For this purpose, it is becoming common to employ open-source microcontroller platforms, such as the Arduino. These boards and associated integrated software development environments provide affordable yet powerful solutions for the implementation of hardware control of transducers and acquisition of signals from detectors and sensors. It is, however, a challenge to write programs that allow interactive use of such arrangements from a personal computer. This task is particularly complex if some of the included hardware components are connected directly to the computer and not via the microcontroller. A graphical user interface framework, Instrumentino, was therefore developed to allow the creation of control programs for complex systems with minimal programming effort. By writing a single code file, a powerful custom user interface is generated, which enables the automatic running of elaborate operation sequences and observation of acquired experimental data in real time. The framework, which is written in Python, allows extension by users, and is made available as an open source project. PMID:26668933

  17. Ancient Secrets of Open-Source Geoscience Software Management (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zender, C. S.

    2009-12-01

    Geoscience research often involves complex models and data analysis designed to test increasingly sophisticated theories. Re-use and improvement of existing models and tools can be more efficient than their re-invention, and this re-use can accelerate knowledge generation and discovery. Open Source Software (OSS) is designed and intended to be re-used, extended, and improved. Hence Earth and Space Science Models (ESSMs) intended for community use are commonly distributed with OSS or OSS-like licenses. Why is it that, despite their permissive licenses, only a relatively small fraction of ESSMs receive community adoption, improvement, and extension? One reason is that developing community geoscience software remains a difficult and perilous exercise for the practicing researcher. This presentation will intercompare the rationale and results of different software management approaches taken in my dozen years as a developer and maintainer of, and participant in, four distinct ESSMs with 10 to 10,000 users. The primary lesson learned is that geoscience research is similar to the wider OSS universe in that most participants are motivated by the desire for greater professional recognition and attribution best summarized as "mindshare". ESSM adoption often hinges on whether the tension between users and developers for mindshare manifests as cooperation or competition. ESSM project management, therefore, should promote (but not require) recognition of all contributors. More practical model management practices include mailing lists, highly visible documentation, consistent APIs, regression tests, and periodic releases to improve features and fix bugs and builds. However, most ESSMs originate as working incarnations of short-term (~three year) research projects and, as such, lack permanent institutional support. Adhering to best software practices to transition these ESSMs from personal to community models often requires sacrificing research time. Recently, funding agencies

  18. Large-scale GW software development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minjung; Mandal, Subhasish; Mikida, Eric; Jindal, Prateek; Bohm, Eric; Jain, Nikhil; Kale, Laxmikant; Martyna, Glenn; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab

    Electronic excitations are important in understanding and designing many functional materials. In terms of ab initio methods, the GW and Bethe-Saltpeter Equation (GW-BSE) beyond DFT methods have proved successful in describing excited states in many materials. However, the heavy computational loads and large memory requirements have hindered their routine applicability by the materials physics community. We summarize some of our collaborative efforts to develop a new software framework designed for GW calculations on massively parallel supercomputers. Our GW code is interfaced with the plane-wave pseudopotential ab initio molecular dynamics software ``OpenAtom'' which is based on the Charm++ parallel library. The computation of the electronic polarizability is one of the most expensive parts of any GW calculation. We describe our strategy that uses a real-space representation to avoid the large number of fast Fourier transforms (FFTs) common to most GW methods. We also describe an eigendecomposition of the plasmon modes from the resulting dielectric matrix that enhances efficiency. This work is supported by NSF through Grant ACI-1339804.

  19. Open source hardware and software platform for robotics and artificial intelligence applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, S. Ng; Tan, K. O.; Lai Clement, T. H.; Ng, S. K.; Mohammed, A. H. Ali; Mailah, Musa; Azhar Yussof, Wan; Hamedon, Zamzuri; Yussof, Zulkifli

    2016-02-01

    Recent developments in open source hardware and software platforms (Android, Arduino, Linux, OpenCV etc.) have enabled rapid development of previously expensive and sophisticated system within a lower budget and flatter learning curves for developers. Using these platform, we designed and developed a Java-based 3D robotic simulation system, with graph database, which is integrated in online and offline modes with an Android-Arduino based rubbish picking remote control car. The combination of the open source hardware and software system created a flexible and expandable platform for further developments in the future, both in the software and hardware areas, in particular in combination with graph database for artificial intelligence, as well as more sophisticated hardware, such as legged or humanoid robots.

  20. Building and operating a network of autonomous observatories with an open source software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubanek, Petr; Prouza, Michal; Jelinek, Martin; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.

    2011-03-01

    I will review our experiences in the development of the open source software for control of a network of autonomous observatories. The software package, called RTS2, uses its own TCP/IP communication stack, allowing different scheduling modes. It is running on over 10 observatories worldwide (on 4 continents). It is being develop for over a decade, from late 1999. I will comment on lessons learned both on hardware and software side during development, installation, commissioning and operation of the system, progress achieved during last years as well as plans for further system development.

  1. A toolbox for developing bioinformatics software

    PubMed Central

    Potrzebowski, Wojciech; Puton, Tomasz; Rother, Magdalena; Wywial, Ewa; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2012-01-01

    Creating useful software is a major activity of many scientists, including bioinformaticians. Nevertheless, software development in an academic setting is often unsystematic, which can lead to problems associated with maintenance and long-term availibility. Unfortunately, well-documented software development methodology is difficult to adopt, and technical measures that directly improve bioinformatic programming have not been described comprehensively. We have examined 22 software projects and have identified a set of practices for software development in an academic environment. We found them useful to plan a project, support the involvement of experts (e.g. experimentalists), and to promote higher quality and maintainability of the resulting programs. This article describes 12 techniques that facilitate a quick start into software engineering. We describe 3 of the 22 projects in detail and give many examples to illustrate the usage of particular techniques. We expect this toolbox to be useful for many bioinformatics programming projects and to the training of scientific programmers. PMID:21803787

  2. A toolbox for developing bioinformatics software.

    PubMed

    Rother, Kristian; Potrzebowski, Wojciech; Puton, Tomasz; Rother, Magdalena; Wywial, Ewa; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2012-03-01

    Creating useful software is a major activity of many scientists, including bioinformaticians. Nevertheless, software development in an academic setting is often unsystematic, which can lead to problems associated with maintenance and long-term availibility. Unfortunately, well-documented software development methodology is difficult to adopt, and technical measures that directly improve bioinformatic programming have not been described comprehensively. We have examined 22 software projects and have identified a set of practices for software development in an academic environment. We found them useful to plan a project, support the involvement of experts (e.g. experimentalists), and to promote higher quality and maintainability of the resulting programs. This article describes 12 techniques that facilitate a quick start into software engineering. We describe 3 of the 22 projects in detail and give many examples to illustrate the usage of particular techniques. We expect this toolbox to be useful for many bioinformatics programming projects and to the training of scientific programmers. PMID:21803787

  3. Developing the E-Scape Software System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derrick, Karim

    2012-01-01

    Most innovations have contextual pre-cursors that prompt new ways of thinking and in their turn help to give form to the new reality. This was the case with the e-scape software development process. The origins of the system existed in software components and ideas that we had developed through previous projects, but the ultimate direction we took…

  4. Software Development Management: Empirical and Analytical Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Keumseok

    2011-01-01

    Managing software development is a very complex activity because it must deal with people, organizations, technologies, and business processes. My dissertation consists of three studies that examine software development management from various perspectives. The first study empirically investigates the impacts of prior experience with similar…

  5. Color science demonstration kit from open source hardware and software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollers, Michael W.

    2014-09-01

    Color science is perhaps the most universally tangible discipline within the optical sciences for people of all ages. Excepting a small and relatively well-understood minority, we can see that the world around us consists of a multitude of colors; yet, describing the "what", "why", and "how" of these colors is not an easy task, especially without some sort of equally colorful visual aids. While static displays (e.g., poster boards, etc.) serve their purpose, there is a growing trend, aided by the recent permeation of small interactive devices into our society, for interactive and immersive learning. However, for the uninitiated, designing software and hardware for this purpose may not be within the purview of all optical scientists and engineers. Enter open source. Open source "anything" are those tools and designs -- hardware or software -- that are available and free to use, often without any restrictive licensing. Open source software may be familiar to some, but the open source hardware movement is relatively new. These are electronic circuit board designs that are provided for free and can be implemented in physical hardware by anyone. This movement has led to the availability of some relatively inexpensive, but quite capable, computing power for the creation of small devices. This paper will showcase the design and implementation of the software and hardware that was used to create an interactive demonstration kit for color. Its purpose is to introduce and demonstrate the concepts of color spectra, additive color, color rendering, and metamers.

  6. Digital Preservation in Open-Source Digital Library Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madalli, Devika P.; Barve, Sunita; Amin, Saiful

    2012-01-01

    Digital archives and digital library projects are being initiated all over the world for materials of different formats and domains. To organize, store, and retrieve digital content, many libraries as well as archiving centers are using either proprietary or open-source software. While it is accepted that print media can survive for centuries with…

  7. Open Source Software: Fully Featured vs. "The Devil You Know"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotrum, Michael; Ludwig, Brian; Baggaley, Jon

    2005-01-01

    The "ILIAS" learning management system (LMS) was evaluated, following its favourable rating in an independent evaluation study of open source software (OSS) products. The current review found "ILIAS" to have numerous features of value to distance education (DE) students and teachers, as well as problems for consideration in the system's ongoing…

  8. Open Source Projects in Software Engineering Education: A Mapping Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nascimento, Debora M. C.; Almeida Bittencourt, Roberto; Chavez, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Context: It is common practice in academia to have students work with "toy" projects in software engineering (SE) courses. One way to make such courses more realistic and reduce the gap between academic courses and industry needs is getting students involved in open source projects (OSP) with faculty supervision. Objective: This study…

  9. Open Source software in medical informatics--why, how and what.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Clement J; Schadow, Gunther; Barnes, Michael; Dexter, Paul; Overhage, J Marc; Mamlin, Burke; McCoy, J Michael

    2003-03-01

    'Open Source' is a 20-40 year old approach to licensing and distributing software that has recently burst into public view. Against conventional wisdom this approach has been wildly successful in the general software market--probably because the openness lets programmers the world over obtain, critique, use, and build upon the source code without licensing fees. Linux, a UNIX-like operating system, is the best known success. But computer scientists at the University of California, Berkeley began the tradition of software sharing in the mid 1970s with BSD UNIX and distributed the major internet network protocols as source code without a fee. Medical informatics has its own history of Open Source distribution: Massachusetts General's COSTAR and the Veterans Administration's VISTA software have been distributed as source code at no cost for decades. Bioinformatics, our sister field, has embraced the Open Source movement and developed rich libraries of open-source software. Open Source has now gained a tiny foothold in health care (OSCAR GEHR, OpenEMed). Medical informatics researchers and funding agencies should support and nurture this movement. In a world where open-source modules were integrated into operational health care systems, informatics researchers would have real world niches into which they could engraft and test their software inventions. This could produce a burst of innovation that would help solve the many problems of the health care system. We at the Regenstrief Institute are doing our part by moving all of our development to the open-source model. PMID:12810121

  10. Workflow-Based Software Development Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izygon, Michel E.

    2013-01-01

    The Software Developer's Assistant (SDA) helps software teams more efficiently and accurately conduct or execute software processes associated with NASA mission-critical software. SDA is a process enactment platform that guides software teams through project-specific standards, processes, and procedures. Software projects are decomposed into all of their required process steps or tasks, and each task is assigned to project personnel. SDA orchestrates the performance of work required to complete all process tasks in the correct sequence. The software then notifies team members when they may begin work on their assigned tasks and provides the tools, instructions, reference materials, and supportive artifacts that allow users to compliantly perform the work. A combination of technology components captures and enacts any software process use to support the software lifecycle. It creates an adaptive workflow environment that can be modified as needed. SDA achieves software process automation through a Business Process Management (BPM) approach to managing the software lifecycle for mission-critical projects. It contains five main parts: TieFlow (workflow engine), Business Rules (rules to alter process flow), Common Repository (storage for project artifacts, versions, history, schedules, etc.), SOA (interface to allow internal, GFE, or COTS tools integration), and the Web Portal Interface (collaborative web environment

  11. Firing Room Remote Application Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Kan

    2015-01-01

    The Engineering and Technology Directorate (NE) at National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is designing a new command and control system for the checkout and launch of Space Launch System (SLS) and future rockets. The purposes of the semester long internship as a remote application software developer include the design, development, integration, and verification of the software and hardware in the firing rooms, in particular with the Mobile Launcher (ML) Launch Accessories (LACC) subsystem. In addition, a software test verification procedure document was created to verify and checkout LACC software for Launch Equipment Test Facility (LETF) testing.

  12. Software systems development in petroleum engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, D. J.; Cain, G. M.; Carmichael, N. P.; Gouldstone, F. G.; Wadsley, A. W.; Webb, S. J.; Winder, P.

    1985-10-01

    Many approaches to designing software systems have been developed for use in commercial or business environments. These development methods and procedures have improved dramatically over the last ten years although it is only recently that these have been employed in scientific and technological applications. Many of these implementations have been unsuccessful because the design methodology has been divorced from the practical requirements of the industry in which the software system is to operate. This paper discusses a modern approach to software development which directly relates to an engineering environment and which is designed to satisfy practical criteria of acceptability of the software when delivered to the petroleum engineer. Since all field developments nowadays rely heavily on associated software systems, the approach presented here can lead to improved mechanical systems reliability and shorter development/design cycles.

  13. Software Productivity of Field Experiments Using the Mobile Agents Open Architecture with Workflow Interoperability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancey, William J.; Lowry, Michael R.; Nado, Robert Allen; Sierhuis, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed a series of ten systematically developed surface exploration systems that integrated a variety of hardware and software components. Design, development, and testing data suggest that incremental buildup of an exploration system for long-duration capabilities is facilitated by an open architecture with appropriate-level APIs, specifically designed to facilitate integration of new components. This improves software productivity by reducing changes required for reconfiguring an existing system.

  14. Automatic Image Registration Using Free and Open Source Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri Babu, D.; Raja Shekhar, S. S.; Chandrasekar, K.; Sesha Sai, M. V. R.; Diwakar, P. G.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2014-11-01

    Image registration is the most critical operation in remote sensing applications to enable location based referencing and analysis of earth features. This is the first step for any process involving identification, time series analysis or change detection using a large set of imagery over a region. Most of the reliable procedures involve time consuming and laborious manual methods of finding the corresponding matching features of the input image with respect to reference. Also the process, as it involves human interaction, does not converge with multiple operations at different times. Automated procedures rely on accurately determining the matching locations or points from both the images under comparison and the procedures are robust and consistent over time. Different algorithms are available to achieve this, based on pattern recognition, feature based detection, similarity techniques etc. In the present study and implementation, Correlation based methods have been used with a improvement over newly developed technique of identifying and pruning the false points of match. Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) have been used to develop the methodology to reach a wider audience, without any dependency on COTS (Commercially off the shelf) software. Standard deviation from foci of the ellipse of correlated points, is a statistical means of ensuring the best match of the points of interest based on both intensity values and location correspondence. The methodology is developed and standardised by enhancements to meet the registration requirements of remote sensing imagery. Results have shown a performance improvement, nearly matching the visual techniques and have been implemented in remote sensing operational projects. The main advantage of the proposed methodology is its viability in production mode environment. This paper also shows that the visualization capabilities of MapWinGIS, GDAL's image handling abilities and OSSIM's correlation facility can be efficiently

  15. Development of Updated ABsorption SIMulation Software (ABSIM)

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhiyao; Tang, Xin; Qu, Ming; Abdelaziz, Omar; Gluesenkamp, Kyle R

    2014-01-01

    ABsorption SIMulation, ABSIM, was developed for the simulation of absorption systems by The Oak Ridge National Laboratory during 1980s and 1990s. ABSIM provides a platform for users to investigate various cycle configurations and working fluids, to calculate their operating parameters, to predict their performance, and to compare them with each other on a uniform basis. ABSIM is indeed a very useful and accurate tool for researchers to investigate various absorption systems. However, it has not been well maintained: it is incompatible with recent operating systems; the interface needs improved user-friendliness, and the system needs better parameter setting and debugging tools to help achieve convergence. Therefore, it is highly needed to update and improve ABSIM. The paper presents recent efforts to improve ABSIM s compatibility with current operating systems, user interface, and analysis capabilities. The paper details the features and functions of the newly updated ABSIM software. The new ABSIM still uses the previously validated calculation engine of the old ABSIM. The new graphic user interfaces (GUI) were developed in Qt, which is an open source license GUI software based on C++. XML was used as the database for data storage in the new ABSIM. The new ABSIM has been designed to be easily learned and used. It has enhanced editing and construction functions, plus enhanced analysis features including parametric tables, plotting, property plots, and master panels for debugging. A single effect water/LiBr absorption system is used as a case study in this paper to illustrate the features, capabilities, and functions of the new ABSIM. This case study was actually an example system available in the old ABSIM. The new version of ABSIM will be continuously developed to include additional subroutines for the components in liquid desiccant systems. The new ABSIM will be available to public for free. The ultimate goal of the new ABSIM is to allow it to become a simulation

  16. Monitoring software development through dynamic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doerflinger, Carl W.; Basili, Victor R.

    1983-01-01

    Research conducted by the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) on the use of dynamic variables as a tool to monitor software development is described. Project independent measures which may be used in a management tool for monitoring software development are identified. Several FORTRAN projects with similar profiles are examined. The staff was experienced in developing these types of projects. The projects developed serve similar functions. Because these projects are similar some underlying relationships exist that are invariant between projects. These relationships, once well defined, may be used to compare the development of different projects to determine whether they are evolving the same way previous projects in this environment evolved.

  17. Monitoring software development through dynamic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doerflinger, C. W.; Basili, V. R.

    1985-01-01

    Research conducted by the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) on the use of dynamic variables as a tool to monitor software development is described. Project independent measures which may be used in a management tool for monitoring software development are identified. Several FORTRAN projects with similar profiles are examined. The staff was experienced in developing these types of projects. The projects developed serve similar functions. Because these projects are similar some underlying relationships exist that are invariant between the projects. These relationships, once well defined, may be used to compare the development of different projects to determine whether they are evolving the same way previous projects in this environment evolved.

  18. Monitoring software development through dynamic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doerflinger, C. W.; Basili, V. R.

    1983-01-01

    Research conducted by the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) on the use of dynamic variables as a tool to monitor software development is described. Project independent measures which may be used in a management tool for monitoring software development are identified. Several FORTRAN projects with similar profiles are examined. The staff was experienced in developing these types of projects. The projects developed serve similar functions. Because these projects are similar some underlying relationships exist that are invariant between the projects. These relationships, once well defined, may be used to compare the development of different projects to determine whether they are evolving the same way previous projects in this environment evolved.

  19. SOFTWARE TOOL DEVELOPMENT FOR MULTIMEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A long term goal of multimedia environmental management is to achieve sustainable ecological resources. Progress towards this goal rests on a foundation of science-based methods and data integrated into predictive multimedia, multi-stressor open architecture modeling systems. The...

  20. A view of software development environment issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm, B.

    1985-01-01

    The unique and challenging nature of the Space Station Program requires that software standards be effectively used to control costs, facilitate enhancements and ensure safety. The Software Standards Panel identified and developed recommendations in four areas to help the Space Station Program achieve these objectives. The areas in which recommendations are offered are policy, organization, process and candidate software standards for the Space Station Program. The concensus process employed by the panel is given and recommendations are made.

  1. Developing Confidence Limits For Reliability Of Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayhurst, Kelly J.

    1991-01-01

    Technique developed for estimating reliability of software by use of Moranda geometric de-eutrophication model. Pivotal method enables straightforward construction of exact bounds with associated degree of statistical confidence about reliability of software. Confidence limits thus derived provide precise means of assessing quality of software. Limits take into account number of bugs found while testing and effects of sampling variation associated with random order of discovering bugs.

  2. Space Shuttle Software Development and Certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, James K.; Henderson, Johnnie A

    2000-01-01

    Man-rated software, "software which is in control of systems and environments upon which human life is critically dependent," must be highly reliable. The Space Shuttle Primary Avionics Software System is an excellent example of such a software system. Lessons learn from more than 20 years of effort have identified basic elements that must be present to achieve this high degree of reliability. The elements include rigorous application of appropriate software development processes, use of trusted tools to support those processes, quantitative process management, and defect elimination and prevention. This presentation highlights methods used within the Space Shuttle project and raises questions that must be addressed to provide similar success in a cost effective manner on future long-term projects where key application development tools are COTS rather than internally developed custom application development tools

  3. Computer-aided software development process design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chi Y.; Levary, Reuven R.

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe an intelligent tool designed to aid managers of software development projects in planning, managing, and controlling the development process of medium- to large-scale software projects. Its purpose is to reduce uncertainties in the budget, personnel, and schedule planning of software development projects. It is based on dynamic model for the software development and maintenance life-cycle process. This dynamic process is composed of a number of time-varying, interacting developmental phases, each characterized by its intended functions and requirements. System dynamics is used as a modeling methodology. The resulting Software LIfe-Cycle Simulator (SLICS) and the hybrid expert simulation system of which it is a subsystem are described.

  4. Educational Software--New Guidelines for Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gold, Patricia Cohen

    1984-01-01

    Discusses standards developed by the Educational Computer Service of the National Education Association that incorporate technical, educational, and documentation components to guide authors in the development of quality educational software. (Author/MBR)

  5. GIS-Based Noise Simulation Open Source Software: N-GNOIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay, Ritesh; Sharma, A.; Kumar, M.; Shende, V.; Chakrabarti, T.; Gupta, Rajesh

    2015-12-01

    Geographical information system (GIS)-based noise simulation software (N-GNOIS) has been developed to simulate the noise scenario due to point and mobile sources considering the impact of geographical features and meteorological parameters. These have been addressed in the software through attenuation modules of atmosphere, vegetation and barrier. N-GNOIS is a user friendly, platform-independent and open geospatial consortia (OGC) compliant software. It has been developed using open source technology (QGIS) and open source language (Python). N-GNOIS has unique features like cumulative impact of point and mobile sources, building structure and honking due to traffic. Honking is the most common phenomenon in developing countries and is frequently observed on any type of roads. N-GNOIS also helps in designing physical barrier and vegetation cover to check the propagation of noise and acts as a decision making tool for planning and management of noise component in environmental impact assessment (EIA) studies.

  6. Free and Open Source Software for Geospatial in the field of planetary science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frigeri, A.

    2012-12-01

    Information technology applied to geospatial analyses has spread quickly in the last ten years. The availability of OpenData and data from collaborative mapping projects increased the interest on tools, procedures and methods to handle spatially-related information. Free Open Source Software projects devoted to geospatial data handling are gaining a good success as the use of interoperable formats and protocols allow the user to choose what pipeline of tools and libraries is needed to solve a particular task, adapting the software scene to his specific problem. In particular, the Free Open Source model of development mimics the scientific method very well, and researchers should be naturally encouraged to take part to the development process of these software projects, as this represent a very agile way to interact among several institutions. When it comes to planetary sciences, geospatial Free Open Source Software is gaining a key role in projects that commonly involve different subjects in an international scenario. Very popular software suites for processing scientific mission data (for example, ISIS) and for navigation/planning (SPICE) are being distributed along with the source code and the interaction between user and developer is often very strict, creating a continuum between these two figures. A very widely spread library for handling geospatial data (GDAL) has started to support planetary data from the Planetary Data System, and recent contributions enabled the support to other popular data formats used in planetary science, as the Vicar one. The use of Geographic Information System in planetary science is now diffused, and Free Open Source GIS, open GIS formats and network protocols allow to extend existing tools and methods developed to solve Earth based problems, also to the case of the study of solar system bodies. A day in the working life of a researcher using Free Open Source Software for geospatial will be presented, as well as benefits and

  7. Cloud based, Open Source Software Application for Mitigating Herbicide Drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraswat, D.; Scott, B.

    2014-12-01

    The spread of herbicide resistant weeds has resulted in the need for clearly marked fields. In response to this need, the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service launched a program named Flag the Technology in 2011. This program uses color-coded flags as a visual alert of the herbicide trait technology within a farm field. The flag based program also serves to help avoid herbicide misapplication and prevent herbicide drift damage between fields with differing crop technologies. This program has been endorsed by Southern Weed Science Society of America and is attracting interest from across the USA, Canada, and Australia. However, flags have risk of misplacement or disappearance due to mischief or severe windstorms/thunderstorms, respectively. This presentation will discuss the design and development of a cloud-based, free application utilizing open-source technologies, called Flag the Technology Cloud (FTTCloud), for allowing agricultural stakeholders to color code their farm fields for indicating herbicide resistant technologies. The developed software utilizes modern web development practices, widely used design technologies, and basic geographic information system (GIS) based interactive interfaces for representing, color-coding, searching, and visualizing fields. This program has also been made compatible for a wider usability on different size devices- smartphones, tablets, desktops and laptops.

  8. Towards Archetypes-Based Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piho, Gunnar; Roost, Mart; Perkins, David; Tepandi, Jaak

    We present a framework for the archetypes based engineering of domains, requirements and software (Archetypes-Based Software Development, ABD). An archetype is defined as a primordial object that occurs consistently and universally in business domains and in business software systems. An archetype pattern is a collaboration of archetypes. Archetypes and archetype patterns are used to capture conceptual information into domain specific models that are utilized by ABD. The focus of ABD is on software factories - family-based development artefacts (domain specific languages, patterns, frameworks, tools, micro processes, and others) that can be used to build the family members. We demonstrate the usage of ABD for developing laboratory information management system (LIMS) software for the Clinical and Biomedical Proteomics Group, at the Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Leeds.

  9. Critical Considerations for WORM Software Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Brian A.

    1987-01-01

    Addresses advantages and disadvantages of write-once read-many (WORM) optical disks and other software considerations resulting from the write-once nature of WORM media to provide guidelines for determining whether this technology is appropriate for an application. Three brief case studies describe WORM software development efforts. (MES)

  10. Issues in Software Development in Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Thomas T.

    Noting the increase in the number of teachers developing computer software for composition instruction, this paper explores the issues that are shaping the direction of computer assistance in writing instruction. The first half of the paper deals with specific questions teachers must consider as they design software. These are divided into…

  11. Interactive Programming Support for Secure Software Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xie, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Software vulnerabilities originating from insecure code are one of the leading causes of security problems people face today. Unfortunately, many software developers have not been adequately trained in writing secure programs that are resistant from attacks violating program confidentiality, integrity, and availability, a style of programming…

  12. Key characteristics for software for open architecture controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, Lawrence E.; Tran, Hy D.

    1997-01-01

    Software development time, cost, and ease of (re)use are now among the major issues in development of advanced machines, whether for machine tools, automation systems, or process systems. Two keys to reducing development time are powerful, user-friendly development tools and software architectures that provide clean, well-documented interfaces to the various real-time functions that such machines require. Examples of essential functions are signal conditioning, servo-control, trajectory generation, calibration/registration, coordination of a synchronous events, task sequencing, communication with external systems, and user interfaces. There are a number of existing standards that can help with software development, such as the IEEE POSIX standards for operating systems and real time services; software tools to compliment these standards are beginning to see use. This paper will detail some of the existing standards, some new tools, and development activities relevant to advanced, 'smart' machines.

  13. Perspex Machine X: software development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Sam; Thomas, Benjamin A.; Anderson, James A. D. W.

    2007-01-01

    The Perspex Machine arose from the unification of computation with geometry. We now report significant redevelopment of both a partial C compiler that generates perspex programs and of a Graphical User Interface (GUI). The compiler is constructed with standard compiler-generator tools and produces both an explicit parse tree for C and an Abstract Syntax Tree (AST) that is better suited to code generation. The GUI uses a hash table and a simpler software architecture to achieve an order of magnitude speed up in processing and, consequently, an order of magnitude increase in the number of perspexes that can be manipulated in real time (now 6,000). Two perspex-machine simulators are provided, one using trans-floating-point arithmetic and the other using transrational arithmetic. All of the software described here is available on the world wide web. The compiler generates code in the neural model of the perspex. At each branch point it uses a jumper to return control to the main fibre. This has the effect of pruning out an exponentially increasing number of branching fibres, thereby greatly increasing the efficiency of perspex programs as measured by the number of neurons required to implement an algorithm. The jumpers are placed at unit distance from the main fibre and form a geometrical structure analogous to a myelin sheath in a biological neuron. Both the perspex jumper-sheath and the biological myelin-sheath share the computational function of preventing cross-over of signals to neurons that lie close to an axon. This is an example of convergence driven by similar geometrical and computational constraints in perspex and biological neurons.

  14. OpenMebius: An Open Source Software for Isotopically Nonstationary 13C-Based Metabolic Flux Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Furusawa, Chikara

    2014-01-01

    The in vivo measurement of metabolic flux by 13C-based metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA) provides valuable information regarding cell physiology. Bioinformatics tools have been developed to estimate metabolic flux distributions from the results of tracer isotopic labeling experiments using a 13C-labeled carbon source. Metabolic flux is determined by nonlinear fitting of a metabolic model to the isotopic labeling enrichment of intracellular metabolites measured by mass spectrometry. Whereas 13C-MFA is conventionally performed under isotopically constant conditions, isotopically nonstationary 13C metabolic flux analysis (INST-13C-MFA) has recently been developed for flux analysis of cells with photosynthetic activity and cells at a quasi-steady metabolic state (e.g., primary cells or microorganisms under stationary phase). Here, the development of a novel open source software for INST-13C-MFA on the Windows platform is reported. OpenMebius (Open source software for Metabolic flux analysis) provides the function of autogenerating metabolic models for simulating isotopic labeling enrichment from a user-defined configuration worksheet. Analysis using simulated data demonstrated the applicability of OpenMebius for INST-13C-MFA. Confidence intervals determined by INST-13C-MFA were less than those determined by conventional methods, indicating the potential of INST-13C-MFA for precise metabolic flux analysis. OpenMebius is the open source software for the general application of INST-13C-MFA. PMID:25006579

  15. Open source software projects of the caBIG In Vivo Imaging Workspace Software special interest group.

    PubMed

    Prior, Fred W; Erickson, Bradley J; Tarbox, Lawrence

    2007-11-01

    The Cancer Bioinformatics Grid (caBIG) program was created by the National Cancer Institute to facilitate sharing of IT infrastructure, data, and applications among the National Cancer Institute-sponsored cancer research centers. The program was launched in February 2004 and now links more than 50 cancer centers. In April 2005, the In Vivo Imaging Workspace was added to promote the use of imaging in cancer clinical trials. At the inaugural meeting, four special interest groups (SIGs) were established. The Software SIG was charged with identifying projects that focus on open-source software for image visualization and analysis. To date, two projects have been defined by the Software SIG. The eXtensible Imaging Platform project has produced a rapid application development environment that researchers may use to create targeted workflows customized for specific research projects. The Algorithm Validation Tools project will provide a set of tools and data structures that will be used to capture measurement information and associated needed to allow a gold standard to be defined for the given database against which change analysis algorithms can be tested. Through these and future efforts, the caBIG In Vivo Imaging Workspace Software SIG endeavors to advance imaging informatics and provide new open-source software tools to advance cancer research. PMID:17846835

  16. Development of ShakeAlert Performance Evaluation Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maechling, P. J.; Liukis, M.; Jordan, T. H.; CISN EEW Team

    2011-12-01

    The CISN Testing Center (CTC) is designed to provide automated and interactive performance evaluations of ShakeAlert earthquake early warning system performance. The CTC software consists of two main parts: (1) software programs that input ShakeAlert EEW performance reports, match ShakeAlert forecasts to observational data, and generate a variety of EEW system performance summaries, and (2) an automated testing framework that can input ShakeAlert EEW performance reports, retrieve ANSS observational data, and produce performance summaries on a daily, or event, basis. The interactive capabilities of the CTC software may be useful for offline testing of ShakeAlert system. The automated capabilities of the CTC software are designed to support ongoing ShakeAlert performance evaluations. The CTC software implements a number of standard EEW performance summaries including magnitude forecast error and location forecast error with evaluation of ShakeAlert ground motion forecasts such as peak velocity under development. The CTC software is distributed as open-source scientific software to support transparency in evaluation processing and to support testing software re-use within ShakeAlert development groups.

  17. Development of Software Correlator for KJJVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeom, J. H.; Oh, S. J.; Roh, D. G.; Kang, Y. W.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, C. H.; Chung, H. S.

    2009-12-01

    Korea-Japan Joint VLBI Correlator (KJJVC) is being developed by collaborating KASI (Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute), Korea, and NAOJ(National Observatory of Japan), Japan. In early 2010, KJJVC will work in normal operation. In this study, we developed the software correlator which is based on VCS (VLBI Correlation Subsystem) hardware specification as the core component of KJJVC. The main specification of software correlator is 8 Gbps, 8192 output channels, and 262,144-points FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) function same as VCS. And the functional algorithm which is same as specification of VCS and arithmetic register are adopted in this software correlator. To verify the performance of developed software correlator, the correlation experiments were carried out using the spectral line and continuum sources which were observed by VERA (VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry), NAOJ. And the experimental results were compared to the output of Mitaka FX correlator by referring spectrum shape, phase rate, and fringe detection and so on. Through the experimental results, we confirmed that the correlation results of software correlator are the same as Mitaka FX correlator and verified the effectiveness of it. In future, we expect that the developed software correlator will be the possible software correlator of KVN (Korean VLBI Network) with KJJVC by introducing the correlation post-processing and modifying the user interface as like GUI (Graphic User Interface).

  18. Global review of open access risk assessment software packages valid for global or continental scale analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniell, James; Simpson, Alanna; Gunasekara, Rashmin; Baca, Abigail; Schaefer, Andreas; Ishizawa, Oscar; Murnane, Rick; Tijssen, Annegien; Deparday, Vivien; Forni, Marc; Himmelfarb, Anne; Leder, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Over the past few decades, a plethora of open access software packages for the calculation of earthquake, volcanic, tsunami, storm surge, wind and flood have been produced globally. As part of the World Bank GFDRR Review released at the Understanding Risk 2014 Conference, over 80 such open access risk assessment software packages were examined. Commercial software was not considered in the evaluation. A preliminary analysis was used to determine whether the 80 models were currently supported and if they were open access. This process was used to select a subset of 31 models that include 8 earthquake models, 4 cyclone models, 11 flood models, and 8 storm surge/tsunami models for more detailed analysis. By using multi-criteria analysis (MCDA) and simple descriptions of the software uses, the review allows users to select a few relevant software packages for their own testing and development. The detailed analysis evaluated the models on the basis of over 100 criteria and provides a synopsis of available open access natural hazard risk modelling tools. In addition, volcano software packages have since been added making the compendium of risk software tools in excess of 100. There has been a huge increase in the quality and availability of open access/source software over the past few years. For example, private entities such as Deltares now have an open source policy regarding some flood models (NGHS). In addition, leaders in developing risk models in the public sector, such as Geoscience Australia (EQRM, TCRM, TsuDAT, AnuGA) or CAPRA (ERN-Flood, Hurricane, CRISIS2007 etc.), are launching and/or helping many other initiatives. As we achieve greater interoperability between modelling tools, we will also achieve a future wherein different open source and open access modelling tools will be increasingly connected and adapted towards unified multi-risk model platforms and highly customised solutions. It was seen that many software tools could be improved by enabling user

  19. Developing Software that Supports State Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burney, James D.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses Alabama's attempt to provide computer aided instruction in remedial and initial instruction. Describes the program's funding, obstacles, and mileposts. Lists five phases for program development of competency software. Notes that 125 mathematics and five reading programs are available. (MVL)

  20. Conceptual Architecture of Building Energy Management Open Source Software (BEMOSS)

    SciTech Connect

    Khamphanchai, Warodom; Saha, Avijit; Rathinavel, Kruthika; Kuzlu, Murat; Pipattanasomporn, Manisa; Rahman, Saifur; Akyol, Bora A.; Haack, Jereme N.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a conceptual architecture of a Building Energy Management Open Source Software (BEMOSS) platform. The proposed BEMOSS platform is expected to improve sensing and control of equipment in small- and medium-sized buildings, reduce energy consumption and help implement demand response (DR). It aims to offer: scalability, robustness, plug and play, open protocol, interoperability, cost-effectiveness, as well as local and remote monitoring. In this paper, four essential layers of BEMOSS software architecture -- namely User Interface, Application and Data Management, Operating System and Framework, and Connectivity layers -- are presented. A laboratory test bed to demonstrate the functionality of BEMOSS located at the Advanced Research Institute of Virginia Tech is also briefly described.

  1. Concept Development for Software Health Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riecks, Jung; Storm, Walter; Hollingsworth, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the work performed by Lockheed Martin Aeronautics (LM Aero) under NASA contract NNL06AA08B, delivery order NNL07AB06T. The Concept Development for Software Health Management (CDSHM) program was a NASA funded effort sponsored by the Integrated Vehicle Health Management Project, one of the four pillars of the NASA Aviation Safety Program. The CD-SHM program focused on defining a structured approach to software health management (SHM) through the development of a comprehensive failure taxonomy that is used to characterize the fundamental failure modes of safety-critical software.

  2. Software Engineering Approaches to Ontology Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaševic, Dragan; Djuric, Dragan; Devedžic, Vladan

    Ontologies, as formal representations of domain knowledge, enable knowledge sharing between different knowledge-based applications. Diverse techniques originating from the field of artificial intelligence are aimed at facilitating ontology development. However, these techniques, although well known to AI experts, are typically unknown to a large population of software engineers. In order to overcome the gap between the knowledge of software engineering practitioners and AI techniques, a few proposals have been made suggesting the use of well-known software engineering techniques, such as UML, for ontology development (Cranefield 2001a).

  3. Science Gateways, Scientific Workflows and Open Community Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, M. E.; Marru, S.

    2014-12-01

    Science gateways and scientific workflows occupy different ends of the spectrum of user-focused cyberinfrastructure. Gateways, sometimes called science portals, provide a way for enabling large numbers of users to take advantage of advanced computing resources (supercomputers, advanced storage systems, science clouds) by providing Web and desktop interfaces and supporting services. Scientific workflows, at the other end of the spectrum, support advanced usage of cyberinfrastructure that enable "power users" to undertake computational experiments that are not easily done through the usual mechanisms (managing simulations across multiple sites, for example). Despite these different target communities, gateways and workflows share many similarities and can potentially be accommodated by the same software system. For example, pipelines to process InSAR imagery sets or to datamine GPS time series data are workflows. The results and the ability to make downstream products may be made available through a gateway, and power users may want to provide their own custom pipelines. In this abstract, we discuss our efforts to build an open source software system, Apache Airavata, that can accommodate both gateway and workflow use cases. Our approach is general, and we have applied the software to problems in a number of scientific domains. In this talk, we discuss our applications to usage scenarios specific to earth science, focusing on earthquake physics examples drawn from the QuakSim.org and GeoGateway.org efforts. We also examine the role of the Apache Software Foundation's open community model as a way to build up common commmunity codes that do not depend upon a single "owner" to sustain. Pushing beyond open source software, we also see the need to provide gateways and workflow systems as cloud services. These services centralize operations, provide well-defined programming interfaces, scale elastically, and have global-scale fault tolerance. We discuss our work providing

  4. Final Report. Center for Scalable Application Development Software

    SciTech Connect

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    2014-10-26

    The Center for Scalable Application Development Software (CScADS) was established as a part- nership between Rice University, Argonne National Laboratory, University of California Berkeley, University of Tennessee – Knoxville, and University of Wisconsin – Madison. CScADS pursued an integrated set of activities with the aim of increasing the productivity of DOE computational scientists by catalyzing the development of systems software, libraries, compilers, and tools for leadership computing platforms. Principal Center activities were workshops to engage the research community in the challenges of leadership computing, research and development of open-source software, and work with computational scientists to help them develop codes for leadership computing platforms. This final report summarizes CScADS activities at Rice University in these areas.

  5. Automated computer software development standards enforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Yule, H.P.; Formento, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    The Uniform Development Environment (UDE) is being investigated as a means of enforcing software engineering standards. For the programmer, it provides an environment containing the tools and utilities necessary for orderly and controlled development and maintenance of code according to requirements. In addition, it provides DoD management and developer management the tools needed for all phases of software life cycle management and control, from project planning and management, to code development, configuration management, version control, and change control. This paper reports the status of UDE development and field testing. 5 refs.

  6. OpenMS: a flexible open-source software platform for mass spectrometry data analysis.

    PubMed

    Röst, Hannes L; Sachsenberg, Timo; Aiche, Stephan; Bielow, Chris; Weisser, Hendrik; Aicheler, Fabian; Andreotti, Sandro; Ehrlich, Hans-Christian; Gutenbrunner, Petra; Kenar, Erhan; Liang, Xiao; Nahnsen, Sven; Nilse, Lars; Pfeuffer, Julianus; Rosenberger, George; Rurik, Marc; Schmitt, Uwe; Veit, Johannes; Walzer, Mathias; Wojnar, David; Wolski, Witold E; Schilling, Oliver; Choudhary, Jyoti S; Malmström, Lars; Aebersold, Ruedi; Reinert, Knut; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2016-08-30

    High-resolution mass spectrometry (MS) has become an important tool in the life sciences, contributing to the diagnosis and understanding of human diseases, elucidating biomolecular structural information and characterizing cellular signaling networks. However, the rapid growth in the volume and complexity of MS data makes transparent, accurate and reproducible analysis difficult. We present OpenMS 2.0 (http://www.openms.de), a robust, open-source, cross-platform software specifically designed for the flexible and reproducible analysis of high-throughput MS data. The extensible OpenMS software implements common mass spectrometric data processing tasks through a well-defined application programming interface in C++ and Python and through standardized open data formats. OpenMS additionally provides a set of 185 tools and ready-made workflows for common mass spectrometric data processing tasks, which enable users to perform complex quantitative mass spectrometric analyses with ease. PMID:27575624

  7. Measures and metrics for software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The evaluations of and recommendations for the use of software development measures based on the practical and analytical experience of the Software Engineering Laboratory are discussed. The basic concepts of measurement and system of classification for measures are described. The principal classes of measures defined are explicit, analytic, and subjective. Some of the major software measurement schemes appearing in the literature are derived. The applications of specific measures in a production environment are explained. These applications include prediction and planning, review and assessment, and evaluation and selection.

  8. Developing Generic Software for Spacecraft Avionics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    A proposed approach to the development of software for spacecraft avionics is based partly on a concept of generic software that could be tailored to satisfy requirements for specific missions. The proposed approach would stand in contrast to the conventional approach of first defining avionics requirements for a specific mission, then developing software specific to those requirements. The proposed approach might also be adaptable to programming computers that control and monitor other complex equipment systems that range in scale from automobiles to factories. The concept of a spacecraft avionics functional model (SAFM) is a major element of the proposed approach. An SAFM would be, essentially, a systematic and hierarchical description of the functionality required of the avionics software (and hardware) for a given mission. Although the initial input information used to start the construction of an SAFM would typically amount to a high-level description, the SAFM would thereafter be decomposed to a low level. The resulting low-level version of the model would be used to develop a set of generic requirements that could be expected to include a large fraction of all requirements for a large fraction of all missions. The generic requirements would be used to develop software modules that could be included in, or excluded from, the final flight software to satisfy the requirements of a specific mission.

  9. Image analysis library software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guseman, L. F., Jr.; Bryant, J.

    1977-01-01

    The Image Analysis Library consists of a collection of general purpose mathematical/statistical routines and special purpose data analysis/pattern recognition routines basic to the development of image analysis techniques for support of current and future Earth Resources Programs. Work was done to provide a collection of computer routines and associated documentation which form a part of the Image Analysis Library.

  10. The SCEC/UseIT Intern Program: Creating Open-Source Visualization Software Using Diverse Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francoeur, H.; Callaghan, S.; Perry, S.; Jordan, T.

    2004-12-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Center undergraduate IT intern program (SCEC UseIT) conducts IT research to benefit collaborative earth science research. Through this program, interns have developed real-time, interactive, 3D visualization software using open-source tools. Dubbed LA3D, a distribution of this software is now in use by the seismic community. LA3D enables the user to interactively view Southern California datasets and models of importance to earthquake scientists, such as faults, earthquakes, fault blocks, digital elevation models, and seismic hazard maps. LA3D is now being extended to support visualizations anywhere on the planet. The new software, called SCEC-VIDEO (Virtual Interactive Display of Earth Objects), makes use of a modular, plugin-based software architecture which supports easy development and integration of new data sets. Currently SCEC-VIDEO is in beta testing, with a full open-source release slated for the future. Both LA3D and SCEC-VIDEO were developed using a wide variety of software technologies. These, which included relational databases, web services, software management technologies, and 3-D graphics in Java, were necessary to integrate the heterogeneous array of data sources which comprise our software. Currently the interns are working to integrate new technologies and larger data sets to increase software functionality and value. In addition, both LA3D and SCEC-VIDEO allow the user to script and create movies. Thus program interns with computer science backgrounds have been writing software while interns with other interests, such as cinema, geology, and education, have been making movies that have proved of great use in scientific talks, media interviews, and education. Thus, SCEC UseIT incorporates a wide variety of scientific and human resources to create products of value to the scientific and outreach communities. The program plans to continue with its interdisciplinary approach, increasing the relevance of the

  11. Advanced Software Development Workstation Project, phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    ACCESS provides a generic capability to develop software information system applications which are explicitly intended to facilitate software reuse. In addition, it provides the capability to retrofit existing large applications with a user friendly front end for preparation of input streams in a way that will reduce required training time, improve the productivity even of experienced users, and increase accuracy. Current and past work shows that ACCESS will be scalable to much larger object bases.

  12. A software development environment utilizing PAMELA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flick, R. L.; Connelly, Richard W.

    1986-01-01

    Hardware capability and efficiency has increased dramatically since the invention of the computer, while software programmer productivity and efficiency has remained at a relatively low level. A user-friendly, adaptable, integrated software development environment is needed to alleviate this problem. The environment should be designed around the Ada language and a design methodology which takes advantage of the features of the Ada language as the Process Abstraction Method for Embedded Large Applications (PAMELA).

  13. The image-guided surgery toolkit IGSTK: an open source C++ software toolkit.

    PubMed

    Enquobahrie, Andinet; Cheng, Patrick; Gary, Kevin; Ibanez, Luis; Gobbi, David; Lindseth, Frank; Yaniv, Ziv; Aylward, Stephen; Jomier, Julien; Cleary, Kevin

    2007-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of the image-guided surgery toolkit (IGSTK). IGSTK is an open source C++ software library that provides the basic components needed to develop image-guided surgery applications. It is intended for fast prototyping and development of image-guided surgery applications. The toolkit was developed through a collaboration between academic and industry partners. Because IGSTK was designed for safety-critical applications, the development team has adopted lightweight software processes that emphasizes safety and robustness while, at the same time, supporting geographically separated developers. A software process that is philosophically similar to agile software methods was adopted emphasizing iterative, incremental, and test-driven development principles. The guiding principle in the architecture design of IGSTK is patient safety. The IGSTK team implemented a component-based architecture and used state machine software design methodologies to improve the reliability and safety of the components. Every IGSTK component has a well-defined set of features that are governed by state machines. The state machine ensures that the component is always in a valid state and that all state transitions are valid and meaningful. Realizing that the continued success and viability of an open source toolkit depends on a strong user community, the IGSTK team is following several key strategies to build an active user community. These include maintaining a users and developers' mailing list, providing documentation (application programming interface reference document and book), presenting demonstration applications, and delivering tutorial sessions at relevant scientific conferences. PMID:17703338

  14. Open source projects in software engineering education: a mapping study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimento, Debora M. C.; Almeida Bittencourt, Roberto; Chavez, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Context: It is common practice in academia to have students work with "toy" projects in software engineering (SE) courses. One way to make such courses more realistic and reduce the gap between academic courses and industry needs is getting students involved in open source projects (OSP) with faculty supervision. Objective: This study aims to summarize the literature on how OSP have been used to facilitate students' learning of SE. Method: A systematic mapping study was undertaken by identifying, filtering and classifying primary studies using a predefined strategy. Results: 72 papers were selected and classified. The main results were: (a) most studies focused on comprehensive SE courses, although some dealt with specific areas; (b) the most prevalent approach was the traditional project method; (c) studies' general goals were: learning SE concepts and principles by using OSP, learning open source software or both; (d) most studies tried out ideas in regular courses within the curriculum; (e) in general, students had to work with predefined projects; (f) there was a balance between approaches where instructors had either inside control or no control on the activities performed by students; (g) when learning was assessed, software artefacts, reports and presentations were the main instruments used by teachers, while surveys were widely used for students' self-assessment; (h) most studies were published in the last seven years. Conclusions: The resulting map gives an overview of the existing initiatives in this context and shows gaps where further research can be pursued.

  15. A framework for teaching software development methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinsky, Yael; Hazzan, Orit

    2005-12-01

    This article presents a study that aims at constructing a teaching framework for software development methods in higher education. The research field is a capstone project-based course, offered by the Technion's Department of Computer Science, in which Extreme Programming is introduced. The research paradigm is an Action Research that involves cycles of data collection, examination, evaluation, and application of results. The research uses several research tools for data gathering, as well as several research methods for data interpretation. The article describes in detail the research background, the research method, and the gradual emergence process of a framework for teaching software development methods. As part of the comprehensive teaching framework, a set of measures is developed to assess, monitor, and improve the teaching and the actual process of software development projects.

  16. Building a Snow Data Management System using Open Source Software (and IDL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodale, C. E.; Mattmann, C. A.; Ramirez, P.; Hart, A. F.; Painter, T.; Zimdars, P. A.; Bryant, A.; Brodzik, M.; Skiles, M.; Seidel, F. C.; Rittger, K. E.

    2012-12-01

    At NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory free and open source software is used everyday to support a wide range of projects, from planetary to climate to research and development. In this abstract I will discuss the key role that open source software has played in building a robust science data processing pipeline for snow hydrology research, and how the system is also able to leverage programs written in IDL, making JPL's Snow Data System a hybrid of open source and proprietary software. Main Points: - The Design of the Snow Data System (illustrate how the collection of sub-systems are combined to create a complete data processing pipeline) - Discuss the Challenges of moving from a single algorithm on a laptop, to running 100's of parallel algorithms on a cluster of servers (lesson's learned) - Code changes - Software license related challenges - Storage Requirements - System Evolution (from data archiving, to data processing, to data on a map, to near-real-time products and maps) - Road map for the next 6 months (including how easily we re-used the snowDS code base to support the Airborne Snow Observatory Mission) Software in Use and their Software Licenses: IDL - Used for pre and post processing of data. Licensed under a proprietary software license held by Excelis. Apache OODT - Used for data management and workflow processing. Licensed under the Apache License Version 2. GDAL - Geospatial Data processing library used for data re-projection currently. Licensed under the X/MIT license. GeoServer - WMS Server. Licensed under the General Public License Version 2.0 Leaflet.js - Javascript web mapping library. Licensed under the Berkeley Software Distribution License. Python - Glue code and miscellaneous data processing support. Licensed under the Python Software Foundation License. Perl - Script wrapper for running the SCAG algorithm. Licensed under the General Public License Version 3. PHP - Front-end web application programming. Licensed under the PHP License Version

  17. Distributed agile software development for the SKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicenec, Andreas; Parsons, Rebecca; Kitaeff, Slava; Vinsen, Kevin; Wu, Chen; Nelson, Paul; Reed, David

    2012-09-01

    The SKA software will most probably be developed by many groups distributed across the globe and coming from dierent backgrounds, like industries and research institutions. The SKA software subsystems will have to cover a very wide range of dierent areas, but still they have to react and work together like a single system to achieve the scientic goals and satisfy the challenging data ow requirements. Designing and developing such a system in a distributed fashion requires proper tools and the setup of an environment to allow for ecient detection and tracking of interface and integration issues in particular in a timely way. Agile development can provide much faster feedback mechanisms and also much tighter collaboration between the customer (scientist) and the developer. Continuous integration and continuous deployment on the other hand can provide much faster feedback of integration issues from the system level to the subsystem developers. This paper describes the results obtained from trialing a potential SKA development environment based on existing science software development processes like ALMA, the expected distribution of the groups potentially involved in the SKA development and experience gained in the development of large scale commercial software projects.

  18. The OPAL Project: Open source Procedure for Assessment of Loss using Global Earthquake Modelling software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniell, James

    2010-05-01

    This paper provides a comparison between Earthquake Loss Estimation (ELE) software packages and their application using an "Open Source Procedure for Assessment of Loss using Global Earthquake Modelling software" (OPAL). The OPAL procedure has been developed to provide a framework for optimisation of a Global Earthquake Modelling process through: 1) Overview of current and new components of earthquake loss assessment (vulnerability, hazard, exposure, specific cost and technology); 2) Preliminary research, acquisition and familiarisation with all available ELE software packages; 3) Assessment of these 30+ software packages in order to identify the advantages and disadvantages of the ELE methods used; and 4) Loss analysis for a deterministic earthquake (Mw7.2) for the Zeytinburnu district, Istanbul, Turkey, by applying 3 software packages (2 new and 1 existing): a modified displacement-based method based on DBELA (Displacement Based Earthquake Loss Assessment), a capacity spectrum based method HAZUS (HAZards United States) and the Norwegian HAZUS-based SELENA (SEismic Loss EstimatioN using a logic tree Approach) software which was adapted for use in order to compare the different processes needed for the production of damage, economic and social loss estimates. The modified DBELA procedure was found to be more computationally expensive, yet had less variability, indicating the need for multi-tier approaches to global earthquake loss estimation. Similar systems planning and ELE software produced through the OPAL procedure can be applied to worldwide applications, given exposure data. Keywords: OPAL, displacement-based, DBELA, earthquake loss estimation, earthquake loss assessment, open source, HAZUS

  19. Development Process for Science Operation Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballester, Pascal

    2015-12-01

    Scientific software development at ESO involves defined processes for the main phases of project inception, monitoring of development performed by instrument consortia, application maintenance, and application support. We discuss the lessons learnt and evolution of the process for the next generation of tools and observing facilities.

  20. Engineering software development with HyperCard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darko, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    The successful and unsuccessful techniques used in the development of software using HyperCard are described. The viability of the HyperCard for engineering is evaluated and the future use of HyperCard by this particular group of developers is discussed.

  1. Near-infrared face recognition utilizing open CV software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellami, Louiza; Ngo, Hau; Fowler, Chris J.; Kearney, Liam M.

    2014-06-01

    Commercially available hardware, freely available algorithms, and authors' developed software are synergized successfully to detect and recognize subjects in an environment without visible light. This project integrates three major components: an illumination device operating in near infrared (NIR) spectrum, a NIR capable camera and a software algorithm capable of performing image manipulation, facial detection and recognition. Focusing our efforts in the near infrared spectrum allows the low budget system to operate covertly while still allowing for accurate face recognition. In doing so a valuable function has been developed which presents potential benefits in future civilian and military security and surveillance operations.

  2. Global Software Development with Cloud Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yara, Pavan; Ramachandran, Ramaseshan; Balasubramanian, Gayathri; Muthuswamy, Karthik; Chandrasekar, Divya

    Offshore and outsourced distributed software development models and processes are facing challenges, previously unknown, with respect to computing capacity, bandwidth, storage, security, complexity, reliability, and business uncertainty. Clouds promise to address these challenges by adopting recent advances in virtualization, parallel and distributed systems, utility computing, and software services. In this paper, we envision a cloud-based platform that addresses some of these core problems. We outline a generic cloud architecture, its design and our first implementation results for three cloud forms - a compute cloud, a storage cloud and a cloud-based software service- in the context of global distributed software development (GSD). Our ”compute cloud” provides computational services such as continuous code integration and a compile server farm, ”storage cloud” offers storage (block or file-based) services with an on-line virtual storage service, whereas the on-line virtual labs represent a useful cloud service. We note some of the use cases for clouds in GSD, the lessons learned with our prototypes and identify challenges that must be conquered before realizing the full business benefits. We believe that in the future, software practitioners will focus more on these cloud computing platforms and see clouds as a means to supporting a ecosystem of clients, developers and other key stakeholders.

  3. Developing educational software for publisher vendors.

    PubMed

    Joseph, L S; Joseph, A F

    1985-09-01

    This article has provided the principles of CAI development, marketing strategies, information on getting started with CAI, and how to approach publisher vendors. Guidelines for software development proposals have been synthesized from major software publishers in nursing. There is a great demand for courseware that teaches critical thinking skills, problem solving, application, and analysis. Tutorials and simulations are much needed. Computer-assisted testing courseware will also be highly used by teachers at all levels in the future. Opportunity awaits the CAI author in the publishing arena! PMID:3903670

  4. Automated real-time software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Walker, Carrie K.; Turkovich, John J.

    1993-01-01

    A Computer-Aided Software Engineering (CASE) system has been developed at the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory (CSDL) under the direction of the NASA Langley Research Center. The CSDL CASE tool provides an automated method of generating source code and hard copy documentation from functional application engineering specifications. The goal is to significantly reduce the cost of developing and maintaining real-time scientific and engineering software while increasing system reliability. This paper describes CSDL CASE and discusses demonstrations that used the tool to automatically generate real-time application code.

  5. Firing Room Remote Application Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Kan

    2014-01-01

    The Engineering and Technology Directorate (NE) at National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is designing a new command and control system for the checkout and launch of Space Launch System (SLS) and future rockets. The purposes of the semester long internship as a remote application software developer include the design, development, integration, and verification of the software and hardware in the firing rooms, in particular with the Mobile Launcher (ML) Launch Accessories subsystem. In addition, a Conversion Fusion project was created to show specific approved checkout and launch engineering data for public-friendly display purposes.

  6. Training Initiative for Embedded Software Engineers through Collaborative Research Project and Open Educational Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Rieko; Yamamoto, Masaki; Unagami, Tomoaki; Mori, Takao; Hond, Shinya; Ichiba, Toshiyuki; Takase, Hideki; Takada, Hiroaki

    The authors developed two types of human resource development program consisting of a) one-year collaborative research project, and b) open education course, aimed to train embedded software engineers to high technical standards. In the collaborative research oriented approach, the authors train engineers through research project at Nagoya University. In the open education course, the authors reflect and adopt the latest outcome of the aforementioned research project to one or two days open education course to educate engineers. This allowed the authors to design and provide several courses aimed to train engineers with the latest contents that reflect the rapid technical advances in the embedded software industry. The courses were highly evaluated by the participants.

  7. Software development methodology for high consequence systems

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, L.S.; Bouchard, J.F.; Collins, E.W.; Eisenhour, M.; Neidigk, D.D.; Shortencarier, M.J.; Trellue, P.A.

    1997-10-01

    This document describes a Software Development Methodology for High Consequence Systems. A High Consequence System is a system whose failure could lead to serious injury, loss of life, destruction of valuable resources, unauthorized use, damaged reputation or loss of credibility or compromise of protected information. This methodology can be scaled for use in projects of any size and complexity and does not prescribe any specific software engineering technology. Tasks are described that ensure software is developed in a controlled environment. The effort needed to complete the tasks will vary according to the size, complexity, and risks of the project. The emphasis of this methodology is on obtaining the desired attributes for each individual High Consequence System.

  8. Open-source data analysis and visualization software platform: SAGUARO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae Wook; Lewis, Benjamin J.; Burge, James H.

    2011-09-01

    Optical engineering projects often require massive data processing with many steps in the course of design, simulation, fabrication, metrology, and evaluation. A MATLAB™-based data processing platform has been developed to provide a standard way to manipulate and visualize various types of data that are created from optical measurement equipment. The operation of this software platform via a graphical user interface is easy and powerful. Data processing is performed by running modules that use a proscribed format for sharing data. Complex operations are performed by stringing modules together using macros. While numerous modules have been developed to allow data processing without the need to write software, the greatest power of the platform is provided by its flexibility. A developer's toolkit is provided to allow development and customization of modules, and the program allows a real-time interface with the standard MATLAB environment. This software, developed by the Large Optics Fabrication and Testing group at the University of Arizona, is now publicly available.** We present the capabilities of the software and provide some demonstrations of its use for data analysis and visualization. Furthermore, we demonstrate the flexibility of the platform for solving new problems.

  9. The advanced software development workstation project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fridge, Ernest M., III; Pitman, Charles L.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Software Development Workstation (ASDW) task is researching and developing the technologies required to support Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) with the emphasis on those advanced methods, tools, and processes that will be of benefit to support all NASA programs. Immediate goals are to provide research and prototype tools that will increase productivity, in the near term, in projects such as the Software Support Environment (SSE), the Space Station Control Center (SSCC), and the Flight Analysis and Design System (FADS) which will be used to support the Space Shuttle and Space Station Freedom. Goals also include providing technology for development, evolution, maintenance, and operations. The technologies under research and development in the ASDW project are targeted to provide productivity enhancements during the software life cycle phase of enterprise and information system modeling, requirements generation and analysis, system design and coding, and system use and maintenance. On-line user's guides will assist users in operating the developed information system with knowledge base expert assistance.

  10. OOSTethys - Open Source Software for the Global Earth Observing Systems of Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridger, E.; Bermudez, L. E.; Maskey, M.; Rueda, C.; Babin, B. L.; Blair, R.

    2009-12-01

    An open source software project is much more than just picking the right license, hosting modular code and providing effective documentation. Success in advancing in an open collaborative way requires that the process match the expected code functionality to the developer's personal expertise and organizational needs as well as having an enthusiastic and responsive core lead group. We will present the lessons learned fromOOSTethys , which is a community of software developers and marine scientists who develop open source tools, in multiple languages, to integrate ocean observing systems into an Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS). OOSTethys' goal is to dramatically reduce the time it takes to install, adopt and update standards-compliant web services. OOSTethys has developed servers, clients and a registry. Open source PERL, PYTHON, JAVA and ASP tool kits and reference implementations are helping the marine community publish near real-time observation data in interoperable standard formats. In some cases publishing an OpenGeospatial Consortium (OGC), Sensor Observation Service (SOS) from NetCDF files or a database or even CSV text files could take only minutes depending on the skills of the developer. OOSTethys is also developing an OGC standard registry, Catalog Service for Web (CSW). This open source CSW registry was implemented to easily register and discover SOSs using ISO 19139 service metadata. A web interface layer over the CSW registry simplifies the registration process by harvesting metadata describing the observations and sensors from the “GetCapabilities” response of SOS. OPENIOOS is the web client, developed in PERL to visualize the sensors in the SOS services. While the number of OOSTethys software developers is small, currently about 10 around the world, the number of OOSTethys toolkit implementers is larger and growing and the ease of use has played a large role in spreading the use of interoperable standards compliant web services widely

  11. Developing Software For Monitoring And Diagnosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, S. J.; Caglayan, A. K.

    1993-01-01

    Expert-system software shell produces executable code. Report discusses beginning phase of research directed toward development of artificial intelligence for real-time monitoring of, and diagnosis of faults in, complicated systems of equipment. Motivated by need for onboard monitoring and diagnosis of electronic sensing and controlling systems of advanced aircraft. Also applicable to such equipment systems as refineries, factories, and powerplants.

  12. Software Tools for Empowering Instructional Developers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayeski, Diane M.

    1991-01-01

    Software systems are being created to assist both novice and expert instructional technologists in response to perceived need of organizations to increase their training. Underlying philosophies and goals of instructional developer automation tools and their potential effects upon the organizations who adopt them must be examined so they will help…

  13. A Framework for Teaching Software Development Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubinsky, Yael; Hazzan, Orit

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a study that aims at constructing a teaching framework for software development methods in higher education. The research field is a capstone project-based course, offered by the Technion's Department of Computer Science, in which Extreme Programming is introduced. The research paradigm is an Action Research that involves…

  14. Selecting Software for a Development Information Database.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geethananda, Hemamalee

    1991-01-01

    Describes software selection criteria considered for use with the bibliographic database of the Development Information Network for South Asia (DEVINSA), which is located in Sri Lanka. Highlights include ease of database creation, database size, input, editing, data validation, inverted files, searching, storing searches, vocabulary control, user…

  15. Development and Testing of "Math Insight" Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zucker, Andrew A.

    2006-01-01

    Computers running appropriate software hold great promise for teaching and learning mathematics. To this end, SRI International developed an integrated, computer-based problem solving environment called "Math Insight" that included interactive tools, such as a spreadsheet and dynamic geometric sketches, and professionally produced videos used to…

  16. An Open Source Software Tool for Hydrologic Climate Change Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Dong Kwan; Shin, Mun-Ju; Kim, Young-Oh

    2015-04-01

    With the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) publishing Climate Change Assessment Reports containing updated forecasts and scenarios regularly, it is necessary to also periodically perform hydrologic assessments studies on these scenarios. The practical users including scientists and government people need to use handy tools that operate from climate input data of historical observations and climate change scenarios to rainfall-runoff simulation and assessment periodically. We propose HydroCAT (Hydrologic Climate change Assessment Tool), which is a flexible software tool designed to simplify and streamline hydrologic climate change assessment studies with the incorporation of: taking climate input values from general circulation models using the latest climate change scenarios; simulation of downscaled values using statistical downscaling methods; calibration and simulation of well-know multiple lumped conceptual hydrologic models; assessment of results using statistical methods. This package is designed in an open source, R-based, software package that includes an operating framework to support wide data frameworks, variety of hydrologic models, and climate change scenarios. The use of the software is demonstrated in a case study of the Geum River basin in Republic of Korea.

  17. Development of the PCAL Reconstruction Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Craig; Wood, Michael; CLAS Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The 12-GeV upgrade at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility requires that the CLAS in Hall B be upgraded for the new kinematics at the higher beam energies. The new CLAS12 detector will include a component called the Pre-shower Calorimeter or PCAL. The PCAL will enhance the capabilities of the existing calorimeters and allow for greater acceptance over a wider range of momenta of particles like the neutral pion. The responsibility of the group at Canisius College is the PCAL reconstruction software. This poster will describe the software development and how it utilizes the Service-Oriented Architecture of CLAS12.

  18. Development of a flight software testing methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccluskey, E. J.; Andrews, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    The research to develop a testing methodology for flight software is described. An experiment was conducted in using assertions to dynamically test digital flight control software. The experiment showed that 87% of typical errors introduced into the program would be detected by assertions. Detailed analysis of the test data showed that the number of assertions needed to detect those errors could be reduced to a minimal set. The analysis also revealed that the most effective assertions tested program parameters that provided greater indirect (collateral) testing of other parameters. In addition, a prototype watchdog task system was built to evaluate the effectiveness of executing assertions in parallel by using the multitasking features of Ada.

  19. Towards an Open, Distributed Software Architecture for UxS Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Charles D.; Motter, Mark A.; Neilan, James H.; Qualls, Garry D.; Rothhaar, Paul M.; Tran, Loc; Trujillo, Anna C.; Allen, B. Danette

    2015-01-01

    To address the growing need to evaluate, test, and certify an ever expanding ecosystem of UxS platforms in preparation of cultural integration, NASA Langley Research Center's Autonomy Incubator (AI) has taken on the challenge of developing a software framework in which UxS platforms developed by third parties can be integrated into a single system which provides evaluation and testing, mission planning and operation, and out-of-the-box autonomy and data fusion capabilities. This software framework, named AEON (Autonomous Entity Operations Network), has two main goals. The first goal is the development of a cross-platform, extensible, onboard software system that provides autonomy at the mission execution and course-planning level, a highly configurable data fusion framework sensitive to the platform's available sensor hardware, and plug-and-play compatibility with a wide array of computer systems, sensors, software, and controls hardware. The second goal is the development of a ground control system that acts as a test-bed for integration of the proposed heterogeneous fleet, and allows for complex mission planning, tracking, and debugging capabilities. The ground control system should also be highly extensible and allow plug-and-play interoperability with third party software systems. In order to achieve these goals, this paper proposes an open, distributed software architecture which utilizes at its core the Data Distribution Service (DDS) standards, established by the Object Management Group (OMG), for inter-process communication and data flow. The design decisions proposed herein leverage the advantages of existing robotics software architectures and the DDS standards to develop software that is scalable, high-performance, fault tolerant, modular, and readily interoperable with external platforms and software.

  20. Rapid Development of Interferometric Software Using MIRIAD and Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Peter K. G.; Law, Casey J.; Bower, Geoffrey C.

    2012-06-01

    State-of-the-art radio interferometers are complex systems that unleash torrents of data. If current and planned instruments are to routinely meet their performance goals, standard analysis techniques must be significantly improved, becoming simultaneously more sophisticated, more automatic, and more scalable. While there is no shortage of ideas for next-generation algorithms, there is a shortage of development resources, so it is vital that programming environments for interferometric software allow for rapid, flexible development. We present an open-source software package, miriad-python, that provides access to the MIRIAD interferometric reduction system in the Python programming language. The modular design of MIRIAD and the high productivity and accessibility of Python provide an excellent foundation for rapid development of interferometric software. Several other projects with similar goals exist, and we describe them and compare miriad-python with them in detail. Along with an overview of the package design, we present sample code and applications, including the detection of millisecond astrophysical transients, determination and application of nonstandard calibration parameters, interactive data visualization, and a reduction pipeline using a directed acyclic graph dependency model analogous to that of the traditional UNIX tool make. The key aspects of the miriad-python software project are documented. We find that miriad-python provides an extremely effective environment for prototyping new interferometric software, though certain existing packages provide far more infrastructure for some applications. While equivalent software written in compiled languages can be much faster than Python, there are many situations in which execution time is profitably exchanged for speed of development, code readability, accessibility to nonexpert programmers, quick interlinking with foreign software packages, and other virtues of the Python language.

  1. Developing collaborative environments - A Holistic software development methodology

    SciTech Connect

    PETERSEN,MARJORIE B.; MITCHINER,JOHN L.

    2000-03-08

    Sandia National Laboratories has been developing technologies to support person-to-person collaboration and the efforts of teams in the business and research communities. The technologies developed include knowledge-based design advisors, knowledge management systems, and streamlined manufacturing supply chains. These collaborative environments in which people can work together sharing information and knowledge have required a new approach to software development. The approach includes an emphasis on the requisite change in business practice that often inhibits user acceptance of collaborative technology. Leveraging the experience from this work, they have established a multidisciplinary approach for developing collaborative software environments. They call this approach ``A Holistic Software Development Methodology''.

  2. Lean Development with the Morpheus Simulation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brogley, Aaron C.

    2013-01-01

    The Morpheus project is an autonomous robotic testbed currently in development at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) with support from other centers. Its primary objectives are to test new 'green' fuel propulsion systems and to demonstrate the capability of the Autonomous Lander Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) sensor, provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) on a lunar landing trajectory. If successful, these technologies and lessons learned from the Morpheus testing cycle may be incorporated into a landing descent vehicle used on the moon, an asteroid, or Mars. In an effort to reduce development costs and cycle time, the project employs lean development engineering practices in its development of flight and simulation software. The Morpheus simulation makes use of existing software packages where possible to reduce the development time. The development and testing of flight software occurs primarily through the frequent test operation of the vehicle and incrementally increasing the scope of the test. With rapid development cycles, risk of loss of the vehicle and loss of the mission are possible, but efficient progress in development would not be possible without that risk.

  3. Toward a methodology for studying the application of open source innovation practices in non-software domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanev, Stoyan

    2007-05-01

    This article represents an initial step in the development of a research methodology that will be applied later to study open source innovation practices in company projects where the released technology or asset is other than software code. A brief review of four possible analytical approaches is presented based on the research literature on open innovation, horizontal user innovation networks, business ecosystems and value creation and appropriation. The OpenAccess project of the Silicon Integration Initiative (Si2) is considered as a potential case study of non-software open source project.

  4. 76 FR 75875 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Open Source Software Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... Software Public Meeting AGENCY: Defense Acquisition Regulations System, Department of Defense (DoD). ACTION... regarding the use of open source software in DoD contracts. DATES: Public Meeting: January 12, 2012, from 10... for the discussions in the meeting. Please cite ``Public Meeting, DFARS--Open Source Software'' in...

  5. Software development tools: A bibliography, appendix C.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddle, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    A bibliography containing approximately 200 citations on tools which help software developers perform some development task (such as text manipulation, testing, etc.), and which would not necessarily be found as part of a computing facility is given. The bibliography comes from a relatively random sampling of the literature and is not complete. But it is indicative of the nature and range of tools currently being prepared or currently available.

  6. Development of a software security assessment instrument to reduce software security risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilliam, D. P.; Kelly, J. C.; Powell, J. D.; Bishop, M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses development of a security assessment instrument for the software development and maintenance life cycle. The assessment instrument is a collection of tools and procedures to support development of secure software.

  7. The Image-Guided Surgery ToolKit IGSTK: an open source C++ software toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Peng; Ibanez, Luis; Gobbi, David; Gary, Kevin; Aylward, Stephen; Jomier, Julien; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Zhang, Hui; Kim, Hee-su; Blake, M. Brian; Cleary, Kevin

    2007-03-01

    The Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK) is an open source C++ software library that provides the basic components needed to develop image-guided surgery applications. The focus of the toolkit is on robustness using a state machine architecture. This paper presents an overview of the project based on a recent book which can be downloaded from igstk.org. The paper includes an introduction to open source projects, a discussion of our software development process and the best practices that were developed, and an overview of requirements. The paper also presents the architecture framework and main components. This presentation is followed by a discussion of the state machine model that was incorporated and the associated rationale. The paper concludes with an example application.

  8. Ethics and Morality in Software Development: A Developer's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Computers and other digital devices have become ubiquitous in our lives. Almost all aspects of our lives are in part or wholly impacted by computers and the software that runs on them. Unknowingly, we are placing our livelihoods and even our lives in the hands unknown software developers. Ethical and moral decisions made during software…

  9. Current Practice in Software Development for Computational Neuroscience and How to Improve It

    PubMed Central

    Gewaltig, Marc-Oliver; Cannon, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Almost all research work in computational neuroscience involves software. As researchers try to understand ever more complex systems, there is a continual need for software with new capabilities. Because of the wide range of questions being investigated, new software is often developed rapidly by individuals or small groups. In these cases, it can be hard to demonstrate that the software gives the right results. Software developers are often open about the code they produce and willing to share it, but there is little appreciation among potential users of the great diversity of software development practices and end results, and how this affects the suitability of software tools for use in research projects. To help clarify these issues, we have reviewed a range of software tools and asked how the culture and practice of software development affects their validity and trustworthiness. We identified four key questions that can be used to categorize software projects and correlate them with the type of product that results. The first question addresses what is being produced. The other three concern why, how, and by whom the work is done. The answers to these questions show strong correlations with the nature of the software being produced, and its suitability for particular purposes. Based on our findings, we suggest ways in which current software development practice in computational neuroscience can be improved and propose checklists to help developers, reviewers, and scientists to assess the quality of software and whether particular pieces of software are ready for use in research. PMID:24465191

  10. Custom software development for use in a clinical laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Sinard, John H.; Gershkovich, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In-house software development for use in a clinical laboratory is a controversial issue. Many of the objections raised are based on outdated software development practices, an exaggeration of the risks involved, and an underestimation of the benefits that can be realized. Buy versus build analyses typically do not consider total costs of ownership, and unfortunately decisions are often made by people who are not directly affected by the workflow obstacles or benefits that result from those decisions. We have been developing custom software for clinical use for over a decade, and this article presents our perspective on this practice. A complete analysis of the decision to develop or purchase must ultimately examine how the end result will mesh with the departmental workflow, and custom-developed solutions typically can have the greater positive impact on efficiency and productivity, substantially altering the decision balance sheet. Involving the end-users in preparation of the functional specifications is crucial to the success of the process. A large development team is not needed, and even a single programmer can develop significant solutions. Many of the risks associated with custom development can be mitigated by a well-structured development process, use of open-source tools, and embracing an agile development philosophy. In-house solutions have the significant advantage of being adaptable to changing departmental needs, contributing to efficient and higher quality patient care. PMID:23372985

  11. The SCEC Broadband Platform: Open-Source Software for Strong Ground Motion Simulation and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulet, C.; Silva, F.; Maechling, P. J.; Callaghan, S.; Jordan, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) Broadband Platform (BBP) is a carefully integrated collection of open-source scientific software programs that can simulate broadband (0-100Hz) ground motions for earthquakes at regional scales. The BBP scientific software modules implement kinematic rupture generation, low and high-frequency seismogram synthesis using wave propagation through 1D layered velocity structures, seismogram ground motion amplitude calculations, and goodness of fit measurements. These modules are integrated into a software system that provides user-defined, repeatable, calculation of ground motion seismograms, using multiple alternative ground motion simulation methods, and software utilities that can generate plots, charts, and maps. The BBP has been developed over the last five years in a collaborative scientific, engineering, and software development project involving geoscientists, earthquake engineers, graduate students, and SCEC scientific software developers. The BBP can run earthquake rupture and wave propagation modeling software to simulate ground motions for well-observed historical earthquakes and to quantify how well the simulated broadband seismograms match the observed seismograms. The BBP can also run simulations for hypothetical earthquakes. In this case, users input an earthquake location and magnitude description, a list of station locations, and a 1D velocity model for the region of interest, and the BBP software then calculates ground motions for the specified stations. The SCEC BBP software released in 2015 can be compiled and run on recent Linux systems with GNU compilers. It includes 5 simulation methods, 7 simulation regions covering California, Japan, and Eastern North America, the ability to compare simulation results against GMPEs, updated ground motion simulation methods, and a simplified command line user interface.

  12. Apache Open Climate Workbench: Building Open Source Climate Science Tools and Community at the Apache Software Foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, M.; Ramirez, P.; Boustani, M.; Mattmann, C. A.; Khudikyan, S.; McGibbney, L. J.; Whitehall, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    Apache Open Climate Workbench (OCW; https://climate.apache.org/) is a Top-Level Project at the Apache Software Foundation that aims to provide a suite of tools for performing climate science evaluations using model outputs from a multitude of different sources (ESGF, CORDEX, U.S. NCA, NARCCAP) with remote sensing data from NASA, NOAA, and other agencies. Apache OCW is the second NASA project to become a Top-Level Project at the Apache Software Foundation. It grew out of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Regional Climate Model Evaluation System (RCMES) project, a collaboration between JPL and the University of California, Los Angeles' Joint Institute for Regional Earth System Science and Engineering (JIFRESSE). Apache OCW provides scientists and developers with tools for data manipulation, metrics for dataset comparisons, and a visualization suite. In addition to a powerful low-level API, Apache OCW also supports a web application for quick, browser-controlled evaluations, a command line application for local evaluations, and a virtual machine for isolated experimentation with minimal setup. This talk will look at the difficulties and successes of moving a closed community research project out into the wild world of open source. We'll explore the growing pains Apache OCW went through to become a Top-Level Project at the Apache Software Foundation as well as the benefits gained by opening up development to the broader climate and computer science communities.

  13. Documenting the decision structure in software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wild, J. Christian; Maly, Kurt; Shen, Stewart N.

    1990-01-01

    Current software development paradigms focus on the products of the development process. Much of the decision making process which produces these products is outside the scope of these paradigms. The Decision-Based Software Development (DBSD) paradigm views the design process as a series of interrelated decisions which involve the identification and articulation of problems, alternates, solutions and justifications. Decisions made by programmers and analysts are recorded in a project data base. Unresolved problems are also recorded and resources for their resolution are allocated by management according to the overall development strategy. This decision structure is linked to the products affected by the relevant decision and provides a process oriented view of the resulted system. Software maintenance uses this decision view of the system to understand the rationale behind the decisions affecting the part of the system to be modified. D-HyperCase, a prototype Decision-Based Hypermedia System is described and results of applying the DBSD approach during its development are presented.

  14. Improving Data Catalogs with Free and Open Source Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, R.; Hankin, S.; O'Brien, K.

    2013-12-01

    The Global Earth Observation Integrated Data Environment (GEO-IDE) is NOAA's effort to successfully integrate data and information with partners in the national US-Global Earth Observation System (US-GEO) and the international Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). As part of the GEO-IDE, the Unified Access Framework (UAF) is working to build momentum towards the goal of increased data integration and interoperability. The UAF project is moving towards this goal with an approach that includes leveraging well known and widely used standards, as well as free and open source software. The UAF project shares the widely held conviction that the use of data standards is a key ingredient necessary to achieve interoperability. Many community-based consensus standards fail, though, due to poor compliance. Compliance problems emerge for many reasons: because the standards evolve through versions, because documentation is ambiguous or because individual data providers find the standard inadequate as-is to meet their special needs. In addition, minimalist use of standards will lead to a compliant service, but one which is of low quality. In this presentation, we will be discussing the UAF effort to build a catalog cleaning tool which is designed to crawl THREDDS catalogs, analyze the data available, and then build a 'clean' catalog of data which is standards compliant and has a uniform set of data access services available. These data services include, among others, OPeNDAP, Web Coverage Service (WCS) and Web Mapping Service (WMS). We will also discuss how we are utilizing free and open source software and services to both crawl, analyze and build the clean data catalog, as well as our efforts to help data providers improve their data catalogs. We'll discuss the use of open source software such as DataNucleus, Thematic Realtime Environmental Distributed Data Services (THREDDS), ncISO and the netCDF Java Common Data Model (CDM). We'll also demonstrate how we are

  15. OpenWIS Software for the WIS and INSPIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roumilhac, Jacques

    2013-04-01

    The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has been working for several years towards upgrading its global infrastructure to support all of its international programmes of work, both operational and research-based, to collect, share and disseminate information. The new infrastructure is called the WIS, the WMO Information System, and identifies three top level functions. These are: • GISC: Global Information System Centre; • DCPC: Data Collection and Production Centre; • NC: National Centre. All three functions contribute to the circulation of priority data, system wide security, monitoring and implementation of WMO data policies. GISCs and DCPCs allow the Discovery Access and Retrieval of data, products and services offered by WIS Centres, but GISCs offer a global view of this information and provide distributed and resilient access to critical data and products. Météo-France, the UK Met Office, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, the Korean Meteorological Administration, and Meteo France International have implemented the OpenWIS software, coupled with their existing systems, to perform the three functions required by the WMO Information System (GISC, DCPC and NC). In particular, the GISC functionality will be shared between the two partners (Meteo France and MetOffice) and will appear as a single GISC to other WMO GISCs. OpenWIS is deployed in an operational environment using the existing private RMDCN Wide Area Network and also support access from the Internet. The functional components of OpenWIS are: • Data Service and its cache of essential data • Metadata Service and its ISO19115 metadata catalogue (synchronisation with other catalogues compliant with OAI-PMH protocol) • Security Service • Monitoring and Control • Portal • External and internal Interfaces Météo France operates disparate dissemination tools. OpenWIS provide a generic interface that Météo France has adapted, covering requests for dissemination and their monitoring

  16. The Geoinformatica free and open source software stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolma, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Geoinformatica free and open source software (FOSS) stack is based mainly on three established FOSS components, namely GDAL, GTK+, and Perl. GDAL provides access to a very large selection of geospatial data formats and data sources, a generic geospatial data model, and a large collection of geospatial analytical and processing functionality. GTK+ and the Cairo graphics library provide generic graphics and graphical user interface capabilities. Perl is a programming language, for which there is a very large set of FOSS modules for a wide range of purposes and which can be used as an integrative tool for building applications. In the Geoinformatica stack, data storages such as FOSS RDBMS PostgreSQL with its geospatial extension PostGIS can be used below the three above mentioned components. The top layer of Geoinformatica consists of a C library and several Perl modules. The C library comprises a general purpose raster algebra library, hydrological terrain analysis functions, and visualization code. The Perl modules define a generic visualized geospatial data layer and subclasses for raster and vector data and graphs. The hydrological terrain functions are already rather old and they suffer for example from the requirement of in-memory rasters. Newer research conducted using the platform include basic geospatial simulation modeling, visualization of ecological data, linking with a Bayesian network engine for spatial risk assessment in coastal areas, and developing standards-based distributed water resources information systems in Internet. The Geoinformatica stack constitutes a platform for geospatial research, which is targeted towards custom analytical tools, prototyping and linking with external libraries. Writing custom analytical tools is supported by the Perl language and the large collection of tools that are available especially in GDAL and Perl modules. Prototyping is supported by the GTK+ library, the GUI tools, and the support for object

  17. New softwares for automated microsatellite marker development.

    PubMed

    Martins, Wellington; de Sousa, Daniel; Proite, Karina; Guimarães, Patrícia; Moretzsohn, Marcio; Bertioli, David

    2006-01-01

    Microsatellites are repeated small sequence motifs that are highly polymorphic and abundant in the genomes of eukaryotes. Often they are the molecular markers of choice. To aid the development of microsatellite markers we have developed a module that integrates a program for the detection of microsatellites (TROLL), with the sequence assembly and analysis software, the Staden Package. The module has easily adjustable parameters for microsatellite lengths and base pair quality control. Starting with large datasets of unassembled sequence data in the form of chromatograms and/or text data, it enables the creation of a compact database consisting of the processed and assembled microsatellite containing sequences. For the final phase of primer design, we developed a program that accepts the multi-sequence 'experiment file' format as input and produces a list of primer pairs for amplification of microsatellite markers. The program can take into account the quality values of consensus bases, improving success rate of primer pairs in PCR. The software is freely available and simple to install in both Windows and Unix-based operating systems. Here we demonstrate the software by developing primer pairs for 427 new candidate markers for peanut. PMID:16493138

  18. Evaluation and selection of open-source EMR software packages based on integrated AHP and TOPSIS.

    PubMed

    Zaidan, A A; Zaidan, B B; Al-Haiqi, Ahmed; Kiah, M L M; Hussain, Muzammil; Abdulnabi, Mohamed

    2015-02-01

    Evaluating and selecting software packages that meet the requirements of an organization are difficult aspects of software engineering process. Selecting the wrong open-source EMR software package can be costly and may adversely affect business processes and functioning of the organization. This study aims to evaluate and select open-source EMR software packages based on multi-criteria decision-making. A hands-on study was performed and a set of open-source EMR software packages were implemented locally on separate virtual machines to examine the systems more closely. Several measures as evaluation basis were specified, and the systems were selected based a set of metric outcomes using Integrated Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and TOPSIS. The experimental results showed that GNUmed and OpenEMR software can provide better basis on ranking score records than other open-source EMR software packages. PMID:25483886

  19. Software Quality Perceptions of Stakeholders Involved in the Software Development Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padmanabhan, Priya

    2013-01-01

    Software quality is one of the primary determinants of project management success. Stakeholders involved in software development widely agree that quality is important (Barney and Wohlin 2009). However, they may differ on what constitutes software quality, and which of its attributes are more important than others. Although, software quality…

  20. General object-oriented software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidewitz, Edwin V.; Stark, Mike

    1986-01-01

    Object-oriented design techniques are gaining increasing popularity for use with the Ada programming language. A general approach to object-oriented design which synthesizes the principles of previous object-oriented methods into the overall software life-cycle, providing transitions from specification to design and from design to code. It therefore provides the basis for a general object-oriented development methodology.

  1. A generic open-source software framework supporting scenario simulations in bioterrorist crises.

    PubMed

    Falenski, Alexander; Filter, Matthias; Thöns, Christian; Weiser, Armin A; Wigger, Jan-Frederik; Davis, Matthew; Douglas, Judith V; Edlund, Stefan; Hu, Kun; Kaufman, James H; Appel, Bernd; Käsbohrer, Annemarie

    2013-09-01

    Since the 2001 anthrax attack in the United States, awareness of threats originating from bioterrorism has grown. This led internationally to increased research efforts to improve knowledge of and approaches to protecting human and animal populations against the threat from such attacks. A collaborative effort in this context is the extension of the open-source Spatiotemporal Epidemiological Modeler (STEM) simulation and modeling software for agro- or bioterrorist crisis scenarios. STEM, originally designed to enable community-driven public health disease models and simulations, was extended with new features that enable integration of proprietary data as well as visualization of agent spread along supply and production chains. STEM now provides a fully developed open-source software infrastructure supporting critical modeling tasks such as ad hoc model generation, parameter estimation, simulation of scenario evolution, estimation of effects of mitigation or management measures, and documentation. This open-source software resource can be used free of charge. Additionally, STEM provides critical features like built-in worldwide data on administrative boundaries, transportation networks, or environmental conditions (eg, rainfall, temperature, elevation, vegetation). Users can easily combine their own confidential data with built-in public data to create customized models of desired resolution. STEM also supports collaborative and joint efforts in crisis situations by extended import and export functionalities. In this article we demonstrate specifically those new software features implemented to accomplish STEM application in agro- or bioterrorist crisis scenarios. PMID:23971799

  2. Development of software for airborne photos analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudowicz-Nawrocka, J.; Tomczak, R. J.; Nowakowski, K.; Mueller, W.; Kujawa, S.

    2014-04-01

    Systems type UAV / UAS enable acquisition of huge amounts of data, such as images. For their storage and analysis IT systems are necessary. Existing systems do not always allow you to perform such operations as researchers wish to [1]. The purpose of the research is to automate the process of recognizing objects and phenomena occurring on grasslands. The basis for action are numerous collections of images taken from the oktokopter [2]. For the purpose of the collection, management and analysis of image data and character acquired in the course of research, in accordance with the principles of software engineering several computer programs has been produced. The resulting software is different functionality and type. Applications were made using a number of popular technologies. The choice of so many technology was primarily dictated by the possibilities of their use for specific tasks and availability on different platforms and the ability to distribute open source. Applications presented by the authors, designed to assess the status of grassland based on aerial photography, show the complexity of the issues but at the same time tend to further research.

  3. APPLICATION OF SOFTWARE QUALITY ASSURANCE CONCEPTS AND PROCEDURES TO ENVIORNMENTAL RESEARCH INVOLVING SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    As EPA’s environmental research expands into new areas that involve the development of software, quality assurance concepts and procedures that were originally developed for environmental data collection may not be appropriate. Fortunately, software quality assurance is a ...

  4. Entrepreneurial model based technology creative industries sector software through the use of free open source software for Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, B.; Hasbullah; Purnama, W.; Hery, A.

    2016-04-01

    Creative industry development areas of software by using Free Open Source Software (FOSS) is expected to be one of the solutions to foster new entrepreneurs of the students who can open job opportunities and contribute to economic development in Indonesia. This study aims to create entrepreneurial coaching model based on the creative industries by utilizing FOSS software field as well as provide understanding and fostering entrepreneurial creative industries based field software for students of Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia. This activity phase begins with identifying entrepreneurs or business software technology that will be developed, training and mentoring, apprenticeship process at industrial partners, creation of business plans and monitoring and evaluation. This activity involves 30 UPI student which has the motivation to self-employment and have competence in the field of information technology. The results and outcomes expected from these activities is the birth of a number of new entrepreneurs from the students engaged in the software industry both software in the world of commerce (e-commerce) and education/learning (e-learning/LMS) and games.

  5. Control of research oriented software development

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, L.C.; Dronkers, J.J.; Pitsker, B.

    1985-12-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 directs the Department of Energy (DOE) to dispose permanently high level radioactive waste and civilian spent nuclear fuel by January 31, 1998. DOE has responded by creating an organizational structure that directs all the activities necessary to carry out the legislative demands. LLNL is conducting research in the earth sciences and is developing some unique computer codes to help establish the feasibility of geologic repositories for nuclear waste. LLNL has several codes under development. This paper examines the administrative and organizational measures that were and still are being undertaken in order to control the development of the two major codes. In the case of one code, the software quality assurance requirements were imposed five years after the code began its development. This required a retroactive application of requirements. The other code is still in the conceptual stages of development and here requirements can be applied as soon as the initial code design begins. Both codes are being developed by scientists, not computer programmers, and both are modeling codes, not data acquisition and reduction codes. Also the projects for which these codes are being developed have slightly different software quality assurance requirements. All these factors contribute unique difficulties in attempts to assure that the development not only results in a reliable prediction, but that whatever the reliability, it can be objectively shown to exist. The paper will examine a software management model. It will also discuss the reasons why it is felt that this particular model would stand a reasonable chance for success. The paper will then describe the way in which the model should be integrated into the existing management configuration and tradition.

  6. OpenChrom: a cross-platform open source software for the mass spectrometric analysis of chromatographic data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Today, data evaluation has become a bottleneck in chromatographic science. Analytical instruments equipped with automated samplers yield large amounts of measurement data, which needs to be verified and analyzed. Since nearly every GC/MS instrument vendor offers its own data format and software tools, the consequences are problems with data exchange and a lack of comparability between the analytical results. To challenge this situation a number of either commercial or non-profit software applications have been developed. These applications provide functionalities to import and analyze several data formats but have shortcomings in terms of the transparency of the implemented analytical algorithms and/or are restricted to a specific computer platform. Results This work describes a native approach to handle chromatographic data files. The approach can be extended in its functionality such as facilities to detect baselines, to detect, integrate and identify peaks and to compare mass spectra, as well as the ability to internationalize the application. Additionally, filters can be applied on the chromatographic data to enhance its quality, for example to remove background and noise. Extended operations like do, undo and redo are supported. Conclusions OpenChrom is a software application to edit and analyze mass spectrometric chromatographic data. It is extensible in many different ways, depending on the demands of the users or the analytical procedures and algorithms. It offers a customizable graphical user interface. The software is independent of the operating system, due to the fact that the Rich Client Platform is written in Java. OpenChrom is released under the Eclipse Public License 1.0 (EPL). There are no license constraints regarding extensions. They can be published using open source as well as proprietary licenses. OpenChrom is available free of charge at http://www.openchrom.net. PMID:20673335

  7. XSEOS: An Open Software for Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castier, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    An Excel add-in--XSEOS--that implements several excess Gibbs free energy models and equations of state has been developed for educational use. Several traditional and modern thermodynamic models are available in the package with a user-friendly interface. XSEOS has open code, is freely available, and should be useful for instructors and students…

  8. An Open Source Software Platform for Visualizing and Teaching Conservation Tasks in Architectural Heritage Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    San Jose, I. Ignacio; Martinez, J.; Alvarez, N.; Fernandez, J. J.; Delgado, F.; Martinez, R.; Puche, J. C.; Finat, J.

    2013-07-01

    In this work we present a new software platform for interactive volumetric visualization of complex architectural objects and their applications to teaching and training conservation interventions in Architectural Cultural Heritage. Photogrammetric surveying is performed by processing the information arising from image- and range-based devices. Our visualization application is based on an adaptation of WebGL open standard; the performed adaptation allows to import open standards and an interactive navigation of 3D models in ordinary web navigators with a good performance. The Visualization platform is scalable and can be applied to urban environments, provided open source files be used; CityGML is an open standard based on a geometry -driven Ontology which is compatible with this approach. We illustrate our results with examples concerning to very damaged churches and a urban district of Segovia (World Cultural Heritage). Their connection with appropriate database eases the building evolution and interventions tracking. We have incorporated some preliminary examples to illustrate Advanced Visualization Tools and architectural e-Learning software platform which have been created for assessing conservation and restoration tasks in very damaged buildings. First version of the Advanced Visualization application has been developed in the framework of ADISPA Spanish Project Results. Our results are illustrated with the application of these software applications to several very damaged cultural heritage buildings in rural zones of Castilla y Leon (Spain).

  9. Buy don`t build: What does that mean for a software developer?

    SciTech Connect

    Little, T.; Rahi, M.A.; Sinclair, C.

    1994-12-31

    The buzz-phrase of the 90s in the petroleum industry has become {open_quotes}Buy, don`t Build.{close_quotes} For an end user in an oil company, this generally means acquiring application software rather than developing it internally. For a software developer, either within an oil company or with a software vendor, the concept of {open_quotes}buy don`t build{close_quotes} can apply to software toolkit components and can expedite the development of an application as well as reduce future support requirements. This paper presents several software tools and the process by which they were evaluated for use in a commercial petroleum engineering application (DeskTop VIP). It highlights the tendency in the software development process to underestimate the complexity of the development process as well as to underestimate the value of the services provided by a software tool. Ultimately, the decision of {open_quotes}buy don`t build{close_quotes} should be an economic decision. As a slogan, it reminds us that whenever one considers building or developing new software, one should also consider the possibility that buying off-the-shelf software could cost less in the long run and bring a product to completion quicker.

  10. Computer-Aided Software Engineering - An approach to real-time software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Carrie K.; Turkovich, John J.

    1989-01-01

    A new software engineering discipline is Computer-Aided Software Engineering (CASE), a technology aimed at automating the software development process. This paper explores the development of CASE technology, particularly in the area of real-time/scientific/engineering software, and a history of CASE is given. The proposed software development environment for the Advanced Launch System (ALS CASE) is described as an example of an advanced software development system for real-time/scientific/engineering (RT/SE) software. The Automated Programming Subsystem of ALS CASE automatically generates executable code and corresponding documentation from a suitably formatted specification of the software requirements. Software requirements are interactively specified in the form of engineering block diagrams. Several demonstrations of the Automated Programming Subsystem are discussed.

  11. Open Source Seismic Software in NOAA's Next Generation Tsunami Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellman, S. B.; Baker, B. I.; Hagerty, M. T.; Leifer, J. M.; Lisowski, S.; Thies, D. A.; Donnelly, B. K.; Griffith, F. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Tsunami Information technology Modernization (TIM) is a project spearheaded by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to update the United States' Tsunami Warning System software currently employed at the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (Eva Beach, Hawaii) and the National Tsunami Warning Center (Palmer, Alaska). This entirely open source software project will integrate various seismic processing utilities with the National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office's core software, AWIPS2. For the real-time and near real-time seismic processing aspect of this project, NOAA has elected to integrate the open source portions of GFZ's SeisComP 3 (SC3) processing system into AWIPS2. To provide for better tsunami threat assessments we are developing open source tools for magnitude estimations (e.g., moment magnitude, energy magnitude, surface wave magnitude), detection of slow earthquakes with the Theta discriminant, moment tensor inversions (e.g. W-phase and teleseismic body waves), finite fault inversions, and array processing. With our reliance on common data formats such as QuakeML and seismic community standard messaging systems, all new facilities introduced into AWIPS2 and SC3 will be available as stand-alone tools or could be easily integrated into other real time seismic monitoring systems such as Earthworm, Antelope, etc. Additionally, we have developed a template based design paradigm so that the developer or scientist can efficiently create upgrades, replacements, and/or new metrics to the seismic data processing with only a cursory knowledge of the underlying SC3.

  12. Software Development Plan for DESCARTES and CIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, P.W.

    1992-12-08

    This Software Development Plan (SDP) outlines all software activities required to obtain functional environmental accumulation and individual dose codes for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) project. The modeling activities addressed use the output of the air transport-code HATCHET to compute radionuclide concentrations in environmental pathways, and continue on through calculations of dose for individuals. The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project has a deliverable in the June 1993 time frame to be able to start computing doses to individuals from nuclear-related activities on the Hanford Site during and following World War II. The CIDER code will compute doses and their uncertainties for individuals living in the contaminated environment computed by DESCARTES. The projected size of the code is 3000 lines.

  13. Global Software Development Patterns for Project Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Välimäki, Antti; Kääriäinen, Jukka; Koskimies, Kai

    Global software development with the agile or waterfall development process has been taken into use in many companies. GSD offers benefits but also new challenges without known, documented solutions. The goal of this research is to present current best practices for GSD in the form of process patterns for project management, evaluated by using a scenario-based assessment method. The best practices have been collected from a large company operating in process automation. It is expected that the resulting pattern language helps other companies to improve their GSD processes by incorporating the patterns in the processes.

  14. Crawling The Web for Libre: Selecting, Integrating, Extending and Releasing Open Source Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truslove, I.; Duerr, R. E.; Wilcox, H.; Savoie, M.; Lopez, L.; Brandt, M.

    2012-12-01

    Libre is a project developed by the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). Libre is devoted to liberating science data from its traditional constraints of publication, location, and findability. Libre embraces and builds on the notion of making knowledge freely available, and both Creative Commons licensed content and Open Source Software are crucial building blocks for, as well as required deliverable outcomes of the project. One important aspect of the Libre project is to discover cryospheric data published on the internet without prior knowledge of the location or even existence of that data. Inspired by well-known search engines and their underlying web crawling technologies, Libre has explored tools and technologies required to build a search engine tailored to allow users to easily discover geospatial data related to the polar regions. After careful consideration, the Libre team decided to base its web crawling work on the Apache Nutch project (http://nutch.apache.org). Nutch is "an open source web-search software project" written in Java, with good documentation, a significant user base, and an active development community. Nutch was installed and configured to search for the types of data of interest, and the team created plugins to customize the default Nutch behavior to better find and categorize these data feeds. This presentation recounts the Libre team's experiences selecting, using, and extending Nutch, and working with the Nutch user and developer community. We will outline the technical and organizational challenges faced in order to release the project's software as Open Source, and detail the steps actually taken. We distill these experiences into a set of heuristics and recommendations for using, contributing to, and releasing Open Source Software.

  15. The Effects of Development Team Skill on Software Product Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaver, Justin M.; Schiavone, Guy A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the effect of the skill/experience of the software development team on the quality of the final software product. A method for the assessment of software development team skill and experience is proposed, and was derived from a workforce management tool currently in use by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Using data from 26 smallscale software development projects, the team skill measures are correlated to 5 software product quality metrics from the ISO/IEC 9126 Software Engineering Product Quality standard. in the analysis of the results, development team skill is found to be a significant factor in the adequacy of the design and implementation. In addition, the results imply that inexperienced software developers are tasked with responsibilities ill-suited to their skill level, and thus have a significant adverse effect on the quality of the software product. Keywords: software quality, development skill, software metrics

  16. Understanding Acceptance of Software Metrics--A Developer Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umarji, Medha

    2009-01-01

    Software metrics are measures of software products and processes. Metrics are widely used by software organizations to help manage projects, improve product quality and increase efficiency of the software development process. However, metrics programs tend to have a high failure rate in organizations, and developer pushback is one of the sources…

  17. Self-service for software development projects and HPC activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husejko, M.; Høimyr, N.; Gonzalez, A.; Koloventzos, G.; Asbury, D.; Trzcinska, A.; Agtzidis, I.; Botrel, G.; Otto, J.

    2014-05-01

    This contribution describes how CERN has implemented several essential tools for agile software development processes, ranging from version control (Git) to issue tracking (Jira) and documentation (Wikis). Running such services in a large organisation like CERN requires many administrative actions both by users and service providers, such as creating software projects, managing access rights, users and groups, and performing tool-specific customisation. Dealing with these requests manually would be a time-consuming task. Another area of our CERN computing services that has required dedicated manual support has been clusters for specific user communities with special needs. Our aim is to move all our services to a layered approach, with server infrastructure running on the internal cloud computing infrastructure at CERN. This contribution illustrates how we plan to optimise the management of our of services by means of an end-user facing platform acting as a portal into all the related services for software projects, inspired by popular portals for open-source developments such as Sourceforge, GitHub and others. Furthermore, the contribution will discuss recent activities with tests and evaluations of High Performance Computing (HPC) applications on different hardware and software stacks, and plans to offer a dynamically scalable HPC service at CERN, based on affordable hardware.

  18. Evaluating software development by analysis of changes: The data from the software engineering laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    An effective data collection methodology for evaluating software development methodologies was applied to four different software development projects. Goals of the data collection included characterizing changes and errors, characterizing projects and programmers, identifying effective error detection and correction techniques, and investigating ripple effects. The data collected consisted of changes (including error corrections) made to the software after code was written and baselined, but before testing began. Data collection and validation were concurrent with software development. Changes reported were verified by interviews with programmers.

  19. SignalPlant: an open signal processing software platform.

    PubMed

    Plesinger, F; Jurco, J; Halamek, J; Jurak, P

    2016-07-01

    The growing technical standard of acquisition systems allows the acquisition of large records, often reaching gigabytes or more in size as is the case with whole-day electroencephalograph (EEG) recordings, for example. Although current 64-bit software for signal processing is able to process (e.g. filter, analyze, etc) such data, visual inspection and labeling will probably suffer from rather long latency during the rendering of large portions of recorded signals. For this reason, we have developed SignalPlant-a stand-alone application for signal inspection, labeling and processing. The main motivation was to supply investigators with a tool allowing fast and interactive work with large multichannel records produced by EEG, electrocardiograph and similar devices. The rendering latency was compared with EEGLAB and proves significantly faster when displaying an image from a large number of samples (e.g. 163-times faster for 75  ×  10(6) samples). The presented SignalPlant software is available free and does not depend on any other computation software. Furthermore, it can be extended with plugins by third parties ensuring its adaptability to future research tasks and new data formats. PMID:27243208

  20. Software Development Infrastructure for the FAIR Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhlig, F.; Al-Turany, M.; Bertini, D.; Karabowicz, R.

    2011-12-01

    The proposed project FAIR (Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research) is an international accelerator facility of the next generation. It builds on top of the experience and technological developments already made at the existing GSI facility, and incorporate new technological concepts. The four scientific pillars of FAIR are NUSTAR (nuclear structure and astrophysics), PANDA (QCD studies with cooled beams of anti-protons), CBM (physics of hadronic matter at highest baryon densities), and APPA (atomic physics, plasma physics, and applications). The FairRoot framework used by all of the big FAIR experiments as a base for their own specific developments, provides basic functionality like IO, geometry handling etc. The challenge is to support all the different experiments with their heterogeneous requirements. Due to the limited manpower, one of the first design decisions was to (re)use as much as possible already available and tested software and to focus on the development of the framework. Beside the framework itself, the FairRoot core team also provides some software development tools. We will describe the complete set of tools in this article. The Makefiles for all projects are generated using CMake. For software testing and the corresponding quality assurance, we use CTest to generate the results and CDash as web front end. The tools are completed by subversion as source code repository and trac as tool for the complete source code management. This set of tools allows us to offer the full functionality we have for FairRoot also to the experiments based on FairRoot.

  1. Software developments for gamma-ray data with high multiplicity

    SciTech Connect

    Lauritsen, T.; Crowell, B.; Ahmad, I.

    1995-08-01

    Software capabilities for angle sort of data from the new powerful gamma detector arrays like Gammasphere and EUROGAM which were developed in preceding years, were enhanced and extended to read new data formats. In addition, we can now sort the data for directional correlation ratios (DCO). This version of the software was exported to a university group. For the analysis of, e.g., the quasi-continuum of gamma-rays it is necessary to angle sort the high multiplicity data and perform a careful background subtraction in order to extract the continuum of gamma rays from the feeding and decay of superdeformed bands. We need to angle sort in order to untangle the parts of the spectra which are of E1 nature from those of quadrupole or of M1/E2 nature. We further developed software running on new fast SUN workstations. We now have two such workstations, each equipped with a stacker and a secondary 8-mm tape drive. We enhanced the software to apply an energy-dependent time gate. We can enhance the events that are in true prompt coincidence, and reject random and signals in the germanium detectors coming from neutrons hitting the detector in coincidence with the gamma-ray burst. By applying energy-dependent time gates, in form of a {open_quotes}reduced time{close_quotes}, we can perform this rejection without the loss of efficiency at low energy. Effort has gone into developing low-level tape reader routines for data from the new EUROGAM array with cluster detectors as well as from the new flexible data format from Gammasphere phase II. In addition, we developed software to read data tapes from the local DAPHNE and MSU data-acquisition systems on the new fast UNIX platforms.

  2. Harvesting, Integrating and Distributing Large Open Geospatial Datasets Using Free and Open-Source Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Ricardo; Moreno, Rafael

    2016-06-01

    Federal, State and Local government agencies in the USA are investing heavily on the dissemination of Open Data sets produced by each of them. The main driver behind this thrust is to increase agencies' transparency and accountability, as well as to improve citizens' awareness. However, not all Open Data sets are easy to access and integrate with other Open Data sets available even from the same agency. The City and County of Denver Open Data Portal distributes several types of geospatial datasets, one of them is the city parcels information containing 224,256 records. Although this data layer contains many pieces of information it is incomplete for some custom purposes. Open-Source Software were used to first collect data from diverse City of Denver Open Data sets, then upload them to a repository in the Cloud where they were processed using a PostgreSQL installation on the Cloud and Python scripts. Our method was able to extract non-spatial information from a `not-ready-to-download' source that could then be combined with the initial data set to enhance its potential use.

  3. Quality Assurance in Software Development: An Exploratory Investigation in Software Project Failures and Business Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ichu, Emmanuel A.

    2010-01-01

    Software quality is perhaps one of the most sought-after attributes in product development, however; this goal is unattained. Problem factors in software development and how these have affected the maintainability of the delivered software systems requires a thorough investigation. It was, therefore, very important to understand software…

  4. SNS-NSTG Collaborative Software Development

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Vickie E; Chen, Meili; Cobb, John W; Farhi, Emmanuel N; Kohl, James Arthur; Miller, Stephen D; Peterson, Peter F; Reuter, Michael A; Travierso, Jessica Anna; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S

    2008-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway (NSTG) are collaborating on software development. SNS at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a world center for materials research with neutron scattering. NSTG connects large neutron science instrument facilities with the cyber infrastructure of the TeraGrid. The TeraGrid is a network of high performance computers supported by the US National Science Foundation. There are eleven partner facilities with over a petaflop of peak computing performance, 136,740 CPU-cores, and sixty petabytes of long-term storage.

  5. Software Development Cost Estimation Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hihn, Jairus M.; Menzies, Tim

    2006-01-01

    Identify simple fully validated cost models that provide estimation uncertainty with cost estimate. Based on COCOMO variable set. Use machine learning techniques to determine: a) Minimum number of cost drivers required for NASA domain based cost models; b) Minimum number of data records required and c) Estimation Uncertainty. Build a repository of software cost estimation information. Coordinating tool development and data collection with: a) Tasks funded by PA&E Cost Analysis; b) IV&V Effort Estimation Task and c) NASA SEPG activities.

  6. User involvement in IPAD software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, W. A.; Crowell, H. A.

    1980-01-01

    The extensive user involvement in the software development of IPAD and the functionality of the IPAD prototype as viewed by the user are addressed. Although not a production system that can support an ongoing design process, the IPAD prototype is useful for the potential user as well as the interested system designer and is an essential tool for the companies committed to the use of the IPAD system. User refers to the engineer or manager responsible for the design, manufacture, or maintenance of a product, together with those supporting these functions.

  7. Learning from open source software projects to improve scientific review

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Satrajit S.; Klein, Arno; Avants, Brian; Millman, K. Jarrod

    2012-01-01

    Peer-reviewed publications are the primary mechanism for sharing scientific results. The current peer-review process is, however, fraught with many problems that undermine the pace, validity, and credibility of science. We highlight five salient problems: (1) reviewers are expected to have comprehensive expertise; (2) reviewers do not have sufficient access to methods and materials to evaluate a study; (3) reviewers are neither identified nor acknowledged; (4) there is no measure of the quality of a review; and (5) reviews take a lot of time, and once submitted cannot evolve. We propose that these problems can be resolved by making the following changes to the review process. Distributing reviews to many reviewers would allow each reviewer to focus on portions of the article that reflect the reviewer's specialty or area of interest and place less of a burden on any one reviewer. Providing reviewers materials and methods to perform comprehensive evaluation would facilitate transparency, greater scrutiny, and replication of results. Acknowledging reviewers makes it possible to quantitatively assess reviewer contributions, which could be used to establish the impact of the reviewer in the scientific community. Quantifying review quality could help establish the importance of individual reviews and reviewers as well as the submitted article. Finally, we recommend expediting post-publication reviews and allowing for the dialog to continue and flourish in a dynamic and interactive manner. We argue that these solutions can be implemented by adapting existing features from open-source software management and social networking technologies. We propose a model of an open, interactive review system that quantifies the significance of articles, the quality of reviews, and the reputation of reviewers. PMID:22529798

  8. Learning from open source software projects to improve scientific review.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Satrajit S; Klein, Arno; Avants, Brian; Millman, K Jarrod

    2012-01-01

    Peer-reviewed publications are the primary mechanism for sharing scientific results. The current peer-review process is, however, fraught with many problems that undermine the pace, validity, and credibility of science. We highlight five salient problems: (1) reviewers are expected to have comprehensive expertise; (2) reviewers do not have sufficient access to methods and materials to evaluate a study; (3) reviewers are neither identified nor acknowledged; (4) there is no measure of the quality of a review; and (5) reviews take a lot of time, and once submitted cannot evolve. We propose that these problems can be resolved by making the following changes to the review process. Distributing reviews to many reviewers would allow each reviewer to focus on portions of the article that reflect the reviewer's specialty or area of interest and place less of a burden on any one reviewer. Providing reviewers materials and methods to perform comprehensive evaluation would facilitate transparency, greater scrutiny, and replication of results. Acknowledging reviewers makes it possible to quantitatively assess reviewer contributions, which could be used to establish the impact of the reviewer in the scientific community. Quantifying review quality could help establish the importance of individual reviews and reviewers as well as the submitted article. Finally, we recommend expediting post-publication reviews and allowing for the dialog to continue and flourish in a dynamic and interactive manner. We argue that these solutions can be implemented by adapting existing features from open-source software management and social networking technologies. We propose a model of an open, interactive review system that quantifies the significance of articles, the quality of reviews, and the reputation of reviewers. PMID:22529798

  9. SOFIA's CORBA Experiences: Instances of Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graybeal, J.; Krzaczek, R.; Milburn, J.

    Developing data systems for special purpose applications---like one-of-a-kind telescopes---is a singular, if not idiosyncratic, process. Developers must master and wisely use rapidly changing software technologies to produce systems faster, better, and cheaper, meanwhile keeping up with iterative requirements and schedules. Architectural standards such as CORBA may help---or may lead to slow, hard to change, and expensive data systems. The Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) will use CORBA in several different environments---the airborne mission systems (MCS), the ground support system (DCS), and a Facility Science Instrument (FLITECAM). A review of CORBA development experiences on the MCS reflects the challenges and choices made, while comparison with other SOFIA implementations shows the variety of CORBA applications and benefits.

  10. Implementing reproducible research using the Madagascar open-source software package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomel, S.

    2015-12-01

    Reproducible research is a concept pioneered by Jon Claerbout. It refers to the discipline of attaching software code and data to scientific publications, which enables the reader to reproduce, verify, and extend published computational experiments. The Madagascar open-source software package provides an example of implementing the reproducible research discipline in geophysical publications. The package contains not only software tools for making geophysical computations but also research papers complete with links to data and reproducible data-analysis workflows. When researchers discover a research paper published on the Madagascar website and install Madagascar, they are able to follow the links and replicate all computations to verify the published computational results. Of course, reproducibility is not the goal in itself. The goal is to be able to extend previously published research by, for example, trying new computations on previously used data or previously used computations on new data. The Madagscar collection currently contains about 150 research papers and book chapters and about 900 reproducible scripts. More than 80 people from different organizations around the world have contributed to the development. This experience shows that, instead of being the responsibility of an individual author, computational reproducibility can become the responsibility of open-source scientific-software communities. Our experience shows how a dedicated community effort can keep a body of computational research alive by actively maintaining its reproducibility.

  11. A Tour of Big Data, Open Source Data Management Technologies from the Apache Software Foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattmann, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Apache Software Foundation, a non-profit foundation charged with dissemination of open source software for the public good, provides a suite of data management technologies for distributed archiving, data ingestion, data dissemination, processing, triage and a host of other functionalities that are becoming critical in the Big Data regime. Apache is the world's largest open source software organization, boasting over 3000 developers from around the world all contributing to some of the most pervasive technologies in use today, from the HTTPD web server that powers a majority of Internet web sites to the Hadoop technology that is now projected at over a $1B dollar industry. Apache data management technologies are emerging as de facto off-the-shelf components for searching, distributing, processing and archiving key science data sets both geophysical, space and planetary based, all the way to biomedicine. In this talk, I will give a virtual tour of the Apache Software Foundation, its meritocracy and governance structure, and also its key big data technologies that organizations can take advantage of today and use to save cost, schedule, and resources in implementing their Big Data needs. I'll illustrate the Apache technologies in the context of several national priority projects, including the U.S. National Climate Assessment (NCA), and in the International Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project that are stretching the boundaries of volume, velocity, complexity, and other key Big Data dimensions.

  12. Looking toward the Future: A Case Study of Open Source Software in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quamen, Harvey

    2006-01-01

    In this article Harvey Quamen examines how the philosophy of open source software might be of particular benefit to humanities scholars in the near future--particularly for academic journals with limited financial resources. To this end he provides a case study in which he describes his use of open source technology (MySQL database software and…

  13. The development and technology transfer of software engineering technology at NASA. Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitman, C. L.; Erb, D. M.; Izygon, M. E.; Fridge, E. M., III; Roush, G. B.; Braley, D. M.; Savely, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    The United State's big space projects of the next decades, such as Space Station and the Human Exploration Initiative, will need the development of many millions of lines of mission critical software. NASA-Johnson (JSC) is identifying and developing some of the Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) technology that NASA will need to build these future software systems. The goal is to improve the quality and the productivity of large software development projects. New trends are outlined in CASE technology and how the Software Technology Branch (STB) at JSC is endeavoring to provide some of these CASE solutions for NASA is described. Key software technology components include knowledge-based systems, software reusability, user interface technology, reengineering environments, management systems for the software development process, software cost models, repository technology, and open, integrated CASE environment frameworks. The paper presents the status and long-term expectations for CASE products. The STB's Reengineering Application Project (REAP), Advanced Software Development Workstation (ASDW) project, and software development cost model (COSTMODL) project are then discussed. Some of the general difficulties of technology transfer are introduced, and a process developed by STB for CASE technology insertion is described.

  14. Open-Source Software for Modeling of Nanoelectronic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oyafuso, Fabiano; Hua, Hook; Tisdale, Edwin; Hart, Don

    2004-01-01

    The Nanoelectronic Modeling 3-D (NEMO 3-D) computer program has been upgraded to open-source status through elimination of license-restricted components. The present version functions equivalently to the version reported in "Software for Numerical Modeling of Nanoelectronic Devices" (NPO-30520), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 27, No. 11 (November 2003), page 37. To recapitulate: NEMO 3-D performs numerical modeling of the electronic transport and structural properties of a semiconductor device that has overall dimensions of the order of tens of nanometers. The underlying mathematical model represents the quantum-mechanical behavior of the device resolved to the atomistic level of granularity. NEMO 3-D solves the applicable quantum matrix equation on a Beowulf-class cluster computer by use of a parallel-processing matrix vector multiplication algorithm coupled to a Lanczos and/or Rayleigh-Ritz algorithm that solves for eigenvalues. A prior upgrade of NEMO 3-D incorporated a capability for a strain treatment, parameterized for bulk material properties of GaAs and InAs, for two tight-binding submodels. NEMO 3-D has been demonstrated in atomistic analyses of effects of disorder in alloys and, in particular, in bulk In(x)Ga(1-x)As and in In(0.6)Ga(0.4)As quantum dots.

  15. Leveraging open-source software in large simulations at LLNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Paul F.

    2004-03-01

    Three intersecting forces are making possible a revolution in the construction of scientific programs. Object-oriented technology has made possible the creation of truly reusable components. The Internet and its search engines have made it possible to find and obtain appropriate components and obtain help in learning to use them. The open source movement has made the components much more reliable, removed economic barriers to reuse, and allowed users to contribute to their evolution and upkeep. Staff members at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are full participants in this movement, both contributing and using reusable components in key areas of science, mathematics, and computer science. We will discuss the use of such components in two efforts in particular: Kull, an ASCI code for modeling laser fusion targets, and CDAT, a tool used world-wide for climate data analysis. We will also briefly discuss the problem of building such a wide variety of software on LLNL's wide variety of exotic hardware, and what factors make this problem more difficult than it need be.

  16. Using Cots Components in Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jilani, Abdul Khader

    2008-10-01

    As commercial off-the-shelf components starts used effectively, in building Component based Systems and new methodologies and processes not only for development and maintenance, but also for other lifecycle phases that are strongly affected. For example, some software vendors have begun to successfully sell and license commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components, and this fact leads to a considerable number of components being available for use. Thus, requirements engineering techniques have to change to deal with more flexible requirements to provide a match between stakeholder requirements and COTS component's services. In addition to changes in activities such as composition and component specification, that are specific to Component-Based Software Engineering (CBSE), there are also a number of managerial issues that require change. Many of these issues are not yet established in practice or even developed. The main goal of this article is to present some characteristics of a CBSD and discuss some of the current issues associated with applying CBSE.

  17. Shaping Software Engineering Curricula Using Open Source Communities: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowring, James; Burke, Quinn

    2016-01-01

    This paper documents four years of a novel approach to teaching a two-course sequence in software engineering as part of the ABET-accredited computer science curriculum at the College of Charleston. This approach is team-based and centers on learning software engineering in the context of open source software projects. In the first course, teams…

  18. OsiriX: an open-source software for navigating in multidimensional DICOM images.

    PubMed

    Rosset, Antoine; Spadola, Luca; Ratib, Osman

    2004-09-01

    A multidimensional image navigation and display software was designed for display and interpretation of large sets of multidimensional and multimodality images such as combined PET-CT studies. The software is developed in Objective-C on a Macintosh platform under the MacOS X operating system using the GNUstep development environment. It also benefits from the extremely fast and optimized 3D graphic capabilities of the OpenGL graphic standard widely used for computer games optimized for taking advantage of any hardware graphic accelerator boards available. In the design of the software special attention was given to adapt the user interface to the specific and complex tasks of navigating through large sets of image data. An interactive jog-wheel device widely used in the video and movie industry was implemented to allow users to navigate in the different dimensions of an image set much faster than with a traditional mouse or on-screen cursors and sliders. The program can easily be adapted for very specific tasks that require a limited number of functions, by adding and removing tools from the program's toolbar and avoiding an overwhelming number of unnecessary tools and functions. The processing and image rendering tools of the software are based on the open-source libraries ITK and VTK. This ensures that all new developments in image processing that could emerge from other academic institutions using these libraries can be directly ported to the OsiriX program. OsiriX is provided free of charge under the GNU open-source licensing agreement at http://homepage.mac.com/rossetantoine/osirix. PMID:15534753

  19. OpenOrb: Open-source asteroid orbit computation software including statistical ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granvik, M.; Virtanen, J.; Oszkiewicz, D.; Muinonen, K.

    2009-01-01

    We are making an open-source asteroid orbit computation software package called OpenOrb publicly available. OpenOrb is built on a well-established Bayesian inversion theory, which means that it is to a large part complementary to orbit-computation packages currently available. In particular, OpenOrb is the first package that contains tools for rigorously estimating the uncertainties resulting from the inverse problem of computing orbital elements using scarce astrometry. In addition to the well-known least-squares method, OpenOrb also contains both Monte-Carlo (MC) and Markov-Chain MC (MCMC; Oszkiewicz et al. [2009]) versions of the statistical ranging method. Ranging allows the user to obtain sampled, non-Gaussian orbital-element probability-density functions and is therefore optimized for cases where the amount of astrometry is scarce or spans a relatively short time interval. Ranging-based methods have successfully been applied to a variety of different problems such as rigorous ephemeris prediction, orbital element distribution studies for transneptunian objects, the computation of invariant collision probabilities between near-Earth objects and the Earth, detection of linkages between astrometric asteroid observations within an apparition as well as between apparitions, and in the rigorous analysis of the impact of orbital arc length and/or astrometric uncertainty on the uncertainty of the resulting orbits. Tools for making ephemeris predictions and for classifying objects based on their orbits are also available in OpenOrb. As an example, we use OpenOrb in the search for candidate retrograde and/or high-inclination objects similar to 2008 KV42 in the known population of transneptunian objects that have an observational time span shorter than 30 days.

  20. Prometheus Reactor I&C Software Development Methodology, for Action

    SciTech Connect

    T. Hamilton

    2005-07-30

    The purpose of this letter is to submit the Reactor Instrumentation and Control (I&C) software life cycle, development methodology, and programming language selections and rationale for project Prometheus to NR for approval. This letter also provides the draft Reactor I&C Software Development Process Manual and Reactor Module Software Development Plan to NR for information.

  1. Developing Open Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parer, Michael S., Ed.

    This collection of 13 articles contains the reflections of experienced course developers on a particular course that illustrates the process of constructing flagship distance education programs. "Educational Developers in Action--A Series of Tales from the Mud" (Michael Parer) is an introduction that discusses the technology of distance education,…

  2. Software Development for an Airborne Wind LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jishan; Li, Zhigang; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Zhishen

    2014-11-01

    Currently, Wind lidar offers an important way to obtain clear air wind field [1]. The principle of the wind lidar is based on the Doppler frequency shift in the air of the laser. The received signal of the lidar is scattered by the air molecular and particles [2]. They are Rayleigh scattering and Mie scattering. Coherent detection technique is an effective method to get the Doppler shift from the scattering in the air. From the Doppler shift we can get the radial wind speed. Generally, the horizontal wind field is that people concerned about. Based on the radial wind speed of more than 3 directions, we can use the VAD technique to retrieve the horizontal wind field. For an airborne lidar, some corrections such as the air plane posture, the air plane velocity must be performed. We developed a set of software for an airborne wind lidar using the MFC visual C++ Programming technology. Functions of the software are raw data decoding, radial wind speed inversion, horizontal wind field retrieve by VAD technique, air plane posture correction, air plane velocity correction, and so on. It also has functions for data display and saves. The results can be saved as picture or numerical values.

  3. Firing Room Remote Application Software Development & Swamp Works Laboratory Robot Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Janette

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is creating a way to send humans beyond low Earth orbit, and later to Mars. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is working to make this possible by developing a Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) which will allow the launch of Space Launch System (SLS). This paper's focus is on the work performed by the author in her first and second part of the internship as a remote application software developer. During the first part of her internship, the author worked on the SCCS's software application layer by assisting multiple ground subsystems teams including Launch Accessories (LACC) and Environmental Control System (ECS) on the design, development, integration, and testing of remote control software applications. Then, on the second part of the internship, the author worked on the development of robot software at the Swamp Works Laboratory which is a research and technology development group which focuses on inventing new technology to help future In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) missions.

  4. Management Guidelines for Database Developers' Teams in Software Development Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusu, Lazar; Lin, Yifeng; Hodosi, Georg

    Worldwide job market for database developers (DBDs) is continually increasing in last several years. In some companies, DBDs are organized as a special team (DBDs team) to support other projects and roles. As a new role, the DBDs team is facing a major problem that there are not any management guidelines for them. The team manager does not know which kinds of tasks should be assigned to this team and what practices should be used during DBDs work. Therefore in this paper we have developed a set of management guidelines, which includes 8 fundamental tasks and 17 practices from software development process, by using two methodologies Capability Maturity Model (CMM) and agile software development in particular Scrum in order to improve the DBDs team work. Moreover the management guidelines developed here has been complemented with practices from authors' experience in this area and has been evaluated in the case of a software company. The management guidelines for DBD teams presented in this paper could be very usefully for other companies too that are using a DBDs team and could contribute towards an increase of the efficiency of these teams in their work on software development projects.

  5. Open-Source as a strategy for operational software - the case of Enki

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolberg, Sjur; Bruland, Oddbjørn

    2014-05-01

    Since 2002, SINTEF Energy has been developing what is now known as the Enki modelling system. This development has been financed by Norway's largest hydropower producer Statkraft, motivated by a desire for distributed hydrological models in operational use. As the owner of the source code, Statkraft has recently decided on Open Source as a strategy for further development, and for migration from an R&D context to operational use. A current cooperation project is currently carried out between SINTEF Energy, 7 large Norwegian hydropower producers including Statkraft, three universities and one software company. Of course, the most immediate task is that of software maturing. A more important challenge, however, is one of gaining experience within the operational hydropower industry. A transition from lumped to distributed models is likely to also require revision of measurement program, calibration strategy, use of GIS and modern data sources like weather radar and satellite imagery. On the other hand, map based visualisations enable a richer information exchange between hydrologic forecasters and power market traders. The operating context of a distributed hydrology model within hydropower planning is far from settled. Being both a modelling framework and a library of plugin-routines to build models from, Enki supports the flexibility needed in this situation. Recent development has separated the core from the user interface, paving the way for a scripting API, cross-platform compilation, and front-end programs serving different degrees of flexibility, robustness and security. The open source strategy invites anyone to use Enki and to develop and contribute new modules. Once tested, the same modules are available for the operational versions of the program. A core challenge is to offer rigid testing procedures and mechanisms to reject routines in an operational setting, without limiting the experimentation with new modules. The Open Source strategy also has

  6. NeuroPG: open source software for optical pattern generation and data acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Avants, Benjamin W.; Murphy, Daniel B.; Dapello, Joel A.; Robinson, Jacob T.

    2015-01-01

    Patterned illumination using a digital micromirror device (DMD) is a powerful tool for optogenetics. Compared to a scanning laser, DMDs are inexpensive and can easily create complex illumination patterns. Combining these complex spatiotemporal illumination patterns with optogenetics allows DMD-equipped microscopes to probe neural circuits by selectively manipulating the activity of many individual cells or many subcellular regions at the same time. To use DMDs to study neural activity, scientists must develop specialized software to coordinate optical stimulation patterns with the acquisition of electrophysiological and fluorescence data. To meet this growing need we have developed an open source optical pattern generation software for neuroscience—NeuroPG—that combines, DMD control, sample visualization, and data acquisition in one application. Built on a MATLAB platform, NeuroPG can also process, analyze, and visualize data. The software is designed specifically for the Mightex Polygon400; however, as an open source package, NeuroPG can be modified to incorporate any data acquisition, imaging, or illumination equipment that is compatible with MATLAB’s Data Acquisition and Image Acquisition toolboxes. PMID:25784873

  7. The distributed development environment for SDSS software

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, E.; Gurbani, V.; Mackinnon, B.; Newberg, H.; Nicinski, T.; Petravick, D.; Pordes, R.; Sergey, G.; Stoughton, C.; Lupton, R.

    1994-12-31

    The authors present an integrated science software development environment, code maintenance and support system for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) now being actively used throughout the collaboration. The SDSS is a collaborative effort between Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the U. of Chicago, Princeton University, the Institute for Advanced Study, The John Hopkins University, U. of Washington, the U.S. Naval Observatory and the Japan Promotion Group. Its main results will be an imaging survey of 10{sup 4}deg{sup 2} and a red shift spectroscopic survey of 10{sup 6} galaxies and 10{sup 5} quasars producing approximately 1.2 {times} 10{sup 13} bytes of data over the 5 year running period (1995-2000). This will produce a three dimensional map of the Universe.

  8. Recent software developments for biomechanical assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaves, John O. B.

    1990-08-01

    While much of the software developed in research laboratories is narrow in focus and suited for a specific experiment, some of it is broad enough and of high enough quality to be useful to others in solving similar problems. Several biomechanical assessment packages are now beginning to emerge, including: * 3D research biomechanics (5- and 6-DOF) with kinematics, kinetics, 32-channel analog data subsystem, and project management. * 3D full-body gait analysis with kinematics, kinetics, EMG charts, and force plate charts. * 2D dynamic rear-foot assessment. * 2D occupational biomechanics lifting task and personnel assessments. * 2D dynamic gait analysis. * Multiple 2D dynamic spine assessments. * 2D sport and biomechanics assessments with kinematics and kinetics. * 2D and 3D equine gait assessments.

  9. Interdependent figure-of-merit software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K.; Kirsch, T.

    1989-01-01

    This program was undertaken in order to understand the complex nature of interdependent performance in space missions. At the first step in a planned sequence of progress, a spread sheet program was developed to evaluate different fuel/oxidizer combinations for a specific Martian mission. This program is to be linked with output attained using sophisticated software produced by Gordon and McBride. The programming to date makes use of 11 independent parameters. Optimization is essential when faced with the incredible magnitude of costs, risks, and benefits involved with space exploration. A system of weights needs to be devised on which to measure the options. It was the goal to devise a Figure of Merit (FoM) on which different choices can be presented and made. The plan was to model typical missions to Mars, identify the parameters, and vary them until the best one is found. Initially, most of the focus was placed on propellant selection.

  10. Advanced software development workstation project: Engineering scripting language. Graphical editor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Software development is widely considered to be a bottleneck in the development of complex systems, both in terms of development and in terms of maintenance of deployed systems. Cost of software development and maintenance can also be very high. One approach to reducing costs and relieving this bottleneck is increasing the reuse of software designs and software components. A method for achieving such reuse is a software parts composition system. Such a system consists of a language for modeling software parts and their interfaces, a catalog of existing parts, an editor for combining parts, and a code generator that takes a specification and generates code for that application in the target language. The Advanced Software Development Workstation is intended to be an expert system shell designed to provide the capabilities of a software part composition system.

  11. IBEX: An open infrastructure software platform to facilitate collaborative work in radiomics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lifei; Yang, Jinzhong; Fried, David V.; Fave, Xenia J.; Hunter, Luke A.; Court, Laurence E.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Radiomics, which is the high-throughput extraction and analysis of quantitative image features, has been shown to have considerable potential to quantify the tumor phenotype. However, at present, a lack of software infrastructure has impeded the development of radiomics and its applications. Therefore, the authors developed the imaging biomarker explorer (IBEX), an open infrastructure software platform that flexibly supports common radiomics workflow tasks such as multimodality image data import and review, development of feature extraction algorithms, model validation, and consistent data sharing among multiple institutions. Methods: The IBEX software package was developed using the MATLAB and C/C++ programming languages. The software architecture deploys the modern model-view-controller, unit testing, and function handle programming concepts to isolate each quantitative imaging analysis task, to validate if their relevant data and algorithms are fit for use, and to plug in new modules. On one hand, IBEX is self-contained and ready to use: it has implemented common data importers, common image filters, and common feature extraction algorithms. On the other hand, IBEX provides an integrated development environment on top of MATLAB and C/C++, so users are not limited to its built-in functions. In the IBEX developer studio, users can plug in, debug, and test new algorithms, extending IBEX’s functionality. IBEX also supports quality assurance for data and feature algorithms: image data, regions of interest, and feature algorithm-related data can be reviewed, validated, and/or modified. More importantly, two key elements in collaborative workflows, the consistency of data sharing and the reproducibility of calculation result, are embedded in the IBEX workflow: image data, feature algorithms, and model validation including newly developed ones from different users can be easily and consistently shared so that results can be more easily reproduced between

  12. Open-source framework for documentation of scientific software written on MATLAB-compatible programming languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konnik, Mikhail V.; Welsh, James

    2012-09-01

    Numerical simulators for adaptive optics systems have become an essential tool for the research and development of the future advanced astronomical instruments. However, growing software code of the numerical simulator makes it difficult to continue to support the code itself. The problem of adequate documentation of the astronomical software for adaptive optics simulators may complicate the development since the documentation must contain up-to-date schemes and mathematical descriptions implemented in the software code. Although most modern programming environments like MATLAB or Octave have in-built documentation abilities, they are often insufficient for the description of a typical adaptive optics simulator code. This paper describes a general cross-platform framework for the documentation of scientific software using open-source tools such as LATEX, mercurial, Doxygen, and Perl. Using the Perl script that translates M-files MATLAB comments into C-like, one can use Doxygen to generate and update the documentation for the scientific source code. The documentation generated by this framework contains the current code description with mathematical formulas, images, and bibliographical references. A detailed description of the framework components is presented as well as the guidelines for the framework deployment. Examples of the code documentation for the scripts and functions of a MATLAB-based adaptive optics simulator are provided.

  13. Avionics Simulation, Development and Software Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    During this reporting period, all technical responsibilities were accomplished as planned. A close working relationship was maintained with personnel of the MSFC Avionics Department Software Group (ED14), the MSFC EXPRESS Project Office (FD31), and the Huntsville Boeing Company. Accomplishments included: performing special tasks; supporting Software Review Board (SRB), Avionics Test Bed (ATB), and EXPRESS Software Control Panel (ESCP) activities; participating in technical meetings; and coordinating issues between the Boeing Company and the MSFC Project Office.

  14. Systematic Task Allocation Evaluation in Distributed Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münch, Jürgen; Lamersdorf, Ansgar

    Systematic task allocation to different development sites in global software development projects can open business and engineering perspectives and help to reduce risks and problems inherent in distributed development. Relying only on a single evaluation criterion such as development cost when distributing tasks to development sites has shown to be very risky and often does not lead to successful solutions in the long run. Task allocation in global software projects is challenging due to a multitude of impact factors and constraints. Systematic allocation decisions require the ability to evaluate and compare task allocation alternatives and to effectively establish customized task allocation practices in an organization. In this article, we present a customizable process for task allocation evaluation that is based on results from a systematic interview study with practitioners. In this process, the relevant criteria for evaluating task allocation alternatives are derived by applying principles from goal-oriented measurement. In addition, the customization of the process is demonstrated, related work and limitations are sketched, and an outlook on future work is given.

  15. Standardized development of computer software. Part 2: Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    This monograph contains standards for software development and engineering. The book sets forth rules for design, specification, coding, testing, documentation, and quality assurance audits of software; it also contains detailed outlines for the documentation to be produced.

  16. Software For Development Of Expert Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark L.; Atkinson, David J.

    1990-01-01

    Modular software system helps create efficient artificial-intelligence computer programs. STAR*TOOL system: Set of high-level software tools; assists programmers in creation of efficient knowledge-based software systems. Provides language and capabilities for compilation of application programs written in Common LISP. Features modularity enabling elimination of unnecessary capabilities from final application program and achieves greater computing performance. Runs on any computer that supports Common LISP and has sufficient memory. Provides programmer with necessary software tools to build wide variety of reasoning and inference engines for such applications as planning, diagnosis and analysis, and simulation.

  17. Software and electronic developments for TUG - T60 robotic telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmaksizoglu, M.; Dindar, M.; Kirbiyik, H.; Helhel, S.

    2014-12-01

    A robotic telescope is a telescope that can make observations without hands-on human control. Its low level behavior is automatic and computer-controlled. Robotic telescopes usually run under the control of a scheduler, which provides high-level control by selecting astronomical targets for observation. TUBITAK National Observatory (TUG) T60 Robotic Telescope is controlled by open source OCAAS software, formally named TALON. This study introduces the improvements on TALON software, new electronic and mechanic designs. The designs and software improvements were implemented in the T60 telescope control software and tested on the real system successfully.

  18. Cloud computing geospatial application for water resources based on free and open source software and open standards - a prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delipetrev, Blagoj

    2016-04-01

    Presently, most of the existing software is desktop-based, designed to work on a single computer, which represents a major limitation in many ways, starting from limited computer processing, storage power, accessibility, availability, etc. The only feasible solution lies in the web and cloud. This abstract presents research and development of a cloud computing geospatial application for water resources based on free and open source software and open standards using hybrid deployment model of public - private cloud, running on two separate virtual machines (VMs). The first one (VM1) is running on Amazon web services (AWS) and the second one (VM2) is running on a Xen cloud platform. The presented cloud application is developed using free and open source software, open standards and prototype code. The cloud application presents a framework how to develop specialized cloud geospatial application that needs only a web browser to be used. This cloud application is the ultimate collaboration geospatial platform because multiple users across the globe with internet connection and browser can jointly model geospatial objects, enter attribute data and information, execute algorithms, and visualize results. The presented cloud application is: available all the time, accessible from everywhere, it is scalable, works in a distributed computer environment, it creates a real-time multiuser collaboration platform, the programing languages code and components are interoperable, and it is flexible in including additional components. The cloud geospatial application is implemented as a specialized water resources application with three web services for 1) data infrastructure (DI), 2) support for water resources modelling (WRM), 3) user management. The web services are running on two VMs that are communicating over the internet providing services to users. The application was tested on the Zletovica river basin case study with concurrent multiple users. The application is a state

  19. A high order approach to flight software development and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinbacher, J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of a software development facility is discussed as a means of producing a reliable and maintainable ECS software system, and as a means of providing efficient use of the ECS hardware test facility. Principles applied to software design are given, including modularity, abstraction, hiding, and uniformity. The general objectives of each phase of the software life cycle are also given, including testing, maintenance, code development, and requirement specifications. Software development facility tools are summarized, and tool deficiencies recognized in the code development and testing phases are considered. Due to limited lab resources, the functional simulation capabilities may be indispensable in the testing phase.

  20. Reusable Software and Open Data Incorporate Ecological Understanding To Optimize Agriculture and Improveme Crops.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeBauer, D.

    2015-12-01

    Humans need a secure and sustainable food supply, and science can help. We have an opportunity to transform agriculture by combining knowledge of organisms and ecosystems to engineer ecosystems that sustainably produce food, fuel, and other services. The challenge is that the information we have. Measurements, theories, and laws found in publications, notebooks, measurements, software, and human brains are difficult to combine. We homogenize, encode, and automate the synthesis of data and mechanistic understanding in a way that links understanding at different scales and across domains. This allows extrapolation, prediction, and assessment. Reusable components allow automated construction of new knowledge that can be used to assess, predict, and optimize agro-ecosystems. Developing reusable software and open-access databases is hard, and examples will illustrate how we use the Predictive Ecosystem Analyzer (PEcAn, pecanproject.org), the Biofuel Ecophysiological Traits and Yields database (BETYdb, betydb.org), and ecophysiological crop models to predict crop yield, decide which crops to plant, and which traits can be selected for the next generation of data driven crop improvement. A next step is to automate the use of sensors mounted on robots, drones, and tractors to assess plants in the field. The TERRA Reference Phenotyping Platform (TERRA-Ref, terraref.github.io) will provide an open access database and computing platform on which researchers can use and develop tools that use sensor data to assess and manage agricultural and other terrestrial ecosystems. TERRA-Ref will adopt existing standards and develop modular software components and common interfaces, in collaboration with researchers from iPlant, NEON, AgMIP, USDA, rOpenSci, ARPA-E, many scientists and industry partners. Our goal is to advance science by enabling efficient use, reuse, exchange, and creation of knowledge.

  1. Is There Such a Thing as Free Software? The Pros and Cons of Open-Source Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trappler, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Today's higher education environment is marked by heightened accountability and decreased budgets. In such an environment, no higher education institution can afford to ignore alternative approaches that could result in more effective and less costly solutions. Open-source software (OSS) can serve as a viable alternative to traditional proprietary…

  2. The Case for Open Source Software: The Interactional Discourse Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Seongsook

    2016-01-01

    Computational techniques and software applications for the quantitative content analysis of texts are now well established, and many qualitative data software applications enable the manipulation of input variables and the visualization of complex relations between them via interactive and informative graphical interfaces. Although advances in…

  3. An open-source software package for data treatment in a MIEZE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, T.; Brandl, G.; Georgii, R.; Böni, P.

    2014-07-01

    We present a newly-developed open-source software toolkit for handling and analysing the 4-dimensional datasets generated by modern multi-layer time-of-flight (TOF) position-sensitive detectors (PSD). Two such detectors of the type "Cascade" are in operation at the MIEZE beam line MIRA 2 and at the neutron resonance spin-echo spectrometer RESEDA at FRM II. The software consists of several modules for data analysis and instrument parameter calculations to assist the user during experiments, during simulations and in data evaluation. Specifically for the Cascade detector, it contains modules that correct phase-shifts in the MIEZE signal caused by the detector geometry and layout.

  4. Software development environments: Status and trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffel, Larry E.

    1988-01-01

    Currently software engineers are the essential integrating factors tying several components together. The components consist of process, methods, computers, tools, support environments, and software engineers. The engineers today empower the tools versus the tools empowering the engineers. Some of the issues in software engineering are quality, managing the software engineering process, and productivity. A strategy to accomplish this is to promote the evolution of software engineering from an ad hoc, labor intensive activity to a managed, technology supported discipline. This strategy may be implemented by putting the process under management control, adopting appropriate methods, inserting the technology that provides automated support for the process and methods, collecting automated tools into an integrated environment and educating the personnel.

  5. The Advanced Software Development and Commercialization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Gallopoulos, E. . Center for Supercomputing Research and Development); Canfield, T.R.; Minkoff, M.; Mueller, C.; Plaskacz, E.; Weber, D.P.; Anderson, D.M.; Therios, I.U. ); Aslam, S.; Bramley, R.; Chen, H.-C.; Cybenko, G.; Gallopoulos, E.; Gao, H.; Malony, A.; Sameh, A. . Center for Supercomputing Research

    1990-09-01

    This is the first of a series of reports pertaining to progress in the Advanced Software Development and Commercialization Project, a joint collaborative effort between the Center for Supercomputing Research and Development of the University of Illinois and the Computing and Telecommunications Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The purpose of this work is to apply techniques of parallel computing that were pioneered by University of Illinois researchers to mature computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and structural dynamics (SD) computer codes developed at Argonne. The collaboration in this project will bring this unique combination of expertise to bear, for the first time, on industrially important problems. By so doing, it will expose the strengths and weaknesses of existing techniques for parallelizing programs and will identify those problems that need to be solved in order to enable wide spread production use of parallel computers. Secondly, the increased efficiency of the CFD and SD codes themselves will enable the simulation of larger, more accurate engineering models that involve fluid and structural dynamics. In order to realize the above two goals, we are considering two production codes that have been developed at ANL and are widely used by both industry and Universities. These are COMMIX and WHAMS-3D. The first is a computational fluid dynamics code that is used for both nuclear reactor design and safety and as a design tool for the casting industry. The second is a three-dimensional structural dynamics code used in nuclear reactor safety as well as crashworthiness studies. These codes are currently available for both sequential and vector computers only. Our main goal is to port and optimize these two codes on shared memory multiprocessors. In so doing, we shall establish a process that can be followed in optimizing other sequential or vector engineering codes for parallel processors.

  6. Technology-driven dietary assessment: a software developer's perspective.

    PubMed

    Buday, R; Tapia, R; Maze, G R

    2014-01-01

    Dietary researchers need new software to improve nutrition data collection and analysis, although the creation of information technology is difficult. Software development projects may be unsuccessful as a result of an inadequate understanding of needs, management problems, technology barriers or legal hurdles. Cost over-runs and schedule delays are common. Barriers facing scientific researchers developing software include workflow, cost, schedule and team issues. Different methods of software development and the role that intellectual property rights play are discussed. A dietary researcher must carefully consider multiple issues to maximise the likelihood of success when creating new software. PMID:22591224

  7. A Software Development Platform for Wearable Medical Applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruikai; Lin, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Wearable medical devices have become a leading trend in healthcare industry. Microcontrollers are computers on a chip with sufficient processing power and preferred embedded computing units in those devices. We have developed a software platform specifically for the design of the wearable medical applications with a small code footprint on the microcontrollers. It is supported by the open source real time operating system FreeRTOS and supplemented with a set of standard APIs for the architectural specific hardware interfaces on the microcontrollers for data acquisition and wireless communication. We modified the tick counter routine in FreeRTOS to include a real time soft clock. When combined with the multitasking features in the FreeRTOS, the platform offers the quick development of wearable applications and easy porting of the application code to different microprocessors. Test results have demonstrated that the application software developed using this platform are highly efficient in CPU usage while maintaining a small code foot print to accommodate the limited memory space in microcontrollers. PMID:26276017

  8. A Quantitative Analysis of Open Source Software's Acceptability as Production-Quality Code

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The difficulty in writing defect-free software has been long acknowledged both by academia and industry. A constant battle occurs as developers seek to craft software that works within aggressive business schedules and deadlines. Many tools and techniques are used in attempt to manage these software projects. Software metrics are a tool that has…

  9. Formal methods in the development of safety critical software systems

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L.G.

    1991-11-15

    As the use of computers in critical control systems such as aircraft controls, medical instruments, defense systems, missile controls, and nuclear power plants has increased, concern for the safety of those systems has also grown. Much of this concern has focused on the software component of those computer-based systems. This is primarily due to historical experience with software systems that often exhibit larger numbers of errors than their hardware counterparts and the fact that the consequences of a software error may endanger human life, property, or the environment. A number of different techniques have been used to address the issue of software safety. Some are standard software engineering techniques aimed at reducing the number of faults in a software protect, such as reviews and walkthroughs. Others, including fault tree analysis, are based on identifying and reducing hazards. This report examines the role of one such technique, formal methods, in the development of software for safety critical systems. The use of formal methods to increase the safety of software systems is based on their role in reducing the possibility of software errors that could lead to hazards. The use of formal methods in the development of software systems is controversial. Proponents claim that the use of formal methods can eliminate errors from the software development process, and produce programs that are probably correct. Opponents claim that they are difficult to learn and that their use increases development costs unacceptably. This report discusses the potential of formal methods for reducing failures in safety critical software systems.

  10. Software Development Offshoring Competitiveness: A Case Study of ASEAN Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bui, Minh Q.

    2011-01-01

    With the success of offshoring within the American software industry, corporate executives are moving their software developments overseas. The member countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) have become a preferred destination. However, there is a lack of published studies on the region's software competitiveness in…

  11. Software Released by LEWICE 2.0 Ice Accretion Software Development Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potapczuk, Mark G.

    2000-01-01

    Computational icing simulation methods are making the transition from the realm of research to commonplace use in design and certification. As such, standards of software management, design, validation, and documentation must be adjusted to accommodate the increased expectations of the user community with respect to accuracy, reliability, capability, and usability. With this in mind, in collaboration with Glenn's Engineering Design and Analysis Division, the Icing Branch of the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field began a software improvement project focused on the two-dimensional ice accretion simulation tool LEWICE. This project is serving as an introduction to the concepts of software management and is intended to serve as a pilot project for future icing simulation code development. The LEWICE 2.0 Software Development Project consisted of two major elements: software management and software validation. The software management element consisted of identifying features of well-designed and well-managed software that are appropriate for an analytical prediction tool such as LEWICE and applying them to a revised version of the code. This element included tasks such as identification of software requirements, development and implementation of coding standards, and implementation of software revision control practices. With the application of these techniques, the LEWICE ice accretion code became a more stable and reliable software product. In addition, the lessons learned about software development and maintenance can be factored into future software projects at the outset. The software validation activity was an integral part of our effort to make LEWICE a more accurate and reliable analysis tool. Because of the efforts taken to extensively validate this software, LEWICE 2.0 is more robust than previous releases and can reproduce results accurately across several computing platforms. It also differs from previous versions in the extensive quantitative

  12. Happy software developers solve problems better: psychological measurements in empirical software engineering.

    PubMed

    Graziotin, Daniel; Wang, Xiaofeng; Abrahamsson, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    For more than thirty years, it has been claimed that a way to improve software developers' productivity and software quality is to focus on people and to provide incentives to make developers satisfied and happy. This claim has rarely been verified in software engineering research, which faces an additional challenge in comparison to more traditional engineering fields: software development is an intellectual activity and is dominated by often-neglected human factors (called human aspects in software engineering research). Among the many skills required for software development, developers must possess high analytical problem-solving skills and creativity for the software construction process. According to psychology research, affective states-emotions and moods-deeply influence the cognitive processing abilities and performance of workers, including creativity and analytical problem solving. Nonetheless, little research has investigated the correlation between the affective states, creativity, and analytical problem-solving performance of programmers. This article echoes the call to employ psychological measurements in software engineering research. We report a study with 42 participants to investigate the relationship between the affective states, creativity, and analytical problem-solving skills of software developers. The results offer support for the claim that happy developers are indeed better problem solvers in terms of their analytical abilities. The following contributions are made by this study: (1) providing a better understanding of the impact of affective states on the creativity and analytical problem-solving capacities of developers, (2) introducing and validating psychological measurements, theories, and concepts of affective states, creativity, and analytical-problem-solving skills in empirical software engineering, and (3) raising the need for studying the human factors of software engineering by employing a multidisciplinary viewpoint. PMID

  13. Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software: Phase 2 Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cianciolo, Alicia D.; Maddock, Robert W.; Prince, Jill L.; Bowes, Angela; Powell, Richard W.; White, Joseph P.; Tolson, Robert; O'Shaughnessy, Daniel; Carrelli, David

    2013-01-01

    NASA has used aerobraking at Mars and Venus to reduce the fuel required to deliver a spacecraft into a desired orbit compared to an all-propulsive solution. Although aerobraking reduces the propellant, it does so at the expense of mission duration, large staff, and DSN coverage. These factors make aerobraking a significant cost element in the mission design. By moving on-board the current ground-based tasks of ephemeris determination, atmospheric density estimation, and maneuver sizing and execution, a flight project would realize significant cost savings. The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) sponsored Phase 1 and 2 of the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software (AADS) study, which demonstrated the initial feasibility of moving these current ground-based functions to the spacecraft. This paper highlights key state-of-the-art advancements made in the Phase 2 effort to verify that the AADS algorithms are accurate, robust and ready to be considered for application on future missions that utilize aerobraking. The advancements discussed herein include both model updates and simulation and benchmark testing. Rigorous testing using observed flight atmospheres, operational environments and statistical analysis characterized the AADS operability in a perturbed environment.

  14. Development of Poincare Software to Predict Arrythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maaliki, Samer

    2003-01-01

    The most distressing types of heart malfunction occur because of an abnormal rhythm of the heart. Cardiac arrythmias can be caused by abnormal rhythmicity of the pacemaker, electrolyte disturbances, blockage of the transmission of the electric impulse through the heart, and other abnormalities. There is strong evidence that space flight is associated with decreased cardiac electrical stability that may pose a life threatening risk to astronauts. For example, during the Skylab missions, a crewmember had a five beat run of ventricular tachycardia during lower body negative pressure. Also, analysis of nine 24-hour Holter monitor recordings obtained during long term spaceflight on Mir revealed one 14-beat run of ventricular tachycardia. A Mir cosmonaut was replaced in 1986 because of cardiac dysrhythmias. Most recently, in July of 1997, a Mir commander was unable to participate in the Spektr module repair due to complaints of an irregular heart rhythm. Despite these examples, possible mechanisms of arrhythmias and countermeasure strategies have barely been addressed. The Poincare method has been proposed as a technique that might potentially predict life-threatening arrhythmias before they occur. According to this method, each RR interval obtained from an EKG recording is plotted sequentially vs. the previous RR interval. Several studies using the method have demonstrated a strong correlation between the shape of the Poincare plot and ventricular arrhythmia. Our purpose was to develop an automated software program that detects the R peaks from an EKG recording while simultaneously displaying the Poincare plot and other related parameters.

  15. Metrics. [measurement for effective software development and management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgarry, Frank

    1991-01-01

    A development status evaluation is presented for practical software performance measurement, or 'metrics', in which major innovations have recently occurred. Metrics address such aspects of software performance as whether a software project is on schedule, how many errors can be expected from it, whether the methodology being used is effective and the relative quality of the software employed. Metrics may be characterized as explicit, analytical, and subjective. Attention is given to the bases for standards and the conduct of metrics research.

  16. STARS 2.0: 2nd-generation open-source archiving and query software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winegar, Tom

    2008-07-01

    The Subaru Telescope is in process of developing an open-source alternative to the 1st-generation software and databases (STARS 1) used for archiving and query. For STARS 2, we have chosen PHP and Python for scripting and MySQL as the database software. We have collected feedback from staff and observers, and used this feedback to significantly improve the design and functionality of our future archiving and query software. Archiving - We identified two weaknesses in 1st-generation STARS archiving software: a complex and inflexible table structure and uncoordinated system administration for our business model: taking pictures from the summit and archiving them in both Hawaii and Japan. We adopted a simplified and normalized table structure with passive keyword collection, and we are designing an archive-to-archive file transfer system that automatically reports real-time status and error conditions and permits error recovery. Query - We identified several weaknesses in 1st-generation STARS query software: inflexible query tools, poor sharing of calibration data, and no automatic file transfer mechanisms to observers. We are developing improved query tools and sharing of calibration data, and multi-protocol unassisted file transfer mechanisms for observers. In the process, we have redefined a 'query': from an invisible search result that can only transfer once in-house right now, with little status and error reporting and no error recovery - to a stored search result that can be monitored, transferred to different locations with multiple protocols, reporting status and error conditions and permitting recovery from errors.

  17. Happy software developers solve problems better: psychological measurements in empirical software engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Abrahamsson, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    For more than thirty years, it has been claimed that a way to improve software developers’ productivity and software quality is to focus on people and to provide incentives to make developers satisfied and happy. This claim has rarely been verified in software engineering research, which faces an additional challenge in comparison to more traditional engineering fields: software development is an intellectual activity and is dominated by often-neglected human factors (called human aspects in software engineering research). Among the many skills required for software development, developers must possess high analytical problem-solving skills and creativity for the software construction process. According to psychology research, affective states—emotions and moods—deeply influence the cognitive processing abilities and performance of workers, including creativity and analytical problem solving. Nonetheless, little research has investigated the correlation between the affective states, creativity, and analytical problem-solving performance of programmers. This article echoes the call to employ psychological measurements in software engineering research. We report a study with 42 participants to investigate the relationship between the affective states, creativity, and analytical problem-solving skills of software developers. The results offer support for the claim that happy developers are indeed better problem solvers in terms of their analytical abilities. The following contributions are made by this study: (1) providing a better understanding of the impact of affective states on the creativity and analytical problem-solving capacities of developers, (2) introducing and validating psychological measurements, theories, and concepts of affective states, creativity, and analytical-problem-solving skills in empirical software engineering, and (3) raising the need for studying the human factors of software engineering by employing a multidisciplinary viewpoint

  18. Open Source Software (OSS) Adoption Framework for Local Environment and its Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laila, U.; Bukhari, S. F. A.

    According to Business Software Alliance (BSA) Pakistan is ranked in the top 10 countries having highest piracy rate [1]. To overcome the problem of piracy local Information Technology (IT) companies are willing to migrate towards Open Source Software (OSS). Due to this reason need for framework/model for OSS adoption has become more pronounced.

  19. Collaboration using open standards and open source software (examples of DIAS/CEOS Water Portal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, S.; Sekioka, S.; Kuroiwa, K.; Kudo, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The DIAS/CEOS Water Portal is a part of the DIAS (Data Integration and Analysis System, http://www.editoria.u-tokyo.ac.jp/projects/dias/?locale=en_US) systems for data distribution for users including, but not limited to, scientists, decision makers and officers like river administrators. One of the functions of this portal is to enable one-stop search and access variable water related data archived multiple data centers located all over the world. This portal itself does not store data. Instead, according to requests made by users on the web page, it retrieves data from distributed data centers on-the-fly and lets them download and see rendered images/plots. Our system mainly relies on the open source software GI-cat (http://essi-lab.eu/do/view/GIcat) and open standards such as OGC-CSW, Opensearch and OPeNDAP protocol to enable the above functions. Details on how it works will be introduced during the presentation. Although some data centers have unique meta data format and/or data search protocols, our portal's brokering function enables users to search across various data centers at one time. And this portal is also connected to other data brokering systems, including GEOSS DAB (Discovery and Access Broker). As a result, users can search over thousands of datasets, millions of files at one time. Users can access the DIAS/CEOS Water Portal system at http://waterportal.ceos.org/.

  20. Modular Open-Source Software for Item Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritikin, Joshua N.; Hunter, Micheal D.; Boker, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces an item factor analysis (IFA) module for "OpenMx," a free, open-source, and modular statistical modeling package that runs within the R programming environment on GNU/Linux, Mac OS X, and Microsoft Windows. The IFA module offers a novel model specification language that is well suited to programmatic generation…

  1. Structural informatics, modeling, and design with an open-source Molecular Software Library (MSL).

    PubMed

    Kulp, Daniel W; Subramaniam, Sabareesh; Donald, Jason E; Hannigan, Brett T; Mueller, Benjamin K; Grigoryan, Gevorg; Senes, Alessandro

    2012-07-30

    We present the Molecular Software Library (MSL), a C++ library for molecular modeling. MSL is a set of tools that supports a large variety of algorithms for the design, modeling, and analysis of macromolecules. Among the main features supported by the library are methods for applying geometric transformations and alignments, the implementation of a rich set of energy functions, side chain optimization, backbone manipulation, calculation of solvent accessible surface area, and other tools. MSL has a number of unique features, such as the ability of storing alternative atomic coordinates (for modeling) and multiple amino acid identities at the same backbone position (for design). It has a straightforward mechanism for extending its energy functions and can work with any type of molecules. Although the code base is large, MSL was created with ease of developing in mind. It allows the rapid implementation of simple tasks while fully supporting the creation of complex applications. Some of the potentialities of the software are demonstrated here with examples that show how to program complex and essential modeling tasks with few lines of code. MSL is an ongoing and evolving project, with new features and improvements being introduced regularly, but it is mature and suitable for production and has been used in numerous protein modeling and design projects. MSL is open-source software, freely downloadable at http://msl-libraries.org. We propose it as a common platform for the development of new molecular algorithms and to promote the distribution, sharing, and reutilization of computational methods. PMID:22565567

  2. Structural informatics, modeling and design with an open-source Molecular Software Library (MSL)

    PubMed Central

    Kulp, Daniel W.; Subramaniam, Sabareesh; Donald, Jason E.; Hannigan, Brett T.; Mueller, Benjamin K.; Grigoryan, Gevorg; Senes, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    We present the Molecular Software Library (MSL), a C++ library for molecular modeling. MSL is a set of tools that supports a large variety of algorithms for the design, modeling and analysis of macromolecules. Among the main features supported by the library are methods for applying geometric transformations and alignments, the implementation of a rich set of energy functions, side chain optimization, backbone manipulation, calculation of Solvent Accessible Surface Area (SASA) and other tools. MSL has a number of unique features, such as the ability of storing alternative atomic coordinates (for modeling) and multiple amino acid identities at the same backbone position (for design). It has a straightforward mechanism for extending its energy functions and can work with any type of molecules. While the code base is large, MSL was created with ease of developing in mind. It allows the rapid implementation of simple tasks while fully supporting the creation of complex applications. Some of the potentialities of the software are demonstrated here with examples that show how to program complex and essential modeling tasks with few lines of code. MSL is an ongoing and evolving project, with new features and improvements being introduced regularly, but it is mature and suitable for production and has been used in numerous protein modeling and design projects. MSL is open source software, freely downloadable at http://msl-libraries.org. We propose it as a common platform for the development of new molecular algorithms, and to promote the distribution, sharing and reutilization of computational methods. PMID:22565567

  3. The development model of software product line based AOP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, JingHai

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, we proposed a development model of MIS (management information system) software based aspect-oriented programming. MIS software will be the full separation of concerns, and establish corresponding platform-independent model, the dynamic weaving of aspects does not require all the static or fixed in weaver weaving in specific areas and at the same time Optimization, reducing system complexity and improve software development efficiency and speed. While the description and implementation of all aspects of the software industry chain assigned to the various levels of development team to complete, MIS can help resolve the current heavy workload of the software development process, low developing level, low software reuse rate, more duplication work of effort Problems.

  4. Team Software Development for Aerothermodynamic and Aerodynamic Analysis and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, N.; Atkins, H. L.; Bibb, K. L.; Biedron, R. T.; Carpenter, M. H.; Gnoffo, P. A.; Hammond, D. P.; Jones, W. T.; Kleb, W. L.; Lee-Rausch, E. M.

    2003-01-01

    A collaborative approach to software development is described. The approach employs the agile development techniques: project retrospectives, Scrum status meetings, and elements of Extreme Programming to efficiently develop a cohesive and extensible software suite. The software product under development is a fluid dynamics simulator for performing aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic analysis and design. The functionality of the software product is achieved both through the merging, with substantial rewrite, of separate legacy codes and the authorship of new routines. Examples of rapid implementation of new functionality demonstrate the benefits obtained with this agile software development process. The appendix contains a discussion of coding issues encountered while porting legacy Fortran 77 code to Fortran 95, software design principles, and a Fortran 95 coding standard.

  5. The maintenance, distribution and development of biomedical computer software: an exercise in software engineering.

    PubMed

    Boston, R C; Granek, H; Sutton, N; Weber, K; Greif, P; Zech, L

    1986-06-01

    The growing reliance of biomedical investigations on computer software in almost all facets of their work places considerable emphasis on the need for the integrated management of the software. In order to efficiently develop, distribute, and maintain the software, tools are required which not only automate these tasks but also, wherever possible, 'semi-intelligently', alert their user to irregular situation. We describe an assortment of such tools routinely used in the management of the SAAM/CONSAM biokinetic software and illustrate their application. Furthermore, using these techniques we have presented some comparative performances of numerical integrators and of computer processors. PMID:3637127

  6. Establishing a Professional Development Network around Dynamic Mathematics Software in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavicza, Zsolt; Hohenwarter, Markus; Jones, Keith; Lu, Allison; Dawes, Mark

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we will outline some results of an NCETM (National Centre for Excellence in the Teaching of Mathematics) funded project that aimed to establish a professional development network with an open-source mathematical software--GeoGebra--in England. During the past few years a large international user and developer community has formed…

  7. Overview of software development at the parabolic dish test site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyazono, C. K.

    1985-01-01

    The development history of the data acquisition and data analysis software is discussed. The software development occurred between 1978 and 1984 in support of solar energy module testing at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Parabolic Dish Test Site, located within Edwards Test Station. The development went through incremental stages, starting with a simple single-user BASIC set of programs, and progressing to the relative complex multi-user FORTRAN system that was used until the termination of the project. Additional software in support of testing is discussed including software in support of a meteorological subsystem and the Test Bed Concentrator Control Console interface. Conclusions and recommendations for further development are discussed.

  8. Evaluating software development characteristics: Assessment of software measures in the Software Engineering Laboratory. [reliability engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, V. R.

    1981-01-01

    Work on metrics is discussed. Factors that affect software quality are reviewed. Metrics is discussed in terms of criteria achievements, reliability, and fault tolerance. Subjective and objective metrics are distinguished. Product/process and cost/quality metrics are characterized and discussed.

  9. An evaluation of the Interactive Software Invocation System (ISIS) for software development applications. [flight software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noland, M. S.

    1981-01-01

    The Interactive Software Invocation System (ISIS), which allows a user to build, modify, control, and process a total flight software system without direct communications with the host computer, is described. This interactive data management system provides the user with a file manager, text editor, a tool invoker, and an Interactive Programming Language (IPL). The basic file design of ISIS is a five level hierarchical structure. The file manager controls this hierarchical file structure and permits the user to create, to save, to access, and to purge pages of information. The text editor is used to manipulate pages of text to be modified and the tool invoker allows the user to communicate with the host computer through a RUN file created by the user. The IPL is based on PASCAL and contains most of the statements found in a high-level programming language. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the system as applied to a flight project, the collection of software components required to support the Annular Suspension and Pointing System (ASPS) flight project were integrated using ISIS. The ASPS software system and its integration into ISIS is described.

  10. A Flexible Method for Producing F.E.M. Analysis of Bone Using Open-Source Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boppana, Abhishektha; Sefcik, Ryan; Meyers, Jerry G.; Lewandowski, Beth E.

    2016-01-01

    This project, performed in support of the NASA GRC Space Academy summer program, sought to develop an open-source workflow methodology that segmented medical image data, created a 3D model from the segmented data, and prepared the model for finite-element analysis. In an initial step, a technological survey evaluated the performance of various existing open-source software that claim to perform these tasks. However, the survey concluded that no single software exhibited the wide array of functionality required for the potential NASA application in the area of bone, muscle and bio fluidic studies. As a result, development of a series of Python scripts provided the bridging mechanism to address the shortcomings of the available open source tools. The implementation of the VTK library provided the most quick and effective means of segmenting regions of interest from the medical images; it allowed for the export of a 3D model by using the marching cubes algorithm to build a surface mesh. To facilitate the development of the model domain from this extracted information required a surface mesh to be processed in the open-source software packages Blender and Gmsh. The Preview program of the FEBio suite proved to be sufficient for volume filling the model with an unstructured mesh and preparing boundaries specifications for finite element analysis. To fully allow FEM modeling, an in house developed Python script allowed assignment of material properties on an element by element basis by performing a weighted interpolation of voxel intensity of the parent medical image correlated to published information of image intensity to material properties, such as ash density. A graphical user interface combined the Python scripts and other software into a user friendly interface. The work using Python scripts provides a potential alternative to expensive commercial software and inadequate, limited open-source freeware programs for the creation of 3D computational models. More work

  11. Development of a New VLBI Data Analysis Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolotin, Sergei; Gipson, John M.; MacMillan, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    We present an overview of a new VLBI analysis software under development at NASA GSFC. The new software will replace CALC/SOLVE and many related utility programs. It will have the capabilities of the current system as well as incorporate new models and data analysis techniques. In this paper we give a conceptual overview of the new software. We formulate the main goals of the software. The software should be flexible and modular to implement models and estimation techniques that currently exist or will appear in future. On the other hand it should be reliable and possess production quality for processing standard VLBI sessions. Also, it needs to be capable of processing observations from a fully deployed network of VLBI2010 stations in a reasonable time. We describe the software development process and outline the software architecture.

  12. Framework Based Guidance Navigation and Control Flight Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McComas, David

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes NASA's guidance navigation and control flight software development background. The contents include: 1) NASA/Goddard Guidance Navigation and Control (GN&C) Flight Software (FSW) Development Background; 2) GN&C FSW Development Improvement Concepts; and 3) GN&C FSW Application Framework.

  13. Flight dynamics system software development environment (FDS/SDE) tutorial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buell, John; Myers, Philip

    1986-01-01

    A sample development scenario using the Flight Dynamics System Software Development Environment (FDS/SDE) is presented. The SDE uses a menu-driven, fill-in-the-blanks format that provides online help at all steps, thus eliminating lengthy training and allowing immediate use of this new software development tool.

  14. Autochthonous Change: Self-Renewal through Open Software Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedbring, Charles

    2005-01-01

    In all likelihood, currently employed therapists and teachers grew up with computer technology. Part of their computer culture included programming computers for entertainment using popular consumer software like Microsoft Basic. Within this social-educational milieu, the "FACTS+" curriculum represents one long-term project covering the…

  15. Measuring Ada as a software development technology in the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agresti, W. W.

    1985-01-01

    An experiment is in progress to measure the effectiveness of Ada in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center flight dynamics software development environment. The experiment features the parallel development of software in FORTRAN and Ada. The experiment organization, objectives, and status are discussed. Experiences with an Ada training program and data from the development of a 5700-line Ada training exercise are reported.

  16. Perceptions of Open Source versus Commercial Software: Is Higher Education Still on the Fence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rooij, Shahron Williams

    2007-01-01

    This exploratory study investigated the perceptions of technology and academic decision-makers about open source benefits and risks versus commercial software applications. The study also explored reactions to a concept for outsourcing campus-wide deployment and maintenance of open source. Data collected from telephone interviews were analyzed,…

  17. Evaluating Open Source Software for Use in Library Initiatives: A Case Study Involving Electronic Publishing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuels, Ruth Gallegos; Griffy, Henry

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses best practices for evaluating open source software for use in library projects, based on the authors' experience evaluating electronic publishing solutions. First, it presents a brief review of the literature, emphasizing the need to evaluate open source solutions carefully in order to minimize Total Cost of Ownership. Next,…

  18. Using "Moodle[TM]" (Open Source Software) with Grades 3-6

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menges, Beth

    2009-01-01

    "Moodle[TM]," an acronym for Modular Object-Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment, is an open source software package that teachers can use to produce Internet-based courses and Web sites. "Open source" basically means that it is copyrighted, but it can be used at no cost as long as the user agrees to provide the source to others. "Moodle[TM]" can…

  19. The Implications of Incumbent Intellectual Property Strategies for Open Source Software Success and Commercialization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wen, Wen

    2012-01-01

    While open source software (OSS) emphasizes open access to the source code and avoids the use of formal appropriability mechanisms, there has been little understanding of how the existence and exercise of formal intellectual property rights (IPR) such as patents influence the direction of OSS innovation. This dissertation seeks to bridge this gap…

  20. Software Engineering Research/Developer Collaborations in 2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pressburger, Tom

    2006-01-01

    In CY 2005, three collaborations between software engineering technology providers and NASA software development personnel deployed three software engineering technologies on NASA development projects (a different technology on each project). The main purposes were to benefit the projects, infuse the technologies if beneficial into NASA, and give feedback to the technology providers to improve the technologies. Each collaboration project produced a final report. Section 2 of this report summarizes each project, drawing from the final reports and communications with the software developers and technology providers. Section 3 indicates paths to further infusion of the technologies into NASA practice. Section 4 summarizes some technology transfer lessons learned. Also included is an acronym list.

  1. Development of Efficient Authoring Software for e-Learning Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozono, Kazutake; Teramoto, Akemi; Akiyama, Hidenori

    The contents creation in e-Learning system becomes an important problem. The contents of e-Learning should include figure and voice media for a high-level educational effect. However, the use of figure and voice complicates the operation of authoring software considerably. A new authoring software, which can build e-Learning contents efficiently, has been developed to solve this problem. This paper reports development results of the authoring software.

  2. Software development predictors, error analysis, reliability models and software metric analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basili, Victor

    1983-01-01

    The use of dynamic characteristics as predictors for software development was studied. It was found that there are some significant factors that could be useful as predictors. From a study on software errors and complexity, it was shown that meaningful results can be obtained which allow insight into software traits and the environment in which it is developed. Reliability models were studied. The research included the field of program testing because the validity of some reliability models depends on the answers to some unanswered questions about testing. In studying software metrics, data collected from seven software engineering laboratory (FORTRAN) projects were examined and three effort reporting accuracy checks were applied to demonstrate the need to validate a data base. Results are discussed.

  3. An assessment of space shuttle flight software development processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In early 1991, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Office of Space Flight commissioned the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board (ASEB) of the National Research Council (NRC) to investigate the adequacy of the current process by which NASA develops and verifies changes and updates to the Space Shuttle flight software. The Committee for Review of Oversight Mechanisms for Space Shuttle Flight Software Processes was convened in Jan. 1992 to accomplish the following tasks: (1) review the entire flight software development process from the initial requirements definition phase to final implementation, including object code build and final machine loading; (2) review and critique NASA's independent verification and validation process and mechanisms, including NASA's established software development and testing standards; (3) determine the acceptability and adequacy of the complete flight software development process, including the embedded validation and verification processes through comparison with (1) generally accepted industry practices, and (2) generally accepted Department of Defense and/or other government practices (comparing NASA's program with organizations and projects having similar volumes of software development, software maturity, complexity, criticality, lines of code, and national standards); (4) consider whether independent verification and validation should continue. An overview of the study, independent verification and validation of critical software, and the Space Shuttle flight software development process are addressed. Findings and recommendations are presented.

  4. Application of Open Source Software by the Lunar Mapping and Modeling Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, P.; Goodale, C. E.; Bui, B.; Chang, G.; Kim, R. M.; Law, E.; Malhotra, S.; Rodriguez, L.; Sadaqathullah, S.; Mattmann, C. A.; Crichton, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Lunar Mapping and Modeling Project (LMMP), led by the Marshall Space Flight center (MSFC), is responsible for the development of an information system to support lunar exploration, decision analysis, and release of lunar data to the public. The data available through the lunar portal is predominantly derived from present lunar missions (e.g., the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO)) and from historical missions (e.g., Apollo). This project has created a gold source of data, models, and tools for lunar explorers to exercise and incorporate into their activities. At Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), we focused on engineering and building the infrastructure to support cataloging, archiving, accessing, and delivery of lunar data. We decided to use a RESTful service-oriented architecture to enable us to abstract from the underlying technology choices and focus on interfaces to be used internally and externally. This decision allowed us to leverage several open source software components and integrate them by either writing a thin REST service layer or relying on the API they provided; the approach chosen was dependent on the targeted consumer of a given interface. We will discuss our varying experience using open source products; namely Apache OODT, Oracle Berkley DB XML, Apache Solr, and Oracle OpenSSO (now named OpenAM). Apache OODT, developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and recently migrated over to Apache, provided the means for ingestion and cataloguing of products within the infrastructure. Its usage was based upon team experience with the project and past benefit received on other projects internal and external to JPL. Berkeley DB XML, distributed by Oracle for both commercial and open source use, was the storage technology chosen for our metadata. This decision was in part based on our use Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) Metadata, which is expressed in XML, and the desire to keep it in its native form and exploit other technologies built on

  5. Experiences Using OpenMP Based on Compiler Directed Software DSM on a PC Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Matthias; Jost, Gabriele; Mueller, Matthias; Ruehle, Roland; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this work we report on our experiences running OpenMP (message passing) programs on a commodity cluster of PCs (personal computers) running a software distributed shared memory (DSM) system. We describe our test environment and report on the performance of a subset of the NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) Parallel Benchmarks that have been automatically parallelized for OpenMP. We compare the performance of the OpenMP implementations with that of their message passing counterparts and discuss performance differences.

  6. Experiences using OpenMP based on Computer Directed Software DSM on a PC Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Matthias; Jost, Gabriele; Mueller, Matthias; Ruehle, Roland

    2003-01-01

    In this work we report on our experiences running OpenMP programs on a commodity cluster of PCs running a software distributed shared memory (DSM) system. We describe our test environment and report on the performance of a subset of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks that have been automaticaly parallelized for OpenMP. We compare the performance of the OpenMP implementations with that of their message passing counterparts and discuss performance differences.

  7. Open Source Scanning Probe Microscopy Control Software Package Gxsm

    SciTech Connect

    Zahl P.; Wagner, T.; Moller, R.; Klust, A.

    2009-08-10

    Gxsm is a full featured and modern scanning probe microscopy (SPM) software. It can be used for powerful multidimensional image/data processing, analysis, and visualization. Connected toan instrument, it is operating many different avors of SPM, e.g., scanning tunneling microscopy(STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) or in general two-dimensional multi channel data acquisition instruments. The Gxsm core can handle different data types, e.g., integer and oating point numbers. An easily extendable plug-in architecture provides many image analysis and manipulation functions. A digital signal processor (DSP) subsystem runs the feedback loop, generates the scanning signals and acquires the data during SPM measurements. The programmable Gxsm vector probe engine performs virtually any thinkable spectroscopy and manipulation task, such as scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) or tip formation. The Gxsm software is released under the GNU general public license (GPL) and can be obtained via the Internet.

  8. Avionics Simulation, Development and Software Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, Ronald C.; Settle, Gray; Tobbe, Patrick A.; Kissel, Ralph; Glaese, John; Blanche, Jim; Wallace, L. D.

    2001-01-01

    This monthly report summarizes the work performed under contract NAS8-00114 for Marshall Space Flight Center in the following tasks: 1) Purchase Order No. H-32831D, Task Order 001A, GPB Program Software Oversight; 2) Purchase Order No. H-32832D, Task Order 002, ISS EXPRESS Racks Software Support; 3) Purchase Order No. H-32833D, Task Order 003, SSRMS Math Model Integration; 4) Purchase Order No. H-32834D, Task Order 004, GPB Program Hardware Oversight; 5) Purchase Order No. H-32835D, Task Order 005, Electrodynamic Tether Operations and Control Analysis; 6) Purchase Order No. H-32837D, Task Order 007, SRB Command Receiver/Decoder; and 7) Purchase Order No. H-32838D, Task Order 008, AVGS/DART SW and Simulation Support

  9. A Capstone Course on Agile Software Development Using Scrum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahnic, V.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an undergraduate capstone course in software engineering is described that not only exposes students to agile software development, but also makes it possible to observe the behavior of developers using Scrum for the first time. The course requires students to work as Scrum Teams, responsible for the implementation of a set of user…

  10. Product assurance policies and procedures for flight dynamics software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, Sandra; Jordan, Leon; Decker, William; Page, Gerald; Mcgarry, Frank E.; Valett, Jon

    1987-01-01

    The product assurance policies and procedures necessary to support flight dynamics software development projects for Goddard Space Flight Center are presented. The quality assurance and configuration management methods and tools for each phase of the software development life cycles are described, from requirements analysis through acceptance testing; maintenance and operation are not addressed.

  11. Software Development through ACOT Teachers' Eyes. ACOT Report #4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapp, Linda

    Eight Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow (ACOT) teachers met with software developers at the Florida Instructional Computing Conference in January 1989. During the session, the panel of ACOT teachers expressed their wants and wishes for educational software and developers responded with their own concerns. The face-to-face communication provided a…

  12. Training Software Developers and Designers to Conduct Usability Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skov, Mikael Brasholt; Stage, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Many efforts to improve the interplay between usability evaluation and software development rely either on better methods for conducting usability evaluations or on better formats for presenting evaluation results in ways that are useful for software designers and developers. Both of these approaches depend on a complete division of work between…

  13. Software development environments: Present and future, appendix D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddle, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    Computerized environments which facilitate the development of appropriately functioning software systems are discussed. Their current status is reviewed and several trends exhibited by their history are identified. A number of principles, some at (slight) variance with the historical trends, are suggested and it is argued that observance of these principles is critical to achieving truly effective and efficient software development support environments.

  14. PandASoft: Open Source Instructional Laboratory Administration Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gay, P. L.; Braasch, P.; Synkova, Y. N.

    2004-12-01

    PandASoft (Physics and Astronomy Software) is software for organizing and archiving a department's teaching resources and materials. An easy to use, secure interface allows faculty and staff to explore equipment inventories, see what laboratory experiments are available, find handouts, and track what has been used in different classes in the past. Divided into five sections: classes, equipment, laboratories, links, and media, its database cross links materials, allowing users to see what labs are used with which classes, what media and equipment are used with which labs, or simply what equipment is lurking in which room. Written in PHP and MySQL, this software can be installed on any UNIX / Linux platform, including Macintosh OS X. It is designed to allow users to easily customize the headers, footers and colors to blend with existing sites - no programming experience required. While initial data input is labor intensive, the system will save time later by allowing users to quickly answer questions related to what is in inventory, where it is located, how many are in stock, and where online they can learn more. It will also provide a central location for storing PDFs of handouts, and links to applets and cool sites at other universities. PandASoft comes with over 100 links to online resources pre-installed. We would like to thank Dr. Wolfgang Rueckner and the Harvard University Science Center for providing computers and resources for this project.

  15. Simulation Modeling of Software Development Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calavaro, G. F.; Basili, V. R.; Iazeolla, G.

    1996-01-01

    A simulation modeling approach is proposed for the prediction of software process productivity indices, such as cost and time-to-market, and the sensitivity analysis of such indices to changes in the organization parameters and user requirements. The approach uses a timed Petri Net and Object Oriented top-down model specification. Results demonstrate the model representativeness, and its usefulness in verifying process conformance to expectations, and in performing continuous process improvement and optimization.

  16. Developing Digital Competences Using an Educational Software. A Pedagogical Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magdas, Ioana; Bontea, Timea

    2011-01-01

    Many teachers and people in educational institutions consider it necessary to prepare children for living in a computerized society. The Internet offers an incredible number of opportunities for teachers. The Web offer of e-learning open source platforms reached an impressive configuration. In this article, we present an educational software for…

  17. The development of automated behavior analysis software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaana, Yuki; Prima, Oky Dicky A.; Imabuchi, Takashi; Ito, Hisayoshi; Hosogoe, Kumiko

    2015-03-01

    The measurement of behavior for participants in a conversation scene involves verbal and nonverbal communications. The measurement validity may vary depending on the observers caused by some aspects such as human error, poorly designed measurement systems, and inadequate observer training. Although some systems have been introduced in previous studies to automatically measure the behaviors, these systems prevent participants to talk in a natural way. In this study, we propose a software application program to automatically analyze behaviors of the participants including utterances, facial expressions (happy or neutral), head nods, and poses using only a single omnidirectional camera. The camera is small enough to be embedded into a table to allow participants to have spontaneous conversation. The proposed software utilizes facial feature tracking based on constrained local model to observe the changes of the facial features captured by the camera, and the Japanese female facial expression database to recognize expressions. Our experiment results show that there are significant correlations between measurements observed by the observers and by the software.

  18. Web-based spatial analysis with the ILWIS open source GIS software and satellite images from GEONETCast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemmens, R.; Maathuis, B.; Mannaerts, C.; Foerster, T.; Schaeffer, B.; Wytzisk, A.

    2009-12-01

    This paper involves easy accessible integrated web-based analysis of satellite images with a plug-in based open source software. The paper is targeted to both users and developers of geospatial software. Guided by a use case scenario, we describe the ILWIS software and its toolbox to access satellite images through the GEONETCast broadcasting system. The last two decades have shown a major shift from stand-alone software systems to networked ones, often client/server applications using distributed geo-(web-)services. This allows organisations to combine without much effort their own data with remotely available data and processing functionality. Key to this integrated spatial data analysis is a low-cost access to data from within a user-friendly and flexible software. Web-based open source software solutions are more often a powerful option for developing countries. The Integrated Land and Water Information System (ILWIS) is a PC-based GIS & Remote Sensing software, comprising a complete package of image processing, spatial analysis and digital mapping and was developed as commercial software from the early nineties onwards. Recent project efforts have migrated ILWIS into a modular, plug-in-based open source software, and provide web-service support for OGC-based web mapping and processing. The core objective of the ILWIS Open source project is to provide a maintainable framework for researchers and software developers to implement training components, scientific toolboxes and (web-) services. The latest plug-ins have been developed for multi-criteria decision making, water resources analysis and spatial statistics analysis. The development of this framework is done since 2007 in the context of 52°North, which is an open initiative that advances the development of cutting edge open source geospatial software, using the GPL license. GEONETCast, as part of the emerging Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), puts essential environmental data at the

  19. A modernized PDL approach for Ada software development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usavage, Paul, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The desire to integrate newly available, graphically-oriented Computed Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tools with existing software design approaches is changing the way Program Design Language (PDL) or Process Description Language is used for large system development. In the approach documented here, Software Engineers use graphics tools to model the problem and to describe high level software design in diagrams. An Ada-based PDL is used to document low level design. Some results are provided along with an analysis for each of three smaller General Electric (GE) Ada development projects that utilized variations on this approach. Finally some considerations are identified for larger scale implementation.

  20. A proven approach for more effective software development and maintenance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pajerski, Rose; Hall, Dana; Sinclair, Craig

    1994-01-01

    Modern space flight mission operations and associated ground data systems are increasingly dependent upon reliable, quality software. Critical functions such as command load preparation, health and status monitoring, communications link scheduling and conflict resolution, and transparent gateway protocol conversion are routinely performed by software. Given budget constraints and the ever increasing capabilities of processor technology, the next generation of control centers and data systems will be even more dependent upon software across all aspects of performance. A key challenge now is to implement improved engineering, management, and assurance processes for the development and maintenance of that software; processes that cost less, yield higher quality products, and that self-correct for continual improvement evolution. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has a unique experience base that can be readily tapped to help solve the software challenge. Over the past eighteen years, the Software Engineering Laboratory within the code 500 Flight Dynamics Division has evolved a software development and maintenance methodology that accommodates the unique characteristics of an organization while optimizing and continually improving the organization's software capabilities. This methodology relies upon measurement, analysis, and feedback much analogous to that of control loop systems. It is an approach with a time-tested track record proven through repeated applications across a broad range of operational software development and maintenance projects. This paper describes the software improvement methodology employed by the Software Engineering Laboratory, and how it has been exploited within the Flight Dynamics Division with GSFC Code 500. Examples of specific improvement in the software itself and its processes are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the methodology. Finally, the initial findings are given when this methodology was applied across the

  1. Investigation of a corrugated channel flow with an open source PIV software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivas, Deniz; Bahadır Olcay, A.; Ahn, Hojin

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the corrugated channel flow was investigated by using an open-source particle image velocimetry (PIV) software. The open-source software called OpenPIV was first verified by using images of an earlier experimental work of a vortex ring formation. The corrugated channel flow images were taken with 200 W power LED light source and a high speed camera and those images were analysed with these spatial and temporal tools of OpenPIV. Laminar, transient and turbulent flow regimes were identified when Reynolds number was below 1100, in between 1100 and 2000 and higher than 2000, respectively. The velocity vectors were found to be about 20% lower than the previous study results. The flow inside the grooves was also investigated with OpenPIV and flow characteristics at the grooves were captured when interrogation window size was lowered. The visualization of the flow was presented for different Reynolds numbers with the relative scale values. As a result of this study, OpenPIV software was determined as promising open source PIV analysis software.

  2. Software Development Environment with Integrated Code Rocket Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, Steve; Paterson, David; Spark, Alan; Yu, Bruce Guoxia

    2013-08-01

    The development of software for embedded systems such as spacecraft instruments, data processing or other on-board applications, faces a number of challenges not always fully met by many of the currently available software development environments. In this paper we describe a new suite of software tools, the STAR Software Development Environment (SSDE), which is intended to address many of these challenges, and which should simplify the development of software for spacecraft applications, and for other embedded environments. The SSDE includes Code Rocket, a code visualisation and documentation tool, which provides both pseudocode and flowchart editing facilities. These are fully integrated with the code editing and debugging features of the underlying integrated development environment (IDE).

  3. Section 508 Electronic Information Accessibility Requirements for Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Section 508 Subpart B 1194.21 outlines requirements for operating system and software development in order to create a product that is accessible to users with various disabilities. This portion of Section 508 contains a variety of standards to enable those using assistive technology and with visual, hearing, cognitive and motor difficulties to access all information provided in software. The focus on requirements was limited to the Microsoft Windows® operating system as it is the predominant operating system used at this center. Compliance with this portion of the requirements can be obtained by integrating the requirements into the software development cycle early and by remediating issues in legacy software if possible. There are certain circumstances with software that may arise necessitating an exemption from these requirements, such as design or engineering software using dynamically changing graphics or numbers to convey information. These exceptions can be discussed with the Section 508 Coordinator and another method of accommodation used.

  4. Faculty/Student Surveys Using Open Source Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaceli, Sali

    2004-01-01

    This session will highlight an easy survey package which lets non-technical users create surveys, administer surveys, gather results, and view statistics. This is an open source application all managed online via a web browser. By using phpESP, the faculty is given the freedom of creating various surveys at their convenience and link them to their…

  5. Distance education course on spatial multi-hazard risk assessment, using Open Source software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Westen, C. J.; Frigerio, S.

    2009-04-01

    As part of the capacity building activities of the United Nations University - ITC School on Disaster Geo-Information Management (UNU-ITC DGIM) the International Institute for Geoinformation Science and Earth Observation (ITC) has developed a distance education course on the application of Geographic Information Systems for multi-hazard risk assessment. This course is designed for academic staff, as well as for professionals working in (non-) governmental organizations where knowledge of disaster risk management is essential. The course guides the participants through the entire process of risk assessment, on the basis of a case study of a city exposed to multiple hazards, in a developing country. The courses consists of eight modules, each with a guide book explaining the theoretical background, and guiding the participants through spatial data requirements for risk assessment, hazard assessment procedures, generation of elements at risk databases, vulnerability assessment, qualitative and quantitative risk assessment methods, risk evaluation and risk reduction. Linked to the theory is a large set of exercises, with exercise descriptions, answer sheets, demos and GIS data. The exercises deal with four different types of hazards: earthquakes, flooding, technological hazards, and landslides. One important consideration in designing the course is that people from developing countries should not be restricted in using it due to financial burdens for software acquisition. Therefore the aim was to use Open Source software as a basis. The GIS exercises are written for the ILWIS software. All exercises have also been integrated into a WebGIS, using the Open source software CartoWeb (based on GNU License). It is modular and customizable thanks to its object-oriented architecture and based on a hierarchical structure (to manage and organize every package of information of every step required in risk assessment). Different switches for every component of the risk assessment

  6. NDE Software Developed at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Donald J.; Martin, Richard E.; Rauser, Richard W.; Nichols, Charles; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center has developed several important Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) related software packages for different projects in the last 10 years. Three of the software packages have been created with commercial-grade user interfaces and are available to United States entities for download on the NASA Technology Transfer and Partnership Office server (https://sr.grc.nasa.gov/). This article provides brief overviews of the software packages.

  7. Architecture independent environment for developing engineering software on MIMD computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valimohamed, Karim A.; Lopez, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    Engineers are constantly faced with solving problems of increasing complexity and detail. Multiple Instruction stream Multiple Data stream (MIMD) computers have been developed to overcome the performance limitations of serial computers. The hardware architectures of MIMD computers vary considerably and are much more sophisticated than serial computers. Developing large scale software for a variety of MIMD computers is difficult and expensive. There is a need to provide tools that facilitate programming these machines. First, the issues that must be considered to develop those tools are examined. The two main areas of concern were architecture independence and data management. Architecture independent software facilitates software portability and improves the longevity and utility of the software product. It provides some form of insurance for the investment of time and effort that goes into developing the software. The management of data is a crucial aspect of solving large engineering problems. It must be considered in light of the new hardware organizations that are available. Second, the functional design and implementation of a software environment that facilitates developing architecture independent software for large engineering applications are described. The topics of discussion include: a description of the model that supports the development of architecture independent software; identifying and exploiting concurrency within the application program; data coherence; engineering data base and memory management.

  8. Open Architecture Standard for NASA's Software-Defined Space Telecommunications Radio Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Johnson, Sandra K.; Kacpura, Thomas J.; Hall, Charles S.; Smith, Carl R.; Liebetreu, John

    2008-01-01

    NASA is developing an architecture standard for software-defined radios used in space- and ground-based platforms to enable commonality among radio developments to enhance capability and services while reducing mission and programmatic risk. Transceivers (or transponders) with functionality primarily defined in software (e.g., firmware) have the ability to change their functional behavior through software alone. This radio architecture standard offers value by employing common waveform software interfaces, method of instantiation, operation, and testing among different compliant hardware and software products. These common interfaces within the architecture abstract application software from the underlying hardware to enable technology insertion independently at either the software or hardware layer. This paper presents the initial Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) Architecture for NASA missions to provide the desired software abstraction and flexibility while minimizing the resources necessary to support the architecture.

  9. Software-Based Challenges of Developing the Future Distribution Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Emma; Kiliccote, Sila; McParland, Charles

    2014-06-01

    The software that the utility industry currently uses may be insufficient to analyze the distribution grid as it rapidly modernizes to include active resources such as distributed generation, switch and voltage control, automation, and increasingly complex loads. Although planners and operators have traditionally viewed the distribution grid as a passive load, utilities and consultants increasingly need enhanced analysis that incorporates active distribution grid loads in order to ensure grid reliability. Numerous commercial and open-source tools are available for analyzing distribution grid systems. These tools vary in complexity from providing basic load-flow and capacity analysis under steady-state conditions to time-series analysis and even geographical representations of dynamic and transient events. The need for each type of analysis is not well understood in the industry, nor are the reasons that distribution analysis requires different techniques and tools both from those now available and from those used for transmission analysis. In addition, there is limited understanding of basic capability of the tools and how they should be practically applied to the evolving distribution system. The study reviews the features and state of the art capability of current tools, including usability and visualization, basic analysis functionality, advanced analysis including inverters, and renewable generation and load modeling. We also discuss the need for each type of distribution grid system analysis. In addition to reviewing basic functionality current models, we discuss dynamics and transient simulation in detail and draw conclusions about existing software?s ability to address the needs of the future distribution grid as well as the barriers to modernization of the distribution grid that are posed by the current state of software and model development. Among our conclusions are that accuracy, data transfer, and data processing abilities are key to future

  10. Stakeholder co-development of farm level nutrient management software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Cathal; Mechan, Sarah; Macken-Walsh, Aine; Heanue, Kevin

    2013-04-01

    Over the last number of decades intensification in the use nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in agricultural production has lead to excessive accumulations of these nutrients in soils, groundwaters and surface water bodies (Sutton et al., 2011). According to the European Environment Agency (2012) despite some progress diffuse pollution from agriculture is still significant in more than 40% of Europe's water bodies in rivers and coastal waters, and in one third of the water bodies in lakes and transitional waters. Recently it was estimated that approximately 29% of monitored river channel length is polluted to some degree across the Republic of Ireland. Agricultural sources were suspected in 47 per cent of cases (EPA, 2012). Farm level management practices to reduce nutrient transfers from agricultural land to watercourses can be divided into source reduction and source interception approaches (Ribaudo et al., 2001). Source interception approaches involve capturing nutrients post mobilisation through policy instruments such as riparian buffer zones or wetlands. Conversely, the source reduction approach is preventative in nature and promotes strict management of nutrient at farm and field level to reduce risk of mobilisation in the first instance. This has the potential to deliver a double dividend of reduced nutrient loss to the wider ecosystem while maximising economic return to agricultural production at the field and farm levels. Adoption and use of nutrient management plans among farmers is far from the norm. This research engages key farmer and extension stakeholders to explore how current nutrient management planning software and outputs should be developed to make it more user friendly and usable in a practical way. An open innovation technology co-development approach was adopted to investigate what is demanded by the end users - farm advisors and farmers. Open innovation is a knowledge management strategy that uses the input of stakeholders to improve

  11. Software Architecture for Simultaneous Process Control and Software Development/Modification

    SciTech Connect

    Lenarduzzi, Roberto; Hileman, Michael S; McMillan, David E; Holmes Jr, William; Blankenship, Mark; Wilder, Terry

    2011-01-01

    A software architecture is described that allows modification of some application code sections while the remainder of the application continues executing. This architecture facilitates long term testing and process control because the overall process need not be stopped and restarted to allow modifications or additions to the software. A working implementation using National Instruments LabVIEW{trademark} sub-panel and shared variable features is described as an example. This architecture provides several benefits in both the program development and execution environments. The software is easier to maintain and it is not necessary to recompile the entire program after a modification.

  12. A Survey of Quality Assurance Practices in Biomedical Open Source Software Projects

    PubMed Central

    Koru, Günes; Neisa, Angelica; Umarji, Medha

    2007-01-01

    Background Open source (OS) software is continuously gaining recognition and use in the biomedical domain, for example, in health informatics and bioinformatics. Objectives Given the mission critical nature of applications in this domain and their potential impact on patient safety, it is important to understand to what degree and how effectively biomedical OS developers perform standard quality assurance (QA) activities such as peer reviews and testing. This would allow the users of biomedical OS software to better understand the quality risks, if any, and the developers to identify process improvement opportunities to produce higher quality software. Methods A survey of developers working on biomedical OS projects was conducted to examine the QA activities that are performed. We took a descriptive approach to summarize the implementation of QA activities and then examined some of the factors that may be related to the implementation of such practices. Results Our descriptive results show that 63% (95% CI, 54-72) of projects did not include peer reviews in their development process, while 82% (95% CI, 75-89) did include testing. Approximately 74% (95% CI, 67-81) of developers did not have a background in computing, 80% (95% CI, 74-87) were paid for their contributions to the project, and 52% (95% CI, 43-60) had PhDs. A multivariate logistic regression model to predict the implementation of peer reviews was not significant (likelihood ratio test = 16.86, 9 df, P = .051) and neither was a model to predict the implementation of testing (likelihood ratio test = 3.34, 9 df, P = .95). Conclusions Less attention is paid to peer review than testing. However, the former is a complementary, and necessary, QA practice rather than an alternative. Therefore, one can argue that there are quality risks, at least at this point in time, in transitioning biomedical OS software into any critical settings that may have operational, financial, or safety implications. Developers of

  13. Improving the Software Development Process Using Testability Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voas, Jeffrey M.; Miller, Keith W.

    1991-01-01

    Software testability is the the tendency of code to reveal existing faults during random testing. This paper proposes to take software testability predictions into account throughout the development process. These predictions can be made from formal specifications, design documents, and the code itself. The insight provided by software testability is valuable during design, coding, testing, and quality assurance. We further believe that software testability analysis can play a crucial role in quantifying the likelihood that faults are not hiding after testing does not result in any failures for the current version.

  14. Greazy: Open-Source Software for Automated Phospholipid Tandem Mass Spectrometry Identification.

    PubMed

    Kochen, Michael A; Chambers, Matthew C; Holman, Jay D; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Weintraub, Susan T; Belisle, John T; Islam, M Nurul; Griss, Johannes; Tabb, David L

    2016-06-01

    Lipid identification from data produced with high-throughput technologies is essential to the elucidation of the roles played by lipids in cellular function and disease. Software tools for identifying lipids from tandem mass (MS/MS) spectra have been developed, but they are often costly or lack the sophistication of their proteomics counterparts. We have developed Greazy, an open source tool for the automated identification of phospholipids from MS/MS spectra, that utilizes methods similar to those developed for proteomics. From user-supplied parameters, Greazy builds a phospholipid search space and associated theoretical MS/MS spectra. Experimental spectra are scored against search space lipids with similar precursor masses using a peak score based on the hypergeometric distribution and an intensity score utilizing the percentage of total ion intensity residing in matching peaks. The LipidLama component filters the results via mixture modeling and density estimation. We assess Greazy's performance against the NIST 2014 metabolomics library, observing high accuracy in a search of multiple lipid classes. We compare Greazy/LipidLama against the commercial lipid identification software LipidSearch and show that the two platforms differ considerably in the sets of identified spectra while showing good agreement on those spectra identified by both. Lastly, we demonstrate the utility of Greazy/LipidLama with different instruments. We searched data from replicates of alveolar type 2 epithelial cells obtained with an Orbitrap and from human serum replicates generated on a quadrupole-time-of-flight (Q-TOF). These findings substantiate the application of proteomics derived methods to the identification of lipids. The software is available from the ProteoWizard repository: http://tiny.cc/bumbershoot-vc12-bin64 . PMID:27186799

  15. Open source tools for ATR development and performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, James M.; Dilsavor, Ronald L.; Stubbles, James; Mossing, John C.

    2002-07-01

    Early in almost every engineering project, a decision must be made about tools; should I buy off-the-shelf tools or should I develop my own. Either choice can involve significant cost and risk. Off-the-shelf tools may be readily available, but they can be expensive to purchase and to maintain licenses, and may not be flexible enough to satisfy all project requirements. On the other hand, developing new tools permits great flexibility, but it can be time- (and budget-) consuming, and the end product still may not work as intended. Open source software has the advantages of both approaches without many of the pitfalls. This paper examines the concept of open source software, including its history, unique culture, and informal yet closely followed conventions. These characteristics influence the quality and quantity of software available, and ultimately its suitability for serious ATR development work. We give an example where Python, an open source scripting language, and OpenEV, a viewing and analysis tool for geospatial data, have been incorporated into ATR performance evaluation projects. While this case highlights the successful use of open source tools, we also offer important insight into risks associated with this approach.

  16. OpenCFU, a New Free and Open-Source Software to Count Cell Colonies and Other Circular Objects

    PubMed Central

    Geissmann, Quentin

    2013-01-01

    Counting circular objects such as cell colonies is an important source of information for biologists. Although this task is often time-consuming and subjective, it is still predominantly performed manually. The aim of the present work is to provide a new tool to enumerate circular objects from digital pictures and video streams. Here, I demonstrate that the created program, OpenCFU, is very robust, accurate and fast. In addition, it provides control over the processing parameters and is implemented in an intuitive and modern interface. OpenCFU is a cross-platform and open-source software freely available at http://opencfu.sourceforge.net. PMID:23457446

  17. Standardized development of computer software. Part 1: Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tausworthe, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    This work is a two-volume set on standards for modern software engineering methodology. This volume presents a tutorial and practical guide to the efficient development of reliable computer software, a unified and coordinated discipline for design, coding, testing, documentation, and project organization and management. The aim of the monograph is to provide formal disciplines for increasing the probability of securing software that is characterized by high degrees of initial correctness, readability, and maintainability, and to promote practices which aid in the consistent and orderly development of a total software system within schedule and budgetary constraints. These disciplines are set forth as a set of rules to be applied during software development to drastically reduce the time traditionally spent in debugging, to increase documentation quality, to foster understandability among those who must come in contact with it, and to facilitate operations and alterations of the program as requirements on the program environment change.

  18. Developing a Decision Support System: The Software and Hardware Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Phillip M.

    1989-01-01

    Describes some of the available software and hardware tools that can be used to develop a decision support system implemented on microcomputers. Activities that should be supported by software are discussed, including data entry, data coding, finding and combining data, and data compatibility. Hardware considerations include speed, storage…

  19. Development Of Software To Recognize Parts Of Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Despain, Ronald R.; Tharpe, Roy, Jr.; Davis, Leon; Hauss, Sharon; Shawaga, Larry; Biro, Ron

    1993-01-01

    Report describes first phase in development of digital image-processing subsystem recognizing parts of plants. Subsystem part of robotic system tending and harvesting plants in automated plant-growth chamber. Initial focus on image-processing software that distinguishes among seed heads, stems, and leaves of wheat plants and further distinguishes between these parts and background. Software adaptable to other types of plants.

  20. Novice and Experienced Instructional Software Developers: Effects on Materials Created with Instructional Software Templates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boot, Eddy W.; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.; Veerman, Arja L.

    2007-01-01

    The development of instructional software is a complex process, posing high demands to the technical and didactical expertise of developers. Domain specialists rather than professional developers are often responsible for it, but authoring tools with pre-structured templates claim to compensate for this limited experience. This study compares…

  1. An open-source deconvolution software package for 3-D quantitative fluorescence microscopy imaging

    PubMed Central

    SUN, Y.; DAVIS, P.; KOSMACEK, E. A.; IANZINI, F.; MACKEY, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Deconvolution techniques have been widely used for restoring the 3-D quantitative information of an unknown specimen observed using a wide-field fluorescence microscope. Deconv, an open-source deconvolution software package, was developed for 3-D quantitative fluorescence microscopy imaging and was released under the GNU Public License. Deconv provides numerical routines for simulation of a 3-D point spread function and deconvolution routines implemented three constrained iterative deconvolution algorithms: one based on a Poisson noise model and two others based on a Gaussian noise model. These algorithms are presented and evaluated using synthetic images and experimentally obtained microscope images, and the use of the library is explained. Deconv allows users to assess the utility of these deconvolution algorithms and to determine which are suited for a particular imaging application. The design of Deconv makes it easy for deconvolution capabilities to be incorporated into existing imaging applications. PMID:19941558

  2. An open source cryostage and software analysis method for detection of antifreeze activity.

    PubMed

    Buch, J L; Ramløv, H

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to provide the reader with a simple setup that can detect antifreeze proteins (AFP) by inhibition of ice recrystallisation in very small sample sizes. This includes an open source cryostage, a method for preparing and loading samples as well as a software analysis method. The entire setup was tested using hyperactive AFP from the cerambycid beetle, Rhagium mordax. Samples containing AFP were compared to buffer samples, and the results are visualised as crystal radius evolution over time and in absolute change over 30 min. Statistical analysis showed that samples containing AFP could reliably be told apart from controls after only two minutes of recrystallisation. The goal of providing a fast, cheap and easy method for detecting antifreeze proteins in solution was met, and further development of the system can be followed at https://github.com/pechano/cryostage. PMID:27041219

  3. Estimating Software-Development Costs With Greater Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Dan; Hihn, Jairus; Lum, Karen

    2008-01-01

    COCOMOST is a computer program for use in estimating software development costs. The goal in the development of COCOMOST was to increase estimation accuracy in three ways: (1) develop a set of sensitivity software tools that return not only estimates of costs but also the estimation error; (2) using the sensitivity software tools, precisely define the quantities of data needed to adequately tune cost estimation models; and (3) build a repository of software-cost-estimation information that NASA managers can retrieve to improve the estimates of costs of developing software for their project. COCOMOST implements a methodology, called '2cee', in which a unique combination of well-known pre-existing data-mining and software-development- effort-estimation techniques are used to increase the accuracy of estimates. COCOMOST utilizes multiple models to analyze historical data pertaining to software-development projects and performs an exhaustive data-mining search over the space of model parameters to improve the performances of effort-estimation models. Thus, it is possible to both calibrate and generate estimates at the same time. COCOMOST is written in the C language for execution in the UNIX operating system.

  4. Lean and Agile Development of the AITS Ground Software System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richters, Mark; Dutruel, Etienne; Mecredy, Nicolas

    2013-08-01

    We present the ongoing development of a new ground software system used for integrating, testing and operating spacecraft. The Advanced Integration and Test Services (AITS) project aims at providing a solution for electrical ground support equipment and mission control systems in future Astrium Space Transportation missions. Traditionally ESA ground or flight software development projects are conducted according to a waterfall-like process as specified in the ECSS-E-40 standard promoted by ESA in the European industry. In AITS a decision was taken to adopt an agile development process. This work could serve as a reference for future ESA software projects willing to apply agile concepts.

  5. Pragmatic quality metrics for evolutionary software development models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Royce, Walker

    1990-01-01

    Due to the large number of product, project, and people parameters which impact large custom software development efforts, measurement of software product quality is a complex undertaking. Furthermore, the absolute perspective from which quality is measured (customer satisfaction) is intangible. While we probably can't say what the absolute quality of a software product is, we can determine the relative quality, the adequacy of this quality with respect to pragmatic considerations, and identify good and bad trends during development. While no two software engineers will ever agree on an optimum definition of software quality, they will agree that the most important perspective of software quality is its ease of change. We can call this flexibility, adaptability, or some other vague term, but the critical characteristic of software is that it is soft. The easier the product is to modify, the easier it is to achieve any other software quality perspective. This paper presents objective quality metrics derived from consistent lifecycle perspectives of rework which, when used in concert with an evolutionary development approach, can provide useful insight to produce better quality per unit cost/schedule or to achieve adequate quality more efficiently. The usefulness of these metrics is evaluated by applying them to a large, real world, Ada project.

  6. Open University Staff Development Materials for Tutors of Open Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langley, Anne; Perkins, Isabel

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the evolution of staff development and the new Supporting Open Learners' (SOL) materials at the United Kingdom Open University. Outlines objectives of the SOL program. Discusses issues arising from use of SOL materials, including instructional attitudes; modelling good practice; developing the reflective practitioner; perceived value;…

  7. Ideas for a Cooperative Software Development for Future GGOS Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neidhardt, A.; Ettl, M.

    2012-12-01

    The development of software is a creative process, which offers a huge degree of freedom. In scientific fields a lot of researchers develop their own software for specific needs. Everyone has their own preferences and backgrounds regarding the used programming languages, styles, and platforms. This complexity results in software which is not always directly usable by others in the communities. In addition, the software is often error-prone as hidden bugs are not always revealed. Therefore ideas came up to solve these problems at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell. The results were coding layouts and policies, documentation strategies, the usage of version control, and a consistent process of continuous integration. Within this, the discussed quality factors can define quality metrics which help to quantize code quality. The resulting software is a repository of tested modules that can be used in different programs for the geodetic space techniques. This is one possible contribution to future GGOS stations.

  8. COSTMODL: An automated software development cost estimation tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, George B.

    1991-01-01

    The cost of developing computer software continues to consume an increasing portion of many organizations' total budgets, both in the public and private sector. As this trend develops, the capability to produce reliable estimates of the effort and schedule required to develop a candidate software product takes on increasing importance. The COSTMODL program was developed to provide an in-house capability to perform development cost estimates for NASA software projects. COSTMODL is an automated software development cost estimation tool which incorporates five cost estimation algorithms including the latest models for the Ada language and incrementally developed products. The principal characteristic which sets COSTMODL apart from other software cost estimation programs is its capacity to be completely customized to a particular environment. The estimation equations can be recalibrated to reflect the programmer productivity characteristics demonstrated by the user's organization, and the set of significant factors which effect software development costs can be customized to reflect any unique properties of the user's development environment. Careful use of a capability such as COSTMODL can significantly reduce the risk of cost overruns and failed projects.

  9. HOLON/CADSE: integrating open software standards and formal methods to generate guideline-based decision support agents.

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, B. G.; Sokolsky, O.; Tannen, V.; Wong, A.; Lang, L.; Khoury, A.; Campbell, K.; Qiang, C.; Sahuguet, A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the efforts of a consortium that is trying to develop and validate formal methods and a meta-environment for authoring, checking, and maintaining a large repository of machine executable practice guidelines. The goal is to integrate and extend a number of open software standards so that guidelines in the meta-environment become a resource that any vendor can plug their applications into and run in their proprietary environment provided they conform to the interface standards. PMID:10566502

  10. The development process for the space shuttle primary avionics software system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, T. W.

    1987-01-01

    Primary avionics software system; software development approach; user support and problem diagnosis; software releases and configuration; quality/productivity programs; and software development/production facilities are addressed. Also examined are the external evaluations of the IBM process.

  11. Development of a common software interface

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.; Parrett, J.

    1997-06-16

    The variety of applications, databases, and information technologies makes it difficult to locate and retrieve information or applications that are otherwise openly available. The promise of the World Wide Web was that it was a paradigm for organizing and distributing information. Under this project, we looked at how we could more tightly couple the Web with the UNIX operating system for exchanging information, connecting programs and data, and facilitating collaboration between people in a more natural way. Ease of secure access and the ability to have electronic dialogues on specific questions will become increasingly important as the pressure Increases for scientists and analysts to rapidly access diverse information to make informed judgments and initiate new lines of Investigation.

  12. The Beagle 2 entry descent and landing system (EDLS) software - development and re-use of software for the Red Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symonds, Martin

    2002-07-01

    This paper provides a brief introduction to the Beagle 2 Mars probe and the associated mission, followed by a description of Logica's software responsibility on this programme. The approach taken during software development and implementation of the missioncritical entry, descent and landing system software is then described. This has focussed on maximising re-use of expertise from similar programmes such as Huygens and Rosetta. At the same time effort was devoted to ensure that re-use was enabled within the programme as well as opening up the possibility for re-use on subsequent missions. Finally, the lessons learned are highlighted and a number of conclusions are drawn.

  13. Free and Open Source Software underpinning the European Forest Data Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Aseretto, Dario; Di Leo, Margherita; de Rigo, Daniele; Corti, Paolo; McInerney, Daniel; Camia, Andrea; San-Miguel-Ayanz, Jesús

    2013-04-01

    Worldwide, governments are growingly focusing [1] on free and open source software (FOSS) as a move toward transparency and the freedom to run, copy, study, change and improve the software [2]. The European Commission (EC) is also supporting the development of FOSS (see e.g., [3]). In addition to the financial savings, FOSS contributes to scientific knowledge freedom in computational science (CS) [4] and is increasingly rewarded in the science-policy interface within the emerging paradigm of open science [5-8]. Since complex computational science applications may be affected by software uncertainty [4,9-11], FOSS may help to mitigate part of the impact of software errors by CS community-driven open review, correction and evolution of scientific code [10,12-15]. The continental scale of EC science-based policy support implies wide networks of scientific collaboration. Thematic information systems also may benefit from this approach within reproducible [16] integrated modelling [4]. This is supported by the EC strategy on FOSS: "for the development of new information systems, where deployment is foreseen by parties outside of the EC infrastructure, [F]OSS will be the preferred choice and in any case used whenever possible" [17]. The aim of this contribution is to highlight how a continental scale information system may exploit and integrate FOSS technologies within the transdisciplinary research underpinning such a complex system. A European example is discussed where FOSS innervates both the structure of the information system itself and the inherent transdisciplinary research for modelling the data and information which constitute the system content. The information system. The European Forest Data Centre (EFDAC, http://forest.jrc.ec.europa.eu/efdac/) has been established at the EC Joint Research Centre (JRC) as the focal point for forest data and information in Europe to supply European decision-makers with processed, quality checked and timely policy relevant

  14. CACTI: free, open-source software for the sequential coding of behavioral interactions.

    PubMed

    Glynn, Lisa H; Hallgren, Kevin A; Houck, Jon M; Moyers, Theresa B

    2012-01-01

    The sequential analysis of client and clinician speech in psychotherapy sessions can help to identify and characterize potential mechanisms of treatment and behavior change. Previous studies required coding systems that were time-consuming, expensive, and error-prone. Existing software can be expensive and inflexible, and furthermore, no single package allows for pre-parsing, sequential coding, and assignment of global ratings. We developed a free, open-source, and adaptable program to meet these needs: The CASAA Application for Coding Treatment Interactions (CACTI). Without transcripts, CACTI facilitates the real-time sequential coding of behavioral interactions using WAV-format audio files. Most elements of the interface are user-modifiable through a simple XML file, and can be further adapted using Java through the terms of the GNU Public License. Coding with this software yields interrater reliabilities comparable to previous methods, but at greatly reduced time and expense. CACTI is a flexible research tool that can simplify psychotherapy process research, and has the potential to contribute to the improvement of treatment content and delivery. PMID:22815713

  15. Deciding on Open Innovation: An Exploration of How Firms Create and Capture Value with Open Source Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Lorraine; Finnegan, Patrick

    Open innovation is a paradigm that proposes that firms can and should use external as well as internal innovations/ideas. A popular example of open innovation has been open source software (OSS). The key issues facing organizational decision makers considering OSS strategies is, how does the firm create value for the customer while simultaneously extracting value for itself? However, the adoption of OSS as part of an open innovation strategy is a recent phenomenon and many unanswered questions remain. Taking the viewpoint of seven IS/IT decision makers in European firms, this paper reveals how decision makers considered aspects of value creation, capture, and networking in making decisions on adopting open source software. The findings reveal that while decision makers look to open innovation for value creation and capture, there is still a desire to remain self reliant, resulting in collaborative design (of external innovations) rather than collaborative decision making with value network partners in relation to how such innovations would help create and capture value within firms.

  16. X-ray enhancement software development and test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butterfield, R. L.; Dillon, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    A repertoire of software to optimally analyze various X-ray imagery was successfully developed. Computer techniques are presented to solve many common problems involved in nondestructive testing X-ray analysis.

  17. EarthEd Online: Open Source Online Software to Support Large Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prothero, W. A.

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of the EarthEd Online software project is to support a modern instructional pedagogy in a large, college level, earth science course. It is an ongoing development project that has evolved in a large general education oceanography course over the last decade. Primary goals for the oceanography course are to support learners in acquiring a knowledge of science process, an appreciation for the relevance of science to society, and basic content knowledge. In order to support these goals, EarthEd incorporates: a) integrated access to various kinds of real earth data (and links to web-based data browsers), b) online discussions, live chat, with integrated graphics editing, linking, and upload, c) online writing, reviewing, and grading, d) online homework assignments, e) on demand grade calculation, and f) instructor grade entry and progress reports. The software was created using Macromedia Director. It is distributed to students on a CDROM and updates are downloaded and installed automatically. Data browsers for plate tectonics relevant data ("Our Dynamic Planet"), a virtual exploration of the East Pacific Rise, the World Ocean Atlas-98, and a fishing simulation game are integrated with the EarthEd software. The system is modular which allows new capabilities, such as new data browsers, to be added. Student reactions to the software are positive overall. They are especially appreciative of the on demand grade computation capability. The online writing, commenting and grading is particularly effective in managing the large number of papers that get submitted. The TA's grade the papers, but the instructor can provide feedback to them as they grade the papers, and a record is maintained of all comments and rubric item grades. Commenting is made easy by simply "dragging" a selection of pre-defined comments into the student's text. Scoring is supported by an integrated scoring rubric. All assignments, rubrics, etc. are configured in text files that are downloaded

  18. Perspectives on NASA flight software development - Apollo, Shuttle, Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garman, John R.

    1990-01-01

    Flight data systems' software development is chronicled for the period encompassing NASA's Apollo, Space Shuttle, and (ongoing) Space Station Freedom programs, with attention to the methodologies and 'development tools' employed in each case and their mutual relationships. A dominant concern in all three programs has been the accommodation of software change; it has also been noted that any such long-term program carries the additional challenge of identifying which elements of its software-related 'institutional memory' are most critical, in order to preclude their loss through the retirement, promotion, or transfer of its 'last expert'.

  19. The Development Process of the LUCIFER Control Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jütte, M.; Polsterer, K.; Lehmitz, M.

    2004-07-01

    We present the design and development process of the control software for the LBT NIR spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral-Field Unit for Extragalactic Research (LUCIFER) which is one of the first-light instruments for the LBT on Mt. Graham, Arizona. The LBT will be equipped with two identical LUCIFER instruments for both mirrors. We give an overview of the software architecture and the current state of the software package and describe the development process by using a virtual LUCIFER instrument.

  20. Rapid Application Development with OpenStudio: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, E.; Long, N.; Fleming, K.; Schott, M.; Benne, K.; Hale, E.

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents several case studies of rapidly implemented, audience-specific applications for whole building energy modeling and standards analysis. By tailoring each application to the audience and the task at hand, the required learning curve for new users was greatly reduced. Each case study used OpenStudio, the U.S. Department of Energy's middleware software development kit (SDK). OpenStudio provides an easy interface to the EnergyPlus whole building simulation engine, while extending its capability and providing higher-level functionality such as software interoperability, standards, analysis, and optimization. Each case study is unique in the technology employed to interface with OpenStudio as well as the methods used for user interaction and data presentation. Four case studies are presented.

  1. Open Source Software Openfoam as a New Aerodynamical Simulation Tool for Rocket-Borne Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staszak, T.; Brede, M.; Strelnikov, B.

    2015-09-01

    The only way to do in-situ measurements, which are very important experimental studies for atmospheric science, in the mesoshere/lower thermosphere (MLT) is to use sounding rockets. The drawback of using rockets is the shock wave appearing because of the very high speed of the rocket motion (typically about 1000 mIs). This shock wave disturbs the density, the temperature and the velocity fields in the vicinity of the rocket, compared to undisturbed values of the atmosphere. This effect, however, can be quantified and the measured data has to be corrected not just to make it more precise but simply usable. The commonly accepted and widely used tool for this calculations is the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique developed by GA. Bird which is available as stand-alone program limited to use a single processor. Apart from complications with simulations of flows around bodies related to different flow regimes in the altitude range of MLT, that rise due to exponential density change by several orders of magnitude, a particular hardware configuration introduces significant difficulty for aerodynamical calculations due to choice of the grid sizes mainly depending on the demands on adequate DSMCs and good resolution of geometries with scale differences of factor of iO~. This makes either the calculation time unreasonably long or even prevents the calculation algorithm from converging. In this paper we apply the free open source software OpenFOAM (licensed under GNU GPL) for a three-dimensional CFD-Simulation of a flow around a sounding rocket instrumentation. An advantage of this software package, among other things, is that it can run on high performance clusters, which are easily scalable. We present the first results and discuss the potential of the new tool in applications for sounding rockets.

  2. WIPDash: Work Item and People Dashboard for Software Development Teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, Mikkel R.; Fernandez, Roland; Czerwinski, Mary; Inkpen, Kori; Kulyk, Olga; Robertson, George G.

    We present WIPDash, a visualization for software development teams designed to increase group awareness of work items and code base activity. WIPDash was iteratively designed by working with two development teams, using interviews, observations, and focus groups, as well as sketches of the prototype. Based on those observations and feedback, we prototyped WIPDash and deployed it with two software teams for a one week field study. We summarize the lessons learned, and include suggestions for a future version.

  3. Spacelab software development and integration concepts study report, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rose, P. L.; Willis, B. G.

    1973-01-01

    The proposed software guidelines to be followed by the European Space Research Organization in the development of software for the Spacelab being developed for use as a payload for the space shuttle are documented. Concepts, techniques, and tools needed to assure the success of a programming project are defined as they relate to operation of the data management subsystem, support of experiments and space applications, use with ground support equipment, and for integration testing.

  4. Community for Innovations: Developing an Integrated Concept for Open Innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretschneider, Ulrich; Huber, Michael; Leimeister, Jan Marco; Krcmar, Helmut

    This paper presents a research project called GENIE. It aims at developing a concept for integrating external stakeholders into a company's innovation management through a virtual community. This novel instrument for opening up a company's innovation process to external stakeholders enables collaborative creation and implementation of innovations along the entire innovation process. We focus on software companies and aim at developing and testing this approach in several real-world settings.

  5. OxMaR: open source free software for online minimization and randomization for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Christopher A

    2014-01-01

    Minimization is a valuable method for allocating participants between the control and experimental arms of clinical studies. The use of minimization reduces differences that might arise by chance between the study arms in the distribution of patient characteristics such as gender, ethnicity and age. However, unlike randomization, minimization requires real time assessment of each new participant with respect to the preceding distribution of relevant participant characteristics within the different arms of the study. For multi-site studies, this necessitates centralized computational analysis that is shared between all study locations. Unfortunately, there is no suitable freely available open source or free software that can be used for this purpose. OxMaR was developed to enable researchers in any location to use minimization for patient allocation and to access the minimization algorithm using any device that can connect to the internet such as a desktop computer, tablet or mobile phone. The software is complete in itself and requires no special packages or libraries to be installed. It is simple to set up and run over the internet using online facilities which are very low cost or even free to the user. Importantly, it provides real time information on allocation to the study lead or administrator and generates real time distributed backups with each allocation. OxMaR can readily be modified and customised and can also be used for standard randomization. It has been extensively tested and has been used successfully in a low budget multi-centre study. Hitherto, the logistical difficulties involved in minimization have precluded its use in many small studies and this software should allow more widespread use of minimization which should lead to studies with better matched control and experimental arms. OxMaR should be particularly valuable in low resource settings. PMID:25353169

  6. Development and Application of New Quality Model for Software Projects

    PubMed Central

    Karnavel, K.; Dillibabu, R.

    2014-01-01

    The IT industry tries to employ a number of models to identify the defects in the construction of software projects. In this paper, we present COQUALMO and its limitations and aim to increase the quality without increasing the cost and time. The computation time, cost, and effort to predict the residual defects are very high; this was overcome by developing an appropriate new quality model named the software testing defect corrective model (STDCM). The STDCM was used to estimate the number of remaining residual defects in the software product; a few assumptions and the detailed steps of the STDCM are highlighted. The application of the STDCM is explored in software projects. The implementation of the model is validated using statistical inference, which shows there is a significant improvement in the quality of the software projects. PMID:25478594

  7. Two-step web-mining approach to study geology/geophysics-related open-source software projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrends, Knut; Conze, Ronald

    2013-04-01

    Geology/geophysics is a highly interdisciplinary science, overlapping with, for instance, physics, biology and chemistry. In today's software-intensive work environments, geoscientists often encounter new open-source software from scientific fields that are only remotely related to the own field of expertise. We show how web-mining techniques can help to carry out systematic discovery and evaluation of such software. In a first step, we downloaded ~500 abstracts (each consisting of ~1 kb UTF-8 text) from agu-fm12.abstractcentral.com. This web site hosts the abstracts of all publications presented at AGU Fall Meeting 2012, the world's largest annual geology/geophysics conference. All abstracts belonged to the category "Earth and Space Science Informatics", an interdisciplinary label cross-cutting many disciplines such as "deep biosphere", "atmospheric research", and "mineral physics". Each publication was represented by a highly structured record with ~20 short data attributes, the largest authorship-record being the unstructured "abstract" field. We processed texts of the abstracts with the statistics software "R" to calculate a corpus and a term-document matrix. Using R package "tm", we applied text-mining techniques to filter data and develop hypotheses about software-development activities happening in various geology/geophysics fields. Analyzing the term-document matrix with basic techniques (e.g., word frequencies, co-occurences, weighting) as well as more complex methods (clustering, classification) several key pieces of information were extracted. For example, text-mining can be used to identify scientists who are also developers of open-source scientific software, and the names of their programming projects and codes can also be identified. In a second step, based on the intermediate results found by processing the conference-abstracts, any new hypotheses can be tested in another webmining subproject: by merging the dataset with open data from github

  8. Assesing Ecohydrological Impacts of Forest Disturbance using Open Source Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovette, J. P.; Chang, T.; Treglia, M.; Gan, T.; Duncan, J.

    2014-12-01

    In the past 30 years, land management protocols, climate change, and land use have radically changed the frequency and magnitudes of disturbance regimes. Landscape scale disturbances can change a forest structure, resulting in impacts on adjacent watersheds that may affect water amount/quality for human and natural resource use. Our project quantifies hydrologic changes from of a suite of disturbance events resulting in vegetation cover shifts at watersheds across the continental United States. These disturbance events include: wildfire, insect/disease, deforestation(logging), hurricanes, ice storms, and human land use. Our major question is: Can the effects of disturbance on ecohydrology be generalized across regions, time scales, and spatial scales? Using a workflow of open source tools, and utilizing publicly available data, this work could be extended and leveraged by other researchers. Spatial data on disturbance include the MODIS Global Disturbance Index (NTSG), Landsat 7 Global Forest Change (Hansen dataset), and the Degree of Human Modification (Theobald dataset). Ecohydrologic response data includes USGS NWIS, USFS-LTER climDB/hydroDB, and the CUAHSI HIS.

  9. Trilinos developers SQE guide : ASC software quality engineering practices.

    SciTech Connect

    Willenbring, James Michael; Heroux, Michael Allen

    2013-05-01

    The Trilinos Project is an effort to develop algorithms and enabling technologies within an object-oriented software framework for the solution of large-scale, complex multi-physics engineering and scientific problems. A new software capability is introduced into Trilinos as a package. A Trilinos package is an integral unit and, although there are exceptions such as utility packages, each package is typically developed by a small team of experts in a particular algorithms area such as algebraic preconditioners, nonlinear solvers, etc. The Trilinos Developers SQE Guide is a resource for Trilinos package developers who are working under Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) and are therefore subject to the ASC Software Quality Engineering Practices as described in the Sandia National Laboratories Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Software Quality Plan: ASC Software Quality Engineering Practices Version 3.0 document [1]. The Trilinos Developer Policies webpage [2] contains a lot of detailed information that is essential for all Trilinos developers. The Trilinos Software Lifecycle Model [3]defines the default lifecycle model for Trilinos packages and provides a context for many of the practices listed in this document.

  10. TWiki as a platform for collaborative software development management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radziwill, Nicole M.; Shelton, Amy L.

    2004-09-01

    The software development process in Green Bank is managed in six-week development cycles, where two cycles fall within one quarter. Each cycle, a Plan of Record is devised which outlines the team's commitments, deliverables, technical leads and scientific sponsors. To be productive and efficient, the team must not only be able to track its progress towards meeting commitments, but also to communicate and circulate the information that will help it meet its goals effectively. In the early summer of 2003, the Software Development Division installed a wiki web site using the TWiki product to improve the effectiveness of the team. Wiki sites contain web pages that are maintainable using a web interface by anyone who becomes a registered user of the site. Because the site naturally supports group involvement, the Plan of Record on the wiki now serves as the central dashboard for project tracking each development cycle. As an example of how the wiki improves productivity, software documentation is now tracked as evidence of the software deliverable. Written status reports are thus not required when the Plan of Record and associated wiki pages are kept up to date. The wiki approach has been quite successful in Green Bank for document management as well as software development management, and has rapidly extended beyond the bounds of the software development group for information management.

  11. Adoption of Requirements Engineering Practices in Malaysian Software Development Companies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solemon, Badariah; Sahibuddin, Shamsul; Ghani, Abdul Azim Abd

    This paper presents exploratory survey results on Requirements Engineering (RE) practices of some software development companies in Malaysia. The survey attempted to identify patterns of RE practices the companies are implementing. Information required for the survey was obtained through a survey, mailed self-administered questionnaires distributed to project managers and software developers who are working at software development companies operated across the country. The results showed that the overall adoption of the RE practices in these companies is strong. However, the results also indicated that fewer companies in the survey have use appropriate CASE tools or software to support their RE process and practices, define traceability policies and maintain traceability manual in their projects.

  12. Developing satellite ground control software through graphical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailin, Sidney; Henderson, Scott; Paterra, Frank; Truszkowski, Walt

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses a program of investigation into software development as graphical modeling. The goal of this work is a more efficient development and maintenance process for the ground-based software that controls unmanned scientific satellites launched by NASA. The main hypothesis of the program is that modeling of the spacecraft and its subsystems, and reasoning about such models, can--and should--form the key activities of software development; by using such models as inputs, the generation of code to perform various functions (such as simulation and diagnostics of spacecraft components) can be automated. Moreover, we contend that automation can provide significant support for reasoning about the software system at the diagram level.

  13. OASIS: a data and software distribution service for Open Science Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bockelman, B.; Caballero Bejar, J.; De Stefano, J.; Hover, J.; Quick, R.; Teige, S.

    2014-06-01

    The Open Science Grid encourages the concept of software portability: a user's scientific application should be able to run at as many sites as possible. It is necessary to provide a mechanism for OSG Virtual Organizations to install software at sites. Since its initial release, the OSG Compute Element has provided an application software installation directory to Virtual Organizations, where they can create their own sub-directory, install software into that sub-directory, and have the directory shared on the worker nodes at that site. The current model has shortcomings with regard to permissions, policies, versioning, and the lack of a unified, collective procedure or toolset for deploying software across all sites. Therefore, a new mechanism for data and software distributing is desirable. The architecture for the OSG Application Software Installation Service (OASIS) is a server-client model: the software and data are installed only once in a single place, and are automatically distributed to all client sites simultaneously. Central file distribution offers other advantages, including server-side authentication and authorization, activity records, quota management, data validation and inspection, and well-defined versioning and deletion policies. The architecture, as well as a complete analysis of the current implementation, will be described in this paper.

  14. Free and Open Source Software underpinning the European Forest Data Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Aseretto, Dario; Di Leo, Margherita; de Rigo, Daniele; Corti, Paolo; McInerney, Daniel; Camia, Andrea; San-Miguel-Ayanz, Jesús

    2013-04-01

    Worldwide, governments are growingly focusing [1] on free and open source software (FOSS) as a move toward transparency and the freedom to run, copy, study, change and improve the software [2]. The European Commission (EC) is also supporting the development of FOSS (see e.g., [3]). In addition to the financial savings, FOSS contributes to scientific knowledge freedom in computational science (CS) [4] and is increasingly rewarded in the science-policy interface within the emerging paradigm of open science [5-8]. Since complex computational science applications may be affected by software uncertainty [4,9-11], FOSS may help to mitigate part of the impact of software errors by CS community-driven open review, correction and evolution of scientific code [10,12-15]. The continental scale of EC science-based policy support implies wide networks of scientific collaboration. Thematic information systems also may benefit from this approach within reproducible [16] integrated modelling [4]. This is supported by the EC strategy on FOSS: "for the development of new information systems, where deployment is foreseen by parties outside of the EC infrastructure, [F]OSS will be the preferred choice and in any case used whenever possible" [17]. The aim of this contribution is to highlight how a continental scale information system may exploit and integrate FOSS technologies within the transdisciplinary research underpinning such a complex system. A European example is discussed where FOSS innervates both the structure of the information system itself and the inherent transdisciplinary research for modelling the data and information which constitute the system content. The information system. The European Forest Data Centre (EFDAC, http://forest.jrc.ec.europa.eu/efdac/) has been established at the EC Joint Research Centre (JRC) as the focal point for forest data and information in Europe to supply European decision-makers with processed, quality checked and timely policy relevant

  15. Open software tools for eddy covariance flux partitioning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agro-ecosystem management and assessment will benefit greatly from the development of reliable techniques for partitioning evapotranspiration (ET) into evaporation (E) and transpiration (T). Among other activities, flux partitioning can aid in evaluating consumptive vs. non-consumptive agricultural...

  16. Interferometer software development at JPL: using software engineering to reduce integration headaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deck, Michael D.; Hines, Braden E.

    1998-07-01

    This paper describes some of the software engineering practices that are being used by the Realtime Interferometer Control Systems Testbed (RICST) project at JPL to address integration and integratability issues.New documentation and review techniques based on formal methods permit early identification of potential interface problems. An incremental life cycle improves the manageability of the software development process. A 'cleanroom mindset' reduces the number of defects that have to be removed during integration and test. And team ownership of work products permits the project to grow while providing a variety of opportunities to team members. This paper presents data, including software metrics and analysis, from the first several incremental deliveries developed by the RICST project.

  17. Framework Support For Knowledge-Based Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huseth, Steve

    1988-03-01

    The advent of personal engineering workstations has brought substantial information processing power to the individual programmer. Advanced tools and environment capabilities supporting the software lifecycle are just beginning to become generally available. However, many of these tools are addressing only part of the software development problem by focusing on rapid construction of self-contained programs by a small group of talented engineers. Additional capabilities are required to support the development of large programming systems where a high degree of coordination and communication is required among large numbers of software engineers, hardware engineers, and managers. A major player in realizing these capabilities is the framework supporting the software development environment. In this paper we discuss our research toward a Knowledge-Based Software Assistant (KBSA) framework. We propose the development of an advanced framework containing a distributed knowledge base that can support the data representation needs of tools, provide environmental support for the formalization and control of the software development process, and offer a highly interactive and consistent user interface.

  18. Recent developments in the ABINIT software package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonze, X.; Jollet, F.; Abreu Araujo, F.; Adams, D.; Amadon, B.; Applencourt, T.; Audouze, C.; Beuken, J.-M.; Bieder, J.; Bokhanchuk, A.; Bousquet, E.; Bruneval, F.; Caliste, D.; Côté, M.; Dahm, F.; Da Pieve, F.; Delaveau, M.; Di Gennaro, M.; Dorado, B.; Espejo, C.; Geneste, G.; Genovese, L.; Gerossier, A.; Giantomassi, M.; Gillet, Y.; Hamann, D. R.; He, L.; Jomard, G.; Laflamme Janssen, J.; Le Roux, S.; Levitt, A.; Lherbier, A.; Liu, F.; Lukačević, I.; Martin, A.; Martins, C.; Oliveira, M. J. T.; Poncé, S.; Pouillon, Y.; Rangel, T.; Rignanese, G.-M.; Romero, A. H.; Rousseau, B.; Rubel, O.; Shukri, A. A.; Stankovski, M.; Torrent, M.; Van Setten, M. J.; Van Troeye, B.; Verstraete, M. J.; Waroquiers, D.; Wiktor, J.; Xu, B.; Zhou, A.; Zwanziger, J. W.

    2016-08-01

    ABINIT is a package whose main program allows one to find the total energy, charge density, electronic structure and many other properties of systems made of electrons and nuclei, (molecules and periodic solids) within Density Functional Theory (DFT), Many-Body Perturbation Theory (GW approximation and Bethe-Salpeter equation) and Dynamical Mean Field Theory (DMFT). ABINIT also allows to optimize the geometry according to the DFT forces and stresses, to perform molecular dynamics simulations using these forces, and to generate dynamical matrices, Born effective charges and dielectric tensors. The present paper aims to describe the new capabilities of ABINIT that have been developed since 2009. It covers both physical and technical developments inside the ABINIT code, as well as developments provided within the ABINIT package. The developments are described with relevant references, input variables, tests and tutorials.

  19. JHelioviewer: Open-Source Software for Discovery and Image Access in the Petabyte Age (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, D.; Dimitoglou, G.; Langenberg, M.; Pagel, S.; Dau, A.; Nuhn, M.; Garcia Ortiz, J. P.; Dietert, H.; Schmidt, L.; Hughitt, V. K.; Ireland, J.; Fleck, B.

    2010-12-01

    The unprecedented torrent of data returned by the Solar Dynamics Observatory is both a blessing and a barrier: a blessing for making available data with significantly higher spatial and temporal resolution, but a barrier for scientists to access, browse and analyze them. With such staggering data volume, the data is bound to be accessible only from a few repositories and users will have to deal with data sets effectively immobile and practically difficult to download. From a scientist's perspective this poses three challenges: accessing, browsing and finding interesting data while avoiding the proverbial search for a needle in a haystack. To address these challenges, we have developed JHelioviewer, an open-source visualization software that lets users browse large data volumes both as still images and movies. We did so by deploying an efficient image encoding, storage, and dissemination solution using the JPEG 2000 standard. This solution enables users to access remote images at different resolution levels as a single data stream. Users can view, manipulate, pan, zoom, and overlay JPEG 2000 compressed data quickly, without severe network bandwidth penalties. Besides viewing data, the browser provides third-party metadata and event catalog integration to quickly locate data of interest, as well as an interface to the Virtual Solar Observatory to download science-quality data. As part of the Helioviewer Project, JHelioviewer offers intuitive ways to browse large amounts of heterogeneous data remotely and provides an extensible and customizable open-source platform for the scientific community.

  20. Advancing global marine biogeography research with open-source GIS software and cloud-computing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fujioka, Ei; Vanden Berghe, Edward; Donnelly, Ben; Castillo, Julio; Cleary, Jesse; Holmes, Chris; McKnight, Sean; Halpin, patrick

    2012-01-01

    Across many scientific domains, the ability to aggregate disparate datasets enables more meaningful global analyses. Within marine biology, the Census of Marine Life served as the catalyst for such a global data aggregation effort. Under the Census framework, the Ocean Biogeographic Information System was established to coordinate an unprecedented aggregation of global marine biogeography data. The OBIS data system now contains 31.3 million observations, freely accessible through a geospatial portal. The challenges of storing, querying, disseminating, and mapping a global data collection of this complexity and magnitude are significant. In the face of declining performance and expanding feature requests, a redevelopment of the OBIS data system was undertaken. Following an Open Source philosophy, the OBIS technology stack was rebuilt using PostgreSQL, PostGIS, GeoServer and OpenLayers. This approach has markedly improved the performance and online user experience while maintaining a standards-compliant and interoperable framework. Due to the distributed nature of the project and increasing needs for storage, scalability and deployment flexibility, the entire hardware and software stack was built on a Cloud Computing environment. The flexibility of the platform, combined with the power of the application stack, enabled rapid re-development of the OBIS infrastructure, and ensured complete standards-compliance.

  1. Learning and Best Practices for Learning in Open-Source Software Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Vandana; Holt, Lila

    2013-01-01

    This research is about participants who use open-source software (OSS) discussion forums for learning. Learning in online communities of education as well as non-education-related online communities has been studied under the lens of social learning theory and situated learning for a long time. In this research, we draw parallels among these two…

  2. Facilitating Constructive Alignment in Power Systems Engineering Education Using Free and Open-Source Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanfretti, L.; Milano, F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes how the use of free and open-source software (FOSS) can facilitate the application of constructive alignment theory in power systems engineering education by enabling the deep learning approach in power system analysis courses. With this aim, this paper describes the authors' approach in using the Power System Analysis Toolbox…

  3. Promoting Conceptual Change through Active Learning Using Open Source Software for Physics Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baser, Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports upon an active learning approach that promotes conceptual change when studying direct current electricity circuits, using free open source software, "Qucs". The study involved a total of 102 prospective mathematics teacher students. Prior to instruction, students' understanding of direct current electricity was determined by a…

  4. PyPedal, an open source software package for pedigree analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The open source software package PyPedal (http://pypedal.sourceforge.net/) was first released in 2002, and provided users with a set of simple tools for manipulating pedigrees. Its flexibility has been demonstrated by its used in a number of settings for large and small populations. After substantia...

  5. Tensor calculus with open-source software: the SageManifolds project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourgoulhon, Eric; Bejger, Michal; Mancini, Marco

    2015-04-01

    The SageManifolds project aims at extending the mathematics software system Sage towards differential geometry and tensor calculus. Like Sage, SageManifolds is free, open- source and is based on the Python programming language. We discuss here some details of the implementation, which relies on Sage's parent/element framework, and present a concrete example of use.

  6. Exploring the Factors Influencing the Adoption of Open Source Software in Western Cape Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Kevin; Begg, Shameemah; Tanner, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    Open Source Software (OSS) presents many benefits to both the private and the public sectors, and has proven to be a viable solution in schools. Although a policy mandating the use of OSS exists in the Western Cape province of South Africa, very few schools in the province have adopted OSS. The education system in South Africa is currently facing…

  7. SIRU development. Volume 3: Software description and program documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehrle, J.

    1973-01-01

    The development and initial evaluation of a strapdown inertial reference unit (SIRU) system are discussed. The SIRU configuration is a modular inertial subsystem with hardware and software features that achieve fault tolerant operational capabilities. The SIRU redundant hardware design is formulated about a six gyro and six accelerometer instrument module package. The six axes array provides redundant independent sensing and the symmetry enables the formulation of an optimal software redundant data processing structure with self-contained fault detection and isolation (FDI) capabilities. The basic SIRU software coding system used in the DDP-516 computer is documented.

  8. The development process of the LUCIFER control software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juette, Marcus; Polsterer, Kai L.; Lehmitz, Michael; Knierim, Volker

    2004-09-01

    In this paper we present the software development process and history of the LUCIFER (LBT NIR spectroscopic Utility with Camera and Integral- Field Unit for Extragalactic Research) multi-mode near-infrared instrument, which is one of the first light instruments of the LBT on Mt. Graham, Arizona. The software is realised as a distributed system in Java using its remote method invocation service (RMI). We describe the current status of the software and give an overview of the planned computer hardware architecture.

  9. A Methodology for Developing Environmental Information Systems with Software Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanasiadis, Ioannis N.; Mitkas, Pericles A.

    This article presents a unifying methodology for developing environmental information systems with software agents. Based on the experience reported in recent literature, we abstract common requirements of environmental information systems into agent types, combine state-of-the-art tools from computer science, service-oriented software engineering and artificial intelligence domains, as software agents and machine learning, and illustrate their potential for solving real-world problems. Specifically, two generic agent types are specified that behave as information carriers and decision makers, which provide an appropriate abstraction for deployment of added-value services in environmental information systems.

  10. OptFlux: an open-source software platform for in silico metabolic engineering

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Over the last few years a number of methods have been proposed for the phenotype simulation of microorganisms under different environmental and genetic conditions. These have been used as the basis to support the discovery of successful genetic modifications of the microbial metabolism to address industrial goals. However, the use of these methods has been restricted to bioinformaticians or other expert researchers. The main aim of this work is, therefore, to provide a user-friendly computational tool for Metabolic Engineering applications. Results OptFlux is an open-source and modular software aimed at being the reference computational application in the field. It is the first tool to incorporate strain optimization tasks, i.e., the identification of Metabolic Engineering targets, using Evolutionary Algorithms/Simulated Annealing metaheuristics or the previously proposed OptKnock algorithm. It also allows the use of stoichiometric metabolic models for (i) phenotype simulation of both wild-type and mutant organisms, using the methods of Flux Balance Analysis, Minimization of Metabolic Adjustment or Regulatory on/off Minimization of Metabolic flux changes, (ii) Metabolic Flux Analysis, computing the admissible flux space given a set of measured fluxes, and (iii) pathway analysis through the calculation of Elementary Flux Modes. OptFlux also contemplates several methods for model simplification and other pre-processing operations aimed at reducing the search space for optimization algorithms. The software supports importing/exporting to several flat file formats and it is compatible with the SBML standard. OptFlux has a visualization module that allows the analysis of the model structure that is compatible with the layout information of Cell Designer, allowing the superimposition of simulation results with the model graph. Conclusions The OptFlux software is freely available, together with documentation and other resources, thus bridging the gap from

  11. Study on Spacelab software development and integration concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted to define the complexity and magnitude of the Spacelab software challenge. The study was based on current Spacelab program concepts, anticipated flight schedules, and ground operation plans. The study was primarily directed toward identifying and solving problems related to the experiment flight application and tests and checkout software executing in the Spacelab onboard command and data management subsystem (CDMS) computers and electrical ground support equipment (EGSE). The study provides a conceptual base from which it is possible to proceed into the development phase of the Software Test and Integration Laboratory (STIL) and establishes guidelines for the definition of standards which will ensure that the total Spacelab software is understood prior to entering development.

  12. Software Development and Test Methodology for a Distributed Ground System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritter, George; Guillebeau, Pat; McNair, Ann R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Payload Operations Center (POC) ground system has evolved over a period of about 10 years. During this time the software processes have migrated from more traditional to more contemporary development processes in an effort to minimize unnecessary overhead while maximizing process benefits. The Software processes that have evolved still emphasize requirements capture, software configuration management, design documenting, and making sure the products that have been developed are accountable to initial requirements. This paper will give an overview of how the Software Processes have evolved, highlighting the positives as well as the negatives. In addition, we will mention the COTS tools that have been integrated into the processes and how the COTS have provided value to the project.

  13. Implementation and Simulation Results using Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddock, Robert W.; DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.; Bowes, Angela; Prince, Jill L. H.; Powell, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    An Autonomous Aerobraking software system is currently under development with support from the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) that would move typically ground-based operations functions to onboard an aerobraking spacecraft, reducing mission risk and mission cost. The suite of software that will enable autonomous aerobraking is the Autonomous Aerobraking Development Software (AADS) and consists of an ephemeris model, onboard atmosphere estimator, temperature and loads prediction, and a maneuver calculation. The software calculates the maneuver time, magnitude and direction commands to maintain the spacecraft periapsis parameters within design structural load and/or thermal constraints. The AADS is currently tested in simulations at Mars, with plans to also evaluate feasibility and performance at Venus and Titan.

  14. Development and implementation of software systems for imaging spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boardman, J.W.; Clark, R.N.; Mazer, A.S.; Biehl, L.L.; Kruse, F.A.; Torson, J.; Staenz, K.

    2006-01-01

    Specialized software systems have played a crucial role throughout the twenty-five year course of the development of the new technology of imaging spectroscopy, or hyperspectral remote sensing. By their very nature, hyperspectral data place unique and demanding requirements on the computer software used to visualize, analyze, process and interpret them. Often described as a marriage of the two technologies of reflectance spectroscopy and airborne/spaceborne remote sensing, imaging spectroscopy, in fact, produces data sets with unique qualities, unlike previous remote sensing or spectrometer data. Because of these unique spatial and spectral properties hyperspectral data are not readily processed or exploited with legacy software systems inherited from either of the two parent fields of study. This paper provides brief reviews of seven important software systems developed specifically for imaging spectroscopy.

  15. Software Engineering Research/Developer Collaborations in 2004 (C104)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pressburger, Tom; Markosian, Lawrance

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, six collaborations between software engineering technology providers and NASA software development personnel deployed a total of five software engineering technologies (for references, see Section 7.2) on the NASA projects. The main purposes were to benefit the projects, infuse the technologies if beneficial into NASA, and give feedback to the technology providers to improve the technologies. Each collaboration project produced a final report (for references, see Section 7.1). Section 2 of this report summarizes each project, drawing from the final reports and communications with the software developers and technology providers. Section 3 indicates paths to further infusion of the technologies into NASA practice. Section 4 summarizes some technology transfer lessons learned. Section 6 lists the acronyms used in this report.

  16. Development of the ISS EMU Dashboard Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernard, Craig; Hill, Terry R.

    2011-01-01

    The EMU (Extra-Vehicular Mobility Unit) Dashboard was developed at NASA s Johnson Space Center to aid in real-time mission support for the ISS (International Space Station) and Shuttle EMU space suit by time synchronizing down-linked video, space suit data and audio from the mission control audio loops. Once the input streams are synchronized and recorded, the data can be replayed almost instantly and has proven invaluable in understanding in-flight hardware anomalies and playing back information conveyed by the crew to missions control and the back room support. This paper will walk through the development from an engineer s idea brought to life by an intern to real time mission support and how this tool is evolving today and its challenges to support EVAs (Extra-Vehicular Activities) and human exploration in the 21st century.

  17. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system subsystem 143 software development plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, D. A.

    1994-11-01

    This plan describes the activities to be performed and the controls to be applied to the process of specifying, developing, and qualifying the data acquisition software for the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System Subsystem 143 Instrumentation and Data Acquisition System (IDAS). This plan will serve as a software quality assurance plan, a verification and validation (V and V) plan, and a configuration management plan.

  18. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system subsystem 143 software development plan

    SciTech Connect

    King, D.A.

    1994-11-10

    This plan describes the activities to be performed and the controls to be applied to the process of specifying, developing, and qualifying the data acquisition software for the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System Subsystem 143 Instrumentation and Data Acquisition System (IDAS). This plan will serve as a software quality assurance plan, a verification and validation (V and V) plan, and a configuration management plan.

  19. Project management in the development of scientific software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platz, Jochen

    1986-08-01

    This contribution is a rough outline of a comprehensive project management model for the development of software for scientific applications. The model was tested in the unique environment of the Siemens AG Corporate Research and Technology Division. Its focal points are the structuring of project content - the so-called phase organization, the project organization and the planning model used, and its particular applicability to innovative projects. The outline focuses largely on actual project management aspects rather than associated software engineering measures.

  20. Need for multiple approaches in collaborative software development.

    SciTech Connect

    LePoire, D. J.

    2002-02-26

    The need to share software and reintegrate it into new applications presents a difficult but important challenge. Component-based development as an approach to this problem is receiving much attention in professional journals and academic curricula. However, there are many other approaches to collaborative software development that might be more appropriate. This paper reviews a few of these approaches and discusses criteria for the conditions and contexts in which these alternative approaches might be more appropriate. This paper complements the discussion of context-based development team organizations and processes. Examples from a small development team that interacts with a larger professional community are analyzed.

  1. Operation and test of hybridized silicon p-i-n arrays using open-source array control hardware and software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Andrew C.; Ninkov, Zoran; Burley, Gregory S.; Forrest, William J.; McMurtry, Craig W.; Avery, Lars E.

    2003-05-01

    A system for controlling and testing high-resolution non-destructive astronomical imagers was constructed using open-source components, both hardware and software. The open-source electronics design, originated by Carnegie Observatories (OCIW) for CCD cameras, was modified, assembled, and augmented with new circuitry which facilitates monitoring of voltages and currents. The electronics was run from Python user interface software based on a design from the University of Rochester. This new software utilized the Numarray and pyFITS modules developed at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI). Interfacing to the "dv" FITS image analysis package from the NASA IRTF was also implemented. Python (the STScI language of choice) was used as the primary language for systems integration, scripts for data acquisition, and scripts for data analysis. The DSP clocking software was a mixture of C and Motorola 56303 assembly. An interrupt-driven kernel-mode PCI device driver for Red Hat Linux was written in C, and used the PC processor and memory for image processing and acquisition. Two 1Κ × 1Κ Raytheon SB226-based hybridized silicon p-i-n arrays were operated and tested with the new system at temperatures as low as 10K. Signal path gain, node capacitance, well depth, dark current, and MTF measurements were made and are presented here.

  2. Development of a software for quantitative evaluation radiotherapy target and organ-at-risk segmentation comparison.

    PubMed

    Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Awan, Musaddiq; Bedrick, Steven; Rasch, Coen R N; Rosenthal, David I; Fuller, Clifton D

    2014-02-01

    Modern radiotherapy requires accurate region of interest (ROI) inputs for plan optimization and delivery. Target delineation, however, remains operator-dependent and potentially serves as a major source of treatment delivery error. In order to optimize this critical, yet observer-driven process, a flexible web-based platform for individual and cooperative target delineation analysis and instruction was developed in order to meet the following unmet needs: (1) an open-source/open-access platform for automated/semiautomated quantitative interobserver and intraobserver ROI analysis and comparison, (2) a real-time interface for radiation oncology trainee online self-education in ROI definition, and (3) a source for pilot data to develop and validate quality metrics for institutional and cooperative group quality assurance efforts. The resultant software, Target Contour Testing/Instructional Computer Software (TaCTICS), developed using Ruby on Rails, has since been implemented and proven flexible, feasible, and useful in several distinct analytical and research applications. PMID:24043593

  3. Dependability modeling and assessment in UML-based software development.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Simona; Merseguer, José; Petriu, Dorina C

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of software nonfunctional properties (NFP) is an important problem in software development. In the context of model-driven development, an emerging approach for the analysis of different NFPs consists of the following steps: (a) to extend the software models with annotations describing the NFP of interest; (b) to transform automatically the annotated software model to the formalism chosen for NFP analysis; (c) to analyze the formal model using existing solvers; (d) to assess the software based on the results and give feedback to designers. Such a modeling→analysis→assessment approach can be applied to any software modeling language, be it general purpose or domain specific. In this paper, we focus on UML-based development and on the dependability NFP, which encompasses reliability, availability, safety, integrity, and maintainability. The paper presents the profile used to extend UML with dependability information, the model transformation to generate a DSPN formal model, and the assessment of the system properties based on the DSPN results. PMID:22988428

  4. Semi-automatic development of Payload Operations Control Center software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballin, Sidney

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes the current status of CTA's investigation of methods and tools for automating the software development process in NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 500. The emphasis in this effort has been on methods and tools in support of software reuse. The most recent phase of the effort has been a domain analysis of Payload Operations Control Center (POCC) software. This report summarizes the results of the domain analysis, and proposes an approach to semi-automatic development of POCC Application Processor (AP) software based on these results. The domain analysis enabled us to abstract, from specific systems, the typical components of a POCC AP. We were also able to identify patterns in the way one AP might be different from another. These two perspectives--aspects that tend to change from AP to AP, and aspects that tend to remain the same--suggest an overall approach to the reuse of POCC AP software. We found that different parts of an AP require different development technologies. We propose a hybrid approach that combines constructive and generative technologies. Constructive methods emphasize the assembly of pre-defined reusable components. Generative methods provide for automated generation of software from specifications in a very-high-level language (VHLL).

  5. Dependability Modeling and Assessment in UML-Based Software Development

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Simona; Merseguer, José; Petriu, Dorina C.

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of software nonfunctional properties (NFP) is an important problem in software development. In the context of model-driven development, an emerging approach for the analysis of different NFPs consists of the following steps: (a) to extend the software models with annotations describing the NFP of interest; (b) to transform automatically the annotated software model to the formalism chosen for NFP analysis; (c) to analyze the formal model using existing solvers; (d) to assess the software based on the results and give feedback to designers. Such a modeling→analysis→assessment approach can be applied to any software modeling language, be it general purpose or domain specific. In this paper, we focus on UML-based development and on the dependability NFP, which encompasses reliability, availability, safety, integrity, and maintainability. The paper presents the profile used to extend UML with dependability information, the model transformation to generate a DSPN formal model, and the assessment of the system properties based on the DSPN results. PMID:22988428

  6. SCaN Testbed Software Development and Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kacpura, Thomas J.; Varga, Denise M.

    2012-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed an on-orbit, adaptable, Software Defined Radio (SDR)Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS)-based testbed facility to conduct a suite of experiments to advance technologies, reduce risk, and enable future mission capabilities on the International Space Station (ISS). The SCAN Testbed Project will provide NASA, industry, other Government agencies, and academic partners the opportunity to develop and field communications, navigation, and networking technologies in the laboratory and space environment based on reconfigurable, SDR platforms and the STRS Architecture.The SDRs are a new technology for NASA, and the support infrastructure they require is different from legacy, fixed function radios. SDRs offer the ability to reconfigure on-orbit communications by changing software for new waveforms and operating systems to enable new capabilities or fix any anomalies, which was not a previous option. They are not stand alone devices, but required a new approach to effectively control them and flow data. This requires extensive software to be developed to utilize the full potential of these reconfigurable platforms. The paper focuses on development, integration and testing as related to the avionics processor system, and the software required to command, control, monitor, and interact with the SDRs, as well as the other communication payload elements. An extensive effort was required to develop the flight software and meet the NASA requirements for software quality and safety. The flight avionics must be radiation tolerant, and these processors have limited capability in comparison to terrestrial counterparts. A big challenge was that there are three SDRs onboard, and interfacing with multiple SDRs simultaneously complicatesd the effort. The effort also includes ground software, which is a key element for both the command of the payload, and displaying data created by the payload. The verification of

  7. DPOI: Distributed software system development platform for ocean information service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhongwen; Hu, Keyong; Jiang, Yongguo; Sun, Zhaosui

    2015-02-01

    Ocean information management is of great importance as it has been employed in many areas of ocean science and technology. However, the developments of Ocean Information Systems (OISs) often suffer from low efficiency because of repetitive work and continuous modifications caused by dynamic requirements. In this paper, the basic requirements of OISs are analyzed first, and then a novel platform DPOI is proposed to improve development efficiency and enhance software quality of OISs by providing off-the-shelf resources. In the platform, the OIS is decomposed hierarchically into a set of modules, which can be reused in different system developments. These modules include the acquisition middleware and data loader that collect data from instruments and files respectively, the database that stores data consistently, the components that support fast application generation, the web services that make the data from distributed sources syntactical by use of predefined schemas and the configuration toolkit that enables software customization. With the assistance of the development platform, the software development needs no programming and the development procedure is thus accelerated greatly. We have applied the development platform in practical developments and evaluated its efficiency in several development practices and different development approaches. The results show that DPOI significantly improves development efficiency and software quality.

  8. Framework for Development of Object-Oriented Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez-Poveda, Gus; Ciavarella, Tony; Nieten, Dan

    2004-01-01

    The Real-Time Control (RTC) Application Framework is a high-level software framework written in C++ that supports the rapid design and implementation of object-oriented application programs. This framework provides built-in functionality that solves common software development problems within distributed client-server, multi-threaded, and embedded programming environments. When using the RTC Framework to develop software for a specific domain, designers and implementers can focus entirely on the details of the domain-specific software rather than on creating custom solutions, utilities, and frameworks for the complexities of the programming environment. The RTC Framework was originally developed as part of a Space Shuttle Launch Processing System (LPS) replacement project called Checkout and Launch Control System (CLCS). As a result of the framework s development, CLCS software development time was reduced by 66 percent. The framework is generic enough for developing applications outside of the launch-processing system domain. Other applicable high-level domains include command and control systems and simulation/ training systems.

  9. Open Source Procedure for Assessment of Loss using Global Earthquake Modelling software (OPAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniell, J. E.

    2011-07-01

    This paper provides a comparison between Earthquake Loss Estimation (ELE) software packages and their application using an "Open Source Procedure for Assessment of Loss using Global Earthquake Modelling software" (OPAL). The OPAL procedure was created to provide a framework for optimisation of a Global Earthquake Modelling process through: 1. overview of current and new components of earthquake loss assessment (vulnerability, hazard, exposure, specific cost, and technology); 2. preliminary research, acquisition, and familiarisation for available ELE software packages; 3. assessment of these software packages in order to identify the advantages and disadvantages of the ELE methods used; and 4. loss analysis for a deterministic earthquake (Mw = 7.2) for the Zeytinburnu district, Istanbul, Turkey, by applying 3 software packages (2 new and 1 existing): a modified displacement-based method based on DBELA (Displacement Based Earthquake Loss Assessment, Crowley et al., 2006), a capacity spectrum based method HAZUS (HAZards United States, FEMA, USA, 2003) and the Norwegian HAZUS-based SELENA (SEismic Loss EstimatioN using a logic tree Approach, Lindholm et al., 2007) software which was adapted for use in order to compare the different processes needed for the production of damage, economic, and social loss estimates. The modified DBELA procedure was found to be more computationally expensive, yet had less variability, indicating the need for multi-tier approaches to global earthquake loss estimation. Similar systems planning and ELE software produced through the OPAL procedure can be applied to worldwide applications, given exposure data.

  10. Software open system for MPEG video and audio transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabitza, Gabriella; Setzu, Maria G.; Fregonese, Giulio

    1998-02-01

    This paper describes some experience we have done in the development of multimedia application inside a distributed architecture. The requirements of such environment are the following: (1) to support high quality multimedia data; (2) to be independent from the hardware platform and from the transport protocol; (3) to be cheap form the client side. The goals to reach were twofold: to develop a client/server system for the management and transmission of MPEG bitstreams, and to optimize the transmission of MPEG over ATM networks. The first goal was reached using standardized technologies in the implementation of the system components: a DSM-CC server has been realized based on CORBA Services, which is able to manage MPEG streams as specified in the ISO DSM-CC document. The client module has been realized using Java. The system, originally written for Sun Solaris has been successfully tested on different Unix and NT platform. The evaluation of quality and performance of the transmission of MPEG over ATM was made using three types of signaling: classical IP over ATM,, LAN emulation and the ATM Native algorithm implemented over FORE API. Both classical IP over ATM and LAN Emulation allows the transparent use of ATM for application written using the widespread TCP/IP family of protocols, but they introduce an overload of data which could not be suitable for real-time transmission. Of course, native ATM gets better performance than Classical IP over ATM and LAN Emulation but binds the application to run only on ATM networks, and at the moment it is hardware dependent.

  11. Laser transit anemometer software development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbiss, John B.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms were developed for the extraction of two components of mean velocity, standard deviation, and the associated correlation coefficient from laser transit anemometry (LTA) data ensembles. The solution method is based on an assumed two-dimensional Gaussian probability density function (PDF) model of the flow field under investigation. The procedure consists of transforming the data ensembles from the data acquisition domain (consisting of time and angle information) to the velocity space domain (consisting of velocity component information). The mean velocity results are obtained from the data ensemble centroid. Through a least squares fitting of the transformed data to an ellipse representing the intersection of a plane with the PDF, the standard deviations and correlation coefficient are obtained. A data set simulation method is presented to test the data reduction process. Results of using the simulation system with a limited test matrix of input values is also given.

  12. Software development for a Ring Imaging Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torisky, Benjamin; Benmokhtar, Fatiha

    2015-04-01

    Jefferson Lab (Jlab) is performing a large-scale upgrade to their Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) up to 12 GeV beam. The Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) in Hall B is being upgraded and a new Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector is being developed to provide better kaon - pion separation throughout the 3 to 12 GeV range. With this addition, when the electron beam hits the target, the resulting pions, kaons, and other particles will pass through a wall of translucent aerogel tiles and create Cherenkov radiation. This light can then be accurately detected by a large array of Multi-Anode PhotoMultiplier Tubes (MA-PMT). I am presenting my work on the implementation of Java based reconstruction programs for the RICH in the CLAS12 main analysis package.

  13. Development of Fuel Accounting Software Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eun, Jong Won; Suk, Juil

    1996-12-01

    A successful spacecraft mission depends on the proper maintenance of the orbit and attitude. One important requirement for the orbit and attitude planning is the accurate estimation of the propellant remaining onboard the spacecraft. For GEO communi-cations satellite, a precise fuel remaining estimation is of particular importance. This paper focuses on the bookkeeping method that was developed for calculating the pro-pellant budget by recording fuel consumption history. In general, the bookkeeping method includes detailed observation of spacecraft maneuver operations throughout the whole mission life. Application of this method is illustrated using a communica-tions satellite. In this the fuel accounting s/w tool, a PC-based spread sheet is utilized to provide an overall view of input/output elements, and to provide strong numerical and graphical merits for analyses.

  14. Software Development for Ring Imaging Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torisky, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    Jefferson Lab (Jlab) is performing a large-scale upgrade to their Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) up to 12GeV beam. The Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS12) in Hall B is being upgraded and a new Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector is being developed to provide better kaon - pion separation throughout the 3 to 12 GeV range. With this addition, when the electron beam hits the target, the resulting pions, kaons, and other particles will pass through a wall of translucent aerogel tiles and create Cherenkov radiation. This light can then be accurately detected by a large array of Multi-Anode PhotoMultiplier Tubes (MA-PMT). I am presenting an update on my work on the implementation of Java based reconstruction programs for the RICH in the CLAS12 main analysis package.

  15. Free/Libre Open Source Software Implementation in Schools: Evidence from the Field and Implications for the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yu-Wei; Zini, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    This empirical paper shows how free/libre open source software (FLOSS) contributes to mutual and collaborative learning in an educational environment. Unlike proprietary software, FLOSS allows extensive customisation of software to support the needs of local users better. This also allows users to participate more proactively in the development…

  16. Training Teachers to Select Educational Computer Software: Results of a Formative Evaluation of an Open University Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preece, Jenny; Jones, Ann

    1985-01-01

    Describes how the Educational Software short course produced by the Open University Micros in Schools project trains inservice teachers to select suitable educational software for classroom use. Findings of a formative evaluation of an activity in the course in which teachers examined three commercially produced educational software packages are…

  17. Services development toolkit for Open Research Data (Promarket)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som de Cerff, W.; Schwichtenberg, H.; Gemünd, A.; Claus, S.; Reichwald, J.; Denvil, S.; Mazetti, P.; Nativi, S.

    2012-04-01

    According to the declaration of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) on Open Access: "OECD Principles and Guidelines for Access to Research Data from Public Funding" research data should be available for everyone and Europe follows these directions (Digital Agenda, N. Kroes). Data being 'open' does not mean directly applicable: research data are often complex to use and difficult to interpret by non-experts. Also, if extra services are needed, e.g. certain delivery guarantees, SLAs need to be negotiated. Comparable to OSS development models, where software is open and services and support are paid for, there is a large potential for commercial activities and services around this open and free research data. E.g. Climate, weather or data from instruments can be used to generate business values when offered as easy and reliable services for Apps integration. The project will design a toolkit for developers in research data centres. The tools will allow to develop services to provide research data and map business processes e.g. automatic service level agreements to their service to make open research data attractive for commercial and academic use by the centre and others. It will enable to build and develop open, reliable and scalable services and end products, e.g. accessible from end user devices such as smart phones. Researchers, interested citizen or company developers will be enabled to access open data as an "easy-to-use" service and aggregate it with other services. The project will address a broad range of developers and give them a toolkit in well-known settings, portable, scalable, open and useable in public development environments and tools. This topic will be addressed technically by utilizing service-oriented approaches based on open standards and protocols, combined with new programming models and techniques.

  18. An Open Software Platform for Sharing Water Resource Models, Code and Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, Stephen; Meier, Philipp; Mohamed, Khaled; Korteling, Brett; Matrosov, Evgenii; Huskova, Ivana; Harou, Julien; Rosenberg, David; Tilmant, Amaury; Medellin-Azuara, Josue; Wicks, Jon

    2016-04-01

    The modelling of managed water resource systems requires new approaches in the face of increasing future uncertainty. Water resources management models, even if applied to diverse problem areas, use common approaches such as representing the problem as a network of nodes and links. We propose a data management software platform, called Hydra, that uses this commonality to allow multiple models using a node-link structure to be managed and run using a single software system. Hydra's user interface allows users to manage network topology and associated data. Hydra feeds this data directly into a model, importing from and exporting to different file formats using Apps. An App connects Hydra to a custom model, a modelling system such as GAMS or MATLAB or to different file formats such as MS Excel, CSV and ESRI Shapefiles. Hydra allows users to manage their data in a single, consistent place. Apps can be used to run domain-specific models and allow users to work with their own required file formats. The Hydra App Store offers a collaborative space where model developers can publish, review and comment on Apps, models and data. Example Apps and open-source libraries are available in a variety of languages (Python, Java and .NET). The App Store can act as a hub for water resource modellers to view and share Apps, models and data easily. This encourages an ecosystem of development using a shared platform, resulting in more model integration and potentially greater unity within resource modelling communities. www.hydraplatform.org www.hydraappstore.com

  19. Development of N-version software samples for an experiment in software fault tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauterbach, L.

    1987-01-01

    The report documents the task planning and software development phases of an effort to obtain twenty versions of code independently designed and developed from a common specification. These versions were created for use in future experiments in software fault tolerance, in continuation of the experimental series underway at the Systems Validation Methods Branch (SVMB) at NASA Langley Research Center. The 20 versions were developed under controlled conditions at four U.S. universities, by 20 teams of two researchers each. The versions process raw data from a modified Redundant Strapped Down Inertial Measurement Unit (RSDIMU). The specifications, and over 200 questions submitted by the developers concerning the specifications, are included as appendices to this report. Design documents, and design and code walkthrough reports for each version, were also obtained in this task for use in future studies.

  20. Development of a new software for analyzing 3-D fracture network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Jeong-Gi; Noh, Young-Hwan; Choi, Yosoon

    2014-05-01

    A new software is presented to analyze fracture network in 3-D. Recently, we completed the software package based on information given in EGU2013. The software consists of several modules that play roles in management of borehole data, stochastic modelling of fracture network, construction of analysis domain, visualization of fracture geometry in 3-D, calculation of equivalent pipes and production of cross-section diagrams. Intel Parallel Studio XE 2013, Visual Studio.NET 2010 and the open source VTK library were utilized as development tools to efficiently implement the modules and the graphical user interface of the software. A case study was performed to analyze 3-D fracture network system at the Upper Devonian Grosmont Formation in Alberta, Canada. The results have suggested that the developed software is effective in modelling and visualizing 3-D fracture network system, and can provide useful information to tackle the geomechanical problems related to strength, deformability and hydraulic behaviours of the fractured rock masses. This presentation describes the concept and details of the development and implementation of the software.

  1. Chaste: using agile programming techniques to develop computational biology software.

    PubMed

    Pitt-Francis, Joe; Bernabeu, Miguel O; Cooper, Jonathan; Garny, Alan; Momtahan, Lee; Osborne, James; Pathmanathan, Pras; Rodriguez, Blanca; Whiteley, Jonathan P; Gavaghan, David J

    2008-09-13

    Cardiac modelling is the area of physiome modelling where the available simulation software is perhaps most mature, and it therefore provides an excellent starting point for considering the software requirements for the wider physiome community. In this paper, we will begin by introducing some of the most advanced existing software packages for simulating cardiac electrical activity. We consider the software development methods used in producing codes of this type, and discuss their use of numerical algorithms, relative computational efficiency, usability, robustness and extensibility. We then go on to describe a class of software development methodologies known as test-driven agile methods and argue that such methods are more suitable for scientific software development than the traditional academic approaches. A case study is a project of our own, Cancer, Heart and Soft Tissue Environment, which is a library of computational biology software that began as an experiment in the use of agile programming methods. We present our experiences with a review of our progress thus far, focusing on the advantages and disadvantages of this new approach compared with the development methods used in some existing packages. We conclude by considering whether the likely wider needs of the cardiac modelling community are currently being met and suggest that, in order to respond effectively to changing requirements, it is essential that these codes should be more malleable. Such codes will allow for reliable extensions to include both detailed mathematical models--of the heart and other organs--and more efficient numerical techniques that are currently being developed by many research groups worldwide. PMID:18565813

  2. The ALMA Common Software as a Basis for a Distributed Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffi, Gianni; Chiozzi, Gianluca; Glendenning, Brian

    The Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) is a joint project involving astronomical organizations in Europe, North America and Japan. ALMA will consist of 64 12-m antennas operating in the millimetre and sub-millimetre wavelength range, with baselines of more than 10 km. It will be located at an altitude above 5000 m in the Chilean Atacama desert. The ALMA Computing group is a joint group with staff scattered on 3 continents and is responsible for all the control and data flow software related to ALMA, including tools ranging from support of proposal preparation to archive access of automatically created images. Early in the project it was decided that an ALMA Common Software (ACS) would be developed as a way to provide to all partners involved in the development a common software platform. The original assumption was that some key middleware like communication via CORBA and the use of XML and Java would be part of the project. It was intended from the beginning to develop this software in an incremental way based on releases, so that it would then evolve into an essential embedded part of all ALMA software applications. In this way we would build a basic unity and coherence into a system that will have been developed in a distributed fashion. This paper evaluates our progress after 1.5 year of work, following a few tests and preliminary releases. It analyzes the advantages and difficulties of such an ambitious approach, which creates an interface across all the various control and data flow applications.

  3. Development of Data Processing Software for NBI Spectroscopic Analysis System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaodan; Hu, Chundong; Sheng, Peng; Zhao, Yuanzhe; Wu, Deyun; Cui, Qinglong

    2015-04-01

    A set of data processing software is presented in this paper for processing NBI spectroscopic data. For better and more scientific managment and querying these data, they are managed uniformly by the NBI data server. The data processing software offers the functions of uploading beam spectral original and analytic data to the data server manually and automatically, querying and downloading all the NBI data, as well as dealing with local LZO data. The set software is composed of a server program and a client program. The server software is programmed in C/C++ under a CentOS development environment. The client software is developed under a VC 6.0 platform, which offers convenient operational human interfaces. The network communications between the server and the client are based on TCP. With the help of this set software, the NBI spectroscopic analysis system realizes the unattended automatic operation, and the clear interface also makes it much more convenient to offer beam intensity distribution data and beam power data to operators for operation decision-making. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11075183), the Chinese Academy of Sciences Knowledge Innovation

  4. A software framework for developing measurement applications under variable requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arpaia, Pasquale; Buzio, Marco; Fiscarelli, Lucio; Inglese, Vitaliano

    2012-11-01

    A framework for easily developing software for measurement and test applications under highly and fast-varying requirements is proposed. The framework allows the software quality, in terms of flexibility, usability, and maintainability, to be maximized. Furthermore, the development effort is reduced and finalized, by relieving the test engineer of development details. The framework can be configured for satisfying a large set of measurement applications in a generic field for an industrial test division, a test laboratory, or a research center. As an experimental case study, the design, the implementation, and the assessment inside the application to a measurement scenario of magnet testing at the European Organization for Nuclear Research is reported.

  5. EPICS: A control system software co-development success story

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, M.; Gurd, D.; Lewis, S.; Thuot, M.

    1993-11-01

    The Experimental Physics and Industrial Control Systems (EPICS) is the result of a software sharing and co-development effort of major importance now underway. The initial two participants, LANL and ANL, have now been joined by three other labs, and an earlier version of the software has been transferred to three commercial firms and is currently undergoing separate development. The reasons for EPICS`s success may be useful to enumerate and explain and the desire and prospects for its continued development are certainly worth examining.

  6. Software Uncertainty in Integrated Environmental Modelling: the role of Semantics and Open Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rigo, Daniele

    2013-04-01

    under deep uncertainty. Technological Forecasting and Social Change. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.techfore.2012.10.004 Bankes, S. C., 2002. Tools and techniques for developing policies for complex and uncertain systems. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 99 (Suppl 3), 7263-7266. http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.092081399 Kandlikar, M., Risbey, J., Dessai, S., 2005. Representing and communicating deep uncertainty in climate-change assessments. Comptes Rendus Geoscience 337 (4), 443-455. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.crte.2004.10.010 de Rigo, D., Corti, P., Caudullo, G., McInerney, D., Di Leo, M., San-Miguel-Ayanz, J., 2013. Toward Open Science at the European scale: Geospatial Semantic Array Programming for Integrated Environmental Modelling. Geophysical Research Abstracts 15, EGU General Assembly 2013 Rodriguez Aseretto, D., Di Leo, M., de Rigo, D., Corti, P., McInerney, D., Camia, A., San Miguel-Ayanz, J., 2013. Free and Open Source Software underpinning the European Forest Data Centre. Geophysical Research Abstracts 15, EGU General Assembly 2013 de Rigo, D., Corti, P., Caudullo, G., McInerney, D., Di Leo, M., San-Miguel-Ayanz, J., (exp. 2013). Supporting Environmental Modelling and Science-Policy Interface at European Scale with Geospatial Semantic Array Programming. In prep. Lempert, R. J., 2002. A new decision sciences for complex systems. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 99 (Suppl 3), 7309-7313. http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.082081699 Kandlikar, M., Risbey, J., Dessai, S., 2005. Representing and communicating deep uncertainty in climate-change assessments. Comptes Rendus Geoscience 337 (4), 443-455. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.crte.2004.10.010 Gober, P., Kirkwood, C. W., 2010. Vulnerability assessment of climate-induced water shortage in Phoenix. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 107 (50), 21295-21299. http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0911113107 de Rigo, D., 2012

  7. Development of a calibrated software reliability model for flight and supporting ground software for avionic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Stella

    1991-01-01

    The object of this project was to develop and calibrate quantitative models for predicting the quality of software. Reliable flight and supporting ground software is a highly important factor in the successful operation of the space shuttle program. The models used in the present study consisted of SMERFS (Statistical Modeling and Estimation of Reliability Functions for Software). There are ten models in SMERFS. For a first run, the results obtained in modeling the cumulative number of failures versus execution time showed fairly good results for our data. Plots of cumulative software failures versus calendar weeks were made and the model results were compared with the historical data on the same graph. If the model agrees with actual historical behavior for a set of data then there is confidence in future predictions for this data. Considering the quality of the data, the models have given some significant results, even at this early stage. With better care in data collection, data analysis, recording of the fixing of failures and CPU execution times, the models should prove extremely helpful in making predictions regarding the future pattern of failures, including an estimate of the number of errors remaining in the software and the additional testing time required for the software quality to reach acceptable levels. It appears that there is no one 'best' model for all cases. It is for this reason that the aim of this project was to test several models. One of the recommendations resulting from this study is that great care must be taken in the collection of data. When using a model, the data should satisfy the model assumptions.

  8. Normal-mode function representation of global 3-D data sets: open-access software for the atmospheric research community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žagar, N.; Kasahara, A.; Terasaki, K.; Tribbia, J.; Tanaka, H.

    2015-04-01

    This article presents new software for the analysis of global dynamical fields in (re)analyses, weather forecasts and climate models. A new diagnostic tool, developed within the MODES project, allows one to diagnose properties of balanced and inertio-gravity (IG) circulations across many scales. In particular, the IG spectrum, which has only recently become observable, can be studied simultaneously in the mass and wind fields while considering the whole model depth in contrast to the majority of studies. The paper includes the theory of normal-mode function (NMF) expansion, technical details of the Fortran 90 code, examples of namelists which control the software execution and outputs of the software application on the ERA Interim reanalysis data set. The applied libraries and default compiler are from the open-source domain. A limited understanding of Fortran suffices for the successful implementation of the software. The presented application of the software to the ERA Interim data set reveals several aspects of the large-scale circulation after it has been partitioned into the linearly balanced and IG components. The global energy distribution is dominated by the balanced energy while the IG modes contribute around 10% of the total wave energy. However, on sub-synoptic scales, IG energy dominates and it is associated with the main features of tropical variability on all scales. The presented energy distribution and features of the zonally averaged and equatorial circulation provide a reference for the validation of climate models.

  9. Normal-mode function representation of global 3-D datasets: an open-access software for atmospheric research community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žagar, N.; Kasahara, A.; Terasaki, K.; Tribbia, J.; Tanaka, H.

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents new software for the analysis of global dynamical fields in (re)analyses, weather forecasts and climate models. A new diagnostic tool, developed within the MODES project, allows one to diagnose properties of balanced and inertio-gravity (IG) circulation across many scales. In particular, the IG spectrum, which has only recently become observable, can be studied simultaneously in the mass field and wind field and considering the whole model depth in contrary to majority of studies. The paper presentation includes the theory of normal-mode function expansion, technical details of the Fortran 90 code, examples of namelists which control the software execution and outputs of the software application on the reanalysis dataset ERA Interim. The applied libraries and default compiler are from the open-source domain. A limited understanding of Fortran suffices for the successful implementation of the software. The presented application of the software to the ERA Interim dataset show some features of the large-scale circulation after it has been split into the balanced and IG components. The global energy distribution is dominated by the balanced energy with IG modes making less than 10% of the total wave energy. However, on subsynoptic scales IG energy dominates and it is associated with the main features of tropical variability on all scales. The presented energy distribution and features of the zonally-averaged and equatorial circulation provide a reference for the validation of climate models.

  10. Multipath protection for data center services in OpenFlow-based software defined elastic optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hui; Cheng, Lei; Yuan, Jian; Zhang, Jie; Zhao, Yongli; Lee, Young

    2015-06-01

    With the rapid growth of data center services, the elastic optical network is a very promising networking architecture to interconnect data centers because it can elastically allocate spectrum tailored for various bandwidth requirements. In case of a link failure, to ensure a high-level quality of service (QoS) for user request after the failure becomes a research focus. In light of it, in this paper, we propose and experimentally demonstrate multipath protection for data center services in OpenFlow-based software defined elastic optical network testbed aiming at improving network reliability. We first propose an OpenFlow-based software defined elastic optical network architecture for data center service protection. Then, based on the proposed architecture, multipath protection scheme is figured based on the importance level of the service. To implement the proposed scheme in the architecture, OpenFlow protocol is extended to support multipath protection in elastic optical network. The performance of our proposed multipath protection scheme is evaluated by means of experiment on our OpenFlow-based testbed. The feasibility of our proposed scheme is also demonstrated in software defined elastic optical networks.

  11. Advanced program development management software system. Software description and user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to apply emerging techniques and tools from the computer science discipline of paperless management to the activities of the Space Transportation and Exploration Office (PT01) in Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Program Development, thereby enhancing the productivity of the workforce, the quality of the data products, and the collection, dissemination, and storage of information. The approach used to accomplish the objectives emphasized the utilization of finished form (off-the-shelf) software products to the greatest extent possible without impacting the performance of the end product, to pursue developments when necessary in the rapid prototyping environment to provide a mechanism for frequent feedback from the users, and to provide a full range of user support functions during the development process to promote testing of the software.

  12. Evaluating software development by analysis of changes - Some data from the Software Engineering Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, D. M.; Basili, V. R.

    1985-01-01

    Basili and Weiss (1984) have discussed an approach for obtaining valid data which may be used to evaluate software development methodologies in a production environment. The methodology consists of five elements, including the identification of goals, the determination of questions of interest from the goals, the development of a data collection form, the development of data collection procedures, and the validation and analysis of the data. The current investigation is concerned with the presentation of the results from such an evaluation. The presented data were collected as part of studies reported by Basili et al. (1977). These studies had been conducted by NASA's Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL). Attention is given to an overview of the SEL, the application of the considered methodology, the results of a data analysis, and conclusions about the SEL environment.

  13. Designing Better Camels: Developing Effective Documentation for Computer Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacher, Candace M.

    This guide to the development of effective documentation for users of computer software begins by identifying five types of documentation, i.e., training manuals, user guides, tutorials, on-screen help comments, and troubleshooting manuals. Six steps in the development process are then outlined and briefly described: (1) planning and preparation;…

  14. Prospective Teachers' Experiences in Developing Lessons with Dynamic Mathematics Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haciomeroglu, Erhan Selcuk; Bu, Lingguo; Schoen, Robert C.; Hohenwarter, Markus

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to examine the development of prospective secondary mathematics teachers' Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge as they worked individually and in small groups to develop and present lessons with dynamic mathematics software. In a three-semester long study, data were collected from 68 prospective secondary mathematics…

  15. Accelerating NASA GN&C Flight Software Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tamblyn, Scott; Henry, Joel; Rapp, John

    2010-01-01

    When the guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) system for the Orion crew vehicle undergoes Critical Design Review (CDR), more than 90% of the flight software will already be developed - a first for NASA on a project of this scope and complexity. This achievement is due in large part to a new development approach using Model-Based Design.

  16. Courseware Development Center: Electronic Sharing of Instructional Software.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusk, Mike D.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the Courseware Development Center at Tulsa Junior College (Oklahoma), which serves as a network hub for statewide sharing of locally developed audiovisual and microcomputer software. Considers the center's three major components: an electronic bulletin board, a courseware database, and a newsletter for instructional designers. (DMM)

  17. Using Web Metric Software to Drive: Mobile Website Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tidal, Junior

    2011-01-01

    Many libraries have developed mobile versions of their websites. In order to understand their users, web developers have conducted both usability tests and focus groups, yet analytical software and web server logs can also be used to better understand users. Using data collected from these tools, the Ursula C. Schwerin Library has made informed…

  18. A Study of Collaborative Software Development Using Groupware Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defranco-Tommarello, Joanna; Deek, Fadi P.

    2005-01-01

    The experimental results of a collaborative problem solving and program development model that takes into consideration the cognitive and social activities that occur during software development is presented in this paper. This collaborative model is based on the Dual Common Model that focuses on individual cognitive aspects of problem solving and…

  19. The 2GCHAS: A high productivity software development environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babb, Larry

    1986-01-01

    To the user, the most visible feature of the Transportable Applications Executive (TAE) is its very powerful user interface. To the programmer, TAE's user interface, proc concept, standardized interface definitions, and hierarchy search provide a set of tools for rapidly prototyping or developing production software. The 2GCHAS (Second Generation Comprehensive Helicopter Analysis System) project has extended and enhanced these mechanisms, creating a powerful and high productivity programming environment where the 2GCHAS development environment is 2GCHAS itself and where a sustained rate for certified, documented, and tested software above 30 delivered source instructions per programmer day has been achieved. The 2GCHAS environment is not limited to helicopter analysis, but is applicable to other disciplines where software development is important.

  20. WILDFIRE IGNITION RESISTANCE ESTIMATOR WIZARD SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.; Robinson, C.; Gupta, N.; Werth, D.

    2012-10-10

    This report describes the development of a software tool, entitled “WildFire Ignition Resistance Estimator Wizard” (WildFIRE Wizard, Version 2.10). This software was developed within the Wildfire Ignition Resistant Home Design (WIRHD) program, sponsored by the U. S. Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate, Infrastructure Protection & Disaster Management Division. WildFIRE Wizard is a tool that enables homeowners to take preventive actions that will reduce their home’s vulnerability to wildfire ignition sources (i.e., embers, radiant heat, and direct flame impingement) well in advance of a wildfire event. This report describes the development of the software, its operation, its technical basis and calculations, and steps taken to verify its performance.