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Sample records for open star clusters

  1. Dynamical Evolution of Open Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Fuente Marcos, Raúl

    1998-09-01

    Stars are not formed independently, but instead they form in clusters. The influence of the initial mass function (IMF) on the evolution of open star clusters is analyzed using numerical integrations of N-body systems by the code NBODY5 (S. J. Aarseth, in Multiple Time Scales, ed. J. U. Brackbill & B. I. Cohen [New York: Academic, 1985], p. 377), which include tidal effects, mass loss due to stellar evolution, the realistic fraction of primordial binaries, and the formation of multiple systems. Five different IMFs (E. E. Salpeter, ApJ, 121, 161 [1955]; L. G. Taff, AJ, 79, 11 [1974]; G. E. Miller & J. M. Scalo, ApJS, 41, 513 [1979]; P. Kroupa, C. A. Tout, & G. Gilmore, MNRAS, 262, 545 [1993]; J. M. Scalo, Fundam. Cosmic Phys., 11, 1 [1986]) are used for generating stellar masses. The results confirm significant differences with single-mass models and allow us to distinguish between the standard power-law models and modern ones. An approximate analytic expression for the escape rate is derived in order to fit the data obtained. When stellar evolution is included, the results show that for all the IMF's studied, the evolution of the cluster is slowed down and the initial core collapse loses importance because of an expansion of the inner regions of the cluster. We find that the total disruption time is very IMF dependent because of different numbers of massive stars and also depends on the richness of the cluster. A differential behavior is found between poor and rich systems with respect to mass loss. Poor systems disrupt earlier than homologous ones without mass loss; the opposite is found for rich systems. The transition population is about N = 300. The binary escape rate seems preferentially due to close encounters in poor clusters, but it seems mainly exponential for populated clusters. It suggests that ejection is the main mechanism for binary escape in poor clusters and evaporation is the dominant one for rich clusters. The formation and evolution of

  2. Absolute Spectrophotometry of 237 Open Cluster Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, L.; Burstein, D.

    1994-12-01

    We present absolute spectrophotometry of 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M 39. The observations were taken using the Wampler single-channel scanner (Wampler 1966) on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. 21 bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwiths ranging from 32Angstroms to 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes--Latham (1975) system. Our measurements are compared to filter colors on the Johnson BV, Stromgren ubvy, and Geneva U V B_1 B_2 V_1 G systems, as well as to spectrophotometry of a few stars published by Gunn, Stryker & Tinsley and in the Spectrophotometric Standards Catalog (Adelman; as distributed by the NSSDC). Both internal and external comparisons to the filter systems indicate a formal statistical accuracy per bandpass of 0.01 to 0.02 mag, with apparent larger ( ~ 0.03 mag) differences in absolute calibration between this data set and existing spectrophotometry. These data will comprise part of the spectrophotometry that will be used to calibrate the Beijing-Arizona-Taipei-Connecticut Color Survey of the Sky (see separate paper by Burstein et al. at this meeting).

  3. VARIABLE STARS IN THE OPEN CLUSTER NGC 7142

    SciTech Connect

    Sandquist, Eric L.; Serio, Andrew W.; Shetrone, Matthew E-mail: aserio@gemini.edu

    2011-12-15

    We present new discoveries of variable stars near the turnoff of the old open cluster NGC 7142. Contrary to previous studies, we detect eight contact or near-contact eclipsing binaries (including three near the cluster turnoff), and most of these have good probability of being cluster members. We also identified one long-period variable that resides far to the red of the cluster giant branch, and four new detached eclipsing binaries. We have re-examined the question of distance and reddening for the cluster and find that the distance is larger and the reddening lower than in most previous studies. In turn this implies that NGC 7142 is probably slightly younger than M67, and is about 3 Gyr old. With an age of this size, NGC 7142 would be one of a small group of clusters with main-sequence turnoff stars at the transition between convective and radiative cores.

  4. Rotation periods of open-cluster stars, 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Charles F.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Dasgupta, Amil; Backman, Dana E.; Laaksonen, Bentley D.; Baker, Shawn W.; Marschall, Laurence A.; Whitney, Barbara A.; Kuijken, Konrad; Stauffer, John R.

    1995-01-01

    We present the results from a photometric monitoring program of 15 open cluster stars and one weak-lined T Tauri star during late 1993/early 1994. Several show rotators which are members of the Alpha Persei, Pleiades, and Hyades open clusters have been monitored and period estimates derived. Using all available Pleiades stars with photometric periods together with current X-ray flux measurements, we illustrate the X-ray activity/rotation relation among Pleiades late-G/K dwarfs. The data show a clear break in the rotation-activity relation around P approximately 6-7 days -- in general accordance with previous results using more heterogeneous samples of G/K stars.

  5. Rotation periods of open-cluster stars, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Charles F.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Marilli, Ettore; Catalano, Santo; Williams, Scott D.; Backman, Dana E.; Laaksonen, Bentley D.; Adige, Vikram; Marschall, Laurence A.; Stauffer, John R.

    1993-01-01

    We present the results from a photometric monitoring program of 21 stars observed during 1992 in the Pleiades and Alpha Persei open clusters. Period determinations for 16 stars are given, 13 of which are the first periods reported for these stars. Brightness variations for an additional five cluster stars are also given. One K dwarf member of the alpha Per cluster is observed to have a period of rotation of only 4.39 hr. perhaps the shortest period currently known among BY Draconis variables. The individual photometric measurements have been deposited with the NSSDC. Combining current X-ray flux determinations with known photometric periods, we illustrate the X-ray activity/rotation relation among Pleiades K dwarfs based on available data.

  6. Two populations of open star clusters in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozha, M. L.; Koval', V. V.; Marsakov, V. A.

    2012-08-01

    Based on our compiled catalogue of fundamental astrophysical parameters for 593 open clusters, we analyze the relations between the chemical composition, spatial positions, Galactic orbital elements, age, and other physical parameters of open star clusters. We show that the population of open clusters is heterogeneous and is divided into two groups differing by their mean parameters, properties, and origin. One group includes the Galactic clusters formed mainly from the interstellar matter of the thin disk with nearly solarmetallicities ([Fe/H] > -0.2) and having almost circular orbits a short distance away from the Galactic plane, i.e., typical of the field stars of the Galactic thin disk. The second group includes the peculiar clusters formed through the interaction of extragalactic objects (such as high-velocity clouds, globular clusters, or dwarf galaxies) with the interstellar matter of the thin disk, which, as a result, derived abnormally low (for field thin-disk stars) metallicities and/or Galactic orbits typical of objects of the older Galactic subsystems. About 70% of the clusters older than 1Gyr have been found to be peculiar, suggesting a slower disruption of clusters with noncircular high orbits. Analysis of orbital elements has shown that the bulk of the clusters from both groups were formed within a Galactocentric radius of ≈10.5 kpc and closer than ≈180 pc from the Galactic plane, but owing to their high initial velocities, the peculiar clusters gradually took up the volumes occupied by the objects of the thick disk, the halo, and even the accreted halo of the Galaxy. Analysis of the relative abundances of magnesium (a representative of the α-elements) in clusters that, according to their kinematical parameters, belong to different Galactic subsystems has shown that all clusters are composed of matter incorporating the interstellar matter of a single protogalactic cloud in different proportions, i.e., reprocessed in genetically related stars of

  7. Searching for Be stars in the open cluster NGC 663

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, P. C.; Lin, C. C.; Chen, W. P.; Lee, C. D.; Ip, W. H.; Ngeow, C. C.; Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason

    2015-02-01

    We present Be star candidates in the open cluster NGC 663, identified by Hα imaging photometry with the Palomar Transient Factory Survey, as a pilot program to investigate how the Be star phenomena, the emission spectra, extended circumstellar envelopes, and fast rotation, correlate with massive stellar evolution. Stellar membership of the candidates was verified by 2MASS magnitudes and colors and by proper motions (PMs). We discover four new Be stars and exclude one known Be star from being a member due to its inconsistent PMs. The fraction of Be stars to member stars [N(Be)/N(members)] in NGC 663 is 3.5%. The spectral type of the 34 Be stars in NGC 663 shows bimodal peaks at B0–B2 and B5–B7, which is consistent with the statistics in most star clusters. Additionally, we also discover 23 emission-line stars of different types, including non-member Be stars, dwarfs, and giants.

  8. Dynamics of the coronas of open star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, V. M.; Putkov, S. I.; Seleznev, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    A method for distinguishing coronas in models of open star clusters is proposed. The method uses trajectories of stars that do not leave the coronas over time intervals t comparable to the mean lifetime τ of the clusters. Corona models are constructed for six numerical cluster models, and the direction and character of the dynamical evolution of the coronas are determined. Retrograde stellar motions are dominant in the coronas. In spite of some signs of dynamical instability of the coronas (small densities compared to the critical density and accelerated expansion of the coronas), the formation of close-toequilibrium density and phase-density distributions at distances from one to three cluster tidal radii from the cluster center can be seen. Approximations are constructed for the corona and cluster phase density using distributions that depend on three parameters (the parameters of the stellar motion in the Lindblad rotating coordinate system). This temporary equilibrium of the corona is due to balance in the number of starsmoving from the central areas of the cluster to the corona, and from the corona to the corona periphery or beyond. Evidence that corona stars can be gravitationally bound at distances out to four tidal radii from the cluster center is found: the presence of nearly periodic retrograde mean motions of a large number of corona stars in the Galactic plane; 91-99% of corona stars satisfy the gravitational binding criterion of Ross, Mennim and Heggie over time intervals that are close to the mean cluster lifetime. The escape rate from the corona is estimated for t ≥ τ, and found to be from 0.03 to 0.23 of the number of corona stars per violent relaxation time.

  9. Investigation of the open star cluster NGC 6800

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananjevskaja, Yu. K.; Frolov, V. N.; Polyakov, E. V.

    2015-07-01

    The results of a comprehensive study of the Galactic open cluster NGC 6800 are presented. The positions of stars to a limiting magnitude B ≃ 16{./ m }5 in an 80' × 80' field centered at the cluster were measured on eight plates from the Pulkovo normal astrograph with a maximum epoch difference of 57 years. The measurements were performed with the Pulkovo "Fantasy" automated measuring system. The corresponding field from the 2MASS catalogue was used as an additional plate. As a result, the relative proper motions of stars were obtained with a root-mean-square error of 3.0 mas yr-1. A catalogue of BV and JHK magnitudes for objects in the investigated region was compiled from available published resources. The astrometric selection of cluster members was made by the maximum likelihood method. An individual cluster membership probability of a star P ≥ 60% served as the first selection criterion. The position of a star on the photometric color-magnitude ( V ~ B - V, J ~ J - K s ) diagrams was considered as the second selection criterion. On the basis of these criteria, it was established that 109 stars are members of NGC 6800, These data were used to refine the physical parameters of the cluster: the mean reddening E( B - V) = 0 m . 40, the true distance modulus ( V - M V )0 = 10{./ m }05, and the cluster age ~250 Myr. The luminosity and mass functions were constructed. The position of the center of the cluster NGC 6800 was improved: α = 19h27m11{./s}2 and δ = +25°07'24〃(2000). The catalogue of relative proper motions for stars in the field is available in electronic form only.

  10. Spectrophotometry of 237 Stars in 7 Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clampitt, Lori; Burstein, David

    1997-08-01

    Spectrophotometry is presented for 237 stars in 7 nearby open clusters: Hyades, Pleiades, Alpha Persei, Praesepe, Coma Berenices, IC 4665, and M39. The observations were taken by Lee McDonald and David Burstein using the Wampler single-channel scanner on the Crossley 0.9m telescope at Lick Observatory from July 1973 through December 1974. Sixteen bandpasses spanning the spectral range 3500 Angstroms to 7780 Angstroms were observed for each star, with bandwidths 32Angstroms, 48 Angstroms or 64 Angstroms. Data are standardized to the Hayes-Latham system to mutual accuracy of 0.016 mag per passband. The accuracy of the spectrophotometry is assessed in three ways on a star-by-star basis. First, comparisons are made with previously published spectrophotometry for 19 stars observed in common. Second, (B-V) colors and uvby colors are compared for 236 stars and 221 stars, respectively. Finally, comparsions are made for 200 main sequence stars to the spectral synthesis models of Kurucz, fixing log g = 4.0 and [Fe/H] = 0.0, and only varying effective temperature. The accuracy of tests using uvby colors and the Kurucz models are shown to track each other closely, yielding an accuracy estimate (1 sigma ) of 0.01 mag for the 13 colors formed from bandpasses longward of the Balmer jump, and 0.02 mag for the 3 colors formed from the three bandpasses below the Balmer jump. In contrast, larger scatter is found relative to the previously published spectrophotometry of Bohm-Vitense & Johnson (16 stars in common) and Gunn & Stryker (3 stars). We also show that the scatter in the fits of the spectrophotometric colors and the uvby filter colors is a reasonable way to identify the observations of which specific stars are accurate to 1 sigma , 2 sigma , .... As such, the residuals from both the filter color fits and the Kurucz model fits are tabulated for each star where it was possible to make a comparison, so users of these data can choose stars according to the accuracy of the data

  11. TWO BARIUM STARS IN THE OPEN CLUSTER NGC 5822

    SciTech Connect

    Katime Santrich, O. J.; Pereira, C. B.; De Castro, D. B. E-mail: claudio@on.br

    2013-08-01

    Open clusters are very useful examples to explain the constraint of the nucleosynthesis process with the luminosities of stars because the distances of the clusters are better known than those of field stars. We carried out a detailed spectroscopic analysis to derive the chemical composition of two red giants in the young open cluster NGC 5822, NGC 5822-2, and NGC 5822-201. We obtained abundances of C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Ca, Si, Ti, Ni, Cr, Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. The atmospheric parameters of the studied stars and their chemical abundances were determined using high-resolution optical spectroscopy. We employed the local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. The abundances of the light elements were derived using the spectral synthesis technique. We found that NGC 5822-2 and -201 have, respectively, a mean overabundance of the elements created by the s-process, ''s'', with the notation [s/Fe] of 0.77 {+-} 0.12 and 0.83 {+-} 0.05. These values are higher than those for field giants of similar metallicity. We also found that NGC 5822-2 and -201 have, respectively, luminosities of 140 L{sub Sun} and 76 L{sub Sun }, which are much lower than the luminosity of an asymptotic giant branch star. We conclude that NGC 5822-2 and NGC 5822-201 are two new barium stars first identified in the open cluster NGC 5822. The mass transfer hypothesis is the best scenario to explain the observed overabundances.

  12. Be Stars in the Open Cluster NGC 6830

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Po-Chieh; Lin, Chien-Cheng; Lin, Hsing-Wen; Lee, Chien-De; Konidaris, Nick; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Ip, Wing-Huen; Chen, Wen-Ping; Chen, Hui-Chen; Malkan, Matthew A.; Chang, Chan-Kao; Laher, Russ; Huang, Li-Ching; Cheng, Yu-Chi; Edelson, Rick; Ritter, Andreas; Quimby, Robert; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Ofek, Eran. O.; Surace, Jason; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.

    2016-05-01

    We report the discovery of two new Be stars, and re-identify one known Be star in the open cluster NGC 6830. Eleven Hα emitters were discovered using the Hα imaging photometry of the Palomar Transient Factory Survey. Stellar membership of the candidates was verified with photometric and kinematic information using 2MASS data and proper motions. The spectroscopic confirmation was carried out by using the Shane 3 m telescope at the Lick observatory. Based on their spectral types, three Hα emitters were confirmed as Be stars with Hα equivalent widths greater than ‑10 Å. Two objects were also observed by the new spectrograph spectral energy distribution-machine (SED-machine) on the Palomar 60-inch Telescope. The SED-machine results show strong Hα emission lines, which are consistent with the results of the Lick observations. The high efficiency of the SED-machine can provide rapid observations for Be stars in a comprehensive survey in the future.

  13. Massive open star clusters using the VVV survey. II. Discovery of six clusters with Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chené, A.-N.; Borissova, J.; Bonatto, C.; Majaess, D. J.; Baume, G.; Clarke, J. R. A.; Kurtev, R.; Schnurr, O.; Bouret, J.-C.; Catelan, M.; Emerson, J. P.; Feinstein, C.; Geisler, D.; de Grijs, R.; Hervé, A.; Ivanov, V. D.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Lucas, P.; Mahy, L.; Martins, F.; Mauro, F.; Minniti, D.; Moni Bidin, C.

    2013-01-01

    Context. The ESO Public Survey "VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea" (VVV) provides deep multi-epoch infrared observations for an unprecedented 562 sq. degrees of the Galactic bulge, and adjacent regions of the disk. Nearly 150 new open clusters and cluster candidates have been discovered in this survey. Aims: This is the second in a series of papers about young, massive open clusters observed using the VVV survey. We present the first study of six recently discovered clusters. These clusters contain at least one newly discovered Wolf-Rayet (WR) star. Methods: Following the methodology presented in the first paper of the series, wide-field, deep JHKs VVV observations, combined with new infrared spectroscopy, are employed to constrain fundamental parameters for a subset of clusters. Results: We find that the six studied stellar groups are real young (2-7 Myr) and massive (between 0.8 and 2.2 × 103 M⊙) clusters. They are highly obscured (AV ~ 5-24 mag) and compact (1-2 pc). In addition to WR stars, two of the six clusters also contain at least one red supergiant star, and one of these two clusters also contains a blue supergiant. We claim the discovery of 8 new WR stars, and 3 stars showing WR-like emission lines which could be classified WR or OIf. Preliminary analysis provides initial masses of ~30-50 M⊙ for the WR stars. Finally, we discuss the spiral structure of the Galaxy using the six new clusters as tracers, together with the previously studied VVV clusters. Based on observations with ISAAC, VLT, ESO (programme 087.D-0341A), New Technology Telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory (programme 087.D-0490A) and with the Clay telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory (programme CN2011A-086). Also based on data from the VVV survey (programme 172.B-2002).

  14. Primordial binary populations in low-density star clusters as seen by Chandra: globular clusters versus old open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Maureen C.

    2015-08-01

    The binaries in the core of a star cluster are the energy source that prevents the cluster from experiencing core collapse. To model the dynamical evolution of a cluster, it is important to have constraints on the primordial binary content. X-ray observations of old star clusters are very efficient in detecting the close interacting binaries among the cluster members. The X-ray sources in star clusters are a mix of binaries that were dynamically formed and primordial binaries. In massive, dense star clusters, dynamical encounters play an important role in shaping the properties and numbers of the binaries. In contrast, in the low-density clusters the impact of dynamical encounters is presumed to be very small, and the close binaries detected in X-rays represent a primordial population. The lowest density globular clusters have current masses and central densities similar to those of the oldest open clusters in our Milky Way. I will discuss the results of studies with the Chandra X-ray Observatory that have nevertheless revealed a clear dichotomy: far fewer (if any at all) X-ray sources are detected in the central regions of the low-density globular clusters compared to the number of secure cluster members that have been detected in old open clusters (above a limiting X-ray luminosity of typically 4e30 erg/s). The low stellar encounter rates imply that dynamical destruction of binaries can be ignored at present, therefore an explanation must be sought elsewhere. I will discuss several factors that can shed light on the implied differences between the primordial close binary populations in the two types of star clusters.

  15. New variable stars in open clusters. I. Methods and results for 20 open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, E.; Zwintz, K.; Maitzen, H. M.; Pintado, O. I.; Rode-Paunzen, M.

    2004-04-01

    We present high precision CCD photometry of 1791 objects in 20 open clusters with an age of 10 Myr to 1 Gyr. These observations were performed within the Δ a photometric system which is primarily used to detect chemically peculiar stars of the upper main sequence. Time bases range from 30 min up to 60 days with data from several nights. We describe the time series analysis reaching a detection limit of down to 0.006 mag for apparent variability. In total, we have detected 35 variable objects of which four are not members of their corresponding clusters. The variables cover the entire Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, hence they are interesting targets for follow-up observations. Based on observations obtained at Complejo Astronómico el Leoncito (CASLEO), operated under the agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba y San Juan; ESO-La Silla and UTSO-Las Campanas.

  16. Do open star clusters evolve towards energy equipartition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spera, Mario; Mapelli, Michela; Jeffries, Robin D.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate whether open clusters (OCs) tend to energy equipartition, by means of direct N-body simulations with a broken power-law mass function. We find that the simulated OCs become strongly mass segregated, but the local velocity dispersion does not depend on the stellar mass for most of the mass range: the curve of the velocity dispersion as a function of mass is nearly flat even after several half-mass relaxation times, regardless of the adopted stellar evolution recipes and Galactic tidal field model. This result holds both if we start from virialized King models and if we use clumpy sub-virial initial conditions. The velocity dispersion of the most massive stars and stellar remnants tends to be higher than the velocity dispersion of the lighter stars. This trend is particularly evident in simulations without stellar evolution. We interpret this result as a consequence of the strong mass segregation, which leads to Spitzer's instability. Stellar winds delay the onset of the instability. Our simulations strongly support the result that OCs do not attain equipartition, for a wide range of initial conditions.

  17. Do open star clusters evolve toward energy equipartition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spera, Mario; Mapelli, Michela; Jeffries, Robin D.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate whether open clusters (OCs) tend to energy equipartition, by means of direct N-body simulations with a broken power-law mass function. We find that the simulated OCs become strongly mass segregated, but the local velocity dispersion does not depend on the stellar mass for most of the mass range: the curve of the velocity dispersion as a function of mass is nearly flat even after several half-mass relaxation times, regardless of the adopted stellar evolution recipes and Galactic tidal field model. This result holds both if we start from virialized King models and if we use clumpy sub-virial initial conditions. The velocity dispersion of the most massive stars and stellar remnants tends to be higher than the velocity dispersion of the lighter stars. This trend is particularly evident in simulations without stellar evolution. We interpret this result as a consequence of the strong mass segregation, which leads to Spitzer's instability. Stellar winds delay the onset of the instability. Our simulations strongly support the result that OCs do not attain equipartition, for a wide range of initial conditions.

  18. Open Clusters as Laboratories: The Angular Momentum Evolution of Young Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, John R.

    1998-01-01

    The core group concentrated on three primary research topics: (1) ROSAT observation of the coronal activity of low mass stars in young open clusters; (2) the determination of stellar ages and the determination of the timescale for dissipation of circumstellar disks around young stars; and (3) the determination of rotation velocities of low mass stars in young open cluster and the inferred angular momentum evolution of low mass stars. With accurate ages for the clusters, we can then derive an independent estimate of the timescale for debris disks to dissipate. As the second half of that project, we are using the Caltech/UC/NASA Keck telescopes to obtain spectra of brown dwarf candidates in a number of nearby, young open clusters, from which we can determine new and accurate cluster ages. The final primary program that we have addressed was the determination of rotational velocities for low mass stars in our target open clusters. Our group has obtained rotational velocities for a large number of stars in several open clusters during this LTSA program, and we have published the results in several papers. One particularly time-consuming aspect of our program was the development of a database of the photometry and rotational velocities for nearby open clusters, which we have made available to the community.

  19. X-ray sources in Galactic old Open Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, M.

    2013-01-01

    I review the current status of studies of the X-ray sources in Galactic old open clusters. Cataclysmic variables (CVs), magnetically-active binaries (ABs), and sub-subgiants (SSGs) dominate the X-ray emission of old open clusters. Surprisingly, the number of ABs detected inside the half-mass radius with LX ≥ 1 × 1030 erg s-1 (0.3-7 keV) does not appear to scale with cluster mass. Comparison of the numbers of CVs, ABs, and SSGs per unit mass in old open and globular clusters shows that each of these classes is under-abundant in globulars. This suggests that dense environments suppress the frequency of even some of the hardest binaries.

  20. Early turbulent mixing as the origin of chemical homogeneity in open star clusters.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi; Krumholz, Mark R

    2014-09-25

    The abundances of elements in stars are critical clues to stars' origins. Observed star-to-star variations in logarithmic abundance within an open star cluster--a gravitationally bound ensemble of stars in the Galactic plane--are typically only about 0.01 to 0.05 over many elements, which is noticeably smaller than the variation of about 0.06 to 0.3 seen in the interstellar medium from which the stars form. It is unknown why star clusters are so homogenous, and whether homogeneity should also prevail in regions of lower star formation efficiency that do not produce bound clusters. Here we report simulations that trace the mixing of chemical elements as star-forming clouds assemble and collapse. We show that turbulent mixing during cloud assembly naturally produces a stellar abundance scatter at least five times smaller than that in the gas, which is sufficient to explain the observed chemical homogeneity of stars. Moreover, mixing occurs very early, so that regions with star formation efficiencies of about 10 per cent are nearly as well mixed as those with formation efficiencies of about 50 per cent. This implies that even regions that do not form bound clusters are likely to be well mixed, and improves the prospects of using 'chemical tagging' to reconstruct (via their unique chemical signatures, or tags) star clusters whose constituent stars have become unbound from one another and spread across the Galactic disk. PMID:25174709

  1. Dynamical Interactions Make Hot Jupiters in Open Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shara, Michael M.; Hurley, Jarrod R.; Mardling, Rosemary A.

    2016-01-01

    Explaining the origin and evolution of exoplanetary hot Jupiters remains a significant challenge. One possible mechanism for the production of hot Jupiters is planet-planet interactions, which produce them from planets born far from their host stars but near their dynamical stability limits. In the much more likely case of planets born far from their dynamical stability limits, can hot Jupiters be formed in star clusters? Our N-body simulations answer this question in the affirmative, and show that hot Jupiter formation is not a rare event, occurring in ˜1% of star cluster planetary systems. We detail three case studies of the dynamics-induced births of hot Jupiters on highly eccentric orbits that can only occur inside star clusters. The hot Jupiters’ orbits bear remarkable similarities to those of some of the most extreme exoplanets known: HAT-P-32b, HAT-P-2b, HD 80606b, and GJ 876d. If stellar perturbations formed these hot Jupiters, then our simulations predict that these very hot inner planets are often accompanied by much more distant gas giants in highly eccentric orbits.

  2. PULSATING B-TYPE STARS IN THE OPEN CLUSTER NGC 884: FREQUENCIES, MODE IDENTIFICATION, AND ASTEROSEISMOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Saesen, S.; Briquet, M.; Aerts, C.; Carrier, F.; Miglio, A.

    2013-10-01

    Recent progress in the seismic interpretation of field β Cep stars has resulted in improvements of the physical description in the stellar structure and evolution model computations of massive stars. Further asteroseismic constraints can be obtained from studying ensembles of stars in a young open cluster, which all have similar age, distance, and chemical composition. We present an observational asteroseismology study based on the discovery of numerous multi-periodic and mono-periodic B stars in the open cluster NGC 884. We describe a thorough investigation of the pulsational properties of all B-type stars in the cluster. Overall, our detailed frequency analysis resulted in 115 detected frequencies in 65 stars. We found 36 mono-periodic, 16 bi-periodic, 10 tri-periodic, and 2 quadru-periodic stars and one star with nine independent frequencies. We also derived the amplitudes and phases of all detected frequencies in the U, B, V, and I filter, if available. We achieved unambiguous identifications of the mode degree for 12 of the detected frequencies in nine of the pulsators. Imposing the identified degrees and measured frequencies of the radial, dipole, and quadrupole modes of five pulsators led to a seismic cluster age estimate of log (age/yr) = 7.12-7.28 from a comparison with stellar models. Our study is a proof-of-concept for and illustrates the current status of ensemble asteroseismology of a young open cluster.

  3. Pulsating B-type Stars in the Open Cluster NGC 884: Frequencies, Mode Identification, and Asteroseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saesen, S.; Briquet, M.; Aerts, C.; Miglio, A.; Carrier, F.

    2013-10-01

    Recent progress in the seismic interpretation of field β Cep stars has resulted in improvements of the physical description in the stellar structure and evolution model computations of massive stars. Further asteroseismic constraints can be obtained from studying ensembles of stars in a young open cluster, which all have similar age, distance, and chemical composition. We present an observational asteroseismology study based on the discovery of numerous multi-periodic and mono-periodic B stars in the open cluster NGC 884. We describe a thorough investigation of the pulsational properties of all B-type stars in the cluster. Overall, our detailed frequency analysis resulted in 115 detected frequencies in 65 stars. We found 36 mono-periodic, 16 bi-periodic, 10 tri-periodic, and 2 quadru-periodic stars and one star with nine independent frequencies. We also derived the amplitudes and phases of all detected frequencies in the U, B, V, and I filter, if available. We achieved unambiguous identifications of the mode degree for 12 of the detected frequencies in nine of the pulsators. Imposing the identified degrees and measured frequencies of the radial, dipole, and quadrupole modes of five pulsators led to a seismic cluster age estimate of log (age/yr) = 7.12-7.28 from a comparison with stellar models. Our study is a proof-of-concept for and illustrates the current status of ensemble asteroseismology of a young open cluster.

  4. uvbyβ photometry of early type open cluster and field stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handler, G.

    2011-04-01

    Context. The β Cephei stars and slowly pulsating B (SPB) stars are massive main sequence variables. The strength of their pulsational driving strongly depends on the opacity of iron-group elements. As many of those stars naturally occur in young open clusters, whose metallicities can be determined in several fundamental ways, it is logical to study the incidence of pulsation in several young open clusters. Aims: To provide the foundation for such an investigation, Strömgren-Crawford uvbyβ photometry of open cluster target stars was carried out to determine effective temperatures, luminosities, and therefore cluster memberships. Methods: In the course of three observing runs, uvbyβ photometry for 168 target stars was acquired and transformed into the standard system by measurements of 117 standard stars. The list of target stars also included some known cluster and field β Cephei stars, as well as β Cephei and SPB candidates that are targets of the asteroseismic part of the Kepler satellite mission. Results: The uvbyβ photometric results are presented. The data are shown to be on the standard system, and the properties of the target stars are discussed: 140 of these are indeed OB stars, a total of 101 targets lie within the β Cephei and/or SPB star instability strips, and each investigated cluster contains such potential pulsators. Conclusions: These measurements will be taken advantage of in a number of subsequent publications. Based on measurements obtained at McDonald Observatory of the University of Texas at Austin.Tables 3-6 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/528/A148

  5. New Wolf-Rayet stars in Galactic open clusters - Sher 1 and the giant H II region core Westerlund 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Shara, Michael M.; Potter, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Two new Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars were found in open clusters: a WN4 star in the O9 cluster Sher 1 and a WN7 star in the O7 cluster Westerlund 2. This confirms a previous trend, namely that fainter, hotter WN stars tend to be older than brighter, cooler WN stars. This may be a consequence of evolution via extreme mass loss.

  6. DISCOVERY OF 14 NEW SLOWLY PULSATING B STARS IN THE OPEN CLUSTER NGC 7654

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y. P.; Han, Z. W.

    2012-02-10

    We carried out time-series BV CCD photometric observations of the open cluster NGC 7654 (Messier 52) to search for variable stars. Eighteen slowly pulsating B (SPB) stars have been detected, among which 14 candidates are newly discovered, three known ones are confirmed, and a previously found {delta} Scuti star is also identified as an SPB candidate. Twelve SPBs are probable cluster members based on membership analysis. This makes NGC 7654 the richest galactic open cluster in terms of SPB star content. It is also a new discovery that NGC 7654 hosts three {gamma} Dor star candidates. We found that all these stars (18 SPB and 3 {gamma} Dor stars) have periods longer than their corresponding fundamental radial mode. With such a big sample of g-mode pulsators in a single cluster, it is clear that multi-mode pulsation is more common in the upper part of the main sequence than in the lower part. All the stars span a narrow strip on the period-luminosity plane, which also includes the {gamma} Dor stars at the low-luminosity extension. This result implies that there may be a single period-luminosity relation applicable to all g-mode main-sequence pulsators. As a by-product, three EA-type eclipsing binaries and an EW-type eclipsing binary are also discovered.

  7. Chemically peculiar A/F stars in open clusters of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebran, M.; Monier, R.

    2010-12-01

    Abundance anomalies have been determined at the surface of many field and open cluster A and F dwarfs. These abundance anomalies are most likely caused by microscopic diffusion at work within the stable envelopes of A stars. However diffusion can be counteracted by several other mixing processes such as convection, rotational mixing and mass loss. We present a short review of the surface abundance patterns of A/F stars in the Pleiades (100 Myr), Coma Berenices (450 Myr) and Hyades (650 Myr) open clusters. Real star-to-star variations of the abundances were found for several chemical elements in the A dwarfs in these clusters. The derived abundances are then compared to evolutionary models from the Montreal group. These comparisons strongly suggest the occurence of hydrodynamical processes at play within the radiative zones of these stars and hindering the effects of microscopic diffusion (mixing processes/mass loss). In the frame of Gaia mission, simulations are presented that predict the number of A stars and open clusters that Gaia will observe in the Galaxy.

  8. Distance moduli of open cluster NGC 6819 from Red Giant Clump stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedigamba, O. P.; Balona, L. A.; Medupe, R.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we study Kepler open cluster NGC 6819 using Kepler data of Red Giant Clump (RGC) single member (SM) stars. The Kepler data spans a period of 4 years starting in 2009. In particular, we derive distance moduli for each individual RGC star, from which we get the mean distance modulus of μ0 = 11.520 ± 0.105 mag for the cluster when we use reddening from the Kepler Input Catalogue (KIC) for each RGC star. A value of μ0 = 11.747 ± 0.086 mag is obtained when uniform reddening value E(B - V) = 0.15 is used for the cluster. The values of μ0 obtained with RGC stars are in agreement with the values in the literature with other methods. We report for the case of Kepler open cluster NGC 6819 that RGC stars can be used as 'distance candles' as has been done in the literature with other open clusters.

  9. Accurate age determinations of several nearby open clusters containing magnetic Ap stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silaj, J.; Landstreet, J. D.

    2014-06-01

    Context. To study the time evolution of magnetic fields, chemical abundance peculiarities, and other characteristics of magnetic Ap and Bp stars during their main sequence lives, a sample of these stars in open clusters has been obtained, as such stars can be assumed to have the same ages as the clusters to which they belong. However, in exploring age determinations in the literature, we find a large dispersion among different age determinations, even for bright, nearby clusters. Aims: Our aim is to obtain ages that are as accurate as possible for the seven nearby open clusters α Per, Coma Ber, IC 2602, NGC 2232, NGC 2451A, NGC 2516, and NGC 6475, each of which contains at least one magnetic Ap or Bp star. Simultaneously, we test the current calibrations of Te and luminosity for the Ap/Bp star members, and identify clearly blue stragglers in the clusters studied. Methods: We explore the possibility that isochrone fitting in the theoretical Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (i.e. log (L/L⊙) vs. log Te), rather than in the conventional colour-magnitude diagram, can provide more precise and accurate cluster ages, with well-defined uncertainties. Results: Well-defined ages are found for all the clusters studied. For the nearby clusters studied, the derived ages are not very sensitive to the small uncertainties in distance, reddening, membership, metallicity, or choice of isochrones. Our age determinations are all within the range of previously determined values, but the associated uncertainties are considerably smaller than the spread in recent age determinations from the literature. Furthermore, examination of proper motions and HR diagrams confirms that the Ap stars identified in these clusters are members, and that the presently accepted temperature scale and bolometric corrections for Ap stars are approximately correct. We show that in these theoretical HR diagrams blue stragglers are particularly easy to identify. Conclusions: Constructing the theoretical HR diagram

  10. An observational asteroseismic study of the pulsating B-type stars in the open cluster NGC 884

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saesen, S.; Briquet, M.; Aerts, C.; Miglio, A.; Carrier, F.

    2014-02-01

    Recent progress in the seismic interpretation of field β Cep stars has resulted in improvements of the physical description in the stellar structure and evolution model computations of massive stars. Further asteroseismic constraints can be obtained from studying ensembles of stars in a young open cluster, which all have similar age, distance and chemical composition. We present an observational asteroseismic study based on the discovery of numerous multi-periodic and mono-periodic B-type stars in the open cluster NGC 884 (χ Persei). Our study illustrates the current status of ensemble asteroseismology of this young open cluster.

  11. Isochrone Fittings for the Open Star Clusters NGC 3680 and Melotte 66

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemaud, Nikolas; Frinchaboy, P. M.; Thompson, B. A.

    2013-01-01

    I will be displaying the results from isochrone fittings on two open star clusters. The stellar evolution models used to generate the isochrones are from Dartmouth (Dotter et al. 2007) and Padova (Mango et al. 2008). Both of the models were applied to two star clusters: NGC 3680 and Melotte 66. The analysis is performed by utilizing infrared observations from the CPAPIR instrument; which is operated in conjunction with CTIO’s 1.5m telescope. This research was made possible by the NSF’s REU grant; award number 0851558.

  12. A DEEP UBVRI CCD PHOTOMETRY OF SIX OPEN STAR CLUSTERS IN THE GALACTIC ANTICENTER REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Lata, Sneh; Pandey, Anil K.; Kumar, Brijesh; Bhatt, Himali; Pace, Giancarlo; Sharma, Saurabh

    2010-02-15

    We present deep UBVRI CCD photometry of six open star clusters situated in the Galactic anticenter region (l{approx} 120-200 deg.). The sample includes three unstudied (Be 6, Be 77, King 17) and three partly studied open clusters (Be 9, NGC 2186, and NGC 2304). The fundamental parameters have been determined by comparing color-color and color-magnitude diagrams with the theoretical models. The structural parameters and morphology of the clusters were discussed on the basis of radial density profiles and isodensity contours, respectively. The isodensity contours show that all the clusters have asymmetric shapes. An investigation of structural parameters indicates that the evolution of core and corona of the clusters is mainly controlled by internal relaxation processes.

  13. Estimating ages of open star clusters using stellar lumionosity and colour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Chris

    2004-12-01

    This paper was designed for the 'armchair' astronomer who is interested in 'amateur research' by utilising the vast amount of images placed on the Internet from various places. Open star clusters are groups of stars that are physically related, bound by mutual gravitational attraction, populate a limited region of space and are all roughly at the same distance from us. We believe they originate from large cosmic gas and dust clouds within the Milky Way and the process of formation takes only a short time, so therefore all members of the cluster are of similar age. Also, as all the stars in a cluster formed from the same cloud, they are all of similar (initial) chemical composition. This 'family' of stars may be of similar birth age but their evolutionary ages differ due to the variation in their masses. High mass stars evolve much quicker than low mass stars they consume their fuel faster, have higher luminosities and die in a very short time (astronomical speaking) compared to a fractional solar mass star.

  14. Proper motions and CCD photometry of stars in the region of the open cluster NGC 6866

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V. N.; Ananjevskaja, Yu. K.; Gorshanov, D. L.; Polyakov, E. V.

    2010-05-01

    We present the results of our comprehensive study of the Galactic open star cluster NGC 6866. The positions of stars in the investigated region have been obtained with the “Fantasy” automatic measuring machine from 10 plates of the normal astrograph at the Pulkovo Astronomical Observatory. The size of the investigated field is 40' × 40', the limiting magnitude is B ˜ 16{·/ m }6, and the maximum epoch difference is 79 yr. For 1202 field stars, we have determined the relative proper motions with an rms error of 2.5 mas yr-1. Out of them, 423 stars may be considered cluster members with a probability P > 70% according to the astrometric criterion. Photometric diagrams have been used as an additional criterion. We have performed two-color BV CCD photometry of stars with the Pulkovo ZA-320M mirror astrograph. The U magnitudes from the literature have also been used to construct the two-color diagrams. A total of 267 stars have turned out to be members of NGC 6866 according to the two criteria. We present refined physical parameters of the cluster and its age estimate (5.6 × 108 yr). The cluster membership of red and blue giants, variable, double, and multiple stars is considered. We have found an almost complete coincidence of the positions of one of the stars in the region (a cluster nonmember) and a soft X-ray source in the ROSAT catalog. The “Fantasy” automatic measuring machine is described in the Appendix.

  15. KIC 8263801: A clump star in the Kepler open cluster NGC 6866 field?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedigamba, O. P.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we study the field of Kepler open cluster NGC 6866 using the data obtained from Kepler mission collected for a period of 4 years. We search for the red clump (RC) stars amongst the red giant (RG) stars showing solar-like oscillations using median gravity-mode period spacings (ΔP). We find a RG star KIC 8263801 having median gravity-mode period spacing 173.7 ± 6.4 s. We claim based on the median gravity-mode period spacing that KIC 8263801 is a secondary red clump (SRC) star which is massive enough to have ignited Helium burning in a non degenerate core. In the literature, no classification for KIC 8263801 has been provided. This is the first time that a star located in the field of NGC 6866 is classified in this manner.

  16. CCD Washington photometry of three highly field star contaminated open clusters in the third Galactic quadrant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.; Clariá, J. J.; Parisi, M. C.; Ahumada, A. V.

    2009-01-01

    We present CCD photometry in the Washington system C and T1 passbands down to T1 ˜ 19.5 magnitudes in the fields of Czernik 26, Czernik 30, and Haffner 11, three poorly studied open clusters located in the third Galactic quadrant. We measured T1 magnitudes and C - T1 colors for a total of 6472 stars distributed throughout cluster areas of 13.6' × 13.6' each. Cluster radii were estimated from star counts in appropriate-sized boxes distributed throughout the entire observed fields. Based on the best fits of isochrones computed by the Padova group to the ( C - T1, T1) color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs), we derived color excesses, heliocentric distances and ages for the three clusters. These are characterized by a relatively small angular size and by a high field star contamination. We performed a firm analysis of the field star contamination of the CMDs and examined different relationships between the position in the Galaxy of known open clusters located within 1 kpc around the three studied ones, their age and their interstellar visual absorption. We confirm previous results in the sense that the closer the cluster birthplace to the Galactic plane, the higher the interstellar visual absorption. We also found that the space velocity dispersion perpendicular to the Galactic plane diminishes as the clusters are younger. The positions, interstellar visual absorptions, ages, and metallicities of the three studied clusters favor the hypothesis that they were not born in the recently discovered Canis major (CMa) dwarf galaxy before it was accreted by the Milky Way.

  17. ACCRETION RATES ON PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS IN THE YOUNG OPEN CLUSTER NGC 6530

    SciTech Connect

    Gallardo, Jose; Del Valle, Luciano; Ruiz, Maria Teresa E-mail: ldelvall@das.uchile.cl

    2012-01-15

    It is well accepted that during the star formation process, material from a protoplanetary disk is accreted onto the central object during the first {approx}1-5 Myr. Different authors have published measurements of accretion rates for young low- and intermediate-mass stars in several nearby star-forming regions (SFRs). Due to its somewhat larger distance, the SFR M8 (the Lagoon Nebula) has not been studied to the same extent, despite its abundant population of young stellar objects. We have obtained optical band low-resolution spectra of a sample of pre-main-sequence stars in the open cluster NGC 6530 located in the aforementioned nebulae using the Gemini Multi Object Spectrograph at Gemini-South in multi-object mode. Spectra cover the H{sub {alpha}} emission line used to measure the accretion rate, following the method presented by Natta et al. The observed spectral characteristics are fully consistent with pre-main-sequence stars, showing lithium absorption lines, which are very common in young stellar objects, as well as prominent and broad H{sub {alpha}} emission lines, indicating a T Tauri evolutionary stage. This work presents the first determinations of mass accretion rates of young stellar objects in the open cluster NGC 6530, confirming that they are classical T Tauri stars going through the accretion phase. These observations contribute to a better understanding of the stellar content and evolutionary phase of the very active Lagoon Nebula SFR.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Catalogue of variable stars in open clusters (Zejda+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zejda, M.; Paunzen, E.; Baumann, B.; Mikulasek, Z.; Liska, J.

    2012-08-01

    The catalogue of variable stars in open clusters were prepared by cross-matching of Variable Stars Index (http://www.aavso.org/vsx) version Apr 29, 2012 (available online, Cat. B/vsx) against the version 3.1. catalogue of open clusters DAML02 (Dias et al. 2002A&A...389..871D, Cat. B/ocl) available on the website http://www.astro.iag.usp.br/~wilton. The open clusters were divided into two categories according to their size, where the limiting diameter was 60 arcmin. The list of all suspected variables and variable stars located within the fields of open clusters up to two times of given cluster radius were generated (Table 1). 8938 and 9127 variable stars are given in 461 "smaller" and 74 "larger" clusters, respectively. All found variable stars were matched against the PPMXL catalog of positions and proper motions within the ICRS (Roeser et al., 2010AJ....139.2440R, Cat. I/317). Proper motion data were included in our catalogue. Unfortunately, a homogeneous data set of mean cluster proper motions has not been available until now. Therefore we used the following sources (sorted alphabetically) to compile a new catalogue: Baumgardt et al. (2000, Cat. J/A+AS/146/251): based on the Hipparcos catalogue Beshenov & Loktin (2004A&AT...23..103B): based on the Tycho-2 catalogue Dias et al. (2001, Cat. J/A+A/376/441, 2002A&A...389..871D, Cat. B/ocl): based on the Tycho-2 catalogue Dias et al. (2006, Cat. J/A+A/446/949): based on the UCAC2 catalog (Zacharias et al., 2004AJ....127.3043Z, Cat. I/289) Frinchaboy & Majewski (2008, Cat. J/AJ/136/118): based on the Tycho-2 catalogue Kharchenko et al. (2005, J/A+A/438/1163): based on the ASCC2.5 catalogue (Kharchenko, 2001KFNT...17..409K, Cat. I/280) Krone-Martins et al. (2010, Cat. J/A+A/516/A3): based on the Bordeaux PM2000 proper motion catalogue (Ducourant et al., 2006A&A...448.1235D, Cat. I/300) Robichon et al. (1999, Cat. J/A+A/345/471): based on the Hipparcos catalogue van Leeuwen (2009A&A...497..209V): based on the new

  19. A super lithium-rich red-clump star in the open cluster Trumpler 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monaco, L.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Bonifacio, P.; Villanova, S.; Carraro, G.; Caffau, E.; Steffen, M.; Ahumada, J. A.; Beletsky, Y.; Beccari, G.

    2014-04-01

    Context. The existence of lithium-rich low-mass red giant stars still represents a challenge for stellar evolution models. Stellar clusters are privileged environments for this kind of investigation. Aims: To investigate the chemical abundance pattern of the old open cluster Trumpler 5, we observed a sample of four red-clump stars with high-resolution optical spectrographs. One of them (#3416) reveals extremely strong lithium lines in its spectrum. Methods: One-dimensional, local thermodynamic equilibrium analysis was performed on the spectra of the observed stars. A 3D-NLTE analysis was performed to derive the lithium abundance of star #3416. Results: Star #3416 is super Li-rich with A(Li) = 3.75 dex. The lack of 6Li enrichment (6Li/7Li < 2%), the low carbon isotopic ratio (12C/13C = 14 ± 3), and the lack of evidence for radial velocity variation or enhanced rotational velocity (vsini = 2.8 km s-1) all suggest that lithium production has occurred in this star through the Cameron & Fowler mechanism. Conclusions: We identified a super Li-rich core helium-burning, red-clump star in an open cluster. Internal production is the most likely cause of the observed enrichment. Given the expected short duration of a star's Li-rich phase, enrichment is likely to have occurred at the red clump or in the immediately preceding phases, namely during the He-flash at the tip of the red giant branch (RGB) or while ascending the brightest portion of the RGB. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program ID 088.D-0045(A).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  20. On the subject of the Ba overabundance in the open clusters stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishenina, T. V.; Korotin, S. A.; Carraro, G.; Kovtyukh, V. V.; Yegorova, I. A.

    2016-01-01

    For eight distant open clusters, namely Ruprecht 4, Ruprecht 7, Berkeley 25, Berkeley 73, Berkeley 75, NGC 6192, NGC 6404, and NGC 6583, we determined the yttrium and barium abundances using the UVES, VLT spectra (ESO, Chile). The stars of one young cluster (Ruprecht 7) demonstrate significant barium overabundance(∼0.55 dex) that can not be due to the determination error. We have considered the Ba abundance determination errors due to LTE approach, saturation of the lines, synthetic and observed barium line fitting, and the causes of the Ba overabundance associated with the Galactic disc enrichment or the origin of open clusters. Possible explanation for this overabundance can be the origin of n-capture elements enrichment of the clusters (galactic or extragalactic) or additional sources of the Ba production.

  1. CCD photometry of late-type stars in the young open cluster IC 2602

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, D. C.; Byrne, P. B.; Hawley, S. L.; Rolleston, W. R. J.

    1997-11-01

    We present the results of VRI photometry of the young open cluster IC 2602. Two 15 arcmin times 15 arcmin fields were observed in February and May 1991 using the 1-m Swope telescope at Las Campanas. Using theoretical isochrones obtained from \\cite[D'Antona & Mazzitelli (1994)]{dam94}, and allowing for observational and other uncertainties, we identify 78 primary candidate members with 12cluster field with an offset field of similar galactic latitude and estimate the contamination due to background stars to be large, >= 50%, as might be expected given its low galactic latitude. We also compare our photometry with that given for the X-ray detected stars of \\cite[Randich et al. (1995)]{ran95}. We present complimentary narrow band H alpha photometry for a subset of the stars.

  2. Basic parameters of open star clusters DOLIDZE 14 and NGC 110 in infrared bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Gireesh C.; Joshi, Y. C.; Joshi, S.; Tyagi, R. K.

    2015-10-01

    The basic physical parameters of a poorly studied open cluster NGC 110 and an unstudied open cluster DOLIDZE 14 are estimated in the present study using the archival PPMXL and WISE catalogues. The radius of both the clusters are estimated by fitting the modified King's empirical model on their stellar density profiles. The other basic parameters of the clusters such as distance, reddening, and age are obtained by visual fitting of the Marigo's solar metallicity isochrone on their IR colour-magnitude diagrams (CMDs). The mean-proper motion of the clusters are estimated through the individual proper motion of probable members identified through the dynamical and statistical methods. The archival catalogues (JHKW1W2) are constructed for both the clusters by compiling the extracted data from the PPMXL and WISE catalogues. The various colour-excesses, such as E (J - H), E (H - K) and E (W1 -W2) , are estimated using the best fit theoretical isochrone on the (J - H) - H, (H - K) - H and (W1 -W2) - H CMDs, respectively. The ratios of various infrared colours of the clusters are obtained through their two-colour diagrams. We also identify the most probable members in these clusters by estimating spatial, kinematic and spatio-kinematic probabilities of stars within the cluster. A correlation between the E (H - K) and E (W1 -W2) is also established.

  3. Mass function study of open star clusters Haffner 11 and Czernik 31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisht, D.; Yadav, R. K. S.; Durgapal, A. K.

    2016-08-01

    We analysis VI CCD data of two open clusters Haffner 11 and Czernik 31 in order to determine their luminosity function, mass function and mass-segregation for the first time. The observed luminosity function is corrected for both data incompleteness and field star contamination. Theoretical stellar evolutionary isochrones are used to convert luminosity function into mass function. The Mass function slopes are derived as 1.22 ± 0.42 and 1.55 ± 0.38 for Haffner 11 and Czernik 31 respectively. They agree with the Salpeter value (x = 1.35) within the errors. The effect of mass segregation are observed in both the clusters. The estimated dynamical relaxation time is less than age of the clusters. This indicates that they are dynamically relaxed. The cause of relaxation may be due to the dynamical evolution or imprint of star formation or both.

  4. Search for Type Ia supernova progenitors in open star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Subho

    2013-12-01

    Though Type Ia supernovae (henceforth SNae) are a primary tool in refining our understanding of cosmology and dark energy, controversies still abound regarding what the progenitors of these SNae are. The two main classes of possible Type Ia SN progenitors are: (1) the single-degenerate model, where a white dwarf (the remnant of a Sun-like star that has completed its life cycle) gravitationally accretes material from a close companion star, and (2) the double-degenerate model, involving the merger of two white dwarfs. In either case, the resulting SN explosion looks the same superficially. But some of the details of the SNae, perhaps including details critical to understanding dark energy, may depend sensitively on what the progenitors are. The goal of this thesis was to search for radial velocity variations in two candidate double degenerate systems. Firstly, I determined if either of these systems were bona fide double degenerates. I used the well-tested method of searching for radial velocity variations due to orbital motion as determined by changing Doppler shifts in their optical spectra. These data were obtained from time-series spectra of both candidate systems over several hours at the world's largest ground based optical telescope, the Keck Observatory in Hawaii. Secondly, I tested whether each confirmed binary system is of sufficient mass and sufficiently short orbital period to be progenitors of a future Type Ia SN. Binary white dwarfs that will merge to form Type IaSNae over a Hubble time have orbital periods less than six hours, which are easily detectable with these data. Type Ia SN progenitors must also have a mass near or above the Chandrasekhar limit of ~1.44 solar masses; the total mass of these systems can also be determined from our data. If one or both of these candidate systems had met both these criteria, the white dwarfs would have been the first definitive examples of the double degenerate class of Type Ia progenitors. This result, which we

  5. Chemical analysis of giant stars in the young open cluster NGC 3114

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santrich, O. J. Katime; Pereira, C. B.; Drake, N. A.

    2013-06-01

    Context. Open clusters are very useful targets for examining possible trends in galactocentric distance and age, especially when young and old open clusters are compared. Aims: We carried out a detailed spectroscopic analysis to derive the chemical composition of seven red giants in the young open cluster NGC 3114. Abundances of C, N, O, Li, Na, Mg, Al, Ca, Si, Ti, Ni, Cr, Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd were obtained, as well as the carbon isotopic ratio. Methods: The atmospheric parameters of the studied stars and their chemical abundances were determined using high-resolution optical spectroscopy. We employed the local-thermodynamic-equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. The abundances of the light elements were derived using the spectral synthesis technique. Results: We found that NGC 3114 has a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -0.01 ± 0.03. The isochrone fit yielded a turn-off mass of 4.2 M⊙. The [N/C] ratio is in good agreement with the models predicted by first dredge-up. We found that two stars, HD 87479 and HD 304864, have high rotational velocities of 15.0 km s-1 and 11.0 km s-1; HD 87526 is a halo star and is not a member of NGC 3114. Conclusions: The carbon and nitrogen abundance in NGC 3114 agree with the field and cluster giants. The oxygen abundance in NGC 3114 is lower compared to the field giants. The [O/Fe] ratio is similar to the giants in young clusters. We detected sodium enrichment in the analyzed cluster giants. As far as the other elements are concerned, their [X/Fe] ratios follow the same trend seen in giants with the same metallicity. Based on observations made with the 2.2 m telescope at the European Southern Observatory (La Silla, Chile).Tables 2 and 5 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  6. Chemical Composition of Intermediate-mass Star Members of the M6 (NGC 6405) Open Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kılıçoğlu, T.; Monier, R.; Richer, J.; Fossati, L.; Albayrak, B.

    2016-03-01

    We present here the first abundance analysis of 44 late B-, A-, and F-type members of the young open cluster M6 (NGC 6405, age about 75 Myr). Low- and medium-resolution spectra, covering the 4500-5840 Å wavelength range, were obtained using the FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectrograph attached to the ESO Very Large Telescopes. We determined the atmospheric parameters using calibrations of the Geneva photometry and by adjusting the Hβ profiles to synthetic ones. The abundances of up to 20 chemical elements, from helium to mercury, were derived for 19 late B, 16 A, and 9 F stars by iteratively adjusting synthetic spectra to the observations. We also derived a mean cluster metallicity of [Fe/H] = 0.07 ± 0.03 dex from the iron abundances of the F-type stars. We find that for most chemical elements, the normal late B- and A-type stars exhibit larger star-to-star abundance variations than the F-type stars probably because of the faster rotation of the B and A stars. The abundances of C, O, Mg, Si, and Sc appear to be anticorrelated with that of Fe, while the opposite holds for the abundances of Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Y, and Ba as expected if radiative diffusion is efficient in the envelopes of these stars. In the course of this analysis, we discovered five new peculiar stars: one mild Am, one Am, and one Fm star (HD 318091, CD-32 13109, GSC 07380-01211, CP1), one HgMn star (HD 318126, CP3), and one He-weak P-rich (HD 318101, CP4) star. We also discovered a new spectroscopic binary, most likely a SB2. We performed a detailed modeling of HD 318101, the new He-weak P-rich CP star, using the Montréal stellar evolution code XEVOL which self-consistently treats all particle transport processes. Although the overall abundance pattern of this star is properly reproduced, we find that detailed abundances (in particular the high P excess) resisted modeling attempts even when a range of turbulence profiles and mass-loss rates were considered. Solutions are proposed which are still under

  7. Variable stars in the field of the open cluster NGC 6939

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, G.; Georgiev, Ts.; Niedzielski, A.

    2008-05-01

    The results of CCD photometric survey performed with the 90/180 cm Schmidt-Cassegrain Telescope of the Nicolaus Copernicus University Astronomical Observatory in Piwnice (Poland) and the 70/172 cm Schmidt Telescope of the National Astronomical Observatory (NAO) at Rozhen (Bulgaria) of the field of the 1 Gyr old open cluster NGC 6939 are presented. Twenty two variable stars were detected, four of them previously known. Four eclipsing systems (3 detached and 1 contact binary) were found to be members of the cluster. Analysis of the brightness of the contact binary V20 strongly supports the distance to the cluster of 1.74 ± 0.20 kpc. The small population of contact binaries in NGC 6939 confirms also the relatively young age of the cluster.

  8. Search for transiting exoplanets and variable stars in the open cluster NGC 7243

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garai, Z.; Pribulla, T.; Hambálek, Ľ.; Errmann, R.; Adam, Ch.; Buder, S.; Butterley, T.; Dhillon, V. S.; Dincel, B.; Gilbert, H.; Ginski, Ch.; Hardy, L. K.; Kellerer, A.; Kitze, M.; Kundra, E.; Littlefair, S. P.; Mugrauer, M.; Nedoroščík, J.; Neuhäuser, R.; Pannicke, A.; Raetz, S.; Schmidt, J. G.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Seeliger, M.; Vaňko, M.; Wilson, R. W.

    2016-03-01

    We report results of the first five observing campaigns for the open stellar cluster NGC 7243 in the frame of project Young Exoplanet Transit Initiative (YETI). The project focuses on the monitoring of young and nearby stellar clusters, with the aim to detect young transiting exoplanets and to study other variability phenomena on time-scales from minutes to years. After five observing campaigns and additional observations during 2013 and 2014, a clear and repeating transit-like signal was detected in the light curve of J221550.6+495611. Furthermore, we detected and analysed 37 new eclipsing binary stars in the studied region. The best fit parameters and light curves of all systems are given. Finally, we detected and analysed 26 new, presumably pulsating variable stars in the studied region. The follow-up investigation of these objects, including spectroscopic measurements of the exoplanet candidate, is currently planned.

  9. Blue Straggler Stars in Galactic Open Clusters and the Simple Stellar Population Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Y.; Deng, L.; Han, Z. W.

    2007-05-01

    The presence of blue straggler stars (BSs) as secure members of Galactic open clusters (OCs) poses a major challenge to the conventional picture of simple stellar population (SSP) models. These are based on the stellar evolution theory of single stars, whereas the major formation mechanisms of BSs are all correlated with stellar interactions. We have illustrated this in a previous study based on a small sample of old (age >=1 Gyr) Galactic OCs. However, for the purpose of demonstrating the contributions of BSs to the conventional SSP models statistically and systematically, a large database with sufficient coverage of age and metallicity is definitely needed. The working sample now includes 100 Galactic OCs with ages ranging from 0.1 to 10 Gyr. The contributions of BSs to the integrated light of their host clusters are calculated on an individual cluster basis. The general existence of BSs in our star cluster sample dramatically alters the predictions of conventional SSP models in terms of their integrated properties. Neglecting the consequences of nonstandard evolutionary products, such as BSs, in stellar populations, very large uncertainties can be made in analyzing their integrated spectral energy distributions at unresolvable conditions. The current work strongly suggests that when evolutionary population synthesis technique is used to study the properties of unresolved stellar populations in galaxies, the contributions of BSs should be taken into account.

  10. Accretion Rates on Pre-main-sequence Stars in the Young Open Cluster NGC 6530

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallardo, José; del Valle, Luciano; Ruiz, María Teresa

    2012-01-01

    It is well accepted that during the star formation process, material from a protoplanetary disk is accreted onto the central object during the first ~1-5 Myr. Different authors have published measurements of accretion rates for young low- and intermediate-mass stars in several nearby star-forming regions (SFRs). Due to its somewhat larger distance, the SFR M8 (the Lagoon Nebula) has not been studied to the same extent, despite its abundant population of young stellar objects. We have obtained optical band low-resolution spectra of a sample of pre-main-sequence stars in the open cluster NGC 6530 located in the aforementioned nebulae using the Gemini Multi Object Spectrograph at Gemini-South in multi-object mode. Spectra cover the Hα emission line used to measure the accretion rate, following the method presented by Natta et al. The observed spectral characteristics are fully consistent with pre-main-sequence stars, showing lithium absorption lines, which are very common in young stellar objects, as well as prominent and broad Hα emission lines, indicating a T Tauri evolutionary stage. This work presents the first determinations of mass accretion rates of young stellar objects in the open cluster NGC 6530, confirming that they are classical T Tauri stars going through the accretion phase. These observations contribute to a better understanding of the stellar content and evolutionary phase of the very active Lagoon Nebula SFR. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciencia e Tecnologia (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva

  11. Global survey of star clusters in the Milky Way. III. 139 new open clusters at high Galactic latitudes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeja, S.; Kharchenko, N. V.; Piskunov, A. E.; Roeser, S.; Schilbach, E.; Froebrich, D.; Scholz, R.-D.

    <-18.5. We present: The Catalogue of new MWSC open clusters found at high galactic latitudes (|b|>18.5°) which includes several files: Catalogue of cluster parameters (confirmed clusters only); Index of all MWSC(|b|>18.5 deg) candidates; Notes for every item of index list. Within each list the entries are ordered along with MWSC number. The Catalogues of the MWSC Stars in 139 circular sky areas with confirmed clusters. Files are ordered by MWSC number; inside each sky area the entries are ordered by Ks magnitudes. The Atlas of new MWSC clusters diagrams. In the Atlas the Cluster pages are ordered by MWSC number. All the data are given in the same format as in the main MWSC catalogue (Cat. J/A+A/558/A53). (5 data files).

  12. A LONG-PERIOD TOTALLY ECLIPSING BINARY STAR AT THE TURNOFF OF THE OPEN CLUSTER NGC 6819 DISCOVERED WITH KEPLER

    SciTech Connect

    Sandquist, Eric L.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Jeffries, Mark W. Jr.; Brewer, Lauren N. E-mail: orosz@sciences.sdsu.edu; and others

    2013-01-01

    We present the discovery of the totally eclipsing long-period (P = 771.8 days) binary system WOCS 23009 in the old open cluster NGC 6819 that contains both an evolved star near central hydrogen exhaustion and a low-mass (0.45 M {sub Sun }) star. This system was previously known to be a single-lined spectroscopic binary, but the discovery of an eclipse near apastron using data from the Kepler space telescope makes it clear that the system has an inclination that is very close to 90 Degree-Sign . Although the secondary star has not been identified in spectra, the mass of the primary star can be constrained using other eclipsing binaries in the cluster. The combination of the total eclipses and a mass constraint for the primary star allows us to determine a reliable mass for the secondary star and radii for both stars, and to constrain the cluster age. Unlike well-measured stars of similar mass in field binaries, the low-mass secondary is not significantly inflated in radius compared to model predictions. The primary star characteristics, in combination with cluster photometry and masses from other cluster binaries, indicate a best age of 2.62 {+-} 0.25 Gyr, although stellar model physics may introduce systematic uncertainties at the {approx}10% level. We find preliminary evidence that the asteroseismic predictions for red giant masses in this cluster are systematically too high by as much as 8%.

  13. Photometry and Spectroscopy of Short-Period Binary Stars in Four Old Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, R. M.; Rucinski, S. M.

    2004-12-01

    We have performed a spectroscopic and photometric study of six contact binary stars in four old open clusters, M67, Praesepe, NGC 6791 and NGC 752, in order to evaluate their suitability for measuring the distance to their respective clusters. The technique being tested uses the cosine Fourier coefficients of the light curves of the binary stars, and the mass ratios obtained spectroscopically, to provide distances to the binaries. The contact binary TX Cnc was used to obtain the distance to Praesepe, which we find to be (V - MV}){o = 6.30 ± 0.08, which is in good agreement with the values of V - MV = 6.20 - 6.35 found in color-magnitude diagram (CMD) studies. Our spectroscopic study of QX And in NGC 752 provided a distance modulus of (V - MV}){o = 8.30± 0.07 for this cluster. This compares to a value of (V - MV}){o = 7.9 ± 0.1 obtained by Milone et al. (1995) using the same star, but is in good agreement with V - MV = 8.25 ± 0.10 obtained by Daniel et al. (1994) from the CMD. We obtained a distance modulus of (V - MV}){o = 12.71 ± 0.44 for V7 in NGC 6791, the oldest cluster in our survey. This agrees within ˜ 1σ the values of 13.3 ≤ (V - MV) ≤ 13.42 obtained by isochrone fitting of the cluster CMD. EV Cnc in M67 did not yield a distance to the cluster from our procedure because of faintness of the system resulting in poor spectroscopic data. The distances to the clusters as determined from the contact binaries using our procedure do not seem to give systematically smaller or larger distances as compared to CMD fitting. However, we have measured the distances to only three clusters, and only one object per cluster, and so establishing any systematic differences may require a larger survey. R. M. Blake acknowledges the support of the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada through grants to S. M. Rucinski and C. T. Bolton.

  14. The Kepler Cluster Study: rotation period measurements for cool stars in the 2.5 billion year open cluster NGC 6819

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibom, Soren; Barnes, Sydney A.; Platais, Imants; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Latham, David W.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Kepler Science Team, Kepler Science Operations Center

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler Cluster Study (KeCS) is a program to measure stellar rotation periods and search for planets around members of open star clusters within the field of view of NASA's Kepler mission. We present here the latest results from KeCS - measurements of stellar rotation periods in the 2.5 billion year open cluster NGC 6819 - and discuss their implications for a technique (gyrochronology) to determine stellar ages from stellar rotation.

  15. Spectroscopy of a stream of G-stars in the area of the open cluster M67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguer-Nuñez L.; Galadi-Enriquez, D.; Jordi, C.; Sanchez, S. F.; Muiños, J. L.

    2011-11-01

    The systematic study of selected open clusters by our team lead to the production of the best set of Strömgren photometry ever obtained of the old open cluster M67. Its analysis showed a previously unknown clump of more than 60 stars in the HR diagram, located below the cluster main sequence. The spatial distribution of these stars suggested that most of them could be cluster members and two alternative hypothesis were proposed: (1) if members, they would be binary systems composed by a white dwarf and a red dwarf, i.e. pre-cataclysmic variable systems; and (2) if non-members, they would constitute a stream of G-type stars placed behind the cluster. Medium dispersion spectra taken using the PMAS/PPAK spectrograph at 3.5 m telescope in Calar Alto lead to the conclusion that all stars are F--G main sequence stars, and therefore the first hypothesis can be discarded. We are acquiring new uvby-H_eta photometric data with the Wide Field Camera of INT and, in addition, we are carrying out an astrometric study with the Meridian Circle of San Fernando CMASF at El Leoncito (Argentina) to derive properties of stars fainter than our previous survey and covering a wider area in the cluster region. The new data will yield proper motions of the stars in the clump as well as allow to study the properties of the corona of M67.

  16. Detection of a new phosphorus rich star in the open cluster M6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiliçoğlu, T.; Monier, R.; Fossati, L.

    2012-12-01

    We present the first spectroscopic analysis of HD318101, a member of the M6 (NGC 6405, age 100 Myr) open cluster, using low and high resolution (R˜7500, R˜25000) spectra stretching from 4500 to 5840 Å. The atmospheric parameters of the star were determined from Geneva photometry and hydrogen line modeling (T_e = 15400 ± 500 K, log g = 4.0 ± 0.25). The abundances of 8 elements were determined by fitting synthetic spectral lines to the observed ones. We derived a strong overabundance of phosphorus (+1.69 dex, relative to the Sun) from several P II lines. We also found helium to be underabundant (-0.37 dex). These abundance anomalies suggest that HD318101 could be a He-weak PGa type star (CP4).

  17. BRIGHT VARIABLE STARS IN NGC 6819: AN OPEN CLUSTER IN THE KEPLER FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Talamantes, Antonio; Sandquist, Eric L.; Clem, James L.; Robb, Russell M.; Balam, David D.; Shetrone, Matthew E-mail: erics@mintaka.sdsu.ed E-mail: robb@uvic.c E-mail: shetrone@astro.as.utexas.ed

    2010-11-15

    We describe a variability study of the moderately old open cluster NGC 6819. We have detected four new detached eclipsing binaries near the cluster turnoff (one of which may be in a triple system). Several of these systems should be able to provide mass and radius information, and can therefore constrain the age of the cluster. We have also newly detected one possible detached binary member about 3.5 mag below the turnoff. One EW-type binary (probably not a cluster member) shows unusually strong night-to-night light curve variations in sets of observations separated by eight years. According to the best current information, the three brightest variables we detected (two of them new) are cluster members, making them blue stragglers. The first one is a {delta} Scu pulsating variable, the second one is a close but detached binary, and the third one contains a detached short-period binary that shows total eclipses. In each case, however, there is evidence hinting that the system may have been produced through the interaction of more than two stars.

  18. Photometric study of open star clusters in II quadrant: Teutsch 1 and Riddle 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisht, D.; Yadav, R. K. S.; Durgapal, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    We present the broad band UBVI CCD photometry in the region of two open star clusters Teutsch 1 and Riddle 4 located in the second Galactic quadrant. The optical CCD data for these clusters are obtained for the first time. Radii of the clusters are estimated as 3‧.5 for both the clusters. Using two color (U - B) versus (B - V) diagram we determined the reddening as E(B - V) = 0.40 ± 0.05 mag for Teutsch 1 and 1.10 ± 0.05 mag for Riddle 4. Using 2MASS JHK and optical data, we estimated E(J - K) = 0.24 ± 0.05 mag and E(V - K) = 1.40 ± 0.05 mag for Teutsch 1 and E(J - K) = 0.47 ± 0.06 mag and E(V - K) = 2.80 ± 0.06 mag for Riddle 4. Color-excess ratio indicates normal interstellar extinction law in the direction of both the clusters. We estimated distance as 4.3 ± 0.5 Kpc for Teutsch 1 and 2.8 ± 0.2 Kpc for Riddle 4 by comparing the color-magnitude diagram of the clusters with theoretical isochrones. The age of the clusters has been estimated as 200 ± 20 Myr for Teutsch 1 and 40 ± 10 Myr for Riddle 4 using the stellar isochrones of metallicity Z = 0.02 . The Mass function slope has been derived 1.89 ± 0.43 and 1.41 ± 0.70 for Teutsch 1 and Riddle 4 respectively. Our analysis indicates that both the clusters are dynamically relaxed. A slight bend of Galactic disc towards the southern latitude is found in the longitude range l = 130-180°.

  19. Stars approaching the substellar limit in the α Persei open cluster.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapatero Osorio, M. R.; Rebolo, R.; Martin, E. L.; Garcia Lopez, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    We present intermediate dispersion optical spectroscopy for seven very low-mass stars in the α Per open cluster with spectral types between M3 and M6, including the brown dwarf candidate of Rebolo et al. (1992). Our radial velocity measurements are found to be generally consistent with the mean cluster velocity to within the measurement errors. Hα equivalent widths have been measured and compared to previous published data for other known members of the cluster. A turnover in chromospheric activity around spectral type M3-M4 is observed. The brown dwarf candidate, located in the cool side of the turnover, is confirmed to exhibit a strong Hα variability. It is the coolest α Per candidate member for which spectra are available and for which chromospheric activity has been measured. Using the LiI doublet at λ6707.8A, we derive upper limits to the atmospheric Li abundance in the sample and discuss them in the context of the most recent stellar evolutionary tracks. The non-detection of the Lii line in the spectrum of the brown dwarf candidate implies a mass greater than 0.08Msun_, and therefore it is not a substellar object. However, its position in the HR diagram implies that this star is indeed very close to the substellar limit.

  20. Massive open star clusters using the VVV survey. IV. WR 62-2, a new very massive star in the core of the VVV CL041 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chené, A.-N.; Ramírez Alegría, S.; Borissova, J.; O'Leary, E.; Martins, F.; Hervé, A.; Kuhn, M.; Kurtev, R.; Consuelo Amigo Fuentes, P.; Bonatto, C.; Minniti, D.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The ESO Public Survey VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) provides deep multi-epoch infrared observations for an unprecedented 562 sq. deg of the Galactic bulge and adjacent regions of the disk. Nearly 150 new open clusters and cluster candidates have been discovered in this survey. Aims: We present the fourth article in a series of papers focussed on young and massive clusters discovered in the VVV survey. This article is dedicated to the cluster VVV CL041, which contains a new very massive star candidate, WR 62-2. Methods: Following the methodology presented in the first paper of the series, wide-field, deep JHKs VVV observations, combined with new infrared spectroscopy, are employed to constrain fundamental parameters (distance, reddening, mass, age) of VVV CL041. Results: We confirm that the cluster VVV CL041 is a young (less than 4 Myr) and massive (3 ± 2 × 103 M⊙) cluster, and not a simple asterism. It is located at a distance of 4.2 ± 0.9 kpc, and its reddening is AV = 8.0 ± 0.2 mag, which is slightly lower than the average for the young clusters towards the centre of the Galaxy. Spectral analysis shows that the most luminous star of the cluster, of the WN8h spectral type, is a candidate to have an initial mass larger than 100 M⊙. Based on observations taken within the ESO VISTA Public Survey VVV, Programme ID 179.B-2002, and on observations with VLT/ISAAC at ESO (programme 087.D.0341A) and Flamingos-2 at Gemini (programme GS-2014A-Q-72).The photometric catalogue is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/584/A31

  1. The chromospheric emission of solar-type stars in the young open clusters IC 2391 and IC 2602

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, S. C.; Carter, B. D.; Donati, J.-F.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we present chromospheric emission levels of the solar-type stars in the young open clusters IC 2391 and IC 2602. High-resolution spectroscopic data were obtained for over 50 F, G and K stars from these clusters over several observing campaigns using the University College London Echelle Spectrograph on the 3.9-m Anglo-Australian Telescope. Unlike older clusters, the majority (28/52) of the solar-type stars in the two clusters are rapid rotators (vsini > 20kms-1) with five of the stars being classified as ultra-rapid rotators (vsini > 100 km s-1). The emission levels in the calcium infrared triplet lines were then used as a measure of the chromospheric activity of the stars. When plotted against the Rossby number (NR), the star's chromospheric emission levels show a plateau in the emission for log(NR) <~ -1.1 indicating chromospheric saturation similar to the coronal saturation seen in previously observed X-ray emission from the same stars. However, unlike the coronal emission, the chromospheric emission of the stars shows little evidence of a reduction in emission (i.e. supersaturation) for the ultra-rapid rotators in the clusters. Thus we believe that coronal supersaturation is not the result of an overall decrease in magnetic dynamo efficiency for ultra-rapid rotators.

  2. Photometry and membership for low mass stars in the young open cluster NGC 2516

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffries, R. D.; Thurston, M. R.; Hambly, N. C.

    2001-09-01

    We present the results of a 0.86 square degree CCD photometric survey of the open cluster NGC 2516, which has an age of about 150 Myr and may have a much lower metallicity than the similarly-aged Pleiades. Our BVI_c survey of cluster members is complete to V =~ 20 and is used to select a preliminary catalogue of 1254 low mass (0.2cluster candidates, of which about 70-80 percent are expected to be genuine. After applying corrections for contamination by non-members and adding data for higher mass stars from the literature, we investigate the cluster binarity, luminosity and mass function, mass segregation and total mass. We find a binary fraction of 26+/-5 percent, for A to M-type systems with mass ratios between 0.6 and 1, which is very similar to the Pleiades. The mass function is metallicity and evolutionary-model dependent, but consistent with a Salpeter-like law (dN/dlog M~ M-alpha , alpha =+1.47+/-0.11 or alpha =+1.67+/-0.11 for the solar and half-solar metallicity models of Siess et al. \\cite{siess00}, and alpha =+1.58+/-0.10 for the solar metallicity models of D'Antona & Mazzitelli \\cite{dantona97}), for 0.7stars in unresolved binary systems with mass ratios less than 0.6. The falling mass function of NGC 2516 at lower masses seems inconsistent with the much flatter mass functions derived from comparable data in the Pleiades and field populations. This deficit of lower mass, fainter stars is also seen in the observed luminosity function. We rule out incompleteness as the cause of this discrepancy, but demonstrate that mass segregation is clearly present

  3. Kinematics and Velocity Ellipsoid Parameters of Stellar Groups and Open Star Clusters: II Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsanhoury, W. H.

    2016-06-01

    Based on the galactic space velocity components (U, V, W) and with aid of the vector and matrix analyses, we computed the velocity ellipsoid parameters for 790 late-type stars from CoRoT (Convection, Rotation and Transits) observations and 290 L dwarf stars. We ran the calculations for spectral types F, G, and K for late-type stars and L0, L1, L2, and L3 for L dwarf stars. We found that the ratio of the middle to the major axis in the galaxy ranged from 0.35 to 0.73. The vertex deviation from the galactic center was very small for the samples under investigation, which agrees well with earlier calculations.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ubvy light curves of CP stars in open clusters (Paunzen+, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, E.; Hensberge, H.; Maitzen, H. M.; Netopil, M.; Trigilio, C.; Fossati, L.; Heiter, U.; Pranka, M.

    2010-11-01

    Photoelectric Stroemgren uvby time series for 27 CP stars are presented. A standard reduction procedure was applied to the data. Members of the following open clusters have been observed: Collinder 132, IC 4725, NGC 2516, NGC 3114, NGC 3228, NGC 3532, NGC 5460, NGC 5662, NGC 6281, NGC 6405, and NGC 6475. For each target star the HJD and the differential uvby magnitudes are given. (2 data files).

  5. Proper motions and CCD-photometry of stars in the region of the open cluster NGC 1513

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V. N.; Jilinski, E. G.; Ananjevskaja, J. K.; Poljakov, E. V.; Bronnikova, N. M.; Gorshanov, D. L.

    2002-12-01

    The results of astrometric and photometric investigations of the poorly studied open cluster NGC 1513 are presented. The proper motions of 333 stars with a root-mean-square error of 1.9;mas yr-1 were obtained by means of the automated measuring complex ``Fantasy''. Eight astrometric plates covering the time interval of 101 years were measured and a total of 141 astrometric cluster members identified. BV CCD-photometry was obtained for stars in an area 17arcminx 17arcmin centered on the cluster. Altogether 33 stars were considered to be cluster members with high reliability by two criteria. The estimated age of NGC 1513 is 2.54x 108 years. Tables 2 and 3 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/396/125.

  6. Massive open star clusters using the VVV survey. V. Young clusters with an OB stellar population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez Alegría, S.; Borissova, J.; Chené, A.-N.; Bonatto, C.; Kurtev, R.; Amigo, P.; Kuhn, M.; Gromadzki, M.; Carballo-Bello, J. A.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The ESO public survey VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) has contributed with deep multi-epoch photometry of the Galactic bulge and the adjacent part of the disk over 526 sq. deg. More than a hundred cluster candidates have been reported thanks to this survey. Aims: We present the fifth article in a series of papers focused on young and massive clusters discovered in the VVV survey. In this paper, we present the physical characterization of five clusters with a spectroscopically confirmed OB-type stellar population. Methods: To characterize the clusters, we used near-infrared photometry (J, H, and KS) from the VVV survey and near-infrared K-band spectroscopy from ISAAC at VLT, following the methodology presented in the previous articles of the series. Results: All clusters in our sample are very young (ages between 1-20 Myr), and their total mass are between (1.07+0.40-0.30)×102 M⊙ and (4.17+4.15-2.08)×103 M⊙. We observed a relation between the clusters total mass Mecl and the mass of their most massive stellar member mmax, for clusters with an age <10 Myr. Based on observations taken within the ESO VISTA Public Survey VVV (programme ID 179.B-2002), and with ISAAC/VLT (programme 087.D-0341(A)).

  7. A photoelectric investigation of Ap-stars in open clusters. II - NGC 6475

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitzen, H. M.; Floquet, M.

    1981-07-01

    Results are presented of photoelectric study of Ap stars in the old galactic cluster NGC 6475. Photometry was obtained in the y, g1 and g2 filters at the 50-cm ESO telescope on La Silla. Observations confirm the presence of the three silicon stars found by Abt (1975) (K 88, 55 and 59) and reveal the Ap nature of two additional stars, K 23 and K 14. A b-y reddening value of 0.050 is obtained which is somewhat lower than that found by Snowden (1976), due to evolutionary effects and the calibration used. In addition, virtually no variable reddening in the cluster is observed.

  8. Main-sequence variable stars in young open cluster NGC 1893

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lata, Sneh; Yadav, Ram Kesh; Pandey, A. K.; Richichi, Andrea; Eswaraiah, C.; Kumar, Brajesh; Kappelmann, Norbert; Sharma, Saurabh

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we present time series photometry of 104 variable stars in the cluster region NGC 1893. The association of the present variable candidates to the cluster NGC 1893 has been determined by using (U - B)/(B - V) and (J - H)/(H - K) two colour diagrams, and V/(V - I) colour-magnitude diagram. 45 stars are found to be main-sequence variables and these could be B-type variable stars associated with the cluster. We classified these objects as β Cep, slowly pulsating B stars and new class variables as discussed by Mowlavi et al. These variable candidates show ˜0.005 to ˜0.02 mag brightness variations with periods of <1.0 d. 17 new class variables are located in the H - R diagram between the slowly pulsating B stars and δ Scuti variables. Pulsation could be one of the causes for periodic brightness variations in these stars. The X-ray emission of present main-sequence variables associated with the cluster lies in the saturated region of X-ray luminosity versus period diagram and follows the general trend by Pizzolato et al.

  9. Lithium Inventory of 2 Solar Mass Red Clump Stars in Open Clusters: A Test of the Helium Flash Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlberg, Joleen K.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.

    2016-01-01

    The temperature distribution of field Li-rich red giants suggests the presence of a population of Li-rich red clump (RC) stars. One proposed explanation for this population is that all stars with masses near 2 solar mass experience a shortlived phase of Li-richness at the onset of core He-burning. Many of these stars have low C-12/C-13, a signature of deep mixing that is presumably associated with the Li regeneration. To test this purported mechanism of Li enrichment, we measured abundances in 38 RC stars and 6 red giant branch (RGB) stars in four open clusters selected to have RC masses near 2 solar mass. We find six Li-rich stars (A(Li) greater than or equal to 1.50 dex) of which only two may be RC stars. None of the RC stars have Li exceeding the levels observed in the RGB stars, but given the brevity of the suggested Li-rich phase and the modest sample size, it is probable that stars with larger Li-enrichments were missed simply by chance. However, we find very few stars in our sample with low C-12/C-13. Such low C-12/C-13, seen in many field Li-rich stars, should persist even after lithium has returned to normal low levels. Thus, if Li synthesis during the He flash occurs, it is a rare, but potentially long-lived occurrence rather than a short-lived phase for all stars. We estimate a conservative upper limit of the fraction of stars going through a Li-rich phase to be less than 47%, based on stars that have low C-12/C-13 for their observed A(Li).

  10. Lithium Inventory of 2 M ⊙ Red Clump Stars in Open Clusters: A Test of the Helium Flash Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlberg, Joleen K.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.

    2016-08-01

    The temperature distribution of field Li-rich red giants suggests the presence of a population of Li-rich red clump (RC) stars. One proposed explanation for this population is that all stars with masses near 2 M ⊙ experience a short-lived phase of Li-richness at the onset of core He-burning. Many of these stars have low 12C/13C, a signature of deep mixing that is presumably associated with the Li regeneration. To test this purported mechanism of Li enrichment, we measured abundances in 38 RC stars and 6 red giant branch (RGB) stars in four open clusters selected to have RC masses near 2 M ⊙. We find six Li-rich stars (A(Li) ≥ 1.50 dex) of which only two may be RC stars. None of the RC stars have Li exceeding the levels observed in the RGB stars, but given the brevity of the suggested Li-rich phase and the modest sample size, it is probable that stars with larger Li-enrichments were missed simply by chance. However, we find very few stars in our sample with low 12C/13C. Such low 12C/13C, seen in many field Li-rich stars, should persist even after lithium has returned to normal low levels. Thus, if Li synthesis during the He flash occurs, it is a rare, but potentially long-lived occurrence rather than a short-lived phase for all stars. We estimate a conservative upper limit of the fraction of stars going through a Li-rich phase to be \\lt 47 % , based on stars that have low 12C/13C for their observed A(Li).

  11. Pre-main sequence stars in open clusters. I. The DAY-I catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, A. J.; Alfaro, E. J.; Yun, J. L.

    2007-06-01

    Context: We present the basic ideas and first results from the project we are carrying out at present, the search for and characterisation of pre-main sequence (PMS) stars among the members of Galactic young clusters. The observations of 10 southern clusters, nine of them located in the Carina-Sagittarius spiral arm of the Milky Way are presented. Aims: We aim at listing candidate PMS member stars in young clusters. The catalogued stars will serve as a basis for future spectroscopic studies of individual objects to determine the properties of stellar formation in the last phases before the main sequence stage. Properties such as the presence of residual envelopes or disks, age spread among PMS members, and the possible presence of several episodes of star formation in the clusters, are to be addressed. Methods: Multicolour photometry in the UBVR_CIC system has been obtained for 10 southern young clusters in the fourth Galactic quadrant, located between Galactic longitudes l = 238° and l = 310°. For six clusters in the sample, the observations presented here provide the first published study based on CCD photometry. A quantitative comparison is performed with post-MS isochrones, and PMS isochrones from three different evolutionary models are used in the photometric membership analysis for possible PMS stars. Results: The observations produce photometric indices in the Johnson-Cousins photometric systems for a total of 26 962 stars. The matching of our pixel coordinates with corresponding fields in the 2MASS data base provides astrometric calibration for all cataloged stars and JHK 2MASS photometric indices for 60% of them. Post-MS cluster ages range from 4 to 60 Myr, whereas the photometric membership analysis assigns PMS membership to a total of 842 stars, covering an age range between 1 and 10 Myr. This information on the PMS candidate members has been collected into a catalogue, named DAY-I, which contains 16 entries for 842 stars in the field of 10 southern

  12. Pre-main sequence variable stars in young open cluster NGC 1893

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lata, Sneh; Pandey, A. K.; Chen, W. P.; Maheswar, G.; Chauhan, Neelam

    We present results of multi-epoch (14 nights during 2007-2010) V-band photometry of the cluster NGC 1893 region to identify photometric variable stars in the cluster. The study identified a total of 53 stars showing photometric variability. The members associated with the region are identified on the basis of spectral energy distribution, J-H/H-K two colour diagram and V/V-I colour-magnitude diagram. The ages and masses of the majority of pre-main-sequence sources are found to be ≲5 Myr and in the range 0.5 ≲ M/M_{⊙} ≲4, respectively. These pre-main-sequence sources hence could be T Tauri stars. We also determined the physical parameters like disk mass and accretion rate from the spectral energy distribution of these T Tauri stars. The periods of majority of the T Tauri stars range from 0.1 to 20 day. We found that the brightness of Classical T Tauri stars is varying with larger amplitude in comparison to weak line T Tauri stars. The amplitude is found to decrease with increase in mass, which could be due to the dispersal of disks of massive stars.

  13. Pre-main-sequence variable stars in young open cluster NGC 1893

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lata, Sneh; Pandey, A. K.; Chen, W. P.; Maheswar, G.; Chauhan, Neelam

    2012-12-01

    We present results of multi-epoch (14 nights during 2007-2010) V-band photometry of the cluster NGC 1893 region to identify photometric variable stars in the cluster. The study identified a total of 53 stars showing photometric variability. The members associated with the region are identified on the basis of spectral energy distribution, J - H/H - K two-colour diagram and V/V - I colour-magnitude diagram. The ages and masses of the majority of pre-main-sequence sources are found to be ≲5 Myr and in the range 0.5≲M/M≲4, respectively. These pre-main-sequence sources hence could be T Tauri stars. We also determined the physical parameters like disc mass and accretion rate from the spectral energy distribution of these T Tauri stars. The periods of majority of the T Tauri stars range from 0.1 to 20 d. The brightness of Classical T Tauri stars is found to vary with larger amplitude in comparison to weak line T Tauri stars. It is found that the amplitude decreases with increase in mass, which could be due to the dispersal of discs of massive stars.

  14. Photometric monitoring of open clusters: Low-mass eclipsing binary stars and the stellar mass-luminosity-radius relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebb, Leslie

    2006-06-01

    This thesis describes a photometric monitoring survey of Galactic star clusters designed to detect low-mass eclipsing binary star systems through variations in their relative lightcurves. The aim is to use cluster eclipsing binaries to measure the masses and radii of M-dwarf stars with ages and metallicities known from studies of brighter cluster stars. This information will provide an improved calibration of the mass-luminosity-radius relation for low-mass stars, be used to test stellar structure and evolution models, and help quantify the contribution of low-mass stars to the global mass census in the Galaxy. The survey is designed to detect eclipse events in stars of ~0.3 M_sun and consists of 600 Gbytes of raw imaging data on six open clusters with a range of ages (~ 0.15 - 4 Gyr) and metallicites (~ -0.2 - 0.0 dex). The clusters NGC 1647 and M 35 contain excellent candidate systems showing eclipse like variations in brightness and photometry consistent with cluster membership. The analysis of these clusters and the eclipsing M-dwarf stars detected in them are presented. Analysis of the candidate system in NGC 1647 confirms the object as a newly discovered M-dwarf eclipsing binary in the cluster with compenent masses of M 1 = 0.47 ± 0.05[Special characters omitted.] and M 2 = 0.19 ± 0.02[Special characters omitted.] . The small mass ratio ( M 2 / M 1 ) and low secondary mass of this object provide an unprecedented opportunity to test stellar models. We find that no stellar evolution models are consistent with all the properties of both M-dwarf stars in the eclipsing binary. The candidate in M 35 has been confirmed as an M-dwarf eclipsing binary, and the masses of the individual components are estimated to be M 1 ~ 0.25 M_sun and M 2 ~ 0.15 M_sun . Additional high resolution spectroscopic and photometric observations, for which we have applied and been awarded time, are necessary to accurately derive the intrinsic properties of the individual stellar

  15. Star formation in the outer Galaxy: membership and fundamental parameters of the young open cluster NGC 1893

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisinzano, L.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Micela, G.; Caramazza, M.; Guarcello, M. G.; Sciortino, S.; Testi, L.

    2011-03-01

    Context. Different environmental conditions can play a crucial role in determining final products of the star formation process, and in this context, less favorable activities of star formation are expected in the external regions of our Galaxy. Aims: We studied the properties of the young open cluster NGC 1893 located about 12 Kpc from the galactic center, to investigate how different physical conditions can affect the process of star formation. Methods: By adopting a multiwavelength approach, we compiled a catalog extending from X-rays to NIR data to derive the cluster membership. In addition, optical and NIR photometric properties are used to evaluate the cluster parameters. Results: We find 415 diskless candidate members and 1061 young stellar objects with a circumstellar disk or class II candidate members, 125 of which are also Hα emitters. Considering the diskless candidate members, we find that the cluster distance is 3.6 ± 0.2 kpc and the mean interstellar reddening is E(B - V) = 0.6 ± 0.1 with evidence of differential reddening in the whole surveyed region. Conclusions: NGC 1893 contains a conspicuous population of pre-main sequence stars, together with the well-studied main sequence cluster population. We found a disk fraction of about 70% similar to the one found in clusters of similar age in the solar neighbor and then, despite expected unfavorable conditions for star formation, we conclude that very rich young clusters can also form in the outer regions of our Galaxy. Full Tables 5-8 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/527/A77

  16. ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCE RATIOS IN STARS OF THE OUTER GALACTIC DISK. IV. A NEW SAMPLE OF OPEN CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Yong, David; Carney, Bruce W.; Friel, Eileen D. E-mail: bruce@physics.unc.edu

    2012-10-01

    We present radial velocities and chemical abundances for nine stars in the old, distant open clusters Be18, Be21, Be22, Be32, and PWM4. For Be18 and PWM4, these are the first chemical abundance measurements. Combining our data with literature results produces a compilation of some 68 chemical abundance measurements in 49 unique clusters. For this combined sample, we study the chemical abundances of open clusters as a function of distance, age, and metallicity. We confirm that the metallicity gradient in the outer disk is flatter than the gradient in the vicinity of the solar neighborhood. We also confirm that the open clusters in the outer disk are metal-poor with enhancements in the ratios [{alpha}/Fe] and perhaps [Eu/Fe]. All elements show negligible or small trends between [X/Fe] and distance (<0.02 dex kpc{sup -1}), but for some elements, there is a hint that the local (R{sub GC} < 13 kpc) and distant (R{sub GC} > 13 kpc) samples may have different trends with distance. There is no evidence for significant abundance trends versus age (<0.04 dex Gyr{sup -1}). We measure the linear relation between [X/Fe] and metallicity, [Fe/H], and find that the scatter about the mean trend is comparable to the measurement uncertainties. Comparison with solar neighborhood field giants shows that the open clusters share similar abundance ratios [X/Fe] at a given metallicity. While the flattening of the metallicity gradient and enhanced [{alpha}/Fe] ratios in the outer disk suggest a chemical enrichment history different from that of the solar neighborhood, we echo the sentiments expressed by Friel et al. that definitive conclusions await homogeneous analyses of larger samples of stars in larger numbers of clusters. Arguably, our understanding of the evolution of the outer disk from open clusters is currently limited by systematic abundance differences between various studies.

  17. Open clusters as laboratories: The angular momentum evolution of young stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauffer, John R.

    1994-01-01

    This is the annual status report for the third year of our LTSA grant 'Open Clusters as Laboratories.' Because we have now had a few years to work on the project, we have started to produce and publish a large number of papers. We have been extremely successful in obtaining ROSAT observations of open clusters. With the demise of the PSPC on ROSAT, our main data source has come to an end and we will be able to concentrate on analyzing those data.

  18. Single stars in the Hyades open cluster. Fiducial sequence for testing stellar and atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopytova, Taisiya G.; Brandner, Wolfgang; Tognelli, Emanuele; Prada Moroni, Pier Giorgio; Da Rio, Nicola; Röser, Siegfried; Schilbach, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Context. Age and mass determinations for isolated stellar objects remain model-dependent. While stellar interior and atmospheric theoretical models are rapidly evolving, we need a powerful tool to test them. Open clusters are good candidates for this role. Aims: We aim to create a fiducial sequence of stellar objects for testing stellar and atmospheric models. Methods: We complement previous studies on the Hyades multiplicity by Lucky Imaging observations with the AstraLux Norte camera. This allows us to exclude possible binary and multiple systems with companions outside a 2-7 AU separation and to create a single-star sequence for the Hyades. The sequence encompasses 250 main-sequence stars ranging from A5V to M6V. Using the Tool for Astrophysical Data Analysis (TA-DA), we create various theoretical isochrones applying different combinations of interior and atmospheric models. We compare the isochrones with the observed Hyades single-star sequence on J vs. J-Ks, J vs. J-H, and Ks vs. H-Ks color-magnitude diagrams. As a reference we also compute absolute fluxes and magnitudes for all stars from X-ray to mid-infrared based on photometric measurements available in the literature(ROSAT X-ray, GALEX UV, APASS gri, 2MASS JHKs, and WISE W1 to W4). Results: We find that combinations of both PISA and DARTMOUTH stellar interior models with BT-Settl 2010 atmospheric models describe the observed sequence well. We use PISA in combination with BT-Settl 2010 models to derive theoretical predictions for physical parameters (Teff, mass, log g) of 250 single stars in the Hyades. The full sequence covers the mass range of 0.13-2.30 M⊙, and effective temperatures between 3060 K and 8200 K. Conclusions: Within the measurement uncertainties, the current generation of models agree well with the single-star sequence. The primary limitations are the uncertainties in the measurement of the distances to individual Hyades members, and uncertainties in the photometry. Gaia parallaxes

  19. Open clusters. II. Fundamental parameters of B stars in Collinder 223, Hogg 16, NGC 2645, NGC 3114, and NGC 6025

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aidelman, Y.; Cidale, L. S.; Zorec, J.; Panei, J. A.

    2015-05-01

    Context. The knowledge of accurate values of effective temperature, surface gravity, and luminosity of stars in open clusters is very important not only to derive cluster distances and ages but also to discuss the stellar structure and evolution. Unfortunately, stellar parameters are still very scarce. Aims: Our goal is to study five open clusters to derive stellar parameters of the B and Be star population and discuss the cluster properties. In a near future, we intend to gather a statistically relevant samples of Be stars to discuss their origin and evolution. Methods: We use the Barbier-Chalonge-Divan spectrophotometric system, based on the study of low-resolution spectra around the Balmer discontinuity, since it is independent of the interstellar and circumstellar extinction and provides accurate Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams and stellar parameters. Results: We determine stellar fundamental parameters, such as effective temperatures, surface gravities, spectral types, luminosity classes, absolute and bolometric magnitudes and colour gradient excesses of the stars in the field of Collinder 223, Hogg 16, NGC 2645, NGC 3114, and NGC 6025. Additional information, mainly masses and ages of cluster stellar populations, is obtained using stellar evolution models. In most cases, stellar fundamental parameters have been derived for the first time. We also discuss the derived cluster properties of reddening, age and distance. Conclusions: Collinder 223 cluster parameters are overline{E(B-V) = 0.25 ± 0.03} mag and overline{(mv - M_v)0 = 11.21 ± 0.25} mag. In Hogg 16, we clearly distinguish two groups of stars (Hogg 16a and Hogg 16b) with very different mean true distance moduli (8.91 ± 0.26 mag and 12.51 ± 0.38 mag), mean colour excesses (0.26 ± 0.03 mag and 0.63 ± 0.08 mag), and spectral types (B early-type and B late-/A-type stars, respectively). The farthest group could be merged with Collinder 272. NGC 2645 is a young cluster (<14 Myr) with overline{E(B-V) = 0

  20. Chemical evolution of A- and B-type stars in open clusters: observed abundances vs. diffusion models. Am stars in the Praesepe cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, L.; Bagnulo, S.; Monier, R.; Khan, S. A.; Kochukhov, O.; Landstreet, J. D.; Wade, G. A.; Weiss, W. W.

    2008-04-01

    We have decided to address the problem of how abundances and peculiarities change during main sequence evolution. We have setup a program to measure the atmospheric abundance patterns from tens of A-type star members of clusters of different ages, and compare the results with theory predictions. In this paper we present the overall project and we focus on the results obtained for a sample of Am stars of the Praesepe cluster (log t= 8.85 ± 0.15; González-García et al., 2006). We have obtained spectra for eight Am stars, two normal A-type stars and one blue straggler, that are probable members of the Praesepe cluster. For all of these stars we have determined fundamental parameters and photospheric abundances for a large number of chemical elements. For seven stars we also obtained spectra in circular polarisation and applied the LSD technique to measure the mean longitudinal magnetic field. We have found good agreement between abundance predictions of diffusion models and measured abundances, except for Na and S. Li appears to be overabundant in three stars of our sample. No magnetic field was detected in any of the analysed stars.

  1. Young Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portegies Zwart, Simon F.; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; Gieles, Mark

    2010-09-01

    Young massive clusters (YMCs) are dense aggregates of young stars that form the fundamental building blocks of galaxies. Several examples exist in the Milky Way Galaxy and the Local Group, but they are particularly abundant in starburst and interacting galaxies. The few YMCs that are close enough to resolve are of prime interest for studying the stellar mass function and the ecological interplay between stellar evolution and stellar dynamics. The distant unresolved clusters may be effectively used to study the star-cluster mass function, and they provide excellent constraints on the formation mechanisms of young cluster populations. YMCs are expected to be the nurseries for many unusual objects, including a wide range of exotic stars and binaries. So far only a few such objects have been found in YMCs, although their older cousins, the globular clusters, are unusually rich in stellar exotica. In this review, we focus on star clusters younger than ˜100 Myr, more than a few current crossing times old, and more massive than ˜104M⊙; the size of the cluster and its environment are considered less relevant as distinguishing parameters. We describe the global properties of the currently known young massive star clusters in the Local Group and beyond, and discuss the state of the art in observations and dynamical modeling of these systems. In order to make this review readable by observers, theorists, and computational astrophysicists, we also review the cross-disciplinary terminology.

  2. Globular and Open Clusters Observed by SDSS/SEGUE: the Giant Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Heather L.; Ma, Zhibo; Clem, James L.; An, Deokkeun; Connor, Thomas; Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Casagrande, Luca; Rockosi, Constance; Yanny, Brian; Harding, Paul; Beers, Timothy C.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2015-12-18

    We present griz observations for the clusters M92, M13 and NGC 6791 and gr photometry for M71, Be 29 and NGC 7789. In addition we present new membership identifications for all these clusters, which have been observed spectroscopically as calibrators for the SDSS/SEGUE survey; this paper focuses in particular on the red giant branch stars in the clusters. In a number of cases, these giants were too bright to be observed in the normal SDSS survey operations, and we describe the procedure used to obtain spectra for these stars. For M71, also present a new variable reddening map and a new fiducial for the gr giant branch. For NGC 7789, we derived a transformation from Teff to g-r for giants of near solar abundance, using IRFM Teff measures of stars with good ugriz and 2MASS photometry and SEGUE spectra. The result of our analysis is a robust list of known cluster members with correctly dereddened and (if needed) transformed gr photometry for crucial calibration efforts for SDSS and SEGUE.

  3. Globular and Open Clusters Observed by SDSS/SEGUE: The Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Heather L.; Ma, Zhibo; Clem, James L.; An, Deokkeun; Connor, Thomas; Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Casagrande, Luca; Rockosi, Constance; Yanny, Brian; Harding, Paul; Beers, Timothy C.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-01-01

    We present griz observations for the clusters M92, M13 and NGC 6791 and gr photometry for M71, Be 29 and NGC 7789. In addition we present new membership identifications for all these clusters, which have been observed spectroscopically as calibrators for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)/SEGUE survey; this paper focuses in particular on the red giant branch stars in the clusters. In a number of cases, these giants were too bright to be observed in the normal SDSS survey operations, and we describe the procedure used to obtain spectra for these stars. For M71, we also present a new variable reddening map and a new fiducial for the gr giant branch. For NGC 7789, we derived a transformation from Teff to g-r for giants of near solar abundance, using IRFM Teff measures of stars with good ugriz and 2MASS photometry and SEGUE spectra. The result of our analysis is a robust list of known cluster members with correctly dereddened and (if needed) transformed gr photometry for crucial calibration efforts for SDSS and SEGUE.

  4. Globular and Open Clusters Observed by SDSS/SEGUE: the Giant Stars

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Morrison, Heather L.; Ma, Zhibo; Clem, James L.; An, Deokkeun; Connor, Thomas; Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Casagrande, Luca; Rockosi, Constance; Yanny, Brian; Harding, Paul; et al

    2015-12-18

    We present griz observations for the clusters M92, M13 and NGC 6791 and gr photometry for M71, Be 29 and NGC 7789. In addition we present new membership identifications for all these clusters, which have been observed spectroscopically as calibrators for the SDSS/SEGUE survey; this paper focuses in particular on the red giant branch stars in the clusters. In a number of cases, these giants were too bright to be observed in the normal SDSS survey operations, and we describe the procedure used to obtain spectra for these stars. For M71, also present a new variable reddening map and amore » new fiducial for the gr giant branch. For NGC 7789, we derived a transformation from Teff to g-r for giants of near solar abundance, using IRFM Teff measures of stars with good ugriz and 2MASS photometry and SEGUE spectra. The result of our analysis is a robust list of known cluster members with correctly dereddened and (if needed) transformed gr photometry for crucial calibration efforts for SDSS and SEGUE.« less

  5. Globular and Open Clusters Observed by SDSS/SEGUE: The Giant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Heather L.; Ma, Zhibo; Clem, James L.; An, Deokkeun; Connor, Thomas; Schechtman-Rook, Andrew; Casagrande, Luca; Rockosi, Constance; Yanny, Brian; Harding, Paul; Beers, Timothy C.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2016-01-01

    We present griz observations for the clusters M92, M13 and NGC 6791 and gr photometry for M71, Be 29 and NGC 7789. In addition we present new membership identifications for all these clusters, which have been observed spectroscopically as calibrators for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)/SEGUE survey; this paper focuses in particular on the red giant branch stars in the clusters. In a number of cases, these giants were too bright to be observed in the normal SDSS survey operations, and we describe the procedure used to obtain spectra for these stars. For M71, we also present a new variable reddening map and a new fiducial for the gr giant branch. For NGC 7789, we derived a transformation from Teff to g–r for giants of near solar abundance, using IRFM Teff measures of stars with good ugriz and 2MASS photometry and SEGUE spectra. The result of our analysis is a robust list of known cluster members with correctly dereddened and (if needed) transformed gr photometry for crucial calibration efforts for SDSS and SEGUE.

  6. Investigation of the open star cluster NGC 2323 (M50) based on the proper motions and photometry of its constituent stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, V. N.; Ananjevskaja, Yu. K.; Polyakov, E. V.

    2012-02-01

    The results of a comprehensive study of the Galactic open cluster NGC 2323 (M50) are presented. The positions of stars to a limiting magnitude {ie74-1} in a {ie74-2} area centered on the cluster were measured on six plates from the Pulkovo normal astrograph with a maximum epoch difference of 60 yr. The measurements were performed with the Pulkovo "Fantasy" automated measuring system upgraded in 2010. The corresponding areas from the USNO-A2.0, USNO-B1, and 2MASS catalogues were used as additional plates. As a result, the relative proper motions of stars were obtained with a root-mean-square error of 5.85 mas yr-1. A catalogue of UBV and JHK magnitudes for objects in the investigated area was compiled from available published resources. The astrometric selection of cluster members was made by the maximum likelihood method. A high individual cluster membership probability of a star ( P ≥ 80%) served as the first selection criterion. The position of a star on the photometric color-magnitude ( V ∝ ( B-V), J ∝ ( J-K)) diagrams of the cluster was considered as the second criterion. The position of an object on the color-color (( U-B)-( B-V), ( J-H)-( J-K)) diagrams served as the third criterion. On the basis of these criteria, it was established that 508 stars are members of NGC 2323. These data were used to refine the physical parameters of the cluster: the mean reddening {ie74-3}, the true distance modulus {ie74-4}, and the cluster age of about 140 Myr from the grid of isochrones computed by the Padova group for solar chemical composition. Two tables contain the catalogues of proper motions and photometry for stars in the area. The luminosity and mass functions were constructed. The cluster membership of red and blue giants, variable, double, and multiple stars was considered. The position of the cluster center was improved: {ie74-5}, δ = -08°20'16″(2000.0).

  7. A search for flares and mass ejections on young late-type stars in the open cluster Blanco-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitzinger, M.; Odert, P.; Greimel, R.; Korhonen, H.; Guenther, E. W.; Hanslmeier, A.; Lammer, H.; Khodachenko, M. L.

    2014-09-01

    We present a search for stellar activity (flares and mass ejections) in a sample of 28 stars in the young open cluster Blanco-1. We use optical spectra obtained with European Southern Observatory's Visible Multi-Object Spectrograph installed on the Very Large Telescope. From the total observing time of ˜5 h, we find four Hα flares but no distinct indication of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on the investigated dK-dM stars. Two flares show `dips' in their light curves right before their impulsive phases which are similar to previous discoveries in photometric light curves of active dMe stars. We estimate an upper limit of <4 CMEs per day per star and discuss this result with respect to a empirical estimation of the CME rate of main-sequence stars. We find that we should have detected at least one CME per star with a mass of ≤ 3 × 1017 g depending on the star's X-ray luminosity, but the estimated Hα fluxes associated with these masses are below the detection limit of our observations. We conclude that the parameter which mainly influences the detection of stellar CMEs using the method of Doppler-shifted emission caused by moving plasma is not the spectral resolution/velocity but the flux/mass of the CME.

  8. The Problem of Hipparcos Distances to Open Clusters. II. Constraints from Nearby Field Theory. Report 2; ClustersConstraints from nearly Field Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderblom, David R.; King, Jeremy R.; Hanson, Robert B.; Jones, Burton F.; Fischer, Debra; Stauffer, John R.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines the discrepancy between distances to nearby open clusters as determined by parallaxes from Hipparcos compared to traditional main-sequence fitting. The biggest difference is seen for the Pleiades, and our hypothesis is that if the Hipparcos distance to the Pleiades is correct, then similar subluminous zero-age main-sequence (ZAMS) stars should exist elsewhere, including in the immediate solar neighborhood. We examine a color-magnitude diagram of very young and nearby solar-type stars and show that none of them lie below the traditional ZAMS, despite the fact that the Hipparcos Pleiades parallax would place its members 0.3 mag below that ZAMS. We also present analyses and observations of solar-type stars that do lie below the ZAMS, and we show that they are subluminous because of low metallicity and that they have the kinematics of old stars.

  9. H-cluster stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, X. Y.; Gao, C. Y.; Xu, R. X.

    2013-06-01

    The study of dense matter at ultrahigh density has a very long history, which is meaningful for us to understand not only cosmic events in extreme circumstances but also fundamental laws of physics. It is well known that the state of cold matter at supranuclear density depends on the non-perturbative nature of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and is essential for modelling pulsars. A so-called H-cluster matter is proposed in this paper as the nature of dense matter in reality. In compact stars at only a few nuclear densities but low temperature, quarks could be interacting strongly with each other there. That might render quarks grouped in clusters, although the hypothetical quark clusters in cold dense matter have not been confirmed due to the lack of both theoretical and experimental evidence. Motivated by recent lattice QCD simulations of the H-dibaryons (with structure uuddss), we therefore consider here a possible kind of quark clusters, H-clusters, that could emerge inside compact stars during their initial cooling as the dominant components inside (the degree of freedom could then be H-clusters there). Taking into account the in-medium stiffening effect, we find that at baryon densities of compact stars H-cluster matter could be more stable than nuclear matter. We also find that for the H-cluster matter with lattice structure, the equation of state could be so stiff that it would seem to be `superluminal' in the most dense region. However, the real sound speed for H-cluster matter is in fact difficult to calculate, so at this stage we do not put constraints on our model from the usual requirement of causality. We study the stars composed of H-clusters, i.e. H-cluster stars, and derive the dependence of their maximum mass on the in-medium stiffening effect, showing that the maximum mass could be well above 2 M⊙ as observed and that the resultant mass-radius relation fits the measurement of the rapid burster under reasonable parameters. Besides a general

  10. Determining the Age of the Kepler Open Cluster NGC 6819 With a New Triple System and Other Eclipsing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Lauren N.; Sandquist, Eric L.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Milliman, Katelyn; Geller, Aaron M.; Jeffries, Mark W., Jr.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Brogaard, Karsten; Platais, Imants; Bruntt, Hans; Grundahl, Frank; Stello, Dennis; Frandsen, Søren

    2016-03-01

    As part of our study of the old (˜2.5 Gyr) open cluster NGC 6819 in the Kepler field, we present photometric (Kepler and ground-based BVRCIC) and spectroscopic observations of the detached eclipsing binary WOCS 24009 (Auner 665; KIC 5023948) with a short orbital period of 3.6 days. WOCS 24009 is a triple-lined system, and we verify that the brightest star is physically orbiting the eclipsing binary using radial velocities and eclipse timing variations. The eclipsing binary components have masses MB = 1.090 ± 0.010 M⊙ and MC = 1.075 ± 0.013 M⊙, and radii RB = 1.099 ± 0.006 ± 0.005 R⊙ and RC = 1.069 ± 0.006 ± 0.013 R⊙. The bright non-eclipsing star resides at the cluster turnoff, and ultimately its mass will directly constrain the turnoff mass: our preliminary determination is MA = 1.251 ± 0.057 M⊙. A careful examination of the light curves indicates that the fainter star in the eclipsing binary undergoes a very brief period of total eclipse, which enables us to precisely decompose the light of the three stars and place them in the color-magnitude diagram (CMD). We also present improved analysis of two previously discussed detached eclipsing stars in NGC 6819 (WOCS 40007 and WOCS 23009) en route to a combined determination of the cluster’s distance modulus (m - M)V = 12.38 ± 0.04. Because this paper significantly increases the number of measured stars in the cluster, we can better constrain the age of the CMD to be 2.21 ± 0.10 ± 0.20 Gyr. Additionally, using all measured eclipsing binary star masses and radii, we constrain the age to 2.38 ± 0.05 ± 0.22 Gyr. The quoted uncertainties are estimates of measurement and systematic uncertainties (due to model physics differences and metal content), respectively. This is paper 57 of the WIYN Open Cluster Study (WOCS).

  11. High-resolution spectroscopic observations of binary stars and yellow stragglers in three open clusters: NGC 2360, NGC 3680, and NGC 5822

    SciTech Connect

    Sales Silva, J. V.; Peña Suárez, V. J.; Katime Santrich, O. J.; Pereira, C. B.; Drake, N. A.; Roig, F. E-mail: jearim@on.br E-mail: claudio@on.br E-mail: froig@on.br

    2014-11-01

    Binary stars in open clusters are very useful targets in constraining the nucleosynthesis process. The luminosities of the stars are known because the distances of the clusters are also known, so chemical peculiarities can be linked directly to the evolutionary status of a star. In addition, binary stars offer the opportunity to verify a relationship between them and the straggler population in both globular and open clusters. We carried out a detailed spectroscopic analysis to derive the atmospheric parameters for 16 red giants in binary systems and the chemical composition of 11 of them in the open clusters NGC 2360, NGC 3680, and NGC 5822. We obtained abundances of C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Ca, Si, Ti, Ni, Cr, Y, Zr, La, Ce, and Nd. The atmospheric parameters of the studied stars and their chemical abundances were determined using high-resolution optical spectroscopy. We employ the local thermodynamic equilibrium model atmospheres of Kurucz and the spectral analysis code MOOG. The abundances of the light elements were derived using the spectral synthesis technique. We found that the stars NGC 2360-92 and 96, NGC 3680-34, and NGC 5822-4 and 312 are yellow straggler stars. We show that the spectra of NGC 5822-4 and 312 present evidence of contamination by an A-type star as a secondary star. For the other yellow stragglers, evidence of contamination is given by the broad wings of the Hα. Detection of yellow straggler stars is important because the observed number can be compared with the number predicted by simulations of binary stellar evolution in open clusters. We also found that the other binary stars are not s-process enriched, which may suggest that in these binaries the secondary star is probably a faint main-sequence object. The lack of any s-process enrichment is very useful in setting constraints for the number of white dwarfs in the open cluster, a subject that is related to the birthrate of these kinds of stars in open clusters and also to the age of a

  12. C, N, O abundances and carbon isotope ratios in evolved stars of the open clusters Collinder 261 and NGC 6253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikolaitis, Š.; Tautvaišienė, G.; Gratton, R.; Bragaglia, A.; Carretta, E.

    2012-05-01

    Context. Investigations of abundances of carbon and nitrogen in the atmospheres of evolved stars of open clusters may provide comprehensive information on chemical composition changes caused by stellar evolution. Aims: Our main aim is to increase the number of open clusters with determined carbon-to nitrogen and carbon isotope ratios. Methods: High-resolution spectra were analysed using a differential model atmosphere method. Abundances of carbon were derived using the C2 Swan (0, 1) band head at 5635.5 Å (FEROS spectra) and the C2 Swan (1, 0) band head at 4737 Å (UVES spectra). The wavelength interval 7980-8130 Å, with strong CN features was analysed to determine nitrogen abundances and 12C/13C isotope ratios. The oxygen abundances were determined from the [O i] line at 6300 Å. Results: The average value of 12C/13C isotope ratios of Cr 261 is equal to 18 ± 2 in four giants and to 12 ± 1 in two clump stars; it is equal to 16 ± 1 in four clump stars of the open cluster NGC 6253. The mean C/N ratios in Cr 261 and NGC 6253 are equal to 1.67 ± 0.06 and 1.37 ± 0.09, respectively. Conclusions: The 12C/13C and C/N values in Cr 261 and NGC 6253 within limits of uncertainties agree with the theoretical model of thermohaline-induced mixing as well as with the cool-bottom processing model. Based on observations collected at ESO telescopes under programmes 65.N-0286, 169.D-0473.

  13. Massive open star clusters using the VVV survey. I. Presentation of the data and description of the approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chené, A.-N.; Borissova, J.; Clarke, J. R. A.; Bonatto, C.; Majaess, D. J.; Moni Bidin, C.; Sale, S. E.; Mauro, F.; Kurtev, R.; Baume, G.; Feinstein, C.; Ivanov, V. D.; Geisler, D.; Catelan, M.; Minniti, D.; Lucas, P.; de Grijs, R.; Kumar, M. S. N.

    2012-09-01

    Context. The ESO Public Survey "VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea" (VVV) provides deep multi-epoch infrared observations for unprecedented 562 sq. degrees of the Galactic bulge, and adjacent regions of the disk. Aims: The VVV observations will foster the construction of a sample of Galactic star clusters with reliable and homogeneously derived physical parameters (e.g., age, distance, and mass, etc.). In this first paper in a series, the methodology employed to establish cluster parameters for the envisioned database are elaborated upon by analysing four known young open clusters: Danks 1, Danks 2, RCW 79, and DBS 132. The analysis offers a first glimpse of the information that can be gleaned from the VVV observations for clusters in the final database. Methods: Wide-field, deep JHKs VVV observations, combined with new infrared spectroscopy, are employed to constrain fundamental parameters for a subset of clusters. Results: Results are inferred from VVV near-infrared photometry and numerous low resolution spectra (typically more than 10 per cluster). The high quality of the spectra and the deep wide-field VVV photometry enables us to precisely and independently determine the characteristics of the clusters studied, which we compare to previous determinations. An anomalous reddening law in the direction of the Danks clusters is found, specifically E(J - H)/E(H - Ks) = 2.20 ± 0.06, which exceeds published values for the inner Galaxy. The G305 star forming complex, which includes the Danks clusters, lies beyond the Sagittarius-Carina spiral arm and occupies the Centaurus arm. Finally, the first deep infrared colour-magnitude diagram of RCW 79 is presented, which reveals a sizeable pre-main sequence population. A list of candidate variable stars in G305 region is reported. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the strength of the dataset and methodology employed, and constitutes the first step of a broader study which shall include reliable parameters for a sizeable

  14. The Young Open Clusters King 12, NGC 7788, and NGC 7790: Pre-main-sequence Stars and Extended Stellar Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidge, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    The stellar contents of the open clusters King 12, NGC 7788, and NGC 7790 are investigated using MegaCam images. Comparisons with isochrones yield an age <20 Myr for King 12, 20-40 Myr for NGC 7788, and 60-80 Myr for NGC 7790 based on the properties of stars near the main-sequence turnoff (MSTO) in each cluster. The reddening of NGC 7788 is much larger than previously estimated. The luminosity functions (LFs) of King 12 and NGC 7788 show breaks that are attributed to the onset of pre-main-sequence (PMS) objects, and comparisons with models of PMS evolution yield ages that are consistent with those measured from stars near the MSTO. In contrast, the r' LF of main-sequence stars in NGC 7790 is matched to r' = 20 by a model that is based on the solar neighborhood mass function. The structural properties of all three clusters are investigated by examining the two-point angular correlation function of blue main-sequence stars. King 12 and NGC 7788 are each surrounded by a stellar halo that extends out to a radius of 5 arcmin (~3.4 pc). It is suggested that these halos form in response to large-scale mass ejection early in the evolution of the clusters, as predicted by models. In contrast, blue main-sequence stars in NGC 7790 are traced out to a radius of ~7.5 arcmin (~5.5 pc), with no evidence of a halo. It is suggested that all three clusters may have originated in the same star-forming complex, but not in the same giant molecular cloud. Based on observations obtained with MegaPrime/MegaCam, a joint project of CFHT and CEA/DAPNIA, at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii.

  15. Low mass stars, brown dwarf candidates and the mass function of the young open cluster NGC 2547

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffries, R. D.; Naylor, Tim; Devey, C. R.; Totten, E. J.

    2004-07-01

    We present a catalogue of RcIcZ photometry over an area of 0.855 square degrees, centred on the young open cluster NGC 2547. The survey is substantially complete to limits of Rc= 21.5, Ic= 19.5, Z= 19.5. We use the catalogue to define a sample of NGC 2547 candidates with model-dependent masses of about 0.05 -1.0 Msolar. After correcting for incompleteness and estimating contamination by foreground field dwarfs, we investigate the mass function of the cluster, its binary content, and search for evidence of mass segregation among the lower mass stars. There is ample evidence for mass segregation between high (>3 Msolar) and lower mass stars, but over the range 0.1 < M < 0.7 Msolar, the data are consistent with no further mass segregation. By fitting King profiles we conclude that at least 60 per cent of the low-mass stellar population are contained within our survey. The cluster mass function is remarkably similar to the Pleiades for 0.075 < M < 0.7 Msolar. Because of its age (~= 30 Myr), we demonstrate that this mass function is robust to a number of systematic uncertainties likely to affect older and younger clusters and is therefore one of the best available estimates for the initial mass function in young disc populations. For 0.05 < M < 0.075 Msolar there is some evidence for a deficit of brown dwarfs in NGC 2547 compared with other clusters. This deficit may extend to lower masses or may only be a dip, perhaps caused by an imperfect understanding of the mass-magnitude relationship at temperatures of around 2800 K. Incompleteness in both our survey and the luminosity functions from which we estimate contamination by foreground objects leave this question open. The binary fraction for systems with mass ratios greater than about 0.5 is 20-35 per cent for M dwarfs in NGC 2547, quite consistent with that found in the field and other young clusters. The full photometric catalogue and our lists of candidate cluster members are made available in electronic format.

  16. Variable stars in one open cluster within the Kepler/K2-Campaign-5 field: M 67 (NGC 2682)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardiello, D.; Libralato, M.; Bedin, L. R.; Piotto, G.; Ochner, P.; Cunial, A.; Borsato, L.; Granata, V.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we continue the release of high-level data products from the multiyear photometric survey collected at the 67/92 cm Schmidt Telescope in Asiago. The primary goal of the survey is to discover and to characterize variable objects and exoplanetary transits in four fields containing five nearby open clusters spanning a broad range of ages. This second paper releases a photometric catalogue, in five photometric bands, of the solar-age, solar-metallicity open cluster M 67 (NGC 2682). Proper motions are derived comparing the positions observed in 2013 at the Asiago's Schmidt Telescope with those extracted from Wide Field Imager@2.2 m Max-Planck-Gesellschaft/European Southern Obseratory images in 2000. We also analyse the variable sources within M 67. We detected 68 variables, 43 of which are new detection. Variable periods and proper-motion memberships of a large majority of sources in our catalogue are improved with respect to previous releases. The entire catalogue will be available in electronic format. Besides the general interest on an improved catalogue, this work will be particularly useful because of: (1) the imminent release of Kepler/K2 Campaign-5 data of this clusters, for which our catalogue will provide an excellent, high spatial resolution input list, and (2) characterization of the M 67 stars which are targets of intense High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher and High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher for the Northern hemisphere radial-velocity surveys for planet search.

  17. The Orion nebula star cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Photography through filters which suppress nebular light reveal a clustering of faint red stars centered on the Trapezium, this evidences a distinct cluster within the larger OB1 association. Stars within about 20 ft of trapezium comprise the Orion Nebula star cluster are considered. Topics discussed re: (1) extinction by dust grains; (2) photometric peculiarities; (3) spectroscopic peculiarities; (4) young variables; (5) the distribution and motion of gas within the cluster.

  18. A Survey of Chromospheric Activity in the Solar-Type Stars in the Open Cluster M67

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampapa, Mark S.; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Radick, Richard R.; Baliunas, Sallie L.

    2006-11-01

    We present the results of a spectroscopic survey of the Ca II H and K core strengths in a sample of 60 solar-type stars that are members of the solar-age and solar-metallicity open cluster M67. We adopt the HK index, defined as the summed H+K core strengths in 1 Å bandpasses centered on the H and K lines, respectively, as a measure of the chromospheric activity that is present. We compare the distribution of mean HK index values for the M67 solar-type stars with the variation of this index as measured for the Sun during the contemporary solar cycle. We find that the stellar distribution in our HK index is broader than that for the solar cycle. Approximately 17% of the M67 Sun-like stars exhibit average HK indices that are less than solar minimum. About 7%-12% are characterized by relatively high activity in excess of solar maximum values, while 72%-80% of the solar analogs exhibit Ca II H+K strengths within the range of the modern solar cycle. The ranges given reflect uncertainties in the most representative value of the maximum in the HK index to adopt for the solar cycle variations observed during the period AD 1976-2004. Thus, ~20%-30% of our homogeneous sample of Sun-like stars have mean chromospheric H+K strengths that are outside the range of the contemporary solar cycle. Any cycle-like variability that is present in the M67 solar-type stars appears to be characterized by periods greater than ~6 yr. Finally, we estimate a mean chromospheric age for M67 in the range of 3.8-4.3 Gyr. The results presented herein are based on data obtained at the WIYN telescope and at the McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope. The WIYN Observatory is a joint facility of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Indiana University, Yale University, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. The McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope Facility is operated by the National Solar Observatory for the National Science Foundation. This paper is WIYN Open Cluster Study XXVIII in the series.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Physical parameters of pre-main sequence stars in open clusters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, A. J.; Alfaro, E. J.; Yun, J. L.

    Photometric colors in the UBVRI system for 27040 stars, in the fields of 11 Young Open Clusters. The membership and physical parameters are listed. For MS and post MS candidate members, only the mass value is listed. It is calculated from comparison to ZAMS and isochrones by Girardi et al. (2002A&A...391..195G). For PMS candidate members, the age, mass, luminosity, and effective temperature are listed as obtained from comparison to four PMS model isochrones: D'Antona and Mazzitelli (1997MmSAI..68..807D), Palla and Stahler (1999ApJ...525..772P), Siess et al. (2000A&A...358..593S), and Yi et al. (2001ApJS..136..417Y). (2 data files).

  20. New slowly pulsating B stars in the field of the young open cluster NGC 2244 discovered by the MOST photometric satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, D.; Saio, H.; Kuschnig, R.; Fossati, L.; Handler, G.; Zwintz, K.; Weiss, W. W.; Matthews, J. M.; Guenther, D. B.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D.

    2012-02-01

    During two weeks of nearly continuous optical photometry of the young open cluster NGC 2244 obtained by the Microvariability and Oscillations of STars (MOST) satellite, we discovered two new slowly pulsating B (SPB) stars, GSC 00154-00785 and GSC 00154-01871. We present frequency analyses of the MOST light curves of these stars, which reveal two oscillation frequencies (0.61 and 0.71 cycle d-1) in GSC 00154-00785 and two (0.40 and 0.51 cycle d-1) in GSC 00154-01871. These frequency ranges are consistent with g modes of ℓ≤ 2 excited in models of main-sequence or pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars of masses 4.5-5 M⊙ and solar composition (X, Z) = (0.7, 0.02). Published proper motion measurements and radial velocities are insufficient to establish unambiguously cluster membership for these two stars. However, the PMS models which fit best their eigenspectra have ages consistent with NGC 2244. If cluster membership can be confirmed, these would be the first known PMS SPB stars, and would open a new window on testing asteroseismically the interior structures of PMS stars. Based on data from MOST, a Canadian Space Agency mission operated by Microsat Systems Canada Inc. (formerly the space division of Dynacon, Inc.) and the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies and the University of British Columbia, with the assistance of the University of Vienna.

  1. Ruprecht 3: An old star cluster remnant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavani, D. B.; Bica, E.; Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.

    2003-02-01

    2MASS J and H photometry and integrated spectroscopy are employed to study the nature of the poorly populated compact concentration of stars Ruprecht 3, which was previously catalogued as an open cluster. The integrated spectrum remarkably resembles that of a moderately metal-rich globular cluster. The distribution of the object stars in the colour-magnitude diagram is compatible with that of a 1.5 +/- 0.5 Gyr open cluster or older, depending on whether the bluer stars are interpreted as turnoff stars or blue stragglers, respectively. We derive for the object a distance from the Sun dsun = 0.72 +0.04-0.03 kpc and a colour excess E(B-V) = 0.04. Although a globular cluster remnant cannot be ruled out, the integrated spectrum resemblance to that of a globular cluster probably reflects a stochastic effect owing to the few brighter stars. The structural and photometric properties of Ruprecht 3 are compatible with what would be expected for an intermediate-age open cluster remnant. Based on observations made at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba and San Juan, Argentina.

  2. Formation and Assembly of Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Stephen

    open access to state-of- the-art simulation techniques within a modern, modular software environment. We will follow the gravitational collapse of 0.1-10 million-solar mass gas clouds through star formation and coalescence into a star cluster, modeling in detail the coupling of the gas and the newborn stars. We will study the effects of star formation by detecting accreting regions of gas in self-gravitating, turbulent, MHD, FLASH models that we will translate into collisional dynamical systems of stars modeled with an N-body code, coupled together in the AMUSE framework. Our FLASH models will include treatments of radiative transfer from the newly formed stars, including heating and radiative acceleration of the surrounding gas. Specific questions to be addressed are: (1) How efficiently does the gas in a star forming region form stars, how does this depend on mass, metallicity, and other parameters, and what terminates star formation? What observational predictions can be made to constrain our models? (2) How important are different mechanisms for driving turbulence and removing gas from a cluster: accretion, radiative feedback, and mechanical feedback? (3) How does the infant mortality rate of young clusters depend on the initial properties of the parent cloud? (4) What are the characteristic formation timescales of massive star clusters, and what observable imprints does the assembly process leave on their structure at an age of 10-20 Myr, when formation is essentially complete and many clusters can be observed? These studies are directly relevant to NASA missions at many electromagnetic wavelengths, including Chandra, GALEX, Hubble, and Spitzer. Each traces different aspects of cluster formation and evolution: X-rays trace supernovae, ultraviolet traces young stars, visible colors can distinguish between young blue stars and older red stars, and the infrared directly shows young embedded star clusters.

  3. Modes of clustered star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfalzner, S.; Kaczmarek, T.; Olczak, C.

    2012-09-01

    Context. The recent realization that most stars form in clusters, immediately raises the question of whether star and planet formation are influenced by the cluster environment. The stellar density in the most prevalent clusters is the key factor here. Whether dominant modes of clustered star formation exist is a fundamental question. Using near-neighbour searches in young clusters, Bressert and collaborators claim this not to be the case. They conclude that - at least in the solar neighbourhood - star formation is continuous from isolated to densely clustered environments and that the environment plays a minor role in star and planet formation. Aims: We investigate under which conditions near-neighbour searches in young clusters can distinguish between different modes of clustered star formation. Methods: Model star clusters with different memberships and density distributions are set up and near-neighbour searches are performed. We investigate the influence of the combination of different cluster modes, observational biases, and types of diagnostic on the results. Results: We find that the specific cluster density profile, the relative sample sizes, the limitations of the observation, and the choice of diagnostic method decide, whether modelled modes of clustered star formation are detected by near-neighbour searches. For density distributions that are centrally concentrated but span a wide density range (for example, King profiles), separate cluster modes are only detectable under ideal conditions (sample selection, completeness) if the mean density of the individual clusters differs by at least a factor of ~65. Introducing a central cut-off can lead to an underestimate of the mean density by more than a factor of ten especially in high density regions. The environmental effect on star and planet formation is similarly underestimated for half of the population in dense systems. Conclusions: Local surface-density distributions are a very useful tool for single

  4. The Gaia-ESO Survey: pre-main-sequence stars in the young open cluster NGC 3293

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, A. J.; Sampedro, L.; Alfaro, E. J.; Costado, M. T.; Yun, J. L.; Frasca, A.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Drew, J. E.; Eislöffel, J.; Blomme, R.; Morel, T.; Lobel, A.; Semaan, T.; Randich, S.; Jeffries, R. D.; Micela, G.; Vallenari, A.; Kalari, V.; Gilmore, G.; Flaccomio, E.; Carraro, G.; Lardo, C.; Monaco, L.; Prisinzano, L.; Sousa, S. G.; Morbidelli, L.; Lewis, J.; Koposov, S.; Hourihane, A.; Worley, C.; Casey, A.; Franciosini, E.; Sacco, G.; Magrini, L.

    2016-08-01

    The young open cluster NGC3293 is included in the observing program of the Gaia-ESO survey (GES). The radial velocity values provided have been used to assign cluster membership probabilities by means of a single-variable parametric analysis. These membership probabilities are compared to the results of the photometric membership assignment of NGC3293, based on UBVRI photometry. The agreement of the photometric and kinematic member samples amounts to 65 per cent, and could increase to 70 per cent as suggested by the analysis of the differences between both samples. A number of photometric PMS candidate members of spectral type F are found, which are confirmed by the results from VPHAS photometry and SED fitting for the stars in common with VPHAS and GES data sets. Excesses at mid- and near-infrared wavelengths, and signs of Hα emission, are investigated for them. Marginal presence of Hα emission or infilling is detected for the candidate members. Several of them exhibit moderate signs of U excess and weak excesses at mid-IR wavelengths. We suggest that these features originate from accretion discs in their last stages of evolution.

  5. Searching for Li-rich giants in a sample of 12 open clusters. Li enhancement in two stars with substellar companions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado Mena, E.; Tsantaki, M.; Sousa, S. G.; Kunitomo, M.; Adibekyan, V.; Zaworska, P.; Santos, N. C.; Israelian, G.; Lovis, C.

    2016-03-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to search for Li-rich giants in a sample of clusters where planets have been searched, thus we can study the planet engulfment scenario to explain Li replenishment using a proper comparison sample of stars without detected giant planets. Methods: We derived Li abundances for a sample of 67 red giant stars in 12 different open clusters using standard spectral synthesis techniques and high-resolution spectra (from HARPS and UVES). We also determined masses, ages, and radius from PARSEC stellar isochrones to constrain the evolutionary stage of these stars. Results: We found three stars in different clusters with clearly enhanced Li abundances compared to other stars within the cluster. Interestingly, the only two stars with a detected substellar companion in our sample belong to that group. One of the planet hosts, NGC 2423 No. 3, might lie close to the luminosity bump on the HR diagram, a phase where Li production by the Cameron-Fowler process is supported by extra-mixing to bring fresh Li up to the surface. On the other hand, NGC 4349 No. 127 is a more massive and more evolved giant that does not seem to be in the evolutionary phase where other Li-rich stars are found. We discuss the possibility that the Li enhancement of this star is triggered by the engulfment of a planet, considering that close-in planets hardly survive the RGB tip and the early AGB phases. Based on observations collected at the La Silla Observatory, ESO (Chile), with HARPS/3.6 m (runs ID 075.C-0140, 076.C-0429, 077.C-0088, and 078.C-0133) and with UVES/VLT at the Cerro Paranal Observatory (run 079.C-0131).

  6. Massive open star clusters using the VVV survey. III. A young massive cluster at the far edge of the Galactic bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez Alegría, S.; Borissova, J.; Chené, A. N.; O'Leary, E.; Amigo, P.; Minniti, D.; Saito, R. K.; Geisler, D.; Kurtev, R.; Hempel, M.; Gromadzki, M.; Clarke, J. R. A.; Negueruela, I.; Marco, A.; Fierro, C.; Bonatto, C.; Catelan, M.

    2014-04-01

    Context. Young massive clusters are key to map the Milky Way's structure, and near-infrared large area sky surveys have contributed strongly to the discovery of new obscured massive stellar clusters. Aims: We present the third article in a series of papers focused on young and massive clusters discovered in the VVV survey. This article is dedicated to the physical characterization of VVV CL086, using part of its OB-stellar population. Methods: We physically characterized the cluster using JHKS near-infrared photometry from ESO public survey VVV images, using the VVV-SkZ pipeline, and near-infrared K-band spectroscopy, following the methodology presented in the first article of the series. Results: Individual distances for two observed stars indicate that the cluster is located at the far edge of the Galactic bar. These stars, which are probable cluster members from the statistically field-star decontaminated CMD, have spectral types between O9 and B0 V. According to our analysis, this young cluster (1.0 Myr < age < 5.0 Myr) is located at a distance of 11+5-6 kpc, and we estimate a lower limit for the cluster total mass of (2.8+1.6-1.4) · 103 M⊙. It is likely that the cluster contains even earlier and more massive stars. Based on observations taken within the ESO VISTA Public Survey VVV (programme ID 179.B-2002), and with ISAAC, VLT, ESO (programme 087.D-0341A).Near-IR photometry of the most probable cluster members is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/564/L9

  7. The Mass-Transfer Formation Frequency of Blue Straggler Stars in the Old Open Cluster NGC 188

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosnell, Natalie M.; Mathieu, Robert D.; Sills, Alison; Geller, Aaron M.; Leigh, Nathan; Knigge, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The formation of blue straggler stars (BSSs), commonly categorized as stars bluer and brighter than the main sequence turnoff, has puzzled astronomers since their first detection over sixty years ago. The well-studied BSS population of the old (7 Gyr) open cluster NGC 188 has the potential to settle outstanding issues surrounding the frequency of different BSS formation mechanisms. NGC 188 contains 21 BSSs: 15 long-period single-lined binaries, two short-period double-lined binaries, and four non-velocity variables. We present results of the Hubble Space Telescope far-ultraviolet (FUV) ACS/SBC survey of the NGC 188 BSS population. This survey aims to detect white dwarf (WD) companions of BSSs that are indicative of a mass-transfer formation history. We directly detect FUV excesses consistent with four hot WD companions (Teff ≥ 12,000 K). We infer the presence of three additional WD companions with temperatures between 11,000-12,000 K. Since WDs cool as they age, these results indicate that seven BSSs formed through mass transfer within the past 400 Myr. These WD detections set a lower limit mass-transfer formation frequency of 33%. After taking into account other potential formation mechanisms we conclude that 14 long-period binary BSSs likely formed through mass transfer, setting a total NGC 188 BSS mass-transfer formation frequency of 67%. Comparing these results to a sophisticated N-body model of NGC 188 implies that binary population synthesis models underproduce mass transfer products, and the parameterization of stable mass transfer may need to be revisited. Finally, when comparing the optical CMD position of young BSSs to the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS), we find that distance from the ZAMS is not necessarily equivalent to BSS age. One must use caution before using standard single-star isochrones to age luminous BSSs.Support for Program number 12492 was provided by NASA through a grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the

  8. CCD photometric search for peculiar stars in open clusters. VIII. King 21, NGC 3293, NGC 5999, NGC 6802, NGC 6830, Ruprecht 44, Ruprecht 115, and Ruprecht 120

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netopil, M.; Paunzen, E.; Maitzen, H. M.; Pintado, O. I.; Claret, A.; Miranda, L. F.; Iliev, I. Kh.; Casanova, V.

    2007-02-01

    Context: We continue our survey of magnetic chemically peculiar (CP2) stars in galactic open clusters to shed more light on their origin and evolution. Aims: To study the group of CP2 stars, it is essential to find these objects in different galactic environments and at a wide range of evolutionary stages. The knowledge of open cluster ages and metallicities can help for finding a correlation between these parameters and the (non-)presence of peculiarities, which has to be taken into account in stellar evolution models. Methods: The intermediate band Δ a photometric system samples the depth of the 5200 Å flux depression by comparing the flux at the centre with the adjacent regions with bandwidths of 110 Å to 230 Å. It is capable of detecting magnetic CP2 and CP4 stars with high efficiency, but also the groups of (metal-weak) λ Bootis and classical Be/shell stars can be successfully investigated. In addition, it allows the age, reddening, and distance modulus to be determined with appropriate accuracy by fitting isochrones. Results: From the 1677 observed members of the eight open clusters, one Ae and twenty-five CP2 stars were identified. Furthermore nineteen deviating stars are designated as questionable for several reasons. The estimated age, reddening, and distance for the programme clusters were compared with published values of the literature and discussed in this context. Conclusions: .The current paper shows that CP2 stars are continuously present in very young (7 Myr) to intermediate age (500 Myr) open clusters at distances greater than 2 kpc from the Sun. Based on observations at CASLEO, CTIO (Proposal 2003A-0057), and OSN. The Observatorio de Sierra Nevada is operated by the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas through the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (Granada, Spain). Photometric data are only avaialable in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb

  9. Rotational Velocities and Chromospheric/Coronal Activity of Low-Mass Stars in the Young Open Clusters IC 2391 and IC 2602

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, John R.; Hartmann, Lee W.; Prosser, Charles F.; Randich, Sofia; Balachandran, Suchitra; Patten, Brian M.; Simon, Theodore; Giampapa, Mark

    1997-04-01

    We have obtained high-resolution, moderate signal-to-noise ratio spectra for approximately 80 candidate low-mass members of the nearby, very young open clusters IC 2391 and IC 2602. Most of the stars observed are confirmed as cluster members based on a combination of photometric and spectroscopic criteria. We provide radial velocities, rotational velocities, and Hα equivalent widths for these stars. From comparison to theoretical pre-main-sequence (PMS) evolutionary isochrones from D'Antona and Mazzitelli, we derive an estimated age of the two clusters of ~25 Myr. By contrast, the usually quoted upper main-sequence turnoff age for the clusters is ~35 Myr. We do not believe that this provides evidence for noncoeval star formation within these clusters, but rather that the best age estimate for them given the uncertainties is ~30 +/- 5 Myr. In principle, the scatter of stars about the PMS isochrone provides a measure of the age spread among the low-mass stars in these clusters; however, with the data presently available, we are able to derive only a relatively uninteresting upper limit for an age spread of order 20 Myr. We compare the rotational velocity distribution for IC 2391/2602 to that observed for the Pleiades. For the G dwarfs in the IC clusters, we resolve rotation in all but one of the probable cluster members, and thus except for inclination effects, our data provide the complete distribution of rotational velocities for solar mass stars on their arrival on the ZAMS. The projected rotational velocities (v sin i) of the G dwarfs in the two IC clusters span the range from ~8 to ~200 km s-1. Comparison of the distribution of rotational velocities for the G dwarfs of the Pleiades and the IC clusters indicates that both the slow and the rapid rotators lose of order half their angular momentum during the first ~35 Myr on the main sequence if they rotate as solid bodies. The low-mass stars in these two clusters exhibit a similar correlation between rotation and

  10. Blue stragglers in star clusters and the conventional SSP models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yu; de Grijs, Richard; Deng, Licai; Kroupa, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    The presence of blue straggler stars (BSs) as secure members of star clusters poses a major challenge to the conventional picture of simple stellar population (SSP) models. The models are based on the stellar evolution theory of single stars, while the major formation mechanisms of BSs are all correlated with stellar interactions. Based on a sufficient working sample including 100 Galactic open clusters, one Galactic globular cluster, and seven Magellanic Cloud star clusters, we discuss the modifications of the properties of broad-band colors and Lick indices of the standard SSP models due to BS populations.

  11. Dynamics of very rich open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, R.; de la Fuente Marcos, C.

    The oldest open clusters in our Galaxy set the lower limit to the age of the Galactic Disk (9-10 Gyr). Although they appear to be very rich now, it is clear that their primordial populations were much larger. Often considered as transitional objects, these populous open clusters show structural differences with respect to globular clusters so their dynamics and characteristic evolutionary time scales can also be different. On the other hand, their large membership lead to different dynamical evolution as compared with average open clusters. In this paper, the differential features of the evolution of rich open clusters are studied using N-body simulations, including several of the largest (10^4 stars) published direct collisional N-body calculations so far, which were performed on a CRAY YMP. The disruption rate of rich open clusters is analysed in detail and the effect of the initial spatial distribution of the stars in the cluster on its dynamics is studied. The results show that cluster life-time depends on this initial distribution, decreasing when it is more concentrated. The effect of stellar evolution on the dynamical evolution of rich clusters is an important subject that also has been considered here. We demonstrate that the cluster's life-expectancy against evaporation increases because of mass loss by evolving high-mass stars.

  12. The Old, Super-metal-rich Open Cluster, NGC 6791—Elemental Abundances in Turn-off Stars from Keck/HIRES Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesgaard, Ann Merchant; Lum, Michael G.; Deliyannis, Constantine P.

    2015-02-01

    The study of star clusters has advanced our understanding of stellar evolution, Galactic chemical evolution, and nucleosynthesis. Here we investigate the composition of turn-off stars in the intriguing open cluster, NGC 6791, which is old, but super-metal-rich with high-resolution (R = 46,000) Keck/HIRES spectra. We find [Fe/H] = +0.30 ± 0.02 from measurements of some 40 unblended, unsaturated lines of both Fe I and Fe II in eight turn-off stars. Our O abundances come from the O I triplet near 7774 Å and we perform a differential analysis relative to the Sun from our Lunar spectrum also obtained with Keck/HIRES. The O results are corrected for small nLTE effects. We find consistent ratios of [O/Fe]n with a mean of -0.06 ± 0.02. This is low with respect to field stars that are also both old and metal-rich and continue the trend of decreasing [O/Fe] with increasing [Fe/H]. The small range in our oxygen abundances is consistent with a single population of stars. Our results for the alpha elements [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe] are near solar and compare well with those of the old, metal-rich field stars. The two Fe-peak elements, Cr and Ni, are consistent with Fe. These turn-off-star abundances provide benchmark abundances to investigate whether there are any observable abundance differences with the giants that might arise from nuclear-burning and dredge-up processes. Determinations of upper limits were found for Li by spectrum synthesis and are consistent with the upper limits in similar stars in the relatively old, super-metal-rich cluster NGC 6253. Our results support the prediction from standard theory that higher-metallicity stars deplete more Li. Probably no stars in NGC 6791 have retained their initial Li.

  13. THE OLD, SUPER-METAL-RICH OPEN CLUSTER, NGC 6791—ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES IN TURN-OFF STARS FROM KECK/HIRES SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant Boesgaard, Ann; Lum, Michael G.; Deliyannis, Constantine P. E-mail: mikelum@ifa.hawaii.edu

    2015-02-01

    The study of star clusters has advanced our understanding of stellar evolution, Galactic chemical evolution, and nucleosynthesis. Here we investigate the composition of turn-off stars in the intriguing open cluster, NGC 6791, which is old, but super-metal-rich with high-resolution (R = 46,000) Keck/HIRES spectra. We find [Fe/H] = +0.30 ± 0.02 from measurements of some 40 unblended, unsaturated lines of both Fe I and Fe II in eight turn-off stars. Our O abundances come from the O I triplet near 7774 Å and we perform a differential analysis relative to the Sun from our Lunar spectrum also obtained with Keck/HIRES. The O results are corrected for small nLTE effects. We find consistent ratios of [O/Fe]{sub n} with a mean of –0.06 ± 0.02. This is low with respect to field stars that are also both old and metal-rich and continue the trend of decreasing [O/Fe] with increasing [Fe/H]. The small range in our oxygen abundances is consistent with a single population of stars. Our results for the alpha elements [Mg/Fe], [Si/Fe], [Ca/Fe], and [Ti/Fe] are near solar and compare well with those of the old, metal-rich field stars. The two Fe-peak elements, Cr and Ni, are consistent with Fe. These turn-off-star abundances provide benchmark abundances to investigate whether there are any observable abundance differences with the giants that might arise from nuclear-burning and dredge-up processes. Determinations of upper limits were found for Li by spectrum synthesis and are consistent with the upper limits in similar stars in the relatively old, super-metal-rich cluster NGC 6253. Our results support the prediction from standard theory that higher-metallicity stars deplete more Li. Probably no stars in NGC 6791 have retained their initial Li.

  14. Do open clusters have distinguishable chemical signatures?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Soubiran, C.; Heiter, U.

    2014-07-01

    Past studies have already shown that stars in open clusters are chemically homogeneous (e.g. De Silva et al. 2006, 2007 and 2009). These results support the idea that stars born from the same giant molecular cloud should have the same chemical composition. In this context, the chemical tagging technique was proposed by Freeman et al. (2002). The principle is to recover disrupted stellar clusters by looking only to the stellar chemical composition. In order to evaluate the feasibility of this approach, it is necessary to test if we can distinguish between stars born from different molecular clouds. For this purpose, we studied the chemical composition of stars in 32 old and intermediate-age open clusters, and we applied machine learning algorithms to recover the original cluster by only considering the chemical signatures.

  15. Models of red giants in the CoRoT asteroseismology fields combining asteroseismic and spectroscopic constraints - The open cluster NGC 6633 and field stars-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagarde, Nadège; Miglio, Andrea; Eggenberger, Patrick; Morel, Thierry; Montalbàn, Josefina; Mosser, Benoit

    2015-08-01

    The availability of asteroseismic constraints for a large sample of red giant stars from the CoRoT and Kepler missions paves the way for various statistical studies of the seismic properties of stellar populations.We use the first detailed spectroscopic study of CoRoT red-giant stars (Morel et al 2014) to compare theoretical stellar evolution models to observations of the open cluster NGC 6633 and field stars.In order to explore the effects of rotation-induced mixing and thermohaline instability, we compare surface abundances of carbon isotopic ratio and lithium with stellar evolution predictions. These chemicals are sensitive to extra-mixing on the red-giant branch.We estimate mass, radius, and distance for each star using the seismic constraints. We note that the Hipparcos and seismic distances are different. However, the uncertainties are such that this may not be significant. Although the seismic distances for the cluster members are self consistent they are somewhat larger than the Hipparcos distance. This is an issue that should be considered elsewhere. Models including thermohaline instability and rotation-induced mixing, together with the seismically determined masses can explain the chemical properties of red-giants targets. Tighter constraints on the physics of the models would be possible if there were detailed knowledge of the core rotation rate and the asymptotic period spacing.

  16. CCD photometric search for peculiar stars in open clusters. IV. Collinder 272, Pismis 20, Lyng\\aa 14, NGC 6396 and NGC 6611

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, E.; Pintado, O. I.; Maitzen, H. M.

    2002-12-01

    The time scale on which chemical peculiarity in upper main sequence stars begins is unknown. Results from the Hipparcos measurements indicate that the classical chemically peculiar (CP) stars occupy the whole area from the zero age main sequence to the terminal age main sequence (Gómez et al. \\cite{Gom98}). However, Hubrig et al. (\\cite{Hub00}) reported that the magnetic fields appear only in stars that have already completed at least approximately 30% of their main sequence life time. Previous observations in the very young Orion OB1 and Scorpio-Centaurus associations (Joncas & Borra 1981; Borra et al. 1982) reveal a percentage of chemically peculiar stars that is significantly smaller (less than 5%) than that of the galactic field (up to 25%). This already indicates that the phenomenon needs at least several 106 yr to appear. Since no further observations have been published since then, we have observed the five very young (1 Myr <= age <= 25 Myr) open clusters Collinder 272, Pismis 20, Lyng\\aa 14, NGC 6396 and NGC 6611. Photometry from 250 CCD frames in the three filter Delta a-system results in very low detection limits (0.008 to 0.015 mag). We find no single photometrically chemically peculiar candidate in approximately 460 observed cluster members in the five program clusters. From the number of observed objects we deduce upper limits between 0.6% and 2.4% for the incidence of CP stars for the four observed aggregates. Based on observations obtained at Complejo Astronómico el Leoncito (CASLEO), operated under the agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba y San Juan; ESO-La Silla and UTSO-Las Campanas.

  17. THE YOUNG OPEN CLUSTER BERKELEY 55

    SciTech Connect

    Negueruela, Ignacio; Marco, Amparo E-mail: amparo.marco@ua.es

    2012-02-15

    We present UBV photometry of the highly reddened and poorly studied open cluster Berkeley 55, revealing an important population of B-type stars and several evolved stars of high luminosity. Intermediate-resolution far-red spectra of several candidate members confirm the presence of one F-type supergiant and six late supergiants or bright giants. The brightest blue stars are mid-B giants. Spectroscopic and photometric analyses indicate an age 50 {+-} 10 Myr. The cluster is located at a distance d Almost-Equal-To 4 kpc, consistent with other tracers of the Perseus Arm in this direction. Berkeley 55 is thus a moderately young open cluster with a sizable population of candidate red (super)giant members, which can provide valuable information about the evolution of intermediate-mass stars.

  18. Star Cluster Buzzing With Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    A dense globular star cluster near the center of our Milky Way Galaxy holds a buzzing beehive of rapidly-spinning millisecond pulsars, according to astronomers who discovered 21 new pulsars in the cluster using the National Science Foundation's 100-meter Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) in West Virginia. The cluster, called Terzan 5, now holds the record for pulsars, with 24, including three known before the GBT observations. Pulsar Diagram Pulsar Diagram: Click on image for more detail. "We hit the jackpot when we looked at this cluster," said Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville, VA. "Not only does this cluster have a lot of pulsars -- and we still expect to find more in it -- but the pulsars in it are very interesting. They include at least 13 in binary systems, two of which are eclipsing, and the four fastest-rotating pulsars known in any globular cluster, with the fastest two rotating nearly 600 times per second, roughly as fast as a household blender," Ransom added. Ransom and his colleagues reported their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in San Diego, CA, and in the online journal Science Express. The star cluster's numerous pulsars are expected to yield a bonanza of new information about not only the pulsars themselves, but also about the dense stellar environment in which they reside and probably even about nuclear physics, according to the scientists. For example, preliminary measurements indicate that two of the pulsars are more massive than some theoretical models would allow. "All these exotic pulsars will keep us busy for years to come," said Jason Hessels, a Ph.D student at McGill University in Montreal. Globular clusters are dense agglomerations of up to millions of stars, all of which formed at about the same time. Pulsars are spinning, superdense neutron stars that whirl "lighthouse beams" of radio waves or light around as they spin. A neutron star is what is

  19. Two spotted and magnetic early B-type stars in the young open cluster NGC 2264 discovered by MOST and ESPaDOnS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, L.; Zwintz, K.; Castro, N.; Langer, N.; Lorenz, D.; Schneider, F. R. N.; Kuschnig, R.; Matthews, J. M.; Alecian, E.; Wade, G. A.; Barnes, T. G.; Thoul, A. A.

    2014-02-01

    Star clusters are known as superb tools for understanding stellar evolution. In a quest for understanding the physical origin of magnetism and chemical peculiarity in about 7% of the massive main-sequence stars, we analysed two of the ten brightest members of the ~10 Myr old Galactic open cluster NGC 2264, the early B-dwarfs HD 47887 and HD 47777. We find accurate rotation periods of 1.95 and 2.64 days, respectively, from MOST photometry. We obtained ESPaDOnS spectropolarimetric observations, through which we determined stellar parameters, detailed chemical surface abundances, projected rotational velocities, and the inclination angles of the rotation axis. Because we found only small (<5 km s-1) radial velocity variations, most likely caused by spots, we can rule out that HD 47887 and HD 47777 are close binaries. Finally, using the least-squares deconvolution technique, we found that both stars possess a large-scale magnetic field with an average longitudinal field strength of about 400 G. From a simultaneous fit of the stellar parameters we determine the evolutionary masses of HD 47887 and HD 47777 to be 9.4+0.6-0.7 M⊙ and 7.6+0.5-0.5 M⊙. Interestingly, HD 47777 shows a remarkable helium underabundance, typical of helium-weak chemically peculiar stars, while the abundances of HD 47887 are normal, which might imply that diffusion is operating in the lower mass star but not in the slightly more massive one. Furthermore, we argue that the rather slow rotation, as well as the lack of nitrogen enrichment in both stars, can be consistent with both the fossil and the binary hypothesis for the origin of the magnetic field. However, the presence of two magnetic and apparently single stars near the top of the cluster mass-function may speak in favour of the latter. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission, jointly operated by Microsatellite Systems Canada Inc. (MSCI), formerly part of Dynacon, Inc., the University of Toronto Institute for

  20. STAR cluster-finder ASIC

    SciTech Connect

    Botlo, M.; LeVine, M.J.; Scheetz, R.A.

    1997-12-31

    The STAR experiment reads out a TPC and an SVT (silicon vertex tracker), both of which require in-line pedestal subtraction, compression of ADC values from 10-bit to 8-bit, and location of time sequences representing responses to charged-particle tracks. The STAR cluster finder ASIC responds to all of these needs. Pedestal subtraction and compression are performed using lookup tables in attached RAM. We describe its design and implementation, as well as testing methodology and results of tests performed on foundry prototypes.

  1. Chemical evolution of star clusters.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Jacco Th

    2010-02-28

    I discuss the chemical evolution of star clusters, with emphasis on old Galactic globular clusters (GCs), in relation to their formation histories. GCs are clearly formed in a complex fashion, under markedly different conditions from any younger clusters presently known. Those special conditions must be linked to the early formation epoch of the Galaxy and must not have occurred since. While a link to the formation of GCs in dwarf galaxies has been suggested, present-day dwarf galaxies are not representative of the gravitational potential wells within which the GCs formed. Instead, a formation deep within the proto-Galaxy or within dark-matter mini-haloes might be favoured. Not all GCs may have formed and evolved similarly. In particular, we may need to distinguish Galactic Halo from Galactic Bulge clusters. PMID:20083507

  2. CCD photometric search for peculiar stars in open clusters. V. NGC 2099, NGC 3114, NGC 6204, NGC 6705 and NGC 6756

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, E.; Pintado, O. I.; Maitzen, H. M.

    2003-12-01

    We have investigated 1008 objects in the area of five intermediate age open clusters (NGC 2099, NGC 3114, NGC 6204, NGC 6705 and NGC 6756) via the narrow band Δ a-system. The detection limit for photometric peculiarity is very low (always less than 0.009 mag) due to the high number of individual frames used (193 in total). We have detected six peculiar objects in NGC 6705 and NGC 6756 from which one in the latter is almost certainly an unreddened late type foreground star. The remaining five stars are probably cluster members and bona fide chemically peculiar objects (two are łambda Bootis type candidates). Furthermore, we have investigated NGC 3114, a cluster for which already photoelectric Δ a-measurements exist. A comparison of the CCD and photoelectric values shows very good agreement. Again, the high capability of our CCD Δ a-photometric system to sort out true peculiar objects together with additional measurements from broad or intermediate band photometry is demonstrated. Based on observations obtained at Complejo Astronómico el Leoncito (CASLEO), operated under the agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Plata, Córdoba y San Juan; ESO-La Silla, UTSO-Las Campanas and L. Figl Observatory, Mt. Schöpfl (Austria). Figure 1 and Table 2 are only available in electronic form at http://www.edpsciences.org

  3. Field star interactions with globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Wei

    1992-09-01

    We investigate a new interaction of globular clusters with galactic field stars. By dynamical friction, high-velocity field stars passing through individual globular clusters are decelerated. This frictional interaction contributes to cluster heating, and, in conjunction with disk shocking and other mechanisms, it helps regulate the evolution of globular clusters. Moreover, penetrating field stars with low relative velocities can even be captured by globular clusters. Our calculated rate of captures suggest that there is a substantial population of stars having an origin external to the globulars in which they now reside. Intriguing candidates for this 'immigrant' population include some blue straggler stars and short-period pulsars.

  4. Open clusters in Auriga OB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, Amparo; Negueruela, Ignacio

    2016-06-01

    We study the area around the H II region Sh 2-234, including the young open cluster Stock 8, to investigate the extent and definition of the association Aur OB2 and the possible role of triggering in massive cluster formation. We obtained Strömgren and J, H, KS photometry for Stock 8 and Strömgren photometry for two other cluster candidates in the area, which we confirm as young open clusters and name Alicante 11 and Alicante 12. We took spectroscopy of ˜33 early-type stars in the area, including the brightest cluster members. We calculate a common distance of 2.80^{+0.27}_{-0.24} kpc for the three open clusters and surrounding association. We derive an age 4-6 Ma for Stock 8, and do not find a significantly different age for the other clusters or the association. The star LS V +34°23, with spectral type O8 II(f), is likely the main source of ionization of Sh 2-234. We observe an important population of pre-main-sequence stars, some of them with discs, associated with the B-type members lying on the main sequence. We interpret the region as an area of recent star formation with some residual and very localized ongoing star formation. We do not find evidence for sequential star formation on a large scale. The classical definition of Aur OB2 has to be reconsidered, because its two main open clusters, Stock 8 and NGC 1893, are not at the same distance. Stock 8 is probably located in the Perseus arm, but other nearby H II regions whose distances also place them in this arm show quite different distances and radial velocities and, therefore, are not connected.

  5. Field star diffusion in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Wei; Weisheit, Jon C.

    1992-10-01

    We investigate a new interaction of globular clusters with galactic field stars: the deceleration (by dynamical friction) of high-velocity field stars diffusing through individual globular clusters. This frictional interaction contributes to cluster heating and, in conjunction with disk shocking and other mechanisms, helps to regulate the evolution of globular clusters. Moreover, penetrating field stars of low relative velocity can even be captured by globular clusters. Our calculated rate of capture suggests that there is a modest population of stars having an origin external to the clusters in which they now reside. Intriguing candidates for this 'immigrant' population include some blue stragglers and short-period pulsars.

  6. Observer's Guide to Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inglis, Mike

    Star clusters are among the most intriguing, amazing, and beautiful objects in the night sky. They can be young or old, large or small, bright or faint, and so on. But what is important, as they relate to this guide, is that seen in a telescope (or binoculars, or even the naked eye), they can be glorious, with a dazzling array of colors, brightnesses, and even shapes with arcs and streams, wisps of nebulosity, and dark dust lanes, making them literally breathtaking.

  7. Binary Origin of Blue Straggler Stars in Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yu

    2015-08-01

    Close-binary evolution is one of the major formation channels of blue straggler stars (BSSs). We present binary evolution models, including case-A and/or case-B mass transfer (MT) in the intermediate- and low-mass stars, to try to understand the binary origin of BSS populations in star clusters. With the help of Monte-Carlo simulations, we compared the distribution of our synthetic MT BSSs with observations in the color-magnitude diagram (CMD) of M67 and M30. The current results show that primordial binary MT can only contribute to a small part of BSSs in M67, and it can credibly explain the formation of the red-BSS sequence observed in the CMD of M30. We also analyzed the spectral properties of BSS populations in open clusters (OCs) based on the LAMOST data, and a small part of BSSs indeed present Carbon depletion compared with the main sequence stars, which indicate their binary origin. Unfortunately, a statistical resfult of how much the binary MT can contribute to BSS fomation in OCs still requires larger working sample.

  8. DYNAMICS OF PLANETARY SYSTEMS IN STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Spurzem, R.; Giersz, M.; Heggie, D. C.; Lin, D. N. C.

    2009-05-20

    At least 10%-15% of nearby Sunlike stars have known Jupiter-mass planets. In contrast, very few planets are found in mature open and globular clusters such as the Hyades and 47 Tuc. We explore here the possibility that this dichotomy is due to the postformation disruption of planetary systems associated with the stellar encounters in long-lived clusters. One supporting piece of evidence for this scenario is the discovery of freely floating low-mass objects in star forming regions. We use two independent numerical approaches, a hybrid Monte Carlo and a direct N-body method, to simulate the impact of the encounters. We show that the results of numerical simulations are in reasonable agreement with analytical determinations in the adiabatic and impulsive limits. They indicate that distant stellar encounters generally do not significantly modify the compact and nearly circular orbits. However, moderately close stellar encounters, which are likely to occur in dense clusters, can excite planets' orbital eccentricity and induce dynamical instability in systems that are closely packed with multiple planets. The disruption of planetary systems occurs primarily through occasional nearly parabolic, nonadiabatic encounters, though eccentricity of the planets evolves through repeated hyperbolic adiabatic encounters that accumulate small-amplitude changes. The detached planets are generally retained by the potential of their host clusters as free floaters in young stellar clusters such as {sigma} Orionis. We compute effective cross sections for the dissolution of planetary systems and show that, for all initial eccentricities, dissolution occurs on timescales that are longer than the dispersion of small stellar associations, but shorter than the age of typical open and globular clusters. Although it is much more difficult to disrupt short-period planets, close encounters can excite modest eccentricity among them, such that subsequent tidal dissipation leads to orbital decay

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: LAMOST DR2 star clusters candidate members (Zhang+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; Chen, X.-Y.; Liu, C.; Chen, L.; Deng, L.-C.; Hou, J.-L.; Shao, Z.-Y.; Yang, F.; Wu, Y.; Yang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Hou, Y.-H.; Wang, Y.-F.

    2015-11-01

    We adopt the Milky Way Star Cluster (MWSC) catalog (Kharchenko et al. 2012, Cat. J/A+A/543/A156; 2013, Cat. J/A+A/558/A53) as the list of target star clusters since it provides homogeneous parameters of Milky Way star clusters and is complete in the volume observed by LAMOST. Thus we use the MWSC radius parameters for star clusters, i.e., r0 in the MWSC is the angular radius of the core of the cluster, and r2 (hereafter rewritten as rc) stands for the angular radius of the cluster. A star cluster is covered by the LAMOST footprint if the number of stars located within 2rc of the cluster is larger than zero. In total, 457 star clusters, including open clusters, globular clusters, stellar associations and moving groups, are included in LAMOST DR2. (2 data files).

  10. A turn-off detached binary star V568 Lyr in the Kepler field of the oldest open cluster (NGC 6791) in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakut, K.; Eggleton, P. P.; Kalomeni, B.; Tout, C. A.; Eldridge, J. J.

    2015-11-01

    We present the Kepler photometric light-variation analysis of the late-type double-lined binary system V568 Lyr that is in the field of the high metallicity old open cluster NGC 6791. The radial velocity and the high-quality short-cadence light curve of the system are analysed simultaneously. The masses, radii and luminosities of the component stars are M1 = 1.0886 ± 0.0031 M⊙, M2 = 0.8292 ± 0.0026 M⊙, R1 = 1.4203 ± 0.0058 R⊙, R2 = 0.7997 ± 0.0015 R⊙, L1 = 1.85 ± 0.15 L⊙, L2 = 0.292 ± 0.018 L⊙ and their separation is a = 31.060 ± 0.025 R⊙. The distance to NGC 6791 is determined to be 4.260 ± 0.290 kpc by analysis of this binary system. We fit the components of this well-detached binary system with evolution models made with the Cambridge STARS and EV(TWIN) codes to test low-mass binary star evolution. We find a good fit with a metallicity of Z = 0.04 and an age of 7.704 Gyr. The standard tidal dissipation, included in EV(TWIN) is insufficient to arrive at the observed circular orbit unless it formed rather circular to begin with.

  11. The life and death of star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, B. C.

    It is generally believed that most stars are born in groups and clusters, rather than in the field. In recent years it has been demonstrated that merging galaxies produce large numbers of young massive star clusters, sometimes called super star clusters. Understanding what triggers the formation of these young massive clusters provides important information about the formation of stars in general. In recent years it has also become apparent that most clusters do not survive more than ~ 10 Myr (i.e., "infant mortality"). Hence, it is just as important to understand the disruption of star clusters as it is to to understand their formation if we want to understand the demographics of both star clusters and field stars. This talk will first discuss what triggers star cluster formation in merging galaxies (primarily in the Antennae galaxies) and will then outline a general framework designed to empirically fit observations of both star clusters and field stars in a wide variety of galaxies from mergers to quiescent spirals.

  12. Membership determination of Open Clusters with CLUSTERIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezima, T.; Galadí-Enríquez, D.; Paunzen, E.; Jordi, C.; Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Jilkova, L.

    2015-05-01

    The web-based application Clusterix has been developed as a collaboration between the Masaryk University (Czech Republic) and the Universitat de Barcelona (Spain) to calculate the membership probability of open clusters on the WEBDA database using a completely non parametric method (Galadí-Enríquez et al., 1998; Balaguer-Núñez et al., 2004). WEBDA is a site devoted to observational data on stars in Galactic open clusters. Clusterix is an interactive tool where the user can define the default values to configure the membership estimation for the area of a cluster. Gaia's capabilities to study the kinematics of clusters of stars with great accuracy is one of the main motivations for the development of this tool. The applet first version can be found at: http://clusterix.cerit-sc.cz/

  13. Formation, Evolution, and Survival of Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fall, Michael

    2015-08-01

    This talk presents a synoptic theory for the formation, evolution, and survival of massive star clusters. These objects are important in the ecology of galaxies, as the sites of star formation and stellar feedback, as the building blocks of stellar populations. The talk is organized around the mass function of star clusters (i.e., the spectrum of cluster masses) and how it evolves with time (age). Observations show some remarkable similarities in the mass functions of clusters in different galaxies, analogous to the similarities in stellar initial mass functions (IMFs). Explaining the similarity of the mass functions of star clusters is one of the goals and successes of the theory presented here. A byproduct of this theory is a unified concept of star clusters of all types: associations, open clusters, populous clusters, globular clusters, etc. The physical processes that affect the mass functions of star clusters include the following: star formation and stellar feedback in the gas-dominated protoclusters, and the subsequent gravitational effects in the gas-free clusters, primarily stellar mass loss, tidal interactions with passing molecular clouds, and internal two-body relaxation. These processes all reduce the masses of clusters, thus lowering the amplitude of their mass function, but in such a way that the shape of the mass function is nearly preserved. The talk presents a quantitative, albeit approximate, analysis of all these effects. As a result of recent developments, there is now a growing connection between theory and observation in this field. The work presented here points to some future observations that would strengthen this connection.

  14. Simulating the Birth of Massive Star Clusters: Is Destruction Inevitable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Anna

    2013-10-01

    Very early in its operation, the Hubble Space Telescope {HST} opened an entirely new frontier: study of the demographics and properties of star clusters far beyond the Milky Way. However, interpretation of HST's observations has proven difficult, and has led to the development of two conflicting models. One view is that most massive star clusters are disrupted during their infancy by feedback from newly formed stars {i.e., "infant mortality"}, independent of cluster mass or environment. The other model is that most star clusters survive their infancy and are disrupted later by mass-dependent dynamical processes. Since observations at present have failed to discriminate between these views, we propose a theoretical investigation to provide new insight. We will perform radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the formation of massive star clusters, including for the first time a realistic treatment of the most important stellar feedback processes. These simulations will elucidate the physics of stellar feedback, and allow us to determine whether cluster disruption is mass-dependent or -independent. We will also use our simulations to search for observational diagnostics that can distinguish bound from unbound clusters, and to predict how cluster disruption affects the cluster luminosity function in a variety of galactic environments.

  15. THE SIZE SCALE OF STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Madrid, Juan P.; Hurley, Jarrod R.; Sippel, Anna C.

    2012-09-10

    Direct N-body simulations of star clusters in a realistic Milky-Way-like potential are carried out using the code NBODY6. Based on these simulations, a new relationship between scale size and galactocentric distance is derived: the scale size of star clusters is proportional to the hyperbolic tangent of the galactocentric distance. The half-mass radius of star clusters increases systematically with galactocentric distance but levels off when star clusters orbit the galaxy beyond {approx}40 kpc. These simulations show that the half-mass radius of individual star clusters varies significantly as they evolve over a Hubble time, more so for clusters with shorter relaxation times, and remains constant through several relaxation times only in certain situations when expansion driven by the internal dynamics of the star cluster and the influence of the host galaxy tidal field balance each other. Indeed, the radius of a star cluster evolving within the inner 20 kpc of a realistic galactic gravitational potential is severely truncated by tidal interactions and does not remain constant over a Hubble time. Furthermore, the half-mass radius of star clusters measured with present-day observations bears no memory of the original cluster size. Stellar evolution and tidal stripping are the two competing physical mechanisms that determine the present-day size of globular clusters. These simulations also show that extended star clusters can form at large galactocentric distances while remaining fully bound to the host galaxy. There is thus no need to invoke accretion from an external galaxy to explain the presence of extended clusters at large galactocentric distances in a Milky-Way-type galaxy.

  16. Massive Stars in the Quintuplet Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, Donald F.; McLean, Ian S.; Morris, Mark

    1999-03-01

    We present near-infrared photometry and K-band spectra of newly identified massive stars in the Quintuplet cluster, one of the three massive clusters projected within 50 pc of the Galactic center. We find that the cluster contains a variety of massive stars, including more unambiguously identified Wolf-Rayet stars than any cluster in the Galaxy, and over a dozen stars in earlier stages of evolution, i.e., luminous blue variables (LBVs), Ofpe/WN9, and OB supergiants. One newly identified star is the second luminous blue variable in the cluster, after the ``Pistol star.'' Although we are unable to provide certain spectral classifications for the five enigmatic Quintuplet-proper members, we tentatively propose that they are extremely dusty versions of the WC stars found elsewhere in the cluster and similar to the dozen or so known examples in the Galaxy. Although the cluster parameters are uncertain because of photometric errors and uncertainties in stellar models, i.e., extrapolating initial masses and estimating ionizing fluxes, we have the following conclusions. Given the evolutionary stages of the identified stars, the cluster appears to be about 4+/-1 Myr old, assuming coeval formation. The total mass in observed stars is ~103 Msolar, and the implied mass is ~104 Msolar, assuming a lower mass cutoff of 1 Msolar and a Salpeter initial mass function. The implied mass density in stars is greater than or similar to a few thousand Msolar pc-3. The newly identified stars increase the estimated ionizing flux from this cluster by about an order of magnitude with respect to earlier estimates, to 1050.9 photons s-1, or roughly what is required to ionize the nearby ``Sickle'' H II region (G0.18-0.04). The total luminosity from the massive cluster stars is ~107.5 Lsolar, enough to account for the heating of the nearby molecular cloud, M0.20-0.033. We propose a picture that integrates most of the major features in this part of the sky, excepting the nonthermal filaments. We

  17. MIGRATION OF STAR CLUSTERS AND NUCLEAR RINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Ven, Glenn; Chang, Philip E-mail: pchang@astro.berkeley.edu

    2009-05-20

    Star clusters that form in nuclear rings appear to be at slightly larger radii than the gas. We argue that the star clusters move out from the gas in which they are formed because of satellite-disk tidal interactions. In calculating the dynamics of this star cluster and gas ring system, we include the effects of dynamical friction of the background stars in the host galaxy on the star cluster, and inflowing gas along the bar onto the nuclear ring at the two contact points. We show that the final separation is of the order of the Hill radius of the nuclear ring, which is typically 20%-30% of its radius. Massive star clusters can reach half of this separation very quickly and produce a factor of a few enhancement in the gas surface density. If this leads to star formation in addition to the (ongoing) formation of star clusters near the contact points, a possible (initial) azimuthal age gradient may become diluted or even disappear. Finally, if the star clusters are massive and/or numerous enough, we expect the nuclear ring to migrate inward, away from the (possibly) associated (inner) Lindblad resonance. We discuss how these predictions may be tested observationally.

  18. Star clusters as simple stellar populations.

    PubMed

    Bruzual A, Gustavo

    2010-02-28

    In this paper, I review to what extent we can understand the photometric properties of star clusters, and of low-mass, unresolved galaxies, in terms of population-synthesis models designed to describe 'simple stellar populations' (SSPs), i.e. groups of stars born at the same time, in the same volume of space and from a gas cloud of homogeneous chemical composition. The photometric properties predicted by these models do not readily match the observations of most star clusters, unless we properly take into account the expected variation in the number of stars occupying sparsely populated evolutionary stages, owing to stochastic fluctuations in the stellar initial mass function. In this case, population-synthesis models reproduce remarkably well the full ranges of observed integrated colours and absolute magnitudes of star clusters of various ages and metallicities. The disagreement between the model predictions and observations of cluster colours and magnitudes may indicate problems with or deficiencies in the modelling, and does not necessarily tell us that star clusters do not behave like SSPs. Matching the photometric properties of star clusters using SSP models is a necessary (but not sufficient) condition for clusters to be considered SSPs. Composite models, characterized by complex star-formation histories, also match the observed cluster colours. PMID:20083506

  19. The nature and nurture of star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2010-01-01

    Star clusters have hierarchical patterns in space and time, suggesting formation processes in the densest regions of a turbulent interstellar medium. Clusters also have hierarchical substructure when they are young, which makes them all look like the inner mixed parts of a pervasive stellar hierarchy. Young field stars share this distribution, presumably because some of them came from dissolved clusters and others formed in a dispersed fashion in the same gas. The fraction of star formation that ends up in clusters is apparently not constant, but may increase with interstellar pressure. Hierarchical structure explains why stars form in clusters and why many of these clusters are self-bound. It also explains the cluster mass function. Halo globular clusters share many properties of disk clusters, including what appears to be an upper cluster cutoff mass. However, halo globulars are self-enriched and often connected with dwarf galaxy streams. The mass function of halo globulars could have initially been like the power-law mass function of disk clusters, but the halo globulars have lost their low-mass members. The reasons for this loss are not understood. It could have happened slowly over time as a result of cluster evaporation, or it could have happened early after cluster formation as a result of gas loss. The latter model explains best the observation that the globular cluster mass function has no radial gradient in galaxies.

  20. Massive star archeology in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantereau, W.; Charbonnel, C.; Meynet, G.

    2015-01-01

    Globular clusters are among the oldest structures in the Universe and they host today low-mass stars and no gas. However, there has been a time when they formed as gaseous objects hosting a large number of short-lived, massive stars. Many details on this early epoch have been depicted recently through unprecedented dissection of low-mass globular cluster stars via spectroscopy and photometry. In particular, multiple populations have been identified, which bear the nucleosynthetic fingerprints of the massive hot stars disappeared a long time ago. Here we discuss how massive star archeology can be done through the lense of these multiple populations.

  1. The Promiscuous Nature of Stars in Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, Jarrod R.; Shara, Michael M.

    2002-05-01

    The recent availability of special-purpose computers designed for calculating gravitational interactions of N bodies at extremely high speed has provided the means to model globular clusters on a star-by-star basis for the first time. By endeavoring to make the N-body codes that operate on these machines as realistic as possible, the addition of stellar evolution being one example, we are learning much about the interaction between the star cluster itself and the stars it contains. A fascinating aspect of this research is the ability to follow the orbits of individual stars in detail and to document the formation of observed exotic systems. This has revealed that many stars within a star cluster lead wildly promiscuous lives, interacting often intimately and in rapid succession with a variety of neighbors.

  2. Binary stars in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, R.; Petr-Gotzens, M. G.; McCaughrean, M. J.; Bouvier, J.; Duchêne, G.; Quirrenbach, A.; Zinnecker, H.

    2006-11-01

    We report on a high-spatial-resolution survey for binary stars in the periphery of the Orion Nebula Cluster, at 5-15 arcmin (0.65-2 pc) from the cluster center. We observed 228 stars with adaptive optics systems, in order to find companions at separations of 0.13 arcsec-1.12 arcsec (60-500 AU), and detected 13 new binaries. Combined with the results of Petr (1998), we have a sample of 275 objects, about half of which have masses from the literature and high probabilities to be cluster members. We used an improved method to derive the completeness limits of the observations, which takes into account the elongated point spread function of stars at relatively large distances from the adaptive optics guide star. The multiplicity of stars with masses >2 M⊙ is found to be significantly larger than that of low-mass stars. The companion star frequency of low-mass stars is comparable to that of main-sequence M-dwarfs, less than half that of solar-type main-sequence stars, and 3.5 to 5 times lower than in the Taurus-Auriga and Scorpius-Centaurus star-forming regions. We find the binary frequency of low-mass stars in the periphery of the cluster to be the same or only slightly higher than for stars in the cluster core (<3 arcmin from θ^1C Ori). This is in contrast to the prediction of the theory that the low binary frequency in the cluster is caused by the disruption of binaries due to dynamical interactions. There are two ways out of this dilemma: Either the initial binary frequency in the Orion Nebula Cluster was lower than in Taurus-Auriga, or the Orion Nebula Cluster was originally much denser and dynamically more active.

  3. Binary Stars in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Rainer; Petr-Gotzens, Monika G.; McCaughrean, Mark J.; Bouvier, Jerome; Duchêne, Gaspard; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Zinnecker, Hans

    2007-08-01

    We report on a high-spatial-resolution survey for binary stars in the periphery of the Orion Nebula Cluster, at 5 - 15 arcmin (0.65 - 2 pc) from the cluster center. We observed 228 stars with adaptive optics systems, in order to find companions at separations of 0.13 - 1.12 arcsec (60 - 500 AU), and detected 13 new binaries. Combined with the results of Petr (1998), we have a sample of 275 objects, about half of which have masses from the literature and high probabilities to be cluster members. We used an improved method to derive the completeness limits of the observations, which takes into account the elongated point spread function of stars at relatively large distances from the adaptive optics guide star. The multiplicity of stars with masses >2 Msun is found to be significantly larger than that of low-mass stars. The companion star frequency of low-mass stars is comparable to that of main-sequence M-dwarfs, less than half that of solar-type main-sequence stars, and 3.5 to 5 times lower than in the Taurus-Auriga and Scorpius-Centaurus star-forming regions. We find the binary frequency of low-mass stars in the periphery of the cluster to be the same or only slightly higher than for stars in the cluster core (<3 arcmin from θ1C Ori). This is in contrast to the prediction of the theory that the low binary frequency in the cluster is caused by the disruption of binaries due to dynamical interactions. There are two ways out of this dilemma: Either the initial binary frequency in the Orion Nebula Cluster was lower than in Taurus-Auriga, or the Orion Nebula Cluster was originally much denser and dynamically more active.

  4. Properties and Formation of Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharina, M. E.

    2016-03-01

    Many key problems in astrophysics involve research on the properties of star clusters, for example: stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis, the history of star formation in galaxies, formation dynamics of galaxies and their subsystems, the calibration of the fundamental distance scale in the universe, and the luminosity functions of stars and star clusters. This review is intended to familiarize the reader with modern observational and theoretical data on the formation and evolution of star clusters in our galaxy and others. Unsolved problems in this area are formulated and research on ways to solve them is discussed. In particular, some of the most important current observational and theoretical problems include: (1) a more complete explanation of the physical processes in molecular clouds leading to the formation and evolution of massive star clusters; (2) observation of these objects in different stages of evolution, including protoclusters, at wavelengths where interstellar absorption is minimal; and, (3) comparison of the properties of massive star clusters in different galaxies and of galaxies during the most active star formation phase at different red shifts. The main goal in solving these problems is to explain the variations in the abundance of chemical elements and in the multiple populations of stars in clusters discovered at the end of the twentieth century.

  5. Probing Massive Star Cluster Formation with ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kelsey

    2015-08-01

    Observationally constraining the physical conditions that give rise to massive star clusters has been a long-standing challenge. Now with the ALMA Observatory coming on-line, we can finally begin to probe the birth environments of massive clusters in a variety of galaxies with sufficient angular resolution. In this talk I will give an overview of ALMA observations of galaxies in which candidate proto-super star cluster molecular clouds have been identified. These new data probe the physical conditions that give rise to super star clusters, providing information on their densities, pressures, and temperatures. In particular, the observations indicate that these clouds may be subject to external pressures of P/k > 108 K cm-3, which is consistent with the prevalence of optically observed adolescent super star clusters in interacting galaxy systems and other high pressure environments. ALMA observations also enable an assessement of the molecular cloud chemical abundances in the regions surrounding super star clusters. Molecular clouds associated with existing super star clusters are strongly correlated with HCO+ emission, but appear to have relatively low ratio of CO/HCO+ emission compared to other clouds, indicating that the super star clusters are impacting the molecular abundances in their vicinity.

  6. Close binary stars in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margon, Bruce

    1991-01-01

    Although close binary stars are thought theoretically to play a major role in globular cluster dynamics, virtually no non-degenerate close binaries are known in clusters. We review the status of observations in this area, and report on two new programs which are finally yielding candidate systems suitable for further study. One of the objects, a close eclipsing system in omega Cen, is also a big straggler, thus finally proving firm evidence that globular cluster blue stragglers really are binary stars.

  7. Giant Planets in Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, S. N.; White, R. J.; Latham, D. W.

    2015-10-01

    Two decades after the discovery of 51 Peg b, more than 200 hot Jupiters have now been confirmed, but the details of their inward migration remain uncertain. While it is widely accepted that short period giant planets could not have formed in situ, several different mechanisms (e.g., Type II migration, planet-planet scattering, Kozai-Lidov cycles) may contribute to shrinking planetary orbits, and the relative importance of each is not well-constrained. Migration through the gas disk is expected to preserve circular, coplanar orbits and must occur quickly (within ˜ 10 Myr), whereas multi-body processes should initially excite eccentricities and inclinations and may take hundreds of millions of years. Subsequent evolution of the system (e.g., orbital circularization and inclination damping via tidal interaction with the host star) may obscure these differences, so observing hot Jupiters soon after migration occurs can constrain the importance of each mechanism. Fortunately, the well-characterized stars in young and adolescent open clusters (with known ages and compositions) provide natural laboratories for such studies, and recent surveys have begun to take advantage of this opportunity. We present a review of the discoveries in this emerging realm of exoplanet science, discuss the constraints they provide for giant planet formation and migration, and reflect on the future direction of the field.

  8. The Chemical Homogeneity of Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovy, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Determining the level of chemical homogeneity in open clusters is of fundamental importance in the study of the evolution of star-forming clouds and that of the Galactic disk. Yet limiting the initial abundance spread in clusters has been hampered by difficulties in obtaining consistent spectroscopic abundances for different stellar types. Without reference to any specific model of stellar photospheres, a model for a homogeneous cluster is that it forms a one-dimensional sequence, with any differences between members due to variations in stellar mass and observational uncertainties. I present a novel method for investigating the abundance spread in open clusters that tests this one-dimensional hypothesis at the level of observed stellar spectra, rather than constraining homogeneity using derived abundances as is traditionally done. Using high-resolution APOGEE spectra for 49 giants in M67, NGC 6819, and NGC 2420 I demonstrate that these spectra form one-dimensional sequences for each cluster. With detailed forward modeling of the spectra and Approximate Bayesian Computation, I derive strong limits on the initial abundance spread of 15 elements: <0.01 (0.02) {dex} for C and Fe, ≲0.015 (0.03) {dex} for N, O, Mg, Si, and Ni, ≲0.02 (0.03) {dex} for Al, Ca, and Mn, and ≲0.03 (0.05) {dex} for Na, S, K, Ti, and V (at 68% and 95% confidence, respectively). The strong limits on C and O imply that no pollution by massive core-collapse supernovae occurred during star formation in open clusters, which, thus, need to form within ≲6 {Myr}. Further development of this and related techniques will bring the power of differential abundances to stars other than solar twins in large spectroscopic surveys and will help unravel the history of star formation and chemical enrichment in the Milky Way through chemical tagging.

  9. Studies on the corona of open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguer-Núñez, L.; Jordi, C.; Muiños, J. L.; Galadí-Enríquez, D.; Masana, E.

    2013-05-01

    High quality proper motions on an extended area of a selection of Open Clusters (OCs) will let us study their coronas with unprecedented accuracy. We are in the process of obtaining astrometry with the Meridian Circles of San Fernando CMASF at El Leoncito (Argentina) and the CTA at La Palma of an area few times the known radius (from Webda) of a selection of OCs. We will make use of Strömgren wide-field photometry to complement their characterization. We have already analysed the old open cluster M67, deriving properties for 2738 stars fainter and, in a wider area, than any previous precise survey in the cluster region. With new data from the CMASF we have covered an area of about 2°×1.4° and down to 17 magnitude in r^'. Proper motions are then used to determine the membership probabilities of stars in the region, applying parametric and non-parametric approaches to cluster/field segregation. Adding photometric criteria, we obtained a preliminary list of 665 probable member stars, up to a distance 0.96° from the cluster centre. These are preliminary results on our work that will lead us to the most complete study of its structure, dynamics and mass segregation up to date. We have already obtained proper motions for NGC 1817, NGC 2264 and NGC 2509 that are now being processed.

  10. Mass-losing red giants in open clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1987-01-01

    Mass-losing stars in open clusters with main-sequence turn-offs at intermediate mass have been searched for by using the IRAS data base. The absence of many strong 60 micron sources in open clusters implies that intermediate-mass stars lose much of their mass during an intense wind phase of rather short duration. For stars of about seven solar masses, this phase, if it exists at all, lasts for not much more than 100,000 yr. For stars of about four solar masses, the intense wind phase appears to last considerably less than 10 million yr; it may well last for less than a million yr.

  11. Plumix: Generating mass segregated star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šubr, Ladislav

    2012-06-01

    Plumix is a small package for generating mass segregated star clusters. Its output can be directly used as input initial conditions for NBODY4 or NBODY6 code. Mass segregation stands as one of the most robust features of the dynamical evolution of self-gravitating star clusters. We formulate parametrized models of mass segregated star clusters in virial equilibrium. To this purpose we introduce mean inter-particle potentials for statistically described unsegregated systems and suggest a single-parameter generalization of its form which gives a mass-segregated state. Plumix is a numerical C-code generating the cluster according the algorithm given for construction of appropriate star cluster models. Their stability over several crossing-times is verified by following the evolution by means of direct N-body integration.

  12. Photometry of the young open cluster Trumpler 37

    SciTech Connect

    Marschall, L.A.; Karshner, G.B.; Comins, N.F. Main, Univ., Orono )

    1990-05-01

    Photoelectric UBV observations of 120 stars in the young open cluster Trumpler 37 are presented, primarily in the magnitude range 10.0 - 13.5. An analysis of the color-magnitude diagram of the cluster yields an age of 6.7 million yr and reveals the presence of a number of possible pre-main-sequence stars in the cluster. 24 refs.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Open clusters in Auriga OB2 (Marco+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, A.; Negueruela, I.

    2016-05-01

    We present tables with coordinates in J2000, near IR photometry and Stromgren photometry for stars in the open cluster Stock 8 and in the two new open clusters: Alicante 11 and Alicante 12 (7 data files).

  14. FUV imaging survey of Galactic open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiz Apellaniz, Jesus

    2007-07-01

    We propose a WFPC2 FUV imaging survey of 6 Galactic open clusters with ages ranging from 1 Myr to 300 Myr complemented with NUV/optical imaging of the same fields. No such survey has ever been attempted before in the FUV at the resolution of WFPC2 {indeed, no WFPC2 FUV images of any Galactic open cluster exist in the HST archive} and, since WFPC2 will be retired in SM4 and none of the other HST instruments can do FUV imaging of bright objects, this is the last chance to do such a survey before another UV telescope is launched. This survey will provide a new perspective on young/intermediate age Galactic clusters and a key template for the study of star formation at high redshift, where the intensity peak we observe in the optical/NIR from Earth is located in the FUV in its rest frame. For clusters still associated with an H II region, UV imaging maps the continuum emission of the ionized gas and the radiation scattered by background dust and, combined with optical nebular images, can be used to determine the 3-D structure of the H II region. For all young clusters, FUV+NUV+optical photometry can be used to study the UV excesses of T-Tauri stars. For clusters older than 40 Myr, the same photometric combination is the easiest method to detect companion white dwarfs which are invisible using only the optical and NIR. WFPC2 is also an excellent instrument to discover close companions around bright stars and improve our knowledge of their multiplicity fraction. Finally, for all clusters, the combination of high-spatial-resolution UV and optical photometry can be used to simultaneously measure the temperature, extinction, extinction law, distance, and existence of companions {resolved and unresolved} and, thus, produce clean HR diagrams with resolved cluster membership and much-reduced systematic uncertainties.

  15. Tidal radius estimates for three open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, V. M.; Loktin, A. V.

    2015-10-01

    A new method is developed for estimating tidal radii and masses of open star clusters (OCL) based on the sky-plane coordinates and proper motions and/or radial velocities of cluster member stars. To this end, we perform the correlation and spectral analysis of oscillations of absolute values of stellar velocity components relative to the cluster mass center along three coordinate planes and along each coordinate axis in five OCL models. Mutual correlation functions for fluctuations of absolute values of velocity field components are computed. The spatial Fourier transform of the mutual correlation functions in the case of zero time offset is used to compute wavenumber spectra of oscillations of absolute values of stellar velocity components. The oscillation spectra of these quantities contain series of local maxima at equidistant wavenumber k values. The ratio of the tidal radius of the cluster to the wavenumber difference Δ k of adjacent local maxima in the oscillation spectra of absolute values of velocity field components is found to be the same for all five OCL models. This ratio is used to estimate the tidal radii and masses of the Pleiades, Praesepe, and M67 based on the proper motions and sky-plane coordinates of the member stars of these clusters. The radial dependences of the absolute values of the tangential and radial projections of cluster star velocities computed using the proper motions relative to the cluster center are determined, along with the corresponding autocorrelation functions and wavenumber spectra of oscillations of absolute values of velocity field components. The Pleiades virial mass is estimated assuming that the cluster is either isolated or non-isolated. Also derived are the estimates of the Pleiades dynamical mass assuming that it is non-stationary and non-isolated. The inferred Pleiades tidal radii corresponding to these masses are reported.

  16. Comets, interstellar clouds and star clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donn, B.

    1976-01-01

    The association of comets with star formation in clusters is elaborated. This hypothesis is also used to explain origin and evaluation of the Oort cloud, the composition of comets, and relationships between cometary and interstellar molecules.

  17. Star formation and substructure in galaxy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Seth A.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Wegner, Gary A.; Einasto, Maret; Vennik, Jaan

    2014-03-10

    We investigate the relationship between star formation (SF) and substructure in a sample of 107 nearby galaxy clusters using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Several past studies of individual galaxy clusters have suggested that cluster mergers enhance cluster SF, while others find no such relationship. The SF fraction in multi-component clusters (0.228 ± 0.007) is higher than that in single-component clusters (0.175 ± 0.016) for galaxies with M{sub r}{sup 0.1}<−20.5. In both single- and multi-component clusters, the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with clustercentric distance and decreases with local galaxy number density, and multi-component clusters show a higher SF fraction than single-component clusters at almost all clustercentric distances and local densities. Comparing the SF fraction in individual clusters to several statistical measures of substructure, we find weak, but in most cases significant at greater than 2σ, correlations between substructure and SF fraction. These results could indicate that cluster mergers may cause weak but significant SF enhancement in clusters, or unrelaxed clusters exhibit slightly stronger SF due to their less evolved states relative to relaxed clusters.

  18. Effect of tidal fields on star clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, David; Weinberg, Martin

    1991-01-01

    We follow the dynamical evolution of a star cluster in a galactic tidal field using a restricted N-body code. We find large asymmetric distortions in the outer profile of the cluster in the first 10 or so crossing times as material is lost. Prograde stars escape preferentially and establish a potentially observable retrograde rotation in the halo. We present the rate of particle loss and compare with the prescription proposed by Lee and Ostriker (1987).

  19. Probing the Birth of Super Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Kelsey

    2009-05-01

    Super star clusters are among the most extreme star formation environments known; they have incredible stellar densities, and each can harbor thousands of massive stars within radii of only a few parsecs. The most robust of these clusters may even be precursors to the ancient globular clusters ubiquitous around massive galaxies in the local universe today. Understanding the formation and feedback of super star clusters has the potential to provide us with insight into the evolution of starburst episodes throughout the universe. At present the relationship between the local physical conditions and the voracity of star formation is not well-constrained. Some progress has been made: over the last decade, a number of natal super star clusters have been discovered, providing us with a glimpse into their early evolution. However, the set of existing observations is anemic, and our current physical model for these natal clusters in simplistic. I will overview what we think we know about these objects based on existing observations and outline some of the most significant gaps in our current understanding.

  20. Applying Machine Learning to Star Cluster Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorenko, Kristina; Grasha, Kathryn; Calzetti, Daniela; Mahadevan, Sridhar

    2016-01-01

    Catalogs describing populations of star clusters are essential in investigating a range of important issues, from star formation to galaxy evolution. Star cluster catalogs are typically created in a two-step process: in the first step, a catalog of sources is automatically produced; in the second step, each of the extracted sources is visually inspected by 3-to-5 human classifiers and assigned a category. Classification by humans is labor-intensive and time consuming, thus it creates a bottleneck, and substantially slows down progress in star cluster research.We seek to automate the process of labeling star clusters (the second step) through applying supervised machine learning techniques. This will provide a fast, objective, and reproducible classification. Our data is HST (WFC3 and ACS) images of galaxies in the distance range of 3.5-12 Mpc, with a few thousand star clusters already classified by humans as a part of the LEGUS (Legacy ExtraGalactic UV Survey) project. The classification is based on 4 labels (Class 1 - symmetric, compact cluster; Class 2 - concentrated object with some degree of asymmetry; Class 3 - multiple peak system, diffuse; and Class 4 - spurious detection). We start by looking at basic machine learning methods such as decision trees. We then proceed to evaluate performance of more advanced techniques, focusing on convolutional neural networks and other Deep Learning methods. We analyze the results, and suggest several directions for further improvement.

  1. Towards Realistic Modeling of Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnedin, O.; Li, H.

    2016-06-01

    Cosmological simulations of galaxy formation are rapidly advancing towards smaller scales. Current models can now resolve giant molecular clouds in galaxies and predict basic properties of star clusters forming within them. I will describe new theoretical simulations of the formation of the Milky Way throughout cosmic time, with the adaptive mesh refinement code ART. However, many challenges - physical and numerical - still remain. I will discuss how observations of massive star clusters and star forming regions can help us overcome some of them. Video of the talk is available at https://goo.gl/ZoZOfX

  2. Ages of Extragalactic Intermediate-Age Star Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    A dating technique for faint, distant star clusters observable in the local group of galaxies with the space telescope is discussed. Color-magnitude diagrams of Magellanic Cloud clusters are mentioned along with the metallicity of star clusters.

  3. Internal Structure of Stellar Clusters: Geometry of Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaro, Emilio J.; Sánchez, Néstor

    2011-04-01

    The study of the internal structure of star clusters provides important clues concerning their formation mechanism and dynamical evolution. There are both observational and numerical evidences indicating that open clusters evolve from an initial clumpy structure, presumably a direct consequence of the formation in a fractal medium, toward a centrally condensed state. This simple picture has, however, several drawbacks. There can be very young clusters exhibiting radial patterns maybe reflecting the early effect of gravity on primordial gas. There can be also very evolved clusters showing fractal patterns that either have survived through time or have been generated subsequently by some (unknown) mechanism. Additionally, the fractal structure of some open clusters is much clumpier than the average structure of the interstellar medium in the Milky Way, although in principle a very similar structure should be expected. Here we summarize and discuss observational and numerical results concerning this subject.

  4. Characterizing star cluster formation with WISE: 652 newly found star clusters and candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo, D.; Bica, E.; Bonatto, C.

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of 652 star clusters, stellar groups and candidates in the Milky Way with Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Most of the objects are projected close to Galactic plane and are embedded clusters. The present sample complements a similar study (Paper I) which provided 437 star clusters and alike. We find evidence that star formation processes span a wide range of sizes, from populous dense clusters to small compact embedded ones, sparse stellar groups or in relative isolation. The present list indicates multiple stellar generations during the embedded phase, with giant molecular clouds collapsing into several clumps composing an embedded cluster aggregate. We investigate the field star decontaminated colour-magnitude diagrams and radial density profiles of nine cluster candidates in the list, and derive their parameters, confirming them as embedded clusters.

  5. The dynamical fate of planetary systems in young star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaochen; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Wang, Long

    2015-11-01

    We carry out N-body simulations to examine the effects of dynamical interactions on planetary systems in young open star clusters. We explore how the planetary populations in these star clusters evolve, and how this evolution depends on the initial amount of substructure, the virial ratio, the cluster mass and density, and the initial semi-major axis of the planetary systems. The fraction of planetary systems that remains intact as a cluster member, fBPS, is generally well-described by the functional form fBPS = f0(1 + [a/a0]c)-1, where (1 - f0) is the fraction of stars that escapes from the cluster, a0 the critical semi-major axis for survival, and c a measure for the width of the transition region. The effect of the initial amount of substructure over time t can be quantified as fBPS = A(t) + B(D), where A(t) decreases nearly linearly with time, and B(D) decreases when the clusters are initially more substructured. Provided that the orbital separation of planetary systems is smaller than the critical value a0, those in clusters with a higher initial stellar density (but identical mass) have a larger probability of escaping the cluster intact. These results help us to obtain a better understanding of the difference between the observed fractions of exoplanets-hosting stars in star clusters and in the Galactic field. It also allows us to make predictions about the free-floating planet population over time in different stellar environments.

  6. Featured Image: Star Clusters in M51

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    This beautiful mosaic of images of the Whirlpool galaxy (M51) and its companion was taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. This nearby, grand-design spiral galaxy has a rich population of star clusters, making it both a stunning target for imagery and an excellent resource for learning about stellar formation and evolution. In a recent study, Rupali Chandar (University of Toledo) and collaborators cataloged over 3,800 compact star clusters within this galaxy. They then used this catalog to determine the distributions for the clusters ages, masses, and sizes, which can provide important clues as to how star clusters form, evolve, and are eventually disrupted. You can read more about their study and what they discovered in the paper below.CitationRupali Chandar et al 2016 ApJ 824 71. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/824/2/71

  7. Gravitational interactions between globular and open clusters: an introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, R.; de la Fuente Marcos, C.; Reilly, D.

    2014-01-01

    Historically, it has been assumed that globular and open clusters never interact. However, recent evidence suggests that: globular clusters passing through the disk may be able to perturb giant molecular clouds (GMCs) triggering formation of open clusters and some old open clusters may be linked to accreted globulars. Here, we further explore the existence of possible dynamical connections between globular and open clusters, and realize that the most obvious link must be in the form of gravitational interactions. If open clusters are born out of GMCs, they have to move in similar orbits. If we accept that globulars can interact with GMCs, triggering star formation, it follows that globular and open clusters must also interact. Consistently, theoretical arguments as well as observational evidence, show that globular and open clusters certainly are interacting populations and their interactions are far more common than usually thought, especially for objects part of the bulge/disk. Monte Carlo calculations confirm that conclusion. Globular clusters seem capable of not only inducing formation of open clusters but, more often, their demise. Relatively frequent high speed cluster encounters or cluster harassment may also cause, on the long-term, slow erosion and tidal truncation on the globulars involved. The disputed object FSR 1767 (2MASS-GC04) may be, statistically speaking, the best example of an ongoing interaction.

  8. PHAT Star Clusters in M31: Insight on Environmental Dependence of Star & Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Lent C.; Dalcanton, Julianne; Seth, Anil; Beerman, Lori; Lewis, Alexia; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R.; Andromeda Project Team, PHAT Team

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical studies of star cluster formation suggest that the star formation efficiency (SFE) of a cluster's progenitor cloud dictates whether or not a gravitationally bound grouping will emerge from an embedded region after gas expulsion. I measure the fraction of stars formed in long-lived clusters relative to unbound field stars on a spatial resolved basis in the Andromeda galaxy. These observations test theoretical predictions that star clusters are formed within a hierarchical interstellar medium at peaks in the gas density where local SFEs are enhanced and regions become stellar dominated. Using data from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey and ancillary observations of M31's gas phase, I investigate how cluster formation correlates with galactic environment and galaxy-scale properties of the star formation. We construct a sample of >2700 star clusters through a crowd-sourced visual search of the high spatial resolution HST imaging data. Our catalog uses ~2 million image classifications collected by the Andromeda Project citizen science website to provide an unparalleled census of clusters that spans ~4 orders of magnitude in mass (50% completeness at ~500 M⊙ at <100 Myr) and increases the number of known clusters within the PHAT survey footprint by a factor of ~6. Cluster ages and masses are obtained by fitting to color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of individually resolved stars within each cluster. Furthermore, we insure our ability to accurately interpret cluster age and mass distributions through careful catalog completeness characterization, made possible by thousands of synthetic cluster tests included during catalog construction work. We combine our high quality cluster sample with spatially resolved star formation histories, derived from CMD fitting of PHAT's photometry of ~117 million resolved field stars. We derived the fraction of stars formed in long-lived clusters and show that only a few percent of coeval stars are found in

  9. Search for OB stars running away from young star clusters. I. NGC 6611

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Bomans, D. J.

    2008-11-01

    N-body simulations have shown that the dynamical decay of the young (~1 Myr) Orion Nebula cluster could be responsible for the loss of at least half of its initial content of OB stars. This result suggests that other young stellar systems could also lose a significant fraction of their massive stars at the very beginning of their evolution. To confirm this expectation, we used the Mid-Infrared Galactic Plane Survey (completed by the Midcourse Space Experiment satellite) to search for bow shocks around a number of young (⪉several Myr) clusters and OB associations. We discovered dozens of bow shocks generated by OB stars running away from these stellar systems, supporting the idea of significant dynamical loss of OB stars. In this paper, we report the discovery of three bow shocks produced by O-type stars ejected from the open cluster NGC 6611 (M16). One of the bow shocks is associated with the O9.5Iab star HD165319, which was suggested to be one of “the best examples for isolated Galactic high-mass star formation” (de Wit et al. 2005, A&A, 437, 247). Possible implications of our results for the origin of field OB stars are discussed.

  10. Open cluster membership probability based on K-means clustering algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Aziz, Mohamed Abd; Selim, I. M.; Essam, A.

    2016-05-01

    In the field of galaxies images, the relative coordinate positions of each star with respect to all the other stars are adapted. Therefore the membership of star cluster will be adapted by two basic criterions, one for geometric membership and other for physical (photometric) membership. So in this paper, we presented a new method for the determination of open cluster membership based on K-means clustering algorithm. This algorithm allows us to efficiently discriminate the cluster membership from the field stars. To validate the method we applied it on NGC 188 and NGC 2266, membership stars in these clusters have been obtained. The color-magnitude diagram of the membership stars is significantly clearer and shows a well-defined main sequence and a red giant branch in NGC 188, which allows us to better constrain the cluster members and estimate their physical parameters. The membership probabilities have been calculated and compared to those obtained by the other methods. The results show that the K-means clustering algorithm can effectively select probable member stars in space without any assumption about the spatial distribution of stars in cluster or field. The similarity of our results is in a good agreement with results derived by previous works.

  11. Bayesian Inference of Kinematics and Memberships of Open Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Z. Y.; Chen, L.; Zhong, J.; Hou, J. L.

    2014-07-01

    Based on the Bayesian Inference (BI) method, the Multiple-modelling approach is improved to combine coordinative positions, proper motions (PM) and radial velocities (RV), to separate the motion of the open cluster from field stars, as well as to describe the intrinsic kinematic status of the cluster.

  12. Luminosity Function Evolution of Young Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. P.; Kao, K. C.; Hu, J. Y.

    The luminosity function of a star cluster evolves markedly during the pre-main sequence phase. With an assumed initial mass function (Miller & Scalo, 1979) and pre-main sequence tracks (D'Antona & Mazzitelli, 1994), we calculate a set of monochromatic luminosity functions which, when compared with observations, can be used to infer the age and star formation history (coeval versus intermittent) of a star cluster. Applied to the Trapezium cluster (2.2 micron imaging data by Zinncker et al 1993), our model suggests an age close to 10^6 years, whereas in IC 348 (2 micron data from Lada & Lada, 1995) the age estimate yields 4--6 times 10^6 years and continual bursts of star formation seem to have occurred in this cluster. CCD imaging observations at optical-infrared I band are presented for NGC 663, for which an age of 1--3 times 10^7 years is inferred. The initial mass function for NGC 663 in the range 2--7.1 {Modot} has a slope of -0.77 plus or minus 0.20, much shallower than that for the solar neighborhood field stars. We interpret this being due to the mass segregation in the cluster.

  13. Star Clusters in Early-Type Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetens, Sidney David; Crocker, Alison Faye

    2016-01-01

    Star formation rates in early-type galaxies are notoriously hard to determine because of their very low specific star formation rates. For this project, we use Hubble Space Telescope photometric data in 4-5 visible and near-UV filters to measure the young stellar clusters in nine early-type galaxies. Aperture photometry colors were compared to colors from synthetic photometry produced by the Flexible Stellar Population Synthesis code (Conroy et. al, ApJ 699, 486-506 (2009)), using a chi-squared likelihood method to estimate the age, metallicity and extinction for each cluster. Masses were determined using the best-fit model, the distance to each galaxy and the measured fluxes. Young clusters were selected below a cutoff age of 100 Myr, and star formation rates for each galaxy were then calculated as the combined mass of the young clusters divided by the cutoff age. Star formation rates computed in this way are far below those computed using the 22 micron emission. While some completeness effects are biasing the cluster-estimated SFRs low, the extreme difference (two orders of magnitude) may also point to SFR overestimation due to contamination from older stars in the 22 micron SFRs.

  14. The Membership and Distance of the Open Cluster Collinder 419

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Lewis C., Jr.; Gies, Douglas R.; Parks, J. Robert; Grundstrom, Erika D.; McSwain, M. Virginia; Berger, David H.; Mason, Brian D.; tenBrummelaar, Theo A.; Turner, Nils H.

    2010-01-01

    The young open cluster Collinder 419 surrounds the massive O star, HD 193322, that is itself a remarkable multiple star system containing at least four components. Here we present a discussion of the cluster distance based upon new spectral classifications of the brighter members, UBV photometry, and an analysis of astrometric and photometric data from the third U. S. Naval Observatory CCD Astrograph Catalog and Two Micron All Sky Survey Catalog. We determine an average cluster reddening of E(B - V) = 0.37 +/-.05 mag and a cluster distance of 741 plus or minus 36 pc. The cluster probably contains some very young stars that may include a reddened M3 III star, IRAS 20161+4035.

  15. STAR CLUSTERS IN PSEUDOBULGES OF SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Di Nino, Daiana; Trenti, Michele; Stiavelli, Massimo; Carollo, C. Marcella; Scarlata, Claudia; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2009-11-15

    We present a study of the properties of the star-cluster systems around pseudobulges of late-type spiral galaxies using a sample of 11 galaxies with distances from 17 Mpc to 37 Mpc. Star clusters are identified from multiband Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFPC2 imaging data by combining detections in three bands (F435W and F814W with ACS and F606W with WFPC2). The photometric data are then compared to population synthesis models to infer the masses and ages of the star clusters. Photometric errors and completeness are estimated by means of artificial source Monte Carlo simulations. Dust extinction is estimated by considering F160W NICMOS observations of the central regions of the galaxies, augmenting our wavelength coverage. In all galaxies we identify star clusters with a wide range of ages, from young (age {approx}< 8 Myr) blue clusters, with typical mass of 10{sup 3} M {sub sun} to older (age >100-250 Myr), more massive, red clusters. Some of the latter might likely evolve into objects similar to the Milky Way's globular clusters. We compute the specific frequencies for the older clusters with respect to the galaxy and bulge luminosities. Specific frequencies relative to the galaxy light appear consistent with the globular cluster specific frequencies of early-type spirals. We compare the specific frequencies relative to the bulge light with the globular cluster specific frequencies of dwarf galaxies, which have a surface brightness profile that is similar to that of the pseudobulges in our sample. The specific frequencies we derive for our sample galaxies are higher than those of the dwarf galaxies, supporting an evolutionary scenario in which some of the dwarf galaxies might be the remnants of harassed late-type spiral galaxies that hosted a pseudobulge.

  16. Galactic Star Cluster mass evolution. High performance star by star simulations. Observations vs. modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berczik, Peter; Just, Andreas; Ernst, Andreas; Spurzem, Rainer

    2015-08-01

    We carry out the large set of Galactic Star Cluster simulations (from 1e2 up to 5e5 Msol initial masses) using our high performance parallel direct N-body code phi-GRAPE+GPU with the maximum possible numerical resolution (one particle one star) on the largest astrophysical GPU clusters (in Germany and China). Our main goal was to investigate the cluster initial volume "filling" factor to the process of the cluster mass loss as well us the cluster whole lifetime. We also investigate the evolution of the present day Cluster Mass Function in solar cylinder depending on the initial parameters of the star formation, Initial Cluster Mass Function and the star clusters masses and initial "filling" factors.

  17. Abundance analysis of B, A and F dwarfs in the M6 open cluster: Spectrum synthesis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiliçoğlu, T.; Monier, R.; Fossati, L.

    2012-12-01

    The chemical abundances of 10 stars in the M6 open cluster (˜100 Myr) were derived using spectrum synthesis. The stars were observed using the FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectrograph. We found star-to-star variations in abundances for A type stars. General enrichment of Si, Cr, and Y were obtained for the cluster.

  18. Al-Sufi's Investigation of Stars, Star Clusters and Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, Ihsan; Stephenson, F. R.; Orchiston, W.

    2011-01-01

    The distinguished Arabic astronomer, Al-Sufi (AD 903-986) is justly famous for his Book of the Fixed Stars, an outstanding Medieval treatise on astronomy that was assembled in 964. Developed from Ptolemy's Algamest, but based upon al-Sufi's own stellar observations, the Book of the Fixed Stars has been copied down through the ages, and currently 35 copies are known to exist in various archival repositories around the world. Among other things, this major work contains 55 astronomical tables, plus star charts for 48 constellations. For the first time a long-overdue English translation of this important early work is in active preparation. In this paper we provide biographical material about Al-Sufi and the contents of his Book of the Fixed Stars, before examining his novel stellar magnitude system, and his listing of star clusters and nebulae (including the first-ever mention of the Great Nebula in Andromeda).

  19. Photometry using Kepler ``superstamps'' of open clusters NGC 6791 & NGC 6819

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, Charles A.; Drury, Jason; Stello, Dennis; Bedding, Timothy R.

    2014-02-01

    The Kepler space telescope has proven to be a gold mine for the study of variable stars. Unfortunately, Kepler only returns a handful of pixels surrounding each star on the target list, which omits a large number of stars in the Kepler field. For the open clusters NGC 6791 and NGC 6819, Kepler also reads out larger superstamps which contain complete images of the central region of each cluster. These cluster images can potentially be used to study additional stars in the open clusters. We present preliminary results from using traditional photometric techniques to identify and analyze additional variable stars from these images.

  20. Gravothermal Star Clusters - Theory and Computer Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurzem, Rainer

    2010-11-01

    In the George Darwin lecture, delivered to the British Royal Astronomical Society in 1960 by Viktor A. Ambartsumian he wrote on the evolution of stellar systems that it can be described by the "dynamic evolution of a gravitating gas" complemented by "a statistical description of the changes in the physical states of stars". This talk will show how this physical concept has inspired theoretical modeling of star clusters in the following decades up to the present day. The application of principles of thermodynamics shows, as Ambartsumian argued in his 1960 lecture, that there is no stable state of equilibrium of a gravitating star cluster. The trend to local thermodynamic equilibrium is always disturbed by escaping stars (Ambartsumian), as well as by gravothermal and gravogyro instabilities, as it was detected later. Here the state-of-the-art of modeling the evolution of dense stellar systems based on principles of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics (Fokker-Planck approximation) will be reviewed. Recent progress including rotation and internal correlations (primordial binaries) is presented. The models have also very successfully been used to study dense star clusters around massive black holes in galactic nuclei and even (in a few cases) relativistic supermassive dense objects in centres of galaxies (here again briefly touching one of the many research fields of V.A. Ambartsumian). For the modern present time of high-speed supercomputing, where we are tackling direct N-body simulations of star clusters, we will show that such direct modeling supports and proves the concept of the statistical models based on the Fokker-Planck theory, and that both theoretical concepts and direct computer simulations are necessary to support each other and make scientific progress in the study of star cluster evolution.

  1. UV-bright stars in globular clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsman, Wayne B.

    1994-01-01

    This paper highlights globular cluster studies with Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT) in three areas: the discrepancy between observed ultraviolet HB magnitudes and predictions of theoretical HB models; the discovery of two hot subdwarfs in NGC 1851, a globular not previously known to contain such stars; and spectroscopic follow up of newly identified UV-bright stars in M79 and w Cen. I also present results of a recent observation of NGC 6397 with the Voyager ultraviolet spectrometer.

  2. NGC 1252: a high altitude, metal poor open cluster remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, R.; de la Fuente Marcos, C.; Moni Bidin, C.; Carraro, G.; Costa, E.

    2013-09-01

    If stars form in clusters but most stars belong to the field, understanding the details of the transition from the former to the latter is imperative to explain the observational properties of the field. Aging open clusters are one of the sources of field stars. The disruption rate of open clusters slows down with age but, as an object gets older, the distinction between the remaining cluster or open cluster remnant (OCR) and the surrounding field becomes less and less obvious. As a result, finding good OCR candidates or confirming the OCR nature of some of the best candidates still remain elusive. One of these objects is NGC 1252, a scattered group of about 20 stars in Horologium. Here we use new wide-field photometry in the UBVI passbands, proper motions from the Yale/San Juan SPM 4.0 catalogue and high-resolution spectroscopy concurrently with results from N-body simulations to decipher NGC 1252's enigmatic character. Spectroscopy shows that most of the brightest stars in the studied area are chemically, kinematically and spatially unrelated to each other. However, after analysing proper motions, we find one relevant kinematic group. This sparse object is relatively close (˜1 kpc), metal poor and is probably not only one of the oldest clusters (3 Gyr) within 1.5 kpc from the Sun but also one of the clusters located farthest from the disc, at an altitude of nearly -900 pc. That makes NGC 1252 the first open cluster that can be truly considered a high Galactic altitude OCR: an unusual object that may hint at a star formation event induced on a high Galactic altitude gas cloud. We also conclude that the variable TW Horologii and the blue straggler candidate HD 20286 are unlikely to be part of NGC 1252. NGC 1252 17 is identified as an unrelated, Population II cannonball star moving at about 400 km s-1.

  3. The structure of young star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladwin, P. P.; Kitsionas, S.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Whitworth, A. P.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we analyse and compare the clustering of young stars in Chamaeleon I and Taurus. We compute the mean surface density of companion stars N as a function of angular displacement theta from each star. We then fit N theta) with two simultaneous power laws, i.e. N(theta) ~ K_bintheta^-beta_bin + K_clutheta^-beta_clu. For Chamaeleon I, we obtain beta_bin= 1.97 +/- and beta_clu= 0.28 +/- 0.06, with the elbow at theta_elb~ 0 011 +/- 0 004. For Taurus, we obtain beta_bin= 2.02 +/- 0.04 and beta _clu= 0.87 +/- 0.01, with the elbow at theta _elb~ 0 013 +/- 0 003. For both star clusters the observational data make large (~ 5 sigma) systematic excursions from the best-fitting curve in the binary regime (theta < theta_elb). These excursions are visible also in the data used by Larson and Simon, and may be attributable to evolutionary effects of the types discussed recently by Nakajima et al. and Bate et al. In the clustering regime (theta > theta_elb) the data conform to the best-fitting curve very well, but the beta_clu values we obtain differ significantly from those obtained by other workers. These differences are due partly to the use of different samples, and partly to different methods of analysis. We also calculate the box dimensions for the two star clusters: for Chamaeleon I we obtain D_box~=1.51+/-0.12, and for Taurus D_box~=1.39+/-0.01. However, the limited dynamic range makes these estimates simply descriptors of the large-scale clustering, and not admissible evidence for fractality. We propose two algorithms for objectively generating maps of constant stellar surface density in young star clusters. Such maps are useful for comparison with molecular-line and dust-continuum maps of star-forming clouds, and with the results of numerical simulations of star formation. They are also useful because they retain information that is suppressed in the evaluation of N(theta). Algorithm I (SCATTER) uses a universal smoothing length, and therefore has a restricted

  4. A Swift/UVOT Study of Open Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaPorte, Samuel; Siegel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Star clusters, due to being coeval populations of similar stars, provide a convenient snapshot of a stellar population to study and compare to theoretical models of stellar evolution. They also serve as the empirical baseline for studies of distant unresolved stellar populations. However, few studies have been performed of detailed color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) of young open clusters in the near ultraviolet. We present a sample of 92 open clusters compiled using Swift's Ultra-Violet and Optical Telescope (UVOT). We construct CMDs and perform isochrone fitting for the most luminous clusters to determine how well the theoretical models reproduce the salient features of the CMDs. We find that the isochrones provide excellent fits to the primary color-magnitude loci, lending confidence to models of unresolved stellar populations and providing, in the future, an opportunity to use open clusters to probe the UV properties of foreground dust.

  5. Local-density-driven clustered star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, G.; Pfalzner, S.

    2013-01-01

    Context. A positive power-law trend between the local surface densities of molecular gas, Σgas, and young stellar objects, Σ ⋆ , in molecular clouds of the solar neighbourhood has recently been identified. How it relates to the properties of embedded clusters, in particular to the recently established radius-density relation, has so far not been investigated. Aims: We model the development of the stellar component of molecular clumps as a function of time and initial local volume density. Our study provides a coherent framework able to explain both the molecular-cloud and embedded-cluster relations quoted above. Methods: We associate the observed volume density gradient of molecular clumps to a density-dependent free-fall time. The molecular clump star formation history is obtained by applying a constant star formation efficiency per free-fall time, ɛff. Results: For the volume density profiles typical of observed molecular clumps (i.e. power-law slope ≃ -1.7), our model gives a star-gas surface-density relation of the form Σ⋆ ∝ Σgas2, which agrees very well with the observations. Taking the case of a molecular clump of mass M0 ≃ 104 M⊙ and radius R ≃ 6 pc experiencing star formation during 2 Myr, we derive what star formation efficiency per free-fall time matches the normalizations of the observed and predicted (Σ ⋆ , Σgas) relations best. We find ɛff ≃ 0.1. We show that the observed growth of embedded clusters, embodied by their radius-density relation, corresponds to a surface density threshold being applied to developing star-forming regions. The consequences of our model in terms of cluster survivability after residual star-forming gas expulsion are that, owing to the locally high star formation efficiency in the inner part of star-forming regions, global star formation efficiency as low as 10% can lead to the formation of bound gas-free star clusters.

  6. The STAR cluster-finder ASIC

    SciTech Connect

    Botlo, M.; LeVine, M.J.; Scheetz, R.A.; Schulz, M.W.; Short, P.; Woods, J.; Crosetto, D.

    1997-12-01

    STAR is a large TPC-based experiment at RHIC, the relativistic heavy ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The STAR experiment reads out a TPC and an SVT (silicon vertex tracker), both of which require in-line pedestal subtraction, compression of ADC values from 10-bit to 8-bit, and location of time sequences representing responses to charged-particle tracks. The STAR cluster finder ASIC responds to all of these needs. Pedestal subtraction and compression are performed using lookup tables in attached RAM. The authors describe its design and implementation, as well as testing methodology and results of tests performed on foundry prototypes.

  7. Stellar contents and star formation in the young star cluster Be 59

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, A. K.; Sharma, Saurabh; Ogura, K.; Ojha, D. K.; Chen, W. P.; Bhatt, B. C.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2008-01-01

    We present UBV Ic CCD photometry of the young open cluster Be 59 with the aim to study the star formation scenario in the cluster. The radial extent of the cluster is found to be ~10 arcmin (2.9 pc). The interstellar extinction in the cluster region varies between E(B - V) ~= 1.4 to 1.8 mag. The ratio of total-to-selective extinction in the cluster region is estimated as 3.7 +/- 0.3. The distance of the cluster is found to be 1.00 +/- 0.05 kpc. Using near-infrared (NIR) colours and slitless spectroscopy, we have identified young stellar objects (YSOs) in the open cluster Be 59 region. The ages of these YSOs range between <1 and ~2 Myr, whereas the mean age of the massive stars in the cluster region is found to be ~2 Myr. There is evidence for second-generation star formation outside the boundary of the cluster, which may be triggered by massive stars in the cluster. The slope of the initial mass function, Γ, in the mass range 2.5 < M/Msolar <= 28 is found to be -1.01 +/- 0.11 which is shallower than the Salpeter value (-1.35), whereas in the mass range 1.5 < M/Msolar <= 2.5 the slope is almost flat. The slope of the K-band luminosity function is estimated as 0.27 +/- 0.02, which is smaller than the average value (~0.4) reported for young embedded clusters. Approximately 32 per cent of Hα emission stars of Be 59 exhibit NIR excess indicating that inner discs of the T Tauri star (TTS) population have not dissipated. The Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) and IRAS-HIRES images around the cluster region are also used to study the emission from unidentified infrared bands and to estimate the spatial distribution of optical depth of warm and cold interstellar dust.

  8. Star Clusters in the Magellanic Clouds-1: Parameterisation and Classification of 1072 Clusters in the LMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, P. K.; Subramaniam, A.; Choudhury, S.; Indu, G.; Sagar, Ram

    2016-08-01

    We have introduced a semi-automated quantitative method to estimate the age and reddening of 1072 star clusters in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) III survey data. This study brings out 308 newly parameterised clusters. In a first of its kind, the LMC clusters are classified into groups based on richness/mass as very poor, poor, moderate and rich clusters, similar to the classification scheme of open clusters in the Galaxy. A major cluster formation episode is found to happen at 125±25 Myr in the inner LMC. The bar region of the LMC appears prominently in the age range 60 - 250 Myr and is found to have a relatively higher concentration of poor and moderate clusters. The eastern and the western ends of the bar are found to form clusters initially, which later propagates to the central part. We demonstrate that there is a significant difference in the distribution of clusters as a function of mass, using a movie based on the propagation (in space and time) of cluster formation in various groups. The importance of including the low mass clusters in the cluster formation history is demonstrated. The catalog with parameters, classification, and cleaned and isochrone fitted CMDs of 1072 clusters, which are available as online material, can be further used to understand the hierarchical formation of clusters in selected regions of the LMC.

  9. The luminosity of Population III star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSouza, Alexander L.; Basu, Shantanu

    2015-06-01

    We analyse the time evolution of the luminosity of a cluster of Population III protostars formed in the early Universe. We argue from the Jeans criterion that primordial gas can collapse to form a cluster of first stars that evolve relatively independently of one another (i.e. with negligible gravitational interaction). We model the collapse of individual protostellar clumps using non-axisymmetric numerical hydrodynamics simulations. Each collapse produces a protostar surrounded by a massive disc (i.e. Mdisc /M* ≳ 0.1), whose evolution we follow for a further 30-40 kyr. Gravitational instabilities result in the fragmentation and the formation of gravitationally bound clumps within the disc. The accretion of these fragments by the host protostar produces accretion and luminosity bursts on the order of 106 L⊙. Within the cluster, we show that a simultaneity of such events across several protostellar cluster members can elevate the cluster luminosity to 5-10 times greater than expected, and that the cluster spends ˜15 per cent of its star-forming history at these levels. This enhanced luminosity effect is particularly enabled in clusters of modest size with ≃10-20 members. In one such instance, we identify a confluence of burst events that raise the luminosity to nearly 1000 times greater than the cluster mean luminosity, resulting in L > 108 L⊙. This phenomenon arises solely through the gravitational-instability-driven episodic fragmentation and accretion that characterizes this early stage of protostellar evolution.

  10. Understanding the star-forming environment in stellar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiya

    The main goal of this thesis is to investigate the physical conditions of the star-forming environment in stellar clusters, especially for the formation of low-mass cluster members. Embedded, young, and intermediate-mass stellar clusters around Herbig Ae/Be stars are sampled. Mid- and near-infrared observations identifying young stars and millimeter interferometric observations probing dense molecular gas and dust continuum are presented. These observations are used to reveal the large-scale young stellar population around the vicinity where the sampled clusters form, probe the physical conditions of dense molecular clumps which are capable of forming individual low-mass cluster members, and examine the influence of the most massive star in the cluster on its siblings and natal cluster-forming cloud. This study shows that stars within the cluster tend to seem younger than those outside the cluster, suggesting a higher and continuous star-forming rate within the cluster than outside, or massive stars are initiated later than low-mass stars within the same cloud. A thorough investigation of young stars and dense gas toward the MWC 1080 cluster further suggests a domination of the most massive star in the cluster on both the natal cloud dispersal and its low-mass cluster members. As active outflows and winds from the Herbig Ae/Be stars increase the non-thermal motion in the cloud, low-mass cluster members are formed within denser and more turbulent cores, than isolated low-mass star-forming cores. In addition, the strong gas dispersal from the Herbig Ae/Be stars also helps the removal of the circumstellar material around nearby low-mass stars. This makes these low-mass cluster members appear older. In summary, this thesis provides the observational evidence showing how the most massive star in the cluster affects the formation and evolution of low-mass cluster members and the physical conditions of star formation in the cluster.

  11. Tracking star formation in dwarf cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rude, Cody Millard

    The evolution of galaxies in dense environments can be affected by close encounters with neighboring galaxies and interactions with the intracluster medium (ICM). Dwarf galaxies may be especially susceptible to these effects due to their low mass. The goal of my dissertation research is to look for signs of star formation in cluster dwarf galaxies by measuring and comparing the r- and u-band luminosity functions of 15 low redshift Abell galaxy clusters using archival data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). Luminosity functions, dwarf-to-giant ratios, and blue fractions are measured in four cluster-centric annuli from stacked cluster data. To account for differences in cluster optical richness, each cluster is scaled according to r200, where r200 is the radius of a sphere, centered on the cluster, whose average density is 200 times the critical density of the universe. The outer region of the cluster sample shows an increase in the faint-end slope of the u-band luminosity function relative to the r-band, indicating star formation in dwarf galaxies. The blue fraction for dwarf galaxies steadily rises with increasing cluster-centric radii. The change in the blue fraction of giant galaxies also increases, but at a lower rate. Additionally, the inner regions of clusters ranging from 0.185 < z < 0.7 from the "Cluster Lensing and Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH)" are used to generate blue- and red-band luminosity functions, dwarf-to-giant ratios, and blue fractions. Comparisons of the inner region of the CLASH and CFHT clusters show an increase in the blue fraction of dwarf galaxies with redshift that is not present in giant galaxies.

  12. Map-based trigonometric parallaxes of open clusters: Coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatewood, George

    1995-01-01

    This is the fourth study in a series to determine the direct trigonometric parallaxes of four of the nearest open star clusters, the Hyades, the Pleiades, the Praesepe, and the nearby cluster in Coma (Gatewood et al. 1990; Gatewood et al. 1992); Gatewood & Kiewiet de Jonge 1994). The results for the open star cluster in Coma are compared with those of the other three clusters, and the members are found to be significantly subluminous. The trigonometric parallax of the cluster is estimated from that of three members studied with the Multichannel Astrometric Photometer (MAP) at the Thaw Refractor of the University of Pittsburgh's Allegheny Observatory. The weighted mean parallax of the cluster is +13.53 +/- 0.54 mass (0.00054 min), corresponding to a distance modulus of 4.34 +/- 0.09 mag. The U-B excess of the Coma cluster members may be used to adjust the observed absolute magnitudes and the B-V measurements as suggested by Sandage & Eggen (1959). The agreement obtained in this manner suggests that, like subdwarf stars, the stars of the Coma cluster appear subluminous because of line blanketing. One of the three members observed in this study was recognized as a member by its parallax and is the faintest known member of the cluster.

  13. A DYING STAR IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A DYING STAR IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER M15 The globular cluster Messier 15 is shown in this color image obtained with the NASA Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). Lying some 40,000 light-years from Earth in the direction of the constellation Pegasus, M15 is one of nearly 150 known globular clusters that form a vast halo surrounding our Milky Way galaxy. Each of these clusters is a spherical association of hundreds of thousands of ancient stars. The image, prepared by the Hubble Heritage team, attempts to show the stars in M15 in their true colors. The brightest cluster stars are red giants, with an orange color due to surface temperatures lower than our Sun's. Most of the fainter stars are hotter, giving them a bluish-white color. If we lived in the core of M15, our sky would blaze with tens of thousands of brilliant stars both day and night! Nestled among the myriads of stars visible in the Hubble image is an astronomical oddity. The pinkish object to the upper left of the cluster's core is a gas cloud surrounding a dying star. Known as Kuestner 648, this was the first planetary nebula to be identified in a globular cluster. In 1928, F. G. Pease, working at the 100-inch telescope of California's Mount Wilson Observatory, photographed the spectrum of K 648 and discovered the telltale bright emission of a nebular gas cloud rather than a normal star. In the ensuing 70 years, only three more planetary nebulae have been discovered in globular clusters. The stars in M15 and other globular clusters are estimated to be about 12 billion years old. They were among the first generations of stars to form in the Milky Way. Our Sun, by comparison, is a youthful 4.6 billion years old. As a star like the Sun ages, it exhausts the hydrogen that fuels its nuclear fusion, and increases in size to become a red giant. Then it ejects its outer layers into space, producing a planetary nebula. The remnant star at the center of the nebula gradually dies away as a

  14. A DYING STAR IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A DYING STAR IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER M15 The globular cluster Messier 15 is shown in this color image obtained with the NASA Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). Lying some 40,000 light-years from Earth in the direction of the constellation Pegasus, M15 is one of nearly 150 known globular clusters that form a vast halo surrounding our Milky Way galaxy. Each of these clusters is a spherical association of hundreds of thousands of ancient stars. The image, prepared by the Hubble Heritage team, attempts to show the stars in M15 in their true colors. The brightest cluster stars are red giants, with an orange color due to surface temperatures lower than our Sun's. Most of the fainter stars are hotter, giving them a bluish-white color. If we lived in the core of M15, our sky would blaze with tens of thousands of brilliant stars both day and night! Nestled among the myriads of stars visible in the Hubble image is an astronomical oddity. The pinkish object to the upper left of the cluster's core is a gas cloud surrounding a dying star. Known as Kuestner 648, this was the first planetary nebula to be identified in a globular cluster. In 1928, F. G. Pease, working at the 100-inch telescope of California's Mount Wilson Observatory, photographed the spectrum of K 648 and discovered the telltale bright emission of a nebular gas cloud rather than a normal star. In the ensuing 70 years, only three more planetary nebulae have been discovered in globular clusters. The stars in M15 and other globular clusters are estimated to be about 12 billion years old. They were among the first generations of stars to form in the Milky Way. Our Sun, by comparison, is a youthful 4.6 billion years old. As a star like the Sun ages, it exhausts the hydrogen that fuels its nuclear fusion, and increases in size to become a red giant. Then it ejects its outer layers into space, producing a planetary nebula. The remnant star at the center of the nebula gradually dies away as a

  15. Primordial star clusters at extreme magnification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zackrisson, Erik; González, Juan; Eriksson, Simon; Asadi, Saghar; Safranek-Shrader, Chalence; Trenti, Michele; Inoue, Akio K.

    2015-05-01

    Gravitationally lensed galaxies with magnification μ ≈ 10-100 are routinely detected at high redshifts, but magnifications significantly higher than this are hampered by a combination of low probability and large source sizes. Magnifications of μ ˜ 1000 may none the less be relevant in the case of intrinsically small, high-redshift objects with very high number densities. Here, we explore the prospects of detecting compact (≲10 pc), high-redshift (z ≳ 7) Population III star clusters at such extreme magnifications in large-area surveys with planned telescopes like Euclid, Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope and Wide-field Imaging Surveyor for High-redshift (WISH). We find that the planned WISH 100 deg2 ultradeep survey may be able to detect a small number of such objects, provided that the total stellar mass of these star clusters is ≳104 M⊙. If candidates for such lensed Population III star clusters are found, follow-up spectroscopy of the surrounding nebula with the James Webb Space Telescope or ground-based Extremely Large Telescopes should be able to confirm the Population III nature of these objects. Multiband photometry of these objects with the James Webb Space Telescope also has the potential to confirm that the stellar initial mass function in these Population III star clusters is top-heavy, as supported by current simulations.

  16. The Hyades open cluster is chemically inhomogeneous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Yong, D.; Asplund, M.; Ramírez, I.; Meléndez, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present a high-precision differential abundance analysis of 16 solar-type stars in the Hyades open cluster based on high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N ≈ 350-400) spectra obtained from the McDonald 2.7-m telescope. We derived stellar parameters and differential chemical abundances for 19 elements (C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Ba) with uncertainties as low as ˜0.01-0.02 dex. Our main results include: (1) there is no clear chemical signature of planet formation detected among the sample stars, i.e. no correlations in abundances versus condensation temperature; (2) the observed abundance dispersions are a factor of ≈1.5-2 larger than the average measurement errors for most elements; (3) there are positive correlations, of high statistical significance, between the abundances of at least 90 per cent of pairs of elements. We demonstrate that none of these findings can be explained by errors due to the stellar parameters. Our results reveal that the Hyades is chemically inhomogeneous at the 0.02 dex level. Possible explanations for the abundance variations include (1) inhomogeneous chemical evolution in the proto-cluster environment, (2) supernova ejection in the proto-cluster cloud and (3) pollution of metal-poor gas before complete mixing of the proto-cluster cloud. Our results provide significant new constraints on the chemical composition of open clusters and a challenge to the current view of Galactic archaeology.

  17. A search for new open clusters hosting cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushkova, E. V.; Zabolotskikh, M. V.; Rastorguev, A. S.; Grudskaya, A. V.; Koposov, S. E.

    We analyze yet-unknown genetic links between open star clusters (OSC) and galactic Cepheids and report the results of the new search for Cepheids -- probable OSC members. A sample of 25% of the stars from a new catalog by Berdnikov (published in Melnik et al. 2015) which lists 674 Cepheids with reliable parameters was investigated. Based on photometric and kinematic data, we selected 17 Cepheids that are likely to be related to star clusters, four of which being new OSCs discovered by us.

  18. Probing the faintest stars in a globular star cluster.

    PubMed

    Richer, Harvey B; Anderson, Jay; Brewer, James; Davis, Saul; Fahlman, Gregory G; Hansen, Brad M S; Hurley, Jarrod; Kalirai, Jasonjot S; King, Ivan R; Reitzel, David; Rich, R Michael; Shara, Michael M; Stetson, Peter B

    2006-08-18

    NGC 6397 is the second closest globular star cluster to the Sun. Using 5 days of time on the Hubble Space Telescope, we have constructed an ultradeep color-magnitude diagram for this cluster. We see a clear truncation in each of its two major stellar sequences. Faint red main-sequence stars run out well above our observational limit and near to the theoretical prediction for the lowest mass stars capable of stable hydrogen burning in their cores. We also see a truncation in the number counts of faint blue stars, namely white dwarfs. This reflects the limit to which the bulk of the white dwarfs can cool over the lifetime of the cluster. There is also a turn toward bluer colors in the least luminous of these objects. This was predicted for the very coolest white dwarfs with hydrogen-rich atmospheres as the formation of H(2) and the resultant collision-induced absorption cause their atmospheres to become largely opaque to infrared radiation. PMID:16917054

  19. Quenching star formation in cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranu, Dan S.; Hudson, Michael J.; Balogh, Michael L.; Smith, Russell J.; Power, Chris; Oman, Kyle A.; Krane, Brad

    2014-05-01

    In order to understand the processes that quench star formation in cluster galaxies, we construct a library of subhalo orbits drawn from Λ cold dark matter cosmological N-body simulations of four rich clusters. We combine these orbits with models of star formation followed by environmental quenching, comparing model predictions with observed bulge and disc colours and stellar absorption line-strength indices of luminous cluster galaxies. Models in which the bulge stellar populations depend only on the galaxy subhalo mass while the disc is quenched upon infall are acceptable fits to the data. An exponential disc quenching time-scale of 3-3.5 Gyr is preferred. Quenching in lower mass groups prior to infall (`pre-processing') provides better fits, with similar quenching time-scales. Models with short (≲1 Gyr) quenching time-scales yield excessively steep cluster-centric gradients in disc colours and Balmer line indices, even if quenching is delayed for several Gyr. The data slightly prefer models where quenching occurs only for galaxies falling within ˜0.5r200. These results imply that the environments of rich clusters must impact star formation rates of infalling galaxies on relatively long time-scales, indicative of gentler quenching mechanisms such as slow `strangulation' over more rapid ram-pressure stripping.

  20. Massive Star Clusters in Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Soeren

    2015-08-01

    Dwarf galaxies are often characterized by very high globular cluster specific frequencies, in some cases exceeding that of the Milky Way by a factor of 100 or more. Moreover, the GCs are typically much more metal-poor than the bulk of the field stars, so that a substantial fraction (up to 20-25% or more) of all metal-poor stars in some dwarf galaxies are associated with GCs. The metal-poor components of these galaxies thus represent an extreme case of the "specific frequency problem". In this talk I will review the current status of our understanding of GC systems in dwarf galaxies. Particular emphasis will be placed on the implications of the high GC specific frequencies for the amount of mass loss the clusters could have experienced and the constraints this provides on theories for the origin of multiple populations in globular clusters.

  1. Hydrodynamic stellar interactions in dense star clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasio, Frederic A.

    1993-01-01

    Highly detailed HST observations of globular-cluster cores and galactic nuclei motivate new theoretical studies of the violent dynamical processes which govern the evolution of these very dense stellar systems. These processes include close stellar encounters and direct physical collisions between stars. Such hydrodynamic stellar interactions are thought to explain the large populations of blue stragglers, millisecond pulsars, X-ray binaries, and other peculiar sources observed in globular clusters. Three-dimensional hydrodynamics techniques now make it possible to perform realistic numerical simulations of these interactions. The results, when combined with those of N-body simulations of stellar dynamics, should provide for the first time a realistic description of dense star clusters. Here I review briefly current theoretical work on hydrodynamic stellar interactions, emphasizing its relevance to recent observations.

  2. Using young massive star clusters to understand star formation and feedback in high-redshift-like environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longmore, S.; Barnes, A.; Battersby, C.; Bally, J.; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Dale, J.; Henshaw, J.; Walker, D.; Rathborne, J.; Testi, L.; Ott, J.; Ginsburg, A.

    2016-05-01

    The formation environment of stars in massive stellar clusters is similar to the environment of stars forming in galaxies at a redshift of 1 - 3, at the peak star formation rate density of the Universe. As massive clusters are still forming at the present day at a fraction of the distance to high-redshift galaxies they offer an opportunity to understand the processes controlling star formation and feedback in conditions similar to those in which most stars in the Universe formed. Here we describe a system of massive clusters and their progenitor gas clouds in the centre of the Milky Way, and outline how detailed observations of this system may be able to: (i) help answer some of the fundamental open questions in star formation and (ii) quantify how stellar feedback couples to the surrounding interstellar medium in this high-pressure, high-redshift analogue environment.

  3. STAR CLUSTERS, GALAXIES, AND THE FUNDAMENTAL MANIFOLD

    SciTech Connect

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Zabludoff, Ann I.; Gonzalez, Anthony H. E-mail: azabludoff@as.arizona.edu

    2011-02-01

    We explore whether global observed properties, specifically half-light radii, mean surface brightness, and integrated stellar kinematics, suffice to unambiguously differentiate galaxies from star clusters, which presumably formed differently and lack dark matter halos. We find that star clusters lie on the galaxy scaling relationship referred to as the fundamental manifold (FM), on the extension of a sequence of compact galaxies, and so conclude that there is no simple way to differentiate star clusters from ultracompact galaxies. By extending the validity of the FM over a larger range of parameter space and a wider set of objects, we demonstrate that the physics that constrains the resulting baryon and dark matter distributions in stellar systems is more general than previously appreciated. The generality of the FM implies (1) that the stellar spatial distribution and kinematics of one type of stellar system do not arise solely from a process particular to that set of systems, such as violent relaxation for elliptical galaxies, but are instead the result of an interplay of all processes responsible for the generic settling of baryons in gravitational potential wells, (2) that the physics of how baryons settle is independent of whether the system is embedded within a dark matter halo, and (3) that peculiar initial conditions at formation or stochastic events during evolution do not ultimately disturb the overall regularity of baryonic settling. We also utilize the relatively simple nature of star clusters to relate deviations from the FM to the age of the stellar population and find that stellar population models systematically and significantly overpredict the mass-to-light ratios of old, metal-rich clusters. We present an empirical calibration of stellar population mass-to-light ratios with age and color. Finally, we use the FM to estimate velocity dispersions for the low surface brightness, outer halo clusters that lack such measurements.

  4. The Pleiades in the "Salle des Taureaux", grotte de Lascaux. Does a rock picture in the cave of Lascaux show the open star cluster of the Pleiades at the Magdalénien era (ca 15.300 BC?"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappenglück, M.

    The cave of Lascaux is famous for its prehistoric paintings and above all for is magnificent portrayals of animals in the "Salle des Taureaux". Although the animals receive a great deal of attention during the guided tours, the sign-like shapes which are also depicted, are mostly passed over. But the puzzle surrounding one of these figures might now have been solved, thereby throwing light on the painting beneath it. The group of spots floating above the back of the largest Aurochs might represent the open cluster of the stars - the Pleiades (M 45/NGC 1432; 1m5), which lie above the constellation of the bull (Taurus).

  5. Evolution of star clusters on eccentric orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Maxwell Xu; Gieles, Mark; Heggie, Douglas C.; Varri, Anna Lisa

    2016-01-01

    We study the evolution of star clusters on circular and eccentric orbits using direct N-body simulations. We model clusters with initially N = 8k and 16k single stars of the same mass, orbiting around a point-mass galaxy. For each orbital eccentricity that we consider, we find the apogalactic radius at which the cluster has the same lifetime as the cluster with the same N on a circular orbit. We show that then, the evolution of bound particle number and half-mass radius is approximately independent of eccentricity. Secondly, when we scale our results to orbits with the same semimajor axis, we find that the lifetimes are, to first order, independent of eccentricity. When the results of Baumgardt and Makino for a singular isothermal halo are scaled in the same way, the lifetime is again independent of eccentricity to first order, suggesting that this result is independent of the galactic mass profile. From both sets of simulations, we empirically derive the higher order dependence of the lifetime on eccentricity. Our results serve as benchmark for theoretical studies of the escape rate from clusters on eccentric orbits. Finally, our results can be useful for generative models for cold streams and cluster evolution models that are confined to spherical symmetry and/or time-independent tides, such as Fokker-Planck models, Monte Carlo models, and (fast) semi-analytic models.

  6. Refining the true parameters of the open cluster NGC 4852

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solivella, Gladys; Giorg, Edgard; Vázquez, Rubén; Carraro, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    NGC 4852 is a moderately compact cluster centered at α2000 = 13 : 00 : 09; δ = -59 : 36 : 48, located near the center of an Hα superring. This cluster forms part of an extended region including young stellar aggregates inside a circle with a radius of 3 degrees, where many show an abundance of emission line stars. In the field of this cluster, two stars of known type exist: Wray 15-1039 (emission-line object) and CD -58:4845 (emission-line star). We do not yet know whether the Be phase is transient or whether it is just what randomly happens in some hot stars. It appears that Be star may be found even in clusters as old as 70 Myr with a high occurrence rate in clusters of 25-27 Myr old. A recent photometric survey in NGC 4852 down to V = 22 - 23 mag established that NGC 4852 is about 200 - 250 Myr old, located at 1.1 kpc from the Sun and with a mean E(B - V) = 0.45 mag. Since the presence of potential Be-type stars in the cluster area suggests it may be a very young object instead of moderately old, we decided to carry out spectroscopy for 33 selected stars and CCD UBVI photometry for the bright objects in the cluster area. This way, we attempt to clarify their evolutionary state and include them in the framework of emission-line stars and open clusters. From our analysis, we agree with the cluster distance and reddening determined by earlier studies, but we derive that the age of NGC 4852 is younger than 40 Myr.

  7. New Galactic star clusters discovered in the VVV survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borissova, J.; Bonatto, C.; Kurtev, R.; Clarke, J. R. A.; Peñaloza, F.; Sale, S. E.; Minniti, D.; Alonso-García, J.; Artigau, E.; Barbá, R.; Bica, E.; Baume, G. L.; Catelan, M.; Chenè, A. N.; Dias, B.; Folkes, S. L.; Froebrich, D.; Geisler, D.; de Grijs, R.; Hanson, M. M.; Hempel, M.; Ivanov, V. D.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Lucas, P.; Mauro, F.; Moni Bidin, C.; Rejkuba, M.; Saito, R. K.; Tamura, M.; Toledo, I.

    2011-08-01

    Context. VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) is one of the six ESO Public Surveys operating on the new 4-m Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA). VVV is scanning the Milky Way bulge and an adjacent section of the disk, where star formation activity is high. One of the principal goals of the VVV Survey is to find new star clusters of differentages. Aims: In order to trace the early epochs of star cluster formation we concentrated our search in the directions to those of known star formation regions, masers, radio, and infrared sources. Methods: The disk area covered by VVV was visually inspected using the pipeline processed and calibrated KS-band tile images for stellar overdensities. Subsequently, we examined the composite JHKS and ZJKS color images of each candidate. PSF photometry of 15 × 15 arcmin fields centered on the candidates was then performed on the Cambridge Astronomy Survey Unit reduced images. After statistical field-star decontamination, color-magnitude and color-color diagrams were constructed and analyzed. Results: We report the discovery of 96 new infrared open clusters and stellar groups. Most of the new cluster candidates are faint and compact (with small angular sizes), highly reddened, and younger than 5 Myr. For relatively well populated cluster candidates we derived their fundamental parameters such as reddening, distance, and age by fitting the solar-metallicity Padova isochrones to the color-magnitude diagrams. Based on observations gathered with VIRCAM, VISTA of the ESO as part of observing programs 172.B-2002Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgTable 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/532/A131

  8. Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. XVI. Star Cluster Formation Efficiency and the Clustered Fraction of Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. Clifton; Seth, Anil C.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Beerman, Lori C.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Lewis, Alexia R.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Bell, Eric F.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Larsen, Søren S.; Sandstrom, Karin; Skillman, Evan D.

    2016-08-01

    We use the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury survey data set to perform spatially resolved measurements of star cluster formation efficiency (Γ), the fraction of stellar mass formed in long-lived star clusters. We use robust star formation history and cluster parameter constraints, obtained through color–magnitude diagram analysis of resolved stellar populations, to study Andromeda’s cluster and field populations over the last ˜300 Myr. We measure Γ of 4%–8% for young, 10–100 Myr-old populations in M31. We find that cluster formation efficiency varies systematically across the M31 disk, consistent with variations in mid-plane pressure. These Γ measurements expand the range of well-studied galactic environments, providing precise constraints in an H i-dominated, low-intensity star formation environment. Spatially resolved results from M31 are broadly consistent with previous trends observed on galaxy-integrated scales, where Γ increases with increasing star formation rate surface density (ΣSFR). However, we can explain observed scatter in the relation and attain better agreement between observations and theoretical models if we account for environmental variations in gas depletion time (τ dep) when modeling Γ, accounting for the qualitative shift in star formation behavior when transitioning from a H2-dominated to a H i-dominated interstellar medium. We also demonstrate that Γ measurements in high ΣSFR starburst systems are well-explained by τ dep-dependent fiducial Γ models.

  9. Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. XVI. Star Cluster Formation Efficiency and the Clustered Fraction of Young Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. Clifton; Seth, Anil C.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Beerman, Lori C.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Lewis, Alexia R.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Bell, Eric F.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Larsen, Søren S.; Sandstrom, Karin; Skillman, Evan D.

    2016-08-01

    We use the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury survey data set to perform spatially resolved measurements of star cluster formation efficiency (Γ), the fraction of stellar mass formed in long-lived star clusters. We use robust star formation history and cluster parameter constraints, obtained through color–magnitude diagram analysis of resolved stellar populations, to study Andromeda’s cluster and field populations over the last ∼300 Myr. We measure Γ of 4%–8% for young, 10–100 Myr-old populations in M31. We find that cluster formation efficiency varies systematically across the M31 disk, consistent with variations in mid-plane pressure. These Γ measurements expand the range of well-studied galactic environments, providing precise constraints in an H i-dominated, low-intensity star formation environment. Spatially resolved results from M31 are broadly consistent with previous trends observed on galaxy-integrated scales, where Γ increases with increasing star formation rate surface density (ΣSFR). However, we can explain observed scatter in the relation and attain better agreement between observations and theoretical models if we account for environmental variations in gas depletion time (τ dep) when modeling Γ, accounting for the qualitative shift in star formation behavior when transitioning from a H2-dominated to a H i-dominated interstellar medium. We also demonstrate that Γ measurements in high ΣSFR starburst systems are well-explained by τ dep-dependent fiducial Γ models.

  10. Caloric curve of star clusters.

    PubMed

    Casetti, Lapo; Nardini, Cesare

    2012-06-01

    Self-gravitating systems, such as globular clusters or elliptical galaxies, are the prototypes of many-body systems with long-range interactions, and should be the natural arena in which to test theoretical predictions on the statistical behavior of long-range-interacting systems. Systems of classical self-gravitating particles can be studied with the standard tools of equilibrium statistical mechanics, provided the potential is regularized at small length scales and the system is confined in a box. The confinement condition looks rather unphysical in general, so that it is natural to ask whether what we learn with these studies is relevant to real self-gravitating systems. In order to provide an answer to this question, we consider a basic, simple, yet effective model of globular clusters: the King model. This model describes a self-consistently confined system, without the need of any external box, but the stationary state is a nonthermal one. In particular, we consider the King model with a short-distance cutoff on the interactions, and we discuss how such a cutoff affects the caloric curve, i.e., the relation between temperature and energy. We find that the cutoff stabilizes a low-energy phase, which is absent in the King model without cutoff; the caloric curve of the model with cutoff turns out to be very similar to that of previously studied confined and regularized models, but for the absence of a high-energy gaslike phase. We briefly discuss the possible phenomenological as well as theoretical implications of these results. PMID:23005049

  11. Properties of star clusters - II. Scaleheight evolution of clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckner, Anne S. M.; Froebrich, Dirk

    2014-10-01

    Until now, it has been impossible to observationally measure how star cluster scaleheight evolves beyond 1 Gyr as only small samples have been available. Here, we establish a novel method to determine the scaleheight of a cluster sample using modelled distributions and Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests. This allows us to determine the scaleheight with a 25 per cent accuracy for samples of 38 clusters or more. We apply our method to investigate the temporal evolution of cluster scaleheight, using homogeneously selected sub-samples of Kharchenko et al. (MWSC), Dias et al. (DAML02), WEBDA, and Froebrich et al. (FSR). We identify a linear relationship between scaleheight and log(age/yr) of clusters, considerably different from field stars. The scaleheight increases from about 40 pc at 1 Myr to 75 pc at 1 Gyr, most likely due to internal evolution and external scattering events. After 1 Gyr, there is a marked change of the behaviour, with the scaleheight linearly increasing with log(age/yr) to about 550 pc at 3.5 Gyr. The most likely interpretation is that the surviving clusters are only observable because they have been scattered away from the mid-plane in their past. A detailed understanding of this observational evidence can only be achieved with numerical simulations of the evolution of cluster samples in the Galactic disc. Furthermore, we find a weak trend of an age-independent increase in scaleheight with Galactocentric distance. There are no significant temporal or spatial variations of the cluster distribution zero-point. We determine the Sun's vertical displacement from the Galactic plane as Z⊙ = 18.5 ± 1.2 pc.

  12. UBV Photometry of the young open cluster Berkely 87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinyemi, Abolaji; Eskridge, Paul B.

    2015-01-01

    We obtained UBV imaging of a field in the young open cluster Berkeley 87. From these images, we measured the brightness of ~180 stars in the cluster. Our photometry was calibrated using published photometry (Turner & Forbes 1982 PASP 94, 789) of a subset of stars in our field. The cluster is in a region of the sky with strongly varying extinction. Therefore we made a (U-B)-(B-V) color-color diagram of the field and used this to de-redden the stars on a case by case basis. We de-reddened the stars using the unreddened supergiant and main sequence colors from Astrophysical Quantities (Cox 2000).The color-magnitude diagrams of the de-reddened stars are compared to the Padova isochrones(Marigo et al 2008 A&A 482 883). The isochrones are generated for a range of ages, with solar metalicity and no α enhancement. The best fit for the isochrones was the main sequence de-reddened stars from which the age of the cluster is estimated to be 20 million years. This is older than previous age estimates (1-5 million years) from earlier studies of the cluster. This may indicate age variation in the cluster.We acknowledge the support of the Physics and Astronomy department, and the College of Science and Engineering, Minnesota State University, Mankato.

  13. McLuster: A Tool to Make a Star Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuepper, A. H. W.; Maschberger, Th.; Kroupa, P.; Baumgardt, H.

    2011-07-01

    The tool McLuster is an open source code that can be used to either set up initial conditions for N-body computations or, alternatively, to generate artificial star clusters for direct investigation. There are two different versions of the code, one basic version for generating all kinds of unevolved clusters (in the following called mcluster) and one for setting up evolved stellar populations at a given age. The former is completely contained in the C file main.c. The latter (dubbed mcluster_sse) is more complex and requires additional FORTRAN routines, namely the Single-Star Evolution (SSE) routines by Hurley, Pols & Tout (ascl:1303.015) that are provided with the McLuster code.

  14. Rotation Periods for Cool Stars in the 4 Gyr old Open Cluster M67, The Solar–Stellar Connection, and the Applicability of Gyrochronology to at least Solar Age

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Sydney A.; Weingrill, Joerg; Fritzewski, Dario; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Platais, Imants

    2016-05-01

    We report rotation periods for 20 cool (FGK) main sequence member stars of the 4 Gyr-old open cluster M67 (=NGC 2682), obtained by analyzing data from Campaign 5 of the K2 mission with the Kepler Space Telescope. The rotation periods delineate a sequence in the color–period diagram (CPD) of increasing period with redder color. This sequence represents a cross-section at the cluster age of the surface P = P(t, M), suggested in prior work to extend to at least solar age. The current Sun is located marginally (approximately 1σ) above M67 in the CPD, as its relative age leads us to expect, and lies on the P = P(t, M) surface to within measurement precision. We therefore conclude that the solar rotation rate is normal as compared with cluster stars, a fact that strengthens the solar–stellar connection. The agreement between the M67 rotation period measurements and prior predictions further implies that rotation periods, especially when coupled with appropriate supporting work such as spectroscopy, can provide reliable ages via gyrochronology for other similar FGK dwarfs from the early main sequence to solar age and likely until the main sequence turnoff. The M67 rotators have a rotational age of 4.2 Gyr with a standard deviation of 0.7 Gyr, implying that similar field stars can be age-dated to precisions of ∼17%. The rotational age of the M67 cluster as a whole is therefore 4.2 Gyr, but with a lower (averaged) uncertainty of 0.2 Gyr.

  15. How a Star Cluster Ruled Out MACHOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    Are massive black holes hiding in the halos of galaxies, making up the majority of the universes mysterious dark matter? This possibility may have been ruled out by a star cluster in a small galaxy recently discovered orbiting the Milky Way.Dark Matter CandidatesThe relative amounts of the different constituents of the universe. Dark matter makes up ~27%. [ESA/Planck]Roughly 27% of the mass and energy in the observable universe is made up of dark matter matter invisible to us, which is neither accounted for by observable baryonic matter nor dark energy.What makes up this dark matter? Among the many proposed candidates, one of the least exotic is that of massive compact halo objects, or MACHOs. MACHOs are hypothesized to be black holes that formed in the early universe and now hide in galactic halos. We cant detect light from these objects but their mass adds to the gravitational pull of galaxies.So far, MACHOs prospects arent looking great. They have not been detected in gravitational lensing surveys, ruling out MACHOs between 10-7 and 30 solar masses as the dominant component of dark matter in our galaxy. MACHOs over 100 solar masses have also been ruled out, due to the existence of fragile wide halo binaries that would have been disrupted by the presence of such large black holes.But what about MACHOs between 30 and 100 solar masses? In a new study, Timothy Brandt (NASA Sagan Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study, in Princeton, NJ) uses a recently discovered faint galaxy, Eridanus II, to place constraints on MACHOs in this mass range.MACHO constraints from the survival of a star cluster in Eri II, assuming a cluster age of 3 Gyr (a lower bound; constraints increase when assuming an age of 12 Gyr). [Adapted from Brandt 2016]A Star Cluster in Eri IIEridanus II is an ultra-faint dwarf galaxy that lies roughly 1.2 million light-years away from us. This dim object is a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way, discovered as part of the Dark Energy Survey

  16. Interrupted Binary Mass Transfer in Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leigh, Nathan W. C.; Geller, Aaron M.; Toonen, Silvia

    2016-02-01

    Binary mass transfer (MT) is at the forefront of some of the most exciting puzzles of modern astrophysics, including SNe Ia, gamma-ray bursts, and the formation of most observed exotic stellar populations. Typically, the evolution is assumed to proceed in isolation, even in dense stellar environments such as star clusters. In this paper, we test the validity of this assumption via the analysis of a large grid of binary evolution models simulated with the SeBa code. For every binary, we calculate analytically the mean time until another single or binary star comes within the mean separation of the mass-transferring binary, and compare this timescale to the mean time for stable MT to occur. We then derive the probability for each respective binary to experience a direct dynamical interruption. The resulting probability distribution can be integrated to give an estimate for the fraction of binaries undergoing MT that are expected to be disrupted as a function of the host cluster properties. We find that for lower-mass clusters (≲ {10}4 {M}⊙ ), on the order of a few to a few tens of percent of binaries undergoing MT are expected to be interrupted by an interloping single, or more often binary, star, over the course of the cluster lifetime, whereas in more massive globular clusters we expect \\ll 1% to be interrupted. Furthermore, using numerical scattering experiments performed with the FEWBODY code, we show that the probability of interruption increases if perturbative fly-bys are considered as well, by a factor ˜2.

  17. UVIS CTE Monitor: Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noeske, Kai

    2010-09-01

    *** NOTE 2: 2ND CHANGE MAR 26 2011: VISIT 13 HAD FAILED. APPROVED FOR REPETITION. ****** NEW VISIT 14 IS IDENTICAL TO FORMER VISIT 13, WITH EXCEPTIONS THAT SOME SUBEXPOSURES ARE REMOVED. ****** SEE OBSERVING DESCRIPTION FOR DETAILS. ****** NOTE: THIS IS A CHANGED PHASE II PROPOSAL AFTER VISITS 1,2,7 HAD BEEN EXECUTED ****** CHANGES BECAME NECESSARY AFTER ANALYSIS OF INCOMING CALIBRATION DATA FROM 12379 AND 12348 ****** THIS REVISED PHASE II {submission 14FEB2011} ADDS THE EVALUATION OF CHARGE INJECTION***The changes amount to:1} dropping the 3rd epoch {August 2011} of external CTE monitoring {3 orbits}2} simplifying the CTE monitor observations in the second epoch {March 2011}, freeing up 1 orbit3} using the freed up orbits from 1} and 2}, together with two additional external orbits that we were granted, to thoroughly assess the data quality of charge - injected data under realistic observing setups.These charge-injected observations will be obtained during the 2nd epoch of the CTE monitor program, in the March 2011 window.------ Original Text prior to 14 Feb 2011 below this line -----------This program extends the Cycle 17 external CTE calibration {CAL/WFC3 ID 11924} program for WFC3/UVIS over Cycle 18. Targets are {i} the sparse cluster NGC 6791 observed in Cycle 17, to continue a consistent set of observations that allows to isolate the time evolution of the CTE, and {ii} a denser field in 47 Tuc {NGC 104}. The latter will provide data to measure the dependence of the CTE on field crowding. It will also provide a consistent comparison between the CTE evolution of WFC3/UVIS and that of ACS/WFC at the same time into the flight {1 year}, because ACS/WFC CTE data were based on 47 Tuc observations. Additional observations of 47 Tuc in the CVZ will provide a wide range of background levels to measure the background dependence of the UVIS CTE.Goals are {i} the continued monitoring of the time evolution of the WFC3/UVIS CTE, {ii} establishing the detector X

  18. STAR CLUSTERS IN M31: OLD CLUSTERS WITH BAR KINEMATICS

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, Heather; Harding, Paul; Caldwell, Nelson; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Athanassoula, E.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze our accurate kinematical data for the old clusters in the inner regions of M31. These velocities are based on high signal-to-noise Hectospec data. The data are well suited for analysis of M31's inner regions because we took particular care to correct for contamination by unresolved field stars from the disk and bulge in the fibers. The metal-poor clusters show kinematics that are compatible with a pressure-supported spheroid. The kinematics of metal-rich clusters, however, argue for a disk population. In particular the innermost region (inside 2 kpc) shows the kinematics of the x{sub 2} family of bar periodic orbits, arguing for the existence of an inner Lindblad resonance in M31.

  19. Evolution of star clusters in a cosmological tidal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Steven; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Langelaan, Paul; Makino, Junichiro; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2013-12-01

    We present a method to couple N-body star cluster simulations to a cosmological tidal field, using AMUSE (Astrophysical Multipurpose Software Environment). We apply this method to star clusters embedded in the CosmoGrid dark matter only Lambda cold dark matter simulation. Our star clusters are born at z = 10 (corresponding to an age of the universe of about 500 Myr) by selecting a dark matter particle and initializing a star cluster with 32 000 stars on its location. We then follow the dynamical evolution of the star cluster within the cosmological environment. We compare the evolution of star clusters in two Milky Way size haloes with a different accretion history. The mass-loss of the star clusters is continuous irrespective of the tidal history of the host halo, but major merger events tend to increase the rate of mass-loss. From the selected two dark matter haloes, the halo that experienced the larger number of mergers tends to drive a smaller mass-loss rate from the embedded star clusters, even though the final masses of both haloes are similar. We identify two families of star clusters: native clusters, which become part of the main halo before its final major merger event, and the immigrant clusters, which are accreted upon or after this event; native clusters tend to evaporate more quickly than immigrant clusters. Accounting for the evolution of the dark matter halo causes immigrant star clusters to retain more mass than when the z = 0 tidal field is taken as a static potential. The reason for this is the weaker tidal field experienced by immigrant star clusters before merging with the larger dark matter halo.

  20. A WISE VIEW OF STAR FORMATION IN LOCAL GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sun Mi; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Stern, Daniel; Stanford, Spencer A.; Brodwin, Mark; Jarrett, Thomas

    2011-12-10

    We present results from a systematic study of star formation in local galaxy clusters using 22 {mu}m data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The 69 systems in our sample are drawn from the Cluster Infall Regions Survey, and all have robust mass determinations. The all-sky WISE data enable us to quantify the amount of star formation, as traced by 22 {mu}m, as a function of radius well beyond R{sub 200}, and investigate the dependence of total star formation rate upon cluster mass. We find that the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with cluster radius but remains below the field value even at 3R{sub 200}. We also find that there is no strong correlation between the mass-normalized total specific star formation rate and cluster mass, indicating that the mass of the host cluster does not strongly influence the total star formation rate of cluster members.

  1. On the metallicity of open clusters. III. Homogenised sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netopil, M.; Paunzen, E.; Heiter, U.; Soubiran, C.

    2016-01-01

    treatment of the Galactic cluster population, or evolutionary studies of individual star groups in open clusters.

  2. DEBRIS DISKS OF MEMBERS OF THE BLANCO 1 OPEN CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Stauffer, John R.; Noriega-Crespo, Alberto; Rebull, Luisa M.; James, David; Strom, Steven; Wolk, Scott; Carpenter, John M.; Barrado y Navascues, David; Backman, Dana; Cargile, P. A.

    2010-08-20

    We have used the Spitzer Space Telescope to obtain Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) 24 {mu}m photometry for 37 members of the {approx}100 Myr old open cluster Blanco 1. For the brightest 25 of these stars (where we have 3{sigma} uncertainties less than 15%), we find significant mid-IR excesses for eight stars, corresponding to a debris disk detection frequency of about 32%. The stars with excesses include two A stars, four F dwarfs, and two G dwarfs. The most significant linkage between 24 {mu}m excess and any other stellar property for our Blanco 1 sample of stars is with binarity. Blanco 1 members that are photometric binaries show few or no detected 24 {mu}m excesses whereas a quarter of the apparently single Blanco 1 members do have excesses. We have examined the MIPS data for two other clusters of similar age to Blanco 1-NGC 2547 and the Pleiades. The AFGK photometric binary star members of both of these clusters also show a much lower frequency of 24 {mu}m excesses compared to stars that lie near the single-star main sequence. We provide a new determination of the relation between the V - K {sub s} color and K {sub s} - [24] color for main sequence photospheres based on Hyades members observed with MIPS. As a result of our analysis of the Hyades data, we identify three low mass Hyades members as candidates for having debris disks near the MIPS detection limit.

  3. ZIRCONIUM, BARIUM, LANTHANUM, AND EUROPIUM ABUNDANCES IN OPEN CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, Heather R.; Friel, Eileen D. E-mail: efriel@indiana.edu

    2013-04-15

    We present an analysis of the s-process elements Zr, Ba, and La and the r-process element Eu in a sample of 50 stars in 19 open clusters. Stellar abundances of each element are based on measures of a minimum of two lines per species via both equivalent width and spectrum synthesis techniques. We investigate cluster mean neutron-capture abundance trends as a function of cluster age and location in the Milky Way disk and compare them to results found in other studies in the literature. We find a statistically significant trend of increasing cluster [Ba/Fe] as a function of decreasing cluster age, in agreement with recent findings for other open cluster samples, supporting the increased importance of low-mass asymptotic giant branch stars to the generation of s-process elements. However, the other s-process elements, [La/Fe] and [Zr/Fe], do not show similar dependences, in contrast to theoretical expectations and the limited observational data from other studies. Conversely, cluster [Eu/Fe] ratios show a slight increase with increasing cluster age, although with marginal statistical significance. Ratios of [s/r]-process abundances, [Ba/Eu] and [La/Eu], however, show more clearly the increasing efficiency of s-process relative to r-process enrichment in open cluster chemical evolution, with significant increases among younger clusters. Last, cluster neutron-capture element abundances appear to be independent of Galactocentric distance. We conclude that a homogeneous analysis of a larger sample of open clusters is needed to resolve the apparent discrepant conclusions between different studies regarding s-process element abundance trends with age to better inform models of galactic chemical evolution.

  4. ALE OF TWO CLUSTERS YIELDS SECRETS OF STAR BIRTH IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image shows rich detail, previously only seen in neighboring star birth regions, in a pair of star clusters 166,000 light-years away in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), in the southern constellation Doradus. The field of view is 130 light-years across and was taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. HST's unique capabilities -- ultraviolet sensitivity, ability to see faint stars, and high resolution -- have been utilized fully to identify three separate populations in this concentration of nearly 10,000 stars down to the 25th magnitude (more that twice as many as can be seen over the entire sky with the naked eye on a clear night on Earth). The field of view is only 130 light-years across. Previous observations with ground-based telescopes resolve less than 1,000 stars in the same region. About 60 percent of the stars belong to the dominant yellow cluster called NGC 1850, which is estimated to be 50 million years old. A scattering of white stars in the image are massive stars that are only about 4 million years old and represent about 20 percent of the stars in the image. (The remainder are field stars in the LMC.) Besides being much younger, the white stars are much more loosely distributed than the yellow cluster. The significant difference between the two cluster ages suggests these are two separate star groups that lie along the same line of sight. The younger, more open cluster probably lies 200 light-years beyond the older cluster. If it were in the foreground, then dust contained in the white cluster would obscure stars in the older yellow cluster. To observe two well-defined star populations separated by such a small gap of space is unusual. This juxtaposition suggests that supernova explosions in the older cluster might have triggered the birth of the younger cluster. This color composite image is assembled from exposures taken in ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared light. Yellow stars correspond to Main

  5. Velocity anisotropy in tidally limited star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiongco, Maria A.; Vesperini, Enrico; Varri, Anna Lisa

    2016-02-01

    We explore the long-term evolution of the anisotropy in the velocity space of star clusters starting with different structural and kinematical properties. We show that the evolution of the radial anisotropy strength and its radial variation within a cluster contain distinct imprints of the cluster initial structural properties, dynamical history, and of the external tidal field of its host galaxy. Initially isotropic and compact clusters with small initial values of the ratio of the half-mass to Jacobi radius, rh/rJ, develop a strong radial anisotropy during their long-term dynamical evolution. Many clusters, if formed with small values of rh/rJ, should now be characterized by a significant radial anisotropy increasing with the distance from the cluster centre, reaching its maximum at a distance between 0.2 rJ and 0.4 rJ, and then becoming more isotropic or mildly tangentially anisotropic in the outermost regions. A similar radial variation of the anisotropy can also result from an early violent relaxation phase. In both cases, as a cluster continues its evolution and loses mass, the anisotropy eventually starts to decrease and the system evolves towards an isotropic velocity distribution. However, in order to completely erase the strong anisotropy developed by these compact systems during their evolution, they must be in the advanced stages of their evolution and lose a large fraction of their initial mass. Clusters that are initially isotropic and characterized by larger initial values of rh/rJ, on the other hand, never develop a significant radial anisotropy.

  6. Map-based trigonometric parallaxes of open clusters: The Praesepe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatewood, George; De Jonge, Joost Kiewiet

    1994-01-01

    Trigonometric parallaxes for stars in the Praesepe open star cluster are deduced from data collected with the Multichannel Astrometric Photometer (MAP) at the Thaw Refractor of the University of Pittsburgh's Allegheny Observatory. The weighted mean parallax of five cluster members is +5.21 +/- 0.79 mas (0.00079 arcsec), corresponding to a distance modulus of 6.42 +/- 0.33 mag. We briefly compare this result with that derived earlier for the Hyades and note agreement with the distance found by main-sequence fitting. We also discuss briefly an improvement in the weighting scheme of the centroiding algorithm used in this series.

  7. STAR-FORMING GAS IN YOUNG CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Philip C.

    2010-05-10

    Initial conditions for star formation in clusters are estimated for protostars whose masses follow the initial mass function from 0.05 to 10 solar masses. Star-forming infall is assumed equally likely to stop at any moment, due to gas dispersal dominated by stellar feedback. For spherical infall, the typical initial condensation must have a steep density gradient, as in low-mass cores, surrounded by a shallower gradient, as in the clumps around cores. These properties match observed column densities in cluster-forming regions when the mean infall stopping time is 0.05 Myr and the accretion efficiency is 0.5. The infall duration increases with final protostar mass, from 0.01 to 0.3 Myr, and the mass accretion rate increases from 3 to 300 x 10{sup -6} solar masses yr{sup -1}. The typical spherical accretion luminosity is {approx}5 solar luminosities, reducing the 'luminosity problem' to a factor of {approx}3. The initial condensation density gradient changes from steep to shallow at radius 0.04 pc, enclosing 0.9 solar masses, with mean column density 2 x 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} and with effective central temperature 16 K. These initial conditions are denser and warmer than those for isolated star formation.

  8. Lithopanspermia in star-forming clusters.

    PubMed

    Adams, Fred C; Spergel, David N

    2005-08-01

    This paper considers the lithopanspermia hypothesis in star-forming groups and clusters, where the chances of biological material spreading from one solar system to another is greatly enhanced (relative to action in the field) because of the close proximity of the systems and lower relative velocities. These effects more than compensate for the reduced time spent in such crowded environments. This paper uses approximately 300,000 Monte Carlo scattering calculations to determine the cross sections for rocks to be captured by binaries and provides fitting formulae for other applications. We assess the odds of transfer as a function of the ejection speed v (eject) and number N(.) of members in the birth aggregate. The odds of any given ejected meteoroid being recaptured by another solar system are relatively low, about 1:10(3)-10(6) over the expected range of ejection speeds and cluster sizes. Because the number of ejected rocks (with mass m > 10 kg) per system can be large, N (R) approximately 10(16), virtually all solar systems are likely to share rocky ejecta with all of the other solar systems in their birth cluster. The number of ejected rocks that carry living microorganisms is much smaller and less certain, but we estimate that N (B) approximately 10(7) rocks can be ejected from a biologically active solar system. For typical birth environments, the capture of life-bearing rocks is expected to occur N (bio) asymptotically equal to 10-16,000 times (per cluster), depending on the ejection speeds. Only a small fraction (f (imp) approximately 10(4)) of the captured rocks impact the surfaces of terrestrial planets, so that N (lps) asymptotically equal to 10(3)-1.6 lithopanspermia events are expected per cluster (under favorable conditions). Finally, we discuss the question of internal versus external seeding of clusters and the possibility of Earth seeding young clusters over its biologically active lifetime. PMID:16078868

  9. WIYN Open Cluster Study. LXVI. Spectroscopic Binary Orbits in the Young Open Cluster M35 (NGC 2168)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiner, E. M.; Mathieu, R. D.; Gosnell, N. M.; Geller, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    The young (150 Myr) open cluster M35 (NGC 2168) has been one of the core clusters of the WIYN Open Cluster Study since 1997. Over these 17 years we have obtained approximately 8000 radial-velocity (RV) measurements of stars in the M35 field, which we provide here. Our target sample consists of 1355 photometrically selected stars in the field of M35 within the main sequence and binary sequence of the cluster and within 13≤slant V≤slant 16.5 and (B-V)≥slant 0.6. Using our RV measurements we cleanly separate likely cluster members from field stars. We calculate RV membership probabilities for over 1200 stars in our sample. 418 are probable cluster members, of which 64 are velocity-variable (binary) systems. Here we present 52 orbital solutions for binary members of M35. This sample defines the hard binary population of M35 that dynamically powers the cluster. We also present XMM-Newton X-ray detections within the cluster. We use our large binary sample to search for interacting binaries among the X-ray sources, investigate M35's period-eccentricity distribution, and determine binary frequency. We find a circularization period of 9.9 ± 1.2 days and a binary frequency of 24% ± 3% for main-sequence binaries with P\\lt {10}4 days. Determining these properties in a young cluster like M35 is key to defining the initial conditions used in models of cluster dynamical evolution.

  10. Spectral analysis of A and F dwarf members of the open cluster M6: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kılıçoǧlu, T.; Monier, R.; Fossati, L.

    2010-12-01

    We present the first abundance analysis of CD-32 13109 (NGC 6405 47), member of the M6 open cluster. The photospheric abundances of 14 chemical elements were determined by comparing synthetic spectra and observed spectra of the star. Findings show that this star should be an Am star.

  11. Multiple Stellar Populations in Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotto, G.

    2013-09-01

    For half a century it had been astronomical dogma that a globular cluster (GC) consists of stars born at the same time out of the same material, and this doctrine has borne rich fruits. In recent years, high resolution spectroscopy and high precision photometry (from space and ground-based observations) have shattered this paradigm, and the study of GC populations has acquired a new life that is now moving it in new directions. Evidence of multiple stellar populations have been identified in the color-magnitude diagrams of several Galactic and Magellanic Cloud GCs where they had never been imagined before.

  12. A PSF-based approach to Kepler/K2 data - III. Search for exoplanets and variable stars within the open cluster M 67 (NGC 2682)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardiello, D.; Libralato, M.; Bedin, L. R.; Piotto, G.; Borsato, L.; Granata, V.; Malavolta, L.; Nascimbeni, V.

    2016-08-01

    In the third paper of this series we continue the exploitation of Kepler/K2 data in dense stellar fields using our PSF-based method. This work is focused on a ˜720-arcmin2 region centred on the Solar-metallicity and Solar-age open cluster M 67. We extracted light curves for all detectable sources in the Kepler channels 13 and 14, adopting our technique based on the usage of a high-angular-resolution input catalogue and target-neighbour subtraction. We detrended light curves for systematic errors, and searched for variables and exoplanets using several tools. We found 451 variables, of which 299 are new detection. Three planetary candidates were detected by our pipeline in this field. Raw and detrended light curves, catalogues, and K2 stacked images used in this work will be released to the community.

  13. Radial velocities of three poorly studied clusters and the kinematics of open clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Christian R.; Friel, Eileen D. E-mail: efriel@indiana.edu

    2014-04-01

    We present radial velocities for stars in the field of the open star clusters Berkeley 44, Berkeley 81, and NGC 6802 from spectra obtained using the Wisconsin-Indiana-Yale-NOAO (WIYN) 3.5 m telescope. These clusters are of intermediate age (1-3 Gyr), located within the solar Galactocentric radius, and have no previous radial velocity measurements. We find mean radial velocities of –9.6 ± 3.0 km s{sup –1}, 48.1 ± 2.0 km s{sup –1}, and 12.4 ± 2.8 km s{sup –1} for Be 44, Be 81, and NGC 6802, respectively. We present an analysis of radial velocities of 134 open clusters of a wide range of ages using data obtained in this study and the literature. Assuming the system of clusters rotates about the Galactic center with a constant velocity, we find older clusters exhibit a slower rotation and larger line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersion than younger clusters. The gradual decrease in rotational velocity of the cluster system with age is accompanied by a smooth increase in LOS velocity dispersion, which we interpret as the effect of heating on the open cluster system over time.

  14. Towards a photometric metallicity scale for open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netopil, M.; Paunzen, E.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Open clusters are a useful tool when investigating several topics connected with stellar evolution; for example the age or distance can be more accurately determined than for field stars. However, one important parameter, the metallicity, is only known for a marginal percentage of open clusters. Aims: We aim at a consistent set of parameters for the open clusters investigated in our photometric Δa survey of chemically peculiar stars. Special attention is paid to expanding our knowledge of cluster metallicities and verifying their scale. Methods: Making use of a previously developed method based on normalised evolutionary grids and photometric data, the distance, age, reddening, and metallicity of open clusters were derived. To transform photometric measurements into effective temperatures to use as input for our method, a set of temperature calibrations for the most commonly used colour indices and photometric systems was compiled. Results: We analysed 58 open clusters in total. Our derived metallicity values were in excellent agreement with about 30 spectroscopically studied targets. The mean value of the absolute deviations was found to be 0.03 dex, with no noticeable offset or gradient. The method was also applied using recent evolutionary models based on the currently accepted lower solar abundance value Z ~ 0.014. No significant differences were found compared to grids using the former adopted solar value Z = 0.02. Furthermore, some divergent photometric datasets were identified and discussed. Conclusions: The method provides an accurate way of obtaining properly scaled metallicity values for open clusters. In light of present and future homogeneous photometric sky surveys, the sample of stellar clusters can be extended to the outskirts of the Milky Way, where spectroscopic studies are almost impossible. This will help for determining galactic metallicity gradients in more detail. Figure 7 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  15. What Do Star Clusters in Nearby Starburst Galaxies Tell Us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sungsoon; Lee, M.; Hwang, N.

    2014-01-01

    Nearby starburst galaxies are a good laboratory for the study of starburst processes. M82, one of the most famous starburst galaxies, has been a target for numerous studies of starburst events. Especially, many studies have used star clusters as starburst tracers in M82, but they usually investigated a only small central region. We present a photometric study of star clusters in M82 using wide-field UBVI, YJ, and H band images in the Hubble Space Telescope archive. We find ˜1100 star clusters in 12’x8’ field, and estimate ages and masses of about 630 star clusters using spectral energy distribution fitting method. Young star clusters are located in the disk region, while old star clusters are found in both disk and halo regions. Age distribution of star clusters shows three distinguished populations: young (≦ 5 Myr), intermediate-age (about 500 Myr), and old (≧10 Gyr) star clusters. Several massive young star clusters (≥˜105M⊙) are found in the nuclear region, which are regarded as a result of recent starburst. Interestingly, we also find very massive star clusters (≥˜106M⊙) with intermediate-age in the nuclear region, which indicates another starburst event at about 500 Myr ago. This suggests that there are at least two starburst events: 5 Myr and 500 Myr ago, and that the earlier starburst at about 500 Myr ago may be more violent than the recent one. We also find about 30 star clusters in the halo region of M82. They are probably metal-poor old globular clusters belonging to M82 halo. It suggests that starburst galaxies may also be enshrouded by old stellar populations.

  16. Stellar and Binary Evolution in Star Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillan, Stephen L. W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a final report on research activities covered on Stellar and Binary Evolution in Star Clusters. Substantial progress was made in the development and dissemination of the "Starlab" software environment. Significant improvements were made to "kira," an N-body simulation program tailored to the study of dense stellar systems such as star clusters and galactic nuclei. Key advances include (1) the inclusion of stellar and binary evolution in a self-consistent manner, (2) proper treatment of the anisotropic Galactic tidal field, (3) numerous technical enhancements in the treatment of binary dynamics and interactions, and (4) full support for the special-purpose GRAPE-4 hardware, boosting the program's performance by a factor of 10-100 over the accelerated version. The data-reduction and analysis tools in Starlab were also substantially expanded. A Starlab Web site (http://www.sns.ias.edu/-starlab) was created and developed. The site contains detailed information on the structure and function of the various tools that comprise the package, as well as download information, "how to" tips and examples of common operations, demonstration programs, animations, etc. All versions of the software are freely distributed to all interested users, along with detailed installation instructions.

  17. Commentary on interstellar matter associated with 18 open clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leisawitz, David

    1989-01-01

    Information supplementary to that contained in Section 4 of an article entitled, A CO Survey of Regions Around 34 Open Clusters, (Leisawitz, Bash, and Thaddeus) published in the Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series, Volume 70, Number 4, August 1989 is summarized. The information presented here, which describes the interstellar environments of young clusters and some cluster physical characteristics, comes from observations published in the astronomical literature and the author's carbon monoxide (CO) emission line survey, and may help clarify our understanding of the interaction of massive stars with the interstellar medium.

  18. The Prevalence and Impact of Wolf–Rayet Stars in Emerging Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokal, Kimberly R.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Indebetouw, Rémy; Massey, Philip

    2016-08-01

    We investigate Wolf–Rayet (WR) stars as a source of feedback contributing to the removal of natal material in the early evolution of massive star clusters. Despite previous work suggesting that massive star clusters clear out their natal material before the massive stars evolve into the WR phase, WR stars have been detected in several emerging massive star clusters. These detections suggest that the timescale for clusters to emerge can be at least as long as the time required to produce WR stars (a few million years), and could also indicate that WR stars may be providing the tipping point in the combined feedback processes that drive a massive star cluster to emerge. We explore the potential overlap between the emerging phase and the WR phase with an observational survey to search for WR stars in emerging massive star clusters hosting WR stars. We select candidate emerging massive star clusters from known radio continuum sources with thermal emission and obtain optical spectra with the 4 m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory and the 6.5 m MMT.4 We identify 21 sources with significantly detected WR signatures, which we term “emerging WR clusters.” WR features are detected in ˜50% of the radio-selected sample, and thus we find that WR stars are commonly present in currently emerging massive star clusters. The observed extinctions and ages suggest that clusters without WR detections remain embedded for longer periods of time, and may indicate that WR stars can aid, and therefore accelerate, the emergence process.

  19. The Prevalence and Impact of Wolf–Rayet Stars in Emerging Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokal, Kimberly R.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Indebetouw, Rémy; Massey, Philip

    2016-08-01

    We investigate Wolf–Rayet (WR) stars as a source of feedback contributing to the removal of natal material in the early evolution of massive star clusters. Despite previous work suggesting that massive star clusters clear out their natal material before the massive stars evolve into the WR phase, WR stars have been detected in several emerging massive star clusters. These detections suggest that the timescale for clusters to emerge can be at least as long as the time required to produce WR stars (a few million years), and could also indicate that WR stars may be providing the tipping point in the combined feedback processes that drive a massive star cluster to emerge. We explore the potential overlap between the emerging phase and the WR phase with an observational survey to search for WR stars in emerging massive star clusters hosting WR stars. We select candidate emerging massive star clusters from known radio continuum sources with thermal emission and obtain optical spectra with the 4 m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory and the 6.5 m MMT.4 We identify 21 sources with significantly detected WR signatures, which we term “emerging WR clusters.” WR features are detected in ∼50% of the radio-selected sample, and thus we find that WR stars are commonly present in currently emerging massive star clusters. The observed extinctions and ages suggest that clusters without WR detections remain embedded for longer periods of time, and may indicate that WR stars can aid, and therefore accelerate, the emergence process.

  20. HUBBLE SPIES HUGE CLUSTERS OF STARS FORMED

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    BY ANCIENT ENCOUNTER This stunningly beautiful image [right] taken with the NASA Hubble Space Telescope shows the heart of the prototypical starburst galaxy M82. The ongoing violent star formation due to an ancient encounter with its large galactic neighbor, M81, gives this galaxy its disturbed appearance. The smaller picture at upper left shows the entire galaxy. The image was taken in December 1994 by the Kitt Peak National Observatory's 0.9-meter telescope. Hubble's view is represented by the white outline in the center. In the Hubble image, taken by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, the huge lanes of dust that crisscross M82's disk are another telltale sign of the flurry of star formation. Below the center and to the right, a strong galactic wind is spewing knotty filaments of hydrogen and nitrogen gas. More than 100 super star clusters -- very bright, compact groupings of about 100,000 stars -- are seen in this detailed Hubble picture as white dots sprinkled throughout M82's central region. The dark region just above the center of the picture is a huge dust cloud. A collaboration of European and American scientists used these clusters to date the ancient interaction between M82 and M81. About 600 million years ago, a region called 'M82 B' (the bright area just below and to the left of the central dust cloud) exploded with new stars. Scientists have discovered that this ancient starburst was triggered by the violent encounter with M81. M82 is a bright (eighth magnitude), nearby (12 million light-years from Earth) galaxy in the constellation Ursa Major (the Great Bear). The Hubble picture was taken Sept. 15, 1997. The natural-color composite was constructed from three Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 exposures, which were combined in chromatic order: 4,250 seconds through a blue filter (428 nm); 2,800 seconds through a green filter (520 nm); and 2,200 seconds through a red (820 nm) filter. Credits for Hubble image: NASA, ESA, R. de Grijs (Institute of

  1. The evolutionary tracks of young massive star clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Pfalzner, S.; Steinhausen, M.; Vincke, K.; Menten, K.; Parmentier, G.

    2014-10-20

    Stars mostly form in groups consisting of a few dozen to several ten thousand members. For 30 years, theoretical models have provided a basic concept of how such star clusters form and develop: they originate from the gas and dust of collapsing molecular clouds. The conversion from gas to stars being incomplete, the leftover gas is expelled, leading to cluster expansion and stars becoming unbound. Observationally, a direct confirmation of this process has proved elusive, which is attributed to the diversity of the properties of forming clusters. Here we take into account that the true cluster masses and sizes are masked, initially by the surface density of the background and later by the still present unbound stars. Based on the recent observational finding that in a given star-forming region the star formation efficiency depends on the local density of the gas, we use an analytical approach combined with N-body simulations to reveal evolutionary tracks for young massive clusters covering the first 10 Myr. Just like the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is a measure for the evolution of stars, these tracks provide equivalent information for clusters. Like stars, massive clusters form and develop faster than their lower-mass counterparts, explaining why so few massive cluster progenitors are found.

  2. The swift UVOT stars survey. I. Methods and test clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Michael H.; Porterfield, Blair L.; Linevsky, Jacquelyn S.; Bond, Howard E.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Berrier, Joshua L.; Gronwall, Caryl A.; Holland, Stephen T.; Breeveld, Alice A.; Brown, Peter J. E-mail: blp14@psu.edu E-mail: caryl@astro.psu.edu E-mail: aab@mssl.ucl.ac.uk

    2014-12-01

    We describe the motivations and background of a large survey of nearby stellar populations using the Ultraviolet Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission. UVOT, with its wide field, near-UV sensitivity, and 2.″3 spatial resolution, is uniquely suited to studying nearby stellar populations and providing insight into the near-UV properties of hot stars and the contribution of those stars to the integrated light of more distant stellar populations. We review the state of UV stellar photometry, outline the survey, and address problems specific to wide- and crowded-field UVOT photometry. We present color–magnitude diagrams of the nearby open clusters M67, NGC 188, and NGC 2539, and the globular cluster M79. We demonstrate that UVOT can easily discern the young- and intermediate-age main sequences, blue stragglers, and hot white dwarfs, producing results consistent with previous studies. We also find that it characterizes the blue horizontal branch of M79 and easily identifies a known post-asymptotic giant branch star.

  3. X-ray Star Clusters in the Carina Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.; Povich, Matthew S.; Garmire, Gordon P.; King, Robert R.; Montmerle, Thierry; Preibisch, Thomas; Smith, Nathan; Stassun, Keivan G.; Wang, Junfeng; Wolk, Scott; Zinnecker, Hans

    2011-05-01

    The distribution of young stars found in the Chandra Carina Complex Project (CCCP) is examined for clustering structure. X-ray surveys are advantageous for identifying young stellar populations compared to optical and infrared surveys in suffering less contamination from nebular emission and Galactic field stars. The analysis is based on smoothed maps of a spatially complete subsample of ~3000 brighter X-ray sources classified as Carina members and ~10,000 stars from the full CCCP sample. The principal known clusters are recovered, and some additional smaller groups are identified. No rich embedded clusters are present, although a number of sparse groups are found. The CCCP reveals considerable complexity in clustering properties. The Trumpler 14 and 15 clusters have rich stellar populations in unimodal, centrally concentrated structures several parsecs across. Non-spherical internal structure is seen, and large-scale low surface density distributions surround these rich clusters. Trumpler 16, in contrast, is comprised of several smaller clusters within a circular boundary. Collinder 228 is a third type of cluster which extends over tens of parsecs with many sparse compact groups likely arising from triggered star formation processes. A widely dispersed, but highly populous, distribution of X-ray stars across the ~50 pc CCCP mosaic supports a model of past generations of star formation in the region. Collinder 234, a group of massive stars without an associated cluster of pre-main-sequence stars, may be part of this dispersed population.

  4. X-RAY STAR CLUSTERS IN THE CARINA COMPLEX

    SciTech Connect

    Feigelson, Eric D.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.; Povich, Matthew S.; Garmire, Gordon P.; King, Robert R.; Montmerle, Thierry; Preibisch, Thomas; Smith, Nathan; Stassun, Keivan G.; Wang Junfeng; Wolk, Scott; Zinnecker, Hans

    2011-05-01

    The distribution of young stars found in the Chandra Carina Complex Project (CCCP) is examined for clustering structure. X-ray surveys are advantageous for identifying young stellar populations compared to optical and infrared surveys in suffering less contamination from nebular emission and Galactic field stars. The analysis is based on smoothed maps of a spatially complete subsample of {approx}3000 brighter X-ray sources classified as Carina members and {approx}10,000 stars from the full CCCP sample. The principal known clusters are recovered, and some additional smaller groups are identified. No rich embedded clusters are present, although a number of sparse groups are found. The CCCP reveals considerable complexity in clustering properties. The Trumpler 14 and 15 clusters have rich stellar populations in unimodal, centrally concentrated structures several parsecs across. Non-spherical internal structure is seen, and large-scale low surface density distributions surround these rich clusters. Trumpler 16, in contrast, is comprised of several smaller clusters within a circular boundary. Collinder 228 is a third type of cluster which extends over tens of parsecs with many sparse compact groups likely arising from triggered star formation processes. A widely dispersed, but highly populous, distribution of X-ray stars across the {approx}50 pc CCCP mosaic supports a model of past generations of star formation in the region. Collinder 234, a group of massive stars without an associated cluster of pre-main-sequence stars, may be part of this dispersed population.

  5. Sequential clustering of star formations in IC 1396

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya-Fang; Li, Jin-Zeng

    2013-05-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the H II region IC 1396 and its star forming activity, in which multi-wavelength data ranging from the optical to the near- and far-infrared were employed. The surface density distribution of all the 2MASS sources with a certain detection toward IC 1396 indicates the existence of a compact cluster spatially consistent with the position of the exciting source of the H II region, HD 206267. The spatial distribution of the sources with excessive infrared emission, selected based on archived 2MASS data, reveals the existence of four sub-clusters in this region. One is associated with the open cluster Trumpler 37. The other three are found to be spatially coincident with the bright rims of the H II region. All the sources with excessive emission in the near infrared are cross-identified with AKARI IRC data. An analysis of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the resultant sample leads to the identification of eight CLASS I, 15 CLASS II and 15 CLASS III sources in IC 1396. Optical identification of the sample sources with R magnitudes brighter than 17 mag corroborates the results from the SED analysis. Based on the spatial distribution of the infrared young stellar objects at different evolutionary stages, the surrounding sub-clusters located in the bright rims are believed to be younger than the central one. This is consistent with a scenario of sequential star formation in this region. Imaging data of a dark patch in IC 1396 by Herschel SPIRE, on the other hand, indicate the presence of two far-infrared cores in LDN 1111, which are likely to be a new generation of protostellar objects in formation. So we infer that the star formation process in this H II region was not continuous but rather episodic.

  6. CCD UBV photometry of the open cluster NGC 6819

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ak, T.; Bostancı, Z. F.; Yontan, T.; Bilir, S.; Güver, T.; Ak, S.; Ürgüp, H.; Paunzen, E.

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of CCD UBV observations of the open cluster NGC 6819. We calculated the stellar density profile in the cluster's field to determine the structural parameters of NGC 6819. Using the existing astrometric data, we calculated the probabilities of the stars being physical members of the cluster, and used these objects in the determination of the astrophysical parameters of NGC 6819. We inferred the reddening and metallicity of the cluster as E(B-V)=0.130±0.035 mag and [Fe/H]=+0.051± 0.020 dex, respectively, using the U-B vs B-V two-colour diagram and UV excesses of the F-G type main-sequence stars. We fit the colour-magnitude diagrams of NGC 6819 with the PARSEC isochrones and derived the distance modula, distance and age of the cluster as μV=12.22± 0.10 mag, d=2309±106 pc and t=2.4±0.2 Gyr, respectively. The parameters of the galactic orbit estimated for NGC 6819 indicate that the cluster is orbiting in a slightly eccentric orbit of e=0.06 with a period of P_{orb}= 142 Myr. The slope of the mass function estimated for the cluster is close to the one found for the stars in the solar neighbourhood.

  7. A detailed study of the open cluster PISMIS 20.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, R. A.; Will, J.-M.; Prado, P.; Feinstein, A.

    1995-05-01

    The very young open cluster Pis 20 has been investigated using CCD UBVR photometry. New blue faint members were found down to V=19mag. With them we obtain a better definition of the lower cluster main sequence. Using the fitting method, we derive a cluster distance of d=3600pc (V_0_-M_V_=12.80). The mean color excess is =1.24mag. From the observed characteristics and spatial location of the bluest cluster stars we conclude that the star WR 67 has a good chance to be a cluster member. In that case, the mass of its progenitor should be greater than 50Msun_ according to evolutionary models. We obtain for Pis 20 an age of 5(+/-1)x10^6^yr from isochrone fitting. We discuss the cluster's mass spectrum whose slope, within the observational uncertainties, appears to be similar to the one in Salpeter's law. We notice that high WR/OB and WC/WN number ratios are present not only within the cluster itself but also in the association where Pis 20 is situated. Although the cluster distance derived here places Pis 20 nearer than the supernova remnant MSH 15-52, we cannot/rule out the possibility that they are spatially related. The presently observed cluster mass is around 600Msun_.

  8. X-Ray source populations in old open clusters: Collinder 261

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vats, Smriti; van den Berg, Maureen; Wijnands, Rudy

    2014-09-01

    We are carrying out an X-ray survey of old open clusters with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Single old stars, being slow rotators, are very faint in X-rays (L_X < 1×10^27 erg/s). Hence, X-rays produced by mass transfer in cataclysmic variables (CVs) or by rapid rotation of the stars in tidally locked, detached binaries (active binaries; ABs) can be detected, without contamination from single stars. By comparing the properties of various types of interacting binaries in different environments (the Galactic field, old open clusters, globular clusters), we aim to study binary evolution and how it may be affected by dynamical encounters with other cluster stars. Stellar clusters are good targets to study binaries, as age, distance, chemical composition, are well constrained. Collinder (Cr) 261 is an old open cluster (age ~ 7 Gyr), with one of the richest populations inferred of close binaries and blue stragglers of all open clusters and is therefore an obvious target to study the products of close encounters in open clusters. We will present the first results of this study, detailing the low-luminosity X-ray population of Cr 261, in conjunction with other open clusters in our survey (NGC 188, Berkeley 17, NGC 6253, M67, NGC 6791) and in comparison with populations in globular clusters.

  9. POTASSIUM IN GLOBULAR CLUSTER STARS: COMPARING NORMAL CLUSTERS TO THE PECULIAR CLUSTER NGC 2419

    SciTech Connect

    Carretta, E.; Bragaglia, A.; Sollima, A.; Gratton, R. G.; Lucatello, S.; D'Orazi, V.; Sneden, C. E-mail: angela.bragaglia@oabo.inaf.it E-mail: raffaele.gratton@oapd.inaf.it E-mail: valentina.dorazi@mq.edu.au

    2013-05-20

    Two independent studies recently uncovered two distinct populations among giants in the distant, massive globular cluster (GC) NGC 2419. One of these populations has normal magnesium (Mg) and potassium (K) abundances for halo stars: enhanced Mg and roughly solar K. The other population has extremely depleted Mg and very enhanced K. To better anchor the peculiar NGC 2419 chemical composition, we have investigated the behavior of K in a few red giant branch stars in NGC 6752, NGC 6121, NGC 1904, and {omega} Cen. To verify that the high K abundances are intrinsic and not due to some atmospheric features in giants, we also derived K abundances in less evolved turn-off and subgiant stars of clusters 47 Tuc, NGC 6752, NGC 6397, and NGC 7099. We normalized the K abundance as a function of the cluster metallicity using 21 field stars analyzed in a homogeneous manner. For all GCs of our sample, the stars lie in the K-Mg abundance plane on the same locus occupied by the Mg-normal population in NGC 2419 and by field stars. This holds for both giants and less-evolved stars. At present, NGC 2419 seems unique among GCs.

  10. The old, massive, metal rich open cluster NGC 6791

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carraro, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    NGC~6791 is a rich open cluster that attracted a lot of attention in the last decade. Recent estimates indicate that the mass is even larger, around 5000\\,$\\mathrm{M}_{\\odot}$. This is quite remarkable: the cluster is in fact 8\\,Gyr old, while the typical dissolution time for Galactic open clusters is a few Myr only. This might imply that the cluster managed to survive so long either because its original mass was much larger, or because it moved along a preferential orbit. In any case, such combination of old age and large mass is unique among Galactic open clusters, especially for clusters located in the inner regions of the Galactic disk. This is not the only special property of NGC 6791. Its abundance in iron is [Fe/H] $\\sim$ +0.40. again unique among Galactic star clusters of the same age range. Significant dispersions in various elements have been detected, that are not routinely found in Galactic open clusters. The combined UV flux of the few hot HB stars makes the cluster the closest proxy of an elliptical galaxy. This surprising result might indeed indicate that NGC 6791 was massive enough at origin to experience a strong burst of star formation and a fast enrichment.This pletora of unique properties renders NGC 6791 an extremely important object to study and understand.How and where could such a stellar system have formed? Is NGC 6791 just an open cluster? Did it form close to the bulge? How could have survived in the adverse, high-density, environment of the inner Galactic disk?These are difficult questions to answer to, of course. One of the still missing key observational evidence is whether the cluster suffered from tidal interaction, that could have significantly decreased its mass. We find such evidences, and use them as an argument to support a scenario in which the cluster formed as a massive object. We also estimate, using approximate analytic description based on available $N$-body models, how much mass NGC~6791 lost, and which was its