Science.gov

Sample records for open test section

  1. Nozzle diffuser for use with an open test section of a wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, P. Stephen (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The nozzle diffuser has an inlet in fluid communication with the narrowed inlet of an open test chamber in a conventional wind tunnel. The nozzle diffuser has a passageway extending from its inlet to an outlet in communication with the open test section. The passageway has an internal cross sectional area which increases from its inlet to its outlet and which may be defined by top and bottom isosceles trapezoid walls of a particular flare angle and by isosceles trapezoid side walls of a different flare angle. In addition, a collector having a decreasing internal cross sectional area from inlet to outlet may be provided at the opposite end of the test chamber such that its outlet is in communication with a diffuser located at this outlet.

  2. Effect of collector configuration on test section turbulence levels in an open-jet wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manuel, G. S.; Molloy, John K.; Barna, P. Stephen

    1992-01-01

    Flow quality studies in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel indicated periodic flow pulsation at discrete frequencies in the test section when the tunnel operated in an open-jet configuration. To alleviate this problem, experiments were conducted in a 1/24-scale model of the full-scale tunnel to evaluate the turbulence reduction potential of six collector configurations. As a result of these studies, the original bell-mouth collector of the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel was replaced by a collector with straight walls, and a slot was incorporated between the trailing edge of the collector and the entrance of the diffuser.

  3. Acoustical modeling study of the open test section of the NASA Langley V/STOL wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ver, I. L.; Andersen, D. W.; Bliss, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    An acoustic model study was carried out to identify effective sound absorbing treatment of strategically located surfaces in an open wind tunnel test section. Also an aerodynamic study done concurrently, sought to find measures to control low frequency jet pulsations which occur when the tunnel is operated in its open test section configuration. The acoustical modeling study indicated that lining of the raised ceiling and the test section floor immediately below it, results in a substantial improvement. The aerodynamic model study indicated that: (1) the low frequency jet pulsations are most likely caused or maintained by coupling of aerodynamic and aeroacoustic phenomena in the closed tunnel circuit, (2) replacing the hard collector cowl with a geometrically identical but porous fiber metal surface of 100 mks rayls flow resistance does not result in any noticable reduction of the test section noise caused by the impingement of the turbulent flow on the cowl.

  4. Open Rotor Spin Test

    NASA Video Gallery

    An open rotor, also known as a high-speed propeller, is tested in a wind tunnel. The propeller moves much more quickly than a standard propeller, and the blades of the propeller are shaped differen...

  5. Open Rotor Test Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.

    2010-01-01

    Testing of low noise, counter-rotating open rotor propulsion concepts has been ongoing at Glenn Research Center in collaboration with General Electric Company. The presentation is an overview of the testing that has been completed to date and previews the upcoming test entries. The NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project Diagnostics entry is the most recent to finish. That test entry included acoustic phased array, pressure sensitive paint, particle image velocimetry, pylon installed measurements and acoustic shielding measurements. A preview of the data to be acquired in the 8x6 high-speed wind tunnel is also included.

  6. Adaptive wall testing sections (AWTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.; Kilgore, Robert A.

    1987-01-01

    The lecture starts with conventional techniques of minimizing wall interference and explains the principle of wall streamlining. The history of AWTS development is highlighted, along with the benefits of wall streamlining, including minimized boundary interference, increased model size, reduced tunnel drive power, noise, and volume, as well as multiple flow field simulations to be performed using one test section. AWTS-associated problems coming from the need to adjust the test-section boundaries for each test condition are assessed, along with the requirements of a boundary-adjustment strategy. Examples of two- and three-dimensional test sections are presented, and attention is focused on residual interference and the effects of compressibility and model lift on flexible-wall contours.

  7. Torsion and buckling of open sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, Herbert

    1936-01-01

    In this paper is a discussion of the general principles for open sections of any shape. In what follows the torsion will be computed and on the basis of the results it will be possible to obtain a proper design of section in each case. The torsion of buckling members for the case where they are centrally loaded, leads to a problem in pure stability and is similar to that of stressed beams.

  8. Language Testing: New Openings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huhta, Ari, Ed.; And Others

    A collection of articles on second-language testing includes: "The State of Language Testing in the 1990s" (J. Charles Alderson); "The Exercise of Power and Control in the Rhetorics of Testing" (Elana Shohamy); "Institutional and Political Aspects of Language Testing" (Bernard Spolsky); "Language Planning Policy and Development of FL Proficiency…

  9. Open-Section Composite Structural Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftin, T. A.; Smith, C. A.; Raheb, S. J.; Nowitzky, A. M.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes investigation of manufacture and mechanical properties of graphite-fiber/aluminum-matrix open-section structural elements; e.g., channels and angle bars. Conducted with view toward using such elements to build lightweight, thermally stable truss structures in outer space. Other applications transport to, and assembly at, remote or otherwise uninviting locations. Advantages include shapes permitting high packing density during shipment, convenient paths for routing tubes, hoses, and cables; accessibility of both inner and outer surfaces for repair; and ease of attachment of additional hardware. Easier and require less equipment to fabricate, and more amenable to automated fabrication and assembly at remote site. Disadvantages, not as resistant to some kinds of deformation under load.

  10. 13. Detail of doubledoor opening between machine shop section of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Detail of double-door opening between machine shop section of roundhouse and engine house section of roundhouse. Engine house visible through rectangular opening. At one time the opening extended to the intrados of the arch above the doorway, allowing railroad engines to fit inside the machine shop. View to east. - Duluth & Iron Range Rail Road Company Shops, Roundhouse, Southwest of downtown Two Harbors, northwest of Agate Bay, Two Harbors, Lake County, MN

  11. Evaluation of the Acoustic Measurement Capability of the NASA Langley V/STOL Wind Tunnel Open Test Section with Acoustically Absorbent Ceiling and Floor Treatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theobald, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    The single source location used for helicopter model studies was utilized in a study to determine the distances and directions upstream of the model accurate at which measurements of the direct acoustic field could be obtained. The method used was to measure the decrease of sound pressure levels with distance from a noise source and thereby determine the Hall radius as a function of frequency and direction. Test arrangements and procedures are described. Graphs show the normalized sound pressure level versus distance curves for the glass fiber floor treatment and for the foam floor treatment.

  12. Torsion and buckling of open sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagner, H; Pretschner, W

    1936-01-01

    Following an abstract of the well-known theory of torsion in compression, the writers give directions for the practical calculation of the values of C(sub BT) (resistance to flexure and torsion) and i(sub SP(exp 2)), which determine the torsion. The second part treats the experiments in support of the theory of torsion of plain and flanged angle sections.

  13. Interior view of main section of milk barn. Opening overhead ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Interior view of main section of milk barn. Opening overhead leads to attic crawl space. Camera is pointed SW. - Kosai Farm, Milk Barn, B Street north of Northwest Twenty-ninth Street, Auburn, King County, WA

  14. Test section configuration for aerodynamic testing in shock tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.; Presley, L. L.; Chapman, G. T.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents results of a study of the test section configuration required to minimize or alleviate interference effects on model flow produced by the presence of test section walls in the aerodynamic testing of two dimensional transonic airfoils in a shock tube. Tests at a nominal Mach number of 0.85 and a chord Reynolds number of 2,000,000 were carried out by means of schlieren photography and pressure measurements for several symmetric airfoil profiles using shock tube test sections with unmodified straight walls, contoured walls, and slotted walls with adjacent chambers. Results were compared with corresponding results from conventional wind tunnel tests of the airfoils. Results for the straight wall tests show major airfoil flow distortions. Results from contoured wall tests and those performed using a slotted wall test section developed in this study exhibit essential agreement with wind tunnel results. The collective results show that test sections for aerodynamic testing can be designed for shock tubes that will alleviate wall interference effects.

  15. Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Conversion Research at UNH: From Fundamental Studies of Hydrofoil Sections, to Moderate Reynolds Number Turbine Tests in a Tow Tank, to Open Water Deployments at Tidal Energy Test Sites (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, M.; Bachant, P.; Nedyalkov, I.; Rowell, M.; Dufresne, N.; Lyon, V.

    2013-12-01

    We report on research related to MHK turbines at the Center for Ocean Renewable Energy (CORE) at the University of New Hampshire (UNH). The research projects span varies scales, levels of complexity and environments - from fundamental studies of hydrofoil sections in a high speed water tunnel, to moderate Reynolds number turbine tests with inflow and wake studies in a large cross-section tow tank, to deployments of highly instrumented process models at tidal energy test sites in New England. A concerted effort over the past few years has brought significant new research infrastructure for marine hydrokinetic energy conversion online at UNH-CORE. It includes: a high-speed cavitation tunnel with independent control of velocity and pressure; a highly accurate tow mechanism, turbine test bed and wake traversing system for the 3.7m x 2.4m cross-section UNH tow tank; a 10.7m x 3.0m tidal energy test platform which can accommodate turbines up to 1.5m in diameter, for deployments at the UNH-CORE Tidal Energy Test Site in Great Bay Estuary, NH, a sheltered 'nursery site' suitable for intermediate scale tidal energy conversion device testing with peak currents typically above 2 m/s during each tidal cycle. Further, a large boundary layer wind tunnel, the new UNH Flow Physics Facility (W6.0m x H2.7m xL72m) is being used for detailed turbine wake studies, producing data and insight also applicable to MHK turbines in low Froude number deployments. Bi-directional hydrofoils, which perform equally well in either flow direction and could avoid the use of complex and maintenance-intensive yaw or blade pitch mechanisms, are being investigated theoretically, numerically and experimentally. For selected candidate shapes lift, drag, wake, and cavitation inception/desinence are measured. When combined with a cavitation inception model for MHK turbines, this information can be used to prescribe turbine design/operational parameters. Experiments were performed with a 1m diameter and 1m

  16. Apex wing section undergoing loading test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    STRESS TEST -- A test section of a wing being developed for the Apex high-altitude research project is being subjected to simulated air loads similar to what it will encounter in flight during tests at Dryden's Flight Loads Laboratory. The current tests on a fiberglass test wing are developing test methods to be used during future ultimate loads tests that will apply loads of 150 percent or greater on another test section until it fails. That section is being built from the actual materials to be used in the Apex flight wing, an all-composite structure which features a stiff, lightweight boron fiber skin covering a foam and graphite cloth core. It is designed for flight loads of 5 Gs (five times the force of gravity) positive and 3 Gs negative. The Apex project, part of NASA's Revolutionary Concepts (RevCon) effort, will use a highly-modified commercial sailplane design to acquire data on the aerodynamics of flight in the previously unexplored regime of 70,000 to 100,000 feet altitude and subsonic speeds of about Mach 0.65. The Apex High-Altitude Flight Experiment is expected to explore the aerodynamics of controlled flight at very high altitudes near 100,000 feet. The Apex will be hoisted aloft tail-first from Dryden by a large high-altitude balloon and released at about 110,000-feet altitude. As it gradually descends, its instrumentation will collect aerodynamic data. The remotely-piloted, semi-autonomous Apex will combine a modified ASC sailplane fuselage design with a new wing designed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The wing will have a special airfoil designed for high subsonic speeds at extreme altitudes. A device extending behind the right wing is a 'wake rake,' which will measure aerodynamic drag behind a test section of the wing, while a rocket pack mounted beneath the fuselage will assist the Apex in transitioning to horizontal flight. Research flights were expected to begin in mid-1998, but a series of technical problems delayed them. In

  17. Wolf Testing: Open Source Testing Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braasch, P.; Gay, P. L.

    2004-12-01

    Wolf Testing is software for easily creating and editing exams. Wolf Testing allows the user to create an exam from a database of questions, view it on screen, and easily print it along with the corresponding answer guide. The questions can be multiple choice, short answer, long answer, or true and false varieties. This software can be accessed securely from any location, allowing the user to easily create exams from home. New questions, which can include associated pictures, can be added through a web-interface. After adding in questions, they can be edited, deleted, or duplicated into multiple versions. Long-term test creation is simplified, as you are able to quickly see what questions you have asked in the past and insert them, with or without editing, into future tests. All tests are archived in the database. Written in PHP and MySQL, this software can be installed on any UNIX / Linux platform, including Macintosh OS X. The secure interface keeps students out, and allows you to decide who can create tests and who can edit information already in the database. Tests can be output as either html with pictures or rich text without pictures, and there are plans to add PDF and MS Word formats as well. We would like to thank Dr. Wolfgang Rueckner and the Harvard University Science Center for providing incentive to start this project, computers and resources to complete this project, and inspiration for the project's name. We would also like to thank Dr. Ronald Newburgh for his assistance in beta testing.

  18. SSME Post Test Diagnostic System: Systems Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bickmore, Timothy

    1995-01-01

    An assessment of engine and component health is routinely made after each test firing or flight firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME). Currently, this health assessment is done by teams of engineers who manually review sensor data, performance data, and engine and component operating histories. Based on review of information from these various sources, an evaluation is made as to the health of each component of the SSME and the preparedness of the engine for another test or flight. The objective of this project - the SSME Post Test Diagnostic System (PTDS) - is to develop a computer program which automates the analysis of test data from the SSME in order to detect and diagnose anomalies. This report primarily covers work on the Systems Section of the PTDS, which automates the analyses performed by the systems/performance group at the Propulsion Branch of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). This group is responsible for assessing the overall health and performance of the engine, and detecting and diagnosing anomalies which involve multiple components (other groups are responsible for analyzing the behavior of specific components). The PTDS utilizes several advanced software technologies to perform its analyses. Raw test data is analyzed using signal processing routines which detect features in the data, such as spikes, shifts, peaks, and drifts. Component analyses are performed by expert systems, which use 'rules-of-thumb' obtained from interviews with the MSFC data analysts to detect and diagnose anomalies. The systems analysis is performed using case-based reasoning. Results of all analyses are stored in a relational database and displayed via an X-window-based graphical user interface which provides ranked lists of anomalies and observations by engine component, along with supporting data plots for each.

  19. Open Source Testing Capability for Geospatial Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez, L. E.

    2013-12-01

    Geospatial Software enables scientists to discover, access and process information for better understanding of the Earth. Hundreds, if not thousands, of geospatial software packages exist today. Many of these implement open standards. The OGC Implementation Statistics page [1] reports, for example, more than 450 software products that implement the OGC Web Map Service (WMS) 1.1.1 standard. Even though organizations voluntarily report their products as implementing the WMS standard, not all of these implementations can interoperate with each other. For example, a WMS client may not interact with all these WMS servers in the same functional way. Making the software work with other software, even when implementing the same standard, still remains a challenge, and the main reason is that not all implementations implement the standard correctly. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Compliance Program provides a testing infrastructure to test for the correct implementation of OGC standards in interfaces and encodings that enable communication between geospatial clients and servers. The OGC testing tool and the tests are all freely available, including the source code and access to the testing facility. The Test, Evaluation, And Measurement (TEAM) Engine is a test harness that executes test suites written using the OGC Compliance Testing Language (CTL) or the TestNG framework. TEAM Engine is available in Sourceforge. OGC hosts an official stable [2] deployment of TEAM Engine with the approved test suites. OGC also hosts a Beta TEAM Engine [3] with the tests in Beta and with new TEAM Engine functionality. Both deployments are freely available to everybody. The OGC testing infrastructure not only enables developers to test OGC standards, but it can be configured to test profiles of OGC standards and community-developed application agreements. These agreements can be any interface and encoding agreement, not only OGC based. The OGC Compliance Program is thus an important

  20. An Open Source Tool to Test Interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez, L. E.

    2012-12-01

    Scientists interact with information at various levels from gathering of the raw observed data to accessing portrayed processed quality control data. Geoinformatics tools help scientist on the acquisition, storage, processing, dissemination and presentation of geospatial information. Most of the interactions occur in a distributed environment between software components that take the role of either client or server. The communication between components includes protocols, encodings of messages and managing of errors. Testing of these communication components is important to guarantee proper implementation of standards. The communication between clients and servers can be adhoc or follow standards. By following standards interoperability between components increase while reducing the time of developing new software. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), not only coordinates the development of standards but also, within the Compliance Testing Program (CITE), provides a testing infrastructure to test clients and servers. The OGC Web-based Test Engine Facility, based on TEAM Engine, allows developers to test Web services and clients for correct implementation of OGC standards. TEAM Engine is a JAVA open source facility, available at Sourceforge that can be run via command line, deployed in a web servlet container or integrated in developer's environment via MAVEN. The TEAM Engine uses the Compliance Test Language (CTL) and TestNG to test HTTP requests, SOAP services and XML instances against Schemas and Schematron based assertions of any type of web service, not only OGC services. For example, the OGC Web Feature Service (WFS) 1.0.0 test has more than 400 test assertions. Some of these assertions includes conformance of HTTP responses, conformance of GML-encoded data; proper values for elements and attributes in the XML; and, correct error responses. This presentation will provide an overview of TEAM Engine, introduction of how to test via the OGC Testing web site and

  1. Testing (Validating?) Cross Sections with ICSBEP Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Kahler, Albert C. III

    2012-06-28

    We discuss how to use critical benchmarks from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments to determine the applicability of specific cross sections to the end-user's problem of interest. Particular attention is paid to making sure the selected suite of benchmarks includes the user's range of applicability (ROA).

  2. Open-Ended Test Items Pose Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Most experts in the testing community have presumed that the $350 million promised by the U.S. Department of Education to support common assessments would promote those that made greater use of open-ended items capable of measuring higher-order critical-thinking skills. But as measurement experts consider the multitude of possibilities for an…

  3. Selecting Tests for an Open Admissions Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tittle, Carol; Kay, Patricia

    The establishment of an open admissions policy necessitated an evaluative procedure to identify groups requiring remedial instruction and to assist in estimating budgeting and staffing needs. This study was undertaken, therefore, to select tests in reading and mathematics which would: (1) discriminate adequately between non-college and college…

  4. Lithium Circuit Test Section Design and Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfroy, Thomas; Garber, Anne

    2006-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission - Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team has designed and built an actively pumped lithium flow circuit. Modifications were made to a circuit originally designed for NaK to enable the use of lithium that included application specific instrumentation and hardware. Component scale freeze/thaw tests were conducted to both gain experience with handling and behavior of lithium in solid and liquid form and to supply anchor data for a Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) model that was modified to include the physics for freeze/thaw transitions. Void formation was investigated. The basic circuit components include: reactor segment, lithium to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic (EM) liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. This paper will discuss the overall system design and build and the component testing findings.

  5. Lithium Circuit Test Section Design and Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfroy, Thomas; Garber, Anne; Martin, James

    2006-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission - Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team has designed and built an actively pumped lithium flow circuit. Modifications were made to a circuit originally designed for NaK to enable the use of lithium that included application specific instrumentation and hardware. Component scale freeze/thaw tests were conducted to both gain experience with handling and behavior of lithium in solid and liquid form and to supply anchor data for a Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) model that was modified to include the physics for freeze/thaw transitions. Void formation was investigated. The basic circuit components include: reactor segment, lithium to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic (EM) liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. This paper discusses the overall system design and build and the component testing findings.

  6. Lithium Circuit Test Section Design and Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Godfroy, Thomas; Garber, Anne; Martin, James

    2006-01-20

    The Early Flight Fission -- Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team has designed and built an actively pumped lithium flow circuit. Modifications were made to a circuit originally designed for NaK to enable the use of lithium that included application specific instrumentation and hardware. Component scale freeze/thaw tests were conducted to both gain experience with handling and behavior of lithium in solid and liquid form and to supply anchor data for a Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP) model that was modified to include the physics for freeze/thaw transitions. Void formation was investigated. The basic circuit components include: reactor segment, lithium to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic (EM) liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. This paper discusses the overall system design and build and the component testing findings.

  7. Measuring Learning through Cross Sectional Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovett, Steve; Johnson, Jennie

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of student learning is becoming increasingly important in U.S. higher education. One way to measure learning is through longitudinal testing, but this becomes especially difficult when applied to cumulative learning within programs in situations of low persistence. In particular, many Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs) find…

  8. Capillary Flows along Open Channel Conduits: the Open-Star Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weislogel, Mark; Chen, Yongkang; Nguyen, Thanh; Geile, John; Callahan, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Capillary rise in tubes, channels, and grooves has received significant attention in the literature for over 100 years. In yet another incremental extension of related work, a transient capillary rise problem is solved for spontaneous flow along an interconnected array of open channels forming what is referred to as an ``open-star'' section. This geometry possesses several attractive characteristics including passive phase separations and high diffusive gas transport rates. Despite the complex geometry, novel and convenient approximations for capillary pressure and viscous resistance enable closed form predictions of the flow. As part of the solution, a combined scaling approach is applied that identifies unsteady-inertial-capillary, convective-inertial-capillary, and visco-capillary transient regimes in a single parameter. Drop tower experiments are performed employing 3-D printed conduits to corroborate all findings. NASA NNX09AP66A, Glenn Research Center.

  9. 7. PHOTOCOPY, PLANS, ELEVATIONS, AND SECTION DRAWING FOR MISSILE TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. PHOTOCOPY, PLANS, ELEVATIONS, AND SECTION DRAWING FOR MISSILE TEST AND ASSEMBLY BUILDING. - NIKE Missile Base SL-40, Missile Test & Assembly Building, South end of launch area, northeast of Generator Building No. 3, Hecker, Monroe County, IL

  10. ADVANCED HOT SECTION MATERIALS AND COATINGS TEST RIG

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Reome; Dan Davies

    2004-04-30

    The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principal activity during this reporting period were the evaluation of syngas combustor concepts, the evaluation of test section concepts and the selection of the preferred rig configuration.

  11. Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Davies

    2004-10-30

    The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principal activities during this reporting period were the continuation of test section detail design and developing specifications for auxiliary systems and facilities.

  12. Transonic cryogenic test section for the Goettingen tube facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornung, H.; Hefer, G.; Krogmann, P.; Stanewsky, E.

    1983-01-01

    The design of modern aircraft requires the solution of problems related to transonic flow at high Reynolds numbers. To investigate these problems experimentally, it is proposed to extend the Ludwieg tube facility by adding a transonic cryogenic test section. After stating the requirements for such a test section, the technical concept is briefly explained and a preliminary estimate of the costs is given.

  13. Test report SEPS solar array root section model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The fabrication and test of a solar array functional root section model to verify preliminary array design concepts is presented. The root section model is full scale width and contains a model array blanket. The blanket contains 1/8 live electrical modules and the remainder contains solar cell mass simulators. A storable Astromast is used for array blanket extension and retraction. The model component and system assembly hardware, tests, and test results are described.

  14. Evaluation tests for photovoltaic concentrator receiver sections and modules

    SciTech Connect

    Woodworth, J.R.; Whipple, M.L.

    1992-06-01

    Sandia has developed a third-generation set of specifications for performance and reliability testing of photovoltaic concentrator modules. Several new requirements have been defined. The primary purpose of the tests is to screen new concentrator designs and new production runs for susceptibility to known failure mechanisms. Ultraviolet radiation testing of materials precedes receiver section and module performance and environmental tests. The specifications include the purpose, procedure, and requirements for each test. Recommendations for future improvements are presented.

  15. The dynamic modelling of a slotted test section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gumas, G.

    1979-01-01

    A mathematical model of the wind tunnel dynamics was developed. The modelling techniques were restricted to the use of one dimensional unsteady flow. The dynamic characteristics of slotted test section incorporated into the model are presented.

  16. ADVANCED HOT SECTION MATERIALS AND COATINGS TEST RIG

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Reome; Dan Davies

    2004-01-01

    The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program initiated this quarter, provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principle activity during this first reporting period were preparing for and conducting a project kick-off meeting, working through plans for the project implementation, and beginning the conceptual design of the test section.

  17. GENERAL VIEW OF THE NORTH SECTION OF THE EAST TEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW OF THE NORTH SECTION OF THE EAST TEST AREA. THE SATURN V TEST FACILITY (BLDG. 4550) IS TO THE LEFT IN THE PHOTO. THE SATURN I TEST FACILITY (BLDG. 4557) IS IN THE CENTER, THE COLD CALIBRATION TEST STAND (BLDG. 4588) IS THE SHORT STEEL FRAMED STRUCTURE TO THE RIGHT IN THE PHOTO AND THE TURBO PUMP / HIGH VOLUME FLOW FACILITY (BLDG. 4548) IS THE TALL STEEL FRAMED STRUCTURE IN THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE PHOTOGRAPHIC IMAGE. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Saturn V Dynamic Test Facility, East Test Area, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  18. The design of test-section inserts for higher speed aeroacoustic testing in the Ames 80- by 120-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Olson, Larry E.

    1992-01-01

    An engineering feasibility study was made of aeroacoustic inserts designed for large-scale acoustic research on aircraft models in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The goal was to find test-section modifications that would allow improved aeroacoustic testing at airspeeds equal to and above the current 100 knots limit. Results indicate that the required maximum airspeed drives the design of a particular insert. Using goals of 200, 150, and 100 knots airspeed, the analysis led to a 30 x 60 ft open-jet test section, a 40 x 80 ft open-jet test section, and a 70 x 110 ft closed test section with enhanced wall lining respectively. The open-jet inserts would be composed of a nozzle, collector, diffuser, and acoustic wedges incorporated in the existing 80 x 120 ft test section. The closed test section would be composed of approximately 5-ft acoustic wedges covered by a porous plate attached to the test-section walls of the existing 80 x 120. All designs would require a double row of acoustic vanes between the test section and fan drive to attenuate fan noise and, in the case of the open-jet designs, to control flow separation at the diffuser downstream end. The inserts would allow virtually anechoic acoustics studies of large helicopter models, jets, and V/STOL aircraft models in simulated flight. Model scale studies would be necessary to optimize the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of any of the designs. Successful development of acoustically transparent walls, though not strictly necessary to the project, would lead to a porous-wall test section that could be substituted for any of the open-jet designs, and thereby eliminate many aerodynamic and acoustic problems characteristic of open-jet shear layers.

  19. 5. "TEST STAND 13, CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. "TEST STAND 1-3, CONCRETE STRUCTURAL SECTIONS AND DETAILS." Specifications No. OC12-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-06; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/17, Rev. A. Stamped: AS BUILT; NO CHANGES. Date of Revision A: 11/1/50. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-3, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  20. 9. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; CABLE TUNNEL, PLAN, SECTIONS, DETAILS." Specifications ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. "TEST STAND; STRUCTURAL; CABLE TUNNEL, PLAN, SECTIONS, DETAILS." Specifications No. OC1-55-72-(Rev.); Drawing No. 60-09-12; sheet 43 of 148; file no. AF 1320/94, Rev. A. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract no. 4338, no change. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A Terminal Room, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  1. Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Davis

    2006-09-30

    Phase I of the Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig Program has been successfully completed. Florida Turbine Technologies has designed and planned the implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. Potential uses of this rig include investigations into environmental attack of turbine materials and coatings exposed to syngas, erosion, and thermal-mechanical fatigue. The principle activities during Phase 1 of this project included providing several conceptual designs for the test section, evaluating various syngas-fueled rig combustor concepts, comparing the various test section concepts and then selecting a configuration for detail design. Conceptual definition and requirements of auxiliary systems and facilities were also prepared. Implementation planning also progressed, with schedules prepared and future project milestones defined. The results of these tasks continue to show rig feasibility, both technically and economically.

  2. Modeling and Simulation of a Nuclear Fuel Element Test Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Robert P.; Emrich, William

    2011-01-01

    "The Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator" test section closely simulates the internal operating conditions of a thermal nuclear rocket. The purpose of testing is to determine the ideal fuel rod characteristics for optimum thermal heat transfer to their hydrogen cooling/working fluid while still maintaining fuel rod structural integrity. Working fluid exhaust temperatures of up to 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit can be encountered. The exhaust gas is rendered inert and massively reduced in temperature for analysis using a combination of water cooling channels and cool N2 gas injectors in the H2-N2 mixer portion of the test section. An extensive thermal fluid analysis was performed in support of the engineering design of the H2-N2 mixer in order to determine the maximum "mass flow rate"-"operating temperature" curve of the fuel elements hydrogen exhaust gas based on the test facilities available cooling N2 mass flow rate as the limiting factor.

  3. Vertical Drop Test of a YS-11 Fuselage Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minegishi, Masakatsu; Kumakura, Ikuo; Iwasaki, Kazuo; Shoji, Hirokazu; Yoshimoto, Norio; Terada, Hiroyuki; Sashikuma, Hirofumi; Isoe, Akira; Yamaoka, Toshihiro; Katayama, Noriaki; Hayashi, Toru; Akaso, Tetsuya

    The Structures and Materials Research Center of the National Aerospace Laboratory of Japan (NAL) and Kawasaki Heavy Industories, Ltd. (KHI) conducted a vertical drop test of a fuselage section cut from a NAMIC YS-11 transport airplane at NAL vertical drop test facility in December 2001. The main objectives of this program were to obtain background data for aircraft cabin safety by drop test of a full-scale fuselage section and to develop computational method for crash simulation. The test article including seats and anthropomorphic test dummies was dropped to a rigid impact surface at a velocity of 6.1 m/s (20 ft/s). The test condition and result were considered to be severe but potentially survivable. A finite element model of this test article was also developed using the explicit nonlinear transient-dynamic analysis code, LS-DYNA3D. An outline of analytical method and comparison of analysis result with drop test data are presented in this paper.

  4. 5. VIEW NORTH OF TEST SECTION IN FULLSCALE WIND TUNNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW NORTH OF TEST SECTION IN FULL-SCALE WIND TUNNEL WITH FREE-FLIGHT MODEL OF A BOEING 737 SUSPENDED FROM A SAFETY CABLE. - NASA Langley Research Center, Full-Scale Wind Tunnel, 224 Hunting Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  5. A study of test section configuration for shock tube testing of transonic airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Two methods are investigated for alleviating wall interference effects in a shock tube test section intended for testing two-dimensional transonic airfoils. The first method involves contouring the test section walls to match approximate streamlines in the flow. Contours are matched to each airfoil tested to produce results close to those obtained in a conventional wind tunnel. Data from a previous study and the present study for two different airfoils demonstrate that useful results are obtained in a shock tube using a test section with contoured walls. The second method involves use of a fixed-geometry slotted-wall test section to provide automatic flow compensation for various airfoils. The slotted-wall test section developed exhibited the desired performance characteristics in the approximate Mach number range 0.82 to 0.89, as evidenced by good agreement obtained between shock tube and wind tunnel results for several airfoil flows.

  6. 6. "TEST STAND NO. 13, RETAINING WALLS & APRON, SECTIONS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. "TEST STAND NO. 1-3, RETAINING WALLS & APRON, SECTIONS & ELEVATIONS." Specifications No. OC11-50-10; Drawing No. 60-09-06; no sheet number within title block. D.O. SERIES 1109/20, Rev. B. Stamped: RECORD DRAWING - AS CONSTRUCTED. Below stamp: Contract DA-04-353 Eng. 177, Rev. B; Date: 26 Dec. 1951. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-3, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. 16-foot transonic tunnel test section flowfield survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yetter, J. A.; Abeyounis, W. K.

    1994-01-01

    A flow survey has been made of the test section of the NASA Langley Research Center 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at subsonic and supersonic speeds. The survey was performed using five five-hole pyramid-head probes mounted at 14 inch intervals on a survey rake. Probes were calibrated at freestream Mach numbers from 0.50 to 0.95 and from 1.18 to 1.23. Flowfield surveys were made at Mach numbers from 0.50 to 0.90 and at Mach 1.20. The surveys were made at tunnel stations 130.6, 133.6, and 136.0. By rotating the survey rake through 180 degrees, a cylindrical volume of the test section 4.7 feet in diameter and 5.4 feet long centered about the tunnel centerline was surveyed. Survey results showing the measured test section upflow and sideflow characteristics and local Mach number distributions are presented. The report documents the survey probe calibration techniques used, summarizes the procedural problems encountered during testing, and identifies the data discrepancies observed during the post-test data analysis.

  8. 3. "TEST STAND NO. 13, EXCAVATION PLAN & SECTIONS." Specifications ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. "TEST STAND NO. 1-3, EXCAVATION PLAN & SECTIONS." Specifications No. ENG 04-353-50-10; Drawing No. 60-0906; no sheet number within title block; D.O. SERIES 1109/10. Stamped: AS BUILT. No revisions or revision dates. Last work date on this drawing "Checked by EAG, 1/31/49." Though this drawing is specific to Test Stand 1-3, it also illustrates the general methods used for excavation design and retaining wall construction at Test Stand 1-5. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-3, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  9. Open-Book Tests to Complement Assessment-Programmes: Analysis of Open and Closed-Book Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heijne-penninga, M.; Kuks, J. B. M.; Schonrock-adema, J.; Snijders, T. A. B.; Cohen-schotanus, J.

    2008-01-01

    Today's health sciences educational programmes have to deal with a growing and changing amount of knowledge. It is becoming increasingly important for students to be able to use and manage knowledge. We suggest incorporating open-book tests in assessment programmes to meet these changes. This view on the use of open-book tests is discussed and the…

  10. Analysis of a Hybrid Wing Body Center Section Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Hsi-Yung T.; Shaw, Peter; Przekop, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The hybrid wing body center section test article is an all-composite structure made of crown, floor, keel, bulkhead, and rib panels utilizing the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) design concept. The primary goal of this test article is to prove that PRSEUS components are capable of carrying combined loads that are representative of a hybrid wing body pressure cabin design regime. This paper summarizes the analytical approach, analysis results, and failure predictions of the test article. A global finite element model of composite panels, metallic fittings, mechanical fasteners, and the Combined Loads Test System (COLTS) test fixture was used to conduct linear structural strength and stability analyses to validate the specimen under the most critical combination of bending and pressure loading conditions found in the hybrid wing body pressure cabin. Local detail analyses were also performed at locations with high stress concentrations, at Tee-cap noodle interfaces with surrounding laminates, and at fastener locations with high bearing/bypass loads. Failure predictions for different composite and metallic failure modes were made, and nonlinear analyses were also performed to study the structural response of the test article under combined bending and pressure loading. This large-scale specimen test will be conducted at the COLTS facility at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  11. IFLA General Conference, 1989. Division of Collections and Services. Open Forum of the Division; Section on Acquisition and Exchange; Section on Interlending and Document Delivery; Section on Serial Publications; Section on Rare and Precious Books and Documents. Booklet 50.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1989

    There are 20 papers in this collection from the Division of Collections and Services: "IFLA Division of Collections and Services" (Hope E. A. Clement); "Divisional Open Forum Reports" ("Section of Acquisition and Exchange" by Ulrich Montag; "Section of Government Information and Official Publications" by Bernadine Abbott Hoduski; "Section on…

  12. Finite Element Analysis and Test Results Comparison for the Hybrid Wing Body Center Section Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Rouse, Marshall; Lovejoy, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents the comparison of test measurements and predictive finite element analysis results for a hybrid wing body center section test article. The testing and analysis efforts were part of the Airframe Technology subproject within the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation project. Test results include full field displacement measurements obtained from digital image correlation systems and discrete strain measurements obtained using both unidirectional and rosette resistive gauges. Most significant results are presented for the critical five load cases exercised during the test. Final test to failure after inflicting severe damage to the test article is also documented. Overall, good comparison between predicted and actual behavior of the test article is found.

  13. Power Enhancement in High Dimensional Cross-Sectional Tests

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jianqing; Liao, Yuan; Yao, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel technique to boost the power of testing a high-dimensional vector H : θ = 0 against sparse alternatives where the null hypothesis is violated only by a couple of components. Existing tests based on quadratic forms such as the Wald statistic often suffer from low powers due to the accumulation of errors in estimating high-dimensional parameters. More powerful tests for sparse alternatives such as thresholding and extreme-value tests, on the other hand, require either stringent conditions or bootstrap to derive the null distribution and often suffer from size distortions due to the slow convergence. Based on a screening technique, we introduce a “power enhancement component”, which is zero under the null hypothesis with high probability, but diverges quickly under sparse alternatives. The proposed test statistic combines the power enhancement component with an asymptotically pivotal statistic, and strengthens the power under sparse alternatives. The null distribution does not require stringent regularity conditions, and is completely determined by that of the pivotal statistic. As specific applications, the proposed methods are applied to testing the factor pricing models and validating the cross-sectional independence in panel data models. PMID:26778846

  14. You May Now Open Your Test Tablets...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2012-01-01

    Tony Alpert, chief operating officer for the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (SBAC), ponders whether to allow tablet computers--and particularly iPads--to be used for summative testing online. As Alpert points out, not only would student cheating compromise the validity of the individual student's test event, "worse yet, it could expose…

  15. SOFIA Observatory Finishes Open-Door Flight Tests

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's SOFIA flying observatory recently completed the second series of envelope-expansion flight tests with its telescope door open. The SOFIA is now fully cleared for astronomy missions at altitu...

  16. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1213 - Motion of Test Template Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of “A” Section and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Motion of Test Template Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of âAâ Section and Boundaries of Opening 3 Figure 3 to Part 1213... Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of “A” Section and Boundaries of Opening ER22DE99.004...

  17. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1213 - Motion of Test Template Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of “A” Section and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Motion of Test Template Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of âAâ Section and Boundaries of Opening 3 Figure 3 to Part 1213... Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of “A” Section and Boundaries of Opening ER22DE99.004...

  18. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1213 - Motion of Test Template Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of “A” Section and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Motion of Test Template Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of âAâ Section and Boundaries of Opening 3 Figure 3 to Part 1213... Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of “A” Section and Boundaries of Opening ER22DE99.004...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1213 - Motion of Test Template Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of “A” Section and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Motion of Test Template Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of âAâ Section and Boundaries of Opening 3 Figure 3 to Part 1213... Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of “A” Section and Boundaries of Opening ER22DE99.004...

  20. NASA/GE Collaboration on Open Rotors - High Speed Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.

    2011-01-01

    A low-noise open rotor system is being tested in collaboration with General Electric and CFM International, a 50/50 joint company between Snecmaand GE. Candidate technologies for lower noise will be investigated as well as installation effects such as pylon integration. Current test status for the 8x6 SWT high speed testing is presented as well as future scheduled testing which includes the FAA/CLEEN test entry. The tunnel blockage and propeller thrust calibration configurations are shown.

  1. Propulsion Test Section personnel test clamshell device for OV-103 repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    JSC Propulsion Test Section personnel working in conjunction with Rockwell International (RI) personnel test option for on-the-pad repair of a tiny reaction control system (RCS) oxidizer leak in Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, left orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pod. Wearing protective gear (masks, gloves) and standing in front of a vent hood, Propulsion Test Section Head Brian G. Morris handles test article (specimen) as another technician looks on. The leading contender for the OV-103 leak repair is a clamshell device that will be fitted over the leaking dynatube, be clamped together, and be filled with sealant.

  2. 42 CFR 84.95 - Service time test; open-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Service time test; open-circuit apparatus. 84.95 Section 84.95 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.95 Service...

  3. Commissioning of the Ground Test Accelerator Intertank Matching Section

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.F.; Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Cole, R.; Connolly, R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Ingalls, W.B.; Kersteins, D.; Little, C.; Lohsen, R.A.; Lysenko, W.P.; Mottershead, C.T.; Power, J.; Rusthoi, D.P.; Sandoval, D.P.; Stevens, R.R.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Weiss, R.; Yuan, V.

    1992-09-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) has the objective of verifying much of the technology (physics and engineering) required for producing high-brightness, high-current H{sup {minus}} beams. GTA commissioning is staged to verify the beam dynamics design of each major accelerator component as it is brought on-line. The commissioning stages are the 35 keV H{sup {minus}} injector, the 2.5 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), the Intertank Matching Section (IMS), the 3.2 MeV first 2{beta}{gamma} Drift Tube Linac (DTL-1) module, the 8.7 MeV 2{beta}{gamma} DTL (modules 1--5), and the 24 MeV GTA; all 10 DTL modules. Commissioning results from the IMS beam experiments will be presented.

  4. Commissioning of the Ground Test Accelerator Intertank Matching Section

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.F.; Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Cole, R.; Connolly, R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Ingalls, W.B.; Kersteins, D.; Little, C.; Lohsen, R.A.; Lysenko, W.P.; Mottershead, C.T.; Power, J.; Rusthoi, D.P.; Sandoval, D.P.; Stevens, R.R.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Weiss, R.; Yuan, V.

    1992-01-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) has the objective of verifying much of the technology (physics and engineering) required for producing high-brightness, high-current H{sup {minus}} beams. GTA commissioning is staged to verify the beam dynamics design of each major accelerator component as it is brought on-line. The commissioning stages are the 35 keV H{sup {minus}} injector, the 2.5 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), the Intertank Matching Section (IMS), the 3.2 MeV first 2{beta}{gamma} Drift Tube Linac (DTL-1) module, the 8.7 MeV 2{beta}{gamma} DTL (modules 1--5), and the 24 MeV GTA; all 10 DTL modules. Commissioning results from the IMS beam experiments will be presented.

  5. Diaphragm opening effects on shock wave formation and acceleration in a rectangular cross section channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakdaman, S. A.; Garcia, M.; Teh, E.; Lincoln, D.; Trivedi, M.; Alves, M.; Johansen, C.

    2016-03-01

    Shock wave formation and acceleration in a high-aspect ratio cross section shock tube were studied experimentally and numerically. The relative importance of geometric effects and diaphragm opening time on shock formation are assessed. The diaphragm opening time was controlled through the use of slit-type (fast opening time) and petal-type (slow opening time) diaphragms. A novel method of fabricating the petal-type diaphragms, which results in a consistent burst pressure and symmetric opening without fragmentation, is presented. High-speed schlieren photography was used to visualize the unsteady propagation of the lead shock wave and trailing gas dynamic structures. Surface-mounted pressure sensors were used to capture the spatial and temporal development of the pressure field. Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes simulation predictions using the shear-stress-transport turbulence model are compared to the experimental data. Simulation results are used to explain the presence of high-frequency pressure oscillations observed experimentally in the driver section as well as the cause of the initial acceleration and subsequent rapid decay of shock velocity measured along the top and bottom channel surfaces. A one-dimensional theoretical model predicting the effect of the finite opening time of the diaphragm on the rate of driver depressurization and shock acceleration is proposed. The model removes the large amount of empiricism that accompanies existing models published in the literature. Model accuracy is assessed through comparisons with experiments and simulations. Limitations of and potential improvements in the model are discussed.

  6. A novel, open access, elliptical cross-section magnet for paediatric MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crozier, Stuart; Forbes, Lawrence K.; Doddrell, David M.

    1998-01-01

    Almost all clinical magnetic resonance imaging systems are based on circular cross-section magnets. Recent advances in elliptical cross-section RF probe and gradient coil hardware raise the question of the possibility of using elliptical cross-section magnet systems. This paper presents a methodology for calculating rapidly the magnetic fields generated by a multi-turn coil of elliptical cross-section and incorporates this in a stochastic optimization method for magnet design. An open magnet system of elliptical cross-section is designed that both reduces the claustrophobia for the patients and allows ready access by attending physicians. The magnet system is optimized for paediatric use. The coil geometry produced by the optimization method has several novel features.

  7. Influence of PBL with Open-Book Tests on Knowledge Retention Measured with Progress Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heijne-Penninga, M.; Kuks, J. B. M.; Hofman, W. H. A.; Muijtjens, A. M. M.; Cohen-Schotanus, J.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of problem-based learning (PBL) and open-book tests on long-term knowledge retention is unclear and subject of discussion. Hypotheses were that PBL as well as open-book tests positively affect long-term knowledge retention. Four progress test results of fifth and sixth-year medical students (n = 1,648) of three medical schools were…

  8. The spectrum and properties of the scattering cross section of electrons in open spherical quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Tkach, N. V. Seti, Ju.

    2009-03-15

    In the effective mass approximation in the model of rectangular potentials, the scattering cross section of electrons in an open spherical quantum dot is calculated for the first time. It is shown that, for such a nanosystem with a barrier of several monolayers, the experimental measurements of the scattering cross section allow adequate identification of the resonance energies and the widths of resonance states in the low-energy region of the quasi-stationary electron spectrum. It is also shown that, for an open spherical quantum dot with a low-strength potential barrier, the adequate spectral parameters of the quasi-stationary spectrum are the generalized resonance energies and widths determined via the probability of an electron being inside the quantum dot.

  9. High-frequency RCS of open cavities with rectangular and circular cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Hao; Lee, Shung-Wu; Chou, Ri-Chee

    1989-01-01

    The radar cross-section (RCS) analysis of open-ended cavities with rectangular and circular cross sections is carried out using the waveguide modal approach and the shooting-and-bouncing ray (SBR) approach. For a cavity opening on the order of ten wavelengths or larger, the comparison between the two approaches is excellent. It is also observed that at lower frequencies the SBR results deviate from the more accurate modal results. On the other hand, the SBR approach allows for greater flexibility in geometrical modeling, and can be applied to problems where waveguide modes cannot be easily found. SBR results for an offset rectangular cavity and a circular cavity with rounded endplate are presented.

  10. Nonlinear Analysis and Preliminary Testing Results of a Hybrid Wing Body Center Section Test Article

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.; Rouse, Marshall; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Wu, Hsi-Yung T.

    2015-01-01

    A large test article was recently designed, analyzed, fabricated, and successfully tested up to the representative design ultimate loads to demonstrate that stiffened composite panels with through-the-thickness reinforcement are a viable option for the next generation large transport category aircraft, including non-conventional configurations such as the hybrid wing body. This paper focuses on finite element analysis and test data correlation of the hybrid wing body center section test article under mechanical, pressure and combined load conditions. Good agreement between predictive nonlinear finite element analysis and test data is found. Results indicate that a geometrically nonlinear analysis is needed to accurately capture the behavior of the non-circular pressurized and highly-stressed structure when the design approach permits local buckling.

  11. Expandable rubber plug seals openings for pressure testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Plug assembly seals openings in piping systems, vessels, and chambers for low pressure leak testing. The assembly, which consists of a rubber sealing plug and the mechanism for expanding it into a pressure-tight configuration, adequately seals irregular diameters without damage to mating surfaces.

  12. Photoionization cross sections for atomic chlorine using an open-shell random phase approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starace, A. F.; Armstrong, L., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The use of the Random Phase Approximation with Exchange (RPAE) for calculating partial and total photoionization cross sections and photoelectron angular distributions for open shell atoms is examined for atomic chlorine. Whereas the RPAE corrections in argon (Z=18) are large, it is found that those in chlorine (Z=17) are much smaller due to geometric factors. Hartree-Fock calculations with and without core relaxation are also presented. Sizable deviations from the close coupling results of Conneely are also found.

  13. Standard methods for open hole tension testing of textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portanova, M. A.; Masters, J. E.

    1995-01-01

    Sizing effects have been investigated by comparing the open hole failure strengths of each of the four different braided architectures as a function of specimen thickness, hole diameter, and the ratio of specimen width to hole diameter. The data used to make these comparisons was primarily generated by Boeing. Direct comparisons of Boeing's results were made with experiments conducted at West Virginia University whenever possible. Indirect comparisons were made with test results for other 2-D braids and 3-D weaves tested by Boeing and Lockheed. In general, failure strength was found to decrease with increasing plate thickness, increase with decreasing hole size, and decreasing with decreasing width to diameter ratio. The interpretation of the sensitive to each of these geometrical parameters was complicated by scatter in the test data. For open hole tension testing of textile composites, the use of standard testing practices employed by industry, such as ASTM D5766 - Standard Test Method for Open Hole Tensile Strength of Polymer Matrix Composite Laminates should provide adequate results for material comparisons studies.

  14. Data from thermal testing of the Open Source Cryostage.

    PubMed

    Buch, Johannes Lørup; Ramløv, Hans

    2016-09-01

    The data presented here is related to the research article "An open source cryostage and software analysis method for detection of antifreeze activity" (Buch and Ramløv, 2016) [1]. The design of the Open Source Cryostage (OSC) is tested in terms of thermal limits, thermal efficiency and electrical efficiency. This article furthermore includes an overview of the electrical circuitry and a flowchart of the software program controlling the temperature of the OSC. The thermal efficiency data is presented here as degrees per volt and maximum cooling capacity. PMID:27508238

  15. Spacelab interface development test, volume 1, sections 1-6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    Data recorded during the following tests is presented: pulse coded modulator master unit to Spacelab (S/L) interface, master timing unit to S/L interface, multiplexer-demultiplexer/serial input-output to S/L interface, and special tests.

  16. Structural fatigue test results for large wind turbine blade sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.; Sullivan, T. L.

    1982-01-01

    In order to provide quantitative information on the operating life capabilities of wind turbine rotor blade concepts for root-end load transfer, a series of cantilever beam fatigue tests was conducted. Fatigue tests were conducted on a laminated wood blade with bonded steel studs, a low cost steel spar (utility pole) with a welded flange, a utility pole with additional root-end thickness provided by a swaged collar, fiberglass spars with both bonded and nonbonded fittings, and, finally, an aluminum blade with a bolted steel fitting (Lockheed Mod-0 blade). Photographs, data, and conclusions for each of these tests are presented. In addition, the aluminum blade test results are compared to field failure information; these results provide evidence that the cantilever beam type of fatigue test is a satisfactory method for obtaining qualitative data on blade life expectancy and for identifying structurally underdesigned areas (hot spots).

  17. Electron ionization of open/closed chain isocarbonic molecules relevant in plasma processing: Theoretical cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Umang R.; Joshipura, K. N.; Pandya, Siddharth H.; Kothari, Harshit N.

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, we report theoretical electron impact ionization cross sections from threshold to 2000 eV for isocarbonic open chain molecules C{sub 4}H{sub 6}, C{sub 4}H{sub 8}, C{sub 4}F{sub 6} including their isomers, and closed chain molecules c-C{sub 4}H{sub 8} and c-C{sub 4}F{sub 8}. Theoretical formalism employed presently, viz., Complex Scattering Potential-ionization contribution method has been used successfully for a variety of polyatomic molecules. The present ionization calculations are very important since results available for the studied targets are either scarce or none. Our work affords comparison of C{sub 4} containing hydrocarbon versus fluorocarbon molecules. Comparisons of the present ionization cross sections are made wherever possible, and new ionization data are also presented.

  18. Observational Tests of One-Bubble Open Inflationary Cosmological Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Bunn, Emory F.

    1996-06-01

    Motivated by recent studies of the one-bubble inflationary scenario, simple open cold dark matter models are tested for consistency with cosmological observations. The initial perturbation spectrum is derived by solving for the evolution of fluctuations in an open inflationary stage under the assumptions that a scalar field is in the Bunch-Davies vacuum state and the conformal vacuum state. A likelihood analysis is performed for the cosmic microwave background anisotropies using the two-year COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) data. For Ω0 ≲ 0.2, the two models give significantly different results because of the appearance of fluctuations of supercurvature scale in the model associated with the Bunch-Davies vacuum state. Having normalized the perturbation spectrum to fit the COBE data, we reconsider the validity of the open model from the viewpoint of cosmic structure formation. Open models may be severely constrained by the COBE likelihood analysis. In particular, small values of are ruled out in the Bunch-Davies case: we find that Ω0 ≳ 0.34 at 95% confidence for this model.

  19. Static and free-vibrational response of semi-circular graphite-epoxy frames with thin-walled open sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. Scott; Johnson, Eric R.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to measure the three-dimensional static and free vibrational response of two graphite-epoxy, thin-walled, open section frames. The frames are semi-circular with a radius of three feet, and one specimen has an I cross section and the other has a channel cross section. The flexibility influence coefficients were measured in static tests for loads applied at midspan with the ends of the specimens clamped. Natural frequencies and modes were determined from vibrational tests for free and clamped end conditions. The experimental data is used to evaluate a new finite element which was developed specifically for the analysis of curved, thin-walled structures. The formulation of the element is based on a Vlasov-type, thin-walled, curved beam theory. The predictions from the finite element program generally correlated well with the experimental data for the symmetric I-specimen. Discrepancies in some of the data were found to be due to flexibility in the clamped end conditions. With respect to the data for the channel specimen, the correlation was less satisfactory. The finite element analysis predicted the out-of-plane response of the channel specimen reasonably well, but large discrepancies occurred between the predicted in-plane response and the experimental data. The analysis predicted a much more compliant in-plane response than was observed in the experiments.

  20. An accelerator test of semi-empirical cross-sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K. H.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    Experimentally measured yields of isotopes of elements from Mg-12 to K-19 resulting from the fragmentation of Ar-40 are compared with calculated yields based on semiempirical cross-section formulae. The measurements, made at the LBL Bevalac using a beam of 287 MeV/amu Ar-40 incident on a CH2 target, achieve excellent mass resolution (up to 0.2 amu) through the use of a Si(Li) detector telescope. The general agreement between calculation and experiment is good (rms difference of about 24 percent), but some significant differences are reported.

  1. Supersonic Retropropulsion Test 1853 in NASA LaRC Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel Test Section 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Rhode, Matthew N.

    2014-01-01

    A supersonic retropropulsion experiment was conducted in the Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel Test Section 2 at Mach numbers of 2.4, 3.5, and 4.6. Intended as a code validation effort, this study used pretest computations to size and refine the model such that tunnel blockage and internal flow separations were minimized. A 5-in diameter 70 degree sphere-cone forebody, which can accommodate up to four 4:1 area ratio nozzles, followed by a 9.55 inches long cylindrical aft body was selected for this test after computational maturation. The primary measurements for this experiment were high spatial-density surface pressures. In addition, high speed schlieren video and internal pressures and temperatures were acquired. The test included parametric variations in the number of nozzles utilized, thrust coefficients (roughly 0 to 4), and angles of attack (-8 to 20 degrees). The run matrix was developed to also allow quantification of various sources of experimental uncertainty, such as random errors due to run-to-run variations and systematic errors due to flowfield or model misalignments. To accommodate the uncertainty assessment, many runs and replicates were conducted with the model at various locations within the tunnel and with model roll angles of 0, 60, 120, and 180 degrees. This test report provides operational details of the experiment, contains a review of trends, and provides all schlieren and pressure results within appendices.

  2. Buckling behavior and structural efficiency of open-section stiffened composite compression panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Stein, M.

    1976-01-01

    Several experiments with J- and blade-stiffened graphite/epoxy panels were conducted to obtain insight into how well experimental data could be correlated with analysis for the buckling behavior of open-section stiffened composite compression panels. Although some nonlinear behavior was observed during the experiments, adequate correlation with analysis was obtained to justify the use of linear, thin-plate buckling analysis in a minimum-weight design synthesis program for J- and blade-configurations. Results from two design studies using this program are presented. In the first study the minimum weights of Jand blade-configurations for two different material systems (graphite/epoxy and aluminum) are determined subject to buckling and strength constraints for a wide range of the compressive load index. In the second study the minimum weights required for graphite/epoxy blade-stiffened panels to satisfy additional stiffness constraints typical of medium-size commercial aircraft wing structures are determined. Both minimum-weight studies indicate that graphite/epoxy open-section stiffened panels can be designed so that weight savings of 30 to 50% are possible compared with the most efficient aluminum designs.

  3. Performance testing open source products for the TMT event service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, K.; Bhate, Yogesh

    2014-07-01

    The software system for TMT is a distributed system with many components on many computers. Each component integrates with the overall system using a set of software services. The Event Service is a publish-subscribe message system that allows the distribution of demands and other events. The performance requirements for the Event Service are demanding with a goal of over 60 thousand events/second. This service is critical to the success of the TMT software architecture; therefore, a project was started to survey the open source and commercial market for viable software products. A trade study led to the selection of five products for thorough testing using a specially constructed computer/network configuration and test suite. The best performing product was chosen as the basis of a prototype Event Service implementation. This paper describes the process and performance tests conducted by Persistent Systems that led to the selection of the product for the prototype Event Service.

  4. Elements configuration of the open lead test circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuzaki, Yumi; Ono, Akira

    2016-07-01

    In the field of electronics, small electronic devices are widely utilized because they are easy to carry. The devices have various functions by user's request. Therefore, the lead's pitch or the ball's pitch have been narrowed and high-density printed circuit board has been used in the devices. Use of the ICs which have narrow lead pitch makes normal connection difficult. When logic circuits in the devices are fabricated with the state-of-the-art technology, some faults have occurred more frequently. It can be divided into types of open faults and short faults. We have proposed a new test method using a test circuit in the past. This paper propose elements configuration of the test circuit.

  5. Documentation of Stainless Steel Lithium Circuit Test Section Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfroy, T. J.; Martin, J. J.; Stewart, E. T.; Rhys, N. O.

    2010-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission-Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team was tasked by Naval Reactors Prime Contract Team (NRPCT) to design, fabricate, and test an actively pumped lithium (Li) flow circuit. This Li circuit takes advantage of work in progress at the EFF TF on a stainless steel sodium/potassium (NaK) circuit. The effort involved modifying the original stainless steel NaK circuit such that it could be operated with Li in place of NaK. This new design considered freeze/thaw issues and required the addition of an expansion tank and expansion/extrusion volumes in the circuit plumbing. Instrumentation has been specified for Li and circuit heaters have been placed throughout the design to ensure adequate operational temperatures and no uncontrolled freezing of the Li. All major components have been designed and fabricated prior to circuit redesign for Li and were not modified. Basic circuit components include: reactor segment, Li to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. The reactor segment, based on a Los Alamos National Laboratory 100-kW design study with 120 fuel pins, is the only prototypic component in the circuit. However, due to earlier funding constraints, a 37-pin partial-array of the core, including the central three rings of fuel pins (pin and flow path dimensions are the same as those in the full design), was selected for fabrication and test. This Technical Publication summarizes the design and integration of the pumped liquid metal Li flow circuit as of May 1, 2005.

  6. Documentation of Stainless Steel Lithium Circuit Test Section Design. Suppl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfroy, Thomas J. (Compiler); Martin, James J.

    2010-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission-Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team was tasked by Naval Reactors Prime Contract Team (NRPCT) to design, fabricate, and test an actively pumped lithium (Li) flow circuit. This Li circuit takes advantage of work in progress at the EFF TF on a stainless steel sodium/potassium (NaK) circuit. The effort involved modifying the original stainless steel NaK circuit such that it could be operated with Li in place of NaK. This new design considered freeze/thaw issues and required the addition of an expansion tank and expansion/extrusion volumes in the circuit plumbing. Instrumentation has been specified for Li and circuit heaters have been placed throughout the design to ensure adequate operational temperatures and no uncontrolled freezing of the Li. All major components have been designed and fabricated prior to circuit redesign for Li and were not modified. Basic circuit components include: reactor segment, Li to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. The reactor segment, based on a Los Alamos National Laboratory 100-kW design study with 120 fuel pins, is the only prototypic component in the circuit. However, due to earlier funding constraints, a 37-pin partial-array of the core, including the central three rings of fuel pins (pin and flow path dimensions are the same as those in the full design), was selected for fabrication and test. This Technical Publication summarizes the design and integration of the pumped liquid metal Li flow circuit as of May 1, 2005. This supplement contains drawings, analysis, and calculations

  7. Large-scale aeroacoustic research feasibility and conceptual design of test-section inserts for the Ames 80- by 120-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.; Olsen, Larry E.

    1990-01-01

    An engineering feasibility study was made of aeroacoustic inserts designed for large-scale acoustic research on aircraft models in the 80 by 120 foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The advantages and disadvantages of likely designs were analyzed. Results indicate that the required maximum airspeed leads to the design of a particular insert. Using goals of 200, 150, and 100 knots airspeed, the analysis indicated a 30 x 60 ft open-jet test section, a 40 x 80 ft open jet test section, and a 70 x 100 ft closed test section with enhanced wall lining, respectively. The open-jet inserts would be composed of a nozzle, collector, diffuser, and acoutic wedges incorporated in the existing 80 x 120 test section. The closed test section would be composed of approximately 5 ft acoustic wedges covered by a porous plate attached to the test section walls of the existing 80 x 120. All designs would require a double row of acoustic vanes between the test section and fan drive to attenuate fan noise and, in the case of the open-jet designs, to control flow separation at the diffuser downstream end. The inserts would allow virtually anechoic acoustic studies of large helicopter models, jets, and V/STOL aircraft models in simulated flight. Model scale studies would be necessary to optimize the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of any of the designs. In all designs studied, the existing structure would have to be reinforced. Successful development of acoustically transparent walls, though not strictly necessary to the project, would lead to a porous-wall test section that could be substituted for any of the open-jet designs, and thereby eliminate many aerodynamic and acoustic problems characteristic of open-jet shear layers. The larger size of the facility would make installation and removal of the insert components difficult. Consequently, scheduling of the existing 80 x 120 aerodynamic test section and scheduling of the open-jet test section would likely be made on an

  8. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1513 - Motion of Test Probe Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of “A” Section of Probe and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Motion of Test Probe Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of âAâ Section of Probe and Boundaries of Opening 3 Figure 3 to Part 1513... REQUIREMENTS FOR BUNK BEDS Pt. 1513, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part 1513—Motion of Test Probe Arrested by...

  9. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1513 - Motion of Test Probe Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of “A” Section of Probe and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Motion of Test Probe Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of âAâ Section of Probe and Boundaries of Opening 3 Figure 3 to Part 1513... REQUIREMENTS FOR BUNK BEDS Pt. 1513, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part 1513—Motion of Test Probe Arrested by...

  10. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1513 - Motion of Test Probe Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of “A” Section of Probe and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Motion of Test Probe Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of âAâ Section of Probe and Boundaries of Opening 3 Figure 3 to Part 1513... REQUIREMENTS FOR BUNK BEDS Pt. 1513, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part 1513—Motion of Test Probe Arrested by...

  11. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1513 - Motion of Test Probe Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of “A” Section of Probe and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Motion of Test Probe Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of âAâ Section of Probe and Boundaries of Opening 3 Figure 3 to Part 1513... REQUIREMENTS FOR BUNK BEDS Pt. 1513, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part 1513—Motion of Test Probe Arrested by...

  12. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1513 - Motion of Test Probe Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of “A” Section of Probe and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Motion of Test Probe Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of âAâ Section of Probe and Boundaries of Opening 3 Figure 3 to Part 1513... REQUIREMENTS FOR BUNK BEDS Pt. 1513, Fig. 3 Figure 3 to Part 1513—Motion of Test Probe Arrested by...

  13. Analysis and Parametric Investigation of Active Open Cross Section Thin Wall Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, James

    The static behaviour of active Open Cross Section Thin Wall Beams (OCSTWB) with embedded Active/Macro Fibre Composites (AFCs/MFCs) has been investigated for the purpose of advancing the fundamental theory needed in the development of advanced smart structures. An efficient code that can analyze active OCSTWB using analytical equations has been studied. Various beam examples have been investigated in order to verify this recently developed analytical active OCSTWB analysis tool. The cross sectional stiffness constants and induced force, moments and bimoment predicted by this analytical code have been compared with those predicted by the 2-D finite element beam cross section analysis codes called the Variational Asymptotic Beam Sectional (VABS) analysis and the University of Michigan VABS (UM/VABS). Good agreement was observed between the results obtained from the analytical tool and VABS. The calculated cross sectional stiffness constants and induced force/moments, the constitutive relation and the six intrinstic static equilibrium equations for OCSTWB were all used together in a first-order accurate forward difference scheme in order to determine the average twist and deflections along the beam span. In order to further verify the analytical code, the static behaviour of a number of beam examples was investigated using 3-D Finite Element Analysis (FEA). For a particular cross section, the rigid body twist and displacements were minimized with the displacements of all the nodes in the 3-D FEA model that compose the cross section. This was done for a number of cross sections along the beam span in order to recover the global beam twist and displacement profiles from the 3-D FEA results. The global twist and deflections predicted by the analytical code agreed closely with those predicted by UM/VABS and 3-D FEA. The study was completed by a parametric investigation to determine the boundary conditions and the composite ply lay-ups of the active and passive plies that

  14. An Extensible Open-Source Compiler Infrastructure for Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D; Ur, S; Vuduc, R

    2005-12-09

    Testing forms a critical part of the development process for large-scale software, and there is growing need for automated tools that can read, represent, analyze, and transform the application's source code to help carry out testing tasks. However, the support required to compile applications written in common general purpose languages is generally inaccessible to the testing research community. In this paper, we report on an extensible, open-source compiler infrastructure called ROSE, which is currently in development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. ROSE specifically targets developers who wish to build source-based tools that implement customized analyses and optimizations for large-scale C, C++, and Fortran90 scientific computing applications (on the order of a million lines of code or more). However, much of this infrastructure can also be used to address problems in testing, and ROSE is by design broadly accessible to those without a formal compiler background. This paper details the interactions between testing of applications and the ways in which compiler technology can aid in the understanding of those applications. We emphasize the particular aspects of ROSE, such as support for the general analysis of whole programs, that are particularly well-suited to the testing research community and the scale of the problems that community solves.

  15. Progress and open questions in the physics of neutrino cross sections at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Ruso, L.; Hayato, Y.; Nieves, J.

    2014-07-01

    New and more precise measurements of neutrino cross sections have renewed interest in a better understanding of electroweak interactions on nucleons and nuclei. This effort is crucial to achieving the precision goals of the neutrino oscillation program, making new discoveries, like the CP violation in the leptonic sector, possible. We review the recent progress in the physics of neutrino cross sections, putting emphasis on the open questions that arise in the comparison with new experimental data. Following an overview of recent neutrino experiments and future plans, we present some details about the theoretical development in the description of (anti)neutrino-induced quasielastic (QE) scattering and the role of multi-nucleon QE-like mechanisms. We cover not only pion production in nucleons and nuclei but also other inelastic channels including strangeness production and photon emission. Coherent reaction channels on nuclear targets are also discussed. Finally, we briefly describe some of the Monte Carlo event generators, which are at the core of all neutrino oscillation and cross-section measurements.

  16. Investigations of detail design issues for the high speed acoustic wind tunnel using a 60th scale model tunnel. Part 1: Tests with open circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barna, P. Stephen

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes the tests on the 1:60 scale model of the High Speed Acoustic Wind Tunnel (HSAWT) performed during the period of November 1989 to December 1990. Throughout the testing the tunnel was operated in the 'open circuit mode', that is when the airflow was induced by a powerful exhaust fan located outside the tunnel circuit. The tests were first performed with the closed test section and were subsequently repeated with the open test section. While operating with the open test section, a novel device, called the 'nozzle-diffuser,' was also tested in order to establish its usefulness of increasing pressure recovery in the first diffuser. The tests established the viability of the tunnel design. The flow distribution in each tunnel component was found acceptable and pressure recovery in the diffusers were found satisfactory. The diffusers appeared to operate without flow separation. All tests were performed at NASA LaRC.

  17. 42 CFR 84.93 - Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. 84.93...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.93 Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. (a) A static-flow test will be performed on all open-circuit apparatus. (b) The flow from the apparatus shall be greater than 200...

  18. 42 CFR 84.93 - Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. 84.93...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.93 Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. (a) A static-flow test will be performed on all open-circuit apparatus. (b) The flow from the apparatus shall be greater than 200...

  19. IFLA General Conference, 1990. Division of General Research Libraries: Open Forum; Section of National Libraries; Section of University Libraries and Other General Research Libraries; Section of Parliamentary Libraries. Booklet 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    The 16 reports in this collection were presented at an open forum on research libraries and meetings of three more specialized sections: (1) "Nature and Purpose of the Division of General Research Libraries" (Ernst Kohl); (2) "Objectives and Goals of the Section of Parliamentary Libraries" (Ernst Kohl); (3) "The IFLA (International Federation of…

  20. 76 FR 68783 - Order Providing for Opening of Lands Subject to Section 24 of the Federal Power Act; Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... FERC Power Project No. 13234, to be opened to State selection subject to Section 24 of the FPA. Upon... Section 24 of the Federal Power Act; Alaska AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice... the Federal Power Act (FPA). The lands include approximately 1,355 acres of National Forest...

  1. IFLA General Conference, 1989. Division of Bibliographic Control. Open Forum of the Division; Section on Cataloguing; Section on Bibliography; Section on Classification and Indexing. Booklet 40.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    There are 16 papers in this collection from the Division of Bibliographic Control: (1) "Report from the Section on Cataloging" (Tom Delsey); (2) "Section on Bibliography Report" (B. C. Bloomfield); (3) "Report from the Section on Classification and Indexing" (Robert P. Holley); (4) "The Cost of Cataloging" (French and English versions; Genevieve…

  2. 16 CFR 1500.43 - Method of test for flashpoint of volatile flammable materials by Tagliabue open-cup apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Method of test for flashpoint of volatile flammable materials by Tagliabue open-cup apparatus. 1500.43 Section 1500.43 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES AND ARTICLES; ADMINISTRATION AND...

  3. Vertical drop test of a transport fuselage center section including the wheel wells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. S.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    A Boeing 707 fuselage section was drop tested to measure structural, seat, and anthropomorphic dummy response to vertical crash loads. The specimen had nominally zero pitch, roll and yaw at impact with a sink speed of 20 ft/sec. Results from this drop test and other drop tests of different transport sections will be used to prepare for a full-scale crash test of a B-720.

  4. Experimental evaluation of wall Mach number distributions of the octagonal test section proposed for NASA Lewis Research Center's altitude wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, Douglas E.; Burley, Richard R.; Corban, Robert R.

    1986-01-01

    Wall Mach number distributions were determined over a range of test-section free-stream Mach numbers from 0.2 to 0.92. The test section was slotted and had a nominal porosity of 11 percent. Reentry flaps located at the test-section exit were varied from 0 (fully closed) to 9 (fully open) degrees. Flow was bled through the test-section slots by means of a plenum evacuation system (PES) and varied from 0 to 3 percent of tunnel flow. Variations in reentry flap angle or PES flow rate had little or no effect on the Mach number distributions in the first 70 percent of the test section. However, in the aft region of the test section, flap angle and PES flow rate had a major impact on the Mach number distributions. Optimum PES flow rates were nominally 2 to 2.5 percent wtih the flaps fully closed and less than 1 percent when the flaps were fully open. The standard deviation of the test-section wall Mach numbers at the optimum PES flow rates was 0.003 or less.

  5. Calibration of the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel with test section air removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, B. W., Jr.; Runckel, J. F.; Igoe, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    The Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel with test section air removal (plenum suction) was calibrated to a Mach number of 1.3. The results of the calibration, including the effects of slot shape modifications, test section wall divergence, and water vapor condensation, are presented. A complete description of the wind tunnel and its auxiliary equipment is included.

  6. 4. VIEW LOOKING NORTHNORTHEAST AT TEST SECTION OF 8FOOT TRANSONIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW LOOKING NORTH-NORTHEAST AT TEST SECTION OF 8-FOOT TRANSONIC PRESSURE TUNNEL SHOWING ACCESS PORT TO TEST SECTION (RIGHT) AND PLENUM SURROUNDING AREA. - NASA Langley Research Center, 8-Foot Transonic Pressure Tunnel, 640 Thornell Avenue, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  7. Performance Test for Open Grade Bitumen and Cement Mixture OGBC-20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y. Y.; Wu, Z. L.; Li, C. M.; Gan, X. Z.; Xiong, X. J.

    For effective prevention of urban road intersection special sections for nit diseases and improving the pavement durability, an open grade bitumen and cement (OGBC-20) mixture is proposed. In organic hydraulic cement mixture design, mix proportion designs of cement mortar and matrix open-graded bitumen were done. The matrix mixture gradation was adjusted .It has greater void of air volume than that of ATPB-25. A variety of tests in laboratory for OGBC-20 were performed. The experimental results show that: The void of air volume of adjusted gradation matrix asphalt mixture is up to 23%. and binder drainage loss is ≤ 0.3%. Cement mortar filling is fuller and better water stability and low temperature crack resistance compared to ordinary bitumen mixture. It has the absolute advantage on high temperature stability and shows the superiority of the new pavement materials.

  8. 42 CFR 84.95 - Service time test; open-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Service time test; open-circuit apparatus. 84.95...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.95 Service time test; open-circuit apparatus. (a) Service time will be measured with a breathing machine as described in § 84.88. (b) The open-circuit apparatus will...

  9. 42 CFR 84.95 - Service time test; open-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service time test; open-circuit apparatus. 84.95...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.95 Service time test; open-circuit apparatus. (a) Service time will be measured with a breathing machine as described in § 84.88. (b) The open-circuit apparatus will...

  10. IFLA General Conference, 1991. Division of Bibliographic Control: Open Forum of Division of Bibliographic Control; Section of Cataloguing; Section of Bibliography; Section of Classification and Indexing. Booklet 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    The 11 reports and papers in this booklet were presented at meetings of 4 sections within the Division of Bibliographic Control: (1) "Report of the Section on Cataloguing--Review of the Work 1990/1991" (Inger Cathrine Spangen, Norway); (2) "Les fichiers d'autorite auteurs: Rapport d'activite 1990-1991 (Author Authority Lists: Report of Activities…

  11. Extraction of model performance from wall data in a 2-dimensional transonic flexible walled test section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    Data obtained from the boundary of a test section provides information on the model contained within it. A method for extracting some of this data in two dimensional testing is described. Examples of model data are included on lift, pitching moment and wake displacement thickness. A FORTRAN listing is also described, having a form suitable for incorporation into the software package used in the running of such a test section.

  12. Open Architecture Data System for NASA Langley Combined Loads Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lightfoot, Michael C.; Ambur, Damodar R.

    1998-01-01

    The Combined Loads Test System (COLTS) is a new structures test complex that is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to test large curved panels and cylindrical shell structures. These structural components are representative of aircraft fuselage sections of subsonic and supersonic transport aircraft and cryogenic tank structures of reusable launch vehicles. Test structures are subjected to combined loading conditions that simulate realistic flight load conditions. The facility consists of two pressure-box test machines and one combined loads test machine. Each test machine possesses a unique set of requirements or research data acquisition and real-time data display. Given the complex nature of the mechanical and thermal loads to be applied to the various research test articles, each data system has been designed with connectivity attributes that support both data acquisition and data management functions. This paper addresses the research driven data acquisition requirements for each test machine and demonstrates how an open architecture data system design not only meets those needs but provides robust data sharing between data systems including the various control systems which apply spectra of mechanical and thermal loading profiles.

  13. Modeling Airborne Beryllium Concentrations From Open Air Dynamic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, N. M.

    2003-12-01

    A heightened awareness of airborne beryllium contamination from industrial activities was reestablished during the late 1980's and early 1990's when it became recognized that Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD) had not been eradicated, and that the Occupational Health and Safety Administration standards for occupational air exposure to beryllium may not be sufficiently protective. This was in response to the observed CBD increase in multiple industrial settings where beryllium was manufactured and/or machined, thus producing beryllium particulates which are then available for redistribution by airborne transport. Sampling and modeling design activities were expanded at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico to evaluate potential airborne beryllium exposure to workers who might be exposed during dynamic testing activities associated with nuclear weapons Stockpile Stewardship. Herein is presented the results of multiple types of collected air measurements that were designed to characterize the production and dispersion of beryllium used in components whose performance is evaluated during high explosive detonation at open air firing sites. Data from fallout, high volume air, medium volume air, adhesive film, particle size impactor, and fine-particulate counting techniques will be presented, integrated, and applied in dispersion modeling to assess potential onsite and offsite personal exposures resulting from dynamic testing activities involving beryllium.

  14. Self streamlining wind tunnel: Low speed testing and transonic test section design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, S. W. D.; Goodyer, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    Comprehensive aerodynamic data on an airfoil section were obtained through a wide range of angles of attack, both stalled and unstalled. Data were gathered using a self streamlining wind tunnel and were compared to results obtained on the same section in a conventional wind tunnel. The reduction of wall interference through streamline was demonstrated.

  15. On the Factor Structure of the Grammar Section of University of Tehran English Proficiency Test (UTEPT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salehi, Mohammad; Rezaee, Abbas Ali

    2009-01-01

    The study was conducted with 3,385 participants who took an English language proficiency test as a partial requirement for entering a PhD program in different fields of education. This test has three sections which are grammar, vocabulary and reading comprehension. To determine the construct validity of the test, a series of analyses were done.…

  16. 16 CFR Figure 3 to Part 1213 - Motion of Test Template Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of “A” Section and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Motion of Test Template Arrested by Simultaneous Contact With Both Sides of âAâ Section and Boundaries of Opening 3 Figure 3 to Part 1213 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS...

  17. Comparison of options for reduction of noise in the test section of the NASA Langley 4x7m wind tunnel, including reduction of nozzle area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    The acoustically significant features of the NASA 4X7m wind tunnel and the Dutch-German DNW low speed tunnel are compared to illustrate the reasons for large differences in background noise in the open jet test sections of the two tunnels. Also introduced is the concept of reducing test section noise levels through fan and turning vane source reductions which can be brought about by reducing the nozzle cross sectional area, and thus the circuit mass flow for a particular exit velocity. The costs and benefits of treating sources, paths, and changing nozzle geometry are reviewed.

  18. 16 CFR Figure 4 to Part 1513 - Neck Portion of “B” Section of Probe Enters Completely Into Opening

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Neck Portion of âBâ Section of Probe Enters Completely Into Opening 4 Figure 4 to Part 1513 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BUNK BEDS Pt. 1513, Fig. 4 Figure 4 to Part 1513—Neck Portion of “B” Section...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 4 to Part 1513 - Neck Portion of “B” Section of Probe Enters Completely Into Opening

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Neck Portion of âBâ Section of Probe Enters Completely Into Opening 4 Figure 4 to Part 1513 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BUNK BEDS Pt. 1513, Fig. 4 Figure 4 to Part 1513—Neck Portion of “B” Section...

  20. IFLA General Conference, 1991. Division of Collections and Services: Open Forum of Division of Collections and Services; Section of Acquisition and Exchange; Section of Interlending and Document Delivery; Section of Serial Publications; Newspapers; Section of Government Information and Official Publications; Section of Rare [Books] and Manuscripts. Booklet 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    The 14 papers in this collection were presented at 6 sections of the Division of Collections and Services: (1) "Open Forum of the Division of Collections and Services Report of the Section on Acquisition and Exchange" (Ulrich Montag); (2) "Acquisition Policy of the USSR National Library Collection" (Z. P. Sorokina and S. M. Shpantseva, USSR); (3)…

  1. Test techniques: A survey paper on cryogenic tunnels, adaptive wall test sections, and magnetic suspension and balance systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilgore, Robert A.; Dress, David A.; Wolf, Stephen W. D.; Britcher, Colin P.

    1989-01-01

    The ability to get good experimental data in wind tunnels is often compromised by things seemingly beyond our control. Inadequate Reynolds number, wall interference, and support interference are three of the major problems in wind tunnel testing. Techniques for solving these problems are available. Cryogenic wind tunnels solve the problem of low Reynolds number. Adaptive wall test sections can go a long way toward eliminating wall interference. A magnetic suspension and balance system (MSBS) completely eliminates support interference. Cryogenic tunnels, adaptive wall test sections, and MSBS are surveyed. A brief historical overview is given and the present state of development and application in each area is described.

  2. 42 CFR 84.93 - Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. 84.93...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.93 Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. (a) A static-flow test will be...) water-column height when full container pressure is applied. (c) Where pressure demand apparatus...

  3. 42 CFR 84.93 - Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. 84.93...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.93 Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. (a) A static-flow test will be...) water-column height when full container pressure is applied. (c) Where pressure demand apparatus...

  4. 42 CFR 84.93 - Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. 84.93...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.93 Gas flow test; open-circuit apparatus. (a) A static-flow test will be...) water-column height when full container pressure is applied. (c) Where pressure demand apparatus...

  5. 16 CFR Figure 4 to Part 1213 - Neck Portion of “B” Section of Template Enters Completely Into Opening

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Neck Portion of âBâ Section of Template Enters Completely Into Opening 4 Figure 4 to Part 1213 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR ENTRAPMENT HAZARDS IN BUNK BEDS...

  6. 16 CFR Figure 4 to Part 1513 - Neck Portion of “B” Section of Probe Enters Completely Into Opening

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Neck Portion of âBâ Section of Probe Enters Completely Into Opening 4 Figure 4 to Part 1513 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BUNK BEDS Pt. 1513, Fig. 4 Figure 4 to...

  7. 16 CFR Figure 4 to Part 1513 - Neck Portion of “B” Section of Probe Enters Completely Into Opening

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Neck Portion of âBâ Section of Probe Enters Completely Into Opening 4 Figure 4 to Part 1513 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BUNK BEDS Pt. 1513, Fig. 4 Figure 4 to...

  8. 16 CFR Figure 4 to Part 1213 - Neck Portion of “B” Section of Template Enters Completely Into Opening

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Neck Portion of âBâ Section of Template Enters Completely Into Opening 4 Figure 4 to Part 1213 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR ENTRAPMENT HAZARDS IN BUNK BEDS Pt. 1213, Fig. 4 Figure 4 to Part 1213—Neck...

  9. 16 CFR Figure 4 to Part 1213 - Neck Portion of “B” Section of Template Enters Completely Into Opening

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Neck Portion of âBâ Section of Template Enters Completely Into Opening 4 Figure 4 to Part 1213 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY ACT REGULATIONS SAFETY STANDARD FOR ENTRAPMENT HAZARDS IN BUNK BEDS Pt. 1213, Fig. 4 Figure 4 to Part 1213—Neck...

  10. A swept wing panel in a low speed flexible walled test section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.

    1987-01-01

    The testing of two-dimensional airfoil sections in adaptive wall tunnels is relatively widespread and has become routine at all speeds up to transonic. In contrast, the experience with the three-dimensional testing of swept panels in adaptive wall test sections is very limited, except for some activity in the 1940's at NPL, London. The current interest in testing swept wing panels led to the work covered by this report, which describes the design of an adaptive-wall swept-wing test section for a low speed wind tunnel and gives test results for a wing panel swept at 40 deg. The test section has rigid flat sidewalls supporting the panel, and features flexible top and bottom wall with ribs swept at the same angle as the wing. When streamlined, the walls form waves swept at the same angle as the wing. The C sub L (-) curve for the swept wing, determined from its pressure distributions taken with the walls streamlined, compare well with reference data which was taken on the same model, unswept, in a test section deep enough to avoid wall interference.

  11. 16 CFR 1611.37 - Reasonable and representative tests under section 8 of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reasonable and representative tests under section 8 of the Act. 1611.37 Section 1611.37 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF VINYL PLASTIC FILM Rules and Regulations § 1611.37 Reasonable and...

  12. 16 CFR 1611.37 - Reasonable and representative tests under section 8 of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reasonable and representative tests under section 8 of the Act. 1611.37 Section 1611.37 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF VINYL PLASTIC FILM Rules and Regulations § 1611.37 Reasonable and...

  13. 16 CFR 1611.37 - Reasonable and representative tests under section 8 of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reasonable and representative tests under section 8 of the Act. 1611.37 Section 1611.37 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF VINYL PLASTIC FILM Rules and...

  14. Vertical drop test of a transport fuselage section located forward of the wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. S.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    A Boeing 707 fuselage section was drop tested at the NASA Langley Research Center to measure structural, seat, and occupant response to vertical crack loads. Post-test inspection showed that the section bottom collapsed inward approximately 2 ft. Preliminary data traces indicated maximum normal accelerations of 20 g on the fuselage bottom, 10 to 12 g on the cabin floor, and 6.5 to 8 g in the pelvises of the anthropomorphic dummies.

  15. The fabrication of a vanadium-stainless steel test section for MHD testing of insulator coatings in flowing lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, C.B.; Mattas, R.F.; Smith, D.L.; Chung, H.; Tsai, H.-C.; Morgan, G.D.; Wille, G.W.; Johnson, W.R.; Young, C.

    1996-12-31

    To test the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pressure drop reduction performance of candidate insulator coatings for the ITER Vanadium/Lithium Breeding Blanket, a test section comprised of a V- 4Cr-4Ti liner inside a stainless steel pipe was designed and fabricated. Theoretically, the MHD pressure drop reduction benefit resulting, from an electrically insulating coating on a vanadium- lined pipe is identical to the benefit derived from an insulated pipe fabricated of vanadium alone. A duplex test section design consisting of a V alloy liner encased in a SS pressure boundary provided protection for vanadium from atmospheric contamination during operation at high temperature and obviated any potential problems with vanadium welding while also minimizing the amount of V alloy material required. From the MHD and insulator coating- point of view, the test section outer SS wall and inner V alloy liner can be modeled simply as a wall having a sandwich construction. Two 52.3 mm OD x 2.9 m long V-alloy tubes were fabricated by Century Tubes from 64 mm x 200 mm x 1245 mm extrusions produced by Teledyne Wah Chang. The test section`s duplex structure was subsequently fabricated at Century Tubes by drawing down a SS pipe (2 inch schedule 10) over one of the 53.2 mm diameter V tubes.

  16. Vertical Drop Test of a YS-11 Fuselage Section (Part 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Kazuo; Kumakura, Ikuo; Minegishi, Masakutsu; Shoji, Hirokazu; Yoshimoto, Norio; Miyaki, Hiromitsu; Terada, Hiroyuki; Isoe, Akira; Yamaoka, Toshihiro; Katayama, Noriaki; Hayashi, Toru; Akaso, Tetsuya; Kosaka, Hideyuki

    The Structures and Materials Research Center of the National Aerospace Laboratory of Japan (NAL) and Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. (KHI) conducted the 2nd vertical drop test of a fuselage section cut from a NAMC YS-11 transport airplane in July 2002. The main objective of this test program was to obtain background data for aircraft cabin safety by drop test of a full-scale fuselage section and to develop computational tool for crash simulation of aircraft fuselage structure. The test article including seats and anthropomorphic test dummies was dropped to a rigid impact surface by free-fall method at a velocity of 7.6m/s (25ft/s). The impact environment and the resultant response of the fuselage structure and the passenger dummies were considered to be severe but potentially survivable. A description of the results of the 1st drop test and the 2nd drop test is presented in this paper.

  17. LPT. Shield test facility (TAN646). Sections and details of water ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LPT. Shield test facility (TAN-646). Sections and details of water management areas. Ralph M. Parsons 1229-17 ANP/GE-6-646-P-3. April 1957. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index code no. 037-0646-51-693-107388 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure, Savannah River Plant: Clay cap test section construction report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-26

    This report contains appendices 3 through 6 for the Clay Cap Test Section Construction Report for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure at the Savannah River Plant. The Clay Cap Test Program was conducted to evaluate the source, lab. permeability, in-situ permeability, and compaction characteristics, representative of kaolin clays from the Aiken, South Carolina vicinity. (KJD)

  19. Inferring Cross Sections of 3D Objects: A New Spatial Thinking Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Cheryl A.; Hegarty, Mary

    2012-01-01

    A new spatial ability test was administered online to 223 undergraduate students enrolled in introductory science courses. The 30-item multiple choice test measures individual differences in ability to identify the two-dimensional cross section of a three-dimensional geometric solid, a skill that has been identified as important in science,…

  20. A&M. Actuator Building, TAN615. Floor plan, elevations, sections. Test and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A&M. Actuator Building, TAN-615. Floor plan, elevations, sections. Test and decontamination areas. Pits. Change room. General electric IDA-615-1070. Date: December 1956. INEEL index no. 034-0615-00-309-217511 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. Vertical drop test of a transport fuselage section located aft of the wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, E. L.; Alfaro-Bou, E.

    1986-01-01

    A 12-foot long Boeing 707 aft fuselage section with a tapering cross section was drop tested at the NASA Langley Research Center to measure structural, seat, and occupant response to vertical crash laods and to provide data for nonlinear finite element modeling. This was the final test in a series of three different transport fuselage sections tested under identical conditions. The test parameters at impact were: 20 ft/s velocity, and zero pitch, roll, and yaw. In addition, the test was an operational shock test of the data acquisition system used for the Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID) of a remotely piloted Boeing 720 that was crash tested at NASA Ames Dryden Flight Research Facility on December 1, 1984. Post-test measurements of the crush showed that the front of the section (with larger diameter) crushed vertically approximately 14 inches while the rear crushed 18 inches. Analysis of the data traces indicate the maximum peak normal (vertical) accelerations at the bottom of the frames were approximately 109 G at body station 1040 and 64 G at body station 1120. The peak floor acceleration varied from 14 G near the wall to 25 G near the center where high frequency oscillations of the floor were evident. The peak anthropomorphic dummy pelvis normal (vertical) acceleration was 19 G's.

  2. Effects of Scoring by Section and Independent Scorers' Patterns on Scorer Reliability in Biology Essay Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebuoh, Casmir N.; Ezeudu, S. A.

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of scoring by section, use of independent scorers and conventional patterns on scorer reliability in Biology essay tests. It was revealed from literature review that conventional pattern of scoring all items at a time in essay tests had been criticized for not being reliable. The study was true experimental study…

  3. Pressure Distribution on a Wing Section with Slotted Flap in Free Flight Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiel, Georg

    1937-01-01

    The pressure distribution was measured in flight on a wing section with a slotted flap for several flap deflections, and the results obtained are presented. The test apparatus and the procedure employed in obtaining the results are also described. A Fieseler type F 5 R airplane was used for the tests.

  4. 26 CFR 1.280C-3 - Disallowance of certain deductions for qualified clinical testing expenses when section 28 credit...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... clinical testing expenses when section 28 credit is allowable. 1.280C-3 Section 1.280C-3 Internal Revenue... (CONTINUED) Items Not Deductible § 1.280C-3 Disallowance of certain deductions for qualified clinical testing... section 28 for qualified clinical testing expenses (as defined in section 28(b)), it must reduce...

  5. Crash Simulation of a Boeing 737 Fuselage Section Vertical Drop Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Jones, Yvonne T.; Frings, Gary; Vu, Tong

    2004-01-01

    A 30-ft/s vertical drop test of a fuselage section of a Boeing 737 aircraft was conducted in October of 1999 at the FAA Technical Center in Atlantic City, NJ. This test was performed to evaluate the structural integrity of a conformable auxiliary fuel tank mounted beneath the floor and to determine its effect on the impact response of the airframe structure and the occupants. The test data were used to compare with a finite element simulation of the fuselage structure and to gain a better understanding of the impact physics through analytical/experimental correlation. To perform this simulation, a full-scale 3-dimensional finite element model of the fuselage section was developed using the explicit, nonlinear transient-dynamic finite element code, MSC.Dytran. The emphasis of the simulation was to predict the structural deformation and floor-level acceleration responses obtained from the drop test of the B737 fuselage section with the auxiliary fuel tank.

  6. 42 CFR 84.95 - Service time test; open-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... classified according to the length of time it supplies air or oxygen to the breathing machine. (c) The... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Service time test; open-circuit apparatus. 84.95...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.95 Service time test; open-circuit apparatus. (a) Service time will...

  7. 42 CFR 84.95 - Service time test; open-circuit apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... classified according to the length of time it supplies air or oxygen to the breathing machine. (c) The... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Service time test; open-circuit apparatus. 84.95...-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.95 Service time test; open-circuit apparatus. (a) Service time will...

  8. Macular microvasculature alterations in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huan; Yu, Jian; Kong, Xiangmei; Sun, Xinghuai; Jiang, Chunhui

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate and compare macular microvasculature changes in eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) to normal eyes, and to assess associations among the retinal microvasculature, neural structural damage, and visual field loss.Ninety-nine eyes (68 patients with POAG and 31 normal subjects) were enrolled in this study. Thirty-five eyes with early-stage glaucoma (EG), 33 eyes with advanced-stage glaucoma (AG), and 31 normal eyes were included. An optical coherence tomography system with a split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography algorithm was used to measure the macular capillary vessel area density and retinal thickness. Visual field testing (30-2 and 10-2 programs) was performed using a Humphrey field analyzer. Correlations between the capillary vessel area density, retinal thickness, and visual field parameters were analyzed.Compared to normal eyes, those with EG and AG had a lower macular capillary vessel area density and lesser retinal thickness (P < 0.001, all). Results of multivariate linear regression analyses showed that each standard deviation (SD) decrease in the vessel area density was associated with a 1.5% and 4.2% thinning of the full retinal thickness and inner retinal layer thickness, respectively. Each SD decrease in the vessel area density was also associated with a 12.9% decrease in the mean sensitivity and a 33.6% increase in the pattern standard deviation (P < 0.001, both). The Pearson partial regression analysis model showed that the vessel area density was most strongly associated with the inner retinal layer thickness and inferior hemimacular thickness. Furthermore, a lower vessel area density was strongly associated with a more severe hemimacular visual field defect and the corresponding hemimacular retinal thickness.The macular capillary vessel area density and retinal thickness were significantly lower in eyes with POAG than in normal eyes. A diminished macular microvasculature network is closely associated with

  9. Wind-tunnel Tests of Four Curtiss Propellers Embodying Different Blade Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, W H

    1941-01-01

    Tests of four 10-foot propellers were made in the propeller-research tunnel for the Army Air Corps to check flight and static thrust test results made on several propellers embodying Clark Y and modified NACA 16-series sections. These propellers were identical as to diameter and activity factor and very closely identical in thickness ratio and pitch distribution. The blades embodied sections with both single- and double-cambered Clark Y, modified NACA 16-series, and a combination of Clark Y and modified NACA-16 airfoils. Tests covered a range of blade angles from 20 deg. to 70 deg., and were all made at tip speeds below 280 feet per second. Although these tests were not conclusive in themselves, owing to the conditions under which they were made, the results seem to check the flight and static tests as closely as would be expected.

  10. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure, Savannah River Plant: Clay cap test section construction report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-26

    This report summarizes the information gathered in constructing the clay cap test section. The purpose of the test section was to determine compaction characteristics of four representative kaolin clays and demonstrate in-situ permeability for these clays of 1 {times} 10 {sup {minus}7} cm/sec or less. The final technical specifications with regard to maximum clod size, acceptable ranges of placement water content, lift thickness, and degree of compaction will be based on experience gained from the test section. The data derived from this study will also be used in the development of Quality Assurance (QA) and Quality Control (QC) methods to be used during actual cap construction of the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) Closure project. 7 tabs.

  11. A survey on open source software testing tools: a preliminary study in 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emami, Seyed Amir; Sim, Jason Chin Lung; Sim, Kwan Yong

    2011-12-01

    Software Testing is a costly and time consuming process in software development. Therefore, software testing tools are often deployed to automate the process in order to reduce cost and improve efficiency. However, many of them are proprietary and expensive. Hence, open source software testing tools could be an appealing alternative. In this paper, we survey the current states of open source software testing tools from three aspects, namely, their availability for different programming platforms and types testing activities, maintenance of the tools and license limitations. From the 152 tools surveyed, we found that open source software testing tools not only are widely available for popular programming platforms, but also support a wide range of testing activities. Furthermore, we also found that more than half of the tools surveyed have been actively maintained and updated by the open source communities. Finally, these tools have very few licensing limitations for commercial use, customization and redistribution.

  12. Bending and Shear Behavior of Pultruded Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Beams With Closed and Open Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estep, Daniel Douglas

    ). Broadly, the proposed equations are predicting critical flexural load capacities within +/-22.3% of experimental data for all cases, with over 70% of all experimental data with within +/-10% error. A second prediction model was developed for predicting the critical lateral-torsional buckling (LTB) load for pultruded GFRP open sections, including wide flange (WF) sections and channels. Multiple LTB equations from several sources were considered and applied but yielded inaccurate results, leading to the development of this new critical buckling load prediction model based on the well-established elastic LTB strength equation for steel. By making a series of modifications to equations for calculating the weak axis moment of inertia, torsional warping constant, and torsion constant for open sections, as well as recognizing the influence of the shear lag phenomenon, the critical LTB load is predicted within +/-15.2% of experimental data for all channel and WF specimens tested and evaluated in the study.

  13. 75 FR 3892 - USDA Section 538 Guaranteed Rural Rental Housing Program; 2010 Industry Forums-Open...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ...--Open Teleconference and/or Web Conference Meetings AGENCY: Rural Housing Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces a series of teleconference and/or Web conference meetings regarding the... in the teleconference and/or web conference meetings. DATES: The dates and times for...

  14. Multi-Terrain Vertical Drop Tests of a Composite Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris; Jackson, Karen E.

    2008-01-01

    A 5-ft-diameter composite fuselage section was retrofitted with four identical blocks of deployable honeycomb energy absorber and crash tested on two different surfaces: soft soil, and water. The drop tests were conducted at the 70-ft. drop tower at the Landing and Impact Research (LandIR) Facility of NASA Langley. Water drop tests were performed into a 15-ft-diameter pool of water that was approximately 42-in. deep. For the soft soil impact, a 15-ft-square container filled with fine-sifted, unpacked sand was located beneath the drop tower. All drop tests were vertical with a nominally flat attitude with respect to the impact surface. The measured impact velocities were 37.4, and 24.7-fps for soft soil and water, respectively. A fuselage section without energy absorbers was also drop tested onto water to provide a datum for comparison with the test, which included energy absorbers. In order to facilitate this type of comparison and to ensure fuselage survivability for the no-energy-absorber case, the velocity of the water impact tests was restricted to 25-fps nominal. While all tests described in this paper were limited to vertical impact velocities, the implications and design challenges of utilizing external energy absorbers during combined forward and vertical impact velocities are discussed. The design, testing and selection of a honeycomb cover, which was required in soft surface and water impacts to transmit the load into the honeycomb cell walls, is also presented.

  15. Multi-terrain Vertical Drop Tests of a Composite Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sotirios, Kellas; Jackson, Karen E.

    2008-01-01

    A 5-ft-diameter composite fuselage section was retrofitted with four identical blocks of deployable honeycomb energy absorber and crash tested on two different surfaces: soft soil, and water. The drop tests were conducted at the 70-ft. drop tower at the Landing and Impact Research (LandIR) Facility of NASA Langley. Water drop tests were performed into a 15-ft-diameter pool of water that was approximately 42-in. deep. For the soft soil impact, a 15-ft-square container filled with fine-sifted, unpacked sand was located beneath the drop tower. All drop tests were vertical with a nominally flat attitude with respect to the impact surface. The measured impact velocities were 37.4, and 24.7-fps for soft soil and water, respectively. A fuselage section without energy absorbers was also drop tested onto water to provide a datum for comparison with the test, which included energy absorbers. In order to facilitate this type of comparison and to ensure fuselage survivability for the no-energy-absorber case, the velocity of the water impact tests was restricted to 25-fps nominal. While all tests described in this paper were limited to vertical impact velocities, the implications and design challenges of utilizing external energy absorbers during combined forward and vertical impact velocities are discussed. The design, testing and selection of a honeycomb cover, which was required in soft surface and water impacts to transmit the load into the honeycomb cell walls, is also presented.

  16. Suppression of background noise in a transonic wind-tunnel test section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutzenhofer, L. A.; Howard, P. W.

    1975-01-01

    Some exploratory tests were recently performed in the transonic test section of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center 14-in. wind tunnel to suppress the background noise. In these tests, the perforated walls of the test section were covered with fine wire screens. The screens eliminated the edge tones generated by the holes in the perforated walls and significantly reduced the tunnel background noise. The tunnel noise levels were reduced to such a degree by this simple modification at Mach numbers 0.75, 0.9, 1.1, 1.2, and 1.46 that the fluctuating pressure levels of a turbulent boundary layer could be measured on a 5-deg half-angle cone.

  17. Feasibility of making sound power measurements in the NASA Langley V/STOL tunnel test section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, T. F.; Scheiman, J.; Silcox, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Based on exploratory acoustic measurements in Langley's V/STOL wind tunnel, recommendations are made on the methodology for making sound power measurements of aircraft components in the closed tunnel test section. During airflow, tunnel self-noise and microphone flow-induced noise place restrictions on the amplitude and spectrum of the sound source to be measured. Models of aircraft components with high sound level sources, such as thrust engines and powered lift systems, seem likely candidates for acoustic testing.

  18. Water Impact Test and Simulation of a Composite Energy Absorbing Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Sparks, Chad; Sareen, Ashish

    2003-01-01

    In March 2002, a 25-ft/s vertical drop test of a composite fuselage section was conducted onto water. The purpose of the test was to obtain experimental data characterizing the structural response of the fuselage section during water impact for comparison with two previous drop tests that were performed onto a rigid surface and soft soil. For the drop test, the fuselage section was configured with ten 100-lb. lead masses, five per side, that were attached to seat rails mounted to the floor. The fuselage section was raised to a height of 10-ft. and dropped vertically into a 15-ft. diameter pool filled to a depth of 3.5-ft. with water. Approximately 70 channels of data were collected during the drop test at a 10-kHz sampling rate. The test data were used to validate crash simulations of the water impact that were developed using the nonlinear, explicit transient dynamic codes, MSC.Dytran and LS-DYNA. The fuselage structure was modeled using shell and solid elements with a Lagrangian mesh, and the water was modeled with both Eulerian and Lagrangian techniques. The fluid-structure interactions were executed using the fast general coupling in MSC.Dytran and the Arbitrary Lagrange-Euler (ALE) coupling in LS-DYNA. Additionally, the smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) meshless Lagrangian technique was used in LS-DYNA to represent the fluid. The simulation results were correlated with the test data to validate the modeling approach. Additional simulation studies were performed to determine how changes in mesh density, mesh uniformity, fluid viscosity, and failure strain influence the test-analysis correlation.

  19. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure, Savannah River Plant: Clay cap test section construction report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-02-26

    This report contains appendix 2 for the Clay Cap Test Section Construction Report for the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) closure at the Savannah River Plant. The Clay Cap Test Program was conducted to evaluate the source, Laboratory permeability, and compaction characteristics representative of Kaolin clays from the aiken, South Carolina vicinity. Included in this report are daily field reports Nos. 1 to 54. (KJD)

  20. LPT. Shield test facility (TAN645 and 646). Sections show relationships ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LPT. Shield test facility (TAN-645 and -646). Sections show relationships among control rooms, coupling station, counting rooms, pools, equipment rooms, data room and other areas. Ralph M. Parsons 1229-17 ANP/GE-6-645-A-4. April 1957. Approved by INEEL Classification Office for public release. INEEL index code no. 037-0645/0646-00-693-107350 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  1. New Test Section Installed in NASA Lewis' 1- by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, Steven W.

    1998-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's 1- by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (1x1) is a critical facility that fulfills the needs of important national programs. This tunnel supports supersonic and hypersonic research test projects for NASA, for other Government agencies, and for industry, such as the High Speed Research (HSR) and Space Transportation Technologies (STT) programs. The 1x1, which is located in Lewis' Building 37, Cell 1NW, was built in 1954 and was upgraded to provide Mach 6.0 capability in 1989. Since 1954, only minor improvements had been made to the test section. To improve the 1x1's capabilities and meet the needs of these programs, Lewis recently redesigned and replaced the test section. The new test section has interchangeable window and wall inserts that allow easier and faster test configuration changes, thereby improving the adaptability and productivity of this highly utilized facility. In addition, both the wall and window areas are much larger. The larger walls provide more flexibility in how models are mounted and instrumented. The new window design vastly increases optical access to the research test hardware, which makes the use of advanced flow-visualization systems more effective.

  2. Reflection plane tests of a wind turbine blade tip section with ailerons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savino, J. M.; Nyland, T. W.; Birchenough, A. G.; Jordan, F. L.; Campbell, N. K.

    1985-08-01

    Tests were conducted in the NASA Langley 30 by 60 foot Wind Tunnel on a full scale 7.31 m (24 ft) long tip section of a wind turbine rotor blade. The blade tip section was built with ailerons on the trailing edge. The ailerons, which spanned a length of 6.1 m (20 ft), were designed so that two types could be evaluated: the plain and the balanced. The ailerons were hinged on the suction surface at the 0.62 X chord station behind the leading edge. The purpose of the tests was to measure the aerodynamic characteristics of the blade section for: an angle of attack range from 0 deg to 90 deg aileron deflections from 0 deg to -90 deg, and Reynolds numbers of 0.79 and 1.5 x 10 to the 6th power. These data were then used to determine which aileron configuration had the most desirable rotor control and aerodynamic braking characteristics. Tests were also run to determine the effects of vortex generators, leading edge roughness, and the gaps between the aileron sections on the lift, drag, and chordwise force coefficients of the blade tip section.

  3. Reflection plane tests of a wind turbine blade tip section with ailerons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savino, J. M.; Nyland, T. W.; Birchenough, A. G.; Jordan, F. L.; Campbell, N. K.

    1985-01-01

    Tests were conducted in the NASA Langley 30 by 60 foot Wind Tunnel on a full scale 7.31 m (24 ft) long tip section of a wind turbine rotor blade. The blade tip section was built with ailerons on the trailing edge. The ailerons, which spanned a length of 6.1 m (20 ft), were designed so that two types could be evaluated: the plain and the balanced. The ailerons were hinged on the suction surface at the 0.62 X chord station behind the leading edge. The purpose of the tests was to measure the aerodynamic characteristics of the blade section for: an angle of attack range from 0 deg to 90 deg aileron deflections from 0 deg to -90 deg, and Reynolds numbers of 0.79 and 1.5 x 10 to the 6th power. These data were then used to determine which aileron configuration had the most desirable rotor control and aerodynamic braking characteristics. Tests were also run to determine the effects of vortex generators, leading edge roughness, and the gaps between the aileron sections on the lift, drag, and chordwise force coefficients of the blade tip section.

  4. Characterization of the Test Section Walls at the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunsford, Charles B.; Graves, Sharon S.

    2003-01-01

    The test section walls of the NASA Langley Research Center 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel are known to move under thermal and pressure loads. Videogrammetry was used to measure wall motion during the summer of 2002. In addition, a laser distancemeter was used to measure the relative distance between the test section walls at a single point. Distancemeter and videogrammetry results were consistent. Data were analyzed as a function of temperature and pressure to determine their effects on wall motion. Data were collected between 50 and 100 F, 0 and 0.315 Mach, and dynamic pressures of 0 and 120 psf. The overall motion of each wall was found to be less than 0.25 in. and less than facility personnel anticipated. The results show how motion depends on the temperature and pressure inside the test section as well is the position of the boundary layer vane. The repeatability of the measurements was +/-0.06 in. This report describes the methods used to record the motion of the test section walls and the results of the data analysis. Future facility plans include the development of a suitable wall restraint system and the determination of the effects of the wall motion on tunnel calibration.

  5. Measurement of countercurrent phase separation and distribution in a two-dimensional test section

    SciTech Connect

    Bukhari, K M; Lahey, Jr, R T

    1984-01-01

    The degree of phase separation that occurs in the core of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) during various postulated accidents is an important consideration for studying the course of events during such accidents. The dependence of countercurrent phase separation and distribution phenomena on flow quality, mass flux and system geometry was studied experimentally in a two-dimensional (2-D) test section. A two-phase (air/water) mixture flowed upwards and single-phase water flowed downward along one side of the test section. This countercurrent flow configuration was intended to simulate the so-called chimney effect in the diabatic JAERI 2-D experiments in Japan. A large air/water loop used with a 91.44 cm x 91.44 cm x 1.27 cm test section to study phase separation and distribution effects. A traversing single beam gamma-densitometer was used to measure the chordal average void fractions at several elevations along the test section. Cross-plots between various flow conditions and geometries were made. An error analysis giving the total error in the void fraction measurements was also performed. High speed photographs were also made of the flow structure, to provide information on flow regimes. The photographic records and the void fraction and hydraulic inflow/outflow data are presented in a form suitable for the assessment of advanced generation computer codes (e.g., TRAC).

  6. Effect of vane opening on aerodynamic performance of the ram-rotor test system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ji-ang; Guan, Jian; Zhong, Jingjun; Yuan, Chenguang

    2016-06-01

    In order to research the influence of adjustable vane on the aerodynamic performance of the ram-rotor test system, FLUENT software has been adopted to simulate the flow passage of the ram-rotor test system numerically. The vane opening is controlled by changing the stagger angle of the vane blades. Results show that flow uniformity of vane outlet is influenced by the vane openings, which has an impact on the aerodynamic loss to some extent. Total pressure ratio, adiabatic efficiency and mass flow rate can be regulated by different openings of the vane. Compared with -8° vane opening, top efficiency of the ram-rotor increases by about 13.8% at +6° opening. And total pressure ratio drops by 5.87%. The rising opening increases the relative Mach number at inlet of the ram-rotor and weakens the intensity of the tip clearance leakage, which comes to a decreasing aerodynamic loss.

  7. The Advanced Placement Physics Examinations: Test Development and Free-Response Section Readings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMurray, Terri; Cain, L. S.

    2003-11-01

    The Advanced Placement Physics B and C Examinations are developed by a Test Development Committee consisting of both high school and college teachers appointed by The College Board. We will discuss the creation of the tests from their conception to their administration to more than 60,000 high school students each year. We will also discuss the reading of the free response sections for each exam. A group of readers, consisting of interested and motivated high school AP physics teachers and college instructors who teach comparable courses, is appointed to read the free response sections during June of each year. Two experienced readers, one of whom is a member of the Test Development Committee, will share information in this talk on becoming involved with the AP program as a reader.

  8. High-speed Tests of a Ducted Body with Various Air-outlet Openings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, John V.; Baals, Donald D.

    1942-01-01

    Test of a ducted body with Internal flow were made in the 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel for the purpose of studying the effects on external drag and an critical speed of the addition of efficient inlet and outlet openings to a basic streamline shape. Drag tests of a 13.6- inch-diameter streamline body of fineness ratio 6.14 were made at Mach numbers ranging from 0.20 to 0.75. The model was centrally mounted on a 9-percent-thick airfoil and was designed to have an efficient airfoil-body juncture and a high critical speed. An air inlet at the nose and various outlets at the tail were added: drag and internal-flow data were obtained over the given speed range. The critical speed of the ducted bodies was found to be as high as that of the streamline body. The external - drag with air flow through the body did not exceed the drag of the basic streamline shape. No appreciable variation in the efficiency of the diffuser section of the internal duct occurred throughout the Mach number range of the tests.

  9. Testing the chemical tagging technique with open clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Soubiran, C.; Heiter, U.; Asplund, M.; Carraro, G.; Costado, M. T.; Feltzing, S.; González-Hernández, J. I.; Jiménez-Esteban, F.; Korn, A. J.; Marino, A. F.; Montes, D.; San Roman, I.; Tabernero, H. M.; Tautvaišienė, G.

    2015-05-01

    Context. Stars are born together from giant molecular clouds and, if we assume that the priors were chemically homogeneous and well-mixed, we expect them to share the same chemical composition. Most of the stellar aggregates are disrupted while orbiting the Galaxy and most of the dynamic information is lost, thus the only possibility of reconstructing the stellar formation history is to analyze the chemical abundances that we observe today. Aims: The chemical tagging technique aims to recover disrupted stellar clusters based merely on their chemical composition. We evaluate the viability of this technique to recover co-natal stars that are no longer gravitationally bound. Methods: Open clusters are co-natal aggregates that have managed to survive together. We compiled stellar spectra from 31 old and intermediate-age open clusters, homogeneously derived atmospheric parameters, and 17 abundance species, and applied machine learning algorithms to group the stars based on their chemical composition. This approach allows us to evaluate the viability and efficiency of the chemical tagging technique. Results: We found that stars at different evolutionary stages have distinct chemical patterns that may be due to NLTE effects, atomic diffusion, mixing, and biases. When separating stars into dwarfs and giants, we observed that a few open clusters show distinct chemical signatures while the majority show a high degree of overlap. This limits the recovery of co-natal aggregates by applying the chemical tagging technique. Nevertheless, there is room for improvement if more elements are included and models are improved. Based on observations obtained at the Telescope Bernard Lyot (USR5026) operated by the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, Université de Toulouse (Paul Sabatier), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and on public data obtained from the ESO Science Archive Facility under requests number 81252 and 81618.

  10. Assessing an open-well aquifer test in fractured crystalline rock

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tiedeman, C.R.; Hsieh, P.A.

    2001-01-01

    Use of open wells to conduct aquifer tests in fractured crystalline rock aquifers is potentially problematic, because open wells can hydraulically connect highly permeable fracture zones at different depths within the rock. Because of this effect, it is questionable whether estimates of the hydraulic properties of the rock obtained from analysis of an open-well aquifer test in fractured crystalline rock are representative of the true rock properties. To address this issue, rock properties estimated from such a test are compared with rock properties estimated from an aquifer test at the same location in which packers were installed in wells to restrict vertical fluid movement along the wellbores. Results indicate that when the open-hole test is analyzed with a numerical model that accurately represents the three-dimensional heterogeneity structure in the wellfield, the open-hole test estimates of the rock hydraulic properties are similar to the packer-isolated test estimates. When the open-well test is analyzed using a model having an oversimplified representation of the rock heterogeneity, the estimates of rock transmissivity are similar to the transmissivity estimates from the packer-isolated test, but the storativity estimates are larger than the storativity estimates from the packer-isolated test. These results indicate the importance of accurately representing the rock heterogeneity structure when analyzing an open-hole aquifer test in fractured crystalline rock.Use of open wells to conduct aquifer tests in fractured crystalline rock aquifers is potentially problematic, because open wells can hydraulically connect highly permeable fracture zones at different depths within the rock. Because of this effect, it is questionable whether estimates of the hydraulic properties of the rock obtained from analysis of an open-well aquifer test in fractured crystalline rock are representative of the true rock properties. To address this issue, rock properties estimated from

  11. Aeroacoustic and Performance Simulations of a Test Scale Open Rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claus, Russell W.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores a comparison between experimental data and numerical simulations of the historical baseline F31/A31 open rotor geometry. The experimental data were obtained at the NASA Glenn Research Center s Aeroacoustic facility and include performance and noise information for a variety of flow speeds (matching take-off and cruise). The numerical simulations provide both performance and aeroacoustic results using the NUMECA s Fine-Turbo analysis code. A non-linear harmonic method is used to capture the rotor/rotor interaction.

  12. Performance and test section flow characteristics of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter T.; Flack, Karen

    1989-01-01

    Results from the performance and test section flow calibration of the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel are presented. A flow calibration test was conducted in May and June 1987. The goal of the flow calibration test was to determine detailed spatial variations in the 40- by 80-ft test section flow quality throughout the tunnel operational envelope. Data were collected for test section speeds up to 300 knots and for air exchange rates of 0, 5, and 10 percent. The tunnel performance was also calibrated during the detailed mapping of the test section flow field. Experimental results presented indicate that the flow quality in the test section, with the exception of temperature, is relatively insensitive to the level of dynamic pressure and the air exchange rate. The dynamic pressure variation in the test section is within + or - 0.5 deg at all test section velocities. Cross-stream temperature gradients in the test section caused by the air exchange system were documented, and a correction method was established. Streamwise static pressure variation on the centerline is about 1 percent of test section dynamic pressure over 30 ft of the test section length.

  13. About Those Tests I Gave You... An Open Letter to My Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dandrea, Ruth Ann

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's open letter to her students. In her letter, the author apologizes to her students for the state's narrow and deceptive standardized test. She asserts that she does not oppose rigorous testing and she understands the purpose of evaluation. A good test can measure achievement and even inspire. But, she argues that…

  14. Self-Similarity in One-Dimensional Unsteady Open Channel Flow through Irregular Channel Cross-Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ercan, A.; Kavvas, M. L.; Haltas, I.

    2014-12-01

    Geophysical processes could be self-similar under certain similarity transformations at certain time and space dimensions. In this study, the conditions under which the Saint Venant equations system for unsteady open channel flow through irregular channel cross-sections becomes self-similar under various time and space scales are investigated by utilizing one-parameter Lie group of point scaling transformations. Self-similarity conditions due to the initial and boundary conditions are also investigated thoroughly in addition to the conditions due to the governing equations. The proposed scaling relations may provide additional spatial, temporal, and economical flexibility in setting up physical hydraulic models.

  15. Fracture toughness testing of core from the Cambro-Ordovician Section on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Lemiszki, P.J.; Landes, J.D.

    1996-10-01

    The modified ring test was used to determine the mode I fracture toughness of bedrock cores from the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation in east Tennessee. Low porosity sandstones, limestones, and dolostones from the lower part of the Paleozoic section in Copper Creek and Whiteoak Mountain thrust sheets were sampled. In general, the average mode I fracture toughness decreases from sandstone, dolostone, and limestone. The fracture toughness of the limestones varies between rock units, which is related to different sedimentologic characteristics. Quality of results was evaluated by testing cores of Berea Sandstone and Indiana Limestone, which produced results similar to published results.

  16. Characteristics of the Langley 8-foot Transonic Tunnel with Slotted Test Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Ray H; Ritchie, Virgil S; Pearson, Albin O

    1958-01-01

    A large wind tunnel, approximately 8 feet in diameter, has been converted to transonic operation by means of slots in the boundary extending in the direction of flow. The usefulness of such a slotted wind tunnel, already known with respect to the reduction of the subsonic blockage interference and the production of continuously variable supersonic flows, has been augmented by devising a slot shape with which a supersonic test region with excellent flow quality could be produced. Experimental locations of detached shock waves ahead of axially symmetric bodies at low supersonic speeds in the slotted test section agreed satisfactorily with predictions obtained by use of existing approximate methods.

  17. The influence of the equivalent hydraulic diameter on the pressure drop prediction of annular test section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Kayiem, A. H. H.; Ibrahim, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The flow behaviour and the pressure drop throughout an annular flow test section was investigated in order to evaluate and justify the reliability of experimental flow loop for wax deposition studies. The specific objective of the present paper is to assess and highlight the influence of the equivalent diameter method on the analysis of the hydrodynamic behaviour of the flow and the pressure drop throughout the annular test section. The test section has annular shape of 3 m length with three flow passages, namely; outer thermal control jacket, oil annular flow and inner pipe flow of a coolant. The oil annular flow has internal and external diameters of 0.0422 m and 0.0801 m, respectively. Oil was re-circulated in the annular passage while a cold water-glycol mixture was re-circulated in the inner pipe counter currently to the oil flow. The experiments were carried out at oil Reynolds number range of 2000 to 17000, covering laminar, transition and turbulent flow regimes. Four different methods of equivalent diameter of the annulus have been considered in this hydraulic analysis. The correction factor model for frictional pressure drop was also considered in the investigations. All methods addressed the high deviation of the prediction from the experimental data, which justified the need of a suitable pressure prediction correlation for the annular test section. The conventional hydraulic diameter method is a convenient substitute for characterizing physical dimension of a non-circular duct, and it leads to fairly good correlation between turbulent fluid flow and heat transfer characteristic of annular ducts.

  18. The characteristics of 78 related airfoil sections from tests in the variable-density wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Eastman N; Ward, Kenneth E; Pinkerton, Robert M

    1933-01-01

    An investigation of a large group of related airfoils was made in the NACA variable-density wind tunnel at a large value of the Reynolds number. The tests were made to provide data that may be directly employed for a rational choice of the most suitable airfoil section for a given application. The variation of the aerodynamic characteristics with variations in thickness and mean-line form were systematically studied. (author)

  19. Perception and use of massive open online courses among medical students in a developing country: multicentre cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Aboshady, Omar A; Radwan, Ahmed E; Eltaweel, Asmaa R; Azzam, Ahmed; Aboelnaga, Amr A; Hashem, Heba A; Darwish, Salma Y; Salah, Rehab; Kotb, Omar N; Afifi, Ahmed M; Noaman, Aya M; Salem, Dalal S; Hassouna, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the prevalence of awareness and use of massive open online courses (MOOCs) among medical undergraduates in Egypt as a developing country, as well as identifying the limitations and satisfaction of using these courses. Design A multicentre, cross-sectional study using a web-based, pilot-tested and self-administered questionnaire. Settings Ten out of 19 randomly selected medical schools in Egypt. Participants 2700 undergraduate medical students were randomly selected, with an equal allocation of participants in each university and each study year. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary outcome measures were the percentages of students who knew about MOOCs, students who enrolled and students who obtained a certificate. Secondary outcome measures included the limitations and satisfaction of using MOOCs through five-point Likert scale questions. Results Of 2527 eligible students, 2106 completed the questionnaire (response rate 83.3%). Of these students, 456 (21.7%) knew the term MOOCs or websites providing these courses. Out of the latter, 136 (29.8%) students had enrolled in at least one course, but only 25 (18.4%) had completed courses earning certificates. Clinical year students showed significantly higher rates of knowledge (p=0.009) and enrolment (p<0.001) than academic year students. The primary reasons for the failure of completion of courses included lack of time (105; 77.2%) and slow Internet speed (73; 53.7%). Regarding the 25 students who completed courses, 21 (84%) were satisfied with the overall experience. However, there was less satisfaction regarding student–instructor (8; 32%) and student–student (5; 20%) interactions. Conclusions About one-fifth of Egyptian medical undergraduates have heard about MOOCs with only about 6.5% actively enrolled in courses. Students who actively participated showed a positive attitude towards the experience, but better time-management skills and faster Internet connection speeds are required

  20. Critical Heat Flux Experiments on the Reactor Vessel Wall Using 2-D Slice Test Section

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Yong Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung; Baek, Won-Pil

    2005-11-15

    The critical heat flux (CHF) on the reactor vessel outer wall was measured using the two-dimensional slice test section. The radius and the channel area of the test section were 2.5 m and 10 cm x 15 cm, respectively. The flow channel area and the heater width were smaller than those of the ULPU experiments, but the radius was greater than that of the ULPU. The CHF data under the inlet subcooling of 2 to 25 deg. C and the mass flux 0 to 300 kg/m{sup 2}.s had been acquired. The measured CHF value was generally slightly lower than that of the ULPU. The difference possibly comes from the difference of the test section material and the thickness. However, the general trend of CHF according to the mass flux was similar with that of the ULPU. The experimental CHF data were compared with the predicted values by SULTAN correlation. The SULTAN correlation predicted well this study's data only for the mass flux higher than 200 kg/m{sup 2}.s, and for the exit quality lower than 0.05. The local condition-based correlation was developed, and it showed good prediction capability for broad quality (-0.01 to 0.5) and mass flux (<300 kg/m{sup 2}.s) conditions with a root-mean-square error of 2.4%. There were increases in the CHF with trisodium phosphate-added water.

  1. Analysis and testing of two-dimensional slot nozzle ejectors with variable area mixing sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, G. B.; Hill, P. G.

    1973-01-01

    Finite difference computer techniques have been used to calculate the detailed performance of air to air two-dimensional ejectors with symmetric variable area mixing sections and coaxial coverging primary nozzles. The analysis of the primary nozzle assumed correct expansion of the flow and is suitable for subsonic and slightly supersonic velocity levels. The variation of the mixing section channel walls is assumed to be gradual so that the static pressure can be assumed uniform on planes perpendicular to the axis. A test program was run to provide two-dimensional ejector test data for verification of the computer analysis. A primary converging nozzle with a discharge geometry of 0.125 inch x 8.0 inch was supplied with 600 SCFM of air at about 35 psia and 180 F. This nozzle was combined with two mixing section geometries with throat sizes of 1.25 inch x 8.0 inch and 1.875 inch x 8.0 inch and was tested at a total of 11 operating points.

  2. An Open-source Community Web Site To Support Ground-Water Model Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraemer, S. R.; Bakker, M.; Craig, J. R.

    2007-12-01

    A community wiki wiki web site has been created as a resource to support ground-water model development and testing. The Groundwater Gourmet wiki is a repository for user supplied analytical and numerical recipes, howtos, and examples. Members are encouraged to submit analytical solutions, including source code and documentation. A diversity of code snippets are sought in a variety of languages, including Fortran, C, C++, Matlab, Python. In the spirit of a wiki, all contributions may be edited and altered by other users, and open source licensing is promoted. Community accepted contributions are graduated into the library of analytic solutions and organized into either a Strack (Groundwater Mechanics, 1989) or Bruggeman (Analytical Solutions of Geohydrological Problems, 1999) classification. The examples section of the wiki are meant to include laboratory experiments (e.g., Hele Shaw), classical benchmark problems (e.g., Henry Problem), and controlled field experiments (e.g., Borden landfill and Cape Cod tracer tests). Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for publication, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use.

  3. Development and Characterization Testing of an Air Pulsation Valve for a Pulse Detonation Engine Supersonic Parametric Inlet Test Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornabene, Robert

    2005-01-01

    In pulse detonation engines, the potential exists for gas pulses from the combustor to travel upstream and adversely affect the inlet performance of the engine. In order to determine the effect of these high frequency pulses on the inlet performance, an air pulsation valve was developed to provide air pulses downstream of a supersonic parametric inlet test section. The purpose of this report is to document the design and characterization tests that were performed on a pulsation valve that was tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center 1x1 Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) test facility. The high air flow pulsation valve design philosophy and analyses performed are discussed and characterization test results are presented. The pulsation valve model was devised based on the concept of using a free spinning ball valve driven from a variable speed electric motor to generate air flow pulses at preset frequencies. In order to deliver the proper flow rate, the flow port was contoured to maximize flow rate and minimize pressure drop. To obtain sharp pressure spikes the valve flow port was designed to be as narrow as possible to minimize port dwell time.

  4. Reduction of acoustic disturbances in the test section of supersonic wind tunnels by laminarizing their nozzle and test section wall boundary layers by means of suction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfenninger, W.; Syberg, J.

    1974-01-01

    The feasibility of quiet, suction laminarized, high Reynolds number (Re) supersonic wind tunnel nozzles was studied. According to nozzle wall boundary layer development and stability studies, relatively weak area suction can prevent amplified nozzle wall TS (Tollmien-Schlichting) boundary layer oscillations. Stronger suction is needed in and shortly upstream of the supersonic concave curvature nozzle area to avoid transition due to amplified TG (Taylor-Goertler) vortices. To control TG instability, moderately rapid and slow expansion nozzles require smaller total suction rates than rapid expansion nozzles, at the cost of larger nozzle length Re and increased TS disturbances. Test section mean flow irregularities can be minimized with suction through longitudinal or highly swept slots (swept behind local Mach cone) as well as finely perforated surfaces. Longitudinal slot suction is optimized when the suction-induced crossflow velocity increases linearly with surface distance from the slot attachment line toward the slot (through suitable slot geometry). Suction in supersonic blowdown tunnels may be operated by one or several individual vacuum spheres.

  5. Variation in charges for 10 common blood tests in California hospitals: a cross-sectional analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Renee Y; Akosa Antwi, Yaa; Nath, Julia P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the variation in charges for 10 common blood tests across California hospitals in 2011, and to analyse the hospital and market-level factors that may explain any observed variation. Design, setting and participants We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the degree of charge variation between hospitals for 10 common blood tests using charge data reported by all non-federal California hospitals to the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development in 2011. Outcome measures Charges for 10 common blood tests at California hospitals during 2011. Results We found that charges for blood tests varied significantly between California hospitals. For example, charges for a lipid panel ranged from US$10 to US$10 169, a thousand-fold difference. Although government hospitals and teaching hospitals were found to charge significantly less than their counterparts for many blood tests, few other hospital characteristics and no market-level predictors significantly predicted charges for blood tests. Our models explained, at most, 21% of the variation between hospitals in charges for the blood test in question. Conclusions These findings demonstrate the seemingly arbitrary nature of the charge setting process, making it difficult for patients to act as true consumers in this era of ‘consumer-directed healthcare.’ PMID:25127708

  6. 26 CFR 1.280C-3 - Disallowance of certain deductions for qualified clinical testing expenses when section 28 credit...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 28(d)(2)). (b) Capitalization of qualified clinical testing expenses. In a case in which qualified... clinical testing expenses when section 28 credit is allowable. 1.280C-3 Section 1.280C-3 Internal Revenue... Not Deductible § 1.280C-3 Disallowance of certain deductions for qualified clinical testing...

  7. Four-Point Bending Strength Testing of Pultruded Fiberglass Composite Wind Turbine Blade Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Musial, W.; Bourne, B; Hughes, S; Zuteck, M. D.

    2001-07-10

    The ultimate strength of the PS Enterprises pultruded blade section was experimentally determined under four-point bending at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Thirteen 8-foot long full-scale blade segments were individually tested to determine their maximum moment carrying capability. Three airfoil-bending configurations were tested: high- and low-pressure skin buckling, and low pressure skin buckling with foam interior reinforcement. Maximum strain was recorded for each sample on the compressive and tensile surfaces of each test blade. Test data are compared to the results of three analytical buckling prediction methods. Based on deviations from the linear strain versus load curve, data indicate a post-buckling region. High-pressure side buckling occurred sooner than low-pressure side buckling. The buckling analyses were conservative for both configurations, but high-pressure side buckling in particular was substantially under-predicted. Both high- and low-pressure buckling configurations had very similar failure loads. These results suggests that a redundant load path may be providing strength to the section in the post-buckling region, making the onset of panel buckling a poor predictor of ultimate strength for the PS Enterprises pultrusion.

  8. Analytical Validation of AmpliChip p53 Research Test for Archival Human Ovarian FFPE Sections.

    PubMed

    Marton, Matthew J; McNamara, Andrew R; Nikoloff, D Michele; Nakao, Aki; Cheng, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene (TP53) is reported to be mutated in nearly half of all tumors and plays a central role in genome integrity. Detection of mutations in p53 can be accomplished by many assays, including the AmpliChip p53 Research Test. The AmpliChip p53 Research Test has been successfully used to determine p53 status in hematologic malignancies and fresh frozen solid tissues but there are few reports of using the assay with formalin fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. The objective of this study was to describe analytical performance characterization of the AmpliChip p53 Research Test to detect p53 mutations in genomic DNA isolated from archival FFPE human ovarian tumor tissues. Method correlation with sequencing showed 96% mutation-wise agreement and 99% chip-wise agreement. We furthermore observed 100% agreement (113/113) of the most prevalent TP53 mutations. Workflow reproducibility was 96.8% across 8 samples, with 2 operators, 2 reagent lots and 2 instruments. Section-to-section reproducibility was 100% for each sample across a 60 μm region of the FFPE block from ovarian tumors. These data indicate that the AmpliChip p53 Research Test is an accurate and reproducible method for detecting mutations in TP53 from archival FFPE human ovarian specimens. PMID:26125596

  9. Update on sulfur compound distribution in NGL: Plant test data GPA Section A committee, plant design

    SciTech Connect

    Harryman, J.M.; Smith, B.

    1996-12-31

    The mystery of why sulfur compounds could never be balanced from analyses of the product streams of NGL fractionation towers was solved by analyzing the data collected during testing completed by GPA Technical Section A in November and December of 1993 at Texaco`s Eunice, New Mexico fractionation plant. Decomposition of dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) to form methyl mercaptan within the towers is the cause of the sulfur balance discrepancies explained in the paper. The results of testing were reported to the 1994 convention, but at the time, a few weeks after completion of testing, the chemistry was not understood, i.e., what is the source of the hydrogen required to complete the formation of methyl mercaptan. This paper is an update of the previous paper and it includes the DMDS decomposition chemistry. It is essentially the body of a report completed in early 1995, excluding the Appendix of data. The 66-page Appendix may be obtained from the GPA, Tulsa.

  10. Damping test results for straight sections of 3-inch and 8-inch unpressurized pipes. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, A.G.; Thinnes, G.L.

    1984-04-01

    EG and G Idaho is assisting the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Pressure Vessel Research Committee in supporting a final position on revised damping values for structural analyses of nuclear piping systems. As part of this program, a series of vibrational tests on unpressurized 3-in. and 8-in. Schedule 40 carbon steel piping was conducted to determine the changes in structural damping due to various parametric effects. The 33-ft straight sections of piping were supported at the ends. Additionally, intermediate supports comprising spring, rod, and constant-force hangers, as well as a sway brace and snubbers, were used. Excitation was provided by low-force-level hammer impacts, a hydraulic shaker, and a 50-ton overhead crane for snapback testing. Data was recorded using acceleration, strain, and displacement time histories. This report presents test results showing the effect of stress level and type of supports on structural damping in piping.

  11. Using genetic information to test causal relationships in cross-sectional data

    PubMed Central

    Verhulst, Brad; Estabrook, Ryne

    2013-01-01

    Cross-sectional data from twins contain information that can be used to derive a test of causality between traits. This test of directionality is based upon the fact that genetic relationships between family members conform to an established structural pattern. In this paper we examine several common methods for empirically testing causality as well as several genetic models that we build on for the Direction of Causation (DoC) model. We then discuss the mathematical components of the DoC model and highlight limitations of the model and potential solutions to these limitations. We conclude by presenting an example from the personality and politics literature that has begun to explore the question whether or not personality traits cause people to hold specific political attitudes. PMID:23946557

  12. The development of a self-streamlining flexible walled transonic test section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.; Wolf, S. W. D.

    1980-01-01

    This design eliminates the uncertainties in data from conventional transonic test sections. Sidewalls are rigid, and the flexible floor and ceiling are positioned by motorized jacks controlled by on-line computer to minimize run times. The tunnel-computer combination is self-streamlining without reference to the model. Data is taken from the model only when the walls are good streamlines, and is corrected for the small, known but inevitable residual interferences. Two-dimensional validation testing in the Mach range up to about 0.85 where the walls are just supercritical shows good agreement with reference data using a height:chord ratio of 1.5. Techniques are under development to extend Mach number above 1. This work has demonstrated the feasibility of almost eliminating wall interferences, improving flow quality, and reducing power requirements or increasing Reynolds number. Extensions to three-dimensional testing are outlined.

  13. Open Source Subtitle Editor Software Study for Section 508 Close Caption Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, F. Brandon

    2013-01-01

    This paper will focus on a specific item within the NASA Electronic Information Accessibility Policy - Multimedia Presentation shall have synchronized caption; thus making information accessible to a person with hearing impairment. This synchronized caption will assist a person with hearing or cognitive disability to access the same information as everyone else. This paper focuses on the research and implementation for CC (subtitle option) support to video multimedia. The goal of this research is identify the best available open-source (free) software to achieve synchronized captions requirement and achieve savings, while meeting the security requirement for Government information integrity and assurance. CC and subtitling are processes that display text within a video to provide additional or interpretive information for those whom may need it or those whom chose it. Closed captions typically show the transcription of the audio portion of a program (video) as it occurs (either verbatim or in its edited form), sometimes including non-speech elements (such as sound effects). The transcript can be provided by a third party source or can be extracted word for word from the video. This feature can be made available for videos in two forms: either Soft-Coded or Hard-Coded. Soft-Coded is the more optional version of CC, where you can chose to turn them on if you want, or you can turn them off. Most of the time, when using the Soft-Coded option, the transcript is also provided to the view along-side the video. This option is subject to compromise, whereas the transcript is merely a text file that can be changed by anyone who has access to it. With this option the integrity of the CC is at the mercy of the user. Hard-Coded CC is a more permanent form of CC. A Hard-Coded CC transcript is embedded within a video, without the option of removal.

  14. Dynamic Open-Rotor Composite Shield Impact Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, Silvia; Frankenberger, Charles; Ruggeri, Charles R.; Revilock, Duane M.; Pereira, J. Michael; Carney, Kelly S.; Emmerling, William C.

    2015-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is working with the European Aviation Safety Agency to determine the certification base for proposed new engines that would not have a containment structure on large commercial aircraft. Equivalent safety to the current fleet is desired by the regulators, which means that loss of a single fan blade will not cause hazard to the aircraft. NASA Glenn and Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) China Lake collaborated with the FAA Aircraft Catastrophic Failure Prevention Program to design and test a shield that would protect the aircraft passengers and critical systems from a released blade that could impact the fuselage. This report documents the live-fire test from a full-scale rig at NAWC China Lake. NASA provided manpower and photogrammetry expertise to document the impact and damage to the shields. The test was successful: the blade was stopped from penetrating the shield, which validates the design analysis method and the parameters used in the analysis. Additional work is required to implement the shielding into the aircraft.

  15. To test or not to test: A cross-sectional survey of the psychosocial determinants of self-testing for cholesterol, glucose, and HIV

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although self-tests are increasingly available and widely used, it is not clear whether their use is beneficial to the users, and little is known concerning the determinants of self-test use. The aim of this study was to identify the determinants of self-test use for cholesterol, glucose, and HIV, and to examine whether these are similar across these tests. Self-testing was defined as using in-vitro tests on body materials, initiated by consumers with the aim of diagnosing a particular disorder, condition, or risk factor for disease. Methods A cross-sectional Internet survey was conducted among 513 self-testers and 600 non-testers, assessing possible determinants of self-test use. The structured questionnaire was based on the Health Belief Model, Theory of Planned Behavior, and Protection Motivation Theory. Data were analyzed by means of logistic regression. Results The results revealed that perceived benefits and self-efficacy were significantly associated with self-testing for all three conditions. Other psychosocial determinants, e.g. gender, cues to action, perceived barriers, subjective norm, and moral obligation, seemed to be more test-specific. Conclusions Psychosocial determinants of self-testing are not identical for all tests and therefore information about self-testing needs to be tailored to a specific test. The general public should not only be informed about advantages of self-test use but also about the disadvantages. Designers of information about self-testing should address all aspects related to self-testing to stimulate informed decision making which, in turn, will result in more effective self-test use. PMID:21329511

  16. 17 CFR 270.18f-1 - Exemption from certain requirements of section 18(f)(1) (of the Act) for registered open-end...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements of section 18(f)(1) (of the Act) for registered open-end investment companies which have the right... which have the right to redeem in kind. (a) A registered open-end investment company which has the right... to pay in cash all requests for redemption by any shareholder of record, limited in amount...

  17. 42 CFR 84.97 - Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and... carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable limits. (a) Open-circuit apparatus. (1) The concentration of carbon dioxide in inspired gas in open-circuit apparatus...

  18. 42 CFR 84.97 - Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and... carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable limits. (a) Open-circuit apparatus. (1) The concentration of carbon dioxide in inspired gas in open-circuit apparatus...

  19. 42 CFR 84.97 - Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and... carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable limits. (a) Open-circuit apparatus. (1) The concentration of carbon dioxide in inspired gas in open-circuit apparatus...

  20. 42 CFR 84.97 - Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and... carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable limits. (a) Open-circuit apparatus. (1) The concentration of carbon dioxide in inspired gas in open-circuit apparatus...

  1. 42 CFR 84.97 - Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Test for carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and... carbon dioxide in inspired gas; open- and closed-circuit apparatus; maximum allowable limits. (a) Open-circuit apparatus. (1) The concentration of carbon dioxide in inspired gas in open-circuit apparatus...

  2. Hardware and operating features of the adaptive wall test section for the 0.3-meter transonic cryogenic tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, Raymond E.

    1989-01-01

    A 13- by 13-inch adaptive wall test section was installed in the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel circuit. This test section has four solid walls and is configured for two-dimensional airfoil testing. The top and bottom walls are flexible and movable, whereas the sidwalls are rigid and fixed. The test section has a turntable to support airfoil models, a survey mechanism to probe the model wake, and provisions for a sidewall boundary-layer-control system. Details of the adaptive wall test section, the tunnel circuit modifications, the supporting instrumentation, the monitoring and control hardware, and the wall adaptation strategy are discussed. Sample results of shakedown tests with the test section empty and with an airfoil installed are also included.

  3. Gerbils exhibit stable open-arms exploration across repeated testing on the elevated plus-maze.

    PubMed

    Rico, Javier Leonardo; Penagos-Gil, Marion; Castañeda, Anderson F; Corredor, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Repeated testing on the elevated plus-maze (EPM) leads rats and mice to avoid the open-arms of the apparatus. The effect of multiple exposures to the EPM on the behavioral profile of gerbils is unknown. In this study, young and middle-aged gerbils were exposed to the EPM and four retests were carried out 24, 48, 72 and 96h after the first trial in order to determine whether animals exhibited open-arms avoidance. In addition, groups of young and middle-aged gerbils were exposed to the EPM for 20-min followed by a 5-min retest trial 24h apart to analyze the effect of a prolonged exposure to the EPM on open-arms exploration during first trial and retest. Gerbils exhibited high exploration of open-arms during the first trial and progressive locomotor decrease across repeated testing. Unlike previous reports for rats and mice, young gerbils showed a stable open-arms exploration both across multiple exposures and during a prolonged exposure to EPM. Middle-aged gerbils also exhibited a stable open-arms exploration during retest prior to the 20-min test. Results suggest a reliable repeated test paradigm for the EPM using our proposed methodology for gerbils. PMID:26621258

  4. Low-frequency rotational noise in closed-test-section wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosher, Marianne

    1987-01-01

    The effects of closed-section wind-tunnel walls on the sound field radiated from a helicopter rotor are investigated by means of numerical simulations, summarizing the findings reported by Mosher (1986). The techniques used to model the rotor and the test section (including geometry, wall absorption, and measurement location) are outlined, and the results are presented in extensive tables and graphs. It is found that first-harmonic acoustic measurements obtained in a hard-walled wind tunnel twice as wide as the rotor diameter do not accurately represent the free-field rotational noise, that the relationship between the sound-pressure levels in the wind tunnel and in the free field is complex, that multiple near-field measurements are needed to characterize the direct acoustic field of the rotor, and that absorptive linings are of little value in enlarging the accurate-measurement zone.

  5. BUGLE-93 (ENDF/B-VI) cross-section library data testing using shielding benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, H.T.; Slater, C.O.; White, J.E.

    1994-06-01

    Several integral shielding benchmarks were selected to perform data testing for new multigroup cross-section libraries compiled from the ENDF/B-VI data for light water reactor (LWR) shielding and dosimetry. The new multigroup libraries, BUGLE-93 and VITAMIN-B6, were studied to establish their reliability and response to the benchmark measurements by use of radiation transport codes, ANISN and DORT. Also, direct comparisons of BUGLE-93 and VITAMIN-B6 to BUGLE-80 (ENDF/B-IV) and VITAMIN-E (ENDF/B-V) were performed. Some benchmarks involved the nuclides used in LWR shielding and dosimetry applications, and some were sensitive specific nuclear data, i.e. iron due to its dominant use in nuclear reactor systems and complex set of cross-section resonances. Five shielding benchmarks (four experimental and one calculational) are described and results are presented.

  6. Monte Carlo predictions of proton SEE cross-sections from heavy ion test data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Kai; Geng, Chao; Zhang,Zhan-Gang; Hou, Ming-Dong; Sun, You-Mei; Luo, Jie; Liu, Tian-Qi; Wang, Bin; Ye, Bing; Yin, Ya-Nan; Liu, Jie

    2016-06-01

    The limits of previous methods prompt us to design a new approach (named PRESTAGE) to predict proton single event effect (SEE) cross-sections using heavy-ion test data. To more realistically simulate the SEE mechanisms, we adopt Geant4 and a location-dependent strategy to describe the physics processes and the sensitivity of the device. Cross-sections predicted by PRESTAGE for over twenty devices are compared with the measured data. Evidence shows that PRESTAGE can calculate not only single event upsets induced by indirect proton ionization, but also direct ionization effects and single event latch-ups. Most of the PRESTAGE calculated results agree with the experimental data within a factor of 2–3. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11179003, 10975164, 10805062, 11005134)

  7. Results of aerodynamic testing of large-scale wing sections in a simulated natural rain environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezos, Gaudy M.; Dunham, R. Earl, Jr.; Campbell, Bryan A.; Melson, W. Edward, Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center has developed a large-scale ground testing capability for evaluating the effect of heavy rain on airfoil lift. The paper presents the results obtained at the Langley Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility on a 10-foot cord NACA 64-210 wing section equipped with a leading-edge slat and double-slotted trailing-edge flap deflected to simulate landing conditions. Aerodynamic lift data were obtained with and without the rain simulation system turned on for an angle-of-attack range of 7.5 to 19.5 deg and for two rainfall conditions: 9 in/hr and 40 in/hr. The results are compared to and correlated with previous small-scale wind tunnel results for the same airfoil section. It appears that to first order, scale effects are not large and the wind tunnel research technique can be used to predict rain effects on airplane performance.

  8. Using Open-Book Tests to Strengthen the Study Skills of Community-College Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    The author observed that students enrolled in first-year college biology courses often had weak study skills. This longitudinal study examined the use of open-book tests to encourage reading and to assess the improvement of college students' study skills. There was a statistically significant improvement from the initial test to the final test…

  9. Comparing Assessments of Students' Knowledge by Computerized Open-Ended and Multiple-Choice Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anbar, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Interactive computerized tests accepting unrestricted natural-language input were used to assess knowledge of clinical biophysics at the State University of New York at Buffalo. Comparison of responses to open-ended sequential questions and multiple-choice questions on the same material found the two formats test different aspects of competence.…

  10. Evaluation of Water-Mineral Interaction Using Microfluidic Tests with Thin Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Y. S.; Ryu, J. H.; Koh, Y. K.; Jo, H. Y.

    2014-12-01

    For the geological disposal of radioactive wastes, geological settings and groundwater conditions are significantly important because of their effects on a radionuclide migration. One of the preferred host rocks for the radioactive waste disposal is crystalline rock. Fractures in crystalline rocks are main fluid pathways. Groundwater reacts with fracture filling minerals in fracture zones, resulting in physicochemical changes in the minerals and groundwater. In this study, fracture filling mineral-groundwater interactions were investigated by conducting microfluidic tests using thin sections at various conditions (i.e., fluid chemistry and flow rate). Groundwater and rock core samples collected from the KAERI Underground Research Tunnel (KURT) located in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) were used in this study. Dominant bedrock is two-mica granite, which contains both biotite and muscovite. Secondary minerals (e.g., chlorite, calcite and clay minerals) occur in fracture and alteration zones. In nature, water-mineral interactions generally take long time. Microfluidic tests were conducted to simulate water-mineral interactions in shorter time with smaller scale. Thin sections of fracture filling minerals, minerals from alteration zones, and natural and synthetic groundwater samples were used for the microfluidic tests. Results showed that water-mineral interactions at various conditions caused changes in groundwater chemistry, dissolution of minerals, precipitation of secondary minerals, and formation of colloids, which can affect radionuclide migration. In addition, the fluid chemistry and flow rate affected characteristics of water-rock interactions.

  11. HIV Testing and Tolerance to Gender Based Violence: A Cross-Sectional Study in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Gari, Sara; Malungo, Jacob R. S.; Martin-Hilber, Adriane; Musheke, Maurice; Schindler, Christian; Merten, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the effect of social relations and gender-based conflicts on the uptake of HIV testing in the South and Central provinces of Zambia. We conducted a community-based cross-sectional study of 1716 randomly selected individuals. Associations were examined using mixed-effect multivariable logistic regression. A total of 264 men (64%) and 268 women (56%) had never tested for HIV. The strongest determinants for not being tested were disruptive couple relationships (OR = 2.48 95% CI = 1.00–6.19); tolerance to gender-based violence (OR = 2.10 95% CI = 1.05–4.32) and fear of social rejection (OR = 1.48 95% CI = 1.23–1.80). In the Zambian context, unequal power relationships within the couple and the community seem to play a pivotal role in the decision to test which until now have been largely underestimated. Policies, programs and interventions to rapidly increase HIV testing need to urgently address gender-power inequity in relationships and prevent gender-based violence to reduce the negative impact on the lives of couples and families. PMID:23991005

  12. Development and Testing of Neutron Cross Section Covariance Data for SCALE 6.2

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, William BJ J; Williams, Mark L; Wiarda, Dorothea; Rearden, Bradley T; Dunn, Michael E; Mueller, Don; Clarity, Justin B; Jones, Elizabeth L

    2015-01-01

    Neutron cross-section covariance data are essential for many sensitivity/uncertainty and uncertainty quantification assessments performed both within the TSUNAMI suite and more broadly throughout the SCALE code system. The release of ENDF/B-VII.1 included a more complete set of neutron cross-section covariance data: these data form the basis for a new cross-section covariance library to be released in SCALE 6.2. A range of testing is conducted to investigate the properties of these covariance data and ensure that the data are reasonable. These tests include examination of the uncertainty in critical experiment benchmark model keff values due to nuclear data uncertainties, as well as similarity assessments of irradiated pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel with suites of critical experiments. The contents of the new covariance library, the testing performed, and the behavior of the new covariance data are described in this paper. The neutron cross-section covariances can be combined with a sensitivity data file generated using the TSUNAMI suite of codes within SCALE to determine the uncertainty in system keff caused by nuclear data uncertainties. The Verified, Archived Library of Inputs and Data (VALID) maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contains over 400 critical experiment benchmark models, and sensitivity data are generated for each of these models. The nuclear data uncertainty in keff is generated for each experiment, and the resulting uncertainties are tabulated and compared to the differences in measured and calculated results. The magnitude of the uncertainty for categories of nuclides (such as actinides, fission products, and structural materials) is calculated for irradiated PWR and BWR fuel to quantify the effect of covariance library changes between the SCALE 6.1 and 6.2 libraries. One of the primary applications of sensitivity/uncertainty methods within SCALE is the

  13. Simulation and steering in the intertank matching section of the ground test accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, V.W.; Bolme, G.O.; Johnson, K.F.; Mottershead, C.T.; Sander, O.R.; Smith, M.T.; Erickson, J.L.

    1994-10-01

    The Intertank Matching Section (IMS) of the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) is a short (36 cm) beamline designed to match the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) exit beam into the first Drift Tube LINAC (DTL) tank. The IMS contains two steering quadrupoles (SMQs) and four variable-field focussing quads (VFQs). The SMQs are fixed strength permanent magnet quadrupoles on mechanical actuators capable of transverse movement for the purpose of steering the beam. The upstream and downstream steering quadrupoles are labelled SMQ1 and SMQ4 respectively. Also contained in the IMS are two RF cavities for longitudinal matching.

  14. Simulation and steering in the Intertank matching section of the ground test accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, V. W.; Bolme, G. O.; Erickson, J. L.; Johnson, K. F.; Mottershead, C. T.; Sander, O. R.; Smith, M. T.

    1995-05-01

    The Intertank Matching Section (IMS) of the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) is a short (36 cm) beamline designed to match the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) exit beam into the first Drift Tube LINAC (DTL) tank. The IMS contains two steering quadrupoles (SMQS) and four variable-field focusing quads (VFQs). The SMQs are fixed strength permanent magnet quadrupoles on mechanical actuators capable of transverse movement for the purpose of steerng the beam. Also contained in the IMS are two RF cavities for longitudinal matching. A comparison of measured to calculated steering coefficients has been made for data aken in 3 different tunes of the IMS transport line. (AIP)

  15. New airfoil sections for general aviation aircraft. [cruising and flap development tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, W. H., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A program has been undertaken to develop new airfoil sections suitable for general aviation aircraft, utilizing theoretical and experimental advanced technology developed in recent years primarily for subsonic jet transport and military aircraft. The airfoil development program is one component of the Advanced Technology Light Twin program sponsored by NASA Langley Research Center. Two-dimensional tests of a new airfoil have demonstrated high cruising performance over a fairly wide C sub 1 range, and a C sub 1 max value of 3.69 with Fowler flap and no leading-edge devices. Experimental and theoretical development of additional configurations is under way.

  16. Multi-Terrain Impact Testing and Simulation of a Composite Energy Absorbing Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Jackson, Karen E.; Lyle, Karen H.; Sparks, Chad E.; Sareen, Ashish K.

    2007-01-01

    Comparisons of the impact performance of a 5-ft diameter crashworthy composite fuselage section were investigated for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts. The fuselage concept, which was originally designed for impacts onto a hard surface only, consisted of a stiff upper cabin, load bearing floor, and an energy absorbing subfloor. Vertical drop tests were performed at 25-ft/s onto concrete, soft-soil, and water at NASA Langley Research Center. Comparisons of the peak acceleration values, pulse durations, and onset rates were evaluated for each test at specific locations on the fuselage. In addition to comparisons of the experimental results, dynamic finite element models were developed to simulate each impact condition. Once validated, these models can be used to evaluate the dynamic behavior of subfloor components for improved crash protection for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts.

  17. Multi-Terrain Impact Testing and Simulation of a Composite Energy Absorbing Fuselage Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.; Sparks, Chad E.; Sareen, Ashish K.

    2004-01-01

    Comparisons of the impact performance of a 5-ft diameter crashworthy composite fuselage section were investigated for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts. The fuselage concept, which was originally designed for impacts onto a hard surface only, consisted of a stiff upper cabin, load bearing floor, and an energy absorbing subfloor. Vertical drop tests were performed at 25-ft/s onto concrete, soft-soil, and water at NASA Langley Research Center. Comparisons of the peak acceleration values, pulse durations, and onset rates were evaluated for each test at specific locations on the fuselage. In addition to comparisons of the experimental results, dynamic finite element models were developed to simulate each impact condition. Once validated, these models can be used to evaluate the dynamic behavior of subfloor components for improved crash protection for hard surface, soft soil, and water impacts.

  18. Status of initial testing of the H2SO4 section of the ILS experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Robert Charles; Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Gelbard, Fred

    2007-12-01

    A sulfuric acid catalytic decomposer section was assembled and tested for the Integrated Laboratory Scale experiments of the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Cycle. This cycle is being studied as part of the U. S. Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. Tests confirmed that the 54-inch long silicon carbide bayonet could produce in excess of the design objective of 100 liters/hr of SO{sub 2} at 2 bar. Furthermore, at 3 bar the system produced 135 liters/hr of SO{sub 2} with only 31 mol% acid. The gas production rate was close to the theoretical maximum determined by equilibrium, which indicates that the design provides adequate catalyst contact and heat transfer. Several design improvements were also implemented to greatly minimize leakage of SO{sub 2} out of the apparatus. The primary modifications were a separate additional enclosure within the skid enclosure, and replacement of Teflon tubing with glass-lined steel pipes.

  19. Cross-section fluctuations in open microwave billiards and quantum graphs: The counting-of-maxima method revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietz, B.; Richter, A.; Samajdar, R.

    2015-08-01

    The fluctuations exhibited by the cross sections generated in a compound-nucleus reaction or, more generally, in a quantum-chaotic scattering process, when varying the excitation energy or another external parameter, are characterized by the width Γcorr of the cross-section correlation function. Brink and Stephen [Phys. Lett. 5, 77 (1963), 10.1016/S0375-9601(63)80037-7] proposed a method for its determination by simply counting the number of maxima featured by the cross sections as a function of the parameter under consideration. They stated that the product of the average number of maxima per unit energy range and Γcorr is constant in the Ercison region of strongly overlapping resonances. We use the analogy between the scattering formalism for compound-nucleus reactions and for microwave resonators to test this method experimentally with unprecedented accuracy using large data sets and propose an analytical description for the regions of isolated and overlapping resonances.

  20. Using Combined Diagnostic Test Results to Hindcast Trends of Infection from Cross-Sectional Data

    PubMed Central

    Rydevik, Gustaf; Innocent, Giles T.; Marion, Glenn; White, Piran C. L.; Billinis, Charalambos; Barrow, Paul; Mertens, Peter P. C.; Gavier-Widén, Dolores; Hutchings, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Infectious disease surveillance is key to limiting the consequences from infectious pathogens and maintaining animal and public health. Following the detection of a disease outbreak, a response in proportion to the severity of the outbreak is required. It is thus critical to obtain accurate information concerning the origin of the outbreak and its forward trajectory. However, there is often a lack of situational awareness that may lead to over- or under-reaction. There is a widening range of tests available for detecting pathogens, with typically different temporal characteristics, e.g. in terms of when peak test response occurs relative to time of exposure. We have developed a statistical framework that combines response level data from multiple diagnostic tests and is able to ‘hindcast’ (infer the historical trend of) an infectious disease epidemic. Assuming diagnostic test data from a cross-sectional sample of individuals infected with a pathogen during an outbreak, we use a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach to estimate time of exposure, and the overall epidemic trend in the population prior to the time of sampling. We evaluate the performance of this statistical framework on simulated data from epidemic trend curves and show that we can recover the parameter values of those trends. We also apply the framework to epidemic trend curves taken from two historical outbreaks: a bluetongue outbreak in cattle, and a whooping cough outbreak in humans. Together, these results show that hindcasting can estimate the time since infection for individuals and provide accurate estimates of epidemic trends, and can be used to distinguish whether an outbreak is increasing or past its peak. We conclude that if temporal characteristics of diagnostics are known, it is possible to recover epidemic trends of both human and animal pathogens from cross-sectional data collected at a single point in time. PMID:27384712

  1. Using Combined Diagnostic Test Results to Hindcast Trends of Infection from Cross-Sectional Data.

    PubMed

    Rydevik, Gustaf; Innocent, Giles T; Marion, Glenn; Davidson, Ross S; White, Piran C L; Billinis, Charalambos; Barrow, Paul; Mertens, Peter P C; Gavier-Widén, Dolores; Hutchings, Michael R

    2016-07-01

    Infectious disease surveillance is key to limiting the consequences from infectious pathogens and maintaining animal and public health. Following the detection of a disease outbreak, a response in proportion to the severity of the outbreak is required. It is thus critical to obtain accurate information concerning the origin of the outbreak and its forward trajectory. However, there is often a lack of situational awareness that may lead to over- or under-reaction. There is a widening range of tests available for detecting pathogens, with typically different temporal characteristics, e.g. in terms of when peak test response occurs relative to time of exposure. We have developed a statistical framework that combines response level data from multiple diagnostic tests and is able to 'hindcast' (infer the historical trend of) an infectious disease epidemic. Assuming diagnostic test data from a cross-sectional sample of individuals infected with a pathogen during an outbreak, we use a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach to estimate time of exposure, and the overall epidemic trend in the population prior to the time of sampling. We evaluate the performance of this statistical framework on simulated data from epidemic trend curves and show that we can recover the parameter values of those trends. We also apply the framework to epidemic trend curves taken from two historical outbreaks: a bluetongue outbreak in cattle, and a whooping cough outbreak in humans. Together, these results show that hindcasting can estimate the time since infection for individuals and provide accurate estimates of epidemic trends, and can be used to distinguish whether an outbreak is increasing or past its peak. We conclude that if temporal characteristics of diagnostics are known, it is possible to recover epidemic trends of both human and animal pathogens from cross-sectional data collected at a single point in time. PMID:27384712

  2. A sectional-splinting technique for impressing multiple implant units by eliminating the use of an open tray

    PubMed Central

    Deogade, Suryakant C.; Dube, Gunjan

    2014-01-01

    Since the inception of root form implant dentistry by P-I Branemark in the early 1980's, so many technical advances have been put forward by several authors. However, the open tray impression technique is still performed for impressing multiple implant fixtures as it was first described in the original Branemark procedure manual. The most critical aspect for a successful implant-supported restoration is the passive and an accurate fit of superstructures to avoid preload and loading stresses. Splinting impression technique in multiple implants has gained popularity. Auto-polymerizing acrylic resin is among the most routinely practiced splinting material for multiple implant units. However, unfortunately, it exhibits shrinkage, which makes an impression quite inaccurate. This case report presents the solution to minimize the shrinkage of resin by utilizing sectional-splinting technique as advocated in the previous implant literature. PMID:24963251

  3. Apex wing section undergoing loading test preparation by Mark Nunnelee and Eliseo Sanchez

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Mark Nunnelee and Eliseo Sanchez prepare an Apex wing section for load tests. The Apex High-Altitude Flight Experiment is expected to explore the aerodynamics of controlled flight at very high altitudes near 100,000 feet. The Apex will be hoisted aloft tail-first from Dryden by a large high-altitude balloon and released at about 110,000-feet altitude. As it gradually descends, its instrumentation will collect aerodynamic data. The remotely-piloted, semi-autonomous Apex will combine a modified ASC sailplane fuselage design with a new wing designed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The wing will have a special airfoil designed for high subsonic speeds at extreme altitudes. A device extending behind the right wing is a 'wake rake,' which will measure aerodynamic drag behind a test section of the wing, while a rocket pack mounted beneath the fuselage will assist the Apex in transitioning to horizontal flight. Research flights were expected to begin in mid-1998, but a series of technical problems delayed them. In the spring of 1999, Apex entered mothball status. This continued for a year, and in the spring of 2000 NASA selected Apex as part of phase 1 of the Revolutionary Concepts effort.

  4. Portuguese Family Physicians’ Awareness of Diagnostic and Laboratory Test Costs: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Luísa; Costa-Santos, Cristina; Teixeira, Andreia; Couto, Luciana; Costa-Pereira, Altamiro; Hespanhol, Alberto; Santos, Paulo; Martins, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background Physicians’ ability to make cost-effective decisions has been shown to be affected by their knowledge of health care costs. This study assessed whether Portuguese family physicians are aware of the costs of the most frequently prescribed diagnostic and laboratory tests. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in a representative sample of Portuguese family physicians, using computer-assisted telephone interviews for data collection. A Likert scale was used to assess physician’s level of agreement with four statements about health care costs. Family physicians were also asked to estimate the costs of diagnostic and laboratory tests. Each physician’s cost estimate was compared with the true cost and the absolute error was calculated. Results One-quarter (24%; 95% confidence interval: 23%–25%) of all cost estimates were accurate to within 25% of the true cost, with 55% (95% IC: 53–56) overestimating and 21% (95% IC: 20–22) underestimating the true actual cost. The majority (76%) of family physicians thought they did not have or were uncertain as to whether they had adequate knowledge of diagnostic and laboratory test costs, and only 7% reported receiving adequate education. The majority of the family physicians (82%) said that they had adequate access to information about the diagnostic and laboratory test costs. Thirty-three percent thought that costs did not influence their decision to order tests, while 27% were uncertain. Conclusions Portuguese family physicians have limited awareness of diagnostic and laboratory test costs, and our results demonstrate a need for improved education in this area. Further research should focus on identifying whether interventions in cost knowledge actually change ordering behavior, in identifying optimal methods to disseminate cost information, and on improving the cost-effectiveness of care. PMID:26356625

  5. 26 CFR 1.1502-98A - Coordination with section 383 generally applicable for testing dates (or members joining or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... applicable for testing dates (or members joining or leaving a group) before June 25, 1999. 1.1502-98A Section... Corporations Joining Or Leaving Consolidated Groups) Before June 25, 1999 § 1.1502-98A Coordination with section 383 generally applicable for testing dates (or members joining or leaving a group) before June...

  6. Performance and test section flow characteristics of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter T.

    1993-01-01

    Results from the performance and test section flow calibration of the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel are presented. Measurements indicating the 80- by 120-ft test section flow quality were obtained throughout the tunnel operational envelope and for atmospheric wind speeds up to approximately 20 knots. Tunnel performance characteristics and a dynamic pressure system calibration were also documented during the process of mapping the test section flow field. Experimental results indicate that the test section flow quality is relatively insensitive to dynamic pressure and the level of atmospheric winds experienced during the calibration. The dynamic pressure variation in the test section is within +/-75 percent of the average. The axial turbulence intensity is less than 0.5 percent up to the maximum test section speed of 100 knots, and the vertical and lateral flow angle variations are within +/-5 deg and +/-7 deg, respectively. Atmospheric winds were found to affect the pressure distribution in the test section only at high ratios of wind speed to test section speed.

  7. Testing amniote models of prey transport kinematics: a quantitative analysis of mouth opening patterns in lizards.

    PubMed

    McBrayer, Lance D; Reilly, Stephen M

    2002-01-01

    Two models have been proposed to describe the prey transport kinematics of terrestrial vertebrates (Bramble and Wake, 1985; Reilly and Lauder, 1990). The critical difference between the models is the presence or absence of a slow open-II phase (SO-II) in the gape profile during mouth opening. Each of these models has been applied to lizards, however to date, lizard feeding kinematics have not been adequately quantified to assess the utility of these models for this clade. Neither model has been sufficiently tested due to the lack of a methodology to assess the specific differences between the models. We describe a method that uses explicit mathematical criteria to define the kinematic phases in tetrapod feeding. This "slope analysis& is used to precisely quantify and compare the transport kinematics of seven lizard species. Lizard transport kinematics were highly variable both within and across taxa. However, several common gape cycle patterns were identified. The predominant patterns were slow-fast opening (37.3%), fast opening only (22.9%) and slow opening only (21.2%). The most common pattern explicitly fits the prediction of the Reilly and Lauder model while the other two are similar to patterns observed in salamanders. Thus, lizards possess both the slow opening-fast opening pattern predicted for amniotes and the more primitive, simple opening pattern characteristic of more basal tetrapods. Plateau phases were found in only 12.8% of the profiles and only a fourth of these (3.4% of the total) explicitly fit the Bramble and Wake model (slow opening, plateau, fast opening) and two species never exhibited plateaus in their gape cycles. Thus, it is clear that the Bramble and Wake model is not supported as a generalized model for lizards or generalized tetrapods. PMID:16351858

  8. Adrenocortical response to open-field test in rats with anterodorsal thalami nuclei lesion.

    PubMed

    Suárez, M; Perassi, N; Dal Zotto, S

    1996-01-01

    The influence of limbic anterodorsal thalami nuclei (ADTN) on adrenocortical activity and on emotional reactivity were investigated in male and female rats. The emotional reactivity was evaluated by means of the open-field test and the corticoadrenal function by means of plasma and adrenal corticosterone concentration. The results demonstrate that ADTN lesion does not affect the behavioural patterns in the open-field test on the 29th and 30th day after lesion nor adrenal response when animals are exposed to a novel situation. PMID:8724884

  9. Test flattening in the larger foraminifer Heterostegina depressa: predicting bathymetry from axial sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, Wolfgang; Hohenegger, Johann; Kinoshita, Shunichi; Wöger, Julia; Briguglio, Antonino

    2016-04-01

    The cosmopolite foraminifer Heterostegina depressa has been a target of studies, describing its internal and external morphology, ecology and biology. During the last decades many researcher concentrated on test morphology and described its maturoevolute shape. Furthermore, a continuously increasing trend of test flattening along water depth has been described multiple times. However, the most common measurements, such as the thickness/diameter ratio, are too dependent on individual size to pose as an accurate tool. /newline Therefore a growth invariant character has been used to describe the change of thickness through the ontogeny of H. depressa. To compute this, the thickness at the half-radius, the so-called mediolateral thickness, of five whorls has been measured in 127 axial section of H. depressa. Based on this the ontogenetic change in thickness has been computed for specimens from different depth intervals of the slope of Sesoko-Jima, NW-Okinawa. In addition, this has been compared with the actual thickness and the corresponding radii at the same measuring points. The latter describes how thickness would change according to the thickness/diameter ratio./newline Hence, our analysis clearly quantifies a continuous transition of individuals with thicker central parts to individuals with flatter central parts along the water depth gradient. This is most likely controlled by light intensity, since photosymbionts (diatoms) of H. depressa are most active at low irradiation levels. Thus, shallower specimens grow thicker tests to reduce light penetration, while deeper specimens increase their surface to reach a better light exposure. Due to its broad water depth distribution H. depressa is a perfect model species to calibrate test flattening as bathymetric signal for fossil assemblages. Since similar ecological constraints are assumed for fossil nummulitid taxa, useful palaeobathymetric information might be gathered from studying test flattening in extinct species

  10. An open-source framework for testing tracking devices using Lego Mindstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jomier, Julien; Ibanez, Luis; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Pace, Danielle; Cleary, Kevin

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we present an open-source framework for testing tracking devices in surgical navigation applications. At the core of image-guided intervention systems is the tracking interface that handles communication with the tracking device and gathers tracking information. Given that the correctness of tracking information is critical for protecting patient safety and for ensuring the successful execution of an intervention, the tracking software component needs to be thoroughly tested on a regular basis. Furthermore, with widespread use of extreme programming methodology that emphasizes continuous and incremental testing of application components, testing design becomes critical. While it is easy to automate most of the testing process, it is often more difficult to test components that require manual intervention such as tracking device. Our framework consists of a robotic arm built from a set of Lego Mindstorms and an open-source toolkit written in C++ to control the robot movements and assess the accuracy of the tracking devices. The application program interface (API) is cross-platform and runs on Windows, Linux and MacOS. We applied this framework for the continuous testing of the Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK), an open-source toolkit for image-guided surgery and shown that regression testing on tracking devices can be performed at low cost and improve significantly the quality of the software.

  11. Testing for loss of protective sensation in patients with foot ulceration: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Wood, William A; Wood, Michael A; Werter, Scott A; Menn, Joseph J; Hamilton, Scott A; Jacoby, Richard; Dellon, A Lee

    2005-01-01

    Current recommendations for the prevention of foot ulceration and amputation include screening at-risk individuals by testing for loss of protective sensation at eight sites using 10-g (5.07) nylon monofilaments. Yet measurement of the cutaneous pressure threshold to differentiate one-point from two-point static touch stimuli may allow identification of these at-risk individuals earlier in the clinical course of diabetic neuropathy. The present study tested this hypothesis using a prospective, cross-sectional, multicenter design that included sensibility testing of 496 patients with diabetic neuropathy, 17 of whom had a history of ulceration or amputation. Considering the cutaneous pressure threshold of the 5.07 Semmes-Weinstein nylon monofilament to be equivalent to the 95 g/mm(2) one-point static touch measured using the Pressure-Specified Sensory Device (Sensory Management Services LLC, Baltimore, Maryland), only 3 of these 17 patients with a history of foot ulceration or amputation would have been identified using the Semmes-Weinstein nylon monofilament screening technique. In contrast, using the Pressure-Specified Sensory Device, all 17 patients were identified as having abnormal sensibility, defined as greater than the 99% confidence limit for age, for two-point static touch on the hallux pulp. We conclude that patients at risk for foot ulceration can best be identified by actual measurement of the cutaneous sensibility of the hallux pulp. PMID:16166466

  12. Recommendations for the shallow-crack fracture toughness testing task within the HSST (Heavy-Section Steel Technology) Program

    SciTech Connect

    Theiss, T.J. )

    1990-09-01

    Recommendations for Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program's investigation into the influence of crack depth on the fracture toughness of a steel prototypic of those in a reactor pressure vessel are included in this report. The motivation for this investigation lies in the fact that probabilistic fracture mechanics evaluations show that shallow flaws play a dominant role in the likelihood of vessel failure, and shallow-flaw specimens have exhibited an elevated toughness compared with conventional deep-notch fracture toughness specimens. Accordingly, the actual margin of safety of vessels may be greater than that predicted using existing deep-notch fracture-toughness results. The primary goal of the shallow-crack project is to investigate the influence of crack depth on fracture toughness under conditions prototypic of a reactor vessel. A limited data base of fracture toughness values will be assembled using a beam specimen of prototypic reactor vessel material and with a depth of 100 mm (4 in.). This will permit comparison of fracture-toughness data from deep-cracked and shallow-crack specimens, and this will be done for several test temperatures. Fracture-toughness data will be expressed in terms of the stress-intensity factor and crack-tip-opening displacement. Results of this investigation are expected to improve the understanding of shallow-flaw behavior in pressure vessels, thereby providing more realistic information for application to the pressurized-thermal shock issues. 33 refs., 17 figs.

  13. Design and Simulation Test of an Open D-Dot Voltage Sensor.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yunjie; Wang, Jingang; Wei, Gang; Yang, Yongming

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, sensor development focuses on miniaturization and non-contact measurement. According to the D-dot principle, a D-dot voltage sensor with a new structure was designed based on the differential D-dot sensor with a symmetrical structure, called an asymmetric open D-dot voltage sensor. It is easier to install. The electric field distribution of the sensor was analyzed through Ansoft Maxwell and an open D-dot voltage sensor was designed. This open D-voltage sensor is characteristic of accessible insulating strength and small electric field distortion. The steady and transient performance test under 10 kV-voltage reported satisfying performances of the designed open D-dot voltage sensor. It conforms to requirements for a smart grid measuring sensor in intelligence, miniaturization and facilitation. PMID:26393590

  14. Design and Simulation Test of an Open D-Dot Voltage Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yunjie; Wang, Jingang; Wei, Gang; Yang, Yongming

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, sensor development focuses on miniaturization and non-contact measurement. According to the D-dot principle, a D-dot voltage sensor with a new structure was designed based on the differential D-dot sensor with a symmetrical structure, called an asymmetric open D-dot voltage sensor. It is easier to install. The electric field distribution of the sensor was analyzed through Ansoft Maxwell and an open D-dot voltage sensor was designed. This open D-voltage sensor is characteristic of accessible insulating strength and small electric field distortion. The steady and transient performance test under 10 kV-voltage reported satisfying performances of the designed open D-dot voltage sensor. It conforms to requirements for a smart grid measuring sensor in intelligence, miniaturization and facilitation. PMID:26393590

  15. Shock wave boundary layer interaction on suction side of compressor profile in single passage test section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flaszynski, Pawel; Doerffer, Piotr; Szwaba, Ryszard; Kaczynski, Piotr; Piotrowicz, Michal

    2015-11-01

    The shock wave boundary layer interaction on the suction side of transonic compressor blade is one of the main objectives of TFAST project (Transition Location Effect on Shock Wave Boundary Layer Interaction). In order to investigate the flow structure on the suction side of a profile, a design of a generic test section in linear transonic wind tunnel was proposed. The experimental and numerical results for the flow structure investigations are shown for the flow conditions as the existing ones on the suction side of the compressor profile. Near the sidewalls the suction slots are applied for the corner flow structure control. It allows to control the Axial Velocity Density Ratio (AVDR), important parameter for compressor cascade investigations. Numerical results for Explicit Algebraic Reynolds Stress Model with transition modeling are compared with oil flow visualization, schlieren and Pressure Sensitive Paint. Boundary layer transition location is detected by Temperature Sensitive Paint.

  16. Simulation and steering in the Intertank matching section of the ground test accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, V.W.; Bolme, G.O.; Erickson, J.L.; Johnson, K.F.; Mottershead, C.T.; Sander, O.R.; Smith, M.T.

    1995-05-05

    The Intertank Matching Section (IMS) of the Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) is a short (36 cm) beamline designed to match the Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) exit beam into the first Drift Tube LINAC (DTL) tank. The IMS contains two steering quadrupoles (SMQS) and four variable-field focusing quads (VFQs). The SMQs are fixed strength permanent magnet quadrupoles on mechanical actuators capable of transverse movement for the purpose of steerng the beam. Also contained in the IMS are two RF cavities for longitudinal matching. A comparison of measured to calculated steering coefficients has been made for data aken in 3 different tunes of the IMS transport line. (AIP) {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  17. Test for abuse under NGPA Section 601(c)(2): Office of Consumers' Counsel v. FERC

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    A review of fraud and abuse challenge against the Natural Gas Policy Act (NGPA) section 601, which allows the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to control the prices pipeline companies pay. The author explores the statutory background of the case, FERC's authority to interpret provisions of the NGPA in the area of take-or-pay problems, and court opinions. He concludes by outlining approaches for applying the fraud and abuse test, and views the guaranteed pass-through exception of fraud, abuse, or similar grounds as a valuable enforcement tool for FERC. As the terms become better defined, pipelines will be able to structure their business activities to avoid situations likely to lead to fraud or abuse charges. Both FERC and the natural gas industry will benefit from further development of the standard.

  18. Fuselage shell and cavity response measurements on a DC-9 test section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, M. A.; Mathur, G. P.; Cannon, M. R.; Tran, B. N.; Burge, P. L.

    1991-01-01

    A series of fuselage shell and cavity response measurements conducted on a DC-9 aircraft test section are described. The objectives of these measurements were to define the shell and cavity model characteristics of the fuselage, understand the structural-acoustic coupling characteristics of the fuselage, and measure the response of the fuselage to different types of acoustic and vibration excitation. The fuselage was excited with several combinations of acoustic and mechanical sources using interior and exterior loudspeakers and shakers, and the response to these inputs was measured with arrays of microphones and accelerometers. The data were analyzed to generate spatial plots of the shell acceleration and cabin acoustic pressure field, and corresponding acceleration and pressure wavenumber maps. Analysis and interpretation of the spatial plots and wavenumber maps provided the required information on modal characteristics, structural-acoustic coupling, and fuselage response.

  19. Utilization of Advanced Diagnostic Methods for Texture and Rut Depth Analysis on a Testing Pavement Section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slabej, Martin; Grinč, Michal; Kotek, Peter; Kováč, Matúš; Decký, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Qualitative characteristics of pavement in wide range reflects the pavement serviceability, which is a summary of the characteristics of the pavement, providing a fast, smooth, economical and especially safe driving of motor-vehicles. The target factor of pavement serviceability and safety of roads represents the quality of their surface properties. In the framework of research activities performed in the Research Centre founded under the auspices of University of Žilina, individual parameters of pavement serviceability were monitored by pavement surface scanning. This paper describes the creation of a 3D - road surface model and its analysis and evaluation from the viewpoint of two pavement serviceability parameters - the rut depth and texture. Measurements were performed on an experimental pavement section used contemporary in an Accelerated Pavement Testing experiment. The long-term goal is to ascertain functions predicting degradation of these two pavement serviceability parameters.

  20. Velocimetry modalities for secondary flows in a curved artery test section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulusu, Kartik V.; Elkins, Christopher J.; Banko, Andrew J.; Plesniak, Michael W.; Eaton, John K.

    2014-11-01

    Secondary flow structures arise due to curvature-related centrifugal forces and pressure imbalances. These flow structures influence wall shear stress and alter blood particle residence times. Magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques were implemented independently, under the same physiological inflow conditions (Womersley number = 4.2). A 180-degree curved artery test section with curvature ratio (1/7) was used as an idealized geometry for curved arteries. Newtonian blood analog fluids were used for both MRV and PIV experiments. The MRV-technique offers the advantage of three-dimensional velocity field acquisition without requiring optical access or flow markers. Phase-averaged, two-dimensional, PIV-data at certain cross-sectional planes and inflow phases were compared to phase-averaged MRV-data to facilitate the characterization of large-scale, Dean-type vortices. Coherent structures detection methods that included a novel wavelet decomposition-based approach to characterize these flow structures was applied to both PIV- and MRV-data. The overarching goal of this study is the detection of motific, three-dimensional shapes of secondary flow structures using MRV techniques with guidance obtained from high fidelity, 2D-PIV measurements. This material is based in part upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number CBET-0828903, and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  1. An integral test of the inelastic cross sections of Pb and Mo using measured neutron spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shook, D. F.; Fieno, D.; Ford, C. H.; Wrights, G. N.

    1972-01-01

    Comparison of measurements and calculations of fast neutron spectra from a radioactive neutron source inside spheres of Mo or Pb and from a cylindrical reactor containing a thick Pb or Mo reflector are used as a test of ENDF cross sections. The sphere leakage spectra were measured at a sphere-to-spectrometer distance of 2 meters using a 54 Ci spherical Am-Be neutron source. Reactor leakage spectrum measurements were made at the surface of the ZP-1 reactor when bare, with a Pb radial reflector 21 cm thick, and with a metallic Mo radial reflector 10 cm thick. In the case of the thin Mo sphere there is agreement between the calculation and measurement. The Pb calculation is much lower than the measurement except at the highest neutron energy. Two-dimensional calculations of reactor spectra result indicate that the reactor source is reasonably well known. Significant differences in leakage spectrum shape for both Mo and Pb reflectors suggest that there are large uncertainties in the inelastic cross sections for Pb and some for Mo.

  2. Studying Reliability of Open Ended Mathematics Items According to the Classical Test Theory and Generalizability Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guler, Nese; Gelbal, Selahattin

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the Classical test theory and generalizability theory were used for determination to reliability of scores obtained from measurement tool of mathematics success. 24 open-ended mathematics question of the TIMSS-1999 was applied to 203 students in 2007-spring semester. Internal consistency of scores was found as 0.92. For…

  3. Testing for Sex Inequality in Standardized Admission Exams: The Case for Open Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Brian; Steelman, Lala Carr

    1982-01-01

    Compares men's and women's performance on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), and suggests that the math section may have penalized women, since they scored equally to men on other sections. Questions the validity of mathematics performance as a predictor of success in law school and as a lawyer. (GC)

  4. Analysis and Design of Rectangular-Cross-Section Nozzles for Scramjet Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaffney, Richard L., Jr.; Korte, John J.

    2004-01-01

    The flow in the square-cross-section Mach-6 nozzle used in the NASA Langley Research Center Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility has been analyzed using three-dimensional viscous CFD methods. The primary cause of the non-uniform flow exiting the nozzle is identified as cross-flow pressure gradients imposed on wall boundary layers. The cross-flow pressure gradients cause the boundary layer to roll up into counter-rotating vortex pairs on each of the four sides of the nozzle. These four vortex pairs produce significant non-uniformity in the nozzle-exit flow. In order to improve the quality of the test flow in the facility, two alternative nozzle designs (one axisymmetric and one rectangular with a 2-D contour) have been investigated. While the axisymmetric design produced the most uniform flow, the 2-D design also produced very good flow. The 2-D design was selected for further refinement, resulting in a new nozzle design which has been constructed and awaits calibration.

  5. Extension of in-situ stress test analysis to rapid hole evacuation at Yucca Mountain due to a network of open conduits

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, J.B.

    1994-01-01

    Yucca Mountain is underlain by tuffaceous rocks that are highly fractured and jointed. During drilling of bore-holes at Yucca Mountain there were numerous occurrences of lost circulation when whole mud was taken by the formation. This evidence suggests that parts of Yucca Mountain are controlled hydrologicaly by a network of open conduits along the existing joints and fractures. Also at Yucca Mountain, stress tests have been performed in-situ by charging a small section along the boreholes with an excess pressure head of water. For many of these tests, the initial drop in water head was so rapid that within seconds up to hundreds of meters of fall had occurred. The opening of fractures as the excess head increases has previously been proposed as an important factor in explaining the shape of the stress test curves at lower pressures. We propose that such induced hydraulic fractures, under increasing water heads, can grow to a length sufficient to intersect the existing network of open joints and fractures. We extend our previous model to incorporate flow out along these open conduits and examine the initial rapid drop in terms of these extended models. We show that this rapid evacuation model fits the observed data from many slug tests in wells in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain. This result is confirmation of the drilling evidence that a network of open conduits exists at various depths below the water table and over a large geographic region around Yucca Mountain.

  6. Contact sensitivity to hair dyes can be detected by the consumer open test.

    PubMed

    Krasteva, Maya; Cristaudo, Antonio; Hall, Barbara; Orton, David; Rudzki, Edward; Santucci, Baltassare; Toutain, Hervé; Wilkinson, John

    2002-01-01

    To avoid allergic reactions to hair dyes, an open test ("skin sensitivity test" or "dab test") is recommended 48 hours before the hair colouring procedure. We have investigated in a multicenter study, under standardized conditions and medical supervision, the validity of this test as a practical method to detect allergy to paraphenylenediamine (PPD)-containing hair dyes in 30 PPD patch test-positive and 30 PPD patch test-negative subjects. A defined volume of a marketed hair colouring product containing 1.8% PPD was applied in an open patch test to the retroauricular area. The grading method comprised the dermatologist's clinical evaluation and objective numerical scores. Allergic reactions were elicited in all PPD-positive subjects with a maximal intensity on Day 2; no allergic reactions were elicited in PPD-negative subjects. Increased severity of reactions by the dermatologist's clinical evaluation was correlated strongly with increasing numerical scores. The "skin sensitivity test" can be considered as an effective method to detect type IV hair dye allergy and as such, as an important factor in its secondary prevention. PMID:12095875

  7. Preliminary geologic section from Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, to Enterprise, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barosh, P.J.

    1967-01-01

    The 154-mile long geologic cross section trends nearly perpendicular to the structural grain of the Basin-Range province in Nevada, and in Utah extends eastward into the transition zone between the Basin-Range and Colorado Plateau provinces. The structure is characterized by complex thrust: faults, involving uppermost Precambrian to lower Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, and normal faults which cut: the thick sequence of Tertiary volcanic rocks as well as older rocks. Some of the normal faults are the result of caldera collapse. The principal normal faults trend northerly west: of Delamar, Nev., and form north-trending basins and ranges. Farther east the principal faults trend northwesterly, and form a moderately rugged highland rather than distinct basins and ranges. The uppermost Precambrian-Paleozoic strata thin markedly eastward across the region. The pre-Pennsylvanian sedimentary rocks vary from 32,500 feet: in thickness at the Nevada Test: Site (Harley Barnes, E. N. Hinrichs, F. A. McKeown and P. P. Orkild, written commun., 1963) to 4,500 feet: in the Beaver Dam Mountains in western Utah (Cook, 1960). Thick Mesozoic deposits, similar to those of the Colorado Plateau, are present in western Utah, but are represented in eastern Nevada by only thin patches of Triassic rock.

  8. Measurement of (α,n) reaction cross sections of erbium isotopes for testing astrophysical rate predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, G. G.; Szücs, T.; Rauscher, T.; Török, Zs; Csedreki, L.; Fülöp, Zs; Gyürky, Gy; Halász, Z.

    2015-05-01

    The γ-process in core-collapse and/or type Ia supernova explosions is thought to explain the origin of the majority of the so-called p nuclei (the 35 proton-rich isotopes between Se and Hg). Reaction rates for γ-process reaction network studies have to be predicted using Hauser-Feshbach statistical model calculations. Recent investigations have shown problems in the prediction of α-widths at astrophysical energies which are an essential input for the statistical model. It has an impact on the reliability of abundance predictions in the upper mass range of the p nuclei. With the measurement of the 164,166Er(α,n)167,169Yb reaction cross sections at energies close to the astrophysically relevant energy range we tested the recently suggested low energy modification of the α+nucleus optical potential in a mass region where γ-process calculations exhibit an underproduction of the p nuclei. Using the same optical potential for the α-width which was derived from combined 162Er(α,n) and 162Er(α,γ) measurement makes it plausible that a low-energy modification of the optical α+nucleus potential is needed.

  9. Analysis and testing of two-dimensional vented Coanda ejectors with asymmetric variable area mixing sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maroti, L. A.; Hill, P. G.; Armstrong, R. L.; Haines, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    The analysis of asymmetric, curved (Coanda) ejector flow has been completed using a finite difference technique and a quasi-orthogonal streamline coordinate system. The boundary layer type jet mixing analysis accounts for the effect of streamline curvature in pressure gradients normal to the streamlines and on eddy viscosities. The analysis assured perfect gases, free of pressure discontinuities and flow separation and treated three compound flows of supersonic and subsonic streams. Flow parameters and ejector performance were measured in a vented Coanda flow geometry for the verification of the computer analysis. A primary converging nozzle with a discharge geometry of 0.003175 m x 0.2032 m was supplied with 0.283 cu m/sec of air at about 241.3 KPa absolute stagnation pressure and 82 C stagnation temperature. One mixing section geometry was used with a 0.127 m constant radius Coanda surface. Eight tests were run at spacing between the Coanda surface and primary nozzle 0.01915 m and 0.318 m and at three angles of Coanda turning: 22.5 deg, 45.0 deg, and 75.0 deg. The wall static pressures, the loci of maximum stagnation pressures, and the stagnation pressure profiles agree well between analytical and experimental results.

  10. CFD study of Jet Impingement Test erosion using Ansys Fluent® and OpenFOAM®

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Alejandro; Nicholls, William; Stickland, Matthew T.; Dempster, William M.

    2015-12-01

    The initial aim of this study was to compare OpenFoam and Ansys Fluent in order to verify OpenFoam's Lagrangian Library and erosion capabilities. However, it was found that previous versions of Fluent have been providing wrong results for the discrete phase and the differences with the latest version (Ansys Fluent 15) are shown. A Submerged Jet Impingement Test is an effective method for studying erosion created by solid particles entrained in a liquid. When considering low particle concentrations a Lagrangian modeling of the particulate phase is a reasonable approach. Proper linkage between OpenFOAM's Lagrangian library and the solver pimpleFoam for incompressible transient flows allows two-phase simulations to be undertaken for comparison with Ansys Fluent with the aim of verifying OpenFoam's accuracy. Steady state convergence for the fluid flow is first accomplished and the results are compared, confirming a good agreement between the two packages. A transient simulation was then set up and spherical particles incorporated into the fluid flow. An assessment of the two codes' discrete phase models was carried out, focusing on the differences between impact angles and velocities yielded at the impingement plate's surface employing a similar strategy to that outlined first by Hattori et al. (2008) and later by Gnanavelu et al. (2009, 2011). In the comparison of OpenFoam with the latest version of Fluent, the main differences between the injection models are highlighted and the coupling possibilities between phases are taken into consideration. Agreement between trends for both impact angles and velocities is satisfactory when the last version of the commercial package is considered and the average discrepancy between numerical values is very low, verifying OpenFoam's Lagrangian library. Two different Jet Impingement Test configurations are also compared and the differences highlighted.