Science.gov

Sample records for open wedge high

  1. Effect of Wedge Insertion Angle on Posterior Tibial Slope in Medial Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Matsumoto, Kazu; Ogawa, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Kentaro; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background: Medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a well-established surgery for medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA) wherein the lower extremity is realigned to shift the load distribution from the medial compartment of the knee to the lateral compartment. However, this surgery is known to affect the posterior tibial slope angle (PTSA), which could lead to abnormal knee kinematics and instability, and eventually to knee OA. Although PTSA control is as important as coronal realignment, few appropriate measurements for this parameter have been reported. The placement of a wedge spacer might have an effect on PTSA. Purpose: To elucidate the relationship between the PTSA and the direction of insertion of a wedge spacer. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: This study assessed 43 knees from 34 patients who underwent medial opening wedge HTO for knee OA. Pre- and postoperative lateral radiographs of the knee as well as postoperative computed tomography scans were performed to evaluate the relationship among PTSA, wedge insertion angle (WIA), and opening gap ratio (distance of the anterior opening gap/distance of the posterior opening gap at the osteotomy site). Results: The PTSA significantly increased from 9.0° ± 2.8° preoperatively to 13.2° ± 4.1° postoperatively (P < .001), resulting in a mean ΔPTSA of 4.7° ± 4.5°. The mean opening gap ratio was 0.86 ± 0.11, and the mean WIA was 25.9° ± 8.4°. The WIA and opening gap ratio were both highly correlated with ΔPTSA (r = 0.71 and 0.72, respectively), implying that a smaller WIA or smaller gap ratio leads to less increase in posterior slope. Conclusion: The direction of wedge insertion is highly correlated with PTSA increase, which suggests that the PTSA can be controlled for by adjusting the direction of wedge insertion during surgery. Clinical Relevance: Study results suggest that it is possible to adjust the PTSA by controlling the WIA during surgery. Proper

  2. Opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy: a seven - to twelve-year study

    PubMed Central

    PIPINO, GENNARO; INDELLI, PIER FRANCESCO; TIGANI, DOMENICO; MAFFEI, GIUSEPPE; VACCARISI, DAVIDE

    2016-01-01

    Purpose medial opening-wedge osteotomy is a widely performed procedure used to treat moderate isolated medial knee osteoarthritis. Historically, the literature has contained reports showing satisfactory mid-term results when accurate patient selection and precise surgical techniques were applied. This study was conducted to investigate the clinical and radiographic seven- to twelve-year results of opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy in a consecutive series of patients affected by varus knee malalignment with isolated medial compartment degenerative joint disease. Methods we reviewed a case series of 147 medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomies at an average follow-up of 9.5 years. Endpoints for evaluation included the reporting of adverse effects, radiographic evidence of bone union, radiographic changes in the correction angle during union, and clinical and functional final outcomes. Results good or excellent results were obtained in 94% of the cases: the patients reported no major complications related to the opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy surgical technique, bone graft resorption, implant choice or postoperative rehabilitation protocol. At final follow-up, the average hip-knee angle was 4° of valgus without major loss of correction during the healing process. A statistically significant change in the patellar height was detected postoperatively, with a trend towards patella infera. Conclusions medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy is still a reliable method for correcting varus deformity while producing stable fixation, thus allowing satisfactory stability, adequate bone healing and satisfactory mid- to long-term results. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic cases series. PMID:27386441

  3. Imageless Navigation Versus Conventional Open Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy: A Meta-Analysis of Comparative Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Yoon, Jung-Ro; Choi, Gi Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To summarize and compare radiological and clinical outcomes of open wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) using imageless computer-assisted navigation with conventional HTO. Methods A literature search of online register databases was conducted. The risk ratio (RR) of radiological outliers and mean differences in clinical outcomes were compared between navigated and conventional HTOs. Radiological results were evaluated by subgroup analyses according to the study period (concurrent/consecutive) and the use of locking fixation device. Results Seven comparative studies with a total sample size of 406 knees were included in this review. Radiographically, the mechanical axis [MA] was within the acceptable range (0°–6°) in 83.7% of the navigation HTO group, showing significant difference from 62.1% of the conventional HTO group. Clinically, despite the forest plot demonstrating a general trend of favoring the navigation system, there were not sufficient studies to determine statistical significance in the meta-analysis. None of the subgroup analyses demonstrated significant differences in the RR of MA outliers. Conclusions The present meta-analysis indicates that the use of navigation in open wedge HTO improves the precision of mechanical alignment by decreasing the incidence of outliers; however, the clinical benefit is not conclusive. Additionally, none of the subgroup analyses demonstrated significant difference in the RR of MA outliers. PMID:26955609

  4. Mid-term outcome of opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy for varus arthritic knees.

    PubMed

    Haviv, Barak; Bronak, Shlomo; Thein, Ran; Kidron, Amos; Thein, Rafael

    2012-02-01

    Gonarthrosis in the relatively young and active population causes major daily discomfort and disability. If the arthritic process is mainly limited to the medial compartment, the axis of a varus knee can be realigned laterally with high tibial osteotomy to unload the medial compartment and allow some cartilage regeneration and pain relief. This study describes the outcomes of patients who underwent opening-wedge high tibial osteotomies using Puddu plate (Arthrex, Naples, Florida) fixation. Eighteen patients (22 knees) with genu varum and medial compartment osteoarthritis were followed-up for an average of 6.3±2.3 years after high tibial osteotomy with Puddu plate fixation and iliac crest allograft. Clinical outcome was assessed by the Oxford Knee Score and subjective satisfaction rating. Pre- and postoperative radiographs were evaluated for tibiofemoral angle, Insall-Salvati index, and Kellgren-Lawrence Grading Scale for osteoarthritis. Mean patient age at surgery was 44±13.7 years, and mean body mass index was 29.1±4.7 kg/m(2). At last follow-up, mean Oxford Knee Score improved from 22.4±13.5 to 37.2±13.7 (P=.002). Average subjective satisfaction rate at last follow-up was 8±3. The measured tibiofemoral angle was corrected to an average genu valgum of 3.3°±4.8° (P=.001). No patient showed severe postoperative osteoarthritis (ie, Kellgren-Lawrence grade 4) at last follow-up. All radiographs showed full incorporation of the bone grafts. At the end of the study, 2 patients underwent total knee replacement. Opening-wedge high tibial valgus osteotomy with Puddu plate fixation can be a reliable procedure for the treatment of medial-compartment osteoarthritis of the knee associated with varus deformity. PMID:22310405

  5. Finite element analysis of Puddu and Tomofix plate fixation for open wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Raja Izaham, Raja Mohd Aizat; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq; Abdul Rashid, Abdul Halim; Hossain, Md Golam; Kamarul, T

    2012-06-01

    The use of open wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) to correct varus deformity of the knee is well established. However, the stability of the various implants used in this procedure has not been previously demonstrated. In this study, the two most common types of plates were analysed (1) the Puddu plates that use the dynamic compression plate (DCP) concept, and (2) the Tomofix plate that uses the locking compression plate (LCP) concept. Three dimensional model of the tibia was reconstructed from computed tomography images obtained from the Medical Implant Technology Group datasets. Osteotomy and fixation models were simulated through computational processing. Simulated loading was applied at 60:40 ratios on the medial:lateral aspect during single limb stance. The model was fixed distally in all degrees of freedom. Simulated data generated from the micromotions, displacement and, implant stress were captured. At the prescribed loads, a higher displacement of 3.25 mm was observed for the Puddu plate model (p<0.001). Coincidentally the amount of stresses subjected to this plate, 24.7 MPa, was also significantly lower (p<0.001). There was significant negative correlation (p<0.001) between implant stresses to that of the amount of fracture displacement which signifies a less stable fixation using Puddu plates. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the Tomofix plate produces superior stability for bony fixation in HTO procedures. PMID:22204773

  6. The validity of the classification for lateral hinge fractures in open wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, R; Komatsu, N; Murao, T; Okamoto, Y; Nakamura, S; Fujita, K; Nishimura, H; Katsuki, Y

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to validate the efficacy of Takeuchi classification for lateral hinge fractures (LHFs) in open wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO). In all 74 osteoarthritic knees (58 females, 16 males; mean age 62.9 years, standard deviation 7.5, 42 to 77) were treated with OWHTO using a TomoFix plate. The knees were divided into non-fracture (59 knees) and LHF (15 knees) groups, and the LHF group was further divided into Takeuchi types I, II, and III (seven, two, and six knees, respectively). The outcomes were assessed pre-operatively and one year after OWHTO. Pre-operative characteristics (age, gender and body mass index) showed no significant difference between the two groups. The mean Japanese Orthopaedic Association score was significantly improved one year after operation regardless of the presence or absence of LHF (p = 0.0015, p < 0.001, respectively). However, six of seven type I cases had no LHF-related complications; both type II cases had delayed union; and of six type III cases, two had delayed union with correction loss and one had overcorrection. These results suggest that Takeuchi type II and III LHFs are structurally unstable compared with type I. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B:1226-31. PMID:26330589

  7. Assessing the local mechanical environment in medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy using finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Pauchard, Yves; Ivanov, Todor G; McErlain, David D; Milner, Jaques S; Giffin, J Robert; Birmingham, Trevor B; Holdsworth, David W

    2015-03-01

    High-tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a surgical technique aimed at shifting load away from one tibiofemoral compartment, in order the reduce pain and progression of osteoarthritis (OA). Various implants have been designed to stabilize the osteotomy and previous studies have been focused on determining primary stability (a global measure) that these designs provide. It has been shown that the local mechanical environment, characterized by bone strains and segment micromotion, is important in understanding healing and these data are not currently available. Finite element (FE) modeling was utilized to assess the local mechanical environment provided by three different fixation plate designs: short plate with spacer, long plate with spacer and long plate without spacer. Image-based FE models of the knee were constructed from healthy individuals (N = 5) with normal knee alignment. An HTO gap was virtually added without changing the knee alignment and HTO implants were inserted. Subsequently, the local mechanical environment, defined by bone compressive strain and wedge micromotion, was assessed. Furthermore, implant stresses were calculated. Values were computed under vertical compression in zero-degree knee extension with loads set at 1 and 2 times the subject-specific body weight (1 BW, 2 BW). All studied HTO implant designs provide an environment for successful healing at 1 BW and 2 BW loading. Implant von Mises stresses (99th percentile) were below 60 MPa in all experiments, below the material yield strength and significantly lower in long spacer plates. Volume fraction of high compressive strain ( > 3000 microstrain) was below 5% in all experiments and no significant difference between implants was detected. Maximum vertical micromotion between bone segments was below 200 μm in all experiments and significantly larger in the implant without a tooth. Differences between plate designs generally became apparent only at 2 BW loading. Results suggest that with

  8. Navigated open-wedge high tibial osteotomy: advantages and disadvantages compared to the conventional technique in a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Hankemeier, S; Hufner, T; Wang, G; Kendoff, D; Zeichen, J; Zheng, G; Krettek, C

    2006-10-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) is an established therapy for the treatment of symptomatic varus malaligned knees. A main reason for disappointing clinical results after HTO is the under- and overcorrection of the mechanical axis due to insufficient intraoperative visualisation. Twenty legs of fresh human cadaver were randomly assigned to navigated open-wedge HTO (n=10) or conventional HTO using the cable method (n=10). Regardless of the pre-existing alignment, the aim of all operations was to align the mechanical axis to pass through 80% of the tibial plateau (beginning with 0% at the medial edge of the tibial plateau and ending with 100% at the lateral edge). This overcorrection was chosen to ensure a sufficient amount of correction. Thus, the medial proximal tibia angle (MPTA) increased by 9.1+/-2.9 degrees (range 5.2 degrees -12.3 degrees ) on the average after navigated HTO and by 8.9+/-2.9 degrees (range 4.7 degrees -12.6 degrees ) after conventional HTO. After stabilization with a fixed angle implant, the alignment was measured by CT. After navigated HTO, the mechanical axis passed the tibial plateau through 79.7% (range 75.5-85.8%). In contrast, after conventional HTO, the average intersection of the mechanical axis was at 72.1% (range 60.4-82.4%) (P=0.020). Additionally, the variability of the mean corrections was significantly lower in the navigated group (3.3% vs. 7.2%, P=0.012). Total fluoroscopic radiation time was significantly lower in the navigated group (P=0.038) whereas the mean dose area product was not significantly different (P=0.231). The time of the operative procedure was 23 min shorter after conventional HTO (P<0.001). Navigation systems provide intraoperative 3-dimensional real time control of the frontal, sagittal, and transverse axis and may increase the accuracy of open-wedge HTO. Future studies have to analyse the clinical effects of navigation on corrective osteotomies. PMID:16501952

  9. Is Bone Grafting Necessary in Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy? A Meta-Analysis of Radiological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jae Hwi; Kim, Hyun Jung; Song, Jae Gwang; Yang, Jae Hyuk; Bhandare, Nikhl N; Fernandez, Aldrich Raymund; Park, Hyung Jun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Bone grafting in opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) is still controversial. The purpose of this study is to compare the radiological outcomes of OWHTO with bone graft (autogenous, allogenous, and synthetic bone graft) and those without bone graft. Materials and Methods PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Register of Studies databases were searched using specific inclusion and exclusion criteria for radiological studies involving OWHTO with bone graft and without bone graft groups. All reported delayed union, nonunion and correction loss were analyzed. Data were searched from the time period of January 2000 through July 2014. In addition, a modified Coleman methodology score (CMS) system was used to assess the methodological quality of the included studies. Results Twenty-five studies with a mean CMS value of 77 (range, 61 to 85 score) were included. In total, 1,841 patients underwent OWHTO using 4 different procedures for bone graft: autobone graft (n=352), allobone graft (n=547), synthetic bone graft (n=541) and no bone graft (n=401). There was a similar tendency for delayed union, nonunion and correction loss rate among the osteotomy space filling methods. Conclusions The meta-analysis showed there was a similar tendency for radiological union and correction maintenance among patients undergoing OWHTO regardless of the type of bone in all of the studies. However, the currently available evidence is not sufficient to strongly support the superiority of OWHTO with bone graft to OWHTO without bone graft. PMID:26675553

  10. A predictive factor for acquiring an ideal lower limb realignment after opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Bito, Haruhiko; Takeuchi, Ryohei; Kumagai, Ken; Aratake, Masato; Saito, Izumi; Hayashi, Riku; Sasaki, Yohei; Aota, Yoichi; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2009-04-01

    Obtaining a correct postoperative limb alignment is an important factor in achieving a successful clinical outcome after an opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO). To better predict some of the aspects that impact upon the clinical outcomes following this procedure, including postoperative correction loss and over correction, we examined the changes in the frontal plane of the lower limb in a cohort of patients who had undergone OWHTO using radiography. Forty-two knees from 33 patients (23 cases of osteoarthritis and 10 of osteonecrosis) underwent a valgus realignment OWHTO procedure and were radiographically assessed for changes that occurred pre- and post-surgery. The mean femorotibial angle (FTA) was found to be 182.1 +/- 2.0 degrees (12 +/- 2.0 anatomical varus angulation) preoperatively and 169.6 +/- 2.4 degrees (10.4 +/- 2.4 anatomical valgus angulation) postoperatively. These measurements thus revealed significant changes in the weight bearing line ratio (WBL), femoral axis angle (FA), tibial axis angle (TA), tibia plateau angle (TP), tibia vara angle (TV) and talar tilt angle (TT) following OWHTO. In contrast, no significant change was found in the weight bearing line angle (WBLA) after these treatments. To assess the relationship between the correction angle and these indexes, 42 knees were divided into the following three groups according to the postoperative FTA; a normal correction group (168 degrees < or = FTA < or = 172 degrees ), an over-correction group (FTA < 168 degrees ), and an under-correction group (FTA > 172 degrees ). There were significant differences in the delta angle [DA; calculated as (pre FTA - post FTA) - (pre TV - post TV)] among each group of patients. Our results thus indicate a negative correlation between the DA and preoperative TA (R(2) = 0.148, p < 0.05). Hence, given that the correction errors in our patients appear to negatively correlate with the preoperative TA, postoperative malalignments are likely to be predictable

  11. Opening- and Closing-Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Mitchell, Justin J.; Liechti, Daniel J.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Menge, Travis J.; Dean, Chase S.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lateral compartment osteoarthritis of the knee can be a challenging pathology in the younger, active population due to limited treatment options and high patient expectations. Distal femoral osteotomy (DFO) has been reported to be a potential treatment option. Purpose: To perform a systematic review on the survival, outcomes, and complications of DFO for treatment of genu valgum with concomitant lateral compartment osteoarthritis of the knee. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was performed using the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials, PubMed, and MEDLINE from 1980 to present. Inclusion criteria were as follows: outcomes of opening- and closing-wedge DFOs performed for treatment of genu valgum with concomitant lateral compartment osteoarthritis of the knee, English language, minimum 2-year follow-up, and human studies. Data abstracted from the selected studies included type of osteotomy (opening vs closing), survival rate, patient-reported and radiographic outcomes, and complications. Results: Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria and were considered for the review. A total of 9 closing-wedge and 5 opening-wedge DFO studies were included. All were retrospective studies and reported good to excellent patient-reported outcomes after DFO. Survival decreased with increasing time from surgery, with 1 study reporting a 100% survival rate at 6.5 years, compared with 21.5% at 20 years in another study. A low rate of complications was reported throughout the review. Conclusion: Highly heterogeneous literature exists for both opening- and closing-wedge DFOs for the treatment of isolated lateral compartment osteoarthritis with valgus malalignment. A mean survival rate of 80% at 10-year follow-up was reported, supporting that this procedure can be a viable treatment option to delay or reduce the need for joint arthroplasty. A low

  12. Open-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy Using a Protective Cutting System: Technical Advancement for the Accuracy of the Osteotomy and Avoiding Intraoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Seuk; Lee, Myung Chul; Kang, Seo Goo; Elazab, Ashraf; Oh, Won Seok

    2016-01-01

    Open-wedge high tibial osteotomy for medial unicompartmental arthritis of the knee joint is a successful treatment option but is associated with potential intraoperative complications such as tibial plateau fracture, dislocation of the osteotomy hinge, under- or over-correction of the posterior slope, and neurovascular injury. Therefore we devised a protective cutting system and describe our method for the prevention of these complications. The potential advantages of this system are protection of the posterior neurovascular structures using a curved protector, bone cutting along the natural tibial slope using a superior surface aligning with the natural tibial slope, and complete 1-plane sawing of the posterior wall before the lateral hinge. PMID:27073780

  13. Opening wedge osteotomies for correction of hallux valgus: a review of wedge plate fixation.

    PubMed

    Smith, W Bret; Hyer, Christopher F; DeCarbo, William T; Berlet, Gregory C; Lee, Thomas H

    2009-12-01

    Osteotomy of the proximal metatarsal for the correction of moderate to severe hallux valgus deformity is commonly performed. The purpose of this study is to review the early results of a technique for the correction of hallux valgus, an opening wedge osteotomy of the proximal first metatarsal with opening wedge plate fixation. A review was performed of the results of 47 patients (49 feet) who underwent correction of hallux valgus with proximal metatarsal opening wedge osteotomy. All osteotomies were secured with plate fixation on the medial side. Evaluation consisted of preoperative and postoperative radiographic as well as clinical evaluations. Mean corrections of 7 degrees were achieved for the 1-2 intermetatarsal angles. Fourteen complications occurred, 6 of which involved mild hardware irritation and did not affect outcome. Four nonunions or delayed unions were identified. The authors find the opening wedge osteotomy of the proximal first metatarsal to be a technically straightforward procedure for correcting moderate to severe hallux valgus. The correction obtained is comparable to other described techniques. PMID:20400425

  14. Flow rate limitation in open wedge channel under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, YueXing; Chen, XiaoQian; Huang, YiYong

    2013-08-01

    A study of flow rate limitation in an open wedge channel is reported in this paper. Under microgravity condition, the flow is controlled by the convection and the viscosity in the channel as well as the curvature of the liquid free surface. A maximum flow rate is achieved when the curvature cannot balance the pressure difference leading to a collapse of the free surface. A 1-dimensional theoretical model is used to predict the critical flow rate and calculate the shape of the free surface. Computational Fluid Dynamics tool is also used to simulate the phenomenon. Results show that the 1-dimensional model overestimates the critical flow rate because extra pressure loss is not included in the governing equation. Good agreement is found in 3-dimensional simulation results. Parametric study with different wedge angles and channel lengths show that the critical flow rate increases with increasing the cross section area; and decreases with increasing the channel length. The work in this paper can help understand the surface collapsing without gravity and for the design in propellant management devices in satellite tanks.

  15. High-energy rate forgings of wedges :

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Thomas Bither; Everhart, Wesley; Switzner, Nathan T; Balch, Dorian K.; San Marchi, Christopher W.

    2014-05-01

    The wedge geometry is a simple geometry for establishing a relatively constant gradient of strain in a forged part. The geometry is used to establish gradients in microstructure and strength as a function of strain, forging temperature, and quenching time after forging. This geometry has previously been used to benchmark predictions of strength and recrystallization using Sandias materials model for type 304L austenitic stainless steel. In this report, the processing conditions, in particular the times to forge and quench the forged parts, are summarized based on information recorded during forging on June 18, 2013 of the so-called wedge geometry from type 316L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn austenitic stainless steels.

  16. High tibial osteotomy using polycaprolactone-tricalcium phosphate polymer wedge in a micro pig model.

    PubMed

    Lim, H-C; Bae, J-H; Song, H-R; Teoh, S H; Kim, H-K; Kum, D-H

    2011-01-01

    Medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy has been gaining popularity in recent years, but adequate supporting material is required in the osteotomy gap for early weight-bearing and rapid union. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the implantation of a polycaprolactone-tricalcium phosphate composite scaffold wedge would enhance healing of the osteotomy in a micro pig model. We carried out open-wedge high tibial osteotomies in 12 micro pigs aged from 12 to 16 months. A scaffold wedge was inserted into six of the osteotomies while the other six were left open. Bone healing was evaluated after three and six months using plain radiographs, CT scans, measurement of the bone mineral density and histological examination. Complete bone union was obtained at six months in both groups. There was no collapse at the osteotomy site, loss of correction or failure of fixation in either group. Staining with haematoxylin and eosin demonstrated that there was infiltration of new bone tissue into the macropores and along the periphery of the implanted scaffold in the scaffold group. The CT scans and measurement of the bone mineral density showed that at six months specimens in the scaffold group had a higher bone mineral density than in the control group, although the implantation of the polycaprolactone-tricalcium phosphate composite scaffold wedge did not enhance healing of the osteotomy. PMID:21196556

  17. 50 CFR Figure 17 to Part 223 - Boone Wedge Cut Escape Opening

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Boone Wedge Cut Escape Opening 17 Figure 17 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES...

  18. 50 CFR Figure 17 to Part 223 - Boone Wedge Cut Escape Opening

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Boone Wedge Cut Escape Opening 17 Figure 17 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES...

  19. Proximal Opening Wedge Osteotomy Provides Satisfactory Midterm Results With a Low Complication Rate.

    PubMed

    Oravakangas, Rami; Leppilahti, Juhana; Laine, Vesa; Niinimäki, Tuukka

    2016-01-01

    Hallux valgus is one of the most common foot deformities. Proximal opening wedge osteotomy is used for the treatment of moderate and severe hallux valgus with metatarsus primus varus. However, hypermobility of the first tarsometatarsal joint can compromise the results of the operation, and a paucity of midterm results are available regarding proximal open wedge osteotomy surgery. The aim of the present study was to assess the midterm results of proximal open wedge osteotomy in a consecutive series of patients with severe hallux valgus. Thirty-one consecutive adult patients (35 feet) with severe hallux valgus underwent proximal open wedge osteotomy. Twenty patients (35.5%) and 23 feet (34.3%) were available for the final follow-up examination. The mean follow-up duration was 5.8 (range 4.6 to 7.0) years. The radiologic measurements and American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hallux-metatarsophalangeal-interphalangeal scores were recorded pre- and postoperatively, and subjective questionnaires were completed and foot scan analyses performed at the end of the follow-up period. The mean hallux valgus angle decreased from 38° to 23°, and the mean intermetatarsal angle correction decreased from 17° to 10°. The mean improvement in the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hallux metatarsophalangeal-interphalangeal score increased from 52 to 84. Two feet (5.7%) required repeat surgery because of recurrent hallux valgus. No nonunions were identified. Proximal open wedge osteotomy provided satisfactory midterm results in the treatment of severe hallux valgus, with a low complication rate. The potential instability of the first tarsometatarsal joint does not seem to jeopardize the midterm results of the operation. PMID:26905255

  20. The new "dual osteotomy": combined open wedge and tibial tuberosity anteriorisation osteotomies.

    PubMed

    Abdel Megied, Wael Samir; Mahran, Mahmoud A; Thakeb, Mootaz F; Abouelela, Amr A K H; Elbatrawy, Yasser

    2010-02-01

    The high frequency with which medial compartment osteoarthritis is associated with patellofemoral osteoarthritis makes the addition of tibial tuberosity anteriorisation to high tibial osteotomy an appealing solution, despite the discouraging previously reported long-term results when tubercle anteriorisation was combined with a Coventry closed wedge technique. We conducted a prospective study of a new osteotomy combination: "the dual osteotomy". An open wedge high tibial osteotomy was combined with 1- to 1.5-cm Maquet-like tibial tuberosity anteriorisation. Thirty-four knees in 30 patients underwent surgery, including ten knees in nine male patients and 24 knees in 21 female patients with a mean age of 45 years (age range 34-58 years). All patients had varus medial compartment osteoarthritis and patellofemoral osteoarthritis with preoperative anatomical tibiofemoral angle exceeding 5 degrees . Twenty-four months after surgery, final evaluation detected improvement in the Knee Society clinical rating system function score from a mean of 61.3 (range 30-80) preoperatively to a mean of 87.3 (range 50-100) postoperatively and in the knee pain score from 27.3 (range 10-30) to 47 (range 30-50) postoperatively. Based on the rating system, at final follow-up, 70% of patients experienced no pain, 13% had mild or occasional pain, 10% had pain on stairs only, and 7% had pain during walking and on stairs. Anatomical tibiofemoral angles from 0 to 10 degrees valgus were achieved in 91% of operated knees, and union was achieved in all cases within six to twelve weeks after surgery. The dual osteotomy was effective in the short term in cases of medial compartment osteoarthritis associated with patellofemoral osteoarthritis. PMID:19998035

  1. Heat transfer from an open-wedge cavity to a symmetrically impinging slot air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Mostafa; Mazraeh, Adel Etefagh

    2014-08-01

    Heat transfer from an open-wedge cavity to a symmetrically impinging slot air jet is investigated at the present study. The effect of the cavity angle was mainly examined on the Nusselt number distribution. Based on the results, heat transfer was generally poor at the vicinity of the apex, rising to form a maximum at the impingement and then followed by a moderate decline at further distances. The region of maximum heat transfer on the surfaces shifted outward the cavity as the cavity angle was decreased. Also, average Nusselt number over an effective length of the surface remained almost constant and independent of the cavity angle for a specified jet Reynolds number and nozzle-to-apex spacing.

  2. Medial proximal tibial angle after medial opening wedge HTO: A retrospective diagnostic test study

    PubMed Central

    Pornrattanamaneewong, Chaturong; Narkbunnam, Rapeepat; Chareancholvanich, Keerati

    2012-01-01

    Background: Medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) is the commonly used angle, which is simply measured from the knee radiographs. It can determine the correction angle in medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (MOWHTO). The hypothesis of our study is that post-osteotomy MPTA can predict the change in correction angle, and we aimed to determine the optimal MPTA with which to prevent recurrent varus deformity after MOWHTO. Materials and Methods: Between January 2002 and April 2010, radiographs of 59 patients, who underwent 71 MOWHTOs using the locking-compression osteotomy plates without bone grafts, were evaluated for the change of the MPTA. The MPTA was measured preoperatively and one and twelve months postoperatively. The changes of MPTA between one and twelve months were classified into valgus, stable, and varus change. The predicting factors were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni multiple comparisons. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to find out the cut off point for preventing the recurrent varus deformity. Results: The overall preoperative, and one and twelve month postoperative MPTA values were 84.4 ± 2.4°, 97.2 ± 4.1°, and 96.3 ± 3.6°, respectively. Between one and twelve months, 39 knees displayed reduced varus change (–2.8 ± 2.1°), 18 knees displayed no change, and 14 knees displayed a greater valgus change (+2.9 ± 2.1°). The best factor for predicting these changes was the one month MPTA value (P = 0.006). By using the ROC curve, a one month MPTA of 95° was analyzed as the cut off point for preventing the recurrent varus deformity. With MPTA ≥95°, 92.3% of the osteotomies exhibited stable or varus change and 7.7% exhibited valgus change. However, with MPTA <95°, 47.4% exhibited stable or varus change and 52.6% exhibited valgus change (P < 0.001, odds ratio = 13.3). Conclusion: The postoperative MPTA can be used to predict the change in correction angle and an MPTA of at least 95° is

  3. Predicting translational deformity following opening-wedge osteotomy for lower limb realignment.

    PubMed

    Barksfield, Richard C; Monsell, Fergal P

    2015-11-01

    An opening-wedge osteotomy is well recognised for the management of limb deformity and requires an understanding of the principles of geometry. Translation at the osteotomy is needed when the osteotomy is performed away from the centre of rotation of angulation (CORA), but the amount of translation varies with the distance from the CORA. This translation enables proximal and distal axes on either side of the proposed osteotomy to realign. We have developed two experimental models to establish whether the amount of translation required (based on the translation deformity created) can be predicted based upon simple trigonometry. A predictive algorithm was derived where translational deformity was predicted as 2(tan α × d), where α represents 50 % of the desired angular correction, and d is the distance of the desired osteotomy site from the CORA. A simulated model was developed using TraumaCad online digital software suite (Brainlab AG, Germany). Osteotomies were simulated in the distal femur, proximal tibia and distal tibia for nine sets of lower limb scanograms at incremental distances from the CORA and the resulting translational deformity recorded. There was strong correlation between the distance of the osteotomy from the CORA and simulated translation deformity for distal femoral deformities (correlation coefficient 0.99, p < 0.0001), proximal tibial deformities (correlation coefficient 0.93-0.99, p < 0.0001) and distal tibial deformities (correlation coefficient 0.99, p < 0.0001). There was excellent agreement between the predictive algorithm and simulated translational deformity for all nine simulations (correlation coefficient 0.93-0.99, p < 0.0001). Translational deformity following corrective osteotomy for lower limb deformity can be anticipated and predicted based upon the angular correction and the distance between the planned osteotomy site and the CORA. PMID:26395502

  4. Dehydration of chlorite explains anomalously high electrical conductivity in the mantle wedges.

    PubMed

    Manthilake, Geeth; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Novella, Davide; Mookherjee, Mainak; Andrault, Denis

    2016-05-01

    Mantle wedge regions in subduction zone settings show anomalously high electrical conductivity (~1 S/m) that has often been attributed to the presence of aqueous fluids released by slab dehydration. Laboratory-based measurements of the electrical conductivity of hydrous phases and aqueous fluids are significantly lower and cannot readily explain the geophysically observed anomalously high electrical conductivity. The released aqueous fluid also rehydrates the mantle wedge and stabilizes a suite of hydrous phases, including serpentine and chlorite. In this present study, we have measured the electrical conductivity of a natural chlorite at pressures and temperatures relevant for the subduction zone setting. In our experiment, we observe two distinct conductivity enhancements when chlorite is heated to temperatures beyond its thermodynamic stability field. The initial increase in electrical conductivity to ~3 × 10(-3) S/m can be attributed to chlorite dehydration and the release of aqueous fluids. This is followed by a unique, subsequent enhancement of electrical conductivity of up to 7 × 10(-1) S/m. This is related to the growth of an interconnected network of a highly conductive and chemically impure magnetite mineral phase. Thus, the dehydration of chlorite and associated processes are likely to be crucial in explaining the anomalously high electrical conductivity observed in mantle wedges. Chlorite dehydration in the mantle wedge provides an additional source of aqueous fluid above the slab and could also be responsible for the fixed depth (120 ± 40 km) of melting at the top of the subducting slab beneath the subduction-related volcanic arc front. PMID:27386526

  5. Dehydration of chlorite explains anomalously high electrical conductivity in the mantle wedges

    PubMed Central

    Manthilake, Geeth; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Novella, Davide; Mookherjee, Mainak; Andrault, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Mantle wedge regions in subduction zone settings show anomalously high electrical conductivity (~1 S/m) that has often been attributed to the presence of aqueous fluids released by slab dehydration. Laboratory-based measurements of the electrical conductivity of hydrous phases and aqueous fluids are significantly lower and cannot readily explain the geophysically observed anomalously high electrical conductivity. The released aqueous fluid also rehydrates the mantle wedge and stabilizes a suite of hydrous phases, including serpentine and chlorite. In this present study, we have measured the electrical conductivity of a natural chlorite at pressures and temperatures relevant for the subduction zone setting. In our experiment, we observe two distinct conductivity enhancements when chlorite is heated to temperatures beyond its thermodynamic stability field. The initial increase in electrical conductivity to ~3 × 10−3 S/m can be attributed to chlorite dehydration and the release of aqueous fluids. This is followed by a unique, subsequent enhancement of electrical conductivity of up to 7 × 10−1 S/m. This is related to the growth of an interconnected network of a highly conductive and chemically impure magnetite mineral phase. Thus, the dehydration of chlorite and associated processes are likely to be crucial in explaining the anomalously high electrical conductivity observed in mantle wedges. Chlorite dehydration in the mantle wedge provides an additional source of aqueous fluid above the slab and could also be responsible for the fixed depth (120 ± 40 km) of melting at the top of the subducting slab beneath the subduction-related volcanic arc front. PMID:27386526

  6. Monte Carlo Simulation of a 6 MV X-Ray Beam for Open and Wedge Radiation Fields, Using GATE Code

    PubMed Central

    Bahreyni-Toosi, Mohammad-Taghi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Momennezhad, Mahdi; Hasanabadi, Fatemeh; Gholamhosseinian, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a control software system, based on Monte Carlo simulation, and calculations of dosimetric parameters of standard and wedge radiation fields, using a Monte Carlo method. GATE version 6.1 (OpenGATE Collaboration), was used to simulate a compact 6 MV linear accelerator system. In order to accelerate the calculations, the phase-space technique and cluster computing (Condor version 7.2.4, Condor Team, University of Wisconsin–Madison) were used. Dosimetric parameters used in treatment planning systems for the standard and wedge radiation fields (10 cm × 10 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm and a 60° wedge), including the percentage depth dose and dose profiles, were measured by both computational and experimental methods. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results with 3%/3 mm criteria. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results. Almost all calculated data points have satisfied gamma index criteria of 3% to 3 mm. Based on the good agreement between calculated and measured results obtained for various radiation fields in this study, GATE may be used as a useful tool for quality control or pretreatment verification procedures in radiotherapy. PMID:25426430

  7. PRE-OPERATIVE PLANNING AND SURGICAL TECHNIQUE OF THE OPEN WEDGE SUPRACONDYLAR OSTEOTOMY FOR CORRECTION OF VALGUS KNEE AND FIXATION WITH A FIXED-ANGLE IMPLANT

    PubMed Central

    Paccola, Cleber Antonio Jansen

    2015-01-01

    The step-by-step preoperative planning for supracondylar opening wedge osteotomy of the femur for precise correction of the load axis of the lower limb using a fixed-angle implant (95° AO blade plate) is presented. The surgical technique and the use of a bone graft from the same site for filling in the defect are also presented. PMID:27026976

  8. Optimal clinical implementation of the Siemens virtual wedge

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.P.; Richmond, N.D.; Lambert, G.D

    2003-09-30

    Installation of a modern high-energy Siemens Primus linear accelerator at the Northern Centre for Cancer Treatment (NCCT) provided the opportunity to investigate the optimal clinical implementation of the Siemens virtual wedge filter. Previously published work has concentrated on the production of virtual wedge angles at 15 deg., 30 deg., 45 deg., and 60 deg. as replacements for the Siemens hard wedges of the same nominal angles. However, treatment plan optimization of the dose distribution can be achieved with the Primus, as its control software permits the selection of any virtual wedge angle from 15 degree sign to 60 degree sign in increments of 1 deg. The same result can also be produced from a combination of open and 60 deg. wedged fields. Helax-TMS models both of these modes of virtual wedge delivery by the wedge angle and the wedge fraction methods respectively. This paper describes results of timing studies in the planning of optimized patient dose distributions by both methods and in the subsequent treatment delivery procedures. Employment of the wedge fraction method results in the delivery of small numbers of monitor units to the beam's central axis; therefore, wedge profile stability and delivered dose with low numbers of monitor units were also investigated. The wedge fraction was proven to be the most efficient method when the time taken for both planning and treatment delivery were taken into consideration, and is now used exclusively for virtual wedge treatment delivery in Newcastle. It has also been shown that there are no unfavorable dosimetric consequences from its practical implementation.

  9. Wedges I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewitt-Morette, Cécile; Low, Stephen G.; Schulman, Lawrence S.; Shiekh, Anwar Y.

    1986-04-01

    The wedge problem, that is, the propagation of radiation or particles in the presence of a wedge, is examined in different contexts. Generally, the paper follows the historical order from Sommerfeld's early work to recent stochastic results—hindsights and new results being woven in as appropriate. In each context, identifying the relevant mathematical problem has been the key to the solution. Thus each section can be given both a physics and a mathematics title: Section 2: diffraction by reflecting wedge; boundary value problem of differential equations; solutions defined on mutiply connected spaces. Section 3: geometrical theory of diffraction; identificiation of function spaces. Section 4: path integral solutions; path integration on multiply connected spaces; asymptotics on the boundaries of function spaces. Section 5: probing the shape of the wedge and the roughness of its surface; stochastic calculus. Several propagators and Green functions are given explicitly, some old ones and some new ones. They include the knife-edge propagator for Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions, the absorbing knife edge propagator, the wedge propagators, the propagator for a free particle on a μ-sheeted Riemann surface, the Dirichlet and the Neumann wedge Green function.

  10. Wedges I

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt-Morette, C.; Low, S.G.; Schulman, L.S.; Shiekh, A.Y.

    1986-04-01

    The wedge problem, that is, the propagation of radiation or particles in the presence of a wedge, is examined in different contexts. Generally, the paper follows the historical order from Sommerfeld's early work to recent stochastic results - hindsights and new results being woven in as appropriate. In each context, identifying the relevant mathematical problem has been the key to the solution. Thus each section can be given both a physics and a mathematics title: Section 2: diffraction by reflecting wedge; boundary value problem of differential equations; solutions defined on multiply connected spaces. Section 3: geometrical theory of diffraction; identification of function spaces. Section 4: path integral solutions; path integration on multiply connected spaces; asymptotics on the boundaries of function spaces. Section 5: probing the shape of the wedge and the roughness of its surface; stochastic calculus. Several propagators and Green functions are given explicitly, some old ones and some new ones. They include the knife-edge propagator for Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions, the absorbing knife edge propagator, the wedge propagators, the propagator for a free particle on a /sigma phi/-sheeted Riemann surface, the Dirichlet and the Neumann wedge Green function.

  11. Nonlinear thermal and moisture response of ice-wedge polygons to permafrost disturbance increases heterogeneity of high Arctic wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Etienne; Fortier, Daniel; Lévesque, Esther

    2016-03-01

    Low-center polygonal terrains with gentle sloping surfaces and lowlands in the high Arctic have a potential to retain water in the lower central portion of ice-wedge polygons and are considered high-latitude wetlands. Such wetlands in the continuous permafrost regions have an important ecological role in an otherwise generally arid region. In the valley of the glacier C-79 on Bylot Island (Nunavut, Canada), thermal erosion gullies were rapidly eroding the permafrost along ice wedges affecting the integrity of the polygons by breaching and collapsing the surrounding rims. Intact polygons were characterized by a relative homogeneity in terms of topography, snow cover, maximum active layer thaw depth, ground moisture content and vegetation cover (where eroded polygons responded nonlinearly to perturbations, which resulted in differing conditions in the latter elements). The heterogeneous nature of disturbed terrains impacted active layer thickness, ground ice aggradation in the upper portion of permafrost, soil moisture, vegetation dynamics and carbon storage.

  12. Structural development of a high-pressure collisional accretionary wedge: The Samaná complex, Northern Hispaniola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escuder-Viruete, Javier; Pérez-Estaún, Andrés; Gabites, Janet; Suárez-Rodríguez, Ángela

    2011-05-01

    The Samaná metamorphic complex exposes a segment of a high-pressure collisional accretionary wedge, built during Caribbean island arc-North America continental margin convergence. Combined detailed mapping, structural and metamorphic analysis, and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology show that the deformation can be divided into five main events. Early subduction-related D1 deformation and high-P/low-T M1 metamorphism under lawsonite blueschist (325-425 °C/12-18 kbar; Rincon Marbles and Santa Bárbara Schists lower structural nappes) and eclogite facies conditions (425-450 °C/18-20 kbar; Punta Balandra upper structural nappe), was followed by M2 decompression and cooling in the blueschist facies conditions during D2 folding, thrusting and nappe stacking. 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages and T-t/P-t estimations revealed Late Eocene to earliest Miocene retrograde M2 metamorphism in the different nappes for a consistent D2 top-to-the-ENE tectonic transport, which suggests a general northeastward progradation of deformation. The D3 event substantially modified the nappe stack and produced open to tight folds with amplitudes up to kilometer-scale and the D4 ductile to brittle normal shear zones and faults, and related subhorizontal folding, record a late extensional deformation, which also affects the whole nappe pile. Non-penetrative D3 and D4 fabrics indicate M3 cooling in and under the M3 greenschist-facies conditions. From the Miocene to the Present, the nappe pile was cut and laterally displaced by a D5 sinistral strike-slip and reverse fault system associated with the Septentrional fault zone.

  13. Rethinking wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Steven J.; Cao, Long; Caldeira, Ken; Hoffert, Martin I.

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Stabilizing CO2 emissions at current levels for fifty years is not consistent with either an atmospheric CO2 concentration below 500 ppm or global temperature increases below 2 °C. Accepting these targets, solving the climate problem requires that emissions peak and decline in the next few decades, and ultimately fall to near zero. Phasing out emissions over 50 years could be achieved by deploying on the order of 19 'wedges', each of which ramps up linearly over a period of 50 years to ultimately avoid 1 GtC y-1 of CO2 emissions. But this level of mitigation will require affordable carbon-free energy systems to be deployed at the scale of tens of terawatts. Any hope for such fundamental and disruptive transformation of the global energy system depends upon coordinated efforts to innovate, plan, and deploy new transportation and energy systems that can provide affordable energy at this scale without emitting CO2 to the atmosphere. 1. Introduction In 2004, Pacala and Socolow published a study in Science arguing that '[h]umanity can solve the carbon and climate problem in the first half of this century simply by scaling up what we already know how to do' [1]. Specifically, they presented 15 options for 'stabilization wedges' that would grow linearly from zero to 1 Gt of carbon emissions avoided per year (GtC y-1 1 Gt = 1012 kg) over 50 years. The solution to the carbon and climate problem, they asserted, was 'to deploy the technologies and/or lifestyle changes necessary to fill all seven wedges of the stabilization triangle'. They claimed this would offset the growth of emissions and put us on a trajectory to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentration at 500 ppm if emissions decreased sharply in the second half of the 21st century. The wedge concept has proven popular as an analytical tool for considering the potential of different technologies to reduce CO2 emissions. In the years since the paper was published, it has been cited more than 400 times, and

  14. Long-term outcomes of wedge resection at the limbus for high irregular corneal astigmatism after repaired corneal laceration

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jun; Zheng, Guang-Ying; Wen, Cheng-Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Fang; Zhu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the clinical value of wedge resection at corneal limbus in patients with traumatic corneal scarring and high irregular astigmatism. METHODS Patients with traumatic corneal astigmatism received wedge resection at least 6mo after suture removal from corneal wound. The uncorrected distance visual acuities (UCVA) and best corrected distance visual acuities (BCVA), pre- and post-operation astigmatism, spherical equivalent (SE), safety and complications were evaluated. RESULTS Ten eyes (10 patients) were enrolled in this study. Mean follow-up time after wedge resection was 37.8±15.4mo (range, 20-61mo). The mean UCVA improved from +1.07±0.55 logMAR to +0.43±0.22 logMAR (P=0.000) and the mean BCVA from +0.50±0.30 logMAR to +0.15±0.17 logMAR (P=0.000). The mean astigmatism power measured by retinoscopy was -2.03±2.27 D postoperatively and -2.83±4.52 D preoperatively (P=0.310). The mean SE was -0.74±1.61 D postoperatively and -0.64±1.89 D preoperatively (P=0.601). Two cases developed mild pannus near the sutures. No corneal perforation, infectious keratitis or wound gape occurred. CONCLUSION Corneal-scleral limbal wedge resection with compression suture is a safe, effective treatment for poor patients with high irregular corneal astigmatism after corneal-scleral penetrating injury. Retinoscopy can prove particularly useful for high irregular corneal astigmatism when other measurements are not amenable. PMID:27366685

  15. Viscid-inviscid interaction associated with incompressible flow past wedges at high Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warpinski, N. R.; Chow, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical method is suggested for the study of the viscid inviscid interaction associated with incompressible flow past wedges with arbitrary angles. It is shown that the determination of the nearly constant pressure (base pressure) prevailing within the near wake is really the heart of the problem, and the pressure can only be established from these interactive considerations. The basic free streamline flow field is established through two discrete parameters which adequately describe the inviscid flow around the body and the wake. The viscous flow processes such as the boundary layer buildup, turbulent jet mixing, and recompression are individually analyzed and attached to the inviscid flow in the sense of the boundary layer concept. The interaction between the viscous and inviscid streams is properly displayed by the fact that the aforementioned discrete parameters needed for the inviscid flow are determined by the viscous flow condition at the point of reattachment. It is found that the reattachment point behaves as a saddle point singularity for the system of equations describing the recompressive viscous flow processes, and this behavior is exploited for the establishment of the overall flow field. Detailed results such as the base pressure, pressure distributions on the wedge, and the geometry of the wake are determined as functions of the wedge angle.

  16. Rethinking wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Steven J.; Cao, Long; Caldeira, Ken; Hoffert, Martin I.

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Stabilizing CO2 emissions at current levels for fifty years is not consistent with either an atmospheric CO2 concentration below 500 ppm or global temperature increases below 2 °C. Accepting these targets, solving the climate problem requires that emissions peak and decline in the next few decades, and ultimately fall to near zero. Phasing out emissions over 50 years could be achieved by deploying on the order of 19 'wedges', each of which ramps up linearly over a period of 50 years to ultimately avoid 1 GtC y-1 of CO2 emissions. But this level of mitigation will require affordable carbon-free energy systems to be deployed at the scale of tens of terawatts. Any hope for such fundamental and disruptive transformation of the global energy system depends upon coordinated efforts to innovate, plan, and deploy new transportation and energy systems that can provide affordable energy at this scale without emitting CO2 to the atmosphere. 1. Introduction In 2004, Pacala and Socolow published a study in Science arguing that '[h]umanity can solve the carbon and climate problem in the first half of this century simply by scaling up what we already know how to do' [1]. Specifically, they presented 15 options for 'stabilization wedges' that would grow linearly from zero to 1 Gt of carbon emissions avoided per year (GtC y-1 1 Gt = 1012 kg) over 50 years. The solution to the carbon and climate problem, they asserted, was 'to deploy the technologies and/or lifestyle changes necessary to fill all seven wedges of the stabilization triangle'. They claimed this would offset the growth of emissions and put us on a trajectory to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentration at 500 ppm if emissions decreased sharply in the second half of the 21st century. The wedge concept has proven popular as an analytical tool for considering the potential of different technologies to reduce CO2 emissions. In the years since the paper was published, it has been cited more than 400 times, and

  17. Radial wedge flange clamp

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    A radial wedge flange clamp comprising a pair of flanges each comprising a plurality of peripheral flat wedge facets having flat wedge surfaces and opposed and mating flat surfaces attached to or otherwise engaged with two elements to be joined and including a series of generally U-shaped wedge clamps each having flat wedge interior surfaces and engaging one pair of said peripheral flat wedge facets. Each of said generally U-shaped wedge clamps has in its opposing extremities apertures for the tangential insertion of bolts to apply uniform radial force to said wedge clamps when assembled about said wedge segments.

  18. Grounding-zone wedges (GZWs) on high-latitude continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, Christine; Dowdeswell, Julian

    2014-05-01

    inferred for GZWs on the Greenland, Norwegian, Canadian and Barents Sea margins. However, no significant relationship between GZW length and thickness exists for the GZWs described from the Antarctic margin. GZWs typically possess a semi-transparent to chaotic acoustic character, which reflects the delivery of diamictic subglacial debris. Many GZWs contain low-amplitude, seaward-dipping internal reflections, which indicate sediment progradation and wedge-growth through continued delivery of basal sediments from the flow of active ice. The formation of GZWs is inferred to require high rates of sediment delivery to a relatively stable, fast-flowing ice margin. Ice-margin stabilisation, and consequently GZW formation, is dependent on a number of factors, including the ice-sheet mass balance, sea-level fluctuations, and the rate of inland-ice delivery to the grounding-zone. GZWs may be formed preferentially by glaciers with termini ending as floating ice shelves, which restrict vertical accommodation space and prevent the build-up of high-amplitude moraine ridges. The basal topography of the continental shelf can also act as a control on GZW formation. The majority of high-latitude GZWs are located at topographic or lateral pinning points within cross-shelf troughs, which encourage ice-margin stabilisation through reducing iceberg calving and increasing basal and lateral drag.

  19. Large Erosional Features on the Cascadia Accretionary Wedge Imaged with New High-Resolution Multibeam Bathymetry and Seismic Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeson, J. W.; Goldfinger, C.

    2013-12-01

    Utilizing new high resolution multibeam bathymetric data along with chirp sub-bottom and multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data, we identified remarkable erosional features on the toe of the Cascadia accretionary wedge near Willapa Canyon, offshore Washington, USA. Bathymetric data was compiled from the Cascadia Open-Access Seismic Transects (COAST) cruise and from the site survey cruise for the Cascadia Initiative. These features loosely resemble slope failures of the frontal thrust, but can be distinguished from such failures by several key features: They incise the crest of the frontal thrust and encompass the landward limb; They have floors below the level of the abyssal plain, similar to plunge pool morphology; They show no evidence of landslide blocks at the base of the slope indicative of block sliding. The features where likely formed during the latest Pleistocene based on post event deposition, cross-cutting relationships with Juan de Fuca Channel and the Willapa Channel levees and wave field, and post event slip on the frontal thrust of the Cascadia accretionary prism. The Holocene levees of both Willapa Channel and Juan de Fuca Channel overlap these older features, and clearly place an upper bound on the age of the erosional features in the latest Pleistocene. A lower bound is estimated from a sub-bottom profile that images ~30 meters of post scour sediment fill. Using existing literature of Holocene and Pleistocene sedimentation rates we estimate a lower age bound between ~23,000 - 56,000 y.b.p. We also map a fault scarp within the erosional feature, with ~60 m of vertical offset. Using multi-channel seismic reflection profiles from the COAST cruise we interpret this scarp as the surface expression of the landward vergent frontal thrust fault. The apparent short duration of the erosional event along the seaward margin of the accretionary wedge, coupled with the presence of the fresh fault scarp within the erosion zone, are indicative of a dormant

  20. Diffusion induced flow on a wedge-shaped obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagumennyi, Ia V.; Dimitrieva, N. F.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper the problem of evolution of diffusion induced flow on a wedge-shaped obstacle is analyzed numerically. The governing set of fundamental equations is solved using original solvers from the open source OpenFOAM package on supercomputer facilities. Due to breaking of naturally existing diffusion flux of a stratifying agent by the impermeable surface of the wedge a complex multi-level vortex system of compensatory fluid motions is formed around the obstacle. Sharp edges of the obstacle generate extended high-gradient horizontal interfaces which are clearly observed in laboratory experiments by high-resolution Schlieren visualization. Formation of an intensive pressure depression zone in front of the leading vertex of the wedge is responsible for generation of propulsive force resulting in a self-displacement of the obstacle along the neutral buoyancy horizon in a stably stratified environment. The size of the pressure deficiency area near the sharp vertex of a concave wedge is about twice that for a convex one. This demonstrates a more intensive propulsion mechanism in case of the concave wedge and, accordingly, a higher velocity of its self-movement in a continuously stratified medium.

  1. On sound scattering by rigid edges and wedges in a flow, with applications to high-lift device aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roger, Michel; Moreau, Stéphane; Kucukcoskun, Korcan

    2016-02-01

    Exact analytical solutions for the scattering of sound by the edge of a rigid half-plane and by a rigid corner in the presence of a uniform flow are considered in this work, for arbitrary source and observer locations. Exact Green's functions for the Helmholtz equation are first reviewed and implemented in a quiescent propagation space from reference expressions of the literature. The effect of uniform fluid motion is introduced in a second step and the properties of the field are discussed for point dipoles and quadrupoles. The asymptotic regime of a source close to the scattering edge/wedge and of an observer far from it in terms of acoustic wavelengths is derived in both cases. Its validity limits are assessed by comparing with the exact solutions. Typically the asymptotic directivity is imposed by Green's function but not by the source itself. This behaviour is associated with a strong enhancement of the radiation with respect to what the source would produce in free field. The amplification depends on the geometry, on the source type and on the source distance to the edge/wedge. Various applications in aeroacoustics of wall-bounded flows are addressed, more specifically dealing with high-lift device noise mechanisms, such as trailing-edge or flap side-edge noise. The asymptotic developments are used to highlight trends that are believed to play a role in airframe noise.

  2. CarD uses a minor groove wedge mechanism to stabilize the RNA polymerase open promoter complex

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Brian; Chen, James; Davis, Elizabeth; Leon, Katherine; Darst, Seth A; Campbell, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    A key point to regulate gene expression is at transcription initiation, and activators play a major role. CarD, an essential activator in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is found in many bacteria, including Thermus species, but absent in Escherichia coli. To delineate the molecular mechanism of CarD, we determined crystal structures of Thermus transcription initiation complexes containing CarD. The structures show CarD interacts with the unique DNA topology presented by the upstream double-stranded/single-stranded DNA junction of the transcription bubble. We confirm that our structures correspond to functional activation complexes, and extend our understanding of the role of a conserved CarD Trp residue that serves as a minor groove wedge, preventing collapse of the transcription bubble to stabilize the transcription initiation complex. Unlike E. coli RNAP, many bacterial RNAPs form unstable promoter complexes, explaining the need for CarD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08505.001 PMID:26349034

  3. Evaluation of a high-precision gear measuring machine for helix measurement using helix and wedge artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Tetsuya; Kondo, Yohan

    2016-08-01

    High-precision gears are required for advanced motion and power transmission. The reliability of the measured value becomes important as the gear accuracy increases, and the establishment of a traceability system is needed. Therefore, a high-precision gear measuring machine (GMM) with a smaller uncertainty is expected to improve the gear calibration uncertainty. For this purpose, we developed a prototype of a high-precision GMM that adopts a direct drive mechanism and other features. Then, the high measurement capability of the developed GMM was verified using gear artifacts. Recently, some new measurement methods using simple shapes such as spheres and planes have been proposed as standards. We have verified the tooth profile measurement using a sphere artifact and reported the results that the developed GMM had a high capability in tooth profile measurement. Therefore, we attempted to devise a new evaluation method for helix measurement using a wedge artifact (WA) whose plane was treated as the tooth flank, and the high measurement capability of the developed GMM was verified. The results will provide a part of information to fully assess measurement uncertainty as our future work. This paper describes the evaluation results of the developed GMM for helix measurement using both a helix artifact and the WA, and discusses the effectiveness of the WA as a new artifact to evaluate the GMMs.

  4. Thermally actuated wedge block

    DOEpatents

    Queen, Jr., Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an automatically-operating wedge block for maintaining intimate structural contact over wide temperature ranges, including cryogenic use. The wedging action depends on the relative thermal expansion of two materials having very different coefficients of thermal expansion. The wedge block expands in thickness when cooled to cryogenic temperatures and contracts in thickness when returned to room temperature.

  5. Wedge Joints for Trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Kenneth E.

    1987-01-01

    Structure assembled rapidly with simple hand tools. Proposed locking wedge joints enable rapid assembly of lightweight beams, towers, scaffolds, and other truss-type structures. Lightweight structure assembled from tubular struts joined at nodes by wedge pins fitting into mating slots. Joint assembled rapidly by seating wedge pin in V-shaped slots and deforming end of strut until primary pawl engages it.

  6. Structure of turbulent wedges created by isolated surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuester, Matthew S.; White, Edward B.

    2016-04-01

    Isolated surface roughness in a laminar boundary layer can create a wedge of turbulence that spreads laterally into the surrounding laminar flow. Some recent studies have identified high- and low-speed streaks along the exterior of turbulent wedges. In this experiment, developing turbulent wedges are measured to observe the creation of these streaks. Naphthalene shear stress surface visualization and hotwire measurements are utilized to investigate the details of turbulent wedges created by cylinders in a laminar flat-plate boundary layer. Both the surface visualization and the hotwire measurements show high- and low-speed streaks in the wake of the cylinder that devolve into a turbulent wedge. The turbulent wedge spreading is associated with the emergence of these high- and low-speed streaks along the outside of the wedge. As the wedge evolves in the streamwise direction, these streaks persist inside of the core of the wedge, while new, lower amplitude streaks form along the outside of the wedge. Adding asymmetry to the cylinder moved the virtual origin closer to the roughness and increased the vortex shedding frequency, while adding small-scale roughness features did not strongly affect turbulent wedge development. Intermittency calculations additionally show the origin of the turbulent core inside of the wedge. The structure and spacing of the high-speed streaks along the extremities of the turbulent wedge give insight into the spreading angle of the turbulent wedge.

  7. High and Ultrahigh pressure peridotites: fossil reservoirs of subduction zone processes and deep crust-mantle wedge interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scambelluri, Marco

    2010-05-01

    The large-scale mass transfer allied with subduction recycles surface volatiles and crustal materials into the mantle, to affect its composition and rheology. Most geological processes related to subduction thus originate from an interplay between subducting plates and overlying lithospheric and asthenospheric mantle. Much information on phase relations during subduction has been provided by experiments and by studies of natural high- (HP) and ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) rocks and fluids. In contrast, knowledge on supra-subduction mantle wedges is much less. Here, the interaction between slab fluids and mantle rocks at variable subduction depths is discussed considering two case-studies: the UHP garnet websterites from Bardane (Western Gneiss Region, Norway) and the HP garnet peridotites from the Ulten Zone (Eastern Alps). The Bardane websterites derive from cold Archean subcontinental mantle involved in Scandian subduction to UHP. Subduction metamorphism was promoted by slab fluid infiltration in the overlying mantle up to P of 6.5 - 7 GPa (c.a. 200 km depth), as witnessed by micro-diamond-bearing inclusions and by crystallization of majoritic garnet in veins. The Ulten peridotites are slices of Variscan mantle wedge which experienced infiltration of metasomatic subduction fluids. These favoured transformation of spinel-peridotites into garnet + amphibole + dolomite peridotites at P < 3GPa. Formation of metasomatized garnet peridotite mylonites suggest channelled influx of subduction fluids. The high XMg and the incompatible element-enriched composition of subduction minerals in Bardane indicate that previously depleted websterites were refertilized by COH subduction fluids. Comparison with the Ulten garnet + amphibole + dolomite peridotites outlines relevant similarity in the metasomatic fingerprints and in the COH fluid phase involved. This calls for concomitant subduction of the continental crust, to provide carbon and incompatible element-enriched fluids. For

  8. The matching of wedge transmission factors across six multi-energy linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Weston, S J; Thompson, R C A; Morgan, A M

    2007-01-01

    Elekta Precise linear accelerators create a wedged isodose distribution using a single, fixed, motorized wedge with a nominal wedge angle of 60 degrees. Wedge angles of less than 60 degrees can be produced by varying the proportion of open and wedge monitor units for a given exposure. The fixed wedge can be replaced with a mobile wedge, the position of which can be moved in order to adjust the wedge transmission factor (WTF). Using the original fixed wedges installed in our fleet of six Elekta accelerators, we found a range of 4% in measured wedge transmission factor for 6 MV beams. Results are presented which demonstrate that by using the mobile wedge it is possible to match the wedge transmission factors to within 1% for the six linear accelerators over three energies. PMID:17267473

  9. Wedged Fibers Suppress Feedback of Laser Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladany, I.

    1986-01-01

    When injected laser is coupled into optical fiber, emission instabilities arise because of optical feedback losses from fiber into laser. Coupling efficiencies as high as 80 percent, however, obtained by shaping end of multimode fiber into obtuse-angled wedge. Because slanted sides eliminate back reflection, such wedged fiber achieves high coupling efficiency.

  10. Evaluating the dose to the contralateral breast when using a dynamic wedge versus a regular wedge.

    PubMed

    Weides, C D; Mok, E C; Chang, W C; Findley, D O; Shostak, C A

    1995-01-01

    The incidence of secondary cancers in the contralateral breast after primary breast irradiation is several times higher than the incidence of first time breast cancer. Studies have shown that the scatter radiation to the contralateral breast may play a large part in the induction of secondary breast cancers. Factors that may contribute to the contralateral breast dose may include the use of blocks, the orientation of the field, and wedges. Reports have shown that the use of regular wedges, particularly for the medial tangential field, gives a significantly higher dose to the contralateral breast compared to an open field. This paper compares the peripheral dose outside the field using a regular wedge, a dynamic wedge, and an open field technique. The data collected consisted of measurements taken with patients, solid water and a Rando phantom using a Varian 2300CD linear accelerator. Ion chambers, thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD), diodes, and films were the primary means for collecting the data. The measurements show that the peripheral dose outside the field using a dynamic wedge is close to that of open fields, and significantly lower than that of regular wedges. This information indicates that when using a medial wedge, a dynamic wedge should be used. PMID:8703326

  11. Five questions to consider before conducting a stepped wedge trial.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, James R; Copas, Andrew J; Beard, Emma; Osrin, David; Lewis, James J; Davey, Calum; Thompson, Jennifer A; Baio, Gianluca; Fielding, Katherine L; Prost, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    Researchers should consider five questions before starting a stepped wedge trial. Why are you planning one? Researchers sometimes think that stepped wedge trials are useful when there is little doubt about the benefit of the intervention being tested. However, if the primary reason for an intervention is to measure its effect, without equipoise there is no ethical justification for delaying implementation in some clusters. By contrast, if you are undertaking pragmatic research, where the primary reason for rolling out the intervention is for it to exert its benefits, and if phased implementation is inevitable, a stepped wedge trial is a valid option and provides better evidence than most non-randomized evaluations. What design will you use? Two common stepped wedge designs are based on the recruitment of a closed or open cohort. In both, individuals may experience both control and intervention conditions and you should be concerned about carry-over effects. In a third, continuous-recruitment, short-exposure design, individuals are recruited as they become eligible and experience either control or intervention condition, but not both. How will you conduct the primary analysis? In stepped wedge trials, control of confounding factors through secular variation is essential. 'Vertical' approaches preserve randomization and compare outcomes between randomized groups within periods. 'Horizontal' approaches compare outcomes before and after crossover to the intervention condition. Most analysis models used in practice combine both types of comparison. The appropriate analytic strategy should be considered on a case-by-case basis. How large will your trial be? Standard sample size calculations for cluster randomized trials do not accommodate the specific features of stepped wedge trials. Methods exist for many stepped wedge designs, but simulation-based calculations provide the greatest flexibility. In some scenarios, such as when the intracluster correlation coefficient is

  12. Bacterial diversity across a highly stratified ecosystem: A salt-wedge Mediterranean estuary.

    PubMed

    Korlević, M; Šupraha, L; Ljubešić, Z; Henderiks, J; Ciglenečki, I; Dautović, J; Orlić, S

    2016-09-01

    Highly stratified Mediterranean estuaries are unique environments where the tidal range is low and the tidal currents are almost negligible. The main characteristics of these environments are strong salinity gradients and other environmental parameters. In this study, 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene in combination with catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) was used to estimate the bacterial diversity across the Krka estuary in February and July 2013. The comparison of the data derived from these two techniques resulted in a significant but weak positive correlation (R=0.28) indicating a substantial difference in the bacterial community structure, depending on the applied method. The phytoplankton bloom observed in February was identified as one of the main factors shaping the bacterial community structure between the two environmentally contrasting sampling months. Roseobacter, Bacteroidetes and Gammaproteobacteria differed substantially between February and July. Typical freshwater bacterial classes (Actinobacteria and Betaproteobacteria) showed strong vertical distribution patterns depending on the salinity gradient. Cyanobacteria decreased in abundance in February due to competition with phytoplankton, while the SAR11 clade increased its abundance in July as a result of a better adaptation toward more oligotrophic conditions. The results provided the first detailed insight into the bacterial diversity in a highly stratified Mediterranean karstic estuary. PMID:27475818

  13. Spatial and Spectral Characterization, Mapping, and 3D Reconstructing of Ice-wedge Polygons Using High Resolution LiDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangodagamage, C.; Rowland, J. C.; Skurikhin, A. N.; Wilson, C. J.; Brumby, S. P.; Painter, S. L.; Gable, C. W.; Bui, Q.; Short, L. S.; Liljedahl, A.; Hubbard, S. S.; Wainwright, H. M.; Dafflon, B.; Tweedie, C. E.; Kumar, J.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    In landscapes with ice-wedge polygons, fine-scale land surface characterization is critically important because the processes that govern the carbon cycle and hydrological dynamics are controlled by features on the order of a few to tens of meters. To characterize the fine-scale features in polygonal ground in Barrow, Alaska, we use high-resolution LiDAR-derived topographic data (such as elevation, slope, curvature, and a novel 'directed distance (DD)') to develop quantitative metrics that allow for the discretization and characterization of polygons (formed by seasonal freeze and thaw processes). First, we used high resolution (0.25 m) LiDAR to show that the high and low centered polygon features exhibit a unique signature in the Fourier power spectrum where the landscape signature on freeze and thaw process (~ 5 to 100 m) is super imposed on the coarse scale fluvial eroded landscape (rudimentary river network) signature. We next convolve LiDAR elevations with multiscale wavelets and objectively choose appropriate scales to map interconnected troughs of high- and low-centered polygons. For the ice wedges where LiDAR surface expressions (troughs) are not well developed, we used a Delaunay triangulation to connect the ice-wedge network and map the topologically connected polygons. This analysis allows us to explore the 3D morphometry of these high- and low-centered polygons and develop a supervised set of ensemble characteristic templates for each polygon type as a function of directed distance (DD). These templates are used to classify the ice-wedge polygon landscape into low-centered polygons with limited troughs, and high- and low-centered polygons with well-developed trough network. We further extend the characteristic templates to polygon ensemble slopes and curvatures as a function of DD and develop a classification scheme for microtopographic features including troughs, rims, elevated ridges, and centers for both high-centered and low-centered polygon

  14. Sojourner, Wedge, & Shark

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) image taken near the end of daytime operations on Sol 50 shows the Sojourner rover between the rocks 'Wedge' (foreground) and 'Shark' (behind rover). The rover successfully deployed its Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer on Shark on Sol 52.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  15. Ice Particle Impacts on a Moving Wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Struk, Peter M.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Palacios, Jose; Lyer, Kaushik A.; Gold, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study of ice particle impacts on a moving wedge. The experiment was conducted in the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility located at Penn State University. The wedge was placed at the tip of a rotating blade. Ice particles shot from a pressure gun intercepted the moving wedge and impacted it at a location along its circular path. The upward velocity of the ice particles varied from 7 to 12 meters per second. Wedge velocities were varied from 0 to 120 meters per second. Wedge angles tested were 0, 30, 45, and 60. High speed imaging combined with backlighting captured the impact allowing observation of the effect of velocity and wedge angle on the impact and the post-impact fragment behavior. It was found that the pressure gun and the rotating wedge could be synchronized to consistently obtain ice particle impacts on the target wedge. It was observed that the number of fragments increase with the normal component of the impact velocity. Particle fragments ejected immediately after impact showed velocities higher than the impact velocity. The results followed the major qualitative features observed by other researchers for hailstone impacts, even though the reduced scale size of the particles used in the present experiment as compared to hailstones was 4:1.

  16. Ice Particle Impacts on a Moving Wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Struk, Peter M.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Palacios, Jose; Iyer, Kaushik A.; Gold, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study of ice particle impacts on a moving wedge. The experiment was conducted in the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility located at Penn State University. The wedge was placed at the tip of a rotating blade. Ice particles shot from a pressure gun intercepted the moving wedge and impacted it at a location along its circular path. The upward velocity of the ice particles varied from 7 to 12 meters per second. Wedge velocities were varied from 0 to 120 meters per second. Wedge angles tested were 0 deg, 30 deg, 45 deg, and 60 deg. High speed imaging combined with backlighting captured the impact allowing observation of the effect of velocity and wedge angle on the impact and the post-impact fragment behavior. It was found that the pressure gun and the rotating wedge could be synchronized to consistently obtain ice particle impacts on the target wedge. It was observed that the number of fragments increase with the normal component of the impact velocity. Particle fragments ejected immediately after impact showed velocities higher than the impact velocity. The results followed the major qualitative features observed by other researchers for hailstone impacts, even though the reduced scale size of the particles used in the present experiment as compared to hailstones was 4:1.

  17. Micromachine Wedge Stepping Motor

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J.; Schriner, H.K.

    1998-11-04

    A wedge stepping motor, which will index a mechanism, has been designed and fabricated in the surface rnicromachine SUMMiT process. This device has demonstrated the ability to index one gear tooth at a time with speeds up to 205 teeth/see. The wedge stepper motor has the following features, whi:h will be useful in a number of applications. o The ability to precisely position mechanical components. . Simple pulse signals can be used for operation. o Only 2 drive signals are requixed for operation. o Torque and precision capabilities increase with device size . The device to be indexed is restrained at all times by the wedge shaped tooth that is used for actuation. This paper will discuss the theory of operation and desi=m of the wedge stepping motor. The fabrication and testing of I he device will also be presented.

  18. Wedges for ultrasonic inspection

    DOEpatents

    Gavin, Donald A.

    1982-01-01

    An ultrasonic transducer device is provided which is used in ultrasonic inspection of the material surrounding a threaded hole and which comprises a wedge of plastic or the like including a curved threaded surface adapted to be screwed into the threaded hole and a generally planar surface on which a conventional ultrasonic transducer is mounted. The plastic wedge can be rotated within the threaded hole to inspect for flaws in the material surrounding the threaded hole.

  19. Ultrasonic transducer with laminated coupling wedge

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, Henry H. B.

    1976-08-03

    An ultrasonic transducer capable of use in a high-temperature environment incorporates a laminated metal coupling wedge including a reflecting edge shaped as a double sloping roof and a transducer crystal backed by a laminated metal sound absorber disposed so as to direct sound waves through the coupling wedge and into a work piece, reflections from the interface between the coupling wedge and the work piece passing to the reflecting edge. Preferably the angle of inclination of the two halves of the reflecting edge are different.

  20. Achieving high levels of color uniformity and optical efficiency for a wedge-shaped waveguide head-mounted display using a photopolymer.

    PubMed

    Piao, Mei-Lan; Kim, Nam

    2014-04-01

    We developed a head-mounted display (HMD) that achieved high levels of color uniformity and optical efficiency. The full-color holographic volume grating (HVG) attached on the specially designed wedge-shaped waveguide HMD system provided a 17° horizontal field of view (FOV). Theoretical analyses showed that the proposed waveguide resolved the problems of thickness and limited FOV. In this system, the HVG was recorded using a special sequential recording process on single photopolymer unit with 633, 532, and 473 nm wavelengths. The results confirm that the designed and fabricated waveguide can be employed in future commercial HMS. PMID:24787179

  1. Wedge and Flat Top

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Flat Top, the rectangular rock at right, is part of a stretch of rocky terrain in this image, taken by the deployed Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. Dust has accumulated on the top of Flat Top, but is not present on the sides due to the steep angles of the rock. This dust may have been placed by dust storms moving across the Martian surface. The rock dubbed 'Wedge' is at left. The objects have been studied using several different color filters on the IMP camera.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  2. Single-stage closing–opening wedge osteotomy of spine to correct severe post-tubercular kyphotic deformities of the spine: a 3-year follow-up of 17 patients

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Kamath; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad

    2009-01-01

    The correction of severe post-tubercular kyphosis (PTK) is complex and has the disadvantage of being multiple staged with a high morbidity. Here, we describe the procedure and results of closing–opening osteotomy for correction of PTK which shortens the posterior column and opens the anterior column appropriately to correct the deformity without altering the length of the spinal cord. Seventeen patients with PTK (10 males; 7 females) with an average age of 18.3 ± 10.6 years (range 4–40 years) formed the study group. There were ten thoracolumbar, one lumbar and six thoracic deformities. The number of vertebrae involved ranged from 2 to 5 (average 2.8). Preoperative kyphosis averaged 69.2° ± 25.1° (range 42°–104°) which included ten patients with deformity greater than 60°. The average vertebral body loss was 2.01 ± 0.79 (range 1.1–4.1). The neurological status was normal in 13 patients, Frankel’s grade D in three patients and grade C in one. Posterior stabilization with pedicle screw instrumentation was followed by a preoperatively calculated wedge resection. Anterior column reconstruction was performed using rib grafts in four, tricortical iliac bone graft in five, cages in six, and bone chips alone and fibular graft in one patient each. Average operating time was 280 min (200–340 min) with an average blood loss of 820 ml (range 500–1,600 ml). The postoperative kyphosis averaged 32.4° ± 19.5° (range 8°–62°). The percentage correction of kyphosis achieved was 56.8 ± 14.6% (range 32–83%). No patient with normal preoperative neurological status showed deterioration in neurology after surgery. The last follow-up was at an average of 43 ± 4 months (range 32–64 months). The average loss of correction at the last follow-up was 5.4° (range 3°–9°). At the last follow-up, the mean preoperative pain visual analogue scale score decreased significantly from 9.2 (range 8–10 points) to 1.5 (range 1–2 points). There

  3. Taper Angle Evolution in Taiwan Accretionary Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Chi, W.; Liu, C.

    2011-12-01

    Liwen Chena,b, Wu-Cheng Chia, Char-Shine Liuc aInstitute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan bInstitute of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan cInstitute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan The critical taper model, originally developed using onland Taiwan as an example, is governed by force balance of a horizontal compressional wedge. This model has been successfully applied to many mountainous regions around the world. Among them, Taiwan is located in an oblique collision between the Luzon Arc and the Chinese Passive margin. Previous critical taper angle studies of Taiwan are mainly focusing on utilizing land data. In this study we want to extend these studies to offshore region from the subduction zone to collision zone. Here we study the varying taper angles of the double-vergent wedge derived from 1,000 km of reflection seismic profiles in both the pro-wedge and retro-wedge locations. These profiles were collected in the last two decades. For the retro-wedge, the topography slope angle changes from 2 to 8.8 degrees; some of the steep slope suggests that some part of the retrowedge is currently in a super-critical angle state. Such dramatic changes in taper angle probably strongly affect regional sedimentary processes, including slumping, in addition to structural deformation. These complex processes might even help develop a mélange or re-open a closed basin. We are currently working on studying the taper angle evolution of the pro-wedge from subduction to arc-continent collision zone in the offshore region. Though further works are needed, our preliminary results show that the evolution of wedge angles and the geometry of the wedge are closely linked and inseparable. The structures of the subducting plate might have strong influence on the deformation style of the over-riding plate. It would be interesting to combine the angle variation with the structure interpretation of the accretionary wedge

  4. Long polymers near wedges and cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Yosi; Kantor, Yacov

    2015-12-01

    We perform a Monte Carlo study of N -step self-avoiding walks, attached to the corner of an impenetrable wedge in two dimensions (d =2 ), or the tip of an impenetrable cone in d =3 , of sizes ranging up to N =106 steps. We find that the critical exponent γα, which determines the dependence of the number of available conformations on N for a cone or wedge with opening angle α , is in good agreement with the theory for d =2 . We study the end-point distribution of the walks in the allowed space and find similarities to the known behavior of random walks (ideal polymers) in the same geometry. For example, the ratio between the mean square end-to-end distances of a polymer near the cone or wedge and a polymer in free space depends linearly on γα, as is known for ideal polymers. We show that the end-point distribution of polymers attached to a wedge does not separate into a product of angular and radial functions, as it does for ideal polymers in the same geometry. The angular dependence of the end position of polymers near the wedge differs from theoretical predictions.

  5. Long polymers near wedges and cones.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Yosi; Kantor, Yacov

    2015-12-01

    We perform a Monte Carlo study of N-step self-avoiding walks, attached to the corner of an impenetrable wedge in two dimensions (d=2), or the tip of an impenetrable cone in d=3, of sizes ranging up to N=10(6) steps. We find that the critical exponent γ(α), which determines the dependence of the number of available conformations on N for a cone or wedge with opening angle α, is in good agreement with the theory for d=2. We study the end-point distribution of the walks in the allowed space and find similarities to the known behavior of random walks (ideal polymers) in the same geometry. For example, the ratio between the mean square end-to-end distances of a polymer near the cone or wedge and a polymer in free space depends linearly on γ(α), as is known for ideal polymers. We show that the end-point distribution of polymers attached to a wedge does not separate into a product of angular and radial functions, as it does for ideal polymers in the same geometry. The angular dependence of the end position of polymers near the wedge differs from theoretical predictions. PMID:26764719

  6. Europa Wedge Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This image shows an area of crustal separation on Jupiter's moon, Europa. Lower resolution pictures taken earlier in the tour of NASA's Galileo spacecraft revealed that dark wedge-shaped bands in this region are areas where the icy crust has completely pulled apart. Dark material has filled up from below and filled the void created by this separation.

    In the lower left corner of this image, taken by Galileo's onboard camera on December 16, 1997, a portion of one dark wedge area is visible, revealing a linear texture along the trend of the wedge. The lines of the texture change orientation slightly and reflect the fact that we are looking at a bend in the wedge. The older, bright background, visible on the right half of the image, is criss-crossed with ridges. A large, bright ridge runs east-west through the upper part of the image, cutting across both the older background plains and the wedge. This ridge is rough in texture, with numerous small terraces and troughs containing dark material.

    North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the northwest. This image, centered at approximately 16.5 degrees south latitude and 196.5 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 10 kilometers square (about 6.5 miles square). The resolution of this image is about 26 meters per picture element. This image was taken by the solid state imaging system from a distance of 1250 kilometers (750 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  7. Penetrable wedge analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharstein, Robert W.; Davis, Anthony M.

    1994-07-01

    Two complementary analyses of the time-harmonic scattering by a penetrable wedge are presented. The distance from the apex (appropriately scaled by the wavenumber in the exterior region) of the exciting line source is the single length scale in this infinite-domain boundary value problem. The work summarized herein represents two mathematical approaches (among a series of candidates) to solve this important scattering problem and to visualize the wave physics.

  8. Transmural Ultrasound Imaging of Thermal Lesion and Action Potential Changes in Perfused Canine Cardiac Wedge Preparations by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ziqi; Gudur, Madhu S. R.; Deng, Cheri X.

    2013-01-01

    Intra-procedural imaging is important for guiding cardiac arrhythmia ablation. It is difficult to obtain intra-procedural correlation of thermal lesion formation with action potential (AP) changes in the transmural plane during ablation. This study tested parametric ultrasound imaging for transmural imaging of lesion and AP changes in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation using coronary perfused canine ventricular wedge preparations (n = 13). The preparations were paced from epi/endocardial surfaces and subjected to HIFU application (3.5 MHz, 11 Hz pulse-repetition-frequency, 70% duty cycle, duration 4 s, 3500 W/cm2), during which simultaneous optical mapping (1 kframes/s) using di-4-ANEPPS and ultrasound imaging (30 MHz) of the same transmural surface of the wedge were performed. Spatiotemporally correlated AP measurements and ultrasound imaging allowed quantification of the reduction of AP amplitude (APA), shortening of AP duration at 50% repolarization, AP triangulation, decrease of optical AP rise, and change of conduction velocity along tissue depth direction within and surrounding HIFU lesions. The threshold of irreversible change in APA correlating to lesions was determined to be 43±1% with a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under curve (AUC) of 0.96±0.01 (n = 13). Ultrasound imaging parameters such as integrated backscatter, Rayleigh (α) and log-normal (σ) parameters, cumulative extrema of σ were tested, with the cumulative extrema of σ performing the best in detecting lesion (ROC AUC 0.89±0.01, n = 13) and change of APA (ROC AUC 0.79±0.03, n = 13). In conclusion, characteristic tissue and AP changes in HIFU ablation were identified and spatiotemporally correlated using optical mapping and ultrasound imaging. Parametric ultrasound imaging using cumulative extrema of σ can detect HIFU lesion and APA reduction. PMID:24349337

  9. Mechanics of injection wedges in collision orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A. B.; Schulmann, K.

    2003-04-01

    Instantaneously juxtaposed lithospheric sections, marked by different geothermal gradient and lithological make-up, are examined to identify zones of highly contrasting strength in adjacent transposed crust and lithospheric mantle. Three types of geotherms and four reference lithospheric segments: thin crust/hot geotherm (rift), thin crust/mean geotherm (relaxed rift), standard crust/hot geotherm (arc), standard crust/mean geotherm (normal crust), are compared with variable permutations of cratonic, standard and rifted lithosphere thicknesses. This permits identification of strong brittle-elastic or plastic mantle, lower and upper crust juxtaposed against plastic rocks of a weak adjacent lithosphere. Vertical positions of shallow dipping detachment zones thus delineate possible areas of hot or cold injection wedges which include: (i) Single shallow wedge (or Flake), (ii) Double shallow and deep wedge, (iii) Deep lithospheric crocodile, (iv) Crustal thickening due to shallow strength differences, (v) Mantle Lithosphere thickening, or wedging, due to deep mantle strength differences and (vii) Exchange tectonics as an extreme wedging process, in which horizontal mass exchange is approximately equal. Rheological calculations are compared to a database of seismic profiles in which the geometry of detachment zones and proposed thermal conditions and lithological make-ups have been presented.

  10. High-Mg# andesites and basalts from the Kamchatka-Kurile subduction system: Implications for primitive arc magma genesis and mantle wedge processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, J. A.; Yogodzinski, G. M.; Churikova, T. G.; Volynets, O. N.

    2007-12-01

    Primitive arc magmatism and mantle wedge processes are investigated through a petrologic and geochemical study of high Mg# (Mg/Mg+Fe>0.65) basalts and andesites from the Kurile-Kamchatka subduction system. The primitive andesites are from the Shisheisky complex (Portnyagin et al., AGU Monograph 172, 2007), a field of Quaternary-age, monogenetic cones located in the Aleutian-Kamchatka junction, north of Shiveluch Volcano, the northernmost active composite cone in Kamchatka. The Shisheisky lavas are similar to primitive andesites from Mt. Shasta, Piip Volcano, and Setouchi, Japan. They have Mg# of 0.66-0.73 at intermediate SiO2 (54-58 wt%), low CaO/Al2O3 (<0.54), and high Ni (184-243 ppm) and Cr (418-880 ppm). Olivine phenocryst core compositions of ~FO90 appear to be in equilibrium with whole-rock `melts', consistent with the aphyric to sparsely phyric nature of these lavas. Compared to the Shishiesky andesites, primitive basalts from the region (Alaid, Tolbachik, Kharchinsky) have higher CaO/Al2O3 (0.69-0.86), and lower whole-rock Ni (105-182 ppm), Cr (395-531 ppm), and Ni/MgO (10-17) at similar Mg# (0.66-.70). Olivine phenocrysts in the basalts have similarly higher CaO, lower Ni, and lower Ni/MgO at ~FO88 compared to the andesites. The absence of plagioclase phenocrysts from the primitive andesites strongly contrasts petrographic observations of the plagioclase-phyric basalts, indicating relatively high pre-eruptive water contents for the andesites compared to the basalts. Petrographic and mineral composition data suggest that the Shisheisky primitive andesites were liquids in equilibrium with mantle peridotite, and were not produced by mixing between primitive basalts and evolved felsic magmas or from contamination by xenocrystic olivine. The key features of the Shisheisky primitive andesites (e.g., low CaO/Al2O3 and high Ni/MgO at high Mg#) appear to have been acquired at sub-moho depths, by processes and under physical conditions in the mantle wedge (lower

  11. Tumor Targeting, Trifunctional Dendritic Wedge

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report in vitro and in vivo evaluation of a newly designed trifunctional theranostic agent for targeting solid tumors. This agent combines a dendritic wedge with high boron content for boron neutron capture therapy or boron MRI, a monomethine cyanine dye for visible-light fluorescent imaging, and an integrin ligand for efficient tumor targeting. We report photophysical properties of the new agent, its cellular uptake and in vitro targeting properties. Using live animal imaging and intravital microscopy (IVM) techniques, we observed a rapid accumulation of the agent and its retention for a prolonged period of time (up to 7 days) in fully established animal models of human melanoma and murine mammary adenocarcinoma. This macromolecular theranostic agent can be used for targeted delivery of high boron load into solid tumors for future applications in boron neutron capture therapy. PMID:25350602

  12. Microtopographic characterization of ice-wedge polygon landscape in Barrow, Alaska: a digital map of troughs, rims, centers derived from high resolution (0.25 m) LiDAR data

    SciTech Connect

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wullschleger, Stan

    2014-07-03

    The dataset represents microtopographic characterization of the ice-wedge polygon landscape in Barrow, Alaska. Three microtopographic features are delineated using 0.25 m high resolution digital elevation dataset derived from LiDAR. The troughs, rims, and centers are the three categories in this classification scheme. The polygon troughs are the surface expression of the ice-wedges that are in lower elevations than the interior polygon. The elevated shoulders of the polygon interior immediately adjacent to the polygon troughs are the polygon rims for the low center polygons. In case of high center polygons, these features are the topographic highs. In this classification scheme, both topographic highs and rims are considered as polygon rims. The next version of the dataset will include more refined classification scheme including separate classes for rims ad topographic highs. The interior part of the polygon just adjacent to the polygon rims are the polygon centers.

  13. Capillary Rise in a Wedge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piva, M.

    2009-01-01

    In introductory-level physics courses, the concept of surface tension is often illustrated using the example of capillary rise in thin tubes. In this paper the author describes experiments conducted using a planar geometry created with two small plates forming a thin wedge. The distribution of the fluid entering the wedge can be studied as a…

  14. Geochemistry of rare high-Nb basalt lavas: Are they derived from a mantle wedge metasomatised by slab melts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastie, Alan R.; Mitchell, Simon F.; Kerr, Andrew C.; Minifie, Matthew J.; Millar, Ian L.

    2011-09-01

    Compositionally, high-Nb basalts are similar to HIMU (high U/Pb) ocean island basalts, continental alkaline basalts and alkaline lavas formed above slab windows. Tertiary alkaline basaltic lavas from eastern Jamaica, West Indies, known as the Halberstadt Volcanic Formation have compositions similar to high-Nb basalts (Nb > 20 ppm). The Halberstadt high-Nb basalts are divided into two compositional sub-groups where Group 1 lavas have more enriched incompatible element concentrations relative to Group 2. Both groups are derived from isotopically different spinel peridotite mantle source regions, which both require garnet and amphibole as metasomatic residual phases. The Halberstadt geochemistry demonstrates that the lavas cannot be derived by partial melting of lower crustal ultramafic complexes, metasomatised mantle lithosphere, subducting slabs, continental crust, mantle plume source regions or an upper mantle source region composed of enriched and depleted components. Instead, their composition, particularly the negative Ce anomalies, the high Th/Nb ratios and the similar isotopic ratios to nearby adakite lavas, suggests that the Halberstadt magmas are derived from a compositionally variable spinel peridotite source region(s) metasomatised by slab melts that precipitated garnet, amphibole, apatite and zircon. It is suggested that high-Nb basalts may be classified as a distinct rock type with Nb > 20 ppm, intraplate alkaline basalt compositions, but that are generated in subduction zones by magmatic processes distinct from those that generate other intraplate lavas.

  15. Wedge Waveguides and Resonators for Quantum Plasmonics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic structures can provide deep-subwavelength electromagnetic fields that are useful for enhancing light–matter interactions. However, because these localized modes are also dissipative, structures that offer the best compromise between field confinement and loss have been sought. Metallic wedge waveguides were initially identified as an ideal candidate but have been largely abandoned because to date their experimental performance has been limited. We combine state-of-the-art metallic wedges with integrated reflectors and precisely placed colloidal quantum dots (down to the single-emitter level) and demonstrate quantum-plasmonic waveguides and resonators with performance approaching theoretical limits. By exploiting a nearly 10-fold improvement in wedge-plasmon propagation (19 μm at a vacuum wavelength, λvac, of 630 nm), efficient reflectors (93%), and effective coupling (estimated to be >70%) to highly emissive (∼90%) quantum dots, we obtain Ag plasmonic resonators at visible wavelengths with quality factors approaching 200 (3.3 nm line widths). As our structures offer modal volumes down to ∼0.004λvac3 in an exposed single-mode waveguide–resonator geometry, they provide advantages over both traditional photonic microcavities and localized-plasmonic resonators for enhancing light–matter interactions. Our results confirm the promise of wedges for creating plasmonic devices and for studying coherent quantum-plasmonic effects such as long-distance plasmon-mediated entanglement and strong plasmon–matter coupling. PMID:26284499

  16. Tectonometamorphic evolution of the Samaná complex, northern Hispaniola: Implications for the burial and exhumation of high-pressure rocks in a collisional accretionary wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escuder-Viruete, Javier; Pérez-Estaún, Andrés; Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Valverde-Vaquero, Pablo

    2011-07-01

    The Samaná complex exposes a segment of a high-P metasedimentary collisional accretionary wedge, built during Caribbean island arc-North America continental margin convergence. Combined detailed mapping, metamorphic mineral assemblages, multi-equilibrium calculations and thermodynamical modelling of garnet zoning, together with isotopic ages, allow proposing a tectonothermal evolution of the complex involving three major stages (M1 to M3). M1 metamorphism was characterised by a prograde P-T path towards the pressure-peak in the lawsonite-blueschists (Santa Bárbara Schists and Rincón Marbles lower structural nappes) and garnet-blueschists to eclogite-facies conditions (Punta Balandra upper nappe). This high-P metamorphism and related D1 deformation took place from the Eocene to Late Oligocene, when the different nappes were buried along a cold subduction-zone gradient. Contemporary to the D2 deformation, M2 retrograde metamorphism was associated in all nappes with substantial decompression under nearly isothermal or cooling conditions to the epidote-blueschists and greenchists facies conditions. D2 deformation produced ENE-directed folding, thrusting and nappe stacking in the complex, when nappes went sequentially incorporated to a growing collisional accretionary complex between the Late Eocene and the earliest Miocene. D2 deformation is thus responsible for much of the exhumation of the subducted rocks and for the thinning of the nappe pile. As the continuity of the P-T conditions within the accreted metasedimentary material were in this case preserved, the exhumation mechanisms for Samaná complex high-P rocks was most probably driven by underthrusting/underplating and erosion. Non-penetrative fabrics associated with D3 and D4 late deformations indicate M3 cooling in the greenschists and subgreenchists-facies conditions. D5 sinistral strike-slip brittle faults cut and laterally displaced the whole nappe pile of the Samaná complex from the Lower Miocene to the

  17. Medial Closing-Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy: Fixation With Proximal Tibial Locking Plate.

    PubMed

    Tírico, Luís Eduardo Passarelli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pécora, José Ricardo

    2015-12-01

    Distal femoral varus osteotomy is a well-established procedure for the treatment of lateral compartment cartilage lesions and degenerative disease, correcting limb alignment and decreasing the progression of the pathology. Surgical techniques can be performed with a lateral opening-wedge or medial closing-wedge correction of the deformity. Fixation methods for lateral opening-wedge osteotomies are widely available, and there are various types of implants that can be used for fixation. However, there are currently only a few options of implants for fixation of a medial closing-wedge osteotomy on the market. This report describes a medial, supracondylar, V-shaped, closing-wedge distal femoral osteotomy using a locked anterolateral proximal tibial locking plate that fits anatomically to the medial side of the distal femur. This is a great option as a stable implant for a medial closing-wedge distal femoral osteotomy. PMID:26870647

  18. Bouncing and bursting in a wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyssat, Etienne; Cohen, Caroline; Quere, David

    2015-11-01

    Placed into an inhomogeneous confined medium, non-wetting drops tend to be expelled from the tightest regions, where their contact with the walls would be maximized. They preferentially explore more open areas which are favorable from the point of view of capillary energy. Following this principle, one may thus use the geometry of confined environments to control fluid droplets in various ways : displacing, filtering, fragmenting... In this communication, we present experimental results on the dynamics of Leidenfrost drops launched into a wedge formed by two quasi-horizontal glass plates. Influenced by the gradient of confinement, these non-wetting liquid pucks approach the apex of the wedge to a minimal distance where they bounce back. At higher impact velocity, we observe that drops tend to penetrate deeper into the wedge but often burst into a large number of small fragments. We also discuss ways to control the deviation of droplets from their initial trajectory. We propose scaling law analyses to explain the characteristics of the observed bouncing and bursting phenomena.

  19. Effect of Mantle Wedge Hybridization by Sediment Melt on Geochemistry of Arc Magma and Arc Mantle Source - Insights from Laboratory Experiments at High Pressures and Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, A.; Dasgupta, R.; Tsuno, K.; Nelson, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Generation of arc magmas involves metasomatism of the mantle wedge by slab-derived H2O-rich fluids and/or melts and subsequent melting of the modified source. The chemistry of arc magmas and the residual mantle wedge are not only regulated by the chemistry of the slab input, but also by the phase relations of metasomatism or hybridization process in the wedge. The sediment-derived silica-rich fluids and hydrous partial melts create orthopyroxene-rich zones in the mantle wedge, due to reaction of mantle olivine with silica in the fluid/melt [1,2]. Geochemical evidence for such a reaction comes from pyroxenitic lithologies coexisting with peridotite in supra-subduction zones. In this study, we have simulated the partial melting of a parcel of mantle wedge modified by bulk addition of sediment-derived melt with variable H2O contents to investigate the major and trace element chemistry of the magmas and the residues formed by this process. Experiments at 2-3 GPa and 1150-1300 °C were conducted on mixtures of 25% sediment-derived melt and 75% lherzolite, with bulk H2O contents varying from 2 to 6 wt.%. Partial reactive crystallization of the rhyolitic slab-derived melt and partial melting of the mixed source produced a range of melt compositions from ultra-K basanites to basaltic andesites, in equilibrium with an orthopyroxene ± phlogopite ± clinopyroxene ± garnet bearing residue, depending on P and bulk H2O content. Model calculations using partition coefficients (from literature) of trace elements between experimental minerals and silicate melt suggest that the geochemical signatures of the slab-derived melt, such as low Ce/Pb and depletion in Nb and Ta (characteristic slab signatures) are not erased from the resulting melt owing to reactive crystallization. The residual mineral assemblage is also found to be similar to the supra-subduction zone lithologies, such as those found in Dabie Shan (China) and Sanbagawa Belt (Japan). In this presentation, we will also

  20. Deformation of the Calabrian accretionary wedge and relative kinematics of the Calabrian and Peloritan backstops: Insights from multibeam bathymetry, high-resolution reflection and wide-angle seismics and analog modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellong, David; Gutscher, Marc-Andre; Klingelhoefer, Frauke; Graindorge, David; Kopp, Heidrun; Moretti, Milena; Marsset, Bruno; Mercier de Lepinay, Bernard; Dominguez, Stephane; Malavieille, Jacques

    2016-04-01

    Recently acquired swath bathymetric data in the Ionian Sea document in unprecedented detail the morphostructure and dynamics of the Calabrian accretionary wedge. A boundary zone between the eastern and western lobes of the accretionary wedge is examined here. Relative displacement between the Calabrian and Peloritan backstops is expected to cause dextral strike-slip deformation between the lobes. A wide-angle seismic profile was acquired in Oct. 2014 with the R/V Meteor (DIONYSUS survey) recorded by 25 Ocean-bottom seismometers (Geomar and Ifremer instruments) and 3 land-stations (INGV stations). Inversion and forward modeling of these seismic data reveal a 5-10 km deep asymmetric rift zone between the Malta Escarpment and the SW tip of Calabria. Analog modeling was performed to test if the origin of this rift could be related to the relative kinematics of the Calabrian and Peloritan backstops. Modeling, using two independently moving backstops, produces a zone of dextral transtension and subsidence in the accretionary wedge between two lobes. This corresponds well to the asymmetric rift observed in the southward prolongation of the straits of Messina faults. Paradoxically however, this dextral displacement does not appear to traverse the external Calabrian accretionary wedge, where prominent curved lineaments observed indicate a sinistral sense of motion. One possible explanation is that the dextral kinematic motion is transferred into a region of crisscrossing faults in the internal portion of the Eastern lobe. The bathymetry and high-resolution reflection seismic images indicate ongoing compression at the deformation front of both the western and eastern lobes. Together with the analog modeling results, these observations unambiguously demonstrate that the western lobe remains tectonically active.

  1. Dosimetric Characteristics of 6 MV Modified Beams by Physical Wedges of a Siemens Linear Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Zabihzadeh, Mansour; Birgani, Mohammad Javad Tahmasebi; Hoseini-Ghahfarokhi, Mojtaba; Arvandi, Sholeh; Hoseini, Seyed Mohammad; Fadaei, Mahbube

    2016-01-01

    Physical wedges still can be used as missing tissue compensators or filters to alter the shape of isodose curves in a target volume to reach an optimal radiotherapy plan without creating a hotspot. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric properties of physical wedges filters such as off-axis photon fluence, photon spectrum, output factor and half value layer. The photon beam quality of a 6 MV Primus Siemens modified by 150 and 450 physical wedges was studied with BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code. The calculated present depth dose and dose profile curves for open and wedged photon beam were in good agreement with the measurements. Increase of wedge angle increased the beam hardening and this effect was more pronounced at the heal region. Using such an accurate MC model to determine of wedge factors and implementation of it as a calculation algorithm in the future treatment planning systems is recommended. PMID:27221838

  2. Wedge Heat-Flux Indicators for Flash Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2003-01-01

    Wedge indicators have been proposed for measuring thermal radiation that impinges on specimens illuminated by flash lamps for thermographic inspection. Heat fluxes measured by use of these indicators would be used, along with known thermal, radiative, and geometric properties of the specimens, to estimate peak flash temperatures on the specimen surfaces. These indicators would be inexpensive alternatives to high-speed infrared pyrometers, which would otherwise be needed for measuring peak flash surface temperatures. The wedge is made from any suitable homogenous material such as plastic. The choice of material is governed by the equation given. One side of the wedge is covered by a temperature sensitive compound that decomposes irreversibly when its temperature exceeds a rated temperature (T-rated). The uncoated side would be positioned alongside or in place of the specimen and exposed to the flash, then the wedge thickness at the boundary between the white and blackened portions measured.

  3. Single-photon cooling in a wedge billiard

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, S.; Sundaram, B.; Raizen, M. G.

    2010-09-15

    Single-photon cooling (SPC), noted for its potential as a versatile method for cooling a variety of atomic species, has recently been demonstrated experimentally. In this paper, we study possible ways to improve the performance of SPC by applying it to atoms trapped inside a wedge billiard. The main feature of the wedge billiard for atoms, also experimentally realized recently, is that the nature of atomic trajectories within it changes from stable periodic orbit to random chaotic motion with the change in wedge angle. We find that a high cooling efficiency is possible in this system with a relatively weak dependence on the wedge angle and that chaotic dynamics, rather than a regular orbit, is more desirable for enhancing the performance of SPC.

  4. Ultrasonic fluid densitometer having liquid/wedge and gas/wedge interfaces

    DOEpatents

    Greenwood, Margaret S.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an ultrasonic liquid densitometer that uses a material wedge having two sections, one with a liquid/wedge interface and another with a gas/wedge interface. It is preferred that the wedge have an acoustic impedance that is near the acoustic impedance of the liquid, specifically less than a factor of 11 greater than the acoustic impedance of the liquid. Ultrasonic signals are internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a liquid is determined by immersing the wedge into the liquid and measuring reflections of ultrasound at the liquid/wedge interface and at the gas/wedge interface.

  5. Geophysical Surveys for Detecting Distribution and Shape of Ice Wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Matsuoka, N.; Ikeda, A.

    2006-12-01

    Recent development of applied geophysical methods has shown detailed structure in various periglacial features. However, these methods have been rarely applied to studies in ice wedges. Thus, we attempted to display distribution and shape of ice wedges using a ground penetrating radar (GPR) and a direct current (DC) resistivity meter. The surveys were performed at a comprehensive monitoring site of ice-wedging in Adventdalen, Svalbard, where troughs and small cracks form polygonal patterns on the ground. Unknown structure below such new cracks is also focused in this study. We obtained 37 GPR profiles using 250 MHz signal. 2-D resistivity surveys were also performed along 14 GPR profiles. The electrodes were placed at 1 m intervals and their combination followed the Wenner array. In addition, shallow boreholes were dug across 5 troughs/cracks to estimate the width of ice wedge. The analyzed results show parabolic patterns formed by the multiple radar waveforms and largely increasing gradients of DC resistivity below the troughs and small cracks. The strong reflections of the radar signals and the starting zones of the increasing resistivity lay about 1 m deep, which corresponded to the top of ice wedges (0.7-0.9 m deep) revealed by the drilling. In the GPR profiles, a relatively flat pattern of the reflection was sandwiched by a pair of parabolic patterns below each well-developed trough, whereas a sharp parabolic pattern was detected below each small crack. These results mean that the presence of narrow ice wedges is detectable by the GPR method and the top of a parabolic pattern roughly corresponds to one edge of an ice wedge table. In the DC resistivity profiles, a high resistivity core exists below each trough and crack. The high resistivity probably resulted from ice having lower unfrozen water content than the surrounding silt materials. The heights of the cores indicate that the ice wedges were formed at least between 1 m and 3 m deep. The cores are, however

  6. Reverse wedge osteotomy of the distal radius in Madelung's deformity.

    PubMed

    Mallard, F; Jeudy, J; Rabarin, F; Raimbeau, G; Fouque, P-A; Cesari, B; Bizot, P; Saint-Cast, Y

    2013-06-01

    Madelung's deformity results from a growth defect in the palmar and ulnar region of the distal radius. It presents as an excessively inclined radial joint surface, inducing "spontaneous progressive palmar subluxation of the wrist". The principle of reverse wedge osteotomy (RWO) consists in the reorientation of the radial joint surface by taking a circumferential bone wedge, the base of which is harvested from the excess of the radial and dorsal cortical bone of the distal radius, then turning it over and putting back this reverse wedge into the osteotomy so as to obtain closure on the excess and opening on the deficient cortical bone. RWO corrects the palmar subluxation of the carpus and improves distal radio-ulnar alignment. All five bilaterally operated patients were satisfied, esthetically and functionally. Its corrective power gives RWO a place apart among the surgical techniques currently available in Madelung's deformity. PMID:23622863

  7. Coherent beam combination using self-phase locked stimulated Brillouin scattering phase conjugate mirrors with a rotating wedge for high power laser generation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangwoo; Cha, Seongwoo; Oh, Jungsuk; Lee, Hwihyeong; Ahn, Heekyung; Churn, Kil Sung; Kong, Hong Jin

    2016-04-18

    The self-phase locking of a stimulated Brillouin scattering-phase conjugate mirror (SBS-PCM) allows a simple and scalable coherent beam combination of existing lasers. We propose a simple optical system composed of a rotating wedge and a concave mirror to overcome the power limit of the SBS-PCM. Its phase locking ability and the usefulness on the beam-combination laser are demonstrated experimentally. A four-beam combination is demonstrated using this SBS-PCM scheme. The relative phases between the beams were measured to be less than λ/24.7. PMID:27137299

  8. The decay of highly excited open strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, D.; Turok, N.; Wilkinson, R.; Jetzer, P.

    1988-01-01

    The decay rates of leading edge Regge trajectory states are calculated for very high level number in open bosonic string theories, ignoring tachyon final states. The optical theorem simplifies the analysis while enabling identification of the different mass level decay channels. The main result is that (in four dimensions) the greatest single channel is the emission of a single photon and a state of the next mass level down. A simple asymptotic formula for arbitrarily high level number is given for this process. Also calculated is the total decay rate exactly up to N=100. It shows little variation over this range but appears to decrease for larger N. The formalism is checked in examples and the decay rate of the first excited level calculated for open superstring theories. The calculation may also have implications for high spin meson resonances.

  9. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.; Feldman, M.

    1992-12-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10[sup 8]. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing. 7 figs.

  10. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.; Feldman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10.sup.8. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing.

  11. A depth dependence determination of the wedge transmission factor for 4-10 MV photon beams.

    PubMed

    McCullough, E C; Gortney, J; Blackwell, C R

    1988-01-01

    The depth dependence (up to 25 cm) of the in-phantom wedge transmission factor (WTF) has been determined for three medical linear accelerator x-ray beams with energies of 4, 6, and 10 MV containing 15 degrees-60 degrees (nominal) brass wedges. All measurements were made with a cylindrical ionization chamber in water, for a field size of 10 X 10 cm2 with a source-skin distance of 80 or 100 cm. We conclude that, for the accelerators studied, the WTF factor at depth is less than 2% different from that determined at dmax (for the nominal wedge angles and photon energies studied) unless the depth of interest is greater than 10 cm. Up to the maximum depth studied (25 cm) the relative wedge factor--that is, wedge factor at depth compared to that determined at dmax--was about equal to or less than 1.02 for the 15 degrees and 30 degrees wedges and any of the photon beam energies studied. For the seldom utilized combination of a nominal wedge angle in excess of 45 degrees with a depth greater than 10 cm, the WTF at depth can differ from the WTF determined at dmax, by up to 5%. Since the wedge transmission factor is reflective of relative percent dose data, our results also indicate that it is in error to use open field percent depth doses for certain combinations of wedge angle, photon energy, and depth. PMID:3211057

  12. Predicting/Extrapolating Active Layer Thickness Using Statistical Learning from Remotely-Sensed High-resolution Data in Arctic Permafrost Landscapes: Improved parameterization of Ice-wedge polygons from LiDAR/WorldView-2 derived metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangodagamage, C.; Rowland, J. C.; Hubbard, S. S.; Brumby, S. P.; Liljedahl, A.; Wainwright, H. M.; Sloan, V. L.; Altmann, G.; Skurikhin, A. N.; Shelef, E.; Wilson, C. J.; Dafflon, B.; Peterson, J.; Ulrich, C.; Gibbs, A.; Tweedie, C. E.; Painter, S. L.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Landscape attributes that vary with micro-topography, such as active layer thickness (ALT) in ice-wedge polygon ground, are labor-intensive to document in the field at large spatial extents, necessitating remotely sensed methods. Robust techniques to estimate ALT over large areas would improve understanding of coupled dynamics between permafrost, hydrology and landsurface processes, and improve simulations of the rate and timing of release of soil carbon from permafrost settings. In particular, it would provide critically needed data to parameterize and initialize soil property information in permafrost models and evaluate model predictions for large, complex domains. In this work, we demonstrate a new data fusion approach using high-resolution remotely sensed data for estimating cm scale ALT in a 5 km2 area of ice-wedge polygon terrain in Barrow, Alaska. We used topographic (directed distance, slope, wavelet-curvature) and spectral (NDVI) metrics derived from multisensor data obtained from LiDAR and WorldView-2 platforms to develop a simple data fusion algorithm using statistical machine learning. This algorithm was used to estimate ALT (2 m spatial resolution) across the study area. A comparison of the estimates with ground-based measurements documented the accuracy (±4.4 cm, r2=0.76) of the approach. Our findings suggest that the broad climatic variability associated with warming air temperature will govern the regional averages of ALT, but the smaller-scale variability could be controlled by local eco-hydro-geomorphic variables. This work demonstrates a path forward for mapping subsurface properties over large areas from readily available remote sensing data. Methodology of Mapping and Characterization Polygons:We convolve LiDAR elevations with multiscale wavelets and objectively chose appropriate scales to map interconnected troughs of high- and low-centered polygons. For the ice wedges where LiDAR surface expressions (troughs) are not well developed, we used

  13. Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Edward S.

    1982-01-01

    An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

  14. Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, E.S.

    1980-05-09

    An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

  15. Tritanium acetabular wedge augments: short-term results

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Camilo; Heller, Snir

    2016-01-01

    Background Reconstruction of acetabular defects in total hip arthroplasty (THA) presents a great challenge to orthopaedic surgeons. Previous studies have reported on the use and outcomes of trabecular metal acetabular augments for the reconstruction of acetabular defects. However, no study has been conducted evaluating the short-term results of tritanium acetabular wedge augments for the reconstruction of acetabular defects in THA. Methods A retrospective study was conducted using a prospective database at a single institution including primary and revision THA patients from January 2013 to December 2014. Patients were included if they received a tritanium acetabular wedge augment system and had a minimum of 2-year follow-up (average 2.2 years ±0.3, range, 2–2.6 years). Demographic data and outcomes data [Harris Hip Score—HHS and Short Form (SF)-36] was collected. Radiographic data was also collected on THA revision cases (Paprosky classification), developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) cases (Crowe classification), and radiographic follow-up using DeLee and Charnley’s classification system. Results There were 4 revision THA patients, 3 DDH patients, and 1 patient with posttraumatic arthritis. At the latest radiographic follow-up, there were no lucent lines in DeLee and Charnley Zones I, II or III. During the follow-up period, there was no open revision surgery. The SF-36 physical score significantly improved from preoperative measurement (29.6±2.2) to postoperative measurement (52.2±8.7, P=0.003), and the SF-36 mental score also significantly improved from preoperative assessment (34.5±4.5) to postoperative assessment (52.2±7.5, P=0.003). Total HHS scores also significantly improved postoperatively (P=0.02), with significant improvements in both the pain score (P=0.01) and function score (P=0.02). Conclusions Tritanium acetabular wedge augments in this short follow-up case series exhibit high clinical outcome scores, no radiographic lucency, and no

  16. Thermal-wave fields in solid wedges using the Green function method: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Rui; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Chinhua; Mandelis, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    In this work, we establish a theoretical model for a cylindrical rod of radius R with opening angle θ illuminated by a modulated incident beam. The model uses the Green function method in cylindrical coordinates. An analytical expression for the Green function and thermal-wave field in such a solid is presented. The theory is validated in the limit of reducing the arbitrary wedge geometrical structure to simpler geometries. For acute angle wedges, it is shown that the thermal-wave field near the edge exhibits confinement behavior and increased amplitude compared to a flat (reference) solid with θ = π. For obtuse angle wedges, it is shown that the opposite is true and relaxation of confinement occurs leading to lower amplitude thermal-wave fields. The theory provides a basis for quantitative thermophysical characterization of wedge-shaped objects and it is tested using an AISI 304 steel wedge and photothermal radiometry detection.

  17. Wide FOV wedge prism endoscope.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keri; Kim, Daeyoung; Matsumiya, Kiyoshi; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Dohi, Takeyoshi

    2005-01-01

    We.. have developed a novel robotic endoscope system. It can be used to observe a wide field of view without moving or bending the whole endoscope system. .. It consists of a rigid endoscope and two wedge prisms at the distal tip. Rotating each wedge prism respectively, we can change the direction of view. Accordingly it becomes possible to observe a wide field of view even in a small space, and suited to clinical uses because it does not damage body tissues or internal organs. .. Wedge prisms are designed to avoid vignetting which is caused by the refraction or the reflection at prisms. The endoscope has 10mm in diameter, and the drive unit is simply separable for the sterilization. In addition, since it has a simple and small drive unit, it does not obstruct surgeon or other surgery robots. The maximum movement of local field of view is 19degrees, and global field of view is 93degrees. In the evaluation experiment, we conformed that both of the image quality and the performance are acceptable. PMID:17281566

  18. High-torque open-end wrench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giandomenico, A.; Dame, J. M.; Behimer, H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A wrench is described that is usable where limited access normally requires an open-end wrench, but which has substantially the high-torque capacity and small radial clearance characteristics of a closed-end wrench. The wrench includes a sleeve forming a nut-engageable socket with a gap in its side, and an adaptor forming a socket with a gap in its side, the adaptor closely surrounding the sleeve and extending across the gap in the sleeve. The sleeve and adaptor have surfaces that become fully engaged when a wrench handle is applied to the adaptor to turn it so as to tighten a nut engaged by the sleeve.

  19. Opening the high-energy frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, C.

    1988-12-01

    I review the scientific motivation for an experimental assault on the 1-TeV scale, elaborating the idea of technicolor as one interesting possibility for what may be found there. I then summarize some of the discovery possibilities opened by a high-luminosity, multi-TeV proton-proton collider. After a brief resume of the experimental environment anticipated at the SSC, I report on the status of the SSC R D effort and discuss the work to be carried out over the course of the next year. 37 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Mantle wedge peridotites: Fossil reservoirs of deep subduction zone processes: Inferences from high and ultrahigh-pressure rocks from Bardane (Western Norway) and Ulten (Italian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scambelluri, Marco; Van Roermund, Herman L. M.; Pettke, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    The garnet websterites from Bardane (Western Gneiss Region, Norway) derive from cold Archean subcontinental lithosphere involved in Scandian continental subduction to ultrahigh-pressures. Subduction zone metamorphism was promoted by slab fluid infiltration into the cold overlying mantle wedge. The earliest subduction transformation (M3-1) consists of garnet/clinopyroxene exsolution from old pre-subduction orthopyroxene. This stage was likely coeval with fluid input and formation of phlogopite and dolomite rods in the exsolution structures. Magnesite formation after dolomite and entrapment of fluid-related diamond-bearing polyphase inclusions in corona structures around the exsolved orthopyroxenes point to pressure increase to 4.5 GPa (M3-2). Peak pressures of 6.5-7 GPa (c.a. 200 km depth) are witnessed by crystallization of majoritic garnet (M3-3), mostly in veins cutting all the above microstructures. When such veins infiltrate the corona domains, formation of majoritic garnet in coronas is enhanced. This multistage evolution thus envisages episodic fluid influx, favouring rock recrystallization and formation of microdiamond-bearing inclusions and of majoritic garnet veins. These mantle rocks thus record fluid circulation along grain boundaries and microfractures down to 200 km depth in subduction environments. The Ulten Zone peridotites are slices of Variscan mantle wedge. Infiltration of metasomatic subduction fluids favoured transition from spinel-facies to garnet + amphibole ± dolomite parageneses at pressures below 3 GPa. Formation of metasomatized garnet-bearing peridotite mylonites suggest channelled influx of subduction fluids. The incompatible element-enriched signature of all subduction minerals in Bardane indicate that previously depleted websterites have been refertilized by COH subduction fluids. Comparison with the Ulten Zone garnet + amphibole ± dolomite peridotites outlines striking similarities in the metasomatic style and in the COH fluid phase

  1. Thrust wedges and fluid overpressures: Sandbox models involving pore fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourgues, R.; Cobbold, P. R.

    2006-05-01

    The well-known model for the critical taper of an accretionary wedge includes overpressure as a first-order parameter. Fluid overpressures reduce frictional resistance at the base of a wedge but they also act as body forces on all material particles of the wedge, in addition to that of gravity. By means of sandbox modeling, many workers have tried to verify the predictions of the critical taper model, but few of them have so far incorporated true fluid pressures. We have used scaled experiments, in which compressed air flows through sand packs, so as to model the deformation of overpressured wedges. A new apparatus provides for a horizontally varying fluid pressure, for example, a linear variation, as in the critical taper model. We have done three series of experiments, involving horizontal shortening of homogeneous or multilayered sand models for various gradients of fluid pressure. As predicted by the critical taper model, the apical angle of the resulting wedge depends on the overpressure gradient. In homogeneous sand at a high overpressure gradient, deformation becomes diffuse and looks ductile. In multilayered models, detachments form beneath layers of low permeability, so that thrusts propagate rapidly toward the undeformed foreland. The efficiency of a detachment and its ability to propagate depend not only on the fluid pressure but also on the permeability ratios between the various layers.

  2. The Influence of Localized Glacial Erosion on Exhumation Paths in Accreting Coulomb Wedges: Insights from Particle Velocimetry Analysis of Sandbox Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, P. J.; Davis, K.; Haq, S. S. B.; Ridgway, K.

    2015-12-01

    Glacial erosion can have an impact on the location and development of faults in mountain belts. The rapid removal and deposition of rock, in some cases, is thought to affect the initiation of slip on older fault structures, or cause the development of new structures within the older part of the wedge. We present cross-sectional data from both erosional and non-erosional sandbox models of Coulomb wedges in order to quantify the impact of localized erosion on the location of and slip on deformational structures, as well as the general path of material through a wedge. To do this, we employ Lagrangian particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) using the open-source Python PTV toolkit trackpy, among a suite of other data analysis tools. We are able to extract robust and reliable sets of particle trajectories from a series of images without the need for predefined markers or marker-beds, instead identifying and tracking natural variations in sand color as individual particles. By comparing the motion of particles in cross-section to the local surface topography over an entire experiment, we determine a high-resolution record of exhumation rates, in addition to simple uplift rates. These comparisons are further informed by the use of high-definition Eulerian particle image velocimetry (PIV), which provides quantitative data about the distribution of deformation and instantaneous material displacements throughout a cross-sectional view of a Coulomb wedge. This allows us to interpret these pathways in relation to the behavior of active structures and general wedge morphology. In our experiments, we observe that localized glacial erosion has an impact on material pathways, in the form of an increased rate of exhumation locally, more vertical trajectories towards surface below the zone of erosion, and reactivation of older structures to maintain force balance within the entire wedge.

  3. Assessment of computerized treatment planning system accuracy in calculating wedge factors of physical wedged fields for 6 MV photon beams.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Wazir; Maqbool, Muhammad; Shahid, Muhammad; Hussain, Amjad; Tahir, Sajjad; Matiullah; Rooh, Gul; Ahmad, Tanveer; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2011-07-01

    Wedge filters are commonly used in external beam radiotherapy to achieve a uniform dose distribution within the target volume. The main objective of this study was to investigate the accuracy of the beam modifier algorithm of Theraplan plus (TPP version 3.8) treatment planning system and to confirm that either the beam hardening, beam softening and attenuation coefficients along with wedge geometry and measured wedge factor at single depth and multiple fields sizes can be the replacement of wedged profile and wedged cross-sectional data or not. In this regard the effect of beam hardening and beam softening was studied with physical wedges for 6 MV photons. The Normalized Wedge Factors (NWFs) were measured experimentally as well as calculated with the Theraplan plus, as a function of depth and field size in a water phantom for 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° wedge filters. The beam hardening and softening was determined experimentally by deriving the required coefficients for all wedge angles. The TPP version 3.8 requires wedge transmission factor at single depth and multiple field sizes. Without incorporating the hardening and softening coefficients the percent difference between measured and calculated NFWs was as high as 7%. After the introduction of these parameters into the algorithm, the agreement between measured and TPP (V 3.8) calculated NWFs were improved to within 2 percent for various depths. Similar improvement was observed in TPP version 3.8 while calculating NWFs for various field sizes when the required coefficients were adjusted. In conclusion, the dose calculation algorithm of TPP version 3.8 showed good accuracy for a 6 MV photon beam provided beam hardening and softening parameters are taken into account. From the results, it is also concluded that, the beam hardening, beam softening and attenuation coefficients along with wedge geometry and measured wedge factor at single depth and multiple fields sizes can be the replacement of wedged profile and

  4. Some Historical Treatments should not be Forgotten: A Review of Cast Wedging and A Trick to Normalize Non-Standardized Digital X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Nathan A.; Lee, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cast wedging is a simple and reproducible method of manipulating a sub-optimally reduced fracture producing a correction and a final alignment that is amenable to definitive closed treatment. Multiple successful techniques have been previously described in the literature (opening wedge, closing wedge and combination). Technical Note: We present a simple reproducible method of templating and executing a proper cast wedging technique using digital imaging systems that are not controlled for magnification with an illustrative case. Conclusion: Renewed interest in cast wedging can provide a cost effective treatment with proven clinical outcomes in an ever changing and uncertain reimbursement climate. PMID:27298956

  5. Ultrasonic radiation from wedges of cubic profile: Experimental results.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian E; Remillieux, Marcel C; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Ulrich, T J; Pieczonka, Lukasz

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents experimental results demonstrating the increase in ultrasonic radiation obtained from a wedge of cubic profile relative to a plate of uniform thickness. The wedge of cubic profile provides high efficiency sound radiation matching layer from a mounted piezoelectric transducer into the surrounding air. Previous research on structures with indentations of power-law profile has focused on vibration mitigation using the so called "acoustic black-hole" effect, whereas here such structures are used to enhance ultrasonic radiation. The work provides experimental verification of the numerical results of Remillieux et al. (2014). PMID:26166628

  6. Mobile wedges in an active turbulent bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Sokolov, Andrey; Lowen, Hartmut; Aronson, Igor S.

    The motion of micro-wedges in a turbulent bacterial bath is explored using computer simulations with explicit modeling of the bacteria and experiments. We demonstrate that collective turbulentlike motion in a bacterial bath can power and steer the directed transport of mesoscopic carriers through the suspension. We will show that both polar ordering and swirl shielding inside the wedge yield an optimal transport velocity. Finally, we show the behavior of several wedges exposed to a bacterial bath.

  7. Experimental simulation of frost wedging-induced crack propagation in alpine rockwall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Hailiang; Leith, Kerry; Krautblatter, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Frost wedging is widely presumed to be the principal mechanism responsible for shattering jointed low-porosity rocks in high alpine rockwalls. The interaction of ice and rock physics regulates the efficacy of frost wedging. In order to better understand temporal aspects of this interaction, we present results of a series of laboratory experiments monitoring crack widening as a result of ice formation in an artificial crack (4mm wide, 80mm deep) cut 20 mm from the end of a rectangular granite block. Our results indicate that i) freezing direction plays a key role in determining the magnitude of crack widening; in short-term (1 day) experiments, maximum crack widening during top-down freezing (associated with 'autumn' conditions) was around 0.11mm, while inside-out freezing (resulting from 'spring' conditions) produced only 0.02 mm of deformation; ii) neither ice, nor water pressure (direct tension and hydraulic fracturing respectively) caused measurable irreversible crack widening during short-term tests, as the calculated maximum stress intensity at the crack tip was less than the fracture toughness of our granite sample; iii) development of ice pressure is closely related to the mechanical properties of the fracture in which it forms, and as such, the interaction of ice and rock is intrinsically dynamic; iv) irreversible crack widening (about 0.03mm) was only observed following a long-term (53 day) experiment representing a simplified transition from autumn to winter conditions. We suggest this is the result of stress corrosion aided by strong opening during freezing, and to a lesser degree by ice segregation up to one week after the initial freezing period, and downward migration of liquid water during the remainder of the test. Our results suggest the fundamental assumption of frost wedging, that rapid freezing from open ends of cracks can seal water inside the crack and thus cause damage through excessive stresses induced by volumetric expansion seems

  8. Effect of a trade between boattail angle and wedge size on the performance of a nonaxisymmetric wedge nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, George T., Jr.; Bare, E. Ann; Burley, James R., II

    1987-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the effect of a boattail angle and wedge-size trade on the performance of nonaxisymmetric wedge nozzles installed on a generic twin-engine fighter aircraft model. Test data were obtained at static conditions and at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.25. Angle of attack was held constant at 0 deg. High-pressure air was used to simulate jet exhaust, and the nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.0 (jet off) to slightly over 15.0. For the configurations studied, the results indicate that wedge size can be reduced without affecting aeropropulsive performance.

  9. Characterization of CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A fringe detection and measurement system was constructed for use with the CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner, consisting of three circuit boards. The first board is a standard Reticon RC-100 B motherboard which is used to provide the timing, video processing, and housekeeping functions required by the Reticon RL-512 G photodiode array used in the system. The sampled and held video signal from the motherboard is processed by a second, custom fabricated circuit board which contains a high speed fringe detection and locating circuit. This board includes a dc level discriminator type fringe detector, a counter circuit to determine fringe center, a pulsed laser triggering circuit, and a control circuit to operate the shutter for the He-Ne reference laser beam. The fringe center information is supplied to the third board, a commercial single board computer, which governs the data collection process and interprets the results.

  10. Characterization of CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A fringe detection and measurement system was constructed for use with the CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner, consisting of three circuit boards. The first board is a standard Reticon RC-100 B motherboard which is used to provide the timing, video processing, and housekeeping functions required by the Reticon RL-512 G photodiode array used in the system. The sampled and held video signal from the motherboard is processed by a second, custom fabricated circuit board which contains a high speed fringe detection and locating circuit. This board includes a dc level discriminator type fringe detector, a counter circuit to determine fringe center, a pulsed laser triggering circuit, and a control circuit to operate the shutter for the He-Ne reference laser beam. The fringe center information is supplied to the third board, a commercial single board computer, which governs the data collection process and interprets the results.

  11. Dissolved organic carbon loss from Yedoma permafrost amplified by ice wedge thaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonk, J. E.; Mann, P. J.; Dowdy, K. L.; Davydova, A.; Davydov, S. P.; Zimov, N.; Spencer, R. G. M.; Bulygina, E. B.; Eglinton, T. I.; Holmes, R. M.

    2013-09-01

    Pleistocene Yedoma permafrost contains nearly a third of all organic matter (OM) stored in circum-arctic permafrost and is characterized by the presence of massive ice wedges. Due to its rapid formation by sediment accumulation and subsequent frozen storage, Yedoma OM is relatively well preserved and highly biologically available (biolabile) upon thaw. A better understanding of the processes regulating Yedoma degradation is important to improve estimates of the response and magnitude of permafrost carbon feedbacks to climate warming. In this study, we examine the composition of ice wedges and the influence of ice wedge thaw on the biolability of Yedoma OM. Incubation assays were used to assess OM biolability, fluorescence spectroscopy to characterize the OM composition, and potential enzyme activity rates to examine the controls and regulation of OM degradation. We show that increasing amounts of ice wedge melt water in Yedoma-leached incubations enhanced the loss of dissolved OM over time. This may be attributed to the presence of low-molecular weight compounds and low initial phenolic content in the OM of ice wedges, providing a readily available substrate that promotes the degradation of Yedoma OC. The physical vulnerability of ice wedges upon thaw (causing irreversible collapse), combined with the composition of ice wedge-engrained OM (co-metabolizing old OM), underlines the particularly strong potential of Yedoma to generate a positive feedback to climate warming relative to other forms of non-ice wedge permafrost.

  12. Depth dependence determination of the wedge transmission factor for 4--10 MV photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, E.C.; Gortney, J.; Blackwell, C.R.

    1988-07-01

    The depth dependence (up to 25 cm) of the in-phantom wedge transmission factor (WTF) has been determined for three medical linear accelerator x-ray beams with energies of 4, 6, and 10 MV containing 15/sup 0/--60/sup 0/ (nominal) brass wedges. All measurements were made with a cylindrical ionization chamber in water, for a field size of 10 x 10 cm/sup 2/ with a source--skin distance of 80 or 100 cm. We conclude that, for the accelerators studied, the WTF factor at depth is less than 2% different from that determined at d/sub max/ (for the nominal wedge angles and photon energies studied) unless the depth of interest is greater than 10 cm. Up to the maximum depth studied (25 cm) the relative wedge factor: that is, wedge factor at depth compared to that determined at d/sub max/ : was about equal to or less than 1.02 for the 15/sup 0/ and 30/sup 0/ wedges and any of the photon beam energies studied. For the seldom utilized combination of a nominal wedge angle in excess of 45/sup 0/ with a depth greater than 10 cm, the WTF at depth can differ from the WTF determined at d/sub max/, by up to 5%. Since the wedge transmission factor is reflective of relative percent dose data, our results also indicate that it is in error to use open field percent depth doses for certain combinations of wedge angle, photon energy, and depth.

  13. Can vertical compaction within wedges promote accretion by backthrusts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeck, J.; Cooke, M. L.; Herbert, J. W.; Madden, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    In natural subduction zones, frontal accretion dominantly occurs via the propagation of forethrusts, whereas accretion via backthrusts has been observed in only a few active subduction zones, including the Cascadia margin. Similarly, in most analog experiments of accretionary wedges deformation is accommodated by forethrusts or backthrust/forethrust pairs, except for some experiments with a layer of silicone below sand, which can produce accretionary backthrusts. Vertical deflection of the detachment caused by the lateral flow of the silicone layer could promote the propagation of backthrusts in these analog experiments. Alternatively, the high Holocene sediment input in parts of the Cascadia margin could produce vertical compaction deep within the wedge that promotes backthrusting. To explore the effect of vertical compaction and deflection of the detachment on fault development in accretionary prisms we use the Boundary Element Method modeling tool Growth by Optimization of Work (GROW) to predict the vergence of faults in a deforming wedge. GROW predicts fault growth by propagating faults in the direction that maximizes the efficiency of the system, or minimizes the external work of the system. We simulate vertical compaction with compliant elements and observe that the addition of these elements deep in the wedge or along the detachment promotes backthrusting rather than forethrusts. Similarly, local downward deflection of the detachment promotes backthrust development over that of forethrusts. These numerical model results suggest that vertical compaction or local deflection of the megathrust may account for backthrust development in parts of the Cascadia margin.

  14. Capillarity driven motion of solid film wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, H.; Miksis, M.J.; Voorhees, P.W.; Davis, S.H.

    1997-06-01

    A solid film freshly deposited on a substrate may form a non-equilibrium contact angle with the substrate, and will evolve. This morphological evolution near the contact line is investigated by studying the motion of a solid wedge on a substrate. The contact angle of the wedge changes at time t = 0 from the wedge angle {alpha} to the equilibrium contact angle {beta}, and its effects spread into the wedge via capillarity-driven surface diffusion. The film profiles at different times are found to be self-similar, with the length scale increasing as t{sup 1 4}. The self-similar film profile is determined numerically by a shooting method for {alpha} and {beta} between 0 and 180. In general, the authors find that the film remains a wedge when {alpha} = {beta}. For {alpha} < {beta}, the film retracts, whereas for {alpha} > {beta}, the film extends. For {alpha} = 90{degree}, the results describe the growth of grain-boundary grooves for arbitrary dihedral angles. For {beta} = 90{degree}, the solution also applies to a free-standing wedge, and the thin-wedge profiles agree qualitatively with those observed in transmission electron microscope specimens.

  15. Pressure Distributions About Finite Wedges in Bounded and Unbounded Subsonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donoughe, Patrick L; Prasse, Ernst I

    1953-01-01

    An analytical investigation of incompressible flow about wedges was made to determine effects of tunnel-wedge ratio and wedge angle on the wedge pressure distributions. The region of applicability of infinite wedge-type velocity distribution was examined for finite wedges. Theoretical and experimental pressure coefficients for various tunnel-wedge ratios, wedge angles, and subsonic Mach numbers were compared.

  16. Mantle wedge anisotropy beneath the Japan and Ryukyu arcs from teleseismic receiver functions - Implications for mantle flow and wedge hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, E. A.; Long, M. D.; Mccormack, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Many fundamental aspects of the mantle wedge above subducting slabs, such as the dynamics of mantle flow and the transport of water and melt, have yet to be fully understood. A complete characterization of seismic anisotropy can yield powerful constraints on mantle flow and the degree of mantle wedge hydration. In this study, we characterize the geometry and strength of anisotropy in the mantle wedges beneath northeast Japan and the Ryukyu arc, which overlie the subducting Pacific and Philippine Sea plates, respectively. We compute radial and transverse component P-to-S receiver functions from 15 stations of the F-net array using the multitaper correlation receiver function estimator (Park and Levin, 2000). In both regions, we observe P-to-SV converted energy on radial component receiver functions that are consistent with conversions originating at the subducting oceanic Moho and the top of the subducting oceanic crust. We also observe P-to-SH conversions on the transverse component receiver functions that are consistent with the presence of multiple anisotropic and/or dipping layers. We compute synthetic receiver functions using a forward modeling scheme to create models for the depths, thicknesses, and strengths of the anisotropic layers beneath both northeast Japan and Ryukyu. Beneath Ryukyu, we detect evidence for a layer of strong anisotropy and high Vp/Vs ratio directly above the slab, consistent with the presence of serpentinite. We see no evidence of this signature in receiver functions from northeast Japan; instead, we see evidence for relatively modest anisotropy due to olivine fabric. We also detect a low-velocity region in the mantle wedge beneath northeast Japan, which may be consistent with the presence of partial melt. Since the presence of serpentinite indicates significant hydration of the wedge, the contrast in anisotropic structure between Ryukyu and northeast Japan has important implications for our understanding of slab hydration and how water

  17. Long-range hybrid wedge plasmonic waveguide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhonglai; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    We design a novel long-range hybrid wedge plasmonic (LRHWP) waveguide composed of two identical dielectric nanowires symmetrically placed on two opposed wedges of a diamond shaped metal wire. With strong coupling between the dielectric nanowire mode and long-range surface plasmon polariton (SPP) mode, both deep subwavelength mode confinement and low propagation loss are achieved. On one hand, when compared to the previous long-range hybrid SPP waveguide, LRHWP waveguide can achieve smaller mode size with similar propagation length; on the other hand, when compared to the previous hybrid wedge SPP waveguide, LRHWP waveguide can provide an order of magnitude longer propagation length with similar level of mode confinement. The designed LRHWP waveguide also features an overall advantage of one-order improvement of Figure of Merit. We further evaluate in detail the impacts of possible practical fabrication imperfections on the mode properties. The obtained results of mode properties show that the proposed LRHWP waveguide with an optimized wedge tip angle of 140 degree is fairly tolerant to practical fabrication errors in geometry parameters such as misalignment in the horizontal direction, asymmetry in the vertical direction, variation of wedge tip angle, tilt or rotation of metal wire, and variation of wedge tip curvature radius. PMID:25362900

  18. Long-range hybrid wedge plasmonic waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhonglai; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    We design a novel long-range hybrid wedge plasmonic (LRHWP) waveguide composed of two identical dielectric nanowires symmetrically placed on two opposed wedges of a diamond shaped metal wire. With strong coupling between the dielectric nanowire mode and long-range surface plasmon polariton (SPP) mode, both deep subwavelength mode confinement and low propagation loss are achieved. On one hand, when compared to the previous long-range hybrid SPP waveguide, LRHWP waveguide can achieve smaller mode size with similar propagation length; on the other hand, when compared to the previous hybrid wedge SPP waveguide, LRHWP waveguide can provide an order of magnitude longer propagation length with similar level of mode confinement. The designed LRHWP waveguide also features an overall advantage of one-order improvement of Figure of Merit. We further evaluate in detail the impacts of possible practical fabrication imperfections on the mode properties. The obtained results of mode properties show that the proposed LRHWP waveguide with an optimized wedge tip angle of 140 degree is fairly tolerant to practical fabrication errors in geometry parameters such as misalignment in the horizontal direction, asymmetry in the vertical direction, variation of wedge tip angle, tilt or rotation of metal wire, and variation of wedge tip curvature radius. PMID:25362900

  19. Two brittle ductile transitions in subduction wedges, as revealed by topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thissen, C.; Brandon, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction wedges contain two brittle ductile transitions. One transition occurs within the wedge interior, and a second transition occurs along the decollement. The decollement typically has faster strain rates, which suggests that the brittle ductile transition along the decollement will be more rearward (deeper) than the transition within the interior. However, the presence of distinct rheologies or other factors such as pore fluid pressure along the decollement may reverse the order of the brittle-ductile transitions. We adopt a solution by Williams et al., (1994) to invert for these brittle ductile transitions using the wedge surface topography. At present, this model does not include an s point or sediment loading atop the wedge. The Hellenic wedge, however, as exposed in Crete presents an ideal setting to test these ideas. We find that the broad high of the Mediterranean ridge represents the coulomb frictional part of the Hellenic wedge. The rollover in topography north of the ridge results from curvature of the down going plate, creating a negative alpha depression in the vicinity of the Strabo, Pliny, and Ionian 'troughs' south of Crete. A steep topographic rise out of these troughs and subsequent flattening reflects the brittle ductile transition at depth in both the decollement and the wedge interior. Crete exposes the high-pressure viscous core of the wedge, and pressure solution textures provide additional evidence for viscous deformation in the rearward part of the wedge. The location of the decollement brittle ductile transition has been previously poorly constrained, and Crete has never experienced a subduction zone earthquake in recorded history. Williams, C. A., et al., (1994). Effect of the brittle ductile transition on the topography of compressive mountain belts on Earth and Venus. Journal of Geophysical Research Solid Earth

  20. Dual Double-Wedge Pseudo-Depolarizer with Anamorphic PSF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Peter; Thompson, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    A polarized scene, which may occur at oblique illumination angles, creates a radiometric signal that varies as a function of viewing angle. One common optical component that is used to minimize such an effect is a polarization scrambler or depolarizer. As part of the CLARREO mission, the SOLARIS instrument project at Goddard Space Flight Center has developed a new class of polarization scramblers using a dual double-wedge pseudo-depolarizer that produces an anamorphic point spread function (PSF). The SOLARIS instrument uses two Wollaston type scramblers in series, each with a distinct wedge angle, to image a pseudo-depolarized scene that is free of eigenstates. Since each wedge is distinct, the scrambler is able to produce an anamorphic PSF that maintains high spatial resolution in one dimension by sacrificing the spatial resolution in the other dimension. This scrambler geometry is ideal for 1-D imagers, such as pushbroom slit spectrometers, which require high spectral resolution, high spatial resolution, and low sensitivity to polarized light. Moreover, the geometry is applicable to a wide range of scientific instruments that require both high SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) and low sensitivity to polarized scenes

  1. Dynamic Open Inquiry Performances of High-School Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, Michal; Sadeh, Irit

    2010-01-01

    In examining open inquiry projects among high-school biology students, we found dynamic inquiry performances expressed in two criteria: "changes occurring during inquiry" and "procedural understanding". Characterizing performances in a dynamic open inquiry project can shed light on both the procedural and epistemological scientific understanding…

  2. Effect of Turbulizing Grid Near Wake on a Boundary Layer on a Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brylyakov, A. P.; Zanin, B. Yu.; Zharkova, G. M.; Sboev, D. S.

    2002-07-01

    The problem of flow about bodies with high free stream turbulence is very important for engineering, because these flows are frequently met in different technical devices and turbo-machines. The recent researches showed that a stationary system of longitudinal structures arose on the winward side of the wing from increasing level of free stream turbulence to 1%. Characteristic transversal size of these structures exceeded the boundary layer thickness in many times. The number of the structures was found to be dependent on the angle of attack and the distance from the wind tunnel nozzle. Those experiments were carried in the open test section and the flow about the wing was complicated because of transversal spread of the flow. The present work is an experimental investigation of a similar phenomenon which takes place in a boundary layer on the winward surface of two-dimensional wedge in close test section.

  3. Transonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of Two Wedge Airfoil Sections Including Unsteady Flow Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Patrick J.

    1959-01-01

    A two-dimensional wind-tunnel investigation has been conducted on a 20-percent-thick single-wedge airfoil section. Steady-state forces and moments were determined from pressure measurements at Mach numbers from 0.70 to about 1.25. Additional information on the flows about the single wedge is provided by means of instantaneous pressure measurements at Mach numbers up to unity. Pressure distributions were also obtained on a symmetrical double-wedge or diamond-shaped profile which had the same leading-edge included angle as the single-wedge airfoil. A comparison of the data on the two profiles to provide information on the effects of the afterbody showed that with the exception of drag, the single-wedge profile proved to be aerodynamically superior to the diamond profile in all respects. The lift effectiveness of the single-wedge airfoil section far exceeded that of conventional thin airfoil sections over the speed range of the investigation. Pitching-moment irregularities, caused by negative loadings near the trailing edge, generally associated with conventional airfoils of equivalent thicknesses were not exhibited by the single-wedge profile. Moderately high pulsating pressures existing over the base of the single-wedge airfoil section were significantly reduced as the Mach number was increased beyond 0.92 and the boundaries of the dead airspace at the base of the model converged to eliminate the vortex street in the wake. Increasing the leading-edge radius from 0 to 1 percent of the chord had a minor effect on the steady-state forces and generally raised the level of pressure pulsations over the forward part of the single-wedge profile.

  4. Hyperspectral data collections with the new wedge imaging spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Jeter, J.W.; Hartshorne, R.; Thunen, J.G.

    1996-11-01

    The Wedge Imaging Spectrometer (WIS) applies a unique technology to hyperspectral imaging systems, allowing flexibility and high performance in a very compact package. This innovation is based on the use of a linear spectral wedge filter mated directly to an area detector array, avoiding the use of bulky and complex optics required for imaging spectrometers based on gratings or prism concepts. The technology was realized in an earlier flight demonstration system as previously reported. Second generation VNIR and SWIR instruments have now been developed, each with two filters whose spectral bandwidths are optimized for specific spectral features. The SWIR instrument can be extended to operate in the 3-5 PM mid-wave spectral region. The new instrument is currently completing its integration and test phase. Preliminary results indicate excellent performance potential for a wide range of applications. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Why is the Cascadia subduction zone backarc hot? Numerical tests of mantle wedge flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, C. A.; Wang, K.; Hyndman, R. D.; He, J.

    2003-12-01

    Understanding mantle wedge processes is critical for constraining thermal and petrological controls on in-slab earthquakes and the behaviour of the deep subduction thrust fault. Observational constraints indicate that the mantle wedge at the northern Cascadia subduction zone is extremely hot. Below the volcanic arc, temperatures greater than 1300° C are required for magma generation. In the backarc, surface heat flow, seismic velocities, thermal isostasy and xenolith studies suggest temperatures of 1200° C at 60 km depth for a distance of 500 km. The landward limit of the backarc is the abrupt contact with the thick, cold North America craton, making high backarc temperatures even more surprising. An initial compilation of thermal data shows that most other backarcs are similarly hot. Finite element thermal models are used to investigate the backarc mantle flow structure that maintains these high temperatures. Two principle driving forces for flow are: traction along the top of the subducting slab and buoyancy forces due to lateral thermal heterogeneities, such as cooling by the slab and Rayleigh instabilities. In this study, we primarily deal with traction-driven flow, using Cascadia subduction parameters. A thick (>200 km) lithosphere was introduced at the landward backarc boundary, consistent with the presence of the North America craton root. For an isoviscous mantle, the craton deflects hot material from depth into the wedge, resulting in a warmer wedge than models without a craton, although the temperatures are 150-300° C lower than inferred from observations. Decoupling of the wedge from the over-riding plate increases the backarc Moho temperature by over 100° C; temperatures below the arc are relatively unaffected. With a more realistic stress- and temperature-dependent viscosity, high velocity flow originates from great depths along the landward boundary, even without a craton. Flow is strongly focussed into the wedge corner, leading to much higher sub

  6. Practical implementation of enhanced dynamic wedge in the CadPlan treatment planning system.

    PubMed

    Samuelsson, A; Johansson, K A; Mattsson, O; Palm, A; Puurunen, H; Sernbo, G

    1997-01-01

    The Varian CadPlan algorithm for computation of relative dose distributions and monitor unit calculations for Enhanced Dynamic Wedge (EDW) fields is based on a combination of open field beam data and Segmented Treatment data Tables. Calculation of dose by the pencil beam convolution model uses scatter kernels and boundary kernels to create the distribution. The principles of the pencil beam convolution model is presented. Comparison of measured and calculated monitor units and relative dose distributions showed good agreement and the deviations are within international accepted tolerans. Test results indicate that the EDW model works satisfactorily for all energies and wedge angles. PMID:9307952

  7. Two-dimensional meniscus in a wedge

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, M.; Pinczewski, W.V.; Oren, P.E.

    1995-03-15

    This paper presents a closed-form analytical solution of the augmented Young-Laplace equation for the meniscus profile in a two-dimensional wedge-shaped capillary. The solution is valid for monotonic forms of disjoining pressure which are repulsive in nature. In the limit of negligible disjoining pressure, it is shown to reduce to the classical solution of constant curvature. The character of the solution is examined and examples of practical interest which demonstrate the application of the solution to the computation of the meniscus profile in a wedge-shaped capillary are discussed.

  8. A review of dynamics modelling of friction wedge suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing; Cole, Colin; Spiryagin, Maksym; Sun, Yan Quan

    2014-11-01

    Three-piece bogies with friction wedge suspensions are the most widely used bogies in heavy haul trains. Fiction wedge suspensions play a key role in these wagon systems. This article reviews current techniques in dynamic modelling of friction wedge suspension with various motivations: to improve dynamic models of friction wedge suspensions so as to improve general wagon dynamics simulations; to seek better friction wedge suspension models for wagon stability assessments in complex train systems; to improve the modelling of other friction devices, such as friction draft gear. Relevant theories and friction wedge suspension models developed by using commercial simulation packages and in-house simulation packages are reviewed.

  9. Crustal wedge deformation in an internally-driven, numerical subduction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dinther, Ylona; Morra, Gabriele; Funiciello, Francesca; Rossetti, Federico; Faccenna, Claudio

    2010-05-01

    The Earth's active convergent margins are characterized by dynamic feedback mechanisms that interact to form an intricate system in which a crustal wedge is shaped and metamorphosed at the will of two large, converging plates. This framework is accompanied by complicated processes, such as seismogenesis and the exhumation of high pressure rocks. To honor the dynamic interaction between different entities and advance on these persisting issues, we model the interaction between the subducting and overriding lithospheres, the mantle and the crustal wedge explicitly, and observe how a crustal wedge evolves in detail within a set of rigid, internally-driven boundary conditions. We model crustal wedge evolution in an intra-oceanic subduction setting by using a plane-strain implicit solid-mechanical Finite Element Model, in which the mechanical conservation equations are solved using the software package ABAQUS. The crustal wedge is modeled as a thick-skinned accretionary wedge of inter-mediate thickness with a linear visco-elastic bulk rheology. The dynamic interaction between the subducting plate, the overriding plate, and crustal wedge is implemented using a Coulomb frictional algorithm. The interaction with the mantle is incorporated using a computationally favorable mantle drag formulation that simulates induced three-dimensional mantle flow. This results in a quasi-static framework with a freely moving slab, trench, and fault, where a weaker wedge deforms in response to self-regulating, rigid boundary conditions formed by single, frictional bounding faults. The self-regulating evolution of crustal wedge architecture follows three phases; 1) initial vertical growth, 2) coeval compression and extension leading to internal corner flow, and 3) a steady-state taper with continuous corner flow. Particle trajectories show that, as shortening continues throughout the second phase, wedge material is constantly forced upward against the backstop, while extension and ocean

  10. Testing the critical Coulomb wedge theory on hyper-extended rifted margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirrengarten, Michael; Manatschal, Gianreto; Kusznir, Nick

    2015-04-01

    Deformation of hyper-extended continental crust and its relationship with the underlying mantle is a key process in the evolution of rifted margins. Recent studies have focused on hyper-extension in rifted margins using different approaches such as numerical modelling, seismic interpretation, potential field methods and field observations. However many fundamental questions about the observed structures and their evolution during the formation of hyper-extended margins are still debated. In this study an observation driven approach has been used to characterise geometrical and physical attributes of the continental crust termination, considered as a hyper-extended wedge, in order to test the applicability of critical Coulomb wedge theory to hyper-extended margins. The Coulomb wedge theory was first developed on accretionary prisms and on fold and thrust belts, but it has also been applied in extensional settings. Coulomb wedge theory explains the evolution of the critical aperture angle of the wedge as a function of basal sliding without deformation in the overlying wedge. This critical angle depends on the frictional parameters of the material, the basal friction, the surface slope, the basal dip and the fluid pressure. If the evolution of hyper-extended wedges could be described by the critical Coulomb wedge theory, it would have a major impact in the understanding of the structural and physical evolution of rifted domains during the hyper-extension processes. On seismic reflection lines imaging magma-poor hyper-extended margins, the continental crust termination is often shown to form a hyper-extended wedge. ODP Sites 1067, 900 and 1068 on the Iberian margin as well as field observations in the Alps give direct access to the rocks forming the hyper-extended wedge, which are typically composed of highly deformed and hydrated continental rocks underlain by serpentinised mantle. The boundary between the hydrated continental and mantle rocks corresponds to a

  11. Wedge Shock and Nozzle Exhaust Plume Interaction in a Supersonic Jet Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond; Zaman, Khairul; Fagan, Amy; Heath, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the nozzle exhaust plume. Aft body shock waves that interact with the exhaust plume contribute to the near-field pressure signature of a vehicle. The plume and shock interaction was studied using computational fluid dynamics and compared with experimental data from a coaxial convergent-divergent nozzle flow in an open jet facility. A simple diamond-shaped wedge was used to generate the shock in the outer flow to study its impact on the inner jet flow. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the opposite plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the nozzle exhaust plume was modified by the presence of the wedge. Both the experimental results and computational predictions show changes in plume deflection.

  12. Assessment of a multibeam Fizeau wedge interferometer for Doppler wind lidar.

    PubMed

    McKay, Jack A

    2002-03-20

    The Fabry-Perot interferometer is the standard instrument for the direct detection Doppler lidar measurement of atmospheric wind speeds. The multibeam Fizeau wedge has some practical advantages over the Fabry-Perot, such as the linear fringe pattern, and is evaluated for this application. The optimal Fizeau must have a resolving power of 10(6) or more. As the multibeam Fizeau wedge is pushed to such high resolving power, the interference fringes of the device become complicated by asymmetry and secondary maxima. A simple condition for the interferometer plate reflectance, optical gap, and wedge angle reveals whether a set of parameters will yield simple, Airy-like fringes or complex Fizeau fringes. Tilting of the Fizeau wedge improves the fringe shape and permits an extension of the regime of Airy-like fringes to higher resolving power. Sufficient resolving power for the wind lidar application is shown to be possible with a large-gap, low-finesse multibeam Fizeau wedge. Liabilities of the multibeam Fizeau wedge in the wind lidar application include a smaller acceptance solid angle and calibration sensitivity to localized deviations of the plates from the ideal. PMID:11921807

  13. Growth of the South Pyrenean orogenic wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meigs, Andrew J.; Burbank, Douglas W.

    1997-04-01

    A six-step reconstruction of the South Pyrenean foreland fold-and-thrust belt in Spain delineates the topographic slope, basal décollement angle, internal deformation, and thrust-front advance from the Early Eocene until the end of contractional deformation in the Late Oligocene. Style of thrust-front advance, dip of the basal décollement, slope of the upper surface, and internal deformation are decoupled and not simply related. Internal deformation increased, decreased, and maintained surface slope angle at different stages. From the onset to the cessation of deformation, the basal décollement angle decreased overall suggesting translation of the thrust belt onto stronger crust with time. Taper angle of the Pyrenean thrust wedge was fundamentally controlled by the flexural rigidity of the lower plate, the relative rate of creation of structural relief in the rear versus the front of the wedge, the extent of deposition of eroded material within the deforming wedge, and the taper of the pretectonic stratigraphic wedge.

  14. A numerical study of the interaction between the mantle wedge, subducting slab, and overriding plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, Michael A.; Grasset, Olivier; Sotin, Christophe

    2002-12-01

    We have formulated a numerical model with strongly temperature-dependent viscosity to calculate thermal structure and flow-field in subduction zones. One important particularity of the model is that the overriding plate is not fixed over its whole thickness in order to allow material exchange between the wedge and the upper lithosphere. Numerical problems due to very high-viscosity contrasts are avoided by coupling a finite difference method and a finite element method for solving the energy conservation equation and the Stockes equation, respectively. In this model, a temperature decrease from 1400 to 1300 °C increases the viscosity by an order of magnitude. We study the temperature structure and the velocity field of the subducting slab and mantle wedge. Surface heat flow, velocity anomalies, and geometry of the partial melting zone are also calculated. To study the effect that boundary conditions play on the interaction between the mantle wedge, overriding plate and subducting plate, we examine models with both fixed and free-slip conditions applied to the overriding plate. When the overriding plate is allowed to move laterally (free-slip), the subducting slab is thick, and both the temperature field and the convective motions in the mantle wedge are similar to those observed when using constant viscosity numerical models or analytical corner flow models. If the surface of the overriding plate is fixed, the subducting slab is thin and the mantle wedge impinges upon the overriding plate forming a high-temperature nose between the overriding plate and subducting lithosphere. Furthermore, viscous decoupling occurs implicitly at shallow depth between the slab and the wedge because hot material from the wedge is entrained close to the trench. In that case, the subducting slab tectonically erodes the lower lithosphere of the overriding plate leading to high-temperatures, low seismic velocities, high attenuation and high heat flow beneath volcanic arc, in agreement

  15. 38. INTERIOR VIEW, DENISON MULTIPRESS FOR INSERTION OF WEDGES ONTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. INTERIOR VIEW, DENISON MULTI-PRESS FOR INSERTION OF WEDGES ONTO HANDLES AND CUTTING OFF SCRAP END OF HANDLE FOLLOWING WEDGE INSERTION, BRIAN KIMBLE, OPERATOR - Warwood Tool Company, Foot of Nineteenth Street, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  16. Simultaneous measurement of refractive index and wedge angle of optical windows using Fizeau interferometry and a cyclic path optical configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Y. Pavan; Chatterjee, Sanjib

    2009-08-20

    We present a new technique for the simultaneous measurement of refractive index and wedge angle of optical windows using Fizeau interferometry and a cyclic path optical configuration (CPOC). Two laterally separated beams are obtained from an expanded collimated beam using an aperture containing two rectangular openings. The test wedge plate is placed in one of the two separated beams. Using CPOC, these two beams are made to overlap and interfere, producing interference fringes in the overlapping region. The beams reflected from the front and back surfaces of the test wedge plate interfere and produce Fizeau fringes. The refractive index is related to the spacing of the above two beam fringes. The wedge angle is determined from the evaluated values of the refractive index and Fizeau fringe spacing. The results obtained for a BK-7 optical window are presented.

  17. Late Holocene stable-isotope based winter temperature records from ice wedges in the Northeast Siberian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opel, Thomas; Meyer, Hanno; Laepple, Thomas; Dereviagin, Alexander Yu.

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic is currently undergoing an unprecedented warming. This highly dynamic response on changes in climate forcing and the global impact of the Arctic water, carbon and energy balances make the Arctic a key region to study past, recent and future climate changes. Recent proxy-based temperature reconstructions indicate a long-term cooling over the past about 8 millennia that is mainly related to a decrease in solar summer insolation and has been reversed only by the ongoing warming. Climate model results on the other hand show no significant change or even a slight warming over this period. This model-proxy data mismatch might be caused by a summer bias of the used climate proxies. Ice wedges may provide essential information on past winter temperatures for a comprehensive seasonal picture of Holocene Arctic climate variability. Polygonal ice wedges are a widespread permafrost feature in the Arctic tundra lowlands. Ice wedges form by the repeated filling of thermal contraction cracks with snow melt water, which quickly refreezes at subzero ground temperatures and forms ice veins. As the seasonality of frost cracking and infill is generally related to winter and spring, respectively, the isotopic composition of wedge ice is indicative of past climate conditions during the annual cold season (DJFMAM, hereafter referred to as winter). δ18O of ice is interpreted as proxy for regional surface air temperature. AMS radiocarbon dating of organic remains in ice-wedge samples provides age information to generate chronologies for single ice wedges as well as regionally stacked records with an up to centennial resolution. In this contribution we seek to summarize Holocene ice-wedge δ18O based temperature information from the Northeast Siberian Arctic. We strongly focus on own work in the Laptev Sea region but consider as well literature data from other regional study sites. We consider the stable-isotope composition of wedge ice, ice-wedge dating and chronological

  18. A resonant series counterpulse technique for high current opening switches

    SciTech Connect

    Dijk, E. van; Gelder, P. van

    1995-01-01

    A counterpulse technique for the controlled interruption of very high currents in inductive storage pulsed power systems is described and analyzed, and some simulation results of its performance are presented. The accompanying circuit comprises a pre-charged capacitor bank, connected in series with the inductive load, which has to be provided with a current pulse. Upon actuation, a resonant counterpulse current is created in the opening switch, connected in parallel with the current source and the load. In this way, the opening switch is opened at low current. A separate closing switch prevents closing of the opening switch at high voltage. Operation of the opening switch, often a mechanical switch, at low current and low voltage prevents arc erosion of the contacts. The advantage of this circuit compared to other counterpulse circuits is that the capacitor bank does not experience a voltage reversal. Electrolytic capacitors, which have a high energy density, are applied. The remaining energy of the capacitor bank after opening the opening switch, is transferred to the load. The required initial voltage of the capacitor bank is only a few hundred volts, whereas it may be above a kilovolt in other circuits. Another advantage of the method described here is that the load does not experience a pre-current, causing unwanted preheating of the load, before the resonant current is activated. At the moment, work is being performed at the Pulse Physics Laboratory to develop the resonant series counterpulse circuit for use with rail accelerators, which must be supplied with current pulses in the millisecond range up to the mega-ampere level.

  19. 21 CFR 884.5200 - Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. 884.5200... Devices § 884.5200 Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. (a) Identification. A hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge provides mechanical support to the perianal region during the labor and delivery...

  20. 21 CFR 884.5200 - Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. 884.5200... Devices § 884.5200 Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. (a) Identification. A hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge provides mechanical support to the perianal region during the labor and delivery...

  1. Latest Pleistocene Sediment Wedge on the New Jersey Outer Continental Shelf - Forced Regressive Paleo-Hudson Delta?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, M.; Goff, J. A.; Steel, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    The offlapping sediment wedge on the outer shelf off New Jersey that overlies the regional reflector R-horizon shows many of the characteristic features of a progradational succession deposited during falling sea level (forced regression). This interpretation is consistent with the estimated latest Pleistocene age of the wedge - a well-established period of large-scale eustatic sea level fall. The sediment wedge occupies the outer shelf of New Jersey south of the Hudson Shelf Valley, extending down to the shelf edge. The sediment wedge appears to be strongly strike-oriented. The absence of any record of time-equivalent fluvial/distributary channels on the proximal part of the sediment wedge led some previous workers to the interpretation that the wedge was a product of redistribution of sediment on the shelf rather than a deltaic feature supplied by a fluvial source. The absence of fluvial and coastal plain deposits capping the proximal end of the wedge is actually a characteristic feature of forced regressive deposits and does not preclude a fluvial source for the sediments constituting the wedge. Reinterpretation of high-resolution (1-12 kHz), deep-towed and hull-mounted CHIRP seismic data collected on the New Jersey outer shelf in 2001, 2002 and 2006 shows possible terminal distributary channel deposits and mass transport deposits preserved in the distal part of the wedge that have not been described previously. These channel-like features are restricted in their distribution and their preservation in the sedimentary record is possibly due to punctuated sea-level rise within the overall falling trajectory of sea level that preceded the last glacial maximum (LGM). The presence of these channels and the mass transport complexes point to a direct fluvial feeder, which supplied the sediments to build the sediment wedge on New Jersey outer continental shelf. Detailed mapping of the sediment wedge using the CHIRP data shows that the sediment wedge is composed of

  2. Measured Hydrologic Storage Characteristics of Three Major Ice Wedge Polygon Types, Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, A. J.; Liljedahl, A.; Wilson, C. J.; Cable, W.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2014-12-01

    Model simulations have suggested that the hydrologic fluxes and stores of Arctic wetlands are constrained by the micro-topographical features of ice wedge polygons, which are abundant in lowland tundra landscapes. Recently observed changes in ice wedge polygon landscapes - in particular, ice wedge degradation and trough formation - emphasize the need to better understand how differing ice wedge polygon morphologies affect the larger hydrologic system. Here we present three seasons of measured end-of-winter snow accumulation, continuous soil moisture and water table elevations, and repeated frost table mapping. Together, these describe the hydrologic characteristics of three main ice wedge polygon types: low centered polygons with limited trough development (representative of a ~500 year old vegetated drained thaw lake basin), and low- and high-centered polygons with well-defined troughs. Dramatic spatiotemporal variability exists both between polygon types and between the features of an individual polygon (e.g. troughs, centers, rims). Landscape-scale end-of-winter snow water equivalent is similar between polygon types, while the sub-polygon scale distribution of the surface water differs, both as snow and as ponded water. Some sub-polygon features appear buffered against large variations in water levels, while others display periods of prolonged recessions and large responses to rain events. Frost table elevations in general mimic the ground surface topography, but with spatiotemporal variability in thaw rate. The studied thaw seasons represented above long-term average rainfall, and in 2014, record high June precipitation. Differing ice wedge polygon types express dramatically different local hydrology, despite nearly identical climate forcing and landscape-scale snow accumulation, making ice wedge polygons an important component when describing the Arctic water, nutrient and energy system.

  3. Climate adaptation wedges: a case study of premium wine in the western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diffenbaugh, Noah S.; White, Michael A.; Jones, Gregory V.; Ashfaq, Moetasim

    2011-04-01

    Design and implementation of effective climate change adaptation activities requires quantitative assessment of the impacts that are likely to occur without adaptation, as well as the fraction of impact that can be avoided through each activity. Here we present a quantitative framework inspired by the greenhouse gas stabilization wedges of Pacala and Socolow. In our proposed framework, the damage avoided by each adaptation activity creates an 'adaptation wedge' relative to the loss that would occur without that adaptation activity. We use premium winegrape suitability in the western United States as an illustrative case study, focusing on the near-term period that covers the years 2000-39. We find that the projected warming over this period results in the loss of suitable winegrape area throughout much of California, including most counties in the high-value North Coast and Central Coast regions. However, in quantifying adaptation wedges for individual high-value counties, we find that a large adaptation wedge can be captured by increasing the severe heat tolerance, including elimination of the 50% loss projected by the end of the 2030-9 period in the North Coast region, and reduction of the projected loss in the Central Coast region from 30% to less than 15%. Increased severe heat tolerance can capture an even larger adaptation wedge in the Pacific Northwest, including conversion of a projected loss of more than 30% in the Columbia Valley region of Washington to a projected gain of more than 150%. We also find that warming projected over the near-term decades has the potential to alter the quality of winegrapes produced in the western US, and we discuss potential actions that could create adaptation wedges given these potential changes in quality. While the present effort represents an initial exploration of one aspect of one industry, the climate adaptation wedge framework could be used to quantitatively evaluate the opportunities and limits of climate adaptation

  4. Climate adaptation wedges: a case study of premium wine in the western United States

    SciTech Connect

    Diffenbaugh, Noah; White, Michael A; Jones, Gregory V; Ashfaq, Moetasim

    2011-01-01

    Design and implementation of effective climate change adaptation activities requires quantitative assessment of the impacts that are likely to occur without adaptation, as well as the fraction of impact that can be avoided through each activity. Here we present a quantitative framework inspired by the greenhouse gas stabilization wedges of Pacala and Socolow. In our proposed framework, the damage avoided by each adaptation activity creates an 'adaptation wedge' relative to the loss that would occur without that adaptation activity. We use premium winegrape suitability in the western United States as an illustrative case study, focusing on the near-term period that covers the years 2000 39. We find that the projected warming over this period results in the loss of suitable winegrape area throughout much of California, including most counties in the high-value North Coast and Central Coast regions. However, in quantifying adaptation wedges for individual high-value counties, we find that a large adaptation wedge can be captured by increasing the severe heat tolerance, including elimination of the 50% loss projected by the end of the 2030 9 period in the North Coast region, and reduction of the projected loss in the Central Coast region from 30% to less than 15%. Increased severe heat tolerance can capture an even larger adaptation wedge in the Pacific Northwest, including conversion of a projected loss of more than 30% in the Columbia Valley region of Washington to a projected gain of more than 150%. We also find that warming projected over the near-term decades has the potential to alter the quality of winegrapes produced in the western US, and we discuss potential actions that could create adaptation wedges given these potential changes in quality. While the present effort represents an initial exploration of one aspect of one industry, the climate adaptation wedge framework could be used to quantitatively evaluate the opportunities and limits of climate adaptation

  5. Laser-generated ultrasonic pulse shapes at solid wedges.

    PubMed

    Pupyrev, Pavel D; Lomonosov, Alexey M; Mayer, Andreas P

    2016-08-01

    Laser pulses focused near the tip of an elastic wedge generate acoustic waves guided at its apex. The shapes of the acoustic wedge wave pulses depend on the energy and the profile of the exciting laser pulse and on the anisotropy of the elastic medium the wedge is made of. Expressions for the acoustic pulse shapes have been derived in terms of the modal displacement fields of wedge waves for laser excitation in the thermo-elastic regime and for excitation via a pressure pulse exerted on the surface. The physical quantity considered is the local inclination of a surface of the wedge, which is measured optically by laser-probe-beam deflection. Experimental results on pulse shapes in the thermo-elastic regime are presented and confirmed by numerical calculations. They pertain to an isotropic sharp-angle wedge with two wedge-wave branches and to a non-reciprocity phenomenon at rectangular silicon edges. PMID:27135188

  6. Maladaptively high and low openness: the case for experiential permeability.

    PubMed

    Piedmont, Ralph L; Sherman, Martin F; Sherman, Nancy C

    2012-12-01

    The domain of Openness within the Five-Factor Model (FFM) has received inconsistent support as a source for maladaptive personality functioning, at least when the latter is confined to the disorders of personality included within the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR; APA, ). However, an advantage of the FFM relative to the DSM-IV-TR is that the former was developed to provide a reasonably comprehensive description of general personality structure. Rather than suggest that the FFM is inadequate because the DSM-IV-TR lacks much representation of Openness, it might be just as reasonable to suggest that the DSM-IV-TR is inadequate because it lacks an adequate representation of maladaptive variants of both high and low Openness. This article discusses the development and validation of a measure of these maladaptive variants, the Experiential Permeability Inventory. PMID:22320184

  7. Opening and closing of cracks at high cyclic strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyyer, N. S.; Dowling, N. E.

    1986-01-01

    The closure behavior of cracks of different length and at different cyclic strain levels (ranging from predominantly elastic to grossly plastic strains) was studied to observe the effect of residual crack-tip plasticity on crack closure. Cracks were initiated either naturally or artificially (from electric discharge machining pits) in uniaxial test specimens of strengthened alloy steel AISI 4340 with a grain size of 0.016 mm. It was found that, at high strains, cracks closed only when the lowest stress level in the cycle was approached. The stress or the strain opening level depended upon the exact point along the crack length where the observations were made. As the plastic deformation increased, the relative crack opening level was found to decrease and approach the value of stress ratio R. The experimental results were compared with those of three analytical models of crack closure and opening, demonstrating the limitations of the currently available elastic-plastic crack growth analysis.

  8. Wedge assembly for electrical transformer component spacing

    DOEpatents

    Baggett, Franklin E.; Cage, W. Franklin

    1991-01-01

    A wedge assembly that is easily inserted between two surfaces to be supported thereby, and thereafter expanded to produce a selected spacing between those surfaces. This wedge assembly has two outer members that are substantially identical except that they are mirror images of each other. Oppositely directed faces of these of these outer members are substantially parallel for the purpose of contacting the surfaces to be separated. The outer faces of these outer members that are directed toward each other are tapered so as to contact a center member having complementary tapers on both faces. A washer member is provided to contact a common end of the outer members, and a bolt member penetrates this washer and is threadably received in a receptor of the center member. As the bolt member is threaded into the center member, the center member is drawn further into the gap between the outer members and thereby separates these outer members to contact the surfaces to be separated. In the preferred embodiment, the contacting surfaces of the outer member and the center member are provided with guide elements. The wedge assembly is described for use in separating the secondary windings from the laminations of an electrical power transformer.

  9. Crustal and Fault Strengths from Critical Taper Measurements: Insights into the behavior of Accretionary Wedges using Distinct-Element Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, L.; Suppe, J.

    2012-12-01

    It is increasingly clear that many major faults are weak relative to quasistatic friction because of dynamical effects involving the microprocesses of high-velocity friction and the energetics of large-scale fault rupture. Even at the toes of accretionary wedges where velocity strengthening is expected, large displacements can occur dynamically. We seek to better understand the relationship between the large-scale strength of such faults and of the crust containing them over a timescale much greater than seismic cycles. Critical-taper theory provides straightforward quantitative relationships between accretionary wedge geometry and absolute basal fault and wedge strengths with minimal assumptions. Wedge tapers constrain the far-field stresses under which detachments slip and wedges grow during wedge-growing events, whether they are dynamical or quasistatic. To date most applications of wedge mechanics to accretionary wedges involve analog and numerical modeling with largely conceptual insight, for example illuminating the role of geological heterogeneity. Here we demonstrate that recent theoretical advances that are successful in extracting absolute wedge and detachment strengths from the geometry of active wedges can also be applied to extract large-scale strengths in distinct element numerical models in both mechanically homogeneous and heterogeneous wedges. The distinct element method (DEM) is an ideal tool for the study and modeling of critical taper wedges: model wedges can be initially cohesive (bonded) or cohesionless. Faults and folds form naturally as the result of progressive bond breakage during shortening and wedge growth. Heterogeneity can be introduced by creating layered groups of particles of differing mechanical properties. The DEM suffers to some extent in that macro material properties cannot be directly prescribed but rather must be defined by a modest number of micro-properties and the process in necessarily iterative and developing a wide

  10. Effect of shockwave curvature on run distance observed with a modified wedge test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Richard; Dorgan, Robert J.; Sutherland, Gerrit; Benedetta, Ashley; Milby, Christopher

    2012-03-01

    The effect of wave curvature on shock initiation in PBXN-110 was investigated using a modified wedge test configuration. Various widths of PBXN-110 donor slabs were used to define the shockwave curvature introduced to wedge samples of the same explosive. The donor slabs were initiated with line-wave generators so that the shock from the donor would be the same shape, magnitude and duration across the entire input surface of the wedge. The shock parameters were varied for a given donor with PMMA spacers placed between the donor and the wedge sample. A high-speed electronic framing camera was used to observe where initiation occurred along the face of the wedge. Initiation always occurred at the center of the shock front instead of along the sides like that reported by others using a much smaller test format. Results were compared to CTH calculations to indicate if there were effects associated with highly curved shock fronts that could not be adequately predicted. The run distance predicted in CTH for a 50.8 mm wide donor slab (low curvature) compared favorably with experimental results. However, results from thinner donor slabs (higher curvature) indicate a more sensitive behavior than the simulations predicted.

  11. The geometry of the Chilean continental wedge: Tectonic segmentation of subduction processes off Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksymowicz, Andrei

    2015-09-01

    Based on high-resolution bathymetry and geophysical observations, the precise continental wedge geometry along the Chilean margin is analyzed. The data show complex patterns in continental wedge geometry that challenge the most frequently used classification methodology for the convergent margin tectonics. A detailed modeling of the parameters involved in the Non-Cohesive Coulomb Wedge theory reveals a tectonic latitudinal segmentation of the Chilean offshore subduction zone. This segmentation is characterized by a sequence of broad segments with different basal effective friction coefficient and/or internal fluid pressure conditions, which are limited by the presence of bathymetric oceanic highs, fracture zones and Peninsulas. The results suggest a general increase of the fluid pressure inside the continental wedge north of 33°S, which is interpreted as a result of a more pervasive fracturing due to tectonic erosion at the base and within the continental wedge. The tectonic segmentation proposed here shows a close spatial relation with the short-term deformation process associated to the coseismic ruptures of large earthquakes in the Chilean margin.

  12. An Experimental Investigation of Transonic Flow Past Two-Dimensional Wedge and Circular-Arc Sections Using A Mach-Zehnder Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Arthur Earl, Jr

    1952-01-01

    Report presents the results of interferometer measurements of the flow field near two-dimensional wedge and circular-arc sections of zero angle of attack at high-subsonic and low-supersonic velocities. Both subsonic flow with local supersonic zone and supersonic flow with detached shock wave have been investigated. Pressure distributions and drag coefficients as a function of Mach number have been obtained. The wedge data are compared with the theoretical work on flow past wedge sections of Guderley and Yoshihara, Vincenti and Wagner, and Cole. Pressure distributions and drag coefficients for the wedge and circular-arc sections are presented throughout the entire transonic range of velocities.

  13. Localised wedge shaped defects of the retinal nerve fibre layer in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Jonas, J B; Schiro, D

    1994-04-01

    Glaucoma can be associated with a diffuse or localised loss of the retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL). This study evaluated the wedge shaped localised RNFL defects. Red free wide angle RNFL photographs of 421 patients with glaucoma and 193 normal subjects were examined. Localised RNFL defects were described for one eye of the normal group and for 20% of the patients with glaucoma. They were usually located in the inferior temporal and superior temporal fundus regions. Within the glaucoma group, localised RNFL defects occurred most often (p < 0.05) in normal pressure glaucoma, followed by primary open angle glaucoma, and finally secondary open angle glaucoma. They were positively associated with disc haemorrhages. The localised RNFL defects had a high specificity to indicate optic nerve damage. The nerve fibre layer defects occurring more likely in mild rather than advanced glaucoma, they were helpful in the diagnosis of early glaucoma. The association between localised RNFL defects and disc haemorrhages and the varying frequency of localised RNFL defects in different types of glaucoma may be important diagnostically and pathogenetically. PMID:8199115

  14. High power Tesla driven miniature plasma opening switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajesh

    The plasma opening switch (POS) is used in pulsed power systems where a very fast opening and high current switch is required. Plasma is injected into the switch, which carries a large conduction current, before it opens in a process that lasts for a few nanosecond and transfers the current to a parallel-connected load at a much increased voltage and with a much shorter rise time. The conduction and opening times of the switch are dependent on plasma parameters such as the distribution, speed and species, all of which are determined by the plasma source. Most of the earlier reported work involves large dimension POSs and a correspondingly high input current (more than 100 kA) and uses carbon plasma. One main objective of the present research was to achieve a low input current (20 kA) and miniaturised POS by using hydrogen plasma rather than carbon plasma on account of its lower mass. A cable gun was selected for producing the plasma, since although this produces both hydrogen and carbon plasma these arise different times during its operation.. For the present application a Tesla transformer was used in preference to a Marx generator to produce an initial high voltage pulse for the system, on the basis of its simpler design and cost effectiveness. This transformer together with an associated water PFL (pulse forming line) and pressurised switch was capable of producing a load current in excess of 20 kA with a rise time of 53 ns, which was fed through the POS to the final load. Special diagnostics arrangements were necessary to measure the fast high current and voltage pulse a in nonintrusive way. Faraday cups and a high speed camera were used to measure the plasma parameters. The overall system built (i.e. including the POS) is capable of producing a 22 kA current with a rise time of 5 ns, and of generating a power of more than 10 GW..

  15. Wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide with long propagation length and ultra-small deep-subwavelength mode area.

    PubMed

    Gui, Chengcheng; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel design of wedge hybrid plasmonic terahertz (THz) waveguide consisting of a silicon (Si) nanowire cylinder above a triangular gold wedge with surrounded high-density polyethylene as cladding. It features long propagation length and ultra-small deep-subwavelength mode confinement. The mode properties of wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide are comprehensively characterized in terms of propagation length (L), normalized mode area (Aeff/A0), figure of merit (FoM), and chromatic dispersion (D). The designed wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide enables an ultra-small deep-subwavelength mode area which is more than one-order of magnitude smaller compared to previous rectangular one. When choosing the diameter of Si nanowire cylinder, a smaller diameter (e.g. 10 μm) is preferred to achieve longer L and higher FoM, while a larger diameter (e.g. 60 μm) is favorable to obtain smaller Aeff/A0 and higher FoM. We further study the impacts of possible practical fabrication errors on the mode properties. The simulated results of propagation length and normalized mode area show that the proposed wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide is tolerant to practical fabrication errors in geometry parameters such as misalignment in the horizontal direction, variation of wedge tip angle, and variation of wedge tip curvature radius. PMID:26155782

  16. Wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide with long propagation length and ultra-small deep-subwavelength mode area

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Chengcheng; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel design of wedge hybrid plasmonic terahertz (THz) waveguide consisting of a silicon (Si) nanowire cylinder above a triangular gold wedge with surrounded high-density polyethylene as cladding. It features long propagation length and ultra-small deep-subwavelength mode confinement. The mode properties of wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide are comprehensively characterized in terms of propagation length (L), normalized mode area (Aeff /A0), figure of merit (FoM), and chromatic dispersion (D). The designed wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide enables an ultra-small deep-subwavelength mode area which is more than one-order of magnitude smaller compared to previous rectangular one. When choosing the diameter of Si nanowire cylinder, a smaller diameter (e.g. 10 μm) is preferred to achieve longer L and higher FoM, while a larger diameter (e.g. 60 μm) is favorable to obtain smaller Aeff /A0 and higher FoM. We further study the impacts of possible practical fabrication errors on the mode properties. The simulated results of propagation length and normalized mode area show that the proposed wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide is tolerant to practical fabrication errors in geometry parameters such as misalignment in the horizontal direction, variation of wedge tip angle, and variation of wedge tip curvature radius. PMID:26155782

  17. Separation over a flat plate-wedge configuration at oceanic Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study of flow over a two-dimensional flat plate-wedge configuration is presented. The investigation encompasses a range of Reynolds numbers characteristics of conditions encountered by deep submersible oceanic vehicles. Flow separation, similar to that found on high speed aircraft control surfaces, is reported and discussed in light of the laminar or transitional nature of the separated shear layer. As discovered in previous high Mach number studies of plate-wedge or ramp configurations, the dependency of the size of the separated region on free stream Reynolds number is reversed for laminar and transitional types of flow separation.

  18. Dying Flow Bursts as Generators of the Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    Many theories or conjectures exist on the driver of the substorm current wedge, e.g. rerouting of the tail current, current disruption, flow braking, vortex formation, and current sheet collapse. Magnitude, spatial scale, and temporal development of the related magnetic perturbations suggest that the generator is related to the interaction of the flow bursts with the dipolar magnetosphere after onset of reconnection in the near-Earth tail. The question remains whether it is the flow energy that feeds the wedge current or the internal energy of the arriving plasma. In this presentation I argue for the latter. The current generation is attributed to the force exerted by the dipolarized magnetic field of the flow bursts on the preceding layer of high-beta plasma after flow braking. The generator current is the grad-B current at the outer boundary of the compressed high-beta plasma layers. It needs the sequential arrival of several flow bursts to account for duration and magnitude of the ionospheric closure current.

  19. Effect of Shockwave Curvature on Run Distance Observed with a Modified Wedge Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Richard; Dorgan, Robert; Sutherland, Gerrit; Benedetta, Ashley; Milby, Christopher

    2011-06-01

    The effect of wave curvature on shock initiation in PBXN-110 was investigated using a modified wedge test configuration. Various thicknesses of PBXN-110 donor slabs were used to define the shockwave curvature introduced to wedge samples of the same explosive. The donor slabs were initiated with line-wave generators so that the introduced shock would be the same shape, magnitude and duration across the entire input surface of the wedge. The shock parameters were varied for a given donor thickness via different widths of PMMA spacers placed between the donor and the wedge. A framing camera was used to observe where initiation occurred along the face of the wedge. Initiation always occurred at the center of the shock front instead of the sides like that reported by others using a much smaller test format. Results were compared to CTH calculations to indicate if there were effects associated with highly curved shock fronts that could not be adequately predicted. The run distance predicted in CTH for a 50.8 mm thick donor slab (low curvature) compared favorably with experimental results. However, results from thinner donor slabs (higher curvature) indicate a more sensitive behavior than the simulations predicted.

  20. Investigation of turbulent wedges generated by different single surface roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traphan, Dominik; Meinlschmidt, Peter; Lutz, Otto; Peinke, Joachim; Gülker, Gerd

    2013-11-01

    It is known that small faults on rotor blades of wind turbines can cause significant power loss. In order to better understand the governing physical effects, in this experimental study, the formation of a turbulent wedge over a flat plate induced by single surface roughness elements is under investigation. The experiments are performed at different ambient pressure gradients, thus allowing conclusions about the formation of a turbulent wedge over an airfoil. With respect to typical initial faults on operating airfoils, the roughness elements are modified in both size and shape (raised or recessed). None intrusive experimental methods, such as stereoscopic PIV and LDA, enable investigations based on temporally and spatially highly resolved velocity measurements. In this way, a spectral analysis of the turbulent boundary layer is performed and differences in coherent structures within the wedge are identified. These findings are correlated with global measurements of the wedge carried out by infrared thermography. This correlation aims to enable distinguishing the cause and main properties of a turbulent wedge by the easy applicable method of infrared thermography, which is of practical relevance in the field of condition monitoring of wind turbines.

  1. NASA/GE Collaboration on Open Rotors - High Speed Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.

    2011-01-01

    A low-noise open rotor system is being tested in collaboration with General Electric and CFM International, a 50/50 joint company between Snecmaand GE. Candidate technologies for lower noise will be investigated as well as installation effects such as pylon integration. Current test status for the 8x6 SWT high speed testing is presented as well as future scheduled testing which includes the FAA/CLEEN test entry. The tunnel blockage and propeller thrust calibration configurations are shown.

  2. High-temperature, high-pressure spherical segment valve provides quick opening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovannetti, A.; Himmelright, R.; Meyer, K.; Nitta, H.

    1964-01-01

    A hollow spherical segment valve with an eccentric permits non-rubbing closure and provides a means for gas-cooling the seal. The design allows quick opening at high temperatures and discharge pressures.

  3. Northeast Siberian ice wedges reveal Arctic long-term winter warming over the past two millennia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opel, Thomas; Meyer, Hanno; Laepple, Thomas; Wetterich, Sebastian; Werner, Martin; Dereviagin, Alexander; Schirrmeister, Lutz

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic currently experiences a pronounced and unprecedented warming. This highly dynamic response on changes in climate forcing and the global impact of the Arctic water, carbon and energy balance make the Arctic a key region to study past and future climate changes on different spatial, temporal and seasonal scales. Recent proxy-based Arctic and Northern Hemisphere temperature reconstructions show a long-term cooling trend over the past millennia that has been reversed by the ongoing Arctic warming. This cooling is mainly related to the decrease in summer insolation. Climate models on the other hand show no significant change or even a slight warming. This model-proxy mismatch might be caused by a summer bias of most records. Hence, there is strong need for past winter climate information. Moreover, the Russian Arctic is largely underrepresented in recent Arctic-wide proxy compilations. Ice wedges may help to fill these seasonal and spatial gaps. Polygonal ice wedges are a widespread permafrost feature in the Arctic coastal lowlands. They are formed by the periodic repetition of wintertime frost cracking and subsequent crack filling in spring mostly by melt water of winter snow. Hence, the isotopic composition of wedge ice is indicative of past climate conditions during this extended winter season. δ18O of ice is interpreted as proxy for local air temperatures. Radiocarbon dating of organic remains in ice-wedge samples enables one to generate chronologies for single ice wedges as well as stacked records with an up to centennial resolution. Here we present ice-wedge records from the Oyogos Yar coast in the Northeast Siberian Arctic (72.7°N, 143.5°E) that cover the past two millennia. We discuss the chronological approaches as well as the paleoclimatic findings. The co-isotopic relationship of wedge ice is close to the Global Meteoric Water Line pointing to no significant isotopic changes during ice-wedge formation and, therefore, to a good suitability for

  4. NGC 1252: a high altitude, metal poor open cluster remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, R.; de la Fuente Marcos, C.; Moni Bidin, C.; Carraro, G.; Costa, E.

    2013-09-01

    If stars form in clusters but most stars belong to the field, understanding the details of the transition from the former to the latter is imperative to explain the observational properties of the field. Aging open clusters are one of the sources of field stars. The disruption rate of open clusters slows down with age but, as an object gets older, the distinction between the remaining cluster or open cluster remnant (OCR) and the surrounding field becomes less and less obvious. As a result, finding good OCR candidates or confirming the OCR nature of some of the best candidates still remain elusive. One of these objects is NGC 1252, a scattered group of about 20 stars in Horologium. Here we use new wide-field photometry in the UBVI passbands, proper motions from the Yale/San Juan SPM 4.0 catalogue and high-resolution spectroscopy concurrently with results from N-body simulations to decipher NGC 1252's enigmatic character. Spectroscopy shows that most of the brightest stars in the studied area are chemically, kinematically and spatially unrelated to each other. However, after analysing proper motions, we find one relevant kinematic group. This sparse object is relatively close (˜1 kpc), metal poor and is probably not only one of the oldest clusters (3 Gyr) within 1.5 kpc from the Sun but also one of the clusters located farthest from the disc, at an altitude of nearly -900 pc. That makes NGC 1252 the first open cluster that can be truly considered a high Galactic altitude OCR: an unusual object that may hint at a star formation event induced on a high Galactic altitude gas cloud. We also conclude that the variable TW Horologii and the blue straggler candidate HD 20286 are unlikely to be part of NGC 1252. NGC 1252 17 is identified as an unrelated, Population II cannonball star moving at about 400 km s-1.

  5. Shock Wave Boundary Layer Interaction Mechanism on a Double Wedge Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Bayram; Barada, Mohammad Adel El Hajj Ali; Durna, Ahmet Selim

    2015-11-01

    A hypersonic test series by Swantek & Austin report complex shock wave boundary layer interaction mechanisms and unsteady surface heat flux from a double wedge geometry in a low enthalpy Mach 7 flow. In order to understand the physics of the flow and the heat transfer, we study the flow computationally and compare the results for the double wedge geometries, whose second angle is higher and lower than the maximum deflection angle at Mach 7. Apart from the numbers of comprehensive computational studies on the subject available in open literature, our study aims to describe the flow physics by taking the influence of both boundary layers that are formed on the two walls of the wedge into account. In addition to describing the flow and heat transfer mechanisms, we investigate the time for the flows to reach steady state. We evaluate the interaction mechanisms in term of instant and time average surface heat flux distributions. We perform all computations using a finite volume based compressible Navier-Stokes solver, rhoCentralFoam, which is one of the several compressible flow solvers of an open source software, openFOAM.

  6. Wedge energy bands of monolayer black phosphorus: a first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Minwoo; Bae, Hyeonhu; Lee, Seunghan; Yang, Li; Lee, Hoonkyung

    2016-08-01

    On the basis of first-principles calculations, we present intriguing electronic properties of halogen-striped functionalized monolayer black phosphorus. The halogen-striped monolayer black phosphorus is found to have a wedge energy band with the energy-momentum relation of E\\propto {{p}y} when the stripe–stripe distance is smaller than ~40 Å. Our tight-binding study shows that the wedge energy band occurs when 2-atom basis 1D lattices are periodically repeated aligned with each other in a 2D lattice. We also discuss the possible applications of this wedge energy band in electron supercollimation with high mobility or severely anisotropic electronic transport, which can be used for the development of optics-like nano-electronics.

  7. Wedge energy bands of monolayer black phosphorus: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Park, Minwoo; Bae, Hyeonhu; Lee, Seunghan; Yang, Li; Lee, Hoonkyung

    2016-08-01

    On the basis of first-principles calculations, we present intriguing electronic properties of halogen-striped functionalized monolayer black phosphorus. The halogen-striped monolayer black phosphorus is found to have a wedge energy band with the energy-momentum relation of [Formula: see text] when the stripe-stripe distance is smaller than ~40 Å. Our tight-binding study shows that the wedge energy band occurs when 2-atom basis 1D lattices are periodically repeated aligned with each other in a 2D lattice. We also discuss the possible applications of this wedge energy band in electron supercollimation with high mobility or severely anisotropic electronic transport, which can be used for the development of optics-like nano-electronics. PMID:27299467

  8. Predicting Run Distances for a Modified Wedge Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorgan, Robert J.; Lee, Richard; Sutherland, Gerrit

    2012-03-01

    Simulations were used to aid in the development of a modified wedge test (MWT). This explosive sensitivity experiment allows the shockwave curvature to be defined in order to investigate the effect of combined shock-shear loading on sensitivity. Various widths of PBXN-110 donor slabs were used to define the shockwave curvature introduced to wedge samples of the same explosive. The donor slabs were initiated with a linewave generator and a Detasheet booster, and the shock wave was attenuated using a slab of PMMA. In developing simulations for these three material experiments, calibrations of the PBXN-110 ignition and growth model and of the PMMA constitutive model were investigated in order to choose between several models found in the literature. A calibration shot from the MWT was also used to demonstrate the appropriateness of the models selected. Experimental results were compared to CTH calculations to indicate if there were effects associated with highly curved shock fronts that could not be adequately predicted. The run distances predicted in CTH for the thicker donor slab compare very favorably with the actual experiments; however, for thinner donor slabs, the actual experimental results seem to suggest a more sensitive behavior than the simulations are able to capture.

  9. Predicting Run Distances for a Modified Wedge Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorgan, Robert; Lee, Richard; Sutherland, Gerrit

    2011-06-01

    Simulations were used to aid in the development of a modified wedge test (MWT). This explosive sensitivity experiment allows the shockwave curvature to be defined in order to investigate the effect of combined shock-shear loading on sensitivity. Various widths of PBXN-110 donor slabs were used to define the shockwave curvature introduced to wedge samples of the same explosive. The donor slabs were initiated with a linewave generator and a Detasheet booster, and the shock wave was attenuated using a slab of PMMA. In developing simulations for these three material experiments, calibrations of the PBXN-110 ignition and growth model and of the PMMA constitutive model were investigated in order to choose between several models found in the literature. A calibration shot from the MWT was also used to demonstrate the appropriateness of the models selected. Experimental results were compared to CTH calculations to indicate if there were effects associated with highly curved shock fronts that could not be adequately predicted. The run distances predicted in CTH for the thicker donor slab compare very favorably with the actual experiments; however, for thinner donor slabs, the actual experimental results seem to suggest a more sensitive behavior than the simulations are able to capture. DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release, distribution unlimited. (96ABW-2011-0053)

  10. An automated optical wedge calibrator for Dobson ozone spectrophotometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, R. D.; Komhyr, W. D.; Grass, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    The Dobson ozone spectrophotometer measures the difference of intensity between selected wavelengths in the ultraviolet. The method uses an optical attenuator (the 'Wedge') in this measurement. The knowledge of the relationship of the wedge position to the attenuation is critical to the correct calculation of ozone from the measurement. The procedure to determine this relationship is time-consuming, and requires a highly skilled person to perform it correctly. The relationship has been found to change with time. For reliable ozone values, the procedure should be done on a Dobson instrument at regular intervals. Due to the skill and time necessary to perform this procedure, many instruments have gone as long as 15 years between procedures. This article describes an apparatus that performs the procedure under computer control, and is adaptable to the majority of existing Dobson instruments. Part of the apparatus is usable for normal operation of the Dobson instrument, and would allow computer collection of the data and real-time ozone measurements.

  11. The wedge bias in reionization 21-cm power spectrum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Hannes; Majumdar, Suman; Mellema, Garrelt; Lidz, Adam; Iliev, Ilian T.; Dixon, Keri L.

    2016-02-01

    A proposed method for dealing with foreground emission in upcoming 21-cm observations from the epoch of reionization is to limit observations to an uncontaminated window in Fourier space. Foreground emission can be avoided in this way, since it is limited to a wedge-shaped region in k∥, k⊥ space. However, the power spectrum is anisotropic owing to redshift-space distortions from peculiar velocities. Consequently, the 21-cm power spectrum measured in the foreground avoidance window - which samples only a limited range of angles close to the line-of-sight direction - differs from the full redshift-space spherically averaged power spectrum which requires an average over all angles. In this paper, we calculate the magnitude of this `wedge bias' for the first time. We find that the bias amplifies the difference between the real-space and redshift-space power spectra. The bias is strongest at high redshifts, where measurements using foreground avoidance will overestimate the redshift-space power spectrum by around 100 per cent, possibly obscuring the distinctive rise and fall signature that is anticipated for the spherically averaged 21-cm power spectrum. In the later stages of reionization, the bias becomes negative, and smaller in magnitude (≲20 per cent).

  12. Multi-gap high impedance plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mason, Rodney J.

    1996-01-01

    A high impedance plasma opening switch having an anode and a cathode and at least one additional electrode placed between the anode and cathode. The presence of the additional electrodes leads to the creation of additional plasma gaps which are in series, increasing the net impedance of the switch. An equivalent effect can be obtained by using two or more conventional plasma switches with their plasma gaps wired in series. Higher impedance switches can provide high current and voltage to higher impedance loads such as plasma radiation sources.

  13. Multi-gap high impedance plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mason, R.J.

    1996-10-22

    A high impedance plasma opening switch having an anode and a cathode and at least one additional electrode placed between the anode and cathode is disclosed. The presence of the additional electrodes leads to the creation of additional plasma gaps which are in series, increasing the net impedance of the switch. An equivalent effect can be obtained by using two or more conventional plasma switches with their plasma gaps wired in series. Higher impedance switches can provide high current and voltage to higher impedance loads such as plasma radiation sources. 12 figs.

  14. Open source high performance floating-point modules.

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, Keith Douglas

    2006-02-01

    Given the logic density of modern FPGAs, it is feasible to use FPGAs for floating-point applications. However, it is important that any floating-point units that are used be highly optimized. This paper introduces an open source library of highly optimized floating-point units for Xilinx FPGAs. The units are fully IEEE compliant and achieve approximately 230 MHz operation frequency for double-precision add and multiply in a Xilinx Virtex-2-Pro FPGA (-7 speed grade). This speed is achieved with a 10 stage adder pipeline and a 12 stage multiplier pipeline. The area requirement is 571 slices for the adder and 905 slices for the multiplier.

  15. Laparoscopic wedge resection of synchronous gastric intraepithelial neoplasia and stromal tumor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mou, Yi-Ping; Xu, Xiao-Wu; Xie, Kun; Zhou, Wei; Zhou, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Ke

    2010-10-21

    Synchronous occurrence of epithelial neoplasia and gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the stomach is uncommon. Only rare cases have been reported in the literature. We present here a 60-year-old female case of synchronous occurrence of gastric high-level intraepithelial neoplasia and GIST with the features of 22 similar cases and detailed information reported in the English-language literature summarized. In the present patient, epithelial neoplasia and GIST were removed en bloc by laparoscopic wedge resection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case treated by laparoscopic wedge resection. PMID:20954290

  16. Impingement of water droplets on wedges and double-wedge airfoils at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, John S

    1954-01-01

    An analytical solution has been obtained for the equations of motion of water droplets impinging on a wedge in a two-dimensional supersonic flow field with a shock wave attached to the wedge. The closed-form solution yields analytical expressions for the equation of the droplet trajectory, the local rate of impingement and the impingement velocity at any point on the wedge surface, and the total rate of impingement. The analytical expressions are utilized to determine the impingement on the forward surfaces of diamond airfoils in supersonic flow fields with attached shock waves. The results presented include the following conditions: droplet diameters from 2 to 100 microns, pressure altitudes from sea level to 30,000 feet, free-stream static temperatures from 420 degrees r, free stream Mach numbers from 1.1 to 2.0, semiapex angles for the wedge from 1.14 degrees to 7.97 degrees, thickness-to-chord ratios for the diamond airfoil from 0.02 to 0.14, chord lengths from 1 to 20 feet, and angles of attack from zero to the inverse tangent of the airfoil thickness-to-chord ratio.

  17. MANUAL DEGATING OPERATIONS PERFORMED BY SLEDGEHAMMERS AND PNEUMATIC WEDGE SEPARATORS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MANUAL DEGATING OPERATIONS PERFORMED BY SLEDGE-HAMMERS AND PNEUMATIC WEDGE SEPARATORS. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Shaking, Degating & Sand Systems, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  18. Molecular Depth Profiling by Wedged Crater Beveling

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Dan; Lu, Caiyan; Winograd, Nicholas; Wucher, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy are employed to characterize a wedge-shaped crater eroded by a 40keV C60+ cluster ion beam on an organic film of Irganox 1010 doped with Irganox 3114 delta layers. From an examination of the resulting surface, the information about depth resolution, topography and erosion rate can be obtained as a function of crater depth for every depth in a single experiment. It is shown that when measurements are performed at liquid nitrogen temperature, a constant erosion rate and reduced bombardment induced surface roughness is observed. At room temperature, however, the erosion rate drops by ~1/3 during the removal of the 400 nm Irganox film and the roughness gradually increased to from 1 nm ~4 nm. From SIMS lateral images of the beveled crater and AFM topography results, depth resolution was further improved by employing glancing angles of incidence and lower primary ion beam energy. Sub-10 nm depth resolution was observed under the optimized conditions on a routine basis. In general, we show that the wedge-crater beveling is an important tool for elucidating the factors that are important for molecular depth profiling experiments. PMID:21744861

  19. Mid-Calcaneal Length After Evans Calcaneal Osteotomy: A Retrospective Comparison of Wedge Locking Plates and Tricortical Allograft Wedges.

    PubMed

    Protzman, Nicole M; Wobst, Garrett M; Storts, Eric C; Mulhern, Jennifer L; McCarroll, Raymond E; Brigido, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Evans calcaneal osteotomy remains a cornerstone in the correction of the flexible flatfoot. Although multiple techniques have been used to maintain the length of the lateral column, a low profile wedge locking plate was recently introduced as an alternative to the traditional tricortical allograft wedge. We hypothesized that the wedge locking plate would better maintain the mid-calcaneal length compared with the tricortical allograft wedge. To test this hypothesis, after Evans osteotomy, the mid-calcaneal length was measured in the immediate postoperative period and again at 3 and 6 months. A total of 24 patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean patient age was 48.1 years (range 11 to 66). Of the 24 patients, 9 (37.5%) were treated with a tricortical allograft wedge and 15 (62.5%) with a wedge locking plate. At 3 months postoperatively, the mean decrease in mid-calcaneal length was similar for the tricortical allograft wedge group (1.3 ± 1.9 mm) and the wedge locking plate group (0.5 ± 0.9 mm, p = .275). At 6 months postoperatively, however, the mean decrease in mid-calcaneal length was greater for the tricortical allograft wedge group (2.8 ± 1.7 mm) than for the wedge locking plate group (0.6 ± 0.7 mm, p = .004). The 2 groups demonstrated a similar incidence of dorsally displaced distal calcaneal fragments throughout the study endpoint (p ≥ .052). These results suggest that the wedge locking plate better maintains the mid-calcaneal length over time compared with the tricortical allograft wedge. PMID:25998470

  20. Structure and activity of the imbricated wedge of the Gulf of Cadiz from MCS images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calahorrano Betancourt, Alcinoe; Ranero, César R.; Gràcia, Eulàlia

    2015-04-01

    In this work we present new results on the structure and activity of the imbricated wedge of the Gulf of Cadiz based on ˜ 3000 km of multichannel (MCS) profiles acquired off NW Moroccan margin. Seismic images indicates that the imbricated wedge is bounded between the Gulf of Cadiz margin at the north, the Kenitra margin at the south and the Rharb margin at the east. It is imaged as a sedimentary body with variable seismic amplitude, and structured by imbricated thrust sheets similar to an accretionary prism. Its maximum thickness is located at the east region of the gulf. It gradually thins toward the center and south of the gulf, where it is buried by ˜0.3 twts of sedimentary deposits, indicating that the imbricated wedge is actually not growing. It probably stops it s activity at ˜5-6 Ma. The imbricated wedge is overlaid by sedimentary sequences whose oldest unit is uppermost Tortonian. No evidences of gravitational (olistostrom) origin were founded. Active deformation related to plate convergence corresponds mainly to strike-slip faulting and minor thrusting. Mud diapirism is imaged intruding both the imbricated wedge and the overlaying sediments. At the south, the seismic images show normal faulting probably related with an extended continental crust or a continent-ocean transition crust. The age of this extension is probably Triassic-Jurassic, and we propose it as the conjugated margin of the Gulf of Cadiz. Toward the east, MCS profiles image high-amplitude continent-verging reflections corresponding to pervasive normal faulting. These deformation related to a extended terrain, named Rharb margin, seems to act as the backstop of the imbricated wedge, and it is over-thrusted by Prebetic/Flysh sequences off the Strait of Gibraltar.

  1. Distribution of ice- and soil wedges in Kapp Linné, Svalbard, mapped by two- and three-dimensional ground-penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Matsuoka, N.; Christiansen, H.

    2009-12-01

    Wedges along non-sorted polygons are consisting of ice or sediments. The wedge infill is often difficult to judge from the surface pattern, since the type of wedge filling depends on both climate and sediment characteristics. In fact, previous studies have reported that ice and active-layer soil wedges can coexist within a small area. We applied two- and three-dimensional ground-penetrating radar (2D and 3D GPR) for mapping subsurface ice and active-layer soil wedges in Kapp Linné, one of the warmest coastal areas in Svalbard. GPR surveys were conducted at six sites on beach ridges, which had emerged in different periods (11-5.5 ka BP). Shallow trenches and boreholes at four sites complemented the interpretation of the GPR results. On the 2D GPR profiles, most of the troughs delimiting the polygons are underlain by a single hyperbolic reflection spreading downward from the ground surface, which represents an active-layer soil wedge. Some troughs are underlain by double hyperbolic reflections extending downward from the ground surface and the frost table, which correspond to a soil wedge penetrating into the top permafrost and an underlying ice-wedge, respectively. However, radar interpretations are sometimes obscured by similar hyperbolic reflections from large stones and unclear reflections from small, narrow (< 50 cm) ice-wedges. The 3D GPR images delineate subsurface ice-wedges underlying the polygon troughs by radar amplitude anomalies more clearly than the 2D profiles. GPR results show that ice-wedges underlie primary polygon troughs and extraordinarily long and wide troughs on lower (younger) beach ridges. This suggests that ice-wedges have been active in the last 5,500 years since beach ridge formation ceased. In contrast, no ice-wedges were detected on higher (older) beach ridges even below the primary polygon troughs. This would be due to the low thermal coefficient of expansion of the material as the high lying snowfree blown ridges are lacking in

  2. Formation of Retro-Wedges during Collision: Insights from Analog and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willingshofer, E.; Vogt, K.; Sokoutis, D.; Matenco, L. C.

    2014-12-01

    We challenge the generally accepted view that continent-continent collision results in doubly verging orogenic wedges with well-developed retro-wedges on the overriding plate. In fact we argue that retro-wedge formation is restricted to specific rheological conditions within the lower and upper plates as well as the plate contact; thus being the exception rather than the rule during collision. In this contribution we use a combination of physical analog and numerical experiments to infer favourable rheological conditions for the development of retro-wedges. In both analog and numerical experiments the contact between the colliding and neutrally buoyant continents is weak and represents the inheritance of a former subduction boundary. The degree of plate coupling however is not constant and is together with the rheological structures of the lower and upper plates, in particular the presence of decoupling horizons, key variable in this study. Plate boundaries are in all experiments orthogonal to the convergence direction. Analog and numerical models with strong decoupling at the plate boundary and different levels (at the Moho or the brittle-ductile transition) of the incoming plate lead to the evolution of mountain belts, where deformation propagates outward, in the direction of the incoming plate, by successive imbrication of upper crustal thrust sheets. Under these conditions, which are typical for subduction-dominated orogens like the Carpathians, the Dinarides or the Apennines, no significant retro-wedges with large-displacement retro-shears develop. Transfer of strain to the upper plate, a pre-requisite for the formation of retro-wedges, is favoured when the degree of plate coupling is high, the crust of the colliding plates is very strong and when the upper plate contains decoupling horizons (e.g. at the Moho or the brittle-ductile transition). Under such conditions large-scale retro-shears develop and deformation propagates outward on the upper plate to form

  3. Colluvial wedge imaging using traveltime and waveform tomography along the Wasatch Fault near Mapleton, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buddensiek, M.-L.; Sheng, J.; Crosby, T.; Schuster, G. T.; Bruhn, R. L.; He, R.

    2008-02-01

    Four high-resolution seismic surveys were conducted across the Wasatch Fault Zone near Mapleton, Utah. The objective was twofold: (1) To use velocity tomograms and reflection images to delineate fault structures and colluvial wedges to more than twice the depth of the Mapleton Megatrench excavated by URS personnel, (2) to assess the strengths and limitations of traveltime and waveform tomography by synthetic studies and comparison of the tomogram to the ground truth seen in the Megatrench log. Four out of the five faults within the trench area are accurately identified in the migrated image and in the tomograms, and the main fault's dip angle is estimated to be between 71 and 80°. Two additional faults are interpreted outside the trench. The faults can be delineated down to 30 m below the surface, which is 20 m deeper than the excavated trench. Five out of six colluvial wedges found in the trench log were seen as low-velocity zones (LVZs) in the tomogram, however the biggest colluvial wedge could not be identified by either tomography method. Waveform tomography prevailed over ray-based traveltime tomography by more clearly recovering the faults and LVZs. A newly discovered LVZ at a depth of 18-21 m below the surface possibly represents a colluvial wedge and is estimated to be less than 21000 years old. If this LVZ is a colluvial wedge, the earthquake history obtained by trenching can be extended from 13500 to 21000 yr with seismic tomography. Our results further demonstrate the capability of tomography in identifying faults, and show that waveform tomography more accurately resolves colluvial wedges compared to traveltime tomography. However, despite the successful recovery of most faults and some, but not all, colluvial wedges, both tomography methods show many more LVZs besides the wedges, so that an unambiguous interpretation cannot be made. A major part of the ambiguity in the tomograms is due to the many major faults, which result in an uneven raypath

  4. Characterization of the Thermal-Wave Field in a Wedge-Shaped Solid Using the Green's Function Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Tai, Rui; Wang, Chinhua; Mandelis, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    In this study, a theoretical model is established for a wedge-like solid with an open sector surrounded by walls of radius of a cylindrical rod illuminated by a modulated circular Gaussian incident beam by means of the Green’s function method in cylindrical coordinates. An analytical expression for the thermal-wave field in such a sample is presented. The theory is validated by reducing the arbitrary geometrical structure of the wedge to simpler geometries. It is shown that the frequency dependence of the thermal-wave field near the edge exhibits a large phase lag compared with that at a location far from the edge. The theory provides a foundation for quantitatively characterizing wedge-shaped industrial samples, such as metals with sintered edges, using photothermal methods in a non-contact and non-destructive manner.

  5. Magneto-optical and photoemission studies of ultrathin wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Bader, S.D.; Li, Dongqi

    1995-12-01

    Magnetic phase transitions of Fe wedges grown epitaxially on Cu(100) are detected via the surface magneto-optical Kerr effect and used to construct a phase diagram for face centered Fe. Also, the confinement of Cu sp- and d-quantum-well states is studied for Cu/Co(wedge)/Cu(100) utilizing undulator-based photoemission experiments.

  6. 28. REPRESENTATIVE CENTER WEDGE. BALANCE WHEELS ON TRACK, WITH RACK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. REPRESENTATIVE CENTER WEDGE. BALANCE WHEELS ON TRACK, WITH RACK TO OUTSIDE, SHOWN TO RIGHT OF THE WEDGE. PHOTO TAKEN AT SOUTH SWING SPAN. - George P. Coleman Memorial Bridge, Spanning York River at U.S. Route 17, Yorktown, York County, VA

  7. Effects of Ferrite Magnetic Wedges and Condenser Capacity on Torque Characteristics of a Capacitor Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Siichi; Kaga, Akio

    1989-04-01

    A split-phase capacitor motor is used to drive such domestic loads as household refrigerators and other home electric appliances. This type of motor, however, is usually operated by producing alternating (pulsating or oscillating) torque. In this study, ferrite magnetic wedges have been inserted into stator slot openings of a capacitor motor, and some experimental investigations have been developed to reduce the alternating torque of the motor. With wedging ferrite materials, the amplitude of alternating torque has been decreased to decrease power losses and to increase motor efficiency. When the capacity of the running condenser was exchanged to find suitable operating conditions, the amplitude of alternating torque was likely to decrease, but the increase of condenser capacity has led to increases in circuit currents and power losses. Accordingly, it has been found that there could be an optimal condenser capacity for improving the motor characteristics.

  8. Configuration and Generation of Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiangning

    The substorm current wedge (SCW), a core element of substorm dynamics coupling the magnetotail to the ionosphere, is crucial in understanding substorms. It has been suggested that the field-aligned currents (FACs) in the SCW are caused by either pressure gradients or flow vortices, or both. Our understanding of FAC generations is based predominately on numerical simulations, because it has not been possible to organize spacecraft observations in a coordinate system determined by the SCW. This dissertation develops an empirical inversion model of the current wedge and inverts midlatitude magnetometer data to obtain the parameters of the current wedge for three solar cycles. This database enables statistical data analysis of spacecraft plasma and magnetic field observations relative to the SCW coordinate. In chapter 2, a new midlatitude positive bay (MPB) index is developed and calculated for three solar cycles of data. The MPB index is processed to determine the substorm onset time, which is shown to correspond to the auroral breakup onset with at most 1-2 minutes difference. Substorm occurrence rate is found to depend on solar wind speed while substorm duration is rather constant, suggesting that substorm process has an intrinsic pattern independent of external driving. In chapter 3, an SCW inversion technique is developed to determine the strength and locations of the FACs in an SCW. The inversion parameters for FAC strength and location, and ring current strength are validated by comparison with other measurements. In chapter 4, the connection between earthward flows and auroral poleward expansion is examined using improved mapping, obtained from a newly-developed dynamic magnetospheric model by superimposing a standard magnetospheric field model with substorm current wedge obtained from the inversion technique. It is shown that the ionospheric projection of flows observed at a fixed point in the equatorial plane map to the bright aurora as it expands poleward

  9. Fabrication of wedged multilayer Laue lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Prasciolu, M.; Leontowich, A. F. G.; Krzywinski, J.; Andrejczuk, A.; Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to fabricate wedged multilayer Laue lenses, in which the angle of diffracting layers smoothly varies in the lens to achieve optimum diffracting efficiency across the entire pupil of the lens. This was achieved by depositing a multilayer onto a flat substrate placed in the penumbra of a straight-edge mask. The distance between the mask and the substrate was calibrated and the multilayer Laue lens was cut in a position where the varying layer thickness and the varying layer tilt simultaneously satisfy the Fresnel zone plate condition and Bragg’s law for all layers in the stack. This method can be used to extend the achievable numerical aperture of multilayer Laue lenses to reach considerably smaller focal spot sizes than achievable with lenses composed of parallel layers.

  10. Fabrication of wedged multilayer Laue lenses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Prasciolu, M.; Leontowich, A. F. G.; Krzywinski, J.; Andrejczuk, A.; Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to fabricate wedged multilayer Laue lenses, in which the angle of diffracting layers smoothly varies in the lens to achieve optimum diffracting efficiency across the entire pupil of the lens. This was achieved by depositing a multilayer onto a flat substrate placed in the penumbra of a straight-edge mask. The distance between the mask and the substrate was calibrated and the multilayer Laue lens was cut in a position where the varying layer thickness and the varying layer tilt simultaneously satisfy the Fresnel zone plate condition and Bragg’s law for all layers in the stack.more » This method can be used to extend the achievable numerical aperture of multilayer Laue lenses to reach considerably smaller focal spot sizes than achievable with lenses composed of parallel layers.« less

  11. Ground penetrating radar estimates of permafrost ice wedge depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsekian, A.; Slater, L. D.; Nolan, J. T.; Grosse, G.; Walter Anthony, K. M.

    2013-12-01

    Vertical ground ice wedges associated with polygonal patterning in permafrost environments form due to frost cracking of soils under harsh winter conditions and subsequent infilling of cracks with snow melt water. Ice wedge polygon patterns have implications for lowland geomorphology, hydrology, and vulnerability of permafrost to thaw. Ice wedge dimensions may exceed two meters width at the surface and several meters depth, however few studies have addressed the question of ice wedge depth due to challenges related to measuring the vertical dimension below the ground. Vertical exposures where ice wedges maybe observed are limited to rapidly retreating lake, river, and coastal bluffs. Coring though the ice wedges to determine vertical extent is possible, however that approach is time consuming and labor intensive. Many geophysical investigations have noted signal anomalies related to the presence of ice wedges, but no reliable method for extracting wedge dimensions from geophysical data has been yet proposed. Here we present new evidence that ground penetrating radar (GPR) may be a viable method for estimating ice wedge depth. We present three new perspectives on processing GPR data collected over ice wedges that show considerable promise for use as a fast, cost effective method for evaluating ice wedge depth. Our novel approaches include 1) a simple frequency-domain analysis, 2) an S-transform frequency domain analysis and 3) an analysis of the returned signal power as a radar cross section (RCS) treating subsurface ice wedges as dihedral corner retro-reflectors. Our methods are demonstrated and validated using finite-difference time domain FDTD) GPR forward models of synthetic idealized ice wedges and field data from permafrost sites in Alaska. Our results indicate that frequency domain and signal power data provide information that is easier to extract from raw GPR data than similar information in the time domain. We also show that we can simplify the problem by

  12. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with birefringent wedges.

    PubMed

    Réhault, Julien; Maiuri, Margherita; Oriana, Aurelio; Cerullo, Giulio

    2014-12-01

    We present a simple experimental setup for performing two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy in the partially collinear pump-probe geometry. The setup uses a sequence of birefringent wedges to create and delay a pair of phase-locked, collinear pump pulses, with extremely high phase stability and reproducibility. Continuous delay scanning is possible without any active stabilization or position tracking, and allows to record rapidly and easily 2D spectra. The setup works over a broad spectral range from the ultraviolet to the near-IR, it is compatible with few-optical-cycle pulses and can be easily reconfigured to two-colour operation. A simple method for scattering suppression is also introduced. As a proof of principle, we present degenerate and two-color 2D spectra of the light-harvesting complex 1 of purple bacteria. PMID:25554272

  13. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with birefringent wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Réhault, Julien; Maiuri, Margherita; Oriana, Aurelio; Cerullo, Giulio

    2014-12-01

    We present a simple experimental setup for performing two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy in the partially collinear pump-probe geometry. The setup uses a sequence of birefringent wedges to create and delay a pair of phase-locked, collinear pump pulses, with extremely high phase stability and reproducibility. Continuous delay scanning is possible without any active stabilization or position tracking, and allows to record rapidly and easily 2D spectra. The setup works over a broad spectral range from the ultraviolet to the near-IR, it is compatible with few-optical-cycle pulses and can be easily reconfigured to two-colour operation. A simple method for scattering suppression is also introduced. As a proof of principle, we present degenerate and two-color 2D spectra of the light-harvesting complex 1 of purple bacteria.

  14. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with birefringent wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Réhault, Julien; Maiuri, Margherita; Oriana, Aurelio; Cerullo, Giulio

    2014-12-15

    We present a simple experimental setup for performing two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy in the partially collinear pump-probe geometry. The setup uses a sequence of birefringent wedges to create and delay a pair of phase-locked, collinear pump pulses, with extremely high phase stability and reproducibility. Continuous delay scanning is possible without any active stabilization or position tracking, and allows to record rapidly and easily 2D spectra. The setup works over a broad spectral range from the ultraviolet to the near-IR, it is compatible with few-optical-cycle pulses and can be easily reconfigured to two-colour operation. A simple method for scattering suppression is also introduced. As a proof of principle, we present degenerate and two-color 2D spectra of the light-harvesting complex 1 of purple bacteria.

  15. Healing period after open high tibial osteotomy and related factors: Can we really say that it is long?

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Masamichi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Onishi, Toru; Hirano, Koji; Doi, Motoyuki

    2016-01-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a general procedure for the treatment of degenerative gonarthrosis. In recent years, it has been reported that opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) has become widespread with good results. Despite these facts, HTOs tend to be avoided due to the need for long-term postoperative treatment. To investigate the treatment period for total recovery (healing period) after OWHTO and the factors affecting it. There were 47 cases of medial type degenerative gonarthrosis who underwent OWHTO from 2008 through 2011. The definition of the healing period was based on the time-dependent changes of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association score, focusing especially on pain on walking and pain on ascending/descending stairs. This score was defined as the Ability score. In this study, the healing period ended when the Ability score reached its maximum or when it showed a perfect score. Patients' characteristics were examined to determine their effect on the healing period. The Ability score was 36.7 ± 10.1 (mean ± SD) before surgery and 51.6 ± 5.4 12 months after OWHTO. The healing period was 6.3 ± 3.9 months. Factors correlated with a longer healing period included female sex (correlation coefficient -0.35) and high BMI (correlation coefficient 0.33). Our study suggested that the healing period after OWHTO is approximately 6 months, and patients' BMI and sex appear to be related to this period. This information is expected to be helpful for counseling patients undergoing treatment for gonarthrosis. Level of evidence Therapeutic study, Level IV. PMID:26904392

  16. Transmission of a Gaussian beam by a Fizeau interferential wedge.

    PubMed

    Stoykova, Elena

    2005-12-01

    Analysis of transmission of a finite-diameter Gaussian beam by a Fizeau interferential wedge is presented. The fringe calculation is based on angular spectrum expansion of the complex amplitude of the incident wave field. The developed approach is applicable to any beam diameter and wedge thickness at any distance from the wedge and yields as a boundary case the fringes at plane-wave illumination. The spatial region of resonant transmission on the wedge surface is given by the width of the transmitted peak for plane-wave illumination. At higher coating reflectivity, the direction of the transmitted beam is deviated with respect to that of the incident beam. Evaluation of the spectral response based on the spectral width of the transmitted power curve is introduced as more realistic for a correct description of the application of a Fizeau wedge as an interferential selector in laser resonators. PMID:16396037

  17. Open air demolition of facilities highly contaminated with plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, E.R.; Lackey, M.B.; Stevens, J.M.; Zinsli, L.C.

    2007-07-01

    The demolition of highly contaminated plutonium buildings usually is a long and expensive process that involves decontaminating the building to near free- release standards and then using conventional methods to remove the structure. It doesn't, however, have to be that way. Fluor has torn down buildings highly contaminated with plutonium without excessive decontamination. By removing the select source term and fixing the remaining contamination on the walls, ceilings, floors, and equipment surfaces; open-air demolition is not only feasible, but it can be done cheaper, better (safer), and faster. Open-air demolition techniques were used to demolish two highly contaminated buildings to slab-on-grade. These facilities on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site were located in, or very near, compounds of operating nuclear facilities that housed hundreds of people working on a daily basis. To keep the facilities operating and the personnel safe, the projects had to be creative in demolishing the structures. Several key techniques were used to control contamination and keep it within the confines of the demolition area: spraying fixatives before demolition; applying fixative and misting with a fine spray of water as the buildings were being taken down; and demolishing the buildings in a controlled and methodical manner. In addition, detailed air-dispersion modeling was done to establish necessary building and meteorological conditions and to confirm the adequacy of the proposed methods. Both demolition projects were accomplished without any spread of contamination outside the modest buffer areas established for contamination control. Furthermore, personnel exposure to radiological and physical hazards was significantly reduced by using heavy equipment rather than 'hands on' techniques. (authors)

  18. OPEN AIR DEMOLITION OF FACILITIES HIGHLY CONTAMINATED WITH PLUTONIUM

    SciTech Connect

    LLOYD, E.R.

    2007-05-31

    The demolition of highly contaminated plutonium buildings usually is a long and expensive process that involves decontaminating the building to near free- release standards and then using conventional methods to remove the structure. It doesn't, however, have to be that way. Fluor has torn down buildings highly contaminated with plutonium without excessive decontamination. By removing the select source term and fixing the remaining contamination on the walls, ceilings, floors, and equipment surfaces; open-air demolition is not only feasible, but it can be done cheaper, better (safer), and faster. Open-air demolition techniques were used to demolish two highly contaminated buildings to slab-on-grade. These facilities on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site were located in, or very near, compounds of operating nuclear facilities that housed hundreds of people working on a daily basis. To keep the facilities operating and the personnel safe, the projects had to be creative in demolishing the structures. Several key techniques were used to control contamination and keep it within the confines of the demolition area: spraying fixatives before demolition; applying fixative and misting with a fine spray of water as the buildings were being taken down; and demolishing the buildings in a controlled and methodical manner. In addition, detailed air-dispersion modeling was done to establish necessary building and meteorological conditions and to confirm the adequacy of the proposed methods. Both demolition projects were accomplished without any spread of contamination outside the modest buffer areas established for contamination control. Furthermore, personnel exposure to radiological and physical hazards was significantly reduced by using heavy equipment rather than ''hands on'' techniques.

  19. Productive high-performance software for OpenCL devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melonakos, John M.; Yalamanchili, Pavan; McClanahan, Chris; Arshad, Umar; Landes, Michael; Jamboti, Shivapriya; Joshi, Abhijit; Mohammed, Shehzan; Spafford, Kyle; Venugopalakrishnan, Vishwanath; Malcolm, James

    2013-05-01

    Over the last three decades, CPUs have continued to produce large performance improvements from one generation to the next. However, CPUs have recently hit a performance wall and need parallel computing to move forward. Parallel computing over the next decade will become increasingly defined by heterogeneous computing, involving the use of accelerators in addition to CPUs to get computational tasks done. In order to use an accelerator, software changes must be made. Regular x86-based compilers cannot compile code to run on accelerators without these needed changes. The amount of software change required varies depending upon the availability of and reliance upon software tools that increase performance and productivity. Writing software that leverages the best parallel computing hardware, adapts well to the rapid pace of hardware updates, and minimizes developer muscle is the industry's goal. OpenCL is the standard around which developers are able to achieve parallel performance. OpenCL itself is too difficult to program to receive general adoptions, but productive high-performing software libraries are becoming increasingly popular and capable in delivering lasting value to user applications.

  20. COAST: Cascadia Open-Access Seismic Transects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, W.; Johnson, H. P.; Kent, G.; Keranen, K. M.; Tobin, H. J.; Trehu, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Cascadia margin is the site of active subduction, where the Juan de Fuca plate subducts under the North American plate at a rate of ~35 mm/yr. This system is of great scientific and societal interest, as it is capable of very large (Mw~9) earthquakes, creates volcanic hazards in the Cascades, and hosts periodic episodic tremor and slip (ETS) episodes. Despite evidence that the system has generated large megathrust earthquakes, limited seismicity creates large uncertainties in the position, structure, and physical state of the plate boundary. The COAST (Cascadia Open-Access Seismic Transects) project conducted an open-access, open-participation 2D seismic survey of the Cascadia subduction margin off Grays Harbor, WA, that will provide benchmark seismic images to address key scientific issues regarding the location, physical state, fluid budget, and associated methane systems of the subducting plate boundary and overlying crust. We collected seismic reflection, multibeam bathymetric, sidescan sonar, gravity, and magnetic data on the Cascadia subduction margin from the R/V Langseth in July 2012 in a high-priority GeoPRISMS corridor off Grays Harbor, Washington. The cruise was open-participation, with an organized shipboard education and training program, and the data are open-access, with immediate, full release to the community of all geophysical data. Project goals include (1) determining the location of the offshore plate boundary, (2) constraining sediment subduction and plate boundary roughness, (3) estimating pore fluid pathways, (4) determining controls on methane distribution, and (5) imaging compressional and extensional structures that may pose geohazards on the Cascadia margin. Initial observations include the following: (1) The Pleistocene accretionary wedge is well imaged and shows landward-vergent thrust faulting throughout our survey area. An outboard series of ramp-and-thrust structures gives way to a region characterized by folds that separate

  1. ExpertEyes: open-source, high-definition eyetracking.

    PubMed

    Parada, Francisco J; Wyatte, Dean; Yu, Chen; Akavipat, Ruj; Emerick, Brandi; Busey, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    ExpertEyes is a low-cost, open-source package of hardware and software that is designed to provide portable high-definition eyetracking. The project involves several technological innovations, including portability, high-definition video recording, and multiplatform software support. It was designed for challenging recording environments, and all processing is done offline to allow for optimization of parameter estimation. The pupil and corneal reflection are estimated using a novel forward eye model that simultaneously fits both the pupil and the corneal reflection with full ellipses, addressing a common situation in which the corneal reflection sits at the edge of the pupil and therefore breaks the contour of the ellipse. The accuracy and precision of the system are comparable to or better than what is available in commercial eyetracking systems, with a typical accuracy of less than 0.4° and best accuracy below 0.3°, and with a typical precision (SD method) around 0.3° and best precision below 0.2°. Part of the success of the system comes from a high-resolution eye image. The high image quality results from uncasing common digital camcorders and recording directly to SD cards, which avoids the limitations of the analog NTSC format. The software is freely downloadable, and complete hardware plans are available, along with sources for custom parts. PMID:24934301

  2. The acoustical structure of highly porous open-cell foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    This work concerns both the theoretical prediction and measurement of structural parameters in open-cell highly porous polyurethane foams. Of particular interest are the dynamic flow resistance, thermal time constant, and mass structure factor and their dependence on frequency and geometry of the cellular structure. The predictions of cell size parameters, static flow resistance, and heat transfer as accounted for by a Nusselt number are compared with measurement. Since the static flow resistance and inverse thermal time constant are interrelated via the 'mean' pore size parameter of Biot, only two independent measurements such as volume porosity and mean filament diameter are required to make the predictions for a given fluid condition. The agreements between this theory and nonacoustical experiments are excellent.

  3. Geodetic observations of megathrust earthquakes and backarc wedge deformation across the central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, J. R.; Brooks, B. A.; Foster, J. H.; Bevis, M. G.; Echalar, A.; Caccamise, D.; Heck, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    High-precision Global Positioning System (GPS) data offer an opportunity to investigate active orogenic wedges yet surface velocity fields are available for only a few examples worldwide. More observations are needed to link deformation processes across multiple timescales and to better understand strain accumulation and release in active wedge settings. Here we present a new GPS velocity field for the central Andes and the backarc orogenic wedge comprising the southern Subandes of Bolivia (SSA), a region previously thought to be mostly isolated from the plate boundary earthquake cycle. The time span of our observations (2000 to mid-2014) includes two megathrust earthquakes along the Chile trench that affected the SSA. The 2007 Mw 7.7 Tocopilla, Chile earthquake resulted in a regional postseismic decrease in the eastward component of horizontal surface velocities. Preliminary analysis of the deformation field from the April 01 2014 Mw 8.2 Pisagua, Chile earthquake also indicates a postseismic signal extending into the SSA. We create an interseismic velocity field for the SSA by correcting campaign GPS site velocities for the seasonal cycles estimated from continuous GPS site time series. We remove the effects of both megathrust events by estimating coseismic steps and fitting linear and logarithmic functions to the postseismic GPS site motions. The velocity estimates at most locations increase after correcting for the transients. This finding suggests that forces leading to shortening and earthquakes in the backarc wedge are not as temporally consistent as previously considered.

  4. Analysis and measurement of electromagnetic scattering by pyramidal and wedge absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, B. T.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1986-01-01

    By modifying the reflection coefficients in the Uniform Geometrical Theory of Diffraction a solution that approximates the scattering from a dielectric wedge is found. This solution agrees closely with the exact solution of Rawlins which is only valid for a few minor cases. This modification is then applied to the corner diffraction coefficient and combined with an equivalent current and geometrical optics solutions to model scattering from pyramid and wedge absorbers. Measured results from 12 inch pyramid absorbers from 2 to 18 GHz are compared to calculations assuming the returns add incoherently and assuming the returns add coherently. The measured results tend to be between the two curves. Measured results from the 8 inch wedge absorber are also compared to calculations with the return being dominated by the wedge diffraction. The procedures for measuring and specifying absorber performance are discussed and calibration equations are derived to calculate a reflection coefficient or a reflectivity using a reference sphere. Shaping changes to the present absorber designs are introduced to improve performance based on both high and low frequency analysis. Some prototypes were built and tested.

  5. Accretion in the wake of terrane collision: The Neogene accretionary wedge off Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fruehn, J.; Von Huene, R.; Fisher, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Subduction accretion and repeated terrane collision shaped the Alaskan convergent margin. The Yakutat Terrane is currently colliding with the continental margin below the central Gulf of Alaska. During the Neogene the terrane's western part was subducted after which a sediment wedge accreted along the northeast Aleutian Trench. This wedge incorporates sediment eroded from the continental margin and marine sediments carried into the subduction zone on the Pacific plate. Prestack depth migration was performed on six seismic reflection lines to resolve the structure within this accretionary wedge and its backstop. The lateral extent of the structures is constrained by high-resolution swath bathymetry and seismic lines collected along strike. Accretionary structure consists of variably sized thrust slices that were deformed against a backstop during frontal accretion and underplating. Toward the northeast the lower slope steepens, the wedge narrows, and the accreted volume decreases notwith-standing a doubling of sediments thickness in the trench. In the northeasternmost transect, near the area where the terrane's trailing edge subducts, no frontal accretion is observed and the slope is eroded. The structures imaged along the seismic lines discussed here most likely result from progressive evolution from erosion to accretion, as the trailing edge of the Yakutat Terrane is subducting.

  6. The Cimmerian accretionary wedge of Anarak, Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchi, Andrea; Malaspina, Nadia; Zanchetta, Stefano; Berra, Fabrizio; Benciolini, Luca; Bergomi, Maria; Cavallo, Alessandro; Javadi, Hamid Reza; Kouhpeyma, Meyssam

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence in Iran of several ophiolite belts dating between Late Palaeozoic to Triassic poses several questions on the possible existence of various sutures marking the closure of the Palaeotethys ocean between Eurasia and this Gondwana-derived microplate. In this scenario, the Anarak region in Central Iran still represents a conundrum. Contrasting geochronological, paleontological, paleomagnetic data and reported field evidence suggest different origins for the Anarak Metamorphic Complex (AMC). The AMC is either interpreted, as: (1) relict of an accretionary wedge developed at the Eurasia margin during the Palaeotethys subduction as part of the Cimmerian suture zone of NE Iran, displaced to Central Iran by a large counter-clockwise rotation of the central Iranian blocks; (2) autochthonous unit forming a secondary branch of the main suture zone. Our structural, petrographic and geochemical data indicate that the AMC consists of several metamorphic units also including dismembered "ophiolites" which display different tectono-metamorphic evolutions. Three main ductile deformational events can be distinguished in the AMC. The Morghab and Chah Gorbeh complexes preserve a different M1 metamorphism, characterized by blueschist relics in the S1 foliation of the former unit, and greenschist assemblages in the latter. They share a subsequent similar D2 deformational and M2 metamorphic history, showing a prograde metamorphism with syn- to post-deformation growth of blueschist facies mineral assemblages on pre-existing greenschist facies associations. High pressure, low temperature (HP/LT) metamorphism responsible for the growth of sodic amphibole has been recognized also within marble lenses at the contact between the Chah Gorbeh Complex and serpentinites. Evidence of HP/LT metamorphism also occurs in glaucophane-bearing meta-pillow lavas and serpentinites, which contain antigorite and form most of the "ophiolites" within the AMC. Structural relationships show that the

  7. A high power microwave triggered RF opening switch.

    PubMed

    Beeson, S; Dickens, J; Neuber, A

    2015-03-01

    A 4-port S-band waveguide structure was designed and fabricated such that a signal of any amplitude (less than 1 MW) can be switched from a normally closed state, <0.5 dB insertion loss (IL), to an open state >30 dB IL by initiating plasma in a gas cell situated at the junction of this waveguide and one propagating a megawatt level magnetron pulse. The 90/10 switching time is as low as 20 ns with a delay of ∼30 ns between the onset of the high power microwave pulse and the initial drop of the signal. Two ports of this device are for the high power triggering pulse while the other two ports are for the triggered signal in a Moreno-like coupler configuration. In order to maintain high isolation, these two sets of waveguides are rotated 90° from each other with a TE111 resonator/plasma cell located at the intersection. This manuscript describes the design and optimization of this structure using COMSOL 4.4 at the design frequency of 2.85 GHz, comparison of simulated scattering parameters with measured "cold tests" (testing without plasma), and finally the temporal waveforms of this device being used to successfully switch a low power CW signal from 2 W to <5 mW on a sub-microsecond timescale. PMID:25832255

  8. Wettability patterning for high-rate, pumpless fluid transport on open, non-planar microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Aritra; Ganguly, Ranjan; Schutzius, Thomas M; Megaridis, Constantine M

    2014-05-01

    Surface tension driven transport of liquids on open substrates offers an enabling tool for open micro total analysis systems that are becoming increasingly popular for low-cost biomedical diagnostic devices. The present study uses a facile wettability patterning method to produce open microfluidic tracks that - due to their shape, surface texture and chemistry - are capable of transporting a wide range of liquid volumes (~1-500 μL) on-chip, overcoming viscous and other opposing forces (e.g., gravity) at the pertinent length scales. Small volumes are handled as individual droplets, while larger volumes require repeated droplet transport. The concept is developed and demonstrated with coatings based on TiO2 filler particles, which, when present in adequate (~80 wt.%) quantities within a hydrophobic fluoroacrylic polymer matrix, form composites that are intrinsically superhydrophobic. Such composite coatings become superhydrophilic upon exposure to UV light (390 nm). A commercial laser printer-based photo-masking approach is used on the coating for spatially selective wettability conversion from superhydrophobic to superhydrophilic. Carefully designed wedge-patterned surface tension confined tracks on the open-air devices move liquid on them without power input, even when acting against gravity. Simple designs of wettability patterning are used on versatile substrates (e.g., metals, polymers, paper) to demonstrate complex droplet handling tasks, e.g., merging, splitting and metered dispensing, some of which occur in 3-D geometries. Fluid transport rates of up to 350 μL s(-1) are attained. Applicability of the design on metal substrates allows these devices to be used also for other microscale engineering applications, e.g., water management in fuel cells. PMID:24622962

  9. Refined numerical solution of the transonic flow past a wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, S.-M.; Fung, K.-Y.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical procedure combining the ideas of solving a modified difference equation and of adaptive mesh refinement is introduced. The numerical solution on a fixed grid is improved by using better approximations of the truncation error computed from local subdomain grid refinements. This technique is used to obtain refined solutions of steady, inviscid, transonic flow past a wedge. The effects of truncation error on the pressure distribution, wave drag, sonic line, and shock position are investigated. By comparing the pressure drag on the wedge and wave drag due to the shocks, a supersonic-to-supersonic shock originating from the wedge shoulder is confirmed.

  10. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jerome P.; Sawvel, Robert M.; Draggoo, Vaughn G.

    1994-01-01

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior.

  11. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOEpatents

    Hall, J.P.; Sawvel, R.M.; Draggoo, V.G.

    1994-06-28

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior. 8 figures.

  12. Octave spanning wedge dispersive mirrors with low dispersion oscillations.

    PubMed

    Habel, Florian; Shirvanyan, Vage; Trubetskov, Michael; Burger, Christian; Sommer, Annkatrin; Kling, Matthias F; Schultze, Martin; Pervak, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    A novel concept for octave spanning dispersive mirrors with low spectral dispersion oscillations is presented. The key element of the so-called wedge dispersive mirror is a slightly wedged layer which is coated on a specially optimized dispersive multilayer stack by a common sputter coating process. The group delay dispersion (GDD) of a pulse reflected on a wedge dispersive mirror is nearly free of oscillations. Fabricated mirrors with negative GDD demonstrate the compression of a pulse down to 3.8 fs as good as double angled mirrors optimized for the same bandwidth. PMID:27137538

  13. Cohesive Strength of Clay-Rich Sediment and Implications for Accretionary Wedge Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikari, M.; Huepers, A.; Kopf, A.

    2011-12-01

    consolidation. Therefore, sediment with high cohesion, either from clay-water interactions or other cementation processes, may affect wedge taper angle, faulting in the prism, and the amount of pore pressures that are maintained within the wedge and in the décollement. Ongoing experiments include cohesion and friction measurements of natural material sampled from the Nankai subduction zone during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expeditions 316 and 322.

  14. Complex interactions between diapirs and 4-D subduction driven mantle wedge circulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvia, R. T.; Kincaid, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    Analogue laboratory experiments generate 4-D flow of mantle wedge fluid and capture the evolution of buoyant mesoscale diapirs. The mantle is modeled with viscous glucose syrup with an Arrhenius type temperature dependent viscosity. To characterize diapir evolution we experiment with a variety of fluids injected from multiple point sources. Diapirs interact with kinematically induced flow fields forced by subducting plate motions replicating a range of styles observed in dynamic subduction models (e.g., rollback, steepening, gaps). Data is collected using high definition timelapse photography and quantified using image velocimetry techniques. While many studies assume direct vertical connections between the volcanic arc and the deeper mantle source region, our experiments demonstrate the difficulty of creating near vertical conduits. Results highlight extreme curvature of diapir rise paths. Trench-normal deflection occurs as diapirs are advected downward away from the trench before ascending into wedge apex directed return flow. Trench parallel deflections up to 75% of trench length are seen in all cases, exacerbated by complex geometry and rollback motion. Interdiapir interaction is also important; upwellings with similar trajectory coalesce and rapidly accelerate. Moreover, we observe a new mode of interaction whereby recycled diapir material is drawn down along the slab surface and then initiates rapid fluid migration updip along the slab-wedge interface. Variability in trajectory and residence time leads to complex petrologic inferences. Material from disparate source regions can surface at the same location, mix in the wedge, or become fully entrained in creeping flow adding heterogeneity to the mantle. Active diapirism or any other vertical fluid flux mechanism employing rheological weakening lowers viscosity in the recycling mantle wedge affecting both solid and fluid flow characteristics. Many interesting and insightful results have been presented based

  15. Effective Thermal Conductivity of High Porosity Open Cell Nickel Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullins, Alan D.; Daryabeigi, Kamran

    2001-01-01

    The effective thermal conductivity of high-porosity open cell nickel foam samples was measured over a wide range of temperatures and pressures using a standard steady-state technique. The samples, measuring 23.8 mm, 18.7 mm, and 13.6 mm in thickness, were constructed with layers of 1.7 mm thick foam with a porosity of 0.968. Tests were conducted with the specimens subjected to temperature differences of 100 to 1000 K across the thickness and at environmental pressures of 10(exp -4) to 750 mm Hg. All test were conducted in a gaseous nitrogen environment. A one-dimensional finite volume numerical model was developed to model combined radiation/conduction heat transfer in the foam. The radiation heat transfer was modeled using the two-flux approximation. Solid and gas conduction were modeled using standard techniques for high porosity media. A parameter estimation technique was used in conjunction with the measured and predicted thermal conductivities at pressures of 10(exp -4) and 750 mm Hg to determine the extinction coefficient, albedo of scattering, and weighting factors for modeling the conduction thermal conductivity. The measured and predicted conductivities over the intermediate pressure values differed by 13%.

  16. Substorm current wedge composition by wedgelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiang; Angelopoulos, V.; Chu, Xiangning; Zhou, Xu-Zhi; Yue, Chao

    2015-03-01

    Understanding how a substorm current wedge (SCW) is formed is crucial to comprehending the substorm phenomenon. One SCW formation scenario suggests that the substorm time magnetosphere is coupled to the ionosphere via "wedgelets," small building blocks of an SCW. Wedgelets are field-aligned currents (FACs) carried by elemental flux transport units known as dipolarizing flux bundles (DFBs). A DFB is a magnetotail flux tube with magnetic field stronger than that of the ambient plasma. Its leading edge, known as a "dipolarization front" or "reconnection front," is a product of near-Earth reconnection. Dipolarizing flux bundles, and thus wedgelets, are localized—each is only <3 RE wide. How these localized wedgelets combine to become large-scale (several hours of magnetic local time) region-1-sense SCW FACs is unclear. To determine how this occurs, we investigated wedgelets statistically using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) data. The results show wedgelet asymmetries: in the dawn (dusk) sector of the magnetotail, a wedgelet has more FAC toward (away from) the Earth than away from (toward) the Earth, so the net FAC is toward (away from) the Earth. The combined effect of many wedgelets is therefore the same as that of large-scale region-1-sense SCW, supporting the idea that they comprise the SCW.

  17. High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Seong Joon

    2012-01-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a widely performed procedure to treat medial knee arthrosis. In general, published studies on HTO report good long-term results with a correct patient selection and a precise surgical technique. The ideal candidate for an HTO is a middle aged patient (60 to 65 years of age), with isolated medial osteoarthritis, with good range of motion and without ligamentous instability. Some issues that need resolution remain; these include the choice between opening and closing wedge tibial osteotomy, the graft selection in opening wedge osteotomies, the type of fixation, the comparison with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty and whether HTO significantly affects a subsequent total joint replacement. Precise indication, preoperative planning, and operative technique selection are essential to achieve good results. PMID:22708105

  18. HOS-ocean: Open-source solver for nonlinear waves in open ocean based on High-Order Spectral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducrozet, Guillaume; Bonnefoy, Félicien; Le Touzé, David; Ferrant, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    HOS-ocean is an efficient High-Order Spectral code developed to solve the deterministic propagation of nonlinear wavefields in open ocean. HOS-ocean is released as open-source, developed and distributed under the terms of GNU General Public License (GPLv3). Along with the source code, a documentation under wiki format is available which makes easy the compilation and execution of the source files. The code has been shown to be accurate and efficient.

  19. VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN NORTHERN QUARRY AREA, FACING NORTH - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 2, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  20. VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN NORTHERN QUARRY AREA, FACING SOUTHEAST - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 2, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  1. DETAIL VIEW OF THREEPART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF THREE-PART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF QUARRY WALL, FACING EAST - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 3, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  2. DETAIL VIEW OF THREEPART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF THREE-PART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF QUARRY WALL, FACING NORTHWEST - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 3, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  3. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Freight Car Components... car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  4. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Freight Car Components... car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  5. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Freight Car Components... car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  6. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Freight Car Components... car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  7. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Freight Car Components... car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  8. Propagation in an elastic wedge using the virtual source technique.

    PubMed

    Abawi, Ahmad T; Porter, Michael B

    2007-03-01

    The virtual source technique, which is based on the boundary integral method, provides the means to impose boundary conditions on arbitrarily shaped boundaries by replacing them by a collection of sources whose amplitudes are determined from the boundary conditions. In this paper the virtual source technique is used to model propagation of waves in a range-dependent ocean overlying an elastic bottom with arbitrarily shaped ocean-bottom interface. The method is applied to propagation in an elastic Pekeris waveguide, an acoustic wedge, and an elastic wedge. In the case of propagation in an elastic Pekeris waveguide, the results agree very well with those obtained from the wavenumber integral technique, as they do with the solution of the parabolic equation (PE) technique in the case of propagation in an acoustic wedge. The results for propagation in an elastic wedge qualitatively agree with those obtained from an elastic PE solution. PMID:17407873

  9. The crack and wedging problem for an orthotropic strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cinar, A.; Erdogan, F.

    1982-01-01

    The plane elasticity problem for an orthotropic strip containing a crack parallel to its boundaries is considered. The problem is formulated under general mixed mode loading conditions. The stress intensity factors depend on two dimensionless orthotropic constants only. For the crack problem the results are given for a single crack and two collinear cracks. The calculated results show that of the two orthotropic constants the influence of the stiffness ratio on the stress intensity factors is much more significant than that of the shear parameter. The problem of loading the strip by a rigid rectangular lengths continuous contact is maintained along the wedge strip interface; at a certain critical wedge length the separation starts at the midsection of the wedge, and the length of the separation zone increases rapidly with increasing wedge length.

  10. The crack and wedging problem for an orthotropic strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cinar, A.; Erdogan, F.

    1983-01-01

    The plane elasticity problem for an orthotropic strip containing a crack parallel to its boundaries is considered. The problem is formulated under general mixed mode loading conditions. The stress intensity factors depend on two dimensionless orthotropic constants only. For the crack problem the results are given for a single crack and two collinear cracks. The calculated results show that of the two orthotropic constants the influence of the stiffness ratio on the stress intensity factors is much more significant than that of the shear parameter. The problem of loading the strip by a rigid rectangular lengths continuous contact is maintained along the wedge strip interface; at a certain critical wedge length the separation starts at the midsection of the wedge, and the length of the separation zone increases rapidly with increasing wedge length. Previously announced in STAR as N82-26707

  11. Stress singularities at the vertex of a cylindrically anisotropic wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.; Boduroglu, H.

    1980-01-01

    The plane elasticity problem for a cylindrically anisotropic solid is formulated. The form of the solution for an infinite wedge shaped domain with various homogeneous boundary conditions is derived and the nature of the stress singularity at the vertex of the wedge is studied. The characteristic equations giving the stress singularity and the angular distribution of the stresses around the vertex of the wedge are obtained for three standard homogeneous boundary conditions. The numerical examples show that the singular behavior of the stresses around the vertex of an anisotropic wedge may be significantly different from that of the isotropic material. Some of the results which may be of practical importance are that for a half plane the stress state at r = 0 may be singular and for a crack the power of stress singularity may be greater or less than 1/2.

  12. OpenACC to FPGA: A Framework for Directive-based High-Performance Reconfigurable Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seyong; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a directive-based, high-level programming framework for high-performance reconfigurable computing. It takes a standard, portable OpenACC C program as input and generates a hardware configuration file for execution on FPGAs. We implemented this prototype system using our open-source OpenARC compiler; it performs source-to-source translation and optimization of the input OpenACC program into an OpenCL code, which is further compiled into a FPGA program by the backend Altera Offline OpenCL compiler. Internally, the design of OpenARC uses a high- level intermediate representation that separates concerns of program representation from underlying architectures, which facilitates portability of OpenARC. In fact, this design allowed us to create the OpenACC-to-FPGA translation framework with minimal extensions to our existing system. In addition, we show that our proposed FPGA-specific compiler optimizations and novel OpenACC pragma extensions assist the compiler in generating more efficient FPGA hardware configuration files. Our empirical evaluation on an Altera Stratix V FPGA with eight OpenACC benchmarks demonstrate the benefits of our strategy. To demonstrate the portability of OpenARC, we show results for the same benchmarks executing on other heterogeneous platforms, including NVIDIA GPUs, AMD GPUs, and Intel Xeon Phis. This initial evidence helps support the goal of using a directive-based, high-level programming strategy for performance portability across heterogeneous HPC architectures.

  13. High School Open On-Line Courses (HOOC): A Case Study from Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canessa, Enrique; Pisani, Armando

    2013-01-01

    The first implementation of complete high school, open on-line courses (HOOC) aiming to support the training and basic scientific knowledge of young students from the Liceo Ginnasio Dante Alighieri in Gorizia, Italy, is discussed. Using the open source and automated recording system openEyA, HOOC give a student the opportunity to watch on-line, at…

  14. Seismicity of the forearc marginal wedge (accrertionary prism)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A.T.; Frohlich, C.; Latham, G.V.

    1982-05-10

    Three different types of seismic data have been examined for seismic events occurring within the zone called the accreted wedge or forearc marginal wedge that underlies the inner trench wall of some arcs. These types of data are (1) teleseismically recorded earthquakes that have been reported in the literature as occurring in major arc-trench regions; these events fail to demonstrate that earthquakes occur within the accreted wedge because the uncertainty of focal depth usually exceeds the depth dimension of the accreted wedge; these data include many tsunamigenic earthquakes, (2) local earthquakes located by combined ocean bottom seismograph and land networks in the arc-trench region in the New Hebrides and the central and eastern Aleutian Trench; none of the more reliable of these hypocenters lies within the accreted wedge; (3) S-P intervals measured at stations on islands located on the outer ridge or at ocean bottom seismograph stations on the forearc marginal wedge; these data do not show the existence of events occurring within the accreted wedge; e.g., from 18 ocean bottom seismograph stations with a cumulative operation time of about 1 year, the smallest S-P time is about 2.5 s for events in the New Hebrides and about 4 s for events in the Adak and Kodiak regions. We found no S-P time smaller than 2 s from 6 years of seismograms recorded at Middleton Island, Alaska, and no S-P time smaller than 4 s from 25 years of seismograms recorded on Barbados. All of the events could have occured outside the forearc marginal wedge.

  15. Open access to high-content clonogenic analysis.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Fernanda; Subramanian, Aishwarya; Wade, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Image-processing programs are used to identify and classify eukaryotic cell colonies as spots following seeding at low density on dishes or in multiwell plates. The output from such approaches, however, is generally limited to 1-2 parameters, and there is no ability to extract phenotypic information at the single colony level. Furthermore, there is a lack of user-friendly pipelines for analysis of clonogenicity in the context of high-content analysis. This article describes an experimental and multiparametric image analysis workflow for clonogenic assays in multiwell format, named the Colony Assay Toolbox (CAT). CAT incorporates a cellular-level resolution of individual colonies and facilitates the extraction of phenotypic information, including the number and size of colonies and nuclei, as well as morphological parameters associated with each structure. Furthermore, the pipeline is capable of discriminating between colonies composed of senescent and nonsenescent cells. We demonstrate the accuracy and flexibility of CAT by interrogating the effects of 2 preclinical compounds, Nutlin-3a and ABT-737, on the growth of human osteosarcoma cells. CAT is accessible to virtually all laboratories because it uses common wide-field fluorescent microscopes, the open-source CellProfiler program for colony image analysis, and a single fluorescent dye for all the segmentation steps. PMID:25381257

  16. Optical refractometry based on Fresnel diffraction from a phase wedge.

    PubMed

    Tavassoly, M Taghi; Saber, Ahad

    2010-11-01

    A method that utilizes the Fresnel diffraction of light from the phase step formed by a transparent wedge is introduced for measuring the refractive indices of transparent solids, liquids, and solutions. It is shown that, as a transparent wedge of small apex angle is illuminated perpendicular to its surface by a monochromatic parallel beam of light, the Fresnel fringes, caused by abrupt change in refractive index at the wedge lateral boundary, are formed on a screen held perpendicular to the beam propagation direction. The visibility of the fringes varies periodically between zero and 1 in the direction normal to the wedge apex. For a known or measured apex angle, the wedge refractive index is obtained by measuring the period length by a CCD. To measure the refractive index of a transparent liquid or solution, the wedge is installed in a transparent rectangle cell containing the sample. Then, the cell is illuminated perpendicularly and the visibility period is measured. By using modest optics, one can measure the refractive index at a relative uncertainty level of 10(-5). There is no limitation on the refractive index range. The method can be applied easily with no mechanical manipulation. The measuring apparatus can be very compact with low mechanical and optical noises. PMID:21042389

  17. Design, implementation and validation of a motorized wedge filter for a telecobalt machine (Bhabhatron-II).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Kar, D C; Sharma, S D; Mayya, Y S

    2012-01-01

    A universal wedge filter of 15W × 20 cm(2) and 60° nominal wedge angle is designed and placed between the collimating jaws and penumbra trimmers inside the treatment head. A pneumatically driven actuating mechanism toggles the wedge between the wedge IN position and wedge OUT position. The effective wedge angles were determined using an analytical formula. An accumulated wedge profile at a depth of 10 cm which was measured using a 2D profiler and dose values at depths of 10 cm and 20 cm for the same experimental setup were used as input parameters in the formula used for determining effective wedge angles. The relationship between the wedge beam weight and effective wedge angle was established. The planned wedge angles were compared with the measured wedge angles and the differences are found to be less than 2° throughout the range of field sizes. Planned doses for various field sizes and wedge angles were measured for verification and the differences were found to be less than 1.8%. This study established that the relationship between the beam weights and effective wedge angles implemented for the motorized wedge filter of medical linacs is not directly applicable for the motorized wedge filter of Telecobalt. PMID:21486704

  18. Stem thrust prediction model for W-K-M double wedge parallel expanding gate valves

    SciTech Connect

    Eldiwany, B.; Alvarez, P.D.; Wolfe, K.

    1996-12-01

    An analytical model for determining the required valve stem thrust during opening and closing strokes of W-K-M parallel expanding gate valves was developed as part of the EPRI Motor-Operated Valve Performance Prediction Methodology (EPRI MOV PPM) Program. The model was validated against measured stem thrust data obtained from in-situ testing of three W-K-M valves. Model predictions show favorable, bounding agreement with the measured data for valves with Stellite 6 hardfacing on the disks and seat rings for water flow in the preferred flow direction (gate downstream). The maximum required thrust to open and to close the valve (excluding wedging and unwedging forces) occurs at a slightly open position and not at the fully closed position. In the nonpreferred flow direction, the model shows that premature wedging can occur during {Delta}P closure strokes even when the coefficients of friction at different sliding surfaces are within the typical range. This paper summarizes the model description and comparison against test data.

  19. Role of Hydrogen in stagnant slabs and big mantle wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, E.; Zhao, D.

    2008-12-01

    Eastern China, Europe, and United State (e.g., [7]). According to the BMW model by Zhao [2], the intra-plate volcanisms in Northeast China including Mt. Changbai are different from the hot plumes and they might be generated due to some processes related to the deep-seated dehydration from the stagnant slab. Recent geochemical studies on volcanic rocks and associated mantle xenoliths in Northeast China (e.g., [8]) indicated that there is no geochemical evidence for involvement of subducting slab in most basalts, i.e., no depletion of high field strength elements and no enrichment of large ion lithophile elements. There is no clear evidence for a high-3He/4He mantle plume component in these rocks, i.e., 3He/4He ratios are significantly below the high 3He/4He ratios of mantle plumes such as those beneath Hawaii and Iceland. The geochemical signatures of the deep dehydration should be different from those in the conventional mantle wedge, since the fluids generated at such depths are completely different from those at the shallow depths. Further studies including the element partitioning between fluids and mantle under the deep upper mantle and the transition zone conditions are necessary to clarify the possible role of the Big Mantle Wedge on the intra-plate volcanism. [1] Fukao, et al., J. G. R. 108, doi:10.1029/2001JB000989, 2003. [2] Zhao et al., Chin. Sci. Bulletin 49, 1401, 2004, [3] Ohtani, Elements, 1, 25, 2005. [4] Richard et al., EPSL, 251, 156, 2006. [5] Hae et al., EPSL, 243, 141, 2006. [6] Litasov and Ohtani, PEPI, 134, 105, 2002. [7] Song et al., Nature, 427, 530, 2004. [8] Chen et al., Lithos, 96, 108, 2007

  20. Measured Two-Dimensional Ice-Wedge Polygon Thermal Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Busey, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Ice-wedge polygons are perhaps the most dominant permafrost related features in the arctic landscape. The microtopography of these features, that includes rims, troughs, and high and low polygon centers, alters the local hydrology, as water tends to collect in the low areas. During winter, wind redistribution of snow leads to an increased snowpack depth in the low areas, while the slightly higher areas often have very thin snow cover, leading to differences across the landscape in vegetation communities and soil moisture between higher and lower areas. These differences in local surface conditions lead to spatial variability of the ground thermal regime in the different microtopographic areas and between different types of ice-wedge polygons. To study these features in depth, we established temperature transects across four different types of ice-wedge polygons near Barrow, Alaska. The transects were composed of five vertical array thermistor probes (VATP) beginning in the center of each polygon and extending through the trough to the rim of the adjacent polygon. Each VATP had 16 thermistors from the surface to a depth of 1.5 m. In addition to these 80 subsurface temperature measurement points per polygon, soil moisture, thermal conductivity, heat flux, and snow depth were all measured in multiple locations for each polygon. Above ground, a full suite of micrometeorological instrumentation was present at each polygon. Data from these sites has been collected continuously for the last three years. We found snow cover, timing and depth, and active layer soil moisture to be major controlling factors in the observed thermal regimes. In troughs and in the centers of low-center polygons, the combined effect of typically saturated soils and increased snow accumulation resulted in the highest mean annual ground temperatures (MAGT). Additionally, these areas were the last part of the polygon to refreeze during the winter. However, increased active layer thickness was not

  1. Hydrodynamic controls on oxygen dynamics in a riverine salt wedge estuary, the Yarra River estuary, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, L. C.; Cook, P. L. M.; Teakle, I.; Hipsey, M. R.

    2014-04-01

    Oxygen depletion in coastal and estuarine waters has been increasing rapidly around the globe over the past several decades, leading to decline in water quality and ecological health. In this study we apply a numerical model to understand how salt wedge dynamics, changes in river flow and temperature together control oxygen depletion in a micro-tidal riverine estuary, the Yarra River estuary, Australia. Coupled physical-biogeochemical models have been previously applied to study how hydrodynamics impact upon seasonal hypoxia; however, their application to relatively shallow, narrow riverine estuaries with highly transient patterns of river inputs and sporadic periods of oxygen depletion has remained challenging, largely due to difficulty in accurately simulating salt wedge dynamics in morphologically complex areas. In this study we overcome this issue through application of a flexible mesh 3-D hydrodynamic-biogeochemical model in order to predict the extent of salt wedge intrusion and consequent patterns of oxygen depletion. The extent of the salt wedge responded quickly to the sporadic riverine flows, with the strength of stratification and vertical density gradients heavily influenced by morphological features corresponding to shallow points in regions of tight curvature ("horseshoe" bends). The spatiotemporal patterns of stratification led to the emergence of two "hot spots" of anoxia, the first downstream of a shallow region of tight curvature and the second downstream of a sill. Whilst these areas corresponded to regions of intense stratification, it was found that antecedent conditions related to the placement of the salt wedge played a major role in the recovery of anoxic regions following episodic high flow events. Furthermore, whilst a threshold salt wedge intrusion was a requirement for oxygen depletion, analysis of the results allowed us to quantify the effect of temperature in determining the overall severity and extent of hypoxia and anoxia. Climate

  2. Severe winter cooling during the Younger Dryas in northern Alaska - evidence from the stable isotope composition of a buried ice-wedge system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Hanno; Schirrmeister, Lutz; Yoshikawa, Kenji; Opel, Thomas; Wetterich, Sebastian; Hubberten, Hans-W.; Brown, Jerry

    2010-05-01

    such as pollen. This reconstruction is the first radiocarbon-dated centennial-scale stable water isotope record from permafrost at all. The Late Glacial winter climate reconstruction from Barrow ice wedges clearly demonstrates the existence of a Younger Dryas cold event, formerly believed to be reduced or absent in this area. Comparing the Barrow ice-wedge record to Greenland ice cores (such as N-GRIP), we observe similar and contemporaneous isotopic variations in the same order of magnitude, underpinning the climatic relevance of our ice wedge data. The Barrow ice-wedge stable isotope record additionally displays a gradual change of the atmospheric moisture source conditions during the Younger Dryas reflected in a shift of the d excess, potentially being associated with the successive opening of the Bering Strait.

  3. Stress intensity factors for surface and corner cracks emanating from a wedge-loaded hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, W.; Sutton, M. A.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    To assist analysis of riveted lap joints, stress intensity factors are determined for surface and corner cracks emanating from a wedge-loaded hole by using a 3-D weight function method in conjunction with a 3-D finite element method. A stress intensity factor equation for surface cracks is also developed to provide a closed-form solution. The equation covers commonly-encountered geometrical ranges and retains high accuracy over the entire range.

  4. Seismological evidence for a sub-volcanic arc mantle wedge beneath the Denali volcanic gap, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNamara, D.E.; Pasyanos, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    Arc volcanism in Alaska is strongly correlated with the 100 km depth contour of the western Aluetian Wadati-Benioff zone. Above the eastern portion of the Wadati-Benioff zone however, there is a distinct lack of volcanism (the Denali volcanic gap). We observe high Poisson's ratio values (0.29-0.33) over the entire length of the Alaskan subduction zone mantle wedge based on regional variations of Pn and Sn velocities. High Poisson's ratios at this depth (40-70 km), adjacent to the subducting slab, are attributed to melting of mantle-wedge peridotites, caused by fluids liberated from the subducting oceanic crust and sediments. Observations of high values of Poisson's ratio, beneath the Denali volcanic gap suggest that the mantle wedge contains melted material that is unable to reach the surface. We suggest that its inability to migrate through the overlying crust is due to increased compression in the crust at the northern apex of the curved Denali fault.

  5. Seismic reflection images of the accretionary wedge of Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, T.H.; Stoffa, P.L. ); McIntosh, K.; Silver, E.A. )

    1990-05-01

    The large-scale structure of modern accretionary wedges is known almost entirely from seismic reflection investigations using single or grids of two-dimensional profiles. The authors will report on the first three-dimensional seismic reflection data volume collected of a wedge. This data set covers a 9-km-wide {times} 22-km-long {times} 6-km-thick volume of the accretionary wedge just arcward of the Middle America Trench off Costa Rica. The three-dimensional processing has improved the imaging ability of the multichannel data, and the data volume allows mapping of structures from a few hundred meters to kilometers in size. These data illustrate the relationships between the basement, the wedge shape, and overlying slope sedimentary deposits. Reflections from within the wedge define the gross structural features and tectonic processes active along this particular convergent margin. So far, the analysis shows that the subdued basement relief (horst and graben structures seldom have relief of more than a few hundred meters off Costa Rica) does affect the larger scale through going structural features within the wedge. The distribution of mud volcanoes and amplitude anomalies associated with the large-scale wedge structures suggests that efficient fluid migration paths may extend from the top of the downgoing slab at the shelf edge out into the lower and middle slope region at a distance of 50-100 km. Offscraping of the uppermost (about 45 m) sediment occurs within 4 km of the trench, creating a small pile of sediments near the trench lower slope. Underplating of parts of the 400-m-thick subducted sedimentary section begins at a very shallow structural level, 4-10 km arcward of the trench. Volumetrically, the most important accretionary process is underplating.

  6. Aligning Optical Fibers by Means of Actuated MEMS Wedges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Brian; Ghodssi, Reza

    2007-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) of a proposed type would be designed and fabricated to effect lateral and vertical alignment of optical fibers with respect to optical, electro-optical, optoelectronic, and/or photonic devices on integrated circuit chips and similar monolithic device structures. A MEMS device of this type would consist of a pair of oppositely sloped alignment wedges attached to linear actuators that would translate the wedges in the plane of a substrate, causing an optical fiber in contact with the sloping wedge surfaces to undergo various displacements parallel and perpendicular to the plane. In making it possible to accurately align optical fibers individually during the packaging stages of fabrication of the affected devices, this MEMS device would also make it possible to relax tolerances in other stages of fabrication, thereby potentially reducing costs and increasing yields. In a typical system according to the proposal (see Figure 1), one or more pair(s) of alignment wedges would be positioned to create a V groove in which an optical fiber would rest. The fiber would be clamped at a suitable distance from the wedges to create a cantilever with a slight bend to push the free end of the fiber gently to the bottom of the V groove. The wedges would be translated in the substrate plane by amounts Dx1 and Dx2, respectively, which would be chosen to move the fiber parallel to the plane by a desired amount Dx and perpendicular to the plane by a desired amount Dy. The actuators used to translate the wedges could be variants of electrostatic or thermal actuators that are common in MEMS.

  7. Implications of Faulting Styles in the Outer Wedge of the Nankai Accretionary Prism, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kington, J. D.; Tobin, H. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Nankai Trough, Japan near Kumano Basin displays a well developed accretionary prism with a major out-of-sequence “megasplay” thrust separating the recently active outer wedge of the prism from the forearc basin deposits. While not in the seismogenic zone, this thrust is thought to play a key role in tsunamigenesis by transferring deeper coseismic slip to the seafloor. Understanding the development of this fault requires a detailed understanding of the kinematics and structure of the outer wedge of the accretionary prism. The outer wedge of the Nankai accretionary prism consists of an in-sequence series of landward-dipping thrusts that record two directions of shortening. Based on 3D reflection seismic, older thrusts and their associated folds strike ~225 degrees, almost exactly perpendicular to plate motion in the area, which has an azimuth of 314 (Zang, et al, 2002). The youngest thrusts, including the megasplay at the rear of the outer wedge, trend 240-245 degrees, subparallel to the margin in the area, which trends roughly 250. This suggests two possibilities: 1) the older thrusts formed during a period of relatively strong coupling with the subducting slab, perhaps due to highly irregular oceanic basement topography which has since been subducted, or 2) the trench margin had been previously indented by a subducted seamount and has since been rebuilding. In addition, two right lateral tear faults with offsets of approximately 1km cut the fold-thrust belt of the outer wedge. These faults cleanly offset the fold hinge of faults striking perpendicular to plate motion and interact with the oldest faults that strike parallel to the margin, implying that their timing is coincident with the change in shortening direction. Therefore, these tear faults may accommodate along-strike changes in the taper angle of the accretionary prism following the subduction of irregular basement topography. Significant normal faulting within the seismically imaged portion of the

  8. Hypersonic slender-wedge analysis with gradual change in angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. N.; Joshi, S. P.; Rodkiewicz, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    The behavior of a narrow cross-section wedge wing moving at a high Mach number and subjected to an angle of attack changing exponentially with time is investigated. This type of wedge wing is commonly employed as a lifting surface in hypersonic vehicles. The time history of wall shear, heat transfer, displacement thickness, and viscous induced pressure are determined. Results show that for the same change in angle of attack, the flow attains the final steady state much faster when the change is exponential than when the change is made impulsively. In addition, the unsteady character of the flow is primarily confined to the initial stages of the change in the angle of attack.

  9. Estimating basal friction in accretionary wedges from the geometry and spacing of frontal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, Bertram; Koyi, Hemin A.

    2001-12-01

    Elastic theory applied to the deformation in accretionary wedges is used to calculate the condition for slip along an active frontal fault and the basal décollement. The equations for calculating the stresses can be solved for the coefficient of basal friction in the situation of the formation of a new frontal thrust fault. This allows us to calculate the efficient coefficient of basal friction, which includes the weakening effect of pore-fluid pressure, from geometric parameters and material properties only. The geometric parameters, like fault dip and layer thickness, can be derived from high-resolution seismic cross-sections. Application of our analysis to the Makran and the Nankai accretionary wedge allows us to estimate the upper limit of the effective coefficient of basal friction, μb≈0.16 and μb≈0.2, in these two areas respectively.

  10. Transforming High School Classrooms with Free/Open Source Software: "It's Time for an Open Source Software Revolution"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaffman, Jay

    2008-01-01

    Free/Open Source Software (FOSS) applications meet many of the software needs of high school science classrooms. In spite of the availability and quality of FOSS tools, they remain unknown to many teachers and utilized by fewer still. In a world where most software has restrictions on copying and use, FOSS is an anomaly, free to use and to…