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Sample records for open wedge high

  1. Effect of Wedge Insertion Angle on Posterior Tibial Slope in Medial Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Matsumoto, Kazu; Ogawa, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Kentaro; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background: Medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a well-established surgery for medial compartment knee osteoarthritis (OA) wherein the lower extremity is realigned to shift the load distribution from the medial compartment of the knee to the lateral compartment. However, this surgery is known to affect the posterior tibial slope angle (PTSA), which could lead to abnormal knee kinematics and instability, and eventually to knee OA. Although PTSA control is as important as coronal realignment, few appropriate measurements for this parameter have been reported. The placement of a wedge spacer might have an effect on PTSA. Purpose: To elucidate the relationship between the PTSA and the direction of insertion of a wedge spacer. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: This study assessed 43 knees from 34 patients who underwent medial opening wedge HTO for knee OA. Pre- and postoperative lateral radiographs of the knee as well as postoperative computed tomography scans were performed to evaluate the relationship among PTSA, wedge insertion angle (WIA), and opening gap ratio (distance of the anterior opening gap/distance of the posterior opening gap at the osteotomy site). Results: The PTSA significantly increased from 9.0° ± 2.8° preoperatively to 13.2° ± 4.1° postoperatively (P < .001), resulting in a mean ΔPTSA of 4.7° ± 4.5°. The mean opening gap ratio was 0.86 ± 0.11, and the mean WIA was 25.9° ± 8.4°. The WIA and opening gap ratio were both highly correlated with ΔPTSA (r = 0.71 and 0.72, respectively), implying that a smaller WIA or smaller gap ratio leads to less increase in posterior slope. Conclusion: The direction of wedge insertion is highly correlated with PTSA increase, which suggests that the PTSA can be controlled for by adjusting the direction of wedge insertion during surgery. Clinical Relevance: Study results suggest that it is possible to adjust the PTSA by controlling the WIA during surgery. Proper

  2. Opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy: a seven - to twelve-year study

    PubMed Central

    PIPINO, GENNARO; INDELLI, PIER FRANCESCO; TIGANI, DOMENICO; MAFFEI, GIUSEPPE; VACCARISI, DAVIDE

    2016-01-01

    Purpose medial opening-wedge osteotomy is a widely performed procedure used to treat moderate isolated medial knee osteoarthritis. Historically, the literature has contained reports showing satisfactory mid-term results when accurate patient selection and precise surgical techniques were applied. This study was conducted to investigate the clinical and radiographic seven- to twelve-year results of opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy in a consecutive series of patients affected by varus knee malalignment with isolated medial compartment degenerative joint disease. Methods we reviewed a case series of 147 medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomies at an average follow-up of 9.5 years. Endpoints for evaluation included the reporting of adverse effects, radiographic evidence of bone union, radiographic changes in the correction angle during union, and clinical and functional final outcomes. Results good or excellent results were obtained in 94% of the cases: the patients reported no major complications related to the opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy surgical technique, bone graft resorption, implant choice or postoperative rehabilitation protocol. At final follow-up, the average hip-knee angle was 4° of valgus without major loss of correction during the healing process. A statistically significant change in the patellar height was detected postoperatively, with a trend towards patella infera. Conclusions medial opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy is still a reliable method for correcting varus deformity while producing stable fixation, thus allowing satisfactory stability, adequate bone healing and satisfactory mid- to long-term results. Level of evidence Level IV, therapeutic cases series. PMID:27386441

  3. Imageless Navigation Versus Conventional Open Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy: A Meta-Analysis of Comparative Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Yoon, Jung-Ro; Choi, Gi Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To summarize and compare radiological and clinical outcomes of open wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) using imageless computer-assisted navigation with conventional HTO. Methods A literature search of online register databases was conducted. The risk ratio (RR) of radiological outliers and mean differences in clinical outcomes were compared between navigated and conventional HTOs. Radiological results were evaluated by subgroup analyses according to the study period (concurrent/consecutive) and the use of locking fixation device. Results Seven comparative studies with a total sample size of 406 knees were included in this review. Radiographically, the mechanical axis [MA] was within the acceptable range (0°–6°) in 83.7% of the navigation HTO group, showing significant difference from 62.1% of the conventional HTO group. Clinically, despite the forest plot demonstrating a general trend of favoring the navigation system, there were not sufficient studies to determine statistical significance in the meta-analysis. None of the subgroup analyses demonstrated significant differences in the RR of MA outliers. Conclusions The present meta-analysis indicates that the use of navigation in open wedge HTO improves the precision of mechanical alignment by decreasing the incidence of outliers; however, the clinical benefit is not conclusive. Additionally, none of the subgroup analyses demonstrated significant difference in the RR of MA outliers. PMID:26955609

  4. Mid-term outcome of opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy for varus arthritic knees.

    PubMed

    Haviv, Barak; Bronak, Shlomo; Thein, Ran; Kidron, Amos; Thein, Rafael

    2012-02-01

    Gonarthrosis in the relatively young and active population causes major daily discomfort and disability. If the arthritic process is mainly limited to the medial compartment, the axis of a varus knee can be realigned laterally with high tibial osteotomy to unload the medial compartment and allow some cartilage regeneration and pain relief. This study describes the outcomes of patients who underwent opening-wedge high tibial osteotomies using Puddu plate (Arthrex, Naples, Florida) fixation. Eighteen patients (22 knees) with genu varum and medial compartment osteoarthritis were followed-up for an average of 6.3±2.3 years after high tibial osteotomy with Puddu plate fixation and iliac crest allograft. Clinical outcome was assessed by the Oxford Knee Score and subjective satisfaction rating. Pre- and postoperative radiographs were evaluated for tibiofemoral angle, Insall-Salvati index, and Kellgren-Lawrence Grading Scale for osteoarthritis. Mean patient age at surgery was 44±13.7 years, and mean body mass index was 29.1±4.7 kg/m(2). At last follow-up, mean Oxford Knee Score improved from 22.4±13.5 to 37.2±13.7 (P=.002). Average subjective satisfaction rate at last follow-up was 8±3. The measured tibiofemoral angle was corrected to an average genu valgum of 3.3°±4.8° (P=.001). No patient showed severe postoperative osteoarthritis (ie, Kellgren-Lawrence grade 4) at last follow-up. All radiographs showed full incorporation of the bone grafts. At the end of the study, 2 patients underwent total knee replacement. Opening-wedge high tibial valgus osteotomy with Puddu plate fixation can be a reliable procedure for the treatment of medial-compartment osteoarthritis of the knee associated with varus deformity. PMID:22310405

  5. Finite element analysis of Puddu and Tomofix plate fixation for open wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Raja Izaham, Raja Mohd Aizat; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq; Abdul Rashid, Abdul Halim; Hossain, Md Golam; Kamarul, T

    2012-06-01

    The use of open wedge high tibial osteotomy (HTO) to correct varus deformity of the knee is well established. However, the stability of the various implants used in this procedure has not been previously demonstrated. In this study, the two most common types of plates were analysed (1) the Puddu plates that use the dynamic compression plate (DCP) concept, and (2) the Tomofix plate that uses the locking compression plate (LCP) concept. Three dimensional model of the tibia was reconstructed from computed tomography images obtained from the Medical Implant Technology Group datasets. Osteotomy and fixation models were simulated through computational processing. Simulated loading was applied at 60:40 ratios on the medial:lateral aspect during single limb stance. The model was fixed distally in all degrees of freedom. Simulated data generated from the micromotions, displacement and, implant stress were captured. At the prescribed loads, a higher displacement of 3.25 mm was observed for the Puddu plate model (p<0.001). Coincidentally the amount of stresses subjected to this plate, 24.7 MPa, was also significantly lower (p<0.001). There was significant negative correlation (p<0.001) between implant stresses to that of the amount of fracture displacement which signifies a less stable fixation using Puddu plates. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that the Tomofix plate produces superior stability for bony fixation in HTO procedures. PMID:22204773

  6. The validity of the classification for lateral hinge fractures in open wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, R; Komatsu, N; Murao, T; Okamoto, Y; Nakamura, S; Fujita, K; Nishimura, H; Katsuki, Y

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to validate the efficacy of Takeuchi classification for lateral hinge fractures (LHFs) in open wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO). In all 74 osteoarthritic knees (58 females, 16 males; mean age 62.9 years, standard deviation 7.5, 42 to 77) were treated with OWHTO using a TomoFix plate. The knees were divided into non-fracture (59 knees) and LHF (15 knees) groups, and the LHF group was further divided into Takeuchi types I, II, and III (seven, two, and six knees, respectively). The outcomes were assessed pre-operatively and one year after OWHTO. Pre-operative characteristics (age, gender and body mass index) showed no significant difference between the two groups. The mean Japanese Orthopaedic Association score was significantly improved one year after operation regardless of the presence or absence of LHF (p = 0.0015, p < 0.001, respectively). However, six of seven type I cases had no LHF-related complications; both type II cases had delayed union; and of six type III cases, two had delayed union with correction loss and one had overcorrection. These results suggest that Takeuchi type II and III LHFs are structurally unstable compared with type I. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B:1226-31. PMID:26330589

  7. Assessing the local mechanical environment in medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy using finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Pauchard, Yves; Ivanov, Todor G; McErlain, David D; Milner, Jaques S; Giffin, J Robert; Birmingham, Trevor B; Holdsworth, David W

    2015-03-01

    High-tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a surgical technique aimed at shifting load away from one tibiofemoral compartment, in order the reduce pain and progression of osteoarthritis (OA). Various implants have been designed to stabilize the osteotomy and previous studies have been focused on determining primary stability (a global measure) that these designs provide. It has been shown that the local mechanical environment, characterized by bone strains and segment micromotion, is important in understanding healing and these data are not currently available. Finite element (FE) modeling was utilized to assess the local mechanical environment provided by three different fixation plate designs: short plate with spacer, long plate with spacer and long plate without spacer. Image-based FE models of the knee were constructed from healthy individuals (N = 5) with normal knee alignment. An HTO gap was virtually added without changing the knee alignment and HTO implants were inserted. Subsequently, the local mechanical environment, defined by bone compressive strain and wedge micromotion, was assessed. Furthermore, implant stresses were calculated. Values were computed under vertical compression in zero-degree knee extension with loads set at 1 and 2 times the subject-specific body weight (1 BW, 2 BW). All studied HTO implant designs provide an environment for successful healing at 1 BW and 2 BW loading. Implant von Mises stresses (99th percentile) were below 60 MPa in all experiments, below the material yield strength and significantly lower in long spacer plates. Volume fraction of high compressive strain ( > 3000 microstrain) was below 5% in all experiments and no significant difference between implants was detected. Maximum vertical micromotion between bone segments was below 200 μm in all experiments and significantly larger in the implant without a tooth. Differences between plate designs generally became apparent only at 2 BW loading. Results suggest that with

  8. Navigated open-wedge high tibial osteotomy: advantages and disadvantages compared to the conventional technique in a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Hankemeier, S; Hufner, T; Wang, G; Kendoff, D; Zeichen, J; Zheng, G; Krettek, C

    2006-10-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) is an established therapy for the treatment of symptomatic varus malaligned knees. A main reason for disappointing clinical results after HTO is the under- and overcorrection of the mechanical axis due to insufficient intraoperative visualisation. Twenty legs of fresh human cadaver were randomly assigned to navigated open-wedge HTO (n=10) or conventional HTO using the cable method (n=10). Regardless of the pre-existing alignment, the aim of all operations was to align the mechanical axis to pass through 80% of the tibial plateau (beginning with 0% at the medial edge of the tibial plateau and ending with 100% at the lateral edge). This overcorrection was chosen to ensure a sufficient amount of correction. Thus, the medial proximal tibia angle (MPTA) increased by 9.1+/-2.9 degrees (range 5.2 degrees -12.3 degrees ) on the average after navigated HTO and by 8.9+/-2.9 degrees (range 4.7 degrees -12.6 degrees ) after conventional HTO. After stabilization with a fixed angle implant, the alignment was measured by CT. After navigated HTO, the mechanical axis passed the tibial plateau through 79.7% (range 75.5-85.8%). In contrast, after conventional HTO, the average intersection of the mechanical axis was at 72.1% (range 60.4-82.4%) (P=0.020). Additionally, the variability of the mean corrections was significantly lower in the navigated group (3.3% vs. 7.2%, P=0.012). Total fluoroscopic radiation time was significantly lower in the navigated group (P=0.038) whereas the mean dose area product was not significantly different (P=0.231). The time of the operative procedure was 23 min shorter after conventional HTO (P<0.001). Navigation systems provide intraoperative 3-dimensional real time control of the frontal, sagittal, and transverse axis and may increase the accuracy of open-wedge HTO. Future studies have to analyse the clinical effects of navigation on corrective osteotomies. PMID:16501952

  9. Is Bone Grafting Necessary in Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy? A Meta-Analysis of Radiological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jae Hwi; Kim, Hyun Jung; Song, Jae Gwang; Yang, Jae Hyuk; Bhandare, Nikhl N; Fernandez, Aldrich Raymund; Park, Hyung Jun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Bone grafting in opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) is still controversial. The purpose of this study is to compare the radiological outcomes of OWHTO with bone graft (autogenous, allogenous, and synthetic bone graft) and those without bone graft. Materials and Methods PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Register of Studies databases were searched using specific inclusion and exclusion criteria for radiological studies involving OWHTO with bone graft and without bone graft groups. All reported delayed union, nonunion and correction loss were analyzed. Data were searched from the time period of January 2000 through July 2014. In addition, a modified Coleman methodology score (CMS) system was used to assess the methodological quality of the included studies. Results Twenty-five studies with a mean CMS value of 77 (range, 61 to 85 score) were included. In total, 1,841 patients underwent OWHTO using 4 different procedures for bone graft: autobone graft (n=352), allobone graft (n=547), synthetic bone graft (n=541) and no bone graft (n=401). There was a similar tendency for delayed union, nonunion and correction loss rate among the osteotomy space filling methods. Conclusions The meta-analysis showed there was a similar tendency for radiological union and correction maintenance among patients undergoing OWHTO regardless of the type of bone in all of the studies. However, the currently available evidence is not sufficient to strongly support the superiority of OWHTO with bone graft to OWHTO without bone graft. PMID:26675553

  10. A predictive factor for acquiring an ideal lower limb realignment after opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Bito, Haruhiko; Takeuchi, Ryohei; Kumagai, Ken; Aratake, Masato; Saito, Izumi; Hayashi, Riku; Sasaki, Yohei; Aota, Yoichi; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2009-04-01

    Obtaining a correct postoperative limb alignment is an important factor in achieving a successful clinical outcome after an opening-wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO). To better predict some of the aspects that impact upon the clinical outcomes following this procedure, including postoperative correction loss and over correction, we examined the changes in the frontal plane of the lower limb in a cohort of patients who had undergone OWHTO using radiography. Forty-two knees from 33 patients (23 cases of osteoarthritis and 10 of osteonecrosis) underwent a valgus realignment OWHTO procedure and were radiographically assessed for changes that occurred pre- and post-surgery. The mean femorotibial angle (FTA) was found to be 182.1 +/- 2.0 degrees (12 +/- 2.0 anatomical varus angulation) preoperatively and 169.6 +/- 2.4 degrees (10.4 +/- 2.4 anatomical valgus angulation) postoperatively. These measurements thus revealed significant changes in the weight bearing line ratio (WBL), femoral axis angle (FA), tibial axis angle (TA), tibia plateau angle (TP), tibia vara angle (TV) and talar tilt angle (TT) following OWHTO. In contrast, no significant change was found in the weight bearing line angle (WBLA) after these treatments. To assess the relationship between the correction angle and these indexes, 42 knees were divided into the following three groups according to the postoperative FTA; a normal correction group (168 degrees < or = FTA < or = 172 degrees ), an over-correction group (FTA < 168 degrees ), and an under-correction group (FTA > 172 degrees ). There were significant differences in the delta angle [DA; calculated as (pre FTA - post FTA) - (pre TV - post TV)] among each group of patients. Our results thus indicate a negative correlation between the DA and preoperative TA (R(2) = 0.148, p < 0.05). Hence, given that the correction errors in our patients appear to negatively correlate with the preoperative TA, postoperative malalignments are likely to be predictable

  11. Opening- and Closing-Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Mitchell, Justin J.; Liechti, Daniel J.; Moatshe, Gilbert; Menge, Travis J.; Dean, Chase S.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lateral compartment osteoarthritis of the knee can be a challenging pathology in the younger, active population due to limited treatment options and high patient expectations. Distal femoral osteotomy (DFO) has been reported to be a potential treatment option. Purpose: To perform a systematic review on the survival, outcomes, and complications of DFO for treatment of genu valgum with concomitant lateral compartment osteoarthritis of the knee. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was performed using the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials, PubMed, and MEDLINE from 1980 to present. Inclusion criteria were as follows: outcomes of opening- and closing-wedge DFOs performed for treatment of genu valgum with concomitant lateral compartment osteoarthritis of the knee, English language, minimum 2-year follow-up, and human studies. Data abstracted from the selected studies included type of osteotomy (opening vs closing), survival rate, patient-reported and radiographic outcomes, and complications. Results: Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria and were considered for the review. A total of 9 closing-wedge and 5 opening-wedge DFO studies were included. All were retrospective studies and reported good to excellent patient-reported outcomes after DFO. Survival decreased with increasing time from surgery, with 1 study reporting a 100% survival rate at 6.5 years, compared with 21.5% at 20 years in another study. A low rate of complications was reported throughout the review. Conclusion: Highly heterogeneous literature exists for both opening- and closing-wedge DFOs for the treatment of isolated lateral compartment osteoarthritis with valgus malalignment. A mean survival rate of 80% at 10-year follow-up was reported, supporting that this procedure can be a viable treatment option to delay or reduce the need for joint arthroplasty. A low

  12. Open-Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy Using a Protective Cutting System: Technical Advancement for the Accuracy of the Osteotomy and Avoiding Intraoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Seuk; Lee, Myung Chul; Kang, Seo Goo; Elazab, Ashraf; Oh, Won Seok

    2016-01-01

    Open-wedge high tibial osteotomy for medial unicompartmental arthritis of the knee joint is a successful treatment option but is associated with potential intraoperative complications such as tibial plateau fracture, dislocation of the osteotomy hinge, under- or over-correction of the posterior slope, and neurovascular injury. Therefore we devised a protective cutting system and describe our method for the prevention of these complications. The potential advantages of this system are protection of the posterior neurovascular structures using a curved protector, bone cutting along the natural tibial slope using a superior surface aligning with the natural tibial slope, and complete 1-plane sawing of the posterior wall before the lateral hinge. PMID:27073780

  13. Opening wedge osteotomies for correction of hallux valgus: a review of wedge plate fixation.

    PubMed

    Smith, W Bret; Hyer, Christopher F; DeCarbo, William T; Berlet, Gregory C; Lee, Thomas H

    2009-12-01

    Osteotomy of the proximal metatarsal for the correction of moderate to severe hallux valgus deformity is commonly performed. The purpose of this study is to review the early results of a technique for the correction of hallux valgus, an opening wedge osteotomy of the proximal first metatarsal with opening wedge plate fixation. A review was performed of the results of 47 patients (49 feet) who underwent correction of hallux valgus with proximal metatarsal opening wedge osteotomy. All osteotomies were secured with plate fixation on the medial side. Evaluation consisted of preoperative and postoperative radiographic as well as clinical evaluations. Mean corrections of 7 degrees were achieved for the 1-2 intermetatarsal angles. Fourteen complications occurred, 6 of which involved mild hardware irritation and did not affect outcome. Four nonunions or delayed unions were identified. The authors find the opening wedge osteotomy of the proximal first metatarsal to be a technically straightforward procedure for correcting moderate to severe hallux valgus. The correction obtained is comparable to other described techniques. PMID:20400425

  14. Flow rate limitation in open wedge channel under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, YueXing; Chen, XiaoQian; Huang, YiYong

    2013-08-01

    A study of flow rate limitation in an open wedge channel is reported in this paper. Under microgravity condition, the flow is controlled by the convection and the viscosity in the channel as well as the curvature of the liquid free surface. A maximum flow rate is achieved when the curvature cannot balance the pressure difference leading to a collapse of the free surface. A 1-dimensional theoretical model is used to predict the critical flow rate and calculate the shape of the free surface. Computational Fluid Dynamics tool is also used to simulate the phenomenon. Results show that the 1-dimensional model overestimates the critical flow rate because extra pressure loss is not included in the governing equation. Good agreement is found in 3-dimensional simulation results. Parametric study with different wedge angles and channel lengths show that the critical flow rate increases with increasing the cross section area; and decreases with increasing the channel length. The work in this paper can help understand the surface collapsing without gravity and for the design in propellant management devices in satellite tanks.

  15. High-energy rate forgings of wedges :

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Thomas Bither; Everhart, Wesley; Switzner, Nathan T; Balch, Dorian K.; San Marchi, Christopher W.

    2014-05-01

    The wedge geometry is a simple geometry for establishing a relatively constant gradient of strain in a forged part. The geometry is used to establish gradients in microstructure and strength as a function of strain, forging temperature, and quenching time after forging. This geometry has previously been used to benchmark predictions of strength and recrystallization using Sandias materials model for type 304L austenitic stainless steel. In this report, the processing conditions, in particular the times to forge and quench the forged parts, are summarized based on information recorded during forging on June 18, 2013 of the so-called wedge geometry from type 316L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn austenitic stainless steels.

  16. High tibial osteotomy using polycaprolactone-tricalcium phosphate polymer wedge in a micro pig model.

    PubMed

    Lim, H-C; Bae, J-H; Song, H-R; Teoh, S H; Kim, H-K; Kum, D-H

    2011-01-01

    Medial open-wedge high tibial osteotomy has been gaining popularity in recent years, but adequate supporting material is required in the osteotomy gap for early weight-bearing and rapid union. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the implantation of a polycaprolactone-tricalcium phosphate composite scaffold wedge would enhance healing of the osteotomy in a micro pig model. We carried out open-wedge high tibial osteotomies in 12 micro pigs aged from 12 to 16 months. A scaffold wedge was inserted into six of the osteotomies while the other six were left open. Bone healing was evaluated after three and six months using plain radiographs, CT scans, measurement of the bone mineral density and histological examination. Complete bone union was obtained at six months in both groups. There was no collapse at the osteotomy site, loss of correction or failure of fixation in either group. Staining with haematoxylin and eosin demonstrated that there was infiltration of new bone tissue into the macropores and along the periphery of the implanted scaffold in the scaffold group. The CT scans and measurement of the bone mineral density showed that at six months specimens in the scaffold group had a higher bone mineral density than in the control group, although the implantation of the polycaprolactone-tricalcium phosphate composite scaffold wedge did not enhance healing of the osteotomy. PMID:21196556

  17. 50 CFR Figure 17 to Part 223 - Boone Wedge Cut Escape Opening

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Boone Wedge Cut Escape Opening 17 Figure 17 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES...

  18. 50 CFR Figure 17 to Part 223 - Boone Wedge Cut Escape Opening

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Boone Wedge Cut Escape Opening 17 Figure 17 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES...

  19. Proximal Opening Wedge Osteotomy Provides Satisfactory Midterm Results With a Low Complication Rate.

    PubMed

    Oravakangas, Rami; Leppilahti, Juhana; Laine, Vesa; Niinimäki, Tuukka

    2016-01-01

    Hallux valgus is one of the most common foot deformities. Proximal opening wedge osteotomy is used for the treatment of moderate and severe hallux valgus with metatarsus primus varus. However, hypermobility of the first tarsometatarsal joint can compromise the results of the operation, and a paucity of midterm results are available regarding proximal open wedge osteotomy surgery. The aim of the present study was to assess the midterm results of proximal open wedge osteotomy in a consecutive series of patients with severe hallux valgus. Thirty-one consecutive adult patients (35 feet) with severe hallux valgus underwent proximal open wedge osteotomy. Twenty patients (35.5%) and 23 feet (34.3%) were available for the final follow-up examination. The mean follow-up duration was 5.8 (range 4.6 to 7.0) years. The radiologic measurements and American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hallux-metatarsophalangeal-interphalangeal scores were recorded pre- and postoperatively, and subjective questionnaires were completed and foot scan analyses performed at the end of the follow-up period. The mean hallux valgus angle decreased from 38° to 23°, and the mean intermetatarsal angle correction decreased from 17° to 10°. The mean improvement in the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hallux metatarsophalangeal-interphalangeal score increased from 52 to 84. Two feet (5.7%) required repeat surgery because of recurrent hallux valgus. No nonunions were identified. Proximal open wedge osteotomy provided satisfactory midterm results in the treatment of severe hallux valgus, with a low complication rate. The potential instability of the first tarsometatarsal joint does not seem to jeopardize the midterm results of the operation. PMID:26905255

  20. The new "dual osteotomy": combined open wedge and tibial tuberosity anteriorisation osteotomies.

    PubMed

    Abdel Megied, Wael Samir; Mahran, Mahmoud A; Thakeb, Mootaz F; Abouelela, Amr A K H; Elbatrawy, Yasser

    2010-02-01

    The high frequency with which medial compartment osteoarthritis is associated with patellofemoral osteoarthritis makes the addition of tibial tuberosity anteriorisation to high tibial osteotomy an appealing solution, despite the discouraging previously reported long-term results when tubercle anteriorisation was combined with a Coventry closed wedge technique. We conducted a prospective study of a new osteotomy combination: "the dual osteotomy". An open wedge high tibial osteotomy was combined with 1- to 1.5-cm Maquet-like tibial tuberosity anteriorisation. Thirty-four knees in 30 patients underwent surgery, including ten knees in nine male patients and 24 knees in 21 female patients with a mean age of 45 years (age range 34-58 years). All patients had varus medial compartment osteoarthritis and patellofemoral osteoarthritis with preoperative anatomical tibiofemoral angle exceeding 5 degrees . Twenty-four months after surgery, final evaluation detected improvement in the Knee Society clinical rating system function score from a mean of 61.3 (range 30-80) preoperatively to a mean of 87.3 (range 50-100) postoperatively and in the knee pain score from 27.3 (range 10-30) to 47 (range 30-50) postoperatively. Based on the rating system, at final follow-up, 70% of patients experienced no pain, 13% had mild or occasional pain, 10% had pain on stairs only, and 7% had pain during walking and on stairs. Anatomical tibiofemoral angles from 0 to 10 degrees valgus were achieved in 91% of operated knees, and union was achieved in all cases within six to twelve weeks after surgery. The dual osteotomy was effective in the short term in cases of medial compartment osteoarthritis associated with patellofemoral osteoarthritis. PMID:19998035

  1. Heat transfer from an open-wedge cavity to a symmetrically impinging slot air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Mostafa; Mazraeh, Adel Etefagh

    2014-08-01

    Heat transfer from an open-wedge cavity to a symmetrically impinging slot air jet is investigated at the present study. The effect of the cavity angle was mainly examined on the Nusselt number distribution. Based on the results, heat transfer was generally poor at the vicinity of the apex, rising to form a maximum at the impingement and then followed by a moderate decline at further distances. The region of maximum heat transfer on the surfaces shifted outward the cavity as the cavity angle was decreased. Also, average Nusselt number over an effective length of the surface remained almost constant and independent of the cavity angle for a specified jet Reynolds number and nozzle-to-apex spacing.

  2. Medial proximal tibial angle after medial opening wedge HTO: A retrospective diagnostic test study

    PubMed Central

    Pornrattanamaneewong, Chaturong; Narkbunnam, Rapeepat; Chareancholvanich, Keerati

    2012-01-01

    Background: Medial proximal tibial angle (MPTA) is the commonly used angle, which is simply measured from the knee radiographs. It can determine the correction angle in medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (MOWHTO). The hypothesis of our study is that post-osteotomy MPTA can predict the change in correction angle, and we aimed to determine the optimal MPTA with which to prevent recurrent varus deformity after MOWHTO. Materials and Methods: Between January 2002 and April 2010, radiographs of 59 patients, who underwent 71 MOWHTOs using the locking-compression osteotomy plates without bone grafts, were evaluated for the change of the MPTA. The MPTA was measured preoperatively and one and twelve months postoperatively. The changes of MPTA between one and twelve months were classified into valgus, stable, and varus change. The predicting factors were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Bonferroni multiple comparisons. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to find out the cut off point for preventing the recurrent varus deformity. Results: The overall preoperative, and one and twelve month postoperative MPTA values were 84.4 ± 2.4°, 97.2 ± 4.1°, and 96.3 ± 3.6°, respectively. Between one and twelve months, 39 knees displayed reduced varus change (–2.8 ± 2.1°), 18 knees displayed no change, and 14 knees displayed a greater valgus change (+2.9 ± 2.1°). The best factor for predicting these changes was the one month MPTA value (P = 0.006). By using the ROC curve, a one month MPTA of 95° was analyzed as the cut off point for preventing the recurrent varus deformity. With MPTA ≥95°, 92.3% of the osteotomies exhibited stable or varus change and 7.7% exhibited valgus change. However, with MPTA <95°, 47.4% exhibited stable or varus change and 52.6% exhibited valgus change (P < 0.001, odds ratio = 13.3). Conclusion: The postoperative MPTA can be used to predict the change in correction angle and an MPTA of at least 95° is

  3. Predicting translational deformity following opening-wedge osteotomy for lower limb realignment.

    PubMed

    Barksfield, Richard C; Monsell, Fergal P

    2015-11-01

    An opening-wedge osteotomy is well recognised for the management of limb deformity and requires an understanding of the principles of geometry. Translation at the osteotomy is needed when the osteotomy is performed away from the centre of rotation of angulation (CORA), but the amount of translation varies with the distance from the CORA. This translation enables proximal and distal axes on either side of the proposed osteotomy to realign. We have developed two experimental models to establish whether the amount of translation required (based on the translation deformity created) can be predicted based upon simple trigonometry. A predictive algorithm was derived where translational deformity was predicted as 2(tan α × d), where α represents 50 % of the desired angular correction, and d is the distance of the desired osteotomy site from the CORA. A simulated model was developed using TraumaCad online digital software suite (Brainlab AG, Germany). Osteotomies were simulated in the distal femur, proximal tibia and distal tibia for nine sets of lower limb scanograms at incremental distances from the CORA and the resulting translational deformity recorded. There was strong correlation between the distance of the osteotomy from the CORA and simulated translation deformity for distal femoral deformities (correlation coefficient 0.99, p < 0.0001), proximal tibial deformities (correlation coefficient 0.93-0.99, p < 0.0001) and distal tibial deformities (correlation coefficient 0.99, p < 0.0001). There was excellent agreement between the predictive algorithm and simulated translational deformity for all nine simulations (correlation coefficient 0.93-0.99, p < 0.0001). Translational deformity following corrective osteotomy for lower limb deformity can be anticipated and predicted based upon the angular correction and the distance between the planned osteotomy site and the CORA. PMID:26395502

  4. Dehydration of chlorite explains anomalously high electrical conductivity in the mantle wedges.

    PubMed

    Manthilake, Geeth; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Novella, Davide; Mookherjee, Mainak; Andrault, Denis

    2016-05-01

    Mantle wedge regions in subduction zone settings show anomalously high electrical conductivity (~1 S/m) that has often been attributed to the presence of aqueous fluids released by slab dehydration. Laboratory-based measurements of the electrical conductivity of hydrous phases and aqueous fluids are significantly lower and cannot readily explain the geophysically observed anomalously high electrical conductivity. The released aqueous fluid also rehydrates the mantle wedge and stabilizes a suite of hydrous phases, including serpentine and chlorite. In this present study, we have measured the electrical conductivity of a natural chlorite at pressures and temperatures relevant for the subduction zone setting. In our experiment, we observe two distinct conductivity enhancements when chlorite is heated to temperatures beyond its thermodynamic stability field. The initial increase in electrical conductivity to ~3 × 10(-3) S/m can be attributed to chlorite dehydration and the release of aqueous fluids. This is followed by a unique, subsequent enhancement of electrical conductivity of up to 7 × 10(-1) S/m. This is related to the growth of an interconnected network of a highly conductive and chemically impure magnetite mineral phase. Thus, the dehydration of chlorite and associated processes are likely to be crucial in explaining the anomalously high electrical conductivity observed in mantle wedges. Chlorite dehydration in the mantle wedge provides an additional source of aqueous fluid above the slab and could also be responsible for the fixed depth (120 ± 40 km) of melting at the top of the subducting slab beneath the subduction-related volcanic arc front. PMID:27386526

  5. Dehydration of chlorite explains anomalously high electrical conductivity in the mantle wedges

    PubMed Central

    Manthilake, Geeth; Bolfan-Casanova, Nathalie; Novella, Davide; Mookherjee, Mainak; Andrault, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Mantle wedge regions in subduction zone settings show anomalously high electrical conductivity (~1 S/m) that has often been attributed to the presence of aqueous fluids released by slab dehydration. Laboratory-based measurements of the electrical conductivity of hydrous phases and aqueous fluids are significantly lower and cannot readily explain the geophysically observed anomalously high electrical conductivity. The released aqueous fluid also rehydrates the mantle wedge and stabilizes a suite of hydrous phases, including serpentine and chlorite. In this present study, we have measured the electrical conductivity of a natural chlorite at pressures and temperatures relevant for the subduction zone setting. In our experiment, we observe two distinct conductivity enhancements when chlorite is heated to temperatures beyond its thermodynamic stability field. The initial increase in electrical conductivity to ~3 × 10−3 S/m can be attributed to chlorite dehydration and the release of aqueous fluids. This is followed by a unique, subsequent enhancement of electrical conductivity of up to 7 × 10−1 S/m. This is related to the growth of an interconnected network of a highly conductive and chemically impure magnetite mineral phase. Thus, the dehydration of chlorite and associated processes are likely to be crucial in explaining the anomalously high electrical conductivity observed in mantle wedges. Chlorite dehydration in the mantle wedge provides an additional source of aqueous fluid above the slab and could also be responsible for the fixed depth (120 ± 40 km) of melting at the top of the subducting slab beneath the subduction-related volcanic arc front. PMID:27386526

  6. Monte Carlo Simulation of a 6 MV X-Ray Beam for Open and Wedge Radiation Fields, Using GATE Code

    PubMed Central

    Bahreyni-Toosi, Mohammad-Taghi; Nasseri, Shahrokh; Momennezhad, Mahdi; Hasanabadi, Fatemeh; Gholamhosseinian, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a control software system, based on Monte Carlo simulation, and calculations of dosimetric parameters of standard and wedge radiation fields, using a Monte Carlo method. GATE version 6.1 (OpenGATE Collaboration), was used to simulate a compact 6 MV linear accelerator system. In order to accelerate the calculations, the phase-space technique and cluster computing (Condor version 7.2.4, Condor Team, University of Wisconsin–Madison) were used. Dosimetric parameters used in treatment planning systems for the standard and wedge radiation fields (10 cm × 10 cm to 30 cm × 30 cm and a 60° wedge), including the percentage depth dose and dose profiles, were measured by both computational and experimental methods. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results with 3%/3 mm criteria. Gamma index was applied to compare calculated and measured results. Almost all calculated data points have satisfied gamma index criteria of 3% to 3 mm. Based on the good agreement between calculated and measured results obtained for various radiation fields in this study, GATE may be used as a useful tool for quality control or pretreatment verification procedures in radiotherapy. PMID:25426430

  7. PRE-OPERATIVE PLANNING AND SURGICAL TECHNIQUE OF THE OPEN WEDGE SUPRACONDYLAR OSTEOTOMY FOR CORRECTION OF VALGUS KNEE AND FIXATION WITH A FIXED-ANGLE IMPLANT

    PubMed Central

    Paccola, Cleber Antonio Jansen

    2015-01-01

    The step-by-step preoperative planning for supracondylar opening wedge osteotomy of the femur for precise correction of the load axis of the lower limb using a fixed-angle implant (95° AO blade plate) is presented. The surgical technique and the use of a bone graft from the same site for filling in the defect are also presented. PMID:27026976

  8. Optimal clinical implementation of the Siemens virtual wedge

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, C.P.; Richmond, N.D.; Lambert, G.D

    2003-09-30

    Installation of a modern high-energy Siemens Primus linear accelerator at the Northern Centre for Cancer Treatment (NCCT) provided the opportunity to investigate the optimal clinical implementation of the Siemens virtual wedge filter. Previously published work has concentrated on the production of virtual wedge angles at 15 deg., 30 deg., 45 deg., and 60 deg. as replacements for the Siemens hard wedges of the same nominal angles. However, treatment plan optimization of the dose distribution can be achieved with the Primus, as its control software permits the selection of any virtual wedge angle from 15 degree sign to 60 degree sign in increments of 1 deg. The same result can also be produced from a combination of open and 60 deg. wedged fields. Helax-TMS models both of these modes of virtual wedge delivery by the wedge angle and the wedge fraction methods respectively. This paper describes results of timing studies in the planning of optimized patient dose distributions by both methods and in the subsequent treatment delivery procedures. Employment of the wedge fraction method results in the delivery of small numbers of monitor units to the beam's central axis; therefore, wedge profile stability and delivered dose with low numbers of monitor units were also investigated. The wedge fraction was proven to be the most efficient method when the time taken for both planning and treatment delivery were taken into consideration, and is now used exclusively for virtual wedge treatment delivery in Newcastle. It has also been shown that there are no unfavorable dosimetric consequences from its practical implementation.

  9. Wedges I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewitt-Morette, Cécile; Low, Stephen G.; Schulman, Lawrence S.; Shiekh, Anwar Y.

    1986-04-01

    The wedge problem, that is, the propagation of radiation or particles in the presence of a wedge, is examined in different contexts. Generally, the paper follows the historical order from Sommerfeld's early work to recent stochastic results—hindsights and new results being woven in as appropriate. In each context, identifying the relevant mathematical problem has been the key to the solution. Thus each section can be given both a physics and a mathematics title: Section 2: diffraction by reflecting wedge; boundary value problem of differential equations; solutions defined on mutiply connected spaces. Section 3: geometrical theory of diffraction; identificiation of function spaces. Section 4: path integral solutions; path integration on multiply connected spaces; asymptotics on the boundaries of function spaces. Section 5: probing the shape of the wedge and the roughness of its surface; stochastic calculus. Several propagators and Green functions are given explicitly, some old ones and some new ones. They include the knife-edge propagator for Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions, the absorbing knife edge propagator, the wedge propagators, the propagator for a free particle on a μ-sheeted Riemann surface, the Dirichlet and the Neumann wedge Green function.

  10. Wedges I

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt-Morette, C.; Low, S.G.; Schulman, L.S.; Shiekh, A.Y.

    1986-04-01

    The wedge problem, that is, the propagation of radiation or particles in the presence of a wedge, is examined in different contexts. Generally, the paper follows the historical order from Sommerfeld's early work to recent stochastic results - hindsights and new results being woven in as appropriate. In each context, identifying the relevant mathematical problem has been the key to the solution. Thus each section can be given both a physics and a mathematics title: Section 2: diffraction by reflecting wedge; boundary value problem of differential equations; solutions defined on multiply connected spaces. Section 3: geometrical theory of diffraction; identification of function spaces. Section 4: path integral solutions; path integration on multiply connected spaces; asymptotics on the boundaries of function spaces. Section 5: probing the shape of the wedge and the roughness of its surface; stochastic calculus. Several propagators and Green functions are given explicitly, some old ones and some new ones. They include the knife-edge propagator for Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions, the absorbing knife edge propagator, the wedge propagators, the propagator for a free particle on a /sigma phi/-sheeted Riemann surface, the Dirichlet and the Neumann wedge Green function.

  11. Nonlinear thermal and moisture response of ice-wedge polygons to permafrost disturbance increases heterogeneity of high Arctic wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Etienne; Fortier, Daniel; Lévesque, Esther

    2016-03-01

    Low-center polygonal terrains with gentle sloping surfaces and lowlands in the high Arctic have a potential to retain water in the lower central portion of ice-wedge polygons and are considered high-latitude wetlands. Such wetlands in the continuous permafrost regions have an important ecological role in an otherwise generally arid region. In the valley of the glacier C-79 on Bylot Island (Nunavut, Canada), thermal erosion gullies were rapidly eroding the permafrost along ice wedges affecting the integrity of the polygons by breaching and collapsing the surrounding rims. Intact polygons were characterized by a relative homogeneity in terms of topography, snow cover, maximum active layer thaw depth, ground moisture content and vegetation cover (where eroded polygons responded nonlinearly to perturbations, which resulted in differing conditions in the latter elements). The heterogeneous nature of disturbed terrains impacted active layer thickness, ground ice aggradation in the upper portion of permafrost, soil moisture, vegetation dynamics and carbon storage.

  12. Structural development of a high-pressure collisional accretionary wedge: The Samaná complex, Northern Hispaniola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escuder-Viruete, Javier; Pérez-Estaún, Andrés; Gabites, Janet; Suárez-Rodríguez, Ángela

    2011-05-01

    The Samaná metamorphic complex exposes a segment of a high-pressure collisional accretionary wedge, built during Caribbean island arc-North America continental margin convergence. Combined detailed mapping, structural and metamorphic analysis, and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology show that the deformation can be divided into five main events. Early subduction-related D1 deformation and high-P/low-T M1 metamorphism under lawsonite blueschist (325-425 °C/12-18 kbar; Rincon Marbles and Santa Bárbara Schists lower structural nappes) and eclogite facies conditions (425-450 °C/18-20 kbar; Punta Balandra upper structural nappe), was followed by M2 decompression and cooling in the blueschist facies conditions during D2 folding, thrusting and nappe stacking. 40Ar/39Ar plateau ages and T-t/P-t estimations revealed Late Eocene to earliest Miocene retrograde M2 metamorphism in the different nappes for a consistent D2 top-to-the-ENE tectonic transport, which suggests a general northeastward progradation of deformation. The D3 event substantially modified the nappe stack and produced open to tight folds with amplitudes up to kilometer-scale and the D4 ductile to brittle normal shear zones and faults, and related subhorizontal folding, record a late extensional deformation, which also affects the whole nappe pile. Non-penetrative D3 and D4 fabrics indicate M3 cooling in and under the M3 greenschist-facies conditions. From the Miocene to the Present, the nappe pile was cut and laterally displaced by a D5 sinistral strike-slip and reverse fault system associated with the Septentrional fault zone.

  13. Rethinking wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Steven J.; Cao, Long; Caldeira, Ken; Hoffert, Martin I.

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Stabilizing CO2 emissions at current levels for fifty years is not consistent with either an atmospheric CO2 concentration below 500 ppm or global temperature increases below 2 °C. Accepting these targets, solving the climate problem requires that emissions peak and decline in the next few decades, and ultimately fall to near zero. Phasing out emissions over 50 years could be achieved by deploying on the order of 19 'wedges', each of which ramps up linearly over a period of 50 years to ultimately avoid 1 GtC y-1 of CO2 emissions. But this level of mitigation will require affordable carbon-free energy systems to be deployed at the scale of tens of terawatts. Any hope for such fundamental and disruptive transformation of the global energy system depends upon coordinated efforts to innovate, plan, and deploy new transportation and energy systems that can provide affordable energy at this scale without emitting CO2 to the atmosphere. 1. Introduction In 2004, Pacala and Socolow published a study in Science arguing that '[h]umanity can solve the carbon and climate problem in the first half of this century simply by scaling up what we already know how to do' [1]. Specifically, they presented 15 options for 'stabilization wedges' that would grow linearly from zero to 1 Gt of carbon emissions avoided per year (GtC y-1 1 Gt = 1012 kg) over 50 years. The solution to the carbon and climate problem, they asserted, was 'to deploy the technologies and/or lifestyle changes necessary to fill all seven wedges of the stabilization triangle'. They claimed this would offset the growth of emissions and put us on a trajectory to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentration at 500 ppm if emissions decreased sharply in the second half of the 21st century. The wedge concept has proven popular as an analytical tool for considering the potential of different technologies to reduce CO2 emissions. In the years since the paper was published, it has been cited more than 400 times, and

  14. Long-term outcomes of wedge resection at the limbus for high irregular corneal astigmatism after repaired corneal laceration

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jun; Zheng, Guang-Ying; Wen, Cheng-Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Fang; Zhu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the clinical value of wedge resection at corneal limbus in patients with traumatic corneal scarring and high irregular astigmatism. METHODS Patients with traumatic corneal astigmatism received wedge resection at least 6mo after suture removal from corneal wound. The uncorrected distance visual acuities (UCVA) and best corrected distance visual acuities (BCVA), pre- and post-operation astigmatism, spherical equivalent (SE), safety and complications were evaluated. RESULTS Ten eyes (10 patients) were enrolled in this study. Mean follow-up time after wedge resection was 37.8±15.4mo (range, 20-61mo). The mean UCVA improved from +1.07±0.55 logMAR to +0.43±0.22 logMAR (P=0.000) and the mean BCVA from +0.50±0.30 logMAR to +0.15±0.17 logMAR (P=0.000). The mean astigmatism power measured by retinoscopy was -2.03±2.27 D postoperatively and -2.83±4.52 D preoperatively (P=0.310). The mean SE was -0.74±1.61 D postoperatively and -0.64±1.89 D preoperatively (P=0.601). Two cases developed mild pannus near the sutures. No corneal perforation, infectious keratitis or wound gape occurred. CONCLUSION Corneal-scleral limbal wedge resection with compression suture is a safe, effective treatment for poor patients with high irregular corneal astigmatism after corneal-scleral penetrating injury. Retinoscopy can prove particularly useful for high irregular corneal astigmatism when other measurements are not amenable. PMID:27366685

  15. Viscid-inviscid interaction associated with incompressible flow past wedges at high Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warpinski, N. R.; Chow, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical method is suggested for the study of the viscid inviscid interaction associated with incompressible flow past wedges with arbitrary angles. It is shown that the determination of the nearly constant pressure (base pressure) prevailing within the near wake is really the heart of the problem, and the pressure can only be established from these interactive considerations. The basic free streamline flow field is established through two discrete parameters which adequately describe the inviscid flow around the body and the wake. The viscous flow processes such as the boundary layer buildup, turbulent jet mixing, and recompression are individually analyzed and attached to the inviscid flow in the sense of the boundary layer concept. The interaction between the viscous and inviscid streams is properly displayed by the fact that the aforementioned discrete parameters needed for the inviscid flow are determined by the viscous flow condition at the point of reattachment. It is found that the reattachment point behaves as a saddle point singularity for the system of equations describing the recompressive viscous flow processes, and this behavior is exploited for the establishment of the overall flow field. Detailed results such as the base pressure, pressure distributions on the wedge, and the geometry of the wake are determined as functions of the wedge angle.

  16. Rethinking wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Steven J.; Cao, Long; Caldeira, Ken; Hoffert, Martin I.

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Stabilizing CO2 emissions at current levels for fifty years is not consistent with either an atmospheric CO2 concentration below 500 ppm or global temperature increases below 2 °C. Accepting these targets, solving the climate problem requires that emissions peak and decline in the next few decades, and ultimately fall to near zero. Phasing out emissions over 50 years could be achieved by deploying on the order of 19 'wedges', each of which ramps up linearly over a period of 50 years to ultimately avoid 1 GtC y-1 of CO2 emissions. But this level of mitigation will require affordable carbon-free energy systems to be deployed at the scale of tens of terawatts. Any hope for such fundamental and disruptive transformation of the global energy system depends upon coordinated efforts to innovate, plan, and deploy new transportation and energy systems that can provide affordable energy at this scale without emitting CO2 to the atmosphere. 1. Introduction In 2004, Pacala and Socolow published a study in Science arguing that '[h]umanity can solve the carbon and climate problem in the first half of this century simply by scaling up what we already know how to do' [1]. Specifically, they presented 15 options for 'stabilization wedges' that would grow linearly from zero to 1 Gt of carbon emissions avoided per year (GtC y-1 1 Gt = 1012 kg) over 50 years. The solution to the carbon and climate problem, they asserted, was 'to deploy the technologies and/or lifestyle changes necessary to fill all seven wedges of the stabilization triangle'. They claimed this would offset the growth of emissions and put us on a trajectory to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentration at 500 ppm if emissions decreased sharply in the second half of the 21st century. The wedge concept has proven popular as an analytical tool for considering the potential of different technologies to reduce CO2 emissions. In the years since the paper was published, it has been cited more than 400 times, and

  17. Radial wedge flange clamp

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    A radial wedge flange clamp comprising a pair of flanges each comprising a plurality of peripheral flat wedge facets having flat wedge surfaces and opposed and mating flat surfaces attached to or otherwise engaged with two elements to be joined and including a series of generally U-shaped wedge clamps each having flat wedge interior surfaces and engaging one pair of said peripheral flat wedge facets. Each of said generally U-shaped wedge clamps has in its opposing extremities apertures for the tangential insertion of bolts to apply uniform radial force to said wedge clamps when assembled about said wedge segments.

  18. Grounding-zone wedges (GZWs) on high-latitude continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, Christine; Dowdeswell, Julian

    2014-05-01

    inferred for GZWs on the Greenland, Norwegian, Canadian and Barents Sea margins. However, no significant relationship between GZW length and thickness exists for the GZWs described from the Antarctic margin. GZWs typically possess a semi-transparent to chaotic acoustic character, which reflects the delivery of diamictic subglacial debris. Many GZWs contain low-amplitude, seaward-dipping internal reflections, which indicate sediment progradation and wedge-growth through continued delivery of basal sediments from the flow of active ice. The formation of GZWs is inferred to require high rates of sediment delivery to a relatively stable, fast-flowing ice margin. Ice-margin stabilisation, and consequently GZW formation, is dependent on a number of factors, including the ice-sheet mass balance, sea-level fluctuations, and the rate of inland-ice delivery to the grounding-zone. GZWs may be formed preferentially by glaciers with termini ending as floating ice shelves, which restrict vertical accommodation space and prevent the build-up of high-amplitude moraine ridges. The basal topography of the continental shelf can also act as a control on GZW formation. The majority of high-latitude GZWs are located at topographic or lateral pinning points within cross-shelf troughs, which encourage ice-margin stabilisation through reducing iceberg calving and increasing basal and lateral drag.

  19. Large Erosional Features on the Cascadia Accretionary Wedge Imaged with New High-Resolution Multibeam Bathymetry and Seismic Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeson, J. W.; Goldfinger, C.

    2013-12-01

    Utilizing new high resolution multibeam bathymetric data along with chirp sub-bottom and multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data, we identified remarkable erosional features on the toe of the Cascadia accretionary wedge near Willapa Canyon, offshore Washington, USA. Bathymetric data was compiled from the Cascadia Open-Access Seismic Transects (COAST) cruise and from the site survey cruise for the Cascadia Initiative. These features loosely resemble slope failures of the frontal thrust, but can be distinguished from such failures by several key features: They incise the crest of the frontal thrust and encompass the landward limb; They have floors below the level of the abyssal plain, similar to plunge pool morphology; They show no evidence of landslide blocks at the base of the slope indicative of block sliding. The features where likely formed during the latest Pleistocene based on post event deposition, cross-cutting relationships with Juan de Fuca Channel and the Willapa Channel levees and wave field, and post event slip on the frontal thrust of the Cascadia accretionary prism. The Holocene levees of both Willapa Channel and Juan de Fuca Channel overlap these older features, and clearly place an upper bound on the age of the erosional features in the latest Pleistocene. A lower bound is estimated from a sub-bottom profile that images ~30 meters of post scour sediment fill. Using existing literature of Holocene and Pleistocene sedimentation rates we estimate a lower age bound between ~23,000 - 56,000 y.b.p. We also map a fault scarp within the erosional feature, with ~60 m of vertical offset. Using multi-channel seismic reflection profiles from the COAST cruise we interpret this scarp as the surface expression of the landward vergent frontal thrust fault. The apparent short duration of the erosional event along the seaward margin of the accretionary wedge, coupled with the presence of the fresh fault scarp within the erosion zone, are indicative of a dormant

  20. Diffusion induced flow on a wedge-shaped obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagumennyi, Ia V.; Dimitrieva, N. F.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper the problem of evolution of diffusion induced flow on a wedge-shaped obstacle is analyzed numerically. The governing set of fundamental equations is solved using original solvers from the open source OpenFOAM package on supercomputer facilities. Due to breaking of naturally existing diffusion flux of a stratifying agent by the impermeable surface of the wedge a complex multi-level vortex system of compensatory fluid motions is formed around the obstacle. Sharp edges of the obstacle generate extended high-gradient horizontal interfaces which are clearly observed in laboratory experiments by high-resolution Schlieren visualization. Formation of an intensive pressure depression zone in front of the leading vertex of the wedge is responsible for generation of propulsive force resulting in a self-displacement of the obstacle along the neutral buoyancy horizon in a stably stratified environment. The size of the pressure deficiency area near the sharp vertex of a concave wedge is about twice that for a convex one. This demonstrates a more intensive propulsion mechanism in case of the concave wedge and, accordingly, a higher velocity of its self-movement in a continuously stratified medium.

  1. On sound scattering by rigid edges and wedges in a flow, with applications to high-lift device aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roger, Michel; Moreau, Stéphane; Kucukcoskun, Korcan

    2016-02-01

    Exact analytical solutions for the scattering of sound by the edge of a rigid half-plane and by a rigid corner in the presence of a uniform flow are considered in this work, for arbitrary source and observer locations. Exact Green's functions for the Helmholtz equation are first reviewed and implemented in a quiescent propagation space from reference expressions of the literature. The effect of uniform fluid motion is introduced in a second step and the properties of the field are discussed for point dipoles and quadrupoles. The asymptotic regime of a source close to the scattering edge/wedge and of an observer far from it in terms of acoustic wavelengths is derived in both cases. Its validity limits are assessed by comparing with the exact solutions. Typically the asymptotic directivity is imposed by Green's function but not by the source itself. This behaviour is associated with a strong enhancement of the radiation with respect to what the source would produce in free field. The amplification depends on the geometry, on the source type and on the source distance to the edge/wedge. Various applications in aeroacoustics of wall-bounded flows are addressed, more specifically dealing with high-lift device noise mechanisms, such as trailing-edge or flap side-edge noise. The asymptotic developments are used to highlight trends that are believed to play a role in airframe noise.

  2. CarD uses a minor groove wedge mechanism to stabilize the RNA polymerase open promoter complex

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Brian; Chen, James; Davis, Elizabeth; Leon, Katherine; Darst, Seth A; Campbell, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    A key point to regulate gene expression is at transcription initiation, and activators play a major role. CarD, an essential activator in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is found in many bacteria, including Thermus species, but absent in Escherichia coli. To delineate the molecular mechanism of CarD, we determined crystal structures of Thermus transcription initiation complexes containing CarD. The structures show CarD interacts with the unique DNA topology presented by the upstream double-stranded/single-stranded DNA junction of the transcription bubble. We confirm that our structures correspond to functional activation complexes, and extend our understanding of the role of a conserved CarD Trp residue that serves as a minor groove wedge, preventing collapse of the transcription bubble to stabilize the transcription initiation complex. Unlike E. coli RNAP, many bacterial RNAPs form unstable promoter complexes, explaining the need for CarD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08505.001 PMID:26349034

  3. Evaluation of a high-precision gear measuring machine for helix measurement using helix and wedge artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Tetsuya; Kondo, Yohan

    2016-08-01

    High-precision gears are required for advanced motion and power transmission. The reliability of the measured value becomes important as the gear accuracy increases, and the establishment of a traceability system is needed. Therefore, a high-precision gear measuring machine (GMM) with a smaller uncertainty is expected to improve the gear calibration uncertainty. For this purpose, we developed a prototype of a high-precision GMM that adopts a direct drive mechanism and other features. Then, the high measurement capability of the developed GMM was verified using gear artifacts. Recently, some new measurement methods using simple shapes such as spheres and planes have been proposed as standards. We have verified the tooth profile measurement using a sphere artifact and reported the results that the developed GMM had a high capability in tooth profile measurement. Therefore, we attempted to devise a new evaluation method for helix measurement using a wedge artifact (WA) whose plane was treated as the tooth flank, and the high measurement capability of the developed GMM was verified. The results will provide a part of information to fully assess measurement uncertainty as our future work. This paper describes the evaluation results of the developed GMM for helix measurement using both a helix artifact and the WA, and discusses the effectiveness of the WA as a new artifact to evaluate the GMMs.

  4. Wedge Joints for Trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Kenneth E.

    1987-01-01

    Structure assembled rapidly with simple hand tools. Proposed locking wedge joints enable rapid assembly of lightweight beams, towers, scaffolds, and other truss-type structures. Lightweight structure assembled from tubular struts joined at nodes by wedge pins fitting into mating slots. Joint assembled rapidly by seating wedge pin in V-shaped slots and deforming end of strut until primary pawl engages it.

  5. Thermally actuated wedge block

    DOEpatents

    Queen, Jr., Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an automatically-operating wedge block for maintaining intimate structural contact over wide temperature ranges, including cryogenic use. The wedging action depends on the relative thermal expansion of two materials having very different coefficients of thermal expansion. The wedge block expands in thickness when cooled to cryogenic temperatures and contracts in thickness when returned to room temperature.

  6. Structure of turbulent wedges created by isolated surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuester, Matthew S.; White, Edward B.

    2016-04-01

    Isolated surface roughness in a laminar boundary layer can create a wedge of turbulence that spreads laterally into the surrounding laminar flow. Some recent studies have identified high- and low-speed streaks along the exterior of turbulent wedges. In this experiment, developing turbulent wedges are measured to observe the creation of these streaks. Naphthalene shear stress surface visualization and hotwire measurements are utilized to investigate the details of turbulent wedges created by cylinders in a laminar flat-plate boundary layer. Both the surface visualization and the hotwire measurements show high- and low-speed streaks in the wake of the cylinder that devolve into a turbulent wedge. The turbulent wedge spreading is associated with the emergence of these high- and low-speed streaks along the outside of the wedge. As the wedge evolves in the streamwise direction, these streaks persist inside of the core of the wedge, while new, lower amplitude streaks form along the outside of the wedge. Adding asymmetry to the cylinder moved the virtual origin closer to the roughness and increased the vortex shedding frequency, while adding small-scale roughness features did not strongly affect turbulent wedge development. Intermittency calculations additionally show the origin of the turbulent core inside of the wedge. The structure and spacing of the high-speed streaks along the extremities of the turbulent wedge give insight into the spreading angle of the turbulent wedge.

  7. High and Ultrahigh pressure peridotites: fossil reservoirs of subduction zone processes and deep crust-mantle wedge interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scambelluri, Marco

    2010-05-01

    The large-scale mass transfer allied with subduction recycles surface volatiles and crustal materials into the mantle, to affect its composition and rheology. Most geological processes related to subduction thus originate from an interplay between subducting plates and overlying lithospheric and asthenospheric mantle. Much information on phase relations during subduction has been provided by experiments and by studies of natural high- (HP) and ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) rocks and fluids. In contrast, knowledge on supra-subduction mantle wedges is much less. Here, the interaction between slab fluids and mantle rocks at variable subduction depths is discussed considering two case-studies: the UHP garnet websterites from Bardane (Western Gneiss Region, Norway) and the HP garnet peridotites from the Ulten Zone (Eastern Alps). The Bardane websterites derive from cold Archean subcontinental mantle involved in Scandian subduction to UHP. Subduction metamorphism was promoted by slab fluid infiltration in the overlying mantle up to P of 6.5 - 7 GPa (c.a. 200 km depth), as witnessed by micro-diamond-bearing inclusions and by crystallization of majoritic garnet in veins. The Ulten peridotites are slices of Variscan mantle wedge which experienced infiltration of metasomatic subduction fluids. These favoured transformation of spinel-peridotites into garnet + amphibole + dolomite peridotites at P < 3GPa. Formation of metasomatized garnet peridotite mylonites suggest channelled influx of subduction fluids. The high XMg and the incompatible element-enriched composition of subduction minerals in Bardane indicate that previously depleted websterites were refertilized by COH subduction fluids. Comparison with the Ulten garnet + amphibole + dolomite peridotites outlines relevant similarity in the metasomatic fingerprints and in the COH fluid phase involved. This calls for concomitant subduction of the continental crust, to provide carbon and incompatible element-enriched fluids. For

  8. The matching of wedge transmission factors across six multi-energy linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Weston, S J; Thompson, R C A; Morgan, A M

    2007-01-01

    Elekta Precise linear accelerators create a wedged isodose distribution using a single, fixed, motorized wedge with a nominal wedge angle of 60 degrees. Wedge angles of less than 60 degrees can be produced by varying the proportion of open and wedge monitor units for a given exposure. The fixed wedge can be replaced with a mobile wedge, the position of which can be moved in order to adjust the wedge transmission factor (WTF). Using the original fixed wedges installed in our fleet of six Elekta accelerators, we found a range of 4% in measured wedge transmission factor for 6 MV beams. Results are presented which demonstrate that by using the mobile wedge it is possible to match the wedge transmission factors to within 1% for the six linear accelerators over three energies. PMID:17267473

  9. Wedged Fibers Suppress Feedback of Laser Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladany, I.

    1986-01-01

    When injected laser is coupled into optical fiber, emission instabilities arise because of optical feedback losses from fiber into laser. Coupling efficiencies as high as 80 percent, however, obtained by shaping end of multimode fiber into obtuse-angled wedge. Because slanted sides eliminate back reflection, such wedged fiber achieves high coupling efficiency.

  10. Evaluating the dose to the contralateral breast when using a dynamic wedge versus a regular wedge.

    PubMed

    Weides, C D; Mok, E C; Chang, W C; Findley, D O; Shostak, C A

    1995-01-01

    The incidence of secondary cancers in the contralateral breast after primary breast irradiation is several times higher than the incidence of first time breast cancer. Studies have shown that the scatter radiation to the contralateral breast may play a large part in the induction of secondary breast cancers. Factors that may contribute to the contralateral breast dose may include the use of blocks, the orientation of the field, and wedges. Reports have shown that the use of regular wedges, particularly for the medial tangential field, gives a significantly higher dose to the contralateral breast compared to an open field. This paper compares the peripheral dose outside the field using a regular wedge, a dynamic wedge, and an open field technique. The data collected consisted of measurements taken with patients, solid water and a Rando phantom using a Varian 2300CD linear accelerator. Ion chambers, thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD), diodes, and films were the primary means for collecting the data. The measurements show that the peripheral dose outside the field using a dynamic wedge is close to that of open fields, and significantly lower than that of regular wedges. This information indicates that when using a medial wedge, a dynamic wedge should be used. PMID:8703326

  11. Five questions to consider before conducting a stepped wedge trial.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, James R; Copas, Andrew J; Beard, Emma; Osrin, David; Lewis, James J; Davey, Calum; Thompson, Jennifer A; Baio, Gianluca; Fielding, Katherine L; Prost, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    Researchers should consider five questions before starting a stepped wedge trial. Why are you planning one? Researchers sometimes think that stepped wedge trials are useful when there is little doubt about the benefit of the intervention being tested. However, if the primary reason for an intervention is to measure its effect, without equipoise there is no ethical justification for delaying implementation in some clusters. By contrast, if you are undertaking pragmatic research, where the primary reason for rolling out the intervention is for it to exert its benefits, and if phased implementation is inevitable, a stepped wedge trial is a valid option and provides better evidence than most non-randomized evaluations. What design will you use? Two common stepped wedge designs are based on the recruitment of a closed or open cohort. In both, individuals may experience both control and intervention conditions and you should be concerned about carry-over effects. In a third, continuous-recruitment, short-exposure design, individuals are recruited as they become eligible and experience either control or intervention condition, but not both. How will you conduct the primary analysis? In stepped wedge trials, control of confounding factors through secular variation is essential. 'Vertical' approaches preserve randomization and compare outcomes between randomized groups within periods. 'Horizontal' approaches compare outcomes before and after crossover to the intervention condition. Most analysis models used in practice combine both types of comparison. The appropriate analytic strategy should be considered on a case-by-case basis. How large will your trial be? Standard sample size calculations for cluster randomized trials do not accommodate the specific features of stepped wedge trials. Methods exist for many stepped wedge designs, but simulation-based calculations provide the greatest flexibility. In some scenarios, such as when the intracluster correlation coefficient is

  12. Bacterial diversity across a highly stratified ecosystem: A salt-wedge Mediterranean estuary.

    PubMed

    Korlević, M; Šupraha, L; Ljubešić, Z; Henderiks, J; Ciglenečki, I; Dautović, J; Orlić, S

    2016-09-01

    Highly stratified Mediterranean estuaries are unique environments where the tidal range is low and the tidal currents are almost negligible. The main characteristics of these environments are strong salinity gradients and other environmental parameters. In this study, 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene in combination with catalyzed reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) was used to estimate the bacterial diversity across the Krka estuary in February and July 2013. The comparison of the data derived from these two techniques resulted in a significant but weak positive correlation (R=0.28) indicating a substantial difference in the bacterial community structure, depending on the applied method. The phytoplankton bloom observed in February was identified as one of the main factors shaping the bacterial community structure between the two environmentally contrasting sampling months. Roseobacter, Bacteroidetes and Gammaproteobacteria differed substantially between February and July. Typical freshwater bacterial classes (Actinobacteria and Betaproteobacteria) showed strong vertical distribution patterns depending on the salinity gradient. Cyanobacteria decreased in abundance in February due to competition with phytoplankton, while the SAR11 clade increased its abundance in July as a result of a better adaptation toward more oligotrophic conditions. The results provided the first detailed insight into the bacterial diversity in a highly stratified Mediterranean karstic estuary. PMID:27475818

  13. Spatial and Spectral Characterization, Mapping, and 3D Reconstructing of Ice-wedge Polygons Using High Resolution LiDAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangodagamage, C.; Rowland, J. C.; Skurikhin, A. N.; Wilson, C. J.; Brumby, S. P.; Painter, S. L.; Gable, C. W.; Bui, Q.; Short, L. S.; Liljedahl, A.; Hubbard, S. S.; Wainwright, H. M.; Dafflon, B.; Tweedie, C. E.; Kumar, J.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    In landscapes with ice-wedge polygons, fine-scale land surface characterization is critically important because the processes that govern the carbon cycle and hydrological dynamics are controlled by features on the order of a few to tens of meters. To characterize the fine-scale features in polygonal ground in Barrow, Alaska, we use high-resolution LiDAR-derived topographic data (such as elevation, slope, curvature, and a novel 'directed distance (DD)') to develop quantitative metrics that allow for the discretization and characterization of polygons (formed by seasonal freeze and thaw processes). First, we used high resolution (0.25 m) LiDAR to show that the high and low centered polygon features exhibit a unique signature in the Fourier power spectrum where the landscape signature on freeze and thaw process (~ 5 to 100 m) is super imposed on the coarse scale fluvial eroded landscape (rudimentary river network) signature. We next convolve LiDAR elevations with multiscale wavelets and objectively choose appropriate scales to map interconnected troughs of high- and low-centered polygons. For the ice wedges where LiDAR surface expressions (troughs) are not well developed, we used a Delaunay triangulation to connect the ice-wedge network and map the topologically connected polygons. This analysis allows us to explore the 3D morphometry of these high- and low-centered polygons and develop a supervised set of ensemble characteristic templates for each polygon type as a function of directed distance (DD). These templates are used to classify the ice-wedge polygon landscape into low-centered polygons with limited troughs, and high- and low-centered polygons with well-developed trough network. We further extend the characteristic templates to polygon ensemble slopes and curvatures as a function of DD and develop a classification scheme for microtopographic features including troughs, rims, elevated ridges, and centers for both high-centered and low-centered polygon

  14. Sojourner, Wedge, & Shark

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) image taken near the end of daytime operations on Sol 50 shows the Sojourner rover between the rocks 'Wedge' (foreground) and 'Shark' (behind rover). The rover successfully deployed its Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer on Shark on Sol 52.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  15. Ice Particle Impacts on a Moving Wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Struk, Peter M.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Palacios, Jose; Lyer, Kaushik A.; Gold, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study of ice particle impacts on a moving wedge. The experiment was conducted in the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility located at Penn State University. The wedge was placed at the tip of a rotating blade. Ice particles shot from a pressure gun intercepted the moving wedge and impacted it at a location along its circular path. The upward velocity of the ice particles varied from 7 to 12 meters per second. Wedge velocities were varied from 0 to 120 meters per second. Wedge angles tested were 0, 30, 45, and 60. High speed imaging combined with backlighting captured the impact allowing observation of the effect of velocity and wedge angle on the impact and the post-impact fragment behavior. It was found that the pressure gun and the rotating wedge could be synchronized to consistently obtain ice particle impacts on the target wedge. It was observed that the number of fragments increase with the normal component of the impact velocity. Particle fragments ejected immediately after impact showed velocities higher than the impact velocity. The results followed the major qualitative features observed by other researchers for hailstone impacts, even though the reduced scale size of the particles used in the present experiment as compared to hailstones was 4:1.

  16. Ice Particle Impacts on a Moving Wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Struk, Peter M.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Palacios, Jose; Iyer, Kaushik A.; Gold, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study of ice particle impacts on a moving wedge. The experiment was conducted in the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility located at Penn State University. The wedge was placed at the tip of a rotating blade. Ice particles shot from a pressure gun intercepted the moving wedge and impacted it at a location along its circular path. The upward velocity of the ice particles varied from 7 to 12 meters per second. Wedge velocities were varied from 0 to 120 meters per second. Wedge angles tested were 0 deg, 30 deg, 45 deg, and 60 deg. High speed imaging combined with backlighting captured the impact allowing observation of the effect of velocity and wedge angle on the impact and the post-impact fragment behavior. It was found that the pressure gun and the rotating wedge could be synchronized to consistently obtain ice particle impacts on the target wedge. It was observed that the number of fragments increase with the normal component of the impact velocity. Particle fragments ejected immediately after impact showed velocities higher than the impact velocity. The results followed the major qualitative features observed by other researchers for hailstone impacts, even though the reduced scale size of the particles used in the present experiment as compared to hailstones was 4:1.

  17. Micromachine Wedge Stepping Motor

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J.; Schriner, H.K.

    1998-11-04

    A wedge stepping motor, which will index a mechanism, has been designed and fabricated in the surface rnicromachine SUMMiT process. This device has demonstrated the ability to index one gear tooth at a time with speeds up to 205 teeth/see. The wedge stepper motor has the following features, whi:h will be useful in a number of applications. o The ability to precisely position mechanical components. . Simple pulse signals can be used for operation. o Only 2 drive signals are requixed for operation. o Torque and precision capabilities increase with device size . The device to be indexed is restrained at all times by the wedge shaped tooth that is used for actuation. This paper will discuss the theory of operation and desi=m of the wedge stepping motor. The fabrication and testing of I he device will also be presented.

  18. Wedges for ultrasonic inspection

    DOEpatents

    Gavin, Donald A.

    1982-01-01

    An ultrasonic transducer device is provided which is used in ultrasonic inspection of the material surrounding a threaded hole and which comprises a wedge of plastic or the like including a curved threaded surface adapted to be screwed into the threaded hole and a generally planar surface on which a conventional ultrasonic transducer is mounted. The plastic wedge can be rotated within the threaded hole to inspect for flaws in the material surrounding the threaded hole.

  19. Ultrasonic transducer with laminated coupling wedge

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, Henry H. B.

    1976-08-03

    An ultrasonic transducer capable of use in a high-temperature environment incorporates a laminated metal coupling wedge including a reflecting edge shaped as a double sloping roof and a transducer crystal backed by a laminated metal sound absorber disposed so as to direct sound waves through the coupling wedge and into a work piece, reflections from the interface between the coupling wedge and the work piece passing to the reflecting edge. Preferably the angle of inclination of the two halves of the reflecting edge are different.

  20. Achieving high levels of color uniformity and optical efficiency for a wedge-shaped waveguide head-mounted display using a photopolymer.

    PubMed

    Piao, Mei-Lan; Kim, Nam

    2014-04-01

    We developed a head-mounted display (HMD) that achieved high levels of color uniformity and optical efficiency. The full-color holographic volume grating (HVG) attached on the specially designed wedge-shaped waveguide HMD system provided a 17° horizontal field of view (FOV). Theoretical analyses showed that the proposed waveguide resolved the problems of thickness and limited FOV. In this system, the HVG was recorded using a special sequential recording process on single photopolymer unit with 633, 532, and 473 nm wavelengths. The results confirm that the designed and fabricated waveguide can be employed in future commercial HMS. PMID:24787179

  1. Wedge and Flat Top

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Flat Top, the rectangular rock at right, is part of a stretch of rocky terrain in this image, taken by the deployed Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. Dust has accumulated on the top of Flat Top, but is not present on the sides due to the steep angles of the rock. This dust may have been placed by dust storms moving across the Martian surface. The rock dubbed 'Wedge' is at left. The objects have been studied using several different color filters on the IMP camera.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  2. Single-stage closing–opening wedge osteotomy of spine to correct severe post-tubercular kyphotic deformities of the spine: a 3-year follow-up of 17 patients

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Kamath; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad

    2009-01-01

    The correction of severe post-tubercular kyphosis (PTK) is complex and has the disadvantage of being multiple staged with a high morbidity. Here, we describe the procedure and results of closing–opening osteotomy for correction of PTK which shortens the posterior column and opens the anterior column appropriately to correct the deformity without altering the length of the spinal cord. Seventeen patients with PTK (10 males; 7 females) with an average age of 18.3 ± 10.6 years (range 4–40 years) formed the study group. There were ten thoracolumbar, one lumbar and six thoracic deformities. The number of vertebrae involved ranged from 2 to 5 (average 2.8). Preoperative kyphosis averaged 69.2° ± 25.1° (range 42°–104°) which included ten patients with deformity greater than 60°. The average vertebral body loss was 2.01 ± 0.79 (range 1.1–4.1). The neurological status was normal in 13 patients, Frankel’s grade D in three patients and grade C in one. Posterior stabilization with pedicle screw instrumentation was followed by a preoperatively calculated wedge resection. Anterior column reconstruction was performed using rib grafts in four, tricortical iliac bone graft in five, cages in six, and bone chips alone and fibular graft in one patient each. Average operating time was 280 min (200–340 min) with an average blood loss of 820 ml (range 500–1,600 ml). The postoperative kyphosis averaged 32.4° ± 19.5° (range 8°–62°). The percentage correction of kyphosis achieved was 56.8 ± 14.6% (range 32–83%). No patient with normal preoperative neurological status showed deterioration in neurology after surgery. The last follow-up was at an average of 43 ± 4 months (range 32–64 months). The average loss of correction at the last follow-up was 5.4° (range 3°–9°). At the last follow-up, the mean preoperative pain visual analogue scale score decreased significantly from 9.2 (range 8–10 points) to 1.5 (range 1–2 points). There

  3. Taper Angle Evolution in Taiwan Accretionary Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Chi, W.; Liu, C.

    2011-12-01

    Liwen Chena,b, Wu-Cheng Chia, Char-Shine Liuc aInstitute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan bInstitute of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan cInstitute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan The critical taper model, originally developed using onland Taiwan as an example, is governed by force balance of a horizontal compressional wedge. This model has been successfully applied to many mountainous regions around the world. Among them, Taiwan is located in an oblique collision between the Luzon Arc and the Chinese Passive margin. Previous critical taper angle studies of Taiwan are mainly focusing on utilizing land data. In this study we want to extend these studies to offshore region from the subduction zone to collision zone. Here we study the varying taper angles of the double-vergent wedge derived from 1,000 km of reflection seismic profiles in both the pro-wedge and retro-wedge locations. These profiles were collected in the last two decades. For the retro-wedge, the topography slope angle changes from 2 to 8.8 degrees; some of the steep slope suggests that some part of the retrowedge is currently in a super-critical angle state. Such dramatic changes in taper angle probably strongly affect regional sedimentary processes, including slumping, in addition to structural deformation. These complex processes might even help develop a mélange or re-open a closed basin. We are currently working on studying the taper angle evolution of the pro-wedge from subduction to arc-continent collision zone in the offshore region. Though further works are needed, our preliminary results show that the evolution of wedge angles and the geometry of the wedge are closely linked and inseparable. The structures of the subducting plate might have strong influence on the deformation style of the over-riding plate. It would be interesting to combine the angle variation with the structure interpretation of the accretionary wedge

  4. Long polymers near wedges and cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Yosi; Kantor, Yacov

    2015-12-01

    We perform a Monte Carlo study of N -step self-avoiding walks, attached to the corner of an impenetrable wedge in two dimensions (d =2 ), or the tip of an impenetrable cone in d =3 , of sizes ranging up to N =106 steps. We find that the critical exponent γα, which determines the dependence of the number of available conformations on N for a cone or wedge with opening angle α , is in good agreement with the theory for d =2 . We study the end-point distribution of the walks in the allowed space and find similarities to the known behavior of random walks (ideal polymers) in the same geometry. For example, the ratio between the mean square end-to-end distances of a polymer near the cone or wedge and a polymer in free space depends linearly on γα, as is known for ideal polymers. We show that the end-point distribution of polymers attached to a wedge does not separate into a product of angular and radial functions, as it does for ideal polymers in the same geometry. The angular dependence of the end position of polymers near the wedge differs from theoretical predictions.

  5. Long polymers near wedges and cones.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Yosi; Kantor, Yacov

    2015-12-01

    We perform a Monte Carlo study of N-step self-avoiding walks, attached to the corner of an impenetrable wedge in two dimensions (d=2), or the tip of an impenetrable cone in d=3, of sizes ranging up to N=10(6) steps. We find that the critical exponent γ(α), which determines the dependence of the number of available conformations on N for a cone or wedge with opening angle α, is in good agreement with the theory for d=2. We study the end-point distribution of the walks in the allowed space and find similarities to the known behavior of random walks (ideal polymers) in the same geometry. For example, the ratio between the mean square end-to-end distances of a polymer near the cone or wedge and a polymer in free space depends linearly on γ(α), as is known for ideal polymers. We show that the end-point distribution of polymers attached to a wedge does not separate into a product of angular and radial functions, as it does for ideal polymers in the same geometry. The angular dependence of the end position of polymers near the wedge differs from theoretical predictions. PMID:26764719

  6. Europa Wedge Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This image shows an area of crustal separation on Jupiter's moon, Europa. Lower resolution pictures taken earlier in the tour of NASA's Galileo spacecraft revealed that dark wedge-shaped bands in this region are areas where the icy crust has completely pulled apart. Dark material has filled up from below and filled the void created by this separation.

    In the lower left corner of this image, taken by Galileo's onboard camera on December 16, 1997, a portion of one dark wedge area is visible, revealing a linear texture along the trend of the wedge. The lines of the texture change orientation slightly and reflect the fact that we are looking at a bend in the wedge. The older, bright background, visible on the right half of the image, is criss-crossed with ridges. A large, bright ridge runs east-west through the upper part of the image, cutting across both the older background plains and the wedge. This ridge is rough in texture, with numerous small terraces and troughs containing dark material.

    North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the northwest. This image, centered at approximately 16.5 degrees south latitude and 196.5 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 10 kilometers square (about 6.5 miles square). The resolution of this image is about 26 meters per picture element. This image was taken by the solid state imaging system from a distance of 1250 kilometers (750 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  7. Penetrable wedge analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharstein, Robert W.; Davis, Anthony M.

    1994-07-01

    Two complementary analyses of the time-harmonic scattering by a penetrable wedge are presented. The distance from the apex (appropriately scaled by the wavenumber in the exterior region) of the exciting line source is the single length scale in this infinite-domain boundary value problem. The work summarized herein represents two mathematical approaches (among a series of candidates) to solve this important scattering problem and to visualize the wave physics.

  8. Transmural Ultrasound Imaging of Thermal Lesion and Action Potential Changes in Perfused Canine Cardiac Wedge Preparations by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ziqi; Gudur, Madhu S. R.; Deng, Cheri X.

    2013-01-01

    Intra-procedural imaging is important for guiding cardiac arrhythmia ablation. It is difficult to obtain intra-procedural correlation of thermal lesion formation with action potential (AP) changes in the transmural plane during ablation. This study tested parametric ultrasound imaging for transmural imaging of lesion and AP changes in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation using coronary perfused canine ventricular wedge preparations (n = 13). The preparations were paced from epi/endocardial surfaces and subjected to HIFU application (3.5 MHz, 11 Hz pulse-repetition-frequency, 70% duty cycle, duration 4 s, 3500 W/cm2), during which simultaneous optical mapping (1 kframes/s) using di-4-ANEPPS and ultrasound imaging (30 MHz) of the same transmural surface of the wedge were performed. Spatiotemporally correlated AP measurements and ultrasound imaging allowed quantification of the reduction of AP amplitude (APA), shortening of AP duration at 50% repolarization, AP triangulation, decrease of optical AP rise, and change of conduction velocity along tissue depth direction within and surrounding HIFU lesions. The threshold of irreversible change in APA correlating to lesions was determined to be 43±1% with a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) area under curve (AUC) of 0.96±0.01 (n = 13). Ultrasound imaging parameters such as integrated backscatter, Rayleigh (α) and log-normal (σ) parameters, cumulative extrema of σ were tested, with the cumulative extrema of σ performing the best in detecting lesion (ROC AUC 0.89±0.01, n = 13) and change of APA (ROC AUC 0.79±0.03, n = 13). In conclusion, characteristic tissue and AP changes in HIFU ablation were identified and spatiotemporally correlated using optical mapping and ultrasound imaging. Parametric ultrasound imaging using cumulative extrema of σ can detect HIFU lesion and APA reduction. PMID:24349337

  9. Mechanics of injection wedges in collision orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A. B.; Schulmann, K.

    2003-04-01

    Instantaneously juxtaposed lithospheric sections, marked by different geothermal gradient and lithological make-up, are examined to identify zones of highly contrasting strength in adjacent transposed crust and lithospheric mantle. Three types of geotherms and four reference lithospheric segments: thin crust/hot geotherm (rift), thin crust/mean geotherm (relaxed rift), standard crust/hot geotherm (arc), standard crust/mean geotherm (normal crust), are compared with variable permutations of cratonic, standard and rifted lithosphere thicknesses. This permits identification of strong brittle-elastic or plastic mantle, lower and upper crust juxtaposed against plastic rocks of a weak adjacent lithosphere. Vertical positions of shallow dipping detachment zones thus delineate possible areas of hot or cold injection wedges which include: (i) Single shallow wedge (or Flake), (ii) Double shallow and deep wedge, (iii) Deep lithospheric crocodile, (iv) Crustal thickening due to shallow strength differences, (v) Mantle Lithosphere thickening, or wedging, due to deep mantle strength differences and (vii) Exchange tectonics as an extreme wedging process, in which horizontal mass exchange is approximately equal. Rheological calculations are compared to a database of seismic profiles in which the geometry of detachment zones and proposed thermal conditions and lithological make-ups have been presented.

  10. High-Mg# andesites and basalts from the Kamchatka-Kurile subduction system: Implications for primitive arc magma genesis and mantle wedge processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, J. A.; Yogodzinski, G. M.; Churikova, T. G.; Volynets, O. N.

    2007-12-01

    Primitive arc magmatism and mantle wedge processes are investigated through a petrologic and geochemical study of high Mg# (Mg/Mg+Fe>0.65) basalts and andesites from the Kurile-Kamchatka subduction system. The primitive andesites are from the Shisheisky complex (Portnyagin et al., AGU Monograph 172, 2007), a field of Quaternary-age, monogenetic cones located in the Aleutian-Kamchatka junction, north of Shiveluch Volcano, the northernmost active composite cone in Kamchatka. The Shisheisky lavas are similar to primitive andesites from Mt. Shasta, Piip Volcano, and Setouchi, Japan. They have Mg# of 0.66-0.73 at intermediate SiO2 (54-58 wt%), low CaO/Al2O3 (<0.54), and high Ni (184-243 ppm) and Cr (418-880 ppm). Olivine phenocryst core compositions of ~FO90 appear to be in equilibrium with whole-rock `melts', consistent with the aphyric to sparsely phyric nature of these lavas. Compared to the Shishiesky andesites, primitive basalts from the region (Alaid, Tolbachik, Kharchinsky) have higher CaO/Al2O3 (0.69-0.86), and lower whole-rock Ni (105-182 ppm), Cr (395-531 ppm), and Ni/MgO (10-17) at similar Mg# (0.66-.70). Olivine phenocrysts in the basalts have similarly higher CaO, lower Ni, and lower Ni/MgO at ~FO88 compared to the andesites. The absence of plagioclase phenocrysts from the primitive andesites strongly contrasts petrographic observations of the plagioclase-phyric basalts, indicating relatively high pre-eruptive water contents for the andesites compared to the basalts. Petrographic and mineral composition data suggest that the Shisheisky primitive andesites were liquids in equilibrium with mantle peridotite, and were not produced by mixing between primitive basalts and evolved felsic magmas or from contamination by xenocrystic olivine. The key features of the Shisheisky primitive andesites (e.g., low CaO/Al2O3 and high Ni/MgO at high Mg#) appear to have been acquired at sub-moho depths, by processes and under physical conditions in the mantle wedge (lower

  11. Tumor Targeting, Trifunctional Dendritic Wedge

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report in vitro and in vivo evaluation of a newly designed trifunctional theranostic agent for targeting solid tumors. This agent combines a dendritic wedge with high boron content for boron neutron capture therapy or boron MRI, a monomethine cyanine dye for visible-light fluorescent imaging, and an integrin ligand for efficient tumor targeting. We report photophysical properties of the new agent, its cellular uptake and in vitro targeting properties. Using live animal imaging and intravital microscopy (IVM) techniques, we observed a rapid accumulation of the agent and its retention for a prolonged period of time (up to 7 days) in fully established animal models of human melanoma and murine mammary adenocarcinoma. This macromolecular theranostic agent can be used for targeted delivery of high boron load into solid tumors for future applications in boron neutron capture therapy. PMID:25350602

  12. Microtopographic characterization of ice-wedge polygon landscape in Barrow, Alaska: a digital map of troughs, rims, centers derived from high resolution (0.25 m) LiDAR data

    SciTech Connect

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wullschleger, Stan

    2014-07-03

    The dataset represents microtopographic characterization of the ice-wedge polygon landscape in Barrow, Alaska. Three microtopographic features are delineated using 0.25 m high resolution digital elevation dataset derived from LiDAR. The troughs, rims, and centers are the three categories in this classification scheme. The polygon troughs are the surface expression of the ice-wedges that are in lower elevations than the interior polygon. The elevated shoulders of the polygon interior immediately adjacent to the polygon troughs are the polygon rims for the low center polygons. In case of high center polygons, these features are the topographic highs. In this classification scheme, both topographic highs and rims are considered as polygon rims. The next version of the dataset will include more refined classification scheme including separate classes for rims ad topographic highs. The interior part of the polygon just adjacent to the polygon rims are the polygon centers.

  13. Capillary Rise in a Wedge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piva, M.

    2009-01-01

    In introductory-level physics courses, the concept of surface tension is often illustrated using the example of capillary rise in thin tubes. In this paper the author describes experiments conducted using a planar geometry created with two small plates forming a thin wedge. The distribution of the fluid entering the wedge can be studied as a…

  14. Geochemistry of rare high-Nb basalt lavas: Are they derived from a mantle wedge metasomatised by slab melts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastie, Alan R.; Mitchell, Simon F.; Kerr, Andrew C.; Minifie, Matthew J.; Millar, Ian L.

    2011-09-01

    Compositionally, high-Nb basalts are similar to HIMU (high U/Pb) ocean island basalts, continental alkaline basalts and alkaline lavas formed above slab windows. Tertiary alkaline basaltic lavas from eastern Jamaica, West Indies, known as the Halberstadt Volcanic Formation have compositions similar to high-Nb basalts (Nb > 20 ppm). The Halberstadt high-Nb basalts are divided into two compositional sub-groups where Group 1 lavas have more enriched incompatible element concentrations relative to Group 2. Both groups are derived from isotopically different spinel peridotite mantle source regions, which both require garnet and amphibole as metasomatic residual phases. The Halberstadt geochemistry demonstrates that the lavas cannot be derived by partial melting of lower crustal ultramafic complexes, metasomatised mantle lithosphere, subducting slabs, continental crust, mantle plume source regions or an upper mantle source region composed of enriched and depleted components. Instead, their composition, particularly the negative Ce anomalies, the high Th/Nb ratios and the similar isotopic ratios to nearby adakite lavas, suggests that the Halberstadt magmas are derived from a compositionally variable spinel peridotite source region(s) metasomatised by slab melts that precipitated garnet, amphibole, apatite and zircon. It is suggested that high-Nb basalts may be classified as a distinct rock type with Nb > 20 ppm, intraplate alkaline basalt compositions, but that are generated in subduction zones by magmatic processes distinct from those that generate other intraplate lavas.

  15. Wedge Waveguides and Resonators for Quantum Plasmonics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic structures can provide deep-subwavelength electromagnetic fields that are useful for enhancing light–matter interactions. However, because these localized modes are also dissipative, structures that offer the best compromise between field confinement and loss have been sought. Metallic wedge waveguides were initially identified as an ideal candidate but have been largely abandoned because to date their experimental performance has been limited. We combine state-of-the-art metallic wedges with integrated reflectors and precisely placed colloidal quantum dots (down to the single-emitter level) and demonstrate quantum-plasmonic waveguides and resonators with performance approaching theoretical limits. By exploiting a nearly 10-fold improvement in wedge-plasmon propagation (19 μm at a vacuum wavelength, λvac, of 630 nm), efficient reflectors (93%), and effective coupling (estimated to be >70%) to highly emissive (∼90%) quantum dots, we obtain Ag plasmonic resonators at visible wavelengths with quality factors approaching 200 (3.3 nm line widths). As our structures offer modal volumes down to ∼0.004λvac3 in an exposed single-mode waveguide–resonator geometry, they provide advantages over both traditional photonic microcavities and localized-plasmonic resonators for enhancing light–matter interactions. Our results confirm the promise of wedges for creating plasmonic devices and for studying coherent quantum-plasmonic effects such as long-distance plasmon-mediated entanglement and strong plasmon–matter coupling. PMID:26284499

  16. Tectonometamorphic evolution of the Samaná complex, northern Hispaniola: Implications for the burial and exhumation of high-pressure rocks in a collisional accretionary wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escuder-Viruete, Javier; Pérez-Estaún, Andrés; Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Valverde-Vaquero, Pablo

    2011-07-01

    The Samaná complex exposes a segment of a high-P metasedimentary collisional accretionary wedge, built during Caribbean island arc-North America continental margin convergence. Combined detailed mapping, metamorphic mineral assemblages, multi-equilibrium calculations and thermodynamical modelling of garnet zoning, together with isotopic ages, allow proposing a tectonothermal evolution of the complex involving three major stages (M1 to M3). M1 metamorphism was characterised by a prograde P-T path towards the pressure-peak in the lawsonite-blueschists (Santa Bárbara Schists and Rincón Marbles lower structural nappes) and garnet-blueschists to eclogite-facies conditions (Punta Balandra upper nappe). This high-P metamorphism and related D1 deformation took place from the Eocene to Late Oligocene, when the different nappes were buried along a cold subduction-zone gradient. Contemporary to the D2 deformation, M2 retrograde metamorphism was associated in all nappes with substantial decompression under nearly isothermal or cooling conditions to the epidote-blueschists and greenchists facies conditions. D2 deformation produced ENE-directed folding, thrusting and nappe stacking in the complex, when nappes went sequentially incorporated to a growing collisional accretionary complex between the Late Eocene and the earliest Miocene. D2 deformation is thus responsible for much of the exhumation of the subducted rocks and for the thinning of the nappe pile. As the continuity of the P-T conditions within the accreted metasedimentary material were in this case preserved, the exhumation mechanisms for Samaná complex high-P rocks was most probably driven by underthrusting/underplating and erosion. Non-penetrative fabrics associated with D3 and D4 late deformations indicate M3 cooling in the greenschists and subgreenchists-facies conditions. D5 sinistral strike-slip brittle faults cut and laterally displaced the whole nappe pile of the Samaná complex from the Lower Miocene to the

  17. Medial Closing-Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy: Fixation With Proximal Tibial Locking Plate.

    PubMed

    Tírico, Luís Eduardo Passarelli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pécora, José Ricardo

    2015-12-01

    Distal femoral varus osteotomy is a well-established procedure for the treatment of lateral compartment cartilage lesions and degenerative disease, correcting limb alignment and decreasing the progression of the pathology. Surgical techniques can be performed with a lateral opening-wedge or medial closing-wedge correction of the deformity. Fixation methods for lateral opening-wedge osteotomies are widely available, and there are various types of implants that can be used for fixation. However, there are currently only a few options of implants for fixation of a medial closing-wedge osteotomy on the market. This report describes a medial, supracondylar, V-shaped, closing-wedge distal femoral osteotomy using a locked anterolateral proximal tibial locking plate that fits anatomically to the medial side of the distal femur. This is a great option as a stable implant for a medial closing-wedge distal femoral osteotomy. PMID:26870647

  18. Bouncing and bursting in a wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyssat, Etienne; Cohen, Caroline; Quere, David

    2015-11-01

    Placed into an inhomogeneous confined medium, non-wetting drops tend to be expelled from the tightest regions, where their contact with the walls would be maximized. They preferentially explore more open areas which are favorable from the point of view of capillary energy. Following this principle, one may thus use the geometry of confined environments to control fluid droplets in various ways : displacing, filtering, fragmenting... In this communication, we present experimental results on the dynamics of Leidenfrost drops launched into a wedge formed by two quasi-horizontal glass plates. Influenced by the gradient of confinement, these non-wetting liquid pucks approach the apex of the wedge to a minimal distance where they bounce back. At higher impact velocity, we observe that drops tend to penetrate deeper into the wedge but often burst into a large number of small fragments. We also discuss ways to control the deviation of droplets from their initial trajectory. We propose scaling law analyses to explain the characteristics of the observed bouncing and bursting phenomena.

  19. Effect of Mantle Wedge Hybridization by Sediment Melt on Geochemistry of Arc Magma and Arc Mantle Source - Insights from Laboratory Experiments at High Pressures and Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, A.; Dasgupta, R.; Tsuno, K.; Nelson, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Generation of arc magmas involves metasomatism of the mantle wedge by slab-derived H2O-rich fluids and/or melts and subsequent melting of the modified source. The chemistry of arc magmas and the residual mantle wedge are not only regulated by the chemistry of the slab input, but also by the phase relations of metasomatism or hybridization process in the wedge. The sediment-derived silica-rich fluids and hydrous partial melts create orthopyroxene-rich zones in the mantle wedge, due to reaction of mantle olivine with silica in the fluid/melt [1,2]. Geochemical evidence for such a reaction comes from pyroxenitic lithologies coexisting with peridotite in supra-subduction zones. In this study, we have simulated the partial melting of a parcel of mantle wedge modified by bulk addition of sediment-derived melt with variable H2O contents to investigate the major and trace element chemistry of the magmas and the residues formed by this process. Experiments at 2-3 GPa and 1150-1300 °C were conducted on mixtures of 25% sediment-derived melt and 75% lherzolite, with bulk H2O contents varying from 2 to 6 wt.%. Partial reactive crystallization of the rhyolitic slab-derived melt and partial melting of the mixed source produced a range of melt compositions from ultra-K basanites to basaltic andesites, in equilibrium with an orthopyroxene ± phlogopite ± clinopyroxene ± garnet bearing residue, depending on P and bulk H2O content. Model calculations using partition coefficients (from literature) of trace elements between experimental minerals and silicate melt suggest that the geochemical signatures of the slab-derived melt, such as low Ce/Pb and depletion in Nb and Ta (characteristic slab signatures) are not erased from the resulting melt owing to reactive crystallization. The residual mineral assemblage is also found to be similar to the supra-subduction zone lithologies, such as those found in Dabie Shan (China) and Sanbagawa Belt (Japan). In this presentation, we will also

  20. Deformation of the Calabrian accretionary wedge and relative kinematics of the Calabrian and Peloritan backstops: Insights from multibeam bathymetry, high-resolution reflection and wide-angle seismics and analog modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellong, David; Gutscher, Marc-Andre; Klingelhoefer, Frauke; Graindorge, David; Kopp, Heidrun; Moretti, Milena; Marsset, Bruno; Mercier de Lepinay, Bernard; Dominguez, Stephane; Malavieille, Jacques

    2016-04-01

    Recently acquired swath bathymetric data in the Ionian Sea document in unprecedented detail the morphostructure and dynamics of the Calabrian accretionary wedge. A boundary zone between the eastern and western lobes of the accretionary wedge is examined here. Relative displacement between the Calabrian and Peloritan backstops is expected to cause dextral strike-slip deformation between the lobes. A wide-angle seismic profile was acquired in Oct. 2014 with the R/V Meteor (DIONYSUS survey) recorded by 25 Ocean-bottom seismometers (Geomar and Ifremer instruments) and 3 land-stations (INGV stations). Inversion and forward modeling of these seismic data reveal a 5-10 km deep asymmetric rift zone between the Malta Escarpment and the SW tip of Calabria. Analog modeling was performed to test if the origin of this rift could be related to the relative kinematics of the Calabrian and Peloritan backstops. Modeling, using two independently moving backstops, produces a zone of dextral transtension and subsidence in the accretionary wedge between two lobes. This corresponds well to the asymmetric rift observed in the southward prolongation of the straits of Messina faults. Paradoxically however, this dextral displacement does not appear to traverse the external Calabrian accretionary wedge, where prominent curved lineaments observed indicate a sinistral sense of motion. One possible explanation is that the dextral kinematic motion is transferred into a region of crisscrossing faults in the internal portion of the Eastern lobe. The bathymetry and high-resolution reflection seismic images indicate ongoing compression at the deformation front of both the western and eastern lobes. Together with the analog modeling results, these observations unambiguously demonstrate that the western lobe remains tectonically active.

  1. Dosimetric Characteristics of 6 MV Modified Beams by Physical Wedges of a Siemens Linear Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Zabihzadeh, Mansour; Birgani, Mohammad Javad Tahmasebi; Hoseini-Ghahfarokhi, Mojtaba; Arvandi, Sholeh; Hoseini, Seyed Mohammad; Fadaei, Mahbube

    2016-01-01

    Physical wedges still can be used as missing tissue compensators or filters to alter the shape of isodose curves in a target volume to reach an optimal radiotherapy plan without creating a hotspot. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric properties of physical wedges filters such as off-axis photon fluence, photon spectrum, output factor and half value layer. The photon beam quality of a 6 MV Primus Siemens modified by 150 and 450 physical wedges was studied with BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code. The calculated present depth dose and dose profile curves for open and wedged photon beam were in good agreement with the measurements. Increase of wedge angle increased the beam hardening and this effect was more pronounced at the heal region. Using such an accurate MC model to determine of wedge factors and implementation of it as a calculation algorithm in the future treatment planning systems is recommended. PMID:27221838

  2. Wedge Heat-Flux Indicators for Flash Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2003-01-01

    Wedge indicators have been proposed for measuring thermal radiation that impinges on specimens illuminated by flash lamps for thermographic inspection. Heat fluxes measured by use of these indicators would be used, along with known thermal, radiative, and geometric properties of the specimens, to estimate peak flash temperatures on the specimen surfaces. These indicators would be inexpensive alternatives to high-speed infrared pyrometers, which would otherwise be needed for measuring peak flash surface temperatures. The wedge is made from any suitable homogenous material such as plastic. The choice of material is governed by the equation given. One side of the wedge is covered by a temperature sensitive compound that decomposes irreversibly when its temperature exceeds a rated temperature (T-rated). The uncoated side would be positioned alongside or in place of the specimen and exposed to the flash, then the wedge thickness at the boundary between the white and blackened portions measured.

  3. Single-photon cooling in a wedge billiard

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, S.; Sundaram, B.; Raizen, M. G.

    2010-09-15

    Single-photon cooling (SPC), noted for its potential as a versatile method for cooling a variety of atomic species, has recently been demonstrated experimentally. In this paper, we study possible ways to improve the performance of SPC by applying it to atoms trapped inside a wedge billiard. The main feature of the wedge billiard for atoms, also experimentally realized recently, is that the nature of atomic trajectories within it changes from stable periodic orbit to random chaotic motion with the change in wedge angle. We find that a high cooling efficiency is possible in this system with a relatively weak dependence on the wedge angle and that chaotic dynamics, rather than a regular orbit, is more desirable for enhancing the performance of SPC.

  4. Ultrasonic fluid densitometer having liquid/wedge and gas/wedge interfaces

    DOEpatents

    Greenwood, Margaret S.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an ultrasonic liquid densitometer that uses a material wedge having two sections, one with a liquid/wedge interface and another with a gas/wedge interface. It is preferred that the wedge have an acoustic impedance that is near the acoustic impedance of the liquid, specifically less than a factor of 11 greater than the acoustic impedance of the liquid. Ultrasonic signals are internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a liquid is determined by immersing the wedge into the liquid and measuring reflections of ultrasound at the liquid/wedge interface and at the gas/wedge interface.

  5. Geophysical Surveys for Detecting Distribution and Shape of Ice Wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Matsuoka, N.; Ikeda, A.

    2006-12-01

    Recent development of applied geophysical methods has shown detailed structure in various periglacial features. However, these methods have been rarely applied to studies in ice wedges. Thus, we attempted to display distribution and shape of ice wedges using a ground penetrating radar (GPR) and a direct current (DC) resistivity meter. The surveys were performed at a comprehensive monitoring site of ice-wedging in Adventdalen, Svalbard, where troughs and small cracks form polygonal patterns on the ground. Unknown structure below such new cracks is also focused in this study. We obtained 37 GPR profiles using 250 MHz signal. 2-D resistivity surveys were also performed along 14 GPR profiles. The electrodes were placed at 1 m intervals and their combination followed the Wenner array. In addition, shallow boreholes were dug across 5 troughs/cracks to estimate the width of ice wedge. The analyzed results show parabolic patterns formed by the multiple radar waveforms and largely increasing gradients of DC resistivity below the troughs and small cracks. The strong reflections of the radar signals and the starting zones of the increasing resistivity lay about 1 m deep, which corresponded to the top of ice wedges (0.7-0.9 m deep) revealed by the drilling. In the GPR profiles, a relatively flat pattern of the reflection was sandwiched by a pair of parabolic patterns below each well-developed trough, whereas a sharp parabolic pattern was detected below each small crack. These results mean that the presence of narrow ice wedges is detectable by the GPR method and the top of a parabolic pattern roughly corresponds to one edge of an ice wedge table. In the DC resistivity profiles, a high resistivity core exists below each trough and crack. The high resistivity probably resulted from ice having lower unfrozen water content than the surrounding silt materials. The heights of the cores indicate that the ice wedges were formed at least between 1 m and 3 m deep. The cores are, however

  6. Reverse wedge osteotomy of the distal radius in Madelung's deformity.

    PubMed

    Mallard, F; Jeudy, J; Rabarin, F; Raimbeau, G; Fouque, P-A; Cesari, B; Bizot, P; Saint-Cast, Y

    2013-06-01

    Madelung's deformity results from a growth defect in the palmar and ulnar region of the distal radius. It presents as an excessively inclined radial joint surface, inducing "spontaneous progressive palmar subluxation of the wrist". The principle of reverse wedge osteotomy (RWO) consists in the reorientation of the radial joint surface by taking a circumferential bone wedge, the base of which is harvested from the excess of the radial and dorsal cortical bone of the distal radius, then turning it over and putting back this reverse wedge into the osteotomy so as to obtain closure on the excess and opening on the deficient cortical bone. RWO corrects the palmar subluxation of the carpus and improves distal radio-ulnar alignment. All five bilaterally operated patients were satisfied, esthetically and functionally. Its corrective power gives RWO a place apart among the surgical techniques currently available in Madelung's deformity. PMID:23622863

  7. Coherent beam combination using self-phase locked stimulated Brillouin scattering phase conjugate mirrors with a rotating wedge for high power laser generation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sangwoo; Cha, Seongwoo; Oh, Jungsuk; Lee, Hwihyeong; Ahn, Heekyung; Churn, Kil Sung; Kong, Hong Jin

    2016-04-18

    The self-phase locking of a stimulated Brillouin scattering-phase conjugate mirror (SBS-PCM) allows a simple and scalable coherent beam combination of existing lasers. We propose a simple optical system composed of a rotating wedge and a concave mirror to overcome the power limit of the SBS-PCM. Its phase locking ability and the usefulness on the beam-combination laser are demonstrated experimentally. A four-beam combination is demonstrated using this SBS-PCM scheme. The relative phases between the beams were measured to be less than λ/24.7. PMID:27137299

  8. The decay of highly excited open strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, D.; Turok, N.; Wilkinson, R.; Jetzer, P.

    1988-01-01

    The decay rates of leading edge Regge trajectory states are calculated for very high level number in open bosonic string theories, ignoring tachyon final states. The optical theorem simplifies the analysis while enabling identification of the different mass level decay channels. The main result is that (in four dimensions) the greatest single channel is the emission of a single photon and a state of the next mass level down. A simple asymptotic formula for arbitrarily high level number is given for this process. Also calculated is the total decay rate exactly up to N=100. It shows little variation over this range but appears to decrease for larger N. The formalism is checked in examples and the decay rate of the first excited level calculated for open superstring theories. The calculation may also have implications for high spin meson resonances.

  9. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.; Feldman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10.sup.8. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing.

  10. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.; Feldman, M.

    1992-12-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10[sup 8]. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing. 7 figs.

  11. A depth dependence determination of the wedge transmission factor for 4-10 MV photon beams.

    PubMed

    McCullough, E C; Gortney, J; Blackwell, C R

    1988-01-01

    The depth dependence (up to 25 cm) of the in-phantom wedge transmission factor (WTF) has been determined for three medical linear accelerator x-ray beams with energies of 4, 6, and 10 MV containing 15 degrees-60 degrees (nominal) brass wedges. All measurements were made with a cylindrical ionization chamber in water, for a field size of 10 X 10 cm2 with a source-skin distance of 80 or 100 cm. We conclude that, for the accelerators studied, the WTF factor at depth is less than 2% different from that determined at dmax (for the nominal wedge angles and photon energies studied) unless the depth of interest is greater than 10 cm. Up to the maximum depth studied (25 cm) the relative wedge factor--that is, wedge factor at depth compared to that determined at dmax--was about equal to or less than 1.02 for the 15 degrees and 30 degrees wedges and any of the photon beam energies studied. For the seldom utilized combination of a nominal wedge angle in excess of 45 degrees with a depth greater than 10 cm, the WTF at depth can differ from the WTF determined at dmax, by up to 5%. Since the wedge transmission factor is reflective of relative percent dose data, our results also indicate that it is in error to use open field percent depth doses for certain combinations of wedge angle, photon energy, and depth. PMID:3211057

  12. Predicting/Extrapolating Active Layer Thickness Using Statistical Learning from Remotely-Sensed High-resolution Data in Arctic Permafrost Landscapes: Improved parameterization of Ice-wedge polygons from LiDAR/WorldView-2 derived metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangodagamage, C.; Rowland, J. C.; Hubbard, S. S.; Brumby, S. P.; Liljedahl, A.; Wainwright, H. M.; Sloan, V. L.; Altmann, G.; Skurikhin, A. N.; Shelef, E.; Wilson, C. J.; Dafflon, B.; Peterson, J.; Ulrich, C.; Gibbs, A.; Tweedie, C. E.; Painter, S. L.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Landscape attributes that vary with micro-topography, such as active layer thickness (ALT) in ice-wedge polygon ground, are labor-intensive to document in the field at large spatial extents, necessitating remotely sensed methods. Robust techniques to estimate ALT over large areas would improve understanding of coupled dynamics between permafrost, hydrology and landsurface processes, and improve simulations of the rate and timing of release of soil carbon from permafrost settings. In particular, it would provide critically needed data to parameterize and initialize soil property information in permafrost models and evaluate model predictions for large, complex domains. In this work, we demonstrate a new data fusion approach using high-resolution remotely sensed data for estimating cm scale ALT in a 5 km2 area of ice-wedge polygon terrain in Barrow, Alaska. We used topographic (directed distance, slope, wavelet-curvature) and spectral (NDVI) metrics derived from multisensor data obtained from LiDAR and WorldView-2 platforms to develop a simple data fusion algorithm using statistical machine learning. This algorithm was used to estimate ALT (2 m spatial resolution) across the study area. A comparison of the estimates with ground-based measurements documented the accuracy (±4.4 cm, r2=0.76) of the approach. Our findings suggest that the broad climatic variability associated with warming air temperature will govern the regional averages of ALT, but the smaller-scale variability could be controlled by local eco-hydro-geomorphic variables. This work demonstrates a path forward for mapping subsurface properties over large areas from readily available remote sensing data. Methodology of Mapping and Characterization Polygons:We convolve LiDAR elevations with multiscale wavelets and objectively chose appropriate scales to map interconnected troughs of high- and low-centered polygons. For the ice wedges where LiDAR surface expressions (troughs) are not well developed, we used

  13. Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Edward S.

    1982-01-01

    An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

  14. Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, E.S.

    1980-05-09

    An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

  15. Tritanium acetabular wedge augments: short-term results

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Camilo; Heller, Snir

    2016-01-01

    Background Reconstruction of acetabular defects in total hip arthroplasty (THA) presents a great challenge to orthopaedic surgeons. Previous studies have reported on the use and outcomes of trabecular metal acetabular augments for the reconstruction of acetabular defects. However, no study has been conducted evaluating the short-term results of tritanium acetabular wedge augments for the reconstruction of acetabular defects in THA. Methods A retrospective study was conducted using a prospective database at a single institution including primary and revision THA patients from January 2013 to December 2014. Patients were included if they received a tritanium acetabular wedge augment system and had a minimum of 2-year follow-up (average 2.2 years ±0.3, range, 2–2.6 years). Demographic data and outcomes data [Harris Hip Score—HHS and Short Form (SF)-36] was collected. Radiographic data was also collected on THA revision cases (Paprosky classification), developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) cases (Crowe classification), and radiographic follow-up using DeLee and Charnley’s classification system. Results There were 4 revision THA patients, 3 DDH patients, and 1 patient with posttraumatic arthritis. At the latest radiographic follow-up, there were no lucent lines in DeLee and Charnley Zones I, II or III. During the follow-up period, there was no open revision surgery. The SF-36 physical score significantly improved from preoperative measurement (29.6±2.2) to postoperative measurement (52.2±8.7, P=0.003), and the SF-36 mental score also significantly improved from preoperative assessment (34.5±4.5) to postoperative assessment (52.2±7.5, P=0.003). Total HHS scores also significantly improved postoperatively (P=0.02), with significant improvements in both the pain score (P=0.01) and function score (P=0.02). Conclusions Tritanium acetabular wedge augments in this short follow-up case series exhibit high clinical outcome scores, no radiographic lucency, and no

  16. Thermal-wave fields in solid wedges using the Green function method: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Rui; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Chinhua; Mandelis, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    In this work, we establish a theoretical model for a cylindrical rod of radius R with opening angle θ illuminated by a modulated incident beam. The model uses the Green function method in cylindrical coordinates. An analytical expression for the Green function and thermal-wave field in such a solid is presented. The theory is validated in the limit of reducing the arbitrary wedge geometrical structure to simpler geometries. For acute angle wedges, it is shown that the thermal-wave field near the edge exhibits confinement behavior and increased amplitude compared to a flat (reference) solid with θ = π. For obtuse angle wedges, it is shown that the opposite is true and relaxation of confinement occurs leading to lower amplitude thermal-wave fields. The theory provides a basis for quantitative thermophysical characterization of wedge-shaped objects and it is tested using an AISI 304 steel wedge and photothermal radiometry detection.

  17. Wide FOV wedge prism endoscope.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keri; Kim, Daeyoung; Matsumiya, Kiyoshi; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Dohi, Takeyoshi

    2005-01-01

    We.. have developed a novel robotic endoscope system. It can be used to observe a wide field of view without moving or bending the whole endoscope system. .. It consists of a rigid endoscope and two wedge prisms at the distal tip. Rotating each wedge prism respectively, we can change the direction of view. Accordingly it becomes possible to observe a wide field of view even in a small space, and suited to clinical uses because it does not damage body tissues or internal organs. .. Wedge prisms are designed to avoid vignetting which is caused by the refraction or the reflection at prisms. The endoscope has 10mm in diameter, and the drive unit is simply separable for the sterilization. In addition, since it has a simple and small drive unit, it does not obstruct surgeon or other surgery robots. The maximum movement of local field of view is 19degrees, and global field of view is 93degrees. In the evaluation experiment, we conformed that both of the image quality and the performance are acceptable. PMID:17281566

  18. High-torque open-end wrench

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giandomenico, A.; Dame, J. M.; Behimer, H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A wrench is described that is usable where limited access normally requires an open-end wrench, but which has substantially the high-torque capacity and small radial clearance characteristics of a closed-end wrench. The wrench includes a sleeve forming a nut-engageable socket with a gap in its side, and an adaptor forming a socket with a gap in its side, the adaptor closely surrounding the sleeve and extending across the gap in the sleeve. The sleeve and adaptor have surfaces that become fully engaged when a wrench handle is applied to the adaptor to turn it so as to tighten a nut engaged by the sleeve.

  19. Opening the high-energy frontier

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, C.

    1988-12-01

    I review the scientific motivation for an experimental assault on the 1-TeV scale, elaborating the idea of technicolor as one interesting possibility for what may be found there. I then summarize some of the discovery possibilities opened by a high-luminosity, multi-TeV proton-proton collider. After a brief resume of the experimental environment anticipated at the SSC, I report on the status of the SSC R D effort and discuss the work to be carried out over the course of the next year. 37 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Mantle wedge peridotites: Fossil reservoirs of deep subduction zone processes: Inferences from high and ultrahigh-pressure rocks from Bardane (Western Norway) and Ulten (Italian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scambelluri, Marco; Van Roermund, Herman L. M.; Pettke, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    The garnet websterites from Bardane (Western Gneiss Region, Norway) derive from cold Archean subcontinental lithosphere involved in Scandian continental subduction to ultrahigh-pressures. Subduction zone metamorphism was promoted by slab fluid infiltration into the cold overlying mantle wedge. The earliest subduction transformation (M3-1) consists of garnet/clinopyroxene exsolution from old pre-subduction orthopyroxene. This stage was likely coeval with fluid input and formation of phlogopite and dolomite rods in the exsolution structures. Magnesite formation after dolomite and entrapment of fluid-related diamond-bearing polyphase inclusions in corona structures around the exsolved orthopyroxenes point to pressure increase to 4.5 GPa (M3-2). Peak pressures of 6.5-7 GPa (c.a. 200 km depth) are witnessed by crystallization of majoritic garnet (M3-3), mostly in veins cutting all the above microstructures. When such veins infiltrate the corona domains, formation of majoritic garnet in coronas is enhanced. This multistage evolution thus envisages episodic fluid influx, favouring rock recrystallization and formation of microdiamond-bearing inclusions and of majoritic garnet veins. These mantle rocks thus record fluid circulation along grain boundaries and microfractures down to 200 km depth in subduction environments. The Ulten Zone peridotites are slices of Variscan mantle wedge. Infiltration of metasomatic subduction fluids favoured transition from spinel-facies to garnet + amphibole ± dolomite parageneses at pressures below 3 GPa. Formation of metasomatized garnet-bearing peridotite mylonites suggest channelled influx of subduction fluids. The incompatible element-enriched signature of all subduction minerals in Bardane indicate that previously depleted websterites have been refertilized by COH subduction fluids. Comparison with the Ulten Zone garnet + amphibole ± dolomite peridotites outlines striking similarities in the metasomatic style and in the COH fluid phase

  1. Thrust wedges and fluid overpressures: Sandbox models involving pore fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourgues, R.; Cobbold, P. R.

    2006-05-01

    The well-known model for the critical taper of an accretionary wedge includes overpressure as a first-order parameter. Fluid overpressures reduce frictional resistance at the base of a wedge but they also act as body forces on all material particles of the wedge, in addition to that of gravity. By means of sandbox modeling, many workers have tried to verify the predictions of the critical taper model, but few of them have so far incorporated true fluid pressures. We have used scaled experiments, in which compressed air flows through sand packs, so as to model the deformation of overpressured wedges. A new apparatus provides for a horizontally varying fluid pressure, for example, a linear variation, as in the critical taper model. We have done three series of experiments, involving horizontal shortening of homogeneous or multilayered sand models for various gradients of fluid pressure. As predicted by the critical taper model, the apical angle of the resulting wedge depends on the overpressure gradient. In homogeneous sand at a high overpressure gradient, deformation becomes diffuse and looks ductile. In multilayered models, detachments form beneath layers of low permeability, so that thrusts propagate rapidly toward the undeformed foreland. The efficiency of a detachment and its ability to propagate depend not only on the fluid pressure but also on the permeability ratios between the various layers.

  2. The Influence of Localized Glacial Erosion on Exhumation Paths in Accreting Coulomb Wedges: Insights from Particle Velocimetry Analysis of Sandbox Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, P. J.; Davis, K.; Haq, S. S. B.; Ridgway, K.

    2015-12-01

    Glacial erosion can have an impact on the location and development of faults in mountain belts. The rapid removal and deposition of rock, in some cases, is thought to affect the initiation of slip on older fault structures, or cause the development of new structures within the older part of the wedge. We present cross-sectional data from both erosional and non-erosional sandbox models of Coulomb wedges in order to quantify the impact of localized erosion on the location of and slip on deformational structures, as well as the general path of material through a wedge. To do this, we employ Lagrangian particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) using the open-source Python PTV toolkit trackpy, among a suite of other data analysis tools. We are able to extract robust and reliable sets of particle trajectories from a series of images without the need for predefined markers or marker-beds, instead identifying and tracking natural variations in sand color as individual particles. By comparing the motion of particles in cross-section to the local surface topography over an entire experiment, we determine a high-resolution record of exhumation rates, in addition to simple uplift rates. These comparisons are further informed by the use of high-definition Eulerian particle image velocimetry (PIV), which provides quantitative data about the distribution of deformation and instantaneous material displacements throughout a cross-sectional view of a Coulomb wedge. This allows us to interpret these pathways in relation to the behavior of active structures and general wedge morphology. In our experiments, we observe that localized glacial erosion has an impact on material pathways, in the form of an increased rate of exhumation locally, more vertical trajectories towards surface below the zone of erosion, and reactivation of older structures to maintain force balance within the entire wedge.

  3. Assessment of computerized treatment planning system accuracy in calculating wedge factors of physical wedged fields for 6 MV photon beams.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Wazir; Maqbool, Muhammad; Shahid, Muhammad; Hussain, Amjad; Tahir, Sajjad; Matiullah; Rooh, Gul; Ahmad, Tanveer; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2011-07-01

    Wedge filters are commonly used in external beam radiotherapy to achieve a uniform dose distribution within the target volume. The main objective of this study was to investigate the accuracy of the beam modifier algorithm of Theraplan plus (TPP version 3.8) treatment planning system and to confirm that either the beam hardening, beam softening and attenuation coefficients along with wedge geometry and measured wedge factor at single depth and multiple fields sizes can be the replacement of wedged profile and wedged cross-sectional data or not. In this regard the effect of beam hardening and beam softening was studied with physical wedges for 6 MV photons. The Normalized Wedge Factors (NWFs) were measured experimentally as well as calculated with the Theraplan plus, as a function of depth and field size in a water phantom for 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° wedge filters. The beam hardening and softening was determined experimentally by deriving the required coefficients for all wedge angles. The TPP version 3.8 requires wedge transmission factor at single depth and multiple field sizes. Without incorporating the hardening and softening coefficients the percent difference between measured and calculated NFWs was as high as 7%. After the introduction of these parameters into the algorithm, the agreement between measured and TPP (V 3.8) calculated NWFs were improved to within 2 percent for various depths. Similar improvement was observed in TPP version 3.8 while calculating NWFs for various field sizes when the required coefficients were adjusted. In conclusion, the dose calculation algorithm of TPP version 3.8 showed good accuracy for a 6 MV photon beam provided beam hardening and softening parameters are taken into account. From the results, it is also concluded that, the beam hardening, beam softening and attenuation coefficients along with wedge geometry and measured wedge factor at single depth and multiple fields sizes can be the replacement of wedged profile and

  4. Some Historical Treatments should not be Forgotten: A Review of Cast Wedging and A Trick to Normalize Non-Standardized Digital X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Nathan A.; Lee, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cast wedging is a simple and reproducible method of manipulating a sub-optimally reduced fracture producing a correction and a final alignment that is amenable to definitive closed treatment. Multiple successful techniques have been previously described in the literature (opening wedge, closing wedge and combination). Technical Note: We present a simple reproducible method of templating and executing a proper cast wedging technique using digital imaging systems that are not controlled for magnification with an illustrative case. Conclusion: Renewed interest in cast wedging can provide a cost effective treatment with proven clinical outcomes in an ever changing and uncertain reimbursement climate. PMID:27298956

  5. Ultrasonic radiation from wedges of cubic profile: Experimental results.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian E; Remillieux, Marcel C; Le Bas, Pierre-Yves; Ulrich, T J; Pieczonka, Lukasz

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents experimental results demonstrating the increase in ultrasonic radiation obtained from a wedge of cubic profile relative to a plate of uniform thickness. The wedge of cubic profile provides high efficiency sound radiation matching layer from a mounted piezoelectric transducer into the surrounding air. Previous research on structures with indentations of power-law profile has focused on vibration mitigation using the so called "acoustic black-hole" effect, whereas here such structures are used to enhance ultrasonic radiation. The work provides experimental verification of the numerical results of Remillieux et al. (2014). PMID:26166628

  6. Mobile wedges in an active turbulent bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Sokolov, Andrey; Lowen, Hartmut; Aronson, Igor S.

    The motion of micro-wedges in a turbulent bacterial bath is explored using computer simulations with explicit modeling of the bacteria and experiments. We demonstrate that collective turbulentlike motion in a bacterial bath can power and steer the directed transport of mesoscopic carriers through the suspension. We will show that both polar ordering and swirl shielding inside the wedge yield an optimal transport velocity. Finally, we show the behavior of several wedges exposed to a bacterial bath.

  7. Experimental simulation of frost wedging-induced crack propagation in alpine rockwall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Hailiang; Leith, Kerry; Krautblatter, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Frost wedging is widely presumed to be the principal mechanism responsible for shattering jointed low-porosity rocks in high alpine rockwalls. The interaction of ice and rock physics regulates the efficacy of frost wedging. In order to better understand temporal aspects of this interaction, we present results of a series of laboratory experiments monitoring crack widening as a result of ice formation in an artificial crack (4mm wide, 80mm deep) cut 20 mm from the end of a rectangular granite block. Our results indicate that i) freezing direction plays a key role in determining the magnitude of crack widening; in short-term (1 day) experiments, maximum crack widening during top-down freezing (associated with 'autumn' conditions) was around 0.11mm, while inside-out freezing (resulting from 'spring' conditions) produced only 0.02 mm of deformation; ii) neither ice, nor water pressure (direct tension and hydraulic fracturing respectively) caused measurable irreversible crack widening during short-term tests, as the calculated maximum stress intensity at the crack tip was less than the fracture toughness of our granite sample; iii) development of ice pressure is closely related to the mechanical properties of the fracture in which it forms, and as such, the interaction of ice and rock is intrinsically dynamic; iv) irreversible crack widening (about 0.03mm) was only observed following a long-term (53 day) experiment representing a simplified transition from autumn to winter conditions. We suggest this is the result of stress corrosion aided by strong opening during freezing, and to a lesser degree by ice segregation up to one week after the initial freezing period, and downward migration of liquid water during the remainder of the test. Our results suggest the fundamental assumption of frost wedging, that rapid freezing from open ends of cracks can seal water inside the crack and thus cause damage through excessive stresses induced by volumetric expansion seems

  8. Effect of a trade between boattail angle and wedge size on the performance of a nonaxisymmetric wedge nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, George T., Jr.; Bare, E. Ann; Burley, James R., II

    1987-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the effect of a boattail angle and wedge-size trade on the performance of nonaxisymmetric wedge nozzles installed on a generic twin-engine fighter aircraft model. Test data were obtained at static conditions and at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.25. Angle of attack was held constant at 0 deg. High-pressure air was used to simulate jet exhaust, and the nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.0 (jet off) to slightly over 15.0. For the configurations studied, the results indicate that wedge size can be reduced without affecting aeropropulsive performance.

  9. Characterization of CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A fringe detection and measurement system was constructed for use with the CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner, consisting of three circuit boards. The first board is a standard Reticon RC-100 B motherboard which is used to provide the timing, video processing, and housekeeping functions required by the Reticon RL-512 G photodiode array used in the system. The sampled and held video signal from the motherboard is processed by a second, custom fabricated circuit board which contains a high speed fringe detection and locating circuit. This board includes a dc level discriminator type fringe detector, a counter circuit to determine fringe center, a pulsed laser triggering circuit, and a control circuit to operate the shutter for the He-Ne reference laser beam. The fringe center information is supplied to the third board, a commercial single board computer, which governs the data collection process and interprets the results.

  10. Characterization of CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A fringe detection and measurement system was constructed for use with the CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner, consisting of three circuit boards. The first board is a standard Reticon RC-100 B motherboard which is used to provide the timing, video processing, and housekeeping functions required by the Reticon RL-512 G photodiode array used in the system. The sampled and held video signal from the motherboard is processed by a second, custom fabricated circuit board which contains a high speed fringe detection and locating circuit. This board includes a dc level discriminator type fringe detector, a counter circuit to determine fringe center, a pulsed laser triggering circuit, and a control circuit to operate the shutter for the He-Ne reference laser beam. The fringe center information is supplied to the third board, a commercial single board computer, which governs the data collection process and interprets the results.

  11. Dissolved organic carbon loss from Yedoma permafrost amplified by ice wedge thaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonk, J. E.; Mann, P. J.; Dowdy, K. L.; Davydova, A.; Davydov, S. P.; Zimov, N.; Spencer, R. G. M.; Bulygina, E. B.; Eglinton, T. I.; Holmes, R. M.

    2013-09-01

    Pleistocene Yedoma permafrost contains nearly a third of all organic matter (OM) stored in circum-arctic permafrost and is characterized by the presence of massive ice wedges. Due to its rapid formation by sediment accumulation and subsequent frozen storage, Yedoma OM is relatively well preserved and highly biologically available (biolabile) upon thaw. A better understanding of the processes regulating Yedoma degradation is important to improve estimates of the response and magnitude of permafrost carbon feedbacks to climate warming. In this study, we examine the composition of ice wedges and the influence of ice wedge thaw on the biolability of Yedoma OM. Incubation assays were used to assess OM biolability, fluorescence spectroscopy to characterize the OM composition, and potential enzyme activity rates to examine the controls and regulation of OM degradation. We show that increasing amounts of ice wedge melt water in Yedoma-leached incubations enhanced the loss of dissolved OM over time. This may be attributed to the presence of low-molecular weight compounds and low initial phenolic content in the OM of ice wedges, providing a readily available substrate that promotes the degradation of Yedoma OC. The physical vulnerability of ice wedges upon thaw (causing irreversible collapse), combined with the composition of ice wedge-engrained OM (co-metabolizing old OM), underlines the particularly strong potential of Yedoma to generate a positive feedback to climate warming relative to other forms of non-ice wedge permafrost.

  12. Depth dependence determination of the wedge transmission factor for 4--10 MV photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, E.C.; Gortney, J.; Blackwell, C.R.

    1988-07-01

    The depth dependence (up to 25 cm) of the in-phantom wedge transmission factor (WTF) has been determined for three medical linear accelerator x-ray beams with energies of 4, 6, and 10 MV containing 15/sup 0/--60/sup 0/ (nominal) brass wedges. All measurements were made with a cylindrical ionization chamber in water, for a field size of 10 x 10 cm/sup 2/ with a source--skin distance of 80 or 100 cm. We conclude that, for the accelerators studied, the WTF factor at depth is less than 2% different from that determined at d/sub max/ (for the nominal wedge angles and photon energies studied) unless the depth of interest is greater than 10 cm. Up to the maximum depth studied (25 cm) the relative wedge factor: that is, wedge factor at depth compared to that determined at d/sub max/ : was about equal to or less than 1.02 for the 15/sup 0/ and 30/sup 0/ wedges and any of the photon beam energies studied. For the seldom utilized combination of a nominal wedge angle in excess of 45/sup 0/ with a depth greater than 10 cm, the WTF at depth can differ from the WTF determined at d/sub max/, by up to 5%. Since the wedge transmission factor is reflective of relative percent dose data, our results also indicate that it is in error to use open field percent depth doses for certain combinations of wedge angle, photon energy, and depth.

  13. Can vertical compaction within wedges promote accretion by backthrusts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeck, J.; Cooke, M. L.; Herbert, J. W.; Madden, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    In natural subduction zones, frontal accretion dominantly occurs via the propagation of forethrusts, whereas accretion via backthrusts has been observed in only a few active subduction zones, including the Cascadia margin. Similarly, in most analog experiments of accretionary wedges deformation is accommodated by forethrusts or backthrust/forethrust pairs, except for some experiments with a layer of silicone below sand, which can produce accretionary backthrusts. Vertical deflection of the detachment caused by the lateral flow of the silicone layer could promote the propagation of backthrusts in these analog experiments. Alternatively, the high Holocene sediment input in parts of the Cascadia margin could produce vertical compaction deep within the wedge that promotes backthrusting. To explore the effect of vertical compaction and deflection of the detachment on fault development in accretionary prisms we use the Boundary Element Method modeling tool Growth by Optimization of Work (GROW) to predict the vergence of faults in a deforming wedge. GROW predicts fault growth by propagating faults in the direction that maximizes the efficiency of the system, or minimizes the external work of the system. We simulate vertical compaction with compliant elements and observe that the addition of these elements deep in the wedge or along the detachment promotes backthrusting rather than forethrusts. Similarly, local downward deflection of the detachment promotes backthrust development over that of forethrusts. These numerical model results suggest that vertical compaction or local deflection of the megathrust may account for backthrust development in parts of the Cascadia margin.

  14. Capillarity driven motion of solid film wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, H.; Miksis, M.J.; Voorhees, P.W.; Davis, S.H.

    1997-06-01

    A solid film freshly deposited on a substrate may form a non-equilibrium contact angle with the substrate, and will evolve. This morphological evolution near the contact line is investigated by studying the motion of a solid wedge on a substrate. The contact angle of the wedge changes at time t = 0 from the wedge angle {alpha} to the equilibrium contact angle {beta}, and its effects spread into the wedge via capillarity-driven surface diffusion. The film profiles at different times are found to be self-similar, with the length scale increasing as t{sup 1 4}. The self-similar film profile is determined numerically by a shooting method for {alpha} and {beta} between 0 and 180. In general, the authors find that the film remains a wedge when {alpha} = {beta}. For {alpha} < {beta}, the film retracts, whereas for {alpha} > {beta}, the film extends. For {alpha} = 90{degree}, the results describe the growth of grain-boundary grooves for arbitrary dihedral angles. For {beta} = 90{degree}, the solution also applies to a free-standing wedge, and the thin-wedge profiles agree qualitatively with those observed in transmission electron microscope specimens.

  15. Pressure Distributions About Finite Wedges in Bounded and Unbounded Subsonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donoughe, Patrick L; Prasse, Ernst I

    1953-01-01

    An analytical investigation of incompressible flow about wedges was made to determine effects of tunnel-wedge ratio and wedge angle on the wedge pressure distributions. The region of applicability of infinite wedge-type velocity distribution was examined for finite wedges. Theoretical and experimental pressure coefficients for various tunnel-wedge ratios, wedge angles, and subsonic Mach numbers were compared.

  16. Mantle wedge anisotropy beneath the Japan and Ryukyu arcs from teleseismic receiver functions - Implications for mantle flow and wedge hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, E. A.; Long, M. D.; Mccormack, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    Many fundamental aspects of the mantle wedge above subducting slabs, such as the dynamics of mantle flow and the transport of water and melt, have yet to be fully understood. A complete characterization of seismic anisotropy can yield powerful constraints on mantle flow and the degree of mantle wedge hydration. In this study, we characterize the geometry and strength of anisotropy in the mantle wedges beneath northeast Japan and the Ryukyu arc, which overlie the subducting Pacific and Philippine Sea plates, respectively. We compute radial and transverse component P-to-S receiver functions from 15 stations of the F-net array using the multitaper correlation receiver function estimator (Park and Levin, 2000). In both regions, we observe P-to-SV converted energy on radial component receiver functions that are consistent with conversions originating at the subducting oceanic Moho and the top of the subducting oceanic crust. We also observe P-to-SH conversions on the transverse component receiver functions that are consistent with the presence of multiple anisotropic and/or dipping layers. We compute synthetic receiver functions using a forward modeling scheme to create models for the depths, thicknesses, and strengths of the anisotropic layers beneath both northeast Japan and Ryukyu. Beneath Ryukyu, we detect evidence for a layer of strong anisotropy and high Vp/Vs ratio directly above the slab, consistent with the presence of serpentinite. We see no evidence of this signature in receiver functions from northeast Japan; instead, we see evidence for relatively modest anisotropy due to olivine fabric. We also detect a low-velocity region in the mantle wedge beneath northeast Japan, which may be consistent with the presence of partial melt. Since the presence of serpentinite indicates significant hydration of the wedge, the contrast in anisotropic structure between Ryukyu and northeast Japan has important implications for our understanding of slab hydration and how water

  17. Long-range hybrid wedge plasmonic waveguide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhonglai; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    We design a novel long-range hybrid wedge plasmonic (LRHWP) waveguide composed of two identical dielectric nanowires symmetrically placed on two opposed wedges of a diamond shaped metal wire. With strong coupling between the dielectric nanowire mode and long-range surface plasmon polariton (SPP) mode, both deep subwavelength mode confinement and low propagation loss are achieved. On one hand, when compared to the previous long-range hybrid SPP waveguide, LRHWP waveguide can achieve smaller mode size with similar propagation length; on the other hand, when compared to the previous hybrid wedge SPP waveguide, LRHWP waveguide can provide an order of magnitude longer propagation length with similar level of mode confinement. The designed LRHWP waveguide also features an overall advantage of one-order improvement of Figure of Merit. We further evaluate in detail the impacts of possible practical fabrication imperfections on the mode properties. The obtained results of mode properties show that the proposed LRHWP waveguide with an optimized wedge tip angle of 140 degree is fairly tolerant to practical fabrication errors in geometry parameters such as misalignment in the horizontal direction, asymmetry in the vertical direction, variation of wedge tip angle, tilt or rotation of metal wire, and variation of wedge tip curvature radius. PMID:25362900

  18. Long-range hybrid wedge plasmonic waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhonglai; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    We design a novel long-range hybrid wedge plasmonic (LRHWP) waveguide composed of two identical dielectric nanowires symmetrically placed on two opposed wedges of a diamond shaped metal wire. With strong coupling between the dielectric nanowire mode and long-range surface plasmon polariton (SPP) mode, both deep subwavelength mode confinement and low propagation loss are achieved. On one hand, when compared to the previous long-range hybrid SPP waveguide, LRHWP waveguide can achieve smaller mode size with similar propagation length; on the other hand, when compared to the previous hybrid wedge SPP waveguide, LRHWP waveguide can provide an order of magnitude longer propagation length with similar level of mode confinement. The designed LRHWP waveguide also features an overall advantage of one-order improvement of Figure of Merit. We further evaluate in detail the impacts of possible practical fabrication imperfections on the mode properties. The obtained results of mode properties show that the proposed LRHWP waveguide with an optimized wedge tip angle of 140 degree is fairly tolerant to practical fabrication errors in geometry parameters such as misalignment in the horizontal direction, asymmetry in the vertical direction, variation of wedge tip angle, tilt or rotation of metal wire, and variation of wedge tip curvature radius. PMID:25362900

  19. Two brittle ductile transitions in subduction wedges, as revealed by topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thissen, C.; Brandon, M. T.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction wedges contain two brittle ductile transitions. One transition occurs within the wedge interior, and a second transition occurs along the decollement. The decollement typically has faster strain rates, which suggests that the brittle ductile transition along the decollement will be more rearward (deeper) than the transition within the interior. However, the presence of distinct rheologies or other factors such as pore fluid pressure along the decollement may reverse the order of the brittle-ductile transitions. We adopt a solution by Williams et al., (1994) to invert for these brittle ductile transitions using the wedge surface topography. At present, this model does not include an s point or sediment loading atop the wedge. The Hellenic wedge, however, as exposed in Crete presents an ideal setting to test these ideas. We find that the broad high of the Mediterranean ridge represents the coulomb frictional part of the Hellenic wedge. The rollover in topography north of the ridge results from curvature of the down going plate, creating a negative alpha depression in the vicinity of the Strabo, Pliny, and Ionian 'troughs' south of Crete. A steep topographic rise out of these troughs and subsequent flattening reflects the brittle ductile transition at depth in both the decollement and the wedge interior. Crete exposes the high-pressure viscous core of the wedge, and pressure solution textures provide additional evidence for viscous deformation in the rearward part of the wedge. The location of the decollement brittle ductile transition has been previously poorly constrained, and Crete has never experienced a subduction zone earthquake in recorded history. Williams, C. A., et al., (1994). Effect of the brittle ductile transition on the topography of compressive mountain belts on Earth and Venus. Journal of Geophysical Research Solid Earth

  20. Dual Double-Wedge Pseudo-Depolarizer with Anamorphic PSF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Peter; Thompson, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    A polarized scene, which may occur at oblique illumination angles, creates a radiometric signal that varies as a function of viewing angle. One common optical component that is used to minimize such an effect is a polarization scrambler or depolarizer. As part of the CLARREO mission, the SOLARIS instrument project at Goddard Space Flight Center has developed a new class of polarization scramblers using a dual double-wedge pseudo-depolarizer that produces an anamorphic point spread function (PSF). The SOLARIS instrument uses two Wollaston type scramblers in series, each with a distinct wedge angle, to image a pseudo-depolarized scene that is free of eigenstates. Since each wedge is distinct, the scrambler is able to produce an anamorphic PSF that maintains high spatial resolution in one dimension by sacrificing the spatial resolution in the other dimension. This scrambler geometry is ideal for 1-D imagers, such as pushbroom slit spectrometers, which require high spectral resolution, high spatial resolution, and low sensitivity to polarized light. Moreover, the geometry is applicable to a wide range of scientific instruments that require both high SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) and low sensitivity to polarized scenes

  1. Dynamic Open Inquiry Performances of High-School Biology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, Michal; Sadeh, Irit

    2010-01-01

    In examining open inquiry projects among high-school biology students, we found dynamic inquiry performances expressed in two criteria: "changes occurring during inquiry" and "procedural understanding". Characterizing performances in a dynamic open inquiry project can shed light on both the procedural and epistemological scientific understanding…

  2. Effect of Turbulizing Grid Near Wake on a Boundary Layer on a Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brylyakov, A. P.; Zanin, B. Yu.; Zharkova, G. M.; Sboev, D. S.

    2002-07-01

    The problem of flow about bodies with high free stream turbulence is very important for engineering, because these flows are frequently met in different technical devices and turbo-machines. The recent researches showed that a stationary system of longitudinal structures arose on the winward side of the wing from increasing level of free stream turbulence to 1%. Characteristic transversal size of these structures exceeded the boundary layer thickness in many times. The number of the structures was found to be dependent on the angle of attack and the distance from the wind tunnel nozzle. Those experiments were carried in the open test section and the flow about the wing was complicated because of transversal spread of the flow. The present work is an experimental investigation of a similar phenomenon which takes place in a boundary layer on the winward surface of two-dimensional wedge in close test section.

  3. Transonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of Two Wedge Airfoil Sections Including Unsteady Flow Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Patrick J.

    1959-01-01

    A two-dimensional wind-tunnel investigation has been conducted on a 20-percent-thick single-wedge airfoil section. Steady-state forces and moments were determined from pressure measurements at Mach numbers from 0.70 to about 1.25. Additional information on the flows about the single wedge is provided by means of instantaneous pressure measurements at Mach numbers up to unity. Pressure distributions were also obtained on a symmetrical double-wedge or diamond-shaped profile which had the same leading-edge included angle as the single-wedge airfoil. A comparison of the data on the two profiles to provide information on the effects of the afterbody showed that with the exception of drag, the single-wedge profile proved to be aerodynamically superior to the diamond profile in all respects. The lift effectiveness of the single-wedge airfoil section far exceeded that of conventional thin airfoil sections over the speed range of the investigation. Pitching-moment irregularities, caused by negative loadings near the trailing edge, generally associated with conventional airfoils of equivalent thicknesses were not exhibited by the single-wedge profile. Moderately high pulsating pressures existing over the base of the single-wedge airfoil section were significantly reduced as the Mach number was increased beyond 0.92 and the boundaries of the dead airspace at the base of the model converged to eliminate the vortex street in the wake. Increasing the leading-edge radius from 0 to 1 percent of the chord had a minor effect on the steady-state forces and generally raised the level of pressure pulsations over the forward part of the single-wedge profile.

  4. Hyperspectral data collections with the new wedge imaging spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Jeter, J.W.; Hartshorne, R.; Thunen, J.G.

    1996-11-01

    The Wedge Imaging Spectrometer (WIS) applies a unique technology to hyperspectral imaging systems, allowing flexibility and high performance in a very compact package. This innovation is based on the use of a linear spectral wedge filter mated directly to an area detector array, avoiding the use of bulky and complex optics required for imaging spectrometers based on gratings or prism concepts. The technology was realized in an earlier flight demonstration system as previously reported. Second generation VNIR and SWIR instruments have now been developed, each with two filters whose spectral bandwidths are optimized for specific spectral features. The SWIR instrument can be extended to operate in the 3-5 PM mid-wave spectral region. The new instrument is currently completing its integration and test phase. Preliminary results indicate excellent performance potential for a wide range of applications. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Why is the Cascadia subduction zone backarc hot? Numerical tests of mantle wedge flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, C. A.; Wang, K.; Hyndman, R. D.; He, J.

    2003-12-01

    Understanding mantle wedge processes is critical for constraining thermal and petrological controls on in-slab earthquakes and the behaviour of the deep subduction thrust fault. Observational constraints indicate that the mantle wedge at the northern Cascadia subduction zone is extremely hot. Below the volcanic arc, temperatures greater than 1300° C are required for magma generation. In the backarc, surface heat flow, seismic velocities, thermal isostasy and xenolith studies suggest temperatures of 1200° C at 60 km depth for a distance of 500 km. The landward limit of the backarc is the abrupt contact with the thick, cold North America craton, making high backarc temperatures even more surprising. An initial compilation of thermal data shows that most other backarcs are similarly hot. Finite element thermal models are used to investigate the backarc mantle flow structure that maintains these high temperatures. Two principle driving forces for flow are: traction along the top of the subducting slab and buoyancy forces due to lateral thermal heterogeneities, such as cooling by the slab and Rayleigh instabilities. In this study, we primarily deal with traction-driven flow, using Cascadia subduction parameters. A thick (>200 km) lithosphere was introduced at the landward backarc boundary, consistent with the presence of the North America craton root. For an isoviscous mantle, the craton deflects hot material from depth into the wedge, resulting in a warmer wedge than models without a craton, although the temperatures are 150-300° C lower than inferred from observations. Decoupling of the wedge from the over-riding plate increases the backarc Moho temperature by over 100° C; temperatures below the arc are relatively unaffected. With a more realistic stress- and temperature-dependent viscosity, high velocity flow originates from great depths along the landward boundary, even without a craton. Flow is strongly focussed into the wedge corner, leading to much higher sub

  6. Practical implementation of enhanced dynamic wedge in the CadPlan treatment planning system.

    PubMed

    Samuelsson, A; Johansson, K A; Mattsson, O; Palm, A; Puurunen, H; Sernbo, G

    1997-01-01

    The Varian CadPlan algorithm for computation of relative dose distributions and monitor unit calculations for Enhanced Dynamic Wedge (EDW) fields is based on a combination of open field beam data and Segmented Treatment data Tables. Calculation of dose by the pencil beam convolution model uses scatter kernels and boundary kernels to create the distribution. The principles of the pencil beam convolution model is presented. Comparison of measured and calculated monitor units and relative dose distributions showed good agreement and the deviations are within international accepted tolerans. Test results indicate that the EDW model works satisfactorily for all energies and wedge angles. PMID:9307952

  7. Two-dimensional meniscus in a wedge

    SciTech Connect

    Kagan, M.; Pinczewski, W.V.; Oren, P.E.

    1995-03-15

    This paper presents a closed-form analytical solution of the augmented Young-Laplace equation for the meniscus profile in a two-dimensional wedge-shaped capillary. The solution is valid for monotonic forms of disjoining pressure which are repulsive in nature. In the limit of negligible disjoining pressure, it is shown to reduce to the classical solution of constant curvature. The character of the solution is examined and examples of practical interest which demonstrate the application of the solution to the computation of the meniscus profile in a wedge-shaped capillary are discussed.

  8. A review of dynamics modelling of friction wedge suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing; Cole, Colin; Spiryagin, Maksym; Sun, Yan Quan

    2014-11-01

    Three-piece bogies with friction wedge suspensions are the most widely used bogies in heavy haul trains. Fiction wedge suspensions play a key role in these wagon systems. This article reviews current techniques in dynamic modelling of friction wedge suspension with various motivations: to improve dynamic models of friction wedge suspensions so as to improve general wagon dynamics simulations; to seek better friction wedge suspension models for wagon stability assessments in complex train systems; to improve the modelling of other friction devices, such as friction draft gear. Relevant theories and friction wedge suspension models developed by using commercial simulation packages and in-house simulation packages are reviewed.

  9. Crustal wedge deformation in an internally-driven, numerical subduction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dinther, Ylona; Morra, Gabriele; Funiciello, Francesca; Rossetti, Federico; Faccenna, Claudio

    2010-05-01

    The Earth's active convergent margins are characterized by dynamic feedback mechanisms that interact to form an intricate system in which a crustal wedge is shaped and metamorphosed at the will of two large, converging plates. This framework is accompanied by complicated processes, such as seismogenesis and the exhumation of high pressure rocks. To honor the dynamic interaction between different entities and advance on these persisting issues, we model the interaction between the subducting and overriding lithospheres, the mantle and the crustal wedge explicitly, and observe how a crustal wedge evolves in detail within a set of rigid, internally-driven boundary conditions. We model crustal wedge evolution in an intra-oceanic subduction setting by using a plane-strain implicit solid-mechanical Finite Element Model, in which the mechanical conservation equations are solved using the software package ABAQUS. The crustal wedge is modeled as a thick-skinned accretionary wedge of inter-mediate thickness with a linear visco-elastic bulk rheology. The dynamic interaction between the subducting plate, the overriding plate, and crustal wedge is implemented using a Coulomb frictional algorithm. The interaction with the mantle is incorporated using a computationally favorable mantle drag formulation that simulates induced three-dimensional mantle flow. This results in a quasi-static framework with a freely moving slab, trench, and fault, where a weaker wedge deforms in response to self-regulating, rigid boundary conditions formed by single, frictional bounding faults. The self-regulating evolution of crustal wedge architecture follows three phases; 1) initial vertical growth, 2) coeval compression and extension leading to internal corner flow, and 3) a steady-state taper with continuous corner flow. Particle trajectories show that, as shortening continues throughout the second phase, wedge material is constantly forced upward against the backstop, while extension and ocean

  10. Testing the critical Coulomb wedge theory on hyper-extended rifted margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirrengarten, Michael; Manatschal, Gianreto; Kusznir, Nick

    2015-04-01

    Deformation of hyper-extended continental crust and its relationship with the underlying mantle is a key process in the evolution of rifted margins. Recent studies have focused on hyper-extension in rifted margins using different approaches such as numerical modelling, seismic interpretation, potential field methods and field observations. However many fundamental questions about the observed structures and their evolution during the formation of hyper-extended margins are still debated. In this study an observation driven approach has been used to characterise geometrical and physical attributes of the continental crust termination, considered as a hyper-extended wedge, in order to test the applicability of critical Coulomb wedge theory to hyper-extended margins. The Coulomb wedge theory was first developed on accretionary prisms and on fold and thrust belts, but it has also been applied in extensional settings. Coulomb wedge theory explains the evolution of the critical aperture angle of the wedge as a function of basal sliding without deformation in the overlying wedge. This critical angle depends on the frictional parameters of the material, the basal friction, the surface slope, the basal dip and the fluid pressure. If the evolution of hyper-extended wedges could be described by the critical Coulomb wedge theory, it would have a major impact in the understanding of the structural and physical evolution of rifted domains during the hyper-extension processes. On seismic reflection lines imaging magma-poor hyper-extended margins, the continental crust termination is often shown to form a hyper-extended wedge. ODP Sites 1067, 900 and 1068 on the Iberian margin as well as field observations in the Alps give direct access to the rocks forming the hyper-extended wedge, which are typically composed of highly deformed and hydrated continental rocks underlain by serpentinised mantle. The boundary between the hydrated continental and mantle rocks corresponds to a

  11. Wedge Shock and Nozzle Exhaust Plume Interaction in a Supersonic Jet Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond; Zaman, Khairul; Fagan, Amy; Heath, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Fundamental research for sonic boom reduction is needed to quantify the interaction of shock waves generated from the aircraft wing or tail surfaces with the nozzle exhaust plume. Aft body shock waves that interact with the exhaust plume contribute to the near-field pressure signature of a vehicle. The plume and shock interaction was studied using computational fluid dynamics and compared with experimental data from a coaxial convergent-divergent nozzle flow in an open jet facility. A simple diamond-shaped wedge was used to generate the shock in the outer flow to study its impact on the inner jet flow. Results show that the compression from the wedge deflects the nozzle plume and shocks form on the opposite plume boundary. The sonic boom pressure signature of the nozzle exhaust plume was modified by the presence of the wedge. Both the experimental results and computational predictions show changes in plume deflection.

  12. Assessment of a multibeam Fizeau wedge interferometer for Doppler wind lidar.

    PubMed

    McKay, Jack A

    2002-03-20

    The Fabry-Perot interferometer is the standard instrument for the direct detection Doppler lidar measurement of atmospheric wind speeds. The multibeam Fizeau wedge has some practical advantages over the Fabry-Perot, such as the linear fringe pattern, and is evaluated for this application. The optimal Fizeau must have a resolving power of 10(6) or more. As the multibeam Fizeau wedge is pushed to such high resolving power, the interference fringes of the device become complicated by asymmetry and secondary maxima. A simple condition for the interferometer plate reflectance, optical gap, and wedge angle reveals whether a set of parameters will yield simple, Airy-like fringes or complex Fizeau fringes. Tilting of the Fizeau wedge improves the fringe shape and permits an extension of the regime of Airy-like fringes to higher resolving power. Sufficient resolving power for the wind lidar application is shown to be possible with a large-gap, low-finesse multibeam Fizeau wedge. Liabilities of the multibeam Fizeau wedge in the wind lidar application include a smaller acceptance solid angle and calibration sensitivity to localized deviations of the plates from the ideal. PMID:11921807

  13. Growth of the South Pyrenean orogenic wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meigs, Andrew J.; Burbank, Douglas W.

    1997-04-01

    A six-step reconstruction of the South Pyrenean foreland fold-and-thrust belt in Spain delineates the topographic slope, basal décollement angle, internal deformation, and thrust-front advance from the Early Eocene until the end of contractional deformation in the Late Oligocene. Style of thrust-front advance, dip of the basal décollement, slope of the upper surface, and internal deformation are decoupled and not simply related. Internal deformation increased, decreased, and maintained surface slope angle at different stages. From the onset to the cessation of deformation, the basal décollement angle decreased overall suggesting translation of the thrust belt onto stronger crust with time. Taper angle of the Pyrenean thrust wedge was fundamentally controlled by the flexural rigidity of the lower plate, the relative rate of creation of structural relief in the rear versus the front of the wedge, the extent of deposition of eroded material within the deforming wedge, and the taper of the pretectonic stratigraphic wedge.

  14. A numerical study of the interaction between the mantle wedge, subducting slab, and overriding plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, Michael A.; Grasset, Olivier; Sotin, Christophe

    2002-12-01

    We have formulated a numerical model with strongly temperature-dependent viscosity to calculate thermal structure and flow-field in subduction zones. One important particularity of the model is that the overriding plate is not fixed over its whole thickness in order to allow material exchange between the wedge and the upper lithosphere. Numerical problems due to very high-viscosity contrasts are avoided by coupling a finite difference method and a finite element method for solving the energy conservation equation and the Stockes equation, respectively. In this model, a temperature decrease from 1400 to 1300 °C increases the viscosity by an order of magnitude. We study the temperature structure and the velocity field of the subducting slab and mantle wedge. Surface heat flow, velocity anomalies, and geometry of the partial melting zone are also calculated. To study the effect that boundary conditions play on the interaction between the mantle wedge, overriding plate and subducting plate, we examine models with both fixed and free-slip conditions applied to the overriding plate. When the overriding plate is allowed to move laterally (free-slip), the subducting slab is thick, and both the temperature field and the convective motions in the mantle wedge are similar to those observed when using constant viscosity numerical models or analytical corner flow models. If the surface of the overriding plate is fixed, the subducting slab is thin and the mantle wedge impinges upon the overriding plate forming a high-temperature nose between the overriding plate and subducting lithosphere. Furthermore, viscous decoupling occurs implicitly at shallow depth between the slab and the wedge because hot material from the wedge is entrained close to the trench. In that case, the subducting slab tectonically erodes the lower lithosphere of the overriding plate leading to high-temperatures, low seismic velocities, high attenuation and high heat flow beneath volcanic arc, in agreement

  15. 38. INTERIOR VIEW, DENISON MULTIPRESS FOR INSERTION OF WEDGES ONTO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. INTERIOR VIEW, DENISON MULTI-PRESS FOR INSERTION OF WEDGES ONTO HANDLES AND CUTTING OFF SCRAP END OF HANDLE FOLLOWING WEDGE INSERTION, BRIAN KIMBLE, OPERATOR - Warwood Tool Company, Foot of Nineteenth Street, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  16. Simultaneous measurement of refractive index and wedge angle of optical windows using Fizeau interferometry and a cyclic path optical configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Y. Pavan; Chatterjee, Sanjib

    2009-08-20

    We present a new technique for the simultaneous measurement of refractive index and wedge angle of optical windows using Fizeau interferometry and a cyclic path optical configuration (CPOC). Two laterally separated beams are obtained from an expanded collimated beam using an aperture containing two rectangular openings. The test wedge plate is placed in one of the two separated beams. Using CPOC, these two beams are made to overlap and interfere, producing interference fringes in the overlapping region. The beams reflected from the front and back surfaces of the test wedge plate interfere and produce Fizeau fringes. The refractive index is related to the spacing of the above two beam fringes. The wedge angle is determined from the evaluated values of the refractive index and Fizeau fringe spacing. The results obtained for a BK-7 optical window are presented.

  17. A resonant series counterpulse technique for high current opening switches

    SciTech Connect

    Dijk, E. van; Gelder, P. van

    1995-01-01

    A counterpulse technique for the controlled interruption of very high currents in inductive storage pulsed power systems is described and analyzed, and some simulation results of its performance are presented. The accompanying circuit comprises a pre-charged capacitor bank, connected in series with the inductive load, which has to be provided with a current pulse. Upon actuation, a resonant counterpulse current is created in the opening switch, connected in parallel with the current source and the load. In this way, the opening switch is opened at low current. A separate closing switch prevents closing of the opening switch at high voltage. Operation of the opening switch, often a mechanical switch, at low current and low voltage prevents arc erosion of the contacts. The advantage of this circuit compared to other counterpulse circuits is that the capacitor bank does not experience a voltage reversal. Electrolytic capacitors, which have a high energy density, are applied. The remaining energy of the capacitor bank after opening the opening switch, is transferred to the load. The required initial voltage of the capacitor bank is only a few hundred volts, whereas it may be above a kilovolt in other circuits. Another advantage of the method described here is that the load does not experience a pre-current, causing unwanted preheating of the load, before the resonant current is activated. At the moment, work is being performed at the Pulse Physics Laboratory to develop the resonant series counterpulse circuit for use with rail accelerators, which must be supplied with current pulses in the millisecond range up to the mega-ampere level.

  18. Late Holocene stable-isotope based winter temperature records from ice wedges in the Northeast Siberian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opel, Thomas; Meyer, Hanno; Laepple, Thomas; Dereviagin, Alexander Yu.

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic is currently undergoing an unprecedented warming. This highly dynamic response on changes in climate forcing and the global impact of the Arctic water, carbon and energy balances make the Arctic a key region to study past, recent and future climate changes. Recent proxy-based temperature reconstructions indicate a long-term cooling over the past about 8 millennia that is mainly related to a decrease in solar summer insolation and has been reversed only by the ongoing warming. Climate model results on the other hand show no significant change or even a slight warming over this period. This model-proxy data mismatch might be caused by a summer bias of the used climate proxies. Ice wedges may provide essential information on past winter temperatures for a comprehensive seasonal picture of Holocene Arctic climate variability. Polygonal ice wedges are a widespread permafrost feature in the Arctic tundra lowlands. Ice wedges form by the repeated filling of thermal contraction cracks with snow melt water, which quickly refreezes at subzero ground temperatures and forms ice veins. As the seasonality of frost cracking and infill is generally related to winter and spring, respectively, the isotopic composition of wedge ice is indicative of past climate conditions during the annual cold season (DJFMAM, hereafter referred to as winter). δ18O of ice is interpreted as proxy for regional surface air temperature. AMS radiocarbon dating of organic remains in ice-wedge samples provides age information to generate chronologies for single ice wedges as well as regionally stacked records with an up to centennial resolution. In this contribution we seek to summarize Holocene ice-wedge δ18O based temperature information from the Northeast Siberian Arctic. We strongly focus on own work in the Laptev Sea region but consider as well literature data from other regional study sites. We consider the stable-isotope composition of wedge ice, ice-wedge dating and chronological

  19. 21 CFR 884.5200 - Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. 884.5200... Devices § 884.5200 Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. (a) Identification. A hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge provides mechanical support to the perianal region during the labor and delivery...

  20. 21 CFR 884.5200 - Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. 884.5200... Devices § 884.5200 Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. (a) Identification. A hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge provides mechanical support to the perianal region during the labor and delivery...

  1. Latest Pleistocene Sediment Wedge on the New Jersey Outer Continental Shelf - Forced Regressive Paleo-Hudson Delta?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, M.; Goff, J. A.; Steel, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    The offlapping sediment wedge on the outer shelf off New Jersey that overlies the regional reflector R-horizon shows many of the characteristic features of a progradational succession deposited during falling sea level (forced regression). This interpretation is consistent with the estimated latest Pleistocene age of the wedge - a well-established period of large-scale eustatic sea level fall. The sediment wedge occupies the outer shelf of New Jersey south of the Hudson Shelf Valley, extending down to the shelf edge. The sediment wedge appears to be strongly strike-oriented. The absence of any record of time-equivalent fluvial/distributary channels on the proximal part of the sediment wedge led some previous workers to the interpretation that the wedge was a product of redistribution of sediment on the shelf rather than a deltaic feature supplied by a fluvial source. The absence of fluvial and coastal plain deposits capping the proximal end of the wedge is actually a characteristic feature of forced regressive deposits and does not preclude a fluvial source for the sediments constituting the wedge. Reinterpretation of high-resolution (1-12 kHz), deep-towed and hull-mounted CHIRP seismic data collected on the New Jersey outer shelf in 2001, 2002 and 2006 shows possible terminal distributary channel deposits and mass transport deposits preserved in the distal part of the wedge that have not been described previously. These channel-like features are restricted in their distribution and their preservation in the sedimentary record is possibly due to punctuated sea-level rise within the overall falling trajectory of sea level that preceded the last glacial maximum (LGM). The presence of these channels and the mass transport complexes point to a direct fluvial feeder, which supplied the sediments to build the sediment wedge on New Jersey outer continental shelf. Detailed mapping of the sediment wedge using the CHIRP data shows that the sediment wedge is composed of

  2. Climate adaptation wedges: a case study of premium wine in the western United States

    SciTech Connect

    Diffenbaugh, Noah; White, Michael A; Jones, Gregory V; Ashfaq, Moetasim

    2011-01-01

    Design and implementation of effective climate change adaptation activities requires quantitative assessment of the impacts that are likely to occur without adaptation, as well as the fraction of impact that can be avoided through each activity. Here we present a quantitative framework inspired by the greenhouse gas stabilization wedges of Pacala and Socolow. In our proposed framework, the damage avoided by each adaptation activity creates an 'adaptation wedge' relative to the loss that would occur without that adaptation activity. We use premium winegrape suitability in the western United States as an illustrative case study, focusing on the near-term period that covers the years 2000 39. We find that the projected warming over this period results in the loss of suitable winegrape area throughout much of California, including most counties in the high-value North Coast and Central Coast regions. However, in quantifying adaptation wedges for individual high-value counties, we find that a large adaptation wedge can be captured by increasing the severe heat tolerance, including elimination of the 50% loss projected by the end of the 2030 9 period in the North Coast region, and reduction of the projected loss in the Central Coast region from 30% to less than 15%. Increased severe heat tolerance can capture an even larger adaptation wedge in the Pacific Northwest, including conversion of a projected loss of more than 30% in the Columbia Valley region of Washington to a projected gain of more than 150%. We also find that warming projected over the near-term decades has the potential to alter the quality of winegrapes produced in the western US, and we discuss potential actions that could create adaptation wedges given these potential changes in quality. While the present effort represents an initial exploration of one aspect of one industry, the climate adaptation wedge framework could be used to quantitatively evaluate the opportunities and limits of climate adaptation

  3. Measured Hydrologic Storage Characteristics of Three Major Ice Wedge Polygon Types, Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, A. J.; Liljedahl, A.; Wilson, C. J.; Cable, W.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2014-12-01

    Model simulations have suggested that the hydrologic fluxes and stores of Arctic wetlands are constrained by the micro-topographical features of ice wedge polygons, which are abundant in lowland tundra landscapes. Recently observed changes in ice wedge polygon landscapes - in particular, ice wedge degradation and trough formation - emphasize the need to better understand how differing ice wedge polygon morphologies affect the larger hydrologic system. Here we present three seasons of measured end-of-winter snow accumulation, continuous soil moisture and water table elevations, and repeated frost table mapping. Together, these describe the hydrologic characteristics of three main ice wedge polygon types: low centered polygons with limited trough development (representative of a ~500 year old vegetated drained thaw lake basin), and low- and high-centered polygons with well-defined troughs. Dramatic spatiotemporal variability exists both between polygon types and between the features of an individual polygon (e.g. troughs, centers, rims). Landscape-scale end-of-winter snow water equivalent is similar between polygon types, while the sub-polygon scale distribution of the surface water differs, both as snow and as ponded water. Some sub-polygon features appear buffered against large variations in water levels, while others display periods of prolonged recessions and large responses to rain events. Frost table elevations in general mimic the ground surface topography, but with spatiotemporal variability in thaw rate. The studied thaw seasons represented above long-term average rainfall, and in 2014, record high June precipitation. Differing ice wedge polygon types express dramatically different local hydrology, despite nearly identical climate forcing and landscape-scale snow accumulation, making ice wedge polygons an important component when describing the Arctic water, nutrient and energy system.

  4. Climate adaptation wedges: a case study of premium wine in the western United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diffenbaugh, Noah S.; White, Michael A.; Jones, Gregory V.; Ashfaq, Moetasim

    2011-04-01

    Design and implementation of effective climate change adaptation activities requires quantitative assessment of the impacts that are likely to occur without adaptation, as well as the fraction of impact that can be avoided through each activity. Here we present a quantitative framework inspired by the greenhouse gas stabilization wedges of Pacala and Socolow. In our proposed framework, the damage avoided by each adaptation activity creates an 'adaptation wedge' relative to the loss that would occur without that adaptation activity. We use premium winegrape suitability in the western United States as an illustrative case study, focusing on the near-term period that covers the years 2000-39. We find that the projected warming over this period results in the loss of suitable winegrape area throughout much of California, including most counties in the high-value North Coast and Central Coast regions. However, in quantifying adaptation wedges for individual high-value counties, we find that a large adaptation wedge can be captured by increasing the severe heat tolerance, including elimination of the 50% loss projected by the end of the 2030-9 period in the North Coast region, and reduction of the projected loss in the Central Coast region from 30% to less than 15%. Increased severe heat tolerance can capture an even larger adaptation wedge in the Pacific Northwest, including conversion of a projected loss of more than 30% in the Columbia Valley region of Washington to a projected gain of more than 150%. We also find that warming projected over the near-term decades has the potential to alter the quality of winegrapes produced in the western US, and we discuss potential actions that could create adaptation wedges given these potential changes in quality. While the present effort represents an initial exploration of one aspect of one industry, the climate adaptation wedge framework could be used to quantitatively evaluate the opportunities and limits of climate adaptation

  5. Laser-generated ultrasonic pulse shapes at solid wedges.

    PubMed

    Pupyrev, Pavel D; Lomonosov, Alexey M; Mayer, Andreas P

    2016-08-01

    Laser pulses focused near the tip of an elastic wedge generate acoustic waves guided at its apex. The shapes of the acoustic wedge wave pulses depend on the energy and the profile of the exciting laser pulse and on the anisotropy of the elastic medium the wedge is made of. Expressions for the acoustic pulse shapes have been derived in terms of the modal displacement fields of wedge waves for laser excitation in the thermo-elastic regime and for excitation via a pressure pulse exerted on the surface. The physical quantity considered is the local inclination of a surface of the wedge, which is measured optically by laser-probe-beam deflection. Experimental results on pulse shapes in the thermo-elastic regime are presented and confirmed by numerical calculations. They pertain to an isotropic sharp-angle wedge with two wedge-wave branches and to a non-reciprocity phenomenon at rectangular silicon edges. PMID:27135188

  6. Maladaptively high and low openness: the case for experiential permeability.

    PubMed

    Piedmont, Ralph L; Sherman, Martin F; Sherman, Nancy C

    2012-12-01

    The domain of Openness within the Five-Factor Model (FFM) has received inconsistent support as a source for maladaptive personality functioning, at least when the latter is confined to the disorders of personality included within the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR; APA, ). However, an advantage of the FFM relative to the DSM-IV-TR is that the former was developed to provide a reasonably comprehensive description of general personality structure. Rather than suggest that the FFM is inadequate because the DSM-IV-TR lacks much representation of Openness, it might be just as reasonable to suggest that the DSM-IV-TR is inadequate because it lacks an adequate representation of maladaptive variants of both high and low Openness. This article discusses the development and validation of a measure of these maladaptive variants, the Experiential Permeability Inventory. PMID:22320184

  7. Opening and closing of cracks at high cyclic strains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyyer, N. S.; Dowling, N. E.

    1986-01-01

    The closure behavior of cracks of different length and at different cyclic strain levels (ranging from predominantly elastic to grossly plastic strains) was studied to observe the effect of residual crack-tip plasticity on crack closure. Cracks were initiated either naturally or artificially (from electric discharge machining pits) in uniaxial test specimens of strengthened alloy steel AISI 4340 with a grain size of 0.016 mm. It was found that, at high strains, cracks closed only when the lowest stress level in the cycle was approached. The stress or the strain opening level depended upon the exact point along the crack length where the observations were made. As the plastic deformation increased, the relative crack opening level was found to decrease and approach the value of stress ratio R. The experimental results were compared with those of three analytical models of crack closure and opening, demonstrating the limitations of the currently available elastic-plastic crack growth analysis.

  8. Wedge assembly for electrical transformer component spacing

    DOEpatents

    Baggett, Franklin E.; Cage, W. Franklin

    1991-01-01

    A wedge assembly that is easily inserted between two surfaces to be supported thereby, and thereafter expanded to produce a selected spacing between those surfaces. This wedge assembly has two outer members that are substantially identical except that they are mirror images of each other. Oppositely directed faces of these of these outer members are substantially parallel for the purpose of contacting the surfaces to be separated. The outer faces of these outer members that are directed toward each other are tapered so as to contact a center member having complementary tapers on both faces. A washer member is provided to contact a common end of the outer members, and a bolt member penetrates this washer and is threadably received in a receptor of the center member. As the bolt member is threaded into the center member, the center member is drawn further into the gap between the outer members and thereby separates these outer members to contact the surfaces to be separated. In the preferred embodiment, the contacting surfaces of the outer member and the center member are provided with guide elements. The wedge assembly is described for use in separating the secondary windings from the laminations of an electrical power transformer.

  9. Crustal and Fault Strengths from Critical Taper Measurements: Insights into the behavior of Accretionary Wedges using Distinct-Element Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, L.; Suppe, J.

    2012-12-01

    It is increasingly clear that many major faults are weak relative to quasistatic friction because of dynamical effects involving the microprocesses of high-velocity friction and the energetics of large-scale fault rupture. Even at the toes of accretionary wedges where velocity strengthening is expected, large displacements can occur dynamically. We seek to better understand the relationship between the large-scale strength of such faults and of the crust containing them over a timescale much greater than seismic cycles. Critical-taper theory provides straightforward quantitative relationships between accretionary wedge geometry and absolute basal fault and wedge strengths with minimal assumptions. Wedge tapers constrain the far-field stresses under which detachments slip and wedges grow during wedge-growing events, whether they are dynamical or quasistatic. To date most applications of wedge mechanics to accretionary wedges involve analog and numerical modeling with largely conceptual insight, for example illuminating the role of geological heterogeneity. Here we demonstrate that recent theoretical advances that are successful in extracting absolute wedge and detachment strengths from the geometry of active wedges can also be applied to extract large-scale strengths in distinct element numerical models in both mechanically homogeneous and heterogeneous wedges. The distinct element method (DEM) is an ideal tool for the study and modeling of critical taper wedges: model wedges can be initially cohesive (bonded) or cohesionless. Faults and folds form naturally as the result of progressive bond breakage during shortening and wedge growth. Heterogeneity can be introduced by creating layered groups of particles of differing mechanical properties. The DEM suffers to some extent in that macro material properties cannot be directly prescribed but rather must be defined by a modest number of micro-properties and the process in necessarily iterative and developing a wide

  10. The geometry of the Chilean continental wedge: Tectonic segmentation of subduction processes off Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksymowicz, Andrei

    2015-09-01

    Based on high-resolution bathymetry and geophysical observations, the precise continental wedge geometry along the Chilean margin is analyzed. The data show complex patterns in continental wedge geometry that challenge the most frequently used classification methodology for the convergent margin tectonics. A detailed modeling of the parameters involved in the Non-Cohesive Coulomb Wedge theory reveals a tectonic latitudinal segmentation of the Chilean offshore subduction zone. This segmentation is characterized by a sequence of broad segments with different basal effective friction coefficient and/or internal fluid pressure conditions, which are limited by the presence of bathymetric oceanic highs, fracture zones and Peninsulas. The results suggest a general increase of the fluid pressure inside the continental wedge north of 33°S, which is interpreted as a result of a more pervasive fracturing due to tectonic erosion at the base and within the continental wedge. The tectonic segmentation proposed here shows a close spatial relation with the short-term deformation process associated to the coseismic ruptures of large earthquakes in the Chilean margin.

  11. Effect of shockwave curvature on run distance observed with a modified wedge test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Richard; Dorgan, Robert J.; Sutherland, Gerrit; Benedetta, Ashley; Milby, Christopher

    2012-03-01

    The effect of wave curvature on shock initiation in PBXN-110 was investigated using a modified wedge test configuration. Various widths of PBXN-110 donor slabs were used to define the shockwave curvature introduced to wedge samples of the same explosive. The donor slabs were initiated with line-wave generators so that the shock from the donor would be the same shape, magnitude and duration across the entire input surface of the wedge. The shock parameters were varied for a given donor with PMMA spacers placed between the donor and the wedge sample. A high-speed electronic framing camera was used to observe where initiation occurred along the face of the wedge. Initiation always occurred at the center of the shock front instead of along the sides like that reported by others using a much smaller test format. Results were compared to CTH calculations to indicate if there were effects associated with highly curved shock fronts that could not be adequately predicted. The run distance predicted in CTH for a 50.8 mm wide donor slab (low curvature) compared favorably with experimental results. However, results from thinner donor slabs (higher curvature) indicate a more sensitive behavior than the simulations predicted.

  12. An Experimental Investigation of Transonic Flow Past Two-Dimensional Wedge and Circular-Arc Sections Using A Mach-Zehnder Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Arthur Earl, Jr

    1952-01-01

    Report presents the results of interferometer measurements of the flow field near two-dimensional wedge and circular-arc sections of zero angle of attack at high-subsonic and low-supersonic velocities. Both subsonic flow with local supersonic zone and supersonic flow with detached shock wave have been investigated. Pressure distributions and drag coefficients as a function of Mach number have been obtained. The wedge data are compared with the theoretical work on flow past wedge sections of Guderley and Yoshihara, Vincenti and Wagner, and Cole. Pressure distributions and drag coefficients for the wedge and circular-arc sections are presented throughout the entire transonic range of velocities.

  13. Localised wedge shaped defects of the retinal nerve fibre layer in glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Jonas, J B; Schiro, D

    1994-04-01

    Glaucoma can be associated with a diffuse or localised loss of the retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL). This study evaluated the wedge shaped localised RNFL defects. Red free wide angle RNFL photographs of 421 patients with glaucoma and 193 normal subjects were examined. Localised RNFL defects were described for one eye of the normal group and for 20% of the patients with glaucoma. They were usually located in the inferior temporal and superior temporal fundus regions. Within the glaucoma group, localised RNFL defects occurred most often (p < 0.05) in normal pressure glaucoma, followed by primary open angle glaucoma, and finally secondary open angle glaucoma. They were positively associated with disc haemorrhages. The localised RNFL defects had a high specificity to indicate optic nerve damage. The nerve fibre layer defects occurring more likely in mild rather than advanced glaucoma, they were helpful in the diagnosis of early glaucoma. The association between localised RNFL defects and disc haemorrhages and the varying frequency of localised RNFL defects in different types of glaucoma may be important diagnostically and pathogenetically. PMID:8199115

  14. High power Tesla driven miniature plasma opening switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajesh

    The plasma opening switch (POS) is used in pulsed power systems where a very fast opening and high current switch is required. Plasma is injected into the switch, which carries a large conduction current, before it opens in a process that lasts for a few nanosecond and transfers the current to a parallel-connected load at a much increased voltage and with a much shorter rise time. The conduction and opening times of the switch are dependent on plasma parameters such as the distribution, speed and species, all of which are determined by the plasma source. Most of the earlier reported work involves large dimension POSs and a correspondingly high input current (more than 100 kA) and uses carbon plasma. One main objective of the present research was to achieve a low input current (20 kA) and miniaturised POS by using hydrogen plasma rather than carbon plasma on account of its lower mass. A cable gun was selected for producing the plasma, since although this produces both hydrogen and carbon plasma these arise different times during its operation.. For the present application a Tesla transformer was used in preference to a Marx generator to produce an initial high voltage pulse for the system, on the basis of its simpler design and cost effectiveness. This transformer together with an associated water PFL (pulse forming line) and pressurised switch was capable of producing a load current in excess of 20 kA with a rise time of 53 ns, which was fed through the POS to the final load. Special diagnostics arrangements were necessary to measure the fast high current and voltage pulse a in nonintrusive way. Faraday cups and a high speed camera were used to measure the plasma parameters. The overall system built (i.e. including the POS) is capable of producing a 22 kA current with a rise time of 5 ns, and of generating a power of more than 10 GW..

  15. Wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide with long propagation length and ultra-small deep-subwavelength mode area

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Chengcheng; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel design of wedge hybrid plasmonic terahertz (THz) waveguide consisting of a silicon (Si) nanowire cylinder above a triangular gold wedge with surrounded high-density polyethylene as cladding. It features long propagation length and ultra-small deep-subwavelength mode confinement. The mode properties of wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide are comprehensively characterized in terms of propagation length (L), normalized mode area (Aeff /A0), figure of merit (FoM), and chromatic dispersion (D). The designed wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide enables an ultra-small deep-subwavelength mode area which is more than one-order of magnitude smaller compared to previous rectangular one. When choosing the diameter of Si nanowire cylinder, a smaller diameter (e.g. 10 μm) is preferred to achieve longer L and higher FoM, while a larger diameter (e.g. 60 μm) is favorable to obtain smaller Aeff /A0 and higher FoM. We further study the impacts of possible practical fabrication errors on the mode properties. The simulated results of propagation length and normalized mode area show that the proposed wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide is tolerant to practical fabrication errors in geometry parameters such as misalignment in the horizontal direction, variation of wedge tip angle, and variation of wedge tip curvature radius. PMID:26155782

  16. Wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide with long propagation length and ultra-small deep-subwavelength mode area.

    PubMed

    Gui, Chengcheng; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel design of wedge hybrid plasmonic terahertz (THz) waveguide consisting of a silicon (Si) nanowire cylinder above a triangular gold wedge with surrounded high-density polyethylene as cladding. It features long propagation length and ultra-small deep-subwavelength mode confinement. The mode properties of wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide are comprehensively characterized in terms of propagation length (L), normalized mode area (Aeff/A0), figure of merit (FoM), and chromatic dispersion (D). The designed wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide enables an ultra-small deep-subwavelength mode area which is more than one-order of magnitude smaller compared to previous rectangular one. When choosing the diameter of Si nanowire cylinder, a smaller diameter (e.g. 10 μm) is preferred to achieve longer L and higher FoM, while a larger diameter (e.g. 60 μm) is favorable to obtain smaller Aeff/A0 and higher FoM. We further study the impacts of possible practical fabrication errors on the mode properties. The simulated results of propagation length and normalized mode area show that the proposed wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide is tolerant to practical fabrication errors in geometry parameters such as misalignment in the horizontal direction, variation of wedge tip angle, and variation of wedge tip curvature radius. PMID:26155782

  17. Separation over a flat plate-wedge configuration at oceanic Reynolds numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study of flow over a two-dimensional flat plate-wedge configuration is presented. The investigation encompasses a range of Reynolds numbers characteristics of conditions encountered by deep submersible oceanic vehicles. Flow separation, similar to that found on high speed aircraft control surfaces, is reported and discussed in light of the laminar or transitional nature of the separated shear layer. As discovered in previous high Mach number studies of plate-wedge or ramp configurations, the dependency of the size of the separated region on free stream Reynolds number is reversed for laminar and transitional types of flow separation.

  18. Dying Flow Bursts as Generators of the Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    Many theories or conjectures exist on the driver of the substorm current wedge, e.g. rerouting of the tail current, current disruption, flow braking, vortex formation, and current sheet collapse. Magnitude, spatial scale, and temporal development of the related magnetic perturbations suggest that the generator is related to the interaction of the flow bursts with the dipolar magnetosphere after onset of reconnection in the near-Earth tail. The question remains whether it is the flow energy that feeds the wedge current or the internal energy of the arriving plasma. In this presentation I argue for the latter. The current generation is attributed to the force exerted by the dipolarized magnetic field of the flow bursts on the preceding layer of high-beta plasma after flow braking. The generator current is the grad-B current at the outer boundary of the compressed high-beta plasma layers. It needs the sequential arrival of several flow bursts to account for duration and magnitude of the ionospheric closure current.

  19. Investigation of turbulent wedges generated by different single surface roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traphan, Dominik; Meinlschmidt, Peter; Lutz, Otto; Peinke, Joachim; Gülker, Gerd

    2013-11-01

    It is known that small faults on rotor blades of wind turbines can cause significant power loss. In order to better understand the governing physical effects, in this experimental study, the formation of a turbulent wedge over a flat plate induced by single surface roughness elements is under investigation. The experiments are performed at different ambient pressure gradients, thus allowing conclusions about the formation of a turbulent wedge over an airfoil. With respect to typical initial faults on operating airfoils, the roughness elements are modified in both size and shape (raised or recessed). None intrusive experimental methods, such as stereoscopic PIV and LDA, enable investigations based on temporally and spatially highly resolved velocity measurements. In this way, a spectral analysis of the turbulent boundary layer is performed and differences in coherent structures within the wedge are identified. These findings are correlated with global measurements of the wedge carried out by infrared thermography. This correlation aims to enable distinguishing the cause and main properties of a turbulent wedge by the easy applicable method of infrared thermography, which is of practical relevance in the field of condition monitoring of wind turbines.

  20. Effect of Shockwave Curvature on Run Distance Observed with a Modified Wedge Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Richard; Dorgan, Robert; Sutherland, Gerrit; Benedetta, Ashley; Milby, Christopher

    2011-06-01

    The effect of wave curvature on shock initiation in PBXN-110 was investigated using a modified wedge test configuration. Various thicknesses of PBXN-110 donor slabs were used to define the shockwave curvature introduced to wedge samples of the same explosive. The donor slabs were initiated with line-wave generators so that the introduced shock would be the same shape, magnitude and duration across the entire input surface of the wedge. The shock parameters were varied for a given donor thickness via different widths of PMMA spacers placed between the donor and the wedge. A framing camera was used to observe where initiation occurred along the face of the wedge. Initiation always occurred at the center of the shock front instead of the sides like that reported by others using a much smaller test format. Results were compared to CTH calculations to indicate if there were effects associated with highly curved shock fronts that could not be adequately predicted. The run distance predicted in CTH for a 50.8 mm thick donor slab (low curvature) compared favorably with experimental results. However, results from thinner donor slabs (higher curvature) indicate a more sensitive behavior than the simulations predicted.

  1. NASA/GE Collaboration on Open Rotors - High Speed Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanZante, Dale E.

    2011-01-01

    A low-noise open rotor system is being tested in collaboration with General Electric and CFM International, a 50/50 joint company between Snecmaand GE. Candidate technologies for lower noise will be investigated as well as installation effects such as pylon integration. Current test status for the 8x6 SWT high speed testing is presented as well as future scheduled testing which includes the FAA/CLEEN test entry. The tunnel blockage and propeller thrust calibration configurations are shown.

  2. High-temperature, high-pressure spherical segment valve provides quick opening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovannetti, A.; Himmelright, R.; Meyer, K.; Nitta, H.

    1964-01-01

    A hollow spherical segment valve with an eccentric permits non-rubbing closure and provides a means for gas-cooling the seal. The design allows quick opening at high temperatures and discharge pressures.

  3. Northeast Siberian ice wedges reveal Arctic long-term winter warming over the past two millennia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opel, Thomas; Meyer, Hanno; Laepple, Thomas; Wetterich, Sebastian; Werner, Martin; Dereviagin, Alexander; Schirrmeister, Lutz

    2015-04-01

    The Arctic currently experiences a pronounced and unprecedented warming. This highly dynamic response on changes in climate forcing and the global impact of the Arctic water, carbon and energy balance make the Arctic a key region to study past and future climate changes on different spatial, temporal and seasonal scales. Recent proxy-based Arctic and Northern Hemisphere temperature reconstructions show a long-term cooling trend over the past millennia that has been reversed by the ongoing Arctic warming. This cooling is mainly related to the decrease in summer insolation. Climate models on the other hand show no significant change or even a slight warming. This model-proxy mismatch might be caused by a summer bias of most records. Hence, there is strong need for past winter climate information. Moreover, the Russian Arctic is largely underrepresented in recent Arctic-wide proxy compilations. Ice wedges may help to fill these seasonal and spatial gaps. Polygonal ice wedges are a widespread permafrost feature in the Arctic coastal lowlands. They are formed by the periodic repetition of wintertime frost cracking and subsequent crack filling in spring mostly by melt water of winter snow. Hence, the isotopic composition of wedge ice is indicative of past climate conditions during this extended winter season. δ18O of ice is interpreted as proxy for local air temperatures. Radiocarbon dating of organic remains in ice-wedge samples enables one to generate chronologies for single ice wedges as well as stacked records with an up to centennial resolution. Here we present ice-wedge records from the Oyogos Yar coast in the Northeast Siberian Arctic (72.7°N, 143.5°E) that cover the past two millennia. We discuss the chronological approaches as well as the paleoclimatic findings. The co-isotopic relationship of wedge ice is close to the Global Meteoric Water Line pointing to no significant isotopic changes during ice-wedge formation and, therefore, to a good suitability for

  4. NGC 1252: a high altitude, metal poor open cluster remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente Marcos, R.; de la Fuente Marcos, C.; Moni Bidin, C.; Carraro, G.; Costa, E.

    2013-09-01

    If stars form in clusters but most stars belong to the field, understanding the details of the transition from the former to the latter is imperative to explain the observational properties of the field. Aging open clusters are one of the sources of field stars. The disruption rate of open clusters slows down with age but, as an object gets older, the distinction between the remaining cluster or open cluster remnant (OCR) and the surrounding field becomes less and less obvious. As a result, finding good OCR candidates or confirming the OCR nature of some of the best candidates still remain elusive. One of these objects is NGC 1252, a scattered group of about 20 stars in Horologium. Here we use new wide-field photometry in the UBVI passbands, proper motions from the Yale/San Juan SPM 4.0 catalogue and high-resolution spectroscopy concurrently with results from N-body simulations to decipher NGC 1252's enigmatic character. Spectroscopy shows that most of the brightest stars in the studied area are chemically, kinematically and spatially unrelated to each other. However, after analysing proper motions, we find one relevant kinematic group. This sparse object is relatively close (˜1 kpc), metal poor and is probably not only one of the oldest clusters (3 Gyr) within 1.5 kpc from the Sun but also one of the clusters located farthest from the disc, at an altitude of nearly -900 pc. That makes NGC 1252 the first open cluster that can be truly considered a high Galactic altitude OCR: an unusual object that may hint at a star formation event induced on a high Galactic altitude gas cloud. We also conclude that the variable TW Horologii and the blue straggler candidate HD 20286 are unlikely to be part of NGC 1252. NGC 1252 17 is identified as an unrelated, Population II cannonball star moving at about 400 km s-1.

  5. Shock Wave Boundary Layer Interaction Mechanism on a Double Wedge Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Bayram; Barada, Mohammad Adel El Hajj Ali; Durna, Ahmet Selim

    2015-11-01

    A hypersonic test series by Swantek & Austin report complex shock wave boundary layer interaction mechanisms and unsteady surface heat flux from a double wedge geometry in a low enthalpy Mach 7 flow. In order to understand the physics of the flow and the heat transfer, we study the flow computationally and compare the results for the double wedge geometries, whose second angle is higher and lower than the maximum deflection angle at Mach 7. Apart from the numbers of comprehensive computational studies on the subject available in open literature, our study aims to describe the flow physics by taking the influence of both boundary layers that are formed on the two walls of the wedge into account. In addition to describing the flow and heat transfer mechanisms, we investigate the time for the flows to reach steady state. We evaluate the interaction mechanisms in term of instant and time average surface heat flux distributions. We perform all computations using a finite volume based compressible Navier-Stokes solver, rhoCentralFoam, which is one of the several compressible flow solvers of an open source software, openFOAM.

  6. Wedge energy bands of monolayer black phosphorus: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Park, Minwoo; Bae, Hyeonhu; Lee, Seunghan; Yang, Li; Lee, Hoonkyung

    2016-08-01

    On the basis of first-principles calculations, we present intriguing electronic properties of halogen-striped functionalized monolayer black phosphorus. The halogen-striped monolayer black phosphorus is found to have a wedge energy band with the energy-momentum relation of [Formula: see text] when the stripe-stripe distance is smaller than ~40 Å. Our tight-binding study shows that the wedge energy band occurs when 2-atom basis 1D lattices are periodically repeated aligned with each other in a 2D lattice. We also discuss the possible applications of this wedge energy band in electron supercollimation with high mobility or severely anisotropic electronic transport, which can be used for the development of optics-like nano-electronics. PMID:27299467

  7. Wedge energy bands of monolayer black phosphorus: a first-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Minwoo; Bae, Hyeonhu; Lee, Seunghan; Yang, Li; Lee, Hoonkyung

    2016-08-01

    On the basis of first-principles calculations, we present intriguing electronic properties of halogen-striped functionalized monolayer black phosphorus. The halogen-striped monolayer black phosphorus is found to have a wedge energy band with the energy-momentum relation of E\\propto {{p}y} when the stripe–stripe distance is smaller than ~40 Å. Our tight-binding study shows that the wedge energy band occurs when 2-atom basis 1D lattices are periodically repeated aligned with each other in a 2D lattice. We also discuss the possible applications of this wedge energy band in electron supercollimation with high mobility or severely anisotropic electronic transport, which can be used for the development of optics-like nano-electronics.

  8. Predicting Run Distances for a Modified Wedge Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorgan, Robert J.; Lee, Richard; Sutherland, Gerrit

    2012-03-01

    Simulations were used to aid in the development of a modified wedge test (MWT). This explosive sensitivity experiment allows the shockwave curvature to be defined in order to investigate the effect of combined shock-shear loading on sensitivity. Various widths of PBXN-110 donor slabs were used to define the shockwave curvature introduced to wedge samples of the same explosive. The donor slabs were initiated with a linewave generator and a Detasheet booster, and the shock wave was attenuated using a slab of PMMA. In developing simulations for these three material experiments, calibrations of the PBXN-110 ignition and growth model and of the PMMA constitutive model were investigated in order to choose between several models found in the literature. A calibration shot from the MWT was also used to demonstrate the appropriateness of the models selected. Experimental results were compared to CTH calculations to indicate if there were effects associated with highly curved shock fronts that could not be adequately predicted. The run distances predicted in CTH for the thicker donor slab compare very favorably with the actual experiments; however, for thinner donor slabs, the actual experimental results seem to suggest a more sensitive behavior than the simulations are able to capture.

  9. Predicting Run Distances for a Modified Wedge Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorgan, Robert; Lee, Richard; Sutherland, Gerrit

    2011-06-01

    Simulations were used to aid in the development of a modified wedge test (MWT). This explosive sensitivity experiment allows the shockwave curvature to be defined in order to investigate the effect of combined shock-shear loading on sensitivity. Various widths of PBXN-110 donor slabs were used to define the shockwave curvature introduced to wedge samples of the same explosive. The donor slabs were initiated with a linewave generator and a Detasheet booster, and the shock wave was attenuated using a slab of PMMA. In developing simulations for these three material experiments, calibrations of the PBXN-110 ignition and growth model and of the PMMA constitutive model were investigated in order to choose between several models found in the literature. A calibration shot from the MWT was also used to demonstrate the appropriateness of the models selected. Experimental results were compared to CTH calculations to indicate if there were effects associated with highly curved shock fronts that could not be adequately predicted. The run distances predicted in CTH for the thicker donor slab compare very favorably with the actual experiments; however, for thinner donor slabs, the actual experimental results seem to suggest a more sensitive behavior than the simulations are able to capture. DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release, distribution unlimited. (96ABW-2011-0053)

  10. An automated optical wedge calibrator for Dobson ozone spectrophotometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, R. D.; Komhyr, W. D.; Grass, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    The Dobson ozone spectrophotometer measures the difference of intensity between selected wavelengths in the ultraviolet. The method uses an optical attenuator (the 'Wedge') in this measurement. The knowledge of the relationship of the wedge position to the attenuation is critical to the correct calculation of ozone from the measurement. The procedure to determine this relationship is time-consuming, and requires a highly skilled person to perform it correctly. The relationship has been found to change with time. For reliable ozone values, the procedure should be done on a Dobson instrument at regular intervals. Due to the skill and time necessary to perform this procedure, many instruments have gone as long as 15 years between procedures. This article describes an apparatus that performs the procedure under computer control, and is adaptable to the majority of existing Dobson instruments. Part of the apparatus is usable for normal operation of the Dobson instrument, and would allow computer collection of the data and real-time ozone measurements.

  11. The wedge bias in reionization 21-cm power spectrum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Hannes; Majumdar, Suman; Mellema, Garrelt; Lidz, Adam; Iliev, Ilian T.; Dixon, Keri L.

    2016-02-01

    A proposed method for dealing with foreground emission in upcoming 21-cm observations from the epoch of reionization is to limit observations to an uncontaminated window in Fourier space. Foreground emission can be avoided in this way, since it is limited to a wedge-shaped region in k∥, k⊥ space. However, the power spectrum is anisotropic owing to redshift-space distortions from peculiar velocities. Consequently, the 21-cm power spectrum measured in the foreground avoidance window - which samples only a limited range of angles close to the line-of-sight direction - differs from the full redshift-space spherically averaged power spectrum which requires an average over all angles. In this paper, we calculate the magnitude of this `wedge bias' for the first time. We find that the bias amplifies the difference between the real-space and redshift-space power spectra. The bias is strongest at high redshifts, where measurements using foreground avoidance will overestimate the redshift-space power spectrum by around 100 per cent, possibly obscuring the distinctive rise and fall signature that is anticipated for the spherically averaged 21-cm power spectrum. In the later stages of reionization, the bias becomes negative, and smaller in magnitude (≲20 per cent).

  12. Multi-gap high impedance plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mason, Rodney J.

    1996-01-01

    A high impedance plasma opening switch having an anode and a cathode and at least one additional electrode placed between the anode and cathode. The presence of the additional electrodes leads to the creation of additional plasma gaps which are in series, increasing the net impedance of the switch. An equivalent effect can be obtained by using two or more conventional plasma switches with their plasma gaps wired in series. Higher impedance switches can provide high current and voltage to higher impedance loads such as plasma radiation sources.

  13. Multi-gap high impedance plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mason, R.J.

    1996-10-22

    A high impedance plasma opening switch having an anode and a cathode and at least one additional electrode placed between the anode and cathode is disclosed. The presence of the additional electrodes leads to the creation of additional plasma gaps which are in series, increasing the net impedance of the switch. An equivalent effect can be obtained by using two or more conventional plasma switches with their plasma gaps wired in series. Higher impedance switches can provide high current and voltage to higher impedance loads such as plasma radiation sources. 12 figs.

  14. Open source high performance floating-point modules.

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, Keith Douglas

    2006-02-01

    Given the logic density of modern FPGAs, it is feasible to use FPGAs for floating-point applications. However, it is important that any floating-point units that are used be highly optimized. This paper introduces an open source library of highly optimized floating-point units for Xilinx FPGAs. The units are fully IEEE compliant and achieve approximately 230 MHz operation frequency for double-precision add and multiply in a Xilinx Virtex-2-Pro FPGA (-7 speed grade). This speed is achieved with a 10 stage adder pipeline and a 12 stage multiplier pipeline. The area requirement is 571 slices for the adder and 905 slices for the multiplier.

  15. Laparoscopic wedge resection of synchronous gastric intraepithelial neoplasia and stromal tumor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mou, Yi-Ping; Xu, Xiao-Wu; Xie, Kun; Zhou, Wei; Zhou, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Ke

    2010-10-21

    Synchronous occurrence of epithelial neoplasia and gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the stomach is uncommon. Only rare cases have been reported in the literature. We present here a 60-year-old female case of synchronous occurrence of gastric high-level intraepithelial neoplasia and GIST with the features of 22 similar cases and detailed information reported in the English-language literature summarized. In the present patient, epithelial neoplasia and GIST were removed en bloc by laparoscopic wedge resection. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case treated by laparoscopic wedge resection. PMID:20954290

  16. Impingement of water droplets on wedges and double-wedge airfoils at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, John S

    1954-01-01

    An analytical solution has been obtained for the equations of motion of water droplets impinging on a wedge in a two-dimensional supersonic flow field with a shock wave attached to the wedge. The closed-form solution yields analytical expressions for the equation of the droplet trajectory, the local rate of impingement and the impingement velocity at any point on the wedge surface, and the total rate of impingement. The analytical expressions are utilized to determine the impingement on the forward surfaces of diamond airfoils in supersonic flow fields with attached shock waves. The results presented include the following conditions: droplet diameters from 2 to 100 microns, pressure altitudes from sea level to 30,000 feet, free-stream static temperatures from 420 degrees r, free stream Mach numbers from 1.1 to 2.0, semiapex angles for the wedge from 1.14 degrees to 7.97 degrees, thickness-to-chord ratios for the diamond airfoil from 0.02 to 0.14, chord lengths from 1 to 20 feet, and angles of attack from zero to the inverse tangent of the airfoil thickness-to-chord ratio.

  17. MANUAL DEGATING OPERATIONS PERFORMED BY SLEDGEHAMMERS AND PNEUMATIC WEDGE SEPARATORS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MANUAL DEGATING OPERATIONS PERFORMED BY SLEDGE-HAMMERS AND PNEUMATIC WEDGE SEPARATORS. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Shaking, Degating & Sand Systems, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  18. Molecular Depth Profiling by Wedged Crater Beveling

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Dan; Lu, Caiyan; Winograd, Nicholas; Wucher, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy are employed to characterize a wedge-shaped crater eroded by a 40keV C60+ cluster ion beam on an organic film of Irganox 1010 doped with Irganox 3114 delta layers. From an examination of the resulting surface, the information about depth resolution, topography and erosion rate can be obtained as a function of crater depth for every depth in a single experiment. It is shown that when measurements are performed at liquid nitrogen temperature, a constant erosion rate and reduced bombardment induced surface roughness is observed. At room temperature, however, the erosion rate drops by ~1/3 during the removal of the 400 nm Irganox film and the roughness gradually increased to from 1 nm ~4 nm. From SIMS lateral images of the beveled crater and AFM topography results, depth resolution was further improved by employing glancing angles of incidence and lower primary ion beam energy. Sub-10 nm depth resolution was observed under the optimized conditions on a routine basis. In general, we show that the wedge-crater beveling is an important tool for elucidating the factors that are important for molecular depth profiling experiments. PMID:21744861

  19. Mid-Calcaneal Length After Evans Calcaneal Osteotomy: A Retrospective Comparison of Wedge Locking Plates and Tricortical Allograft Wedges.

    PubMed

    Protzman, Nicole M; Wobst, Garrett M; Storts, Eric C; Mulhern, Jennifer L; McCarroll, Raymond E; Brigido, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Evans calcaneal osteotomy remains a cornerstone in the correction of the flexible flatfoot. Although multiple techniques have been used to maintain the length of the lateral column, a low profile wedge locking plate was recently introduced as an alternative to the traditional tricortical allograft wedge. We hypothesized that the wedge locking plate would better maintain the mid-calcaneal length compared with the tricortical allograft wedge. To test this hypothesis, after Evans osteotomy, the mid-calcaneal length was measured in the immediate postoperative period and again at 3 and 6 months. A total of 24 patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean patient age was 48.1 years (range 11 to 66). Of the 24 patients, 9 (37.5%) were treated with a tricortical allograft wedge and 15 (62.5%) with a wedge locking plate. At 3 months postoperatively, the mean decrease in mid-calcaneal length was similar for the tricortical allograft wedge group (1.3 ± 1.9 mm) and the wedge locking plate group (0.5 ± 0.9 mm, p = .275). At 6 months postoperatively, however, the mean decrease in mid-calcaneal length was greater for the tricortical allograft wedge group (2.8 ± 1.7 mm) than for the wedge locking plate group (0.6 ± 0.7 mm, p = .004). The 2 groups demonstrated a similar incidence of dorsally displaced distal calcaneal fragments throughout the study endpoint (p ≥ .052). These results suggest that the wedge locking plate better maintains the mid-calcaneal length over time compared with the tricortical allograft wedge. PMID:25998470

  20. Structure and activity of the imbricated wedge of the Gulf of Cadiz from MCS images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calahorrano Betancourt, Alcinoe; Ranero, César R.; Gràcia, Eulàlia

    2015-04-01

    In this work we present new results on the structure and activity of the imbricated wedge of the Gulf of Cadiz based on ˜ 3000 km of multichannel (MCS) profiles acquired off NW Moroccan margin. Seismic images indicates that the imbricated wedge is bounded between the Gulf of Cadiz margin at the north, the Kenitra margin at the south and the Rharb margin at the east. It is imaged as a sedimentary body with variable seismic amplitude, and structured by imbricated thrust sheets similar to an accretionary prism. Its maximum thickness is located at the east region of the gulf. It gradually thins toward the center and south of the gulf, where it is buried by ˜0.3 twts of sedimentary deposits, indicating that the imbricated wedge is actually not growing. It probably stops it s activity at ˜5-6 Ma. The imbricated wedge is overlaid by sedimentary sequences whose oldest unit is uppermost Tortonian. No evidences of gravitational (olistostrom) origin were founded. Active deformation related to plate convergence corresponds mainly to strike-slip faulting and minor thrusting. Mud diapirism is imaged intruding both the imbricated wedge and the overlaying sediments. At the south, the seismic images show normal faulting probably related with an extended continental crust or a continent-ocean transition crust. The age of this extension is probably Triassic-Jurassic, and we propose it as the conjugated margin of the Gulf of Cadiz. Toward the east, MCS profiles image high-amplitude continent-verging reflections corresponding to pervasive normal faulting. These deformation related to a extended terrain, named Rharb margin, seems to act as the backstop of the imbricated wedge, and it is over-thrusted by Prebetic/Flysh sequences off the Strait of Gibraltar.

  1. Distribution of ice- and soil wedges in Kapp Linné, Svalbard, mapped by two- and three-dimensional ground-penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, T.; Matsuoka, N.; Christiansen, H.

    2009-12-01

    Wedges along non-sorted polygons are consisting of ice or sediments. The wedge infill is often difficult to judge from the surface pattern, since the type of wedge filling depends on both climate and sediment characteristics. In fact, previous studies have reported that ice and active-layer soil wedges can coexist within a small area. We applied two- and three-dimensional ground-penetrating radar (2D and 3D GPR) for mapping subsurface ice and active-layer soil wedges in Kapp Linné, one of the warmest coastal areas in Svalbard. GPR surveys were conducted at six sites on beach ridges, which had emerged in different periods (11-5.5 ka BP). Shallow trenches and boreholes at four sites complemented the interpretation of the GPR results. On the 2D GPR profiles, most of the troughs delimiting the polygons are underlain by a single hyperbolic reflection spreading downward from the ground surface, which represents an active-layer soil wedge. Some troughs are underlain by double hyperbolic reflections extending downward from the ground surface and the frost table, which correspond to a soil wedge penetrating into the top permafrost and an underlying ice-wedge, respectively. However, radar interpretations are sometimes obscured by similar hyperbolic reflections from large stones and unclear reflections from small, narrow (< 50 cm) ice-wedges. The 3D GPR images delineate subsurface ice-wedges underlying the polygon troughs by radar amplitude anomalies more clearly than the 2D profiles. GPR results show that ice-wedges underlie primary polygon troughs and extraordinarily long and wide troughs on lower (younger) beach ridges. This suggests that ice-wedges have been active in the last 5,500 years since beach ridge formation ceased. In contrast, no ice-wedges were detected on higher (older) beach ridges even below the primary polygon troughs. This would be due to the low thermal coefficient of expansion of the material as the high lying snowfree blown ridges are lacking in

  2. Formation of Retro-Wedges during Collision: Insights from Analog and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willingshofer, E.; Vogt, K.; Sokoutis, D.; Matenco, L. C.

    2014-12-01

    We challenge the generally accepted view that continent-continent collision results in doubly verging orogenic wedges with well-developed retro-wedges on the overriding plate. In fact we argue that retro-wedge formation is restricted to specific rheological conditions within the lower and upper plates as well as the plate contact; thus being the exception rather than the rule during collision. In this contribution we use a combination of physical analog and numerical experiments to infer favourable rheological conditions for the development of retro-wedges. In both analog and numerical experiments the contact between the colliding and neutrally buoyant continents is weak and represents the inheritance of a former subduction boundary. The degree of plate coupling however is not constant and is together with the rheological structures of the lower and upper plates, in particular the presence of decoupling horizons, key variable in this study. Plate boundaries are in all experiments orthogonal to the convergence direction. Analog and numerical models with strong decoupling at the plate boundary and different levels (at the Moho or the brittle-ductile transition) of the incoming plate lead to the evolution of mountain belts, where deformation propagates outward, in the direction of the incoming plate, by successive imbrication of upper crustal thrust sheets. Under these conditions, which are typical for subduction-dominated orogens like the Carpathians, the Dinarides or the Apennines, no significant retro-wedges with large-displacement retro-shears develop. Transfer of strain to the upper plate, a pre-requisite for the formation of retro-wedges, is favoured when the degree of plate coupling is high, the crust of the colliding plates is very strong and when the upper plate contains decoupling horizons (e.g. at the Moho or the brittle-ductile transition). Under such conditions large-scale retro-shears develop and deformation propagates outward on the upper plate to form

  3. Colluvial wedge imaging using traveltime and waveform tomography along the Wasatch Fault near Mapleton, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buddensiek, M.-L.; Sheng, J.; Crosby, T.; Schuster, G. T.; Bruhn, R. L.; He, R.

    2008-02-01

    Four high-resolution seismic surveys were conducted across the Wasatch Fault Zone near Mapleton, Utah. The objective was twofold: (1) To use velocity tomograms and reflection images to delineate fault structures and colluvial wedges to more than twice the depth of the Mapleton Megatrench excavated by URS personnel, (2) to assess the strengths and limitations of traveltime and waveform tomography by synthetic studies and comparison of the tomogram to the ground truth seen in the Megatrench log. Four out of the five faults within the trench area are accurately identified in the migrated image and in the tomograms, and the main fault's dip angle is estimated to be between 71 and 80°. Two additional faults are interpreted outside the trench. The faults can be delineated down to 30 m below the surface, which is 20 m deeper than the excavated trench. Five out of six colluvial wedges found in the trench log were seen as low-velocity zones (LVZs) in the tomogram, however the biggest colluvial wedge could not be identified by either tomography method. Waveform tomography prevailed over ray-based traveltime tomography by more clearly recovering the faults and LVZs. A newly discovered LVZ at a depth of 18-21 m below the surface possibly represents a colluvial wedge and is estimated to be less than 21000 years old. If this LVZ is a colluvial wedge, the earthquake history obtained by trenching can be extended from 13500 to 21000 yr with seismic tomography. Our results further demonstrate the capability of tomography in identifying faults, and show that waveform tomography more accurately resolves colluvial wedges compared to traveltime tomography. However, despite the successful recovery of most faults and some, but not all, colluvial wedges, both tomography methods show many more LVZs besides the wedges, so that an unambiguous interpretation cannot be made. A major part of the ambiguity in the tomograms is due to the many major faults, which result in an uneven raypath

  4. Characterization of the Thermal-Wave Field in a Wedge-Shaped Solid Using the Green's Function Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jie; Tai, Rui; Wang, Chinhua; Mandelis, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    In this study, a theoretical model is established for a wedge-like solid with an open sector surrounded by walls of radius of a cylindrical rod illuminated by a modulated circular Gaussian incident beam by means of the Green’s function method in cylindrical coordinates. An analytical expression for the thermal-wave field in such a sample is presented. The theory is validated by reducing the arbitrary geometrical structure of the wedge to simpler geometries. It is shown that the frequency dependence of the thermal-wave field near the edge exhibits a large phase lag compared with that at a location far from the edge. The theory provides a foundation for quantitatively characterizing wedge-shaped industrial samples, such as metals with sintered edges, using photothermal methods in a non-contact and non-destructive manner.

  5. 28. REPRESENTATIVE CENTER WEDGE. BALANCE WHEELS ON TRACK, WITH RACK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. REPRESENTATIVE CENTER WEDGE. BALANCE WHEELS ON TRACK, WITH RACK TO OUTSIDE, SHOWN TO RIGHT OF THE WEDGE. PHOTO TAKEN AT SOUTH SWING SPAN. - George P. Coleman Memorial Bridge, Spanning York River at U.S. Route 17, Yorktown, York County, VA

  6. Magneto-optical and photoemission studies of ultrathin wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Bader, S.D.; Li, Dongqi

    1995-12-01

    Magnetic phase transitions of Fe wedges grown epitaxially on Cu(100) are detected via the surface magneto-optical Kerr effect and used to construct a phase diagram for face centered Fe. Also, the confinement of Cu sp- and d-quantum-well states is studied for Cu/Co(wedge)/Cu(100) utilizing undulator-based photoemission experiments.

  7. Effects of Ferrite Magnetic Wedges and Condenser Capacity on Torque Characteristics of a Capacitor Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Siichi; Kaga, Akio

    1989-04-01

    A split-phase capacitor motor is used to drive such domestic loads as household refrigerators and other home electric appliances. This type of motor, however, is usually operated by producing alternating (pulsating or oscillating) torque. In this study, ferrite magnetic wedges have been inserted into stator slot openings of a capacitor motor, and some experimental investigations have been developed to reduce the alternating torque of the motor. With wedging ferrite materials, the amplitude of alternating torque has been decreased to decrease power losses and to increase motor efficiency. When the capacity of the running condenser was exchanged to find suitable operating conditions, the amplitude of alternating torque was likely to decrease, but the increase of condenser capacity has led to increases in circuit currents and power losses. Accordingly, it has been found that there could be an optimal condenser capacity for improving the motor characteristics.

  8. Configuration and Generation of Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiangning

    The substorm current wedge (SCW), a core element of substorm dynamics coupling the magnetotail to the ionosphere, is crucial in understanding substorms. It has been suggested that the field-aligned currents (FACs) in the SCW are caused by either pressure gradients or flow vortices, or both. Our understanding of FAC generations is based predominately on numerical simulations, because it has not been possible to organize spacecraft observations in a coordinate system determined by the SCW. This dissertation develops an empirical inversion model of the current wedge and inverts midlatitude magnetometer data to obtain the parameters of the current wedge for three solar cycles. This database enables statistical data analysis of spacecraft plasma and magnetic field observations relative to the SCW coordinate. In chapter 2, a new midlatitude positive bay (MPB) index is developed and calculated for three solar cycles of data. The MPB index is processed to determine the substorm onset time, which is shown to correspond to the auroral breakup onset with at most 1-2 minutes difference. Substorm occurrence rate is found to depend on solar wind speed while substorm duration is rather constant, suggesting that substorm process has an intrinsic pattern independent of external driving. In chapter 3, an SCW inversion technique is developed to determine the strength and locations of the FACs in an SCW. The inversion parameters for FAC strength and location, and ring current strength are validated by comparison with other measurements. In chapter 4, the connection between earthward flows and auroral poleward expansion is examined using improved mapping, obtained from a newly-developed dynamic magnetospheric model by superimposing a standard magnetospheric field model with substorm current wedge obtained from the inversion technique. It is shown that the ionospheric projection of flows observed at a fixed point in the equatorial plane map to the bright aurora as it expands poleward

  9. Fabrication of wedged multilayer Laue lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Prasciolu, M.; Leontowich, A. F. G.; Krzywinski, J.; Andrejczuk, A.; Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to fabricate wedged multilayer Laue lenses, in which the angle of diffracting layers smoothly varies in the lens to achieve optimum diffracting efficiency across the entire pupil of the lens. This was achieved by depositing a multilayer onto a flat substrate placed in the penumbra of a straight-edge mask. The distance between the mask and the substrate was calibrated and the multilayer Laue lens was cut in a position where the varying layer thickness and the varying layer tilt simultaneously satisfy the Fresnel zone plate condition and Bragg’s law for all layers in the stack. This method can be used to extend the achievable numerical aperture of multilayer Laue lenses to reach considerably smaller focal spot sizes than achievable with lenses composed of parallel layers.

  10. Fabrication of wedged multilayer Laue lenses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Prasciolu, M.; Leontowich, A. F. G.; Krzywinski, J.; Andrejczuk, A.; Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to fabricate wedged multilayer Laue lenses, in which the angle of diffracting layers smoothly varies in the lens to achieve optimum diffracting efficiency across the entire pupil of the lens. This was achieved by depositing a multilayer onto a flat substrate placed in the penumbra of a straight-edge mask. The distance between the mask and the substrate was calibrated and the multilayer Laue lens was cut in a position where the varying layer thickness and the varying layer tilt simultaneously satisfy the Fresnel zone plate condition and Bragg’s law for all layers in the stack.more » This method can be used to extend the achievable numerical aperture of multilayer Laue lenses to reach considerably smaller focal spot sizes than achievable with lenses composed of parallel layers.« less

  11. Ground penetrating radar estimates of permafrost ice wedge depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsekian, A.; Slater, L. D.; Nolan, J. T.; Grosse, G.; Walter Anthony, K. M.

    2013-12-01

    Vertical ground ice wedges associated with polygonal patterning in permafrost environments form due to frost cracking of soils under harsh winter conditions and subsequent infilling of cracks with snow melt water. Ice wedge polygon patterns have implications for lowland geomorphology, hydrology, and vulnerability of permafrost to thaw. Ice wedge dimensions may exceed two meters width at the surface and several meters depth, however few studies have addressed the question of ice wedge depth due to challenges related to measuring the vertical dimension below the ground. Vertical exposures where ice wedges maybe observed are limited to rapidly retreating lake, river, and coastal bluffs. Coring though the ice wedges to determine vertical extent is possible, however that approach is time consuming and labor intensive. Many geophysical investigations have noted signal anomalies related to the presence of ice wedges, but no reliable method for extracting wedge dimensions from geophysical data has been yet proposed. Here we present new evidence that ground penetrating radar (GPR) may be a viable method for estimating ice wedge depth. We present three new perspectives on processing GPR data collected over ice wedges that show considerable promise for use as a fast, cost effective method for evaluating ice wedge depth. Our novel approaches include 1) a simple frequency-domain analysis, 2) an S-transform frequency domain analysis and 3) an analysis of the returned signal power as a radar cross section (RCS) treating subsurface ice wedges as dihedral corner retro-reflectors. Our methods are demonstrated and validated using finite-difference time domain FDTD) GPR forward models of synthetic idealized ice wedges and field data from permafrost sites in Alaska. Our results indicate that frequency domain and signal power data provide information that is easier to extract from raw GPR data than similar information in the time domain. We also show that we can simplify the problem by

  12. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with birefringent wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Réhault, Julien; Maiuri, Margherita; Oriana, Aurelio; Cerullo, Giulio

    2014-12-01

    We present a simple experimental setup for performing two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy in the partially collinear pump-probe geometry. The setup uses a sequence of birefringent wedges to create and delay a pair of phase-locked, collinear pump pulses, with extremely high phase stability and reproducibility. Continuous delay scanning is possible without any active stabilization or position tracking, and allows to record rapidly and easily 2D spectra. The setup works over a broad spectral range from the ultraviolet to the near-IR, it is compatible with few-optical-cycle pulses and can be easily reconfigured to two-colour operation. A simple method for scattering suppression is also introduced. As a proof of principle, we present degenerate and two-color 2D spectra of the light-harvesting complex 1 of purple bacteria.

  13. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with birefringent wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Réhault, Julien; Maiuri, Margherita; Oriana, Aurelio; Cerullo, Giulio

    2014-12-15

    We present a simple experimental setup for performing two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy in the partially collinear pump-probe geometry. The setup uses a sequence of birefringent wedges to create and delay a pair of phase-locked, collinear pump pulses, with extremely high phase stability and reproducibility. Continuous delay scanning is possible without any active stabilization or position tracking, and allows to record rapidly and easily 2D spectra. The setup works over a broad spectral range from the ultraviolet to the near-IR, it is compatible with few-optical-cycle pulses and can be easily reconfigured to two-colour operation. A simple method for scattering suppression is also introduced. As a proof of principle, we present degenerate and two-color 2D spectra of the light-harvesting complex 1 of purple bacteria.

  14. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with birefringent wedges.

    PubMed

    Réhault, Julien; Maiuri, Margherita; Oriana, Aurelio; Cerullo, Giulio

    2014-12-01

    We present a simple experimental setup for performing two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy in the partially collinear pump-probe geometry. The setup uses a sequence of birefringent wedges to create and delay a pair of phase-locked, collinear pump pulses, with extremely high phase stability and reproducibility. Continuous delay scanning is possible without any active stabilization or position tracking, and allows to record rapidly and easily 2D spectra. The setup works over a broad spectral range from the ultraviolet to the near-IR, it is compatible with few-optical-cycle pulses and can be easily reconfigured to two-colour operation. A simple method for scattering suppression is also introduced. As a proof of principle, we present degenerate and two-color 2D spectra of the light-harvesting complex 1 of purple bacteria. PMID:25554272

  15. Healing period after open high tibial osteotomy and related factors: Can we really say that it is long?

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Masamichi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Onishi, Toru; Hirano, Koji; Doi, Motoyuki

    2016-01-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a general procedure for the treatment of degenerative gonarthrosis. In recent years, it has been reported that opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) has become widespread with good results. Despite these facts, HTOs tend to be avoided due to the need for long-term postoperative treatment. To investigate the treatment period for total recovery (healing period) after OWHTO and the factors affecting it. There were 47 cases of medial type degenerative gonarthrosis who underwent OWHTO from 2008 through 2011. The definition of the healing period was based on the time-dependent changes of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association score, focusing especially on pain on walking and pain on ascending/descending stairs. This score was defined as the Ability score. In this study, the healing period ended when the Ability score reached its maximum or when it showed a perfect score. Patients' characteristics were examined to determine their effect on the healing period. The Ability score was 36.7 ± 10.1 (mean ± SD) before surgery and 51.6 ± 5.4 12 months after OWHTO. The healing period was 6.3 ± 3.9 months. Factors correlated with a longer healing period included female sex (correlation coefficient -0.35) and high BMI (correlation coefficient 0.33). Our study suggested that the healing period after OWHTO is approximately 6 months, and patients' BMI and sex appear to be related to this period. This information is expected to be helpful for counseling patients undergoing treatment for gonarthrosis. Level of evidence Therapeutic study, Level IV. PMID:26904392

  16. Transmission of a Gaussian beam by a Fizeau interferential wedge.

    PubMed

    Stoykova, Elena

    2005-12-01

    Analysis of transmission of a finite-diameter Gaussian beam by a Fizeau interferential wedge is presented. The fringe calculation is based on angular spectrum expansion of the complex amplitude of the incident wave field. The developed approach is applicable to any beam diameter and wedge thickness at any distance from the wedge and yields as a boundary case the fringes at plane-wave illumination. The spatial region of resonant transmission on the wedge surface is given by the width of the transmitted peak for plane-wave illumination. At higher coating reflectivity, the direction of the transmitted beam is deviated with respect to that of the incident beam. Evaluation of the spectral response based on the spectral width of the transmitted power curve is introduced as more realistic for a correct description of the application of a Fizeau wedge as an interferential selector in laser resonators. PMID:16396037

  17. Open air demolition of facilities highly contaminated with plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, E.R.; Lackey, M.B.; Stevens, J.M.; Zinsli, L.C.

    2007-07-01

    The demolition of highly contaminated plutonium buildings usually is a long and expensive process that involves decontaminating the building to near free- release standards and then using conventional methods to remove the structure. It doesn't, however, have to be that way. Fluor has torn down buildings highly contaminated with plutonium without excessive decontamination. By removing the select source term and fixing the remaining contamination on the walls, ceilings, floors, and equipment surfaces; open-air demolition is not only feasible, but it can be done cheaper, better (safer), and faster. Open-air demolition techniques were used to demolish two highly contaminated buildings to slab-on-grade. These facilities on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site were located in, or very near, compounds of operating nuclear facilities that housed hundreds of people working on a daily basis. To keep the facilities operating and the personnel safe, the projects had to be creative in demolishing the structures. Several key techniques were used to control contamination and keep it within the confines of the demolition area: spraying fixatives before demolition; applying fixative and misting with a fine spray of water as the buildings were being taken down; and demolishing the buildings in a controlled and methodical manner. In addition, detailed air-dispersion modeling was done to establish necessary building and meteorological conditions and to confirm the adequacy of the proposed methods. Both demolition projects were accomplished without any spread of contamination outside the modest buffer areas established for contamination control. Furthermore, personnel exposure to radiological and physical hazards was significantly reduced by using heavy equipment rather than 'hands on' techniques. (authors)

  18. OPEN AIR DEMOLITION OF FACILITIES HIGHLY CONTAMINATED WITH PLUTONIUM

    SciTech Connect

    LLOYD, E.R.

    2007-05-31

    The demolition of highly contaminated plutonium buildings usually is a long and expensive process that involves decontaminating the building to near free- release standards and then using conventional methods to remove the structure. It doesn't, however, have to be that way. Fluor has torn down buildings highly contaminated with plutonium without excessive decontamination. By removing the select source term and fixing the remaining contamination on the walls, ceilings, floors, and equipment surfaces; open-air demolition is not only feasible, but it can be done cheaper, better (safer), and faster. Open-air demolition techniques were used to demolish two highly contaminated buildings to slab-on-grade. These facilities on the Department of Energy's Hanford Site were located in, or very near, compounds of operating nuclear facilities that housed hundreds of people working on a daily basis. To keep the facilities operating and the personnel safe, the projects had to be creative in demolishing the structures. Several key techniques were used to control contamination and keep it within the confines of the demolition area: spraying fixatives before demolition; applying fixative and misting with a fine spray of water as the buildings were being taken down; and demolishing the buildings in a controlled and methodical manner. In addition, detailed air-dispersion modeling was done to establish necessary building and meteorological conditions and to confirm the adequacy of the proposed methods. Both demolition projects were accomplished without any spread of contamination outside the modest buffer areas established for contamination control. Furthermore, personnel exposure to radiological and physical hazards was significantly reduced by using heavy equipment rather than ''hands on'' techniques.

  19. Productive high-performance software for OpenCL devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melonakos, John M.; Yalamanchili, Pavan; McClanahan, Chris; Arshad, Umar; Landes, Michael; Jamboti, Shivapriya; Joshi, Abhijit; Mohammed, Shehzan; Spafford, Kyle; Venugopalakrishnan, Vishwanath; Malcolm, James

    2013-05-01

    Over the last three decades, CPUs have continued to produce large performance improvements from one generation to the next. However, CPUs have recently hit a performance wall and need parallel computing to move forward. Parallel computing over the next decade will become increasingly defined by heterogeneous computing, involving the use of accelerators in addition to CPUs to get computational tasks done. In order to use an accelerator, software changes must be made. Regular x86-based compilers cannot compile code to run on accelerators without these needed changes. The amount of software change required varies depending upon the availability of and reliance upon software tools that increase performance and productivity. Writing software that leverages the best parallel computing hardware, adapts well to the rapid pace of hardware updates, and minimizes developer muscle is the industry's goal. OpenCL is the standard around which developers are able to achieve parallel performance. OpenCL itself is too difficult to program to receive general adoptions, but productive high-performing software libraries are becoming increasingly popular and capable in delivering lasting value to user applications.

  20. COAST: Cascadia Open-Access Seismic Transects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, W.; Johnson, H. P.; Kent, G.; Keranen, K. M.; Tobin, H. J.; Trehu, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Cascadia margin is the site of active subduction, where the Juan de Fuca plate subducts under the North American plate at a rate of ~35 mm/yr. This system is of great scientific and societal interest, as it is capable of very large (Mw~9) earthquakes, creates volcanic hazards in the Cascades, and hosts periodic episodic tremor and slip (ETS) episodes. Despite evidence that the system has generated large megathrust earthquakes, limited seismicity creates large uncertainties in the position, structure, and physical state of the plate boundary. The COAST (Cascadia Open-Access Seismic Transects) project conducted an open-access, open-participation 2D seismic survey of the Cascadia subduction margin off Grays Harbor, WA, that will provide benchmark seismic images to address key scientific issues regarding the location, physical state, fluid budget, and associated methane systems of the subducting plate boundary and overlying crust. We collected seismic reflection, multibeam bathymetric, sidescan sonar, gravity, and magnetic data on the Cascadia subduction margin from the R/V Langseth in July 2012 in a high-priority GeoPRISMS corridor off Grays Harbor, Washington. The cruise was open-participation, with an organized shipboard education and training program, and the data are open-access, with immediate, full release to the community of all geophysical data. Project goals include (1) determining the location of the offshore plate boundary, (2) constraining sediment subduction and plate boundary roughness, (3) estimating pore fluid pathways, (4) determining controls on methane distribution, and (5) imaging compressional and extensional structures that may pose geohazards on the Cascadia margin. Initial observations include the following: (1) The Pleistocene accretionary wedge is well imaged and shows landward-vergent thrust faulting throughout our survey area. An outboard series of ramp-and-thrust structures gives way to a region characterized by folds that separate

  1. ExpertEyes: open-source, high-definition eyetracking.

    PubMed

    Parada, Francisco J; Wyatte, Dean; Yu, Chen; Akavipat, Ruj; Emerick, Brandi; Busey, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    ExpertEyes is a low-cost, open-source package of hardware and software that is designed to provide portable high-definition eyetracking. The project involves several technological innovations, including portability, high-definition video recording, and multiplatform software support. It was designed for challenging recording environments, and all processing is done offline to allow for optimization of parameter estimation. The pupil and corneal reflection are estimated using a novel forward eye model that simultaneously fits both the pupil and the corneal reflection with full ellipses, addressing a common situation in which the corneal reflection sits at the edge of the pupil and therefore breaks the contour of the ellipse. The accuracy and precision of the system are comparable to or better than what is available in commercial eyetracking systems, with a typical accuracy of less than 0.4° and best accuracy below 0.3°, and with a typical precision (SD method) around 0.3° and best precision below 0.2°. Part of the success of the system comes from a high-resolution eye image. The high image quality results from uncasing common digital camcorders and recording directly to SD cards, which avoids the limitations of the analog NTSC format. The software is freely downloadable, and complete hardware plans are available, along with sources for custom parts. PMID:24934301

  2. The acoustical structure of highly porous open-cell foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    This work concerns both the theoretical prediction and measurement of structural parameters in open-cell highly porous polyurethane foams. Of particular interest are the dynamic flow resistance, thermal time constant, and mass structure factor and their dependence on frequency and geometry of the cellular structure. The predictions of cell size parameters, static flow resistance, and heat transfer as accounted for by a Nusselt number are compared with measurement. Since the static flow resistance and inverse thermal time constant are interrelated via the 'mean' pore size parameter of Biot, only two independent measurements such as volume porosity and mean filament diameter are required to make the predictions for a given fluid condition. The agreements between this theory and nonacoustical experiments are excellent.

  3. Accretion in the wake of terrane collision: The Neogene accretionary wedge off Kenai Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fruehn, J.; Von Huene, R.; Fisher, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Subduction accretion and repeated terrane collision shaped the Alaskan convergent margin. The Yakutat Terrane is currently colliding with the continental margin below the central Gulf of Alaska. During the Neogene the terrane's western part was subducted after which a sediment wedge accreted along the northeast Aleutian Trench. This wedge incorporates sediment eroded from the continental margin and marine sediments carried into the subduction zone on the Pacific plate. Prestack depth migration was performed on six seismic reflection lines to resolve the structure within this accretionary wedge and its backstop. The lateral extent of the structures is constrained by high-resolution swath bathymetry and seismic lines collected along strike. Accretionary structure consists of variably sized thrust slices that were deformed against a backstop during frontal accretion and underplating. Toward the northeast the lower slope steepens, the wedge narrows, and the accreted volume decreases notwith-standing a doubling of sediments thickness in the trench. In the northeasternmost transect, near the area where the terrane's trailing edge subducts, no frontal accretion is observed and the slope is eroded. The structures imaged along the seismic lines discussed here most likely result from progressive evolution from erosion to accretion, as the trailing edge of the Yakutat Terrane is subducting.

  4. Analysis and measurement of electromagnetic scattering by pyramidal and wedge absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dewitt, B. T.; Burnside, Walter D.

    1986-01-01

    By modifying the reflection coefficients in the Uniform Geometrical Theory of Diffraction a solution that approximates the scattering from a dielectric wedge is found. This solution agrees closely with the exact solution of Rawlins which is only valid for a few minor cases. This modification is then applied to the corner diffraction coefficient and combined with an equivalent current and geometrical optics solutions to model scattering from pyramid and wedge absorbers. Measured results from 12 inch pyramid absorbers from 2 to 18 GHz are compared to calculations assuming the returns add incoherently and assuming the returns add coherently. The measured results tend to be between the two curves. Measured results from the 8 inch wedge absorber are also compared to calculations with the return being dominated by the wedge diffraction. The procedures for measuring and specifying absorber performance are discussed and calibration equations are derived to calculate a reflection coefficient or a reflectivity using a reference sphere. Shaping changes to the present absorber designs are introduced to improve performance based on both high and low frequency analysis. Some prototypes were built and tested.

  5. Geodetic observations of megathrust earthquakes and backarc wedge deformation across the central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, J. R.; Brooks, B. A.; Foster, J. H.; Bevis, M. G.; Echalar, A.; Caccamise, D.; Heck, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    High-precision Global Positioning System (GPS) data offer an opportunity to investigate active orogenic wedges yet surface velocity fields are available for only a few examples worldwide. More observations are needed to link deformation processes across multiple timescales and to better understand strain accumulation and release in active wedge settings. Here we present a new GPS velocity field for the central Andes and the backarc orogenic wedge comprising the southern Subandes of Bolivia (SSA), a region previously thought to be mostly isolated from the plate boundary earthquake cycle. The time span of our observations (2000 to mid-2014) includes two megathrust earthquakes along the Chile trench that affected the SSA. The 2007 Mw 7.7 Tocopilla, Chile earthquake resulted in a regional postseismic decrease in the eastward component of horizontal surface velocities. Preliminary analysis of the deformation field from the April 01 2014 Mw 8.2 Pisagua, Chile earthquake also indicates a postseismic signal extending into the SSA. We create an interseismic velocity field for the SSA by correcting campaign GPS site velocities for the seasonal cycles estimated from continuous GPS site time series. We remove the effects of both megathrust events by estimating coseismic steps and fitting linear and logarithmic functions to the postseismic GPS site motions. The velocity estimates at most locations increase after correcting for the transients. This finding suggests that forces leading to shortening and earthquakes in the backarc wedge are not as temporally consistent as previously considered.

  6. The Cimmerian accretionary wedge of Anarak, Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchi, Andrea; Malaspina, Nadia; Zanchetta, Stefano; Berra, Fabrizio; Benciolini, Luca; Bergomi, Maria; Cavallo, Alessandro; Javadi, Hamid Reza; Kouhpeyma, Meyssam

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence in Iran of several ophiolite belts dating between Late Palaeozoic to Triassic poses several questions on the possible existence of various sutures marking the closure of the Palaeotethys ocean between Eurasia and this Gondwana-derived microplate. In this scenario, the Anarak region in Central Iran still represents a conundrum. Contrasting geochronological, paleontological, paleomagnetic data and reported field evidence suggest different origins for the Anarak Metamorphic Complex (AMC). The AMC is either interpreted, as: (1) relict of an accretionary wedge developed at the Eurasia margin during the Palaeotethys subduction as part of the Cimmerian suture zone of NE Iran, displaced to Central Iran by a large counter-clockwise rotation of the central Iranian blocks; (2) autochthonous unit forming a secondary branch of the main suture zone. Our structural, petrographic and geochemical data indicate that the AMC consists of several metamorphic units also including dismembered "ophiolites" which display different tectono-metamorphic evolutions. Three main ductile deformational events can be distinguished in the AMC. The Morghab and Chah Gorbeh complexes preserve a different M1 metamorphism, characterized by blueschist relics in the S1 foliation of the former unit, and greenschist assemblages in the latter. They share a subsequent similar D2 deformational and M2 metamorphic history, showing a prograde metamorphism with syn- to post-deformation growth of blueschist facies mineral assemblages on pre-existing greenschist facies associations. High pressure, low temperature (HP/LT) metamorphism responsible for the growth of sodic amphibole has been recognized also within marble lenses at the contact between the Chah Gorbeh Complex and serpentinites. Evidence of HP/LT metamorphism also occurs in glaucophane-bearing meta-pillow lavas and serpentinites, which contain antigorite and form most of the "ophiolites" within the AMC. Structural relationships show that the

  7. A high power microwave triggered RF opening switch.

    PubMed

    Beeson, S; Dickens, J; Neuber, A

    2015-03-01

    A 4-port S-band waveguide structure was designed and fabricated such that a signal of any amplitude (less than 1 MW) can be switched from a normally closed state, <0.5 dB insertion loss (IL), to an open state >30 dB IL by initiating plasma in a gas cell situated at the junction of this waveguide and one propagating a megawatt level magnetron pulse. The 90/10 switching time is as low as 20 ns with a delay of ∼30 ns between the onset of the high power microwave pulse and the initial drop of the signal. Two ports of this device are for the high power triggering pulse while the other two ports are for the triggered signal in a Moreno-like coupler configuration. In order to maintain high isolation, these two sets of waveguides are rotated 90° from each other with a TE111 resonator/plasma cell located at the intersection. This manuscript describes the design and optimization of this structure using COMSOL 4.4 at the design frequency of 2.85 GHz, comparison of simulated scattering parameters with measured "cold tests" (testing without plasma), and finally the temporal waveforms of this device being used to successfully switch a low power CW signal from 2 W to <5 mW on a sub-microsecond timescale. PMID:25832255

  8. Wettability patterning for high-rate, pumpless fluid transport on open, non-planar microfluidic platforms.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Aritra; Ganguly, Ranjan; Schutzius, Thomas M; Megaridis, Constantine M

    2014-05-01

    Surface tension driven transport of liquids on open substrates offers an enabling tool for open micro total analysis systems that are becoming increasingly popular for low-cost biomedical diagnostic devices. The present study uses a facile wettability patterning method to produce open microfluidic tracks that - due to their shape, surface texture and chemistry - are capable of transporting a wide range of liquid volumes (~1-500 μL) on-chip, overcoming viscous and other opposing forces (e.g., gravity) at the pertinent length scales. Small volumes are handled as individual droplets, while larger volumes require repeated droplet transport. The concept is developed and demonstrated with coatings based on TiO2 filler particles, which, when present in adequate (~80 wt.%) quantities within a hydrophobic fluoroacrylic polymer matrix, form composites that are intrinsically superhydrophobic. Such composite coatings become superhydrophilic upon exposure to UV light (390 nm). A commercial laser printer-based photo-masking approach is used on the coating for spatially selective wettability conversion from superhydrophobic to superhydrophilic. Carefully designed wedge-patterned surface tension confined tracks on the open-air devices move liquid on them without power input, even when acting against gravity. Simple designs of wettability patterning are used on versatile substrates (e.g., metals, polymers, paper) to demonstrate complex droplet handling tasks, e.g., merging, splitting and metered dispensing, some of which occur in 3-D geometries. Fluid transport rates of up to 350 μL s(-1) are attained. Applicability of the design on metal substrates allows these devices to be used also for other microscale engineering applications, e.g., water management in fuel cells. PMID:24622962

  9. Refined numerical solution of the transonic flow past a wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, S.-M.; Fung, K.-Y.

    1985-01-01

    A numerical procedure combining the ideas of solving a modified difference equation and of adaptive mesh refinement is introduced. The numerical solution on a fixed grid is improved by using better approximations of the truncation error computed from local subdomain grid refinements. This technique is used to obtain refined solutions of steady, inviscid, transonic flow past a wedge. The effects of truncation error on the pressure distribution, wave drag, sonic line, and shock position are investigated. By comparing the pressure drag on the wedge and wave drag due to the shocks, a supersonic-to-supersonic shock originating from the wedge shoulder is confirmed.

  10. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jerome P.; Sawvel, Robert M.; Draggoo, Vaughn G.

    1994-01-01

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior.

  11. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOEpatents

    Hall, J.P.; Sawvel, R.M.; Draggoo, V.G.

    1994-06-28

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior. 8 figures.

  12. Octave spanning wedge dispersive mirrors with low dispersion oscillations.

    PubMed

    Habel, Florian; Shirvanyan, Vage; Trubetskov, Michael; Burger, Christian; Sommer, Annkatrin; Kling, Matthias F; Schultze, Martin; Pervak, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    A novel concept for octave spanning dispersive mirrors with low spectral dispersion oscillations is presented. The key element of the so-called wedge dispersive mirror is a slightly wedged layer which is coated on a specially optimized dispersive multilayer stack by a common sputter coating process. The group delay dispersion (GDD) of a pulse reflected on a wedge dispersive mirror is nearly free of oscillations. Fabricated mirrors with negative GDD demonstrate the compression of a pulse down to 3.8 fs as good as double angled mirrors optimized for the same bandwidth. PMID:27137538

  13. Cohesive Strength of Clay-Rich Sediment and Implications for Accretionary Wedge Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikari, M.; Huepers, A.; Kopf, A.

    2011-12-01

    consolidation. Therefore, sediment with high cohesion, either from clay-water interactions or other cementation processes, may affect wedge taper angle, faulting in the prism, and the amount of pore pressures that are maintained within the wedge and in the décollement. Ongoing experiments include cohesion and friction measurements of natural material sampled from the Nankai subduction zone during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expeditions 316 and 322.

  14. Complex interactions between diapirs and 4-D subduction driven mantle wedge circulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvia, R. T.; Kincaid, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    Analogue laboratory experiments generate 4-D flow of mantle wedge fluid and capture the evolution of buoyant mesoscale diapirs. The mantle is modeled with viscous glucose syrup with an Arrhenius type temperature dependent viscosity. To characterize diapir evolution we experiment with a variety of fluids injected from multiple point sources. Diapirs interact with kinematically induced flow fields forced by subducting plate motions replicating a range of styles observed in dynamic subduction models (e.g., rollback, steepening, gaps). Data is collected using high definition timelapse photography and quantified using image velocimetry techniques. While many studies assume direct vertical connections between the volcanic arc and the deeper mantle source region, our experiments demonstrate the difficulty of creating near vertical conduits. Results highlight extreme curvature of diapir rise paths. Trench-normal deflection occurs as diapirs are advected downward away from the trench before ascending into wedge apex directed return flow. Trench parallel deflections up to 75% of trench length are seen in all cases, exacerbated by complex geometry and rollback motion. Interdiapir interaction is also important; upwellings with similar trajectory coalesce and rapidly accelerate. Moreover, we observe a new mode of interaction whereby recycled diapir material is drawn down along the slab surface and then initiates rapid fluid migration updip along the slab-wedge interface. Variability in trajectory and residence time leads to complex petrologic inferences. Material from disparate source regions can surface at the same location, mix in the wedge, or become fully entrained in creeping flow adding heterogeneity to the mantle. Active diapirism or any other vertical fluid flux mechanism employing rheological weakening lowers viscosity in the recycling mantle wedge affecting both solid and fluid flow characteristics. Many interesting and insightful results have been presented based

  15. Substorm current wedge composition by wedgelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiang; Angelopoulos, V.; Chu, Xiangning; Zhou, Xu-Zhi; Yue, Chao

    2015-03-01

    Understanding how a substorm current wedge (SCW) is formed is crucial to comprehending the substorm phenomenon. One SCW formation scenario suggests that the substorm time magnetosphere is coupled to the ionosphere via "wedgelets," small building blocks of an SCW. Wedgelets are field-aligned currents (FACs) carried by elemental flux transport units known as dipolarizing flux bundles (DFBs). A DFB is a magnetotail flux tube with magnetic field stronger than that of the ambient plasma. Its leading edge, known as a "dipolarization front" or "reconnection front," is a product of near-Earth reconnection. Dipolarizing flux bundles, and thus wedgelets, are localized—each is only <3 RE wide. How these localized wedgelets combine to become large-scale (several hours of magnetic local time) region-1-sense SCW FACs is unclear. To determine how this occurs, we investigated wedgelets statistically using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) data. The results show wedgelet asymmetries: in the dawn (dusk) sector of the magnetotail, a wedgelet has more FAC toward (away from) the Earth than away from (toward) the Earth, so the net FAC is toward (away from) the Earth. The combined effect of many wedgelets is therefore the same as that of large-scale region-1-sense SCW, supporting the idea that they comprise the SCW.

  16. Effective Thermal Conductivity of High Porosity Open Cell Nickel Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullins, Alan D.; Daryabeigi, Kamran

    2001-01-01

    The effective thermal conductivity of high-porosity open cell nickel foam samples was measured over a wide range of temperatures and pressures using a standard steady-state technique. The samples, measuring 23.8 mm, 18.7 mm, and 13.6 mm in thickness, were constructed with layers of 1.7 mm thick foam with a porosity of 0.968. Tests were conducted with the specimens subjected to temperature differences of 100 to 1000 K across the thickness and at environmental pressures of 10(exp -4) to 750 mm Hg. All test were conducted in a gaseous nitrogen environment. A one-dimensional finite volume numerical model was developed to model combined radiation/conduction heat transfer in the foam. The radiation heat transfer was modeled using the two-flux approximation. Solid and gas conduction were modeled using standard techniques for high porosity media. A parameter estimation technique was used in conjunction with the measured and predicted thermal conductivities at pressures of 10(exp -4) and 750 mm Hg to determine the extinction coefficient, albedo of scattering, and weighting factors for modeling the conduction thermal conductivity. The measured and predicted conductivities over the intermediate pressure values differed by 13%.

  17. High Tibial Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Seong Joon

    2012-01-01

    High tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a widely performed procedure to treat medial knee arthrosis. In general, published studies on HTO report good long-term results with a correct patient selection and a precise surgical technique. The ideal candidate for an HTO is a middle aged patient (60 to 65 years of age), with isolated medial osteoarthritis, with good range of motion and without ligamentous instability. Some issues that need resolution remain; these include the choice between opening and closing wedge tibial osteotomy, the graft selection in opening wedge osteotomies, the type of fixation, the comparison with unicompartmental knee arthroplasty and whether HTO significantly affects a subsequent total joint replacement. Precise indication, preoperative planning, and operative technique selection are essential to achieve good results. PMID:22708105

  18. HOS-ocean: Open-source solver for nonlinear waves in open ocean based on High-Order Spectral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducrozet, Guillaume; Bonnefoy, Félicien; Le Touzé, David; Ferrant, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    HOS-ocean is an efficient High-Order Spectral code developed to solve the deterministic propagation of nonlinear wavefields in open ocean. HOS-ocean is released as open-source, developed and distributed under the terms of GNU General Public License (GPLv3). Along with the source code, a documentation under wiki format is available which makes easy the compilation and execution of the source files. The code has been shown to be accurate and efficient.

  19. Propagation in an elastic wedge using the virtual source technique.

    PubMed

    Abawi, Ahmad T; Porter, Michael B

    2007-03-01

    The virtual source technique, which is based on the boundary integral method, provides the means to impose boundary conditions on arbitrarily shaped boundaries by replacing them by a collection of sources whose amplitudes are determined from the boundary conditions. In this paper the virtual source technique is used to model propagation of waves in a range-dependent ocean overlying an elastic bottom with arbitrarily shaped ocean-bottom interface. The method is applied to propagation in an elastic Pekeris waveguide, an acoustic wedge, and an elastic wedge. In the case of propagation in an elastic Pekeris waveguide, the results agree very well with those obtained from the wavenumber integral technique, as they do with the solution of the parabolic equation (PE) technique in the case of propagation in an acoustic wedge. The results for propagation in an elastic wedge qualitatively agree with those obtained from an elastic PE solution. PMID:17407873

  20. The crack and wedging problem for an orthotropic strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cinar, A.; Erdogan, F.

    1982-01-01

    The plane elasticity problem for an orthotropic strip containing a crack parallel to its boundaries is considered. The problem is formulated under general mixed mode loading conditions. The stress intensity factors depend on two dimensionless orthotropic constants only. For the crack problem the results are given for a single crack and two collinear cracks. The calculated results show that of the two orthotropic constants the influence of the stiffness ratio on the stress intensity factors is much more significant than that of the shear parameter. The problem of loading the strip by a rigid rectangular lengths continuous contact is maintained along the wedge strip interface; at a certain critical wedge length the separation starts at the midsection of the wedge, and the length of the separation zone increases rapidly with increasing wedge length.

  1. The crack and wedging problem for an orthotropic strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cinar, A.; Erdogan, F.

    1983-01-01

    The plane elasticity problem for an orthotropic strip containing a crack parallel to its boundaries is considered. The problem is formulated under general mixed mode loading conditions. The stress intensity factors depend on two dimensionless orthotropic constants only. For the crack problem the results are given for a single crack and two collinear cracks. The calculated results show that of the two orthotropic constants the influence of the stiffness ratio on the stress intensity factors is much more significant than that of the shear parameter. The problem of loading the strip by a rigid rectangular lengths continuous contact is maintained along the wedge strip interface; at a certain critical wedge length the separation starts at the midsection of the wedge, and the length of the separation zone increases rapidly with increasing wedge length. Previously announced in STAR as N82-26707

  2. Stress singularities at the vertex of a cylindrically anisotropic wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delale, F.; Erdogan, F.; Boduroglu, H.

    1980-01-01

    The plane elasticity problem for a cylindrically anisotropic solid is formulated. The form of the solution for an infinite wedge shaped domain with various homogeneous boundary conditions is derived and the nature of the stress singularity at the vertex of the wedge is studied. The characteristic equations giving the stress singularity and the angular distribution of the stresses around the vertex of the wedge are obtained for three standard homogeneous boundary conditions. The numerical examples show that the singular behavior of the stresses around the vertex of an anisotropic wedge may be significantly different from that of the isotropic material. Some of the results which may be of practical importance are that for a half plane the stress state at r = 0 may be singular and for a crack the power of stress singularity may be greater or less than 1/2.

  3. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Freight Car Components... car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  4. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Freight Car Components... car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  5. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Freight Car Components... car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  6. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Freight Car Components... car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  7. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD FREIGHT CAR SAFETY STANDARDS Freight Car Components... car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  8. VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN NORTHERN QUARRY AREA, FACING NORTH - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 2, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  9. VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN NORTHERN QUARRY AREA, FACING SOUTHEAST - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 2, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  10. DETAIL VIEW OF THREEPART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF THREE-PART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF QUARRY WALL, FACING EAST - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 3, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  11. DETAIL VIEW OF THREEPART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF THREE-PART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF QUARRY WALL, FACING NORTHWEST - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 3, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  12. High School Open On-Line Courses (HOOC): A Case Study from Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canessa, Enrique; Pisani, Armando

    2013-01-01

    The first implementation of complete high school, open on-line courses (HOOC) aiming to support the training and basic scientific knowledge of young students from the Liceo Ginnasio Dante Alighieri in Gorizia, Italy, is discussed. Using the open source and automated recording system openEyA, HOOC give a student the opportunity to watch on-line, at…

  13. OpenACC to FPGA: A Framework for Directive-based High-Performance Reconfigurable Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seyong; Vetter, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a directive-based, high-level programming framework for high-performance reconfigurable computing. It takes a standard, portable OpenACC C program as input and generates a hardware configuration file for execution on FPGAs. We implemented this prototype system using our open-source OpenARC compiler; it performs source-to-source translation and optimization of the input OpenACC program into an OpenCL code, which is further compiled into a FPGA program by the backend Altera Offline OpenCL compiler. Internally, the design of OpenARC uses a high- level intermediate representation that separates concerns of program representation from underlying architectures, which facilitates portability of OpenARC. In fact, this design allowed us to create the OpenACC-to-FPGA translation framework with minimal extensions to our existing system. In addition, we show that our proposed FPGA-specific compiler optimizations and novel OpenACC pragma extensions assist the compiler in generating more efficient FPGA hardware configuration files. Our empirical evaluation on an Altera Stratix V FPGA with eight OpenACC benchmarks demonstrate the benefits of our strategy. To demonstrate the portability of OpenARC, we show results for the same benchmarks executing on other heterogeneous platforms, including NVIDIA GPUs, AMD GPUs, and Intel Xeon Phis. This initial evidence helps support the goal of using a directive-based, high-level programming strategy for performance portability across heterogeneous HPC architectures.

  14. Seismicity of the forearc marginal wedge (accrertionary prism)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A.T.; Frohlich, C.; Latham, G.V.

    1982-05-10

    Three different types of seismic data have been examined for seismic events occurring within the zone called the accreted wedge or forearc marginal wedge that underlies the inner trench wall of some arcs. These types of data are (1) teleseismically recorded earthquakes that have been reported in the literature as occurring in major arc-trench regions; these events fail to demonstrate that earthquakes occur within the accreted wedge because the uncertainty of focal depth usually exceeds the depth dimension of the accreted wedge; these data include many tsunamigenic earthquakes, (2) local earthquakes located by combined ocean bottom seismograph and land networks in the arc-trench region in the New Hebrides and the central and eastern Aleutian Trench; none of the more reliable of these hypocenters lies within the accreted wedge; (3) S-P intervals measured at stations on islands located on the outer ridge or at ocean bottom seismograph stations on the forearc marginal wedge; these data do not show the existence of events occurring within the accreted wedge; e.g., from 18 ocean bottom seismograph stations with a cumulative operation time of about 1 year, the smallest S-P time is about 2.5 s for events in the New Hebrides and about 4 s for events in the Adak and Kodiak regions. We found no S-P time smaller than 2 s from 6 years of seismograms recorded at Middleton Island, Alaska, and no S-P time smaller than 4 s from 25 years of seismograms recorded on Barbados. All of the events could have occured outside the forearc marginal wedge.

  15. Open access to high-content clonogenic analysis.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Fernanda; Subramanian, Aishwarya; Wade, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Image-processing programs are used to identify and classify eukaryotic cell colonies as spots following seeding at low density on dishes or in multiwell plates. The output from such approaches, however, is generally limited to 1-2 parameters, and there is no ability to extract phenotypic information at the single colony level. Furthermore, there is a lack of user-friendly pipelines for analysis of clonogenicity in the context of high-content analysis. This article describes an experimental and multiparametric image analysis workflow for clonogenic assays in multiwell format, named the Colony Assay Toolbox (CAT). CAT incorporates a cellular-level resolution of individual colonies and facilitates the extraction of phenotypic information, including the number and size of colonies and nuclei, as well as morphological parameters associated with each structure. Furthermore, the pipeline is capable of discriminating between colonies composed of senescent and nonsenescent cells. We demonstrate the accuracy and flexibility of CAT by interrogating the effects of 2 preclinical compounds, Nutlin-3a and ABT-737, on the growth of human osteosarcoma cells. CAT is accessible to virtually all laboratories because it uses common wide-field fluorescent microscopes, the open-source CellProfiler program for colony image analysis, and a single fluorescent dye for all the segmentation steps. PMID:25381257

  16. Optical refractometry based on Fresnel diffraction from a phase wedge.

    PubMed

    Tavassoly, M Taghi; Saber, Ahad

    2010-11-01

    A method that utilizes the Fresnel diffraction of light from the phase step formed by a transparent wedge is introduced for measuring the refractive indices of transparent solids, liquids, and solutions. It is shown that, as a transparent wedge of small apex angle is illuminated perpendicular to its surface by a monochromatic parallel beam of light, the Fresnel fringes, caused by abrupt change in refractive index at the wedge lateral boundary, are formed on a screen held perpendicular to the beam propagation direction. The visibility of the fringes varies periodically between zero and 1 in the direction normal to the wedge apex. For a known or measured apex angle, the wedge refractive index is obtained by measuring the period length by a CCD. To measure the refractive index of a transparent liquid or solution, the wedge is installed in a transparent rectangle cell containing the sample. Then, the cell is illuminated perpendicularly and the visibility period is measured. By using modest optics, one can measure the refractive index at a relative uncertainty level of 10(-5). There is no limitation on the refractive index range. The method can be applied easily with no mechanical manipulation. The measuring apparatus can be very compact with low mechanical and optical noises. PMID:21042389

  17. Design, implementation and validation of a motorized wedge filter for a telecobalt machine (Bhabhatron-II).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Kar, D C; Sharma, S D; Mayya, Y S

    2012-01-01

    A universal wedge filter of 15W × 20 cm(2) and 60° nominal wedge angle is designed and placed between the collimating jaws and penumbra trimmers inside the treatment head. A pneumatically driven actuating mechanism toggles the wedge between the wedge IN position and wedge OUT position. The effective wedge angles were determined using an analytical formula. An accumulated wedge profile at a depth of 10 cm which was measured using a 2D profiler and dose values at depths of 10 cm and 20 cm for the same experimental setup were used as input parameters in the formula used for determining effective wedge angles. The relationship between the wedge beam weight and effective wedge angle was established. The planned wedge angles were compared with the measured wedge angles and the differences are found to be less than 2° throughout the range of field sizes. Planned doses for various field sizes and wedge angles were measured for verification and the differences were found to be less than 1.8%. This study established that the relationship between the beam weights and effective wedge angles implemented for the motorized wedge filter of medical linacs is not directly applicable for the motorized wedge filter of Telecobalt. PMID:21486704

  18. Stem thrust prediction model for W-K-M double wedge parallel expanding gate valves

    SciTech Connect

    Eldiwany, B.; Alvarez, P.D.; Wolfe, K.

    1996-12-01

    An analytical model for determining the required valve stem thrust during opening and closing strokes of W-K-M parallel expanding gate valves was developed as part of the EPRI Motor-Operated Valve Performance Prediction Methodology (EPRI MOV PPM) Program. The model was validated against measured stem thrust data obtained from in-situ testing of three W-K-M valves. Model predictions show favorable, bounding agreement with the measured data for valves with Stellite 6 hardfacing on the disks and seat rings for water flow in the preferred flow direction (gate downstream). The maximum required thrust to open and to close the valve (excluding wedging and unwedging forces) occurs at a slightly open position and not at the fully closed position. In the nonpreferred flow direction, the model shows that premature wedging can occur during {Delta}P closure strokes even when the coefficients of friction at different sliding surfaces are within the typical range. This paper summarizes the model description and comparison against test data.

  19. Role of Hydrogen in stagnant slabs and big mantle wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, E.; Zhao, D.

    2008-12-01

    Eastern China, Europe, and United State (e.g., [7]). According to the BMW model by Zhao [2], the intra-plate volcanisms in Northeast China including Mt. Changbai are different from the hot plumes and they might be generated due to some processes related to the deep-seated dehydration from the stagnant slab. Recent geochemical studies on volcanic rocks and associated mantle xenoliths in Northeast China (e.g., [8]) indicated that there is no geochemical evidence for involvement of subducting slab in most basalts, i.e., no depletion of high field strength elements and no enrichment of large ion lithophile elements. There is no clear evidence for a high-3He/4He mantle plume component in these rocks, i.e., 3He/4He ratios are significantly below the high 3He/4He ratios of mantle plumes such as those beneath Hawaii and Iceland. The geochemical signatures of the deep dehydration should be different from those in the conventional mantle wedge, since the fluids generated at such depths are completely different from those at the shallow depths. Further studies including the element partitioning between fluids and mantle under the deep upper mantle and the transition zone conditions are necessary to clarify the possible role of the Big Mantle Wedge on the intra-plate volcanism. [1] Fukao, et al., J. G. R. 108, doi:10.1029/2001JB000989, 2003. [2] Zhao et al., Chin. Sci. Bulletin 49, 1401, 2004, [3] Ohtani, Elements, 1, 25, 2005. [4] Richard et al., EPSL, 251, 156, 2006. [5] Hae et al., EPSL, 243, 141, 2006. [6] Litasov and Ohtani, PEPI, 134, 105, 2002. [7] Song et al., Nature, 427, 530, 2004. [8] Chen et al., Lithos, 96, 108, 2007

  20. Measured Two-Dimensional Ice-Wedge Polygon Thermal Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Busey, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Ice-wedge polygons are perhaps the most dominant permafrost related features in the arctic landscape. The microtopography of these features, that includes rims, troughs, and high and low polygon centers, alters the local hydrology, as water tends to collect in the low areas. During winter, wind redistribution of snow leads to an increased snowpack depth in the low areas, while the slightly higher areas often have very thin snow cover, leading to differences across the landscape in vegetation communities and soil moisture between higher and lower areas. These differences in local surface conditions lead to spatial variability of the ground thermal regime in the different microtopographic areas and between different types of ice-wedge polygons. To study these features in depth, we established temperature transects across four different types of ice-wedge polygons near Barrow, Alaska. The transects were composed of five vertical array thermistor probes (VATP) beginning in the center of each polygon and extending through the trough to the rim of the adjacent polygon. Each VATP had 16 thermistors from the surface to a depth of 1.5 m. In addition to these 80 subsurface temperature measurement points per polygon, soil moisture, thermal conductivity, heat flux, and snow depth were all measured in multiple locations for each polygon. Above ground, a full suite of micrometeorological instrumentation was present at each polygon. Data from these sites has been collected continuously for the last three years. We found snow cover, timing and depth, and active layer soil moisture to be major controlling factors in the observed thermal regimes. In troughs and in the centers of low-center polygons, the combined effect of typically saturated soils and increased snow accumulation resulted in the highest mean annual ground temperatures (MAGT). Additionally, these areas were the last part of the polygon to refreeze during the winter. However, increased active layer thickness was not

  1. Hydrodynamic controls on oxygen dynamics in a riverine salt wedge estuary, the Yarra River estuary, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, L. C.; Cook, P. L. M.; Teakle, I.; Hipsey, M. R.

    2014-04-01

    Oxygen depletion in coastal and estuarine waters has been increasing rapidly around the globe over the past several decades, leading to decline in water quality and ecological health. In this study we apply a numerical model to understand how salt wedge dynamics, changes in river flow and temperature together control oxygen depletion in a micro-tidal riverine estuary, the Yarra River estuary, Australia. Coupled physical-biogeochemical models have been previously applied to study how hydrodynamics impact upon seasonal hypoxia; however, their application to relatively shallow, narrow riverine estuaries with highly transient patterns of river inputs and sporadic periods of oxygen depletion has remained challenging, largely due to difficulty in accurately simulating salt wedge dynamics in morphologically complex areas. In this study we overcome this issue through application of a flexible mesh 3-D hydrodynamic-biogeochemical model in order to predict the extent of salt wedge intrusion and consequent patterns of oxygen depletion. The extent of the salt wedge responded quickly to the sporadic riverine flows, with the strength of stratification and vertical density gradients heavily influenced by morphological features corresponding to shallow points in regions of tight curvature ("horseshoe" bends). The spatiotemporal patterns of stratification led to the emergence of two "hot spots" of anoxia, the first downstream of a shallow region of tight curvature and the second downstream of a sill. Whilst these areas corresponded to regions of intense stratification, it was found that antecedent conditions related to the placement of the salt wedge played a major role in the recovery of anoxic regions following episodic high flow events. Furthermore, whilst a threshold salt wedge intrusion was a requirement for oxygen depletion, analysis of the results allowed us to quantify the effect of temperature in determining the overall severity and extent of hypoxia and anoxia. Climate

  2. Severe winter cooling during the Younger Dryas in northern Alaska - evidence from the stable isotope composition of a buried ice-wedge system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Hanno; Schirrmeister, Lutz; Yoshikawa, Kenji; Opel, Thomas; Wetterich, Sebastian; Hubberten, Hans-W.; Brown, Jerry

    2010-05-01

    such as pollen. This reconstruction is the first radiocarbon-dated centennial-scale stable water isotope record from permafrost at all. The Late Glacial winter climate reconstruction from Barrow ice wedges clearly demonstrates the existence of a Younger Dryas cold event, formerly believed to be reduced or absent in this area. Comparing the Barrow ice-wedge record to Greenland ice cores (such as N-GRIP), we observe similar and contemporaneous isotopic variations in the same order of magnitude, underpinning the climatic relevance of our ice wedge data. The Barrow ice-wedge stable isotope record additionally displays a gradual change of the atmospheric moisture source conditions during the Younger Dryas reflected in a shift of the d excess, potentially being associated with the successive opening of the Bering Strait.

  3. Stress intensity factors for surface and corner cracks emanating from a wedge-loaded hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, W.; Sutton, M. A.; Shivakumar, K. N.; Newman, J. C., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    To assist analysis of riveted lap joints, stress intensity factors are determined for surface and corner cracks emanating from a wedge-loaded hole by using a 3-D weight function method in conjunction with a 3-D finite element method. A stress intensity factor equation for surface cracks is also developed to provide a closed-form solution. The equation covers commonly-encountered geometrical ranges and retains high accuracy over the entire range.

  4. Seismological evidence for a sub-volcanic arc mantle wedge beneath the Denali volcanic gap, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNamara, D.E.; Pasyanos, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    Arc volcanism in Alaska is strongly correlated with the 100 km depth contour of the western Aluetian Wadati-Benioff zone. Above the eastern portion of the Wadati-Benioff zone however, there is a distinct lack of volcanism (the Denali volcanic gap). We observe high Poisson's ratio values (0.29-0.33) over the entire length of the Alaskan subduction zone mantle wedge based on regional variations of Pn and Sn velocities. High Poisson's ratios at this depth (40-70 km), adjacent to the subducting slab, are attributed to melting of mantle-wedge peridotites, caused by fluids liberated from the subducting oceanic crust and sediments. Observations of high values of Poisson's ratio, beneath the Denali volcanic gap suggest that the mantle wedge contains melted material that is unable to reach the surface. We suggest that its inability to migrate through the overlying crust is due to increased compression in the crust at the northern apex of the curved Denali fault.

  5. Seismic reflection images of the accretionary wedge of Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect

    Shipley, T.H.; Stoffa, P.L. ); McIntosh, K.; Silver, E.A. )

    1990-05-01

    The large-scale structure of modern accretionary wedges is known almost entirely from seismic reflection investigations using single or grids of two-dimensional profiles. The authors will report on the first three-dimensional seismic reflection data volume collected of a wedge. This data set covers a 9-km-wide {times} 22-km-long {times} 6-km-thick volume of the accretionary wedge just arcward of the Middle America Trench off Costa Rica. The three-dimensional processing has improved the imaging ability of the multichannel data, and the data volume allows mapping of structures from a few hundred meters to kilometers in size. These data illustrate the relationships between the basement, the wedge shape, and overlying slope sedimentary deposits. Reflections from within the wedge define the gross structural features and tectonic processes active along this particular convergent margin. So far, the analysis shows that the subdued basement relief (horst and graben structures seldom have relief of more than a few hundred meters off Costa Rica) does affect the larger scale through going structural features within the wedge. The distribution of mud volcanoes and amplitude anomalies associated with the large-scale wedge structures suggests that efficient fluid migration paths may extend from the top of the downgoing slab at the shelf edge out into the lower and middle slope region at a distance of 50-100 km. Offscraping of the uppermost (about 45 m) sediment occurs within 4 km of the trench, creating a small pile of sediments near the trench lower slope. Underplating of parts of the 400-m-thick subducted sedimentary section begins at a very shallow structural level, 4-10 km arcward of the trench. Volumetrically, the most important accretionary process is underplating.

  6. Aligning Optical Fibers by Means of Actuated MEMS Wedges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Brian; Ghodssi, Reza

    2007-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) of a proposed type would be designed and fabricated to effect lateral and vertical alignment of optical fibers with respect to optical, electro-optical, optoelectronic, and/or photonic devices on integrated circuit chips and similar monolithic device structures. A MEMS device of this type would consist of a pair of oppositely sloped alignment wedges attached to linear actuators that would translate the wedges in the plane of a substrate, causing an optical fiber in contact with the sloping wedge surfaces to undergo various displacements parallel and perpendicular to the plane. In making it possible to accurately align optical fibers individually during the packaging stages of fabrication of the affected devices, this MEMS device would also make it possible to relax tolerances in other stages of fabrication, thereby potentially reducing costs and increasing yields. In a typical system according to the proposal (see Figure 1), one or more pair(s) of alignment wedges would be positioned to create a V groove in which an optical fiber would rest. The fiber would be clamped at a suitable distance from the wedges to create a cantilever with a slight bend to push the free end of the fiber gently to the bottom of the V groove. The wedges would be translated in the substrate plane by amounts Dx1 and Dx2, respectively, which would be chosen to move the fiber parallel to the plane by a desired amount Dx and perpendicular to the plane by a desired amount Dy. The actuators used to translate the wedges could be variants of electrostatic or thermal actuators that are common in MEMS.

  7. Implications of Faulting Styles in the Outer Wedge of the Nankai Accretionary Prism, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kington, J. D.; Tobin, H. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Nankai Trough, Japan near Kumano Basin displays a well developed accretionary prism with a major out-of-sequence “megasplay” thrust separating the recently active outer wedge of the prism from the forearc basin deposits. While not in the seismogenic zone, this thrust is thought to play a key role in tsunamigenesis by transferring deeper coseismic slip to the seafloor. Understanding the development of this fault requires a detailed understanding of the kinematics and structure of the outer wedge of the accretionary prism. The outer wedge of the Nankai accretionary prism consists of an in-sequence series of landward-dipping thrusts that record two directions of shortening. Based on 3D reflection seismic, older thrusts and their associated folds strike ~225 degrees, almost exactly perpendicular to plate motion in the area, which has an azimuth of 314 (Zang, et al, 2002). The youngest thrusts, including the megasplay at the rear of the outer wedge, trend 240-245 degrees, subparallel to the margin in the area, which trends roughly 250. This suggests two possibilities: 1) the older thrusts formed during a period of relatively strong coupling with the subducting slab, perhaps due to highly irregular oceanic basement topography which has since been subducted, or 2) the trench margin had been previously indented by a subducted seamount and has since been rebuilding. In addition, two right lateral tear faults with offsets of approximately 1km cut the fold-thrust belt of the outer wedge. These faults cleanly offset the fold hinge of faults striking perpendicular to plate motion and interact with the oldest faults that strike parallel to the margin, implying that their timing is coincident with the change in shortening direction. Therefore, these tear faults may accommodate along-strike changes in the taper angle of the accretionary prism following the subduction of irregular basement topography. Significant normal faulting within the seismically imaged portion of the

  8. Estimating basal friction in accretionary wedges from the geometry and spacing of frontal faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, Bertram; Koyi, Hemin A.

    2001-12-01

    Elastic theory applied to the deformation in accretionary wedges is used to calculate the condition for slip along an active frontal fault and the basal décollement. The equations for calculating the stresses can be solved for the coefficient of basal friction in the situation of the formation of a new frontal thrust fault. This allows us to calculate the efficient coefficient of basal friction, which includes the weakening effect of pore-fluid pressure, from geometric parameters and material properties only. The geometric parameters, like fault dip and layer thickness, can be derived from high-resolution seismic cross-sections. Application of our analysis to the Makran and the Nankai accretionary wedge allows us to estimate the upper limit of the effective coefficient of basal friction, μb≈0.16 and μb≈0.2, in these two areas respectively.

  9. Hypersonic slender-wedge analysis with gradual change in angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, R. N.; Joshi, S. P.; Rodkiewicz, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    The behavior of a narrow cross-section wedge wing moving at a high Mach number and subjected to an angle of attack changing exponentially with time is investigated. This type of wedge wing is commonly employed as a lifting surface in hypersonic vehicles. The time history of wall shear, heat transfer, displacement thickness, and viscous induced pressure are determined. Results show that for the same change in angle of attack, the flow attains the final steady state much faster when the change is exponential than when the change is made impulsively. In addition, the unsteady character of the flow is primarily confined to the initial stages of the change in the angle of attack.

  10. Transforming High School Classrooms with Free/Open Source Software: "It's Time for an Open Source Software Revolution"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaffman, Jay

    2008-01-01

    Free/Open Source Software (FOSS) applications meet many of the software needs of high school science classrooms. In spite of the availability and quality of FOSS tools, they remain unknown to many teachers and utilized by fewer still. In a world where most software has restrictions on copying and use, FOSS is an anomaly, free to use and to…

  11. SU-E-T-562: Scanned Percent Depth Dose Curve Discrepancy for Photon Beams with Physical Wedge in Place (Varian IX) Using Different Sensitive Volume Ion Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, H; Sarkar, V; Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Huang, Y; Szegedi, M; Huang, L; Salter, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate and report the discrepancy of scanned percent depth dose (PDD) for photon beams with physical wedge in place when using ion chambers with different sensitive volumes. Methods/Materials: PDD curves of open fields and physical wedged fields (15, 30, 45, and 60 degree wedge) were scanned for photon beams (6MV and 10MV, Varian iX) with field size of 5x5 and 10x10 cm using three common scanning chambers with different sensitive volumes - PTW30013 (0.6cm3), PTW23323 (0.1cm3) and Exradin A16 (0.007cm3). The scanning system software used was OmniPro version 6.2, and the scanning water tank was the Scanditronix Wellhoffer RFA 300.The PDD curves from the three chambers were compared. Results: Scanned PDD curves of the same energy beams for open fields were almost identical between three chambers, but the wedged fields showed non-trivial differences. The largest differences were observed between chamber PTW30013 and Exradin A16. The differences increased as physical wedge angle increased. The differences also increased with depth, and were more pronounced for 6MV beam. Similar patterns were shown for both 5x5 and 10x10 cm field sizes. For open fields, all PDD values agreed with each other within 1% at 10cm depth and within 1.62% at 20 cm depth. For wedged fields, the difference of PDD values between PTW30013 and A16 reached 4.09% at 10cm depth, and 5.97% at 20 cm depth for 6MV with 60 degree physical wedge. Conclusion: We observed a significant difference in scanned PDD curves of photon beams with physical wedge in place obtained when using different sensitive volume ion chambers. The PDD curves scanned with the smallest sensitive volume ion chamber showed significant difference from larger chamber results, beyond 10cm depth. We believe this to be caused by varying response to beam hardening by the wedges.

  12. Openings

    PubMed Central

    Selwyn, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing his clinic patient schedule for the day, a physician reflects on the history of a young woman he has been caring for over the past 9 years. What starts out as a routine visit then turns into a unique opening for communication and connection. A chance glimpse out the window of the exam room leads to a deeper meditation on parenthood, survival, and healing, not only for the patient but also for the physician. How many missed opportunities have we all had, without even realizing it, to allow this kind of fleeting but profound opening? PMID:26195687

  13. Openings.

    PubMed

    Selwyn, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Reviewing his clinic patient schedule for the day, a physician reflects on the history of a young woman he has been caring for over the past 9 years. What starts out as a routine visit then turns into a unique opening for communication and connection. A chance glimpse out the window of the exam room leads to a deeper meditation on parenthood, survival, and healing, not only for the patient but also for the physician. How many missed opportunities have we all had, without even realizing it, to allow this kind of fleeting but profound opening? PMID:26195687

  14. Body radiation exposure in breast cancer radiotherapy: Impact of breast IMRT and virtual wedge compensation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Tony; Pignol, Jean-Philippe . E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sw.ca; Rakovitch, Eileen; Vu, Toni; Hicks, Deanna; O'Brien, Peter; Pritchard, Kathleen

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: Recent reports demonstrate a dramatically increased rate of secondary leukemia for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant high-dose anthracycline and radiotherapy, and that radiation is an independent factor for the development of leukemia. This study aimed to evaluate the radiation body exposure during breast radiotherapy and to characterize the factors associated with an increased exposure. Patients and Methods: In a prospective cohort of 120 women, radiation measurements were taken from four sites on the body at the time of adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Multiple regression analysis was performed to analyze patient and treatment factors associated with the amount of scattered radiation. Results: For standard 50 Gy breast radiotherapy, the minimal dose received by abdominal organs is on average 0.45 Gy, ranging from 0.06 to 1.55 Gy. The use of physical wedges as a compensation technique was the most significant factor associated with increased scattered dose (p < 0.001), resulting in approximately three times more exposure compared with breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dynamic wedge. Conclusions: The amount of radiation that is scattered to a patient's body is consistent with exposure reported to be associated with excess of leukemia. In accordance with the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle, we recommend using breast IMRT or virtual wedging for the radiotherapy of breast cancer receiving high-dose anthracycline chemotherapy.

  15. Computational analysis of asymmetric water entry of wedge and ship section at constant velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahaman, Md. Mashiur; Ullah, Al Habib; Afroz, Laboni; Shabnam, Sharmin; Sarkar, M. A. Rashid

    2016-07-01

    Water impact problems receive much attention due to their short duration and large unsteady component of hydrodynamic loads. The effect of water entry has several important applications in various aspects of the naval field. Significant attention has been given to various water entry phenomena such as ship slamming, planning hulls, high-speed hydrodynamics of seaplanes, surface-piercing propellers and the interaction of high-speed liquid drops with structural elements. Asymmetric water entry may be caused by various natural phenomena such as weather conditions or strong winds. Since the determination of hydrodynamic impact load plays a vital role in designing safe and effcient vessels, an accurate and reliable prediction method is necessary to investigate asymmetric water entry problems. In this paper, water entry of a two-dimensional wedge and ship section at constant velocity in asymmetric condition will be analysed numerically and the effects of asymmetric impact on the velocity and pressure distribution will be discussed. The finite volume method is employed to solve the dynamic motion of the wedge in two-phase flow. During the water entry, the air and water interface is described implicitly by the volume of fluid (VOF) scheme. The numerical code and method was first validated for symmetric condition by one of the present author is applied for asymmetric wedge and ship section. The free surface, velocity and pressure distribution for asymmetric water entry are investigated and visualized with contour plots at different time steps.

  16. Polymer wedge for perfectly vertical light coupling to silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrauwen, J.; Scheerlinck, S.; Van Thourhout, D.; Baets, R.

    2009-02-01

    We present the design and fabrication of a refractive polymer wedge that allows perfectly vertical coupling of light into a silicon waveguide, which is of interest for flip-chip bonding of vertical cavity emitting light sources on a silicon integrated circuit. The structure includes a conventional diffractive grating coupler that requires off-normal incidence to avoid second order Bragg reflections. The polymer wedge is thus used to refract vertically impinging light into an off-normal wave that couples into the underlying grating. The fabrication involves two steps: mold fabrication and imprint replication. Firstly negative wedge-shaped craters are etched into a quartz mold by Focused-ion-beam milling. Secondly the mold is used to imprint a UV-curable polymer onto a silicon chip containing waveguides and grating couplers, and so replicating the wedges. The characterization setup consisted of a fiber-to-fiber transmission measurement of a silicon waveguide equipped with a pair of grating couplers and polymer wedges. The obtained fiber coupling efficiency was equal to the efficiency of regular grating couplers and fiber positioned at an off-normal angle. The proposed fabrication method enables low cost integration of vertical cavity emitting light sources on silicon integrated photonic circuits.

  17. OpenCourseWare Resources for Advanced High School Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Steve

    2008-01-01

    In 2000, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) faculty first proposed putting the course materials from all 1,800 MIT classes online, free of charge. The idea behind MIT OpenCourseWare (OCW) was to use the Internet for more than just distance learning. When MIT began placing the course materials online in 2002 and 2003, the audience…

  18. Open ISEmeter: An open hardware high-impedance interface for potentiometric detection.

    PubMed

    Salvador, C; Mesa, M S; Durán, E; Alvarez, J L; Carbajo, J; Mozo, J D

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a new open hardware interface based on Arduino to read electromotive force (emf) from potentiometric detectors is presented. The interface has been fully designed with the open code philosophy and all documentation will be accessible on web. The paper describes a comprehensive project including the electronic design, the firmware loaded on Arduino, and the Java-coded graphical user interface to load data in a computer (PC or Mac) for processing. The prototype was tested by measuring the calibration curve of a detector. As detection element, an active poly(vinyl chloride)-based membrane was used, doped with cetyltrimethylammonium dodecylsulphate (CTA(+)-DS(-)). The experimental measures of emf indicate Nernstian behaviour with the CTA(+) content of test solutions, as it was described in the literature, proving the validity of the developed prototype. A comparative analysis of performance was made by using the same chemical detector but changing the measurement instrumentation. PMID:27250474

  19. Wedged AFM-cantilevers for parallel plate cell mechanics.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Martin P; Hodel, Adrian W; Spielhofer, Andreas; Cattin, Cedric J; Müller, Daniel J; Helenius, Jonne

    2013-04-01

    The combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical microscopy has gained popularity for mechanical analysis of living cells. In particular, recent AFM-based assays featuring tipless cantilevers and whole-cell deformation have yielded insights into cellular function, structure, and dynamics. However, in these assays the standard ≈10° tilt of the cantilever prevents uniaxial loading, which complicates assessment of cellular geometry and can cause cell sliding or loss of loosely adherent cells. Here, we describe an approach to modify tipless cantilevers with wedges and, thereby, achieve proper parallel plate mechanics. We provide guidance on material selection, the wedge production process, property and geometry assessment, and the calibration of wedged cantilevers. Furthermore, we demonstrate their ability to simplify the assessment of cell shape, prevent lateral displacement of round cells during compression, and improve the assessment of cell mechanical properties. PMID:23473778

  20. Wedge Absorber Design for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.; Snopok, P.; Coney, L.; Jansson, A.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    In the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE), muons are cooled by ionisation cooling. Muons are passed through material, reducing the total momentum of the beam. This results in a decrease in transverse emittance and a slight increase in longitudinal emittance, but overall reduction of 6d beam emittance. In emittance exchange, a dispersive beam is passed through wedge-shaped absorbers. Muons with higher energy pass through more material, resulting in a reduction in longitudinal emittance as well as transverse emittance. We consider the cooling performance of different wedge materials and geometries and propose a set of measurements that would be made in MICE.We outline the resources these measurements would require and detail some constraints that guide the choice of wedge parameters.

  1. On the validity of 2D critical taper theory in 3D wedges: defining a lateral deformation length scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leever, Karen; Oncken, Onno; Thorden Haug, Øystein

    2015-04-01

    For 2D critical taper theory to be applicable to 3D natural cases, cylindric deformation is a requirement. The assumption of cylindricity is violated in case of localized perturbations (subducting seamount, localized sedimentation) or due to a lateral change in decollement strength or depth. In natural accretionary wedges and fold-and-thrust belts, along strike changes may occur in a variety of ways: geometrical (due to a protruding indenter or a change in decollement depth), through a lateral change in basal friction (leading to laterally different tapers), or through a change in surface slope (by strongly localized fan sedimentation on accretionary wedges). Recent numerical modelling results (Ruh et al., 2013) have shown that lateral coupling preferentially occurs for relatively small perturbations, i.e. the horizontal shear stress caused by the perturbation is supported by the system. Lateral linking of the wedge in front of a protruding indenter to the wedge in front of the trailing edge of the back stop leads to curved thrust fronts and importantly it has been noted that even outside the curved zone, where the wedge front is again parallel to the direction of tectonic transport, the lateral effect is still evident: both tapers are different from the analytical prediction. We present results from a 3D analogue modelling parameter study to investigate this behavior more quantitatively, with the objective of empirically finding a lateral length scale of deformation in brittle contractional wedges. For a given wedge strength (angle of internal friction), we infer this to be a function of the size (width) of the perturbation and its magnitude (difference in basal friction). To this end we run different series of models in which we systematically vary the width and/or magnitude of a local perturbation. In the first series, the width of a zone of high basal friction is varied, in the second series we vary the width of an indenter and in the third series

  2. Continuous beam divergence control via wedge-pair for laser communication applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, Keith M.; DeCew, Alan E.; Narkewich, Lawrence E.; Williams, Timothy H.

    2015-03-01

    Lasercom terminals often scan an area of uncertainty during acquisition with a wide-divergence beacon beam. Once the terminal has established cooperative tracking with the remote terminal, a narrow divergence beam is used for communication. A mechanism that enables continuous beam divergence control can provide significant size, weight, and power (SWaP) benefits to the terminal. First, the acquisition and the communication beams can be launched from the same fiber so only a single high-power optical amplifier is required. Second, by providing mid-divergences, it eases the remote terminal's transition from the acquisition phase to the communication phase. This paper describes a mechanism that provides gradual, progressive adjustment of far-field beam divergence, from wide divergence (> 300 μrad FWHM) through collimated condition (38 μrad FWHM) and that works over a range of wavelengths. The mechanism is comprised of a variable-thickness optical element, formed by a pair of opposing wedges that is placed between the launch fiber and the collimating lens. Variations in divergence with no beam blockage are created by laterally translating one wedge relative to a fixed wedge. Divergence is continuously adjustable within the thickness range, allowing for a coordinated transition of divergence, wavelength, and beam power. Measurements of this low-loss, low-wavefront error assembly show that boresight error during divergence transition is maintained to a fraction of the communication beamwidth over wavelength and optical power ranges.

  3. Bacciger bacciger (Trematoda: Fellodistomidae) infection effects on wedge clam Donax trunculus condition.

    PubMed

    de Montaudouin, Xavier; Bazairi, Hocein; Mlik, Karima Ait; Gonzalez, Patrice

    2014-10-16

    Wedge clams Donax trunculus inhabit high-energy environments along sandy coasts of the northeastern Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. Two sites were sampled monthly, one in Morocco (Mehdia), where the density was normal, and one in France (Biscarosse), where the density was very low. We tested the hypothesis that the difference in density between the sites was related to infection by the trematode parasite Bacciger bacciger. Identity of both the parasite and the host were verified using anatomical and molecular criteria. Parasite prevalence (i.e. the percentage of parasitized clams) was almost 3 times higher at Biscarosse. At this site, overall prevalence reached 32% in July and was correlated with the migration of several individuals (with a prevalence of 88%) to the sediment surface. After this peak, prevalence decreased rapidly, suggesting death of parasitized clams. The deleterious effect of B. bacciger on wedge clams was also supported by our calculations indicating that the weight of the parasite made up to 56% of the total weight of the parasitized clams. However, condition indices of trematode-free clams were also lower in Biscarosse than in Mehdia or other sites, suggesting that other factors such as pollutants or microparasites (Microcytos sp.) may alter wedge clam population fitness in Biscarosse. PMID:25320038

  4. Trench-parallel anisotropy produced by serpentine deformation in the hydrated mantle wedge.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Ikuo; Hirauchi, Ken-ichi; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Ando, Jun-ichi

    2009-10-22

    Seismic anisotropy is a powerful tool for detecting the geometry and style of deformation in the Earth's interior, as it primarily reflects the deformation-induced preferred orientation of anisotropic crystals. Although seismic anisotropy in the upper mantle is generally attributed to the crystal-preferred orientation of olivine, the strong trench-parallel anisotropy (delay time of one to two seconds) observed in several subduction systems is difficult to explain in terms of olivine anisotropy, even if the entire mantle wedge were to act as an anisotropic source. Here we show that the crystal-preferred orientation of serpentine, the main hydrous mineral in the upper mantle, can produce the strong trench-parallel seismic anisotropy observed in subduction systems. High-pressure deformation experiments reveal that the serpentine c-axis tends to rotate to an orientation normal to the shear plane during deformation; consequently, seismic velocity propagating normal to the shear plane (plate interface) is much slower than that in other directions. The seismic anisotropy estimated for deformed serpentine aggregates is an order of magnitude greater than that for olivine, and therefore the alignment of serpentine in the hydrated mantle wedge results in a strong trench-parallel seismic anisotropy in the case of a steeply subducting slab. This hypothesis is also consistent with the presence of a hydrous phase in the mantle wedge, as inferred from anomalously low seismic-wave velocities. PMID:19847262

  5. Wedge absorber design and simulation for MICE Step IV

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, C.T.; Snopok, P.; Coney, L.; Hanson, G.; /UC, Riverside

    2011-03-01

    In the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), muons are cooled by passing through material, then through RF cavities to compensate for the energy loss; which reduces the transverse emittance. It is planned to demonstrate longitudinal emittance reduction via emittance exchange in MICE by using a solid wedge absorber in Step IV. Based on the outcome of previous studies, the shape and material of the wedge were chosen. We address here further simulation efforts for the absorber of choice as well as engineering considerations in connection with the absorber support design.

  6. Quantifying the effects of material properties on analog models of critical taper wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, F.; Rosenau, M.; Schreurs, G.; Friedrich, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    Analogue models are inherently handmade and reflect their creator's shaping character. For example, sieving style in combination with grain geometry and distribution have been claimed to influence bulk material properties and the outcome of analogue experiments. Few studies exist that quantify these effects and here we aim at investigating the impact of bulk properties of granular materials on the structural development of convergent brittle wedges in analogue experiments. In a systematic fashion, natural sands as well as glass beads of different grain size and size distribution were sieved by different persons from different heights and the resulting bulk density was measured. A series of analogue experiments in both the push and pull setup were performed. The differences in the outcome of experiments were analyzed based on sidewall pictures and 3D laserscanning of the surface. A new high-resolution approach to measuring surface slope automatically is introduced and applied to the evaluation of images and profiles. This procedure is compared to manual methods of determining surface slope. The effect of sidewall friction was quantified by measuring lateral changes in surface slope. The resulting dataset is used to identify the main differences between pushed and pulled wedge experiments in the light of critical taper theory. The bulk density of granular material was found to be highly dependent on sieve height. Sieve heights of less than 50 cm produced a bulk density that was up to 10% less than the maximum bulk density; an effect equally shown for different people sieving the material. Glass beads were found to produce a more regular structure of in-sequence-thrusts in both, space and time, than sands while displaying less variability. Surface slope was found to be highly transient for pushed wedge experiments, whereas it reached and attained a stable value in pulled experiments. Pushed wedges are inferred to develop into a supercritical state because they exceed

  7. Transient and Steady-State Kinematic Response to Erosional Forcing in an Orogenic Wedge: Sandbox Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, L.; Teyssier, C.; Annia, F.; Take, A.

    2005-12-01

    The evolution of orogens is highly affected by surface processes that control mass distribution. Transportation and redistribution of mass at the Earth's surface modifies the gravitational load and alters the stress field and kinematics within orogens. We explore the role of asymmetric erosion, indenter dip angle, and flux steady/non-steady state in determining the patterns of deformation and exhumation in doubly-sided orogenic wedges. In our analogue model, shortening of the orogen is driven by rigid indenters, represented by Plexiglas wedged blocks (35 and 70 degrees) that deform a non-cohesive dry Coulomb material (walnut shells) representing crustal material. Three end-member erosional scenarios are considered. In the first case, erosion is not applied, and thus the doubly-sided orogenic wedge evolves without restraints (non-steady state). In the second case, erosion is concentrated solely on the indenters side of the orogen (retrowedge), and in the third case, erosion is focused on the flank opposite to the indenter side (prowedge). In the last two cases, steady-state conditions were present in the middle stages of shortening. Strain and exhumation were calculated using displacement fields from 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV analysis). In the three cases, the model deforms as a combination of lateral compaction and localization of strain in shear bands. In the early stages of deformation, a "pop-up" structure develops, bounded by a fore-shear on the front and a back-shear toward the indenter. As deformation continues, a new fore-shear develops, and the previous one remains inactive and is passively pushed up the wedge. In the case of no erosion, the old fore-shears rotate slightly toward the indenter, and the shear bands evolve to steeply dipping structures. In the case of retrowedge erosion, the old fore-shears back rotate toward the indenter, and the shear bands evolve to shallowly dipping structures. In the case of prowedge erosion, old fore

  8. The Superimposed Paleocene-Miocene Tectonics of the middle part of the Nallihan Wedge (NW Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Murat; Yaltirak, Cenk

    2015-04-01

    In the NW Turkey, the area between the suture zones of the Rhodope-Pontide Ocean and Izmir-Ankara Ocean, and North Anatolian Fault Zone (NAFZ) and Thrace-Eskişehir Fault Zone (TEFZ) is known as the Nallıhan Wedge. The shape of Nallıhan Wedge is a 90 degree counter-clockwise rotated isosceles triangle. The northwestern boundary is a part of NAFZ and the southwestern boundary is a part of TEFZ. The 160 km-long eastern boundary is located at around Beypazarı and western corner is on the Bursa Plain. Nallıhan is situated at the centre of this isosceles triangle. While all the thrusts and folds shrink towards to the west and show an imbricate-like structure, the characteristics of the folds turn into to the open folds. Thrusts faults are locally observed as blind and almost perpendicular thrusts at the fold limbs towards to the east. The rocks of the study area show different characteristics according to their types and basins of formation. On the other hand the structural properties of these rocks display the effects of the closure of the Intra-Pontide and Izmir-Ankara Oceans in between Paleocene and Early Oligocene. During Miocene, the thrust faults reactivated and a deformation formed the NEE-SWW left lateral strike-slip faults parallel to these thrust faults. Whereas the first events are related to the closure of the branches of Neo-Tethys, the Miocene deformation is probably based on the Miocene tectonics of the Western Anatolia by the reason of equivalent age of the TEFZ. In this framework, the deformation of the Nallıhan Wedge presents significant information about the period between the evolution of Paleotectonic and Neotectonic of Turkey.

  9. Rise of a variable-viscosity fluid in a steadily spreading wedge-shaped conduit with accreting walls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lachenbruch, Arthur H.; Nathenson, Manuel

    1976-01-01

    Relatively rigid plates making up the outer 50 to 100 km of the Earth are steadily separating from one another along narrow globe-circling zones of submarine volcanism, the oceanic spreading centers. Continuity requires that the viscous underlying material rise beneath spreading centers and accrete onto the steadily diverging plates. It is likely that during the rise the viscosity changes systematically and that the viscous tractions exerted on the plates contribute to the unique pattern of submarine mountains and earthquake faults observed at spreading centers. The process is modeled by viscous creep in a wedge-shaped conduit (with apex at the sea floor) in which the viscosity varies as rm where r is distance from the apex and m is a parameter. For these conditions, the governing differential equations take a simple form. The solution for the velocity is independent of r and of the sign of m. As viscous stresses vary as rm-1, the pattern of stress on the conduit wall is sensitive to viscosity variation. For negative m, the viscous pressure along the base of the conduit is quite uniform; for positive m, it falls toward zero in the axial region as the conduit base widens. For small opening angles, viscous forces push the plates apart, and for large ones, they oppose plate separation. Though highly idealized, the solution provides a tool for investigating tectonic processes at spreading centers.

  10. Dynamic properties of high structural integrity auxetic open cell foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpa, F.; Ciffo, L. G.; Yates, J. R.

    2004-02-01

    This paper illustrates various dynamic characteristics of open cell compliant polyurethane foam with auxetic (negative Poisson's ratio) behaviour. The foam is obtained from off-the-shelf open cell polyurethane grey foam with a manufacturing process based on mechanical deformation on a mould in a temperature-controlled oven. The Poisson's ratio is measured with an image processing technique based on edge detection with wavelet methods. Foam samples have been tested in a viscoelastic analyser tensile test machine to determine the Young's modulus and loss factor for small dynamic strains. The same samples have also been tested in an acoustic impedance tube to measure acoustic absorption and specific acoustic resistance and reactance with a transmissibility technique. Another set of tests has been set up on a cam plastometer machine for constant strain rate dynamic crushing analysis. All the tests have been carried out on auxetic and normal foam samples to provide a comparison between the two types of cellular solids. The results from the experimental tests are discussed and interpreted using microstructure models for cellular materials existing in the literature. The negative Poisson's ratio foam presented in this paper shows an overall superiority regarding damping and acoustic properties compared to the original conventional foam. Its dynamic crushing performance is also significantly superior to the normal foam, suggesting a possible use in structural integrity compliant elements.

  11. Evolution of Strain in Obliquely Convergent Analog Doubly-Vergent Wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, D. M.; Haq, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    We have conducted a range of analog experiments across the parameter space from 0° to 70°, in which we have tracked the evolution of the model geometries and strain fields. Surface deformation is monitored by photographic analysis of the experiment and a plane laser is used to obtain precise topography of the developing pro and retro-wedges normal to strike At both high and low obliquities, our results are broadly consistent with theoretical expectations. At obliquities ranging from 0° to close to 60°, doubly-vergent wedges with the same combination of a broad, minimum taper pro-wedge and a narrower, maximum-taper double retro-wedge found in normal convergence at obliquities up to close to 60°. Above about 60° obliquity, though, the orogen continues to grow with a much greater degree of symmetry; it never develops the broad prowedge that characterizes the orogens at low to moderately high obliquities. This result is entirely consistent with the rotation of stresses and reversal in principal stress order associated with the transition from an essentially convergent orogen with some margin-parallel shear to transpression with dominant strike-slip, as described by various authors. This marked change in tectonic style and orogen shape at about 60° obliquity is accompanied by a change in the distribution of shear within the model. In normal convergence, there is no margin-parallel shear to be accommodated, so it is everywhere equal to zero. Margin-normal shortening is accommodated across the orogen, but, as taper is maintained, it occurs most rapidly near the deformation front (at left). In no case is there extension in these purely frictional models, unlike the case with a ductile layer at depth. At non-zero obliquities, there is also margin-parallel shear to be distributed across the margin. In addition to a broad zone centered on the topographic high (over the tip of the backstop), that shear is distributed across the prowedge, where it is accommodated in the

  12. The role of aerothermochemistry in double cone and double wedge flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swantek, Andrew

    In this work, hypervelocity flows over double cone and double wedge geometries are studied. The flow configurations established over the double cone/double wedge models are extremely sensitive to thermochemistry, and thus serve as ideal benchmarks for validating chemical models. The goals of this research are: i) to investigate the coupling between the fluid mechanics and thermochemistry in these flow fields by varying freestream flow composition and enthalpy, ii) to implement a diagnostic suite for time-resolved surface and freestream measurements, iii) to investigate the nature of flow field unsteadiness across various test conditions, and lastly iv) to extend the experimental database for shock wave boundary/layer interactions. An expansion tube is used to generate flows with enthalpies ranging from 2.2-8.0 MJ/kg (2-4 km/s) and Mach numbers from 4-7. The expansion tube is a novel impulse facility for accelerating a test gas to these velocities, while maintaining a minimally dissociated freestream. Additionally, the facility allows variation of the freestream composition (between nitrogen and air), while maintaining freestream test parameters (Mach number, density, enthalpy) to within 0.5%. Two models are used: a 25-55 degree double cone model and a 30-55 degree double wedge. There are four diagnostic components to this research which aim to enable a better understanding of these canonical flow fields. Single frame, high resolution schlieren photography is used to visualize various flow features including: the separation zone formed in the corner, the triple point interaction, and a supersonic shear layer. From these images, a separation zone length scaling parameter is determined. This parameter, derived for wedge geometries, is successfully applied to conical geometries by using a judicious choice of flow properties for scaling. In the wedge image series, nitrogen test conditions exhibit a distinct increase in bow shock standoff distance. Additionally, aft

  13. 49 CFR 230.104 - Driving box shoes and wedges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Driving box shoes and wedges. 230.104 Section 230.104 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS...

  14. Electrodynamic Casimir effect in a medium-filled wedge.

    PubMed

    Brevik, Iver; Ellingsen, Simen A; Milton, Kimball A

    2009-04-01

    We re-examine the electrodynamic Casimir effect in a wedge defined by two perfect conductors making dihedral angle alpha=pi/p. This system is analogous to the system defined by a cosmic string. We consider the wedge region as filled with an azimuthally symmetric material, with permittivity and permeability epsilon1, micro1 for distance from the axis ra. The results are closely related to those for a circular-cylindrical geometry, but with noninteger azimuthal quantum number mp. Apart from a zero-mode divergence, which may be removed by choosing periodic boundary conditions on the wedge, and may be made finite if dispersion is included, we obtain finite results for the free energy corresponding to changes in a for the case when the speed of light is the same inside and outside the radius a , and for weak coupling, |epsilon1-epsilon2|<1, for purely dielectric media. We also consider the radiation produced by the sudden appearance of an infinite cosmic string, situated along the cusp line of the pre-existing wedge. PMID:19518186

  15. Interfacial shear-stress effects on transient capillary wedge flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Song-Kai; Lai, Chun-Liang

    2004-06-01

    The effects on the transient capillary flow in a wedge due to the interfacial shear-stress distribution S along the flow direction z is studied theoretically. With the assumptions of a slender liquid column and negligible gravitational and inertia effects, the problem is reduced to finding the axial velocity distribution at any cross section. The propagation of the liquid column h(z,t) and the tip location l(t) are then solved with the aid of the continuity equation. When the half-wedge angle α, the contact angle θ, and the shear-stress distribution on the free surface S are constant, analytic solutions exist. Otherwise, numerical simulation has to be applied. The results indicate that when S(z) is acting in the flow direction, the flow is strengthened and the liquid column propagates faster. When S(z) is opposing the flow direction, reverse flow may exist near the free surface and the propagation speed of the liquid column is reduced. Moreover, for a capillary flow in a wedge with constant α, θ, and S, both the analytic solutions and the numerical simulation predict that l(t)∝t3/5 for the constant-flow-rate stage and l(t)∝t1/2 for the constant-height flow stage. When S is a function of the flow direction z, the above functional relationship between l and t becomes no longer valid; it varies as the liquid column propagates along the wedge.

  16. Thrusting and wedge growth, Southern Alps of Lombardia (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeder, Dietrich

    1992-06-01

    A south-vergent fold-thrust belt of Miocene-Recent age accompanies the south slope of the Lombardian Alps and is partly buried beneath Plio-Pleistocene Po Valley basin fill. The belt is probably detached along a trans-crustal thrust, named Main South Alpine Thrust (MSAT), with an estimated dip slip of 70-100 km. Transport on this thrust piggybacks the Adamello pluton of Late Eocene age, pre-Adamello folds, and Oligocene-Miocene Insubric strike-slip structures, by ramping up through 12-15 km of Austro-Alpine (Adria) crust and through 8-10 km of Triassic to Eocene sediments. Folds in the Front Ranges are ascribed to MSAT ramping, not to pre-Adamello compression. The MSAT soles upward in a blind thrust beneath 3-4 km of Oligocene-Pliocene foredeep fill. Initial regional failure along the MSAT implies substantial and pre-existing topographic relief near the Insubric line. An average of 25% wedge thickening during MSAT transport is consistent with the requirement of Coulomb critical taper. Progression of the south-Alpine detachment from the MSAT to the base of the foreland sediments has added a thickness of 6-12 km in footwall imbrications to the base and the toe of the thrust wedge. This addition in wedge volume is consistent with wedge dynamics only if a mid-Miocene or younger spike of excess Alpine topography is admitted.

  17. Hypersonic, nonequilibrium flow over a cylindrically blunted 6 deg wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    1993-01-01

    The numerical simulation of hypersonic flow in chemical nonequilibrium over cylindrically blunted 6 degree wedge is described. The simulation was executed on a Cray C-90 with Program LAURA 92-vl. Code setup procedures and sample results, including grid refinement studies and variations of species number are discussed. This simulation relates to a study of wing leading edge heating on transatmospheric vehicles.

  18. Magnetic and structural instabilities of ultrathin Fe(100) wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Bader, S.D.; Li, Dongqi; Qiu, Z.Q.

    1994-05-01

    An overview is provided of recent efforts to explore magnetic and related structural issues for ultrathin Fe films grown epitaxially as wedge structures onto Ag(100) and Cu(100). Experiments were carried out utilizing the surface magneto-optic Kerr effect (SMOKE). Ordinary bcc Fe is lattice-matched to the primitive unit cell of the Ag(100) surface. Fe wedges on Ag(100) can be fabricated whose thick end has in-plane magnetic easy axes due to the shape anisotropy, and whose thin end has perpendicular easy axes due to the surface magnetic anisotrophy. A spin-reorientation transition can thus be studied in the center of the wedge where the competing anisotropies cancel. The goal is to test the Mermin-Wagner theorem which states that long-range order is lost at finite temperatures in an isotropic two-dimensional Heisenberg system. Fe wedges on Cu(100) can be studied in like manner, but the lattice matching permits fcc and tetragonally-distorted fcc phases to provide structural complexity in addition to the interplay of competing magnetic anisotropies. The results of these studies are new phase identifications that help both to put previous work into perspective and to define issues to pursue in the future.

  19. How important is randomisation in a stepped wedge trial?

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, James R; Prost, Audrey; Fielding, Katherine L; Copas, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    In cluster randomised trials, randomisation increases internal study validity. If enough clusters are randomised, an unadjusted analysis should be unbiased. If a smaller number of clusters are included, stratified or matched randomisation can increase comparability between trial arms. In addition, an adjusted analysis may be required; nevertheless, randomisation removes the possibility for systematically biased allocation and increases transparency. In stepped wedge trials, clusters are randomised to receive an intervention at different start times ('steps'), and all clusters eventually receive it. In a recent study protocol for a 'modified stepped wedge trial', the investigators considered randomisation of the clusters (hospital wards), but decided against it for ethical and logistical reasons, and under the assumption that it would not add much to the rigour of the evaluation. We show that the benefits of randomisation for cluster randomised trials also apply to stepped wedge trials. The biggest additional issue for stepped wedge trials in relation to parallel cluster randomised trials is the need to control for secular trends in the outcome. Analysis of stepped wedge trials can in theory be based on 'horizontal' or 'vertical' comparisons. Horizontal comparisons are based on measurements taken before and after the intervention is introduced in each cluster, and are unbiased if there are no secular trends. Vertical comparisons are based on outcome measurements from clusters that have switched to the intervention condition and those from clusters that have yet to switch, and are unbiased under randomisation since at any time point, which clusters are in intervention and control conditions will have been determined at random. Secular outcome trends are a possibility in many settings. Many stepped wedge trials are analysed with a mixed model, including a random effect for cluster and fixed effects for time period to account for secular trends, thereby combining both

  20. [Relationships between temperature change and microbial amount in inactive ice wedges in Yitulihe, Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Yang, Si-Zhong; Jin, Hui-Jun; Wen, Xi; Luo, Dong-Liang; Yu, Shao-Peng

    2009-11-01

    Ice-wedge is an indicator of paleoclimate change. The delta18 O concentration in different layers could reflect the change of paleotemperature during ice-wedge growth. In the late 1980s, inactive ice wedges were found in Yitulihe, Northeast China, which were the south-most ones so far and were important in climatic and environmental research. In this paper, the delta18 O concentration and microbial number in the inactive ice-wedges were analyzed by using stable isotope, fluorescence microscopy counting, and flow cytometer (FCM). During the ice-wedge growth in Yitulihe area, there were three short-term paleotemperature fluctuation, and three times of fluctuation in microbial amount in different ice-wedge layer. Correlation analysis indicated that there was a converging relationship between the temperature change and microbial amount in the ice-wedges. The lower the temperature when ice-wedge layer formed, the less the microbes survived in the layer. PMID:20136017

  1. Formation of high overburden dumps in open-casts

    SciTech Connect

    S.G. Molotilov; V.K. Norri

    2007-09-15

    The specificity of formation of high overburden dumps in opencast excavations and ravines is considered. It is proposed to exercise high dumping and deformation control in piled rocks by using a new dumping complex supporting high efficiency and safety of dumping operations.

  2. The Seismic Structure of the Mantle Wedge under Cascade Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levander, A.; Liu, K.; Porritt, R. W.; Allen, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    Under a number of Cascade volcanoes we have identified a characteristic seismic signature in individual station Ps receiver functions and in Ps CCP image volumes made from USArray Transportable Array and Flexible Array stations. In the mantle wedge, the CCP images and the RFs show a strong negative event just below the Moho, paired with a weak to moderate positive event between 50-70 km, and a strong slab event. At most of these volcanoes, a strong negative signal also appears between 15 and 25 km depth in the crust. The signature is particularly clear under Mt. Lassen and Mt. Shasta in data from FAME (Flexible Array Mendocino Experiment), where instruments were close to the volcanic centers. Comparing the average Cascadia volcano signature to those of stations throughout the western U.S. and specifically those of the Cascadia backarc region, shows that this signal is unique to the Cascadia volcanoes. Joint inversion of the Ps receiver functions and ambient noise Rayleigh wave phase velocities (Porritt et al., 2011; Liu et al., submitted) for those volcanoes with the paired events provides 1D shear velocity profiles having common characteristics. A strong sub-Moho low velocity zone from 5 to 15 km thick gives rise to the paired negative-positive signals in the receiver functions. The sub-Moho low velocity zones, with velocities of 3.7 < Vs < 4.0 km/s, are evident in 15 of the 22 stations we examined. Stations not exhibiting this pattern also show a characteristic seismic structure: There is no abrupt velocity increase at Moho depths, instead Vs increases gradually from the lower crust to as deep as ~70 km, forming a thick, relatively high velocity layer (4.0 < Vs <4.5 km/s). This project was initiated as part of the CIDER 2011 summer program.

  3. Investigation of Acoustical Shielding by a Wedge-Shaped Airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Clark, Lorenzo R.; Dunn, Mark H.; Tweed, John

    2004-01-01

    Experiments on a scale model of an advanced unconventional subsonic transport concept, the Blended Wing Body (BWB), have demonstrated significant shielding of inlet-radiated noise. A computational model of the shielding mechanism has been developed using a combination of boundary integral equation method (BIEM) and equivalent source method (ESM). The computation models the incident sound from a point source in a nacelle and determines the scattered sound field. In this way the sound fields with and without the airfoil can be estimated for comparison to experiment. An experimental test bed using a simplified wedge-shape airfoil and a broadband point noise source in a simulated nacelle has been developed for the purposes of verifying the analytical model and also to study the effect of engine nacelle placement on shielding. The experimental study is conducted in the Anechoic Noise Research Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The analytic and experimental results are compared at 6300 and 8000 Hz. These frequencies correspond to approximately 150 Hz on the full scale aircraft. Comparison between the experimental and analytic results is quite good, not only for the noise scattering by the airframe, but also for the total sound pressure in the far field. Many of the details of the sound field that the analytic model predicts are seen or indicated in the experiment, within the spatial resolution limitations of the experiment. Changing nacelle location produces comparable changes in noise shielding contours evaluated analytically and experimentally. Future work in the project will be enhancement of the analytic model to extend the analysis to higher frequencies corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the high bypass ratio ducted fan engines that are expected to power the BWB.

  4. Investigation of Acoustical Shielding by a Wedge-Shaped Airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Clark, Lorenzo R.; Dunn, Mark H.; Tweed, John

    2006-01-01

    Experiments on a scale model of an advanced unconventional subsonic transport concept, the Blended Wing Body (BWB), have demonstrated significant shielding of inlet-radiated noise. A computational model of the shielding mechanism has been developed using a combination of boundary integral equation method (BIEM) and equivalent source method (ESM). The computation models the incident sound from a point source in a nacelle and determines the scattered sound field. In this way the sound fields with and without the airfoil can be estimated for comparison to experiment. An experimental test bed using a simplified wedge-shape airfoil and a broadband point noise source in a simulated nacelle has been developed for the purposes of verifying the analytical model and also to study the effect of engine nacelle placement on shielding. The experimental study is conducted in the Anechoic Noise Research Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The analytic and experimental results are compared at 6300 and 8000 Hz. These frequencies correspond to approximately 150 Hz on the full scale aircraft. Comparison between the experimental and analytic results is quite good, not only for the noise scattering by the airframe, but also for the total sound pressure in the far field. Many of the details of the sound field that the analytic model predicts are seen or indicated in the experiment, within the spatial resolution limitations of the experiment. Changing nacelle location produces comparable changes in noise shielding contours evaluated analytically and experimentally. Future work in the project will be enhancement of the analytic model to extend the analysis to higher frequencies corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the high bypass ratio ducted fan engines that are expected to power the BWB.

  5. The foreground wedge and 21-cm BAO surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hee-Jong; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2016-03-01

    Redshifted H I 21 cm emission from unresolved low-redshift large-scale structure is a promising window for ground-based baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) observations. A major challenge for this method is separating the cosmic signal from the foregrounds of Galactic and extra-Galactic origins that are stronger by many orders of magnitude than the former. The smooth frequency spectrum expected for the foregrounds would nominally contaminate only very small k∥ modes; however, the chromatic response of the telescope antenna pattern at this wavelength to the foreground introduces non-smooth structure, pervasively contaminating the cosmic signal over the physical scales of our interest. Such contamination defines a wedged volume in Fourier space around the transverse modes that is inaccessible for the cosmic signal. In this paper, we test the effect of this contaminated wedge on the future 21-cm BAO surveys using Fisher information matrix calculation. We include the signal improvement due to the BAO reconstruction technique that has been used for galaxy surveys and test the effect of this wedge on the BAO reconstruction as a function of signal to noises and incorporate the results in the Fisher matrix calculation. We find that the wedge effect expected at z = 1-2 is very detrimental to the angular diameter distances: the errors on angular diameter distances increased by 3-4.4 times, while the errors on H(z) increased by a factor of 1.5-1.6. We conclude that calibration techniques that clean out the foreground `wedge' would be extremely valuable for constraining angular diameter distances from intensity-mapping 21-cm surveys.

  6. Dynamics of Sub-Micron Bubbles Growing in a Wedge in the Low Capillary Number Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Michael; Park, Jeung; Kodambaka, Suneel; Ross, Frances; Bau, Haim

    2014-11-01

    Using a hermetically-sealed liquid cell, we observed the growth and migration of bubbles (tens to hundreds of nanometers in diameter) with a transmission electron microscope. The internal pressure of the liquid caused the thin silicon nitride membranes that comprise the cell's observation windows to bow outward, creating spatial gradients in the liquid cell's height. As a result, growing bubbles migrated in the direction of increasing cell height. To better understand the migration dynamics, we developed a simple, two-dimensional model to predict the translational velocity of a bubble that makes contact with both wedge surfaces as a function of the bubble growth rate and wedge opening angle. The model is valid in the asymptotic limit of zero capillary number and relies on a phenomenological relationship between the contact line velocity and the dynamic contact angle. The theoretical predictions are compared with experimental observations. MN was supported, in part, by the Nano/Bio Interface Center through the National Science Foundation NSEC DMR08-32802. HHB and FR were supported, in part, by Grants 1129722 and 1066573 from the National Science Foundation.

  7. Universal authoring system: Round two: The wedge

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, A.E.; Spangenberg, L.; Trainor, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Recent papers in the literature have proposed a universal authoring system. While these papers are valuable because they stimulated debate and provided a baseline, pursuing a universal authoring system at this time is a search for a solution before the requirements and problems have been clearly identified. This paper explores several issues related to the concept of a universal authoring system and concludes with an alternative prescription both for users (customers) and vendors. The user prescription includes a clear definition of requirements and establishment of internal standards. The vendor prescription includes working with the users more closely to aid in system comparison. This task is very difficult now because of nonstandard criteria used by the scores of vendors involved. A model for a /open quotes/universal/close quotes/ authoring system is presented to illustrate that the options are endless. Technical issues regarding difficulties of achieving universality of authoring without restricting progress in hardware. The authors agree that the plethora of authoring systems on the market today inhibits courseware portability, but we feel that our free enterprise system as well as more informed consumers will help reduce the number of surviving authoring systems. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Constraining exhumation pathway in an accretionary wedge by (U-Th)/He thermochronology—Case study on Meliatic nappes in the Western Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putiš, Marián; Danišík, Martin; Ružička, Peter; Schmiedt, Ivan

    2014-11-01

    This study reconstructs the late stages in the exhumation history of a nappe derived from the Meliatic accretionary wedge in the Western Carpathians by means of zircon and apatite (U-Th)/He dating. The Meliatic accretionary wedge formed due to the closure of the Neotethyan Triassic-Jurassic Meliata-Hallstatt Ocean in the Late Jurassic. The studied fragments of the blueschist-bearing Meliatic Bôrka Nappe were metamorphosed at low-temperature and high- to medium-pressure conditions at ca. 160-150 Ma and included into the accretionary wedge. The time of the accretionary wedge formation constrains the beginning of the Bôrka Nappe northward thrusting over the Gemeric Unit of the evolving Central Western Carpathians (CWC) orogenic wedge. The zircon (U-Th)/He data on four samples recorded three evolutionary stages: (i) cooling through the ∼180 °C isotherm at 130-120 Ma related to starting collapse of the accretionary wedge, following exhumation of the high-pressure slices in the Meliatic accretionary wedge; (ii) postponed exhumation and cooling of some fragments through the ∼180 °C isotherm from 115 to 95 Ma due to ongoing collapse of this wedge; and (iii) cooling from 80 to 65 Ma, postdating the thrusting (∼100-80 Ma) of the Bôrka Nappe slices during the Late Cretaceous compression related to formation of the CWC orogenic wedge. The third stage already documents cooling of the Meliatic Bôrka Nappe slices in the CWC orogenic wedge. The apatite (U-Th)/He data may indicate cooling of a Bôrka Nappe slice to near-surface temperatures at ∼65 Ma. The younger AHe age clusters indicate that at least one, or possibly two, reheating events could have occurred in the longer interval from ∼40 to ∼10 Ma during the Oligocene-Miocene. These were related to sedimentary burial and/or the magmatism as documented in other parts of the CWC.

  9. Degree of serpentinization in the forearc mantle wedge of Kyushu subduction zone: quantitative evaluations from seismic velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Shaohong; Sun, Jinlong; Huang, Haibo

    2015-09-01

    Serpentinization is an important phenomenon for understanding the water cycle and geodynamics of subduction zones in the upper mantle. In this study, we evaluate quantitatively the degree of serpentinization using the seismic velocity. The results show that serpentinization mainly occurs in the forearc mantle wedge along the subducted oceanic crust, and the degree of serpentinization in the forearc mantle wedge of Kyushu is strongly heterogeneous and varies from 0 to 12 %, containing about 0-1.8 % water contents. In general, the degree of serpentinization gradually decreases with depth from 40 to 80 km and the largest degree usually occur in about 40-50 km depth. Localized high anomalies of serpentinization are revealed in the northern and southern portions of Kyushu, respectively. We suggest that in the northern portion of the forearc mantle wedge, the water contents are relatively large, which might result from the abundant fractures and cracks with more fluids in the subducting slab because of the subduction of Kyushu-Palau ridge and the sudden change in its subduction angle of Philippine Sea lithosphere. But the high degree of serpentinization in the southern portion is closely associated with the active left-lateral shear zone revealed by global positioning system site velocities and earthquake focal mechanisms. In addition, the present results also display that the low degree of serpentinization in the central domain of the forearc mantle wedge is consistent with the location of anomalous arc volcano. The distribution of water contents is closely associated with the degree of serpentinization in the forearc mantle wedge.

  10. Jane Austen in the High School Classroom (Open to Suggestion).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritzer, Penelope

    1996-01-01

    Argues that Jane Austen's novels lend themselves to the high school curriculum, and that students will discover a leisurely, rural world in which the concerns of the young people are often similar to theirs. (SR)

  11. An Accurate Upper Bound Solution for Plane Strain Extrusion through a Wedge-Shaped Die

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Yusof; Lyamina, Elena

    2014-01-01

    An upper bound method for the process of plane strain extrusion through a wedge-shaped die is derived. A technique for constructing a kinematically admissible velocity field satisfying the exact asymptotic singular behavior of real velocity fields in the vicinity of maximum friction surfaces (the friction stress at sliding is equal to the shear yield stress on such surfaces) is described. Two specific upper bound solutions are found using the method derived. The solutions are compared to an accurate slip-line solution and it is shown that the accuracy of the new method is very high. PMID:25101311

  12. Experimental investigation of sound absorption of acoustic wedges for anechoic chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, I. V.; Golubev, A. Yu.; Zverev, A. Ya.; Makashov, S. Yu.; Palchikovskiy, V. V.; Sobolev, A. F.; Chernykh, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    The results of measuring the sound absorption by acoustic wedges, which were performed in AC-3 and AC-11 reverberation chambers at the Central Aerohydrodynamic Institute (TsAGI), are presented. Wedges of different densities manufactured from superfine basaltic and thin mineral fibers were investigated. The results of tests of these wedges were compared to the sound absorption of wedges of the operating AC-2 anechoic facility at TsAGI. It is shown that basaltic-fiber wedges have better sound-absorption characteristics than the investigated analogs and can be recommended for facing anechoic facilities under construction.

  13. Preclinical assessment of drug-induced proarrhythmias: role of the arterially perfused rabbit left ventricular wedge preparation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongqi; Patel, Chinmay; Cui, Changcong; Yan, Gan-Xin

    2008-08-01

    Drug-induced torsade de pointes (TdP) is a rare but lethal side effect of many cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular drugs. It has led to black box warnings or even withdrawal of many useful compounds from the market and is one of the major stumbling blocks for new drug development. The critical need for a better test that can predict the TdP liability of a candidate drug has led to the development of multiple preclinical models. Each of these models has it own merits and limitations in preclinical testing for TdP liability; however, most of these models have not been adequately validated, so their precise sensitivity and specificity remain largely unknown. Recent blinded validation studies have demonstrated that the rabbit left ventricular wedge preparation can predict drug-induced TdP with an extremely high sensitivity and specificity. As a matter of fact, the wedge technique was initially developed primarily for studying the electrical heterogeneity of myocardium and the cellular basis of QT prolongation and TdP. Naturally then, the electrophysiological data obtained from the wedge takes into account every critical factor associated with the development of TdP. The TdP scores generated using the wedge technique have been shown to assess the torsadogenic potential of the drugs in a predictable fashion. This review elaborates on the current and prospective role of the rabbit left ventricular wedge preparation in preclinical assessment of drug-induced proarrhythmias including but not limited to TdP. PMID:18423604

  14. Wedge spectrometer concepts for space IR remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeter, James W.; Blasius, Karl R.

    1999-10-01

    Wedge Imaging Spectrometer (WIS) technology promises advantages in lower size, cost, and sensor complexity but requires consideration of the effects of non-simultaneous collection of spectral information. Space applications appear particularly matched to the characteristics of this technology. Examples of WIS imagery collected by airborne acquisition systems have been used to assess the utility of WIS space imagery. Recent hardware development efforts have produced sensor components amenable to hyperspectral space applications in the Visible-Near-Infrared, Short Wavelength Infrared, Short-Mid Wavelength Infrared, and Long Wavelength Infrared bands. These components demonstrate excellent performance and provide the basis for space instrument concepts that utilize the inherent simplicity, compactness, and economy of the wedge spectrometer technology.

  15. Wedge-Local Fields in Integrable Models with Bound States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadamuro, Daniela; Tanimoto, Yoh

    2015-12-01

    Recently, large families of two-dimensional quantum field theories with factorizing S-matrices have been constructed by the operator-algebraic methods, by first showing the existence of observables localized in wedge-shaped regions. However, these constructions have been limited to the class of S-matrices whose components are analytic in rapidity in the physical strip. In this work, we construct candidates for observables in wedges for scalar factorizing S-matrices with poles in the physical strip and show that they weakly commute on a certain domain. We discuss some technical issues concerning further developments, especially the self-adjointness of the candidate operators here and strong commutativity between them.

  16. Shock wave reflection over convex and concave wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitade, M.; Kosugi, T.; Yada, K.; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2001-04-01

    It is well known that the transition criterion nearly agrees with the detachment criterion in the case of strong shocks, two-dimensional, and pseudosteady flow. However, when the shock wave diffracts over a wedge whose angle is below the detachment criterion, that is, in the domain of Mach reflection, precursory regular reflection (PRR) appears near the leading edge and as the shock wave propagates, the PRR is swept away by the overtaking corner signal (cs) that forces the transition to Mach reflection. It is clear that viscosity and thermal conductivity influences transition and the triple point trajectory. On the other hand, the reflection over concave and convex wedges is truly unsteady flow, and the effect of viscosity and thermal conductivity on transition and triple point trajectory has not been reported. This paper describes that influence of viscosity over convex and concave corners investigated both experiments and numerical simulations.

  17. Distribution of lithium in the Cordilleran Mantle wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shervais, J. W.; Jean, M. M.; Seitz, H. M.

    2015-12-01

    Enriched fluid-mobile element (i.e., B, Li, Be) concentrations in peridotites from the Coast Range ophiolite are compelling evidence that this ophiolite originated in a subduction environment. A new method presented in Shervais and Jean (2012) for modeling the fluid enrichment process, represents the total addition of material to the mantle wedge source region and can be applied to any refractory mantle peridotite that has been modified by melt extraction and/or metasomatism. Although the end-result is attributed to an added flux of aqueous fluid or fluid-rich melt phase derived from the subducting slab, in the range of tens of parts per million - the nature and composition of this fluid could not be constrained. To address fluid(s) origins, we have analyzed Li isotopes in bulk rock peridotite and eclogite, and garnet separates, to identify possible sources, and fluid flow mechanisms and pathways. Bulk rock Li abundances of CRO peridotites (δ7Li = -14.3 to 5.5‰; 1.9-7.5 ppm) are indicative of Li addition and δ7Li-values are lighter than normal upper mantle values. However, Li abundances of clino- and orthopyroxene appear to record different processes operating during the CRO-mantle evolution. Low Li abundances in orthopyroxene (<1 ppm) suggest depletion via partial melting, whereas high concentrations in clinopyroxenes (>2 ppm) record subsequent interaction with Li-enriched fluids (or melts). The preferential partitioning of lithium in clinopyroxene could be indicative of a particular metasomatic agent, e.g., fluids from a dehydrating slab. Future in-situ peridotite isotope studies via laser ablation will further elucidate the fractionation of lithium between orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, and serpentine. To obtain a more complete picture of the slab to arc transfer processes, we also measured eclogites and garnet separates to δ7Li= -18 to 3.5‰ (11.5-32.5 ppm) and δ7Li= 1.9 to 11.7‰ (0.7-3.9 ppm), respectively. In connection with previous studies focused

  18. Wedge Prism for Direction Resolved Speckle Correlation Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pechersky, M.J.

    1999-01-20

    The role of a wedge prism for strain sign determination and enhancing the sensitivity for sub-fringe changes is emphasized. The design and incorporation aspects for in-plane sensitive interferometers have been described in detail. Some experimental results dealing with stress determination by laser annealing and speckle corelation interferometry are presented. The prism can also be applied to produce standardized carrier fringes in spatial phase shifting interferometry.

  19. Mechanism of Hot Finger Formation in Mantle Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, M. Y.; Tamura, Y.; Sakaguchi, H.

    2013-12-01

    Processes of mantle melting and volcanic eruptions along subduction zones are often illustrated by the use of two-dimensional cross-section models of convergent margins. However, Quaternary volcanoes in the NE Japan arc could be grouped into ten volcano clusters striking transverse to the arc; these have an average width of ~ 50 km, and are separated by parallel gaps 30-75 km wide (Tamura et al., 2002). Moreover, the structure of the mantle wedge and arc crust beneath the NE Japan arc and the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc, respectively, suggest that the third dimension, lying along the strike of the arc, is necessary to understand the actual production of magmas in subduction zones (e.g., Nakajima et al., 2001; Hasegawa & Nakajima, 2004; Kodaira et al., 2007; Kodaira et al., 2008). Common periodic structural variations, having wavelengths of 80-100 km, can be observed in both areas. This grouping of volcanoes and the structural variations may be related to locally developed hot regions within the mantle wedge that have the form of inclined, 50 km-wide fingers (hot fingers). The 'hot fingers' models (Tamura et al., 2002) may play an important role in linking the 3D structures within the mantle wedge and overlying arc crust to volcanic eruptions at the surface. To explore a physical and mathematical mechanism to produce a hot finger pattern, we develop a hydrodynamic model of mantle convection in mantle wedge. A hypothesis incorporated in our model is a double diffusive mechanism of mantle materials; diffusion of composition of mantle materials is much weaker than temperature diffusion. We show that our model shows a spatiotemporal pattern in a mantle material composition, temperature, and velocity that are similar to the spatiotemporal patterns observed in the NE Japan arc.

  20. Generating Single-sided Subduction with Parameterized Mantle Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. J.; Tan, E.; Ma, K. F.

    2015-12-01

    Subduction on Earth is one-sided, where one oceanic plate sinks beneath the overriding plate. However, subduction zones in most numerical models tends to develop two-sided subduction, where both plates sink to the mantle. In this study, we use numerical model to find out how the existence of low viscosity wedge (LVW) can enable single-sided subduction and affects the flow in the subduction system.At the mantle wedge, water released from dehydrated oceanic crust serpentinized the mantle, which forms the LVW. LVW is an important part of the subduction system and provides efficient lubricant between the subducting slab and overriding lithosphere. Single-sided subduction can be generated in numerical models by different techniques, including prescribed plate velocity, non-Newtonian rheology, and free surface. These techniques either requires kinematic boundary condition, which produce mantle flow inconsistent with the buoyancy, or costs great amount of computational resources when solving nonlinear equations. In this study, we tried to generating single-sided subduction with Newtonian viscosity and free slip surface. A set of tracers representing hydrated oceanic crust are placed near the surface. As the tracers subducted with the lithosphere, we assume that the oceanic crust becomes dehydrated and serpentinizes the mantle wedge above. A parameterized LVW is placed above the subducted tracers in the models. We test with different upper/lower depth limits of the LVW and the viscosity of the LVW. Both overriding plate and subducting plate's surface velocity relative to the trench is calculated in order to determine whether the subduction is one-sided.Results of our numerical models show that not only the low viscosity wedge above the slab is essential for the formation of one-side subduction, a low viscosity layer in between two tectonic plates is also needed to provide the slab efficient lubricant after the subduction started. On the other hand, the plate's age, which

  1. Quantitative comparisons of numerical models of brittle wedge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buiter, Susanne

    2010-05-01

    Numerical and laboratory models are often used to investigate the evolution of deformation processes at various scales in crust and lithosphere. In both approaches, the freedom in choice of simulation method, materials and their properties, and deformation laws could affect model outcomes. To assess the role of modelling method and to quantify the variability among models, we have performed a comparison of laboratory and numerical experiments. Here, we present results of 11 numerical codes, which use finite element, finite difference and distinct element techniques. We present three experiments that describe shortening of a sand-like, brittle wedge. The material properties of the numerical ‘sand', the model set-up and the boundary conditions are strictly prescribed and follow the analogue setup as closely as possible. Our first experiment translates a non-accreting wedge with a stable surface slope of 20 degrees. In agreement with critical wedge theory, all models maintain the same surface slope and do not deform. This experiment serves as a reference that allows for testing against analytical solutions for taper angle, root-mean-square velocity and gravitational rate of work. The next two experiments investigate an unstable wedge in a sandbox-like setup, which deforms by inward translation of a mobile wall. The models accommodate shortening by formation of forward and backward shear zones. We compare surface slope, rate of dissipation of energy, root-mean-square velocity, and the location, dip angle and spacing of shear zones. We show that we successfully simulate sandbox-style brittle behaviour using different numerical modelling techniques and that we obtain the same styles of deformation behaviour in numerical and laboratory experiments at similar levels of variability. The GeoMod2008 Numerical Team: Markus Albertz, Michelle Cooke, Tony Crook, David Egholm, Susan Ellis, Taras Gerya, Luke Hodkinson, Boris Kaus, Walter Landry, Bertrand Maillot, Yury Mishin

  2. Wedge prism for direction resolved speckle correlation interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Vikram, C.S.; Pechersky, M.J.

    1999-10-01

    The role of a wedge prism for strain sign determination and to enhance the sensitivity for subfringe changes is presented. The design and incorporation aspects for in-plane sensitive interferometers are described in detail. Some experimental results dealing with stress determination by laser annealing and speckle correlation interferometry are presented. The prism can also be applied to produce standardized carrier fringes in spatial phase shifting interferometry. {copyright} {ital 1999 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.}

  3. [Sensitometry of Mammographic Screen-film System Using Bootstrap Aluminum Step-Wedge.].

    PubMed

    Abe, Shinji; Imada, Ryou; Terauchi, Takashi; Fujisaki, Tatsuya; Monma, Masahiko; Nishimura, Katsuyuki; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Mochizuki, Yasuo

    2005-01-01

    Recently, a few types of step-wedges for bootstrap sensitometry with a mammographic screen-film system have been proposed. In this study, the bootstrap sensitometry with the mammographic screen-film system was studied for two types of aluminum step-wedges. Characteristic X-ray energy curves were determined using mammographic and general radiographic aluminum step-wedges devised to prevent scattered X-rays generated from one step penetrating into the region of another one, and dependence of the characteristic curves on the wedges was also discussed. No difference was found in the characteristic curves due to the difference in the step-wedges for mammography and general radiography although there was a slight difference in shape at the shoulder portion for the two types of step-wedges. Therefore, it was concluded that aluminum step-wedges for mammography and general radiography could be employed in bootstrap sensitometry with the mammographic screen-film system. PMID:16479054

  4. Which Type of Inquiry Project Do High School Biology Students Prefer: Open or Guided?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeh, Irit; Zion, Michal

    2012-10-01

    In teaching inquiry to high school students, educators differ on which method of teaching inquiry is more effective: Guided or open inquiry? This paper examines the influence of these two different inquiry learning approaches on the attitudes of Israeli high school biology students toward their inquiry project. The results showed significant differences between the two groups: Open inquiry students were more satisfied and felt they gained benefits from implementing the project to a greater extent than guided inquiry students. On the other hand, regarding documentation throughout the project, guided inquiry students believed that they conducted more documentation, as compared to their open inquiry peers. No significant differences were found regarding `the investment of time', but significant differences were found in the time invested and difficulties which arose concerning the different stages of the inquiry process: Open inquiry students believed they spent more time in the first stages of the project, while guided inquiry students believed they spent more time in writing the final paper. In addition, other differences were found: Open inquiry students felt more involved in their project, and felt a greater sense of cooperation with others, in comparison to guided inquiry students. These findings may help teachers who hesitate to teach open inquiry to implement this method of inquiry; or at least provide their students with the opportunity to be more involved in inquiry projects, and ultimately provide their students with more autonomy, high-order thinking, and a deeper understanding in performing science.

  5. Washing wedges: a capillary instability in a gradient of confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiser, Ludovic; Herbaut, Remy; Bico, Jose; Reyssat, Etienne

    2015-11-01

    When a drop of oil is introduced into a gradient of confinement (two glass plates forming a sharp wedge) capillary forces drive it toward the most confined regions, where the solid-fluid contact area is maximal. A surfactant solution subsequently introduced into the wedge undergoes the same movement until it reaches the oil previously added. If the aqueous phase wets the solid better than the oil, a complex exchange process between both phases occurs. The water-oil interface destabilizes, oil fingers grow in the water phase, pinch-off and lead to the formation of droplets that migrate away from the tip of the wedge. The whole oil phase is eventually extracted. A linear stability analysis of the interface is presented and captures the size of the oil droplets. The dynamics of the system is however not perfectly explained by a simple Poiseuille flow. Indeed, more refined models should account for the dissipation in meniscii and lubrication films. Finally, we suggest that our model experiment may constitute a useful tool to select optimal systems for oil recovery processes.

  6. Wedge-filtering of geomorphologic terrestrial laser scan data.

    PubMed

    Panholzer, Helmut; Prokop, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial laser scanning is of increasing importance for surveying and hazard assessments. Digital terrain models are generated using the resultant data to analyze surface processes. In order to determine the terrain surface as precisely as possible, it is often necessary to filter out points that do not represent the terrain surface. Examples are vegetation, vehicles, and animals. Filtering in mountainous terrain is more difficult than in other topography types. Here, existing automatic filtering solutions are not acceptable, because they are usually designed for airborne scan data. The present article describes a method specifically suitable for filtering terrestrial laser scanning data. This method is based on the direct line of sight between the scanner and the measured point and the assumption that no other surface point can be located in the area above this connection line. This assumption is only true for terrestrial laser data, but not for airborne data. We present a comparison of the wedge filtering to a modified inverse distance filtering method (IDWMO) filtered point cloud data. Both methods use manually filtered surfaces as reference. The comparison shows that the mean error and root-mean-square-error (RSME) between the results and the manually filtered surface of the two methods are similar. A significantly higher number of points of the terrain surface could be preserved, however, using the wedge-filtering approach. Therefore, we suggest that wedge-filtering should be integrated as a further parameter into already existing filtering processes, but is not suited as a standalone solution so far. PMID:23429548

  7. GROMACS 4.5: a high-throughput and highly parallel open source molecular simulation toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Pronk, Sander; Páll, Szilárd; Schulz, Roland; Larsson, Per; Bjelkmar, Pär; Apostolov, Rossen; Shirts, Michael R.; Smith, Jeremy C.; Kasson, Peter M.; van der Spoel, David; Hess, Berk; Lindahl, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Molecular simulation has historically been a low-throughput technique, but faster computers and increasing amounts of genomic and structural data are changing this by enabling large-scale automated simulation of, for instance, many conformers or mutants of biomolecules with or without a range of ligands. At the same time, advances in performance and scaling now make it possible to model complex biomolecular interaction and function in a manner directly testable by experiment. These applications share a need for fast and efficient software that can be deployed on massive scale in clusters, web servers, distributed computing or cloud resources. Results: Here, we present a range of new simulation algorithms and features developed during the past 4 years, leading up to the GROMACS 4.5 software package. The software now automatically handles wide classes of biomolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids and lipids, and comes with all commonly used force fields for these molecules built-in. GROMACS supports several implicit solvent models, as well as new free-energy algorithms, and the software now uses multithreading for efficient parallelization even on low-end systems, including windows-based workstations. Together with hand-tuned assembly kernels and state-of-the-art parallelization, this provides extremely high performance and cost efficiency for high-throughput as well as massively parallel simulations. Availability: GROMACS is an open source and free software available from http://www.gromacs.org. Contact: erik.lindahl@scilifelab.se Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23407358

  8. A High-Leverage Language Teaching Practice: Leading an Open-Ended Group Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Erin

    2015-01-01

    In response to calls for more practice-based teacher education, this study investigated the way in which two high-performing novice world language teachers, one in Spanish and one in Latin, implemented a high-leverage teaching practice, leading an open-ended group discussion. Observational data revealed a number of constituent micro-practices. The…

  9. Lessons Learned from Recently Opened High Schools: A Study of Process and Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Withycombe, Richard

    This case study of six newly-opened high schools explored: (1) What steps were taken to involve district staff members and community representatives in educational-specifications and design-development work? How effective did these steps prove to be? What impact did this involvement appear to have on the emergent and completed high school project?…

  10. Which Type of Inquiry Project Do High School Biology Students Prefer: Open or Guided?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadeh, Irit; Zion, Michal

    2012-01-01

    In teaching inquiry to high school students, educators differ on which method of teaching inquiry is more effective: Guided or open inquiry? This paper examines the influence of these two different inquiry learning approaches on the attitudes of Israeli high school biology students toward their inquiry project. The results showed significant…

  11. Rheological contrast between serpentine species and implications for slab-mantle wedge decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirauchi, Ken-ichi; Katayama, Ikuo

    2013-11-01

    Serpentine is considered the main hydrous mineral to cause significant weakening at the slab-mantle interface; however, despite the possible presence of lizardite/chrysotile (liz/ctl) and antigorite (i.e., low- and high-temperature serpentine species, respectively) at the base of the mantle wedge, the differences in rheological properties between these two serpentine types are poorly understood. To investigate the effect of serpentine speciation on slab-mantle decoupling, we performed a series of two-layer shear deformation experiments on liz/ctl, antigorite, and olivine at P = 1 GPa and T = 250-300 °C, using a Griggs-type solid-medium apparatus. With increasing shear strain (γ up to ~ 5), the liz/ctl and antigorite samples evolved to deform predominantly by slip or glide on the (001) basal plane, whereas the olivine sample deformed by a combination of brittle and crystal-plastic mechanisms. The contrasting amount of rotation of strain markers between layers demonstrates that the shear strain of liz/ctl is significantly lower than that of antigorite, possibly arising from differences in interlayer bond strength. The strain contrasts between serpentines and olivine were γliz/ctl/γol = 9-12 and γatg/γol = 1-2. Our results indicate that assuming a thin, serpentinized layer upon a subducting slab, significant decoupling can occur only where liz/ctl is stable in the layer. Thus, the distribution of serpentine species in the hydrated mantle wedge is a critical factor that controls the degree of decoupling along the slab-wedge interface, at depths below the seismogenic zone.

  12. Control of structural inheritance on thrust initiation and material transfer in accretionary wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leever, Karen; Geersen, Jacob; Ritter, Malte; Lieser, Kathrin; Behrmann, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Faults in the incoming sediment layer are commonly observed in subduction zone settings and well developed in the incoming plate off Sumatra. To investigate how they affect the structural development of the accretionary wedge, we conducted a series of 2D analogue tectonic experiments in which a 2 cm thick quartz sand layer on top of a thin detachment layer of glass beads was pulled against a rigid backstop by a basal conveyor belt in a 20cm wide box with glass walls. A gap at the base of the back wall avoids entrainment of the glass beads. At regular spacing of either 2.3, 5.5 or 7.8 cm (fractions of the thrust sheet length in the reference model), conjugate pairs of weakness zones dipping 60deg were created by cutting the sand layer with a thin (1 mm) metal blade. Both the undisturbed sand and the pre-cuts have an angle of internal friction of ~29o, but their cohesion is different by 50 Pa (110 Pa for the undisturbed material, 60 Pa along the pre-cuts). Friction of the glass beads is ~24deg. The experiments are monitored with high resolution digital cameras; displacement fields derived from digital image correlation are used to constrain fault activity. In all experiments, a critically tapered wedge developed with a surface slope of 7.5deg. In the reference model (no weakness zones in the input section), the position of new thrust faults is controlled by the frontal slope break. The average length of the thrust sheets is 11 cm and the individual thrusts accommodate on average 8 cm displacement each. The presence of weakness zones causes thrust initiation at a position different from the reference case, and affects their dip. For a fault spacing of 7.8 cm (or 75% of the reference thrust sheet length), every single incoming weakness zone causes the formation of a new thrust, thus resulting in thrust sheets shorter than the equilibrium case. In addition, less displacement is accommodated on each thrust. As a consequence, the frontal taper is smaller than expected

  13. 2D and 3D numerical models on compositionally buoyant diapirs in the mantle wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasenclever, Jörg; Morgan, Jason Phipps; Hort, Matthias; Rüpke, Lars H.

    2011-11-01

    We present 2D and 3D numerical model calculations that focus on the physics of compositionally buoyant diapirs rising within a mantle wedge corner flow. Compositional buoyancy is assumed to arise from slab dehydration during which water-rich volatiles enter the mantle wedge and form a wet, less dense boundary layer on top of the slab. Slab dehydration is prescribed to occur in the 80-180 km deep slab interval, and the water transport is treated as a diffusion-like process. In this study, the mantle's rheology is modeled as being isoviscous for the benefit of easier-to-interpret feedbacks between water migration and buoyant viscous flow of the mantle. We use a simple subduction geometry that does not change during the numerical calculation. In a large set of 2D calculations we have identified that five different flow regimes can form, in which the position, number, and formation time of the diapirs vary as a function of four parameters: subduction angle, subduction rate, water diffusivity (mobility), and mantle viscosity. Using the same numerical method and numerical resolution we also conducted a suite of 3D calculations for 16 selected parameter combinations. Comparing the 2D and 3D results for the same model parameters reveals that the 2D models can only give limited insights into the inherently 3D problem of mantle wedge diapirism. While often correctly predicting the position and onset time of the first diapir(s), the 2D models fail to capture the dynamics of diapir ascent as well as the formation of secondary diapirs that result from boundary layer perturbations caused by previous diapirs. Of greatest importance for physically correct results is the numerical resolution in the region where diapirs nucleate, which must be high enough to accurately capture the growth of the thin wet boundary layer on top of the slab and, subsequently, the formation, morphology, and ascent of diapirs. Here 2D models can be very useful to quantify the required resolution, which we

  14. Friction properties of the plate boundary megathrust beneath the frontal wedge near the Japan Trench: an inference from topographic variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koge, Hiroaki; Fujiwara, Toshiya; Kodaira, Shuichi; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Kameda, Jun; Kitamura, Yujin; Hamahashi, Mari; Fukuchi, Rina; Yamaguchi, Asuka; Hamada, Yohei; Ashi, Juichiro; Kimura, Gaku

    2014-12-01

    The 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake (Mw 9.0) produced a fault rupture that extended to the toe of the Japan Trench. The deformation and frictional properties beneath the forearc are keys that can help to elucidate this unusual event. In the present study, to investigate the frictional properties of the shallow part of the plate boundary, we applied the critically tapered Coulomb wedge theory to the Japan Trench and obtained the effective coefficient of basal friction and Hubbert-Rubey pore fluid pressure ratio (λ) of the wedge beneath the lower slope. We extracted the surface slope angle and décollement dip angle (which are the necessary topographic parameters for applying the critical taper theory) from seismic reflection and refraction survey data at 12 sites in the frontal wedges of the Japan Trench. We found that the angle between the décollement and back-stop interface generally decreases toward the north. The measured taper angle and inferred effective friction coefficient were remarkably high at three locations. The southernmost area, which had the highest coefficient of basal friction, coincides with the area where the seamount is colliding offshore of Fukushima. The second area with a high effective coefficient of basal friction coincides with the maximum slip location during the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake. The area of the 2011 earthquake rupture was topographically unique from other forearc regions in the Japan Trench. The strain energy accumulation near the trench axis may have proceeded because of the relatively high friction, and later this caused a large slip and collapse of the wedge. The location off Sanriku, where there are neither seamount collisions nor rupture propagation, also has a high coefficient of basal friction. The characteristics of the taper angle, effective coefficient of basal friction, and pore fluid pressure ratio along the Japan Trench presented herein may contribute to the understanding of the relationship between the geometry of

  15. Rivers, re-entrants, and 3D variations in orogenic wedge development: a case study of the NW Indian Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, A. G.; Yu, H.; Hendershott, Z.

    2010-12-01

    Orogenic wedges are standard elements of collisional plate tectonics, from accretionary prisms to retro-arc basins. Recent study of orogenic wedge development has focused on links between mechanisms of internal deformation and surface processes. Models of orogenic wedges are commonly presented in the cross-section plane, which is generally effective as wedges largely develop via plane strain. The 3rd dimension can be utilized to explore effects of differences in controlling parameters on wedge evolution. We are investigating a stretch of the western Himalayan orogenic wedge that has two prominent changes in along-strike morphology: (1) a tectonic window (the Kullu Window) that appears to be strongly influenced by erosion along the 3rd largest river in the Himalayan system, the Sutlej River and (2) the Kangra Re-entrant, the largest re-entrant along the Himalayan arc. In addition to the along-strike heterogeneity, a key advantage of the proposed study area is its rich stratigraphy, with the most known diversity in the Himalayan arc. The stratigraphic wealth, combined with the along-strike heterogeneity in exposure level, offers a high resolution view of regional structural geometry. Our preliminary reconstructions suggest that the Sutlej River erosion increases the exposure depth and shortening budget across a narrow segment of the orogen, strongly warping the Kullu Window. Previous models have suggested that the out-of-sequence Munsiari thrust is the main structure associated with Kullu window formation, while our work suggests that most of this uplift and warping is accomplished by antiformal stacking of basement thrust horses. Late Miocene ages (U-Pb ages of zircons and Th-Pb ages of monazites) from a leucogranite in the core of the Kullu Window along the Sutlej River further suggests that this segment of the orogen represents a middle ground between plane strain orogenic wedge development and a tectonic aneurysm model. We have constructed a palinspastic

  16. Analyzing Inquiry Questions of High-School Students in a Gas Chromatography Open-Ended Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blonder, Ron; Mamlock-Naaman, Rachel; Hofstein, Avi

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of an open-ended inquiry experiment for high-school students, based on gas chromatography (GC). The research focuses on identifying the level of questions that students ask during the GC open inquiry laboratory, and it examines whether implementing the advanced inquiry laboratory opens up new directions for…

  17. Ammonia losses and nitrogen partitioning at a southern High Plains open lot dairy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Richard W.; Cole, N. Andy; Hagevoort, G. Robert; Casey, Kenneth D.; Auvermann, Brent W.

    2015-06-01

    Animal agriculture is a significant source of ammonia (NH3). Cattle excrete most ingested nitrogen (N); most urinary N is converted to NH3, volatilized and lost to the atmosphere. Open lot dairies on the southern High Plains are a growing industry and face environmental challenges as well as reporting requirements for NH3 emissions. We quantified NH3 emissions from the open lot and wastewater lagoons of a commercial New Mexico dairy during a nine-day summer campaign. The 3500-cow dairy consisted of open lot, manure-surfaced corrals (22.5 ha area). Lactating cows comprised 80% of the herd. A flush system using recycled wastewater intermittently removed manure from feeding alleys to three lagoons (1.8 ha area). Open path lasers measured atmospheric NH3 concentration, sonic anemometers characterized turbulence, and inverse dispersion analysis was used to quantify emissions. Ammonia fluxes (15-min) averaged 56 and 37 μg m-2 s-1 at the open lot and lagoons, respectively. Ammonia emission rate averaged 1061 kg d-1 at the open lot and 59 kg d-1 at the lagoons; 95% of NH3 was emitted from the open lot. The per capita emission rate of NH3 was 304 g cow-1 d-1 from the open lot (41% of N intake) and 17 g cow-1 d-1 from lagoons (2% of N intake). Daily N input at the dairy was 2139 kg d-1, with 43, 36, 19 and 2% of the N partitioned to NH3 emission, manure/lagoons, milk, and cows, respectively.

  18. Crystallization of soft matter under confinement at interfaces and in wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, Andrew J.; Malijevský, Alexandr

    2016-06-01

    opening angle of the wedge is commensurate with the crystal lattice.

  19. Crystallization of soft matter under confinement at interfaces and in wedges.

    PubMed

    Archer, Andrew J; Malijevský, Alexandr

    2016-06-22

    The surface freezing and surface melting transitions that are exhibited by a model two-dimensional soft matter system are studied. The behaviour when confined within a wedge is also considered. The system consists of particles interacting via a soft purely repulsive pair potential. Density functional theory (DFT) is used to calculate density profiles and thermodynamic quantities. The external potential due to the confining walls is modelled via a hard wall with an additional repulsive Yukawa potential. The surface phase behaviour depends on the range and strength of this repulsion: when the repulsion is weak, the wall promotes freezing at the surface of the wall. The thickness of this frozen layer grows logarithmically as the bulk liquid-solid phase coexistence is approached. Our mean-field DFT predicts that this crystalline layer at the wall must be nucleated (i.e. there is a free energy barrier) and its formation is necessarily a first-order transition, referred to as 'prefreezing', by analogy with the prewetting transition. However, in contrast to the latter, prefreezing cannot terminate in a critical point, since the phase transition involves a change in symmetry. If the wall-fluid interaction is sufficiently long ranged and the repulsion is strong enough, surface melting can occur instead. Then the interface between the wall and the bulk crystalline solid is wetted by the liquid phase as the chemical potential is decreased towards the value at liquid-solid coexistence. It is observed that the finite thickness fluid film at the wall has a broken translational symmetry due to its proximity to the bulk crystal, and so the nucleation of the wetting film can be either first order or continuous. Our mean-field theory predicts that for certain wall potentials there is a premelting critical point analogous to the surface critical point for the prewetting transition. When the fluid is confined within a linear wedge, this can strongly promote freezing when the opening

  20. Integrated Analysis Platform: An Open-Source Information System for High-Throughput Plant Phenotyping1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Klukas, Christian; Chen, Dijun; Pape, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput phenotyping is emerging as an important technology to dissect phenotypic components in plants. Efficient image processing and feature extraction are prerequisites to quantify plant growth and performance based on phenotypic traits. Issues include data management, image analysis, and result visualization of large-scale phenotypic data sets. Here, we present Integrated Analysis Platform (IAP), an open-source framework for high-throughput plant phenotyping. IAP provides user-friendly interfaces, and its core functions are highly adaptable. Our system supports image data transfer from different acquisition environments and large-scale image analysis for different plant species based on real-time imaging data obtained from different spectra. Due to the huge amount of data to manage, we utilized a common data structure for efficient storage and organization of data for both input data and result data. We implemented a block-based method for automated image processing to extract a representative list of plant phenotypic traits. We also provide tools for build-in data plotting and result export. For validation of IAP, we performed an example experiment that contains 33 maize (Zea mays ‘Fernandez’) plants, which were grown for 9 weeks in an automated greenhouse with nondestructive imaging. Subsequently, the image data were subjected to automated analysis with the maize pipeline implemented in our system. We found that the computed digital volume and number of leaves correlate with our manually measured data in high accuracy up to 0.98 and 0.95, respectively. In summary, IAP provides a multiple set of functionalities for import/export, management, and automated analysis of high-throughput plant phenotyping data, and its analysis results are highly reliable. PMID:24760818

  1. On the Origin of High-altitude Open Clusters in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Medina, L. A.; Pichardo, B.; Moreno, E.; Peimbert, A.; Velazquez, H.

    2016-01-01

    We present a dynamical study of the effect of the bar and spiral arms on the simulated orbits of open clusters in the Galaxy. Specifically, this work is devoted to the puzzling presence of high-altitude open clusters in the Galaxy. For this purpose we employ a very detailed observationally motivated potential model for the Milky Way and a careful set of initial conditions representing the newly born open clusters in the thin disk. We find that the spiral arms are able to raise an important percentage of open clusters (about one-sixth of the total employed in our simulations, depending on the structural parameters of the arms) above the Galactic plane to heights beyond 200 pc, producing a bulge-shaped structure toward the center of the Galaxy. Contrary to what was expected, the spiral arms produce a much greater vertical effect on the clusters than the bar, both in quantity and height; this is due to the sharper concentration of the mass on the spiral arms, when compared to the bar. When a bar and spiral arms are included, spiral arms are still capable of raising an important percentage of the simulated open clusters through chaotic diffusion (as tested from classification analysis of the resultant high-z orbits), but the bar seems to restrain them, diminishing the elevation above the plane by a factor of about two.

  2. Modes of continental extension in a crustal wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guangliang; Lavier, Luc L.; Choi, Eunseo

    2015-07-01

    We ran numerical experiments of the extension of a crustal wedge as an approximation to extension in an orogenic belt or a continental margin. We study the effects of the strength of the lower crust and of a weak mid-crustal shear zone on the resulting extension styles. A weak mid-crustal shear zone effectively decouples upper crustal extension from lower crustal flow. Without the mid-crustal shear zone, the degree of coupling between the upper and the lower crust increases and extension of the whole crust tends to focus on the thickest part of the wedge. We identify three distinct modes of extension determined by the strength of the lower crust, which are characterized by 1) localized, asymmetric crustal exhumation in a single massif when the lower crust is weak, 2) the formation of rolling-hinge normal faults and the exhumation of lower crust in multiple core complexes with an intermediate strength lower crust, and 3) distributed domino faulting over the weak mid-crustal shear zone when the lower crust is strong. A frictionally stronger mid-crustal shear zone does not change the overall model behaviors but extension occurred over multiple rolling-hinges. The 3 modes of extension share characteristics similar to geological models proposed to explain the formation of metamorphic core complexes: 1) the crustal flow model for the weak lower crust, 2) the rolling-hinge and crustal flow models when the lower crust is intermediate and 3) the flexural uplift model when the lower crust is strong. Finally we show that the intensity of decoupling between the far field extension and lower crustal flow driven by the regional pressure gradient in the wedge control the overall style of extension in the models.

  3. Polarization induced two dimensional confinement of carriers in wedge shaped polar semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Deb, S.; Bhasker, H. P.; Thakur, Varun; Shivaprasad, S. M.; Dhar, S.

    2016-01-01

    A novel route to achieve two dimensional (2D) carrier confinement in a wedge shaped wall structure made of a polar semiconductor has been demonstrated theoretically. Tapering of the wall along the direction of the spontaneous polarization leads to the development of charges of equal polarity on the two inclined facades of the wall. Polarization induced negative (positive) charges on the facades can push the electrons (holes) inward for a n-type (p-type) material which results in the formation of a 2D electron (hole) gas at the central plane and ionized donors (acceptors) at the outer edges of the wall. The theory shows that this unique mode of 2D carrier confinement can indeed lead to a significant enhancement of carrier mobility. It has been found that the reduced dimensionality is not the only cause for the enhancement of mobility in this case. Ionized impurity scattering, which is one of the major contributer to carrier scattering, is significantly suppressed as the carriers are naturally separated from the ionized centers. A recent experimental finding of very high electron mobility in wedge shaped GaN nanowall networks has been analyzed in the light of this theoretical reckoning. PMID:27210269

  4. Structure of the Yeast DEAD Box Protein Mss116p Reveals Two Wedges that Crimp RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Del Campo, Mark; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2010-01-12

    The yeast DEAD box protein Mss116p is a general RNA chaperone that functions in mitochondrial group I and II intron splicing, translational activation, and RNA end processing. Here we determined high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of Mss116p complexed with an RNA oligonucleotide and ATP analogs AMP-PNP, ADP-BeF{sub 3}, or ADP-AlF{sub 4}{sup -}. The structures show the entire helicase core acting together with a functionally important C-terminal extension. In all structures, the helicase core is in a closed conformation with a wedge {alpha} helix bending RNA 3' of the central bound nucleotides, as in previous DEAD box protein structures. Notably, Mss116p's C-terminal extension also bends RNA 5' of the central nucleotides, resulting in RNA crimping. Despite reported functional differences, we observe few structural changes in ternary complexes with different ATP analogs. The structures constrain models of DEAD box protein function and reveal a strand separation mechanism in which a protein uses two wedges to act as a molecular crimper.

  5. Polarization induced two dimensional confinement of carriers in wedge shaped polar semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Deb, S; Bhasker, H P; Thakur, Varun; Shivaprasad, S M; Dhar, S

    2016-01-01

    A novel route to achieve two dimensional (2D) carrier confinement in a wedge shaped wall structure made of a polar semiconductor has been demonstrated theoretically. Tapering of the wall along the direction of the spontaneous polarization leads to the development of charges of equal polarity on the two inclined facades of the wall. Polarization induced negative (positive) charges on the facades can push the electrons (holes) inward for a n-type (p-type) material which results in the formation of a 2D electron (hole) gas at the central plane and ionized donors (acceptors) at the outer edges of the wall. The theory shows that this unique mode of 2D carrier confinement can indeed lead to a significant enhancement of carrier mobility. It has been found that the reduced dimensionality is not the only cause for the enhancement of mobility in this case. Ionized impurity scattering, which is one of the major contributer to carrier scattering, is significantly suppressed as the carriers are naturally separated from the ionized centers. A recent experimental finding of very high electron mobility in wedge shaped GaN nanowall networks has been analyzed in the light of this theoretical reckoning. PMID:27210269

  6. Polarization induced two dimensional confinement of carriers in wedge shaped polar semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deb, S.; Bhasker, H. P.; Thakur, Varun; Shivaprasad, S. M.; Dhar, S.

    2016-05-01

    A novel route to achieve two dimensional (2D) carrier confinement in a wedge shaped wall structure made of a polar semiconductor has been demonstrated theoretically. Tapering of the wall along the direction of the spontaneous polarization leads to the development of charges of equal polarity on the two inclined facades of the wall. Polarization induced negative (positive) charges on the facades can push the electrons (holes) inward for a n-type (p-type) material which results in the formation of a 2D electron (hole) gas at the central plane and ionized donors (acceptors) at the outer edges of the wall. The theory shows that this unique mode of 2D carrier confinement can indeed lead to a significant enhancement of carrier mobility. It has been found that the reduced dimensionality is not the only cause for the enhancement of mobility in this case. Ionized impurity scattering, which is one of the major contributer to carrier scattering, is significantly suppressed as the carriers are naturally separated from the ionized centers. A recent experimental finding of very high electron mobility in wedge shaped GaN nanowall networks has been analyzed in the light of this theoretical reckoning.

  7. Ingestion of plastic debris by Laysan albatrosses and wedge-tailed shearwaters in the Hawaiian Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fry, D.M.; Fefer, S.I.; Sileo, L.

    1987-01-01

    Surveys of Laysan Albatross and Wedge-tailed Shearwaters on Midway and Oahu Island, Hawaii, identified a high proportion of birds with plastic in the upper gastrointestinal tract, representing hazards to the health of adult birds and their chicks. Fifty Laysan Albatross chicks were examined for plastic items lodged within the upper digestive tract. Forty-five (90%) contained plastic, including 3 chicks having proventricular impactions or ulcerative lesions. Plastic items in 21 live albatross chicks weighed a mean of 35.7 g chicka??1 (range 1a??175 g). Four dead birds contained 14a??175 g (mean 76.7 g). Two of four adult albatross examined contained plastic in the gut. Laysan albatross chicks have the highest reported incidence and amount of ingested plastic of any seabird species. Twelve of 20 adult Wedge-tailed Shearwaters (60%) contained plastic particles 2a??4 mm in diameter. Impaction did not appear to be a significant hazard for adult shearwaters. Shearwater chicks were not examined. Chemical toxicity of plastic polymers, plasticizers and antioxidant additives is low, although many pigments are toxic and plastics may serve as vehicles for the adsorption of organochlorine pollutants from sea water, and the toxicity of plastics is unlikely to pose significant hazard compared to obstruction and impaction of the gut.

  8. Enhanced performance of fast-response 3-hole wedge probes for transonic flows in axial turbomachinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delhaye, D.; Paniagua, G.; Fernández Oro, J. M.; Dénos, R.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the development and application of a three-sensor wedge probe to measure unsteady aerodynamics in a transonic turbine. CFD has been used to perform a detailed uncertainty analysis related to probe-induced perturbations, in particular the separation zones appearing on the wedge apex. The effects of the Reynolds and Mach numbers are studied using both experimental data together with CFD simulations. The angular range of the probe and linearity of the calibration maps are enhanced with a novel zonal calibration technique, used for the first time in compressible flows. The data reduction methodology is explained and demonstrated with measurements performed in a single-stage high-pressure turbine mounted in the compression tube facility of the von Karman Institute. The turbine was operated at subsonic and transonic pressure ratios (2.4 and 5.1) for a Reynolds number of 106, representative of modern engine conditions. Complete maps of the unsteady flow angle and rotor outlet Mach number are documented. These data allow the study of secondary flows and rotor trailing edge shocks.

  9. Development and Status of Cu Ball/Wedge Bonding in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider-Ramelow, Martin; Geißler, Ute; Schmitz, Stefan; Grübl, Wolfgang; Schuch, Bernhard

    2013-03-01

    Starting in the 1980s and continuing right into the last decade, a great deal of research has been published on Cu ball/wedge (Cu B/W) wire bonding. Despite this, the technology has not been established in industrial manufacturing to any meaningful extent. Only spikes in the price of Au, improvements in equipment and techniques, and better understanding of the Cu wire-bonding process have seen Cu B/W bonding become more widespread—initially primarily for consumer goods manufacturing. Cu wire bonding is now expected to soon be used for at least 20% of all ball/wedge-bonded components, and its utilization in more sophisticated applications is around the corner. In light of this progress, the present paper comprehensively reviews the existing literature on this topic and discusses wire-bonding materials, equipment, and tools in the ongoing development of Cu B/W bonding technology. Key bonding techniques, such as flame-off, how to prevent damage to the chip (cratering), and bond formation on various common chip and substrate finishes are also described. Furthermore, apart from discussing quality assessment of Cu wire bonds in the initial state, the paper also provides an overview of Cu bonding reliability, in particular regarding Cu balls on Al metalization at high temperatures and in humidity (including under the influence of halide ions).

  10. Joule-Heating-Induced Damage in Cu-Al Wedge Bonds Under Current Stressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tsung-Han; Lin, Yu-Min; Ouyang, Fan-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Copper wires are increasingly used to replace gold wires in wire-bonding technology owing to their better electrical properties and lower cost. However, not many studies have been conducted on electromigration-induced failure of Cu wedge bonds on Al metallization. In this study, we investigated the failure mechanism of Cu-Al wedge bonds under high current stressing from 4 × 104 A/cm2 to 1 × 105 A/cm2 at ambient temperature of 175°C. The resistance evolution of samples during current stressing and the microstructure of the joint interface between the Cu wire and Al-Si bond pad were examined. The results showed that abnormal crack formation accompanying significant intermetallic compound growth was observed at the second joint of the samples, regardless of the direction of electric current for both current densities of 4 × 104 A/cm2 and 8 × 104 A/cm2. We propose that this abnormal crack formation at the second joint is mainly due to the higher temperature induced by the greater Joule heating at the second joint for the same current stressing, because of its smaller bonded area compared with the first joint. The corresponding fluxes induced by the electric current and chemical potential difference between Cu and Al were calculated and compared to explain the failure mechanism. For current density of 1 × 105 A/cm2, the Cu wire melted within 0.5 h owing to serious Joule heating.

  11. Opening the Creative Mind of High Need for Cognitive Closure Individuals through Activation of Uncreative Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Lay See; Leung, Angela K.-Y.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on the integrative system theory of creativity combining the person, process, and press perspectives, this research offers the first evidence of how high-need-for-cognitive-closure (NFC) individuals' creative mind can be opened up, by making them become more cognizant of uncreative ideas as consensually invalid solutions to creative…

  12. The Fate of an Innovation: Open Education in Victorian High Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Ronald Charles

    This study compares open education groups and traditional education groups with respect to student attitudes toward high school; creative thinking of students; collaborative behavior among students; and student preferences for intellectual activities, activities involving change or sameness, and activities involving autonomy or dependence. Groups…

  13. Simple ideal gas model of the Pavlovskii high-explosive opening switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, T. J.

    1983-08-01

    The behavior of the Pavlovskii type high-explosive opening switch is modeled using an ideal gas formulation. It is shown that this simple 1 dimensional model agrees with experiment during early arc compression but that at later times the process exhibits a more complex behavior, resulting from turbulent mixing.

  14. My Former Students' Reflections on Having an Openly Gay Teacher in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macgillivray, Ian

    2008-01-01

    This study examines how high school students were affected by having an openly gay teacher and compares its results to a previous study (Rofes, 2000). The author's lesbian, gay, or bisexual students experienced a sense of relief that they could finally feel comfortable about themselves, as well as feeling happy that others in the school were…

  15. "OpenLAB": A 2-Hour PCR-Based Practical for High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouakaze, Caroline; Eschbach, Judith; Fouquerel, Elise; Gasser, Isabelle; Kieffer, Emmanuelle; Krieger, Sophie; Milosevic, Sara; Saandi, Thoueiba; Florentz, Catherine; Marechal-Drouard, Laurence; Labouesse, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The Strasbourg University PhD school in Life and Health Sciences launched an initiative called "OpenLAB." This project was developed in an effort to help high school teenagers understand theoretical and abstract concepts in genetics. A second objective of this program is to help students in defining their future orientation and to attract them to…

  16. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Oblique Shock Wave Reflection from a Water Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Qian; Jeon, Hongjoo; Eliasson, Veronica

    2015-11-01

    Shock wave interaction with solid wedges at different inclination angles has been an area of much research studied in the past, but not many results have been obtained for shock wave reflection from liquid wedges. To find the transition angle from regular to irregular reflection of shock wave reflection over liquid wedges - both Newtonian and non-Newtonian liquids - we used a combination of experimental and numerical methods. In experiments, an inclined shock tube with adjustable inclination angle and a test section filled with the liquid of interest was used. Simulations were performed using a collection of CFD and CSD solvers to simulate the same situation as in the experiments. Results show that the transition angles for liquid wedges is different from smooth solid wedges, but agree fairly well if one assumes a certain surface roughness of the solid wedge.

  17. Assessment of tennis elbow using the Marcy Wedge-Pro.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R W; Mani, R; Cawley, M I; Englisch, W; Eckenberger, P

    1993-01-01

    The Marcy Wedge-Pro (MWP), a device used in training by tennis players, was employed in the assessment of tennis elbow. The MWP was used to measure the ability of patients to perform wrist extension exercises, since pain resulting from this specific activity is a prominent symptom of the condition. The MWP results were compared with clinical measures and found to identify accurately patients who responded to treatment (P < 0.05). This study illustrates the potential of the MWP to assess tennis elbow quantitatively. Images Figure 1 PMID:8130959

  18. Nonlinear Instability of Hypersonic Flow past a Wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seddougui, Sharon O.; Bassom, Andrew P.

    1991-01-01

    The nonlinear stability of a compressible flow past a wedge is investigated in the hypersonic limit. The analysis follows the ideas of a weakly nonlinear approach. Interest is focussed on Tollmien-Schlichting waves governed by a triple deck structure and it is found that the attached shock can profoundly affect the stability characteristics of the flow. In particular, it is shown that nonlinearity tends to have a stabilizing influence. The nonlinear evolution of the Tollmien-Schlichting mode is described in a number of asymptotic limits.

  19. Structure of an oblique detonation wave induced by a wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Liu, Y.-S.; Wu, D.; Wang, J.-P.

    2016-03-01

    The structure of an oblique detonation wave (ODW) induced by a wedge is investigated via numerical simulations and Rankine-Hugoniot analysis. The two-dimensional Euler equations coupled with a two-step chemical reaction model are solved. In the numerical results, four configurations of the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) ODW reflection (overall Mach reflection, Mach reflection, regular reflection, and non-reflection) are observed to take place sequentially as the inflow Mach number increases. According to the numerical and analytical results, the change of the CJ ODW reflection configuration results from the interaction among the ODW, the CJ ODW, and the centered expansion wave.

  20. Exploration of Salt Wedge Dynamics in the Columbia River Estuary Using Optical Measurements of Internal Ship Wakes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, R. A.; Greydanus, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    In May of 2013 and beyond, Argus optical measurements of the mouth of the Columbia River estuary and plume were collected as part of the RIVET II multi-investigator field experiment. One surprise was the strength of eddy and internal wave signatures observed in movies computed from one-minute averages of high-frequency snapshots (such that gravity waves were averaged out but slicks and variable surface roughness remained). In particular, passing ships left wakes that propagated away at speeds on the order of 0.5 m/s, much slower than gravity waves and presumably surface manifestations of internal waves associated with the time-varying salt-wedge. Thus, these internal ship wakes appear to act as probes of internal stratification dynamics. This paper will explore the time variations of these internal wakes and relate them to corresponding variations in the estuary salt wedge.

  1. Surface acoustic admittance of highly porous open-cell, elastic foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    This work presents a comprehensive study of the surface acoustic admittance properties of graded sizes of open-cell foams that are highly porous and elastic. The intrinsic admittance as well as properties of samples of finite depth were predicted and then measured for sound at normal incidence over a frequency range extending from about 35-3500 Hz. The agreement between theory and experiment for a range of mean pore size and volume porosity is excellent. The implications of fibrous structure on the admittance of open-cell foams is quite evident from the results.

  2. Open Science CBS Neuroimaging Repository: Sharing ultra-high-field MR images of the brain.

    PubMed

    Tardif, Christine Lucas; Schäfer, Andreas; Trampel, Robert; Villringer, Arno; Turner, Robert; Bazin, Pierre-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging at ultra high field opens the door to quantitative brain imaging at sub-millimeter isotropic resolutions. However, novel image processing tools to analyze these new rich datasets are lacking. In this article, we introduce the Open Science CBS Neuroimaging Repository: a unique repository of high-resolution and quantitative images acquired at 7 T. The motivation for this project is to increase interest for high-resolution and quantitative imaging and stimulate the development of image processing tools developed specifically for high-field data. Our growing repository currently includes datasets from MP2RAGE and multi-echo FLASH sequences from 28 and 20 healthy subjects respectively. These datasets represent the current state-of-the-art in in-vivo relaxometry at 7 T, and are now fully available to the entire neuroimaging community. PMID:26318051

  3. On the Use of a Driven Wedge Test to Acquire Dynamic Fracture Energies of Bonded Beam Specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Dillard, David A.; Pohilt, David; Jacob, George Chennakattu; Starbuck, Michael; Rakesh, Kapania

    2011-01-01

    A driven wedge test is used to characterize the mode I fracture resistance of adhesively bonded composite beam specimens over a range of crosshead rates up to 1 m/s. The shorter moment arms (between wedge contact and crack tip) significantly reduce inertial effects and stored energy in the debonded adherends, when compared with conventional means of testing double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens. This permitted collecting an order of magnitude more crack initiation events per specimen than could be obtained with end-loaded DCB specimens bonded with an epoxy exhibiting significant stick-slip behavior. The localized contact of the wedge with the adherends limits the amount of both elastic and kinetic energy, significantly reduces crack advance during slip events, and facilitates higher resolution imaging of the fracture zone with high speed imaging. The method appears to work well under both quasi-static and high rate loading, consistently providing substantially more discrete fracture events for specimens exhibiting pronounced stick-slip failures. Deflections associated with beam transverse shear and root rotation for the shorter beams were not negligible, so simple beam theory was inadequate for obtaining qualitative fracture energies. Finite element analysis of the specimens, however, showed that fracture energies were in good agreement with values obtained from traditional DCB tests. The method holds promise for use in dynamic testing and for characterizing bonded or laminated materials exhibiting significant stick slip behavior, reducing the number of specimens required to characterize a sufficient number of fracture events.

  4. SPIM-fluid: open source light-sheet based platform for high-throughput imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gualda, Emilio J.; Pereira, Hugo; Vale, Tiago; Estrada, Marta Falcão; Brito, Catarina; Moreno, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy has recently emerged as the technique of choice for obtaining high quality 3D images of whole organisms/embryos with low photodamage and fast acquisition rates. Here we present an open source unified implementation based on Arduino and Micromanager, which is capable of operating Light Sheet Microscopes for automatized 3D high-throughput imaging on three-dimensional cell cultures and model organisms like zebrafish, oriented to massive drug screening. PMID:26601007

  5. SPIM-fluid: open source light-sheet based platform for high-throughput imaging.

    PubMed

    Gualda, Emilio J; Pereira, Hugo; Vale, Tiago; Estrada, Marta Falcão; Brito, Catarina; Moreno, Nuno

    2015-11-01

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy has recently emerged as the technique of choice for obtaining high quality 3D images of whole organisms/embryos with low photodamage and fast acquisition rates. Here we present an open source unified implementation based on Arduino and Micromanager, which is capable of operating Light Sheet Microscopes for automatized 3D high-throughput imaging on three-dimensional cell cultures and model organisms like zebrafish, oriented to massive drug screening. PMID:26601007

  6. Late Holocene ice wedges near Fairbanks, Alaska, USA: environmental setting and history of growth.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, T.D.; Ager, T.A.; Robinson, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    Test trenches excavated into muskeg near Fairbanks in 1969 exposed a polygonal network of active ice wedges. The history of ice-wedge growth shows that wedges can form and grow to more than 1m apparent width under mean annual temperatures that probably are close to those of the Fairbanks area today (-3.5oC) and under vegetation cover similar to that of the interior Alaskan boreal forest. The commonly held belief that ice wedges develop only below mean annual air temperatures of -6 to -8oC in the zone of continuous permafrost is invalid.-from Authors

  7. Perspectives on open access high resolution digital elevation models to produce global flood hazard layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampson, Christopher; Smith, Andrew; Bates, Paul; Neal, Jeffrey; Trigg, Mark

    2015-12-01

    Global flood hazard models have recently become a reality thanks to the release of open access global digital elevation models, the development of simplified and highly efficient flow algorithms, and the steady increase in computational power. In this commentary we argue that although the availability of open access global terrain data has been critical in enabling the development of such models, the relatively poor resolution and precision of these data now limit significantly our ability to estimate flood inundation and risk for the majority of the planet's surface. The difficulty of deriving an accurate 'bare-earth' terrain model due to the interaction of vegetation and urban structures with the satellite-based remote sensors means that global terrain data are often poorest in the areas where people, property (and thus vulnerability) are most concentrated. Furthermore, the current generation of open access global terrain models are over a decade old and many large floodplains, particularly those in developing countries, have undergone significant change in this time. There is therefore a pressing need for a new generation of high resolution and high vertical precision open access global digital elevation models to allow significantly improved global flood hazard models to be developed.

  8. Human-like characteristics for high degree of freedom robotic door-opening end-effector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Jeremy P.; Campagna, Frank

    2011-05-01

    In the field of military Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV's), military units are forced to sweep largely populated cities and towns in search of hostile enemies. These urban types of operations are referred to as MOUT (Military Operations on Urban Terrain). During urban operations, these UGV's encounter difficulties when opening doors. Current manipulator end effectors have these difficulties, because they are not designed to mimic human hand operations. This paper explains the mechanical nature of the Modular Universal Door Opening End-effector (MUDOE). MUDOE is a result of our development research to improve robotic manipulators ability to negotiate closed doors. The presented solution has the ability to mimic human hand characteristics when opening doors. The end-effector possesses an ability to maintain a high Degree of Freedom (DoF), and grasp the doorknob by applying equally distributed forces to all points of contact.

  9. Preliminary engineering study: Quick opening valve MSFC high Reynolds number wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    FluiDyne Engineering Corporation has conducted a preliminary engineering study of a quick-opening valve for the MSFC High Reynolds Number Wind Tunnel under NASA Contract NAS8-35056. The subject valve is intended to replace the Mylar diaphragm system as the flow initiation device for the tunnel. Only valves capable of opening within 0.05 sec. and providing a minimum of 11.4 square feet of flow area were considered. Also, the study focused on valves which combined the quick-opening and tight shutoff features in a single unit. A ring sleeve valve concept was chosen for refinement and pricing. Sealing for tight shutoff, ring sleeve closure release and sleeve actuation were considered. The resulting cost estimate includes the valve and requisite modifications to the facility to accommodate the valve as well as the associated design and development work.

  10. Open Access Publishing in High-Energy Physics: the SCOAP3 Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mele, S.

    2010-10-01

    Scholarly communication in High-Energy Physics (HEP) shows traits very similar to Astronomy and Astrophysics: pervasiveness of Open Access to preprints through community-based services; a culture of openness and sharing among its researchers; a compact number of yearly articles published by a relatively small number of journals which are dear to the community. These aspects have led HEP to spearhead an innovative model for the transition of its scholarly publishing to Open Access. The Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics (SCOAP) aims to be a central body to finance peer-review service rather than the purchase of access to information as in the traditional subscription model, with all articles in the discipline eventually available in Open Access. Sustainable funding to SCOAP would come from libraries, library consortia and HEP funding agencies, through a re-direction of funds currently spent for subscriptions to HEP journals. This paper presents the cultural and bibliometric factors at the roots of SCOAP and the current status of this worldwide initiative.

  11. Partially coherent electromagnetic beams propagating through double-wedge depolarizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sande, J. Carlos G.; Piquero, Gemma; Santarsiero, Massimo; Gori, Franco

    2014-03-01

    The irradiance and polarization characteristics of quasi-monochromatic partially coherent electromagnetic beams are analyzed when they propagate after passing through a deterministic linear optical element, i.e., an optical element that can be represented by a Jones matrix. A class of such optical elements, which includes double-wedge depolarizers and polarization gratings, is defined and studied in detail. Analytical expressions are obtained for the case of double-wedge depolarizers and examples are given for an incident Gaussian Schell-model beam. For such an input beam, the effects on the irradiance and degree of polarization of the field propagating beyond the optical element are investigated in detail. A rich variety of behaviors is obtained by varying the beam size, coherence width and polarization state of the input field. The results not only provide a mathematical extension of well-known results to the domain of partial coherence, but they also exemplify mixing between coherence and polarization, which is, of course, not possible if, for example, fully spatially coherent fields are analyzed.

  12. Mass stranding of wedge-tailed shearwater chicks in Hawaii.

    PubMed

    Work, T M; Rameyer, R A

    1999-07-01

    Unusual numbers of wedge-tailed shearwater (Puffinus pacificus) chicks stranded on Oahu (Hawaii, USA) in 1994. Compared to healthy wedge-tailed shearwater (WTSW) chicks, stranded chicks were underweight, dehydrated, leukopenic, lymphopenic, eosinopenic, and heterophilic; some birds were toxemic and septic. Stranded chicks also were hypoglycemic and had elevated aspartate amino transferase levels. Most chicks apparently died from emaciation, dehydration, or bacteremia. Because many birds with bacteremia also had severe necrosis of the gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa associated with bacteria, we suspect the GI tract to be the source of disseminated bacterial infection. The identity of the bacteria was not confirmed. The daily number of chicks stranded was significantly related to average wind speeds, and the mortality coincided with the fledging period for WTSW. Strong southeasterly winds were a distinguishing meteorologic factor in 1994 and contributed to the distribution of stranded chicks on Oahu. More objective data on WTSW demographics would enhance future efforts to determine predisposing causes of WTSW wrecks and their effects on seabird colonies. PMID:10479083

  13. Substorm Current Wedge as a Combined Effect of Wedgelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding how the substorm current wedge (SCW) is formed is crucial to solving the substorm mystery. One recent idea on the SCW formation is the "wedgelets" picture, which proposes that dipolarizing flux bundles (DFBs) are the building elements of an SCW. (A DFB is a ~1-3 RE wide flux tube with stronger magnetic field than the ambient plasma in the magnetotail; its leading edge is known as a "dipolarization front", or "reconnection front", the product of near-Earth reconnection). Although each DFB carries field-aligned currents (FACs) in similar configuration to an SCW, it is unclear how the DFBs combine to become the large-scale (several magnetic local times wide) region-1-sense (towards Earth at the dawn sector of the magnetotail and away from Earth at the dusk sector) FACs of the SCW. To answer this question, we investigate the FACs of DFBs statistically using THEMIS data. Our results suggest that at the dawn (dusk) sector of the magnetotail, a DFB has more FAC towards (away from) Earth than away from (towards) Earth, so that the net FAC is towards (away from) Earth. The combined effect of many DFBs is therefore the same as the large-scale region-1-sense SCW, supporting the idea that "wedgelets" comprise the large scale substorm current wedge.

  14. Mass stranding of wedge-tailed shearwater chicks in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Rameyer, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    Unusual numbers of wedge-tailed shearwater (Puffinus pacificus) chicks stranded on Oahu (Hawaii, USA) in 1994. Compared to healthy wedge-tailed shearwater (WTSW) chicks, stranded chicks were underweight, dehydrated, leukopenic, lymphopenic, eosinopenic, and heterophilic; some birds were toxemic and septic. Stranded chicks also were hypoglycemic and had elevated aspartate amino transferase levels. Most chicks apparently died from emaciation, dehydration, or bacteremia. Because many birds with bacteremia also had severe necrosis of the gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa associated with bacteria, we suspect the GI tract to be the source of disseminated bacterial infection. The identity of the bacteria was not confirmed. The daily number of chicks stranded was significantly related to average wind speeds, and the mortality coincided with the fledging period for WTSW. Strong southeasterly winds were a distinguishing meteorologic factor in 1994 and contributed to the distribution of stranded chicks on Oahu. More objective data on WTSW demographics would enhance future efforts to determine predisposing causes of WTSW wrecks and their effects on seabird colonies.

  15. Growth of the deposit wedge in the mountain reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Song, G.

    2011-12-01

    The sedimentary problem of mountain reservoirs in Taiwan is getting serious year by year.Due to eroded sediments enter downstream reservoirs,the loss of sediment transport capacity may cause deposition of sediment in reservoirs.This phenomenon make problems to small mountain reservoirs.To realize the interaction between deposit wedges and mountain reservoirs,we selected Wushe reservoir which is situated in central Taiwan for a case study. Wushe reservoir is long and narrow.In recent years,most sediment is introduced during rain events that now accompany climate change are very important in sediment supply.In this thesis,we collected data of underwater landform and sub-bottom bedding information by using high resolution Multibeam Survey System(MBS) and seismic-reflection system.Up to now,we already had the bathymetric data for more than ten years,moreover,in 2010,we used 3.5kHz sub-bottom seismic profiler to analysis the sedimentary bedding situation in this area.These methods provide us accurate reservoir topography,sediment accumulation and the major ways of sediment transportation.The study purposes are as follows: First,according to the available underwater data for last ten years,we recognize the geomorphological characters of sedimentation as well as complete the mappings.Comparing to bathymetric images each year,we evaluate the carried ways of sediment.The flow water which enters this area transports along the thalweg,which in eastern reservoir.The range of water level variation cause alteration of sedimentary morphology,it also affects the scope of alluvial fan.The alluvial fan is located in the middle of the reservoir,the edge of it had moved forward 500 meters for last ten years.The annual mean of forward velocity was 50 meters,the elevation of fan edge also accelerated 10 meters per year.In a word,the large volume of the sedimentary delta is in Wushe reservoir now. Second,trying to clarify the composition of sedimentation and explain the sub

  16. Robotic-assisted laparoscopic wedge resection of a gastric leiomyoma with intraoperative ultrasound localization.

    PubMed

    Abdel Khalek, Mohamed; Joshi, Virendra; Kandil, Emad

    2011-12-01

    Gastric leiomyoma is a rare gastric neoplasm that traditionally has been resected for negative margins using an open approach. The laparoscopic approach may also treat various gastric tumors without opening the gastric cavity. Robotic surgery was developed in response to the limitations and drawbacks of laparoscopic surgery. Herein, we describe a case of robotic-assisted laparoscopic wedge resection of a gastric leiomyoma. A 63-year-old male complaining of abdominal pain was found to have an incidental 3 cm antral mass on an abdominal CT. Endoscopy with endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) confirmed a submucosal mass. Biopsy of the lesion was consistent with a leiomyoma. The DaVinci robotic system was used for partial gastrectomy and reconstruction, with the addition of intraoperative ultrasound to localize the lesion intraoperatively. Pathological examination of the resected mass confirmed a diagnosis of leiomyoma with negative margins. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The patient was discharged home on the second postoperative day. Intraoperative endoscopic ultrasound is a safe technique that may improve the success rate of surgery by confirming the location of the lesion. Robotic assistance in gastric resection offers an easy minimally invasive approach to such tumors. This approach can achieve adequate surgical margins and lead to short hospital stays. PMID:21919811

  17. Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic wedge hepatic resection with a water-jet hybrid knife in a non-survival porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hong; Jiang, Sheng-Jun; Li, Bin; Fu, Deng-Ke; Xin, Pei; Wang, Yong-Guang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To explore the feasibility of a water-jet hybrid knife to facilitate wedge hepatic resection using a natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) approach in a non-survival porcine model. METHODS: The Erbe Jet2 water-jet system allows a needleless, tissue-selective hydro-dissection with a pre-selected pressure. Using this system, wedge hepatic resection was performed through three natural routes (trans-anal, trans-vaginal and trans-umbilical) in three female pigs weighing 35 kg under general anesthesia. Entry into the peritoneal cavity was via a 15-mm incision using a hook knife. The targeted liver segment was marked by an APC probe, followed by wedge hepatic resection performed using a water-jet hybrid knife with the aid of a 4-mm transparent distance soft cap mounted onto the tip of the endoscope for holding up the desired plane. The exposed vascular and ductal structures were clipped with Endoclips. Hemostasis was applied to the bleeding cut edges of the liver parenchyma by electrocautery. After the procedure, the incision site was left open, and the animal was euthanized followed by necropsy. RESULTS: Using the Erbe Jet2 water-jet system, trans-anal and trans-vaginal wedge hepatic resection was successfully performed in two pigs without laparoscopic assistance. Trans-umbilical attempt failed due to an unstable operating platform. The incision for peritoneal entry took 1 min, and about 2 h was spent on excision of the liver tissue. The intra-operative blood loss ranged from 100 to 250 mL. Microscopically, the hydro-dissections were relatively precise and gentle, preserving most vessels. CONCLUSION: The Erbe Jet2 water-jet system can safely accomplish non-anatomic wedge hepatic resection in NOTES, which deserves further studies to shorten the dissection time. PMID:21412502

  18. Supercritical aqueous fluids in subduction zones carrying carbon and sulfur: oxidants for the mantle wedge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sverjensky, Dimitri; Manning, Craig

    2014-05-01

    magnesite, the C/S ratio can vary from 0.2 to 3.5 when temperature varies from 650 to 750 °C at 4 GPa. Fe concentrations remain negligible. These results strongly suggest that aqueous subarc eclogitic fluids that evolve to QFM +3 to +4, perhaps by reaction with metamorphosed Fe-oxide-bearing sediments, could transport significant amounts of C and/or S into the mantle wedge environment depending on the temperature. Hotter subduction should favor high C/S fluids, whereas colder subduction should favor low C/S fluids. Aqueous Fe transport is unlikely to be playing a significant role in oxidizing the mantle wedge. Sverjensky, D. A., Harrison, B., and Azzolini, D., 2014. Water in the deep Earth: the dielectric constant and the solubilities of quartz and corundum to 60 kb and 1,200°C. Geochim. et Cosmochim. Acta (in press).

  19. Tectonic wedging, back-thrusting and basin development in the frontal parts of the Mesoproterozoic Karagwe-Ankole belt in NW Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koegelenberg, C.; Kisters, A. F. M.

    2014-09-01

    Structural complexities in the Mesoproterozoic Karagwe-Ankole fold belt in northwest Tanzania have led to conflicting interpretations of regional kinematics and the geodynamic significance of the belt. Structural mapping of an eastern portion of the belt indicates that the regional-scale (>100 km) Mugera-Nyakahura basement inlier may be considered a forethrusted tectonic wedge. Tectonic wedging in the frontal parts of the belt occurred during top-to-the southeast thick-skinned thrusting of the gneissic Archaean basement. The diagnostic feature of tectonic wedging is the reversal of vergence directions of kinematic fabrics on either side of the basement wedge, resulting in hinterland-directed, top-to-the northwest kinematics in front and on top of the wedge. Strain is localised into the often graphitic metapelitic rocks of the Upper Muyaga Group. The mainly coarse-grained clastic Mesoproterozoic sediments of the Bukoba Group represent the foreland, molasse-type deposits of the Karagwe-Ankole fold belt. The only gently folded Bukoba Group is separated from the underthrusted, highly deformed Muyaga Group by a passive roof thrust. This corresponds to the regional-scale asymmetry of the synclinal structure of the Bukoba basin in the frontal parts of the belt. The gentle folding is the result of the underthrusting and lifting of the Bukoba sediments above the basement wedge creating a triangle zone. The kinematics and geometry of the frontal parts of the Karagwe-Ankole belt described here confirm the belt to represent a top-to-the-east and -southeast verging foreland fold-and-thrust belt. The actual timing of deformation is, at present, unknown, but regional-scale kinematics and the metamorphic zonation are compatible with an origin of the belt during convergence between the Congo and Tanzania Cratons in the west.

  20. Ice wedge growth in the Fox Permafrost Tunnel dates to marine isotope stage II?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachniet, M. S.; Sloat, A. R.; Lawson, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    We dated a Pleistocene ice wedge (wedge 50S) and its host sediments from the CRREL Fox Permafrost Tunnel near Fairbanks, Alaska with twenty radiocarbon analyses on wood, dispersed organic material, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The age of a wood fragment within the host sediments is 35,570 ± 340 14C yr BP and is thus a maximum age of wedge growth. Previous 14C ages of dispersed organic matter within the ice wedge returned ages from 28 to 31 14C ka, and the wedge is overlain by sediment in which a wood fragment returned an age of 30,090 ± 300 14C yr BP, thus suggesting an age of between 28-35 14C ka BP. Such an age is surprising because it occurs during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) III, not the colder intervals of MIS II. To constrain better the wedge age for paleoclimatic analysis, we determined DIC and DOC age pairs within four ice blocks subsampled from the wedge. Our new DIC/DOC dates are up to 8000 years younger than dispersed organic material in the wedge. The DIC/DOC age pairs return divergent ages, which suggest fluctuating proportions of carbon dioxide and organic carbon with variable radiocarbon ages entrapped within the ice wedge. Because the organic matter ages are older than the DIC/DOC ages, we conclude that they represent 'detrital' maximum ages for the ice wedge and represent the timing of permafrost aggradation prior to wedge growth. Based on the assumption that the ice ages can only be contaminated by old 'detrital' carbon associated with the stratigraphically older host sediments, the youngest dates likely provide the best estimate of when the ice wedge was last active. The youngest age we determined is 21,600 ± 140 14C yr BP (on DOC) recovered from inclined folia that parallel the outer wedge margin at ca. 3.25 cm from the left-most edge, which corresponds to a calendar age of 25.7 cal ka. This sample location corresponds to the stratigraphically-oldest ice according to standard ice wedge growth models. We

  1. Arc-parallel extension and fluid flow in an ancient accretionary wedge: The San Juan Islands, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schermer, E.R.; Gillaspy, J.R.; Lamb, R.

    2007-01-01

    Structural analysis of the Lopez Structural Complex, a major Late Cretaceous terrane-bounding fault zone in the San Juan thrust system, reveals a sequence of events that provides insight into accretionary wedge mechanics and regional tectonics. After formation of regional ductile flattening and shear-related fabrics, the area was crosscut by brittle structures including: (1) southwest-vergent thrusts, (2) extension veins and normal faults related to northwest-southeast extension, and (3) conjugate strike-slip structures that record northwest-southeast extension and northeast-southwest shortening. Aragonite-bearing veins are associated with thrust and normal faults, but only rarely with strike-slip faults. High-pressure, low-temperature (HP-LT) minerals constrain the conditions for brittle deformation to ???20 km and <250 ??C. The presence of similar structures elsewhere indicates that the brittle structural sequence is typical of the San Juan nappes. Sustained HP-LT conditions are possible only if structures formed in an accretionary prism during active subduction, which suggests that these brittle structures record internal wedge deformation at depth and early during uplift of the San Juan nappes. The structures are consistent with orogen-normal shortening and vertical thickening followed by vertical thinning and along-strike extension. The kinematic evolution may be related initially to changes in wedge strength, followed by response to overthickening of the wedge in an unbuttressed, obliquely convergent setting. The change in vein mineralogy indicates that exhumation occurred prior to the strike-slip event. The pressure and temperature conditions and spatial and temporal extent of small faults associated with fluid flow suggest a link between these structures and the silent earthquake process. ?? 2007 Geological Society of America.

  2. Underground thermo-erosion of ice wedges: numerical simulation of tunnel freeze- back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Fortier, D.

    2008-12-01

    On Bylot Island in the Eastern Canadian Arctic archipelago, Fortier et al. (2007) observed and characterized the formation and development of tunnels initiated by the process of underground thermo-erosion of ice wedges networks. These tunnels often collapsed during the course of one or two summers and developed into gullies. However, observations of such tunnels in permafrost exposures indicate that they can be preserved in the permafrost record. The objective of this study is to estimate the freeze-back time of tunnels filled with water and slurry in cold and warm permafrost conditions. Ultimately, the goal is to evaluate time the tunnels remain "open"" for groundwater flow. We used numerical thermal modeling to conduct simple simulations of the conductive heat transfer during freeze-back of the tunnels. The thermal analyses were performed using the GeoslopeTM unsteady finite element heat conduction model TEMP/W. We used Bylot Island, Nunavut, Canada (Mean air temperature around -15 C) as a cold permafrost study case and Beaver Creek, Yukon Territory, Canada (Mean annual air temperature around -5.5C) as a warm permafrost study case. The air temperature was converted to ground surface temperature by the n-factor method. Zero heat flux was applied at the vertical and bottom boundaries due to the permafrost which is several tens to hundreds of meters thick. Based on previous studies, we simulated tunnels partly cut in ice-wedges and in the adjacent permafrost. The syngenetic permafrost of the case studies was assumed to be fully saturated with 110% gravimetric water content. The geometry of the tunnels was based on field measurements on Bylot Island. We considered three scenarios for the slurry filling the tunnels: 1) 100% water; 2) fully saturated sand with 30% gravimetric water content; and 3) an air layer at the top of the tunnel with water and saturated sands partly filling the bottom of the tunnel. We used three water/slurry temperatures: 1) 0.5C which simulates

  3. Mosaic of Wedge, Shark, Half-Dome, Moe and Flat Top

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The front cameras aboard the rover Sojourner imaged several prominent rocks on Sol 44. The highly-textured rock at left is Wedge, and in the background from left to right are Shark, Half-Dome, and Moe. The rectangular rock at right is Flat Top, which earlier close-up images revealed to be made up of elongated pits, possibly made by vesicles from volcanic outgassing or etches caused by weathering.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  4. Laparoscopic versus open radical prostatectomy in high prostate volume cases: impact on oncological and functional results

    PubMed Central

    Alessandro, Sciarra; Alessandro, Gentilucci; Susanna, Cattarino; Michele, Innocenzi; Francesca, Di Quilio; Andrea, Fasulo; heland, Magnus Von; Vincenzo, Gentile; Stefano, Salciccia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background and objective: To prospectively compare the laparoscopic versus open approach to RP in cases with high prostate volume and to evaluate a possible different impact of prostate volume. Materials and Methods: From March 2007 to March 2013 a total of 120 cases with clinically localized prostate cancer (PC) and a prostate volume>70cc identified for radical prostatectomy (RP), were prospectively analyzed in our institute. Patients were offered as surgical technique either an open retropubic or an intraperitoneal laparoscopic (LP) approach. In our population, 54 cases were submitted to LP and 66 to open RP. We analyzed the association of the surgical technique with perioperative, oncological and postoperative functional parameters. Results: In those high prostate volume cases, the surgical technique (laparoscopic versus open) does not represent a significant independent factor able to influence positive surgical margins rates and characteristics (p=0.4974). No significant differences (p>0.05) in the overall rates of positive margins was found, and also no differences following stratification according to the pathological stage and nerve sparing (NS) procedure. The surgical technique was able to significantly and independently influence the hospital stay, time of operation and blood loss (p<0.001). On the contrary, in our population, the surgical technique was not a significant factor influencing all pathological and 1-year oncological or functional outcomes (p>0.05). Conclusions: In our prospective non randomized analysis on high prostate volumes, the laparoscopic approach to RP is able to guarantee the same oncological and functional results of an open approach, maintaining the advantages in terms of perioperative outcomes.

  5. The Open Cloud Testbed: Supporting Open Source Cloud Computing Systems Based on Large Scale High Performance, Dynamic Network Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Robert; Gu, Yunhong; Sabala, Michal; Bennet, Colin; Seidman, Jonathan; Mambratti, Joe

    Recently, a number of cloud platforms and services have been developed for data intensive computing, including Hadoop, Sector, CloudStore (formerly KFS), HBase, and Thrift. In order to benchmark the performance of these systems, to investigate their interoperability, and to experiment with new services based on flexible compute node and network provisioning capabilities, we have designed and implemented a large scale testbed called the Open Cloud Testbed (OCT). Currently OCT has 120 nodes in 4 data centers: Baltimore, Chicago (two locations), and San Diego. In contrast to other cloud testbeds, which are in small geographic areas and which are based on commodity Internet services, the OCT is a wide area testbed and the 4 data centers are connected with a high performance 10Gb/s network, based on a foundation of dedicated lightpaths. This testbed can address the requirements of extremely large data streams that challenge other types of distributed infrastructure. We have also developed several utilities to support the development of cloud computing systems and services, including novel node and network provisioning services, a monitoring system, and an RPC system. In this paper, we describe the OCT concepts, architecture, infrastructure, a few benchmarks that were developed for this platform, interoperability studies, and results.

  6. Wedge and spring assembly for securing coils in electromagnets and dynamoelectric machines

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, M.; Cottingham, J.G.

    1994-12-31

    A wedge and spring assembly for use in electromagnets or dynamoelectric machines having a housing with an axis therethrough and a plurality of coils supported on salient poles that extend radially inward from the housing toward the housing axis to define a plurality of interpole spaces, respectively between the housing and adjacent coils, the interpole spaces each extending in a direction generally parallel to the housing axis. The wedge and spring assembly includes a nonmagnetic retainer spring and a nonmagnetic wedge. The retainer spring is formed to fit into one of the interpole spaces, and has juxtaposed ends defining between them a slit extending in a direction generally parallel to the housing axis. The wedge for insertion into the slit provides an outwardly directed force on respective portions of the juxtaposed ends defining the slit to expand the slit so that respective portions of the retainer spring engage areas of the coils adjacent thereto, thereby resiliently holding the coils against their respective salient poles. Preferably, the spring retainer and wedge are self-locking wherein wedge is fabricated from a material softer than a material the retainer spring is fabricated from, so that the wedge is securely retained in the slit. The retainer spring is generally triangular shaped to fit within the interpole space and fabricated from berryllium-copper alloy, and the wedge is generally T-shaped and fabricated from aluminum. Alternatively, a wedge and spring assembly includes a wedge having divergent sloped surfaces in which each surface and the respective juxtaposed ends of the retainer spring are angled relative to one another so that the wedge is securely retained in the slit by friction existing between its sloped surfaces and the juxtaposed ends of the retaining spring.

  7. AZOrange - High performance open source machine learning for QSAR modeling in a graphical programming environment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Machine learning has a vast range of applications. In particular, advanced machine learning methods are routinely and increasingly used in quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) modeling. QSAR data sets often encompass tens of thousands of compounds and the size of proprietary, as well as public data sets, is rapidly growing. Hence, there is a demand for computationally efficient machine learning algorithms, easily available to researchers without extensive machine learning knowledge. In granting the scientific principles of transparency and reproducibility, Open Source solutions are increasingly acknowledged by regulatory authorities. Thus, an Open Source state-of-the-art high performance machine learning platform, interfacing multiple, customized machine learning algorithms for both graphical programming and scripting, to be used for large scale development of QSAR models of regulatory quality, is of great value to the QSAR community. Results This paper describes the implementation of the Open Source machine learning package AZOrange. AZOrange is specially developed to support batch generation of QSAR models in providing the full work flow of QSAR modeling, from descriptor calculation to automated model building, validation and selection. The automated work flow relies upon the customization of the machine learning algorithms and a generalized, automated model hyper-parameter selection process. Several high performance machine learning algorithms are interfaced for efficient data set specific selection of the statistical method, promoting model accuracy. Using the high performance machine learning algorithms of AZOrange does not require programming knowledge as flexible applications can be created, not only at a scripting level, but also in a graphical programming environment. Conclusions AZOrange is a step towards meeting the needs for an Open Source high performance machine learning platform, supporting the efficient development of

  8. Lateglacial and Holocene isotopic and environmental history of northern coastal Alaska - Results from a buried ice-wedge system at Barrow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Hanno; Schirrmeister, Lutz; Andreev, Andrei; Wagner, Dirk; Hubberten, Hans-W.; Yoshikawa, Kenji; Bobrov, Anatoly; Wetterich, Sebastian; Opel, Thomas; Kandiano, Evgeniya; Brown, Jerry

    2010-12-01

    winter and summer indicators comprehensively describes the seasonality of climate-relevant processes in discrete time intervals. The stable isotope record for the Barrow buried ice-wedge system documents for the first time winter climate change at the Lateglacial-Holocene transition continuously and at relatively high (likely centennial) resolution.

  9. Extension, disruption and translation of an orogenic wedge by exhumation of large ultrahigh pressure terranes: Two examples from the Norwegian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brueckner, H. K.; Cuthbert, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    We propose the thrust-dominated accretion of an orogenic wedge during continental subduction can be succeeded by stretching, disruption and passive transport of the frontal part of the wedge on top of an exhuming high pressure/ultrahigh pressure (HP/UHP) metamorphic terrane. Initial thrusting occurs when cratons collide and one subducts beneath the other into the mantle. The subducted craton undergoes HP/UHP metamorphism while an accretionary orogenic wedge develops at its junction with the overlying craton. The subsequent exhumation of the HP/UHP terrane either by true extension and/or buoyancy-driven extrusion reverses the shear traction along its upper boundary from its earlier foreland-directed thrust motion to hinterland-directed normal displacement. This normal-sense shear stretches the orogenic wedge and can potentially detach a fragment of its frontal part away from the rearward part, allowing it to be carried passively towards the foreland on the exhuming plate with the length of displacement a function of the amount of exhumation of the HP/UHP terrane. The Jotun and Trondheim Basin Nappe Complexes of the Caledonide orogenic wedge in southern and central Scandinavia were thrust (sensu stricto) E/SE onto the Baltic Shield during the Scandian Orogeny when the western edge of Baltica subducted into the mantle beneath Laurentia to form the HP/UHP Western Gneiss Complex (WGC). Kinematic indicators along the basal décollements of orogenic wedge allochthons indicate a change in shear sense from top-E/SE to top-W/NW at the same time (≈415 Ma) radiometric ages indicate the WGC began exhumation from the mantle. The shear traction along the top of the exhuming WGC stretched the Jotun and Trondheim Basin allochthons, then broke them into segments, and finally separated the frontal part of some of the allochthons away from the main body, causing them to be carried passively E/SE as the WGC continued to exhume out of the mantle. The lack of fragmentation and absence

  10. Perceptions of low agency and high sexual openness mediate the relationship between sexualization and sexual aggression.

    PubMed

    Blake, Khandis R; Bastian, Brock; Denson, Thomas F

    2016-09-01

    Researchers have become increasingly interested in the saturation of popular Western culture by female hypersexualization. We provide data showing that men have more sexually aggressive intentions toward women who self-sexualize, and that self-sexualized women are vulnerable to sexual aggression if two qualifying conditions are met. Specifically, if perceivers view self-sexualized women as sexually open and lacking agency (i.e., the ability to influence one's environment), they harbor more sexually aggressive intentions and view women as easier to sexually victimize. In Experiment 1, male participants viewed a photograph of a woman whose self-sexualization was manipulated through revealing versus non-revealing clothing. In subsequent experiments, men and women (Experiment 2) and men only (Experiment 3) viewed a photograph of a woman dressed in non-revealing clothing but depicted as open or closed to sexual activity. Participants rated their perceptions of the woman's agency, then judged how vulnerable she was to sexual aggression (Experiments 1 and 2) or completed a sexually aggressive intentions measure (Experiment 3). Results indicated that both men and women perceived self-sexualized women as more vulnerable to sexual aggression because they assumed those women were highly sexually open and lacked agency. Perceptions of low agency also mediated the relationship between women's perceived sexual openness and men's intentions to sexually aggress. These effects persisted even when we described the self-sexualized woman as possessing highly agentic personality traits and controlled for individual differences related to sexual offending. The current work suggests that perceived agency and sexual openness may inform perpetrator decision-making and that cultural hypersexualization may facilitate sexual aggression. Aggr. Behav. 42:483-497, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26848102

  11. Observations on open and closed string scattering amplitudes at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputa, Pawel; Hirano, Shinji

    2012-02-01

    We study massless open and closed string scattering amplitudes in flat space at high energies. Similarly to the case of AdS space, we demonstrate that, under the T-duality map, the open string amplitudes are given by the exponential of minus minimal surface areas whose boundaries are cusped closed loops formed by lightlike momentum vectors. We show further that the closed string amplitudes are obtained by gluing two copies of minimal surfaces along their cusped lightlike boundaries. This can be thought of as a manifestation of the Kawai-Lewellen-Tye (KLT) relation at high energies. We also discuss the KLT relation in AdS/CFT and its possible connection to amplitudes in mathcal{N} = {8} supergravity as well as the correlator/amplitude duality.

  12. Google Classroom and Open Clusters: An Authentic Science Research Project for High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Chelen H.; Linahan, Marcella; Cuba, Allison Frances; Dickmann, Samantha Rose; Hogan, Eleanor B.; Karos, Demetra N.; Kozikowski, Kendall G.; Kozikowski, Lauren Paige; Nelson, Samantha Brooks; O'Hara, Kevin Thomas; Ropinski, Brandi Lucia; Scarpa, Gabriella; Garmany, Catharine D.

    2016-01-01

    STEM education is about offering unique opportunities to our students. For the past three years, students from two high schools (Breck School in Minneapolis, MN, and Carmel Catholic High School in Mundelein, IL) have collaborated on authentic astronomy research projects. This past year they surveyed archival data of open clusters to determine if a clear turnoff point could be unequivocally determined. Age and distance to each open cluster were calculated. Additionally, students requested time on several telescopes to obtain original data to compare to the archival data. Students from each school worked in collaborative teams, sharing and verifying results through regular online hangouts and chats. Work papers were stored in a shared drive and on a student-designed Google site to facilitate dissemination of documents between the two schools.

  13. Propagation of sound in highly porous open-cell elastic foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, R. F.

    1983-01-01

    This work presents both theoretical predictions and experimental measurements of attenuation and progressive phase constants of sound in open-cell, highly porous, elastic polyurethane foams. The foams are available commercially in graded pore sizes for which information about the static flow resistance, thermal time constant, volume porosity, dynamic structure factor, and speed of sound is known. The analysis is specialized to highly porous foams which can be efficient sound absorbers at audio frequencies. Negligible effect of internal wave coupling on attenuation and phase shift for the frequency range 16-6000 Hz was predicted and no experimentally significant effects were observed in the bulk samples studied. The agreement between predictions and measurements in bulk materials is excellent. The analysis is applicable to both the regular and compressed elastic open-cell foams.

  14. Changing conditions of mantle wedge melting across arc as illustrated by changing iron isotopes compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foden, J. D.; Halverson, G. P.; Sossi, P.; Elburg, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    Active volcanoes in the eastern Sunda Arc , Indonesia are distributed across a wide range of position above the active Benioff Zone. These include the near fore-arc tholeiite suite from Ija volcano on Flores Island which is about 100 Km above the slab. Then at successively greater depths are the archetypal calcalkaline suites of Rinjani and Batur volcanoes on Lombok and Bali and then the rear arc alkalic suites from Tambora, Sangeang Api and Batu Tara. The latter approaching 200km above the slab. The fore-arc volcano Ija is clearly influenced by hydrous fluid flux from the slab, having high Ba/Th and U/Nb ratios. The strongly undersaturated alkalic suites from Tambora and Batu Tara are highly enriched in LIL incompatible elements, but do not have sufficiently anomalously high 87Sr/86Sr or Pb isotopic ratios or low 143Nd/144Nd ratios to explain this anomaly as entirely due to significantly larger components of subducted sediment. This implies that these rear arc volcanoes are the product of smaller percentage melting of the supra-slab mantle wedge. This is also consistent with the determined lower water content of Tambora basalts compared with Ija fore-arc basalts. δ56Fe values were determined and show a systematic increase across the arc that is equivalent to that determined by other workers between some global MORB and OIB suites the bulk earth. This is like across arc variation described elsewhere (New Britain; Dauphas et al., 2009). It appears that this stable isotope fractionation results from the changed mode of melt percolation and extraction from the deeper, rear arc mantle wedge domains compared to the shallow fore-arc.

  15. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1508 - Crib Slat Loading Wedge

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Crib Slat Loading Wedge 1 Figure 1 to Part 1508 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT... Wedge EC03OC91.061 (Secs. 2(f)(1)(D), (q)(1)(A), (s), 3(e)(1), 74 Stat. 372, 374, 375, as amended,...

  16. Pan-Arctic ice-wedge degradation in warming permafrost and its influence on tundra hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljedahl, Anna K.; Boike, Julia; Daanen, Ronald P.; Fedorov, Alexander N.; Frost, Gerald V.; Grosse, Guido; Hinzman, Larry D.; Iijma, Yoshihiro; Jorgenson, Janet C.; Matveyeva, Nadya; Necsoiu, Marius; Raynolds, Martha K.; Romanovsky, Vladimir E.; Schulla, Jörg; Tape, Ken D.; Walker, Donald A.; Wilson, Cathy J.; Yabuki, Hironori; Zona, Donatella

    2016-04-01

    Ice wedges are common features of the subsurface in permafrost regions. They develop by repeated frost cracking and ice vein growth over hundreds to thousands of years. Ice-wedge formation causes the archetypal polygonal patterns seen in tundra across the Arctic landscape. Here we use field and remote sensing observations to document polygon succession due to ice-wedge degradation and trough development in ten Arctic localities over sub-decadal timescales. Initial thaw drains polygon centres and forms disconnected troughs that hold isolated ponds. Continued ice-wedge melting leads to increased trough connectivity and an overall draining of the landscape. We find that melting at the tops of ice wedges over recent decades and subsequent decimetre-scale ground subsidence is a widespread Arctic phenomenon. Although permafrost temperatures have been increasing gradually, we find that ice-wedge degradation is occurring on sub-decadal timescales. Our hydrological model simulations show that advanced ice-wedge degradation can significantly alter the water balance of lowland tundra by reducing inundation and increasing runoff, in particular due to changes in snow distribution as troughs form. We predict that ice-wedge degradation and the hydrological changes associated with the resulting differential ground subsidence will expand and amplify in rapidly warming permafrost regions.

  17. Immediate and 1 week effects of laterally wedge insoles on gait biomechanics in healthy females.

    PubMed

    Weinhandl, Joshua T; Sudheimer, Sarah E; Van Lunen, Bonnie L; Stewart, Kimberly; Hoch, Matthew C

    2016-03-01

    It is estimated that approximately 45% of the U.S. population will develop knee osteoarthritis, a disease that creates significant economic burdens in both direct and indirect costs. Laterally wedged insoles have been frequently recommended to reduce knee abduction moments and to manage knee osteoarthritis. However, it remains unknown whether the lateral wedge will reduce knee abduction moments over a prolonged period of time. Thus, the purposes of this study were to (1) examine the immediate effects of a laterally wedged insole in individuals normally aligned knees and (2) determine prolonged effects after the insole was worn for 1 week. Gait analysis was performed on ten women with and without a laterally wedged insole. After participants wore the wedges for a week, a second gait analysis was performed with and without the insole. The wedged insole did not affect peak knee abduction moment, although there was a significant increase in knee abduction angular impulse after wearing the insoles for 1 week. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in vertical ground reaction force at the instance of peak knee abduction moment with the wedges. While the laterally wedged insole used in the current study did not alter knee abduction moments as expected, other studies have shown alterations. Future studies should also examine a longer acclimation period, the influence of gait speed, and the effect of different shoe types with the insole. PMID:26979900

  18. OpenTopography: Enabling Online Access to High-Resolution Lidar Topography Data and Processing Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, Christopher; Nandigam, Viswanath; Baru, Chaitan; Arrowsmith, J. Ramon

    2013-04-01

    High-resolution topography data acquired with lidar (light detection and ranging) technology are revolutionizing the way we study the Earth's surface and overlying vegetation. These data, collected from airborne, tripod, or mobile-mounted scanners have emerged as a fundamental tool for research on topics ranging from earthquake hazards to hillslope processes. Lidar data provide a digital representation of the earth's surface at a resolution sufficient to appropriately capture the processes that contribute to landscape evolution. The U.S. National Science Foundation-funded OpenTopography Facility (http://www.opentopography.org) is a web-based system designed to democratize access to earth science-oriented lidar topography data. OpenTopography provides free, online access to lidar data in a number of forms, including the raw point cloud and associated geospatial-processing tools for customized analysis. The point cloud data are co-located with on-demand processing tools to generate digital elevation models, and derived products and visualizations which allow users to quickly access data in a format appropriate for their scientific application. The OpenTopography system is built using a service-oriented architecture (SOA) that leverages cyberinfrastructure resources at the San Diego Supercomputer Center at the University of California San Diego to allow users, regardless of expertise level, to access these massive lidar datasets and derived products for use in research and teaching. OpenTopography hosts over 500 billion lidar returns covering 85,000 km2. These data are all in the public domain and are provided by a variety of partners under joint agreements and memoranda of understanding with OpenTopography. Partners include national facilities such as the NSF-funded National Center for Airborne Lidar Mapping (NCALM), as well as non-governmental organizations and local, state, and federal agencies. OpenTopography has become a hub for high-resolution topography

  19. Performance of an isolated two-dimensional wedge nozzle with fixed cowl and variable wedge centerbody at Mach numbers up to 2.01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiden, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation has been conducted to determine the aeropropulsion performance (thrust minus drag) of an isolated, two-dimensional wedge nozzle with a simulated variable-wedge mechanism and a fixed cowl. The investigation was conducted statically and at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.20 in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel and at a Mach number of 2.01 in the Langley 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel. The ratio of exhaust jet total pressure to free-stream static pressure was varied up to 27 depending on free-stream Mach number. The results indicate that the aeropropulsion performance of the two-dimensional fixed-cowl variable-wedge nozzle is slightly lower (0.7 to 1.4 percent of ideal thrust) than that achieved for a two-dimensional wedge nozzle with a translating shroud, although part of the difference in performance is attributed to internal-performance differences. The effects of cowl boattail angle, internal expansion area ratio, and wedge half-angle on the performance of the two-dimensional wedge nozzle are discussed.

  20. Image Harvest: an open-source platform for high-throughput plant image processing and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, Avi C.; Campbell, Malachy T.; Caprez, Adam; Swanson, David R.; Walia, Harkamal

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput plant phenotyping is an effective approach to bridge the genotype-to-phenotype gap in crops. Phenomics experiments typically result in large-scale image datasets, which are not amenable for processing on desktop computers, thus creating a bottleneck in the image-analysis pipeline. Here, we present an open-source, flexible image-analysis framework, called Image Harvest (IH), for processing images originating from high-throughput plant phenotyping platforms. Image Harvest is developed to perform parallel processing on computing grids and provides an integrated feature for metadata extraction from large-scale file organization. Moreover, the integration of IH with the Open Science Grid provides academic researchers with the computational resources required for processing large image datasets at no cost. Image Harvest also offers functionalities to extract digital traits from images to interpret plant architecture-related characteristics. To demonstrate the applications of these digital traits, a rice (Oryza sativa) diversity panel was phenotyped and genome-wide association mapping was performed using digital traits that are used to describe different plant ideotypes. Three major quantitative trait loci were identified on rice chromosomes 4 and 6, which co-localize with quantitative trait loci known to regulate agronomically important traits in rice. Image Harvest is an open-source software for high-throughput image processing that requires a minimal learning curve for plant biologists to analyzephenomics datasets. PMID:27141917

  1. Image Harvest: an open-source platform for high-throughput plant image processing and analysis.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Avi C; Campbell, Malachy T; Caprez, Adam; Swanson, David R; Walia, Harkamal

    2016-05-01

    High-throughput plant phenotyping is an effective approach to bridge the genotype-to-phenotype gap in crops. Phenomics experiments typically result in large-scale image datasets, which are not amenable for processing on desktop computers, thus creating a bottleneck in the image-analysis pipeline. Here, we present an open-source, flexible image-analysis framework, called Image Harvest (IH), for processing images originating from high-throughput plant phenotyping platforms. Image Harvest is developed to perform parallel processing on computing grids and provides an integrated feature for metadata extraction from large-scale file organization. Moreover, the integration of IH with the Open Science Grid provides academic researchers with the computational resources required for processing large image datasets at no cost. Image Harvest also offers functionalities to extract digital traits from images to interpret plant architecture-related characteristics. To demonstrate the applications of these digital traits, a rice (Oryza sativa) diversity panel was phenotyped and genome-wide association mapping was performed using digital traits that are used to describe different plant ideotypes. Three major quantitative trait loci were identified on rice chromosomes 4 and 6, which co-localize with quantitative trait loci known to regulate agronomically important traits in rice. Image Harvest is an open-source software for high-throughput image processing that requires a minimal learning curve for plant biologists to analyzephenomics datasets. PMID:27141917

  2. Numerical investigation of shedding partial cavities over a sharp wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budich, B.; Neuner, S.; Schmidt, S. J.; Adams, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this contribution, we examine transient dynamics and cavitation patterns of periodically shedding partial cavities by numerical simulations. The investigation reproduces reference experiments of the cavitating flow over a sharp wedge. Utilizing a homogeneous mixture model, full compressibility of the two-phase flow of water and water vapor is taken into account by the numerical method. We focus on inertia-dominated mechanisms, thus modeling the flow as inviscid. Based on the assumptions of thermodynamic equilibrium and barotropic flow, the thermodynamic properties are computed from closed-form analytical relations. Emphasis is put on a validation of the employed numerical approach. We demonstrate that computed shedding dynamics are in agreement with the references. Complex flow features observed in the experiments, including cavitating hairpin and horse-shoe vortices, are also predicted by the simulations. Furthermore, a condensation discontinuity occurring during the collapse phase at the trailing portion of the partial cavity is equally obtained.

  3. Defect dynamics in a smectic Grandjean-Cano wedge.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Christophe; Zuodar, Nadia; Lelidis, Ioannis; Kleman, Maurice; Martin, Jean-Luc

    2004-01-01

    An array of edge dislocation forms spontaneously in a Grandjean-Cano wedge filled by a smectic liquid crystal. In the vicinity of the smectic A to smectic C transition, these defects are visible under the microscope [R. B. Meyer, B. Stebler, and S. T. Lagerwall, Phys. Rev. Lett. 41, 1393 (1978)]. This paper deals with their dynamics under controlled deformation (dilation and compression). First, we characterize several regimes of dislocation mobility occurring with increasing strain epsilon or strain rate epsilon;. We relate these regimes to the interactions between screw and edge dislocations. We also show that screw dislocations give rise to loops of edge dislocations under sufficient strain, which strengthens the model of loop nucleation by helical instability of screw dislocations. Lastly, we discuss several models for the microscopic origin of the interactions between defects. PMID:14995638

  4. Defect dynamics in a smectic Grandjean-Cano wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanc, Christophe; Zuodar, Nadia; Lelidis, Ioannis; Kleman, Maurice; Martin, Jean-Luc

    2004-01-01

    An array of edge dislocation forms spontaneously in a Grandjean-Cano wedge filled by a smectic liquid crystal. In the vicinity of the smectic A to smectic C transition, these defects are visible under the microscope [R. B. Meyer, B. Stebler, and S. T. Lagerwall, Phys. Rev. Lett. 41, 1393 (1978)]. This paper deals with their dynamics under controlled deformation (dilation and compression). First, we characterize several regimes of dislocation mobility occurring with increasing strain ɛ or strain rate ɛ˙. We relate these regimes to the interactions between screw and edge dislocations. We also show that screw dislocations give rise to loops of edge dislocations under sufficient strain, which strengthens the model of loop nucleation by helical instability of screw dislocations. Lastly, we discuss several models for the microscopic origin of the interactions between defects.

  5. Aberration analysis of a wedge-plate display system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi-Kai; Chung, Sen-Nien; Chern, Jyh-Long

    2007-08-01

    The aberration characteristics of a wedge-plate display optical system are analyzed. The study shows that a kink-like feature is inherent in the ray-intercept curve due to either the onset of the dark zone in imaging or the coincidence of the ray direction with the vertex. Third-order aberration coefficients are deduced, and the total amount of aberration is investigated to illustrate the basic limitations of image quality in this type of display. The issue of design optimization is also investigated based on the aberration characteristics. A numerical example of a 50 in. display with a 1:10 thickness and a diagonal screen length ratio is also provided. PMID:17621338

  6. Coupled mode propagation in an elastic oceanic wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abawi, Ahmad T.

    2002-11-01

    The elastic version of the one-way coupled mode propagation model [Abawi, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 111, 160-167 (2002)] is used to compute the propagation of waves in an ocean overlaying a shear-supporting wedge-shaped bottom. The range-dependent ocean is approximated by a set of stair-step elastic waveguides. The elastic modes are obtained from the solution of the equations of motion in each stair-step and the solution of the range-dependent problem is obtained by solving a set of coupled differential equations for the mode amplitudes as a function of range. Various field quantities such as the scalar and shear potentials, the compressional and shear pressures, and the displacements are computed and the results are compared with those obtained from the fast field propagation model, OASES.

  7. Magnetic quantum well states in ultrathin film and wedge structures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Bader, S.D.

    1996-04-01

    Magnetic quantum-well (QW) states are probed with angle- and spin-resolved photoemission to address critical issues pertaining to the origin of the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) optimization and oscillatory coupling of magnetic multilayers. Two epitaxial systems are highlighted: Cu/Co(wedge)/Cu(100) and Cr/Fe(100)-whisker. The confinement of Cu sp-QW states by a Co barrier requires a characteristic Co thickness of 2.2 {+-} 0.6 {angstrom}, which is consistent with the interfacial Co thickness reported to optimize the GMR of permalloy-Cu structures. The controversial k-space origin of the 18-{angstrom} long period oscillation in Fe/Cr multilayers is identified by the vector that spans the d-derived lens feature of the Cr Fermi surface, based on the emergence of QW states with 17 {+-} 2 {angstrom} periodicity in this region.

  8. [Diversity of bacterial forms in ice wedge of the Mamontova Gora Glacial complex (central Yakutiya)].

    PubMed

    Filippova, S N; Surgucheva, N A; Sorokin, V V; Cherbunina, M Iu; Karnysheva, E A; Brushkov, A V; Gal'chenko, V F

    2014-01-01

    Electron microscopic investigation of four samples of ancient ice wedge from the Pleistocene glacial complex of Mamontova Gora (Yakutiya, Russia) revealed high diversity of bacteriomorphic particles. Their structural features included the presence of electron-transparent zones, presumably inclusions containing storage compounds, and microenvironment (capsules or external sheaths). These features may be a result of adaptive strategies providing for microbial survival under permafrost conditions. Predominance of rod-shaped forms morphologically resembling coryneform actinobacteria was found. X-ray microanalysis revealed organic origin of bacteriomorphic particles. Some particles were characterized by incomplete spectra of the major biogenic elements, resulting probably from low-temperature damage to the cellular structures. Total numbers of aerobic heterotrophic bacteria determined by plating on nutrient media were comparable to the values obtained for permafrost soils and Arctic ice. Predominance of coryneform actinobacteria was observed. Abundance of these evolutionarily early groups of actinobacteria may indicate the ancient origin of the microflora of the relic frozen rocks. PMID:25423726

  9. Metamorphism of peritotites in the mantle wedge above the subduction zone: Hydration of the lithospheric mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelieva, G. N.; Raznitsin, Yu. N.; Merkulova, M. V.

    2016-05-01

    Two areas with different types of hydration (serpentinization), which occurred in two settings distinct in temperatures, pressures, and stresses, are spatially individualized in the ophiolitic ultramafic massifs of the Polar Urals. The high-temperature hydration of ultramafic rocks occurred in the lithosphere of the mantle wedge directly above the subducted slab. The initial conditions of hydration are limited to 1.2-2 GPa and 650-700°C; a stable assemblage of olivine + antigorite + magnetite → amphibole → talc → chlorite was formed at 0.9-1.2 GPa and 550-600°C. The low-temperature mesh lizardite-chrysotile serpentinization occurred in the crustal, near-surface conditions. Both types of hydration were accompanied by release of hydrogen, which participates in abiogenic CH4 synthesis in the presence of CO2 dissolved in water.

  10. Tubulation by amphiphysin requires concentration-dependent switching from wedging to scaffolding

    PubMed Central

    Isas, J. Mario; Ambroso, Mark R.; Hegde, Prabhavati B.; Langen, Jennifer; Langen, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Summary BAR proteins are involved in a variety of membrane remodeling events, but how they can mold membranes into different shapes remains poorly understood. Using EPR, we find that vesicle binding of the N-BAR protein amphiphysin is predominantly mediated by the shallow insertion of amphipathic N-terminal helices. In contrast, the interaction with tubes involves deeply inserted N-terminal helices together with the concave surface of the BAR domain, which acts as a scaffold. Combined with the observed concentration dependence of tubulation and BAR domain scaffolding, the data indicate that initial membrane deformations and vesicle binding are mediated by insertion of amphipathic helical wedges, while tubulation requires high protein densities at which oligomeric BAR domain scaffolds form. In addition, we identify a pocket of residues on the concave surface of the BAR domain that deeply insert into tube membrane. Interestingly, this pocket harbors a number of disease mutants in the homologous amphiphysin 2. PMID:25865245

  11. The Substorm Current Wedge: Further Insights from MHD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    2015-01-01

    Using a recent magnetohydrodynamic simulation of magnetotail dynamics, we further investigate the buildup and evolution of the substorm current wedge (SCW), resulting from flow bursts generated by near-tail reconnection. Each flow burst generates an individual current wedge, which includes the reduction of cross-tail current and the diversion to region 1 (R1)-type field-aligned currents (earthward on the dawn and tailward on the duskside), connecting the tail with the ionosphere. Multiple flow bursts generate initially multiple SCW patterns, which at later times combine to a wider single SCW pattern. The standard SCWmodel is modified by the addition of several current loops, related to particular magnetic field changes: the increase of Bz in a local equatorial region (dipolarization), the decrease of |Bx| away from the equator (current disruption), and increases in |By| resulting from azimuthally deflected flows. The associated loop currents are found to be of similar magnitude, 0.1-0.3 MA. The combined effect requires the addition of region 2 (R2)-type currents closing in the near tail through dawnward currents but also connecting radially with the R1 currents. The current closure at the inner boundary, taken as a crude proxy of an idealized ionosphere, demonstrates westward currents as postulated in the original SCW picture as well as North-South currents connecting R1- and R2-type currents, which were larger than the westward currents by a factor of almost 2. However, this result should be applied with caution to the ionosphere because of our neglect of finite resistance and Hall effects.

  12. Distribution of strain rates in the Taiwan orogenic wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouthereau, F.; Fillon, C.; Ma, K.-F.

    2009-07-01

    To constrain the way Eurasian crust is accreted to the Taiwan orogenic wedge we investigate the present-day 3D seismogenic deformation field using the summation of 1129 seismic moment tensors of events ( Mw > 4) covering a period of 11 years (1995 to 2005). Based on the analysis of the principal strain-rate field, including dilatation and maximum shear rates, we distinguish four domains. Domain I comprises the Coastal Plain and the Western Foothills. It is mainly contractional in both the horizontal plane and in cross-section. Domain II comprises the eastern Western Foothills, the Hsuehshan Range and the Backbone Range. It is characterized by the highest contraction rates of 10 - 6 yr - 1 in association with area expansion in cross-section and area contraction in the horizontal plane. Domain III corresponds to the Central Range. It is characterized by area contraction in cross-section and area expansion in the horizontal plane. The maximum contractional axis is typically low and plunges ~ 30°E. Extension is larger, horizontal and strikes parallel to the axis of the mountain range. Domain IV corresponding to the Coastal Range and offshore Luzon Arc shows deformation patterns similar to domain II. This seismogenic strain-rate field, which is found in good agreement with the main features of the geodetic field, supports shortening within a thick wedge whose basal décollement is relatively flat and located in the middle-to-lower crust > 20 km. The east plunges of maximum strain-rate axes below the Central Range argue for the development of top-to-the-east transport of rocks resulting from the extrusion of the whole crust along west-dipping crustal-scale shear zones. The study of seismogenic strain rates argues that the initiation of subduction reversal has already started in the Taiwan collision domain.

  13. Wedge imaging spectrometer: application to drug and pollution law enforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elerding, George T.; Thunen, John G.; Woody, Loren M.

    1991-08-01

    The Wedge Imaging Spectrometer (WIS) represents a novel implementation of an imaging spectrometer sensor that is compact and rugged and, therefore, suitable for use in drug interdiction and pollution monitoring activities. With performance characteristics equal to comparable conventional imaging spectrometers, it would be capable of detecting and identifying primary and secondary indicators of drug activities and pollution events. In the design, a linear wedge filter is mated to an area array of detectors to achieve two-dimensional sampling of the combined spatial/spectral information passed by the filter. As a result, the need for complex and delicate fore optics is avoided, and the size and weight of the instrument are approximately 50% that of comparable sensors. Spectral bandwidths can be controlled to provide relatively narrow individual bandwidths over a broad spectrum, including all visible and infrared wavelengths. This sensor concept has been under development at the Hughes Aircraft Co. Santa Barbara Research Center (SBRC), and hardware exists in the form of a brassboard prototype. This prototype provides 64 spectral bands over the visible and near infrared region (0.4 to 1.0 micrometers ). Implementation issues have been examined, and plans have been formulated for packaging the sensor into a test-bed aircraft for demonstration of capabilities. Two specific areas of utility to the drug interdiction problem are isolated: (1) detection and classification of narcotic crop growth areas and (2) identification of coca processing sites, cued by the results of broad-area survey and collateral information. Vegetation stress and change-detection processing may also be useful in detecting active from dormant airfields. For pollution monitoring, a WIS sensor could provide data with fine spectral and spatial resolution over suspect areas. On-board or ground processing of the data would isolate the presence of polluting effluents, effects on vegetation caused by

  14. Periodic nanostructures from self assembled wedge-type block-copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yan; Sveinbjornsson, Benjamin R.; Grubbs, Robert H.; Weitekamp, Raymond; Miyake, Garret M.; Piunova, Victoria; Daeffler, Christopher Scot

    2015-06-02

    The invention provides a class of wedge-type block copolymers having a plurality of chemically different blocks, at least a portion of which incorporates a wedge group-containing block providing useful properties. For example, use of one or more wedge group-containing blocks in some block copolymers of the invention significantly inhibits chain entanglement and, thus, the present block copolymers materials provide a class of polymer materials capable of efficient molecular self-assembly to generate a range of structures, such as periodic nanostructures and microstructures. Materials of the present invention include copolymers having one or more wedge group-containing blocks, and optionally for some applications copolymers also incorporating one or more polymer side group-containing blocks. The present invention also provides useful methods of making and using wedge-type block copolymers.

  15. Mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges Cohesive Coulomb theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlen, F. A.; Suppe, J.; Davis, D.

    1984-01-01

    A self-consistent theory for the mechanics of thin-skinned accretionary Coulomb wedges is developed and applied to the active fold-and-thrust belt of western Taiwan. The state of stress everywhere within a critical wedge is determined by solving the static equilibrium equations subject to the appropriate boundary conditions. The influence of wedge cohesion, which gives rise to a concave curvature of the critical topographic surface and affects the orientation of the principal stresses and Coulomb fracture within the wedge, is considered. The shape of the topographic surface and the angles at which thrust faults step up from the basal decollement in the Taiwanese belt is analyzed taking into account the extensive structural and fluid-pressure data available there. It is concluded that the gross geometry and structure of the Taiwan wedge are consistent with normal laboratory frictional and fracture strengths of sedimentary rocks.

  16. Wedge and spring assembly for securing coils in electromagnets and dynamoelectric machines

    DOEpatents

    Lindner, Melvin; Cottingham, James G.

    1996-03-12

    A wedge and spring assembly for use in electromagnets or dynamoelectric machines having a housing with an axis therethrough and a plurality of coils supported on salient poles that extend radially inward from the housing toward the housing axis to define a plurality of interpole spaces. The wedge and spring assembly includes a nonmagnetic retainer spring and a nonmagnetic wedge. The retainer spring is formed to fit into one of the interpole spaces, and has juxtaposed ends defining between them a slit extending in a direction generally parallel to the housing axis. The wedge for insertion into the slit provides an outwardly directed force on respective portions of the juxtaposed ends to expand the slit so that respective portions of the retainer spring engage areas of the coils adjacent thereto, thereby resiliently holding the coils against their respective salient poles. The retainer spring is generally triangular shaped to fit within the interpole space, and the wedge is generally T-shaped.

  17. Comparison of the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges. [Subjects and Methods] Nine females participated in this study. Surface electrodes measurements were taken over the hamstring and quadriceps under 3 squat exercise conditions, and the hamstring/quadriceps ratio was calculated. [Results] The hamstring/quadriceps ratio was significantly increased during squat exercise in inclined wedge condition (7.4 ± 1.8), compared to the declined wedge condition (5.3 ± 2.2) and no wedge condition (6.4 ± 3.2). [Conclusion] This study suggests that squat exercise in the inclined wedge condition may be effective for increasing the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females.

  18. Deriving Animal Behaviour from High-Frequency GPS: Tracking Cows in Open and Forested Habitat.

    PubMed

    de Weerd, Nelleke; van Langevelde, Frank; van Oeveren, Herman; Nolet, Bart A; Kölzsch, Andrea; Prins, Herbert H T; de Boer, W Fred

    2015-01-01

    The increasing spatiotemporal accuracy of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) tracking systems opens the possibility to infer animal behaviour from tracking data. We studied the relationship between high-frequency GNSS data and behaviour, aimed at developing an easily interpretable classification method to infer behaviour from location data. Behavioural observations were carried out during tracking of cows (Bos Taurus) fitted with high-frequency GPS (Global Positioning System) receivers. Data were obtained in an open field and forested area, and movement metrics were calculated for 1 min, 12 s and 2 s intervals. We observed four behaviour types (Foraging, Lying, Standing and Walking). We subsequently used Classification and Regression Trees to classify the simultaneously obtained GPS data as these behaviour types, based on distances and turning angles between fixes. GPS data with a 1 min interval from the open field was classified correctly for more than 70% of the samples. Data from the 12 s and 2 s interval could not be classified successfully, emphasizing that the interval should be long enough for the behaviour to be defined by its characteristic movement metrics. Data obtained in the forested area were classified with a lower accuracy (57%) than the data from the open field, due to a larger positional error of GPS locations and differences in behavioural performance influenced by the habitat type. This demonstrates the importance of understanding the relationship between behaviour and movement metrics, derived from GNSS fixes at different frequencies and in different habitats, in order to successfully infer behaviour. When spatially accurate location data can be obtained, behaviour can be inferred from high-frequency GNSS fixes by calculating simple movement metrics and using easily interpretable decision trees. This allows for the combined study of animal behaviour and habitat use based on location data, and might make it possible to detect deviations

  19. OpenMSI: A High-Performance Web-Based Platform for Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rubel, Oliver; Greiner, Annette; Cholia, Shreyas; Louie, Katherine; Bethel, E. Wes; Northen, Trent R.; Bowen, Benjamin P.

    2013-10-02

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) enables researchers to directly probe endogenous molecules directly within the architecture of the biological matrix. Unfortunately, efficient access, management, and analysis of the data generated by MSI approaches remain major challenges to this rapidly developing field. Despite the availability of numerous dedicated file formats and software packages, it is a widely held viewpoint that the biggest challenge is simply opening, sharing, and analyzing a file without loss of information. Here we present OpenMSI, a software framework and platform that addresses these challenges via an advanced, high-performance, extensible file format and Web API for remote data access (http://openmsi.nersc.gov). The OpenMSI file format supports storage of raw MSI data, metadata, and derived analyses in a single, self-describing format based on HDF5 and is supported by a large range of analysis software (e.g., Matlab and R) and programming languages (e.g., C++, Fortran, and Python). Careful optimization of the storage layout of MSI data sets using chunking, compression, and data replication accelerates common, selective data access operations while minimizing data storage requirements and are critical enablers of rapid data I/O. The OpenMSI file format has shown to provide >2000-fold improvement for image access operations, enabling spectrum and image retrieval in less than 0.3 s across the Internet even for 50 GB MSI data sets. To make remote high-performance compute resources accessible for analysis and to facilitate data sharing and collaboration, we describe an easy-to-use yet powerful Web API, enabling fast and convenient access to MSI data, metadata, and derived analysis results stored remotely to facilitate high-performance data analysis and enable implementation of Web based data sharing, visualization, and analysis.

  20. OpenMSI: a high-performance web-based platform for mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Rübel, Oliver; Greiner, Annette; Cholia, Shreyas; Louie, Katherine; Bethel, E Wes; Northen, Trent R; Bowen, Benjamin P

    2013-11-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) enables researchers to directly probe endogenous molecules directly within the architecture of the biological matrix. Unfortunately, efficient access, management, and analysis of the data generated by MSI approaches remain major challenges to this rapidly developing field. Despite the availability of numerous dedicated file formats and software packages, it is a widely held viewpoint that the biggest challenge is simply opening, sharing, and analyzing a file without loss of information. Here we present OpenMSI, a software framework and platform that addresses these challenges via an advanced, high-performance, extensible file format and Web API for remote data access (http://openmsi.nersc.gov). The OpenMSI file format supports storage of raw MSI data, metadata, and derived analyses in a single, self-describing format based on HDF5 and is supported by a large range of analysis software (e.g., Matlab and R) and programming languages (e.g., C++, Fortran, and Python). Careful optimization of the storage layout of MSI data sets using chunking, compression, and data replication accelerates common, selective data access operations while minimizing data storage requirements and are critical enablers of rapid data I/O. The OpenMSI file format has shown to provide >2000-fold improvement for image access operations, enabling spectrum and image retrieval in less than 0.3 s across the Internet even for 50 GB MSI data sets. To make remote high-performance compute resources accessible for analysis and to facilitate data sharing and collaboration, we describe an easy-to-use yet powerful Web API, enabling fast and convenient access to MSI data, metadata, and derived analysis results stored remotely to facilitate high-performance data analysis and enable implementation of Web based data sharing, visualization, and analysis. PMID:24087878

  1. Deriving Animal Behaviour from High-Frequency GPS: Tracking Cows in Open and Forested Habitat

    PubMed Central

    de Weerd, Nelleke; van Langevelde, Frank; van Oeveren, Herman; Nolet, Bart A.; Kölzsch, Andrea; Prins, Herbert H. T.; de Boer, W. Fred

    2015-01-01

    The increasing spatiotemporal accuracy of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) tracking systems opens the possibility to infer animal behaviour from tracking data. We studied the relationship between high-frequency GNSS data and behaviour, aimed at developing an easily interpretable classification method to infer behaviour from location data. Behavioural observations were carried out during tracking of cows (Bos Taurus) fitted with high-frequency GPS (Global Positioning System) receivers. Data were obtained in an open field and forested area, and movement metrics were calculated for 1 min, 12 s and 2 s intervals. We observed four behaviour types (Foraging, Lying, Standing and Walking). We subsequently used Classification and Regression Trees to classify the simultaneously obtained GPS data as these behaviour types, based on distances and turning angles between fixes. GPS data with a 1 min interval from the open field was classified correctly for more than 70% of the samples. Data from the 12 s and 2 s interval could not be classified successfully, emphasizing that the interval should be long enough for the behaviour to be defined by its characteristic movement metrics. Data obtained in the forested area were classified with a lower accuracy (57%) than the data from the open field, due to a larger positional error of GPS locations and differences in behavioural performance influenced by the habitat type. This demonstrates the importance of understanding the relationship between behaviour and movement metrics, derived from GNSS fixes at different frequencies and in different habitats, in order to successfully infer behaviour. When spatially accurate location data can be obtained, behaviour can be inferred from high-frequency GNSS fixes by calculating simple movement metrics and using easily interpretable decision trees. This allows for the combined study of animal behaviour and habitat use based on location data, and might make it possible to detect deviations

  2. Opening-mode fracture in siliceous mudstone at high homologous temperature—effect of surface forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhubl, Peter; Aydin, Atilla; Lore, Jason

    In analogy to high-temperature sintering of ceramics and metal powder compacts, the formation of opening-mode fractures in siliceous mudstone during natural in-situ combustion of hydrocarbons is attributed to contractile surface forces between mineral grains and an interstitial melt phase. A comparison between bulk density increase during sintering and created fracture space indicates that fracturing resulted from contraction of the rock matrix due to porosity reduction, grain-scale mass transfer, and high-temperature mineral formation. It is suggested that contractile surface forces between mineral grains and between mineral grains and pore fluid contribute to subcritical fracture formation under a wide range of subsurface conditions.

  3. Scalable High Performance Message Passing over InfiniBand for Open MPI

    SciTech Connect

    Friedley, A; Hoefler, T; Leininger, M L; Lumsdaine, A

    2007-10-24

    InfiniBand (IB) is a popular network technology for modern high-performance computing systems. MPI implementations traditionally support IB using a reliable, connection-oriented (RC) transport. However, per-process resource usage that grows linearly with the number of processes, makes this approach prohibitive for large-scale systems. IB provides an alternative in the form of a connectionless unreliable datagram transport (UD), which allows for near-constant resource usage and initialization overhead as the process count increases. This paper describes a UD-based implementation for IB in Open MPI as a scalable alternative to existing RC-based schemes. We use the software reliability capabilities of Open MPI to provide the guaranteed delivery semantics required by MPI. Results show that UD not only requires fewer resources at scale, but also allows for shorter MPI startup times. A connectionless model also improves performance for applications that tend to send small messages to many different processes.

  4. Exploring Infiniband Hardware Virtualization in OpenNebula towards Efficient High-Performance Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Pais Pitta de Lacerda Ruivo, Tiago; Bernabeu Altayo, Gerard; Garzoglio, Gabriele; Timm, Steven; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Noh, Seo-Young; Raicu, Ioan

    2014-11-11

    has been widely accepted that software virtualization has a big negative impact on high-performance computing (HPC) application performance. This work explores the potential use of Infiniband hardware virtualization in an OpenNebula cloud towards the efficient support of MPI-based workloads. We have implemented, deployed, and tested an Infiniband network on the FermiCloud private Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud. To avoid software virtualization towards minimizing the virtualization overhead, we employed a technique called Single Root Input/Output Virtualization (SRIOV). Our solution spanned modifications to the Linux’s Hypervisor as well as the OpenNebula manager. We evaluated the performance of the hardware virtualization on up to 56 virtual machines connected by up to 8 DDR Infiniband network links, with micro-benchmarks (latency and bandwidth) as well as w a MPI-intensive application (the HPL Linpack benchmark).

  5. tranSMART: An Open Source Knowledge Management and High Content Data Analytics Platform

    PubMed Central

    Scheufele, Elisabeth; Aronzon, Dina; Coopersmith, Robert; McDuffie, Michael T.; Kapoor, Manish; Uhrich, Christopher A.; Avitabile, Jean E.; Liu, Jinlei; Housman, Dan; Palchuk, Matvey B.

    2014-01-01

    The tranSMART knowledge management and high-content analysis platform is a flexible software framework featuring novel research capabilities. It enables analysis of integrated data for the purposes of hypothesis generation, hypothesis validation, and cohort discovery in translational research. tranSMART bridges the prolific world of basic science and clinical practice data at the point of care by merging multiple types of data from disparate sources into a common environment. The application supports data harmonization and integration with analytical pipelines. The application code was released into the open source community in January 2012, with 32 instances in operation. tranSMART’s extensible data model and corresponding data integration processes, rapid data analysis features, and open source nature make it an indispensable tool in translational or clinical research. PMID:25717408

  6. tranSMART: An Open Source Knowledge Management and High Content Data Analytics Platform.

    PubMed

    Scheufele, Elisabeth; Aronzon, Dina; Coopersmith, Robert; McDuffie, Michael T; Kapoor, Manish; Uhrich, Christopher A; Avitabile, Jean E; Liu, Jinlei; Housman, Dan; Palchuk, Matvey B

    2014-01-01

    The tranSMART knowledge management and high-content analysis platform is a flexible software framework featuring novel research capabilities. It enables analysis of integrated data for the purposes of hypothesis generation, hypothesis validation, and cohort discovery in translational research. tranSMART bridges the prolific world of basic science and clinical practice data at the point of care by merging multiple types of data from disparate sources into a common environment. The application supports data harmonization and integration with analytical pipelines. The application code was released into the open source community in January 2012, with 32 instances in operation. tranSMART's extensible data model and corresponding data integration processes, rapid data analysis features, and open source nature make it an indispensable tool in translational or clinical research. PMID:25717408

  7. Fast optical 3D form measurement of aspheres including determination of thickness and wedge and decenter errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stover, E.; Berger, G.; Wendel, M.; Petter, J.

    2015-10-01

    A method for non-contact 3D form testing of aspheric surfaces including determination of decenter and wedge errors and lens thickness is presented. The principle is based on the absolute measurement capability of multi-wavelength interferometry (MWLI). The approach produces high density 3D shape information and geometric parameters at high accuracy in short measurement times. The system allows inspection of aspheres without restrictions in terms of spherical departures, of segmented and discontinuous optics. The optics can be polished or ground and made of opaque or transparent materials.

  8. Fluids confined in wedges and by edges: Virial series for the line-thermodynamic properties of hard spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, Ignacio

    2014-12-01

    This work is devoted to analyze the relation between the thermodynamic properties of a confined fluid and the shape of its confining vessel. Recently, new insights in this topic were found through the study of cluster integrals for inhomogeneous fluids that revealed the dependence on the vessel shape of the low density behavior of the system. Here, the statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of fluids confined in wedges or by edges is revisited, focusing on their cluster integrals. In particular, the well known hard sphere fluid, which was not studied in this framework so far, is analyzed under confinement and its thermodynamic properties are analytically studied up to order two in the density. Furthermore, the analysis is extended to the confinement produced by a corrugated wall. These results rely on the obtained analytic expression for the second cluster integral of the confined hard sphere system as a function of the opening dihedral angle 0 < β < 2π. It enables a unified approach to both wedges and edges.

  9. Fluids confined in wedges and by edges: Virial series for the line-thermodynamic properties of hard spheres

    SciTech Connect

    Urrutia, Ignacio

    2014-12-28

    This work is devoted to analyze the relation between the thermodynamic properties of a confined fluid and the shape of its confining vessel. Recently, new insights in this topic were found through the study of cluster integrals for inhomogeneous fluids that revealed the dependence on the vessel shape of the low density behavior of the system. Here, the statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of fluids confined in wedges or by edges is revisited, focusing on their cluster integrals. In particular, the well known hard sphere fluid, which was not studied in this framework so far, is analyzed under confinement and its thermodynamic properties are analytically studied up to order two in the density. Furthermore, the analysis is extended to the confinement produced by a corrugated wall. These results rely on the obtained analytic expression for the second cluster integral of the confined hard sphere system as a function of the opening dihedral angle 0 < β < 2π. It enables a unified approach to both wedges and edges.

  10. Fluids confined in wedges and by edges: virial series for the line-thermodynamic properties of hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, Ignacio

    2014-12-28

    This work is devoted to analyze the relation between the thermodynamic properties of a confined fluid and the shape of its confining vessel. Recently, new insights in this topic were found through the study of cluster integrals for inhomogeneous fluids that revealed the dependence on the vessel shape of the low density behavior of the system. Here, the statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of fluids confined in wedges or by edges is revisited, focusing on their cluster integrals. In particular, the well known hard sphere fluid, which was not studied in this framework so far, is analyzed under confinement and its thermodynamic properties are analytically studied up to order two in the density. Furthermore, the analysis is extended to the confinement produced by a corrugated wall. These results rely on the obtained analytic expression for the second cluster integral of the confined hard sphere system as a function of the opening dihedral angle 0 < β < 2π. It enables a unified approach to both wedges and edges. PMID:25554179

  11. High tibial osteotomy in varus knees: indications and limits

    PubMed Central

    LOIA, MARCO CORGIAT; VANNI, STEFANIA; ROSSO, FEDERICA; BONASIA, DAVIDE EDOARDO; BRUZZONE, MATTEO; DETTONI, FEDERICO; ROSSI, ROBERTO

    2016-01-01

    Opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) is a surgical procedure that aims to correct the weight-bearing axis of the knee, moving the loads laterally from the medial compartment. Conventional indications for OWHTO are medial compartment osteoarthritis and varus malalignment of the knee; recently OWHTO has been used successfully in the treatment of double and triple varus. OWHTO, in contrast to closing wedge high tibial osteotomy, does not require fibular osteotomy or peroneal nerve dissection, or lead to disruption of the proximal tibiofibular joint and bone stock loss. For these reasons, interest in this procedure has grown in recent years. The aim of this study is to review the literature on OWHTO, considering indications and prognostic factors (body mass index, grade of osteoarthritis, instability, range of movement and age), outcomes at mid-term follow-up, and limits of the procedure (slope modifications, patellar height changes and difficulties in conversion to a total knee arthroplasty). PMID:27602350

  12. High tibial osteotomy in varus knees: indications and limits.

    PubMed

    Loia, Marco Corgiat; Vanni, Stefania; Rosso, Federica; Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Bruzzone, Matteo; Dettoni, Federico; Rossi, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (OWHTO) is a surgical procedure that aims to correct the weight-bearing axis of the knee, moving the loads laterally from the medial compartment. Conventional indications for OWHTO are medial compartment osteoarthritis and varus malalignment of the knee; recently OWHTO has been used successfully in the treatment of double and triple varus. OWHTO, in contrast to closing wedge high tibial osteotomy, does not require fibular osteotomy or peroneal nerve dissection, or lead to disruption of the proximal tibiofibular joint and bone stock loss. For these reasons, interest in this procedure has grown in recent years. The aim of this study is to review the literature on OWHTO, considering indications and prognostic factors (body mass index, grade of osteoarthritis, instability, range of movement and age), outcomes at mid-term follow-up, and limits of the procedure (slope modifications, patellar height changes and difficulties in conversion to a total knee arthroplasty). PMID:27602350

  13. Hyper-extended continental crust deformation in the light of Coulomb critical wedge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirrengarten, Michael; Manatschal, Gianreto; Yuan, Xiaoping; Kusznir, Nick; Maillot, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    The rocks forming the wedge shape termination of hyper-extended continental crust are deformed in the frictional field during the last stage of continental rifting due to cooling and hydration. Seismic interpretation and field evidence show that the basal boundary of the wedge is a low frictional décollement level. The wedge shape, the frictional deformation and the basal décollement correspond to the requirements of the critical Coulomb wedge (CCW) theory which describes the stability limit of a frictional wedge over a décollement. In a simple shear separation model the upper-plate margin (in the hangingwall of the detachment fault) corresponds to a tectonic extensional wedge whereas the lower plate (in the footwall of the detachment fault) is a gravitational wedge. This major difference causes the asymmetry of conjugate hyper-extended rifted margins. We measure a dataset of upper and lower hyper-extended wedge and compare it to the stability envelope of the CCW theory for serpentine and clay friction. We find a good fit by adjusting fluid pressure. The main results of our analysis are that the crustal wedges of lower plate margins are close to the critical shape, which explains their low variability whereas upper plate wedges can be critical, sub- or sup- critical due to the detachment evolution during rifting. On the upper plate side, according to the Coulomb tectonic extensional wedge, faults should be oriented toward the continent. Observations showed some continentward faults in the termination of the continental crust but there are also oceanward faults. This can be explained by two processes, first continentward faults are created only over the detachment, therefore if part of the hyper-extended upper plate crust is not directly over the detachment it will not be part of the wedge. Secondly the tip block of the wedge can be detached creating an extensional allochthon induced by the flattening of the detachment near the surface, therefore continentward

  14. Ice-wedge based permafrost chronologies and stable-water isotope records from Arctic Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterich, Sebastian; Opel, Thomas; Meyer, Hanno; Schwamborn, Georg; Schirrmeister, Lutz; Dereviagin, Alexander Yu.

    2016-04-01

    Late Quaternary permafrost of northern latitudes contains large proportions of ground ice, including pore ice, segregation ice, massive ice, buried glacier ice and in particular ice wedges. Fossil ice-wedges are remnants of polygonal patterned ground in former tundra areas, which evolved over several tens of thousands of years in non-glaciated Beringia. Ice wedges originate from repeated frost cracking of the ground in winter and subsequent crack filling by snowmelt and re-freezing in the ground in spring. Hence, the stable water isotope composition (δ18O, δD, d excess) of wedge ice derives from winter precipitation and is commonly interpreted as wintertime climate proxy. Paleoclimate studies based on ice-wedge isotope data cover different timescales and periods of the late Quaternary. (MIS 6 to MIS 1). In the long-term scale the temporal resolution is rather low and corresponds to mid- and late Pleistocene and Holocene stratigraphic units. Recent progress has been made in developing centennial Late Glacial and Holocene time series of ice-wedge stable isotopes by applying radiocarbon dating of organic remains in ice samples. Ice wedges exposed at both coasts of the Dmitry Laptev Strait (East Siberian Sea) were studied to deduce winter climate conditions since about 200 kyr. Ice wedges aligned to distinct late Quaternary permafrost strata were studied for their isotopic composition and dated by radiocarbon ages of organic matter within the wedge ice or by cosmogenic nuclide ratios (36Cl/Cl-) of the ice. The paleoclimate interpretation is furthermore based on geocryological and paleoecological proxy data and geochronological information (radiocarbon, luminescence, radioisotope disequilibria 230Th/U) from ice-wedge embedding frozen deposits. Coldest winter conditions are mirrored by most negative δ18O mean values of -37 ‰ and δD mean values of -290 ‰ from ice wedges of the Last Glacial Maximum (26 to 22 kyr BP) while late Holocene (since about 4 kyr BP) and in

  15. Minimum work analysis on the critical taper accretionary wedges- insights from analogue modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santimano, Tasca; Rosenau, Matthias; Oncken, Onno

    2014-05-01

    The Critical taper theory (CTT) is a fundamental concept for the understanding of mountain building processes. Based on force balance it predicts the preferred steady state geometry of an accretionary wedge system and its tectonic regime (extensive, compressive, stable). However, it does not specify which structures are formed and reactivated to reach the preferred state. The latter can be predicted by the minimum work concept. Here we test both concepts and their interplay by analysing two simple sand wedge models which differ only in the thickness of the basal detachment (a layer of glass beads). While the steady state critical taper is controlled by internal and basal friction coefficients and therefore the same in all experiments, different processes can minimise work by 1. reducing gravitational work e.g. by lowering the amount of uplift or volume uplifted, or 2. reducing frictional work e.g. by lowering the load or due to low friction coefficient along thrusts. Since a thick detachment allows entrainment of low friction material and therefore lowering of the friction along active thrusts, we speculate that the style of wedge growth will differ between the two models. We observe that the wedge with a thin basal detachment localizes strain at the toe of the wedge periodically and reactivate older faults to reach the critical topography. On the contrary, in the wedge with the thicker detachment layer, friction along thrusts is lowered due to the entrainment of low friction material from the detachment zone, subsequently increasing the lifetime of a thrust. Long thrust episodes are always followed by a fault of shorter lifetime, with the aim of reaching the critical taper. From the two experiments, we analyze the time-series evolution of the wedge to infer the work done by the two styles of deformation and predict the trend over time to differ but the maximum work to be similar Our observations show that the critical taper theory determines the geometry of the

  16. Ridges on Europa: Origin by Incremental Ice-Wedging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melosh, H. J.; Turtle, E. P.

    2004-01-01

    The surface of Europa is covered by ridges that display a variety of morphologies . The most common type is characterized by a double ridge divided by an axial trough. These ridges are, in general, narrow (typically only a few km across) and remarkably linear. They are up to a few hundred meters high and the inner and outer slopes appear to stand at the angle of repose . A number of diverse mechanisms have been proposed to explain the formation of these ubiquitous features , although none can fully account for all of their observed characteristics. We propose a different formation theory in which accumulation of material within cracks that open during the extensional phase of the tidal cycle prevents complete closure of the cracks during the tidal cycle s compressional phase. This accumulation deforms the surrounding ice and, in time, results in the growth of a landform remarkably similar to the ridges observed on Europa.

  17. Deformation transients in the brittle regime: Insights from spring-wedge experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenau, Matthias; Santimano, Tasca; Oncken, Onno

    2016-04-01

    Deformation of the earth's crust varies over timescales ranging from the seismic cycle to plate tectonic phases. Seismic cycles can generically be explained by sudden coseismic release of strain energy accumulated slowly over the interseismic period. The simplest models of such transient behavior is a spring-slider system where the spring stores elastic energy and the slider is characterized by static and dynamic friction at its base allowing cyclic occurrence of slip instabilities. Here we extend this model by allowing the slider to deform in an accretionary wedge type system. Because cyclic thrust formation is associated with bulk strain weakening this should introduce slip instabilities at the time-scale of accretionary cycles superimposed on seismic cycles which are controlled by static and dynamic friction at the wedge base. To test this hypothesis we set up sandbox-type experiments where the backwall is not rigid but elastic. We vary stiffness, friction coefficients and amount of strain weakening during fault formation and reactivation within realistic ranges when scaled to nature and monitor backwall push force and surface deformation at high resolution. We observe slip instabilities both at seismic and accretionary cycle scale. Depending on the ratio of the amount of strain weakening to elastic stiffness, shortening rate increases transiently by a factor of 2-3 during fault growth. Applied to nature our observation suggests that episodic deformation transients might be interpreted as longterm slip instabilities related to crustal weakening at all relevant spatial scales: At local scale "slow earthquakes" might be interpreted as the result of the interplay between matrix stiffness and strain weakening in fault gouge material. At regional scale, applying buckling theory, we predict that deformation zones bordered by "soft" oceanic plates (e.g. the Andes) are more susceptible to deformation transients than "stiff" intracontinental settings (e.g. the Himalaya).

  18. Deep long-period earthquakes west of the volcanic arc in Oregon: evidence of serpentine dehydration in the fore-arc mantle wedge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vidale, John E.; Schmidt, David A.; Malone, Stephen D.; Hotovec-Ellis, Alicia J.; Moran, Seth C.; Creager, Kenneth C.; Houston, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Here we report on deep long-period earthquakes (DLPs) newly observed in four places in western Oregon. The DLPs are noteworthy for their location within the subduction fore arc: 40–80 km west of the volcanic arc, well above the slab, and near the Moho. These “offset DLPs” occur near the top of the inferred stagnant mantle wedge, which is likely to be serpentinized and cold. The lack of fore-arc DLPs elsewhere along the arc suggests that localized heating may be dehydrating the serpentinized mantle wedge at these latitudes and causing DLPs by dehydration embrittlement. Higher heat flow in this region could be introduced by anomalously hot mantle, associated with the western migration of volcanism across the High Lava Plains of eastern Oregon, entrained in the corner flow proximal to the mantle wedge. Alternatively, fluids rising from the subducting slab through the mantle wedge may be the source of offset DLPs. As far as we know, these are among the first DLPs to be observed in the fore arc of a subduction-zone system.

  19. Prediction of orbiter RSI tile gap heating ratios from NASA/Ames double wedge model test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    In-depth gap heating ratios for Orbiter RSI tile sidewalls were predicted based on near steady state temperature measurements obtained from double wedge model tests. An analysis was performed to derive gap heating ratios which would result in the best fit of test data; provide an assessment of open gap response, and supply the definition of gap filler requirements on the Orbiter. A comparison was made of these heating ratios with previously derived ratios in order to verify the extrapolation of the wing glove data to Orbiter flight conditions. The analysis was performed with the Rockwell TPS Multidimensional Heat Conduction Program for a 3-D, 2.0-inch thick flat RSI tile with 255 nodal points. The data from 14 tests was used to correlate with the analysis. The results show that the best-fit heating ratios at the station farthest upstream on the model for most gap depths were less than the extrapolated values of the wing glove model heating ratios. For the station farthest downstream on the model, the baseline heating ratios adequately predicted or over-predicted the test data.

  20. Nematic liquid crystal in the wedge and edge geometry in the case of homeotropic alignment.

    PubMed

    Poniewierski, A

    2010-02-01

    Nematic liquid crystal confined to a wedge or edge is studied on the assumption that the confining surfaces provide strong and weak homeotropic anchorings, respectively. Both infinite and finite systems are considered. The model based on the Frank-Oseen and Rapini-Papoular formalisms predicts two textures of opposite rotations of the director as in the case of strong anchoring on both surfaces. However, the presence of weak anchoring results in a length scale lambda which characterizes the crossover between the regions close to the apex and far from it. The ratio lambda/b , where b is the extrapolation length, is a function of the opening angle alpha. Both stable and metastable textures are considered and the mechanism by which a texture loses its stability is found. It is related to the formation of a defect-like structure at the surface of weak anchoring whose distance from the apex is lambda(alpha) and the loss of stability is signalled by the divergence of lambda. Only in the limit alpha --> 2tau, the defect-like structure transforms into a defect of strength -1/2 located at a finite distance from the apex. PMID:20195687

  1. Oasis: A high-level/high-performance open source Navier-Stokes solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Mikael; Valen-Sendstad, Kristian

    2015-03-01

    Oasis is a high-level/high-performance finite element Navier-Stokes solver written from scratch in Python using building blocks from the FEniCS project (fenicsproject.org). The solver is unstructured and targets large-scale applications in complex geometries on massively parallel clusters. Oasis utilizes MPI and interfaces, through FEniCS, to the linear algebra backend PETSc. Oasis advocates a high-level, programmable user interface through the creation of highly flexible Python modules for new problems. Through the high-level Python interface the user is placed in complete control of every aspect of the solver. A version of the solver, that is using piecewise linear elements for both velocity and pressure, is shown to reproduce very well the classical, spectral, turbulent channel simulations of Moser et al. (1999). The computational speed is strongly dominated by the iterative solvers provided by the linear algebra backend, which is arguably the best performance any similar implicit solver using PETSc may hope for. Higher order accuracy is also demonstrated and new solvers may be easily added within the same framework.

  2. Electromagnetic scattering by coated convex surfaces and wedges simulated by approximate boundary conditions. Ph.D. Thesis Technical Report, Feb. - Sep. 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, H. H.; Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Asymptotic/high-frequency solutions are developed for analyzing the non-specular scattering mechanisms associated with coated convex surfaces and edges simulated by approximate boundary conditions. In particular, the standard impedance boundary conditions (SIBC's) and the second order generalized impedance boundary conditions (GIBC's) are employed for a characterization of the edge diffraction, creeping wave, and surface diffracted wave contributions. To study the creeping wave and surface diffracted wave mechanisms, rigorous UTD (uniform geometrical theory of diffraction) diffraction coefficients are developed for a convex coated cylinder simulated with SIBC's and GIBC's. The ray solutions obtained remain valid in the transition region and reduce uniformly to those in the deep lit and shadow regions. A uniform asymptotic solution is also presented for observations in the close vicinity of the cylinder. The diffraction coefficient for a convex cylinder are obtained via a generalization of the corresponding ones of the circular cylinder. To validate the asymptotic/high-frequency solution, integral equations are derived for both E and H-polarization and solved numerically using the method of moments. Results are presented for a single and three layered coated convex cylinder. Some insights are also provided on the accuracy of the employed GIBC's versus SIBC's for application to curved surfaces. To characterize the scattering by impedance wedges illuminated at skew incidence, diffraction coefficients are derived from an approximate solution of the governing functional difference equations. This solution exactly recovers the known ones for an impedance half plane or an arbitrary wedge at normal incidence, and to validate it for other wedge angles, a moment method code was used. Finally, to test the usefulness of the approximate skew incidence impedance wedge diffraction coefficient for three dimensional structures, equivalent currents are derived in the context of the

  3. Biomechanical effects of lateral and medial wedge insoles on unilateral weight bearing

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Tomonori; Kito, Nobuhiro; Yukimune, Masaki; Tokuda, Kazuki; Tanimoto, Kenji; Anan, Masaya; Takahashi, Makoto; Shinkoda, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Lateral wedge insoles reduce the peak external knee adduction moment and are advocated for patients with knee osteoarthritis. However, some patients demonstrate adverse biomechanical effects with treatment. In this study, we examined the immediate effects of lateral and medial wedge insoles under unilateral weight bearing. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy young adults participated in this study. The subjects were assessed by using the foot posture index, and were divided into three groups: normal foot, pronated foot, and supinated foot groups. The knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm under the studied conditions were measured by using a three-dimensional motion capture system and force plates. [Results] In the normal and pronated groups, the change in knee adduction moment significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition compared with the medial wedge insole condition. In the normal group, the change in the knee-ground reaction force lever arm also significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition than under the medial wedge insole condition. [Conclusion] Lateral wedge insoles significantly reduced the knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm during unilateral weight bearing in subjects with normal feet, and the biomechanical effects varied according to individual foot alignment. PMID:26957775

  4. Inferring the spatial variation of the wedge strength based on a modified critical taper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C.; Liu, H.; Hsieh, Y.; Dong, J.

    2013-12-01

    Critical taper wedge theory has been widely applied to evaluate the strength of the detachment fault and the wedge by measuring taper angle. Traditional taper model, which incorporated constant cohesion and friction angle, fails to explain the lateral variation of the taper angle. A modified critical taper model adopting nonlinear Hoek-Brown failure criterion is proposed accordingly. The fold-and-thrust belt of central Taiwan was studied. Based on the field works and laboratory tests, the geological strength index (GSI) and the uniaxial compressive strength were obtained and the wedge strength can be estimated accordingly. The GSI values from investigation are decreased from the west to the east along the cross section due to the wedge strength heterogeneity. The uniaxial compressive strength of intact rock varies from the age of formation and lithology. The estimated wedge strength exhibits a strong spatial variation. The strength of the detachment fault was derived from rotary shear tests using fault gouge materials under different velocities and normal stresses. General speaking, the steady-state friction coefficient are about 0.29-0.46 when the shear velocity less than 0.1 m/s. The friction coefficient is not sensitive to the normal stress. Consequently, the lateral variation of the taper angle, which calculated by modified critical taper model, is mainly dominated by the wedge strength heterogeneity and the thickening of the wedge from the west to the east.

  5. OpenCL: a viable solution for high-performance medical image reconstruction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegl, Christian; Hofmann, H. G.; Keck, B.; Prümmer, M.; Hornegger, J.

    2011-03-01

    Reconstruction of 3-D volumetric data from C-arm CT projections is a computationally demanding task. For interventional image reconstruction, hardware optimization is mandatory. Manufacturers of medical equipment use a variety of high-performance computing (HPC) platforms, like FPGAs, graphics cards, or multi-core CPUs. A problem of this diversity is that many different frameworks and (vendor-specific) programming languages are used. Furthermore, it is costly to switch the platform, since the code has to be re-written, verified, and optimized. OpenCL, a relatively new industry standard for HPC, promises to enable portable code. Its key idea is to abstract hardware in a way that allows an efficient mapping onto real CPUs, GPUs, and other hardware. The code is compiled for the actual target by the device driver. In this work we investigated the suitability of OpenCL as a tool to write portable code that runs efficiently across different hardware. The problems chosen are back- and forward-projection, the most time-consuming parts of (iterative) reconstruction. We present results on three platforms, a multi-core CPU system and two GPUs, and compare them against manually optimized native implementations. We found that OpenCL allows to share a common framework in one language across platforms. However, considering differences in the underlying architecture, a hardware-oblivious implementation cannot be expected to deliver maximal performance. By optimizing the OpenCL code for the specific hardware we reached over 90% of native performance for both problems, back- and forward-projection, on all platforms.

  6. Metastable olivine wedge beneath northeast China and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, G.; Zhao, D.; Zhang, G.

    2013-12-01

    When the Pacific slab subducted into the mantle transition zone, there might exist a metastable olivine wedge (MOW) inside the slab due to the phase transition. Lots of researchers have adopted such various methods to detect the characteristics of this MOW as the forward modeling of travel times, shear wave amplitude patterns, teleseismic P wave coda, receiver function imaging, thermodynamic simulation and so on. Almost all results could be more or less affected by the source, the receiver and/or the velocity model passed through by the seismic rays. In this study, we have used 21 deep earthquakes, greater than 400 km and locating beneath northeast China, to study the velocity within the MOW. For more precisions, we have done further modifications in two ways based on our previous studies. (1) Double-difference location method is used to relocate all events with an error of 1-2 km with the data recorded by stations both at northeast China and at Japan. All relocated events locate in a zone about 30 km away from the upper boundary of Pacific slab. (2) Double residual travel times, generated by an event-pair at a common station at only Japan, are used to constrain the velocity anomaly rather than the residuals themselves. As a result, we have found that an ultra-lower velocity zone (ULVZ), averagely -7% relative to the iasp91 model, exists within the subducted Pacific slab around the deep earthquakes, which might be represented as the metastable olivine wedge. Because of the lower-velocity corresponding to the lower-density, the MOW would provide upward buoyancy forces which might prevent the slab from free subduction into the mantle transition zone. This feed-back mechanism of MOW to the slab is called ';parachute-effect', which is characterized by other researchers. In addition, the existence of the ULVZ or the MOW in the slab may supply a possible mechanism for triggering deep earthquakes, called ';phase transformation faulting', which was already proposed few

  7. Application of the critical Coulomb wedge theory to hyper-extended, magma-poor rifted margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirrengarten, M.; Manatschal, G.; Yuan, X. P.; Kusznir, N. J.; Maillot, B.

    2016-05-01

    The Critical Coulomb Wedge Theory (CCWT) has been extensively used in compressional tectonics to resolve the shape of orogenic or accretionary prisms, while it is less applied to extensional and gravitational wedges despite the fact that it can be described by the same equation. In particular, the hyper-extended domain at magma-poor rifted margins, forming the oceanward termination of extended continental crust, satisfies the three main requirements of the CCWT: 1) it presents a wedge shape, 2) the rocks forming the wedge are completely brittle (frictional), and 3) the base of the wedge corresponds to a low friction décollement. However hyper-extended margins present a fully frictional behaviour only for a very thin crust; therefore this study is limited to the termination of hyper-extended continental crust which deforms in the latest stage of continental rifting. In this paper we define a method to measure the surface slope and the basal deep of this wedge that we apply to 17 hyper-extended, magma-poor rifted margins in order to compare the results to the values predicted by the CCWT. Because conjugate pairs of hyper-extended, magma-poor rifted margins are commonly asymmetric, due to detachment faulting, the wedges in the upper and lower plate margins corresponding respectively to the hanging wall and footwall of the detachment system are different. While the stress field in the upper plate wedge corresponds to a tectonic extensional wedge, the one in the lower plate matches that of a gravity extensional wedge. Using typical frictional properties of phyllosilicates (e.g. clays and serpentine), the shape of the hyper-extended wedges can be resolved by the CCWT using consistent fluid overpressures. Our results show that all lower plate margins are gravitationally stable and therefore have a close to critical shape whereas the tectonic extensional wedges at upper plate margins are critical, sub or sup critical due to the detachment initial angle and the duration of

  8. Line-shape flattening resulting from hypersonic nozzle wedge flow in low-pressure chemical lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Livingston, P.M.; Bullock, D.L.

    1980-07-01

    The new hypersonic wedge nozzle (HYWN) supersonic wedge nozzle design produces a significant component of directed gas flow along the optical axis of a laser cavity comparable to thermal speeds. The gain-line-shape function is broadened and the refractive-index line shape is also spread as a function of wedge-flow half-angle. An analytical treatment as well as a numerical study is presented that evaluates the Doppler-directed-flow impact on the number of longitudinal modes and their frequencies as well as on gain and refractive-index saturation of those that lase in a Fabry--Perot cavity.

  9. Line-shape flattening resulting from hypersonic nozzle wedge flow in low-pressure chemical lasers.

    PubMed

    Livingston, P M; Bullock, D L

    1980-07-01

    The new hypersonic wedge nozzle (HYWN) supersonic wedge nozzle design produces a significant component of directed gas flow along the optical axis of a laser cavity comparable to thermal speeds. The gain-line-shape function is broadened and the refractive-index line shape is also spread as a function of wedge-flow half-angle. An analytical treatment as well as a numerical study is presented that evaluates the Doppler-directed-flow impact on the number of longitudinal modes and their frequencies as well as on gain and refractive-index saturation of those that lase in a Fabry-Perot cavity. PMID:19693204

  10. High-Throughput Metagenomic Technologies for Complex Microbial Community Analysis: Open and Closed Formats

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhili; Yang, Yunfeng; Deng, Ye; Tringe, Susannah G.; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Understanding the structure, functions, activities and dynamics of microbial communities in natural environments is one of the grand challenges of 21st century science. To address this challenge, over the past decade, numerous technologies have been developed for interrogating microbial communities, of which some are amenable to exploratory work (e.g., high-throughput sequencing and phenotypic screening) and others depend on reference genes or genomes (e.g., phylogenetic and functional gene arrays). Here, we provide a critical review and synthesis of the most commonly applied “open-format” and “closed-format” detection technologies. We discuss their characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages within the context of environmental applications and focus on analysis of complex microbial systems, such as those in soils, in which diversity is high and reference genomes are few. In addition, we discuss crucial issues and considerations associated with applying complementary high-throughput molecular technologies to address important ecological questions. PMID:25626903

  11. High-throughput metagenomic technologies for complex microbial community analysis. Open and closed formats

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili; Yang, Yunfeng; Deng, Ye; Tringe, Susannah G.; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2015-01-27

    Understanding the structure, functions, activities and dynamics of microbial communities in natural environments is one of the grand challenges of 21st century science. To address this challenge, over the past decade, numerous technologies have been developed for interrogating microbial communities, of which some are amenable to exploratory work (e.g., high-throughput sequencing and phenotypic screening) and others depend on reference genes or genomes (e.g., phylogenetic and functional gene arrays). Here, we provide a critical review and synthesis of the most commonly applied “open-format” and “closed-format” detection technologies. We discuss their characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages within the context of environmental applications and focus on analysis of complex microbial systems, such as those in soils, in which diversity is high and reference genomes are few. In addition, we discuss crucial issues and considerations associated with applying complementary high-throughput molecular technologies to address important ecological questions.

  12. Decarbonation and carbonation processes in the slab and mantle wedge - insights from thermomechanical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, C. M.; Gorczyk, W.; Connolly, J. A.; Gerya, T.; Hobbs, B. E.; Ord, A.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction zones offer one of the most geologically active and complex systems to investigate. They initiate a process in which crustal sediments are recycled, mantle heterogeneities arise, and mantle wedge refertilization occurs via slab derived volatiles and magma generation. Slab derived volatiles, consisting primarily of H2O - CO2 fluids, are especially critical in subduction evolution as they rheologically weaken the mantle wedge, decrease solidus temperatures, and rock-fluid interactions result in metasomatism. While the effects of H2O in these processes have been well studied in the past decades, CO2's role remains open for much scientific study. This is partly attributed to the sensitivity of decarbonation to the thermal gradient of the subduction zone, bulk compositions (sediments, basalts, peridotites) and redox state of the mantle. Here we show benchmarking results of a subduction scenario that implements carbonation-decarbonation reactions into a fully coupled petrological-thermomechanical numerical modeling code. We resolve stable mineralogy and extract rock properties via Perple_X at a resolution of 5°C and 25 MPa. The numerical technique employed is a characteristics-based marker-in-cell technique with conservative finite-differences that includes visco-elastic-plastic rheologies (I2ELVIS). The devolatilized fluids are tracked via markers that are either generated or consumed based on P-T conditions. The fluids are also allowed to freely advect within the velocity field. The hosts for CO2 in this system are computed via GLOSS average sediments (H2O: 7.29 wt% & CO2: 3.01 wt%), metabasalts ( H2O: 2.63 & CO2: 2.90 wt%), and ophicarbonates (H2O: 1.98 wt% & CO2: 5.00 wt%). Our results demonstrate the feasibility of applying this decarbonation-carbonation numerical method to a range of geodynamic scenarios that simulate the removal of CO2 from the subducting slab. Such applicable scenarios include sediment diapirism into the convecting wedge and better

  13. Motion control of the wedge prisms in Risley-prism-based beam steering system for precise target tracking.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuan; Lu, Yafei; Hei, Mo; Liu, Guangcan; Fan, Dapeng

    2013-04-20

    Two exact inverse solutions of Risley prisms have been given by previous authors, based on which we calculate the gradients of the scan field that open a way to investigate the nonlinear relationship between the slewing rate of the beam and the required angular velocities of the two wedge prisms in the Risley-prism-based beam steering system for target tracking. The limited regions and singularity point at the center and the edge of the field of regard are discussed. It is found that the maximum required rotational velocities of the two prisms for target tracking are nearly the same and are dependent on the altitude angle. The central limited region is almost independent of the prism parameters. The control singularity at the crossing center path can be avoided by switching the two solutions. PMID:23669697

  14. Scattering of a Plane Electromagnetic Wave by an Infinite Dihedral Wedge with a Slotted Cylinder at the Apex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepilko, E. V.

    2003-11-01

    The problem of scattering of a plane electromagnetic wave by a perfectly conducting dihedral wedge with a slotted cylinder at the apex in rigorous formulation is reduced to solving a system of linear algebraic equations for unknown coefficients of the Fourier expansion of the scattered field. The results of calculation of the far-zone field with a given accuracy are presented in the case of an E-polarized incident wave. It is shown that for a slot with a large opening angle, the radiation patterns of the field in the long-wavelength far zone has a shape similar to a cardioid and does not depend on the incident-wave direction and the dielectric permittivity of the cylinder. In the case of a narrow slot, the radiation-pattern shape depends significantly on the incidence angle of the wave.

  15. Controls on the Flow Regime and Thermal Structure of the Subduction Zone Mantle Wedge: A Systematic 2-D and 3-D Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Voci, Giuseppe; Davies, Rhodri; Goes, Saskia; Kramer, Stephan; Wilson, Cian

    2014-05-01

    Arc volcanism at subduction zones is likely regulated by the mantle wedge's flow regime and thermal structure and, hence, numerous studies have attempted to quantify the principal controls on mantle wedge conditions. Here, we build on these previous studies by undertaking the first systematic 2-D and 3-D numerical investigation, across a wide parameter-space, into how hydration and thermal buoyancy influence the wedge's flow regime and associated thermal structure, above a kinematically driven subducting plate. We find that small-scale convection (SSC), resulting from Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, or drips, off the base of the overriding lithosphere, is a typical occurrence, if: (i) viscosities are < 5×1018 Pa s; and (ii) hydrous weakening of wedge rheology extends at least 100-150 km from the trench. In 2-D models, instabilities generally take the form of 'drips'. Although along-strike averages of wedge velocities and temperature in 3-D structure are consistent with those in 2-D, fluctuations are larger in 3-D. Furthermore, in 3-D, two separate, but interacting, longitudinal Richter roll systems form (with their axes aligned perpendicular to the trench), the first below the arc region and the second below the back-arc region. These instabilities result in transient and spatial temperature fluctuations of 100-150K, which are sufficient to influence melting, the stability of hydrous minerals and the dehydration of crustal material. Furthermore, they are efficient at eroding the overriding lithosphere, particularly in 3-D and, thus, provide a means to explain observations of high heat flow and thin back-arc lithosphere at many subduction zones, if back-arc mantle is hydrated.

  16. Influence of intermolecular forces at critical-point wedge filling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malijevský, Alexandr; Parry, Andrew O.

    2016-04-01

    We use microscopic density functional theory to study filling transitions in systems with long-ranged wall-fluid and short-ranged fluid-fluid forces occurring in a right-angle wedge. By changing the strength of the wall-fluid interaction we can induce both wetting and filling transitions over a wide range of temperatures and study the order of these transitions. At low temperatures we find that both wetting and filling transitions are first order in keeping with predictions of simple local effective Hamiltonian models. However close to the bulk critical point the filling transition is observed to be continuous even though the wetting transition remains first order and the wetting binding potential still exhibits a small activation barrier. The critical singularities for adsorption for the continuous filling transitions depend on whether retarded or nonretarded wall-fluid forces are present and are in excellent agreement with predictions of effective Hamiltonian theory even though the change in the order of the transition was not anticipated.

  17. Transonic flow past a wedge profile with detached bow wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincenti, Walter G; Wagoner, Cleo B

    1952-01-01

    A theoretical study has been made of the aerodynamic characteristics at zero angle of attack of a thin, doubly symmetrical double-wedge profile in the range of supersonic flight speed in which the bow wave is detached. The analysis utilizes the equations of the transonic small-disturbance theory and involves no assumptions beyond those implicit in this theory. The mixed flow about the front half of the profile is calculated by relaxation solution of boundary conditions along the shock polar and sonic line. The purely subsonic flow about the rear of the profile is found by means of the method of characteristics specialized to the transonic small-disturbance theory. Complete calculations were made for four values of the transonic similarity parameter. These were found sufficient to bridge the gap between the previous results of Guderley and Yoshihara at a Mach number of 1 and the results which are readily obtained when the bow wave is attached and the flow is completely supersonic.

  18. High school students' enactment of chemistry knowing in open-entry laboratory investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilane, Sentsetsa M.

    2003-10-01

    This study is an exploration of student meaning making in a non-traditional, high activity, hands-on grade 12 high school chemistry setting. The study focused on a sequence of three "open-entry" laboratory investigations (i.e., iodine clock reaction, pop-can cell and electroplating). These open-entry laboratory investigations were designed to be flexible and to take place in settings where students could make an impact. Students were responsible for devising their own problem and entry strategy, for making decisions about what reagents to use, what variables to manipulate, and how to proceed to develop the problem to a resolution acceptable to them and to the teacher. To explore students' meaning making in open-entry laboratory settings, their interactions were video taped and samples of their written laboratory reports were collected from time to time. Students were also requested to write reflective notes on their experiences of each investigation, some students were interviewed at the end of the course. This thesis consists of accounts and interpretations of what students did and said as they made meaning in these open-entry, hands-on laboratory investigations. The research uses an enactivist perspective to explore the meanings emerging from the study. From an enactivist view, cognition is seen as perceptually guided action in which a knower brings forth a world of significance with others. Enactivism suggests that students do not only express their knowing in what they say or write but also in their actions with others within this learning community. The research revealed that meaning making in these circumstances was highly complex. It involved systematic trial and error at various levels within the multiple iterative feedback loops. Students' interactions in this setting were mediated by the culture of chemistry which is embodied in the practices of the discipline. With students having to make decisions with every action, their meaning making was not only

  19. Hyaluronan Based Heparin Free Coated Open and Closed Extracorporeal Circuits for High Risk Coronary Revascularization

    PubMed Central

    Gunaydin, Serdar; Ucar, Halil Ibrahim; Serter, Tanzer; McCusker, Kevin; Ozcelik, Gokhan; Salman, Nevriye; Yorgancioglu, Ali Cem

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: This prospective randomized study compares the inflammatory response and fibrinolytic activation of fully coated/uncoated and open/closed extracorporeal circuits (ECC) in high risk patients. Over a 2-month period, 48 patients with EuroSCOREs 6 or greater undergoing coronary revascularization were pro spectively randomized to one of the four perfusion protocols: Group 1: Closed and totally hyaluronan based heparin free coated (Vision HFO-GBS-HF™, Gish Biomedical, Rancho Santa Margarita, CA) ECC with a soft-shell coated venous reservoir (SVR11S2-HFC™, Gish Biomedical) and a hard-shell cardiotomy (CAPVRF44, Gish Biomedical) (n = 12); Group 2: Closed and totally uncoated identical ECC with soft-shell uncoated venous reservoir and a hard-shell cardiotomy (n = 12); Group 3: Open, totally hyaluronan based heparin free coated ECC (n = 12); and Group 4: Control-open, uncoated ECC (n = 12). Blood samples were collected at T1: Baseline; T2: 15 minutes after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) initiation; T3: before cessation of CPB; T4: 15 minutes after protamine reversal, and T5: in the intensive care unit. Serum IL-6 levels were significantly lower at T2 in all study groups, at T3 for coated groups, and T4 for closed+coated group (p < .05 versus control). Creatine kinase M-band (MB) levels in coronary sinus blood demonstrated well preserved myocardium after CPB in both coated groups versus Control (p < .05). Neutrophil CD11b/CD18 levels were significantly lower for all study groups versus control at T2, for both coated groups at T3 and only for closed+coated group at T4 (p < .05). Postoperative hemorrhage (mL) was 510 ± 40 in closed+coated and 536 ± 40 in open+coated groups (control: 784 ± 48, p ≤ .05). No significant differences in thrombin-antithrombin complex and free plasma hemoglobin were observed. Desorbed protein amount on ECC (mg/dL) was 1.7 ± .01 in closed+coated, 2.01 ± .01 in open+coated, and 3.3 ± .015 in control groups (p ≤ .05). Use of a

  20. Performance of an isolated two-dimensional variable-geometry wedge nozzle with translating shroud and collapsing wedge at speeds up to Mach 2.01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiden, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation was conducted to determine the aeropropulsion performance (thrust-minus-drag) of a single-engine, variable-geometry, two-dimensional (2-D) wedge nozzle with simulated translating-shroud and collapsing-wedge mechanisms. The investigation was conducted statically and at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 2.01 at an angle of attack of 0 deg and at varied jet total-pressure ratios up to 21, depending on the Mach number. The results indicate that the isolated aeropropulsion performance of a variable-geometry two-dimensional wedge nozzle is competitive with axisymmetric nozzles at transonic and supersonic speeds, but the isolated performance is slightly inferior for static take-off and low subsonic speeds. With the use of a simple tertiary-air ejector, the static take-off performance was increased.

  1. Clinical implementation of enhanced dynamic wedges into the Pinnacle treatment planning system: Monte Carlo validation and patient-specific QA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Munir; Deng, Jun; Lund, Molly W.; Chen, Zhe; Kimmett, James; Moran, Meena S.; Nath, Ravinder

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this work is to present a systematic Monte Carlo validation study on the clinical implementation of the enhanced dynamic wedges (EDWs) into the Pinnacle3 (Philips Medical Systems, Fitchburg, WI) treatment planning system (TPS) and QA procedures for patient plan verification treated with EDWs. Modeling of EDW beams in the Pinnacle3 TPS, which employs a collapsed-cone convolution superposition (CCCS) dose model, was based on a combination of measured open-beam data and the 'Golden Segmented Treatment Table' (GSTT) provided by Varian for each photon beam energy. To validate EDW models, dose profiles of 6 and 10 MV photon beams from a Clinac 2100 C/D were measured in virtual water at depths from near-surface to 30 cm for a wide range of field sizes and wedge angles using the Profiler 2 (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL) diode array system. The EDW output factors (EDWOFs) for square fields from 4 to 20 cm wide were measured in virtual water using a small-volume Farmer-type ionization chamber placed at a depth of 10 cm on the central axis. Furthermore, the 6 and 10 MV photon beams emerging from the treatment head of Clinac 2100 C/D were fully modeled and the central-axis depth doses, the off-axis dose profiles and the output factors in water for open and dynamically wedged fields were calculated using the Monte Carlo (MC) package EGS4. Our results have shown that (1) both the central-axis depth doses and the off-axis dose profiles of various EDWs computed with the CCCS dose model and MC simulations showed good agreement with the measurements to within 2%/2 mm; (2) measured EDWOFs used for monitor-unit calculation in Pinnacle3 TPS agreed well with the CCCS and MC predictions within 2%; (3) all the EDW fields satisfied our validation criteria of 1% relative dose difference and 2 mm distance-to-agreement (DTA) with 99-100% passing rate in routine patient treatment plan verification using MapCheck 2D diode array.

  2. Clinical implementation of enhanced dynamic wedges into the Pinnacle treatment planning system: Monte Carlo validation and patient-specific QA.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Munir; Deng, Jun; Lund, Molly W; Chen, Zhe; Kimmett, James; Moran, Meena S; Nath, Ravinder

    2009-01-21

    The goal of this work is to present a systematic Monte Carlo validation study on the clinical implementation of the enhanced dynamic wedges (EDWs) into the Pinnacle(3) (Philips Medical Systems, Fitchburg, WI) treatment planning system (TPS) and QA procedures for patient plan verification treated with EDWs. Modeling of EDW beams in the Pinnacle(3) TPS, which employs a collapsed-cone convolution superposition (CCCS) dose model, was based on a combination of measured open-beam data and the 'Golden Segmented Treatment Table' (GSTT) provided by Varian for each photon beam energy. To validate EDW models, dose profiles of 6 and 10 MV photon beams from a Clinac 2100 C/D were measured in virtual water at depths from near-surface to 30 cm for a wide range of field sizes and wedge angles using the Profiler 2 (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL) diode array system. The EDW output factors (EDWOFs) for square fields from 4 to 20 cm wide were measured in virtual water using a small-volume Farmer-type ionization chamber placed at a depth of 10 cm on the central axis. Furthermore, the 6 and 10 MV photon beams emerging from the treatment head of Clinac 2100 C/D were fully modeled and the central-axis depth doses, the off-axis dose profiles and the output factors in water for open and dynamically wedged fields were calculated using the Monte Carlo (MC) package EGS4. Our results have shown that (1) both the central-axis depth doses and the off-axis dose profiles of various EDWs computed with the CCCS dose model and MC simulations showed good agreement with the measurements to within 2%/2 mm; (2) measured EDWOFs used for monitor-unit calculation in Pinnacle(3) TPS agreed well with the CCCS and MC predictions within 2%; (3) all the EDW fields satisfied our validation criteria of 1% relative dose difference and 2 mm distance-to-agreement (DTA) with 99-100% passing rate in routine patient treatment plan verification using MapCheck 2D diode array. PMID:19098353

  3. Evaluation of ‘OpenCL for FPGA’ for Data Acquisition and Acceleration in High Energy Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Srikanth

    2015-12-01

    The increase in the data acquisition and processing needs of High Energy Physics experiments has made it more essential to use FPGAs to meet those needs. However harnessing the capabilities of the FPGAs has been hard for anyone but expert FPGA developers. The arrival of OpenCL with the two major FPGA vendors supporting it, offers an easy software-based approach to taking advantage of FPGAs in applications such as High Energy Physics. OpenCL is a language for using heterogeneous architectures in order to accelerate applications. However, FPGAs are capable of far more than acceleration, hence it is interesting to explore if OpenCL can be used to take advantage of FPGAs for more generic applications. To answer these questions, especially in the context of High Energy Physics, two applications, a DAQ module and an acceleration workload, were tested for implementation with OpenCL on FPGAs2. The challenges on using OpenCL for a DAQ application and their solutions, together with the performance of the OpenCL based acceleration are discussed. Many of the design elements needed to realize a DAQ system in OpenCL already exists, mostly as FPGA vendor extensions, but a small number of elements were found to be missing. For acceleration of OpenCL applications, using FPGAs has become as easy as using GPUs. OpenCL has the potential for a massive gain in productivity and ease of use enabling non FPGA experts to design, debug and maintain the code. Also, FPGA power consumption is much lower than other implementations. This paper describes one of the first attempts to explore the use of OpenCL for applications outside the acceleration workloads.

  4. Goals of and open problems in high-performance heterogeneous computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Howard J.; Antonio, John K.; Metzger, Richard C.; Tan, Min; Li, Yan A.

    1995-01-01

    Ideally, a heterogeneous computing (HC) environment, is a well-orchestrated and coordinates suite of high-performance machines that provides support for computationally intensive applications with diverse computing requirements. Such an HC system includes a heterogeneous suite of machines, high-speed interconnections, interfaces, operating systems, communication protocols, and programming environments. HC is the effective use of these diverse hardware and software components to meet the distinct and varied computational requirements of a given application. Implicit in this concept of HC is the idea that subtasks with different machine architectural requirements are embedded in the applications executed by the HC system. Two types of HC systems, mixed-mode machines and mixed-machine systems, are discussed. The goals of and open problems in HC are overviewed.

  5. kspectrum: an open-source code for high-resolution molecular absorption spectra production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eymet, V.; Coustet, C.; Piaud, B.

    2016-01-01

    We present the kspectrum, scientific code that produces high-resolution synthetic absorption spectra from public molecular transition parameters databases. This code was originally required by the atmospheric and astrophysics communities, and its evolution is now driven by new scientific projects among the user community. Since it was designed without any optimization that would be specific to any particular application field, its use could also be extended to other domains. kspectrum produces spectral data that can subsequently be used either for high-resolution radiative transfer simulations, or for producing statistic spectral model parameters using additional tools. This is a open project that aims at providing an up-to-date tool that takes advantage of modern computational hardware and recent parallelization libraries. It is currently provided by Méso-Star (http://www.meso-star.com) under the CeCILL license, and benefits from regular updates and improvements.

  6. Open and closed shear-walls in high-rise structural systems: Static and dynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Lacidogna, Giuseppe; Nitti, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    In the present paper, a General Algorithm is applied to the analysis of high-rise structures. This algorithm is to be used as a calculation tool in preliminary design; it allows to define the interaction between closed and open, straight or curved shear-walls, and the forces exchanged in structures subject to mainly horizontal loads. The analysis can be performed in both static and dynamic regimes, the mode shapes and the natural frequencies being assessed. This general formulation allows analyses of high-rise structures by taking into account the torsional rigidity and the warping deformations of the elements composing the building without gross simplifications. In thisway it is possible to model the structure as a single equivalent cantilever, thus minimising the degrees of freedom of the system, and consequently the calculation time. Finally, potentials of the method proposed are demonstrated by a numerical example which emphasizes the link between global displacements and stresses in the elements composing the structure.

  7. Status of {open_quotes}Nirvana{close_quotes}: High quality GUI based software for HEP

    SciTech Connect

    Edel, M.; Kryiakopulos, J.; Lebrun, P.; Kallenbach, J.; Ravoor, S.; Iourcha, K.

    1994-12-31

    The Fermilab {open_quotes}Nirvana{close_quotes} project has produced a number of tools for data analysis in High Energy Physics. The authors goal has been to produce software which takes maximum advantage of the workstation graphical user interface. Histo-Scope and NPlot enable users to browse data from running programs and HBOOK, Histo-Scope, and columnar text files. They also provide highly interactive two and three dimensional plots which can be rotated, scaled and adjusted directly with the workstation mouse. The newest program, NFit, a GUI version of the MINUIT fitting program, will be ready in a few months. In addition, NEdit, the programmer`s text editor, was released as public domain in December. The authors discuss the basics of these software products, as well as improvements in the newest versions of Histo-Scope, NPlot, and NEdit.

  8. Model of a wedge-electrode corona discharge under saturation: Exact solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boltachev, G. Sh.; Zubarev, N. M.; Zubareva, O. V.

    2014-03-01

    Analytical solutions for the distributions of the electric field potential and electric charge density are derived for the outer region of a steady-state unipolar corona discharge from an ideal wedge-shaped electrode under the conditions of space-charge-limited current. Two situations are considered: a corona is initiated only from the edge of the wedge and from the entire surface of the electrode. In the former case, general solutions are obtained by sewing together exact cylindrically symmetric solutions in the drift space and plane symmetric solutions in space-charge-free regions. In the latter case, the field distribution near the edge turns out to be self-similar, i.e., invariant under extensions in the cross-sectional plane of the wedge, with the center at the top of the wedge. For both models, the dependences of the saturation current per edge's unit length on the apex angle and applied potential difference are obtained.

  9. Study on Mach stems induced by interaction of planar shock waves on two intersecting wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Gaoxiang; Wang, Chun; Teng, Honghui; Yang, Yang; Jiang, Zonglin

    2016-06-01

    The properties of Mach stems in hypersonic corner flow induced by Mach interaction over 3D intersecting wedges were studied theoretically and numerically. A new method called "spatial dimension reduction" was used to analyze theoretically the location and Mach number behind Mach stems. By using this approach, the problem of 3D steady shock/shock interaction over 3D intersecting wedges was transformed into a 2D moving one on cross sections, which can be solved by shock-polar theory and shock dynamics theory. The properties of Mach interaction over 3D intersecting wedges can be analyzed with the new method, including pressure, temperature, density in the vicinity of triple points, location, and Mach number behind Mach stems. Theoretical results were compared with numerical results, and good agreement was obtained. Also, the influence of Mach number and wedge angle on the properties of a 3D Mach stem was studied.

  10. Application of slip-line analysis to the mechanical model of active accretionary wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, I.; Lee, H.; Kim, J.

    2012-04-01

    An active accretionary wedge is formed from sediments accreted continuously at a continental margin by a subducting plate and mechanically characterized by a plane-strain compressive frictional flow throughout its entire volume. Continuous deformation induced by incoming sediments raises the distortional stress eventually leading to an ultimate condition known as a critical state. According to the critical taper theory (Davis et al., JGR, 1983), the angle of wedge increases as the incoming materials are accreted into the wedge until it reaches a critical value where the shear force on the basal detachment is in equilibrium with the basal friction. Under this concept, we applied the plastic slip-line theory for the computation of stress and velocity fields throughout the continuously deforming area of the wedge. For the simplicity, we assumed that the tapered wedge overlying a basal décollement fault is described by a perfectly plastic rheology complying with the Coulomb failure criterion and the associated flow rule. A complete description of soil rheology at the critical state requires the determination of stress tensors and velocity vectors at given points within the deforming region. For the boundary condition of stress, the effective normal and shear tractions on the upper surface of wedge are equal to zero, and thus the maximum principal stress acts parallel to the surface. Considering the two-dimensional plane strain deformation, we numerically obtained the slip-line solution for the mean effective stress with respect to the orientation of the maximum principal stress at each intersection point of the potential (conjugate) slip lines given by the Coulomb criterion. Then the maximum shear stress was calculated using the failure criterion. After the stress solution was yielded, the velocity field was determined by the same procedure using the boundary condition of the velocity of incoming sediments obtained from the velocity of subducting plate. Our result

  11. Salt-wedge propagation in a Mediterranean micro-tidal river mouth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haralambidou, Kiriaki; Sylaios, Georgios; Tsihrintzis, Vassilios A.

    2010-12-01

    The dynamics of a seasonally formed salt-wedge propagating along the micro-tidal channel of Strymon River estuary, Northern Greece, and its consequences on river water quality, are thoroughly studied through intensive sampling campaigns. The wedge is developed at the downstream river part, under the summer limited freshwater discharge conditions ( Q < 30 m 3/s). The geometric features of the wedge (length and thickness) appeared directly related to Strymon River discharge. A maximum intrusion length of 4.7 km along Strymon River estuary was observed under minimum river discharge of almost 6 m 3/s. Relations produced from in situ data illustrate that limited river flow expands the wedge horizontally, reducing its vertical dimension, while higher flows lead to increased wedge thickness. Estuarine flushing time ranges between 0.2 and 1.5 days, exponentially dependent on Strymon River discharge. Wedge velocities depicted tidal asymmetry between tidal phases, with consistent inward motion, even under the ebb tidal stage. Strong vertical stratification prevails throughout the tidal cycle, proving the limited vertical mixing between the two layers, although higher interfacial stresses are produced in ebb. Bottom topography plays an interesting role in wedge propagation, as the presence of an underwater sill either prevents saline intrusion during flood or isolates the front of the wedge from its core at the ebb. Ecological consequences of salt-wedge propagation in Strymon River estuary are the frequent evidence of bottom hypoxic conditions and the increased TSS levels, leading to the occurrence of a turbidity maximum at the tip of the salt-wedge. Higher BOD and ammonium levels were mostly observed at the river end, associated to point and non-point pollution sources. Nitrates and silicates were found associated with freshwater fluxes, while ammonia levels were related to saline intrusions. The reduced phosphorus freshwater fluxes, resulting from phosphorus uptake at the

  12. The Río de la Plata estuary response to wind variability in synoptic time scale: Salinity fields and salt wedge structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meccia, V. L.; Simionato, C. G.; Guerrero, R. A.

    2009-04-01

    The Río de la Plata estuary is located in the eastern coast of southern South America, approximately at 35° S. It has a northwest to southeast oriented funnel shape approximately 300 km long that narrows from 220 km at its mouth to 40 km at its upper end. With a mean discharge of 25,000 m3 s-1 and a drainage area of 3.5 × 106 km2 it ranks fourth and fifth worldwide in freshwater discharge and drainage area, respectively. The interaction between estuarine and shelf waters originates an intense and active salinity front which plays an important role in the flow dynamics and the distribution of properties on the shelf. As a result of the constant displacement of the surface front and the steadiness of the bottom front whose location is controlled by the bathymetry, a time-variable salt wedge structure is observed in the estuary during most of the year. In this work, Estuary, Coastal and Ocean Model (ECOM) was applied to study the processes associated to the salinity fields and the salt wedge structure in the Río de la Plata estuary. It was found that salinity fields in the Río de la Plata rapidly respond -order of 3 days- to wind variability. Therefore, the traditional conceptual scheme that considers seasonal variability as the main feature of the salinity field in this estuary does not longer hold and conditions classically though as characteristic of ‘winter' or ‘summer' can take place during any season with high variability. The estuary response to wind variability can be explained in terms of four characteristic patterns associated to winds that blow with dominant components perpendicular and parallel to the estuary axis. Northeasterly winds produce a southwestward retraction of the surface salinity front. The results are consistent with upwelling motion along the Uruguayan coast under this wind direction. Southwesterly winds produce a northward displacement of the surface salinity front towards the Uruguayan coast and, according to our simulations, a

  13. The effect of a dynamic wedge in the medial tangential field upon the contralateral breast dose

    SciTech Connect

    McParland, B.J. )

    1990-12-01

    The elevated incidence of breast cancer following irradiation of breast tissue has led to concern over the magnitude of the scattered radiation received by the uninvolved contralateral breast during radiation therapy for a primary breast lesion and the risk of an induced contralateral breast cancer. Some linear accelerators use a single dynamic (or universal) wedge that is mounted within the treatment head at an extended distance from the patient. Because of the combined effects of distance and shielding, the contralateral breast dose due to a medial tangent containing a dynamic wedge is expected to be less than that containing a conventional wedge. This paper presents contralateral breast dose (CBD) measurements performed on an anthropomorphic phantom with breast prostheses irradiated with 6 MV X rays from a linear accelerator equipped with a dynamic wedge. Doses were measured at 15 points within the contralateral breast prosthesis with thermoluminescent dosimeters. It was found that the contralateral breast dose per unit target breast dose decreases with the perpendicular distance from the posterior edge of the medial tangent to the dose measurement point and increases with effective wedge angle by factors ranging up to 2.8, in agreement with data presented earlier for a water phantom geometry. This dose elevation showed no statistically significant dependence (p less than 0.05) upon the perpendicular distance from the beam edge. Comparisons with data in the literature show that the contralateral breast dose increase by a dynamic wedge is typically only about half of that reported for a conventional wedge for the same wedge angle and distance from the beam.

  14. Development of tectono-sedimentary mélanges in accretionary wedges: Insights from analog modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genti, M.; Malavieille, J.; Molli, G.; Dominguez, S.; Taboada, A.; Vitale-Brovarone, A.

    2012-04-01

    Orogenic wedges locally present chaotic tectonostratigraphic units that contain exotic blocks of various size, origin, age and lithology, embedded in a sedimentary matrix. The occurrence of ophiolitic blocks, sometimes huge, in such "mélanges" raises questions on i) the mechanisms responsible for the incorporation of oceanic basement rocks into an accretionary wedge and ii) the mechanisms allowing exhumation and possibly redeposition of these exotic elements in "mélanges" during wedge growth. The tectonic evolution of the back part of doubly vergent accretionary wedges is mainly controled by backthrusting. The retrowedge is characterized by steep slopes that are prone to gravitational instabilities. We assume that these steep slopes trigger submarine landslides playing a major erosional role and therefore inducing huge mass transfers. This erosion allows exhumation of the ophiolitic fragments formerly accreted at the base of the wedge and then reworked as tectono-sedimentary "mélanges" redeposited in proximal basins located at the base of the retrowedge slope. These basin deposits are then continuously involved in backthrusting-induced deformation. In this study, we present the results of a series of analog experiments performed to characterize the processes and parameters responsible for accretion, exhumation and final tectonosedimentary reworking of oceanic basement lithosphere fragments in an accretionary wedge. The experimental setup is designed to simulate the interaction between tectonics, erosion and sedimentation. Different configurations are applied to study the impact of various parameters, such as irregular oceanic floor due to structural inheritance, or the presence of layers with contrasted rheology that can affect deformation partitioning in the wedge (frontal accretion vs basal accretion) influencing its growth. The experimental results are then compared with observations on ophiolite-bearing mélanges in the Taïwan (Lichi mélange) and northern

  15. Evidence of Arc Magma Genesis in a Paleo-Mantle Wedge, the Higashi-Akaishi Peridotite, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, C. B.; Guild, M. R.; Grove, T. L.; Carlson, R. W.

    2014-12-01

    Located in the Sanbagawa subduction-related high-pressure metamorphic belt in SW Japan on the island of Shikoku, the Higashi-akaishi peridotite body is composed of dunite, lherzolite and garnet clinopyroxenite, interfingered in one locality with quartz-rich eclogite. Previous work indicates the P-T history of the peridotite includes rapid prograde metamorphism with peak temperatures of 700-810°C and pressures of 2.9-3.8 GPa [1] at ~88-89 Ma followed by rapid exhumation at >2.5 cm/yr [2,3]. Major and trace element and isotopic data from samples within the Higashi-akaishi peridotite presented here and in another recent study [4] provide a record of subduction zone melting processes in a paleo-mantle wedge. Ultramafic samples range from 40-52 wt.% SiO2, 1-11 wt.% Al2O3 and 21-45 wt.% MgO with olivine and clinopyroxene Mg#'s as high as 0.93. The quartz-rich eclogite contains 62 wt.% SiO2, 6 wt.% MgO and 13 wt.% Al2O3 with trace element concentrations that are enriched relative to the ultramafic samples. 87Sr/86Sr (.703237-.704288), 143Nd/144Nd (ɛNd=+2 to +6) and Pb isotopic compositions are within the range of previously studied Japanese arc rocks. We interpret the pyroxenites as shallowly crystallized cumulates with varying amounts of trapped hydrous melt and the harzburgites as residues of melting. The peak P-T conditions of these rocks are similar to the solidus conditions of H2O-saturated fertile mantle near the base of the mantle wedge [5,6]. The presence of garnet porphyroblasts that enclose primary euhedral chlorite together with the chemical evidence, suggest these samples are associated with mantle melting in the presence of H2O. Major element modeling suggests the quartz-rich eclogite composition can be reproduced through mixing melts of subducted sediment with wet peridotite melts in the mantle wedge. Thus the Higashi-aikashi rock suite provides an in-situ record of the beginnings of hydrous melting and the mechanisms of metasomatism in the mantle wedge

  16. Breakdown in helium in high-voltage open discharge with subnanosecond current front rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweigert, I. V.; Alexandrov, A. L.; Bokhan, P. A.; Zakrevskiy, Dm. E.

    2016-07-01

    Investigations of high-voltage open discharge in helium have shown a possibility of generation of current pulses with subnanosecond front rise, due to ultra-fast breakdown development. The open discharge is ignited between two planar cathodes with mesh anode in the middle between them. For gas pressure 6 Torr and 20 kV applied voltage, the rate of current rise reaches 500 A/(cm2 ns) for current density 200 A/cm2 and more. The time of breakdown development was measured for different helium pressures and a kinetic model of breakdown in open discharge is presented, based on elementary reactions for electrons, ions and fast atoms. The model also includes various cathode emission processes due to cathode bombardment by ions, fast atoms, electrons and photons of resonant radiation with Doppler shift of frequency. It is shown, that the dominating emission processes depend on the evolution of the discharge voltage during the breakdown. In the simulations, two cases of voltage behavior were considered: (i) the voltage is kept constant during the breakdown; (ii) the voltage is reduced with the growth of current. For the first case, the exponentially growing current is maintained due to photoemission by the resonant photons with Doppler-shifted frequency. For the second case, the dominating factor of current growth is the secondary electron emission. In both cases, the subnanosecond rise of discharge current was obtained. Also the effect of gas pressure on breakdown development was considered. It was found that for 20 Torr gas pressure the time of current rise decreases to 0.1 ns, which is in agreement with experimental data.

  17. Analysis of open-pit mines using high-resolution topography from UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianping; Li, Ke; Sofia, Giulia; Tarolli, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Among the anthropogenic topographic signatures on the Earth, open-pit mines deserve a great importance, since they significantly affect the Earth's surface and its related processes (e.g. erosion, pollution). Their geomorphological analysis, therefore, represents a real challenge for the Earth science community. The purpose of this research is to characterize the open-pit mining features using a recently published landscape metric, the Slope Local Length of Auto-Correlation (SLLAC) (Sofia et al., 2014), and high-resolution DEMs (Digital Elevation Models) derived from drone surveyed topography. The research focuses on two main case studies of iron mines located in the Beijing district (P.R. China). The main topographic information (Digital Surface Models, DSMs) was derived using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and the Structure from Motion (SfM) photogrammetric technique. The results underline the effectiveness of the adopted methodologies and survey techniques in the characterization of the main geomorphic features of the mines. Thanks to the SLLAC, the terraced area given by multi-benched sideways-moving method for the iron extraction is automatically depicted, and using some SLLAC derived parameters, the related terraces extent is automatically estimated. The analysis of the correlation length orientation, furthermore, allows to identify the terraces orientation respect to the North, and to understand as well the shape of the open-pit area. This provides a basis for a large scale and low cost topographic survey for a sustainable environmental planning and, for example, for the mitigation of environmental anthropogenic impact due to mining. References Sofia G., Marinello F, Tarolli P. 2014. A new landscape metric for the identification of terraced sites: the Slope Local Length of Auto-Correlation (SLLAC). ISPRS Journal of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, doi:10.1016/j.isprsjprs.2014.06.018

  18. Thermocleavable materials for polymer solar cells with high open circuit voltage-a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Tromholt, Thomas; Gevorgyan, Suren A; Jørgensen, Mikkel; Krebs, Frederik C; Sylvester-Hvid, Kristian O

    2009-12-01

    The search for polymer solar cells giving a high open circuit voltage was conducted through a comparative study of four types of bulk-heterojunction solar cells employing different photoactive layers. As electron donors the thermo-cleavable polymer poly-(3-(2-methylhexyloxycarbonyl)dithiophene) (P3MHOCT) and unsubstituted polythiophene (PT) were used, the latter of which results from thermo cleaving the former at 310 degrees C. As reference, P3HT solar cells were built in parallel. As electron acceptors, either PCBM or bis-[60]PCBM were used. In excess of 300 solar cells were produced under as identical conditions as possible, varying only the material combination of the photo active layer. It was observed that on replacing PCBM with bis[60]PCBM, the open circuit voltage on average increased by 100 mV for P3MHOCT and 200 mV for PT solar cells. Open circuit voltages approaching 1 V were observed for the PT:bis[60]PCBM solar cells and a maximum conversion efficiency of 1.3% was obtained for solar cells with P3MHOCT:PCBM as the photoactive material. For the reference solar cells maximum efficiencies of 2.1 and 2.4% were achieved for P3HT:PCBM and P3HT:bis[60]PCBM, respectively. Despite special measures taken in terms of substrate design and device processing, a substantial spread in the photovoltaic properties was generally observed. This spread could not be correlated with the optical properties of the solar cells, the thickness of the photo active layer or the electrode deposition conditions of the aluminum top electrode. PMID:20356155

  19. Contemporaneous comparison of open vs minimally-invasive radical prostatectomy for high-risk prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pierorazio, Phillip M.; Mullins, Jeffrey K.; Eifler, John B.; Voth, Kipp; Hyams, Elias S.; Han, Misop; Pavlovich, Christian P.; Bivalacqua, Trinity J.; Partin, Alan W.; Allaf, Mohamad E.; Schaeffer, Edward M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives • To analyze pathological and short-term oncological outcomes in men undergoing open and minimally-invasive radical prostatectomy (MIRP) for high-risk prostate cancer (HRPC; prostate-specific antigen level [PSA] >20 ng/mL, ≥cT2c, Gleason score 8–10) in a contemporaneous series. Patients and Methods • In total, 913 patients with HRPC were identified in the Johns Hopkins Radical Prostatectomy Database subsequent to the inception of MIRP at this institution (2002–2011) • Of these, 743 (81.4%) underwent open radical retropubic prostatectomy (ORRP), 105 (11.5%) underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALRP) and 65 (7.1%) underwent laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP) for HRPC. • Appropriate comparative tests were used to evaluate patient and prostate cancer characteristics. • Proportional hazards regression models were used to predict biochemical recurrence. Results • Age, race, body mass index, preoperative PSA level, clinical stage, number of positive cores and Gleason score at final pathology were similar between ORRP and MIRP. • On average, men undergoing MIRP had smaller prostates and more organ-confined (pT2) disease (P = 0.02). • The number of surgeons and surgeon experience were greatest for the ORRP cohort. • Overall surgical margin rate was 29.4%, 34.3% and 27.7% (P = 0.52) and 1.9%, 2.9% and 6.2% (P = 0.39) for pT2 disease in men undergoing ORRP, RALRP and LRP, respectively. • Biochemical recurrence-free survival among ORRP, RALRP and LRP was 56.3%, 67.8% and 41.1%, respectively, at 3 years (P = 0.6) and the approach employed did not predict biochemical recurrence in regression models. Conclusions • At an experienced centre, MIRP is comparable to open radical prostatectomy for HRPC with respect to surgical margin status and biochemical recurrence. PMID:23356390

  20. Inside the subduction factory: Modeling fluid mobile element enrichment in the mantle wedge above a subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shervais, John W.; Jean, Marlon M.

    2012-10-01

    Enrichment of the mantle wedge above subduction zones with fluid mobile elements is thought to represent a fundamental process in the origin of arc magmas. This "subduction factory" is typically modeled as a mass balance of inputs (from the subducted slab) and outputs (arc volcanics). We present here a new method to model fluid mobile elements, based on the composition of peridotites associated with supra-subduction ophiolites, which form by melt extraction and fluid enrichment in the mantle wedge above nascent subduction zones. The Coast Range ophiolite (CRO), California, is a Jurassic supra-subduction zone ophiolite that preserves mantle lithologies formed in response to hydrous melting. We use high-precision laser ablation ICP-MS analyses of relic pyroxenes from these peridotites to document fluid-mobile element (FME) concentrations, along with a suite of non-fluid mobile elements that includes rare earth and high-field strength elements. In the CRO, fluid-mobile elements are enriched by factors of up to 100× DMM, whereas fluid immobile elements are progressively depleted by melt extraction. The high concentrations of fluid mobile elements in supra-subduction peridotite pyroxene can be attributed to a flux of aqueous fluid or fluid-rich melt phase derived from the subducting slab. To model this enrichment, we derive a new algorithm that calculates the concentration of fluid mobile elements added to the source: C=[C/[[D/(D-PF)]∗[1-(PF/D)

  1. Focusing of surface phonon-polaritons along conical and wedge polar nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluchko, Sergei; Ordonez-Miranda, Jose; Tranchant, Laurent; Antoni, Thomas; Volz, Sebastian

    2015-08-01

    Focusing of surface phonon-polaritons propagating toward the tip of a cone and the edge of a wedge is theoretically analyzed and compared. Based on Maxwell's equations, explicit expressions for the dispersion relations in each structure are determined and solved numerically for a propagation parameter driving the surface phonon-polariton energy density. For conical and wedge structures of SiO2, it is found that: (1) the cone (wedge) supports the polariton focusing only for aperture angles in the interval 18 ° - 68 ° ( 21 ° - 51 ° ), and within the range of excitation frequencies from 32.1 THz (31.5 THz) to 33.9 THz (33.9 THz). In this frequency interval, the real part of the SiO2 permittivity is negative and the presence of polaritons is significant. (2) The polariton focusing efficiency of both the cone and wedge reaches its maximum values at the critical frequency f cr = 33.6 THz and at different aperture angles of about α opt = 45 ° and α opt = 30 ° , respectively. (3) When the polaritons travel from 100 nm to 5 nm toward the tip of the cone with this optimum angle, their Poynting vector increases by a factor of 12, which is about four times larger than the corresponding one provided by the wedge and indicates that the cone is more efficient than the wedge for the focusing of surface phonon-polaritons.

  2. Provenance of the Middle Ordovician Blount clastic wedge, Georgia and Tennessee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Greg H.

    1985-04-01

    Convergent tectonism along the Appalachian continental margin in Middle Ordovician time resulted in cratonward-prograding clastic wedges. Detrital modes of 52 sandstones of the Blount clastic wedge in Georgia and Tennessee are dominated by monocrystalline quartz (68%), feldspar (10%, plagioclase >K-feldspar), and pelitic rock fragments (10%), with lesser amounts of polycrystalline quartz (6%), chert (2%), low-grade metamorphic rock fragments (2%), and quartzofeldspathic rock fragments (0.3%). The primary source rocks were sedimentary; subordinate contributions were from low-grade metamorphic and plagioclase-rich plutonic and/or gneissic rocks. The composition of sandstones from the Martinsburg clastic wedge, based on point-counting 18 samples from the collection of McBride, and from the Taconic clastic wedge, based on data of Hiscott, is similar to the Blount clastic wedge except that Martinsburg and Taconic sandstones have additional evidence of derivation from intermediate or mafic volcanic and deep-water sedimentary source rocks, which were lacking in the Blount source terrane. The differences in provenance among the clastic wedges may indicate along-strike variations in tectonic style, or variations in the distribution of rock types, or differences in the level of erosion within orogenic terranes of similar origin.

  3. Improve the transconductance of a graphene field-effect transistor by folding graphene into a wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Guiming; Liu, Weihua; Cao, Meng; Li, Xin; Zhang, Anping; Wang, Xiaoli; Chen, Bangdao

    2016-07-01

    The transport property of a graphene wedge channel is studied theoretically and its leakage current through field emission is estimated when considering the effect of the internal electric field. The transconductance of the graphene transistor is improved from 0.016 to 0.321 μS μm‑1 when the graphene is folded into a wedge (with angle of wedge π/6 and radius curvature 2.7 nm at the tip), while the wedge height is much smaller than the space between the top-gate and the channel. The improved transconductance is due to the locally enhanced electric field, which results in a potential well and causes electron accumulation at the wedge tip. The leakage current through field emission J FE shows a super-linear increase with the channel conductive current J DS, where overall the electron supply for the field emission at the wedge tip is improved by the channel bias voltage V DS.

  4. Dosimetric verification of enhanced dynamic wedges by a 2D ion chamber array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Se An; Kim, Sung Kyu; Kang, Min Kyu; Yea, Ji Woon; Kim, Eng Chan

    2013-12-01

    Wedge filters are commonly used to achieve dose uniformity in the target volume in radiotherapy and can be categorized as physical wedges (PWs) and enhanced dynamic wedges (EDWs). The EDW generates PW-like dose profiles while moving the upper jaw in the Y directions with a varying dose rate in the treatment beams. Task Group 53 of the AAPM (American Association of Physicists in Medicine) recommended that the dynamic wedge be verified before implementation in the radiation treatment planning (RTP) system. The aim of this study was to use the I'mRT MatriXX to verify the dose profiles of the EDWs manufactured by Varian. We used Pencil Beam Convolution algorithms (eclipse 8.6) for the calculation and I'mRT MatriXX with Plastic Water® phantom MULTICube for dose measurements. The gamma indices of the calculations and the measurements for the EDWs were 84.84% and 86.54% in 2%/2 mm tolerance, and 99.47% and 99.64% in 3%/3 mm tolerance for wedge angles of 15°, 30°, 45° and 60°, respectively. The dose distributions differed between the calculations using the system and the measurements in the penumbra and the outer beam regions of the wedge fields. We confirmed that the dosimetric verifications of the EDW were acceptable when using the criterion for external beam dose calculations of Task Group 53.

  5. The Effects of a Lateral Wedge Insole on Knee and Ankle Joints During Slope Walking.

    PubMed

    Uto, Yuki; Maeda, Tetsuo; Kiyama, Ryoji; Kawada, Masayuki; Tokunaga, Ken; Ohwatashi, Akihiko; Fukudome, Kiyohiro; Ohshige, Tadasu; Yoshimoto, Yoichi; Yone, Kazunori

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a lateral wedge insole reduces the external knee adduction moment during slope walking. Twenty young, healthy subjects participated in this study. Subjects walked up and down a slope using 2 different insoles: a control flat insole and a 7° lateral wedge insole. A three-dimensional motion analysis system and force plate were used to examine the knee adduction moment, the ankle valgus moment, and the moment arm of the ground reaction force to the knee joint center in the frontal plane. The lateral wedge insole significantly decreased the moment arm of the ground reaction force, resulting in a reduction of the knee adduction moment during slope walking, similar to level walking. The reduction ratio of knee adduction moment by the lateral wedge insole during the early stance of up-slope walking was larger than that of level walking. Conversely, the lateral wedge insole increased the ankle valgus moment during slope walking, especially during the early stance phase of up-slope walking. Clinicians should examine the utilization of a lateral wedge insole for knee osteoarthritis patients who perform inclined walking during daily activity, in consideration of the load on the ankle joint. PMID:26252560

  6. Effect of lateral versus supine wedged position on development of spinal blockade and hypotension.

    PubMed

    Hartley, H; Seed, P T; Ashworth, H; Kubli, M; O'Sullivan, G; Reynolds, F

    2001-07-01

    Aortocaval compression may not be completely prevented by the supine wedged or tilted positions. It is commonly believed, however, that the unmodified full lateral position after induction of spinal anaesthesia might allow excessive spread of the block. We therefore compared baseline arterial pressures in the supine wedged, sitting, tilted and full lateral positions in 40 women who were about to undergo elective caesarean section. They were then given spinal anaesthesia in the left lateral position and randomised to be turned to the right lateral or the supine wedged position, after which speed of onset and spread of blockade to cold sensation were measured every 2 min for 10 min and mean arterial pressure and ephedrine requirement were recorded every minute for 20 min. Baseline mean arterial pressure was 9 mmHg (95% CI 3 to 14) lower in the left lateral (measured in the upper arm) than in the sitting position; those in the supine wedged and tilted positions were intermediate. Following spinal anaesthesia, hypotension (defined as a reading wedged group, but there was no significant difference between the groups in maximum fall or ephedrine requirement. The upper level of block rose more rapidly in the supine wedged than in the lateral group and showed less variability. There is therefore no reason to fear the unmodified lateral group position, which may offer better protection against hypotension. PMID:15321608

  7. Field observation of low-to-mid-frequency acoustic propagation characteristics of an estuarine salt wedge.

    PubMed

    Reeder, D Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The estuarine environment often hosts a salt wedge, the stratification of which is a function of the tide's range and speed of advance, river discharge volumetric flow rate, and river mouth morphology. Competing effects of temperature and salinity on sound speed in this stratified environment control the degree of acoustic refraction occurring along an acoustic path. A field experiment was carried out in the Columbia River Estuary to test the hypothesis: the estuarine salt wedge is acoustically observable in terms of low-to-mid-frequency acoustic propagation. Linear frequency-modulated acoustic signals in the 500-2000 Hz band were transmitted during the advance and retreat of the salt wedge during May 27-29, 2013. Results demonstrate that the salt wedge front is the dominant physical mechanism controlling acoustic propagation in this environment: received signal energy is relatively stable before and after the passage of the salt wedge front when the acoustic path consists of a single medium (either entirely fresh water or entirely salt water), and suffers a 10-15 dB loss and increased variability during salt wedge front passage. Physical parameters and acoustic propagation modeling corroborate and inform the acoustic observations. PMID:26827001

  8. Formation of Graphene p n Superlattices on Pb Quantum Wedged Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Wenguang; Chen, Hua; Bevan, Kirk H; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of first-principles calculations within density functional theory, we report on a novel scheme to create graphene p n superlattices on Pb wedged islands with quantum stability. Pb(111) wedged islands grown on vicinal Si(111) extend over several Si steps, forming a wedged structure with atomically flat tops. The monolayer thickness variation due to the underlying substrate steps is a sizable fraction of the total thickness of the wedged islands and gives rise to a bilayer oscillation in the work function of Pb(111) due to quantum size effects. Here, we demonstrate that when a graphene sheet is placed on the surface of such a Pb wedged island, the spatial work function oscillation on the Pb wedged island surface caused by the underlying steps results in an oscillatory shift in the graphene Dirac point with respect to the Fermi level. Furthermore, by applying an external electric field of 0.5 V/ in the surface normal direction, the Fermi level of the system can be globally tuned to an appropriate position such that the whole graphene layer becomes a graphene p n superlattice of seamless junctions, with potentially exotic physical properties and intriguing applications in nanoelectronics.

  9. Open Structure of the Ca2+ Gating Ring in the High-Conductance Ca2+-Activated K+ Channel

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Peng; Leonetti, Manuel D.; Hsiung, Yichun; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2012-01-01

    High conductance voltage-and Ca2+-activated K+ channels (Slo1 or BK channels) function in many physiological processes that link cell membrane voltage and intracellular Ca2+, including neuronal electrical activity, skeletal and smooth muscle contraction, and hair cell tuning1–8. Like other voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channels, BK channels open when the cell membrane depolarizes, but in contrast to other Kv channels they also open when intracellular Ca2+ levels rise. Channel opening by Ca2+ is conferred by a structure called the gating ring, located in the cytoplasm. Recent structural studies have defined the Ca2+-free, closed conformation of the gating ring, but the open conformation is not yet known9. Here we present the Ca2+-bound, open conformation of the gating ring. This structure shows how one layer of the gating ring, in response to the binding of Ca2+, opens like the petals of a flower. The magnitude of opening explains how Ca2+ binding can open the pore. These findings present amolecular basis of Ca2+ activation and suggest new possibilities for targeting the gating ring to treat diseases such as asthma and hypertension. PMID:22139424

  10. Discrete dislocation plasticity analysis of the wedge indentation of films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balint, D. S.; Deshpande, V. S.; Needleman, A.; Van der Giessen, E.

    2006-11-01

    The plane strain indentation of single crystal films on a rigid substrate by a rigid wedge indenter is analyzed using discrete dislocation plasticity. The crystals have three slip systems at ±35.3∘ and 90∘ with respect to the indentation direction. The analyses are carried out for three values of the film thickness, 2, 10 and 50 μm, and with the dislocations all of edge character modeled as line singularities in a linear elastic material. The lattice resistance to dislocation motion, dislocation nucleation, dislocation interaction with obstacles and dislocation annihilation are incorporated through a set of constitutive rules. Over the range of indentation depths considered, the indentation pressure for the 10 and 50 μm thick films decreases with increasing contact size and attains a contact size-independent value for contact lengths A>4 μm. On the other hand, for the 2 μm films, the indentation pressure first decreases with increasing contact size and subsequently increases as the plastic zone reaches the rigid substrate. For the 10 and 50 μm thick films sink-in occurs around the indenter, while pile-up occurs in the 2 μm film when the plastic zone reaches the substrate. Comparisons are made with predictions obtained from other formulations: (i) the contact size-independent indentation pressure is compared with that given by continuum crystal plasticity; (ii) the scaling of the indentation pressure with indentation depth is compared with the relation proposed by Nix and Gao [1998. Indentation size effects in crystalline materials: a law for strain gradient plasticity. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 43, 411-423]; and (iii) the computed contact area is compared with that obtained from the estimation procedure of Oliver and Pharr [1992. An improved technique for determining hardness and elastic-modulus using load and displacement sensing indentation experiments, J. Mater. Res. 7, 1564-1583].

  11. Flow Pattern relative to the Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, X.; McPherron, R. L.; Hsu, T.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetospheric substorms play a key role in the coupling of the solar wind and the magnetosphere. The Substorm Current Wedge (SCW) is a key element in the present physical model of substorms. It is widely accepted that the SCW is created by earthward busty flows, but the generation mechanism is still unknown. Previous studies suggest pressure gradients and magnetic vortices are possible candidates. Due to the sparse coverage of satellites in space, these studies were strongly dependent on the assumption that the satellites were in the generation region of the field-aligned currents (FAC) forming the SCW. In this work, we take advantage of an inversion technique that determines the parameters describing the SCW and perform a statistical study on the plasma and magnetic field parameters of the flow pattern relative to the SCW. The inversion technique finds the location and the intensity of the SCW from midlatitude magnetic data. The technique has been validated using auroral observations, Equivalent Ionospheric Currents (EIC), SYM-H index from SuperMAG, and magnetic perturbations at geosynchronous orbit by the GOES satellite. A database of substorm events has been created using midlatitude positive bays, which are the ground signature of the SCW at lower latitudes. The inversion technique is applied to each event in the database to determine the location of the origin of the SCW. The inversion results are also used to find conjunction events with space observations from VAP (RBSP), THEMIS and GOES. The plasma and magnetic field parameters such as the pressure gradient and magnetic vorticity are then categorized as a function of their location relative to the origin of the SCW. How the distribution/pattern of the pressure gradient and vorticity are related to the properties of the SCW (locations and intensity of the FAC), and flows (entropy, velocity and density) will be determined.

  12. Saline Fluids in Subduction Channels and Mantle Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, T.; Hertwig, A.; Schertl, H. P.; Maresch, W. V.; Shigeno, M.; Mori, Y.; Nishiyama, T.

    2015-12-01

    Saline fluids can transport large-ion-lithophile elements and carbonate. Subduction-zone fluids contain salts with various amounts of NaCl equivalent similar to that of the present and/or Phanerozoic seawater (about 3.5 wt% NaCl). The salinity of aqueous fluids in the mantle wedge decreases from trench side to back-arc side, although available data have been limited. Such saline fluids from mantle peridotite underneath Pinatubo, a frontal volcano of the Luzon arc, contain 5.1 wt% NaCl equivalent and CO2 [Kawamoto et al., 2013 Proc Natl Acad Sci USA] and in Ichinomegeta, a rear-arc volcano of the Northeast Japan arc, contain 3.7 wt% NaCl equivalent and CO2 [Kumagai et al., Contrib Mineral Petrol 2014]. Abundances of chlorine and H2O in olivine-hosted melt inclusions also suggest that aqueous fluids to produce frontal basalts have higher salinity than rear-arc basalts in Guatemala arc [Walker et al., Contrib Mineral Petrol 2003]. In addition to these data, quartz-free jadeitites contain fluid inclusions composed of aqueous fluids with 7 wt% NaCl equivalent and quartz-bearing jadeitite with 4.6 wt% NaCl equivalent in supra-subduction zones in Southwest Japan [Mori et al., 2015, International Eclogite Conference] and quartz-bearing jadeitite and jadeite-rich rocks contain fluid inclusions composed of aqueous fluids with 4.2 wt% NaCl equivalent in Rio San Juan Complex, Dominica Republic [Kawamoto et al., 2015, Goldschmidt Conference]. Aqueous fluids generated at pressures lower than conditions for albite=jadeite+quartz occurring at 1.5 GPa, 500 °C may contain aqueous fluids with higher salinity than at higher pressures.

  13. Grounding zone wedges, Kveithola Trough (NW Barents Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebesco, Michele; Urgeles, Roger; Özmaral, Asli; Hanebuth, Till; Caburlotto, Andrea; Hörner, Tanja; Lantzsch, Hendrik; LLopart, Juame; Lucchi, Renata; Skøtt Nicolaisen, Line; Giacomo, Osti; Sabbatini, Anna; Camerlenghi, Angelo

    2014-05-01

    Swath bathymetry within Kveithola Trough (NW Barents Sea) shows a seafloor characterized by E-W trending megascale glacial lineations (MSGLs) overprinted by transverse Grounding Zone Wedges (GZWs), which give the trough a stair profile (Rebesco et al., 2011). GZWs are formed by deposition of subglacial till at temporarily stable ice-stream fronts in between successive episodic retreats (Rüther et al., 2012; Bjarnadóttir et al., 2012). Sub-bottom data show that present-day morphology is largely inherited from palaeo-seafloor topography of GZWs, which is draped by a deglacial to early Holocene glaciomarine sediments (about 15 m thick). The ice stream that produced such subglacial morphology was flowing from East to West inside Kveithola Trough during Last Glacial Maximum. Its rapid retreat was likely associated with progressive lift-offs, and successive rapid melting of the grounded ice, induced by the eustatic sea-level rise (Lucchi et al., 2013). References: Bjarnadóttir, L.R., Rüther, D.C., Winsborrow, M.C.M., Andreassen, K., 2012. Grounding-line dynamics during the last deglaciation of Kveithola, W Barents Sea, as revealed by seabed geomorphology and shallow seismic stratigraphy. Boreas, 42, 84-107. Lucchi R.G., et al. 2013. Postglacial sedimentary processes on the Storfjorden and Kveithola TMFs: impact of extreme glacimarine sedimentation. Global and Planetary Change, 111, 309-326. Rebesco, M., et al. 2011. Deglaciation of the Barents Sea Ice Sheet - a swath bathymetric and subbottom seismic study from the Kveitehola Trough. Marine Geology, 279, 141-14. Rüther, D.C., Bjarnadóttir, L.R., Junttila, J., Husum, K., Rasmussen, T.L., Lucchi, R.G., Andreassen, K., 2012. Pattern and timing of the north-western Barents Sea Ice Sheet deglaciation and indications of episodic Holocene deposition. Boreas 41, 494-512.

  14. MANTA--an open-source, high density electrophysiology recording suite for MATLAB.

    PubMed

    Englitz, B; David, S V; Sorenson, M D; Shamma, S A

    2013-01-01

    The distributed nature of nervous systems makes it necessary to record from a large number of sites in order to decipher the neural code, whether single cell, local field potential (LFP), micro-electrocorticograms (μECoG), electroencephalographic (EEG), magnetoencephalographic (MEG) or in vitro micro-electrode array (MEA) data are considered. High channel-count recordings also optimize the yield of a preparation and the efficiency of time invested by the researcher. Currently, data acquisition (DAQ) systems with high channel counts (>100) can be purchased from a limited number of companies at considerable prices. These systems are typically closed-source and thus prohibit custom extensions or improvements by end users. We have developed MANTA, an open-source MATLAB-based DAQ system, as an alternative to existing options. MANTA combines high channel counts (up to 1440 channels/PC), usage of analog or digital headstages, low per channel cost (<$90/channel), feature-rich display and filtering, a user-friendly interface, and a modular design permitting easy addition of new features. MANTA is licensed under the GPL and free of charge. The system has been tested by daily use in multiple setups for >1 year, recording reliably from 128 channels. It offers a growing list of features, including integrated spike sorting, PSTH and CSD display and fully customizable electrode array geometry (including 3D arrays), some of which are not available in commercial systems. MANTA runs on a typical PC and communicates via TCP/IP and can thus be easily integrated with existing stimulus generation/control systems in a lab at a fraction of the cost of commercial systems. With modern neuroscience developing rapidly, MANTA provides a flexible platform that can be rapidly adapted to the needs of new analyses and questions. Being open-source, the development of MANTA can outpace commercial solutions in functionality, while maintaining a low price-point. PMID:23653593

  15. MANTA—an open-source, high density electrophysiology recording suite for MATLAB

    PubMed Central

    Englitz, B.; David, S. V.; Sorenson, M. D.; Shamma, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    The distributed nature of nervous systems makes it necessary to record from a large number of sites in order to decipher the neural code, whether single cell, local field potential (LFP), micro-electrocorticograms (μECoG), electroencephalographic (EEG), magnetoencephalographic (MEG) or in vitro micro-electrode array (MEA) data are considered. High channel-count recordings also optimize the yield of a preparation and the efficiency of time invested by the researcher. Currently, data acquisition (DAQ) systems with high channel counts (>100) can be purchased from a limited number of companies at considerable prices. These systems are typically closed-source and thus prohibit custom extensions or improvements by end users. We have developed MANTA, an open-source MATLAB-based DAQ system, as an alternative to existing options. MANTA combines high channel counts (up to 1440 channels/PC), usage of analog or digital headstages, low per channel cost (<$90/channel), feature-rich display and filtering, a user-friendly interface, and a modular design permitting easy addition of new features. MANTA is licensed under the GPL and free of charge. The system has been tested by daily use in multiple setups for >1 year, recording reliably from 128 channels. It offers a growing list of features, including integrated spike sorting, PSTH and CSD display and fully customizable electrode array geometry (including 3D arrays), some of which are not available in commercial systems. MANTA runs on a typical PC and communicates via TCP/IP and can thus be easily integrated with existing stimulus generation/control systems in a lab at a fraction of the cost of commercial systems. With modern neuroscience developing rapidly, MANTA provides a flexible platform that can be rapidly adapted to the needs of new analyses and questions. Being open-source, the development of MANTA can outpace commercial solutions in functionality, while maintaining a low price-point. PMID:23653593

  16. Mud volcano venting induced gas hydrate formation at the upper slope accretionary wedge, offshore SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Saulwood; Tseng, Yi-Ting; Cheng, Wan-Yen; Chou, Cheng-Tien; Chen, NeiChen; Hsieh, I.-Chih

    2016-04-01

    TsanYao Mud Volcano (TYMV) is the largest mud volcano cone in the Hengchun Mud Volcano Group (HCMVG), located at the upper slope of the accrretionary wedge, southwest of Taiwan. The region is under active tectonic activity with the Philippine Plate, moving northwestward at a rate of ~8 cm/year. This region also receives huge quantity of suspended particle load of ~100 mT/year at present time from adjacent small rivers of the Island of Taiwan. Large loads of suspended sediments influx become a major source of organic carbon and later gas and other hydrocarbon. Gas and fluid in the mud volcano are actively venting from deep to the sea floor on the upper slope of the accretionary wedge. In order to understand venting on the HCMVG, echo sounder, towcam and coring were carried out. Pore water sulfate, chloride, potassium, calcium, stable isotope O-18, gas compositions, dissolved sulfide were analysed. The HCMVG consists of 12 volcano cones of different sizes. Large quantity of gas and fluid are venting directly from deep to the TYMV structure high, as well as 50+ other vents as appeared as flares on the echo sounder. Some flares are reaching to the atmosphere and likely a source of green house gases to the atmosphere. Venting fluids include gas bubbles, suspended particle, mud, and breccia. Breccia size could reach more than 12 cm in diameter. Circular bands in different color appeared around the cone may represent stages of vent eruptions. Compositions of vent gas include methane, ethane and propane. High proportions of ethane and propane in the vent gas demonstrated that source of gas are thermogenic in origin. Patchy authigenic carbonate, bacterial mats, bivalves, tube worms and other chemosynthesis organisms were supported by venting gas AOM process near the sea floor. Pore water chloride concentrations show distinct variation pattern from center cone to the side of the volcano, with low in the center and high away from the cone. Pore water with higher than seawater

  17. High-sensitivity open-loop electronics for gravimetric acoustic-wave-based sensors.

    PubMed

    Rabus, David; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Ballandras, Sylvain; Martin, Gilles; Carry, Emile; Blondeau-Patissier, Virginie

    2013-06-01

    Detecting chemical species in gas phase has recently received an increasing interest mainly for security control, trying to implement new systems allowing for extended dynamics and reactivity. In this work, an open-loop interrogation strategy is proposed to use radio-frequency acoustic transducers as micro-balances for that purpose. The resulting system is dedicated to the monitoring of chemical compounds in gaseous or liquid-phase state. A 16 Hz standard deviation is demonstrated at 125 MHz, with a working frequency band in the 60 to 133 MHz range, answering the requirements for using Rayleigh- and Love-wave-based delay lines operating with 40-μm acoustic wavelength transducers. Moreover, this electronic setup was used to interrogate a high-overtone bulk acoustic wave resonator (HBAR) microbalance, a new sensor class allowing for multi-mode interrogation for gravimetric measurement improvement. The noise source still limiting the system performance is due to the analog-to-digital converter of the microcontroller, thus leaving open degrees-of-freedom for improving the obtained results by optimizing the voltage reference and board layout. The operation of the system is illustrated using a calibrated galvanic deposition at the surface of Love-wave delay lines to assess theoretical predictions of their gravimetric sensitivity and to compare them with HBAR-based sensor sensitivity. PMID:25004485

  18. Population Connectivity Shifts at High Frequency within an Open-Coast Marine Protected Area Network

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Geoffrey S.; Parnell, P. Ed; Levin, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    A complete understanding of population connectivity via larval dispersal is of great value to the effective design and management of marine protected areas (MPA). However empirical estimates of larval dispersal distance, self-recruitment, and within season variability of population connectivity patterns and their influence on metapopulation structure remain rare. We used high-resolution otolith microchemistry data from the temperate reef fish Hypsypops rubicundus to explore biweekly, seasonal, and annual connectivity patterns in an open-coast MPA network. The three MPAs, spanning 46 km along the southern California coastline were connected by larval dispersal, but the magnitude and direction of connections reversed between 2008 and 2009. Self-recruitment, i.e. spawning, dispersal, and settlement to the same location, was observed at two locations, one of which is a MPA. Self-recruitment to this MPA ranged from 50–84%; within the entire 60 km study region, self-recruitment accounted for 45% of all individuals settling to study reefs. On biweekly time scales we observed directional variability in alongshore current data and larval dispersal trajectories; if viewed in isolation these data suggest the system behaves as a source-sink metapopulation. However aggregate biweekly data over two years reveal a reef network in which H. rubicundus behaves more like a well-mixed metapopulation. As one of the few empirical studies of population connectivity within a temperate open coast reef network, this work can inform the MPA design process, implementation of ecosystem based management plans, and facilitate conservation decisions. PMID:25077486

  19. Stress and stability comparison between different systems for high tibial osteotomies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High tibial osteotomy (HTO) with a medial opening wedge has been used to treat medial compartment osteoarthritis. However, this makes the proximal tibia a highly unstable structure and causes plate and screws to be the potentials sources for mechanical failure. Consequently, proper design and use of the fixation device are essential to the HTO especially for overweight or full weight-bearing patients. Methods Based on the CT-based images, a tibial finite-element model with medial opening was simulated and instrumented with one-leg and two-leg plate systems. The construct was subjected to physiological and surgical loads. Construct stresses and wedge micromotions were chosen as the comparison indices. Results The use of locking screws can stabilize the construct and decrease the implant and bone stresses. Comparatively, the two-leg design provides a wider load-sharing base to form a force-couple mechanism that effectively reduces construct stresses and wedge micromotions. However, the incision size, muscular stripping, and structural rigidity are the major concerns of using the two-leg systems. The one-leg plates behave as the fulcrum of the leverage system and make the wedge tip the zone of tension and thus have been reported to negatively affect the callus formation. Conclusions The choice of the HTO plates involved the trade-off between surgical convenience, construct stability, and stress-shielding effect. If the stability of the medial opening is the major concern, the two-leg system is suggested for the patients with heavy load demands and greater proximal tibial size. The one-leg system with locking screws can be used for the majority of the patients without heavy bodyweight and poor bone quality. PMID:23530858

  20. MRF Applications: Measurement of Process-dependent Subsurface Damage in Optical Materials using the MRF Wedge Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, J A; Davis, P J; Steele, W A; Wong, L L; Suratwala, T I; Miller, P E

    2005-11-02

    Understanding the behavior of fractures and subsurface damage in the processes used during optic fabrication plays a key role in determining the final quality of the optical surface finish. During the early stages of surface preparation, brittle grinding processes induce fractures at or near an optical surface whose range can extend from depths of a few mm to hundreds of mm depending upon the process and tooling being employed. Controlling the occurrence, structure, and propagation of these sites during subsequent grinding and polishing operations is highly desirable if one wishes to obtain high-quality surfaces that are free of such artifacts. Over the past year, our team has made significant strides in developing a diagnostic technique that combines magnetorheological finishing (MRF) and scanning optical microscopy to measure and characterize subsurface damage in optical materials. The technique takes advantage of the unique nature of MRF to polish a prescribed large-area wedge into the optical surface without propagating existing damage or introducing new damage. The polished wedge is then analyzed to quantify subsurface damage as a function of depth from the original surface. Large-area measurement using scanning optical microscopy provides for improved accuracy and reliability over methods such as the COM ball-dimple technique. Examples of the technique's use will be presented that illustrate the behavior of subsurface damage in fused silica that arises during a variety of intermediate optical fabrication process steps.

  1. MRF applications: measurement of process-dependent subsurface damage in optical materials using the MRF wedge technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menapace, Joseph A.; Davis, Pete J.; Steele, William A.; Wong, Lana L.; Suratwala, Tayyab I.; Miller, Philip E.

    2005-12-01

    Understanding the behavior of fractures and subsurface damage in the processes used during optic fabrication plays a key role in determining the final quality of the optical surface finish. During the early stages of surface preparation, brittle grinding processes induce fractures at or near an optical surface whose range can extend from depths of a few μm to hundreds of μm depending upon the process and tooling being employed. Controlling the occurrence, structure, and propagation of these sites during subsequent grinding and polishing operations is highly desirable if one wishes to obtain high-quality surfaces that are free of such artifacts. Over the past year, our team has made significant strides in developing a diagnostic technique that combines magnetorheological finishing (MRF) and scanning optical microscopy to measure and characterize subsurface damage in optical materials. The technique takes advantage of the unique nature of MRF to polish a prescribed large-area wedge into the optical surface without propagating existing damage or introducing new damage. The polished wedge is then analyzed to quantify subsurface damage as a function of depth from the original surface. Large-area measurement using scanning optical microscopy provides for improved accuracy and reliability over methods such as the COM ball-dimple technique. Examples of the technique's use will be presented that illustrate the behavior of subsurface damage in fused silica that arises during a variety of intermediate optical fabrication process steps.

  2. Cost Effective Open Geometry HTS MRI System amended to BSCCO 2212 Wire for High Field Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Kennth Marken

    2006-08-11

    The original goal of this Phase II Superconductivity Partnership Initiative project was to build and operate a prototype Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system using high temperature superconductor (HTS) coils wound from continuously processed dip-coated BSCCO 2212 tape conductor. Using dip-coated tape, the plan was for MRI magnet coils to be wound to fit an established commercial open geometry, 0.2 Tesla permanent magnet system. New electronics and imaging software for a prototype higher field superconducting system would have added significantly to the cost. However, the use of the 0.2 T platform would allow the technical feasibility and the cost issues for HTS systems to be fully established. Also it would establish the energy efficiency and savings of HTS open MRI compared with resistive and permanent magnet systems. The commercial goal was an open geometry HTS MRI running at 0.5 T and 20 K. This low field open magnet was using resistive normal metal conductor and its heat loss was rather high around 15 kolwatts. It was expected that an HTS magnet would dissipate around 1 watt, significantly reduce power consumption. The SPI team assembled to achieve this goal was led by Oxford Instruments, Superconducting Technology (OST), who developed the method of producing commercial dip coated tape. Superconductive Components Inc. (SCI), a leading US supplier of HTS powders, supported the conductor optimization through powder optimization, scaling, and cost reduction. Oxford Magnet Technology (OMT), a joint venture between Oxford Instruments and Siemens and the world’s leading supplier of MRI magnet systems, was involved to design and build the HTS MRI magnet and cryogenics. Siemens Magnetic Resonance Division, a leading developer and supplier of complete MRI imaging systems, was expected to integrate the final system and perform imaging trials. The original MRI demonstration project was ended in July 2004 by mutual consent of Oxford Instruments and Siemens. Between

  3. HTSstation: a web application and open-access libraries for high-throughput sequencing data analysis.

    PubMed

    David, Fabrice P A; Delafontaine, Julien; Carat, Solenne; Ross, Frederick J; Lefebvre, Gregory; Jarosz, Yohan; Sinclair, Lucas; Noordermeer, Daan; Rougemont, Jacques; Leleu, Marion

    2014-01-01

    The HTSstation analysis portal is a suite of simple web forms coupled to modular analysis pipelines for various applications of High-Throughput Sequencing including ChIP-seq, RNA-seq, 4C-seq and re-sequencing. HTSstation offers biologists the possibility to rapidly investigate their HTS data using an intuitive web application with heuristically pre-defined parameters. A number of open-source software components have been implemented and can be used to build, configure and run HTS analysis pipelines reactively. Besides, our programming framework empowers developers with the possibility to design their own workflows and integrate additional third-party software. The HTSstation web application is accessible at http://htsstation.epfl.ch. PMID:24475057

  4. HTSstation: A Web Application and Open-Access Libraries for High-Throughput Sequencing Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    David, Fabrice P. A.; Delafontaine, Julien; Carat, Solenne; Ross, Frederick J.; Lefebvre, Gregory; Jarosz, Yohan; Sinclair, Lucas; Noordermeer, Daan; Rougemont, Jacques; Leleu, Marion

    2014-01-01

    The HTSstation analysis portal is a suite of simple web forms coupled to modular analysis pipelines for various applications of High-Throughput Sequencing including ChIP-seq, RNA-seq, 4C-seq and re-sequencing. HTSstation offers biologists the possibility to rapidly investigate their HTS data using an intuitive web application with heuristically pre-defined parameters. A number of open-source software components have been implemented and can be used to build, configure and run HTS analysis pipelines reactively. Besides, our programming framework empowers developers with the possibility to design their own workflows and integrate additional third-party software. The HTSstation web application is accessible at http://htsstation.epfl.ch. PMID:24475057

  5. High temperature conductance fluctuations in an InGaAs/InAlAs open quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faniel, S.; Hackens, B.; Delfosse, F.; Gustin, C.; Boutry, H.; Huynen, I.; Bayot, V.; Wallart, X.; Bollaert, S.; Cappy, A.

    2002-03-01

    We present magnetotransport measurements in an open quantum dot realized on an InGaAs/InAlAs narrow quantum well. The measurements are performed on a 500 nm diameter circular cavity patterned by electron beam lithography and wet etching. The electronic density can be tuned by a Ti/Pt/Au electrostatic gate. The sample is characterized down to 300mK in a magnetic field up to 5T. We observe a superposition of slowly varying reproducible magnetoconductance fluctuations and a rich pattern of universal conductance fluctuations whose characteristic magnetic field scale is much shorter. We study the evolution of these two types of fluctuations as a function of the temperature (up to 230K) and the gate voltage. We notice the persistence of fluctuations up to unexpectedly high temperatures.

  6. High open circuit voltages of solar cells based on quantum dot and dye hybrid-sensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yujie; Zhao, Wanyu; Chen, Jingkuo; Li, Huayang; Fu, Wuyou E-mail: fuwy56@163.com; Sun, Guang; Cao, Jianliang; Zhang, Zhanying; Bala, Hari E-mail: fuwy56@163.com

    2014-01-06

    A type of solar cell based on quantum dot (QD) and dye hybrid-sensitized mesoporous TiO{sub 2} film electrode was designed and reported. The electrode was consisted of a TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle (NP) thin film layer sensitized with CdS quantum dot (QD) and an amorphous TiO{sub 2} coated TiO{sub 2} NP thin film layer that sensitized with C106 dye. The amorphous TiO{sub 2} layer was obtained by TiCl{sub 4} post-treatment to improve the properties of solar cells. Research showed that the solar cells fabricated with as-prepared hybrid-sensitized electrode exhibited excellent photovoltaic performances and a fairly high open circuit voltage of 796 mV was achieved.

  7. High open circuit voltages of solar cells based on quantum dot and dye hybrid-sensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yujie; Bala, Hari; Zhao, Wanyu; Chen, Jingkuo; Li, Huayang; Fu, Wuyou; Sun, Guang; Cao, Jianliang; Zhang, Zhanying

    2014-01-01

    A type of solar cell based on quantum dot (QD) and dye hybrid-sensitized mesoporous TiO2 film electrode was designed and reported. The electrode was consisted of a TiO2 nanoparticle (NP) thin film layer sensitized with CdS quantum dot (QD) and an amorphous TiO2 coated TiO2 NP thin film layer that sensitized with C106 dye. The amorphous TiO2 layer was obtained by TiCl4 post-treatment to improve the properties of solar cells. Research showed that the solar cells fabricated with as-prepared hybrid-sensitized electrode exhibited excellent photovoltaic performances and a fairly high open circuit voltage of 796 mV was achieved.

  8. The open-access high-throughput crystallization facility at EMBL Hamburg.

    PubMed

    Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen

    2006-12-01

    Here, the establishment of Europe's largest high-throughput crystallization facility with open access to the general user community is reported. The facility covers every step in the crystallization process from the preparation of crystallization cocktails for initial or customized screens to the setup of hanging-drop vapour-diffusion experiments and their automatic imaging. In its first year of operation, 43 internal and 40 external users submitted over 500 samples for a total of 2985 crystallization plates. An electronic booking system for registration, the selection of experimental parameters (e.g. drop size, sample-to-reservoir ratio) and the reservation of time slots was developed. External users can choose from more than 1000 initial crystallization conditions. By default, experiments are kept for six months and are imaged 15 times during this time period. A remote viewing system is available to inspect experiments via the internet. Over 100 stock solutions are available for users wishing to design customized screens. PMID:17139079

  9. Three-Dimensional Vertebral Wedging in Mild and Moderate Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Scherrer, Sophie-Anne; Begon, Mickaël; Leardini, Alberto; Coillard, Christine; Rivard, Charles-Hilaire; Allard, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background Vertebral wedging is associated with spinal deformity progression in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Reporting frontal and sagittal wedging separately could be misleading since these are projected values of a single three-dimensional deformation of the vertebral body. The objectives of this study were to determine if three-dimensional vertebral body wedging is present in mild scoliosis and if there are a preferential vertebral level, position and plane of deformation with increasing scoliotic severity. Methodology Twenty-seven adolescent idiopathic scoliotic girls with mild to moderate Cobb angles (10° to 50°) participated in this study. All subjects had at least one set of bi-planar radiographs taken with the EOS® X-ray imaging system prior to any treatment. Subjects were divided into two groups, separating the mild (under 20°) from the moderate (20° and over) spinal scoliotic deformities. Wedging was calculated in three different geometric planes with respect to the smallest edge of the vertebral body. Results Factorial analyses of variance revealed a main effect for the scoliosis severity but no main effect of vertebral Levels (apex and each of the three vertebrae above and below it) (F = 1.78, p = 0.101). Main effects of vertebral Positions (apex and above or below it) (F = 4.20, p = 0.015) and wedging Planes (F = 34.36, p<0.001) were also noted. Post-hoc analysis demonstrated a greater wedging in the inferior group of vertebrae (3.6°) than the superior group (2.9°, p = 0.019) and a significantly greater wedging (p≤0.03) along the sagittal plane (4.3°). Conclusions Vertebral wedging was present in mild scoliosis and increased as the scoliosis progressed. The greater wedging of the inferior group of vertebrae could be important in estimating the most distal vertebral segment to be restrained by bracing or to be fused in surgery. Largest vertebral body wedging values obtained in the sagittal plane support the claim

  10. A numerical model of deformation and fluid-flow in an evolving thrust wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, Luther M.; Hudleston, Peter J.; Lorig, Loren J.

    2001-06-01

    To investigate deformation and fluid-flow in an actively deforming tectonic wedge, we model the evolution of a large, two-dimensional (100 km long, 5 km thick), mechanically and hydrologically homogeneous and isotropic pile of sedimentary strata that is deformed to become a thrust wedge. We compare both 'dry' and 'wet' cases, in order to illustrate: (1) the relative importance of fluids on wedge evolution, and (2) the effect of brittle deformation on fluid-flow. We use an elastic-plastic constitutive relation, including a Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion and a non-associated flow rule, and coupled fluid flow, with bulk rock properties that approximate typical foreland sedimentary strata. Simulations are made both with and without dilation. The model is fully dynamic, but inertial forces remain small. Results show that deformation within the wedge is accommodated by reverse-slip movement on shear bands, which migrate in both directions through the wedge as both fore- and back-thrusts. The model has features predicted by the critical-taper theory: (1) overall wedge geometry; (2) crudely self-similar growth during evolution; (3) more intense deformation toward the rear of the wedge. The models show strong overall in-sequence faulting behavior with major thrusts isolating relatively undeformed packages, which are moved in a piggyback manner upon the active thrusts. Intermittent out-of-sequence faulting does however occur, in order to maintain the wedge taper. Fluid-flow in the deforming wedge is dominated by topography, but is also strongly affected by dilational plastic deformation. In all simulations, there is focused fluid flow within fault zones. When mechanical time-stepping is shut off (uncoupled), flow systems evolve to steady-state where inflow equals outflow. By subtracting the two 'states' we isolate the mechanical fluid response from the total coupled system response. The mechanical fluid response is manifest as contours of head and pressure difference and

  11. Does Human Body Odor Represent a Significant and Rewarding Social Signal to Individuals High in Social Openness?

    PubMed Central

    Lübke, Katrin T.; Croy, Ilona; Hoenen, Matthias; Gerber, Johannes; Pause, Bettina M.; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Across a wide variety of domains, experts differ from novices in their response to stimuli linked to their respective field of expertise. It is currently unknown whether similar patterns can be observed with regard to social expertise. The current study therefore focuses on social openness, a central social skill necessary to initiate social contact. Human body odors were used as social cues, as they inherently signal the presence of another human being. Using functional MRI, hemodynamic brain responses to body odors of women reporting a high (n = 14) or a low (n = 12) level of social openness were compared. Greater activation within the inferior frontal gyrus and the caudate nucleus was observed in high socially open individuals compared to individuals low in social openness. With the inferior frontal gyrus being a crucial part of the human mirror neuron system, and the caudate nucleus being implicated in social reward, it is discussed whether human body odor might constitute more of a significant and rewarding social signal to individuals high in social openness compared to individuals low in social openness process. PMID:24718308

  12. Origin of the high open circuit voltage in planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells: Role of the reduced bimolecular recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenchao; Yao, Yao; Wu, Chang-Qin

    2015-03-01

    The high open circuit voltage is an attractive feature for the currently popular organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells. In this paper, by employing the macroscopic device model simulation, we investigate its origin for the planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells. Based on the calculated current density-voltage characteristics, it is revealed that compared to the excitonic solar cells, the fast thermal-activated exciton dissociation in the bulk due to the small exciton binding energy may improve the short circuit current and the fill factor, but its beneficial role on the open circuit voltage is marginal. The most significant contribution for the open circuit voltage comes from the reduced bimolecular recombination. In the perovskites, with the recombination prefactor many orders of magnitude smaller than that based on the Langevin's theory, the internal charge density level is significantly enhanced and the density gradient is removed, leading to the high quasi-Fermi level splitting and thus the small open circuit voltage loss. For the nonradiative recombination pathway due to the deep trap states, it may induce significant loss of open circuit voltage as the trap density is high, while for the moderately low density its effect on the open circuit voltage is small and negligible.

  13. High-frequency asymptotic methods for analyzing the EM scattering by open-ended waveguide cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkholder, R. J.; Pathak, P. H.

    1989-01-01

    Four high-frequency methods are described for analyzing the electromagnetic (EM) scattering by electrically large open-ended cavities. They are: (1) a hybrid combination of waveguide modal analysis and high-frequency asymptotics, (2) geometrical optics (GO) ray shooting, (3) Gaussian beam (GB) shooting, and (4) the generalized ray expansion (GRE) method. The hybrid modal method gives very accurate results but is limited to cavities which are made up of sections of uniform waveguides for which the modal fields are known. The GO ray shooting method can be applied to much more arbitrary cavity geometries and can handle absorber treated interior walls, but it generally only predicts the major trends of the RCS pattern and not the details. Also, a very large number of rays need to be tracked for each new incidence angle. Like the GO ray shooting method, the GB shooting method can handle more arbitrary cavities, but it is much more efficient and generally more accurate than the GO method because it includes the fields diffracted by the rim at the open end which enter the cavity. However, due to beam divergence effects the GB method is limited to cavities which are not very long compared to their width. The GRE method overcomes the length-to-width limitation of the GB method by replacing the GB's with GO ray tubes which are launched in the same manner as the GB's to include the interior rim diffracted field. This method gives good accuracy and is generally more efficient than the GO method, but a large number of ray tubes needs to be tracked.

  14. High-frequency asymptotic methods for analyzing the EM scattering by open-ended waveguide cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkholder, R. J.; Pathak, P. H.

    1989-09-01

    Four high-frequency methods are described for analyzing the electromagnetic (EM) scattering by electrically large open-ended cavities. They are: (1) a hybrid combination of waveguide modal analysis and high-frequency asymptotics, (2) geometrical optics (GO) ray shooting, (3) Gaussian beam (GB) shooting, and (4) the generalized ray expansion (GRE) method. The hybrid modal method gives very accurate results but is limited to cavities which are made up of sections of uniform waveguides for which the modal fields are known. The GO ray shooting method can be applied to much more arbitrary cavity geometries and can handle absorber treated interior walls, but it generally only predicts the major trends of the RCS pattern and not the details. Also, a very large number of rays need to be tracked for each new incidence angle. Like the GO ray shooting method, the GB shooting method can handle more arbitrary cavities, but it is much more efficient and generally more accurate than the GO method because it includes the fields diffracted by the rim at the open end which enter the cavity. However, due to beam divergence effects the GB method is limited to cavities which are not very long compared to their width. The GRE method overcomes the length-to-width limitation of the GB method by replacing the GB's with GO ray tubes which are launched in the same manner as the GB's to include the interior rim diffracted field. This method gives good accuracy and is generally more efficient than the GO method, but a large number of ray tubes needs to be tracked.

  15. Comparison of weak-shock reflection factors for wedges, cylinders and blast waves

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1992-07-01

    Ernst Mach (1838--1916) was the first to discover an irregular reflection phenomenon of shock waves, as is well known in our community. In fact, this occurred in 1875 -- three years earlier than usually assumed in the literature. A facsimile of the paper in which he mentioned a special shock wave behavior is shown in a figure. However, it is correct that Mach gave the physical interpretation of this phenomenon in 1878. Since Mach`s discovery of an irregular shock reflection pattern 117 years ago, new shock configurations have been discovered -- one of the most recent examples is the so-called {open_quotes}von Neumann reflection{close_quotes} for weak shocks as reported by Colella and Henderson in 1990. Due to active research efforts related to shock reflection, especially in the last two decades, we now have a relatively detailed understanding of reflection phenomena and of transition conditions from one reflection configuration to another. The purpose of this paper is to compare reflection factors for weak shocks from various surfaces, and to focus attention on some unsolved questions. Three different cases are considered: (1) square-wave planar shock reflection from wedges, (2) square-wave planar shock reflection from cylinders and (3) spherical blast wave reflection from a planar surface. The authors restrict themselves to weak shocks. Following Henderson`s definition, shocks with a Mach number of M{sub 0} < 1.56 in air or with an overpressure of {Delta}p{sub I} < 25 psi (1.66 bar) under normal ambient conditions are called weak.

  16. Comparison of weak-shock reflection factors for wedges, cylinders and blast waves

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H. , Freiburg im Breisgau ); Kuhl, A.L. )

    1992-07-01

    Ernst Mach (1838--1916) was the first to discover an irregular reflection phenomenon of shock waves, as is well known in our community. In fact, this occurred in 1875 -- three years earlier than usually assumed in the literature. A facsimile of the paper in which he mentioned a special shock wave behavior is shown in a figure. However, it is correct that Mach gave the physical interpretation of this phenomenon in 1878. Since Mach's discovery of an irregular shock reflection pattern 117 years ago, new shock configurations have been discovered -- one of the most recent examples is the so-called [open quotes]von Neumann reflection[close quotes] for weak shocks as reported by Colella and Henderson in 1990. Due to active research efforts related to shock reflection, especially in the last two decades, we now have a relatively detailed understanding of reflection phenomena and of transition conditions from one reflection configuration to another. The purpose of this paper is to compare reflection factors for weak shocks from various surfaces, and to focus attention on some unsolved questions. Three different cases are considered: (1) square-wave planar shock reflection from wedges, (2) square-wave planar shock reflection from cylinders and (3) spherical blast wave reflection from a planar surface. The authors restrict themselves to weak shocks. Following Henderson's definition, shocks with a Mach number of M[sub 0] < 1.56 in air or with an overpressure of [Delta]p[sub I] < 25 psi (1.66 bar) under normal ambient conditions are called weak.

  17. Closing the wedge: Search strategies for extended Higgs sectors with heavy flavor final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, Stefania; Kim, Ian-Woo; Shah, Nausheen R.; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2016-04-01

    We consider search strategies for an extended Higgs sector at the high-luminosity LHC14 utilizing multitop final states. In the framework of a two Higgs doublet model, the purely top final states (t t ¯ , 4 t ) are important channels for heavy Higgs bosons with masses in the wedge above 2 mt and at low values of tan β , while a 2 b 2 t final state is most relevant at moderate values of tan β . We find, in the t t ¯H channel, with H →t t ¯, that both single and three lepton final states can provide statistically significant constraints at low values of tan β for mA as high as ˜750 GeV . When systematics on the t t ¯ background are taken into account, however, the three lepton final state is more powerful, though the precise constraint depends fairly sensitively on lepton fake rates. We also find that neither 2 b 2 t nor t t ¯ final states provide constraints on additional heavy Higgs bosons with couplings to tops smaller than the top Yukawa due to expected systematic uncertainties in the t t ¯ background.

  18. Opening Wedge Osteotomy for Distal Radius Malunion: Dorsal or Palmar Approach?

    PubMed Central

    Rothenfluh, Esin; Schweizer, Andreas; Nagy, Ladislav

    2013-01-01

    Background There are various technical variations to consider when performing a corrective osteotomy of a distal radius malunion. We chose two of the more commonly reported techniques and compared the results of volar (palmar) osteotomy and fixation with dorsal osteotomy and fixation. Method Within a continuous cohort of patients who had undergone corrective osteotomy for a malunited Colles fracture, two groups could be identified retrospectively. In 8 patients a dorsal approach was used. A structural trapezoidal graft, subtending the amount of correction, was inserted into the osteotomy gap and stabilization was performed with a thin round-hole mini-fragment plate. In 14 patients a palmar approach and a palmar fixed-angle plate was used for correction of the malunion and for angular stable rigid fixation of the two fragments. The osteotomy gap was loosely filled with nonstructural cancellous bone chips. A retrospective comparison of the two groups was performed to see whether the outcome was affected by the use of either operative technique.The demographics, the preoperative amount of deformity, range of motion, pain, and force were comparable for both groups. All osteotomies healed without loss of correction. After a minimal follow-up of one year, radiographic appearance, objective functional parameters were assessed and subjective data (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand [DASH] score and special pain and function questionnaire) obtained. Results These data did not show statistical difference for the two groups except for the amount of final wrist flexion. This parameter was significantly better in patients who had palmar approaches and fixed-angle plates. Conclusion Corrective osteotomies of distal radius malunions can be done in either way. It might result in some better flexion, if performed volarly. PMID:24436789

  19. High-speed Tests of a Ducted Body with Various Air-outlet Openings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, John V.; Baals, Donald D.

    1942-01-01

    Test of a ducted body with Internal flow were made in the 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel for the purpose of studying the effects on external drag and an critical speed of the addition of efficient inlet and outlet openings to a basic streamline shape. Drag tests of a 13.6- inch-diameter streamline body of fineness ratio 6.14 were made at Mach numbers ranging from 0.20 to 0.75. The model was centrally mounted on a 9-percent-thick airfoil and was designed to have an efficient airfoil-body juncture and a high critical speed. An air inlet at the nose and various outlets at the tail were added: drag and internal-flow data were obtained over the given speed range. The critical speed of the ducted bodies was found to be as high as that of the streamline body. The external - drag with air flow through the body did not exceed the drag of the basic streamline shape. No appreciable variation in the efficiency of the diffuser section of the internal duct occurred throughout the Mach number range of the tests.

  20. High-throughput metagenomic technologies for complex microbial community analysis. Open and closed formats

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili; Yang, Yunfeng; Deng, Ye; Tringe, Susannah G.; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2015-01-27

    Understanding the structure, functions, activities and dynamics of microbial communities in natural environments is one of the grand challenges of 21st century science. To address this challenge, over the past decade, numerous technologies have been developed for interrogating microbial communities, of which some are amenable to exploratory work (e.g., high-throughput sequencing and phenotypic screening) and others depend on reference genes or genomes (e.g., phylogenetic and functional gene arrays). Here, we provide a critical review and synthesis of the most commonly applied “open-format” and “closed-format” detection technologies. We discuss their characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages within the context of environmental applications andmore » focus on analysis of complex microbial systems, such as those in soils, in which diversity is high and reference genomes are few. In addition, we discuss crucial issues and considerations associated with applying complementary high-throughput molecular technologies to address important ecological questions.« less