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Sample records for opinion radiotherapy volume

  1. X-ray volume imaging in bladder radiotherapy verification

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Ann M. . E-mail: amhenry@doctors.net.uk; Stratford, Julia; McCarthy, Claire; Davies, Julie; Sykes, Jonathan R.; Amer, Ali; Marchant, Tom; Cowan, Richard; Wylie, James; Logue, John; Livsey, Jacqueline; Khoo, Vincent S.; Moore, Chris; Price, Pat

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the clinical utility of X-ray volume imaging (XVI) for verification of bladder radiotherapy and to quantify geometric error in bladder radiotherapy delivery. Methods and Materials: Twenty subjects undergoing conformal bladder radiotherapy were recruited. X-ray volume images and electronic portal images (EPIs) were acquired for the first 5 fractions and then once weekly. X-ray volume images were co-registered with the planning computed tomography scan and clinical target volume coverage assessed in three dimensions (3D). Interfraction bladder volume change was described by quantifying changes in bladder volume with time. Bony setup errors were compared from both XVI and EPI. Results: The bladder boundary was clearly visible on coronal XVI views in nearly all images, allowing accurate 3D treatment verification. In 93.5% of imaged fractions, the clinical target volume was within the planning target volume. Most subjects displayed consistent bladder volumes, but 25% displayed changes that could be predicted from the first three XVIs. Bony setup errors were similar whether calculated from XVI or EPI. Conclusions: Coronal XVI can be used to verify 3D bladder radiotherapy delivery. Image-guided interventions to reduce geographic miss and normal tissue toxicity are feasible with this technology.

  2. Radiotherapy Dose-Volume Effects on Salivary Gland Function

    SciTech Connect

    Deasy, Joseph O.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Marks, Lawrence; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Nam, Jiho; Eisbruch, Avraham

    2010-03-01

    Publications relating parotid dose-volume characteristics to radiotherapy-induced salivary toxicity were reviewed. Late salivary dysfunction has been correlated to the mean parotid gland dose, with recovery occurring with time. Severe xerostomia (defined as long-term salivary function of <25% of baseline) is usually avoided if at least one parotid gland is spared to a mean dose of less than {approx}20 Gy or if both glands are spared to less than {approx}25 Gy (mean dose). For complex, partial-volume RT patterns (e.g., intensity-modulated radiotherapy), each parotid mean dose should be kept as low as possible, consistent with the desired clinical target volume coverage. A lower parotid mean dose usually results in better function. Submandibular gland sparing also significantly decreases the risk of xerostomia. The currently available predictive models are imprecise, and additional study is required to identify more accurate models of xerostomia risk.

  3. Radiotherapy Dose-Volume Effects on Salivary Gland Function

    PubMed Central

    Deasy, Joseph O.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Marks, Lawrence; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Nam, Jiho; Eilsbruch, Avraham

    2013-01-01

    Publications relating parotid dose-volume characteristics to radiotherapy-induced salivary toxicity were reviewed. Late salivary dysfunction has been correlated to the mean parotid gland dose, with recovery occurring with time. Severe xerostomia (defined as long-term salivary function of <25% of baseline) is usually avoided if at least one parotid gland is spared to a mean dose of less than ≈20 Gy or if both glands are spared to less than ≈25 Gy (mean dose). For complex, partial-volume RT patterns (e.g., intensity-modulated radiotherapy), each parotid mean dose should be kept as low as possible, consistent with the desired clinical target volume coverage. A lower parotid mean dose usually results in better function. Submandibular gland sparing also significantly decreases the risk of xerostomia. The currently available predictive models are imprecise, and additional study is required to identify more accurate models of xerostomia risk. PMID:20171519

  4. Biological dose volume histograms during conformal hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Koukourakis, Michael I.; Abatzoglou, Ioannis; Touloupidis, Stavros; Manavis, Ioannis

    2007-01-15

    Radiobiological data suggest that prostate cancer has a low {alpha}/{beta} ratio. Large radiotherapy fractions may, therefore, prove more efficacious than standard radiotherapy, while radiotherapy acceleration should further improve control rates. This study describes the radiobiology of a conformal hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy scheme for the treatment of high risk prostate cancer. Anteroposterior fields to the pelvis deliver a daily dose of 2.7 Gy, while lateral fields confined to the prostate and seminal vesicles deliver an additional daily dose of 0.7 Gy. Radiotherapy is accomplished within 19 days (15 fractions). Dose volume histograms, calculated for tissue specific {alpha}/{beta} ratios and time factors, predict a high biological dose to the prostate and seminal vesicles (77-93 Gy). The biological dose to normal pelvic tissues is maintained at standard levels. Radiobiological dosimetry suggests that, using hypofractionated and accelerated radiotherapy, high biological radiation dose can be given to the prostate without overdosing normal tissues.

  5. [Gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) in radiotherapy of benign skull base tumors].

    PubMed

    Maire, J P; Liguoro, D; San Galli, F

    2001-10-01

    Skull base tumours represent about 35 to 40% of all intracranial tumours. There are now many reports in the literature confirming the fact that about 80 to 90% of such tumours are controlled with fractionated radiotherapy. Stereotactic and 3-dimensional treatment planning techniques increase local control and central nervous system tolerance. Definition of the gross tumor volume (GTV) is generally easy with currently available medical imaging systems and computers for 3-dimensional dosimetry. The definition of the clinical target volume (CTV) is more difficult to appreciate; it is defined from the CTV plus a margin, which depends on the histology and anterior therapeutic history of the tumour. It is important to take into account the visible tumour and its possible extension pathways (adjacent bone, holes at the base of skull) and/or an anatomic region (sella turcica + adjacent cavernous sinus). It is necessary to evaluate these volumes with CT Scan and MRI to appreciate tumor extension in a 3-dimentional approach, in order to reduce the risk of marginal recurrences. The aim of this paper is to discuss volume definition as a function of tumour site and tumour type to be irradiated. PMID:11715310

  6. Assessing the Effect of a Contouring Protocol on Postprostatectomy Radiotherapy Clinical Target Volumes and Interphysician Variation

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Darren M.; Perry, Lesley; Smith, Steve; Elliott, Tony; Wylie, James P.; Cowan, Richard A.; Livsey, Jacqueline E.; Logue, John P.

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To compare postprostatectomy clinical target volume (CTV) delineation before and after the introduction of a contouring protocol and to investigate its effect on interphysician variability Methods and Materials: Six site-specialized radiation oncologists independently delineated a CTV on the computed tomography (CT) scans of 3 patients who had received postprostatectomy radiotherapy. At least 3 weeks later this was repeated, but with the physicians adhering to the contouring protocol from the Medical Research Council's Radiotherapy and Androgen Deprivation In Combination After Local Surgery (RADICALS) trial. The volumes obtained before and after the protocol were compared and the effect of the protocol on interphysician variability assessed. Results: An increase in mean CTV for all patients of 40.7 to 53.9cm{sup 3} was noted as a result of observing the protocol, with individual increases in the mean CTV of 65%, 15%, and 24% for Patients 1, 2, and 3 respectively. A reduction in interphysician variability was noted when the protocol was used. Conclusions: Substantial interphysician variation in target volume delineation for postprostatectomy radiotherapy exists, which can be reduced by the use of a contouring protocol. The RADICALS contouring protocol increases the target volumes when compared with those volumes typically applied at our center. The effect of treating larger volumes on the therapeutic ratio and resultant toxicity should be carefully monitored, particularly if the same dose-response as documented in radical prostate radiotherapy applies to the adjuvant and salvage setting. Prostate cancer, Postprostatectomy, Radiotherapy, Target volume.

  7. Large Cohort Dose-Volume Response Analysis of Parotid Gland Function After Radiotherapy: Intensity-Modulated Versus Conventional Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dijkema, Tim Terhaard, Chris H.J.; Roesink, Judith M.; Braam, Petra M.; Gils, Carla H. van; Moerland, Marinus A.; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To compare parotid gland dose-volume response relationships in a large cohort of patients treated with intensity-modulated (IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Methods and materials: A total of 221 patients (64 treated with IMRT, 157 with CRT) with various head-and-neck malignancies were prospectively evaluated. The distribution of tumor subsites in both groups was unbalanced. Stimulated parotid flow rates were measured before and 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year after radiotherapy. Parotid gland dose-volume histograms were derived from computed tomography-based treatment planning. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model proposed by Lyman was fit to the data. A complication was defined as stimulated parotid flow ratio <25% of the pretreatment flow rate. The relative risk of complications was determined for IMRT vs. CRT and adjusted for the mean parotid gland dose using Poisson regression modeling. Results: One year after radiotherapy, NTCP curves for IMRT and CRT were comparable with a TD{sub 50} (uniform dose leading to a 50% complication probability) of 38 and 40 Gy, respectively. Until 6 months after RT, corrected for mean dose, different complication probabilities existed for IMRT vs. CRT. The relative risk of a complication for IMRT vs. CRT after 6 weeks was 1.42 (95% CI 1.21-1.67), after 6 months 1.41 (95% CI; 1.12-1.77), and at 1 year 1.21 (95% CI 0.87-1.68), after correcting for mean dose. Conclusions: One year after radiotherapy, no difference existed in the mean dose-based NTCP curves for IMRT and CRT. Early after radiotherapy (up to 6 months) mean dose based (Lyman) models failed to fully describe the effects of radiotherapy on the parotid glands.

  8. Characterization of Target Volume Changes During Breast Radiotherapy Using Implanted Fiducial Markers and Portal Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Emma J. Donovan, Ellen M.; Yarnold, John R.; Coles, Charlotte E.; Evans, Philip M.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To determine target volume changes by using volume and shape analysis for patients receiving radiotherapy after breast conservation surgery and to compare different methods of automatically identifying changes in target volume, position, size, and shape during radiotherapy for use in adaptive radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients undergoing whole breast radiotherapy had fiducial markers sutured into the excision cavity at the time of surgery. Patients underwent imaging using computed tomography (for planning and at the end of treatment) and during treatment by using portal imaging. A marker volume (MV) was defined by using the measured marker positions. Changes in both individual marker positions and MVs were identified manually and using six automated similarity indices. Comparison of the two types of analysis (manual and automated) was undertaken to establish whether similarity indices can be used to automatically detect changes in target volumes. Results: Manual analysis showed that 3 patients had significant MV reduction. This analysis also showed significant changes between planning computed tomography and the start of treatment for 9 patients, including single and multiple marker movement, deformation (shape change), and rotation. Four of the six similarity indices were shown to be sensitive to the observed changes. Conclusions: Significant changes in size, shape, and position occur to the fiducial marker-defined volume. Four similarity indices can be used to identify these changes, and a protocol for their use in adaptive radiotherapy is suggested.

  9. Monte Carlo Simulations for Dosimetry in Prostate Radiotherapy with Different Intravesical Volumes and Planning Target Volume Margins

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wei; Yu, Dong; He, Hengda; Liu, Qian

    2016-01-01

    In prostate radiotherapy, the influence of bladder volume variation on the dose absorbed by the target volume and organs at risk is significant and difficult to predict. In addition, the resolution of a typical medical image is insufficient for visualizing the bladder wall, which makes it more difficult to precisely evaluate the dose to the bladder wall. This simulation study aimed to quantitatively investigate the relationship between the dose received by organs at risk and the intravesical volume in prostate radiotherapy. The high-resolution Visible Chinese Human phantom and the finite element method were used to construct 10 pelvic models with specific intravesical volumes ranging from 100 ml to 700 ml to represent bladders of patients with different bladder filling capacities during radiotherapy. This series of models was utilized in six-field coplanar 3D conformal radiotherapy simulations with different planning target volume (PTV) margins. Each organ’s absorbed dose was calculated using the Monte Carlo method. The obtained bladder wall displacements during bladder filling were consistent with reported clinical measurements. The radiotherapy simulation revealed a linear relationship between the dose to non-targeted organs and the intravesical volume and indicated that a 10-mm PTV margin for a large bladder and a 5-mm PTV margin for a small bladder reduce the effective dose to the bladder wall to similar degrees. However, larger bladders were associated with evident protection of the intestines. Detailed dosimetry results can be used by radiation oncologists to create more accurate, individual water preload protocols according to the patient’s anatomy and bladder capacity. PMID:27441944

  10. [Postoperative radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: Efficacy, target volume, dose].

    PubMed

    Dupic, G; Bellière-Calandry, A

    2016-04-01

    The rate of local failure of stage IIIA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer is 20 to 40%, even if they are managed with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Postoperative radiotherapy improves local control, but its benefit on global survival remains to be demonstrated. Considered for many years as an adjuvant treatment option for pN2 cancers, it continues nevertheless to be deemed too toxic. What is the current status of postoperative radiotherapy? The Lung Adjuvant Radiotherapy Trial (Lung ART) phase III trial should give us a definitive, objective response on global survival, but inclusion of patients is difficult. The results are consequently delayed. The aim of this review is to show all the results about efficacy and tolerance of postoperative radiotherapy and to define the target volume and dose to prescribe. PMID:26996789

  11. Dose-Volume Comparison of Proton Radiotherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kadoya, Noriyuki; Obata, Yasunori; Kato, Takahiro; Kagiya, Masaru; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Tomoda, Takuya; Takada, Akinori; Takayama, Kanako; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: This study designed photon and proton treatment plans for patients treated with hypofractionated proton radiotherapy (PT) at the Southern Tohoku Proton Therapy Center (STPTC). We then calculated dosimetric parameters and compared results with simulated treatment plans for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), using dose--volume histograms to clearly explain differences in dose distributions between PT and SBRT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (stage IA, n = 15 patients; stage IB, n = 6 patients) were studied. All tumors were located in the peripheral lung, and total dose was 66 Gray equivalents (GyE) (6.6 GyE/fraction). For treatment planning, beam incidence for proton beam technique was restricted to two to three directions for PT, and seven or eight noncoplanar beams were manually selected for SBRT to achieve optimal planning target volume (PTV) coverage and minimal dose to organs at risk. Results: Regarding lung tissues, mean dose, V5, V10, V13, V15, and V20 values were 4.6 Gy, 13.2%, 11.4%, 10.6%, 10.1%, and 9.1%, respectively, for PT, whereas those values were 7.8 Gy, 32.0%, 21.8%, 17.4%, 15.3%, and 11.4%, respectively, for SBRT with a prescribed dose of 66 Gy. Pearson product moment correlation coefficients between PTV and dose--volume parameters of V5, V10, V15, and V20 were 0.45, 0.52, 0.58, and 0.63, respectively, for PT, compared to 0.52, 0.45, 0.71, and 0.74, respectively, for SBRT. Conclusions: Correlations between dose--volume parameters of the lung and PTV were observed and may indicate that PT is more advantageous than SBRT when treating a tumor with a relatively large PTV or several tumors.

  12. Automated Extraction of Dose/Volume Statistics for Radiotherapy-Treatment-Plan Evaluation in Clinical-Trial Quality Assurance

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yutao U. T.; Yu, Jialu; Pang, Dalong; Zhen, Heming; Galvin, James; Xiao, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy clinical-trial quality assurance is a crucial yet challenging process. This note presents a tool that automatically extracts dose/volume statistics for determining dosimetry compliance review with improved efficiency and accuracy. A major objective of this study is to develop an automated solution for clinical-trial radiotherapy dosimetry review. PMID:26973814

  13. Guidelines for delineation of lymphatic clinical target volumes for high conformal radiotherapy: head and neck region

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The success of radiotherapy depends on the accurate delineation of the clinical target volume. The delineation of the lymph node regions has most impact, especially for tumors in the head and neck region. The purpose of this article was the development an atlas for the delineation of the clinical target volume for patients, who should receive radiotherapy for a tumor of the head and neck region. Literature was reviewed for localisations of the adjacent lymph node regions and their lymph drain in dependence of the tumor entity. On this basis the lymph node regions were contoured on transversal CT slices. The probability for involvement was reviewed and a recommendation for the delineation of the CTV was generated. PMID:21854585

  14. Toxicity Profile With a Large Prostate Volume After External Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkawa, Michael Fischedick, Karin; Asadpour, Branka; Gagel, Bernd; Piroth, Marc D.; Nussen, Sandra; Eble, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of prostate volume on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) before and at different intervals after radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A group of 204 patients was surveyed prospectively before (Time A), at the last day (Time B), 2 months after (Time C), and 16 months (median) after (Time D) radiotherapy, with a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). The group was divided into subgroups with a small (11-43 cm{sup 3}) and a large (44-151 cm{sup 3}) prostate volume. Results: Patients with large prostates presented with lower urinary bother scores (median 79 vs. 89; p = 0.01) before treatment. Urinary function/bother scores for patients with large prostates decreased significantly compared to patients with small prostates due to irritative/obstructive symptoms only at Time B (pain with urination more than once daily in 48% vs. 18%; p < 0.01). Health-related quality of life did not differ significantly between both patient groups at Times C and D. In contrast to a large prostate, a small initial bladder volume (with associated higher dose-volume load) was predictive for lower urinary bother scores both in the acute and late phase; at Time B it predisposed for pollakiuria but not for pain. Patients with neoadjuvant hormonal therapy reached significantly lower HRQOL scores in several domains (affecting only incontinence in the urinary domain), despite a smaller prostate volume (34 cm{sup 3} vs. 47 cm{sup 3}; p < 0.01). Conclusions: Patients with a large prostate volume have a great risk of irritative/obstructive symptoms (particularly dysuria) in the acute radiotherapy phase. These symptoms recover rapidly and do not influence long-term HRQOL.

  15. Target Volume Delineation for Partial Breast Radiotherapy Planning: Clinical Characteristics Associated with Low Interobserver Concordance

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, Ross P.; Truong, Pauline T. Kader, Hosam A.; Berthelet, Eric; Lee, Junella C.; Hilts, Michelle L.; Kader, Adam S.; Beckham, Wayne A.; Olivotto, Ivo A.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To examine variability in target volume delineation for partial breast radiotherapy planning and evaluate characteristics associated with low interobserver concordance. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients who underwent planning CT for adjuvant breast radiotherapy formed the study cohort. Using a standardized scale to score seroma clarity and consensus contouring guidelines, three radiation oncologists independently graded seroma clarity and delineated seroma volumes for each case. Seroma geometric center coordinates, maximum diameters in three axes, and volumes were recorded. Conformity index (CI), the ratio of overlapping volume and encompassing delineated volume, was calculated for each case. Cases with CI {<=}0.50 were analyzed to identify features associated with low concordance. Results: The median time from surgery to CT was 42.5 days. For geometric center coordinates, variations from the mean were 0.5-1.1 mm and standard deviations (SDs) were 0.5-1.8 mm. For maximum seroma dimensions, variations from the mean and SDs were predominantly <5 mm, with the largest SDs observed in the medial-lateral axis. The mean CI was 0.61 (range, 0.27-0.84). Five cases had CI {<=}0.50. Conformity index was significantly associated with seroma clarity (p < 0.001) and seroma volume (p < 0.002). Features associated with reduced concordance included tissue stranding from the surgical cavity, proximity to muscle, dense breast parenchyma, and benign calcifications that may be mistaken for surgical clips. Conclusion: Variability in seroma contouring occurred in three dimensions, with the largest variations in the medial-lateral axis. Awareness of clinical features associated with reduced concordance may be applied toward training staff and refining contouring guidelines for partial breast radiotherapy trials.

  16. Verification of dose volume histograms in stereotactic radiosurgery and radiotherapy using polymer gel and MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šemnická, Jitka; Novotný, Josef, Jr.; Spěváček, Václav; Garčic, Jirí; Steiner, Martin; Judas, Libor

    2006-12-01

    In this work we focus on dose volume histograms (DVHs) measurement in stereotactic radiosurgery (SR) performed with the Leksell gamma knife (ELEKTA Instrument AB, Stockholm, Sweden) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) performed with linear accelerator 6 MV Varian Clinac 2100 C/D (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, USA) in conjunction with BrainLAB stereotactic system (BrainLAB, Germany) using modified BANG gel and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of the experiments was to investigate a method for acquiring entire dose volume information from irradiated gel dosimeter and calculate DVHs.

  17. Radiotherapy to volumes defined by metabolic imaging in gliomas: time to abandon monstrous margins?

    PubMed Central

    Susheela, Sridhar P.

    2016-01-01

    The survival in patients with high grade gliomas (HGG) remains poor even after the adoption post-operative radiotherapy (RT) to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based volumes. Despite delivery of ‘standardized’ doses of radiation, recurrence is the norm, rather than the exception. Recurrences occur both within, and outside of the volume of irradiation, leading us to two questions—firstly concerning the adequacy of the dose of radiation used, and secondly about the current methods of treatment volume delineation. The emergence of newer radiopharmaceuticals for use in positron emission tomography (PET) have kindled the hope of more precise volume localizations for post-operative RT, and it is likely that these new radiopharmaceuticals can help us define accurate areas at highest risk of recurrence and thus allow us to use increased doses of radiation with confidence. PMID:26904577

  18. Clinical target volume delineation in glioblastomas: pre-operative versus post-operative/pre-radiotherapy MRI

    PubMed Central

    Farace, P; Giri, M G; Meliadò, G; Amelio, D; Widesott, L; Ricciardi, G K; Dall'Oglio, S; Rizzotti, A; Sbarbati, A; Beltramello, A; Maluta, S; Amichetti, M

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Delineation of clinical target volume (CTV) is still controversial in glioblastomas. In order to assess the differences in volume and shape of the radiotherapy target, the use of pre-operative vs post-operative/pre-radiotherapy T1 and T2 weighted MRI was compared. Methods 4 CTVs were delineated in 24 patients pre-operatively and post-operatively using T1 contrast-enhanced (T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV) and T2 weighted images (T2PRECTV and T2POSTCTV). Pre-operative MRI examinations were performed the day before surgery, whereas post-operative examinations were acquired 1 month after surgery and before chemoradiation. A concordance index (CI) was defined as the ratio between the overlapping and composite volumes. Results The volumes of T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV were not statistically different (248 ± 88 vs 254 ± 101), although volume differences >100 cm3 were observed in 6 out of 24 patients. A marked increase due to tumour progression was shown in three patients. Three patients showed a decrease because of a reduced mass effect. A significant reduction occurred between pre-operative and post-operative T2 volumes (139 ± 68 vs 78 ± 59). Lack of concordance was observed between T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV (CI = 0.67 ± 0.09), T2PRECTV and T2POSTCTV (CI = 0.39 ± 0.20) and comparing the portion of the T1PRECTV and T1POSTCTV not covered by that defined on T2PRECTV images (CI = 0.45 ± 0.16 and 0.44 ± 0.17, respectively). Conclusion Using T2 MRI, huge variations can be observed in peritumoural oedema, which are probably due to steroid treatment. Using T1 MRI, brain shifts after surgery and possible progressive enhancing lesions produce substantial differences in CTVs. Our data support the use of post-operative/pre-radiotherapy T1 weighted MRI for planning purposes. PMID:21045069

  19. Online adaptive radiotherapy of the bladder: Small bowel irradiated-volume reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Burridge, Nichola . E-mail: nichola.burridge@physics.cr.man.ac.uk; Amer, Ali; Marchant, Tom; Sykes, Jonathan; Stratford, Julie; Henry, Ann; McBain, Catherine; Price, Pat; Moore, Chris

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the potential reduction of small bowel volume receiving high-dose radiation by using kilovoltage X-ray cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and quantized margin selection for adaptive bladder cancer treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty bladder patients were planned conformally using a four-field, 15-mm uniform margin technique. Two additional planning target volumes (PTVs) were created using margins quantized to 5 and 10 mm in the superior direction only. CBCTs ({approx}8 scans/patient) were acquired during treatment. CBCT volumes were registered with CT planning scans to determine setup errors and to select the appropriate PTV of the day. Margin reduction in other directions was considered. Outlining of small bowel in every fraction is required to properly quantify the volume of small bowel spared from high doses. In the case of CBCT this is not always possible owing to artifacts created by small bowel movement and the presence of gas. A simpler method was adopted by considering the volume difference between PTVs created using uniform and adapted margins, which corresponds to the potential volume of small bowel sparing. Results: The average small bowel volume that can be spared by this form of adaptive radiotherapy is 31 {+-} 23 cm{sup 3} ({+-}1 SD). The bladder for 1 patient was systematically smaller than the planning scan and hence demonstrated the largest average reduction of 76 cm{sup 3}. The clinical target volume to PTV margins in other directions can be safely reduced to 10 mm except in the anterior direction where, like the superior direction, the bladder showed significant variation. Conclusions: Online CBCT-assisted plan selection based on quantized margins can significantly reduce the volume of small bowel receiving high doses for some bladder patients. CBCT allows the 15-mm margins used in some directions to be safely reduced to 10 mm.

  20. Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Adamietz, Irenaus A

    2010-01-01

    The intrathoracic growth of the tumor causes several severe symptoms as cough, dyspnea, chest pain, hemoptysis, hoarseness, anorexia/nausea, and dysphagia. In patients with manifest or threatening symptoms radiotherapy (RT) as an effective measure should be implemented into the management concept. Palliative RT radiotherapy prefers short hypofractionated schemas (e.g. 10 x 3 Gy, 4 x 5 Gy, 2 x 8 Gy, 1 x 10 Gy). Careful radiation planning supports the precision of palliative RT and reduces significantly the complication rate. A good response and prolonged palliation effects (6-12 months) can be achieved in many cases. However, the minimum biologically equivalent dose should not be less than 35 Gy. RT produces a good outcome in all types of metastases of lung carcinoma. In emergencies like VCSS or spinal cord compression RT should be initiated immediately. The selection of the optimal therapy for locally advanced lung carcinoma with malignant airway obstruction is difficult. Both brachytherapy and percutaneous irradiation are effective, however published results including local a sum of response, functionality and life quality demonstrates more benefit by percutaneous RT. Due to different physical properties of these two methods the combination of brachytherapy and external beam irradiation may be advantageous. PMID:19955803

  1. Comparison between voxelized, volumized and analytical phantoms applied to radiotherapy simulation with Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Abella, V; Miro, R; Juste, B; Verdu, G

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a comparison between the different methods utilized for building up anthropomorphic phantoms in Radiotherapy Treatment Plans. A simplified model of the Snyder Head Phantom was used in order to construct an analytical, voxelized and volumized phantom, throughout a segmentation program and different algorithms programmed in Matlab code. The irradiation of the resulting phantoms was simulated with the MCNP5 (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code, version 5, and the calculations presented in particle flux maps inside the phantoms by utilizing the FMESH tool, superimposed mesh tally. The different variables involved in the simulation were analyzed, like particle flux, MCNP standard deviation and real simulation CPU time cost. In the end the volumized model resulted to have the largest computer time cost and bigger discrepancies in the particle flux distribution. PMID:19964509

  2. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Craniospinal Irradiation: Target Volume Considerations, Dose Constraints, and Competing Risks

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, William Filion, Edith; Roberge, David; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: To report the results of an analysis of dose received to tissues and organs outside the target volume, in the setting of spinal axis irradiation for the treatment of medulloblastoma, using three treatment techniques. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans (total dose, 23.4 Gy) for a standard two-dimensional (2D) technique, a three-dimensional (3D) technique using a 3D imaging-based target volume, and an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique, were compared for 3 patients in terms of dose-volume statistics for target coverage, as well as organ at risk (OAR) and overall tissue sparing. Results: Planning target volume coverage and dose homogeneity was superior for the IMRT plans for V{sub 95%} (IMRT, 100%; 3D, 96%; 2D, 98%) and V{sub 107%} (IMRT, 3%; 3D, 38%; 2D, 37%). In terms of OAR sparing, the IMRT plan was better for all organs and whole-body contour when comparing V{sub 10Gy}, V{sub 15Gy}, and V{sub 20Gy}. The 3D plan was superior for V{sub 5Gy} and below. For the heart and liver in particular, the IMRT plans provided considerable sparing in terms of V{sub 10Gy} and above. In terms of the integral dose, the IMRT plans were superior for liver (IMRT, 21.9 J; 3D, 28.6 J; 2D, 38.6 J) and heart (IMRT, 9 J; 3D, 14.1J; 2D, 19.4 J), the 3D plan for the body contour (IMRT, 349 J; 3D, 337 J; 2D, 555 J). Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is a valid treatment option for spinal axis irradiation. We have shown that IMRT results in sparing of organs at risk without a significant increase in integral dose.

  3. Volume Changes After Stereotactic LINAC Radiotherapy in Vestibular Schwannoma: Control Rate and Growth Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Langenberg, Rick van de; Dohmen, Amy J.C.; Bondt, Bert J. de; Nelemans, Patty J.; Baumert, Brigitta G.; Stokroos, Robert J.

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the control rate of vestibular schwannomas (VS) after treatment with linear accelerator (LINAC)-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or radiotherapy (SRT) by using a validated volumetric measuring tool. Volume-based studies on prognosis after LINAC-based SRS or SRT for VS are reported scarcely. In addition, growth patterns and risk factors predicting treatment failure were analyzed. Materials and Methods: Retrospectively, 37 VS patients treated with LINAC based SRS or SRT were analyzed. Baseline and follow-up magnetic resonance imaging scans were analyzed with volume measurements on contrast enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Absence of intervention after radiotherapy was defined as 'no additional intervention group, ' absence of radiological growth was defined as 'radiological control group. ' Significant growth was defined as a volume change of 19.7% or more, as calculated in a previous study. Results: The cumulative 4-year probability of no additional intervention was 96.4% {+-} 0.03; the 4-year radiological control probability was 85.4% {+-} 0.1). The median follow-up was 40 months. Overall, shrinkage was seen in 65%, stable VS in 22%, and growth in 13%. In 54% of all patients, transient swelling was observed. No prognostic factors were found regarding VS growth. Previous treatment and SRS were associated with transient swelling significantly. Conclusions: Good control rates are reported for LINAC based SRS or SRT in VS, in which the lower rate of radiological growth control is attributed to the use of the more sensitive volume measurements. Transient swelling after radiosurgery is a common phenomenon and should not be mistaken for treatment failure. Previous treatment and SRS were significantly associated with transient swelling.

  4. Evaluation of Peritumoral Edema in the Delineation of Radiotherapy Clinical Target Volumes for Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Eric L. . E-mail: echang@mdanderson.org; Akyurek, Serap; Avalos, Tedde C; Rebueno, Neal C; Spicer, Chris C; Garcia, John C; Famiglietti, Robin; Allen, Pamela K.; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Mahajan, Anita; Woo, Shiao Y.; Maor, Moshe H.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the spatial relationship between peritumoral edema and recurrence pattern in patients with glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Forty-eight primary GBM patients received three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy that did not intentionally include peritumoral edema within the clinical target volume between July 2000 and June 2001. All 48 patients have subsequently recurred, and their original treatment planning parameters were used for this study. New theoretical radiation treatment plans were created for the same 48 patients, based on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) target delineation guidelines that specify inclusion of peritumoral edema. Target volume and recurrent tumor coverage, as well as percent volume of normal brain irradiated, were assessed for both methods of target delineation using dose-volume histograms. Results: A comparison between the location of recurrent tumor and peritumoral edema volumes from all 48 cases failed to show correlation by linear regression modeling (r {sup 2} 0.0007; p = 0.3). For patients with edema >75 cm{sup 3}, the percent volume of brain irradiated to 46 Gy was significantly greater in treatment plans that intentionally included peritumoral edema compared with those that did not (38% vs. 31%; p = 0.003). The pattern of failure was identical between the two sets of plans (40 central, 3 in-field, 3 marginal, and 2 distant recurrence). Conclusion: Clinical target volume delineation based on a 2-cm margin rather than on peritumoral edema did not seem to alter the central pattern of failure for patients with GBM. For patients with peritumoral edema >75 cm{sup 3}, using a constant 2-cm margin resulted in a smaller median percent volume of brain being irradiated to 30 Gy, 46 Gy, and 50 Gy compared with corresponding theoretical RTOG plans that deliberately included peritumoral edema.

  5. Conformal radiotherapy, reduced boost volume, hyperfractionated radiotherapy, and online quality control in standard-risk medulloblastoma without chemotherapy: Results of the French M-SFOP 98 protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Carrie, Christian . E-mail: carrie@lyon.fnclcc.fr; Muracciole, Xavier; Gomez, Frederic

    2005-11-01

    Purpose: Between December 1998 and October 2001, patients <19 years old were treated for standard-risk medulloblastoma according to the Medulloblastome-Societe Francaise d'Oncologie Pediatrique 1998 (M-SFOP 98) protocol. Patients received hyperfractionated radiotherapy (36 Gy in 36 fractions) to the craniospinal axis, a boost with conformal therapy restricted to the tumor bed (to a total dose of 68 Gy in 68 fractions), and no chemotherapy. Records of craniospinal irradiation were reviewed before treatment start. Results: A total of 48 patients were considered assessable. With a median follow-up of 45.7 months, the overall survival and progression-free survival rate at 3 years was 89% and 81%, respectively. Fourteen major deviations were detected and eight were corrected. No relapses occurred in the frontal region and none occurred in the posterior fossa outside the boost volume. Nine patients were available for volume calculation without reduction of the volume irradiated. We observed a reduction in the subtentorial volume irradiated to >60 Gy, but a slight increase in the volume irradiated to 40 Gy. No decrease in intelligence was observed in the 22 children tested during the first 2 years. Conclusion: This hyperfractionated radiotherapy protocol with a reduced boost volume and without chemotherapy was not associated with early relapses in children. Moreover, intellectual function seemed to be preserved. These results are promising.

  6. Accurate tracking of tumor volume change during radiotherapy by CT-CBCT registration with intensity correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seyoun; Robinson, Adam; Quon, Harry; Kiess, Ana P.; Shen, Colette; Wong, John; Plishker, William; Shekhar, Raj; Lee, Junghoon

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a CT-CBCT registration method to accurately predict the tumor volume change based on daily cone-beam CTs (CBCTs) during radiotherapy. CBCT is commonly used to reduce patient setup error during radiotherapy, but its poor image quality impedes accurate monitoring of anatomical changes. Although physician's contours drawn on the planning CT can be automatically propagated to daily CBCTs by deformable image registration (DIR), artifacts in CBCT often cause undesirable errors. To improve the accuracy of the registration-based segmentation, we developed a DIR method that iteratively corrects CBCT intensities by local histogram matching. Three popular DIR algorithms (B-spline, demons, and optical flow) with the intensity correction were implemented on a graphics processing unit for efficient computation. We evaluated their performances on six head and neck (HN) cancer cases. For each case, four trained scientists manually contoured the nodal gross tumor volume (GTV) on the planning CT and every other fraction CBCTs to which the propagated GTV contours by DIR were compared. The performance was also compared with commercial image registration software based on conventional mutual information (MI), VelocityAI (Varian Medical Systems Inc.). The volume differences (mean±std in cc) between the average of the manual segmentations and automatic segmentations are 3.70+/-2.30 (B-spline), 1.25+/-1.78 (demons), 0.93+/-1.14 (optical flow), and 4.39+/-3.86 (VelocityAI). The proposed method significantly reduced the estimation error by 9% (B-spline), 38% (demons), and 51% (optical flow) over the results using VelocityAI. Although demonstrated only on HN nodal GTVs, the results imply that the proposed method can produce improved segmentation of other critical structures over conventional methods.

  7. Impact of the accuracy of automatic tumour functional volume delineation on radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Maitre, Amandine; Hatt, Mathieu; Pradier, Olivier; Cheze-le Rest, Catherine; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2012-09-01

    Over the past few years several automatic and semi-automatic PET segmentation methods for target volume definition in radiotherapy have been proposed. The objective of this study is to compare different methods in terms of dosimetry. For such a comparison, a gold standard is needed. For this purpose, realistic GATE-simulated PET images were used. Three lung cases and three H&N cases were designed with various shapes, contrasts and heterogeneities. Four different segmentation approaches were compared: fixed and adaptive thresholds, a fuzzy C-mean and the fuzzy locally adaptive Bayesian method. For each of these target volumes, an IMRT treatment plan was defined. The different algorithms and resulting plans were compared in terms of segmentation errors and ground-truth volume coverage using different metrics (V95, D95, homogeneity index and conformity index). The major differences between the threshold-based methods and automatic methods occurred in the most heterogeneous cases. Within the two groups, the major differences occurred for low contrast cases. For homogeneous cases, equivalent ground-truth volume coverage was observed for all methods but for more heterogeneous cases, significantly lower coverage was observed for threshold-based methods. Our study demonstrates that significant dosimetry errors can be avoided by using more advanced image-segmentation methods.

  8. Tumor Volume-Adapted Dosing in Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy of Lung Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Trakul, Nicholas; Chang, Christine N.; Harris, Jeremy; Chapman, Christopher; Rao, Aarti; Shen, John; Quinlan-Davidson, Sean; Filion, Edith J.; Wakelee, Heather A.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Whyte, Richard I.; and others

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Current stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) protocols for lung tumors prescribe a uniform dose regimen irrespective of tumor size. We report the outcomes of a lung tumor volume-adapted SABR dosing strategy. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes in 111 patients with a total of 138 primary or metastatic lung tumors treated by SABR, including local control, regional control, distant metastasis, overall survival, and treatment toxicity. We also performed subset analysis on 83 patients with 97 tumors treated with a volume-adapted dosing strategy in which small tumors (gross tumor volume <12 mL) received single-fraction regimens with biologically effective doses (BED) <100 Gy (total dose, 18-25 Gy) (Group 1), and larger tumors (gross tumor volume {>=}12 mL) received multifraction regimens with BED {>=}100 Gy (total dose, 50-60 Gy in three to four fractions) (Group 2). Results: The median follow-up time was 13.5 months. Local control for Groups 1 and 2 was 91.4% and 92.5%, respectively (p = 0.24) at 12 months. For primary lung tumors only (excluding metastases), local control was 92.6% and 91.7%, respectively (p = 0.58). Regional control, freedom from distant metastasis, and overall survival did not differ significantly between Groups 1 and 2. Rates of radiation pneumonitis, chest wall toxicity, and esophagitis were low in both groups, but all Grade 3 toxicities developed in Group 2 (p = 0.02). Conclusion: A volume-adapted dosing approach for SABR of lung tumors seems to provide excellent local control for both small- and large-volume tumors and may reduce toxicity.

  9. Localized volume effects for late rectal and anal toxicity after radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Peeters, Stephanie T.H.; Lebesque, Joos V. . E-mail: j.lebesque@nki.nl; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Putten, Wim L.J. van; Slot, Annerie; Dielwart, Michel F.H.; Koper, Peter C.M.

    2006-03-15

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric parameters derived from anorectal, rectal, and anal wall dose distributions that correlate with different late gastrointestinal (GI) complications after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In this analysis, 641 patients from a randomized trial (68 Gy vs. 78 Gy) were included. Toxicity was scored with adapted Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) criteria and five specific complications. The variables derived from dose-volume histogram of anorectal, rectal, and anal wall were as follows: % receiving {>=}5-70 Gy (V5-V70), maximum dose (D{sub max}), and mean dose (D{sub mean}). The anus was defined as the most caudal 3 cm of the anorectum. Statistics were done with multivariate Cox regression models. Median follow-up was 44 months. Results: Anal dosimetric variables were associated with RTOG/EORTC Grade {>=}2 (V5-V40, D{sub mean}) and incontinence (V5-V70, D{sub mean}). Bleeding correlated most strongly with anorectal V55-V65, and stool frequency with anorectal V40 and D{sub mean}. Use of steroids was weakly related to anal variables. No volume effect was seen for RTOG/EORTC Grade {>=}3 and pain/cramps/tenesmus. Conclusion: Different volume effects were found for various late GI complications. Therefore, to evaluate the risk of late GI toxicity, not only intermediate and high doses to the anorectal wall volume should be taken into account, but also the dose to the anal wall.

  10. Is internal target volume accurate for dose evaluation in lung cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jiayuan; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Jiazhou; Xie, Jiang; Hu, Weigang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose 4DCT delineated internal target volume (ITV) was applied to determine the tumor motion and used as planning target in treatment planning in lung cancer stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). This work is to study the accuracy of using ITV to predict the real target dose in lung cancer SBRT. Materials and methods Both for phantom and patient cases, the ITV and gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were contoured on the maximum intensity projection (MIP) CT and ten CT phases, respectively. A SBRT plan was designed using ITV as the planning target on average projection (AVG) CT. This plan was copied to each CT phase and the dose distribution was recalculated. The GTV_4D dose was acquired through accumulating the GTV doses over all ten phases and regarded as the real target dose. To analyze the ITV dose error, the ITV dose was compared to the real target dose by endpoints of D99, D95, D1 (doses received by the 99%, 95% and 1% of the target volume), and dose coverage endpoint of V100(relative volume receiving at least the prescription dose). Results The phantom study shows that the ITV underestimates the real target dose by 9.47%∼19.8% in D99, 4.43%∼15.99% in D95, and underestimates the dose coverage by 5% in V100. The patient cases show that the ITV underestimates the real target dose and dose coverage by 3.8%∼10.7% in D99, 4.7%∼7.2% in D95, and 3.96%∼6.59% in V100 in motion target cases. Conclusions Cautions should be taken that ITV is not accurate enough to predict the real target dose in lung cancer SBRT with large tumor motions. Restricting the target motion or reducing the target dose heterogeneity could reduce the ITV dose underestimation effect in lung SBRT. PMID:26968812

  11. Gross tumor volume is the prognostic factor for squamous cell esophageal cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Zhang, Zhen; Jiang, Guoliang

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate whether gross tumor volume (GTV) defined on radiotherapy planning scans a prognostic factor for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients treated with definitive radiotherapy. Methods From 2008 to 2011, 187 ESCC patients who were treated with definitive radio(chemo)therapy were analyzed retrospectively. Tumor volumes such as GTV, gross tumor volume of primary esophageal cancer (GTV-P), and gross tumor volume of metastases lymph nodes (GTV-N) were computed by Philips Healthcare radiation therapy planning system (Pinnacle 8.0). Kaplan-Meier cumulative probability and Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to assess the effect of the clinical factors along with tumor volume on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results In the univariate analysis, fraction dose, TNM stage, total radiation dose, GTV, GTV-P, and GTV-N were all significantly associated with both OS and PFS (P<0.05). While in multivariate analysis, GTV and fraction dose were significantly associated with both OS and PFS (adjusted P<0.05) with adjustment for age, sex, smoking status, chemotherapy, fraction dose, GTV, and radiation dose. Conclusions GTV may serve as a good prognostic factor for ESCC patients treated with definitive radiotherapy. Larger prospective studies are needed to validate these findings. PMID:27293832

  12. Clinicopathologic Analysis of Microscopic Extension in Lung Adenocarcinoma: Defining Clinical Target Volume for Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grills, Inga S.; Fitch, Dwight L.; Goldstein, Neal S.; Yan Di; Chmielewski, Gary W.; Welsh, Robert J.; Kestin, Larry L.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the gross tumor volume (GTV) to clinical target volume margin for non-small-cell lung cancer treatment planning. Methods: A total of 35 patients with Stage T1N0 adenocarcinoma underwent wedge resection plus immediate lobectomy. The gross tumor size and microscopic extension distance beyond the gross tumor were measured. The nuclear grade and percentage of bronchoalveolar features were analyzed for association with microscopic extension. The gross tumor dimensions were measured on a computed tomography (CT) scan (lung and mediastinal windows) and compared with the pathologic dimensions. The potential coverage of microscopic extension for two different lung stereotactic radiotherapy regimens was evaluated. Results: The mean microscopic extension distance beyond the gross tumor was 7.2 mm and varied according to grade (10.1, 7.0, and 3.5 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively, p < 0.01). The 90th percentile for microscopic extension was 12.0 mm (13.0, 9.7, and 4.4 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively). The CT lung windows correlated better with the pathologic size than did the mediastinal windows (gross pathologic size overestimated by a mean of 5.8 mm; composite size [gross plus microscopic extension] underestimated by a mean of 1.2 mm). For a GTV contoured on the CT lung windows, the margin required to cover microscopic extension for 90% of the cases would be 9 mm (9, 7, and 4 mm for Grade 1 to 3, respectively). The potential microscopic extension dosimetric coverage (55 Gy) varied substantially between the stereotactic radiotherapy schedules. Conclusion: For lung adenocarcinomas, the GTV should be contoured using CT lung windows. Although a GTV based on the CT lung windows would underestimate the gross tumor size plus microscopic extension by only 1.2 mm for the average case, the clinical target volume expansion required to cover the microscopic extension in 90% of cases could be as large as 9 mm, although considerably smaller for high-grade tumors

  13. Automated delineation of radiotherapy volumes: are we going in the right direction?

    PubMed Central

    Whitfield, G A; Price, P; Price, G J; Moore, C J

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Rapid and accurate delineation of target volumes and multiple organs at risk, within the enduring International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement framework, is now hugely important in radiotherapy, owing to the rapid proliferation of intensity-modulated radiotherapy and the advent of four-dimensional image-guided adaption. Nevertheless, delineation is still generally clinically performed with little if any machine assistance, even though it is both time-consuming and prone to interobserver variation. Currently available segmentation tools include those based on image greyscale interrogation, statistical shape modelling and body atlas-based methods. However, all too often these are not able to match the accuracy of the expert clinician, which remains the universally acknowledged gold standard. In this article we suggest that current methods are fundamentally limited by their lack of ability to incorporate essential human clinical decision-making into the underlying models. Hybrid techniques that utilise prior knowledge, make sophisticated use of greyscale information and allow clinical expertise to be integrated are needed. This may require a change in focus from automated segmentation to machine-assisted delineation. Similarly, new metrics of image quality reflecting fitness for purpose would be extremely valuable. We conclude that methods need to be developed to take account of the clinician's expertise and honed visual processing capabilities as much as the underlying, clinically meaningful information content of the image data being interrogated. We illustrate our observations and suggestions through our own experiences with two software tools developed as part of research council-funded projects. PMID:23239689

  14. Localization Accuracy of the Clinical Target Volume During Image-Guided Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Badawi, Ahmed; Orton, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the position and shape of the originally defined clinical target volume (CTV) over the treatment course, and to assess the impact of gross tumor volume (GTV)-based online computed tomography (CT) guidance on CTV localization accuracy. Methods and Materials: Weekly breath-hold CT scans were acquired in 17 patients undergoing radiotherapy. Deformable registration was used to propagate the GTV and CTV from the first weekly CT image to all other weekly CT images. The on-treatment CT scans were registered rigidly to the planning CT scan based on the GTV location to simulate online guidance, and residual error in the CTV centroids and borders was calculated. Results: The mean GTV after 5 weeks relative to volume at the beginning of treatment was 77% {+-} 20%, whereas for the prescribed CTV, it was 92% {+-} 10%. The mean absolute residual error magnitude in the CTV centroid position after a GTV-based localization was 2.9 {+-} 3.0 mm, and it varied from 0.3 to 20.0 mm over all patients. Residual error of the CTV centroid was associated with GTV regression and anisotropy of regression during treatment (p = 0.02 and p = 0.03, respectively; Spearman rank correlation). A residual error in CTV border position greater than 2 mm was present in 77% of patients and 50% of fractions. Among these fractions, residual error of the CTV borders was 3.5 {+-} 1.6 mm (left-right), 3.1 {+-} 0.9 mm (anterior-posterior), and 6.4 {+-} 7.5 mm (superior-inferior). Conclusions: Online guidance based on the visible GTV produces substantial error in CTV localization, particularly for highly regressing tumors. The results of this study will be useful in designing margins for CTV localization or for developing new online CTV localization strategies.

  15. Reirradiation of Large-Volume Recurrent Glioma With Pulsed Reduced-Dose-Rate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Adkison, Jarrod B.; Tome, Wolfgang; Seo, Songwon; Richards, Gregory M.; Robins, H. Ian; Rassmussen, Karl; Welsh, James S.; Mahler, Peter A.; Howard, Steven P.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Pulsed reduced-dose-rate radiotherapy (PRDR) is a reirradiation technique that reduces the effective dose rate and increases the treatment time, allowing sublethal damage repair during irradiation. Patients and Methods: A total of 103 patients with recurrent glioma underwent reirradiation using PRDR (86 considered to have Grade 4 at PRDR). PRDR was delivered using a series of 0.2-Gy pulses at 3-min intervals, creating an apparent dose rate of 0.0667 Gy/min to a median dose of 50 Gy (range, 20-60) delivered in 1.8-2.0-Gy fractions. The mean treatment volume was 403.5 {+-} 189.4 cm{sup 3} according to T{sub 2}-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and a 2-cm margin. Results: For the initial or upgraded Grade 4 cohort (n = 86), the median interval from the first irradiation to PRDR was 14 months. Patients undergoing PRDR within 14 months of the first irradiation (n = 43) had a median survival of 21 weeks. Those treated {>=}14 months after radiotherapy had a median survival of 28 weeks (n = 43; p = 0.004 and HR = 1.82 with a 95% CI ranging from 1.25 to 3.10). These data compared favorably to historical data sets, because only 16% of the patients were treated at first relapse (with 46% treated at the second relapse, 32% at the third or fourth relapse, and 4% at the fourth or fifth relapse). The median survival since diagnosis and retreatment was 6.3 years and 11.4 months for low-grade, 4.1 years and 5.6 months for Grade 3, and 1.6 years and 5.1 months for Grade 4 tumors, respectively, according to the initial histologic findings. Multivariate analysis revealed age at the initial diagnosis, initial low-grade disease, and Karnofsky performance score of {>=}80 to be significant predictors of survival after initiation of PRDR. Conclusion: PRDR allowed for safe retreatment of larger volumes to high doses with palliative benefit.

  16. Outcomes of visual acuity in carbon ion radiotherapy: Analysis of dose-volume histograms and prognostic factors

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Azusa . E-mail: azusa@nirs.go.jp; Mizoe, Jun-etsu; Mizota, Atsushi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the tolerance dose for retention of visual acuity in patients with head-and-neck tumors treated with carbon ion radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From June 1994 to March 2000, 163 patients with tumors in the head and neck or skull base region were treated with carbon ion radiotherapy. Analysis was performed on 54 optic nerves (ONs) corresponding to 30 patients whose ONs had been included in the irradiated volume. These patients showed no evidence of visual impairment due to other factors and had a follow-up period of >4 years. All patients had been informed of the possibility of visual impairment before treatment. We evaluated the dose-complication probability and the prognostic factors for the retention of visual acuity in carbon ion radiotherapy, using dose-volume histograms and multivariate analysis. Results: The median age of 30 patients (14 men, 16 women) was 57.2 years. Median prescribed total dose was 56.0 gray equivalents (GyE) at 3.0-4.0 GyE per fraction per day (range, 48-64 GyE; 16-18 fractions; 4-6 weeks). Of 54 ONs that were analyzed, 35 had been irradiated with <57 GyE (maximum dose [D{sub max}]) resulting in no visual loss. Conversely, 11 of the 19 ONs (58%) irradiated with >57 GyE (D{sub max}) suffered a decrease of visual acuity. In all of these cases, the ONs had been involved in the tumor before carbon ion radiotherapy. In the multivariate analysis, a dose of 20% of the volume of the ON (D{sub 2}) was significantly associated with visual loss. Conclusions: The occurrence of visual loss seems to be correlated with a delivery of >60 GyE to 20% of the volume of the ON.

  17. A clip-based protocol for breast boost radiotherapy provides clear target visualisation and demonstrates significant volume reduction over time

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Lorraine; Cox, Jennifer; Morgia, Marita; Atyeo, John; Lamoury, Gillian

    2015-09-15

    The clinical target volume (CTV) for early stage breast cancer is difficult to clearly identify on planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Surgical clips inserted around the tumour bed should help to identify the CTV, particularly if the seroma has been reabsorbed, and enable tracking of CTV changes over time. A surgical clip-based CTV delineation protocol was introduced. CTV visibility and its post-operative shrinkage pattern were assessed. The subjects were 27 early stage breast cancer patients receiving post-operative radiotherapy alone and 15 receiving post-operative chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. The radiotherapy alone (RT/alone) group received a CT scan at median 25 days post-operatively (CT1rt) and another at 40 Gy, median 68 days (CT2rt). The chemotherapy/RT group (chemo/RT) received a CT scan at median 18 days post-operatively (CT1ch), a planning CT scan at median 126 days (CT2ch), and another at 40 Gy (CT3ch). There was no significant difference (P = 0.08) between the initial mean CTV for each cohort. The RT/alone cohort showed significant CTV volume reduction of 38.4% (P = 0.01) at 40 Gy. The Chemo/RT cohort had significantly reduced volumes between CT1ch: median 54 cm{sup 3} (4–118) and CT2ch: median 16 cm{sup 3}, (2–99), (P = 0.01), but no significant volume reduction thereafter. Surgical clips enable localisation of the post-surgical seroma for radiotherapy targeting. Most seroma shrinkage occurs early, enabling CT treatment planning to take place at 7 weeks, which is within the 9 weeks recommended to limit disease recurrence.

  18. The role of tumor volume in radiotherapy of patients with head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The assumption that the larger tumor contains a higher number of clonogenic cells what may deteriorate prognosis of patients treated with RT has been confirmed in many clinical studies. Significant prognostic influence of tumor volume (TV) on radiotherapy (RT) outcome has been found for tumors of different localizations including patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Although TV usually is a stronger prognostic factor than T stage, commonly used TNM classification system dose not incorporate TV data. The aim of the paper is to refresh clinical data regarding the role of TV in RT of patients with HNC. At present somehow new meaning of TV could be employed in the aspect of modern RT techniques and combined treatment strategies. For larger TV more aggressive treatment options may be considered. In modern RT techniques escalated dose could be provided highly conformal or RT can be combined with systemic treatment increasing therapeutic ratio. In the study several reports estimating prognostic value of TV for patients with HNC treated with RT has been reviewed. Due to substantially various reported groups of patients as to tumor site, stage of disease or treatment strategies, precise cut-off value could not be establish in general, but the significant association between TV and treatment outcome had been found in almost all studies. There is a strong suggestion that TV should supplement clinical decision in the choice of optimal treatment strategy for patients with HNC. PMID:24423415

  19. Modeling the Interplay Between Tumor Volume Regression and Oxygenation in Uterine Cervical Cancer During Radiotherapy Treatment.

    PubMed

    Belfatto, Antonella; Riboldi, Marco; Ciardo, Delia; Cattani, Federica; Cecconi, Agnese; Lazzari, Roberta; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Orecchia, Roberto; Baroni, Guido; Cerveri, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a patient-specific mathematical model to predict the evolution of uterine cervical tumors at a macroscopic scale, during fractionated external radiotherapy. The model provides estimates of tumor regrowth and dead-cell reabsorption, incorporating the interplay between tumor regression rate and radiosensitivity, as a function of the tumor oxygenation level. Model parameters were estimated by minimizing the difference between predicted and measured tumor volumes, these latter being obtained from a set of 154 serial cone-beam computed tomography scans acquired on 16 patients along the course of the therapy. The model stratified patients according to two different estimated dynamics of dead-cell removal and to the predicted initial value of the tumor oxygenation. The comparison with a simpler model demonstrated an improvement in fitting properties of this approach (fitting error average value <5%, p < 0.01), especially in case of tumor late responses, which can hardly be handled by models entailing a constant radiosensitivity, failing to model changes from initial severe hypoxia to aerobic conditions during the treatment course. The model predictive capabilities suggest the need of clustering patients accounting for cancer cell line, tumor staging, as well as microenvironment conditions (e.g., oxygenation level). PMID:25647734

  20. Predictors of Mastoiditis after Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: A Dose-Volume Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ji-Jin; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Jin, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Wang-Jian; Lin, Li; Yu, Xiao-Li; Shao, Jian-Yong; Ma, Jun; Sun, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Background: To identify predictors for development of mastoiditis after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: Data for 146 NPC patients treated with IMRT was retrospectively reviewed under institutional ethics committee approval. Clinical factors associated with mastoiditis were analyzed. Dose-volume histogram analysis was performed for the Eustachian tube, tympanic cavity, mastoid air cells, cochlea, internal auditory canal and vestibular apparatus to relate doses to radiographic changes in the mastoid. Mastoiditis was assessed using magnetic resonance imaging and was classified as Grade 0 (none), 1 (mild), 2 (moderate) or 3 (severe); Grade 3 mastoiditis was the study end-point. Results: Eighty-eight ears (36%) had radiation-induced mastoiditis: 38/244 (15.6%) mastoid complexes had Grade 1-2 mastoiditis and 50/244 (20.5%) mastoid complexes had Grade 3 mastoiditis. Multivariate analysis revealed a mastoid mean dose > 35.93 Gy (odds ratio [OR]=4.22, P=.003), Eustachian tube mean dose > 53.43 Gy (OR=2.16, P=.034) and advanced T category (T3 and T4; OR=10.33, P=.032) were negative prognostic factors for Grade 3 mastoiditis. Conclusions: Radiation-induced mastoiditis remains a common late toxicity in NPC after radiotherapy. The mean dose to the mastoid air cells and Eustachian tube should be limited to reduce the risk of radiation-induced mastoiditis. PMID:26918040

  1. Dose response explorer: an integrated open-source tool for exploring and modelling radiotherapy dose volume outcome relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Naqa, I.; Suneja, G.; Lindsay, P. E.; Hope, A. J.; Alaly, J. R.; Vicic, M.; Bradley, J. D.; Apte, A.; Deasy, J. O.

    2006-11-01

    Radiotherapy treatment outcome models are a complicated function of treatment, clinical and biological factors. Our objective is to provide clinicians and scientists with an accurate, flexible and user-friendly software tool to explore radiotherapy outcomes data and build statistical tumour control or normal tissue complications models. The software tool, called the dose response explorer system (DREES), is based on Matlab, and uses a named-field structure array data type. DREES/Matlab in combination with another open-source tool (CERR) provides an environment for analysing treatment outcomes. DREES provides many radiotherapy outcome modelling features, including (1) fitting of analytical normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) and tumour control probability (TCP) models, (2) combined modelling of multiple dose-volume variables (e.g., mean dose, max dose, etc) and clinical factors (age, gender, stage, etc) using multi-term regression modelling, (3) manual or automated selection of logistic or actuarial model variables using bootstrap statistical resampling, (4) estimation of uncertainty in model parameters, (5) performance assessment of univariate and multivariate analyses using Spearman's rank correlation and chi-square statistics, boxplots, nomograms, Kaplan-Meier survival plots, and receiver operating characteristics curves, and (6) graphical capabilities to visualize NTCP or TCP prediction versus selected variable models using various plots. DREES provides clinical researchers with a tool customized for radiotherapy outcome modelling. DREES is freely distributed. We expect to continue developing DREES based on user feedback.

  2. Conformal radiotherapy for lung cancer: interobservers' variability in the definition of gross tumor volume between radiologists and radiotherapists

    PubMed Central

    Tyng, Chiang J; Chojniak, Rubens; Pinto, Paula NV; Borba, Marcelle A; Bitencourt, Almir GV; Fogaroli, Ricardo C; Castro, Douglas G; Novaes, Paulo E

    2009-01-01

    Background Conformal external radiotherapy aims to improve tumor control by boosting tumor dose, reducing morbidity and sparing healthy tissues. To meet this objective careful visualization of the tumor and adjacent areas is required. However, one of the major issues to be solved in this context is the volumetric definition of the targets. This study proposes to compare the gross volume of lung tumors as delineated by specialized radiologists and radiotherapists of a cancer center. Methods Chest CT scans of a total of 23 patients all with non-small cell lung cancer, not submitted to surgery, eligible and referred to conformal radiotherapy on the Hospital A. C. Camargo (São Paulo, Brazil), during the year 2004 were analyzed. All cases were delineated by 2 radiologists and 2 radiotherapists. Only the gross tumor volume and the enlarged lymph nodes were delineated. As such, four gross tumor volumes were achieved for each one of the 23 patients. Results There was a significant positive correlation between the 2 measurements (among the radiotherapists, radiologists and intra-class) and there was randomness in the distribution of data within the constructed confidence interval. Conclusion There were no significant differences in the definition of gross tumor volume between radiologists and radiotherapists. PMID:19653915

  3. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation.

    PubMed

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  4. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H.; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  5. Mathematical modelling of tumour volume dynamics in response to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariq, Imran; Humbert-Vidan, Laia; Chen, Tao; South, Christopher P.; Ezhil, Veni; Kirkby, Norman F.; Jena, Rajesh; Nisbet, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports a modelling study of tumour volume dynamics in response to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). The main objective was to develop a model that is adequate to describe tumour volume change measured during SABR, and at the same time is not excessively complex as lacking support from clinical data. To this end, various modelling options were explored, and a rigorous statistical method, the Akaike information criterion, was used to help determine a trade-off between model accuracy and complexity. The models were calibrated to the data from 11 non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with SABR. The results showed that it is feasible to model the tumour volume dynamics during SABR, opening up the potential for using such models in a clinical environment in the future.

  6. Pros: concurrent chemo-radiotherapy remains the ideal treatment in fit patients with large volume unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rabatic, Bryan M.

    2016-01-01

    The debate of treating stage III, large volume non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with definitive chemo-radiotherapy continues to be waged. A physically fit patient, having large volume and unresectable disease is the ideal candidate for this treatment approach. The ability of this patient population to successfully complete, and thereby benefit from an aggressive, combined treatment to improve local control and survival, drives the recommendation of treating oncologists for this approach. Until a phase III trial proves otherwise, concurrent chemo-radiotherapy will remain the ideal treatment for fit patients having large volume unresectable stage III NSCLC. PMID:27186513

  7. [Radiotherapy of cancers of the pancreas and extrahepatic biliary tree. Gross tumor volume (GTV). Clinical target volume (CTV)].

    PubMed

    Atlan, D; Mornex, F

    2001-10-01

    Anatomical data of pancreas, biliary tree, regional lymph nodes is required to define GTV and CTV. In case of postoperative irradiation, CTV is designed in collaboration with radiation oncologist and surgeon oncologist. For exclusive radiotherapy, endodigestive ultrasonography, CT scan and MRI could help radiation oncologist defining GTV. Although, accuracy of all the imaging techniques in past years remains poor. Currently, no available literature is published regarding security margins for the definition of CTV. Therefore, recommendations according to clinical experience are proposed. PMID:11715305

  8. Evaluating changes in tumor volume using magnetic resonance imaging during the course of radiotherapy treatment of high-grade gliomas: Implications for conformal dose-escalation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tsien, Christina . E-mail: ctsien@umich.edu; Gomez-Hassan, Diana; Haken, Randall K. ten; Tatro, Daniel C.; Junck, L.; Chenevert, T.L.; Lawrence, T.

    2005-06-01

    Objective: To determine whether changes in tumor volume occur during the course of conformal 3D radiotherapy of high-grade gliomas by use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during treatment and whether these changes had an impact on tumor coverage. Methods and Materials: Between December 2000 and January 2004, 21 patients with WHO Grades 3 to 4 supratentorial malignant gliomas treated with 3D conformal radiotherapy (median dose, 70 Gy) were enrolled in a prospective clinical study. All patients underwent T1-weighted contrast-enhancing and T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) imaging at approximately 1 to 2 weeks before radiotherapy, during radiotherapy (Weeks 1 and 3), and at routine intervals thereafter. All MRI scans were coregistered to the treatment-planning CT. Gross tumor volume (GTV Pre-Rx) was defined from a postoperative T1-weighted contrast-enhancing MRI performed 1 to 2 weeks before start of radiotherapy. A second GTV (GTV Week 3) was defined by use of an MRI performed during Week 3 of radiotherapy. A uniform 0.5 cm expansion of the respective GTV, PTV (Pre-Rx), and PTV (Week 3) was applied to the final boost plan. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were used to analyze any potential adverse changes in tumor coverage based on Week 3 MRI. Results: All MRI scans were reviewed independently by a neuroradiologist (DGH). Two patients were noted to have multifocal disease at presentation and were excluded from analysis. In 19 cases, changes in the GTV based on MRI at Week 3 during radiotherapy were as follows: 2 cases had an objective decrease in GTV ({>=}50%); 12 cases revealed a slight decrease in the rim enhancement or changes in cystic appearance of the GTV; 2 cases showed no change in GTV; and 3 cases demonstrated an increase in tumor volume. Both cases with objective decreases in GTV during treatment were Grade 3 tumors. No cases of tumor progression were noted in Grade 3 tumors during treatment. In comparison, three of 12 Grade 4

  9. Strategies to evaluate the impact of rectal volume on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Ana Paula Diniz Fortuna; Dias, Rodrigo Souza; Giordani, Adelmo José; Segreto, Helena Regina Comodo; Segreto, Roberto Araujo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the rectal volume influence on prostate motion during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer. Materials and Methods Fifty-one patients with prostate cancer underwent a series of three computed tomography scans including an initial planning scan and two subsequent scans during 3D-CRT. The organs of interest were outlined. The prostate contour was compared with the initial CT images considering the anterior, posterior, superior, inferior and lateral edges of the organ. Variations in the anterior limits and volume of the rectum were assessed and correlated with prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction. Results The maximum range of prostate motion was observed in the superoinferior direction, followed by the anteroposterior direction. A significant correlation was observed between prostate motion and rectal volume variation (p = 0.037). A baseline rectal volume superior to 70 cm3 had a significant influence on the prostate motion in the anteroposterior direction (p = 0.045). Conclusion The present study showed a significant interfraction motion of the prostate during 3D-CRT with greatest variations in the superoinferior and anteroposterior directions, and that a large rectal volume influences the prostate motion with a cutoff value of 70 cm3. Therefore, the treatment of patients with a rectal volume > 70 cm3 should be re-planned with appropriate rectal preparation. PMID:26929456

  10. The Relationship Between Local Recurrence and Radiotherapy Treatment Volume for Soft Tissue Sarcomas Treated With External Beam Radiotherapy and Function Preservation Surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Dickie, Colleen I.; Griffin, Anthony M.; Parent, Amy L.; Chung, Peter W.M.; Catton, Charles N.; Svensson, Jon; Ferguson, Peter C.; Wunder, Jay S.; Bell, Robert S.; Sharpe, Michael B.; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To examine the geometric relationship between local recurrence (LR) and external beam radiotherapy (RT) volumes for soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) patients treated with function-preserving surgery and RT. Methods and Materials: Sixty of 768 (7.8%) STS patients treated with combined therapy within our institution from 1990 through 2006 developed an LR. Thirty-two received preoperative RT, 16 postoperative RT, and 12 preoperative RT plus a postoperative boost. Treatment records, RT simulation images, and diagnostic MRI/CT data sets of the original and LR disease were retrospectively compared. For LR location analysis, three RT target volumes were defined according to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements 29 as follows: (1) the gross tumor or operative bed; (2) the treatment volume (TV) extending 5 cm longitudinally beyond the tumor or operative bed unless protected by intact barriers to spread and at least 1-2 cm axially (the TV was enclosed by the isodose curve representing the prescribed target absorbed dose [TAD] and accounted for target/patient setup uncertainty and beam characteristics), and (3) the irradiated volume (IRV) that received at least 50% of the TAD, including the TV. LRs were categorized as developing in field within the TV, marginal (on the edge of the IRV), and out of field (occurring outside of the IRV). Results: Forty-nine tumors relapsed in field (6.4% overall). Nine were out of field (1.1% overall), and 2 were marginal (0.3% overall). Conclusions: The majority of STS tumors recur in field, indicating that the incidence of LR may be affected more by differences in biologic and molecular characteristics rather than aberrations in RT dose or target volume coverage. In contrast, only two patients relapsed at the IRV boundary, suggesting that the risk of a marginal relapse is low when the TV is appropriately defined. These data support the accurate delivery of optimal RT volumes in the most precise way using advanced

  11. Toward Semi-automated Assessment of Target Volume Delineation in Radiotherapy Trials: The SCOPE 1 Pretrial Test Case

    SciTech Connect

    Gwynne, Sarah; Spezi, Emiliano; Wills, Lucy; Nixon, Lisette; Hurt, Chris; Joseph, George; Evans, Mererid; Griffiths, Gareth; Crosby, Tom; Staffurth, John

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate different conformity indices (CIs) for use in the analysis of outlining consistency within the pretrial quality assurance (Radiotherapy Trials Quality Assurance [RTTQA]) program of a multicenter chemoradiation trial of esophageal cancer and to make recommendations for their use in future trials. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Research Institute SCOPE 1 trial is an ongoing Cancer Research UK-funded phase II/III randomized controlled trial of chemoradiation with capecitabine and cisplatin with or without cetuximab for esophageal cancer. The pretrial RTTQA program included a detailed radiotherapy protocol, an educational package, and a single mid-esophageal tumor test case that were sent to each investigator to outline. Investigator gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were received from 50 investigators in 34 UK centers, and CERR (Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research) was used to perform an assessment of each investigator GTV against a predefined gold-standard GTV using different CIs. A new metric, the local conformity index (l-CI), that can localize areas of maximal discordance was developed. Results: The median Jaccard conformity index (JCI) was 0.69 (interquartile range, 0.62-0.70), with 14 of 50 investigators (28%) achieving a JCI of 0.7 or greater. The median geographical miss index was 0.09 (interquartile range, 0.06-0.16), and the mean discordance index was 0.27 (95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.30). The l-CI was highest in the middle section of the volume, where the tumor was bulky and more easily definable, and identified 4 slices where fewer than 20% of investigators achieved an l-CI of 0.7 or greater. Conclusions: The available CIs analyze different aspects of a gold standard-observer variation, with JCI being the most useful as a single metric. Additional information is provided by the l-CI and can focus the efforts of the RTTQA team in these areas, possibly leading to semi-automated outlining assessment.

  12. SU-E-J-79: Evaluation of Prostate Volume Changes During Radiotherapy Using Implanted Markers and On-Board Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ispir, B; Akdeniz, Y; Ugurluer, G; Eken, A; Arpaci, T; Serin, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate prostate volume changes during radiation therapy using implanted gold markers and on-board imaging. Methods: Twenty-five patients were included who underwent an implantation of three gold markers. Cartesian coordinates of markers were assessed in kV-images. The coordinates of centers of two markers were measured on kV-images from the center of the marker at the apex which was reference. The distances between the markers were extrapolated from the coordinates using the Euclid formula. The radius of the sphere through markers was calculated using sinus theorem. The prostate volume for the first and last fraction was substituted with a sphere model and was calculated for each patient. The t-test was used for analysis. Results: The mean prostate volume for first and last fraction was 24.65 and 20.87 cc, respectively (p≤0.05). The prostate volume was smaller for 23 patients, whereas there was an expansion for 2 patients. Fifteen patients had androgen deprivation during radiotherapy (H group) and ten did not (NH group). The mean prostate volume for the first and last fraction for the NH group was 30.73 cc and 24.89 cc and for the H group 20.84 cc and 18.19 cc, respectively. There was a 15.8% volume change during treatment for the NH group and 12.2% for the H group, but the difference was not statistically significant. The radius difference of the theoretical sphere for the first and last fraction was 0.98 mm (range, 0.09–2.95 mm) and remained below 2 mm in 88% of measurements. Conclusion: There was a significant volume change during prostate radiotherapy. The difference between H group and NH group was not significant. The radius changes did not exceed 3 mm and it was below adaptive treatment requirements. Our results indicate that prostate volume changes during treatment should be taken into account during contouring and treatment planning.

  13. Investigation of bladder dose and volume factors influencing late urinary toxicity after external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, M. Rex . E-mail: mrcheung@mdanderson.org; Tucker, Susan L.; Dong Lei; Crevoisier, Renaud de; Lee, Andrew K.; Frank, Steven; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Thames, Howard; Mohan, Radhe; Kuban, Deborah

    2007-03-15

    Background: We sought to identify the bladder dose-volume factors associated with an increased risk of late urinary toxicity among prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: This retrospective analysis included data from 128 prostate cancer patients treated on protocol with 2 Gy/fraction to 46 Gy followed by a boost to 78 Gy. The endpoint for this analysis was Grade 1 or greater late genitourinary (GU) toxicity occurring within two years of treatment. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman, mean dose, threshold dose, and hottest volume models were fitted to the toxicity data using the maximum likelihood method. Results: Model fits based on dose-volume histograms tended to fit the toxicity data better than models based on dose-wall histograms. The hottest volume (hotspot) model was found to be the best-fitting model investigated. The best fit was for the hottest 2.9% of bladder (95% CI, 1.1-6.8%). This model has an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.74. The hotspot model separated the patients into clinically meaningful subgroups with {approx}25% of the patients who received <78 Gy to the hottest 2.9% of bladder had GU toxicity at eight years compared with {approx}50% when the dose was {>=}78 Gy (p = 0.002). Conclusion: This provides the first evidence supporting that bladder 'hotspots' are related to GU toxicity within two years after external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Confirming data are needed from other investigators. Particular attention should be given to hotspots higher than 78 Gy in bladder in radiation treatment planning.

  14. NOTE Thyroid volume measurement in external beam radiotherapy patients using CT imaging: correlation with clinical and anthropometric characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veres, C.; Garsi, J. P.; Rubino, C.; Pouzoulet, F.; Bidault, F.; Chavaudra, J.; Bridier, A.; Ricard, M.; Ferreira, I.; Lefkopoulos, D.; de Vathaire, F.; Diallo, I.

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study is to define criteria for accurate representation of the thyroid in human models used to represent external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) patients and evaluate the relationship between the volume of this organ and clinical and anthropometric characteristics. From CT images, we segmented the thyroid gland and calculated its volume for a population of 188 EBRT patients of both sexes, with ages ranging from 1 to 89 years. To evaluate uncertainties linked to measured volumes, experimental studies on the Livermore anthropomorphic phantom were performed. For our population of EBRT patients, we observed that in children, thyroid volume increased rapidly with age, from about 3 cm3 at 2 years to about 16 cm3 at 20. In adults, the mean thyroid gland volume was 23.5 ± 9 cm3 for males and 17.5 ± 8 cm3 for females. According to anthropometric parameters, the best fit for children was obtained by modeling the log of thyroid volume as a linear function of body surface area (BSA) (p < 0.0001) and age (p = 0.04) and for adults, as a linear function of BSA (p < 0.0001) and gender (p = 0.01). This work enabled us to demonstrate that BSA was the best indicator of thyroid volume for both males and females. These results should be taken into account when modeling the volume of the thyroid in human models used to represent EBRT patients for dosimetry in retrospective studies of the relationship between the estimated dose to the thyroid and long-term follow-up data on EBRT patients.

  15. Environmental Projects. Volume 17; Biological Assessment, Opinion, and New 34-Meter Beam-Waveguide Antenna (DSS 24) at Apollo Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bengelsdorf, Irving

    1996-01-01

    This report deals with the Biological Assessment, Biological Opinion and Final Report on the construction of a high- efficiency 34-meter, multifrequency beam-waveguide antenna at the Apollo Site of the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex, operated by JPL. According to the Endangered Species Act of 1973, a Biological Assessment must be conducted and a Biological Opinion, with terms and conditions, rendered (the Opinion by the U.S. Department of the Interior) before construction of any federal project that may affect endangered or threatened flora or fauna. After construction, a final report is filed with the Department. The desert tortoise, designated "threatened" by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Mojave ground squirrel and the Lane Mountain milk vetch, both designated "candidate threatened," required the reporting specified by the Act. The Assessment found no significant danger to the animal species if workers are educated about them. No stands of the plant species were observed in the surveyed construction area. The Department issued a Biological Opinion to safeguard the two animal species. The Service and the California Department of Fish and Game both issued a Biological Concurrence that JPL had satisfied all environmental criteria for preserving threatened species.

  16. Dose-Volume Constraints to Reduce Rectal Side Effects From Prostate Radiotherapy: Evidence From MRC RT01 Trial ISRCTN 47772397

    SciTech Connect

    Gulliford, Sarah L.; Foo, Kerwyn; Morgan, Rachel C.; Aird, Edwin G.; Bidmead, A. Margaret; Critchley, Helen; Evans, Philip M. D.Phil.; Gianolini, Stefano; Mayles, W. Philip; Moore, A. Rollo; Sanchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Partridge, Mike; Sydes, Matthew R. C.Stat; Webb, Steve; Dearnaley, David P.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: Radical radiotherapy for prostate cancer is effective but dose limited because of the proximity of normal tissues. Comprehensive dose-volume analysis of the incidence of clinically relevant late rectal toxicities could indicate how the dose to the rectum should be constrained. Previous emphasis has been on constraining the mid-to-high dose range (>=50 Gy). Evidence is emerging that lower doses could also be important. Methods and Materials: Data from a large multicenter randomized trial were used to investigate the correlation between seven clinically relevant rectal toxicity endpoints (including patient- and clinician-reported outcomes) and an absolute 5% increase in the volume of rectum receiving the specified doses. The results were quantified using odds ratios. Rectal dose-volume constraints were applied retrospectively to investigate the association of constraints with the incidence of late rectal toxicity. Results: A statistically significant dose-volume response was observed for six of the seven endpoints for at least one of the dose levels tested in the range of 30-70 Gy. Statistically significant reductions in the incidence of these late rectal toxicities were observed for the group of patients whose treatment plans met specific proposed dose-volume constraints. The incidence of moderate/severe toxicity (any endpoint) decreased incrementally for patients whose treatment plans met increasing numbers of dose-volume constraints from the set of V30<=80%, V40<=65%, V50<=55%, V60<=40%, V65<=30%, V70<=15%, and V75<=3%. Conclusion: Considering the entire dose distribution to the rectum by applying dose-volume constraints such as those tested here in the present will reduce the incidence of late rectal toxicity.

  17. Relationship Between Pelvic Organ-at-Risk Dose and Clinical Target Volume in Postprostatectomy Patients Receiving Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Stanic, Sinisa; Mathai, Mathew; Cui Jing; Purdy, James A.; Valicenti, Richard K.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate dose-volume consequences of inclusion of the seminal vesicle (SV) bed in the clinical target volume (CTV) for the rectum and bladder using biological response indices in postprostatectomy patients receiving intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: We studied 10 consecutive patients who underwent prostatectomy for prostate cancer and subsequently received adjuvant or salvage RT to the prostate fossa. The CTV to planning target volume (PTV) expansion was 7 mm, except posterior expansion, which was 5 mm. Two IMRT plans were generated for each patient, including either the prostate fossa alone or the prostate fossa with the SV bed, but identical in all other aspects. Prescription dose was 68.4 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions prescribed to {>=}95% PTV. Results: With inclusion of the SV bed in the treatment volume, PTV increased and correlated with PTV-bladder and PTV-rectum volume overlap (Spearman {rho} 0.91 and 0.86, respectively; p < 0.05). As a result, the dose delivered to the bladder and rectum was higher (p < 0.05): mean bladder dose increased from 11.3 {+-} 3.5 Gy to 21.2 {+-} 6.6 Gy, whereas mean rectal dose increased from 25.8 {+-} 5.5 Gy to 32.3 {+-} 5.5 Gy. Bladder and rectal equivalent uniform dose correlated with mean bladder and rectal dose. Inclusion of the SV bed in the treatment volume increased rectal normal tissue complication probability from 2.4% to 4.8% (p < 0.01). Conclusions: Inclusion of the SV bed in the CTV in postprostatectomy patients receiving IMRT increases bladder and rectal dose, as well as rectal normal tissue complication probability. The magnitude of PTV-bladder and PTV-rectal volume overlap and subsequent bladder and rectum dose increase will be higher if larger PTV expansion margins are used.

  18. Volume or Position Changes of Primary Lung Tumor During (Chemo-)Radiotherapy Cannot Be Used as a Surrogate for Mediastinal Lymph Node Changes: The Case for Optimal Mediastinal Lymph Node Imaging During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Elmpt, Wouter van; Ollers, Michel; Herwijnen, Henrieke van; Holder, Linda den; Vercoulen, Lindsay; Wouters, Monique; Lambin, Philippe; De Ruysscher, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Primary lung tumors can be visualized mostly with cone beam computed tomography (CT), whereas visualization is much more difficult for mediastinal lymph nodes (LN). If the volumetric and positional changes of the primary tumor could be used as a surrogate for the LN, this would facilitate image-guided radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the positional and volumetric changes in primary tumors and the involved LN during (chemo)radiotherapy treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer patients. Methods and Materials: [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging was performed before radiotherapy and in the second week of treatment in 35 patients. Gross tumor volumes (GTV) of the primary tumor (GTVprim) and of the involved LN (GTVlymph) were delineated. Changes in position and volume of GTVprim with respect to GTVlymph and the bony anatomy were compared. Results: In individual cases, large displacements up to 1.6 cm and volume changes of 50% of the primary tumor may occur that are not correlated to the changes in involved LN. The volume of GTVprim reduced, on average, by 5.7% {+-} 19.0% and was not correlated with the small increase of 1.4% {+-} 18.2% in involved LN volume. Compared to bony anatomy, displacement of the primary tumor was statistically correlated to the involved LN displacement. Conclusions: Volume and position changes of the primary tumor are not always predictive for LN changes. This suggests that for characterization of involved LN, repeated state-of-the-art mediastinal imaging during radiotherapy may be necessary.

  19. FDG-PET imaging for the assessment of physiologic volume response during radiotherapy in cervix cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Lilie L.; Yang Zhiyun; Mutic, Sasa; Miller, Tom R.; Grigsby, Perry W. . E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the physiologic tumor volume response during treatment in cervical cancer using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET). Patients and Methods: This was a prospective study of 32 patients. Physiologic tumor volume in cubic centimeters was determined from the FDG-PET images using the 40% threshold method. Results: The mean pretreatment tumor volume was 102 cm{sup 3}. The mean volume by clinical Stages I, II, and III were 54, 79, and 176 cm{sup 3}, respectively. After 19.8 Gy external irradiation to the pelvis, the reduction in tumor volume was 29% (72 cm{sup 3}). An additional 13 Gy from high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy reduced the mean volume to 15.4 cm{sup 3}, and this was subsequently reduced to 8.6 cm{sup 3} with 13 Gy additional HDR brachytherapy (26 Gy, HDR). Four patients had physiologic FDG uptake in the cervix at 3 months after the completion of therapy. The mean time to the 50% reduction in physiologic tumor volume was 19.9 days and after combined external irradiation and HDR to 24.9 Gy. Conclusion: These results indicate that physiologic tumor volume determination by FDG-PET is feasible and that a 50% physiologic tumor volume reduction occurs within 20 days of starting therapy.

  20. Multiple local minima in radiotherapy optimization problems with dose-volume constraints.

    PubMed

    Deasy, J O

    1997-07-01

    The cause of multiple local minima in beam weight optimization problems subject to dose-volume constraints is analyzed. Three objective functions were considered: (a) maximization of tumor control probability (TCP), (b) maximization of the minimum target dose, and (c) minimization of the mean-squared-deviation of the target dose from the prescription dose. It is shown that: (a) TCP models generally result in strongly quasiconvex objective functions; (b) maximization of the minimum target dose results in a strongly quasiconvex objective function; and (c) minimizing the root-mean-square dose deviation results in a convex objective function. Dose-volume constraints are considered such that, for each region at risk (RAR), the volume of tissue whose dose exceeds a certain tolerance dose (DTol) is kept equal to or below a given fractional level (VTol). If all RARs lack a "volume effect" (i.e., VTol = 0 for all RARs) then there is a single local minimum. But if volume effects are present, then the feasible space is possibly nonconvex and therefore possibly leads to multiple local minima. These conclusions hold for all three objective functions. Hence, possible local minima come not from the nonlinear nature of the objective functions considered, but from the "either this volume or that volume but not both" nature of the volume effect. These observations imply that optimization algorithms for dose-volume constraint types of problems should have effective strategies for dealing with multiple local minima. PMID:9243478

  1. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer reduces volume of bowel treated to high dose levels

    SciTech Connect

    Urbano, M. Teresa Guerrero; Henrys, Anthony J.; Adams, Elisabeth J.; Norman, Andrew R.; Bedford, James L.; Harrington, Kevin J.; Nutting, Christopher M.; Dearnaley, David P.; Tait, Diana M. . E-mail: jenny.pearson@rmh.nthames.nhs.uk

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to spare the bowel in rectal tumors. Methods and Materials: The targets (pelvic nodal and rectal volumes), bowel, and bladder were outlined in 5 patients. All had conventional, three-dimensional conformal RT and forward-planned multisegment three-field IMRT plans compared with inverse-planned simultaneous integrated boost nine-field equally spaced IMRT plans. Equally spaced seven-field and five-field and five-field, customized, segmented IMRT plans were also evaluated. Results: Ninety-five percent of the prescribed dose covered at least 95% of both planning target volumes using all but the conventional plan (mean primary and pelvic planning target volume receiving 95% of the prescribed dose was 32.8 {+-} 13.7 Gy and 23.7 {+-} 4.87 Gy, respectively), reflecting a significant lack of coverage. The three-field forward planned IMRT plans reduced the volume of bowel irradiated to 45 Gy and 50 Gy by 26% {+-} 16% and 42% {+-} 27% compared with three-dimensional conformal RT. Additional reductions to 69 {+-} 51 cm{sup 3} to 45 Gy and 20 {+-} 21 cm{sup 3} to 50 Gy were obtained with the nine-field equally spaced IMRT plans-64% {+-} 11% and 64% {+-} 20% reductions compared with three-dimensional conformal RT. Reducing the number of beams and customizing the angles for the five-field equally spaced IMRT plan did not significantly reduce bowel sparing. Conclusion: The bowel volume irradiated to 45 Gy and 50 Gy was significantly reduced with IMRT, which could potentially lead to less bowel toxicity. Reducing the number of beams did not reduce bowel sparing and the five-field customized segmented IMRT plan is a reasonable technique to be tested in clinical trials.

  2. Accurate Analysis of the Change in Volume, Location, and Shape of Metastatic Cervical Lymph Nodes During Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Takao, Seishin; Tadano, Shigeru; Taguchi, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Koichi; Onimaru, Rikiya; Ishikawa, Masayori; Bengua, Gerard; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Shirato, Hiroki

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To establish a method for the accurate acquisition and analysis of the variations in tumor volume, location, and three-dimensional (3D) shape of tumors during radiotherapy in the era of image-guided radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Finite element models of lymph nodes were developed based on computed tomography (CT) images taken before the start of treatment and every week during the treatment period. A surface geometry map with a volumetric scale was adopted and used for the analysis. Six metastatic cervical lymph nodes, 3.5 to 55.1 cm{sup 3} before treatment, in 6 patients with head and neck carcinomas were analyzed in this study. Three fiducial markers implanted in mouthpieces were used for the fusion of CT images. Changes in the location of the lymph nodes were measured on the basis of these fiducial markers. Results: The surface geometry maps showed convex regions in red and concave regions in blue to ensure that the characteristics of the 3D tumor geometries are simply understood visually. After the irradiation of 66 to 70 Gy in 2 Gy daily doses, the patterns of the colors had not changed significantly, and the maps before and during treatment were strongly correlated (average correlation coefficient was 0.808), suggesting that the tumors shrank uniformly, maintaining the original characteristics of the shapes in all 6 patients. The movement of the gravitational center of the lymph nodes during the treatment period was everywhere less than {+-}5 mm except in 1 patient, in whom the change reached nearly 10 mm. Conclusions: The surface geometry map was useful for an accurate evaluation of the changes in volume and 3D shapes of metastatic lymph nodes. The fusion of the initial and follow-up CT images based on fiducial markers enabled an analysis of changes in the location of the targets. Metastatic cervical lymph nodes in patients were suggested to decrease in size without significant changes in the 3D shape during radiotherapy. The movements of the

  3. Defining Radiotherapy Target Volumes Using {sup 18}F-Fluoro-Deoxy-Glucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography: Still a Pandora's Box?

    SciTech Connect

    Devic, Slobodan; Tomic, Nada; Faria, Sergio; Menard, Sonia; Lisbona, Robert; Lehnert, Shirley

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: We discuss the effect of {sup 18}F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) data on target volume definition for radiotherapy planning. We compared the effect of various thresholding methods on the PET-based target volume vs. the standard CT-based tumor volume. Methods and Materials: Different thresholding methods were reviewed and compared to our PET-based gross tumor volume data obtained from a cohort of 31 non-small-cell lung carcinoma patients who had undergone preoperative PET/CT scans for staging. The feasibility and limitations of FDG-based PET/CT data on target volume delineation in radiotherapy planning have been demonstrated with frequently used approaches for target outlining such as the qualitative visual method and the fixed 15% or 40% of the maximal iso-uptake value threshold methods. Results: The relationship between PET-based and CT-based volumes generally suffers from poor correlation between the two image data sets, expressed in terms of a large statistical variation in gross tumor volume ratios, irrespective of the threshold method used. However, we found that the maximal signal/background ratios in non-small-cell lung carcinoma patients correlated well with the pathologic results, with an average ratio for adenocarcinoma, large cell carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma of 10.5 {+-} 3.5, 12.6 {+-} 2.8, and 14.1 {+-} 5.9, respectively. Conclusion: The fluctuations in tumor volume using different quantitative PET thresholding approaches did not depend on the thresholding method used. They originated from the nature of functional imaging in general and PET imaging in particular. Functional imaging will eventually be used for biologically tailored target radiotherapy volume definition not as a replacement of CT- or magnetic resonance imaging-based anatomic gross tumor volumes but with the methods complementing each other in a complex mosaic of distinct biologic target volumes.

  4. Associations between Metabolic Risk Factors and the Hypothalamic Volume in Childhood Leukemia Survivors Treated with Cranial Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Follin, Cecilia; Gabery, Sanaz; Petersén, Åsa; Sundgren, Pia C.; Björkman-Burtcher, Isabella; Lätt, Jimmy; Mannfolk, Peter; Erfurth, Eva Marie

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic complications are prevalent in individuals treated with cranial radiotherapy (CRT) for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The hypothalamus is a master regulator of endocrine and metabolic control. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the hypothalamic volume would be associated to metabolic parameters in ALL survivors. Thirty-eight (21 women) survivors participated in this study 34 years after diagnosis and with a median age of 38 (27–46) years. All were treated with a median CRT dose of 24 Gy and 11 years (3–13) of complete hormone supplementation. Comparisons were made to 31 matched controls. We performed analyses of fat mass, fat free mass, plasma (p)-glucose, p-insulin, Homa-Index (a measure of insulin resistance), serum (s)-leptin, s-ghrelin and of the hypothalamic volume in scans obtained by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3 Tesla. Serum leptin/kg fat mass (r = -0.4, P = 0.04) and fat mass (r = -0.4, P = 0.01) were negatively correlated with the HT volume among ALL survivors, but not among controls. We also detected significantly higher BMI, waist, fat mass, p-insulin, Homa-Index, leptin/kg fat mass and s-ghrelin and significantly lower fat free mass specifically among female ALL survivors (all P<0.01). Interestingly, s-ghrelin levels increased with time since diagnosis and with low age at diagnosis for childhood ALL. Our results showed that leptin/kg fat mass and fat mass were associated with a reduced HT volume 34 years after ALL diagnosis and that women treated with CRT after ALL are at high risk of metabolic abnormalities. Taken together our data suggest that the hypothalamus is involved in the metabolic consequences after CRT in ALL survivors. PMID:26824435

  5. Effect of Bra Use during Radiotherapy for Large-Breasted Women: Acute Toxicity and Treated Heart and Lung Volumes

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Lanea; Cohen, Randi; Sopka, Dennis M; Li, Tianyu; Li, Linna; Anderson, Penny R; Fowble, Barbara L.; Freedman, Gary M

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Large breast size presents special problems during radiation simulation, planning and patient treatment, including increased skin toxicity, in women undergoing breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (BCT). We report our experience using a bra during radiation in large-breasted women and its effect on acute toxicity and heart and lung dosimetry. Materials and methods From 2001 to 2006, 246 consecutive large-breasted women (bra size ≥ 38 and/or ≥ D cup) were treated with BCT using either 3D conformal (3D-CRT) or Intensity Modulated Radiation (IMRT). In 58 cases, at the physicians’ discretion, a custom-fit bra was used during simulation and treatment. Endpoints were acute radiation dermatitis, and dosimetric comparison of heart and lung volumes in a subgroup of 12 left-sided breast cancer patients planned with and without a bra. Results The majority of acute skin toxicities were grade 2 and were experienced by 90% of patients in a bra compared to 70% of patients not in a bra (p=0.003). On multivariate analysis significant predictors of grade 2/3 skin toxicity included 3D-CRT instead of IMRT (OR=3.9, 95% CI:1.8-8.5) and the use of a bra (OR=5.5, 95% CI:1.6-18.8). For left-sided patients, use of a bra was associated with a volume of heart in the treatment fields decreased by 63.4% (p=0.002), a volume of left lung decreased by 18.5% (p=0.25), and chest wall separation decreased by a mean of 1 cm (p=0.03). Conclusions The use of a bra to augment breast shape and position in large-breasted women is an alternative to prone positioning and associated with reduced chest wall separation and reduced heart volume within the treatment field. PMID:23459714

  6. [Prostate cancer external beam radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Pommier, P; Latorzeff, I; Chapet, O; Chauvet, B; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    The prostate external beam radiotherapy techniques are described, when irradiating the prostate or after prostatectomy, with and without pelvic lymph nodes. The following parts are presented: indications of radiotherapy, total dose and fractionation, planning CT image acquisition, volume of interest delineation (target volumes and organs at risk) and margins, Intensity modulated radiotherapy planning and corresponding dose-volume constraints, and finally Image guided radiotherapy. PMID:27516051

  7. SU-E-J-238: Monitoring Lymph Node Volumes During Radiotherapy Using Semi-Automatic Segmentation of MRI Images

    SciTech Connect

    Veeraraghavan, H; Tyagi, N; Riaz, N; McBride, S; Lee, N; Deasy, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Identification and image-based monitoring of lymph nodes growing due to disease, could be an attractive alternative to prophylactic head and neck irradiation. We evaluated the accuracy of the user-interactive Grow Cut algorithm for volumetric segmentation of radiotherapy relevant lymph nodes from MRI taken weekly during radiotherapy. Method: The algorithm employs user drawn strokes in the image to volumetrically segment multiple structures of interest. We used a 3D T2-wturbo spin echo images with an isotropic resolution of 1 mm3 and FOV of 492×492×300 mm3 of head and neck cancer patients who underwent weekly MR imaging during the course of radiotherapy. Various lymph node (LN) levels (N2, N3, N4'5) were individually contoured on the weekly MR images by an expert physician and used as ground truth in our study. The segmentation results were compared with the physician drawn lymph nodes based on DICE similarity score. Results: Three head and neck patients with 6 weekly MR images were evaluated. Two patients had level 2 LN drawn and one patient had level N2, N3 and N4'5 drawn on each MR image. The algorithm took an average of a minute to segment the entire volume (512×512×300 mm3). The algorithm achieved an overall DICE similarity score of 0.78. The time taken for initializing and obtaining the volumetric mask was about 5 mins for cases with only N2 LN and about 15 mins for the case with N2,N3 and N4'5 level nodes. The longer initialization time for the latter case was due to the need for accurate user inputs to separate overlapping portions of the different LN. The standard deviation in segmentation accuracy at different time points was utmost 0.05. Conclusions: Our initial evaluation of the grow cut segmentation shows reasonably accurate and consistent volumetric segmentations of LN with minimal user effort and time.

  8. Simulation of tissue activity curves of 64Cu-ATSM for sub-target volume delineation in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalah, E.; Bradley, D.; Nisbet, A.

    2010-02-01

    There is much interest in positron emission tomography (PET) for measurements of regional tracer concentration in hypoxic tumour-bearing tissue, focusing on the need for accurate radiotherapy treatment planning. Generally, relevant data are taken over multiple time frames in the form of tissue activity curves (TACs), thus providing an indication of vasculature structure and geometry. This is a potential key in providing information on cellular perfusion and limited diffusion. A number of theoretical studies have attempted to describe tracer uptake in tissue cells in an effort to understand such complicated behaviour of cellular uptake and the mechanism of washout. More recently, a novel computerized reaction diffusion equation method was developed by Kelly and Brady (2006 A model to simulate tumour oxygenation and dynamic [18F]-FMISO PET data Phys. Med. Biol. 51 5859-73), where they managed to simulate the realistic dynamic TACs of 18F-FMISO. The model was developed over a multi-step process. Here we present a refinement to the work of Kelly and Brady, such that the model allows simulation of a realistic tissue activity curve (TAC) of any hypoxia selective PET tracer, in a single step process. In this work we show particular interest in simulating the TAC of perhaps the most promising hypoxia selective tracer, 64Cu-ATSM. In addition, we demonstrate its potential role in tumour sub-volume delineation for radiotherapy treatment planning. Simulation results have demonstrated the significant high contrast of imaging using ATSM, with a tumour to blood ratio ranging from 2.24 to 4.1.

  9. Dose-Volume Histogram Analysis of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer: A Focus on Duodenal Dose Constraints.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Christy; Price, Patricia; Cross, Timothy; Loughlin, Sheila; Cowley, Ian; Plowman, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is an aggressive disease and radiotherapy treatment delivery to the primary tumor is constrained by the anatomical close location of the duodenum, stomach, and small bowel. Duodenal dose tolerance for radiosurgery in 2-5 fractions has been largely unknown. The literature was surveyed for quantitative models of risk in 1-5 fractions and we analyzed our own patient population of 44 patients with unresectable pancreatic tumors who received 3 or 5 fractions of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) between March 2009 and March 2013. A logistic model was constructed in the dose-volume histogram (DVH) Evaluator software for the duodenal D50%, D30cc, D5cc, D1cc, and maximum point dose D0.035cc. Dose tolerance limits from the literature were overlaid onto the clinical duodenal data in the form of a DVH Risk Map, with risk levels of the published limits estimated from the model of clinical data. In 3 fractions, Kopek 2010 found a statistically significant difference in D1cc of patients with no common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) v3 grade 2 or higher duodenal complications (mean D1cc = 25.3Gy) as compared with patients with grade 2 or higher toxicity (mean D1cc = 37.4Gy). From the logistic model of our duodenal data in 3 fractions, D1cc = 25.3Gy had 4.7% risk of grade 3-4 hemorrhage or stricture and D1cc = 37.4Gy had 20% risk. The 10% risk level was D1cc = 31.4Gy and we were able to keep duodenum dose for all our patients later this level. PMID:27000512

  10. Risk factors for neovascular glaucoma after carbon ion radiotherapy of choroidal melanoma using dose-volume histogram analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hirasawa, Naoki . E-mail: naoki_h@nirs.go.jp; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Koyama-Ito, Hiroko; Kamada, Tadashi; Mizoe, Jun-Etsu; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Naganawa, Shinji; Ohnishi, Yoshitaka; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the risk factors for neovascular glaucoma (NVG) after carbon ion radiotherapy (C-ion RT) of choroidal melanoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 55 patients with choroidal melanoma were treated between 2001 and 2005 with C-ion RT based on computed tomography treatment planning. All patients had a tumor of large size or one located close to the optic disk. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the risk factors of NVG for the following parameters; gender, age, dose-volumes of the iris-ciliary body and the wall of eyeball, and irradiation of the optic disk (ODI). Results: Neovascular glaucoma occurred in 23 patients and the 3-year cumulative NVG rate was 42.6 {+-} 6.8% (standard error), but enucleation from NVG was performed in only three eyes. Multivariate analysis revealed that the significant risk factors for NVG were V50{sub IC} (volume irradiated {>=}50 GyE to iris-ciliary body) (p = 0.002) and ODI (p = 0.036). The 3-year NVG rate for patients with V50{sub IC} {>=}0.127 mL and those with V50{sub IC} <0.127 mL were 71.4 {+-} 8.5% and 11.5 {+-} 6.3%, respectively. The corresponding rate for the patients with and without ODI were 62.9 {+-} 10.4% and 28.4 {+-} 8.0%, respectively. Conclusion: Dose-volume histogram analysis with computed tomography indicated that V50{sub IC} and ODI were independent risk factors for NVG. An irradiation system that can reduce the dose to both the anterior segment and the optic disk might be worth adopting to investigate whether or not incidence of NVG can be decreased with it.

  11. Effect of Radiotherapy Volume and Dose on Secondary Cancer Risk in Stage I Testicular Seminoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zwahlen, Daniel R. Martin, Jarad M.; Millar, Jeremy L.; Schneider, Uwe

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To estimate and compare the secondary cancer risk (SCR) due to para-aortic (PA), dogleg field (DLF), or extensive field (EF) radiotherapy (RT) at different dose levels for Stage I testicular seminoma. Methods and Materials: The organ equivalent dose concept with a linear, plateau, and linear-exponential dose-response model was applied to the dose distributions to estimate the SCR. The dose distributions were calculated in a voxel-based anthropomorphic phantom. Three different three-dimensional plans were computed: PA, DLF, and EF. The plans were calculated with 6-MV photons and two opposed fields, using 20 Gy in 10 fractions. Results: The estimated cumulative SCR for a 75-year-old patient treated with PA-RT at age 35 was 23.3% (linear model), 20.9% (plateau model), and 20.8% (linear-exponential model) compared with 19.8% for the general population. Dependent on the model, PA-RT compared with DLF-RT reduced the SCR by 48-63% or 64-69% when normalized to EF-RT. For PA-RT, the linear dose-response model predicted a decrease of 45% in the SCR, using 20 Gy instead of 30 Gy; the linear-exponential dose-response model predicted no change in SCR. Conclusion: Our model suggested that the SCR after PA-RT for Stage I testicular seminoma is reduced by approximately one-half to two-thirds compared with DLF-RT, independent of the dose-response model. The SCR is expected to be equal or lower with 20 Gy than with 30 Gy. In the absence of mature patient data, the organ equivalent dose concept offers the best potential method of estimating the SCR when discussing treatment options with patients.

  12. Beam-specific planning volumes for scattered-proton lung radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flampouri, S.; Hoppe, B. S.; Slopsema, R. L.; Li, Z.

    2014-08-01

    This work describes the clinical implementation of a beam-specific planning treatment volume (bsPTV) calculation for lung cancer proton therapy and its integration into the treatment planning process. Uncertainties incorporated in the calculation of the bsPTV included setup errors, machine delivery variability, breathing effects, inherent proton range uncertainties and combinations of the above. Margins were added for translational and rotational setup errors and breathing motion variability during the course of treatment as well as for their effect on proton range of each treatment field. The effect of breathing motion and deformation on the proton range was calculated from 4D computed tomography data. Range uncertainties were considered taking into account the individual voxel HU uncertainty along each proton beamlet. Beam-specific treatment volumes generated for 12 patients were used: a) as planning targets, b) for routine plan evaluation, c) to aid beam angle selection and d) to create beam-specific margins for organs at risk to insure sparing. The alternative planning technique based on the bsPTVs produced similar target coverage as the conventional proton plans while better sparing the surrounding tissues. Conventional proton plans were evaluated by comparing the dose distributions per beam with the corresponding bsPTV. The bsPTV volume as a function of beam angle revealed some unexpected sources of uncertainty and could help the planner choose more robust beams. Beam-specific planning volume for the spinal cord was used for dose distribution shaping to ensure organ sparing laterally and distally to the beam.

  13. Dose-volume factors associated with ear disorders following intensity modulated radiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ji-Jin; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Lin, Li; Zhang, Wang-Jian; Peng, Ying-Lin; Chen, Lei; Tang, Ling-Long; Mao, Yan-Ping; Ma, Jun; Sun, Ying

    2015-01-01

    This study is to identify significant dosimetric parameters for ear disorders in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients treated with intensity modulated therapy only. Ninety-seven patients with NPC were retrospectively reviewed. Organs at risk (OARs) in the auditory apparatus were contoured. Dose–volume histogram parameters were generated for the Eustachian tube (ET), tympanic cavity (TC), mastoid air cells, vestibular apparatus, cochlea and internal auditory canal (IAC). Ear disorders were rated 0 (none), 1 (mild) or 2 (severe) by a clinician blinded to radiation doses; Grade 2 ear disorders was the study end-point. Multivariate analysis revealed ET.D30 (dose to 30% of ET volume) >52.75 Gy and M.D0.5CC (dose to 0.5 ml of mastoid volume) >41.04 Gy (OR = 3.77, P = 0.012 and OR = 1.27, P = 0.033, respectively) were associated with Grade 2 ear disorders. Our results demonstrated that post-irradiation ear disorders remain a common late toxicity in NPC after IMRT. ET.D30 and M.D0.5CC should be considered during IMRT treatment plan optimization, review and approval. PMID:26323586

  14. Patterns of epidural progression following postoperative spine stereotactic body radiotherapy: implications for clinical target volume delineation.

    PubMed

    Chan, Michael W; Thibault, Isabelle; Atenafu, Eshetu G; Yu, Eugene; John Cho, B C; Letourneau, Daniel; Lee, Young; Yee, Albert; Fehlings, Michael G; Sahgal, Arjun

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT The authors performed a pattern-of-failure analysis, with a focus on epidural disease progression, in patients treated with postoperative spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). METHODS Of the 70 patients with 75 spinal metastases (cases) treated with postoperative spine SBRT, there were 26 cases of local disease recurrence and 25 cases with a component of epidural disease progression. Twenty-four of the 25 cases had preoperative epidural disease with subsequent epidural disease progression, and this cohort was the focus of this epidural-specific pattern-of-failure investigation. Preoperative, postoperative, and follow-up MRI scans were reviewed, and epidural disease was characterized based on location according to a system in which the vertebral anatomy is divided into 6 sectors, with the anterior compartment comprising Sectors 1, 2, and 6, and the posterior compartment comprising Sectors 3, 4, and 5. RESULTS Patterns of epidural progression are reported specifically for the 24 cases with preoperative epidural disease and subsequent epidural progression. Epidural disease progression within the posterior compartment was observed to be significantly lower in those with preoperative epidural disease confined to the anterior compartment than in those with preoperative epidural disease involving both anterior and posterior compartments (56% vs 93%, respectively; p = 0.047). In a high proportion of patients with epidural disease progression, treatment failure was found in the anterior compartment, including both those with preoperative epidural disease confined to the anterior compartment and those with preoperative epidural disease involving both anterior and posterior compartments (100% vs. 73%, respectively). When epidural disease was confined to the anterior compartment on the preoperative and postoperative MRIs, no epidural disease progression was observed in Sector 4, which is the most posterior sector. Postoperative epidural disease characteristics

  15. Volume effects of late term normal tissue toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonta, Dacian Viorel

    Modeling of volume effects for treatment toxicity is paramount for optimization of radiation therapy. This thesis proposes a new model for calculating volume effects in gastro-intestinal and genito-urinary normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) following radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma. The radiobiological and the pathological basis for this model and its relationship to other models are detailed. A review of the radiobiological experiments and published clinical data identified salient features and specific properties a biologically adequate model has to conform to. The new model was fit to a set of actual clinical data. In order to verify the goodness of fit, two established NTCP models and a non-NTCP measure for complication risk were fitted to the same clinical data. The method of fit for the model parameters was maximum likelihood estimation. Within the framework of the maximum likelihood approach I estimated the parameter uncertainties for each complication prediction model. The quality-of-fit was determined using the Aikaike Information Criterion. Based on the model that provided the best fit, I identified the volume effects for both types of toxicities. Computer-based bootstrap resampling of the original dataset was used to estimate the bias and variance for the fitted parameter values. Computer simulation was also used to estimate the population size that generates a specific uncertainty level (3%) in the value of predicted complication probability. The same method was used to estimate the size of the patient population needed for accurate choice of the model underlying the NTCP. The results indicate that, depending on the number of parameters of a specific NTCP model, 100 (for two parameter models) and 500 patients (for three parameter models) are needed for accurate parameter fit. Correlation of complication occurrence in patients was also investigated. The results suggest that complication outcomes are correlated in a patient, although

  16. Internal target volume determined with expansion margins beyond composite gross tumor volume in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, Helen A.; Jiang, Steve B.; Aljarrah, Khaled M.; Doppke, Karen P.; Choi, Noah C. . E-mail: nchoi@partners.org

    2004-10-01

    helical scan at free breathing (n = 14) required the largest internal margin (mean, 3.5 mm; maximum, 18 mm; standard deviation [SD], 4.2 mm) to match the composite GTV, compared with those of the 4-s slow scan (mean 2.7 mm, maximum 14 mm, SD 3.5 mm) or combined breath-hold scans (mean 1.1 mm, maximum 9 mm, SD 1.9 mm). Internal margins (expansion margins) required to approximate the composite GTV in 95% of cases were 13 mm, 10 mm, and 5 mm for the GTVs of a single fast scan, 4-s slow scan, and breath-hold scans at the end of tidal volume inspiration and expiration, respectively. Conclusions: The internal margins required to account for the internal tumor motion in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy are substantial. For the use of symmetric and population-based margins to account for internal tumor motion, GTV defined with breath-hold scans at the end of tidal volume inspiration and expiration has a narrower range of internal margins in all directions than that of either a single fast scan or 4-s slow scan.

  17. On the automated definition of mobile target volumes from 4D-CT images for stereotactic body radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Tiezhi; Orton, Nigel P.; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2005-11-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) can be used to treat small lesions in the chest. A vacuum-based immobilization system is used in our clinic for SBRT, and a motion envelope is used in treatment planning. The purpose of this study is to automatically derive motion envelopes using deformable image registration of 4D-CT images, and to assess the effect of abdominal pressure on the motion envelopes. 4D-CT scans at ten phases were acquired prior to treatment for both free and restricted breathing using a vacuum-based immobilization system that includes an abdominal pressure pillow. To study the stability of the motion envelope over the course of treatment, a mid-treatment 4D-CT scan was obtained after delivery of the third fraction for two patients. The planning target volume excluding breathing motion (PTV{sub ex}) was defined on the image set at full exhalation phase and transformed into all other phases using displacement maps from deformable image registration. The motion envelope was obtained as the union of PTV{sub ex} masks of all phases. The ratios of the motion envelope to PTV{sub ex} volume ranged from 1.3 to 2.5. When pressure was applied, the ratios were reduced by as much as 29% compared to free breathing for some patients, but increased by up to 9% for others. The abdominal pressure pillow has more motion restriction effects on the anterior/inferior region of the lung. For one of the two patients for whom the 4D-CT scan was repeated at mid-treatment, the motion envelope was reproducible. However, for the other patient the tumor location and lung motion pattern significantly changed due to changes in the anatomy surrounding the tumor during the course of treatment, indicating that an image-guided approach to SBRT may increase the efficacy of this treatment.

  18. SU-E-T-379: Concave Approximations of Target Volume Dose Metrics for Intensity- Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Y; Chen, Y; Wickerhauser, M; Deasy, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The widely used treatment plan metric Dx (mimimum dose to the hottest x% by volume of the target volume) is simple to interpret and use, but is computationally poorly behaved (non-convex), this impedes its use in computationally efficient intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning algorithms. We therefore searched for surrogate metrics that are concave, computationally efficient, and accurately correlated to Dx values in IMRT treatment plans. Methods: To find concave surrogates of D95—and more generally, Dx values with variable x values—we tested equations containing one or two generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) functions. Fits were obtained by varying gEUD ‘a’ parameter values, as well as the linear equation coefficients. Fitting was performed using a dataset of dose-volume histograms from 498 de-identified head and neck IMRT treatment plans. Fit characteristics were tested using a crossvalidation process. Reported root-mean-square error values were averaged over the cross-validation shuffles. Results: As expected, the two-gEUD formula provided a superior fit, compared to the single-gEUD formula. The best approximation uses two gEUD terms: 16.25 x gEUD[a=0.45] – 15.30 x gEUD[a=1.75] – 0.69. The average root-mean-square error on repeated (70/30) cross validation was 0.94 Gy. In addition, a formula was found that reasonably approximates Dx for x between 80% and 96%. Conclusion: A simple concave function using two gEUD terms was found that correlates well with PTV D95s for these head and neck treatment plans. More generally, a formula was found that represents well the Dx for x values from 80% to 96%, thus providing a computationally efficient formula for use in treatment planning optimization. The formula may need to be adjusted for other institutions with different treatment planning protocols. We conclude that the strategy of replacing Dx values with gEUD-based formulas is promising.

  19. Defining the Clinical Target Volume for Bladder Cancer Radiotherapy Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Peter; Anjarwalla, Salim; Gilbert, Hugh; Kinder, Richard

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: There are currently no data for the expansion margin required to define the clinical target volume (CTV) around bladder tumors. This information is particularly relevant when perivesical soft tissue changes are seen on the planning scan. While this appearance may reflect extravesical extension (EVE), it may also be an artifact of previous transurethral resection (TUR). Methods and Materials: Eighty patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer who had undergone radical cystectomy were studied. All patients underwent preoperative TUR and staging computed tomography (CT) scans. The presence and extent of tumor growth beyond the outer bladder wall was measured radiologically and histopathologically. Results: Forty one (51%) patients had histologically confirmed tumor extension into perivesical fat. The median and mean extensions beyond the outer bladder wall were 1.7 and 3.1 mm, respectively. Thirty five (44%) patients had EVE, as seen on CT scans. The sensitivity and specificity of CT scans for EVE were 56% and 79%, respectively. False-positive results were infrequent and not affected by either the timing or the amount of tissue resected at TUR. CT scans consistently tended to overestimate the extent of EVE. Tumor size and the presence of either lymphovascular invasion or squamoid differentiation predict a greater extent of EVE. Conclusions: In patients with radiological evidence of extravesical disease, the CTV should comprise the outer bladder wall plus a 10-mm margin. In patients with no evidence of extravesical disease on CT scans, the CTV should be restricted to the outer bladder wall plus a 6-mm margin. These recommendations would encompass microscopic disease extension in 90% of cases.

  20. RTOG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists Reach Consensus on Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) and Clinical Target Volume (CTV) on Computed Tomographic Images for Preoperative Radiotherapy of Primary Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremity in RTOG Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dian; Bosch, Walter; Roberge, David; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Petersen, Ivy; Haddock, Michael; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Saito, Naoyuki G.; Kirsch, David G.; Hitchcock, Ying J.; Wolfson, Aaron H.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To develop an Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) atlas delineating gross tumor volume (GTV), and clinical target volume (CTV) to be used for preoperative radiotherapy of primary extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods A consensus meeting was held during the RTOG meeting in January 2010 to reach agreement about GTV and CTV delineation on CT images for preoperative radiotherapy of high-grade large extremity STS. Data were presented to address the local extension of STS. Extensive discussion ensued to develop optimal criteria for GTV and CTV delineation on CT images. Results A consensus was reached on appropriate CT-based GTV and CTV. GTV is gross tumor defined by T1 contrast-enhanced MRI images. Fusion of MRI and CT is recommended to delineate the GTV. CTV for high-grade large STS typically includes GTV plus 3 cm margins in the longitudinal directions. If this causes the field to extend beyond the compartment, the field can be shortened to include the end of a compartment. The radial margin from the lesion should be 1.5 cm including any portion of the tumor not confined by an intact fascial barrier, bone or skin surface. Conclusion The consensus on GTV and CTV for preoperative radiotherapy of high-grade large extremity STS is available as web-based images as well as descriptive format through the RTOG. This is expected to improve target volume consistency and allow for rigorous evaluation of the benefits and risks of such treatment. PMID:21676552

  1. A Prognostic Volumetric Threshold of Gross Tumor Volume in Head and Neck Cancer Patients Treated With Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Romesser, Paul B.; Qureshi, Muhammad M.; Subramaniam, Rathan M.; Sakai, Osamu; Jalisi, Scharukh; Truong, Minh T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prognostic utility of a volumetric threshold for gross tumor volume (GTV) of the primary and nodal disease when accounting for the TNM classification in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT). Materials and Methods From 2004 to 2011, 79 HNC patients were treated to a median dose of 70 Gy, using intensity-modulated RT in 78.5% and 3-dimensional conformal RT in 21.5% with 83.5% receiving concurrent chemotherapy. Primary (GTV-P) and nodal (GTV-N) GTVs were derived from computed tomography (CT)-based contours for RT planning, of which 89.7% were aided by positron emission tomography-computed tomography. Local (LC), nodal (NC), distant (DC) control, and overall survival (OS) were assessed using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method. Results With a median follow-up of 27.1 months GTV-P, threshold of <32.9 mL (mean value) compared with ≥32.9 mL, correlated with improved 2-year LC (96.2% vs. 63.9%, P < 0.0001), NC (100% vs. 69.2%, P < 0.0001), DC (87.9% vs. 64.2%, P = 0.001), and OS (88.4% vs. 58.6%, P = 0.001). GTV-P demonstrated its prognostic utility in multivariate analyses when adjusted for tumor category, cancer site, and chemotherapy regimen. Nodal GTV (mean, 34.0 mL) was not predictive of nodal control and survival. Conclusions A volumetric threshold of the primary tumor may be used as an independent prognostic factor in patients with HNC undergoing definitive RT. PMID:23211218

  2. Opinions and decisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with selected orders, July 1, 1995--December 31, 1995. Volume 42, Pages 1-258

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    This is the 42nd volume of issuances of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and its Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, Administrative Law Judges, and Office Directors. This book is a reprinting, containing corrections of numerous printing errors in a previously distributed book. It covers the period from July 1, 1995 to December 31, 1995. Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards conduct adjudicatory hearings on applications to construct and operate nuclear power plants and related facilities, and issue initial decisions which, subject to internal review and appellate procedures, become the final Commission action with respect to those applications. The hardbound edition of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances is a final compilation of the monthly issuances. It includes all of the legal precedents for the agency within a 6-month period. Any opinions, decisions, denials, memoranda and orders of the Commission inadvertently omitted from the monthly editions and any corrections submitted by the NRC legal staff to the printed softbound issuances are contained in the hardbound edition.

  3. Effect of {sup 11}C-Methionine-Positron Emission Tomography on Gross Tumor Volume Delineation in Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Skull Base Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Astner, Sabrina T. Dobrei-Ciuchendea, Mihaela; Essler, Markus; Bundschuh, Ralf A.; Sai, Heitetsu; Schwaiger, Markus; Molls, Michael; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of trimodal image fusion using computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and {sup 11}C-methionine positron emission tomography (MET-PET) for gross tumor volume delineation in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of skull base meningiomas. Patients and Methods: In 32 patients with skull base meningiomas, the gross tumor volume (GTV) was outlined on CT scans fused to contrast-enhanced MRI (GTV-MRI/CT). A second GTV, encompassing the MET-PET positive region only (GTV-PET), was generated. The additional information obtained by MET-PET concerning the GTV delineation was evaluated using the PET/CT/MRI co-registered images. The sizes of the overlapping regions of GTV-MRI/CT and GTV-PET were calculated and the amounts of additional volumes added by the complementing modality determined. Results: The addition of MET-PET was beneficial for GTV delineation in all but 3 patients. MET-PET detected small tumor portions with a mean volume of 1.6 {+-} 1.7 cm{sup 3} that were not identified by CT or MRI. The mean percentage of enlargement of the GTV using MET-PET as an additional imaging method was 9.4% {+-} 10.7%. Conclusions: Our data have demonstrated that integration of MET-PET in radiotherapy planning of skull base meningiomas can influence the GTV, possibly resulting in an increase, as well as in a decrease.

  4. Quantification of Trade-Off Between Parotid Gland Sparing and Planning Target Volume Underdosages in Clinically Node-Negative Head-and-Neck Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kruijf, Wilhelmus de . E-mail: kruijf.de.w@bvi.nl; Heijmen, Ben; Levendag, Peter C.

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To quantify the trade-off between parotid gland sparing and planning target volume (PTV) underdosages for head-and-neck intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A planning study was performed for 4 patients with either soft palate or tonsil tumors treated with external radiotherapy up to 46 Gy. The trade-off between underdosages in the PTV and sparing of the parotid glands was investigated by systematically varying the optimization objectives for the inverse planning. A new way of presenting dose-volume information allows easy detection of small PTV subvolumes with underdosages that cannot be assessed in conventional cumulative dose-volume histograms. A simple radiobiological model to estimate the control probability for an electively irradiated neck level was developed. Results: The average dose to the parotid glands can decrease by >10 Gy by allowing the PTV to be underdosed in such a way that the radiobiological model predicts a decrease in subclinical disease control probability of (typically) 1% to a few percent. Conclusion: The trade-off between parotid gland sparing and underdosages in the PTV has been quantified by the use of an alternative method to present dose-volume information and by the use of a radiobiological model to predict subclinical disease control probability.

  5. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3D Conformal Radiotherapy for Postoperative Gynecologic Cancer: Are They Covering the Same Planning Target Volume?

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Nikhilesh; D'souza, David; Millman, Barbara; Yaremko, Brian P; Leung, Eric; Whiston, Frances; Hajdok, George; Wong, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: This study compares dosimetric parameters of planning target volume (PTV) coverage and organs at risk (OAR) sparing when postoperative radiotherapy for gynecologic cancers is delivered using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus a four-field (4FLD) box technique. Material and Methods: From July to December 2012, women requiring postoperative radiation for gynecologic cancers were treated with a standardized VMAT protocol. Two sets of optimized 4FLD plans were retrospectively generated: one based on standard anatomical borders (4FLD) and one based on the clinical target volume (CTV) created for VMAT with a 2 cm expansion guiding field border placement (4FLD+2). Ninety-five percent isodose curves were generated to evaluate PTV coverage. Results: VMAT significantly improved dose conformity compared with 4FLD and 4FLD+2 plans (p < 0.001) and provided additional coverage of the PTV posteriorly and superiorly, corresponding to coverage of the presacral and proximal iliac vessels. There was a significant reduction in dose to all OARs with VMAT, including a 58% reduction in the volume of the small bowel receiving more than 45 Gy (p=0.005). Conclusions: Despite treating a larger volume, radiotherapy using a 4FLD technique is less homogenous and provides inferior coverage of the PTV compared with VMAT. With meticulous treatment planning and delivery, VMAT effectively encompasses the PTV and minimizes dose to OARs. PMID:26973802

  6. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy for gliomas:dosimetric effects of changes in gross tumor volume on organs at risk and healthy brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen; Zhang, Zijian; Wang, Xia; Hu, Yongmei; Lyu, Zhiping; Huo, Lei; Wei, Rui; Fu, Jun; Hong, Jidong

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to explore the effects of changes in the gross tumor volume (GTV) on dose distribution in organs at risk (OARs) and healthy brain tissue in patients with gliomas. Methods Eleven patients suffering from gliomas with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans treated with a simultaneous integrated boost technique planned before therapy (initial plans) were prospectively enrolled. At the end of radiotherapy, patients underwent repeat computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and IMRT was replanned. The GTV and dosimetric parameters between the initial and replanned IMRT were compared using the Wilcoxon two-related-sample test, and correlations between the initial GTV and the replanned target volumes were assessed using the bivariate correlation test. Results The volume of the residual tumor did not change significantly (P>0.05), the volume of the surgical cavity decreased significantly (P<0.05), and the GTV and target volumes decreased significantly at the end of IMRT (all P<0.05). The near-maximum dose to OARs and volumes of healthy brain tissue receiving total doses of 10–50 Gy were lower in the replanned IMRT than in the initial IMRT (all P<0.05). The GTV in the initial plan was significantly positively correlated with the changes in the GTV and planning target volume 1 that occurred during IMRT (all P<0.05). Conclusion The reduction in the GTV in patients with gliomas resulted from shrinkage of the surgical cavity during IMRT, leading to decreased doses to the OARs and healthy brain tissue. Such changes appeared to be most meaningful in patients with large initial GTV values. PMID:27366091

  7. Derivation and representation of dose-volume response from large clinical trial data sets: an example from the RADAR prostate radiotherapy trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, M. A.; Foo, K.; Haworth, A.; Gulliford, S. L.; Kearvall, R.; Kennedy, A.; Richardson, S.; Krawiec, M.; Stewart, N.; Joseph, D. J.; Denham, J. W.

    2014-03-01

    Large multicentre radiotherapy trials incorporating assessment of multiple outcomes at multiple timepoints can generate extensive datasets. We have investigated graphical techniques for presentation of this data and the associated underlying dose-volume response information, necessary for guiding statistical analyses and translating outcomes to future patient treatments. A relational database was used to archive reviewed plan data for patients accrued to the TROG 03.04 RADAR trial. Viewing software was used to clean and enhance the data. Scripts were developed to export arbitrary dose-histogram data which was combined with clinical toxicity data with a median follow-up of 72 months. Graphical representations of dose-volume response developed include prevalence atlasing, univariate logistic regression and dose-volume-point odds ratios, and continuous cut-point derivation via ROC analysis. These representations indicate variable association of toxicities across structures and time-points.

  8. 3.4 Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, H.-M.; Selbach, H.-J.; Vatnitsky, S.

    This document is part of Subvolume A 'Fundamentals and Data in Radiobiology, Radiation Biophysics, Dosimetry and Medical Radiological Protection' of Volume 7 'Medical Radiological Physics' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group VIII 'Advanced Materials and Technologies'. It contains the Section '3.4 Radiotherapy' of the Chapter '3 Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and Radiotherapy' with the contents:

  9. Chest Wall Volume Receiving >30 Gy Predicts Risk of Severe Pain and/or Rib Fracture After Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlap, Neal E.; Cai, Jing; Biedermann, Gregory B.; Yang, Wensha; Benedict, Stanley H.; Sheng Ke; Schefter, Tracey E.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Larner, James M.

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To identify the dose-volume parameters that predict the risk of chest wall (CW) pain and/or rib fracture after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From a combined, larger multi-institution experience, 60 consecutive patients treated with three to five fractions of stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary or metastatic peripheral lung lesions were reviewed. CW pain was assessed using the Common Toxicity Criteria for pain. Peripheral lung lesions were defined as those located within 2.5 cm of the CW. A minimal point dose of 20 Gy to the CW was required. The CW volume receiving >=20, >=30, >=40, >=50, and >=60 Gy was determined and related to the risk of CW toxicity. Results: Of the 60 patients, 17 experienced Grade 3 CW pain and five rib fractures. The median interval to the onset of severe pain and/or fracture was 7.1 months. The risk of CW toxicity was fitted to the median effective concentration dose-response model. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy best predicted the risk of severe CW pain and/or rib fracture (R{sup 2} = 0.9552). A volume threshold of 30 cm{sup 3} was observed before severe pain and/or rib fracture was reported. A 30% risk of developing severe CW toxicity correlated with a CW volume of 35 cm{sup 3} receiving 30 Gy. Conclusion: The development of CW toxicity is clinically relevant, and the CW should be considered an organ at risk in treatment planning. The CW volume receiving 30 Gy in three to five fractions should be limited to <30 cm{sup 3}, if possible, to reduce the risk of toxicity without compromising tumor coverage.

  10. An Effective Preoperative Three-Dimensional Radiotherapy Target Volume for Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcoma and the Effect of Margin Width on Local Control

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Bo Kyong; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Kirsch, David G.; Goldberg, Saveli I.; Kobayashi, Wendy; Kung, Jong Hyun; Wolfgang, John A.; Doppke, Karen

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: There is little information on the appropriate three-dimensional (3D) preoperative radiotherapy (XRT) volume for extremity soft-tissue sarcomas (STS). We retrospectively analyzed the pattern of local failure (LF) to help elucidate optimal field design. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the 56 patients who underwent computed tomography-planned XRT for Stage I to III extremity STS between June 2000 and December 2006. Clinical target volume (CTV) included the T1 post-gadolinium-defined gross tumor volume with 1- to 1.5-cm radial and 3.5-cm longitudinal margins. Planning target volume expansion was 5 to 7 mm, and {>=}95% of dose was delivered to the planning target volume. Preoperative XRT was 44 to 50.4 Gy (median, 50). Postoperative boost of 10 to 20 Gy was given to 12 patients (6 with positive and 6 with close margins). Results: Follow-up ranged from 15 to 76 months (median, 41 months). The 5-year local control, freedom from distant metastasis, disease-free survival, and overall survival were 88.5%, 80.0%, 77.5% and 82.8%, respectively. Three patients (all with positive margin) experienced local failure (LF) as first relapse (2 isolated, 1 with distant failure), and 2 additional patients (all with margin<1 mm) had late LF after distant metastasis. The LFs were within the CTV in 3 patients and within and also extending beyond the CTV in 2 patients. Conclusions: These target volume definitions appear to be appropriate for most patients. No local recurrences were observed with surgical margins {>=}1 mm, and it appears that these may be adequate for patients with extremity STS treated with preoperative radiotherapy.

  11. Temporal Evolution of Parotid Volume and Parotid Apparent Diffusion Coefficient in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients Treated by Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Investigated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Juan, Chun-Jung; Cheng, Cheng-Chieh; Chiu, Su-Chin; Jen, Yee-Min; Liu, Yi-Jui; Chiu, Hui-Chu; Kao, Hung-Wen; Wang, Chih-Wei; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Huang, Guo-Shu; Hsu, Hsian-He

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To concurrently quantify the radiation-induced changes and temporal evolutions of parotid volume and parotid apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients treated by intensity-modulated radiotherapy by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods A total of 11 NPC patients (9 men and 2 women; 48.7 ± 11.7 years, 22 parotid glands) were enrolled. Radiation dose, parotid sparing volume, severity of xerostomia, and radiation-to-MR interval (RMI) was recorded. MRI studies were acquired four times, including one before and three after radiotherapy. The parotid volume and the parotid ADC were measured. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS and MedCalc. Bonferroni correction was applied for multiple comparisons. A P value less than 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results The parotid volume was 26.2 ± 8.0 cm3 before radiotherapy. The parotid ADC was 0.8 ± 0.15 × 10−3 mm2/sec before radiotherapy. The parotid glands received a radiation dose of 28.7 ± 4.1 Gy and a PSV of 44.1 ± 12.6%. The parotid volume was significantly smaller at MR stage 1 and stage 2 as compared to pre-RT stage (P < .005). The volume reduction ratio was 31.2 ± 13.0%, 26.1 ± 13.5%, and 17.1 ± 16.6% at stage 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The parotid ADC was significantly higher at all post-RT stages as compared to pre-RT stage reciprocally (P < .005 at stage 1 and 2, P < .05 at stage 3). The ADC increase ratio was 35.7 ± 17.4%, 27.0 ± 12.8%, and 20.2 ± 16.6% at stage 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The parotid ADC was negatively correlated to the parotid volume (R = -0.509; P < .001). The parotid ADC was positively associated with the radiation dose significantly (R2 = 0.212; P = .0001) and was negatively associated with RMI significantly (R2 = 0.203; P = .00096) significantly. Multiple regression analysis further showed that the post-RT parotid ADC was related to the radiation dose and RMI significantly (R2 = 0

  12. Percentage of Cancer Volume in Biopsy Cores Is Prognostic for Prostate Cancer Death and Overall Survival in Patients Treated With Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, Sean M.; Stenmark, Matthew H.; Blas, Kevin; Halverson, Schulyer; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Feng, Felix Y.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic utility of the percentage of cancer volume (PCV) in needle biopsy specimens for prostate cancer patients treated with dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The outcomes were analyzed for 599 men treated for localized prostate cancer with external beam radiotherapy to a minimal planning target volume dose of 75 Gy (range, 75-79.2). We assessed the effect of PCV and the pretreatment and treatment-related factors on the freedom from biochemical failure, freedom from metastasis, cause-specific survival, and overall survival. Results: The median number of biopsy cores was 7 (interquartile range, 6-12), median PCV was 10% (interquartile range, 2.5-25%), and median follow-up was 62 months. The PCV correlated with the National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group and individual risk features, including T stage, prostate-specific antigen level, Gleason score, and percentage of positive biopsy cores. On log-rank analysis, the PCV stratified by quartile was prognostic for all endpoints, including overall survival. In addition, the PCV was a stronger prognostic factor than the percentage of positive biopsy cores when the two metrics were analyzed together. On multivariate analysis, the PCV predicted a worse outcome for all endpoints, including freedom from biochemical failure, (hazard ratio, 1.9; p = .0035), freedom from metastasis (hazard ratio, 1.7, p = .09), cause-specific survival (hazard ratio, 3.9, p = .014), and overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.8, p = .02). Conclusions: For patients treated with dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy, the volume of cancer in the biopsy specimen adds prognostic value for clinically relevant endpoints, particularly in intermediate- and high-risk patients. Although the PCV determination is more arduous than the percentage of positive biopsy cores, it provides superior risk stratification.

  13. Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy in Postoperative Treatment of Endometrial and Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Small, William Mell, Loren K.; Anderson, Penny; Creutzberg, Carien; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Gaffney, David; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Schefter, Tracey; Iyer, Revathy; Varia, Mahesh; Winter, Kathryn M.S.; Mundt, Arno J.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an atlas of the clinical target volume (CTV) definitions for postoperative radiotherapy of endometrial and cervical cancer to be used for planning pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group led an international collaberation of cooperative groups in the development of the atlas. The groups included the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Gynecologic Oncology Group, National Cancer Institute of Canada, European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and American College of Radiology Imaging Network. The members of the group were asked by questionnaire to define the areas that were to be included in the CTV and to outline theses areas on individual computed tomography images. The initial formulation of the group began in late 2004 and culminated with a formal consensus conference in June 2005. Results: The committee achieved a consensus CTV definition for postoperative therapy for endometrial and cervical cancer. The CTV should include the common, external, and internal iliac lymph node regions. The upper 3.0 cm of the vagina and paravaginal soft tissue lateral to the vagina should also be included. For patients with cervical cancer, or endometrial cancer with cervical stromal invasion, it is also recommended that the CTV include the presacral lymph node region. Conclusion: This report serves as an international template for the definition of the CTV for postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy for endometrial and cervical cancer.

  14. Radiotherapy of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Curative-intent radical radiotherapy of cervical cancer consists of external-beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and concomitant chemotherapy with cisplatin. For each element, new developments aim to improve tumor control rates or treatment tolerance. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has been shown to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity and can be used to selectively increase the radiotherapy dose. Individualized, image-guided brachytherapy enables better adaptation of high-dose volumes to the tumor extension. Intensification of concomitant or sequential systemic therapy is under evaluation. PMID:27614991

  15. Landmark opinions

    SciTech Connect

    Julian Levy

    2007-08-15

    On April 2, 2007, the U.S. Supreme Court issued two landmark opinions affecting the regulation of air quality in the United States. The first addressed one facet of what constitutes a modification under New Source Review (NSR) and the second addressed the issue of global climate change, specifically carbon dioxide emissions. For this month's issue, EM invited five leaders in the field of air quality to give their perspectives on these court opinions to gauge what they might mean for future air quality regulations. Titles of the five features are: Two landmark interpretations of the Clean Air Act: EPA authority to regulate greenhouse gases and increases in annual emissions trigger NSR (pp 6-10); Court examines EPA's interpretation of the Clean Air Act (pp 11,13); New Jersey: a state's perspective (pp 14-15); Supreme Court delivers historic environmental rulings (pp 17-18); and an industry perspective on the Supreme Court rulings (pp 20-21).

  16. Accuracy of volume measurement using 3D ultrasound and development of CT-3D US image fusion algorithm for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Jihye; Huh, Jangyoung; Hyun An, So; Oh, Yoonjin; Kim, Myungsoo; Kim, DongYoung; Chung, Kwangzoo; Cho, Sungho; Lee, Rena

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of measuring volumes using three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US), and to verify the feasibility of the replacement of CT-MR fusion images with CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning. Methods: Phantoms, consisting of water, contrast agent, and agarose, were manufactured. The volume was measured using 3D US, CT, and MR devices. A CT-3D US and MR-3D US image fusion software was developed using the Insight Toolkit library in order to acquire three-dimensional fusion images. The quality of the image fusion was evaluated using metric value and fusion images. Results: Volume measurement, using 3D US, shows a 2.8 {+-} 1.5% error, 4.4 {+-} 3.0% error for CT, and 3.1 {+-} 2.0% error for MR. The results imply that volume measurement using the 3D US devices has a similar accuracy level to that of CT and MR. Three-dimensional image fusion of CT-3D US and MR-3D US was successfully performed using phantom images. Moreover, MR-3D US image fusion was performed using human bladder images. Conclusions: 3D US could be used in the volume measurement of human bladders and prostates. CT-3D US image fusion could be used in monitoring the target position in each fraction of external beam radiation therapy. Moreover, the feasibility of replacing the CT-MR image fusion to the CT-3D US in radiotherapy treatment planning was verified.

  17. RTOG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists Reach Consensus on Gross Tumor Volume and Clinical Target Volume on Computed Tomographic Images for Preoperative Radiotherapy of Primary Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremity in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dian; Bosch, Walter; Roberge, David; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Petersen, Ivy; Haddock, Michael; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Saito, Naoyuki G.; Kirsch, David G.; Hitchcock, Ying J.; Wolfson, Aaron H.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2011-11-15

    Objective: To develop a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) atlas delineating gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) to be used for preoperative radiotherapy of primary extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods and Materials: A consensus meeting was held during the RTOG meeting in January 2010 to reach agreement about GTV and CTV delineation on computed tomography (CT) images for preoperative radiotherapy of high-grade large extremity STS. Data were presented to address the local extension of STS. Extensive discussion ensued to develop optimal criteria for GTV and CTV delineation on CT images. Results: A consensus was reached on appropriate CT-based GTV and CTV. The GTV is gross tumor defined by T1 contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images. Fusion of magnetic resonance and images is recommended to delineate the GTV. The CTV for high-grade large STS typically includes the GTV plus 3-cm margins in the longitudinal directions. If this causes the field to extend beyond the compartment, the field can be shortened to include the end of a compartment. The radial margin from the lesion should be 1.5 cm, including any portion of the tumor not confined by an intact fascial barrier, bone, or skin surface. Conclusion: The consensus on GTV and CTV for preoperative radiotherapy of high-grade large extremity STS is available as web-based images and in a descriptive format through the RTOG. This is expected to improve target volume consistency and allow for rigorous evaluation of the benefits and risks of such treatment.

  18. Delineation of clinical target volume for postoperative radiotherapy in stage IIIA-pN2 non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xuquan; Meng, Xue; Sun, Xindong; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    With the high locoregional relapse rate and the improvement of radiation technology, postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) has been widely used in the treatment of completely resected stage IIIA-pN2 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, there is still no definitive consensus on clinical target volume for the pN2 subgroup. This review will discuss how to delineate the clinical target volume (CTV) for pN2 subgroups of IIIA-N2 NSCLC based on the published literature and to investigate the optimal PORT CTV in this cohort of patients. Besides overall survival (OS), locoregional recurrence (LR), and radiotherapy-related toxicity of this subset of the population in the modern PORT era, selection of proper patients will also be considered in this review. In summary, it is appropriate to include involved lymph node stations and uninvolved stations at high risk in PORT CTV for patients with pN2 disease when PORT is administered. PORT can reduce LR and has the potential to improve OS. In the current era of modern radiation technology, PORT can be administered safely with well-tolerated toxicity. Clinicopathological characteristics may be helpful in selecting proper candidates for PORT. PMID:26929651

  19. SU-E-T-427: Cell Surviving Fractions Derived From Tumor-Volume Variation During Radiotherapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Comparison with Predictive Assays

    SciTech Connect

    Chvetsov, A; Schwartz, J; Mayr, N; Yartsev, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To show that a distribution of cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} in a heterogeneous group of patients can be derived from tumor-volume variation curves during radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Our analysis was based on two data sets of tumor-volume variation curves for heterogeneous groups of 17 patients treated for nonsmall cell lung cancer with conventional dose fractionation. The data sets were obtained previously at two independent institutions by using megavoltage (MV) computed tomography (CT). Statistical distributions of cell surviving fractions S{sup 2} and cell clearance half-lives of lethally damaged cells T1/2 have been reconstructed in each patient group by using a version of the two-level cell population tumor response model and a simulated annealing algorithm. The reconstructed statistical distributions of the cell surviving fractions have been compared to the distributions measured using predictive assays in vitro. Results: Non-small cell lung cancer presents certain difficulties for modeling surviving fractions using tumor-volume variation curves because of relatively large fractional hypoxic volume, low gradient of tumor-volume response, and possible uncertainties due to breathing motion. Despite these difficulties, cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} for non-small cell lung cancer derived from tumor-volume variation measured at different institutions have similar probability density functions (PDFs) with mean values of 0.30 and 0.43 and standard deviations of 0.13 and 0.18, respectively. The PDFs for cell surviving fractions S{sup 2} reconstructed from tumor volume variation agree with the PDF measured in vitro. Comparison of the reconstructed cell surviving fractions with patient survival data shows that the patient survival time decreases as the cell surviving fraction increases. Conclusion: The data obtained in this work suggests that the cell surviving fractions S{sub 2} can be reconstructed from the tumor volume

  20. Impact of FDG-PET/CT on Radiotherapy Volume Delineation in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer and Correlation of Imaging Stage With Pathologic Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Faria, Sergio L. Menard, Sonia; Devic, Slobodan; Sirois, Christian; Souhami, Luis; Lisbona, Robert; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomography (CT) is more accurate than CT in determining the extent of non-small-cell lung cancer. We performed a study to evaluate the impact of FDG-PET/CT on the radiotherapy volume delineation compared with CT without using any mathematical algorithm and to correlate the findings with the pathologic examination findings. Methods and Materials: A total of 32 patients with proven non-small-cell lung cancer, pathologic specimens from the mediastinum and lung primary, and pretreatment chest CT and FDG-PET/CT scans were studied. For each patient, two data sets of theoretical gross tumor volumes were contoured. One set was determined using the chest CT only, and the second, done separately, was based on the co-registered FDG-PET/CT data. The disease stage of each patient was determined using the TNM staging system for three data sets: the CT scan only, FDG-PET/CT scan, and pathologic findings. Results: Pathologic examination altered the CT-determined stage in 22 (69%) of 32 patients and the PET-determined stage in 16 (50%) of 32 patients. The most significant alterations were related to the N stage. PET altered the TNM stage in 15 (44%) of 32 patients compared with CT alone, but only 7 of these 15 alterations were confirmed by the pathologic findings. With respect to contouring the tumor volume for radiotherapy, PET altered the contour in 18 (56%) of 32 cases compared with CT alone. Conclusion: The contour of the tumor volume of non-small-cell lung cancer patients with co-registered FDG-PET/CT resulted in >50% alterations compared with CT targeting, findings similar to those of other publications. However, the significance of this change is unknown. Furthermore, pathologic examination showed that PET is not always accurate and histologic examination should be obtained to confirm the findings of PET whenever possible.

  1. A New Brain Positron Emission Tomography Scanner With Semiconductor Detectors for Target Volume Delineation and Radiotherapy Treatment Planning in Patients With Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Norio; Yasuda, Koichi; Shiga, Tohru; Hasegawa, Masakazu; Onimaru, Rikiya; Shimizu, Shinichi; Bengua, Gerard; Ishikawa, Masayori; Tamaki, Nagara; Shirato, Hiroki

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We compared two treatment planning methods for stereotactic boost for treating nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC): the use of conventional whole-body bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillator positron emission tomography (PET{sub CONV}WB) versus the new brain (BR) PET system using semiconductor detectors (PET{sub NEW}BR). Methods and Materials: Twelve patients with NPC were enrolled in this study. [{sup 18}F]Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET images were acquired using both the PET{sub NEW}BR and the PET{sub CONV}WB system on the same day. Computed tomography (CT) and two PET data sets were transferred to a treatment planning system, and the PET{sub CONV}WB and PET{sub NEW}BR images were coregistered with the same set of CT images. Window width and level values for all PET images were fixed at 3000 and 300, respectively. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was visually delineated on PET images by using either PET{sub CONV}WB (GTV{sub CONV}) images or PET{sub NEW}BR (GTV{sub NEW}) images. Assuming a stereotactic radiotherapy boost of 7 ports, the prescribed dose delivered to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV) was set to 2000 cGy in 4 fractions. Results: The average absolute volume ({+-}standard deviation [SD]) of GTV{sub NEW} was 15.7 ml ({+-}9.9) ml, and that of GTV{sub CONV} was 34.0 ({+-}20.5) ml. The average GTV{sub NEW} was significantly smaller than that of GTV{sub CONV} (p = 0.0006). There was no statistically significant difference between the maximum dose (p = 0.0585) and the mean dose (p = 0.2748) of PTV. The radiotherapy treatment plan based on the new gross tumor volume (PLAN{sub NEW}) significantly reduced maximum doses to the cerebrum and cerebellum (p = 0.0418) and to brain stem (p = 0.0041). Conclusion: Results of the present study suggest that the new brain PET system using semiconductor detectors can provide more accurate tumor delineation than the conventional whole-body BGO PET system and may be an important tool for functional and molecular radiotherapy

  2. Is intensity-modulated radiotherapy better than conventional radiation treatment and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for mediastinal masses in patients with Hodgkin's disease, and is there a role for beam orientation optimization and dose constraints assigned to virtual volumes?

    SciTech Connect

    Girinsky, Theodore . E-mail: girinsky@igr.fr; Pichenot, Charlotte; Beaudre, Anne; Ghalibafian, Mithra; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of beam orientation optimization and the role of virtual volumes (VVs) aimed at protecting adjacent organs at risk (OARs), and to compare various intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) setups with conventional treatment with anterior and posterior fields and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: Patients with mediastinal masses in Hodgkin's disease were treated with combined modality therapy (three to six cycles of adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine [ABVD] before radiation treatment). Contouring and treatment planning were performed with Somavision and CadPlan Helios (Varian Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The gross tumor volume was determined according to the prechemotherapy length and the postchemotherapy width of the mediastinal tumor mass. A 10-mm isotropic margin was added for the planning target volume (PTV). Because dose constraints assigned to OARs led to unsatisfactory PTV coverage, VVs were designed for each patient to protect adjacent OARs. The prescribed dose was 40 Gy to the PTV, delivered according to guidelines from International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements Report No. 50. Five different IMRT treatment plans were compared with conventional treatment and 3D-CRT. Results: Beam orientation was important with respect to the amount of irradiated normal tissues. The best compromise in terms of PTV coverage and protection of normal tissues was obtained with five equally spaced beams (5FEQ IMRT plan) using dose constraints assigned to VVs. When IMRT treatment plans were compared with conventional treatment and 3D-CRT, dose conformation with IMRT was significantly better, with greater protection of the heart, coronary arteries, esophagus, and spinal cord. The lungs and breasts in women received a slightly higher radiation dose with IMRT compared with conventional treatments. The greater volume of normal tissue receiving low radiation doses could be a cause for

  3. Variations in Target Volume Definition for Postoperative Radiotherapy in Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Analysis of an International Contouring Study

    SciTech Connect

    Spoelstra, Femke; Senan, Suresh; Le Pechoux, Cecile; Ishikura, Satoshi; Casas, Francesc; Ball, David; Price, Allan; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Soernsen de Koste, John R. van

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: Postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) in patients with completely resected non-small-cell lung cancer with mediastinal involvement is controversial because of the failure of earlier trials to demonstrate a survival benefit. Improved techniques may reduce toxicity, but the treatment fields used in routine practice have not been well studied. We studied routine target volumes used by international experts and evaluated the impact of a contouring protocol developed for a new prospective study, the Lung Adjuvant Radiotherapy Trial (Lung ART). Methods and Materials: Seventeen thoracic radiation oncologists were invited to contour their routine clinical target volumes (CTV) for 2 representative patients using a validated CD-ROM-based contouring program. Subsequently, the Lung ART study protocol was provided, and both cases were contoured again. Variations in target volumes and their dosimetric impact were analyzed. Results: Routine CTVs were received for each case from 10 clinicians, whereas six provided both routine and protocol CTVs for each case. Routine CTVs varied up to threefold between clinicians, but use of the Lung ART protocol significantly decreased variations. Routine CTVs in a postlobectomy patient resulted in V{sub 20} values ranging from 12.7% to 54.0%, and Lung ART protocol CTVs resulted in values of 20.6% to 29.2%. Similar results were seen for other toxicity parameters and in the postpneumectomy patient. With the exception of upper paratracheal nodes, protocol contouring improved coverage of the required nodal stations. Conclusion: Even among experts, significant interclinician variations are observed in PORT fields. Inasmuch as contouring variations can confound the interpretation of PORT results, mandatory quality assurance procedures have been incorporated into the current Lung ART study.

  4. Changes in Prostate Shape and Volume and Their Implications for Radiotherapy After Introduction of Endorectal Balloon as Determined by MRI at 3T

    SciTech Connect

    Heijmink, Stijn W.T.P.J. Scheenen, Tom W.J.; Lin, Emile N.J.T. van; Visser, Andries G.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.L.M.; Witjes, J. Alfred; Barentsz, Jelle O.

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To determine the changes in prostate shape and volume after the introduction of an endorectal coil (ERC) by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 3T. Methods and materials: A total of 44 consecutive patients with biopsy-proven prostate cancer underwent separate MRI examinations at 3T with a body array coil and subsequently with an ERC inflated with 50 mL of fluid. Prospectively, two experienced readers independently evaluated all data sets in random order. The maximal anteroposterior, right-to-left, and craniocaudal prostate diameters, as well as the total prostate and peripheral zone and central gland volumes were measured before and after ERC introduction. The changes in prostate shape and volume were analyzed using Wilcoxon's test for paired samples. Results: The introduction of the ERC significantly changed the prostate shape in all three directions, with mean changes in the anteroposterior, right-to-left, and craniocaudal diameters of 15.7% (5.5 mm), 7.7% (3.5 mm), and 6.3% (2.2 mm), respectively. The mean total prostate, peripheral zone, and central gland volume decreased significantly after ERC introduction by 17.9% (8.3 cm{sup 3}), 21.6% (4.8 cm{sup 3}), and 14.2% (3.4 cm{sup 3}), respectively. Conclusion: ERC introduction as observed by 3T MRI changed the prostate shape and volume significantly. The mean anteroposterior diameter was reduced by nearly one-sixth of its original diameter, and the mean total prostate volume was decreased by approximately 18%. This could cause difficulties and should be considered when using ERC-based MRI for MRI-computed tomography fusion and radiotherapy planning.

  5. Improved target volume definition for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with intracranial meningiomas by correlation of CT, MRI, and [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC-PET

    SciTech Connect

    Milker-Zabel, Stefanie . E-mail: stefanie_milker-zabel@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Zabel-du Bois, Angelika; Henze, Marcus; Huber, Peter; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela; Hoess, Angelika; Haberkorn, Uwe; Debus, Juergen

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of {sup 68}-Ga-labeled DOTA ( )-D-Phe ({sup 1})-Tyr ({sup 3})-Octreotide positron emission tomography ([{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC-PET) for target definition for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) as a complementary modality to computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Because meningiomas show a high expression of somatostatin receptor subtype 2, somatostatin analogs such as DOTATOC offer the possibility of receptor-targeted imaging. Patients and Methods: Twenty-six patients received stereotactic CT, MRI, and [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC-PET as part of their treatment planning. Histology was: World Health Organization (WHO) Grade 1 61.5%, WHO Grade 2 7.7%, WHO Grade 3 3.9%, and undetermined 26.9%. Six patients received radiotherapy as primary treatment, 2 after subtotal resection; 17 patients were treated for recurrent disease. Dynamic PET scans were acquired before radiotherapy over 60 min after intravenous injection of 156 {+-} 29 MBq [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC. These PET images were imported in the planning software for FSRT. Planning target volume (PTV)-I outlined on CT and contrast-enhanced MRI was compared with PTV-II outlined on PET. PTV-III was defined with CT, MRI, and PET and was actually used for radiotherapy treatment. Results: PTV-III was smaller than PTV-I in 9 patients, the same size in 7 patients, and larger in 10 patients. Median PTV-I was 49.6 cc, median PTV-III was 57.2 cc. In all patients [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC-PET delivered additional information concerning tumor extension. PTV-III was significantly modified based on DOTATOC-PET data in 19 patients. In 1 patient no tumor was exactly identified on CT/MRI but was visible on PET. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC-PET improves target definition for FSRT in patients with intracranial meningiomas. Radiation targeting with fused DOTATOC-PET, CT, and MRI resulted in significant alterations in target definition in 73%.

  6. Evaluation of volume change in rectum and bladder during application of image-guided radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, J. A.; Rojas, J. I.

    2016-07-01

    All prostate cancer patients from Centro Médico Radioterapia Siglo XXI receive Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT). This therapy uses image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) with the Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT). This study compares the planned dose in the reference CT image against the delivered dose recalculate in the CBCT image. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the anatomic changes and related dosimetric effect based on weekly CBCT directly for patients with prostate cancer undergoing volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment. The collected data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA.

  7. Assessment of Planning Target Volume Margins for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy of the Prostate Gland: Role of Daily Inter- and Intrafraction Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Tanyi, James A.; He, Tongming; Summers, Paige A.; Mburu, Ruth G.; Kato, Catherine M.; Rhodes, Stephen M.; Hung, Arthur Y.; Fuss, Martin

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To determine planning target volume margins for prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy based on inter- and intrafraction motion using four daily localization techniques: three-point skin mark alignment, volumetric imaging with bony landmark registration, volumetric imaging with implanted fiducial marker registration, and implanted electromagnetic transponders (beacons) detection. Methods and Materials: Fourteen patients who underwent definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer formed the basis of this study. Each patient was implanted with three electromagnetic transponders and underwent a course of 39 treatment fractions. Daily localization was based on three-point skin mark alignment followed by transponder detection and patient repositioning. Transponder positioning was verified by volumetric imaging with cone-beam computed tomography of the pelvis. Relative motion between the prostate gland and bony anatomy was quantified by offline analyses of daily cone-beam computed tomography. Intratreatment organ motion was monitored continuously by the Calypso (registered) System for quantification of intrafraction setup error. Results: As expected, setup error (that is, inter- plus intrafraction motion, unless otherwise stated) was largest with skin mark alignment, requiring margins of 7.5 mm, 11.4 mm, and 16.3 mm, in the lateral (LR), longitudinal (SI), and vertical (AP) directions, respectively. Margin requirements accounting for intrafraction motion were smallest for transponder detection localization techniques, requiring margins of 1.4 mm (LR), 2.6 mm (SI), and 2.3 mm (AP). Bony anatomy alignment required 2.1 mm (LR), 9.4 mm (SI), and 10.5 mm (AP), whereas image-guided marker alignment required 2.8 mm (LR), 3.7 mm (SI), and 3.2 mm (AP). No marker migration was observed in the cohort. Conclusion: Clinically feasible, rapid, and reliable tools such as the electromagnetic transponder detection system for pretreatment target localization

  8. Improved target volume definition for precision radiotherapy planning of meningiomas by correlation of CT and dynamic, Gd-DTPA-enhanced FLASH MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Schad, L R; Blüml, S; Debus, J; Scharf, J; Lorenz, W J

    1994-10-01

    In this methodological paper the authors report a fast, T1-weighted gradient-echo sequence (FLASH) for dynamic, Gd-DTPA-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of meningiomas and its application in precision radiotherapy planning. Indications for radiotherapy included unresected tumors, tumor remaining after surgery, and recurrences. The patient's head was fixed in a stereotactic localization system which is usable at the CT, MR and the linear accelerator installations. By phantom measurements different materials (steel, aluminum, titanium, plastic, wood, ceramics) used for the stereotactic system were tested for mechanical stability and geometric MR image distortion. All metallic stereotactic rings (closed rings made of massive metal) led to a more or less dramatic geometric distortion and signal cancellation in the MR images. The best properties--nearly no distortion and high mechanic stability--are provided by a ceramic ring. If necessary, the remaining geometric MR image distortion can be 'corrected' (reducing displacements to the size of a pixel) by calculations based on modeling the distortion as a fourth order two-dimensional polynomial. The target volume was defined in dynamic, T1-weighted FLASH MR images, which were measured before, during, and after the controlled intravenous infusion of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight Gd-DTPA. The stereotactic localization technique allows the precise transfer of the target volume information from MR onto CT data to provide a map of the radiation attenuation coefficient for dose calculation. In genera, the superior soft tissue contrast of MR showed an excellent tumor delineation, especially in regions, such as the base of the skull, where the target often was obscured in CT images.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7878213

  9. Converging Stereotactic Radiotherapy Using Kilovoltage X-Rays: Experimental Irradiation of Normal Rabbit Lung and Dose-Volume Analysis With Monte Carlo Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kawase, Takatsugu; Kunieda, Etsuo Deloar, Hossain M.; Tsunoo, Takanori; Seki, Satoshi; Oku, Yohei; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Ogawa, Eileen N.; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Kameyama, Kaori; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To validate the feasibility of developing a radiotherapy unit with kilovoltage X-rays through actual irradiation of live rabbit lungs, and to explore the practical issues anticipated in future clinical application to humans through Monte Carlo dose simulation. Methods and Materials: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit was developed, consisting of a modified diagnostic computed tomography (CT) scanner. A tiny cylindrical volume in 13 normal rabbit lungs was individually irradiated with single fractional absorbed doses of 15, 30, 45, and 60 Gy. Observational CT scanning of the whole lung was performed every 2 weeks for 30 weeks after irradiation. After 30 weeks, histopathologic specimens of the lungs were examined. Dose distribution was simulated using the Monte Carlo method, and dose-volume histograms were calculated according to the data. A trial estimation of the effect of respiratory movement on dose distribution was made. Results: A localized hypodense change and subsequent reticular opacity around the planning target volume (PTV) were observed in CT images of rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histograms of the PTVs and organs at risk showed a focused dose distribution to the target and sufficient dose lowering in the organs at risk. Our estimate of the dose distribution, taking respiratory movement into account, revealed dose reduction in the PTV. Conclusions: A converging stereotactic irradiation unit using kilovoltage X-rays was able to generate a focused radiobiologic reaction in rabbit lungs. Dose-volume histogram analysis and estimated sagittal dose distribution, considering respiratory movement, clarified the characteristics of the irradiation received from this type of unit.

  10. Methods and computer executable instructions for rapidly calculating simulated particle transport through geometrically modeled treatment volumes having uniform volume elements for use in radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Frandsen, Michael W.; Wessol, Daniel E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.

    2001-01-16

    Methods and computer executable instructions are disclosed for ultimately developing a dosimetry plan for a treatment volume targeted for irradiation during cancer therapy. The dosimetry plan is available in "real-time" which especially enhances clinical use for in vivo applications. The real-time is achieved because of the novel geometric model constructed for the planned treatment volume which, in turn, allows for rapid calculations to be performed for simulated movements of particles along particle tracks there through. The particles are exemplary representations of neutrons emanating from a neutron source during BNCT. In a preferred embodiment, a medical image having a plurality of pixels of information representative of a treatment volume is obtained. The pixels are: (i) converted into a plurality of substantially uniform volume elements having substantially the same shape and volume of the pixels; and (ii) arranged into a geometric model of the treatment volume. An anatomical material associated with each uniform volume element is defined and stored. Thereafter, a movement of a particle along a particle track is defined through the geometric model along a primary direction of movement that begins in a starting element of the uniform volume elements and traverses to a next element of the uniform volume elements. The particle movement along the particle track is effectuated in integer based increments along the primary direction of movement until a position of intersection occurs that represents a condition where the anatomical material of the next element is substantially different from the anatomical material of the starting element. This position of intersection is then useful for indicating whether a neutron has been captured, scattered or exited from the geometric model. From this intersection, a distribution of radiation doses can be computed for use in the cancer therapy. The foregoing represents an advance in computational times by multiple factors of

  11. Radiotherapy of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.S.

    1985-04-01

    The role of radiotherapy in the treatment of malignant melanoma is limited, and surgery generally forms the mainstay of medical practice. However, there are some circumstances in which radiotherapy should be considered the treatment of choice. Symptomatic metastatic lesions in bone or brain can effectively be palliated in a substantial proportion of instances. At the current stage of our knowledge, conventionally fractionated treatment of such lesions forms the standard against which other treatments should be measured. In contrast, metastatic lesions to skin or lymph nodes that do not overlie critical normal structures probably are better treated by high-dose-per-fraction techniques. Radiotherapy may play a definitive role in the treatment of lentigo maligna. The precise optimal energy of the beam to be used remains to be defined. Slightly more penetrating radiation appears to be required for lentigo maligna melanomas. Here, too, the optimal energy remains to be defined. The treatment of nonlentigenous melanomas primarily by radiotherapy is unproved in my opinion. Certainly, the data from the Princess Margaret Hospital is exciting, but I believe it must be corroborated by a well-designed trial before it can be accepted without question. Future directions in treatment of malignant melanoma are likely to include further trials of unconventional fractionation and the use of radiosensitizing agents in conjunction with radiotherapy. The time for dermatologists and radiation therapists to cooperate in such studies is at hand.

  12. Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy for the Definitive Treatment of Cervix Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Karen; Portelance, Lorraine; Creutzberg, Carien; Juergenliemk-Schulz, Ina M.; Mundt, Arno; Mell, Loren K.; Mayr, Nina; Viswanathan, Akila; Jhingran, Anuja; Erickson, Beth; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Gaffney, David; Yashar, Catheryn; Beriwal, Sushil; Wolfson, Aaron

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: Accurate target definition is vitally important for definitive treatment of cervix cancer with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), yet a definition of clinical target volume (CTV) remains variable within the literature. The aim of this study was to develop a consensus CTV definition in preparation for a Phase 2 clinical trial being planned by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group. Methods and Materials: A guidelines consensus working group meeting was convened in June 2008 for the purposes of developing target definition guidelines for IMRT for the intact cervix. A draft document of recommendations for CTV definition was created and used to aid in contouring a clinical case. The clinical case was then analyzed for consistency and clarity of target delineation using an expectation maximization algorithm for simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE), with kappa statistics as a measure of agreement between participants. Results: Nineteen experts in gynecological radiation oncology generated contours on axial magnetic resonance images of the pelvis. Substantial STAPLE agreement sensitivity and specificity values were seen for gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation (0.84 and 0.96, respectively) with a kappa statistic of 0.68 (p < 0.0001). Agreement for delineation of cervix, uterus, vagina, and parametria was moderate. Conclusions: This report provides guidelines for CTV definition in the definitive cervix cancer setting for the purposes of IMRT, building on previously published guidelines for IMRT in the postoperative setting.

  13. Is a Clinical Target Volume (CTV) Necessary in the Treatment of Lung Cancer in the Modern Era Combining 4-D Imaging and Image-guided Radiotherapy (IGRT)?

    PubMed Central

    Kilburn, Jeremy M; Lucas, John T; Soike, Michael H; Ayala-Peacock, Diandra N; Blackstock, Arthur W; Hinson, William H; Munley, Michael T; Petty, William J

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesized that omission of clinical target volumes (CTV) in lung cancer radiotherapy would not compromise control by determining retrospectively if the addition of a CTV would encompass the site of failure. Methods: Stage II-III patients were treated from 2009-2012 with daily cone-beam imaging and a 5 mm planning target volume (PTV) without a CTV. PTVs were expanded 1 cm and termed CTVretro. Recurrences were scored as 1) within the PTV, 2) within CTVretro, or 3) outside the PTV. Locoregional control (LRC), distant control (DC), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were estimated. Result: Among 110 patients, Stage IIIA 57%, IIIB 32%, IIA 4%, and IIB 7%. Eighty-six percent of Stage III patients received chemotherapy. Median dose was 70 Gy (45-74 Gy) and fraction size ranged from 1.5-2.7 Gy. Median follow-up was 12 months, median OS was 22 months (95% CI 19-30 months), and LRC at two years was 69%. Fourteen local and eight regional events were scored with two CTVretro failures equating to a two-year CTV failure-free survival of 98%. Conclusion: Omission of a 1 cm CTV expansion appears feasible based on only two events among 110 patients and should be considered in radiation planning. PMID:26929893

  14. Dose-volume relationships for moderate or severe neck muscle atrophy after intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu-Lu; Wang, Xiao-Ju; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Tang, Ling-Long; Lin, Ai-Hua; Ma, Jun; Sun, Ying

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the dosimetric parameters and radiation dose tolerances associated with moderate or severe sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) atrophy after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). We retrospectively analysed 138 patients treated with IMRT between 2011 and 2012 for whom IMRT treatment plans and pretreatment and 3-year post-IMRT MRI scans were available. The association between mean dose (Dmean), maximum dose (Dmax), VX (% SCM volume that received more than X Gy), DX (dose to X% of the SCM volume) at X values of 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80 and SCM atrophy at 3 years after IMRT were analyzed. All dosimetric parameters, except V40, V50 and V80, were significantly associated with moderate or severe SCM atrophy. Multivariate analysis showed that V65 was an independent predictor of moderate or severe SCM atrophy (P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve indicated a V65 of 21.47% (area under ROC curves, 0.732; P < 0.001) was the tolerated dose for moderate or severe SCM atrophy. We suggest a limit of 21.47% for V65 to optimize NPC treatment planning, whilst minimizing the risk of moderate or severe SCM atrophy. PMID:26678599

  15. Dose-volume relationships for moderate or severe neck muscle atrophy after intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu-Lu; Wang, Xiao-Ju; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Tang, Ling-Long; Lin, Ai-Hua; Ma, Jun; Sun, Ying

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the dosimetric parameters and radiation dose tolerances associated with moderate or severe sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) atrophy after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). We retrospectively analysed 138 patients treated with IMRT between 2011 and 2012 for whom IMRT treatment plans and pretreatment and 3-year post-IMRT MRI scans were available. The association between mean dose (Dmean), maximum dose (Dmax), VX (% SCM volume that received more than X Gy), DX (dose to X% of the SCM volume) at X values of 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80 and SCM atrophy at 3 years after IMRT were analyzed. All dosimetric parameters, except V40, V50 and V80, were significantly associated with moderate or severe SCM atrophy. Multivariate analysis showed that V65 was an independent predictor of moderate or severe SCM atrophy (P < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve indicated a V65 of 21.47% (area under ROC curves, 0.732; P < 0.001) was the tolerated dose for moderate or severe SCM atrophy. We suggest a limit of 21.47% for V65 to optimize NPC treatment planning, whilst minimizing the risk of moderate or severe SCM atrophy. PMID:26678599

  16. SU-E-J-76: Incorporation of Ultrasound Elastography in Target Volume Delineation for Partial Breast Radiotherapy Planning: A Comparative Study

    SciTech Connect

    Juneja, P; Harris, E; Bamber, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: There is substantial observer variability in the delineation of target volumes for post-surgical partial breast radiotherapy because the tumour bed has poor x-ray contrast. This variability may result in substantial variations in planned dose distribution. Ultrasound elastography (USE) has an ability to detect mechanical discontinuities and therefore, the potential to image the scar and distortion in breast tissue architecture. The goal of this study was to compare USE techniques: strain elastography (SE), shear wave elastography (SWE) and acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging using phantoms that simulate features of the tumour bed, for the purpose of incorporating USE in breast radiotherapy planning. Methods: Three gelatine-based phantoms (10% w/v) containing: a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with adhered boundaries, a stiff inclusion (gelatine 16% w/v) with mobile boundaries and fluid cavity inclusion (to mimic seroma), were constructed and used to investigate the USE techniques. The accuracy of the elastography techniques was quantified by comparing the imaged inclusion with the modelled ground-truth using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). For two regions of interest (ROI), the DSC measures their spatial overlap. Ground-truth ROIs were modelled using geometrical measurements from B-mode images. Results: The phantoms simulating stiff scar tissue with adhered and mobile boundaries and seroma were successfully developed and imaged using SE and SWE. The edges of the stiff inclusions were more clearly visible in SE than in SWE. Subsequently, for all these phantoms the measured DSCs were found to be higher for SE (DSCs: 0.91–0.97) than SWE (DSCs: 0.68–0.79) with an average relative difference of 23%. In the case of seroma phantom, DSC values for SE and SWE were similar. Conclusion: This study presents a first attempt to identify the most suitable elastography technique for use in breast radiotherapy planning. Further analysis will

  17. {sup 11}C-methionine PET improves the target volume delineation of meningiomas treated with stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Grosu, Anca-Ligia . E-mail: anca-ligia.grosu@lrz.tum.de; Weber, Wolfgang A.; Astner, Sabrina T.; Adam, Markus; Krause, Bernd J.; Schwaiger, Markus; Molls, Michael; Nieder, Carsten

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of {sup 11}C-methionine positron emission tomography (MET-PET) in target volume delineation for meningiomas and to determine the interobserver variability. Methods and Materials: Two independent observers performed treatment planning in 10 patients according to a prospective written protocol. In the first step, they used coregistered computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the second step, MET-PET was added to CT/MRI (image fusion based on mutual information). Results: The correlation between gross tumor volume (GTVs) delineated by the two observers based on CT/MRI was r = 0.855 (Spearman's correlation coefficient, p = 0.002) and r = 0.988 (p = 0.000) when MET-PET/CT/MRI were used. The number of patients with agreement in more then 80% of the outlined volume increased with the availability of MET-PET from 1 in 10 to 5 in 10. The median volume of intersection between the regions delineated by two observers increased significantly from 69% (from the composite volume) to 79%, by the addition of MET-PET (p = 0.005). The information of MET-PET was useful to delineate GTV in the area of cavernous sinus, orbit, and base of the skull. Conclusions: The hypothesis-generating findings of potential normal tissue sparing and reduced interobserver variability provide arguments for invasive studies of the correlation between MET-PET images and histologic tumor extension and for prospective trials of target volume delineation with CT/MRI/MET-PET image fusion.

  18. A gradient feature weighted Minimax algorithm for registration of multiple portal images to 3DCT volumes in prostate radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chelikani, Sudhakar . E-mail: sudhakar.chelikani@yale.edu; Purushothaman, Kailasnath; Knisely, Jonathan; Chen, Zhe; Nath, Ravinder; Bansal, Ravi; Duncan, James

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an accurate, fast, and robust algorithm for registering portal and computed tomographic (CT) images for radiotherapy using a combination of sparse and dense field data that complement each other. Methods and Materials: Gradient Feature Weighted Minimax (GFW Minimax) method was developed to register multiple portal images to three-dimensional CT images. Its performance was compared with that of three others: Minimax, Mutual Information, and Gilhuijs' method. Phantom and prostate cancer patient images were used. Effects of registration errors on tumor control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) were investigated as a relative measure. Results: Registration of four portals to CTs resulted in 30% lower error when compared with registration with two portals. Computation time increased by nearly 50%. GFW Minimax performed the best, followed by Gilhuijs' method, the Minimax method, and Mutual Information. Conclusions: Using four portals instead of two lowered the registration error. Reduced fields of view images with full feature sets gave similar results in shorter times as full fields of view images. In clinical situations where soft tissue targets are of importance, GFW Minimax algorithm was significantly more accurate and robust. With registration errors lower than 1 mm, margins may be scaled down to 4 mm without adversely affecting TCP and NTCP.

  19. SU-C-204-03: In-Vivo Range Verification and Tissue Response to Proton Radiotherapy Using Prompt Gamma Volume Histograms

    SciTech Connect

    Polf, J; Lin, M

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To study if prompt gamma (PG) volume histograms created from PG images acquired during treatment delivery can be used to identify changes to beam range and tissue composition in response to proton radiotherapy. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations of a single field from a single treatment fraction (100 cGy) for prostate cancer were performed for the cases of: 1) an ideal patient setup, 1) a setup shift in the superior direction and 2) a reduction in oxygen concentration in the tumor. For each case, the 3 -Dimsional dose delivery and elemental PG emission in the patient for the treatment fraction were recorded and imported into a commercial treatment planning system. Changes in the dose volume histograms (DVH), as well as the PG volume histograms (PG-VH) for the PG emission from oxygen and for the total PG emission (from all elements) were analyzed. Results: For the 1 cm superior shift, the prostate DVH and total PG-VH both shifted toward lower doses with the shape of the curves remaining nearly unchanged, resulting in the DVH V95 dropping from 100 cGy to 90 cGy. For the total PG-VH, the V95 fell from 50 to 38. For the reduced oxygen case, both the DVH and PG-VH had a much different shape than for the ideal case, with a significant downward slope in the curves as a function of dose. Conclusions: The shift in the prostate PG-VH for a superior shift in the patient setup correlated well with the DVH indicating it is possible to detect setup errors by analyzing the PG-VH from prompt gamma images obtained during daily proton treatment delivery. Additionally, it may be possible to detect changes in the elemental concentrations of irradiated tissues by analyzing the shape of the PG-VH.

  20. Experimental validation of heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on respiratory-averaged CT images in stereotactic body radiotherapy for moving tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Miyabe, Yuki; Matsuo, Yukinori; Kamomae, Takeshi; Nakata, Manabu; Yano, Shinsuke; Sawada, Akira; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to experimentally assess the validity of heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on respiratory-averaged computed tomography (RACT) images in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for moving tumors. Four-dimensional computed tomography (CT) data were acquired while a dynamic anthropomorphic thorax phantom with a solitary target moved. Motion pattern was based on cos (t) with a constant respiration period of 4.0 sec along the longitudinal axis of the CT couch. The extent of motion (A{sub 1}) was set in the range of 0.0-12.0 mm at 3.0-mm intervals. Treatment planning with the heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription was designed on RACT images. A new commercially available Monte Carlo algorithm of well-commissioned 6-MV photon beam was used for dose calculation. Dosimetric effects of intrafractional tumor motion were then investigated experimentally under the same conditions as 4D CT simulation using the dynamic anthropomorphic thorax phantom, films, and an ionization chamber. The passing rate of {gamma} index was 98.18%, with the criteria of 3 mm/3%. The dose error between the planned and the measured isocenter dose in moving condition was within {+-} 0.7%. From the dose area histograms on the film, the mean {+-} standard deviation of the dose covering 100% of the cross section of the target was 102.32 {+-} 1.20% (range, 100.59-103.49%). By contrast, the irradiated areas receiving more than 95% dose for A{sub 1} = 12 mm were 1.46 and 1.33 times larger than those for A{sub 1} = 0 mm in the coronal and sagittal planes, respectively. This phantom study demonstrated that the cross section of the target received 100% dose under moving conditions in both the coronal and sagittal planes, suggesting that the heterogeneity-corrected dose-volume prescription on RACT images is acceptable in SBRT for moving tumors.

  1. Dose-Volume Parameters of the Corpora Cavernosa Do Not Correlate With Erectile Dysfunction After External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results From a Dose-Escalation Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Wielen, Gerard J. van der Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Dohle, Gert R.; Putten, Wim L.J. van; Incrocci, Luca

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To analyze the correlation between dose-volume parameters of the corpora cavernosa and erectile dysfunction (ED) after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 1997 and February 2003, a randomized dose-escalation trial comparing 68 Gy and 78 Gy was conducted. Patients at our institute were asked to participate in an additional part of the trial evaluating sexual function. After exclusion of patients with less than 2 years of follow-up, ED at baseline, or treatment with hormonal therapy, 96 patients were eligible. The proximal corpora cavernosa (crura), the superiormost 1-cm segment of the crura, and the penile bulb were contoured on the planning computed tomography scan and dose-volume parameters were calculated. Results: Two years after EBRT, 35 of the 96 patients had developed ED. No statistically significant correlations between ED 2 years after EBRT and dose-volume parameters of the crura, the superiormost 1-cm segment of the crura, or the penile bulb were found. The few patients using potency aids typically indicated to have ED. Conclusion: No correlation was found between ED after EBRT for prostate cancer and radiation dose to the crura or penile bulb. The present study is the largest study evaluating the correlation between ED and radiation dose to the corpora cavernosa after EBRT for prostate cancer. Until there is clear evidence that sparing the penile bulb or crura will reduce ED after EBRT, we advise to be careful in sparing these structures, especially when this involves reducing treatment margins.

  2. Volume and dosimetric variations during two-phase adaptive intensity-modulated radiotherapy for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-hao; Zhang, Shu-xu; Zhou, Ling-hong; Zhang, Guo-qian; Yu, Hui; Lin, Xiao-dan; Lin, Shengqu

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the volume and dosimetric variations during IMRT for locally advanced NPC and to identify the benefits of a two-phase adaptive IMRT method. Twenty patients with locally advanced NPC having received IMRT treatment were included. Each patient had both an initial planning CT (CT-1) and a repeated CT scan (CT-2) after treatment at a dose of 40 Gy. Three IMRT planning scenarios were compared: (1) the initial plan on the CT-1 (plan-1); (2) the hybrid plan recalculated the initial plan on the CT-2 (plan-2); (3) the replan generated on the CT-2 being used to complete the course of IMRT (plan-3). The mean gross target volume and mean volumes of the positive neck lymph nodes, high-risk clinical target volume, and the left and right parotid glands significantly decreased by 30.2%, 45.1%, 21.1%, 14.7% and 18.2%, respectively on the CT-2. Comparing plan-2 with plan-1, the dose coverage of the targets remained unchanged, whereas the dose delivered to the parotid glands and spinal cord increased significantly. These patients with locally advanced NPC might benefit from replanning because of the sparing of the parotid glands and spinal cord. PMID:24212016

  3. Grading-System-Dependent Volume Effects for Late Radiation-Induced Rectal Toxicity After Curative Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Laan, Hans Paul van der

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the association between the dose distributions in the rectum and late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC), Late Effects of Normal Tissue SOMA, and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 3.0 graded rectal toxicity among patients with prostate cancer treated with RT. Methods and Materials: Included in the study were 124 patients who received three-dimensional conformal RT for prostate cancer to a total dose of 70 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. All patients completed questionnaires regarding rectum complaints before RT and during long-term follow-up. Late rectum Grade 2 or worse toxicity, according to RTOG/EORTC, LENT SOMA, and CTCAE v3.0 criteria, was analyzed in relation to rectal dose and volume parameters. Results: Dose-volume thresholds (V40 {>=}65%, V50 {>=}55%, V65 {>=}45%, V70 {>=}20%, and a rectum volume {<=}140 cm{sup 3}), significantly discriminated patients with late Grade 0-1 and Grade 2 or worse rectal toxicity, particularly using the LENT SOMA and CTCAE v3.0 systems. The rectum volume receiving {>=}70 Gy (V70) was most predictive for late Grade 2 or worse rectal toxicity with each of the grading systems. The associations were strongest, however, with use of the LENT SOMA system. Conclusions: Volume effects for late radiation-induced rectal toxicity are present, but their clinical significance depends on the grading system used. This should be taken into account in the interpretation of studies reporting on radiation-induced rectal toxicity.

  4. TU-A-12A-06: Intra-Observer Variability in Delineation of Target Volumes in Breast Radiotherapy and Its Effect On Accuracy of Deformation Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Juneja, P; Harris, E; Bonora, M; Evans, P

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In breast radiotherapy, the target volume may change during treatment and need adaptation of the treatment plan. This is possible for both tumour bed (TB) and whole breast (WB) target volumes. Delineation of the target (to detect changes) is also subject to uncertainty due to intra- and inter-observer variability. This work measured the uncertainty, due to intraobserver variability, in the quantification of tissue deformation. Methods: Datasets consisting of paired prone and supine CT scans of three patients were used. Significant deformation in target volumes is expected between prone and supine patient positions. The selected cases had 1) no seroma, 2) some seroma, and 3) large seroma. The TB and WB were outlined on each dataset three times by one clinician. Delineation variability was defined as the standard deviations of the distances between observer outlines. For each target volume and each case, tissue deformation between prone and supine delineations was quantified using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) and the average surface distance (ASD). The uncertainty in the tissue deformation (due to delineation variability) was quantified by measuring the ranges of DSC and ASD using all combinations of pairs of outlines (9 pairs). Results: For the TB, the range of delineation variability was 0.44-1.16 mm. The deformation, DSC and ASD, (and uncertainty in measurement) of the TB between prone and supine position of the cases were: 1) 0.21 (0.17-0.28) and 12.4 mm (11.8-13 mm); 2) 0.54 (0.51-0.57) and 3.3 mm (3.1-3.5 mm); 3) 0.62 (0.61-0.64) and 4.9 mm (4.6-5.2 mm). WB deformation measurements were subject to less uncertainty due to delineation variability than TB deformation measurements. Conclusion: For the first time, the uncertainty, due to observer variability, in the measurement of the deformation of breast target volumes was investigated. Deformations in these ranges would be difficult to detect. This work was supported in part by Cancer Research

  5. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances: Opinions and decisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with selected orders, July 1--December 31, 1996. Volume 44, Pages 1--432

    SciTech Connect

    1997-10-01

    The hardbound edition of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances is a final compilation of the monthly issuances. It includes all of the legal precedents for the agency within a six-month period. Any opinions, decisions, denials, memoranda and orders of the Commission inadvertently omitted from the monthly softbounds and any corrections submitted by the NRC legal staff to the printed softbound issuances are contained in the hardbound edition. Cross references in the text and indexes are to the NRCI page numbers which are the same as the page numbers in this publication. Issuances are referred to as follows: Commission--CLI, Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards--LBP, Administrative Law Judges--ALJ, Directors` Decisions--DD, and Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking--DPRM.

  6. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances. Opinions and decisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with selected orders, July 1, 1994--December 31, 1994. Volume 40, Pages 1--387

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The hardbound edition of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances is a final compilation of the monthly issuances. It includes all of the legal precedents for the agency within a six-month period. Any opinions, decisions, denials, memoranda and orders of the Commission inadvertently omitted from the monthly softbounds and any corrections submitted by the NRC legal staff to the printed softbound issuances are contained in the hardbound edition. Cross references in the text and indexes are to the NRCI page numbers which are the same as the page numbers in this publication. This book covers the following: issuances of the NRC; issuances of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards; and issuances of Directors` decisions.

  7. Evaluation of the cone beam CT for internal target volume localization in lung stereotactic radiotherapy in comparison with 4D MIP images

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lu; Chen, Xiaoming; Lin, Mu-Han; Lin, Teh; Fan, Jiajin; Jin, Lihui; Ma, Charlie M.; Xue, Jun

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether the three-dimensional cone-beam CT (CBCT) is clinically equivalent to the four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) maximum intensity projection (MIP) reconstructed images for internal target volume (ITV) localization in image-guided lung stereotactic radiotherapy.Methods: A ball-shaped polystyrene phantom with built-in cube, sphere, and cone of known volumes was attached to a motor-driven platform, which simulates a sinusoidal movement with changeable motion amplitude and frequency. Target motion was simulated in the patient in a superior-inferior (S-I) direction with three motion periods and 2 cm peak-to-peak amplitudes. The Varian onboard Exact-Arms kV CBCT system and the GE LightSpeed four-slice CT integrated with the respiratory-position-management 4DCT scanner were used to scan the moving phantom. MIP images were generated from the 4DCT images. The clinical equivalence of the two sets of images was evaluated by comparing the extreme locations of the moving objects along the motion direction, the centroid position of the ITV, and the ITV volumes that were contoured automatically by Velocity or calculated with an imaging gradient method. The authors compared the ITV volumes determined by the above methods with those theoretically predicted by taking into account the physical object dimensions and the motion amplitudes. The extreme locations were determined by the gradient method along the S-I axis through the center of the object. The centroid positions were determined by autocenter functions. The effect of motion period on the volume sizes was also studied.Results: It was found that the extreme locations of the objects determined from the two image modalities agreed with each other satisfactorily. They were not affected by the motion period. The average difference between the two modalities in the extreme locations was 0.68% for the cube, 1.35% for the sphere, and 0.5% for the cone, respectively. The maximum difference in the

  8. SU-E-J-75: Importance of 4DCT for Target Volume Definition in Stereotactic Lung Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Goksel, E; Cone, D; Kucucuk, H; Senkesen, O; Yilmaz, M; Aslay, I; Tezcanli, E; Garipagaoglu, M; Sengoz, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We aimed to investigate the importance of 4DCT for lung tumors treated with SBRT and whether maximum intensity projection (MIP) and free breathing (FB) images can compansate for tumor movement. Methods: Six patients with primary lung cancer and 2 patients with lung metastasis with a median age of 69.5 (42–86) were included. Patients were positioned supine on a vacuum bag. In addition to FB planning CT images, 4DCT images were obtained at 3 mm intervals using Varian RPM system with (Siemens Somatom Sensetion 64). MIP series were reconstructed using 4DCT images. PTV-FB and PTV-MIP (GTV+5mm) volumes were contoured using FB and MIP series, respectively. GTVs were defined on each of eight different breathing phase images and were merged to create the ITV. PTV-4D was generated with a 5 mm margin to ITV. PTV-MIP and PTV-4D contours were copied to FB CT series and treatment plans for PTV-MIP and PTV-FB were generated using RapidArc (2 partial arc) technique in Eclipse (version 11, AAA algorithm). The prescription dose was 5600cGy in 7 fractions. ITV volumes receiving prescription dose (%) and V95 for ITV were calculated for each treatment plan. Results: The mean PTV-4B, PTV-MIP and PTV-FB volumes were 23.2 cc, 15.4cc ve 11cc respectively. Median volume of ITV receiving the prescription dose was 34.6% (16.4–70 %) and median V95 dose for ITV was 1699cGy (232cGy-5117cGy) in the plan optimized for PTV-FB as the reference. When the plan was optimized for PTV-MIP, median ITV volume receiving the prescription dose was 67.15% (26–86%) and median V95 dose for ITV was 4231cGy (1735cGy-5290cGy). Conclusion: Images used in lung SBRT are critical for treatment quality; FB and MIP images did not compensate target movement, therefore 4DCT images should be obtained for all patients undergoing lung SBRT or the safety margins should be adjusted.

  9. Harmonization of the Volume of Interest Delineation among All Eleven Radiotherapy Centers in the North of France

    PubMed Central

    Pasquier, David; Boutaud de la Combe-Chossiere, Laurence; Carlier, Damien; Darloy, Franck; Degrendel-Courtecuisse, Anne Catherine; Dufour, Chantal; Fares, Mustapha; Gilbeau, Laurent; Liem, Xavier; Martin, Philippe; Meyer, Pascal; Minne, Jean François; Olszyk, Olimpia; Rhliouch, Hassan; Tokarski, Marc; Viot, Chloé; Castelain, Bernard; Lartigau, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Background Inter-observer delineation variation has been detailed for many years in almost every tumor location. Inadequate delineation can impair the chance of cure and/or increase toxicity. The aim of our original work was to prospectively improve the homogeneity of delineation among all of the senior radiation oncologists in the Nord-Pas de Calais region, irrespective of the conditions of practice. Methods All 11 centers were involved. The first studied cancer was prostate cancer. Three clinical cases were studied: a low-risk prostate cancer case (case 1), a high-risk prostate cancer case (pelvic nodes, case 2) and a case of post-operative biochemical elevated PSA (case 3). All of the involved physicians delineated characteristically the clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk. The volumes were compared using validated indexes: the volume ratio (VR), common and additional volumes (CV and AV), volume overlap (VO) and Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). A second delineation of the same three cases was performed after discussion of the slice results and the choice of shared guidelines to evaluate homogenization. A comparative analysis of the indexes before and after discussion was conducted using the Wilcoxon test for paired samples. A p-value less than 0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. Results The indexes were not improved in case 1, for which the inter-observer agreement was considered good after the first comparison (DSC = 0.83±0.06). In case 2, the second comparison showed homogenization of the CTV delineation with a significant improvement in CV (81.4±11.7 vs. 88.6±10.26, respectively, p = 0.048), VO (0.41±0.09 vs. 0.47±0.07, respectively; p = 0.009) and DSC (0.58±0.09 vs. 0.63±0.07, respectively; p = 0.0098). In case 3, VR and AV were significantly improved: VR: 1.71(±0.6) vs. 1.34(±0.46), respectively, p = 0.0034; AV: 46.58(±14.50) vs. 38.08(±15.10), respectively, p = 0.0024. DSC was not improved, but it was already

  10. Variation in the Gross Tumor Volume and Clinical Target Volume for Preoperative Radiotherapy of Primary Large High-Grade Soft Tissue Sarcoma of the Extremity Among RTOG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dian; Bosch, Walter; Kirsch, David G.; Al Lozi, Rawan; El Naqa, Issam; Roberge, David; Finkelstein, Steven E.; Petersen, Ivy; Haddock, Michael; Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Saito, Naoyuki G.; Hitchcock, Ying J.; Wolfson, Aaron H.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate variability in the definition of preoperative radiotherapy gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) delineated by sarcoma radiation oncologists. Methods and Materials: Extremity sarcoma planning CT images along with the corresponding diagnostic MRI from two patients were distributed to 10 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group sarcoma radiation oncologists with instructions to define GTV and CTV using standardized guidelines. The CT data with contours were then returned for central analysis. Contours representing statistically corrected 95% (V95) and 100% (V100) agreement were computed for each structure. Results: For the GTV, the minimum, maximum, mean (SD) volumes (mL) were 674, 798, 752 {+-} 35 for the lower extremity case and 383, 543, 447 {+-} 46 for the upper extremity case. The volume (cc) of the union, V95 and V100 were 882, 761, and 752 for the lower, and 587, 461, and 455 for the upper extremity, respectively. The overall GTV agreement was judged to be almost perfect in both lower and upper extremity cases (kappa = 0.9 [p < 0.0001] and kappa = 0.86 [p < 0.0001]). For the CTV, the minimum, maximum, mean (SD) volumes (mL) were 1145, 1911, 1605 {+-} 211 for the lower extremity case and 637, 1246, 1006 {+-} 180 for the upper extremity case. The volume (cc) of the union, V95, and V100 were 2094, 1609, and 1593 for the lower, and 1533, 1020, and 965 for the upper extremity cases, respectively. The overall CTV agreement was judged to be almost perfect in the lower extremity case (kappa = 0.85 [p < 0.0001]) but only substantial in the upper extremity case (kappa = 0.77 [p < 0.0001]). Conclusions: Almost perfect agreement existed in the GTV of these two representative cases. Tshere was no significant disagreement in the CTV of the lower extremity, but variation in the CTV of upper extremity was seen, perhaps related to the positional differences between the planning CT and the diagnostic MRI.

  11. Histologically Proven Radiation-Induced Brainstem Glioma 93 Months After External Beam Radiotherapy for Pituitary Macroadenoma: Radiation Treatment Dose and Volume Correlation.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Salim E; Wolansky, Leo J; Manjila, Sunil V; Lo, Simon S; Arafah, Baha M; Selman, Warren R; Couce, Marta E; Rogers, Lisa R

    2015-01-01

    Patient is a 29-year-old with a history of recurrent growth hormone-secreting pituitary macroadenoma diagnosed 12 years prior to presentation. Eight years prior to current presentation, the patient underwent re-resection and received 50.4 Gy external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in 28 fractions of 1.8 Gy each. Serial postradiation MRIs demonstrated regression in pituitary tumor size. Patient presented with new headaches 7.5 years after completing EBRT. Brain MRI demonstrated new FLAIR hyperintensity and contrast enhancement within the pons and medulla, corresponding to the 36 Gy isodose line of each radiation dose fraction. Differential diagnosis included radiation necrosis and radiation-induced glioma (RIG). The patient's neurologic exam worsened over the following 4 months. MRI showed progressive increase in mass effect, extent of FLAIR hyperintensity, and contrast enhancement in the brainstem. Stereotactic-assisted biopsy showed infiltrating astrocytoma with moderate atypia. A PubMed search showed this is the first case of histologically verified brainstem RIG correlated with 3-dimensional conformational radiation therapy dose and volume planning following EBRT for a pituitary adenoma. The rare occurrence of brainstem RIG after radiation therapy for pituitary tumor supports the need for long-term imaging monitoring of such patients. PMID:25345677

  12. SU-E-J-179: Assessment of Tumor Volume Change and Movement During Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for Lung Cancer: Is Adaptive Radiation Therapy (ART) Necessary?

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C; Lee, C

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Delineation of gross tumor volumes (GTVs) is important for stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). However, tumor volume changes during treatment response. Here, we have investigated tumor volume changes and movement during SBRT for lung cancer, as a means of examining the need for adaptive radiation therapy (ART). Methods: Fifteen tumors in 15 patients with lung cancer were treated with SBRT (total dose: 60 Gy in 4 fractions). GTVs were obtained from cone-beam computed tomography scans (CBCT1–4) taken before each of the 4 fractions was administered. GTVs were delineated and measured by radiation oncologists using a treatment planning system. Variance in the tumor position was assessed between the planning CT and the CBCT images. To investigate the dosimetric effects of tumor volume changes, planning CT and CBCT4 treatment plans were compared using the conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and Paddick’s index (PCI). Results: The GTV on CBCT1 was employed as a baseline for comparisons. GTV had decreased by a mean of 20.4% (range: 0.7% to 47.2%) on CBCT4. Most patients had smaller GTVs on CBCT4 than on CBCT1. The interfractional shifts of the tumor position between the planning CT and CBCT1–4 were as follows: right-left, −0.4 to 1.3 mm; anterior-posterior, −0.8 to 0.5 mm; and superiorinferior, −0.9 to 1.1 mm. Indices for plans from the planning CT and CBCT4 were as follows: CI = 0.94±0.02 and 1.11±0.03; HI= 1.1±0.02 and 1.10±0.03; and PCI = 1.35±0.16 and 1.11±0.02, respectively. Conclusion: CI, HI, and PCI did not differ between the planning CT and CBCTs. However, daily CBCT revealed a significant decrease in the GTV during lung SBRT. Furthermore, there was an obvious interfractional shift in tumor position. Using ART could potentially lead to a reduced GTV margin and improved regional tumor control for lung cancer patients with significantly decreased GTV.

  13. Bone Fractures Following External Beam Radiotherapy and Limb-Preservation Surgery for Lower Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Relationship to Irradiated Bone Length, Volume, Tumor Location and Dose

    SciTech Connect

    Dickie, Colleen I.; Parent, Amy L.; Griffin, Anthony M.; Fung, Sharon; Chung, Peter W.M.; Catton, Charles N.; Ferguson, Peter C.; Wunder, Jay S.; Bell, Robert S.; Sharpe, Michael B.; O'Sullivan, Brian

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To examine the relationship between tumor location, bone dose, and irradiated bone length on the development of radiation-induced fractures for lower extremity soft tissue sarcoma (LE-STS) patients treated with limb-sparing surgery and radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Of 691 LE-STS patients treated from 1989 to 2005, 31 patients developed radiation-induced fractures. Analysis was limited to 21 fracture patients (24 fractures) who were matched based on tumor size and location, age, beam arrangement, and mean total cumulative RT dose to a random sample of 53 nonfracture patients and compared for fracture risk factors. Mean dose to bone, RT field size (FS), maximum dose to a 2-cc volume of bone, and volume of bone irradiated to >=40 Gy (V40) were compared. Fracture site dose was determined by comparing radiographic images and surgical reports to fracture location on the dose distribution. Results: For fracture patients, mean dose to bone was 45 +- 8 Gy (mean dose at fracture site 59 +- 7 Gy), mean FS was 37 +- 8 cm, maximum dose was 64 +- 7 Gy, and V40 was 76 +- 17%, compared with 37 +- 11 Gy, 32 +- 9 cm, 59 +- 8 Gy, and 64 +- 22% for nonfracture patients. Differences in mean, maximum dose, and V40 were statistically significant (p = 0.01, p = 0.02, p = 0.01). Leg fractures were more common above the knee joint. Conclusions: The risk of radiation-induced fracture appears to be reduced if V40 <64%. Fracture incidence was lower when the mean dose to bone was <37 Gy or maximum dose anywhere along the length of bone was <59 Gy. There was a trend toward lower mean FS for nonfracture patients.

  14. Weekly Dose-Volume Parameters of Mucosa and Constrictor Muscles Predict the Use of Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy During Exclusive Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Gunn, G. Brandon; Parker, Brent C.; Endres, Eugene J.; Zeng Jing; Fiorino, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To define predictors of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) use during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for oropharyngeal cancer. Methods and Materials: Data for 59 consecutive patients treated with exclusive IMRT at a single institution were recovered. Of 59 patients, 25 were treated with hyperfractionation (78 Gy, 1.3 Gy per fraction, twice daily; 'HYPER'); and 34 of 59 were treated with a once-daily fractionation schedule (66 Gy, 2.2 Gy per fraction, or 70 Gy, 2 Gy per fraction; 'no-HYPER'). On the basis of symptoms during treatment, a PEG tube could have been placed as appropriate. A number of clinical/dosimetric factors, including the weekly dose-volume histogram of oral mucosa (OM DVHw) and weekly mean dose to constrictors and larynx, were considered. The OM DVHw of patients with and without PEG were compared to assess the most predictive dose-volume combinations. Results: Of 59 patients, 22 needed a PEG tube during treatment (for 15 of 22, {>=}3 months). The best cutoff values for OM DVHw were V9.5 Gy/week <64 cm{sup 3} and V10 Gy/week <54 cm{sup 3}. At univariate analysis, fractionation, mean weekly dose to OM and superior and middle constrictors, and OM DVHw were strongly correlated with the risk of PEG use. In a stepwise multivariate logistic analysis, OM V9.5 Gy/week ({>=}64 vs. <64 cm{sup 3}) was the most predictive parameter (odds ratio 30.8, 95% confidence interval 3.7-254.2, p = 0.0015), confirmed even in the no-HYPER subgroup (odds ratio 21, 95% CI 2.1 confidence interval 210.1, p = 0.01). Conclusions: The risk of PEG use is drastically reduced when OM V9.5-V10 Gy/week is <50-60 cm{sup 3}. These data warrant prospective validation.

  15. Impact of the radiotherapy technique on the correlation between dose-volume histograms of the bladder wall defined on MRI imaging and dose-volume/surface histograms in prostate cancer patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggio, Angelo; Carillo, Viviana; Cozzarini, Cesare; Perna, Lucia; Rancati, Tiziana; Valdagni, Riccardo; Gabriele, Pietro; Fiorino, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the ‘true’ absolute and relative dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the bladder wall, dose-wall histogram (DWH) defined on MRI imaging and other surrogates of bladder dosimetry in prostate cancer patients, planned both with 3D-conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques. For 17 prostate cancer patients, previously treated with radical intent, CT and MRI scans were acquired and matched. The contours of bladder walls were drawn by using MRI images. External bladder surfaces were then used to generate artificial bladder walls by performing automatic contractions of 5, 7 and 10 mm. For each patient a 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and an IMRT treatment plan was generated with a prescription dose of 77.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fr) and DVH of the whole bladder of the artificial walls (DVH-5/10) and dose-surface histograms (DSHs) were calculated and compared against the DWH in absolute and relative value, for both treatment planning techniques. A specific software (VODCA v. 4.4.0, MSS Inc.) was used for calculating the dose-volume/surface histogram. Correlation was quantified for selected dose-volume/surface parameters by the Spearman correlation coefficient. The agreement between %DWH and DVH5, DVH7 and DVH10 was found to be very good (maximum average deviations below 2%, SD < 5%): DVH5 showed the best agreement. The correlation was slightly better for absolute (R = 0.80-0.94) compared to relative (R = 0.66-0.92) histograms. The DSH was also found to be highly correlated with the DWH, although slightly higher deviations were generally found. The DVH was not a good surrogate of the DWH (R < 0.7 for most of parameters). When comparing the two treatment techniques, more pronounced differences between relative histograms were seen for IMRT with respect to 3DCRT (p < 0.0001).

  16. The optimization of intensity modulated radiotherapy in cases where the planning target volume extends into the build-up region.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T B; Hoole, A C F; Burnet, N G; Thomas, S J

    2009-04-21

    A common clinical problem in IMRT, especially when treating head and neck cases, is that the clinical target volume (CTV) stops short of the skin surface, whilst the margin for geometric uncertainties may take the planning target volume (PTV) to the skin surface or beyond. In these cases, optimization leads to over-dosing of the skin, unless the planner resorts to procedural tricks to avoid this, such as the use of pretend bolus or reduction of the PTV followed by adding 'flash' after optimization. This paper describes a method of avoiding the need for these tricks by using a multiple-isocentre CTV-based objective function. This enables plans to be produced that will give good coverage of the CTV for all the geometrical uncertainties that would have been covered by the PTV without causing the problem of over-dosing the skin. Eight isocentre shifts, equally distributed on the surface of a sphere with a radius equal to the CTV-PTV margin, are shown to be adequate for the optimization process. The resulting fluence maps are much simpler than those resulting from PTV optimization and will therefore be simpler to deliver. The method also permits better sparing of organs at risk such as the spinal cord. PMID:19336846

  17. Opinion Integration and Summarization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Yue

    2011-01-01

    As Web 2.0 applications become increasingly popular, more and more people express their opinions on the Web in various ways in real time. Such wide coverage of topics and abundance of users make the Web an extremely valuable source for mining people's opinions about all kinds of topics. However, since the opinions are usually expressed as…

  18. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 06: Optimizing planning target volume in lung radiotherapy using deformable registration

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang, P; Wierzbicki, M

    2014-08-15

    A four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) image is acquired for all radically treated, lung cancer patients to define the internal target volume (ITV), which encompasses tumour motion due to breathing and subclinical disease. Patient set-up error and anatomical motion that is not due to breathing is addressed through an additional 1 cm margin around the ITV to obtain the planning target volume (PTV). The objective of this retrospective study is to find the minimum PTV margin that provides an acceptable probability of delivering the prescribed dose to the ITV. Acquisition of a kV cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image at each fraction was used to shift the treatment couch to accurately align the spinal cord and carina. Our method utilized deformable image registration to automatically position the planning ITV on each CBCT. We evaluated the percentage of the ITV surface that fell within various PTVs for 79 fractions across 18 patients. Treatment success was defined as a situation where at least 99% of the ITV is covered by the PTV. Overall, this is to be achieved in at least 90% of the treatment fractions. The current approach with a 1cm PTV margin was successful ∼96% of the time. This analysis revealed that the current margin can be reduced to 0.8cm isotropic or 0.6×0.6×1 cm{sup 3} non-isotropic, which were successful 92 and 91 percent of the time respectively. Moreover, we have shown that these margins maintain accuracy, despite intrafractional variation, and maximize CBCT image guidance capabilities.

  19. Salvage Treatment for Recurrent Intracranial Germinoma After Reduced-Volume Radiotherapy: A Single-Institution Experience and Review of the Literature

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yu-Wen; Huang, Pin-I; Wong, Tai-Tong; Ho, Donald Ming-Tak; Chang, Kai-Ping; Guo, Wan-Yuo; Chang, Feng-Chi; Shiau, Cheng-Yin; Liang, Muh-Lii; Lee, Yi-Yen; and others

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Intracranial germinomas (IGs) are highly curable with radiotherapy (RT). However, recurrence still occurs, especially when limited-field RT is applied, and the optimal salvage therapy remains controversial. Methods and Materials: Between January 1989 and December 2010, 14 patients with clinically or pathologically diagnosed recurrent IGs after RT were reviewed at our institution. Of these, 11 received focal-field RT, and the other 3 received whole-brain irradiation, whole-ventricle irradiation, and Gamma Knife radiosurgery as the respective first course of RT. In addition, we identified from the literature 88 patients with recurrent IGs after reduced-volume RT, in whom the details of salvage therapy were recorded. Results: The median time to recurrence was 30.3 months (range, 3.8-134.9 months). One patient did not receive further treatment and was lost during follow-up. Of the patients, 7 underwent salvage with craniospinal irradiation (CSI) plus chemotherapy (CT), 4 with CSI alone, 1 with whole-brain irradiation plus CT, and 1 with Gamma Knife radiosurgery. The median follow-up time was 105.1 months (range, 24.2-180.9 months). Three patients died without evidence of disease progression: two from second malignancies and one from unknown cause. The others remained disease free. The 3-year survival rate after recurrence was 83.3%. A total of 102 patients from our study and the literature review were analyzed to determine the factors affecting prognosis and outcomes. After recurrence, the 5-year survival rates were 71% and 92.9% for all patients and for those receiving salvage CSI, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that initial RT volume, initial RT dose, initial CT, and salvage RT type were significant prognostic predictors of survival. On multivariable analysis, salvage CSI was the most significant factor (p = 0.03). Conclusions: Protracted follow-up is recommended because late recurrence is not uncommon. CSI with or without CT is an effective

  20. Dosimetric benefit of DMLC tracking for conventional and sub-volume boosted prostate intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pommer, Tobias; Falk, Marianne; Poulsen, Per R.; Keall, Paul J.; O’Brien, Ricky T.; Petersen, Peter Meidahl; Rosenschöld, Per Munck af

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the dosimetric impact of uncompensated motion and motion compensation with dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking for prostate intensity modulated arc therapy. Two treatment approaches were investigated; a conventional approach with a uniform radiation dose to the target volume and an intraprostatic lesion (IPL) boosted approach with an increased dose to a subvolume of the prostate. The impact on plan quality of optimizations with a leaf position constraint, which limited the distance between neighbouring adjacent MLC leaves, was also investigated. Deliveries were done with and without DMLC tracking on a linear acceleration with a high-resolution MLC. A cylindrical phantom containing two orthogonal diode arrays was used for dosimetry. A motion platform reproduced six patient-derived prostate motion traces, with the average displacement ranging from 1.0 to 8.9 mm during the first 75 seconds. A research DMLC tracking system was used for real-time motion compensation with optical monitoring for position input. The gamma index was used for evaluation, with measurements with a static phantom or the planned dose as reference, using 2% and 2 mm gamma criteria. The average pass rate with DMLC tracking was 99.9% (range 98.7–100%, measurement as reference), whereas the pass rate for untracked deliveries decreased distinctly as the average displacement increased, with an average pass rate of 61.3% (range 32.7–99.3%). Dose-volume histograms showed that DMLC tracking maintained the planned dose distributions in the presence of motion whereas traces with > 3 mm average displacement caused clear plan degradation for untracked deliveries. The dose to the rectum and bladder had an evident dependence on the motion direction and amplitude for untracked deliveries, and the dose to the rectum was slightly increased for IPL boosted plans compared to conventional plans for anterior motion with large amplitude. In conclusion, optimization using a leaf

  1. Dosimetric benefit of DMLC tracking for conventional and sub-volume boosted prostate intensity-modulated arc radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommer, Tobias; Falk, Marianne; Poulsen, Per R.; Keall, Paul J.; O'Brien, Ricky T.; Meidahl Petersen, Peter; Rosenschöld, Per Munck af

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated the dosimetric impact of uncompensated motion and motion compensation with dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking for prostate intensity modulated arc therapy. Two treatment approaches were investigated; a conventional approach with a uniform radiation dose to the target volume and an intraprostatic lesion (IPL) boosted approach with an increased dose to a subvolume of the prostate. The impact on plan quality of optimizations with a leaf position constraint, which limited the distance between neighbouring adjacent MLC leaves, was also investigated. Deliveries were done with and without DMLC tracking on a linear acceleration with a high-resolution MLC. A cylindrical phantom containing two orthogonal diode arrays was used for dosimetry. A motion platform reproduced six patient-derived prostate motion traces, with the average displacement ranging from 1.0 to 8.9 mm during the first 75 s. A research DMLC tracking system was used for real-time motion compensation with optical monitoring for position input. The gamma index was used for evaluation, with measurements with a static phantom or the planned dose as reference, using 2% and 2 mm gamma criteria. The average pass rate with DMLC tracking was 99.9% (range 98.7-100%, measurement as reference), whereas the pass rate for untracked deliveries decreased distinctly as the average displacement increased, with an average pass rate of 61.3% (range 32.7-99.3%). Dose-volume histograms showed that DMLC tracking maintained the planned dose distributions in the presence of motion whereas traces with >3 mm average displacement caused clear plan degradation for untracked deliveries. The dose to the rectum and bladder had an evident dependence on the motion direction and amplitude for untracked deliveries, and the dose to the rectum was slightly increased for IPL boosted plans compared to conventional plans for anterior motion with large amplitude. In conclusion, optimization using a leaf position

  2. Setup Variations in Radiotherapy of Anal Cancer: Advantages of Target Volume Reduction Using Image-Guided Radiation Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yijen; Suh, Steve; Nelson, Rebecca A.; Liu An; Pezner, Richard D.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To define setup variations in the radiation treatment (RT) of anal cancer and to report the advantages of image-guided RT (IGRT) in terms of reduction of target volume and treatment-related side effects. Methods and Materials: Twelve consecutive patients with anal cancer treated by combined chemoradiation by use of helical tomotherapy from March 2007 to November 2008 were selected. With patients immobilized and positioned in place, megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) scans were performed before each treatment and were automatically registered to planning CT scans. Patients were shifted per the registration data and treated. A total of 365 MVCT scans were analyzed. The primary site received a median dose of 55 Gy. To evaluate the potential dosimetric advantage(s) of IGRT, cases were replanned according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0529, with and without adding recommended setup variations from the current study. Results: Significant setup variations were observed throughout the course of RT. The standard deviations for systematic setup correction in the anterior-posterior (AP), lateral, and superior-inferior (SI) directions and roll rotation were 1.1, 3.6, and 3.2 mm, and 0.3 Degree-Sign , respectively. The average random setup variations were 3.8, 5.5, and 2.9 mm, and 0.5 Degree-Sign , respectively. Without daily IGRT, margins of 4.9, 11.1, and 8.5 mm in the AP, lateral, and SI directions would have been needed to ensure that the planning target volume (PTV) received {>=}95% of the prescribed dose. Conversely, daily IGRT required no extra margins on PTV and resulted in a significant reduction of V15 and V45 of intestine and V10 of pelvic bone marrow. Favorable toxicities were observed, except for acute hematologic toxicity. Conclusions: Daily MVCT scans before each treatment can effectively detect setup variations and thereby reduce PTV margins in the treatment of anal cancer. The use of concurrent chemotherapy and IGRT provided favorable

  3. Phase II dose escalation study of image-guided adaptive radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Use of dose-volume constraints to achieve rectal isotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Vargas, Carlos; Yan Di; Kestin, Larry L.; Krauss, Daniel; Lockman, David M.; Brabbins, Donald S.; Martinez, Alvaro A. . E-mail: amartinez@beaumont.edu

    2005-09-01

    significant difference by dose level was seen in the 2-year rate of Grade 2 or higher chronic rectal toxicity. These rates were 27%, 15%, 14%, 17%, and 24% for dose levels equal to or less than 72, 73.8, 75.6, 77.4, and 79.2 Gy, respectively (p = 0.3). Grade 2 or higher chronic rectal bleeding was significantly greater for Group 2 than for Group 1, 17% vs. 8% (p = 0.035). Conclusions: High doses (79.2 Gy) were safely delivered in selected patients by our adaptive radiotherapy process. Under the rectal dose-volume histogram constraints for the dose level selection, the risk of chronic rectal toxicity is similar among patients treated to different dose levels. Therefore, rectal chronic toxicity rates reflect the dose-volume cutoff used and are independent of the actual dose levels. On the other hand, a larger PTV will increase the rectal wall dose and chronic rectal toxicity rates. PTV volume and dose constraints should be defined, considering their potential benefit.

  4. Accuracy of relocation, evaluation of geometric uncertainties and clinical target volume (CTV) to planning target volume (PTV) margin in fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for intracranial tumors using relocatable Gill-Thomas-Cosman (GTC) frame.

    PubMed

    Das, Saikat; Isiah, Rajesh; Rajesh, B; Ravindran, B Paul; Singh, Rabi Raja; Backianathan, Selvamani; Subhashini, J

    2011-01-01

    The present study is aimed at determination of accuracy of relocation of Gill-Thomas-Cosman frame during fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy. The study aims to quantitatively determine the magnitudes of error in anteroposterior, mediolateral and craniocaudal directions, and determine the margin between clinical target volume to planning target volume based on systematic and random errors. Daily relocation error was measured using depth helmet and measuring probe. Based on the measurements, translational displacements in anteroposterior (z), mediolateral (x), and craniocaudal (y) directions were calculated. Based on the displacements in x, y and z directions, systematic and random error were calculated and three-dimensional radial displacement vector was determined. Systematic and random errors were used to derive CTV to PTV margin. The errors were within ± 2 mm in 99.2% cases in anteroposterior direction (AP), in 99.6% cases in mediolateral direction (ML), and in 97.6% cases in craniocaudal direction (CC). In AP, ML and CC directions, systematic errors were 0.56, 0.38, 0.42 mm and random errors were 1.86, 1.36 and 0.73 mm, respectively. Mean radial displacement was 1.03 mm ± 0.34. CTV to PTV margins calculated by ICRU formula were 1.86, 1.45 and 0.93 mm; by Stroom's formula they were 2.42, 1.74 and 1.35 mm; by van Herk's formula they were 2.7, 1.93 and 1.56 mm (AP, ML and CC directions). Depth helmet with measuring probe provides a clinically viable way for assessing the relocation accuracy of GTC frame. The errors were within ± 2 mm in all directions. Systematic and random errors were more along the anteroposterior axes. According to the ICRU formula, a margin of 2 mm around the tumor seems to be adequate. PMID:21587166

  5. [Which rules apply to hypofractionated radiotherapy?].

    PubMed

    Supiot, S; Clément-Colmou, K; Paris, F; Corre, I; Chiavassa, S; Delpon, G

    2015-10-01

    Hypofractionated radiotherapy is now more widely prescribed due to improved targeting techniques (intensity modulated radiotherapy, image-guided radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy). Low dose hypofractionated radiotherapy is routinely administered mostly for palliative purposes. High or very high dose hypofractionated irradiation must be delivered according to very strict procedures since every minor deviation can lead to major changes in dose delivery to the tumor volume and organs at risk. Thus, each stage of the processing must be carefully monitored starting from the limitations and the choice of the hypofractionation technique, tumour contouring and dose constraints prescription, planning and finally dose calculation and patient positioning verification. PMID:26321647

  6. Reinforcement in opinion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volovik, Daniel

    I consider the evolution and acceptance of a new opinion in a population of unaware agents by using physics-based models of contagion spread. These models rely upon agent-based dynamics, in which an agent changes opinion by interactions with neighbors according to specific interactions. Most of these models have the feature that only a single input is required to change the opinion of an agent --- an agent has no commitment to its current opinion and accepts a new idea at the slightest provocation. These single-input models fail to account for people's confidence in their own beliefs. Thus I study the concept of social reinforcement --- that an agent adopts a new opinion only after multiple reinforcing prompts. Building on single-input models, I introduce two models of opinion spreading that incorporate a social reinforcement mechanism. (a) In the irreversible innovation and in the transient fad spreading models, a development is initially known only to a small portion of the population and subsequently spreads. An individual requires M > 1 interactions with an adopter before adopting the development. The ultimate extent of a transient fad depends critically on the characteristic time the fad keeps the attention of an adopting agent. (b) In the confident voter model, a voter can be in one of two opinion states and can additionally have two levels of commitment to an opinion: confident and vacillating. Upon interacting with an agent of a different opinion, a confident voter becomes less committed, or vacillating, but does not change opinion. However, a vacillating agent changes opinion by interacting with an agent of a different opinion. In two dimensions, the distribution of consensus times is characterized by two distinct times one that scales linearly with N and another that appears to scale as N 3/2. The longer time arises from configurations that fall into long-lived states that consist of multiple single-opinion stripes before consensus is reached.

  7. Survival of extreme opinions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jiann-wien; Huang, Ding-wei

    2009-12-01

    We study the survival of extreme opinions in various processes of consensus formation. All the opinions are treated equally and subjected to the same rules of changing. We investigate three typical models to reach a consensus in each case: (A) personal influence, (B) influence from surroundings, and (C) influence to surroundings. Starting with uniformly distributed random opinions, our calculated results show that the extreme opinions can survive in both models (A) and (B), but not in model (C). We obtain a conclusion that both personal influence and passive adaptation to the environment are not sufficient enough to eradicate all the extreme opinions. Only the active persuasion to change the surroundings eliminates the extreme opinions completely.

  8. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances. Opinions and decisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with selected orders: July 1, 1992--December 31, 1992, Volume 36, Pages 1--396

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This is the thirty-sixth volume of issuances (1-396) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and its Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, Administrative Law Judges, and Office Directors. It covers the period from July 1, 1992-December 31, 1992. Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards are authorized by Section 191 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. These Boards, comprised of three members conduct adjudicatory hearings on applications to construct and operate nuclear power plants and related facilities and issue initial decisions which, subject to internal review and appellate procedures, become the final Commission action with respect to those applications. Boards are drawn from the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel, comprised of lawyers, nuclear physicists and engineers, environmentalists, chemists, and economists. The Atomic Energy Commission first established Licensing Boards in 1962 and the Panel in 1967.

  9. [Radiotherapy of larynx cancers].

    PubMed

    Pointreau, Y; Lafond, C; Legouté, F; Trémolières, P; Servagi-Vernat, S; Giraud, P; Maingon, P; Calais, G; Lapeyre, M

    2016-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy is the gold standard in the treatment of larynx cancers (except T1 glottic tumour). Early T1 and T2 tumours may be treated by exclusive radiation or surgery. For tumours requiring total laryngectomy (T2 or T3), induction chemotherapy followed by exclusive radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy is possible. For T4 tumour, surgery must be proposed. The treatment of lymph nodes is based on the initial treatment of the primary tumour. In non-surgical procedure, in case of sequential radiotherapy, the curative dose is 70Gy and the prophylactic dose is 50Gy. An integrated simultaneous boost radiotherapy is allowed (70Gy in 2Gy per fraction and 56Gy in 1.8Gy per fraction or 70Gy in 2.12Gy per fraction). Postoperatively, radiotherapy is used in locally advanced cancer with dose levels based on pathologic criteria (66Gy for R1 resection, 50 to 54Gy for complete resection). Volume delineation was based on guidelines. PMID:27521037

  10. Morbidity and survival patterns in patients after radical hysterectomy and postoperative adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorica, J.V.; Roberts, W.S.; Greenberg, H.; Hoffman, M.S.; LaPolla, J.P.; Cavanagh, D. )

    1990-03-01

    Morbidity and survival patterns were reviewed in 50 patients who underwent radical hysterectomy, pelvic lymphadenectomy, and adjuvant postoperative pelvic radiotherapy for invasive cervical cancer. Ninety percent of the patients were FIGO stage IB, and 10% were clinical stage IIA or IIB. Indications for adjuvant radiotherapy included pelvic lymph node metastasis, large volume, deep stromal penetration, lower uterine segment involvement, or capillary space involvement. Seventy-two percent of the patients had multiple high-risk factors. An average of 4700 cGy of whole-pelvis radiotherapy was administered. Ten percent of the patients suffered major gastrointestinal complications, 14% minor gastrointestinal morbidity, 12% minor genitourinary complications, one patient a lymphocyst, and one patient lymphedema. Of the five patients with major gastrointestinal morbidity, all occurred within 12 months of treatment. Three patients required intestinal bypass surgery for distal ileal obstructions and all are currently doing well and free of disease. All of the patients who developed recurrent disease had multiple, high-risk factors. The median time of recurrence was 12 months. All patients recurred within the radiated field. Actuarial survival was 90% and disease-free survival 87% at 70 months. It is our opinion that the morbidity of postoperative pelvic radiotherapy is acceptable, and benefit may be gained in such a high-risk patient population.

  11. Dose-Volume Analysis of Predictors for Gastrointestinal Toxicity After Concurrent Full-Dose Gemcitabine and Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Jiayi; Robertson, John M.; Ye Hong; Margolis, Jeffrey; Nadeau, Laura; Yan Di

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric predictors for the development of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma (LAPC) treated with concurrent full-dose gemcitabine and radiotherapy (GemRT). Methods and Materials: From June 2002 to June 2009, 46 LAPC patients treated with definitive GemRT were retrospectively analyzed. The stomach and duodenum were retrospectively contoured separately to determine their dose-volume histogram (DVH) parameters. GI toxicity was defined as Grade 3 or higher GI toxicity. The follow-up time was calculated from the start of RT to the date of death or last contact. Univariate analysis (UVA) and multivariate analysis (MVA) using Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression models were performed to identify risk factors associated with GI toxicity. The receiver operating characteristic curve and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) were used to determine the best DVH parameter to predict for GI toxicity. Results: Of the patients, 28 (61%) received concurrent gemcitabine alone, and 18 (39%) had concurrent gemcitabine with daily erlotinib. On UVA, only the V{sub 20Gy} to V{sub 35Gy} of duodenum were significantly associated with GI toxicity (all p {<=} 0.05). On MVA, the V{sub 25Gy} of duodenum and the use of erlotinib were independent risk factors for GI toxicity (p = 0.006 and 0.02, respectively). For the entire cohort, the V{sub 25Gy} of duodenum is the best predictor for GI toxicity (AUC = 0.717), and the 12-month GI toxicity rate was 8% vs. 48% for V{sub 25Gy} {<=} 45% and V{sub 25Gy} > 45%, respectively (p = 0.03). However, excluding the erlotinib group, the V{sub 35Gy} is the best predictor (AUC = 0.725), and the 12-month GI toxicity rate was 0% vs. 41% for V{sub 35Gy} {<=} 20% and V{sub 35Gy} > 20%, respectively (p = 0.04). Conclusions: DVH parameters of duodenum may predict Grade 3 GI toxicity after GemRT for LAPC. Concurrent use of erlotinib during GemRT may increase GI

  12. Discourse, Opinions, and Ideologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Dijk, Teun A.

    1995-01-01

    Attempts to demonstrate the linkage between opinions, attitudes, and ideologies and to look for ways of explaining variation in opinions as well as in shared social dimensions of evaluative beliefs. The article argues that theories of discourse and ideologies, as well as the cognitive aspects of ideologies, should not be reduced to any partial…

  13. SU-E-T-330: To Analyze the Calculation Error of Live Dose-Volume Indices Applying 4D-CT in Radiotherapy for PTVs Within the Liver Completely

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, G; Liu, C; Yin, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To study the variation rule of normal liver dose-volume indices calculation for the liver malignancy patients whose plan target volumes were in the liver completely in all breath phases. Methods: Ten patients who accepted radiotherapy for malignant tumor were selected in our study. All patients underwent 4D-CT simulation and 3D-CT simulation in free breathing(FB). 4D-CT was sorted into 10 series CT images according to breath phase, named CT0, CT10 to CT90, respectively. And GTVs were contoured on different CT series, and the individual target volume(ITV) was obtained by merging 10 GTVs from 4D-CT. The PTVs were obtained from ITV applying margins. The PTVs were not beyond the boundary of liver in all breath phase observed by dynamic 4D-CT. The radiotherapy plans were designed and irradiation dose was calculated on 3D-CT images, and the livers were contoured on different series CT images and mapped to 3D-CT images applying rigid registration. To compare the dose-volume difference of livers based on distinct CT images. Results: (1)The liver volumes were similar on 4D-CT and 3D-CT images(CTFB 1485±500cm{sup 3}, CT0 1413±377cm{sup 3}, CT10 1409±396cm{sup 3}, CT20 1419±418cm{sup 3},CT30 1485±500cm{sup 3}, CT40 1438±392cm{sup 3}, CT50 1437±404cm{sup 3}, CT60 1439±409cm{sup 3}, CT70 1408±393cm{sup 3}, CT80 1384±397cm{sup 3}, CT90 1398±397cm{sup 3}; F=0.064,p=1.00) (2) The PTVs volume were 30.17±14.62cm{sup 3};(3) The mean dose and V5 to V10 of liver were similar among 4D-CT different series CT images(p>0.05), and the indices varied less than ±4% refer to liver on CT50. Conclusion: The calculation affection of liver dose-volume indices induced by breath motion were not significant for the PTV within liver completely as estimation before. And more objective prediction indices for radiation induced l.

  14. Heavy particle radiotherapy: prospects and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect

    Faju, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    The use of heavy particles in radiotherapy of tumor volumes is examined. Particles considered are protons, helium ions, heavy ions, negative pions, and fast neutrons. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed. (ACR)

  15. [Radiotherapy of carcinoma of the salivary glands].

    PubMed

    Servagi-Vernat, S; Tochet, F

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, and technique of radiotherapy for salivary glands carcinoma are presented, and the contribution of neutrons and carbon ions. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed. PMID:27521038

  16. Time to demand dosimetry for molecular radiotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Guy, M J

    2015-01-01

    Molecular radiotherapy (MRT) has been used clinically for around 75 years. Despite this long history of clinical use, there is no established dosimetry practice for calculating the absorbed dose delivered to tumour targets or to organs at risk. As a result, treatment protocols have often evolved based on experience with relatively small numbers of patients, each receiving a similar administered activity but, potentially, widely varying doses. This is in stark contrast to modern external-beam radiotherapy practice. This commentary describes some of the barriers to MRT dosimetry and gives some opinions on the way forward. PMID:25571916

  17. Evaluation of the Planning Target Volume in the Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy: What Is the Appropriate Expansion Margin in the Setting of Daily Image Guidance?

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Luu, Quang; Donald, Paul J.; Perks, Julian; Purdy, James A.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To compare patterns of disease failure among patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in conjunction with daily image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) for head and neck cancer, according to the margins used to expand the clinical target volume (CTV) to create a planning target volume (PTV). Methods and Materials: Two-hundred and twenty-five patients were treated with IMRT for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Daily IGRT scans were acquired using either kilovoltage or megavoltage volumetric imaging prior to each delivered fraction. The first 95 patients were treated with IMRT with 5-mm CTV-to-PTV margins. The subsequent 130 patients were treated using 3-mm PTV expansion margins. Results: Two-year estimates of overall survival, local-regional control, and distant metastasis-free survival were 76%, 78%, and 81%, respectively. There were no differences with respect to any of these endpoints among patients treated with 5-mm and 3-mm PTV expansion margins (p > 0.05, all). The 2-year local-regional control rate for patients treated with IMRT with 5-mm and 3-mm PTV margins was 78% and 78%, respectively (p = 0.96). Spatial evaluation revealed no differences in the incidences of marginal failures among those treated with 5-mm and 3-mm PTV margins. Conclusions: The use of 3-mm PTV expansion margins appears adequate and did not increase local-regional failures among patients treated with IMRT for head and neck cancer. These data demonstrate the safety of PTV reduction of less than 5 mm and support current protocols recommending this approach in the setting of daily IGRT.

  18. Usefulness of double dose contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for clear delineation of gross tumor volume in stereotactic radiotherapy treatment planning of metastatic brain tumors: a dose comparison study

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Kalloo Sharma; Takahashi, Takeo; Yamano, Takafumi; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Nishimura, Keiichiro; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the size and clearness of gross tumor volumes (GTVs) of metastatic brain tumors on T1-weighted magnetic resonance images between a single dose contrast administration protocol and a double dose contrast administration protocol to determine the optimum dose of contrast-enhancement for clear delineation of GTV in stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). A total of 28 small metastatic brain tumors were evaluated in 13 patients by intra-individual comparison of GTV measurements using single dose and double dose contrast-enhanced thin-slice (1-mm) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). All patients had confirmed histological types of primary tumors and had undergone hypo-fractionated SRT for metastatic brain tumors. The mean tumor diameter with single dose and double dose contrast-enhancement was 12.0 ± 1.1 mm and 13.2 ± 1.1 mm respectively (P < 0.001). The mean incremental ratio (MIR) obtained by comparing mean tumor diameters was 11.2 ± 0.02 %. The mean volume of GTV-1 (single dose contrast-enhancement) and GTV-2 (double dose contrast-enhancement) was 1.38 ± 0.41 ml and 1.59 ± 0.45 ml respectively (P < 0.01). The MIR by comparing mean tumor volumes was 32.3 ± 0.4 %. The MIR of GTV-1 with < 1ml volume and GTV-1 with > 1ml volume was 41.8 ± 0.05 % and 12.4 ± 0.03 % respectively (P < 0.001). We conclude that double dose contrast-enhanced thin-slice MRI is a more useful technique than single dose contrast-enhanced thin-slice MRI, especially for clear delineation of GTVs of small metastatic brain tumors in treatment planning of highly precise SRT. PMID:22843378

  19. Evidence-based estimates of the demand for radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Delaney, G P; Barton, M B

    2015-02-01

    There are different methods that may be used to estimate the future demand for radiotherapy services in a population ranging from expert opinion through to complex modelling techniques. This manuscript describes the use of evidence-based treatment guidelines to determine indications for radiotherapy. It also uses epidemiological data to estimate the proportion of the population who have attributes that suggest a benefit from radiotherapy in order to calculate the overall proportion of a population of new cases of cancer who appropriately could be recommended to undergo radiotherapy. Evidence-based methods are transparent and adaptable to different populations but require extensive information about the indications for radiotherapy and the proportion of cancer cases with those indications in the population. In 2003 this method produced an estimate that 52.4% of patients with a registered cancer-type had an indication for radiotherapy. The model was updated in 2012 because of changes in cancer incidence, stage distributions and indications for radiotherapy. The new estimate of the optimal radiotherapy utilisation rate was 48.3%. The decrease was due to changes in the relative frequency of cancer types and some changes in indications for radiotherapy. Actual rates of radiotherapy utilisation in most populations still fall well below this benchmark. PMID:25455408

  20. Anisotropic opinion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neirotti, Juan

    2016-07-01

    We consider the process of opinion formation in a society of interacting agents, where there is a set B of socially accepted rules. In this scenario, we observed that agents, represented by simple feed-forward, adaptive neural networks, may have a conservative attitude (mostly in agreement with B ) or liberal attitude (mostly in agreement with neighboring agents) depending on how much their opinions are influenced by their peers. The topology of the network representing the interaction of the society's members is determined by a graph, where the agents' properties are defined over the vertexes and the interagent interactions are defined over the bonds. The adaptability of the agents allows us to model the formation of opinions as an online learning process, where agents learn continuously as new information becomes available to the whole society (online learning). Through the application of statistical mechanics techniques we deduced a set of differential equations describing the dynamics of the system. We observed that by slowly varying the average peer influence in such a way that the agents attitude changes from conservative to liberal and back, the average social opinion develops a hysteresis cycle. Such hysteretic behavior disappears when the variance of the social influence distribution is large enough. In all the cases studied, the change from conservative to liberal behavior is characterized by the emergence of conservative clusters, i.e., a closed knitted set of society members that follow a leader who agrees with the social status quo when the rule B is challenged.

  1. Anisotropic opinion dynamics.

    PubMed

    Neirotti, Juan

    2016-07-01

    We consider the process of opinion formation in a society of interacting agents, where there is a set B of socially accepted rules. In this scenario, we observed that agents, represented by simple feed-forward, adaptive neural networks, may have a conservative attitude (mostly in agreement with B) or liberal attitude (mostly in agreement with neighboring agents) depending on how much their opinions are influenced by their peers. The topology of the network representing the interaction of the society's members is determined by a graph, where the agents' properties are defined over the vertexes and the interagent interactions are defined over the bonds. The adaptability of the agents allows us to model the formation of opinions as an online learning process, where agents learn continuously as new information becomes available to the whole society (online learning). Through the application of statistical mechanics techniques we deduced a set of differential equations describing the dynamics of the system. We observed that by slowly varying the average peer influence in such a way that the agents attitude changes from conservative to liberal and back, the average social opinion develops a hysteresis cycle. Such hysteretic behavior disappears when the variance of the social influence distribution is large enough. In all the cases studied, the change from conservative to liberal behavior is characterized by the emergence of conservative clusters, i.e., a closed knitted set of society members that follow a leader who agrees with the social status quo when the rule B is challenged. PMID:27575150

  2. [Current situation and future prospects of radiotherapy for malignant gliomas].

    PubMed

    Terahara, Atsuro

    2013-10-01

    Prognosis of malignant gliomas remains poor, although adjuvant radiotherapy increases survival time. To improve treatment outcomes, high-precision radiotherapy techniques such as three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, stereotactic irradiation, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and charged particle radiotherapy have been developed for dose distribution optimization and dose escalation. Improvements in clinical outcomes with these new treatment strategies have been reported; however, the efficacy of these treatment strategies has not yet been verified in randomized trials. Further development of radiation delivery techniques, including boron neutron capture therapy, and ways of achieving more adequate target volume delineation using modern multimodality imaging technology are currently being intensively investigated to further improve patient outcomes. PMID:24105051

  3. High Dose-Per-Fraction Irradiation of Limited Lung Volumes Using an Image-Guided, Highly Focused Irradiator: Simulating Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Regimens in a Small-Animal Model

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Jaeho; Kodym, Reinhard; Seliounine, Serguei

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate the underlying biology associated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), both in vivo models and image-guided, highly focal irradiation systems are necessary. Here, we describe such an irradiation system and use it to examine normal tissue toxicity in a small-animal model at lung volumes similar to those associated with human therapy. Methods and Materials: High-dose radiation was delivered to a small volume of the left lung of C3H/HeJCr mice using a small-animal stereotactic irradiator. The irradiator has a collimation mechanism to produce focal radiation beams, an imaging subsystem consisting of a fluorescent screen coupled to a charge-coupled device camera, and a manual positioning stage. Histopathologic examination and micro-CT were used to evaluate the radiation response. Results: Focal obliteration of the alveoli by fibrous connective tissue, hyperplasia of the bronchiolar epithelium, and presence of a small number of inflammatory cells are the main reactions to low-volume/high-dose irradiation of the mouse lung. The tissue response suggested a radiation dose threshold for early phase fibrosis lying between 40 and 100 Gy. The irradiation system satisfied our requirements of high-dose-rate, small beam diameter, and precise localization and verification. Conclusions: We have established an experimental model and image-guided animal irradiation system for the study of high dose per fraction irradiations such as those used with SBRT at volumes analogous to those used in human beings. It will also allow the targeting of specific anatomical structures of the thorax or ultimately, orthotopic tumors of the lung.

  4. Unsolicited medical opinion.

    PubMed

    Ratzan, R M

    1985-05-01

    By virtue of their professional ethics as healers and because of their specialized technical knowledge and clinical experience in assessing and reacting to real and potential emergencies, physicians have an obligation to offer an unsolicited medical opinion when the following conditions are met: (1) physicians assess a high probability of potentially serious disease in a stranger because of information presented to them, either in the form of a communication or physical signs; (2) physicians judge this information to be latent (not readily interpretable as potentially dangerous by the stranger) and likely to remain latent prior to the onset of symptoms; (3) the physicians possess the medical knowledge appropriate to the professional interpretation of this information. Although not a morally risk-free endeavor (invasion of privacy and the potential creation of a 'sick role' whether or not the diagnosis is correct), offering an unsolicited medical opinion under the above conditions can prevent suffering and save lives in unsuspecting strangers. PMID:4009080

  5. A planning target volume margin formula for hypofractionated intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy under cone beam CT image guidance with a six-degrees-of-freedom robotic couch and a mouthpiece-assisted mask system: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Kunishima, N; Yamamoto, K; Yoda, K

    2014-01-01

    Objective: A planning target volume (PTV) margin formula for hypofractionated intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) has been proposed under cone beam CT (CBCT) image guidance with a six-degrees-of-freedom (6-DOF) robotic couch. Methods: CBCT-based registration using a 6-DOF couch reportedly led to negligibly small systematic positioning errors, suggesting that each in-treatment positioning error during the treatment courses for the patients employing this combination was predominantly caused by a random gaussian process. Under this assumption, an anisotropic PTV margin for each axis was formulated based on a gaussian distribution model. 19 patients with intracranial lesions who underwent additional post-treatment CBCT were consecutively selected, to whom stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy was delivered by a linear accelerator equipped with a CBCT imager, a 6-DOF couch and a mouthpiece-assisted mask system. Time-averaged patient-positioning errors during treatment were estimated by comparing the post-treatment CBCT with the reference planning CT images. Results: It was suggested that each histogram of the in-treatment positioning error in each axis would approach each single gaussian distribution with a mean of zero. The calculated PTV margins in the x, y and z directions were 0.97, 1.30 and 0.88 mm, respectively. Conclusion: The empirical isotropic PTV margin of 2 mm used in our facility for intracranial SRT was consistent with the margin calculated by the proposed gaussian model. Advances in knowledge: We have proposed a PTV margin formula for hypofractionated intracranial SRT under CBCT image guidance with a 6-DOF robotic couch. PMID:25029296

  6. Conformal Radiotherapy Facilitates the Delivery of Concurrent Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy: A Case of Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumour of the Chest Wall

    PubMed Central

    Twyman, N.; Earl, H. M.; Burnet, N. G.

    2000-01-01

    We illustrate the principle of conformal radiotherapy by discussing the case of a patient with a primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the chest wall. Recent advances in radiotherapy planning enable precise localization of the planning target volume (PTV) and normal organs at risk of irradiation. Customized blocks are subsequently designed to produce a treatment field that ‘conforms’ to the PTV. The use of conformal radiotherapy (CRT) in this case facilitated the delivery of concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy by significantly reducing the volume of red marrow irradiated.The lack of acute and late toxicities was attributed to optimal exclusion of normal tissues from the treatment field, made possible by CRT. PMID:18521292

  7. Outcomes of high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy alone with 1 cm planning target volume posterior margin for localized prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinically localized prostate cancer may be treated by different approaches of radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to report the results of disease control and toxicity in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with high dose IMRT alone with 1 cm PTV posterior margin. Methods From September 2001 to April 2008, 140 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with definitive IMRT (dose ≥ 74 Gy) without hormone therapy. Outcomes were measured from the conclusion of radiotherapy. Biochemical failure was defined as PSA nadir + 2.0 ng/dL. Toxicities were assessed using the NCI-CTCAE-version 3.0. Median follow-up was 58 months. Results Biochemical failure occurred in 13.6% of patients. Actuarial 5-year biochemical control rates were 91.7%, 82.5% and 85.9% for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk patients, respectively. Stage T2 patients presented a risk of biochemical failure almost three times higher than stage T1 (RR = 2.91; 95% CI: 1.04; 8.17). Distant metastases occurred in 3 (2%) patients. Five-year metastasis-free and overall survivals were 96% and 97.5%, respectively. Late grade 3 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity rates were, respectively, 1.6% and 3%. Conclusion High-dose IMRT alone with 1 cm posterior PTV margin was effective and safe for patients with localized prostate cancer. PMID:24314072

  8. {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography-Based Radiotherapy Target Volume Definition in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Delineation by Radiation Oncologists vs. Joint Outlining With a PET Radiologist?

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, Gerard G.; Carson, Kathryn J.; Lynch, Tom; McAleese, Jonathan; Cosgrove, Vivian P.; Eakin, Ruth L.; Stewart, David P.; Zatari, Ashraf; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) has benefits in target volume (TV) definition in radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC); however, an optimal protocol for TV delineation has not been determined. We investigate volumetric and positional variation in gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation using a planning PET/CT among three radiation oncologists and a PET radiologist. Methods and Materials: RTP PET/CT scans were performed on 28 NSCLC patients (Stage IA-IIIB) of which 14 patients received prior induction chemotherapy. Three radiation oncologists and one PET radiologist working with a fourth radiation oncologist independently delineated the GTV on CT alone (GTV{sub CT}) and on fused PET/CT images (GTV{sub PETCT}). The mean percentage volume change (PVC) between GTV{sub CT} and GTV{sub PETCT} for the radiation oncologists and the PVC between GTV{sub CT} and GTV{sub PETCT} for the PET radiologist were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Concordance index (CI) was used to assess both positional and volume change between GTV{sub CT} and GTV{sub PETCT} in a single measurement. Results: For all patients, a significant difference in PVC from GTV{sub CT} to GTV{sub PETCT} exists between the radiation oncologist (median, 5.9%), and the PET radiologist (median, -0.4%, p = 0.001). However, no significant difference in median concordance index (comparing GTV{sub CT} and GTV{sub FUSED} for individual cases) was observed (PET radiologist = 0.73; radiation oncologists = 0.66; p = 0.088). Conclusions: Percentage volume changes from GTV{sub CT} to GTV{sub PETCT} were lower for the PET radiologist than for the radiation oncologists, suggesting a lower impact of PET/CT in TV delineation for the PET radiologist than for the oncologists. Guidelines are needed to standardize the use of PET/CT for TV delineation in RTP.

  9. Association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury after intensity-modulated radiotherapy in lung cancer: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinmei; Hong, Jinsheng; Zou, Xi; Lv, Wenlong; Guo, Feibao; Hong, Hualan; Zhang, Weijian

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between absolute volumes of lung spared from low-dose irradiation and radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) after intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for lung cancer. The normal lung relative volumes receiving greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (V5-30) mean lung dose (MLD), and absolute volumes spared from greater than 5, 10, 20 and 30 Gy (AVS5-30) for the bilateral and ipsilateral lungs of 83 patients were recorded. Any association of clinical factors and dose-volume parameters with Grade ≥2 RILI was analyzed. The median follow-up was 12.3 months; 18 (21.7%) cases of Grade 2 RILI, seven (8.4%) of Grade 3 and two (2.4%) of Grade 4 were observed. Univariate analysis revealed the located lobe of the primary tumor. V5, V10, V20, MLD of the ipsilateral lung, V5, V10, V20, V30 and MLD of the bilateral lung, and AVS5 and AVS10 of the ipsilateral lung were associated with Grade ≥2 RILI (P < 0.05). Multivariate analysis indicated AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung was prognostic for Grade ≥2 RILI (P = 0.010, OR = 0.272, 95% CI: 0.102-0.729). Receiver operating characteristic curves indicated Grade ≥2 RILI could be predicted using AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung (area under curve, 0.668; cutoff value, 564.9 cm(3); sensitivity, 60.7%; specificity, 70.4%). The incidence of Grade ≥2 RILI was significantly lower with AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung ≥564.9 cm(3) than with AVS5 < 564.9 cm(3) (P = 0.008). Low-dose irradiation relative volumes and MLD of the bilateral or ipsilateral lung were associated with Grade ≥2 RILI, and AVS5 of the ipsilateral lung was prognostic for Grade ≥2 RILI for lung cancer after IMRT. PMID:26454068

  10. Imaging in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calandrino, R.; Del Maschio, A.; Cattaneo, G. M.; Castiglioni, I.

    2009-09-01

    The diagnostic methodologies used for the radiotherapy planning have undergone great developments in the last 30 years. Since the 1980s, after the introduction of the CT scanner, the modality for the planning moved beyond the planar 2D assessment to approach a real and more realistic volumetric 3D definition. Consequently the dose distribution, previously obtained by means of an overly simple approximation, became increasingly complex, better tailoring the true shape of the tumour. The final therapeutic improvement has been obtained by a parallel increase in the complexity of the irradiating units: the Linacs for therapy have, in fact, been equipped with a full accessory set capable to modulate the fluence (IMRT) and to check the correct target position continuously during the therapy session (IMRT-IGRT). The multimodal diagnostic approach, which integrates diagnostic information, from images of the patient taken with CT, NMR, PET and US, further improves the data for a biological and topological optimization of the radiotherapy plan and consequently of the dose distribution in the Planning Target Volume. Proteomic and genomic analysis will be the next step in tumour diagnosis. These methods will provide the planners with further information, for a true personalization of the treatment regimen and the assessment of the predictive essays for each tumour and each patient.

  11. Communications and Public Opinion: A Public Opinion Quarterly Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Robert O., Ed.

    The phenomenon of the close relationship between communication and public opinion is shown in this book to have played a major role historically in the measurement of support for political policies, officials, and candidates. The communications media influence public opinion and are subject to it; yet the precise nature and definition of public…

  12. Coregistration of Prechemotherapy PET-CT for Planning Pediatric Hodgkin's Disease Radiotherapy Significantly Diminishes Interobserver Variability of Clinical Target Volume Definition

    SciTech Connect

    Metwally, Hussein; Courbon, Frederic; David, Isabelle; Filleron, Thomas; Blouet, Aurelien; Rives, Michel; Izar, Francoise; Zerdoud, Slimane; Plat, Genevieve; Vial, Julie; Robert, Alain; Laprie, Anne

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the interobserver variability in clinical target volume (CTV) definitions when using registered {sup 18}F-labeled deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET-CT) versus side-by-side image sets in pediatric Hodgkin's disease (HD). Methods and Materials: Prechemotherapy FDG-PET-CT scans performed in the treatment position were acquired from 20 children (median age, 14 years old) with HD (stages 2A to 4B) and registered with postchemotherapy planning CT scans. The patients had a median age of 14 years and stages of disease ranging between 2A and 4B. Image sets were coregistered using a semiautomatic coregistration system. The biological target volume was defined on all the coregistered images as a guide to defining the initial site of involvement and to avoid false-positive or negative results. Five radiation oncologists independently defined the CTV for all 20 patients: once using separate FDG-PET-CT images as a guide (not registered) to define CTVa and once using the registered FDG-PET-CT data to define CTVb. The total volumes were compared, as well as their coefficients of variation (COV). To assess the interobserver variability, the percentages of intersection between contours drawn by all observers for each patient were calculated for CTVa and for CTVb. Results: The registration of a prechemotherapy FDG-PET-CT scan caused a change in the CTV for all patients. Comparing CTVa with CTVb showed that the mean CTVb increased in 14 patients (range, 0.61%-101.96%) and decreased in 6 patients (range, 2.97%-37.26%). The COV for CTVb significantly decreased for each patient; the mean COVs for CTVa and CTVb were 45% (21%-65%) and 32% (13%-57%), respectively (p = 0.0004). The percentage of intersection among all CTVbs for the five observers increased significantly by 89.77% (1.99%-256.41%) compared to that of CTVa (p = 0.0001). Conclusions: High observer variability can occur during CT-based definition of CTVs for children diagnosed with HD

  13. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Primary Lung Cancer at a Dose of 50 Gy Total in Five Fractions to the Periphery of the Planning Target Volume Calculated Using a Superposition Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Kunieda, Etsuo Ohashi, Toshio; Oku, Yohei; Takeda, Toshiaki; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Kubo, Atsushi

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively analyze the clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for patients with Stages 1A and 1B non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with curative intent between Dec 2001 and May 2007. All patients had histopathologically or cytologically confirmed disease, increased levels of tumor markers, and/or positive findings on fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography. Staging studies identified their disease as Stage 1A or 1B. Performance status was 2 or less according to World Health Organization guidelines in all cases. The prescribed dose of 50 Gy total in five fractions, calculated by using a superposition algorithm, was defined for the periphery of the planning target volume. Results: One hundred twenty-one patients underwent SBRT during the study period, and 63 were eligible for this analysis. Thirty-eight patients had Stage 1A (T1N0M0) and 25 had Stage 1B (T2N0M0). Forty-nine patients were not appropriate candidates for surgery because of chronic pulmonary disease. Median follow-up of these 49 patients was 31 months (range, 10-72 months). The 3-year local control, disease-free, and overall survival rates in patients with Stages 1A and 1B were 93% and 96% (p = 0.86), 76% and 77% (p = 0.83), and 90% and 63% (p = 0.09), respectively. No acute toxicity was observed. Grade 2 or higher radiation pneumonitis was experienced by 3 patients, and 1 of them had fatal bacterial pneumonia. Conclusions: The SBRT at 50 Gy total in five fractions to the periphery of the planning target volume calculated by using a superposition algorithm is feasible. High local control rates were achieved for both T2 and T1 tumors.

  14. Dosimetric Effects of Magnetic Resonance Imaging-assisted Radiotherapy Planning: Dose Optimization for Target Volumes at High Risk and Analytic Radiobiological Dose Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Suh, Tae Suk; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Park, Hae-Jin; Choe, Bo-Young; Hong, Semie

    2015-10-01

    Based on the assumption that apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) define high-risk clinical target volume (aCTVHR) in high-grade glioma in a cellularity-dependent manner, the dosimetric effects of aCTVHR-targeted dose optimization were evaluated in two intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images and ADC maps were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively to determine aCTVHR in a high-grade glioma with high cellularity. After confirming tumor malignancy using the average and minimum ADCs and ADC ratios, the aCTVHR with double- or triple-restricted water diffusion was defined on computed tomography images through image registration. Doses to the aCTVHR and CTV defined on T1-weighted MR images were optimized using a simultaneous integrated boost technique. The dosimetric benefits for CTVs and organs at risk (OARs) were compared using dose volume histograms and various biophysical indices in an ADC map-based IMRT (IMRTADC) plan and a conventional IMRT (IMRTconv) plan. The IMRTADC plan improved dose conformity up to 15 times, compared to the IMRTconv plan. It reduced the equivalent uniform doses in the visual system and brain stem by more than 10% and 16%, respectively. The ADC-based target differentiation and dose optimization may facilitate conformal dose distribution to the aCTVHR and OAR sparing in an IMRT plan. PMID:26425053

  15. [Hepatic tumors and radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Rio, E; Mornex, F; Peiffert, D; Huertas, A

    2016-09-01

    Recent technological developments led to develop the concept of focused liver radiation therapy. We must distinguish primary and secondary tumors as the indications are restricted and must be discussed as an alternative to surgical or medical treatments. For hepatocellular carcinoma 5 to 10cm (or more), a conformational radiation with or without intensity modulation is performed. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is being evaluated and is increasingly proposed as an alternative to radiofrequency ablative treatment for primary or secondary tumors (typically less than 5cm). Tumor (and liver) movements induced by respiratory motions must be taken into account. Strict dosimetric criteria must be met with particular attention to the dose-volume histograms to liver and the hollow organs, including cases of SBRT. PMID:27521035

  16. 5 CFR 2636.103 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advisory opinions. 2636.103 Section 2636... Advisory opinions. (a) Request for an advisory opinion. (1) An employee may request an advisory opinion... any provision contained in this part. (2) An advisory opinion may not be obtained for the purpose...

  17. 5 CFR 2636.103 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advisory opinions. 2636.103 Section 2636... Advisory opinions. (a) Request for an advisory opinion. (1) An employee may request an advisory opinion... any provision contained in this part. (2) An advisory opinion may not be obtained for the purpose...

  18. 5 CFR 2636.103 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Advisory opinions. 2636.103 Section 2636... Advisory opinions. (a) Request for an advisory opinion. (1) An employee may request an advisory opinion... any provision contained in this part. (2) An advisory opinion may not be obtained for the purpose...

  19. 5 CFR 2636.103 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advisory opinions. 2636.103 Section 2636... Advisory opinions. (a) Request for an advisory opinion. (1) An employee may request an advisory opinion... any provision contained in this part. (2) An advisory opinion may not be obtained for the purpose...

  20. A dose comparison of proton radiotherapy and photon radiotherapy for pediatric brain tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. Y.; Cho, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of photon radiotherapy and to compare the dose of treatment planning between proton radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for pediatric brain tumor patients. This study was conducted in five pediatric brain tumor patients who underwent craniospinal irradiation treatment from October 2013 to April 2014 in the hospital. The study compared organs at risk (OARs) by assessing the dose distribution of normal tissue from the proton plan and 3D-CRT. Furthermore, this study assessed the treatment plans by looking at the homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI). As a result, the study revealed OARs due to the small volume proton radiotherapy dose distribution in the normal tissue. Also, by comparing HI and CI between the 3D-CRT and proton radiotherapy plan, the study found that the dose of proton radiotherapy plan was homogenized. When conducting 3D-CRT and proton radiotherapy in a dose-volume histogram comparison, the dose of distribution turned out to be low. Consequently, proton radiotherapy is used for protecting the normal tissue, and is used in tumor tissue as a homogenized dose for effective treatment.

  1. [Role of 18FDG-PET/CT in the management and gross tumor volume definition for radiotherapy of head and neck cancer; single institution experiences based on long-term follow-up].

    PubMed

    Hideghéty, Katalin; Cserháti, Adrienne; Besenyi, Zsuzsanna; Zag, Levente; Gaál, Szilvia; Együd, Zsófia; Mózes, Petra; Szántó, Erika; Csenki, Melinda; Rusz, Orsolya; Varga, Zoltán; Dobi, Ágnes; Maráz, Anikó; Pávics, László; Lengyel, Zsolt

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of our work is evaluation of the impact of 18FDG-PET/CT on the complex management of locoregionally advanced (T3-4N1-3) head and neck squamous cell cancer (LAHNSC), and on the target definition for 3D conformal (3DCRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). 18FDG-PET/CT were performed on 185 patients with LAHNSC prior to radiotherapy/chemoradiation in the treatment position between 2006 and 2011. Prior to it 91 patients received induction chemotherapy (in 20 cases of these, baseline PET/CT was also available). The independently delineated CT-based gross tumor volume (GTVct) and PET/CT based ones (GTVpet) were compared. Impact of PET/CT on the treatment strategy, on tumor response evaluation to ICT, on GTV definition furthermore on overall and disease-specific survival (OS, DSS) was analysed. PET/CT revealed 10 head and neck, 2 lung cancers for 15 patients with carcinoma of unknown primary (CUP) while 3 remained unknown. Second tumors were detected in 8 (4.4%), distant metastasis in 15 (8.2%) cases. The difference between GTVct and GTVpet was significant (p=0.001). In 16 patients (14%) the GTVpet were larger than GTVct due to multifocal manifestations in the laryngo-pharyngeal regions (4 cases) or lymph node metastases (12 cases). In the majority of the cases (82 pts, 72%) PET/CT-based conturing resulted in remarkable decrease in the volume (15-20%: 4 cases, 20-50%: 46 cases, >50%: 32 cases). On the basis of the initial and post-ICT PET/CT comparison in 15/20 patients more than 50% volume reduction and in 6/20 cases complete response were achieved. After an average of 6.4 years of follow-up the OS (median: 18.3±2.6 months) and DSS (median: 25.0±4.0 months) exhibited close correlation (p=0.0001) to the GTVpet. In cases with GTVpet <10 cm3 prior to RT, DSS did not reach the median, the mean is 82.1±6.1 months, while in cases with GTVpet 10-40 cm3 the median of the DSS was 28.8±4.9 months (HR = 3.57; 95% CI: 1.5-8.3), and in those with GTVpet >40

  2. 38 CFR 20.901 - Rule 901. Medical opinions and opinions of the General Counsel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... opinions and opinions of the General Counsel. 20.901 Section 20.901 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... § 20.901 Rule 901. Medical opinions and opinions of the General Counsel. (a) Opinion from the Veterans... Pathology opinions. The Board may refer pathologic material to the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology...

  3. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances: Opinions and decisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with selected orders. Progress report, January 1, 1996--June 30, 1996. Volume 43, pages 1-358

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The hardbound edition of the Nuclear Regulatory Issuances is a final compilation of the monthly issuances. It includes all legal precedents for the agency within a six month period. This is the forty-third volume of issuances.

  4. Proton Radiotherapy for Liver Tumors: Dosimetric Advantages Over Photon Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaochun Krishnan, Sunil; Zhang Xiaodong; Dong Lei; Briere, Tina; Crane, Christopher H.; Martel, Mary; Gillin, Michael; Mohan, Radhe; Beddar, Sam

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to dosimetrically investigate the advantages of proton radiotherapy over photon radiotherapy for liver tumors. The proton plan and the photon plan were designed using commercial treatment planning systems. The treatment target dose conformity and heterogeneity and dose-volume analyses of normal structures were compared between proton and photon radiotherapy for 9 patients with liver tumors. Proton radiotherapy delivered a more conformal target dose with slightly less homogeneity when compared with photon radiotherapy. Protons significantly reduced the fractional volume of liver receiving dose greater or equal to 30 Gy (V{sub 30}) and the mean liver dose. The stomach and duodenal V{sub 45} were significantly lower with the use of proton radiotherapy. The V{sub 40} and V{sub 50} of the heart and the maximum spinal cord dose were also significantly lower with the use of proton radiotherapy. Protons were better able to spare one kidney completely and deliver less dose to one (generally the left) kidney than photons. The mean dose to the total body and most critical structures was significantly decreased using protons when compared to corresponding photon plans. In conclusion, our study suggests the dosimetric benefits of proton radiotherapy over photon radiotherapy. These dosimetric advantages of proton plans may permit further dose escalation with lower risk of complications.

  5. SU-E-J-182: A Feasibility Study Evaluating Automatic Identification of Gross Tumor Volume for Breast Cancer Radiotherapy Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C; Horton, J; Yin, F; Blitzblau, R; Palta, M; Chang, Z

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a computerized pharmacokinetic model-free Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) segmentation method based on dynamic contrastenhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) data that can improve physician GTV contouring efficiency. Methods: 12 patients with biopsy-proven early stage breast cancer with post-contrast enhanced DCE-MRI images were analyzed in this study. A fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering-based method was applied to segment 3D GTV from pre-operative DCE-MRI data. A region of interest (ROI) is selected by a clinician/physicist, and the normalized signal evolution curves were calculated by dividing the signal intensity enhancement value at each voxel by the pre-contrast signal intensity value at the corresponding voxel. Three semi-quantitative metrics were analyzed based on normalized signal evolution curves: initial Area Under signal evolution Curve (iAUC), Immediate Enhancement Ratio (IER), and Variance of Enhancement Slope (VES). The FCM algorithm wass applied to partition ROI voxels into GTV voxels and non-GTV voxels by using three analyzed metrics. The partition map for the smaller cluster is then generated and binarized with an automatically calculated threshold. To reduce spurious structures resulting from background, a labeling operation was performed to keep the largest three-dimensional connected component as the identified target. Basic morphological operations including hole-filling and spur removal were useutilized to improve the target smoothness. Each segmented GTV was compared to that drawn by experienced radiation oncologists. An agreement index was proposed to quantify the overlap between the GTVs identified using two approaches and a thershold value of 0.4 is regarded as acceptable. Results: The GTVs identified by the proposed method were overlapped with the ones drawn by radiation oncologists in all cases, and in 10 out of 12 cases, the agreement indices were above the threshold of 0.4. Conclusion: The proposed automatic segmentation method was shown to

  6. Contribution of FDOPA PET to radiotherapy planning for advanced glioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowson, Nicholas; Fay, Michael; Thomas, Paul; Jeffree, Rosalind; McDowall, Robert; Winter, Craig; Coulthard, Alan; Smith, Jye; Gal, Yaniv; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Salvado, Olivier; Crozier, Stuart; Rose, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Despite radical treatment with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, advanced gliomas recur within months. Geographic misses in radiotherapy planning may play a role in this seemingly ineluctable recurrence. Planning is typically performed on post-contrast MRIs, which are known to underreport tumour volume relative to FDOPA PET scans. FDOPA PET fused with contrast enhanced MRI has demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity than MRI alone. One sign of potential misses would be differences between gross target volumes (GTVs) defined using MRI alone and when fused with PET. This work examined whether such a discrepancy may occur. Materials and Methods: For six patients, a 75 minute PET scan using 3,4-dihydroxy-6-18F-fluoro-L-phynel-alanine (18F-FDOPA) was taken within 2 days of gadolinium enhanced MRI scans. In addition to standard radiotherapy planning by an experienced radiotherapy oncologist, a second gross target volume (GTV) was defined by an experienced nuclear medicine specialist for fused PET and MRI, while blinded to the radiotherapy plans. The volumes from standard radiotherapy planning were compared to the PET defined GTV. Results: The comparison indicated radiotherapy planning would change in several cases if FDOPA PET data was available. PET-defined contours were external to 95% prescribed dose for several patients. However, due to the radiotherapy margins, the discrepancies were relatively small in size and all received a dose of 50 Gray or more. Conclusions: Given the limited size of the discrepancies it is uncertain that geographic misses played a major role in patient outcome. Even so, the existence of discrepancies indicates that FDOPA PET could assist in better defining margins when planning radiotherapy for advanced glioma, which could be important for highly conformal radiotherapy plans.

  7. [Prophylactic axillary radiotherapy for breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Rivera, S; Louvel, G; Rivin Del Campo, E; Boros, A; Oueslati, H; Deutsch, É

    2015-06-01

    Adjuvant radiotherapy, after breast conserving surgery or mastectomy for breast cancer, improves overall survival while decreasing the risk of recurrence. However, prophylactic postoperative radiotherapy of locoregional lymph nodes for breast cancer, particularly of the axillary region, is still controversial since the benefits and the risks due to axillary irradiation have not been well defined. To begin with, when performing conformal radiotherapy, volume definition is crucial for the analysis of the risk-benefit balance of any radiation treatment. Definition and contouring of the axillary lymph node region is discussed in this work, as per the recommendations of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO). Axillary recurrences are rare, and the recent trend leads toward less aggressive surgery with regard to the axilla. In this literature review we present the data that lead us to avoid adjuvant axillary radiotherapy in pN0, pN0i+ and pN1mi patients even without axillary clearance and to perform it in some other situations. Finally, we propose an update about the potential toxicity of adjuvant axillary irradiation, which is essential for therapeutic decision-making based on current evidence, and to guide us in the evolution of our techniques and indications of axillary radiotherapy. PMID:26044178

  8. 24 CFR 1710.17 - Advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Advisory opinion. 1710.17 Section... Advisory opinion. (a) General. A developer may request an opinion from the Secretary as to whether an... requests for Advisory Opinions must be accompanied by the following: (1) A $500.00 filing fee submitted...

  9. 38 CFR 14.507 - Opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Opinions. 14.507 Section... COUNSEL, AND MISCELLANEOUS CLAIMS § 14.507 Opinions. (a) A written legal opinion of the General Counsel... been a material change in controlling statute or regulation, a superseding written legal opinion by...

  10. 39 CFR 310.6 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Advisory opinions. 310.6 Section 310.6 Postal... PRIVATE EXPRESS STATUTES § 310.6 Advisory opinions. An advisory opinion on any question arising under this..., 475 L'Enfant Plaza SW., Washington, DC 20260-1100. A numbered series of advisory opinions is...

  11. 39 CFR 310.6 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Advisory opinions. 310.6 Section 310.6 Postal... PRIVATE EXPRESS STATUTES § 310.6 Advisory opinions. An advisory opinion on any question arising under this..., 475 L'Enfant Plaza SW., Washington, DC 20260-1100. A numbered series of advisory opinions is...

  12. 24 CFR 1710.17 - Advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Advisory opinion. 1710.17 Section... Advisory opinion. (a) General. A developer may request an opinion from the Secretary as to whether an... requests for Advisory Opinions must be accompanied by the following: (1) A $500.00 filing fee submitted...

  13. 19 CFR 210.79 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Advisory opinions. 210.79 Section 210.79 Customs... ADJUDICATION AND ENFORCEMENT Enforcement Procedures and Advisory Opinions § 210.79 Advisory opinions. (a) Advisory opinions. Upon request of any person, the Commission may, upon such investigation as it...

  14. 5 CFR 1800.3 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advisory opinions. 1800.3 Section 1800.3... opinions. The Special Counsel is authorized to issue advisory opinions only about political activity of..., subchapter III). A person can seek an advisory opinion from OSC by any of the following methods: (a) By...

  15. 5 CFR 2638.313 - Agency opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Agency opinions. 2638.313 Section 2638... AND EXECUTIVE AGENCY ETHICS PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITIES Formal Advisory Opinion Service § 2638.313 Agency opinions. If the designated agency ethics official issues a written opinion concerning the application...

  16. 38 CFR 14.507 - Opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Opinions. 14.507 Section... COUNSEL, AND MISCELLANEOUS CLAIMS § 14.507 Opinions. (a) A written legal opinion of the General Counsel... been a material change in controlling statute or regulation, a superseding written legal opinion by...

  17. 19 CFR 210.79 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Advisory opinions. 210.79 Section 210.79 Customs... ADJUDICATION AND ENFORCEMENT Enforcement Procedures and Advisory Opinions § 210.79 Advisory opinions. (a) Advisory opinions. Upon request of any person, the Commission may, upon such investigation as it...

  18. 5 CFR 2638.313 - Agency opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Agency opinions. 2638.313 Section 2638... AND EXECUTIVE AGENCY ETHICS PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITIES Formal Advisory Opinion Service § 2638.313 Agency opinions. If the designated agency ethics official issues a written opinion concerning the application...

  19. 5 CFR 1800.3 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Advisory opinions. 1800.3 Section 1800.3... opinions. The Special Counsel is authorized to issue advisory opinions only about political activity of..., subchapter III). A person can seek an advisory opinion from OSC by any of the following methods: (a) By...

  20. 19 CFR 210.79 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Advisory opinions. 210.79 Section 210.79 Customs... ADJUDICATION AND ENFORCEMENT Enforcement Procedures and Advisory Opinions § 210.79 Advisory opinions. (a) Advisory opinions. Upon request of any person, the Commission may, upon such investigation as it...

  1. 12 CFR 1010.17 - Advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advisory opinion. 1010.17 Section 1010.17 Banks... Requirements § 1010.17 Advisory opinion. (a) General. A developer may request an opinion from the Director as...) Requirements. All requests for Advisory Opinions must be accompanied by the following: (1) A $500.00 filing...

  2. 39 CFR 310.6 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Advisory opinions. 310.6 Section 310.6 Postal... PRIVATE EXPRESS STATUTES § 310.6 Advisory opinions. An advisory opinion on any question arising under this..., 475 L'Enfant Plaza SW., Washington, DC 20260-1100. A numbered series of advisory opinions is...

  3. 39 CFR 310.6 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Advisory opinions. 310.6 Section 310.6 Postal... PRIVATE EXPRESS STATUTES § 310.6 Advisory opinions. An advisory opinion on any question arising under this..., 475 L'Enfant Plaza SW., Washington, DC 20260-1100. A numbered series of advisory opinions is...

  4. 5 CFR 2638.313 - Agency opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Agency opinions. 2638.313 Section 2638... AND EXECUTIVE AGENCY ETHICS PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITIES Formal Advisory Opinion Service § 2638.313 Agency opinions. If the designated agency ethics official issues a written opinion concerning the application...

  5. 38 CFR 14.507 - Opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Opinions. 14.507 Section... COUNSEL, AND MISCELLANEOUS CLAIMS § 14.507 Opinions. (a) A written legal opinion of the General Counsel... been a material change in controlling statute or regulation, a superseding written legal opinion by...

  6. 38 CFR 14.507 - Opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Opinions. 14.507 Section... COUNSEL, AND MISCELLANEOUS CLAIMS § 14.507 Opinions. (a) A written legal opinion of the General Counsel... been a material change in controlling statute or regulation, a superseding written legal opinion by...

  7. 5 CFR 1800.3 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advisory opinions. 1800.3 Section 1800.3... opinions. The Special Counsel is authorized to issue advisory opinions only about political activity of..., subchapter III). A person can seek an advisory opinion from OSC by any of the following methods: (a) By...

  8. 5 CFR 2638.313 - Agency opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Agency opinions. 2638.313 Section 2638... AND EXECUTIVE AGENCY ETHICS PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITIES Formal Advisory Opinion Service § 2638.313 Agency opinions. If the designated agency ethics official issues a written opinion concerning the application...

  9. 5 CFR 2638.313 - Agency opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Agency opinions. 2638.313 Section 2638... AND EXECUTIVE AGENCY ETHICS PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITIES Formal Advisory Opinion Service § 2638.313 Agency opinions. If the designated agency ethics official issues a written opinion concerning the application...

  10. 19 CFR 210.79 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Advisory opinions. 210.79 Section 210.79 Customs... ADJUDICATION AND ENFORCEMENT Enforcement Procedures and Advisory Opinions § 210.79 Advisory opinions. (a) Advisory opinions. Upon request of any person, the Commission may, upon such investigation as it...

  11. 12 CFR 1010.17 - Advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advisory opinion. 1010.17 Section 1010.17 Banks... Requirements § 1010.17 Advisory opinion. (a) General. A developer may request an opinion from the Director as...) Requirements. All requests for Advisory Opinions must be accompanied by the following: (1) A $500.00 filing...

  12. 12 CFR 1010.17 - Advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Advisory opinion. 1010.17 Section 1010.17 Banks... Requirements § 1010.17 Advisory opinion. (a) General. A developer may request an opinion from the Director as...) Requirements. All requests for Advisory Opinions must be accompanied by the following: (1) A $500.00 filing...

  13. 39 CFR 310.6 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Advisory opinions. 310.6 Section 310.6 Postal... PRIVATE EXPRESS STATUTES § 310.6 Advisory opinions. An advisory opinion on any question arising under this..., 475 L'Enfant Plaza SW., Washington, DC 20260-1100. A numbered series of advisory opinions is...

  14. 24 CFR 1710.17 - Advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Advisory opinion. 1710.17 Section... Advisory opinion. (a) General. A developer may request an opinion from the Secretary as to whether an... requests for Advisory Opinions must be accompanied by the following: (1) A $500.00 filing fee submitted...

  15. 5 CFR 1800.3 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advisory opinions. 1800.3 Section 1800.3... opinions. The Special Counsel is authorized to issue advisory opinions only about political activity of..., subchapter III). A person can seek an advisory opinion from OSC by any of the following methods: (a) By...

  16. 19 CFR 210.79 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Advisory opinions. 210.79 Section 210.79 Customs... ADJUDICATION AND ENFORCEMENT Enforcement Procedures and Advisory Opinions § 210.79 Advisory opinions. (a) Advisory opinions. Upon request of any person, the Commission may, upon such investigation as it...

  17. 5 CFR 1800.3 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advisory opinions. 1800.3 Section 1800.3... opinions. The Special Counsel is authorized to issue advisory opinions only about political activity of..., subchapter III). A person can seek an advisory opinion from OSC by any of the following methods: (a) By...

  18. 24 CFR 1710.17 - Advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Advisory opinion. 1710.17 Section... Advisory opinion. (a) General. A developer may request an opinion from the Secretary as to whether an... requests for Advisory Opinions must be accompanied by the following: (1) A $500.00 filing fee submitted...

  19. 38 CFR 14.507 - Opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Opinions. 14.507 Section... COUNSEL, AND MISCELLANEOUS CLAIMS § 14.507 Opinions. (a) A written legal opinion of the General Counsel... been a material change in controlling statute or regulation, a superseding written legal opinion by...

  20. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, K.M.; Doyle, B.L.

    1996-08-20

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue. 25 figs.

  1. Ion-induced nuclear radiotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Horn, Kevin M.; Doyle, Barney L.

    1996-01-01

    Ion-induced Nuclear Radiotherapy (INRT) is a technique for conducting radiosurgery and radiotherapy with a very high degree of control over the spatial extent of the irradiated volume and the delivered dose. Based upon the concept that low energy, ion induced atomic and nuclear reactions can be used to produce highly energetic reaction products at the site of a tumor, the INRT technique is implemented through the use of a conduit-needle or tube which conducts a low energy ion beam to a position above or within the intended treatment area. At the end of the conduit-needle or tube is a specially fabricated target which, only when struck by the ion beam, acts as a source of energetic radiation products. The inherent limitations in the energy, and therefore range, of the resulting reaction products limits the spatial extent of irradiation to a pre-defined volume about the point of reaction. Furthermore, since no damage is done to tissue outside this irradiated volume, the delivered dose may be made arbitrarily large. INRT may be used both as a point-source of radiation at the site of a small tumor, or as a topical bath of radiation to broad areas of diseased tissue.

  2. Opinion Dynamics with Confirmation Bias

    PubMed Central

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Galstyan, Aram

    2014-01-01

    Background Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science. Methodology/Principal Findings We formulate a (non-Bayesian) model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect–when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preference is given to the last opinion (recency) or the first opinion (primacy) –and relates recency to confirmation bias. Finally, we study the model in the case of repeated persuasion and analyze its convergence properties. Conclusions The standard Bayesian approach to probabilistic opinion revision is inadequate for describing the observed phenomenology of persuasion process. The simple non-Bayesian model proposed here does agree with this phenomenology and is capable of reproducing a spectrum of effects observed in psychology: primacy-recency phenomenon, boomerang effect and cognitive dissonance. We point out several limitations of the model that should motivate its future development. PMID:25007078

  3. [Radiotherapy for Thyroid Cancer].

    PubMed

    Jingu, Keiichi; Maruoka, Shin; Umezawa, Rei; Takahashi, Noriyoshi

    2015-06-01

    Radioactive 131I therapy for differentiated thyroid cancer has been used since the 1940s and is an established and effective treatment. In contrast, external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was considered to be effective for achieving local control but not for prolonging survival. Although clinicians were hesitant to administer EBRT owing to the potential radiation-induced adverse effects of 2 dimensional (2D)-radiotherapy until 2000, it is expected that adverse effects will be reduced and treatment efficacy improved through the introduction of more advanced techniques for delivering radiation (eg, 3D-radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiotherapy [IMRT]). The prognosis of undifferentiated thyroid cancer is known to be extremely bad, although in very rare cases, multimodality therapy (total or subtotal resection, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy) has allowed long-term survival. Here, we report the preliminary results of using hypofractionated radiotherapy for undifferentiated thyroid cancer in our institution. PMID:26199238

  4. Quality Assurance in Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mckenzie, Alan

    A common feature of the Radiotherapy Centres where there have been major accidents involving incorrect radiotherapy treatment is that they did not operate good Quality Assurance systems. A Quality Assurance system is sometimes called a Quality Management system, and it is designed to give assurance that quality standards are being met. One of the "spin offs" from operating a Quality Management system is that it reduces the likelihood of a radiotherapy accident. A detailed account of how to set up a quality system in radiotherapy has been given in an ESTRO booklet.2

  5. Community Size, Perceptions of Majority Opinion and Opinion Expression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Charles T.; Oshagan, Hayg

    A study examined structural determinants of opinion expression by merging two theoretical perspectives: the "spiral of silence" model advanced by Elisabeth Noelle-Neumann, and the structural approach to communication research offered by Phillip Tichenor, George Donohue, and Clarice Olien. The study also distinguished between different forms of…

  6. Antiproton radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bassler, Niels; Alsner, Jan; Beyer, Gerd; DeMarco, John J; Doser, Michael; Hajdukovic, Dragan; Hartley, Oliver; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Jäkel, Oliver; Knudsen, Helge V; Kovacevic, Sandra; Møller, Søren Pape; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B; Solberg, Timothy D; Sørensen, Brita S; Vranjes, Sanja; Wouters, Bradly G; Holzscheiter, Michael H

    2008-01-01

    Antiprotons are interesting as a possible future modality in radiation therapy for the following reasons: When fast antiprotons penetrate matter, protons and antiprotons have near identical stopping powers and exhibit equal radiobiology well before the Bragg-peak. But when the antiprotons come to rest at the Bragg-peak, they annihilate, releasing almost 2 GeV per antiproton-proton annihilation. Most of this energy is carried away by energetic pions, but the Bragg-peak of the antiprotons is still locally augmented with approximately 20-30 MeV per antiproton. Apart from the gain in physical dose, an increased relative biological effect also has been observed, which can be explained by the fact that some of the secondary particles from the antiproton annihilation exhibit high-LET properties. Finally, the weakly interacting energetic pions, which are leaving the target volume, may provide a real time feedback on the exact location of the annihilation peak. We have performed dosimetry experiments and investigated the radiobiological properties using the antiproton beam available at CERN, Geneva. Dosimetry experiments were carried out with ionization chambers, alanine pellets and radiochromic film. Radiobiological experiments were done with V79 WNRE Chinese hamster cells. The radiobiological experiments were repeated with protons and carbon ions at TRIUMF and GSI, respectively, for comparison. Several Monte Carlo particle transport codes were investigated and compared with our experimental data obtained at CERN. The code that matched our data best was used to generate a set of depth dose data at several energies, including secondary particle-energy spectra. This can be used as base data for a treatment planning software such as TRiP. Our findings from the CERN experiments indicate that the biological effect of antiprotons in the plateau region may be reduced by a factor of 4 for the same biological target dose in a spread-out Bragg-peak, when comparing with protons. The

  7. National Opinion Poll: Education, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bositis, David A.

    In 2002, a national opinion poll of 2,463 U.S. adults examined such topics as politics, education, crime and criminal justice policy, globalization, international relations, and race relations. The education poll focused on such issues as school quality, school safety, school vouchers, school violence, and same-sex education. The survey sample…

  8. A Survey of Student Opinion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroll, Herman M.

    An important area of concern to university faculties and administrators is the effect upon students of the college environment. Are students pleased or dissatisfied? What is the source of their approval or dissatisfaction? The University of Wisconsin Center System sponsored a comprehensive system-wide survey of student opinion in 1975 for the…

  9. Opinion: Writing for the Public

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Mike

    2010-01-01

    For the past twenty years or so, the author has been fortunate to write for a fairly broad audience. While he was teaching, or running an educational program, or doing research, he was also composing opinion pieces or commentaries about the work he was doing. This process of writing with part of his attention on the classroom or research site and…

  10. Student Opinion of Tutorial CAL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiting, John

    1986-01-01

    Describes program design and presents undergraduate students' opinions of computer tutorial--"GROWTH"--used to replace teachers in mastery learning experience. Student reactions were favorable to the program, which stimulated small tutorial group formation. Although females and younger students had more difficulty answering program questions, they…

  11. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules. PMID:27522189

  12. Planning National Radiotherapy Services

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Countries, states, and island nations often need forward planning of their radiotherapy services driven by different motives. Countries without radiotherapy services sponsor patients to receive radiotherapy abroad. They often engage professionals for a feasibility study in order to establish whether it would be more cost-beneficial to establish a radiotherapy facility. Countries where radiotherapy services have developed without any central planning, find themselves in situations where many of the available centers are private and thus inaccessible for a majority of patients with limited resources. Government may decide to plan ahead when a significant exodus of cancer patients travel to another country for treatment, thus exposing the failure of the country to provide this medical service for its citizens. In developed countries, the trigger has been the existence of highly visible waiting lists for radiotherapy revealing a shortage of radiotherapy equipment. This paper suggests that there should be a systematic and comprehensive process of long-term planning of radiotherapy services at the national level, taking into account the regulatory infrastructure for radiation protection, planning of centers, equipment, staff, education programs, quality assurance, and sustainability aspects. Realistic budgetary and cost considerations must also be part of the project proposal or business plan. PMID:25505730

  13. Phase transitions in Nowak Sznajd opinion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wołoszyn, Maciej; Stauffer, Dietrich; Kułakowski, Krzysztof

    2007-05-01

    The Nowak modification of the Sznajd opinion dynamics model on the square lattice assumes that with probability β the opinions flip due to mass-media advertising from down to up, and vice versa. Besides, with probability α the Sznajd rule applies that a neighbour pair agreeing in its two opinions convinces all its six neighbours of that opinion. Our Monte Carlo simulations and mean-field theory find sharp phase transitions in the parameter space.

  14. Dosimetric Study of Current Treatment Options for Radiotherapy in Retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Eldebawy, Eman; Parker, William; Abdel Rahman, Wamied; Freeman, Carolyn R.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine the best treatment technique for patients with retinoblastoma requiring radiotherapy to the whole eye. Methods and Materials: Treatment plans for 3 patients with retinoblastoma were developed using 10 radiotherapy techniques including electron beams, photon beam wedge pair (WP), photon beam three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), fixed gantry intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), photon volumetric arc therapy (VMAT), fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy (HT). Dose-volume analyses were carried out for each technique. Results: All techniques provided similar target coverage; conformity was highest for VMAT, nine-field (9F) IMRT, and HT (conformity index [CI] = 1.3) and lowest for the WP and two electron techniques (CI = 1.8). The electron techniques had the highest planning target volume dose gradient (131% of maximum dose received [D{sub max}]), and the CRT techniques had the lowest (103% D{sub max}) gradient. The volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V{sub 20Gy}) for the ipsilateral bony orbit was lowest for the VMAT and HT techniques (56%) and highest for the CRT techniques (90%). Generally, the electron beam techniques were superior in terms of brain sparing and delivered approximately one-third of the integral dose of the photon techniques. Conclusions: Inverse planned image-guided radiotherapy delivered using HT or VMAT gives better conformity index, improved orbital bone and brain sparing, and a lower integral dose than other techniques.

  15. Opinion formation with upper and lower bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Ryosuke; Martin, Arnaud

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the opinion formation with upper and lower bounds. We formulate the binary exchange of opinions between two peoples under the second (or political) party using the relativistic inelastic-Boltzmann-Vlasov equation with randomly perturbed motion. In this paper, we discuss the relativistic effects on the opinion formation of peoples from the standpoint of the relativistic kinetic theory.

  16. Opinion Expression as a Rational Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sei-Hill

    This study looks at individuals' opinion expressions as a rational behavior based on a conscious calculus of expected benefits and costs (economic analysis). The influences of "issue benefit,""opinion congruence," and "issue knowledge," as sources of benefits and costs on opinion expression were hypothesized and tested. The study also examined the…

  17. 22 CFR 1429.10 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Advisory opinions. 1429.10 Section 1429.10... AND GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Miscellaneous § 1429.10 Advisory opinions. The Board and the General Counsel will not issue advisory opinions....

  18. 22 CFR 1429.10 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Advisory opinions. 1429.10 Section 1429.10... AND GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Miscellaneous § 1429.10 Advisory opinions. The Board and the General Counsel will not issue advisory opinions....

  19. 5 CFR 2429.10 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advisory opinions. 2429.10 Section 2429.10 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY, GENERAL COUNSEL OF THE FEDERAL LABOR....10 Advisory opinions. The Authority and the General Counsel will not issue advisory opinions....

  20. 21 CFR 10.85 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Advisory opinions. 10.85 Section 10.85 Food and... PRACTICES AND PROCEDURES General Administrative Procedures § 10.85 Advisory opinions. (a) An interested person may request an advisory opinion from the Commissioner on a matter of general applicability....

  1. 21 CFR 808.5 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Advisory opinions. 808.5 Section 808.5 Food and... Advisory opinions. (a) Any State, political subdivision, or other interested person may request an advisory opinion from the Commissioner with respect to any general matter concerning preemption of State or...

  2. 21 CFR 12.83 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Advisory opinions. 12.83 Section 12.83 Food and... PUBLIC HEARING Hearing Procedures § 12.83 Advisory opinions. Before or during a hearing, a person may, under § 10.85, request the Commissioner for an advisory opinion on whether any regulation or order...

  3. 22 CFR 1429.10 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Advisory opinions. 1429.10 Section 1429.10... AND GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Miscellaneous § 1429.10 Advisory opinions. The Board and the General Counsel will not issue advisory opinions....

  4. 5 CFR 2429.10 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Advisory opinions. 2429.10 Section 2429.10 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY, GENERAL COUNSEL OF THE FEDERAL LABOR....10 Advisory opinions. The Authority and the General Counsel will not issue advisory opinions....

  5. 13 CFR 134.303 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advisory opinions. 134.303 Section... and NAICS Code Designations § 134.303 Advisory opinions. The Office of Hearings and Appeals does not issue advisory opinions....

  6. 13 CFR 134.303 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advisory opinions. 134.303 Section... and NAICS Code Designations § 134.303 Advisory opinions. The Office of Hearings and Appeals does not issue advisory opinions....

  7. 21 CFR 808.5 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Advisory opinions. 808.5 Section 808.5 Food and... Advisory opinions. (a) Any State, political subdivision, or other interested person may request an advisory opinion from the Commissioner with respect to any general matter concerning preemption of State or...

  8. 13 CFR 134.303 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advisory opinions. 134.303 Section... and NAICS Code Designations § 134.303 Advisory opinions. The Office of Hearings and Appeals does not issue advisory opinions....

  9. 21 CFR 808.5 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Advisory opinions. 808.5 Section 808.5 Food and... Advisory opinions. (a) Any State, political subdivision, or other interested person may request an advisory opinion from the Commissioner with respect to any general matter concerning preemption of State or...

  10. 5 CFR 2429.10 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advisory opinions. 2429.10 Section 2429.10 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY, GENERAL COUNSEL OF THE FEDERAL LABOR....10 Advisory opinions. The Authority and the General Counsel will not issue advisory opinions....

  11. 21 CFR 10.85 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Advisory opinions. 10.85 Section 10.85 Food and... PRACTICES AND PROCEDURES General Administrative Procedures § 10.85 Advisory opinions. (a) An interested person may request an advisory opinion from the Commissioner on a matter of general applicability....

  12. 5 CFR 2429.10 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advisory opinions. 2429.10 Section 2429.10 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY, GENERAL COUNSEL OF THE FEDERAL LABOR....10 Advisory opinions. The Authority and the General Counsel will not issue advisory opinions....

  13. 13 CFR 134.303 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advisory opinions. 134.303 Section... and NAICS Code Designations § 134.303 Advisory opinions. The Office of Hearings and Appeals does not issue advisory opinions....

  14. 21 CFR 10.85 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Advisory opinions. 10.85 Section 10.85 Food and... PRACTICES AND PROCEDURES General Administrative Procedures § 10.85 Advisory opinions. (a) An interested person may request an advisory opinion from the Commissioner on a matter of general applicability....

  15. 21 CFR 10.85 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Advisory opinions. 10.85 Section 10.85 Food and... PRACTICES AND PROCEDURES General Administrative Procedures § 10.85 Advisory opinions. (a) An interested person may request an advisory opinion from the Commissioner on a matter of general applicability....

  16. 21 CFR 12.83 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Advisory opinions. 12.83 Section 12.83 Food and... PUBLIC HEARING Hearing Procedures § 12.83 Advisory opinions. Before or during a hearing, a person may, under § 10.85, request the Commissioner for an advisory opinion on whether any regulation or order...

  17. 21 CFR 12.83 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Advisory opinions. 12.83 Section 12.83 Food and... PUBLIC HEARING Hearing Procedures § 12.83 Advisory opinions. Before or during a hearing, a person may, under § 10.85, request the Commissioner for an advisory opinion on whether any regulation or order...

  18. 21 CFR 12.83 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Advisory opinions. 12.83 Section 12.83 Food and... PUBLIC HEARING Hearing Procedures § 12.83 Advisory opinions. Before or during a hearing, a person may, under § 10.85, request the Commissioner for an advisory opinion on whether any regulation or order...

  19. 22 CFR 1429.10 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Advisory opinions. 1429.10 Section 1429.10... AND GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Miscellaneous § 1429.10 Advisory opinions. The Board and the General Counsel will not issue advisory opinions....

  20. 5 CFR 2429.10 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advisory opinions. 2429.10 Section 2429.10 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY, GENERAL COUNSEL OF THE FEDERAL LABOR....10 Advisory opinions. The Authority and the General Counsel will not issue advisory opinions....

  1. 21 CFR 12.83 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Advisory opinions. 12.83 Section 12.83 Food and... PUBLIC HEARING Hearing Procedures § 12.83 Advisory opinions. Before or during a hearing, a person may, under § 10.85, request the Commissioner for an advisory opinion on whether any regulation or order...

  2. 21 CFR 808.5 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Advisory opinions. 808.5 Section 808.5 Food and... Advisory opinions. (a) Any State, political subdivision, or other interested person may request an advisory opinion from the Commissioner with respect to any general matter concerning preemption of State or...

  3. 21 CFR 808.5 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Advisory opinions. 808.5 Section 808.5 Food and... Advisory opinions. (a) Any State, political subdivision, or other interested person may request an advisory opinion from the Commissioner with respect to any general matter concerning preemption of State or...

  4. 13 CFR 134.303 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Advisory opinions. 134.303 Section... and NAICS Code Designations § 134.303 Advisory opinions. The Office of Hearings and Appeals does not issue advisory opinions....

  5. 21 CFR 10.85 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Advisory opinions. 10.85 Section 10.85 Food and... PRACTICES AND PROCEDURES General Administrative Procedures § 10.85 Advisory opinions. (a) An interested person may request an advisory opinion from the Commissioner on a matter of general applicability....

  6. 22 CFR 1429.10 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Advisory opinions. 1429.10 Section 1429.10... AND GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Miscellaneous § 1429.10 Advisory opinions. The Board and the General Counsel will not issue advisory opinions....

  7. Nonlinear Opinion Dynamics on Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbay, Michael; Das, Arindam

    2013-03-01

    A model which treats group decision making as nonlinear opinion dynamics occurring over a network is presented. The model makes predictions regarding the interaction of network structure and initial disagreement level upon decision outcomes and consensus formation. The model displays bifurcations at high disagreement levels which lead to behaviors that are qualitatively distinct from those at low disagreement. For example, at high disagreement, the model exhibits asymmetric, majority rule outcomes that arise even when the system is symmetric with respect to the distribution of initial opinions and network structure. Analytical approximations for the bifurcation boundaries agree well with numerically-determined boundaries. An ongoing experimental effort involving the use of online discussion groups to test the model predictions is briefly described. We acknowledge the support of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and the Office of Naval Research under grant HDTRA1-10-1-0075

  8. Collective opinion formation on fluctuating networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngampruetikorn, Vudtiwat; Stephens, Greg

    Thanks to the advent of online social networks, not only are we more connected than ever but we are also able to design and maintain our own social networks. An insight into this phenomenon will be key to understanding modern societies. To this end, we argue that active network maintenance exposes individuals to selective exposure (preference for agreeing information sources) and we explore how this could affect the structure of social networks and collective opinion formation. More technically, we investigate opinion dynamics on a complex network with fast stochastic rewiring. We show that selective exposure while inducing segregation of agents with different opinions, stabilises consensus state regardless of opinion update rules. We argue further that selective exposure can lead to a shorter time to consensus. The time to consensus has non-trivial dependence on the magnitude of selective exposure. Moreover, we find for some opinion updating rules, selective exposure can increase the lifetime of opinion segregation (polarisation of opinions).

  9. 42 CFR 1008.59 - Range of the advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Range of the advisory opinion. 1008.59 Section 1008... AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Scope and Effect of OIG Advisory Opinions § 1008.59 Range of the advisory opinion. (a) An advisory opinion will state only the OIG's opinion regarding the subject matter...

  10. 42 CFR 1008.59 - Range of the advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Range of the advisory opinion. 1008.59 Section 1008... AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Scope and Effect of OIG Advisory Opinions § 1008.59 Range of the advisory opinion. (a) An advisory opinion will state only the OIG's opinion regarding the subject matter...

  11. 42 CFR 1008.59 - Range of the advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Range of the advisory opinion. 1008.59 Section 1008... AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Scope and Effect of OIG Advisory Opinions § 1008.59 Range of the advisory opinion. (a) An advisory opinion will state only the OIG's opinion regarding the subject matter...

  12. 42 CFR 1008.59 - Range of the advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Range of the advisory opinion. 1008.59 Section 1008... AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Scope and Effect of OIG Advisory Opinions § 1008.59 Range of the advisory opinion. (a) An advisory opinion will state only the OIG's opinion regarding the subject matter...

  13. 42 CFR 1008.59 - Range of the advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Range of the advisory opinion. 1008.59 Section 1008... AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Scope and Effect of OIG Advisory Opinions § 1008.59 Range of the advisory opinion. (a) An advisory opinion will state only the OIG's opinion regarding the subject matter...

  14. Recruitment in Radiotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deeley, T. J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The Faculty Board of Radiotherapy and Oncology of the Royal College of Radiobiologists surveyed the factors thought to influence recruitment into the specialty. Possible factors listed in replies of 36 questionnaires are offered. (LBH)

  15. Radiotherapy for Management of Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcomas: Why, When, and Where?

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Rick L.M.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; O'Sullivan, Brian; Keus, Ronald B.; Le Pechoux, Cecile; Olmi, Patricia; Poulsen, Jan-Peter; Seddon, Beatrice; Wang, Dian

    2012-11-01

    This critical review will focus on published data on the indications for radiotherapy in patients with extremity soft tissue sarcomas and its role in local control, survival, and treatment complications. The differences between pre- and postoperative radiotherapy will be discussed and consensus recommendations on target volume delineation proposed.

  16. Radiotherapy considerations in patients with Hodgkin's disease who receive mediastinal radiotherapy and anthracycline-containing chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Plowman, P N

    1998-01-01

    Recent clinical work in breast cancer patients has demonstrated that increasing the cardiac volume encompassment within radiotherapy portals leads to greater cardiac morbidity. In Hodgkin's disease, anthracycline chemotherapy is currently favoured, although mantle radiotherapy after anthracycline chemotherapy carries enhanced cardiac toxicity risks. Where anthracycline-based chemotherapy has produced a good response, with centripetal shrinkage of mediastinal disease, considerable cardiac protection is afforded by subcarinal blocking, either after a specific radiation dose or even by truncating the radiation portal in the subcarinal region from the outset. In the eight patients presented here, standard mantle blocks screened 35% (+/-3.2 SE) of the cardiac volume, particularly the left ventricle, throughout radiotherapy. Subcarinal blocks screened an increasing proportion of the cardiac volume as the spinal level of the blocks became higher. This was shown to occur most steeply over the spinal level D9 to D7, the mean extracardiac volume protection over this range being 21% (+/-3.7% SE) to 56% (+/-4.1% SE). These cardiac protection data were calculated for other block placement levels. The routine adoption of subcarinal/ cardiac blocking is advocated, particularly in conjunction with anthracycline-based chemotherapy, in an attempt to reduce late cardiac morbidity resulting from chemoradiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. PMID:9890541

  17. [Opinion of the citizens, opinion of the officials].

    PubMed

    1997-09-01

    No government can survive without consulting the opinion of the governed. Even dictators cannot be completely ignorant of the needs and sentiments of the population. This truth applies as well in intimate aspects of life related to conscience and morality. Mexican federal and local legislators lack means of consulting the citizenry. Only a few localities have the type of procedures to determine the will of the electorate used in nations of long democratic tradition. Abortion and other matters of conscience should be subjected to referendum. At present, referenda are impracticable in Mexico. Reflecting the situation in secular society, the Catholic Church hierarchy lacks means of consulting that would at least temper the authoritarian condemnation by the Pope of contraception and birth control and the obsessive opposition to condoms, the best HIV preventive. It is difficult to gauge the true weight of the pope¿s influence in Mexico, but many lawmakers and authorities consider it definitive. The Church hierarchy neither consults the faithful nor listens to those within the Church who recommend modification of doctrines regarding reproduction. Surveys reveal that Catholic men and women use contraception, and women have obtained abortions without considering themselves outside the religious community. Legislators and officials should know what people really think, and citizens should be provided with information to enable them to form their own opinions. PMID:12349538

  18. The dynamics of opinion in hierarchical organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laguna, M. F.; Risau Gusman, S.; Abramson, G.; Gonçalves, S.; Iglesias, J. R.

    2005-06-01

    We study the mutual influence of authority and persuasion in the flow of opinions. We describe a simple model with no social mobility, where each agent belongs to a class in the hierarchy and has also a persuasion capability. Agents use the force of its persuasion to propagate their opinions; however a high-rank agent can also use its authority to impose its opinion on other ones. The model is studied analytically within a mean field approximation and by means of numerical simulations. In the case of a three authority level hierarchy the agreement between the two approaches is excellent. We obtain a phase diagram identifying the relative frequency of the prevailing opinions, and find that the stratum where the dominant opinion arises from is strongly dependent on the relative population of each hierarchy level. The time evolution shows that conflicting opinions polarize after a short transient.

  19. Rationale and development of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy post-prostatectomy: the present standard of care?

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Julia R; McNair, Helen A; Dearnaley, David P

    2015-01-01

    The indications for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy have evolved over the last decade, although the optimal timing, dose, and target volume remain to be well defined. The target volume is susceptible to anatomical variations with its borders interfacing with the rectum and bladder. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy has become the gold standard for radical prostate radiotherapy. Here we review the current evidence for image-guided techniques with intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the prostate bed and describe current strategies to reduce or account for interfraction and intrafraction motion. PMID:26635484

  20. Evaluation of 12 strategies for obtaining second opinions to improve interpretation of breast histopathology: simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Tosteson, Anna NA; Pepe, Margaret S; Longton, Gary M; Nelson, Heidi D; Geller, Berta; Carney, Patricia A; Onega, Tracy; Allison, Kimberly H; Jackson, Sara L; Weaver, Donald L

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the potential effect of second opinions on improving the accuracy of diagnostic interpretation of breast histopathology. Design Simulation study. Setting 12 different strategies for acquiring independent second opinions. Participants Interpretations of 240 breast biopsy specimens by 115 pathologists, one slide for each case, compared with reference diagnoses derived by expert consensus. Main outcome measures Misclassification rates for individual pathologists and for 12 simulated strategies for second opinions. Simulations compared accuracy of diagnoses from single pathologists with that of diagnoses based on pairing interpretations from first and second independent pathologists, where resolution of disagreements was by an independent third pathologist. 12 strategies were evaluated in which acquisition of second opinions depended on initial diagnoses, assessment of case difficulty or borderline characteristics, pathologists’ clinical volumes, or whether a second opinion was required by policy or desired by the pathologists. The 240 cases included benign without atypia (10% non-proliferative, 20% proliferative without atypia), atypia (30%), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS, 30%), and invasive cancer (10%). Overall misclassification rates and agreement statistics depended on the composition of the test set, which included a higher prevalence of difficult cases than in typical practice. Results Misclassification rates significantly decreased (P<0.001) with all second opinion strategies except for the strategy limiting second opinions only to cases of invasive cancer. The overall misclassification rate decreased from 24.7% to 18.1% when all cases received second opinions (P<0.001). Obtaining both first and second opinions from pathologists with a high volume (≥10 breast biopsy specimens weekly) resulted in the lowest misclassification rate in this test set (14.3%, 95% confidence interval 10.9% to 18.0%). Obtaining second opinions only for

  1. Prediction of collective opinion in consensus formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lei; Liu, Jianguo; Pan, Xue; Song, Wen-Jun; Li, Xu-Dong

    2014-12-01

    In the consensus formation dynamics, the effect of leaders and interventions have been widely studied for it has many applications such as in politics and commerce. However, the problem is how to know if it is necessary for one to make an intervention. In this paper, we theoretically propose a method for predicting the tendency and final state of collective opinion. By giving each agent a conviction ci which measures the ability to insist on his opinion, we present an opinion formation model in which agents with high convictions naturally show up properties of the opinion leaders. Results reveal that, although each agent initially gets an opinion evenly distributed in the range [-1, 1], the collective opinion of the steady-state may deviate to the positive or negative direction because of the initial bias of the leaders' opinions. We further get the correlation coefficient of the linear relationship between the collective opinion and the initial bias according to both the experimental and theoretical analysis. Thus, we could predict the final state at the very beginning of the dynamic only if we get the opinions of a small portion of the population. The prediction would afford us more time and opportunities to make reactions and interventions.

  2. In vivo dosimetry in external beam radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Mijnheer, Ben; Beddar, Sam; Izewska, Joanna; Reft, Chester

    2013-07-15

    In vivo dosimetry (IVD) is in use in external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to detect major errors, to assess clinically relevant differences between planned and delivered dose, to record dose received by individual patients, and to fulfill legal requirements. After discussing briefly the main characteristics of the most commonly applied IVD systems, the clinical experience of IVD during EBRT will be summarized. Advancement of the traditional aspects of in vivo dosimetry as well as the development of currently available and newly emerging noninterventional technologies are required for large-scale implementation of IVD in EBRT. These new technologies include the development of electronic portal imaging devices for 2D and 3D patient dosimetry during advanced treatment techniques, such as IMRT and VMAT, and the use of IVD in proton and ion radiotherapy by measuring the decay of radiation-induced radionuclides. In the final analysis, we will show in this Vision 20/20 paper that in addition to regulatory compliance and reimbursement issues, the rationale for in vivo measurements is to provide an accurate and independent verification of the overall treatment procedure. It will enable the identification of potential errors in dose calculation, data transfer, dose delivery, patient setup, and changes in patient anatomy. It is the authors' opinion that all treatments with curative intent should be verified through in vivo dose measurements in combination with pretreatment checks.

  3. Treatment of brain metastases of renal cell cancer with combined hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and whole brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing

    PubMed Central

    VRÁNA, DAVID; ŠTUDENTOVÁ, HANA; MATZENAUER, MARCEL; VLACHOVÁ, ZUZANA; CWIERTKA, KAREL; GREMLICA, DAVID; KALITA, ONDŘEJ

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell cancer patients with brain metastatic disease generally have poor prognosis. Treatment options include surgery, radiotherapy, targeted therapy or best supportive care with respect to disease burden, patient preference and performance status. In the present case report the radiotherapy technique combining whole brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing (hippocampal avoidance whole brain radiotherapy HA-WBRT) and hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) of the brain metastases is performed in a patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. HA-WBRT was administered to 30 Gy in 10 fractions with sparing of the hippocampal structures and SRT of 21 Gy in 3 fractions to brain metastases which has preceded the HA-WBRT. Two single arc volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) plans were prepared using Monaco planning software. The HA-WBRT treatment plan achieved the following results: D2=33.91 Gy, D98=25.20 Gy, D100=14.18 Gy, D50=31.26 Gy. The homogeneity index was calculated as a deduction of the minimum dose in 2% and 98% of the planning target volume (PTV), divided by the minimum dose in 50% of the PTV. The maximum dose to the hippocampus was 17.50 Gy and mean dose was 11.59 Gy. The following doses to organs at risk (OAR) were achieved: Right opticus Dmax, 31.96 Gy; left opticus Dmax, 30.96 Gy; chiasma D max, 32,76 Gy. The volume of PTV for stereotactic radiotherapy was 3,736 cm3, with coverage D100=20.95 Gy and with only 0.11% of the PTV being irradiated to dose below the prescribed dose. HA-WBRT with SRT represents a feasible technique for radiotherapy of brain metastatic disease, however this technique is considerably demanding on departmental equipment and staff time/experience. PMID:27313693

  4. Radiotherapy of inoperable lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Namer, M.; Lalanne, C.M.; Boublil, J.L.; Hery, M.; Chauvel, P.; Verschoore, J.; Aubanel, J.M.; Bruneton, J.N.

    1980-08-01

    Evaluation of loco-regional results obtained by radiotherapy for 31 patients with inoperable epidermoid lung cancer revealed objective remission (over 50%) in only 25% of patients. These results emphasize the limited effectiveness of radiotherapy in such cases and point out the need for increased research in radiotherapy techniques if survival rates are to be improved.

  5. [Radiotherapy for brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Latorzeff, I; Antoni, D; Gaudaire-Josset, S; Feuvret, L; Tallet-Richard, A; Truc, G; Noël, G

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy for brain metastases has become more multifaceted. Indeed, with the improvement of the patient's life expectancy, side effects must be undeniably avoided and the retreatments or multiple treatments are common. The cognitive side effects should be warned and the most modern techniques of radiation therapy are used regularly to reach this goal. The new classifications of patients with brain metastases help guiding treatment more appropriately. Stereotactic radiotherapy has supplanted whole brain radiation therapy both for patients with metastases in place and for those who underwent surgery. Hippocampus protection is possible with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Its relevance in terms of cognitive functioning should be more clearly demonstrated but the requirement, for using it, is increasingly strong. While addressing patients in palliative phase, the treatment of brain metastases is one of the localisations where technical thinking is the most challenging. PMID:27523410

  6. [Radiotherapy in Europe].

    PubMed

    Verheij, M; Slotman, B J

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy plays an important part in the curing of cancer patients and is an effective treatment for tumour-related symptoms. However, in many countries the level of access to this treatment modality is unacceptably low due to shortage of infrastructure, modern apparatus and trained staff. In Europe it is mainly the Eastern European countries that are behind in the provision of and accessibility to radiotherapy. Worldwide investment to narrow the gap would put an end to these undesirable differences. In addition, these investments would deliver economic benefits, especially in low-to-middle income countries. In this article, on the basis of a number of recently published reports, we discuss the differences that exist in the geographical spread of radiotherapy departments and the availability of apparatus within Europe. In conclusion we also take a short look at the Dutch situation. PMID:27334085

  7. 32 CFR 1698.4 - Confidentiality of advisory opinions and requests for advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Confidentiality of advisory opinions and requests for advisory opinions. 1698.4 Section 1698.4 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.4 Confidentiality of advisory...

  8. 32 CFR 1698.4 - Confidentiality of advisory opinions and requests for advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Confidentiality of advisory opinions and requests for advisory opinions. 1698.4 Section 1698.4 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.4 Confidentiality of advisory...

  9. 20 CFR 258.7 - Board decisions and opinions and dissenting opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Board decisions and opinions and dissenting opinions. 258.7 Section 258.7 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT HEARINGS BEFORE THE BOARD OR DESIGNATED EXAMINERS § 258.7 Board decisions and opinions...

  10. 20 CFR 258.7 - Board decisions and opinions and dissenting opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Board decisions and opinions and dissenting opinions. 258.7 Section 258.7 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT HEARINGS BEFORE THE BOARD OR DESIGNATED EXAMINERS § 258.7 Board decisions and opinions...

  11. 20 CFR 258.7 - Board decisions and opinions and dissenting opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Board decisions and opinions and dissenting opinions. 258.7 Section 258.7 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT HEARINGS BEFORE THE BOARD OR DESIGNATED EXAMINERS § 258.7 Board decisions and opinions...

  12. 32 CFR 1698.4 - Confidentiality of advisory opinions and requests for advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Confidentiality of advisory opinions and requests for advisory opinions. 1698.4 Section 1698.4 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.4 Confidentiality of advisory...

  13. 20 CFR 258.7 - Board decisions and opinions and dissenting opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Board decisions and opinions and dissenting opinions. 258.7 Section 258.7 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT HEARINGS BEFORE THE BOARD OR DESIGNATED EXAMINERS § 258.7 Board decisions and opinions...

  14. 32 CFR 1698.4 - Confidentiality of advisory opinions and requests for advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Confidentiality of advisory opinions and requests for advisory opinions. 1698.4 Section 1698.4 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.4 Confidentiality of advisory...

  15. 20 CFR 258.7 - Board decisions and opinions and dissenting opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Board decisions and opinions and dissenting opinions. 258.7 Section 258.7 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT HEARINGS BEFORE THE BOARD OR DESIGNATED EXAMINERS § 258.7 Board decisions and opinions...

  16. 32 CFR 1698.4 - Confidentiality of advisory opinions and requests for advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Confidentiality of advisory opinions and requests for advisory opinions. 1698.4 Section 1698.4 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.4 Confidentiality of advisory...

  17. Measurement of neutron ambient dose equivalent in passive carbon-ion and proton radiotherapies

    SciTech Connect

    Yonai, Shunsuke; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Matsui, Yuki; Matsushita, Kaoru; Yamashita, Haruo; Numano, Masumi; Sakae, Takeji; Terunuma, Toshiyuki; Nishio, Teiji; Kohno, Ryosuke; Akagi, Takashi

    2008-11-15

    Secondary neutron ambient dose equivalents per the treatment absorbed dose in passive carbon-ion and proton radiotherapies were measured using a rem meter, WENDI-II at two carbon-ion radiotherapy facilities and four proton radiotherapy facilities in Japan. Our measured results showed that (1) neutron ambient dose equivalent in carbon-ion radiotherapy is lower than that in proton radiotherapy, and (2) the difference to the measured neutron ambient dose equivalents among the facilities is within a factor of 3 depending on the operational beam setting used at the facility and the arrangement of the beam line, regardless of the method for making a laterally uniform irradiation field: the double scattering method or the single-ring wobbling method. The reoptimization of the beam line in passive particle radiotherapy is an effective way to reduce the risk of secondary cancer because installing an adjustable precollimator and designing the beam line devices with consideration of their material, thickness and location, etc., can significantly reduce the neutron exposure. It was also found that the neutron ambient dose equivalent in passive particle radiotherapy is equal to or less than that in the photon radiotherapy. This result means that not only scanning particle radiotherapy but also passive particle radiotherapy can provide reduced exposure to normal tissues around the target volume without an accompanied increase in total body dose.

  18. Radiotherapy for lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Bleehen, N.M.; Cox, J.D.

    1985-05-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the management of lung cancer was reviewed at a workshop held in Cambridge, England, in June 1984. It was concluded that there was a continuing role for radiation therapy in the primary management of small cell lung cancer, including the loco-regional treatment for patients with limited disease. Radical radiotherapy for patients with non-small cell carcinoma could be curative for a proportion of patients with limited disease. Careful planning and quality control was essential. Palliative radiotherapy provided useful treatment for many other patients. Other related aspects of treatment are also presented.

  19. [Radiotherapy in cancers of the oesophagus, the gastric cardia and the stomach].

    PubMed

    Créhange, G; Huguet, F; Quero, L; N'Guyen, T V; Mirabel, X; Lacornerie, T

    2016-09-01

    Localized oesophageal and gastric cancers have a poor prognosis. In oesophageal cancer, external radiotherapy combined with concomitant chemotherapy is accepted as part of the therapeutic armamentarium in a curative intent in the preoperative setting for resectable tumours; or without surgery in inoperable patients or non-resectable tumours due to wide local and/or regional extension. Data from the literature show conflicting results with no clinical evidence in favour of either a unique dose protocol or consensual target volume definition in the setting of exclusive chemoradiation. In the preoperative setting, chemoradiotherapy has become the standard in oesophageal cancer, even though there is no evidence that surgery may be beneficial in locally advanced tumours that respond to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The main cause of failure after exclusive chemoradiotherapy in oesophageal cancer is locoregional relapse suggesting that doses and volumes usually considered may be inadequate. In gastric cancer, radiotherapy may be indicated postoperatively in patients with resected tumours that include less than D2 lymph node dissection or in the absence of perioperative chemotherapy. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy in gastric cancers is still under investigation. The evolving techniques of external radiotherapy, such as image-guided radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arctherapy (VMAT) have reduced the volume of lung and heart exposed to radiation, which seems to have diminished radiotherapy-related morbi-mortality rates. Given this, quality assurance for radiotherapy and protocols for radiotherapy delivery must be better standardized. This article on the indications for radiotherapy and the techniques used in oesophageal and gastric cancers is included in a special issue dedicated to national recommendations from the French society of radiation oncology (SFRO) on radiotherapy indications, planning, dose prescription, and techniques of radiotherapy delivery. PMID

  20. 32 CFR 1698.6 - Issuance of advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Issuance of advisory opinions. 1698.6 Section... ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.6 Issuance of advisory opinions. A copy of the advisory opinion will be furnished... opinion will be furnished, without charge, to any Federal, state, or municipal governmental agency...

  1. 42 CFR 1008.51 - Exclusivity of OIG advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Exclusivity of OIG advisory opinions. 1008.51... SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Scope and Effect of OIG Advisory Opinions § 1008.51 Exclusivity of OIG advisory opinions. The only method for obtaining a binding advisory opinion regarding...

  2. 28 CFR 80.13 - Scope of FCPA Opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Scope of FCPA Opinion. 80.13 Section 80.13 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT OPINION PROCEDURE § 80.13 Scope of FCPA Opinion. An FCPA Opinion will state only the Attorney General's opinion...

  3. 42 CFR 1008.33 - Expert opinions from outside sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Expert opinions from outside sources. 1008.33... SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Advisory Opinion Fees § 1008.33 Expert opinions from... necessary to respond to the advisory opinion request. For example, the OIG may require the use...

  4. 32 CFR 1698.6 - Issuance of advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Issuance of advisory opinions. 1698.6 Section... ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.6 Issuance of advisory opinions. A copy of the advisory opinion will be furnished... opinion will be furnished, without charge, to any Federal, state, or municipal governmental agency...

  5. 28 CFR 80.13 - Scope of FCPA Opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Scope of FCPA Opinion. 80.13 Section 80.13 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT OPINION PROCEDURE § 80.13 Scope of FCPA Opinion. An FCPA Opinion will state only the Attorney General's opinion...

  6. 42 CFR 1008.33 - Expert opinions from outside sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Expert opinions from outside sources. 1008.33... SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Advisory Opinion Fees § 1008.33 Expert opinions from... necessary to respond to the advisory opinion request. For example, the OIG may require the use...

  7. 32 CFR 1698.6 - Issuance of advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Issuance of advisory opinions. 1698.6 Section... ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.6 Issuance of advisory opinions. A copy of the advisory opinion will be furnished... opinion will be furnished, without charge, to any Federal, state, or municipal governmental agency...

  8. 32 CFR 1698.6 - Issuance of advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Issuance of advisory opinions. 1698.6 Section... ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.6 Issuance of advisory opinions. A copy of the advisory opinion will be furnished... opinion will be furnished, without charge, to any Federal, state, or municipal governmental agency...

  9. 42 CFR 1008.51 - Exclusivity of OIG advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exclusivity of OIG advisory opinions. 1008.51... SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Scope and Effect of OIG Advisory Opinions § 1008.51 Exclusivity of OIG advisory opinions. The only method for obtaining a binding advisory opinion regarding...

  10. 42 CFR 1008.33 - Expert opinions from outside sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Expert opinions from outside sources. 1008.33... SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Advisory Opinion Fees § 1008.33 Expert opinions from... necessary to respond to the advisory opinion request. For example, the OIG may require the use...

  11. 42 CFR 1008.51 - Exclusivity of OIG advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exclusivity of OIG advisory opinions. 1008.51... SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Scope and Effect of OIG Advisory Opinions § 1008.51 Exclusivity of OIG advisory opinions. The only method for obtaining a binding advisory opinion regarding...

  12. 28 CFR 80.13 - Scope of FCPA Opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Scope of FCPA Opinion. 80.13 Section 80.13 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT OPINION PROCEDURE § 80.13 Scope of FCPA Opinion. An FCPA Opinion will state only the Attorney General's opinion...

  13. 28 CFR 80.13 - Scope of FCPA Opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Scope of FCPA Opinion. 80.13 Section 80.13 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT OPINION PROCEDURE § 80.13 Scope of FCPA Opinion. An FCPA Opinion will state only the Attorney General's opinion...

  14. 42 CFR 1008.51 - Exclusivity of OIG advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exclusivity of OIG advisory opinions. 1008.51... SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Scope and Effect of OIG Advisory Opinions § 1008.51 Exclusivity of OIG advisory opinions. The only method for obtaining a binding advisory opinion regarding...

  15. 42 CFR 1008.51 - Exclusivity of OIG advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Exclusivity of OIG advisory opinions. 1008.51... SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Scope and Effect of OIG Advisory Opinions § 1008.51 Exclusivity of OIG advisory opinions. The only method for obtaining a binding advisory opinion regarding...

  16. 32 CFR 1698.6 - Issuance of advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Issuance of advisory opinions. 1698.6 Section... ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.6 Issuance of advisory opinions. A copy of the advisory opinion will be furnished... opinion will be furnished, without charge, to any Federal, state, or municipal governmental agency...

  17. 42 CFR 1008.33 - Expert opinions from outside sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Expert opinions from outside sources. 1008.33... SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Advisory Opinion Fees § 1008.33 Expert opinions from... necessary to respond to the advisory opinion request. For example, the OIG may require the use...

  18. 28 CFR 80.13 - Scope of FCPA Opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Scope of FCPA Opinion. 80.13 Section 80.13 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT OPINION PROCEDURE § 80.13 Scope of FCPA Opinion. An FCPA Opinion will state only the Attorney General's opinion...

  19. 42 CFR 1008.33 - Expert opinions from outside sources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Expert opinions from outside sources. 1008.33... SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Advisory Opinion Fees § 1008.33 Expert opinions from... necessary to respond to the advisory opinion request. For example, the OIG may require the use...

  20. Methods and computer readable medium for improved radiotherapy dosimetry planning

    DOEpatents

    Wessol, Daniel E.; Frandsen, Michael W.; Wheeler, Floyd J.; Nigg, David W.

    2005-11-15

    Methods and computer readable media are disclosed for ultimately developing a dosimetry plan for a treatment volume irradiated during radiation therapy with a radiation source concentrated internally within a patient or incident from an external beam. The dosimetry plan is available in near "real-time" because of the novel geometric model construction of the treatment volume which in turn allows for rapid calculations to be performed for simulated movements of particles along particle tracks therethrough. The particles are exemplary representations of alpha, beta or gamma emissions emanating from an internal radiation source during various radiotherapies, such as brachytherapy or targeted radionuclide therapy, or they are exemplary representations of high-energy photons, electrons, protons or other ionizing particles incident on the treatment volume from an external source. In a preferred embodiment, a medical image of a treatment volume irradiated during radiotherapy having a plurality of pixels of information is obtained.

  1. Applied Linguists and Institutions of Opinion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Greg

    2005-01-01

    Public opinion research is not an area that has received much attention from applied linguists. But language lies at the heart of the procedures used to define, elicit, and report opinions, whether through such methods as polling, interviews, and focus groups, or through the less obvious channels of vox pop interviews, letters to the editor, radio…

  2. A Public Opinion Survey on Educational Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puzzuoli, David A.; Gillespie, John O.

    Major objectives of this planning study were (1) to determine public opinion as related to the need for a "multi-county" educational service unit and (2) to determine public opinion on selected school functions as they are presently organized in Region II, West Virginia. The 3 phases of the study consisted of development of the questionnaire by…

  3. Collaborators' Attitudes about Differences of Opinion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creamer, Elizabeth G.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes how long-term collaborators interpret substantive differences of opinion and the strategies they use to negotiate them. Long-term collaborators are coauthors who have had a working relationship for ten or more years. Differences of opinion refer to differences in interpretation about substantive issues related to research…

  4. Museum Personnel's Opinions on Mobile Guidance Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoshimura, Hirokazu; Sekiguchi, Hiromi; Yabumoto, Yoshitaka

    2007-01-01

    While opinions from the general public are certainly important, opinions from the museum staff are also necessary to improve user service systems. this article introduces two groups of museum staff who have evaluated the usability of mobile guidance systems in Japanese museums. One group is the research team who used the PDA system in the National…

  5. Public Opinion Poll Question Databases: An Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    This paper evaluates five polling resource: iPOLL, Polling the Nations, Gallup Brain, Public Opinion Poll Question Database, and Polls and Surveys. Content was evaluated on disclosure standards from major polling organizations, scope on a model for public opinion polls, and presentation on a flow chart discussing search limitations and usability.

  6. Internet Censorship in Turkey: University Students' Opinions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozkan, Hasan; Arikan, Arda

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study university students' opinions toward online censorship with references to their socio-political and economic variables. Considering the upwards trend and the increasing number of online restrictions in Turkey, the opinions of university students (n=138) are thought to give significant findings. The questionnaire…

  7. Public Opinion Poll on Community Priorities: Sacramento

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sierra Health Foundation, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to measure public perceptions, opinions and priorities as they pertain to youth issues in Sacramento for the purposes of further developing public and private youth programming and public policy in the Sacramento region. By presenting a "statistically reliable" profile of public opinion on youth issues, the…

  8. 17 CFR 200.63 - Commission opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Commission opinions. 200.63 Section 200.63 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Canons of Ethics § 200.63 Commission opinions. The...

  9. 17 CFR 200.63 - Commission opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Commission opinions. 200.63 Section 200.63 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Canons of Ethics § 200.63 Commission opinions. The...

  10. 17 CFR 200.63 - Commission opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Commission opinions. 200.63 Section 200.63 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Canons of Ethics § 200.63 Commission opinions. The...

  11. 17 CFR 200.63 - Commission opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Commission opinions. 200.63 Section 200.63 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Canons of Ethics § 200.63 Commission opinions. The...

  12. 17 CFR 200.63 - Commission opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Commission opinions. 200.63 Section 200.63 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION; CONDUCT AND ETHICS; AND INFORMATION AND REQUESTS Canons of Ethics § 200.63 Commission opinions. The...

  13. Quantifying discrepancies in opinion spectra from online and offline networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Deokjae; Hahn, Kyu S; Yook, Soon-Hyung; Park, Juyong

    2015-01-01

    Online social media such as Twitter are widely used for mining public opinions and sentiments on various issues and topics. The sheer volume of the data generated and the eager adoption by the online-savvy public are helping to raise the profile of online media as a convenient source of news and public opinions on social and political issues as well. Due to the uncontrollable biases in the population who heavily use the media, however, it is often difficult to measure how accurately the online sphere reflects the offline world at large, undermining the usefulness of online media. One way of identifying and overcoming the online-offline discrepancies is to apply a common analytical and modeling framework to comparable data sets from online and offline sources and cross-analyzing the patterns found therein. In this paper we study the political spectra constructed from Twitter and from legislators' voting records as an example to demonstrate the potential limits of online media as the source for accurate public opinion mining, and how to overcome the limits by using offline data simultaneously. PMID:25915931

  14. Quantifying Discrepancies in Opinion Spectra from Online and Offline Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Deokjae; Hahn, Kyu S.; Yook, Soon-Hyung; Park, Juyong

    2015-01-01

    Online social media such as Twitter are widely used for mining public opinions and sentiments on various issues and topics. The sheer volume of the data generated and the eager adoption by the online-savvy public are helping to raise the profile of online media as a convenient source of news and public opinions on social and political issues as well. Due to the uncontrollable biases in the population who heavily use the media, however, it is often difficult to measure how accurately the online sphere reflects the offline world at large, undermining the usefulness of online media. One way of identifying and overcoming the online–offline discrepancies is to apply a common analytical and modeling framework to comparable data sets from online and offline sources and cross-analyzing the patterns found therein. In this paper we study the political spectra constructed from Twitter and from legislators' voting records as an example to demonstrate the potential limits of online media as the source for accurate public opinion mining, and how to overcome the limits by using offline data simultaneously. PMID:25915931

  15. Opinion Formation Models on a Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Gastner, Michael T.; Markou, Nikolitsa; Pruessner, Gunnar; Draief, Moez

    2014-01-01

    Statistical physicists have become interested in models of collective social behavior such as opinion formation, where individuals change their inherently preferred opinion if their friends disagree. Real preferences often depend on regional cultural differences, which we model here as a spatial gradient g in the initial opinion. The gradient does not only add reality to the model. It can also reveal that opinion clusters in two dimensions are typically in the standard (i.e., independent) percolation universality class, thus settling a recent controversy about a non-consensus model. However, using analytical and numerical tools, we also present a model where the width of the transition between opinions scales , not as in independent percolation, and the cluster size distribution is consistent with first-order percolation. PMID:25474528

  16. Opinion formation models on a gradient.

    PubMed

    Gastner, Michael T; Markou, Nikolitsa; Pruessner, Gunnar; Draief, Moez

    2014-01-01

    Statistical physicists have become interested in models of collective social behavior such as opinion formation, where individuals change their inherently preferred opinion if their friends disagree. Real preferences often depend on regional cultural differences, which we model here as a spatial gradient g in the initial opinion. The gradient does not only add reality to the model. It can also reveal that opinion clusters in two dimensions are typically in the standard (i.e., independent) percolation universality class, thus settling a recent controversy about a non-consensus model. However, using analytical and numerical tools, we also present a model where the width of the transition between opinions scales proportional g(-1/4), not proportional g(-4/7) as in independent percolation, and the cluster size distribution is consistent with first-order percolation. PMID:25474528

  17. Survey Data for Trend Analysis. An Index to Repeated Questions in U. S. National Surveys Held by the Roper Public Opinion Research Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, Philip K., Ed.; And Others

    This volume consists of an index of questions repeated in public opinion surveys, and the variants of these questions. The questions included are drawn from American national samples (primarily of the general population) conducted by AIPO (Gallup) NORC, and Roper, and archived at the Roper Public Opinion Research Center. The basic data for over 90…

  18. OpinionFlow: Visual Analysis of Opinion Diffusion on Social Media.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingcai; Liu, Shixia; Yan, Kai; Liu, Mengchen; Wu, Fangzhao

    2014-12-01

    It is important for many different applications such as government and business intelligence to analyze and explore the diffusion of public opinions on social media. However, the rapid propagation and great diversity of public opinions on social media pose great challenges to effective analysis of opinion diffusion. In this paper, we introduce a visual analysis system called OpinionFlow to empower analysts to detect opinion propagation patterns and glean insights. Inspired by the information diffusion model and the theory of selective exposure, we develop an opinion diffusion model to approximate opinion propagation among Twitter users. Accordingly, we design an opinion flow visualization that combines a Sankey graph with a tailored density map in one view to visually convey diffusion of opinions among many users. A stacked tree is used to allow analysts to select topics of interest at different levels. The stacked tree is synchronized with the opinion flow visualization to help users examine and compare diffusion patterns across topics. Experiments and case studies on Twitter data demonstrate the effectiveness and usability of OpinionFlow. PMID:26356890

  19. Perspectives: A Journal of Research and Opinion about Educational Service Agencies, 1995-1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keane, William G., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This document consists of the first four volumes of the annual serial publication "Perspectives: A Journal of Research and Opinion about Educational Service Agencies." Educational service agencies (ESAs) have various names and characteristics across states, but all provide services to local education agencies in a specific geographic region. ESAs…

  20. Choice Shift in Opinion Network Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbay, Michael

    Choice shift is a phenomenon associated with small group dynamics whereby group discussion causes group members to shift their opinions in a more extreme direction so that the mean post-discussion opinion exceeds the mean pre-discussion opinion. Also known as group polarization, choice shift is a robust experimental phenomenon and has been well-studied within social psychology. In opinion network models, shifts toward extremism are typically produced by the presence of stubborn agents at the extremes of the opinion axis, whose opinions are much more resistant to change than moderate agents. However, we present a model in which choice shift can arise without the assumption of stubborn agents; the model evolves member opinions and uncertainties using coupled nonlinear differential equations. In addition, we briefly describe the results of a recent experiment conducted involving online group discussion concerning the outcome of National Football League games are described. The model predictions concerning the effects of network structure, disagreement level, and team choice (favorite or underdog) are in accord with the experimental results. This research was funded by the Office of Naval Research and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency.

  1. Nonconsensus opinion model on directed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Bo; Li, Qian; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H. Eugene; Wang, Huijuan

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic social opinion models have been widely studied on undirected networks, and most of them are based on spin interaction models that produce a consensus. In reality, however, many networks such as Twitter and the World Wide Web are directed and are composed of both unidirectional and bidirectional links. Moreover, from choosing a coffee brand to deciding who to vote for in an election, two or more competing opinions often coexist. In response to this ubiquity of directed networks and the coexistence of two or more opinions in decision-making situations, we study a nonconsensus opinion model introduced by Shao et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 018701 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.018701] on directed networks. We define directionality ξ as the percentage of unidirectional links in a network, and we use the linear correlation coefficient ρ between the in-degree and out-degree of a node to quantify the relation between the in-degree and out-degree. We introduce two degree-preserving rewiring approaches which allow us to construct directed networks that can have a broad range of possible combinations of directionality ξ and linear correlation coefficient ρ and to study how ξ and ρ impact opinion competitions. We find that, as the directionality ξ or the in-degree and out-degree correlation ρ increases, the majority opinion becomes more dominant and the minority opinion's ability to survive is lowered.

  2. Estimation of daily interfractional larynx residual setup error after isocentric alignment for head and neck radiotherapy: Quality-assurance implications for target volume and organ-at-risk margination using daily CT-on-rails imaging

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Charles A.; Awan, Musaddiq J.; Mohamed, Abdallah S. R.; Akel, Imad; Rosenthal, David I.; Gunn, G. Brandon; Garden, Adam S.; Dyer, Brandon A.; Court, Laurence; Sevak, Parag R; Kocak-Uzel, Esengul; Fuller, Clifton D.

    2016-01-01

    Larynx may alternatively serve as a target or organ-at-risk (OAR) in head and neck cancer (HNC) image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The objective of this study was to estimate IGRT parameters required for larynx positional error independent of isocentric alignment and suggest population–based compensatory margins. Ten HNC patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) with daily CT-on-rails imaging were assessed. Seven landmark points were placed on each daily scan. Taking the most superior anterior point of the C5 vertebra as a reference isocenter for each scan, residual displacement vectors to the other 6 points were calculated post-isocentric alignment. Subsequently, using the first scan as a reference, the magnitude of vector differences for all 6 points for all scans over the course of treatment were calculated. Residual systematic and random error, and the necessary compensatory CTV-to-PTV and OAR-to-PRV margins were calculated, using both observational cohort data and a bootstrap-resampled population estimator. The grand mean displacements for all anatomical points was 5.07mm, with mean systematic error of 1.1mm and mean random setup error of 2.63mm, while bootstrapped POIs grand mean displacement was 5.09mm, with mean systematic error of 1.23mm and mean random setup error of 2.61mm. Required margin for CTV-PTV expansion was 4.6mm for all cohort points, while the bootstrap estimator of the equivalent margin was 4.9mm. The calculated OAR-to-PRV expansion for the observed residual set-up error was 2.7mm, and bootstrap estimated expansion of 2.9mm. We conclude that the interfractional larynx setup error is a significant source of RT set-up/delivery error in HNC both when the larynx is considered as a CTV or OAR. We estimate the need for a uniform expansion of 5mm to compensate for set up error if the larynx is a target or 3mm if the larynx is an OAR when using a non-laryngeal bony isocenter. PMID:25679151

  3. Opinion Dynamics with Disagreement and Modulated Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sîrbu, Alina; Loreto, Vittorio; Servedio, Vito D. P.; Tria, Francesca

    2013-04-01

    Opinion dynamics concerns social processes through which populations or groups of individuals agree or disagree on specific issues. As such, modelling opinion dynamics represents an important research area that has been progressively acquiring relevance in many different domains. Existing approaches have mostly represented opinions through discrete binary or continuous variables by exploring a whole panoply of cases: e.g. independence, noise, external effects, multiple issues. In most of these cases the crucial ingredient is an attractive dynamics through which similar or similar enough agents get closer. Only rarely the possibility of explicit disagreement has been taken into account (i.e., the possibility for a repulsive interaction among individuals' opinions), and mostly for discrete or 1-dimensional opinions, through the introduction of additional model parameters. Here we introduce a new model of opinion formation, which focuses on the interplay between the possibility of explicit disagreement, modulated in a self-consistent way by the existing opinions' overlaps between the interacting individuals, and the effect of external information on the system. Opinions are modelled as a vector of continuous variables related to multiple possible choices for an issue. Information can be modulated to account for promoting multiple possible choices. Numerical results show that extreme information results in segregation and has a limited effect on the population, while milder messages have better success and a cohesion effect. Additionally, the initial condition plays an important role, with the population forming one or multiple clusters based on the initial average similarity between individuals, with a transition point depending on the number of opinion choices.

  4. Personalized radiotherapy: concepts, biomarkers and trial design.

    PubMed

    Ree, A H; Redalen, K R

    2015-07-01

    In the past decade, and pointing onwards to the immediate future, clinical radiotherapy has undergone considerable developments, essentially including technological advances to sculpt radiation delivery, the demonstration of the benefit of adding concomitant cytotoxic agents to radiotherapy for a range of tumour types and, intriguingly, the increasing integration of targeted therapeutics for biological optimization of radiation effects. Recent molecular and imaging insights into radiobiology will provide a unique opportunity for rational patient treatment, enabling the parallel design of next-generation trials that formally examine the therapeutic outcome of adding targeted drugs to radiation, together with the critically important assessment of radiation volume and dose-limiting treatment toxicities. In considering the use of systemic agents with presumed radiosensitizing activity, this may also include the identification of molecular, metabolic and imaging markers of treatment response and tolerability, and will need particular attention on patient eligibility. In addition to providing an overview of clinical biomarker studies relevant for personalized radiotherapy, this communication will highlight principles in addressing clinical evaluation of combined-modality-targeted therapeutics and radiation. The increasing number of translational studies that bridge large-scale omics sciences with quality-assured phenomics end points-given the imperative development of open-source data repositories to allow investigators the access to the complex data sets-will enable radiation oncology to continue to position itself with the highest level of evidence within existing clinical practice. PMID:25989697

  5. Personalized radiotherapy: concepts, biomarkers and trial design

    PubMed Central

    Redalen, K R

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, and pointing onwards to the immediate future, clinical radiotherapy has undergone considerable developments, essentially including technological advances to sculpt radiation delivery, the demonstration of the benefit of adding concomitant cytotoxic agents to radiotherapy for a range of tumour types and, intriguingly, the increasing integration of targeted therapeutics for biological optimization of radiation effects. Recent molecular and imaging insights into radiobiology will provide a unique opportunity for rational patient treatment, enabling the parallel design of next-generation trials that formally examine the therapeutic outcome of adding targeted drugs to radiation, together with the critically important assessment of radiation volume and dose-limiting treatment toxicities. In considering the use of systemic agents with presumed radiosensitizing activity, this may also include the identification of molecular, metabolic and imaging markers of treatment response and tolerability, and will need particular attention on patient eligibility. In addition to providing an overview of clinical biomarker studies relevant for personalized radiotherapy, this communication will highlight principles in addressing clinical evaluation of combined-modality-targeted therapeutics and radiation. The increasing number of translational studies that bridge large-scale omics sciences with quality-assured phenomics end points—given the imperative development of open-source data repositories to allow investigators the access to the complex data sets—will enable radiation oncology to continue to position itself with the highest level of evidence within existing clinical practice. PMID:25989697

  6. Food irradiation: Public opinion surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, S.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Canadian government are discussing the legislation, regulations and practical protocol necessary for the commercialization of food irradiation. Food industry marketing, public relations and media expertise will be needed to successfully introduce this new processing choice to retailers and consumers. Consumer research to date including consumer opinion studies and market trials conducted in the Netherlands, United States, South Africa and Canada will be explored for signposts to successful approaches to the introduction of irradiated foods to retailers and consumers. Research has indicated that the terms used to describe irradiation and information designed to reduce consumer fears will be important marketing tools. Marketers will be challenged to promote old foods, which look the same to consumers, in a new light. Simple like or dislike or intention to buy surveys will not be effective tools. Consumer fears must be identified and effectively handled to support a receptive climate for irradiated food products. A cooperative government, industry, health professional, consumer association and retailer effort will be necessary for the successful introduction of irradiated foods into the marketplace. Grocery Products Manufacturers of Canada is a national trade association of more than 150 major companies engaged in the manufacture of food, non-alcoholic beverages and array of other national-brand consumer items sold through retail outlets.

  7. Adjuvant Radiotherapy for Gastric Cancer: A Dosimetric Comparison of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Tomotherapy (registered) and Conventional Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect

    Dahele, Max; Skinner, Matthew; Schultz, Brenda; Cardoso, Marlene; Bell, Chris; Ung, Yee C.

    2010-07-01

    Some patients with gastric cancer benefit from post-operative chemo-radiotherapy, but adequately irradiating the planning target volume (PTV) whilst avoiding organs at risk (OAR) can be difficult. We evaluate 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (CRT), conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and helical tomotherapy (TT). TT, 2 and 5-field (F) CRT and IMRT treatment plans with the same PTV coverage were generated for 5 patients and compared. Median values are reported. The volume of left/right kidney receiving at least 20Gy (V20) was 57/51% and 51/60% for 2 and 5F-CRT, and 28/14% for TT and 27/19% for IMRT. The volume of liver receiving at least 30Gy (V30) was 45% and 62% for 2 and 5F-CRT, and 37% for TT and 35% for IMRT. With TT, 98% of the PTV received 95-105% of the prescribed dose, compared with 45%, 34% and 28% for 2F-CRT, 5F-CRT and IMRT respectively. Using conventional metrics, conventional IMRT can achieve comparable PTV coverage and OAR sparing to TT, but at the expense of PTV dose heterogeneity. Both irradiate large volumes of normal tissue to low doses. Additional studies are needed to demonstrate the clinical impact of these technologies.

  8. How to Get a Second Opinion

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be skilled in using all the latest technology. Getting a second opinion from a different doctor ... doctor you trust. You can also call university teaching hospitals and medical societies in your area for ...

  9. The Bakke Opinions and Equal Protection Doctrine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karst, Kenneth L.; Horowitz, Harold W.

    1979-01-01

    Constitutional issues addressed in the Supreme Court's decision are reviewed. The opinions rendered by Justice Powell are viewed as reflections of the weakness of recent equal protection theory, and as signs of future doctrine. (GC)

  10. Social opinion dynamics is not chaotic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Chjan; Zhang, Weituo

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by the research on social opinion dynamics over large and dense networks, a general framework for verifying the monotonicity property of multi-agent dynamics is introduced. This allows a derivation of sociologically meaningful sufficient conditions for monotonicity that are tailor-made for social opinion dynamics, which typically have high nonlinearity. A direct consequence of monotonicity is that social opinion dynamics is nonchaotic. A key part of this framework is the definition of a partial order relation that is suitable for a large class of social opinion dynamics such as the generalized naming games. Comparisons are made to previous techniques to verify monotonicity. Using the results obtained, we extend many of the consequences of monotonicity to this class of social dynamics, including several corollaries on their asymptotic behavior, such as global convergence to consensus and tipping points of a minority fraction of zealots or leaders.

  11. Modeling opinion interactions in a BBS community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, F.; Liu, Y.

    2010-11-01

    This paper is devoted to apply agent based models to real opinion interactions in a bulletin board system (BBS) community. By analyzing a real BBS community, we reveal some empirical features of opinion interactions on the Web. Then, we propose a simple opinion model that bears both general characteristics of traditional opinion models, and some real interacting rules on the Web. The model simulates a group of agents representing Web users participating to a discussion. Simulation results show some dynamical regimes consistent with empirical facts, and offer some possible explanations for the emergence of some real features. Our work implies the possibility of building simple agent based models to simulate computer-mediated interactions on the Web.

  12. Friends, the Media, and Opinion Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beinstein, Judith

    1977-01-01

    Compares the uses of mass media and informal social networks in opinion formation among women from three varying population density groups. Results indicate that the degree of urbanity and education mediate choice of information source. (JMF)

  13. Retroperitoneal Sarcoma (RPS) High Risk Gross Tumor Volume Boost (HR GTV Boost) Contour Delineation Agreement Among NRG Sarcoma Radiation and Surgical Oncologists

    PubMed Central

    Baldini, Elizabeth H.; Bosch, Walter; Kane, John M.; Abrams, Ross A.; Salerno, Kilian E.; Deville, Curtiland; Raut, Chandrajit P.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Chen, Yen-Lin; Mullen, John T.; Millikan, Keith W.; Karakousis, Giorgos; Kendrick, Michael L.; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Wang, Dian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Curative intent management of retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS) requires gross total resection. Preoperative radiotherapy (RT) often is used as an adjuvant to surgery, but recurrence rates remain high. To enhance RT efficacy with acceptable tolerance, there is interest in delivering “boost doses” of RT to high-risk areas of gross tumor volume (HR GTV) judged to be at risk for positive resection margins. We sought to evaluate variability in HR GTV boost target volume delineation among collaborating sarcoma radiation and surgical oncologist teams. Methods Radiation planning CT scans for three cases of RPS were distributed to seven paired radiation and surgical oncologist teams at six institutions. Teams contoured HR GTV boost volumes for each case. Analysis of contour agreement was performed using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm and kappa statistics. Results HRGTV boost volume contour agreement between the seven teams was “substantial” or “moderate” for all cases. Agreement was best on the torso wall posteriorly (abutting posterior chest abdominal wall) and medially (abutting ipsilateral para-vertebral space and great vessels). Contours varied more significantly abutting visceral organs due to differing surgical opinions regarding planned partial organ resection. Conclusions Agreement of RPS HRGTV boost volumes between sarcoma radiation and surgical oncologist teams was substantial to moderate. Differences were most striking in regions abutting visceral organs, highlighting the importance of collaboration between the radiation and surgical oncologist for “individualized” target delineation on the basis of areas deemed at risk and planned resection. PMID:26018727

  14. Dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy for lung stereotactic body radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kinhikar, Rajesh Ashok; Ghadi, Yogesh G; Sahoo, Priyadarshini; Laskar, Sarbani Ghosh; Deshpande, Deepak D; Shrivastava, Shyam K; Agarwal, Jaiprakash

    2015-01-01

    To compare the treatment plans generated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT), intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and helical tomotherapy (HT) for stereotactic body radiotherapy of lung, twenty patients with medically inoperable (early nonsmall cell lung cancer) were retrospectively reviewed for dosimetric evaluation of treatment delivery techniques (3DCRT, IMRT, and HT). A dose of 6 Gy per fraction in 8 fractions was prescribed to deliver 95% of the prescription dose to 95% volume of planning target volume (PTV). Plan quality was assessed using conformity index (CI) and homogeneity index (HI). Doses to critical organs were assessed. Mean CI with 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT was 1.19 (standard deviation [SD] 0.13), 1.18 (SD 0.11), and 1.08 (SD 0.04), respectively. Mean HI with 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT was 1.14 (SD 0.05), 1.08 (SD 0.02), and 1.07 (SD 0.04), respectively. Mean R50% values for 3DCRT, IMRT, and HT was 8.5 (SD 0.35), 7.04 (SD 0.45), and 5.43 (SD 0.29), respectively. D2cm was found superior with IMRT and HT. Significant sparing of critical organs can be achieved with highly conformal techniques (IMRT and HT) without compromising the PTV conformity and homogeneity. PMID:26865754

  15. Dual modeling of political opinion networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, R.; A. Wang, Q.

    2011-09-01

    We present the result of a dual modeling of opinion networks. The model complements the agent-based opinion models by attaching to the social agent (voters) network a political opinion (party) network having its own intrinsic mechanisms of evolution. These two subnetworks form a global network, which can be either isolated from, or dependent on, the external influence. Basically, the evolution of the agent network includes link adding and deleting, with the opinion changes influenced by social validation, the political climate, the attractivity of the parties, and the interaction between them. The opinion network is initially composed of numerous nodes representing opinions or parties that are located on a one dimensional axis according to their political positions. The mechanism of evolution includes union, splitting, change of position, and attractivity, taking into account the pairwise node interaction decaying with node distance in power law. The global evolution ends in a stable distribution of the social agents over a quasistable and fluctuating stationary number of remaining parties. Empirical study on the lifetime distribution of numerous parties and vote results is carried out to verify numerical results.

  16. Which bowel preparation is best? Comparison of a high-fibre diet leaflet, daily microenema and no preparation in prostate cancer patients treated with radical radiotherapy to assess the effect on planned target volume shifts due to rectal distension

    PubMed Central

    Zarkar, A; Southgate, E; Nightingale, P; Webster, G

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated and compared a high-fibre diet leaflet, daily microenema and no preparation to establish how best to achieve consistent bowel preparation in prostate cancer patients being treated with radical radiotherapy. Methods: 3 cohorts of 10 patients had different dietary interventions: no bowel preparation, high-fibre diet information leaflet and daily microenemas. The available cone beam CT (CBCT) scans of each patient were used to quantify interfractional changes in rectal distension (measured using average cross-sectional area—CSA), prostate shifts relative to bony anatomy compared with that at CT planning scan and rates of geometric miss (i.e. shifts of ≥5 mm). 85 CBCT scans were available in the pre-leaflet cohort, 89 scans in the post-leaflet, and 89 scans in the post-enema group. Results: Mean rectal CSA in the post-enema group was reduced compared with both pre-leaflet (p=0.010) and post-leaflet values (p=0.031). The magnitude of observed mean prostate shifts was significantly reduced in the post-enema group compared with the pre-leaflet group (p=0.014). The proportion of scans showing geometric miss (i.e. shift >5 mm) in the post-enema group (31%) was significantly lower than in the pre-leaflet (62%, p<0.001) or post-leaflet groups (56%, p<0.001). Conclusion: This study indicates microenema to be an effective measure to achieve reduction in rectal CSA, prostate shift and reduce geometric miss of ≥5 mm. A further prospective randomised study is advocated to validate the results. Advances in knowledge: The use of microenema is effective in reducing prostate shift and rectal CSA, consequently decreasing the incidence of geographical miss. PMID:23995876

  17. {sup 18}F-FDG PET Definition of Gross Tumor Volume for Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer: Is the Tumor Uptake Value-Based Approach Appropriate for Lymph Node Delineation?

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Nuria; Sanz, Xavier; Trampal, Carlos; Foro, Palmira; Reig, Anna; Lacruz, Marti; Membrive, Ismael; Lozano, Joan; Quera, Jaime; Algara, Manuel

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) with the glucose analogue [18F] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG-PET) has been used in radiation treatment planning for non-small-cell carcinoma. To date, lymph nodes have been contoured according to the uptake of the tumor. This prospective study was performed to evaluate if nodal volume delineates according to FDG uptake within the primary tumor (PET-GTVnt) is suitable for nodal target volume delineation or if individualized nodal FDG uptake measure (PET-GTVnn) is necessary to better nodal target definition. Methods and Materials: Forty cases, who underwent a diagnostic {sup 18}F-FDG PET/computed tomography (CT) scan, were included. Two PET-based GTVs for each lymph node were contoured and compared. First, we used an isocontour of 40% of the maximum tumor uptake (PET-GTVnt). Second, an isocontour of 40% of the maximum uptake of each node (PET-GTVnn) was employed. To avoid interobserver variability, this was carried out by the same radiation oncologist. Afterwards, the difference between both lymph node volumes was plotted against the ratio of the maximum uptakes (I{sub n}/I{sub t}) in a linear regression analysis. Results: Compared with CT-based lymph node volume (CT-GTVn), the intraclass correlation coefficient of PET-GTVnn was higher than the coefficient of PET-GTVnt (p < 0.001). All cases could be divided into four groups: undetected (17.5%), detected but overestimated (10%), detected but underestimated (35%), and correctly detected (37.5%). Conclusions: If a method of automatic delineation shall be applied, this method must be applied to every lesion separately. However, to facilitate the delineation in daily practice, when I{sub n}/I{sub t} is {<=}25%, lymph nodes could be delineated in accordance with tumor uptake, keeping an absolute difference in radii <5 mm.

  18. Big Data Analytics for Prostate Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Coates, James; Souhami, Luis; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a first-line treatment option for localized prostate cancer and radiation-induced normal tissue damage are often the main limiting factor for modern radiotherapy regimens. Conversely, under-dosing of target volumes in an attempt to spare adjacent healthy tissues limits the likelihood of achieving local, long-term control. Thus, the ability to generate personalized data-driven risk profiles for radiotherapy outcomes would provide valuable prognostic information to help guide both clinicians and patients alike. Big data applied to radiation oncology promises to deliver better understanding of outcomes by harvesting and integrating heterogeneous data types, including patient-specific clinical parameters, treatment-related dose–volume metrics, and biological risk factors. When taken together, such variables make up the basis for a multi-dimensional space (the “RadoncSpace”) in which the presented modeling techniques search in order to identify significant predictors. Herein, we review outcome modeling and big data-mining techniques for both tumor control and radiotherapy-induced normal tissue effects. We apply many of the presented modeling approaches onto a cohort of hypofractionated prostate cancer patients taking into account different data types and a large heterogeneous mix of physical and biological parameters. Cross-validation techniques are also reviewed for the refinement of the proposed framework architecture and checking individual model performance. We conclude by considering advanced modeling techniques that borrow concepts from big data analytics, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, before discussing the potential future impact of systems radiobiology approaches. PMID:27379211

  19. Big Data Analytics for Prostate Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Coates, James; Souhami, Luis; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a first-line treatment option for localized prostate cancer and radiation-induced normal tissue damage are often the main limiting factor for modern radiotherapy regimens. Conversely, under-dosing of target volumes in an attempt to spare adjacent healthy tissues limits the likelihood of achieving local, long-term control. Thus, the ability to generate personalized data-driven risk profiles for radiotherapy outcomes would provide valuable prognostic information to help guide both clinicians and patients alike. Big data applied to radiation oncology promises to deliver better understanding of outcomes by harvesting and integrating heterogeneous data types, including patient-specific clinical parameters, treatment-related dose-volume metrics, and biological risk factors. When taken together, such variables make up the basis for a multi-dimensional space (the "RadoncSpace") in which the presented modeling techniques search in order to identify significant predictors. Herein, we review outcome modeling and big data-mining techniques for both tumor control and radiotherapy-induced normal tissue effects. We apply many of the presented modeling approaches onto a cohort of hypofractionated prostate cancer patients taking into account different data types and a large heterogeneous mix of physical and biological parameters. Cross-validation techniques are also reviewed for the refinement of the proposed framework architecture and checking individual model performance. We conclude by considering advanced modeling techniques that borrow concepts from big data analytics, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, before discussing the potential future impact of systems radiobiology approaches. PMID:27379211

  20. A Self-Categorization Explanation for Opinion Consensus Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jinguang; Reid, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    The public expression of opinions (and related communicative activities) hinges upon the perception of opinion consensus. Current explanations for opinion consensus perceptions typically focus on egocentric and other biases, rather than functional cognitions. Using self-categorization theory we showed that opinion consensus perceptions flow from…

  1. 42 CFR 411.389 - Range of the advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Range of the advisory opinion. 411.389 Section 411.389 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... opinion. (a) An advisory opinion states only CMS's opinion regarding the subject matter of the request....

  2. 42 CFR 411.389 - Range of the advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Range of the advisory opinion. 411.389 Section 411.389 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... opinion. (a) An advisory opinion states only CMS's opinion regarding the subject matter of the request....

  3. 42 CFR 411.389 - Range of the advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Range of the advisory opinion. 411.389 Section 411.389 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... opinion. (a) An advisory opinion states only CMS's opinion regarding the subject matter of the request....

  4. 42 CFR 411.389 - Range of the advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Range of the advisory opinion. 411.389 Section 411.389 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... opinion. (a) An advisory opinion states only CMS's opinion regarding the subject matter of the request....

  5. 42 CFR 411.389 - Range of the advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Range of the advisory opinion. 411.389 Section 411.389 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... opinion. (a) An advisory opinion states only CMS's opinion regarding the subject matter of the request....

  6. 29 CFR 18.704 - Opinion on ultimate issue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Opinion on ultimate issue. 18.704 Section 18.704 Labor... OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Opinions and Expert Testimony § 18.704 Opinion on ultimate issue. Testimony in the form of an opinion or inference otherwise admissible is not...

  7. 49 CFR 604.19 - Processing of advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Processing of advisory opinions. 604.19 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CHARTER SERVICE Advisory Opinions and Cease and Desist Orders § 604.19 Processing of advisory opinions. (a) A request for an advisory opinion shall be sent to the...

  8. 28 CFR 80.11 - Effect of FCPA Opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Effect of FCPA Opinion. 80.11 Section 80.11 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT OPINION PROCEDURE § 80.11 Effect of FCPA Opinion. Except as specified in § 80.10, an FCPA Opinion will not bind...

  9. 32 CFR 1698.2 - Requests for advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requests for advisory opinions. 1698.2 Section... ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.2 Requests for advisory opinions. (a) Any male born after December 31, 1959 who has attained 18 years of age may request an advisory opinion as to his liability to register...

  10. 32 CFR 1698.2 - Requests for advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Requests for advisory opinions. 1698.2 Section... ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.2 Requests for advisory opinions. (a) Any male born after December 31, 1959 who has attained 18 years of age may request an advisory opinion as to his liability to register...

  11. 5 CFR 2638.309 - Reliance on formal advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reliance on formal advisory opinions... OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS AND EXECUTIVE AGENCY ETHICS PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITIES Formal Advisory Opinion Service § 2638.309 Reliance on formal advisory opinions. (a) Any formal advisory opinion referred to...

  12. 49 CFR 604.20 - Effect of an advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Effect of an advisory opinion. 604.20 Section 604... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CHARTER SERVICE Advisory Opinions and Cease and Desist Orders § 604.20 Effect of an advisory opinion. (a) An advisory opinion represents the formal position of FTA on...

  13. 32 CFR 1698.2 - Requests for advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Requests for advisory opinions. 1698.2 Section... ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.2 Requests for advisory opinions. (a) Any male born after December 31, 1959 who has attained 18 years of age may request an advisory opinion as to his liability to register...

  14. 28 CFR 80.11 - Effect of FCPA Opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effect of FCPA Opinion. 80.11 Section 80.11 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT OPINION PROCEDURE § 80.11 Effect of FCPA Opinion. Except as specified in § 80.10, an FCPA Opinion will not bind...

  15. 32 CFR 1698.7 - Reconsideration of advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reconsideration of advisory opinions. 1698.7... ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.7 Reconsideration of advisory opinions. Whenever the Director has reason to believe that there is substantial error in the information on which an advisory opinion is based, he...

  16. 28 CFR 80.11 - Effect of FCPA Opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Effect of FCPA Opinion. 80.11 Section 80.11 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT OPINION PROCEDURE § 80.11 Effect of FCPA Opinion. Except as specified in § 80.10, an FCPA Opinion will not bind...

  17. 10 CFR 590.404 - Final opinions and orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Final opinions and orders. 590.404 Section 590.404 Energy... WITH RESPECT TO THE IMPORT AND EXPORT OF NATURAL GAS Opinions and Orders § 590.404 Final opinions and orders. The Assistant Secretary shall issue a final opinion and order and attach such conditions...

  18. 32 CFR 1698.5 - Basis of advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Basis of advisory opinions. 1698.5 Section 1698.5 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.5 Basis of advisory opinions. Advisory opinions will be based on the request...

  19. 29 CFR 101.39 - Initiation of advisory opinion case.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Initiation of advisory opinion case. 101.39 Section 101.39... Opinions and Declaratory Orders Regarding Board Jurisdiction § 101.39 Initiation of advisory opinion case... advisory opinion determining whether it would or would not assert jurisdiction on the basis of the...

  20. 32 CFR 1698.7 - Reconsideration of advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reconsideration of advisory opinions. 1698.7... ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.7 Reconsideration of advisory opinions. Whenever the Director has reason to believe that there is substantial error in the information on which an advisory opinion is based, he...

  1. 5 CFR 2638.309 - Reliance on formal advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reliance on formal advisory opinions... OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS AND EXECUTIVE AGENCY ETHICS PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITIES Formal Advisory Opinion Service § 2638.309 Reliance on formal advisory opinions. (a) Any formal advisory opinion referred to...

  2. 32 CFR 1698.5 - Basis of advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Basis of advisory opinions. 1698.5 Section 1698.5 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.5 Basis of advisory opinions. Advisory opinions will be based on the request...

  3. 32 CFR 1698.7 - Reconsideration of advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reconsideration of advisory opinions. 1698.7... ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.7 Reconsideration of advisory opinions. Whenever the Director has reason to believe that there is substantial error in the information on which an advisory opinion is based, he...

  4. 29 CFR 18.704 - Opinion on ultimate issue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Opinion on ultimate issue. 18.704 Section 18.704 Labor... OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Opinions and Expert Testimony § 18.704 Opinion on ultimate issue. Testimony in the form of an opinion or inference otherwise admissible is not...

  5. 49 CFR 604.18 - Request for an advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Request for an advisory opinion. 604.18 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CHARTER SERVICE Advisory Opinions and Cease and Desist Orders § 604.18 Request for an advisory opinion. (a) An interested party may request an advisory opinion from...

  6. 32 CFR 1698.7 - Reconsideration of advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reconsideration of advisory opinions. 1698.7... ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.7 Reconsideration of advisory opinions. Whenever the Director has reason to believe that there is substantial error in the information on which an advisory opinion is based, he...

  7. 32 CFR 1698.2 - Requests for advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Requests for advisory opinions. 1698.2 Section... ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.2 Requests for advisory opinions. (a) Any male born after December 31, 1959 who has attained 18 years of age may request an advisory opinion as to his liability to register...

  8. 32 CFR 1698.8 - Effect of advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Effect of advisory opinion. 1698.8 Section 1698... OPINIONS § 1698.8 Effect of advisory opinion. The Selective Service System will not take action with respect to any person concerning whom the Director has issued an advisory opinion insonsistent with...

  9. 14 CFR 13.227 - Expert or opinion witnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Expert or opinion witnesses. 13.227 Section... Expert or opinion witnesses. An employee of the agency may not be called as an expert or opinion witness... respondent may not be called by an agency attorney as an expert or opinion witness for the FAA in...

  10. 49 CFR 604.19 - Processing of advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Processing of advisory opinions. 604.19 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CHARTER SERVICE Advisory Opinions and Cease and Desist Orders § 604.19 Processing of advisory opinions. (a) A request for an advisory opinion shall be sent to the...

  11. 32 CFR 1698.5 - Basis of advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Basis of advisory opinions. 1698.5 Section 1698.5 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.5 Basis of advisory opinions. Advisory opinions will be based on the request...

  12. 49 CFR 604.18 - Request for an advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Request for an advisory opinion. 604.18 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CHARTER SERVICE Advisory Opinions and Cease and Desist Orders § 604.18 Request for an advisory opinion. (a) An interested party may request an advisory opinion from...

  13. 32 CFR 1698.7 - Reconsideration of advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reconsideration of advisory opinions. 1698.7... ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.7 Reconsideration of advisory opinions. Whenever the Director has reason to believe that there is substantial error in the information on which an advisory opinion is based, he...

  14. 32 CFR 1698.5 - Basis of advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Basis of advisory opinions. 1698.5 Section 1698.5 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.5 Basis of advisory opinions. Advisory opinions will be based on the request...

  15. 29 CFR 18.704 - Opinion on ultimate issue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Opinion on ultimate issue. 18.704 Section 18.704 Labor... OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Opinions and Expert Testimony § 18.704 Opinion on ultimate issue. Testimony in the form of an opinion or inference otherwise admissible is not...

  16. 49 CFR 604.19 - Processing of advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Processing of advisory opinions. 604.19 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CHARTER SERVICE Advisory Opinions and Cease and Desist Orders § 604.19 Processing of advisory opinions. (a) A request for an advisory opinion shall be sent to the...

  17. 14 CFR 13.227 - Expert or opinion witnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Expert or opinion witnesses. 13.227 Section... Expert or opinion witnesses. An employee of the agency may not be called as an expert or opinion witness... respondent may not be called by an agency attorney as an expert or opinion witness for the FAA in...

  18. 28 CFR 80.11 - Effect of FCPA Opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Effect of FCPA Opinion. 80.11 Section 80.11 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT OPINION PROCEDURE § 80.11 Effect of FCPA Opinion. Except as specified in § 80.10, an FCPA Opinion will not bind...

  19. 32 CFR 1698.2 - Requests for advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Requests for advisory opinions. 1698.2 Section... ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.2 Requests for advisory opinions. (a) Any male born after December 31, 1959 who has attained 18 years of age may request an advisory opinion as to his liability to register...

  20. 49 CFR 604.20 - Effect of an advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Effect of an advisory opinion. 604.20 Section 604... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CHARTER SERVICE Advisory Opinions and Cease and Desist Orders § 604.20 Effect of an advisory opinion. (a) An advisory opinion represents the formal position of FTA on...

  1. 29 CFR 101.39 - Initiation of advisory opinion case.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Initiation of advisory opinion case. 101.39 Section 101.39... Opinions and Declaratory Orders Regarding Board Jurisdiction § 101.39 Initiation of advisory opinion case... advisory opinion determining whether it would or would not assert jurisdiction on the basis of the...

  2. 49 CFR 604.19 - Processing of advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Processing of advisory opinions. 604.19 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CHARTER SERVICE Advisory Opinions and Cease and Desist Orders § 604.19 Processing of advisory opinions. (a) A request for an advisory opinion shall be sent to the...

  3. 32 CFR 1698.5 - Basis of advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Basis of advisory opinions. 1698.5 Section 1698.5 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.5 Basis of advisory opinions. Advisory opinions will be based on the request...

  4. 29 CFR 101.39 - Initiation of advisory opinion case.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Initiation of advisory opinion case. 101.39 Section 101.39... Opinions and Declaratory Orders Regarding Board Jurisdiction § 101.39 Initiation of advisory opinion case... advisory opinion determining whether it would or would not assert jurisdiction on the basis of the...

  5. 5 CFR 2638.309 - Reliance on formal advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reliance on formal advisory opinions... OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS AND EXECUTIVE AGENCY ETHICS PROGRAM RESPONSIBILITIES Formal Advisory Opinion Service § 2638.309 Reliance on formal advisory opinions. (a) Any formal advisory opinion referred to...

  6. 49 CFR 604.19 - Processing of advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Processing of advisory opinions. 604.19 Section... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CHARTER SERVICE Advisory Opinions and Cease and Desist Orders § 604.19 Processing of advisory opinions. (a) A request for an advisory opinion shall be sent to the...

  7. 29 CFR 101.39 - Initiation of advisory opinion case.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Initiation of advisory opinion case. 101.39 Section 101.39... Opinions and Declaratory Orders Regarding Board Jurisdiction § 101.39 Initiation of advisory opinion case... advisory opinion determining whether it would or would not assert jurisdiction on the basis of the...

  8. 49 CFR 604.20 - Effect of an advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Effect of an advisory opinion. 604.20 Section 604... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CHARTER SERVICE Advisory Opinions and Cease and Desist Orders § 604.20 Effect of an advisory opinion. (a) An advisory opinion represents the formal position of FTA on...

  9. 28 CFR 80.11 - Effect of FCPA Opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Effect of FCPA Opinion. 80.11 Section 80.11 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT OPINION PROCEDURE § 80.11 Effect of FCPA Opinion. Except as specified in § 80.10, an FCPA Opinion will not bind...

  10. Predicting toxicity in radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Landoni, Valeria; Fiorino, Claudio; Cozzarini, Cesare; Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Valdagni, Riccardo; Rancati, Tiziana

    2016-03-01

    This comprehensive review addresses most organs at risk involved in planning optimization for prostate cancer. It can be considered an update of a previous educational review that was published in 2009 (Fiorino et al., 2009). The literature was reviewed based on PubMed and MEDLINE database searches (from January 2009 up to September 2015), including papers in press; for each section/subsection, key title words were used and possibly combined with other more general key-words (such as radiotherapy, dose-volume effects, NTCP, DVH, and predictive model). Publications generally dealing with toxicity without any association with dose-volume effects or correlations with clinical risk factors were disregarded, being outside the aim of the review. A focus was on external beam radiotherapy, including post-prostatectomy, with conventional fractionation or moderate hypofractionation (<4Gy/fraction); extreme hypofractionation is the topic of another paper in this special issue. Gastrointestinal and urinary toxicity are the most investigated endpoints, with quantitative data published in the last 5years suggesting both a dose-response relationship and the existence of a number of clinical/patient related risk factors acting as dose-response modifiers. Some results on erectile dysfunction, bowel toxicity and hematological toxicity are also presented. PMID:27068274

  11. Dose masking feature for BNCT radiotherapy planning

    DOEpatents

    Cook, Jeremy L.; Wessol, Daniel E.; Wheeler, Floyd J.

    2000-01-01

    A system for displaying an accurate model of isodoses to be used in radiotherapy so that appropriate planning can be performed prior to actual treatment on a patient. The nature of the simulation of the radiotherapy planning for BNCT and Fast Neutron Therapy, etc., requires that the doses be computed in the entire volume. The "entire volume" includes the patient and beam geometries as well as the air spaces in between. Isodoses derived from the computed doses will therefore extend into the air regions between the patient and beam geometries and thus depict the unrealistic possibility that radiation deposition occurs in regions containing no physical media. This problem is solved by computing the doses for the entire geometry and then masking the physical and air regions along with the isodose contours superimposed over the patient image at the corresponding plane. The user is thus able to mask out (remove) the contour lines from the unwanted areas of the image by selecting the appropriate contour masking region from the raster image.

  12. Variability of Target and Normal Structure Delineation for Breast Cancer Radiotherapy: An RTOG Multi-Institutional and Multiobserver Study

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X. Allen Tai, An; Arthur, Douglas W.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Macdonald, Shannon; Marks, Lawrence B.; Moran, Jean M.; Pierce, Lori J.; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Taghian, Alphonse; Vicini, Frank; Woodward, Wendy; White, Julia R.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To quantify the multi-institutional and multiobserver variability of target and organ-at-risk (OAR) delineation for breast-cancer radiotherapy (RT) and its dosimetric impact as the first step of a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group effort to establish a breast cancer atlas. Methods and Materials: Nine radiation oncologists specializing in breast RT from eight institutions independently delineated targets (e.g., lumpectomy cavity, boost planning target volume, breast, supraclavicular, axillary and internal mammary nodes, chest wall) and OARs (e.g., heart, lung) on the same CT images of three representative breast cancer patients. Interobserver differences in structure delineation were quantified regarding volume, distance between centers of mass, percent overlap, and average surface distance. Mean, median, and standard deviation for these quantities were calculated for all possible combinations. To assess the impact of these variations on treatment planning, representative dosimetric plans based on observer-specific contours were generated. Results: Variability in contouring the targets and OARs between the institutions and observers was substantial. Structure overlaps were as low as 10%, and volume variations had standard deviations up to 60%. The large variability was related both to differences in opinion regarding target and OAR boundaries and approach to incorporation of setup uncertainty and dosimetric limitations in target delineation. These interobserver differences result in substantial variations in dosimetric planning for breast RT. Conclusions: Differences in target and OAR delineation for breast irradiation between institutions/observers appear to be clinically and dosimetrically significant. A systematic consensus is highly desirable, particularly in the era of intensity-modulated and image-guided RT.

  13. Identifying Network Public Opinion Leaders Based on Markov Logic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weizhe; Li, Xiaoqiang; He, Hui; Wang, Xing

    2014-01-01

    Public opinion emergencies have important effect on social activities. Recognition of special communities like opinion leaders can contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the development trend of public opinion. In this paper, a network opinion leader recognition method based on relational data was put forward, and an opinion leader recognition system integrating public opinion data acquisition module, data characteristic selection, and fusion module as well as opinion leader discovery module based on Markov Logic Networks was designed. The designed opinion leader recognition system not only can overcome the incomplete data acquisition and isolated task of traditional methods, but also can recognize opinion leaders comprehensively with considerations to multiple problems by using the relational model. Experimental results demonstrated that, compared with the traditional methods, the proposed method can provide a more accurate opinion leader recognition and has good noise immunity. PMID:24977188

  14. [Description of latest generation equipment in external radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Pellejero, S; Lozares, S; Mañeru, F

    2009-01-01

    Both the planning systems and the form of administering radiotherapy have changed radically since the introduction of 3D planning. At present treatment planning based on computerised axial tomography (CAT) images is standard practice in radiotherapy services. In recent years lineal accelerators for medical use have incorporated technology capable of administering intensity modulated radiation beams (IMRT). With this mode distributions of conformed doses are generated that adjust to the three dimensional form of the white volume, providing appropriate coverage and a lower dose to nearby risk organs. The use of IMRT is rapidly spreading amongst radiotherapy centres throughout the world. This growing use of IMRT has focused attention on the need for greater control of the geometric uncertainties in positioning the patient and control of internal movements. To this end, both flat and volumetric image systems have been incorporated into the treatment equipment, making image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) possible. This article offers a brief description of the latest advances included in the planning and administration of radiotherapy treatment. PMID:19738655

  15. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dayes, I; Rumble, R B; Bowen, J; Dixon, P; Warde, P

    2012-09-01

    Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is a newer method of radiotherapy that uses beams with multiple intensity levels for any single beam, allowing concave dose distributions and tighter margins than those possible using conventional radiotherapy. IMRT is ideal for treating complex treatment volumes and avoiding close proximity organs at risk that may be dose limiting and provides increased tumour control through an escalated dose and reduces normal tissue complications through organ at risk sparing. Given the potential advantages of IMRT and the availability of IMRT-enabled treatment planning systems and linear accelerators, IMRT has been introduced in a number of disease sites. This systematic review examined the evidence for IMRT in the treatment of breast cancer to quantify the potential benefits of this new technology and to make recommendations for radiation treatment programmes considering adopting this technique. Providing that avoidance of acute adverse effects associated with radiation is an outcome of interest, then IMRT is recommended over tangential radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery, based on a review of six published reports including 2012 patients. There were insufficient data to recommend IMRT over standard tangential radiotherapy for reasons of oncological outcomes or late toxicity. Future research should focus on studies with longer follow-up and provide data on late toxicity and disease recurrence rates. PMID:22748561

  16. [Medical expert opinion--credibility, ethics, remuneration].

    PubMed

    Sahar, Avraham

    2007-07-01

    Israeli Law requires a Personal Injury Claim to be supported by an Expert Medical Opinion. Such evidence provides the Court with information essential for the evaluation of scientific material, which is beyond the Court's "judicial knowledge". Incongruent Expert Opinions are not necessarily the result of deceit. Experts are entitled to differences in their respective evaluation and interpretation of data and conflicting medical opinions may be legitimate. The Court's duty and prerogative is to select the "legally correct" opinion. The sole tool at the Court's disposal is precise and logical thinking, aided by principles set by the U.S. Supreme Court for the evaluation of scientific evidence, and adopted by the Israeli Court. The choice of the "correct" opinion centers on it's objectivity. A court-appointed expert is not necessarily an effective solution. Remuneration of the expert by the interested party increases the level of mistrust. The difficult questions concerning the credibility of an opinion arise as the result of insufficient specific expertise of the witness, presentation by a pretender to expertise or plain misrepresentation of data, excerpts of literature etc. Such transgressions are best exposed by the opposing party's expert and attorney. The court has effective means for the control of such behavior. The fraudulent expert witness is neither immune to criminal prosecution, nor to civil suit. IMA's Code of Ethics for Experts is adequate. Expert's fees should be consistent with the effort involved, as well as with the expert's rank and experience. Any linkage of fees to the outcome of the procedure should be prohibited, as well as the intervention of "contractors". Attempts to limit experts' fees, may result in the abstention of the most knowledgeable specialists from such duties. The blame for a false opinion does not lie with the paying party, it is mostly the witness who is responsible. PMID:17803167

  17. Practical problems in aggregating expert opinions

    SciTech Connect

    Booker, J.M.; Picard, R.R.; Meyer, M.A.

    1993-11-01

    Expert opinion is data given by a qualified person in response to a technical question. In these analyses, expert opinion provides information where other data are either sparse or non-existent. Improvements in forecasting result from the advantageous addition of expert opinion to observed data in many areas, such as meteorology and econometrics. More generally, analyses of large, complex systems often involve experts on various components of the system supplying input to a decision process; applications include such wide-ranging areas as nuclear reactor safety, management science, and seismology. For large or complex applications, no single expert may be knowledgeable enough about the entire application. In other problems, decision makers may find it comforting that a consensus or aggregation of opinions is usually better than a single opinion. Many risk and reliability studies require a single estimate for modeling, analysis, reporting, and decision making purposes. For problems with large uncertainties, the strategy of combining as diverse a set of experts as possible hedges against underestimation of that uncertainty. Decision makers are frequently faced with the task of selecting the experts and combining their opinions. However, the aggregation is often the responsibility of an analyst. Whether the decision maker or the analyst does the aggregation, the input for it, such as providing weights for experts or estimating other parameters, is imperfect owing to a lack of omniscience. Aggregation methods for expert opinions have existed for over thirty years; yet many of the difficulties with their use remain unresolved. The bulk of these problem areas are summarized in the sections that follow: sensitivities of results to assumptions, weights for experts, correlation of experts, and handling uncertainties. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the sources of these problems and describe their effects on aggregation.

  18. [Stereotactic radiotherapy in brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Dhermain, F; Reyns, N; Colin, P; Métellus, P; Mornex, F; Noël, G

    2015-02-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy of brain metastases is increasingly proposed after polydisciplinary debates among experts. Its definition and modalities of prescription, indications and clinical interest regarding the balance between efficacy versus toxicity need to be discussed. Stereotactic radiotherapy is a 'high precision' irradiation technique (within 1mm), using different machines (with invasive contention or frameless, photons X or gamma) delivering high doses (4 to 25Gy) in a limited number of fractions (usually 1 to 5, ten maximum) with a high dose gradient. Dose prescription will depend on materials, dose constraints to organs at risk varying with fractionation. Stereotactic radiotherapy may be proposed: (1) in combination with whole brain radiotherapy with the goal of increasing (modestly) overall survival of patients with a good performance status, 1 to 3 brain metastases and a controlled extracranial disease; (2) for recurrence of 1-3 brain metastases after whole brain radiotherapy; (3) after complete resection of a large and/or symptomatic brain metastases; (4) after diagnosis of 3-5 asymptomatic new or progressing brain metastases during systemic therapy, with the aim of delaying whole brain radiotherapy (avoiding its potential neurotoxicity) and maintaining a high focal control rate. Only a strict follow-up with clinical and MRI every 3 months will permit to deliver iterative stereotactic radiotherapies without jeopardizing survival. Simultaneous delivering of stereotactic radiotherapy with targeted medicines should be carefully discussed. PMID:25640215

  19. Conformal Radiotherapy in the Treatment of Advanced Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma With Intracranial Extension: An Institutional Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Santam; Ghoshal, Sushmita; Patil, Vijay Maruti; Oinam, Arun Singh; Sharma, Suresh C.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To describe the results of conformal radiotherapy in advanced juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma in a tertiary care institution. Methods and Materials: Retrospective chart review was conducted for 8 patients treated with conformal radiotherapy between 2006 and 2009. The median follow-up was 17 months. All patients had Stage IIIB disease with intracranial extension. Radiotherapy was considered as treatment because patients were deemed inoperable owing to extensive intracranial/intraorbital extension or proximity to optic nerve. All but 1 patient were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy using seven coplanar fields. Median (range) dose prescribed was 39.6 (30-46) Gy. Actuarial analysis of local control and descriptive analysis of toxicity profile was conducted. Results: Despite the large and complex target volume (median planning target volume, 292 cm{sup 3}), intensity-modulated radiotherapy achieved conformal dose distributions (median van't Reit index, 0.66). Significant sparing of the surrounding organs at risk was obtained. No significant Grade 3/4 toxicities were experienced during or after treatment. Actual local control at 2 years was 87.5%. One patient died 1 month after radiotherapy secondary to massive epistaxis. The remaining 7 patients had progressive resolution of disease and were symptom-free at last follow-up. Persistent rhinitis was the only significant toxicity, seen in 1 patient. Conclusions: Conformal radiotherapy results in good local control with minimal acute and late side effects in juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas, even in the presence of advanced disease.

  20. Information Filtering Based on Users' Negative Opinions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qiang; Li, Yang; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2013-05-01

    The process of heat conduction (HC) has recently found application in the information filtering [Zhang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett.99, 154301 (2007)], which is of high diversity but low accuracy. The classical HC model predicts users' potential interested objects based on their interesting objects regardless to the negative opinions. In terms of the users' rating scores, we present an improved user-based HC (UHC) information model by taking into account users' positive and negative opinions. Firstly, the objects rated by users are divided into positive and negative categories, then the predicted interesting and dislike object lists are generated by the UHC model. Finally, the recommendation lists are constructed by filtering out the dislike objects from the interesting lists. By implementing the new model based on nine similarity measures, the experimental results for MovieLens and Netflix datasets show that the new model considering negative opinions could greatly enhance the accuracy, measured by the average ranking score, from 0.049 to 0.036 for Netflix and from 0.1025 to 0.0570 for Movielens dataset, reduced by 26.53% and 44.39%, respectively. Since users prefer to give positive ratings rather than negative ones, the negative opinions contain much more information than the positive ones, the negative opinions, therefore, are very important for understanding users' online collective behaviors and improving the performance of HC model.

  1. Percolation in a kinetic opinion exchange model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Anjan Kumar

    2012-02-01

    We study the percolation transition of the geometrical clusters in the square-lattice LCCC model [a kinetic opinion exchange model introduced by Lallouache, Chakrabarti, Chakraborti, and Chakrabarti, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.82.056112 82, 056112 (2010)] with the change in conviction and influencing parameter. The cluster is comprised of the adjacent sites having an opinion value greater than or equal to a prefixed threshold value of opinion (Ω). The transition point is different from that obtained for the transition of the order parameter (average opinion value) found by Lallouache Although the transition point varies with the change in the threshold value of the opinion, the critical exponents for the percolation transition obtained from the data collapses of the maximum cluster size, the cluster size distribution, and the Binder cumulant remain the same. The exponents are also independent of the values of conviction and influencing parameters, indicating the robustness of this transition. The exponents do not match any other known percolation exponents (e.g., the static Ising, dynamic Ising, and standard percolation). This means that the LCCC model belongs to a separate universality class.

  2. Clinical Experience With Image-Guided Radiotherapy in an Accelerated Partial Breast Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Charles E.; Tallhamer, Michael M.S.; Johnson, Tim; Hunter, Kari C.M.D.; Howell, Kathryn; Kercher, Jane; Widener, Jodi; Kaske, Terese; Paul, Devchand; Sedlacek, Scot; Carter, Dennis L.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of fiducial markers for the use of image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) in an accelerated partial breast intensity modulated radiotherapy protocol. Methods and Materials: Nineteen patients consented to an institutional review board approved protocol of accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy with fiducial marker placement and treatment with IGRT. Patients (1 patient with bilateral breast cancer; 20 total breasts) underwent ultrasound guided implantation of three 1.2- x 3-mm gold markers placed around the surgical cavity. For each patient, table shifts (inferior/superior, right/left lateral, and anterior/posterior) and minimum, maximum, mean error with standard deviation were recorded for each of the 10 BID treatments. The dose contribution of daily orthogonal films was also examined. Results: All IGRT patients underwent successful marker placement. In all, 200 IGRT treatment sessions were performed. The average vector displacement was 4 mm (range, 2-7 mm). The average superior/inferior shift was 2 mm (range, 0-5 mm), the average lateral shift was 2 mm (range, 1-4 mm), and the average anterior/posterior shift was 3 mm (range, 1 5 mm). Conclusions: This study shows that the use of IGRT can be successfully used in an accelerated partial breast intensity-modulated radiotherapy protocol. The authors believe that this technique has increased daily treatment accuracy and permitted reduction in the margin added to the clinical target volume to form the planning target volume.

  3. Monte Carlo dosimetry for synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy of brain tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudou, Caroline; Balosso, Jacques; Estève, François; Elleaume, Hélène

    2005-10-01

    A radiation dose enhancement can be obtained in brain tumours after infusion of an iodinated contrast agent and irradiation with kilovoltage x-rays in tomography mode. The aim of this study was to assess dosimetric properties of the synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy technique applied to humans (SSR) for preparing clinical trials. We designed an interface for dose computation based on a Monte Carlo code (MCNPX). A patient head was constructed from computed tomography (CT) data and a tumour volume was modelled. Dose distributions were calculated in SSR configuration for various energy beam and iodine content in the target volume. From the calculations, it appears that the iodine-filled target (10 mg ml-1) can be efficiently irradiated by a monochromatic beam of energy ranging from 50 to 85 keV. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of stereotactic radiotherapy for treating deep-seated brain tumours with monoenergetic x-rays from a synchrotron.

  4. Opinion formation on social media: an empirical approach.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Fei; Liu, Yun

    2014-03-01

    Opinion exchange models aim to describe the process of public opinion formation, seeking to uncover the intrinsic mechanism in social systems; however, the model results are seldom empirically justified using large-scale actual data. Online social media provide an abundance of data on opinion interaction, but the question of whether opinion models are suitable for characterizing opinion formation on social media still requires exploration. We collect a large amount of user interaction information from an actual social network, i.e., Twitter, and analyze the dynamic sentiments of users about different topics to investigate realistic opinion evolution. We find two nontrivial results from these data. First, public opinion often evolves to an ordered state in which one opinion predominates, but not to complete consensus. Second, agents are reluctant to change their opinions, and the distribution of the number of individual opinion changes follows a power law. Then, we suggest a model in which agents take external actions to express their internal opinions according to their activity. Conversely, individual actions can influence the activity and opinions of neighbors. The probability that an agent changes its opinion depends nonlinearly on the fraction of opponents who have taken an action. Simulation results show user action patterns and the evolution of public opinion in the model coincide with the empirical data. For different nonlinear parameters, the system may approach different regimes. A large decay in individual activity slows down the dynamics, but causes more ordering in the system. PMID:24697392

  5. Opinion formation on social media: An empirical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Fei; Liu, Yun

    2014-03-01

    Opinion exchange models aim to describe the process of public opinion formation, seeking to uncover the intrinsic mechanism in social systems; however, the model results are seldom empirically justified using large-scale actual data. Online social media provide an abundance of data on opinion interaction, but the question of whether opinion models are suitable for characterizing opinion formation on social media still requires exploration. We collect a large amount of user interaction information from an actual social network, i.e., Twitter, and analyze the dynamic sentiments of users about different topics to investigate realistic opinion evolution. We find two nontrivial results from these data. First, public opinion often evolves to an ordered state in which one opinion predominates, but not to complete consensus. Second, agents are reluctant to change their opinions, and the distribution of the number of individual opinion changes follows a power law. Then, we suggest a model in which agents take external actions to express their internal opinions according to their activity. Conversely, individual actions can influence the activity and opinions of neighbors. The probability that an agent changes its opinion depends nonlinearly on the fraction of opponents who have taken an action. Simulation results show user action patterns and the evolution of public opinion in the model coincide with the empirical data. For different nonlinear parameters, the system may approach different regimes. A large decay in individual activity slows down the dynamics, but causes more ordering in the system.

  6. Analysing Customer Opinions with Text Mining Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consoli, Domenico

    2009-08-01

    Knowing what the customer thinks of a particular product/service helps top management to introduce improvements in processes and products, thus differentiating the company from their competitors and gain competitive advantages. The customers, with their preferences, determine the success or failure of a company. In order to know opinions of the customers we can use technologies available from the web 2.0 (blog, wiki, forums, chat, social networking, social commerce). From these web sites, useful information must be extracted, for strategic purposes, using techniques of sentiment analysis or opinion mining.

  7. Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Favorable Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rene, Nicholas; Faria, Sergio; Cury, Fabio; David, Marc; Duclos, Marie; Shenouda, George; Souhami, Luis

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Since the recognition that prostate cancer probably has a low {alpha}/{beta} ratio, hypofractionated radiotherapy has become an attractive treatment option for localized prostate cancer. However, there is little experience with the use of hypofractionation delivering a high biologically equivalent dose. We report our experience with high-dose hypofractionated radiotherapy. Material and Methods: A total of 129 patients with favorable risk prostate cancer were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy treatment plans to the dose of 66 Gy in 22 fractions, prescribed at the isocenter. Planning target volume consisted of the prostate plus a uniform 7-mm margin, including the rectal margin. No patient received hormonal therapy. Toxicity was prospectively graded by the Common Toxicity Criteria version3. Biochemical relapse was defined as postradiotherapy nadir prostate-specific antigen + 2 ng/mL. Results: With a median follow-up of 51 months, the 5-year actuarial biochemical control rate is 98%. The only 3 cases with biochemical failure did not have a clinical local relapse. More than 50% of patients did not develop acute toxicity. For late toxicity, the worst crude rate of Grade {>=}2 genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity seen at any time during follow-up were 32% and 25%, respectively. There was no Grade 4 or 5 toxicity. At the last follow-up, persistent Grade {>=}2 late GU and GI toxicity were 2% and 1.5%, respectively. Conclusions: This hypofractionated regimen provides excellent biochemical control in favorable risk prostate cancer with an acceptable rate of late toxicity. Further studies exploring this hypofractionation regimen are warranted.

  8. Understanding Radiotherapy-Induced Second Cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, David

    2007-03-01

    There is increasing concern regarding radiation-related second-cancer risks in long-term radiotherapy survivors, and a corresponding need to be able to predict cancer risks at high radiation doses. While cancer risks at moderately low radiation doses are reasonably understood from A-bomb survivor studies, there is much more uncertainty at the high doses used in radiotherapy. It has generally been assumed that cancer induction decreases rapidly at high doses due to cell killing. However, most recent studies of radiation-induced second cancers in the lung and breast, covering a very wide range of doses, contradict this assumption. A likely resolution of this disagreement comes from considering cellular repopulation during and after radiation exposure. Repopulation / proliferation with a significant number radiation-induced pre-malignant cells, tends to counteract the effect of cell killing, and keeps the induced cancer risks higher at high doses. We describe and apply a biologically based, minimally parameterized model of dose-dependent cancer risks, incorporating carcinogenic effects, cell killing and, additionally, proliferation / repopulation effects. The situation is somewhat different for radiation-induced leukemia, as repopulation via the blood stream tends to be with cells that originated father away from the treatment volume than is the case for solid second cancers, thus containing a smaller proportion of radiation-damaged cells. The model predictions agree well with recent data on second cancer risks, both for radiation-induced solid cancers and for radiation-induced leukemias. Incorporating repopulation effects provides both a mechanistic understanding of cancer risks at high doses, as well as providing a practical methodology for predicting, and therefore potentially minimizing, cancer risks in organs exposed to high radiation doses during radiotherapy.

  9. Clinical Applications of 3-D Conformal Radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miralbell, Raymond

    Although a significant improvement in cancer cure (i.e. 20% increment) has been obtained in the last 2-3 decades, 30-40% of patients still fail locally after curative radiotherapy. In order to improve local tumor control rates with radiotherapy high doses to the tumor volume are frequently necessary. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3-D CRT) is used to denote a spectrum of radiation planning and delivery techniques that rely on three-dimensional imaging to define the target (tumor) and to distinguish it from normal tissues. Modern, high-precision radiotherapy (RT) techniques are needed in order to implement the goal of optimal tumor destruction delivering minimal dose to the non-target normal tissues. A better target definition is nowadays possible with contemporary imaging (computerized tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography) and image registration technology. A highly precise dose distributions can be obtained with optimal 3-D CRT treatment delivery techniques such as stereotactic RT, intensity modulated RT (IMRT), or protontherapy (the latter allowing for in-depth conformation). Patient daily set-up repositioning and internal organ immobilization systems are necessary before considering to undertake any of the above mentioned high-precision treatment approaches. Prostate cancer, brain tumors, and base of skull malignancies are among the sites most benefitting of dose escalation approaches. Nevertheless, a significant dose reduction to the normal tissues in the vicinity of the irradiated tumor also achievable with optimal 3-D CRT may also be a major issue in the treatment of pediatric tumors in order to preserve growth, normal development, and to reduce the risk of developing radiation induced diseases such as cancer or endocrinologic disorders.

  10. Radiotherapy planning using MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Maria A.; Payne, Geoffrey S.

    2015-11-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in radiotherapy (RT) planning is rapidly expanding. We review the wide range of image contrast mechanisms available to MRI and the way they are exploited for RT planning. However a number of challenges are also considered: the requirements that MR images are acquired in the RT treatment position, that they are geometrically accurate, that effects of patient motion during the scan are minimized, that tissue markers are clearly demonstrated, that an estimate of electron density can be obtained. These issues are discussed in detail, prior to the consideration of a number of specific clinical applications. This is followed by a brief discussion on the development of real-time MRI-guided RT.

  11. 24 CFR 1710.17 - Advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Advisory opinion. 1710.17 Section 1710.17 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND...

  12. 5 CFR 2636.103 - Advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... from an agency ethics official as to whether specific conduct which has not yet occurred would violate... issue a written opinion as to whether the conduct in issue would violate any provision contained in this part. Where conduct which would not violate this part would violate another statute relating...

  13. Psychiatric Opinion and Homosexuality: A Short Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, R. F.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    In a survey of opinion among 100 psychiatrists and 93 trainees in Australia, the majority endorsed the view either that "homosexuality is a developmental anomaly not necessarily or commonly associated with neurotic symptoms" or that "homosexuality is a normal variant like left-handedness." (Author)

  14. Legal Decisions and Opinions in Pollution Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hills, John P.

    1976-01-01

    When dealing with the "frontier of scientific knowledge" and questions of public health, United States courts are waiving traditional burdens of proof, giving increased weight to expert opinions and/or lowering their standard of necessary proof. Recent cases involving asbestos, pesticides, lead in gasoline, and vinyl chlorides are discussed. (BT)

  15. Farmers' Opinions about Third-Wave Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasley, Paul; Bultena, Gordon

    The opinions of 1,585 Iowa farmers about 8 emergent agricultural technologies (energy production from feed grains and oils; energy production from livestock waste; genetic engineering research on plants, livestock, and humans; robotics for on-farm use; confinement livestock facilities; and personal computers for farm families) were found to be…

  16. Students and Instructors Opinions about Piano Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilic, Deniz Beste Çevik

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the opinions of the students and piano instructors in the Turkish Education Faculties' Fine Arts Instruction Departments' music instruction programs about piano instruction. The study data were collected using a questionnaire administered to the piano instructors and the students who took lessons from them. The study results…

  17. No Common Opinion on the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Michael B.; Peterson, Paul E.; West, Martin R.

    2015-01-01

    According to the three authors of this article, the 2014 "EdNext" poll yields four especially important new findings: (1) Opinion with respect to the Common Core has yet to coalesce. The idea of a common set of standards across the country has wide appeal, and the Common Core itself still commands the support of a majority of the public.…

  18. Opinion and Special Articles: "Physician debtor".

    PubMed

    Scharf, Eugene L; Jones, Lyell K

    2016-01-19

    The increasing cost of attending medical school has contributed to increasing physician indebtedness. The burden of medical school debt has implications for physician career choice, professional satisfaction, and burnout. This opinion discusses the impact of physician indebtedness, the importance of improving debt awareness among neurology trainees, and program- and policy-level solutions to the debt crisis. PMID:26783273

  19. Decision-Making When Public Opinion Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coppock, Rob

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the impact of public opinion on government decision-making, and develops a model that describes how certain input or control factors can combine to produce discontinuous or divergent policy decisions. Available from: Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company, Box 211, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, single copies available. (Author/JG)

  20. The Use of Language in Judicial Opinions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, Stephen S.

    Legal writing is a unique form of composition. The legal style is characterized by a reliance upon nominalizations, archaisms, jargon, and foreign (especially French and Latin) terms and a scarcity of verbs and adverbs. Twelve judicial opinions, all on the subject of whether an advance degree should be considered marital property upon divorce,…

  1. Secondary School Students' Opinions about Readers' Theatre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karabag, S. Gulin

    2015-01-01

    In this article, a teaching strategy which not only blends yesterday and today in a meaningful way but also powerfully integrates literacy and history will be examined. Firstly Readers' Theatre as a technique will be introduced. Secondly, the usage guidelines of Readers' Theatre will be presented. Finally the opinions of secondary school students…

  2. Public opinion factors regarding nuclear power

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, B.

    1991-12-31

    This paper is an effort to identify, as comprehensively as possible, public concerns about nuclear power, and to assess, where possible, the relative importance of these concerns as they relate to government regulation of and policy towards nuclear power. It is based on some two dozen in-depth interviews with key communicators representing the nuclear power industry, the environmental community, and government, as well as on the parallel efforts in our research project: (1) review of federal court case law, (2) a selective examination of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) administrative process, and (3) the preceding George Mason University research project in this series. The paper synthesizes our findings about public attitudes towards nuclear power as expressed through federal court case law, NRC administrative law, public opinion surveys, and direct personal interviews. In so doing, we describe the public opinion environment in which the nuclear regulatory process must operate. Our premise is that public opinion ultimately underlies the approaches government agencies take towards regulating nuclear power, and that, to the degree that the nuclear power industry`s practices are aligned with public opinion, a more favorable regulatory climate is possible.

  3. Public opinion factors regarding nuclear power

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper is an effort to identify, as comprehensively as possible, public concerns about nuclear power, and to assess, where possible, the relative importance of these concerns as they relate to government regulation of and policy towards nuclear power. It is based on some two dozen in-depth interviews with key communicators representing the nuclear power industry, the environmental community, and government, as well as on the parallel efforts in our research project: (1) review of federal court case law, (2) a selective examination of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) administrative process, and (3) the preceding George Mason University research project in this series. The paper synthesizes our findings about public attitudes towards nuclear power as expressed through federal court case law, NRC administrative law, public opinion surveys, and direct personal interviews. In so doing, we describe the public opinion environment in which the nuclear regulatory process must operate. Our premise is that public opinion ultimately underlies the approaches government agencies take towards regulating nuclear power, and that, to the degree that the nuclear power industry's practices are aligned with public opinion, a more favorable regulatory climate is possible.

  4. Palliative Radiotherapy for Bone Metastases: An ASTRO Evidence-Based Guideline

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Stephen; Berk, Lawrence; Chang, Eric; Chow, Edward; Hahn, Carol; Hoskin, Peter; Howell, David; Konski, Andre; Kachnic, Lisa; Lo, Simon; Sahgal, Arjun; Silverman, Larry; Gunten, Charles von; Mendel, Ehud; Vassil, Andrew; Bruner, Deborah Watkins; Hartsell, William

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To present guidance for patients and physicians regarding the use of radiotherapy in the treatment of bone metastases according to current published evidence and complemented by expert opinion. Methods and Materials: A systematic search of the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database between 1998 and 2009 yielded 4,287 candidate original research articles potentially applicable to radiotherapy for bone metastases. A Task Force composed of all authors synthesized the published evidence and reached a consensus regarding the recommendations contained herein. Results: The Task Force concluded that external beam radiotherapy continues to be the mainstay for the treatment of pain and/or prevention of the morbidity caused by bone metastases. Various fractionation schedules can provide significant palliation of symptoms and/or prevent the morbidity of bone metastases. The evidence for the safety and efficacy of repeat treatment to previously irradiated areas of peripheral bone metastases for pain was derived from both prospective studies and retrospective data, and it can be safe and effective. The use of stereotactic body radiotherapy holds theoretical promise in the treatment of new or recurrent spine lesions, although the Task Force recommended that its use be limited to highly selected patients and preferably within a prospective trial. Surgical decompression and postoperative radiotherapy is recommended for spinal cord compression or spinal instability in highly selected patients with sufficient performance status and life expectancy. The use of bisphosphonates, radionuclides, vertebroplasty, and kyphoplasty for the treatment or prevention of cancer-related symptoms does not obviate the need for external beam radiotherapy in appropriate patients. Conclusions: Radiotherapy is a successful and time efficient method by which to palliate pain and/or prevent the morbidity of bone metastases. This Guideline reviews the available data to define its proper use

  5. Discrepancy and Disliking Do Not Induce Negative Opinion Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Flache, Andreas; Mäs, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Both classical social psychological theories and recent formal models of opinion differentiation and bi-polarization assign a prominent role to negative social influence. Negative influence is defined as shifts away from the opinion of others and hypothesized to be induced by discrepancy with or disliking of the source of influence. There is strong empirical support for the presence of positive social influence (a shift towards the opinion of others), but evidence that large opinion differences or disliking could trigger negative shifts is mixed. We examine positive and negative influence with controlled exposure to opinions of other individuals in one experiment and with opinion exchange in another study. Results confirm that similarities induce attraction, but results do not support that discrepancy or disliking entails negative influence. Instead, our findings suggest a robust positive linear relationship between opinion distance and opinion shifts. PMID:27333160

  6. Indications for Salivary Gland Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Thomson, David J; Slevin, Nick J; Mendenhall, William M

    2016-01-01

    There is an established role for post-operative radiotherapy in the treatment of benign and malignant salivary gland tumours. For benign disease, the addition of radiotherapy improves local tumour control in cases with incomplete excision, involved surgical margins or multi-focal disease recurrence. After capsule rupture or spillage alone, surveillance should usually be advised. For malignant disease, post-operative radiotherapy is recommended for an advanced tumour stage, high-grade tumour, perineural or lympho-vascular invasion, close or positive resection margins, extra-parotid extension or lymph node involvement. The main benefit is increased loco-regional tumour control, although this may translate into a modest improvement in survival. The possible late side effects of parotid bed irradiation include skin changes, chronic otitis externa, sensorineural hearing loss, osteoradionecrosis and secondary malignancy. Severe complications are rare, but patients should be counselled carefully about the risks. Primary radiotherapy is unlikely to be curative and is reserved to cases in which resection would cause unacceptable functional or cosmetic morbidity or would likely result in subtotal resection (R2) or to patients with distant metastases to gain local tumour control. There are provisional data on the use of charged particle radiotherapy in this setting. Some patients may benefit from synchronous chemotherapy with radiotherapy, but this group is not defined, and data from comparative prospective studies are required before routine clinical use of this treatment. PMID:27093301

  7. Xeroderma pigmentosum and medulloblastoma: chromosomal damage to lymphocytes during radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gianneli, F.; Avery, J.; Polani, P.E.; Terrell, C.; Giammusso, V.

    1981-10-01

    The effects of radiotherapy on a patient with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) of complementation group C and medulloblastoma are reported. His lymphocytes showed no x-ray-induced chromatid damage, but unstable chromosomal aberrations increased throughout the course of radiotherapy as observed also in two other children (patients 2 and 3) with a similar tumor. Such damage was more dependent on spinal than cranial irradiation, lowest in the XP patient and highest in patient 3. Interindividual differences seemed largely due to the relative volume of body irradiated, but the damage in patient 3 remained relatively high even after accounting for such a factor. A maximum of 36, 68, and 77% of lymphocytes had aberrations in the XP and patients 2 and 3, respectively, but chromosomal damage did not show a Poisson distribution and indicated admixture of irradiated and nonirradiated cells. The relative frequency of the irradiated cells was estimated and seemed proportional to the ratios of the average irradiated field to the total body area. The XP patient showed no preferential loss of highly damaged cells and seemed not to suffer excessive chromosomal damage; he had a normal clinical response to and a favorable outcome of radiotherapy. These findings reduce anxiety on the use of radiotherapy in XP patients or at least in those of group C.

  8. A Review of Update Clinical Results of Carbon Ion Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tsujii, Hirohiko; Kamada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Among various types of ion species, carbon ions are considered to have the most balanced, optimal properties in terms of possessing physically and biologically effective dose localization in the body. This is due to the fact that when compared with photon beams, carbon ion beams offer improved dose distribution, leading to the concentration of the sufficient dose within a target volume while minimizing the dose in the surrounding normal tissues. In addition, carbon ions, being heavier than protons, provide a higher biological effectiveness, which increases with depth, reaching the maximum at the end of the beam's range. This is practically an ideal property from the standpoint of cancer radiotherapy. Clinical studies have been carried out in the world to confirm the efficacy of carbon ions against a variety of tumors as well as to develop effective techniques for delivering an efficient dose to the tumor. Through clinical experiences of carbon ion radiotherapy at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences and Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung, a significant reduction in the overall treatment time with acceptable toxicities has been obtained in almost all types of tumors. This means that carbon ion radiotherapy has meanwhile achieved for itself a solid place in general practice. This review describes clinical results of carbon ion radiotherapy together with physical, biological and technological aspects of carbon ions. PMID:22798685

  9. Late sensorial alterations in different radiotherapy techniques for nasopharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Riva, Giuseppe; Raimondo, Luca; Ravera, Mattia; Moretto, Francesco; Boita, Monica; Potenza, Ilenia; Rampino, Monica; Ricardi, Umberto; Garzaro, Massimiliano

    2015-05-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) allowed a better distribution of the dose to the tumor volume, sparing surrounding structures. Aim of the study is the objective evaluation of olfactory and gustatory impairments in patients who underwent chemo-radiotherapy for NPC. Correlation between smell and taste alterations, xerostomy, and radiation technique was investigated. Thirty healthy subjects and 30 patients treated with chemo-radiation therapy for NPC, with at least a 2-years follow-up period, were evaluated. All subjects underwent symptoms evaluation, endoscopic fiber optic nasal examination, taste strips, Sniffin' sticks tests, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer late radiation morbidity scoring system. Patients were divided in 2 groups: 2-dimensional radiotherapy/conformal 3-dimensional radiotherapy and IMRT. A higher percentage of rhinorrhea, nasal obstruction, xerostomy, hyposmia, hypogeusia, mucosal hyperemia, and presence of nasopharyngeal secretions was found in irradiated subjects (P < 0.05). Concerning olfactory and gustatory scores, we demonstrated a statistically significant difference between healthy subjects and irradiated patients (P < 0.05), with lower gustatory total score in IMRT group (P < 0.01). In conclusion, chemo-radiotherapy for NPC induces long-term smell and taste impairments, which can compromise quality of life. Although based on small samples, it is also important to consider that IMRT can induce higher taste dysfunction compared with traditional techniques. PMID:25800268

  10. Treatment outcome of postoperative radiotherapy for retroperitoneal sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun Jin; Kwon, Tae-Won; Yook, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Song-Cheol; Han, Duck-Jong; Kim, Choung-Soo; Ahn, Hanjong; Chang, Heung Moon; Ahn, Jin-Hee; Jwa, Eun Jin; Lee, Sang-Wook; Kim, Jong Hoon; Choi, Eun Kyung; Shin, Seong Soo; Ahn, Seung Do

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the treatment outcome and prognostic factor after postoperative radiotherapy in retroperitoneal sarcoma. Materials and Methods Forty patients were treated with surgical resection and postoperative radiotherapy for retroperitoneal sarcoma from August 1990 to August 2008. Treatment volume was judged by the location of initial tumor and surgical field, and 45-50 Gy of radiation was basically delivered and additional dose was considered to the high-risk area. Results The median follow-up period was 41.4 months (range, 3.9 to 140.6 months). The 5-year overall survival (OS) was 51.8% and disease free survival was 31.5%. The 5-year locoregional recurrence free survival was 61.9% and distant metastasis free survival was 50.6%. In univariate analysis, histologic type (p = 0.006) was the strongest prognostic factor for the OS and histologic grade (p = 0.044) or resection margin (p = 0.032) had also effect on the OS. Histologic type (p = 0.004) was unique significant prognostic factor for the actuarial local control. Conclusion Retroperitoneal sarcoma still remains as a poor prognostic disease despite the combined modality treatment including surgery and postoperative radiotherapy. Selective dose-escalation of radiotherapy or combination of effective chemotherapeutic agent must be considered to improve the treatment result especially for the histopathologic type showing poor prognosis. PMID:22984679

  11. Technical Advances and Pitfalls in Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Parvathaneni, Upendra; Laramore, George E.; Liao, Jay J.

    2012-01-01

    Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) is the standard of care in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) based on level 1 evidence. Technical advances in radiotherapy have revolutionized the treatment of HNSCC, with the most tangible gain being a reduction in long term morbidity. However, these benefits come with a serious and sobering price. Today, there is a greater chance of missing the target/tumor due to uncertainties in target volume definition by the clinician that is demanded by the highly conformal planning process involved with IMRT. Unless this is urgently addressed, our patients would be better served with the historically practiced non conformal radiotherapy, than IMRT which promises lesser morbidity. Image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) ensures the level of set up accuracy warranted to deliver a highly conformal treatment plan and should be utilized with IMRT, where feasible. Proton therapy has a theoretical physical advantage over photon therapy due to a lack of “exit dose”. However, clinical data supporting the routine use of this technology for HNSCC are currently sparse. The purpose of this article is to review the literature, discuss the salient issues and make recommendations that address the gaps in knowledge. PMID:22701482

  12. 12 CFR 211.11 - Advisory opinions under Regulation K.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advisory opinions under Regulation K. 211.11... INTERNATIONAL BANKING OPERATIONS (REGULATION K) International Operations of U.S. Banking Organizations § 211.11 Advisory opinions under Regulation K. (a) Request for advisory opinion. Any person may submit a request...

  13. 12 CFR 211.11 - Advisory opinions under Regulation K.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advisory opinions under Regulation K. 211.11... INTERNATIONAL BANKING OPERATIONS (REGULATION K) International Operations of U.S. Banking Organizations § 211.11 Advisory opinions under Regulation K. (a) Request for advisory opinion. Any person may submit a request...

  14. 12 CFR 211.11 - Advisory opinions under Regulation K.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Advisory opinions under Regulation K. 211.11... INTERNATIONAL BANKING OPERATIONS (REGULATION K) International Operations of U.S. Banking Organizations § 211.11 Advisory opinions under Regulation K. (a) Request for advisory opinion. Any person may submit a request...

  15. 12 CFR 211.11 - Advisory opinions under Regulation K.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advisory opinions under Regulation K. 211.11... INTERNATIONAL BANKING OPERATIONS (REGULATION K) International Operations of U.S. Banking Organizations § 211.11 Advisory opinions under Regulation K. (a) Request for advisory opinion. Any person may submit a request...

  16. 50 CFR 81.11 - Divergent opinions over project merits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Divergent opinions over project merits. 81... INTERIOR (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE AND SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM CONSERVATION OF... opinions over project merits. Any difference of opinion about the substantiality of a proposed project...

  17. 50 CFR 81.11 - Divergent opinions over project merits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Divergent opinions over project merits. 81... INTERIOR (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM CONSERVATION OF... opinions over project merits. Any difference of opinion about the substantiality of a proposed project...

  18. 50 CFR 81.11 - Divergent opinions over project merits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Divergent opinions over project merits. 81... INTERIOR (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM CONSERVATION OF... opinions over project merits. Any difference of opinion about the substantiality of a proposed project...

  19. 50 CFR 81.11 - Divergent opinions over project merits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Divergent opinions over project merits. 81... INTERIOR (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM CONSERVATION OF... opinions over project merits. Any difference of opinion about the substantiality of a proposed project...

  20. 50 CFR 81.11 - Divergent opinions over project merits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Divergent opinions over project merits. 81... INTERIOR (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE AND SPORT FISH RESTORATION PROGRAM CONSERVATION OF... opinions over project merits. Any difference of opinion about the substantiality of a proposed project...

  1. University Opinion Poll 8A: Bicycles on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matross, Ronald; And Others

    The University Opinion Poll conducted a two-stage survey of campus bicycle usage and opinions toward campus bicycle facilities. In the first stage, 952 persons, 78% of a random sample of students and staff reported their commuting habits and opinions about campus bicycle lanes. In the second stage, 139 persons, 84% of a sample of student and staff…

  2. 5 CFR 2634.607 - Advice and opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the public. Good faith reliance on such opinions shall provide a defense to any penalty or sanction... opinions. To assist employees in avoiding situations in which they might violate applicable financial... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Advice and opinions. 2634.607...

  3. 42 CFR 411.387 - Parties affected by advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Parties affected by advisory opinions. 411.387 Section 411.387 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... by advisory opinions. An advisory opinion issued by CMS does not apply in any way to any...

  4. 42 CFR 411.387 - Parties affected by advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Parties affected by advisory opinions. 411.387 Section 411.387 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... by advisory opinions. An advisory opinion issued by CMS does not apply in any way to any...

  5. 42 CFR 411.387 - Parties affected by advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Parties affected by advisory opinions. 411.387 Section 411.387 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... by advisory opinions. An advisory opinion issued by CMS does not apply in any way to any...

  6. 5 CFR 2634.607 - Advice and opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the public. Good faith reliance on such opinions shall provide a defense to any penalty or sanction... opinions. To assist employees in avoiding situations in which they might violate applicable financial... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Advice and opinions. 2634.607...

  7. 42 CFR 411.387 - Parties affected by advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Parties affected by advisory opinions. 411.387 Section 411.387 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... by advisory opinions. An advisory opinion issued by CMS does not apply in any way to any...

  8. 42 CFR 411.387 - Parties affected by advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Parties affected by advisory opinions. 411.387 Section 411.387 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... by advisory opinions. An advisory opinion issued by CMS does not apply in any way to any...

  9. 32 CFR 1698.8 - Effect of advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Effect of advisory opinion. 1698.8 Section 1698.8 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM ADVISORY OPINIONS § 1698.8 Effect of advisory opinion. The Selective Service System will not take action...

  10. 42 CFR 403.258 - Statement of actuarial opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Statement of actuarial opinion. 403.258 Section 403... Program: Loss Ratio Provisions § 403.258 Statement of actuarial opinion. (a) For purposes of certification... actuarial opinion means a signed declaration in which a qualified actuary states that the assumptions...

  11. 42 CFR 403.258 - Statement of actuarial opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Statement of actuarial opinion. 403.258 Section 403... Program: Loss Ratio Provisions § 403.258 Statement of actuarial opinion. (a) For purposes of certification... actuarial opinion means a signed declaration in which a qualified actuary states that the assumptions...

  12. 42 CFR 403.258 - Statement of actuarial opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Statement of actuarial opinion. 403.258 Section 403... Program: Loss Ratio Provisions § 403.258 Statement of actuarial opinion. (a) For purposes of certification... actuarial opinion means a signed declaration in which a qualified actuary states that the assumptions...

  13. 42 CFR 1008.15 - Facts subject to advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Facts subject to advisory opinions. 1008.15 Section... Requesting Party § 1008.15 Facts subject to advisory opinions. (a) The OIG will consider requests from a requesting party for advisory opinions regarding the application of specific facts to the subject matters...

  14. 42 CFR 1008.15 - Facts subject to advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Facts subject to advisory opinions. 1008.15 Section... Requesting Party § 1008.15 Facts subject to advisory opinions. (a) The OIG will consider requests from a requesting party for advisory opinions regarding the application of specific facts to the subject matters...

  15. 42 CFR 1008.15 - Facts subject to advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Facts subject to advisory opinions. 1008.15 Section... Requesting Party § 1008.15 Facts subject to advisory opinions. (a) The OIG will consider requests from a requesting party for advisory opinions regarding the application of specific facts to the subject matters...

  16. 42 CFR 1008.15 - Facts subject to advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Facts subject to advisory opinions. 1008.15 Section... Requesting Party § 1008.15 Facts subject to advisory opinions. (a) The OIG will consider requests from a requesting party for advisory opinions regarding the application of specific facts to the subject matters...

  17. 42 CFR 1008.15 - Facts subject to advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Facts subject to advisory opinions. 1008.15 Section... Requesting Party § 1008.15 Facts subject to advisory opinions. (a) The OIG will consider requests from a requesting party for advisory opinions regarding the application of specific facts to the subject matters...

  18. 10 CFR 590.404 - Final opinions and orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Final opinions and orders. 590.404 Section 590.404 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES WITH RESPECT TO THE IMPORT AND EXPORT OF NATURAL GAS Opinions and Orders § 590.404 Final opinions...

  19. 10 CFR 590.404 - Final opinions and orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final opinions and orders. 590.404 Section 590.404 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) NATURAL GAS (ECONOMIC REGULATORY ADMINISTRATION) ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES WITH RESPECT TO THE IMPORT AND EXPORT OF NATURAL GAS Opinions and Orders § 590.404 Final opinions...

  20. 29 CFR 18.610 - Religious beliefs or opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Religious beliefs or opinions. 18.610 Section 18.610 Labor... OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Witnesses § 18.610 Religious beliefs or opinions. Evidence of the beliefs or opinions of a witness on matters of religion is not admissible for the...

  1. 28 CFR 80.9 - No oral opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false No oral opinion. 80.9 Section 80.9 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT OPINION PROCEDURE § 80.9 No oral opinion. No oral clearance, release or other statement purporting to limit...

  2. 5 CFR 2634.607 - Advice and opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Advice and opinions. 2634.607 Section... opinions. To assist employees in avoiding situations in which they might violate applicable financial... advisory opinions and informal advisory letters on generally applicable matters, or on important matters...

  3. 28 CFR 80.8 - Attorney General opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Attorney General opinion. 80.8 Section 80.8 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT OPINION PROCEDURE § 80.8 Attorney General opinion. The Attorney General or his designee shall, within 30 days...

  4. 28 CFR 80.8 - Attorney General opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Attorney General opinion. 80.8 Section 80.8 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT OPINION PROCEDURE § 80.8 Attorney General opinion. The Attorney General or his designee shall, within 30 days...

  5. 12 CFR 211.11 - Advisory opinions under Regulation K.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advisory opinions under Regulation K. 211.11... INTERNATIONAL BANKING OPERATIONS (REGULATION K) International Operations of U.S. Banking Organizations § 211.11 Advisory opinions under Regulation K. (a) Request for advisory opinion. Any person may submit a request...

  6. 42 CFR 403.258 - Statement of actuarial opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Statement of actuarial opinion. 403.258 Section 403... Program: Loss Ratio Provisions § 403.258 Statement of actuarial opinion. (a) For purposes of certification... actuarial opinion means a signed declaration in which a qualified actuary states that the assumptions...

  7. 28 CFR 80.9 - No oral opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false No oral opinion. 80.9 Section 80.9 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT OPINION PROCEDURE § 80.9 No oral opinion. No oral clearance, release or other statement purporting to limit...

  8. 49 CFR 604.21 - Special considerations for advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special considerations for advisory opinions. 604... TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CHARTER SERVICE Advisory Opinions and Cease and Desist Orders § 604.21 Special considerations for advisory opinions. Based on new facts...

  9. 5 CFR 2634.607 - Advice and opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advice and opinions. 2634.607 Section... opinions. To assist employees in avoiding situations in which they might violate applicable financial... advisory opinions and informal advisory letters on generally applicable matters, or on important matters...

  10. 37 CFR 104.23 - Expert or opinion testimony.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Expert or opinion testimony... Proceedings § 104.23 Expert or opinion testimony. (a)(1) If the General Counsel authorizes an employee to give... opinion testimony upon the requester showing, pursuant to § 104.3 of this part, that...

  11. 28 CFR 80.8 - Attorney General opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Attorney General opinion. 80.8 Section 80.8 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT OPINION PROCEDURE § 80.8 Attorney General opinion. The Attorney General or his designee shall, within 30 days...

  12. 29 CFR 18.610 - Religious beliefs or opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Religious beliefs or opinions. 18.610 Section 18.610 Labor... OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Witnesses § 18.610 Religious beliefs or opinions. Evidence of the beliefs or opinions of a witness on matters of religion is not admissible for the...

  13. 38 CFR 14.808 - Expert or opinion testimony.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Expert or opinion... Production of Department Records in Legal Proceedings § 14.808 Expert or opinion testimony. (a) VA personnel shall not provide, with or without compensation, opinion or expert testimony in any legal...

  14. 28 CFR 80.8 - Attorney General opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Attorney General opinion. 80.8 Section 80.8 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT OPINION PROCEDURE § 80.8 Attorney General opinion. The Attorney General or his designee shall, within 30 days...

  15. 28 CFR 80.8 - Attorney General opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Attorney General opinion. 80.8 Section 80.8 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT OPINION PROCEDURE § 80.8 Attorney General opinion. The Attorney General or his designee shall, within 30 days...

  16. 29 CFR 18.610 - Religious beliefs or opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Religious beliefs or opinions. 18.610 Section 18.610 Labor... OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Witnesses § 18.610 Religious beliefs or opinions. Evidence of the beliefs or opinions of a witness on matters of religion is not admissible for the...

  17. 42 CFR 403.258 - Statement of actuarial opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Statement of actuarial opinion. 403.258 Section 403... Program: Loss Ratio Provisions § 403.258 Statement of actuarial opinion. (a) For purposes of certification... actuarial opinion means a signed declaration in which a qualified actuary states that the assumptions...

  18. 49 CFR 604.21 - Special considerations for advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special considerations for advisory opinions. 604... TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CHARTER SERVICE Advisory Opinions and Cease and Desist Orders § 604.21 Special considerations for advisory opinions. Based on new facts...

  19. 28 CFR 80.9 - No oral opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false No oral opinion. 80.9 Section 80.9 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT OPINION PROCEDURE § 80.9 No oral opinion. No oral clearance, release or other statement purporting to limit...

  20. 49 CFR 1503.645 - Expert or opinion witnesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Expert or opinion witnesses. 1503.645 Section 1503... PROCEDURES Rules of Practice in TSA Civil Penalty Actions § 1503.645 Expert or opinion witnesses. An employee of the agency may not be called as an expert or opinion witness, for any party other than TSA, in...