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Sample records for opioid receptor modulation

  1. Role of the mu opioid receptor in opioid modulation of immune function

    PubMed Central

    Ninković, Jana; Roy, Sabita

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Endogenous opioids are synthesized in vivo in order to modulate pain mechanisms and inflammatory pathways. Endogenous and exogenous opioids mediate analgesia in response to painful stimuli by binding to opioid receptors on neuronal cells. However, wide distribution of opioid receptors on tissues and organ systems outside the CNS, such as the cells of the immune system, indicate that opioids are capable of exerting additional effects in the periphery, such as immunomodulation. The increased prevalence of infections in opioid abusers based epidemiological studies further highlights the immunosuppressive effects of opioids. In spite of their many debilitating side effects, prescription opioids remain a gold standard for treatment of chronic pain. Therefore, given the prevalence of opioid use and abuse, opioid mediated immune suppression presents a serious concern in our society today. It is imperative to understand the mechanisms by which exogenous opioids modulate immune processes. In this review we will discuss the role of opioid receptors and their ligands in mediating immune suppressive functions. We will summarize recent studies on direct and indirect opioid modulation of the cells of the immune system as well as the role of opioids in exacerbation of certain disease states. PMID:22170499

  2. Modulation of opioid receptor function by protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Alfaras-Melainis, Konstantinos; Gomes, Ivone; Rozenfeld, Raphael; Zachariou, Venetia; Devi, Lakshmi

    2009-01-01

    Opioid receptors, MORP, DORP and KORP, belong to the family A of G protein coupled receptors (GPCR), and have been found to modulate a large number of physiological functions, including mood, stress, appetite, nociception and immune responses. Exogenously applied opioid alkaloids produce analgesia, hedonia and addiction. Addiction is linked to alterations in function and responsiveness of all three opioid receptors in the brain. Over the last few years, a large number of studies identified protein-protein interactions that play an essential role in opioid receptor function and responsiveness. Here, we summarize interactions shown to affect receptor biogenesis and trafficking, as well as those affecting signal transduction events following receptor activation. This article also examines protein interactions modulating the rate of receptor endocytosis and degradation, events that play a major role in opiate analgesia. Like several other GPCRs, opioid receptors may form homo or heterodimers. The last part of this review summarizes recent knowledge on proteins known to affect opioid receptor dimerization. PMID:19273296

  3. Mu-opioid receptors modulate the stability of dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Liao, Dezhi; Lin, Hang; Law, Ping Yee; Loh, Horace H

    2005-02-01

    Opioids classically regulate the excitability of neurons by suppressing synaptic GABA release from inhibitory neurons. Here, we report a role for opioids in modulating excitatory synaptic transmission. By activating ubiquitously clustered mu-opioid receptor (MOR) in excitatory synapses, morphine caused collapse of preexisting dendritic spines and decreased synaptic alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors. Meanwhile, the opioid antagonist naloxone increased the density of spines. Chronic treatment with morphine decreased the density of dendritic spines even in the presence of Tetrodotoxin, a sodium channel blocker, indicating that the morphine's effect was not caused by altered activity in neural network through suppression of GABA release. The effect of morphine on dendritic spines was absent in transgenic mice lacking MORs and was blocked by CTOP (D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-ThrNH2), a mu-receptor antagonist. These data together with others suggest that endogenous opioids and/or constitutive activity of MORs participate in maintaining normal morphology and function of spines, challenging the classical model of opioids. Abnormal alteration of spines may occur in drug addiction when opioid receptors are overactivated by exogenous opiates. PMID:15659552

  4. Ignavine: a novel allosteric modulator of the μ opioid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Miyagi, Chika; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Mizuhara, Yasuharu; Mizuno, Keita; Omiya, Yuji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Warabi, Eiji; Sudo, Yuka; Yokoyama, Akinobu; Miyano, Kanako; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2016-01-01

    Processed Aconiti tuber (PAT) is used to treat pain associated with various disorders. Although it has been demonstrated that the κ opioid receptor (KOR) signaling pathway is a mediator of the analgesic effect of PAT, active components affecting opioid signaling have not yet been identified. In this study, we explored candidate components of PAT by pharmacokinetic analysis and identified ignavine, which is a different structure from aconitine alkaloids. A receptor binding assay of opioid receptors showed that ignavine specifically binds the μ opioid receptor (MOR), not the KOR. Receptor internalization assay in MOR-expressing cell lines revealed that ignavine augmented the responses produced by D-Ala(2)-N-Me-Phe(4)-Gly-ol(5)-enkephalin (DAMGO), a representative MOR agonist, at a low concentration and inhibited it at a higher concentration. Ignavine also exerted positive modulatory activity for DAMGO, endomorphin-1 and morphine in cAMP assay. Additionally, ignavine alone showed an analgesic effect in vivo. In silico simulation analysis suggested that ignavine would induce a unique structural change distinguished from those induced by a representative MOR agonist and antagonist. These data collectively suggest the possibility that ignavine could be a novel allosteric modulator of the MOR. The present results may open the way for the development of a novel pain management strategy. PMID:27530869

  5. Ignavine: a novel allosteric modulator of the μ opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Miyagi, Chika; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Mizuhara, Yasuharu; Mizuno, Keita; Omiya, Yuji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Warabi, Eiji; Sudo, Yuka; Yokoyama, Akinobu; Miyano, Kanako; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2016-01-01

    Processed Aconiti tuber (PAT) is used to treat pain associated with various disorders. Although it has been demonstrated that the κ opioid receptor (KOR) signaling pathway is a mediator of the analgesic effect of PAT, active components affecting opioid signaling have not yet been identified. In this study, we explored candidate components of PAT by pharmacokinetic analysis and identified ignavine, which is a different structure from aconitine alkaloids. A receptor binding assay of opioid receptors showed that ignavine specifically binds the μ opioid receptor (MOR), not the KOR. Receptor internalization assay in MOR-expressing cell lines revealed that ignavine augmented the responses produced by D-Ala(2)-N-Me-Phe(4)-Gly-ol(5)-enkephalin (DAMGO), a representative MOR agonist, at a low concentration and inhibited it at a higher concentration. Ignavine also exerted positive modulatory activity for DAMGO, endomorphin-1 and morphine in cAMP assay. Additionally, ignavine alone showed an analgesic effect in vivo. In silico simulation analysis suggested that ignavine would induce a unique structural change distinguished from those induced by a representative MOR agonist and antagonist. These data collectively suggest the possibility that ignavine could be a novel allosteric modulator of the MOR. The present results may open the way for the development of a novel pain management strategy. PMID:27530869

  6. Sigma 1 receptor modulation of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling: potentiation of opioid transduction independent from receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Felix J; Kovalyshyn, Ivanka; Burgman, Maxim; Neilan, Claire; Chien, Chih-Cheng; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2010-04-01

    sigma Ligands modulate opioid actions in vivo, with agonists diminishing morphine analgesia and antagonists enhancing the response. Using human BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells that natively express opioid receptors and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells transfected with a cloned mu opioid receptor, we now demonstrate a similar modulation of opioid function, as assessed by guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTP gamma S) binding, by sigma(1) receptors. sigma Ligands do not compete opioid receptor binding. Administered alone, neither sigma agonists nor antagonists significantly stimulated [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. Yet sigma receptor selective antagonists, but not agonists, shifted the EC(50) of opioid-induced stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding by 3- to 10-fold to the left. This enhanced potency was seen without a change in the efficacy of the opioid, as assessed by the maximal stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. sigma(1) Receptors physically associate with mu opioid receptors, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation studies in transfected HEK cells, implying a direct interaction between the proteins. Thus, sigma receptors modulate opioid transduction without influencing opioid receptor binding. RNA interference knockdown of sigma(1) in BE(2)-C cells also potentiated mu opioid-induced stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding. These modulatory actions are not limited to mu and delta opioid receptors. In mouse brain membrane preparations, sigma(1)-selective antagonists also potentiated both opioid receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding, suggesting a broader role for sigma receptors in modulating G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. PMID:20089882

  7. σ1 Receptor Modulation of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Signaling: Potentiation of Opioid Transduction Independent from Receptor Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Felix J.; Kovalyshyn, Ivanka; Burgman, Maxim; Neilan, Claire; Chien, Chih-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    σ Ligands modulate opioid actions in vivo, with agonists diminishing morphine analgesia and antagonists enhancing the response. Using human BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells that natively express opioid receptors and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells transfected with a cloned μ opioid receptor, we now demonstrate a similar modulation of opioid function, as assessed by guanosine 5′-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate ([35S]GTPγS) binding, by σ1 receptors. σ Ligands do not compete opioid receptor binding. Administered alone, neither σ agonists nor antagonists significantly stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding. Yet σ receptor selective antagonists, but not agonists, shifted the EC50 of opioid-induced stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding by 3- to 10-fold to the left. This enhanced potency was seen without a change in the efficacy of the opioid, as assessed by the maximal stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding. σ1 Receptors physically associate with μ opioid receptors, as shown by coimmunoprecipitation studies in transfected HEK cells, implying a direct interaction between the proteins. Thus, σ receptors modulate opioid transduction without influencing opioid receptor binding. RNA interference knockdown of σ1 in BE(2)-C cells also potentiated μ opioid-induced stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding. These modulatory actions are not limited to μ and δ opioid receptors. In mouse brain membrane preparations, σ1-selective antagonists also potentiated both opioid receptor and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated stimulation of [35S]GTPγS binding, suggesting a broader role for σ receptors in modulating G-protein-coupled receptor signaling. PMID:20089882

  8. IRAS Modulates Opioid Tolerance and Dependence by Regulating μ Opioid Receptor Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei; Ma, Hao; Wu, Ning; Li, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Imidazoline receptor antisera-selected (IRAS) protein, the mouse homologue named Nischarin, was found to target to early endosomes with properties of sorting nexins in vitro. Recently, we generated IRAS knockout mice and found IRAS deficiency exacerbated the analgesic tolerance and physical dependence caused by opioids, suggesting that IRAS plays a role in regulating μ opioid receptor (MOR) functions. In the present study, we found that IRAS interacts with MOR and regulates MOR trafficking in vitro. In the CHO or HEK293 cells co-expressing MOR and IRAS, IRAS, through its PX domain, interacted with MOR. The interaction facilitated the recycling of internalized MOR and prevented MOR downregulation induced by DAMGO, the MOR agonist. Functionally, IRAS accelerated MOR resensitization and attenuated DAMGO-induced MOR desensitization, which is believed as one of mechanisms mediating opioid tolerance and dependence. Taken together, we propose that IRAS is a new MOR interacting protein and regulates agonist-induced trafficking of MOR via sorting internalized MOR to the recycling pathway, which may be a molecular mechanism underlying IRAS modulating opioid tolerance and dependence. PMID:26363797

  9. Activation and Allosteric Modulation of Human μ Opioid Receptor in Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bartuzi, Damian; Kaczor, Agnieszka A; Matosiuk, Dariusz

    2015-11-23

    Allosteric protein modulation has gained increasing attention in drug design. Its application as a mechanism of action could bring forth safer and more effective medicines. Targeting opioid receptors with allosteric modulators can result in better treatment of pain, depression, and respiratory and immune disorders. In this work we use recent reports on negative modulators of μ opioid receptor as a starting point for identification of allosteric sites and mechanisms of opioid receptor modulation using homology modeling and docking and molecular dynamics studies. An allosteric binding site description is presented. Results suggest a shared binding region for lipophilic allosteric ligands, reveal possible differences in the modulation mechanism between cannabinoids and salvinorin A, and show ambiguous properties of the latter. Also, they emphasize the importance of native-like environment in molecular dynamics simulations and uncover relationships between modulator and orthosteric ligand binding and receptor behavior. Relationships between ligands, transmission switch, and hydrophobic lock are analyzed. PMID:26517559

  10. The mu (μ) and delta (δ) opioid receptors modulate boar sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Carrillo, Alejandro; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Manuel; Rodríguez-Martínez, Heriberto

    2016-08-01

    Endogenous and exogenous opioids modulate reproductive functions in target cells via opioid receptors (μ, δ, and κ). Sperm motility is a metric of gamete functionality, and serves as a suitable parameter for in vitro drug-induced toxicity assays. This study identifies the presence and location of opioid receptors in pig spermatozoa as well as their functional response after in vitro challenge with known agonists (morphine [μ]; [D-Pen 2,5]-enkephanile [δ]; and U 50488 [κ]) and antagonists (naloxone [μ]; naltrindole [δ]; and nor-binaltrorphimine [κ]). Only the μ- and δ-opioid receptors were present in the boar sperm plasma membrane, overlying the acrosome, neck, and principal piece. Challenge experiments with agonists and antagonists identified both μ- and δ-opioid receptors as regulators of sperm kinematics, wherein μ maintains or increases sperm movement whereas δ decreases sperm motility over time. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 83: 724-734, 2016 © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27391529

  11. Opioid modulation of immunocompetence: Receptor characterization and second messenger involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Hemmick, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to examine the effects of opioids on several indices of immunocompetence, determined the receptor specificity of these effects, and ascertain whether the actions of opioids on lymphocytes could be correlated with activation of second messenger systems. By measuring {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} uptake into lymphocytes, it was demonstrated that {beta}-endorphin 1-31 ({beta}-END 1-31) enhanced rat thymocyte Ca{sup 2+} uptake in response to concanavalin A (Con A) but not phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Related opioid peptides and alkaloids were unable to mimic the effect, and naloxone did not block it, suggesting that {beta}-END 1-31 acted by binding to specific, non-opioid receptors on the thymocytes. Rat splenocyte Con A-stimulated Ca{sup 2+} uptake was not affected by {beta}-END 1-31. {beta}-END 1-31 did not affect basal Ca{sup 2+} uptake by either cell type. Using ({sup 3}H)thymidine uptake as an index of lymphocyte proliferation, {beta}-END 1-31 and several related opioid peptides reversed prostaglandin E{sub 1} (PGE{sub 1}) suppression of rat lymph node cell Con A- and PHA-stimulated proliferation. Naloxone did not block the reversal. {beta}-END 1-31 was unable to reverse forskolin and cholera toxin suppression of proliferation, indicating that the lowering of cyclic AMP levels was not the mechanism involved. Verapamil inhibition of proliferation was also not reversed by {beta}-END 1-31, suggesting that promotion of Ca{sup 2+} influx was not a major mechanism involved.

  12. Modulation of brain opioid receptors by zinc and histidine

    SciTech Connect

    Hanissian, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of zinc and several trace elements was studied on the binding of the opioid receptor antagonist ({sup 3}H)-naloxone and the agonists ({sup 3}H)-DAGO, ({sup 3}H)-DSTLE, and ({sup 3}H)-EKC, specific for the mu, delta and kappa receptors, respectively, in several areas of the rat brain. Physiological concentrations of zinc were inhibitory to the binding of naloxone, DAGO, and EKC, whereas delta receptors were insensitive to this inhibition. Copper, cadmium, and mercury also inhibited the binding of all the ligands studied to their receptors. Histidine was most effective in preventing the inhibitory effects of zinc and copper, whereas it was less effective on cadmium, and without any effect on the inhibit was less effective on cadmium, and without any effect on the inhibition caused by mercury. Its metabolites histamine and imidazoleacetic acid, and also citrate were ineffective. Magnesium and manganese were stimulatory to opioid receptor binding, whereas cobalt and nickel had dual effects. Concentrations of zinc less that its IC{sub 50} totally prevented the stimulatory effects of magnesium and manganese on the mu and delta receptors on which zinc alone had no effects. The reducing reagents dithiothreitol and B-mercaptoethanol partially protected against zinc inhibition, and the oxidizing reagent dithiobisnitrobenzoic acid even potentiated the inhibitory effects of zinc on DSTLE and DAGO binding, although to different extents.

  13. Synthetic and Receptor Signaling Explorations of the Mitragyna Alkaloids: Mitragynine as an Atypical Molecular Framework for Opioid Receptor Modulators.

    PubMed

    Kruegel, Andrew C; Gassaway, Madalee M; Kapoor, Abhijeet; Váradi, András; Majumdar, Susruta; Filizola, Marta; Javitch, Jonathan A; Sames, Dalibor

    2016-06-01

    Mu-opioid receptor agonists represent mainstays of pain management. However, the therapeutic use of these agents is associated with serious side effects, including potentially lethal respiratory depression. Accordingly, there is a longstanding interest in the development of new opioid analgesics with improved therapeutic profiles. The alkaloids of the Southeast Asian plant Mitragyna speciosa, represented by the prototypical member mitragynine, are an unusual class of opioid receptor modulators with distinct pharmacological properties. Here we describe the first receptor-level functional characterization of mitragynine and related natural alkaloids at the human mu-, kappa-, and delta-opioid receptors. These results show that mitragynine and the oxidized analogue 7-hydroxymitragynine, are partial agonists of the human mu-opioid receptor and competitive antagonists at the kappa- and delta-opioid receptors. We also show that mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine are G-protein-biased agonists of the mu-opioid receptor, which do not recruit β-arrestin following receptor activation. Therefore, the Mitragyna alkaloid scaffold represents a novel framework for the development of functionally biased opioid modulators, which may exhibit improved therapeutic profiles. Also presented is an enantioselective total synthesis of both (-)-mitragynine and its unnatural enantiomer, (+)-mitragynine, employing a proline-catalyzed Mannich-Michael reaction sequence as the key transformation. Pharmacological evaluation of (+)-mitragynine revealed its much weaker opioid activity. Likewise, the intermediates and chemical transformations developed in the total synthesis allowed the elucidation of previously unexplored structure-activity relationships (SAR) within the Mitragyna scaffold. Molecular docking studies, in combination with the observed chemical SAR, suggest that Mitragyna alkaloids adopt a binding pose at the mu-opioid receptor that is distinct from that of classical opioids. PMID

  14. Proposed Mode of Binding and Action of Positive Allosteric Modulators at Opioid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yi; Yeatman, Holly R; Provasi, Davide; Alt, Andrew; Christopoulos, Arthur; Canals, Meritxell; Filizola, Marta

    2016-05-20

    Available crystal structures of opioid receptors provide a high-resolution picture of ligand binding at the primary ("orthosteric") site, that is, the site targeted by endogenous ligands. Recently, positive allosteric modulators of opioid receptors have also been discovered, but their modes of binding and action remain unknown. Here, we use a metadynamics-based strategy to efficiently sample the binding process of a recently discovered positive allosteric modulator of the δ-opioid receptor, BMS-986187, in the presence of the orthosteric agonist SNC-80, and with the receptor embedded in an explicit lipid-water environment. The dynamics of BMS-986187 were enhanced by biasing the potential acting on the ligand-receptor distance and ligand-receptor interaction contacts. Representative lowest-energy structures from the reconstructed free-energy landscape revealed two alternative ligand binding poses at an allosteric site delineated by transmembrane (TM) helices TM1, TM2, and TM7, with some participation of TM6. Mutations of amino acid residues at these proposed allosteric sites were found to either affect the binding of BMS-986187 or its ability to modulate the affinity and/or efficacy of SNC-80. Taken together, these combined experimental and computational studies provide the first atomic-level insight into the modulation of opioid receptor binding and signaling by allosteric modulators. PMID:26841170

  15. Opioid receptors in the prelimbic cortex modulate restraint stress-induced cardiovascular responses in the rat.

    PubMed

    Fassini, Aline; Scopinho, América A; Resstel, Leonardo B M; Correa, Fernando M A

    2014-10-01

    The prelimbic cortex (PL) is involved in the control of behavioral and autonomic responses to stress. The present study aimed to investigate whether opioid neurotransmission in the PL modulates autonomic responses evoked by restraint stress (RS). Bilateral microinjection of 0.03, 0.3 and 3 nmol/100 nL of the nonselective opioid antagonist naloxone into the PL reduced pressure and tachycardiac responses evoked by RS. However, no effects were observed after its injection at doses of 0.003 and 30 nmol/100 nL, thus resulting in an inverted U-shaped dose-inhibition curve. Similar to naloxone, the selective μ-opioid antagonist CTAP, and the selective κ-opioid antagonist nor-BNI, also reduced MAP and HR increases induced by RS when injected into the PL, whereas treatment with the selective δ-opioid antagonist naltrindole did not affect the pressor and tachycardiac response caused by RS. Blockade of opioid neurotransmission in the PL did not affect the fall in tail temperature and increase in body temperature induced by RS. The present results confirm the involvement of PL opioid neurotransmission in the modulation of cardiovascular responses evoked during the exposure to an aversive situation, and suggest that responses observed after the blockade of local opioid receptors is due to alterations in PL neuronal activity. Furthermore, these results suggest that a distinct circuitry is involved in modulation of the sympathetic output to different vascular territories. PMID:24813527

  16. Positive allosteric modulators of the μ-opioid receptor: a novel approach for future pain medications

    PubMed Central

    Burford, N T; Traynor, J R; Alt, A

    2015-01-01

    Morphine and other agonists of the μ-opioid receptor are used clinically for acute and chronic pain relief and are considered to be the gold standard for pain medication. However, these opioids also have significant side effects, which are also mediated via activation of the μ-opioid receptor. Since the latter half of the twentieth century, researchers have sought to tease apart the mechanisms underlying analgesia, tolerance and dependence, with the hope of designing drugs with fewer side effects. These efforts have revolved around the design of orthosteric agonists with differing pharmacokinetic properties and/or selectivity profiles for the different opioid receptor types. Recently, μ-opioid receptor-positive allosteric modulators (μ-PAMs) were identified, which bind to a (allosteric) site on the μ-opioid receptor separate from the orthosteric site that binds an endogenous agonist. These allosteric modulators have little or no detectable functional activity when bound to the receptor in the absence of orthosteric agonist, but can potentiate the activity of bound orthosteric agonist, seen as an increase in apparent potency and/or efficacy of the orthosteric agonist. In this review, we describe the potential advantages that a μ-PAM approach might bring to the design of novel therapeutics for pain that may lack the side effects currently associated with opioid therapy. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24460691

  17. The orexin 1 receptor modulates kappa opioid receptor function via a JNK-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James D; McDonald, Patricia H

    2015-07-01

    The orexin 1 receptor (OX1R) and the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) are two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) previously demonstrated to play important roles in modulating the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine. Using cells heterologously expressing both receptors, we investigated whether OX1R can regulate the function of KOR and vice versa. Activation of OX1R was found to attenuate agonist-activated KOR-mediated inhibition of cAMP production. In contrast, agonist-activated KOR-mediated β-arrestin recruitment and p38 activation were enhanced in the presence of activated OX1R. These effects are independent of OX1R internalization but are blocked in the presence of the JNK inhibitor SP-600125. OX1R signaling does not affect ligand binding by KOR. Taken together, these data suggest that OX1R signaling can modulate KOR function in a JNK-dependent manner, promoting preferential signaling of KOR via β-arrestin/p38 rather than Gαi. Conversely, Gαq coupling of OX1R is unaffected by activation of KOR, suggesting that this crosstalk is unidirectional. Given that KOR Gαi-mediated signaling events and β-arrestin-mediated signaling events are thought to promote distinct cellular responses and physiological outcomes downstream of KOR activation, this mechanism may have important implications on the behavioral effects of KOR activity. PMID:25857454

  18. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor modulation of mu (mu) opioid receptors in adult rat sphenopalatine ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Margas, Wojciech; Mahmoud, Saifeldin; Ruiz-Velasco, Victor

    2010-01-01

    The sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) neurons represent the parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system involved in controlling cerebral blood flow. In the present study, we examined the coupling mechanism between mu (mu) opioid receptors (MOR) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR) with Ca(2+) channels in acutely dissociated adult rat SPG neurons. Successful MOR activation was recorded in approximately 40-45% of SPG neurons employing the whole cell variant of the patch-clamp technique. In addition, immunofluorescence assays indicated that MOR are not expressed in all SPG neurons while M(2) mAChR staining was evident in all neurons. The concentration-response relationships generated with morphine and [d-Ala2-N-Me-Phe4-Glycol5]-enkephalin (DAMGO) showed IC(50) values of 15.2 and 56.1 nM and maximal Ca(2+) current inhibition of 26.0 and 38.7%, respectively. Activation of MOR or M(2) mAChR with morphine or oxotremorine-methiodide (Oxo-M), respectively, resulted in voltage-dependent inhibition of Ca(2+) currents via coupling with Galpha(i/o) protein subunits. The acute prolonged exposure (10 min) of neurons to morphine or Oxo-M led to the homologous desensitization of MOR and M(2) mAChR, respectively. The prolonged stimulation of M(2) mAChR with Oxo-M resulted in heterologous desensitization of morphine-mediated Ca(2+) current inhibition, and was sensitive to the M(2) mAChR blocker methoctramine. On the other hand, when the neurons were exposed to morphine or DAMGO for 10 min, heterologous desensitization of M(2) mAChR was not observed. These results suggest that in rat SPG neurons activation of M(2) mAChR likely modulates opioid transmission in the brain vasculature to adequately maintain cerebral blood flow. PMID:19889856

  19. Modulation of pre- and postsynaptic dopamine D2 receptor function by the selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593.

    PubMed

    Acri, J B; Thompson, A C; Shippenberg, T

    2001-03-15

    The repeated administration of selective kappa-opioid receptor agonists prevents the locomotor activation produced by acute cocaine administration and the development of cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization. Previous studies have shown that dopamine (DA) D2 autoreceptors modulate the synthesis and release of DA in the striatum. Evidence that kappa agonist treatment downregulates DA D2 receptors in this same brain region has recently been obtained. Accordingly, the present studies were undertaken to examine the influence of repeated kappa-opioid receptor agonist administration on pre- and postsynaptic DA D2 receptor function in the dorsal striatum using pre- and postsynaptic receptor-selective doses of quinpirole. Rats were injected once daily with the selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 (0.16-0.32 mg/kg s.c.) or vehicle for 3 days. Microdialysis studies assessing basal and quinpirole-evoked (0.05 mg/kg s.c.) DA levels were conducted 2 days later. Basal and quinpirole-stimulated locomotor activity were assessed in a parallel group of animals. The no-net flux method of quantitative microdialysis revealed no effect of U69593 on basal DA dynamics, in that extracellular DA concentration and extraction fraction did not differ in control and U69593-treated animals. Acute administration of quinpirole significantly decreased striatal DA levels in control animals, but in animals treated with U69593, the inhibitory effects of quinpirole were significantly reduced. Quinpirole produced a dose-related increase in locomotor activity in control animals, and this effect was significantly attenuated in U69593-treated animals. These data reveal that prior repeated administration of a selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist attenuates quinpirole-induced alterations in DA neurotransmission and locomotor activity. These results suggest that both pre- and postsynaptic striatal DA D2 receptors may be downregulated following repeated kappa-opioid receptor agonist

  20. Cocaine modulates the expression of opioid receptors and miR-let-7d in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    López-Bellido, Roger; Barreto-Valer, Katherine; Sánchez-Simón, Fátima Macho; Rodríguez, Raquel E

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to cocaine, in mammals, has been shown to interfere with the expression of opioid receptors, which can have repercussions in its activity. Likewise, microRNAs, such as let-7, have been shown to regulate the expression of opioid receptors and hence their functions in mammals and in vitro experiments. In light of this, using the zebrafish embryos as a model our aim here was to evaluate the actions of cocaine in the expression of opioid receptors and let-7d miRNA during embryogenesis. In order to determine the effects produced by cocaine on the opioid receptors (zfmor, zfdor1 and zfdor2) and let-7d miRNA (dre-let-7d) and its precursors (dre-let-7d-1 and dre-let-7d-2), embryos were exposed to 1.5 µM cocaine hydrochloride (HCl). Our results revealed that cocaine upregulated dre-let-7d and its precursors, and also increased the expression of zfmor, zfdor1 and zfdor2 during early developmental stages and decreased them in late embryonic stages. The changes observed in the expression of opioid receptors might occur through dre-let-7d, since DNA sequences and the morpholinos of opioid receptors microinjections altered the expression of dre-let-7d and its precursors. Likewise, opioid receptors and dre-let-7d showed similar distributions in the central nervous system (CNS) and at the periphery, pointing to a possible interrelationship between them.In conclusion, the silencing and overexpression of opioid receptors altered the expression of dre-let-7d, which points to the notion that cocaine via dre-let-7 can modulate the expression of opioid receptors. Our study provides new insights into the actions of cocaine during zebrafish embryogenesis, indicating a role of miRNAs, let-7d, in development and its relationship with gene expression of opioid receptors, related to pain and addiction process. PMID:23226419

  1. Cocaine Modulates the Expression of Opioid Receptors and miR-let-7d in Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    López-Bellido, Roger; Barreto-Valer, Katherine; Sánchez-Simón, Fátima Macho; Rodríguez, Raquel E.

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to cocaine, in mammals, has been shown to interfere with the expression of opioid receptors, which can have repercussions in its activity. Likewise, microRNAs, such as let-7, have been shown to regulate the expression of opioid receptors and hence their functions in mammals and in vitro experiments. In light of this, using the zebrafish embryos as a model our aim here was to evaluate the actions of cocaine in the expression of opioid receptors and let-7d miRNA during embryogenesis. In order to determine the effects produced by cocaine on the opioid receptors (zfmor, zfdor1 and zfdor2) and let-7d miRNA (dre-let-7d) and its precursors (dre-let-7d-1 and dre-let-7d-2), embryos were exposed to 1.5 µM cocaine hydrochloride (HCl). Our results revealed that cocaine upregulated dre-let-7d and its precursors, and also increased the expression of zfmor, zfdor1 and zfdor2 during early developmental stages and decreased them in late embryonic stages. The changes observed in the expression of opioid receptors might occur through dre-let-7d, since DNA sequences and the morpholinos of opioid receptors microinjections altered the expression of dre-let-7d and its precursors. Likewise, opioid receptors and dre-let-7d showed similar distributions in the central nervous system (CNS) and at the periphery, pointing to a possible interrelationship between them. In conclusion, the silencing and overexpression of opioid receptors altered the expression of dre-let-7d, which points to the notion that cocaine via dre-let-7 can modulate the expression of opioid receptors. Our study provides new insights into the actions of cocaine during zebrafish embryogenesis, indicating a role of miRNAs, let-7d, in development and its relationship with gene expression of opioid receptors, related to pain and addiction process. PMID:23226419

  2. The pharmacological profile of delta opioid receptor ligands, (+) and (-) TAN-67 on pain modulation.

    PubMed

    Nagase, H; Yajima, Y; Fujii, H; Kawamura, K; Narita, M; Kamei, J; Suzuki, T

    2001-04-01

    We designed the nonpeptidic highly selective delta opioid receptor agonist on the basis of message address concept and the accessory site theory and synthesized (+/-) TAN-67. In spite of highly potent agonistic activity in in vitro assay, (+/-) TAN-67 (racemate) afforded a weak antinociceptive effect in the mouse tail-flick test. This result led us to separate (+/-) TAN-67 to optical pure compounds, (+) and (-) TAN-67. An i.t.-treatment with (-) TAN-67 produced profound antinociceptive effects through specifically acting on delta1 receptors. Unlike (-) TAN-67, i.t.-administered (+) TAN-67 displayed dose-related nociceptive behaviors such as scratching, biting and licking. The effect of (+) TAN-67 was blocked by i.t.-treatment with NTI (delta receptor antagonist) and (-) TAN-67 (delta1 receptor agonist), but not by morphine (mu receptor agonist). The mechanisms involved in spinal pain modulation induced by (+) and (-) TAN-67 were also described. PMID:11358331

  3. Structural and functional interactions between six-transmembrane μ-opioid receptors and β2-adrenoreceptors modulate opioid signaling

    PubMed Central

    Samoshkin, Alexander; Convertino, Marino; Viet, Chi T.; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S.; Kambur, Oleg; Marcovitz, Jaclyn; Patel, Pinkal; Stone, Laura S.; Kalso, Eija; Mogil, Jeffrey S.; Schmidt, Brian L.; Maixner, William; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-01-01

    The primary molecular target for clinically used opioids is the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). Besides the major seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptors, the MOR gene codes for alternatively spliced six-transmembrane (6TM) isoforms, the biological and clinical significance of which remains unclear. Here, we show that the otherwise exclusively intracellular localized 6TM-MOR translocates to the plasma membrane upon coexpression with β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-ARs) through an interaction with the fifth and sixth helices of β2-AR. Coexpression of the two receptors in BE(2)-C neuroblastoma cells potentiates calcium responses to a 6TM-MOR ligand, and this calcium response is completely blocked by a selective β2-antagonist in BE(2)-C cells, and in trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. Co-administration of 6TM-MOR and β2-AR ligands leads to substantial analgesic synergy and completely reverses opioid-induced hyperalgesia in rodent behavioral models. Together, our results provide evidence that the heterodimerization of 6TM-MOR with β2-AR underlies a molecular mechanism for 6TM cellular signaling, presenting a unique functional responses to opioids. This signaling pathway may contribute to the hyperalgesic effects of opioids that can be efficiently blocked by β2-AR antagonists, providing a new avenue for opioid therapy. PMID:26657998

  4. Discovery, synthesis, and molecular pharmacology of selective positive allosteric modulators of the δ-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Burford, Neil T; Livingston, Kathryn E; Canals, Meritxell; Ryan, Molly R; Budenholzer, Lauren M L; Han, Ying; Shang, Yi; Herbst, John J; O'Connell, Jonathan; Banks, Martyn; Zhang, Litao; Filizola, Marta; Bassoni, Daniel L; Wehrman, Tom S; Christopoulos, Arthur; Traynor, John R; Gerritz, Samuel W; Alt, Andrew

    2015-05-28

    Allosteric modulators of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have a number of potential advantages compared to agonists or antagonists that bind to the orthosteric site of the receptor. These include the potential for receptor selectivity, maintenance of the temporal and spatial fidelity of signaling in vivo, the ceiling effect of the allosteric cooperativity which may prevent overdose issues, and engendering bias by differentially modulating distinct signaling pathways. Here we describe the discovery, synthesis, and molecular pharmacology of δ-opioid receptor-selective positive allosteric modulators (δ PAMs). These δ PAMs increase the affinity and/or efficacy of the orthosteric agonists leu-enkephalin, SNC80 and TAN67, as measured by receptor binding, G protein activation, β-arrestin recruitment, adenylyl cyclase inhibition, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) activation. As such, these compounds are useful pharmacological tools to probe the molecular pharmacology of the δ receptor and to explore the therapeutic potential of δ PAMs in diseases such as chronic pain and depression. PMID:25901762

  5. Ivy and neurogliaform interneurons are a major target of μ-opioid receptor modulation.

    PubMed

    Krook-Magnuson, Esther; Luu, Lillian; Lee, Sang-Hun; Varga, Csaba; Soltesz, Ivan

    2011-10-19

    μ-Opioid receptors (μORs) are selectively expressed on interneurons in area CA1 of the hippocampus. Fast-spiking, parvalbumin-expressing, basket cells express μORs, but circumstantial evidence suggests that another major, unidentified, GABAergic cell class must also be modulated by μORs. Here we report that the abundant, dendritically targeting, neurogliaform family of cells (Ivy and neurogliaform cells) is a previously unrecognized target of direct modulation by μORs. Ivy and neurogliaform cells are not only numerous but also have unique properties, including promiscuous gap junctions formed with various interneuronal subtypes, volume transmission, and the ability to produce a postsynaptic GABA(B) response after a single presynaptic spike. Using a mouse line expressing green fluorescent protein under the neuropeptide Y promoter, we find that, across all layers of CA1, activation of μORs hyperpolarizes Ivy and neurogliaform cells. Furthermore, paired recordings between synaptically coupled Ivy and pyramidal cells show that Ivy cell terminals are dramatically inhibited by μOR activation. Effects in Ivy and neurogliaform cells are seen at similar concentrations of agonist as those producing inhibition in fast-spiking parvalbumin basket cells. We also report that Ivy cells display the recently described phenomenon of persistent firing, a state of continued firing in the absence of continued input, and that induction of persistent firing is inhibited by μOR activation. Together, these findings identify a major, previously unrecognized, target of μOR modulation. Given the prominence of this cell type in and beyond CA1, as well as its unique role in microcircuitry, opioid modulation of neurogliaform cells has wide implications. PMID:22016519

  6. Amylin Receptor Signaling in the Nucleus Accumbens Negatively Modulates μ-opioid-Driven Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Baisley, Sarah K; Baldo, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    Amylin is a peptide co-secreted with insulin that penetrates into the brain, and produces satiation-like effects via actions in the brainstem, hypothalamus, and mesencephalon. Little is known, however, about the effects of amylin in the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh), where a circumscribed zone of intense amylin receptor (AMY-R) binding overlaps reported mappings of a ‘hotspot' for μ-opioid receptor (μ-OR) amplification of food reward. Here, the ability of intra-AcbSh AMY-R signaling to modulate μ-OR-driven feeding was explored. Amylin (1–30 ng) was administered with the μ-OR agonist, D-Ala2, N-MePhe4, Gly-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) (0.25 μg), directly into the AcbSh of ad libitum-maintained rats. Amylin dose-dependently reversed DAMGO-induced hyperphagia; 3 ng of amylin reduced DAMGO-mediated feeding by nearly 50%. This dose was, however, completely ineffective at altering DAMGO-induced feeding in the anterior dorsal striatum. Intra-AcbSh amylin alone (3–30 ng) modestly suppressed 10% sucrose intake in ad libitum-maintained rats, and chow in food-deprived rats, but only at the 30-ng dose. This result indicates that reversal of AcbSh DAMGO-induced feeding at a 10-fold lower dose was neither due to malaise nor motoric impairment. Finally, intra-AcbSh infusion of the AMY-R antagonist, AC187 (20 μg), significantly attenuated the ability of prefeeding to suppress DAMGO-induced food intake, with no effects in non-prefed rats. Hence, AMY-R signaling negatively modulates μ-OR-mediated appetitive responses at the level of the AcbSh. The results with AC187 indicate that endogenous AMY-R transmission in the AcbSh curtails opioid function in the postprandial period, suggesting a novel pathway for peripheral-central integration in the control of appetitive motivation and opioid reward. PMID:24957819

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Opioid Receptor-Dependent Signaling and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hasani, Ream; Bruchas, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Opioid receptors have been targeted for the treatment of pain and related disorders for thousands of years, and remain the most widely used analgesics in the clinic. Mu (μ), kappa (κ), and delta (δ) opioid receptors represent the originally classified receptor subtypes, with opioid receptor like-1 (ORL1) being the least characterized. All four receptors are G-protein coupled, and activate inhibitory G-proteins. These receptors form homo- and hetereodimeric complexes, signal to kinase cascades, and scaffold a variety of proteins. In this review, we discuss classical mechanisms and developments in understanding opioid tolerance, opioid receptor signaling, and highlight advances in opioid molecular pharmacology, behavioral pharmacology, and human genetics. We put into context how opioid receptor signaling leads to the modulation of behavior with the potential for therapeutic intervention. Finally, we conclude that there is a continued need for more translational work on opioid receptors in vivo. PMID:22020140

  8. Mu opioid receptor modulation in the nucleus accumbens lowers voluntary wheel running in rats bred for high running motivation.

    PubMed

    Ruegsegger, Gregory N; Toedebusch, Ryan G; Will, Matthew J; Booth, Frank W

    2015-10-01

    The exact role of opioid receptor signaling in mediating voluntary wheel running is unclear. To provide additional understanding, female rats selectively bred for motivation of low (LVR) versus high voluntary running (HVR) behaviors were used. Aims of this study were 1) to identify intrinsic differences in nucleus accumbens (NAc) mRNA expression of opioid-related transcripts and 2) to determine if nightly wheel running is differently influenced by bilateral NAc injections of either the mu-opioid receptor agonist D-Ala2, NMe-Phe4, Glyo5-enkephalin (DAMGO) (0.25, 2.5 μg/side), or its antagonist, naltrexone (5, 10, 20 μg/side). In Experiment 1, intrinsic expression of Oprm1 and Pdyn mRNAs were higher in HVR compared to LVR. Thus, the data imply that line differences in opioidergic mRNA in the NAc could partially contribute to differences in wheel running behavior. In Experiment 2, a significant decrease in running distance was present in HVR rats treated with 2.5 μg DAMGO, or with 10 μg and 20 μg naltrexone between hours 0-1 of the dark cycle. Neither DAMGO nor naltrexone had a significant effect on running distance in LVR rats. Taken together, the data suggest that the high nightly voluntary running distance expressed by HVR rats is mediated by increased endogenous mu-opioid receptor signaling in the NAc, that is disturbed by either agonism or antagonism. In summary, our findings on NAc opioidergic mRNA expression and mu-opioid receptor modulations suggest HVR rats, compared to LVR rats, express higher running levels mediated by an increase in motivation driven, in part, by elevated NAc opioidergic signaling. PMID:26044640

  9. Mu Opioid Receptor Modulation of Dopamine Neurons in the Periaqueductal Gray/Dorsal Raphe: A Role in Regulation of Pain.

    PubMed

    Li, Chia; Sugam, Jonathan A; Lowery-Gionta, Emily G; McElligott, Zoe A; McCall, Nora M; Lopez, Alberto J; McKlveen, Jessica M; Pleil, Kristen E; Kash, Thomas L

    2016-07-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) is a brain region involved in nociception modulation, and an important relay center for the descending nociceptive pathway through the rostral ventral lateral medulla. Given the dense expression of mu opioid receptors and the role of dopamine in pain, the recently characterized dopamine neurons in the ventral PAG (vPAG)/dorsal raphe (DR) region are a potentially critical site for the antinociceptive actions of opioids. The objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate synaptic modulation of the vPAG/DR dopamine neurons by mu opioid receptors and to (2) dissect the anatomy and neurochemistry of these neurons, in order to assess the downstream loci and functions of their activation. Using a mouse line that expresses eGFP under control of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter, we found that mu opioid receptor activation led to a decrease in inhibitory inputs onto the vPAG/DR dopamine neurons. Furthermore, combining immunohistochemistry, optogenetics, electrophysiology, and fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in a TH-cre mouse line, we demonstrated that these neurons also express the vesicular glutamate type 2 transporter and co-release dopamine and glutamate in a major downstream projection structure-the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. Finally, activation of TH-positive neurons in the vPAG/DR using Gq designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs displayed a supraspinal, but not spinal, antinociceptive effect. These results indicate that vPAG/DR dopamine neurons likely play a key role in opiate antinociception, potentially via the activation of downstream structures through dopamine and glutamate release. PMID:26792442

  10. Modulation of the behavioral and neurochemical effects of psychostimulants by kappa-opioid receptor systems.

    PubMed

    Shippenberg, T S; Chefer, V I; Zapata, A; Heidbreder, C A

    2001-06-01

    The repeated, intermittent use of cocaine and other drugs of abuse produces profound and often long-lasting alterations in behavior and brain chemistry. It has been suggested that these consequences of drug use play a critical role in drug craving and relapse to addiction. This article reviews the effects of psychostimulant administration on dopaminergic and excitatory amino acid neurotransmission in brain regions comprising the brain's motive circuit and provides evidence that the activation of endogenous kappa-opioid receptor systems in these regions opposes the behavioral and neurochemical consequences of repeated drug use. The role of this opioid system in mediating alterations in mood and affect that occur during abstinence from repeated psychostimulant use are also discussed. PMID:11458540

  11. Role of lateral parabrachial opioid receptors in exercise-induced modulation of the hypotensive hemorrhage response in conscious male rats.

    PubMed

    Ahlgren, Joslyn K; Hayward, Linda F

    2012-01-15

    Some of the benefits of exercise appear to be mediated through modulation of neuronal excitability in central autonomic control circuits. Previously, we identified that six weeks of voluntary wheel running had a protective effect during hemorrhage (HEM), limiting both the hypotensive phase of HEM and enhancing recovery. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the role of opioid release in the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN) on the response to severe HEM in chronically exercised (EX, voluntary) versus sedentary (SED) controls. Male Sprague Dawley rats were allowed either free access to running wheels (EX) or normal cage conditions (SED). After 6 weeks of "training" animals were instrumented with a bilateral cannula directed toward the dorsolateral pons and arterial catheters. After a recovery period, animals underwent central microinjection of either vehicle (VEH; n=3/group) or the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (NAL; n=6/group) followed by withdrawal of 30% of their total estimated blood volume. Following VEH injection, the drop in MAP during and following HEM was significantly attenuated in the EX vs SED animals. Alternatively, NAL microinjection in the dorsolateral pons (20 μM, 200-500 nl) reversed the beneficial effect of EX on the HEM response. NAL microinjection in SED rats did not significantly alter the response to HEM. These data suggest chronic voluntary EX has a beneficial effect on the autonomic response to severe HEM which is mediated, in part, via EX-induced plasticity of the opioid system within the dorsolateral pons. PMID:21985861

  12. Opioid Receptors Blockade Modulates Apoptosis in a Rat Model of Cirrhotic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Ata; Joharimoqaddam, Adel; Faramarzi, Negar; Khosravi, Mohsen; Jahanzad, Issa; Dehpour, Ahmad R

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cirrhosis is a common consequence of chronic liver inflammation is known to be associated with various manifestation of cardiovascular dysfunction, which has been introduced as a cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. Some possible pathogenic mechanisms has been reported and still more details should be explored. Aim: The present study is the first study to explore the contribution of endogenous opioids in the apoptosis process in a rat model of cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. Materials and Methods: Cirrhosis was induced in rats by bile duct ligation (BDL) and resection. Cardiomyopathy was confirmed using trichrome staining for fibrosis. Naltrexone, an opioid antagonist was administered for 29(1) days. Apoptosis was detected using terminal transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling assay with some modification. Statistical evaluation of data was performed using analysis of variance test. P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Left ventricular (LV) wall thickness was significantly (P < 0.001) lower in the BDL group than the sham group, either receiving naltrexone or saline. No significant difference was seen in LV wall thickness or LV end diastolic diameter in BDL group receiving either saline or naltrexone. The apoptosis density of cardiac specimens of sham operated and BDL rats were dramatically different from each other. The cardiac specimens of BDL rats contained multiple apoptotic cells. In saline treated samples (BDL-saline vs. sham-saline), apoptosis density was significantly increased in BDL-saline group (P < 0.001). Cardiomyocyte apoptosis was significantly decreased in the BDL-naltrexone group compared to BDL-saline group (P < 0.001). There was no significant change in apoptosis density in sham groups receiving either naltrexone or saline. Conclusion: Apoptosis occurs during cirrhotic cardiomyopathy and endogenous opioid receptors blockade using naltrexone decreases its amount, but cardiac function may not be improved. PMID

  13. Cell death sensitization of leukemia cells by opioid receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Claudia; Roscher, Mareike; Hormann, Inis; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf A.; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates a number of cellular processes and modulates cell death induction. cAMP levels are altered upon stimulation of specific G-protein-coupled receptors inhibiting or activating adenylyl cyclases. Opioid receptor stimulation can activate inhibitory Gi-proteins which in turn block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. Opioids such as D,L-methadone induce cell death in leukemia cells. However, the mechanism how opioids trigger apoptosis and activate caspases in leukemia cells is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that downregulation of cAMP induced by opioid receptor activation using the opioid D,L-methadone kills and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Enhancing cAMP levels by blocking opioid-receptor signaling strongly reduced D,L-methadone-induced apoptosis, caspase activation and doxorubicin-sensitivity. Induction of cell death in leukemia cells by activation of opioid receptors using the opioid D,L-methadone depends on critical levels of opioid receptor expression on the cell surface. Doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in leukemia cells. In addition, the opioid D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux in leukemia cells, suggesting that the opioid D,L-methadone as well as doxorubicin mutually increase their cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, we found that opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone alone or in addition to doxorubicin inhibits tumor growth significantly in vivo. These results demonstrate that opioid receptor activation via triggering the downregulation of cAMP induces apoptosis, activates caspases and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Hence, opioid receptor activation seems to be a promising strategy to improve anticancer therapies. PMID:23633472

  14. Opioid System Modulates the Immune Function: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xuan; Liu, Renyu; Chen, Chunhua; Ji, Fang; Li, Tianzuo

    2016-01-01

    Opioid receptors and their ligands produce powerful analgesia that is effective in perioperative period and chronic pain managements accompanied with various side effects including respiratory depression, constipation and addiction etc. Opioids can also interfere with the immune system, not only participating in the function of the immune cells, but also modulating innate and acquired immune responses. The traditional notion of opioids is immunosuppressive. Recent studies indicate that the role of opioid receptors on immune function is complicated, working through various different mechanisms. Different opioids or opioids administrations show various effects on the immune system: immunosuppressive, immunostimulatory, or dual effect. It is important to elucidate the relationship between opioids and immune function, since immune system plays critical role in various physiological and pathophysiological processes, including the inflammation, tumor growth and metastasis, drug abuse, and so on. This review article tends to have an overview of the recent work and perspectives on opioids and the immune function. PMID:26985446

  15. Mechanistic insights into the allosteric modulation of opioid receptors by sodium ions.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yi; LeRouzic, Valerie; Schneider, Sebastian; Bisignano, Paola; Pasternak, Gavril W; Filizola, Marta

    2014-08-12

    The idea of sodium ions altering G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand binding and signaling was first suggested for opioid receptors (ORs) in the 1970s and subsequently extended to other GPCRs. Recently published ultra-high-resolution crystal structures of GPCRs, including that of the δ-OR subtype, have started to shed light on the mechanism underlying sodium control in GPCR signaling by revealing details of the sodium binding site. Whether sodium accesses different receptor subtypes from the extra- or intracellular sides, following similar or different pathways, is still an open question. Earlier experiments in brain homogenates suggested a differential sodium regulation of ligand binding to the three major OR subtypes, in spite of their high degree of sequence similarity. Intrigued by this possibility, we explored the dynamic nature of sodium binding to δ-OR, μ-OR, and κ-OR by means of microsecond-scale, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Rapid sodium permeation was observed exclusively from the extracellular milieu, and following similar binding pathways in all three ligand-free OR systems, notwithstanding extra densities of sodium observed near nonconserved residues of κ-OR and δ-OR, but not in μ-OR. We speculate that these differences may be responsible for the differential increase in antagonist binding affinity of μ-OR by sodium resulting from specific ligand binding experiments in transfected cells. On the other hand, sodium reduced the level of binding of subtype-specific agonists to all OR subtypes. Additional biased and unbiased MD simulations were conducted using the δ-OR ultra-high-resolution crystal structure as a model system to provide a mechanistic explanation for this experimental observation. PMID:25073009

  16. Molecular characterization of opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this research was to purify and characterize active opioid receptors and elucidate molecular aspects of opioid receptor heterogeneity. Purification to apparent homogeneity of an opioid binding protein from bovine caudate was achieved by solubilization in the non-ionic detergent, digitonin, followed by sequential chromatography on the opiate affinity matrix, ..beta..-naltrexylethylenediamine-CH-Sepharose 4B, and on the lectine affinity matrix, wheat germ agglutinin-agarose. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS-PAGE) followed by autoradiography revealed that radioiodinated purified receptor gave a single band. Purified receptor preparations showed a specific activity of 12,000-15,000 fmol of opiate bound per mg of protein. Radioiodinated human beta-endorphin (/sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/) was used as a probe to investigate the ligand binding subunits of mu and delta opioid receptors. /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ was shown to bind to a variety of opioid receptor-containing tissues with high affinity and specificity with preference for mu and delta sites, and with little, if any, binding to kappa sites. Affinity crosslinking techniques were employed to covalently link /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ to opioid receptors, utilizing derivatives of bis-succinimidyl esters that are bifunctional crosslinkers with specificities for amino and sulfhydryl groups. This, and competition experiments with high type-selective ligands, permitted the assignment of two labeled peptides to their receptor types, namely a peptide of M/sub r/ = 65,000 for mu receptors and one of M/sub r/ = 53,000 for delta receptors.

  17. Activation of μ Opioid Receptors Modulates Inflammation in Acute Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Anselmi, L.; Huynh, J.; Duraffourd, C.; Jaramillo, I.; Vegezzi, G.; Saccani, F; Boschetti, E.; Brecha, N.C.; De Giorgio, R.; Sternini, C

    2015-01-01

    Background μ opioid receptors (μORs) are expressed by neurons and inflammatory cells and mediate immune response. We tested whether activation of peripheral μORs ameliorates the acute and delayed phase of colitis. Methods C57BL/6J mice were treated with 3% dextran sodium sulfate in water, 5 days (DSS) with or without the peripherally-acting μOR agonist, [D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-Enkephalin (DAMGO) or with DAMGO+μOR antagonist at day 2–5, then euthanized. Other mice received DSS followed by water for 4 weeks, or DSS with DAMGO starting at day 2 of DSS for 2 or 3 weeks followed by water, then euthanized at 4 weeks. Disease activity index (DAI), histological damage, and myeloperoxidase assay (MPO), as index of neutrophil infiltration, were evaluated. Cytokines and μOR mRNAs were measured with RT-PCR, and nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB), the antiapoptotic factor Bcl-xL, and caspase 3 and 7 with Western blot. Key Results DSS induced acute colitis with elevated DAI, tissue damage, apoptosis and increased MPO, cytokines, μOR mRNA and NF-kB. DAMGO significantly reduced DAI, inflammatory indexes, cytokines, and caspases, and NF-kB, and upregulated Bcl-xL, effects prevented by μOR antagonist. In DSS mice plus 4 weeks of water, DAI, NF-kB and μOR were normal, whereas MPO, histological damage and cytokines were still elevated; DAMGO did not reduce inflammation, and did not upregulate Bcl-xL. Conclusions & Inferences μOR activation ameliorated the acute but not the delayed phase of DSS colitis by reducing cytokines, likely through activation of the antiapoptotic factor, Bcl-xL, and suppression of NF- kB, a potentiator of inflammation. PMID:25690069

  18. Differential Modulation of N-Type Calcium Channels by μ-Opioid Receptors in Oxytocinergic Versus Vasopressinergic Neurohypophysial Terminals

    PubMed Central

    ORTIZ-MIRANDA, SONIA I.; DAYANITHI, GOVINDAN; VELÁZQUEZ-MARRERO, CRISTINA; CUSTER, EDWARD E.; TREISTMAN, STEVEN N.; LEMOS, JOSÉ R.

    2011-01-01

    Opioids modulate the electrical activity of magnocellular neurons (MCN) and inhibit neuropeptide release at their terminals in the neurohypophysis. We have previously shown that μ-opioid receptor (MOR) activation induces a stronger inhibition of oxytocin (OT) than vasopressin (AVP) release from isolated MCN terminals. This higher sensitivity of OT release is due, at least in part, to the selective targeting of R-type calcium channels. We now describe the underlying basis for AVP's weaker inhibition by MOR activation and provide a more complete explanation of the complicated effects on neuropeptide release. We found that N-type calcium channels in AVP terminals are differentially modulated by MOR; enhanced at lower concentrations but increasingly inhibited at higher concentrations of agonists. On the other hand, N-type calcium channels in OT terminals were always inhibited. The response pattern in co-labeled terminals was analogous to that observed in AVP-containing terminals. Changes in intracellular calcium concentration and neuropeptide release corroborated these results as they showed a similar pattern of enhancement and inhibition in AVP terminals contrasting with solely inhibitory responses in OT terminals to MOR agonists. We established that fast translocation of Ca2+ channels to the plasma membrane was not mediating current increments and thus, changes in channel kinetic properties are most likely involved. Finally, we reveal a distinct Ca-channel β-subunit expression between each type of nerve endings that could explain some of the differences in responses to MOR activation. These results help advance our understanding of the complex modulatory mechanisms utilized by MORs in regulating presynaptic neuropeptide release. PMID:20509142

  19. In vivo opioid receptor heteromerization: where do we stand?

    PubMed Central

    Massotte, D

    2015-01-01

    Opioid receptors are highly homologous GPCRs that modulate brain function at all levels of neural integration, including autonomous, sensory, emotional and cognitive processing. Opioid receptors functionally interact in vivo, but the underlying mechanisms involving direct receptor–receptor interactions, affecting signalling pathways or engaging different neuronal circuits, remain unsolved. Heteromer formation through direct physical interaction between two opioid receptors or between an opioid receptor and a non-opioid one has been postulated and can be characterized by specific ligand binding, receptor signalling and trafficking properties. However, despite numerous studies in heterologous systems, evidence for physical proximity in vivo is only available for a limited number of opioid heteromers, and their physiopathological implication remains largely unknown mostly due to the lack of appropriate tools. Nonetheless, data collected so far using endogenous receptors point to a crucial role for opioid heteromers as a molecular entity that could underlie human pathologies such as alcoholism, acute or chronic pain as well as psychiatric disorders. Opioid heteromers therefore stand as new therapeutic targets for the drug discovery field. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24666391

  20. Investigation of the role of βarrestin2 in kappa opioid receptor modulation in a mouse model of pruritus.

    PubMed

    Morgenweck, Jenny; Frankowski, Kevin J; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Aubé, Jeffrey; Bohn, Laura M

    2015-12-01

    The kappa opioid receptor (KOR) is involved in mediating pruritus; agonists targeting this receptor have been used to treat chronic intractable itch. Conversely, antagonists induce an itch response at the site of injection. As a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), the KOR has potential for signaling via G proteins and βarrestins, however, it is not clear which of these pathways are involved in the KOR modulation of itch. In this study asked whether the actions of KOR in pruritus involve βarrestins by using βarrestin2 knockout (βarr2-KO) mice as well as a recently described biased KOR agonist that biases receptor signaling toward G protein pathways over βarrestin2 recruitment. We find that the KOR antagonists nor-binaltorphimine (NorBNI) and 5'-guanidinonaltrindole (5'GNTI) induce acute pruritus in C57BL/6J mice, with reduced effects in KOR-KO mice. βArr2-KO mice display less of a response to KOR antagonist-induced itch compared to wild types, however no genotype differences are observed from chloroquine phosphate (CP)-induced itch, suggesting that the antagonists may utilize a KOR-βarrestin2 dependent mechanism. The KOR agonist U50,488H was equally effective in both WT and βarr2-KO mice in suppressing CP-induced itch. Furthermore, the G protein biased agonist, Isoquinolinone 2.1 was as effective as U50,488H in suppressing the itch response induced by KOR antagonist NorBNI or CP in C57BL/6J mice. Together these data suggest that the antipruritic effects of KOR agonists may not require βarrestins. PMID:26318102

  1. Sodium modulates opioid receptors through a membrane component different from G-proteins. Demonstration by target size analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, S.; Costa, T.; Herz, A.

    1988-07-25

    The target size for opioid receptor binding was studied after manipulations known to affect the interactions between receptor and GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G-proteins). Addition of GTP or its analogs to the binding reaction, exposure of intact cells to pertussis toxin prior to irradiation, or treatment of irradiated membranes with N-ethylmaleimide did not change the target size (approximately equal to 100 kDa) for opioid receptors in NG 108-15 cells and rat brain. These data suggest that the 100-kDa species does not include an active subunit of a G-protein or alternatively that GTP does not promote the dissociation of the receptor-G-protein complex. The presence of Na+ (100 mM) in the radioligand binding assay induced a biphasic decay curve for agonist binding and a flattening of the monoexponential decay curve for a partial agonist. In both cases the effect was explained by an irradiation-induced loss of the low affinity state of the opioid receptor produced by the addition of Na+. This suggests that an allosteric inhibitor that mediates the effect of sodium on the receptor is destroyed at low doses of irradiation, leaving receptors which are no longer regulated by sodium. The effect of Na+ on target size was slightly increased by the simultaneous addition of GTP but was not altered by pertussis toxin treatment. Thus, the sodium unit is distinct from G-proteins and may represent a new component of the opioid receptor complex. Assuming a simple bimolecular model of one Na+ unit/receptor, the size of this inhibitor can be measured as 168 kDa.

  2. The evolution of vertebrate opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Craig W.

    2011-01-01

    The proteins that mediate the analgesic and other effects of opioid drugs and endogenous opioid peptides are known as opioid receptors. Opioid receptors consist of a family of four closely-related proteins belonging to the large superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors. The three types of opioid receptors shown unequivocally to mediate analgesia in animal models are the mu (MOR), delta (DOR), and kappa (KOR) opioid receptor proteins. The role of the fourth member of the opioid receptor family, the nociceptin or orphanin FQ receptor (ORL), is not as clear as hyperalgesia, analgesia, and no effect was reported after administration of ORL agonists. There are now cDNA sequences for all four types of opioid receptors that are expressed in the brain of six species from three different classes of vertebrates. This review presents a comparative analysis of vertebrate opioid receptors using bioinformatics and data from recent human genome studies. Results indicate that opioid receptors arose by gene duplication, that there is a vector of opioid receptor divergence, and that MOR shows evidence of rapid evolution. PMID:19273128

  3. Kappa-opioid-receptor agonists modulate the renal excretion of water and electrolytes in anaesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Ashton, N; Balment, R J; Blackburn, T P

    1990-01-01

    1. Subcutaneous injection of the kappa-opioid agonists U50,488 (10 mg kg-1) and tifluadom (3.5 mg kg-1) into Inactin-anaesthetized, saline-infused rats was associated with a diuresis, antinatriuresis and antikaliuresis which lasted for up to 2 h. A high (5 mg kg-1), but not low (0.1 mg kg-1), dose of naloxone blocked the renal effects of U50,488. 2. U50,488 administration in anaesthetized, vasopressin-deficient Brattleboro DI rats was associated with an attenuated diuresis, though the antinatriuretic response remained intact. 3. The diuretic action of U50,488 was associated with an increase in glomerular filtration rate while fractional fluid reabsorption remained steady. In contrast, fractional sodium and potassium reabsorption were increased. 4. These data suggest that kappa-opioid agonists alter renal handling of both water and electrolytes. This appears to be mediated by two separate mechanisms: increased fluid loss largely reflects altered glomerular events while the fall in electrolyte excretion results from altered tubular handling. PMID:2158834

  4. Blockade of opioid receptors in anterior cingulate cortex disrupts ethanol-seeking behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Gremel, Christina M; Young, Emily A; Cunningham, Christopher L

    2011-06-01

    The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and opioid receptors have been suggested to play a role in attributing incentive motivational properties to drug-related cues. We examined whether blockade of ACC opioid receptors would reduce cue-induced ethanol-seeking behavior in mice. We show that intra-ACC opioid receptor blockade disrupted expression of an ethanol-induced conditioned place preference, suggesting that endogenous opioid modulation in the ACC may be critical for maintaining the cue's conditioned rewarding effects. PMID:21219940

  5. [Opioid receptors and their selective ligands].

    PubMed

    Piestrzeniewicz, Mariola Katarzyna; Fichna, Jakub; Michna, Jakub; Janecka, Anna

    2006-01-01

    Opioid receptors (micro, delta, and kappa) belong to a large family of G protein-coupled receptors and play an important physiological role. Stimulation of these receptors triggers analgesic effects and affects the function of gastrointestinal tract. The discovery of opioid peptides, which are endogenous ligands of opioid receptors, including delta-selective enkephalins, kappa-selective dynorphins, and micro-selective endomorphins, initiated their structure-activity relationship studies. For the last 30 years, hundreds of analogs of opioid peptides have been synthesized in an effort to obtain the compounds more active, selective, and resistant to biodegradation than the endogenous ligands. Different unnatural amino acids, as well as cyclisation procedures, leading to conformationaly restricted analogs, were employed. All these modifications resulted in obtaining very selective agonists and antagonists with high affinity at micro-, dlta-, and kappa-opioid receptors, which are extremely useful tools in further studies on the pharmacology of opioid receptors in a mammalian organism. PMID:17201067

  6. Tetrahydroquinoline derivatives as opioid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cunyu; Westaway, Susan M; Speake, Jason D; Bishop, Michael J; Goetz, Aaron S; Carballo, Luz Helena; Hu, Mike; Epperly, Andrea H

    2011-01-15

    Opioid receptors play an important role in both behavioral and homeostatic functions. We herein report tetrahydroquinoline derivatives as opioid receptor antagonists. SAR studies led to the identification of the potent antagonist 2v, endowed with 1.58nM (K(i)) functional activity against the μ opioid receptor. DMPK data suggest that novel tetrahydroquinoline analogs may be advantageous in peripheral applications. PMID:21193310

  7. Activation of delta-type opioid receptors modulates the responses of cat terminal ileum to field electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Venkova, K; Pencheva, N; Radomirov, R

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of (D-Ala2, D-Leu5) enkephalin amide (DADLE) on the responses of the cat terminal ileum to field electrical stimulation (pulse duration of 0.5 msec, train duration of 10 sec, 30 V) were evaluated by the changes in the contractile or the relaxatory responses of longitudinal and circular strips to electrical stimuli with a frequency of 2, 10 or 30 Hz. 2. Stimulation with a frequency of 2, 10 or 30 Hz elicited contractile responses from the longitudinal strips while in the circular strips 2 Hz stimulation induced contractions and 10 or 30 Hz stimulation caused relaxation. Tetrodotoxin (TTX) (0.1 mumol/l) abolished the electrically-induced responses in both longitudinal and circular strips. 3. DADLE (1 nmol/l) significantly inhibited the cholinergic contractile responses of the longitudinal strips to 2, 10 or 30 Hz stimulation and the contractile responses of the circular strips to 2 Hz stimulation. The relaxatory responses of the circular strips to 10 or 30 Hz stimulation were insignificantly increased by DADLE. 4. On the background of guanetidine (10 mumol/l) and atropine (3 mumol/l) DADLE significantly decreased the nonadrenergic, noncholinergic relaxatory responses of the circular strips to 2, 10 or 30 Hz stimulation. 5. DADLE did not change the maximum effects and the EC50 values of acetylcholine and noradrenaline in both longitudinal and circular strips. 6. It is suggested that in the cat terminal ileum activation of delta-type opioid receptors modulates the mechanical activity suppressing the cholinergic responses in the longitudinal and circular layers as well as the adrenergic and nonadrenergic, noncholinergic responses in the circular layer. PMID:2153605

  8. Opioid receptors in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Opium is arguably one of the oldest herbal medicines, being used as analgesic, sedative and antidiarrheal drug for thousands of years. These effects mirror the actions of the endogenous opioid system and are mediated by the principal μ-, κ- and δ-opioid receptors. In the gut, met-enkephalin, leu-enkephalin, β-endorphin and dynorphin occur in both neurons and endocrine cells. When released, opioid peptides activate opioid receptors on the enteric circuitry controlling motility and secretion. As a result, inhibition of gastric emptying, increase in sphincter tone, induction of stationary motor patterns and blockade of peristalsis ensue. Together with inhibition of ion and fluid secretion, these effects cause constipation, one of the most frequent and troublesome adverse reactions of opioid analgesic therapy. Although laxatives are most frequently used to ameliorate opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, their efficacy is unsatisfactory. Specific antagonism of peripheral opioid receptors is a more rational approach. This goal is addressed by the use of opioid receptor antagonists with limited absorption such as oral prolonged-release naloxone and opioid receptor antagonists that do not penetrate the blood-brain barrier such as methylnaltrexone and alvimopan. Preliminary evidence indicates that peripherally restricted opioid receptor antagonists may act as prokinetic drugs in their own right. PMID:19345246

  9. Opioid receptor trafficking and interaction in nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X; Bao, L; Li, S

    2015-01-01

    Opiate analgesics such as morphine are often used for pain therapy. However, antinociceptive tolerance and dependence may develop with long-term use of these drugs. It was found that μ-opioid receptors can interact with δ-opioid receptors, and morphine antinociceptive tolerance can be reduced by blocking δ-opioid receptors. Recent studies have shown that μ- and δ-opioid receptors are co-expressed in a considerable number of small neurons in the dorsal root ganglion. The interaction of μ-opioid receptors with δ-opioid receptors in the nociceptive afferents is facilitated by the stimulus-induced cell-surface expression of δ-opioid receptors, and contributes to morphine tolerance. Further analysis of the molecular, cellular and neural circuit mechanisms that regulate the trafficking and interaction of opioid receptors and related signalling molecules in the pain pathway would help to elucidate the mechanism of opiate analgesia and improve pain therapy. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24611685

  10. Molecular Physiology of Enteric Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Galligan, James J.; Akbarali, Hamid I.

    2015-01-01

    Opioid drugs have powerful antidiarrheal effects and many patients taking these drugs for chronic pain relief experience chronic constipation that can progress to opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. Three classes of opioid receptors are expressed by enteric neurons: μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors (MOR, DOR, and KOR). MOR and DOR couple to inhibition of adenylate cylase and nerve terminal Ca2+ channels and activation of K+ channels. These effects reduce neuronal activity and neurotransmitter release. KOR couples to inhibition of Ca2+ channels and inhibition of neurotransmitter release. In the human gastrointestinal tract, MOR, DOR, and KOR link to inhibition of acetylcholine release from enteric interneurons and purine/nitric oxide release from inhibitory motorneurons. These actions inhibit propulsive motility. MOR and DOR also link to inhibition of submucosal secretomotor neurons, reducing active Cl− secretion and passive water movement into the colonic lumen. These effects account for the constipation caused by opioid receptor agonists. Tolerance develops to the analgesic effects of opioid receptor agonists but not to the constipating actions. This may be due to differential β-arrestin-2-dependent opioid receptor desensitization and internalization in enteric nerves in the colon compared with the small intestine and in neuronal pain pathways. Further studies of differential opioid receptor desensitization and tolerance in subsets of enteric neurons may identify new drugs or other treatment strategies of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. PMID:25207608

  11. Molecular physiology of enteric opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Galligan, James J; Akbarali, Hamid I

    2014-09-10

    Opioid drugs have powerful antidiarrheal effects and many patients taking these drugs for chronic pain relief experience chronic constipation that can progress to opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. Three classes of opioid receptors are expressed by enteric neurons: μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors (MOR, DOR, and KOR). MOR and DOR couple to inhibition of adenylate cylase and nerve terminal Ca(2+) channels and activation of K(+) channels. These effects reduce neuronal activity and neurotransmitter release. KOR couples to inhibition of Ca(2+) channels and inhibition of neurotransmitter release. In the human gastrointestinal tract, MOR, DOR, and KOR link to inhibition of acetylcholine release from enteric interneurons and purine/nitric oxide release from inhibitory motorneurons. These actions inhibit propulsive motility. MOR and DOR also link to inhibition of submucosal secretomotor neurons, reducing active Cl(-) secretion and passive water movement into the colonic lumen. These effects account for the constipation caused by opioid receptor agonists. Tolerance develops to the analgesic effects of opioid receptor agonists but not to the constipating actions. This may be due to differential β-arrestin-2-dependent opioid receptor desensitization and internalization in enteric nerves in the colon compared with the small intestine and in neuronal pain pathways. Further studies of differential opioid receptor desensitization and tolerance in subsets of enteric neurons may identify new drugs or other treatment strategies of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction. PMID:25207608

  12. Modulation of Ca2+ channels by opioid receptor antagonists in mesenteric arterial smooth muscle cells of rats in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Kai, Li; Wang, Zhong-Feng; Hu, De-Yao; Shi, Yu-Liang; Liu, Liang-Ming

    2002-10-01

    The effects of hemorrhagic shock on Ba currents ( ) via Ca channels and the regulation of the channels in the vascular hyporesponse stage of hemorrhagic shock by opioid receptor antagonists were examined by using the whole-cell recording of patch-clamp technique in mesenteric arterial smooth muscle cells of rats. The results showed that hemorrhagic shock induced an inhibition of Ca channels in the cells; 10 micro M of naloxone and 100 n of naltrindole, nor-binaltorphimine, and beta-funaltrexamine increased the in the cells of rats in shock. After inhibition of protein kinase C by using 1-(5-isoquindinesulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine via electrodes, the enhancement of by the antagonists was not observed. These results suggested that the inhibition of Ca channel induced by hemorrhagic shock was mediated by delta-, kappa-, and mu -opioid receptors in the cells and may be partly responsible for vascular hyporesponse. The enhancement of was mediated by activation of protein kinase C and may be responsible for the antagonist-caused improvement in the response of resistance arteries to vasoactive stimulants at the decompensatory stage of hemorrhagic shock. PMID:12352325

  13. Differential involvement of ventral tegmental mu, delta and kappa opioid receptors in modulation of basal mesolimbic dopamine release: in vivo microdialysis studies.

    PubMed

    Devine, D P; Leone, P; Pocock, D; Wise, R A

    1993-09-01

    In vivo microdialysis was used to assess the involvement of ventral tegmental area (VTA) mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors in modulation of basal extracellular ventral striatal dopamine (DA) and DA-metabolite concentrations. Independent groups of chloral hydrate-anesthetized rats were given VTA microinjections of selective opioid agonists, and extracellular ventral striatal DA and DA-metabolite concentrations were assayed using HPLC. VTA microinjections of [D-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4-Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO; a mu agonist) and [D-Pen2, D-Pen5]-enkephalin (DDDPE; a delta agonist) each caused dose-orderly increases in ventral striatal DA and DA-metabolite concentrations. The effective concentrations of DPDPE were 100- to 1000-fold higher than the effective concentrations of DAMGO. VTA microinjections of (trans-(dl)-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclo-hexyl]- benzeneacetamide) methane sulfonate hydrate (U-50,488H); a kappa agonist) failed to alter ventral striatal DA concentrations at any dose tested, but subsequent systemic injections significantly decreased DA and DA-metabolite concentrations. Pretreatment with VTA microinjections of 17-cyclopropylmethyl-6,7-dehydro-4,5-epoxy-3,14-dihydroxy-6,7,2',3'- indolmorphinan hydrochloride (naltrindole; a delta antagonist) (delta antagonist) antagonized VTA DPDPE-mediated increases in ventral striatal DA and DA-metabolite concentrations but failed to antagonize VTA DAMGO-mediated increases. Pretreatment with D-Pen-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP; a mu antagonist) antagonized VTA DAMGO-mediated increases but failed to antagonize VTA DPDPE-mediated increases. Thus both mu and delta receptor agonist appear capable of increasing ventral striatal DA and DA-metabolite concentrations through selective actions on their preferred class of opioid receptors in the VTA. The increases in ventral striatal DA and DA-metabolite concentrations that are seen after systemic treatment with kappa opioid agonists appear not to

  14. Pharmacological Profiles of Oligomerized μ-Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cynthia Wei-Sheng; Ho, Ing-Kang

    2013-01-01

    Opioids are widely prescribed pain relievers with multiple side effects and potential complications. They produce analgesia via G-protein-protein coupled receptors: μ-, δ-, κ-opioid and opioid receptor-like 1 receptors. Bivalent ligands targeted to the oligomerized opioid receptors might be the key to developing analgesics without undesired side effects and obtaining effective treatment for opioid addicts. In this review we will update the biological effects of μ-opioids on homo- or hetero-oligomerized μ-opioid receptor and discuss potential mechanisms through which bivalent ligands exert beneficial effects, including adenylate cyclase regulation and receptor-mediated signaling pathways. PMID:24709876

  15. Opposite role of delta 1- and delta 2-opioid receptors activated by endogenous or exogenous opioid agonists on the endogenous cholecystokinin system: further evidence for delta-opioid receptor heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Noble, F; Fournie-Zaluski, M C; Roques, B P

    1996-12-01

    Using the mouse caudate-putamen, where delta-opioid receptor subtypes have been shown to regulate adenylyl cyclase activity, we show in this study that endogenous enkephalins inhibit enzyme activity through activation of delta 1- and delta 2-opioid receptors. Thus, naltriben or 7-benzylidenenaltrexone as well as the delta-selective antagonist naltrindole (mixed delta 1 and delta 2 antagonist) antagonized inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity induced by methionine- or leucine-enkephalin, while the micro-antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP) was without effect. Furthermore, we have previously shown that activation of delta-opioid receptors increases cholecystokinin release in the central nervous system, resulting in a potentiation of micro-opioid antinociceptive responses, and the respective role of delta 1- and delta 2-opioid receptors in this facilitatory effect has now been evaluated. Activation of delta 2-opioid receptors, either by endogenous enkephalins protected from catabolism by the complete enkephalin-degrading enzyme inhibitor N-((R,S)-2-benzyl-3((S)(2-amino-4-methyl-thio) butyldithio)-1-oxopropyl)-L-phenyl-alanine benzyl ester (RB 101), or by the delta 2-selective agonist Tyr-D-Ser(O-tert-butyl)-Gly-Phe-Leu-Thr(O-tert-butyl) (BUBU), potentiated micro-opioid antinociceptive responses in the hot-plate test in mice. This effect was antagonized by a selective cholecystokinin-A antagonist. Activation of delta 1-opioid receptors by endogenous opioid peptides decreased the micro-opioid responses. These results suggest that stimulation of delta 2-opioid receptors potentiates micro-opioid analgesia in the hot-plate test in mice through an increase in endogenous cholecystokinin release, while activation of delta 1-opioid receptors could decrease it. Thus, the pre-existing physiological balance between opioid and cholecystokinin systems seems to be modulated in opposite directions depending on whether delta 1- or delta 2-opioid receptors are

  16. Sex differences in opioid analgesia and addiction: interactions among opioid receptors and estrogen receptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Opioids are widely used as the pain reliever and also notorious for being addictive drugs. Sex differences in the opioid analgesia and addiction have been reported and investigated in human subjects and animal models. Yet, the molecular mechanism underlying the differences between males and females is still unclear. Here, we reviewed the literature describing the sex differences in analgesic responses and addiction liabilities to clinically relevant opioids. The reported interactions among opioids, estrogens, opioid receptors, and estrogen receptors are also evaluated. We postulate that the sex differences partly originated from the crosstalk among the estrogen and opioid receptors when stimulated by the exogenous opioids, possibly through common secondary messengers and the downstream gene transcriptional regulators. PMID:24010861

  17. Regulation of opioid receptors by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Unterwald, E M

    2001-06-01

    Cocaine is a widely abused psychostimulant. Its direct actions include inhibition of dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine reuptake into presynaptic nerve terminals, thereby potentiating the actions of these transmitters in the synapse. A variety of studies have demonstrated that cocaine can also have profound effects on the endogenous opioid system. Compelling evidence points to the importance of mu opioid receptors in human cocaine addiction and craving. Animal studies support these findings and demonstrate that chronic cocaine administration can result in alterations in opioid receptor expression and function as measured by changes in critical signal transduction pathways. This chapter reviews studies on the regulation of opioid receptors as the result of exposure to cocaine. PMID:11458541

  18. Opioid modulation of taste hedonics within the ventral striatum.

    PubMed

    Kelley, A E; Bakshi, V P; Haber, S N; Steininger, T L; Will, M J; Zhang, M

    2002-07-01

    There is a long-standing interest in the role of endogenous opioid peptides in feeding behavior and, in particular, in the modulation of food reward and palatability. Since drugs such as heroin, morphine, alcohol, and cannabinoids, interact with this system, there may be important common neural substrates between food and drug reward with regard to the brain's opioid systems. In this paper, we review the proposed functional role of opioid neurotransmission and mu opiate receptors within the nucleus accumbens and surrounding ventral striatum. Opioid compounds, particularly those selective for the mu receptor, induce a potent increase in food intake, sucrose, salt, saccharin, and ethanol intake. We have explored this phenomenon with regard to macronutrient selection, regional specificity, role of output structures, Fos mapping, analysis of motivational state, and enkephalin gene expression. We hypothesize that opioid-mediated mechanisms within ventral striatal medium spiny neurons mediate the affective or hedonic response to food ('liking' or food 'pleasure'). A further refinement of this hypothesis is that activation of ventral striatal opioids specifically encodes positive affect induced by tasty and/or calorically dense foods (such as sugar and fat), and promotes behaviors associated with this enhanced palatability. It is proposed that this brain mechanism was beneficial in evolutionary development for ensuring the consumption of relatively scarce, high-energy food sources. However, in modern times, with unlimited supplies of high-calorie food, it has contributed to the present epidemic of obesity. PMID:12117573

  19. Opioid-induced redistribution of 6TM and 7TM μ opioid receptors: A hypothesized mechanistic facilitator model of opioid-induced hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Jin, Xiaoju; Liu, Yusheng; Xu, Shiqin; Lei, Liming; Shen, Xiaofeng; Guo, Xirong; Xia, Xiaoqiong; Wang, Fuzhou

    2016-08-01

    Opioids are still the most popular form of pain treatment, but many unavoidable side effects make opioids a big challenge in effective pain management. Opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), a paradoxical phenomenon, portrays an increased sensitivity to harmful stimuli caused by opioid exposure. Changes in the neural modulation are considered a major contributor to the development of OIH. Activation of opioid receptors (ORs) and corresponding downstream molecules are the vital composition of functional performance of opioids. Increasing interests were proposed of the interaction between ORs and other neural transmitter systems such as glutamatergic, GABAergic and adrenergic ones to the genesis of OIH. G protein coupled μ-opioid receptor (MOR) was studied comprehensively on its role in the development of OIH. In addition to the relationship between MOR and other neurotransmitter receptors, a new intracellular MOR that has six transmembrane (6TM) domains was identified, and found to perform a pro-nociceptive task in contrast to the counterpart 7TM isoform. A mechanistic model of OIH in which both 6TM and 7TM MORs undergoing membrane redistribution upon opioid exposure is proposed which eventually facilitates the neurons more sensitive to nociceptive stimulation than that of the preceding opioid exposure. PMID:27116700

  20. State-dependent μ-opioid modulation of social motivation

    PubMed Central

    Loseth, Guro E.; Ellingsen, Dan-Mikael; Leknes, Siri

    2014-01-01

    Social mammals engage in affiliative interactions both when seeking relief from negative affect and when searching for pleasure and joy. These two motivational states are both modulated by μ-opioid transmission. The μ-opioid receptor (MOR) system in the brain mediates pain relief and reward behaviors, and is implicated in social reward processing and affiliative bonding across mammalian species. However, pharmacological manipulation of the μ-opioid system has yielded opposite effects on rodents and primates: in rodents, social motivation is generally increased by MOR agonists and reduced by antagonists, whereas the opposite pattern has been shown in primates. Here, we address this paradox by taking into account differences in motivational state. We first review evidence for μ-opioid mediation of reward processing, emotion regulation, and affiliation in humans, non-human primates, rodents and other species. Based on the consistent cross-species similarities in opioid functioning, we propose a unified, state-dependent model for μ-opioid modulation of affiliation across the mammalian species. Finally, we show that this state-dependent model is supported by evidence from both rodent and primate studies, when species and age differences in social separation response are taken into account. PMID:25565999

  1. Molecular Pharmacology of δ-Opioid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Gendron, Louis; Cahill, Catherine M; von Zastrow, Mark; Schiller, Peter W; Pineyro, Graciela

    2016-07-01

    Opioids are among the most effective analgesics available and are the first choice in the treatment of acute severe pain. However, partial efficacy, a tendency to produce tolerance, and a host of ill-tolerated side effects make clinically available opioids less effective in the management of chronic pain syndromes. Given that most therapeutic opioids produce their actions via µ-opioid receptors (MOPrs), other targets are constantly being explored, among which δ-opioid receptors (DOPrs) are being increasingly considered as promising alternatives. This review addresses DOPrs from the perspective of cellular and molecular determinants of their pharmacological diversity. Thus, DOPr ligands are examined in terms of structural and functional variety, DOPrs' capacity to engage a multiplicity of canonical and noncanonical G protein-dependent responses is surveyed, and evidence supporting ligand-specific signaling and regulation is analyzed. Pharmacological DOPr subtypes are examined in light of the ability of DOPr to organize into multimeric arrays and to adopt multiple active conformations as well as differences in ligand kinetics. Current knowledge on DOPr targeting to the membrane is examined as a means of understanding how these receptors are especially active in chronic pain management. Insight into cellular and molecular mechanisms of pharmacological diversity should guide the rational design of more effective, longer-lasting, and better-tolerated opioid analgesics for chronic pain management. PMID:27343248

  2. Nitric oxide and histone deacetylases modulate cocaine-induced mu-opioid receptor levels in PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cocaine exposure has been reported to alter central μ-opioid receptor (MOR) expression in vivo. The present study employed an in vitro cellular model to explore possible mechanisms that may be involved in this action of cocaine. Methods To assess the effects of cocaine on MOR levels, two treatment regimens were tested in PC12 cells: single continuous or multiple intermittent. MOR protein levels were assessed by western blot analysis and quantitative PCR was used to determine relative MOR mRNA expression levels. To evaluate the role of nitric oxide (NO) and histone acetylation in cocaine-induced MOR expression, cells were pre-treated with the NO synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME) or the non-selective histone acetyltransferase inhibitor curcumin. Results Both cocaine treatment regimens significantly increased MOR protein levels and protein stability, but only multiple intermittent treatments increased MOR mRNA levels as well as c-fos mRNA levels and activator protein 1 binding activity. Both regimens increased NO production, and pre-treatment with L-NAME prevented cocaine-induced increases in MOR protein and mRNA levels. Single and multiple cocaine treatment regimens inhibited histone deacetylase activity, and pre-treatment with curcumin prevented cocaine-induced up-regulation of MOR protein expression. Conclusions In the PC12 cell model, both NO and histone deacetylase activity regulate cocaine-induced MOR expression at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Based on these novel findings, it is hypothesized that epigenetic mechanisms are implicated in cocaine’s action on MOR expression in neurons. PMID:23079001

  3. Effects of defeat stress on behavioral flexibility in males and females: modulation by the mu-opioid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Laredo, Sarah A.; Steinman, Michael Q.; Robles, Cindee F.; Ferrer, Emilio; Ragen, Benjamin J.; Trainor, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral flexibility is a component of executive functioning that allows individuals to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Independent lines of research indicate that the mu opioid receptor (MOR) is an important mediator of behavioral flexibility and responses to psychosocial stress. The current study bridges these two lines of research and tests the extent to which social defeat and MOR affect behavioral flexibility and whether sex moderates these effects in California mice (Peromyscus californicus). Males and females assigned to social defeat or control conditions were tested in a Barnes maze. In males, defeat impaired behavioral flexibility but not acquisition. Female performance was unaffected by defeat. MOR binding in defeated and control mice in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), striatum, and hippocampus was examined via autoradiography. Stressed males had reduced MOR binding in the OFC whereas females were unaffected. The MOR antagonist beta-funaltrexamine (1 mg/kg) impaired performance in males naïve to defeat during the reversal phase but had no effect on females. Finally, we examined the effects of the MOR agonist morphine (2.5, 5 mg/kg) on stressed mice. As expected, morphine improved behavioral flexibility in stressed males. The stress-induced deficits in behavioral flexibility in males are consistent with a proactive coping strategy, including previous observations that stressed male California mice exhibit strong social approach and aggression. Our pharmacological data suggest that a down-regulation of MOR signaling in males may contribute to sex differences in behavioral flexibility following stress. This is discussed in the framework of coping strategies for individuals with mood disorders. PMID:25615538

  4. Effects of defeat stress on behavioral flexibility in males and females: modulation by the mu-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Laredo, Sarah A; Steinman, Michael Q; Robles, Cindee F; Ferrer, Emilio; Ragen, Benjamin J; Trainor, Brian C

    2015-02-01

    Behavioral flexibility is a component of executive functioning that allows individuals to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Independent lines of research indicate that the mu opioid receptor (MOR) is an important mediator of behavioral flexibility and responses to psychosocial stress. The current study bridges these two lines of research and tests the extent to which social defeat and MOR affect behavioral flexibility and whether sex moderates these effects in California mice (Peromyscus californicus). Males and females assigned to social defeat or control conditions were tested in a Barnes maze. In males, defeat impaired behavioral flexibility but not acquisition. Female performance was unaffected by defeat. MOR binding in defeated and control mice in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), striatum and hippocampus was examined via autoradiography. Stressed males had reduced MOR binding in the OFC whereas females were unaffected. The MOR antagonist beta-funaltrexamine (1 mg/kg) impaired performance in males naïve to defeat during the reversal phase but had no effect on females. Finally, we examined the effects of the MOR agonist morphine (2.5 and 5 mg/kg) on stressed mice. As expected, morphine improved behavioral flexibility in stressed males. The stress-induced deficits in behavioral flexibility in males are consistent with a proactive coping strategy, including previous observations that stressed male California mice exhibit strong social approach and aggression. Our pharmacological data suggest that a down-regulation of MOR signaling in males may contribute to sex differences in behavioral flexibility following stress. This is discussed in the framework of coping strategies for individuals with mood disorders. PMID:25615538

  5. Regulation and Functional Implications of Opioid Receptor Splicing in Opioid Pharmacology and HIV Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Regan, Patrick M; Langford, Dianne; Khalili, Kamel

    2016-05-01

    Despite the identification and characterization of four opioid receptor subtypes and the genes from which they are encoded, pharmacological data does not conform to the predications of a four opioid receptor model. Instead, current studies of opioid pharmacology suggest the existence of additional receptor subtypes; however, no additional opioid receptor subtype has been identified to date. It is now understood that this discrepancy is due to the generation of multiple isoforms of opioid receptor subtypes. While several mechanisms are utilized to generate these isoforms, the primary mechanism involves alternative splicing of the pre-mRNA transcript. Extensive alternative splicing patterns for opioid receptors have since been identified and discrepancies in opioid pharmacology are now partially attributed to variable expression of these isoforms. Recent studies have been successful in characterizing the localization of these isoforms as well as their specificity in ligand binding; however, the regulation of opioid receptor splicing specificity is poorly characterized. Furthermore, the functional significance of individual receptor isoforms and the extent to which opioid- and/or HIV-mediated changes in the opioid receptor isoform profile contributes to altered opioid pharmacology or the well-known physiological role of opioids in the exacerbation of HIV neurocognitive dysfunction is unknown. As such, the current review details constitutive splicing mechanisms as well as the specific architecture of opioid receptor genes, transcripts, and receptors in order to highlight the current understanding of opioid receptor isoforms, potential mechanisms of their regulation and signaling, and their functional significance in both opioid pharmacology and HIV-associated neuropathology. PMID:26529364

  6. [Nociceptin and the ORL1 receptor: pharmacology of a new opioid receptor].

    PubMed

    Grond, S; Meuser, T; Pietruck, C; Sablotzki, A

    2002-12-01

    Molecular biological investigations led to the discovery of the ORL1 receptor ( opioid receptor like-1 receptor) and its endogenous ligand nociceptin. Although its sequence and structure are closely related to traditional opioid receptors, the ORL1 receptor shows low binding affinities for selective opioid agonists and antagonists. On the other hand, the ORL1 ligand nociceptin does not bind to the three traditional opioid receptors. The activation of the G protein-coupled ORL1 receptor inhibits adenlylate cyclase activity, reduces the intracellular concentration of the second messenger cAMP and regulates ion channels. The supraspinal administration of nociceptin produces hyperalgesia. unlike opioids. Spinal intrathecal and peripheral administration of nociceptin causes hyperalgesia in low doses and analgesia in high doses. The physiological role and detailed mechanisms of these dose-dependent nociceptin effects in opposite directions are not yet known. In addition, nociceptin modulates other biological phenomena such as feeding, locomotion, gastrointestinal function,memory, cardiovascular function,immunity, renal function, anxiety,dependence and tolerance.Future research on the physiological and pathophysiological importance of the nociceptin/ORL1 receptor systems may provide a target for novel therapeutics. PMID:12486589

  7. Kappa Opioid Receptor Agonist and Brain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Chunhua, Chen; Chunhua, Xi; Megumi, Sugita; Renyu, Liu

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors, especially Kappa opioid receptor (KOR) play an important role in the pathophysiological process of cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. Previously accepted KOR agonists activity has included anti-nociception, cardiovascular, anti-pruritic, diuretic, and antitussive effects, while compelling evidence from various ischemic animal models indicate that KOR agonist have neuroprotective effects through various mechanisms. In this review, we aimed to demonstrate the property of KOR agonist and its role in global and focal cerebral ischemia. Based on current preclinical research, the KOR agonists may be useful as a neuroprotective agent. The recent discovery of salvinorin A, highly selective non-opioid KOR agonist, offers a new tool to study the role of KOR in brain HI injury and the protective effects of KOR agonist. The unique pharmacological profile of salvinorin A along with the long history of human usage provides its high candidacy as a potential alternative medication for brain HI injury. PMID:25574482

  8. Selectively Promiscuous Opioid Ligands: Discovery of High Affinity/Low Efficacy Opioid Ligands with Substantial Nociceptin Opioid Peptide Receptor Affinity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Emerging clinical and preclinical evidence suggests that a compound displaying high affinity for μ, κ, and δ opioid (MOP, KOP, and DOP) receptors and antagonist activity at each, coupled with moderate affinity and efficacy at nociceptin opioid peptide (NOP) receptors will have utility as a relapse prevention agent for multiple types of drug abuse. Members of the orvinol family of opioid ligands have the desired affinity profile but have typically displayed substantial efficacy at MOP and or KOP receptors. In this study it is shown that a phenyl ring analogue (1d) of buprenorphine displays the desired profile in vitro with high, nonselective affinity for the MOP, KOP, and DOP receptors coupled with moderate affinity for NOP receptors. In vivo, 1d lacked any opioid agonist activity and was an antagonist of both the MOP receptor agonist morphine and the KOP receptor agonist ethylketocyclazocine, confirming the desired opioid receptor profile in vivo. PMID:24761755

  9. Molecular Control of δ-Opioid Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Giguere, Patrick M.; Katritch, Vsevolod; Huang, Xi-Ping; Thompson, Aaron A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Roth, Bryan L.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Opioids represent widely prescribed and abused medications, although their signal transduction mechanisms are not well understood. Here we present the 1.8Å high-resolution crystal structure of the human δ-opioid receptor (δ-OR), revealing the presence and fundamental role of a sodium ion mediating allosteric control of receptor functional selectivity and constitutive activity. The distinctive δ-OR sodium ion site architecture is centrally located in a polar interaction network in the 7-transmembrane bundle core, with the sodium ion stabilizing a reduced agonist affinity state, and thereby modulating signal transduction. Site-directed mutagenesis and functional studies reveal that changing the allosteric sodium site residue Asn131 to alanine or valine augments constitutive arrestin-ergic signaling. Asp95Ala, Asn310Ala, and Asn314Ala mutations transform classical δ-opioid antagonists like naltrindole into potent β-arrestin-biased agonists. The data establish the molecular basis for allosteric sodium ion control in opioid signaling, revealing that sodium-coordinating residues act as “efficacy-switches” at a prototypic G protein-coupled receptor. PMID:24413399

  10. Autoradiographic localization of mu and delta opioid receptors in the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system

    SciTech Connect

    Dilts, R.P. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    In vitro autoradiographic techniques were coupled with selective chemical lesions of the A10 dopamine cells and intrinsic perikarya of the region to delineate the anatomical localization of mu and delta opioid receptors, as well as, neurotensin receptors. Mu opioid receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-DAGO. Delta receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-DPDPE. Neurotensin receptors were labeled with {sup 125}I-NT3. Unilateral lesions of the dopamine perikarya were produced by injections of 6-OHDA administered in the ventral mesencephalon. Unilateral lesions of intrinsic perikarya were induced by injections of quinolinic acid in to the A10 dopamine cell region. Unilateral lesions produced with 6-OHDA resulted in the loss of neurotensin receptors in the A10 region and within the terminal fields. Mu opioid receptors were unaffected by this treatment, but delta opioid receptors increased in the contralateral striatum and nucleus accumbens following 6-OHDA administration. Quinolinic acid produced a reduction of mu opioid receptors within the A10 region with a concomitant reduction in neurotensin receptors in both the cell body region and terminal fields. These results are consistent with a variety of biochemical and behavioral data which suggest the indirect modulation of dopamine transmission by the opioids. In contrast these results strongly indicate a direct modulation of the mesolimbic dopamine system by neurotensin.

  11. The diverse clinical uses of opioid receptor drugs.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2010-05-01

    Opioid receptors are widely distributed throughout the nervous system. In addition to their central role in brain pathways mediating pain, endogenous opioid peptides function as neuromodulators and opioid systems are involved in many physiological functions. Opioid receptor drugs, including methadone (Dolophine), buprenorphine (Buprenex, Subutex), naltrexone (Revia), naloxone (Narcan), and buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone), are the focus of this article. This class of drugs is likely to be further developed for the treatment of addictions and mood disorders. PMID:20415289

  12. The role of the dynorphin/κ opioid receptor system in anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Ai; Wang, Yu-jun; He, Ling; Liu, Jing-gen

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most common and prevalent forms of psychiatric disease, although the biological basis of anxiety is not well understood. The dynorphin/κ opioid receptor system is widely distributed in the central nervous system and has been shown to play a critical role in modulating mood and emotional behaviors. In the present review, we summarize current literature relating to the role played by the dynorphin/κ opioid receptor system in anxiety and κ opioid receptor antagonists as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of anxiety disorders. PMID:25982631

  13. The role of the dynorphin/κ opioid receptor system in anxiety.

    PubMed

    Hang, Ai; Wang, Yu-jun; He, Ling; Liu, Jing-gen

    2015-07-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most common and prevalent forms of psychiatric disease, although the biological basis of anxiety is not well understood. The dynorphin/κ opioid receptor system is widely distributed in the central nervous system and has been shown to play a critical role in modulating mood and emotional behaviors. In the present review, we summarize current literature relating to the role played by the dynorphin/κ opioid receptor system in anxiety and κ opioid receptor antagonists as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of anxiety disorders. PMID:25982631

  14. µ- and κ-Opioid receptor activation in the dorsal periaqueductal grey matter differentially modulates panic-like behaviours induced by electrical and chemical stimulation of the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Twardowschy, André; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2015-02-01

    It has been shown that electrical stimulation of the mesencephalic tectum (MT) provokes defensive responses in both humans and rodents. During an emotional aversive state, some convergent studies have also demonstrated the existence of a complex interaction between endogenous opioid peptide- and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing connections during fear-induced responses. It has been proposed that opioid neurons exert an influence on GABAergic interneurons, which, in turn, exert inhibitory tonic control on the mesencephalic excitatory pathways. Thus, opioid peptides can disinhibit neurons that are tonically inhibited by GABA, therefore, modulating the expression of defensive behavioural reactions. In the present work, we used both electric stimulation and microinjections of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline in the inferior colliculus (IC) of Wistar rats in combination with microinjections of µ- and κ-opioid receptor selective agonists into the dorsal columns of periaqueductal grey matter (dPAG) to evaluate the effects on panic-like behaviours elicited by IC electrical and chemical stimulation. The present results showed that neurochemical lesions of the dPAG caused a significant impairment in the organisation of defensive responses by IC neurons, reducing the duration [t(14)=3.0; p<0.01] of defensive immobility and the duration [t(14)=2.8; p<0.05] and frequency [t(14)=2.5; p<0.05] of escape. Paradoxically, treating the dPAG with the µ-opioid receptor agonist met-enkephalin caused a significant reduction of panic-like behaviours induced by both electrical and chemical stimulation of the IC, increasing the escape behaviour threshold [F(2,23)=13.5; p<0.001] and decreasing the frequency [F(3,36)=11.7; p<0.001] and duration [F(3,36)=11.6; p<0.001] of escape and the duration of defensive immobility [F(3,36)=16.1; p<0.05]. In contrast, treating the dPAG with the κ-opioid receptor agonist salvinorin-A increased the frequency [F(3,36)=12.4; p<0.01] and

  15. Inhibition of opioid release in the rat spinal cord by α2C adrenergic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenling; Song, Bingbing; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G.

    2008-01-01

    Neurotransmitter receptors that control the release of opioid peptides in the spinal cord may play an important role in pain modulation. Norepinephrine, released by a descending pathway originating in the brainstem, is a powerful inducer of analgesia in the spinal cord. Adrenergic α2C receptors are present in opioid-containing terminals in the dorsal horn, where they could modulate opioid release. The goal of this study was to investigate this possibility. Opioid release was evoked from rat spinal cord slices by incubating them with the sodium channel opener veratridine in the presence of peptidase inhibitors (actinonin, captopril and thiorphan), and was measured in situ through the internalization of μ-opioid receptors in dorsal horn neurons. Veratridine produced internalization in 70% of these neurons. The α2 receptor agonists clonidine, guanfacine, medetomidine and UK-14304 inhibited the evoked μ-opioid receptor internalization with IC50s of 1.7 μM, 248 nM, 0.3 nM and 22 nM, respectively. However, inhibition by medetomidine was only partial, and inhibition by UK-14304 reversed itself at concentrations higher than 50 nM. None of these agonists inhibited μ-opioid receptor internalization produced by endomorphin-2, showing that they inhibited opioid release and not the internalization itself. The inhibition produced by clonidine, guanfacine or UK-14304 was completely reversed by the selective α2C antagonist JP-1203. In contrast, inhibition by guanfacine was not prevented by the α2A antagonist BRL-44408. These results show that α2C receptors inhibit the release of opioids in the dorsal horn. This action may serve to shut down the opioid system when the adrenergic system is active. PMID:18343461

  16. Duration of opioid receptor blockade determines biotherapeutic response.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Patricia J; Zagon, Ian S

    2015-10-01

    Historically, studies on endogenous and exogenous opioids and their receptors focused on the mediation of pain, with excess opiate consumption leading to addiction. Opioid antagonists such as naloxone and naltrexone blocked these interactions, and still are widely used to reverse drug and alcohol overdose. Although specific opioid antagonists have been designed for mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors, the general antagonists remain the most effective. With the discovery of the opioid growth factor (OGF)-OGF receptor (OGFr) axis as a novel biological pathway involved in homeostasis of replicating cells and tissues, the role of opioid receptor antagonists was expanded. An intermittent OGFr blockade by low dosages of naltrexone resulted in depressed cell replication, whereas high (or sustained) dosages of naltrexone that conferred a continuous OGFr blockade resulted in enhanced growth. More than 3 decades of research have confirmed that the duration of opioid receptor blockade, not specifically the dosage, by general opioid antagonists determines the biotherapeutic outcome. Dysregulation of the OGF-OGFr pathway is apparent in a number of human disorders including diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and cancer, and thus opioid antagonist disruption of interaction prevails as a therapeutic intervention. We review evidence that the duration of opioid receptor blockade is correlated with the magnitude and direction of response, and discuss the potential therapeutic effectiveness of continuous receptor blockade for treatment of diabetic complications such as corneal defects and skin wounds, and of intermittent receptor blockade by low dosages of naltrexone for treatment of autoimmune diseases and cancer. PMID:26119823

  17. Label-free integrative pharmacology on-target of opioid ligands at the opioid receptor family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In vitro pharmacology of ligands is typically assessed using a variety of molecular assays based on predetermined molecular events in living cells. Many ligands including opioid ligands pose the ability to bind more than one receptor, and can also provide distinct operational bias to activate a specific receptor. Generating an integrative overview of the binding and functional selectivity of ligands for a receptor family is a critical but difficult step in drug discovery and development. Here we applied a newly developed label-free integrative pharmacology on-target (iPOT) approach to systematically survey the selectivity of a library of fifty-five opioid ligands against the opioid receptor family. All ligands were interrogated using dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays in both recombinant and native cell lines that express specific opioid receptor(s). The cells were modified with a set of probe molecules to manifest the binding and functional selectivity of ligands. DMR profiles were collected and translated to numerical coordinates that was subject to similarity analysis. A specific set of opioid ligands were then selected for quantitative pharmacology determination. Results Results showed that among fifty-five opioid ligands examined most ligands displayed agonist activity in at least one opioid receptor expressing cell line under different conditions. Further, many ligands exhibited pathway biased agonism. Conclusion We demonstrate that the iPOT effectively sorts the ligands into distinct clusters based on their binding and functional selectivity at the opioid receptor family. PMID:23497702

  18. Kappa-opioid receptor signaling in the striatum as a potential modulator of dopamine transmission in cocaine dependence.

    PubMed

    Trifilieff, Pierre; Martinez, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is accompanied by a decrease in striatal dopamine signaling, measured as a decrease in dopamine D2 receptor binding as well as blunted dopamine release in the striatum. These alterations in dopamine transmission have clinical relevance, and have been shown to correlate with cocaine-seeking behavior and response to treatment for cocaine dependence. However, the mechanisms contributing to the hypodopaminergic state in cocaine addiction remain unknown. Here we review the positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies showing alterations in D2 receptor binding potential and dopamine transmission in cocaine abusers and their significance in cocaine-seeking behavior. Based on animal and human studies, we propose that the kappa receptor/dynorphin system, because of its impact on dopamine transmission and upregulation following cocaine exposure, could contribute to the hypodopaminergic state reported in cocaine addiction, and could thus be a relevant target for treatment development. PMID:23760592

  19. Semisynthetic Neoclerodanes as Kappa Opioid Receptor Probes

    PubMed Central

    Lovell, Kimberly M.; Vasiljevik, Tamara; Araya, Juan J.; Lozama, Anthony; Prevatt-Smith, Katherine M.; Day, Victor W.; Dersch, Christina M.; Rothman, Richard B.; Butelman, Eduardo R.; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Prisinzano, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Modification of the furan ring of salvinorin A (1), the main active component of Salvia divinorum, has resulted in novel neoclerodane diterpenes with opioid receptor affinity and activity. Conversion of the furan ring to an aldehyde at the C-12 position (5) has allowed for the synthesis of analogues with new carbon-carbon bonds at that position. Previous methods for forming these bonds, such as Grignard and Stille conditions, have met with limited success. We report a palladium catalyzed Liebeskind-Srogl cross-coupling reaction of a thioester and a boronic acid that occurs at neutral pH and ambient temperature to produce ketone analogs at C-12. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported usage of the Liebeskind-Srogl reaction to diversify a natural product scaffold. We also describe a one-step protocol for the conversion of 1 to 12-epi-1 (3) through microwave irradiation. Previously, this synthetically challenging process has required multiple steps. Additionally, we report in this study that alkene 9 and aromatic analogues 12, 19, 23, 25, and 26 were discovered to retain affinity and selectivity at kappa opioid receptors (KOP). Finally, we report that the furan-2-yl analog of 1 (31) has similar affinity to 1. Collectively, these findings suggest that different aromatic groups appended directly to the decalin core may be well tolerated by KOP receptors, and may generate further ligands with affinity and activity at KOP receptors. PMID:22464684

  20. Delta opioid receptors presynaptically regulate cutaneous mechanosensory neuron input to the spinal cord dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Bardoni, Rita; Tawfik, Vivianne L; Wang, Dong; François, Amaury; Solorzano, Carlos; Shuster, Scott A; Choudhury, Papiya; Betelli, Chiara; Cassidy, Colleen; Smith, Kristen; de Nooij, Joriene C; Mennicken, Françoise; O'Donnell, Dajan; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Woodbury, C Jeffrey; Basbaum, Allan I; MacDermott, Amy B; Scherrer, Grégory

    2014-03-19

    Cutaneous mechanosensory neurons detect mechanical stimuli that generate touch and pain sensation. Although opioids are generally associated only with the control of pain, here we report that the opioid system in fact broadly regulates cutaneous mechanosensation, including touch. This function is predominantly subserved by the delta opioid receptor (DOR), which is expressed by myelinated mechanoreceptors that form Meissner corpuscles, Merkel cell-neurite complexes, and circumferential hair follicle endings. These afferents also include a small population of CGRP-expressing myelinated nociceptors that we now identify as the somatosensory neurons that coexpress mu and delta opioid receptors. We further demonstrate that DOR activation at the central terminals of myelinated mechanoreceptors depresses synaptic input to the spinal dorsal horn, via the inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels. Collectively our results uncover a molecular mechanism by which opioids modulate cutaneous mechanosensation and provide a rationale for targeting DOR to alleviate injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. PMID:24583022

  1. Delta Opioid Receptors Presynaptically Regulate Cutaneous Mechanosensory Neuron Input to the Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn

    PubMed Central

    Bardoni, Rita; Tawfik, Vivianne L.; Wang, Dong; François, Amaury; Solorzano, Carlos; Shuster, Scott A.; Choudhury, Papiya; Betelli, Chiara; Cassidy, Colleen; Smith, Kristen; de Nooij, Joriene C.; Mennicken, Françoise; O’Donnell, Dajan; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Woodbury, C. Jeffrey; Basbaum, Allan I.; MacDermott, Amy B.; Scherrer, Grégory

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cutaneous mechanosensory neurons detect mechanical stimuli that generate touch and pain sensation. Although opioids are generally associated only with the control of pain, here we report that the opioid system in fact broadly regulates cutaneous mechanosensation, including touch. This function is predominantly subserved by the delta opioid receptor (DOR), which is expressed by myelinated mechanoreceptors that form Meissner corpuscles, Merkel cell-neurite complexes, and circumferential hair follicle endings. These afferents also include a small population of CGRP-expressing myelinated nociceptors that we now identify as the somatosensory neurons that coexpress mu and delta opioid receptors. We further demonstrate that DOR activation at the central terminals of myelinated mechanoreceptors depresses synaptic input to the spinal dorsal horn, via the inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels. Collectively our results uncover a molecular mechanism by which opioids modulate cutaneous mechanosensation and provide a rationale for targeting DOR to alleviate injury-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. PMID:24583022

  2. The opioid receptors as targets for drug abuse medication

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Florence; Lenoir, Magalie; Marie, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The endogenous opioid system is largely expressed in the brain, and both endogenous opioid peptides and receptors are present in areas associated with reward and motivation. It is well known that this endogenous system plays a key role in many aspects of addictive behaviours. The present review summarizes the modifications of the opioid system induced by chronic treatment with drugs of abuse reported in preclinical and clinical studies, as well as the action of opioid antagonists and agonists on the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse, with therapeutic perspectives. We have focused on the effects of chronic psychostimulants, alcohol and nicotine exposure. Taken together, the changes in both opioid peptides and opioid receptors in different brain structures following acute or chronic exposure to these drugs of abuse clearly identify the opioid system as a potential target for the development of effective pharmacotherapy for the treatment of addiction and the prevention of relapse. PMID:25988826

  3. The opioid receptors as targets for drug abuse medication.

    PubMed

    Noble, Florence; Lenoir, Magalie; Marie, Nicolas

    2015-08-01

    The endogenous opioid system is largely expressed in the brain, and both endogenous opioid peptides and receptors are present in areas associated with reward and motivation. It is well known that this endogenous system plays a key role in many aspects of addictive behaviours. The present review summarizes the modifications of the opioid system induced by chronic treatment with drugs of abuse reported in preclinical and clinical studies, as well as the action of opioid antagonists and agonists on the reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse, with therapeutic perspectives. We have focused on the effects of chronic psychostimulants, alcohol and nicotine exposure. Taken together, the changes in both opioid peptides and opioid receptors in different brain structures following acute or chronic exposure to these drugs of abuse clearly identify the opioid system as a potential target for the development of effective pharmacotherapy for the treatment of addiction and the prevention of relapse. PMID:25988826

  4. Revolution in GPCR signalling: opioid receptor heteromers as novel therapeutic targets: IUPHAR Review 10

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Wakako; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2014-01-01

    GPCRs can interact with each other to form homomers or heteromers. Homomers involve interactions with the same receptor type while heteromers involve interactions between two different GPCRs. These receptor–receptor interactions modulate not only the binding but also the signalling and trafficking properties of individual receptors. Opioid receptor heteromerization has been extensively investigated with the objective of identifying novel therapeutic targets that are as potent as morphine but without the side effects associated with chronic morphine use. In this context, studies have described heteromerization between the different types of opioid receptors and between opioid receptors and a wide range of GPCRs including adrenoceptors, cannabinoid, 5-HT, metabotropic glutamate and sensory neuron-specific receptors. Recent advances in the field involving the generation of heteromer-specific reagents (antibodies or ligands) or of membrane-permeable peptides that disrupt the heteromer interaction are helping to elucidate the physiological role of opioid receptor heteromers and the contribution of the partner receptor to the side effects associated with opioid use. For example, studies using membrane-permeable peptides targeting the heteromer interface have implicated μ and δ receptor heteromers in the development of tolerance to morphine, and heteromers of μ and gastrin-releasing peptide receptors in morphine-induced itch. In addition, a number of ligands that selectively target opioid receptor heteromers exhibit potent antinociception with a decrease in the side effects commonly associated with morphine use. In this review, we summarize the latest findings regarding the biological and functional characteristics of opioid receptor heteromers both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24916280

  5. Social touch modulates endogenous μ-opioid system activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Tuominen, Lauri; Dunbar, Robin; Hirvonen, Jussi; Manninen, Sandra; Arponen, Eveliina; Machin, Anna; Hari, Riitta; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Sams, Mikko

    2016-09-01

    In non-human primates, opioid-receptor blockade increases social grooming, and the endogenous opioid system has therefore been hypothesized to support maintenance of long-term relationships in humans as well. Here we tested whether social touch modulates opioidergic activation in humans using in vivo positron emission tomography (PET). Eighteen male participants underwent two PET scans with [11C]carfentanil, a ligand specific to μ-opioid receptors (MOR). During the social touch scan, the participants lay in the scanner while their partners caressed their bodies in a non-sexual fashion. In the baseline scan, participants lay alone in the scanner. Social touch triggered pleasurable sensations and increased MOR availability in the thalamus, striatum, and frontal, cingulate, and insular cortices. Modulation of activity of the opioid system by social touching might provide a neurochemical mechanism reinforcing social bonds between humans. PMID:27238727

  6. The role of opioid antagonist efficacy and constitutive opioid receptor activity in the opioid withdrawal syndrome in mice.

    PubMed

    Navani, Dipesh M; Sirohi, Sunil; Madia, Priyanka A; Yoburn, Byron C

    2011-10-01

    On the basis of efficacy, opioid antagonists are classified as inverse opioid agonists (e.g. naltrexone) or neutral opioid antagonists (e.g. 6β-naltrexol). This study examined the interaction between naltrexone and 6β-naltrexol in the precipitated opioid withdrawal syndrome in morphine dependent mice. Furthermore, the possible contribution of constitutive opioid receptor activity to precipitated withdrawal was evaluated using increasing levels of morphine dependence. In the first experiment, low doses of 6β-naltrexol antagonized naltrexone precipitated withdrawal while high doses acted additively. All doses of naltrexone increased 6β-naltrexol's potency to precipitate withdrawal. The next experiment examined changes in antagonist potency to precipitate withdrawal with increasing morphine dependence. Mice were exposed to morphine for 1-6 days and then withdrawal was precipitated. Naltrexone was more potent than 6β-naltrexol at all the time points. The ED(50) of both drugs decreased at the same rate suggesting that increased dependence produced no change in constitutive opioid receptor activity. Taken together these results indicate that the functional efficacy of 6β-naltrexol is dose-dependent and that constitutive opioid receptor activity did not change as opioid dependence increased from 1 to 6 days. PMID:21736895

  7. The multiple facets of opioid receptor function: implications for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Pierre-Eric; Kieffer, Brigitte L.

    2013-01-01

    Addiction is characterized by altered reward processing, disrupted emotional responses and poor decision-making. Beyond a central role in drug reward, increasing evidence indicate that opioid receptors are more generally involved in all these processes. Recent studies establish the mu opioid receptor as a main player in social reward, which attracts increasing attention in psychiatric research. There is growing interest in blocking the kappa opioid receptor to prevent relapse, and alleviate the negative affect of withdrawal. The delta opioid receptor emerges as a potent mood enhancer, whose involvement in addiction is less clear. All three opioid receptors are likely implicated in addiction-depression comorbidity, and understanding of their roles in cognitive deficits associated to drug abuse is only beginning. PMID:23453713

  8. Structure of the [delta]-opioid receptor bound to naltrindole

    SciTech Connect

    Granier, Sébastien; Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C.; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Weis, William I.; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2012-07-11

    The opioid receptor family comprises three members, the {mu}-, {delta}- and {kappa}-opioid receptors, which respond to classical opioid alkaloids such as morphine and heroin as well as to endogenous peptide ligands like endorphins. They belong to the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, and are excellent therapeutic targets for pain control. The {delta}-opioid receptor ({delta}-OR) has a role in analgesia, as well as in other neurological functions that remain poorly understood. The structures of the {mu}-OR and {kappa}-OR have recently been solved. Here we report the crystal structure of the mouse {delta}-OR, bound to the subtype-selective antagonist naltrindole. Together with the structures of the {mu}-OR and {kappa}-OR, the {delta}-OR structure provides insights into conserved elements of opioid ligand recognition while also revealing structural features associated with ligand-subtype selectivity. The binding pocket of opioid receptors can be divided into two distinct regions. Whereas the lower part of this pocket is highly conserved among opioid receptors, the upper part contains divergent residues that confer subtype selectivity. This provides a structural explanation and validation for the 'message-address' model of opioid receptor pharmacology, in which distinct 'message' (efficacy) and 'address' (selectivity) determinants are contained within a single ligand. Comparison of the address region of the {delta}-OR with other GPCRs reveals that this structural organization may be a more general phenomenon, extending to other GPCR families as well.

  9. Amygdalar opioids modulate hypothalamic melanocortin-induced anorexia

    PubMed Central

    Beckman, Tiffany R.; Shi, Qiuying; Levine, Allen S.; Billington, Charles J.

    2014-01-01

    We wanted to assess the possibility that opioid activity in the central amygdala (CeA) could modulate the feeding inhibition of melanocortin stimulation of the paraventricular hypothalamus (PVN). The melanocortin system is important in both the acute regulation of satiety and feeding behavior and in the integration of long-term appetite signals. Melanotan II (MTII) is a synthetic MC3R and MC4R agonist which reduces food intake when given intracerebroventricularly (ICV) and into the PVN. Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-(me) Phe-Gly-ol (DAMGO), a μ-opioid receptor agonist, increases food intake, while opioid antagonists, like naltrexone (NTX), inhibit food intake after injection into many brain sites involved in appetite regulation, including the CeA. In food-deprived male Sprague-Dawley rats, co-injected intra-PVN MTII partially blocked the orexigenic effect of co-injected intra-CeA DAMGO. Intra-CeA NTX co-injected with intra-PVN MTII reduced food intake significantly more than either alone. NTX administered intra-CeA reduced c-Fos-immunoreactivity (IR) in nucleus accumbens neurons significantly compared to the intra-PVN MTII treated animals, animals co-injected intra-PVN with MTII and intra-CeA with NTX animals, and control animal Intra-PVN MTII induced c-Fos-IR in significantly more PVN neurons than observed in control animals. Intra-CeA NTX co-injected with intra-PVN MTII induced c-Fos-IR significantly in PVN neurons relative to control and intra-CeA NTX animals. Such data support the significance of opioid action within the CeA as a modulator of the feeding regulation action of melanocortins within the PVN, occurring within the context of a larger appetitive network. PMID:19136019

  10. κ-Opioid receptor participates of NSAIDs peripheral antinociception.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lívia Caroline Resende; Castor, Marina Gomes Miranda E; Navarro, Larissa Caldeira; Romero, Thiago Roberto Lima; Duarte, Igor Dimitri Gama

    2016-05-27

    NSAIDs represent some of the most widely prescribed drugs for relief of short-term fever, pain and inflammation. The participation of the opioid system in the peripheral is poorly understood. The aim of this study was evaluate the role of opioid system in the peripheral antinociception by diclofenac and dipyrone. To test this hypothesis, opioid receptor antagonists were evaluated using the rat paw pressure test, in which pain sensitivity is increased by intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, 2μg). Diclofenac (20μg/paw) and Dipyrone (40μg/paw) administered locally into the right paw elicited an antinociceptive effect. It was used naloxone (50μg/paw), a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, which antagonized peripheral antinociception induced by diclofenac and dipyrone. Selectively, it was evaluated the μ-, δ- and κ-opioid receptor antagonists, respectively, clocinnamox (40μg/paw), naltrindole (50μg/paw) and nor-binaltorphimine (20, 40 and 80μg/paw). Our data indicated that only the κ-opioid antagonist was capable to reverse the peripheral antinociception by NSAIDs. The present results provide evidence that the opioid system participated in the diclofenac and dipyrone-induced peripheral antinociception by indirect activation of κ-opioid receptor probable by release of endogenous opioids such as dynorphins. PMID:27091501

  11. Opioid receptor desensitization: mechanisms and its link to tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Allouche, Stéphane; Noble, Florence; Marie, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Opioid receptors (OR) are part of the class A of G-protein coupled receptors and the target of the opiates, the most powerful analgesic molecules used in clinic. During a protracted use, a tolerance to analgesic effect develops resulting in a reduction of the effectiveness. So understanding mechanisms of tolerance is a great challenge and may help to find new strategies to tackle this side effect. This review will summarize receptor-related mechanisms that could underlie tolerance especially receptor desensitization. We will focus on the latest data obtained on molecular mechanisms involved in opioid receptor desensitization: phosphorylation, receptor uncoupling, internalization, and post-endocytic fate of the receptor. PMID:25566076

  12. Opioid receptors and legal highs: Salvia divinorum and Kratom.

    PubMed

    Babu, Kavita M; McCurdy, Christopher R; Boyer, Edward W

    2008-02-01

    Salvia divinorum and Mitragyna speciosa ("Kratom"), two unscheduled dietary supplements whose active agents are opioid receptor agonists, have discrete psychoactive effects that have contributed to their increasing popularity. Salvia divinorum contains the highly selective kappa- opioid receptor agonist salvinorin A; this compound produces visual hallucinations and synesthesia. Mitragynine, the major alkaloid identified from Kratom, has been reported as a partial opioid agonist producing similar effects to morphine. An interesting minor alkaloid of Kratom, 7-hydroxymitragynine, has been reported to be more potent than morphine. Both Kratom alkaloids are reported to activate supraspinal mu- and delta- opioid receptors, explaining their use by chronic narcotics users to ameliorate opioid withdrawal symptoms. Despite their widespread Internet availability, use of Salvia divinorum and Kratom represents an emerging trend that escapes traditional methods of toxicologic monitoring. The purpose of this article is to familiarize toxicologists and poison control specialists with these emerging psychoactive dietary supplements. PMID:18259963

  13. Dual allosteric modulation of opioid antinociceptive potency by α2A-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Chabot-Doré, Anne-Julie; Millecamps, Magali; Naso, Lina; Devost, Dominic; Trieu, Phan; Piltonen, Marjo; Diatchenko, Luda; Fairbanks, Carolyn A; Wilcox, George L; Hébert, Terence E; Stone, Laura S

    2015-12-01

    Opioid and α2-adrenoceptor (AR) agonists are analgesic when administered in the spinal cord and show a clinically beneficial synergistic interaction when co-administered. However, α2-AR antagonists can also inhibit opioid antinociception, suggesting a complex interaction between the two systems. The α2A-AR subtype is necessary for spinal adrenergic analgesia and synergy with opioids for most agonist combinations. Therefore, we investigated whether spinal opioid antinociception and opioid-adrenergic synergy were under allosteric control of the α2A-AR. Drugs were administered intrathecally in wild type (WT) and α2A-knock-out (KO) mice and antinociception was measured using the hot water tail immersion or substance P behavioral assays. The α2A-AR agonist clonidine was less effective in α2A-KO mice in both assays. The absence of the α2A-AR resulted in 10-70-fold increases in the antinociceptive potency of the opioid agonists morphine and DeltII. In contrast, neither morphine nor DeltII synergized with clonidine in α2A-KO mice, indicating that the α2AAR has both positive and negative modulatory effects on opioid antinociception. Depletion of descending adrenergic terminals with 6-OHDA resulted in a significant decrease in morphine efficacy in WT but not in α2A-KO mice, suggesting that endogenous norepinephrine acts through the α2A-AR to facilitate morphine antinociception. Based on these findings, we propose a model whereby ligand-occupied versus ligand-free α2A-AR produce distinct patterns of modulation of opioid receptor activation. In this model, agonist-occupied α2A-ARs potentiate opioid analgesia, while non-occupied α2A-ARs inhibit opioid analgesia. Exploiting such interactions between the two receptors could lead to the development of better pharmacological treatments for pain management. PMID:26254859

  14. Imaging of opioid receptors in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen, Gjermund

    2008-01-01

    In vivo functional imaging by means of positron emission tomography (PET) is the sole method for providing a quantitative measurement of μ-, κ and δ-opioid receptor-mediated signalling in the central nervous system. During the last two decades, measurements of changes to the regional brain opioidergic neuronal activation—mediated by endogenously produced opioid peptides, or exogenously administered opioid drugs—have been conducted in numerous chronic pain conditions, in epilepsy, as well as by stimulant- and opioidergic drugs. Although several PET-tracers have been used clinically for depiction and quantification of the opioid receptors changes, the underlying mechanisms for regulation of changes to the availability of opioid receptors are still unclear. After a presentation of the general signalling mechanisms of the opioid receptor system relevant for PET, a critical survey of the pharmacological properties of some currently available PET-tracers is presented. Clinical studies performed with different PET ligands are also reviewed and the compound-dependent findings are summarized. An outlook is given concluding with the tailoring of tracer properties, in order to facilitate for a selective addressment of dynamic changes to the availability of a single subclass, in combination with an optimization of the quantification framework are essentials for further progress in the field of in vivo opioid receptor imaging. PMID:18048446

  15. Challenges for opioid receptor nomenclature: IUPHAR Review 9

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Brian M; Christie, Macdonald J; Devi, Lakshmi; Toll, Lawrence; Traynor, John R

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in the study of the structure and function of opioid receptors raise significant challenges for the definition of individual receptor types and the development of a nomenclature that precisely describes isoforms that may subserve different functions in vivo. Presentations at the 2013 meeting of the International Narcotics Research Conference in Cairns, Australia, considered some of the new discoveries that are now unravelling the complexities of opioid receptor signalling. Variable processing of opioid receptor messenger RNAs may lead to the presence of several isoforms of the μ receptor. Each opioid receptor type can function either as a monomer or as part of a homo- or heterodimer or higher multimer. Additionally, recent evidence points to the existence of agonist bias in the signal transduction pathways activated through μ receptors, and to the presence of regulatory allosteric sites on the receptors. This brief review summarizes the recent discoveries that raise challenges for receptor definition and the characterization of signal transduction pathways activated by specific receptor forms. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24528283

  16. Central antinociception induced by ketamine is mediated by endogenous opioids and μ- and δ-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Daniela da Fonseca; Romero, Thiago Roberto Lima; Duarte, Igor Dimitri Gama

    2014-05-01

    It is generally believed that NMDA receptor antagonism accounts for most of the anesthetic and analgesic effects of ketamine, however, it interacts at multiple sites in the central nervous system, including NMDA and non-NMDA glutamate receptors, nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors, and adrenergic and opioid receptors. Interestingly, it was shown that at supraspinal sites, ketamine interacts with the μ-opioid system and causes supraspinal antinociception. In this study, we investigated the involvement of endogenous opioids in ketamine-induced central antinociception. The nociceptive threshold for thermal stimulation was measured in Swiss mice using the tail-flick test. The drugs were administered via the intracerebroventricular route. Our results demonstrated that the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, the μ-opioid receptor antagonist clocinnamox and the δ-opioid receptor antagonist naltrindole, but not the κ-opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine, antagonized ketamine-induced central antinociception in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, the administration of the aminopeptidase inhibitor bestatin significantly enhanced low-dose ketamine-induced central antinociception. These data provide evidence for the involvement of endogenous opioids and μ- and δ-opioid receptors in ketamine-induced central antinociception. In contrast, κ-opioid receptors not appear to be involved in this effect. PMID:24675031

  17. Naloxegol: First oral peripherally acting mu opioid receptor antagonists for opioid-induced constipation

    PubMed Central

    Anantharamu, Tejus; Sharma, Sushil; Gupta, Ajay Kumar; Dahiya, Navdeep; Singh Brashier, Dick B.; Sharma, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is one of the most troublesome and the most common effects of opioid use leading to deterioration in quality of life of the patients and also has potentially deleterious repercussions on adherence and compliance to opioid therapy. With the current guidelines advocating liberal use of opioids by physicians even for non-cancer chronic pain, the situation is further complicated as these individuals are not undergoing palliative care and hence there cannot be any justification to subject these patients to the severe constipation brought on by opioid therapy which is no less debilitating than the chronic pain. The aim in these patients is to prevent the opioid-induced constipation but at the same time allow the analgesic activity of opioids. Many drugs have been used with limited success but the most specific among them were the peripherally acting mu opioid receptor antagonists (PAMORA). Methylnaltrexone and alvimopan were the early drugs in this group but were not approved for oral use in OIC. However naloxegol, the latest PAMORA has been very recently approved as the first oral drug for OIC. This article gives an overview of OIC, its current management and more specifically the development and approval of naloxegol, including pharmacokinetics, details of various clinical trials, adverse effects and its current status for the management of OIC. PMID:26312011

  18. Functions of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in the central nervous system and its regulation by μ-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Nash, Bradley; Meucci, Olimpia

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the G protein-coupled receptor CXCR4 by its chemokine ligand CXCL12 regulates a number of physiopathological functions in the central nervous system, during development as well as later in life. In addition to the more classical roles of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis in the recruitment of immune cells or migration and proliferation of neural precursor cells, recent studies suggest that CXCR4 signaling also modulates synaptic function and neuronal survival in the mature brain, through direct and indirect effects on neurons and glia. These effects, which include regulation of glutamate receptors and uptake, and of dendritic spine density, can significantly alter the ability of neurons to face excitotoxic insults. Therefore, they are particularly relevant to neurodegenerative diseases featuring alterations of glutamate neurotransmission, such as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Importantly, CXCR4 signaling can be dysregulated by HIV viral proteins, host HIV-induced factors, and opioids. Potential mechanisms of opioid regulation of CXCR4 include heterologous desensitization, transcriptional regulation and changes in receptor expression levels, opioid-chemokine receptor dimer or heteromer formation, and the newly described modulation by the protein ferritin heavy chain-all leading to inhibition of CXCR4 signaling. After reviewing major effects of chemokines and opioids in the CNS, this chapter discusses chemokine-opioid interactions in neuronal and immune cells, focusing on their potential contribution to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. PMID:25175863

  19. Evaluation of Opioid Modulation in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ehrich, Elliot; Turncliff, Ryan; Du, Yangchun; Leigh-Pemberton, Richard; Fernandez, Emilio; Jones, Reese; Fava, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Although opioids have known antidepressant activity, their use in major depressive disorder (MDD) has been greatly limited by risk of abuse and addiction. Our aim was to determine whether opioid modulation achieved through a combination of a μ-opioid partial agonist, buprenorphine (BUP), and a potent μ-opioid antagonist, samidorphan (SAM), would demonstrate antidepressant activity without addictive potential. A placebo-controlled crossover study assessed the opioid pharmacodynamic profile following escalating doses of SAM co-administered with BUP in opioid-experienced adults. A subsequent 1-week, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study was conducted in subjects with MDD and an inadequate response to standard antidepressant therapy. This second study evaluated safety and efficacy of ratios of BUP/SAM that were associated with partial and with maximal blockade of opioid responses in the initial study. Pupillometry, visual analog scale assessments, and self-reported questionnaires demonstrated that increasing amounts of SAM added to a fixed dose of BUP resulted in dose-dependent reductions in objective and subjective opioid effects, including euphoria and drug liking, in opioid-experienced adults. Following 7 days of treatment in subjects with MDD, a 1 : 1 ratio of BUP and SAM, the ratio associated with maximal antagonism of opioid effects, exhibited statistically significant improvement vs placebo in HAM-D17 total score (p=0.032) and nearly significant improvement in Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score (p=0.054). Overall, BUP/SAM therapy was well tolerated. A combination of BUP and SAM showed antidepressant activity in subjects with MDD. Balanced agonist–antagonist opioid modulation represents a novel and potentially clinically important approach to the treatment of MDD and other psychiatric disorders. PMID:25518754

  20. Evaluation of opioid modulation in major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Ehrich, Elliot; Turncliff, Ryan; Du, Yangchun; Leigh-Pemberton, Richard; Fernandez, Emilio; Jones, Reese; Fava, Maurizio

    2015-05-01

    Although opioids have known antidepressant activity, their use in major depressive disorder (MDD) has been greatly limited by risk of abuse and addiction. Our aim was to determine whether opioid modulation achieved through a combination of a μ-opioid partial agonist, buprenorphine (BUP), and a potent μ-opioid antagonist, samidorphan (SAM), would demonstrate antidepressant activity without addictive potential. A placebo-controlled crossover study assessed the opioid pharmacodynamic profile following escalating doses of SAM co-administered with BUP in opioid-experienced adults. A subsequent 1-week, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study was conducted in subjects with MDD and an inadequate response to standard antidepressant therapy. This second study evaluated safety and efficacy of ratios of BUP/SAM that were associated with partial and with maximal blockade of opioid responses in the initial study. Pupillometry, visual analog scale assessments, and self-reported questionnaires demonstrated that increasing amounts of SAM added to a fixed dose of BUP resulted in dose-dependent reductions in objective and subjective opioid effects, including euphoria and drug liking, in opioid-experienced adults. Following 7 days of treatment in subjects with MDD, a 1 : 1 ratio of BUP and SAM, the ratio associated with maximal antagonism of opioid effects, exhibited statistically significant improvement vs placebo in HAM-D17 total score (p=0.032) and nearly significant improvement in Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score (p=0.054). Overall, BUP/SAM therapy was well tolerated. A combination of BUP and SAM showed antidepressant activity in subjects with MDD. Balanced agonist-antagonist opioid modulation represents a novel and potentially clinically important approach to the treatment of MDD and other psychiatric disorders. PMID:25518754

  1. Activation of kappa-opioid receptor as a method for prevention of ischemic and reperfusion arrhythmias: role of protein kinase C and K(ATP) channels.

    PubMed

    Lishmanov, A Yu; Maslov, L N; Lasukova, T V; Crawford, D; Wong, T M

    2007-02-01

    Intravenous pretreatment with kappa-opioid receptor antagonist (-)-U-50,488 (1 mg/kg) improved heart resistance to the arrhythmogenic effect of coronary occlusion and reperfusion. Selective kappa1-opioid receptor antagonist norbinaltorphimine and nonselective blocker of peripheral opioid receptors methylnaloxone abolished this antiarrhythmic effect. Preliminary blockade of protein kinase C with chelerythrine or inhibition of ATP-dependent K+ channels (K(ATP) channels) with glybenclamide abolished the antiarrhythmic effect of kappa-opioid receptor activation. Selective inhibitor of sarcolemmal K(ATP) channels did not modulate the kappa-opioid receptor-mediated increase in cardiac electrical stability. Our results suggest that protein kinase C and mitochondrial K(ATP) channels play an important role in the antiarrhythmic effect associated with activation of peripheral kappa-opioid receptors. PMID:17970197

  2. Anti-nociception mediated by a κ opioid receptor agonist is blocked by a δ receptor agonist

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, A M W; Roberts, K W; Pradhan, A A; Akbari, H A; Walwyn, W; Lutfy, K; Carroll, F I; Cahill, C M; Evans, C J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The opioid receptor family comprises four structurally homologous but functionally distinct sub-groups, the μ (MOP), δ (DOP), κ (KOP) and nociceptin (NOP) receptors. As most opioid agonists are selective but not specific, a broad spectrum of behaviours due to activation of different opioid receptors is expected. In this study, we examine whether other opioid receptor systems influenced KOP-mediated antinociception. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We used a tail withdrawal assay in C57Bl/6 mice to assay the antinociceptive effect of systemically administered opioid agonists with varying selectivity at KOP receptors. Pharmacological and genetic approaches were used to analyse the interactions of the other opioid receptors in modulating KOP-mediated antinociception. KEY RESULTS Etorphine, a potent agonist at all four opioid receptors, was not anti-nociceptive in MOP knockout (KO) mice, although etorphine is an efficacious KOP receptor agonist and specific KOP receptor agonists remain analgesic in MOP KO mice. As KOP receptor agonists are aversive, we considered KOP-mediated antinociception might be a form of stress-induced analgesia that is blocked by the anxiolytic effects of DOP receptor agonists. In support of this hypothesis, pretreatment with the DOP antagonist, naltrindole (10 mg·kg−1), unmasked etorphine (3 mg·kg−1) antinociception in MOP KO mice. Further, in wild-type mice, KOP-mediated antinociception by systemic U50,488H (10 mg·kg−1) was blocked by pretreatment with the DOP agonist SNC80 (5 mg·kg−1) and diazepam (1 mg·kg−1). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Systemic DOP receptor agonists blocked systemic KOP antinociception, and these results identify DOP receptor agonists as potential agents for reversing stress-driven addictive and depressive behaviours mediated through KOP receptor activation. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles

  3. Interactions between opioid-peptides-containing pathways and GABA(A)-receptors-mediated systems modulate panic-like-induced behaviors elicited by electric and chemical stimulation of the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Fabrício; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2006-08-01

    Aiming to clarify the effect of interactive interconnections between the endogenous opioid peptides-neural links and GABAergic pathways on panic-like responses, in the present work, the effect of the peripheral and central administration of morphine or the non-specific opioid receptors antagonist naloxone was evaluated on the fear-induced responses (defensive attention, defensive immobility and escape behavior) elicited by electric and chemical stimulation of the inferior colliculus. Central microinjections of opioid drugs in the inferior colliculus were also performed followed by local administration of the GABA(A)-receptor antagonist bicuculline. The defensive behavior elicited by the blockade of GABAergic receptors in the inferior colliculus had been quantitatively analyzed, recording the number of crossing, jump, rotation and rearing, in each minute, during 30 min, in the open-field test. The opioid receptors stimulation with morphine decreased the defensive attention, the defensive immobility and escape behavior thresholds, and the non-specific opioid receptors blockade caused opposite effects, enhancing the defensive behavior thresholds. These effects were corroborated by either the stimulation or the inhibition of opioid receptors followed by the GABA(A) receptor blockade with bicuculline, microinjected into the inferior colliculus. There was a significant increase in the diverse fear-induced responses caused by bicuculline with the pretreatment of the inferior colliculus with morphine, and the opposite effect was recorded after the pretreatment of the inferior colliculus nuclei with naloxone followed by bicuculline local administration. These findings suggest an interaction between endogenous opioid-peptides-containing connections and GABA(A)-receptor-mediated system with direct influence on the organization of the panic-like or fear-induced responses elaborated in the inferior colliculus during critical emotional states. PMID:16797498

  4. Opioid Peptidomimetics: Leads for the Design of Bioavailable Mixed Efficacy Mu Opioid Receptor (MOR) Agonist/Delta Opioid Receptor (DOR) Antagonist Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Mosberg, Henry I.; Yeomans, Larisa; Harland, Aubrie A.; Bender, Aaron M.; Sobczyk-Kojiro, Katarzyna; Anand, Jessica P.; Clark, Mary J.; Jutkiewicz, Emily M.; Traynor, John R.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously described opioid peptidomimetic, 1, employing a tetrahydroquinoline scaffold and modeled on a series of cyclic tetrapeptide opioid agonists. We have recently described modifications to these peptides that confer a mu opioid receptor (MOR) agonist, delta opioid receptor (DOR) antagonist profile, which has been shown to reduce the development of tolerance to the analgesic actions of MOR agonists. Several such bifunctional ligands have been reported, but none has been demonstrated to cross the blood brain barrier. Here we describe the transfer of structural features that evoked MOR agonist/DOR antagonist behavior in the cyclic peptides to the tetrahydroquinoline scaffold and show that the resulting peptidomimetics maintain the desired pharmacological profile. Further, the 4R diastereomer of 1 was fully efficacious and approximately equipotent to morphine in the mouse warm water tail withdrawal assay following intraperitoneal administration and thus a promising lead for the development of opioid analgesics with reduced tolerance. PMID:23419026

  5. The Kappa Opioid Receptor: From Addiction to Depression, and Back

    PubMed Central

    Lalanne, Laurence; Ayranci, Gulebru; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Lutz, Pierre-Eric

    2014-01-01

    Comorbidity is a major issue in psychiatry that notably associates with more severe symptoms, longer illness duration, and higher service utilization. Therefore, identifying key clusters of comorbidity and exploring the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms represent important steps toward improving mental health care. In the present review, we focus on the frequent association between addiction and depression. In particular, we summarize the large body of evidence from preclinical models indicating that the kappa opioid receptor (KOR), a member of the opioid neuromodulatory system, represents a central player in the regulation of both reward and mood processes. Current data suggest that the KOR modulates overlapping neuronal networks linking brainstem monoaminergic nuclei with forebrain limbic structures. Rewarding properties of both drugs of abuse and natural stimuli, as well as the neurobiological effects of stressful experiences, strongly interact at the level of KOR signaling. In addiction models, activity of the KOR is potentiated by stressors and critically controls drug-seeking and relapse. In depression paradigms, KOR signaling is responsive to a variety of stressors, and mediates despair-like responses. Altogether, the KOR represents a prototypical substrate of comorbidity, whereby life experiences converge upon common brain mechanisms to trigger behavioral dysregulation and increased risk for distinct but interacting psychopathologies. PMID:25538632

  6. Synaptic actions of neuropeptide FF in the rat parabrachial nucleus: interactions with opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Zidichouski, J A; Harris, K H; Jhamandas, J H

    2000-08-01

    The pontine parabrachial nucleus (PBN) receives both opioid and Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) projections from the lower brain stem and/or the spinal cord. Because of this anatomical convergence and previous evidence that NPFF displays both pro- and anti-opioid activities, this study examined the synaptic effects of NPFF in the PBN and the mechanisms underlying these effects using an in vitro brain slice preparation and the nystatin-perforated patch-clamp recording technique. Under voltage-clamp conditions, NPFF reversibly reduced the evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in a dose-dependent fashion. This effect was not accompanied by apparent changes in the holding current, the current-voltage relationship or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-induced inward currents in the PBN cells. When a paired-pulse protocol was used, NPFF increased the ratio of these synaptic currents. Analysis of miniature EPSCs showed that NPFF caused a rightward shift in the frequency-distribution curve, whereas the amplitude-distribution curve remained unchanged. Collectively, these experiments indicate that NPFF reduces the evoked EPSCs through a presynaptic mechanism of action. The synaptic effects induced by NPFF (5 microM) could not be blocked by the specific mu-opioid receptor antagonist, D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH(2) (1 microM), but application of delta-opioid receptor antagonist Tyr-Tic-Phe-Phe (5 microM) almost completely prevented effects of NPFF. Moreover, the delta-opioid receptor agonist, Deltorphin (1 microM), mimicked the effects as NPFF and also occluded NPFF's actions on synaptic currents. These results indicate that NPFF modulates excitatory synaptic transmission in the PBN through an interaction with presynaptic delta-opioid receptors. These observations provide a cellular basis for NPFF enhancement of the antinociceptive effects consequent to central activation of delta-opioid receptors. PMID:10938301

  7. Combined autoradiographic-immunocytochemical analysis of opioid receptors and opioid peptide neuronal systems in brain

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.E.; Khachaturian, H.; Watson, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    Using adjacent section autoradiography-immunocytochemistry, the distribution of (TH)naloxone binding sites was studied in relation to neuronal systems containing (Leu)enkephalin, dynorphin A, or beta-endorphin immunoreactivity in rat brain. Brain sections from formaldehyde-perfused rats show robust specific binding of (TH)naloxone, the pharmacological (mu-like) properties of which appear unaltered. In contrast, specific binding of the delta ligand (TH)D-Ala2,D-Leu5-enkephalin was virtually totally eliminated as a result of formaldehyde perfusion. Using adjacent section analysis, the authors have noted associations between (TH)naloxone binding sites and one, two, or all three opioid systems in different brain regions; however, in some areas, no apparent relationship could be observed. Within regions, the relationship was complex. The complexity of the association between (TH)naloxone binding sites and the multiple opioid systems, and previous reports of co-localization of mu and kappa receptors in rat brain, are inconsistent with a simple-one-to-one relationship between a given opioid precursor and opioid receptor subtype. Instead, since differential processing of the three precursors gives rise to peptides of varying receptor subtype potencies and selectivities, the multiple peptide-receptor relationships may point to a key role of post-translational processing in determining the physiological consequences of opioid neurotransmission.

  8. Cloning and pharmacological characterization of a rat kappa opioid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Meng, F; Xie, G X; Thompson, R C; Mansour, A; Goldstein, A; Watson, S J; Akil, H

    1993-01-01

    A full-length cDNA was isolated from a rat striatal library by using low-stringency screening with two PCR fragments, one spanning transmembrane domains 3-6 of the mouse delta opioid receptor and the other unidentified but homologous to the mouse delta receptor from rat brain. The novel cDNA had a long open reading frame encoding a protein of 380 residues with 59% identity to the mouse delta receptor and topography consistent with a seven-helix guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled receptor. COS-1 cells transfected with the coding region of this clone showed high-affinity binding to kappa opioid receptor-selective ligands such as dynorphin A and U-50,488 and also nonselective opioid ligands such as bremazocine, ethylketocyclazocine, and naloxone. Not bound at all (or bound with low affinity) were dynorphin A-(2-13), enantiomers of naloxone and levophanol [i.e., (+)-naloxone and dextrorphan], and selective mu and delta opioid receptor ligands. Activation of the expressed receptor by kappa receptor agonists led to inhibition of cAMP. Finally, in situ hybridization revealed a mRNA distribution in rat brain that corresponded well to the distribution of binding sites labeled with kappa-selective ligands. These observations indicate that we have cloned a cDNA encoding a rat kappa receptor of the kappa 1 subtype. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8234341

  9. Characterization of opioid peptides and opioid receptors in the brain of jerboa (Jaculus orientalis), a hibernating rodent.

    PubMed

    Bourhim, N; Kabine, M; Elkebbaj, M S

    1997-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the biochemical characteristics of the opioid receptors and opioid peptides in the jerboa (Jaculus orientalis) brain, a subdesert rodent of Morocco. We have demonstrated the presence of delta, mu, and kappa sites in the jerboa brain. The endogenous opioid peptides methionine-enkephalin, beta-endorphin, and dynorphin were evaluated in different physiological states of the animal (active and hibernating). The circulating methionine-enkephalin in different states of the animal (active, hibernating, exposure to cold conditions, and fasting) was evaluated in the plasma. Our results indicate that the hibernating state the opioid receptors level decreased, whereas the concentration of opioid peptides increased. These findings suggest that both opioid receptors and opioid peptides could be involved in the adaptation of the jerboa to survive under thermal stress. PMID:9365806

  10. Periaqueductal gray μ and κ opioid receptors determine behavioral selection from maternal to predatory behavior in lactating rats.

    PubMed

    Klein, Marianne Orlandini; Cruz, Aline de Mello; Machado, Franciele Corrêa; Picolo, Gisele; Canteras, Newton Sabino; Felicio, Luciano Freitas

    2014-11-01

    Every mother must optimize her time between caring for her young and her subsistence. The rostro lateral portion of the periaqueductal grey (rlPAG) is a critical site that modulates the switch between maternal and predatory behavior. Opioids play multiple roles in both maternal behavior and this switching process. The present study used a pharmacological approach to evaluate the functional role of rlPAG μ and κ opioid receptors in behavioral selection. Rat dams were implanted with a guide cannula in the rlPAG and divided into three experiments in which we tested the role of opioid agonists (Experiment 1), the influence of μ and κ opioid receptor blockade in the presence of morphine (Experiment 2), and the influence of μ and κ opioid receptor blockade (Experiment 3). After behavioral test, in Experiment 4, we evaluated rlPAG μ and κ receptor activation in all Experiments 1-3. The results showed that massive opioidergic activation induced by morphine in the rlPAG inhibited maternal behavior without interfering with predatory hunting. No behavioral changes and no receptor activation were promoted by the specific agonist alone. However, κ receptor blockade increased hunting behavior and increased the level of μ receptor activation in the rlPAG. Thus, endogenous opioidergic tone might be modulated by a functional interaction between opioid receptor subtypes. Such a compensatory receptor interaction appears to be relevant for behavioral selection among motivated behaviors. These findings indicate a role for multiple opioid receptor interactions in the modulation of behavioral selection between maternal and predatory behaviors in the PAG. PMID:25116253

  11. Interactions of trimebutine with guinea-pig opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Roman, F; Pascaud, X; Taylor, J E; Junien, J L

    1987-05-01

    Affinities of trimebutine (TMB) and N-desmethyl trimebutine (NDTMB) for mu, delta and kappa opioid receptor subtypes have been examined using specific 3H-ligands and guinea-pig membrane. TMB and NDTMB showed a relative higher affinity for the mu receptor subtype although they were, respectively, 30- and 48-fold less active than morphine. The receptor selectivity index for mu, delta and kappa were 100:12:14.4 for TMB, 100:32:25 for NDTMB and 100:5:5 for morphine. The sodium shift ratio was 14 for TMB, 10 for NDTMB and 37 for morphine. These data show that (unlike morphine, a pure mu agonist) TMB and NDTMB can be classified as weak opioid agonists and confirm that peripheral opioid receptors mediate their gastrointestinal motility effects. PMID:2886594

  12. Functional and ultrastructural neuroanatomy of interactive intratectal/tectonigral mesencephalic opioid inhibitory links and nigrotectal GABAergic pathways: involvement of GABAA and mu1-opioid receptors in the modulation of panic-like reactions elicited by electrical stimulation of the dorsal midbrain.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, S J; Ciscato, J G; de Oliveira, R; de Oliveira, R C; D'Angelo-Dias, R; Carvalho, A D; Felippotti, T T; Rebouças, E C C; Castellan-Baldan, L; Hoffmann, A; Corrêa, S A L; Moreira, J E; Coimbra, N C

    2005-12-01

    In the present study, the functional neuroanatomy of nigrotectal-tectonigral pathways as well as the effects of central administration of opioid antagonists on aversive stimuli-induced responses elicited by electrical stimulation of the midbrain tectum were determined. Central microinjections of naloxonazine, a selective mu(1)-opiod receptor antagonist, in the mesencephalic tectum (MT) caused a significant increase in the escape thresholds elicited by local electrical stimulation. Furthermore, either naltrexone or naloxonazine microinjected in the substantia nigra, pars reticulata (SNpr), caused a significant increase in the defensive thresholds elicited by electrical stimulation of the continuum comprised by dorsolateral aspects of the periaqueductal gray matter (dlPAG) and deep layers of the superior colliculus (dlSC), as compared with controls. These findings suggest an opioid modulation of GABAergic inhibitory inputs controlling the defensive behavior elicited by MT stimulation, in cranial aspects. In fact, iontophoretic microinjections of the neurotracer biodextran into the SNpr, a mesencephalic structure rich in GABA-containing neurons, show outputs to neural substrate of the dlSC/dlPAG involved with the generation and organization of fear- and panic-like reactions. Neurochemical lesion of the nigrotectal pathways increased the sensitivity of the MT to electrical (at alertness, freezing and escape thresholds) and chemical (blockade of GABA(A) receptors) stimulation, suggesting a tonic modulatory effect of the nigrotectal GABAergic outputs on the neural networks of the MT involved with the organization of the defensive behavior and panic-like reactions. Labeled neurons of the midbrain tectum send inputs with varicosities to ipsi and contralateral dlSC/dlPAG and ipsilateral substantia nigra, pars reticulata and compacta, in which the anterograde and retrograde tracing from a single injection indicates that the substantia nigra has reciprocal connections with

  13. Nucleus accumbens μ-opioid receptors mediate social reward.

    PubMed

    Trezza, Viviana; Damsteegt, Ruth; Achterberg, E J Marijke; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J

    2011-04-27

    Positive social interactions are essential for emotional well-being and proper behavioral development of young individuals. Here, we studied the neural underpinnings of social reward by investigating the involvement of opioid neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in social play behavior, a highly rewarding social interaction in adolescent rats. Intra-NAc infusion of morphine (0.05-0.1 μg) increased pinning and pouncing, characteristic elements of social play behavior in rats, and blockade of NAc opioid receptors with naloxone (0.5 μg) prevented the play-enhancing effects of systemic morphine (1 mg/kg, s.c.) administration. Thus, stimulation of opioid receptors in the NAc was necessary and sufficient for morphine to increase social play. Intra-NAc treatment with the selective μ-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala(2),N-MePhe(4),Gly(5)-ol]enkephalin (DAMGO) (0.1-10 ng) and the μ-opioid receptor antagonist Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH(2) (CTAP) (0.3-3 μg) increased and decreased social play, respectively. The δ-opioid receptor agonist DPDPE ([D-Pen(2),D-Pen(5)]-enkephalin) (0.3-3 μg) had no effects, whereas the κ-opioid receptor agonist U69593 (N-methyl-2-phenyl-N-[(5R,7S,8S)-7-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)-1-oxaspiro[4.5]dec-8-yl]acetamide) (0.01-1 μg) decreased social play. Intra-NAc treatment with β-endorphin (0.01-1 μg) increased social play, but met-enkephalin (0.1-5 μg) and the enkephalinase inhibitor thiorphan (0.1-1 μg) were ineffective. DAMGO (0.1-10 ng) increased social play after infusion into both the shell and core subregions of the NAc. Last, intra-NAc infusion of CTAP (3 μg) prevented the development of social play-induced conditioned place preference. These findings identify NAc μ-opioid receptor stimulation as an important neural mechanism for the attribution of positive value to social interactions in adolescent rats. Altered NAc μ-opioid receptor function may underlie social impairments in psychiatric disorders such as autism

  14. Functions of the Chemokine Receptor CXCR4 in the Central Nervous System and Its Regulation by μ-Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Bradley; Meucci, Olimpia

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the G protein-coupled receptor CXCR4 by its chemokine ligand CXCL12 regulates a number of physiopathological functions in the central nervous system, during development as well as later in life. In addition to the more classical roles of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis in the recruitment of immune cells or migration and proliferation of neural precursor cells, recent studies suggest that CXCR4 signaling also modulates synaptic function and neuronal survival in the mature brain, through direct and indirect effects on neurons and glia. These effects, which include regulation of glutamate receptors and uptake, and of dendritic spine density, can significantly alter the ability of neurons to face excitotoxic insults. Therefore, they are particularly relevant to neurodegenerative diseases featuring alterations of glutamate neurotransmission, such as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Importantly, CXCR4 signaling can be dysregulated by HIV viral proteins, host HIV-induced factors, and opioids. Potential mechanisms of opioid regulation of CXCR4 include heterologous desensitization, transcriptional regulation and changes in receptor expression levels, opioid–chemokine receptor dimer or heteromer formation, and the newly described modulation by the protein ferritin heavy chain—all leading to inhibition of CXCR4 signaling. After reviewing major effects of chemokines and opioids in the CNS, this chapter discusses chemokine–opioid interactions in neuronal and immune cells, focusing on their potential contribution to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. PMID:25175863

  15. Mu opioid receptor binding sites in human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Pilapil, C.; Welner, S.; Magnan, J.; Zamir, N.; Quirion, R.

    1986-01-01

    Our experiments focused on the examination of the distribution of mu opioid receptor binding sites in normal human brain using the highly selective ligand (/sup 3/H)DAGO, in both membrane binding assay and in vitro receptor autoradiography. Mu opioid binding sites are very discretely distributed in human brain with high densities of sites found in the posterior amygdala, caudate, putamen, hypothalamus and certain cortical areas. Moreover the autoradiographic distribution of (/sup 3/H)DAGO binding sites clearly reveals the discrete lamination (layers I and III-IV) of mu sites in cortical areas.

  16. Different subtypes of opioid receptors have different affinities for G-proteins.

    PubMed

    Polastron, J; Jauzac, P

    1994-05-01

    In this work, we have characterized the opioid receptor expressed by the human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-BE and compared its hydrodynamic behaviour with those of well known opioid receptors: mu-opioid receptor of rabbit cerebellum and delta-opioid receptor of the hybrid cell line NG 108-15. Human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-BE expresses a substantial amount of opioid receptors (200-300 fmoles/mg of protein). Pharmacological characterization suggests an heterogenous population of receptors and the presence of two delta subtypes which are, at least partially, negatively coupled with adenylate cyclase via a Gi protein. These receptors exist under two different molecular forms and, in this respect, strikingly contrast with the archetypic delta receptors of NG 108-15 hybrid cell line which show only a high molecular weight form and appear more tightly coupled with the G protein. Hydrodynamic behaviour of SK-N-BE opioid receptors is reminiscent of the profile observed with the rabbit cerebellum mu-opioid receptor. This observation is consistent with the presence of two delta-opioid receptors subtypes, one of which exhibiting properties close to those of mu opioid receptors. Taken overall, our results suggest that different types and subtypes of opioid receptors, even if they are coupled to the same inhibitory G protein, are more or less tightly coupled with their transduction proteins and that closely related opioid receptors can form allosterically interacting complexes. PMID:7920183

  17. Targeting the opioid growth factor: opioid growth factor receptor axis for treatment of human ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zagon, Ian S; Donahue, Renee; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2013-05-01

    The opioid growth factor (OGF) - opioid growth factor receptor (OGFr) axis is a biological pathway that is present in human ovarian cancer cells and tissues. OGF, chemically termed [Met(5)]-enkephalin, is an endogenous opioid peptide that interfaces with OGFr to delay cells moving through the cell cycle by upregulation of cyclin-dependent inhibitory kinase pathways. OGF inhibitory activity is dose dependent, receptor mediated, reversible, protein and RNA dependent, but not related to apoptosis or necrosis. The OGF-OGFr axis can be targeted for treatment of human ovarian cancer by (i) administration of exogenous OGF, (ii) genetic manipulation to over-express OGFr and (iii) use of low dosages of naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, which stimulates production of OGF and OGFr for subsequent interaction following blockade of the receptor. The OGF-OGFr axis may be a feasible target for treatment of cancer of the ovary (i) in a prophylactic fashion, (ii) following cytoreduction or (iii) in conjunction with standard chemotherapy for additive effectiveness. In summary, preclinical data support the transition of these novel therapies for treatment of human ovarian cancer from the bench to bedside to provide additional targets for treatment of this devastating disease. PMID:23856908

  18. Supraspinal peroxynitrite modulates pain signaling by suppressing the endogenous opioid pathway.

    PubMed

    Little, Joshua W; Chen, Zhoumou; Doyle, Timothy; Porreca, Frank; Ghaffari, Mahsa; Bryant, Leesa; Neumann, William L; Salvemini, Daniela

    2012-08-01

    Peroxynitrite (PN, ONOO(-)) is a potent oxidant and nitrating agent that contributes to pain through peripheral and spinal mechanisms, but its supraspinal role is unknown. We present evidence here that PN in the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) is essential for descending nociceptive modulation in rats during inflammatory and neuropathic pain through PN-mediated suppression of opioid signaling. Carrageenan-induced thermal hyperalgesia was associated with increased 3-nitrotyrosine (NT), a PN biomarker, in the RVM. Furthermore, intra-RVM microinjections of the PN decomposition catalyst Fe(III)-5,10,15,20-tetrakis(N-methyl-pyridinium-4-yl)porphyrin (FeTMPyP(5+)) dose-dependently reversed this thermal hyperalgesia. These effects of FeTMPyP(5+) were abrogated by intra-RVM naloxone, implicating potential interplay between PN and opioids. In support, we identified NT colocalization with the endogenous opioid enkephalin (ENK) in the RVM during thermal hyperalgesia, suggesting potential in situ interactions. To address the functional significance of such interactions, we exposed methionine-enkephalin (MENK) to PN and identified the major metabolite, 3-nitrotyrosine-methionine-sulfoxide (NSO)-MENK, using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Next, we isolated, purified, and tested NSO-MENK for opioid receptor binding affinity and analgesic effects. Compared to MENK, this NSO-MENK metabolite lacked appreciable binding affinity for δ, μ, and κ opioid receptors. Intrathecal injection of NSO-MENK in rats did not evoke antinociception, suggesting that PN-mediated chemical modifications of ENK suppress opioid signaling. When extended to chronic pain, intra-RVM FeTMPyP(5+) produced naloxone-sensitive reversal of mechanical allodynia in rats following chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. Collectively, our data reveal the central role of PN in RVM descending facilitation during inflammatory and neuropathic pain potentially through anti-opioid activity. PMID

  19. The critical role of spinal 5-HT7 receptors in opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Yesilyurt, Ozgur; Seyrek, Melik; Tasdemir, Serdar; Kahraman, Serdar; Deveci, Mehmet Salih; Karakus, Emre; Halici, Zekai; Dogrul, Ahmet

    2015-09-01

    The opioid and non-opioid types of stress-induced analgesia have been well defined. One of the non-opioid type involve the endocannabinoid system. We previously reported that the spinal serotonin 7 receptor (5-HT7) blockers inhibit both morphine and cannabinoid-induced analgesia, thus we hypothesized that descending serotonergic pathways-spinal 5-HT7 receptor loop might contribute to stress-induced analgesia. Stress-induced analgesia was induced with warm (32°C) or cold (20°C) water swim stress in male Balb-C mice. The effects of intrathecal injection of a selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, SB 269970, of the denervation of serotonergic neurons by intrathecal administration of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) and of lesions of the dorsolateral funiculus on opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia were evaluated with the tail-flick and hot plate tests. The expression of 5-HT7 receptors mRNA in the dorsal lumbar region of spinal cord were analyzed by RT-PCR following spinal serotonin depletion or dorsolateral funiculus lesion. The effects of the selective 5-HT7 receptor agonists LP 44 and AS 19 were tested on nociception. Intrathecal SB 269970 blocked both opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia. Dorsolateral funiculus lesion or denervation of the spinal serotonergic neurons resulted in a marked decrease in 5-HT7 receptor expression in the dorsal lumbar spinal cord, accompanied by inhibition of opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia. However, the systemic or intrathecal LP 44 and AS 19 alone did not produce analgesia in unstressed mice. These results indicate that descending serotonergic pathways and the spinal 5-HT7 receptor loop play a crucial role in mediating both opioid and non-opioid type stress-induced analgesia. PMID:25917322

  20. Contribution of opioid receptors on primary afferent versus sympathetic neurons to peripheral opioid analgesia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, L; Zhang, Q; Stein, C; Schäfer, M

    1998-08-01

    Opioid receptors are synthesized in dorsal root ganglia and transported into peripheral terminals of primary afferent neurons. Activation of such receptors results in antinociceptive effects that are most prominent in inflammation. In addition, opioid receptors located on sympathetic postganglionic neuron terminals may be involved in these effects. This study investigates the peripheral analgesic efficacy of the mu, delta and kappa receptor agonists [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly-ol5]-enkephalin, [D-Pen2,5]-enkephalin and trans-(+/-)3, 4-Dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-cyclohexyl]-benzeneacetamid e, the effective number of peripheral mu, delta and kappa receptors in relation to the development of inflammation and the contribution of sympathetic vs. sensory neurons by use of capsaicin and 6-hydroxydopamine, respectively. In Wistar rats with Freund's adjuvant-induced hindpaw inflammation, antinociceptive effects of intraplantar [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly-ol5]-enkephalin (1.0-32 microg), [D-Pen2,5]-enkephalin (10-100 microg) and trans-(+/-)3, 4-Dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(l-pyrrolidiny)-cyclohexyl]-benzeneace tam ide (10-100 microg) were evaluated by paw pressure test. These effects increased linearly between 6 and 24 hr, but did not change between 24 and 96 hr of inflammation, whereas the doses of the irreversible antagonists beta-funaltrexamine, [D-Ala2,Leu5,Cys6]enkephalin or (+/-)-(5beta,7a,8beta)-3, 4-dichloro-N-[3-methylene-2-oxo-8-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-1-oxaspir[4, 5]dec-7-yl]benzeneacetamide required to abolish the respective agonist effects increased between 12 and 96 hr. Pretreatment with capsaicin (30, 50, 70 mg/kg s.c. over 3 days) but not with 6-hydroxydopamine (75 mg/kg i.p. over 3 days) reversed the hyperalgesia in inflamed paws and almost abolished antinociceptive effects of all three agonists. These results suggest that the increased opioid agonist efficacy is due to an increased number of peripheral opioid receptors at later stages of inflammation and that

  1. Antitussive activity of Withania somnifera and opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Nosálová, Gabriela; Sivová, Veronika; Ray, Bimalendu; Fraňová, Soňa; Ondrejka, Igor; Flešková, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Arabinogalactan is a polysaccharide isolated from the roots of the medicinal plant Withania somnifera L. It contains 65% arabinose and 18% galactose. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antitussive activity of arabinogalactan in conscious, healthy adult guinea pigs and the role of the opioid pathway in the antitussive action. A polysaccharide extract was given orally in a dose of 50 mg/kg. Cough was induced by an aerosol of citric acid in a concentration 0.3 mol/L, generated by a jet nebulizer into a plethysmographic chamber. The intensity of cough response was defined as the number of cough efforts counted during a 3-min exposure to the aerosol. The major finding was that arabinogalactan clearly suppressed the cough reflex; the suppression was comparable with that of codeine that was taken as a reference drug. The involvement of the opioid system was tested with the use of a blood-brain barrier penetrable, naloxone hydrochloride, and non-penetrable, naloxone methiodide, to distinguish between the central and peripheral mu-opioid receptor pathways. Both opioid antagonists acted to reverse the arabinogalactan-induced cough suppression; the reversion was total over time with the latter antagonist. We failed to confirm the presence of a bronchodilating effect of the polysaccharide, which could be involved in its antitussive action. We conclude that the polysaccharide arabinogalactan from Withania somnifera has a distinct antitussive activity consisting of cough suppression and that this action involves the mu-opioid receptor pathways. PMID:25252908

  2. Regulation of μ and δ opioid receptor functions: involvement of cyclin-dependent kinase 5

    PubMed Central

    Beaudry, H; Mercier-Blais, A-A; Delaygue, C; Lavoie, C; Parent, J-L; Neugebauer, W; Gendron, L

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Phosphorylation of δ opioid receptors (DOP receptors) by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) was shown to regulate the trafficking of this receptor. Therefore, we aimed to determine the role of CDK5 in regulating DOP receptors in rats treated with morphine or with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). As μ (MOP) and DOP receptors are known to be co-regulated, we also sought to determine if CDK5-mediated regulation of DOP receptors also affects MOP receptor functions. Experimental Approach The role of CDK5 in regulating opioid receptors in CFA- and morphine-treated rats was studied using roscovitine as a CDK inhibitor and a cell-penetrant peptide mimicking the second intracellular loop of DOP receptors (C11-DOPri2). Opioid receptor functions were assessed in vivo in a series of behavioural experiments and correlated by measuring ERK1/2 activity in dorsal root ganglia homogenates. Key Results Chronic roscovitine treatment reduced the antinociceptive and antihyperalgesic effects of deltorphin II (Dlt II) in morphine- and CFA-treated rats respectively. Repeated administrations of C11-DOPri2 also robustly decreased Dlt II-induced analgesia. Interestingly, DAMGO-induced analgesia was significantly increased by roscovitine and C11-DOPri2. Concomitantly, in roscovitine-treated rats the Dlt II-induced ERK1/2 activation was decreased, whereas the DAMGO-induced ERK1/2 activation was increased. An acute roscovitine treatment had no effect on Dlt II- or DAMGO-induced analgesia. Conclusions and Implications Together, our results demonstrate that CDK5 is a key player in the regulation of DOP receptors in morphine- and CFA-treated rats and that the regulation of DOP receptors by CDK5 is sufficient to modulate MOP receptor functions through an indirect process. PMID:25598508

  3. It’s MORe exciting than mu: crosstalk between mu opioid receptors and glutamatergic transmission in the mesolimbic dopamine system

    PubMed Central

    Chartoff, Elena H.; Connery, Hilary S.

    2014-01-01

    Opioids selective for the G protein-coupled mu opioid receptor (MOR) produce potent analgesia and euphoria. Heroin, a synthetic opioid, is considered one of the most addictive substances, and the recent exponential rise in opioid addiction and overdose deaths has made treatment development a national public health priority. Existing medications (methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone), when combined with psychosocial therapies, have proven efficacy in reducing aspects of opioid addiction. Unfortunately, these medications have critical limitations including those associated with opioid agonist therapies (e.g., sustained physiological dependence and opioid withdrawal leading to high relapse rates upon discontinuation), non-adherence to daily dosing, and non-renewal of monthly injection with extended-release naltrexone. Furthermore, current medications fail to ameliorate key aspects of addiction such as powerful conditioned associations that trigger relapse (e.g., cues, stress, the drug itself). Thus, there is a need for developing novel treatments that target neural processes corrupted with chronic opioid use. This requires a basic understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying effects of opioids on synaptic transmission and plasticity within reward-related neural circuits. The focus of this review is to discuss how crosstalk between MOR-associated G protein signaling and glutamatergic neurotransmission leads to immediate and long-term effects on emotional states (e.g., euphoria, depression) and motivated behavior (e.g., drug-seeking, relapse). Our goal is to integrate findings on how opioids modulate synaptic release of glutamate and postsynaptic transmission via α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area with the clinical (neurobehavioral) progression of opioid dependence, as well as to identify gaps in knowledge that can be addressed in future studies

  4. Heteromers of μ-δ opioid receptors: new pharmacology and novel therapeutic possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Wakako; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2015-01-01

    Several studies suggest that heteromerization between μ (MOP) and δ (DOP) opioid receptors modulates the signalling properties of the individual receptors. For example, whereas activation of MOP receptors by an agonist induces G protein-mediated signalling, the same agonist induces β-arrestin-mediated signalling in the context of the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer. Moreover, heteromer-mediated signalling is allosterically modulated by a combination of MOP and DOP receptor ligands. This has implications in analgesia given that morphine-induced antinociception can be potentiated by DOP receptor ligands. Recently reagents selectively targeting the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer such as bivalent ligands, antibodies or membrane permeable peptides have been generated; these reagents are enabling studies to elucidate the contribution of endogenously expressed heteromers to analgesia as well as to the development of side-effects associated with chronic opioid use. Recent advances in drug screening technology have led to the identification of a MOP-DOP receptor heteromer-biased agonist that activates both G protein-mediated and β-arrestin-mediated signalling. Moreover, this heteromer-biased agonist exhibits potent antinociceptive activity but with reduced side-effects, suggesting that ligands targeting the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer form a basis for the development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of pain. In this review, we summarize findings regarding the biological and functional characteristics of the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer and the in vitro and in vivo properties of heteromer-selective ligands. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24571499

  5. Receptor reserve reflects differential intrinsic efficacy associated with opioid diastereomers.

    PubMed

    Carliss, Richard D S; Keefer, James F; Perschke, Scott; Welch, Sandra; Rich, Thomas C; Weissman, Arthur D

    2009-05-01

    Structure-activity relationships built around receptor binding or cell-based assays are designed to reveal physiochemical differences between ligands. We hypothesized that agonist receptor reserve may provide a unique approach to distinguish structurally-related agonists exhibiting similar functional characteristics. An intracellular calcium activation assay in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells expressing cloned human mu-opioid receptors was developed. We examined two isomers exhibiting indistinguishable receptor binding and in vitro potency profiles. Oxymorphone, a clinically-available congener of codeine has at least two active diastereomeric metabolites (6alpha- and 6beta-oxymorphols) found to be similar for mu-opioid receptor binding affinity (K(d) = 15 versus 14 nM) and calcium activation (EC(50) = 22 versus 14 nM). Calcium activation was then inhibited in CHO cells in a concentration-dependent manner using the irreversible mu-opioid receptor antagonist, beta-funaltrexamine (beta-FNA). Under these conditions, approximately 10-fold greater receptor reserve was found for 6alpha-oxymorphol compared to 6beta-oxymorphol. This difference between the oxymorphols corresponded to a rank order of intrinsic efficacy (Emax): DAMGO > oxymorphone = 6alpha-oxymorphol = oxycodone > 6beta-oxymorphol. In addition, 6alpha-oxymorphol exhibited greater relative potency than the 6beta-oxymorphol in mouse tail-flick, hot-plate and phenylquinone writhing antinociceptive assays, regardless of route of administration. Thus the beta-FNA/calcium model provides a novel, cell-based approach to distinguish structurally related mu-opioid agonists, and in the specific case of the oxymorphols, receptor reserve differences provided a means to bridge functional in vitro and in vivo models. PMID:19463265

  6. Opioid modulation of Fos protein expression and olfactory circuitry plays a pivotal role in what neonates remember

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Tania L.; Moriceau, Stephanie; Sullivan, Regina M.

    2006-01-01

    Paradoxically, fear conditioning (odor–0.5 mA shock) yields a learned odor preference in the neonate, presumably due to a unique learning and memory circuit that does not include apparent amygdala participation. Post-training opioid antagonism with naltrexone (NTX) blocks consolidation of this odor preference and instead yields memory of a learned odor aversion. Here we characterize the neural circuitry underlying this switch during memory consolidation. Experiment 1 assessed post-training opioid modulation of Fos protein expression within olfactory circuitry (olfactory bulb, piriform cortex, amygdala). Odor–shock conditioning with no post-training treatment (odor preference) induced significant changes in Fos protein expression in the granule cell layer of the olfactory bulb and anterior piriform cortex. Post-training opioid receptor antagonism (odor aversion) prevented the learning-induced changes in the anterior piriform cortex and also induced significant changes in Fos protein expression in the central nucleus of the amygdala. Experiment 2 assessed intra-amygdala opioid modulation of neonate memory consolidation. Post-training infusion of NTX within the amygdala permitted consolidation of an odor aversion, while vehicle-infused pups continued to demonstrate an odor preference. Overall, results demonstrate that opioids modulate memory consolidation in the neonate via modulating Fos protein expression in olfactory circuitry. Furthermore, these results suggest that opioids are instrumental in suppressing neonate fear behavior via modulating the amygdala. PMID:17015856

  7. Estrogen changes as a critical factor in modulation of central opioid tonus: possible correlations with post-menopausal migraine.

    PubMed

    Genazzani, A R; Petraglia, F; Volpe, A; Facchinetti, F

    1985-05-01

    The effects exerted by ovarian steroids on the modulation of opioid activity were investigated in post-menopausal migraine sufferers and in healthy controls. In order to evaluate central opioid tonus, plasma LH rise after naloxone injection was measured, bearing in mind the tonic inhibition of endogenous opioid on hypothalamic LH-RH. There was no response of plasma LH to naloxone in post-menopausal women or in patients submitted to ovariectomy in fertile life. When the subjects underwent a sequential estrogens + progestagens therapy, such a response was noted from the first month of treatment; progestagens alone were ineffective. The same phenomena were also evident in post-menopausal migraine sufferers. These data indicate that ovarian steroids modulate the activity of opiate receptors in both healthy women and migraine sufferers. Interestingly, replacement therapies through ovarian steroids restored the activity of central opioid tonus in patients affected by migraine. PMID:2990722

  8. Modulating pain in the periphery: gene-based therapies to enhance peripheral opioid analgesia: Bonica lecture, ASRA 2010.

    PubMed

    Raja, Srinivasa N

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview of earlier work of our group on the peripheral signaling of pain, summarizes more recent studies on the role of opioids in chronic neuropathic pain, and speculates on the future of gene-based therapies as novel strategies to enhance the peripheral modulation of pain. Neurophysiologic and psychophysical studies have revealed features of primary afferent activity from somatic tissue that led to improved understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of pain signaling by nociceptive and nonnociceptive fibers. The demonstration of peripheral opioid mechanisms in neuropathic pain suggests a potential role for these receptors in the modulation of pain at its initiation site. Our work has focused on characterizing this peripheral opioid analgesia in chronic neuropathic pain such that it can be exploited to develop novel and potent peripheral analgesics for its treatment. Ongoing research on virus-mediated gene transfer strategies to enhance peripheral opioid analgesia is presented. PMID:22189620

  9. The opioid receptors of the rat periaqueductal gray

    SciTech Connect

    Fedynyshyn, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    The opioid binding characteristics of the rat (PAG) and the signal transduction mechanisms of the opioid receptors were examined with in vitro radioligand binding, GTPase, adenylyl cyclase, and inositol phosphate assays. The nonselective ligand {sup 3}H-ethylketocyclazocine (EKC), the {mu} and {delta} selective ligand {sup 3}H-(D-Ala{sup 2}, D-Leu{sup 5}) enkephalin (DADLE), the {mu} selective ligand {sup 3}H-(D-Ala{sup 2}, N-methyl Phe{sup 4}, Glyol{sup 5}) enkephalin (DAGO), and the {delta} selective ligand {sup 3}H-(D-Pen{sup 2}, D-Pen{sup 5}) enkephalin (DPDPE) were separately used as tracer ligands to label opioid binding sites in rat PAG enriched P{sub 2} membrane in competition with unlabeled DADLE, DAGO, DPDPE, or the {kappa} selective ligand trans-3,4-dichloro-N-(2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)cyclohexyl)benzeneacetamide, methane sulfonate, hydrate (U50, 488H). Only {mu} selective high affinity opioid binding was observed. No high affinity {delta} or {kappa} selective binding was detected. {sup 3}H-DAGO was used as a tracer ligand to label {mu} selective high affinity opioid binding sites in PAG enriched P{sub 2} membrane in competition with unlabeled {beta}-endorphin, dynorphin A (1-17), BAM-18, methionine enkephalin, dynorphin A (1-8), and leucine enkephalin. Of these endogenous opioid peptides only those with previously reported high affinity {mu} type opioid binding activity competed with {sup 3}H-DAGO for binding sites in rat PAG enriched P{sub 2} membrane with affinities similar to that of unlabeled DAGO.

  10. Long-term cognitive enrichment affects opioid receptor expression in the amygdala of domestic pigs.

    PubMed

    Kalbe, C; Puppe, B

    2010-02-01

    Enriching the housing environment by stimuli that challenge both reward and cognitive mechanisms may enhance behavioural experiences and can improve animal welfare, particularly in farm animals. A newly developed experimental feeding system for domestic pigs using food-rewarded learning of discriminatory and instrumental tasks enabled the animals to successfully master a cognitive challenge and to be rewarded ca. 30 times per day with small food portions. Reward-related behaviour is expected to be modulated by endogenous opioid systems. Furthermore, recent evidence supports a role for the amygdala in processing positive affects by stimulus-reward learning. Hence, the present study investigates mRNA expression of cerebral receptors, which are involved in these processes. In an initial step, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) provided the first evidence that transcripts of three different opioid receptors (MOR, DOR, KOR), as well as the neuropeptide Y 5 receptor (NPY5R), leptin receptor (LEPR) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC), are expressed in both the porcine amygdala and hypothalamus. Using real-time PCR we could show that the expression of two receptors of the opioid system (amygdala: KOR, DOR), in addition to the expression of NPY5R (hypothalamus) in eight enriched housed pigs was markedly downregulated compared to that of conventionally housed and fed pigs. Focusing on opioid receptors in the amygdala, the present study shows that long-term cognitive enrichment acts as a biologically relevant stimulus that causes modifications of gene expression of reward-sensitive cerebral receptors in domestic pigs. PMID:19804558

  11. Mu Opioids and Their Receptors: Evolution of a Concept

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ying-Xian

    2013-01-01

    Opiates are among the oldest medications available to manage a number of medical problems. Although pain is the current focus, early use initially focused upon the treatment of dysentery. Opium contains high concentrations of both morphine and codeine, along with thebaine, which is used in the synthesis of a number of semisynthetic opioid analgesics. Thus, it is not surprising that new agents were initially based upon the morphine scaffold. The concept of multiple opioid receptors was first suggested almost 50 years ago (Martin, 1967), opening the possibility of new classes of drugs, but the morphine-like agents have remained the mainstay in the medical management of pain. Termed mu, our understanding of these morphine-like agents and their receptors has undergone an evolution in thinking over the past 35 years. Early pharmacological studies identified three major classes of receptors, helped by the discovery of endogenous opioid peptides and receptor subtypes—primarily through the synthesis of novel agents. These chemical biologic approaches were then eclipsed by the molecular biology revolution, which now reveals a complexity of the morphine-like agents and their receptors that had not been previously appreciated. PMID:24076545

  12. Biotinylated human. beta. -endorphins as probes for the opioid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Hochhaus, G.; Gibson, B.W.; Sadee, W.

    1988-01-05

    The reaction of human ..beta..-endorphin and biotinyl N-hydroxysuccinimide with or without spacer arm, afforded a series of products that were separated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Liquid secondary ion mass spectrometry of the biotinylated products and their tryptic digests produced abundant protonated molecular ions (MH/sup +/), which specified the number and location of biotinylation. Between 1 and 4 biotinyl residues were incorporated per human ..beta..-endorphin molecule, at Lys-9, -19, -24, -28, and -29, but not at the amino-terminal Try-1. Three HPLC fractions were isolated for receptor binding studies monobiotinylation of Lys-9, Lys-19, and a mixture of Lys-24, Lys-28, and Lys-29 derivatives. IC/sub 50/ values for binding to ..mu.. and delta opioid receptor sites were 3-8 times higher for monobiotinylated derivatives than for the parent human ..beta..-endorphin. Association with avidin decreased opioid receptor affinities for the C/sub 6/ spacer derivative biotinylated at position Lys-9, which is close to the (1-5) enkephalin receptor region. In contrast, avidin did not affect or even increased apparent affinities to ..mu.. and delta sites for derivatives biotinylated at the ..cap alpha..-helical part of the molecule (Lys-19, -24, -28, and -29). Biotinylated human ..beta..-endorphins also bound to low affinity nonopioid binding sites on NG-108-15 cells; however, affinities to these sites were considerably reduced when derivatives were bound to avidin. The ability of biotinylated human ..beta..-endorphin to cross-link the ..mu.. and delta opioid receptors to avidin allows application of the biotin-avidin system as a molecular probe of the opioid receptor.

  13. Differential effects of exercise on brain opioid receptor binding and activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Arida, Ricardo Mario; Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Brand, Serge; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise stimulates the release of endogenous opioid peptides supposed to be responsible for changes in mood, anxiety, and performance. Exercise alters sensitivity to these effects that modify the efficacy at the opioid receptor. Although there is evidence that relates exercise to neuropeptide expression in the brain, the effects of exercise on opioid receptor binding and signal transduction mechanisms downstream of these receptors have not been explored. Here, we characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor or delta opioid receptor in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. As regards short- (acute) or long-term effects (chronic) of exercise, overall, higher opioid receptor binding was observed in acute-exercise animals and the opposite was found in the chronic-exercise animals. The binding of [(35) S]GTPγS under basal conditions (absence of agonists) was elevated in sensorimotor cortex and hippocampus, an effect more evident after chronic exercise. Divergence of findings was observed for mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor, and delta opioid receptor receptor activation in our study. Our results support existing evidence of opioid receptor binding and G protein activation occurring differentially in brain regions in response to diverse exercise stimuli. We characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu, kappa, and delta opioid receptors in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. Higher opioid receptor binding was observed in the acute exercise animal group and opposite findings in the chronic exercise group. Higher G protein activation under basal conditions was noted in rats submitted to chronic exercise, as visible in the depicted pseudo-color autoradiograms. PMID:25330347

  14. Involvement of peripheral mu opioid receptors in scratching behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Atsuki; Sugimoto, Yukio

    2010-12-15

    Pruritus is a common adverse effect of opioid treatment. However, the mechanism by which pruritus is induced by opioid administration is unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of the intradermal injection of loperamide, a peripherally restricted opioid receptor agonist, on the itch sensation. When injected intradermally into the rostral part of the back in mice, loperamide elicited scratching behavior. We also examined the effects of the selective mu opioid receptor agonist [d-Ala², N-Me-Phe⁴, Gly⁵-ol]-enkephalin acetate (DAMGO), the selective delta opioid receptor agonist [d-Pen(2,5)]-enkephalin (DPDPE), and the selective kappa opioid receptor agonist U-50488H on scratching behavior in mice in order to determine which subtype is involved in opioid-induced pruritus. Following intradermal injection into the rostral part of the back in mice, DAMGO elicited scratching behavior, while DPDPE and U-50488H did not. This suggests that peripheral mu opioid activation elicits the itch sensation. Next, we focused on the treatment of opioid-induced itch sensation without central adverse effects. Naloxone methiodide is a peripherally restricted opioid receptor antagonist. In the present study, naloxone methiodide significantly suppressed scratching behavior induced by loperamide and DAMGO. These findings suggest that mu opioid receptors play a primary role in peripheral pruritus and that naloxone methiodide may represent a possible remedy for opioid-induced itching. PMID:20863827

  15. Modulation of MDMA-induced behavioral and transcriptional effects by the delta opioid antagonist naltrindole in mice

    PubMed Central

    Belkaï, Emilie; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Noble, Florence; Marie-Claire, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    The delta opioid system is involved in the behavioral effects of various drugs of abuse. However, only few studies have focused on the possible interactions between the opioid system and the effects of MDMA. In order to examine the possible role of the delta opioid system in MDMA-induced behaviors in mice, locomotor activity and conditioned place preference were investigated in the presence of naltrindole, a selective delta opioid antagonist. Moreover, the consequences of acute and chronic MDMA administration on Penk (pro-enkephalin) and Pomc (pro-opioimelanocortin) gene expression were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR. The results showed that, after acute MDMA administration (9mg/kg; i.p.), naltrindole (5mg/kg, s.c.) was able to totally block MDMA-induced hyperlocomotion. Penk expression gene was not modulated by acute MDMA but a decrease of Pomc gene expression was observed that was not antagonized by naltrindole. Administration of the antagonist prevented the acquisition of MDMA-induced conditioned place preference, suggesting an implication of the delta opioid receptors in this behavior. Following chronic MDMA treatment only the level of Pomc was modulated. The observed increase was totally blocked by naltrindole pretreatment. All these results confirm the interactions between the delta opioid system (receptors and peptides) and the effects of MDMA. PMID:19523041

  16. Modulation of MDMA-induced behavioral and transcriptional effects by the delta opioid antagonist naltrindole in mice.

    PubMed

    Belkaï, Emilie; Scherrmann, Jean-Michel; Noble, Florence; Marie-Claire, Cynthia

    2009-07-01

    The delta opioid system is involved in the behavioral effects of various drugs of abuse. However, only a few studies have focused on the possible interactions between the opioid system and the effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). In order to examine the possible role of the delta opioid system in MDMA-induced behaviors in mice, locomotor activity and conditioned place preference (CPP) were investigated in the presence of naltrindole (NTI), a selective delta opioid antagonist. Moreover, the consequences of acute and chronic MDMA administration on pro-enkephalin (Penk) and pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc) gene expression were assessed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR). The results showed that, after acute MDMA administration (9 mg/kg; i.p.), NTI (5 mg/kg, s.c.) was able to totally block MDMA-induced hyperlocomotion. Penk gene expression was not modulated by acute MDMA, but a decrease of Pomc gene expression was observed, which was not antagonized by NTI. Administration of the antagonist prevented the acquisition of MDMA-induced CPP, suggesting an implication of the delta opioid receptors in this behavior. Following chronic MDMA treatment, only the level of Pomc was modulated. The observed increase was totally blocked by NTI pre-treatment. All these results confirm the interactions between the delta opioid system (receptors and peptides) and the effects of MDMA. PMID:19523041

  17. Expression and Localization of Opioid Receptors in Male Germ Cells and the Implication for Mouse Spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gianzo, Marta; Urizar-Arenaza, Itziar; Casis, Luis; Irazusta, Jon; Subirán, Nerea

    2016-01-01

    The presence of endogenous opioid peptides in different testicular cell types has been extensively characterized and provides evidence for the participation of the opioid system in the regulation of testicular function. However, the exact role of the opioid system during the spermatogenesis has remained controversial since the presence of the mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptors in spermatogenic cells was yet to be demonstrated. Through a combination of quantitative real-time PCR, immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry approaches, we report for the first time the presence of active mu-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptors in mouse male germ cells. They show an exposition time-dependent response to opioid agonist, hence suggesting their active involvement in spermatogenesis. Our results contribute to understanding the role of the opioid receptors in the spermatogenesis and could help to develop new strategies to employ the opioid system as a biochemical tool for the diagnosis and treatment of male infertility. PMID:27031701

  18. Activation of peripheral opioid receptors has no effect on heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Ellidokuz, Ender; Kaya, Dayimi; Uslan, Ihsan; Celik, Ataç; Esen, Ali Metin; Barutça, Irfan

    2008-06-01

    Opioid receptors involved in regulating the motility of the gastrointestinal tract have been localized in both contractile and neuronal tissues. Trimebutine, a peripheral opioid receptor agonist, modulates gastrointestinal motor activity in both directions and also may act on cardiac tissue. This study investigated the effects of trimebutine in clinical doses on cardiac autonomic functions with heart rate variability. The effect of trimebutine on cardiac autonomic outflows was evaluated in 11 healthy subjects. Trimebutine (200 mg) or placebo was administered orally at random in a double-blind, cross-over manner. Continuous electrocardiography recordings were obtained before and after drug administration during three states: rest, controlled breathing, and a hand grip exercise. Heart rate variability analysis showed that there was no significant difference between subjects administered with placebo or trimebutine throughout rest, controlled breathing, or the hand grip exercise. We concluded that trimebutine, in clinical doses, has no significant effect on cardiac autonomic functions. PMID:18449593

  19. The Effect of Opioid Receptor Blockade on the Neural Processing of Thermal Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Schoell, Eszter D.; Bingel, Ulrike; Eippert, Falk; Yacubian, Juliana; Christiansen, Kerrin; Andresen, Hilke; May, Arne; Buechel, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The endogenous opioid system represents one of the principal systems in the modulation of pain. This has been demonstrated in studies of placebo analgesia and stress-induced analgesia, where anti-nociceptive activity triggered by pain itself or by cognitive states is blocked by opioid antagonists. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of opioid receptor blockade on the physiological processing of painful thermal stimulation in the absence of cognitive manipulation. We therefore measured BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) signal responses and intensity ratings to non-painful and painful thermal stimuli in a double-blind, cross-over design using the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. On the behavioral level, we observed an increase in intensity ratings under naloxone due mainly to a difference in the non-painful stimuli. On the neural level, painful thermal stimulation was associated with a negative BOLD signal within the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, and this deactivation was abolished by naloxone. PMID:20811582

  20. The effect of opioid receptor blockade on the neural processing of thermal stimuli.

    PubMed

    Schoell, Eszter D; Bingel, Ulrike; Eippert, Falk; Yacubian, Juliana; Christiansen, Kerrin; Andresen, Hilke; May, Arne; Buechel, Christian

    2010-01-01

    The endogenous opioid system represents one of the principal systems in the modulation of pain. This has been demonstrated in studies of placebo analgesia and stress-induced analgesia, where anti-nociceptive activity triggered by pain itself or by cognitive states is blocked by opioid antagonists. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of opioid receptor blockade on the physiological processing of painful thermal stimulation in the absence of cognitive manipulation. We therefore measured BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) signal responses and intensity ratings to non-painful and painful thermal stimuli in a double-blind, cross-over design using the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. On the behavioral level, we observed an increase in intensity ratings under naloxone due mainly to a difference in the non-painful stimuli. On the neural level, painful thermal stimulation was associated with a negative BOLD signal within the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex, and this deactivation was abolished by naloxone. PMID:20811582

  1. Acute and chronic fentanyl administration causes hyperalgesia independently of opioid receptor activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Amanda R; Arout, Caroline; Caldwell, Megan; Dahan, Albert; Kest, Benjamin

    2009-10-01

    Although mu-receptor opioids are clinically important analgesics, they can also paradoxically cause hyperalgesia independently of opioid receptor activity, presumably via the action of neuroexcitatory glucoronide metabolites. However, it is unknown whether the commonly used mu-receptor opioid analgesic fentanyl, which is not subject to glucuronidation, can also induce hyperalgesia independently of opioid receptor activity. Thus, here we examined whether fentanyl increases nociception on the tail-withdrawal test in CD-1 mice concurrently treated with the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone or in opioid receptor triple knock-out mice lacking mu, delta, and kappa opioid receptors. For both groups, an acute fentanyl bolus dose (0.25mg/kg, s.c.) and continuous fentanyl infusion (cumulative daily dose: 10mg/kg) did not cause analgesia at any time. Instead, fentanyl significantly decreased withdrawal latencies relative to pre-drug values for the next 15-60 min and for six days, respectively. MK-801 blocked and reversed hyperalgesia caused by the acute injection and continuous infusion of fentanyl, respectively, in naltrexone-treated CD-1 mice, indicating the contribution of NMDA receptors to fentanyl hyperalgesia. These data show that the synthetic opioid fentanyl causes hyperalgesia independently of prior or concurrent opioid receptor activity or analgesia. Since the biotransformation of fentanyl does not yield any known pronociceptive metabolites, these data challenge assumptions regarding the role of neuroexcitatory metabolites in opioid-induced hyperalgesia. PMID:19559072

  2. GRK2 Protein-mediated Transphosphorylation Contributes to Loss of Function of μ-Opioid Receptors Induced by Neuropeptide FF (NPFF2) Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Moulédous, Lionel; Froment, Carine; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Zajac, Jean-Marie; Mollereau, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) interacts with specific receptors to modulate opioid functions in the central nervous system. On dissociated neurons and neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) transfected with NPFF receptors, NPFF acts as a functional antagonist of μ-opioid (MOP) receptors by attenuating the opioid-induced inhibition of calcium conductance. In the SH-SY5Y model, MOP and NPFF2 receptors have been shown to heteromerize. To understand the molecular mechanism involved in the anti-opioid activity of NPFF, we have investigated the phosphorylation status of the MOP receptor using phospho-specific antibody and mass spectrometry. Similarly to direct opioid receptor stimulation, activation of the NPFF2 receptor by [d-Tyr-1-(NMe)Phe-3]NPFF (1DMe), an analog of NPFF, induced the phosphorylation of Ser-377 of the human MOP receptor. This heterologous phosphorylation was unaffected by inhibition of second messenger-dependent kinases and, contrarily to homologous phosphorylation, was prevented by inactivation of Gi/o proteins by pertussis toxin. Using siRNA knockdown we could demonstrate that 1DMe-induced Ser-377 cross-phosphorylation and MOP receptor loss of function were mediated by the G protein receptor kinase GRK2. In addition, mass spectrometric analysis revealed that the phosphorylation pattern of MOP receptors was qualitatively similar after treatment with the MOP agonist Tyr-d-Ala-Gly (NMe)-Phe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) or after treatment with the NPFF agonist 1DMe, but the level of multiple phosphorylation was more intense after DAMGO. Finally, NPFF2 receptor activation was sufficient to recruit β-arrestin2 to the MOP receptor but not to induce its internalization. These data show that NPFF-induced heterologous desensitization of MOP receptor signaling is mediated by GRK2 and could involve transphosphorylation within the heteromeric receptor complex. PMID:22375000

  3. GRK2 protein-mediated transphosphorylation contributes to loss of function of μ-opioid receptors induced by neuropeptide FF (NPFF2) receptors.

    PubMed

    Moulédous, Lionel; Froment, Carine; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Zajac, Jean-Marie; Mollereau, Catherine

    2012-04-13

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) interacts with specific receptors to modulate opioid functions in the central nervous system. On dissociated neurons and neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) transfected with NPFF receptors, NPFF acts as a functional antagonist of μ-opioid (MOP) receptors by attenuating the opioid-induced inhibition of calcium conductance. In the SH-SY5Y model, MOP and NPFF(2) receptors have been shown to heteromerize. To understand the molecular mechanism involved in the anti-opioid activity of NPFF, we have investigated the phosphorylation status of the MOP receptor using phospho-specific antibody and mass spectrometry. Similarly to direct opioid receptor stimulation, activation of the NPFF(2) receptor by [D-Tyr-1-(NMe)Phe-3]NPFF (1DMe), an analog of NPFF, induced the phosphorylation of Ser-377 of the human MOP receptor. This heterologous phosphorylation was unaffected by inhibition of second messenger-dependent kinases and, contrarily to homologous phosphorylation, was prevented by inactivation of G(i/o) proteins by pertussis toxin. Using siRNA knockdown we could demonstrate that 1DMe-induced Ser-377 cross-phosphorylation and MOP receptor loss of function were mediated by the G protein receptor kinase GRK2. In addition, mass spectrometric analysis revealed that the phosphorylation pattern of MOP receptors was qualitatively similar after treatment with the MOP agonist Tyr-D-Ala-Gly (NMe)-Phe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) or after treatment with the NPFF agonist 1DMe, but the level of multiple phosphorylation was more intense after DAMGO. Finally, NPFF(2) receptor activation was sufficient to recruit β-arrestin2 to the MOP receptor but not to induce its internalization. These data show that NPFF-induced heterologous desensitization of MOP receptor signaling is mediated by GRK2 and could involve transphosphorylation within the heteromeric receptor complex. PMID:22375000

  4. Kappa-opioid receptor signaling and brain reward function

    PubMed Central

    Bruijnzeel, Adrie W.

    2009-01-01

    The dynorphin-like peptides have profound effects on the state of the brain reward system and human and animal behavior. The dynorphin-like peptides affect locomotor activity, food intake, sexual behavior, anxiety-like behavior, and drug intake. Stimulation of kappa-opioid receptors, the endogenous receptor for the dynorphin-like peptides, inhibits dopamine release in the striatum (nucleus accumbens and caudate putamen) and induces a negative mood state in humans and animals. The administration of drugs of abuse increases the release of dopamine in the striatum and mediates the concomitant release of dynorphin-like peptides in this brain region. The reviewed studies suggest that chronic drug intake leads to an upregulation of the brain dynorphin system in the striatum and in particular in the dorsal part of the striatum/caudate putamen. This might inhibit drug-induced dopamine release and provide protection against the neurotoxic effects of high dopamine levels. After the discontinuation of chronic drug intake these neuroadaptations remain unopposed which has been suggested to contribute to the negative emotional state associated with drug withdrawal and increased drug intake. Kappa-opioid receptor agonists have also been shown to inhibit calcium channels. Calcium channel inhibitors have antidepressant-like effects and inhibit the release of norepinephrine. This might explain that in some studies kappa-opioid receptor agonists attenuate nicotine and opioid withdrawal symptomatology. A better understanding of the role of dynorphins in the regulation of brain reward function might contribute to the development of novel treatments for mood disorders and other disorders that stem from a dysregulation of the brain reward system. PMID:19804796

  5. Identification of rat brain opioid (enkephalin) receptor by photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    A photoreactive, radioactive enkephalin derivative was prepared and purified by high performance liquid chromatography. Rat brain and spinal cord plasma membranes were incubated with this radioiodinated photoprobe and were subsequently photolysed. Autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of the solubilized and reduced membranes showed that a protein having an apparent molecular weight of 46,000 daltons was specifically labeled, suggesting that this protein may be the opioid (enkephalin) receptor.

  6. Central kappa opioid receptor-evoked changes in renal function in conscious rats: participation of renal nerves.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Obih, J C

    1993-10-01

    The present investigations examined the cardiovascular and renal responses produced by central nervous system stimulation of kappa opioid receptors by the selective kappa opioid receptor agonist, U-50488H, in conscious Sprague-Dawley rats. Administration of U-50488H (1 microgram total) into the lateral cerebroventricle produced a profound diuretic and antinatriuretic response. In addition, concurrent with the decrease in urinary sodium excretion, i.c.v. U-50488H elicited an increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity. The increases in urine flow rate and renal sympathetic nerve activity and the decrease in urinary sodium excretion produced by U-50488H were completely prevented in rats that had undergone pretreatment with the selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist, nor-binaltorphimine. In contrast, in animals that had undergone irreversible mu opioid receptor blockade with the selective mu opioid receptor antagonist, beta-funaltrexamine, central U-50488H administration elicited similar diuretic and antinatriuretic responses as observed in intact naive animals. In further studies, the antinatriuretic response produced by i.c.v. U-50488H was completely abolished in rats that had undergone chronic bilateral renal denervation, a technique used to remove the influence of the renal sympathetic nerves. Glomerular filtration rates and effective renal plasma flows were not altered by i.c.v. administration of U-50488H in intact or renal denervated animals. Together, these studies provide evidence for the role of central kappa opioid receptor mechanisms in the regulation of urinary sodium and water excretion. Moreover, these studies indicate that the changes in renal sodium handling produced by central kappa opioid agonists result from an action of these compounds to modulate sympathetic neural outflow to the kidneys. PMID:8229746

  7. Irradiation exposure modulates central opioid functions

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, P.M.; Dafny, N.

    1987-11-01

    Exposure to low doses of gamma irradiation results in the modification of both the antinociceptive properties of morphine and the severity of naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in morphine-dependent rats. To better define the interactions between gamma irradiation and these opiate-mediated phenomena, dose-response studies were undertaken of the effect of irradiation on morphine-induced antinociception, and on the naloxone-precipitated withdrawal syndrome of morphine-dependent rats. In addition, electrophysiologic studies were conducted in rats after irradiation exposure and morphine treatment correlating with the behavioral studies. The observations obtained demonstrated that the antinociceptive effects of morphine as well as naloxone-precipitated withdrawal were modified in a dose-dependent manner by irradiation exposure. In addition, irradiation-induced changes in the evoked responses obtained from four different brain regions demonstrated transient alterations in both baseline and morphine-treated responses that may reflect the alterations observed in the behavioral paradigms. These results suggest that the effects of irradiation on opiate activities resulted from physiologic alterations of central endogenous opioid systems due to alterations manifested within peripheral targets.

  8. Sigma and opioid receptors in human brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.E.; Szuecs, M.; Mamone, J.Y.; Bem, W.T.; Rush, M.D.; Johnson, F.E.; Coscia, C.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Human brain tumors and nude mouse-borne human neuroblastomas and gliomas were analyzed for sigma and opioid receptor content. Sigma binding was assessed using ({sup 3}H) 1, 3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG), whereas opioid receptor subtypes were measured with tritiated forms of the following: {mu}, (D-ala{sup 2}, mePhe{sup 4}, gly-ol{sup 5}) enkephalin (DAMGE); {kappa}, ethylketocyclazocine (EKC) or U69,593; {delta}, (D-pen{sup 2}, D-pen{sup 5}) enkephalin (DPDPE) or (D-ala{sup 2}, D-leu{sup 5}) enkephalin (DADLE) with {mu} suppressor present. Binding parameters were estimated by homologous displacement assays followed by analysis using the LIGAND program. Sigma binding was detected in 15 of 16 tumors examined with very high levels found in a brain metastasis from an adenocarcinoma of lung and a human neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC) passaged in nude mice. {kappa} opioid receptor binding was detected in 4 of 4 glioblastoma multiforme specimens and 2 of 2 human astrocytoma cell lines tested but not in the other brain tumors analyzed.

  9. Does the kappa opioid receptor system contribute to pain aversion?

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Catherine M.; Taylor, Anna M. W.; Cook, Christopher; Ong, Edmund; Morón, Jose A.; Evans, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    The kappa opioid receptor (KOR) and the endogenous peptide-ligand dynorphin have received significant attention due the involvement in mediating a variety of behavioral and neurophysiological responses, including opposing the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse including opioids. Accumulating evidence indicates this system is involved in regulating states of motivation and emotion. Acute activation of the KOR produces an increase in motivational behavior to escape a threat, however, KOR activation associated with chronic stress leads to the expression of symptoms indicative of mood disorders. It is well accepted that KOR can produce analgesia and is engaged in chronic pain states including neuropathic pain. Spinal studies have revealed KOR-induced analgesia in reversing pain hypersensitivities associated with peripheral nerve injury. While systemic administration of KOR agonists attenuates nociceptive sensory transmission, this effect appears to be a stress-induced effect as anxiolytic agents, including delta opioid receptor agonists, mitigate KOR agonist-induced analgesia. Additionally, while the role of KOR and dynorphin in driving the dysphoric and aversive components of stress and drug withdrawal has been well characterized, how this system mediates the negative emotional states associated with chronic pain is relatively unexplored. This review provides evidence that dynorphin and the KOR system contribute to the negative affective component of pain and that this receptor system likely contributes to the high comorbidity of mood disorders associated with chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:25452729

  10. Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Receptor Structure, Signaling, Ligands, Functions, and Interactions with Opioid Systems.

    PubMed

    Toll, Lawrence; Bruchas, Michael R; Calo', Girolamo; Cox, Brian M; Zaveri, Nurulain T

    2016-04-01

    The NOP receptor (nociceptin/orphanin FQ opioid peptide receptor) is the most recently discovered member of the opioid receptor family and, together with its endogenous ligand, N/OFQ, make up the fourth members of the opioid receptor and opioid peptide family. Because of its more recent discovery, an understanding of the cellular and behavioral actions induced by NOP receptor activation are less well developed than for the other members of the opioid receptor family. All of these factors are important because NOP receptor activation has a clear modulatory role on mu opioid receptor-mediated actions and thereby affects opioid analgesia, tolerance development, and reward. In addition to opioid modulatory actions, NOP receptor activation has important effects on motor function and other physiologic processes. This review discusses how NOP pharmacology intersects, contrasts, and interacts with the mu opioid receptor in terms of tertiary structure and mechanism of receptor activation; location of receptors in the central nervous system; mechanisms of desensitization and downregulation; cellular actions; intracellular signal transduction pathways; and behavioral actions with respect to analgesia, tolerance, dependence, and reward. This is followed by a discussion of the agonists and antagonists that have most contributed to our current knowledge. Because NOP receptors are highly expressed in brain and spinal cord and NOP receptor activation sometimes synergizes with mu receptor-mediated actions and sometimes opposes them, an understanding of NOP receptor pharmacology in the context of these interactions with the opioid receptors will be crucial to the development of novel therapeutics that engage the NOP receptor. PMID:26956246

  11. Effect of sodium ion on the affinity of naloxone for the kappa opioid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Cheney, B.V.; Lahti, R.A.

    1987-03-16

    Several investigators have observed that sodium ion enhances the binding of naloxone to opioid receptors. This effect has generally been attributed to allosteric modulation of the state of the mu receptor. However, a recent claim has been made that the enhancement does not involve a change in the mu receptor, but instead occurs because naloxone becomes a more kappa-specific drug when sodium ion is present in high concentration. Since the claim was not based on experimental evidence from binding studies involving known high-affinity kappa ligands, the authors have investigated the competition of naloxone for the kappa site using (/sup 3/H)U-69593 as the marker for receptor binding. Assays were carried out in the presence and absence of 100 mM NaCl. The results of the study indicate that sodium ion does not increase the affinity of naloxone or U-69593 for the kappa receptor. 9 references, 1 figure.

  12. Preferential cytoplasmic localization of delta-opioid receptors in rat striatal patches: comparison with plasmalemmal mu-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Pickel, V M

    2001-05-01

    The activation of delta-opioid receptors (DORs) in the caudate-putamen nucleus (CPN) produces regionally distinct changes in motor functions, many of which are also influenced by opioids active at micro-opioid receptors (MORs). These actions most likely occur in MOR-enriched patch compartments in the CPN. To determine the functional sites for DOR activation and potential interactions involving MOR in these regions, immunoperoxidase and immunogold-silver labeling methods were applied reversibly for the ultrastructural localization of DOR and MOR in single rat brain sections containing patches of the CPN. DOR immunoreactivity was commonly seen within the cytoplasm of spiny and aspiny neurons, many of which also expressed MOR. In dendrites and spines, DOR labeling was preferentially localized to membranes of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and spine apparatus, whereas MOR showed a prominent plasmalemmal distribution. DOR- and/or MOR-labeled spines received asymmetric, excitatory synapses, some of which showed notable perforations, suggesting the involvement of these receptors in activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. DORs were more frequently detected than were MORs within axon terminals that formed either asymmetric synapses with spine heads or symmetric synapses with spine necks. Our results suggest that in striatal patches, DORs, often in cooperation with MORs, play a direct modulatory role in controlling the postsynaptic excitability of spines, whereas presynaptic neurotransmitter release onto spines is mainly influenced by DOR activation. In comparison with MOR, the prevalent association of DOR with cytoplasmic organelles that are involved in intracellular trafficking of cell surface proteins suggests major differences in availability of these receptors to extracellular opioids. PMID:11312309

  13. Proteasome involvement in agonist-induced down-regulation of mu and delta opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, K; Bandari, P; Chinen, N; Howells, R D

    2001-04-13

    This study investigated the mechanism of agonist-induced opioid receptor down-regulation. Incubation of HEK 293 cells expressing FLAG-tagged delta and mu receptors with agonists caused a time-dependent decrease in opioid receptor levels assayed by immunoblotting. Pulse-chase experiments using [(35)S]methionine metabolic labeling indicated that the turnover rate of delta receptors was accelerated 5-fold following agonist stimulation. Inactivation of functional G(i) and G(o) proteins by pertussis toxin-attenuated down-regulation of the mu opioid receptor, while down-regulation of the delta opioid receptor was unaffected. Pretreatment of cells with inhibitors of lysosomal proteases, calpain, and caspases had little effect on mu and delta opioid receptor down-regulation. In marked contrast, pretreatment with proteasome inhibitors attenuated agonist-induced mu and delta receptor down-regulation. In addition, incubation of cells with proteasome inhibitors in the absence of agonists increased steady-state mu and delta opioid receptor levels. Immunoprecipitation of mu and delta opioid receptors followed by immunoblotting with ubiquitin antibodies suggested that preincubation with proteasome inhibitors promoted accumulation of polyubiquitinated receptors. These data provide evidence that the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway plays a role in agonist-induced down-regulation and basal turnover of opioid receptors. PMID:11152677

  14. A photochromic agonist for μ-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Schönberger, Matthias; Trauner, Dirk

    2014-03-17

    Opioid receptors (ORs) are widely distributed in the brain, the spinal cord, and the digestive tract and play an important role in nociception. All known ORs are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) of family A. Another well-known member of this family, rhodopsin, is activated by light through the cis/trans isomerization of a covalently bound chromophore, retinal. We now show how an OR can be combined with a synthetic azobenzene photoswitch to gain light sensitivity. Our work extends the reach of photopharmacology and outlines a general strategy for converting Family A GPCRs, which account for the majority of drug targets, into photoreceptors. PMID:24519993

  15. Opioid neurotransmission in the post-ictal analgesia: involvement of mu(1)-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, N C; Freitas, R L; Savoldi, M; Castro-Souza, C; Segato, E N; Kishi, R; Weltson, A; Resende, G C

    2001-06-01

    Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), a non-competitive antagonist that blocks GABA-mediated Cl(-) flux, was used in the present work to induce seizures in animals. The aim of this work is to study the neurochemical basis of the antinociception induced by convulsions elicited by peripheral administration of PTZ (64 mg/kg). The analgesia was measured by the tail-flick test, in eight rats per group. Convulsions were followed by significative increase in the tail-flick latencies (TFL), for at least 120 min of the post-ictal period. Peripheral administration of naltrexone (5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg) caused a significant decrease in the TFL in seizing animals, as compared to controls. These data were corroborated with peripheral administration of naloxonazine (10 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg), a mu(1)-opioid blocker, in the same doses used for non-specific antagonist. These results indicate that endogenous opioids may be involved in the post-ictal analgesia. The involvement of mu(1)-opioid receptor was also considered. PMID:11382405

  16. Impact of Efficacy at the μ-Opioid Receptor on Antinociceptive Effects of Combinations of μ-Opioid Receptor Agonists and Cannabinoid Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor agonists, such as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), enhance the antinociceptive effects of μ-opioid receptor agonists, which suggests that combining cannabinoids with opioids would improve pain treatment. Combinations with lower efficacy agonists might be preferred and could avoid adverse effects associated with large doses; however, it is unclear whether interactions between opioids and cannabinoids vary across drugs with different efficacy. The antinociceptive effects of μ-opioid receptor agonists alone and in combination with cannabinoid receptor agonists were studied in rhesus monkeys (n = 4) using a warm water tail withdrawal procedure. Etorphine, fentanyl, morphine, buprenorphine, nalbuphine, Δ9-THC, and CP 55,940 (2-[(1R,2R,5R)-5-hydroxy-2-(3-hydroxypropyl) cyclohexyl]-5-(2-methyloctan-2-yl)phenol) each increased tail withdrawal latency. Pretreatment with doses of Δ9-THC (1.0 mg/kg) or CP 55,940 (0.032 mg/kg) that were ineffective alone shifted the fentanyl dose-effect curve leftward 20.6- and 52.9-fold, respectively, and the etorphine dose-effect curve leftward 12.4- and 19.6-fold, respectively. Δ9-THC and CP 55,940 shifted the morphine dose-effect curve leftward only 3.4- and 7.9-fold, respectively, and the buprenorphine curve only 5.4- and 4.1-fold, respectively. Neither Δ9-THC nor CP 55,940 significantly altered the effects of nalbuphine. Cannabinoid receptor agonists increase the antinociceptive potency of higher efficacy opioid receptor agonists more than lower efficacy agonists; however, because much smaller doses of each drug can be administered in combinations while achieving adequate pain relief and that other (e.g., abuse-related) effects of opioids do not appear to be enhanced by cannabinoids, these results provide additional support for combining opioids with cannabinoids to treat pain. PMID:25194020

  17. Development of concepts on the interaction of drugs with opioid receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmina, N. E.; Kuzmin, V. S.

    2011-02-01

    The development of concepts on the molecular mechanisms of the action of medicinal drugs on the opioid receptors is briefly surveyed. The modern point of view on the mechanism of activation of opioid receptors is given based on the data from chimeric and site-directed mutagenesis of the cloned opioid receptors and the computer-aided simulations of the reception zone and ligand-receptor complexes. Three-dimensional models of the opioid pharmacophore derived by both conventional methods and a comparative analysis of molecular fields are described in detail.

  18. Delta opioid modulation of hypothalamic serotonergic neurotransmission in the ovariectomized and steroid-primed rat.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Bayram; Gilmore, Desmond P.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We have investigated the modulating effects of DPDPE (a delta opioid agonist) and opioid receptor antagonists on both LH release and indoleamine concentrations in specific hypothalamic regions of the ovx and steroid-primed rat. METHODS: DPDPE was intracerebroventricularly infused alone or with either ICI 154129 (a delta opioid antagonist) or naloxone under ketamine anesthesia. Blood samples were collected at hourly intervals on the afternoon of the anticipated LH surge. The rats were then decapitated and the medial preoptic area (MPOA), suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), median eminence (ME) and arcuate nucleus (ARN) surgically isolated by micropunch. Concentrations of 5-HT and its metabolite (5-HIAA) in these samples were determined by HPLC with ECD. Plasma LH levels were measured by RIA. RESULTS: The delta-agonist significantly reduced 5-HT concentrations in the SCN, ME and ARN, but not in the MPOA. 5-HIAA levels were decreased, but these changes were significant in only the MPOA and ARN compared to the control group. ICI 154129 had no significant effects on 5-HT release and turnover in any of the hypothalamic regions examined. However, co-administration of DPDPE with naloxone resulted in significant increases in 5-HT and 5-HIAA concentrations in the MPOA, SCN, ME and ARN compared to the DPDPE-treated group. Plasma LH levels were either low or undetectable in all groups. CONCLUSIONS: The present results suggest that delta-opioid receptors are involved in the opioid inhibition of the serotonergic neurotransmission in the hypothalamus. It is thought that the ketamine anesthesia interfered with LH secretory systems. PMID:11455339

  19. Synaptic localization of. kappa. opioid receptors in guinea pig neostriatum

    SciTech Connect

    Jomary, C.; Beaudet, A. ); Gairin, J.E. )

    1992-01-15

    Distribution of {kappa} opioid receptors was examined by EM radioautography in sections of guinea pig neostriatum with the selective {sup 125}I-labeled dynorphin analog (D-Pro{sup 10})dynorphin-(1-11). Most specifically labeled binding sites were found by probability circle analysis to be associated with neuronal membrane appositions. Because of limitations in resolution of the method, the radioactive sources could not be ascribed directly to either one of the apposed plasma membranes. Nevertheless, three lines of evidence favored a predominant association of ligand with dendrites of intrinsic striatal neurons: (1) the high frequency with which labeled interfaces implicated a dendrite, (2) the enrichment of dendrodendritic interfaces, and (3) the occurrence of dendritic profiles labeled at several contact points along their plasma membranes. A small proportion of labeled sites was associated with axo-axonic interfaces, which may subserve the {kappa} opioid-induced regulation of presynaptic dopamine and acetylcholine release documented in guinea pig neostriatum. These results support the hypothesis that in mammalian brain {kappa} opioid receptors are conformationally and functionally distinct from {mu} and {delta} types.

  20. Activation of G protein by opioid receptors: role of receptor number and G-protein concentration.

    PubMed

    Remmers, A E; Clark, M J; Alt, A; Medzihradsky, F; Woods, J H; Traynor, J R

    2000-05-19

    The collision-coupling model for receptor-G-protein interaction predicts that the rate of G-protein activation is dependent on receptor density, but not G-protein levels. C6 cells expressing mu- or delta-opioid receptors, or SH-SY5Y cells, were treated with beta-funaltrexamine (mu) or naltrindole-5'-isothiocyanate (delta) to decrease receptor number. The time course of full or partial agonist-stimulated ¿35SGTPgammaS binding did not vary in C6 cell membranes containing <1-25 pmol/mg mu-opioid receptor, or 1. 4-4.3 pmol/mg delta-opioid receptor, or in SHSY5Y cells containing 0. 16-0.39 pmol/mg receptor. The association of ¿35SGTPgammaS binding was faster in membranes from C6mu cells than from C6delta cells. A 10-fold reduction in functional G-protein, following pertussis toxin treatment, lowered the maximal level of ¿35SGTPgammaS binding but not the association rate. These data indicate a compartmentalization of opioid receptors and G protein at the cell membrane. PMID:10822058

  1. Mu Opioid Receptor Actions in the Lateral Habenula.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Elyssa B; Fields, Howard L

    2016-01-01

    Increased activity of lateral habenula (LHb) neurons is correlated with aversive states including pain, opioid abstinence, rodent models of depression, and failure to receive a predicted reward. Agonists at the mu opioid receptor (MOR) are among the most powerful rewarding and pain relieving drugs. Injection of the MOR agonist morphine directly into the habenula produces analgesia, raising the possibility that MOR acts locally within the LHb. Consequently, we examined the synaptic actions of MOR agonists in the LHb using whole cell patch clamp recording. We found that the MOR selective agonist DAMGO inhibits a subset of LHb neurons both directly and by inhibiting glutamate release onto these cells. Paradoxically, DAMGO also presynaptically inhibited GABA release onto most LHb neurons. The behavioral effect of MOR activation will thus depend upon both the level of intrinsic neuronal activity in the LHb and the balance of activity in glutamate and GABA inputs to different LHb neuronal populations. PMID:27427945

  2. Mu Opioid Receptor Actions in the Lateral Habenula

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Elyssa B.; Fields, Howard L.

    2016-01-01

    Increased activity of lateral habenula (LHb) neurons is correlated with aversive states including pain, opioid abstinence, rodent models of depression, and failure to receive a predicted reward. Agonists at the mu opioid receptor (MOR) are among the most powerful rewarding and pain relieving drugs. Injection of the MOR agonist morphine directly into the habenula produces analgesia, raising the possibility that MOR acts locally within the LHb. Consequently, we examined the synaptic actions of MOR agonists in the LHb using whole cell patch clamp recording. We found that the MOR selective agonist DAMGO inhibits a subset of LHb neurons both directly and by inhibiting glutamate release onto these cells. Paradoxically, DAMGO also presynaptically inhibited GABA release onto most LHb neurons. The behavioral effect of MOR activation will thus depend upon both the level of intrinsic neuronal activity in the LHb and the balance of activity in glutamate and GABA inputs to different LHb neuronal populations. PMID:27427945

  3. Interactions between cannabinoid receptor agonists and mu opioid receptor agonists in rhesus monkeys discriminating fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; France, Charles P

    2016-08-01

    Cannabinoid receptor agonists such as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) enhance some (antinociceptive) but not other (positive reinforcing) effects of mu opioid receptor agonists, suggesting that cannabinoids might be combined with opioids to treat pain without increasing, and possibly decreasing, abuse. The degree to which cannabinoids enhance antinociceptive effects of opioids varies across drugs insofar as Δ(9)-THC and the synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist CP55940 increase the potency of some mu opioid receptor agonists (e.g., fentanyl) more than others (e.g., nalbuphine). It is not known whether interactions between cannabinoids and opioids vary similarly for other (abuse-related) effects. This study examined whether Δ(9)-THC and CP55940 differentially impact the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl and nalbuphine in monkeys (n=4) discriminating 0.01mg/kg of fentanyl (s.c.) from saline. Fentanyl (0.00178-0.0178mg/kg) and nalbuphine (0.01-0.32mg/kg) dose-dependently increased drug-lever responding. Neither Δ(9)-THC (0.032-1.0mg/kg) nor CP55940 (0.0032-0.032mg/kg) enhanced the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl or nalbuphine; however, doses of Δ(9)-THC and CP55940 that shifted the nalbuphine dose-effect curve markedly to the right and/or down were less effective or ineffective in shifting the fentanyl dose-effect curve. The mu opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (0.032mg/kg) attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of fentanyl and nalbuphine similarly. These data indicate that the discriminative stimulus effects of nalbuphine are more sensitive to attenuation by cannabinoids than those of fentanyl. That the discriminative stimulus effects of some opioids are more susceptible to modification by drugs from other classes has implications for developing maximally effective therapeutic drug mixtures with reduced abuse liability. PMID:27184925

  4. μ Opioid receptor: novel antagonists and structural modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaserer, Teresa; Lantero, Aquilino; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Spetea, Mariana; Schuster, Daniela

    2016-02-01

    The μ opioid receptor (MOR) is a prominent member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and the molecular target of morphine and other opioid drugs. Despite the long tradition of MOR-targeting drugs, still little is known about the ligand-receptor interactions and structure-function relationships underlying the distinct biological effects upon receptor activation or inhibition. With the resolved crystal structure of the β-funaltrexamine-MOR complex, we aimed at the discovery of novel agonists and antagonists using virtual screening tools, i.e. docking, pharmacophore- and shape-based modeling. We suggest important molecular interactions, which active molecules share and distinguish agonists and antagonists. These results allowed for the generation of theoretically validated in silico workflows that were employed for prospective virtual screening. Out of 18 virtual hits evaluated in in vitro pharmacological assays, three displayed antagonist activity and the most active compound significantly inhibited morphine-induced antinociception. The new identified chemotypes hold promise for further development into neurochemical tools for studying the MOR or as potential therapeutic lead candidates.

  5. μ Opioid receptor: novel antagonists and structural modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kaserer, Teresa; Lantero, Aquilino; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Spetea, Mariana; Schuster, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The μ opioid receptor (MOR) is a prominent member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and the molecular target of morphine and other opioid drugs. Despite the long tradition of MOR-targeting drugs, still little is known about the ligand-receptor interactions and structure-function relationships underlying the distinct biological effects upon receptor activation or inhibition. With the resolved crystal structure of the β-funaltrexamine-MOR complex, we aimed at the discovery of novel agonists and antagonists using virtual screening tools, i.e. docking, pharmacophore- and shape-based modeling. We suggest important molecular interactions, which active molecules share and distinguish agonists and antagonists. These results allowed for the generation of theoretically validated in silico workflows that were employed for prospective virtual screening. Out of 18 virtual hits evaluated in in vitro pharmacological assays, three displayed antagonist activity and the most active compound significantly inhibited morphine-induced antinociception. The new identified chemotypes hold promise for further development into neurochemical tools for studying the MOR or as potential therapeutic lead candidates. PMID:26888328

  6. The imidazoline receptors and ligands in pain modulation

    PubMed Central

    Bektas, Nurcan; Nemutlu, Dilara; Arslan, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Pain is an unpleasant experience and effects daily routine negatively. Although there are various drugs, many of them are not entirely successful in relieving pain, since pain modulation is a complex process involving numerous mediators and receptors. Therefore, it is a rational approach to identify the factors involved in the complex process and develop new agents that act on these pain producing mechanisms. In this respect, the involvement of the imidazoline receptors in pain modulation has drawn attention in recent years. In this review, it is aimed to focus on the imidazoline receptors and their ligands which contribute to the pain modulation. It is demonstrated that imidazoline-2 (I2) receptors are steady new drug targets for analgesics. Even if the mechanism of I2 receptor is not well known in the modulation of pain, it is known that it plays a role in tonic and chronic pain but not in acute phasic pain. Moreover, the I2 receptor ligands increase the analgesic effects of opioids in both acute and chronic pain and prevent the development of opioid tolerance. So, they are valuable for the chronic pain treatment and also therapeutic coadjuvants in the management of chronic pain with opiate drugs due to the attenuation of opioid tolerance and addiction. Thus, the use of the ligands which bind to the imidazoline receptors is an effective strategy for relieving pain. This educational forum exhibits the role of imidazoline receptors and ligands in pain process by utilizing experimental studies. PMID:26600633

  7. δ-Opioid receptor agonists inhibit migraine-related hyperalgesia, aversive state and cortical spreading depression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Amynah A; Smith, Monique L; Zyuzin, Jekaterina; Charles, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Migraine is an extraordinarily common brain disorder for which treatment options continue to be limited. Agonists that activate the δ-opioid receptor may be promising for the treatment of migraine as they are highly effective for the treatment of chronic rather than acute pain, do not induce hyperalgesia, have low abuse potential and have anxiolytic and antidepressant properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic potential of δ-opioid receptor agonists for migraine by characterizing their effects in mouse migraine models. Experimental Approach Mechanical hypersensitivity was assessed in mice treated with acute and chronic doses of nitroglycerin (NTG), a known human migraine trigger. Conditioned place aversion to NTG was also measured as a model of migraine-associated negative affect. In addition, we assessed evoked cortical spreading depression (CSD), an established model of migraine aura, in a thinned skull preparation. Key Results NTG evoked acute and chronic mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in mice, as well as conditioned place aversion. Three different δ-opioid receptor agonists, SNC80, ARM390 and JNJ20788560, significantly reduced NTG-evoked hyperalgesia. SNC80 also abolished NTG-induced conditioned place aversion, suggesting that δ-opioid receptor activation may also alleviate the negative emotional state associated with migraine. We also found that SNC80 significantly attenuated CSD, a model that is considered predictive of migraine preventive therapies. Conclusions and Implications These data show that δ-opioid receptor agonists modulate multiple basic mechanisms associated with migraine, indicating that δ-opioid receptors are a promising therapeutic target for this disorder. PMID:24467301

  8. Characterization and visualization of rat and guinea pig brain. kappa. opioid receptors: Evidence for. kappa. sub 1 and. kappa. sub 2 opioid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Zukin, R.S.; Eghbali, M.; Olive, D.; Unterwald, E.M.; Tempel, A. )

    1988-06-01

    {kappa} opioid receptors ({kappa} receptors) have been characterized in homogenates of guinea pig and rat brain under in vitro binding conditions. {kappa} receptors were labeled by using the tritiated prototypic {kappa} opioid ethylketocyclazocine under conditions in which {mu} and {delta} opioid binding was suppressed. In the case of guinea pig brain membranes, a single population of high-affinity {kappa} opioid receptor sites was observed. In contrast, in the case of rat brain, two populations of {kappa} sites were observed. To test the hypothesis that the high- and low-affinity {kappa} sites represent two distinct {kappa} receptor subtypes, a series of opioids were tested for their abilities to compete for binding to the two sites. U-69,593 and Cambridge 20 selectively displaced the high-affinity {kappa} site in both guinea pig and rat tissue, but were inactive at the rat-brain low-affinity site. Other {kappa} opioid drugs competed for binding to both sites, but with different rank orders of potency. Quantitative light microscopy in vitro autoradiography was used to visualize the neuroanatomical pattern of {kappa} receptors in rat and guinea pig brain. The distribution patterns of the two {kappa} receptor subtypes of rat brain were clearly different. Collectively, these data provide direct evidence for the presence of two {kappa} receptor subtypes; the U-69,593-sensitive, high-affinity {kappa}{sub 1} site predominates in guinea pig brain, and the U-69,593-insensitive, low-affinity {kappa}{sub 2} site predominates in rat brain.

  9. The opioid receptor selectivity for trimebutine in isolated tissues experiments and receptor binding studies.

    PubMed

    Kaneto, H; Takahashi, M; Watanabe, J

    1990-07-01

    Differences of affinity to and selectivity for trimebutine between peripheral and central opioid receptors have been investigated. Trimebutine inhibited electrically induced contraction of guinea-pig ileum (GPI) and mouse vas deferens (MVD) but not of rabbit vas deferens, and the inhibition was antagonized by naloxone and, to lesser extent, by nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI). The pA2 values for morphine and trimebutine with naloxone were higher than the values for these compounds with nor-BNI in both GPI and MVD preparations. GPI preparations incubated with a high concentration of morphine or trimebutine developed tolerance; however, there was no cross-tolerance between them, suggesting difference in the underlying mechanisms. In mouse and guinea-pig brain homogenate trimebutine was about 1/13 as potent as morphine to displace the [3H]naloxone binding, while it has no appreciable affinity for kappa-opioid receptors in [3H]U-69593, a selective kappa-receptor agonist. These results suggest that trimebutine, showing its low affinity to opioid receptors, possesses mu-receptor selective properties rather than those of kappa-opioid receptor in the peripheral tissues and in the central brain homogenate. PMID:1963196

  10. Opioid Receptors Mediate Direct Predictive Fear Learning: Evidence from One-Trial Blocking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Sindy; McNally, Gavan P.

    2007-01-01

    Pavlovian fear learning depends on predictive error, so that fear learning occurs when the actual outcome of a conditioning trial exceeds the expected outcome. Previous research has shown that opioid receptors, including [mu]-opioid receptors in the ventrolateral quadrant of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (vlPAG), mediate such predictive fear…

  11. Binding-site analysis of opioid receptors using monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, W.G.

    1988-01-01

    Structural relatedness between the variable region of anti-ligand antibodies and opioid binding sites allowed the generation of anti-idiotypic antibodies which recognized opioid receptors. The IgG{sub 3}k antibodies which bound to opioid receptors were obtained when an anti-morphine antiserum was the idiotype. Both antibodies bound to opioid receptors, but only one of these blocked the binding of ({sup 3}H)naloxone. The antibody which did not inhibit the binding of ({sup 3}H)naloxone was itself displaced from the receptor by opioid ligands. The unique binding properties displayed by this antibody indicated that anti-idiotypic antibodies are not always a perfect image of the original ligand, and therefore may be more useful than typical ligands as probes for the receptor. An auto-anti-idiotypic technique was successfully used to obtain anti-opioid receptor antibodies. Another IgG{sub 3}k antibody that blocked the binding of ({sup 3}H)naloxone to rat brain opioid receptors was obtained when a mouse was immunized with naloxone conjugated to bovine serum albumin. These data confirmed that an idiotype-anti-idiotype network which can generate an anti-receptor antibody normally functions when an opioid ligand is introduced into an animal in an immunogenic form.

  12. Stilbenes as κ-Selective, Non-nitrogenous Opioid Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The natural stilbene pawhuskin A has been shown to function as an opioid receptor antagonist, with preferential binding to the κ receptor. This finding encouraged assembly of a set of analogues to probe the importance of key structural features. Assays on these compounds determined that one (compound 29) shows potent opioid receptor binding activity and significantly improved selectivity for the κ receptor. These studies begin to illuminate the structural features of these non-nitrogenous opioid receptor antagonists that are required for activity. PMID:24456556

  13. Effect of Intra CA1 and Intraperitoneal Administration of Opioid Receptor Modulating Agents on The Anxiolytic Properties of Nano and Conventional ZnO in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Torabi, Mozhgan; Kesmati, Mahnaz; Eshagh Harooni, Hooman; Varzi, Hosein Najafzadeh

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nano components are today’s new wonder material. However, the safety or toxicity of these components in humans is not yet clear. In a previous study we indicated that nano ZnO (nZnO) has a stronger anxiolytic effect compared to the conventional ZnO (cZnO). The present study was designed to evaluate the intraperitoneal administration of an opioidergic receptor agonist and antagonist of as well as the intra CA1 administration of an opioidergic receptor antagonist on the anxiolytic properties of nano and conventional ZnO in adult male Wistar rats. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, rats received drugs via two modes of injection; intraperitoneal (IP.) and intra CA1 (intra hippocampus, CA1 area). Firstly, nZnO (5, 10, 20 mg/kg), cZnO (5, 10, 20 mg/kg), morphine 6 mg/kg, and naloxone 1 mg/kg were injected IP and naloxone 1µg/rat was injected intra CA1. Subsequently, morphine and na- loxone (IP and intra CA1) were co-injected with the effective dose of nZnO and cZnO. An elevated plus maze was used to evaluate anxiety related behavior and anxiety parameters 30 minutes after the second injection. Results The results indicated that the anxiolytic effects of nZnO 5 mg/kg and cZnO 10 mg/kg were equal. When injected intraperitoneally, naloxone increased anxiety but did not inhibit the anxiolytic effect of nZnO and cZnO. The anxiolytic effects of morphine potentiated the anxio- lytic effects of ZnO, particularly nZno. When introduced via intra CA1 injection naloxone alone had no effect on anxiety behaviors and did not inhibit the anxiolytic effect of nZnO. Conclusion It seems that the opioidergic system activity involved in the anxiolytic effect of nano and conventional ZnO may operate through shared and unshared pathways. PMID:24567946

  14. PPARγ Activation Attenuates Opioid Consumption and Modulates Mesolimbic Dopamine Transmission

    PubMed Central

    de Guglielmo, Giordano; Melis, Miriam; De Luca, Maria Antonietta; Kallupi, Marsida; Li, Hong Wu; Niswender, Kevin; Giordano, Antonio; Senzacqua, Martina; Somaini, Lorenzo; Cippitelli, Andrea; Gaitanaris, George; Demopulos, Gregory; Damadzic, Ruslan; Tapocik, Jenica; Heilig, Markus; Ciccocioppo, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    PPARγ is one of the three isoforms identified for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and is the receptor for the thiazolidinedione class of anti-diabetic medications including pioglitazone. PPARγ has been long studied for its role in adipogenesis and glucose metabolism, but the discovery of the localization in ventral tegmental area (VTA) neurons opens new vistas for a potential role in the regulation of reward processing and motivated behavior in drug addiction. Here, we demonstrate that activation of PPARγ by pioglitazone reduces the motivation for heroin and attenuates its rewarding properties. These effects are associated with a marked reduction of heroin-induced increase in phosphorylation of DARPP-32 protein in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and with a marked and selective reduction of acute heroin-induced elevation of extracellular dopamine (DA) levels in the NAc shell, as measured by in vivo microdialysis. Through ex vivo electrophysiology in acute midbrain slices, we also show that stimulation of PPARγ attenuates opioid-induced excitation of VTA DA neurons via reduction of presynaptic GABA release from the rostromedial tegmental nucleus (RMTg). Consistent with this finding, site-specific microinjection of pioglitazone into the RMTg but not into the VTA reduced heroin taking. Our data illustrate that activation of PPARγ may represent a new pharmacotherapeutic option for the treatment of opioid addiction. PMID:25311134

  15. The rewarding properties of MDMA are preserved in mice lacking mu-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Robledo, Patricia; Mendizabal, Victoria; Ortuño, Jordi; de la Torre, Rafael; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Maldonado, Rafael

    2004-08-01

    The involvement of mu-opioid receptors in the rewarding properties of MDMA was explored in mu-opioid receptor knockout mice using the conditioning place preference paradigm. The associated release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens was investigated by in vivo microdialysis. A significant rewarding effect of MDMA (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was observed in both wild-type and mu-opioid receptor knockout mice. MDMA (10 mg/kg, i.p.) also induced similar increases in dopamine and decreases in 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid in the nucleus accumbens dialysates of both wild-type and mu-opioid receptor knockout mice. No significant differences in basal levels of dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic or homovanillic acids between wild-type and mu-opioid receptor knockout mice were observed. In summary, the present results suggest that, in contrast to what has been reported for other drugs of abuse such as opioids, ethanol, nicotine and Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, mu-opioid receptors do not play a major role in the rewarding properties of MDMA. These differences could be due to distinct mechanisms controlling dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens and suggest that the effects of MDMA on dopaminergic neurons are independent of micro -opioid receptors. PMID:15255997

  16. Rapid, Opioid-sensitive Mechanisms Involved in Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Sensitization*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Vetter, Irina; Cheng, Wei; Peiris, Madusha; Wyse, Bruce D.; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J.; Zheng, Jie; Monteith, Gregory R.; Cabot, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    TRPV1 is a nociceptive, Ca2+-selective ion channel involved in the development of several painful conditions. Sensitization of TRPV1 responses by cAMP-dependent PKA crucially contributes to the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. However, the pathways involved in potentiation of TRPV1 responses by cAMP-dependent PKA remain largely unknown. Using HEK cells stably expressing TRPV1 and the μ opioid receptor, we demonstrated that treatment with the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin significantly increased the multimeric TRPV1 species. Pretreatment with the μ opioid receptor agonist morphine reversed this increased TRPV1 multimerization. FRET analysis revealed that treatment with forskolin did not cause multimerization of pre-existing TRPV1 monomers on the plasma membrane and that intracellular pools of TRPV1 exist mostly as monomers in this model. This suggests that increased TRPV1 multimerization occurred from an intracellular store of inactive TRPV1 monomers. Treatment with forskolin also caused an increase in TRPV1 expression on the plasma membrane not resulting from increased TRPV1 expression, and this rapid TRPV1 translocation was inhibited by treatment with morphine. Thus, potentiation of TRPV1 responses by cAMP-dependent PKA involves plasma membrane insertion of functional TRPV1 multimers formed from an intracellular store of inactive TRPV1 monomers. This potentiation occurs rapidly and can be dynamically modulated by activation of the μ opioid receptor under conditions where cAMP levels are raised, such as with inflammation. Increased translocation and multimerization of TRPV1 channels provide a cellular mechanism for finetuning of nociceptive responses that allow for rapid modulation of TRPV1 responses independent of transcriptional changes. PMID:18482991

  17. Inflammatory Pain Promotes Increased Opioid Self-Administration: Role of Dysregulated Ventral Tegmental Area μ Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hipólito, Lucia; Wilson-Poe, Adrianne; Campos-Jurado, Yolanda; Zhong, Elaine; Gonzalez-Romero, Jose; Virag, Laszlo; Whittington, Robert; Comer, Sandra D.; Carlton, Susan M.; Walker, Brendan M.; Bruchas, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Pain management in opioid abusers engenders ethical and practical difficulties for clinicians, often resulting in pain mismanagement. Although chronic opioid administration may alter pain states, the presence of pain itself may alter the propensity to self-administer opioids, and previous history of drug abuse comorbid with chronic pain promotes higher rates of opioid misuse. Here, we tested the hypothesis that inflammatory pain leads to increased heroin self-administration resulting from altered mu opioid receptor (MOR) regulation of mesolimbic dopamine (DA) transmission. To this end, the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) model of inflammation was used to assess the neurochemical and functional changes induced by inflammatory pain on MOR-mediated mesolimbic DA transmission and on rat intravenous heroin self-administration under fixed ratio (FR) and progressive ratio (PR) schedules of reinforcement. In the presence of inflammatory pain, heroin intake under an FR schedule was increased for high, but attenuated for low, heroin doses with concomitant alterations in mesolimbic MOR function suggested by DA microdialysis. Consistent with the reduction in low dose FR heroin self-administration, inflammatory pain reduced motivation for a low dose of heroin, as measured by responding under a PR schedule of reinforcement, an effect dissociable from high heroin dose PR responding. Together, these results identify a connection between inflammatory pain and loss of MOR function in the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway that increases intake of high doses of heroin. These findings suggest that pain-induced loss of MOR function in the mesolimbic pathway may promote opioid dose escalation and contribute to opioid abuse-associated phenotypes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study provides critical new insights that show that inflammatory pain alters heroin intake through a desensitization of MORs located within the VTA. These findings expand our knowledge of the interactions between

  18. Mu opioid receptors in developing human spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    RAY, SUBRATA BASU; WADHWA, SHASHI

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of mu opioid receptors was studied in human fetal spinal cords between 12–13 and 24–25 wk gestational ages. Autoradiographic localisation using [3H] DAMGO revealed the presence of mu receptors in the dorsal horn at all age groups with a higher density in the superficial laminae (I–II). A biphasic expression was noted. Receptor density increased in the dorsal horn, including the superficial laminae, between 12–13 and 16–17 wk. This could be associated with a spurt in neurogenesis. The density increased again at 24–25 wk in laminae I–II which resembled the adult pattern of distribution. A dramatic proliferation of cells was noted from the region of the ventricular zone between 16–17 and 24–25 wk. These were considered to be glial cells from their histological features. Mu receptor expression was noted over a large area of the spinal cord including the lateral funiculus at 24–25 wk. This may be due to receptor expression by glial cells. The study presents evidence of mu receptor expression by both neurons and glia during early development of human spinal cord. PMID:10473288

  19. Alcohol addiction and the mu-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Berrettini, Wade

    2016-02-01

    Alcohol addiction is one of the most common and devastating diseases in the world. Given the tremendous heterogeneity of alcohol addicted individuals, it is unlikely that one medication will help nearly all patients. Thus, there is a clear need to develop predictors of response to existing medications. Naltrexone is a mu-opioid receptor antagonist which has been approved in the United States for treatment of alcohol addiction since 1994. It has limited efficacy, in part due to noncompliance, but many patients do not respond despite high levels of compliance. There are reports that a mis-sense single nucleotide polymorphism (rs179919 or A118G) in the mu-opioid receptor gene predicts a favorable response to naltrexone if an individual carries a 'G' allele. This chapter will review the evidence for this hypothesis. The data are promising that the 'G' allele predisposes to a beneficial naltrexone response among alcohol addicted persons, but additional research is needed to prove this hypothesis in prospective clinical trials. PMID:26226591

  20. The triplet puzzle theory indicates extensive formation of heteromers between opioid and chemokine receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Tarakanov, Alexander O; Fuxe, Kjell

    2015-11-01

    Biochemical studies had previously demonstrated examples of heteromerization between opioid and chemokine receptors. Based on the triplet puzzle theory, it has been discovered that opioid receptors are structurally more closely related to chemokine receptors than to other class A G-protein-coupled receptors. Their similarity is established in terms of the number of triplet homologies Asn-Leu-Ala, Thr-Leu-Pro, and Tyr-Ala-Phe in the amino acid code of extensive numbers of members of these two receptor groups. Such widespread similarities probably mean that many opioid and chemokine receptor subtypes utilize some of these mutual triplets to form heteromers. The findings underline that heteromerization among these two receptor groups can represent a major general mechanism for significant interactions between opioid peptides and chemokines in pain and neuroinflammation within the neural-glial networks of the CNS including immune cells. PMID:26133164

  1. Differential ontogeny of multiple opioid receptors (mu, delta, and kappa)

    SciTech Connect

    Spain, J.W.; Roth, B.L.; Coscia, C.J.

    1985-03-01

    We investigated the postnatal ontogeny of opioid receptors in rat brain under assay conditions which, when combined with computerized analysis, effectively reflect the developmental profile of high affinity binding to mu, delta, and kappa subpopulations. Concentrations of mu sites were assessed with the selective ligand /sup 3/H-(D-ala2,mePhe4,gly-ol5)enkephalin (DAGO). The other two sites were analyzed in binding assays with less selective radioligands but in the presence of specific unlabeled ligands which suppress cross-reactivity. We utilized /sup 3/H-(D-ala2,D-leu5)enkephalin (DADL) in the presence of 10 nM DAGO to label delta sites and /sup 3/H-ethylketocyclazocine (EKC) in the presence of 100 nM DADL + 100 nM (D-ala2,mePhe4,Met(0)ol5)enkephalin to detect kappa receptors. After birth, the density (femtomoles per milligram of wet weight) of mu sites declined for several days and then rose sharply over the next 2 weeks, increasing 2-fold by adulthood. Delta (delta) sites appeared in the second week postnatal and increased more than 8-fold in the next 2 weeks. Levels of kappa receptors were relatively low at birth and increased slowly (2-fold, overall). Computerized analyses of binding data revealed that DAGO and DADL were binding to single populations of sites throughout the postnatal period. DAGO and EKC affinities did not fluctuate in this period, whereas DADL affinities were low for the first week and then rose to adult levels. In summary, mu, kappa, and delta receptors exhibit differential postnatal developmental profiles. The former two are present at birth, whereas the latter appears in the second week. The postnatal increase for all three sites appear to be preceded by the previously demonstrated emergence of opioid peptides.

  2. Analgesic effect of interferon-alpha via mu opioid receptor in the rat.

    PubMed

    Jiang, C L; Son, L X; Lu, C L; You, Z D; Wang, Y X; Sun, L Y; Cui, R Y; Liu, X Y

    2000-03-01

    Using the tail-flick induced by electro-stimulation as a pain marker, it was found that pain threshold (PT) was significantly increased after injecting interferon-alpha (IFN alpha) into the lateral ventricle of rats. This effect was dosage-dependent and abolished by monoclonal antibody (McAb) to IFN alpha. Naloxone could inhibit the analgesic effect of IFN alpha, suggesting that the analgesic effect of IFN alpha be related to the opioid receptors. Beta-funaltrexamine (beta-FNA), the mu specific receptor antagonist could completely block the analgesic effect of IFN alpha. The selective delta-opioid receptor antagonist, ICI174,864 and the kappa-opioid receptor antagonist, nor-BNI both failed to prevent the analgesic effect of IFN alpha. IFN alpha could significantly inhibit the production of the cAMP stimulated by forskolin in SK-N-SH cells expressing the mu-opioid receptor, not in NG108-15 cells expressing the delta-opioid receptor uniformly. The results obtained provide further evidence for opioid activity of IFN alpha and suggest that this effect is mediated by central opioid receptors of the mu subtype. The evidence is consistent with the hypothesis that multiple actions of cytokines, such as immunoregulatory and neuroregulatory effects, might be mediated by distinct domains of cytokines interacting with different receptors. PMID:10676852

  3. In vivo and in vitro evaluation of novel μ-opioid receptor agonist compounds.

    PubMed

    Nikaido, Yoshiaki; Kurosawa, Aya; Saikawa, Hitomi; Kuroiwa, Satoshi; Suzuki, Chiharu; Kuwabara, Nobuo; Hoshino, Hazime; Obata, Hideaki; Saito, Shigeru; Saito, Tamio; Osada, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Isao; Sezutsu, Hideki; Takeda, Shigeki

    2015-11-15

    Opioids are the most effective and widely used drugs for pain treatment. Morphine is an archetypal opioid and is an opioid receptor agonist. Unfortunately, the clinical usefulness of morphine is limited by adverse effects such as analgesic tolerance and addiction. Therefore, it is important to study the development of novel opioid agonists as part of pain control. The analgesic effects of opioids are mediated by three opioid receptors, namely opioid μ-, δ-, and κ-receptors. They belong to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily and are coupled to Gi proteins. In the present study, we developed a ligand screening system to identify novel opioid μ-receptor agonists that measures [(35)S]GTPγS binding to cell membrane fractions prepared from the fat body of transgenic silkworms expressing μ-receptor-Gi1α fusion protein. We screened the RIKEN Natural Products Depository (NPDepo) chemical library, which contains 5848 compounds, and analogs of hit compounds. We successfully identified a novel, structurally unique compound, that we named GUM1, with agonist activity for the opioid μ-receptor (EC50 of 1.2 µM). The Plantar Test (Hargreaves' Method) demonstrated that subcutaneous injection of 3mg/kg of GUM1 into wild-type rats significantly extended latency time. This extension was also observed in a rat model of morphine tolerance and was inhibited by pre-treatment of naloxone. The unique molecular skeleton of GUM1 makes it an attractive molecule for further ligand-opioid receptor binding studies. PMID:26476280

  4. μ Opioid receptor A118G polymorphism in association with striatal opioid neuropeptide gene expression in heroin abusers

    PubMed Central

    Drakenberg, Katarina; Nikoshkov, Andrej; Horváth, Monika Cs; Fagergren, Pernilla; Gharibyan, Anna; Saarelainen, Kati; Rahman, Sadia; Nylander, Ingrid; Bakalkin, Georgy; Rajs, Jovan; Keller, Eva; Hurd, Yasmin L.

    2006-01-01

    μ Opioid receptors are critical for heroin dependence, and A118G SNP of the μ opioid receptor gene (OPRM1) has been linked with heroin abuse. In our population of European Caucasians (n = 118), ≈90% of 118G allelic carriers were heroin users. Postmortem brain analyses showed the OPRM1 genotype associated with transcription, translation, and processing of the human striatal opioid neuropeptide system. Whereas down-regulation of preproenkephalin and preprodynorphin genes was evident in all heroin users, the effects were exaggerated in 118G subjects and were most prominent for preproenkephalin in the nucleus accumbens shell. Reduced opioid neuropeptide transcription was accompanied by increased dynorphin and enkephalin peptide concentrations exclusively in 118G heroin subjects, suggesting that the peptide processing is associated with the OPRM1 genotype. Abnormal gene expression related to peptide convertase and ubiquitin/proteosome regulation was also evident in heroin users. Taken together, alterations in opioid neuropeptide systems might underlie enhanced opiate abuse vulnerability apparent in 118G individuals. PMID:16682632

  5. Binding characteristics of [3H]14-methoxymetopon, a high affinity mu-opioid receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Spetea, Mariana; Tóth, Fanni; Schütz, Johannes; Otvös, Ferenc; Tóth, Géza; Benyhe, Sandor; Borsodi, Anna; Schmidhammer, Helmut

    2003-07-01

    The highly potent micro -opioid receptor agonist 14-methoxymetopon (4,5alpha-epoxy-3-hydroxy-14beta-methoxy-5beta,17-dimethylmorphinan-6-one) was prepared in tritium labelled form by a catalytic dehalogenation method resulting in a specific radioactivity of 15.9 Ci/mmol. Opioid binding characteristics of [3H]14-methoxymetopon were determined using radioligand binding assay in rat brain membranes. [3H]14-Methoxymetopon specifically labelled a single class of opioid sites with affinity in low subnanomolar range (Ki = 0.43 nm) and maximal number of binding sites of 314 fmol/mg protein. Binding of [3H]14-methoxymetopon was inhibited by ligands selective for the micro -opioid receptor with high potency, while selective kappa-opioids and delta-opioids were weaker inhibitors. 14-Methoxymetopon increased guanosine-5'-O-(3-[35S]thio)-triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding with an EC50 of 70.9 nm, thus, providing evidence for the agonist character of this ligand. The increase of [35S]GTPgammaS binding was inhibited by naloxone and selective micro -opioid antagonists, indicating a micro -opioid receptor-mediated action. [3H]14-Methoxymetopon is one of the few nonpeptide mu-opioid receptor agonists available in radiolabelled form up to now. Due to its high affinity and selectivity, high stability and extremely low nonspecific binding (<10%), this radioligand would be an important and useful tool in probing mu-opioid receptor mechanisms, as well as to promote a further understanding of the opioid system at the cellular and molecular level. PMID:12887410

  6. Purification and mass spectrometric analysis of the kappa opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Wannemacher, Kenneth M; Terskiy, Alexandra; Bian, Shengjie; Yadav, Prem N; Li, Hong; Howells, Richard D

    2008-09-16

    A clonal human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cell line was established that stably expressed the rat kappa-opioid receptor (rKOR) with a FLAG epitope at the amino terminus. The Kd for [3H]diprenorphine was 1.1+/-0.2 nM, and the Bmax was 2.6+/-0.4 pmol/mg. Dynorphin A (1-13), U69,593 and naloxone competitively inhibited [3H]diprenorphine binding with Ki values of 2.0, 18 and 18 nM, respectively, in good agreement with previously reported affinities for the unmodified receptor. U69,593 stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding in a concentration-dependent manner and caused phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, indicating that the activated epitope-tagged receptor triggered appropriate signaling pathways. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that two immunoreactive receptor species with apparent molecular masses of 42 and 52 kDa were expressed. Previous studies indicated that the 42 kDa protein was localized intracellularly and was a precursor of the 52 kDa receptor, which was present at the cell surface. rKOR was extracted from transfected HEK 293 cell membranes with n-dodecyl-beta-D-maltopyranoside. Sequential use of wheat germ agglutinin chromatography, Sephacryl S300 gel filtration chromatography, anti-FLAG immunoaffinity chromatography and SDS/PAGE permitted purification of the 52 kDa receptor. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was used to identify peptides derived from rKOR following sequential in-gel digestion with trypsin and cyanogen bromide. Eighteen rKOR peptides were detected, corresponding to 27.1% coverage of the receptor. Precursor-selective MS/MS confirmed the identity of most of these peptides. In addition, we have identified heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) as a rKOR-interacting protein. PMID:18656460

  7. Purification and Mass Spectrometric Analysis of the κ Opioid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Wannemacher, Kenneth M.; Terskiy, Alexandra; Bian, Shengjie; Yadav, Prem N.; Li, Hong; Howells, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    A clonal human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cell line was established that stably expressed the rat κ-opioid receptor (rKOR) with a FLAG epitope at the amino terminus. The Kd for [3H]diprenorphine was 1.1 ± 0.2 nM, and the Bmax was 2.6 ± 0.4 pmoles/mg. Dynorphin A (1–13), U69,593 and naloxone competitively inhibited [3H]diprenorphine binding with Ki values of 2.0, 18 and 18 nM, respectively, in good agreement with previously reported affinities for the unmodified receptor. U69,593 stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding in a concentration-dependent manner and caused phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, indicating that the activated epitope-tagged receptor triggered appropriate signaling pathways. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated that two immunoreactive receptor species with apparent molecular masses of 42 and 52 kDa were expressed. Previous studies indicated that the 42 kDa protein was localized intracellularly and was a precursor of the 52 kDa receptor, which was present at the cell surface. rKOR was extracted from transfected HEK 293 cell membranes with n-dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside. Sequential use of wheat germ agglutinin chromatography, Sephacryl S300 gel filtration chromatography, anti-FLAG immunoaffinity chromatography and SDS/PAGE permitted purification of the 52 kDa receptor. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry was used to identify peptides derived from rKOR following sequential in-gel digestion with trypsin and cyanogen bromide. Eighteen rKOR peptides were detected, corresponding to 27.1% coverage of the receptor. Precursor-selective MS/MS confirmed the identity of most of these peptides. In addition, we have identified heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) as a rKOR-interacting protein. PMID:18656460

  8. Peripheral administration of a μ-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO suppresses the anxiolytic and stimulatory effects of caffeine.

    PubMed

    Sudakov, S K; Nazarova, G A; Alekseeva, E V; Kolpakov, A A

    2015-01-01

    We studied the possibility of modulation of the stimulatory and anxiolytic effects of caffeine by activation of μ-opioid receptors in the gastrointestinal tract. Caffeine in a dose of 10 mg/kg (but not in a dose of 100 mg/kg) had a strong anxiolytic and psychostimulant effect. This effect was manifested in a significant increase in the time spent in the open arms of the elevated plus-maze, elevation of locomotor activity, and stimulation of metabolism. Administration of DAMGO to animals receiving caffeine in a dose of 10 mg/kg abolished the anxiolytic and psychostimulant effects of caffeine. By contrast, administration of DAMGO to rats receiving caffeine in a dose of 100 mg/kg had the anxiolytic effect. Activation of peripheral μ-opioid receptors is followed by the inhibition of the central μ-opioid system. We observed a decrease in the number of μ-opioid receptors in the midbrain and cerebral cortex and inhibition of β-endorphin release from nerve ending of the cingulate cortex in rats. These changes are probably followed by activation of the adenosine system in the brain. Caffeine dose should be increased to achieve the effect. Therefore, the anxiolytic and stimulatory effects of caffeine in a dose of 10 mg/kg are abolished under these conditions. By contrast, the anxiolytic effect of caffeine in a dose of 100 mg/kg (not observed under normal conditions) develops after this treatment. PMID:25573353

  9. μ Opioid Receptor Expression after Morphine Administration Is Regulated by miR-212/132 Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Concejo, Adrian; Jimenez-Gonzalez, Ada; Rodríguez, Raquel E.

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, miRNAs have emerged as a promising therapeutical approach in the treatment of several diseases, as demonstrated by miR-212 and its relation to addiction. Here we prove that the miR-212/132 cluster can be regulated by morphine, through the activation of mu opioid receptor (Oprm1). The molecular pathways triggered after morphine administration also induce changes in the levels of expression of oprm1. In addition, miR-212/132 cluster is actively repressing the expression of mu opioid receptor by targeting a sequence in the 3’ UTR of its mRNA. These findings suggest that this cluster is closely related to opioid signaling, and function as a post-transcriptional regulator, modulating morphine response in a dose dependent manner. The regulation of miR-212/132 cluster expression is mediated by MAP kinase pathway, CaMKII-CaMKIV and PKA, through the phosphorylation of CREB. Moreover, the regulation of both oprm1 and of the cluster promoter is mediated by MeCP2, acting as a transcriptional repressor on methylated DNA after prolonged morphine administration. This mechanism explains the molecular signaling triggered by morphine as well as the regulation of the expression of the mu opioid receptor mediated by morphine and the implication of miR-212/132 in these processes. PMID:27380026

  10. Direct association of Mu-opioid and NMDA glutamate receptors supports their cross-regulation: molecular implications for opioid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Garzón, Javier; Rodríguez-Muñoz, María; Sánchez-Blázquez, Pilar

    2012-09-01

    In the nervous system, the interaction of opioids like morphine and its derivatives, with the G protein-coupled Mu-opioid receptor (MOR) provokes the development of analgesic tolerance, as well as physical dependence. Tolerance implies that increasing doses of the drug are required to achieve the same effect, a phenomenon that contributes significantly to the social problems surrounding recreational opioid abuse. In recent years, our understanding of the mechanisms that control MOR function in the nervous system, and that eventually produce opioid tolerance, has increased greatly. Pharmacological studies have identified a number of signaling proteins involved in morphine-induced tolerance, including the N-methyl-D-aspartate acid glutamate receptor (NMDAR), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), protein kinase C (PKC), protein kinase A (PKA), calcium (Ca²⁺)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), delta-opioid receptor (DOR) and the regulators of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins. There is general agreement on the critical role of the NMDAR/nNOS/CaMKII pathway in this process, which is supported by the recent demonstration of a physical association between MORs and NMDARs in post-synaptic structures. Indeed, it is feasible that treatments that diminish morphine tolerance may target distinct elements within the same regulatory MOR-NMDAR pathway. Accordingly, we propose a model that incorporates the most relevant signaling components implicated in opioid tolerance in which, certain signals originating from the activated MOR are perceived by the associated NMDAR, which in turn exerts a negative feedback effect on MOR signaling. MOR- and NMDAR-mediated signals work together in a sequential and interconnected manner to ultimately induce MOR desensitization. Future studies of these phenomena should focus on adding further components to this signaling pathway in order to better define the mechanism underlying MOR desensitization in neural cells. PMID:22920535

  11. MicroRNA 339 down-regulates μ-opioid receptor at the post-transcriptional level in response to opioid treatment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qifang; Hwang, Cheol Kyu; Zheng, Hui; Wagley, Yadav; Lin, Hong-Yiou; Kim, Do Kyung; Law, Ping-Yee; Loh, Horace H; Wei, Li-Na

    2013-02-01

    μ-Opioid receptor (MOR) level is directly related to the function of opioid drugs, such as morphine and fentanyl. Although agonist treatment generally does not affect transcription of mor, previous studies suggest that morphine can affect the translation efficiency of MOR transcript via microRNAs (miRNAs). On the basis of miRNA microarray analyses of the hippocampal total RNA isolated from mice chronically treated with μ-opioid agonists, we found a miRNA (miR-339-3p) that was consistently and specifically increased by morphine (2-fold) and by fentanyl (3.8-fold). miR-339-3p bound to the MOR 3'-UTR and specifically suppressed reporter activity. Suppression was blunted by adding miR-339-3p inhibitor or mutating the miR-339-3p target site. In cells endogenously expressing MOR, miR-339-3p inhibited the production of MOR protein by destabilizing MOR mRNA. Up-regulation of miR-339-3p by fentanyl (EC(50)=0.75 nM) resulted from an increase in primary miRNA transcript. Mapping of the miR-339-3p primary RNA and its promoter revealed that the primary miR-339-3p was embedded in a noncoding 3'-UTR region of an unknown host gene and was coregulated by the host promoter. The identified promoter was activated by opioid agonist treatment (10 nM fentanyl or 10 μM morphine), a specific effect blocked by the opioid antagonist naloxone (10 μM). Taken together, these results suggest that miR-339-3p may serve as a negative feedback modulator of MOR signals by regulating intracellular MOR biosynthesis. PMID:23085997

  12. Effects of imipramine treatment on delta-opioid receptors of the rat brain cortex and striatum.

    PubMed

    Varona, Adolfo; Gil, Javier; Saracibar, Gonzalo; Maza, Jose Luis; Echevarria, Enrique; Irazusta, Jon

    2003-01-01

    Imipramine (CAS 113-52-0) is being utilized widely for the treatment of major depression. In recent years, there has been evidence of the involvement of the endogenous opioid system in major depression and its treatment. There is some evidence indicating that opioid receptors could be involved in the antidepressant mechanism of action. Regarding this topic, mood-related behavior of endogenous enkephalins seems to be mediated by delta-opioid receptors. In this work, the effects of subacute (5 day) and chronic (15 day) treatments of imipramine on the density and the affinity of the delta-receptors in the striatum and in the parietal and frontal cortices of the rat brain are described. Studied parameters (Bmax and Kd) were calculated by a saturation binding assay with the delta-opioid agonists [3H]-DPDPE (tyrosyl-2,6-3H(N)-(2-D-penicillamine-5-D-penicillamine)-enkephalin) as specific ligand and DSLET ([D-serine2]-D-leucine-enkephalin-threonine) as non-radioactive competing ligand. It was found that 15 days treatment significantly decreased the delta-opioid receptor density,without changing the affinity, in the frontal cortex of the rat brain. That decrease was confirmed by delta-opioid receptor immunostaining. These results suggest that delta-opioid receptors could play a role in the chronic action mechanism of imipramine. PMID:12608010

  13. Mu opioid receptor polymorphism, early social adversity, and social traits.

    PubMed

    Carver, Charles S; Johnson, Sheri L; Kim, Youngmee

    2016-10-01

    A polymorphism in the mu opioid receptor gene OPRM1 (rs1799971) has been investigated for its role in sensitivity to social contexts. Evidence suggests that the G allele of this polymorphism is associated with higher levels of sensitivity. This study tested for main effects of the polymorphism and its interaction with a self-report measure of childhood adversity as an index of negative environment. Outcomes were several personality measures relevant to social connection. Significant interactions were obtained, such that the negative impact of childhood adversity on personality was greater among G carriers than among A homozygotes on measures of agreeableness, interdependence, anger proneness, hostility, authentic pride, life engagement, and an index of (mostly negative) feelings coloring one's world view. Findings support the role of OPRM1 in sensitivity to negative environments. Limitations are noted, including the lack of a measure of advantageous social environment to assess sensitivity to positive social contexts. PMID:26527429

  14. Identification of opioid receptor subtypes in antinociceptive actions of supraspinally-administered mitragynine in mice.

    PubMed

    Thongpradichote, S; Matsumoto, K; Tohda, M; Takayama, H; Aimi, N; Sakai, S; Watanabe, H

    1998-01-01

    Mitragynine (MG), a major alkaloidal constituent extracted from the plant Mitragyna speciosa Korth, is known to exert an opioid-like activity. Our previous study showed the involvement of opioid systems in the antinociceptive activity of MG in the tail-pinch and hot-plate tests in mice. In the present study, to clarify the opioid receptor subtypes involved in the antinociceptive action of MG, we investigated the effects of selective antagonists for mu-, delta- and kappa- opioid receptors on antinociception caused by the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of MG in the tail-pinch and hot-plate tests in mice. The coadministration of a selective mu-opioid antagonist, cyprodime (1-10 microg, i.c.v.) and the pretreatment with a selective mu1-opioid antagonist naloxonazine (1-3 microg, i.c.v.) significantly antagonized the antinociceptive activities of MG (10 microg, i.c.v.) and morphine (MOR, 3 microg, i.c.v.) in the tail-pinch and hot-plate tests. Naltrindole (1-5 ng, i.c.v.), a selective delta-opioid antagonist, also blocked the effects of MG (10 microg, i.c.v.) without affecting MOR (3 microg, i.c.v.) antinociception. Nor-binaltorphimine, a selective kappa-opioid antagonist, significantly attenuated MG (10 microg, i.c.v.) antinociception in the tail-pinch test but not in the hot-plate test at the dose (1 microg, i.c.v.) that antagonized the antinociceptive effects of the selective kappa-opioid agonist U50,488H in both tests, while it had no effect on MOR antinociception in either tests. These results suggest that antinociception caused by i.c.v. MG is dominantly mediated by mu- and delta-opioid receptor subtypes, and that the selectivity of MG for the supraspinal opioid receptor subtypes differs from that of MOR in mice. PMID:9585164

  15. Shadows across mu-Star? Constitutively active mu-opioid receptors revisited.

    PubMed

    Connor, Mark

    2009-04-01

    Constitutively active mu-opioid receptors (mu* receptors) are reported to be formed following prolonged agonist treatment of cells or whole animals. mu* receptors signal in the absence of activating ligand and a blockade of mu* activation of G-proteins by naloxone and naltrexone has been suggested to underlie the profound withdrawal syndrome precipitated by these antagonists in vivo. In this issue of the Journal, Divin et al. examined whether treatment of C6 glioma cells with mu-opioid receptor agonists produced constitutively active mu-opioid receptors or other commonly reported adaptations to prolonged agonist treatment. Adenylyl cyclase superactivation was readily apparent following agonist treatment but there was no evidence of the formation of constitutively active mu-opioid receptors. This result challenges the notion that prolonged agonist exposure inevitably produces mu* receptors, and is consistent with many studies of adaptations in neurons produced by chronic agonist treatment. The investigators provide no explanation of their failure to see mu* receptors in C6 cells, but this is perhaps understandable because the molecular nature of mu* receptors remains elusive, and the precise mechanisms that lead to their formation are unknown. Without knowing exactly what mu* receptors are, how they are formed and how they signal, understanding their role in cellular adaptations to prolonged opioid treatment will remain impossible. Studies such as this should refocus attention on establishing the molecular mechanisms that underlie that phenomenon of mu* receptors. PMID:19368530

  16. Structural insights into μ-opioid receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weijiao; Manglik, Aashish; Venkatakrishnan, A. J.; Laeremans, Toon; Feinberg, Evan N.; Sanborn, Adrian L.; Kato, Hideaki E.; Livingston, Kathryn E.; Thorsen, Thor S.; Kling, Ralf; Granier, Sébastien; Gmeiner, Peter; Husbands, Stephen M.; Traynor, John R.; Weis, William I.; Steyaert, Jan; Dror, Ron O.; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Activation of the μ-opioid receptor (μOR) is responsible for the efficacy of the most effective analgesics. To understand the structural basis for μOR activation, we obtained a 2.1 Å X-ray crystal structure of the μOR bound to the morphinan agonist BU72 and stabilized by a G protein-mimetic camelid-antibody fragment. The BU72-stabilized changes in the μOR binding pocket are subtle and differ from those observed for agonist-bound structures of the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and the M2 muscarinic receptor (M2R). Comparison with active β2AR reveals a common rearrangement in the packing of three conserved amino acids in the core of the μOR, and molecular dynamics simulations illustrate how the ligand-binding pocket is conformationally linked to this conserved triad. Additionally, an extensive polar network between the ligand-binding pocket and the cytoplasmic domains appears to play a similar role in signal propagation for all three GPCRs. PMID:26245379

  17. Regulation of ingestive behaviors in the rat by GSK1521498, a novel micro-opioid receptor-selective inverse agonist.

    PubMed

    Ignar, Diane M; Goetz, Aaron S; Noble, Kimberly Nichols; Carballo, Luz Helena; Stroup, Andrea E; Fisher, Julie C; Boucheron, Joyce A; Brainard, Tracy A; Larkin, Andrew L; Epperly, Andrea H; Shearer, Todd W; Sorensen, Scott D; Speake, Jason D; Hommel, Jonathan D

    2011-10-01

    μ-Opioid receptor (MOR) agonism induces palatable food consumption principally through modulation of the rewarding properties of food. N-{[3,5-difluoro-3'-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)-4-biphenylyl]methyl}-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-2-amine (GSK1521498) is a novel opioid receptor inverse agonist that, on the basis of in vitro affinity assays, is greater than 10- or 50-fold selective for human or rat MOR, respectively, compared with κ-opioid receptors (KOR) and δ-opioid receptors (DOR). Likewise, preferential MOR occupancy versus KOR and DOR was observed by autoradiography in brain slices from Long Evans rats dosed orally with the drug. GSK1521498 suppressed nocturnal food consumption of standard or palatable chow in lean and diet-induced obese (DIO) Long Evans rats. Both the dose-response relationship and time course of efficacy in lean rats fed palatable chow correlated with μ receptor occupancy and the plasma concentration profile of the drug. Chronic oral administration of GSK1521498 induced body weight loss in DIO rats, which comprised fat mass reduction. The reduction in body weight was equivalent to the cumulative reduction in food consumption; thus, the effect of GSK1521498 on body weight is related to inhibition of food consumption. GSK1521498 suppressed the preference for sucrose-containing solutions in lean rats. In operant response models also using lean rats, GSK1521498 reduced the reinforcement efficacy of palatable food reward and enhanced satiety. In conclusion, GSK1521498 is a potent, MOR-selective inverse agonist that modulates the hedonic aspects of ingestion and, therefore, could represent a pharmacological treatment for obesity and binge-eating disorders. PMID:21712426

  18. The endogenous opioid system in cocaine addiction: what lessons have opioid peptide and receptor knockout mice taught us?

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji Hoon; Kitchen, Ian; Bailey, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine addiction has become a major concern in the UK as Britain tops the European ‘league table’ for cocaine abuse. Despite its devastating health and socio-economic consequences, no effective pharmacotherapy for treating cocaine addiction is available. Identifying neurochemical changes induced by repeated drug exposure is critical not only for understanding the transition from recreational drug use towards compulsive drug abuse but also for the development of novel targets for the treatment of the disease and especially for relapse prevention. This article focuses on the effects of chronic cocaine exposure and withdrawal on each of the endogenous opioid peptides and receptors in rodent models. In addition, we review the studies that utilized opioid peptide or receptor knockout mice in order to identify and/or clarify the role of different components of the opioid system in cocaine-addictive behaviours and in cocaine-induced alterations of brain neurochemistry. The review of these studies indicates a region-specific activation of the µ-opioid receptor system following chronic cocaine exposure, which may contribute towards the rewarding effect of the drug and possibly towards cocaine craving during withdrawal followed by relapse. Cocaine also causes a region-specific activation of the κ-opioid receptor/dynorphin system, which may antagonize the rewarding effect of the drug, and at the same time, contribute to the stress-inducing properties of the drug and the triggering of relapse. These conclusions have important implications for the development of effective pharmacotherapy for the treatment of cocaine addiction and the prevention of relapse. PMID:22428846

  19. Modulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine efflux from rat cortical synaptosomes by opioids and nociceptin

    PubMed Central

    Sbrenna, S; Marti, M; Morari, M; Calo', G; Guerrini, R; Beani, L; Bianchi, C

    2000-01-01

    The modulation of [3H]-5-hydroxytryptamine ([3H]-5-HT) efflux from superfused rat cortical synaptosomes by delta, kappa, mu and ORL1 opioid receptor agonists and antagonists was studied. Spontaneous [3H]-5-HT efflux was reduced (20% inhibition) by either 0.5 μM tetrodotoxin or Ca2+-omission. Ten mM K+-evoked [3H]-5-HT overflow was largely Ca2+-dependent (90%) and tetrodotoxin-sensitive (50%). The delta receptor agonist, deltorphin-I, failed to modulate the K+-evoked neurotransmitter efflux up to 0.3 μM. The kappa and the mu receptor agonists, U-50,488 and endomorphin-1, inhibited K+-evoked [3H]-5-HT overflow (EC50=112 and 7 nM, respectively; Emax=28 and 29% inhibition, respectively) in a norBinaltorphimine- (0.3 μM) and naloxone- (1 μM) sensitive manner, respectively. None of these agonists significantly affected spontaneous [3H]-5-HT efflux. The ORL1 receptor agonist nociceptin inhibited both spontaneous (EC50=67 nM) and K+-evoked (EC50=13 nM; Emax=52% inhibition) [3H]-5-HT efflux. The effect of NC was insensitive to naloxone (up to 10 μM), but was antagonized by [Nphe1]nociceptin(1-13)NH2 (a novel selective ORL1 receptor antagonist; pA2=6.7) and by naloxone benzoylhydrazone (pA2=6.3). The ORL1 ligand [Phe1ψ(CH2-NH)Gly2]nociceptin(1-13)NH2 also inhibited K+ stimulated [3H]-5-HT overflow (EC50=64 nM; Emax=31% inhibition), but its effect was partially antagonized by 10 μM naloxone. It is concluded that the ORL1 receptor is the most important presynaptic modulator of neocortical 5-HT release within the opioid receptor family. This suggests that the ORL1/nociceptin system may have a powerful role in the control of cerebral 5-HT-mediated biological functions. PMID:10807682

  20. Characterization of methadone as a β-arrestin-biased μ-opioid receptor agonist

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Seira; Mori, Tomohisa; Uzawa, Naoki; Arima, Takamichi; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Uchida, Masashi; Yawata, Ayaka; Narita, Michiko; Uezono, Yasuhito; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Background Methadone is a unique µ-opioid receptor agonist. Although several researchers have insisted that the pharmacological effects of methadone are mediated through the blockade of NMDA receptor, the underlying mechanism by which methadone exerts its distinct pharmacological effects compared to those of other µ-opioid receptor agonists is still controversial. In the present study, we further investigated the pharmacological profile of methadone compared to those of fentanyl and morphine as measured mainly by the discriminative stimulus effect and in vitro assays for NMDA receptor binding, µ-opioid receptor-internalization, and µ-opioid receptor-mediated β-arrestin recruitment. Results We found that fentanyl substituted for the discriminative stimulus effects of methadone, whereas a relatively high dose of morphine was required to substitute for the discriminative stimulus effects of methadone in rats. Under these conditions, the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 did not substitute for the discriminative stimulus effects of methadone. In association with its discriminative stimulus effect, methadone failed to displace the receptor binding of MK801 using mouse brain membrane. Methadone and fentanyl, but not morphine, induced potent µ-opioid receptor internalization accompanied by the strong recruitment of β-arrestin-2 in µ-opioid receptor-overexpressing cells. Conclusions These results suggest that methadone may, at least partly, produce its pharmacological effect as a β-arrestin-biased µ-opioid receptor agonist, similar to fentanyl, and NMDA receptor blockade is not the main contributor to the pharmacological profile of methadone. PMID:27317580

  1. Inhibition of mu and delta opioid receptor ligand binding by the peptide aldehyde protease inhibitor, leupeptin.

    PubMed

    Christoffers, Keith H; Khokhar, Arshia; Chaturvedi, Kirti; Howells, Richard D

    2002-04-15

    We reported recently that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is involved in agonist-induced down regulation of mu and delta opioid receptors [J. Biol. Chem. 276 (2001) 12345]. While evaluating the effects of various protease inhibitors on agonist-induced opioid receptor down regulation, we observed that while the peptide aldehyde, leupeptin (acetyl-L-Leucyl-L-Leucyl-L-Arginal), did not affect agonist-induced down regulation, leupeptin at submillimolar concentrations directly inhibited radioligand binding to opioid receptors. In this study, the inhibitory activity of leupeptin on radioligand binding was characterized utilizing human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cell lines expressing transfected mu, delta, or kappa opioid receptors. The rank order of potency for leupeptin inhibition of [3H]bremazocine binding to opioid receptors was mu > delta > kappa. In contrast to the effect of leupeptin, the peptide aldehyde proteasome inhibitor, MG 132 (carbobenzoxy-L-Leucyl-L-Leucyl-L-Leucinal), had significantly less effect on bremazocine binding to mu, delta, or kappa opioid receptors. We propose that leupeptin inhibits ligand binding by reacting reversibly with essential sulfhydryl groups that are necessary for high-affinity ligand/receptor interactions. PMID:11853866

  2. The μ-opioid receptor: an electrophysiologist's perspective from the sharp end

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Graeme

    2015-01-01

    Morphine, the prototypical opioid analgesic drug, produces its behavioural effects primarily through activation of μ-opioid receptors expressed in neurones of the central and peripheral nervous systems. This perspective provides a historical view of how, over the past 40 years, the use of electrophysiological recording techniques has helped to reveal the molecular mechanisms by which acute and chronic activation of μ-opioid receptors by morphine and other opioid drugs modify neuronal function. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24640948

  3. RAPID HETEROLOGOUS DESENSITIZATION OF ANTINOCICEPTIVE ACTIVITY BETWEEN MU OR DELTA OPIOID RECEPTORS AND CHEMOKINE RECEPTORS IN RATS

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaohong; Geller, Ellen B.; Rogers, Thomas J.; Adler, Martin W.

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have shown pretreatment with chemokines CCL5/RANTES (100 ng) or CXCL12/SDF-1alpha (100 ng) injected into the periaqueductal grey (PAG) region of the brain, 30 minutes (min) before the mu opioid agonist DAMGO (400 ng), blocked the antinociception induced by DAMGO in the in vivo cold water tail-flick (CWT) antinociceptive test in rats. In the present experiments, we tested whether the action of other agonists at mu and delta opioid receptors is blocked when CCL5/RANTES or CXCL12/SDF-1alpha is administered into the PAG 30 min before, or co-administered with, opioid agonists in the CWT assay. The results showed that (1) CXCL12/SDF-1alpha (100 ng, PAG) or CCL5/RANTES (100 ng, PAG), given 30 min before the opioid agonist morphine, or selective delta opioid receptor agonist DPDPE, blocked the antinociceptive effect of these drugs; (2) CXCL12/SDF-1alpha (100 ng, PAG) or CCL5/RANTES (100 ng, PAG), injected at the same time as DAMGO or DPDPE, significantly reduced the antinociceptive effect induced by these drugs. These results demonstrate that the heterologous desensitization is rapid between the mu or delta opioid receptors and either CCL5/RANTES receptor CCR5 or CXCL12/SDF-1alpha receptor CXCR4 in vivo, but the effect is greater if the chemokine is administered before the opioid. PMID:17049756

  4. Activation of μ opioid receptors in the LPBN facilitates sodium intake in rats.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Carolina G; Roncari, Camila F; Barbosa, Silas P; De Paula, Patrícia M; Colombari, Débora S A; De Luca, Laurival A; Colombari, Eduardo; Menani, José V

    2015-07-15

    Important inhibitory mechanisms for the control of water and sodium intake are present in the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBN). Opioid receptors are expressed by LPBN neurons and injections of β-endorphin (nonspecific opioid receptor agonist) in this area induce 0.3M NaCl and water intake in satiated rats. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the injections of endomorphin-1 (μ opioid receptor agonist) alone or combined with the blockade of μ, κ or δ opioid receptors into the LPBN on 0.3M NaCl and water intake induced by subcutaneous injections of the diuretic furosemide (FURO) combined with low dose of the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor captopril (CAP). Male Holtzman rats with stainless steel cannulas implanted bilaterally in the LPBN were used. Bilateral injections of endomorphin-1 (0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0nmol/0.2μl) into the LPBN increased 0.3M NaCl and water intake induced by FURO+CAP. The previous blockade of μ opioid receptor with CTAP (1.0nmol/0.2μl) into the LPBN reduced the effect of endomorphin-1 on FURO+CAP-induced 0.3M NaCl. GNTI (κ opioid receptor antagonist; 2.0nmol/0.2μl) and naltrindole (δ opioid receptor antagonist; 2.0nmol/0.2μl) injected into the LPBN did not change the effects of endomorphin-1 on FURO+CAP-induced 0.3M NaCl. The results suggest that μ opioid receptors in the LPBN are involved in the control of sodium intake. PMID:25827924

  5. Hormonal regulation of delta opioid receptor immunoreactivity in interneurons and pyramidal cells in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Tanya J.; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Chapleau, Jeanette D.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and preclinical studies indicate that women and men differ in relapse vulnerability to drug-seeking behavior during abstinence periods. As relapse is frequently triggered by exposure of the recovered addict to objects previously associated with drug use and the formation of these associations requires memory systems engaged by the hippocampal formation (HF), studies exploring ovarian hormone modulation of hippocampal function are warranted. Previous studies revealed that ovarian steroids alter endogenous opioid peptide levels and trafficking of mu opioid receptors in the HF, suggesting cooperative interaction between opioids and estrogens in modulating hippocampal excitability. However, whether ovarian steroids affect the levels or trafficking of delta opioid receptors (DORs) in the HF is unknown. Here, hippocampal sections of adult male and normal cycling female Sprague-Dawley rats were processed for quantitative immunoperoxidase light microscopy and dual label fluorescence or immunoelectron microscopy using antisera directed against the DOR and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Consistent with previous studies in males, DOR-immunoreactivity (-ir) localized to select interneurons and principal cells in the female HF. In comparison to males, females, regardless of estrous cycle phase, show reduced DOR-ir in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus and proestrus (high estrogen) females, in particular, display reduced DOR-ir in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer. Ultrastructural analysis of DOR-labeled profiles in CA1 revealed that while females generally show fewer DORs in the distal apical dendrites of pyramidal cells, proestrus females, in particular, exhibit DOR internalization and trafficking towards the soma. Dual label studies revealed that DORs are found in NPY-labeled interneurons in the hilus, CA3, and CA1. While DOR colocalization frequency in NPY-labeled neuron somata was similar between animals in the hilus, proestrus females had fewer NPY-labeled neurons that

  6. Differential Regulation of 6- and 7-Transmembrane Helix Variants of μ-Opioid Receptor in Response to Morphine Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Convertino, Marino; Samoshkin, Alexander; Viet, Chi T.; Gauthier, Josee; Li Fraine, Steven P.; Sharif-Naeini, Reza; Schmidt, Brian L.; Maixner, William; Diatchenko, Luda; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2015-01-01

    The pharmacological effect of opioids originates, at the cellular level, by their interaction with the μ-opioid receptor (mOR) resulting in the regulation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and inwardly rectifying K+ channels that ultimately modulate the synaptic transmission. Recently, an alternative six trans-membrane helix isoform of mOR, (6TM-mOR) has been identified, but its function and signaling are still largely unknown. Here, we present the structural and functional mechanisms of 6TM-mOR signaling activity upon binding to morphine. Our data suggest that despite the similarity of binding modes of the alternative 6TM-mOR and the dominant seven trans-membrane helix variant (7TM-mOR), the interaction with morphine generates different dynamic responses in the two receptors, thus, promoting the activation of different mOR-specific signaling pathways. We characterize a series of 6TM-mOR-specific cellular responses, and observed that they are significantly different from those for 7TM-mOR. Morphine stimulation of 6TM-mOR does not promote a cellular cAMP response, while it increases the intracellular Ca2+ concentration and reduces the cellular K+ conductance. Our findings indicate that 6TM-mOR has a unique contribution to the cellular opioid responses. Therefore, it should be considered as a relevant target for the development of novel pharmacological tools and medical protocols involving the use of opioids. PMID:26554831

  7. Human native kappa opioid receptor functions not predicted by recombinant receptors: Implications for drug design.

    PubMed

    Broad, John; Maurel, Damien; Kung, Victor W S; Hicks, Gareth A; Schemann, Michael; Barnes, Michael R; Kenakin, Terrence P; Granier, Sébastien; Sanger, Gareth J

    2016-01-01

    If activation of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors in host cells (by drugs or other ligands) has predictive value, similar data must be obtained with native receptors naturally expressed in tissues. Using mouse and human recombinant κ opioid receptors transfected into a host cell, two selectively-acting compounds (ICI204448, asimadoline) equi-effectively activated both receptors, assessed by measuring two different cell signalling pathways which were equally affected without evidence of bias. In mouse intestine, naturally expressing κ receptors within its nervous system, both compounds also equi-effectively activated the receptor, inhibiting nerve-mediated muscle contraction. However, whereas ICI204448 acted similarly in human intestine, where κ receptors are again expressed within its nervous system, asimadoline was inhibitory only at very high concentrations; instead, low concentrations of asimadoline reduced the activity of ICI204448. This demonstration of species-dependence in activation of native, not recombinant κ receptors may be explained by different mouse/human receptor structures affecting receptor expression and/or interactions with intracellular signalling pathways in native environments, to reveal differences in intrinsic efficacy between receptor agonists. These results have profound implications in drug design for κ and perhaps other receptors, in terms of recombinant-to-native receptor translation, species-dependency and possibly, a need to use human, therapeutically-relevant, not surrogate tissues. PMID:27492592

  8. Human native kappa opioid receptor functions not predicted by recombinant receptors: Implications for drug design

    PubMed Central

    Broad, John; Maurel, Damien; Kung, Victor W. S.; Hicks, Gareth A.; Schemann, Michael; Barnes, Michael R.; Kenakin, Terrence P.; Granier, Sébastien; Sanger, Gareth J.

    2016-01-01

    If activation of recombinant G protein-coupled receptors in host cells (by drugs or other ligands) has predictive value, similar data must be obtained with native receptors naturally expressed in tissues. Using mouse and human recombinant κ opioid receptors transfected into a host cell, two selectively-acting compounds (ICI204448, asimadoline) equi-effectively activated both receptors, assessed by measuring two different cell signalling pathways which were equally affected without evidence of bias. In mouse intestine, naturally expressing κ receptors within its nervous system, both compounds also equi-effectively activated the receptor, inhibiting nerve-mediated muscle contraction. However, whereas ICI204448 acted similarly in human intestine, where κ receptors are again expressed within its nervous system, asimadoline was inhibitory only at very high concentrations; instead, low concentrations of asimadoline reduced the activity of ICI204448. This demonstration of species-dependence in activation of native, not recombinant κ receptors may be explained by different mouse/human receptor structures affecting receptor expression and/or interactions with intracellular signalling pathways in native environments, to reveal differences in intrinsic efficacy between receptor agonists. These results have profound implications in drug design for κ and perhaps other receptors, in terms of recombinant-to-native receptor translation, species-dependency and possibly, a need to use human, therapeutically-relevant, not surrogate tissues. PMID:27492592

  9. κ-opioid receptors are not necessary for the antidepressant treatment of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Megat, Salim; Bohren, Yohann; Doridot, Stephane; Gaveriaux-Ruff, Claire; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José; Yalcin, Ipek; Barrot, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Tricyclic antidepressants are used clinically as first-line treatments for neuropathic pain. Opioid receptors participate in this pain-relieving action, and preclinical studies in receptor-deficient mice have highlighted a critical role for δ-, but not μ-opioid receptors. In this study, we investigated whether κ-opioid (KOP) receptors have a role in the antiallodynic action of tricyclic antidepressants. Experimental Approach We used a model of neuropathic pain induced by unilateral sciatic nerve cuffing. In this model, the mechanical allodynia was evaluated using von Frey filaments. Experiments were conducted in C57BL/6J mice, and in KOP receptor-deficient mice and their wild-type littermates. The tricyclic antidepressant nortriptyline (5 mg·kg−1) was delivered twice a day for over 2 weeks. Agonists and antagonists of opioid receptors were used to test the selectivity of the KOP receptor antagonist norbinaltorphimine (nor-BNI) in mice with neuropathic pain. Key Results After 12 days of treatment, nortriptyline relieved neuropathic allodynia in both wild-type and KOP receptor-deficient mice. Surprisingly, acute nor-BNI reversed the effect of nortriptyline in both wild-type and KOP receptor-deficient mice. Further experiments showed that nor-BNI action was selective for KOP receptors at a late time-point after its administration (8 h), but not at an early time-point, when it may also interact with δ-opioid (DOP) receptors. Conclusions and Implications KOP receptors are not necessary for the effect of a tricyclic antidepressant against neuropathic allodynia. These findings together with previous data indicate that the DOP receptor is the only opioid receptor that is necessary for the antiallodynic action of antidepressants. PMID:25297905

  10. Novel approaches for the treatment of psychostimulant and opioid abuse – focus on opioid receptor-based therapies

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Chris P.; Husbands, Steve M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Psychostimulant and opioid addiction are poorly treated. The majority of abstinent users relapse back to drug-taking within a year of abstinence, making ‘anti-relapse’ therapies the focus of much current research. There are two fundamental challenges to developing novel treatments for drug addiction. Firstly, there are 3 key stimuli that precipitate relapse back to drug-taking: stress, presentation of drug-conditioned cue, taking a small dose of drug. The most successful novel treatment would be effective against all 3 stimuli. Secondly, a large number of drug users are poly-drug users: taking more than one drug of abuse at a time. The ideal anti-addiction treatment would therefore be effective against all classes of drugs of abuse. Areas Covered In this review, the authors discuss the clinical need and animal models used to uncover potential novel treatments. There is a very broad range of potential treatment approaches and targets currently being examined as potential anti-relapse therapies. These broadly fit into 2 categories: ‘memory-based’ and ‘receptor-based’ and the authors discuss the key targets here within. Expert opinion Opioid receptors and ligands have been widely studied, and research into how different opioid subtypes affect behaviours related to addiction (reward, dysphoria, motivation) suggests that they are tractable targets as anti-relapse treatments. Regarding opioid ligands as novel ‘anti-relapse’ medications targets - research suggests that a ‘non-selective’ approach to targeting opioid receptors will be the most effective. PMID:25253272

  11. Propagation of conformational changes during μ-opioid receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Sounier, Rémy; Mas, Camille; Steyaert, Jan; Laeremans, Toon; Manglik, Aashish; Huang, Weijiao; Kobilka, Brian; Déméné, Héléne; Granier, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    μ-Opioid receptors (μOR) are G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are activated by a structurally diverse spectrum of natural and synthetic agonists including endogenous endorphin peptides, morphine and methadone. The recent structures of the μOR in inactive1 and agonist-induced active states (companion article) provide snapshots of the receptor at the beginning and end of a signaling event, but little is known about the dynamic sequence of events that span these two states. Here we report the use of solution-state NMR to examine the process of μOR activation. We obtained spectra of the μOR in the absence of ligand, and in the presence of the high-affinity agonist BU72 alone, or with BU72 and a G protein mimetic nanobody. Our results show that conformational changes in transmembrane segments (TM) 5 and 6, which are required for the full engagement of a G protein, are almost completely dependent on the presence of both the agonist and the G protein mimetic nanobody revealing a weak allosteric coupling between the agonist binding pocket and the G protein coupling interface (TM5 and TM6) similar to what has been observed for the β2-adrenergic receptor2. Unexpectedly, in the presence of agonist alone, we observe larger spectral changes involving intracellular loop 1 (ICL1) and helix 8 (H8), when compared to changes in TM5 and TM6. These results suggest that one or both of these domains may play a role in the initial interaction with the G protein, and that TM5 and TM6 are only engaged later in the process of complex formation. The initial interactions between the G protein and ICL1 and/or H8 may play a role in G protein coupling specificity as has been suggested for other family A GPCRs. PMID:26245377

  12. Opioid receptors mediate direct predictive fear learning: Evidence from one-trial blocking

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Sindy; McNally, Gavan P.

    2007-01-01

    Pavlovian fear learning depends on predictive error, so that fear learning occurs when the actual outcome of a conditioning trial exceeds the expected outcome. Previous research has shown that opioid receptors, including μ-opioid receptors in the ventrolateral quadrant of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (vlPAG), mediate such predictive fear learning. Four experiments reported here used a within-subject one-trial blocking design to study whether opioid receptors mediate a direct or indirect action of predictive error on Pavlovian association formation. In Stage I, rats were trained to fear conditioned stimulus (CS) A by pairing it with shock. In Stage II, CSA and CSB were co-presented once and co-terminated with shock. Two novel stimuli, CSC and CSD, were also co-presented once and co-terminated with shock in Stage II. The results showed one-trial blocking of fear learning (Experiment 1) as well as one-trial unblocking of fear learning when Stage II training employed a higher intensity footshock than was used in Stage I (Experiment 2). Systemic administrations of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (Experiment 3) or intra-vlPAG administrations of the selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist CTAP (Experiment 4) prior to Stage II training prevented one-trial blocking. These results show that opioid receptors mediate the direct actions of predictive error on Pavlovian association formation. PMID:17404385

  13. Opioid receptors and cardioprotection – ‘opioidergic conditioning’ of the heart

    PubMed Central

    Headrick, John P; See Hoe, Louise E; Du Toit, Eugene F; Peart, Jason N

    2015-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) remains a major cause of morbidity/mortality globally, firmly established in Westernized or ‘developed’ countries and rising in prevalence in developing nations. Thus, cardioprotective therapies to limit myocardial damage with associated ischaemia–reperfusion (I–R), during infarction or surgical ischaemia, is a very important, although still elusive, clinical goal. The opioid receptor system, encompassing the δ (vas deferens), κ (ketocyclazocine) and μ (morphine) opioid receptors and their endogenous opioid ligands (endorphins, dynorphins, enkephalins), appears as a logical candidate for such exploitation. This regulatory system may orchestrate organism and organ responses to stress, induces mammalian hibernation and associated metabolic protection, triggers powerful adaptive stress resistance in response to ischaemia/hypoxia (preconditioning), and mediates cardiac benefit stemming from physical activity. In addition to direct myocardial actions, central opioid receptor signalling may also enhance the ability of the heart to withstand I–R injury. The δ- and κ-opioid receptors are strongly implicated in cardioprotection across models and species (including anti-infarct and anti-arrhythmic actions), with mixed evidence for μ opioid receptor-dependent protection in animal and human tissues. A small number of clinical trials have provided evidence of cardiac benefit from morphine or remifentanil in cardiopulmonary bypass or coronary angioplasty patients, although further trials of subtype-specific opioid receptor agonists are needed. The precise roles and utility of this GPCR family in healthy and diseased human myocardium, and in mediating central and peripheral survival responses, warrant further investigation, as do the putative negative influences of ageing, IHD co-morbidities, and relevant drugs on opioid receptor signalling and protective responses. PMID:25521834

  14. Role of preoptic opioid receptors in the body temperature reduction during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Scarpellini, Carolina da Silveira; Gargaglioni, Luciane H; Branco, Luis G S; Bícego, Kênia C

    2009-08-25

    Evidence indicates that endogenous opioids play a role in body temperature (Tb) regulation in mammals but no data exist about the involvement of the specific opioid receptors, mu, kappa and delta, in the reduction of Tb induced by hypoxia. Thus, we investigated the participation of these opioid receptors in the anteroventral preoptic region (AVPO) in hypoxic decrease of Tb. To this end, Tb of unanesthetized Wistar rats was monitored by temperature data loggers before and after intra-AVPO microinjection of the selective kappa-opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine dihydrochloride (nor-BNI; 0.1 and 1.0 microg/100 nL/animal), the selective mu-opioid receptor antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 cyclic (CTAP; 0.1 and 1.0 microg/100 nL/animal), and the selective delta-opioid receptor antagonist Naltrindole (0.06 and 0.6 microg/100 nL/animal) or saline (vehicle, 100 nL/animal), during normoxia and hypoxia (7% inspired O2). Under normoxia, no effect of opioid antagonists on Tb was observed. Hypoxia induced Tb to reduce in vehicle group, a response that was inhibited by the microinjection intra-AVPO of nor-BNI. In contrast, CTAP and Naltrindole did not change Tb during hypoxia but caused a longer latency for the return of Tb to the normoxic values just after low O2 exposure. Our results indicate the kappa-opioid receptor in the AVPO is important for the reduction of Tb during hypoxia while the mu and delta receptors are involved in the increase of Tb during normoxia post-hypoxia. PMID:19545549

  15. Prolonged central mu-opioid receptor occupancy after single and repeated nalmefene dosing.

    PubMed

    Ingman, Kimmo; Hagelberg, Nora; Aalto, Sargo; Någren, Kjell; Juhakoski, Auni; Karhuvaara, Sakari; Kallio, Antero; Oikonen, Vesa; Hietala, Jarmo; Scheinin, Harry

    2005-12-01

    The opioid antagonist nalmefene offers an alternative to traditional pharmacological treatments for alcoholism. The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between nalmefene plasma concentration and central mu-opioid receptor occupancy after a clinically effective dose (20 mg, orally). Pharmacokinetics and mu-opioid receptor occupancy of nalmefene after single and repeated dosing over 7 days was studied in 12 healthy subjects. Serial blood samples were obtained after both dosings, and pharmacokinetic parameters for nalmefene and main metabolites were determined. Central mu-opioid receptor occupancy of nalmefene was measured with positron emission tomography (PET) and [(11)C]carfentanil at four time points (3, 26, 50, 74 h) after both dosings. Nalmefene was rapidly absorbed in all subjects. The mean t(1/2) of nalmefene was 13.4 h after single and repeated dosing. The accumulation of nalmefene and its main metabolites in plasma during the repeated dosing period was as expected for a drug with linear pharmacokinetics, and steady-state was reached for all analytes. Both nalmefene dosings resulted in a very high occupancy at mu-opioid receptors (87-100%), and the decline in the occupancy was similar after both dosings but clearly slower than the decline in the plasma concentration of nalmefene or metabolites. High nalmefene occupancy (83-100%) persisted at 26 h after the dosings. The prolonged mu-opioid receptor occupancy by nalmefene indicates slow dissociation of the drug from mu-opioid receptors. These results support the rational of administering nalmefene when needed before alcohol drinking, and they additionally suggest that a high mu-opioid receptor occupancy can be maintained when nalmefene is taken once daily. PMID:15956985

  16. Stress and opioids: role of opioids in modulating stress-related behavior and effect of stress on morphine conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Bali, Anjana; Randhawa, Puneet Kaur; Jaggi, Amteshwar Singh

    2015-04-01

    Research studies have defined the important role of endogenous opioids in modulating stress-associated behavior. The release of β-endorphins in the amygdala in response to stress helps to cope with a stressor by inhibiting the over-activation of HPA axis. Administration of mu opioid agonists reduces the risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following a traumatic event by inhibiting fear-related memory consolidation. Similarly, the release of endogenous enkephalin and nociceptin in the basolateral amygdala and the nucleus accumbens tends to produce the anti-stress effects. An increase in dynorphin levels during prolonged exposure to stress may produce learned helplessness, dysphoria and depression. Stress also influences morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) depending upon the intensity and duration of the stressor. Acute stress inhibits morphine CPP, while chronic stress potentiates CPP. The development of dysphoria due to increased dynorphin levels may contribute to chronic stress-induced potentiation of morphine CPP. The activation of ERK/cyclic AMP responsive element-binding (CREB) signaling in the mesocorticolimbic area, glucocorticoid receptors in the basolateral amygdala, and norepinephrine and galanin system in the nucleus accumbens may decrease the acute stress-induced inhibition of morphine CPP. The increase in dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens and augmentation of GABAergic transmission in the median prefrontal cortex may contribute in potentiating morphine CPP. Stress exposure reinstates the extinct morphine CPP by activating the orexin receptors in the nucleus accumbens, decreasing the oxytocin levels in the lateral septum and amygdala, and altering the GABAergic transmission (activation of GABAA and inactivation of GABAB receptors). The present review describes these varied interactions between opioids and stress along with the possible mechanism. PMID:25636946

  17. Opioid and nicotine receptors affect growth regulation of human lung cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Maneckjee, R.; Minna, J.D. Uniformed Services Univ. of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD )

    1990-05-01

    Using specific radioactively-labeled ligands, the authors find that lung cancer cell lines of diverse histologic types express multiple, high-affinity membrane receptors for {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists and for nicotine and {alpha}-bungarotoxin. These receptors are biologically active because cAMP levels decreased in lung cancer cells after opioid and nicotine application. Nicotine at concentrations found in the blood of smokers had no effect on in vitro lung cancer cell growth, whereas {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists at low concentrations inhibited lung cancer growth in vitro. They also found that lung cancer cells expressed various combinations of immunoreactive opioid peptides ({beta}-endorphin, enkephalin, or dynorphin), suggesting the participation of opioids in a negative autocrine loop or tumor-suppressing system. Due to the almost universal exposure of patients with lung cancer to nicotine, they tested whether nicotine affected the response of lung cancer cell growth to opioids and found that nicotine at concentrations of 100-200 nM partially or totally reversed opioid-induced growth inhibition in 9/14 lung cancer cell lines. These in vitro results for lung cancer cells suggest that opioids could function as part of a tumor suppressor system and that nicotine can function to circumvent this system in the pathogenesis of lung cancer.

  18. Design, Syntheses, and Biological Evaluation of 14-Heteroaromatic Substituted Naltrexone Derivatives: Pharmacological Profile Switch from Mu Opioid Receptor Selectivity to Mu/Kappa Opioid Receptor Dual Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yunyun; Zaidi, Saheem A.; Elbegdorj, Orgil; Aschenbach, Lindsey C. K.; Li, Guo; Stevens, David L.; Scoggins, Krista L.; Dewey, William L.; Selley, Dana E.; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Based on a mu opioid receptor (MOR) homology model and the “isosterism” concept, three generations of 14-heteroaromatically substituted naltrexone derivatives were designed, synthesized, and evaluated as potential MOR selective ligands. The first generation ligands appeared to be MOR selective, whereas the second and the third generation ones showed MOR/kappa opioid receptor (KOR) dual selectivity. Docking of ligands 2 (MOR selective) and 10 (MOR/KOR dual selective) to the three opioid receptor crystal structures revealed a non-conserved residue facilitated “hydrogen bonding network” that could be responsible for their distinctive selectivity profiles. The MOR/KOR dual selective ligand 10 showed no agonism and acted as a potent antagonist in the tail flick assay. It also produced less severe opioid withdrawal symptoms than naloxone in morphine dependent mice. In conclusion, ligand 10 may serve as a novel lead compound to develop MOR/KOR dual selective ligands, which might possess unique therapeutic value for opioid addiction treatment. PMID:24144240

  19. BU08073 a buprenorphine analogue with partial agonist activity at μ-receptors in vitro but long-lasting opioid antagonist activity in vivo in mice

    PubMed Central

    Khroyan, T V; Wu, J; Polgar, W E; Cami-Kobeci, G; Fotaki, N; Husbands, S M; Toll, L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Buprenorphine is a potent analgesic with high affinity at μ, δ and κ and moderate affinity at nociceptin opioid (NOP) receptors. Nevertheless, NOP receptor activation modulates the in vivo activity of buprenorphine. Structure activity studies were conducted to design buprenorphine analogues with high affinity at each of these receptors and to characterize them in in vitro and in vivo assays. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Compounds were tested for binding affinity and functional activity using [35S]GTPγS binding at each receptor and a whole-cell fluorescent assay at μ receptors. BU08073 was evaluated for antinociceptive agonist and antagonist activity and for its effects on anxiety in mice. KEY RESULTS BU08073 bound with high affinity to all opioid receptors. It had virtually no efficacy at δ, κ and NOP receptors, whereas at μ receptors, BU08073 has similar efficacy as buprenorphine in both functional assays. Alone, BU08073 has anxiogenic activity and produces very little antinociception. However, BU08073 blocks morphine and U50,488-mediated antinociception. This blockade was not evident at 1 h post-treatment, but is present at 6 h and remains for up to 3–6 days. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These studies provide structural requirements for synthesis of ‘universal’ opioid ligands. BU08073 had high affinity for all the opioid receptors, with moderate efficacy at μ receptors and reduced efficacy at NOP receptors, a profile suggesting potential analgesic activity. However, in vivo, BU08073 had long-lasting antagonist activity, indicating that its pharmacokinetics determined both the time course of its effects and what receptor-mediated effects were observed. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24903063

  20. Identification of short-acting κ-opioid receptor antagonists with anxiolytic-like activity.

    PubMed

    Peters, Matthew F; Zacco, Anna; Gordon, John; Maciag, Carla M; Litwin, Linda C; Thompson, Carolann; Schroeder, Patricia; Sygowski, Linda A; Piser, Timothy M; Brugel, Todd A

    2011-07-01

    The κ-opioid receptor plays a central role in mediating the response to stressful life events. Inhibiting κ-opioid receptor signaling is proposed as a mechanism for treating stress-related conditions such as depression and anxiety. Preclinical testing consistently confirms that disruption of κ-opioid signaling is efficacious in animal models of mood disorders. However, concerns about the feasibility of developing antagonists into drugs stem from an unusual pharmacodynamic property of prototypic κ-opioid receptor-selective antagonists; they inhibit receptor signaling for weeks to months after a single dose. Several fundamental questions include - is it possible to identify short-acting antagonists; is long-lasting inhibition necessary for efficacy; and is it safe to develop long-acting antagonists in the clinic. Here, we test representative compounds (AZ-ECPC, AZ-MTAB, and LY-DMPF) from three new chemical series of κ-opioid receptor ligands for long-lasting inhibition. Each compound dose-dependently reversed κ-opioid agonist-induced diuresis. However, unlike the prototypic antagonist, nBNI, which fully inhibited evoked diuresis for at least four weeks, the new compounds showed no inhibition after one week. The two compounds with greater potency and selectivity were tested in prenatally-stressed rats on the elevated plus maze, an exploration-based model of anxiety. Spontaneous exploration of open arms in the elevated plus maze was suppressed by prenatal stress and restored with both compounds. These findings indicate that persistent inhibition is not an inherent property of κ-opioid-selective antagonists and that post-stress dosing with transient inhibitors can be effective in a mood disorder model. This further supports κ-opioid receptor as a promising target for developing novel psychiatric medications. PMID:21539838

  1. Solid Phase Synthesis and Application of Labeled Peptide Derivatives: Probes of Receptor-Opioid Peptide Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aldrich, Jane V.; Kumar, Vivek; Dattachowdhury, Bhaswati; Peck, Angela M.; Wang, Xin; Murray, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Solid phase synthetic methodology has been developed in our laboratory to incorporate an affinity label (a reactive functionality such as isothiocyanate or bromoacetamide) into peptides (Leelasvatanakij, L. and Aldrich, J. V. (2000) J. Peptide Res. 56, 80), and we have used this synthetic strategy to prepare affinity label derivatives of a variety of opioid peptides. To date side reactions have been detected only in two cases, both involving intramolecular cyclization. We have identified several peptide-based affinity labels for δ opioid receptors that exhibit wash-resistant inhibition of binding to these receptors and are valuable pharmacological tools to study opioid receptors. Even in cases where the peptide derivatives do not bind covalently to their target receptor, studying their binding has revealed subtle differences in receptor interactions with particular opioid peptide residues, especially Phe residues in the N-terminal “message” sequences. Solid phase synthetic methodology for the incorporation of other labels (e.g. biotin) into the C-terminus of peptides has also been developed in our laboratory (Kumar, V. and Aldrich, J. V. (2003) Org. Lett. 5, 613). These two synthetic approaches have been combined to prepare peptides containing multiple labels that can be used as tools to study peptide ligand-receptor interactions. These solid phase synthetic methodologies are versatile strategies that are applicable to the preparation of labeled peptides for a variety of targets in addition to opioid receptors. PMID:19956785

  2. Prospects for Creation of Cardioprotective and Antiarrhythmic Drugs Based on Opioid Receptor Agonists.

    PubMed

    Maslov, Leonid N; Khaliulin, Igor; Oeltgen, Peter R; Naryzhnaya, Natalia V; Pei, Jian-Ming; Brown, Stephen A; Lishmanov, Yury B; Downey, James M

    2016-09-01

    It has now been demonstrated that the μ, δ1 , δ2 , and κ1 opioid receptor (OR) agonists represent the most promising group of opioids for the creation of drugs enhancing cardiac tolerance to the detrimental effects of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Opioids are able to prevent necrosis and apoptosis of cardiomyocytes during I/R and improve cardiac contractility in the reperfusion period. The OR agonists exert an infarct-reducing effect with prophylactic administration and prevent reperfusion-induced cardiomyocyte death when ischemic injury of heart has already occurred; that is, opioids can mimic preconditioning and postconditioning phenomena. Furthermore, opioids are also effective in preventing ischemia-induced arrhythmias. PMID:27197922

  3. Cellular signalling of non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the human μ-opioid receptor (OPRM1)

    PubMed Central

    Knapman, Alisa; Connor, Mark

    2015-01-01

    There is significant variability in individual responses to opioid drugs, which is likely to have a significant genetic component. A number of non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the coding regions of the μ-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1) have been postulated to contribute to this variability. Although many studies have investigated the clinical influences of these μ-opioid receptor variants, the outcomes are reported in the context of thousands of other genes and environmental factors, and we are no closer to being able to predict individual response to opioids based on genotype. Investigation of how μ-opioid receptor SNPs affect their expression, coupling to second messengers, desensitization and regulation is necessary to understand how subtle changes in receptor structure can impact individual responses to opioids. To date, the few functional studies that have investigated the consequences of SNPs on the signalling profile of the μ-opioid receptor in vitro have shown that the common N40D variant has altered functional responses to some opioids, while other, rarer, variants display altered signalling or agonist-dependent regulation. Here, we review the data available on the effects of μ-opioid receptor polymorphisms on receptor function, expression and regulation in vitro, and discuss the limitations of the studies to date. Whether or not μ-opioid receptor SNPs contribute to individual variability in opioid responses remains an open question, in large part because we have relatively little good data about how the amino acid changes affect μ-opioid receptor function. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24527749

  4. Antinociceptive Interactions between the Imidazoline I2 Receptor Agonist 2-BFI and Opioids in Rats: Role of Efficacy at the μ-Opioid Receptor.

    PubMed

    Siemian, Justin N; Obeng, Samuel; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yanan; Li, Jun-Xu

    2016-06-01

    Although μ-opioids have been reported to interact favorably with imidazoline I2 receptor (I2R) ligands in animal models of chronic pain, the dependence on the μ-opioid receptor ligand efficacy on these interactions had not been previously investigated. This study systematically examined the interactions between the selective I2 receptor ligand 2-(2-benzofuranyl)-2-imidazoline hydrochloride (2-BFI) and three μ-opioid receptor ligands of varying efficacies: fentanyl (high efficacy), buprenorphine (medium-low efficacy), and 17-cyclopropylmethyl-3,14β-dihydroxy-4,5α-epoxy-6α-[(3'-isoquinolyl) acetamido] morphine (NAQ; very low efficacy). The von Frey test of mechanical nociception and Hargreaves test of thermal nociception were used to examine the antihyperalgesic effects of drug combinations in complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammatory pain in rats. Food-reinforced schedule-controlled responding was used to examine the rate-suppressing effects of each drug combination. Dose-addition and isobolographical analyses were used to characterize the nature of drug-drug interactions in each assay. 2-BFI and fentanyl fully reversed both mechanical and thermal nociception, whereas buprenorphine significantly reversed thermal but only slightly reversed mechanical nociception. NAQ was ineffective in both nociception assays. When studied in combination with fentanyl, NAQ acted as a competitive antagonist (apparent pA2 value: 6.19). 2-BFI/fentanyl mixtures produced additive to infra-additive analgesic interactions, 2-BFI/buprenorphine mixtures produced supra-additive to infra-additive interactions, and 2-BFI/NAQ mixtures produced supra-additive to additive interactions in the nociception assays. The effects of all combinations on schedule-controlled responding were generally additive. Results consistent with these were found in experiments using female rats. These findings indicate that lower-efficacy μ-opioid receptor agonists may interact more favorably with I2R

  5. Opioid Drug Abuse and Modulation of Immune Function: Consequences in the Susceptibility to Opportunistic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sabita; Ninkovic, Jana; Banerjee, Santanu; Charboneau, Richard; Das, Subhas; Dutta, Raini; Kirchner, Varvara; Koodie, Lisa; Ma, Jing; Meng, Jingjing

    2013-01-01

    Infection rate among intravenous drug users (IDU) is higher than the general public, and is the major cause of morbidity and hospitalization in the IDU population. Epidemiologic studies provide data on increased prevalence of opportunistic bacterial infections such as TB and pneumonia, and viral infections such as HIV-1 and hepatitis in the IDU population. An important component in the intravenous drug abuse population and in patients receiving medically indicated chronic opioid treatment is opioid withdrawal. Data on bacterial virulence in the context of opioid withdrawal suggest that mice undergoing withdrawal had shortened survival and increased bacterial load in response to Salmonella infection. As the body of evidence in support of opioid dependency and its immunosuppressive effects is growing, it is imperative to understand the mechanisms by which opioids exert these effects and identify the populations at risk that would benefit the most from the interventions to counteract opioid immunosuppressive effects. Thus, it is important to refine the existing animal model to closely match human conditions and to cross-validate these findings through carefully controlled human studies. Better understanding of the mechanisms will facilitate the search for new therapeutic modalities to counteract adverse effects including increased infection rates. This review will summarize the effects of morphine on innate and adaptive immunity, identify the role of the mu opioid receptor in these functions and the signal transduction activated in the process. The role of opioid withdrawal in immunosuppression and the clinical relevance of these findings will also be discussed. PMID:21789507

  6. Reduced basal ganglia μ-opioid receptor availability in trigeminal neuropathic pain: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although neuroimaging techniques have provided insights into the function of brain regions involved in Trigeminal Neuropathic Pain (TNP) in humans, there is little understanding of the molecular mechanisms affected during the course of this disorder. Understanding these processes is crucial to determine the systems involved in the development and persistence of TNP. Findings In this study, we examined the regional μ-opioid receptor (μOR) availability in vivo (non-displaceable binding potential BPND) of TNP patients with positron emission tomography (PET) using the μOR selective radioligand [11C]carfentanil. Four TNP patients and eight gender and age-matched healthy controls were examined with PET. Patients with TNP showed reduced μOR BPND in the left nucleus accumbens (NAc), an area known to be involved in pain modulation and reward/aversive behaviors. In addition, the μOR BPND in the NAc was negatively correlated with the McGill sensory and total pain ratings in the TNP patients. Conclusions Our findings give preliminary evidence that the clinical pain in TNP patients can be related to alterations in the endogenous μ-opioid system, rather than only to the peripheral pathology. The decreased availability of μORs found in TNP patients, and its inverse relationship to clinical pain levels, provide insights into the central mechanisms related to this condition. The results also expand our understanding about the impact of chronic pain on the limbic system. PMID:23006894

  7. N-METHYL-d-ASPARTATE RECEPTORS AND LARGE CONDUCTANCE CALCIUM-SENSITIVE POTASSIUM CHANNELS INHIBIT THE RELEASE OF OPIOID PEPTIDES THAT INDUCE μ-OPIOID RECEPTOR INTERNALIZATION IN THE RAT SPINAL CORD

    PubMed Central

    SONG, B.; MARVIZÓN, J. C. G.

    2006-01-01

    Endogenous opioids in the spinal cord play an important role in nociception, but the mechanisms that control their release are poorly understood. To simultaneously detect all opioids able to activate the μ-opioid receptor, we measured μ-opioid receptor internalization in rat spinal cord slices stimulated electrically or chemically to evoke opioid release. Electrical stimulation of the dorsal horn in the presence of peptidase inhibitors produced μ-opioid receptor internalization in half of the μ-opioid receptor neurons. This internalization was rapidly abolished by N-methyl-d-aspartate (IC50=2 μM), and N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonists prevented this effect. μ-Opioid receptor internalization evoked by high K+ or veratridine was also inhibited by N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor activation. N-methyl-d-aspartate did not affect μ-opioid receptor internalization induced by exogenous endomorphins, confirming that the effect of N-methyl-d-aspartate was on opioid release. We hypothesized that this inhibition was mediated by large conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels BK(Ca2+). Indeed, inhibition by N-methyl-d-aspartate was prevented by tetraethylammonium and by the selective BK(Ca2+) blockers paxilline, penitrem A and verruculogen. Paxilline did not increase μ-opioid receptor internalization in the absence of N-methyl-d-aspartate, indicating that it does not produce an increase in opioid release unrelated to the inhibition by N-methyl-d-aspartate. The BK(Ca2+) involved appears to be a subtype with slow association kinetics for iberiotoxin, which was effective only with long incubations. The BK(Ca2+) opener NS-1619 also inhibited the evoked μ-opioid receptor internalization, and iberiotoxin prevented this effect. We concluded that Ca2+ influx through N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors causes the opening of BK(Ca2+) and hyperpolarization in opioid-containing dorsal horn neurons, resulting in the inhibition of opioid release. Since μ-opioid receptors in the dorsal horn

  8. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and large conductance calcium-sensitive potassium channels inhibit the release of opioid peptides that induce mu-opioid receptor internalization in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Song, B; Marvizón, J C G

    2005-01-01

    Endogenous opioids in the spinal cord play an important role in nociception, but the mechanisms that control their release are poorly understood. To simultaneously detect all opioids able to activate the mu-opioid receptor, we measured mu-opioid receptor internalization in rat spinal cord slices stimulated electrically or chemically to evoke opioid release. Electrical stimulation of the dorsal horn in the presence of peptidase inhibitors produced mu-opioid receptor internalization in half of the mu-opioid receptor neurons. This internalization was rapidly abolished by N-methyl-D-aspartate (IC50=2 microM), and N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonists prevented this effect. mu-Opioid receptor internalization evoked by high K+ or veratridine was also inhibited by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation. N-methyl-D-aspartate did not affect mu-opioid receptor internalization induced by exogenous endomorphins, confirming that the effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate was on opioid release. We hypothesized that this inhibition was mediated by large conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels BK(Ca2+). Indeed, inhibition by N-methyl-D-aspartate was prevented by tetraethylammonium and by the selective BK(Ca2+) blockers paxilline, penitrem A and verruculogen. Paxilline did not increase mu-opioid receptor internalization in the absence of N-methyl-D-aspartate, indicating that it does not produce an increase in opioid release unrelated to the inhibition by N-methyl-d-aspartate. The BK(Ca2+) involved appears to be a subtype with slow association kinetics for iberiotoxin, which was effective only with long incubations. The BK(Ca2+) opener NS-1619 also inhibited the evoked mu-opioid receptor internalization, and iberiotoxin prevented this effect. We concluded that Ca2+ influx through N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors causes the opening of BK(Ca2+) and hyperpolarization in opioid-containing dorsal horn neurons, resulting in the inhibition of opioid release. Since mu-opioid receptors in the dorsal horn

  9. Kappa opioid receptors stimulate phosphoinositide turnover in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Periyasamy, S.; Hoss, W. )

    1990-01-01

    The effects of various subtype-selective opioid agonists and antagonists on the phosphoinositide (PI) turnover response were investigated in the rat brain. The {kappa}-agonists U-50,488H and ketocyclazocine produced a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of IP's in hippocampal slices. The other {kappa}-agonists Dynorphin-A (1-13) amide, and its protected analog D(Ala){sup 2}-dynorphin-A (1-13) amide also produced a significant increase in the formation of ({sup 3}H)-IP's, whereas the {mu}-selective agonists (D-Ala{sup 2}-N-Me-Phe{sup 4}-Gly{sup 5}-ol)-enkephalin and morphine and the {delta}-selective agonist (D-Pen{sup 2,5})-enkephalin were ineffective. The increase in IP's formation elicited by U-50,488H was partially antagonized by naloxone and more completely antagonized by the {kappa}-selective antagonists nor-binaltorphimine and MR 2266. The formation of IP's induced by U-50,488H varies with the regions of the brain used, being highest in hippocampus and amygdala, and lowest in striatum and pons-medullar. The results indicate that brain {kappa}- but neither {mu}- nor {delta}- receptors are coupled to the PI turnover response.

  10. G-protein-independent modulation of P-type calcium channels by μ-opioids in Purkinje neurons of rat

    PubMed Central

    Iegorova, Olena; Fisyunov, Alexander; Krishtal, Oleg

    2010-01-01

    P-type calcium channels play a key role in the synaptic transmission between mammalian central neurons since a major part of calcium entering pre-synaptic terminals is delivered via these channels. Using conventional whole-cell patch clamp techniques we have studied the effect of μ-opioids on P-type calcium channels in acutely isolated Purkinje neurons from rat cerebellum. The selective μ-opioid agonist DAMGO (10 nM) produced a small, but consistent facilitation of current through P-type calcium channels (10±1%, n=27, p<0.001). The effect of DAMGO was rapid (less than 10 sec) and fully reversible. This effect was both concentration and voltage-dependent. The EC50 for the effect of DAMGO was 1.3±0.4 nM and the saturating concentration was 100 nM. The endogenous selective agonist of μ-opioid receptors, endomorphin-1 demonstrated similar action. Intracellular perfusion of Purkinje neurons with GTPγS (0.5 mM) or GDPβS (0.5 mM), as well as strong depolarizing pre-pulses (+50 mV), did not eliminate facilitatory action of DAMGO on P-channels indicating that this effect is not mediated by G-proteins. Furthermore, the effect of DAMGO was preserved in the presence of a non-specific inhibitor of PKA and PKC, (H7, 10 μM) inside the cell. DAMGO–induced facilitation of P-current was almost completely abolished by the selective μ-opioid antagonist CTOP (100 nM). These observations indicate that μ-type opioid receptors modulate P-type calcium channels in Purkinje neurons via G-protein-independent mechanism. PMID:20541588

  11. Effect of mitragynine, derived from Thai folk medicine, on gastric acid secretion through opioid receptor in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Shizuko; Miyashita, Sanae; Yamamoto, Makiko; Horie, Syunji; Sakai, Shin-Ichiro; Aimi, Norio; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2002-05-17

    Mitragynine, an indole alkaloid from Thai folk medicine Mitragyna speciosa, exerts agonistic effects on opioid receptors. Gastric acid secretion is proposed to be regulated by opioid receptors in the central nervous system (CNS). Previously, we reported the dual roles (inhibition via micro-opioid receptors and stimulation via kappa-opioid receptors) of the opioid system in the central control of gastric acid secretion. We investigated whether mitragynine affects gastric acid secretion via opioid receptors in the CNS. Injection of mitragynine (30 microg) alone into the lateral cerebroventricle did not have a significant effect on basal gastric acid secretion in the perfused stomach of anesthetized rats. Injection of mitragynine (3-30 microg) into the fourth cerebroventricle, like morphine, inhibited 2-deoxy-D-glucose-stimulated gastric acid secretion. The inhibitory effect of mitragynine (30 microg) was reversed by naloxone (100 microg). These results suggest that mitragynine has a morphine-like action on gastric acid secretion in the CNS. PMID:12044808

  12. Salvinorin A analogs and other kappa opioid receptor compounds as treatments for cocaine abuse

    PubMed Central

    Kivell, Bronwyn M; Ewald, Amy WM; Prisinzano, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Acute activation of κ opioid receptors produces anti-addictive effects by regulating dopamine levels in the brain. Unfortunately, classic κ opioid agonists have undesired side effects such as sedation, aversion and depression which restrict their clinical use. Salvinorin A (Sal A), a novel κ opioid receptor agonist extracted from the plant Salvia divinorum, has been identified as a potential therapy for drug abuse and addiction. Here, we review the preclinical effects of Sal A in comparison with traditional κ opioid agonists and several new analogues. Sal A retains the anti-addictive properties of traditional κ opioid receptors agonists with several improvements including reduced side effects. However, the rapid metabolism of Sal A makes it undesirable for clinical development. In an effort to improve the pharmacokinetics and tolerability of this compound, κ opioid receptor agonists based on the structure of Sal A have been synthesized. While work in this field is still in progress, several analogues with improved pharmacokinetic profiles have been shown to have anti-addiction effects. While in its infancy, it is clear that these compounds hold promise for the future development of anti-addiction therapeutics. PMID:24484985

  13. The role of δ-opioid receptors in learning and memory underlying the development of addiction

    PubMed Central

    Klenowski, Paul; Morgan, Michael; Bartlett, Selena E

    2015-01-01

    Opioids are important endogenous ligands that exist in both invertebrates and vertebrates and signal by activation of opioid receptors to produce analgesia and reward or pleasure. The μ-opioid receptor is the best known of the opioid receptors and mediates the acute analgesic effects of opiates, while the δ-opioid receptor (DOR) has been less well studied and has been linked to effects that follow from chronic use of opiates such as stress, inflammation and anxiety. Recently, DORs have been shown to play an essential role in emotions and increasing evidence points to a role in learning actions and outcomes. The process of learning and memory in addiction has been proposed to involve strengthening of specific brain circuits when a drug is paired with a context or environment. The DOR is highly expressed in the hippocampus, amygdala, striatum and other basal ganglia structures known to participate in learning and memory. In this review, we will focus on the role of the DOR and its potential role in learning and memory underlying the development of addiction. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24641428

  14. Inhibition of Opioid Transmission at the μ-Opioid Receptor Prevents Both Food Seeking and Binge-Like Eating

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, Chiara; Robbins, Trevor W; Nathan, Pradeep J; Bullmore, Edward T; Everitt, Barry J

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous opioids, and in particular μ-opioid receptors, have been linked to hedonic and rewarding mechanisms engaged during palatable food intake. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GSK1521498, a novel μ-opioid receptor antagonist, on food-seeking behavior and on binge-like eating of a highly preferred chocolate diet. Food seeking was measured in rats trained to respond for chocolate under a second-order schedule of reinforcement, in which prolonged periods of food-seeking behavior were maintained by contingent presentation of a reward-associated conditioned reinforcer. After reaching a stable baseline in both procedures, animals were treated with GSK1521498 (0.1, 1, and 3 mg/kg; IP) or naltrexone (NTX, 0.1, 1, and 3 mg/kg; SC). The binge eating model was characterized by four temporally contiguous phases: 1-h chow access, 2-h food deprivation, 10-min chow access, and 10-min access to either chocolate-flavoured food or standard chow. During training the rats developed binge-like hyperphagia of palatable food and anticipatory chow hypophagia (anticipatory negative contrast). Both compounds reduced binge-like palatable food hyperphagia. However, GSK1521498 reduced the impact of high hedonic value on ingestion more specifically than NTX, abolishing anticipatory chow hypophagia. GSK1521498 also dose-dependently reduced food seeking both before and after food ingestion, whereas NTX reduced food seeking only after food ingestion. Thus, while both drugs affected the hedonic value of the preferred food, GSK1521498 also directly decreased incentive motivation for chocolate. Selective μ-opioid receptor antagonism by GSK1521498 may have utility as a treatment for reducing maladaptive, palatability-driven eating behavior by reducing the motivational properties of stimuli that elicit the binge eating commonly associated with obesity. PMID:22805601

  15. The presence of the mu-opioid receptor in the isthmus of mare oviduct.

    PubMed

    Desantis, S; Albrizio, M; Ventriglia, G; Deflorio, M; Guaricci, A C; Minoia, R; De Metrio, G

    2008-05-01

    The presence of the mu-opioid receptor and the type of glycosylation in the third extra-cellular loop of this receptor was investigated in the isthmus of mare oviduct during oestrus by means of immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry combined with enzymatic (N-glycosidase F and O-glycosidase) and chemical (beta-elimination) treatments. Immunoblotting analysis showed that the mu-opioid receptor consists of two peptides with molecular weights of around 65 and 50 kDa. After N-deglycosylation with N-glycosidase F an additional immunoreactive peptide was observed at around 30 KDa. The cleavage of O-glycans by O-glycosidase failed in immunoblotting as well as in immunohistochemistry investigations, revealing that the third extra-cellular loop of the mu-opioid receptor expressed in mare isthmus oviduct contains some modifications of the Galbeta(1-3)GalNAc core binding to serine or threonine. Immunohistochemistry revealed the mu-opioid receptor in the mucosal epithelium, some stromal cells, muscle cells and blood vessels. In ciliated cells the mu-opioid receptor showed N-linked glycans, since the immunoreactivity was abolished after N-glycosidase F treatment, whereas it was preserved in the apical region after beta-elimination. Most non-ciliated cells expressed the mu-opioid receptor with both N- and O-linked oligosaccharides, as revealed by the abolition of immunostaining after N-glycosidase F and beta-elimination. Stromal cells, endothelial and muscle cells of blood vessels expressed the mu-opioid receptor containing both N- and O-linked oligosaccharides. Myosalpinx myocytes expressed the mu-opioid receptor with O-linked oligosaccharides. The immunopositive myocytes formed a circular coat in the intrinsic musculature, whereas they were arranged in some isolated, oblique bundles in the extrinsic musculature. In conclusion, the mu-opioid receptor could have a role in the production and the movement of isthmus lumen content that contributes to ensuring the effective

  16. Discovery of the first small-molecule opioid pan antagonist with nanomolar affinity at mu, delta, kappa, and nociceptin opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Zaveri, Nurulain T; Journigan, V Blair; Polgar, Willma E

    2015-04-15

    The trans-(3R,4R)-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine scaffold is a known pharmacophore for mu opioid (MOP), kappa opioid (KOP), and delta opioid (DOP) receptor antagonists; however, it has not been explored in nociceptin opioid (NOP/ORL-1) receptor ligands. We recently found that the selective KOP antagonist JDTic, (3R)-7-hydroxy-N-((1S)-1-{[(3R,4R)-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-3,4-dimethyl-1-piperidinyl]methyl}-2-methylpropyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide, containing this opioid antagonist pharmacophore, has significant binding affinity at the NOP receptor (Ki 16.67 ± 0.76 nM), with no intrinsic activity in the [(35)S]GTPγS functional assay. Since this is the first ligand containing the trans-(3R,4R)-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine opioid antagonist pharmacophore to have affinity for the NOP receptor, we explored the structural determinants of its NOP binding affinity. When rational chemical modifications of JDTic were carried out, based on our previously established NOP pharmacophoric structure-activity relationship (SAR) model, most modifications led to a significant decrease in NOP and opioid binding affinity compared to JDTic. Interestingly, however, removal of the 3,4-dimethyl groups of the trans-(3R,4R)-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine antagonist scaffold of JDTic increased the binding affinity at NOP by 10-fold (Ki 1.75 ± 0.74 nM) while maintaining comparable affinity for KOP, MOP, and DOP receptors (Ki 1.14 ± 0.63, 1.67 ± 0.6, and 19.6 ± 1.3 nM, respectively). In vitro functional efficacy studies using the [(35)S]GTPγS assay showed that this compound AT-076 functions as an antagonist at all four opioid receptors. Detailed characterization of the antagonist activity of AT-076 shows that it has a noncompetitive antagonist profile at the NOP and KOP receptors (insurmountable antagonism), but is a potent competitive antagonist at the MOP and DOP receptors, with Ke values 3-6-fold more potent than those of JDTic. AT-076 is the

  17. Discovery of the First Small-Molecule Opioid Pan Antagonist with Nanomolar Affinity at Mu, Delta, Kappa, and Nociceptin Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The trans-(3R,4R)-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine scaffold is a known pharmacophore for mu opioid (MOP), kappa opioid (KOP), and delta opioid (DOP) receptor antagonists; however, it has not been explored in nociceptin opioid (NOP/ORL-1) receptor ligands. We recently found that the selective KOP antagonist JDTic, (3R)-7-hydroxy-N-((1S)-1-{[(3R,4R)-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-3,4-dimethyl-1-piperidinyl]methyl}-2-methylpropyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide, containing this opioid antagonist pharmacophore, has significant binding affinity at the NOP receptor (Ki 16.67 ± 0.76 nM), with no intrinsic activity in the [35S]GTPγS functional assay. Since this is the first ligand containing the trans-(3R,4R)-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine opioid antagonist pharmacophore to have affinity for the NOP receptor, we explored the structural determinants of its NOP binding affinity. When rational chemical modifications of JDTic were carried out, based on our previously established NOP pharmacophoric structure–activity relationship (SAR) model, most modifications led to a significant decrease in NOP and opioid binding affinity compared to JDTic. Interestingly, however, removal of the 3,4-dimethyl groups of the trans-(3R,4R)-dimethyl-4-(3-hydroxyphenyl)piperidine antagonist scaffold of JDTic increased the binding affinity at NOP by 10-fold (Ki 1.75 ± 0.74 nM) while maintaining comparable affinity for KOP, MOP, and DOP receptors (Ki 1.14 ± 0.63, 1.67 ± 0.6, and 19.6 ± 1.3 nM, respectively). In vitro functional efficacy studies using the [35S]GTPγS assay showed that this compound AT-076 functions as an antagonist at all four opioid receptors. Detailed characterization of the antagonist activity of AT-076 shows that it has a noncompetitive antagonist profile at the NOP and KOP receptors (insurmountable antagonism), but is a potent competitive antagonist at the MOP and DOP receptors, with Ke values 3–6-fold more potent than those of JDTic. AT-076 is the

  18. In Vivo Techniques to Investigate the Internalization Profile of Opioid Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Amynah A.; Tawfik, Vivianne L.; Laboy, Alycia F.; Scherrer, Grégory

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) regulate a remarkable diversity of biological functions, and are thus often targeted for drug therapies. Receptor internalization is commonly observed following agonist binding and activation. Receptor trafficking events have been well characterized in cell systems, but the in vivo significance of GPCR internalization is still poorly understood. To address this issue, we have developed an innovative knock-in mouse model, where an opioid receptor is directly visible in vivo. These knockin mice express functional fluorescent delta opioid receptors (DOR-eGFP) in place of the endogenous receptor, and these receptors are expressed at physiological levels within their native environment. DOR-eGFP mice have proven to be an extraordinary tool in studying receptor neuroanatomy, real-time receptor trafficking in live neurons, and in vivo receptor internalization. We have used this animal model to determine the relationship between receptor trafficking in neurons and receptor function at a behavioral level. Here, we describe in detail the construction and characterization of this knockin mouse. We also outline how to use these mice to examine the behavioral consequences of agonist-specific trafficking at the delta opioid receptor. These techniques are potentially applicable to any GPCR, and highlight the powerful nature of this imaging tool. PMID:25293318

  19. Interaction of co-expressed mu- and delta-opioid receptors in transfected rat pituitary GH(3) cells.

    PubMed

    Martin, N A; Prather, P L

    2001-04-01

    mu- and delta-Opioid agonists interact in a synergistic manner to produce analgesia in several animal models. Additionally, receptor binding studies using membranes derived from brain tissue indicate that interactions between mu- and delta-opioid receptors might be responsible for the observation of multiple opioid receptor subtypes. To examine potential interactions between mu- and delta-opioid receptors, we examined receptor binding and functional characteristics of mu-, delta-, or both mu- and delta-opioid receptors stably transfected in rat pituitary GH(3) cells (GH(3)MOR, GH(3)DOR, and GH(3)MORDOR, respectively). Saturation and competition binding experiments revealed that coexpression of mu- and delta-opioid receptors resulted in the appearance of multiple affinity states for mu- but not delta-opioid receptors. Additionally, coadministration of selective mu- and delta-opioid agonists in GH(3)MORDOR cells resulted in a synergistic competition with [(3)H][D-Pen(2,5)]enkephalin (DPDPE) for delta-opioid receptors. Finally, when equally effective concentrations of [D-Ala(2),N-MePhe(4),Gly-ol(5)]enkephalin (DAMGO) and two different delta-opioid agonists (DPDPE or 2-methyl-4a alpha-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,3,4,4a,5,12,12a alpha-octahydroquinolino-[2,3,3-g]-isoquinoline; TAN67) were coadministered in GH(3)MORDOR cells, a synergistic inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity was observed. These results strongly suggest that cotransfection of mu- and delta-opioid receptors alters the binding and functional characteristics of the receptors. Therefore, we propose that the simultaneous exposure of GH(3)MORDOR cells to selective mu- and delta-opioid agonists produces an interaction between receptors resulting in enhanced receptor binding. This effect is translated into an augmented ability of these agonists to inhibit adenylyl cyclase activity. Similar interactions occurring in neurons that express both mu- and delta-opioid receptors could explain observations of multiple

  20. Autoradiographic localization of opioid receptor types in the rat small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Dashwood, M.R.; Sykes, R.M.; Thompson, C.S.

    1986-01-01

    The selective mu and delta ligands (/sup 3/H)DAGO and (/sup 3/H)DPDPE have been used to investigate the distribution of specific opioid subtypes in the rat small intestine by in vitro autoradiography. There was a greater density of (/sup 3/H)DPDPE binding at regions of the villi and crypts than (/sup 3/H)DAGO binding. These results suggest that the opioid receptors located in these regions are predominantly of the delta subtype.

  1. Antinociceptive action of isolated mitragynine from Mitragyna Speciosa through activation of opioid receptor system.

    PubMed

    Shamima, Abdul Rahman; Fakurazi, Sharida; Hidayat, Mohamad Taufik; Hairuszah, Ithnin; Moklas, Mohamad Aris Mohd; Arulselvan, Palanisamy

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoids and opioids systems share numerous pharmacological properties and antinociception is one of them. Previous findings have shown that mitragynine (MG), a major indole alkaloid found in Mitragyna speciosa (MS) can exert its antinociceptive effects through the opioids system. In the present study, the action of MG was investigated as the antinociceptive agent acting on Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and effects on the opioids receptor. The latency time was recorded until the mice showed pain responses such as shaking, licking or jumping and the duration of latency was measured for 2 h at every 15 min interval by hot plate analysis. To investigate the beneficial effects of MG as antinociceptive agent, it was administered intraperitoneally 15 min prior to pain induction with a single dosage (3, 10, 15, 30, and 35 mg/kg b.wt). In this investigation, 35 mg/kg of MG showed significant increase in the latency time and this dosage was used in the antagonist receptor study. The treated groups were administered with AM251 (cannabinoid receptor-1 antagonist), naloxone (non-selective opioid antagonist), naltrindole (δ-opioid antagonist) naloxonazine (μ(1)-receptor antagonist) and norbinaltorpimine (κ-opioid antagonist) respectively, prior to administration of MG (35 mg/kg). The results showed that the antinociceptive effect of MG was not antagonized by AM251; naloxone and naltrindole were effectively blocked; and norbinaltorpimine partially blocked the antinociceptive effect of MG. Naloxonazine did inhibit the effect of MG, but it was not statistically significant. These results demonstrate that CB1 does not directly have a role in the antinociceptive action of MG where the effect was observed with the activation of opioid receptor. PMID:23109863

  2. Antinociceptive Action of Isolated Mitragynine from Mitragyna Speciosa through Activation of Opioid Receptor System

    PubMed Central

    Shamima, Abdul Rahman; Fakurazi, Sharida; Hidayat, Mohamad Taufik; Hairuszah, Ithnin; Moklas, Mohamad Aris Mohd; Arulselvan, Palanisamy

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoids and opioids systems share numerous pharmacological properties and antinociception is one of them. Previous findings have shown that mitragynine (MG), a major indole alkaloid found in Mitragyna speciosa (MS) can exert its antinociceptive effects through the opioids system. In the present study, the action of MG was investigated as the antinociceptive agent acting on Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and effects on the opioids receptor. The latency time was recorded until the mice showed pain responses such as shaking, licking or jumping and the duration of latency was measured for 2 h at every 15 min interval by hot plate analysis. To investigate the beneficial effects of MG as antinociceptive agent, it was administered intraperitoneally 15 min prior to pain induction with a single dosage (3, 10, 15, 30, and 35 mg/kg b.wt). In this investigation, 35 mg/kg of MG showed significant increase in the latency time and this dosage was used in the antagonist receptor study. The treated groups were administered with AM251 (cannabinoid receptor-1 antagonist), naloxone (non-selective opioid antagonist), naltrindole (δ-opioid antagonist) naloxonazine (μ1-receptor antagonist) and norbinaltorpimine (κ-opioid antagonist) respectively, prior to administration of MG (35 mg/kg). The results showed that the antinociceptive effect of MG was not antagonized by AM251; naloxone and naltrindole were effectively blocked; and norbinaltorpimine partially blocked the antinociceptive effect of MG. Naloxonazine did inhibit the effect of MG, but it was not statistically significant. These results demonstrate that CB1 does not directly have a role in the antinociceptive action of MG where the effect was observed with the activation of opioid receptor. PMID:23109863

  3. Powerful inhibitory action of mu opioid receptors (MOR) on cholinergic interneuron excitability in the dorsal striatum.

    PubMed

    Ponterio, G; Tassone, A; Sciamanna, G; Riahi, E; Vanni, V; Bonsi, P; Pisani, A

    2013-12-01

    Cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) of dorsal striatum play a key role in motor control and in behavioural learning. Neuropeptides regulate cholinergic transmission and mu opioid receptor (MOR) activation modulates striatal acetylcholine release. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect are yet uncharacterized. Here, we examined the electrophysiological responses of ChIs to the selective MOR agonist, DAMGO {[D-Ala2-MePhe4-Gly(ol)5] enkephalin}. We observed a robust, dose-dependent inhibition of spontaneous firing activity (0.06-3 μM) which was reversible upon drug washout and blocked by the selective antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP) (1 μM). Voltage-clamp analysis of the reversal potential of the DAMGO effect did not provide univocal results, indicating the involvement of multiple membrane conductances. The MOR-dependent effect persisted in the presence of GABAA and ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, ruling out an indirect effect. Additionally, it depended upon G-protein activation, as it was prevented by intrapipette GDP-β-S. Because D2 dopamine receptors (D2R) and MOR share a common post-receptor signalling pathway, occlusion experiments were performed with maximal doses of both D2R and MOR agonists. The D2R agonist quinpirole decreased spike discharge, which was further reduced by adding DAMGO. Then, D2R or MOR antagonists were used to challenge the response to the respective agonists, DAMGO or quinpirole. No cross-effect was observed, suggesting that the two receptors act independently. Our findings demonstrate a postsynaptic inhibitory modulation by MOR on ChIs excitability. Such opioidergic regulation of cholinergic transmission might contribute to shape information processing in basal ganglia circuits, and represent a potential target for pharmacological intervention. PMID:23891638

  4. Purification and characterization of mu-specific opioid receptor from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, J.; Cho, T.M.; Ge, B.L.; Loh, H.H.

    1986-03-05

    A mu-specific opioid receptor was purified to apparent homogeneity from rat brain membranes by 6-succinylmorphine affinity chromatography, Ultrogel filtration, wheat germ agglutinin affinity chromatography, and isoelectric focusing. The purified receptor had a molecular weight of 58,000 as determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and was judged to be homogeneous by the following criteria: (1) a single band on the SDS gel; and (2) a specific opioid binding activity of 17,720 pmole/mg protein, close to the theoretical value. In addition, the 58,000 molecular weight value agrees closely with that determined by covalently labelling purified receptor with bromoacetyl-/sup 3/H-dihydromorphine or with /sup 125/I-beta-endorphin and dimethyl suberimidate. To their knowledge, this is the first complete purification of an opioid receptor that retains its ability to bind opiates.

  5. Antidepressant-like Effects of Buprenorphine are Mediated by Kappa Opioid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Falcon, Edgardo; Browne, Caroline A; Leon, Rosa M; Fleites, Vanessa C; Sweeney, Rachel; Kirby, Lynn G; Lucki, Irwin

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have identified potential antidepressant effects of buprenorphine (BPN), a drug with high affinity for mu opioid receptor (MORs) and kappa opioid receptors (KORs) and some affinity at delta opioid receptor (DOR) and opioid receptor-like 1 (ORL-1) receptors. Therefore, these studies examined which opioid receptors were involved in BPN's effects on animal behavior tests sensitive to antidepressant drugs. The acute effects of BPN were tested in the forced swim test (FST) using mice with genetic deletion of individual opioid receptors or after pharmacological blockade of receptors. For evaluating the effects of BPN on chronic stress, separate groups of mice were exposed to unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) for 3 weeks and treated with BPN for at least 7 days before behavioral assessment and subsequent measurement of Oprk1, Oprm1, and Pdyn mRNA expression in multiple brain regions. BPN did not reduce immobility in mice with KOR deletion or after pretreatment with norbinaltorphimine, even though desipramine remained effective. In contrast, BPN reduced immobility in MOR and DOR knockout mice and in mice pretreated with the ORL-1 antagonist JTC-801. UCMS reduced sucrose preference, decreased time in the light side of the light/dark box, increased immobility in the FST and induced region-specific alterations in Oprk1, Oprm1, and PDYN mRNA expression in the frontal cortex and striatum. All of these changes were normalized following BPN treatment. The KOR was identified as a key player mediating the effects of BPN in tests sensitive to antidepressant drugs in mice. These studies support further development of BPN as a novel antidepressant. PMID:26979295

  6. Opioid receptor activation triggering downregulation of cAMP improves effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Claudia; Hormann, Inis; Roscher, Mareike; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma are the most frequent and malignant human brain tumors, having a very poor prognosis. The enhanced radio- and chemoresistance of glioblastoma and the glioblastoma stem cells might be the main reason why conventional therapies fail. The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) controls cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Downregulation of cAMP sensitizes tumor cells for anti-cancer treatment. Opioid receptor agonists triggering opioid receptors can activate inhibitory Gi proteins, which, in turn, block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. In this study, we show that downregulation of cAMP by opioid receptor activation improves the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma. The µ-opioid receptor agonist D,L-methadone sensitizes glioblastoma as well as the untreatable glioblastoma stem cells for doxorubicin-induced apoptosis and activation of apoptosis pathways by reversing deficient caspase activation and deficient downregulation of XIAP and Bcl-xL, playing critical roles in glioblastomas’ resistance. Blocking opioid receptors using the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone or increasing intracellular cAMP by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) strongly reduced opioid receptor agonist-induced sensitization for doxorubicin. In addition, the opioid receptor agonist D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux, whereas doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in glioblastomas. Furthermore, opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone inhibited tumor growth significantly in vivo. Our findings suggest that opioid receptor activation triggering downregulation of cAMP is a promising strategy to inhibit tumor growth and to improve the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma and in killing glioblastoma stem cells. PMID:24626197

  7. Renal mu opioid receptor mechanisms in regulation of renal function in rats.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Jones, S Y; DiBona, G F

    1991-07-01

    Studies were performed in pentobarbital anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats to determine whether mu opioid receptor agonists produce changes in renal function via intrarenal mechanisms. Left renal artery infusion of isotonic saline vehicle or the selective mu opioid receptor agonist, dermorphin (0.5 nmol/kg/min), did not alter mean arterial pressure or heart rate. In contrast, left renal artery dermorphin administration produced a significant decrease in left kidney urinary flow rate and sodium excretion without altering glomerular filtration rate or effective renal plasma flow; function of the right kidney was unaffected. Pretreatment of the left kidney with the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, 50 micrograms/kg into left renal artery, prevented changes in urinary flow rate and sodium excretion induced by subsequent left renal artery dermorphin administration. Prior bilateral renal denervation abolished the antidiuretic and antinatriuretic responses to left renal artery dermorphin administration. These results suggest that mu opioid receptor agonists participate in the process of renal tubular sodium and water reabsorption via an intrarenal action that is dependent on an interaction with renal sympathetic nerves. This may occur via an action of mu opioid receptor agonists to facilitate the nerve terminal release and/or the direct tubular action of norepinephrine to affect renal tubular sodium and water reabsorption. PMID:1677034

  8. Maturational alterations in constitutive activity of medial prefrontal cortex kappa-opioid receptors in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Sirohi, Sunil; Walker, Brendan M

    2015-11-01

    Opioid receptors can display spontaneous agonist-independent G-protein signaling (basal signaling/constitutive activity). While constitutive κ-opioid receptor (KOR) activity has been documented in vitro, it remains unknown if KORs are constitutively active in native systems. Using [(35) S] guanosine 5'-O-[gamma-thio] triphosphate coupling assay that measures receptor functional state, we identified the presence of medial prefrontal cortex KOR constitutive activity in young rats that declined with age. Furthermore, basal signaling showed an age-related decline and was insensitive to neutral opioid antagonist challenge. Collectively, the present data are first to demonstrate age-dependent alterations in the medial prefrontal cortex KOR constitutive activity in rats and changes in the constitutive activity of KORs can differentially impact KOR ligand efficacy. These data provide novel insights into the functional properties of the KOR system and warrant further consideration of KOR constitutive activity in normal and pathophysiological behavior. Opioid receptors exhibit agonist-independent constitutive activity; however, kappa-opioid receptor (KOR) constitutive activity has not been demonstrated in native systems. Our results confirm KOR constitutive activity in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) that declines with age. With the ability to presynaptically inhibit multiple neurotransmitter systems in the mPFC, maturational or patho-logical alterations in constitutive activity could disrupt corticofugal glutamatergic pyramidal projection neurons mediating executive function. Regulation of KOR constitutive activity could serve as a therapeutic target to treat compromised executive function. PMID:26257334

  9. Opiate-induced constipation related to activation of small intestine opioid μ2-receptors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wency; Chung, Hsien-Hui; Cheng, Juei-Tang

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of opioid μ-receptor subtype in opiate-induced constipation (OIC). METHODS: The effect of loperamide on intestinal transit was investigated in mice. Ileum strips were isolated from 12-wk-old male BALB/c mice for identification of isometric tension. The ileum strips were precontracted with 1 μmol/L acetylcholine (ACh). Then, decrease in muscle tone (relaxation) was characterized after cumulative administration of 0.1-10 μmol/L loperamide into the organ bath, for a concentration-dependent study. Specific blockers or antagonists were used for pretreatment to compare the changes in loperamide-induced relaxation. RESULTS: In addition to the delay in intestinal transit, loperamide produced a marked relaxation in isolated ileum precontracted with ACh, in a dose-dependent manner. This relaxation was abolished by cyprodime, a selective opioid μ-receptor antagonist, but not modified by naloxonazine at a dose sufficient to block opioid μ-1 receptors. Also, treatment with opioid μ-1 receptor agonist failed to modify the muscle tone. Moreover, the relaxation by loperamide was attenuated by glibenclamide at a dose sufficient to block ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels, and by protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, but was enhanced by an inhibitor of phosphodiesterase for cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). CONCLUSION: Loperamide induces intestinal relaxation by activation of opioid μ-2 receptors via the cAMP-PKA pathway to open KATP channels, relates to OIC. PMID:22493554

  10. Analgesic tolerance of opioid agonists in mutant mu-opioid receptors expressed in sensory neurons following intrathecal plasmid gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Phosphorylation sites in the C-terminus of mu-opioid receptors (MORs) are known to play critical roles in the receptor functions. Our understanding of their participation in opioid analgesia is mostly based on studies of opioid effects on mutant receptors expressed in in vitro preparations, including cell lines, isolated neurons and brain slices. The behavioral consequences of the mutation have not been fully explored due to the complexity in studies of mutant receptors in vivo. To facilitate the determination of the contribution of phosphorylation sites in MOR to opioid-induced analgesic behaviors, we expressed mutant and wild-type human MORs (hMORs) in sensory dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, a major site for nociceptive (pain) signaling and determined morphine- and the full MOR agonist, DAMGO,-induced effects on heat-induced hyperalgesic behaviors and potassium current (IK) desensitization in these rats. Findings A mutant hMOR DNA with the putative phosphorylation threonine site at position 394 replaced by an alanine (T394A), i.e., hMOR-T, or a plasmid containing wild type hMOR (as a positive control) was intrathecally delivered. The plasmid containing GFP or saline was used as the negative control. To limit the expression of exogenous DNA to neurons of DRGs, a neuron-specific promoter was included in the plasmid. Following a plasmid injection, hMOR-T or hMOR receptors were expressed in small and medium DRG neurons. Compared with saline or GFP rats, the analgesic potency of morphine was increased to a similar extent in hMOR-T and hMOR rats. Morphine induced minimum IK desensitization in both rat groups. In contrast, DAMGO increased analgesic potency and elicited IK desensitization to a significantly less extent in hMOR-T than in hMOR rats. The development and extent of acute and chronic tolerance induced by repeated morphine or DAMGO applications were not altered by the T394A mutation. Conclusions These results indicate that phosphorylation of T394