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Sample records for optic neuropathy aion

  1. Protective effects of systemic treatment with methylprednisolone in a rodent model of non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION).

    PubMed

    Huang, Tzu-Lun; Huang, Shun-Ping; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Lin, Kung-Hung; Chang, Shu-Wen; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the protective effects of the administration of steroids on optic nerves (ON) and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in a rodent model of non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION). We induced rAION using rose bengal and argon laser irradiation in a photodynamic procedure on the optic discs of rats. The treated groups received methylprednisolone (MP) via peritoneal injection for 2 weeks. The control group received intraperitoneal injections of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) post-rAION. At the 4th week post-infarct, MP treatments significantly rescued the RGCs (mm(2)) in the central retinas (1920 ± 210, p < 0.001) and mid-peripheral retinas (950 ± 240, respectively, p = 0.018) compared with those of the PBS-treated rats (central: 900 ± 210 and mid-peripheral: 440 ± 180). Functional assessment with flash visual-evoked potentials demonstrated that P1 latency (ms) was shortened in the MP group compared to the PBS group (108 ± 14 and 147 ± 9, respectively, p < 0.001). In addition, the P1 amplitude (uV) was enhanced in the MP group compared to the PBS group (55 ± 12 and 41 ± 13, respectively, p < 0.05). TUNEL assays showed a decrease in the number of apoptotic cells in the RGC layers of MP-treated retinas compared to the PBS-treated group (p < 0.05). ED1 positive cells (/HPF) were significantly decreased in the ONs of the MP group compared to the PBS group (p < 0.001). In conclusion, systemic administration of MP had neuroprotective effects on RGC survival and ON function in the rAION animal model. PMID:25543054

  2. Axonal degeneration, regeneration and ganglion cell death in a rodent model of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cheng; Guo, Yan; Slater, Bernard J; Miller, Neil R; Bernstein, Steven L

    2010-08-01

    Using laser-induced photoactivation of intravenously administered rose Bengal in rats, we generated an ischemic infarction of the intrascleral portion of the optic nerve (ON) comparable to that which occurs in humans to investigate optic nerve axon degenerative events following optic nerve infarct and the potential for axon re-growth. Animals were euthanized at different times post infarct. Axon degeneration was evaluated with SMI312 immunolabeling, and GAP-43 immunostaining was used to identify axon regeneration. Terminal dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was used to evaluate retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death. There was significant axon structural disruptinot ion at the anterior intrascleral portion of the ON by 3d post-infarct, extending to the posterior ON by 7d post-stroke. Destruction of normal axon structure and massive loss of axon fibers occurred by 2 weeks. GAP-43 immunoreactivity occurred in the anterior ON by 7d post-infarct, lasting 3-4 weeks, without extension past the primary ischemic lesion. TUNEL-positive cells in the RGC layer appeared by 7d post-insult. These results indicate that following induction of ischemic optic neuropathy, significant axon damage occurs by 3d post-infarct, with later neuronal death. Post-stroke adult rat retinal ganglion cells attempt to regenerate their axons, but this effort is restricted to the unmyelinated region of the anterior ON. These responses are important in understanding pathologic process that underlies human non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and may guide both the appropriate treatment of NAION and the window of opportunity for such treatment. PMID:20621651

  3. Management of ischemic optic neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Hayreh, Sohan Singh

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic optic neuropathies (IONs) consist primarily of two types: anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION). AION comprises arteritic AION (A-AION: due to giant cell arteritis) and non-arteritic AION (NA-AION: due to other causes). PION consists of arteritic PION (A-PION: due to giant cell arteritis), non-arteritic PION (NA-PION: due to other causes), and surgical PION (a complication of several systemic surgical procedures). These five types of ION are distinct clinical entities etiologically, pathogenetically, clinically and from the management point of view. In the management of AION, the first crucial step with patients aged 50 and over is to identify immediately whether it is arteritic or not because A-AION is an ophthalmic emergency and requires urgent treatment with high-dose steroid therapy to prevent any further visual loss in one or both eyes. Patients with NA-AION, when treated with systemic corticosteroid therapy within first 2 weeks of onset, had significantly better visual outcome than untreated ones. Systemic risk factors, particularly nocturnal arterial hypotension, play major roles in the development of NA-AION; management of them is essential in its prevention and management. NA-PION patients, when treated with high-dose systemic steroid therapy during the very early stages of the disease, showed significant improvement in visual acuity and visual fields, compared to untreated eyes. A-PION, like A-AION, requires urgent treatment with high-dose steroid therapy to prevent any further visual loss in one or both eyes. There is no satisfactory treatment for surgical PION, except to take prophylactic measures to prevent its development. PMID:21350282

  4. Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and its experimental models

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Steven L.; Johnson, Mary A.; Miller, Neil R.

    2011-01-01

    Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) can be divided into nonarteritic (NAION) and arteritic (AAION) forms. NAION makes up ~85% of all cases of AION, and until recently was poorly understood. There is no treatment for NAION, and its initiating causes are poorly understood, in part because NAION is not lethal, making it difficult to obtain fresh, newly affected tissue for study. In-vivo electrophysiology and post-mortem studies reveal specific responses that are associated with NAION. New models of NAION have been developed which enable insights into the pathophysiological events surrounding this disease. These models include both rodent and primate species, and the power of a `vertically integrated' multi-species approach can help in understanding the common cellular mechanisms and physiological responses to clinical NAION, and to identify potential approaches to treatment. The models utilize laser light to activate intravascular photoactive dye to induce capillary vascular thrombosis, while sparing the larger vessels. The observable optic nerve changes associated with rodent models of AION (rAION) and primate NAION (pNAION) are indistinguishable from that seen in clinical disease, including sectoral axonal involvement, and in-vivo electrophysiological data from these models are consistent with clinical data. Early post-infarct events reveal an unexpected inflammatory response, and changes in intraretinal gene expression for both stress response, while sparing outer retinal function, which occurs in AAION models. Histologically, the NAION models reveal an isolated loss of retinal ganglion cells by apoptosis. There are changes detectable by immunohistochemistry suggesting that other retinal cells mount a brisk response to retinal ganglion cell distress without themselves dying. The optic nerve ultimately shows axonal loss and scarring. Inflammation is a prominent early histological feature. This suggests that clinically, specific modulation of inflammation may

  5. Functional rescue of experimental ischemic optic neuropathy with αB-crystallin

    PubMed Central

    Pangratz-Fuehrer, S; Kaur, K; Ousman, S S; Steinman, L; Liao, Y J

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) is an important cause of acute vision loss in adults, and there is no effective treatment. We studied early changes following experimental AION and tested the benefit of a potential treatment. Materials and Methods We induced experimental AION in adult mice and tested the effects of short-term (daily for 3 days) and long-term (every other day for 3 weeks) αB-crystallin (αBC) treatment using histological and serial intracranial flash visual evoked potential recordings. Results One day after experimental AION, there was swelling at the optic nerve (ON) head and increased expression of αBC, a small heat shock protein important in ischemia and inflammation. This upregulation coincided with microglial and astrocytic activation. Our hypothesis was that αBC may be part of the endogenous protective mechanism against injury, thus we tested the effects of αBC on experimental AION. Daily intraveneous or intravitreal αBC injections did not improve visual evoked potential amplitude or latency at days 1–2. However, αBC treatment decreased swelling and dampened the microglial and astrocytic activation on day 3. Longer treatment with intravenous αBC led to acceleration of visual evoked potential latency over 3 weeks, without improving amplitude. This latency acceleration did not correlate with increased retinal ganglion cell survival but did correlate with complete rescue of the ON oligodendrocytes, which are important for myelination. Conclusions We identified αBC as an early marker following experimental AION. Treatment with αBC enhanced this endogenous, post-ischemic response by decreasing microglial activation and promoting ON oligodendrocyte survival. PMID:21475310

  6. SUR1-Associated Mechanisms Are Not Involved in Ischemic Optic Neuropathy 1 Day Post-Injury

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, James D.; Guo, Yan; Bernstein, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury after central nervous system (CNS) injury presents a major health care challenge with few promising treatments. Recently, it has become possible to reduce edema after CNS injury by antagonizing a sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) regulated ion channel expressed after injury. SUR1 upregulation after injury is a necessary precondition for the formation of this channel, and has been implicated in white matter injury after clinical spinal cord trauma. Glibenclamide, an SUR1 antagonist, appears to have neuroprotective effect against cerebral stroke in an open-label small clinical trial and great effectiveness in reducing damage after varied experimental CNS injury models. Despite its importance in CNS injuries, SUR1 upregulation appears to play no part in rodent anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION) injury as tested by real-time PCR and immunohistochemical staining of rAION-injured rat optic nerve (ON). Furthermore, the SUR1 antagonist glibenclamide administered immediately after rAION injury provided no protection to proximal ON microvasculature 1 day post-injury but may reduce optic nerve head edema in a manner unrelated to ON SUR1 expression. Our results suggest that there may be fundamental differences between rAION optic nerve ischemia and other CNS white matter injuries where SUR1 appears to play a role. PMID:27560494

  7. SUR1-Associated Mechanisms Are Not Involved in Ischemic Optic Neuropathy 1 Day Post-Injury.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, James D; Guo, Yan; Bernstein, Steven L

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury after central nervous system (CNS) injury presents a major health care challenge with few promising treatments. Recently, it has become possible to reduce edema after CNS injury by antagonizing a sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) regulated ion channel expressed after injury. SUR1 upregulation after injury is a necessary precondition for the formation of this channel, and has been implicated in white matter injury after clinical spinal cord trauma. Glibenclamide, an SUR1 antagonist, appears to have neuroprotective effect against cerebral stroke in an open-label small clinical trial and great effectiveness in reducing damage after varied experimental CNS injury models. Despite its importance in CNS injuries, SUR1 upregulation appears to play no part in rodent anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION) injury as tested by real-time PCR and immunohistochemical staining of rAION-injured rat optic nerve (ON). Furthermore, the SUR1 antagonist glibenclamide administered immediately after rAION injury provided no protection to proximal ON microvasculature 1 day post-injury but may reduce optic nerve head edema in a manner unrelated to ON SUR1 expression. Our results suggest that there may be fundamental differences between rAION optic nerve ischemia and other CNS white matter injuries where SUR1 appears to play a role. PMID:27560494

  8. Skin biopsies in the evaluation of atypical optic neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Bielory, L; Kupersmith, M; Warren, F; Bystryn, J; Frohman, L

    1993-01-01

    Patients with atypical clinical presentations of common optic neuropathies such as optic neuritis (ON), anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION), or optic neuropathy of unknown etiology (UON) are difficult to distinguish from inflammatory autoimmune optic neuropathy (AON) which is typically associated with a poor visual prognosis, unless treated with high doses of corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressive agents. The authors retrospectively evaluated 34 patients [AON (n = 12); AION (n = 5); ON (n = 9); UON (n = 8)] with visual loss which deteriorated over weeks to months or followed an atypical course, for the presence of immunological markers suggestive of AON. These markers included serological testing for antiphospholipid (APA) and antinuclear (ANA) antibodies, and evaluation of histopathologic and immunofluorescent staining of skin biopsies. All patients underwent a skin biopsy. Four of the 12 patients with AON had urticarial cutaneous lesions which revealed leukocytoclastic and/or lymphohistiocytic vasculitis. Seven of the remaining eight AON patients had skin biopsies of non-lesional skin which revealed immunoreactant deposition. Seven of the 21 skin biopsies obtained from the non-AON patients had findings of vacuolization or mild perivascular infiltration of lymphocytes (n = 5) and immunofluorescent deposits (n = 2). Abnormal skin biopsies (92%;p = 0.0009) and circulating APA (82%; p = 0.013) were common in AON patients while ANA was not statistically increased in AON patients (p = 0.06) when compared to the remaining patients as a whole. AON patients typically demonstrate evidence of systemic autoimmune involvement, as manifested by cutaneous abnormalities such as urticarial vasculitis and/or immunoreactant deposition and circulating APA. These may serve as markers for identifying AON patients who may be treated with immunomodulatory agents. PMID:22822778

  9. Evidence for preserved direct pupillary light response in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Wakakura, M; Yokoe, J

    1995-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND--Pupillary light response is usually defective in all types of optic neuropathy. However, the authors have observed in patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) relatively normal light response, with consequent misdiagnosis psychogenic visual loss in some cases. To confirm this clinical impression, afferent pupillary defect was assessed by measurement of adjusted constriction amplitude (CA) and escape rate (ER) by infrared videopupillography (Iriscorder-C 2515). METHODS--Thirteen consecutive patients (26 eyes) with LHON (average age 27.2 years) were examined; 12 had the mitochondrial DNA 11778 mutation and one the 14484 mutation. Seven of these patients had a positive family history. For comparison, the above rates were determined in 19 patients (23 eyes) with idiopathic optic neuritis (ON; average age 35.1 years), 18 patients (19 eyes) with anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy (AION; average age 58.1 years), and 25 volunteers (50 eyes) with healthy eyes (average age 39.6 years). RESULTS--The distribution of visual acuity was essentially the same in all optic neuropathy groups. Reduction in CA and increase in ER were significant in patients with ON and AION, but not in those with LHON. Only slight afferent pupillary defect was evident even 2 years after the onset of LHON. CA in AION and ER in ON were correlated statistically with visual acuity and Humphrey mean threshold deviation, while CA and ER in LHON were not. CONCLUSION--Pupillary light response in patients with LHON obviously differs from that in patients with other types of optic neuropathy. LHON appears to be pathophysiologically characterised by well preserved afferent fibres for pupillary light response (probably from W cells). Besides being of pathogenetic interest, the detection of clinical features should facilitate the diagnosis of LHON particularly when family history provides no indication. PMID:7612556

  10. Infectious optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Golnik, Karl C

    2002-03-01

    A wide variety of infectious agents are known to cause optic neuropathy. This article will consider the bacteria, spirochetes, fungi, and viruses that most commonly affect the optic nerve. Clinical presentation is variable, but some pathogens often produce a characteristic funduscopic pattern. Diagnosis is usually made on the basis of clinical suspicion and serologic testing. Polymerase chain reaction is also increasingly utilized. Most infectious agents can be effectively treated but visual recovery is highly variable. PMID:15513450

  11. Dysthyroid optic neuropathy (DON).

    PubMed

    Ebner, Roberto

    2002-03-01

    Dysthyroid Optic Neuropathy (DON) affects a small percentage of patients with Graves disease, but, when it occurs, it can cause significant and permanent loss of vision. DON is treatable if recognized early. Systemic steroids can be effective, but may cause side affects. Orbital injection of steroids may play a role in selected patients. Orbital radiation has a more permanent effect and has gained wide acceptance as a relatively non-invasive method of reversing DON. Surgery to decompress crowded orbits has been used for years and continues to be a viable approach for those patients with optic neuropathy, especially when there is significant proptosis. Optic nerve decompression can also be achieved through a transethmoidal approach. PMID:15513451

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Leber hereditary optic neuropathy Leber hereditary optic neuropathy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is an inherited form of vision loss. ...

  13. Radiation optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, L.B.; Kim, J.Y.; Ceballos, R.

    1985-08-01

    Following surgery for pituitary adenoma, radiation therapy is an accepted treatment in reducing tumor recurrence. However, a potential therapeutic complication is delayed radionecrosis of perisellar neural structures, including the optic nerves and chiasm. This particular cause of visual loss, radiation optic neuropathy (RON), has not been emphasized in the ophthalmologic literature. Four cases of RON seen in the past five years are reported. Diagnostic criteria include: (1) acute visual loss (monocular or binocular), (2) visual field defects indicating optic nerve or chiasmal dysfunction, (3) absence of optic disc edema, (4) onset usually within three years of therapy (peak: 1-1 1/2 years), and (5) no computed tomographic evidence of visual pathway compression. Pathologic findings, differential diagnosis and therapy will be discussed in outlining the clinical profile of RON.

  14. Ultrasonography in distinguishing optic neuritis from nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dehghani, Alireza; Giti, Masoomeh; Akhlaghi, Mohamad Reza; Karami, Mehdi; Salehi, Fatemeh

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Optic neuritis (ON) and nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) have some overlapping clinical profiles. We evaluated the usefulness of B-scan ultrasonography in distinguishing ON from NAION by measuring diameter of the optic nerve. Materials and Methods: Consecutive patients with an acute noncompressive unilateral optic neuropathy with relative afferent pupillary defect and onset of visual loss during the last 2 weeks were included. Diagnosis of ON was based on age ≤ 35 years, orbital pain associated with eye movement, and no disk edema, and diagnosis of NAION was based on age ≥ 60 years, no orbital pain associated with eye movement, and presence of disk edema. Age- and gender-matched subjects without ocular disease were selected for comparison. The diameter of the optic nerve was measured by a single radiologist with B-scan ultrasonography. Results: In ON patients, the mean diameter of the affected nerve was significantly larger than that of the unaffected nerve and also larger than that of the right nerve of young controls; P < 0.05. In NAION patients, however, there was no significant difference between the mean diameter of the affected nerve and of the unaffected nerve or the right nerve of elderly controls; P > 0.05. Also, the diameter of the affected nerve was significantly larger in ON than in AION patients; P < 0.05. Conclusion: B-scan ultrasonography is helpful in the early stages of optic neuropathy to distinguish ON from NAION in those cases for which the diagnosis is still uncertain after clinical evaluation. PMID:23210062

  15. Traumatic Optic Neuropathy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kumaran, Arjunan Muthu; Sundar, Gangadhara; Chye, Lim Thiam

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to evaluate current literature on investigation and management of traumatic optic neuropathy (TON), propose recommendations for diagnosis and management, and explore novel future treatments. TON, though uncommon, causes substantial visual loss. Without clear guidelines, there is much ambiguity regarding its diagnosis and management. Investigation and treatment (conservative, medical, surgical, and combined) vary widely between centers. Electronic databases PubMed, MEDLINE, PROSPERO, CENTRAL, and EMBASE were searched for content that matched “Traumatic optic neuropathy.” Articles with abstracts and full text available, published in the past 10 years, written English and limited to human adults, were selected. All study designs were acceptable except case reports and case series with fewer 10 patients. All abstracts were then evaluated for relevance. References of these studies were evaluated and if also relevant, included. A total of 2,686 articles were retrieved and 43 examined for relevance. Of these, 23 articles were included. TON is a clinical diagnosis. Visual-evoked potential is useful in diagnosis and prognosis. Computed tomography demonstrates canal fractures and concomitant injuries. Magnetic resonance images should be reserved for select and stable patients. Conservative treatment is appropriate in mild TON. Steroids are of questionable benefit and may be harmful. Surgery should be reserved for patients with radiological evidence of compression and individualized. PMID:25709751

  16. Optic neuropathy associated with systemic sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Ben J.; Graham, Elizabeth M.; Plant, Gordon T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify and follow a series of 52 patients with optic neuropathy related to sarcoidosis. Methods: Prospective observational cohort study. Results: The disorder was more common in women and affected a wide age range. It was proportionately more common in African and Caribbean ethnic groups. Two clinical subtypes were identified: the more common was a subacute optic neuropathy resembling optic neuritis; a more slowly progressive optic neuropathy arose in the remaining 17%. Sixteen (31%) were bilateral. Concurrent intraocular inflammation was seen in 36%. Pain arose in only 27% of cases. An optic perineuritis was seen in 2 cases, and predominate involvement of the chiasm in one. MRI findings showed optic nerve involvement in 75% of cases, with adjacent and more widespread inflammation in 31%. Treatment with corticosteroids was helpful in those with an inflammatory optic neuropathy, but not those with mass lesions. Relapse of visual signs arose in 25% of cases, necessitating an increase or escalation of treatment, but relapse was not a poor prognostic factor. Conclusions: This is a large prospective study of the clinical characteristics and outcome of treatment in optic neuropathy associated with sarcoidosis. Patients who experience an inflammatory optic neuropathy respond to treatment but may relapse. Those with infiltrative or progressive optic neuropathies improve less well even though the inflammatory disorder responds to therapy. PMID:27536707

  17. Emerging Mitochondrial Therapeutic Targets in Optic Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Lopez Sanchez, M I G; Crowston, J G; Mackey, D A; Trounce, I A

    2016-09-01

    Optic neuropathies are an important cause of blindness worldwide. The study of the most common inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) has highlighted a fundamental role for mitochondrial function in the survival of the affected neuron-the retinal ganglion cell. A picture is now emerging that links mitochondrial dysfunction to optic nerve disease and other neurodegenerative processes. Insights gained from the peculiar susceptibility of retinal ganglion cells to mitochondrial dysfunction are likely to inform therapeutic development for glaucoma and other common neurodegenerative diseases of aging. Despite it being a fast-evolving field of research, a lack of access to human ocular tissues and limited animal models of mitochondrial disease have prevented direct retinal ganglion cell experimentation and delayed the development of efficient therapeutic strategies to prevent vision loss. Currently, there are no approved treatments for mitochondrial disease, including optic neuropathies caused by primary or secondary mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent advances in eye research have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms that mediate pathogenesis, and new therapeutic strategies including gene correction approaches are currently being investigated. Here, we review the general principles of mitochondrial biology relevant to retinal ganglion cell function and provide an overview of the major optic neuropathies with mitochondrial involvement, LHON and ADOA, whilst highlighting the emerging link between mitochondrial dysfunction and glaucoma. The pharmacological strategies currently being trialed to improve mitochondrial dysfunction in these optic neuropathies are discussed in addition to emerging therapeutic approaches to preserve retinal ganglion cell function. PMID:27288727

  18. Traumatic Optic Neuropathy - A Conundrum.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Vinoth Kanna; Viswanathan, Ramachandran; Devanathan, Vasudevan

    2016-03-01

    Visual impairment following head injury may be an enigma especially if the onset of symptoms were to be few days after the actual trauma and the bias arising out of the initial normal ophthalmological examination is not neutralised by unbiased repeated formal clinical evaluation aided with electrophysiology. We report and discuss here a 32-year-old lady with delayed onset of indirect traumatic visual loss with anaemia who failed to improve after blood transfusion but improved immediately following steroid therapy seven days after trauma. Though steroids have not been shown to have a significant contribution on outcomes following Traumatic optic neuropathy, this report rekindles its role in delayed progressive visual loss following head trauma and the need to re-analyse the role of steroids in patients with delayed progressive visual disturbance following head injury excluding those with acute onset symptoms in view of different pathologies in both these presentations. This paper also highlights potential mechanisms for the two major types of presentation. PMID:27134913

  19. Toxic optic neuropathies: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Zülsdorff, Magdalena; Wilhelm, Helmut; Tonagel, Felix

    2015-08-01

    Toxic optic neuropathy (TON) is caused by the damage to the optic nerve through different toxins, including drugs, metals, organic solvents, methanol and carbon dioxide. A similar clinical picture may also be caused by nutritional deficits, including B vitamins, folic acid and proteins with sulphur-containing amino acids. This review summarizes the present knowledge on disease-causing factors, clinical presentation, diagnostics and treatment in TON. It discusses in detail known and hypothesized relations between drugs, including tuberculostatic drugs, antimicrobial agents, antiepileptic drugs, antiarrhythmic drugs, disulfiram, halogenated hydroquinolones, antimetabolites, tamoxifen and phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors and optic neuropathy. PMID:25159832

  20. Pegylated Interferon Alpha–Associated Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Kathleen T.; Nelson, Bruce; Harrison, Andrew R.; McLoon, Linda K.; Lee, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    A 52-year-old man with chronic hepatitis C presented with painless, bilateral, simultaneous non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and peripheral neuropathy. Symptoms began 19 weeks after starting peginterferon alpha-2a. The peripheral neuropathy and vision of the right eye improved, but the vision of the left eye worsened after stopping interferon. We identified 23 additional cases of NAION during interferon alpha therapy. At least 12 of these patients suffered bilateral NAION. Patients lost vision 1–40 weeks after initiating therapy. Of 21 eyes that had documented initial and follow-up acuities, 8 improved, 1 worsened, and the rest remained stable. One patient had a painful peripheral neuropathy. Treatment with interferon alpha may result in NAION. Discontinuation of therapy deserves consideration after weighing individual risks and benefits. PMID:20351572

  1. [Optic neuropathy in acute poisoning with methanol].

    PubMed

    Sekkat, A; Maillard, P; Dupeyron, G; Bensouda, J; Arne, J L; Bec, P

    1982-01-01

    The authors report four cases of methanol poisoning, two of which suffering acute bilateral optic neuropathy which secondarily leads to optic atrophy. The report the main clinical features of such a poisoning and the actual basis of its physiopathology and treatment. According to the four cases reported, they underline the importance of early diagnosis and specific treatment. PMID:7169508

  2. Systemic corticosteroids in nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zubidi, Nagham; Zhang, Jason; Spitze, Arielle; Lee, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is one of the most prevalent optic nerve disorders seen in ophthalmic practice. The role of corticosteroid therapy in NAION remains a highly controversial area of debate in ophthalmology. This brief review will provide an overview of the current clinical evidence on this topic as well as some comment on the medical debate. PMID:25449939

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of radiation optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, C.F.; Schatz, N.J.; Glaser, J.S. )

    1990-10-15

    Three patients with delayed radiation optic neuropathy after radiation therapy for parasellar neoplasms underwent magnetic resonance imaging. The affected optic nerves and chiasms showed enlargement and focal gadopentetate dimeglumine enhancement. The magnetic resonance imaging technique effectively detected and defined anterior visual pathway changes of radionecrosis and excluded the clinical possibility of visual loss because of tumor recurrence.

  4. [Ischemic optic neuropathy after lumbar spine surgery].

    PubMed

    Bermejo-Alvarez, M A; Carpintero, M; García-Carro, G; Acebal, G; Fervienza, P; Cosío, F

    2007-12-01

    Ischemic optic neuropathy is the most common cause of visual complications after non-ophthalmic surgery. The incidence has varied in different case series, but prone-position spine surgery appears to be involved in most of the reports. We present the case of a 47-year-old woman who developed near total blindness in the left eye following lumbar spine fusion surgery involving the loss of 900 mL of blood. An ophthalmic examination including inspection of the ocular fundus, fluorescein angiography, and visual evoked potentials returned a diagnosis of retrolaminar optic neuropathy. Outcome was poor. PMID:18200998

  5. Late onset Leber's optic neuropathy: a case confused with ischaemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Borruat, F X; Green, W T; Graham, E M; Sweeney, M G; Morgan-Hughes, J A; Sanders, M D

    1992-01-01

    A case is reported of a 63-year-old man with progressive central visual loss in one eye followed 11 months later by involvement of the fellow eye. A diagnosis of chronic ischaemic optic neuropathy was considered. However, despite a negative family history, the absence of electrocardiographic abnormalities, and minimal fundus changes a diagnosis of Leber's optic neuropathy was made on the basis of magnetic resonance imaging findings and the mitochondrial DNA mutation at base pair 11778. Images PMID:1420066

  6. Postirradiation optic neuropathy in antral carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.; Vashist, S.

    1984-06-01

    A case is described of a patient who developed radiation-induced optic neuropathy 18 months following cobalt-60 irradiation for carcinoma of the left maxillary antrum and ethmoid sinus. This case is unusual because of the early onset of the optic nerve damage following radiation therapy and the ultimate emergence of the eye involved by tumor compression as the better eye in terms of visual acuity.

  7. Methanol optic neuropathy: a histopathological study.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, J A; Hostovsky, M; Bilbao, J M; Rewcastle, N B

    1982-10-01

    The histopathologic effects of methanol on the optic nerve were studied in four patients. Circumscribed myelin damage occurred behind the lamina cribrosa in each nerve. Axons were preserved. Demyelination also occurred in cerebral hemispheric white matter in one patient. This selective myelinoclastic effect of methanol metabolism is probably caused by histotoxic anoxia in watershed areas of the cerebral and distal optic nerve circulations. Juxtabulbar demyelination may cause optic disk edema in methanol poisoning by compressive obstruction of orthograde axoplasmic flow. Visual loss may be due to disruption of saltatory conduction. Retrolaminar demyelinating optic neuropathy is an early morphologic correlate of visual loss in methanol intoxication. PMID:6889696

  8. Mutations for Leber hereditary optic neuropathy in patients with alcohol and tobacco optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Amaral-Fernandes, Marcela Scabello; Marcondes, Ana Maria; Miranda, Paulo Maurício do Amor Divino; Maciel-Guerra, Andréa Trevas

    2011-01-01

    Purpose There are many similarities in the clinical presentation of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and in patients who have optic neuropathy and a history of heavy tobacco and alcohol consumption. The main objective of this study is to investigate the frequency of primary and secondary mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations for LHON in patients diagnosed as having alcohol and tobacco optic neuropathy (ATON). Methods Twenty-six patients who had a history of heavy alcohol and tobacco consumption and who developed bilateral optic neuropathy were tested for primary mutations (G11778A, T14484C, and G3460A) by restriction analysis, and 14 secondary mutations in the genes mitochondrially encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (MT-ND1), mitochondrially encoded NADH dehydrogenase 4 (MT-ND4), mitochondrially encoded NADH dehydrogenase 4L (MT-ND4L), mitochondrially encoded NADH dehydrogenase 5 (MT-ND5), mitochondrially encoded NADH dehydrogenase 6 (MT-ND6), and mitochondrially encoded cytochrome B (MT-CYB) by direct sequencing. Results Four (15.4%) of 26 patients tested positive for LHON primary mutations, two for the G11778A mutation, and two for the T14484C mutation. No patient tested positive for any of the 14 secondary mutations. Familial recurrence was present in four patients, and only three of these patients have presented the LHON mutation. Conclusions The diagnosis of LHON should be considered in all patients diagnosed as having optic neuropathy, particularly those with familial recurrence of vision loss. PMID:22194643

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging in Leber's optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Kermode, A G; Moseley, I F; Kendall, B E; Miller, D H; MacManus, D G; McDonald, W I

    1989-01-01

    Thirteen males with Leber's optic neuropathy had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, and in eight the optic nerves were imaged using STIR (Short Time Inversion Recovery) sequences. All optic nerve scans were abnormal. In seven with bilateral visual loss four showed bilateral increased optic nerve signal and three unilateral increase. The involvement was of the mid and posterior intra-orbital sections over three 5 mm slices or more with sparing of the anterior portion. One patient with unilateral visual loss had increased signal only on the affected side. Brain MRI was normal, in marked contrast to the findings in clinically isolated optic neuritis in which multiple white matter lesions are seen in the majority. Images PMID:2732742

  10. The transcorneal electrical stimulation as a novel therapeutic strategy against retinal and optic neuropathy: a review of experimental and clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ye; Chen, Tao; Liu, Bei; Wang, Li-Qiang; Peng, Guang-Hua; Qin, Li-Min; Yan, Zhong-Jun; Huang, Yi-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Transcorneal electrical stimulation (TES) is a novel therapeutic approach to activate the retina and related downstream structures. TES has multiple advantages over traditional treatments, such as being minimally invasive and readily applicable in a routine manner. Series of animal experiments have shown that TES protects the retinal neuron from traumatic or genetic induced degeneration. These laboratory evidences support its utilization in ophthalmological therapies against various retinal and optical diseases including retinitis pigmentosa (RP), traumatic optic neuropathy, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION), and retinal artery occlusions (RAOs). Several pioneering explorations sought to clarify the functional mechanism underlying the neuroprotective effects of TES. It seems that the neuroprotective effects should not be attributed to a solitary pathway, on the contrary, multiple mechanisms might contribute collectively to maintain cellular homeostasis and promote cell survival in the retina. More precise evaluations via functional and morphological techniques would determine the exact mechanism underlying the remarkable neuroprotective effect of TES. Further studies to determine the optimal parameters and the long-term stability of TES are crucial to justify the clinical significance and to establish TES as a popularized therapeutic modality against retinal and optic neuropathy. PMID:27366697

  11. The transcorneal electrical stimulation as a novel therapeutic strategy against retinal and optic neuropathy: a review of experimental and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ye; Chen, Tao; Liu, Bei; Wang, Li-Qiang; Peng, Guang-Hua; Qin, Li-Min; Yan, Zhong-Jun; Huang, Yi-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Transcorneal electrical stimulation (TES) is a novel therapeutic approach to activate the retina and related downstream structures. TES has multiple advantages over traditional treatments, such as being minimally invasive and readily applicable in a routine manner. Series of animal experiments have shown that TES protects the retinal neuron from traumatic or genetic induced degeneration. These laboratory evidences support its utilization in ophthalmological therapies against various retinal and optical diseases including retinitis pigmentosa (RP), traumatic optic neuropathy, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION), and retinal artery occlusions (RAOs). Several pioneering explorations sought to clarify the functional mechanism underlying the neuroprotective effects of TES. It seems that the neuroprotective effects should not be attributed to a solitary pathway, on the contrary, multiple mechanisms might contribute collectively to maintain cellular homeostasis and promote cell survival in the retina. More precise evaluations via functional and morphological techniques would determine the exact mechanism underlying the remarkable neuroprotective effect of TES. Further studies to determine the optimal parameters and the long-term stability of TES are crucial to justify the clinical significance and to establish TES as a popularized therapeutic modality against retinal and optic neuropathy. PMID:27366697

  12. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Meyerson, Cherise; Van Stavern, Greg; McClelland, Collin

    2015-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is one of the most common inherited optic neuropathies causing bilateral central vision loss. The disorder results from point mutations in mitochondrial DNA and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction. The primary cell type that is lost in LHON is the retinal ganglion cell, which is highly susceptible to disrupted ATP production and oxidative stress. Inheritance of LHON follows that of mitochondrial genetics, and it has a highly variable clinical phenotype, as other genetic and environmental factors also play a role. Although LHON usually presents with isolated vision loss, some patients suffer other neurological sequelae. For ill-defined reasons, male LHON mutation carriers are more affected than females. Most LHON patients remain legally blind, but a small proportion can experience spontaneous partial recovery, often within the first year of symptom onset. Unfortunately, at this time there are no established curative interventions and treatment is largely supportive. Patients should be offered low vision services and counseled on mitigating risk factors for additional vision loss, such as smoking and consuming alcohol. Encouraging treatments currently undergoing investigation includes ubiquinone analogs, such as idebenone, as well as gene therapy and stem cells to restore ATP synthesis and provide neuroprotection to surviving retinal ganglion cells. PMID:26170609

  13. Optic neuropathy following an altitude exposure.

    PubMed

    Steigleman, Allan; Butler, Frank; Chhoeu, Austin; O'Malley, Timothy; Bower, Eric; Giebner, Stephen

    2003-09-01

    This case report describes a 20-yr-old man who presented with retro-orbital pain and blurred vision in his left eye 3 wk after an altitude exposure in a hypobaric chamber. He was found to have significant deficits in color vision and visual fields consistent with an optic neuropathy in his left eye. The patient was diagnosed with decompression sickness and treated with hyperbaric oxygen with a U.S. Navy Treatment Table VI. All signs and symptoms resolved with a single hyperbaric oxygen treatment but recurred. A head MRI revealed a left frontoethmoid sinus opacity. A concomitant sinusitis was diagnosed. The patient had full resolution of symptoms after a total of four hyperbaric oxygen treatments and antibiotic therapy at 6-wk follow-up. Although a para-infectious etiology for this patient's optic neuropathy cannot be excluded, his history of altitude exposure and significant, rapid response to hyperbaric oxygen treatment strongly implies decompression sickness in this case. PMID:14503679

  14. Idebenone for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gueven, N

    2016-03-01

    Idebenone is a rapidly absorbed, safe and well-tolerated drug and is currently the only clinically proven treatment option for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) patients. Idebenone (Raxone®) is approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of LHON and has been available on the European market since 2015. Due to its molecular mode of action of bypassing the defective mitochondrial complex I, idebenone leads to improved energy supply and a functional recovery of retinal ganglion cells during the acute stage of the disease, thereby preventing further vision loss and promoting recovery of vision. Thus, commencing treatment shortly after the onset of symptoms is likely to have the best therapeutic effect, a hypothesis that is supported by the available clinical data. PMID:27186591

  15. Spheniodal mucocele causing bilateral optic neuropathy and ophthalmoplegia

    PubMed Central

    Selvakumar, Ambika; Mahalaxmi, Balasubramanyam; Ananth, V; Gautam, Cugati

    2014-01-01

    Sphenoid sinus mucocele comprises only 2% of all paranasal sinus mucoceles. In literature, there is a case report on sphenoidal mucocele causing bilateral optic neuropathy, with unilateral partial recovery and cranial nerve palsy, but we did not come across any literature with bilateral optic neuropathy and ophthalmoplegia together caused by spheno-ethmoidal mucocele. We present such a rare case of spheno-ethmoidal mucocele causing bilateral optic neuropathy and unilateral sixth nerve palsy who had postsurgery, unilateral good vision recovery, and complete resolution of sixth nerve palsy. PMID:23571243

  16. The clinical spectrum of amiodarone-associated optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lenworth N.; Krohel, Gregory B.; Thomas, Eric R.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe the clinical spectrum of amiodarone-associated optic neuropathy. METHODS: Observational cases series and review. RESULTS: Of 55 cases, the median interval for onset of optic neuropathy was four months after initiating amiodarone; 88% occurred within 12 months. Seven (13%) patients were asymptomatic. Twenty-two (40%) patients presented with sudden visual loss, while 26 (47%) had insidious loss of vision. Visual acuity ranged from 20/15 to light perception; 10 (18%) patients had legal blindness with visual acuity of 20/200 or worse. Visual field loss was present in 91% of cases. Color vision loss was present in eight (40%) of 20 cases. Optic disc edema was present in 85% of cases, while eight (15%) patients had retrobulbar optic neuropathy, without evidence of disc edema. Optic disc edema resolved over a median time of three months. Five patients had raised intracranial pressure on lumbar puncture. CONCLUSION: We were able to classify amiodarone-associated optic neuropathy into five clinical categories with respect to temporal characteristics and optic nerve appearance: insidious-onset (43%), acute-onset (28%), retrobulbar (13%), increased intracranial pressure (8%), and delayed-progressive onset (8%). Most cases of optic neuropathy commenced within 12 months of initiating amiodarone, with the median onset being four months. Over 10% of patients will have no visual symptoms at the onset. Ophthalmologic examinations within the first 12 months--and particularly within four months of initiating amiodarone--should improve early detection of amiodarone-associated optic neuropathy. PMID:15586652

  17. Dysthyroid optic neuropathy. The crowded orbital apex syndrome.

    PubMed

    Neigel, J M; Rootman, J; Belkin, R I; Nugent, R A; Drance, S M; Beattie, C W; Spinelli, J A

    1988-11-01

    The authors have reviewed the clinical presentation, visual fields, color vision testing, visual-evoked potentials, and computed tomographic (CT) findings of 58 patients (95 eyes) with dysthyroid optic neuropathy. The authors compared these findings to a control group of 60 patients (119 eyes) with thyroid eye disease who underwent CT scanning and did not exhibit evidence of optic neuropathy. Clinically, dysthyroid optic neuropathy is an insidious disease; when compared with the usual Graves' orbitopathy patient, the optic neuropathy group presented at a later age and with a later onset of thyroid eye disease. The patients in this group were more likely to be male and/or diabetic, and often presented with desaturation of color vision. Asymmetrical extraocular muscle restriction and vertical tropias were more frequent in the optic neuropathy group. The most sensitive indicators of optic nerve dysfunction appeared to be visual-evoked potentials and color vision. Computed tomographic studies confirmed that apical orbital crowding was a characteristic feature of optic neuropathy. These findings should alert the clinician to a more aggressive approach to these patients. PMID:3211460

  18. Toxic optic neuropathy: an unusual cause.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Hema L; Savino, Peter J

    2014-10-01

    A 60-year-old woman with a history of chronic alcoholism and tobacco use presented with the complaint of a painless decrease in vision in both eyes. She lost vision first in the left eye then in the right eye. She admitted consuming at least one 16 ounce bottle of over the counter mouthwash daily and denied consumption of any other alcohols, methanol, or antifreeze. She stated that her vision had been continuing to deteriorate in both eyes. Her best-corrected visual acuity was 4/200 in each eye. Color vision was nil in each eye. Her pupils were sluggish bilaterally, and her optic discs were flat and hyperemic with peripapillary hemorrhages. Her visual fields revealed central scotomas bilaterally. The magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and lumbar puncture were within normal limits. Antinuclear antibody, human leukocyte antigen-B27 genotyping, and B12 were normal; serum thiamine was low. While continuing to ingest mouthwash, her vision decreased to count fingers at 2 feet, and maculopapillary bundle pallor developed. She was started on folate and thiamine supplementation. Once she discontinued mouthwash, her vision improved to 20/400 bilaterally, and her central scotomas improved. This case demonstrates an alcohol-induced toxic optic neuropathy from mouthwash ingestion with some visual recovery after discontinuation of the offending agent. PMID:25449946

  19. Traumatic Optic Neuropathy – A Conundrum

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Vinoth Kanna; Devanathan, Vasudevan

    2016-01-01

    Visual impairment following head injury may be an enigma especially if the onset of symptoms were to be few days after the actual trauma and the bias arising out of the initial normal ophthalmological examination is not neutralised by unbiased repeated formal clinical evaluation aided with electrophysiology. We report and discuss here a 32-year-old lady with delayed onset of indirect traumatic visual loss with anaemia who failed to improve after blood transfusion but improved immediately following steroid therapy seven days after trauma. Though steroids have not been shown to have a significant contribution on outcomes following Traumatic optic neuropathy, this report rekindles its role in delayed progressive visual loss following head trauma and the need to re-analyse the role of steroids in patients with delayed progressive visual disturbance following head injury excluding those with acute onset symptoms in view of different pathologies in both these presentations. This paper also highlights potential mechanisms for the two major types of presentation. PMID:27134913

  20. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy in association with optic nervehead drusen

    PubMed Central

    Megur, Bharathi; Megur, Deepak; Megur, Umesh; Reddy, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    Optic nerve head drusen (ONHD) are incidental ophthalmologic finding in the optic nerve. Patients with ONHD are often asymptomatic, but sometimes present with transient visual obscuration's (TVO), the reported incidence of which is 8.6%. Optic nerve head drusen are of two types: Superficial; visible and deep. The deep-buried drusen mimic papilledema. Because of the varied presentation deep-buried drusen pose a diagnostic challenge to the ophthalmologists. In young patients, they are mistaken for papilledema as it is clinically difficult to detect a buried drusen in the optic nerve head, but are seen on the surface with aging as the retinal nerve fiber layer thins out. They are observed as pale yellow lesions more often located towards the poles. Clinical examination aided with diagnostic tests like computed tomography (CT) orbits and ultrasound B scan can help establish the diagnosis. Herein, we report a rare case of optic nerve head drusen in a young lady, who presented with loss of vision and clinical evaluation and investigations suggested ONHD with anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. PMID:25116784

  1. Deficiency of thiosulphate sulphurtransferase (rhodanese) in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Poole, C J; Kind, P R

    1986-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a rare cause of progressive visual failure. Its cause is unknown, but one hypothesis is that patients have a defect in the detoxication of cyanide. One of the enzymes used in this detoxication is thiosulphate sulphurtransferase (rhodanese). The activity of this enzyme was measured in the rectal mucosa of a group of subjects with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy, and it was found to be considerably reduced compared with that in a group of controls (p less than 0.001). This finding supports the hypothesis of an inborn error of cyanide detoxication in this condition. PMID:3085790

  2. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy in severe dysthyroid optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, J.R.; Fagien, S.; Donovan, J.P.; Rubin, M.L. )

    1989-07-01

    Five patients with severe dysthyroid optic neuropathy were treated with intravenous methylprednisolone (1 g daily for 3 consecutive days). Before administration, visual acuity of the more severely affected eyes of each patient was counting fingers at 5 feet, 8/200, 20/400, 20/200, and 20/80. Immediately after completion of pulse therapy, visual acuity improved to 20/25 in four patients and 20/30 in one. Remissions were maintained with oral prednisone and external beam irradiation of the orbit. Pulse methylprednisolone therapy appears to be beneficial in the initial management of severe dysthyroid optic neuropathy.

  3. Radial optic neurotomy as a treatment for anterior ischemic optic neuropathy secondary to optic disc drusen

    PubMed Central

    Pinxten, Isabel; Stalmans, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Importance: Radial optic neurotomy (RON) was first described by Opremcak as a treatment for patients with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). The most common cause of visual loss in patients with optic disc drusen is nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). The pathogenesis of nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy associated with optic disc drusen is assumed to be similar to the compartment-like syndrome described by Opremcak in the case of central retinal vein occlusion. Observation: An 82-year-old male with bilateral optic disc drusen presented with bilateral visual loss and severe visual field defects consistent with nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy. A radial optic neurotomy was performed to treat the most affected eye. Postoperatively, significant and persistent improvement of visual acuity and improved automated perimetry were observed in the operated eye. Conclusion: Optic nerve head decompression by radial optic neurotomy could be a treatment option in patients with nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy associated with optic disc drusen and severe visual field defects.

  4. Comparison of Optic Disc Morphology of Optic Nerve Atrophy between Compressive Optic Neuropathy and Glaucomatous Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hata, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Oishi, Akio; Makiyama, Yukiko; Gotoh, Norimoto; Kimura, Yugo; Akagi, Tadamichi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare the optic nerve head (ONH) structure between compressive optic neuropathy (CON) and glaucomatous optic neuropathy (GON), and to determine whether selected ONH quantitative parameters effectively discriminate between GON and CON, especially CON cases presenting with a glaucoma-like disc. Methods We prospectively assessed 34 patients with CON, 34 age-matched patients with moderate or severe GON, and 34 age-matched healthy control subjects. The quantitative parameters of ONH structure were compared using the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph 2 (HRT2) and Spectralis optical coherence tomography with an enhanced depth imaging method. Results The mean and maximum cup depths of CON were significantly smaller than those with GON (P<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively). The distance between Bruch's membrane opening and anterior surface of the lamina cribrosa (BMO-anterior LC) of CON was also significantly smaller than that of glaucoma but was similar to that of the healthy group (P<0.001 and P = 0.47, respectively). Based on Moorfields regression analysis of the glaucoma classification of HRT2, 15 eyes with CON were classified with a glaucoma-like disc. The cup/disc area ratio did not differ between cases of CON with a glaucoma-like disc and cases of GON (P = 0.16), but the BMO-anterior LC and mean and maximum cup depths of CON cases with a glaucoma-like disc were smaller than those in GON (P = 0.005, P = 0.003, and P = 0.001, respectively). Conclusions Measurements of the cup depths and the LC depth had good ability to differentiate between CON with a glaucoma-like disc and glaucoma. There was no laminar remodeling detected by laminar surface position in the patients with CON compared to those with GON. PMID:25375855

  5. Bilateral optic disc oedema and associated optic neuropathy in the setting of FOLFOX chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To report a case of bilateral optic disc oedema and associated optic neuropathy in the setting of FOLFOX chemotherapy. Case presentation A case of a 57-year-old male being treated with FOLFOX chemotherapy for stage 3B colorectal cancer, who developed bilateral optic disc oedema and associated left sided optic neuropathy is described. The patient presented following cycles 7, 8 and 9 of chemotherapy with a history of bilateral simultaneous intermittent inferior altitudinal field defects. These episodes progressed to bilateral optic nerve oedema and a subsequent left sided optic neuropathy. The patient’s symptoms and oedema regressed with discontinuation of chemotherapy. Conclusion This is the first report suggesting a vasospastic role of 5-fluoruracil in 5-FU associated optic neuropathy. It highlights that 5-FU may have the potential to cause arterial vasospasm outside the cardiac vasculature, resulting in end-organ optic nerve ischaemia. PMID:23926927

  6. Retrobulbar optic neuropathy secondary to isolated sphenoid sinus disease

    PubMed Central

    Chafale, Vishal Annaji; Lahoti, Satish Arunkumar; Pandit, Alak; Gangopadhyay, Goutam; Biswas, Atanu

    2015-01-01

    Paranasal sinus disease can cause a condition that mimics optic neuritis. Simultaneous appearance of both diseases would create etiological dilemma. We report two cases of retrobulbar optic neuropathy secondary to isolated sphenoid sinus disease. In the case of a 65-year-old female who had presented with acute loss of vision in the left eye associated with left-sided frontal headache which subsequently turned out to be caused by optic nerve compression at the orbital apex due to collection in abnormally pneumatized left lesser wing of the sphenoid. In another case, a 65-year-old lady had presented with symptoms of bilateral retrobulbar optic neuropathy which was found to be due to direct compression of optic nerves at the orbital apex secondary to metastases from breast carcinoma. PMID:25883489

  7. Investigation-Directed Approach to Inflammatory Optic Neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Boudreault, Katherine; Durand, Marlene L; Rizzo, Joseph F

    2016-01-01

    Any presentation of an optic neuropathy with features that suggest inflammation should be addressed promptly because of blindness and the potential for effective treatment in some cases. A step-wise approach, including laboratory testing and imaging, is often informative, although the diagnosis may remain elusive despite detailed investigation. PMID:26959137

  8. Visual Rehabilitation of Persons with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudanko, S.-L.

    1995-01-01

    This article presents results of a noncontrolled clinical study of 20 persons with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy who were treated from 1976 to 1990 at the Low Vision Centre of the Finnish Federation of the Visually Handicapped. The importance of early functional visual rehabilitation is emphasized, as is the use of low vision aids to help…

  9. [An Undeniable Case of Optic Neuropathy Due to Cabazitaxel].

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Yusuke; Kawashima, Yugo; Kawara, Hiroko; Kaneko, Masatomo; Nakauchi, Hiroo; Tokuyama, Yoko

    2016-06-01

    Cabazitaxelis a taxane-type antineoplastic agent used for treating prostate cancer. Although typical side effects include neutropenia and fatigue, no studies have investigated eye disorders as a possible side effect, and the details are not clear. Herein, we report our experience of an undeniable case of optic neuropathy caused by cabazitaxel. A 78-year-old man had been diagnosed with prostate cancer (cT3aN1M1b, stage IV) 3 years previously, with a treatment history of bicalutamide, leuprorelin, flutamide, docetaxel, abiraterone, and enzalutamide. Because of a decline in vision during the second and third administration cycles of cabazitaxel, the patient visited an ophthalmologist. He was found to have reduced visual acuity, reduced central critical flicker frequency, narrowed field of vision, and impaired color vision, and was diagnosed with optic neuropathy. Although cabazitaxel administration was continued through 6 cycles, the symptoms were unchanged, and no drastic exacerbation was seen. This patient undeniably developed optic neuropathy due to cabazitaxel. Optic neuropathy due to taxane-type antineoplastic agents has also been reported with paclitaxel or docetaxel, and all precautions should be taken when administering such drugs. Detailed studies that include data from a larger number of facilities should be conducted in the future. PMID:27306820

  10. Finger prick blood testing in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, D; Nasioulas, S; Forrest, S

    1993-01-01

    Individuals from 33 unrelated Australian families with optic atrophy were screened for 10 different single base alterations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) using direct polymerase chain reaction amplification of blood spots collected on Guthrie cards. This method using blood spots allows easily accessible screening for LHON mtDNA mutations with minimal biohazard risk and reduced expense in the storage and transport of specimens. PMID:8318469

  11. Amiodarone-Associated Optic Neuropathy: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Passman, Rod S.; Bennett, Charles L.; Purpura, Joseph M.; Kapur, Rashmi; Johnson, Lenworth N.; Raisch, Dennis W.; West, Dennis P.; Edwards, Beatrice J.; Belknap, Steven M.; Liebling, Dustin B.; Fisher, Mathew J.; Samaras, Athena T.; Jones, Lisa-Gaye A.; Tulas, Katrina-Marie E.; McKoy, June M.

    2011-01-01

    Although amiodarone is the most commonly prescribed antiarrhythmic drug, its use is limited by serious toxicities, including optic neuropathy. Current reports of amiodarone associated optic neuropathy identified from the Food and Drug Administration's Adverse Event Reporting System (FDA-AERS) and published case reports were reviewed. A total of 296 reports were identified: 214 from AERS, 59 from published case reports, and 23 from adverse events reports for patients enrolled in clinical trials. Mean duration of amiodarone therapy before vision loss was 9 months (range 1-84 months). Insidious onset of amiodarone associated optic neuropathy (44%) was the most common presentation, and nearly one-third were asymptomatic. Optic disc edema was present in 85% of cases. Following drug cessation, 58% had improved visual acuity, 21% were unchanged, and 21% had further decreased visual acuity. Legal blindness (< 20/200) was noted in at least one eye in 20% of cases. Close ophthalmologic surveillance of patients during the tenure of amiodarone administration is warranted. PMID:22385784

  12. A Novel Rodent Model of Posterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Brown, Dale P.; Duan, Yuanli; Kong, Wei; Watson, Brant D.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To develop a reliable, reproducible rat model of posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION) and study the cellular responses in the optic nerve and retina. Methods Posterior ischemic optic neuropathy was induced in adult rats by photochemically induced ischemia. Retinal and optic nerve vasculature was examined by fluorescein isothiocyanate–dextran extravasation. Tissue sectioning and immunohistochemistry were used to investigate the pathologic changes. Retinal ganglion cell survival at different times after PION induction, with or without neurotrophic application, was quantified by fluorogold retrograde labeling. Results Optic nerve injury was confirmed after PION induction, including local vascular leakage, optic nerve edema, and cavernous degeneration. Immunostaining data revealed microglial activation and focal loss of astrocytes, with adjacent astrocytic hypertrophy. Up to 23%, 50%, and 70% retinal ganglion cell loss was observed at 1 week, 2 weeks, and 3 weeks, respectively, after injury compared with a sham control group. Experimental treatment by brain-derived neurotrophic factor and ciliary neurotrophic factor remarkably prevented retinal ganglion cell loss in PION rats. At 3 weeks after injury, more than 40% of retinal ganglion cells were saved by the application of neurotrophic factors. Conclusions Rat PION created by photochemically induced ischemia is a reproducible and reliable animal model for mimicking the key features of human PION. Clinical Relevance The correspondence between the features of this rat PION model to those of human PION makes it an ideal model to study the pathophysiologic course of the disease, most of which remains to be elucidated. Furthermore, it provides an optimal model for testing therapeutic approaches for optic neuropathies. PMID:23544206

  13. Fasudil alleviates traumatic optic neuropathy by inhibiting Rho signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jianglong; Lan, Shiying; Wang, Ruijia; Maier, Aba; Luan, Xinping

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The present study is to investigate the pathological changes in rabbits with traumatic optic neuropathy (TON), as well as the effect of fasudil on the lesions. Methods: A total of 144 New Zealand rabbits were successfully established as TON models. Twelve hours after surgery, the rabbits in control, dexamethasone, and fasudil groups were administrated with saline, dexamethasone, and fasudil via ear veins, respectively. Then, retinas of the rabbits were obtained at 72 h and on days 7, 14 and 21 after surgery. The pathological changes in retina and optic nerves were observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy. The expression levels of Rho-associated genes were measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results: In control group, the axons were swelling, and mitochondria showed vacuolation after optic nerve crush. Mitochondria were swelled slightly in dexamethasone group. By contrast, nerves in fasudil group were repaired. Retinal ganglion cells in control group were reduced significantly due to optic nerve crush. The loss of retinal ganglion cells was alleviated in fasudil group. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that the expression of Rho-associated genes were down-regulated. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates that fasudil inhibits the apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells and ameliorates damages of optic nerves in traumatic optic neuropathy. PMID:26550269

  14. Optic neuropathy resulting from indirect trauma.

    PubMed

    Ginifer, Corinne; Scharapow, David

    2002-09-01

    Minor blunt injury to the head and face may result in optic nerve contusion with secondary optic atrophy. The resulting visual loss is devastating for the individual. We report an uncommon but important complication that may result from an apparently trivial injury. Early identification and initiation of appropriate management may restore the individual's vision. Emergency physicians are often the first to see patients at risk of this complication yet there is little discussion of this injury in the emergency medicine literature. PMID:12487050

  15. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Associated with Bilateral Macular Holes

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Yoshiaki; Horiguchi, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) causes visual loss, predominantly in healthy young men. We recently examined a patient who previously had bilateral macular holes and subsequently developed LHON at 74 years of age. Although his central scotomas were initially attributed to the macular holes, his visual acuity declined following an initial improvement after operative closure of the macular holes; thus, other diagnoses, including LHON, were considered. Furthermore, macular optical coherence tomography (OCT) images remained unchanged in this time. A mitochondrial genetic analysis identified a 11778G→A mutation. From this case, we propose that LHON remains in the differential diagnosis even in older patients, as has previously been reported. PMID:27335507

  16. Mitochondrial DNA Mutation Associated with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Singh, Gurparkash; Lott, Marie T.; Hodge, Judy A.; Schurr, Theodore G.; Lezza, Angela M. S.; Elsas, Louis J.; Nikoskelainen, Eeva K.

    1988-12-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is a maternally inherited disease resulting in optic nerve degeneration and cardiac dysrhythmia. A mitochondrial DNA replacement mutation was identified that correlated with this disease in multiple families. This mutation converted a highly conserved arginine to a histidine at codon 340 in the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 gene and eliminated an Sfa NI site, thus providing a simple diagnostic test. This finding demonstrated that a nucleotide change in a mitochondrial DNA energy production gene can result in a neurological disease.

  17. Mitochondrial optic neuropathies – Disease mechanisms and therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Griffiths, Philip G.; Chinnery, Patrick F.

    2011-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal-dominant optic atrophy (DOA) are the two most common inherited optic neuropathies in the general population. Both disorders share striking pathological similarities, marked by the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and the early involvement of the papillomacular bundle. Three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations; m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C account for over 90% of LHON cases, and in DOA, the majority of affected families harbour mutations in the OPA1 gene, which codes for a mitochondrial inner membrane protein. Optic nerve degeneration in LHON and DOA is therefore due to disturbed mitochondrial function and a predominantly complex I respiratory chain defect has been identified using both in vitro and in vivo biochemical assays. However, the trigger for RGC loss is much more complex than a simple bioenergetic crisis and other important disease mechanisms have emerged relating to mitochondrial network dynamics, mtDNA maintenance, axonal transport, and the involvement of the cytoskeleton in maintaining a differential mitochondrial gradient at sites such as the lamina cribosa. The downstream consequences of these mitochondrial disturbances are likely to be influenced by the local cellular milieu. The vulnerability of RGCs in LHON and DOA could derive not only from tissue-specific, genetically-determined biological factors, but also from an increased susceptibility to exogenous influences such as light exposure, smoking, and pharmacological agents with putative mitochondrial toxic effects. Our concept of inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies has evolved over the past decade, with the observation that patients with LHON and DOA can manifest a much broader phenotypic spectrum than pure optic nerve involvement. Interestingly, these phenotypes are sometimes clinically indistinguishable from other neurodegenerative disorders such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, hereditary spastic

  18. Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: The Mitochondrial Connection Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Amero, Khaled K.

    2011-01-01

    Our current understanding of Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON)-mitochondrial connection falls short of comprehensive. Twenty years of intensive investigation have yielded a wealth of information about mitochondria, the mitochondrial genome, the metabolism of the optic nerve and other structures, and the phenotypic variability of classic LHON. However, we still cannot completely explain how primary LHON mutations injure the optic nerve or why the optic nerve is particularly at risk. We cannot explain the incomplete penetrance or the male predominance of LHON, the typical onset in young adult life without warning, or the synchronicity of visual loss. Moreover, primary LHON mutations clearly are not present in every family with the LHON phenotype (including multigenerational maternal inheritance), and they are present in only a minority of individuals who have the LHON optic neuropathy phenotype without a family history. All lines of evidence point to abnormalities of the mitochondria as the direct or indirect cause of LHON. Therefore, the mitochondria-LHON connection needs to be revisited and examined closely. This review will attempt to do that and provide an update on various aspects of LHON. PMID:21572729

  19. Radiation-induced optic neuropathy: A magnetic resonance imaging study

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, J.; Mancuso, A.; Beck, R.; Moster, M.L.; Sedwick, L.A.; Quisling, R.G.; Rhoton, A.L. Jr.; Protzko, E.E.; Schiffman, J. )

    1991-03-01

    Optic neuropathy induced by radiation is an infrequent cause of delayed visual loss that may at times be difficult to differentiate from compression of the visual pathways by recurrent neoplasm. The authors describe six patients with this disorder who experienced loss of vision 6 to 36 months after neurological surgery and radiation therapy. Of the six patients in the series, two had a pituitary adenoma and one each had a metastatic melanoma, multiple myeloma, craniopharyngioma, and lymphoepithelioma. Visual acuity in the affected eyes ranged from 20/25 to no light perception. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed sellar and parasellar recurrence of both pituitary adenomas, but the intrinsic lesions of the optic nerves and optic chiasm induced by radiation were enhanced after gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (DTPA) administration and were clearly distinguishable from the suprasellar compression of tumor. Repeated MR imaging showed spontaneous resolution of gadolinium-DTPA enhancement of the optic nerve in a patient who was initially suspected of harboring recurrence of a metastatic malignant melanoma as the cause of visual loss. The authors found the presumptive diagnosis of radiation-induced optic neuropathy facilitated by MR imaging with gadolinium-DTPA. This neuro-imaging procedure may help avert exploratory surgery in some patients with recurrent neoplasm in whom the etiology of visual loss is uncertain.

  20. Automated Peripheral Neuropathy Assessment Using Optical Imaging and Foot Anthropometry.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Hafeez-U R; Spruce, Michelle; Alty, Stephen R; Dudley, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    A large proportion of individuals who live with type-2 diabetes suffer from plantar sensory neuropathy. Regular testing and assessment for the condition is required to avoid ulceration or other damage to patient's feet. Currently accepted practice involves a trained clinician testing a patient's feet manually with a hand-held nylon monofilament probe. The procedure is time consuming, labor intensive, requires special training, is prone to error, and repeatability is difficult. With the vast increase in type-2 diabetes, the number of plantar sensory neuropathy sufferers has already grown to such an extent as to make a traditional manual test problematic. This paper presents the first investigation of a novel approach to automatically identify the pressure points on a given patient's foot for the examination of sensory neuropathy via optical image processing incorporating plantar anthropometry. The method automatically selects suitable test points on the plantar surface that correspond to those repeatedly chosen by a trained podiatrist. The proposed system automatically identifies the specific pressure points at different locations, namely the toe (hallux), metatarsal heads and heel (Calcaneum) areas. The approach is generic and has shown 100% reliability on the available database used. The database consists of Chinese, Asian, African, and Caucasian foot images. PMID:26186748

  1. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: Bringing the Lab to the Clinic.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Nailyn; Lessell, Simmons; Cestari, Dean M

    2016-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) was the first clinically characterized mitochondrial disorder. Since its first description in 1871, much has been discovered regarding the genetics and pathophysiology of the disease. This has enabled the development of in vitro cell and animal models that can be used to try to determine not only the effects of the genetic mutation upon the clinical phenotype but to also test potential novel therapies. Treatments for LHON have ranged from vitamins and minerals to immunosuppressants and, more recently, targeted gene therapy. This article reviews the pathophysiology and clinical features of LHON with a focus on translational research. PMID:26959136

  2. Atypical Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy: 18 Year Interval Between Eyes.

    PubMed

    Ohden, Kaitlyn L; Tang, Peter H; Lilley, Chrystia C; Lee, Michael S

    2016-09-01

    A 5-year-old boy developed profound loss of vision in his right eye and was found to have a 11778 mitochondrial point mutation consistent with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). He maintained 20/20 vision in the left eye for 18 years until age 23, when he experienced loss of vision in that eye. This 18 year interval between eye involvement in LHON is the longest reported to date and reinforces the variability in presentation and progression seen in this disease. PMID:26819093

  3. Macular infarction and traumatic optic neuropathy following blunt ocular trauma.

    PubMed

    Goel, Neha; Rajput, Metu; Sawhney, Amrita; Sardana, Tushar

    2016-01-01

    Macular infarction is a visually disabling condition caused by a variety of reasons. It has rarely been described in association with blunt ocular trauma. We describe the case of a young healthy male who sustained injury with a bull's leg and presented with severe visual loss owing to macular infarction and traumatic optic neuropathy. This report of an angiographically documented macular infarct secondary to ocular contusion highlights an additional feature in the spectrum of ocular findings following blunt trauma that might lead to a severe and permanent affliction of vision. PMID:26949360

  4. Macular infarction and traumatic optic neuropathy following blunt ocular trauma

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Neha; Rajput, Metu; Sawhney, Amrita; Sardana, Tushar

    2015-01-01

    Macular infarction is a visually disabling condition caused by a variety of reasons. It has rarely been described in association with blunt ocular trauma. We describe the case of a young healthy male who sustained injury with a bull’s leg and presented with severe visual loss owing to macular infarction and traumatic optic neuropathy. This report of an angiographically documented macular infarct secondary to ocular contusion highlights an additional feature in the spectrum of ocular findings following blunt trauma that might lead to a severe and permanent affliction of vision. PMID:26949360

  5. A retrospective review of 26 cases of dysthyroid optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Panzo, G.J.; Tomsak, R.L.

    1983-08-01

    Sixteen patients (14 women and two men) with dysthyroid optic neuropathy (26 involved eyes) were treated with either oral corticosteroids, orbital irradiation, surgical orbital decompression, combined corticosteroids and irradiation, or combined corticosteroids and surgical decompression. Thirteen of 16 eyes responded favorably to corticosteroid therapy but eight of the 13 relapsed upon discontinuation of treatment. Two of four eyes responded to irradiation initially but later relapsed. The response to orbital decompression was almost uniformly beneficial (eight of nine eyes responded) and lasting in all. Combined modes of therapy offered no additional advantage.

  6. Biomechanical assessment in models of glaucomatous optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao D; Ethier, C Ross

    2015-12-01

    The biomechanical environment within the eye is of interest in both the regulation of intraocular pressure and the loss of retinal ganglion cell axons in glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Unfortunately, this environment is complex and difficult to determine. Here we provide a brief introduction to basic concepts of mechanics (stress, strain, constitutive relationships) as applied to the eye, and then describe a variety of experimental and computational approaches used to study ocular biomechanics. These include finite element modeling, direct experimental measurements of tissue displacements using optical and other techniques, direct experimental measurement of tissue microstructure, and combinations thereof. Thanks to notable technical and conceptual advances in all of these areas, we are slowly gaining a better understanding of how tissue biomechanical properties in both the anterior and posterior segments may influence the development of, and risk for, glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Although many challenging research questions remain unanswered, the potential of this body of work is exciting; projects underway include the coupling of clinical imaging with biomechanical modeling to create new diagnostic tools, development of IOP control strategies based on improved understanding the mechanobiology of the outflow tract, and attempts to develop novel biomechanically-based therapeutic strategies for preservation of vision in glaucoma. PMID:26115620

  7. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy with 3460 mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jeong-Min; Chang, Bong Leen; Koh, Hyoung Jun; Kim, Ji Yeon; Park, Sung Sup

    2002-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally transmitted disease causing acute or subacute, bilateral optic atrophy mainly in young men. It is found to be a mitochondrial disorder with the primary mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations at 11,778, 3460, and 14,484. The incidence of each mutation is reported to be race-dependent. Point mutations at mtDNA nucleotide position 11,778 and 14,484 have been reported in Korean patients with LHON, however there has been no report of mtDNA mutation at nucleotide position 3460. Molecular genetic analyses at four primary sites (11,778, 14,484, 15,257, and 3460) of mitochondrial DNA using the polymerase chain reaction, restriction enzyme digestion, and direct sequencing were performed in a 35-yr-old man with severe visual loss. A point mutation in the mtDNA at nucleotide position 3460 was identified and a conversion of a single alanine to a threonine was confirmed. To our knowledge, this is the first report confirming mtDNA mutation at nucleotide position 3460 in Korean patients with LHON. Detailed molecular analyses would be very helpful for the correct diagnosis of optic neuropathy of unknown etiology and for genetic counseling. PMID:11961321

  8. Bilateral Glaucomatous Optic Neuropathy Caused by Eye Rubbing.

    PubMed

    Savastano, Alfonso; Savastano, Maria Cristina; Carlomusto, Laura; Savastano, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we describe a particular condition of a 52-year-old man who showed advanced bilateral glaucomatous-like optic disc damage, even though the intraocular pressure resulted normal during all examinations performed. Visual field test, steady-state pattern electroretinogram, retinal nerve fiber layer and retinal tomographic evaluations were performed to evaluate the optic disc damage. Over a 4-year observational period, his visual acuity decreased to 12/20 in the right eye and counting fingers in the left eye. Visual fields were severely compromised, and intraocular pressure values were not superior to 14 mm Hg during routine examinations. An accurate anamnesis and the suspicion of this disease represent a crucial aspect to establish the correct diagnosis. In fact, our patient strongly rubbed his eyes for more than 10 h per day. Recurrent and continuous eye rubbing can induce progressive optic neuropathy, causing severe visual field damage similar to the pathology of advanced glaucoma. PMID:26483667

  9. Evaluation of acute radiation optic neuropathy by B-scan ultrasonography

    SciTech Connect

    Lovato, A.A.; Char, D.H.; Quivey, J.M.; Castro, J.R. )

    1990-09-15

    We studied the accuracy of B-scan ultrasonography to diagnose radiation-induced optic neuropathy in 15 patients with uveal melanoma. Optic neuropathy was diagnosed by an observer masked as to clinical and photographic data. We analyzed planimetry area measurements of the retrobulbar nerve before and after irradiation. The retrobulbar area of the optic nerve shadow on B-scan was quantitated with a sonic digitizer. Increased optic nerve shadow area was confirmed in 13 of 15 patients who had radiation optic neuropathy (P less than .004). The correct diagnosis was confirmed when the results of ultrasound were compared to fundus photography and fluorescein angiography. In 13 patients there was acute radiation optic neuropathy. Two patients did not show an enlarged retrobulbar optic nerve, and the clinical appearance suggested early progression to optic atrophy. Ultrasonography documents the enlargement of the optic nerve caused by acute radiation changes.

  10. Treatment strategies for inherited optic neuropathies: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Wai-Man, P; Votruba, M; Moore, A T; Chinnery, P F

    2014-01-01

    Bilateral visual loss secondary to inherited optic neuropathies is an important cause of registrable blindness among children and young adults. The two prototypal disorders seen in clinical practice are Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (DOA). About 90% of LHON cases are due to one of three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations: m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C, which affect critical complex I subunits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The majority of patients with DOA harbour pathogenic mutations within OPA1, a nuclear gene that codes for a multifunctional inner mitochondrial membrane protein. Despite their contrasting genetic basis, LHON and DOA share overlapping pathological and clinical features that serve to highlight the striking tissue-specific vulnerability of the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) layer to disturbed mitochondrial function. In addition to severe visual loss secondary to progressive optic nerve degeneration, a subgroup of patients will also develop a more aggressive syndromic phenotype marked by significant neurological deficits. The management of LHON and DOA remains largely supportive, but major advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning RGC loss in these two disorders are paving the way for novel forms of treatment aimed at halting or reversing visual deterioration at different stages of the disease process. In addition to neuroprotective strategies for rescuing RGCs from irreversible cell death, innovative in vitro fertilisation techniques are providing the tantalising prospect of preventing the germline transmission of pathogenic mtDNA mutations, eradicating in so doing the risk of disease in future generations. PMID:24603424

  11. Auditory function in individuals within Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Rance, Gary; Kearns, Lisa S; Tan, Johanna; Gravina, Anthony; Rosenfeld, Lisa; Henley, Lauren; Carew, Peter; Graydon, Kelley; O'Hare, Fleur; Mackey, David A

    2012-03-01

    The aims of this study are to investigate whether auditory dysfunction is part of the spectrum of neurological abnormalities associated with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and to determine the perceptual consequences of auditory neuropathy (AN) in affected listeners. Forty-eight subjects confirmed by genetic testing as having one of four mitochondrial mutations associated with LHON (mt11778, mtDNA14484, mtDNA14482 and mtDNA3460) participated. Thirty-two of these had lost vision, and 16 were asymptomatic at the point of data collection. While the majority of individuals showed normal sound detection, >25% (of both symptomatic and asymptomatic participants) showed electrophysiological evidence of AN with either absent or severely delayed auditory brainstem potentials. Abnormalities were observed for each of the mutations, but subjects with the mtDNA11778 type were the most affected. Auditory perception was also abnormal in both symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects, with >20% of cases showing impaired detection of auditory temporal (timing) cues and >30% showing abnormal speech perception both in quiet and in the presence of background noise. The findings of this study indicate that a relatively high proportion of individuals with the LHON genetic profile may suffer functional hearing difficulties due to neural abnormality in the central auditory pathways. PMID:21887510

  12. Therapeutic strategies for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy: A current update.

    PubMed

    Gueven, Nuri; Faldu, Dharmesh

    2013-11-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a rare mitochondrial retinopathy, caused by mutations in subunits of complex I of the respiratory chain, which leads to elevated levels of oxidative stress and an insufficient energy supply. This molecular pathology is thought to be responsible for the dysfunction and eventual apoptotic loss of retinal ganglion cells in the eye, which ultimately results in blindness. Many strategies, ranging from neuroprotectants, antioxidants, anti-apoptotic- and anti-inflammatory compounds have been tested with mixed results. Currently, the most promising compounds are short-chain quinones that have been shown to protect the vision of LHON patients during the early stages of the disease. This commentary gives a brief overview on the current status of tested therapeutics and also addresses future developments such as the use of gene therapy that hopefully will provide safe and efficient therapy options for all LHON patients. PMID:25343117

  13. Nutritional Optic Neuropathy Caused by Copper Deficiency After Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, Yuna; Lavin, Patrick J M

    2016-06-01

    A 47-year-old woman developed severe bilateral visual loss 4 years after a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and 24 years after vertical banded gastroplasty. Her serum copper level was 35 μg/dL (normal, 80-155 μg/dL). She was prescribed elemental copper tablets. Because her methylmalonic acid was slightly elevated, she received vitamin B12 injections as well. Five weeks later, she reported that her vision had improved and, at 10 months, her vision had recovered from 20/400 bilaterally to 20/25 in each eye. This case highlights the importance of checking copper levels in addition to the "more routine" vitamin levels, such as B1, B6, B12, E, and serum folate in patients with suspected nutritional optic neuropathy after bariatric surgery, particularly if it involved a bypass procedure. PMID:26828841

  14. Macular thickness as a predictor of loss of visual sensitivity in ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Chun-xia; Zhang, Ai-di; Chen, Bing; Yang, Bing-jian; Wang, Qiu-hong; Yang, Mo; Wei, Shi-hui

    2016-01-01

    Ethambutol is a common cause of drug-related optic neuropathy. Prediction of the onset of ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy and consequent drug withdrawal may be an effective method to stop visual loss. Previous studies have shown that structural injury to the optic nerve occurred earlier than the damage to visual function. Therefore, we decided to detect structural biomarkers marking visual field loss in early stage ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy. The thickness of peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer, macular thickness and visual sensitivity loss would be observed in 11 ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy patients (22 eyes) using optical coherence tomography. Twenty-four healthy age- and sex-matched participants (48 eyes) were used as controls. Results demonstrated that the temporal peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and average macular thickness were thinner in patients with ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy compared with healthy controls. The average macular thickness was strongly positively correlated with central visual sensitivity loss (r2 =0.878, P=0.000). These findings suggest that optical coherence tomography can be used to efficiently screen patients. Macular thickness loss could be a potential factor for predicting the onset of ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy. PMID:27127488

  15. Macular thickness as a predictor of loss of visual sensitivity in ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chun-Xia; Zhang, Ai-di; Chen, Bing; Yang, Bing-Jian; Wang, Qiu-Hong; Yang, Mo; Wei, Shi-Hui

    2016-03-01

    Ethambutol is a common cause of drug-related optic neuropathy. Prediction of the onset of ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy and consequent drug withdrawal may be an effective method to stop visual loss. Previous studies have shown that structural injury to the optic nerve occurred earlier than the damage to visual function. Therefore, we decided to detect structural biomarkers marking visual field loss in early stage ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy. The thickness of peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer, macular thickness and visual sensitivity loss would be observed in 11 ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy patients (22 eyes) using optical coherence tomography. Twenty-four healthy age- and sex-matched participants (48 eyes) were used as controls. Results demonstrated that the temporal peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and average macular thickness were thinner in patients with ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy compared with healthy controls. The average macular thickness was strongly positively correlated with central visual sensitivity loss (r (2) =0.878, P=0.000). These findings suggest that optical coherence tomography can be used to efficiently screen patients. Macular thickness loss could be a potential factor for predicting the onset of ethambutol-induced optic neuropathy. PMID:27127488

  16. Peripapillary Pachychoroid in Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nagia, Lina; Huisingh, Carrie; Johnstone, John; Kline, Lanning B.; Clark, Mark; Girard, Michael J. A.; Mari, Jean Martial; Girkin, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study examined the peripapillary choroidal thickness (PCT) in nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) in comparison to contralateral eyes and normal eyes. Methods We used enhanced depth imaging spectral-domain optical coherence tomography to image the optic nerve head of 20 NAION, 10 contralateral eyes, and 102 normal eyes. Following compensation, the scans were manually delineated to identify relevant surfaces including Bruch's membrane opening (BMO), Bruch's membrane, and anterior sclera. The PCT was defined as the measurement between Bruch's membrane and the anterior sclera and was measured at increasing distance from BMO. Models adjusted for age, BMO area, and axial length were used to compare the mean PCT between NAION and normal eyes, and contralateral eyes and normal eyes. Paired t-tests were used to compare the PCT between NAION and contralateral eyes. Results The mean PCT was thicker in NAION and contralateral eyes when compared with normal eyes at all distances from BMO (P < 0.001). The PCT was not significantly thicker in contralateral eyes when compared with affected NAION eyes. Choroidal thickness was thinnest in the inferior quadrant in all eyes regardless of the group. Conclusions Increased peripapillary choroidal thickness was noted in both NAION and contralateral eyes. The thicker choroid may be an associated feature or a result of the disorder. Although further longitudinal study is required to determine causation, these findings may suggest that a thickened peripapillary choroid may be a component of the disk-at-risk clinical phenotype. PMID:27583829

  17. High doses of cobalt induce optic and auditory neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Apostoli, Pietro; Catalani, Simona; Zaghini, Anna; Mariotti, Andrea; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Vielmi, Valentina; Semeraro, Francesco; Duse, Sarah; Porzionato, Andrea; Macchi, Veronica; Padovani, Alessandro; Rizzetti, Maria Cristina; De Caro, Raffaele

    2013-09-01

    The adverse biological effects of continuous exposure to cobalt and chromium have been well defined. In the past, this toxicity was largely an industrial issue concerning workers exposed in occupational setting. Nevertheless, recent reports have described a specific toxicity mediated by the high levels of cobalt and chromium released by metallic prostheses, particularly in patients who had received hip implants. Clinical symptoms, including blindness, deafness and peripheral neuropathy, suggest a specific neurotropism. However, little is known about the neuropathological basis of this process, and experimental evidence is still lacking. We have investigated this issue in an experimental setting using New Zealand White rabbits treated with repeated intravenous injections of cobalt and chromium, alone or in combination. No evident clinical or pathological alterations were associated after chromium administration alone, despite its high levels in blood and tissue while cobalt-chromium and cobalt-treated rabbits showed clinical signs indicative of auditory and optic system toxicity. On histopathological examination, the animals showed severe retinal and cochlear ganglion cell depletion along with optic nerve damage and loss of sensory cochlear hair cells. Interestingly, the severity of the alterations was related to dosages and time of exposure. These data confirmed our previous observation of severe auditory and optic nerve toxicity in patients exposed to an abnormal release of cobalt and chromium from damaged hip prostheses. Moreover, we have identified the major element mediating neurotoxicity to be cobalt, although the molecular mechanisms mediating this toxicity still have to be defined. PMID:23069009

  18. Congenital optic nerve anomalies and hereditary optic neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Heidary, Gena

    2014-01-01

    Congenital and hereditary optic nerve anomalies represent a significant cause of visual dysfunction. While some optic nerve abnormalities affect the visual system alone, others may be associated with neurologic and systemic findings. Correct identification of the optic nerve disease therefore is crucial both for developing a treatment plan with respect to visual rehabilitation, but also for initiating the appropriate multidisciplinary evaluation. The purpose of this review is to highlight common examples of congenital and inherited optic nerve abnormalities in an effort to familiarize the clinician with salient clinical features of these diseases and to review important systemic testing when relevant.

  19. Post-traumatic optic neuropathy: our surgical and medical protocol.

    PubMed

    Emanuelli, E; Bignami, M; Digilio, E; Fusetti, S; Volo, T; Castelnuovo, P

    2015-11-01

    Post-traumatic optic neuropathy (TON) is a rare, but very much feared event. It is a traumatic injury of the optic nerve at any level along its course (often inside the optic canal), with partial or total loss of visual acuity, temporarily or permanently. Until now, an univocal treatment strategy does not exist. The clinical records of 26 patients, treated from 2002 to 2013, were reviewed. The most frequent cause of injury was road traffic accident (63%), followed by iatrogenic damage, work injuries, sport or home accidents. All patients underwent pre-operative ophthalmological evaluation, neuro-imaging (angio-CT or angio-MRI scans) and systemic corticosteroid therapy. All patients required a surgical treatment, due to poor response to medical therapy; it consisted of an endonasal endoscopic decompression of the intracanalicular segment of the optic nerve, performed by removing the bony wall of the optical canal and releasing the perineural sheath. Improvement of visual acuity was reached in 65% of cases. No minor or major complication occurred intra- or post-operative, with a maximum follow-up time of 41 months. An improvement in visual acuity was achieved, although very limited in some cases, when surgery was performed as close as possible to the traumatic event. In the literature, there is no evidence-based data evaluating both of the two main treatment options (medical therapy versus surgical decompression), to state which is the gold standard in the treatment for TON. We discuss the pro and cons of our protocol: medical endovenous steroid treatment, within 8 h of injury, and endoscopic surgical decompression within 12-24 since the beginning of medical therapy, represent the best solution in terms of risk-benefit ratio for the patients. PMID:25472815

  20. Imaging studies for diagnosing Graves' orbitopathy and dysthyroid optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Allan C. Pieroni; Gebrim, Eloísa M. M. S.; Monteiro, Mário L. R.

    2012-01-01

    Although the diagnosis of Graves' orbitopathy is primarily made clinically based on laboratory tests indicative of thyroid dysfunction and autoimmunity, imaging studies, such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and color Doppler imaging, play an important role both in the diagnosis and follow-up after clinical or surgical treatment of the disease. Imaging studies can be used to evaluate morphological abnormalities of the orbital structures during the diagnostic workup when a differential diagnosis versus other orbital diseases is needed. Imaging may also be useful to distinguish the inflammatory early stage from the inactive stage of the disease. Finally, imaging studies can be of great help in identifying patients prone to develop dysthyroid optic neuropathy and therefore enabling the timely diagnosis and treatment of the condition, avoiding permanent visual loss. In this paper, we review the imaging modalities that aid in the diagnosis and management of Graves' orbitopathy, with special emphasis on the diagnosis of optic nerve dysfunction in this condition. PMID:23184212

  1. Acute and Bilateral Blindness Due to Optic Neuropathy Associated With Copper Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Naismith, Robert T.; Shepherd, James B.; Weihl, Conrad C.; Tutlam, Nhial T.; Cross, Anne H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Acquired copper deficiency in adults is associated with a subacute to chronic progressive myeloneuropathy and optic neuropathy. Objective To describe an individual after gastric bypass surgery who developed a chronic progressive myeloneuropathy, an acute optic neuropathy, along with anemia and leukopenia. Design Case report. Setting Academic center. Patient A 55-year-old woman, following gastric bypass surgery 22 years earlier, developed progressive numbness, weakness, and sphincter disturbance over 6 years. She awoke one morning with bilateral blindness. Examination findings showed evidence of severe myelopathy and peripheral neuropathy. Main Outcome Measures Magnetic resonance imaging, optical coherence tomography, electrophysiologic studies, nerve and muscle biopsy specimens, and vision testing. Results Over 1 year of follow-up, copper infusion therapy seemed to stabilize the progressive myeloneuropathy and improved leukopenia and anemia. It had no effect on the optic neuropathy. Optic nerve tissue injury was observed on magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging and on optical coherence tomography. Conclusions Copper deficiency should be considered in cases of atypical optic neuropathy. Serum copper levels should be monitored in patients with a compatible neurologic syndrome who have undergone gastric bypass surgery. Although visual acuity did not improve after copper infusion in our patient, prompt recognition of copper deficiency may prevent further deterioration. PMID:19667226

  2. Psychophysical testing in rodent models of glaucomatous optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Stephanie L; Koulen, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Processing of visual information begins in the retina, with photoreceptors converting light stimuli into neural signals. Ultimately, signals are transmitted to the brain through signaling networks formed by interneurons, namely bipolar, horizontal and amacrine cells providing input to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which form the optic nerve with their axons. As part of the chronic nature of glaucomatous optic neuropathy, the increasing and irreversible damage and ultimately loss of neurons, RGCs in particular, occurs following progressive damage to the optic nerve head (ONH), eventually resulting in visual impairment and visual field loss. There are two behavioral assays that are typically used to assess visual deficits in glaucoma rodent models, the visual water task and the optokinetic drum. The visual water task can assess an animal's ability to distinguish grating patterns that are associated with an escape from water. The optokinetic drum relies on the optomotor response, a reflex turning of the head and neck in the direction of the visual stimuli, which usually consists of rotating black and white gratings. This reflex is a physiological response critical for keeping the image stable on the retina. Driven initially by the neuronal input from direction-selective RGCs, this reflex is comprised of a number of critical sensory and motor elements. In the presence of repeatable and defined stimuli, this reflex is extremely well suited to analyze subtle changes in the circuitry and performance of retinal neurons. Increasing the cycles of these alternating gratings per degree, or gradually reducing the contrast of the visual stimuli, threshold levels can be determined at which the animal is no longer tracking the stimuli, and thereby visual function of the animal can be determined non-invasively. Integrating these assays into an array of outcome measures that determine multiple aspects of visual function is a central goal in vision research and can be realized, for

  3. Ischemic optic neuropathies and their models: disease comparisons, model strengths and weaknesses

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Neil R.

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic optic neuropathies (IONs) describe a group of diseases that specifically target the optic nerve and result in sudden vision loss. These include nonarteritic and arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION and AAION) and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NPION, APION). Until recently, little was known of the mechanisms involved in ION damage, due to a lack of information about the mechanisms associated with these diseases. This review discusses the new models that closely mimic these diseases (rodent NAION, primate NAION, rodent PION). These models have enabled closer dissection of the mechanisms involved with the pathophysiology of these disorders and enable identification of relevant mechanisms and potential pathways for effective therapeutic intervention. Descriptions of the different models are included, and comparisons between the models, their relative similarities with the clinical disease, as well as differences are discussed. PMID:25690987

  4. Methylene blue provides behavioral and metabolic neuroprotection against optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Julio C; John, Joseph M; Lee, Jung; Gonzalez-Lima, F

    2009-04-01

    Methylene blue (MB) is a diaminophenothiazine with potent antioxidant and unique redox properties that prevent morphologic degenerative changes in the mouse retina induced by rotenone, a specific mitochondrial complex I inhibitor. This study evaluated pigmented rats to determine whether MB's neuroprotective effects against rotenone-mediated retinal neurotoxicity have functional relevance and whether these effects are mediated by an improvement in neuronal energy metabolism in vivo. Visual function was behaviorally assessed by determining differences in the illuminance sensitivity threshold pre- and post-bilateral intravitreal injection of rotenone (200 microg/kg) or rotenone plus MB (70 microg/kg). Retinal degeneration was morphologically studied using unbiased stereological tools. Changes in histochemically determined cytochrome oxidase activity in the visual pathway were used to evaluate the impact of treatments on neuronal energy metabolism. Rotenone induced a 1.4 log unit increase in the illumination threshold compared to baseline, as well as a 32% decrease in ganglion cell layer cell (GCL) density, and a 56% decrease in GCL layer + nerve fiber layer thickness. Co-administration of MB prevented the changes in visual function and the retinal histopathology. Furthermore, rotenone induced a functional deafferentation of the visual system, as revealed by decreases in the metabolic activity of the retina, superior colliculus, and visual cortex. These metabolic changes were also prevented by MB. The results provided the first demonstration of MB's behavioral and metabolic neuroprotection against optic neuropathy, and implicate MB as a candidate neuroprotective agent with metabolic-enhancing properties that may be used in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:19384599

  5. Hyperbaric oxygen in the treatment of radiation-induced optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, J.; Schatz, N.J.

    1986-08-01

    Four patients with radiation-induced optic neuropathies were treated with hyperbaric oxygen. They had received radiation therapy for treatment of pituitary tumors, reticulum cell sarcoma, and meningioma. Two presented with amaurosis fugax before the onset of unilateral visual loss and began hyperbaria within 72 hours after development of unilateral optic neuropathy. Both had return of visual function to baseline levels. The others initiated treatment two to six weeks after visual loss occurred in the second eye and had no significant improvement of vision. Treatment consisted of daily administration of 100% oxygen under 2.8 atmospheres of pressure for 14-28 days. There were no medical complications of hyperbaria. While hyperbaric oxygen is effective in the treatment of radiation-induced optic neuropathy, it must be instituted within several days of deterioration in vision for restoration of baseline function.

  6. Unilateral Optic Neuropathy and Acute Angle-Closure Glaucoma following Snake Envenomation

    PubMed Central

    Olcaysu, Osman Okan; Cadirci, Kenan; Durur Karakaya, Afak; Bayramlar, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. We aimed to describe a unique case in which a patient developed unilateral optic neuritis and angle-closure glaucoma as a result of snake envenomation. Case Report. Approximately 18 hours after envenomation, a 67-year-old female patient described visual impairment and severe pain in her left eye (LE). The patient's best corrected visual acuity was 10/10 in the RE and hand motion in the LE. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging showed signs of neuropathy in the left optic nerve. In the LE, corneal haziness, closure of the iridocorneal angle, and mild mydriasis were observed and pupillary light reflex was absent. Intraocular pressure was 25 mmHg and 57 mmHg in the RE and LE, respectively. The patient was diagnosed with acute angle-closure glaucoma in the LE. Optic neuropathy was treated with intravenous pulse methylprednisolone. Left intraocular pressure was within normal range starting on the fourth day. One month after the incident, there was no sign of optic neuropathy; relative afferent pupillary defect and optic nerve swelling disappeared. Conclusions. Patients with severe headache and visual loss after snake envenomation must be carefully examined for possible optic neuropathy and angle-closure glaucoma. Early diagnosis and treatment of these cases are necessary to prevent permanent damage to optic nerves. PMID:25705536

  7. Radiation optic neuropathy after megavoltage external-beam irradiation: Analysis of time-dose factors

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, J.T.; Bova, F.J.; Million, R.R.

    1994-11-15

    To investigate the risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy according to total radiotherapy dose and fraction size, based on both retrospective and prospectively collected data. Between October 1964 and May 1989, 215 optic nerves in 131 patients received fractionated external-beam irradiation during the treatment of primary extracranial head and neck tumors. All patients had a minimum of 3 years of ophthalmologic follow-up (range, 3 to 21 years). The clinical end point was visual acuity of 20/100 or worse as a result of optic nerve injury. Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy developed in five nerves (at mean and median times of 32 and 30 months, respectively, and a range of 2-4 years). Retrobulbar optic neuropathy developed in 12 nerves (at mean and median times of 47 and 28 months, respectively, and a range of 1-14 years). No injuries were observed in 106 optic nerves that received a total dose of <59 Gy. Among nerves that received doses of {ge} 60 Gy, the dose per fraction was more important than the total dose in producing optic neuropathy. The 15-year actuarial risk of optic compared with 47% when given in fraction sizes {ge}1.9 Gy. The data also suggest an increased risk of optic nerve injury with increasing age. As there is no effective treatment of radiation-induced optic neuropathy, efforts should be directed at its prevention by minimizing the total dose, paying attention to the dose per fraction to the nerve, and using reduced field techniques where appropriate to limit the volume of tissues that receive high-dose irradiation. 32 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia with peripheral neuropathy, optic atrophy and mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Miyama, S; Arimoto, K; Kimiya, S; Tomi, H

    2000-08-01

    An 8-year old girl with a not previously described type of complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is presented. Spasticity in her lower limbs had already been recognized during infancy and worsened progressively. Severe delay in mental development was observed. Peripheral neuropathy and optic atrophy developed at 5 years of age. On brain magnetic resonance imaging, an abnormally thin corpus callosum was observed. Involvement of the fasciculus gracilis was suggested by somatosensory evoked potentials. To our knowledge, there has been no reported case of complicated HSP with peripheral neuropathy, optic atrophy and mental retardation so far. We postulate that our patient is a sporadic case of not previously described complicated HSP. PMID:11071149

  9. Unilateral compressive optic neuropathy due to skull hyperostosis secondary to nutritional vitamin A deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Zayed, Mohammed G.; Hickman, Simon J.; Batty, Ruth; McCloskey, Eugene V.; Pepper, Irene M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We report a 17-year-old boy who presented with a chronic left unilateral optic neuropathy. Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated compression of the left optic nerve due to skull hyperostosis. He was found to be profoundly vitamin A deficient secondary to an unusual diet consisting predominantly of potato chips and crisps. Skull hyperostosis with cranial neuropathies and other neurological abnormalities has been described in growing animals fed vitamin A deficient diets but has not been previously reported in humans. PMID:26136803

  10. Isolated optic neuropathy in a case of Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Ebru N; Yaylali, Volkan; Yildirim, Cem

    2011-04-01

    A 57-year-old male with a 1-year history of recurrent oral ulceration and papulopustular lesions presented with acute visual loss in his left eye. He had an oedematous disc without any signs of uveitis. Laboratory work-up regarding infectious diseases was negative. The patient was diagnosed with acute optic neuropathy secondary to Behçet's disease. Systemic steroid and colchicine treatments were started but his vision did not improve. Isolated optic neuropathy is rare in Behçet's disease and early treatment with high-dose steroids may not be successful in some cases. PMID:21264492

  11. Unilateral compressive optic neuropathy due to skull hyperostosis secondary to nutritional vitamin A deficiency.

    PubMed

    Zayed, Mohammed G; Hickman, Simon J; Batty, Ruth; McCloskey, Eugene V; Pepper, Irene M

    2015-01-01

    We report a 17-year-old boy who presented with a chronic left unilateral optic neuropathy. Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated compression of the left optic nerve due to skull hyperostosis. He was found to be profoundly vitamin A deficient secondary to an unusual diet consisting predominantly of potato chips and crisps. Skull hyperostosis with cranial neuropathies and other neurological abnormalities has been described in growing animals fed vitamin A deficient diets but has not been previously reported in humans. PMID:26136803

  12. [Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy animal model and its treatment applications].

    PubMed

    Chuman, Hideki

    2014-04-01

    Nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is one of the most common acute unilaterally onset optic nerve diseases. One management problem in terms of NAION is the difficulty of differential diagnosis between NAION and anterior optic neuritis (ON). A second problem is that there is no established treatment for the acute stage of NAION. A third problem is that there is no preventive treatment for a subsequent attack on the fellow eye, estimated to occur in 15 to 25% of patients with NAION. For differentiation of acute NAION from anterior optic neuritis, we investigated the usefulness of laser speckle flowgraphy (LSFG). In the normal control group, the tissue blood flow did not significantly differ between the right and left eyes. In the NAION group, all 6 patients had 29.5% decreased mean blur rate (MBR), which correlates to optic disc blood flow, of the NAION eye compared with the unaffected eye. In the anterior ON group, all 6 cases had 15.9% increased MBR of the anterior ON eye compared with the unaffected eye. Thus, LSFG showed a difference of the underlying pathophysiology between NAION and anterior ON despite showing disc swelling in both groups and could be useful for differentiating both groups. For the treatment of acute stage of NAION, we tried to reproduce the rodent model of NAION (rNAION) developed by Bernstein and colleagues. To induce rNAION, after the administration of rose bengal(RB) (2.5 mM) into the tail vein of SD rats, the small vessels of the left optic nerve were photoactivated using a 514 nm argon green laser (RB-laser-induction). In the RB-laser-induction eyes, the capillaries within the optic disc were reduced markedly, the optic disc became swollen, and fluorescein angiography showed filling defect in the choroid and the optic disc at an early stage, followed by hyperfluorescence at a late stage. Electrophysiological evaluation revealed that visual evoked potential (VEP) amplitude was significantly decreased but an electroretinogram

  13. Color Doppler imaging of orbital venous flow in dysthyroid optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Nakase, Y; Osanai, T; Yoshikawa, K; Inoue, Y

    1994-01-01

    Color Doppler imaging was performed to evaluate the venous stasis in 39 orbits, including 9 optic neuropathy orbits, of 20 patients with dysthyroid ophthalmopathy and 22 orbits of 11 healthy subjects. The superior ophthalmic vein (SOV) was detected in 26 dysthyroid ophthalmopathy orbits and in 13 control orbits. The blood flow in the SOV was in the anteroposterior direction in 20 dysthyroid ophthalmopathy orbits and in 13 control orbits. Reversed flow, ie, the flow in the posteroanterior direction, was seen in 6 dysthyroid ophthalmopathy orbits and in none of the control orbits. In dysthyroid ophthalmopathy orbits, the blood flow in the SOV was reversed in 5 (36%) of the 14 orbits with apical orbital crowding observed on computed tomography, which means there was compression of the optic nerve by enlarged extraocular muscles, as compared to in 1 (4%) of the 25 orbits without apical orbital crowding (P < 0.05). The percentage of the orbits having reversed flow in SOV was 44% of dysthyroid ophthalmopathy orbits with optic neuropathy as opposed to 7% of those without optic neuropathy (P < 0.05). Reversed blood flow in the SOV strongly supported the existence of severe venous stasis in the orbits, which may be related to the development of dysthyroid optic neuropathy. PMID:7933702

  14. Bilateral simultaneous anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, an extrahepatic manifestation of hepatitis C cured with direct acting antivirals.

    PubMed

    Prud'homme, Sylvie; Nevens, Frederik; Casteels, Ingele

    2016-01-01

    We report a patient with a bilateral optic anterior ischemic neuropathy as an extrahepatic complication of a chronic hepatitis C (HCV) infection. The patient presented with a bilateral visual acuity loss and bilateral optic disc oedema. The optic neuropathy was associated with a sudden increase in the viral HCV load after a recent liver transplantation. The stop of the calcineurin inhibitor had no effect on the course of the optic neuropathy. Visual improvement and normalization of HCV viraemia occurred after treatment with sofosbuvir and daclatasvir, which are direct acting antivirals. PMID:27625964

  15. Bilateral simultaneous anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, an extrahepatic manifestation of hepatitis C cured with direct acting antivirals

    PubMed Central

    Prud’homme, Sylvie; Nevens, Frederik; Casteels, Ingele

    2016-01-01

    We report a patient with a bilateral optic anterior ischemic neuropathy as an extrahepatic complication of a chronic hepatitis C (HCV) infection. The patient presented with a bilateral visual acuity loss and bilateral optic disc oedema. The optic neuropathy was associated with a sudden increase in the viral HCV load after a recent liver transplantation. The stop of the calcineurin inhibitor had no effect on the course of the optic neuropathy. Visual improvement and normalization of HCV viraemia occurred after treatment with sofosbuvir and daclatasvir, which are direct acting antivirals. PMID:27625964

  16. Oestrogens ameliorate mitochondrial dysfunction in Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Carla; Montopoli, Monica; Perli, Elena; Orlandi, Maurizia; Fantin, Marianna; Ross-Cisneros, Fred N.; Caparrotta, Laura; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Ragazzi, Eugenio; Ghelli, Anna; Sadun, Alfredo A.; d’Amati, Giulia

    2011-01-01

    Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy, the most frequent mitochondrial disease due to mitochondrial DNA point mutations in complex I, is characterized by the selective degeneration of retinal ganglion cells, leading to optic atrophy and loss of central vision prevalently in young males. The current study investigated the reasons for the higher prevalence of Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy in males, exploring the potential compensatory effects of oestrogens on mutant cell metabolism. Control and Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy osteosarcoma-derived cybrids (11778/ND4, 3460/ND1 and 14484/ND6) were grown in glucose or glucose-free, galactose-supplemented medium. After having shown the nuclear and mitochondrial localization of oestrogen receptors in cybrids, experiments were carried out by adding 100 nM of 17β-oestradiol. In a set of experiments, cells were pre-incubated with the oestrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780. Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy cybrids in galactose medium presented overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which led to decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, increased apoptotic rate, loss of cell viability and hyper-fragmented mitochondrial morphology compared with control cybrids. Treatment with 17β-oestradiol significantly rescued these pathological features and led to the activation of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase 2. In addition, 17β-oestradiol induced a general activation of mitochondrial biogenesis and a small although significant improvement in energetic competence. All these effects were oestrogen receptor mediated. Finally, we showed that the oestrogen receptor β localizes to the mitochondrial network of human retinal ganglion cells. Our results strongly support a metabolic basis for the unexplained male prevalence in Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy and hold promises for a therapeutic use for oestrogen-like molecules. PMID:20943885

  17. Postoperative posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION) following right pterional meningioma surgery

    PubMed Central

    Maramattom, Boby Varkey; Sundar, Shyam; Thomas, Dalvin; Panikar, Dilip

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative visual loss (POVL) is an unpredictable complication of nonocular surgeries. Posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION) is particularly feared in spinal surgeries in the prone position. We report a rare case of PION occurring after surgery for a pterional meningioma and discuss the various factors implicated in POVL.

  18. Bilateral Blindness due to Ischemic Optic Nerve Neuropathy After Abdominal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Geis, Alexander B U; Höfert, Anke; Silvanus, Marie-Therese; Bornfeld, Norbert; Peters, Jürgen

    2015-08-15

    Postoperative blindness is an unpredictable, devastating, and yet not-uncommon complication of anesthesia. We present the case of a patient who suffered bilateral loss of eyesight after surgery. The diagnostic evidence led us to believe that it was bilateral posterior ischemic optic neuropathy; however, the true mechanisms of damage remain a matter of speculation. PMID:26275307

  19. Should steroids be offered to patients with nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION)?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Andrew G.; Biousse, Valérie

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of nonarteritic anterior optic neuropathy remains very limited and disappointing. Recent publications have suggested that oral steroids as well as intravitreal injections of steroids might be helpful to accelerate resolution of disc edema and improve visual outcome. However, the use of steroids to treat acute NAION remains largely debated. PMID:20523196

  20. Postoperative posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION) following right pterional meningioma surgery.

    PubMed

    Maramattom, Boby Varkey; Sundar, Shyam; Thomas, Dalvin; Panikar, Dilip

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative visual loss (POVL) is an unpredictable complication of nonocular surgeries. Posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION) is particularly feared in spinal surgeries in the prone position. We report a rare case of PION occurring after surgery for a pterional meningioma and discuss the various factors implicated in POVL. PMID:27570391

  1. Management of traumatic optic neuropathy--a study of 23 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Mauriello, J. A.; DeLuca, J.; Krieger, A.; Schulder, M.; Frohman, L.

    1992-01-01

    Twenty three patients with traumatic optic neuropathy were managed by medical and surgical treatment as follows. High dose intravenous steroids were initiated in all patients. If visions did not improve significantly after 24 to 48 hours decompression of an optic nerve sheath haematoma by medial orbitotomy and neurosurgical decompression of the optic canal were considered based on computed tomographic scan findings. Nine of 16 patients who received steroids only showed significant improvement. One of three showed improvement on optic nerve decompression after steroid failure; three or four showed improvement on optic nerve decompression after steroid failure; three or four showed improvement with combined optic nerve sheath decompression by the medial orbitotomy and decompression of the optic canal by frontal craniotomy. A lucid interval of vision after injury and an enlarged optic nerve sheath were associated with an improved prognosis. Five of the 23 patients had a lucid interval and all five had a final improved vision, while only five of 18 patients without a lucid interval improved. Similarly seven of the nine with an enlarged optic nerve sheath showed improvement while only three of 10 patients (three bilateral cases) who presented with no light perception improved with medical and surgical treatment. While a prospective controlled study of the management of traumatic optic neuropathy is necessary this preliminary study suggests that treatment of traumatic optic nerve sheath haematoma by optic nerve sheath decompression should be considered in selected patients. Images PMID:1622947

  2. Traumatic Optic Neuropathy: A Potentially Unrecognized Diagnosis after Sports-Related Concussion.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Michael J; Ritchie, Lesley; Cordingley, Dean; Essig, Marco; Mansouri, Behzad

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic optic neuropathy is a rare cause of visual disturbance after head injury that can be difficult to distinguish from coexisting vestibulo-ocular dysfunction because of the overlap in presenting symptoms in patients with these conditions. We present a case report of a 13-year-old girl who sustained a head injury during a ringette game leading to blurred vision and diplopia persisting 5 months after injury. Clinical history and physical examination findings were consistent with a traumatic optic neuropathy, convergence insufficiency, and postconcussion syndrome. Neuroimaging was normal. The patient was managed using a multidisciplinary approach. At 6 months of follow-up, neuro-ophthalmological examination demonstrated evidence of permanent partial optic nerve injury, and formal neuropsychological testing fell primarily within normal limits. The patient was advised to retire from collision sports. The authors discuss the value of a comprehensive multidisciplinary approach to the evaluation and management of concussion patients presenting with persistent visual symptoms. PMID:26745167

  3. Toxic optic neuropathy in the setting of docetaxel chemotherapy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To describe the first reported case of toxic optic neuropathy secondary to docetaxel (Taxotere®) chemotherapy. Case presentation A 53-year-old female presented with predominantly unilateral visual loss, but extensive bilateral visual field defects and bilateral optic nerve head swelling 2 weeks after first dose of docetaxel (Taxotere®) and trastuzumab (Herceptin®) chemotherapy for a left sided node-positive, HER2 positive breast cancer. Extensive investigation ruled out other causes of optic neuropathy. She was treated with high dose corticosteroids intravenously for 1 week then a tapering oral dose over 8 weeks. Visual field defects gradually resolved and visual acuity improved. Docetaxel chemotherapy was discontinued but targeted therapy with trastuzumab continued without further complication. Conclusion Docetaxel can cause a toxic optic neuropathy possibly due to an ischemic or neurotoxic mechanism at the optic nerve head. With cessation of docetaxel therapy and treatment with systemic corticosteroids, visual recovery can occur without significant residual visual deficit. PMID:24564293

  4. Subacute myelo‑optic neuropathy, beriberi, and HTLV‑I‑associated myelopathy: elucidation of some neurological diseases in Japan.

    PubMed

    Igata, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    Personal experience of the discovery of the cause, pathophysiology, and treatment as well as prevention of subacute myelo‑optic neuropathy, beriberi, and HTLV‑I‑associated myelopathy were described. PMID:23222550

  5. Recessive Mutations in RTN4IP1 Cause Isolated and Syndromic Optic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Angebault, Claire; Guichet, Pierre-Olivier; Talmat-Amar, Yasmina; Charif, Majida; Gerber, Sylvie; Fares-Taie, Lucas; Gueguen, Naig; Halloy, François; Moore, David; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Manes, Gael; Hebrard, Maxime; Bocquet, Béatrice; Quiles, Mélanie; Piro-Mégy, Camille; Teigell, Marisa; Delettre, Cécile; Rossel, Mireille; Meunier, Isabelle; Preising, Markus; Lorenz, Birgit; Carelli, Valerio; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Kaplan, Josseline; Roubertie, Agathe; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Bonneau, Dominique; Reynier, Pascal; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Bomont, Pascale; Hamel, Christian P.; Lenaers, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive optic neuropathies are rare blinding conditions related to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) and optic-nerve degeneration, for which only mutations in TMEM126A and ACO2 are known. In four families with early-onset recessive optic neuropathy, we identified mutations in RTN4IP1, which encodes a mitochondrial ubiquinol oxydo-reductase. RTN4IP1 is a partner of RTN4 (also known as NOGO), and its ortholog Rad8 in C. elegans is involved in UV light response. Analysis of fibroblasts from affected individuals with a RTN4IP1 mutation showed loss of the altered protein, a deficit of mitochondrial respiratory complex I and IV activities, and increased susceptibility to UV light. Silencing of RTN4IP1 altered the number and morphogenesis of mouse RGC dendrites in vitro and the eye size, neuro-retinal development, and swimming behavior in zebrafish in vivo. Altogether, these data point to a pathophysiological mechanism responsible for RGC early degeneration and optic neuropathy and linking RTN4IP1 functions to mitochondrial physiology, response to UV light, and dendrite growth during eye maturation. PMID:26593267

  6. Optic neuropathy secondary to dasatinib in the treatment of a chronic myeloid leukemia case

    PubMed Central

    Monge, Katia Sotelo; Gálvez-Ruiz, Alberto; Alvárez-Carrón, Alberto; Quijada, César; Matheu, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The drug dasatinib is a new therapeutic option for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) as well as acute lymphocytic lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). However, the scientific literature has not reached a consensus regarding the types of secondary ophthalmologic effects that this drug may have. In this study, we present the case of a 36-year-old male patient who was treated with dasatinib. Two and a half months later, this patient began to experience progressive visual loss in the superior visual field of both eyes. After ruling out various diagnostic options and performing extensive complementary tests, the suspected diagnosis was compatible with optic neuropathy secondary to dasatinib. The patient partially improved after stopping this medication and receiving oral corticosteroid treatment. Although secondary ophthalmological effects related to dasatinib are practically non-existent, our case is the first to report optic neuropathy secondary to this drug. PMID:26155085

  7. [Not only optic neuropathy: new molecular and clinical aspects of OPA1 gene mutations].

    PubMed

    Ołdak, Monika; Sciezyńska, Aneta; Szulborski, Kamil; Szaflik, Jacek P; Szaflik, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant optic nerve atrophy is the most frequent dominantly inherited optic neuropathy. The main causesof the disease are OPA1 gene mutations, which are detected in about 60% of patients. Encoded by the nuclear genome the OPA1 protein plays an important role in a wide variety of processes crucial to the proper functioning of mitochondria, the role of OPAl in many of them has been discovered recently. A detailed study of patients with mutations in the OPA1 gene has shown that about 20% of them present symptoms of a multiple system disease, which may include hearing loss, progressive external ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, myopathy, peripheral neuropathy, spastic paraparesis and multiple sclerosis-like illness. This clinical manifestation is difficult to differentiate from other neurodegenerative diseases, that is why genetic testing is very important in order to determine the molecular basis of the disease in these patients. PMID:25137924

  8. Combined endoscopic and subciliary orbital decompression for thyroid-related compressive optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Graham, S M; Carter, K D

    1997-09-01

    Compressive optic neuropathy is a feared, although unusual, complication of thyroid-related orbitopathy. A variety of surgical approaches have been described to achieve orbital decompression and alleviate the hallmark apical orbital crowding of this condition. We describe a subciliary anterior orbitotomy approach to the floor combined with an endoscopic medial wall resection. The anterior orbitotomy allows removal of the bones of the orbital floor both medial and lateral to the canal of the infraorbital nerve. The anterior orbital floor is retained for globe support. This combined approach retains the low morbidity of the endoscopic operation while achieving increased apical medial orbital wall and orbital floor decompression. We describe two illustrative cases where this approach produced a dramatic improvement in visual function. The surgical refinements associated with this combined approach offer technical advantages over other operations in the treatment of thyroid-related compressive optic neuropathy. PMID:9403938

  9. Genetic heterogeneity and mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Holt, I J; Miller, D H; Harding, A E

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of mitochondrial DNA from patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and their relatives showed that the previously reported mutation at base pair (bp) 11778, shown by loss of a recognition site for the restriction endonuclease SfaNI, was present in only four out of eight families. This mutation was associated with a poor prognosis for visual recovery, whereas four of five affected males without the 11778 bp mutation followed for four years or more had regained useful vision. All but one of the subjects showing the SfaNI site loss had a variable mixture of mutant and normal mitochondrial DNA in peripheral blood, and the relative proportions appeared to be correlated with the risk of developing or transmitting Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. Images PMID:2575667

  10. A randomized placebo-controlled trial of idebenone in Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Klopstock, Thomas; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos; Rouleau, Jacinthe; Heck, Suzette; Bailie, Maura; Atawan, Alaa; Chattopadhyay, Sandip; Schubert, Marion; Garip, Aylin; Kernt, Marcus; Petraki, Diana; Rummey, Christian; Leinonen, Mika; Metz, Günther; Griffiths, Philip G.; Meier, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Major advances in understanding the pathogenesis of inherited metabolic disease caused by mitochondrial DNA mutations have yet to translate into treatments of proven efficacy. Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy is the most common mitochondrial DNA disorder causing irreversible blindness in young adult life. Anecdotal reports support the use of idebenone in Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy, but this has not been evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. We conducted a 24-week multi-centre double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in 85 patients with Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy due to m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C or mitochondrial DNA mutations. The active drug was idebenone 900 mg/day. The primary end-point was the best recovery in visual acuity. The main secondary end-point was the change in best visual acuity. Other secondary end-points were changes in visual acuity of the best eye at baseline and changes in visual acuity for both eyes in each patient. Colour-contrast sensitivity and retinal nerve fibre layer thickness were measured in subgroups. Idebenone was safe and well tolerated. The primary end-point did not reach statistical significance in the intention to treat population. However, post hoc interaction analysis showed a different response to idebenone in patients with discordant visual acuities at baseline; in these patients, all secondary end-points were significantly different between the idebenone and placebo groups. This first randomized controlled trial in the mitochondrial disorder, Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy, provides evidence that patients with discordant visual acuities are the most likely to benefit from idebenone treatment, which is safe and well tolerated. PMID:21788663

  11. Analysis of Fundus Photography and Fluorescein Angiography in Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy and Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated fundus and fluorescein angiography (FAG) findings and characteristics that can help distinguish nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) from optic neuritis (ON). Methods Twenty-three NAION patients and 17 ON with disc swelling patients were enrolled in this study. We performed fundus photography and FAG. The disc-swelling pattern, hyperemia grade, presence of splinter hemorrhages, cotton-wool spots, artery/vein ratio and degree of focal telangiectasia were investigated. The FAG findings for each patient were compared with respect to the following features: the pattern of disc leakage in the early phase, arteriovenous (artery/vein) transit time (second), and the presence and pattern of the filling delay. Results Cotton-wool spots, focal telangiectasia, and venous congestion were more common in the affected eyes of NAION patients. Upon FAG, 76.5% of the patients in the ON group exhibited normal choroidal circulation. However, 56.5% of patients in the NAION group demonstrated abnormal filling defects, such as peripapillary, generalized, or watershed zone filling delays. Conclusions Fundus findings, including cotton-wool spots, focal telangiectasia, and venous congestion in the affected eye, may be clues that can be used to diagnose NAION. In addition, choroidal insufficiencies on FAG could be also helpful in differentiating NAION from ON. PMID:27478356

  12. Preserved Visual Acuity in Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy Secondary to Giant Cell (temporal) Arteritis

    PubMed Central

    Antonio-Santos, Aileen A.; Murad-Kejbou, Sally J.; Foroozan, Rod; Yedavally, Sunita; Kaufman, David I.; Eggenberger, Eric R.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the prevalence and clinical profile of patients with biopsy-proven arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy presenting with preserved visual acuity of 20/40 or better and those with an initial poor visual acuity of 20/50 or worse through a retrospective chart review RESULTS Nine of 37 patients with arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy presented with a preserved visual acuity of 20/40 or better in the affected eye. All patients with preserved visual acuity had initial visual field defects that spared the central field. All 37 patients immediately received high-dose corticosteroid therapy. Visual acuity worsened by > 2 lines in one of nine patients (11%) with preserved visual acuity, with a corresponding progression of visual field constriction. CONCLUSION Although preserved visual acuity of 20/40 or better has traditionally been associated with the nonarteritic form of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, giant cell arteritis should still be strongly considered, especially if they have giant cell arteritis systemic symptoms. PMID:26958148

  13. Recessive optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy and cataract associated with novel compound heterozygous mutations in OPA1

    PubMed Central

    LEE, JINHO; JUNG, SUNG-CHUL; HONG, YOUNG BIN; YOO, JEONG HYUN; KOO, HEASOO; LEE, JA HYUN; HONG, HYUN DAE; KIM, SANG-BEOM; CHUNG, KI WHA; CHOI, BYUNG-OK

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the optic atrophy 1 gene (OPA1) are associated with autosomal dominant optic atrophy and 20% of patients demonstrate extra-ocular manifestations. In addition to these autosomal dominant cases, only a few syndromic cases have been reported thus far with compound heterozygous OPA1 mutations, suggestive of either recessive or semi-dominant patterns of inheritance. The majority of these patients were diagnosed with Behr syndrome, characterized by optic atrophy, ataxia and peripheral neuropathy. The present study describes a 10-year-old boy with Behr syndrome presenting with early-onset severe optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy, ataxia and congenital cataracts. He had optic atrophy and was declared legally blind at six years old. Electrophysiological, radiological, and histopathological findings were compatible with axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathy. At birth, he presented with a congenital cataract, which has not been previously described in patients with OPA1 mutations. Whole exome sequencing indicated a pair of novel compound heterozygous mutations: p.L620fs*13 (c.1857–1858delinsT) and p.R905Q (c.G2714A). Neither mutation was observed in controls (n=300), and thus, they were predicted to be pathogenic by multiple in silico analyses. The mutation sites were highly conserved throughout different vertebrate species. The patients parents did not have any ophthalmic or neurologic symptoms and the results of electrophysiological studies were normal, suggestive of an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. The present study identified novel compound heterozygous OPA1 mutations in a patient with recessive optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy and congenital cataracts, indicating an expansion of the clinical spectrum of pathologies associated with OPA1 mutations. Thus, OPA1 gene screening is advisable in the workup of patients with recessive optic atrophy, particularly with Behr syndrome and cataracts. PMID:27150940

  14. Recessive optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy and cataract associated with novel compound heterozygous mutations in OPA1.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinho; Jung, Sung-Chul; Hong, Young Bin; Yoo, Jeong Hyun; Koo, Heasoo; Lee, Ja Hyun; Hong, Hyun Dae; Kim, Sang-Beom; Chung, Ki Wha; Choi, Byung-Ok

    2016-07-01

    Mutations in the optic atrophy 1 gene (OPA1) are associated with autosomal dominant optic atrophy and 20% of patients demonstrate extra-ocular manifestations. In addition to these autosomal dominant cases, only a few syndromic cases have been reported thus far with compound heterozygous OPA1 mutations, suggestive of either recessive or semi‑dominant patterns of inheritance. The majority of these patients were diagnosed with Behr syndrome, characterized by optic atrophy, ataxia and peripheral neuropathy. The present study describes a 10-year-old boy with Behr syndrome presenting with early‑onset severe optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy, ataxia and congenital cataracts. He had optic atrophy and was declared legally blind at six years old. Electrophysiological, radiological, and histopathological findings were compatible with axonal sensorimotor polyneuropathy. At birth, he presented with a congenital cataract, which has not been previously described in patients with OPA1 mutations. Whole exome sequencing indicated a pair of novel compound heterozygous mutations: p.L620fs*13 (c.1857‑1858delinsT) and p.R905Q (c.G2714A). Neither mutation was observed in controls (n=300), and thus, they were predicted to be pathogenic by multiple in silico analyses. The mutation sites were highly conserved throughout different vertebrate species. The patients parents did not have any ophthalmic or neurologic symptoms and the results of electrophysiological studies were normal, suggestive of an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. The present study identified novel compound heterozygous OPA1 mutations in a patient with recessive optic atrophy, sensorimotor neuropathy and congenital cataracts, indicating an expansion of the clinical spectrum of pathologies associated with OPA1 mutations. Thus, OPA1 gene screening is advisable in the workup of patients with recessive optic atrophy, particularly with Behr syndrome and cataracts. PMID:27150940

  15. Mitochondrial EFTs defects in juvenile-onset Leigh disease, ataxia, neuropathy, and optic atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ahola, Sofia; Isohanni, Pirjo; Euro, Liliya; Brilhante, Virginia; Palotie, Aarno; Pihko, Helena; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Lehtonen, Tanita; Laine, Jukka; Tyynismaa, Henna

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We report novel defects of mitochondrial translation elongation factor Ts (EFTs), with high carrier frequency in Finland and expand the manifestations of this disease group from infantile cardiomyopathy to juvenile neuropathy/encephalopathy disorders. Methods: DNA analysis, whole-exome analysis, protein biochemistry, and protein modeling. Results: We used whole-exome sequencing to find the genetic cause of infantile-onset mitochondrial cardiomyopathy, progressing to juvenile-onset Leigh syndrome, neuropathy, and optic atrophy in 2 siblings. We found novel compound heterozygous mutations, c.944G>A [p.C315Y] and c.856C>T [p.Q286X], in the TSFM gene encoding mitochondrial EFTs. The same p.Q286X variant was found as compound heterozygous with a splice site change in a patient from a second family, with juvenile-onset optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, and ataxia. Our molecular modeling predicted the coding-region mutations to cause protein instability, which was experimentally confirmed in cultured patient cells, with mitochondrial translation defect and lacking EFTs. Only a single TSFM mutation has been previously described in different populations, leading to an infantile fatal multisystem disorder with cardiomyopathy. Sequence data from 35,000 Finnish population controls indicated that the heterozygous carrier frequency of p.Q286X change was exceptionally high in Finland, 1:80, but no homozygotes were found in the population, in our mitochondrial disease patient collection, or in an intrauterine fetal death material, suggesting early developmental lethality of the homozygotes. Conclusions: We show that in addition to early-onset cardiomyopathy, TSFM mutations should be considered in childhood and juvenile encephalopathies with optic and/or peripheral neuropathy, ataxia, or Leigh disease. PMID:25037205

  16. Bilateral optic neuropathy following bite from brown recluse spider (Loxosceles reclusa).

    PubMed

    Mantopoulos, Dimosthenis; Hendershot, Andrew J; Cebulla, Colleen M; Hirsh, David K

    2016-06-01

    A 63-year-old female with history of a resected frontal lobe meningioma presented with bilaterally decreased vision after a bite from a brown recluse spider. The exam was significant for a left relative afferent pupillary defect, bilateral optic nerve pallor, decreased foveal sensitivity in the left eye and new bilateral visual field defects, despite stability of her meningioma. The findings remained stable at 1-year follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of optic neuropathy secondary to a brown recluse spider bite. Visual field tests performed prior to the bite allowed us to compare and localize changes related to the bite. PMID:25869060

  17. Optic neuropathy secondary to syphilis in an HIV negative patient.

    PubMed

    Berrozpe-Villabona, C; Santos-Bueso, E; Bañeros-Rojas, P; Aguilar Munoa, S; Saenz-Francés, F; Díaz-Valle, D; Martínez-de-la-Casa, J M; García-Feijoo, J

    2016-02-01

    Ocular syphilis is a resurgent clinical condition due to unsafe sexual practices. It has been reported in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients, but in HIV positive patients, it is more likely to exhibit a more aggressive course and adopt atypical clinical patterns such as optic nerve involvement. Herein we report an atypical case of optic neuritis secondary to syphilis in an HIV negative patient. This case highlights the importance of considering syphilis in the differential diagnosis of ocular inflammation and of obtaining HIV serology, since both diseases share common risk factors. PMID:26868532

  18. Current concepts in the diagnosis, pathogenesis and management of nonarteritic anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, N R; Arnold, A C

    2015-01-01

    Nonarteritic anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is the most common acute optic neuropathy in patients over the age of 50 and is the second most common cause of permanent optic nerve-related visual loss in adults after glaucoma. Patients typically present with acute, painless, unilateral loss of vision associated with a variable visual field defect, a relative afferent pupillary defect, a swollen, hyperaemic optic disc, and one or more flame-shaped peripapillary retinal haemorrhages. The pathogenesis of this condition is unknown, but it occurs primarily in patients with structurally small optic discs that have little or no cup and a variety of underlying vascular disorders that may or may not be known at the time of visual loss. There is no consistently beneficial medical or surgical treatment for the condition, but there are now animal models that allow testing of various potential therapies. About 40% of patients experience spontaneous improvement in visual acuity. Patients in whom NAION occurs in one eye have a 15–19% risk of developing a similar event in the opposite eye over the subsequent 5 years. PMID:24993324

  19. Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Affects Only Female Matrilineal Relatives in Two Chinese Families

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Jia; Wang, Ying; Tong, Yi; Zhou, Xiangtian; Zhao, Fuxin; Yang, Li; Zhang, Shoukang; Zhang, Juanjuan; West, Constance E.; Guan, Min-Xin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of modifier factors in the expression of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Methods. Thirty-five subjects from two Han Chinese families with maternally transmitted LHON underwent a clinical and genetic evaluation and molecular analysis of mitochondrial (mt)DNA. Results. Matrilineal relatives in the two Chinese families exhibited a wide range of severity in visual impairment, from blindness to nearly normal vision. Very strikingly, all nine affected individuals of 21 matrilineal relatives (13 females/8 males) were female, which translates to 33% and 57% of penetrance for optic neuropathy in the two families. The average age at onset was 22 and 25 years. These observations were in contrast with typical features in many LHON pedigrees that have a predominance of affected males. Molecular analysis of their mtDNAs identified the homoplasmic ND4 G11778A mutation and distinct sets of variants belonging to the Asian haplogroups M1 and M10a. Of other variants, the L175F variant in CO3; the I58V variant in ND6; and the I189V, L292R, and S297A variants in CYTB were located at highly conserved residues of polypeptides. Conclusions. Only female matrilineal relatives with a wide range of penetrance, severity, and age at onset of optic neuropathy in these two Chinese pedigrees showed the involvement of X-linked or autosomal recessive modifier genes in the phenotypic manifestation of the G11778A mutation. Furthermore, mitochondrial haplogroup-specific variants, together with epigenetic and environmental factors, may contribute to the phenotypic manifestation of the primary LHON-associated G11778A mutation in these pedigrees. PMID:20435583

  20. Autosomal recessive hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with mental retardation, optic atrophy and pyramidal signs.

    PubMed Central

    MacDermot, K D; Walker, R W

    1987-01-01

    A syndrome is described, consisting of severe neurogenic distal wasting, generalised muscle weakness, absent ankle reflexes, pyramidal signs, mental retardation, optic atrophy and retinal colloid bodies. A sural nerve biopsy from one case showed loss of nerve fibres suggesting the diagnosis of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy. Progression of the disorder was very slow, all patients still being able to walk more than 20 years after the onset. The persons affected with this syndrome were two brothers and their female cousin from a large Gujerati pedigree where consanguinity was high. Autosomal recessive inheritance is therefore suggested. Images PMID:3479531

  1. Bilateral simultaneous optic neuropathy in adults: clinical, imaging, serological, and genetic studies.

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, S P; Borruat, F X; Miller, D H; Moseley, I F; Sweeney, M G; Govan, G G; Kelly, M A; Francis, D A; Harding, A E; McDonald, W I

    1995-01-01

    To elucidate the cause(s) of acute or subacute bilateral simultaneous optic neuropathy (BSON) in adult life, a follow up study of 23 patients was performed with clinical assessment, brain MRI, HLA typing, and mitochondrial DNA analysis. The results of CSF electrophoresis were available from previous investigations in 11 patients. At follow up, five (22%) had developed clinically definite multiple sclerosis, four (17%) had mitochondrial DNA point mutations indicating a diagnosis of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The remaining 14 patients (61%) still had clinically isolated BSON a mean of 50 months after the onset of visual symptoms: three of 14 (21%) had multiple MRI white matter lesions compatible with multiple sclerosis, three of 14 (21%) had the multiple sclerosis associated HLA-DR15/DQw6 haplotype, and one of seven tested had CSF oligoclonal IgG bands; in total only five (36%) had one or more of these risk factors. The low frequency of risk factors for the development of multiple sclerosis in these 14 patients suggests that few will develop multiple sclerosis with more prolonged follow up. It is concluded that: (a) about 20% of cases of BSON without affected relatives are due to LHON; (b) multiple sclerosis develops after BSON in at least 20% of cases, but the long term conversion rate is likely to be considerably less than the rate of over 70% seen after an episode of acute unilateral optic neuritis in adult life. PMID:7823072

  2. [Interferon-alpha toxicity and reversible bilateral optical neuropathy: a timely withdrawal of the drug].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Carro, G; Fernández-Alonso, R; González-Diéguez, M L; Rodríguez-García, M; Junceda-Moreno, J

    2014-04-01

    Clinical case A patient with chronic, painless, bilateral loss of vision, after significant intake of interferon (IFNα) and ribavirina due to liver transplant. Ocular fundus is normal. A suspected retrobulbar optic neuropathy is confirmed by a prolongation of the latency of the patient's visual evoked potential. There being no prior record of risk factors and with the patient's systemic analysis giving normal results, the clinical improvement and the electro-physiological tests conducted after the drug was withdrawn point to interferon as negatively affecting the bilateral optic nerve. Discussion Interferon-α is used in the treatment of viral and neoplastic illnesses. Currently the drug is formulated as Interferon alfa pegilado (IFNα-p) in order to reduce toxicity and increase tolerance. The most common secondary effects are flu symptoms, asthenia and weigh loss. Affected ocular tissue is rare and optic neuropathy is also an infrequent complication: retinopathy at the beginning of treatment is, however, more frequent. The most widely accepted hypothesis as to the cause of toxicity is the presence of circulating immune complexes. It is, therefore, essential for ophthalmologists to be aware of the toxicity of this drug in order to be able to withdraw it in good time, thus preventing potentially irreversible sight loss. PMID:24269470

  3. Does altered fractionation influence the risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy?

    SciTech Connect

    Bhandare, Niranjan; Monroe, Alan T.; Morris, Christopher G.; Bhatti, M. Tariq; Mendenhall, William M. . E-mail: mendewil@shands.ufl.edu

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the parameters that influence the risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) after radiotherapy for head-and-neck tumors. Methods and Materials: Between 1964 and 2000, 273 patients with tumors of the nasopharynx, paranasal sinuses, nasal cavity, and hard palate adenoid cystic carcinomas were treated with curative intent and had radiation fields that included the optic nerves and/or chiasm. Patients were followed for at least 1 year after radiotherapy. Results: Radiation-induced optic neuropathy developed in 32 eyes of 24 patients (9%). The 5-year rates of freedom from RION according to the total dose and once- vs. twice-daily fractionation were as follows: {<=}63 Gy once daily, 95%; {<=}63 Gy twice daily, 98%; >63 Gy once daily, 78%; and >63 Gy twice daily, 91%. Multivariate analysis revealed that the total dose affected the risk of RION (p = 0.0047), with patient age (p = 0.0909), once-daily vs. twice-daily fractionation (p = 0.0684), and overall treatment time (p = 0.0972) were marginally significant. The use of adjuvant chemotherapy did not significantly influence the likelihood of developing RION. Conclusion: The likelihood of developing RION is primarily influenced by the total dose. Hyperfractionation may reduce the risk of experiencing this complication.

  4. Electrophysiological changes in optic neuropathy of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Ghita, AM; Parvu, D; Sava, R; Georgescu, L; Zagrean, L

    2013-01-01

    The visually evoked potentials are electrical signals generated by the occipital cortex due to electrical stimulus. The clinical importance of VEP is to diagnose the functional changes of the optic nerve in different diseases such as diabetic mellitus. Our study sought latency of VEP changes depending on glycemic value and duration of diabetes in Wistar rats. Methods: this study evaluated the VEP of 25 rats in three groups: control group, diabetic group 1 with glycemic values between 200-400mg/dl and diabetic group 2 with glycemic values between 400 and 600mg/dl. These rats from diabetic group 2 were followed for 4 months and the ones in control group and diabetic group 1 for 5 months. Results: the latency of VEP shows slight changes without any statistical significance in the control group. In diabetic group 1 and 2 similar changes occurred, with statistical significance and the amplitude of the changes was proportional with the glycemic value. The rats had a rapid increase of VEP latency after the induction of diabetes and returned to a normal range in the first month. After a time, when the latencies of VEP were in normal range, a new growth appeared faster and larger as the glycemic values were higher. Conclusion: diabetes brings changes to the visual signal transmission and to the central processing, this being revealed by the examination of the visually evoked potential. Increased VEP latency is statistically correlated with the changes that occur at the level of the values of glucose in blood. A rapid growth in blood sugar lowers the visual signal transmission. This change is temporary despite the persistence of elevated blood glucose values, probably by adjusting to the new condition. However, maintaining high glycemic values remotely produces a progressive increase of the delay of the visual signal. This progressive increase is faster as blood glucose levels are higher. PMID:24155786

  5. In vivo imaging methods to assess glaucomatous optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Fortune, Brad

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize the most common imaging methods currently applied for in vivo assessment of ocular structure in animal models of experimental glaucoma with an emphasis on translational relevance to clinical studies of the human disease. The most common techniques in current use include optical coherence tomography and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. In reviewing the application of these and other imaging modalities to study glaucomatous optic neuropathy, this article is organized into three major sections: 1) imaging the optic nerve head, 2) imaging the retinal nerve fiber layer and 3) imaging retinal ganglion cell soma and dendrites. The article concludes with a brief section on possible future directions. PMID:26048475

  6. Leber's "plus": neurological abnormalities in patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Nikoskelainen, E K; Marttila, R J; Huoponen, K; Juvonen, V; Lamminen, T; Sonninen, P; Savontaus, M L

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) may be a systemic disorder with manifestations in organs other than the optic nerves. To evaluate nervous system involvement 38 men and eight women with LHON were re-examined. The patients were divided into three groups according to mtDNA analysis--namely, patients with the 11778 or with the 3460 mutation and patients without these primary mutations. Fifty nine per cent of patients had neurological abnormalities but there was no significant difference between the three groups. Movement disorders were the most common finding; nine patients had constant postural tremor, one chronic motor tic disorder, and one parkinsonism with dystonia. Four patients had peripheral neuropathy with no other evident cause. Two patients had a multiple sclerosis-like syndrome; in both patients MRI showed changes in the periventricular white matter. Thoracic kyphosis occurred in seven patients, five of whom had the 3460 mutation. In one patient the 3460 mutation was associated with involvement of the brain stem. It is suggested that various movement disorders, multiple sclerosis-like illness, and deformities of the vertebral column may associate pathogenetically with LHON. Images PMID:7629530

  7. Unilateral optic neuropathy from possible sphenoidal sinus barotrauma after recreational scuba diving: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gunn, David J; O'Hagan, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    A case report is presented of a 35-year-old woman who developed a progressive right optic neuropathy while surfacing from a series of four recreational dives on the Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia. The patient reported severe sudden onset blurred vision in the right eye associated with a mild headache and epistaxis on surfacing from diving. The patient had her first medical review the day after returning from her trip. At this time visual acuity in the right eye was 20/80, with left eye 20/20. There was a relative afferent pupillary defect in the right eye. A high-resolution computed tomography scan showed fluid in the right sphenoid sinus. Computed perimetry revealed patchy visual field loss in the right eye. The provisional diagnosis of sphenoidal sinus barotrauma-induced optic neuropathy was made. Over 10 days of observation, the visual acuity returned to 20/20 in the right eye and visual field changes resolved. This case highlights a very unusual cause of visual loss associated with diving. PMID:23397871

  8. The 14th Hoyt Lecture: Ischemic Optic Neuropathy: The Evolving Profile, 1966-2015.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Anthony C

    2016-06-01

    Since the first English language description by Miller and Smith in 1966 of ischemic optic neuropathy as a distinct ophthalmic syndrome, a long series of studies has refined the clinical profile to what we consider to be accurate today. From the specifics of pathogenesis to the clinical appearance to the effect of therapy, the basic tenets of diagnosis and management have evolved over 5 decades. What we thought we knew about the following topics has changed: location of vasculopathy; incidence; age at onset; optic disc appearance; risk factors for development; natural history; rate of fellow eye involvement; ischemia as an all-or-none phenomenon; and treatment. A look back at these discoveries shows both how far we have come and how far we have to go in managing this disorder. PMID:27176556

  9. Macular Microcysts in Mitochondrial Optic Neuropathies: Prevalence and Retinal Layer Thickness Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Carbonelli, Michele; La Morgia, Chiara; Savini, Giacomo; Cascavilla, Maria Lucia; Borrelli, Enrico; Chicani, Filipe; do V. F. Ramos, Carolina; Salomao, Solange R.; Parisi, Vincenzo; Sebag, Jerry; Bandello, Francesco; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Carelli, Valerio; Barboni, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the thickness of the retinal layers and to assess the prevalence of macular microcysts (MM) in the inner nuclear layer (INL) of patients with mitochondrial optic neuropathies (MON). Methods All patients with molecularly confirmed MON, i.e. Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) and Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA), referred between 2010 and 2012 were enrolled. Eight patients with MM were compared with two control groups: MON patients without MM matched by age, peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness, and visual acuity, as well as age-matched controls. Retinal segmentation was performed using specific Optical coherence tomography (OCT) software (Carl Zeiss Meditec). Macular segmentation thickness values of the three groups were compared by one-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc corrections. Results MM were identified in 5/90 (5.6%) patients with LHON and 3/58 (5.2%) with DOA. The INL was thicker in patients with MON compared to controls regardless of the presence of MM [133.1±7μm vs 122.3±9μm in MM patients (p<0.01) and 128.5±8μm vs. 122.3±9μm in no-MM patients (p<0.05)], however the outer nuclear layer (ONL) was thicker in patients with MM (101.4±1mμ) compared to patients without MM [77.5±8mμ (p<0.001)] and controls [78.4±7mμ (p<0.001)]. ONL thickness did not significantly differ between patients without MM and controls. Conclusion The prevalence of MM in MON is low (5-6%), but associated with ONL thickening. We speculate that in MON patients with MM, vitreo-retinal traction contributes to the thickening of ONL as well as to the production of cystic spaces. PMID:26047507

  10. Hereditary Neuropathies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Hereditary Neuropathies Information Page Synonym(s): Neuropathy - Hereditary Table of Contents ( ... and Information Publicaciones en Español What are Hereditary Neuropathies? Hereditary neuropathies are a group of inherited disorders ...

  11. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Peripheral Neuropathy Information Page Condensed from Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Peripheral Neuropathy? Peripheral neuropathy describes damage to the peripheral nervous ...

  12. Multiplex MALDI-TOF MS detection of mitochondrial variants in Brazilian patients with hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Matilde da Silva-Costa, Sueli; Balieiro, Juliane Cristina; Fernandes, Marcela Scabello Amaral; Alves, Rogério Marins; Guerra, Andrea Trevas Maciel; Marcondes, Ana Maria; Sartorato, Edi Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disease characterized by bilateral vision loss. More than 95% of LHON cases are associated with one of the three main mtDNA mutations: G11778A, T14484C, and G3460A. The other 5% of cases are due to other rare mutations related to the disease. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence and spectrum of LHON mtDNA mutations, including the haplogroup, in a cohort of Brazilian patients with optic neuropathy and to evaluate the usefulness of iPLEX Gold/matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) technology in detecting LHON mutations. Methods We analyzed a total of 101 patients; 67 had a clinical diagnosis of LHON and 34 had optic neuropathy of unknown etiology. Direct sequencing and iPLEX Gold/MALDI-TOF MS were used to screen for the most common pathogenic point mutations in LHON, together with the rare mutations G3733A, C4171A, T10663C, G14459A, C14482G, A14495G, C14568T, and C14482A. Results We identified mutations in 36 patients, of whom 83.3% carried the G11778A mutation and 16.7% carried the T14484C mutation. In individuals with mutations, the haplogroups found were L1/L2, L3, C, R, U, D, and H. Rare mutations were not detected in any of the patients analyzed. Conclusions The frequencies of the main LHON mutations were similar to those previously reported for Latin America. A different frequency was found only for the A3460G mutation. The most frequent haplogroups identified were of African origin. The iPLEX Gold/MALDI-TOF MS technology proved to be highly accurate and efficient for screening mutations and identifying the haplogroups related to LHON. The MassArray platform, combined with other techniques, enabled definitive diagnosis of LHON in 36% (36/101) of the cases studied. PMID:27582625

  13. Bilateral non-arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy in a transsexual woman using excessive estrogen dosage.

    PubMed

    Wierckx, Katrien; De Zaeytijd, Julie; Elaut, Els; Heylens, Gunter; T'Sjoen, Guy

    2014-02-01

    We present a case report on a 53-year-old transsexual woman who developed acute painless vision loss in both eyes during cross-sex hormone treatment. After 10 months of cross-sex hormone treatment, she experienced total vision loss of the right eye and, 6 months later, vision loss to 20/63 in the left eye. After a full ophthalmic exam, bilateral sequential non-arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NA-ION) was diagnosed. Extensive etiological work-up revealed no cardiac abnormalities or inherited blood-clotting disorders. A manifest self-administered overdose of transdermal estrogen treatment with serum estradiol levels of 5,765 pg/ml was possibly related to the sequential bilateral NA-ION resulting in nearly total vision loss in this transsexual woman. PMID:24057212

  14. Bilateral Simultaneous Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy after Ingestion of Sildenafil for Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Tarantini, Anna; Faraoni, Alessandra; Menchini, Francesca; Lanzetta, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To describe a patient who developed bilateral, simultaneous nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) after ingestion of Sildenafil citrate (Viagra) for erectile dysfunction. Methods. Observational case report. Results. A 60-year-old diabetic man noted sudden decrease of vision in both eyes 16 hours after his third consecutive 50 mg daily Sildenafil ingestion. A diagnosis of bilateral NAION was made and he was treated for three days with methylprednisolone 1 g/d intravenously, followed by oral prednisone 75 mg/d. Final visual acuity was 20/50 right eye (OD) and 20/20 left eye (OS). He had preexisting diabetes. Conclusion. This is the first reported case of simultaneous bilateral NAION occurred in a diabetic patient early after Sildenafil intake. Patients with predisposing conditions such as diabetes have to be warned against the use of PDE inhibitors. PMID:22481954

  15. Gene-Based Therapies for Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy. Hype or Hope?

    PubMed

    Mackey, David A; Kearns, Lisa S; Hewitt, Alex W

    2016-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy has now joined Leber congenital amaurosis in the list of genetic eye diseases undergoing gene therapy clinical trials. Although a dramatic response to treatment would be welcome, a minor improvement in vision is a major challenge in efficacy assessment, given this may occur spontaneously as part of the natural history of minor recovery in some patients. Thus, we must await the outcome of adequately powered clinical trials to know if the treatment is effective, particularly given the likely high cost of such therapeutic interventions in the future. We need global cooperation to ensure that the most suitable patients are enrolled in these trials and that support is provided for participants who need to travel from the Asia-Pacific region to Europe or North America if there are no local arms of these trials. PMID:27488066

  16. Atypical presentation of Leigh syndrome associated with a Leber hereditary optic neuropathy primary mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Fruhman, Gary; Landsverk, Megan L; Lotze, Timothy E; Hunter, Jill V; Wangler, Michael F; Adesina, Adekunle M; Wong, Lee-Jun C; Scaglia, Fernando

    2011-06-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is caused by point mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), and is characterized by bilateral, painless sub-acute visual loss that develops during the second decade of life. Here we report the case of a five year old girl who presented with clinical and neuroradiological findings reminiscent of Leigh syndrome but carried a mtDNA mutation m.11778G>A (p.R340H) in the MTND4 gene usually observed in patients with LHON. This case is unusual for age of onset, gender, associated neurological findings and evolution, further expanding the clinical spectrum associated with primary LHON mtDNA mutations. PMID:21414825

  17. Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy as the presenting manifestation of primary antiphospholipid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tugcu, Betul; Acar, Nur; Coskun, Cigdem Tanrıverdi; Celik, Selda; Yigit, Fadime Ulviye

    2014-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by vascular thrombosis or pregnancy morbidity. Ocular involvement in APS includes a broad spectrum of manifestations involving anterior and posterior segment or the presence of neuroophthalmologic features. Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is a very rare finding, and in this report a case having NAION as the prevailing sign of APS is presented. A middle-aged women who presented with visual disturbances in her left eye (LE) and turned out to have the diagnosis of primary APS with the help of rheumatological investigations is discussed. She was treated with oral steroids for NAION in her LE. With systemic and rheumatological work-up, primary APS was diagnosed, and hydroxychloroquine, coumadin, and aspirin were started, after which she remained stable under control. Due to the important diagnostic and therapeutic implications of APS, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of NAION, particularly when the etiology is uncertain. PMID:23571268

  18. Evidence against an X-linked visual loss susceptibility locus in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Chalmers, R.M.; Davis, M.B.; Sweeney, M.G.; Wood, N.W.; Harding, A.E.

    1996-07-01

    Pedigree analysis of British families with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) closely fits a model in which a pathogenic mtDNA mutation interacts with an X-linked visual loss susceptibility locus (VLSL). This model predicts that 60% of affected females will show marked skewing of X inactivation. Linkage analysis in British and Italian families with genetically proven LHON has excluded the presence of such a VLSL over 169 cM of the X chromosome both when all families were analyzed together and when only families with the bp 11778 mutation were studied. Further, there was no excess skewing of X inactivation in affected females. There was no evidence for close linkage to three markers in the pseudoautosomal region of the sex chromosomes. The mechanism of incomplete penetrance and male predominance in LHON remains unclear. 27 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  19. Single-cell analysis of intercellular heteroplasmy of mtDNA in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Y.; Sharpe, H.; Brown, N.

    1994-07-01

    The authors have investigated the distribution of mutant mtDNA molecules in single cells from a patient with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). LHON is a maternally inherited disease that is characterized by a sudden-onset bilateral loss of central vision, which typically occurs in early adulthood. More than 50% of all LHON patients carry an mtDNA mutation at nucleotide position 11778. This nucleotide change converts a highly conserved arginine residue to histidine at codon 340 in the NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase subunit 4 (ND4) gene of mtDNA. In the present study, the authors used PCR amplification of mtDNA from lymphocytes to investigate mtDNA heteroplasmy at the single-cell level in a LHON patient. They found that most cells were either homoplasmic normal or homoplasmic mutant at nucleotide position 11778. Some (16%) cells contained both mutant and normal mtDNA.

  20. Inhibition of adenosine kinase attenuates inflammation and neurotoxicity in traumatic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Saif; Elsherbiny, Nehal M; Bhatia, Kanchan; Elsherbini, Ahmed M; Fulzele, Sadanand; Liou, Gregory I

    2014-12-15

    Traumatic optic neuropathy (TON) is associated with apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells. Local productions of reactive oxygen species and inflammatory mediators from activated microglial cells have been hypothesized to underlie apoptotic processes. We previously demonstrated that the anti-inflammatory effect of adenosine, through A2A receptor activation had profound protective influence against retinal injury in traumatic optic neuropathy. This protective effect is limited due to rapid cellular re-uptake of adenosine by equilibrative nucleotside transporter-1 (ENT1) or break down by adenosine kinase (AK), the key enzyme in adenosine clearance pathway. Further, the use of adenosine receptors agonists are limited by systemic side effects. Therefore, we seek to investigate the potential role of amplifying the endogenous ambient level of adenosine by pharmacological inhibition of AK. We tested our hypothesis by comparing TON-induced retinal injury in mice with and without ABT-702 treatment, a selective AK inhibitor (AKI). The retinal-protective effect of ABT-702 was demonstrated by significant reduction of Iba-1, ENT1, TNF-α, IL-6, and iNOS/nNOS protein or mRNA expression in TON as revealed by western blot and real time PCR. TON-induced superoxide anion generation and nitrotyrosine expression were reduced in ABT-702 treated mice retinal sections as determined by immunoflourescence. In addition, ABT-702 attenuated p-ERK1/2 and p-P38 activation in LPS induced activated mouse microglia cells. The results of the present investigation suggested that ABT-702 had a protective role against marked TON-induced retinal inflammation and damage by augmenting the endogenous therapeutic effects of site- and event-specific accumulation of extracellular adenosine. PMID:25457840

  1. Crystallins Are Regulated Biomarkers for Monitoring Topical Therapy of Glaucomatous Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Prokosch, Verena; Schallenberg, Maurice; Thanos, Solon

    2013-01-01

    Optic nerve atrophy caused by abnormal intraocular pressure (IOP) remains the most common cause of irreversible loss of vision worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine whether topically applied IOP-lowering eye drugs affect retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and retinal metabolism in a rat model of optic neuropathy. IOP was elevated through cauterization of episcleral veins, and then lowered either by the daily topical application of timolol, timolol/travoprost, timolol/dorzolamide, or timolol/brimonidine, or surgically with sectorial iridectomy. RGCs were retrogradely labeled 4 days prior to enucleation, and counted. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry allowed the identification of IOP-dependent proteomic changes. Genomic changes were scrutinized using microarrays and qRT-PCR. The significant increase in IOP induced by episcleral vein cauterization that persisted until 8 weeks of follow-up in control animals (p<0.05) was effectively lowered by the eye drops (p<0.05). As anticipated, the number of RGCs decreased significantly following 8 weeks of elevated IOP (p<0.05), while treatment with combination compounds markedly improved RGC survival (p<0.05). 2D-PAGE and Western blot analyses revealed an IOP-dependent expression of crystallin cry-βb2. Microarray and qRT-PCR analyses verified the results at the mRNA level. IHC demonstrated that crystallins were expressed mainly in the ganglion cell layer. The data suggest that IOP and either topically applied antiglaucomatous drugs influence crystallin expression within the retina. Neuronal crystallins are thus suitable biomarkers for monitoring the progression of neuropathy and evaluating any neuroprotective effects. PMID:23468831

  2. A Case of Decreased Visual Field after Uneventful Cataract Surgery: Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hun; Kim, Chan Yun; Seong, Gong Je

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to report a case of nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) after uneventful cataract surgery. A 53-year-old Filipina underwent cataract surgery. She had a small optic disc with cup-to-disc ratio of 0.2 in the left eye and 0.3 in the right eye. On the first postoperative day, the uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) was 20/20, with an intraocular pressure (IOP) of 20 mmHg in the left eye. At one week after operation, the UCVA was 20/20 and the IOP was 15 mmHg. Three weeks later, she underwent cataract surgery in the right eye. On the first postoperative day, her UCVA was 20/20 in both eyes, but she complained of a visual field decrease in the left eye. A relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD) was noted and the optic disc was pallid and swollen diffusely. A red-free photo showed defect surrounding the optic disc. A visual field test showed tunnel vision sparing the central vision. In this report, the authors hypothesize an association between cataract extraction and delayed NAION. Since the risk of NAION in the fellow eye is 30-50%, visual acuity, visual field, fundus exam and RAPD should be routinely checked. PMID:20157417

  3. A case of decreased visual field after uneventful cataract surgery: nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hun; Kim, Chan Yun; Seong, Gong Je; Ma, Kyoung Tak

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to report a case of nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) after uneventful cataract surgery. A 53-year-old Filipina underwent cataract surgery. She had a small optic disc with cup-to-disc ratio of 0.2 in the left eye and 0.3 in the right eye. On the first postoperative day, the uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA) was 20/20, with an intraocular pressure (IOP) of 20 mmHg in the left eye. At one week after operation, the UCVA was 20/20 and the IOP was 15 mmHg. Three weeks later, she underwent cataract surgery in the right eye. On the first postoperative day, her UCVA was 20/20 in both eyes, but she complained of a visual field decrease in the left eye. A relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD) was noted and the optic disc was pallid and swollen diffusely. A red-free photo showed defect surrounding the optic disc. A visual field test showed tunnel vision sparing the central vision. In this report, the authors hypothesize an association between cataract extraction and delayed NAION. Since the risk of NAION in the fellow eye is 30-50%, visual acuity, visual field, fundus exam and RAPD should be routinely checked. PMID:20157417

  4. Antivascular Endothelial Growth Factor Bevacizumab for Radiation Optic Neuropathy: Secondary to Plaque Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Finger, Paul T.; Chin, Kimberly J.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the intravitreal antivascular endothelial growth factor, bevacizumab, for treatment of radiation optic neuropathy (RON). Methods and Materials: A prospective interventional clinical case series was performed of 14 patients with RON related to plaque radiotherapy for choroidal melanoma. The RON was characterized by optic disc edema, hemorrhages, microangiopathy, and neovascularization. The entry criteria included a subjective or objective loss of vision, coupled with findings of RON. The study subjects received a minimum of two initial injections of intravitreal bevacizumab (1.25 mg in 0.05 mL) every 6-8 weeks. The primary objectives included safety and tolerability. The secondary objectives included the efficacy as measured using the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study chart for visual acuity, fundus photography, angiography, and optical coherence tomography/scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Results: Reductions in optic disc hemorrhage and edema were noted in all patients. The visual acuity was stable or improved in 9 (64%) of the 14 patients. Of the 5 patients who had lost vision, 2 had relatively large posterior tumors, 1 had had the vision decrease because of intraocular hemorrhage, and 1 had developed optic atrophy. The fifth patient who lost vision was noncompliant. No treatment-related ocular or systemic side effects were observed. Conclusions: Intravitreal antivascular endothelial growth factor bevacizumab was tolerated and generally associated with improved vision, reduced papillary hemorrhage, and resolution of optic disc edema. Persistent optic disc neovascularization and fluorescein angiographic leakage were invariably noted. The results of the present study support additional evaluation of antivascular endothelial growth factor medications as treatment of RON.

  5. Intraretinal Layer Segmentation of Macular Optical Coherence Tomography Images Using Optimal 3-D Graph Search

    PubMed Central

    Abràmoff, Michael D.; Kardon, Randy; Russell, Stephen R.; Wu, Xiaodong; Sonka, Milan

    2008-01-01

    Current techniques for segmenting macular optical coherence tomography (OCT) images have been 2-D in nature. Furthermore, commercially available OCT systems have only focused on segmenting a single layer of the retina, even though each intraretinal layer may be affected differently by disease. We report an automated approach for segmenting (anisotropic) 3-D macular OCT scans into five layers. Each macular OCT dataset consisted of six linear radial scans centered at the fovea. The six surfaces defining the five layers were identified on each 3-D composite image by transforming the segmentation task into that of finding a minimum-cost closed set in a geometric graph constructed from edge/regional information and a priori determined surface smoothness and interaction constraints. The method was applied to the macular OCT scans of 12 patients (24 3-D composite image datasets) with unilateral anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION). Using the average of three experts’ tracings as a reference standard resulted in an overall mean unsigned border positioning error of 6.1 ± 2.9 µm, a result comparable to the interobserver variability (6.9 ± 3.3 µm). Our quantitative analysis of the automated segmentation results from AION subject data revealed that the inner retinal layer thickness for the affected eye was 24.1 µm (21%) smaller on average than for the unaffected eye (P < 0.001), supporting the need for segmenting the layers separately. PMID:18815101

  6. Clioquinol-zinc chelate: a candidate causative agent of subacute myelo-optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Arbiser, J. L.; Kraeft, S. K.; van Leeuwen, R.; Hurwitz, S. J.; Selig, M.; Dickersin, G. R.; Flint, A.; Byers, H. R.; Chen, L. B.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: 5-chloro-7-iodo-8-hydroxyquinoline (clioquinol) was used clinically three decades ago as an oral antiparasitic agent and to increase intestinal absorption of zinc in patients with acrodermatitis enteropathica, a genetic disorder of zinc absorption. Use of clioquinol was epidemiologically linked to subacute myelo-optic neuropathy (SMON), characterized by peripheral neuropathy and blindness, which affected 10,000 patients in Japan. Discontinuation of oral clioquinol use led to elimination of SMON, however, the mechanism of how clioquinol induces neurotoxicity is unclear. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We tested the effect of clioquinol-metal chelates on neural crest-derived melanoma cells. The effect of clioquinol chelates on cells was further studied by electron microscopy and by a mitochondrial potential-sensitive fluorescent dye. RESULTS: Of the ions tested, only clioquinol-zinc chelate demonstrated cytotoxicity. The cytotoxicity of clioquinol-zinc chelate was extremely rapid, suggesting that its primary effect was on the mitochondria. Electron microscopic analysis demonstrated that clioquinol-zinc chelate caused mitochondrial damage. This finding was further confirmed by the observation that clioquinol-zinc chelate caused a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate that clioquinol, in the presence of zinc, is converted to a potent mitochondrial toxin. The phenomenon of clioquinol mediated toxicity appears to be specific to zinc and is not seen with other metals tested. Since clioquinol has been shown to cause increased systemic absorption of zinc in humans, it is likely that clioquinol-zinc chelate was present in appreciable levels in patients with SMON and may be the ultimate causative toxin of SMON. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:9848083

  7. Comparison of the Deep Optic Nerve Head Structure between Normal-Tension Glaucoma and Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Woo; Hwang, Jeong-Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the deep optic nerve head (ONH) structure between normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) and nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and also in healthy subjects as a control using enhanced depth imaging (EDI) spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods This prospective cross-sectional study included 21 NAION patients who had been diagnosed as NAION at least 6 months prior to study entry, and 42 NTG patients and 42 healthy controls who were matched with NAION patients in terms of age, intraocular pressure (IOP), and optic disc area. The retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness in the affected sector was also matched between NAION and NTG patients. The ONH was imaged using SD-OCT with the EDI technique. The anterior lamina cribrosa surface depth (LCD) and average prelaminar tissue (PT) thickness were measured in a sector of interest in each eye and compared among the three groups. Results In the sector-matched comparison, LCD was largest in NTG patients, followed by NAION patients, while PT was thinner in NTG patients than in NAION patients (all P < 0.001). NAION patients had a comparable LCD and a thinner PT relative to normal controls (P = 0.170 and < 0.001, respectively). Conclusion The deep ONH configuration is strikingly different between NTG and NAION. The differing features provide comparative insight into the pathophysiology of the two diseases, and may be useful for differential diagnosis. PMID:27035660

  8. Diabetic Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Diabetic Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... Organizations Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Diabetic Neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy is a peripheral nerve disorder caused ...

  9. Metabolic neuropathies

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - metabolic ... can be caused by many different things. Metabolic neuropathy may be caused by: A problem with the ... one of the most common causes of metabolic neuropathies. People who are at the highest risk for ...

  10. Efficacy and Safety of rAAV2-ND4 Treatment for Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xing; Pei, Han; Zhao, Min-Jian; Yang, Shuo; Hu, Wei-Kun; He, Heng; Ma, Si-Qi; Zhang, Ge; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dao-Wen; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrially inherited disease leading to blindness. A mitochondrial DNA point mutation at the 11778 nucleotide site of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4) gene is the most common cause. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) carrying ND4 (rAAV2-ND4) in LHON patients carrying the G11778A mutation. Nine patients were administered rAAV2-ND4 by intravitreal injection to one eye and then followed for 9 months. Ophthalmologic examinations of visual acuity, visual field, and optical coherence tomography were performed. Physical examinations included routine blood and urine. The visual acuity of the injected eyes of six patients improved by at least 0.3 log MAR after 9 months of follow-up. In these six patients, the visual field was enlarged but the retinal nerve fibre layer remained relatively stable. No other outcome measure was significantly changed. None of the nine patients had local or systemic adverse events related to the vector during the 9-month follow-up period. These findings support the feasible use of gene therapy for LHON. PMID:26892229

  11. Visual evoked potentials to multiple temporal frequencies. Use in the differential diagnosis of optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bobak, P; Friedman, R; Brigell, M; Goodwin, J; Anderson, R

    1988-07-01

    The usefulness of the visual evoked potential (VEP) in differential diagnosis increases when stimulus parameters such as check size and grating orientation are varied. In this study we varied the stimulation frequency. Temporal frequency-specific abnormalities were compared in three patient categories, including retrobulbar optic neuritis (eight patients), pseudotumor cerebri (11 patients), and thyroid eye disease (seven patients). All patients had minimal clinical evidence of optic nerve damage when tested. A 2.3 cycle-per-degree sinusoidal grating of 55% contrast was phase reversed at either 1 or 4 Hz. The P1 latency of the 1-Hz data and the phase at 8 Hz, the second harmonic of the 4-Hz input frequency, were measured. In retrobulbar neuritis, latency (phase) was severely abnormal at both temporal frequencies. In thyroid eye disease, VEP phase was abnormal at 8 Hz while the P1 latency was normal at 1 Hz. The P1 latency and phase were normal in most cases of pseudotumor cerebri. The results suggest differing mechanisms for damage in compressive vs primary demyelinating neuropathies. PMID:3390057

  12. Peripheral neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral neuritis; Neuropathy - peripheral; Neuritis - peripheral; Nerve disease; Polyneuropathy ... Neuropathy is very common. There are many types and causes. Often, no cause can be found. Some ...

  13. Predictive value of visual evoked potentials, relative afferent pupillary defect, and orbital fractures in patients with traumatic optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabaei, Seyed Ali; Soleimani, Mohammad; Alizadeh, Mahdi; Movasat, Morteza; Mansoori, Mohammad Reza; Alami, Zakieh; Foroutan, Alireza; Joshaghani, Mahmood; Safari, Saeid; Goldiz, Arzhang

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the predictive value of flash visual-evoked potentials (VEP), relative afferent pupillary defect, and presence of orbital fractures in patients with traumatic optic neuropathy. Methods: A prospective study was conducted in 15 patients with indirect traumatic optic neuropathy. All patients underwent a thorough ophthalmic examination. Initial visual acuity, final visual acuity, and relative afferent pupillary defect were determined, and visual acuity was converted into logMAR units. We performed flash VEP and an orbital computed tomography scan in all patients. Results: There was a good correlation between relative afferent pupillary defect and final visual acuity (r = −0.83), and better initial visual acuity could predict better final visual acuity (r = 0.92). According to findings from flash VEP parameters, there was a relationship between final visual acuity and amplitude ratio of the wave (r = 0.59) and latency ratio of the wave (r = −0.61). Neither primary visual acuity nor final visual acuity was related to the presence of orbital fractures in the orbital CT scan. Conclusion: Patients with traumatic optic neuropathy often present with severe vision loss. Flash VEP, poor initial visual acuity, and higher grade of relative afferent pupillary defect could predict final visual acuity in these patients. Presence of orbital fracture was not a predictive factor for primary visual acuity or final visual acuity. PMID:21845028

  14. Dendrimers Target the Ischemic Lesion in Rodent and Primate Models of Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yan; Johnson, Mary A.; Mehrabian, Zara; Mishra, Manoj K.; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Miller, Neil R.; Bernstein, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Polyamidoamine dendrimer nanoparticles (~ 4 nanometers) are inert polymers that can be linked to biologically active compounds. These dendrimers selectively target and accumulate in inflammatory cells upon systemic administration. Dendrimer-linked compounds enable sustained release of therapeutic compounds directly at the site of damage. The purpose of this study was to determine if dendrimers can be used to target the optic nerve (ON) ischemic lesion in our rodent and nonhuman primate models of nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION), a disease affecting >10,000 individuals in the US annually, and for which there currently is no effective treatment. Methods NAION was induced in male Long-Evans rats (rNAION) and in one adult male rhesus monkey (pNAION) using previously described procedures. Dendrimers were covalently linked to near-infrared cyanine-5 fluorescent dye (D-Cy5) and injected both intravitreally and systemically (in the rats) or just systemically (in the monkey) to evaluate D-Cy5 tissue accumulation in the eye and optic nerve following induction of NAION. Results Following NAION induction, Cy-5 dendrimers selectively accumulated in astrocytes and circulating macrophages. Systemic dendrimer administration provided the best penetration of the ON lesion site when injected shortly after induction. Systemic administration 1 day post-induction in the pNAION model gave localization similar to that seen in the rats. Conclusions Dendrimers selectively target the ischemic ON lesion after induction of both rNAION and pNAION. Systemic nanoparticle-linked therapeutics thus may provide a powerful, targeted and safe approach to NAION treatment by providing sustained and focused treatment of the cells directly affected by ischemia. PMID:27128315

  15. MRI in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy: the relationship to multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Lucy; Enzinger, Christian; Fazekas, Franz; Rovira, Alex; Ciccarelli, Olga; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Filippi, Massimo; Frederiksen, Jette L; Giorgio, Antonio; Küker, Wilhelm; Lukas, Carsten; Rocca, Maria A; De Stefano, Nicola; Toosy, Ahmed; Yousry, Tarek; Palace, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    Background Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and a multiple sclerosis (MS)-like illness appear to coexist 50 times more frequently than would be expected by chance. This association of LHON and MS (LMS) raises an important question about whether there could be a common pathophysiological mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction. Objective The primary aim was to define MRI features of LMS and LHON, and to assess the proportions of individuals displaying features typical of MS. Secondarily, we investigated the effect of gender on the risk of developing white matter lesions in the context of LHON. Methods A blinded standardised review of conventional brain MRIs of 30 patients with MS, 31 patients with LHON and 11 patients with LMS was conducted by three independent experts in the field. MS-like MRI features were assessed. Results All patients with LMS and 26% of patients with LHON had white matter lesions. Of these, all patients with LMS and 25% with LHON were found to have an MRI appearance typical of MS. Female patients with LHON had a significantly greater risk of having white matter lesions consistent with MS compared with male patients (relative risk 8.3). Conclusions A blinded review of conventional brain MRIs shows that patients with LMS have a scan appearance indistinguishable from MS. Mitochondrial dysfunction could be a common pathophysiological pathway in the formation of white matter lesions. There appears to be a strong female influence on the radiological appearance as well as clinical development of MS in patients with LHON. PMID:25053773

  16. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    Ghaleh Bandi, Mir Farhad; Naserbakht, Morteza; Tabasi, Abdolreza; Marghaiezadeh, Azin; Riazee Esfahani, Mohammad; Golzarian, Zohre

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sleep apnea is temporary cessation or absence of breathing during sleep. Significant increase in blood pressure is clinically seen in apneic episodes. The aim of this study was to examine sleep apnea syndrome as a risk factor for non- arthritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) in a case control study. Methods: Nineteen NAION patients (9 men and 10 women) and 31 age and sex matched control participants (18 men and 13 women) were evaluated for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Full night polysomnography was performed and proportion of OSAS was compared between the NAION patients and the control group. Other risk factors for NAION such as hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, ischemic heart disease and tobacco consumption were also evaluated. Chi square test and independent samples t-test were used for statistical analysis. Results: OF the 19 NAION patients, 18 (95%) had OSAS, and of the control group 13 (41.9%) had OSAS. The frequency of OSAS was significantly higher among NAION patients compared to the controls (p< 0.001). The Mean Respiratory Disturbance Index (RDI) was 37.65/h SD= 37.61/h in NAION patients and it was 15.05/h SD= 11.97/h (p= 0.018) in controls. The frequency of diabetes and hypertension was significantly higher in the NAION patients than in controls. Conclusion: based on the results of this study, it seems that there is an association between NAION and OSAS. PMID:26913263

  17. The Epidemiology of Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy in the North East of England

    PubMed Central

    Man, P. Y. W.; Griffiths, P. G.; Brown, D. T.; Howell, N.; Turnbull, D. M.; Chinnery, P. F.

    2003-01-01

    We performed the first population-based clinical and molecular genetic study of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) in a population of 2,173,800 individuals in the North East of England. We identified 16 genealogically unrelated families who harbor one of the three primary mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations that cause LHON. Two of these families were found to be linked genetically to a common maternal founder. A de novo mtDNA mutation (G3460A) was identified in one family. The minimum point prevalence of visual failure due to LHON within this population was 3.22 per 100,000 (95% CI 2.47–3.97 per 100,000), and the minimum point prevalence for mtDNA LHON mutations was 11.82 per 100,000 (95% CI 10.38–13.27 per 100,000). These results indicate that LHON is not rare but has a population prevalence similar to autosomally inherited neurological disorders. The majority of individuals harbored only mutant mtDNA (homoplasmy), but heteroplasmy was detected in ∼12% of individuals. Overall, however, ∼33% of families with LHON had at least one heteroplasmic individual. The high incidence of heteroplasmy in pedigrees with LHON raises the possibility that a closely related maternal relative of an index case may not harbor the mtDNA mutation, highlighting the importance of molecular genetic testing for each maternal family member seeking advice about their risks of visual failure. PMID:12518276

  18. Pitfalls in the molecular genetic diagnosis of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON).

    PubMed Central

    Johns, D R; Neufeld, M J

    1993-01-01

    Pathogenetic mutations in mtDNA are found in the majority of patients with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), and molecular genetic techniques to detect them are important for the diagnosis. A false-positive molecular genetic error has adverse consequences for the diagnosis of this maternally inherited disease. We found a number of mtDNA polymorphisms that occur adjacent to known LHON-associated mutations and that confound their molecular genetic detection. These transition mutations occur at mtDNA nt 11779 (SfaNI site loss, 11778 mutation), nt 3459 (BsaHI site loss, 3460 mutation), nt 15258 (AccI site loss, 15257 mutation), nt 14485 (mismatch primer Sau3AI site loss, 14484 mutation), and nt 13707 (BstNI site loss, 13708 mutation). Molecular genetic detection of the most common pathogenetic mtDNA mutations in LHON, using a single restriction enzyme, may be confounded by adjacent polymorphisms that occur with a false-positive rate of 2%-7%. PMID:8213820

  19. Phylogenetic Analysis of the Mitochondrial Genomes from Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Howell, N.; Kubacka, I.; Halvorson, S.; Howell, B.; McCullough, D. A.; Mackey, D.

    1995-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the mitochondrial genomes from patients with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) were used for phylogenetic analysis to study the origin and population history of pathogenic mitochondrial mutations. Sequences of both the coding region (8300 bp) and the more rapidly evolving noncoding control region (1300 bp) were analyzed. Patients with the primary LHON mutations at nucleotides 3460, 11,778, and 14,484 were included in this study, as were LHON patients and non-LHON controls that lacked these primary mutations; some of the subjects also carried secondary LHON mutations. The phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that primary LHON mutations arose and were fixed multiple times within the population, even for the small set of LHON patients that was analyzed in these initial studies. In contrast, the secondary LHON mutations at nucleotides 4216, 4917, and 13,708 arose once: the mitochondrial genomes that carried these secondary mutations formed a well supported phylogenetic cluster that apparently arose 60,000 to 100,000 years ago. Previous studies found secondary LHON mutations at a higher frequency among LHON patients than among control subjects. However, this finding does not prove a pathogenetic role of these mutations in LHON. Instead, the increased frequency is more likely to reflect the population genetic history of secondary mutations relative to that of primary LHON mutations. PMID:7635294

  20. Optic neuropathy in a patient with vitamin B12 deficiency: a case report.

    PubMed

    Areekul, S; Roongpisuthipong, C; Churdchu, K; Thanomsak, W

    1992-12-01

    A 19-year-old man presented with blurring of vision for 2 weeks. He also complained of anorexia with weight loss during the past 4 months. Eight years ago, his small bowel from midportion of the jejunum, ileum, ascending colon and transverse colon were resected because of gangrene. He gave no history of exposure to tobacco, alcohol or other toxins. The bone marrow aspiration showed hypocellular with panhypoplasia. Serum vitamin B12 level was low while serum and red cell folate were within normal limits. His visual acuity was 5/200 in both eyes with centrocecal scotomas in both eyes. Other neurologic and ophthalmic examinations were found to be normal. The patient was given intramuscular injections of 1,000 micrograms of cyanocobalamin. Four months later, his visual acuity improved, serum vitamin B12 level and the bone marrow returned to be normal. This is a frank case of optic neuropathy in a patient with vitamin B12 deficiency due to a massive small bowel resection. PMID:1308541

  1. Mean Platelet Volume in Patients with Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Şahin, Muhammed; Şahin, Alparslan; Elbey, Bilal; Yüksel, Harun; Türkcü, Fatih Mehmet; Cingü, Abdullah Kürşat

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We aimed to investigate the mean platelet volume (MPV) of the patients with nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). Methods. The medical records of 46 patients with the diagnosis of NAION and 90 control subjects were retrospectively evaluated. All participants underwent complete ocular examination including intraocular pressure (IOP) measurement. Hematocrit, MPV, hemoglobin, and platelet levels of the patients with NAION were compared with those of control subjects. Results. There was no significant difference between the groups in platelet counts (p = 0.76). NAION group had significantly higher MPV values (8.25 ± 1.26 fL) than that of control subjects (7.64 ± 1.01 fL) (p < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that MPV is an independent predictor of NAION (odds ratio = 1.61; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.13–2.28; p = 0.007). The mean IOP was significantly higher in NAION group (p < 0.001). IOP was also found as an independent predictor of NAION according to the regression analysis (OR = 1.27; 95% CI = 1.08–1.48; p = 0.003). Conclusion. Our results demonstrated that the MPV values were significantly higher in NAION patients, suggesting that larger platelets may contribute to the pathogenesis of the NAION. PMID:26966556

  2. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with mitochondrial ND1 T3394C mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Min; Guan, Minqiang; Zhao, Fuxing; Zhou, Xiangtian; Yuan, Meixia; Tong, Yi; Yang, Li; Wei, Qi-Ping; Sun, Yan-Hong; Lu, Fan; Qu, Jia; and others

    2009-06-05

    We report here the clinical, genetic and molecular characterization of four Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). There were variable severity and age-of-onset in visual impairment among these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the homoplasmic T3394C (Y30H) mutation, which localized at a highly conserved tyrosine at position 30 of ND1, and distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphisms belonging to haplogroups D4b and M9a. The occurrence of T3394C mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by visual impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of visual impairment. However, there was the absence of functionally significant mtDNA mutations in these four Chinese pedigrees carrying the T3394C mutation. Therefore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or environmental factor(s) may play a role in the phenotypic expression of the LHON-associated T3394C mutation.

  3. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with mitochondrial ND6 T14502C mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Fuxin; Guan, Minqiang; Zhou, Xiangtian; Yuan, Meixia; Liang, Ming; Liu, Qi; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Yongmei; Yang, Li; Tong, Yi; Wei, Qi-Ping; Sun, Yan-Hong; Qu, Jia; and others

    2009-11-20

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of three Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). There were variable severity and age of onset in visual impairment among these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the homoplasmic T14502C (I58V) mutation, which localized at a highly conserved isoleucine at position 58 of ND6, and distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphisms belonging to haplogroups M10a, F1a1, and H2. The occurrence of T14502C mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by visual impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of visual impairment. Here, mtDNA variants I187T in the ND1, A122V in CO1, S99A in the A6, and V254I in CO3 exhibited an evolutionary conservation, indicating a potential modifying role in the development of visual impairment associated with T14502C mutation in those families. Furthermore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or environmental factor(s) may play a role in the phenotypic manifestation of the LHON-associated T14502C mutation in these Chinese families.

  4. Pitfalls in the molecular genetic diagnosis of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON)

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, D.R. ); Neufeld, M.J. )

    1993-10-01

    Pathogenetic mutations in mtDNA are found in the majority of patients with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), and molecular genetic techniques to detect them are important for diagnosis. A false-positive molecular genetic error has adverse consequences for the diagnosis of this maternally inherited disease. The authors found a number of mtDNA polymorphisms that occur adjacent to known LHON-associated mutations and that confound their molecular genetic detection. These transition mutations occur at mtDNA nt 11779 (SfaNI site loss, 11778 mutation), nt 3459 (BsaHI site loss, 3460 mutation), nt 15258 (AccI site loss, 15257 mutation), nt 14485 (mismatch primer Sau3AI site loss, 14484 mutation), and nt 13707 (BstNI site loss, 13708 mutation). Molecular genetic detection of the most common pathogenetic mtDNA mutations in LHON, using a single restriction enzyme, may be confounded by adjacent polymorphisms that occur with a false-positive rate of 2%-7%. 19 refs.

  5. Simultaneous Bilateral Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy in a Patient with a History of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, David B.; Lemor, Daniel; Brown, Archie; Nussdorf, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAAION) has a poorly understood etiology, and the onset of simultaneous bilateral NAAION in a patient <50 years without identifiable systemic risk factors is rare. Case Report We present the case of a patient with acute painless monocular vision loss and bilateral optic disc edema who subsequently developed painless vision loss in the fellow eye. The patient's history was significant for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and our pressing diagnostic concern was to determine if his vision loss and bilateral optic disc changes represented lymphomatous infiltrates. A complete ocular exam demonstrated findings consistent with simultaneous bilateral NAAION. After an extensive systemic workup for malignancy with central nervous system involvement, vasculitis, and other entities associated with NAAION, we determined that the patient's primary risk factor for developing bilateral ischemic optic neuropathies was his crowded optic discs. Conclusion This case supports the hypothesis that a crowded optic disc is a sufficient primary risk factor for developing NAAION. PMID:25829891

  6. Orbital Volumetry in Graves' Orbitopathy: Muscle and Fat Involvement in relation to Dysthyroid Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Al-Bakri, Moug; Rasmussen, Ase Krogh; Thomsen, Carsten; Toft, Peter Bjerre

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We wanted to investigate the relative significance of fat and muscle enlargement in the development of dysthyroid optic neuropathy (DON) in Graves' orbitopathy (GO). Methods. Preoperative coronal CT scans of 13 patients with and without DON who subsequently underwent orbital decompression were retrospectively analyzed. Thirteen patients imaged for unilateral orbital fractures served as controls. Results. The retrobulbar muscle volume was 2.1 ± 0.5 cm(3) (mean ± SD) in controls, 4.3 ± 1.5 cm(3) in GO without DON, and 4.7 ± 1.7 cm(3) in GO with DON. The retrobulbar fat volume was 5.4 ± 1.6 cm(3) in controls, 8.7 ± 8.0 cm(3) in GO without DON, and 9.4 ± 3.1 cm(3) in GO with DON. The muscle and fat volumes were higher in patients with GO than in controls (P < 0.001), but the volumes in orbits with and without DON were not significantly different. The volume of the optic nerve were similar in the 3 groups. The number of apical, coronal 2 mm thick slices with no fat was 2.9 ± 0.9 in normal orbits, it was 4.1 ± 1.0 in GO orbits without DON and 5.3 ± 0.8 in GO orbits with DON (P = 0.007). Conclusion. Apical muscle enlargement may be more important than orbital fat enlargement in the development of DON. However, the fact that apical crowding and muscle enlargement also occur in orbits without DON suggests that other factors also play a role in the development of DON. PMID:25101183

  7. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: identification of the same mitochondrial ND1 mutation in six pedigrees.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, N; Bindoff, L A; McCullough, D A; Kubacka, I; Poulton, J; Mackey, D; Taylor, L; Turnbull, D M

    1991-01-01

    Biochemical and molecular genetic evidence is presented that in six independent pedigrees the development of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is due to the same primary mutation in the mitochondrial ND1 gene. A LHON family from the Newcastle area of Great Britain was analyzed in depth to determine the mitochondrial genetic etiology of their disease. Biochemical assays of mitochondrial electron transport in organelles isolated from the platelet/white-blood-cell fraction have established that the members of this family have a substantial and specific lowering of flux through complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase). To determine the site of the primary mitochondrial gene mutation in this pedigree, all seven mitochondrial complex I genes were sequenced, in their entirety, from two family members. The primary mutation was identified as a homoplasmic transition at nucleotide 3460, which results in the substitution of threonine for alanine at position 52 of the ND1 protein. This residue occurs within a very highly conserved hydrophilic loop, is invariantly alanine or glycine in all ND1 proteins, and is adjacent to an invariant aspartic acid residue. This is only the second instance in which both a biochemical abnormality and a mitochondrial gene mutation have been identified in an LHON pedigree. The sequence analysis of the ND81 gene was extended to a further 11, unrelated LHON pedigrees that had been screened previously and found not to carry the mitochondrial ND4/R340H mutation. The ND1/A52T mutation at nucleotide 3460 was found in five of these 11 pedigrees. In contrast, this sequence change was not found in any of the 47 non-LHON controls. The possible role of secondary complex I mutations in the etiology of LHON is also addressed in these studies. PMID:1928099

  8. Long-term Evaluation of Radiation-Induced Optic Neuropathy After Single-Fraction Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Leavitt, Jacqueline A.; Stafford, Scott L.; Link, Michael J.; Pollock, Bruce E.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the long-term risk of radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) in patients having single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for benign skull base tumors. Methods and Materials: Retrospective review of 222 patients having Gamma Knife radiosurgery for benign tumors adjacent to the anterior visual pathway (AVP) between 1991 and 1999. Excluded were patients with prior or concurrent external beam radiation therapy or SRS. One hundred twenty-nine patients (58%) had undergone previous surgery. Tumor types included confirmed World Health Organization grade 1 or presumed cavernous sinus meningioma (n=143), pituitary adenoma (n=72), and craniopharyngioma (n=7). The maximum dose to the AVP was ≤8.0 Gy (n=126), 8.1-10.0 Gy (n=39), 10.1-12.0 Gy (n=47), and >12 Gy (n=10). Results: The mean clinical and imaging follow-up periods were 83 and 123 months, respectively. One patient (0.5%) who received a maximum radiation dose of 12.8 Gy to the AVP developed unilateral blindness 18 months after SRS. The chance of RION according to the maximum radiation dose received by the AVP was 0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0-3.6%), 0 (95% CI 0-10.7%), 0 (95% CI 0-9.0%), and 10% (95% CI 0-43.0%) for patients receiving ≤8 Gy, 8.1-10.0 Gy, 10.1-12.0 Gy, and >12 Gy, respectively. The overall risk of RION in patients receiving >8 Gy to the AVP was 1.0% (95% CI 0-6.2%). Conclusions: The risk of RION after single-fraction SRS in patients with benign skull base tumors who have no prior radiation exposure is very low if the maximum dose to the AVP is ≤12 Gy. Physicians performing single-fraction SRS should remain cautious when treating lesions adjacent to the AVP, especially when the maximum dose exceeds 10 Gy.

  9. Nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy: associations with homozygosity for the C677T methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutation.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Wang, Ping; Bell, Howard; Rangaraj, Venkat; Goldenberg, Naila

    2004-03-01

    The association between nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and coagulation disorders was prospectively assessed at least 3 months after the occurrence of ocular vascular events in 12 white patients in an outpatient clinical research center. Two community-based ophthalmologists evaluated the 12 NAION patients in the consecutive order of their referral. Polymerase chain reaction-complementary DNA assays of gene mutations associated with coagulation disorders and serologic coagulation measurements in study patients were compared with those in 36 healthy, normal race-, sex-, and age-matched controls, with 3 controls matched for each case. Of the 12 patients, 4 men and 8 women (mean age 62 +/- 15 years, 3 of them 55 years or older), 8 had unilateral NAION (bilateral in 4). The 12 patients with NAION were more likely than controls to demonstrate homozygosity for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T mutation (50% vs 11 %; Fisher's P =.009, with the likelihood of a type I error quite small, 0.9%). Our sample size had a power of 80% to detect this case-control difference in C677T MTHFR homozygosity at an alpha value of.05. Of the 12 NAION patients, 7 (58%) had at least 1 gene mutation in the C677T MTHFR, G1691A V Leiden, or G20210A prothrombin gene, compared with 5 of 36 controls (14%) (chi(2) = 9.48, P =. 002, with the likelihood of a type I error quite small, 0.2%). Our sample size had a power of 85% to detect this case-control difference at alpha =. 05. Of the 8 women with NAION, 5 (63%) first experienced the condition while taking hormone replacement therapy (n = 4) or during pregnancy (n = 1), with superposition of estrogen-induced thrombophilia on heritable thrombophilia and hypofibrinolysis. Confirmation of a causal relationship between coagulation disorders and NAION should facilitate its prevention and treatment and help protect against thrombi in other vascular beds. PMID:15007309

  10. Neuromyelitis optica (Devic's syndrome): no association with the primary mitochondrial DNA mutations found in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Cock, H; Mandler, R; Ahmed, W; Schapira, A H

    1997-01-01

    Devic's neuromyelitis optica is a rare syndrome characterised by the combination of acute or subacute optic neuritis and transverse myelitis, in some cases considered to be a variant of multiple sclerosis. Mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) have been identified in some patients with multiple sclerosis in whom optic neuritis is a prominent early feature. Using restriction enzyme digestion of mtDNA products amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, the primary LHON mtDNA mutations at positions 3460 bp, 11,778 bp, and 14,484 bp have been excluded in four women with Devic's neuromyelitis optica. A mutation at 4160 bp associated in some LHON families with more widespread neurological disease was also not detected. It is concluded that the primary mtDNA mutations currently associated with LHON are not responsible for the prominence of optic nerve disease in Devic's neuromyelitis optica. PMID:9010406

  11. Interaction of heritable and estrogen-induced thrombophilia: possible etiologies for ischemic optic neuropathy and ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Glueck, C J; Fontaine, R N; Wang, P

    2001-02-01

    Our specific aim was to assess how thrombophilic exogenous estrogens interacted with heritable thrombophilias leading to non-arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and ischemic stroke. Coagulation measures were performed in a 74 year old patient and her immediate family. The proband had a 47 year history of 9 previous thrombotic episodes, and developed unilateral NAION 4 years after starting estrogen replacement therapy (ERT). The proband was heterozygous for two thrombophilic gene mutations (G20210A prothrombin gene, platelet glycoprotein IIIa P1A1/A2 polymorphism), and homozygous for the C677T mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene. Of 238 normal controls, none had these 3 gene mutations together. The proband's mother and brother had deep venous thrombosis (DVT). The proband's brother, sister, nephew, daughter, and two granddaughters were homozygous for the C677T MTHFR mutation. The proband's brother was heterozygous for the G20210A prothrombin gene mutation. The proband's niece was heterozygous for the G20210A prothrombin gene mutation, homozygous for the C677T MTHFR mutation, homozygous for the hypofibrinolytic 4G polymorphism of the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) gene, and heterozygous for the platelet glycoprotein IIIa P1A1/A2 polymorphism. Of 238 normal controls, none had the niece's combination of 4 gene mutations. When ERT-mediated thrombophilia was superimposed on the proband's heritable thrombophilias, unilateral ischemic optic neuropathy developed, her tenth thrombotic event over a 5 decade period. When estrogen-progestin oral contraceptives were given to the proband's niece, she had an ischemic stroke at age 22. Exogenous estrogen-mediated thrombophilia superimposed on heritable thrombophilia and hypofibrinolysis is associated with arterial and venous thrombi, and appears to be a preventable, and potentially reversible etiology for ischemic optic neuropathy and ischemic stroke. PMID:11246543

  12. Analysis of Retinal Layer Thicknesses and Their Clinical Correlation in Patients with Traumatic Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju-Yeun; Cho, Kyuyeon; Park, Kyung-Ah; Oh, Sei Yeul

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were 1) To evaluate retinal nerve fiber layer (fRNFL) thickness and ganglion cell layer plus inner plexiform layer (GCIPL) thickness at the fovea in eyes affected with traumatic optic neuropathy (TON) compared with contralateral normal eyes, 2) to further evaluate these thicknesses within 3 weeks following trauma (defined as “early TON”), and 3) to investigate the relationship between these retinal layer thicknesses and visual function in TON eyes. Twenty-nine patients with unilateral TON were included. Horizontal and vertical spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) scans of the fovea were taken in patients with unilateral TON. The main outcome measure was thickness of the entire retina, fRNFL, and GCIPL in eight areas. Thickness of each retinal layer was compared between affected and unaffected eyes. The correlation between the thickness of each retinal layer and visual function parameters, including best corrected visual acuity, color vision, P100 latency, and P100 amplitude in visual evoked potential (VEP), mean deviation (MD) and visual field index (VFI) in Humphrey visual field analysis in TON eyes was analyzed. Thicknesses of the entire retina, fRNFL, and GCIPL in SD-OCT were significantly thinner (3–36%) in all measurement areas of TON eyes compared to those in healthy eyes (all p<0.05). Whereas, only GCIPL in the outer nasal, superior, and inferior areas was significantly thinner (5–10%) in the early TON eyes than that in the control eyes (all p<0.01). A significant correlation was detected between retinal layer thicknesses and visual function parameters including color vision, P100 latency and P100 amplitude in VEP, MD, and VFI (particularly P100 latency, MD, and VFI) (r = -0.70 to 0.84). Among the retinal layers analyzed in this study, GCIPL (particularly in the superior and inferior areas) was most correlated with these five visual function parameters (r = -0.70 to 0.71). Therefore, evaluation of morphological

  13. Assessment of retinal ganglion cell damage in glaucomatous optic neuropathy: Axon transport, injury and soma loss.

    PubMed

    Nuschke, Andrea C; Farrell, Spring R; Levesque, Julie M; Chauhan, Balwantray C

    2015-12-01

    Glaucoma is a disease characterized by progressive axonal pathology and death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which causes structural changes in the optic nerve head and irreversible vision loss. Several experimental models of glaucomatous optic neuropathy (GON) have been developed, primarily in non-human primates and, more recently and commonly, in rodents. These models provide important research tools to study the mechanisms underlying glaucomatous damage. Moreover, experimental GON provides the ability to quantify and monitor risk factors leading to RGC loss such as the level of intraocular pressure, axonal health and the RGC population. Using these experimental models we are able to gain a better understanding of GON, which allows for the development of potential neuroprotective strategies. Here we review the advantages and disadvantages of the relevant and most often utilized methods for evaluating axonal degeneration and RGC loss in GON. Axonal pathology in GON includes functional disruption of axonal transport (AT) and structural degeneration. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP), rhodamine-B-isothiocyanate (RITC) and cholera toxin-B (CTB) fluorescent conjugates have proven to be effective reporters of AT. Also, immunohistochemistry (IHC) for endogenous AT-associated proteins is often used as an indicator of AT function. Similarly, structural degeneration of axons in GON can be investigated via changes in the activity and expression of key axonal enzymes and structural proteins. Assessment of axonal degeneration can be measured by direct quantification of axons, qualitative grading, or a combination of both methods. RGC loss is the most frequently quantified variable in studies of experimental GON. Retrograde tracers can be used to quantify RGC populations in rodents via application to the superior colliculus (SC). In addition, in situ IHC for RGC-specific proteins is a common method of RGC quantification used in many studies. Recently, transgenic mouse models

  14. A “Fille du Roy” Introduced the T14484C Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Mutation in French Canadians

    PubMed Central

    Laberge, Anne-Marie; Jomphe, Michèle; Houde, Louis; Vézina, Hélène; Tremblay, Marc; Desjardins, Bertrand; Labuda, Damian; St-Hilaire, Marc; Macmillan, Carol; Shoubridge, Eric A.; Brais, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    The predominance of the T14484C mutation in French Canadians with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy is due to a founder effect. By use of genealogical reconstructions of maternal lineages, a woman married in Quebec City in 1669 is identified as the shared female ancestor for 11 of 13 affected individuals, who were previously not known to be related. These individuals carry identical mitochondrial haplogroups. The current geographic distribution of French Canadian cases overlaps with that of the founder’s female descendants in 1800. This is the first example of genealogical reconstruction to identify the introduction of a mitochondrial mutation by a woman in a founder population. PMID:15954041

  15. Alcoholic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - alcoholic; Alcoholic polyneuropathy ... The exact cause of alcoholic neuropathy is unknown. It likely includes both a direct poisoning of the nerve by the alcohol and the effect of poor nutrition ...

  16. Neuropathy Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Neuropathy Share this page: Was this page helpful? Overview | ... of testing are: To diagnose the presence of neuropathy and distinguish it from other conditions that may ...

  17. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be associated with peripheral neuropathy. Metabolic and endocrine disorders impair the body’s ability to transform nutrients into ... to neuropathies as a result of chemical imbalances. Endocrine disorders that lead to hormonal imbalances can disturb normal ...

  18. Levodopa-carbidopa may improve vision loss in indirect traumatic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Razeghinejad, M Reza; Rahat, Feisal; Bagheri, Mohammadhadi

    2010-10-01

    To compare the effect of levodopa-carbidopa on the visual outcome of patients with indirect traumatic optic neuropathy (ITON), this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted on 32 patients with ITON within 6 days after trauma. Patients underwent a complete ocular examination, pattern visual evoked potential (PVEP) testing, and high-resolution orbital computed tomography (CT) scanning. All patients received high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone, and levodopa was also administered to the levodopa group. The main outcome measures were best corrected visual acuity and PVEP results at the last-completed examination. The study was completed on 16 patients in the levodopa group and 10 patients in the placebo group because the others were lost to follow-up. There were no statistically significant differences for age, sex, involved eye, ocular and CT scan findings, pretreatment visual acuity, frequency of recordable PVEPs, and follow-up. In the levodopa group the visual acuity improved significantly after treatment (p = 0.009), but not in the placebo group (p = 0.34). After treatment the visual acuity in the levodopa group was 2.1 ± 2.1, and in the placebo group was 3.9 ± 1.2 (p = 0.008). In those who had visual acuity less than or equal to figure count, significant improvement in visual acuity was observed in the levodopa group (p = 0.03), but not in the placebo group (p = 0.34). However, the final visual acuity in these patients was comparable after treatment (p = 0.21). Nine patients (56.2%) in the levodopa group, and 1 (10%) in the placebo group, experienced improvement in visual acuity (p = 0.02). The frequency of unrecordable PVEPs were comparable in both groups (p = 0.09). Patients treated with levodopa within 6 days of onset of ITON were more likely to experience improvement in visual acuity than those in the placebo group. PMID:20649490

  19. Risk of Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy Following End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yuh-Shin; Weng, Shih-Feng; Chang, Chun; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Su, Shih-Bin; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Jan, Ren-Long

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the risk of nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) following end-stage renal disease (ESRD).A retrospective, nationwide, matched cohort study.ESRD patients identified by the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) code 585.The study cohort included 93,804 ESRD patients registered with the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database between January 2000 and December 2009. An age- and sex-matched control group comprised 93,804 patients (case:control = 1:1) selected from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. Information for each patient was collected from the index date until December 2011. The incidence and risk of NAION were compared between the ESRD and control groups. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for NAION after adjustment for potential confounders was obtained by a Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. A Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to calculate the cumulative incidence rate of NAION.The incidence of NAION following ESRD.In total, 133 ESRD patients (0.14%) and 51 controls (0.05%) had NAION (P < 0.001) during the follow-up period, leading to a significantly elevated risk of NAION in the ESRD patients compared with the controls (incidence rate ratio = 3.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.11-4.67). After adjustment for potential confounders including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypotension, hyperlipidemia, and 2-way interaction terms between any 2 factors, ESRD patients were 3.12 times more likely to develop NAION than non-ESRD patients in the full cohort (adjusted HR = 3.12, 95% CI = 2.10-4.64). Additionally, patients with hypertension and hyperlipidemia showed higher incidence rates of NAION in the ESRD group compared with the controls: 2.31 (95% CI = 1.40-3.82) for hypertension and 2.72 (95% CI = 1.14-6.50) for hyperlipidemia.ESRD increased the risk of NAION, which is an interdisciplinary emergency. Close

  20. An example of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy not involving a mutation in the mitochondrial ND4 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, N; McCullough, D

    1990-01-01

    A large Australian family afflicted with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) is analyzed at the nucleotide sequence level in this report. Biochemical assays of platelet mitochondria isolated from members of this family have demonstrated a significant decrease in the specific activity of Complex I (NADH-ubiquinol oxidoreductase) of the electron transport chain. It is shown here, however, that neither this biochemical lesion nor the optic neuropathy are due to the mutation at nucleotide position 11,778 of the mitochondrial ND4 gene first identified by Wallace et al. in several LHON pedigrees. Furthermore, extensive DNA sequencing studies reveal no candidate mutations within the mitochondrial ND3 gene, the ND4L/ND4 genes, or the contiguous tRNA genes. These studies provide the first direct evidence that not all LHON lineages--even those associated with a biochemical defect in mitochondrial respiratory chain Complex I--carry a mutation in the ND4 gene. Members of the Australian LHON family exhibit neurological abnormalities in addition to the well-characterized ophthalmological changes. It is hypothesized that LHON may be a syndrome or set of related diseases in which the clinical abnormalities are a function, at least in part, of the mitochondrial Complex I gene in which the proximate mutation occurs. Images Figure 2 PMID:2121024

  1. AIonAI: a humanitarian law of artificial intelligence and robotics.

    PubMed

    Ashrafian, Hutan

    2015-02-01

    The enduring progression of artificial intelligence and cybernetics offers an ever-closer possibility of rational and sentient robots. The ethics and morals deriving from this technological prospect have been considered in the philosophy of artificial intelligence, the design of automatons with roboethics and the contemplation of machine ethics through the concept of artificial moral agents. Across these categories, the robotics laws first proposed by Isaac Asimov in the twentieth century remain well-recognised and esteemed due to their specification of preventing human harm, stipulating obedience to humans and incorporating robotic self-protection. However the overwhelming predominance in the study of this field has focussed on human-robot interactions without fully considering the ethical inevitability of future artificial intelligences communicating together and has not addressed the moral nature of robot-robot interactions. A new robotic law is proposed and termed AIonAI or artificial intelligence-on-artificial intelligence. This law tackles the overlooked area where future artificial intelligences will likely interact amongst themselves, potentially leading to exploitation. As such, they would benefit from adopting a universal law of rights to recognise inherent dignity and the inalienable rights of artificial intelligences. Such a consideration can help prevent exploitation and abuse of rational and sentient beings, but would also importantly reflect on our moral code of ethics and the humanity of our civilisation. PMID:24414678

  2. Lack of differences among mitochondrial DNA in family members with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and differing visual outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mashima, Y; Hiida, Y; Oguchi, Y

    1995-03-01

    Investigation of a maternal family of three generations of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) showed four affected and three unaffected individuals. Two of the four patients had recovered near-normal vision, one spontaneously, and one following treatment with idebenone, a quinol compound. One patient whose visual impairment persisted was a heavy consumer of alcohol and tobacco. Molecular genetic analysis of 12 known primary or secondary mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) associated with LHON revealed only the 11778 mutation in a homoplasmic fashion with no secondary mutations. The variations in clinical outcome thus could not be explained by synergistically interacting secondary mutations in mtDNA. Environmental factors may play an etiologic role in the development of optic atrophy. PMID:7780566

  3. Features of mtDNA mutation patterns in European pedigrees and sporadic cases with leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Obermaier-Kusser, B.; Schubring, S.; Paprotta, A.; Meitinger, T.; Jaksch, M.; Gerbitz, K.D.; Lorenz, B.; Zerres, K.; Meire, F.; Cochaux, P.

    1994-11-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is maternally transmitted and is characterized by bilateral loss of central vision in young adults as a result of optic nerve degeneration. Fifteen transition mutations located in different genes for the mitochondrially encoded subunits of respiratory chain complexes have been associated thus far with the disease. Genetic studies have led to the classification of the pathogenic significance of these different mutations. However, more research is required to determine the causality of the mutations and the penetrance of the disease. The present study compares studies of populations of different ethnic origins, namely European LHON pedigrees and sporadic cases, in order to elucidate the pathogenic mechanisms involved. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. High resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the anterior visual pathway in patients with optic neuropathies using fast spin echo and phased array local coils.

    PubMed Central

    Gass, A; Barker, G J; MacManus, D; Sanders, M; Riordan-Eva, P; Tofts, P S; Thorpe, J; McDonald, W I; Moseley, I F; Miller, D H

    1995-01-01

    High resolution MRI of the anterior visual pathways was evaluated using frequency selective fat suppressed fast spin echo (FSE) sequences in conjunction with phased array local coils in patients with optic neuropathies. Fifteen normal controls and 57 patients were examined. Coronal T2 weighted fat suppressed FSE images were obtained in 11 minutes with an in plane resolution of 0.39 x 0.39 mm. The optic nerve and its sheath containing CSF were clearly differentiated. Central retinal vessels were often visible. In demyelinating optic neuritis and in anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy high signal within the nerve was readily delineated. Meningiomas and gliomas involving the optic nerve were precisely visualised both in the orbit and intracranially. Extrinsic compression of the optic nerves was readily visualised in carotid artery ectasia and dysthyroid eye disease. Enlarged subarachnoid spaces around the optic nerves were demonstrated in benign intracranial hypertension. High resolution MRI of the anterior visual pathway represents an advance in the diagnosis and management of patients presenting with optic neuropathy. Images PMID:7745403

  5. Evidence for Detrimental Cross Interactions between Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Cells

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Here we have collected evidence suggesting that chronic changes in the NO homeostasis and the rise of reactive oxygen species bioavailability can contribute to cell dysfunction in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) patients. We report that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), derived from a female LHON patient with bilateral reduced vision and carrying the pathogenic mutation 11778/ND4, display increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), as revealed by flow cytometry, fluorometric measurements of nitrite/nitrate, and 3-nitrotyrosine immunodetection. Moreover, viability assays with the tetrazolium dye MTT showed that lymphoblasts from the same patient are more sensitive to prolonged NO exposure, leading to cell death. Taken together these findings suggest that oxidative and nitrosative stress cooperatively play an important role in driving LHON pathology when excess NO remains available over time in the cell environment. PMID:26881022

  6. Measurement of Systemic Mitochondrial Function in Advanced Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma and Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Van Bergen, Nicole J; Crowston, Jonathan G.; Craig, Jamie E.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Kearns, Lisa S.; Sharma, Shiwani; Hewitt, Alex W.; Mackey, David A.; Trounce, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) is a common neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective and gradual loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Aging and increased intraocular pressure (IOP) are glaucoma risk factors; nevertheless patients deteriorate at all levels of IOP, implying other causative factors. Recent evidence presents mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex-I impairments in POAG. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) patients suffer specific and rapid loss of RGCs, predominantly in young adult males, due to complex-I mutations in the mitochondrial genome. This study directly compares the degree of OXPHOS impairment in POAG and LHON patients, testing the hypothesis that the milder clinical disease in POAG is due to a milder complex-I impairment. To assess overall mitochondrial capacity, cells can be forced to produce ATP primarily from mitochondrial OXPHOS by switching the media carbon source to galactose. Under these conditions POAG lymphoblasts grew 1.47 times slower than controls, whilst LHON lymphoblasts demonstrated a greater degree of growth impairment (2.35 times slower). Complex-I enzyme specific activity was reduced by 18% in POAG lymphoblasts and by 29% in LHON lymphoblasts. We also assessed complex-I ATP synthesis, which was 19% decreased in POAG patients and 17% decreased in LHON patients. This study demonstrates both POAG and LHON lymphoblasts have impaired complex-I, and in the majority of aspects the functional defects in POAG were milder than LHON, which could reflect the milder disease development of POAG. This new evidence places POAG in the spectrum of mitochondrial optic neuropathies and raises the possibility for new therapeutic targets aimed at improving mitochondrial function. PMID:26496696

  7. A variant of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy characterized by recovery of vision and by an unusual mitochondrial genetic etiology.

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, D; Howell, N

    1992-01-01

    The Tas2 and Vic2 Australian families are affected with a variant of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The risk of developing the optic neuropathy shows strict maternal inheritance, and the ophthalmological changes in affected family members are characteristic of LHON. However, in contrast to the common form of the disease, members of these two families show a high frequency of vision recovery. To ascertain the mitochondrial genetic etiology of the LHON in these families, both (a) the the nucleotide sequences of the seven mitochondrial genes encoding subunits of respiratory-chain complex I and (b) the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene were determined for representatives of both families. Neither family carries any of the previously identified primary mitochondrial LHON mutations: ND4/11778, ND1/3460, or ND1/4160. Instead, both LHON families carry multiple nucleotide changes in the mitochondrial complex I genes, which produce conservative amino acid changes. From the available sequence data, it is inferred that the Vic2 and Tas2 LHON families are phylogenetically related to each other and to a cluster of LHON families in which mutations in the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene have been hypothesized to play a primary etiological role. However, sequencing analysis establishes that the Vic2 and Tas2 LHON families do not carry these cytochrome b mutations. There are two hypotheses to account for the unusual mitochondrial genetic etiology of the LHON in the Tas2 and Vic2 LHON families. One possibility is that there is a primary LHON mutation within the mitochondrial genome but that it is at a site that was not included in the sequencing analyses. Alternatively, the disease in these families may result from the cumulative effects of multiple secondary LHON mutations that have less severe phenotypic consequences. PMID:1463007

  8. A variant of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy characterized by recovery of vision and by an unusual mitochondrial genetic etiology

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, D. ); Howell, N. )

    1992-12-01

    The Tas2 and Vic2 Australian families are affected with a variant of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The risk of developing the optic neuropathy shows strict maternal inheritance, and the opthalmological changes in affected family members are characteristic of LHON. However, in contrast to the common form of the disease, members of these two families show a high frequency of vision recovery. To ascertain the mitochondrial genetic etiology of the LHON in these families, both (a) the nucleotide sequences of the seven mitochondrial genes encoding subunits of respiratory-chain complex I and (b) the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene were determined for representatives of both families. Neither family carries any of the previously identified primary mitochondrial LHON mutations: ND4/11778, ND1/3460, or ND1/4160. Instead, both LHON families carry multiple nucleotide changes in the mitochondrial complex I genes, which produce conservative amino acid changes. From the available sequence data, it is inferred that the Vic2 and Tas2 LHON families are phylogenetically related to each other and to a cluster of LHON families in which mutations in the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene have been hypothesized to play a primary etiological role. However, sequencing analysis establishes that the Vic2 and Tas2 LHON families do not carry these cytochrome b mutations. There are two hypotheses to account for the unusual mitochondrial genetic etiology of the LHON in the Tas2 and Vic2 LHON families. One possibility is that there is a primary LHON mutation within the mitochondrial genome but that it is at a site that was not included in the sequencing analyses. Alternatively, the disease in these families may result from the cumulative effects of multiple secondary LHON mutations that have less severe phenotypic consequences. 29 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. [New insights into the pathogenesis of glaucomatous optic neuropathy and refinement of the objective assessment of its functional damage].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Makoto

    2012-03-01

    Glaucomatous optic neuropathy is a primary pathological condition responsible for visual dysfunction due to glaucoma. However, how intraocular pressure and other risk factors lead to glaucomatous optic neuropathy is not fully understood. Given that static or kinetic visual field tests for evaluating visual dysfunction in glaucomatous optic neuropathy are a subjective assessments based on a psychophysical principle, the development of a tool for objective assessment of the visual field is needed. In this study, we attempt to elucidate the pathophysiology of glaucomatous optic neuropathy and to refine a modality for the objective assessment of the visual dysfunction due to it. Aquaporin (AQP) water channels are located primarily in the plasma membrane. These proteins form either a homo- or hetero-tetramer and allow water to cross the plasma membrane bi-directionally. The transmembrane water movement through AQPs is critically involved in the maintenance of normal neuronal activity. Among the 13 isoforms indentified so far, AQP-4 is known to be expressed in the retrobulbar portion of the optic nerve. However, the optic nerve head, the primary pathological site of glaucomatous optic neuropathy, reportedly does not express AQP-4. We found that in control rats, astrocytes throughout the optic nerve express AQP-9. The chronic elevation of intraocular pressure due to cauterization of three episcleral veins substantially reduced both gene expression and immunoreactivity of AQP-9, whereas it did not change the AQP-4 gene or protein expression in the retrobulbar portion of the optic nerve. These findings are implicated in the chronic elevation of intraocular pressure in astrocytes. Similar findings were also observed in the eyes of a monkey with angle-laser-induced ocular hypertension and of a human with primary open-angle glaucoma. AQP-9 was also expressed in the cell bodies of retinal ganglion cells in control rats and its expression was significantly reduced in the eyes of

  10. Diabetic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Russell, James W.; Zilliox, Lindsay A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article provides an overview for understanding the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and management of diabetic neuropathy. Recent Findings: New information about the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy continues to emerge, which will lead to identifying new drug targets. It is clear that the natural history of diabetic neuropathy is changing and the rate of progression is slowing. This is likely because of a combination of earlier diagnosis, improved glycemic management, and improved control of related complications such as hyperlipidemia and hypertension. Early diagnosis is critical, and small fiber neuropathy or subclinical diabetic neuropathy may be reversed or significantly improved with appropriate intervention. The American Academy of Neurology recently published guidelines for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy. Summary: Diabetic neuropathy is common and can present with varied clinical presentations discussed in this article. Although treatment currently focuses on pain management, attention should be paid to potential risk factors for neuropathy. For example, glycemic control, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension should be managed with diet, exercise, and medications. Class I or II clinical studies indicate that pregabalin, duloxetine, amitriptyline, gabapentin, and opioids are effective in the management of diabetic neuropathic pain. PMID:25299279

  11. Differences between Non-arteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy and Open Angle Glaucoma with Altitudinal Visual Field Defect

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sangyoun; Jung, Jong Jin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the differences in retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) change and optic nerve head parameters between non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) and open angle glaucoma (OAG) with altitudinal visual field defect. Methods Seventeen NAION patients and 26 OAG patients were enrolled prospectively. The standard visual field indices (mean deviation, pattern standard deviation) were obtained from the Humphrey visual field test and differences between the two groups were analyzed. Cirrus HD-OCT parameters were used, including optic disc head analysis, average RNFL thickness, and RNFL thickness of each quadrant. Results The mean deviation and pattern standard deviation were not significantly different between the groups. In the affected eye, although the disc area was similar between the two groups (2.00 ± 0.32 and 1.99 ± 0.33 mm2, p = 0.586), the rim area of the OAG group was smaller than that of the NAION group (1.26 ± 0.56 and 0.61 ± 0.15 mm2, respectively, p < 0.001). RNFL asymmetry was not different between the two groups (p = 0.265), but the inferior RNFL thickness of both the affected and unaffected eyes were less in the OAG group than in the NAION group. In the analysis of optic disc morphology, both affected and unaffected eyes showed significant differences between two groups. Conclusions To differentiate NAION from OAG in eyes with altitudinal visual field defects, optic disc head analysis of not only the affected eye, but also the unaffected eye, by using spectral domain optical coherence tomography may be helpful. PMID:26635459

  12. Peripapillary Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Swelling Predicts Peripapillary Atrophy in a Primate Model of Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Mary A.; Miller, Neil R.; Nolan, Theresa; Bernstein, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the relationship between peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (PRNFL) swelling and eventual PRNFL atrophy, and between PRNFL swelling/atrophy and neural function, in a nonhuman primate model of nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (pNAION). Methods pNAION was induced in five normal, adult male rhesus monkeys by laser activation of intravenously injected rose bengal at the optic nerve head. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography measurements of the PRNFL were performed at baseline; 1 day; 1, 2, and 4 weeks; and several later times over a period of an additional 2 to 3 months. Simultaneous pattern-reversal electroretinograms (PERGs) and visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded and color fundus photographs taken at the same time points. Results In all cases, initial PRNFL swelling was associated with atrophy, and the greater the initial swelling, the greater the degree of eventual atrophy (r = 0.65, P = 0.0002). The change in PRNFL thickness closely correlated with VEP amplitude loss (r = 0.90), although this relationship was only a strong trend (P = 0.083). Furthermore, VEP amplitude loss closely correlated with PERG N95 amplitude loss (r = 0.80, P = 0.00002) Conclusions In our model of human NAION, the degree of initial PRNFL swelling correlated with the severity of atrophy. Areas that did not swell developed little to no atrophy. The amount of PRNFL loss was reflected in VEP and PERG N95 amplitude reductions. PMID:26868755

  13. Autonomic neuropathies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Low, P. A.

    1998-01-01

    A limited autonomic neuropathy may underlie some unusual clinical syndromes, including the postural tachycardia syndrome, pseudo-obstruction syndrome, heat intolerance, and perhaps chronic fatigue syndrome. Antibodies to autonomic structures are common in diabetes, but their specificity is unknown. The presence of autonomic failure worsens prognosis in the diabetic state. Some autonomic neuropathies are treatable. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy may respond to liver transplantation. There are anecdotal reports of acute panautonomic neuropathy responding to intravenous gamma globulin. Orthostatic hypotension may respond to erythropoietin or midodrine.

  14. Efficacy and Safety of rAAV2-ND4 Treatment for Leber’s Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xing; Pei, Han; Zhao, Min-jian; Yang, Shuo; Hu, Wei-kun; He, Heng; Ma, Si-qi; Zhang, Ge; Dong, Xiao-yan; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dao-wen; Li, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrially inherited disease leading to blindness. A mitochondrial DNA point mutation at the 11778 nucleotide site of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4 (ND4) gene is the most common cause. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) carrying ND4 (rAAV2-ND4) in LHON patients carrying the G11778A mutation. Nine patients were administered rAAV2-ND4 by intravitreal injection to one eye and then followed for 9 months. Ophthalmologic examinations of visual acuity, visual field, and optical coherence tomography were performed. Physical examinations included routine blood and urine. The visual acuity of the injected eyes of six patients improved by at least 0.3 log MAR after 9 months of follow-up. In these six patients, the visual field was enlarged but the retinal nerve fibre layer remained relatively stable. No other outcome measure was significantly changed. None of the nine patients had local or systemic adverse events related to the vector during the 9-month follow-up period. These findings support the feasible use of gene therapy for LHON. PMID:26892229

  15. Differential visual system organization and susceptibility to experimental models of optic neuropathies in three commonly used mouse strains.

    PubMed

    De Groef, Lies; Dekeyster, Eline; Geeraerts, Emiel; Lefevere, Evy; Stalmans, Ingeborg; Salinas-Navarro, Manuel; Moons, Lieve

    2016-04-01

    Mouse disease models have proven indispensable in glaucoma research, yet the complexity of the vast number of models and mouse strains has also led to confusing findings. In this study, we evaluated baseline intraocular pressure, retinal histology, and retinofugal projections in three mouse strains commonly used in glaucoma research, i.e. C57Bl/6, C57Bl/6-Tyr(c), and CD-1 mice. We found that the mouse strains under study do not only display moderate variations in their intraocular pressure, retinal architecture, and retinal ganglion cell density, also the retinofugal projections to the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus and the superior colliculus revealed striking differences, potentially underlying diverging optokinetic tracking responses and visual acuity. Next, we reviewed the success rate of three models of (glaucomatous) optic neuropathies (intravitreal N-methyl-d-aspartic acid injection, optic nerve crush, and laser photocoagulation-induced ocular hypertension), looking for differences in disease susceptibility between these mouse strains. Different genetic backgrounds and albinism led to differential susceptibility to experimentally induced retinal ganglion cell death among these three mouse strains. Overall, CD-1 mice appeared to have the highest sensitivity to retinal ganglion cell damage, while the C57Bl/6 background was more resistant in the three models used. PMID:26791081

  16. Alcoholic neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... objects in the shoes Guarding the extremities to prevent injury from pressure Alcohol must be stopped to prevent the damage from ... The only way to prevent alcoholic neuropathy is not to drink excessive amounts of alcohol.

  17. Handcuff neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Stone, D A; Laureno, R

    1991-01-01

    Compressive neuropathy due to tight application of handcuffs occurred in 5 patients. The superficial radial nerve was affected in 8 hands and the median nerve in two. Neurologic deficits persisted as long as 3 years after handcuffing. Nerve conduction studies helped to exclude malingering and other diagnoses. All patients had been intoxicated when handcuffed or had been arrested with force. The handcuff mechanism, which allows accidental overtightening after application, is an unrecognized factor in these neuropathies. PMID:1985280

  18. Mitochondrial tRNA(Thr) A15951G mutation may not be associated with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Yu, Shuaishuai; Tu, Yunhai; Huang, Wenjie

    2016-07-01

    Mutation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been found to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON). Three primary mutations, the ND4 G11778A, ND6 T14484C, and ND1 G3460A, have been found to account more than 90% of LHON patients in many families worldwide. In addition to the mutations in genes encoding the respiratory chain complex I, reports concerning the mt-tRNA gene mutations associated with LHON have increased, some pathogenic mutations caused the failure in mt-tRNA metabolism, thereby worsened the mitochondrial dysfunction that is responsible for LHON. Recently, the A15951G mutation in mt-tRNA(Thr) gene has been reported to be a "modified" factor in increasing the penetrance and expressivity of LHON-associated ND4 G11778A mutation in three Chinese families. However, evolutionary conservation analysis of this mutation suggested a poor conservation index and the pathogenicity scoring system showed that this mutation was a neutral polymorphism. PMID:26000946

  19. Radiation-induced optic neuropathy following external beam radiation therapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: A retrospective case-control study

    PubMed Central

    WANG, WEI; YANG, HUI; GUO, LING; SU, HONGYU; WEI, SHIHUI; ZHANG, XIULAN

    2016-01-01

    Radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) is a severe ocular complication in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) following external beam radiation therapy. However, the systemic risk factors for this condition remain unclear. Therefore, patients with NPC who received radiotherapy between 2004 and 2007 at the Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center were retrospectively reviewed in this case-control study. The study included 40 RION patients and 40 patients in the control group, who were strictly matched to the RION patients by tumor histopathology, location, Union for International Cancer Control-Tumor Node Metastasis classification and radiotherapy protocol. Univariate and multivariate statistical regression analyses were performed to identify factors predictive of RION. The univariate analysis demonstrated that age (>60 years), gender (female) and chemotherapy significantly affected the risk of RION, whereas diabetes, hypertension and hepatitis B virus infection did not exert a significant effect. The results of the multivariate analysis suggested that only gender and chemotherapy were significantly associated with an increased incidence of RION. Therefore, the results of the present study suggested that female gender and chemotherapy constitute risk factors for the development of RION following radiotherapy for NPC. The ocular symptoms of high-risk patients should be carefully investigated and reported by ophthalmologists. PMID:27123298

  20. Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: involvement of the mitochondrial ND1 gene and evidence for an intragenic suppressor mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, N; Kubacka, I; Xu, M; McCullough, D A

    1991-01-01

    A large Queensland family has an extreme form of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) in which several neurological abnormalities and an infantile encephalopathy are present in addition to the characteristic ophthalmological changes. Sequence analysis of the seven mitochondrial genes encoding subunits of respiratory chain complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase) reveals two novel features of the etiology of this mitochondrial genetic disease. The first conclusion from these studies is that the ophthalmological and neurological deficits in this family are produced by a mutation at nucleotide 4160 of the ND1 gene. This nucleotide alteration results in the substitution of proline for the highly conserved leucine residue at position 285 of the ND1 protein. Secondary-structure analysis predicts that the proline replacement disrupts a small alpha helix in a hydrophilic loop. All nine family members analyzed were homoplasmic for this mutation. The second major result from these studies is that the members of one branch of this family carry, at nucleotide 4136 of the same gene, a second mutation, also homoplasmic, which produces a cysteine-for-tyrosine replacement at position 277. The clinical and biochemical phenotypes of the family members indicate that this second nucleotide substitution may function as an intragenic suppressor mutation which ameliorates the neurological abnormalities and complex I deficiency. PMID:2018041

  1. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with the mitochondrial ND6 T14484C mutation in three Chinese families

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yanhong; Wei Qiping; Zhou Xiangtian; Qian Yaping; Zhou Jian; Lu Fan; Qu Jia . E-mail: jqu@wzmc.net; Guan Minxin . E-mail: min-xin.guan@cchmc.org

    2006-08-18

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of three Chinese families with maternally transmitted Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Clinical and genetic evaluations revealed the variable severity and age-of-onset in visual impairment in these families. In the affected matrilineal relatives, the loss of central vision is bilateral, the fellow eye becoming affected either simultaneously (45%) or sequentially (55%). The penetrances of vision loss in these pedigrees were 27%, 50%, and 60%, respectively. The age-at-onset of vision loss in these families was 14, 19, and 24 years, respectively. Furthermore, the ratios between affected male and female matrilineal relatives were 1:1, 1:1.2, and 1:2, respectively. Mutational analysis of mitochondrial DNA revealed the presence of homoplasmic ND6 T14484C mutation, which has been associated with LHON. The incomplete penetrance and phenotypic variability implicate the involvement of nuclear modifier gene(s), environmental factor(s) or mitochondrial haplotype(s) in the phenotypic expression of the LHON-associated T14484C mutation in these Chinese pedigrees.

  2. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is associated with the mitochondrial ND4 G11696A mutation in five Chinese families

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Xiangtian |; Wei Qiping; Yang Li; Tong Yi |; Zhao Fuxin; Lu Chunjie; Qian Yaping; Sun Yanghong; Lu Fan; Qu Jia |. E-mail: jqu@wzmc.net; Guan Minxin ||. E-mail: min-xin.guan@cchmc.org

    2006-02-03

    We report here the clinical, genetic, and molecular characterization of five Chinese families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Clinical and genetic evaluations revealed the variable severity and age-of-onset in visual impairment in these families. Strikingly, there were extremely low penetrances of visual impairment in these Chinese families. Sequence analysis of the complete mitochondrial genomes in these pedigrees showed the distinct sets of mtDNA polymorphism, in addition to the identical ND4 G11696A mutation associated with LHON. Indeed, this mutation is present in homoplasmy only in the maternal lineage of those pedigrees but not other members of these families. In fact, the occurrence of the G11696A mutation in these several genetically unrelated subjects affected by visual impairment strongly indicates that this mutation is involved in the pathogenesis of visual impairment. Furthermore, the N405D in the ND5 and G5820A in the tRNA{sup Cys}, showing high evolutional conservation, may contribute to the phenotypic expression of G11696A mutation in the WZ10 pedigree. However, there was the absence of functionally significant mtDNA mutations in other four Chinese pedigrees carrying the G11696A mutation. Therefore, nuclear modifier gene(s) or environmental factor(s) may play a role in the phenotypic expression of the LHON-associated G11696A mutation in these Chinese pedigrees.

  3. Visual outcome of mega-dose intravenous corticosteroid treatment in non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy – retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To date, non arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) is still incurable. We wish to evaluate the effect of intravenous (IV) corticosteroids on the visual outcome of NAION patients. Methods Visual parameters were retrospectively compared between NAION patients treated with IV corticosteroids and untreated NAION patients (control). Visual acuity (VA) and Humphrey automated static perimetry visual field (VF) defects of the affected eye were compared between groups at baseline, 1, 3, 6 months, and end of follow-up visits. The VF analysis consisted of number of quadrant involvements and mean deviation (MD). Results Each group comprised 23 patients (24 eyes). Mean initial VA was similar in the control and treatment groups (p = 0.8). VA at end of follow-up did not improve in either groups (p = 0.8 treated group, p = 0.1 control group). No improvement and no difference in VF defects were found by either quadrant analysis (p = 0.1 treated group, p = 0.5 control group) or MD analysis (p = 0.2, treated group, p = 0.9 control group). VA and VF parameters tended to be worse in the treated group, although without statistical significance. Conclusions Our results suggest that IV corticosteroids may not improve the visual outcome of NAION patients. Since intravenous corticosteroids could potentially cause serious adverse effects, this treatment for NAION is questionable. PMID:24886579

  4. Genetic and biochemical impairment of mitochondrial complex I activity in a family with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and hereditary spastic dystonia

    SciTech Connect

    De Vries, D.D.; Oost, B.A. van; Went, L.N.; Bruyn, G.W.

    1996-04-01

    A rare form of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) that is associated with hereditary spastic dystonia has been studied in a large Dutch family. Neuropathy and ophthalmological lesions were present together in some family members, whereas only one type of abnormality was found in others. mtDNA mutations previously reported in LHON were not present. Sequence analysis of the protein-coding mitochondrial genes revealed two previously unreported mtDNA mutations. A heteroplasmic A{yields}G transition at nucleotide position 11696 in the ND4 gene resulted in the substitution of an isoleucine for valine at amino acid position 312. A second mutation, a homoplasmic T{yields}A transition at nucleotide position 14596 in the ND6 gene, resulted in the substitution of a methionine for the isoleucine at amino acid residue 26. Biochemical analysis of a muscle biopsy revealed a severe complex I deficiency, providing a link between these unique mtDNA mutations and this rare, complex phenotype including Leber optic neuropathy. 80 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. [A case of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy with pyramidal tract sign, optic nerve atrophy and mental retardation].

    PubMed

    Adachi, T; Imaoka, K; Shirasawa, A; Yamaguchi, S; Kobayashi, S

    1998-12-01

    The patient was a 61-year-old man who suffered from gait disturbance since childhood. He also had mental retardation. Gait disturbance was slowly progressive. His mother, sister, brother and son of his sister suffered from gait disturbance. On neurological examination, he showed mental retardation, optic nerve atrophy and neural deafness. He also showed severe muscle atrophy and weakness of bilateral lower limbs associated with pes cavus. Muscle tonus of lower limbs and patellar tendon reflex were increased bilaterally. Achilles tendon reflex was absent. Babinski and Chaddock signs were positive. Superficial and deep sensations were almost normal. There were no cerebellar signs. Blood chemistry was normal. On nerve conduction studies, motor nerve conduction velocity of the upper limbs was normal and that of the posterior tibial nerve was decreased; right 36.0m/sec, left 29.7m/sec. Sensory nerve conduction velocity of the median nerve was slightly decreased; right 36.5m/sec, left 45.2m/sec and sural nerve did not respond to electric stimuli. On sural nerve biopsy, the density of myelinated fibers was severely decreased. Onion bulb formation was not observed. We classified this case as hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) type II based on nerve conduction studies and findings from sural nerve biopsy. HMSN with pyramidal tract sign has been classified as type V and HMSN with optic nerve atrophy as type VI. This case had characteristic symptoms as type V and VI. Histopathological findings of HMSN type V and VI have not been established yet. This case might provide an important clue for classification of HMSN. PMID:10349345

  6. Optic neuropathy in a herd of beef cattle in Alberta associated with consumption of moldy corn

    PubMed Central

    Sandmeyer, Lynne S.; Vujanovic, Vladimir; Petrie, Lyall; Campbell, John R.; Bauer, Bianca S.; Allen, Andrew L.; Grahn, Bruce H.

    2015-01-01

    A group of beef cattle in eastern Alberta was investigated due to sudden onset of blindness after grazing on standing corn in mid-winter. Fumonisin-producing Fusarium spp. were isolated from the corn. Blindness was due to an optic nerve degeneration suspected to be secondary to fumonisin mycotoxin. PMID:25750444

  7. Bilateral optic neuropathy and intraretinal deposits after pars plana vitrectomy in amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Alberto; Alberto, Rossetti; Spedicato, Luigi; Luigi, Spedicato; Fassina, Ambrogio; Ambrogio, Fassina; Doro, Daniele; Daniele, Doro

    2015-01-01

    Pathological examination of material from a nonextensive pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) in the right eye provided a diagnosis of nonfamilial amyloidosis in a 68-year-old woman, who presented with bilateral glass wool-like vitreous opacities. Genetic testing revealed a Tyr114Cys mutation in the transthyretin gene. Six months after PPV, perimetry showed intense constriction with a temporal island and central scotoma in the right eye. An extensive PPV was performed in the left eye. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography evidenced bilateral epimacular amyloid deposits and unreported reflective spots within the inner retina. One year later, visual acuity had decreased to 20/400 in the left eye, with mild vitreous opacity, pale cupped optic disc and inferior altitudinal field defect. Bilateral diurnal intraocular pressure, transiently increased after PPV, never exceeded 16 mmHg with medication. Our patient presented optic nerve blood supply impairment, due to amyloidosis, which caused optic atrophy. Epiretinal and intraretinal deposit detection could aid in diagnosing patients with suspected amyloidosis. PMID:25686071

  8. Improved Vision from Severe Compressive Optic Neuropathy by Apical Cavernous Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyera; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Yasuda, Muneyoshi; Akutsu, Hiroyoshi; Kakizaki, Hirohiko

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old woman had a 1-year history of right vision loss. Her visual acuity was then 0.01 OD, and the critical flicker frequency (CFF) was 8 Hz OD. Goldmann perimetry examination showed inferior suppression of the right visual field center. Funduscopic examination revealed normal coloring of the right optic disc. Imaging studies showed an apical oval tumor. The optic nerve was compressed by both the tumor and the superior rectus muscle/levator palpebrae superioris complex. The tumor was dissected from the surrounding tissues and completely extracted. Histopathologic examination confirmed a cavernous hemangioma. The patient underwent three cycles of postoperative steroid pulse therapy. One year after the surgery, her visual acuity and CFF improved to 1.0 and 32 Hz OD, respectively. Her right visual field was within the normal range. PMID:27099610

  9. Improved Vision from Severe Compressive Optic Neuropathy by Apical Cavernous Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyera; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Yasuda, Muneyoshi; Akutsu, Hiroyoshi; Kakizaki, Hirohiko

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year-old woman had a 1-year history of right vision loss. Her visual acuity was then 0.01 OD, and the critical flicker frequency (CFF) was 8 Hz OD. Goldmann perimetry examination showed inferior suppression of the right visual field center. Funduscopic examination revealed normal coloring of the right optic disc. Imaging studies showed an apical oval tumor. The optic nerve was compressed by both the tumor and the superior rectus muscle/levator palpebrae superioris complex. The tumor was dissected from the surrounding tissues and completely extracted. Histopathologic examination confirmed a cavernous hemangioma. The patient underwent three cycles of postoperative steroid pulse therapy. One year after the surgery, her visual acuity and CFF improved to 1.0 and 32 Hz OD, respectively. Her right visual field was within the normal range. PMID:27099610

  10. Inherited neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Chance, P F; Reilly, M

    1994-10-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (CMT) type 1 is a genetically heterogeneous group of chronic demyelinating polyneuropathies with loci mapping to chromosome 17 (CMT1A), chromosome 1 (CMT1B), the X chromosome (CMTX), and to another unknown autosome (CMT1C). CMT1A is most often associated with a tandem 1.5-Mb duplication in chromosome 17p11.2-12, or in rare patients may result from a point mutation in the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) gene. CMT1B is associated with point mutations in the myelin protein zero (P0) gene. The molecular defect in CMT1C is unknown. CMTX is associated with mutations in the connexin 32 gene. CMT2 is an axonal neuropathy of undetermined cause. One form of CMT2 maps to chromosome 1p36 (CMT2A). Dejerine-Sottas disease is a severe, infantile-onset demyelinating polyneuropathy that may be associated with point mutations in either the PMP22 gene or the P0 gene. Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is a recurrent, episodic demyelinating neuropathy. HNPP is associated with a 1.5-Mb deletion in chromosome 17p11.2-12 and may result from reduced expression of the PMP22 gene. Most examples of CMT1A and HNPP are reciprocal duplication or deletion syndromes originating from unequal crossover during germ cell meiosis. Familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP) is an autosomal dominant disorder that classically presents with a sensory peripheral neuropathy and early autonomic involvement. Transthyretin (TTR) is the most common constituent amyloid fibril protein deposited in FAP, and there are now 28 point mutations in the TTR gene described in TTR-related FAP. Liver transplantation looks promising as a treatment for TTR-related FAP. PMID:7804455

  11. Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS) for retinal and optic nerve diseases: a case report of improvement in relapsing auto-immune optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jeffrey N; Levy, Steven; Benes, Susan C

    2015-09-01

    We present the results from a patient with relapsing optic neuropathy treated within the Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS). SCOTS is an Institutional Review Board approved clinical trial and has become the largest ophthalmology stem cell study registered at the National Institutes of Health to date (www.clinicaltrials.gov Identifier NCT 01920867). SCOTS utilizes autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) for treatment of retinal and optic nerve diseases. Pre-treatment and post-treatment comprehensive eye exams of a 54 year old female patient were performed both at the Florida Study Center, USA and at The Eye Center of Columbus, USA. As a consequence of a relapsing optic neuritis, the patient's previously normal visual acuity decreased to between 20/350 and 20/400 in the right eye and to 20/70 in the left eye. Significant visual field loss developed bilaterally. The patient underwent a right eye vitrectomy with injection of BMSCs into the optic nerve of the right eyeand retrobulbar, subtenon and intravitreal injection of BMSCs in the left eye. At 15 months after SCOTS treatment, the patient's visual acuity had improved to 20/150 in the right eye and 20/20 in the left eye. Bilateral visual fields improved markedly. Both macular thickness and fast retinal nerve fiber layer thickness were maximally improved at 3 and 6 months after SCOTS treatment. The patient also reduced her mycophenylate dose from 1,500 mg per day to 500 mg per day and required no steroid pulse therapy during the 15-month follow up. PMID:26604914

  12. Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS) for retinal and optic nerve diseases: a case report of improvement in relapsing auto-immune optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jeffrey N.; Levy, Steven; Benes, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results from a patient with relapsing optic neuropathy treated within the Stem Cell Ophthalmology Treatment Study (SCOTS). SCOTS is an Institutional Review Board approved clinical trial and has become the largest ophthalmology stem cell study registered at the National Institutes of Health to date (www.clinicaltrials.gov Identifier NCT 01920867). SCOTS utilizes autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) for treatment of retinal and optic nerve diseases. Pre-treatment and post-treatment comprehensive eye exams of a 54 year old female patient were performed both at the Florida Study Center, USA and at The Eye Center of Columbus, USA. As a consequence of a relapsing optic neuritis, the patient's previously normal visual acuity decreased to between 20/350 and 20/400 in the right eye and to 20/70 in the left eye. Significant visual field loss developed bilaterally. The patient underwent a right eye vitrectomy with injection of BMSCs into the optic nerve of the right eyeand retrobulbar, subtenon and intravitreal injection of BMSCs in the left eye. At 15 months after SCOTS treatment, the patient's visual acuity had improved to 20/150 in the right eye and 20/20 in the left eye. Bilateral visual fields improved markedly. Both macular thickness and fast retinal nerve fiber layer thickness were maximally improved at 3 and 6 months after SCOTS treatment. The patient also reduced her mycophenylate dose from 1,500 mg per day to 500 mg per day and required no steroid pulse therapy during the 15-month follow up. PMID:26604914

  13. Intravitreal Injection of a Rho-Kinase Inhibitor (Fasudil) for Recent-Onset Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sanjari, Nasrin; Pakravan, Mohammad; Nourinia, Ramin; Esfandiari, Hamed; Hafezi-Moghadam, Ali; Zandi, Souska; Nakao, Shintaro; Shah-Heidari, Mohamamad-Hassan; Jamali, Arsia; Yaseri, Mehdi; Ahmadieh, Hamid

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the effects of intravitreal injection of fasudil (IVF), a Rho-kinase inhibitor, in cases of recent-onset nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). In this interventional case series, 13 eyes of 13 patients diagnosed with NAION within 14 days of onset were included. The affected eyes received a 0.025 mg/0.05 mL IVF. Functional and structural outcomes were assessed 1 and 3 months following treatment. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was the main outcome measured, with mean deviation (MD) index of the VF test and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness as secondary measures. There was a statistically significant improvement in the patients' BCVA 1 and 3 months following IVF; BCVA improved from 1.69 ± 0.55 logMAR at baseline to 0.98 ± 0.47 and 0.93 ± 0.51 logMAR at 1 and 3 months, respectively (P = .004). The change in BCVA was not significant between month 1 and month 3 (P = .22). Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness decreased from 173.5 ± 29.28 µm in the baseline evaluation to 85.8 ± 8.8 µm at 1 month, and 62.9 ± 5.97 µm at 3 months (P = .003). MD values changed from 24.60 ± 3.80 to 21.0 ± 6.10 and 20.5 ± 6.50 at 1 and 3 months, respectively (P = .007 and .005, respectively). This pilot study suggests that IVF may be an effective treatment for patients with recent-onset NAION. Larger studies are required to establish the therapeutic role of fasudil for NAION. PMID:26444290

  14. Cigarette toxicity triggers Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy by affecting mtDNA copy number, oxidative phosphorylation and ROS detoxification pathways

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, L; Deceglie, S; d'Adamo, P; Valentino, M L; La Morgia, C; Fracasso, F; Roberti, M; Cappellari, M; Petrosillo, G; Ciaravolo, S; Parente, D; Giordano, C; Maresca, A; Iommarini, L; Del Dotto, V; Ghelli, A M; Salomao, S R; Berezovsky, A; Belfort, R; Sadun, A A; Carelli, V; Loguercio Polosa, P; Cantatore, P

    2015-01-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), the most frequent mitochondrial disease, is associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations affecting Complex I subunits, usually homoplasmic. This blinding disorder is characterized by incomplete penetrance, possibly related to several genetic modifying factors. We recently reported that increased mitochondrial biogenesis in unaffected mutation carriers is a compensatory mechanism, which reduces penetrance. Also, environmental factors such as cigarette smoking have been implicated as disease triggers. To investigate this issue further, we first assessed the relationship between cigarette smoke and mtDNA copy number in blood cells from large cohorts of LHON families, finding that smoking was significantly associated with the lowest mtDNA content in affected individuals. To unwrap the mechanism of tobacco toxicity in LHON, we exposed fibroblasts from affected individuals, unaffected mutation carriers and controls to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC). CSC decreased mtDNA copy number in all cells; moreover, it caused significant reduction of ATP level only in mutated cells including carriers. This implies that the bioenergetic compensation in carriers is hampered by exposure to smoke derivatives. We also observed that in untreated cells the level of carbonylated proteins was highest in affected individuals, whereas the level of several detoxifying enzymes was highest in carriers. Thus, carriers are particularly successful in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging capacity. After CSC exposure, the amount of detoxifying enzymes increased in all cells, but carbonylated proteins increased only in LHON mutant cells, mostly from affected individuals. All considered, it appears that exposure to smoke derivatives has a more deleterious effect in affected individuals, whereas carriers are the most efficient in mitigating ROS rather than recovering bioenergetics. Therefore, the identification of genetic modifiers that

  15. Unilateral Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy: Chromatic Pupillometry in Affected, Fellow Non-Affected and Healthy Control Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Kristina; Sander, Birgit; Lund-Andersen, Henrik; Wegener, Marianne; Hannibal, Jens; Milea, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) express the photopigment melanopsin, which is sensitive to blue light. Previous chromatic pupillometry studies have shown that the post-illumination response is considered an indicator of the melanopsin activation. The aim of this study was to investigate the ipRGC mediated pupil response in patients with a unilateral non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). Consensual pupil responses during and after exposure to continuous 20 s blue (470 nm) or red (660 nm) light of high intensity (300 cd/m2) were recorded in each eye for 10 patients. Comparisons were performed both intra-individually (affected versus non-affected eyes) and inter-individually (compared with healthy controls). The pupil response was calculated both during the illumination and during the post-illumination phase. The pupil responses to blue and red colors were significantly reduced in the NAION-affected eyes, compared with the fellow non-affected eyes. When comparing the affected eyes with the healthy control eyes, the post-illumination responses were not significantly different. In addition, the post-illumination pupil responses after blue light exposure were increased in the fellow non-affected patients’ eyes, compared with the healthy controls. However, significance was only reached for the late post-illumination response. In conclusion, chromatic pupillometry disclosed reduced post-illumination pupil responses in the NAION-affected eyes, compared with the non-affected fellow eyes, suggesting dysfunction of the ipRGCs. Compared with the responses of the healthy controls, the blue light post-illumination pupil responses were similar in the affected eyes and increased in the fellow non-affected eyes. This suggests a possible adaptive phenomenon, involving the ipRGCs of both eyes after unilateral NAION. PMID:23717301

  16. Longitudinal study of a heteroplasmic 3460 Leber hereditary optic neuropathy family by multiplexed primer-extension analysis and nucleotide sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, S.S.; Fahy, E.; Bodis-Wollner, I.

    1996-02-01

    Nucleotide-sequencing and multiplexed primer-extension assays have been used to quantitate the mutant-allele frequency in 14 maternal relatives, spanning three generations, from a family that is heteroplasmic for the primary Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) mutation at nucleotide 3460 of the mitochondrial genome. There was excellent agreement between the values that were obtained with the two different methods. The longitudinal study shows that the mutant-allele frequency was constant within individual family members over a sampling period of 3.5 years. Second, although there was an overall increase in the mutant-allele frequency in successive generations, segregation in the direction of the mutant allele was not invariant, and there was one instance in which there was a significant decrease in the frequency from parent to offspring. From these two sets of results, and from previous studies of heteroplasmic LHON families, we conclude that there is no evidence for a marked selective pressure that determines the replication, segregation, or transmission of primary LHON mutations to white blood cells and platelets. Instead, the mtDNA molecules are most likely to replicate and segregate under conditions of random drift at the cellular level. Finally, the pattern of transmission in this maternal lineage is compatible with a developmental bottleneck model in which the number of mitochondrial units of segregation in the female germ line is relatively small in relation to the number of mtDNA molecules within a cell. However, this is not an invariant pattern for humans, and simple models of mitochondrial gene transmission are inappropriate at the present time. 37 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Clustering of Caucasian Leber hereditary optic neuropathy patients containing the 11778 or 14484 mutations on an mtDNA lineage

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.D.; Sun, F.; Wallace, D.C.

    1997-02-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a type of blindness caused by mtDNA mutations. Three LHON mtDNA mutations at nucleotide positions 3460, 11778, and 14484 are specific for LHON and account for 90% of worldwide cases and are thus designated as {open_quotes}primary{close_quotes} LHON mutations. Fifteen other {open_quotes}secondary{close_quotes} LHON mtDNA mutations have been identified, but their pathogenicity is unclear. mtDNA haplotype and phylogenetic analysis of the primary LHON mutations in North American Caucasian patients and controls has shown that, unlike the 3460 and 11778 mutations, which are distributed throughout the European-derived (Caucasian) mtDNA phylogeny, patients containing the 14484 mutation tended to be associated with European mtDNA haplotype J. To investigate this apparent clustering, we performed {chi}{sup 2}-based statistical analyses to compare the distribution of LHON patients on the Caucasian phylogenetic tree. Our results indicate that, unlike the 3460 and 11778 mutations, the 14484 mutation was not distributed on the phylogeny in proportion to the frequencies of the major Caucasian mtDNA haplogroups found in North America. The 14484 mutation was next shown to occur on the haplogroup J background more frequently that expected, consistent with the observation that {approximately}75% of worldwide 14484-positive LHON patients occur in association with haplogroup J. The 11778 mutation also exhibited a moderate clustering on haplogroup J. These observations were supported by statistical analysis using all available mutation frequencies reported in the literature. This paper thus illustrates the potential importance of genetic background in certain mtDNA-based diseases, speculates on a pathogenic role for a subset of LHON secondary mutations and their interaction with primary mutations, and provides support for a polygenic model for LHON expression in some cases. 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  18. Plasma Exchange and Immunoadsorption in Pediatric Inflammatory Optic Neuropathy Resistant to Corticosteroid Therapy: Four French Cases.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Coralie; Garnier, Arnaud; Cheuret, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Steroids as a foremost therapy are widely used in pediatric optic neuritis (ON). Yet, this treatment is not standardized to date. Some children show a resistance to the classic treatment by steroids. Although plasma exchange (PE) and immunoadsorption (IA) techniques are increasingly being adopted and lead to good results in resistant cases in adult patients, very few studies have shown interest in treating ON when steroids have failed. In this study, we report four observations of children, two of whom are treated by PE and two by IA techniques, describing the treatment protocols together with the side effects observed. PMID:26926073

  19. Transient vision loss at depth due to presumed barotraumatic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hexdall, Eric J; Butler, Frank K

    2012-01-01

    Pressure-related vision loss has been reported during ascent to altitude. We report the case of an otherwise healthy diver who suffered painless, sudden-onset binocular vision loss at depth, followed by complete recovery immediately upon surfacing. We examine the dive and briefly discuss the differential diagnosis of transient vision loss in the setting of ambient pressure changes. We conclude that the diver likely suffered from sphenoid sinus barotrauma, possibly in association with dehiscence of the bony canals of the optic nerves as they travel in close proximity to the walls of the sphenoid sinus. PMID:23045919

  20. Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy Is Associated with the T3866C Mutation in Mitochondrial ND1 Gene in Three Han Chinese Families

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiangtian; Qian, Yaping; Zhang, Juanjuan; Tong, Yi; Jiang, Pingping; Liang, Min; Dai, Xianning; Zhou, Huihui; Zhao, Fuxin; Ji, Yanchun; Mo, Jun Qin; Qu, Jia; Guan, Min-Xin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the pathophysiology of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). Methods. Seventy-one subjects from three Chinese families with LHON underwent clinical, genetic, molecular, and biochemical evaluations. Biochemical characterizations included the measurements of the rates of endogenous, substrate-dependent respirations, the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and generation of reactive oxygen species using lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from five affected matrilineal relatives of these families and three control subjects. Results. Ten of 41 matrilineal relatives exhibited variable severity and age at onset of optic neuropathy. The average age at onset of optic neuropathy in matrilineal relatives of the three families was 5, 11, and 24 years, respectively. Molecular analysis identified the ND1 T3866C (I187T) mutation and distinct sets of polymorphisms belonging to the Eastern Asian haplogroups D4a, M10a, and R, respectively. The I187T mutation is localized at the highly conserved isoleucine at a transmembrane domain of the ND1 polypeptide. The marked reductions in the rate of endogenous, malate/glutamate-promoted and succinate/glycerol-3-phosphate-promoted respiration were observed in mutant cell lines carrying the T3866C mutation. The deficient respiration is responsible for the reduced ATP synthesis and increased generation of reactive oxygen species. Conclusions. Our data convincingly show that the ND1 T3866C mutation leads to LHON. This mutation may be insufficient to produce a clinical phenotype. Other modifier factors may contribute to the phenotypic manifestation of the T3866C mutation. The T3866C mutation should be added to the list of inherited factors for molecular diagnosis of LHON. Thus, our findings may provide new insights into the understanding of pathophysiology and valuable information on the management of LHON. PMID:22577081

  1. [The analysis of mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and variants for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy in Chinese families carrying the m.14484T >C mutation].

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangjuan; Zhu, Jinping; Gao, Min; Zhang, Sai; Zhao, Fuxin; Zhang, Juanjuan; Liu, Xiaoling; Wei, Qiping; Tong, Yi; Zhang, Minglian; Qu, Jia; Guan, Minxin

    2014-04-01

    The m.14484T>C mutation in mitochondrial ND6 gene (MT-ND6) is a primary mutation underlying the development of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) , but by itself not enough to cause visual loss. To explore the role of mitochondrial haplogroups on the expression of LHON for the people carrying the m.14484T>C mutation, we performed systematic and extended mutational screening of MT-ND6 gene in a cohort of 1177 Han Chinese patients with LHON. A total of 67 affected subjects carried the homoplasmic m.14484T>C mutation, accounting for 5.7% of this LHON population. The penetrances of optic neuropathy among 51 pedigrees carrying the m.14484T>C mutation ranged from 5.6% to 100.0%, with the average of 21.5%. The sequence analysis of entire mitochondrial genomes of 51 probands exhibited distinct sets of polymorphisms belonging to 18 Eastern Asian haplogroups. The frequencies of haplogroup A and haplogroup F were sig-nificantly less in the LHON mtDNA samples than those in 106 Chinese controls. On the other hand, the haplogroup M10a accounted for 9.8% of the patient's mtDNA samples but was absent in 106 Chinese controls. Strikingly, the average pene-trance (46.13%) of optic neuropathy for the pedigrees carrying mitochondrial haplogroup M10a was higher than those car-rying other mtDNA haplogroups. These observations indicated that mitochondrial haplogroup M10a may increase the risk of visual loss. PMID:24846978

  2. Nab-paclitaxel-induced cystoid macular edema in a patient with pre-existing optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Park, Elizabeth; Goldberg, Naomi R; Adams, Sylvia

    2016-07-01

    Paclitaxel is a widely used chemotherapy agent that has rarely been associated with ophthalmic toxicities. Cystoid macular edema is one such rare side effect of paclitaxel therapy. Its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. Here, we report on a 69-year-old woman who developed cystoid macular edema associated with the albumin-bound formulation of paclitaxel after several months of therapy for breast cancer. After 2 months of drug withdrawal, her vision improved and there was a significant improvement in the macular edema by imaging with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Oncologists using taxane agents should be aware of this rare adverse outcome for timely patient referral to an ophthalmologist and appropriate treatment to preserve a patient's visual acuity. PMID:26982237

  3. Crowdsourcing as a Screening Tool to Detect Clinical Features of Glaucomatous Optic Neuropathy from Digital Photography

    PubMed Central

    Mitry, Danny; Peto, Tunde; Hayat, Shabina; Blows, Peter; Morgan, James; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Foster, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Crowdsourcing is the process of simplifying and outsourcing numerous tasks to many untrained individuals. Our aim was to assess the performance and repeatability of crowdsourcing in the classification of normal and glaucomatous discs from optic disc images. Methods Optic disc images (N = 127) with pre-determined disease status were selected by consensus agreement from grading experts from a large cohort study. After reading brief illustrative instructions, we requested that knowledge workers (KWs) from a crowdsourcing platform (Amazon MTurk) classified each image as normal or abnormal. Each image was classified 20 times by different KWs. Two study designs were examined to assess the effect of varying KW experience and both study designs were conducted twice for consistency. Performance was assessed by comparing the sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results Overall, 2,540 classifications were received in under 24 hours at minimal cost. The sensitivity ranged between 83–88% across both trials and study designs, however the specificity was poor, ranging between 35–43%. In trial 1, the highest AUC (95%CI) was 0.64(0.62–0.66) and in trial 2 it was 0.63(0.61–0.65). There were no significant differences between study design or trials conducted. Conclusions Crowdsourcing represents a cost-effective method of image analysis which demonstrates good repeatability and a high sensitivity. Optimisation of variables such as reward schemes, mode of image presentation, expanded response options and incorporation of training modules should be examined to determine their effect on the accuracy and reliability of this technique in retinal image analysis. PMID:25692287

  4. Time Course of Macular and Peripapillary Inner Retinal Thickness in Non-arteritic Anterior Ischaemic Optic Neuropathy Using Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Katsutoshi; Miki, Atsushi; Araki, Syunsuke; Mizukawa, Kenichi; Nakagawa, Masaki; Takizawa, Go; Ieki, Yoshiaki; Kiryu, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT To report a time course of the ganglion cell complex (GCC) and circumpapillary retinal nerve fibre layer (cpRNFL) thicknesses using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography in patients with non-arteritic anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy (NAION), five patients with unilateral NAION were studied (the average age of 66.8 ± 7.8 years old). Forty-one age-matched normal controls were also enrolled. The GCC and cpRNFL thicknesses were measured at the initial visit and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months using RTVue-100. The GCC thickness and the cpRNFL thickness of the patients were compared with those of the normal controls. The GCC thickness in the NAION patients was 96.49 μm at the initial visit, 84.28 μm at 1 month, 74.26 μm at 3 months, 71.23 μm at 6 months, and 69.51 μm at 12 months. The values at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months were significantly reduced (p < 0.01). The cpRNFL thickness at the initial visit was significantly increased, whereas the values at 6 and 12 months were significantly reduced (p < 0.01). The GCC thickness is more useful for the detection of retinal ganglion cell loss at an early stage than the cpRNFL thickness, because the GCC thickness is unaffected by optic disc swelling at the initial visit, unlike the cpRNFL thickness. PMID:27110047

  5. Hereditary neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Wayne F

    2010-01-01

    A 58-year-old male presented with a history of slowly progressive bilateral hand weakness manifested by decreased grip strength and pinch strength associated with some pain in the first metacarpal-carpal joints with atrophy of the muscles of the web space. An evaluation based on history, physical exam, and judicious diagnostic testing yielded a finding of motor and sensory peripheral polyneuropathy and a working diagnosis of hereditary nerve pressure palsy syndrome (HNPP) or hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. The clinical findings and diagnostic tests for sensory and motor peripheral neuropathy are discussed. The case details over time, hereditary features, and the natural history of this disorder lead to a favorable clinical and insurance medicine prognosis. PMID:21290997

  6. Giant Axonal Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Giant Axonal Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Giant Axonal Neuropathy? Giant axonal neuropathy (GAN) is a rare inherited ...

  7. Multifocal Motor Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multifocal Motor Neuropathy Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Multifocal Motor Neuropathy? Multifocal motor neuropathy is a progressive muscle disorder ...

  8. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  9. Automatic quantitative analysis of experimental primary and secondary retinal neurodegeneration: implications for optic neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Davis, B M; Guo, L; Brenton, J; Langley, L; Normando, E M; Cordeiro, M F

    2016-01-01

    Secondary neurodegeneration is thought to play an important role in the pathology of neurodegenerative disease, which potential therapies may target. However, the quantitative assessment of the degree of secondary neurodegeneration is difficult. The present study describes a novel algorithm from which estimates of primary and secondary degeneration are computed using well-established rodent models of partial optic nerve transection (pONT) and ocular hypertension (OHT). Brn3-labelled retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) were identified in whole-retinal mounts from which RGC density, nearest neighbour distances and regularity indices were determined. The spatial distribution and rate of RGC loss were assessed and the percentage of primary and secondary degeneration in each non-overlapping segment was calculated. Mean RGC number (82 592±681) and RGC density (1695±23.3 RGC/mm2) in naïve eyes were comparable with previous studies, with an average decline in RGC density of 71±17 and 23±5% over the time course of pONT and OHT models, respectively. Spatial analysis revealed greatest RGC loss in the superior and central retina in pONT, but significant RGC loss in the inferior retina from 3 days post model induction. In comparison, there was no significant difference between superior and inferior retina after OHT induction, and RGC loss occurred mainly along the superior/inferior axis (~30%) versus the nasal–temporal axis (~15%). Intriguingly, a significant loss of RGCs was also observed in contralateral eyes in experimental OHT. In conclusion, a novel algorithm to automatically segment Brn3a-labelled retinal whole-mounts into non-overlapping segments is described, which enables automated spatial and temporal segmentation of RGCs, revealing heterogeneity in the spatial distribution of primary and secondary degenerative processes. This method provides an attractive means to rapidly determine the efficacy of neuroprotective therapies with implications for any

  10. Analysis of Vision Loss Caused by Radiation-Induced Optic Neuropathy After Particle Therapy for Head-and-Neck and Skull-Base Tumors Adjacent to Optic Nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Demizu, Yusuke; Murakami, Masao; Miyawaki, Daisuke; Niwa, Yasue; Akagi, Takashi; Sasaki, Ryohei; Terashima, Kazuki; Suga, Daisaku; Kamae, Isao; Hishikawa, Yoshio

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the incident rates of vision loss (VL; based on counting fingers or more severe) caused by radiation-induced optic neuropathy (RION) after particle therapy for tumors adjacent to optic nerves (ONs), and to evaluate factors that may contribute to VL. Methods and Materials: From August 2001 to August 2006, 104 patients with head-and-neck or skull-base tumors adjacent to ONs were treated with carbon ion or proton radiotherapy. Among them, 145 ONs of 75 patients were irradiated and followed for greater than 12 months. The incident rate of VL and the prognostic factors for occurrence of VL were evaluated. The late effects of carbon ion and proton beams were compared on the basis of a biologically effective dose at alpha/beta = 3 gray equivalent (GyE{sub 3}). Results: Eight patients (11%) experienced VL resulting from RION. The onset of VL ranged from 17 to 58 months. The median follow-up was 25 months. No significant difference was observed between the carbon ion and proton beam treatment groups. On univariate analysis, age (>60 years), diabetes mellitus, and maximum dose to the ON (>110 GyE{sub 3}) were significant, whereas on multivariate analysis only diabetes mellitus was found to be significant for VL. Conclusions: The time to the onset of VL was highly variable. There was no statistically significant difference between carbon ion and proton beam treatments over the follow-up period. Based on multivariate analysis, diabetes mellitus correlated with the occurrence of VL. A larger study with longer follow-up is warranted.

  11. Pan-American mDNA haplogroups in Chilean patients with Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Pablo; Fernández, Verónica; Slabaugh, Mark; Seleme, Nicolás; Reyes, Nury; Gallardo, Patricia; Herrera, Luisa; Peña, Luis; Pezo, Patricio; Moraga, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The clinical impact of mDNA mutations on the development of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) may be modulated by mitochondrial haplogroups, which vary across populations. The aim of this research was to determine the clinical spectrum and molecular characteristics, including the haplogroup, of 15 South American families with LHON. Methods This study was a prospective, observational study conducted between March 2006 and August 2012. All patients were referred to the Clinical Hospital of the University of Chile, where the clinical study was conducted. Molecular studies were conducted at the Biomedical Sciences Institute (ICBM) of the University of Chile. Fifteen index cases were identified with molecular analysis after initial neuroophthalmic examination at different centers throughout Chile. Clinical features of patients with LHON and maternal relatives of the 15 families (75 individuals: 26 affected and 49 healthy carriers) were evaluated. The primary mDNA mutations (m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, or m.14484T>C) were determined with restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis in all individuals. Mitochondrial haplogroups were determined with direct sequencing of two hypervariable regions (HV1 and HV2) and compared with reference sequences. Results The m.11778G>A mutation was found in 59 subjects (78.7%), the m.14484T>C mutation was found in 12 subjects (16.0%), and the m.3460G>A mutation was found in four (5.3%) subjects. The average age of onset of symptoms in affected subjects was 22.2 years old (range 3 to 53 years); 21 (80.7%) were male, and five (19.3%) were female. Twelve families (80%) had Amerindian haplogroups: One family had the A2 haplogroup, four families had the B2i2 haplogroup, six families had the C1b haplogroup, and one family had the D1g haplogroup. Conclusions In this limited sample size, the Amerindian haplogroup A2 was associated with delayed onset of disease in this population. Patients with haplogroup C retained better vision

  12. Simultaneous occurrence of the 11778 (ND4) and the 9438 (COX III) mtDNA mutations in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: Molecular, biochemical, and clinical findings

    SciTech Connect

    Oostra, R.J.; Bleeker-Wagemakers, E.M.; Zwart, R.

    1995-10-01

    Three mtDNA point mutations at nucleotide position (np) 3460, at np 11778 and at np 14484, are thought to be of primary importance in the pathogenesis of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), a maternally inherited disease characterized by subacute central vision loss. These mutations are present in genes coding for subunits of complex I (NADH dehydrogenase) of the respiratory chain, occur exclusively in LHON maternal pedigrees, and have never been reported to occur together. Johns and Neufeld postulated that an mtDNA mutation at np 9438, in the gene coding for one of the subunits (COX III) of complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase), was also of primary importance. Johns and Neufeld (1993) found this mutation, which changed a conserved glycine to a serine, in 5 unrelated LHON probands who did not carry one of the presently known primary mutations, but they did not find it in 400 controls. However, the role of this sequence variant has been questioned in the Journal when it has been found to occur in apparently healthy African and Cuban individuals. Subsequently, Johns et al. described this mutation in two Cuban individuals presenting with optic and peripheral neuropathy. 22 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Management of Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Raymond Azman

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the commonest cause of neuropathy worldwide. Diabetic neuropathy (DN) develops in about 4–10% of diabetic patients after 5 years and in 15% after 20 years. Four main mechanisms have been postulated to underlie the pathogenesis of DN. Diabetic neuropathy can be divided into symmetrical and asymmetrical neuropathies. Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy (DAN) parallels the severity of DSN, and affects primarily the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, genitourinary and integumentary systems. The cornerstone of treatment of diabetic neuropathy is optimization of glycaemic control. Future treatments for diabetic neuropathy should address the underlying pathogenesis. PMID:23386794

  14. Optic nerve atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Optic atrophy; Optic neuropathy ... There are many causes of optic atrophy. The most common is poor blood flow. This is called ischemic optic neuropathy. The problem most often affects older adults. ...

  15. COMPUTERIZED EXPERT SYSTEM FOR EVALUATION OF AUTOMATED VISUAL FIELDS FROM THE ISCHEMIC OPTIC NEUROPATHY DECOMPRESSION TRIAL: METHODS, BASELINE FIELDS, AND SIX-MONTH LONGITUDINAL FOLLOW-UP

    PubMed Central

    Feldon, Steven E

    2004-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose To validate a computerized expert system evaluating visual fields in a prospective clinical trial, the Ischemic Optic Neuropathy Decompression Trial (IONDT). To identify the pattern and within-pattern severity of field defects for study eyes at baseline and 6-month follow-up. Design Humphrey visual field (HVF) change was used as the outcome measure for a prospective, randomized, multi-center trial to test the null hypothesis that optic nerve sheath decompression was ineffective in treating nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and to ascertain the natural history of the disease. Methods An expert panel established criteria for the type and severity of visual field defects. Using these criteria, a rule-based computerized expert system interpreted HVF from baseline and 6-month visits for patients randomized to surgery or careful follow-up and for patients who were not randomized. Results A computerized expert system was devised and validated. The system was then used to analyze HVFs. The pattern of defects found at baseline for patients randomized to surgery did not differ from that of patients randomized to careful follow-up. The most common pattern of defect was a superior and inferior arcuate with central scotoma for randomized eyes (19.2%) and a superior and inferior arcuate for nonrandomized eyes (30.6%). Field patterns at 6 months and baseline were not different. For randomized study eyes, the superior altitudinal defects improved (P = .03), as did the inferior altitudinal defects (P = .01). For nonrandomized study eyes, only the inferior altitudinal defects improved (P = .02). No treatment effect was noted. Conclusions A novel rule-based expert system successfully interpreted visual field defects at baseline of eyes enrolled in the IONDT. PMID:15747764

  16. N-hexane neuropathy in offset printers.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, C M; Yu, C W; Fong, K Y; Leung, S Y; Tsin, T W; Yu, Y L; Cheung, T F; Chan, S Y

    1993-01-01

    In an offset printing factory with 56 workers, 20 (36%) developed symptomatic peripheral neuropathy due to exposure to n-hexane. Another 26 workers (46%) were found to have subclinical neuropathy. The initial change in the nerve conduction study was reduced amplitude of the sensory action potentials, followed by reduced amplitude of the motor action potentials, reduction in motor conduction velocities and increase in distal latencies. These changes indicate primary axonal degeneration with secondary demyelination. Sural nerve biopsy in a severe case showed giant axonal swellings due to accumulation of 10nm neurofilaments, myelin sheath attenuation and widening of nodal gaps. The development of neuropathy bore no direct relationship to the duration of exposure, hence factors such as individual susceptibility may be important. Optic neuropathy and CNS involvement were uncommon and autonomic neuropathy was not encountered. Images PMID:8505647

  17. Genetic heterogeneity of primary open angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension: linkage to GLC1A associated with an increased risk of severe glaucomatous optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Brézin, A P; Béchetoille, A; Hamard, P; Valtot, F; Berkani, M; Belmouden, A; Adam, M F; Dupont de Dinechin, S; Bach, J F; Garchon, H J

    1997-01-01

    The GLC1A locus for autosomal dominant juvenile and middle age onset primary open angle glaucoma (OAG) has been mapped to chromosome 1q21-q31. OAG, however, is a heterogeneous disease. We tested linkage of OAG and ocular hypertension (OHT), a major risk factor for OAG, to GLC1A in eight French families with multiple cases of juvenile and middle age onset OAG. There was strong evidence of genetic heterogeneity, four families being linked to GLC1A and two or three others being unlinked, depending on whether the complete OAG phenotype was analysed alone or jointly with OHT. Peak intraocular pressure (IOP) did not differ significantly between the two groups of families, while linkage to GLC1A conferred a highly increased risk of developing OAG and of having severe glaucomatous optic neuropathy. Testing linkage of familial OAG to GLC1A may therefore have prognostic value too. PMID:9222961

  18. Searching the co-occurrence of pathogenic mutations for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and hearing loss in more than 26,000 whole mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haixin; Liu, Rui; Wang, Chuan-Chao

    2016-09-01

    The co-occurrence of pathogenic or candidate mutations for Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and hearing loss has long been suggested to be a rare incident. The "rare" is probably caused by inadequate database searches. In this study, we created and released a comprehensive database with detailed information of haplogroup, variants, coding sites, and potential pathogenic mutations for more than 26,000 whole mitochondrial genomes. We found the co-occurrence in more than 200 individuals including not only LHON or hearing loss patients but also individuals sampled from general populations with various haplogroup backgrounds. The results highlighted the significant importance of adequate database searching in the genetic analysis of mitochondrial disorders. PMID:25714144

  19. Detection of the mtDNA 14484 mutation on an African-specific haplotype: Implications about its role in causing Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Torroni, A.; Petrozzi, M.; Terracina, M.

    1996-07-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a maternally transmitted disease whose primary clinical manifestation is acute or subacute bilateral loss of central vision leading to central scotoma and blindness. To date, LHON has been associated with 18 mtDNA missense mutations, even though, for many of these mutations, it remains unclear whether they cause the disease, contribute to the pathology, or are nonpathogenic mtDNA polymorphisms. On the basis of numerous criteria, which include the specificity for LHON, the frequency in the general population, and the penetrance within affected pedigrees, the detection of associated defects in the respiratory chain, mutations at three nucleotide positions (nps), 11778 (G{r_arrow}A), 3460 (G{r_arrow}A), and 14484 (T{r_arrow}C) have been classified as high-risk and primary LHON mutations. Overall, these three mutations encompass {ge}90% of the LHON cases. 29 refs., 1 fig.

  20. A mitochondrial DNA variant, identified in Leber hereditary optic neuropathy patients, which extends the amino acid sequence of cytochrome c oxidase subunit I.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M D; Yang, C C; Trounce, I; Torroni, A; Lott, M T; Wallace, D C

    1992-01-01

    A G-to-A transition at nucleotide pair (np) 7444 in the mtDNA was found to correlate with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The mutation eliminates the termination codon of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene, extending the COI polypeptide by three amino acids. The mutation was discovered as an XbaI restriction-endonuclease-site loss present in 2 (9.1%) of 22 LHON patients who lacked the np 11778 LHON mutation and in 6 (1.1%) of 545 unaffected controls. The mutant polypeptide has an altered mobility on SDS-PAGE, suggesting a structural alteration, and the cytochrome c oxidase enzyme activity of patient lymphocytes is reduced approximately 40% relative to that in controls. These data suggest that the np 7444 mutation results in partial respiratory deficiency and thus contributes to the onset of LHON. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:1322638

  1. Evidence against an X-linked locus close to DXS7 determining visual loss susceptibility in British and Italian families with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, M.G.; Davis, M.B.; Lashwood, A.; Brockington, M.; Harding, A.E. ); Toscano, A. )

    1992-10-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is associated with mutations of mtDNA, but two features of LHON pedigrees are not explicable solely on the basis of mitochondrial inheritance. There is a large excess of affected males, and not all males at risk develop the disease. These observations could be explained by the existence of an X-linked visual loss susceptibility gene. This hypothesis was supported by linkage studies in Finland, placing the susceptibility locus at DXS7, with a maximum lod score of 2.48 at a recombination fraction of 0. Linkage studies in 1 Italian and 12 British families with LHON, analyzed either together or separately depending on the associated mtDNA mutation, have excluded the presence of such a locus from an interval of about 30 cM around DXS7 in these kindreds, with a total lod score of -26.51 at a recombination fraction of 0. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Neuropathy secondary to drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000700.htm Neuropathy secondary to drugs To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Neuropathy secondary to drugs is a loss of sensation ...

  3. Neuropathy secondary to drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy secondary to drugs is a loss of sensation or movement in a part of the body ... weakness. Many medicines may affect the development of neuropathy, including: Heart or blood pressure drugs: Amiodarone Hydralazine ...

  4. A Single Intravitreal Injection of Ranibizumab Provides No Neuroprotection in a Nonhuman Primate Model of Moderate-to-Severe Nonarteritic Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Neil R.; Johnson, Mary A.; Nolan, Theresa; Guo, Yan; Bernstein, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Ranibizumab, a vascular endothelial growth factor-antagonist, is said to be neuroprotective when injected intravitreally in patients with nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION). We evaluated the efficacy of a single intravitreal (IVT) injection of ranibizumab in a nonhuman primate model of NAION (pNAION). Methods We induced pNAION in one eye of four adult male rhesus monkeys using a laser-activated rose Bengal induction method. We then immediately injected the eye with either ranibizumab or normal saline (NS) intravitreally. We performed a clinical assessment, optical coherence tomography, electrophysiological testing, fundus photography, and fluorescein angiography in three of the animals (one animal developed significant retinal hemorrhages and, therefore, could not be analyzed completely) prior to induction, 1 day and 1, 2, and 4 weeks thereafter. Following the 4-week analysis of the first eye, we induced pNAION in the contralateral eye and then injected either ranibizumab or NS, whichever substance had not been injected in the first eye. We euthanized all animals 5 to 12 weeks after the final assessment of the second eye and performed both immunohistochemical and light and electron microscopic analyses of the retina and optic nerves of both eyes. Results A single IVT dose of ranibizumab administered immediately after induction of pNAION resulted in no significant reduction of clinical, electrophysiological, or histologic damage compared with vehicle-injected eyes. Conclusions A single IVT dose of ranibizumab is not neuroprotective when administered immediately after induction of pNAION. PMID:26624498

  5. Peripheral neuropathies 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Assal, J.P.; Liniger, C.

    1990-01-01

    The authors present results and experience in sixteen specific disciplines related to the study of nerve physiopathology, diagnosis and treatment. Twenty-two different peripheral neuropathies are presented, and different models related to health care strategies are discussed. The authors report on Inflammatory and autoimmune neuropathies and Genetic neuropathies.

  6. Entrapment neuropathies III: lower limb.

    PubMed

    Beltran, Luis S; Bencardino, Jenny; Ghazikhanian, Varand; Beltran, Javier

    2010-11-01

    Clinicians frequently encounter compressive neuropathies of the lower extremity. The clinical history and physical examination, along with electrodiagnostic testing and imaging studies, lead to the correct diagnosis. The imaging characteristics of the compression neuropathies can include acute and chronic changes in the nerves and the muscles they innervate. We provide a detailed review of compression neuropathies of the lower extremity with an emphasis on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics. We discuss the clinical presentation, etiology, anatomical location, and MR imaging appearance of these neuropathies, including the piriformis syndrome, iliacus syndrome, saphenous neuropathy, obturator neuropathy, lateral femoral cutaneous neuropathy (meralgia paresthetica), proximal tibial neuropathy, common peroneal neuropathy, deep peroneal neuropathy, superficial peroneal neuropathy, tarsal tunnel syndrome, Baxter's neuropathy, jogger's foot, sural neuropathy, and Morton's neuroma. PMID:21072728

  7. Giant axonal neuropathy: visual and oculomotor deficits.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, T H; Guitton, D; Coupland, S G

    1980-08-01

    Giant axonal neuropathy, a generalised disorder or neurofilaments, presents as a chronic, progressive peripheral neuropathy in childhood. Evidence for central nervous system involvement is demonstrated in this study of four male patients with giant axonal neuropathy who had defective visual function and abnormal ocular motility. The visual system was studied by electroretinography, which showed normal retinal function, and by visual evoked potentials, which showed disease of both optic nerves and retrochiasmal visual pathways. The ocular motility disorder, studied by electrooculography, comprised defective pursuit, inability to maintain eccentric gaze with gaze paretic and rebound nystagmus, abnormal optokinetic responses and failure of suppression of the vestibulo-ocular reflex by fixation. These findings suggested involvement by giant axonal neuropathy of the cerebellar and brain stem pathways important in the control of ocular motility. PMID:7192592

  8. Two families with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy carrying G11778A and T14502C mutations with haplogroup H2a2a1 in mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Chen; Wei, Tanwei; Hu, Bo; Peng, Chunyan; Qiu, Xueping; Wei, Li; Yan, Ming

    2015-08-01

    The mitochondrial haplogroup has been reported to affect the clinical expression of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON). The present study aimed to investigate the interaction between mutations and the haplogroup of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in families. Two unrelated families with LHON were enrolled in the study, and clinical, genetic and molecular characterizations were determined in the affected and unaffected family members. Polymerase chain reaction direct sequencing was performed using 24 pairs of overlapping primers for whole mtDNA to screen for mutations and haplogroup. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to evaluate the pathogenic effect of these mtDNA mutations and the haplogroup. The G11778A mutation was identified in the two families. In addition, the members of family 2 exhibited the T14502C mutation and those in family 1 exhibited the T3394C and T14502C mutations, which were regarded as secondary mutations. The penetrance of visual loss in families 1 and 2 were 30.8 and 33.3%, respectively. In addition, the two families were found to be in the H2a2a1 haplogroup. In this limited sample size, it was demonstrated that the H2a2a1 haplogroup had a possible protective effect against LHON. Additional modifying factors, including environmental factors, lifestyle, estrogen levels and nuclear genes may also be important in LHON. PMID:25936877

  9. X chromosome-linked and mitochondrial gene control of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: evidence from segregation analysis for dependence on X chromosome inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Bu, X D; Rotter, J I

    1991-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) has been shown to involve mutation(s) of mitochondrial DNA, yet there remain several confusing aspects of its inheritance not explained by mitochondrial inheritance alone, including male predominance, reduced penetrance, and a later age of onset in females. By extending segregation analysis methods to disorders that involve both a mitochondrial and a nuclear gene locus, we show that the available pedigree data for LHON are most consistent with a two-locus disorder, with one responsible gene being mitochondrial and the other nuclear and X chromosome-linked. Furthermore, we have been able to extend the two-locus analytic method and demonstrate that a proportion of affected females are likely heterozygous at the X chromosome-linked locus and are affected due to unfortunate X chromosome inactivation, thus providing an explanation for the later age of onset in females. The estimated penetrance for a heterozygous female is 0.11 +/- 0.02. The calculated frequency of the X chromosome-linked gene for LHON is 0.08. Among affected females, 60% are expected to be heterozygous, and the remainder are expected to be homozygous at the responsible X chromosome-linked locus. PMID:1896469

  10. X-inactivation patterns in female Leber`s hereditary optic neuropathy patients do not support a strong X-linked determinant

    SciTech Connect

    Pegoraro, E.; Hoffman, E.P.; Carelli, V.; Cortelli, P.

    1996-02-02

    Leber`s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) accounts for about 3% of the cases of blindness in young adult males. The underlying mitochondrial pathogenesis of LHON has been well studied, with specific mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations of structural genes described and well characterized. However, enigmatic aspects of the disease are not explained by mutation data, such as the higher proportion of affected males, the later onset of the disease in females, and the presence of unaffected individuals with a high proportion of mutant mtDNA. A hypothesis which has been put forward to explain the unusual disease expression is a dual model of mtDNA and X-linked nuclear gene inheritance. If a nuclear X-linked modifier gene influences the expression of the mitochondrial-linked mutant gene then the affected females should be either homozygous for the nuclear determinant, or if heterozygous, lyonization should favor the mutant X. In order to determine if an X-linked gene predisposes to LHON phenotype we studied X-inactivation patterns in 35 females with known mtDNA mutations from 10 LHON pedigrees. Our results do not support a strong X-linked determinant in LHON cause: 2 of the 10 (20%) manifesting carriers showed skewing of X-inactivation, as did 3 of the 25 (12%) nonmanifesting carriers. 39 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.