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Sample records for optic sensor systems

  1. High pressure fiber optic sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Guida, Renato; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon K; Dekate, Sachin N

    2013-11-26

    The present application provides a fiber optic sensor system. The fiber optic sensor system may include a small diameter bellows, a large diameter bellows, and a fiber optic pressure sensor attached to the small diameter bellows. Contraction of the large diameter bellows under an applied pressure may cause the small diameter bellows to expand such that the fiber optic pressure sensor may measure the applied pressure.

  2. Optical seismic sensor systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Beal, A. Craig; Cummings, Malcolm E.; Zavriyev, Anton; Christensen, Caleb A.; Lee, Keun

    2015-12-08

    Disclosed is an optical seismic sensor system for measuring seismic events in a geological formation, including a surface unit for generating and processing an optical signal, and a sensor device optically connected to the surface unit for receiving the optical signal over an optical conduit. The sensor device includes at least one sensor head for sensing a seismic disturbance from at least one direction during a deployment of the sensor device within a borehole of the geological formation. The sensor head includes a frame and a reference mass attached to the frame via at least one flexure, such that movement of the reference mass relative to the frame is constrained to a single predetermined path.

  3. Power system applications of fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, A. R.; Jackson, S. P.; Kirkham, H.; Yeh, C.

    1986-06-01

    This document is a progress report of work done in 1985 on the Communications and Control for Electric Power Systems Project at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. These topics are covered: Electric Field Measurement, Fiber Optic Temperature Sensing, and Optical Power transfer. Work was done on the measurement of ac and dc electric fields. A prototype sensor for measuring alternating fields was made using a very simple electroscope approach. An electronic field mill sensor for dc fields was made using a fiber optic readout, so that the entire probe could be operated isolated from ground. There are several instances in which more precise knowledge of the temperature of electrical power apparatus would be useful. This report describes a number of methods whereby the distributed temperature profile can be obtained using a fiber optic sensor. The ability to energize electronics by means of an optical fiber has the advantage that electrical isolation is maintained at low cost. In order to accomplish this, it is necessary to convert the light energy into electrical form by means of photovoltaic cells. JPL has developed an array of PV cells in gallium arsenide specifically for this purpose. This work is described.

  4. Power system applications of fiber optic sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. R.; Jackson, S. P.; Kirkham, H.; Yeh, C.

    1986-01-01

    This document is a progress report of work done in 1985 on the Communications and Control for Electric Power Systems Project at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. These topics are covered: Electric Field Measurement, Fiber Optic Temperature Sensing, and Optical Power transfer. Work was done on the measurement of ac and dc electric fields. A prototype sensor for measuring alternating fields was made using a very simple electroscope approach. An electronic field mill sensor for dc fields was made using a fiber optic readout, so that the entire probe could be operated isolated from ground. There are several instances in which more precise knowledge of the temperature of electrical power apparatus would be useful. This report describes a number of methods whereby the distributed temperature profile can be obtained using a fiber optic sensor. The ability to energize electronics by means of an optical fiber has the advantage that electrical isolation is maintained at low cost. In order to accomplish this, it is necessary to convert the light energy into electrical form by means of photovoltaic cells. JPL has developed an array of PV cells in gallium arsenide specifically for this purpose. This work is described.

  5. Power system applications of fiber optic sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, A.R.; Jackson, S.P.; Kirkham, H.; Yeh, C.

    1986-06-01

    Three topics are covered: Electric Field Measurement, Fiber Optic Temperature Sensing, and Optical Power Transfer. Work was done on the measurement of ac and dc electric fields. A prototype sensor for measuring alternating fields was made using a very simple electroscope approach. An electronic field mill sensor for dc fields was made using a fiber optic readout, so that the entire probe could be operated isolated from ground. There are several instances in which more precise knowledge of the temperature of electrical power apparatus would be useful. This report describes a number of methods whereby the distributed temperature profile can be obtained using a fiber optic sensor. The ability to energize electronics by means of an optical fiber has the advantage that electrical isolation is maintained at low cost. In order to accomplish this, it is necessary to convert the light energy into electrical form by means of photovoltaic cells. JPL has developed an array of PV cells in gallium arsenide specifically for this purpose. This work is described.

  6. Optical multi-species gas monitoring sensor and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A. (Inventor); Korman, Valentin (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The system includes at least one light source generating light energy having a corresponding wavelength. The system's sensor is based on an optical interferometer that receives light energy from each light source. The interferometer includes a free-space optical path disposed in an environment of interest. The system's sensor includes an optical device disposed in the optical path that causes light energy of a first selected wavelength to continue traversing the optical path whereas light energy of at least one second selected wavelength is directed away from the optical path. The interferometer generates an interference between the light energy of the first selected wavelength so-traversing the optical path with the light energy at the corresponding wavelength incident on the optical interferometer. A first optical detector detects the interference. At least one second detector detects the light energy at the at least one second selected wavelength directed away from the optical path.

  7. Fiber-optic push-pull sensor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, David L.; Brown, David A.; Garrett, Steven L.

    1991-01-01

    Fiber-optic push-pull sensors are those which exploit the intrinsically differential nature of an interferometer with concommitant benefits in common-mode rejection of undesired effects. Several fiber-optic accelerometer and hydrophone designs are described. Additionally, the recent development at the Naval Postgraduate School of a passive low-cost interferometric signal demodulator permits the development of economical fiber-optic sensor systems.

  8. Multifunctional optical system-on-a-chip for heterogeneous fiber optic sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Pang, Cheng; Gupta, Ashwani

    2015-08-01

    In this article, we review our recent progress on the development of a multifunctional optical system-on-a-chip platform, which can be used for achieving heterogeneous wireless fiber optical sensor networks. A multifunctional optical sensor platform based on the micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology is developed. The key component of the multifunctional optical sensor platform is a MEMS based tunable Fabry-Pérot (FP) filter, which can be used as a phase modulator or a wavelength tuning device in a multifunctional optical sensing system. Mechanics model of the FP filter and optics model of the multifunctional optical sensing system are developed to facilitate the design of the filter. The MEMS FP filter is implemented in a multifunctional optical sensing system including both Fabry-Perot interferometer based sensors and Fiber Bragg grating sensors. The experimental results indicate that this large dynamic range tunable filter can enable high performance heterogeneous optical sensing for many applications.

  9. Optical detection system for MEMS-type pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareło, K.; Górecka-Drzazga, A.; Dziuban, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper a special optical detection system designed for a MEMS-type (micro-electro-mechanical system) silicon pressure sensor is presented. The main part of the optical system—a detection unit with a perforated membrane—is bonded to the silicon sensor, and placed in a measuring system. An external light source illuminates the membrane of the pressure sensor. Owing to the light reflected from the deflected membrane sensor, the optical pattern consisting of light points is visible, and pressure can be estimated. The optical detection unit (20   ×   20   ×   20.4 mm3) is fabricated using microengineering techniques. Its dimensions are adjusted to the dimensions of the pressure sensor (5   ×   5 mm2 silicon membrane). Preliminary tests of the optical detection unit integrated with the silicon pressure sensor are carried out. For the membrane sensor from 15 to 60 µm thick, a repeatable detection of the differential pressure in the range of 0 to 280 kPa is achieved. The presented optical microsystem is especially suitable for the pressure measurements in a high radiation environment.

  10. Thin-film fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Nave, S.E.

    1998-07-21

    The invention discloses a sensor probe device for monitoring of hydrogen gas concentrations and temperatures by the same sensor probe. The sensor probe is constructed using thin-film deposition methods for the placement of a multitude of layers of materials sensitive to hydrogen concentrations and temperature on the end of a light transparent lens located within the sensor probe. The end of the lens within the sensor probe contains a lens containing a layer of hydrogen permeable material which excludes other reactive gases, a layer of reflective metal material that forms a metal hydride upon absorbing hydrogen, and a layer of semi-conducting solid that is transparent above a temperature dependent minimum wavelength for temperature detection. The three layers of materials are located at the distal end of the lens located within the sensor probe. The lens focuses light generated by broad-band light generator and connected by fiber-optics to the sensor probe, onto a reflective metal material layer, which passes through the semi-conducting solid layer, onto two optical fibers located at the base of the sensor probe. The reflected light is transmitted over fiber optic cables to a spectrometer and system controller. The absence of electrical signals and electrical wires in the sensor probe provides for an elimination of the potential for spark sources when monitoring in hydrogen rich environments, and provides a sensor free from electrical interferences. 3 figs.

  11. Novel single-phase fiber optic flow sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Wei; Pickrell, Gary R.; Xu, Juncheng; Huang, Zhengyu; Kim, Dae Woong; Wang, Anbo

    2004-03-01

    In this paper, we present a novel design of a fiber optic flow sensor system for single-phase fluid flow detection. This new system is based on the principle of broadband interferometry and cantilever beam bending. The fiber optic sensor system utilizes two fiber ferrule sensors that are bonded on both sides of a cantilever beam. The flow rate can be determined by monitoring the air gap changes caused by bending of the cantilever beam. Cross-sensitivity of the temperature and pressure dependence of the sensor can be compensated for automatically. The prototype sensor system was fabricated and tested on the lab-scale with preliminary evaluations completed. Field-testing was performed in the indoor and outdoor flow loops of Tulsa University in Tulsa, Okalahoma. Both the lab-scale and field-testing results verified that the designed flow sensor system could measure the single-phase fluid flow rate with high resolution and repeatability by compensating the thermal and pressure effects of the environment. The outdoor field-testing demonstrated the feasibility of the designed fiber optic flow sensor for single-phase fluid flow rate measurements in the oil fields.

  12. Thin-film fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Nave, Stanley E.

    1998-01-01

    The invention discloses a sensor probe device for monitoring of hydrogen gas concentrations and temperatures by the same sensor probe. The sensor probe is constructed using thin-film deposition methods for the placement of a multitude of layers of materials sensitive to hydrogen concentrations and temperature on the end of a light transparent lens located within the sensor probe. The end of the lens within the sensor probe contains a lens containing a layer of hydrogen permeable material which excludes other reactive gases, a layer of reflective metal material that forms a metal hydride upon absorbing hydrogen, and a layer of semi-conducting solid that is transparent above a temperature dependent minimum wavelength for temperature detection. The three layers of materials are located at the distal end of the lens located within the sensor probe. The lens focuses light generated by broad-band light generator and connected by fiber-optics to the sensor probe, onto a reflective metal material layer, which passes through the semi-conducting solid layer, onto two optical fibers located at the base of the sensor probe. The reflected light is transmitted over fiberoptic cables to a spectrometer and system controller. The absence of electrical signals and electrical wires in the sensor probe provides for an elimination of the potential for spark sources when monitoring in hydrogen rich environments, and provides a sensor free from electrical interferences.

  13. High speed demodulation systems for fiber optic grating sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Udd, Eric (Inventor); Weisshaar, Andreas (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Fiber optic grating sensor demodulation systems are described that offer high speed and multiplexing options for both single and multiple parameter fiber optic grating sensors. To attain very high speeds for single parameter fiber grating sensors ratio techniques are used that allow a series of sensors to be placed in a single fiber while retaining high speed capability. These methods can be extended to multiparameter fiber grating sensors. Optimization of speeds can be obtained by minimizing the number of spectral peaks that must be processed and it is shown that two or three spectral peak measurements may in specific multiparameter applications offer comparable or better performance than processing four spectral peaks. Combining the ratio methods with minimization of peak measurements allows very high speed measurement of such important environmental effects as transverse strain and pressure.

  14. Airborne Electro-Optical Sensor Simulation System. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayworth, Don

    The total system capability, including all the special purpose and general purpose hardware comprising the Airborne Electro-Optical Sensor Simulation (AEOSS) System, is described. The functional relationship between hardware portions is described together with interface to the software portion of the computer image generation. Supporting rationale…

  15. Polymer optical fiber sensors for civil infrastructure systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiesel, Sharon; Peters, Kara; Abdi, O.; Hassan, Tasnim; Kowalsky, Mervyn

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents intrinsic polymer fiber (POF) sensors for high-strain applications such as the performance-based assessment and health monitoring of civil infrastructure systems subjected to earthquake loading or morphing aircraft. POFs provide a potential maximum strain range of 6-12%, are more flexible that silica optical fibers, and are more durable in harsh chemical or environmental conditions. Recent advances in the fabrication of singlemode POFs have made it possible to extend POFs to interferometric sensor capabilities. Furthermore, the interferometric nature of intrinsic sensors permits high accuracy for such measurements. Measurements of the mechanical response of the sensor at various strain rates are presented. In addition, the design of a time-of-flight interferometer for phase measurements over the large strain range required is discussed. Finally the bond strength between the embedded POF and various structural materials is investigated and a methodology demonstrated for embedment of the sensors into a reinforced concrete structural component.

  16. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor); Mattes, Brenton L. (Inventor); Charnetski, Clark J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  17. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  18. Pyramid wavefront sensor for image quality evaluation of optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhendong

    2015-08-01

    When the pyramid wavefront sensor is used to evaluate the imaging quality, placed at the focal plane of the aberrated optical system e.g., a telescope, it splits the light into four beams. Four images of the pupil are created on the detector and the detection signals of the pyramid wavefront sensor are calculated with these four intensity patterns, providing information on the derivatives of the aberrated wavefront. Based on the theory of the pyramid wavefront sensor, we are going to develop simulation software and a wavefront detector which can be used to test the imaging quality of the telescope. In our system, the subpupil image intensity through the pyramid sensor is calculated to obtain the aberration of wavefront where the piston, tilt, defocus, spherical, coma, astigmatism and other high level aberrations are separately represented by Zernike polynomials. The imaging quality of the optical system is then evaluated by the subsequent wavefront reconstruction. The performance of our system is to be checked by comparing with the measurements carried out using Puntino wavefront instrument (the method of SH wavefront sensor). Within this framework, the measurement precision of pyramid sensor will be discussed as well through detailed experiments. In general, this project would be very helpful both in our understanding of the principle of the wavefront reconstruction and its future technical applications. So far, we have produced the pyramid and established the laboratory setup of the image quality detecting system based on this wavefront sensor. Preliminary results are obtained, in that we have obtained the intensity images of the four pupils. Additional work is needed to analyze the characteristics of the pyramid wavefront sensor.

  19. Multifunction medical endoscope system with optical fiber temperature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhengquan; Zhou, Libin; Luo, Baoke; Hu, Baowen; Du, Xinchao; Li, Yulin

    2014-09-01

    Thermal therapy (or hyperthermia) is one of the effective operations for tumor treating and curing. As tumor tissues are more susceptible to heat than normal tissues, in thermal therapy operations, temperature on operation area is a crucial parameter for optimal treating. When the temperature is too low, the tumor tissues cannot be killed; otherwise, the temperature is too high, the operation may damage normal tissues around the tumor. During thermal therapy operation, the heating power is normally supplied by high-frequency EM field, so traditional temperature sensors, such as thermal couples, thermistors, cannot work stably due to EM interference. We present a multi-function endoscope optical fiber temperature sensor system. With this sensor setup based on principle of fluorescence life time, the temperature on operation point is detected in real time. Furthermore, a build-in endoscope centers in the fiber sensor, thus the operation area can be viewed or imaged directly during the operation. This design can navigate the operation, particularly for in vivo operations. The temperature range of the sensor system is 30°C-150°C, the accuracy can achieve to 0.2°C. The imaging fiber buddle is constituted of more than 50k fibers. As the sensor probe is very thin (around 4 mm in diameter), it can also be assembled inside the radiofrequency operation knife. With the presented sensor system in clinic operation physicians can check the temperature in the operation point and view the operation area at the same time.

  20. A synchronous phase detection system for an optical interferometric sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, I. J.

    1982-05-01

    A system has been developed to accurately detect phase produced in optical interferometric sensors. The system employs optical heterodyning, and it synchronously detects optical phase by feeding an error signal back to a phase modulator in the reference leg of the interferometer. This system is seen to have properties similar to a phase-locked loop used for the demodulation of FM signals. The system model is second order and nonlinear, but a linear approximation serves to accurately describe the system in synchronous operation and is corroborated with well-matched empirical data. The complete model is simulated via computer techniques and is needed to describe the system's parameters that lead to loss and reacquisition of synchronization.

  1. 78 FR 17187 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... Department of the Navy Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems... to grant to Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology Corporation, a revocable, nonassignable, exclusive... its intent to grant to Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology Corporation a revocable,...

  2. Fiber-optic vibration sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jun; Wang, Qingpu; Zhang, Xingyu; Ma, Liangzhu; Wang, Hao; Zhang, Sasa; Wang, Qian; Ni, Jiasheng; Wu, Yanbin

    2008-07-01

    A vibration measuring system based on a matched-fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is demonstrated, and the cross sensitivity of the temperature and strain was reduced by packaging the matched-sensing and interrogation FBG in the same shell, theory, system structure, and experimental results are presented. The experimental results demonstrated that the system has a good response to the 8 80 Hz vibration signal; it responds well to an acceleration of as low as 0.05 m/s2, the system was deployed in a coalmine, and good experimental result were received. Because the system has the advantage of intrinsic safety and an easy multiplex, it has good prospects in the mining and petrochemical industry.

  3. Wavefront sensors and algorithms for adaptive optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, V. P.; Botygina, N. N.; Emaleev, O. N.; Konyaev, P. A.

    2010-07-01

    The results of recent works related to techniques and algorithms for wave-front (WF) measurement using Shack-Hartmann sensors show their high efficiency in solution of very different problems of applied optics. The goal of this paper was to develop a sensitive Shack-Hartmann sensor with high precision WF measurement capability on the base of modern technology of optical elements making and new efficient methods and computational algorithms of WF reconstruction. The Shack-Hartmann sensors sensitive to small WF aberrations are used for adaptive optical systems, compensating the wave distortions caused by atmospheric turbulence. A high precision Shack-Hartmann WF sensor has been developed on the basis of a low-aperture off-axis diffraction lens array. The device is capable of measuring WF slopes at array sub-apertures of size 640×640 μm with an error not exceeding 4.80 arcsec (0.15 pixel), which corresponds to the standard deviation equal to 0.017λ at the reconstructed WF with wavelength λ . Also the modification of this sensor for adaptive system of solar telescope using extended scenes as tracking objects, such as sunspot, pores, solar granulation and limb, is presented. The software package developed for the proposed WF sensors includes three algorithms of local WF slopes estimation (modified centroids, normalized cross-correlation and fast Fourierdemodulation), as well as three methods of WF reconstruction (modal Zernike polynomials expansion, deformable mirror response functions expansion and phase unwrapping), that can be selected during operation with accordance to the application.

  4. Optical Sensors for Use in Propulsion Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritsch, Klaus

    1997-01-01

    This final technical report describes the results of a cooperative effort which was originally established between John Carroll University and the Instrumentation and Control Technology Division at NASA Lewis Research Center on November, 1982, and then continued with the Engine Sensor Technology Branch at NASA Lewis until March, 1995. All work at John Carroll University was directed by the principal investigator of this grant, Klaus Fritsch, Ph.D. For the first two years of this grant this effort was supervised at NASA by Mr. Robert J. Baumbick and for the remainder of the grant by Dr. Glenn M. Beheim. All research was carried out in close cooperation with Dr. Beheim. Electrically passive optical sensors for measurands such as pressure, temperature, position, and rotational speed are required for aircraft engine control in fly-by-light digital aircraft control systems. Fiberoptic data links and optical multiplexing techniques should be used for combining and processing the outputs from several sensors, sharing as many optical end electronic parts as possible. The overall objective of this grant was to explore techniques for designing and constructing such electrically passive optical sensors for measuring physical parameters in jet aircraft engines and for use in aircraft control systems. We have concentrated our efforts on pressure, temperature, and position sensors employing techniques which are relatively immune to transmissivity variations of the fiber links and to variations in intensity of the light source. Infrared light-emitting diodes are employed because of their longevity and immunity to vibration. We have also studied a number of multiplexing techniques. On the following pages I will give thumbnail sketches of the projects carried out under this grant and provide references to publications and John Carroll M.S. theses which resulted directly from this work and which describe these projects in greater detail.

  5. Distributed optical proximity sensor system - HexEYE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Sukhan

    1992-01-01

    A novel optical proximity sensor system, capable of measuring the distance to the orientation and the discontinuity at a local area of an object surface, was designed and evaluated for robotic applications. The sensor system gets its name, Hexagonal Eye, (HexEYE) from its shape where seven identical hexagonal sensing units were configured hexagonally into a compact geometric structure. The seven sensing units were grouped into multiple combinations of three sensing units to measure the surface orientation as well as surface discontinuity. The distinctive features of HexEYE are an order of magnitude increased in distance sensitivity by optimizing the curvature of a conical mirror, the enhanced measurement accuracy based on multiple levels of sensor fusion, and the compactness in size due to a sensing mechanism based on the Gaussian lens law. A prototype of single sensing unit has been built and was evaluated experimentally.

  6. 77 FR 73456 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... Department of the Navy Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems... Navy hereby gives notice of its intent to grant to Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology Corporation a... described in U.S. Patent No. 7,020,354: Intensity Modulated Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor, Navy Case No....

  7. 75 FR 34988 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... Department of the Navy Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems... Navy hereby gives notice of its intent to grant to Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology Corporation a.... Patent No. 7,149,374: Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor, Navy Case No. 84,557.//U.S. Patent No....

  8. Optical Electronic Bragg Reflection Sensor System with Hydrodynamic Flow Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, D. R.

    2003-01-01

    This project, as described in the following report, involved design and fabrication of fiber optic sensors for the detection and measurement of dynamic fluid density variations. These devices are created using UV (ultraviolet) ablation and generally modified transverse holographic fiber grating techniques. The resulting phase gratings created on or immediately underneath the flat portion of D-shaped optical waveguides are characterized as evanescent field sensing devices. The primary applications include the sensor portion of a real-time localized or distributed measurement system for hydrodynamic flow, fluid density measurements, and phase change phenomena. Several design modifications were implemented in an attempt to accomplish the tasks specified in our original proposal. In addition, we have established key collaborative relationships with numerous people and institutions.

  9. Micro-optics technology and sensor systems applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gal, George; Herman, B.; Anderson, W.; Whitney, R.; Morrow, H.

    1993-01-01

    The current generation of electro-optical sensors utilizing refractive and reflective optical elements require sophisticated, complex, and expensive designs. Advanced-technology-based electro-optical sensors of minimum size and weight require miniaturization of optical, electrical, and mechanical devices with an increasing trend toward integration of various components. Micro-optics technology has the potential in a number of areas to simplify optical design with improved performance. This includes internally cooled apertures, hybrid optical design, microlenses, dispersive multicolor microlenses, active dither, electronically controlled optical beam steer, and microscopic integration of micro-optics, detectors, and signal processing layers. This paper describes our approach to the development of micro-optics technology with our main emphasis for sensors applications.

  10. Electro-optic architecture for servicing sensors and actuators in advanced aircraft propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppel, G. L.; Glasheen, W. M.

    1989-01-01

    A detailed design of a fiber optic propulsion control system, integrating favored sensors and electro-optics architecture is presented. Layouts, schematics, and sensor lists describe an advanced fighter engine system model. Components and attributes of candidate fiber optic sensors are identified, and evaluation criteria are used in a trade study resulting in favored sensors for each measurand. System architectural ground rules were applied to accomplish an electro-optics architecture for the favored sensors. A key result was a considerable reduction in signal conductors. Drawings, schematics, specifications, and printed circuit board layouts describe the detailed system design, including application of a planar optical waveguide interface.

  11. Large deformation polymer optical fiber sensors for civil infrastructure systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdi, Omid; Kowalsky, Mervyn; Hassan, Tasnim; Kiesel, Sharon; Peters, Kara

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents intrinsic polymer fiber (POF) sensors for high-strain applications such as the performance-based assessment and health monitoring of civil infrastructure systems subjected to earthquake loading or morphing aircraft. POFs provide a potential maximum strain range of 6-12%, are more flexible that silica optical fibers, and are more durable in harsh chemical or environmental conditions. Recent advances in the fabrication of single mode POFs have made it possible to extend POFs to interferometric sensor capabilities. Furthermore, the interferometric nature of intrinsic sensors permits high accuracy for such measurements. Measurements of the mechanical response of the sensor at various strain rates are presented. Several cleaving methods were also tested in order to appropriately cleave POFs for coupling purposes. In addition, the design of a time-of-flight interferometer for phase measurements over the large strain range required is discussed. Finally the bond strength between the embedded POF and various structural materials is investigated and a methodology demonstrated for embedment of the sensors into a reinforced concrete structural component.

  12. Strapdown optical stabilization system for EO sensors on moving platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Arnott

    1996-08-01

    The need to stabilize the line-of-sight of EO sensors and lasers on moving platforms has been satisfied by mechanical systems using the directional gyro technique. However such systems that use mirror or prism line-of-sight steering, stabilize in only 2-axes, have limited elevation steering range and require skilled fabrication. The use of the strapdown technique puts the functional control into software and offers improved functionality, e.g. 3-axis stabilization, absolute directional reference, simple mechanical design and low cost assembly. The main criticisms have been the extensive computation of space transformation algorithms and reliance on the precision of transducers. Until the present, the powerful real-time processing resources demanded by this technique for EO sensor applications have not been available in sufficiently compact and low cost form, although systems have been produced for radar antennae and direct view optics with inferior stability. Pilkington Optronics has studied various stabilization systems and has determined that with emerging technology, the strapdown technique is now feasible and desirable for many high performance applications. Accordingly, we have developed a 3-axis strapdown optical stabilization system, initially for a Submarine Optronics Mast, but readily applicable to vehicle sights and other moving platform applications. The system involves inertial sensing by fiber-optic gyros, processing by multiple digital signal processors and opto-mechanical steering by 2-axis gimballed prism plus optical de-rotator mechanism. The successful operation in terms of image stability has required the use of precise algorithms, advanced digital servo control and rigorous modellization of gyro's and resolvers.

  13. Review of High-Speed Fiber Optic Grating Sensors Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Udd, E; Benterou, J; May, C; Mihailov, S J; Lu, P

    2010-03-24

    Fiber grating sensors can be used to support a wide variety of high speed measurement applications. This includes measurements of vibrations on bridges, traffic monitoring on freeways, ultrasonic detection to support non-destructive tests on metal plates and providing details of detonation events. This paper provides a brief overview of some of the techniques that have been used to support high speed measurements using fiber grating sensors over frequency ranges from 10s of kHz, to MHZ and finally toward frequencies approaching the GHz regime. Very early in the development of fiber grating sensor systems it was realized that a high speed fiber grating sensor system could be realized by placing an optical filter that might be a fiber grating in front of a detector so that spectral changes in the reflection from a fiber grating were amplitude modulated. In principal the only limitation on this type of system involved the speed of the output detector which with the development of high speed communication links moved from the regime of 10s of MHz toward 10s of GHz. The earliest deployed systems involved civil structures including measurements of the strain fields on composite utility poles and missile bodies during break tests, bridges and freeways. This was followed by a series of developments that included high speed fiber grating sensors to support nondestructive testing via ultrasonic wave detection, high speed machining and monitoring ship hulls. Each of these applications involved monitoring mechanical motion of structures and thus interest was in speeds up to a few 10s of MHz. Most recently there has been interest in using fiber grating to monitor the very high speed events such as detonations and this has led to utilization of fiber gratings that are consumed during an event that may require detection speeds of hundreds of MHz and in the future multiple GHz.

  14. Optical fiber sensor systems for forest protection in Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domanski, Andrzej W.; Wolinski, Tomasz R.; Dybko, Artur; Sosin, Tomasz P.; Bock, Wojtek J.

    1993-03-01

    Forest damages in Canada have been observed to occur since the mid-1970's. Current hypotheses that attempt to explain forest declines implicate the effects of acid deposition, excess sulfur and nitrogen deposition, and elevated concentration of ozone and carbon dioxide on forest soils and nutrition as major contributors. Forest protection requires information about the pH of precipitation and aquatic ground water/soil systems along with the characterization of chemical toxicants distribution in the forest environment. Present analytical techniques for toxic chemical compounds are not well suited for field measurements. Current methods require collection of samples in the field and subsequent analysis in the laboratory. The paper discusses the possibility of applying fiber optic sensing networks for constant monitoring of pH and input/output balance of forest ecosystems to overcome most of the limitations of current methods for characterizing the distribution of chemical toxicants in the forest environment. The idea of such networks is based on sensors which couple fluorescence measurement with optical fibers offering not only a good precision and reliability but direct compatibility with fiber optic telemetry, optical data transmission systems, and optical multiplexing technology.

  15. Optical-system design for next-generation pushbroom sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mika, A. M.; Richard, H. L.

    1984-01-01

    Next-generation pushbroom sensors for earth observation require high-performance optics that provide high spatial resolution over wide fields of view. Specifically, blur diameters on the order of 10 to 15 microns are needed over 5 to 15 deg fields. In addition to this fundamental level of optical performance, other characteristics, such as spatial coregistration of spectral bands, flat focal plane, telecentricity, and workable pupil location are significant instrument design considerations. The detector-assembly design, optical line-of-sight pointing method and sensor packaging all hinge on these secondary attributes. Moreover, the need for broad spectral coverage, ranging from 0.4 to 12.5 microns, places an additional constraint on optical design. This paper presents alternative design forms that are candidates for wide-field pushbroom sensors, and discusses the instrument-design tradeoffs that are linked to the selection of these alternate optical approaches.

  16. Extrinsic fiber optic displacement sensors and displacement sensing systems

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Kent A.; Gunther, Michael F.; Vengsarkar, Ashish M.; Claus, Richard O.

    1994-01-01

    An extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor comprises a single-mode fiber, used as an input/output fiber, and a multimode fiber, used purely as a reflector, to form an air gap within a silica tube that acts as a Fizeau cavity. The Fresnel reflection from the glass/air interface at the front of the air gap (reference reflection) and the reflection from the air/glass interface at the far end of the air gap (sensing reflection) interfere in the input/output fiber. The two fibers are allowed to move in the silica tube, and changes in the air gap length cause changes in the phase difference between the reference reflection and the sensing reflection. This phase difference is observed as changes in intensity of the light monitored at the output arm of a fused biconical tapered coupler. The extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor behaves identically whether it is surface mounted or embedded, which is unique to the extrinsic sensor in contrast to intrinsic Fabry-Perot sensors. The sensor may be modified to provide a quadrature phase shift extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor for the detection of both the amplitude and the relative polarity of dynamically varying strain. The quadrature light signals may be generated by either mechanical or optical means. A plurality of the extrinsic sensors may connected in cascade and multiplexed to allow monitoring by a single analyzer.

  17. Extrinsic fiber optic displacement sensors and displacement sensing systems

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, K.A.; Gunther, M.F.; Vengsarkar, A.M.; Claus, R.O.

    1994-04-05

    An extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor comprises a single-mode fiber, used as an input/output fiber, and a multimode fiber, used purely as a reflector, to form an air gap within a silica tube that acts as a Fizeau cavity. The Fresnel reflection from the glass/air interface at the front of the air gap (reference reflection) and the reflection from the air/glass interface at the far end of the air gap (sensing reflection) interfere in the input/output fiber. The two fibers are allowed to move in the silica tube, and changes in the air gap length cause changes in the phase difference between the reference reflection and the sensing reflection. This phase difference is observed as changes in intensity of the light monitored at the output arm of a fused biconical tapered coupler. The extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor behaves identically whether it is surface mounted or embedded, which is unique to the extrinsic sensor in contrast to intrinsic Fabry-Perot sensors. The sensor may be modified to provide a quadrature phase shift extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor for the detection of both the amplitude and the relative polarity of dynamically varying strain. The quadrature light signals may be generated by either mechanical or optical means. A plurality of the extrinsic sensors may connected in cascade and multiplexed to allow monitoring by a single analyzer. 14 figures.

  18. Development of an instrumentation system for measurement of degradation of lubricating oil using optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, S.; Bordoloi, S.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an instrumentation system to measure the degradation in lubricating oil using a bare, tapered and bent multi-mode optical fiber (BTBMOF) sensor probe and a temperature probe. The sensor system consists of (i) a bare, tapered and bent multi-mode optical fiber (BTBMOF) as optical sensor along with a laser source and a LDR (Light Dependent Resistor) as detector (ii) a temperature sensor (iii) a ATmega microcontroller based data acquisition system and (iv) a trained ANN for processing and calibration. The BTBMOF sensor and the temperature sensor are used to provide the measure of refractive index (RI) and the temperature of a lubricating oil sample. A microcontroller based instrumentation system with trained ANN algorithm has been developed to determine the degradation of the lubricating oil sample by sampling the readings of the optical fiber sensor, and the temperature sensor.

  19. Research on distributed fiber-optic sensor based motor fault monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Xu, Haiyan; Xiao, Qian; Wu, Hongyan; Zhao, Dong

    2010-10-01

    A new running condition monitoring method of motors such as generator sets, and aircraft engines, using distributed fiber-optic sensor was introduced in this paper. A Michelson Interferometer based fiber-optic sensor was constructed, which offered a high sensitivity of disturbance detection. Because the sensing arm of the sensor was composed of optical fiber, the distributed fiber-optic interferometric sensor provided a high capacity of anti-electromagnetic interference. The monitoring system had a simple structure, and the sensor could be fixed on the motor easily to monitor its running condition.

  20. Electro-optic architecture (EOA) for sensors and actuators in aircraft propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glomb, W. L., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Results of a study to design an optimal architecture for electro-optical sensing and control in advanced aircraft and space systems are described. The propulsion full authority digital Electronic Engine Control (EEC) was the focus for the study. The recommended architecture is an on-engine EEC which contains electro-optic interface circuits for fiber-optic sensors on the engine. Size and weight are reduced by multiplexing arrays of functionally similar sensors on a pair of optical fibers to common electro-optical interfaces. The architecture contains common, multiplex interfaces to seven sensor groups: (1) self luminous sensors; (2) high temperatures; (3) low temperatures; (4) speeds and flows; (5) vibration; (6) pressures; and (7) mechanical positions. Nine distinct fiber-optic sensor types were found to provide these sensing functions: (1) continuous wave (CW) intensity modulators; (2) time division multiplexing (TDM) digital optic codeplates; (3) time division multiplexing (TDM) analog self-referenced sensors; (4) wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) digital optic code plates; (5) wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) analog self-referenced intensity modulators; (6) analog optical spectral shifters; (7) self-luminous bodies; (8) coherent optical interferometers; and (9) remote electrical sensors. The report includes the results of a trade study including engine sensor requirements, environment, the basic sensor types, and relevant evaluation criteria. These figures of merit for the candidate interface types were calculated from the data supplied by leading manufacturers of fiber-optic sensors.

  1. Integrated optics for fiber optic sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minford, W. J.; Depaula, R. P.

    1991-01-01

    Recent progress achieved in the field of fiber-optic sensor applications is discussed with emphasis placed on LiNbO3-based integrated optics (IO). Particular consideration is given to advanced electromagnetic-field sensors, an integrated laser vibrometer system, and a fiber-optic gyroscope system. It is shown that the multifunction IO chips have enabled high perforamance fiber-optic sensors (e.g., fiber-optic gyros), provided advanced and unique signal processing capabilities and advanced architectures, and have a potential of making fiber-optic sensors at low cost.

  2. Structural health monitoring system of soccer arena based on optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkin, Victor V.; Churin, Alexey E.; Kharenko, Denis S.; Zheleznova, Maria A.; Shelemba, Ivan S.

    2014-05-01

    A structural health monitoring system based on optical sensors has been developed and installed on the indoor soccer arena "Zarya" in Novosibirsk. The system integrates 119 fiber optic sensors: 85 strain, 32 temperature and 2 displacement sensors. In addition, total station is used for measuring displacement in 45 control points. All of the constituents of the supporting structure are subjects for monitoring: long-span frames with under floor ties, connections, purlins and foundation.

  3. Fiber optic sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, J.; Sohler, W.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of the developments in the field of fiber optics sensor technology is presented along with a discussion of the advantages of optical measuring instruments as compared with electronic sensors. The two primary types of fiber optics sensors, specifically those with multiwave fibers and those with monowave fibers, are described. Examples of each major sensor type are presented and discussed. Multiwave detectors include external and internal fiber optics sensors. Among the monowave detectors are Mach-Zender interferometers, Michelson interferometers, Sagnac interferometers (optical gyroscopes), waveguide resonators, and polarimeter sensors. Integrated optical sensors and their application in spectroscopy are briefly discussed.

  4. Fourier transform spectrometry for fiber-optic sensor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beheim, Glenn; Tuma, Margaret L.; Sotomayor, Jorge L.; Flatico, Joseph M.

    1993-01-01

    An integrated-optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer is used as a Fourier transform spectrometer to analyze the input and output spectra of a temperature-sensing thin-film etalon. This type of spectrometer has an advantage over conventional grating spectrometers because it is better suited for use with time-division-multiplexed sensor networks. In addition, this spectrometer has the potential for low cost due to its use of a component that could be manufactured in large quantities for the optical communications industry.

  5. Simple and accurate optical height sensor for wafer inspection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimura, Kei; Nakai, Naoya; Taniguchi, Koichi; Itoh, Masahide

    2016-02-01

    An accurate method for measuring the wafer surface height is required for wafer inspection systems to adjust the focus of inspection optics quickly and precisely. A method for projecting a laser spot onto the wafer surface obliquely and for detecting its image displacement using a one-dimensional position-sensitive detector is known, and a variety of methods have been proposed for improving the accuracy by compensating the measurement error due to the surface patterns. We have developed a simple and accurate method in which an image of a reticle with eight slits is projected on the wafer surface and its reflected image is detected using an image sensor. The surface height is calculated by averaging the coordinates of the images of the slits in both the two directions in the captured image. Pattern-related measurement error was reduced by applying the coordinates averaging to the multiple-slit-projection method. Accuracy of better than 0.35 μm was achieved for a patterned wafer at the reference height and ±0.1 mm from the reference height in a simple configuration.

  6. Remote Management for Multipoint Sensing Systems Using Hetero-Core Spliced Optical Fiber Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Lee See; Anoda, Yuji; Kazuhiro, Watanabe; Shinomiya, Norihiko

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design and experimental verification of a multipoint sensing system with hetero-core spliced optical fiber sensors and its remote management using an internet-standard protocol. The study proposes two different types of design and conducts experiments to verify those systems' feasibility. In order to manage the sensing systems remotely, the management method uses a standard operation and maintenance protocol for internet: the Simple Network Management Protocol is proposed. The purpose of this study is to construct a multipoint sensing system remote management tool by which the system can also determine the status and the identity of fiber optic sensors. The constructed sensing systems are verified and the results have demonstrated that the first proposed system can distinguish the responses from different hetero-core spliced optical fiber sensors remotely. The second proposed system shows that data communications are performed successfully while identifying the status of hetero-core spliced optical fiber sensors remotely. PMID:24379051

  7. Experimental and theoretical analysis of an optical current sensor for high power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brigida, A. C. S.; Nascimento, I. M.; Mendonça, S.; Costa, J. C. W. A.; Martinez, M. A. G.; Baptista, J. M.; Jorge, P. A. S.

    2013-03-01

    A magneto-optical sensor, using a dual quadrature polarimetric processing scheme, was evaluated for current metering and protection applications in high voltage lines. Sensor calibration and resolution were obtained in different operational conditions using illumination in the 1550-nm band. Results obtained indicated the feasibility of interrogating such sensor via the optical ground wire (OPGW) link installed in standard high power grids. The polarimetric bulk optical current sensor also was theoretically studied, and the effects of different sources of error considering practical deployment were evaluated. In particular, the interference from external magnetic fields in a tree-phase system was analyzed.

  8. Advances towards the qualification of an aircraft fuel tank inert environment fiber optic oxygen sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar A.; Esterkin, Yan; Kempen, Cornelia; Sun, Songjian; Susko, Kenneth; Goglia, John

    2011-06-01

    An all optical pressure and temperature compensated fiber optic oxygen sensor (FOxSenseTM) system is under qualification for use in the in-situ closed-loop-control of the inert atmosphere environment inside fuel tanks of military and commercial aircraft. The all-optical oxygen environment control sensor is a passive, intrinsically safe, fiber-optic sensor device with no electrical connections leading to the sensors installed within the fuel tanks of an aircraft. To control the fuel tank environment, an array of multiple sensors is deployed throughout the fuel tanks of an aircraft, and a remote multi-channel optoelectronic system is used to monitor the status of all the sensors in real time to provide feedback oxygen environment information to the on-board inert gas generating system (OBIGS). Qualification testing of the all optical sensor have demonstrated the ability to monitor the oxygen environment inside a simulated fuel tank environment in the oxygen range from 0% to 21% oxygen concentrations, temperatures from (-) 40°C to (+) 60°C, and altitudes from sea level to 40,000 feet. Fiber optic oxygen sensors with built-in temperature compensation as well as the conduit fiber optic cables have passed DO-160E including acoustic noise and burn test.

  9. New optical sensor systems for high-resolution satellite, airborne and terrestrial imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckardt, Andreas; Börner, Anko; Lehmann, Frank

    2007-10-01

    The department of Optical Information Systems (OS) at the Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) has more than 25 years experience with high-resolution imaging technology. The technology changes in the development of detectors, as well as the significant change of the manufacturing accuracy in combination with the engineering research define the next generation of spaceborne sensor systems focusing on Earth observation and remote sensing. The combination of large TDI lines, intelligent synchronization control, fast-readable sensors and new focal-plane concepts open the door to new remote-sensing instruments. This class of instruments is feasible for high-resolution sensor systems regarding geometry and radiometry and their data products like 3D virtual reality. Systemic approaches are essential for such designs of complex sensor systems for dedicated tasks. The system theory of the instrument inside a simulated environment is the beginning of the optimization process for the optical, mechanical and electrical designs. Single modules and the entire system have to be calibrated and verified. Suitable procedures must be defined on component, module and system level for the assembly test and verification process. This kind of development strategy allows the hardware-in-the-loop design. The paper gives an overview about the current activities at DLR in the field of innovative sensor systems for photogrammetric and remote sensing purposes.

  10. Apparatus and Method for Elimination of Polarization-Induced Fading in Fiber-optic Sensor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Hon Man (Inventor); Parker, Jr., Allen R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus and method of eliminating polarization-induced fading in interferometric fiber-optic sensor system having a wavelength-swept laser optical signal. The interferometric return signal from the sensor arms are combined and provided to a multi-optical path detector assembly and ultimately to a data acquisition and processing unit by way of a switch that is time synchronized with the laser scan sweep cycle.

  11. A Phase-Shifting Zernike Wavefront Sensor for the Palomar P3K Adaptive Optics System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, J. Kent; Crawford, Sam; Loya, Frank; Moore, James

    2012-01-01

    A phase-shifting Zernike wavefront sensor has distinct advantages over other types of wavefront sensors. Chief among them are: 1) improved sensitivity to low-order aberrations and 2) efficient use of photons (hence reduced sensitivity to photon noise). We are in the process of deploying a phase-shifting Zernike wavefront sensor to be used with the realtime adaptive optics system for Palomar. Here we present the current state of the Zernike wavefront sensor to be integrated into the high-order adaptive optics system at Mount Palomar's Hale Telescope.

  12. Wearable Optical Chemical Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobnik, Aleksandra

    Wearable sensors can be used to provide valuable information about the wearer's health and/or monitor the wearer's surroundings, identify safety concerns and detect threats, during the wearer's daily routine within his or her natural environment. The "sensor on a textile", an integrated sensor capable of analyzing data, would enable early many forms of detection. Moreover, a sensor connected with a smart delivery system could simultaneously provide comfort and monitoring (for safety and/or health), non-invasive measurements, no laboratory sampling, continuous monitoring during the daily activity of the person, and possible multi-parameter analysis and monitoring. However, in order for the technology to be accessible, it must remain innocuous and impose a minimal intrusion on the daily activities of the wearer. Therefore, such wearable technologies should be soft, flexible, and washable in order to meet the expectations of normal clothing. Optical chemical sensors (OCSs) could be used as wearable technology since they can be embedded into textile structures by using conventional dyeing, printing processes and coatings, while fiber-optic chemical sensors (FOCSs) as well as nanofiber sensors (NFSs) can be incorporated by weaving, knitting or laminating. The interest in small, robust and sensitive sensors that can be embedded into textile structures is increasing and the research activity on this topic is an important issue.

  13. Fiber optic chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Chuck C.; McCrae, David A.; Saaski, Elric W.

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides a broad overview of the field of fiber optic chemical sensors. Several different types of fiber optic sensors and probes are described, and references are cited for each category discussed.

  14. Fiber optical sensor system for shape and haptics for flexible instruments in minimally invasive surgery: overview and status quo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledermann, Christoph; Pauer, Hendrikje; Woern, Heinz

    2014-05-01

    In minimally invasive surgery, exible mechatronic instruments promise to improve the overall performance of surgical interventions. However, those instruments require highly developed sensors in order to provide haptic feedback to the surgeon or to enable (semi-)autonomous tasks. Precisely, haptic sensors and a shape sensor are required. In this paper, we present our ber optical sensor system of Fiber Bragg Gratings, which consists of a shape sensor, a kinesthetic sensor and a tactile sensor. The status quo of each of the three sensors is described, as well as the concept to integrate them into one ber optical sensor system.

  15. Experimental study on performance verification tests for coordinate measuring systems with optical distance sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmignato, Simone

    2009-01-01

    Optical sensors are increasingly used for dimensional and geometrical metrology. However, the lack of international standards for testing optical coordinate measuring systems is currently limiting the traceability of measurements and the easy comparison of different optical systems. This paper presents an experimental investigation on artefacts and procedures for testing coordinate measuring systems equipped with optical distance sensors. The work is aimed at contributing to the standardization of testing methods. The VDI/VDE 2617-6.2:2005 guideline, which is probably the most complete document available at the state of the art for testing systems with optical distance sensors, is examined with specific experiments. Results from the experiments are discussed, with particular reference to the tests used for determining the following characteristics: error of indication for size measurement, probing error and structural resolution. Particular attention is given to the use of artefacts alternative to gauge blocks for determining the error of indication for size measurement.

  16. Luminescence-based optical sensor systems for monitoring water parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobnik, Aleksandra; Turel, Matejka; Korent, Špela Mojca

    2007-06-01

    Lanthanide-sensitized luminescence is very attractive because the intramolecular energy transfers between the absorbing ligand and the luminescent ion results in strong narrow-band fluorescence with a large Stokes' shift and long decay times. We will report about several sensor systems based either on sol-gel materials or lanthanide chelates for monitoring and controlling water parameters, such as heavy metals, amines, phosphates.

  17. Optical technologies for space sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hu; Liu, Jie; Xue, Yaoke; Liu, Yang; Liu, Meiying; Wang, Lingguang; Yang, Shaodong; Lin, Shangmin; Chen, Su; Luo, Jianjun

    2015-10-01

    Space sensors are used in navigation sensor fields. The sun, the earth, the moon and other planets are used as frame of reference to obtain stellar position coordinates, and then to control the attitude of an aircraft. Being the "eyes" of the space sensors, Optical sensor system makes images of the infinite far stars and other celestial bodies. It directly affects measurement accuracy of the space sensor, indirectly affecting the data updating rate. Star sensor technology is the pilot for Space sensors. At present more and more attention is paid on all-day star sensor technology. By day and night measurements of the stars, the aircraft's attitude in the inertial coordinate system can be provided. Facing the requirements of ultra-high-precision, large field of view, wide spectral range, long life and high reliability, multi-functional optical system, we integration, integration optical sensors will be future space technology trends. In the meantime, optical technologies for space-sensitive research leads to the development of ultra-precision optical processing, optical and precision test machine alignment technology. It also promotes the development of long-life optical materials and applications. We have achieved such absolute distortion better than ±1um, Space life of at least 15years of space-sensitive optical system.

  18. Seismic damage identification using multi-line distributed fiber optic sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Jinping; Hou, Shuang

    2005-06-01

    Determination of the actual nonlinear inelastic response mechanisms developed by civil structures such as buildings and bridges during strong earthquakes and post-earthquake damage assessment of these structures represent very difficult challenges for earthquake structural engineers. One of the main reasons is that the traditional sensor can't serve for such a long period to cover an earthquake and the seismic damage location in the structure can't be predicted in advance definitely. It is thought that the seismic damage of reinforced concrete (RC) structure can be related to the maximum response the structure, which can also be related to the cracks on the concrete. A distributed fiber optic sensor was developed to detect the cracks on the reinforced concrete structure under load. Fiber optic couples were used in the sensor system to extend the sensor system's capacity from one random point detection to more. An optical time domain reflectometer (OTDR) is employed for interrogation of the sensor signal. Fiber optic sensors are attached on the surface of the concrete by the epoxy glue. By choosing the strength of epoxy, the damage state of the concrete can be responded to the occurrence of the Fresnel scattering in the fiber optic sensor. Experiments involved monotonic loading to failure. Finally, the experimental results in terms of crack detection capability are presented and discussed.

  19. Fiber optic flocculation sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lun K.; Stelwagen, Uilke

    1994-02-01

    A fiber optic flocculation sensor based on measuring the intensity of light reflected by solid particles in suspension (i.e. paper pulp) in a well defined measurement volume, was constructed. This sensor is designed for monitoring the flocculation state of paper pulp in the papermaking process. The flocculation determines to a great extent the quality of the final product, the paper. Tests with different types of pulp were performed in both a closed loop system and a small paper machine. In this investigation the flocculation state is expressed as a root mean square flocculation index. The flocculation index delivered by this fiber optic system shows a very high correlation with the flocculation index provided by a camera system `looking at' the same pulp, while the latter has a great resemblance with the human perception of the flocculation.

  20. Development of Fault Point Locating System for Underground Transmission Lines using Optical Fiber Current Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurosawa, Kiyoshi; Kondo, Reishi; Nasukawa, Shinsuke; Yamaguchi, Tatsushi; Amano, Kazuo

    Fault point locating systems based on surge current detection have recently been used for fast recovery of underground transmission line from the fault. Electromagnetic induction type sensors have mainly been used for detection of the surge current. However they are susceptible to electromagnetic noise which causes unstable system operation. To solve this problem, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Toko Electric Corporation and Fujikura Ltd., by a joint research, have developed a new system that applies optical fiber current sensors.

  1. Rapid Constructions of Microstructures for Optical Fiber Sensors Using a Commercial CO2 Laser System

    PubMed Central

    Irawan, Rudi; Chuan, Tjin Swee; Meng, Tay Chia; Ming, Tan Khay

    2008-01-01

    Exposing an optical fiber core to the measurand surrounding the fiber is often used to enhance the sensitivity of an optical fiber sensor. This paper reports on the rapid fabrication of microstructures in an optical fiber using a CO2 laser system which help exposing the optical fiber core to the measurand. The direct-write CO2 laser system used is originally designed for engraving the polymeric material. Fabrications of microstructures such as in-fiber microhole, D-shaped fiber, in-fiber microchannel, side-sliced fiber and tapered fiber were attempted. The microstructures in the fibers were examined using a SEM and an optical microscope. Quality of microstructures shown by the SEM images and promising results from fluorescence sensor tests using in-fiber microchannels of 100μm width, 210μm depth and 10mm length show the prospect of this method for use in optical fiber sensor development. The direct-write CO2 laser system is a flexible and fast machining tool for fabricating microstructures in an optical fiber, and can possibly be a replacement of the time consuming chemical etching and polishing methods used for microstructure fabrications of optical the fiber sensors reported in other literatures. PMID:19662114

  2. Fiber optic liquid level sensor system for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Alex A.; Yang, Chenging; Chen, Shiping

    2014-09-01

    Detection of the liquid level in fuel tank becomes a critical element for the safety and efficiency in aerospace operations. Two liquid level sensing techniques are presented in this paper. The first technique is based on optical fiber Long Period Gratings (LPG). In this system, the full length of a specially fabricated fiber is the body of the probe because the length of the sensing fiber that is submerged in the liquid can be detected by the interrogation system. The second system based on Total Internal Reflection (TIR) uses optical fibers to guide light to and from an array of point probes. These probes are specially fabricated, miniature optical components which reflects a substantial amount of light back into the lead fiber when the probe is gas but almost no light when it is in liquid. A detailed theoretical study by computer simulation was carried out on these two techniques in order to determine which technique was more suitable for experimental investigation. The study revealed that although the first technique may provide more potential benefits in terms of weight and easy installation; a number of technical challenges make it not suitable for a short term solution. The second, probe array based technique, on the other hand, is more mature technically. The rest of the research program was therefore focused on the experimental investigation of the probe array detection technique and the test results are presented in this paper.

  3. Application of a Fiber Optic Distributed Strain Sensor System to Woven E-Glass Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anastasi, Robert F.; Lopatin, Craig

    2001-01-01

    A distributed strain sensing system utilizing a series of identically written Bragg gratings along an optical fiber is examined for potential application to Composite Armored Vehicle health monitoring. A vacuum assisted resin transfer molding process was used to fabricate a woven fabric E-glass/composite panel with an embedded fiber optic strain sensor. Test samples machined from the panel were mechanically tested in 4-point bending. Experimental results are presented that show the mechanical strain from foil strain gages comparing well to optical strain from the embedded sensors. Also, it was found that the distributed strain along the sample length was consistent with the loading configuration.

  4. Design and study on optic fiber sensor detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xuemei; Liu, Quan; Liang, Xiaoyu; Lin, Haiyan

    2005-11-01

    With the development of industry and agriculture, the environmental pollution becomes more and more serious. Various kinds of poisonous gas are the important pollution sources. Various kinds of poisonous gas, such as the carbon monoxide, sulfureted hydrogen, sulfur dioxide, methane, acetylene are threatening human normal life and production seriously especially today when industry and various kinds of manufacturing industries develop at full speed. The acetylene is a kind of gas with very lively chemical property, extremely apt to burn, resolve and explode, and it is great to destroy things among these poisonous gases. Comparing with other inflammable and explosive gas, the explosion range of the acetylene is heavier. Therefore carrying on monitoring acetylene pollution sources scene in real time, grasping the state of pollution taking place and development in time, have very important meanings. Aim at the above problems, a set of optical fiber detection system of acetylene gas based on the characteristic of spectrum absorption of acetylene is presented in this paper, which has reference channel and is for on-line and real-time detection. In order to eliminate the effect of other factors on measurement precision, the double light sources, double light paths and double cells are used in this system. Because of the use of double wavelength compensating method, this system can eliminate the disturbance in the optical paths, the problem of instability is solved and the measurement precision is greatly enhanced. Some experimental results are presented at the end of this paper.

  5. Fiber optic oxygen sensor detection system for harsh environments of aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Alex A.; Mendoza, Edgar; Goswami, Kish; Kempen, Lothar

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes the first successful fiber optic oxygen detection sensor systems developed for the Boeing Delta IV Launch Vehicle harsh environment of engine section. It illustrates a novel multi-point fiber optic microsensor (optrode) based on dynamic luminescence quenching that was developed for measuring oxygen leak detection for the space applications. The sensor optrodes employ the quenching by oxygen of the fluorescence from a ruthenium complex. These optrodes were fabricated using Ruthenium-based fluorescent indicator immobilized in a porous glass rod placed at the end of multimode fiber. The light from a blue LED is launched into the optrode via a fiber optic bundle and used as the excitation source. The optrode's fluorescent emission intensity in the range of 0% to 10% oxygen is measured as a function of time. The measuring system is based on high reliability and low cost. The system consists of four units: 1) temperature compensated oxygen optrodes combined with an optical setup, 2) multipoint sensor communication fiber optic network cable, 3) digital/analogue optoelectronic signal processing unit with built-in micro controller for control of data acquisition and processing, and 4) a laptop computer for data display and storage. In testing, the sensor exhibited excellent response time and reversibility. To qualify the sensors, performed detail investigation for thermal, humidity, temperature, vibration and accelerate testing for life expectancy of harsh environmental of engine section. Extensive networking using MatLab were carried out for lab and actual field demonstrations.

  6. Shaft Position Optical Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A. (Inventor); Hakum, Claef F. (Inventor); Johnson, Clarence S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is an optical sensor that senses the movement of a shaft. Detection of radial movement is made when a portion of light incident on the shaft sensor-target is blocked. For detection of axial movement, a disk with flat surface is mounted and used to block a portion of light. The variation in the amount of light allowed to pass through is a measure of the position of the shaft. As proposed by this invention, significant improvement is made with respect to sensitivity and linearity of the system when the light is permanently partially blocked. To accomplish this goal this invention adds a boss to the system. To eliminate possible drift of system performance due to LED degradation or temperature variation, a feedback feature is added to the system.

  7. Robustness analysis of an intensity modulated fiber-optic position sensor with an image sensor readout system.

    PubMed

    Jason, Johan; Nilsson, Hans-Erik; Arvidsson, Bertil; Larsson, Anders

    2013-06-01

    An intensity modulated fiber-optic position sensor, based on a fiber-to-bundle coupling and a readout system using a CMOS image camera together with fast routines for position extraction and calibration, is presented and analyzed. The proposed system eliminates alignment issues otherwise associated with coupling-based fiber-optic sensors, still keeping the sensing point free from detector electronics. In this study the robustness of the system is characterized through simulations of the system performance, and the outcome is compared with experimental results. It is shown that knowledge of the shape of the coupled power distribution is the single most important factor for high performance of the system. Further it is experimentally shown that the position extraction error can be improved down to the theoretical limit by employing a modulation function model well fitted to the real coupled power distribution. PMID:23736347

  8. Control systems using modal domain optical fiber sensors for smart structure applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Reichard, Karl M.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, a new class of sensors has emerged for structural control which respond to environmental changes over a significant gauge length; these sensors are called distributed-effect sensors. These sensors can be fabricated with spatially varying sensitivity to the distributed measurand, and can be configured to measure a variety of structural parameters which can not be measured directly using point sensors. Examples of distributed-effect sensors include piezoelectric film, holographic sensors, and modal domain optical fiber sensors. Optical fiber sensors are particularly attractive for smart structure applications because they are flexible, have low mass, and can easily be embedded directly into materials. In this paper we describe the implementation of weighted modal domain optical fiber sensors. The mathematical model of the modal domain optical fiber sensor model is described and used to derive an expression for the sensor sensitivity. The effects of parameter variations on the sensor sensitivity are demonstrated to illustrate methods of spatially varying the sensor sensitivity.

  9. Deployment optimization of electro-optical sensor systems for naval missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Valkenburg-Haarst, Tanja Y. C.; van Norden, Wilbert L.; van der Meiden, Hilderick A.; ten Holter, Koen P. A.

    2010-10-01

    In today's naval missions, such as anti-piracy or counter-drugs operations, Electro-Optical (EO) sensors play an increasingly important role. In particular, these sensors are essential for classification and identification of targets. These tasks are traditionally performed by human operators, but because the complexity of today's missions, in combination with reduced manning, automating the information processing of EO sensors is increasingly necessary. This paper discusses the contribution of EO sensor systems to the picture compilation process, and how the deployment of EO sensors can be optimized for current naval missions. In particular, we discuss automation techniques for detection, classification and identification using EO sensors. Based on our findings, we give recommendations for future research.

  10. A novel spatial-frequency-multiplexed fiber-optic Fizeau strain sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Yun-Jiang; Jiang, Jian; Zhou, Chang X.

    2005-02-01

    A novel method for multiplexing fiber-optic Fizeau strain sensors with optical amplification is proposed and demonstrated. This method overcomes the two intrinsic disadvantages of fiber-optic Fabry-Perot (F-P) strain sensors, i.e. weak signal and difficult multiplexing. The amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and optical amplification of an Erbium-doped fiber (EDF) pumped by a 980nm laser diode are used simultaneously to enhance the interferometric signal considerably. A Fizeau interferometer formed by two fiber ends with a quite different reflectivity is used to replace the F-P cavity in sensor head design. Such a Fizeau cavity can enlarge the cavity length by at least an order of magnitude and allows more than ten sensors to be multiplexed simultaneously by using spatial-frequency multiplexing. The operating principle of the sensor system is discussed and an experiment is carried out to verify the concept of the method proposed. It is anticipated that such a sensor system could find important applications for health monitoring of large structures.

  11. Virtual touch 3D interactive system for autostereoscopic display with embedded optical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Pai; Wang, Guo-Zhen; Ma, Ming-Ching; Tung, Shang-Yu; Huang, Shu-Yi; Tseng, Hung-Wei; Kuo, Chung-Hong; Li, Chun-Huai

    2011-06-01

    The traidational 3D interactive sysetm which uses CCD camera to capture image is difficult to operate on near range for mobile applications.Therefore, 3D interactive display with embedded optical sensor was proposed. Based on optical sensor based system, we proposed four different methods to support differenct functions. T mark algorithm can obtain 5- axis information (x, y, z,θ, and φ)of LED no matter where LED was vertical or inclined to panel and whatever it rotated. Sequential mark algorithm and color filter based algorithm can support mulit-user. Finally, bare finger touch system with sequential illuminator can achieve to interact with auto-stereoscopic images by bare finger. Furthermore, the proposed methods were verified on a 4-inch panel with embedded optical sensors.

  12. Infrared Fiber Optic Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Successive years of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Langley Research Center to Sensiv Inc., a joint venture between Foster-Miller Inc. and Isorad, Ltd., assisted in the creation of remote fiber optic sensing systems. NASA's SBIR interest in infrared, fiber optic sensor technology was geared to monitoring the curing cycles of advanced composite materials. These funds helped in the fabrication of an infrared, fiber optic sensor to track the molecular vibrational characteristics of a composite part while it is being cured. Foster-Miller ingenuity allowed infrared transmitting optical fibers to combine with Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy to enable remote sensing. Sensiv probes operate in the mid-infrared range of the spectrum, although modifications to the instrument also permits its use in the near-infrared region. The Sensiv needle-probe is built to be placed in a liquid or powder and analyze the chemicals in the mixture. Other applications of the probe system include food processing control; combustion control in furnaces; and maintenance problem solving.

  13. Optical sensors for displacement measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlade, S. M.

    1981-06-01

    A measurement system consists of sensors which are connected to a control center. The use of fiber optics as the communications link has a number of advantages. Two of the most important are immunity from electromagnetic interference and the elimination of the danger of electrical sparking in explosive environments. These advantages are reduced by the necessity to use electrical devices in the sensors. If the sensors were wholly optical then the advantages of fiber optics would apply to the entire system outside the control center. Optical sensors will be difficult to develop. Initially, at least, they are only justified in applications where such methods are becoming essential. One such area is in military aircraft. An optical displacement transducer can be obtained by using the displacement to alter the transmission aperture of a light beam. Attention is also given to strain measurement using two beam interferometry, Fabry-Perot interferometry displacement measurement, and strain induced birefringence.

  14. Fiber optic coupled optical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, Kevin J.

    2001-01-01

    A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

  15. PET and PVC separation system based on optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Sánchez, G. G.; Álvarez Chávez, J. A.; Pérez-Torres, J. R.; Gómez-Vieyra, A.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we present experimental results of a cost-efficient photonic system capable to discriminate Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) bottles from those made of Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET). The proposed array uses a semiconductor laser emitting at 810 nm, whose output is diverged employing a line lens in order to obtain a line light pattern. Given the lower attenuation coefficient of the PVC in comparison to PET at this wavelength, the received optical power is higher for the PVC than for the PET, which results in higher photogenerated current and, consequently, higher voltage after the transimpedance amplifier. Experiments considering several samples reveal an average voltage difference of 10% between materials, probing its feasibility for future industrial applications.

  16. Fiber optic sensor for angular position measurement: application for an electrical power-assisted steering system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javahiraly, Nicolas; Chakari, Ayoub

    2013-05-01

    To achieve a very effective automotive power steering system, we need two important data, the angular position of the wheel and the torque applied on the shaft by the driver of the car. We present a new accurate optical fiber angular position sensor connected to an automotive power steering column. In this new design, the sensor allows the measurement of the angular position of a car steering wheel over a large and adjustable range (± several turns of the wheel). The wheel rotation induces micro-bending in the transducer part of the optical fiber sensing system. This system operates as an amplitude modulation sensor based on mode coupling in the transducing fiber in the case when all the modes are equally excited. We study the sensor response both theoretically and experimentally with a multimode step index optical fiber [rf (fiber radius) = 300 μm rc (core radius) = 50 μm nc (core index) = 1,457; N.A. = 0, 22 and the wavelength is 632,8 nm at the ambient Temperature (20°C)]. We show that the sensitivity can be controlled as a function of the sensor's length. We compare modeling and experimental validation and we conclude with a perspective on what could soon be an industrial sensor.

  17. A Study for Efficient Methods of System Calibration between Optical and Range Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, W.; Kim, C.; Kim, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Recently, interests in 3D indoor modeling and positioning have been growing. Data fusion by using different sensors data is one of the 3D model producing methods. For a data fusion between two kinds of sensors, precise system calibration is essential. If relative geometric location of each sensor can be accurately measured with a system-calibration, it is possible to locate a pixel that corresponds to the same object in two different images, and thus, produce a more precise data-fusion. Purpose of this study is finding more efficient method of system calibration between optical and range sensor. For this purpose, experiment was designed by considering following variables, i) system calibration method, ii) testbed type, iii) and distance data(whether use it or not). So, In this study, test-bed for system calibration was designed by considering the characteristics of sensors. Also, precise simulation was done to find efficient method of system calibration, and its results were reflected in real experiment. Results of simulation show that the bundle adjustment method is more efficient than single photo resection in system calibration between range and optical sensors. And the most efficient case was when using i) the bundle adjustment with ii) the simulated data set which were obtained between 2m to 4m away from the test-bed. These results of simulation were reflected in real system calibration. Finally, real system calibration were performed and its results were compared to results of simulation. And accuracy of system calibration was evaluated by producing fusion data between range and optical sensors.

  18. Development of Landslide Early Warning System Using Macro-bending Loss Based Optical Fibre Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzuki, Ahmad; Heriyanto, Muhammad; Dedy Setiyadi, Ika; Koesuma, Sorja

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the design of a simple and cheap landslide early warning system which mainly consists of a displacement fibre sensor, mechanical displacement converter, and Short Messaging Service (SMS) gateway equipped with a siren. Displacement fibre optic sensors were made by wrapping a polymer optical fibre (POF) around a holey elastic cylinder connected to a mechanical displacement converter that converts a real land displacement in centimetres order of magnitude into millimetres order that fibre optic sensor can detect. From the experimental results we suggest an optical fibre sensor that has ability to monitor land displacement in the range of 40 cm, sensitivity of (5.9 ± 0.2) dB/cm and linearity 99.5% as well as the way of improving sensor performance to meet the real need. A whole system has been tested making use of a slider attached to the mechanical displacement converter. Once a nonzero continuous displacement for 5 seconds or a downward land displacement of 10.0 cm occurs, the system will activate the siren and spread an alert via SMS automatically.

  19. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Homuth, Emil F.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  20. Advances In Optical Fiber Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, J. H.; Giallorenzi, T. G.; Bucaro, J. A.

    1981-07-01

    Over the past several years, a new non-communication optical fiber application has emerged. This application utilizes optical fibers for sensing. Initial interest centered around rate rotation sensing. Since that time, however, acoustic, magnetic, and temperature sensing utilizing optical fibers has evolved into a viable research effort with significant potential payoff. As an example, laboratory fiber optic acoustic sensors now rival the best sensitivity obtained with piezoelectric ceramics. These sensors possess a unique geometric versatility previously unavailable. In conjunction with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the Navy has begun a Fiber Optic Sensor System (FOSS) program to develop associated technology necessary to realize these sensors. Substantial effort is ongoing at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and other Navy laboratories with considerable contractual effort from universities and industry. This paper reviews the status of the FOSS program.

  1. Fiber optic liquid level monitoring system using microstructured polymer fiber Bragg grating array sensors: performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, C. A. F.; Pospori, A.; Sáez-Rodríguez, D.; Nielsen, K.; Bang, O.; Webb, D. J.

    2015-09-01

    A highly sensitive liquid level monitoring system based on microstructured polymer optical fiber Bragg grating (mPOFBG) array sensors is reported for the first time. The configuration is based on five mPOFBGs inscribed in the same fiber in the 850 nm spectral region, showing the potential to interrogate liquid level by measuring the strain induced in each mPOFBG embedded in a silicone rubber (SR) diaphragm, which deforms due to hydrostatic pressure variations. The sensor exhibits a highly linear response over the sensing range, a good repeatability, and a high resolution. The sensitivity of the sensor is found to be 98 pm/cm of water, enhanced by more than a factor of 9 when compared to an equivalent sensor based on a silica fiber around 1550 nm. The temperature sensitivity is studied and a multi-sensor arrangement proposed, which has the potential to provide level readings independent of temperature and the liquid density.

  2. Spectrally encoded optical fibre sensor systems and their application in process control, environmental and structural monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willsch, Reinhardt; Ecke, Wolfgang; Schwotzer, Gunter

    2005-09-01

    Different types of advanced optical fibre sensor systems using similar spectral interrogation principles and potential low-cost polychromator optoelectronic signal processing instrumentation will be presented, and examples of their industrial application are demonstrated. These are such sensors as multimode fibre based humidity, temperature, and pressure sensors with extrinsic microoptical Fabry-Perot transducers for process control in gas industry, UV absorption evanescent field sensors for organic pollution monitoring in groundwater, and single mode fibre Bragg grating (FBG) multiplexed strain & vibration and temperature sensor networks for structural health monitoring applications in electric power facilities, aerospace, railways, geotechnical and civil engineering. Recent results of current investigations applying FBGs and microstructured fibres for chemical sensing will be discussed.

  3. Advanced spectral fiber optic sensor systems and their application in energy facility monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willsch, Reinhardt; Ecke, Wolfgang; Bosselmann, Thomas; Willsch, Michael; Lindner, Eric; Bartelt, Hartmut

    2011-06-01

    Various spectral-encoded fiber optic sensor concepts and advanced system solutions for application in energy facility monitoring have been investigated. The technological maturity, high performance and reliability of multiplexed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor arrays and networks for the measurement of temperature, dynamic strain, air flow, and magnetic field distributions in electric power generators increasing their efficiency will be demonstrated by selected examples of field testing under harsh environmental conditions. For high-temperature combustion monitoring in gas turbines, beside silica FBGs with enhanced temperature stability also sapphire FBGs and Fabry-Perot sensors have been tested and evaluated as well as fiber-based black-body thermal radiation sensors. Finally, the potential of FBG sensors for application in cryo-energetic facilities such as super-conductive high-power motors and experimental nuclear fusion reactors will be discussed.

  4. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  5. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, Joseph B.; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Tobin, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  6. A miniature optical breathing sensor

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Jinesh; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel miniature optical breathing sensor based on an Agarose infiltrated photonic crystal fiber interferometer. The sensor detects the variation in relative humidity that occurs between inhaled and exhaled breath. The sensor interrogation system can determine the breathing pattern in real time and can also predict the breathing rate and the breathing status during respiration. The sensor is suitable for monitoring patients during a magnetic resonance imaging scan where use of sedatives and anesthetics necessitates breathing monitoring; electronic sensors are not suitable in such an environment and a visual observation of the patient's respiratory efforts is often difficult. PMID:23243581

  7. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Chuck C.; Saaski, Elric W.; McCrae, David A.

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes a novel fiber optic-based hydrogen sensor. The sensor consists of a thin-film etalon, constructed on the distal end of a fiber optic. The exterior mirror of the etalon is palladium or a palladium-alloy, which undergoes an optical change upon exposure to hydrogen. Data is presented on fiber optic sensors constructed with palladium and several alloys of palladium. The linearity of the optical response of these sensors to hydrogen is examined. Etalons made with pure palladium are found to be desirable for sensing low concentrations of hydrogen, or for one-time exposure to high concentrations of hydrogen. Etalons made from palladium alloys are found to be more desirable in applications were repeated cycling in high concentrations of hydrogen occurs.

  8. Remote fiber sensors and optical amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontes, M. J.; Coelho, Thiago V. N.; Carvalho, Joel P.; Santos, J. L.; Guerreiro, A.

    2013-11-01

    This work discusses remote fiber sensors enabled by optical amplification. Continuous wave numerical modeling based on the propagation of pumps and signal lasers coupled to optical fibers explores Raman amplification schemes to predict the sensor's behavior. Experimental analyses report the results to a temperature remote optical sensor with 50 km distance between the central unit and the sensor head. An electrical interrogation scheme is used due to their low cost and good time response. Different architectures in remote sensor systems are evaluated, where diffraction gratings are the sensor element. A validation of calculated results is performed by experimental analyses and, as an application, the noise generated by Raman amplification in the remote sensors systems is simulated applying such numerical modeling. The analyses of sensors systems based on diffraction gratings requires optical broadband sources to interrogate the optical sensor unit, mainly in long period gratings that shows a characteristic rejection band. Therefore, the sensor distance is limited to a few kilometers due to the attenuation in optical fibers. Additional attenuation is introduced by the sensor element. Hence, to extend the distance in the optical sensor system, the optical amplification system is needed to compensate the losses in the optical fibers. The Raman amplification technology was selected mainly due to the flexibility in the gain bandwidth. The modeling can be applied to sensor systems that monitor sites located at long distances, or in places that the access is restricted due to harsh environment conditions in such cases conventional sensors are relatively fast deteriorated.

  9. Overcoming adverse weather conditions with a common optical path, multiple sensors, and intelligent image fusion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Joseph; Piacentino, Michael; Caldwell, Brian

    2008-04-01

    Mission success is highly dependent on the ability to accomplish Surveillance, Situation Awareness, Target Detection and Classification, but is challenging under adverse weather conditions. This paper introduces an engineering prototype to address the image collection challenges using a Common Optical Path, Multiple Sensors and an Intelligent Image Fusion System, and provides illustrations and sample fusion images. Panavision's advanced wide spectrum optical design has permitted a suite of imagers to perform observations through a common optical path with a common field of view, thereby aligning images and facilitating optimized downstream image processing. The adaptable design also supports continuous zoom or Galilean lenses for multiple field of views. The Multiple Sensors include: (1) High-definition imaging sensors that are small, have low power consumption and a wide dynamic range; (2) EMCCD sensors that transition from daylight to starlight, even under poor weather conditions, with sensitivity down to 0.00025 Lux; and (3) SWIR sensors that, with the advancement in InGaAs, are able to generate ultra-high sensitivity images from 1-1.7μm reflective light and can achieve imaging through haze and some types of camouflage. The intelligent fusion of multiple sensors provides high-resolution color information with previously impossible sensitivity and contrast. With the integration of Field-Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) and Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs), real-time Image Processing and Fusion Algorithms can facilitate mission success in a small, low power package.

  10. Wavefront detection method of a single-sensor based adaptive optics system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chongchong; Hu, Lifa; Xu, Huanyu; Wang, Yukun; Li, Dayu; Wang, Shaoxin; Mu, Quanquan; Yang, Chengliang; Cao, Zhaoliang; Lu, Xinghai; Xuan, Li

    2015-08-10

    In adaptive optics system (AOS) for optical telescopes, the reported wavefront sensing strategy consists of two parts: a specific sensor for tip-tilt (TT) detection and another wavefront sensor for other distortions detection. Thus, a part of incident light has to be used for TT detection, which decreases the light energy used by wavefront sensor and eventually reduces the precision of wavefront correction. In this paper, a single Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor based wavefront measurement method is presented for both large amplitude TT and other distortions' measurement. Experiments were performed for testing the presented wavefront method and validating the wavefront detection and correction ability of the single-sensor based AOS. With adaptive correction, the root-mean-square of residual TT was less than 0.2 λ, and a clear image was obtained in the lab. Equipped on a 1.23-meter optical telescope, the binary stars with angle distance of 0.6″ were clearly resolved using the AOS. This wavefront measurement method removes the separate TT sensor, which not only simplifies the AOS but also saves light energy for subsequent wavefront sensing and imaging, and eventually improves the detection and imaging capability of the AOS. PMID:26367988

  11. Multiplexed Optical Fiber Sensors for Coal Fired Advanced Fossil Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Anbo; Pickrell, Gary

    2012-03-31

    This report summarizes technical progress on the program Multiplexed Optical Fiber Sensors for Coal Fired Advanced Fossil Energy Systems funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed jointly by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Virginia Tech. This three-year project started on October 1, 2008. In the project, a fiber optical sensing system based on intrinsic Fabry-Perot Interferometer (IFPI) was developed for strain and temperature measurements for Ultra Supercritical boiler condition assessment. Investigations were focused on sensor design, fabrication, attachment techniques and novel materials for high temperature and strain measurements. At the start of the project, the technical requirements for the sensing technology were determined together with our industrial partner Alstom Power. As is demonstrated in Chapter 4, all the technical requirements are successfully met. The success of the technology extended beyond laboratory test; its capability was further validated through the field test at DOE NETL, in which the sensors yielded distributed temperature mapping of a testing coupon installed in the turbine test rig. The measurement results agreed well with prior results generated with thermocouples. In this project, significant improvements were made to the IFPI sensor technology by splicing condition optimization, transmission loss reduction, sensor signal demodulation and sensor system design.

  12. Accurate and automatic extrinsic calibration method for blade measurement system integrated by different optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Wantao; Li, Zhongwei; Zhong, Kai; Shi, Yusheng; Zhao, Can; Cheng, Xu

    2014-11-01

    Fast and precise 3D inspection system is in great demand in modern manufacturing processes. At present, the available sensors have their own pros and cons, and hardly exist an omnipotent sensor to handle the complex inspection task in an accurate and effective way. The prevailing solution is integrating multiple sensors and taking advantages of their strengths. For obtaining a holistic 3D profile, the data from different sensors should be registrated into a coherent coordinate system. However, some complex shape objects own thin wall feather such as blades, the ICP registration method would become unstable. Therefore, it is very important to calibrate the extrinsic parameters of each sensor in the integrated measurement system. This paper proposed an accurate and automatic extrinsic parameter calibration method for blade measurement system integrated by different optical sensors. In this system, fringe projection sensor (FPS) and conoscopic holography sensor (CHS) is integrated into a multi-axis motion platform, and the sensors can be optimally move to any desired position at the object's surface. In order to simple the calibration process, a special calibration artifact is designed according to the characteristics of the two sensors. An automatic registration procedure based on correlation and segmentation is used to realize the artifact datasets obtaining by FPS and CHS rough alignment without any manual operation and data pro-processing, and then the Generalized Gauss-Markoff model is used to estimate the optimization transformation parameters. The experiments show the measurement result of a blade, where several sampled patches are merged into one point cloud, and it verifies the performance of the proposed method.

  13. Overview of Fiber-Optical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Depaula, Ramon P.; Moore, Emery L.

    1987-01-01

    Design, development, and sensitivity of sensors using fiber optics reviewed. State-of-the-art and probable future developments of sensors using fiber optics described in report including references to work in field. Serves to update previously published surveys. Systems incorporating fiber-optic sensors used in medical diagnosis, navigation, robotics, sonar, power industry, and industrial controls.

  14. Microelectromechanical system pressure sensor integrated onto optical fiber by anodic bonding.

    PubMed

    Saran, Anish; Abeysinghe, Don C; Boyd, Joseph T

    2006-03-10

    Optical microelectromechanical system pressure sensors based on the principle of Fabry-Perot interferometry have been developed and fabricated using the technique of silicon-to-silicon anodic bonding. The pressure sensor is then integrated onto an optical fiber by a novel technique of anodic bonding without use of any adhesives. In this anodic bonding technique we use ultrathin silicon of thickness 10 microm to bond the optical fiber to the sensor head. The ultrathin silicon plays the role of a stress-reducing layer, which helps the bonding of an optical fiber to silicon having conventional wafer thickness. The pressure-sensing membrane is formed by 8 microm thick ultrathin silicon acting as a membrane, thus eliminating the need for bulk silicon etching. The pressure sensor integrated onto an optical fiber is tested for static response, and experimental results indicate degradation in the fringe visibility of the Fabry-Perot interferometer. This effect was mainly due to divergent light rays from the fiber degrading the fringe visibility. This effect is demonstrated in brief by an analytical model. PMID:16572689

  15. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1992-10-06

    An apparatus and method are described for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer. 4 figs.

  16. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

  17. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, Bruce R.; Prather, William S.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer.

  18. Experimental Validation of an Optical System for Interrogation of Dermally-Implanted Microparticle Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Long, Ruiqi; McShane, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Dermally-implanted microparticle sensors are being developed for on-demand monitoring of blood sugar levels. For these to be deployed in vivo, a matched opto-electronic system for delivery of excitation, collection and analysis of escaping fluorescent signal is needed. Previous studies predicted the characteristics of fluorescence from microparticle sensors to facilitate design of hardware system. Based on the results of simulations, we designed and constructed the optical part of this opto-electronic system. This study experimentally verified the simulation results and tested the capability of the designed optical system. Reliable skin phantoms sufficient for future dynamic tests were developed. Skin phantoms with different thicknesses were made and the optical properties of skin phantoms were determined with an integrating sphere system and Inverse Adding-Doubling method. Measurements of sensor emission spectrum through phantoms with different thicknesses were done with the designed optical system. Simulations for the experiment situation were performed. The experimental measurements agreed well with simulations in most cases. The results of hardware experiment and validation with skin phantoms provided us with critical information for future dynamic tests and animal experiments. PMID:19964925

  19. Virtual 3D interactive system with embedded multiwavelength optical sensor array and sequential devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guo-Zhen; Huang, Yi-Pai; Hu, Kuo-Jui

    2012-06-01

    We proposed a virtual 3D-touch system by bare finger, which can detect the 3-axis (x, y, z) information of finger. This system has multi-wavelength optical sensor array embedded on the backplane of TFT panel and sequentail devices on the border of TFT panel. We had developed reflecting mode which can be worked by bare finger for the 3D interaction. A 4-inch mobile 3D-LCD with this proposed system was successfully been demonstrated already.

  20. Integration of an autonomous optical sensor system in the machining area of milling centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preißler, Marc; Schellhorn, Mathias; Hoffmann, Rolf; Notni, Gunther

    2015-05-01

    The integration of quality control in manufacturing process contains this paper and discusses the possibilities for integrated quality control in CNC milling machines without clamping off a workpiece. For these concepts non-contact measurements with image processing sensors have significant benefits for data acquisition in rapidity and a high grade of flexibility. New effective measurement strategies can be developed in effect of the quality controlling in the machining area. These includes classical geometric measurement applications from optical 2D but also options for 3D measurement tasks like determining roughness or other typical image processing applications. This paper presents the challenges for the implementation of an optical sensor system in the machining area of milling centers. Primarily a suitable location in the machining area must be found and an associated strategy has to be developed. The integrated optical image sensor system should be protect against impurity and does not derogate in his functionality. For the full integration as a quality control loop, the results must feed into the machine control. Thus a further interface between measurement program and a machine control is necessary. Another major field of research exists in the optical components. Especially the illumination, image sensor and lens are selected and adaptable for the measurement tasks after the considerations of the above-mentioned basic requirements. The presented research provides a suitable solution to make the CNC manufacture more efficient. Quality controls of the work piece can be executed within the CNC process and potential post processing can be performed simultaneously.

  1. Functionality Enhancement of Industrialized Optical Fiber Sensors and System Developed for Full-Scale Pavement Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huaping; Liu, Wanqiu; He, Jianping; Xing, Xiaoying; Cao, Dandan; Gao, Xipeng; Hao, Xiaowei; Cheng, Hongwei; Zhou, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Pavements always play a predominant role in transportation. Health monitoring of pavements is becoming more and more significant, as frequently suffering from cracks, rutting, and slippage renders them prematurely out of service. Effective and reliable sensing elements are thus in high demand to make prognosis on the mechanical properties and occurrence of damage to pavements. Therefore, in this paper, various types of functionality enhancement of industrialized optical fiber sensors for pavement monitoring are developed, with the corresponding operational principles clarified in theory and the performance double checked by basic experiments. Furthermore, a self-healing optical fiber sensing network system is adopted to accomplish full-scale monitoring of pavements. The application of optical fiber sensors assembly and self-healing network system in pavement has been carried out to validate the feasibility. It has been proved that the research in this article provides a valuable method and meaningful guidance for the integrity monitoring of civil structures, especially pavements. PMID:24854060

  2. On the use of a compact optical fiber sensor system in aircraft structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrad, Nezih; Guo, Honglei; Xiao, Gaozhi; Rocha, Bruno; Sun, Zhigang

    2012-06-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) has been identified as an area of significant potential for advanced aircraft maintenance programs that ensure continued airworthiness, enhanced operational safety and reduced life cycle cost. Several sensors and sensory systems have been developed for the implementation of such health monitoring capability. Among a wide range of developed technologies, fiber optic sensor technology, in particular fiber Bragg grating based emerged as one of the most promising for aircraft structural applications. This paper is set to explore the suitability of using a new Fiber Bragg Grating sensor (FBG) system developed for operation in two modes, low and high speed sensing modes, respectively. The suitability of the system for potential use in aircraft load monitoring and damage detection applications has been demonstrated. Results from FBG sensor system were in good agreement with results from conventional resistive strain gauges, validating this capability for load monitoring. For damage detection, the FBG sensor system was able to detect acoustic waves generated 52 inches (1.32 m) away. The initial results, obtained in a full stale experimentation, demonstrate the potential of using FBG sensors for both load monitoring and damage detection in aircraft environment.

  3. A Robust Distributed Multipoint Fiber Optic Gas Sensor System Based on AGC Amplifier Structure.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cunguang; Wang, Rende; Tao, Xuechen; Wang, Guangwei; Wang, Pengpeng

    2016-01-01

    A harsh environment-oriented distributed multipoint fiber optic gas sensor system realized by automatic gain control (AGC) technology is proposed. To improve the photoelectric signal reliability, the electronic variable gain can be modified in real time by an AGC closed-loop feedback structure to compensate for optical transmission loss which is caused by the fiber bend loss or other reasons. The deviation of the system based on AGC structure is below 4.02% when photoelectric signal decays due to fiber bending loss for bending radius of 5 mm, which is 20 times lower than the ordinary differential system. In addition, the AGC circuit with the same electric parameters can keep the baseline intensity of signals in different channels of the distributed multipoint sensor system at the same level. This avoids repetitive calibrations and streamlines the installation process. PMID:27483267

  4. Ground movement monitoring using an optic fiber Bragg grating sensored system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Yen-Te; Huang, An-Bin; Ma, Jiming; Zhang, Baishan

    2005-05-01

    The authors have developed a fiber optic ground movement monitoring system using the optic Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG). A series of FBG's are glued to the outside of flexible plastic elements. These flexible elements are connected together to form a single probe. When the flexible element is bent, the FBG's sense the flexural strain as a result of the bending. Twice integration of the strains along the longitudinal axis of the probe yields the distribution of the displacement of the monitoring probe associated with the bending. The sensitivity and range of allowable bending of the monitoring probe can be adjusted according to the need in the field. The FBG based monitoring system has been experimented to measure the displacement distribution of a laterally loaded pile in Yuin-Lin, Taiwan. This paper describes the principles of the FBG sensor monitoring probe system and presents a case of field application of the sensor system.

  5. Nanosecond transient electric field measurement system using an integrated electro-optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiahong; Chen, Fushen; Sun, Bao; Chen, Kaixin

    2014-11-01

    A lithium niobate optical waveguide-based integrated electro-optic (EO) electric field (E-field) sensor dedicated to the measurement of intense nanosecond transient electromagnetic pulse (EMP) signals has been developed and calibrated. The time domain calibration system for measurement of intense nanosecond EMP signals has been established. A pure optical bias phase angle control system based on wavelength tuning has been developed and implemented to ensure that the sensor has a linear transfer function. The fluctuations of the sensor static output optical power are <0.1 dB with the proposed bias control system while >3 dB without bias control. The time domain characteristics of the detected pulsed E-fields have been compared with those of the input EMP signals. For the first type nanosecond level (ns-level) EMP signal, the relative errors of the detected E-fields on rise time, fall time, and pulse width are 0.38%, 0.69%, and 0.79%, respectively. Also, for the second type ns-level EMP signal, the relative errors of the measured E-fields on rise time, fall time, and pulse width are 0.40%, 0.31%, and 0.01%, respectively. All these results demonstrate that the developed integrated EO E-field sensing system has the potential to be used to accurately extract the information of transient E-fields.

  6. Inertial and optical sensor fusion to compensate for partial occlusions in surgical tracking systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Changyu; Liu, Yue

    2015-08-01

    To solve the occlusion problem in optical tracking system (OTS) for surgical navigation, this paper proposes a sensor fusion approach and an adaptive display method to handle cases where partial or total occlusion occurs. In the sensor fusion approach, the full 6D pose information provided by the optical tracker is used to estimate the bias of the inertial sensors when all of the markers are visible. When partial occlusion occurs, the optical system can track the position of at least one marker which can be combined with the orientation estimated from the inertial measurements to recover the full 6D pose information. When all the markers are invisible, the position tracking will be realized based on outputs of the Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) which may generate increasing drifting error. To alert the user when the drifting error is great enough to influence the navigation, the images adaptive to the drifting error are displayed in the field of the user's view. The experiments are performed with an augmented reality HMD which displays the AR images and the hybrid tracking system (HTS) which consists of an OTS and an IMU. Experimental result shows that with proposed sensor fusion approach the 6D pose of the head with respect to the reference frame can be estimated even under partial occlusion conditions. With the help of the proposed adaptive display method, the users can recover the scene of markers when the error is considered to be relatively high.

  7. Diffraction-based optical sensor detection system for capture-restricted environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandekar, Rahul M.; Nikulin, Vladimir V.

    2008-04-01

    The use of digital cameras and camcorders in prohibited areas presents a growing problem. Piracy in the movie theaters results in huge revenue loss to the motion picture industry every year, but still image and video capture may present even a bigger threat if performed in high-security locations. While several attempts are being made to address this issue, an effective solution is yet to be found. We propose to approach this problem using a very commonly observed optical phenomenon. Cameras and camcorders use CCD and CMOS sensors, which include a number of photosensitive elements/pixels arranged in a certain fashion. Those are photosites in CCD sensors and semiconductor elements in CMOS sensors. They are known to reflect a small fraction of incident light, but could also act as a diffraction grating, resulting in the optical response that could be utilized to identify the presence of such a sensor. A laser-based detection system is proposed that accounts for the elements in the optical train of the camera, as well as the eye-safety of the people who could be exposed to optical beam radiation. This paper presents preliminary experimental data, as well as the proof-of-concept simulation results.

  8. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  9. Real-time distributed fiber optic sensor for security systems: Performance, event classification and nuisance mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Seedahmed S.; Visagathilagar, Yuvaraja; Katsifolis, Jim

    2012-09-01

    The success of any perimeter intrusion detection system depends on three important performance parameters: the probability of detection (POD), the nuisance alarm rate (NAR), and the false alarm rate (FAR). The most fundamental parameter, POD, is normally related to a number of factors such as the event of interest, the sensitivity of the sensor, the installation quality of the system, and the reliability of the sensing equipment. The suppression of nuisance alarms without degrading sensitivity in fiber optic intrusion detection systems is key to maintaining acceptable performance. Signal processing algorithms that maintain the POD and eliminate nuisance alarms are crucial for achieving this. In this paper, a robust event classification system using supervised neural networks together with a level crossings (LCs) based feature extraction algorithm is presented for the detection and recognition of intrusion and non-intrusion events in a fence-based fiber-optic intrusion detection system. A level crossings algorithm is also used with a dynamic threshold to suppress torrential rain-induced nuisance alarms in a fence system. Results show that rain-induced nuisance alarms can be suppressed for rainfall rates in excess of 100 mm/hr with the simultaneous detection of intrusion events. The use of a level crossing based detection and novel classification algorithm is also presented for a buried pipeline fiber optic intrusion detection system for the suppression of nuisance events and discrimination of intrusion events. The sensor employed for both types of systems is a distributed bidirectional fiber-optic Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometer.

  10. Multichannel fiber optic pressure sensor system for parametric emission monitoring in combustion engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poorman, Thomas J.; Kalashnikov, Sergey P.; Wlodarczyk, Marek T.; Daire, Adam; Goeke, Wayne; Kropp, Richard; Kamat, Pradip

    1995-09-01

    A multichannel fiber-optic combustion pressure sensor system is described dedicated to parametric emission monitoring systems (PEMS) for use in natural gas-fueled, stationary, and reciprocating engines. In view of the emerging 1995 emission regulations for large stationary engines, the natural gas pipeline operators have turned their attention to PEMS' for predicting and controlling the amount of polluting emissions such as NOx and HC. We present design considerations and performance data of a 8-channel pressure monitoring system employing fiber-optic combustion pressure sensors. The control/monitoring unit offers capabilities of sensor calibration, health monitoring, and real-time data acquisition. Using an engine position sensor trigger, the monitoring unit can calculate peak pressure, indicative mean pressure, and location of peak pressure. The system allows for 50 kHz, burst mode transfer of multisensor data to a host PC. We demonstrated performance data collected on three large-bore engines and long-term endurance test data. While initially intended for stationary engines, the system can be used in applications requiring portability including moving vehicles.

  11. Acoustic and optical multi-sensor threat detection system for border patrol against aerial threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsawadi, Motasem S.; Ismail, Ahmad; Al-Azem, Badeea F.; El-Desouki, Munir M.; Alghamdi, Sultan; Alghamdi, Mansour

    2012-10-01

    Saudi Arabia has borders covering over 4,300 km that are shared with seven countries. Such large borders pose many challenges for security and patrol. Thermal imagers are considered the most reliable means of threat detection, however, they are quite costly, which can prevent using them over large areas. This work discusses a multi-sensor acoustic and optical implementation for threat detection as an effort to reduce system cost. The acoustic sensor provides position and direction recognition by using a four microphone setup. The data analysis of field tests will be discussed in this work.

  12. Optical displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Dustin W.

    2008-04-08

    An optical displacement sensor is disclosed which uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coupled to an optical cavity formed by a moveable membrane and an output mirror of the VCSEL. This arrangement renders the lasing characteristics of the VCSEL sensitive to any movement of the membrane produced by sound, vibrations, pressure changes, acceleration, etc. Some embodiments of the optical displacement sensor can further include a light-reflective diffractive lens located on the membrane or adjacent to the VCSEL to control the amount of lasing light coupled back into the VCSEL. A photodetector detects a portion of the lasing light from the VCSEL to provide an electrical output signal for the optical displacement sensor which varies with the movement of the membrane.

  13. Optical Communications and Sensor Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Andres; Petro, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The Optical Communications and Sensor Demonstration (OCSD) project addresses two cross-cutting capabilities of value to many future small spacecraft missions: high-speed optical transmission of data and small spacecraft proximity operations. Optical data rates demonstrated by OCSD are expected to be 200 megabits persecond (Mbs) or higher, a factor of 100 increase over current high-end CubeSat communications systems. The proximity sensors developed for this mission enable relative position measurement between two small satellites - a capability not previously demonstrated.

  14. Optical-fibre sensor system for monitoring the performance of the gas propellant centrifuge separator of a spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romo-Medrano, Katya E.; Khotiaintsev, Sergei N.; García-Garduño, Victor

    2004-08-01

    An optical-fibre sensor system is presented for monitoring void fraction distribution in a spacecraft's gas and propellant centrifuge separator. The system could be used at the separator development stage or for monitoring, during ground tests, the elements of the spacecraft propulsion system. Our sensor system employs an array of point optical-fibre refractometric transducers installed in the form of several linear radial arrays on the separator rotating blades. We employed a small-size hemispherical optical detection element as the transducer and we optimized its parameters through numerical ray-tracing. The aim is to minimize the effect of the thin film of liquid that forms on the transducer's surface in this application. The features of this sensor system are: (1) an efficient matrix-type multiplexing scheme, (2) the installation of the main optoelectronic unit of the sensor in a hermetically sealed container inside the separator tank located on the rotating shaft and (3) the spark-proof and explosion-proof design of the sensor circuits and elements. The sensor is simple, reliable, low-cost and is capable of withstanding the factors involved during operation of the propulsion system such as cryogenic temperatures and chemically aggressive liquids. The novel elements and design concepts implemented in this sensor system can also find applications in other sensors for spacecraft propulsion systems and also in a variety of optical-fibre sensors used in scientific research and industry.

  15. Fiber Optic Control System integration for advanced aircraft. Electro-optic and sensor fabrication, integration, and environmental testing for flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seal, Daniel W.; Weaver, Thomas L.; Kessler, Bradley L.; Bedoya, Carlos A.; Mattes, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the design, development, and testing of passive fiber optic sensors and a multiplexing electro-optic architecture (EOA) for installation and flight test on a NASA-owned F-18 aircraft. This hardware was developed under the Fiber Optic Control Systems for Advanced Aircraft program, part of a multiyear NASA initiative to design, develop, and demonstrate through flight test 'fly-by-light' systems for application to advanced aircraft flight and propulsion control. This development included the design and production of 10 passive optical sensors and associated multiplexed EOA hardware based on wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) technology. A variety of sensor types (rotary position, linear position, temperature, and pressure) incorporating a broad range of sensor technologies (WDM analog, WDM digital, analog microbend, and fluorescent time rate of decay) were obtained from different manufacturers and functionally integrated with an independently designed EOA. The sensors were built for installation in a variety of aircraft locations, placing the sensors in a variety of harsh environments. The sensors and EOA were designed and built to have the resulting devices be as close as practical to a production system. The integrated system was delivered to NASA for flight testing on a NASA-owned F-18 aircraft. Development and integration testing of the system provided valuable information as to which sensor types were simplest to design and build for a military aircraft environment and which types were simplest to operate with a multiplexed EOA. Not all sensor types met the full range of performance and environmental requirements. EOA development problems provided information on directions to pursue in future fly-by-light flight control development programs. Lessons learned in the development of the EOA and sensor hardware are summarized.

  16. Innovative technologies in optical fiber hydrogen sensor detection systems for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Alex A.

    2010-04-01

    Hydrogen detection is priority for every launch vehicle where hydrogen is involved. Hydrogen sensors are necessary to monitor the detection of every possible leak. For space application is very challenging to pin point exact location of leaks and public acceptance of hydrogen fuel is require the integration of a reliable hydrogen safety sensor. For detecting leakage of cryogenic fluids in spaceport facilities, launch vehicle industry and aerospace agencies are currently relying heavily on the bulky mass spectrometers, which fill one or more equipment racks, and weigh several hundred kilograms. Recently new innovation in optical hydrogen makes these sensors intrinsically safe since they produce no arc or spark in an explosive environment caused by the leakage of hydrogen. Being a very small molecule, hydrogen is prone to leakage through seals and micro-cracks. This paper describes the development of fiber optic innovative technologies for detection of hydrogen in space applications. These systems consisted of Micro Mirror, Fiber Bragg grating, Evanescent Optical Fiber and Colorimetric Technology. The paper would discuss the sensor design and performance data under field deployment conditions.

  17. Optimum design of 30-km long-distance distributed optical fiber Raman temperature sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zaixuan; Liu, Honglin; Wang, Jianfeng; Yu, Xiangdong; Jin, Yongxing; Kim, Insoo S.; Wu, Xiaobiao

    2005-02-01

    A 30km long distance distributed optical fiber Raman temperature sensor (DOFRTS) system has been made, it use new measuring temperature principle of optical fiber amplified anti-Stokes Raman spontaneous scattering. In the system, 1550nm erbium-doped optical fiber laser, a highness speed data acquisition card and signal processing technique are used. By using these technique, the problem of weak signal detection is resolved and signal to noise ratio is increased. All components of system are put into an intellectualized constant temperature box and work in constant temperature condition. Stability and environment adaptability are improved. By appraisal, performance of the system is listed as follows: length of single mode fiber: 31km, temperature rang:0-100°C (can be expanded), temperature measuring uncertainty:+/-2°C, temperature resolution:0.1°C, measurement time:432s, spatial resolution :3m.

  18. Demonstration of a VOC in-situ fiber optic sensor for use with a penetrometer analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartenstein, Steven D.; Moore, Glenn A.; Nelson, Bruce N.; Kane, James; Lowe, Mark

    1996-11-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory with their industrial CRADA partner GEO-CENTERS demonstrated a fiber optic based VOC sensor at the Army Environmental Center technology demonstration at Dover Air Force Base. The sensor used during the demonstration was a single fiber optic cable coupled to an in situ sensor element contained in a cone penetrometer tip. The sensor's fluorescence response was measured at the surface using an optical breadboard-based instrument. Results from this demonstration showed that the sensor provided semi-quantitative results for total VOCs comparable to the historical values of VOCs. In addition, the demonstration identified several technical challenges for improvement of the sensor. This paper describes the analytical properties of the reversible sensing materials, construction of an improved sensor system, and the planned demonstration of the modified in- situ VOC sensor system. This sensor system is tentatively scheduled for demonstration at the Army Environmental Center's Aberdeen Proving Ground Test site. Improvements to the VOC sensor system include an optical configuration that will correct for soil matrix interferences and multiple sensing substrates to learn whether VOC selectivity can be achieved.

  19. Strain gauge ambiguity sensor for segmented mirror active optical system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyman, C. L.; Howe, T. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A system is described to measure alignment between interfacing edges of mirror segments positioned to form a segmented mirror surface. It serves as a gauge having a bending beam with four piezoresistive elements coupled across the interfaces of the edges of adjacent mirror segments. The bending beam has a first position corresponding to alignment of the edges of adjacent mirror segments, and it is bendable from the first position in a direction and to a degree dependent upon the relative misalignment between the edges of adjacent mirror segments to correspondingly vary the resistance of the strain guage. A source of power and an amplifier are connected in circuit with the strain gauge whereby the output of the amplifier varies according to the misalignment of the edges of adjacent mirror segments.

  20. Multi-Stress Monitoring System with Fiber-Optic Mandrels and Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors in a Sagnac Loop.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunjin; Sampath, Umesh; Song, Minho

    2015-01-01

    Fiber Bragg grating sensors are placed in a fiber-optic Sagnac loop to combine the grating temperature sensors and the fiber-optic mandrel acoustic emission sensors in single optical circuit. A wavelength-scanning fiber-optic laser is used as a common light source for both sensors. A fiber-optic attenuator is placed at a specific position in the Sagnac loop in order to separate buried Bragg wavelengths from the Sagnac interferometer output. The Bragg wavelength shifts are measured with scanning band-pass filter demodulation and the mandrel output is analyzed by applying a fast Fourier transform to the interference signal. This hybrid-scheme could greatly reduce the size and the complexity of optical circuitry and signal processing unit, making it suitable for low cost multi-stress monitoring of large scale power systems. PMID:26230700

  1. Multi-Stress Monitoring System with Fiber-Optic Mandrels and Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors in a Sagnac Loop

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunjin; Sampath, Umesh; Song, Minho

    2015-01-01

    Fiber Bragg grating sensors are placed in a fiber-optic Sagnac loop to combine the grating temperature sensors and the fiber-optic mandrel acoustic emission sensors in single optical circuit. A wavelength-scanning fiber-optic laser is used as a common light source for both sensors. A fiber-optic attenuator is placed at a specific position in the Sagnac loop in order to separate buried Bragg wavelengths from the Sagnac interferometer output. The Bragg wavelength shifts are measured with scanning band-pass filter demodulation and the mandrel output is analyzed by applying a fast Fourier transform to the interference signal. This hybrid-scheme could greatly reduce the size and the complexity of optical circuitry and signal processing unit, making it suitable for low cost multi-stress monitoring of large scale power systems. PMID:26230700

  2. Employing optical code division multiple access technology in the all fiber loop vibration sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Shin-Pin; Yen, Chih-Ta; Syu, Rong-Shun; Cheng, Hsu-Chih

    2013-12-01

    This study proposes a spectral amplitude coding-optical code division multiple access (SAC-OCDMA) framework to access the vibration frequency of a test object on the all fiber loop vibration sensor (AFLVS). Each user possesses an individual SAC, and fiber Bragg grating (FBG) encoders/decoders using multiple FBG arrays were adopted, providing excellent orthogonal properties in the frequency domain. The system also mitigates multiple access interference (MAI) among users. When an optical fiber is bent to a point exceeding the critical radius, the fiber loop sensor becomes sensitive to external physical parameters (e.g., temperature, strain, and vibration). The AFLVS involves placing a fiber loop with a specific radius on a designed vibration platform.

  3. Multipoint dynamically reconfigure adaptive distributed fiber optic acoustic emission sensor (FAESense) system for condition based maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar; Prohaska, John; Kempen, Connie; Esterkin, Yan; Sun, Sunjian; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes preliminary results obtained under a Navy SBIR contract by Redondo Optics Inc. (ROI), in collaboration with Northwestern University towards the development and demonstration of a next generation, stand-alone and fully integrated, dynamically reconfigurable, adaptive fiber optic acoustic emission sensor (FAESense™) system for the in-situ unattended detection and localization of shock events, impact damage, cracks, voids, and delaminations in new and aging critical infrastructures found in ships, submarines, aircraft, and in next generation weapon systems. ROI's FAESense™ system is based on the integration of proven state-of-the-art technologies: 1) distributed array of in-line fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) sensors sensitive to strain, vibration, and acoustic emissions, 2) adaptive spectral demodulation of FBG sensor dynamic signals using two-wave mixing interferometry on photorefractive semiconductors, and 3) integration of all the sensor system passive and active optoelectronic components within a 0.5-cm x 1-cm photonic integrated circuit microchip. The adaptive TWM demodulation methodology allows the measurement of dynamic high frequnency acoustic emission events, while compensating for passive quasi-static strain and temperature drifts. It features a compact, low power, environmentally robust 1-inch x 1-inch x 4-inch small form factor (SFF) package with no moving parts. The FAESense™ interrogation system is microprocessor-controlled using high data rate signal processing electronics for the FBG sensors calibration, temperature compensation and the detection and analysis of acoustic emission signals. Its miniaturized package, low power operation, state-of-the-art data communications, and low cost makes it a very attractive solution for a large number of applications in naval and maritime industries, aerospace, civil structures, the oil and chemical industry, and for homeland security applications.

  4. A new integrated optical angular velocity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciminelli, Caterina; Peluso, Francesco; Armenise, Mario N.

    2005-03-01

    Very compact and low-cost rotation sensors are strongly required for any moving systems in several applications. Integrated optical angular velocity sensors seem to be very promising in terms of low cost, compactness, light weight and high-performance. In the paper a new integrated optical angular velocity sensor having a passive resonant configuration is proposed. Preliminary results are really encouraging and demonstrate the possibility of using the sensor in gyro systems for satellite applications.

  5. Fiber optic sensors for smart taxiways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzen, Douglas D.; Fuerstenau, Norbert; Goetze, Wolfgang

    1995-09-01

    Fiber-optic sensors could offer advantages in the field of airport ground traffic monitoring: immunity to electromagnetic interference, installation without costly and time consuming airfield closures, and low loss, low noise optical connection between sensors and signal processing equipment. This paper describes fiber-optic sensors developed for airport taxiway monitoring and the first steps toward their installation in an experimental surface movement guidance and control system at the Braunschweig airport. Initial results obtained with fiber- optic light barriers and vibration sensors are reported. The feasibility of employing interferometric strain gauges for this application will be discussed based on sensor characteristics obtained through measurements of strain in an aircraft structure in flight.

  6. Fiber optic sensor system for detecting movement or position of a rotating wheel bearing

    DOEpatents

    Veeser, Lynn R.; Rodriguez, Patrick J.; Forman, Peter R.; Monahan, Russell E.; Adler, Jonathan M.

    1997-01-01

    An improved fiber optic sensor system and integrated sensor bearing assembly for detecting movement or position of a rotating wheel bearing having a multi-pole tone ring which produces an alternating magnetic field indicative of movement and position of the rotating member. A magneto-optical material, such as a bismuth garnet iron (B.I.G.) crystal, having discrete magnetic domains is positioned in the vicinity of the tone ring so that the domains align themselves to the magnetic field generated by the tone ring. A single fiber optic cable, preferably single mode fiber, carries light generated by a source of light to the B.I.G. crystal. The light passes through the B.I.G. crystal and is refracted at domain boundaries in the crystal. The intensity of the refracted light is indicative of the amount of alignment of the domains and therefore the strength of the magnetic field. The refracted light is carried by the fiber optic cable to an optic receiver where the intensity is measured and an electrical signal is generated and sent to a controller indicating the frequency of the changes in light intensity and therefore the rotational speed of the rotating wheel bearing.

  7. Nanowire humidity optical sensor system based on fast Fourier transform technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rota-Rodrigo, S.; Pérez-Herrera, R.; Lopez-Aldaba, A.; López Bautista, M. C.; Esteban, O.; López-Amo, M.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, a new sensor system for relative humidity measurements based on its interaction with the evanescent field of a nanowire is presented. The interrogation of the sensing head is carried out by monitoring the fast Fourier transform phase variations of one of the nanowire interference frequencies. This method is independent of the signal amplitude and also avoids the necessity of tracking the wavelength evolution in the spectrum, which can be a handicap when there are multiple interference frequency components with different sensitivities. The sensor is operated within a wide humidity range (20%-70% relative humidity) with a maximum sensitivity achieved of 0.14rad/% relative humidity. Finally, due to the system uses an optical interrogator as unique active element, the system presents a cost-effective feature.

  8. Optical Pointing Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Joel F.; Metz, Brandon C.

    2010-01-01

    The optical pointing sensor provides a means of directly measuring the relative positions of JPL s Formation Control Testbed (FCT) vehicles without communication. This innovation is a steerable infrared (IR) rangefinder that gives measurements in terms of range and bearing to a passive retroreflector.

  9. Ionophore-Based Optical Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mistlberger, Günter; Crespo, Gastón A.; Bakker, Eric

    2014-06-01

    This review provides an overview of the key aspects of designing ionophore-based optical sensors (IBOS). Exact response functions are developed and compared with a simplified, generalized equation. We also provide a brief introduction into less established but promising working principles, namely dynamic response and exhaustive exchange. Absorbance and fluorescence are the main optical readout strategies used in the evaluation of a sensor response, but they usually require a robust referencing technique for real-world applications. Established referencing schemes using IBOS as well as those from other optical sensors are also discussed. Finally, the power of recently developed photoresponsive ion extraction/release systems is outlined and discussed in view of dynamically switchable IBOS or regenerative exhaustive exchange IBOS.

  10. Optical rate sensor algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhde-Lacovara, Jo A.

    1989-01-01

    Optical sensors, in particular Charge Coupled Device (CCD) arrays, will be used on Space Station to track stars in order to provide inertial attitude reference. Algorithms are presented to derive attitude rate from the optical sensors. The first algorithm is a recursive differentiator. A variance reduction factor (VRF) of 0.0228 was achieved with a rise time of 10 samples. A VRF of 0.2522 gives a rise time of 4 samples. The second algorithm is based on the direct manipulation of the pixel intensity outputs of the sensor. In 1-dimensional simulations, the derived rate was with 0.07 percent of the actual rate in the presence of additive Gaussian noise with a signal to noise ratio of 60 dB.

  11. An automatic data acquisition system for optical characterization of PEDOT:PSS-based gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junaidi, Aba, La; Triyana, Kuwat

    2015-04-01

    A measurement system that consists of a pair of laser diode and photodiode coupled with an automatic data acquisition system based on microcontroller of AVR ATMega16 (hereafter to be called DAQ MA-16) has been developed for measuring optical response of polymer-based gas sensor. In this case, the optical response was represented by the voltage output of the photodiode. The polymer-based gas sensor was a thin film of polymer of Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulfonate) or PEDOT:PSS deposited on a glass substrate. For measurement, the sensor was placed in the chamber, and then the gas ammonia with a fix flow rate was flowed into the chamber. The opposite part of the chamber was installed a pump to throw the gas. The National Instrument Data Acquisition (NI DAQ) BNC-2110 has been used to calibrate the DAQ MA-16 system. From the calibration, it can be estimated that the accuracy of DAQ MA-16 is about 99.4%.

  12. Optical fibre pressure and temperature sensor system designed for urodynamic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duraibabu, Dineshbabu; Kelly, Niall; Poeggel, Sven; Flood, Hugh; Yuan, Hongwei; Dooly, Gerard; McGrath, Deirdre; Tosi, Daniele; Lewis, Elfed; Leen, Gabriel

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an optical fibre pressure and temperature sensor (OFPTS) system, which is adapted for use as a urodynamic pressure measurement system (UPS) for differential pressure measurement with temperature compensation. The OFTPS is based on a Fabry Perot interferometer (FPI), which acts as a pressure sensor and includes an embedded fibre Bragg grating (FBG) for temperature measurement. The sensor system is evaluated in a lower urinary tract (LUT) simulator, which simulates the bladder, rectum and detrusor muscle. The system was benchmarked against a commercially available urodynamic system, at the University Hospital Limerick (UHL) Urology Clinic. Both systems demonstrate a high correlation with a relative pressure variation of less than +/-2.8cmH2O for abdominal and +/-4cmH2O for vesical pressure. The repetitive measurement of the OFPTS system in the LUT simulator against the commercial system demonstrated the high repeatability. Furthermore, the low fabrication cost makes the OFPTS a potentially interesting instrument for urodynamic and other medical applications.

  13. Monitoring Composite Material Pressure Vessels with a Fiber-Optic/Microelectronic Sensor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimcak, C.; Jaduszliwer, B.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the concept of an integrated, fiber-optic/microelectronic distributed sensor system that can monitor composite material pressure vessels for Air Force space systems to provide assessments of the overall health and integrity of the vessel throughout its entire operating history from birth to end of life. The fiber optic component would include either a semiconductor light emitting diode or diode laser and a multiplexed fiber optic sensing network incorporating Bragg grating sensors capable of detecting internal temperature and strain. The microelectronic components include a power source, a pulsed laser driver, time domain data acquisition hardware, a microprocessor, a data storage device, and a communication interface. The sensing system would be incorporated within the composite during its manufacture. The microelectronic data acquisition and logging system would record the environmental conditions to which the vessel has been subjected to during its storage and transit, e.g., the history of thermal excursions, pressure loading data, the occurrence of mechanical impacts, the presence of changing internal strain due to aging, delamination, material decomposition, etc. Data would be maintained din non-volatile memory for subsequent readout through a microcomputer interface.

  14. Integrated optical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Watkins, A.D.; Smartt, H.B.; Taylor, P.L.

    1994-01-04

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control is described. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties. 6 figures.

  15. Integrated optical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Watkins, Arthur D.; Smartt, Herschel B.; Taylor, Paul L.

    1994-01-01

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties.

  16. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey, W. W.; Glenn, W. H.; Snitzer, E.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature sensor has been developed that utilizes the temperature dependent absorption of a rare earth doped optical fiber. The temperature measurement is localized at a remote position by splicing a short section of the rare earth fiber into a loop of commercial data communication fiber that sends and returns an optical probe signal to the temperature sensitive section of fiber. The optical probe signal is generated from two different wavelength filtered LED sources. A four port fiber optic coupler combines the two separate wavelength signals into the fiber sensing loop. Time multiplexing is used so that each signal wavelength is present at a different time. A reference signal level measurement is also made from the LED sources and a ratio taken with the sensor signal to produce a transmission measurement of the fiber loop. The transmission is affected differently at each wavelength by the rare earth temperature sensitive fiber. The temperature is determined from a ratio of the two transmission measurements. This method eliminates any ambiguity with respect to changes in signal level in the fiber loop such as mating and unmating optical connectors. The temperature range of the sensor is limited to about 800 C by the temperature limit fo the feed fibers.

  17. Fiber optic chemical sensor systems for monitoring pH changes in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basheer, Muhammed P.; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.; Sun, Tong; Long, Adrian E.; McPolin, Daniel; Xie, Weiguo

    2004-12-01

    Carbonation-induced corrosion of steel is one of the principal causes of deterioration of reinforced concrete structures. When concrete carbonates, its pH decreases from a value in excess of 12.6 to less than 9 and, hence, a measure of the pH is an indicator of the degree of carbonation. This paper describes the development, testing and evaluation of two types of fibre optic sensors for the pH monitoring. One of these used a sol-gel based probe tip, into which an indicator dye has been introduced and the second used a disc containing an indicator operating over a narrower range of pH with shorter lifetime. Both were connected to a portable spectrometer system, which is used to monitor the spectral changes in optical absorption of the probe tip. A white light source to interrogate the active elements is used as the systems operate in the visible part of the spectrum. The two types of sensors have been found to be sensitive to the changes in pH due to carbonation, but the response time depended on the thickness of the coating material in the case of the sol-gel sensor. The durability of the sensors is still under investigation. The disc type sensor has a life span of approximately 1 month and, hence, it is not suitable for embedding in concrete for long-term monitoring of pH changes. However, it can be used for assessing the pH in vivo. The harder sol-gel is more durable and, hence, has a slower, but acceptable response time.

  18. Architecture for fiber-optic sensors and actuators in aircraft propulsion systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glomb, W. L., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a design for fiber-optic sensing and control in advanced aircraft Electronic Engine Control (EEC). The recommended architecture is an on-engine EEC which contains electro-optic interface circuits for fiber-optic sensors. Size and weight are reduced by multiplexing arrays of functionally similar sensors on a pairs of optical fibers to common electro-optical interfaces. The architecture contains interfaces to seven sensor groups. Nine distinct fiber-optic sensor types were found to provide the sensing functions. Analysis revealed no strong discriminator (except reliability of laser diodes and remote electronics) on which to base a selection of preferred common interface type. A hardware test program is recommended to assess the relative maturity of the technologies and to determine real performance in the engine environment.

  19. An irradiation system for photodynamic therapy with a fiber-optic sensor for measuring tissue oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanar, L.; Fabila, D.; Stolik, S.; de la Rosa, J. M.

    2013-11-01

    Photodynamic Therapy is a well known treatment based on the interaction of light of specific wavelength with a photosensitizing drug. In the presence of oxygen molecules, the illumination of the photosensitizer can activate the production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to the death of target cells within the treated tissue. In order to obtain the best therapy response, the tissue oxygen concentration should be measured to adjust the therapy parameters before and during the treatment. In this work, an irradiation system for 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Photodynamic Therapy is presented. It allows the application of visible light radiation of 630 nm using as a light source a high-brightness light emitting diode with an optical-power automatic control considering a light depth-distribution model. A module to measure the tissue oxygen saturation has been implemented into the system. It is based on two light emitting diodes of 660 nm and 940 nm as light sources, a photodiode as a detector and a new handheld fiber optic reflectance pulse oximetry sensor for estimating the blood oxygen saturation within the tissue. The pulse oximetry sensor was modeled through multilayered Monte Carlo simulations to study the behavior of the sensor with changes in skin thickness and melanin content.

  20. Adaptive optical zoom sensor.

    SciTech Connect

    Sweatt, William C.; Bagwell, Brett E.; Wick, David Victor

    2005-11-01

    In order to optically vary the magnification of an imaging system, continuous mechanical zoom lenses require multiple optical elements and use fine mechanical motion to precisely adjust the separations between individual or groups of lenses. By incorporating active elements into the optical design, we have designed and demonstrated imaging systems that are capable of variable optical magnification with no macroscopic moving parts. Changing the effective focal length and magnification of an imaging system can be accomplished by adeptly positioning two or more active optics in the optical design and appropriately adjusting the optical power of those elements. In this application, the active optics (e.g. liquid crystal spatial light modulators or deformable mirrors) serve as variable focal-length lenses. Unfortunately, the range over which currently available devices can operate (i.e. their dynamic range) is relatively small. Therefore, the key to this concept is to create large changes in the effective focal length of the system with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual elements by leveraging the optical power of conventional optical elements surrounding the active optics. By appropriately designing the optical system, these variable focal-length lenses can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length, and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses.

  1. Electro-Optical High-Voltage Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottsche, Allan; Johnston, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    Electro-optical sensors for measuring high voltages developed for use in automatically controlled power-distribution systems. Sensors connected to optoelectronic interrogating equipment by optical fibers. Because sensitive material and optical fibers are all dielectric, no problem in electrically isolating interrogating circuitry from high voltage, and no need for voltage dividers. Sensor signals transmitted along fibers immune to electromagnetic noise at radio and lower frequencies.

  2. A chemical-detecting system based on a cross-reactive optical sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Todd A.; White, Joel; Kauer, John S.; Walt, David R.

    1996-08-01

    THE vertebrate olfactory system has long been recognized for its extraordinary sensitivity and selectivity for odours. Chemical sensors have been developed recently that are based on analogous distributed sensing properties1-4, but although an association between artificial devices and the olfactory system has been made explicit in some previous studies4,5, none has incorporated comparable mechanisms into the mode of detection. Here we describe a multi-analyte fibre-optic sensor modelled directly on the olfactory system, in the sense that complex, time-dependent signals from an array of sensors provide a 'signature' of each analyte. In our system, polymer-immobilized dye molecules on the fibre tips give different fluorescent response patterns (including spectral shifts, intensity changes, spectral shape variations6 and temporal responses) on exposure to organic vapours, depending on the physical and chemical nature (for example, polarity, shape and size) of both the vapour and the polymer. We use video images of temporal responses of the multi-fibre tip as the input signals to train a neural network for vapour recognition. The system is able to identify individual vapours at different concentrations with great accuracy. 'Artificial noses' such as this should have wide potential application, most notably in environmental and medical monitoring.

  3. Triboluminescent Fiber-Optic Sensors Measure Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, Robert S.

    1994-01-01

    Triboluminescence exploited in fiber-optic sensor system for measuring changes in pressures, strains, vibrations, and acoustic emissions, in structural members. Sensors embedded in members for in situ monitoring of condition of structure. System passive in sense no source of radiation required to interrogate optical fiber. Technique has potential for wide range of applications in which detection and measurement of structural stress required.

  4. Three-gas detection system with IR optical sensor based on NDIR technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Qiulin; Tang, Licheng; Yang, Mingliang; Xue, Chenyang; Zhang, Wendong; Liu, Jun; Xiong, Jijun

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a three-gas detection system with a environmental parameter compensation method is proposed based on Non-dispersive infra-red (NDIR) technique, which can be applied to detect multi-gas (methane, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide). In this system, an IR source and four single-channel pyroelectric sensors are integrated in the miniature optical gas chamber successfully. Inner wall of the chamber coated with Au film is designed as paraboloids. The infrared light is reflected twice before reaching to detectors, thus increasing optical path. Besides, a compensation method is presented to overcome the influence in variation of environment (ambient temperature, humidity and pressure), thus leading to improve the accuracy in gas detection. Experimental results demonstrated that detection ranges are 0-50,000 ppm for CH4, 0-44,500 ppm for CO, 0-48,000 ppm for CO2 and the accuracy is ±0.05%.

  5. Small arms mini-fire control system: fiber-optic barrel deflection sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Rajic, Slobodan; Datskos, Panos G

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally the methods to increase firearms accuracy, particularly at distance, have concentrated on barrel isolation (free floating) and substantial barrel wall thickening to gain rigidity. This barrel stiffening technique did not completely eliminate barrel movement but the problem was significantly reduced to allow a noticeable accuracy enhancement. This process, although highly successful, came at a very high weight penalty. Obviously the goal would be to lighten the barrel (firearm), yet achieve even greater accuracy. Thus, if lightweight barrels could ultimately be compensated for both their static and dynamic mechanical perturbations, the result would be very accurate, yet significantly lighter weight, weapons. We discuss our development of a barrel reference sensor system that is designed to accomplish this ambitious goal. Our optical fiber-based sensor monitors the barrel muzzle position and autonomously compensates for any induced perturbations. The reticle is electronically adjusted in position to compensate for the induced barrel deviation in real time.

  6. Small arms mini-fire control system: fiber-optic barrel deflection sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajic, S.; Datskos, P.; Lawrence, W.; Marlar, T.; Quinton, B.

    2012-06-01

    Traditionally the methods to increase firearms accuracy, particularly at distance, have concentrated on barrel isolation (free floating) and substantial barrel wall thickening to gain rigidity. This barrel stiffening technique did not completely eliminate barrel movement but the problem was significantly reduced to allow a noticeable accuracy enhancement. This process, although highly successful, came at a very high weight penalty. Obviously the goal would be to lighten the barrel (firearm), yet achieve even greater accuracy. Thus, if lightweight barrels could ultimately be compensated for both their static and dynamic mechanical perturbations, the result would be very accurate, yet significantly lighter weight, weapons. We discuss our development of a barrel reference sensor system that is designed to accomplish this ambitious goal. Our optical fiber-based sensor monitors the barrel muzzle position and autonomously compensates for any induced perturbations. The reticle is electronically adjusted in position to compensate for the induced barrel deviation in real time.

  7. Experience with wavefront sensor and deformable mirror interfaces for wide-field adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basden, A. G.; Atkinson, D.; Bharmal, N. A.; Bitenc, U.; Brangier, M.; Buey, T.; Butterley, T.; Cano, D.; Chemla, F.; Clark, P.; Cohen, M.; Conan, J.-M.; de Cos, F. J.; Dickson, C.; Dipper, N. A.; Dunlop, C. N.; Feautrier, P.; Fusco, T.; Gach, J. L.; Gendron, E.; Geng, D.; Goodsell, S. J.; Gratadour, D.; Greenaway, A. H.; Guesalaga, A.; Guzman, C. D.; Henry, D.; Holck, D.; Hubert, Z.; Huet, J. M.; Kellerer, A.; Kulcsar, C.; Laporte, P.; Le Roux, B.; Looker, N.; Longmore, A. J.; Marteaud, M.; Martin, O.; Meimon, S.; Morel, C.; Morris, T. J.; Myers, R. M.; Osborn, J.; Perret, D.; Petit, C.; Raynaud, H.; Reeves, A. P.; Rousset, G.; Sanchez Lasheras, F.; Sanchez Rodriguez, M.; Santos, J. D.; Sevin, A.; Sivo, G.; Stadler, E.; Stobie, B.; Talbot, G.; Todd, S.; Vidal, F.; Younger, E. J.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in adaptive optics (AO) have led to the implementation of wide field-of-view AO systems. A number of wide-field AO systems are also planned for the forthcoming Extremely Large Telescopes. Such systems have multiple wavefront sensors of different types, and usually multiple deformable mirrors (DMs). Here, we report on our experience integrating cameras and DMs with the real-time control systems of two wide-field AO systems. These are CANARY, which has been operating on-sky since 2010, and DRAGON, which is a laboratory AO real-time demonstrator instrument. We detail the issues and difficulties that arose, along with the solutions we developed. We also provide recommendations for consideration when developing future wide-field AO systems.

  8. Experimental study of low-cost fiber optic distributed temperature sensor system performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashkov, Michael V.; Zharkov, Alexander D.

    2016-03-01

    The distributed control of temperature is an actual task for various application such as oil & gas fields, high-voltage power lines, fire alarm systems etc. The most perspective are optical fiber distributed temperature sensors (DTS). They have advantages on accuracy, resolution and range, but have a high cost. Nevertheless, for some application the accuracy of measurement and localization aren't so important as cost. The results of an experimental study of low-cost Raman based DTS based on standard OTDR are represented.

  9. Integration of Fiber-Optic Sensor Arrays into a Multi-Modal Tactile Sensor Processing System for Robotic End-Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Kampmann, Peter; Kirchner, Frank

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing complexity of robotic missions and the development towards long-term autonomous systems, the need for multi-modal sensing of the environment increases. Until now, the use of tactile sensor systems has been mostly based on sensing one modality of forces in the robotic end-effector. The use of a multi-modal tactile sensory system is motivated, which combines static and dynamic force sensor arrays together with an absolute force measurement system. This publication is focused on the development of a compact sensor interface for a fiber-optic sensor array, as optic measurement principles tend to have a bulky interface. Mechanical, electrical and software approaches are combined to realize an integrated structure that provides decentralized data pre-processing of the tactile measurements. Local behaviors are implemented using this setup to show the effectiveness of this approach. PMID:24743158

  10. Integration of fiber-optic sensor arrays into a multi-modal tactile sensor processing system for robotic end-effectors.

    PubMed

    Kampmann, Peter; Kirchner, Frank

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing complexity of robotic missions and the development towards long-term autonomous systems, the need for multi-modal sensing of the environment increases. Until now, the use of tactile sensor systems has been mostly based on sensing one modality of forces in the robotic end-effector. The use of a multi-modal tactile sensory system is motivated, which combines static and dynamic force sensor arrays together with an absolute force measurement system. This publication is focused on the development of a compact sensor interface for a fiber-optic sensor array, as optic measurement principles tend to have a bulky interface. Mechanical, electrical and software approaches are combined to realize an integrated structure that provides decentralized data pre-processing of the tactile measurements. Local behaviors are implemented using this setup to show the effectiveness of this approach. PMID:24743158

  11. Optical Fiber Networks for Remote Fiber Optic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Vallejo, Montserrat; Lopez-Amo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of optical fiber sensor networks for remote sensing. Firstly, the state of the art of remote fiber sensor systems has been considered. We have summarized the great evolution of these systems in recent years; this progress confirms that fiber-optic remote sensing is a promising technology with a wide field of practical applications. Afterwards, the most representative remote fiber-optic sensor systems are briefly explained, discussing their schemes, challenges, pros and cons. Finally, a synopsis of the main factors to take into consideration in the design of a remote sensor system is gathered. PMID:22666011

  12. Optical fiber networks for remote fiber optic sensors.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Vallejo, Montserrat; Lopez-Amo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of optical fiber sensor networks for remote sensing. Firstly, the state of the art of remote fiber sensor systems has been considered. We have summarized the great evolution of these systems in recent years; this progress confirms that fiber-optic remote sensing is a promising technology with a wide field of practical applications. Afterwards, the most representative remote fiber-optic sensor systems are briefly explained, discussing their schemes, challenges, pros and cons. Finally, a synopsis of the main factors to take into consideration in the design of a remote sensor system is gathered. PMID:22666011

  13. Hydrogen Optical Fiber Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, Robert A.; Beshay, Manal; Cordero, Steven R.

    2008-07-28

    Optically-based hydrogen sensors promise to deliver an added level of safety as hydrogen and fuel cell technologies enter the mainstream. More importantly, they offer reduced power consumption and lower cost, which are desirable for mass production applications such as automobiles and consumer appliances. This program addressed two of the major challenges previously identified in porous optrode-based optical hydrogen sensors: sensitivity to moisture (ambient humidity), and interference from the oxygen in air. Polymer coatings to inhibit moisture and oxygen were developed in conjunction with newer and novel hydrogen sensing chemistries. The results showed that it is possible to achieve sensitive hydrogen detection and rapid response with minimal interference from oxygen and humidity. As a result of this work, a new and more exciting avenue of investigation was developed: the elimination of the porous optrode and deposition of the sensor chemistry directly into the polymer film. Initial results have been promising, and open up a wider range of potential applications from extended optical fiber sensing networks, to simple plastic "stickers" for use around the home and office.

  14. Structural integrity and damage assessment of high performance arresting cable systems using an embedded distributed fiber optic sensor (EDIFOS) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar A.; Kempen, Cornelia; Sun, Sunjian; Esterkin, Yan; Prohaska, John; Bentley, Doug; Glasgow, Andy; Campbell, Richard

    2010-04-01

    Redondo Optics in collaboration with the Cortland Cable Company, TMT Laboratories, and Applied Fiber under a US Navy SBIR project is developing an embedded distributed fiber optic sensor (EDIFOSTM) system for the real-time, structural health monitoring, damage assessment, and lifetime prediction of next generation synthetic material arresting gear cables. The EDIFOSTM system represents a new, highly robust and reliable, technology that can be use for the structural damage assessment of critical cable infrastructures. The Navy is currently investigating the use of new, all-synthetic- material arresting cables. The arresting cable is one of the most stressed components in the entire arresting gear landing system. Synthetic rope materials offer higher performance in terms of the strength-to-weight characteristics, which improves the arresting gear engine's performance resulting in reduced wind-over-deck requirements, higher aircraft bring-back-weight capability, simplified operation, maintenance, supportability, and reduced life cycle costs. While employing synthetic cables offers many advantages for the Navy's future needs, the unknown failure modes of these cables remains a high technical risk. For these reasons, Redondo Optics is investigating the use of embedded fiber optic sensors within the synthetic arresting cables to provide real-time structural assessment of the cable state, and to inform the operator when a particular cable has suffered impact damage, is near failure, or is approaching the limit of its service lifetime. To date, ROI and its collaborators have developed a technique for embedding multiple sensor fibers within the strands of high performance synthetic material cables and use the embedded fiber sensors to monitor the structural integrity of the cable structures during tensile and compressive loads exceeding over 175,000-lbsf without any damage to the cable structure or the embedded fiber sensors.

  15. Fiber Optic Sensor for Acoustic Detection of Partial Discharges in Oil-Paper Insulated Electrical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Posada-Roman, Julio; Garcia-Souto, Jose A.; Rubio-Serrano, Jesus

    2012-01-01

    A fiber optic interferometric sensor with an intrinsic transducer along a length of the fiber is presented for ultrasound measurements of the acoustic emission from partial discharges inside oil-filled power apparatus. The sensor is designed for high sensitivity measurements in a harsh electromagnetic field environment, with wide temperature changes and immersion in oil. It allows enough sensitivity for the application, for which the acoustic pressure is in the range of units of Pa at a frequency of 150 kHz. In addition, the accessibility to the sensing region is guaranteed by immune fiber-optic cables and the optical phase sensor output. The sensor design is a compact and rugged coil of fiber. In addition to a complete calibration, the in-situ results show that two types of partial discharges are measured through their acoustic emissions with the sensor immersed in oil. PMID:22666058

  16. Rare Earth Optical Temperature Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor); Jenkins, Phillip (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A rare earth optical temperature sensor is disclosed for measuring high temperatures. Optical temperature sensors exist that channel emissions from a sensor to a detector using a light pipe. The invention uses a rare earth emitter to transform the sensed thermal energy into a narrow band width optical signal that travels to a detector using a light pipe. An optical bandpass filter at the detector removes any noise signal outside of the band width of the signal from the emitter.

  17. Organic semiconductor lasers as integrated light sources for optical sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punke, Martin; Woggon, Thomas; Stroisch, Marc; Ebenhoch, Bernd; Geyer, Ulf; Karnutsch, Christian; Gerken, Martina; Lemmer, Uli; Bruendel, Mathias; Wang, Jing; Weimann, Thomas

    2007-09-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of organic semiconductor lasers as light sources for lab-on-a-chip systems. These lasers are based on a 1D- or 2D-photonic crystal resonator structure providing optical feedback in the active laser material that is deposited on top, e.g. aluminum tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq 3) doped with the laser dye 4-dicyanomethylene-2-methyl-6-(p-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (DCM). We investigated different fabrication methods for the resonator structures, like thermal nanoimprint, UV nanoimprint, and laser interference lithography. Different substrate materials commonly used in lab-on-a-chip systems, e.g. PMMA, Topas, and Ormocer were deployed. By changing the distributed feedback grating periodicity, we demonstrate a tuning range for a single material system of more than 120 nm. The investigated organic semiconductor lasers are optically pumped. External optical pumping provides a feasible way for one-time-use chips. Our recent success of pumping organic lasers with a low-cost laser diode also renders hand-held systems possible. As a further step towards the integration of organic lasers in sensor systems, we demonstrate the coupling of an organic laser into polymeric waveguides which can be combined with microfluidic channels. The integrated organic lasers and the waveguides are both fabricated on the same polished PMMA substrate using thermal nanoimprint lithography and deep-UV modification, respectively. We could demonstrate the guiding of the laser light in single-mode waveguides.

  18. Improvements of optical tactile sensors for robotic system by gold nanocomposite material.

    PubMed

    Massaro, A; Spano, F; Cazzato, P; Cingolani, R; Athanassiou, A

    2012-06-01

    In this work we propose the evolution of a new class of optical pressure sensors suitable for robot tactile sensing. The sensors are based on a tapered optical fiber, where optical signals travel embedded into a PDMS-gold nanocomposite material. By applying different pressure forces on the PDMS-based nanocomposite we measure in real time the change of the optical transmitted intensity due to the coupling between the gold nanocomposite material and the tapered fiber region. The intensity reduction of the transmitted light intensity is correlated with the pressure force magnitude. PMID:22905545

  19. Algorithm for a novel fiber-optic weigh-in-motion sensor system

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, K.W. Jr.; Muhs, J.D.

    1991-08-01

    Over the past decade, the demand from both government and private industry for small, lightweight, vehicle weigh-in-motion (WIM) systems has grown substantially. During the 1980s several techniques for weighing vehicles in motion were developed that include piezoelectric cables, capacitive mats, and hydraulic and bending-plate load cells. These different systems have advantages and disadvantages that trade off between accuracy, physical size and system complexity. The smaller portable systems demonstrate medium to poor accuracy and repeatability while the larger more accurate systems are nonportable. A small, lightweight, and portable WIM system based on a fiber-optic pressure transducer has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to meet the demands of government and industry. The algorithm for extracting vehicle weight from the time-dependent sensor response is developed and presented in this report, along with data collected by the system for several classes of vehicles. These results show that the ORNL fiber-optic WIM system is a viable alternative to other commercial systems that are presently available. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  20. High speed optical wireless data transmission system for particle sensors in high energy physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, W.; Corsini, R.; Ciaramella, E.; Dell'Orso, R.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.

    2015-08-01

    High speed optical fiber or copper wire communication systems are frequently deployed for readout data links used in particle physics detectors. Future detector upgrades will need more bandwidth for data transfer, but routing requirements for new cables or optical fiber will be challenging due to space limitations. Optical wireless communication (OWC) can provide high bandwidth connectivity with an advantage of reduced material budget and complexity of cable installation and management. In a collaborative effort, Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna and INFN Pisa are pursuing the development of a free-space optical link that could be installed in a future particle physics detector or upgrade. We describe initial studies of an OWC link using the inner tracker of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector as a reference architecture. The results of two experiments are described: the first to verify that the laser source transmission wavelength of 1550 nm will not introduce fake signals in silicon strip sensors while the second was to study the source beam diameter and its tolerance to misalignment. For data rates of 2.5 Gb/s and 10 Gb/s over a 10 cm working distance it was observed that a tolerance limit of ±0.25 mm to ±0.8 mm can be obtained for misaligned systems with source beam diameters of 0.38 mm to 3.5 mm, respectively.

  1. Optical tomographic scanning target-tracking system based on single pixel sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baosheng; Wang, Yicheng; Yang, Jiuchun

    2015-11-01

    Optical tomography imaging had the characteristics of high resolution. The rotating periscope system and modulating plate with 65 slits were designed. Filter back projection (FBP) algorithm was applied to the one-dimensional signals, which were obtained by multi-angle scanning in modulating plate, to reconstruct two-dimensional image. Single pixel photoelectric sensor has high frequency response and can acquire high speed real-time signal. This work had carried on the simulation and experiment about scanning system based on the analysis and determination about the modulating plate's parameters, and verify the feasibility of scanning system. In this paper, the method plays an important role in developing novel target tracking system and provides deep foundation for deeper experimental research.

  2. Distributed sensor for water and pH measurements using fiber optics and swellable polymeric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michie, W. C.; Culshaw, B.; McKenzie, I.; Konstantakis, M.; Graham, N. B.; Moran, C.; Santos, F.; Bergqvist, E.; Carlstrom, B.

    1995-01-01

    We report on the design, construction and test of a generic form of sensor for making distributed measurements of a range of chemical parameters. The technique combines optical time-domain reflectometry with chemically sensitive water-swellable polymers (hydrogels). Initial experiments have concentrated on demonstrating a distributed water detector; however, gels have been developed that enable this sensor to be

  3. Spectrum-Modulating Fiber-Optic Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beheim, Glenn; Fritsch, Klaus

    1989-01-01

    Family of spectrum-modulating fiber-optic sensors undergoing development for use in aircraft-engine control systems. Fiber-optic sensors offer advantages of small size, high bandwidth, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and light weight. Furthermore, they reduce number of locations on aircraft to which electrical power has to be supplied.

  4. Concept and design of a fiber-optic and an I2C hybrid sensor bus system for telecommunication satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putzer, P.; Hurni, A.; Manhart, M.; Tiefenbeck, C.; Plattner, M.; Koch, A. W.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper the concept and design of the Hybrid Sensor Bus (HSB) system for telecommunication satellites is presented. The HSB development in the frame of an ESA-ARTES project has been started in 2011 and the system will be tested as flight demonstrator onboard the German Heinrich Hertz communication satellite (H2Sat) in 2016. In state-of-the-art telecommunication platforms hundreds of sensors are necessary for satellite control and monitoring. The sensors are wired point-to-point (p2p) to the satellite management unit (SMU) which results in a high mass impact but preliminary increases AIT effort and thereby the overall satellite costs. Sensor bus architectures reduce AIT cost by reduction of wiring effort, reduction in required test time and by providing a flexible sensor network topology. The HSB system is based on a modular concept including a controller module, a fiber-optic interrogator module and an I²C electric interrogator module The HSB system provides advanced performance which includes programmable and sensor specific alarm functions, averaging of dedicated sensor values and thereby a reduction of SMU processor load. The combination of electrical I2C sensors for punctual resolved measurements and fiber-optic sensors for e.g. thermal mapping of panels by embedding sensor fibers in the satellite structures results in a versatile system. In this paper we present the design of the HSB system taking into account the requirements from European platform manufacturers. The HSB design yields a product which can be implemented as replacement of standard p2p systems to build up a more cost efficient sensor system for geostationary satellites.

  5. Optical Sensor Technology Development and Deployment

    SciTech Connect

    B. G. Parker

    2005-01-24

    The objectives of this ESP (Enhanced Surveillance) project are to evaluate sensor performance for future aging studies of materials, components and weapon systems. The goal of this project is to provide analysis capability to experimentally identify and characterize the aging mechanisms and kinetics of Core Stack Assembly (CSA) materials. The work on fiber optic light sources, hermetic sealing of fiber optics, fiber optic hydrogen sensors, and detection systems will be discussed.

  6. Fiber optic light sensor.

    PubMed

    Chudyk, Wayne; Flynn, Kyle F

    2015-06-01

    We describe a low-cost fiber optic sensor for measuring photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in turbulent flow. Existing technology was combined in a novel way for probe development addressing the need for a small but durable instrument for use in flowing water. Optical components including fiber optics and a wide-spectrum light detector were used to separate light collection from electronic detection so that measurements could be completed in either the field or laboratory, in air or underwater. Connection of the detector to Arduino open-source electronics and a portable personal computer (PC) enabled signal processing and allowed data to be stored in a spreadsheet for ease of analysis. Calibration to a commercial cosine-corrected instrument showed suitable agreement with the added benefit that the small sensor face allowed measurements in tight spaces such as close to the streambed or within leafy or filamentous plant growth. Subsequently, we applied the probe in a separate study where over 35 experiments were successfully completed to characterize downward light attenuation in filamentous algae in turbulent flow. PMID:26009160

  7. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.A.; Sanchez, R.; Dulleck, G.R.

    1996-05-01

    This report covers the development of fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensors for monitoring dissolved hydrogen gas in transformer oil. The concentration of hydrogen gas is a measure of the corona and spark discharge within the transformer and reflects the state of health of the transformer. Key features of the instrument include use of palladium alloys to enhance hydrogen sensitivity, a microprocessor controlled instrument with RS-232, liquid crystal readout, and 4-20 ma. current loop interfaces. Calibration data for both sensors can be down loaded to the instrument through the RS-232 interface. This project was supported by the Technology Transfer Initiative in collaboration with J. W. Harley, Inc. through the mechanism of a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA).

  8. Novel Modified Optical Fibers for High Temperature In-Situ Miniaturized Gas Sensors in Advanced Fossil Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pickrell, Gary; Scott, Brian

    2014-06-30

    This report covers the technical progress on the program “Novel Modified Optical Fibers for High Temperature In-Situ Miniaturized Gas Sensors in Advanced Fossil Energy Systems”, funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Materials Science & Engineering and Electrical & Computer Engineering Departments at Virginia Tech, and summarizes technical progress from July 1st, 2005 –June 30th, 2014. The objective of this program was to develop novel fiber materials for high temperature gas sensors based on evanescent wave absorption in optical fibers. This project focused on two primary areas: the study of a sapphire photonic crystal fiber (SPCF) for operation at high temperature and long wavelengths, and a porous glass based fiber optic sensor for gas detection. The sapphire component of the project focused on the development of a sapphire photonic crystal fiber, modeling of the new structures, fabrication of the optimal structure, development of a long wavelength interrogation system, testing of the optical properties, and gas and temperature testing of the final sensor. The fabrication of the 6 rod SPCF gap bundle (diameter of 70μm) with a hollow core was successfully constructed with lead-in and lead-out 50μm diameter fiber along with transmission and gas detection testing. Testing of the sapphire photonic crystal fiber sensor capabilities with the developed long wavelength optical system showed the ability to detect CO2 at or below 1000ppm at temperatures up to 1000°C. Work on the porous glass sensor focused on the development of a porous clad solid core optical fiber, a hollow core waveguide, gas detection capabilities at room and high temperature, simultaneous gas species detection, suitable joining technologies for the lead-in and lead-out fibers and the porous sensor, sensor system sensitivity improvement, signal processing improvement, relationship between pore structure and fiber

  9. Research of labyrinth seals clearance test system based on optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Qin, Dongxing; Wang, Qimei; Dong, Zheng

    2006-11-01

    When light irradiates to a test part, the change of the position of the test part can make the intensity of the reflecting light alter accordingly, based on this mechanism of reflective light intensity modulation, a new scheme with optical-fiber displacement sensor is put forward to testing the tip clearance of labyrinth seals. By analysis and treatment of the data from calibration test in static condition, the relationship of the optical-fiber displacement sensor's output in static state and the position from the test part to the sensor are obtained, also influence of different environments to the response curves is analyzed. The results of the experiment show that the presented scheme is feasible, and the high measuring accuracy of the optical-fiber sensor can meet the prospective purpose.

  10. Ultra-sensitive optical oxygen sensors for characterisation of nearly anoxic systems

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Philipp; Staudinger, Christoph; Borisov, Sergey M.; Klimant, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen quantification in trace amounts is essential in many fields of science and technology. Optical oxygen sensors proved invaluable tools for oxygen measurements in a broad concentration range but until now neither optical nor electrochemical oxygen sensors were able to quantify oxygen in the sub-nanomolar concentration range. Herein we present new optical oxygen sensing materials with unmatched sensitivity. They rely on the combination of ultra-long decaying (several hundred milliseconds lifetime) phosphorescent boron- and aluminium-chelates and highly oxygen-permeable and chemically stable perfluorinated polymers. The sensitivity of the new sensors is improved up to 20-fold compared to state-of-the-art analogues. The limits of detection are as low as 5 parts per billion, volume in gas phase under atmospheric pressure or 7 picomolar in solution. The sensors enable completely new applications for monitoring of oxygen in previously inaccessible concentration ranges. PMID:25042041

  11. Ultra-sensitive optical oxygen sensors for characterization of nearly anoxic systems.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Philipp; Staudinger, Christoph; Borisov, Sergey M; Klimant, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen quantification in trace amounts is essential in many fields of science and technology. Optical oxygen sensors proved invaluable tools for oxygen measurements in a broad concentration range, but until now neither optical nor electrochemical oxygen sensors were able to quantify oxygen in the sub-nanomolar concentration range. Herein we present new optical oxygen-sensing materials with unmatched sensitivity. They rely on the combination of ultra-long decaying (several 100 ms lifetime) phosphorescent boron- and aluminium-chelates, and highly oxygen-permeable and chemically stable perfluorinated polymers. The sensitivity of the new sensors is improved up to 20-fold compared with state-of-the-art analogues. The limits of detection are as low as 5 p.p.b., volume in gas phase under atmospheric pressure or 7 pM in solution. The sensors enable completely new applications for monitoring of oxygen in previously inaccessible concentration ranges. PMID:25042041

  12. Low-coherence interferometric sensor system utilizing an integrated optics configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plissi, M. V.; Rogers, A. J.; Brassington, D. J.; Wilson, M. G. F.

    1995-08-01

    The implementation of a twin Mach-Zehnder reference interferometer in an integrated optics substrate is described. From measurements of the fringe visibilities, an identification of the fringe order is attempted as a way to provide an absolute sensor for any parameter capable of modifying the difference in path length between two interfering optical paths.

  13. Optical humidity sensor

    DOEpatents

    Tarvin, J.A.

    1987-02-10

    An optical dielectric humidity sensor is disclosed which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors. 2 figs.

  14. Optical humidity sensor

    DOEpatents

    Tarvin, Jeffrey A.

    1987-01-01

    An optical dielectric humidity sensor which includes a dielectric mirror having multiple alternating layers of two porous water-adsorbent dielectric materials with differing indices of refraction carried by a translucent substrate. A narrow-band polarized light source is positioned to direct light energy onto the mirror, and detectors are positioned to receive light energy transmitted through and reflected by the mirror. A ratiometer indicates humidity in the atmosphere which surrounds the dielectric mirror as a function of a ratio of light energies incident on the detectors.

  15. An Optical Actuation System and Curvature Sensor for a MR-compatible Active Needle

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Seok Chang; Quek, Zhan Fan; Renaud, Pierre; Black, Richard J.; Daniel, Bruce L.; Cutkosky, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    A side optical actuation method is presented for a slender MR-compatible active needle. The needle includes an active region with a shape memory alloy (SMA) wire actuator, where the wire generates a contraction force when optically heated by a laser delivered though optical fibers, producing needle tip bending. A prototype, with multiple side heating spots, demonstrates twice as fast an initial response compared to fiber tip heating when 0.8 W of optical power is applied. A single-ended optical sensor with a gold reflector is also presented to measure the curvature as a function of optical transmission loss. Preliminary tests with the sensor prototype demonstrate approximately linear response and a repeatable signal, independent of the bending history. PMID:26509099

  16. Microfiber Optical Sensors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jingyi; Wang, Yipei; Tong, Limin

    2014-01-01

    With diameter close to or below the wavelength of guided light and high index contrast between the fiber core and the surrounding, an optical microfiber shows a variety of interesting waveguiding properties, including widely tailorable optical confinement, evanescent fields and waveguide dispersion. Among various microfiber applications, optical sensing has been attracting increasing research interest due to its possibilities of realizing miniaturized fiber optic sensors with small footprint, high sensitivity, fast response, high flexibility and low optical power consumption. Here we review recent progress in microfiber optical sensors regarding their fabrication, waveguide properties and sensing applications. Typical microfiber-based sensing structures, including biconical tapers, optical gratings, circular cavities, Mach-Zehnder interferometers and functionally coated/doped microfibers, are summarized. Categorized by sensing structures, microfiber optical sensors for refractive index, concentration, temperature, humidity, strain and current measurement in gas or liquid environments are reviewed. Finally, we conclude with an outlook for challenges and opportunities of microfiber optical sensors. PMID:24670720

  17. Shack-Hartmann sensor based optical quality testing of whole slide imaging systems for digital pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeri, S. M.; Hulsken, Bas; van Vliet, Lucas J.; Stallinga, Sjoerd

    2015-03-01

    Whole Slide Imaging (WSI) systems are used in the emerging field of digital pathology for capturing high-resolution images of tissue slides at high throughput. We present a technique to measure the optical aberrations of WSI systems using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor as a function of field position. The resulting full-field aberration maps for the lowest order astigmatism and coma are analyzed using nodal aberration theory. According to this theory two coefficients describe the astigmatism and coma inherent to the optical design and another six coefficients are needed to describe the cumulative effects of all possible misalignments on astigmatism and coma. The nodal aberration theory appears to fit well to the experimental data. We have measured and analyzed the full-field aberration maps for two different objective lens-tube lens assemblies and found that only the optical design related astigmatism coefficient differed substantially between the two cases, but in agreement with expectations. We have also studied full-field aberration maps for intentional decenter and tilt and found that these affect the misalignment coefficient for constant coma (decenter) and the misalignment coefficient for linear astigmatism (tilt), while keeping all other nodal aberration theory coefficients constant.

  18. A fiber optic sensor system for control of rate-adaptive cardiac pacemakers and implantable defibrillators.

    PubMed

    Müller, Stefan; Hexamer, Martin; Werner, Jürgen

    2006-12-01

    Commercially available cardiac pacemakers and implantable cardioverters/defibrillators (ICDs) predominantly use an intracardiac-derived electrocardiogram (ECG) for the detection of arrhythmias. To achieve automatic control of the heart frequency in accordance with cardiovascular strain and improved detection of life-threatening arrhythmias, it is desirable to monitor the heart by an input signal correlated with the hemodynamic state. One possible approach to derive such a signal is to measure the inotropy (mechanical contraction strength of the heart muscle). For this purpose, an optoelectronic measurement system has been designed. The fundamental function of the system has been shown in earlier investigations using an isolated beating pig heart. In this paper the design of two algorithms for use in pacemakers and ICDs based on a fiber optic sensor signal is presented. PMID:17155869

  19. Continuous pH monitoring in a perfused bioreactor system using an optical pH sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Vani, Sundeep; Taylor, Thomas D.; Anderson, Melody M.

    2002-01-01

    Monitoring and regulating the pH of the solution in a bioprocess is one of the key steps in the success of bioreactor operation. An in-line optical pH sensor, based on the optical absorption properties of phenol red present in the medium, was developed and tested in this work for use in NASA space bioreactors based on a rotating wall-perfused vessel system supporting a baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cell culture. The sensor was tested over three 30-day and one 124-day cell runs. The pH sensor initially was calibrated and then used during the entire cell culture interval. The pH reported by the sensor was compared to that measured by a fiber optically coupled Shimadzu spectrophotometer and a blood gas analyzer. The maximum standard error of prediction for all the four cell runs for development pH sensor against BGA was +/-0.06 pH unit and for the fiber optically coupled Shimadzu spectrophotometer against the blood gas analyzer was +/-0.05 pH unit. The pH sensor system performed well without need of recalibration for 124 days. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Fiber optical sensors for aircraft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechstedt, Ralf D.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper selected fiber optical point sensors that are of potential interest for deployment in aircraft are discussed. The operating principles together with recent measurement results are described. Examples include a high-temperature combined pressure and temperature sensor for engine health, hydraulics and landing gear monitoring, an ultra-high sensitive pressure sensor for oil, pneumatic and fluid aero systems applications and a combined acceleration and temperature sensor for condition monitoring of rotating components.

  1. Optical fiber sensors for life support applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieberman, R. A.; Schmidlin, E. M.; Ferrell, D. J.; Syracuse, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary experimental results on systems designed to demonstrate sensor operation in regenerative food production and crew air supply applications are presented. The systems use conventional fibers and sources in conjunction with custom wavelength division multiplexers in their optical signal processing sections and nonstandard porous optical fibers in the optical sensing elements. It is considered to be possible to create practical sensors for life-support system applications, and particularly, in regenerative food production environments, based on based on reversible sensors for oxygen, carbon monoxide, and humidity.

  2. Development of a novel proton dosimetry system using an array of fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensors.

    PubMed

    Son, Jaeman; Kim, Meyoung; Shin, Dongho; Hwang, Uijung; Lee, Sebyeong; Lim, Youngkyung; Park, Jeonghoon; Park, Sung yong; Cho, Kwanho; Kim, Daeyong; Jang, Kyoung Won; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2015-12-01

    This study describes the development and evaluation of a new dosimetric system for proton therapy using an array of fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensors (AFCRS). The AFCRS was superior to a conventional, multi-layer ion chamber (MLIC) system in real-time data acquisition and cost effectiveness. PMID:26293200

  3. Development of optical diaphragm deflection sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghering, W. L.; Varshneya, D.; Jeffers, L. A.; Bailey, R. T.; Berthold, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop high-temperature pressure sensors using non-metallic components and optical sensing methods. The sensors are to operate over a temperature range from room temperature approx. 20C to 540C, to respond to internal pressure up to 690 kPa, to respond to external pressure up to 690 kPa, and to withstand external overpressure of 2070 kPa. Project tasks include evaluating sensing techniques and sensor systems. These efforts include materials and sensing method selection, sensor design, sensor fabrication, and sensor testing. Sensors are tested as a function of temperature, pressure, overpressure, and vibration. The project results show that high-temperature pressure sensors based on glass components and optical sensing methods are feasible. The microbend optical diaphragm deflection sensor exhibits the required sensitivity and stability for use as a pressure sensor with temperature compensation. for the microbend sensor, the 95% confidence level deviation of input pressure from the pressure calculated from the overall temperature-compensated calibration equation is 3.7% of full scale. The limitations of the sensors evaluated are primarily due to the restricted temperature range of suitable commercially available optical fibers and the problems associated with glass-to-metal pressure sealing over the entire testing temperature range.

  4. Silicon fiber optic sensors

    DOEpatents

    Pocha, Michael D.; Swierkowski, Steve P.; Wood, Billy E.

    2007-10-02

    A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially or wholly reflective surface on the free end of an integrated elongate channel or an integrated bounding wall of a chip of a wafer and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. Such a constructed device can be utilized to detect one or more physical parameters, such as, for example, strain, through the optical fiber using an optical detection system to provide measuring accuracies of less than aboutb0.1%.

  5. What must be the accuracy and target of optical sensor systems for patient monitoring?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Klaus H.; Kessler, Manfred D.

    2002-06-01

    Although the treatment in the intensive care unit has improved in recent years enabling greater surgical engagements and improving patients survival rate, no adequate monitoring is available in imminent severe pathological cases. Otherwise such kind of monitoring is necessary for early or prophylactic treatment in order to avoid or reduce the severity of the disease and protect the patient from sepsis or multiple organ failure. In these cases the common monitoring is limited, because clinical physiological and laboratory parameters indicate either the situation of macro-circulation or late disturbances of microcirculation, which arise previously on sub-cellular level. Optical sensor systems enable to reveal early variations in local capillary flow. The correlation between clinical parameters and changes in condition of oxygenation as a function of capillary flow disturbances is meaningful for the further treatment. The target should be to develop a predictive parameter, which is useful for detection and follow-up of changes in circulation.

  6. Design considerations for infrared fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Anheier, Norman C., Jr.; Osantowski, Robert E.; Matlock, Charlene A.; Olsen, Khris B.

    1994-03-01

    This presentation focuses on mechanical and electro-optical design considerations embodied in VOtectTM -- an infrared fiber optic sensor for volatile organic compounds. Presently, the VOtectTM system is configured for remote detection of hydrocarbon vapors associated with gasoline and other internal-combustion fuels. Using commercially available zirconate glass optical fibers, the sensor exploits the overlap of absorption spectra due to carbon-hydrogen stretching vibrations between 3.3 and 3.6 microns, with the optical output of an infrared HeNe laser operating at 3.39 microns. Compensation for position-dependent fiber bending losses is achieved using 1.15-micron radiation simultaneously emitted by the laser source. Initial laboratory evaluations of the VOtectTM system indicates detection sensitivities well below the lower explosion limits for petroleum distillates, indicating the usefulness of the sensor for petrochemical safety applications. The sensor is intrinsically safe (e.g., explosion-proof), since no electrical power is required at the probe tip. Preliminary sensor optical power budget calculations indicate that the zirconate fiber optic umbilical, which connects the sensor probe to the electro-optical detection system, can be as long as several hundred meters. Calibration data for a variety of hydrocarbons indicate linear relationships between ln(V/Vo) and vapor concentration, suggesting that the sensor should prove useful for on-line, real-time process control applications.

  7. Fiber-optic proximity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.; Hermann, W. A.; Primus, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    Proximity sensor for mechanical hand of remote manipulator incorporates fiber optics to conduct signals between light source and light detector. Fiber optics are not prone to noise from electromagnetic interference and radio-frequency interference as are sensors using long electrical cables.

  8. Monolithic fiber optic sensor assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, Scott

    2015-02-10

    A remote sensor element for spectrographic measurements employs a monolithic assembly of one or two fiber optics to two optical elements separated by a supporting structure to allow the flow of gases or particulates therebetween. In a preferred embodiment, the sensor element components are fused ceramic to resist high temperatures and failure from large temperature changes.

  9. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  10. Improved Optical Fiber Chemical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio O.; Rogowski, Robert S.

    1994-01-01

    Calculations, based on exact theory of optical fiber, have shown how to increase optical efficiency sensitivity of active-core, step-index-profile optical-fiber fluorosensor. Calculations result of efforts to improve efficiency of optical-fiber chemical sensor of previous concept described in "Making Optical-Fiber Chemical Sensors More Sensitive" (LAR-14525). Optical fiber chemical detector of enhanced sensitivity made in several configurations. Portion of fluorescence or chemiluminescence generated in core, and launched directly into bound electromagnetic modes that propagate along core to photodetector.

  11. Wavefront response matrix for closed-loop adaptive optics system based on non-modulation pyramid wavefront sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianxin; Bai, Fuzhong; Ning, Yu; Li, Fei; Jiang, Wenhan

    2012-06-01

    Pyramid wavefront sensor (PWFS) is a kind of wavefront sensor with high spatial resolution and high energy utilization. In this paper an adaptive optics system with PWFS as wavefront sensor and liquid-crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) as wavefront corrector is built in the laboratory. The wavefront response matrix is a key element in the close-loop operation. It can be obtained by measuring the real response to given aberrations, which is easily contaminated by noise and influenced by the inherent aberration in the optical system. A kind of analytic solution of response matrix is proposed, with which numerical simulation and experiment are also implemented to verify the performance of closed-loop correction of static aberration based on linear reconstruction theory. Results show that this AO system with the proposed matrix can work steadily in closed-loop operation.

  12. Miniaturised optical sensors for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, M. L.; Hanson, S. G.

    2010-04-01

    When addressing optical sensors for use in e.g. industry, compactness, robustness and performance are essentials. Adhering to these demands, we have developed a suit of compact optical sensors for the specific purposes of measuring angular velocity and linear translations of rigid objects. The technology is based on compact and low-cost laser sources such as Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs). The methods characterise the object motion by speckle translation in the near field (imaging) or far field (optical Fourier transform) by optical spatial filtering velocimetry. The volume of the two optical solutions is less than 1 cm3, including the application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), which processes the data and interfaces a PC/Laptop directly via a USB driver. The sensors are designed for working distances of 2 and 12 mm for near field and far field, respectively. We will consider the requirements for the optical designs in order to optimize the two sensor concepts for their respective purpose. For the angular velocity sensor the phase curvature of the illuminating beam is important in order to avoid parasitic contributions from any linear (transverse, in-plane) translations. The linear translation sensor is based on an imaging system. Therefore, the optical solution requires some kind of a beam-combining device because the VCSEL and the photodetectors being located in separate areas on the ASIC. We will present these two optical sensor designs and measurements for evaluation of their performance.

  13. Improved artificial bee colony algorithm for wavefront sensor-less system in free space optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Chaojun; Han, Xiang'e.

    2015-10-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) technology is an effective way to alleviate the effect of turbulence on free space optical communication (FSO). A new adaptive compensation method can be used without a wave-front sensor. Artificial bee colony algorithm (ABC) is a population-based heuristic evolutionary algorithm inspired by the intelligent foraging behaviour of the honeybee swarm with the advantage of simple, good convergence rate, robust and less parameter setting. In this paper, we simulate the application of the improved ABC to correct the distorted wavefront and proved its effectiveness. Then we simulate the application of ABC algorithm, differential evolution (DE) algorithm and stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm to the FSO system and analyze the wavefront correction capabilities by comparison of the coupling efficiency, the error rate and the intensity fluctuation in different turbulence before and after the correction. The results show that the ABC algorithm has much faster correction speed than DE algorithm and better correct ability for strong turbulence than SPGD algorithm. Intensity fluctuation can be effectively reduced in strong turbulence, but not so effective in week turbulence.

  14. Precision Fiber Optic Sensor Market Forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Jeff D.; Glasco, Jon; Dixon, Frank W.

    1986-01-01

    The worldwide market for precision fiber optic sensors is forecasted, 1984-1994. The forecast is based upon o Analysis of fiber optic sensor and related component current technology, and a forecast of technology advancement o Review and projection of demand for precision sensing, and the penetration which fiber optics will make into this market The analysis and projections are based mainly on interviews conducted worldwide with research teams, government agencies, systems contractors, medical and industrial laboratories, component suppliers and others. The worldwide market for precision (interferometric) fiber optic sensing systems is forecasted to exceed $0.8 billion by 1994. The forecast is segmented by geographical region (Europe, Japan and North America) and by function; o Gyroscope o Sonar o Gradiometer/Magnetometer o Other - Chemical Composition - Atmospheric Acoustic - Temperature - Position - Pressure Requirements for components are reviewed. These include special fiber, emitters and detectors, modulators, couplers, switches, integrated optical circuits and integrated optoelectronics. The advancement in component performance is forecasted. The major driving forces creating fiber optic sensor markets are reviewed. These include fiber optic sensor technical and economic advantages, increasingly stringent operational requirements, and technology evolution. The leading fiber optic sensor and related component development programs are reviewed. Component sources are listed. Funding sources for sensor and component development are outlined, and trends forecasted.

  15. Numerical modelling of interrogation systems for optical fibre Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, Daniel; Richardson, Steven; Wild, Graham

    2011-12-01

    There are a number of interrogation methods that can be used in optical Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensing system. For very high frequency signals interrogating the sensor signal from an FBG is limited to two intensiometric methods, edge filter detection and power detection. In edge filter detection, a broadband light source illuminates an FBG, the reflected spectrum is then passed through a spectral filter. In power detection, a narrowband light source with a wavelength corresponding to the 3dB point of the FBG is filtered by the FBG itself. Both methods convert the spectral shift of the FBG into intensity signals. These two categories each have a number of variations, all with different performance characteristics. In this work we present a numerical model for all of these interrogation systems. The numerical model is based on previous analytical modelling, which could only be utilised for perfect Gaussian profiles. However, interrogation systems can make use of non Gaussian shaped filters, or sources. The numerical modelling enables the different variations to be compared using identical component performance, showing the relative strengths and weakness of the systems in terms of useful parameters, including, signal-to-noise ratio, sensitivity, and dynamic resolution. The two different detection methods can also be compared side-by-side using the same FBG. Since the model is numerical, it enables real spectral data to be used for the various components (FBG, light source, filters). This has the added advantage of increasing the accuracy and usefulness of the model, over previous analytical work.

  16. Fiber optic multimode displacement sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, K.A.; Jarzynski, J.

    1996-04-01

    An underwater Optical Motion Sensor (OMS) based on a design first presented by W. B. Spillman, {ital Schlieren} {ital multimode} {ital fiber}-{ital optic} {ital hydrophone}, Applied Physics Letters 37(2), 15 July 1980, p. 145{endash}146 is described. The displacement sensor uses the same acoustooptical intensity modulation mechanism as Spillman, however the sensing mechanism is isolated from the ambient fluid environment by a small cylindrical aluminum enclosure (1{double_prime} OD{times}3/4{double_prime}). The enclosure contains an inertial mass and the fiber collimators. The inertial mass is suspended in the center of the enclosure by three small wires rigidly mounted to the walls. The mass and wires act as a cantilever beam system with a mechanical resonance near 100 Hz. The transduction mechanism consists of two opposed optical gratings aligned and positioned between the fiber collimators. One grating is mounted on the inertial mass while the other is mounted on the lower end cap of the enclosure. Relative motion between the gratings causes a modulation of the light transmitted through the gratings. The modulated beam is focused onto a photodetector and converted to electric current. The frequency response is flat from 200 Hz{endash}9 kHz with a minimum detectable displacement of 0.002 A and the dynamic range is 136 dB. The small size and light weight give the sensor an effective density of 1.08 g/cm{sup 3} making it almost neutrally buoyant in water. This in conjunction with the performance characteristics make this sensor suitable for use in acoustical sensing applications. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Toward Paper-Based Sensors: Turning Electrical Signals into an Optical Readout System.

    PubMed

    Liana, Devi D; Raguse, Burkhard; Gooding, J Justin; Chow, Edith

    2015-09-01

    Paper-based sensors are gaining increasing attention for their potential applications in resource-limited settings and for point-of-care analysis. However, chemical analysis of paper-based electronic sensors is frequently interpreted using complex software and electronic displays which compromise the advantages of using paper. In this work, we present two semiquantitative paper-based readout systems that can visually measure a change in resistance of a resistive-based sensor. The readout systems use electrochromic Prussian blue/polyaniline as an electrochromic indicator on a resistive gold nanoparticle film that is fabricated on paper. When the readout system is integrated with a resistive sensor in an electrical circuit, and a voltage is applied, the voltage drop along the readout system varies depending on the sensor's resistance. Due to the voltage gradient formed along the gold nanoparticle film, the overlaying Prussian blue/polyaniline will change color at voltages greater than its reduction voltage (green/blue for oxidized state and transparent for reduced state). Thus, the changes in resistances of a sensor can be semiquantified through color visualization by either measuring the length of the transparent film (analog readout system) or by counting the number of transparent segments (digital readout system). The work presented herein can potentially serve as an alternative paper-based display system for resistive sensors in instances where cost and weight is a premium. PMID:26329490

  18. In vivo monitoring of the gastrooesophageal system using optical fibre sensors.

    PubMed

    Baldini, Francesco

    2003-03-01

    In the present paper optical fibre sensors for the detection of foregut diseases are described, in particular, sensors for the detection of bile, carbon dioxide and pH. Bile-containing refluxes are measured by means of a sensor which uses bilirubin as natural marker. The sensor, which is already present on the market, has been clinically validated by various hospitals. The clinically relevant parameter is the exposure time of the stomach/oesophagus mucosa to the bile. When measured in the oesophagus, it has been shown to be closely correlated with the onset of Barrett's oesophagus or general oesophagitis. Recently, optical fibres have been proposed for the continuous monitoring of carbon dioxide in the stomach: an important parameter in critically ill patients. A clinically validated prototype has shown its superiority in comparison with the traditional method, that is based on gastric tonometry. For the sake of completeness, also gastric pH sensors are considered, although at the moment their development is stationary at the laboratory stage. PMID:12664171

  19. Fiber Optic Sensor Components and Systems for Smart Materials and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, R.

    1999-01-01

    The general objective of the funded research effort has been the development of discrete and distributed fiber sensors and fiber optic centered opto-electronic networks for the intelligent monitoring of phenomena in various aerospace structures related to NASA Marshall specific applications. In particular, we have proposed and have been developing technologies that we believe to be readily transferrable and which involve new fabrication techniques. The associated sensors developed can be incorporated into the matrix or on the surfaces of structures for the purpose of sensing stress, strain, temperature-both low and high, pressure field variations, phase changes, and the presence of various chemical constituents.

  20. Optical Communication System for Remote Monitoring and Adaptive Control of Distributed Ground Sensors Exhibiting Collective Intelligence

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, S.M.; Stantz, K.M.; Trahan, M.W.; Wagner, J.S.

    1998-11-01

    Comprehensive management of the battle-space has created new requirements in information management, communication, and interoperability as they effect surveillance and situational awareness. The objective of this proposal is to expand intelligent controls theory to produce a uniquely powerful implementation of distributed ground-based measurement incorporating both local collective behavior, and interoperative global optimization for sensor fusion and mission oversight. By using a layered hierarchal control architecture to orchestrate adaptive reconfiguration of autonomous robotic agents, we can improve overall robustness and functionality in dynamic tactical environments without information bottlenecks. In this concept, each sensor is equipped with a miniaturized optical reflectance modulator which is interactively monitored as a remote transponder using a covert laser communication protocol from a remote mothership or operative. Robot data-sharing at the ground level can be leveraged with global evaluation criteria, including terrain overlays and remote imaging data. Information sharing and distributed intelli- gence opens up a new class of remote-sensing applications in which small single-function autono- mous observers at the local level can collectively optimize and measure large scale ground-level signals. AS the need for coverage and the number of agents grows to improve spatial resolution, cooperative behavior orchestrated by a global situational awareness umbrella will be an essential ingredient to offset increasing bandwidth requirements within the net. A system of the type described in this proposal will be capable of sensitively detecting, tracking, and mapping spatial distributions of measurement signatures which are non-stationary or obscured by clutter and inter- fering obstacles by virtue of adaptive reconfiguration. This methodology could be used, for example, to field an adaptive ground-penetrating radar for detection of underground structures in

  1. Design and Performance Evaluation of Sensors and Actuators for Advanced Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art commercial sensors and actuators do not meet many of NASA s next generation spacecraft and instrument needs. Nor do they satisfy the DoD needs for satellite missions, especially micro/nano satellite missions. In an effort to develop advanced optical devices and instruments that meet mission requirements, NASA Langley recently completed construction of a new cleanroom housing equipment capable of fabricating high performance active optic and adaptive optic technologies including deformable mirrors, reconfigurable lenses (both refractive and diffractive), spectrometers, spectro-polarimeters, tunable filters and many other active optic devices. In addition to performance, these advanced optic technologies offer advantages in speed, size, weight, power consumption, and radiation tolerance. The active optic devices described in this paper rely on birefringent liquid crystal materials to alter either the phase or the polarization of the incoming light. Design considerations and performance evaluation results for various NASA applications are presented. Applications presented will include large space telescopes, optical communications, spacecraft windows, coronagraphs, and star trackers. Keywords: Photonics, Adaptive Optics, Tunable Filters, MEMs., MOEMs, Coronagraph, Star Tracker

  2. Electro-optical rendezvous and docking sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tubbs, David J.; Kesler, Lynn O.; Sirko, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    Electro-optical sensors provide unique and critical functionality for space missions requiring rendezvous, docking, and berthing. McDonnell Douglas is developing a complete rendezvous and docking system for both manned and unmanned missions. This paper examines our sensor development and the systems and missions which benefit from rendezvous and docking sensors. Simulation results quantifying system performance improvements in key areas are given, with associated sensor performance requirements. A brief review of NASA-funded development activities and the current performance of electro-optical sensors for space applications is given. We will also describe current activities at McDonnell Douglas for a fully functional demonstration to address specific NASA mission needs.

  3. Multi Mode Optical Sensor MMOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The development of a multimode optical sensor (MMOS) is reported. The objectives, accomplishments, and history of the program are presented along with a description of the MMOS. A collection of design studies, tradeoff studies, and test results are included.

  4. Low noise optical position sensor

    DOEpatents

    Spear, J.D.

    1999-03-09

    A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments. 14 figs.

  5. Low noise optical position sensor

    DOEpatents

    Spear, Jonathan David

    1999-01-01

    A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments.

  6. Multi optical path generator for fiber optic strain sensors multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hao; Yuan, Yonggui; Yuan, Libo

    2015-07-01

    A multi optical path generator based on a tunable long Fabry-Perot optical fiber cavity is proposed and demonstrated. It would be used in an optical fiber sensing system which could multiplex a number of fiber sensors with different gauge lengths. Using this optical path generator, we can get a sequence of light beams with different optical paths, which will be coupled to the fiber sensor array in the sensing system. The multi optical path lengths generated by the device are analyzed and discussed. And the relative intensity of the corresponding light beam is calculated. The multiplexing capability caused by the optical path generator is discussed and the experimental results are confirmed this. The system can be used in strain or deformation sensing for smart structure health monitoring.

  7. Feasibility of fiber optic displacement sensor scanning system for imaging of dental cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Husna Abdul; Che Ani, Adi Izhar; Harun, Sulaiman Wadi; Yasin, Moh.; Apsari, Retna; Ahmad, Harith

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential of intensity modulated fiber optic displacement sensor scanning system for the imaging of dental cavity. Here, we discuss our preliminary results in the imaging of cavities on various teeth surfaces, as well as measurement of the diameter of the cavities which are represented by drilled holes on the teeth surfaces. Based on the analysis of displacement measurement, the sensitivities and linear range for the molar, canine, hybrid composite resin, and acrylic surfaces are obtained at 0.09667 mV/mm and 0.45 mm 0.775 mV/mm and 0.4 mm 0.5109 mV/mm and 0.5 mm and 0.25 mV/mm and 0.5 mm, respectively, with a good linearity of more than 99%. The results also show a clear distinction between the cavity and surrounding tooth region. The stability, simplicity of design, and low cost of fabrication make it suitable for restorative dentistry.

  8. A Fiber Bragg Grating Sensor Interrogation System Based on a Linearly Wavelength-Swept Thermo-Optic Laser Chip

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung-Seok; Lee, Hwi Don; Kim, Hyo Jin; Cho, Jae Du; Jeong, Myung Yung; Kim, Chang-Seok

    2014-01-01

    A linearized wavelength-swept thermo-optic laser chip was applied to demonstrate a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor interrogation system. A broad tuning range of 11.8 nm was periodically obtained from the laser chip for a sweep rate of 16 Hz. To measure the linear time response of the reflection signal from the FBG sensor, a programmed driving signal was directly applied to the wavelength-swept laser chip. The linear wavelength response of the applied strain was clearly extracted with an R-squared value of 0.99994. To test the feasibility of the system for dynamic measurements, the dynamic strain was successfully interrogated with a repetition rate of 0.2 Hz by using this FBG sensor interrogation system. PMID:25177803

  9. A systems engineering approach to structural health monitoring of composites using embedded optical fibre Bragg sensors for aeronautical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wyk, A. J.; Roberson, Craig V.

    2011-06-01

    The need to perform structural health monitoring on composite primary structures in real time for their life cycle has become cardinal because of the drastic increase in composite usage on aircraft, helicopters and unmanned aerial systems. The Systems Engineering approach was followed to ensure that these efficient low weight high strength components are optimally, economically and safely utilized. Details of the phases involved in this approach are outlined. In this document the activities associated with the preliminary design phase of the Systems Engineering process will be emphasised. Glass embedded optical fibre Bragg sensors were identified as the most appropriate for the strain measurement essential for the structural health monitoring of composites. The necessary Interrogator instrumentation subsystem for data acquisition and an Algorithm analysis subsystem are outlined. Detail design aspects of only the embedded optical fibre Bragg sensor subsystem will be covered in this paper.

  10. Fiber optic voltage sensor for 420 kV electric power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnert, Klaus M.; Kostovic, Jadran; Pequignot, P.

    2000-11-01

    We present an optical fiber voltage sensor for 420 kV electric power lines. The sensor exploits the converse piezoelectric effect of quartz and measures the voltage by a line integration of the electric field. The alternating voltage is partitioned to a series of four cylinder-shaped quartz crystals, which are embedded in polyurethane resin within a 3.2-m long insulator tube of fiber reinforced epoxy. The alternating piezoelectric deformations of the crystals are sensed by a common elliptical-core dual-mode fiber, which is wound onto the circumferential crystal surfaces. The fiber is interrogated using low coherence interferometry. We determine the dielectric design of the sensor from a numerical analysis of the electric field distribution within and in the vicinity of the sensor. We experimentally verify the dielectric reliability under ac overvoltages up to 520 kV root mean square and lightning and switching impulse voltages up to 1425 and 1050 kV, respectively. Further, we investigate the sensor performance including accuracy, dynamic range, bandwidth, and temperature dependence.

  11. Optical fiber sensors using vibration wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Maria Q.; Suzuki, Hideyo

    1994-09-01

    Experimental research of new optical fiber sensors for monitoring civil infrastructure systems is presented. The proposed optical sensors employ a vibrating wire shoe tension can be modulated by external force, strain, or vibration and is translated into the change in the wire vibration frequency. The wire vibration frequency is detected by light sent to and reflected from the wire through an optical fiber cable. Compared to other existing optical fiber sensors which tend to suffer from the lack of reliability and robustness, the proposed sensors have two significant advantages: one is that the sensing head is a vibrating wire (rather than an optical fiber), which can sense a specific physical quantity without interference from miscellaneous effects; the other is that the wire vibration is a well understood physical phenomenon. In fact, with a high level of reliability, its frequency is optically measured and transmitted to recording and other devices through the optical fiber without attenuation or distortion. These advantages make the sensor system simple, reliable and robust, and hence more readily deployable in civil infrastructure applications.

  12. Optical satellite data volcano monitoring: a multi-sensor rapid response system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duda, Kenneth A.; Ramsey, Michael; Wessels, Rick L.; Dehn, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    of the ASTER Urgent Request Protocol (URP) for natural disaster monitoring and scientific analysis, has expanded the project to other volcanoes around the world and is in progress through 2011. The focus on ASTER data is due to the suitability of the sensor for natural disaster monitoring and the availability of data. The instrument has several unique facets that make it especially attractive for volcanic observations (Ramsey and Dehn, 2004). Specifically, ASTER routinely collects data at night, it has the ability to generate digital elevation models using stereo imaging, it can collect data in various gain states to minimize data saturation, it has a cross-track pointing capability for faster targeting, and it collects data up to ±85° latitude for better global coverage. As with any optical imaging-based remote sensing, the viewing conditions can negatively impact the data quality. This impact varies across the optical and thermal infrared wavelengths as well as being a function of the specific atmospheric window within a given wavelength region. Water vapor and cloud formation can obscure surface data in the visible and near infrared (VNIR)/shortwave infrared (SWIR) region due mainly to non-selective scattering of the incident photons. In the longer wavelengths of the thermal infrared (TIR), scattering is less of an issue, but heavy cloud cover can still obscure the ground due to atmospheric absorption. Thin clouds can be optically-transparent in the VNIR and TIR regions, but can cause errors in the extracted surface reflectance or derived surface temperatures. In regions prone to heavy cloud cover, optical remote sensing can be improved through increased temporal resolution. As more images are acquired in a given time period the chances of a clear image improve dramatically. The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) routine monitoring, which commonly collects 4-6 images per day of any north Pacific volcano, takes advantage of this fact. The rapid

  13. Optical networks for wideband sensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Lin Horng

    2011-12-01

    This thesis presents the realization of novel systems for optical sensing networks with an array of long-period grating (LPG) sensors. As a launching point of the thesis, the motivation to implement optical sensing network in precisely catering LPG sensors is presented. It highlights the flexibility of the sensing network to act as the foundation in order to boost the application of the various LPG sensor design in biological and chemical sensing. After the thorough study on the various optical sensing networks, sub-carrier multiplexing (SCM) and optical time division multiplexing (OTDM) schemes are adopted in conjunction with tunable laser source (TLS) to facilitate simultaneous interrogation of the LPG sensors array. In fact, these systems are distinct to have the capability to accommodate wideband optical sensors. Specifically, the LPG sensors which is in 20nm bandwidth are identified to operate in these systems. The working principles of the systems are comprehensively elucidated in this thesis. It highlights the mathematical approach to quantify the experimental setup of the optical sensing network. Additionally, the system components of the designs are identified and methodically characterized so that the components well operate in the designed environment. A mockup has been setup to demonstrate the application in sensing of various liquid indices and analyse the response of the LPG sensors in order to evaluate the performance of the systems. Eventually, the resemblance of the demultiplexed spectral response to the pristine spectral response are quantified to have excellent agreement. Finally, the promising result consistency of the systems is verified through repeatability test.

  14. Fiber optic gas sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Peng (Inventor); Buric, Michael P. (Inventor); Swinehart, Philip R. (Inventor); Maklad, Mokhtar S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gas sensor includes an in-fiber resonant wavelength device provided in a fiber core at a first location. The fiber propagates a sensing light and a power light. A layer of a material is attached to the fiber at the first location. The material is able to absorb the gas at a temperature dependent gas absorption rate. The power light is used to heat the material and increases the gas absorption rate, thereby increasing sensor performance, especially at low temperatures. Further, a method is described of flash heating the gas sensor to absorb more of the gas, allowing the sensor to cool, thereby locking in the gas content of the sensor material, and taking the difference between the starting and ending resonant wavelengths as an indication of the concentration of the gas in the ambient atmosphere.

  15. Fiber-Optic Chemical Sensors and Fiber-Optic Bio-Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Pospíšilová, Marie; Kuncová, Gabriela; Trögl, Josef

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes principles and current stage of development of fiber-optic chemical sensors (FOCS) and biosensors (FOBS). Fiber optic sensor (FOS) systems use the ability of optical fibers (OF) to guide the light in the spectral range from ultraviolet (UV) (180 nm) up to middle infrared (IR) (10 µm) and modulation of guided light by the parameters of the surrounding environment of the OF core. The introduction of OF in the sensor systems has brought advantages such as measurement in flammable and explosive environments, immunity to electrical noises, miniaturization, geometrical flexibility, measurement of small sample volumes, remote sensing in inaccessible sites or harsh environments and multi-sensing. The review comprises briefly the theory of OF elaborated for sensors, techniques of fabrications and analytical results reached with fiber-optic chemical and biological sensors. PMID:26437407

  16. Innovative system of very wide field optical sensors for space surveillance in the LEO region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimare, L.; Farnocchia, D.; Gronchi, G.; Milani, A.; Bernardi, F.; Rossi, A.

    2011-09-01

    We present the results of a large scale simulation, reproducing the behavior of a data center for the build-up and maintenance of a complete catalog of space debris in the upper part of the low Earth orbits region (LEO). The purpose is to determine the achievable performances of a network of advanced optical sensors, through the use of the newest orbit determination algorithms developed by the Department of Mathematics of Pisa (DM). Such a network was designed and proposed to the European Space Agency (ESA) in the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) framework by Carlo Gavazzi Space SpA (CGS), Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica (INAF), DM and Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologie dell'Informazione (ISTI-CNR). The latest developed orbit determination algorithms were used to process simulated observations from the proposed network. In particular two innovative methods for preliminary orbit determination based on the first integrals of the Kepler problem were compared, by using them to process the same data. In both cases, the results showed that it is possible to use a network of optical sensors to build up a catalog containing more than 98% of the objects with perigee height between 1100 and 2000 km, and diameter greater than 8 cm. Such a catalog is obtained in just two months of observations. However, such results depend upon specific assumptions on the sensor and on the software technologies.

  17. Optical sensors for aeronautics and space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, R. J.; Alexander, J.; Katz, R.; Terry, J.

    1980-01-01

    A review of some NASA and DOD programs to develop optical sensors with fiberoptics for instrumentation and control is presented. Fiberoptic systems offer some distinct advantages. Noise immunity is one important asset. Fiberoptic systems do not conduct electricity and therefore can be used in and near areas that contain explosive or flammable materials. One objective of these programs is to produce more reliable sensors and to improve the safety and operating economy of future aircraft and space vehicles.

  18. Optical temperature sensor utilizing birefringent crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quick, William H. (Inventor); James, Kenneth A. (Inventor); Strahan, Virgil H. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A temperature sensor comprising an optical transducer member having an array of birefringent crystals. The length and, accordingly, the sensitivity to temperature change of successive birefringent crystals varies according to a particular relationship. The transducer is interconnected with a fiber optic transmission and detecting system. Respective optical output signals that are transmitted from the birefringent crystals via the fiber optic transmission system are detected and decoded so as to correspond to digits of a numbering system, whereby an accurate digital representation of temperature can ultimately be provided.

  19. Characterization and simulation of optical sensors.

    PubMed

    Grapinet, M; De Souza, Ph; Smal, J-C; Blosseville, J-M

    2013-11-01

    Numerical simulation is gradually becoming an advantage in active safety. This is why the development of realistic numerical models enabling to substitute real truth by simulated truth is primordial. In order to provide an accurate and cost effective solution to simulate real optical sensor behavior, the software Pro-SiVIC™ has been developed. Simulations with the software Pro-SiVIC™ can replace real tests with optical sensors and hence allow substantial cost and time savings during the development of solutions for driver assistance systems. An optical platform has been developed by IFSTTAR (French Institute of Science and Technology for Transport, Development and Networks) to characterize and validate any existing camera, in order to measure their characteristics as distortion, vignetting, focal length, etc. By comparing real and simulated sensors with this platform, this paper demonstrates that Pro-SiVIC™ accurately reproduces real sensors' behavior. PMID:23735581

  20. Optical Manufacturing and Testing Requirements Identified by the NASA Science Instruments, Observatories and Sensor Systems Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Barney, Rich; Bauman, Jill; Feinberg, Lee; Mcleese, Dan; Singh, Upendra

    2011-01-01

    In August 2010, the NASA Office of Chief Technologist (OCT) commissioned an assessment of 15 different technology areas of importance to the future of NASA. Technology assessment #8 (TA8) was Science Instruments, Observatories and Sensor Systems (SIOSS). SIOSS assess the needs for optical technology ranging from detectors to lasers, x-ray mirrors to microwave antenna, in-situ spectrographs for on-surface planetary sample characterization to large space telescopes. The needs assessment looked across the entirety of NASA and not just the Science Mission Directorate. This paper reviews the optical manufacturing and testing technologies identified by SIOSS which require development in order to enable future NASA high priority missions.

  1. High-resolution spectrally-resolved fiber optic sensor interrogation system based on a standard DWDM laser module.

    PubMed

    Njegovec, Matej; Donlagic, Denis

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents a spectrally-resolved integration system suitable for the reading of Bragg grating, all-fiber Fabry-Perot, and similar spectrally-resolved fiber-optic sensors. This system is based on a standard telecommunication dense wavelength division multiplexing transmission module that contains a distributed feedback laser diode and a wavelength locker. Besides the transmission module, only a few additional opto-electronic components were needed to build an experimental interrogation system that demonstrated over a 2 nm wide wavelength interrogation range, and a 1 pm wavelength resolution. When the system was combined with a typical Bragg grating sensor, a strain resolution of 1 με and temperature resolution of 0.1 °C were demonstrated experimentally. The proposed interrogation system relies entirely on Telecordia standard compliant photonic components and can thus be straightforwardly qualified for use within the range of demanding applications. PMID:21164765

  2. Impact damage detection system using small-diameter optical fiber sensors wavily embedded in CFRP laminate structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsui, Hiroaki; Kawamata, Akio; Kimoto, Junichi; Isoe, Akira; Hirose, Yasuo; Sanda, Tomio; Takeda, Nobuo

    2003-08-01

    It is well known that barely visible damage is often induced in composite structures subjected to out-of plane impact, and the mechanical properties of the composites decrease markedly. In this study, some element technologies for the detection of the damage are explained. Those are (1) the technologies for the arrangement of embedded small-diameter optical fibers which have no serious effect on the mechanical properties of composites, (2) the technologies for the egress of the optical fibers using "the embedded connector for smart structures" which can be trimmed without care about the optical fibers, (3) the technologies for the damage detection system that has the functions for data acquisition and analysis, the evaluation of the initiation and the position of damage, and the visualization of damage information. The impact test using the composite airframe demonstrator is conducted. The sensors embedded in the upper panel of the stiffened cylindrical composite structure with 1.5 m in diameter and 3 m in length, are FBG sensors for strain measurement and the optical fibers for optical loss measurement. The detection of damage in the composite structures using a developed damage detection system is demonstrated.

  3. SnO2-MOF-Fabry-Perot humidity optical sensor system based on fast Fourier transform technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Aldaba, A.; Lopez-Torres, D.; Ascorbe, J.; Rota-Rodrigo, S.; Elosua, C.; Lopez-Amo, M.; Arregui, F. J.; Corres, J. M.; Auguste, J.-L.; Jamier, R.; Roy, P.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a new sensor system for relative humidity measurements based on a SnO2 sputtering deposition on a microstructured optical fiber (MOF) low-finesse Fabry-Perot (FP) sensing head is presented and characterized. The interrogation of the sensing head is carried out by monitoring the Fast Fourier Transform phase variations of the FP interference frequency. This method is low-sensitive to signal amplitude variations and also avoids the necessity of tracking the evolution of peaks and valleys in the spectrum. The sensor is operated within a wide humidity range (20%-90% relative humidity) with a maximum sensitivity achieved of 0.14rad/%. The measurement method uses a commercial optical interrogator as the only active element, this compact solution allows real time analysis of the data.

  4. Fiber optic and laser sensors V; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, Aug. 17-19, 1987

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Paula, Ramon P. (Editor); Udd, Eric (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume focus on recent developments in fiber optic and laser sensors. Topics discussed include electric and magnetic field sensors, fiber optic pressure sensors, fiber optic gyros, fiber optic sensors for aerospace applications, fiber sensor multiplexing, temperature sensors, and specialized fiber optic sensors. Papers are presented on remote fiber optic sensors for angular orientation; fiber optic rotation sensor for space missions; adaptation of an electro-optic monitoring system to aerospace structures; optical fiber sensor for dust concentration measurements; and communication-sensing system using a single optical fiber.

  5. Porous glasses for optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorosz, Dominik; Procyk, Bernadeta

    2006-03-01

    Microporous glasses from the Na II0-B II0 3-Si0 II system can be obtained by appropriate thermal and chemical treatment. During the thermal treatment the separation of the borate phase from the silicon skeleton has been occurred. The borates are in the form small drops joined to each other. In the course of chemical treatment the borates become leached in water, water solutions of acids or basis and the glass becomes porous. Microporous glasses may find application in many branches of science and engineering. The applications depend on the internal arrangement, size and shape of pores. These parameters may be in a wide range modified by a change of the chemical composition. The received porous glass was used as an element in optical fibre NO II sensor. The specific coloration reaction between organic reagents and NO II in the pores was occurred. It is possible to detection of 10-50 ppm NO II level.

  6. Evaluation of Underwater Adhesives and Friction Coatings for In Situ Attachment of Fiber Optic Sensor System for Subsea Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Henry H.; Le, Suy Q.; Orndoff, Evelyne S.; Smith, Frederick D.; Tapia, Alma S.; Brower, David V.

    2012-01-01

    Integrity and performance monitoring of subsea pipelines and structures provides critical information for managing offshore oil and gas production operation and preventing environmentally damaging and costly catastrophic failure. Currently pipeline monitoring devices require ground assembly and installation prior to the underwater deployment of the pipeline. A monitoring device that could be installed in situ on the operating underwater structures could enhance the productivity and improve the safety of current offshore operation. Through a Space Act Agreement (SAA) between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) and Astro Technology, Inc. (ATI), JSC provides technical expertise and testing facilities to support the development of fiber optic sensor technologies by ATI. This paper details the first collaboration effort between NASA JSC and ATI in evaluating underwater applicable adhesives and friction coatings for attaching fiber optic sensor system to subsea pipeline. A market survey was conducted to examine different commercial ]off ]the ]shelf (COTS) underwater adhesive systems and to select adhesive candidates for testing and evaluation. Four COTS epoxy based underwater adhesives were selected and evaluated. The adhesives were applied and cured in simulated seawater conditions and then evaluated for application characteristics and adhesive strength. The adhesive that demonstrated the best underwater application characteristics and highest adhesive strength were identified for further evaluation in developing an attachment system that could be deployed in the harsh subsea environment. Various friction coatings were also tested in this study to measure their shear strengths for a mechanical clamping design concept for attaching fiber optic sensor system. A COTS carbide alloy coating was found to increase the shear strength of metal to metal clamping interface by up to 46 percent. This study provides valuable data for

  7. Fiber-Optic Temperature Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maram, Jonathan M.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed sensor measures temperatures over wide range, from cryogenic liquids to burning gases. Made in part of optical fibers, sensor lighter in weight than thermocouple and immune to electromagnetic interference. Device does not respond to temperatures elsewhere than at sensing tip. Thermal expansion and contraction of distance between fiber end and mirror alters interference between light reflected from those two surfaces, thereby giving interferometric indication of temperatures.

  8. Fiber optic sensor and method for making

    DOEpatents

    Vartuli, James Scott; Bousman, Kenneth Sherwood; Deng, Kung-Li; McEvoy, Kevin Paul; Xia, Hua

    2010-05-18

    A fiber optic sensor including a fiber having a modified surface integral with the fiber wherein the modified surface includes an open pore network with optical agents dispersed within the open pores of the open pore network. Methods for preparing the fiber optic sensor are also provided. The fiber optic sensors can withstand high temperatures and harsh environments.

  9. Integrated-Optic Oxygen Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza, Edgar A.; Lieberman, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Compact optical oxygen sensors with self-calibration capabilities are undergoing development. A sensor of this type features a single-chip, integrated-optic design implemented by photolithographic fabrication of optical waveguides in a photosensitive porous glass. The porosity serves as both a matrix for retention of an oxygen-sensitive fluorescent indicator chemical and a medium for diffusion of oxygen to the chemical from the ambient air to be monitored. Each sensor includes at least one such waveguide exposed to the atmosphere and at least one covered with metal for isolation from the atmosphere. The covered one serves as a reference channel. In operation, the concentration of oxygen is deduced from the intensity and lifetime of the fluorescence in the exposed channel, with the help of calibration data acquired via the reference channel. Because the sensory chemical is placed directly in and throughout the cross section of the light path, approximately 99 percent of the light in the waveguide is available for interaction with the chemical, in contradistinction to only about 1 percent of the light in an optical sensor that utilizes evanescentwave coupling. Hence, a sensor of this type is significantly more sensitive.

  10. Fiber-optic temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect

    O`Rourke, P.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Jantzen, C.M.; Ramsey, W.G.; Hopkins, C.D.

    1993-10-01

    Researchers at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) have developed a class of fiber-optic temperature sensors based upon temperature induced changes in the absorption spectrum of selected materials. For example, a neodymium (Nd) doped glass sensor can be used over a very broad temperature range ({minus}196 to 500{degree}C) and provide good precision and accuracy ({plus_minus}1{degree}C). This type temperature probe is constructed so that light from a fiber optic cable shines through the Nd glass and is reflected onto a second fiber optic cable. Light from this second fiber optic is measured by a diode array spectrophotometer, and the absorption spectrum of the Nd glass used to compute temperature.

  11. Hybrid Piezoelectric/Fiber-Optic Sensor Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Mark; Qing, Xinlin

    2004-01-01

    Hybrid piezoelectric/fiber-optic (HyPFO) sensor sheets are undergoing development. They are intended for use in nondestructive evaluation and long-term monitoring of the integrity of diverse structures, including aerospace, aeronautical, automotive, and large stationary ones. It is anticipated that the further development and subsequent commercialization of the HyPFO sensor systems will lead to economic benefits in the form of increased safety, reduction of life-cycle costs through real-time structural monitoring, increased structural reliability, reduction of maintenance costs, and increased readiness for service. The concept of a HyPFO sensor sheet is a generalization of the concept of a SMART Layer(TradeMark), which is a patented device that comprises a thin dielectric film containing an embedded network of distributed piezoelectric actuator/sensors. Such a device can be mounted on the surface of a metallic structure or embedded inside a composite-material structure during fabrication of the structure. There is has been substantial interest in incorporating sensors other than piezoelectric ones into SMART Layer(TradeMark) networks: in particular, because of the popularity of the use of fiber-optic sensors for monitoring the "health" of structures in recent years, it was decided to incorporate fiber-optic sensors, giving rise to the concept of HyPFO devices.

  12. All-digital demodulation system of interferometric fiber optic sensors using an improved PGC algorithm based on fundamental frequency mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ai-ling; Wang, Kai-han; Zhang, Shuai; Wang, Yan

    2015-05-01

    We present an all-digital demodulation system of interferometric fiber optic sensor based on an improved arctangent-differential-self-multiplying (arctan-DSM) algorithm. The total harmonic distortion (THD) and the light intensity disturbance (LID) are also suppressed, the same as those in the traditional arctan-DSM algorithm. Moreover, the lowest sampling frequency is also reduced by introducing anti-aliasing filter, so the occupation of the system memory is reduced. The simulations show that the improved algorithm can correctly demodulate cosine signal and chirp signal with lower sampling frequency.

  13. Optical high acidity sensor

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, B.S.; Nekimken, H.L.; Carey, W.P.; O`Rourke, P.E.

    1997-07-22

    An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber. 10 figs.

  14. Optical high acidity sensor

    DOEpatents

    Jorgensen, Betty S.; Nekimken, Howard L.; Carey, W. Patrick; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining acid concentrations in solutions having acid concentrations of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar is disclosed. The apparatus includes a chamber for interrogation of the sample solution, a fiber optic light source for passing light transversely through the chamber, a fiber optic collector for receiving the collimated light after transmission through the chamber, a coating of an acid resistant polymeric composition upon at least one fiber end or lens, the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution within the chamber and having a detectable response to acid concentrations within the range of from about 0.1 Molar to about 16 Molar, a measurer for the response of the polymeric composition in contact with the sample solution, and, a comparer of the measured response to predetermined standards whereby the acid molarity of the sample solution within the chamber can be determined. Preferably, a first lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic light source, the first lens adapted to collimate light from the fiber optic light source, and a second lens is attached to the end of the fiber optic collector for focusing the collimated light after transmission through the chamber.

  15. Optical network of silicon micromachined sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Mark L.; Burns, David W.; Zook, J. David

    1996-03-01

    The Honeywell Technology Center, in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin and the Mobil Corporation, and under funding from this ARPA sponsored program, are developing a new type of `hybrid' micromachined silicon/fiber optic sensor that utilizes the best attributes of each technology. Fiber optics provide a noise free method to read out the sensor without electrical power required at the measurement point. Micromachined silicon sensor techniques provide a method to design many different types of sensors such as temperature, pressure, acceleration, or magnetic field strength and report the sensor data using FDM methods. Our polysilicon resonant microbeam structures have a built in Fabry-Perot interferometer that offers significant advantages over other configurations described in the literature. Because the interferometer is an integral part of the structure, the placement of the fiber becomes non- critical, and packaging issues become considerably simpler. The interferometer spacing are determined by the thin-film fabrication processes and therefore can be extremely well controlled. The main advantage, however, is the integral vacuum cavity that ensures high Q values. Testing results have demonstrated relaxed alignment tolerances in packaging these devices, with an excellent Signal to Noise Ratio. Networks of 16 or more sensors are currently being developed. STORM (Strain Transduction by Optomechanical Resonant Microbeams) sensors can also provide functionality and self calibration information which can be used to improve the overall system reliability. Details of the sensor and network design, as well as test results, are presented.

  16. High-Temperature Optical Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Varga, Donald J.; Floyd, Bertram M.

    2010-01-01

    A high-temperature optical sensor (see Figure 1) has been developed that can operate at temperatures up to 1,000 C. The sensor development process consists of two parts: packaging of a fiber Bragg grating into a housing that allows a more sturdy thermally stable device, and a technological process to which the device is subjected to in order to meet environmental requirements of several hundred C. This technology uses a newly discovered phenomenon of the formation of thermally stable secondary Bragg gratings in communication-grade fibers at high temperatures to construct robust, optical, high-temperature sensors. Testing and performance evaluation (see Figure 2) of packaged sensors demonstrated operability of the devices at 1,000 C for several hundred hours, and during numerous thermal cycling from 400 to 800 C with different heating rates. The technology significantly extends applicability of optical sensors to high-temperature environments including ground testing of engines, flight propulsion control, thermal protection monitoring of launch vehicles, etc. It may also find applications in such non-aerospace arenas as monitoring of nuclear reactors, furnaces, chemical processes, and other hightemperature environments where other measurement techniques are either unreliable, dangerous, undesirable, or unavailable.

  17. Development of dual-probe atomic force microscopy system using optical beam deflection sensors with obliquely incident laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunemi, Eika; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2011-03-01

    We developed a dual-probe (DP) atomic force microscopy (AFM) system that has two independently controlled probes. The deflection of each cantilever is measured by the optical beam deflection (OBD) method. In order to keep a large space over the two probes for an objective lens with a large numerical aperture, we employed the OBD sensors with obliquely incident laser beams. In this paper, we describe the details of our developed DP-AFM system, including analysis of the sensitivity of the OBD sensor for detection of the cantilever deflection. We also describe a method to eliminate the crosstalk caused by the vertical translation of the cantilever. In addition, we demonstrate simultaneous topographic imaging of a test sample by the two probes and surface potential measurement on an α-sexithiophene (α-6T) thin film by one probe while electrical charges were injected by the other probe.

  18. Development of dual-probe atomic force microscopy system using optical beam deflection sensors with obliquely incident laser beams.

    PubMed

    Tsunemi, Eika; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2011-03-01

    We developed a dual-probe (DP) atomic force microscopy (AFM) system that has two independently controlled probes. The deflection of each cantilever is measured by the optical beam deflection (OBD) method. In order to keep a large space over the two probes for an objective lens with a large numerical aperture, we employed the OBD sensors with obliquely incident laser beams. In this paper, we describe the details of our developed DP-AFM system, including analysis of the sensitivity of the OBD sensor for detection of the cantilever deflection. We also describe a method to eliminate the crosstalk caused by the vertical translation of the cantilever. In addition, we demonstrate simultaneous topographic imaging of a test sample by the two probes and surface potential measurement on an α-sexithiophene (α-6T) thin film by one probe while electrical charges were injected by the other probe. PMID:21456752

  19. Measurement of radial expansion and tumbling motion of a high-speed rotor using an optical sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, P.; Dreier, F.; Pfister, T.; Czarske, J.; Haupt, T.; Hufenbach, W.

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the load capacity and the strength properties of high-speed rotors, dynamic deformation and vibration measurements are of importance, in particular at lightweight composite devices which cannot be simulated reliably. This is a challenging task in metrology since non-contact inspection techniques are required which offer micron uncertainties and high temporal resolution simultaneously, also under vacuum conditions. In order to meet these requirements, a non-incremental laser Doppler distance sensor system was developed using fiber and diffractive optics. In this paper we present for the first time high-speed deformation measurements of a cylindrical steel rotor using this novel sensor system. The radial rotor expansion of only some microns was determined despite the presence of an unsteady tumbling motion of the rotor, which was measured simultaneously. Future prospects are discussed including the possibility to measure non-metallic devices such as fiber-reinforced composites.

  20. A Novel Error Model of Optical Systems and an On-Orbit Calibration Method for Star Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuang; Geng, Yunhai; Jin, Rongyu

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the on-orbit measurement accuracy of star sensors, the effects of image-plane rotary error, image-plane tilt error and distortions of optical systems resulting from the on-orbit thermal environment were studied in this paper. Since these issues will affect the precision of star image point positions, in this paper, a novel measurement error model based on the traditional error model is explored. Due to the orthonormal characteristics of image-plane rotary-tilt errors and the strong nonlinearity among these error parameters, it is difficult to calibrate all the parameters simultaneously. To solve this difficulty, for the new error model, a modified two-step calibration method based on the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and Least Square Methods (LSM) is presented. The former one is used to calibrate the main point drift, focal length error and distortions of optical systems while the latter estimates the image-plane rotary-tilt errors. With this calibration method, the precision of star image point position influenced by the above errors is greatly improved from 15.42% to 1.389%. Finally, the simulation results demonstrate that the presented measurement error model for star sensors has higher precision. Moreover, the proposed two-step method can effectively calibrate model error parameters, and the calibration precision of on-orbit star sensors is also improved obviously. PMID:26703599

  1. A Novel Error Model of Optical Systems and an On-Orbit Calibration Method for Star Sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Geng, Yunhai; Jin, Rongyu

    2015-01-01

    In order to improve the on-orbit measurement accuracy of star sensors, the effects of image-plane rotary error, image-plane tilt error and distortions of optical systems resulting from the on-orbit thermal environment were studied in this paper. Since these issues will affect the precision of star image point positions, in this paper, a novel measurement error model based on the traditional error model is explored. Due to the orthonormal characteristics of image-plane rotary-tilt errors and the strong nonlinearity among these error parameters, it is difficult to calibrate all the parameters simultaneously. To solve this difficulty, for the new error model, a modified two-step calibration method based on the Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) and Least Square Methods (LSM) is presented. The former one is used to calibrate the main point drift, focal length error and distortions of optical systems while the latter estimates the image-plane rotary-tilt errors. With this calibration method, the precision of star image point position influenced by the above errors is greatly improved from 15.42% to 1.389%. Finally, the simulation results demonstrate that the presented measurement error model for star sensors has higher precision. Moreover, the proposed two-step method can effectively calibrate model error parameters, and the calibration precision of on-orbit star sensors is also improved obviously. PMID:26703599

  2. Design and evaluation of an optical fine-pointing control system for telescopes utilizing a digital star sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostroff, A. J.; Romanczyk, K. C.

    1973-01-01

    One of the most significant problems associated with the development of large orbiting astronomical telescopes is that of maintaining the very precise pointing accuracy required. A proposed solution to this problem utilizes dual-level pointing control. The primary control system maintains the telescope structure attitude stabilized within the field of view to the desired accuracy. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of optically stabilizing the star images to the desired accuracy a regulating system has been designed and evaluated. The control system utilizes a digital star sensor and an optical star image motion compensator, both of which have been developed for this application. These components have been analyzed mathematically, analytical models have been developed, and hardware has been built and tested.

  3. Optical Spatial Filter Sensor for Ground Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yasunobu; Uno, Tetsuya; Takagi, Junichi; Yamashita, Tsukasa

    1995-01-01

    The prototype for a ground speed sensor has been designed, fabricated and evaluated. It works on the principle of optical spatial filtering and uses pulse driven light emitting diodes as a source of illumination. The sensor was tested at speeds ranging from 2 to 50 km/h, and an accuracy of 1.5 km/h was obtained with response time of 30 ms, height from ground of from 230 to 370 mm and on various road surfaces. The sensor is viewed as beneficial for use in a vehicle’s antilock braking system and will contribute to traffic safety.

  4. Fiber-optic shock position sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, J.D.

    1993-03-01

    This report describes work performed for the development of a fiber-optic shock position sensor used to measure the location of a shock front in the neighborhood of a nuclear explosion. Such a measurement would provide a hydrodynamic determination of nuclear yield. The original proposal was prompted by the Defense Nuclear Agency's interest in replacing as many electrical sensors as possible with their optical counterparts for the verification of a treaty limiting the yield of a nuclear device used in underground testing. Immunity to electromagnetic pulse is the reason for the agency's interest; unlike electrical sensors and their associated cabling, fiber-optic systems do not transmit to the outside world noise pulses from the device containing secret information.

  5. Fiber optic sensors for military, industrial and commercial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, K. A.; Quick, W. H.; Strahan, V. H.

    1978-01-01

    Four examples of specific fiber optic sensor system designs, each of which demonstrates a different optical modulation format, are described. The birefrigent temperature transducer illustrates direct digital signal modulation. The temperature/pressure dependent semiconductor filter illustrates high-pass optical wavelength signal encoding. The coupled polarized-mode transducer shows how a solid-state sensor can produce narrow-bandpass optical wavelength signal encoding. The luminescent temperature sensor illustrates a way to construct a solid state sensor in order to produce pulse width modulation of an optical signal.

  6. Rare Earth Optical Temperature Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Wolford, David S.

    2000-01-01

    A new optical temperature sensor suitable for high temperatures (greater than 1700 K) and harsh environments is introduced. The key component of the sensor is the rare earth material contained at the end of a sensor that is in contact with the sample being measured. The measured narrow wavelength band emission from the rare earth is used to deduce the sample temperature. A simplified relation between the temperature and measured radiation was verified experimentally. The upper temperature limit of the sensor is determined by material limits to be approximately 2000 C. The lower limit, determined by the minimum detectable radiation, is found to be approximately 700 K. At high temperatures 1 K resolution is predicted. Also, millisecond response times are calculated.

  7. Fiber optic (flight quality) sensors for advanced aircraft propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppel, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Development of flight prototype, fiber-optic sensing system components for measuring nine sensed parameters (three temperatures, two speeds, three positions, and one flame) on an F404-400 aircraft engine is described. Details of each sensor's design, functionality, and environmental testing, and the electro-optics architecture for sensor signal conditioning are presented. Eight different optical sensing techniques were utilized. Design, assembly, and environmental testing of an engine-mounted, electro-optics chassis unit (EOU), providing MIL-C-1553 data output, are related. Interconnection cables and connectors between the EOU and the sensors are identified. Results of sensor/cable/circuitry integrated testing, and installation and ground testing of the sensor system on an engine in October 1993 and April 1994 are given, including comparisons with the engine control system's electrical sensors. Lessons learned about the design, fabrication, testing, and integration of the sensor system components are included.

  8. Fiber optic moisture sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kirkham, R.R.

    1984-08-03

    A method and apparatus for sensing moisture changes by utilizing optical fiber technology. One embodiment uses a reflective target at the end of an optical fiber. The reflectance of the target varies with its moisture content and can be detected by a remote unit at the opposite end of the fiber. A second embodiment utilizes changes in light loss along the fiber length. This can be attributed to changes in reflectance of cladding material as a function of its moisture content. It can also be affected by holes or inserts interposed in the cladding material and/or fiber. Changing light levels can also be coupled from one fiber to another in an assembly of fibers as a function of varying moisture content in their overlapping lengths of cladding material.

  9. Novel NDE fiber optic corrosion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, Paul S.; Ikegami, Roy; Shrader, John E.; Sherrer, David; Zabaronick, Noel; Zeakes, Jason S.; Murphy, Kent A.; Claus, Richard O.

    1996-05-01

    Life extension programs for military metallic aircraft are becoming increasingly important as defense budgets shrink and world economies realign themselves to an uncertain future. For existing military weapon systems, metallic corrosion damage costs an estimated $8 billion per year. One approach to reducing this cost is to develop a reliable method to detect and monitor corrosion in hidden metallic structure with the use of corrosion sensors which would give an early indication of corrosion without significant disassembly. This paper describes the current status of the development, analysis, and testing of a fiber optic corrosion sensor developed jointly by Boeing and Virginia Tech Fiber & Electro-Optics Research Center and sponsored by USAF Wright Laboratory, Materials Directorate, contract #F33615-93-C-5368. In the sensor which is being developed under this contract, the normal cladding is removed in the sensor region, and replaced with aluminum alloy and allowed to corrode on coupons representative of C/KC-135 body structure in an ASTM B117 salt spray chamber. In this approach, the optical signal out of the sensor is designed to increase as corrosion takes place. These test results to determine the correlation between sensor output and structural degradation due to corrosion are discussed.

  10. Aluminum alloy clad fiber optic corrosion sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, Paul S.; Ikegami, Roy; Shrader, John E.; Sherrer, David; Zabaronick, Noel; Zeakes, Jason S.; Murphy, Kent A.; Claus, Richard O.

    1997-06-01

    Life extension programs for military metallic aircraft are becoming increasingly important as defense budgets shrink and world economies realign themselves to an uncertain future. For existing military weapon systems, metallic corrosion damage costs as estimated $DOL8 billion per year. One approach to reducing this cost is to develop a reliable method to detect and monitor corrosion in hidden metallic structure with the use of corrosion sensors which would give an early indication of corrosion without significant disassembly, thereby reducing maintenance costs. This presentation describes the development, analysis, and testing of a fiber optic corrosion sensor developed jointly with the Virginia Polytechnic Fiber and Electro-Optics Research Center and sponsored by Wright Laboratory Materials Directorate. In the sensor which was researched, the normal cladding is removed in the sensor region, and replaced with aluminum alloy and allowed to corrode on coupons representative of C/KC-135 body structure in an ASTM B117 salt spray chamber and a Boeing developed Crevice Corrosion Cell. In this approach, the optical signal output of the sensor was originally designed to increase as corrosion takes place, however interaction with the corrosion byproducts yielded different results than anticipated. These test results to determine a correlation between the sensor output and the structural degradation due to corrosion are discussed.

  11. Development of integrated damage detection system for international America's Cup class yacht structures using a fiber optic distributed sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyoshi, Shimada; Naruse, Hiroshi; Uzawa, Kyoshi; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro

    2000-06-01

    We constructed a new health monitoring system to detect damage using a fiber optic distributed sensor, namely a Brillouin optical time domain reflectometer (BOTDR), and installed it in International America's Cup Class (IACC) yachts, the Japanese entry in America's Cup 2000. IACC yachts are designed to be as fast as possible, so it is essential that they are lightweight and encounter minimum water resistance. Advanced composite sandwich structures, made with carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) skins and a honeycomb core, are used to achieve the lightweight structure. Yacht structure designs push the strength of the materials to their limit and so it is important to detect highly stressed or damaged regions that might cause a catastrophic fracture. The BOTDR measures changes in the Brillouin frequency shift caused by distributed strain along one optical fiber. We undertook two experiments: a pulling test and a four point bending test on a composite beam. The former showed that no slippage occurred between the optical fiber glass and its coating. The latter confirmed that a debonding between the skin and the core of 300 mm length could be found with the BOTDR. Next we examined the effectiveness with which this system can assess the structural integrity of IACC yachts. The results show that our system has the potential for use as a damage detection system for smart structures.

  12. A near-infrared tip-tilt sensor for the Keck I laser guide star adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wizinowich, Peter; Smith, Roger; Biasi, Roberto; Cetre, Sylvain; Dekany, Richard; Femenia-Castella, Bruno; Fucik, Jason; Hale, David; Neyman, Chris; Pescoller, Dietrich; Ragland, Sam; Stomski, Paul; Andrighettoni, Mario; Bartos, Randy; Bui, Khanh; Cooper, Andrew; Cromer, John; van Dam, Marcos; Hess, Michael; James, Ean; Lyke, Jim; Rodriguez, Hector; Stalcup, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The sky coverage and performance of laser guide star (LGS) adaptive optics (AO) systems is limited by the natural guide star (NGS) used for low order correction. This limitation can be dramatically reduced by measuring the tip and tilt of the NGS in the near-infrared where the NGS is partially corrected by the LGS AO system and where stars are generally several magnitudes brighter than at visible wavelengths. We present the design of a near-infrared tip-tilt sensor that has recently been integrated with the Keck I telescope's LGS AO system along with some initial on-sky results. The implementation involved modifications to the AO bench, real-time control system, and higher level controls and operations software that will also be discussed. The tip-tilt sensor is a H2RG-based near-infrared camera with 0.05 arc second pixels. Low noise at high sample rates is achieved by only reading a small region of interest, from 2×2 to 16×16 pixels, centered on an NGS anywhere in the 100 arc second diameter field. The sensor operates at either Ks or H-band using light reflected by a choice of dichroic beamsplitters located in front of the OSIRIS integral field spectrograph.

  13. Design, development, and testing of a lightweight optical sensor cover system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, Mike; Christiansen, Scott

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses aspects of the design, development, and testing of the sensor cover on the Clementine (DSPSE) spacecraft. Particular attention is given to defining the typically ambiguous issue of cleanliness. To characterize performance with respect to these requirements, a simple and effective method for testing prototype seals was developed. This testing was useful for comparing various types of seals as well as for providing information about achievable cleanliness levels. The results were invaluable input for defining a realistic final cleanliness requirement that satisfied everyone from mechanisms to sensor engineers. Balancing torque margins (reliability) versus cost and/or weight of the system can be significantly influenced by the choice of seal type. Several seal types are discussed in terms of both cleanliness and ease of implementation. These design issues influence the actuator selection and structural integrity of the door. The cover system designed and fabricated as described above was thoroughly tested both on a component level and on the Clementine system level. Testing included characterization, vibration, pyro-shock, life, and thermal/vacuum. The extensive testing identified problems early enough that they could be resolved prior to integration and launch.

  14. Tracking radiometric responsivity of optical sensors without on-board calibration systems-case of the Chinese HJ-1A/1B CCD sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Chen, Xiaoling; Tian, Liqiao; Feng, Lian

    2015-01-26

    The radiometric stability of satellite sensors is crucial for generating highly consistent remote sensing measurements and products. We have presented a radiometric responsivity tracking method designed especially for optical sensors without on-board calibration systems. Using a temporally stable desert site with high reflectance, the sensor responsivity was simulated using the Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S) radiative transfer model (RTM) with information from validated MODIS atmospheric data. Next, radiometric responsivity drifting was identified using a linear regression of the time series bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) normalized coefficients. The proposed method was applied to Chinese HJ-1A/1B charge-coupled device (CCD) sensors, which have been on-orbit operations for more than 5 years without continuous assessment of their radiometric performance. Results from the Dunhuang desert site between 2008 and 2013 indicated that the CCD sensors degraded at various rates, with the most significant degradation occurring in the blue bands, ranging from 2.8% to 4.2% yr-1. The red bands were more stable, with a degradation rate of 0.7-3.1% yr-1. A cross-sensor comparison revealed the least degradation for the HJ-1A CCD1 (blue: 2.8%; green: 2.8%; red: 0.7%; and NIR: 0.9% yr-1), whereas the degradation of HJ-1B CCD1 was most pronounced (blue: 3.5%; green: 4.1%; red: 2.3%; and NIR: 3.4% yr-1). The uncertainties of the method were evaluated theoretically based on the propagation of uncertainties from all possible sources of the RT simulations. In addition, a cross comparison with matchup ground-based absolute calibration results was conducted. The comparison demonstrated that the method was useful for continuously monitoring the radiometric performance of remote sensors, such as HJ-1A/1B CCD and GaoFen (GF) series (China's latest high-definition Earth observation

  15. Immunoassay procedures for fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ligler, Frances S.

    1988-04-01

    There is an increasing need for the development of an ultrasensitive immunoassay for use with fiber optic sensors. These detection systems can be used for such applications as disease diagnosis, detection of chemical and biological warfare agents or drugs of abuse, pollution control, therapeutic monitoring, and explosive detection. This specific program is designed to produce generic chemistries for use with existing fiber optic-based sensors to detect pathogens of particular threat to Army personnel as determined by USAMRIID. The detection system under development involves the attachment of antibodies to an optical fiber at high density. In addition, the immobilization must be achieved in a way which retains the antibody's ability to bind antigen. The functionality of the antibody will be tested through the binding of a labelled antigen. In the future, this assay could incorporate the antibodies developed by the Army for pathogens of particularly military concern.

  16. High accuracy optical rate sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uhde-Lacovara, J.

    1990-01-01

    Optical rate sensors, in particular CCD arrays, will be used on Space Station Freedom to track stars in order to provide inertial attitude reference. An algorithm to provide attitude rate information by directly manipulating the sensor pixel intensity output is presented. The star image produced by a sensor in the laboratory is modeled. Simulated, moving star images are generated, and the algorithm is applied to this data for a star moving at a constant rate. The algorithm produces accurate derived rate of the above data. A step rate change requires two frames for the output of the algorithm to accurately reflect the new rate. When zero mean Gaussian noise with a standard deviation of 5 is added to the simulated data of a star image moving at a constant rate, the algorithm derives the rate with an error of 1.9 percent at a rate of 1.28 pixels per frame.

  17. A laser-optical sensor system for blade vibration detection of high-speed compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Mathias; Dreier, Florian; Günther, Philipp; Wilke, Ulrich; Fischer, Andreas; Büttner, Lars; Holzinger, Felix; Schiffer, Heinz-Peter; Czarske, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    Improved efficiency as well as increased lifetime of turbines and compressors are important goals in turbomachinery development. A significant enhancement to accomplish these aims can be seen in online monitoring of the operating parameters of the machines. During the operation of compressors it is of high interest to predict critical events like flutter or stall which can be achieved by observing blade deformations and vibrations. We have developed a laser Doppler distance sensor (LDDS), which is capable of simultaneously measuring the radial blade expansions, the circumferential blade deflections as well as the circumferential velocities of the rotor blade tips. As a result, an increase of blade vibrations is measured before stall at characteristic frequencies. While the detected vibration frequencies and the vibration increase are in agreement with the measurement results of a commercial capacitive blade tip timing system, the measured values of the vibration amplitudes differ by a factor of three. This difference can be mainly attributed to the different measurement locations and to the different measurement approaches. Since the LDDS is applicable to metal as well as ceramic, carbon-fiber and glass-fiber reinforced composite blades, a universally applicable sensor system for stall prediction and status monitoring is presented.

  18. Missile and aircraft field test data acquired with the rapid optical beam steering (ROBS) sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Bruce; Dunn, Murray; Herr, David W.; Hyman, Howard; Leslie, Daniel H.; Lovern, Michael G.

    1997-08-01

    The ROBS instrument has recently acquired unique imagery of a missile intercepting an airborne drone target. We present a summary of that mission. We also present imagery of three airborne targets collected while the ROBS instrument simultaneously tracked all three aircraft. The recent test data highlights the capability of the ROBS instrument for autonomous acquisition, tracking, and imaging of multiple targets under field test conditions. We also describe improvements to the optical system currently underway.

  19. Fiber-Optic Ammonia Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Michael T.

    2003-01-01

    Reversible, colorimetric fiber-optic sensors are undergoing development for use in measuring concentrations of ammonia in air at levels relevant to human health [0 to 50 parts per million (ppm)]. A sensor of this type includes an optical fiber that has been modified by replacing a portion of its cladding with a polymer coat that contains a dye that reacts reversibly with ammonia and changes color when it does so. The change in color is measured as a change in the amount of light transmitted from one end of the fiber to the other. Responses are reversible and proportional to the concentration of ammonia over the range from 9 to 175 ppm and in some cases the range of reversibility extends up to 270 ppm. The characteristic time for the response of a sensor to rise from 10 to 90 percent of full scale is about 25 seconds. These sensors are fully operational in pure carbon dioxide and are not adversely affected by humidity. This work was done by Michael T. Carter

  20. Temperature sensor based on dielectric optical microresonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Anisur

    2011-12-01

    An optical temperature sensor has been presented based on Whispering Gallery Mode (WGM) dielectric microresonator. The effect of Transverse Electric (TE) wave propagation in dielectric micro-spheres presented has been for optical resonances based on WGM. TE waves are characterized both theoretically and experimentally for large size parameter of the micro-spheres. A theoretical model has been developed based on asymptotic approach. The theoretical development is mathematically robust and significantly less complicated than existing approaches presented in the literature. The quality factor of experimental resonance spectra observed in the laboratory is calculated approximately in the order of 10 4 which is sensitive enough to detect micro or nano level temperature changes in the surrounding medium. The sensitivity of the Morphology Dependent Resonance (MDR) temperature sensor is wavelength change of 10 -9 m for one degree centigrade change in temperature. This sensor could potentially be used for nano technology, Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) devices, and biomedical applications.

  1. Fiber-Optic pH Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, A. Balaji; Radhakrishnan, T. K.

    The new enhancement in the determination of pH using optical fiber system is described here. This work uses the membrane made of cellulose acetate membrane for reagent immobilization and congo red (pKa 3.7) and neutral red (pKa 7.2) as pH indicators. An effective covalent chemical binding procedure is used to immobilize the indicatorsE The response time, reversibility, linear range, reproducibility, and long-term stability of fiber optic sensor with congo red as well as neutral red have been determined. The linear range measured for the sensor based on the congo red and neutral red is 4.2-6.3 and 4.1-9.0, respectively. The response time of sensor membrane is measured by varying the substance pH values between 11.0 and 2.0.

  2. Self-Repairing Polymer Optical Fiber Strain Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young Jun

    This research develops a self-repairing polymer optical fiber strain sensor for structural health monitoring applications where the sensor network must survive under extreme conditions. Inspired by recent research in self-healing material systems, this dissertation demonstrates a self-repairing strain sensor waveguide, created by self-writing in a photopolymerizable resin system. In an initial configuration, the waveguide sensor was fabricated between two multi-mode (MM) optical fibers via ultraviolet (UV) lightwaves in the UV curable resin and operated as a strain sensor by interrogation of the infrared (IR) power transmission through the waveguide. After failure of the sensor occurred due to loading, the waveguide re-bridged the gap between the two optical fibers through the UV resin. The response of the waveguide sensors was sensitive to the applied strain and repeatable during multiple loading cycles with low observed hysteresis, however was not always monotonic. The strain response of the original sensor and the self-repaired sensor showed similar behaviors. Packaging the sensor in a polymer capillary improved the performance of the sensor by removing previous "no-response" zones. The resulting sensor output was monotonic throughout the measurement range. The hysteresis in the sensor behavior between multiple loading cycles was also significantly reduced. However, a jump in sensor output voltage was observed after the sensor self-repair process, which presents challenges for calibration of the sensor. The sensor configuration was modified to a Fabry-Perot interferometer to improve the sensor response. The measurable strain range was extended through multiple sensor self-repairs, and strain measurements were demonstrated up to 150% applied tensile strain. A hybrid sensor was fabricated by splicing a short segment of MM optical fiber to the input single-mode (SM) optical fiber. The hybrid sensor provided the high quality of waveguide fabrication previously

  3. Flight Tests on a Fiber Optic Temperature Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret L.; Sawatari, Takeo; Lin, Yuping; Elam, Kristie A.

    1998-01-01

    For aircraft engine control, one key parameter to detect on an airplane is the exhaust gas temperature (EGT). Presently, thermocouples are used to perform this measurement. These electrical sensors perform adequately; however, fully utilizing the benefits of optical sensors requires replacing electrical architectures with optical architectures. Part of this requires replacing electrical sensors with optical sensors, such as the EGT sensor chosen for these tests. The objective of the development and testing of this prototype sensor system was to determine the feasibility of operating an optical sensor in a hostile aircraft environment. The fiber optic sensor system was developed to measure temperatures from 20C to 600C in an aircraft environment and was utilized to monitor the EGT of an OV-10D aircraft engine. The sensor has successfully flown over 50 hours and proven to be immune to surface deterioration of the optical element (located inside the sensor head) and able to withstand and operate in normal and sustained severe flight conditions where forces on the airplane exceeded 4 g's. Potential commercial uses for this sensor include monitoring temperature for aeropropulsion system control, military vehicle and naval engine control, conventional and nuclear power plant monitoring and industrial plan monitoring where EMI issues are critical.

  4. Renewable Reagent Fiber Optic Based Ammonia Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Richard J.; Burgess, Lloyd W.

    1990-02-01

    Many fiber optic based chemical sensors have been described which rely on a reagent chemistry fixed at the fiber endface to provide analyte specificity. In such systems, problems involving probe-to-probe reproducibility, reagent photolability and reagent leaching are frequently encountered. As a result, calibration and standardization of these sensors becomes difficult or impossible and thus inhibits their application for long term in situ chemical monitoring. Many of these problems can be addressed and several additional advantages gained by continuously renewing the reagent chemistry. To illustrate this concept, a fiber optic ammonia sensor is described in which the reagent is delivered under direct control to a sensing volume of approximately 400 nanoliters located at the probe tip. Using an acid-base indicator (bromothymol blue) as the reagent, the sample ammonia concentrations are related to modulations in light intensity with a lower limit of detection of 10 ppb. The sensor performance was studied with respect to reagent pH, concentration and reagent delivery rate. Compared with previous fiber optic ammonia sensors, the ability to reproducibly renew the reagent has resulted in improvements with respect to response and return times, probe-to-probe reproducibility, probe lifetime and flexibility of use.

  5. Deflection Sensors Utilizing Optical Multi-Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shehadeh, Shadi H.; Cada, Michael; Qasymeh, Montasir; Ma, Yuan

    2010-06-01

    Deflection sensors have attracted significant attention due to their wide application in pressure and temperature measurements in practical systems. Several techniques have been proposed, studied, and tested to realize optical deflection sensor elements, including Mach-Zehnder (MZI), and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In this work, a novel optical deflection sensor that is comprised of two cascaded optical resonators is proposed and analyzed. The proposed structure is designed to operate in the multi-stable (input to output) regime. As the first resonator is equipped with a movable mirror, which is connected to a diaphragm in order to sense changes in deflection, the second resonator is filled with non-linear material. It is demonstrated that such a structure has a novel memory property, aside from having the ability to yield instant deflection measurements. This novel property is attributed to the non-linear refractive index of the medium of the second resonator. Furthermore, the sensor sensitivity (which is the ratio of the change in the output light intensity to the change in the induced deflection) is enhanced due to the input-output multi-stable behavior of the proposed structure. This device possesses a promising potential for applications in future smart sensors.

  6. A Complete Optical Sensor System Based on a POF-SPR Platform and a Thermo-Stabilized Flow Cell for Biochemical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cennamo, Nunzio; Chiavaioli, Francesco; Trono, Cosimo; Tombelli, Sara; Giannetti, Ambra; Baldini, Francesco; Zeni, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    An optical sensor platform based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in a plastic optical fiber (POF) integrated into a thermo-stabilized flow cell for biochemical sensing applications is proposed. This device has been realized and experimentally tested by using a classic receptor-analyte assay. For this purpose, the gold surface of the POF was chemically modified through the formation of a self-assembling monolayer. The surface robustness of the POF-SPR platform has been tested for the first time thanks to the flow cell. The experimental results show that the proposed device can be successfully used for label-free biochemical sensing. The final goal of this work is to achieve a complete, small-size, simple to use and low cost optical sensor system. The whole system with the flow cell and the optical sensor are extensively described, together with the experimental results obtained with an immunoglobulin G (IgG)/anti-IgG assay. PMID:26861328

  7. A Complete Optical Sensor System Based on a POF-SPR Platform and a Thermo-Stabilized Flow Cell for Biochemical Applications.

    PubMed

    Cennamo, Nunzio; Chiavaioli, Francesco; Trono, Cosimo; Tombelli, Sara; Giannetti, Ambra; Baldini, Francesco; Zeni, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    An optical sensor platform based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in a plastic optical fiber (POF) integrated into a thermo-stabilized flow cell for biochemical sensing applications is proposed. This device has been realized and experimentally tested by using a classic receptor-analyte assay. For this purpose, the gold surface of the POF was chemically modified through the formation of a self-assembling monolayer. The surface robustness of the POF-SPR platform has been tested for the first time thanks to the flow cell. The experimental results show that the proposed device can be successfully used for label-free biochemical sensing. The final goal of this work is to achieve a complete, small-size, simple to use and low cost optical sensor system. The whole system with the flow cell and the optical sensor are extensively described, together with the experimental results obtained with an immunoglobulin G (IgG)/anti-IgG assay. PMID:26861328

  8. Evaluations of fiber optic sensors for interior applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, M.W.; Malone, T.P.

    1996-02-01

    This report addresses the testing and evaluation of commercial fiber optic intrusion detection systems in interior applications. The applications include laying optical fiber cable above suspended ceilings to detect removal of ceiling tiles, embedding optical fibers inside a tamper or item monitoring blanket that could be placed over an asset, and installing optical fibers on a door to detect movement or penetration. Detection capability of the fiber optic sensors as well as nuisance and false alarm information were focused on during the evaluation. Fiber optic sensor processing, system components, and system setup are described.

  9. Electro-optical voltage sensor head

    DOEpatents

    Woods, G.K.

    1998-03-24

    A miniature electro-optic voltage sensor system capable of accurate operation at high voltages is disclosed. The system employs a transmitter, a sensor disposed adjacent to but out of direct electrical contact with a conductor on which the voltage is to be measured, a detector, and a signal processor. The transmitter produces a beam of electromagnetic radiation which is routed into the sensor where the beam undergoes the Pockels electro-optic effect. The electro-optic effect causes phase shifting in the beam, which is in turn converted to a pair of independent beams, from which the voltage of a system based on its E-field is determined when the two beams are normalized by the signal processor. The sensor converts the beam by splitting the beam in accordance with the axes of the beam`s polarization state (an ellipse whose ellipticity varies between -1 and +1 in proportion to voltage) into at least two AM signals. These AM signals are fed into a signal processor and processed to determine the voltage between a ground conductor and the conductor on which voltage is being measured. 6 figs.

  10. Electro-optical voltage sensor head

    DOEpatents

    Woods, Gregory K.

    1998-01-01

    A miniature electro-optic voltage sensor system capable of accurate operation at high voltages. The system employs a transmitter, a sensor disposed adjacent to but out of direct electrical contact with a conductor on which the voltage is to be measured, a detector, and a signal processor. The transmitter produces a beam of electromagnetic radiation which is routed into the sensor where the beam undergoes the Pockels electro-optic effect. The electro-optic effect causes phase shifting in the beam, which is in turn converted to a pair of independent beams, from which the voltage of a system based on its E-field is determined when the two beams are normalized by the signal processor. The sensor converts the beam by splitting the beam in accordance with the axes of the beam's polarization state (an ellipse whose ellipticity varies between -1 and +1 in proportion to voltage) into at least two AM signals. These AM signals are fed into a signal processor and processed to determine the voltage between a ground conductor and the conductor on which voltage is being measured.

  11. Specialized wavefront sensors for adaptive optics

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, D.R.; Mansell, J.D.; Gruetzner, J.K.

    1995-08-01

    The performance of an adaptive optical system is strongly dependent upon correctly measuring the wavefront of the arriving light. The most common wavefront measurement techniques used to date are the shearing interferometer and the Shack-Hartmann sensor. Shack-Hartmann sensors rely on the use of lenslet arrays to sample the aperture appropriately. These have traditionally been constructed using ULM or step and repeat technology, and more recently with binary optics technology. Diffractive optics fabrication methodology can be used to remove some of the limitations of the previous technologies and can allow for low-cost production of sophisticated elements. We have investigated several different specialized wavefront sensor configurations using both Shack-Hartmann and shearing interferometer principles. We have taken advantage of the arbitrary nature of these elements to match pupil shapes of detector and telescope aperture and to introduce magnification between the lenslet array and the detector. We have fabricated elements that facilitate matching the sampling to the current atmospheric conditions. The sensors were designed using a far-field diffraction model and a photolithography layout program. They were fabricated using photolithography and RIE etching. Several different designs will be presented with some experimental results from a small-scale adaptive optics brass-board.

  12. Accuracy of PARTwear Inertial Sensor and Optojump Optical Measurement System for Measuring Ground Contact Time During Running.

    PubMed

    Ammann, Rahel; Taube, Wolfgang; Wyss, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Ammann, R, Taube, W, and Wyss, T. Accuracy of PARTwear inertial sensor and Optojump optical measurement system for measuring ground contact time during running. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 2057-2063, 2016-The aim of this study was to validate the detection of ground contact time (GCT) during running in 2 differently working systems: a small inertial measurement sensor, PARTwear (PW), worn on the shoe laces, and the optical measurement system, Optojump (OJ), placed on the track. Twelve well-trained subjects performed 12 runs each on an indoor track at speeds ranging from 3.0 to 9.0 m·s. GCT of one step per run (total 144) was simultaneously obtained by the PW, the OJ, and a high-speed video camera (HSC), whereby the latter served as reference system. The sampling rate was 1,000 Hz for all methods. Compared with the HSC, the PW and the OJ systems underestimated GCT by -1.3 ± 6.1% and -16.5 ± 6.7% (p-values ≤ 0.05), respectively. The intraclass correlation coefficients between PW and HSC and between OJ and HSC were 0.984 and 0.853 (p-values < 0.001), respectively. Despite the constant systematic underestimation of GCT, analyses indicated that PW successfully recorded GCT over a wide range of speeds. However, results showed only moderate validity for the OJ system, with increasing errors when speed decreased. In conclusion, the PW proved to be a highly useful and valid application, and its use can be recommended not only for laboratory settings but also for field applications. In contrast, data on GCT obtained by OJ during running must be treated with caution, specifically when running speed changes or when comparisons are made with GCT data collected by other measurement systems. PMID:26677827

  13. Fibre optic sensors for mine hazard detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T.; Wang, C.; Wei, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Huo, D.; Shang, Y.; Wang, Z.; Ning, Y.

    2009-07-01

    We report the development of a comprehensive safety monitoring solution for coal mines. A number of fibre optic sensors have been developed and deployed for safety monitoring of mine roof integrity and hazardous gases. The FOS-based mine hazard detection system offers unique advantages of intrinsic safety, multi-location and multi-parameter monitoring. They can be potentially used to build expert systems for mine hazard early detection and prevention.

  14. Great prospects for fiber optics sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, T. E.

    1983-01-01

    Fiber optic sensors provide noise immunity and galvanic insulation at the measurement point. Interest in such sensors is increasing for these reasons. In the United States sales are expected to increase from 12 million dollars in 1981 to 180 million in 1991. Interferometric sensors based on single modus fibers deliver extremely high sensitivity, while sensors based on multi-modus fibers are more easily manufactured. The fiber optic sensors which are available today are based on point measurements. Development of fiber optic sensors in Norway is being carried out at the Central institute and has resulted in the development of medical manometers which are now undergoing clinical testing.

  15. Optical waveguide tamper sensor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, R.F.; Butler, M.A.; Sinclair, M.B.

    1997-03-01

    Dielectric optical waveguides exhibit properties that are well suited to sensor applications. They have low refractive index and are transparent to a wide range of wavelengths. They can react with the surrounding environment in a variety of controllable ways. In certain sensor applications, it is advantageous to integrate the dielectric waveguide on a semiconductor substrate with active devices. In this work, we demonstrate a tamper sensor based on dielectric waveguides that connect epitaxial GaAs-GaAlAs sources and detectors. The tamper sensing function is realized by attaching particles of absorbing material with high refractive index to the surface of the waveguides. These absorbers are then attached to a lid or cover, as in an integrated circuit package or multi-chip module. The absorbers attenuate the light in the waveguides as a function of absorber interaction. In the tamper indicating mode, the absorbers are placed randomly on the waveguides, to form a unique attenuation pattern that is registered by the relative signal levels on the photodetectors. When the lid is moved, the pattern of absorbers changes, altering the photodetector signals. This dielectric waveguide arrangement is applicable to a variety of sensor functions, and specifically can be fabricated as a chemical sensor by the application of cladding layers that change their refractive index and/or optical absorption properties upon exposure to selected chemical species. An example is found in palladium claddings that are sensitive to hydrogen. A description of designs and a basic demonstration of the tamper sensing and chemical sensing functions is described herein.

  16. Fiber-optic liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber-optic liquid level sensor measures the height of a column of liquid through the hydrostatic pressure it produces. The sensor employs a fiber-optic displacement sensor to detect the pressure-induced displacement of the center of a corrugated diaphragm.

  17. International Conference on Optical Fibre Sensors in China OFS(C) '91, Wuhan, China, Oct. 9-11, 1991, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culshaw, Brian

    The present volume on optical fiber sensors discusses sensor techniques and applications, temperature measurements, guided wave components, force, pressure, and displacement sensors, and distributed and multiplexed sensor systems. Attention is given to fiber-optical gyroscopes and other interferometers, chemical and related sensors, voltage, current, and magnetic field sensors, strain sensors, and remote measurements and imaging sensors. Topics addressed include research on an optical fiber colorimeter, an electronic polarimetric detection system for optical fiber sensor application, a high-stability optical fiber sensor system, and a multipurpose fiber-optic sensor with a sloped tip. Also discussed are special optical fibers for sensors, a two-color ratio pyrometer with optical fiber, a novel robot slip sensor using optical fiber and its application, and a transmissive serial interferometric fiber-optic sensor array.

  18. Blood detection in the spinal column of whole cooked chicken using an optical fibre based sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, C.; O'Farrell, M.; Lyons, W. B.; Lewis, E.; Flanagan, C.; Jackman, N.

    2005-01-01

    An optical fibre based sensor has been developed to aid the quality assurance of food cooked in industrial ovens by monitoring the product in situ as it cooks. The sensor measures the product colour as it cooks by examining the reflected visible light from the surface as well as the core of the product. This paper examines the use of the sensor for the detection of blood in the spinal area of cooked whole chickens. The results presented here show that the sensor can be successfully used for this purpose.

  19. Embedded Optical Sensors for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    David R. Clarke

    2006-07-31

    The third year of this program on developing embedded optical sensors for thermal barrier coatings has been devoted to two principal topics: (i) continuing the assessment of the long-term, thermal cycle stability of the Eu{sup 3+} doped 8YSZ temperature sensor coatings, and (ii) improving the fiber-optic based luminescence detector system. Following the earlier, preliminary findings, it has been found that not only is the luminescence from the sensors not affected by prolonged thermal cycling, even after 195 hours at 1425 C, but the variation in luminescence lifetime with temperature remains unchanged. As the temperature of 1425 C is much higher than present engines attain or even planned in the foreseeable future, our findings indicate that the Eu{sup 3+} doped thermal barrier coating sensors are very robust and have the potential of being stable throughout the life of coatings. Investigation of Eu{sup 3+} doped coatings prepared by plasma-spraying exhibited the same luminescence characteristics as those prepared by electron-beam evaporation. This is of major significance since thermal barrier coatings can be prepared by both process technologies. A fiber-optic based luminescence system has been constructed in which the hottest section of fiber operates to at least 1250 C.

  20. Application of optical fiber sensors in Smart Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ruirui

    2013-12-01

    Smart Grid is a promising power delivery infrastructure integrated with communication and information technologies. By incorporating monitoring, analysis, control and communications facilities, it is possible to optimize the performance of the power system, allowing electricity to be delivered more efficiently. In the transmission and distribution sector, online monitoring of transmission lines and primary equipments is of vital importance, which can improve the reliability of power systems effectively. Optical fiber sensors can provide an alternative to conventional electrical sensors for such applications, with high accuracy, long term stability, streamlined installation, and premium performance under harsh environmental conditions. These optical fiber sensors offer immunity to EMI and extraordinary resistance to mechanical fatigue and therefore they will have great potential in on-line monitoring applications in Smart Grid. In this paper, we present a summary of the on-line monitoring needs of Smart Grid and explore the use of optical fiber sensors in Smart Grid. First, the on-line monitoring needs of Smart Grid is summarized. Second, a review on optical fiber sensor technology is given. Third, the application of optical fiber sensors in Smart Grid is discussed, including transmission line monitoring, primary equipment monitoring and substation perimeter intrusion detection. Finally, future research directions of optical fiber sensors for power systems are discussed. Compared to other traditional electrical sensors, the application of optical fiber sensors in Smart Grid has unique advantages.

  1. Experimental qualification by extensive evaluation of fibre optic strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schilder, Constanze; Kusche, Nadine; Schukar, Vivien G.; Münzenberger, Sven; Habel, Wolfgang R.

    2013-09-01

    Fibre optic strain sensors used in practical applications have to provide reliable measurements. Therefore, the applied sensor and the sensor systems must be validated experimentally. This can be achieved with facilities which use physically independent measurement systems in order to avoid the influences caused by the application of a reference sensor. This paper describes the testing methods of the specially developed validation facility KALFOS for the qualification and evaluation of surface-applied strain sensors. For reliable sensor results, the performance of fibre optic strain patches with and without FBG under combined thermal and mechanical loading was investigated. Additionally, the strain gauge factor of the fibre optic strain patches with FBG was determined experimentally and compared to the specified strain gauge factor. These results will be the basis for the development of guidelines and standards concerning the application of the sensors.

  2. A novel method for weak signal demodulation in long-distance optical fiber Sagnac interferometer sensor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G. Z.; Gao, X.; Chang, Y.

    2015-08-01

    A novel demodulation method for weak signal of fiber sagnac interferometer is proposed, by which we obtained a simple long distance optical fiber sensor system with positioning accuracy less than 1 km. In our work, we expanded one channel of interference signal in a Taylor series, and the weak phase difference of interference signal could be obtained by a weak signal approximation theory from the Taylor series, then the approximate phase difference was used to demodulate the weak signal and locate the fiber vibration. By using the proposed method, there was no need to use phase amplification technology such as the phase generated carrier modulation or phase-locked amplification technology for weak signal demodulation, whereas, we just need one channel to demodulate the phase, therefore it simplified the system structure and demodulation algorithm, and cut down the cost. Based on this new demodulation theory, the strong signal could also be demodulated; it just need choose a weak part from the strong signal. This proposed method was demonstrated in a long-distance fiber sagnac interferometer sensor system with length of 50 km. The positioning accuracy was less than 1 km in the length of 10, 20, 30 and 40 km. We believe the accuracy could be enhanced with the help of signal processing technology such as signal filter and signal denoising.

  3. Low-Cost Linear Optical Sensors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsey, Kenneth F.; Meisel, David D.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the properties and application of three light-to-voltage optical sensors. The sensors have been used for sensing diffraction patterns, the inverse-square law, and as a fringe counter with an interferometer. (MVL)

  4. Optical Beam-Shear Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Stefan; Szwaykowski, Piotr

    2007-01-01

    A technique for measuring optical beam shear is based on collecting light from the four quadrants of the beam and comparing the optical power collected from each quadrant with that from the other three quadrants. As used here, "shear" signifies lateral displacement of a beam of light from a nominal optical axis. A sensor for implementing this technique consists of a modified focusing lens and a quad-cell photodetector, both centered on the nominal optical axis. The modification of the lens consists in cutting the lens into four sectors (corresponding to the four quadrants) by sawing along two orthogonal diameters, then reassembling the lens following either of two approaches described next. In one approach, the lens is reassembled by gluing the sectors back together. In the simplest variant of this approach, the kerf of the saw matches the spacing of the photodetector cells, so that the focus of each sector crosses the axis of symmetry to fall on the opposite photodetector cell (see figure). In another variant of this approach, the lens sectors are spaced apart to make their individual foci to fall on separate photodetector cells, without crossing the optical axis. In the case of a sufficiently wide beam, the modified lens could be replaced with four independent lenses placed in a square array, each focusing onto an independent photodetector

  5. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  6. High precision optical fiber bundle displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hui-min; Chen, You-ping; Zhang, Gang; Zhou, Zu-de

    2006-02-01

    A noncontact optical fiber bundle displacement sensor with nanometer resolution and low drift is proposed. The principle of the sensor is based on reflective intensity modulation technique. The optical fiber bundle probe contains one transmitting bundle and two receiving bundles. There are 727 identical glass optical fibers with a diameter of 50μm arranged in a concentric random pattern at the probe end. The diameter of the probe coated with a thin stainless ferrule is as small as 2.5mm. A carrier amplifier system is adopted to reduce dc drift and the interference of ambient stray light. The disturbance caused by fluctuation of light source and variation of target surface reflectivity is eliminated by taking a ratio of two receiving signals. The thermal drifts from two photoelectric signal processing circuits cancel out each other by using elements with identical specifications for both photodetector-amplifier chains. The sensitivity of the sensor is 5.9mV/nm over a linear range of 700-2300μm with a nonlinearity of 1%. The achieved resolution is 1nm/square root Hz; over a dynamic bandwidth of 10KHz and the dynamic range is 286dB. It has been proved that the sensor run sufficiently well when used with nano-technological instruments.

  7. Integrated optical tamper sensor with planar waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Carson, Richard F.; Casalnuovo, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    A monolithic optical tamper sensor, comprising an optical emitter and detector, connected by an optical waveguide and placed into the critical entry plane of an enclosed sensitive region, the tamper sensor having a myriad of scraps of a material optically absorbent at the wavelength of interest, such that when the absorbent material is in place on the waveguide, an unique optical signature can be recorded, but when entry is attempted into the enclosed sensitive region, the scraps of absorbent material will be displaced and the optical/electrical signature of the tamper sensor will change and that change can be recorded.

  8. Integrated optical tamper sensor with planar waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Carson, R.F.; Casalnuovo, S.A.

    1993-01-05

    A monolithic optical tamper sensor, comprising an optical emitter and detector, connected by an optical waveguide and placed into the critical entry plane of an enclosed sensitive region, the tamper sensor having a myriad of scraps of a material optically absorbent at the wavelength of interest, such that when the absorbent material is in place on the waveguide, an unique optical signature can be recorded, but when entry is attempted into the enclosed sensitive region, the scraps of absorbent material will be displaced and the optical/electrical signature of the tamper sensor will change and that change can be recorded.

  9. Borehole optical lateral displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, R.E.

    1998-10-20

    There is provided by this invention an optical displacement sensor that utilizes a reflective target connected to a surface to be monitored to reflect light from a light source such that the reflected light is received by a photoelectric transducer. The electric signal from the photoelectric transducer is then imputed into electronic circuitry to generate an electronic image of the target. The target`s image is monitored to determine the quantity and direction of any lateral displacement in the target`s image which represents lateral displacement in the surface being monitored. 4 figs.

  10. Optical fiber sensors for in-flight health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borinski, Jason W.; Meller, Scott A.; Pulliam, Wade J.; Murphy, Kent A.; Schetz, Joseph A.

    2000-06-01

    Optical fiber sensors, because of their small size, low weight, extremely high information carrying capability, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and large operational temperature range, provide numerous advantages over conventional electrical based sensors. Current and future aircraft designs require reduced sensor size and weight while maintaining resolution and accuracy in the extreme flight environment. Unmanned air vehicles also require more accurate sensor information to improve aircraft control systems. This paper presents preliminary results from optical fiber sensor designs for monitoring acceleration, pressure, and skin friction in-flight.

  11. Fiber-optically sensorized composite wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Joannes M.; Black, Richard J.; Moslehi, Behzad; Oblea, Levy; Patel, Rona; Sotoudeh, Vahid; Abouzeida, Essam; Quinones, Vladimir; Gowayed, Yasser; Soobramaney, Paul; Flowers, George

    2014-04-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) immune and light-weight, fiber-optic sensor based Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) will find increasing application in aerospace structures ranging from aircraft wings to jet engine vanes. Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) has been developing multi-functional fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor systems including parallel processing FBG interrogators combined with advanced signal processing for SHM, structural state sensing and load monitoring applications. This paper reports work with Auburn University on embedding and testing FBG sensor arrays in a quarter scale model of a T38 composite wing. The wing was designed and manufactured using fabric reinforced polymer matrix composites. FBG sensors were embedded under the top layer of the composite. Their positions were chosen based on strain maps determined by finite element analysis. Static and dynamic testing confirmed expected response from the FBGs. The demonstrated technology has the potential to be further developed into an autonomous onboard system to perform load monitoring, SHM and Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of composite aerospace structures (wings and rotorcraft blades). This platform technology could also be applied to flight testing of morphing and aero-elastic control surfaces.

  12. Passive long range acousto-optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slater, Dan

    2006-08-01

    Alexander Graham Bell's photophone of 1880 was a simple free space optical communication device that used the sun to illuminate a reflective acoustic diaphragm. A selenium photocell located 213 m (700 ft) away converted the acoustically modulated light beam back into sound. A variation of the photophone is presented here that uses naturally formed free space acousto-optic communications links to provide passive multichannel long range acoustic sensing. This system, called RAS (remote acoustic sensor), functions as a long range microphone with a demonstrated range in excess of 40 km (25 miles).

  13. Hybrid optical fiber sensor and artificial neural network system for bioethanol quality control and productivity enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusken, Edmilton; Salgado, Ricardo M.; Rossell, Carlos E. V.; Ohishi, Takaaki; Suzuki, Carlos K.

    2008-04-01

    Bioethanol is produced by bio-chemical process that converts sugar or biomass feedstock into ethanol. After bio-chemical process, the solution is distilled under controlled conditions of pressure and temperature, in order to obtain an ethanol-water solution. However, the ethanol concentration analysis is generally performed off-line and, sometimes, a re-distillation process becomes necessary. In this research, an optical apparatus based on Fresnel reflection has been used in combination with artificial neural networks for determination of bioethanol concentration in hydro-alcoholic solution at any temperature. The volumetric concentration and temperature effect was investigated. This intelligent system can effectively detect and update in real-time the correction of distillation parameters to reduce losses of bioethanol and also to improve the quality in a production plant.

  14. Development of an Optical Read-Out System for the LISA/NGO Gravitational Reference Sensor: A Status Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Fiore, L.; De Rosa, R.; Garufi, F.; Grado, A.; Milano, L.; Spagnuolo, V.; Russano, G.

    2013-01-01

    The LISA group in Napoli is working on the development of an Optical Read-Out (ORO) system, based on optical levers and position sensitive detectors, for the LISA gravitational reference sensor. ORO is not meant as an alternative, but as an addition, to capacitive readout, that is the reference solution for LISA/NGO and will be tested on flight by LISA-Pathfinder. The main goal is the introduction of some redundancy with consequent mission risk mitigation. Furthermore, the ORO system is more sensitive than the capacitive one and its usage would allow a significant relaxation of the specifications on cross-couplings in the drag free control loops. The reliability of the proposed ORO device and the fulfilment of the sensitivity requirements have been already demonstrated in bench-top measurements and tests with the four mass torsion pendulum developed in Trento as a ground testing facility for LISA-Pathfinder and LISA hardware. In this paper we report on the present status of this activity presenting the last results and perspectives on some relevant aspects. 1) System design, measured sensitivity and noise characterization. 2) Possible layouts for integration in LISA/NGO and bench-top tests on real scale prototypes. 3) Search for space compatible components and preliminary tests. We will also discuss next steps in view of a possible application in LISA/NGO.

  15. Fiber-Optic/Photoelastic Flow Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesson, Laurence N.; Cabato, Nellie L.; Brooks, Edward F.

    1995-01-01

    Simple, rugged, lightweight transducers detect periodic vortices. Fiber-optic-coupled transducers developed to measure flows over wide dynamic ranges and over wide temperature ranges in severe environments. Used to measure flows of fuel in advanced aircraft engines. Feasibility of sensors demonstrated in tests of prototype sensor in water flowing at various temperatures and speeds. Particularly attractive for aircraft applications because optical fibers compact and make possible transmission of sensor signals at high rates with immunity from electromagnetic interference at suboptical frequencies. Sensors utilize optical-to-optical conversion via photoelastic effect.

  16. The proposition of reflectometric fibre optic load sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borecki, Michał; Bebłowska, Maria; Wrzosek, Paweł

    2006-10-01

    Fibre optic load sensor are gaining attention because of their immunity to electromagnetic and radio frequency interference, suitability for use at elevated temperatures, and intrinsically safe nature. Construction of load sensor for application in safety systems has been presented. The device consists of sensor's head and source and detector units. Designed sensor could be mounted in monitored place (e.g. under a floor) and controlled by PC unit or could be used as a portable device for a valuable object protection.

  17. Optical fiber sensors and signal processing for intelligent structure monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, Robert; Claus, R. O.; Lindner, D. K.; Thomas, Daniel; Cox, Dave

    1988-01-01

    The analytic and experimental performance of optical fiber sensors for the control of vibration of large aerospace and other structures are investigated. In particular, model domain optical fiber sensor systems, are being studied due to their apparent potential as distributed, low mass sensors of vibration over appropriate ranges of both low frequency and low amplitude displacements. Progress during the past three months is outlined. Progress since September is divided into work in the areas of experimental hardware development, analytical analysis, control design and sensor development. During the next six months, tests of a prototype closed-loop control system for a beam are planned which will demonstrate the solution of several optical fiber instrumentation device problems, the performance of the control system theory which incorporates the model of the modal domain sensor, and the potential for distributed control which this sensor approach offers.

  18. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Farah, J.

    1995-05-30

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically. 29 figs.

  19. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Farah, J.

    1999-04-06

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically. 23 figs.

  20. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Farah, John

    1999-01-01

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically.

  1. Interferometric fiber optic displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Farah, John

    1995-01-01

    A method is presented to produce a change in the optical path length in the gap between two single mode optical fibers proportional to the lateral displacement of either fiber end normal to its axis. This is done with the use of refraction or diffraction at the interface between a guiding and non-guiding media to change the direction of propagation of the light in the gap. A method is also presented for laying a waveguide on a cantilever so that the displacement of the tip of the cantilever produces a proportional path length change in the gap by distancing the waveguide from the neutral axis of the cantilever. The fiber is supported as a cantilever or a waveguide is deposited on a micromachined cantilever and incorporated in an interferometer which is made totally on a silicon substrate with the use of integrated-optic technology. A resonant element in the form of a micro-bridge is incorporated in the ridge waveguide and produces a frequency output which is readily digitizeable and immune to laser frequency noise. Finally, monolithic mechanical means for phase modulation are provided on the same sensor substrate. This is done by vibrating the cantilever or micro-bridge either electrically or optically.

  2. Optical Sensors Based on Plastic Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Bilro, Lúcia; Alberto, Nélia; Pinto, João L.; Nogueira, Rogério

    2012-01-01

    The recent advances of polymer technology allowed the introduction of plastic optical fiber in sensor design. The advantages of optical metrology with plastic optical fiber have attracted the attention of the scientific community, as they allow the development of low-cost or cost competitive systems compared with conventional technologies. In this paper, the current state of the art of plastic optical fiber technology will be reviewed, namely its main characteristics and sensing advantages. Several measurement techniques will be described, with a strong focus on interrogation approaches based on intensity variation in transmission and reflection. The potential applications involving structural health monitoring, medicine, environment and the biological and chemical area are also presented. PMID:23112707

  3. Temperature Sensors Based on WGM Optical Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Yu, Nan; Maleki, Lute; Itchenko, Vladimir; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2008-01-01

    A proposed technique for measuring temperature would exploit differences between the temperature dependences of the frequencies of two different electromagnetic modes of a whispering gallery-mode (WGM) optical resonator. An apparatus based on this technique was originally intended to be part of a control system for stabilizing a laser frequency in the face of temperature fluctuations. When suitably calibrated, apparatuses based on this technique could also serve as precise temperature sensors for purposes other than stabilization of lasers. A sensor according to the proposal would include (1) a transparent WGM dielectric resonator having at least two different sets of modes characterized by different thermo-optical constants and (2) optoelectronic instrumentation for measuring the difference between the temperature-dependent shifts of the resonance frequencies of the two sets of modes.

  4. Optical pressure sensor based on the combined system of a variable liquid lens and a point diffraction interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Arellano, Anmi; Gómez-García, Manuel; Acosta, Eva

    2011-09-01

    In this work we present an experimental proposal for an efficient optical pressure sensor based on a Variable Liquid Lens (VLL) and a modified Point Diffraction Interferometer (PDI). The working principle of the proposed sensor relies on the fact that a pressure variation induces a change in the lens curvature and hence in its focal length which can be tracked and measured with the interferometer. The pressure is then measured by recording and processing the interferometric images. The calibration of the sensor in this proposal demonstrated a working range of 0-26 kPa with an accuracy of less than 0.1 kPa in the whole range.

  5. Sensitivity of optical mass sensor enhanced by optomechanical coupling

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yong

    2015-03-23

    Optical mass sensors based on cavity optomechanics employ radiation pressure force to drive mechanical resonator whose mechanical susceptibility can be described by nonlinear optical transmission spectrum. In this paper, we present an optical mass sensor based on a two-cavity optomechanical system where the mechanical damping rate can be decreased by adjusting a pump power so that the mass sensitivity which depends on the mechanical quality factor has been enhanced greatly. Compared with that of an optical mass sensor based on single-cavity optomechanics, the mass sensitivity of the optical mass sensor is improved by three orders of magnitude. This is an approach to enhance the mass sensitivity by means of optomechanical coupling, which is suitable for all mass sensor based on cavity optomechanics. Finally, we illustrate the accurate measurement for the mass of a few chromosomes, which can be achieved based on the current experimental conditions.

  6. Revolution of Sensors in Micro-Electromechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esashi, Masayoshi

    2012-08-01

    Microsensors realized by micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology play a key role as the input devices of systems. In this report, the following sensors are reviewed: piezoresistive and capacitive pressure sensors, surface acoustic wave (SAW) wireless pressure sensors, tactile sensor networks for robots, accelerometers, angular velocity sensors (gyroscopes), range image sensors using optical scanners, infrared imagers, chemical sensing systems as Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and gas chromatography, flow sensors for fluids, and medical sensors such as ultrafine optical-fiber blood pressure sensors and implantable pressure sensors.

  7. Assessment of fiber optic pressure sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemian, H.M.; Black, C.L.; Farmer, J.P.

    1995-04-01

    This report presents the results of a six-month Phase 1 study to establish the state-of-the-art in fiber optic pressure sensing and describes the design and principle of operation of various fiber optic pressure sensors. This study involved a literature review, contact with experts in the field, an industrial survey, a site visit to a fiber optic sensor manufacturer, and laboratory testing of a fiber optic pressure sensor. The laboratory work involved both static and dynamic performance tests. In addition, current requirements for environmental and seismic qualification of sensors for nuclear power plants were reviewed to determine the extent of the qualification tests that fiber optic pressure sensors may have to meet before they can be used in nuclear power plants. This project has concluded that fiber optic pressure sensors are still in the research and development stage and only a few manufacturers exist in the US and abroad which supply suitable fiber optic pressure sensors for industrial applications. Presently, fiber optic pressure sensors are mostly used in special applications for which conventional sensors are not able to meet the requirements.

  8. Development of a flow injection analysis (FIA) system for the measurement of heavy metals using a fiber optic chemical sensor based on laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Prestel, Harald; Gahr, Achim; Niessner, Reinhard

    2000-05-01

    The development of a fiber optic sensor system is described, for the on-line detection of heavy metal ions in water. This is based on laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy of suitable metal-ligand complexes. The sensor system is designed to measure heavy metal ions in the field. Flow injection analysis (FIA) is coupled with the sensor system, to overcome problems of a slow diffusion rate of heavy metals through the membrane of an in situ sensor head. Preliminary experiments show the new FIA system has good reproducibility, a high sample analysis rate and it can measure heavy metal ions (Cu(II), Ni(II), Cd(II) and Zn(II)) at the ppb level, when using the appropriate ligands.

  9. A novel wireless mobile platform integrated with optical fibre sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bochao; Yang, Shuo; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a novel design of wireless mobile platform which enables effective integration of a number of optical fibre sensors with an advanced mobile wireless sensor network (WSN) and allows for potential applications such as monitoring in remote and harsh environments and tracking, exploiting fully the advantages offered both by mobile WSN and by advanced optical fibre sensing technologies. The platform which was designed and implemented consists of an optical fibre sensor module and a smart mobile WSN module, which shows important advantages for mobile sensing and tracking and mesh networking. In this study, a fibre Bragg grating (FBG)-based temperature sensor was specially designed and integrated successfully into the optical fibre sensor module as an exemplar to investigate the performance of the integrated system based on the mobile WSN platform. The positive experimental results obtained have confirmed the functionality of the platform designed and demonstrated its capacity for real-time optical fibre sensor data monitoring, processing and wireless transmission. The successful creation of this type of wireless mobile platform with optical fibre sensors would be expected to make an important impact on many sectors, where either conventional optical sensor designs or WSNs alone cannot meet the systems requirements.

  10. Semiconductor sensor for optically measuring polarization rotation of optical wavefronts using rare earth iron garnets

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, Paul G.

    2002-01-01

    Described are the design of a rare earth iron garnet sensor element, optical methods of interrogating the sensor element, methods of coupling the optical sensor element to a waveguide, and an optical and electrical processing system for monitoring the polarization rotation of a linearly polarized wavefront undergoing external modulation due to magnetic field or electrical current fluctuation. The sensor element uses the Faraday effect, an intrinsic property of certain rare-earth iron garnet materials, to rotate the polarization state of light in the presence of a magnetic field. The sensor element may be coated with a thin-film mirror to effectively double the optical path length, providing twice the sensitivity for a given field strength or temperature change. A semiconductor sensor system using a rare earth iron garnet sensor element is described.

  11. Fiber optical sensors for enhanced battery safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Jan; Nedjalkov, Antonio; Doering, Alexander; Angelmahr, Martin; Schade, Wolfgang

    2015-05-01

    Over the last years, battery safety becomes more and more important due to the wide spread of high-capacity lithium ion batteries applied in e.g. consumer electronics and electrical power storages for vehicles or stationary energy storage systems. However, for these types of batteries, malfunctions could be highly dangerous and all aspects of safety issues are not sufficiently considered, yet. Therefore, the improvement of the battery safety behavior is one of the most important issues discussed in actual research projects. In this paper the application of fiber optical sensors for enhanced battery safety is presented. The temperature is one of the most critical parameters indicating a failure of the cell, but even state-to-the-art battery management systems (BMS) are not able to monitor and interpret the distributed temperature field of a total battery storage system sufficiently. Furthermore, the volume expansion of the battery cell, which could be monitored by the strain on the cells' surfaces, is one additional parameter not considered up to now. Both parameters could be simultaneous monitored by fiber optical sensor arrays, consisting of discrete fiber Bragg grating (FBG) elements. The FBG sensors are directly attached on the surface of the cell, recording the temperature as well as the strain distribution highly accurate and close-meshed. Failures and malfunction such as overcharging, gassing, and thermal runaway can be early predicted and avoided to extend the battery lifetime and enhance the operational battery safety. Moreover, battery aging effects lead to variations in the volume change behavior which can be detected additionally. Hence, a battery fully equipped with fiber optical sensor arrays in combination with an appropriate BMS enables a safe and continuous utilization of the energy storage system even under harsh conditions like rapid charging.

  12. A fiber-optic current sensor for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Rose, A. H.; Tang, D.; Day, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    A robust, accurate, broadband, alternating current sensor using fiber optics is being developed for space applications at power frequencies as high as 20 kHz. It can also be used in low- and high-voltage 60-Hz terrestrial power systems and in 400-Hz aircraft systems. It is intrinsically EMI (electromagnetic interference) immune and has the added benefit of excellent isolation. The sensor uses the Faraday effect in optical fiber and standard polarimetric measurements to sense electrical current. The primary component of the sensor is a specially treated coil of single-mode optical fiber, through which the current carrying conductor passes. Improved precision is accomplished by temperature compensation by means of signals from a fiber-optic temperature sensor embedded in the sensing head. The authors report on the technology contained in the sensor and also relate the results of precision tests conducted at various temperatures within the wide operating range. The results of early EMI tests are shown.

  13. A fiber-optic current sensor for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Rose, A. H.; Tang, D.; Day, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    A robust, accurate, broadband, alternating current sensor using fiber optics is being developed for space applications at power frequencies as high as 20 kHz. It can also be used in low and high voltage 60-Hz terrestrial power systems and in 400-Hz aircraft systems. It is intrinsically electromagnetic interference (EMI) immune and has the added benefit of excellent isolation. The sensor uses the Faraday effect in optical fiber and standard polarimetric measurements to sense electrical current. The primary component of the sensor is a specially treated coil of single-mode optical fiber, through which the current carrying conductor passes. Improved precision is accomplished by temperature compensation by means of signals from a novel fiber-optic temperature sensor embedded in the sensing head. The technology used in the sensor is examined and the results of precision tests conducted at various temperatures within the wide operating range are given. The results of early EMI tests are also given.

  14. A fiber-optic current sensor for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Rose, A. H.; Tang, D.; Day, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    A robust, accurate, broad-band, alternating current sensor using fiber optics is being developed for space applications at power frequencies as high as 20 kHz. It can also be used in low and high voltage 60 Hz terrestrial power systems and in 400 Hz aircraft systems. It is intrinsically electromagnetic interference (EMI) immune and has the added benefit of excellent isolation. The sensor uses the Faraday effect in optical fiber and standard polarimetric measurements to sense electrical current. The primary component of the sensor is a specially treated coil of single-mode optical fiber, through which the current carrying conductor passes. Improved precision is accomplished by temperature compensation by means of signals from a novel fiber-optic temperature sensor embedded in the sensing head. The technology contained in the sensor is examined and the results of precision tests conducted at various temperatures within the wide operating range are given. The results of early EMI tests are also given.

  15. A fiber-optic current sensor for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Rose, A. H.; Tang, D.; Day, G. W.

    1990-12-01

    A robust, accurate, broadband, alternating current sensor using fiber optics is being developed for space applications at power frequencies as high as 20 kHz. It can also be used in low and high voltage 60-Hz terrestrial power systems and in 400-Hz aircraft systems. It is intrinsically electromagnetic interference (EMI) immune and has the added benefit of excellent isolation. The sensor uses the Faraday effect in optical fiber and standard polarimetric measurements to sense electrical current. The primary component of the sensor is a specially treated coil of single-mode optical fiber, through which the current carrying conductor passes. Improved precision is accomplished by temperature compensation by means of signals from a novel fiber-optic temperature sensor embedded in the sensing head. The technology used in the sensor is examined and the results of precision tests conducted at various temperatures within the wide operating range are given. The results of early EMI tests are also given.

  16. A fiber-optic current sensor for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Rose, A. H.; Tang, D.; Day, G. W.

    A robust, accurate, broadband, alternating current sensor using fiber optics is being developed for space applications at power frequencies as high as 20 kHz. It can also be used in low- and high-voltage 60-Hz terrestrial power systems and in 400-Hz aircraft systems. It is intrinsically EMI (electromagnetic interference) immune and has the added benefit of excellent isolation. The sensor uses the Faraday effect in optical fiber and standard polarimetric measurements to sense electrical current. The primary component of the sensor is a specially treated coil of single-mode optical fiber, through which the current carrying conductor passes. Improved precision is accomplished by temperature compensation by means of signals from a fiber-optic temperature sensor embedded in the sensing head. The authors report on the technology contained in the sensor and also relate the results of precision tests conducted at various temperatures within the wide operating range. The results of early EMI tests are shown.

  17. A fiber-optic current sensor for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Rose, A. H.; Tang, D.; Day, G. W.

    A robust, accurate, broad-band, alternating current sensor using fiber optics is being developed for space applications at power frequencies as high as 20 kHz. It can also be used in low and high voltage 60 Hz terrestrial power systems and in 400 Hz aircraft systems. It is intrinsically electromagnetic interference (EMI) immune and has the added benefit of excellent isolation. The sensor uses the Faraday effect in optical fiber and standard polarimetric measurements to sense electrical current. The primary component of the sensor is a specially treated coil of single-mode optical fiber, through which the current carrying conductor passes. Improved precision is accomplished by temperature compensation by means of signals from a novel fiber-optic temperature sensor embedded in the sensing head. The technology contained in the sensor is examined and the results of precision tests conducted at various temperatures within the wide operating range are given. The results of early EMI tests are also given.

  18. Biomimetic optical sensor for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Gorospe, George E.; Wright, Cameron H. G.; Barrett, Steven F.

    2015-05-01

    We report on a fiber optic sensor based on the physiological aspects of the eye and vision-related neural layers of the common housefly (Musca domestica) that has been developed and built for aerospace applications. The intent of the research is to reproduce select features from the fly's vision system that are desirable in image processing, including high functionality in low-light and low-contrast environments, sensitivity to motion, compact size, lightweight, and low power and computation requirements. The fly uses a combination of overlapping photoreceptor responses that are well approximated by Gaussian distributions and neural superposition to detect image features, such as object motion, to a much higher degree than just the photoreceptor density would imply. The Gaussian overlap in the biomimetic sensor comes from the front-end optical design, and the neural superposition is accomplished by subsequently combining the signals using analog electronics. The fly eye sensor is being developed to perform real-time tracking of a target on a flexible aircraft wing experiencing bending and torsion loads during flight. We report on results of laboratory experiments using the fly eye sensor to sense a target moving across its field of view.

  19. Optical Fiber Sensors for Advanced Civil Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Marten Johannes Cornelius

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this dissertation is to develop, analyze, and implement optical fiber-based sensors for the nondestructive quantitative evaluation of advanced civil structures. Based on a comparative evaluation of optical fiber sensors that may be used to obtain quantitative information related to physical perturbations in the civil structure, the extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric (EFPI) optical fiber sensor is selected as the most attractive sensor. The operation of the EFPI sensor is explained using the Kirchhoff diffraction approach. As is shown in this dissertation, this approach better predicts the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of gap length than methods employed previously. The performance of the optical fiber sensor is demonstrated in three different implementations. In the first implementation, performed with researchers in the Civil Engineering Department at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, optical fiber sensors were used to obtain quantitative strain information from reinforced concrete interior and exterior column-to-beam connections. The second implementation, performed in cooperation with researchers at the United States Bureau of Mines in Spokane, Washington, used optical fiber sensors to monitor the performance of roof bolts used in mines. The last implementation, performed in cooperation with researchers at the Turner-Fairbanks Federal Highway Administration Research Center in McLean, Virginia, used optical fiber sensors, attached to composite prestressing strands used for reinforcing concrete, to obtain absolute strain information. Multiplexing techniques including time, frequency and wavelength division multiplexing are briefly discussed, whereas the principles of operation of spread spectrum and optical time domain reflectometery (OTDR) are discussed in greater detail. Results demonstrating that spread spectrum and OTDR techniques can be used to multiplex optical fiber sensors are presented. Finally, practical

  20. Development of optical MEMS CO2 sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeal, Mark P.; Moelders, Nicholas; Pralle, Martin U.; Puscasu, Irina; Last, Lisa; Ho, William; Greenwald, Anton C.; Daly, James T.; Johnson, Edward A.; George, Thomas

    2002-09-01

    Inexpensive optical MEMS gas and chemical sensors offer chip-level solutions to environmental monitoring, industrial health and safety, indoor air quality, and automobile exhaust emissions monitoring. Previously, Ion Optics, Inc. reported on a new design concept exploiting Si-based suspended micro-bridge structures. The devices are fabricated using conventional CMOS compatible processes. The use of photonic bandgap (PBG) crystals enables narrow band IR emission for high chemical selectivity and sensitivity. Spectral tuning was accomplished by controlling symmetry and lattice spacing of the PBG structures. IR spectroscopic studies were used to characterize transmission, absorption and emission spectra in the 2 to 20 micrometers wavelength range. Prototype designs explored suspension architectures and filament geometries. Device characterization studies measured drive and emission power, temperature uniformity, and black body detectivity. Gas detection was achieved using non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) spectroscopic techniques, whereby target gas species were determined from comparison to referenced spectra. A sensor system employing the emitter/detector sensor-chip with gas cell and reflective optics is demonstrated and CO2 gas sensitivity limits are reported.

  1. Non-contact optical Liquid Level Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiseleva, L. L.; Tevelev, L. V.; Shaimukhametov, R. R.

    2016-06-01

    Information about characteristics of the optical liquid level sensor are present. Sensors are used to control of the light level limit fluid - water, kerosene, alcohol, solutions, etc. Intrinsically safe, reliable and easy to use. The operating principle of the level sensor is an optoelectronic infrared device.

  2. Indium oxide based fiber optic SPR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Sarika; Sharma, Navneet K.

    2016-05-01

    Surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic sensor using indium oxide layer is presented and theoretically studied. It has been found that with increase in thickness of indium oxide layer beyond 170 nm, the sensitivity of SPR sensor decreases. 170 nm thick indium oxide layer based SPR sensor holds maximum sensitivity.

  3. Fiber optic interferometric sensors for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Y. C.

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses two fiber optic sensor development programs in the Photonics Laboratory, NASA Ames Research Center, one in progress and the other being initiated. The ongoing program involves development of advanced acoustic sensors for wind tunnel applications. The new undertaking involves development of a novel sensor technique for studies of aerodynamic transition from laminar to turbulent flow.

  4. Recent Progress in Optical Chemical Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Qazi, Hummad Habib; Mohammad, Abu Bakar bin; Akram, Muhammad

    2012-01-01

    Optical chemical sensors have promoted escalating interest in the determination of various pollutants in the environment, which are creating toxicity and may cause serious health problems. This review paper focuses particularly on the recent progress and developments in this field; the working principles and basic classes of optical chemical sensors have been briefly described. PMID:23443392

  5. Improved Thermal-Vacuum Compatible Flat Plate Radiometric Source For System-Level Testing Of Optical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, Mark A.; Kent, Craig J.; Bousquet, Robert; Brown, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we describe an improved thermal-vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source which has been developed and utilized for the characterization and calibration of remote optical sensors. This source is unique in that it can be used in situ, in both ambient and thermal-vacuum environments, allowing it to follow the sensor throughout its testing cycle. The performance of the original flat plate radiometric source was presented at the 2009 SPIE1. Following the original efforts, design upgrades were incorporated into the source to improve both radiometric throughput and uniformity. The pre-thermal-vacuum (pre-TVAC) testing results of a spacecraft-level optical sensor with the improved flat plate illumination source, both in ambient and vacuum environments, are presented. We also briefly discuss potential FPI configuration changes in order to improve its radiometric performance.

  6. Design of Fiber Optic Sensors for Measuring Hydrodynamic Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, Donald R.; Quiett, Carramah; Griffin, DeVon (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The science of optical hydrodynamics involves relating the optical properties to the fluid dynamic properties of a hydrodynamic system. Fiber-optic sensors are being designed for measuring the hydrodynamic parameters of various systems. As a flowing fluid makes an encounter with a flat surface, it forms a boundary layer near this surface. The region between the boundary layer and the flat plate contains information about parameters such as viscosity, compressibility, pressure, density, and velocity. An analytical model has been developed for examining the hydrodynamic parameters near the surface of a fiber-optic sensor. An analysis of the conservation of momentum, the continuity equation and the Navier-Stokes equation for compressible flow were used to develop expressions for the velocity and the density as a function of the distance along the flow and above the surface. When examining the flow near the surface, these expressions are used to estimate the sensitivity required to perform direct optical measurements and to derive the shear force for indirect optical measurements. The derivation of this result permits the incorporation of better design parameters for other fiber-based sensors. Future work includes analyzing the optical parametric designs of fiber-optic sensors, modeling sensors to utilize the parameters for hydrodynamics and applying different mixtures of hydrodynamic flow. Finally, the fabrication of fiber-optic sensors for hydrodynamic flow applications of the type described in this presentation could enhance aerospace, submarine, and medical technology.

  7. Intelligent pipelines using fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tennyson, Rod C.; Morison, W. D.; Manuelpillai, Gerald N.

    2003-07-01

    This paper presents an investigation of the application of "long gage" fiber optic sensors (FOS) to monitor the behaviour and integrity of pipelines. A description of the long gage sensor technology is provided, together with the sensor system developed for structural applications. Tests were conducted on pipe sections under a variety of load conditions, including internal pressure, axial compression, bending and local buckling. Long gage sensors were boneded to the pipes and displacements measured using a FOX-TEK FTI 3300 instrument that employs an interferometric technique to obtain displacements to an acuracy of 20 microns. Results obtained showed that the FOS could track changes in loads, detect prebuckling deformations, and measure post-buckling plastic strains. The long gage sensors were then applied to a tailings pipeline in northern Alberta, Canada) to monitor continuously the pipe wall thinning due to erosion/corosion. Employing the FTI 3300 with a PC containing an Aircard for wireless transmission, test data were monitored remotely through internet access. Using analytical models in combination with real-time measurements of the pipe's response, predictions of the operational lifetime for the pipe were made.

  8. Fiber optic sensor-based intelligent coal mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, T.; Wang, C.; Wei, Y.; Ni, J.; Li, Y.; Wang, Q.; Ma, L.; Shi, Z.; Liu, X.

    2007-07-01

    Fiber optic sensors have become increasingly attractive for application in advanced intelligent coal mines, which consist of extensive sensor network to monitor the structural integrity, environmental safety and production parameters. Fiber optic based strain (mining pressure), temperature, water pressure, methane gas, seismic and ultrasound sensors can be used to monitor the condition of the coal mine and provide information for accident prediction and early warning. We report for the first time an all fiber optic comprehensive coal mine safety monitoring system. The system is capable of methane gas monitoring, temperature monitoring, seismic event and mine pressure detection and water pressure monitoring. The advantages of this fiber optic sensor system include intrinsic safety in explosive environment and multiparameter monitoring. The technology potentially can be used to replace many discrete and incompatible monitoring systems currently deployed in the coal mines and consequently greatly enhance coal mine safety.

  9. Fiber optic sensors for corrosion detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Alphonso C.

    1993-01-01

    The development of fiber optic sensors for the detection of a variety of material parameters has grown tremendously over the past several years. Additionally, the potential for analytical applications of fiber optic sensors have become more widely used. New pH sensors have also been developed using fiber optic techniques to detect fluorescence characteristics from immobilized fluorogenic reagent chemicals. The primary purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using fiber optic sensors to detect the presence of Al(sup 3+) ions made in the process of environmental corrosion of aluminum materials. The Al(sup 3+) ions plus a variety of other type of metal ions can be detected using analytical techniques along with fiber optic sensors.

  10. Long-distance fiber Bragg grating sensor system with a high optical signal-to-noise ratio based on a tunable fiber ring laser configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Yun-Jiang; Ran, Zeng-Ling; Chen, Rong-Rui

    2006-09-01

    A novel tunable fiber ring laser configuration with a combination of bidirectional Raman amplification and dual erbium-doped fiber (EDF) amplification is proposed for realizing high optical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), long-distance, quasi-distributed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing systems with large capacities and low cost. The hybrid Raman-EDF amplification configuration arranged in the ring laser can enhance the optical SNR of FBG sensor signals significantly owing to the good combination of the high gain of the erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) and the low noise of the Raman amplification. Such a sensing system can support a large number of FBG sensors because of the use of a tunable fiber Fabry-Perot filter located within the ring laser and spatial division multiplexing for expansion of sensor channels. Experimental results show that an excellent optical SNR of ˜60 dB has been achieved for a 50 km transmission distance with a low Raman pump power of ˜170 mW at a wavelength of 1455 nm and a low EDFA pump power of ˜40 mW at a wavelength of 980 nm, which is the highest optical SNR achieved so far for a 50 km long FBG sensor system, to our knowledge.

  11. Long-distance fiber Bragg grating sensor system with a high optical signal-to-noise ratio based on a tunable fiber ring laser configuration.

    PubMed

    Rao, Yun-Jiang; Ran, Zeng-Ling; Chen, Rong-Rui

    2006-09-15

    A novel tunable fiber ring laser configuration with a combination of bidirectional Raman amplification and dual erbium-doped fiber (EDF) amplification is proposed for realizing high optical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), long-distance, quasi-distributed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing systems with large capacities and low cost. The hybrid Raman-EDF amplification configuration arranged in the ring laser can enhance the optical SNR of FBG sensor signals significantly owing to the good combination of the high gain of the erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) and the low noise of the Raman amplification. Such a sensing system can support a large number of FBG sensors because of the use of a tunable fiber Fabry-Perot filter located within the ring laser and spatial division multiplexing for expansion of sensor channels. Experimental results show that an excellent optical SNR of approximately 60 dB has been achieved for a 50 km transmission distance with a low Raman pump power of approximately 170 mW at a wavelength of 1455 nm and a low EDFA pump power of approximately 40 mW at a wavelength of 980 nm, which is the highest optical SNR achieved so far for a 50 km long FBG sensor system, to our knowledge. PMID:16936857

  12. Fibre-optic sensors in health care

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grazia Mignani, Anna; Baldini, Francesco

    1997-05-01

    Biomedical fibre-optic sensors are attractive for the measurement of physical, chemical and biochemical parameters and for spectral measurements directly performed on the patient. An overview of fibre-optic sensors for in vivo monitoring is given, with particular attention paid to the advantages that these sensors are able to offer in different application fields such as cardiovascular and intensive care, angiology, gastroenterology, ophthalmology, oncology, neurology, dermatology and dentistry.

  13. SU-E-T-111: Development of Proton Dosimetry System Using Fiber-Optic Cerenkov Radiation Sensor Array

    SciTech Connect

    Son, J; Kim, M; Shin, D; Lim, Y; Lee, S; Kim, J; Kim, J; Hwang, U; Yoon, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We had developed and evaluated a new dosimetric system for proton therapy using array of fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor (FOCRS) which can measure a percent depth dose (PDD) instantly. In this study, the Bragg peaks and spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) of the proton beams measured by FOCRS array were compared with those measured by an ion chamber. Methods and Method: We fabricated an optical fiber array of FOCRS in a handmade phantom which is composed of poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA). There are 75 holes of 1mm diameter inside the phantom which is designed to be exposed in direction of beam when it is emerged in water phantom. The proton beam irradiation was carried out using IBA cyclotron PROTEUS 235 at national cancer center in Korea and a commercial data acquisition system was used to digitize the analog signal. Results: The measured Bragg peak and SOBP for the proton ranges of 7∼ 20 cm were well matched with the result from ion chamber. The comparison results show that the depth of proton beam ranges and the width of SOBP measured by array of FOCRS are comparable with the measurement from multi-layer ion chamber (MLIC) although there are some uncertainty in the measurement of FOCRS array for some specific beam ranges. Conclusion: The newly developed FOCRS array based dosimetric system for proton therapy can efficiently reduce the time and effort needed for proton beam range measurement compared to the conventional method and has the potential to be used for the proton pencil beam application.

  14. Optical proximity sensors for manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, A. R.

    1973-01-01

    A breadboard optical proximity sensor intended for application to remotely operated manipulators has been constructed and evaluated in the laboratory. The sensing head was 20 mm x 15 mm x 10 mm in size, and could be made considerably smaller. Several such devices could be conveniently mounted on a manipulator hand, for example, to align the hand with an object. Type 1 and Type 2 optical configurations are discussed, Type 1 having a sharply defined sensitive volume, Type 2 an extended one. The sensitive volume can be placed at any distance between 1 cm and approximately 1 m by choice of a replaceable prism. The Type 1 lateral resolution was 0.5 mm on one axis and 5 mm perpendicular to it for a unit focused at 7.5 cm. The corresponding resolution in the axial direction was 2.4 cm, but improvement to 0.5 cm is possible. The effect of surface reflectivity is discussed and possible modes of application are suggested.

  15. Leakage detection of oil pipeline using distributed fiber optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Song; Wang, Li; Zhou, Jinfeng

    2007-07-01

    A system of distributed optical fiber sensor has presented based on the optical fiber sensor technology and detected the oil pipeline leakage using Mach-Zehnder optical interferometer. There are two interferential signals from sensor and reference light to put in computer has been analyzed using the analysis software LabVIEW of National Instruments' that can operate for the cross-correlation function, then compare the correlation peak to obtain the disturbance of oil leakage location, the detection precision 200m at around 50km for pipeline in the high speed sampling and data signal processing has obtained.

  16. OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR EFFICIENT AND ECONOMICAL OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2003-04-01

    This report summarizes technical progress over the fourth year of the ''Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery'' program, funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. During the reporting period, research efforts under the program were focused on the development and evaluation of the fiber optic flow sensor system, and field testing in Tulsa, OK and the second field test of the pressure and temperature sensors in Coalinga, CA. The feasibility of a self-compensating fiber optic flow sensor based on a cantilever beam and interferometer for real-time flow rate measurements in the fluid filled pipes of oil field was clearly demonstrated. In addition, field testing of the pressure and temperature sensors deployed downhole continued. These accomplishments are summarized here: (1) Theoretical analysis and simulations were performed to ensure performance of the design. (2) The sensor fabrication and packaging techniques were investigated and improved. (3) Prototype flow sensors were fabricated based on the fabrication experience of hundreds of test sensors. (4) A lab-scale flow testing system was constructed and used for sensor evaluation. (5) Field-testing was performed in both the indoor and outdoor flow testing facility at the University of Tulsa, OK. (6) Testing of a multimode white light pressure and temperature sensor system continued at the oil site of Chevron/Texaco Company (Coalinga CA).

  17. Fiber optic, Fabry-Perot high temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, K.; Quick, B.

    1984-01-01

    A digital, fiber optic temperature sensor using a variable Fabry-Perot cavity as the sensor element was analyzed, designed, fabricated, and tested. The fiber transmitted cavity reflection spectra is dispersed then converted from an optical signal to electrical information by a charged coupled device (CCD). A microprocessor-based color demodulation system converts the wavelength information to temperature. This general sensor concept not only utilizes an all-optical means of parameter sensing and transmitting, but also exploits microprocessor technology for automated control, calibration, and enhanced performance. The complete temperature sensor system was evaluated in the laboratory. Results show that the Fabry-Perot temperature sensor has good resolution (0.5% of full seale), high accuracy, and potential high temperature ( 1000 C) applications.

  18. Smoke and mirrors: a fiber optic smoke sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitesel, Henry K.; Overby, John K.; Ransford, Michael J.; Tatem, Patricia A.

    1994-11-01

    Smoke detectors in general, are usually threshold devices that frequently experience false alarms. Optical smoke detectors usually depend on the measurement of optical power absorption and scattering across an air gap and are usually threshold devices. Fiber optic sensor technology offers potential improvements for existing smoke detector technology. We have developed a new smoke sensor design based on wavelength selective absorption and scattering that generates a continuous measurement of smoke density. This technique provides first order compensation for water and dirt coatings on the optical surfaces and for optical power and ambient light changes. The sensor has a 2 inch sensing region and utilizes multimode technology with an 850 nanometer LED source. Experimental models of the fiber optic smoke sensors were tested successfully in our laboratory and on the ex-USS SHADWELL. Operational performance advantages of the fiber optic smoke sensor are expected in the areas of monitoring visibility, reducing false alarms, improving reliability, and continuous measurement of smoke density; this will improve fire detection capability and will assist in developing fire fighting strategy. Application of the sensors are planned for the shipboard environment to provide sensor input to new damage control management systems.

  19. Long-term functionalization of optical resonance sensor spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saetchnikov, Vladimir A.; Tcherniavskaia, Elina A.; Saetchnikov, Anton V.; Schweiger, Gustav; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    New approach to increase density of sensing units for higher precision as well as the selectivity of biological components under investigation in microcavity evanescent wave optical sensor systems is proposed. Long-term functionalization results of array sensor cells by different agents are represented.

  20. Optical sensors with MEMS, slit masks, and micromechanical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesenberg, Rainer; Wuttig, Andreas

    2001-10-01

    Concepts to increase the performance of optical sensors by combination with optical MEMS are discussed. Architectures of subsystems are reviewed, which modulate or switch the amplitude of the light by scanning, multiplexing and selecting interesting signal components (multi-object-mode). Arrangements with MEMS for optical sensors and instruments can decrease the pixel size and increase their number by creating virtual pixels. A number of signal components can be detected with a smaller number of detectors (detector pixels) by scanning. If the scanning is substituted by multiplexing the best efficiency is achieved. The measurement time can be reduced by selecting interesting objects or signal components to be detected. Architectures which combine single sensors, linear sensor arrays or two dimensional detector arrays with MEMS, slit masks, and micro-mechanical devices are discussed. Such devices are micro-mirrors, micro-shutters, the slit positioning system, the fibre positioning system, and other optical switches.

  1. Generalised optical differentiation wavefront sensor: a sensitive high dynamic range wavefront sensor.

    PubMed

    Haffert, S Y

    2016-08-22

    Current wavefront sensors for high resolution imaging have either a large dynamic range or a high sensitivity. A new kind of wavefront sensor is developed which can have both: the Generalised Optical Differentiation wavefront sensor. This new wavefront sensor is based on the principles of optical differentiation by amplitude filters. We have extended the theory behind linear optical differentiation and generalised it to nonlinear filters. We used numerical simulations and laboratory experiments to investigate the properties of the generalised wavefront sensor. With this we created a new filter that can decouple the dynamic range from the sensitivity. These properties make it suitable for adaptive optic systems where a large range of phase aberrations have to be measured with high precision. PMID:27557179

  2. Electro-optic high voltage sensor

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, James R.; Seifert, Gary D.

    2003-09-16

    A small sized electro-optic voltage sensor capable of accurate measurement of high voltages without contact with a conductor or voltage source is provided. When placed in the presence of an electric field, the sensor receives an input beam of electromagnetic radiation. A polarization beam displacer separates the input beam into two beams with orthogonal linear polarizations and causes one linearly polarized beam to impinge a crystal at a desired angle independent of temperature. The Pockels effect elliptically polarizes the beam as it travels through the crystal. A reflector redirects the beam back through the crystal and the beam displacer. On the return path, the polarization beam displacer separates the elliptically polarized beam into two output beams of orthogonal linear polarization. The system may include a detector for converting the output beams into electrical signals and a signal processor for determining the voltage based on an analysis of the output beams.

  3. Slab coupled optical fiber sensor calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitaker, B.; Noren, J.; Chadderdon, S.; Wang, W.; Forber, R.; Selfridge, R.; Schultz, S.

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents a method for calibrating slab coupled optical fiber sensors (SCOS). An automated system is presented for selecting the optimal laser wavelength for use in SCOS interrogation. The wavelength calibration technique uses a computer sound card for both the creation of the applied electric field and the signal detection. The method used to determine the ratio between the measured SCOS signal and the applied electric field is also described along with a demonstration of the calibrated SCOS involving measuring the dielectric breakdown of air.

  4. Bioinspired sensor systems.

    PubMed

    Del Valle, Manel

    2011-01-01

    This editorial summarizes and classifies the contributions presented by different authors to the special issue of the journal Sensors dedicated to Bioinspired Sensor Systems. From the coupling of sensor arrays or networks, plus computer processing abilities, new applications to mimic or to complement human senses are arising in the context of ambient intelligence. Principles used, and illustrative study cases have been presented permitting readers to grasp the current status of the field. PMID:22346637

  5. Bioinspired Sensor Systems

    PubMed Central

    del Valle, Manel

    2011-01-01

    This editorial summarizes and classifies the contributions presented by different authors to the special issue of the journal Sensors dedicated to Bioinspired Sensor Systems. From the coupling of sensor arrays or networks, plus computer processing abilities, new applications to mimic or to complement human senses are arising in the context of ambient intelligence. Principles used, and illustrative study cases have been presented permitting readers to grasp the current status of the field. PMID:22346637

  6. High-temperature fiber optic pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthold, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to a program to develop fiber optic methods to measure diaphragm deflection. The end application is intended for pressure transducers capable of operating to 540 C. In this paper are reported the results of a laboratory study to characterize the performance of the fiber-optic microbend sensor. The data presented include sensitivity and spring constant. The advantages and limitations of the microbend sensor for static pressure measurement applications are described. A proposed design is presented for a 540 C pressure transducer using the fiber optic microbend sensor.

  7. Fiber optic NIR evanescent wave absorption sensor systems for in-situ monitoring of hydrocarbon compounds in waste and ground water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buerck, Jochen; Denter, P.; Mensch, M.; Kraemer, K.; Scholz, Michael

    1999-02-01

    In situ measurements with the prototype of a portable fiber- optic sensor system for the monitoring of nonpolar hydrocarbons (HC) in ground water or industrial waste water are presented. This sensor system can be used for quantitative in situ analysis of pollutants such as aromatic solvents, fuels, mineral oils or chlorinated HCs in a broad concentration range from around 200 (mu) g(DOT) L-1 up to a few 100 mg(DOT) L-1. The sensing principle is based on solid phase extraction of analyte molecules into a hydrophobic silicone cladding of a quartz glass optical fiber and the direct absorptiometric measurement of the extracted species in the polymer through the evanescent wave. The sensor can be connected via all-silica fibers with a length of up to 100 m to a filter photometer developed at the IFIA, thus allowing even remote analysis in monitoring wells. This instrument provides a sum concentration signal of the extracted organic compounds by measuring the integral absorption at the C-H overtone bands in the near-infrared spectral range. In situ measurements with the sensor system were performed in a ground water circulation well at the VEGAS research facility (Universitat Stuttgart). Here, the sensor proved to trace the HC sum concentration of xylene isomers in process water pumped from the well to a stripper column. In further experiments the sensor was combined with an oil sampling device and was tested with simulated waste waters of a commercial vehicle plant contaminated with different types of mineral oil. In this case the sensor system was able to detect the presence of mineral oil films floating on water or oil-in-water emulsions with concentrations greater than 20 ppm (v/v) within a few minutes.

  8. Improved Thermal-Vacuum Compatible Flat Plate Radiometric Souce for System-Level Testing of Optical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, Mark A.; Kent, Craig J.; Bousquet, Robert; Brown, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the development of an improved vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source used for characterizing and calibrating remote optical sensors, in situ, throughout their testing period. The original flat plate radiometric source was developed for use by the VIIRS instrument during the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP). Following this effort, the FPI has had significant upgrades in order to improve both the radiometric throughput and uniformity. Results of the VIIRS testing with the reconfigured FPI are reported and discussed.

  9. Development of a Robust Optical Glucose Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cote, Gerard Laurence

    1990-01-01

    The long term objective of this research was the development of a noninvasive, optically-based, polarimetric sensor to monitor in vivo glucose concentrations. The goal of diabetes therapy is to approximate the 24-hour blood glucose profile of a normal individual. There have been major advances in the development of reliable, versatile, and accurate pumps for the delivery of insulin to diabetic patients and in the development of control algorithms for closed-loop insulin delivery, however, there remain major obstacles to the development of clinically useful, continuous glucose sensors. The development of an accurate noninvasive glucose sensor would have significant application in the diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitis both in conjunction with, and independent of, the glucose pump controller applications. The linear polarization vector of light routes when it interacts with an optically active material such as glucose. The amount of rotation of polarization is directly proportional to the glucose concentration and to the path length. The ability to quantitate blood glucose levels for the limited available path length in our primary sensing site, namely, the anterior chamber of the eye, therefore depends on the signal-to-noise ratio of the polarization detector. Our primary research focused on the development and testing of a prototype optical polarimetry system using D + glucose solution in a test cell, as well as using an enucleated human eye to assess the sensitivity of the system to measure physiologic glucose levels for the approximate one centimeter path length present in the anterior chamber of the eye. Our research has led to the development of a true phase technique in which helium neon laser light was coupled through a rotating linear polarizer along with two stationary linear polarizers and two detectors to produce reference and signal outputs whose amplitudes varied sinusoidally and whose phase was proportional to the rotation of light caused by

  10. Intelligent detection and identification in fiber-optical perimeter intrusion monitoring system based on the FBG sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huijuan; Qian, Ya; Zhang, Wei; Li, Hanyu; Xie, Xin

    2015-12-01

    A real-time intelligent fiber-optic perimeter intrusion detection system (PIDS) based on the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor network is presented in this paper. To distinguish the effects of different intrusion events, a novel real-time behavior impact classification method is proposed based on the essential statistical characteristics of signal's profile in the time domain. The features are extracted by the principal component analysis (PCA), which are then used to identify the event with a K-nearest neighbor classifier. Simulation and field tests are both carried out to validate its effectiveness. The average identification rate (IR) for five sample signals in the simulation test is as high as 96.67%, and the recognition rate for eight typical signals in the field test can also be achieved up to 96.52%, which includes both the fence-mounted and the ground-buried sensing signals. Besides, critically high detection rate (DR) and low false alarm rate (FAR) can be simultaneously obtained based on the autocorrelation characteristics analysis and a hierarchical detection and identification flow.

  11. Fiber-Optic Distribution Of Pulsed Power To Multiple Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkham, Harold

    1996-01-01

    Optoelectronic systems designed according to time-sharing scheme distribute optical power to multiple integrated-circuit-based sensors in fiber-optic networks. Networks combine flexibility of electronic sensing circuits with advantage of electrical isolation afforded by use of optical fibers instead of electrical conductors to transmit both signals and power. Fiber optics resist corrosion and immune to electromagnetic interference. Sensor networks of this type useful in variety of applications; for example, in monitoring strains in aircraft, buildings, and bridges, and in monitoring and controlling shapes of flexible structures.

  12. Acoustic optic hybrid (AOH) sensor

    PubMed

    Matthews; Arrieta

    2000-09-01

    The ability of laser vibrometers to receive and process acoustic echoes from the water surface above a submerged target is established and evaluated. Sonar echoes from a submerged target are collected from the water surface by a laser vibrometer. Feasibility of this approach to sensing underwater sound is demonstrated. If the acoustic excitation at an otherwise undisturbed water surface is 195 to 168 dB re: 1 microPa, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), at the vibrometer output, is shown to range from about 46 to 6 dB. Capillary waves and gravity waves at the water surface are expected and shown to have some destructive effect on the process of echo retrieval. A series of experiments to quantify the surface wave effects is described. The wave experiment results are reported. A successful attempt to acquire echoes from a submerged target over a grid of points for further processing into a three-dimensional image is made and described. The data acquisition and beamforming techniques constitute a three-dimensional, acoustic optic, synthetic aperture sonar (SAS). Beamformed images are included. For an aircraft towing acoustic sensors through the water with a mechanical link, this technique holds the promise of increased safety and improved fuel efficiency. PMID:11008811

  13. Investigation of a mathematical model of the system of electro-optical sensors for monitoring nonlinear surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrochenko, Andrew V.; Konyakhin, Igor A.

    2015-06-01

    Actually during construction of the high building actively are used objects of various nonlinear surface, for example, sinuous (parabolic or hyperbolic) roofs of the sport complexes that require automatic deformation control [1,2,3,4]. This type of deformation has character of deflection that is impossible to monitor objectively with just one optoelectronic sensor (which is fixed on this surface). In this article is described structure of remote optoelectronic sensor, which is part of the optoelectronic monitoring system of nonlinear surface, and mathematical transformation of exterior orientation sensor elements in the coordinates of control points.

  14. Optical sensors in water monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauglitz, Guenter

    2007-07-01

    An upcoming problem in Europe is the protection of water resources and control of water quality. Coastal areas, rivers, ground water, wetlands, and especially drinking water require permanent monitoring to avoid pollution by small organic molecules or especially endocrine disrupting compounds. Biosensors have demonstrated the proof-of-principle of immunochemistry for these applications. It turns out that especially optical methods based on fluorescence detection can be successfully used for the development of fast, sensitive, cost-effective, and easy-to-use analytical systems meeting the requirements given by European Community Directives and national legislation. Results obtained with the RIANA and AWACSS systems are discussed here.

  15. Few-mode fiber based optical sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, An; Wang, Yifei; Hu, Qian; Shieh, William

    2015-01-26

    Few-mode fibers (FMFs) have found applications in optical communications and sensors with attractive features that standard single mode fiber (SSMF) do not possess. We report our recent progress on FMF based optical sensors, and show the potential of utilizing the spatial dimension for multi-parameter sensing with discrimination capability. We first show a discrete type FMF sensor based on interferometer structure with a short FMF, utilizing the modal interference between either the polarizations (x and y) or the spatial modes (LP(01) and LP(11)). We then show a distributed type FMF sensor by generating the stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in a long FMF. We characterize the Brillouin gain spectrum (BGS) with a pump-probe configuration, and measure the temperature and strain coefficients for LP(01) and LP(11) modes. The proposed FMF based optical sensor can be applied to sensing a wide range of parameters. PMID:25835874

  16. Electric current measurement using fiber-optic curvature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Haiting; Xin, Ying; Sun, Suping

    2016-02-01

    A novel fiber-optic curvature sensor, which can measure curvature directly, has been developed in recent years. The electric current measurements system based on fiber-optic curvature sensor and electromagnetic principle is developed. A fiber-optic curvature sensor is bonded to a thin-walled cantilever and two circular magnet targets with the same parameters are configured at the tip of the cantilever symmetrically. In this case, the throughput of the sensor will be changed due to the bending deformation of cantilever, which is proportional to the electromagnetic force caused by measured electric current. Direct and alternate characteristics of the proposed measurement system are studied experimentally. The results show that the measurement errors are within the range of ±5.5 mA and the corresponding accuracy is within 1% at the current measurement range from -300 mA to 300 mA, which indicate the feasibility of the proposed measurement system.

  17. Wide-band polarization-insensitive fiber optic acoustic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Sung-Tsun

    1998-03-01

    A polarization-insensitive fiber optic acoustic sensor is constructed with a 3 X 3 coupler and Faraday rotator mirrors. This system deals with the polarization-induced signal fading by a passive method. The method is eliminating polarization-induced signal fading and the output intensities of this system are described and demonstrated. The homodyne symmetric demodulation system used to recover the sensing signal is also analyzed in detail with experimental verification. The sensing head of this sensor is made of single mode optical fiber wound in to a cylindrical shell with cast polyurethane rubber as the acoustic window. The sensitivity of this sensor is measured in anechoic water tank. The results show that this senor has a stable receiving sensitivity of - 145.5 dB re 1V/(mu) Pa and the bandwidth extends from 2 to 50 kHz. This sensor configuration can be used as a high sensitivity, wide band underwater acoustic sensor.

  18. Optical fiber sensor system for oil contamination measurement based on 3D fluorescence spectrum parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Liping; Shi, Jinshan

    2000-10-01

    In recent years oil contamination in water is more serious and destroys the mode of life and relation to water body environments. Excitation fluorescence method is one of the main approaches to monitor oil contamination on line. But average intensity of oil fluorescence only indicates its density, not indicates the type of contamination oil. Two-dimensional fluorescence spectrum is more difficult to determine the kind of oil, because the different oil has fluorescence spectrum overlapping to a great extent. In this paper, the 3D fluorescence spectrum parameterization is introduced. It can extract several characteristic parameters to measure the kid of oil to be measured. A prototype of optical fiber 3D fluorescence spectrum meter we developed carries out the identification of different oil types, such as crude oil, diesel oil and kerosene. The experiment arrangement conceived to measure pulse xenon lamp induced of oil component in water. The experiment results state clearly that the 3D fluorescence spectrum parameterization and software are successful to measure oil density and identify the type of oil in situ.

  19. Low-Cost Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor

    DOEpatents

    Sheem, Sang K.

    2004-05-18

    The size and cost of fabricating fiber optic pressure sensors is reduced by fabricating the membrane of the sensor in a non-planar shape. The design of the sensors may be made in such a way that the non-planar membrane becomes a part of an air-tight cavity, so as to make the membrane resilient due to the air-cushion effect of the air-tight cavity. Such non-planar membranes are easier to make and attach.

  20. Low-Cost Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor

    DOEpatents

    Sheem, Sang K.

    2003-07-22

    The size and cost of fabricating fiber optic pressure sensors is reduced by fabricating the membrane of the sensor in a non-planar shape. The design of the sensors may be made in such a way that the non-planar membrane becomes a part of an air-tight cavity, so as to make the membrane resilient due to the air-cushion effect of the air-tight cavity. Such non-planar membranes are easier to make and attach.

  1. Optical Temperature Sensor For Gas Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mossey, P. W.

    1987-01-01

    New design promises accuracy even in presence of contamination. Improved sensor developed to measure gas temperatures up to 1,700 degree C in gas-turbine engines. Sensor has conical shape for mechanical strengths and optical configuration insensitive to deposits of foreign matter on sides of cone.

  2. Optical Temperature Sensor Has Digital Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, K.; Quick, W.; Strahan, V. H.

    1983-01-01

    New instrument measures temperature reliabily and accurately. Device uses Fabry-Perot multiple-beam sensor. Both temperature sensor and optical lines are free of all electrical and electromagnetic effects and interference. Variation in spacer is made sensitive to other physical quantities, such as pressure. Sensing element itself is quite small, enhancing use in confined areas.

  3. A portable optical human sweat sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-omari, Mahmoud; Liu, Gengchen; Mueller, Anja; Mock, Adam; Ghosh, Ruby N.; Smith, Kyle; Kaya, Tolga

    2014-11-01

    We describe the use of HNQ (2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone or Lawsone) as a potential sweat sensor material to detect the hydration levels of human beings. We have conducted optical measurements using both artificial and human sweat to validate our approach. We have determined that the dominant compound that affects HNQ absorbance in artificial sweat is sodium. The presence of lactate decreases the reactivity of HNQ while urea promotes more interactions of sodium and potassium ions with HNQ. The interactions between the hydroxyl group of HNQ and the artificial sweat components (salts, lactic acid, and urea) were investigated comprehensively. We have also proposed and developed a portable diode laser absorption sensor system that converts the absorbance at a particular wavelength range (at 455 ± 5 nm, where HNQ has an absorbance peak) into light intensity measurements via a photocell. The absorbance intensity values obtained from our portable sensor system agrees within 10.4% with measurements from a laboratory based ultraviolet-visible spectrometer. Findings of this research will provide significant information for researchers who are focusing on real-time, in-situ hydration level detection.

  4. Optical sensors for water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pellerin, Brian A.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancements in commercially available in situ sensors, data platforms, and new techniques for data analysis provide an opportunity to monitor water quality in rivers, lakes, and estuaries on the time scales in which changes occur. For example, measurements that capture the variability in freshwater systems over time help to assess how shifts in seasonal runoff, changes in precipitation intensity, and increased frequencies of disturbances (such as fire and insect outbreaks) affect the storage, production, and transport of carbon and nitrogen in watersheds. Transmitting these data in real-time also provides information that can be used for early trend detection, help identify monitoring gaps, and provide sciencebased decision support across a range of issues related to water quality, freshwater ecosystems, and human health.

  5. An Innovative Optical Sensor for the Online Monitoring and Control of Biomass Concentration in a Membrane Bioreactor System for Lactic Acid Production

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Rong; Ebrahimi, Mehrdad; Quitmann, Hendrich; Aden, Matthias; Czermak, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Accurate real-time process control is necessary to increase process efficiency, and optical sensors offer a competitive solution because they provide diverse system information in a noninvasive manner. We used an innovative scattered light sensor for the online monitoring of biomass during lactic acid production in a membrane bioreactor system because biomass determines productivity in this type of process. The upper limit of the measurement range in fermentation broth containing Bacillus coagulans was ~2.2 g·L−1. The specific cell growth rate (µ) during the exponential phase was calculated using data representing the linear range (cell density ≤ 0.5 g·L−1). The results were consistently and reproducibly more accurate than offline measurements of optical density and cell dry weight, because more data were gathered in real-time over a shorter duration. Furthermore, µmax was measured under different filtration conditions (transmembrane pressure 0.3–1.2 bar, crossflow velocity 0.5–1.5 m·s−1), showing that energy input had no significant impact on cell growth. Cell density was monitored using the sensor during filtration and was maintained at a constant level by feeding with glucose according to the fermentation kinetics. Our novel sensor is therefore suitable for integration into control strategies for continuous fermentation in membrane bioreactor systems. PMID:27007380

  6. An Innovative Optical Sensor for the Online Monitoring and Control of Biomass Concentration in a Membrane Bioreactor System for Lactic Acid Production.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rong; Ebrahimi, Mehrdad; Quitmann, Hendrich; Aden, Matthias; Czermak, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Accurate real-time process control is necessary to increase process efficiency, and optical sensors offer a competitive solution because they provide diverse system information in a noninvasive manner. We used an innovative scattered light sensor for the online monitoring of biomass during lactic acid production in a membrane bioreactor system because biomass determines productivity in this type of process. The upper limit of the measurement range in fermentation broth containing Bacillus coagulans was ~2.2 g·L(-1). The specific cell growth rate (µ) during the exponential phase was calculated using data representing the linear range (cell density ≤ 0.5 g·L(-1)). The results were consistently and reproducibly more accurate than offline measurements of optical density and cell dry weight, because more data were gathered in real-time over a shorter duration. Furthermore, µ(max) was measured under different filtration conditions (transmembrane pressure 0.3-1.2 bar, crossflow velocity 0.5-1.5 m·s(-1)), showing that energy input had no significant impact on cell growth. Cell density was monitored using the sensor during filtration and was maintained at a constant level by feeding with glucose according to the fermentation kinetics. Our novel sensor is therefore suitable for integration into control strategies for continuous fermentation in membrane bioreactor systems. PMID:27007380

  7. Optical hydrogen sensors based on metal-hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slaman, M.; Westerwaal, R.; Schreuders, H.; Dam, B.

    2012-06-01

    For many hydrogen related applications it is preferred to use optical hydrogen sensors above electrical systems. Optical sensors reduce the risk of ignition by spark formation and are less sensitive to electrical interference. Currently palladium and palladium alloys are used for most hydrogen sensors since they are well known for their hydrogen dissociation and absorption properties at relatively low temperatures. The disadvantages of palladium in sensors are the low optical response upon hydrogen loading, the cross sensitivity for oxygen and carbon, the limited detection range and the formation of micro-cracks after some hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles. In contrast to Pd, we find that the use of magnesium or rear earth bases metal-hydrides in optical hydrogen sensors allow tuning of the detection levels over a broad pressure range, while maintaining a high optical response. We demonstrate a stable detection layer for detecting hydrogen below 10% of the lower explosion limit in an oxygen rich environment. This detection layer is deposited at the bare end of a glass fiber as a micro-mirror and is covered with a thin layer of palladium. The palladium layer promotes the hydrogen uptake at room temperature and acts as a hydrogen selective membrane. To protect the sensor for a long time in air a final layer of a hydrophobic fluorine based coating is applied. Such a sensor can be used for example as safety detector in automotive applications. We find that this type of fiber optic hydrogen sensor is also suitable for hydrogen detection in liquids. As example we demonstrate a sensor for detecting a broad range of concentrations in transformer oil. Such a sensor can signal a warning when sparks inside a high voltage power transformer decompose the transformer oil over a long period.

  8. Optical fiber sensors and signal processing for intelligent structure monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Daniel; Cox, Dave; Lindner, D. K.; Claus, R. O.

    1989-01-01

    Few mode optical fibers have been shown to produce predictable interference patterns when placed under strain. The use is described of a modal domain sensor in a vibration control experiment. An optical fiber is bonded along the length of a flexible beam. Output from the modal domain sensor is used to suppress vibrations induced in the beam. A distributed effect model for the modal domain sensor is developed. This model is combined with the beam and actuator dynamics to produce a system suitable for control design. Computer simulations predict open and closed loop dynamic responses. An experimental apparatus is described and experimental results are presented.

  9. Smart fabrics: integrating fiber optic sensors and information networks.

    PubMed

    El-Sherif, Mahmoud

    2004-01-01

    "Smart Fabrics" are defined as fabrics capable of monitoring their own "health", and sensing environmental conditions. They consist of special type of sensors, signal processing, and communication network embedded into textile substrate. Available conventional sensors and networking systems are not fully technologically mature for such applications. New classes of miniature sensors, signal processing and networking systems are urgently needed for such application. Also, the methodology for integration into textile structures has to be developed. In this paper, the development of smart fabrics with embedded fiber optic systems is presented for applications in health monitoring and diagnostics. Successful development of such smart fabrics with embedded sensors and networks is mainly dependent on the development of the proper miniature sensors technology, and on the integration of these sensors into textile structures. The developed smart fabrics will be discussed and samples of the results will be presented. PMID:15718661

  10. Real time corner detection for miniaturized electro-optical sensors onboard small unmanned aerial systems.

    PubMed

    Forlenza, Lidia; Carton, Patrick; Accardo, Domenico; Fasano, Giancarmine; Moccia, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the target detection algorithm for the image processor of a vision-based system that is installed onboard an unmanned helicopter. It has been developed in the framework of a project of the French national aerospace research center Office National d'Etudes et de Recherches Aérospatiales (ONERA) which aims at developing an air-to-ground target tracking mission in an unknown urban environment. In particular, the image processor must detect targets and estimate ground motion in proximity of the detected target position. Concerning the target detection function, the analysis has dealt with realizing a corner detection algorithm and selecting the best choices in terms of edge detection methods, filtering size and type and the more suitable criterion of detection of the points of interest in order to obtain a very fast algorithm which fulfills the computation load requirements. The compared criteria are the Harris-Stephen and the Shi-Tomasi, ones, which are the most widely used in literature among those based on intensity. Experimental results which illustrate the performance of the developed algorithm and demonstrate that the detection time is fully compliant with the requirements of the real-time system are discussed. PMID:22368499

  11. Real Time Corner Detection for Miniaturized Electro-Optical Sensors Onboard Small Unmanned Aerial Systems

    PubMed Central

    Forlenza, Lidia; Carton, Patrick; Accardo, Domenico; Fasano, Giancarmine; Moccia, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the target detection algorithm for the image processor of a vision-based system that is installed onboard an unmanned helicopter. It has been developed in the framework of a project of the French national aerospace research center Office National d’Etudes et de Recherches Aérospatiales (ONERA) which aims at developing an air-to-ground target tracking mission in an unknown urban environment. In particular, the image processor must detect targets and estimate ground motion in proximity of the detected target position. Concerning the target detection function, the analysis has dealt with realizing a corner detection algorithm and selecting the best choices in terms of edge detection methods, filtering size and type and the more suitable criterion of detection of the points of interest in order to obtain a very fast algorithm which fulfills the computation load requirements. The compared criteria are the Harris-Stephen and the Shi-Tomasi, ones, which are the most widely used in literature among those based on intensity. Experimental results which illustrate the performance of the developed algorithm and demonstrate that the detection time is fully compliant with the requirements of the real-time system are discussed. PMID:22368499

  12. Plasmon-enhanced optical sensors: a review.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Cushing, Scott K; Wu, Nianqiang

    2015-01-21

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has found extensive applications in chemi-sensors and biosensors. Plasmons play different roles in different types of optical sensors. SPR transduces a signal in a colorimetric sensor through shifts in the spectral position and intensity in response to external stimuli. SPR can also concentrate the incident electromagnetic field in a nanostructure, modulating fluorescence emission and enabling plasmon-enhanced fluorescence to be used for ultrasensitive detection. Furthermore, plasmons have been extensively used for amplifying a Raman signal in a surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensor. This paper presents a review of recent research progress in plasmon-enhanced optical sensing, giving emphasis on the physical basis of plasmon-enhanced sensors and how these principles guide the design of sensors. In particular, this paper discusses the design strategies for nanomaterials and nanostructures to plasmonically enhance optical sensing signals, also highlighting the applications of plasmon-enhanced optical sensors in healthcare, homeland security, food safety and environmental monitoring. PMID:25365823

  13. Plasmon-Enhanced Optical Sensors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Cushing, Scott K

    2014-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) has found extensive applications in chemi-sensors and biosensors. Plasmons play different roles in different types of optical sensors. SPR transduces a signal in a colorimetric sensor through shifts in the spectral position and intensity in response to external stimuli. SPR can also concentrate the incident electromagnetic field in a nanostructure, modulating fluorescence emission and enabling plasmon-enhanced fluorescence to be used for ultrasensitive detection. Furthermore, plasmons have been extensively used for amplifying a Raman signal in a surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensor. This paper presents a review of recent research progress in plasmon-enhanced optical sensing, giving an emphasis on the physical basis of plasmon-enhanced sensors and how these principles guide the design of sensors. In particular, this paper discusses the design strategies for nanomaterials and nanostructures to plasmonically enhance optical sensing signals, also highlighting the applications of plasmon-enhanced optical sensors in health care, homeland security, food safety and environmental monitoring. PMID:25365823

  14. A Fibre Optic Sensor Of Physiological Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legendre, J. P.; Forester, G. V.

    1986-11-01

    This paper presents an ultraminiature fibre optic probe capable of physiological monitoring in situ. The system has been described previously where a fibre optic reflectometer was configured as a temperature sensor and as a refractometer. For the present experiments a bare fibre tip was used as sensing element. We show that we have been able to monitor cyclic physiological parameters such as heart and respiratory rates in various animal preparations. The probe has been used to obtain signals from the oesophagus, the lower gastro-intestinal tract, the abdominal cavity and from blood vessels (arteries and veins). The probe has also measured phasic activity coincident with mechanical activity of isolated heart muscle. The small physical size of the sensor (125 µm diameter), its flexibility and the fact that it is biologically inert are all very important characteristics for medical and biological considerations. Most recently, the probe has been used to monitor cardiac and respiratory rates while obtaining NMR spectra assessing metabolic activity. This was possible only because the probe is magnetically transparent.

  15. Monolithic integrated-optic TDLAS sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frish, Michael B.; Scherer, David R.; Wainner, Richard T.; Allen, Mark G.; Shankar, Raji; Loncar, Marko

    2012-06-01

    We are developing prototype chip-scale low-power integrated-optic gas-phase chemical sensors based on infrared Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS). TDLAS is able to sense many gas phase chemicals with high sensitivity and selectivity. Using semiconductor fabrication and assembly techniques, the low-cost integrated optic TDLAS technology will permit mass production of sensors that have wide ranging industrial, medical, environmental, and consumer applications. Novel gas sensing elements using low-loss resonant photonic crystal cavities or waveguides will permit monolithic integration of a laser source, sampling elements, and detector on a semiconductor materials system substrate. Practical challenges to fabricating these devices include: a) selecting and designing the high-Q micro-resonator sensing element appropriate for the selected analyte; and b) device thermal management, especially stabilizing laser temperature with the precision needed for sensitive spectroscopic detection. In this paper, we analyze the expected sensitivity of micro-resonator-based structures for chemical sensing, and demonstrate a novel approach for exploiting laser waste heat to stabilize the laser temperature.

  16. Electro-optic voltage sensor head

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Thomas M.; Davidson, James R.; Woods, Gregory K.

    1999-01-01

    The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers.

  17. Electro-optic voltage sensor head

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, T.M.; Davidson, J.R.; Woods, G.K.

    1999-08-17

    The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers. 6 figs.

  18. Dynamic temperature measurements with embedded optical sensors.

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H.,; Seagle, Christopher T; Ao, Tommy

    2013-10-01

    This report summarizes LDRD project number 151365, %5CDynamic Temperature Measurements with Embedded Optical Sensors%22. The purpose of this project was to develop an optical sensor capable of detecting modest temperature states (<1000 K) with nanosecond time resolution, a recurring diagnostic need in dynamic compression experiments at the Sandia Z machine. Gold sensors were selected because the visible re ectance spectrum of gold varies strongly with temperature. A variety of static and dynamic measurements were performed to assess re ectance changes at di erent temperatures and pressures. Using a minimal optical model for gold, a plausible connection between static calibrations and dynamic measurements was found. With re nements to the model and diagnostic upgrades, embedded gold sensors seem capable of detecting minor (<50 K) temperature changes under dynamic compression.

  19. Data acquisition with fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kist, R.

    The advantages of using fiber optic sensors for data acquisition are discussed, and their present utilization in this area is examined. Because of their high cost, these sensors are not likely to be competitive in general metrological applications in the near future. They do, however, provide important advantages in specific areas such as isolation against high voltage and immunity against electromagnetic fields and explosive and/or corrosive environments. They also offer the possibility of miniaturized and compact packaging of the sensing element an application within a broad temperature range. Multimode fiber optic sensors for parameters such as temperature, pressure, and refractive index have more immediate commercial potential than monomode fiber optic sensors, which have higher costs. The latter allow for high precision solutions of metrological tasks under specific conditions, and will be utilized in the foreseeable future.

  20. Development of a soil detector based on an optical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Lihua; Pan, Luan; Li, Minzan; An, Xiaofei

    2008-12-01

    An estimation model of the soil organic matter content has been built based on NIR spectroscopy and a portable soil organic matter detector based on optical sensor is developed. The detector uses a micro processor 89S52 as the Micro Controller Unit (MCU) and consists of an optical system and a control system. The optical system includes a 850nm near-infrared lamp-house, a lamp-house driving-circuit, a Y type optical fiber, a probe, and a photoelectric sensor. The control system includes an amplified circuit, an A/D circuit, a display circuit with LCD, and a storage circuit with USB interface. Firstly the single waveband optical signal from the near-infrared lamp-house is transferred to the surface of the target soil via the incidence fibers. Then the reflected optical signal is collected and transferred to photoelectric sensor, where the optical signal is conveyed to the electrical signal. Subsequently, the obtained electrical signal is processed by 89S52 MCU. Finally, the calculated soil organic matter content is displayed on the LCD and stored in the USB disk. The calibration experiment using the estimation model of the soil organic matter is conducted. The decision coefficient (R2) reaches 0.9839 between the measured data by the soil organic matter sensor and by the laboratory chemistry method.

  1. Structural health monitoring using smart optical fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Heddwyn; Everall, Lorna A.; Gallon, Andrew M.

    2001-04-01

    This paper describes the potential of a smart monitoring system, incorporating optical fiber sensing techniques, to provide important structural information to designers and users alike. This technology has application in all areas including aerospace, civil, maritime and automotive engineering. In order to demonstrate the capability of the sensing system it has been installed in a 35 m free-standing carbon fiber yacht mast, where a complete optical network of strain and temperature sensors were embedded into a composite mast and boom during lay-up. The system was able to monitor the behavior of the composite rig through a range of handling conditions and the resulting strain information could be used by engineers to improve the structural design process. The optical strain sensor system comprises of three main components: the sensor network, the opto-electronic data acquisition unit (OFSSS) and the external PC which acts as a data log and display. Embedded fiber optic sensors have wide ranging application for structural load monitoring. Due to their small size, optical fiber sensors can be readily embedded into composite materials. Other advantages include their immediate multiplexing capability and immunity to electromagnetic interference. The capability of this system has been demonstrated within the maritime environment, but can be adapted for any application.

  2. Inertial navigation sensor integrated obstacle detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhanu, Bir (Inventor); Roberts, Barry A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A system that incorporates inertial sensor information into optical flow computations to detect obstacles and to provide alternative navigational paths free from obstacles. The system is a maximally passive obstacle detection system that makes selective use of an active sensor. The active detection typically utilizes a laser. Passive sensor suite includes binocular stereo, motion stereo and variable fields-of-view. Optical flow computations involve extraction, derotation and matching of interest points from sequential frames of imagery, for range interpolation of the sensed scene, which in turn provides obstacle information for purposes of safe navigation.

  3. Microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2002-01-01

    A microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor for detecting chemicals in a sample, and a method for its use, is disclosed. The sensor comprises at least one optical fiber having a microbend section (a section of small undulations in its axis), for transmitting and receiving light. In transmission, light guided through the microbend section scatters out of the fiber core and interacts, either directly or indirectly, with the chemical in the sample, inducing fluorescence radiation. Fluorescence radiation is scattered back into the microbend section and returned to an optical detector for determining characteristics of the fluorescence radiation quantifying the presence of a specific chemical.

  4. SMART composite high pressure vessels with integrated optical fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blazejewski, Wojciech; Czulak, Andrzej; Gasior, Pawel; Kaleta, Jerzy; Mech, Rafal

    2010-04-01

    In this paper application of integrated Optical Fiber Sensors for strain state monitoring of composite high pressure vessels is presented. The composite tanks find broad application in areas such as: automotive industry, aeronautics, rescue services, etc. In automotive application they are mainly used for gaseous fuels storage (like CNG or compressed Hydrogen). In comparison with standard steel vessels, composite ones have many advantages (i.e. high mechanical strength, significant weight reduction, etc). In the present work a novel technique of vessel manufacturing, according to this construction, was applied. It is called braiding technique, and can be used as an alternative to the winding method. During braiding process, between GFRC layers, two types of optical fiber sensors were installed: point sensors in the form of FBGs as well as interferometric sensors with long measuring arms (SOFO®). Integrated optical fiber sensors create the nervous system of the pressure vessel and are used for its structural health monitoring. OFS register deformation areas and detect construction damages in their early stage (ensure a high safety level for users). Applied sensor system also ensured a possibility of strain state monitoring even during the vessel manufacturing process. However the main application of OFS based monitoring system is to detect defects in the composite structure. An idea of such a SMART vessel with integrated sensor system as well as an algorithm of defect detection was presented.

  5. Magneto-optic current sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lanagan, Michael T.; Valsko-Vlasov, Vitalii K.; Fisher, Brandon L.; Welp, Ulrich

    2003-10-07

    An optical current transducer configured to sense current in the conductor is disclosed. The optical current transducer includes a light source and a polarizer that generates linearly polarized light received from a the light source. The light is communicated to a magneto-optic garnet that includes, among other elements, bismuth, iron and oxygen and is coupled to the conductor. The magneto-optic garnet is configured to rotate the polarization of the linearly polarized light received from the polarizer. The optical current transducer also includes an analyzer in optical communication with the magneto-optic garnet. The analyzer detects the rotation of the linearly polarized light caused by the magneto-optic garnet.

  6. Hypervelocity impact testing of spacecraft optical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    Hypervelocity tests of spacecraft optical sensors were conducted to determine if the optical signature from an impact inside the optical sensor sunshade resembled signals that have been observed on-orbit. Impact tests were conducted in darkness and with the ejected debris illuminated. The tests were conducted at the Johnson Space Center Hypervelocity Impact Test Facility. The projectile masses and velocities that may be obtained at the facility are most representative of the hypervelocity particles thought to be responsible for a group of anomalous optical sensors responses that have been observed on-orbit. The projectiles are a few micrograms, slightly more massive than the microgram particles thought to be responsible for the signal source. The test velocities were typically 7.3 km/s, which are somewhat slower than typical space particles.

  7. Optical Fibre Pressure Sensors in Medical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Poeggel, Sven; Tosi, Daniele; Duraibabu, DineshBabu; Leen, Gabriel; McGrath, Deirdre; Lewis, Elfed

    2015-01-01

    This article is focused on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of optical fibre pressure sensors for medical applications. Optical fibres have inherent advantages due to their small size, immunity to electromagnetic interferences and their suitability for remote monitoring and multiplexing. The small dimensions of optical fibre-based pressure sensors, together with being lightweight and flexible, mean that they are minimally invasive for many medical applications and, thus, particularly suited to in vivo measurement. This means that the sensor can be placed directly inside a patient, e.g., for urodynamic and cardiovascular assessment. This paper presents an overview of the recent developments in optical fibre-based pressure measurements with particular reference to these application areas. PMID:26184228

  8. Optical sensors for process monitoring in biotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ploetz, F.; Schelp, Carsten; Anders, K.; Eberhardt, F.; Scheper, Thomas-Helmut; Bueckmann, F.

    1991-09-01

    The development and application of various optical sensors will be presented. Among these are optical sensors (optrodes) with immobilized enzymes, coenzymes, and labeled antibodies. The NADH formation of coenzyme dependent enzymes was used for detection of lactate, pyrovate mannitol, ethanol, and formate. An enzyme optrode based on a pH-optrode as a transducer for the monitoring of urea and penicillin in fermentation media was developed. For preparing an oxygen optrode, oxygen-sensitive fluorophores were entrapped in a gaspermeable silicone matrix that is attached to the distal end of a bifurcated fiber optic waveguide bundle. By labeling of immuncomponent with fluorophores or enzymes, which transpose fluorophores or chromophores, immunreactions were observed by an optical sensors.

  9. Novel optical fiber sensor for deformation measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Haiting; Sun, Suping; Yu, Jianqiang; Liu, Renqiang

    2010-10-01

    A light intensity modulation optical fiber sensor, which can measure deformation directly, has been developed. A light leakage zone is introduced on one side of fiber to increase the sensitivity of fiber under deformation. The machining process of sensor is considered. Hand carving, milling and embossing methods are introduced to produce the light leakage zone respectively, and the comparison between these methods is carried out. To obtain the static curve of sensor, cantilevered beam, simple support beam and cylinders are used respectively to measure little and large deformation. The static characters of sensor, such as sensitivity and measurement range, are analyzed from the static curve. The experimental results show that the sensor can distinguish the direction of deformation (positive bending and negative bending). Positive bending increases the throughput of light, and is distinguishable from negative bending, which decreases the throughput. The output of sensor is linear with curvature when the curvature radius is larger than 60mm. The response of sensor is a cosine function with the direction of deformation and there is a maximum sensitivity direction (perpendicular to the light leakage zone plane and passing through the axis of the fiber) and a minimum sensitivity direction (parallel to light leakage zone plane and pass through the axis of the fiber). The dynamic responds of attenuation vibration and sawtooth input signal are studied. Comparison between the optical fiber sensor, untreated fiber and strain gauge shows that the sensor is 400 times of untreated fiber in sensitivity and is more advantageous in measurement of thin structures. The sensor is easily made by multi-mode plastic optical fiber and the detection equipments are very simple, therefore it is small in size, simple in structure and low in cost, which make the sensor can be widely used in various fields.

  10. Electro-optic high voltage sensor

    DOEpatents

    Davidson, James R.; Seifert, Gary D.

    2002-01-01

    A small sized electro-optic voltage sensor capable of accurate measurement of high levels of voltages without contact with a conductor or voltage source is provided. When placed in the presence of an electric field, the sensor receives an input beam of electromagnetic radiation into the sensor. A polarization beam displacer serves as a filter to separate the input beam into two beams with orthogonal linear polarizations. The beam displacer is oriented in such a way as to rotate the linearly polarized beams such that they enter a Pockels crystal having at a preferred angle of 45 degrees. The beam displacer is therefore capable of causing a linearly polarized beam to impinge a crystal at a desired angle independent of temperature. The Pockels electro-optic effect induces a differential phase shift on the major and minor axes of the input beam as it travels through the Pockels crystal, which causes the input beam to be elliptically polarized. A reflecting prism redirects the beam back through the crystal and the beam displacer. On the return path, the polarization beam displacer separates the elliptically polarized beam into two output beams of orthogonal linear polarization representing the major and minor axes. The system may include a detector for converting the output beams into electrical signals, and a signal processor for determining the voltage based on an analysis of the output beams. The output beams are amplitude modulated by the frequency of the electric field and the amplitude of the output beams is proportional to the magnitude of the electric field, which is related to the voltage being measured.

  11. High electric field measurement using slab-coupled optical sensors.

    PubMed

    Stan, Nikola; Seng, Frederick; Shumway, LeGrand; King, Rex; Selfridge, Richard; Schultz, Stephen

    2016-01-20

    A fiber-optic electric field sensor was developed to measure electric field up to 18 MV/m. The sensor uses resonant coupling between an optical fiber and a nonlinear electro-optical crystal. The sensing system uses high dielectric strength materials to eliminate dielectric breakdown. A postprocessing nonlinear calibration method is developed that maps voltage change to wavelength shift and then converts the wavelength shift to electric field using the transmission spectrum. The nonlinear calibration method is compared against the linear method with electric field pulses having magnitudes from 1.5 to 18 MV/m. PMID:26835936

  12. Effects of the source, surface, and sensor couplings and colorimetric of laser speckle pattern on the performance of optical imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwiesh, M.; El-Sherif, Ashraf F.; El-Ghandour, Hatem; Aly, Hussein A.; Mokhtar, A. M.

    2011-03-01

    Optical imaging systems are widely used in different applications include tracking for portable scanners; input pointing devices for laptop computers, cell phones, and cameras, fingerprint-identification scanners, optical navigation for target tracking, and in optical computer mouse. We presented an experimental work to measure and analyze the laser speckle pattern (LSP) produced from different optical sources (i.e. various color LEDs, 3 mW diode laser, and 10mW He-Ne laser) with different produced operating surfaces (Gabor hologram diffusers), and how they affects the performance of the optical imaging systems; speckle size and signal-to-noise ratio (signal is represented by the patches of the speckles that contain or carry information, and noise is represented by the whole remaining part of the selected image). The theoretical and experimental studies of the colorimetry (color correction is done in the color images captured by the optical imaging system to produce realistic color images which contains most of the information in the image by selecting suitable gray scale which contains most of the informative data in the image, this is done by calculating the accurate Red-Green-Blue (RGB) color components making use of the measured spectrum for light sources, and color matching functions of International Telecommunication Organization (ITU-R709) for CRT phosphorus, Tirinton-SONY Model ) for the used optical sources are investigated and introduced to present the relations between the signal-to-noise ratios with different diffusers for each light source. The source surface coupling has been discussed and concludes that the performance of the optical imaging system for certain source varies from worst to best based on the operating surface. The sensor /surface coupling has been studied and discussed for the case of He-Ne laser and concludes the speckle size is ranged from 4.59 to 4.62 μm, which are slightly different or approximately the same for all produced

  13. Fiber optic sensor for methane hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Virendra; Chandra, Dinesh

    1999-11-01

    Different types of fiber optic methane sensor, especially for ming application, have been reviewed in this paper. Optical absorption and differential optical absorption techniques for the remote detection of methane gas using low-loss silica fiber have been discussed. IR fiber optic, sol-gel and correlation spectroscopy methods have been described in brief. Another noble technique based on attenuation of evanescent field has been enunciated using D- fiber. Merits and demerits of each technique and its suitability to mining industry have been highlighted. Optical fiber, being a dielectric, non-metallic and non- sparking, is an intrinsically safe media and is ideally suited to the hazardous environment present in mines.

  14. Linear array optical edge sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, Antal K. (Inventor); Primus, Howard C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A series of independent parallel pairs of light emitting and detecting diodes for a linear pixel array, which is laterally positioned over an edge-like discontinuity in a workpiece to be scanned, is disclosed. These independent pairs of light emitters and detectors sense along intersecting pairs of separate optical axes. A discontinuity, such as an edge in the sensed workpiece, reflects a detectable difference in the amount of light from that discontinuity in comparison to the amount of light that is reflected on either side of the discontinuity. A sequentially sychronized clamping and sampling circuit detects that difference as an electrical signal which is recovered by circuitry that exhibits an improved signal-to-noise capability for the system.

  15. Civil infrastructure monitoring for IVHS using optical fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Marten J.; Arya, Vivek; Grinder, C. R.; Murphy, Kent A.; Claus, Richard O.

    1995-01-01

    8Early deployment of Intelligent Vehicle Highway Systems would necessitate the internal instrumentation of infrastructure for emergency preparedness. Existing quantitative analysis and visual analysis techniques are time consuming, cost prohibitive, and are often unreliable. Fiber optic sensors are rapidly replacing conventional instrumentation because of their small size, light weight, immunity to electromagnetic interference, and extremely high information carrying capability. In this paper research on novel optical fiber sensing techniques for health monitoring of civil infrastructure such as highways and bridges is reported. Design, fabrication, and implementation of fiber optic sensor configurations used for measurements of strain are discussed. Results from field tests conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of fiber sensors at determining quantitative strain vector components near crack locations in bridges are presented. Emerging applications of fiber sensors for vehicle flow, vehicle speed, and weigh-in-motion measurements are also discussed.

  16. Fiber optic sensors for structural health monitoring of air platforms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Honglei; Xiao, Gaozhi; Mrad, Nezih; Yao, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft operators are faced with increasing requirements to extend the service life of air platforms beyond their designed life cycles, resulting in heavy maintenance and inspection burdens as well as economic pressure. Structural health monitoring (SHM) based on advanced sensor technology is potentially a cost-effective approach to meet operational requirements, and to reduce maintenance costs. Fiber optic sensor technology is being developed to provide existing and future aircrafts with SHM capability due to its unique superior characteristics. This review paper covers the aerospace SHM requirements and an overview of the fiber optic sensor technologies. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor technology is evaluated as the most promising tool for load monitoring and damage detection, the two critical SHM aspects of air platforms. At last, recommendations on the implementation and integration of FBG sensors into an SHM system are provided. PMID:22163816

  17. Fiber-optic epoxy composite cure sensor. II. Performance characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Kai-Yuen; Afromowitz, Martin A.

    1995-09-01

    The performance of a fiber-optic epoxy composite cure sensor, as previously proposed, depends on the optical properties and the reaction kinetics of the epoxy. The reaction kinetics of a typical epoxy system are presented. It is a third-order autocatalytic reaction with a peak observed in each isothermal reaction-rate curve. A model is derived to describe the performance characteristics of the epoxy cure sensor. If a composite coupon is cured at an isothermal temperature, the sensor signal can be used to predict the time when the gel point occurs and to monitor the cure process. The sensor is also shown to perform well in nonstoichiometric epoxy matrices. In addition the sensor can detect the end of the cure without calibration.

  18. Fiber Optic Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring of Air Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Honglei; Xiao, Gaozhi; Mrad, Nezih; Yao, Jianping

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft operators are faced with increasing requirements to extend the service life of air platforms beyond their designed life cycles, resulting in heavy maintenance and inspection burdens as well as economic pressure. Structural health monitoring (SHM) based on advanced sensor technology is potentially a cost-effective approach to meet operational requirements, and to reduce maintenance costs. Fiber optic sensor technology is being developed to provide existing and future aircrafts with SHM capability due to its unique superior characteristics. This review paper covers the aerospace SHM requirements and an overview of the fiber optic sensor technologies. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor technology is evaluated as the most promising tool for load monitoring and damage detection, the two critical SHM aspects of air platforms. At last, recommendations on the implementation and integration of FBG sensors into an SHM system are provided. PMID:22163816

  19. INSENS sensor system

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, D.W.; Baker, J.; Benzel, D.M.; Fuess, D.A.

    1993-09-29

    This paper describes an unattended ground sensor system that has been developed for the immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). The system, known as INSENS, was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for use by the United States Border Patrol. This system assists in the detection of illegal entry of aliens and contraband (illegal drugs, etc.) into the United States along its land borders. Key to the system is its flexible modular design which allows future software and hardware enhancements to the system without altering the fundamental architecture of the system. Elements of the system include a sensor system capable of processing signals from multiple directional probes, a repeater system, and a handheld monitor system. Seismic, passive infrared (PIR), and magnetic probes are currently supported. The design of the INSENS system elements and their performance are described.

  20. Smart aircraft composite structures with embedded small-diameter optical fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Nobuo; Minakuchi, Shu

    2012-02-01

    This talk describes the embedded optical fiber sensor systems for smart aircraft composite structures. First, a summary of the current Japanese national project on structural integrity diagnosis of aircraft composite structures is described with special emphasis on the use of embedded small-diameter optical fiber sensors including FBG sensors. Then, some examples of life-cycle monitoring of aircraft composite structures are presented using embedded small-diameter optical fiber sensors for low-cost and reliable manufacturing merits.

  1. Fiber optic control system integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppel, G. L.; Glasheen, W. M.; Russell, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    A total fiber optic, integrated propulsion/flight control system concept for advanced fighter aircraft is presented. Fiber optic technology pertaining to this system is identified and evaluated for application readiness. A fiber optic sensor vendor survey was completed, and the results are reported. The advantages of centralized/direct architecture are reviewed, and the concept of the protocol branch is explained. Preliminary protocol branch selections are made based on the F-18/F404 application. Concepts for new optical tools are described. Development plans for the optical technology and the described system are included.

  2. 1700 deg C optical temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mossey, P. W.; Shaffernocker, W. M.; Mulukutla, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    A new gas temperature sensor was developed that shows promise of sufficient ruggedness to be useful as a gas turbine temperature sensor. The sensor is in the form of a single-crystal aluminum oxide ceramic, ground to a cone shape and given an emissive coating. A lens and an optical fiber conduct the thermally emitted light to a remote and near-infrared photodetector assembly. Being optically coupled and passive, the sensor is highly immune to all types of electrical interference. Candidate sensors were analyzed for optical sensor performance, heat transfer characteristics, stress from gas loading. This led to the selection of the conical shape as the most promising for the gas turbine environment. One uncoated and two coated sensing elements were prepared for testing. Testing was conducted to an indicated 1750 C in a propane-air flame. Comparison with the referee optical pyrometer shows an accuracy of + or - 25 C at 1700 C for this initial development. One hundred cycles from room temperature to 1700 C left the sapphire cone intact, but some loss of the platinum, 6% rhodium coating was observed. Several areas for improving the overall performance and durability are identified.

  3. Novel ultrahigh resolution optical fibre temperature sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poeggel, Sven; Duraibabu, Dineshbabu; Dooly, Gerard; Lewis, Elfed; Leen, Gabriel

    2016-05-01

    In this paper a novel patent pending high resolution optical fibre temperature sensor, based on an optical fibre pressure and temperature sensor (OFTPS), which is surrounded by an oil filled chamber, is presented. The OFPTS is based on a Fabry Perot interferometer (FPI) which has an embedded fibre Bragg grating (FBG). The high ratio between the volume of the oil filled outer cavity and the FPIs air filled cavity, results in a highly sensitive temperature sensor. The FBG element of the device can be used for wide range temperature measurements, and combining this capability with the high resolution capability of the FPI/oil cavity results in a wide range and high resolution temperature sensing device. The outer diameter of the sensor is less than 1mm in diameter and can be designed to be even smaller. The sensors temperature response was measured in a range of ΔT = 7K and resulted in a shift in the optical spectrum of ΔλF = 61.42nm. Therefore the Q-point of the reflected optical FPI spectrum is shifting with a sensitivity of sot = 8.77 nm/K . The sensitivity can easily be further increased by changing the oil/air volumetric ratio and therefore adapt the sensor to a wide variety of applications.

  4. New intravascular flow sensor using fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stenow, Erik N. D.

    1994-12-01

    A new sensor using fiber optics is suggested for blood flow measurements in small vessels. The sensor principle and a first evaluation on a flow model are presented. The new sensor uses small CO2 gas bubbles as flow markers for optical detection. When the bubbles pass an optical window, light emitted from one fiber is reflected and scattered into another fiber. The sensor has been proven to work in a 3 mm flow model using two 110 micrometers optical fibers and a 100 micrometers steel capillary inserted into a 1 mm guide wire. The evaluation of a sensor archetype shows that the new sensor provides a promising method for intravascular blood flow measurement in small vessels. The linearity for steady state flow is studied in the flow interval 30 - 130 ml/min. comparison with ultrasound Doppler flowmetry was performed for pulsatile flow in the interval 25 - 125 ml/min. with a pulse length between 0.5 and 2 s. The use of intravascular administered CO2 in small volumes is harmless because the gas is rapidly dissolved in whole blood.

  5. Polymer Optical Fiber Sensor and the Prediction of Sensor Response Utilizing Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haroglu, Derya

    The global market researches showed that there is a growing trend in the field of polymer optical fiber (POF) and POF sensors. Telecommunications, medicine, defense, aerospace, and automotive are the application areas of fiber optic sensors, where the automotive industry is the most promising application area for innovations in the field of POF sensors. The POF sensors in automobiles are particularly for detection of seat occupancy, and intelligent pedestrian protection systems. This dissertation investigates graded index perfluorinated polymer optical fiber as an intensity modulated intrinsic sensor for application in automotive seat occupancy sensing. Since a fiber optic sensor has a high bandwidth, is small in size, is lightweight, and is immune to electromagnetic interference (EMI) it offers higher performance than that of its electrical based counterparts such as strain gauge, elastomeric bladder, and resistive sensor systems. This makes the fiber optic sensor a potential suitable material for seat occupancy sensing. A textile-based fiber optic sensor was designed to be located in the area beneath the typical seated human's thighs. The pressure interval under which the proposed POF sensor design could perform well was found to be between 0.18 and 0.21 N/cm2, where perfluorinated (PF) graded index (GI) POF (62.5/750 mum) was used as the POF material. In addition, the effect of the automotive seat covering including face material (fabric) and foam backing to the sensor's performance was analyzed. The face fabric structure and the thickness of foam backing were not found to be significant factors to change the sensor results. A research study, survey, was conducted of which purpose was to better understand market demands in terms of sensor performance characteristics for automotive seat weight sensors, as a part of the Quality Function Deployment (QFD) House of Quality analysis. The companies joined the survey agreed on the first 5 most important sensor

  6. Broadband ultrasound field mapping system using a wavelength tuned, optically scanned focused laser beam to address a Fabry Perot polymer film sensor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul

    2006-07-01

    An optical system for rapidly mapping broad-band ultrasound fields with high spatial resolution has been developed. The transduction mechanism is based upon the detection of acoustically induced changes in the optical thickness of a thin polymer film acting as a Fabry Perot sensing interferometer (FPI). By using a PC-controlled galvanometer mirror to line-scan a focused laser beam over the surface of the FPI, and a wavelength-tuned phase bias control system to optimally set the FPI working point, a notional 1D ultrasound array was synthesized. This system enabled ultrasound fields to be mapped over an aperture of 40 mm, in 50-microm steps with an optically defined element size of 50 microm and an acquisition time of 50 ms per step. The sensor comprised a 38-microm polymer film FPI which was directly vacuum-deposited onto an impedance-matched polycarbonate backing stub. The -3 dB acoustic bandwidth of the sensor was 300 kHz to 28 MHz and the peak noise-equivalent-pressure was 10 kPa over a 20-MHz measurement bandwidth. To demonstrate the system, the outputs of various planar and focused pulsed ultrasound transducers with operating frequencies in the range 3.5 to 20 MHz were mapped. It is considered that this approach offers a practical and inexpensive alternative to piezoelectric-based arrays and scanning systems for rapid transducer field characterization and biomedical and industrial ultrasonic imaging applications. PMID:16889340

  7. Fiber-optic chloride sensor development

    SciTech Connect

    Cosentino, P.; Grossman, B.; Shieh, C.; Doi, S.; Xi, H.; Erbland, P.

    1995-08-01

    Chloride in the form of salt water is a major contaminant of ground water, percolating through landfill liners and causing corrosion of steel. Four fiber-optic sensors capable of detecting chloride concentrations were developed. The most promising sensor detects chloride concentrations from 100 {micro}g/mL to greater than 3,000 {micro}g/mL. This sensor works when the chloride changes a reddish-brown silver chromate strip to white silver chloride. The color change causes the intensity of light propagating through the fiber to increase. The increase is monitored, and a calibration curve depicting light intensity versus chloride concentration results. The most promising sensor was multiplexed to determine the diffusion coefficients of chloride in a saturated sand column. The development, operation, and sensitivity of the sensors are described. Upon further development the sensor could be placed in the soil or in reinforced concrete for insitu monitoring of chloride. The sensor`s advantages over electronic sensors include immunity to corrosion and electromagnetic interference, and the ability for multiplexing sensors onto a single fiber.

  8. Fiber Optic Chemical Sensors Using Immobilized Bioreceptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walt, David R.; Luo, Shufang; Munkholm, Christiane

    1988-06-01

    Optrodes employing immobilized enzymes were developed using covalent attachment of sensor reagents. This development is an extension of the original application of this sensor technology in which a pH sensor was constructed with the pH sensitive dye fluorescein incorporated into a polymer covalently attached to the fiber tip. This sensor displayed significantly improved response times over previous fiber optic sensors because of reduced diffusion limitations. In addition, the signal intensities were greatly enhanced by the high concentration of fluorescent dye localized at the fiber tip. With the anticipation that these qualities would be preserved, a class of sensors based on the immobilization of biomolecules in the polymer matrix became the next goal. This paper will first describe a fiber optic probe prepared by immobilizing esterase in a crosslinked polyacrylamide matrix. The immobilized esterase converts the nonfluorescent fluoresceindiacetate into fluorescein. Both the steady state level and kinetic generation of fluorescence can be related to the concentration of fluoresceindiacetate. A fiber optic sensor for penicillin has been made by coimmobili zing penicillinase with a pH sensitive fluorescent dye. Penicillinase converts penicillin to penicilloic acid which produces a microenvironmental pH change in the dye-containing polymer matrix resulting in a concommitant change in fluorescence. The change in fluorescence is proportional to the concentration of penicillin and a 95% response is reached in 40-60 seconds. The sensor has a detection limit of 2.5 x 10-4 M. Another class of sensors using immobilized bioreceptors will be based on the principles of fluoroimmunoassay. This paper will discuss some basic principles and problems of 1) fluorescence quenching immunoassays, 2) fluorescence excitation transfer immunoassays, and 3) energy transfer immunoassays for digoxin. Both advantages and inherent problems for these sensor preparations will be addressed.

  9. Electronic Nose System Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has designed and built an electronic nose system -- ENose -- to take on the duty of staying alert for smells that could indicate hazardous conditions in a closed spacecraft environment. Its sensors (shown here) are tailored so they conduct electricity differently when an air stream carries a particular chemical across them. JPL has designed and built a 3-pound flight version. The active parts are 32 sensors, each with a different mix of polymers saturated with carbon. When certain chemicals latch onto a sensor, they change how the sensor conducts electricity. This signal tells how much of a compound is in the air. The electronic nose flown aboard STS-95 in 1998 was capable of successfully detecting 10 toxic compounds.

  10. Research on a fiber-optic hydrogen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-Jian; Ye, Miaoyuan; Zhang, Zhipeng

    1993-09-01

    A new type of hydrogen sensor for detecting the concentration of hydrogen in transformer oil with a fibre optical sensor is reported. This optic sensor is intrinsically safe for use in potentially explosive environments. The sensor responds to change in the optic properties of a thin palladium film exposed to hydrogen.

  11. A mobile wireless sensor network platform for use with optical fibre sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bochao; Yang, Shuo; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.

    2013-05-01

    This paper presents a novel design of a system for using smart mobile robots to deploy a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) for different optical fibre sensors, allowing for potential applications where there is a remote and harsh monitoring environment and allowing for the advantages of the optical fibre technology for the sensor itself to be used. The platform which was designed is comprised of a smart mobile robot, an optical fibre sensor module and a WSN module integrated with a localization component based on Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI), which has important advantages for mobile sensing and tracking, flexible deployment and mesh networking. The design principle and implementation-related issues for the platform have been discussed in this study. To investigate the performance of the mobile WSN platform, an experiment simulating measurement in a real environment has been performed. With the positive experimental data obtained, the functionalities of the platform are successfully demonstrated, which enables the real-time monitoring and transmission of sensor data and in addition estimated positional information. The exploitation of this kind of mobile WSN platform with fibre optic sensors is expected to make an impact on many applications, including those where advanced optical fibre sensing is particularly advantageous, yet where conventional WSNs cannot meet the requirements of the total sensing system.

  12. Fiber optic, Faraday rotation current sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Veeser, L.R.; Day, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    At the Second Megagauss Conference in 1979, there were reports of experiments that used the Faraday magneto-optic effect in a glass rod to measure large electric current pulses or magnetic fields. Since then we have seen the development of single-mode optical fibers that can carry polarized light in a closed loop around a current load. A fiber optic Faraday rotation sensor will integrate the flux, instead of sampling it at a discrete point, to get a measurement independent of the current distribution. Early Faraday rotation experiments using optical fibers to measure currents dealt with problems such as fiber birefringence and difficulties in launching light into the tiny fiber cores. We have built on those experiments, working to reduce the effects of shocks and obtaining higher bandwidths, absolute calibration, and computerized recording and data analysis, to develop the Faraday rotation sensors into a routine current diagnostic. For large current pulses we find reduced sensitivity to electromagnetic interference and other backgrounds than for Rogowski loops; often the fiber optic sensors are useful where conductive probes cannot be used at all. In this paper we describe the fiber optic sensors and some practical matters involved in fielding them.

  13. Fibre Optic Temperature Sensors Using Fluorescent Phenomena.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selli, Raman Kumar

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. A number of fibre optic sensors based on fluorescent phenomena using low cost electronic and optical filtering techniques, for temperature sensing applications are described and discussed. The initial device developed uses the absorption edge change of an optical glass to monitor changes in temperature with a second wavelength reference channel being generated from a fluorescent material, neodymium doped in glass. This device demonstrates the working of the self-referencing principle in a practical device tested over the temperature range of -60^circ C to 200^circC. This initial device was improved by incorporating a microprocessor and by modifying the processing electronic circuitry. An alternative probe was constructed which used a second fibre placed along-side the addressing fibre in contrast to the original device where the fibre is placed at the opposite end of the addressing fibre. A device based on the same principle but with different absorption glasses and a different fluorescent medium, crystalline ruby, was also examined. This device operated at a lower wavelength region compared to the infra -red working region of the first device. This work illustrated the need to make an appropriate choice of sensor absorption glass so that the cheaper indicator type LEDs, which operated at lower wavelengths, may be used. Ruby is a fluorescent material which is characterized by each emission wavelength having its own temperature characteristics. The integrated energy output over the complete emission spectrum is independent of temperature. This provided a means of generating a reference from the complete spectrum while a small frequency band gave a temperature dependent output. This characteristic of ruby was used to develop a temperature measuring device. A final system which utilises the temperature dependent decay-time emission properties of crystalline ruby was developed. In this case the ruby was

  14. All-Optical Graphene Oxide Humidity Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Weng Hong; Yap, Yuen Kiat; Chong, Wu Yi; Ahmad, Harith

    2014-01-01

    The optical characteristics of graphene oxide (GO) were explored to design and fabricate a GO-based optical humidity sensor. GO film was coated onto a SU8 polymer channel waveguide using the drop-casting technique. The proposed sensor shows a high TE-mode absorption at 1550 nm. Due to the dependence of the dielectric properties of the GO film on water content, this high TE-mode absorption decreases when the ambient relative humidity increases. The proposed sensor shows a rapid response (<1 s) to periodically interrupted humid air flow. The transmission of the proposed sensor shows a linear response of 0.553 dB/% RH in the range of 60% to 100% RH. PMID:25526358

  15. Fiber optic plantar pressure/shear sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soetanto, William; Nguyen, Ngoc T.; Wang, Wei-Chih

    2011-04-01

    A full-scale foot pressure/shear sensor that has been developed to help diagnose the cause of ulcer formation in diabetic patients is presented. The design involves a tactile sensor array using intersecting optical fibers embedded in soft elastomer. The basic configuration incorporates a mesh that is comprised of two sets of parallel optical fiber plane; the planes are configured so the parallel rows of fiber of the top and bottom planes are perpendicular to each other. Threedimensional information is determined by measuring the loss of light from each of the waveguide to map the overall pressure distribution and the shifting of the layers relative to each other. In this paper we will present the latest development on the fiber optic plantar pressure/shear sensor which can measure normal force up from 19.09 kPa to 1000 kPa.

  16. Optical temperature sensor using thermochromic semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1998-06-30

    An optical temperature measuring device utilizes thermochromic semiconductors which vary in color in response to changes in temperature. The thermochromic material is sealed in a glass matrix which allows the temperature sensor to detect high temperatures without breakdown. Cuprous oxide and cadmium sulfide are among the semiconductor materials which provide the best results. The changes in color may be detected visually using a sensor chip and an accompanying color card. 8 figs.

  17. Optical temperature sensor using thermochromic semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1998-01-01

    An optical temperature measuring device utilizes thermochromic semiconductors which vary in color in response to changes in temperature. The thermochromic material is sealed in a glass matrix which allows the temperature sensor to detect high temperatures without breakdown. Cuprous oxide and cadmium sulfide are among the semiconductor materials which provide the best results. The changes in color may be detected visually using a sensor chip and an accompanying color card.

  18. Optical Displacement Sensor for Sub-Hertz Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abramovici, Alexander; Chiao, Meng P.; Dekens, Frank G.

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses a sensor made from off-the-shelf electro-optical photodiodes and electronics that achieves 20 nm/(Hz)(exp 1/2) displacement sensitivity at 1 mHz. This innovation was created using a fiber-coupled laser diode (or Nd:YAG) through a collimator and an aperture as the illumination source. Together with a germanium quad photodiode, the above-mentioned displacement sensor sensitivities have been achieved. This system was designed to aid the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) with microthruster tests and to be a backup sensor for monitoring the relative position between a proof mass and a spacecraft for drag-free navigation. The optical displacement sensor can be used to monitor any small displacement from a remote location with minimal invasion on the system.

  19. A fiber optic temperature sensor for aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Stephen C.; Tilstra, Shelle D.; Barnabo, Geoffrey A.; Thomas, David C.; Phillips, Richard W.

    1991-02-01

    A fiber-optic temperature sensor has been developed for aerospace applications on the basis of the time rate of decay (TRD) principle, with a view to an operational temperature range of -60 to 350 C. This TRD system has completed qualification testing and will then undergo flight tests. Attention is presently given to the design and performance of four low temperature sensors that are subelements of the larger sensor system; in order to convert analog signals into over/under temperature indications, simple comparators are implemented in software.

  20. A multi-channel fiber optic proximity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byeong Kwon; Joo, Ki-Nam

    2016-03-01

    In this investigation, we propose an efficient multi-channel optical proximity sensor based on the spectrally-resolved interferometric principle. This sensor consists of a single optical source, a spectrometer and fiber optic components such as an optical circulator, a coarse wavelength division multiplexer (CWDM) and fiber optic probes. A spectrometer is used to detect the spectral interferograms of the measuring probes according to their own spectral bandwidths and the interference signals can be separated by the spectral filtering by a CWDM. The principle of the proposed sensor system was verified with feasibility experiments with the home-built 4 channel sensor system. The measuring range of each channel was 1 mm and the resolution was a few tens of nanometers determined by the deviation of linear motions. The stability of the sensor was less than 30 nm. With the aid of a broadband source and a spectrometer, the measurement channel can be extended further by using a suitable CWDM.

  1. Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor

    DOEpatents

    Veeser, L.R.; Forman, P.R.; Rodriguez, P.J.

    1998-02-17

    Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor is disclosed. The construction of a viable Faraday sensor has been achieved. Multimode fiber bundles are used to collect the light. If coupled directly into a 100 or 200 {micro}m core fiber, light from a light emitting diode (LED) is sufficient to operate the sensor. In addition, LEDs ensure that no birefringence effects in the input fiber are possible, as the output from such light sources have random polarization. No lens is required since the large diameter optical fibers and thin crystals of materials having high Verdet constants (such as iron garnets) employed permit the collection of a substantial quantity of light. No coupler is required. The maximum amount of light which could reach a detector using a coupler is 25%, while the measured throughput of the fiber-optic bundle without a coupler is about 42%. All of the elements employed in the present sensor are planar, and no particular orientation of these elements is required. The present sensor operates over a wide range of distances from magnetic field sources, and observed signals are large. When a tone wheel is utilized, the signals are independent of wheel speed, and the modulation is observed to be about 75%. No sensitivity to bends in the input or output optical fiber leads was observed. Reliable operation was achieved down to zero frequency, or no wheel rotation. 5 figs.

  2. Lensless Magneto-optic speed sensor

    DOEpatents

    Veeser, Lynn R.; Forman, Peter R.; Rodriguez, Patrick J.

    1998-01-01

    Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor. The construction of a viable Faraday sensor has been achieved. Multimode fiber bundles are used to collect the light. If coupled directly into a 100 or 200 .mu.m core fiber, light from a light emitting diode (LED) is sufficient to operate the sensor. In addition, LEDs ensure that no birefringence effects in the input fiber are possible, as the output from such light sources have random polarization. No lens is required since the large diameter optical fibers and thin crystals of materials having high Verdet constants (such as iron garnets) employed permit the collection of a substantial quantity of light. No coupler is required. The maximum amount of light which could reach a detector using a coupler is 25%, while the measured throughput of the fiber-optic bundle without a coupler is about 42%. All of the elements employed in the present sensor are planar, and no particular orientation of these elements is required. The present sensor operates over a wide range of distances from magnetic field sources, and observed signals are large. When a tone wheel is utilized, the signals are independent of wheel speed, and the modulation is observed to be about 75%. No sensitivity to bends in the input or output optical fiber leads was observed. Reliable operation was achieved down to zero frequency, or no wheel rotation.

  3. The feasibility and design of optical sensors for modal control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Charles A.

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of optical type sensors for control of flexible bodies was examined. The accuracies of such systems were determined via simulation and the sources of potential errors were designated. An initial laboratory design was effected and preliminary results obtained. These results are discussed critically with applications to future studies and system designs.

  4. Porous Silicon Structures as Optical Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Levitsky, Igor A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a short review of recent progress in the field of optical gas sensors based on porous silicon (PSi) and PSi composites, which are separate from PSi optochemical and biological sensors for a liquid medium. Different periodical and nonperiodical PSi photonic structures (bares, modified by functional groups or infiltrated with sensory polymers) are described for gas sensing with an emphasis on the device specificity, sensitivity and stability to the environment. Special attention is paid to multiparametric sensing and sensor array platforms as effective trends for the improvement of analyte classification and quantification. Mechanisms of gas physical and chemical sorption inside PSi mesopores and pores of PSi functional composites are discussed. PMID:26287199

  5. OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR EFFICIENT AND ECONOMICAL OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Anbo Wang; Kristie L. Cooper; Gary R. Pickrell

    2003-06-01

    Efficient recovery of petroleum reserves from existing oil wells has been proven to be difficult due to the lack of robust instrumentation that can accurately and reliably monitor processes in the downhole environment. Commercially available sensors for measurement of pressure, temperature, and fluid flow exhibit shortened lifetimes in the harsh downhole conditions, which are characterized by high pressures (up to 20 kpsi), temperatures up to 250 C, and exposure to chemically reactive fluids. Development of robust sensors that deliver continuous, real-time data on reservoir performance and petroleum flow pathways will facilitate application of advanced recovery technologies, including horizontal and multilateral wells. This is the final report for the four-year program ''Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery'', funded by the National Petroleum Technology Office of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech from October 1, 1999 to March 31, 2003. The main objective of this research program was to develop cost-effective, reliable optical fiber sensor instrumentation for real-time monitoring of various key parameters crucial to efficient and economical oil production. During the program, optical fiber sensors were demonstrated for the measurement of temperature, pressure, flow, and acoustic waves, including three successful field tests in the Chevron/Texaco oil fields in Coalinga, California, and at the world-class oil flow simulation facilities in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Research efforts included the design and fabrication of sensor probes, development of signal processing algorithms, construction of test systems, development and testing of strategies for the protection of optical fibers and sensors in the downhole environment, development of remote monitoring capabilities allowing real-time monitoring of the field

  6. In-flight fiber optic acoustic emission sensor (FAESense) system for the real time detection, localization, and classification of damage in composite aircraft structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar; Prohaska, John; Kempen, Connie; Esterkin, Yan; Sun, Sunjian

    2013-05-01

    Acoustic emission sensing is a leading structural health monitoring technique use for the early warning detection of structural damage associated with impacts, cracks, fracture, and delaminations in advanced materials. Current AE systems based on electronic PZT transducers suffer from various limitations that prevent its wide dynamic use in practical avionics and aerospace applications where weight, size and power are critical for operation. This paper describes progress towards the development of a wireless in-flight distributed fiber optic acoustic emission monitoring system (FAESense™) suitable for the onboard-unattended detection, localization, and classification of damage in avionics and aerospace structures. Fiber optic AE sensors offer significant advantages over its counterpart electronic AE sensors by using a high-density array of micron-size AE transducers distributed and multiplex over long lengths of a standard single mode optical fiber. Immediate SHM applications are found in commercial and military aircraft, helicopters, spacecraft, wind mil turbine blades, and in next generation weapon systems, as well as in the petrochemical and aerospace industries, civil structures, power utilities, and a wide spectrum of other applications.

  7. Relative-Motion Sensors and Actuators for Two Optical Tables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gursel, Yekta; McKenney, Elizabeth

    2004-01-01

    Optoelectronic sensors and magnetic actuators have been developed as parts of a system for controlling the relative position and attitude of two massive optical tables that float on separate standard air suspensions that attenuate ground vibrations. In the specific application for which these sensors and actuators were developed, one of the optical tables holds an optical system that mimics distant stars, while the other optical table holds a test article that simulates a spaceborne stellar interferometer that would be used to observe the stars. The control system is designed to suppress relative motion of the tables or, on demand, to impose controlled relative motion between the tables. The control system includes a sensor system that detects relative motion of the tables in six independent degrees of freedom and a drive system that can apply force to the star-simulator table in the six degrees of freedom. The sensor system includes (1) a set of laser heterodyne gauges and (2) a set of four diode lasers on the star-simulator table, each aimed at one of four quadrant photodiodes at nominal corresponding positions on the test-article table. The heterodyne gauges are used to measure relative displacements along the x axis.

  8. Optical temperature sensor using thermochromic semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1996-08-20

    An optical temperature measuring device utilizes thermochromic semiconductors which vary in color in response to changes in temperature. The thermochromic material is sealed in a glass matrix which allows the temperature sensor to detect high temperatures without breakdown. Cuprous oxide and cadmium sulfide are among the semiconductor materials which provide the best results. The changes in color may be detected visually or by utilizing an optical fiber and an electrical sensing circuit. 7 figs.

  9. Optical temperature sensor using thermochromic semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1996-01-01

    An optical temperature measuring device utilizes thermochromic semiconductors which vary in color in response to changes in temperature. The thermochromic material is sealed in a glass matrix which allows the temperature sensor to detect high temperatures without breakdown. Cuprous oxide and cadmium sulfide are among the semiconductor materials which provide the best results. The changes in color may be detected visually or by utilizing an optical fiber and an electrical sensing circuit.

  10. Application of homodyne demodulation system in fiber optic sensors using phase generated carrier based on LabVIEW in pipeline leakage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Cunfu; Hang, Lijun; Wu, Bin

    2006-02-01

    Phase generated carrier (PGC) homodyne demodulation technique is frequently used in optical fiber interferometric sensors for demodulating sensing signals. However, it is difficult for the system to achieve optimum performance because the electronic components which constitute the analog circuit of a PGC homodyne demodulation system have some problems such as overload, improper resistance, etc. all those will bring noise to the system. Therefore, the system could not be allowed to work well for those noises introduced by electronic components. For overcoming these disadvantages of the analog circuit mentioned above, a digital PGC demodulation system based on LabVIEW is described in this paper, and it is applied to demodulate the sensing signals from all fiber oil pipeline leakage detection system based on Sagnac interferometer. The results verify that this system can well demodulate sensing signals.

  11. Implantable medical sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Darrow, Christopher B.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Lee, Abraham P.; Wang, Amy W.

    2001-01-01

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  12. Chemical sensor system

    DOEpatents

    Darrow, Christopher B.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Lee, Abraham P.; Wang, Amy W.

    2002-01-01

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  13. EDITORIAL: Optical Fibre Sensors 18 (OFS-18)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Julian D. C.; Tatam, Ralph P.

    2007-10-01

    The International Conference on Optical Fibre Sensors (OFS-18) was held in October 2006 in Cancún, Mexico, under the general chairmanship of Dr Alexis Mendez (MCH Engineering LLC, USA) and Dr Fernando Mendoza (Centro de Investigaciones en Optica, Mexico). 'OFS', as it has become known, is firmly established as the leading international conference for the optical fibre sensor community. Since its inception, in London in 1983, and under the leadership of an international steering committee independent of any learned society or professional institution, it has been held approximately every eighteen months. The venue nominally rotates from Europe, to the Americas, and thence to Asia and the Pacific. OFS-18 demonstrated the continuing vigour of the community, with some 250 papers presented, plus two workshops, with attendance as international as ever. In recent years, it has become a tradition to publish a post-conference special issue in the journal Measurement Science and Technology, and these special issues offer a representative sample of the current status of the field. In the nearly 25 years since OFS began, many of the early ideas and laboratory-based proof-of-principle experiments have led to highly developed instrumentation systems, and to successful commercial products. Perhaps the most mature of all of these technologies is the optical fibre gyroscope, with the fibre hydrophone a close second—originally developed for defence applications for which it is now established, but with increasing relevance to the oil and gas industry; electromagnetic sensors based on the Faraday and electro-optic effects are of growing significance in the power generation and distribution industry; whilst in-fibre grating-based sensors occupy an expanding niche in structural monitoring, especially in civil engineering. It is therefore appropriate that the first day of OFS was devoted to workshops on structural health monitoring, and to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the

  14. Optical Sensors for Monitoring Gamma and Neutron Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Clark D.

    2011-01-01

    For safety and efficiency, nuclear reactors must be carefully monitored to provide feedback that enables the fission rate to be held at a constant target level via adjustments in the position of neutron-absorbing rods and moderating coolant flow rates. For automated reactor control, the monitoring system should provide calibrated analog or digital output. The sensors must survive and produce reliable output with minimal drift for at least one to two years, for replacement only during refueling. Small sensor size is preferred to enable more sensors to be placed in the core for more detailed characterization of the local fission rate and fuel consumption, since local deviations from the norm tend to amplify themselves. Currently, reactors are monitored by local power range meters (LPRMs) based on the neutron flux or gamma thermometers based on the gamma flux. LPRMs tend to be bulky, while gamma thermometers are subject to unwanted drift. Both electronic reactor sensors are plagued by electrical noise induced by ionizing radiation near the reactor core. A fiber optic sensor system was developed that is capable of tracking thermal neutron fluence and gamma flux in order to monitor nuclear reactor fission rates. The system provides near-real-time feedback from small- profile probes that are not sensitive to electromagnetic noise. The key novel feature is the practical design of fiber optic radiation sensors. The use of an actinoid element to monitor neutron flux in fiber optic EFPI (extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric) sensors is a new use of material. The materials and structure used in the sensor construction can be adjusted to result in a sensor that is sensitive to just thermal, gamma, or neutron stimulus, or any combination of the three. The tested design showed low sensitivity to thermal and gamma stimuli and high sensitivity to neutrons, with a fast response time.

  15. Coded Access Optical Sensor (CAOS) Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riza, N. A.; Amin, M. J.; La Torre, J. P.

    2015-04-01

    High spatial resolution, low inter-pixel crosstalk, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), adequate application dependent speed, economical and energy efficient design are common goals sought after for optical image sensors. In optical microscopy, overcoming the diffraction limit in spatial resolution has been achieved using materials chemistry, optimal wavelengths, precision optics and nanomotion-mechanics for pixel-by-pixel scanning. Imagers based on pixelated imaging devices such as CCD/CMOS sensors avoid pixel-by-pixel scanning as all sensor pixels operate in parallel, but these imagers are fundamentally limited by inter-pixel crosstalk, in particular with interspersed bright and dim light zones. In this paper, we propose an agile pixel imager sensor design platform called Coded Access Optical Sensor (CAOS) that can greatly alleviate the mentioned fundamental limitations, empowering smart optical imaging for particular environments. Specifically, this novel CAOS imager engages an application dependent electronically programmable agile pixel platform using hybrid space-time-frequency coded multiple-access of the sampled optical irradiance map. We demonstrate the foundational working principles of the first experimental electronically programmable CAOS imager using hybrid time-frequency multiple access sampling of a known high contrast laser beam irradiance test map, with the CAOS instrument based on a Texas Instruments (TI) Digital Micromirror Device (DMD). This CAOS instrument provides imaging data that exhibits 77 dB electrical SNR and the measured laser beam image irradiance specifications closely match (i.e., within 0.75% error) the laser manufacturer provided beam image irradiance radius numbers. The proposed CAOS imager can be deployed in many scientific and non-scientific applications where pixel agility via electronic programmability can pull out desired features in an irradiance map subject to the CAOS imaging operation.

  16. Fiber optics spectrochemical emission sensors

    DOEpatents

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Olsen, Khris B.

    1992-01-01

    A method of in situ monitoring of a body of a fluid stored in a tank or groundwater or vadose zone gases in a well for the presence of selected chemical species uses a probe insertable into the well or tank via a cable and having electrical apparatus for exciting selected chemical species in the body of fluid. The probe can have a pair of electrodes for initiating a spark or a plasma cell for maintaining a plasma to excite the selected chemical species. The probe also has optical apparatus for receiving optical emissions emitted by the excited species and optically transmitting the emissions via the cable to an analysis location outside the well. The analysis includes detecting a selected wavelength in the emissions indicative of the presence of the selected chemical species. A plurality of probes can be suspended at an end of a respective cable, with the transmitting and analyzing steps for each probe being synchronized sequentially for one set of support equipment and instrumentation to monitor at multiple test points. The optical apparatus is arranged about the light guide axis so that the selected chemical species are excited the fluid in alignment with the light guide axis and optical emissions are received from the excited chemical species along such axis.

  17. Fiber optics spectrochemical emission sensors

    DOEpatents

    Griffin, J.W.; Olsen, K.B.

    1992-02-04

    A method is described of in situ monitoring of a body of a fluid stored in a tank or groundwater or vadose zone gases in a well for the presence of selected chemical species. The method uses a probe insertable into the well or tank via a cable and having an electrical apparatus for exciting selected chemical species in the body of fluid. The probe can have a pair of electrodes for initiating a spark or a plasma cell for maintaining a plasma to excite the selected chemical species. The probe also has an optical apparatus for receiving optical emissions emitted by the excited species and optically transmitting the emissions via the cable to an analysis location outside the well. The analysis includes detecting a selected wavelength in the emissions indicative of the presence of the selected chemical species. A plurality of probes can be suspended at an end of a respective cable, with the transmitting and analyzing steps for each probe being synchronized sequentially for one set of support equipment and instrumentation to monitor at multiple test points. The optical apparatus is arranged about the light guide axis so that the selected chemical species are excited in the fluid in alignment with the light guide axis. Optical emissions are received from the excited chemical species along such axis. 18 figs.

  18. Embedded Optical Sensors for Thermal Barrier Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    David R. Clarke

    2005-11-09

    In the second year of this program on developing embedded optical sensors for thermal barrier coatings, our research has focused three topics: (1) Eu{sup 3+} doping for temperature sensing, (2) the effect of long-term, high-temperature aging on the characteristics of the luminescence from the Eu{sup 3+} ions of 8YSZ materials, (3) construction of a fiber-optic based luminescence detector system. It has been demonstrated that the variation in luminescence lifetime with temperature is identical for electron-beam evaporated Eu-doped YSZ coatings as for bulk ceramics of the same composition. Experiments indicate that the luminescence lifetime method of measuring temperatures is sensitive up to 1150 C for both Eu-doped YSZ coatings and Eu-doped Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Furthermore, the technique is sensitive up to 1250 C for the composition Eu{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}. The luminescence spectra Eu-doped YSZ are insensitive to long-term aging at high-temperatures, even to 195 hours at 1425 C, except for a small frequency shift that is probably too small in measure except with instruments of the highest spectral resolution. The temperature of 1425 C is much higher than present engines attain or even planned in the foreseeable future. Nevertheless, experiments are on-going to explore longer term exposures. A fiber-optic based luminescence system has been constructed in which the hottest section of fiber operates to at least 1250 C.

  19. Analysis, design, fabrication and testing of an optical tip clearance sensor. [turbocompressor blade tips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppel, G. L.; Marple, D. T. F.; Kingsley, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    Analyses and the design, fabrication, and testing of an optical tip clearance sensor with intended application in aircraft propulsion control systems are reported. The design of a sensor test rig, evaluation of optical sensor components at elevated temperatures, sensor design principles, sensor test results at room temperature, and estimations of sensor accuracy at temperatures of an aircraft engine environment are discussed. Room temperature testing indicated possible measurement accuracies of less than 12.7 microns (0.5 mils). Ways to improve performance at engine operating temperatures are recommended. The potential of this tip clearance sensor is assessed.

  20. Flow sensor using optical fiber strain gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Nicolas F.; Morgan, R.; Scully, Patricia J.; Lewis, Elfed; Chandy, Rekha

    1995-09-01

    A novel technique for the measurement of air flow velocity using an optical fiber sensor is reported. The sensor measures the deformation of a rubber cantilever beam when subjected to the stresses induced by drag forces in the presence of the airflow. Tests performed in a wind tunnel have indicated a sensitivity of 2 (mu) /(m/s). A qualitative model based on fiber mode propagation has been developed which allows the sensor to be characterized in terms of optical losses. A single 1 mm diameter polymer fiber is mounted on the rectangular section rubber cantilever (section 14 mm by 6 mm) and six grooves are etched into the fiber which extend into the core of the fiber. As the beam deviates the surface deforms (stretches or contracts) and the fiber is subjected to strain. As the strain is increased the grooves become wider and the amount of light transmitted through the fiber is reduced due to increased losses. The sensor described has all the advantages of optical fiber sensors including electrical noise immunity and intrinsic safety for use in hazardous environments. However, its simple construction, robustness, versatility for a number of different fluid applications, as well as relatively low cost make it attractive for use in a wide variety of measurement applications e.g. wind velocity measurement where airborne moisture or chemicals are present.

  1. Fiber-optic Sensors for Space Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Xiaoli; Liang, liangsheng1981. Sheng; Huang, Xingli

    Fiber-optic sensors (FOSs) offer several advantages over conventional sensors, such as high sensitivity, intrinsic safety in hazardous environments, immunity to electromagnetic interference, geometric flexibility, light weight, small size and the compatibility to fiber-optic communication, capability to distributed sensing. Due to these specific advantages, FOSs have been considered as a potentially effective solution for applications in space. A historical overview of how this powerful framework has been exploited to develop aerospace instruments is presented in this paper. This paper provides a review on the concepts, principles, methodology of FOSs for space applications. Firstly, the current state of the art of FOSs is reviewed. As significant cases of developments in FOSs, the interferometric sensors, fiber Grating sensors, photo crystal fiber sensors and scattering based sensors are outlined, respectively. Furthermore, several potential applications, including oxygen and hydrogen detection, temperature measurement, structure health monitoring, are discussed. Furthermore, some important performances, such as resolution, precision and dynamic range, are analyzed for different applications. Then, some potential theoretical and technological opportunities to improve FOSs for space applications are presented and discussed.

  2. Evaluation of air acidity through optical sensors.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Heras, M; Kromka, K; Faber, J; Karaszkiewicz, P; Villegas, M A

    2005-05-15

    Optical sensors developed from dye-doped coatings obtained through the sol-gel method were designed and produced to evaluate air acidity. Both laboratory calibration and field test measurements in several locales of downtown Cracow, Poland, were undertaken with the aim of assessing the sensors' behavior. As a first approach, SO2 was considered as the main gaseous pollutant with acid properties capable of sensitizing the sensors under humid conditions. A relationship between the SO2 concentration measured by conventional automatic air pollution monitoring stations and the optical response of the sensors was established. To correlate such a relationship with the air acidity, a simple calculation, which also takes into account relative humidity, temperature, and atmospheric pressure, was done. Following this calculation, the sensors' detection threshold for pH was found to be 0.05, approximately. The sensors can be a very useful analytical tool to alert against acid rain risks in preventive conservation of historical materials, among other applications. PMID:15952380

  3. Commercially available low-cost fiber optic combustion pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poorman, Thomas J.; Kalashnikov, Sergey P.; Wlodarczyk, Marek T.

    1995-09-01

    We report design considerations and performance data of a fiber optic pressure sensor system that is suitable for continouus cobustion pressure measurements. The sensor is designed for 0 to 1000 psi pressure range and sensor housing temperatures ranging from -40 degrees C to 300 degrees C. A durable metal diaphragm design ensures fatigue-resistant long-term sensor operation and linear response. An intelligent autoreferencing technique provides drift- free output and compensates for high temperature and other environmental effects. Performance data is presented from tests performed in passenger cars and large-bore stationary engines. Typical sensor accuracy is +/- 1% at constant temperature and when connected to different interface units. Continuing endurance tests demonstrate excellent sensor durability for over 2000 hours continuous operation or 200 million pressure cycles that the sensors have been exposed to so far. The FiberPSITM pressure sensor system, commercially viable at this time, meets or exceeds the performance of research grade pressure sensors at a fraction of the cost.

  4. A new paradigm for video cameras: optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grottle, Kevin; Nathan, Anoo; Smith, Catherine

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents a new paradigm for the utilization of video surveillance cameras as optical sensors to augment and significantly improve the reliability and responsiveness of chemical monitoring systems. Incorporated into a hierarchical tiered sensing architecture, cameras serve as 'Tier 1' or 'trigger' sensors monitoring for visible indications after a release of warfare or industrial toxic chemical agents. No single sensor today yet detects the full range of these agents, but the result of exposure is harmful and yields visible 'duress' behaviors. Duress behaviors range from simple to complex types of observable signatures. By incorporating optical sensors in a tiered sensing architecture, the resulting alarm signals based on these behavioral signatures increases the range of detectable toxic chemical agent releases and allows timely confirmation of an agent release. Given the rapid onset of duress type symptoms, an optical sensor can detect the presence of a release almost immediately. This provides cues for a monitoring system to send air samples to a higher-tiered chemical sensor, quickly launch protective mitigation steps, and notify an operator to inspect the area using the camera's video signal well before the chemical agent can disperse widely throughout a building.

  5. Optical Sensor Of High Gas Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Arthur J.

    1988-01-01

    Contact pyrometer resists effects of heat, vibration, and moisture. New sensor consists of shielded sapphire rod with sputtered layer of precious metal on end. Metal layer acts as blackbody. Emits radiation having known dependence of spectral distribution with temperature of metal and temperature of hot gas flowing over metal. Fiber-optic cable carries radiation from sapphire rod to remote photodetector.

  6. Optical Sensor Based Corn Algorithm Evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optical sensor based algorithms for corn fertilization have developed by researchers in several states. The goal of this international research project was to evaluate these different algorithms and determine their robustness over a large geographic area. Concurrently the goal of this project was to...

  7. Fibre optic grating sensors for biofuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, M.; Fabris, J. L.; Kalinowski, H. J.

    2010-09-01

    Biofuels will have more intense impact on the energetic grid of the planet, because known fossil fuels reserves are being exhausted. The biofuel production relies on the transformation process of some organic material in the desired hydrocarbon product. Because of the natural characteristics of the related processes, fibre optic sensors appear to be adequate candidates to be used.

  8. Seaborne electro-optical sensors and their technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horman, Stephen R.; Headley, Robert M., Jr.; Zurasky, Matthew W.; Dezeeuw, Patrick A.; Trahan, Joseph W.

    1999-07-01

    The US Navy (USN) has long placed a strong emphasis on the production and use of electro-optical (EO) sensors for a wide variety of mission on naval aircraft. Numerous EO fire control and surveillance sensor systems have been developed for USN surface ship applications, but production and deployment has been limited. This apparent dichotomy is due to the vastly different missions and environments of aircraft and ships, and to the need for shipboard system that will support operations dictated by our global interest. EO technology has now evolved to the point where surveillance and fire control sensor systems can be built that have excellent performance under the preponderance of environmental conditions, and where atmospheric refraction, rather than transmission, is the primary design driver. In addition, the consensus of USN decision-makers is that EO sensor system that are designed to complement not supplant, radar systems can provide dramatic improvements in combat system performance at acceptable costs. The two sensor classes that have achieved this level of maturity are Horizon IR Surveillance Systems and the Thermal Imaging Sensors. This paper describes the technologies that have made these sensors possible as well as some of the phenomenological drivers to their designs.

  9. Data Optical Networking Architecture Using Wavelength-Division Multiplexing Method for Optical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.

    2008-01-01

    Recently there has been a growth in the number of fiber optical sensors used for health monitoring in the hostile environment of commercial aircraft. Health monitoring to detect the onset of failure in structural systems from such causes as corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and fatigue is a critical factor in safety as well in aircraft maintenance costs. This report presents an assessment of an analysis model of optical data networking architectures used for monitoring data signals among these optical sensors. Our model is focused on the design concept of the wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) method since most of the optical sensors deployed in the aircraft for health monitoring typically operate in a wide spectrum of optical wavelengths from 710 to 1550 nm.

  10. Cloaking a sensor via transformation optics.

    PubMed

    Greenleaf, Allan; Kurylev, Yaroslav; Lassas, Matti; Uhlmann, Gunther

    2011-01-01

    Ideal transformation optics cloaking at positive frequency, besides rendering the cloaked region invisible to detection by scattering of incident waves, also shields the region from those same waves. In contrast, we demonstrate that approximate cloaking permits a strong coupling between the cloaked and uncloaked regions; careful choice of parameters allows this coupling to be amplified, leading to effective cloaks with degraded shielding. The sensor modes we describe are close to but distinct from interior resonances, which destroy cloaking. As one application, we describe how to use transformation optics to hide sensors in the cloaked region and yet enable the sensors to efficiently measure incident waves on the exterior of the cloak, an effect similar to the plasmon-based approach of Alù and Engheta. PMID:21405787

  11. Optical sensor for heat conduction measurement in biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez-Arroyo, A.; Sanchez-Perez, C.; Aleman-Garcia, N.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the design of a heat flux sensor using an optical fiber system to measure heat conduction in biological tissues. This optoelectronic device is based on the photothermal beam deflection of a laser beam travelling in an acrylic slab this deflection is measured with a fiber optic angle sensor. We measure heat conduction in biological samples with high repeatability and sensitivity enough to detect differences in tissues from three chicken organs. This technique could provide important information of vital organ function as well as the detect modifications due to degenerative diseases or physical damage caused by medications or therapies.

  12. The optical slit sensor as a standard sensor for spacecraft attitude determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wertz, J.

    1975-01-01

    The basic concept of an optical slit sensor as a standard altitude sensor is considered for any missions using a spinning spacecraft or where rotating sensors or mirrors could be used. Information available from a single sensor or from two sensors is analyzed. A standard slit sensor package is compared with the altitude package flown on the first synchronous meteorological satellite.

  13. Welding Sensor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    A system originally designed for welding components of the huge Space Shuttle external tank led to a laser-based automated welder for industrial use. A laser sensor tracks the seam where two pieces of metal are to be joined, measures gaps, misfits and automatically corrects welding of torch distance and height. A small industrial computer translates the sensor's information to the weld head and records and displays weld data for control purposes and analysis. The system was modified for commercial use by Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Martin Marietta and Applied Research, Inc., which produces the commercial system. Applications are in industrial welding processes that require repetitive operations and a high degree of reliability.

  14. Lightning Current Measurement with Fiber-Optic Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.; Szatkowski, George N.; Mata, Carlos T.; Mata, Angel G.; Snyder, Gary P.

    2014-01-01

    A fiber-optic current sensor is successfully developed with many potential applications for electric current measurement. Originally developed for in-flight lightning measurement, the sensor utilizes Faraday Effect in an optical fiber. The Faraday Effect causes linear light polarization in a fiber to rotate when the fiber is exposed to a magnetic field. The polarization change is detected using a reflective polarimetric scheme. Forming fiber loops and applying Ampere's law, measuring the total light rotation results in the determination of the total current enclosed. The sensor is conformable to complex structure geometry. It is also non-conductive and immune to electromagnetic interference, saturation or hysteresis. Installation is non-intrusive, and the sensor can be safely routed through flammable areas. Two similar sensor systems are described in this paper. The first system operates at 1310nm laser wavelength and is capable of measuring approximately 300 A - 300 kA, a 60 dB range. Laboratory validation results of aircraft lighting direct and in-direct effect current amplitudes are reported for this sensor. The second system operates at 1550nm wavelength and can measure about 400 A - 400 kA. Triggered-lightning measurement data are presented for this system. Good results are achieved in all cases.

  15. Optical fiber sensors for harsh environments

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Juncheng; Wang, Anbo

    2007-02-06

    A diaphragm optic sensor comprises a ferrule including a bore having an optical fiber disposed therein and a diaphragm attached to the ferrule, the diaphragm being spaced apart from the ferrule to form a Fabry-Perot cavity. The cavity is formed by creating a pit in the ferrule or in the diaphragm. The components of the sensor are preferably welded together, preferably by laser welding. In some embodiments, the entire ferrule is bonded to the fiber along the entire length of the fiber within the ferrule; in other embodiments, only a portion of the ferrule is welded to the fiber. A partial vacuum is preferably formed in the pit. A small piece of optical fiber with a coefficient of thermal expansion chosen to compensate for mismatches between the main fiber and ferrule may be spliced to the end of the fiber.

  16. Optical fiber-based fluorescent viscosity sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidekker, Mark A.; Akers, Walter J.; Fischer, Derek; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A.

    2006-09-01

    Molecular rotors are a unique group of viscosity-sensitive fluorescent probes. Several recent studies have shown their applicability as nonmechanical fluid viscosity sensors, particularly in biofluids containing proteins. To date, molecular rotors have had to be dissolved in the fluid for the measurement to be taken. We now show that molecular rotors may be covalently bound to a fiber-optic tip without loss of viscosity sensitivity. The optical fiber itself may be used as a light guide for emission light (external illumination of the tip) as well as for both emission and excitation light. Covalently bound molecular rotors exhibit a viscosity-dependent intensity increase similar to molecular rotors in solution. An optical fiber-based fluorescent viscosity sensor may be used in real-time measurement applications ranging from biomedical applications to the food industry.

  17. Optical inverse-square displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Howe, Robert D.; Kychakoff, George

    1989-01-01

    This invention comprises an optical displacement sensor that uses the inverse-square attenuation of light reflected from a diffused surface to calculate the distance from the sensor to the reflecting surface. Light emerging from an optical fiber or the like is directed onto the surface whose distance is to be measured. The intensity I of reflected light is angle dependent, but within a sufficiently small solid angle it falls off as the inverse square of the distance from the surface. At least a pair of optical detectors are mounted to detect the reflected light within the small solid angle, their ends being at different distances R and R+.DELTA.R from the surface. The distance R can then be found in terms of the ratio of the intensity measurements and the separation length as ##EQU1##

  18. Optical inverse-square displacement sensor

    DOEpatents

    Howe, R.D.; Kychakoff, G.

    1989-09-12

    This invention comprises an optical displacement sensor that uses the inverse-square attenuation of light reflected from a diffused surface to calculate the distance from the sensor to the reflecting surface. Light emerging from an optical fiber or the like is directed onto the surface whose distance is to be measured. The intensity I of reflected light is angle dependent, but within a sufficiently small solid angle it falls off as the inverse square of the distance from the surface. At least a pair of optical detectors are mounted to detect the reflected light within the small solid angle, their ends being at different distances R and R + [Delta]R from the surface. The distance R can then be found in terms of the ratio of the intensity measurements and the separation length as given in an equation. 10 figs.

  19. Polarization-Rotating Sensors Connected To Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazer, Robert E.

    1992-01-01

    Proposed optoelectronic sensor system includes polarization-rotating sensing elements interrogated by polarized light transmitted to and from sensing elements along optical fibers. Polarization of light altered by combinations of inherent birefringence, stress-induced birefrigence, and Faraday rotation. Advantages include: light weight, fast response, immunity to electromagnetic interference at radio and lower frequencies, and no need to supply electrical power to sensing elements.

  20. Monolithic integrated optic fiber Bragg grating sensor interrogator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar A.; Esterkin, Yan; Kempen, Cornelia; Sun, Songjian

    2010-04-01

    Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are a mature sensing technology that has gained rapid acceptance in civil, aerospace, chemical and petrochemical, medicine, aviation and automotive industries. Fiber Bragg grating sensors can be use for a variety of measurements including strain, stress, vibration, acoustics, acceleration, pressure, temperature, moisture, and corrosion distributed at multiple locations within the structure using a single fiber element. The most prominent advantages of FBGs are: small size and light weight, multiple FBG transducers on a single fiber, and immunity to radio frequency interference. A major disadvantage of FBG technology is that conventional state-of-the-art fiber Bragg grating interrogation systems are typically bulky, heavy, and costly bench top instruments that are assembled from off-the-shelf fiber optic and optical components integrated with a signal electronics board into an instrument console. Based on the need for a compact FBG interrogation system, this paper describes recent progress towards the development of a miniature fiber Bragg grating sensor interrogator (FBG-TransceiverTM) system based on multi-channel monolithic integrated optic sensor microchip technology. The integrated optic microchip technology enables the monolithic integration of all of the functionalities, both passive and active, of conventional bench top FBG sensor interrogators systems, packaged in a miniaturized, low power operation, 2-cm x 5-cm small form factor (SFF) package suitable for the long-term structural health monitoring in applications where size, weight, and power are critical for operation.

  1. Distributed-aperture infrared sensor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusgard, Thomas C.

    1999-07-01

    The on-going maturation of electro-optic technology in which the advent of third generation focal plane array is being combined with the capabilities of increasingly powerful signal processing algorithm now points to a new direction in design of electro-optic sensor system for both military and non-military applications. Taking advantage of those advances. Distributed Aperture IR Sensor systems (DAIRS) are currently in development within the Defense Department for installation in a variety of platforms for utilization in a wide variety of tactical scenarios. DAIRS employs multiple fixed identical sensor to obtain the functionality that was previously obtained using specialized sensors for each function. In its role in tactical scenarios. DAIRS employs multiple fixed identical sensor to obtain the functionality that was previously obtained using specialized sensor for each function. In its role in tactical aircraft, DAIRS uses an array of six strategically located sensors which provide 4(pi) steradian sensor coverage, i.e., full sphere situational awareness (SA), to the aircrew. That awareness provides: missile threat warning, IR Search and Track, battle damage assessment, targeting assistance, and pilotage. DAIRS has applicability in providing expanded SA for surface ships, armored land vehicles and unmanned air combat vehicles. A typical sensor design has less than twenty-five percent of the weight, volume, and electrical power demand of current federated airborne IR sensor system and can become operational with a significant reduction in lifetime system cost. DAIRS, when combined with autocueing, may have a significant role in technological advancement of aircraft proximity warning system for in-flight collision avoidance. DAIRS is currently founded in part by the Office of Naval Research which will result in the IR Distributed Aperture System (MIDAS), which is funded as a Navy Advanced Technology Demonstration, the DAIRS will undergo airborne testing using four

  2. Fluorescent optical liquid level sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2001-01-01

    A liquid level sensor comprising a transparent waveguide containing fluorescent material that is excited by light of a first wavelength and emits at a second, longer wavelength. The upper end of the waveguide is connected to a light source at the first wavelength through a beveled portion of the waveguide such that the input light is totally internally reflected within the waveguide above an air/liquid interface in a tank but is transmitted into the liquid below this interface. Light is emitted from the fluorescent material only in those portions of the waveguide that are above the air/liquid interface, to be collected at the upper end of the waveguide by a detector that is sensitive only to the second wavelength. As the interface moves down in the tank, the signal strength from the detector will increase.

  3. Miniature fiber optic sensor based on fluorescence energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadows, David L.; Schultz, Jerome S.

    1992-04-01

    Optical fiber biosensors based on fluorescence assays have several distinct advantages when measuring biological analytes such as metabolites, cofactors, toxins, etc. Not only are optical signals immune to electronic interferences, but the polychromatic nature of most fluorochemical assays provides more potentially useful data about the system being studied. One of the most common difficulties normally encountered with optical biosensors is the inability to routinely recalibrate the optical and electronic components of the system throughout the life of the sensor. With this in mind, we present an optical fiber assay system for glucose based on a homogeneous singlet/singlet energy transfer assay along with the electronic instrumentation built to support the sensor system. In the sensor probe, glucose concentrations are indirectly measured from the level of fluorescence quenching caused by the homogeneous competition assay between TRITC labeled concanavalin A (receptor) and FITC labeled Dextran (ligand). The FITC signal is used to indicate glucose concentrations and the TRITC signal is used for internal calibration. Data is also presented on a protein derivatization procedure that was used to prevent aggregation of the receptor protein in solution. Also, a molecular model is described for the singlet/singlet energy transfer interactions that can occur in a model system composed of a monovalent ligand (FITC labeled papain) and a monovalent receptor (TRITC labeled concanavalin A).

  4. Vibration sensing in flexible structures using a distributed-effect modal domain optical fiber sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichard, Karl M.; Lindner, Douglas K.; Claus, Richard O.

    1991-01-01

    Modal domain optical fiber sensors have recently been employed in the implementation of system identification algorithms and the closed-loop control of vibrations in flexible structures. The mathematical model of the modal domain optical fiber sensor used in these applications, however, only accounted for the effects of strain in the direction of the fiber's longitudinal axis. In this paper, we extend this model to include the effects of arbitrary stress. Using this sensor model, we characterize the sensor's sensitivity and dynamic range.

  5. Railroad bridge instrumentation with fiber-optic sensors.

    PubMed

    Lee, W; Lee, J; Henderson, C; Taylor, H F; James, R; Lee, C E; Swenson, V; Atkins, R A; Gemeiner, W G

    1999-03-01

    Fiber-optic sensors were installed on fatigue-critical components in the superstructure of a railroad bridge to monitor dynamic strains induced by trains crossing the bridge as well as to detect the onset of cracks. Each fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) strain gage was adhesively bonded to a stainless-steel strip to facilitate all-weather installation on the steel bridge members by spot welding. FFPI strain sensors were also installed on a rail at an approach to the bridge. Electrical resistive strain gages were colocated with the fiber-optic sensors on the bridge for the purpose of performance verification. In addition to the strain gages, fiber-optic continuity sensors for crack detection were bonded to the structure at critical locations. A telemetry system for transmitting the data over telephone lines was also installed at the bridge site. Dynamic response of the fiber-optic strain sensors is comparable with that of the electrical gages, and their performance has not degraded in the year since the initial installation. PMID:18305719

  6. An all-fiber partial discharge monitoring system based on both intrinsic fiber optic interferometry sensor and fluorescent fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zelin; Zhang, Ruirui; Tong, Jie; Chen, Xi

    2013-12-01

    Partial discharges (PDs) are an electrical phenomenon that occurs within a transformer whenever the voltage stress is sufficient to produce ionization in voids or inclusions within a solid dielectric, at conductor/dielectric interfaces, or in bubbles within liquid dielectrics such as oil; high-frequency transient current discharges will then appear repeatedly and will progressively deteriorate the insulation, ultimately leading to breakdown. Fiber sensor has great potential on the partial discharge detection in high-voltage equipment for its immunity to electromagnetic interference and it can take direct measurement in the high voltage equipment. The energy released in PDs produces a number of effects, resulting in flash, chemical and structural changes and electromagnetic emissions and so on. Acoustic PD detection is based on the mechanical pressure wave emitted from the discharge and fluorescent fiber PD detection is based on the emitted light produced by ionization, excitation and recombination processes during the discharge. Both of the two methods have the shortage of weak anti-interference capacity in the physical environment, like thunder or other sound source. In order to avoid the false report, an all-fiber combined PD detection system of the two methods is developed in this paper. In the system the fluorescent fiber PD sensor is considered as a reference signal, three F-P based PD detection sensors are used to both monitor the PD intensity and calculate the exact position of the discharge source. Considering the wave band of the F-P cavity and the fluorescent probe are quite different, the reflection spectrum of the F-P cavity is in the infrared region, however the fluorescent probe is about 600nm to 700nm, thus the F-P sensor and fluorescent fiber probe can be connected in one fiber and the reflection light can be detected by two different detectors without mutual interference. The all-fiber partial discharge monitoring system not only can detect the PDs

  7. Optical sensor for measuring American Lobster vitality

    SciTech Connect

    Tomassetti, Brian R. A.; Vetelino, John F.

    2011-06-10

    The vitality of the American Lobster (Homarus americanus) is correlated to the total hemolymph protein (THP) in lobster hemolymph (blood). The standard technique for determining lobster vitality is to draw blood from a lobster and measure THP with a refractometer. This technique is invasive and endangers the lobster's health since blood must be drawn from the lobster. In the present work an optical sensor is developed to measure a lobster's vitality in vivo. It is comprised of a broadband light source, a monochromator, a fiber optic reflection probe, a spectrometer and a computer. This sensor measures protein concentrations by exciting a lobster with 280 nm and 334 nm wavelength light sources and measuring the corresponding absorbance peaks for THP and the fluorescence peak for hemocyanin (Hc), the majority protein in hemolymph. In this work several lobsters are tested. For each lobster, absorbance and fluorescence peaks are measured using the sensor and compared to protein concentrations measured using a refractometer. It is found that the shell thickness and muscle density, which correspond directly to protein concentration and the molting stage of the lobster have a significant effect on the absorbance and fluorescence measurements. It is also found that within specific molting stages, such as pre-molt and post-molt, protein concentration measured with a refractometer correlates linearly to absorbance and fluorescence measurements with the optical sensor.

  8. Optical Sensor for Measuring American Lobster Vitality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomassetti, Brian R. A.; Vetelino, John F.

    2011-06-01

    The vitality of the American Lobster (Homarus americanus) is correlated to the total hemolymph protein (THP) in lobster hemolymph (blood). The standard technique for determining lobster vitality is to draw blood from a lobster and measure THP with a refractometer. This technique is invasive and endangers the lobster's health since blood must be drawn from the lobster. In the present work an optical sensor is developed to measure a lobster's vitality in vivo. It is comprised of a broadband light source, a monochromator, a fiber optic reflection probe, a spectrometer and a computer. This sensor measures protein concentrations by exciting a lobster with 280 nm and 334 nm wavelength light sources and measuring the corresponding absorbance peaks for THP and the fluorescence peak for hemocyanin (Hc), the majority protein in hemolymph. In this work several lobsters are tested. For each lobster, absorbance and fluorescence peaks are measured using the sensor and compared to protein concentrations measured using a refractometer. It is found that the shell thickness and muscle density, which correspond directly to protein concentration and the molting stage of the lobster have a significant effect on the absorbance and fluorescence measurements. It is also found that within specific molting stages, such as pre-molt and post-molt, protein concentration measured with a refractometer correlates linearly to absorbance and fluorescence measurements with the optical sensor.

  9. Fiber optic temperature sensors for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaafsma, David T.; Palmer, Gail; Bechtel, James H.

    2003-07-01

    Recent developments in fiber-optic sensor technology have demonstrated the utility of fiber-optic sensors for both medical and industrial applications. Fiber sensors based on fluorescent decay of rare earth doped materials allow rapid and accurate temperature measurement in challenging environments. Here we review the principles of operation of these sensors with a rare earth doped probe material and demonstrate why this material is an excellent choice for these types of sensors. The decay time technique allows accurate temperature determination from two measurements of the fluorescence intensity at a well-defined time interval. With this method, all instrumental and extraneous environmental effect will cancel, thus providing an accurate temperature measurement. Stability data will be presented for the fiber-optic probes. For medical applications, new breakthroughs in RF ablation technology and electro-surgical procedures are being introduced as alternative, less invasive treatment for removal of small tumors and for removal of plaque within arteries as a preventive treatment that avoids open heart surgery. The availability of small diameter temperature probes (230 microns or 450 microns in diameter) offers a whole new scope to temperature measurement. Accurate and reliable temperature monitoring during any laser treatment procedure or RF ablation at the surgical site is critical. Precise, NIST traceable reliable results are needed to prevent overheating or underheating during treatment. In addition, how interventional catheters are used in hyperthermia studies and the advantages to having flexible cables and multiple sensors are discussed. Preliminary data is given from an animal study where temperature was monitored in a pig during an RF study.

  10. Fiber-Optic Pressure Sensor With Dynamic Demodulation Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lekki, John D.

    2002-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center developed in-house a method to detect pressure fluctuations using a fiber-optic sensor and dynamic signal processing. This work was in support of the Intelligent Systems Controls and Operations project under NASA's Information Technology Base Research Program. We constructed an optical pressure sensor by attaching a fiber-optic Bragg grating to a flexible membrane and then adhering the membrane to one end of a small cylinder. The other end of the cylinder was left open and exposed to pressure variations from a pulsed air jet. These pressure variations flexed the membrane, inducing a strain in the fiber-optic grating. This strain was read out optically with a dynamic spectrometer to record changes in the wavelength of light reflected from the grating. The dynamic spectrometer was built in-house to detect very small wavelength shifts induced by the pressure fluctuations. The spectrometer is an unbalanced interferometer specifically designed for maximum sensitivity to wavelength shifts. An optimum pathlength difference, which was determined empirically, resulted in a 14-percent sensitivity improvement over theoretically predicted path-length differences. This difference is suspected to be from uncertainty about the spectral power difference of the signal reflected from the Bragg grating. The figure shows the output of the dynamic spectrometer as the sensor was exposed to a nominally 2-kPa peak-to-peak square-wave pressure fluctuation. Good tracking, sensitivity, and signal-to-noise ratios are evident even though the sensor was constructed as a proof-of-concept and was not optimized in any way. Therefore the fiber-optic Bragg grating, which is normally considered a good candidate as a strain or temperature sensor, also has been shown to be a good candidate for a dynamic pressure sensor.

  11. Optical dust sensor for the mining industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierakowski, Marek W.; Wolinski, Tomasz R.; Domanski, Andrzej W.; Osinska, Katarzyna

    2003-04-01

    One of many hazards in mining industry is presence of airborne dust on underground boards. Hazards caused by dust generated and spread in mines are of the two types: (1) health risk for miners from airborne dust produced from rocks, coal, soluble minerals (pneumoconiosis, toxicity), (2) danger of explosion of carbon dust. Dust particles produced in mines underground range from 0 to about 400 micrometers, have irregular shapes and prevailingly are strongly light absorbing. It is assumed that the most health-risky are particles between 1 μm and 5 μm in size. They are not visible with naked eyes, so their control and measurement need technical equipment. As a standard in polish mines, gravimetric measurement method is used at present. This method works well in post-event evaluation of total health-risk factor, but is not much useful for instantaneous risk warning. In order to recognize and possibly prevent the dust risk as it appears, other methods have to be used, like optical method. Looking towards this demand, an experimental optical dust sensor is demonstrated. The sensor is based on light scattering effect by dust particles, as usual do devices of this type. Originality of this solution lies in construction details of the sensor. Scattering is a complex function of dust kind, size, shape and concentration. Moreover, operating conditions of such a device are cruel -- humidity, elevated temperature, vibrations, and over-all contact with dust -- are harmful for optics. Thus, to achieve reliable indications of the sensor is really a challenge. This paper describes optical construction attempting to overcome difficulties in obtaining dust concentration sensor intended for mining industry and similar applications. First laboratory and operational tests are also reported.

  12. Flow-cell fibre-optic enzyme sensor for phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Papkovsky, D.B.; Ghindilis, A.L.; Kurochkin, I.N. )

    1993-07-01

    A solid-state fibre-optic luminescent oxygen sensor was used for flow-through measurements. It acts as a transducer in a new flow-cell enzyme sensor arrangement. This arrangement comprises a flow path, sample injector, microcolumn with the immobilized enzyme, oxygen membrane and fibre-optic connector joined together to form an integral unit. Laccase enzyme was used as a recognition system which provided specific oxidation of the substrates with the dissolved oxygen being monitored. The assay procedure was optimized and performance of the new system studied. The sensor was applied to the determination polyphenol content in tea, brandy, etc. (quality control test). The sensitivity to some important phenolic compounds was tested with the view of industrial wastewater control applications. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Wavelength-coded fiber optic sensors for verification of identity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gary, Charles K.; Rubin, Josh

    1996-10-01

    In this paper we present a fiber-optic sensing system designed to verify the identity of objects or personnel. The spectrum of a fiber-optic Bragg grating can store information, which can then be accessed simply by examining the reflection spectrum of the grating. Typically, fiber- optic Bragg grating sensors measure perturbations in the spectrum of the grating caused by the environment. However, spectral information can also distinguish various Bragg gratings, a principle that is used to wavelength division multiplex limited numbers of Bragg gratings sensors. Going one step further, a very large number of gratings can be distinguished by their spectra. In this paper, we present the experimental validation of a system capable of distinguishing over 1000 sensor heads. The fiber-optic Bragg gratings can be thought of as keys, or ID cards, that can be read by a detector to limit access to secure information or places. The system can readily expand to provide the capability of distinguishing over a million keys. In addition, the keys can also function as sensors.

  14. Fiber-optic displacement sensors on the Hunters Trophy UGT impulse gauge experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Green, R.E.L.; Poutiatine, A.I.

    1995-03-01

    As part of a program to develop gauges for measurement of various mechanical properties in hostile environments, the authors fielded purely optical displacement sensors at the ends of long fiber-optic cables as supplements to the regular displacement sensors of four impulse gauges fielded as part of a materials study on the Hunters Trophy underground effects test at the Nevada Test Site. These fiber-optic sensor systems and their performance on the Hunters Trophy test are described in this report.

  15. An encapsulated fiber optic fuel level sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, D.; Sai Shankar, M.; Saidi Reddy, P.; Sai Prasad, R. L. N.; Kamineni, K. S.; Kishore, P.

    2011-05-01

    An encapsulated fiber optic sensor head for the detection of level of fuel in a tank is presented. The design is based on a concentric cam used along with a float and extrinsic intensity modulation of light. The sensor has been tested for its performance to measure a fuel level range of 35cm and a sensitivity of 0.2316 volts/cm was observed during rise in fuel level. The sensitivity and range of level sensing can be varied by varying the length of the connecting rod.

  16. Fiber optic and laser sensors IX; Proceedings of the Meeting, Boston, MA, Sept. 3-5, 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Depaula, Ramon P. (Editor); Udd, Eric (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present volume on fiber-optic and laser sensors discusses industrial applications of fiber-optic sensors, fiber-optic temperature sensors, fiber-optic current sensors, fiber-optic pressure/displacement/vibration sensors, and generic fiber-optic systems. Attention is given to a fiber-sensor design for turbine engines, fiber-optic remote Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, near-IR fiber-optic temperature sensors, and an intensity-type fiber-optic electric current sensor. Topics addressed include fiber-optic magnetic field sensors based on the Faraday effect in new materials, diaphragm size and sensitivity for fiber-optic pressure sensors, a microbend pressure sensor for high-temperature environments, and linear position sensing by light exchange between two lossy waveguides. Also discussed are two-mode elliptical-core fiber sensors for measurement of strain and temperature, a fiber-optic interferometric X-ray dosimeter, fiber-optic interferometric sensors using multimode fibers, and optical fiber sensing of corona discharges.

  17. EDITORIAL: Optical Fibre Sensors 17 (OFS-17)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatam, Ralph P.; Jones, Julian D. C.

    2006-05-01

    This special issue of Measurement Science and Technology provides an overview of current developments in the field of optical fibre sensors. The papers presented here are more detailed versions of those presented at the 17th Optical Fibre Sensors conference (OFS-17) held at the Oud St-Jan Art and Congress Centre in Bruges, Belgium, from 23 27 May 2005. The first OFS conference was held in London in 1983 and the conference series is now held in international locations every 18 months and is the recognized venue for presentations of papers describing recent developments in the field of fibre optic sensing. The conference in Bruges was the largest to date of the OFS series with approximately 450 attendees and consisted of a plenary talk, describing photonic crystal gas sensors, ten invited contributions, 51 oral presentations and 197 posters. A third of the papers in this special issue are concerned with fibre Bragg and long period gratings, reflecting the widespread interest in this technology. Papers describe new laser based fabrication and processing techniques, signal processing methods, and applications to the measurement of physical parameters such as radiation detection, hydrogen sensing, load monitoring in wind turbines and stress measurement for geotechnical applications. Other non-grating sensing methodologies are presented for the measurement of gases, refractive index, colour and electric field/voltage. In addition to the descriptions of optical fibres sensors and signal processing schemes there are a number of contributions describing developments in enabling technologies such as sources for use with fibre sensors including, for example, quantum dots for temperature sensing. Developments in emerging technologies such as nanostructured fibres for sensing and investigating the sensing properties of carbon nanotubes using fibre sensor techniques are described along with the use of coherent imaging fibre bundles for flow measurement applications. We hope that

  18. Distributed fiber optic acoustic sensor for leak detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurmer, John P.; Kingsley, Stuart A.; Laudo, John S.; Krak, Stephen J.

    1992-01-01

    Leaks in dielectric fluid-filled, high-voltage distribution lines can cause significant problems for the electric power industry. Often, these lines run over long distance and are difficult to access. Operators may know that a leak exists because additional fluid is required to maintain pipe pressure; however, locating the leak is often a significant challenge. A system that could monitor and locate leaks within the electrical distribution pipe lines would be highly desirable. We present a distributed fiber optic acoustic sensor technology that could be used to measure and locate leaks within fluid-filled, high-voltage distribution lines. In this application, the optical fiber sensor is placed inside the fluid-filled pipe and can potentially locate leaks to within several meters. The fiber optic acoustic sensor is designed such that it can listen to the sound produced by the fluid as it escapes from the pipe into the surrounding soil. The fluid inside the pipe is typically maintained at a pressure of 200 psi and escapes at high velocity when a leak occurs. The distributed fiber optic sensing system being developed is based upon the Sagnac interferometer and is unusual in that range information is not obtained by the more common method of optical time domain reflectometry or optical frequency domain reflectometry, but by essentially a CW technique which works in the frequency domain. It is also unusual in that the signal processing technique actually looks for the absence of a signal.

  19. Modulated-splitting-ratio fiber-optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beheim, Glenn; Anthan, Donald J.; Rys, John R.; Fritsch, Klaus; Ruppe, Walter A.

    1988-01-01

    A fiber-optic temperature sensor is described, which uses a small silicon beamsplitter whose splitting ratio varies as a function of temperature. A four-beam technique is used to measure the sensor's temperature-indicating splitting ratio. This referencing method provides a measurement that is largely independent of the transmission properties of the sensor's optical fiber link. A significant advantage of this sensor, relative to other fiber-optic sensors, is its high stability, which permits the fiber-optic components to be readily substituted, thereby simplifying the sensor's installation and maintenance.

  20. Adhesive bond failure monitoring with triboluminescent optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shohag, Md Abu S.; Hammel, Emily C.; Olawale, David O.; Okoli, Okenwa O.

    2016-04-01

    One of the most severe damage modes in modern wind turbines is the failure of the adhesive joints in the trailing edge of the large composite blades. The geometrical shape of the blade and current manufacturing techniques make the trailing edge of the wind turbine blade more sensitive to damage. Failure to timely detect this damage type may result in catastrophic failures, expensive system downtime, and high repair costs. A novel sensing system called the In-situ Triboluminescent Optical Fiber (ITOF) sensor has been proposed for monitoring the initiation and propagation of disbonds in composite adhesive joints. The ITOF sensor combines the triboluminescent property of ZnS:Mn with the many desirable features of optical fiber to provide in-situ and distributed damage sensing in large composite structures like the wind blades. Unlike other sensor systems, the ITOF sensor does not require a power source at the sensing location or for transmitting damage-induced signals to the hub of the wind turbine. Composite parts will be fabricated and the ITOF integrated within the bondline to provide in-situ and real time damage sensing. Samples of the fabricated composite parts with integrated ITOF will be subjected to tensile and flexural loads, and the response from the integrated sensors will be monitored and analyzed to characterize the performance of the ITOF sensor as a debonding damage monitoring system. In addition, C-scan and optical microscopy will be employed to gain greater insights into the damage propagation behavior and the signals received from the ITOF sensors.

  1. Embedded intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical fiber sensors in cement concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki S.; Yoo, Jae-Wook; Kim, Seung Kwan; Kim, Byoung Yoon

    1996-05-01

    Intrinsic Fabry-Perot optical fiber sensors were embedded to the tensile side of the 20 cm by 20 cm by 150 cm cement concrete structures. The sensors were attached to the reinforcing steels and then, the cement concretes were applied. It took 30 days for curing the specimens. After that, the specimens were tested with 4-point bending method by a universal testing machine. Strains were measured and recorded by the strain gauges embedded near optical fiber sensors. Output data of fiber sensor showed good linearity to the strain data from the strain gauges up to 2000 microstrain. The optical fiber sensors showed good response after yielding of the structure while embedded metal film strain gauges did not show any response. We also investigated the behavior of the optical fiber sensor when the specimens were broken down. In conclusion, the optical fiber sensors can be used as elements of health monitoring systems for cement concrete infra-structures.

  2. Fiber optic sensors III; Proceedings of the Meeting, Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany, Sept. 21, 22, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Kersten, R.TH.

    1989-01-01

    Papers on fiber optic sensors are presented, covering subjects such as automatic inspection, multiplexing, sensor components, special fibers, displacement, pressure, sensor systems, and temperature-, gas-, and electric-sensors. Specific topics include multiplexed sensing systems using all fiber ring resonators, a multiplexed fiber-optic interferometric system with down-lead insensitive fiber-optic probes, an integrated optical circuit for the fiber gyro, glass seals for sensors, integrated optics, a single mode waveguide embedded in the wall of a capillary fiber, and concepts for a long stroke displacement transducer. Other topics are a single fiber shutter-type sensor using a self-detecting LED, micromechanical structures excited by noise-modulated light via optical fibers, vibration monitoring in high power electrical plants, high dynamic dual mode fiber transitometry, methods for strain monitoring and nondestructive testing, photoelastic pressure sensors with optical fiber links, and a microstructure fiber-tip sensor with spectral encoding.

  3. Digital and analog readout systems for fiber-optic strain sensors as applied to the monitoring of roller element bearing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Juan C.; Conkey, Andrew P.; Perez, Robert X.; Taylor, Henry F.

    2003-11-01

    A rotating machinery test rig was instrumented with fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer strain sensors for condition monitoring of rolling element bearings. Strain variations produced by ball passes were observed and analyzed in the time and frequency domain. Wavelength division multiplexing was utilized to simultaneously monitor the sensors with analog and digital readout systems-analog for high bandwidth and digital for high dynamic range and the monitoring of multiple sensors. The effects of imbalance on the shaft, changes in rotational speed, effects on the rotor system, and detection of bearing defects were investigated. Frequency peaks observed in the bearing sensor spectra closely matched predicted values. Imbalance and rotational speed tests showed good agreement with expected trends, and bearing defects were successfully detected.

  4. Coordinating standards and applications for optical water quality sensor networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergamaschi, B.; Pellerin, B.

    2011-01-01

    Joint USGS-CUAHSI Workshop: In Situ Optical Water Quality Sensor Networks; Shepherdstown, West Virginia, 8-10 June 2011; Advanced in situ optical water quality sensors and new techniques for data analysis hold enormous promise for advancing scientific understanding of aquatic systems through measurements of important biogeochemical parameters at the time scales over which they vary. High-frequency and real-time water quality data also provide the opportunity for early warning of water quality deterioration, trend detection, and science-based decision support. However, developing networks of optical sensors in freshwater systems that report reliable and comparable data across and between sites remains a challenge to the research and monitoring community. To address this, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI), convened a 3-day workshop to explore ways to coordinate development of standards and applications for optical sensors, as well as handling, storage, and analysis of the continuous data they produce.

  5. Thermal/structural/optical integrated design for optical sensor mounted on unmanned aerial vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gaopeng; Yang, Hongtao; Mei, Chao; Wu, Dengshan; Shi, Kui

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid development of science and technology and the promotion of many local wars in the world, altitude optical sensor mounted on unmanned aerial vehicle is more widely applied in the airborne remote sensing, measurement and detection. In order to obtain high quality image of the aero optical remote sensor, it is important to analysis its thermal-optical performance on the condition of high speed and high altitude. Especially for the key imaging assembly, such as optical window, the temperature variation and temperature gradient can result in defocus and aberrations in optical system, which will lead to the poor quality image. In order to improve the optical performance of a high speed aerial camera optical window, the thermal/structural/optical integrated design method is developed. Firstly, the flight environment of optical window is analyzed. Based on the theory of aerodynamics and heat transfer, the convection heat transfer coefficient is calculated. The temperature distributing of optical window is simulated by the finite element analysis software. The maximum difference in temperature of the inside and outside of optical window is obtained. Then the deformation of optical window under the boundary condition of the maximum difference in temperature is calculated. The optical window surface deformation is fitted in Zernike polynomial as the interface, the calculated Zernike fitting coefficients is brought in and analyzed by CodeV Optical Software. At last, the transfer function diagrams of the optical system on temperature field are comparatively analyzed. By comparing and analyzing the result, it can be obtained that the optical path difference caused by thermal deformation of the optical window is 138.2 nm, which is under PV ≤1 4λ . The above study can be used as an important reference for other optical window designs.

  6. Power budget considerations for optically activated conventional sensors and actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kexing

    1991-02-01

    Optically powered conventional instrumentation with optical fiber links that combine the advantages of a familiar technology and of fiber optics is described. A number of examples are given of the development of pneumatic pressure sensors and actuators with reduced power consumption that are operated by optical power and incorporated with fiber-optic links. Their performance and power budget are discussed. They are particularly applicable to transmissions through regions having high EM interference, high EM pulses, and explosive, radiative, or corrosive hazards, such as in nuclear power plants, process plants, aircraft, or spacecraft. These low-optical-power transmission and operation characteristics will help to meet safety requirements and to reduce the system cost.

  7. Silicon retina for optical tracking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohbehn, K.; Jenkins, R. E.; Sun, X.; Andreou, A. G.

    1993-01-01

    There are a host of position sensors, such as quadcells and CCD's, which are candidates for detecting optical position errors and providing error signals for a mirror positioning loop. We are developing a novel, very high bandwidth, biologically inspired position sensor for optical position tracking systems. We present recent test results and design issues for the use of biologically inspired silicon retinas for spaceborne optical position tracking systems.

  8. Fundamental concepts of integrated and fiber optic sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuma, Margaret L.

    1995-01-01

    This chapter discusses fiber optic and integrated optic sensor concepts. Unfortunately, there is no standard method to categorize these sensor concepts. Here, fiber optic and integrated optic sensor concepts will be categorized by the primary modulation technique. These modulation techniques have been classified as: intensity, phase, wavelength, polarization, and time/frequency modulation. All modulate the output light with respect to changes in the physical or chemical property to be measured. Each primary modulation technique is then divided into fiber optic and integrated optic sections which are treated independently. For each sensor concept, possible sensor applications are discussed. The sensors and references discussed are not exhaustive, but sufficient to give the reader an overview of sensor concepts developed to date. Sensor multiplexing techniques such as wavelength division, time division, and frequency division will not be discussed as they are beyond the scope of this report.

  9. Insect-Inspired Optical-Flow Navigation Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, Sarita; Morookian, John M.; Chahl, Javan; Soccol, Dean; Hines, Butler; Zornetzer, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Integrated circuits that exploit optical flow to sense motions of computer mice on or near surfaces ( optical mouse chips ) are used as navigation sensors in a class of small flying robots now undergoing development for potential use in such applications as exploration, search, and surveillance. The basic principles of these robots were described briefly in Insect-Inspired Flight Control for Small Flying Robots (NPO-30545), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 1 (January 2005), page 61. To recapitulate from the cited prior article: The concept of optical flow can be defined, loosely, as the use of texture in images as a source of motion cues. The flight-control and navigation systems of these robots are inspired largely by the designs and functions of the vision systems and brains of insects, which have been demonstrated to utilize optical flow (as detected by their eyes and brains) resulting from their own motions in the environment. Optical flow has been shown to be very effective as a means of avoiding obstacles and controlling speeds and altitudes in robotic navigation. Prior systems used in experiments on navigating by means of optical flow have involved the use of panoramic optics, high-resolution image sensors, and programmable imagedata- processing computers.

  10. Optical fiber sensor layer embedded in smart composite material and structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Xiao Wen; Liang, Da Kai; Li, Dongsheng

    2006-10-01

    A composite structure health monitoring system with optical fiber sensors is an important development in smart materials and structures. But it is difficult to embed a network of distributed optical fiber sensors in a smart composite structure, and the most effective method would be integrating the network of sensors with the polyimide film as a layer, called the optical fiber sensor layer, and then embedding the layer with optical fiber sensors in the composite material. This paper introduces three methods of making a distributed optical fiber sensor layer with polyimide. The first is to sandwich optical fiber sensors in two polyimide films. The second is to deposit the network of sensors in polyimide solution, and dry the polyimide solution. The last is to build thin-film optical waveguides and optical sensors by using fluorinated polyimide, which is expected to have high integration and high reliability. Some tests indicate that there is a little influence on the mechanical performance of the structure; however, optical fiber sensor built-in polyimide films work very well.

  11. Intensity-modulated optical fiber sensors based on chirped-fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xinyong

    2011-09-01

    Intensity-modulated fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors, compared with normal wavelength-encoding FBG sensors, can reduce the cost of sensor system significantly by using cost-efficient optical power detection devices, instead of expensive wavelength measurement instruments. Chirped-FBG (CFBG) based intensity-modulated sensors show potential applications in various sensing areas due to their many advantages, including inherent independence of temperature, high measurement speed, and low cost, in addition to the merits of all fiber-optic sensors. This paper theoretically studies the sensing principle of CFBG-based intensity-modulated sensors and briefly reviews their recent progress in measurement of displacement, acceleration, and tilt angle.

  12. Gamma radiation resistant Fabry-Perot fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanying; Miller, Don W.; Talnagi, Joseph

    2002-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1998 completed a study of emerging technologies that could be applicable to measurement systems in nuclear power plants [H. M. Hashemian [et al.], "Advanced Instrumentation and Maintenance Technologies for Nuclear Power Plants," NUREG/CR-5501 (1998)]. This study concluded that advanced fiber optic sensing technology is an emerging technology that should be investigated. It also indicated that there had been very little research related to performance evaluation of fiber optic sensors in nuclear plant harsh environments, although substantial research has been performed on nuclear radiation effects on optical fibers in the last two decades. A type of Fabry-Perot fiber optic temperature sensor, which is manufactured by Fiso Technologies in Canada, is qualified to be a candidate for potential applications in nuclear radiation environment due to its unique signal processing technique and its resistance to power loss. The gamma irradiation effects on this type of sensors are investigated in this article. Two sensors were irradiated in a gamma irradiation field and one of them was irradiated up to a total gamma dose of 133 Mrad. The sensor on-line performance was monitored during each gamma irradiation test. Furthermore, the sensor static and dynamic performance before and after each irradiation test were evaluated according to the Standard ISA-dS67.06.01 ("Performance Monitoring for Nuclear Safety-Related Instrument Channels in Nuclear Power Plants", Standard ISA-dS67.06.01, Draft 7, Instrument Society of America, 1999). Although several abnormal phenomena were observed, analysis shows that gamma irradiation is not accredited to the abnormal behavior, which implies that this type of sensor is suitable to a gamma irradiation environment with a high gamma dose.

  13. Enzyme-Based Fiber Optic Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulp, Thomas J.; Camins, Irene; Angel, Stanley M.

    1988-06-01

    Fiber optic chemical sensors capable of detecting glucose and penicillin were developed. Each consists of a polymer membrane that is covalently attached to the tip of a glass optical fiber. The membrane contains the enzyme and a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye (fluorescein). A signal is produced when the enzyme catalyzes the conversion of the analyte (glucose or penicillin) into a product (gluconic or penicilloic acid, respectively) that lowers the microenvironmental pH of the membrane and, consequently, lowers the fluorescence intensity of the dye. Each sensor is capable of responding to analyte concentrations in the range of ~0.1 to 100 mM. The penicillin optrode response time is 40 to 60 s while that for glucose is ~5 to 12 min.

  14. An optical RIE process uniformity control sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, S.C.; Pruka, W.; Holloway, J.P.; Brake, M.

    1997-12-31

    Radial etch process measurement techniques have been compared using a GEC reference cell for Argon sputter etching of silicon oxide. Post process reflectometry measurements. Langmuir probe studies, and optical tomography results were used to study the process uniformity at various set points. The purpose of this experiment is to demonstrate the ability of a small window plasma tomography sensor to function as a process diagnostic, allowing in situ process monitoring and an alternative uniformity measurement to post process wafer measurements. An overview of the sensor geometry, signal reconstruction, and comparison to Langmuir probe and reflectometry measurements will be presented. Future work will include similar optical analysis for more complex plasma chemistries and industrial reactors.

  15. Enzyme-based fiber optic sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Kulp, T.J.; Camins, I.; Angel, S.M.

    1987-12-01

    Fiber optic chemical sensors capable of detecting glucose and penicillin were developed. Each consists of a polymer membrane that is covalently attached to the tip of a glass optical fiber. The membrane contains the enzyme and a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye (fluorescein). A signal is produced when the enzyme catalyzes the conversion of the analyte (glucose or penicillin) into a product (gluconic or penicilloic acid, respectively) that lowers the microenvironmental pH of the membrane and consequently, lowers the fluorescence intensity of the dye. Each sensor is capable of responding to analyte concentrations in the range of approx.0.1 to 100 mM. The penicillin optrode response time is 40 to 60 s while that for glucose is approx.5 to 12 min. 7 figs.

  16. Fiber optic hydrogen sensors: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Minghong; Dai, Jixiang

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen is one of the next generation energies in the future, which shows promising applications in aerospace and chemical industries. Hydrogen leakage monitoring is very dangerous and important because of its low ignition energy, high combustion efficiency, and smallest molecule. This paper reviews the state-of-art development of the fiber optic hydrogen sensing technology. The main developing trends of fiber optic hydrogen sensors are based on two kinds of hydrogen sensitive materials, i.e. palladium-alloy thin films and Pt-doped WO3 coatings. In this review work, the advantages and disadvantages of these two kinds of sensing technologies will be evaluated.

  17. The 1994 Fiber Optic Sensors for Aerospace Technology (FOSAT) Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert (Compiler); Adamovsky, Grigory (Compiler); Tuma, Meg (Compiler); Beheim, Glenn (Compiler); Sotomayor, Jorge (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center conducted a workshop on fiber optic technology on October 18-20, 1994. The workshop objective was to discuss the future direction of fiber optics and optical sensor research, especially in the aerospace arena. The workshop was separated into four sections: (1) a Systems Section which dealt specifically with top level overall architectures for the aircraft and engine; (2) a Subsystems Section considered the parts and pieces that made up the subsystems of the overall systems; (3) a Sensor/Actuators section considered the status of research on passive optical sensors and optical powered actuators; and (4) Components Section which addressed the interconnects for the optical systems (e.g., optical connectors, optical fibers, etc.). This report contains the minutes of the discussion on the workshop, both in each section and in the plenary sessions. The slides used by a limited number of presenters are also included as presented. No attempt was made to homogenize this report. The view of most of the attendees was: (1) the government must do a better job of disseminating technical information in a more timely fashion; (2) enough work has been done on the components, and system level architecture definition must dictate what work should be done on components; (3) a Photonics Steering Committee should be formed to coordinate the efforts of government and industry in the photonics area, to make sure that programs complimented each other and that technology transferred from one program was used in other programs to the best advantage of the government and industry.

  18. Integrated optical sensor platform for multiparameter bio-chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Lützow, Peter; Pergande, Daniel; Heidrich, Helmut

    2011-07-01

    There is growing demand for robust, reliable, low cost, and easy to use sensor systems that feature multiparameter analysis in many application areas ranging from safety and security to point of care and medical diagnostics. Here, we highlight the theory and show first experimental results on a novel approach targeting the realization of massively multiplexed sensor arrays. The presented sensor platform is based on arrays of frequency-modulated integrated optical microring resonators (MRR) fed by a single bus waveguide combined with lock-in detection to filter out in a reliable and simple manner their individual response to external stimuli. The working principle is exemplified on an array of four thermo-optically modulated MRR. It is shown that with this technique tracking of individual resonances is possible even in case of strong spectral overlap. PMID:21747482

  19. Field evaluation of a multipoint fiber optic sensor array for methane detection (OMEGA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkinson, Jane; Pride, Russell; Tandy, Chris; Moodie, David G.; Stewart, George

    2000-08-01

    A multi-point fiber optic sensor array for methane detector (`OMEGA') has been developed and tested under semi- quantitative field conditions. The new system employed wavelength modulation spectroscopy using a DFB laser source scanned across the Q6 methane line at 1.665 micrometers . A branched fiber network connected the single source to up to 64 sensor heads. Controlled releases of natural gas were provided for test purposes within an array of four optical sensors and four pellistor reference sensors. An automated system delivered standard gases to each sensor, to enable routine calibration checks to be carried out. Agreement between the conventional and optical systems was excellent in the range 0 - 100% LEL (lower explosion limit). The optical system offers a simple, intrinsically safe design with a low cost of ownership per sensor head.

  20. Electro-optic voltage sensor with Multiple Beam Splitting

    DOEpatents

    Woods, Gregory K.; Renak, Todd W.; Crawford, Thomas M.; Davidson, James R.

    2000-01-01

    A miniature electro-optic voltage sensor system capable of accurate operation at high voltages without use of the dedicated voltage dividing hardware. The invention achieves voltage measurement without significant error contributions from neighboring conductors or environmental perturbations. The invention employs a transmitter, a sensor, a detector, and a signal processor. The transmitter produces a beam of electromagnetic radiation which is routed into the sensor. Within the sensor the beam undergoes the Pockels electro-optic effect. The electro-optic effect produces a modulation of the beam's polarization, which is in turn converted to a pair of independent conversely-amplitude-modulated signals, from which the voltage of the E-field is determined by the signal processor. The use of converse AM signals enables the signal processor to better distinguish signal from noise. The sensor converts the beam by splitting the beam in accordance with the axes of the beam's polarization state (an ellipse) into at least two AM signals. These AM signals are fed into a signal processor and processed to determine the voltage between a ground conductor and the conductor on which voltage is being measured.